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Sample records for early enzymatic steps

  1. Frank Westheimer's Early Demonstration of Enzymatic Specificity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ault, Addison

    2008-01-01

    In this article I review one of the most significant accomplishments of Frank H. Westheimer, one of the most respected chemists of the 20th century. This accomplishment was a series of stereospecific enzymatic oxidation and reduction experiments that led chemists to recognize what we now call the enantiotopic and diastereotopic relationships of…

  2. Early steps in steroidogenesis: intracellular cholesterol trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Walter L.; Bose, Himangshu S.

    2011-01-01

    Steroid hormones are made from cholesterol, primarily derived from lipoproteins that enter cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis. In endo-lysosomes, cholesterol is released from cholesterol esters by lysosomal acid lipase (LAL; disordered in Wolman disease) and exported via Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) proteins (disordered in NPC disease). These diseases are characterized by accumulated cholesterol and cholesterol esters in most cell types. Mechanisms for trans-cytoplasmic cholesterol transport, membrane insertion, and retrieval from membranes are less clear. Cholesterol esters and “free” cholesterol are enzymatically interconverted in lipid droplets. Cholesterol transport to the cholesterol-poor outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) appears to involve cholesterol transport proteins. Cytochrome P450scc (CYP11A1) then initiates steroidogenesis by converting cholesterol to pregnenolone on the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM). Acute steroidogenic responses are regulated by cholesterol delivery from OMM to IMM, triggered by the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Chronic steroidogenic capacity is determined by CYP11A1 gene transcription. StAR mutations cause congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia, with absent steroidogenesis, potentially lethal salt loss, and 46,XY sex reversal. StAR mutations initially destroy most, but not all steroidogenesis; low levels of StAR-independent steroidogenesis are lost later due to cellular damage, explaining the clinical findings. Rare P450scc mutations cause a similar syndrome. This review addresses these early steps in steroid biosynthesis. PMID:21976778

  3. A two-step enzymatic modification method to reduce immuno-reactivity of milk proteins.

    PubMed

    Damodaran, Srinivasan; Li, Yan

    2017-12-15

    A two-step enzymatic approach to reduce immuno-reactivity of whey protein isolate and casein has been studied. The method involves partial hydrolysis of proteins with proteases, followed by repolymerization with microbial transglutaminase. Whey protein isolate partially hydrolyzed with chymotrypsin, trypsin, or thermolysin retained about 80%, 30%, and 20% of the original immuno-reactivity, respectively. Upon repolymerization the immuno-reactivity decreased to 45%, 35%, and 5%, respectively. The immuno-reactivity of hydrolyzed and repolymerized casein was negligible compared to native casein. The repolymerized products were partially resistant to in vitro digestion. Peptides released during digestion of repolymerized thermolysin-whey protein hydrolysate had less than 5% immuno-reactivity, whereas those of whey protein control exhibited a sinusoidal immuno-reactivity ranging from 5 to 20%. Peptides released during digestion of repolymerized thermolysin-casein hydrolysates had no immuno-reactivity. These results indicated that it is possible to produce hypoallergenic milk protein products using the two-step enzymatic modification method involving thermolysin and transglutaminase. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Are there dynamical effects in enzyme catalysis? Some thoughts concerning the enzymatic chemical step.

    PubMed

    Tuñón, Iñaki; Laage, Damien; Hynes, James T

    2015-09-15

    We offer some thoughts on the much debated issue of dynamical effects in enzyme catalysis, and more specifically on their potential role in the acceleration of the chemical step. Since the term 'dynamics' has been used with different meanings, we find it useful to first return to the Transition State Theory rate constant, its assumptions and the choices it involves, and detail the various sources of deviations from it due to dynamics (or not). We suggest that much can be learned about the key current questions for enzyme catalysis from prior extensive studies of dynamical and other effects in the case of reactions in solution. We analyze dynamical effects both in the neighborhood of the transition state and far from it, together with the situation when quantum nuclear motion is central to the reaction, and we illustrate our discussion with various examples of enzymatic reactions. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The alignment of enzymatic steps reveals similar metabolic pathways and probable recruitment events in Gammaproteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Poot-Hernandez, Augusto Cesar; Rodriguez-Vazquez, Katya; Perez-Rueda, Ernesto

    2015-11-17

    It is generally accepted that gene duplication followed by functional divergence is one of the main sources of metabolic diversity. In this regard, there is an increasing interest in the development of methods that allow the systematic identification of these evolutionary events in metabolism. Here, we used a method not based on biomolecular sequence analysis to compare and identify common and variable routes in the metabolism of 40 Gammaproteobacteria species. The metabolic maps deposited in the KEGG database were transformed into linear Enzymatic Step Sequences (ESS) by using the breadth-first search algorithm. These ESS represent subsequent enzymes linked to each other, where their catalytic activities are encoded in the Enzyme Commission numbers. The ESS were compared in an all-against-all (pairwise comparisons) approach by using a dynamic programming algorithm, leaving only a set of significant pairs. From these comparisons, we identified a set of functionally conserved enzymatic steps in different metabolic maps, in which cell wall components and fatty acid and lysine biosynthesis were included. In addition, we found that pathways associated with biosynthesis share a higher proportion of similar ESS than degradation pathways and secondary metabolism pathways. Also, maps associated with the metabolism of similar compounds contain a high proportion of similar ESS, such as those maps from nucleotide metabolism pathways, in particular the inosine monophosphate pathway. Furthermore, diverse ESS associated with the low part of the glycolysis pathway were identified as functionally similar to multiple metabolic pathways. In summary, our comparisons may help to identify similar reactions in different metabolic pathways and could reinforce the patchwork model in the evolution of metabolism in Gammaproteobacteria.

  6. Production of Biodiesel from Acid Oil via a Two-Step Enzymatic Transesterification.

    PubMed

    Choi, Nakyung; Lee, Jeom-Sig; Kwak, Jieun; Lee, Junsoo; Kim, In-Hwan

    2016-11-01

    A two-step enzymatic transesterification process in a solvent-free system has been developed as a novel approach to the production of biodiesel using acid oil from rice bran oil soapstock. The acid oil consisted of 53.7 wt% fatty acids, 2.4 wt% monoacylglycerols, 9.1 wt% diacylglycerols, 28.8 wt% triacylglycerols, and 6.0 wt% others. Three immobilized lipases were evaluated as potential biocatalysts, including Novozym 435 from Candida antarctica, Lipozyme RM IM from Rhizomucor miehei, and Lipozyme TL IM from Thermomyces lanuginosus. The effects of molar ratio of acid oil to ethanol, temperature, and enzyme loading were investigated to determine the optimum conditions for the transesterification with the three immobilized lipases. The optimum conditions of the three immobilized lipases were a molar ratio of 1:5 (acid oil to ethanol), the temperature range of 30-40°C, and the enzyme loading range of 5-10%. The two-step transesterification was then conducted under the optimum conditions of each lipase. The stepwise use of Novozym 435 and Lipozyme TL IM or Lipozyme RM IM and Lipozyme TL IM resulted in similar or higher levels of yield to the individual lipases. The maximum yields obtained in both stepwise uses were ca. 92%.

  7. Step enzymatic hydrolysis of sodium hydroxide-pretreated Chinese liquor distillers' grains for ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yue-Hong; Wu, Zheng-Yun; Yang, Jian; Yuan, Yu-Ju; Zhang, Wen-Xue

    2014-01-01

    Distillers' grains are a co-product of ethanol production. In China, only a small portion of distillers' grains have been used to feed the livestock because the amount was so huge. Nowadays, it has been reported that the distillers' grains have the potential for fuel ethanol production because they are composed of lignocelluloses and residual starch. In order to effectively convert distillers' grains to fuel ethanol and other valuable production, sodium hydroxide pretreatment, step-by-step enzymatic hydrolysis, and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) were investigated. The residual starch was first recycled from wet distillers' grains (WDG) with glucoamylase to obtain glucose-rich liquid. The total sugar concentration was 21.3 g/L, and 111.9% theoretical starch was hydrolyzed. Then the removed-starch dry distillers' grains (RDDG) were pretreated with NaOH under optimal conditions and the pretreated dry distillers' grains (PDDG) were used for xylanase hydrolysis. The xylose concentration was 19.4 g/L and 68.6% theoretical xylose was hydrolyzed. The cellulose-enriched dry distillers' grains (CDDG) obtained from xylanase hydrolysis were used in SSF for ethanol production. The ethanol concentration was 42.1 g/L and the ethanol productivity was 28.7 g/100 g CDDG. After the experiment, approximately 80.6% of the fermentable sugars in WDG was converted to ethanol.

  8. Enzymatic debridement for the treatment of severely burned upper extremities - early single center experiences.

    PubMed

    Cordts, Tomke; Horter, Johannes; Vogelpohl, Julian; Kremer, Thomas; Kneser, Ulrich; Hernekamp, Jochen-Frederick

    2016-06-24

    Severe burns of hands and arms are complex and challenging injuries. The Standard of care (SOC) - necrosectomy with skin grafting - is often associated with poor functional or aesthetic outcome. Enzymatic debridement (ED) is considered one promising alternative but, until recently, results proved to be highly variable. Between 04/2014 and 04/2015, 16 patients with deep partial- to full-thickness burns of the upper extremities underwent enzymatic debridement (ED) in our Burn Center and were evaluated for extent of additional surgery, wound healing, pain management and functional parameters. Following ED, no further surgical intervention was required in 53.8 % of the study population. In patients who required surgical treatment, the the skin-grafted area could be reduced by 37.0 % when compared to initial assessment. Time from injury to ED was 24.4 h and patients were able to start physical therapy after 2.0 days but suffered from prolonged wound closure (28.0 days). Regionally administered anesthesia proved to be superior to pain medication alone as pain levels and consumed morphine-equivalent were lower. Post-demission follow-up showed good functional results and pain levels with low scores in two self-report questionnaires (DASH, PRWE-G) but 3 patients reported increased susceptibility to shear stress. Based on these early experiences, we developed a 3-step algorithm for consecutive patients allowing appropriate and individualized treatment selection. We see a potential benefit for ED in the treatment of severely burned hands and forearms but further investigations and proper prospective, randomized controlled trials are needed to statistically support any outlined assumptions.

  9. One-step process of hydrothermal and alkaline treatment of wheat straw for improving the enzymatic saccharification.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shaolong; Zhang, Lidan; Liu, Fang; Fan, Xiaolin; Sun, Run-Cang

    2018-01-01

    To increase the production of bioethanol, a two-step process based on hydrothermal and dilute alkaline treatment was applied to reduce the natural resistance of biomass. However, the process required a large amount of water and a long operation time due to the solid/liquid separation before the alkaline treatment, which led to decrease the pure economic profit for production of bioethanol. Therefore, four one-step processes based on order of hydrothermal and alkaline treatment have been developed to enhance concentration of glucose of wheat straw by enzymatic saccharification. The aim of the present study was to systematically evaluated effect for different one-step processes by analyzing the physicochemical properties (composition, structural change, crystallinity, surface morphology, and BET surface area) and enzymatic saccharification of the treated substrates. In this study, hemicelluloses and lignins were removed from wheat straw and the morphologic structures were destroyed to various extents during the four one-step processes, which were favorable for cellulase absorption on cellulose. A positive correlation was also observed between the crystallinity and enzymatic saccharification rate of the substrate under the conditions given. The surface area of the substrate was positively related to the concentration of glucose in this study. As compared to the control (3.0 g/L) and treated substrates (11.2-14.6 g/L) obtained by the other three one-step processes, the substrate treated by one-step process based on successively hydrothermal and alkaline treatment had a maximum glucose concentration of 18.6 g/L, which was due to the high cellulose concentration and surface area for the substrate, accompanying with removal of large amounts of lignins and hemicelluloses. The present study demonstrated that the order of hydrothermal and alkaline treatment had significant effects on the physicochemical properties and enzymatic saccharification of wheat straw. The one-step

  10. Functionalization of monolithic and porous three-dimensional graphene by one-step chitosan electrodeposition for enzymatic biosensor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiyang; Wang, Xiaohui; Wang, Tianshu; Li, Dan; Xi, Fengna; Wang, Jin; Wang, Erkang

    2014-11-26

    Biological modification of monolithic and porous 3D graphene is of great significance for extending its application in fabricating highly sensitive biosensors. The present work reports on the first biofunctionalization of monolithic and freestanding 3D graphene foam for one-step preparation of reagentless enzymatic biosensors by controllable chitosan (CS) electrodeposition technology. Using a homogeneous three-component electrodeposition solution containing a ferrocene (Fc) grafted CS hybrid (Fc-CS), glucose oxidase (GOD), and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), a homogeneous biocomposite film of Fc-CS/SWNTs/GOD was immobilized on the surface of 3D graphene foam by one-step electrodeposition. The Fc groups grafted on chitosan can be stably immobilized on the 3D graphene surface and keep their original electrochemical activity. The SWNTs doped into the Fc-CS matrix act as a nanowire to facilitate electron transfer and improve the conductivity of the biocomposite film. Combined with the extraordinary properties of 3D graphene foam including large active surface area, high conductivity, and fast mass transport dynamics, the 3D graphene based enzymatic biosensor achieved a large linear range (5.0 μM to 19.8 mM), a low detection limit (1.2 μM), and rapid response (reaching the 95% steady-state response within 8 s) for reagentless detection of glucose in the phosphate buffer solution.

  11. Integrated microreactor for enzymatic reaction automation: An easy step toward the quality control of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ladner, Yoann; Mas, Silvia; Coussot, Gaelle; Bartley, Killian; Montels, Jérôme; Morel, Jacques; Perrin, Catherine

    2017-12-15

    The main purpose of the present work is to provide a fully integrated miniaturized electrophoretic methodology in order to facilitate the quality control of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). This methodology called D-PES, which stands for Diffusion-mediated Proteolysis combined with an Electrophoretic Separation, permits to perform subsequently mAb tryptic digestion and electrophoresis separation of proteolysis products in an automated manner. Tryptic digestion conditions were optimized regarding the influence of enzyme concentration and incubation time in order to achieve similar enzymatic digestion efficiency to that obtained with the classical methodology (off-line). Then, the optimization of electrophoretic separation conditions concerning the nature of background electrolyte (BGE), ionic strength and pH was realized. Successful and repeatable electrophoretic profiles of three mAbs digests (Trastuzumab, Infliximab and Tocilizumab), comparable to the off-line digestion profiles, were obtained demonstrating the feasibility and robustness of the proposed methodology. In summary, the use of the proposed and optimized in-line approach opens a new, fast and easy way for the quality control of mAbs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. High-yield production of pure tagatose from fructose by a three-step enzymatic cascade reaction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seon-Hwa; Hong, Seung-Hye; Kim, Kyoung-Rok; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2017-08-01

    To produce tagatose from fructose with a high conversion rate and to establish a high-yield purification method of tagatose from the reaction mixture. Fructose at 1 M (180 g l -1 ) was converted to 0.8 M (144 g l -1 ) tagatose by a three-step enzymatic cascade reaction, involving hexokinase, plus ATP, fructose-1,6-biphosphate aldolase, phytase, over 16 h with a productivity of 9 g l -1 h -1 . No byproducts were detected. Tagatose was recrystallized from ethanol to a purity of 99.9% and a yield of 96.3%. Overall, tagatose at 99.9% purity was obtained from fructose with a yield of 77%. This is the first biotechnological production of tagatose from fructose and the first application of solvent recrystallization for the purification of rare sugars.

  13. Biocatalyst including porous enzyme cluster composite immobilized by two-step crosslinking and its utilization as enzymatic biofuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Yongjin; Christwardana, Marcelinus; Tannia, Daniel Chris; Kim, Ki Jae; Kwon, Yongchai

    2017-08-01

    An enzyme cluster composite (TPA/GOx) formed from glucose oxidase (GOx) and terephthalaldehyde (TPA) that is coated onto polyethyleneimine (PEI) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is suggested as a new catalyst ([(TPA/GOx)/PEI]/CNT). In this catalyst, TPA promotes inter-GOx links by crosslinking to form a large and porous structure, and the TPA/GOx composite is again crosslinked with PEI/CNT to increase the amount of immobilized GOx. Such a two-step crosslinking (i) increases electron transfer because of electron delocalization by π conjugation and (ii) reduces GOx denaturation because of the formation of strong chemical bonds while its porosity facilitates mass transfer. With these features, an enzymatic biofuel cell (EBC) employing the new catalyst is fabricated and induces an excellent maximum power density (1.62 ± 0.08 mW cm-2), while the catalytic activity of the [(TPA/GOx)/PEI]/CNT catalyst is outstanding. This is clear evidence that the two-step crosslinking and porous structure caused by adoption of the TPA/GOx composite affect the performance enhancement of EBC.

  14. Rapid One-step Enzymatic Synthesis and All-aqueous Purification of Trehalose Analogues.

    PubMed

    Meints, Lisa M; Poston, Anne W; Piligian, Brent F; Olson, Claire D; Badger, Katherine S; Woodruff, Peter J; Swarts, Benjamin M

    2017-02-17

    Chemically modified versions of trehalose, or trehalose analogues, have applications in biology, biotechnology, and pharmaceutical science, among other fields. For instance, trehalose analogues bearing detectable tags have been used to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis and may have applications as tuberculosis diagnostic imaging agents. Hydrolytically stable versions of trehalose are also being pursued due to their potential for use as non-caloric sweeteners and bioprotective agents. Despite the appeal of this class of compounds for various applications, their potential remains unfulfilled due to the lack of a robust route for their production. Here, we report a detailed protocol for the rapid and efficient one-step biocatalytic synthesis of trehalose analogues that bypasses the problems associated with chemical synthesis. By utilizing the thermostable trehalose synthase (TreT) enzyme from Thermoproteus tenax, trehalose analogues can be generated in a single step from glucose analogues and uridine diphosphate glucose in high yield (up to quantitative conversion) in 15-60 min. A simple and rapid non-chromatographic purification protocol, which consists of spin dialysis and ion exchange, can deliver many trehalose analogues of known concentration in aqueous solution in as little as 45 min. In cases where unreacted glucose analogue still remains, chromatographic purification of the trehalose analogue product can be performed. Overall, this method provides a "green" biocatalytic platform for the expedited synthesis and purification of trehalose analogues that is efficient and accessible to non-chemists. To exemplify the applicability of this method, we describe a protocol for the synthesis, all-aqueous purification, and administration of a trehalose-based click chemistry probe to mycobacteria, all of which took less than 1 hour and enabled fluorescence detection of mycobacteria. In the future, we envision that, among other applications, this protocol may be applied to

  15. Estimation of intestinal protein digestibility of protein supplements for ruminants using a three-step enzymatic in vitro procedure.

    PubMed

    Hippenstiel, Friederike; Kivitz, Andre; Benninghoff, Jens; Südekum, Karl-Heinz

    2015-01-01

    This study included 33 samples with main focus on unprotected or rumen-protected rapeseed and soybean feedstuffs, which were analysed using an enzymatic in vitro procedure (EIVP) in order to determine intestinal crude protein (CP) digestibility (IPD) of ruminally undegraded CP. The EIVP involved the sequential digestion of samples with a protease from Streptomyces griseus, pepsin-HCl and pancreatin. Briefly, the EIVP started with determination of true protein. Feeds were incubated for 18 h in a buffer solution at a constant ratio (41 U/g) of S. griseus protease activity to feed true protein. The dried residues were incubated in pepsin-HCl solution for 1 h, and residues from this step were incubated in pancreatin solution for 24 h. Results appeared to have lower IPD dimensions than literature data of previous studies. In addition, a negative correlation became apparent between acid detergent fibre and IPD, as well as a positive correlation between CP, true protein and IPD. The EIVP in its current, strictly standardised form can be applied to develop a database that can be used for protein evaluation systems for establishing tabular values of IPD. Nevertheless, future studies may be hindered since sufficient reference values, i.e. in vivo data, are completely missing.

  16. Accelerating the Rate-Limiting Step in Novel Enzymatic Carbohydrate-to-Hydrogen Technology by Enzyme Engineering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-30

    stable phosphoglucose isomerase through immobilization of cellulose-binding module-tagged thermophilic enzyme on low- cost high-capacity celiulosic...NOVEL ENZYMATIC CARBOHYDRATE-TO-HYDROGEN TECHNOLOGY BY ENZYME ENGINEERING Grant/Contract Number: FA9550-08-1-0145 Program Manager: Dr. Walt...bbtransformation (SyPaB) is the implementation of complicated biochemical reactions by in vitro assembly of enzyme and coenzymes. Different from in vivo

  17. An Alternative Explanation for "Step-Like" Early VLF Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R. C.

    2016-12-01

    A newly-deployed array of VLF receivers along the East Coast of the United States is ideally suited for detecting VLF scattering from lightning-induced disturbances to the lower ionosphere. The array was deployed in May 2016, and one VLF receiver was deployed only 20 km from the NAA transmitter (24.0 kHz) in Cutler, Maine. The phase of the NAA signal at this closest site varies significantly with time, due simply to the impedance match of the transmitter varying with time. Additionally, both the amplitude and phase exhibit periods of rapid shifts that could possibly explain at least some "step-like" VLF scattering events. Here, we distinguish between "step-like" VLF scattering events and other events in that "step-like" events are typically not closely associated with a detected causative lightning flash and also tend to exhibit little or no recovery to ambient conditions after the event onset. We present an analysis of VLF observations from the East Coast array that demonstrates interesting examples of step-like VLF events far from the transmitter that are associated with step-like events very close to the transmitter. We conclude that step-like VLF events should be treated with caution, unless definitively associated with a causative lightning flash and/or detected using observations of multiple transmitter signals.

  18. First Steps: Stories on Inclusion in Early Childhood Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    This publication presents papers from 13 nations that describe the integration of children with disabilities into early childhood education programs. The compilation of case studies will serve as a reference document for the International Consultation on Early Childhood Education and Special Educational Needs, organized by UNESCO in collaboration…

  19. Early phenylpropanoid biosynthetic steps in Cannabis sativa: link between genes and metabolites.

    PubMed

    Docimo, Teresa; Consonni, Roberto; Coraggio, Immacolata; Mattana, Monica

    2013-06-28

    Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), Cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase (C4H) and 4-Coumarate: CoA ligase (4CL) catalyze the first three steps of the general phenylpropanoid pathway whereas chalcone synthase (CHS) catalyzes the first specific step towards flavonoids production. This class of specialized metabolites has a wide range of biological functions in plant development and defence and a broad spectrum of therapeutic activities for human health. In this study, we report the isolation of hemp PAL and 4CL cDNA and genomic clones. Through in silico analysis of their deduced amino acid sequences, more than an 80% identity with homologues genes of other plants was shown and phylogenetic relationships were highlighted. Quantitative expression analysis of the four above mentioned genes, PAL and 4CL enzymatic activities, lignin content and NMR metabolite fingerprinting in different Cannabis sativa tissues were evaluated. Furthermore, the use of different substrates to assay PAL and 4CL enzymatic activities indicated that different isoforms were active in different tissues. The diversity in secondary metabolites content observed in leaves (mainly flavonoids) and roots (mainly lignin) was discussed in relation to gene expression and enzymatic activities data.

  20. Early Phenylpropanoid Biosynthetic Steps in Cannabis sativa: Link between Genes and Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Docimo, Teresa; Consonni, Roberto; Coraggio, Immacolata; Mattana, Monica

    2013-01-01

    Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), Cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase (C4H) and 4-Coumarate: CoA ligase (4CL) catalyze the first three steps of the general phenylpropanoid pathway whereas chalcone synthase (CHS) catalyzes the first specific step towards flavonoids production. This class of specialized metabolites has a wide range of biological functions in plant development and defence and a broad spectrum of therapeutic activities for human health. In this study, we report the isolation of hemp PAL and 4CL cDNA and genomic clones. Through in silico analysis of their deduced amino acid sequences, more than an 80% identity with homologues genes of other plants was shown and phylogenetic relationships were highlighted. Quantitative expression analysis of the four above mentioned genes, PAL and 4CL enzymatic activities, lignin content and NMR metabolite fingerprinting in different Cannabis sativa tissues were evaluated. Furthermore, the use of different substrates to assay PAL and 4CL enzymatic activities indicated that different isoforms were active in different tissues. The diversity in secondary metabolites content observed in leaves (mainly flavonoids) and roots (mainly lignin) was discussed in relation to gene expression and enzymatic activities data. PMID:23812081

  1. Four Steps for Becoming Familiar with Early Music Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jinyoung; Robinson, Helen Mele

    2010-01-01

    Music has a profound impact on children's lives, yet it is often overlooked in early childhood classrooms. Music instruction enhances children's spatial-temporal reasoning skills--skills that are crucial to learning math and science. For children who received formal music lessons, there was a positive long-lasting correlation with IQ and academic…

  2. Steps to Implementing Technology in Inclusive Early Childhood Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Catherine D.; Tredwell, Claire T.

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-first-century preschool children, with and without disabilities, may be found using technology, including assistive technologies, on a daily basis in their homes, schools, and communities. Early childhood educators are exploring opportunities to integrate technology and interactive media into the present-day curriculum. The authors suggest…

  3. Atg1 kinase regulates early and late steps during autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Kijanska, Monika; Peter, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    The notion that phosphorylation constitutes a major mechanism to induce autophagy was established 15 years ago when a conserved Atg1/ULK kinase family was identified as an essential component of the autophagy machinery. The key observation was that starved atg1Δ cells lack autophagosomes in the cytosol and fail to accumulate autophagic bodies in the vacuole. Although many studies have revealed important details of Atg1 activation and function, a cohesive model for how Atg1 regulates the autophagic machinery is lacking. Our recent findings identified conserved steps of temporal and spatial regulation of Atg1/ULK1 kinase at both the PAS and autophagosomal membranes, suggesting that Atg1 not only promotes autophagy induction, but may also facilitate late stages of autophagosome biogenesis. PMID:23108207

  4. Structure-based prediction of modifications in glutarylamidase to allow single-step enzymatic production of 7-aminocephalosporanic acid from cephalosporin C.

    PubMed

    Fritz-Wolf, Karin; Koller, Klaus-Peter; Lange, Gudrun; Liesum, Alexander; Sauber, Klaus; Schreuder, Herman; Aretz, Werner; Kabsch, Wolfgang

    2002-01-01

    Glutarylamidase is an important enzyme employed in the commercial production of 7-aminocephalosporanic acid, a starting compound in the synthesis of cephalosporin antibiotics. 7-aminocephalosporanic acid is obtained from cephalosporin C, a natural antibiotic, either chemically or by a two-step enzymatic process utilizing the enzymes D-amino acid oxidase and glutarylamidase. We have investigated possibilities for redesigning glutarylamidase for the production of 7-aminocephalosporanic acid from cephalosporin C in a single enzymatic step. These studies are based on the structures of glutarylamidase, which we have solved with bound phosphate and ethylene glycol to 2.5 A resolution and with bound glycerol to 2.4 A. The phosphate binds near the catalytic serine in a way that mimics the hemiacetal that develops during catalysis, while the glycerol occupies the side-chain binding pocket. Our structures show that the enzyme is not only structurally similar to penicillin G acylase but also employs essentially the same mechanism in which the alpha-amino group of the catalytic serine acts as a base. A subtle difference is the presence of two catalytic dyads, His B23/Glu B455 and His B23/Ser B1, that are not seen in penicillin G acylase. In contrast to classical serine proteases, the central histidine of these dyads interacts indirectly with the O(gamma) through a hydrogen bond relay network involving the alpha-amino group of the serine and a bound water molecule. A plausible model of the enzyme-substrate complex is proposed that leads to the prediction of mutants of glutarylamidase that should enable the enzyme to deacylate cephalosporin C into 7-aminocephalosporanic acid.

  5. Structure-based prediction of modifications in glutarylamidase to allow single-step enzymatic production of 7-aminocephalosporanic acid from cephalosporin C

    PubMed Central

    Fritz-Wolf, Karin; Koller, Klaus-Peter; Lange, Gudrun; Liesum, Alexander; Sauber, Klaus; Schreuder, Herman; Aretz, Werner; Kabsch, Wolfgang

    2002-01-01

    Glutarylamidase is an important enzyme employed in the commercial production of 7-aminocephalosporanic acid, a starting compound in the synthesis of cephalosporin antibiotics. 7-aminocephalosporanic acid is obtained from cephalosporin C, a natural antibiotic, either chemically or by a two-step enzymatic process utilizing the enzymes D-amino acid oxidase and glutarylamidase. We have investigated possibilities for redesigning glutarylamidase for the production of 7-aminocephalosporanic acid from cephalosporin C in a single enzymatic step. These studies are based on the structures of glutarylamidase, which we have solved with bound phosphate and ethylene glycol to 2.5 Å resolution and with bound glycerol to 2.4 Å. The phosphate binds near the catalytic serine in a way that mimics the hemiacetal that develops during catalysis, while the glycerol occupies the side-chain binding pocket. Our structures show that the enzyme is not only structurally similar to penicillin G acylase but also employs essentially the same mechanism in which the α-amino group of the catalytic serine acts as a base. A subtle difference is the presence of two catalytic dyads, His B23/Glu B455 and His B23/Ser B1, that are not seen in penicillin G acylase. In contrast to classical serine proteases, the central histidine of these dyads interacts indirectly with the Oγ through a hydrogen bond relay network involving the α-amino group of the serine and a bound water molecule. A plausible model of the enzyme–substrate complex is proposed that leads to the prediction of mutants of glutarylamidase that should enable the enzyme to deacylate cephalosporin C into 7-aminocephalosporanic acid. PMID:11742126

  6. Biomimicry promotes the efficiency of a 10-step sequential enzymatic reaction on nanoparticles, converting glucose to lactate

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Chinatsu; Gao, Lizeng; Nelson, Jacquelyn L.; Lata, James P.; Cohen, Roy; Wu, Lauren; Hinchman, Meleana M.; Bergkvist, Magnus; Sherwood, Robert W.; Zhang, Sheng; Travis, Alexander J.

    2016-01-01

    For nanobiotechnology to achieve its potential, complex organic-inorganic systems must grow to utilize the sequential functions of multiple biological components. Critical challenges exist: immobilizing enzymes can block substrate-binding sites or prohibit conformational changes, substrate composition can interfere with activity, and multistep reactions risk diffusion of intermediates. As a result, the most complex tethered reaction reported involves only 3 enzymes. Inspired by the oriented immobilization of glycolytic enzymes on the fibrous sheath of mammalian sperm, here we show a complex reaction of 10 enzymes tethered to nanoparticles. Although individual enzyme efficiency was higher in solution, the efficacy of the 10-step pathway measured by conversion of glucose to lactate was significantly higher when tethered. To our knowledge, this is the most complex organic-inorganic system described, and it shows that tethered, multi-step biological pathways can be reconstituted in hybrid systems to carry out functions such as energy production or delivery of molecular cargo. PMID:27901298

  7. Exploring the early steps of amyloid peptide aggregation by computers.

    PubMed

    Mousseau, Normand; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2005-11-01

    The assembly of normally soluble proteins into amyloid fibrils is a hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases. Because protein aggregation is very complex, involving a variety of oligomeric metastable intermediates, the detailed aggregation paths and structural characterization of the intermediates remain to be determined. Yet, there is strong evidence that these oligomers, which form early in the process of fibrillogenesis, are cytotoxic. In this paper, we review our current understanding of the underlying factors that promote the aggregation of peptides into amyloid fibrils. We focus here on the structural and dynamic aspects of the aggregation as observed in state-of-the-art computer simulations of amyloid-forming peptides with an emphasis on the activation-relaxation technique.

  8. Alcohol consumption stimulates early steps in reverse cholesterol transport.

    PubMed

    van der Gaag, M S; van Tol, A; Vermunt, S H; Scheek, L M; Schaafsma, G; Hendriks, H F

    2001-12-01

    Alcohol consumption is associated with increased HDL cholesterol levels, which may indicate stimulated reverse cholesterol transport. The mechanism is, however, not known. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of alcohol consumption on the first two steps of the reverse cholesterol pathway: cellular cholesterol efflux and plasma cholesterol esterification. Eleven healthy middle-aged men consumed four glasses (40 g of alcohol) of red wine, beer, spirits (Dutch gin), or carbonated mineral water (control) daily with evening dinner, for 3 weeks, according to a 4 x 4 Latin square design. After 3 weeks of alcohol consumption the plasma ex vivo cholesterol efflux capacity, measured with Fu5AH cells, was raised by 6.2% (P < 0.0001) and did not differ between the alcoholic beverages. Plasma cholesterol esterification was increased by 10.8% after alcohol (P = 0.008). Changes were statistically significant after beer and spirits, but not after red wine consumption (P = 0.16). HDL lipids changed after alcohol consumption; HDL total cholesterol, HDL cholesteryl ester, HDL free cholesterol, HDL phospholipids and plasma apolipoprotein A-I all increased (P < 0.01). In conclusion, alcohol consumption stimulates cellular cholesterol efflux and its esterification in plasma. These effects were mostly independent of the kind of alcoholic beverage

  9. Biomimicry Promotes the Efficiency of a 10-Step Sequential Enzymatic Reaction on Nanoparticles, Converting Glucose to Lactate.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Chinatsu; Gao, Lizeng; Nelson, Jacquelyn L; Lata, James P; Cohen, Roy; Wu, Lauren; Hinchman, Meleana M; Bergkvist, Magnus; Sherwood, Robert W; Zhang, Sheng; Travis, Alexander J

    2017-01-02

    For nanobiotechnology to achieve its potential, complex organic-inorganic systems must grow to utilize the sequential functions of multiple biological components. Critical challenges exist: immobilizing enzymes can block substrate-binding sites or prohibit conformational changes, substrate composition can interfere with activity, and multistep reactions risk diffusion of intermediates. As a result, the most complex tethered reaction reported involves only 3 enzymes. Inspired by the oriented immobilization of glycolytic enzymes on the fibrous sheath of mammalian sperm, here we show a complex reaction of 10 enzymes tethered to nanoparticles. Although individual enzyme efficiency was higher in solution, the efficacy of the 10-step pathway measured by conversion of glucose to lactate was significantly higher when tethered. To our knowledge, this is the most complex organic-inorganic system described, and it shows that tethered, multi-step biological pathways can be reconstituted in hybrid systems to carry out functions such as energy production or delivery of molecular cargo. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Batch and multi-step fed-batch enzymatic saccharification of Formiline-pretreated sugarcane bagasse at high solid loadings for high sugar and ethanol titers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuebing; Dong, Lei; Chen, Liang; Liu, Dehua

    2013-05-01

    Formiline pretreatment pertains to a biomass fractionation process. In the present work, Formiline-pretreated sugarcane bagasse was hydrolyzed with cellulases by batch and multi-step fed-batch processes at 20% solid loading. For wet pulp, after 144 h incubation with cellulase loading of 10 FPU/g dry solid, fed-batch process obtained ~150 g/L glucose and ~80% glucan conversion, while batch process obtained ~130 g/L glucose with corresponding ~70% glucan conversion. Solid loading could be further increased to 30% for the acetone-dried pulp. By fed-batch hydrolysis of the dried pulp in pH 4.8 buffer solution, glucose concentration could be 247.3±1.6 g/L with corresponding 86.1±0.6% glucan conversion. The enzymatic hydrolyzates could be well converted to ethanol by a subsequent fermentation using Saccharomices cerevisiae with ethanol titer of 60-70 g/L. Batch and fed-batch SSF indicated that Formiline-pretreated substrate showed excellent fermentability. The final ethanol concentration was 80 g/L with corresponding 82.7% of theoretical yield. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Three steps to writing adaptive study protocols in the early phase clinical development of new medicines

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This article attempts to define terminology and to describe a process for writing adaptive, early phase study protocols which are transparent, self-intuitive and uniform. It provides a step by step guide, giving templates from projects which received regulatory authorisation and were successfully performed in the UK. During adaptive studies evolving data is used to modify the trial design and conduct within the protocol-defined remit. Adaptations within that remit are documented using non-substantial protocol amendments which do not require regulatory or ethical review. This concept is efficient in gathering relevant data in exploratory early phase studies, ethical and time- and cost-effective. PMID:24980283

  12. Molecular mechanisms involved in the early steps of flavivirus cell entry.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Bärbel; Rossmann, Michael G

    2011-01-01

    Flaviviruses enter their host cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis, a well-orchestrated process of receptor recognition, penetration and uncoating. Recent findings on these early steps in the life cycle of flaviviruses are the focus of this review. Copyright © 2010 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Efficacy Trial of the Second Step Early Learning (SSEL) Curriculum: Preliminary Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Upshur, Carole C.; Heyman, Miriam; Wenz-Gross, Melodie

    2017-01-01

    A classroom randomized trial (n = 31 classrooms) was conducted using the Second Step Early Learning (SSEL) curriculum compared to usual curricula. Head Start and community preschool classrooms enrolling low income children were randomly assigned to deliver SSEL (n = 16) or usual curricula (n = 15). Data are reported for four year olds…

  14. Challenges of Early Detection of Oral Cancer: Raising Awareness as a First Step to Successful Campaigning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumann, Eva; Koller, Michael; Wiltfang, Jörg; Wenz, Hans-Jürgen; Möller, Björn; Hertrampf, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    In Germany, ~13 000 people are found to have oral and pharyngeal cancer every year. Awareness and knowledge about this cancer remain insufficient, particularly amongst elderly people. A campaign for early detection was launched in Northern Germany in April 2012. The first step of the campaign was to increase awareness about oral cancer. Prior to a…

  15. First Steps to School Readiness: South Carolina's Response to At-Risk Early Childhood Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buford, Rhonda; Stegelin, Dolores A.

    2003-01-01

    Describes South Carolina's new state early childhood program, First Steps to School Readiness. Includes a profile of the state's at-risk child population, noting poverty and education risk indicators, and describing key program components. The article discusses program oversight, local program partnerships, program funding mechanisms, and local…

  16. Smoke regions extraction based on two steps segmentation and motion detection in early fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Wenlin; Wu, Kaizhi; Yu, Zirong; Chen, Lijuan

    2018-03-01

    Aiming at the early problems of video-based smoke detection in fire video, this paper proposes a method to extract smoke suspected regions by combining two steps segmentation and motion characteristics. Early smoldering smoke can be seen as gray or gray-white regions. In the first stage, regions of interests (ROIs) with smoke are obtained by using two step segmentation methods. Then, suspected smoke regions are detected by combining the two step segmentation and motion detection. Finally, morphological processing is used for smoke regions extracting. The Otsu algorithm is used as segmentation method and the ViBe algorithm is used to detect the motion of smoke. The proposed method was tested on 6 test videos with smoke. The experimental results show the effectiveness of our proposed method over visual observation.

  17. Different enzymatic antioxidative pathways operate within the sheep caruncular and intercaruncular endometrium throughout the estrous cycle and early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Al-Gubory, K H; Faure, P; Garrel, C

    2017-09-01

    There has been a growing interest in the role played by antioxidant enzymes in the regulation of endometrial function in mammals. However, little is known about enzymatic antioxidative pathways involved in conditioning the cyclic and early pregnant endometrium for conceptus attachment and implantation in domestic ruminants. We aimed to investigate changes in activities of superoxide dismutase 1 and 2 (SOD1, SOD2), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GR) and catalase (CAT) in sheep caruncles (CAR) and intercaruncles (ICAR) endometrial tissues of cyclic and early pregnant ewes. Irrespective of day of cycle or pregnancy, CAR demonstrated higher activities of SOD1 and SOD2 than in ICAR. On day 12 of the estrous cycle, ICAR demonstrated higher activity of GPX and GR than in CAR tissues. On days 12 and 16 the estrous cycle, ICAR demonstrated higher activity of CAT than in CAR. CAR demonstrated higher activity of GPX on day 18 than on days 4, 8, 12 and 16 of the estrous cycle. CAR demonstrated higher activity of CAT on day 18 than on days 4, 8, 12 and 16 of the estrous cycle. ICAR demonstrated higher activity of CAT on day 18 than on days 4, 8, and 16 of the estrous cycle. The activity of CAT in ICAR increased from days 4 and 8 to day 12 of the estrous cycle. The activity of SOD2 in CAR increased from day 16 to day 18 of pregnancy. On day 12 of pregnancy, CAR demonstrated higher activity of GPX than in ICAR. On day 16 of pregnancy, ICAR demonstrated higher activity of GPX than in CAR. The activity of GPX in ICAR increased from day 12 to day 16 of pregnancy. The activity of GPX in CAR increased from day 16 to day 18 of pregnancy. The activity of GR in CAR and ICAR increased from days 12 and 16 to day 18 of pregnancy. On days 16 and 18 of pregnancy, ICAR demonstrated higher activity of CAT than in CAR. The activity of CAT in CAR decreased from day 12 to days 16 and 18 of pregnancy. The activity of CAT in ICAR decreased from day 12 to day 16 of pregnancy and

  18. Enzymatic debridement of deeply burned faces: Healing and early scarring based on tissue preservation compared to traditional surgical debridement.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Alexandra; Fuchs, Paul Christian; Rothermundt, Irene; Hoffmann, Alexandra; Rosenberg, Lior; Shoham, Yaron; Oberländer, Henrik; Schiefer, Jennifer

    2017-09-01

    Facial burns occur frequently and depending on the injured skin layers often heal with scars which may cause permanent functional and cosmetic sequelae. Preservation of the sensitive facial skin layers, especially of the dermis is essential for scarless epithelialisation. Enzymatic debridement of deep thermal burns has already been shown to assist with preserving viable dermis. However, up to date, there are no published reports on wound healing and in the long term aesthetic outcome after enzymatic debridement of facial burns. Therefore we performed a-single centre clinical trial that included 26 subjects aged 18-78 years with facial burns clinically evaluated as deep dermal or deeper. Burns were treated either with enzymatic debridement or excisional surgical debridement. Then we compared both groups regarding debridement selectivity, wound closure and scar quality after more than 12 months. Enzymatic debridement significantly reduced time to complete wound closure after admission (19.85 days versus 42.23 days, p=0.002), and after enzymatic eschar removal (18.92 days versus 35.62 days, p=0.042). The number of procedures to complete debridement were significantly lower in the enzymatic debridement group (1.00 versus 1.77, p=0.003). 77% of facial burns that had been debrided enzymatically were found to be more superficially burned than initially estimated. Wounds undergoing autografting of any size were significantly reduced by enzymatic debridement (15% versus 77%, p=0.002). Scar quality after enzymatic debridement was superior compared to surgical debridement after 12 months regarding pigmentation (p=0.016), thickness (p=0.16), relief (p=0.10), pliability (p=0.01), surface area (p=0.004), stiffness (p=0.023), thickness (0.011) and scar irregularity (p=0.011). Regarding erythema and melanin, viscoelasticity and pliability, trans-epidermal water loss or laser tissue oxygen saturation, haemoglobin level and microcirculation we found no significant differences for

  19. Discovery of Cellular Proteins Required for the Early Steps of HCV Infection Using Integrative Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jae-Seong; Kwon, Oh Sung; Kim, Sanguk; Jang, Sung Key

    2013-01-01

    Successful viral infection requires intimate communication between virus and host cell, a process that absolutely requires various host proteins. However, current efforts to discover novel host proteins as therapeutic targets for viral infection are difficult. Here, we developed an integrative-genomics approach to predict human genes involved in the early steps of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. By integrating HCV and human protein associations, co-expression data, and tight junction-tetraspanin web specific networks, we identified host proteins required for the early steps in HCV infection. Moreover, we validated the roles of newly identified proteins in HCV infection by knocking down their expression using small interfering RNAs. Specifically, a novel host factor CD63 was shown to directly interact with HCV E2 protein. We further demonstrated that an antibody against CD63 blocked HCV infection, indicating that CD63 may serve as a new therapeutic target for HCV-related diseases. The candidate gene list provides a source for identification of new therapeutic targets. PMID:23593195

  20. Enzymatic Synthesis of Psilocybin.

    PubMed

    Fricke, Janis; Blei, Felix; Hoffmeister, Dirk

    2017-09-25

    Psilocybin is the psychotropic tryptamine-derived natural product of Psilocybe carpophores, the so-called "magic mushrooms". Although its structure has been known for 60 years, the enzymatic basis of its biosynthesis has remained obscure. We characterized four psilocybin biosynthesis enzymes, namely i) PsiD, which represents a new class of fungal l-tryptophan decarboxylases, ii) PsiK, which catalyzes the phosphotransfer step, iii) the methyltransferase PsiM, catalyzing iterative N-methyl transfer as the terminal biosynthetic step, and iv) PsiH, a monooxygenase. In a combined PsiD/PsiK/PsiM reaction, psilocybin was synthesized enzymatically in a step-economic route from 4-hydroxy-l-tryptophan. Given the renewed pharmaceutical interest in psilocybin, our results may lay the foundation for its biotechnological production. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Tools for Transition in Early Childhood: A Step-by-Step Guide for Agencies, Teachers, and Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rous, Beth S., Ed.D; Hallam, Rena A.

    2006-01-01

    For young children with and without disabilities, positive outcomes depend on smooth, effective transitions between and within early intervention programs, preschool programs, and public school programs. Now there is a how-to guide that helps professionals across programs work together to make these transitions happen. Coauthored by top expert…

  2. An early cytoplasmic step of peptidoglycan synthesis is associated to MreB in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Rueff, Anne-Stéphanie; Chastanet, Arnaud; Domínguez-Escobar, Julia; Yao, Zhizhong; Yates, James; Prejean, Maria-Victoria; Delumeau, Olivier; Noirot, Philippe; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland; Filipe, Sergio R; Carballido-López, Rut

    2014-01-01

    MreB proteins play a major role during morphogenesis of rod-shaped bacteria by organizing biosynthesis of the peptidoglycan cell wall. However, the mechanisms underlying this process are not well understood. In Bacillus subtilis, membrane-associated MreB polymers have been shown to be associated to elongation-specific complexes containing transmembrane morphogenetic factors and extracellular cell wall assembly proteins. We have now found that an early intracellular step of cell wall synthesis is also associated to MreB. We show that the previously uncharacterized protein YkuR (renamed DapI) is required for synthesis of meso-diaminopimelate (m-DAP), an essential constituent of the peptidoglycan precursor, and that it physically interacts with MreB. Highly inclined laminated optical sheet microscopy revealed that YkuR forms uniformly distributed foci that exhibit fast motion in the cytoplasm, and are not detected in cells lacking MreB. We propose a model in which soluble MreB organizes intracellular steps of peptidoglycan synthesis in the cytoplasm to feed the membrane-associated cell wall synthesizing machineries. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. One-Step to Prepare Self-Organized Nanoporous NiO/TiO2 Layers and its Use in Non-Enzymatic Glucose Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhi-Da; Han, Yuyao; Wang, Yongmei; Xu, Jingwen; Song, Yan-Yan

    2013-01-01

    A highly ordered nanoporous NiTi oxide layers were fabricated on Ti alloys with high Ni contents (50.6 at.%) by a combination of self-organizing anodization at 0°C and subsequent selective etching in H2O2. The key for successful formation of such layers is to sufficiently suppress the dissolve of NiO by applying lower temperature during anodization. The resulting nanoporous structure is connected and well-adhered, which exhibits a much higher electrochemical cycling stability in 0.1 M NaOH. Without further surface modification or the use of polymer binders, the layers can be behave as a low-cost, stable and sensitive platform in non-enzymatic glucose sensing. PMID:24270125

  4. Exploring the early steps of aggregation of amyloid-forming peptide KFFE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Guanghong; Mousseau, Normand; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2004-11-01

    It has been shown recently that even a tetrapeptide can form amyloid fibrils sharing all the characteristics of amyloid fibrils built from large proteins. Recent experimental studies also suggest that the toxicity observed in several neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, is not only related to the mature fibrils themselves, but also to the soluble oligomers formed early in the process of fibrillogenesis. This raises the interest in studying the early steps of the aggregation process. Although fibril formation follows the nucleation-condensation process, characterized by the presence of lag phase, the exact pathways remain to be determined. In this study, we used the activation-relaxation technique and a generic energy model to explore the process of self-assembly and the structures of the resulting aggregates of eight KFFE peptides. Our simulations show, starting from different states with a preformed antiparallel dimer, that eight chains can self-assemble to adopt, with various orientations, four possible distant oligomeric well-aligned structures of similar energy. Two of these structures show a double-layer β-sheet organization, in agreement with the structure of amyloid fibrils as observed by x-ray diffraction; another two are mixtures of dimers and trimers. Our results also suggest that octamers are likely to be below the critical size for nucleation of amyloid fibrils for small peptides.

  5. Screening Tool for Early Postnatal Prediction of Retinopathy of Prematurity in Preterm Newborns (STEP-ROP).

    PubMed

    Ricard, Caroline A; Dammann, Christiane E L; Dammann, Olaf

    2017-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a disorder of the preterm newborn characterized by neurovascular disruption in the immature retina that may cause visual impairment and blindness. To develop a clinical screening tool for early postnatal prediction of ROP in preterm newborns based on risk information available within the first 48 h of postnatal life. Using data submitted to the Vermont Oxford Network (VON) between 1995 and 2015, we created logistic regression models based on infants born <28 completed weeks gestational age. We developed a model with 60% of the data and identified birth weight, gestational age, respiratory distress syndrome, non-Hispanic ethnicity, and multiple gestation as predictors of ROP. We tested the model in the remaining 40%, performed tenfold cross-validation, and tested the score in ELGAN study data. Of the 1,052 newborns in the VON database, 627 recorded an ROP status. Forty percent had no ROP, 40% had mild ROP (stages 1 and 2), and 20% had severe ROP (stages 3-5). We created a weighted score to predict any ROP based on the multivariable regression model. A cutoff score of 5 had the best sensitivity (95%, 95% CI 93-97), while maintaining a strong positive predictive value (63%, 95% CI 57-68). When applied to the ELGAN data, sensitivity was lower (72%, 95% CI 69-75), but PPV was higher (80%, 95% CI 77-83). STEP-ROP is a promising screening tool. It is easy to calculate, does not rely on extensive postnatal data collection, and can be calculated early after birth. Early ROP screening may help physicians limit patient exposure to additional risk factors, and may be useful for risk stratification in clinical trials aimed at reducing ROP. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Early assessment of the 10-step patient engagement framework for patient-centred outcomes research studies: the first three steps.

    PubMed

    Sofolahan-Oladeinde, Yewande; Newhouse, Robin P; Lavallee, Danielle C; Huang, Jennifer C; Mullins, C Daniel

    2017-06-01

    A key principle of patient-centred outcomes research (PCOR) is the engagement of patients and other stakeholders in the research process, but the evidence is still emerging on the impact patient engagement has on the research process. A 10-step framework has been developed to provide methodological guidance for patient engagement throughout the research process. However, the utility of the framework for patient engagement has not been tested in actual research studies. To describe researcher's overall experiences with engaging patients at the beginning of their PCOR research process. Twelve in-depth interviews were conducted face-to-face and by telephone with PCOR researchers between November 2014 and January 2015 at an Academic Health Center in the eastern USA. All data were audiotaped and transcribed, and NVivo 10 software was used for data analysis. Four major themes emerged (i) the importance of patient engagement and how it provides 'a perspective you can't get unless you talk to the patient'; (ii) the impact of patient engagement; (iii) challenges and barriers of engagement; and (iv) the realities of patient engagement. Researchers' views illustrate the need to re-evaluate patient engagement in PCOR based on current realities. Given the many challenges to engagement that researchers encounter, it may be more productive to redefine the process of patient engagement so that the issues researchers now face are taken into account in future funding announcements, engagement rubrics and methodology frameworks developed. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Single-molecule studies highlight conformational heterogeneity in the early folding steps of a large ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zheng; Srividya, Narayanan; Sosnick, Tobin R.; Pan, Tao; Scherer, Norbert F.

    2004-01-01

    The equilibrium folding of the catalytic domain of Bacillus subtilis RNase P RNA is investigated by single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). Previous ensemble studies of this 255-nucleotide ribozyme described the equilibrium folding with two transitions, U-to-Ieq-to-N, and focused on the Ieq-to-N transition. The present study focuses on the U-to-Ieq transition. Comparative ensemble measurements of the ribozyme construct labeled with fluorescein at the 5′ end and Cy3 at the 3′ end show that modifications required for labeling do not interfere with folding and help to define the Mg2+ concentration range for the U-to-Ieq transition. Histogram analysis of the Mg2+-dependent single-molecule FRET efficiency reveals two previously undetermined folding intermediates. The single-molecule FRET trajectories exhibit non-two-state and nonergodic behaviors at intermediate Mg2+ concentrations on the time scale of seconds. The trajectories at intermediate Mg2+ concentrations are classified into five classes based on three FRET levels and their dynamics of interconversion within the measured time range. This heterogeneity, together with the observation of “nonsudden jump” FRET transitions, indicates that the early folding steps of this ribozyme involve a series of intermediates with different degrees of kinetic isolation and that folding occurs under kinetic control and involves many “local” conformational switches. A free energy contour is constructed to illustrate the complex folding surface. PMID:14704266

  8. Early manifestation of arm-leg coordination during stepping on a surface in human neonates.

    PubMed

    La Scaleia, Valentina; Ivanenko, Y; Fabiano, A; Sylos-Labini, F; Cappellini, G; Picone, S; Paolillo, P; Di Paolo, A; Lacquaniti, F

    2018-04-01

    The accomplishment of mature locomotor movements relies upon the integrated coordination of the lower and upper limbs and the trunk. Human adults normally swing their arms and a quadrupedal limb coordination persists during bipedal walking despite a strong corticospinal control of the upper extremities that allows to uncouple this connection during voluntary activities. Here we investigated arm-leg coordination during stepping responses on a surface in human neonates. In eight neonates, we found the overt presence of alternating arm-leg oscillations, the arms moving up and down in alternation with ipsilateral lower limb movements. These neonates moved the diagonal limbs together, and the peak of the arm-to-trunk angle (i.e., maximum vertical excursion of the arm) occurred around the end of the ipsilateral stance phase, as it occurs during typical adult walking. Although episodes of arm-leg coordination were sporadic in our sample of neonates, their presence provides significant evidence for a neural coupling between the upper and lower limbs during early ontogenesis of locomotion in humans.

  9. Challenges of early detection of oral cancer: raising awareness as a first step to successful campaigning.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Eva; Koller, Michael; Wiltfang, Jörg; Wenz, Hans-Jürgen; Möller, Björn; Hertrampf, Katrin

    2016-04-01

    In Germany, ∼ 13,000 people are found to have oral and pharyngeal cancer every year. Awareness and knowledge about this cancer remain insufficient, particularly amongst elderly people. A campaign for early detection was launched in Northern Germany in April 2012. The first step of the campaign was to increase awareness about oral cancer. Prior to a pre-campaign evaluation at the campaign start, March 2012 and an intermediate-campaign evaluation, November 2012, a sample representative for the population aged 50 ≥ years (target group; N = 500) was drawn for a first process evaluation. The surveys were conducted by means of telephone interviews including questions on behaviour, knowledge and sociodemographic/socioeconomic aspects and target group-oriented questions on issue, media and campaign material awareness. The process evaluation showed an increase in issue awareness from 25 to 40% (P < 0.001) and the media awareness increased by over 10% (P < 0.001). The results suggested that particularly women, the core age group (60-79 years) and the educationally disadvantaged group might benefit from the campaign. Awareness about the issue 'oral cancer' was already significantly increased 7 months after the campaign start. The highest general and media-related increase in awareness was achieved in the target group. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. New insights into the early steps of oil body mobilization during pollen germination

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Antonio Jesús

    2013-01-01

    In some plants, pollen grains accumulate storage lipids that serve as energy supply during germination. Here, three enzymes involved in early steps of oil body mobilization in the male gametophyte were functionally characterized for the first time. The effect of extracellular sugars on pollen performance and oil body dynamics was also analysed. Olive pollen oil bodies showed phospholipase A, lipase, and lipoxygenase activities on their surface. Enzyme activity levels increased during germination with a maximum after 3h. Removal of extracellular sugars from the germination medium did not affect pollen performance but increased enzyme activity rates and sped up oil body mobilization. Inhibitors seriously hampered pollen germination and pollen tube growth, leading to a characteristic accumulation of oil bodies in the germinative aperture. It can be concluded that storage lipids are sufficient for proper olive pollen germination. A lipase and a lipoxygenase are likely involved in oil body mobilization. Extracellular sugars may modulate their function, while a phospholipase A may promote their access to the storage lipids. PMID:23132905

  11. Single-Molecule Optical Spectroscopy and Imaging: From Early Steps to Recent Advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moerner, William E.

    The initial steps toward optical detection and spectroscopy of single molecules arose out of the study of spectral hole-burning in inhomogeneously broadened optical absorption profiles of molecular impurities in solids at low temperatures. Spectral signatures relating to the fluctuations of the number of molecules in resonance led to the attainment of the single-molecule limit in 1989. In the early 1990s, many fascinating physical effects were observed for individual molecules such as spectral diffusion, optical switching, vibrational spectra, and magnetic resonance of a single molecular spin. Since the mid-1990s when experiments moved to room temperature, a wide variety of biophysical effects may be explored, and a number of physical phenomena from the low temperature studies have analogs at high temperature. Recent advances worldwide cover a huge range, from in vitro studies of enzymes, proteins, and oligonucleotides, to observations in real time of a single protein performing a specific function inside a living cell. Because each single fluorophore acts a light source roughly 1 nm in size, microscopic observation of individual fluorophores leads naturally to localization beyond the optical diffraction limit. Combining this with active optical control of the number of emitting molecules leads to superresolution imaging, a new frontier for optical microscopy beyond the optical diffraction limit and for chemical design of photoswitchable fluorescent labels. Finally, to study one molecule in aqueous solution without surface perturbations, a new electrokinetic trap is described (the ABEL trap) which can trap single small biomolecules without the need for large dielectric beads.

  12. A novel two-step enzymatic synthesis of blastose, a β-d-fructofuranosyl-(2↔6)-d-glucopyranose sucrose analogue.

    PubMed

    Miranda-Molina, Alfonso; Castillo, Edmundo; Lopez Munguia, Agustin

    2017-07-15

    Blastose, a natural disaccharide found in honey, is usually found as a byproduct of fructo-oligosaccharide synthesis from sucrose with fructosyltransferases. In this study, we describe a novel two-step biosynthetic route to obtain blastose, designed from a detailed observation of B. subtilis levansucrase (SacB) acceptor structural requirements for fructosylation. The strategy consisted first in the synthesis of the trisaccharide O-β-d-Fruf-(2↔6)-O-α-d-Glcp-(1↔1)-α-d-Glcp, through a regioselective β-d-transfructosylation of trehalose (Tre) which acts as acceptor in a reaction catalyzed by SacB using sucrose or levan as fructosyl donor. In this reaction, levansucrase (LS) transfers regioselectively a fructosyl residue to either C 6 -OH group of the glucose residues in Tre. The resulting trisaccharide obtained in 23% molar yield based on trehalose, was purified and fully characterized by extensive NMR studies. In the second step, the trisaccharide is specifically hydrolyzed by trehalase, to obtain blastose in 43.2% molar yield based on the trisaccharide. This is the first report describing the formation of blastose through a sequential transfuctosylation-hydrolysis reaction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Early steps of adventitious rooting: morphology, hormonal profiling and carbohydrate turnover in carnation stem cuttings.

    PubMed

    Agulló-Antón, María Ángeles; Ferrández-Ayela, Almudena; Fernández-García, Nieves; Nicolás, Carlos; Albacete, Alfonso; Pérez-Alfocea, Francisco; Sánchez-Bravo, José; Pérez-Pérez, José Manuel; Acosta, Manuel

    2014-03-01

    The rooting of stem cuttings is a common vegetative propagation practice in many ornamental species. A detailed analysis of the morphological changes occurring in the basal region of cultivated carnation cuttings during the early stages of adventitious rooting was carried out and the physiological modifications induced by exogenous auxin application were studied. To this end, the endogenous concentrations of five major classes of plant hormones [auxin, cytokinin (CK), abscisic acid, salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid] and the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid were analyzed at the base of stem cuttings and at different stages of adventitious root formation. We found that the stimulus triggering the initiation of adventitious root formation occurred during the first hours after their excision from the donor plant, due to the breakdown of the vascular continuum that induces auxin accumulation near the wounding. Although this stimulus was independent of exogenously applied auxin, it was observed that the auxin treatment accelerated cell division in the cambium and increased the sucrolytic activities at the base of the stem, both of which contributed to the establishment of the new root primordia at the stem base. Further, several genes involved in auxin transport were upregulated in the stem base either with or without auxin application, while endogenous CK and SA concentrations were specially affected by exogenous auxin application. Taken together our results indicate significant crosstalk between auxin levels, stress hormone homeostasis and sugar availability in the base of the stem cuttings in carnation during the initial steps of adventitious rooting. © 2013 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  14. Early Intervention for Preschoolers at Risk for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: Preschool First Step to Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feil, Edward G.; Small, Jason W.; Seeley, John R.; Walker, Hill M.; Golly, Annemieke; Frey, Andy; Forness, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of the Preschool First Step (PFS) to Success early intervention for children at risk for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). PFS is a targeted intervention for children 3-5 years old with externalizing behavior problems and addresses secondary prevention goals and objectives. As part of a larger…

  15. Dealing with the sulfur part of cysteine: four enzymatic steps degrade l-cysteine to pyruvate and thiosulfate in Arabidopsis mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Höfler, Saskia; Lorenz, Christin; Busch, Tjorven; Brinkkötter, Mascha; Tohge, Takayuki; Fernie, Alisdair R; Braun, Hans-Peter; Hildebrandt, Tatjana M

    2016-07-01

    Amino acid catabolism is essential for adjusting pool sizes of free amino acids and takes part in energy production as well as nutrient remobilization. The carbon skeletons are generally converted to precursors or intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. In the case of cysteine, the reduced sulfur derived from the thiol group also has to be oxidized in order to prevent accumulation to toxic concentrations. Here we present a mitochondrial sulfur catabolic pathway catalyzing the complete oxidation of l-cysteine to pyruvate and thiosulfate. After transamination to 3-mercaptopyruvate, the sulfhydryl group from l-cysteine is transferred to glutathione by sulfurtransferase 1 and oxidized to sulfite by the sulfur dioxygenase ETHE1. Sulfite is then converted to thiosulfate by addition of a second persulfide group by sulfurtransferase 1. This pathway is most relevant during early embryo development and for vegetative growth under light-limiting conditions. Characterization of a double mutant produced from Arabidopsis thaliana T-DNA insertion lines for ETHE1 and sulfurtransferase 1 revealed that an intermediate of the ETHE1 dependent pathway, most likely a persulfide, interferes with amino acid catabolism and induces early senescence. © 2016 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  16. Enzymatic reactions in confined environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küchler, Andreas; Yoshimoto, Makoto; Luginbühl, Sandra; Mavelli, Fabio; Walde, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Within each biological cell, surface- and volume-confined enzymes control a highly complex network of chemical reactions. These reactions are efficient, timely, and spatially defined. Efforts to transfer such appealing features to in vitro systems have led to several successful examples of chemical reactions catalysed by isolated and immobilized enzymes. In most cases, these enzymes are either bound or adsorbed to an insoluble support, physically trapped in a macromolecular network, or encapsulated within compartments. Advanced applications of enzymatic cascade reactions with immobilized enzymes include enzymatic fuel cells and enzymatic nanoreactors, both for in vitro and possible in vivo applications. In this Review, we discuss some of the general principles of enzymatic reactions confined on surfaces, at interfaces, and inside small volumes. We also highlight the similarities and differences between the in vivo and in vitro cases and attempt to critically evaluate some of the necessary future steps to improve our fundamental understanding of these systems.

  17. A step-by-step introduction to vegetables at the beginning of complementary feeding. The effects of early and repeated exposure.

    PubMed

    Hetherington, Marion M; Schwartz, C; Madrelle, J; Croden, F; Nekitsing, C; Vereijken, C M J L; Weenen, H

    2015-01-01

    Breastfeeding (BF) is associated with willingness to accept vegetables. This may be due to the variety of flavours delivered via breast milk. Some mothers add vegetables to milk during complementary feeding (CF) to enhance acceptance. The present study tested a step-by-step exposure to vegetables in milk then rice during CF, on intake and liking of vegetables. Just before CF, enrolled mothers were randomised to an intervention (IG, n = 18; 6 BF) or control group (CG, n = 18; 6 BF). IG infants received 12 daily exposures to vegetable puree added to milk (days 1-12), then 12 × 2 daily exposures to vegetable puree added to rice at home (days 13-24). Plain milk and rice were given to CG. Then both received 11 daily exposures to vegetable puree. Intake was weighed and liking rated on days 25-26 and 33-35 after the start of CF in the laboratory, supplemented by the same data recorded at home. Vegetables were rotated daily (carrots, green beans, spinach, broccoli). Intake, liking and pace of eating were greater for IG than CG infants. Intake and liking of carrots were greater than green beans. However, at 6m then 18m follow up, vegetable (carrot > green beans) but not group differences were observed. Mothers reported appreciation of the structure and guidance of this systematic approach. Early exposure to vegetables in a step-by-step method could be included in CF guidelines and longer term benefits assessed by extending the exposure period. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Tangible Steps Toward Tomorrow: New Designs for Early Education, Ages 0-8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    W. K. Kellogg Foundation, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This publication, developed by W.K. Kellogg Foundation in collaboration with IDEO, details a human-centered approach to evolving the system of early education for the needs and possibilities of the 21st century. It provides a set of ideas or "thought-starters" on transforming early education to ensure school readiness and success for the…

  19. Early Onset of Kinetic Roughening due to a Finite Step Width in Hematin Crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olafson, Katy N.; Rimer, Jeffrey D.; Vekilov, Peter G.

    2017-11-01

    The structure of the interface of a growing crystal with its nutrient phase largely determines the growth dynamics. We demonstrate that hematin crystals, crucial for the survival of malaria parasites, transition from faceted to rough growth interfaces at increasing thermodynamic supersaturation Δ μ . Contrary to theoretical predictions and previous observations, this transition occurs at moderate values of Δ μ . Moreover, surface roughness varies nonmonotonically with Δ μ , and the rate constant for rough growth is slower than that resulting from nucleation and spreading of layers. We attribute these unexpected behaviors to the dynamics of step growth dominated by surface diffusion and the loss of identity of nuclei separated by less than the step width w . We put forth a general criterion for the onset of kinetic roughening using w as a critical length scale.

  20. Live-Cell Imaging of Early Steps of Single HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Francis, Ashwanth C; Melikyan, Gregory B

    2018-05-19

    Live-cell imaging of single HIV-1 entry offers a unique opportunity to delineate the spatio-temporal regulation of infection. Novel virus labeling and imaging approaches enable the visualization of key steps of HIV-1 entry leading to nuclear import, integration into the host genome, and viral protein expression. Here, we discuss single virus imaging strategies, focusing on live-cell imaging of single virus fusion and productive uncoating that culminates in HIV-1 infection.

  1. A Step towards Clerical Preferment: Secondary School Teachers' Careers in Early Modern Sweden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindmark, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    This article investigates the function served by embarking on a teaching career in the Latin school system for recruitment to the clergy in early modern Sweden. The study is restricted to the eighty-nine teachers serving at Pitea Grammar School in Northern Sweden in the period from 1650 to 1849. The investigation pays considerable attention to the…

  2. Improving the Nation's Health. Step One: Reduce Toxic Stress in Early Childhood. Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louv, Richard

    2006-01-01

    To reduce risk factors for adult disease in our society, we must tackle the problem of toxic stress in early childhood. This condition is associated with the excessive release of a stream of hormones whose persistent elevation can disrupt the wiring of the developing brain and the functioning of the immune system. Children who experience toxic…

  3. Early Steps to School Success (ESSS): Examining Pathways Linking Home Visiting and Language Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iruka, Iheoma U.; Brown, Deborah; Jerald, Judith; Blitch, Kimberly

    2018-01-01

    Background: Improving the home environment and parenting practices to support children's early development and learning is a key focus of many. Home visiting is one potential strategy to improve the home environment and parenting; however, more data about current programmatic efforts is needed, especially for children with multiple risks living in…

  4. Small Steps: An Early Intervention Program for Children with Developmental Delays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pieterse, Moira; And Others

    This boxed set includes eight booklets of home activities for early intervention for young children with developmental delays. The first book provides an introduction to the program and its implementation, lists 23 resources, describes a videotape which supplements the booklets, and includes a glossary. Book 2 covers how to select goals for the…

  5. Minimizing cows' stress when calves were early weaned using the two-step method with nose flaps.

    PubMed

    Ungerfeld, R; Quintans, G; Hötzel, M J

    2016-11-01

    Early weaning may be used in beef cattle production to improve reproduction rates in range conditions. However, weaning causes a stress response in cows, which may be especially strong in early weaning management, as the bond between the cow and the calf is still strong. We hypothesized that weaning calves in two steps, with the aid of anti-sucking devices (nose flaps) would reduce the behavioural stress response in the cows separated from their calves 2 months after parturition. We compared the behaviour frequency and weight change in cows that were weaned abruptly, by separation of the calf on day 0 of the study, or in two steps, consisting of the use of anti-sucking nose flaps for 5 days before permanent separation; a third group was not weaned to serve as control. Thirty-six crossbred multiparous Aberdeen Angus×Hereford cows and their calves (n=12/treatment) were managed in three paddocks with similar pasture availability, with four dyads from each treatment per paddock. Cows' behaviour was observed by direct visual instantaneous sampling, at 10 min intervals from days -3 to 11. Weaning the calves in two steps clearly attenuated the behavioural stress response observed in abruptly weaned cows, which included reductions in grazing and lying, and increases in pacing, walking and vocalizing. Our results corroborate those previously shown for cows nursing older calves, and indicate that step weaning can reduce the behavioural stress response of cows at weaning, even when the calf is weaned shortly after birth, when the bond between the cow and calf is still very strong.

  6. OBJECT REPRESENTATION, IDENTITY, AND THE PARADOX OF EARLY PERMANENCE: Steps Toward a New Framework.

    PubMed

    Meltzoff, Andrew N; Moore, M Keith

    1998-01-01

    The sensorimotor theory of infancy has been overthrown, but there is little consensus on a replacement. We hypothesize that a capacity for representation is the starting point for infant development, not its culmination. Logical distinctions are drawn between object representation, identity, and permanence. Modern experiments on early object permanence and deferred imitation suggest: (a) even for young infants, representations persist over breaks in sensory contact, (b) numerical identity of objects ( O s) is initially specified by spatiotemporal criteria (place and trajectory), (c) featural and functional identity criteria develop, (d) events are analyzed by comparing representations to current perception, and (e) representation operates both prospectively, anticipating future contacts with an O , and retrospectively, reidentifying an O as the "same one again." A model of the architecture and functioning of the early representational system is proposed. It accounts for young infants' behavior toward absent people and things in terms of their efforts to determine the identity of objects. Our proposal is developmental without denying innate structure and elevates the power of perception and representation while being cautious about attributing complex concepts to young infants.

  7. OBJECT REPRESENTATION, IDENTITY, AND THE PARADOX OF EARLY PERMANENCE: Steps Toward a New Framework

    PubMed Central

    Meltzoff, Andrew N.; Moore, M. Keith

    2013-01-01

    The sensorimotor theory of infancy has been overthrown, but there is little consensus on a replacement. We hypothesize that a capacity for representation is the starting point for infant development, not its culmination. Logical distinctions are drawn between object representation, identity, and permanence. Modern experiments on early object permanence and deferred imitation suggest: (a) even for young infants, representations persist over breaks in sensory contact, (b) numerical identity of objects (Os) is initially specified by spatiotemporal criteria (place and trajectory), (c) featural and functional identity criteria develop, (d) events are analyzed by comparing representations to current perception, and (e) representation operates both prospectively, anticipating future contacts with an O, and retrospectively, reidentifying an O as the “same one again.” A model of the architecture and functioning of the early representational system is proposed. It accounts for young infants’ behavior toward absent people and things in terms of their efforts to determine the identity of objects. Our proposal is developmental without denying innate structure and elevates the power of perception and representation while being cautious about attributing complex concepts to young infants. PMID:25147418

  8. A role of the Lowe syndrome protein OCRL in early steps of the endocytic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Erdmann, Kai S.; Mao, Yuxin; McCrea, Heather J.; Zoncu, Roberto; Lee, Sangyoon; Paradise, Summer; Modregger, Jan; Biemesderfer, Daniel; Toomre, Derek; De Camilli, Pietro

    2007-01-01

    Mutations in the inositol 5-phosphatase OCRL are responsible for Lowe syndrome, whose manifestations include mental retardation and renal Fanconi syndrome. OCRL has been implicated in membrane traffic, but disease mechanisms remain unclear. We show that OCRL visits late stage endocytic clathrin coated pits and binds the Rab5 effector APPL1 on peripheral early endosomes. The interaction with APPL1, which is mediated by the ASH-RhoGAP-like domains of OCRL and is abolished by disease mutations, provides a link to protein networks implicated in the reabsorptive function of kidney and in traffic and signaling of growth factor receptors in brain. Crystallographic studies reveal a role of the ASH-RhoGAP-like domains in positioning the phosphatase domain at the membrane interface and a clathrin box protruding from the RhoGAP-like domain. Our results support a role of OCRL in the early endocytic pathway consistent with the predominant localization of its preferred substrates, PI(4,5)P2 and PI(3,4,5)P3, at the cell surface. PMID:17765681

  9. Crystal structure of Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumolysin provides key insights into early steps of pore formation

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Sara L.; Feil, Susanne C.; Morton, Craig J.; Farrand, Allison J.; Mulhern, Terrence D.; Gorman, Michael A.; Wade, Kristin R.; Tweten, Rodney K.; Parker, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Pore-forming proteins are weapons often used by bacterial pathogens to breach the membrane barrier of target cells. Despite their critical role in infection important structural aspects of the mechanism of how these proteins assemble into pores remain unknown. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the world’s leading cause of pneumonia, meningitis, bacteremia and otitis media. Pneumolysin (PLY) is a major virulence factor of S. pneumoniae and a target for both small molecule drug development and vaccines. PLY is a member of the cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs), a family of pore-forming toxins that form gigantic pores in cell membranes. Here we present the structure of PLY determined by X-ray crystallography and, in solution, by small-angle X-ray scattering. The crystal structure reveals PLY assembles as a linear oligomer that provides key structural insights into the poorly understood early monomer-monomer interactions of CDCs at the membrane surface. PMID:26403197

  10. Perinatal Risks and Childhood Premorbid Indicators of Later Psychosis: Next Steps for Early Psychosocial Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cindy H.; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Tronick, Ed; Seidman, Larry J.

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia and affective psychoses are debilitating disorders that together affect 2%–3% of the adult population. Approximately 50%–70% of the offspring of parents with schizophrenia manifest a range of observable difficulties including socioemotional, cognitive, neuromotor, speech-language problems, and psychopathology, and roughly 10% will develop psychosis. Despite the voluminous work on premorbid vulnerabilities to psychosis, especially on schizophrenia, the work on premorbid intervention approaches is scarce. While later interventions during the clinical high-risk (CHR) phase of psychosis, characterized primarily by attenuated positive symptoms, are promising, the CHR period is a relatively late phase of developmental derailment. This article reviews and proposes potential targets for psychosocial interventions during the premorbid period, complementing biological interventions described by others in this Special Theme issue. Beginning with pregnancy, parents with psychoses may benefit from enhanced prenatal care, social support, parenting skills, reduction of symptoms, and programs that are family-centered. For children at risk, we propose preemptive early intervention and cognitive remediation. Empirical research is needed to evaluate these interventions for parents and determine whether interventions for parents and children positively influence the developmental course of the offspring. PMID:25904724

  11. Early Steps in Autophagy Depend on Direct Phosphorylation of Atg9 by the Atg1 Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Papinski, Daniel; Schuschnig, Martina; Reiter, Wolfgang; Wilhelm, Larissa; Barnes, Christopher A.; Maiolica, Alessio; Hansmann, Isabella; Pfaffenwimmer, Thaddaeus; Kijanska, Monika; Stoffel, Ingrid; Lee, Sung Sik; Brezovich, Andrea; Lou, Jane Hua; Turk, Benjamin E.; Aebersold, Ruedi; Ammerer, Gustav; Peter, Matthias; Kraft, Claudine

    2014-01-01

    Summary Bulk degradation of cytoplasmic material is mediated by a highly conserved intracellular trafficking pathway termed autophagy. This pathway is characterized by the formation of double-membrane vesicles termed autophagosomes engulfing the substrate and transporting it to the vacuole/lysosome for breakdown and recycling. The Atg1/ULK1 kinase is essential for this process; however, little is known about its targets and the means by which it controls autophagy. Here we have screened for Atg1 kinase substrates using consensus peptide arrays and identified three components of the autophagy machinery. The multimembrane-spanning protein Atg9 is a direct target of this kinase essential for autophagy. Phosphorylated Atg9 is then required for the efficient recruitment of Atg8 and Atg18 to the site of autophagosome formation and subsequent expansion of the isolation membrane, a prerequisite for a functioning autophagy pathway. These findings show that the Atg1 kinase acts early in autophagy by regulating the outgrowth of autophagosomal membranes. PMID:24440502

  12. Evaluation of the effects of implementing an electronic early warning score system: protocol for a stepped wedge study.

    PubMed

    Bonnici, Timothy; Gerry, Stephen; Wong, David; Knight, Julia; Watkinson, Peter

    2016-02-09

    An Early Warning Score is a clinical risk score based upon vital signs intended to aid recognition of patients in need of urgent medical attention. The use of an escalation of care policy based upon an Early Warning Score is mandated as the standard of practice in British hospitals. Electronic systems for recording vital sign observations and Early Warning Score calculation offer theoretical benefits over paper-based systems. However, the evidence for their clinical benefit is limited. Previous studies have shown inconsistent results. The majority have employed a "before and after" study design, which may be strongly confounded by simultaneously occurring events. This study aims to examine how the implementation of an electronic early warning score system, System for Notification and Documentation (SEND), affects the recognition of clinical deterioration occurring in hospitalised adult patients. This study is a non-randomised stepped wedge evaluation carried out across the four hospitals of the Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, comparing charting on paper and charting using SEND. We assume that more frequent monitoring of acutely ill patients is associated with better recognition of patient deterioration. The primary outcome measure is the time between a patient's first observations set with an Early Warning Score above the alerting threshold and their subsequent set of observations. Secondary outcome measures are in-hospital mortality, cardiac arrest and Intensive Care admission rates, hospital length of stay and system usability measured using the System Usability Scale. We will also measure Intensive Care length of stay, Intensive Care mortality, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II acute physiology score on admission, to examine whether the introduction of SEND has any effect on Intensive Care-related outcomes. The development of this protocol has been informed by guidance from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ

  13. The nucleolus in the mouse oocyte is required for the early step of both female and male pronucleus organization.

    PubMed

    OGUSHI, Sugako; SAITOU, Mitinori

    2010-10-01

    During oocyte growth in the ovary, the nucleolus is mainly responsible for ribosome biogenesis. However, in the fully-grown oocyte, all transcription ceases, including ribosomal RNA synthesis, and the nucleolus adopts a specific monotonous fibrillar morphology without chromatin. The function of this inactive nucleolus in oocytes and embryos is still unknown. We previously reported that the embryo lacking an inactive nucleolus failed to develop past the first few cleavages, indicating the requirement of a nucleolus for preimplantation development. Here, we reinjected the nucleolus into oocytes and zygotes without nucleoli at various time points to examine the timing of the nucleolus requirement during meiosis and early embryonic development. When we put the nucleolus back into oocytes lacking a nucleolus at the germinal vesicle (GV) stage and at second metaphase (MII), these oocytes were fertilized, formed pronuclei with nucleoli and developed to full term. When the nucleolus was reinjected at the pronucleus (PN) stage, most of the reconstructed zygotes cleaved and formed nuclei with nucleoli at the 2-cell stage, but the rate of blastocyst formation and the numbers of surviving pups were profoundly reduced. Moreover, the zygotes without nucleoli showed a disorder of higher chromatin organization not only in the female pronucleus but also, interestingly, in the male pronucleus. Thus, the critical time point when the nucleolus is required for progression of early embryonic development appears to be at the point of the early step of pronucleus organization.

  14. A Randomized Controlled Trial of the First Step to Success Early Intervention: Demonstration of Program Efficacy Outcomes in a Diverse, Urban School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Hill M.; Seeley, John R.; Small, Jason; Severson, Herbert H.; Graham, Bethany A.; Feil, Edward G.; Serna, Loretta; Golly, Annemieke M.; Forness, Steven R.

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on a randomized controlled trial of the First Step to Success early intervention that was conducted over a 4-year period in Albuquerque Public Schools. First Step is a selected intervention for students in Grades 1 through 3 with externalizing behavior problems, and it addresses secondary prevention goals and objectives. It…

  15. Human vaginal fluid contains exosomes that have an inhibitory effect on an early step of the HIV-1 life cycle.

    PubMed

    Smith, Johanna A; Daniel, Rene

    2016-11-13

    Vaginal transmission is crucial to the spread of HIV-1 around the world. It is not yet clear what type (s) of innate defenses against HIV-1 infection are present in the vagina. Here, we aimed to determine whether human vaginal fluid contains exosomes that may possess anti-HIV-1 activity. The exosomal fraction was isolated from samples of vaginal fluids. The presence of exosomes was confirmed by flow cytometry and western blotting. The newly discovered exosomes were tested for their ability to block early steps of HIV-1 infection in vitro using established cell culture systems and real time PCR-based methods. Vaginal fluid contains exosomes expressing CD9, CD63, and CD81 exosomal markers. The exosomal fraction of the fluid-reduced transmission of HIV-1 vectors by 60%, the efficiency of reverse transcription step by 58.4%, and the efficiency of integration by 47%. Exosomes had no effect on the entry of HIV-1 vectors. Human vaginal fluid exosomes are newly discovered female innate defenses that may protect women against HIV-1 infection.

  16. Effectiveness of a Very Early Stepping Verticalization Protocol in Severe Acquired Brain Injured Patients: A Randomized Pilot Study in ICU

    PubMed Central

    Bonini, Sara; Maffia, Sara; Molatore, Katia; Sebastianelli, Luca; Zarucchi, Alessio; Matteri, Diana; Ercoli, Giuseppe; Maestri, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Verticalization was reported to improve the level of arousal and awareness in patients with severe acquired brain injury (ABI) and to be safe in ICU. We evaluated the effectiveness of a very early stepping verticalization protocol on their functional and neurological outcome. Methods Consecutive patients with Vegetative State or Minimally Conscious State were enrolled in ICU on the third day after an ABI. They were randomized to undergo conventional physiotherapy alone or associated to fifteen 30-minute sessions of verticalization, using a tilt table with robotic stepping device. Once stabilized, patients were transferred to our Neurorehabilitation unit for an individualized treatment. Outcome measures (Glasgow Coma Scale, Coma Recovery Scale revised -CRSr-, Disability Rating Scale–DRS- and Levels of Cognitive Functioning) were assessed on the third day from the injury (T0), at ICU discharge (T1) and at Rehab discharge (T2). Between- and within-group comparisons were performed by the Mann-Whitney U test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test, respectively. Results Of the 40 patients enrolled, 31 completed the study without adverse events (15 in the verticalization group and 16 in the conventional physiotherapy). Early verticalization started 12.4±7.3 (mean±SD) days after ABI. The length of stay in ICU was longer for the verticalization group (38.8 ± 15.7 vs 25.1 ± 11.2 days, p = 0.01), while the total length of stay (ICU+Neurorehabilitation) was not significantly different (153.2 ± 59.6 vs 134.0 ± 61.0 days, p = 0.41). All outcome measures significantly improved in both groups after the overall period (T2 vs T0, p<0.001 all), as well as after ICU stay (T1 vs T0, p<0.004 all) and after Neurorehabilitation (T2 vs T1, p<0.004 all). The improvement was significantly better in the experimental group for CRSr (T2-T0 p = 0.033, T1-T0 p = 0.006) and (borderline) for DRS (T2-T0 p = 0.040, T1-T0 p = 0.058). Conclusions A stepping verticalization

  17. Effectiveness of a Very Early Stepping Verticalization Protocol in Severe Acquired Brain Injured Patients: A Randomized Pilot Study in ICU.

    PubMed

    Frazzitta, Giuseppe; Zivi, Ilaria; Valsecchi, Roberto; Bonini, Sara; Maffia, Sara; Molatore, Katia; Sebastianelli, Luca; Zarucchi, Alessio; Matteri, Diana; Ercoli, Giuseppe; Maestri, Roberto; Saltuari, Leopold

    2016-01-01

    Verticalization was reported to improve the level of arousal and awareness in patients with severe acquired brain injury (ABI) and to be safe in ICU. We evaluated the effectiveness of a very early stepping verticalization protocol on their functional and neurological outcome. Consecutive patients with Vegetative State or Minimally Conscious State were enrolled in ICU on the third day after an ABI. They were randomized to undergo conventional physiotherapy alone or associated to fifteen 30-minute sessions of verticalization, using a tilt table with robotic stepping device. Once stabilized, patients were transferred to our Neurorehabilitation unit for an individualized treatment. Outcome measures (Glasgow Coma Scale, Coma Recovery Scale revised -CRSr-, Disability Rating Scale-DRS- and Levels of Cognitive Functioning) were assessed on the third day from the injury (T0), at ICU discharge (T1) and at Rehab discharge (T2). Between- and within-group comparisons were performed by the Mann-Whitney U test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test, respectively. Of the 40 patients enrolled, 31 completed the study without adverse events (15 in the verticalization group and 16 in the conventional physiotherapy). Early verticalization started 12.4±7.3 (mean±SD) days after ABI. The length of stay in ICU was longer for the verticalization group (38.8 ± 15.7 vs 25.1 ± 11.2 days, p = 0.01), while the total length of stay (ICU+Neurorehabilitation) was not significantly different (153.2 ± 59.6 vs 134.0 ± 61.0 days, p = 0.41). All outcome measures significantly improved in both groups after the overall period (T2 vs T0, p<0.001 all), as well as after ICU stay (T1 vs T0, p<0.004 all) and after Neurorehabilitation (T2 vs T1, p<0.004 all). The improvement was significantly better in the experimental group for CRSr (T2-T0 p = 0.033, T1-T0 p = 0.006) and (borderline) for DRS (T2-T0 p = 0.040, T1-T0 p = 0.058). A stepping verticalization protocol, started since the acute stages, improves the short

  18. Ift25 is not a cystic kidney disease gene but is required for early steps of kidney development.

    PubMed

    Desai, Paurav B; San Agustin, Jovenal T; Stuck, Michael W; Jonassen, Julie A; Bates, Carlton M; Pazour, Gregory J

    2018-06-01

    Eukaryotic cilia are assembled by intraflagellar transport (IFT) where large protein complexes called IFT particles move ciliary components from the cell body to the cilium. Defects in most IFT particle proteins disrupt ciliary assembly and cause mid gestational lethality in the mouse. IFT25 and IFT27 are unusual components of IFT-B in that they are not required for ciliary assembly and mutant mice survive to term. The mutants die shortly after birth with numerous organ defects including duplex kidneys. Completely duplex kidneys result from defects in ureteric bud formation at the earliest steps of metanephric kidney development. Ureteric bud initiation is a highly regulated process involving reciprocal signaling between the ureteric epithelium and the overlying metanephric mesenchyme with regulation by the peri-Wolffian duct stroma. The finding of duplex kidney in Ift25 and Ift27 mutants suggests functions for these genes in regulation of ureteric bud initiation. Typically the deletion of IFT genes in the kidney causes rapid cyst growth in the early postnatal period. In contrast, the loss of Ift25 results in smaller kidneys, which show only mild tubule dilations that become apparent in adulthood. The smaller kidneys appear to result from reduced branching in the developing metanephric kidney. This work indicates that IFT25 and IFT27 are important players in the early development of the kidney and suggest that duplex kidney is part of the ciliopathy spectrum. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Biomechanical and neuromuscular adaptations during the landing phase of a stepping-down task in patients with early or established knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Ramirez, Diana C; Malfait, Bart; Baert, Isabel; van der Leeden, Marike; van Dieën, Jaap; Lems, Willem F; Dekker, Joost; Luyten, Frank P; Verschueren, Sabine

    2016-06-01

    To compare the knee joint kinematics, kinetics and EMG activity patterns during a stepping-down task in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) with control subjects. 33 women with knee OA (early OA, n=14; established OA n=19) and 14 female control subjects performed a stepping-down task from a 20cm step. Knee joint kinematics, kinetics and EMG activity were recorded on the stepping-down leg during the loading phase. During the stepping-down task patients with established knee OA showed greater normalized medial hamstrings activity (p=0.034) and greater vastus lateralis-medial hamstrings co-contraction (p=0.012) than controls. Greater vastus medialis-medial hamstrings co-contraction was found in patients with established OA compared to control subjects (p=0.040) and to patients with early OA (p=0.023). Self-reported knee instability was reported in 7% and 32% of the patients with early and established OA, respectively. The greater EMG co-activity found in established OA might suggest a less efficient use of knee muscles or an attempt to compensate for greater knee laxity usually present in patients with established OA. In the early stage of the disease, the biomechanical and neuromuscular control of stepping-down is not altered compared to healthy controls. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Improving Early Palliative Care with a Scalable, Stepped Peer Navigator and Social Work Intervention: A Single-Arm Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Bekelman, David B; Johnson-Koenke, Rachel; Bowles, Daniel W; Fischer, Stacy M

    2018-02-20

    Patients with cancer could benefit from early primary (i.e., basic) palliative care. Scalable models of care delivery are needed. Examine the feasibility of a stepped peer navigator and social work intervention developed to improve palliative care outcomes. Single-arm prospective clinical trial. The peer navigator educated patients to advocate for pain and symptom management with their healthcare providers, motivated patients to pursue advance care planning, and discussed the role of hospice. The social worker saw patients with persistent psychosocial distress. Patients with advanced cancer at a VA Medical Center not currently in palliative care or hospice whose oncologist would not be surprised if the patient died in the subsequent year. Participation and retention rates, patient-reported symptoms and quality of life, advance directive documentation, patient satisfaction survey, and semistructured interviews. The participation rate was 38% (17/45), and 35% (7/17) completed final survey measures. Patients had stage IV (81%) and primarily genitourinary (47%) and lung (24%) malignancies. Median Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status was 0. Patient-reported surveys indicated low distress (mean scores: Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General, 75.3 [standard deviation {SD} 17.6]; Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale symptom scores ranged from 1.6 to 3.8; Patient Health Questionnaire-9, 5.7 [SD 5.2]; and Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7, 2.8 [SD 4.1]). Of those who had not completed advance directives at baseline (n = 11, 65%), five completed them by the end of study (5/11, 45%). Patients who completed satisfaction surveys (n = 7) and interviews (n = 4) provided mixed reviews of the intervention. At a single site, a stepped peer navigator and social work palliative care study had several challenges to feasibility, including low patient-reported distress and loss to follow-up.

  1. Identification of tissues and patterning events required for distinct steps in early migration of zebrafish primordial germ cells.

    PubMed

    Weidinger, G; Wolke, U; Köprunner, M; Klinger, M; Raz, E

    1999-12-01

    In many organisms, the primordial germ cells have to migrate from the position where they are specified towards the developing gonad where they generate gametes. Extensive studies of the migration of primordial germ cells in Drosophila, mouse, chick and Xenopus have identified somatic tissues important for this process and demonstrated a role for specific molecules in directing the cells towards their target. In zebrafish, a unique situation is found in that the primordial germ cells, as marked by expression of vasa mRNA, are specified in random positions relative to the future embryonic axis. Hence, the migrating cells have to navigate towards their destination from various starting positions that differ among individual embryos. Here, we present a detailed description of the migration of the primordial germ cells during the first 24 hours of wild-type zebrafish embryonic development. We define six distinct steps of migration bringing the primordial germ cells from their random positions before gastrulation to form two cell clusters on either side of the midline by the end of the first day of development. To obtain information on the origin of the positional cues provided to the germ cells by somatic tissues during their migration, we analyzed the migration pattern in mutants, including spadetail, swirl, chordino, floating head, cloche, knypek and no isthmus. In mutants with defects in axial structures, paraxial mesoderm or dorsoventral patterning, we find that certain steps of the migration process are specifically affected. We show that the paraxial mesoderm is important for providing proper anteroposterior information to the migrating primordial germ cells and that these cells can respond to changes in the global dorsoventral coordinates. In certain mutants, we observe accumulation of ectopic cells in different regions of the embryo. These ectopic cells can retain both morphological and molecular characteristics of primordial germ cells, suggesting that, in

  2. Quantitative assessment of early biomechanical modifications in diabetic foot patients: the role of foot kinematics and step width.

    PubMed

    Lamola, Giuseppe; Venturi, Martina; Martelli, Dario; Iacopi, Elisabetta; Fanciullacci, Chiara; Coppelli, Alberto; Rossi, Bruno; Piaggesi, Alberto; Chisari, Carmelo

    2015-11-09

    Forefoot ulcers (FU) are one of the most disabling and relevant chronic complications of diabetes mellitus (DM). In recent years there is emerging awareness that a better understanding of the biomechanical factors underlying the diabetic ulcer could lead to improve the management of the disease, with significant socio-economic impacts. Our purpose was to try to detect early biomechanical factors associated with disease progression. Thirty subjects (M/F: 22/8; mean age ± SD: 61,84 ± 10 years) with diagnosis of type II DM were included. The participants were divided into 3 groups (10 subjects per group) according to the stage of evolution of the disease: Group 1, subjects with newly diagnosed type II DM, without clinical or instrumental diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) nor FU (group called "DM"); Group 2, with DPN but without FU (group called "DPN"); Group 3, with DPN and FU (group called "DNU"). All subjects underwent 3-D Gait Analysis during walking at self-selected speed, measuring spatio-temporal, kinematic and kinetic parameters and focusing on ankle and foot joints. The comparative analysis of values between groups was performed using 1-way ANOVA. We also investigated group to group differences with Tukey HSD test. The results taken into consideration were those with a significance of P < 0,05. 95 % confidence interval was also calculated. A progressive and significant trend of reduction of ROM in flexion-extension of the metatarso-phalangeal joint (P = 0.0038) and increasing of step width (P = 0.0265) with the advance of the disease was evident, with a statistically significant difference comparing subjects with recently diagnosed diabetes mellitus and subjects with diabetic neuropathy and foot ulcer (P = 0.0048 for ROM and P = 0.0248 for step width at Tukey's test). The results provide evidence that foot segmental kinematics, along with step width, can be proposed as simple and clear indicators of disease progression. This

  3. Steps to Enhance Early Recovery After Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Lessons Learned From a Physical Activity Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Eileen Danaher; Peters, Tara; Patel, Pritesh; Rondelli, Damiano

    This pilot study tested and refined a free-living physical activity intervention. The investigators evaluated the acceptability and feasibility of the intervention after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and determined preliminary effects on physical activity, fatigue, muscle strength, functional ability, and quality of life. This pilot study used a 1-group, pretest-posttest design. The free-living physical activity intervention consisted of an education component and 6 weeks of gradually increasing physical activity after discharge from the hospital. The intervention was designed to increase steps by 10% weekly. Subjects were assessed before transplantation and during the seventh week after discharge from the hospital after completing the intervention. Pretest-posttest scores were analyzed with paired t tests. Subject wore the physical activity tracker for an average of 38 of 42 days and met their physical activity goals 57% of the time. Subjects reported significantly less physical fatigue after the free-living physical activity intervention compared with baseline (P = .05). Improvements in quality of life approached significance (P = .06). The findings demonstrate that the free-living physical activity intervention implemented during the very early recovery period after transplantation is feasible and acceptable. The intervention potentially reduces fatigue and improves quality of life. The positive results must be interpreted cautiously given the pilot nature of the study. The evidence supports continued investigation.

  4. LESSONS LEARNED AND NEXT STEPS FOR BUILDING KNOWLEDGE ABOUT TRIBAL MATERNAL, INFANT, AND EARLY CHILDHOOD HOME VISITING.

    PubMed

    Whitmore, Corrie B; Sarche, Michelle; Ferron, Cathy; Moritsugu, John; Sanchez, Jenae G

    2018-05-16

    Authors in this Special Issue of the Infant Mental Health Journal shared the work of the first three cohorts of Tribal Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) grantees funded by the Administration for Children and Families. Since 2010, Tribal MIECHV grantees have served families and children prenatally to kindergarten entry in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities across the lower 48 United States and Alaska. Articles highlighted challenges and opportunities that arose as grantees adapted, enhanced, implemented, and evaluated their home-visiting models. This article summarizes nine lessons learned across the articles in this Special Issue. Lessons learned address the importance of strengths-based approaches, relationship-building, tribal community stakeholder involvement, capacity-building, alignment of resources and expectations, tribal values, adaptation to increase cultural and contextual attunement, indigenous ways of knowing, community voice, and sustainability. Next steps in Tribal MIECHV are discussed in light of these lessons learned. © 2018 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  5. FOXL2 activates P450 aromatase gene transcription: towards a better characterization of the early steps of mammalian ovarian development.

    PubMed

    Pannetier, Maëlle; Fabre, Stéphane; Batista, Frank; Kocer, Ayhan; Renault, Lauriane; Jolivet, Geneviève; Mandon-Pépin, Béatrice; Cotinot, Corinne; Veitia, Reiner; Pailhoux, Eric

    2006-06-01

    Previous studies have equated FOXL2 as a crucial actor in the ovarian differentiation process in different vertebrate species. Its transcriptional extinction in the polled intersex syndrome (PIS) leads primarily to a drastic decrease of aromatase (CYP19) expression in the first steps of goat ovarian development. In this study, we provide a better characterization of early ovarian development in goat, and we provide experimental evidence demonstrating that FOXL2 represents a direct transcriptional activator of the CYP19 gene through its ovarian-specific promoter 2. Moreover, the ovarian location of FOXL2 and CYP19 proteins, together with their expression profiles in the female gonads, stress the involvement of FOXL2 co-factor(s) for regulating CYP19 transcription. Expressional analyses show that activin-betaA can be considered as a strong candidate for being one of these FOXL2 co-factors. Finally, we discuss evidence for a role of activin and estrogens in somatic and germinal cell proliferation occurring before germ cell meiosis. This period, of 20 days in goat, seems to have no equivalent in mouse. This species-specific difference could explain the phenotype discrepancy observed between XX goat PIS(-/-) and XX mouse Foxl2(-/-).

  6. Eschar removal by bromelain based enzymatic debridement (Nexobrid®) in burns: An European consensus.

    PubMed

    Hirche, Christoph; Citterio, Antonella; Hoeksema, Henk; Koller, Ján; Lehner, Martina; Martinez, José Ramón; Monstrey, Stan; Murray, Alexandra; Plock, Jan A; Sander, Frank; Schulz, Alexandra; Ziegler, Benjamin; Kneser, Ulrich

    2017-12-01

    Early debridement and/or eschar removal is regarded as a significant step in the treatment of deep partial and full thickness burns. It aims to control wound bioburden and allows early wound closure by conservative treatment or skin grafting. Preservation of viable dermis accompanied by early wound closure, is regarded as a necessary step to reduce scar related complication, e.g. functional limitations and/or unaesthetic scar formation. Aside from the classical techniques of surgical excision as tangential excision for eschar removal, hydro-surgery, maggot therapy, laser, enzymatic debridement have been described as additional techniques in the burn surgeon's armamentarium. It is widely accepted that early eschar removal within 72h improves the outcome of burn wound treatment by reducing bacterial wound colonization, infection and length of hospital stay. In contrast, the right technique for eschar removal is still a matter of debate. There is increasing evidence that enzymatic debridement is a powerful tool to remove eschar in burn wounds, reducing blood loss, the need for autologous skin grafting and the number of wounds requiring surgical excision. In order to assess the role and clinical advantages of enzymatic debridement by a mixture of proteolytic enzymes enriched in Bromelain (Nexobrid ® ) beyond the scope of the literature and in view of users' experience, a European Consensus Meeting was scheduled. The aim was to provide statements for application, based on the mutual experience of applying enzymatic debridement in more than 500 adult and pediatric patients by the consensus panelists. Issues to be addressed were: indications, pain management and anesthesia, timing of application, technique of application, after-intervention care, skin grafting after enzymatic debridement, blood loss, training strategies and learning curve and areas of future research needs. Sixty-eight (68) consensus statements were provided for the use of enzymatic debridement. The

  7. The Next Step in Understanding Impaired Reactive Balance Control in People With Stroke: The Role of Defective Early Automatic Postural Responses.

    PubMed

    de Kam, Digna; Roelofs, Jolanda M B; Bruijnes, Amber K B D; Geurts, Alexander C H; Weerdesteyn, Vivian

    2017-08-01

    Postural muscle responses are often impaired after stroke. We aimed to identify the contribution of deficits in very early postural responses to poorer reactive balance capacity, with a particular focus on reactive stepping as a key strategy for avoiding falls. A total of 34 chronic stroke survivors and 17 controls were subjected to translational balance perturbations in 4 directions. We identified the highest perturbation intensity that could be recovered without stepping (single stepping threshold [SST]) and with maximally 1 step (multiple stepping threshold [MST]). We determined onset latencies and response amplitudes of 7 leg muscles bilaterally and identified associations with balance capacity. People with stroke had a lower MST than controls in all directions. Side steps resulted in a higher lateral MST than crossover steps but were less common toward the paretic side. Postural responses were delayed and smaller in amplitude on the paretic side only. We observed the strongest associations between gluteus medius (GLUT) onset and amplitude and MST toward the paretic side ( R 2 = 0.33). Electromyographic variables were rather weakly associated with forward and backward MSTs ( R 2 = 0.10-0.22) and with SSTs ( R 2 = 0.08-0.15). Delayed and reduced paretic postural responses are associated with impaired reactive stepping after stroke. Particularly, fast and vigorous activity of the GLUT is imperative for overcoming large sideways perturbations, presumably because it facilitates the effective use of side steps. Because people with stroke often fall toward the paretic side, this finding indicates an important target for training.

  8. Fucoidan promotes early step of cardiac differentiation from human embryonic stem cells and long-term maintenance of beating areas.

    PubMed

    Hamidi, Sofiane; Letourneur, Didier; Aid-Launais, Rachida; Di Stefano, Antonio; Vainchenker, William; Norol, Françoise; Le Visage, Catherine

    2014-04-01

    Somatic stem cells require specific niches and three-dimensional scaffolds provide ways to mimic this microenvironment. Here, we studied a scaffold based on Fucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide known to influence morphogen gradients during embryonic development, to support human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) differentiation toward the cardiac lineage. A macroporous (pore 200 μm) Fucoidan scaffold was selected to support hESCs attachment and proliferation. Using a protocol based on the cardiogenic morphogen bone morphogenic protein 2 (BMP2) and transforming growth factor (TGFβ) followed by tumor necrosis factor (TNFα), an effector of cardiopoietic priming, we examined the cardiac differentiation in the scaffold compared to culture dishes and embryoid bodies (EBs). At day 8, Fucoidan scaffolds supported a significantly higher expression of the 3 genes encoding for transcription factors marking the early step of embryonic cardiac differentiation NKX2.5 (p<0.05), MEF2C (p<0.01), and GATA4 (p<0.01), confirmed by flow cytometry analysis for MEF2C and NKX2.5. The ability of Fucoidan scaffolds to locally concentrate and slowly release TGFβ and TNFα was confirmed by Luminex technology. We also found that Fucoidan scaffolds supported the late stage of embryonic cardiac differentiation marked by a significantly higher atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) expression (p<0.001), although only rare beating areas were observed. We postulated that absence of mechanical stress in the soft hydrogel impaired sarcomere formation, as confirmed by molecular analysis of the cardiac muscle myosin MYH6 and immunohistological staining of sarcomeric α-actinin. Nevertheless, Fucoidan scaffolds contributed to the development of thin filaments connecting beating areas through promotion of smooth muscle cells, thus enabling maintenance of beating areas for up to 6 months. In conclusion, Fucoidan scaffolds appear as a very promising biomaterial to control cardiac differentiation from hESCs that

  9. The neuroregenerative mechanism mediated by the Hsp90-binding immunophilin FKBP52 resembles the early steps of neuronal differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Quintá, HR; Galigniana, MD

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The immunosuppressive macrolide FK506 (tacrolimus) shows neuroregenerative action by a mechanism that appears to involve the Hsp90-binding immunophilin FKBP52. This study analyses some aspects of the early steps of neuronal differentiation and neuroregeneration. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Undifferentiated murine neuroblastoma cells and hippocampal neurones isolated from embryonic day-17 rat embryos were induced to differentiate with FK506. Subcellular relocalization of FKBP52, Hsp90 and its co-chaperone p23 was analysed by indirect immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and by Western blots of axonal fractions isolated from cells grown on a porous transwell cell culture chamber. Neuroregeneration was evaluated using a scratch-wound assay. KEY RESULTS In undifferentiated cells, FKBP52, Hsp90 and p23 are located in the cell nucleus, forming an annular structure that disassembles when the differentiation process is triggered by FK506. This was observed in the N2a cell line and in hippocampal neurones. More importantly, the annular structure of chaperones is reassembled after damaging the neurones, whereas FK506 prompts their rapid regeneration, a process linked to the subcellular redistribution of the heterocomplex. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS There is a direct relationship between the disassembly of the chaperone complex and the progression of neuronal differentiation upon stimulation with the immunophilin ligand FK506. Both neuronal differentiation and neuroregeneration appear to be mechanistically linked, so the elucidation of one mechanism may lead to unravel the properties of the other. This study also implies that the discovery of FK506 derivatives, devoid of immunosuppressive action, would be therapeutically significant for neurotrophic use. PMID:22091865

  10. Nup153 and Nup98 bind the HIV-1 core and contribute to the early steps of HIV-1 replication

    SciT

    Di Nunzio, Francesca, E-mail: francesca.di-nunzio@pasteur.fr; Fricke, Thomas; Miccio, Annarita

    The early steps of HIV-1 replication involve the entry of HIV-1 into the nucleus, which is characterized by viral interactions with nuclear pore components. HIV-1 developed an evolutionary strategy to usurp the nuclear pore machinery and chromatin in order to integrate and efficiently express viral genes. In the current work, we studied the role of nucleoporins 153 and 98 (Nup153 and Nup98) in infection of human Jurkat lymphocytes by HIV-1. We showed that Nup153-depleted cells exhibited a defect in nuclear import, while depletion of Nup 98 caused a slight defect in HIV integration. To explore the biochemical viral determinants formore » the requirement of Nup153 and Nup98 during HIV-1 infection, we tested the ability of these nucleoporins to interact with HIV-1 cores. Our findings showed that both nucleoporins bind HIV-1 cores suggesting that this interaction is important for HIV-1 nuclear import and/or integration. Distribution analysis of integration sites in Nup153-depleted cells revealed a reduced tendency of HIV-1 to integrate in intragenic sites, which in part could account for the large infectivity defect observed in Nup153-depleted cells. Our work strongly supports a role for Nup153 in HIV-1 nuclear import and integration. - Highlights: ► We studied the role of Nup98 and Nup153 in HIV-1 infection. ► Nup98 binds the HIV-1 core and is involved in HIV-1 integration. ► Nup153 binds the HIV-1 core and is involved in HIV-1 nuclear import. ► Depletion of Nup153 decreased the integration of HIV-1 in transcriptionally active sites.« less

  11. Views of Teachers, Parents, and Counselors toward the Preschool Version of First Step to Success Early Intervention Program (FSS-PSV) in Preventing Antisocial Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çolak, Aysun; Tomris, Gözde; Diken, Ibrahim H.; Arikan, Arzu; Aksoy, Funda; Çelik, Seçil

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to describe the views of teachers, parents, and FSS-PSV counselors on the Preschool Version of First Step to Success Early Intervention Program (FSS-PSV) in preventing antisocial behaviors; in addition, the implementation process and contributions from the program will also be outlined. The study was conducted in six different…

  12. [Methods for enzymatic determination of triglycerides in liver homogenates].

    PubMed

    Höhn, H; Gartzke, J; Burck, D

    1987-10-01

    An enzymatic method is described for the determination of triacylglycerols in liver homogenate. In contrast to usual methods, higher reliability and selectivity are achieved by omitting the extraction step.

  13. Effectiveness of the Preschool Version of the First Step to Success Early Intervention Program for Preventing Antisocial Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çelik, Seçil; Arikan, Azru; Diken, Ibrahim H.; Aksoy, Funda; Çolak, Aysun; Tomris, Gözde

    2016-01-01

    Preventing antisocial behaviors appearing at an early age--before they become chronic--through effective early intervention programs, has become an important issue in recent years. In Turkey, the increase in the number of children at risk of antisocial behavior makes it necessary to get these behaviors under control at an early age through some…

  14. Direct growth of metal-organic frameworks thin film arrays on glassy carbon electrode based on rapid conversion step mediated by copper clusters and hydroxide nanotubes for fabrication of a high performance non-enzymatic glucose sensing platform.

    PubMed

    Shahrokhian, Saeed; Khaki Sanati, Elnaz; Hosseini, Hadi

    2018-07-30

    The direct growth of self-supported metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) thin film can be considered as an effective strategy for fabrication of the advanced modified electrodes in sensors and biosensor applications. However, most of the fabricated MOFs-based sensors suffer from some drawbacks such as time consuming for synthesis of MOF and electrode making, need of a binder or an additive layer, need of expensive equipment and use of hazardous solvents. Here, a novel free-standing MOFs-based modified electrode was fabricated by the rapid direct growth of MOFs on the surface of the glassy carbon electrode (GCE). In this method, direct growth of MOFs was occurred by the formation of vertically aligned arrays of Cu clusters and Cu(OH) 2 nanotubes, which can act as both mediator and positioning fixing factor for the rapid formation of self-supported MOFs on GCE surface. The effect of both chemically and electrochemically formed Cu(OH) 2 nanotubes on the morphological and electrochemical performance of the prepared MOFs were investigated. Due to the unique properties of the prepared MOFs thin film electrode such as uniform and vertically aligned structure, excellent stability, high electroactive surface area, and good availability to analyte and electrolyte diffusion, it was directly used as the electrode material for non-enzymatic electrocatalytic oxidation of glucose. Moreover, the potential utility of this sensing platform for the analytical determination of glucose concentration was evaluated by the amperometry technique. The results proved that the self-supported MOFs thin film on GCE is a promising electrode material for fabricating and designing non-enzymatic glucose sensors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Enzymatic modification of schizophyllan

    An enzymatic method was developed for the progressive modification of the polysaccharide schizophyllan. Fungal strains Hypocrea nigricans NRRL 62555, Penicillium crustosum NRRL 62558, and Penicillium simplicissimum NRRL 62550 were previously identified as novel sources of ß-endoglucanase with specif...

  16. Medial knee loading is altered in subjects with early osteoarthritis during gait but not during step-up-and-over task

    PubMed Central

    Wesseling, Mariska; Smith, Colin R.; Thelen, Darryl G.; Verschueren, Sabine; Jonkers, Ilse

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluates knee joint loading during gait and step-up-and-over tasks in control subjects, subjects with early knee OA and those with established knee OA. Thirty-seven subjects with varying degrees of medial compartment knee OA severity (eighteen with early OA and sixteen with established OA), and nineteen healthy controls performed gait and step-up-and-over tasks. Knee joint moments, contact forces (KCF), the magnitude of contact pressures and center of pressure (CoP) location were analyzed for the three groups for both activities using a multi-body knee model with articular cartilage contact, 14 ligaments, and six degrees of freedom tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joints. During gait, the first peak of the medial KCF was significantly higher for patients with early knee OA (p = 0.048) and established knee OA (p = 0.001) compared to control subjects. Furthermore, the medial contact pressure magnitudes and CoP location were significantly different in both groups of patients compared to controls. Knee rotation moments (KRMs) and external rotation angles were significantly higher during early stance in both patient groups (p < 0.0001) compared to controls. During step-up-and-over, there was a high variability between the participants and no significant differences in KCF were observed between the groups. Knee joint loading and kinematics were found to be altered in patients with early knee OA only during gait. This is an indication that an excessive medial KCF and altered loading location, observed in these patients, is a contributor to early progression of knee OA. PMID:29117248

  17. State Initiatives To Promote Early Learning: Next Steps in Coordinating Subsidized Child Care, Head Start, and State Prekindergarten. Full Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumacher, Rachel; Greenberg, Mark; Lombardi, Joan

    While current early education and care funding still reaches only a fraction of preschool children, some states now have considerable experience in coordinating subsidized child care, Head Start, and state prekindergarten initiatives to enhance early education and learning opportunities for young children. Drawing on the experiences of Georgia,…

  18. Photoelectrochemical enzymatic biosensors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei-Wei; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2017-06-15

    Enzymatic biosensors have been valuable bioanalytical devices for analysis of diverse targets in disease diagnosis, biological and biomedical research, etc. Photoelectrochemical (PEC) bioanalysis is a recently emerged method that promptly becoming a subject of new research interests due to its attractive potential for future bioanalysis with high sensitivity and specificity. PEC enzymatic biosensors integrate the inherent sensitivities of PEC bioanalysis and the selectivity of enzymes and thus share their both advantages. Currently, PEC enzymatic biosensors have become a hot topic of significant research and the recent impetus has grown rapidly as demonstrated by increased research papers. Given the pace of advances in this area, this review will make a thorough discussion and survey on the fundamentals, sensing strategies, applications and the state of the art in PEC enzymatic biosensors, followed by future prospects based on our own opinions. We hope this work could provide an accessible introduction to PEC enzymatic biosensors for any scientist. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. First step toward translation of thermophotonic lock-in imaging to dentistry as an early caries detection technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojaghi, Ashkan; Parkhimchyk, Artur; Tabatabaei, Nima

    2016-09-01

    Early detection of the most prevalent oral disease worldwide, i.e., dental caries, still remains as one of the major challenges in dentistry. The current dental standard of care relies on caries detection methods, such as visual inspection and x-ray radiography, which lack the sufficient specificity and sensitivity to detect caries at early stages of formation when they can be healed. We report on the feasibility of early caries detection in a clinically and commercially viable thermophotonic imaging system. The system incorporates intensity-modulated laser light along with a low-cost long-wavelength infrared (LWIR; 8 to 14 μm) camera, providing diagnostic contrast based on the enhanced light absorption of early caries. The LWIR camera is highly suitable for integration into clinical platforms because of its low weight and cost. In addition, through theoretical modeling, we show that LWIR detection enhances the diagnostic contrast due to the minimal LWIR transmittance of enamel and suppression of the masking effect of the direct thermal Planck emission. Diagnostic performance of the system and its detection threshold are experimentally evaluated by monitoring the inception and progression of artificially induced occlusal and smooth surface caries. The results are suggestive of the suitability of the developed LWIR system for detecting early dental caries.

  20. First S.T.E.P.: A Model for the Early Identification of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koegel, Lynn Kern; Koegel, Robert L.; Nefdt, Nicolette; Fredeen, Rosy; Klein, Eileen F.; Bruinsma, Yvonne E. M.

    2005-01-01

    Even though children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can be reliably identified by autism experts at 18 months, and the majority of parents report symptoms before age 2, the average age of diagnosis for children with autism in the United States is 3 to 4 years of age. Early identification is especially vital given the growing amount of…

  1. A Practice-Based Evaluation of Barnardo's Forward Steps Early Intervention Programme for Children Diagnosed with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braiden, Hannah Jane; McDaniel, Benny; McCrudden, Eunan; Janes, Michele; Crozier, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    This study used a pre-experimental and post-experimental design to evaluate a TEACCH-based Early Intervention Programme. Thirty-one parents of 18 preschool children recently diagnosed with an Autistic Spectrum Disorder attended the eight-week programme delivered by trained facilitators. Parents completed pre-intervention and post-intervention…

  2. Printing enzymatic reactions.

    PubMed

    Tian, Junfei; Shen, Wei

    2011-02-07

    We used relief and planographic printing methods to print the catalytic effect of an enzyme, but not the enzyme molecules, onto paper. Printing enzymatic reactions have applications in bioactive papers, low-cost diagnostics, anti-counterfeiting devices and advanced packaging materials. These methods can create novel printing effects on commodity surfaces for advanced applications.

  3. Enzymatic DNA molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Gerald F. (Inventor); Breaker, Ronald R. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention discloses deoxyribonucleic acid enzymes--catalytic or enzymatic DNA molecules--capable of cleaving nucleic acid sequences or molecules, particularly RNA, in a site-specific manner, as well as compositions including same. Methods of making and using the disclosed enzymes and compositions are also disclosed.

  4. Apoptosis induced in an early step of African swine fever virus entry into vero cells does not require virus replication.

    PubMed

    Carrascosa, Angel L; Bustos, María J; Nogal, María L; González de Buitrago, Gonzalo; Revilla, Yolanda

    2002-03-15

    Permissive Vero cells develop apoptosis, as characterized by DNA fragmentation, caspases activation, cytosolic release of mitochondrial cytochrome c, and flow cytometric analysis of DNA content, upon infection with African swine fever virus (ASFV). To determine the step in virus replication that triggers apoptosis, we used UV-inactivated virus, inhibitors of protein and nucleic acid synthesis, and lysosomotropic drugs that block virus uncoating. ASFV-induced apoptosis was accompanied by caspase-3 activation, which was detected even in the presence of either cytosine arabinoside or cycloheximide, indicating that viral DNA replication and protein synthesis were not required to activate the apoptotic process. The activation of caspase-3 was released from chloroquine inhibition 2 h after virus absorption, while the infection with UV-inactivated ASFV did not induce the activation of the caspase cascade. We conclude that ASFV induces apoptosis in the infected cell by an intracellular pathway probably triggered during the process of virus uncoating.

  5. The early steps of chloroform anaesthesia in Turkey during the Ottoman Empire in the 19th century.

    PubMed

    Ulman, Yesim Isil

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study was to research the pioneering steps for the employment of chloroform in Turkey in comparison with the developments in the West i.e. in the United States and in Europe. The development of anaesthesiology in the West started in the first half of the 19th century. As an anaesthetic substance, ether was first employed in a medical operation by R. Liston in December 1846. But taking into consideration of its bronchially irritant effect, British gynaecologist Dr. J.Y. Simpson preferred to utilize chloroform in obstetrical operations in 1847. The paper aims at shedding light on the earlier steps for modern anaesthesiology in Turkey in that sense. The survey used evaluation of archival documents, first hand-original sources such as the annual medical reports of the Medical School, books, official journals, and newspapers of the time, and also secondary sources concerned with the subject. In view of the findings of the survey, chloroform, as an anaesthetic material, began to be administered surgically in Turkey much earlier than it was already known. It was experienced and used in operations at the surgical clinic of the Imperial School of Medicine at the Capital city, Istanbul in 1848. The Crimean War (1853-1855) induced to the prevalent surgical use of chloroform in Istanbul on the soldiers back from the front. In other words, it was evidenced that surgeons started to make use of this anaesthetic substance in the Ottoman Empire, shortly after it was put into medical practice in Europe. This study deals with that phenomenal progress of chloroform anaesthesia in the medical history in Turkey during the second half of the 19th century.

  6. Single microfilaments mediate the early steps of microtubule bundling during preprophase band formation in onion cotyledon epidermal cells

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Miyuki; Karahara, Ichirou; Kajimura, Naoko; Takaoka, Akio; Murata, Kazuyoshi; Misaki, Kazuyo; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Staehelin, L. Andrew; Mineyuki, Yoshinobu

    2016-01-01

    The preprophase band (PPB) is a cytokinetic apparatus that determines the site of cell division in plants. It originates as a broad band of microtubules (MTs) in G2 and narrows to demarcate the future division site during late prophase. Studies with fluorescent probes have shown that PPBs contain F-actin during early stages of their development but become actin depleted in late prophase. Although this suggests that actins contribute to the early stages of PPB formation, how actins contribute to PPB-MT organization remains unsolved. To address this question, we used electron tomography to investigate the spatial relationship between microfilaments (MFs) and MTs at different stages of PPB assembly in onion cotyledon epidermal cells. We demonstrate that the PPB actins observed by fluorescence microscopy correspond to short, single MFs. A majority of the MFs are bound to MTs, with a subset forming MT-MF-MT bridging structures. During the later stages of PPB assembly, the MF-mediated links between MTs are displaced by MT-MT linkers as the PPB MT arrays mature into tightly packed MT bundles. On the basis of these observations, we propose that the primary function of actins during PPB formation is to mediate the initial bundling of the PPB MTs. PMID:27053663

  7. Functionally Redundant RXLR Effectors from Phytophthora infestans Act at Different Steps to Suppress Early flg22-Triggered Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Fraiture, Malou; Liu, Xiaoyu; Boevink, Petra C.; Gilroy, Eleanor M.; Chen, Ying; Kandel, Kabindra; Sessa, Guido; Birch, Paul R. J.; Brunner, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Genome sequences of several economically important phytopathogenic oomycetes have revealed the presence of large families of so-called RXLR effectors. Functional screens have identified RXLR effector repertoires that either compromise or induce plant defense responses. However, limited information is available about the molecular mechanisms underlying the modes of action of these effectors in planta. The perception of highly conserved pathogen- or microbe-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs/MAMPs), such as flg22, triggers converging signaling pathways recruiting MAP kinase cascades and inducing transcriptional re-programming, yielding a generic anti-microbial response. We used a highly synchronizable, pathogen-free protoplast-based assay to identify a set of RXLR effectors from Phytophthora infestans (PiRXLRs), the causal agent of potato and tomato light blight that manipulate early stages of flg22-triggered signaling. Of thirty-three tested PiRXLR effector candidates, eight, called Suppressor of early Flg22-induced Immune response (SFI), significantly suppressed flg22-dependent activation of a reporter gene under control of a typical MAMP-inducible promoter (pFRK1-Luc) in tomato protoplasts. We extended our analysis to Arabidopsis thaliana, a non-host plant species of P. infestans. From the aforementioned eight SFI effectors, three appeared to share similar functions in both Arabidopsis and tomato by suppressing transcriptional activation of flg22-induced marker genes downstream of post-translational MAP kinase activation. A further three effectors interfere with MAMP signaling at, or upstream of, the MAP kinase cascade in tomato, but not in Arabidopsis. Transient expression of the SFI effectors in Nicotiana benthamiana enhances susceptibility to P. infestans and, for the most potent effector, SFI1, nuclear localization is required for both suppression of MAMP signaling and virulence function. The present study provides a framework to decipher the molecular

  8. Impact of early initiation versus national standard of care of antiretroviral therapy in Swaziland's public sector health system: study protocol for a stepped-wedge randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Fiona J; Bärnighausen, Till; Delva, Wim; Fleming, Yvette; Khumalo, Gavin; Lejeune, Charlotte L; Mazibuko, Sikhathele; Mlambo, Charmaine Khudzie; Reis, Ria; Spiegelman, Donna; Zwane, Mandisa; Okello, Velephi

    2017-08-18

    There is robust clinical evidence to support offering early access to antiretroviral treatment (ART) to all HIV-positive individuals, irrespective of disease stage, to both improve patient health outcomes and reduce HIV incidence. However, as the global treatment guidelines shift to meet this evidence, it is still largely unknown if early access to ART for all (also referred to as "treatment as prevention" or "universal test and treat") is a feasible intervention in the resource-limited countries where this approach could have the biggest impact on the course of the HIV epidemics. The MaxART Early Access to ART for All (EAAA) implementation study was designed to determine the feasibility, acceptability, clinical outcomes, affordability, and scalability of offering early antiretroviral treatment to all HIV-positive individuals in Swaziland's public sector health system. This is a three-year stepped-wedge randomized design with open enrollment for all adults aged 18 years and older across 14 government-managed health facilities in Swaziland's Hhohho Region. Primary endpoints are retention and viral suppression. Secondary endpoints include ART initiation, adherence, drug resistance, tuberculosis, HIV disease progression, patient satisfaction, and cost per patient per year. Sites are grouped to transition two at a time from the control (standard of care) to intervention (EAAA) stage at each four-month step. This design will result in approximately one half of the total observation time to accrue in the intervention arm and the other half in the control arm. Our estimated enrolment number, which is supported by conservative power calculations, is 4501 patients over the course of the 36-month study period. A multidisciplinary, mixed-methods approach will be adopted to supplement the randomized controlled trial and meet the study aims. Additional study components include implementation science, social science, economic evaluation, and predictive HIV incidence modeling. A

  9. Evidence for a direct effect of captopril on early steps of insulin action in BC3H-1 myocytes.

    PubMed

    Moisés, Regina S; Carvalho, Carla R O; Shiota, Debora; Saad, Mario J A

    2003-03-01

    Captopril, an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, has been reported to improve insulin sensitivity. However, despite extensive investigation, the mechanisms responsible for this effect are not fully understood. Reduction of plasma angiotensin II and inhibition of kininase II have been suggested to contribute to improve insulin sensitivity. Insulin binding was measured at tracer insulin concentration in intact cells with or without captopril treatment. Specific binding, expressed as percent of total insulin added, was not different in control and captopril-treated cells. However, captopril treatment caused an increase in insulin-induced insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) phosphorylation accompanied by an increased association of IRS-1 with phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI-3 kinase), despite no change on insulin receptor (IR) autophosphorylation. There was also an increased threonine kinase B (AKT) phosphorylation in captopril-treated cells followed by enhanced basal and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. These results indicate that captopril treatment has a direct effect on early phosphorylation events induced by insulin in BC3H-1 myocytes. Copyright 2003, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  10. Walking the Line: A Fibronectin Fiber-Guided Assay to Probe Early Steps of (Lymph)angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mitsi, Maria; Schulz, Martin Michael Peter; Gousopoulos, Epameinondas; Ochsenbein, Alexandra Michaela; Detmar, Michael; Vogel, Viola

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis are highly complex morphogenetic processes, central to many physiological and pathological conditions, including development, cancer metastasis, inflammation and wound healing. While it is described that extracellular matrix (ECM) fibers are involved in the spatiotemporal regulation of angiogenesis, current angiogenesis assays are not specifically designed to dissect and quantify the underlying molecular mechanisms of how the fibrillar nature of ECM regulates vessel sprouting. Even less is known about the role of the fibrillar ECM during the early stages of lymphangiogenesis. To address such questions, we introduced here an in vitro (lymph)angiogenesis assay, where we used microbeads coated with endothelial cells as simple sprouting sources and deposited them on single Fn fibers used as substrates to mimic fibrillar ECM. The fibers were deposited on a transparent substrate, suitable for live microscopic observation of the ensuing cell outgrowth events at the single cell level. Our proof-of-concept studies revealed that fibrillar Fn, compared to Fn-coated surfaces, provides far stronger sprouting and guidance cues to endothelial cells, independent of the tested mechanical strains of the Fn fibers. Additionally, we found that VEGF-A, but not VEGF-C, stimulates the collective outgrowth of lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC), while the collective outgrowth of blood vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC) was prominent even in the absence of these angiogenic factors. In addition to the findings presented here, the modularity of our assay allows for the use of different ECM or synthetic fibers as substrates, as well as of other cell types, thus expanding the range of applications in vascular biology and beyond. PMID:26689200

  11. Asymmetrical, inversely graded, upstream-migrating cyclic steps in marine settings: Late Miocene-early Pliocene Fish Creek-Vallecito Basin, southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Chenglin; Chen, Liuqin; West, Logan

    2017-10-01

    Cyclic steps are ubiquitous in modern sedimentary environments, yet their recognition remains sparse in the rock record. Here, we interpret three sets of undulating backsets (1 to 3) recognized in the late Miocene-early Pliocene Latrania Formation in the Anza-Borrego Desert, the Fish Creek-Vallecito Basin, southern California, USA as the first cm- to dm-scale outcrop record of cyclic steps, based on asymmetrical cross-sections, upstream migration, and inversely graded laminae. Upstream migration and asymmetrical cross-sections of backsets and concomitant backset laminae are attributed to supercritical-to-subcritical flow transitions through weak hydraulic jumps, which are composed of: (i) thin (tens of centimetres) and slower (reported as flow velocities (Ū) of 0.45 to 1.45 m s- 1, with mean value of Ū = 0.89 m s- 1) subcritical (represented by internal Froude numbers (Fr) of 0.67 to 0.99, with mean value of Fr = 0.84) turbidity currents on the stoss sides, and (ii) thin (tens of centimetres) and faster (reported as Ū of 0.99 to 4.03 m s- 1, with mean value of Ū = 2.24 m s- 1) supercritical (represented by Fr of 1.84 to 3.07, with mean value of Fr = 2.42) turbidity flows on the lee sides. The inversely graded laminae in the troughs of backsets are 2 to 5 cm thick, and consist of two discrete divisions: (i) 1 to 2 cm thick, lower finer-grained divisions made up of parallel laminated siltstones, overlain by very fine- to fine-grained sandstones, and (ii) 2 to 3 cm thick, upper divisions composed of medium- to coarse-grained sandstones, with sporadic occurrence of subrounded pebbles. These inversely graded laminae are related to stratified, collisional and/or frictional traction carpets under conditions of high fall-out rates. Due to the poor preservation potential of cyclic steps, the rock record of cyclic steps is generally considered to be rare. The present outcrop-based study presents a detailed analysis of sedimentary facies, growth patterns, and flow

  12. A Networks Approach to Modeling Enzymatic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Imhof, P

    2016-01-01

    Modeling enzymatic reactions is a demanding task due to the complexity of the system, the many degrees of freedom involved and the complex, chemical, and conformational transitions associated with the reaction. Consequently, enzymatic reactions are not determined by precisely one reaction pathway. Hence, it is beneficial to obtain a comprehensive picture of possible reaction paths and competing mechanisms. By combining individually generated intermediate states and chemical transition steps a network of such pathways can be constructed. Transition networks are a discretized representation of a potential energy landscape consisting of a multitude of reaction pathways connecting the end states of the reaction. The graph structure of the network allows an easy identification of the energetically most favorable pathways as well as a number of alternative routes. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Implications of a two-step procedure in surgical management of patients with early-stage endometrioid endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bleu, Géraldine; Merlot, Benjamin; Boulanger, Loïc; Vinatier, Denis; Kerdraon, Olivier; Collinet, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Objective Since European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) recommendations and French guidelines, pelvic lymphadenectomy should not be systematically performed for women with early-stage endometrioid endometrial cancer (EEC) preoperatively assessed at presumed low- or intermediate-risk. The aim of our study was to evaluate the change of our surgical practices after ESMO recommendations, and to evaluate the rate and morbidity of second surgical procedure in case of understaging after the first surgery. Methods This retrospective single-center study included women with EEC preoperatively assessed at presumed low- or intermediate-risk who had surgery between 2006 and 2013. Two periods were defined the times before and after ESMO recommendations. Demographics characteristics, surgical management, operative morbidity, and rate of understaging were compared. The rate of second surgical procedure required for lymph node resection during the second period and its morbidity were also studied. Results Sixty-one and sixty-two patients were operated for EEC preoperatively assessed at presumed low-or intermediate-risk before and after ESMO recommendations, respectively. Although immediate pelvic lymphadenectomy was performed more frequently during the first period than the second period (88.5% vs. 19.4%; p<0.001), the rate of postoperative risk-elevating or upstaging were comparable between the two periods (31.1% vs. 27.4%; p=0.71). Among the patients requiring second surgical procedure during the second period (21.0%), 30.8% did not undergo the second surgery due to their comorbidity or old age. For the patients who underwent second surgical procedure, mean operative time of the second procedure was 246.1±117.8 minutes. Third operation was required in 33.3% of them because of postoperative complications. Conclusion Since ESMO recommendations, second surgical procedure for lymph node resection is often required for women with EEC presumed at low- or intermediate-risk. This

  14. Enzymatic temperature change indicator

    DOEpatents

    Klibanov, Alexander M.; Dordick, Jonathan S.

    1989-01-21

    A temperature change indicator is described which is composed of an enzyme and a substrate for that enzyme suspended in a solid organic solvent or mixture of solvents as a support medium. The organic solvent or solvents are chosen so as to melt at a specific temperature or in a specific temperature range. When the temperature of the indicator is elevated above the chosen, or critical temperature, the solid organic solvent support will melt, and the enzymatic reaction will occur, producing a visually detectable product which is stable to further temperature variation.

  15. Enzymatic cascade bioreactor

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, Blake A.; Volponi, Joanne V.; Ingersoll, David; Walker, Andrew

    2007-09-04

    Disclosed is an apparatus and method for continuously converting sucrose to .beta.-D-glucose. The method comprises a three stage enzymatic reactor in which an aqueous solution of sucrose is first converted into a solution of fructose and .alpha.-D-glucose by passing it through a porous, packed column containing an inert media on which invertase is immobilized. This solution is then sent through a second packed column containing glucose isomerase and finally a third packed column containing mutarotase. Solution temperature and pH are adjusted to maximize glucose output.

  16. Next Step for STEP

    SciT

    Wood, Claire; Bremner, Brenda

    2013-08-09

    The Siletz Tribal Energy Program (STEP), housed in the Tribe’s Planning Department, will hire a data entry coordinator to collect, enter, analyze and store all the current and future energy efficiency and renewable energy data pertaining to administrative structures the tribe owns and operates and for homes in which tribal members live. The proposed data entry coordinator will conduct an energy options analysis in collaboration with the rest of the Siletz Tribal Energy Program and Planning Department staff. An energy options analysis will result in a thorough understanding of tribal energy resources and consumption, if energy efficiency and conservation measuresmore » being implemented are having the desired effect, analysis of tribal energy loads (current and future energy consumption), and evaluation of local and commercial energy supply options. A literature search will also be conducted. In order to educate additional tribal members about renewable energy, we will send four tribal members to be trained to install and maintain solar panels, solar hot water heaters, wind turbines and/or micro-hydro.« less

  17. Modelling Tethered Enzymatic Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis Salas, Citlali; Goyette, Jesse; Coker-Gordon, Nicola; Bridge, Marcus; Isaacson, Samuel; Allard, Jun; Maini, Philip; Dushek, Omer

    Enzymatic reactions are key to cell functioning, and whilst much work has been done in protein interaction in cases where diffusion is possible, interactions of tethered proteins are poorly understood. Yet, because of the large role cell membranes play in enzymatic reactions, several reactions may take place where one of the proteins is bound to a fixed point in space. We develop a model to characterize tethered signalling between the phosphatase SHP-1 interacting with a tethered, phosphorylated protein. We compare our model to experimental data obtained using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). We show that a single SPR experiment recovers 5 independent biophysical/biochemical constants. We also compare the results between a three dimensional model and a two dimensional model. The work gives the opportunity to use known techniques to learn more about signalling processes, and new insights into how enzyme tethering alters cellular signalling. With support from the Mexican Council for Science and Technology (CONACyT), the Public Education Secretariat (SEP), and the Mexican National Autonomous University's Foundation (Fundacion UNAM).

  18. Revealing Early Steps of α2β1 Integrin-mediated Adhesion to Collagen Type I by Using Single-Cell Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Taubenberger, Anna; Cisneros, David A.; Friedrichs, Jens; Puech, Pierre-Henri; Muller, Daniel J.

    2007-01-01

    We have characterized early steps of α2β1 integrin-mediated cell adhesion to a collagen type I matrix by using single-cell force spectroscopy. In agreement with the role of α2β1 as a collagen type I receptor, α2β1-expressing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-A2 cells spread rapidly on the matrix, whereas α2β1-negative CHO wild-type cells adhered poorly. Probing CHO-A2 cell detachment forces over a contact time range of 600 s revealed a nonlinear adhesion response. During the first 60 s, cell adhesion increased slowly, and forces associated with the smallest rupture events were consistent with the breakage of individual integrin–collagen bonds. Above 60 s, a fraction of cells rapidly switched into an activated adhesion state marked by up to 10-fold increased detachment forces. Elevated overall cell adhesion coincided with a rise of the smallest rupture forces above the value required to break a single-integrin–collagen bond, suggesting a change from single to cooperative receptor binding. Transition into the activated adhesion mode and the increase of the smallest rupture forces were both blocked by inhibitors of actomyosin contractility. We therefore propose a two-step mechanism for the establishment of α2β1-mediated adhesion as weak initial, single-integrin–mediated binding events are superseded by strong adhesive interactions involving receptor cooperativity and actomyosin contractility. PMID:17314408

  19. Effects of Inner Nuclear Membrane Proteins SUN1/UNC-84A and SUN2/UNC-84B on the Early Steps of HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Torsten; Bulli, Lorenzo; Pollpeter, Darja; Betancor, Gilberto; Kutzner, Juliane; Apolonia, Luis; Herold, Nikolas; Burk, Robin; Malim, Michael H

    2017-10-01

    leads to a mild reduction or no effect on infectivity, respectively. We speculate that SUN1/SUN2 may function redundantly in early HIV-1 infection steps and therefore influence HIV-1 replication and pathogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Schaller et al.

  20. Tumor suppression effects of bilberry extracts and enzymatically modified isoquercitrin in early preneoplastic liver cell lesions induced by piperonyl butoxide promotion in a two-stage rat hepatocarcinogenesis model.

    PubMed

    Hara, Shintaro; Morita, Reiko; Ogawa, Takashi; Segawa, Risa; Takimoto, Norifumi; Suzuki, Kazuhiko; Hamadate, Naobumi; Hayashi, Shim-Mo; Odachi, Ayano; Ogiwara, Isao; Shibusawa, Sakae; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the protective effect of bilberry extracts (BBE) and enzymatically modified isoquercitrin (EMIQ) on the hepatocarcinogenic process involving oxidative stress responses, we used a two-stage hepatocarcinogenesis model in N-diethylnitrosamine-initiated and piperonyl butoxide (PBO)-promoted rats. We examined the modifying effect of co-administration with BBE or EMIQ on the liver tissue environment including oxidative stress responses, cell proliferation and apoptosis, and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN)/Akt and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β/Smad signalings on the induction mechanism of preneoplastic lesions during early stages of hepatocellular tumor promotion. PBO increased the numbers and area of glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P)(+) liver cell foci and the numbers of Ki-67(+) proliferating cells within GST-P(+) foci. Co-administration of BBE or EMIQ suppressed these effects with the reductions of GST-P(+) foci (area) to 48.9-49.4% and Ki-67(+) cells to 55.5-61.4% of the PBO-promoted cases. Neither BBE nor EMIQ decreased microsomal reactive oxygen species induced by PBO. However, only EMIQ suppressed the level of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances to 78.4% of the PBO-promoted cases. PBO increased the incidences of phospho-PTEN(-) foci, phospho-Akt substrate(+) foci, phospho-Smad3(-) foci and Smad4(-) foci in GST-P(+) foci. Both BBE and EMIQ decreased the incidences of phospho-PTEN(-) foci in GST-P(+) foci to 59.8-72.2% and Smad4(-) foci to 62.4-71.5% of the PBO-promoted cases, and BBE also suppressed the incidence of phospho-Akt substrate(+) foci in GST-P(+) foci to 75.2-75.7% of the PBO-promoted cases. These results suggest that PBO-induced tumor promotion involves facilitation of PTEN/Akt and disruptive TGF-β/Smad signalings without relation to oxidative stress responses, but this promotion was suppressed by co-treatment with BBE or EMIQ through suppression of cell proliferation activity of preneoplastic liver cells

  1. Metabolism of monoterpenes: early steps in the metabolism of d-neomenthyl-. beta. -D-glucoside in peppermint (Mentha piperita) rhizomes

    SciT

    Croteau, R.; Sood, V.K.; Renstroem, B.

    1984-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that the monoterpene ketone l-(G-/sup 3/H) menthone is reduced to the epimeric alcohols l-menthol and d-neomenthol in leaves of flowering peppermint (Mentha piperita L.), and that a portion of the menthol is converted to methyl acetate while the bulk of the neomenthol is transformed to neomenthyl-..beta..-D-glucoside which is then transported to the rhizome. Analysis of the disposition of l-(G)/sup 3/H)menthone applied to midstem leaves of intact flowering plants allowed the kinetics of synthesis and transport of the monoterpenyl glucoside to be determined, and gave strong indication that the glucoside was subsequently metabolized in the rhizome. Studiesmore » with d-(G-/sup 3/H)neomenthyl-..beta..-D-glucoside as substrate, using excised rhizomes or rhizome segments, confirmed the hydrolysis of the glucoside as an early step in metabolism at this site, and revealed that the terpenoid moiety was further converted to a series of ether-soluble, methanol-soluble, and water-soluble products. The conversion of menthone to the lactone, and of the lactone to more polar products, were confirmed in vivo using l-(G-/sup 3/H)menthone and l-(G-/sup 3/H)-3,4-menthone lactone as substrates. Additional oxidation products were formed in vivo via the desaturation of labeled neomenthol and/or menthone, but none of these transformations appeared to lead to ring opening of the p-menthane skeleton. Each step in the main reaction sequence, from hydrolysis of neomenthyl glucoside to lactonization of menthone, was demonstrated in cell-free extracts from the rhizomes of flowering mint plants. The lactomization step is of particular significance in providing a means of cleaving the p-methane ring to afford an acyclic carbon skeleton that can be further degraded by modifications of the well-known ..beta..-oxidation sequence. 41 references, 3 figures, 1 table.« less

  2. Enzymatic degradation of endomorphins.

    PubMed

    Janecka, Anna; Staniszewska, Renata; Gach, Katarzyna; Fichna, Jakub

    2008-11-01

    Centrally acting plant opiates, such as morphine, are the most frequently used analgesics for the relief of severe pain, even though their undesired side effects are serious limitation to their usefulness. The search for new therapeutics that could replace morphine has been mainly focused on the development of peptide analogs or peptidomimetics with high selectivity for one receptor type and high bioavailability, that is good blood-brain barrier permeability and enzymatic stability. Drugs, in order to be effective, must be able to reach the target tissue and to remain metabolically stable to produce the desired effects. The study of naturally occurring peptides provides a rational and powerful approach in the design of peptide therapeutics. Endogenous opioid peptides, endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2, are two potent and highly selective mu-opioid receptor agonists, discovered only a decade ago, which display potent analgesic activity. However, extensive studies on the possible use of endomorphins as analgesics instead of morphine met with failure due to their instability. This review deals with the recent investigations that allowed determine degradation pathways of endomorphins in vitro and in vivo and propose modifications that will lead to more stable analogs.

  3. [Steps to transform a necessity into a validated and useful screening tool for early detection of developmental problems in Mexican children].

    PubMed

    Rizzoli-Córdoba, Antonio; Delgado-Ginebra, Ismael

    A screening test is an instrument whose primary function is to identify individuals with a probable disease among an apparently healthy population, establishing risk or suspicion of a disease. Caution must be taken when using a screening tool in order to avoid unrealistic measurements, delaying an intervention for those who may benefit from it. Before introducing a screening test into clinical practice, it is necessary to certify the presence of some characteristics making its worth useful. This "certification" process is called validation. The main objective of this paper is to describe the different steps that must be taken, from the identification of a need for early detection through the generation of a validated and reliable screening tool using, as an example, the process for the modified version of the Child Development Evaluation Test (CDE or Prueba EDI) in Mexico. Copyright © 2015 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  4. Infection dynamic of symbiotic bacteria in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum gut and host immune response at the early steps in the infection process.

    PubMed

    Renoz, François; Noël, Christine; Errachid, Abdelmounaim; Foray, Vincent; Hance, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    In addition to its obligatory symbiont Buchnera aphidicola, the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum can harbor several facultative bacterial symbionts which can be mutualistic in the context of various ecological interactions. Belonging to a genus where many members have been described as pathogen in invertebrates, Serratia symbiotica is one of the most common facultative partners found in aphids. The recent discovery of strains able to grow outside their host allowed us to simulate environmental acquisition of symbiotic bacteria by aphids. Here, we performed an experiment to characterize the A. pisum response to the ingestion of the free-living S. symbiotica CWBI-2.3T in comparison to the ingestion of the pathogenic Serratia marcescens Db11 at the early steps in the infection process. We found that, while S. marcescens Db11 killed the aphids within a few days, S. symbiotica CWBI-2.3T did not affect host survival and colonized the whole digestive tract within a few days. Gene expression analysis of immune genes suggests that S. symbiotica CWBI-2.3T did not trigger an immune reaction, while S. marcescens Db11 did, and supports the hypothesis of a fine-tuning of the host immune response set-up for fighting pathogens while maintaining mutualistic partners. Our results also suggest that the lysosomal system and the JNK pathway are possibly involved in the regulation of invasive bacteria in aphids and that the activation of the JNK pathway is IMD-independent in the pea aphid.

  5. Infection Dynamic of Symbiotic Bacteria in the Pea Aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum Gut and Host Immune Response at the Early Steps in the Infection Process

    PubMed Central

    Renoz, François; Noël, Christine; Errachid, Abdelmounaim; Foray, Vincent; Hance, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    In addition to its obligatory symbiont Buchnera aphidicola, the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum can harbor several facultative bacterial symbionts which can be mutualistic in the context of various ecological interactions. Belonging to a genus where many members have been described as pathogen in invertebrates, Serratia symbiotica is one of the most common facultative partners found in aphids. The recent discovery of strains able to grow outside their host allowed us to simulate environmental acquisition of symbiotic bacteria by aphids. Here, we performed an experiment to characterize the A. pisum response to the ingestion of the free-living S. symbiotica CWBI-2.3T in comparison to the ingestion of the pathogenic Serratia marcescens Db11 at the early steps in the infection process. We found that, while S. marcescens Db11 killed the aphids within a few days, S. symbiotica CWBI-2.3T did not affect host survival and colonized the whole digestive tract within a few days. Gene expression analysis of immune genes suggests that S. symbiotica CWBI-2.3T did not trigger an immune reaction, while S. marcescens Db11 did, and supports the hypothesis of a fine-tuning of the host immune response set-up for fighting pathogens while maintaining mutualistic partners. Our results also suggest that the lysosomal system and the JNK pathway are possibly involved in the regulation of invasive bacteria in aphids and that the activation of the JNK pathway is IMD-independent in the pea aphid. PMID:25811863

  6. Homogeneous, Heterogeneous, and Enzymatic Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oyama, S. Ted; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses three areas of catalysis: homegeneous, heterogeneous, and enzymatic. Explains fundamentals and economic impact of catalysis. Lists and discusses common industrial catalysts. Provides a list of 107 references. (MVL)

  7. Data Delivery Latency Improvements And First Steps Towards The Distributed Computing Of The Caltech/USGS Southern California Seismic Network Earthquake Early Warning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubailo, I.; Watkins, M.; Devora, A.; Bhadha, R. J.; Hauksson, E.; Thomas, V. I.

    2016-12-01

    The USGS/Caltech Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN) is a modern digital ground motion seismic network. It develops and maintains Earthquake Early Warning (EEW) data collection and delivery systems in southern California as well as real-time EEW algorithms. Recently, Behr et al., SRL, 2016 analyzed data from several regional seismic networks deployed around the globe. They showed that the SCSN was the network with the smallest data communication delays or latency. Since then, we have reduced further the telemetry delays for many of the 330 current sites. The latency has been reduced on average from 2-6 sec to 0.4 seconds by tuning the datalogger parameters and/or deploying software upgrades. Recognizing the latency data as one of the crucial parameters in EEW, we have started archiving the per-packet latencies in mseed format for all the participating sites in a similar way it is traditionally done for the seismic waveform data. The archived latency values enable us to understand and document long-term changes in performance of the telemetry links. We can also retroactively investigate how latent the waveform data were during a specific event or during a specific time period. In addition the near-real time latency values are useful for monitoring and displaying the real-time station latency, in particular to compare different telemetry technologies. A future step to reduce the latency is to deploy the algorithms on the dataloggers at the seismic stations and transmit either the final solutions or intermediate parameters to a central processing center. To implement this approach, we are developing a stand-alone version of the OnSite algorithm to run on the dataloggers in the field. This will increase the resiliency of the SCSN to potential telemetry restrictions in the immediate aftermath of a large earthquake, either by allowing local alarming by the single station, or permitting transmission of lightweight parametric information rather than continuous

  8. Aldimine Formation Reaction, the First Step of the Maillard Early-phase Reaction, Might be Enhanced in Variant Hemoglobin, Hb Himeji.

    PubMed

    Koga, Masafumi; Inada, Shinya; Shimizu, Sayoko; Hatazaki, Masahiro; Umayahara, Yutaka; Nishihara, Eijun

    2015-01-01

    Hb Himeji (β140Ala→Asp) is known as a variant hemoglobin in which glycation is enhanced and HbA1c measured by immunoassay shows a high value. The phenomenon of enhanced glycation in Hb Himeji is based on the fact that the glycation product of variant hemoglobin (HbX1c) shows a higher value than HbA1c. In this study, we investigated whether aldimine formation reaction, the first step of the Maillard early-phase reaction, is enhanced in Hb Himeji in vitro. Three non-diabetic subjects with Hb Himeji and four non-diabetic subjects without variant hemoglobin were enrolled. In order to examine aldimine formation reaction, whole blood cells were incubated with 500 mg/dl of glucose at 37°C for 1 hour and were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Both HbA1c and HbX1c were not increased in this condition. After incubation with glucose, labile HbA1c (LA1c) fraction increased in the controls (1.1±0.3%). In subjects with Hb Himeji increases in the labile HbX1c (LX1c) fraction as well as the LA1c fraction were observed, and the degree of increase in the LX1c fraction was significantly higher than that of the LA1c fraction (1.8±0.1% vs. 0.5±0.2%, P<0.01). We have shown for the first time that aldimine (LX1c) formation reaction might be enhanced in Hb Himeji in vitro. The 140th amino acid in β chain of hemoglobin is suggested to be involved in aldimine formation reaction. © 2015 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  9. HINTS to diagnose stroke in the acute vestibular syndrome: three-step bedside oculomotor examination more sensitive than early MRI diffusion-weighted imaging.

    PubMed

    Kattah, Jorge C; Talkad, Arun V; Wang, David Z; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Newman-Toker, David E

    2009-11-01

    Acute vestibular syndrome (AVS) is often due to vestibular neuritis but can result from vertebrobasilar strokes. Misdiagnosis of posterior fossa infarcts in emergency care settings is frequent. Bedside oculomotor findings may reliably identify stroke in AVS, but prospective studies have been lacking. The authors conducted a prospective, cross-sectional study at an academic hospital. Consecutive patients with AVS (vertigo, nystagmus, nausea/vomiting, head-motion intolerance, unsteady gait) with >or=1 stroke risk factor underwent structured examination, including horizontal head impulse test of vestibulo-ocular reflex function, observation of nystagmus in different gaze positions, and prism cross-cover test of ocular alignment. All underwent neuroimaging and admission (generally <72 hours after symptom onset). Strokes were diagnosed by MRI or CT. Peripheral lesions were diagnosed by normal MRI and clinical follow-up. One hundred one high-risk patients with AVS included 25 peripheral and 76 central lesions (69 ischemic strokes, 4 hemorrhages, 3 other). The presence of normal horizontal head impulse test, direction-changing nystagmus in eccentric gaze, or skew deviation (vertical ocular misalignment) was 100% sensitive and 96% specific for stroke. Skew was present in 17% and associated with brainstem lesions (4% peripheral, 4% pure cerebellar, 30% brainstem involvement; chi(2), P=0.003). Skew correctly predicted lateral pontine stroke in 2 of 3 cases in which an abnormal horizontal head impulse test erroneously suggested peripheral localization. Initial MRI diffusion-weighted imaging was falsely negative in 12% (all <48 hours after symptom onset). Skew predicts brainstem involvement in AVS and can identify stroke when an abnormal horizontal head impulse test falsely suggests a peripheral lesion. A 3-step bedside oculomotor examination (HINTS: Head-Impulse-Nystagmus-Test-of-Skew) appears more sensitive for stroke than early MRI in AVS.

  10. Isolation and characterization of a Ds-tagged rice (Oryza sativa L.) GA-responsive dwarf mutant defective in an early step of the gibberellin biosynthesis pathway.

    PubMed

    Margis-Pinheiro, Marcia; Zhou, Xue-Rong; Zhu, Qian-Hao; Dennis, Elizabeth S; Upadhyaya, Narayana M

    2005-03-01

    We have isolated a severe dwarf transposon (Ds) insertion mutant in rice (Oryza sativa L.), which could be differentiated early in the seedling stage by reduced shoot growth and dark green leaves, and later by severe dwarfism and failure to initiate flowering. These mutants, however, showed normal seed germination and root growth. One of the sequences flanking Ds, rescued from the mutant, was of a chromosome 4-located putative ent-kaurene synthase (KS) gene, encoding the enzyme catalyzing the second step of the gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis pathway. Dwarf mutants were always homozygous for this Ds insertion and no normal plants homozygous for this mutation were recovered in the segregating progeny, indicating that the Ds insertion mutation is recessive. As mutations in three recently reported rice GA-responsive dwarf mutant alleles and the dwarf mutation identified in this study mapped to the same locus, we designate the corresponding gene OsKS1. The osks1 mutant seedlings were responsive to exogenous gibberellin (GA3). OsKS1 transcripts of about 2.3 kb were detected in leaves and stem of wild-type plants, but not in germinating seeds or roots, suggesting that OsKS1 is not involved in germination or root growth. There are at least five OsKS1-like genes in the rice genome, four of which are also represented in rice expressed sequence tag (EST) databases. All OsKS1-like genes are transcribed with different expression patterns. ESTs corresponding to all six OsKS genes are represented in other cereal databases including barley, wheat and maize, suggesting that they are biologically active.

  11. Physicochemical structural changes of cellulosic substrates during enzymatic saccharification

    SciT

    Meng, Xianzhi; Yoo, Chang Geun; Li, Mi

    Enzymatic hydrolysis represents one of the major steps and barriers in the commercialization process of converting cellulosic substrates into biofuels and other value added products. It is usually achieved by a synergistic action of enzyme mixture typically consisting of multiple enzymes such as glucanase, cellobiohydrolase and β-glucosidase with different mode of actions. Due to the innate biomass recalcitrance, enzymatic hydrolysis normally starts with an initial fast rate of hydrolysis followed by a rapid decrease of rate toward the end of hydrolysis. With majority of literature studies focusing on the effect of key substrate characteristics on the initial rate or finalmore » yield of enzymatic hydrolysis, information about physicochemical structural changes of cellulosic substrates during enzymatic hydrolysis is still quite limited. Consequently, what slows down the reaction rate toward the end of hydrolysis is not well understood. Lastly, this review highlights recent advances in understanding the structural changes of cellulosic substrates during the hydrolysis process, to better understand the fundamental mechanisms of enzymatic hydrolysis.« less

  12. Physicochemical structural changes of cellulosic substrates during enzymatic saccharification

    DOE PAGES

    Meng, Xianzhi; Yoo, Chang Geun; Li, Mi; ...

    2016-12-30

    Enzymatic hydrolysis represents one of the major steps and barriers in the commercialization process of converting cellulosic substrates into biofuels and other value added products. It is usually achieved by a synergistic action of enzyme mixture typically consisting of multiple enzymes such as glucanase, cellobiohydrolase and β-glucosidase with different mode of actions. Due to the innate biomass recalcitrance, enzymatic hydrolysis normally starts with an initial fast rate of hydrolysis followed by a rapid decrease of rate toward the end of hydrolysis. With majority of literature studies focusing on the effect of key substrate characteristics on the initial rate or finalmore » yield of enzymatic hydrolysis, information about physicochemical structural changes of cellulosic substrates during enzymatic hydrolysis is still quite limited. Consequently, what slows down the reaction rate toward the end of hydrolysis is not well understood. Lastly, this review highlights recent advances in understanding the structural changes of cellulosic substrates during the hydrolysis process, to better understand the fundamental mechanisms of enzymatic hydrolysis.« less

  13. Unusual enzymatic glycoside cleavage mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Jongkees, Seino A K; Withers, Stephen G

    2014-01-21

    Over the sixty years since Koshland initially formulated the classical mechanisms for retaining and inverting glycosidases, researchers have assembled a large body of supporting evidence and have documented variations of these mechanisms. Recently, however, researchers have uncovered a number of completely distinct mechanisms for enzymatic cleavage of glycosides involving elimination and/or hydration steps. In family GH4 and GH109 glycosidases, the reaction proceeds via transient NAD(+)-mediated oxidation at C3, thereby acidifying the proton at C2 and allowing for elimination across the C1-C2 bond. Subsequent Michael-type addition of water followed by reduction at C3 generates the hydrolyzed product. Enzymes employing this mechanism can hydrolyze thioglycosides as well as both anomers of activated substrates. Sialidases employ a conventional retaining mechanism in which a tyrosine functions as the nucleophile, but in some cases researchers have observed off-path elimination end products. These reactions occur via the normal covalent intermediate, but instead of an attack by water on the anomeric center, the catalytic acid/base residue abstracts an adjacent proton. These enzymes can also catalyze hydration of the enol ether via the reverse pathway. Reactions of α-(1,4)-glucan lyases also proceed through a covalent intermediate with subsequent abstraction of an adjacent proton to give elimination. However, in this case, the departing carboxylate "nucleophile" serves as the base in a concerted but asynchronous syn-elimination process. These enzymes perform only elimination reactions. Polysaccharide lyases, which act on uronic acid-containing substrates, also catalyze only elimination reactions. Substrate binding neutralizes the charge on the carboxylate, which allows for abstraction of the proton on C5 and leads to an elimination reaction via an E1cb mechanism. These enzymes can also cleave thioglycosides, albeit slowly. The unsaturated product of polysaccharide

  14. Nano Step

    2012-09-25

    ISS033-E-007358 (25 Sept. 2012) --- Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Aki Hoshide, Expedition 33 flight engineer, services the Nano Step payload in the Kibo laboratory of the International Space Station.

  15. Next Steps.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-01-01

    Next Steps : Use case development : Developing representative use cases for receivers : Defining parameters for transmit application for uplink and down link : Defining and finalize propagation models to be used : Antenna Characte...

  16. Effects of organic carbon sequestration strategies on soil enzymatic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglisi, E.; Suciu, N.; Botteri, L.; Ferrari, T.; Coppolecchia, D.; Trevisan, M.; Piccolo, A.

    2009-04-01

    Greenhouse gases emissions can be counterbalanced with proper agronomical strategies aimed at sequestering carbon in soils. These strategies must be tested not only for their ability in reducing carbon dioxide emissions, but also for their impact on soil quality: enzymatic activities are related to main soil ecological quality, and can be used as early and sensitive indicators of alteration events. Three different strategies for soil carbon sequestration were studied: minimum tillage, protection of biodegradable organic fraction by compost amendment and oxidative polimerization of soil organic matter catalyzed by biometic porfirins. All strategies were compared with a traditional agricultural management based on tillage and mineral fertilization. Experiments were carried out in three Italian soils from different pedo-climatic regions located respectively in Piacenza, Turin and Naples and cultivated with maize or wheat. Soil samples were taken for three consecutive years after harvest and analyzed for their content in phosphates, ß-glucosidase, urease and invertase. An alteration index based on these enzymatic activities levels was applied as well. The biomimetic porfirin application didn't cause changes in enzymatic activities compared to the control at any treatment or location. Enzymatic activities were generally higher in the minimum tillage and compost treatment, while differences between location and date of samplings were limited. Application of the soil alteration index based on enzymatic activities showed that soils treated with compost or subjected to minimum tillage generally have a higher biological quality. The work confirms the environmental sustainability of the carbon sequestering agronomical practices studied.

  17. Bioluminescence methods for enzymatic determinations

    DOEpatents

    Bostick, William D.; Denton, Mark S.; Dinsmore, Stanley R.

    1982-01-01

    An enzymatic method for continuous, on-line and rapid detection of diagnostically useful biomarkers, which are symptomatic of disease or trauma-related tissue damage, is disclosed. The method is characterized by operability on authentic samples of complex biological fluids which contain the biomarkers.

  18. [REVIEW OF 30 YEARS OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF AN ENZYMATIC DEBRIDEMENT AGENT FOR BURNS].

    PubMed

    Krieger, Yuval; Shoham, Yaron; Bogdanov-Berezovsky, Alexander; Silberstein, Eldad; Sagi, Amiram; Levy, Avraham; Rosenberg, Nir; Rubin, Guy; Egozi, Dana; Ullman, Yehuda; Haik, Josef; Rosenberg, Lior

    2016-05-01

    Early removal of burn eschar is a cornerstone of burn care. The most commonly practiced eschar removal technique for deep burns in modern burn care is surgical debridement but this technique is associated with surgical burden and leads to unnecessary excision of viable tissue. To review 30 years of research and development of an enzymatic debridement agent for burns. Studies performed during the last 30 years are reviewed in this manuscript. Patients who underwent enzymatic debridement had a significantly shorter time to complete debridement, the surgical burden was significantly lower, hand burns did not necessitate escharotomy, and the long term results were favorable. Early enzymatic debridement leads to an efficient debridement, preservation of viable tissue, a reduction in surgical burden and favorable long term results. We believe early enzymatic debridement will lead to better care for burn victims and perhaps, even to a paradigm shift in the treatment of burns.

  19. Early Childhood Educator Competencies: A Literature Review of Current Best Practices, and a Public Input Process on Next Steps for California. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for the Study of Child Care Employment, University of California at Berkeley, 2008

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, growing knowledge of the critical importance of early childhood development for lifelong learning and growth had led to increased calls for the professionalism of early childhood educators, including higher standards for their training and education. As part of this attention to professional development, many states are…

  20. [Temporary Pacemakers - Step by Step].

    PubMed

    Graf, Matthias; Stiller, Patrick; Karch, Martin

    2018-06-01

    Symptomatic bradycardia is usually caused by abnormalities of atrioventricular conduction or sinus node dysfunction. Reversible and irreversible causes must be considered.Temporary pacemakers are used in the emergency treatment in case of severe bradyarrhythmia.They help to bridge the acute phase until spontaneous restoration of atrioventricular or sinus node function or -if spontaneous restoration fails- until a permanent pacemaker system was implanted.In the following article we discuss the commonly used temporary pacemaker systems. We demonstrate their use and correct programming by an illustrated step by step explanation. For troubleshooting a flow chart was added. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Evaluation of an early step-down strategy from intravenous anidulafungin to oral azole therapy for the treatment of candidemia and other forms of invasive candidiasis: results from an open-label trial.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Jose; Reboli, Annette C; Pappas, Peter G; Patterson, Thomas F; Reinhardt, John; Chin-Hong, Peter; Tobin, Ellis; Kett, Daniel H; Biswas, Pinaki; Swanson, Robert

    2014-02-21

    Hospitalized patients are at increased risk for candidemia and invasive candidiasis (C/IC). Improved therapeutic regimens with enhanced clinical and pharmacoeconomic outcomes utilizing existing antifungal agents are still needed. An open-label, non-comparative study evaluated an intravenous (i.v.) to oral step-down strategy. Patients with C/IC were treated with i.v. anidulafungin and after 5 days of i.v. therapy had the option to step-down to oral azole therapy (fluconazole or voriconazole) if they met prespecified criteria. The primary endpoint was the global response rate (clinical + microbiological) at end of treatment (EOT) in the modified intent-to-treat (MITT) population (at least one dose of anidulafungin plus positive Candida within 96 hours of study entry). Secondary endpoints included efficacy at other time points and in predefined patient subpopulations. Patients who stepped down early (≤ 7 days' anidulafungin) were identified as the "early switch" subpopulation. In total, 282 patients were enrolled, of whom 250 were included in the MITT population. The MITT global response rate at EOT was 83.7% (95% confidence interval, 78.7-88.8). Global response rates at all time points were generally similar in the early switch subpopulation compared with the MITT population. Global response rates were also similar across multiple Candida species, including C. albicans, C. glabrata, and C. parapsilosis. The most common treatment-related adverse events were nausea and vomiting (four patients each). A short course of i.v. anidulafungin, followed by early step-down to oral azole therapy, is an effective and well-tolerated approach for the treatment of C/IC. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00496197.

  2. Evaluation of an early step-down strategy from intravenous anidulafungin to oral azole therapy for the treatment of candidemia and other forms of invasive candidiasis: results from an open-label trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hospitalized patients are at increased risk for candidemia and invasive candidiasis (C/IC). Improved therapeutic regimens with enhanced clinical and pharmacoeconomic outcomes utilizing existing antifungal agents are still needed. Methods An open-label, non-comparative study evaluated an intravenous (IV) to oral step-down strategy. Patients with C/IC were treated with IV anidulafungin and after 5 days of IV therapy had the option to step-down to oral azole therapy (fluconazole or voriconazole) if they met prespecified criteria. The primary endpoint was the global response rate (clinical + microbiological) at end of treatment (EOT) in the modified intent-to-treat (MITT) population (at least one dose of anidulafungin plus positive Candida within 96 hours of study entry). Secondary endpoints included efficacy at other time points and in predefined patient subpopulations. Patients who stepped down early (≤ 7 days’ anidulafungin) were identified as the "early switch" subpopulation. Results In total, 282 patients were enrolled, of whom 250 were included in the MITT population. The MITT global response rate at EOT was 83.7% (95% confidence interval, 78.7–88.8). Global response rates at all time points were generally similar in the early switch subpopulation compared with the MITT population. Global response rates were also similar across multiple Candida species, including C. albicans, C. glabrata, and C. parapsilosis. The most common treatment-related adverse events were nausea and vomiting (four patients each). Conclusions A short course of IV anidulafungin, followed by early step-down to oral azole therapy, is an effective and well-tolerated approach for the treatment of C/IC. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00496197 PMID:24559321

  3. Enzymatic cell disruption of microalgae biomass in biorefinery processes.

    PubMed

    Demuez, Marie; Mahdy, Ahmed; Tomás-Pejó, Elia; González-Fernández, Cristina; Ballesteros, Mercedes

    2015-10-01

    When employing biotechnological processes for the procurement of biofuels and bio-products from microalgae, one of the most critical steps affecting economy and yields is the "cell disruption" stage. Currently, enzymatic cell disruption has delivered effective and cost competitive results when compared to mechanical and chemical cell disruption methods. However, the introduction of enzymes implies additional associated cost within the overall process. In order to reduce this cost, autolysis of microalgae is proposed as alternative enzymatic cell disruption method. This review aims to provide the state of the art of enzymatic cell disruption treatments employed in biorefinery processes and highlights the use of endopeptidases. During the enzymatic processes of microalgae life cycle, some lytic enzymes involved in cell division and programmed cell death have been proven useful in performing cell lysis. In this context, the role of endopeptidases is emphasized. Mirroring these natural events, an alternative cell disruption approach is proposed and described with the potential to induce the autolysis process using intrinsic cell enzymes. Integrating induced autolysis within biofuel production processes offers a promising approach to reduce overall global costs and energetic input associated with those of current cell disruption methods. A number of options for further inquiry are also discussed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Enzymatic Processes in Marine Biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Trincone, Antonio

    2017-03-25

    In previous review articles the attention of the biocatalytically oriented scientific community towards the marine environment as a source of biocatalysts focused on the habitat-related properties of marine enzymes. Updates have already appeared in the literature, including marine examples of oxidoreductases, hydrolases, transferases, isomerases, ligases, and lyases ready for food and pharmaceutical applications. Here a new approach for searching the literature and presenting a more refined analysis is adopted with respect to previous surveys, centering the attention on the enzymatic process rather than on a single novel activity. Fields of applications are easily individuated: (i) the biorefinery value-chain, where the provision of biomass is one of the most important aspects, with aquaculture as the prominent sector; (ii) the food industry, where the interest in the marine domain is similarly developed to deal with the enzymatic procedures adopted in food manipulation; (iii) the selective and easy extraction/modification of structurally complex marine molecules, where enzymatic treatments are a recognized tool to improve efficiency and selectivity; and (iv) marine biomarkers and derived applications (bioremediation) in pollution monitoring are also included in that these studies could be of high significance for the appreciation of marine bioprocesses.

  5. Enzymatic Processes in Marine Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Trincone, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    In previous review articles the attention of the biocatalytically oriented scientific community towards the marine environment as a source of biocatalysts focused on the habitat-related properties of marine enzymes. Updates have already appeared in the literature, including marine examples of oxidoreductases, hydrolases, transferases, isomerases, ligases, and lyases ready for food and pharmaceutical applications. Here a new approach for searching the literature and presenting a more refined analysis is adopted with respect to previous surveys, centering the attention on the enzymatic process rather than on a single novel activity. Fields of applications are easily individuated: (i) the biorefinery value-chain, where the provision of biomass is one of the most important aspects, with aquaculture as the prominent sector; (ii) the food industry, where the interest in the marine domain is similarly developed to deal with the enzymatic procedures adopted in food manipulation; (iii) the selective and easy extraction/modification of structurally complex marine molecules, where enzymatic treatments are a recognized tool to improve efficiency and selectivity; and (iv) marine biomarkers and derived applications (bioremediation) in pollution monitoring are also included in that these studies could be of high significance for the appreciation of marine bioprocesses. PMID:28346336

  6. Early steps in protein synthesis and their regulation: a background study related to the biological effects of radiation. Progress report, July 1, 1975--June 30, 1976

    SciT

    Zamecnik, P.C.

    This is a continuing study of protein synthesis, involving a search for the role of Ap/sub 4/A and other unusual nucleotides in growth regulation; studies of the mechanism of action of aminoacyl-tRNA ligases and the effect thereof on protein synthesis; a search for new regulators of the translation step, in cell-free systems; and an effort to improve the sensitivity and quantitation of chemical sequencing at the 3'-end of messenger RNA.

  7. The VLF fingerprint of elves: Step-like and long-recovery early VLF perturbations caused by powerful ±CG lightning EM pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldoupis, Christos; Cohen, Morris; Arnone, Enrico; Cotts, Benjamin; Dietrich, Stefano

    2013-08-01

    Subionospheric VLF recordings are investigated in relation with intense cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning data. Lightning impacts the lower ionosphere via heating and ionization changes which produce VLF signal perturbations known as early VLF events. Typically, early events recover in about 100 s, but a small subclass does not recover for many minutes, known as long-recovery early events (LORE). In this study, we identify LORE as a distinct category of early VLF events, whose signature may occur either on its own or alongside the short-lived typical early VLF event. Since LORE onsets coincide with powerful lightning strokes of either polarity (±), we infer that they are due to long-lasting ionization changes in the uppermost D region ionosphere caused by electromagnetic pulses emitted by strong ± CG lightning peak currents of typically > 250 kA, which are also known to generate elves. The LORE perturbations are detected when the discharge is located within ~250 km from the great circle path of a VLF transmitter-receiver link. The probability of occurrence increases with stroke intensity and approaches unity for discharges with peak currents ≥ ~300 kA. LOREs are nighttime phenomena that occur preferentially, at least in the present regional data set, during winter when strong ± CG discharges are more frequent and intense. The evidence suggests LORE as a distinct signature representing the VLF fingerprint of elves, a fact which, although was predicted by theory, it escaped identification in the long-going VLF research of lightning effects in the lower ionosphere.

  8. Stepped nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Sutton, George P.

    1998-01-01

    An insert which allows a supersonic nozzle of a rocket propulsion system to operate at two or more different nozzle area ratios. This provides an improved vehicle flight performance or increased payload. The insert has significant advantages over existing devices for increasing nozzle area ratios. The insert is temporarily fastened by a simple retaining mechanism to the aft end of the diverging segment of the nozzle and provides for a multi-step variation of nozzle area ratio. When mounted in place, the insert provides the nozzle with a low nozzle area ratio. During flight, the retaining mechanism is released and the insert ejected thereby providing a high nozzle area ratio in the diverging nozzle segment.

  9. Stepped nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Sutton, G.P.

    1998-07-14

    An insert is described which allows a supersonic nozzle of a rocket propulsion system to operate at two or more different nozzle area ratios. This provides an improved vehicle flight performance or increased payload. The insert has significant advantages over existing devices for increasing nozzle area ratios. The insert is temporarily fastened by a simple retaining mechanism to the aft end of the diverging segment of the nozzle and provides for a multi-step variation of nozzle area ratio. When mounted in place, the insert provides the nozzle with a low nozzle area ratio. During flight, the retaining mechanism is released and the insert ejected thereby providing a high nozzle area ratio in the diverging nozzle segment. 5 figs.

  10. On-chip enzymatic microbiofuel cell-powered integrated circuits.

    PubMed

    Mark, Andrew G; Suraniti, Emmanuel; Roche, Jérôme; Richter, Harald; Kuhn, Alexander; Mano, Nicolas; Fischer, Peer

    2017-05-16

    A variety of diagnostic and therapeutic medical technologies rely on long term implantation of an electronic device to monitor or regulate a patient's condition. One proposed approach to powering these devices is to use a biofuel cell to convert the chemical energy from blood nutrients into electrical current to supply the electronics. We present here an enzymatic microbiofuel cell whose electrodes are directly integrated into a digital electronic circuit. Glucose oxidizing and oxygen reducing enzymes are immobilized on microelectrodes of an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) using redox hydrogels to produce an enzymatic biofuel cell, capable of harvesting electrical power from just a single droplet of 5 mM glucose solution. Optimisation of the fuel cell voltage and power to match the requirements of the electronics allow self-powered operation of the on-board digital circuitry. This study represents a step towards implantable self-powered electronic devices that gather their energy from physiological fluids.

  11. Enzymatic hydrolysis of potato pulp.

    PubMed

    Lesiecki, Mariusz; Białas, Wojciech; Lewandowicz, Grażyna

    2012-01-01

    Potato pulp constitutes a complicated system of four types of polysaccharides: cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin and starch. Its composition makes it a potential and attractive raw material for the production of the second generation bioethanol. The aim of this research project was to assess the usefulness of commercial enzymatic preparations for the hydrolysis of potato pulp and to evaluate the effectiveness of hydrolysates obtained in this way as raw materials for ethanol fermentation. Sterilised potato pulp was subjected to hydrolysis with commercial enzymatic preparations. The effectiveness of the preparations declared as active towards only one fraction of potato pulp (separate amylase, pectinase and cellulase activity) and mixtures of these preparations was analysed. The monomers content in hydrolysates was determined using HPLC method. The application of amylolytic enzymes for potato pulp hydrolysis resulted in the release of only 18% of raw material with glucose as the dominant (77%) constituent of the formed product. In addition, 16% galactose was also determined in it. The hydrolysis of the cellulose fraction yielded up to 35% raw material and the main constituents of the obtained hydrolysate were glucose (46%) and arabinose (40%). Simultaneous application of amylolytic, cellulolytic and pectinolytic enzymes turned out to be the most effective way of carrying out the process as its efficiency in this case reached 90%. The obtained hydrolysate contained 63% glucose, 25% arabinose and 12% other simple substances. The application of commercial enzymatic preparations made it possible to perform potato pulp hydrolysis with 90% effectiveness. This was achieved by the application of a complex of amylolytic, cellulolytic and pectinolytic enzymes and the hydrolysate obtained in this way contained, primarily, glucose making it a viable substrate for ethanol fermentation.

  12. Lessons learned in stepped chute research

    Early research on stepped chutes focused on steep gravity style stepped chutes. Today, the research trend has shifted to stepped chutes applied to more moderate slopes like those for aging embankment dams. Research contributions have been made on hydraulic properties of stepped chutes including ai...

  13. Enzymatically triggered rupture of polymersomes.

    PubMed

    Jang, Woo-Sik; Park, Seung Chul; Reed, Ellen H; Dooley, Kevin P; Wheeler, Samuel F; Lee, Daeyeon; Hammer, Daniel A

    2016-01-28

    Polymersomes are robust vesicles made from amphiphilic block co-polymers. Large populations of uniform giant polymersomes with defined, entrapped species can be made by templating of double-emulsions using microfluidics. In the present study, a series of two enzymatic reactions, one inside and the other outside of the polymersome, were designed to induce rupture of polymersomes. We measured how the kinetics of rupture were affected by altering enzyme concentration. These results suggest that protocells with entrapped enzymes can be engineered to secrete contents on cue.

  14. Force-Manipulation Single-Molecule Spectroscopy Studies of Enzymatic Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, H. Peter; He, Yufan; Lu, Maolin; Cao, Jin; Guo, Qing

    2014-03-01

    Subtle conformational changes play a crucial role in protein functions, especially in enzymatic reactions involving complex substrate-enzyme interactions and chemical reactions. We applied AFM-enhanced and magnetic tweezers-correlated single-molecule spectroscopy to study the mechanisms and dynamics of enzymatic reactions involved with kinase and lysozyme proteins. Enzymatic reaction turnovers and the associated structure changes of individual protein molecules were observed simultaneously in real-time by single-molecule FRET detections. Our single-molecule spectroscopy measurements of enzymatic conformational dynamics have revealed time bunching effect and intermittent coherence in conformational state change dynamics involving in enzymatic reaction cycles. The coherent conformational state dynamics suggests that the enzymatic catalysis involves a multi-step conformational motion along the coordinates of substrate-enzyme complex formation and product releasing. Our results support a multiple-conformational state model, being consistent with a complementary conformation selection and induced-fit enzymatic loop-gated conformational change mechanism in substrate-enzyme active complex formation.

  15. Precursor binding to an 880-kDa Toc complex as an early step during active import of protein into chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuan-Yu; Li, Hsou-min

    2007-01-01

    The import of protein into chloroplasts is mediated by translocon components located in the chloroplast outer (the Toc proteins) and inner (the Tic proteins) envelope membranes. To identify intermediate steps during active import, we used sucrose density gradient centrifugation and blue-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) to identify complexes of translocon components associated with precursor proteins under active import conditions instead of arrested binding conditions. Importing precursor proteins in solubilized chloroplast membranes formed a two-peak distribution in the sucrose density gradient. The heavier peak was in a similar position as the previously reported Tic/Toc supercomplex and was too large to be analyzed by BN-PAGE. The BN-PAGE analyses of the lighter peak revealed that precursors accumulated in at least two complexes. The first complex migrated at a position close to the ferritin dimer (approximately 880 kDa) and contained only the Toc components. Kinetic analyses suggested that this Toc complex represented an earlier step in the import process than the Tic/Toc supercomplex. The second complex in the lighter peak migrated at the position of the ferritin trimer (approximately 1320 kDa). It contained, in addition to the Toc components, Tic110, Hsp93, and an hsp70 homolog, but not Tic40. Two different precursor proteins were shown to associate with the same complexes. Processed mature proteins first appeared in the membranes at the same fractions as the Tic/Toc supercomplex, suggesting that processing of transit peptides occurs while precursors are still associated with the supercomplex.

  16. Precursor binding to an 880-kDa Toc complex as an early step during active import of protein into chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuan-Yu; Li, Hsou-min

    2007-01-01

    The import of protein into chloroplasts is mediated by translocon components located in the chloroplast outer (the Toc proteins) and inner (the Tic proteins) envelope membranes. To identify intermediate steps during active import, we used sucrose density gradient centrifugation and blue-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) to identify complexes of translocon components associated with precursor proteins under active import conditions instead of arrested binding conditions. Importing precursor proteins in solubilized chloroplast membranes formed a two-peak distribution in the sucrose density gradient. The heavier peak was in a similar position as the previously reported Tic/Toc supercomplex and was too large to be analyzed by BN-PAGE. The BN-PAGE analyses of the lighter peak revealed that precursors accumulated in at least two complexes. The first complex migrated at a position close to the ferritin dimer (approximately 880 kDa) and contained only the Toc components. Kinetic analyses suggested that this Toc complex represented an earlier step in the import process than the Tic/Toc supercomplex. The second complex in the lighter peak migrated at the position of the ferritin trimer (approximately 1320 kDa). It contained, in addition to the Toc components, Tic110, Hsp93, and an hsp70 homolog, but not Tic40. Two different precursor proteins were shown to associate with the same complexes. Processed mature proteins first appeared in the membranes at the same fractions as the Tic/Toc supercomplex, suggesting that processing of transit peptides occurs while precursors are still associated with the supercomplex. PMID:17144891

  17. [Enzymatic analysis of the quality of foodstuffs].

    PubMed

    Kolesnov, A Iu

    1997-01-01

    Enzymatic analysis is an independent and separate branch of enzymology and analytical chemistry. It has become one of the most important methodologies used in food analysis. Enzymatic analysis allows the quick, reliable determination of many food ingredients. Often these contents cannot be determined by conventional methods, or if methods are available, they are determined only with limited accuracy. Today, methods of enzymatic analysis are being increasingly used in the investigation of foodstuffs. Enzymatic measurement techniques are used in industry, scientific and food inspection laboratories for quality analysis. This article describes the requirements of an optimal analytical method: specificity, sample preparation, assay performance, precision, sensitivity, time requirement, analysis cost, safety of reagents.

  18. Enzymatic Synthesis of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kolhatkar, Arati G.; Dannongoda, Chamath; Kourentzi, Katerina; Jamison, Andrew C.; Nekrashevich, Ivan; Kar, Archana; Cacao, Eliedonna; Strych, Ulrich; Rusakova, Irene; Martirosyan, Karen S.; Litvinov, Dmitri; Lee, T. Randall; Willson, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first in vitro enzymatic synthesis of paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic nanoparticles toward magnetic ELISA reporting. With our procedure, alkaline phosphatase catalyzes the dephosphorylation of l-ascorbic-2-phosphate, which then serves as a reducing agent for salts of iron, gadolinium, and holmium, forming magnetic precipitates of Fe45±14Gd5±2O50±15 and Fe42±4Ho6±4O52±5. The nanoparticles were found to be paramagnetic at 300 K and antiferromagnetic under 25 K. Although weakly magnetic at 300 K, the room-temperature magnetization of the nanoparticles found here is considerably greater than that of analogous chemically-synthesized LnxFeyOz (Ln = Gd, Ho) samples reported previously. At 5 K, the nanoparticles showed a significantly higher saturation magnetization of 45 and 30 emu/g for Fe45±14Gd5±2O50±15 and Fe42±4Ho6±4O52±5, respectively. Our approach of enzymatically synthesizing magnetic labels reduces the cost and avoids diffusional mass-transfer limitations associated with pre-synthesized magnetic reporter particles, while retaining the advantages of magnetic sensing. PMID:25854425

  19. Enzymatic synthesis of structured lipids.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yugo; Yamane, Tsuneo

    2004-01-01

    Structured lipids (SLs) are defined as lipids that are modified chemically or enzymatically in order to change their structure. This review deals with structured triacylglycerols (STGs) and structured phospholipids (SPLs). The most typical STGs are MLM-type STGs, having medium chain fatty acids (FAs) at the 1- and 3-positions and a long chain fatty acid at the 2- position. MLM-type STGs are synthesized by: 1) 1,3-position-specific lipase-catalyzed acyl exchange of TG with FA or with FA ethylester (FAEt); 2) 1,3-position-specific lipase-catalyzed acylation of glycerol with FA, giving symmetric 1,3-diacyl-sn-glycerol, followed by chemical acylation at the sn-2 position, and; 3) 1,3-position-specific lipase-catalyzed deacylation of TG, giving 2-monoacylglycerol, followed by reacylation at the 1- and 3-positions with FA or with (FAEt). Enzymatic preparation of SPLs requires: 1) acyl group modification, and 2) head group modification of phospholipids. Acyl group modification is performed using lipases or phospholipase A2-mediated transesterification or ester synthesis to introduce arbitrary fatty acid to phospholipids. Head group modification is carried out by phospholipase D-catalyzed transphosphatidylation. A wide range of compounds can be introduced into the polar head of phospholipids, making it possible to prepare various SPLs.

  20. A construction of standardized near infrared hyper-spectral teeth database: a first step in the development of reliable diagnostic tool for quantification and early detection of caries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bürmen, Miran; Usenik, Peter; Fidler, Aleš; Pernuš, Franjo; Likar, Boštjan

    2011-03-01

    Dental caries is a disease characterized by demineralization of enamel crystals leading to the penetration of bacteria into the dentin and pulp. If left untreated, the disease can lead to pain, infection and tooth loss. Early detection of enamel demineralization resulting in increased enamel porosity, commonly known as white spots, is a difficult diagnostic task. Several papers reported on near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy to be a potentially useful noninvasive spectroscopic technique for early detection of caries lesions. However, the conducted studies were mostly qualitative and did not include the critical assessment of the spectral variability of the sound and carious dental tissues and influence of the water content. Such assessment is essential for development and validation of reliable qualitative and especially quantitative diagnostic tools based on NIR spectroscopy. In order to characterize the described spectral variability, a standardized diffuse reflectance hyper-spectral database was constructed by imaging 12 extracted human teeth with natural lesions of various degrees in the spectral range from 900 to 1700 nm with spectral resolution of 10 nm. Additionally, all the teeth were imaged by digital color camera. The influence of water content on the acquired spectra was characterized by monitoring the teeth during the drying process. The images were assessed by an expert, thereby obtaining the gold standard. By analyzing the acquired spectra we were able to accurately model the spectral variability of the sound dental tissues and identify the advantages and limitations of NIR hyper-spectral imaging.

  1. Method for the enzymatic production of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Woodward, Jonathan; Mattingly, Susan M.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is an enzymatic method for producing hydrogen comprising the steps of: a) forming a reaction mixture within a reaction vessel comprising a substrate capable of undergoing oxidation within a catabolic reaction, such as glucose, galactose, xylose, mannose, sucrose, lactose, cellulose, xylan and starch. The reaction mixture further comprises an amount of glucose dehydrogenase in an amount sufficient to catalyze the oxidation of the substrate, an amount of hydrogenase sufficient to catalyze an electron-requiring reaction wherein a stoichiometric yield of hydrogen is produced, an amount of pH buffer in an amount sufficient to provide an environment that allows the hydrogenase and the glucose dehydrogenase to retain sufficient activity for the production of hydrogen to occur and also comprising an amount of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate sufficient to transfer electrons from the catabolic reaction to the electron-requiring reaction; b) heating the reaction mixture at a temperature sufficient for glucose dehydrogenase and the hydrogenase to retain sufficient activity and sufficient for the production of hydrogen to occur, and heating for a period of time that continues until the hydrogen is no longer produced by the reaction mixture, wherein the catabolic reaction and the electron-requiring reactions have rates of reaction dependent upon the temperature; and c) detecting the hydrogen produced from the reaction mixture.

  2. Method for the enzymatic production of hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Woodward, J.; Mattingly, S.M.

    1999-08-24

    The present invention is an enzymatic method for producing hydrogen comprising the steps of: (a) forming a reaction mixture within a reaction vessel comprising a substrate capable of undergoing oxidation within a catabolic reaction, such as glucose, galactose, xylose, mannose, sucrose, lactose, cellulose, xylan and starch; the reaction mixture also comprising an amount of glucose dehydrogenase in an amount sufficient to catalyze the oxidation of the substrate, an amount of hydrogenase sufficient to catalyze an electron-requiring reaction wherein a stoichiometric yield of hydrogen is produced, an amount of pH buffer in an amount sufficient to provide an environment that allows the hydrogenase and the glucose dehydrogenase to retain sufficient activity for the production of hydrogen to occur and also comprising an amount of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate sufficient to transfer electrons from the catabolic reaction to the electron-requiring reaction; (b) heating the reaction mixture at a temperature sufficient for glucose dehydrogenase and the hydrogenase to retain sufficient activity and sufficient for the production of hydrogen to occur, and heating for a period of time that continues until the hydrogen is no longer produced by the reaction mixture, wherein the catabolic reaction and the electron-requiring reactions have rates of reaction dependent upon the temperature; and (c) detecting the hydrogen produced from the reaction mixture. 8 figs.

  3. Aqueous enzymatic extraction of Moringa oleifera oil.

    PubMed

    Mat Yusoff, Masni; Gordon, Michael H; Ezeh, Onyinye; Niranjan, Keshavan

    2016-11-15

    This paper reports on the extraction of Moringa oleifera (MO) oil by using aqueous enzymatic extraction (AEE) method. The effect of different process parameters on the oil recovery was discovered by using statistical optimization, besides the effect of selected parameters on the formation of its oil-in-water cream emulsions. Within the pre-determined ranges, the use of pH 4.5, moisture/kernel ratio of 8:1 (w/w), and 300stroke/min shaking speed at 40°C for 1h incubation time resulted in highest oil recovery of approximately 70% (goil/g solvent-extracted oil). These optimized parameters also result in a very thin emulsion layer, indicating minute amount of emulsion formed. Zero oil recovery with thick emulsion were observed when the used aqueous phase was re-utilized for another AEE process. The findings suggest that the critical selection of AEE parameters is key to high oil recovery with minimum emulsion formation thereby lowering the load on the de-emulsification step. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass from wood.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Consolación; Reyes-Sosa, Francisco Manuel; Díez, Bruno

    2016-03-01

    Current research and development in cellulosic ethanol production has been focused mainly on agricultural residues and dedicated energy crops such as corn stover and switchgrass; however, woody biomass remains a very important feedstock for ethanol production. The precise composition of hemicellulose in the wood is strongly dependent on the plant species, therefore different types of enzymes are needed based on hemicellulose complexity and type of pretreatment. In general, hardwood species have much lower recalcitrance to enzymes than softwood. For hardwood, xylanases, beta-xylosidases and xyloglucanases are the main hemicellulases involved in degradation of the hemicellulose backbone, while for softwood the effect of mannanases and beta-mannosidases is more relevant. Furthermore, there are different key accessory enzymes involved in removing the hemicellulosic fraction and increasing accessibility of cellulases to the cellulose fibres improving the hydrolysis process. A diversity of enzymatic cocktails has been tested using from low to high densities of biomass (2-20% total solids) and a broad range of results has been obtained. The performance of recently developed commercial cocktails on hardwoods and softwoods will enable a further step for the commercialization of fuel ethanol from wood. © 2016 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Dynamic Analysis of the Expression of the TGFβ/SMAD2 Pathway and CCN2/CTGF during Early Steps of Tooth Development

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Marcos S.; Reis, Alice H.; Aguiar, Diego P.; Lyons, Karen M.; Abreu, José G.

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aims CCN2 is present during tooth development. However, the relationship between CCN2 and the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)/SMAD2/3 signaling cascade during early stages of tooth development is unclear. Here, we compare the expression of CCN2 and TGFβ/SMAD2/3 components during tooth development, and analyze the functioning of TGFβ/SMAD2/3 in wild-type (WT) and Ccn2 null (Ccn2−/−) mice. Methods Coronal sections of mice on embryonic day (E)11.5, E12.5, E13.5, E14.5 and E18.5 from WT and Ccn2−/− were immunoreacted to detect CCN2 and components of the TGFβ signaling pathway and assayed for 5′-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine immunolabeling and proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunostaining. Results CCN2 and TGFβ signaling components such as TGFβ1, TGFβ receptor II, SMADs2/3 and SMAD4 were expressed in inducer tissues during early stages of tooth development. Proliferation analysis in these areas showed that epithelial cells proliferate less than mesenchymal cells from E11.5 to E13.5, while at E14.5 they proliferate more than mesenchymal cells. We did not find a correlation between functioning of the TGFβ1 cascade and CCN2 expression because Ccn2−/− mice showed neither a reduction in SMAD2 phosphorylation nor a difference in cell proliferation. Conclusion CCN2 and the TGFβ/SMAD2/3 signaling pathway are active in signaling centers of tooth development where proliferation is dynamic, but these mechanisms may act independently. PMID:18089935

  6. A Multiscale Approach to Characterize the Early Aggregation Steps of the Amyloid-Forming Peptide GNNQQNY from the Yeast Prion Sup-35

    PubMed Central

    Nasica-Labouze, Jessica; Meli, Massimiliano; Derreumaux, Philippe; Colombo, Giorgio; Mousseau, Normand

    2011-01-01

    The self-organization of peptides into amyloidogenic oligomers is one of the key events for a wide range of molecular and degenerative diseases. Atomic-resolution characterization of the mechanisms responsible for the aggregation process and the resulting structures is thus a necessary step to improve our understanding of the determinants of these pathologies. To address this issue, we combine the accelerated sampling properties of replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations based on the OPEP coarse-grained potential with the atomic resolution description of interactions provided by all-atom MD simulations, and investigate the oligomerization process of the GNNQQNY for three system sizes: 3-mers, 12-mers and 20-mers. Results for our integrated simulations show a rich variety of structural arrangements for aggregates of all sizes. Elongated fibril-like structures can form transiently in the 20-mer case, but they are not stable and easily interconvert in more globular and disordered forms. Our extensive characterization of the intermediate structures and their physico-chemical determinants points to a high degree of polymorphism for the GNNQQNY sequence that can be reflected at the macroscopic scale. Detailed mechanisms and structures that underlie amyloid aggregation are also provided. PMID:21625573

  7. Testing the applicability of rapid on-site enzymatic activity detection for surface water monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadler, Philipp; Vogl, Wolfgang; Juri, Koschelnik; Markus, Epp; Maximilian, Lackner; Markus, Oismüller; Monika, Kumpan; Peter, Strauss; Regina, Sommer; Gabriela, Ryzinska-Paier; Farnleitner Andreas, H.; Matthias, Zessner

    2015-04-01

    bacteria. Therefore the applicability of on-site enzymatic activity determination as a direct surrogate or proxy parameter for microbiological standard assays and quantification of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) concentration could not be approved and further research in this field is necessary. Presently we conclude that rapid on-site detection of enzymatic activity is applicable for surface water monitoring and that it constitutes a complementary on-site monitoring parameter with high potential. Selection of the type of measured enzymatic activities has to be done on a catchment-specific basis and further work is needed to learn more about its detailed information characteristics in different habitats. The accomplishment of this method detecting continuous data of enzymatic activity in high temporal resolution caused by a target bacterial member is on the way of becoming a powerful tool for water quality monitoring, health related water quality- and early warning requirements.

  8. H.U.B city steps: methods and early findings from a community-based participatory research trial to reduce blood pressure among african americans

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Community-based participatory research (CBPR) has been recognized as an important approach to develop and execute health interventions among marginalized populations, and a key strategy to translate research into practice to help reduce health disparities. Despite growing interest in the CBPR approach, CBPR initiatives rarely use experimental or other rigorous research designs to evaluate health outcomes. This behavioral study describes the conceptual frameworks, methods, and early findings related to the reach, adoption, implementation, and effectiveness on primary blood pressure outcomes. Methods The CBPR, social support, and motivational interviewing frameworks are applied to test treatment effects of a two-phased CBPR walking intervention, including a 6-month active intervention quasi experimental phase and 12-month maintenance randomized controlled trial phase to test dose effects of motivational interviewing. A community advisory board helped develop and execute the culturally-appropriate intervention components which included social support walking groups led by peer coaches, pedometer diary self-monitoring, monthly diet and physical activity education sessions, and individualized motivational interviewing sessions. Although the study is on-going, three month data is available and reported. Analyses include descriptive statistics and paired t tests. Results Of 269 enrolled participants, most were African American (94%) females (85%) with a mean age of 43.8 (SD = 12.1) years. Across the 3 months, 90% of all possible pedometer diaries were submitted. Attendance at the monthly education sessions was approximately 33%. At the 3-month follow-up 227 (84%) participants were retained. From baseline to 3-months, systolic BP [126.0 (SD = 19.1) to 120.3 (SD = 17.9) mmHg; p < 0.001] and diastolic BP [83. 2 (SD = 12.3) to 80.2 (SD = 11.6) mmHg; p < 0.001] were significantly reduced. Conclusions This CBPR study highlights implementation factors and signifies

  9. One-Step Nucleic Acid Amplification (OSNA): A fast molecular test based on CK19 mRNA concentration for assessment of lymph-nodes metastases in early stage endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Fanfani, Francesco; Monterossi, Giorgia; Ghizzoni, Viola; Rossi, Esther D; Dinoi, Giorgia; Inzani, Frediano; Fagotti, Anna; Gueli Alletti, Salvatore; Scarpellini, Francesca; Nero, Camilla; Santoro, Angela; Scambia, Giovanni; Zannoni, Gian F

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the current study is to evaluate the detection rate of micro- and macro-metastases of the One-Step Nucleic Acid Amplification (OSNA) compared to frozen section examination and subsequent ultra-staging examination in early stage endometrial cancer (EC). From March 2016 to June 2016, data of 40 consecutive FIGO stage I EC patients were prospectively collected in an electronic database. The sentinel lymph node mapping was performed in all patients. All mapped nodes were removed and processed. Sentinel lymph nodes were sectioned and alternate sections were respectively examined by OSNA and by frozen section analysis. After frozen section, the residual tissue from each block was processed with step-level sections (each step at 200 micron) including H&E and IHC slides. Sentinel lymph nodes mapping was successful in 29 patients (72.5%). In the remaining 11 patients (27.5%), a systematic pelvic lymphadenectomy was performed. OSNA assay sensitivity and specificity were 87.5% and 100% respectively. Positive and negative predictive values were 100% and 99% respectively, with a diagnostic accuracy of 99%. As far as frozen section examination and subsequent ultra-staging analysis was concerned, we reported sensitivity and specificity of 50% and 94.4% respectively; positive and negative predictive values were 14.3% and 99%, respectively, with an accuracy of 93.6%. In one patient, despite negative OSNA and frozen section analysis of the sentinel node, a macro-metastasis in 1 non-sentinel node was found. The combination of OSNA procedure with the sentinel lymph node mapping could represent an efficient intra-operative tool for the selection of early-stage EC patients to be submitted to systematic lymphadenectomy.

  10. Stepping Up Together: Financing Early Care and Education in the 21st Century. Volume 2. Proceedings for "Making It Economically Viable: Financing Early Care and Education." A Working Meeting (Santa Cruz, California, March 3-5, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Child Advocates, Washington, DC.

    The need for an adequate financial base for the future of quality early care and education (ECE) for young children is being increasingly recognized. This document presents the proceedings for a 1999 working meeting of individuals from diverse fields to identify and explore possible actions related to financing ECE for children birth through 5…

  11. Sequential enzymatic epoxidation involved in polyether lasalocid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Minami, Atsushi; Shimaya, Mayu; Suzuki, Gaku; Migita, Akira; Shinde, Sandip S; Sato, Kyohei; Watanabe, Kenji; Tamura, Tomohiro; Oguri, Hiroki; Oikawa, Hideaki

    2012-05-02

    Enantioselective epoxidation followed by regioselective epoxide opening reaction are the key processes in construction of the polyether skeleton. Recent genetic analysis of ionophore polyether biosynthetic gene clusters suggested that flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) could be involved in the oxidation steps. In vivo and in vitro analyses of Lsd18, an FMO involved in the biosynthesis of polyether lasalocid, using simple olefin or truncated diene of a putative substrate as substrate mimics demonstrated that enantioselective epoxidation affords natural type mono- or bis-epoxide in a stepwise manner. These findings allow us to figure out enzymatic polyether construction in lasalocid biosynthesis. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  12. Sugar ester surfactants: enzymatic synthesis and applications in food industry.

    PubMed

    Neta, Nair S; Teixeira, José A; Rodrigues, Lígia R

    2015-01-01

    Sugar esters are non-ionic surfactants that can be synthesized in a single enzymatic reaction step using lipases. The stability and efficiency of lipases under unusual conditions and using non-conventional media can be significantly improved through immobilization and protein engineering. Also, the development of de novo enzymes has seen a significant increase lately under the scope of the new field of synthetic biology. Depending on the esterification degree and the nature of fatty acid and/or sugar, a range of sugar esters can be synthesized. Due to their surface activity and emulsifying capacity, sugar esters are promising for applications in food industry.

  13. Enzymatic Decontamination of Environmental Organophosphorus Compounds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-04

    ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) The abstract is below since many authors do not follow the 200 word limit 14. SUBJECT TERMS organophosphorus compounds ...5404 Enzymatic decontamination of environmental organophosphorus compounds REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 18. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION ON THIS PAGE...239-18 298-102 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 20. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UL - 4-Dec-2006 Enzymatic decontamination of environmental organophosphorus compounds

  14. Enzymatic regeneration of adenosine triphosphate cofactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    Regenerating adenosine triphosphate (ATP) from adenosine diphosphate (ADP) by enzymatic process which utilizes carbamyl phosphate as phosphoryl donor is technique used to regenerate expensive cofactors. Process allows complex enzymatic reactions to be considered as candidates for large-scale continuous processes.

  15. Conscious coupling: The challenges and opportunities of cascading enzymatic microreactors.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Pia; Marques, Marco P C; O'Sullivan, Brian; Baganz, Frank; Wohlgemuth, Roland; Szita, Nicolas

    2017-07-01

    The continuous production of high value or difficult to synthesize products is of increasing interest to the pharmaceutical industry. Cascading reaction systems have already been employed for chemical synthesis with great success, allowing a quick change in reaction conditions and addition of new reactants as well as removal of side products. A cascading system can remove the need for isolating unstable intermediates, increasing the yield of a synthetic pathway. Based on the success for chemical synthesis, the question arises how cascading systems could be beneficial to chemo-enzymatic or biocatalytic synthesis. Microreactors, with their rapid mass and heat transfer, small reaction volumes and short diffusion pathways, are promising tools for the development of such processes. In this mini-review, the authors provide an overview of recent examples of cascaded microreactors. Special attention will be paid to how microreactors are combined and the challenges as well as opportunities that arise from such combinations. Selected chemical reaction cascades will be used to illustrate this concept, before the discussion is widened to include chemo-enzymatic and multi-enzyme cascades. The authors also present the state of the art of online and at-line monitoring for enzymatic microreactor cascades. Finally, the authors review work-up and purification steps and their integration with microreactor cascades, highlighting the potential and the challenges of integrated cascades. © 2017 The Authors. Biotechnology Journal published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Resveratrol Interferes with an Early Step in the Fibrillization Pathway of Human Lysozyme and Modulates it towards Less-Toxic, Off-Pathway Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Kamal Zaidi, Fatima; Bhat, Rajiv

    2018-01-18

    The effect of resveratrol, a polyphenol in red wine, on the amyloid fibril formation of human lysozyme (HuL) was investigated, towards elucidating the mechanism of resveratrol action and probing its role as a possible modulator of lysozyme aggregation and toxicity. By using a number of biophysical tools, resveratrol was observed to alter the fibrillization kinetics of HuL and inhibit its fibrillization by binding with weak to moderate affinity to the conformations populated at the early stages of the pathway with concomitant stabilization of these initial conformations. The marginal decrease in the lifetime of HuL in the presence of resveratrol by time-resolved fluorescence measurements indicated the involvement of a static quenching mechanism in the interaction between HuL and resveratrol. Docking studies predicted the binding of resveratrol to aggregation-prone regions in HuL, and structure and activity analyses demonstrated the retention of much of the α-helical structure and activity of HuL in the presence of resveratrol. Resveratrol modulated the fibrillization pathway towards less-hydrophobic, less-toxic, off-pathway aggregates. These results demonstrate that binding of resveratrol to HuL could protect against the formation of pathogenic, cytotoxic aggregates formed in amyloidogenic disorders, such as systemic amyloidosis; thus suggesting its potential as a plausible therapeutic agent against lysozyme amyloidosis. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Early ART initiation among HIV-positive pregnant women in central Mozambique: a stepped wedge randomized controlled trial of an optimized Option B+ approach.

    PubMed

    Cowan, James F; Micek, Mark; Cowan, Jessica F Greenberg; Napúa, Manuel; Hoek, Roxanne; Gimbel, Sarah; Gloyd, Stephen; Sherr, Kenneth; Pfeiffer, James T; Chapman, Rachel R

    2015-04-30

    Despite effective prevention strategies and increasing investments in global health, maternal to child transmission (MTCT) of HIV remains a significant problem globally, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. In 2012, there were 94,000 HIV-positive pregnant women in Mozambique. Approximately 15% of these women transmitted HIV to their newborn infants, resulting in nearly 14,000 new pediatric HIV infections that year. To address this issue, in 2013, the Mozambican Ministry of Health implemented the World Health Organization-recommended "Option B+" strategy in which all newly diagnosed HIV-positive pregnant women are counseled to initiate combination anti-retroviral therapy (ART) immediately upon diagnosis regardless of CD4 count and to continue treatment for life. Given the limited experience with Option B+ in sub-Saharan Africa, few rigorous pragmatic trials have studied this new treatment strategy. This study utilizes an initial formative research process involving patient and health care provider interviews and focus groups, workforce assessments, value stream mapping, and commodity utilization assessments to understand the strengths and weaknesses in the current Option B+ care cascade. The formative research is intended to guide identification and prioritization of key workflow modifications and the development of an enhanced adherence and retention package. These two components are bundled into a defined intervention implemented and evaluated across six health facilities utilizing a stepped wedge randomized controlled trial study design. The overall objective of this trial is to develop and test a pilot intervention in central Mozambique to implement the new Option B+ guidelines with high fidelity and increase the proportion of HIV-positive pregnant women in target antenatal clinics (ANC) who start ART prior to delivery and are retained in care. This pragmatic study utilizes research strategies that have the potential to meaningfully improve the Option B+ care

  18. Characterization of the Novel Factor Paa Involved in the Early Steps of the Adhesion Mechanism of Attaching and Effacing Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Batisson, Isabelle; Guimond, Marie-Pierre; Girard, Francis; An, Hongyan; Zhu, Chengru; Oswald, Eric; Fairbrother, John M.; Jacques, Mario; Harel, Josée

    2003-01-01

    Nonenterotoxigenic porcine Escherichia coli strains belonging to the serogroup O45 have been associated with postweaning diarrhea in swine and adhere to intestinal epithelial cells in a characteristic attaching and effacing (A/E) pattern. O45 porcine enteropathogenic E. coli (PEPEC) strain 86-1390 induces typical A/E lesions in a pig ileal explant model. Using TnphoA transposon insertion mutagenesis on strain 86-1390, we found a mutant that did not induce A/E lesions. The insertion was identified in a gene designated paa (porcine A/E-associated gene). Sequence analysis of paa revealed an open reading frame of 753 bp encoding a 27.6-kDa protein which displayed 100, 51.8, and 49% homology with Paa of enterohemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7 strains (EDL933 and Sakai), PEB3 of Campylobacter jejuni, and AcfC of Vibrio cholerae, respectively. Chromosomal localization studies indicated that the region containing paa was inserted between the yciD and yciE genes at about 28.3 min of the E. coli K-12 chromosome. The presence of paa and eae sequences in the porcine O45 strains is highly correlated with the A/E phenotype. However, the observation that three eae-positive but paa-negative PEPEC O45 strains were A/E negative provides further evidence for the importance of the paa gene in the A/E activity of O45 strains. As well, the complementation of the paa mutant restored the A/E activity of the 86-1390 strain, showing the involvement of Paa in PEPEC pathogenicity. These observations suggest that Paa contributes to the early stages of A/E E. coli virulence. PMID:12874331

  19. Characterization of the novel factor paa involved in the early steps of the adhesion mechanism of attaching and effacing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Batisson, Isabelle; Guimond, Marie-Pierre; Girard, Francis; An, Hongyan; Zhu, Chengru; Oswald, Eric; Fairbrother, John M; Jacques, Mario; Harel, Josée

    2003-08-01

    Nonenterotoxigenic porcine Escherichia coli strains belonging to the serogroup O45 have been associated with postweaning diarrhea in swine and adhere to intestinal epithelial cells in a characteristic attaching and effacing (A/E) pattern. O45 porcine enteropathogenic E. coli (PEPEC) strain 86-1390 induces typical A/E lesions in a pig ileal explant model. Using TnphoA transposon insertion mutagenesis on strain 86-1390, we found a mutant that did not induce A/E lesions. The insertion was identified in a gene designated paa (porcine A/E-associated gene). Sequence analysis of paa revealed an open reading frame of 753 bp encoding a 27.6-kDa protein which displayed 100, 51.8, and 49% homology with Paa of enterohemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7 strains (EDL933 and Sakai), PEB3 of Campylobacter jejuni, and AcfC of Vibrio cholerae, respectively. Chromosomal localization studies indicated that the region containing paa was inserted between the yciD and yciE genes at about 28.3 min of the E. coli K-12 chromosome. The presence of paa and eae sequences in the porcine O45 strains is highly correlated with the A/E phenotype. However, the observation that three eae-positive but paa-negative PEPEC O45 strains were A/E negative provides further evidence for the importance of the paa gene in the A/E activity of O45 strains. As well, the complementation of the paa mutant restored the A/E activity of the 86-1390 strain, showing the involvement of Paa in PEPEC pathogenicity. These observations suggest that Paa contributes to the early stages of A/E E. coli virulence.

  20. Phenol Is the Initial Product Formed during Growth and Degradation of Bromobenzene by Tropical Marine Yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica NCIM 3589 via an Early Dehalogenation Step

    PubMed Central

    Vatsal, Aakanksha A.; Zinjarde, Smita S.; RaviKumar, Ameeta

    2017-01-01

    Bromobenzene (BrB), a hydrophobic, recalcitrant organic compound, is listed by the environmental protection agencies as an environmental and marine pollutant having hepatotoxic, mutagenic, teratogenic, and carcinogenic effects. The tropical marine yeast Yarrowia lipolytica 3589 was seen to grow aerobically on BrB and displayed a maximum growth rate (μmax) of 0.04 h-1. Furthermore, we also observed an increase in cell size and sedimentation velocity for the cells grown on BrB as compared to the glucose grown cells. The cells attached to the hydrophobic bromobenzene droplets through its hydrophobic and acid–base interactions. The BrB (0.5%, 47.6 mM) was utilized by the cells with the release of a corresponding amount of bromide (12.87 mM) and yielded a cell mass of 1.86 g/L after showing 34% degradation in 96 h. Maximum dehalogenase activity of 16.16 U/mL was seen in the cell free supernatant after 24 h of growth. Identification of metabolites formed as a result of BrB degradation, namely, phenol, catechol, cis, cis muconic acid, and carbon dioxide were determined by LC–MS and GC–MS. The initial attack on bromobenzene by Y. lipolytica cells lead to the transient accumulation of phenol as an early intermediate which is being reported for the first time. Degradation of phenol led to catechol which was degraded by the ortho- cleavage pathway forming cis, cis muconic acid and then to Krebs cycle intermediates eventually leading to CO2 production. The study shows that dehalogenation via an extracellular dehalogenase occurs prior to ring cleavage with phenol as the preliminary degradative compound being produced. The yeast was also able to grow on the degradative products, i.e., phenol and catechol, to varying degrees which would be of potential relevance in the degradation and remediation of xenobiotic environmental bromoaromatic pollutants such as bromobenzene. PMID:28690604

  1. Phenol Is the Initial Product Formed during Growth and Degradation of Bromobenzene by Tropical Marine Yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica NCIM 3589 via an Early Dehalogenation Step.

    PubMed

    Vatsal, Aakanksha A; Zinjarde, Smita S; RaviKumar, Ameeta

    2017-01-01

    Bromobenzene (BrB), a hydrophobic, recalcitrant organic compound, is listed by the environmental protection agencies as an environmental and marine pollutant having hepatotoxic, mutagenic, teratogenic, and carcinogenic effects. The tropical marine yeast Yarrowia lipolytica 3589 was seen to grow aerobically on BrB and displayed a maximum growth rate (μ max ) of 0.04 h -1 . Furthermore, we also observed an increase in cell size and sedimentation velocity for the cells grown on BrB as compared to the glucose grown cells. The cells attached to the hydrophobic bromobenzene droplets through its hydrophobic and acid-base interactions. The BrB (0.5%, 47.6 mM) was utilized by the cells with the release of a corresponding amount of bromide (12.87 mM) and yielded a cell mass of 1.86 g/L after showing 34% degradation in 96 h. Maximum dehalogenase activity of 16.16 U/mL was seen in the cell free supernatant after 24 h of growth. Identification of metabolites formed as a result of BrB degradation, namely, phenol, catechol, cis, cis muconic acid, and carbon dioxide were determined by LC-MS and GC-MS. The initial attack on bromobenzene by Y. lipolytica cells lead to the transient accumulation of phenol as an early intermediate which is being reported for the first time. Degradation of phenol led to catechol which was degraded by the ortho- cleavage pathway forming cis, cis muconic acid and then to Krebs cycle intermediates eventually leading to CO 2 production. The study shows that dehalogenation via an extracellular dehalogenase occurs prior to ring cleavage with phenol as the preliminary degradative compound being produced. The yeast was also able to grow on the degradative products, i.e., phenol and catechol, to varying degrees which would be of potential relevance in the degradation and remediation of xenobiotic environmental bromoaromatic pollutants such as bromobenzene.

  2. Calcium and calmodulin are involved in blue light induction of the gsa gene for an early chlorophyll biosynthetic step in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed Central

    Im, C S; Matters, G L; Beale, S I

    1996-01-01

    The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii nuclear gene gsa, which encodes the early chlorophyll biosynthetic enzyme glutamate 1-semialdehyde aminotransferase (GSAT), is specifically induced by blue light in cells synchronized in a 12-hr-light and 12-hr-dark regime. Light induction required the presence of a nitrogen source in the incubation medium. Maximal induction also required acetate. However, in the absence of acetate, partial induction occurred when Ca2+ was present in the medium at concentrations of > or = 1 microM. The Ca2+ channel-blocking agents Nd3+ and nifedipine partially inhibited the external Ca(2+)-supported induction of GSAT mRNA but did not inhibit acetate-supported induction. The calmodulin antagonists trifluoperazine and N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide inhibited both external Ca(2+)-supported and acetate-supported induction. The Ca2+ ionophore A23187 caused a transient induction in the dark. These results suggest that Ca2+ and calmodulin are involved in the signal transduction pathway linking blue light perception to the induction of GSAT mRNA. The electron transport uncoupler carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone inhibited acetate-supported induction of GSAT mRNA but did not inhibit external Ca(2+)-supported induction. It is proposed that in the presence of acetate, an internal pool of Ca2+ can be mobilized as a second message, whereas in the absence of acetate, internal Ca2+ is not available but the requirement for Ca2+ can be partially met by an external Ca2+ source. The mobilization of internal Ca2+ may require energy derived from metabolism of acetate. PMID:8989881

  3. Bubble electrodeposition of gold porous nanocorals for the enzymatic and non-enzymatic detection of glucose.

    PubMed

    Sanzó, Gabriella; Taurino, Irene; Antiochia, Riccarda; Gorton, Lo; Favero, Gabriele; Mazzei, Franco; De Micheli, Giovanni; Carrara, Sandro

    2016-12-01

    Au nanocorals are grown on gold screen-printed electrodes (SPEs) by using a novel and simple one-step electrodeposition process. Scanning electron microscopy was used for the morphological characterization. The devices were assembled on a three-electrode SPE system, which is flexible and mass producible. The electroactive surface area, determined by cyclic voltammetry in sulphuric acid, was found to be 0.07±0.01cm(2) and 35.3±2.7cm(2) for bare Au and nanocoral Au, respectively. The nanocoral modified SPEs were used to develop an enzymatic glucose biosensor based on H2O2 detection. Au nanocoral electrodes showed a higher sensitivity of 48.3±0.9μA/(mMcm(2)) at +0.45V vs Ag|AgCl compared to a value of 24.6±1.3μA/(mMcm(2)) at +0.70V vs Ag|AgCl obtained with bare Au electrodes. However, the modified electrodes have indeed proven to be extremely powerful for the direct detection of glucose with a non-enzymatic approach. The results confirmed a clear peak observed by using nanocoral Au electrode even in the presence of chloride ions at physiological concentration. Amperometric study carried out at +0.15V vs Ag|AgCl in the presence of 0.12M NaCl showed a linear range for glucose between 0.1 and 13mM. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Substrate-Related Factors Affecting Enzymatic Saccharification of Lignocelluloses: Our Recent Understanding

    Shao-Yuan Leu; J.Y. Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Enzymatic saccharification of cellulose is a key step in conversion of plant biomass to advanced biofuel and chemicals. Many substrate-related factors affect saccharification. Rather than examining the role of each individual factor on overall saccharification efficiency, this study examined how each factor affects the three basic processes of a heterogeneous...

  5. Combined subcritical water and enzymatic hydrolysis for reducing sugar production from coconut husk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muharja, Maktum; Junianti, Fitri; Nurtono, Tantular; Widjaja, Arief

    2017-05-01

    Coconut husk wastes are abundantly available in Indonesia. It has a potential to be used into alternative renewable energy sources such as hydrogen using enzymatic hydrolysis followed by a fermentation process. Unfortunately, enzymatic hydrolysis is hampered by the complex structure of lignocellulose, so the cellulose component is hard to degrade. In this study, Combined Subcritical Water (SCW) and enzymatic hydrolysis are applied to enhance fermentable, thereby reducing production of sugar from coconut husk. There were two steps in this study, the first step was coconut husk pretreated by SCW in batch reactor at 80 bar and 150-200°C for 60 minutes reaction time. Secondly, solid fraction from the results of SCW was hydrolyzed using the mixture of pure cellulose and xylanase enzymes. Analysis was conducted on untreated and SCW-treated by gravimetric assay, liquid fraction after SCW and solid fraction after enzymatic hydrolysis using DNS assay. The maximum yield of reducing sugar (including xylose, arabinose glucose, galactose, mannose) was 1.254 gr per 6 gr raw material, representing 53.95% of total sugar in coconut husk biomass which was obtained at 150°C 80 bar for 60 minutes reaction time of SCW-treated and 6 hour of enzymatic hydrolysis using mixture of pure cellulose and xylanase enzymes (18.6 U /gram of coconut husk).

  6. What’s New in Enzymatic Halogenations

    PubMed Central

    Fujimori, Danica Galoniæ; Walsh, Christopher T.

    2007-01-01

    Summary The halogenation of thousands of natural products occurs during biosynthesis and often confers important functional properties. While haloperoxidases had been the default paradigm for enzymatic incorporation of halogens, via X+ equivalents into organic scaffolds, a combination of microbial genome sequencing, enzymatic studies and structural biology have provided deep new insights into enzymatic transfer of halide equivalents in three oxidation states. These are: (1) the halide ions (X−) abundant in nature, (2) halogen atoms (X•), and (3) the X+ equivalents. The mechanism of halogen incorporation is tailored to the electronic demands of specific substrates and involves enzymes with distinct redox coenzyme requirements. PMID:17881282

  7. Enzymatic degradation of thiolated chitosan.

    PubMed

    Laffleur, Flavia; Hintzen, Fabian; Rahmat, Deni; Shahnaz, Gul; Millotti, Gioconda; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the biodegradability of thiolated chitosans in comparison to unmodified chitosan. Mediated by carbodiimide, thioglycolic acid (TGA) and mercaptonicotinic acid (MNA) were covalently attached to chitosan via formation an amide bond. Applying two different concentrations of carbodiimide 50 and 100 mM, two chitosan TGA conjugates (TGA A and TGA B) were obtained. According to chitosan solution (3% m/v) thiomer solutions were prepared and chitosanolytic enzyme solutions were added. Lysozyme, pectinase and cellulase were examined in chitosan degrading activity. The enzymatic degradability of these thiomers was investigated by viscosity measurements with a plate-plate viscometer. The obtained chitosan TGA conjugate A displayed 267.7 µmol and conjugate B displayed 116.3 µmol of immobilized thiol groups. With 325.4 µmol immobilized thiol groups, chitosan MNA conjugate displayed the most content of thiol groups. In rheological studies subsequently the modification proved that chitosan TGA conjugates with a higher coupling rate of thiol groups were not only degraded to a lesser extent by 20.9-26.4% but also more slowly. Chitosan mercaptonicotinic acid was degraded by 31.4-50.1% depending the investigated enzyme and even faster than unmodified chitosan. According to these results the biodegradability can be influenced by various modifications of the polymer which showed in particular that the rate of biodegradation is increased when MNA is the ligand, whereas the degradation is hampered when TGA is used as ligand for chitosan.

  8. ß-Cyanoalanine Synthase Action in Root Hair Elongation is Exerted at Early Steps of the Root Hair Elongation Pathway and is Independent of Direct Cyanide Inactivation of NADPH Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Arenas-Alfonseca, Lucía; Gotor, Cecilia; Romero, Luis C; García, Irene

    2018-05-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, cyanide is produced concomitantly with ethylene biosynthesis and is mainly detoxified by the ß-cyanoalanine synthase CAS-C1. In roots, CAS-C1 activity is essential to maintain a low level of cyanide for proper root hair development. Root hair elongation relies on polarized cell expansion at the growing tip, and we have observed that CAS-C1 locates in mitochondria and accumulates in root hair tips during root hair elongation, as shown by observing the fluorescence in plants transformed with the translational construct ProC1:CASC1-GFP, containing the complete CAS-C1 gene fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Mutants in the SUPERCENTIPEDE (SCN1) gene, that regulate the NADPH oxidase gene ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE 2 (RHD2)/AtrbohC, are affected at the very early steps of the development of root hair that do not elongate and do not show a preferential localization of the GFP accumulation in the tips of the root hair primordia. Root hairs of mutants in CAS-C1 or RHD2/AtrbohC, whose protein product catalyzes the generation of ROS and the Ca2+ gradient, start to grow out correctly, but they do not elongate. Genetic crosses between the cas-c1 mutant and scn1 or rhd2 mutants were performed, and the detailed phenotypic and molecular characterization of the double mutants demonstrates that scn1 mutation is epistatic to cas-c1 and cas-c1 is epistatic to rhd2 mutation, indicating that CAS-C1 acts in early steps of the root hair development process. Moreover, our results show that the role of CAS-C1 in root hair elongation is independent of H2O2 production and of a direct NADPH oxidase inhibition by cyanide.

  9. Elements for optimizing a one-step enzymatic bio-refinery process of shrimp cuticles: Focus on enzymatic proteolysis screening.

    PubMed

    Baron, R; Socol, M; Kaas, R; Arhaliass, A; Rodriguez Del Pino, J; Le Roux, K; Donnay-Moreno, C; Bergé, J P

    2017-09-01

    This article complements an earlier work published in 2015 Baron et al. (2015) that showed the interest of a shrimp shells bio-refining process. We compare here the effect of eleven commercial proteases at pH 3.5 or 4.0 on a residual amount of shrimp shells proteins after 6 h at 50 °C. The two pH are obtained when respectively 40 and 25 mmol of formic acid are added to 5 g of mild dried shell. Deproteinisation yield above 95% are obtained. Residual amino acids profile in the solid phase was identical for the eleven proteases except for pepsin which was similar to the raw material profile. A significant relative increase in the proportion of Glycine is observed for the ten other cases. Likewise, shapes of size exclusion chromatograms of the dissolved phase are similar except with pepsin.

  10. IMPORTANCE OF ENZYMATIC BIOTRANSFORMATION IN IMMUNOTOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many immunotoxic compounds, such as benzene and other organic solvents, pesticides, mycotoxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, can alter immune function only after undergoing enzyme-mediated reactions within various tissues. In the review that follows, the role of enzymatic...

  11. BENEFITS OF TOTAL BODY PHOTOGRAPHY AND DIGITAL DERMOSCOPY (“TWO-STEP METHOD OF DIGITAL FOLLOW-UP”) IN THE EARLY DIAGNOSIS OF MELANOMA IN HIGH-RISK PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Salerni, Gabriel; Carrera, Cristina; Lovatto, Louise; Puig-Butille, Joan Anton; Badenas, Celia; Plana, Estel; Puig, Susana; Malvehy, Josep

    2011-01-01

    Background Early detection of melanoma is the best way to improve prognosis. Digital follow up (DFU) programs of high-risk populations could be an efficient strategy for detecting early melanomas with low morbidity. Objective to report the added value of the use of the “two-step method” (digital total-body photography and digital dermoscopy) Methods Analysis of the surveillance of 618 high-risk melanoma patients included in our DFU-program from 1999 to 2008. Results A total of 11396 lesions were monitored (mean 18.44 per patient) during a median follow-up of 96 months (median 10 visits per patient). 1152 lesions, 1.86 per patient, were excised. Almost 70% (798) were lesions previously registered at least twice, while 356 (30%) were detected and removed in the same visit. During follow-up, 98 melanomas (8.5% of excised lesions) were diagnosed in 78 patients (12.6%). 53 melanomas were in situ (53.3%), while invasive (45) showed a Breslow index of less than 1 mm (median 0.5 mm) and none was ulcerated. Limitations Since there are no control groups we cannot convey if the combined use of total-body photography and digital dermoscopy is more beneficial than these techniques used separately. Conclusion DFU with Total-Body Photography and Dermoscopy in a selected high-risk population demonstrated the early detection of melanomas with a low rate of excisions. Long-term follow-up is required to allow the detection of slow growing melanomas. Based on our 10-year experience, melanomas can be diagnosed at any time, suggesting that in high-risk population, DFU should be maintained with time. PMID:21683472

  12. Non-enzymatic depolymerization of cotton cellulose by fungal mimicking metabolites

    Anne Christine Steenkjaer Hastrup; Caitlin Howell; Bo Jensen; Frederick Green

    2011-01-01

    Small, low molecular weight, non-enzymatic compounds have been linked to the early stages of brown rot decay as the enzymes involved with holocellulose degradation are too large to penetrate the S3 layer of intact wood cells. We investigated the most notable of these compounds, i.e. hydrogen peroxide, iron, and oxalic acid. The former two are involved in the Fenton...

  13. Single-Molecule Probing the Energy Landscape of Enzymatic Reaction and Non-Covalent Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, H. Peter; Hu, Dehong; Chen, Yu; Vorpagel, Erich R.

    2002-03-01

    We have applied single-molecule spectroscopy under physiological conditions to study the mechanisms and dynamics of T4 lysozyme enzymatic reactions, characterizing mode-specific protein conformational dynamics. Enzymatic reaction turnovers and the associated structure changes of individual protein molecules were observed simultaneously in real-time. The overall reaction rates were found to vary widely from molecule-to-molecule, and the initial non-specific binding of the enzyme to the substrate was seen to dominate this inhomogeneity. The reaction steps subsequent to the initial binding were found to have homogeneous rates. Molecular dynamics simulation has been applied to elucidate the mechanism and intermediate states of the single-molecule enzymatic reaction. Combining the analysis of single-molecule experimental trajectories, MD simulation trajectories, and statistical modeling, we have revealed the nature of multiple intermediate states involved in the active enzyme-substrate complex formation and the associated conformational change mechanism and dynamics.

  14. Improving enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency of wheat straw through sequential autohydrolysis and alkaline post-extraction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xinxing; Huang, Chen; Zhai, Shengcheng; Liang, Chen; Huang, Caoxing; Lai, Chenhuan; Yong, Qiang

    2018-03-01

    In this work, a two-step pretreatment process of wheat straw was established by combining autohydrolysis pretreatment and alkaline post-extraction. The results showed that employing alkaline post-extraction to autohydrolyzed wheat straw could significantly improve its enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency from 36.0% to 83.7%. Alkaline post-extraction lead to the changes of the structure characteristics of autohydrolyzed wheat straw. Associations between enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency and structure characteristics were also studied. The results showed that the factors of structure characteristics such as delignification, xylan removal yield, crystallinity, accessibility and hydrophobicity are positively related to enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency within a certain range for alkaline post-extracted wheat straw. The results demonstrated that autohydrolysis coupled with alkaline post-extraction is an effective and promising method to gain fermentable sugars from biomass. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. One-step fabrication of multifunctional micromotors.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wenlong; Liu, Mei; Liu, Limei; Zhang, Hui; Dong, Bin; Li, Christopher Y

    2015-09-07

    Although artificial micromotors have undergone tremendous progress in recent years, their fabrication normally requires complex steps or expensive equipment. In this paper, we report a facile one-step method based on an emulsion solvent evaporation process to fabricate multifunctional micromotors. By simultaneously incorporating various components into an oil-in-water droplet, upon emulsification and solidification, a sphere-shaped, asymmetric, and multifunctional micromotor is formed. Some of the attractive functions of this model micromotor include autonomous movement in high ionic strength solution, remote control, enzymatic disassembly and sustained release. This one-step, versatile fabrication method can be easily scaled up and therefore may have great potential in mass production of multifunctional micromotors for a wide range of practical applications.

  16. Molecular Steps in the Immune Signaling Pathway Evoked by Plant Elicitor Peptides: Ca2+-Dependent Protein Kinases, Nitric Oxide, and Reactive Oxygen Species Are Downstream from the Early Ca2+ Signal1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi; Zhao, Yichen; Walker, Robin K.; Berkowitz, Gerald A.

    2013-01-01

    Endogenous plant elicitor peptides (Peps) can act to facilitate immune signaling and pathogen defense responses. Binding of these peptides to the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plasma membrane-localized Pep receptors (PEPRs) leads to cytosolic Ca2+ elevation, an early event in a signaling cascade that activates immune responses. This immune response includes the amplification of signaling evoked by direct perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns by plant cells under assault. Work included in this report further characterizes the Pep immune response and identifies new molecular steps in the signal transduction cascade. The PEPR coreceptor BRASSINOSTEROID-INSENSITIVE1 Associated Kinase1 contributes to generation of the Pep-activated Ca2+ signal and leads to increased defense gene expression and resistance to a virulent bacterial pathogen. Ca2+-dependent protein kinases (CPKs) decode the Ca2+ signal, also facilitating defense gene expression and enhanced resistance to the pathogen. Nitric oxide and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase-dependent reactive oxygen species generation (due to the function of Respiratory Burst Oxidase Homolog proteins D and F) are also involved downstream from the Ca2+ signal in the Pep immune defense signal transduction cascade, as is the case with BRASSINOSTEROID-INSENSITIVE1 Associated Kinase1 and CPK5, CPK6, and CPK11. These steps of the pathogen defense response are required for maximal Pep immune activation that limits growth of a virulent bacterial pathogen in the plant. We find a synergism between function of the PEPR and Flagellin Sensing2 receptors in terms of both nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species generation. Presented results are also consistent with the involvement of the secondary messenger cyclic GMP and a cyclic GMP-activated Ca2+-conducting channel in the Pep immune signaling pathway. PMID:24019427

  17. One-step fabrication of multifunctional micromotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wenlong; Liu, Mei; Liu, Limei; Zhang, Hui; Dong, Bin; Li, Christopher Y.

    2015-08-01

    Although artificial micromotors have undergone tremendous progress in recent years, their fabrication normally requires complex steps or expensive equipment. In this paper, we report a facile one-step method based on an emulsion solvent evaporation process to fabricate multifunctional micromotors. By simultaneously incorporating various components into an oil-in-water droplet, upon emulsification and solidification, a sphere-shaped, asymmetric, and multifunctional micromotor is formed. Some of the attractive functions of this model micromotor include autonomous movement in high ionic strength solution, remote control, enzymatic disassembly and sustained release. This one-step, versatile fabrication method can be easily scaled up and therefore may have great potential in mass production of multifunctional micromotors for a wide range of practical applications.Although artificial micromotors have undergone tremendous progress in recent years, their fabrication normally requires complex steps or expensive equipment. In this paper, we report a facile one-step method based on an emulsion solvent evaporation process to fabricate multifunctional micromotors. By simultaneously incorporating various components into an oil-in-water droplet, upon emulsification and solidification, a sphere-shaped, asymmetric, and multifunctional micromotor is formed. Some of the attractive functions of this model micromotor include autonomous movement in high ionic strength solution, remote control, enzymatic disassembly and sustained release. This one-step, versatile fabrication method can be easily scaled up and therefore may have great potential in mass production of multifunctional micromotors for a wide range of practical applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Videos S1-S4 and Fig. S1-S3. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03574k

  18. Structural Perspective on Enzymatic Halogenation

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Simple halogen substituents frequently afford key structural features that account for the potency and selectivity of natural products, including antibiotics and hormones. For example, when a single chlorine atom on the antibiotic vancomycin is replaced by hydrogen, the resulting antibacterial activity decreases by up to 70% (HarrisC. M.; KannanR.; KopeckaH.; HarrisT. M.J. Am. Chem. Soc.1985, 107, 6652−6658). This Account analyzes how structure underlies mechanism in halogenases, the molecular machines designed by nature to incorporate halogens into diverse substrates. Traditional synthetic methods of integrating halogens into complex molecules are often complicated by a lack of specificity and regioselectivity. Nature, however, has developed a variety of elegant mechanisms for halogenating specific substrates with both regio- and stereoselectivity. An improved understanding of the biological routes toward halogenation could lead to the development of novel synthetic methods for the creation of new compounds with enhanced functions. Already, researchers have co-opted a fluorinase from the microorganism Streptomyces cattleya to produce 18F-labeled molecules for use in positron emission tomography (PET) (DengH.; CobbS. L.; GeeA. D.; LockhartA.; MartarelloL.; McGlincheyR. P.; O’HaganD.; OnegaM.Chem. Commun.2006, 652−654). Therefore, the discovery and characterization of naturally occurring enzymatic halogenation mechanisms has become an active area of research. The catalogue of known halogenating enzymes has expanded from the familiar haloperoxidases to include oxygen-dependent enzymes and fluorinases. Recently, the discovery of a nucleophilic halogenase that catalyzes chlorinations has expanded the repertoire of biological halogenation chemistry (DongC.; HuangF.; DengH.; SchaffrathC.; SpencerJ. B.; O’HaganD.; NaismithJ. H.Nature2004, 427, 561−56514765200). Structural characterization has provided a basis toward a mechanistic understanding of the specificity

  19. Enzymatic analysis of α-ketoglutaramate—A biomarker for hyperammonemia

    PubMed Central

    Halámková, Lenka; Mailloux, Shay; Halámek, Jan; Cooper, Arthur J.L.; Katz, Evgeny

    2012-01-01

    Two enzymatic assays were developed for the analysis of α-ketoglutaramate (KGM)—an important biomarker of hepatic encephalopathy and other hyperammonemic diseases. In both procedures, KGM is first converted to α-ketoglutarate (KTG) via a reaction catalyzed by ω-amidase (AMD). In the first procedure, KTG generated in the AMD reaction initiates a biocatalytic cascade in which the concerted action of alanine transaminase and lactate dehydrogenase results in the oxidation of NADH. In the second procedure, KTG generated from KGM is reductively aminated, with the concomitant oxidation of NADH, in a reaction catalyzed by L-glutamic dehydrogenase. In both assays, the decrease in optical absorbance (λ=340 nm) corresponding to NADH oxidation is used to quantify concentrations of KGM. The two analytical procedures were applied to 50% (v/v) human serum diluted with aqueous solutions containing the assay components and spiked with concentrations of KGM estimated to be present in normal human plasma and in plasma from hyperammonemic patients. Since KTG is the product of AMD-catalyzed hydrolysis of KGM, in a separate study, this compound was used as a surrogate for KGM. Statistical analyses of samples mimicking the concentration of KGM assumed to be present in normal and pathological concentration ranges were performed. Both enzymatic assays for KGM were confirmed to discriminate between the predicted normal and pathophysiological concentrations of the analyte. The present study is the first step toward the development of a clinically useful probe for KGM analysis in biological fluids. PMID:23141304

  20. Removal of Water-Soluble Extractives Improves the Enzymatic Digestibility of Steam-Pretreated Softwood Barks.

    PubMed

    Frankó, Balázs; Carlqvist, Karin; Galbe, Mats; Lidén, Gunnar; Wallberg, Ola

    2018-02-01

    Softwood bark contains a large amounts of extractives-i.e., soluble lipophilic (such as resin acids) and hydrophilic components (phenolic compounds, stilbenes). The effects of the partial removal of water-soluble extractives before acid-catalyzed steam pretreatment on enzymatic digestibility were assessed for two softwood barks-Norway spruce and Scots pine. A simple hot water extraction step removed more than half of the water-soluble extractives from the barks, which improved the enzymatic digestibility of both steam-pretreated materials. This effect was more pronounced for the spruce than the pine bark, as evidenced by the 30 and 11% glucose yield improvement, respectively, in the enzymatic digestibility. Furthermore, analysis of the chemical composition showed that the acid-insoluble lignin content of the pretreated materials decreased when water-soluble extractives were removed prior to steam pretreatment. This can be explained by a decreased formation of water-insoluble "pseudo-lignin" from water-soluble bark phenolics during the acid-catalyzed pretreatment, which otherwise results in distorted lignin analysis and may also contribute to the impaired enzymatic digestibility of the barks. Thus, this study advocates the removal of extractives as the first step in the processing of bark or bark-rich materials in a sugar platform biorefinery.

  1. Radical-Mediated Enzymatic Polymerizations

    PubMed Central

    Zavada, Scott R.; Battsengel, Tsatsral; Scott, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization reactions are commonly effected by exposing monomer formulations to some initiation stimulus such as elevated temperature, light, or a chemical reactant. Increasingly, these polymerization reactions are mediated by enzymes―catalytic proteins―owing to their reaction efficiency under mild conditions as well as their environmental friendliness. The utilization of enzymes, particularly oxidases and peroxidases, for generating radicals via reduction-oxidation mechanisms is especially common for initiating radical-mediated polymerization reactions, including vinyl chain-growth polymerization, atom transfer radical polymerization, thiol–ene step-growth polymerization, and polymerization via oxidative coupling. While enzyme-mediated polymerization is useful for the production of materials intended for subsequent use, it is especially well-suited for in situ polymerizations, where the polymer is formed in the place where it will be utilized. Such polymerizations are especially useful for biomedical adhesives and for sensing applications. PMID:26848652

  2. Enzymatic approaches to rare sugar production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenli; Zhang, Tao; Jiang, Bo; Mu, Wanmeng

    Rare sugars have recently attracted much attention because of their potential applications in the food, nutraceutical, and pharmaceutical industries. A systematic strategy for enzymatic production of rare sugars, named Izumoring, was developed >10years ago. The strategy consists of aldose-ketose isomerization, ketose C-3 epimerization, and monosaccharide oxidation-reduction. Recent development of the Izumoring strategy is reviewed herein, especially the genetic approaches to the improvement of rare sugar-producing enzymes and the applications of target-oriented bioconversion. In addition, novel non-Izumoring enzymatic approaches are also summarized, including enzymatic condensation, phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cascade reaction, aldose epimerization, ulosonic acid decarboxylation, and biosynthesis of rare disaccharides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Enzymatic Inverse Opal Hydrogel Particles for Biocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Gu, Hongcheng; Chen, Zhuoyue; Shang, Luoran; Zhao, Ze; Gu, Zhongze; Zhao, Yuanjin

    2017-04-19

    Enzymatic carriers have a demonstrated value for chemical reactions and industrial applications. Here, we present a novel kind of inverse opal hydrogel particles as the enzymatic carriers. The particles were negatively replicated from spherical colloidal crystal templates by using magnetic nanoparticles tagged acrylamide hydrogel. Thus, they were endowed with the features of monodispersity, small volume, complete penetrating structure, and controllable motion, which are all beneficial for improving the efficiency of biocatalysis. In addition, due to the ordered porous nanostructure, the inverse opal hydrogel particles were imparted with unique photonic band gaps (PBGs) and vivid structural colors for encoding varieties of immobilized enzymes and for constructing a multienzymes biocatalysis system. These features of the inverse opal hydrogel particles indicate that they are ideal enzymatic carriers for biocatalysis.

  4. Enzymatic Enantioselective Decarboxylative Protonation of Heteroaryl Malonates

    PubMed Central

    Lewin, Ross; Goodall, Mark; Thompson, Mark L; Leigh, James; Breuer, Michael; Baldenius, Kai; Micklefield, Jason

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme aryl/alkenyl malonate decarboxylase (AMDase) catalyses the enantioselective decarboxylative protonation (EDP) of a range of disubstituted malonic acids to give homochiral carboxylic acids that are valuable synthetic intermediates. AMDase exhibits a number of advantages over the non-enzymatic EDP methods developed to date including higher enantioselectivity and more environmentally benign reaction conditions. In this report, AMDase and engineered variants have been used to produce a range of enantioenriched heteroaromatic α-hydroxycarboxylic acids, including pharmaceutical precursors, from readily accessible α-hydroxymalonates. The enzymatic method described here represents an improvement upon existing synthetic chemistry methods that have been used to produce similar compounds. The relationship between the structural features of these new substrates and the kinetics associated with their enzymatic decarboxylation is explored, which offers further insight into the mechanism of AMDase. PMID:25766433

  5. Cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of combination therapy in early rheumatoid arthritis: randomized comparison of combined step-down prednisolone, methotrexate and sulphasalazine with sulphasalazine alone. COBRA Trial Group. Combinatietherapie Bij Reumatoïde Artritis.

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, A C; Bibo, J C; Boers, M; Engel, G L; van der Linden, S

    1998-10-01

    Assessment of the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of early intervention in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, with combined step-down prednisolone, methotrexate and sulphasalazine, compared to sulphasalazine alone. Multicentre 56 week randomized double-blind trial with full economic analysis of direct costs and utility analysis with rating scale and standard gamble measurement techniques. The combined-treatment group included 76 patients and the sulphasalazine group 78 patients. The mean total costs per patient in the first 56 weeks of follow-up were $5519 for combined treatment and $6511 for treatment with sulphasalazine alone (P = 0.37). Out-patient care, in-patient care and non-health care each contributed about one-third to the total costs. The combined-treatment group appeared to generate savings in the length of hospital stay for RA, non-protocol drugs and costs of home help, but comparisons were not statistically significant. Protocol drugs and monitoring were slightly more expensive in the combined-treatment group. Clinical, radiographic and functional outcomes significantly favoured combined treatment at week 28 (radiography also at week 56). Utility scores also favoured combined treatment. Combined treatment is cost-effective due to enhanced efficacy at lower or equal direct costs.

  6. [Enzymatic methods in the analysis of musts and wines].

    PubMed

    Lafon-Lafourcade, S

    1978-01-01

    The enzymatic methods are based on the property of the enzymes to catalyse specifically and reversibly the conversion of certain metabolites. These methods, developed thanks to the industrial preparation of enzymes, can be applied with no major modification to the analysis of drinks. About 15 constituants of musts and wines can now be determined by these methods. If their cost price was not relatively high, their specificity, sensitivity and rapidity would enable them to compete with the most precise of chemical methods. This is why they are only used in analytic oenology when chemical analysis is most specific enough or too laborious. Enzymatic measurement allows one by its specificity to determine the amount of residual sugar that is fermentable in a dry wine and by its sensitivity to verifie the total disappearance of the malic acid of the wine. Its rapidity must make it preferable to the long and not very specific chemical measurement, especially concerning the determination of citric acid. But glycerol, ethanol and acetic acid can be measured by chemical or chromatographical means with sufficient precision and for a more modest price. In oenology the methods are essentially used for research. They have permitted the study of the combinations of sulphur anhydride in wines (measurement of cetonic acids). The determination of the isomeric nature of the lactic acid produced from sugars by lactic bacteria is based on their application; this determination is a criterium for the identification and classification of these microorganisms. The measurement of the lactic acid during vinification allows the early disclosure of the first effects of a bacterial development; inversely it permits the invalidation of the existence of a lactic sourness, which a high volatile acidity might point to. Lastly, the enzymatic measurement of gluconic acid allows the health of the crop to be controlled.

  7. Enzymatic desulfurization of coal: Third quarterly report

    SciT

    Marquis, Judith K.; Kitchell, Judith P.

    Our current efforts to develop clean coal technology emphasize the advantages of enzymatic desulfurization techniques and have specifically addressed the potential of using partially-purified extracellular microbial enzymes or commercially available enzymes. Our work is focused on the treatment of ''model'' organic sulfur compounds such as dibenzothiophene (DBT) and ethylphenylsulfide (EPS). Furthermore, we are designing experiments to facilitate the enzymatic process by means of a hydrated organic solvent matrix. In this quarter we obtained important results both with the development of our understanding of the enzyme reaction systems and also with the microbial work at Woods Hole. 12 figs., 11 tabs.

  8. Enzymatic transesterification of waste vegetable oil to produce biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Lopresto, C G; Naccarato, S; Albo, L; De Paola, M G; Chakraborty, S; Curcio, S; Calabrò, V

    2015-11-01

    An experimental study on enzymatic transesterification was performed to produce biodiesel from waste vegetable oils. Lipase from Pseudomonas cepacia was covalently immobilized on a epoxy-acrylic resin support. The immobilized enzyme exhibited high catalytic specific surface and allowed an easy recovery, regeneration and reutilisation of biocatalyst. Waste vegetable oils - such as frying oils, considered not competitive with food applications and wastes to be treated - were used as a source of glycerides. Ethanol was used as a short chain alcohol and was added in three steps with the aim to reduce its inhibitory effect on lipase activity. The effect of biocatalyst/substrate feed mass ratios and the waste oil quality have been investigated in order to estimate the process performances. Biocatalyst recovery and reuse have been also studied with the aim to verify the stability of the biocatalyst for its application in industrial scale. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Spectral-Doppler-Sonography - Step by Step].

    PubMed

    Bönhof, Leoni; Steffgen, Ludwig; Bönhof, Jörg

    2018-06-07

    Step by step explanation and detailed overview of the correct approach to spectral-Doppler-sonography, including several practical examples. The article provides comprehensive explanations of the appropriate settings in different situations. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Step-Growth Polymerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stille, J. K.

    1981-01-01

    Following a comparison of chain-growth and step-growth polymerization, focuses on the latter process by describing requirements for high molecular weight, step-growth polymerization kinetics, synthesis and molecular weight distribution of some linear step-growth polymers, and three-dimensional network step-growth polymers. (JN)

  11. Stepping motor controller

    DOEpatents

    Bourret, S.C.; Swansen, J.E.

    1982-07-02

    A stepping motor is microprocessor controlled by digital circuitry which monitors the output of a shaft encoder adjustably secured to the stepping motor and generates a subsequent stepping pulse only after the preceding step has occurred and a fixed delay has expired. The fixed delay is variable on a real-time basis to provide for smooth and controlled deceleration.

  12. Studying enzymatic bioreactions in a millisecond microfluidic flow mixer

    PubMed Central

    Buchegger, Wolfgang; Haller, Anna; van den Driesche, Sander; Kraft, Martin; Lendl, Bernhard; Vellekoop, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the pre-steady state development of enzymatic bioreactions using a microfluidic mixer is presented. To follow such reactions fast mixing of reagents (enzyme and substrate) is crucial. By using a highly efficient passive micromixer based on multilaminar flow, mixing times in the low millisecond range are reached. Four lamination layers in a shallow channel reduce the diffusion lengths to a few micrometers only, enabling very fast mixing. This was proven by confocal fluorescence measurements in the channel’s cross sectional area. Adjusting the overall flow rate in the 200 μm wide and 900 μm long mixing and observation channel makes it possible to investigate enzyme reactions over several seconds. Further, the device enables changing the enzyme/substrate ratio from 1:1 up to 3:1, while still providing high mixing efficiency, as shown for the enzymatic hydrolysis using β-galactosidase. This way, the early kinetics of the enzyme reaction at multiple enzyme/substrate concentrations can be collected in a very short time (minutes). The fast and easy handling of the mixing device makes it a very powerful and convenient instrument for millisecond temporal analysis of bioreactions. PMID:22662071

  13. Bacterial Production and Enzymatic Activities in Deep-Sea Sediments of the Pacific Ocean: Biogeochemical Implications of Different Temperature Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danovaro, R.; Corinaldesi, C.; dell'Anno, A.

    2002-12-01

    The deep-sea bed, acting as the ultimate sink for organic material derived from the upper oceans primary production, is now assumed to play a key role in biogeochemical cycling of organic matter on global scale. Early diagenesis of organic matter in marine sediments is dependent upon biological processes (largely mediated by bacterial activity) and by molecular diffusion. Organic matter reaching the sea floor by sedimentation is subjected to complex biogeochemical transformations that make organic matter largely unsuitable for direct utilization by benthic heterotrophs. Extracellular enzymatic activities in the sediment is generally recognized as the key step in the degradation and utilization of organic polymers by bacteria and a key role in biopolymeric carbon mobilization is played by aminopeptidase, alkaline phosphatase and glucosidase activities. In the present study we investigated bacterial density, bacterial C production and exo-enzymatic activities (aminopeptidase, glucosidase and phosphatase activity) in deep-sea sediments of the Pacific Ocean in relation with the biochemical composition of sediment organic matter (proteins, carbohydrates and lipids), in order to gather information on organic matter cycling and diagenesis. Benthic viral abundance was also measured to investigate the potential role of viruses on microbial loop functioning. Sediment samples were collected at eight stations (depth ranging from 2070-3100 m) along two transects located at the opposite side (north and south) of ocean seismic ridge Juan Fernandez (along latitudes 33° 20' - 33° 40'), constituted by the submerged vulcanoes, which connects the Chilean coasts to Rapa Nui Island. Since the northern and southern sides of this ridge apparently displayed small but significant differences in deep-sea temperature (related to the general ocean circulation), this sampling strategy allowed also investigating the role of different temperature constraints on bacterial activity and

  14. Starch: chemistry, microstructure, processing and enzymatic degradation

    Starch is recognized as one of the most abundant and important commodities containing value added attributes for a vast number of industrial applications. Its chemistry, structure, property and susceptibility to various chemical, physical and enzymatic modifications offer a high technological value ...

  15. Enzymatic preparation of nanocrystalline and microcrystalline cellulose

    Sarah R. Anderson; Dominic Esposito; William Gillette; J.Y. Zhu; Ulrich Baxa; Scott E. Mcneil

    2014-01-01

    Traditional cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) production methods use harsh chemicals, are energetically expensive, and result in a hydrophilic sulfate surface chemistry with limited utility. Enzymatic production of CNCs is a less expensive alternative production method that eliminates the need for harsh chemicals and requires much less energy for mechanical fibrillation and...

  16. pH & Rate of Enzymatic Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clariana, Roy B.

    1991-01-01

    A quantitative and inexpensive way to measure the rate of enzymatic reaction is provided. The effects of different pH levels on the reaction rate of an enzyme from yeast are investigated and the results graphed. Background information, a list of needed materials, directions for preparing solutions, procedure, and results and discussion are…

  17. Enzymatic mechanisms of biological magnetic sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Letuta, Ulyana G; Berdinskiy, Vitaly L; Udagawa, Chikako; Tanimoto, Yoshifumi

    2017-10-01

    Primary biological magnetoreceptors in living organisms is one of the main research problems in magnetobiology. Intracellular enzymatic reactions accompanied by electron transfer have been shown to be receptors of magnetic fields, and spin-dependent ion-radical processes can be a universal mechanism of biological magnetosensitivity. Magnetic interactions in intermediate ion-radical pairs, such as Zeeman and hyperfine (HFI) interactions, in accordance with proposed strict quantum mechanical theory, can determine magnetic-field dependencies of reactions that produce biologically important molecules needed for cell growth. Hyperfine interactions of electrons with nuclear magnetic moments of magnetic isotopes can explain the most important part of biomagnetic sensitivities in a weak magnetic field comparable to the Earth's magnetic field. The theoretical results mean that magnetic-field dependencies of enzymatic reaction rates in a weak magnetic field that can be independent of HFI constant a, if H < a, and are determined by the rate constant of chemical transformations in the enzyme active site. Both Zeeman and HFI interactions predict strong magnetic-field dependence in weak magnetic fields and magnetic-field independence of enzymatic reaction rate constants in strong magnetic fields. The theoretical results can explain the magnetic sensitivity of E. coli cell and demonstrate that intracellular enzymatic reactions are primary magnetoreceptors in living organisms. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:511-521, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Step by Step: Avoiding Spiritual Bypass in 12-Step Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashwell, Craig S.; Clarke, Philip B.; Graves, Elizabeth G.

    2009-01-01

    With spirituality as a cornerstone, 12-step groups serve a vital role in the recovery community. It is important for counselors to be mindful, however, of the potential for clients to be in spiritual bypass, which likely will undermine the recovery process.

  19. Enzymatic induction of supramolecular order and bioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chengbiao; Ren, Xinrui; Ding, Dan; Wang, Ling; Yang, Zhimou

    2016-05-01

    We showed in this study that enzymatic triggering is a totally different pathway for the preparation of self-assembling nanomaterials to the heating-cooling process. Because the molecules were under lower energy levels and the molecular conformation was more ordered during the enzymatic triggeration under mild conditions, nanomaterials with higher supramolecular order could be obtained through biocatalytic control. In this study, nanoparticles were obtained by an enzymatic reaction and nanofibers were observed through the heating-cooling process. We observed a distinct trough at 318 nm from the CD spectrum of a particle sample but not a fiber sample, suggesting the long range arrangement of molecules and helicity in the nanoparticles. The nanoparticles with higher supramolecular order possessed much better potency as a protein vaccine adjuvant because it accelerated the DC maturation and elicited stronger T-cells cytokine production than the nanofibers. Our study demonstrated that biocatalytic triggering is a useful method for preparing supramolecular nanomaterials with higher supramolecular order and probably better bioactivity.We showed in this study that enzymatic triggering is a totally different pathway for the preparation of self-assembling nanomaterials to the heating-cooling process. Because the molecules were under lower energy levels and the molecular conformation was more ordered during the enzymatic triggeration under mild conditions, nanomaterials with higher supramolecular order could be obtained through biocatalytic control. In this study, nanoparticles were obtained by an enzymatic reaction and nanofibers were observed through the heating-cooling process. We observed a distinct trough at 318 nm from the CD spectrum of a particle sample but not a fiber sample, suggesting the long range arrangement of molecules and helicity in the nanoparticles. The nanoparticles with higher supramolecular order possessed much better potency as a protein vaccine

  20. A Step Circuit Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Susan

    1995-01-01

    Aerobics instructors can use step aerobics to motivate students. One creative method is to add the step to the circuit workout. By incorporating the step, aerobic instructors can accommodate various fitness levels. The article explains necessary equipment and procedures, describing sample stations for cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular strength,…

  1. Volleyball. Steps to Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viera, Barbara L.; Ferguson, Bonnie Jill

    This handbook was written to introduce learners to the game of volleyball and its skills and strategies. Twenty-four steps to mastery of techniques of the game are organized sequentially, providing a transition from one skill to the next. An explanation of what is covered in the step, why it is important, and how to execute or perform the step's…

  2. Biofunctional Properties of Enzymatic Squid Meat Hydrolysate

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Joon Hyuk; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Kim, Sang Moo

    2015-01-01

    Squid is one of the most important commercial fishes in the world and is mainly utilized or consumed as sliced raw fish or as processed products. The biofunctional activities of enzymatic squid meat hydrolysate were determined to develop value-added products. Enzymatic squid hydrolysate manufactured by Alcalase effectively quenched 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical, hydroxyl radical, and hydrogen peroxide radical with IC50 values of 311, 3,410, and 111.5 μg/mL, respectively. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory activity of squid hydrolysate was strong with an IC50 value of 145.1 μg/mL, while tyrosinase inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 4.72 mg/mL was moderately low. Overall, squid meat hydrolysate can be used in food or cosmetic industries as a bioactive ingredient and possibly be used in the manufacture of seasoning, bread, noodle, or cosmetics. PMID:25866752

  3. A singular enzymatic megacomplex from Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Straight, Paul D; Fischbach, Michael A; Walsh, Christopher T; Rudner, David Z; Kolter, Roberto

    2007-01-02

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS), polyketide synthases (PKS), and hybrid NRPS/PKS are of particular interest, because they produce numerous therapeutic agents, have great potential for engineering novel compounds, and are the largest enzymes known. The predicted masses of known enzymatic assembly lines can reach almost 5 megadaltons, dwarfing even the ribosome (approximately 2.6 megadaltons). Despite their uniqueness and importance, little is known about the organization of these enzymes within the native producer cells. Here we report that an 80-kb gene cluster, which occupies approximately 2% of the Bacillus subtilis genome, encodes the subunits of approximately 2.5 megadalton active hybrid NRPS/PKS. Many copies of the NRPS/PKS assemble into a single organelle-like membrane-associated complex of tens to hundreds of megadaltons. Such an enzymatic megacomplex is unprecedented in bacterial subcellular organization and has important implications for engineering novel NRPS/PKSs.

  4. Production of MAG via enzymatic glycerolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamlus, Norul Naziraa Ahmad; Derawi, Darfizzi; Salimon, Jumat

    2015-09-01

    Enzymatic glycerolysis of a medium chain methyl ester, methyl laurate was performed using lipase Candida antarctica (Novozyme 435) for 6 hours at 55°C. The percentage of components mixture of product were determined by using gas chromatography technique. The enzymatic reaction was successfully produced monolaurin (45.9 %), dilaurin (47.1 %) and trilaurin (7.0 %) respectively. Thin layer chromatography (TLC) plate also showed a good separation of component spots. Fourier transformation infra-red (FTIR) spectrum showed the presence of ester carbonyl at wavenumber 1739.99 cm-1 and hydrogen bonded O-H at 3512.03 cm-1. The product is potentially to be used as emulsifier and additive in food industry, pharmaceutical, as well as antibacterial.

  5. Benchmarking reference services: step by step.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, H S; Marshall, J G

    1996-01-01

    This article is a companion to an introductory article on benchmarking published in an earlier issue of Medical Reference Services Quarterly. Librarians interested in benchmarking often ask the following questions: How do I determine what to benchmark; how do I form a benchmarking team; how do I identify benchmarking partners; what's the best way to collect and analyze benchmarking information; and what will I do with the data? Careful planning is a critical success factor of any benchmarking project, and these questions must be answered before embarking on a benchmarking study. This article summarizes the steps necessary to conduct benchmarking research. Relevant examples of each benchmarking step are provided.

  6. Enzymatic Activity Detection via Electrochemistry for Enceladus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studemeister, Lucy; Koehne, Jessica; Quinn, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Electrochemical detection of biological molecules is a pertinent topic and application in many fields such as medicine, environmental spills, and life detection in space. Proteases, a class of molecules of interest in the search for life, catalyze the hydrolysis of peptides. Trypsin, a specific protease, was chosen to investigate an optimized enzyme detection system using electrochemistry. This study aims at providing the ideal functionalization of an electrode that can reliably detect a signal indicative of an enzymatic reaction from an Enceladus sample.

  7. Enzymatic Activity of Free-Prostate-Specific Antigen (f-PSA) Is Not Required for Some of its Physiological Activities

    PubMed Central

    Chadha, Kailash C.; Nair, Bindukumar B.; Chakravarthi, Srikant; Zhou, Rita; Godoy, Alejandro; Mohler, James L.; Aalinkeel, Ravikumar; Schwartz, Stanley A.; Smith, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Prostate specific antigen (PSA) is a well known biomarker for early diagnosis and management of prostate cancer. Furthermore, PSA has been documented to have anti-angiogenic and anti-tumorigenic activities in both in vitro and in vivo studies. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism(s) involved in regulation of these processes, in particular the role of the serine-protease enzymatic activity of PSA. METHODS Enzymatic activity of PSA isolated directly from seminal plasma was inhibited specifically (>95%) by incubation with zinc2+. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were utilized to compare/contrast the physiological effects of enzymatically active versus inactive PSA. RESULTS Equimolar concentrations of enzymatically active PSA and PSA enzymatically inactivated by incubation with Zn2+ had similar physiological effects on HUVEC, including inhibiting the gene expression of pro-angiogenic growth factors, like VEGF and bFGF, and up-regulation of expression of the anti-angiogenic growth factor IFN-γ; suppression of mRNA expression for markers of blood vessel development, like FAK, FLT, KDR, TWIST-1; P-38; inhibition of endothelial tube formation in the in vitro Matrigel Tube Formation Assay; and inhibition of endothelial cell invasion and migration properties. DISCUSSION Our data provides compelling evidence that the transcriptional regulatory and the anti-angiogenic activities of human PSA are independent of the innate enzymatic activity PMID:21446007

  8. Enzymatic transformation of nonfood biomass to starch

    PubMed Central

    You, Chun; Chen, Hongge; Myung, Suwan; Sathitsuksanoh, Noppadon; Ma, Hui; Zhang, Xiao-Zhou; Li, Jianyong; Zhang, Y.-H. Percival

    2013-01-01

    The global demand for food could double in another 40 y owing to growth in the population and food consumption per capita. To meet the world’s future food and sustainability needs for biofuels and renewable materials, the production of starch-rich cereals and cellulose-rich bioenergy plants must grow substantially while minimizing agriculture’s environmental footprint and conserving biodiversity. Here we demonstrate one-pot enzymatic conversion of pretreated biomass to starch through a nonnatural synthetic enzymatic pathway composed of endoglucanase, cellobiohydrolyase, cellobiose phosphorylase, and alpha-glucan phosphorylase originating from bacterial, fungal, and plant sources. A special polypeptide cap in potato alpha-glucan phosphorylase was essential to push a partially hydrolyzed intermediate of cellulose forward to the synthesis of amylose. Up to 30% of the anhydroglucose units in cellulose were converted to starch; the remaining cellulose was hydrolyzed to glucose suitable for ethanol production by yeast in the same bioreactor. Next-generation biorefineries based on simultaneous enzymatic biotransformation and microbial fermentation could address the food, biofuels, and environment trilemma. PMID:23589840

  9. Microbial Enzymatic Degradation of Biodegradable Plastics.

    PubMed

    Roohi; Bano, Kulsoom; Kuddus, Mohammed; Zaheer, Mohammed R; Zia, Qamar; Khan, Mohammed F; Ashraf, Ghulam Md; Gupta, Anamika; Aliev, Gjumrakch

    2017-01-01

    The renewable feedstock derived biodegradable plastics are important in various industries such as packaging, agricultural, paper coating, garbage bags and biomedical implants. The increasing water and waste pollution due to the available decomposition methods of plastic degradation have led to the emergence of biodegradable plastics and biological degradation with microbial (bacteria and fungi) extracellular enzymes. The microbes utilize biodegradable polymers as the substrate under starvation and in unavailability of microbial nutrients. Microbial enzymatic degradation is suitable from bioremediation point of view as no waste accumulation occurs. It is important to understand the microbial interaction and mechanism involved in the enzymatic degradation of biodegradable plastics under the influence of several environmental factors such as applied pH, thermo-stability, substrate molecular weight and/or complexity. To study the surface erosion of polymer film is another approach for hydrolytic degradation characteristion. The degradation of biopolymer is associated with the production of low molecular weight monomer and generation of carbon dioxide, methane and water molecule. This review reported the degradation study of various existing biodegradable plastics along with the potent degrading microbes (bacteria and fungi). Patents available on plastic biodegradation with biotechnological significance is also summarized in this paper. This paper assesses that new disposal technique should be adopted for the degradation of polymers and further research is required for the economical production of biodegradable plastics along with their enzymatic degradation. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. Cold enzymatic bleaching of fluid whey.

    PubMed

    Campbell, R E; Drake, M A

    2013-01-01

    Chemical bleaching of fluid whey and retentate with hydrogen peroxide (HP) alone requires high concentrations (100-500 mg of HP/kg) and recent studies have demonstrated that off-flavors are generated during chemical bleaching that carry through to spray-dried whey proteins. Bleaching of fluid whey and retentate with enzymes such as naturally present lactoperoxidase or an exogenous commercial peroxidase (EP) at cold temperatures (4°C) may be a viable alternative to traditional chemical bleaching of whey. The objective of this study was to determine the optimum level of HP for enzymatic bleaching (both lactoperoxidase and EP) at 4°C and to compare bleaching efficacy and sensory characteristics to HP chemical bleaching at 4°C. Selected treatments were subsequently applied for whey protein concentrate with 80% protein (WPC80) manufacture. Fluid Cheddar whey and retentate (80% protein) were manufactured in triplicate from pasteurized whole milk. The optimum concentration of HP (0 to 250 mg/kg) to activate enzymatic bleaching at 4°C was determined by quantifying the loss of norbixin. In subsequent experiments, bleaching efficacy, descriptive sensory analysis, and volatile compounds were monitored at selected time points. A control with no bleaching was also evaluated. Enzymatic bleaching of fluid whey and retentate at 4°C resulted in faster bleaching and higher bleaching efficacy (color loss) than bleaching with HP alone at 250 mg/kg. Due to concentrated levels of naturally present lactoperoxidase, retentate bleached to completion (>80% norbixin destruction in 30 min) faster than fluid whey at 4°C (>80% norbixin destruction in 12h). In fluid whey, the addition of EP decreased bleaching time. Spray-dried WPC80 from bleached wheys, regardless of bleaching treatment, were characterized by a lack of sweet aromatic and buttery flavors, and the presence of cardboard flavor concurrent with higher relative abundance of 1-octen-3-ol and 1-octen-3-one. Among enzymatically

  11. Two-step sequential pretreatment for the enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis of coffee spent waste.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Rajeev; Jaiswal, Swarna; Abu-Ghannam, Nissreen; Jaiswal, Amit K

    2017-09-01

    In the present study, eight different pretreatments of varying nature (physical, chemical and physico-chemical) followed by a sequential, combinatorial pretreatment strategy was applied to spent coffee waste to attain maximum sugar yield. Pretreated samples were analysed for total reducing sugar, individual sugars and generation of inhibitory compounds such as furfural and hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF) which can hinder microbial growth and enzyme activity. Native spent coffee waste was high in hemicellulose content. Galactose was found to be the predominant sugar in spent coffee waste. Results showed that sequential pretreatment yielded 350.12mg of reducing sugar/g of substrate, which was 1.7-fold higher than in native spent coffee waste (203.4mg/g of substrate). Furthermore, extensive delignification was achieved using sequential pretreatment strategy. XRD, FTIR, and DSC profiles of the pretreated substrates were studied to analyse the various changes incurred in sequentially pretreated spent coffee waste as opposed to native spent coffee waste. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. One-step pretreatment of yellow poplar biomass using peracetic acid to enhance enzymatic digestibility.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeong Rae; Kazlauskas, Romas J; Park, Tai Hyun

    2017-09-22

    Pretreatment of biomass with dilute acid requires high temperatures of >160 °C to remove xylan and does not remove lignin. Here we report that the addition of peracetic acid, a strong oxidant, to mild dilute acid pretreatment reduces the temperature requirement to only 120 °C. Pretreatment of yellow poplar with peracetic acid (300 mM, 2.3 wt%) and dilute sulfuric acid (100 mM, 1.0 wt%) at 120 °C for 5 min removed 85.7% of the xylan and 90.4% of the lignin leaving a solid consisting of 75.6% glucan, 6.0% xylan and 4.7% lignin. Low enzyme loadings of 5 FPU/g glucan and 10 pNPGU/g glucan converted this solid to glucose with an 84.0% yield. This amount of glucose was 2.5 times higher than with dilute acid-pretreated solid and 13.8 times higher than with untreated yellow poplar. Thus, the addition of peracetic acid, easily generated from acetic acid and hydrogen peroxide, dramatically increases the effectiveness of dilute acid pretreatment of biomass.

  13. Enzymatic production of xylooligosaccharides from corn stover and corn cobs treated with aqueous ammonia.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yongming; Kim, Tae Hyun; Lee, Y Y; Chen, Rongfu; Elander, Richard T

    2006-01-01

    A novel method of producing food-grade xylooligosaccharides from corn stover and corn cobs was investigated. The process starts with pretreatment of feedstock in aqueous ammonia, which results delignified and xylan-rich substrate. The pretreated substrates are subjected to enzymatic hydrolysis of xylan using endoxylanase for production of xylooligosaccharides. The conventional enzyme-based method involves extraction of xylan with a strong alkaline solution to form a liquid intermediate containing soluble xylan. This intermediate is heavily contaminated with various extraneous components. A costly purification step is therefore required before enzymatic hydrolysis. In the present method, xylan is obtained in solid form after pretreatment. Water-washing is all that is required for enzymatic hydrolysis of this material. The complex step of purifying soluble xylan from contaminant is essentially eliminated. Refining of xylooligosaccharides to food-grade is accomplished by charcoal adsorption followed by ethanol elution. Xylanlytic hydrolysis of the pretreated corn stover yielded glucan-rich residue that is easily digestible by cellulase enzyme. The digestibility of the residue reached 86% with enzyme loading of 10 filter paper units/g-glucan. As a feedstock for xylooligosaccharides production, corn cobs are superior to corn stover because of high xylan content and high packing density. The high packing density of corn cobs reduces water input and eventually raises the product concentration.

  14. Fast Enzymatic Processing of Proteins for MS Detection with a Flow-through Microreactor

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Iulia M.; Deng, Jingren; Smith, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of mass spectrometry (MS)-based protein analysis methods involve an enzymatic digestion step prior to detection, typically with trypsin. This step is necessary for the generation of small molecular weight peptides, generally with MW < 3,000-4,000 Da, that fall within the effective scan range of mass spectrometry instrumentation. Conventional protocols involve O/N enzymatic digestion at 37 ºC. Recent advances have led to the development of a variety of strategies, typically involving the use of a microreactor with immobilized enzymes or of a range of complementary physical processes that reduce the time necessary for proteolytic digestion to a few minutes (e.g., microwave or high-pressure). In this work, we describe a simple and cost-effective approach that can be implemented in any laboratory for achieving fast enzymatic digestion of a protein. The protein (or protein mixture) is adsorbed on C18-bonded reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) silica particles preloaded in a capillary column, and trypsin in aqueous buffer is infused over the particles for a short period of time. To enable on-line MS detection, the tryptic peptides are eluted with a solvent system with increased organic content directly in the MS ion source. This approach avoids the use of high-priced immobilized enzyme particles and does not necessitate any aid for completing the process. Protein digestion and complete sample analysis can be accomplished in less than ~3 min and ~30 min, respectively. PMID:27078683

  15. Fast Enzymatic Processing of Proteins for MS Detection with a Flow-through Microreactor.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Iulia M; Deng, Jingren; Smith, Nicole

    2016-04-06

    The vast majority of mass spectrometry (MS)-based protein analysis methods involve an enzymatic digestion step prior to detection, typically with trypsin. This step is necessary for the generation of small molecular weight peptides, generally with MW < 3,000-4,000 Da, that fall within the effective scan range of mass spectrometry instrumentation. Conventional protocols involve O/N enzymatic digestion at 37 ºC. Recent advances have led to the development of a variety of strategies, typically involving the use of a microreactor with immobilized enzymes or of a range of complementary physical processes that reduce the time necessary for proteolytic digestion to a few minutes (e.g., microwave or high-pressure). In this work, we describe a simple and cost-effective approach that can be implemented in any laboratory for achieving fast enzymatic digestion of a protein. The protein (or protein mixture) is adsorbed on C18-bonded reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) silica particles preloaded in a capillary column, and trypsin in aqueous buffer is infused over the particles for a short period of time. To enable on-line MS detection, the tryptic peptides are eluted with a solvent system with increased organic content directly in the MS ion source. This approach avoids the use of high-priced immobilized enzyme particles and does not necessitate any aid for completing the process. Protein digestion and complete sample analysis can be accomplished in less than ~3 min and ~30 min, respectively.

  16. Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose pretreated with ionic liquids and N-methyl Morpholine N-Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yau Li, Elizabeth

    The effect of N-methyl Morpholine N-Oxide (NMMO), 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium acetate ([Emim]Ac) and 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium diethyl phosphate ([Emim]DEP) on pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of dissolving pulp was studied. X-ray diffraction measurements of regenerated cellulose from these solvents showed that solvent pretreatment reduces the crystallinity of cellulose. However, crystallinity might not be a major factor affecting the in-situ enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose in these solvents. Although regenerated cellulose from [Emim]DEP showed the lowest crystallinity index (˜15%), in-situ enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose dissolved in NMMO showed the highest cellulose conversion (68% compared to 65% for [Emim]Ac and 37% for [Emim]DEP at enzyme loading of 122 FPU/g). Moreover, results showed that enzymes could tolerate up to NMMO concentration of 100 g/L and still yield full conversion of cellulose. Since it is not necessary to remove all the NMMO, less amount of water will be required for the washing step and thus the process will be more economical. The HCH-1 model was used in an attempt to model the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose in NMMO. With the incorporation of NMMO inhibition and a factor to account for unreacted cellulose, the model was able to correlate the experimental data of the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose (6.68 g/L) at various NMMO concentrations (0, 50, 100, 150 and 250 g/L). However, the experimental results also suggest that NMMO might be deactivating the enzymes rather than inhibiting them. More studies need to be done at varying cellulose, NMMO and enzyme concentrations to find the exact nature of this deactivation of NMMO.

  17. An air-breathing enzymatic cathode with extended lifetime by continuous laccase supply.

    PubMed

    Kipf, Elena; Sané, Sabine; Morse, Daniel; Messinger, Thorsten; Zengerle, Roland; Kerzenmacher, Sven

    2018-04-22

    We present a novel concept of an air-breathing enzymatic biofuel cell cathode combined with continuous supply of unpurified laccase-containing supernatant of the white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor for extended lifetime. The air-breathing cathode design obviates the need for energy-intensive active aeration. In a corresponding long-term experiment at a constant current density of 50 µA cm -2 , we demonstrated an increased lifetime of 33 days (cathode potential above 0.430 V vs. SCE), independent of enzyme degradation. The obtained data suggest that theoretically a longer lifetime is feasible. However, further engineering efforts are required to prevent clogging and fouling of the supply tubes. These results represent an important step towards the realization of enzymatic biofuel cell cathodes with extended lifetime and enhanced performance. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A simple method to extract DNA from hair shafts using enzymatic laundry powder.

    PubMed

    Guan, Zheng; Zhou, Yu; Liu, Jinchuan; Jiang, Xiaoling; Li, Sicong; Yang, Shuming; Chen, Ailiang

    2013-01-01

    A simple method to extract DNA from hair shafts was developed by using enzymatic laundry powder at the first step of the process. The whole extraction can be finished in less than 2 hours. The simple extraction reagent proposed here contains only two cheap components: ordinary enzymatic laundry powder and PCR buffer. After extraction, an ultra sensitive fluorescent nucleic acid stain, PicoGreen, was used for quantifying trace amount of double-stranded DNA in the solution extracted. For further validation of DNA extraction, four primers were employed to amplify DNA microsatellite loci. Both fluorescence spectroscopy and PCR results suggested that this method can extract DNA from hair shafts with good efficiency and repeatability. The study will greatly facilitate the use of hair shafts in future for DNA analyses on genome-wide scale.

  19. Dynamic modeling and validation of a lignocellulosic enzymatic hydrolysis process--a demonstration scale study.

    PubMed

    Prunescu, Remus Mihail; Sin, Gürkan

    2013-12-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis process is one of the key steps in second generation biofuel production. After being thermally pretreated, the lignocellulosic material is liquefied by enzymes prior to fermentation. The scope of this paper is to evaluate a dynamic model of the hydrolysis process on a demonstration scale reactor. The following novel features are included: the application of the Convection-Diffusion-Reaction equation to a hydrolysis reactor to assess transport and mixing effects; the extension of a competitive kinetic model with enzymatic pH dependency and hemicellulose hydrolysis; a comprehensive pH model; and viscosity estimations during the course of reaction. The model is evaluated against real data extracted from a demonstration scale biorefinery throughout several days of operation. All measurements are within predictions uncertainty and, therefore, the model constitutes a valuable tool to support process optimization, performance monitoring, diagnosis and process control at full-scale studies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Distribution, industrial applications, and enzymatic synthesis of D-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiuzhen; Ma, Qinyuan; Zhu, Hailiang

    2015-04-01

    D-Amino acids exist widely in microbes, plants, animals, and food and can be applied in pharmaceutical, food, and cosmetics. Because of their widespread applications in industry, D-amino acids have recently received more and more attention. Enzymes including D-hydantoinase, N-acyl-D-amino acid amidohydrolase, D-amino acid amidase, D-aminopeptidase, D-peptidase, L-amino acid oxidase, D-amino acid aminotransferase, and D-amino acid dehydrogenase can be used for D-amino acids synthesis by kinetic resolution or asymmetric amination. In this review, the distribution, industrial applications, and enzymatic synthesis methods are summarized. And, among all the current enzymatic methods, D-amino acid dehydrogenase method not only produces D-amino acid by a one-step reaction but also takes environment and atom economics into consideration; therefore, it is deserved to be paid more attention.

  1. Comparison of 1-step and 2-step methods of fitting microbiological models.

    PubMed

    Jewell, Keith

    2012-11-15

    Previous conclusions that a 1-step fitting method gives more precise coefficients than the traditional 2-step method are confirmed by application to three different data sets. It is also shown that, in comparison to 2-step fits, the 1-step method gives better fits to the data (often substantially) with directly interpretable regression diagnostics and standard errors. The improvement is greatest at extremes of environmental conditions and it is shown that 1-step fits can indicate inappropriate functional forms when 2-step fits do not. 1-step fits are better at estimating primary parameters (e.g. lag, growth rate) as well as concentrations, and are much more data efficient, allowing the construction of more robust models on smaller data sets. The 1-step method can be straightforwardly applied to any data set for which the 2-step method can be used and additionally to some data sets where the 2-step method fails. A 2-step approach is appropriate for visual assessment in the early stages of model development, and may be a convenient way to generate starting values for a 1-step fit, but the 1-step approach should be used for any quantitative assessment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Enzymatic Activation of the Emerging Drug Resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Koyani, Rina D; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael

    2018-05-01

    The plant originated stilbene "resveratrol" (3,4',5-trans-trihydroxystilbene) is well known for its diverse health benefits including anti-tumor, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, and anti-oxidant properties. Besides a significant amount of reports on different aspects of its application as prodrug in the last 50 years, still, a strategy leading to the production of the active drug is missing. The aim of this work was to evaluate the enzymatic activation of prodrug resveratrol to the effective drug piceatannol, without engaging expensive cofactors. Five different heme proteins were analyzed for the transformation of resveratrol. Kinetic parameters of resveratrol transformation and analysis of the transformed products were conducted through HPLC and GC-MS. Effect of pH and organic solvent on the transformation process had also been evaluated. Among all tested heme proteins, only a variant of cytochrome P450 BM3 from Bacillus megaterium (CYP BM3 F87A) was found suitable for piceatannol production. The most suitable pH for the reaction conditions was 8.5, while organic solvents did not show any effect on transformation. For resveratrol transformation, the turnover rate (k cat ) was 21.7 (± 0.6) min -1 , the affinity constant (K M ) showed a value of 55.7 (± 16.7) μM for a catalytic efficiency (k cat /K M ) of 389 min -1  mM -1 . GC-MS analysis showed that the only product from resveratrol transformation by cytochrome P450 BM3 is the biologically active piceatannol. The enzymatic transformation of resveratrol, an emerging compound with medical interest, to active product piceatannol by a variant of cytochrome P450 BM3 in the absence of expensive NADPH cofactor is demonstrated. This enzymatic process is economically attractive and can be scaled up to cover the increasing medical demand for piceatannol.

  3. Kinetic study of enzymatic hydrolysis of acid-pretreated coconut coir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatmawati, Akbarningrum; Agustriyanto, Rudy

    2015-12-01

    Biomass waste utilization for biofuel production such as bioethanol, has become more prominent currently. Coconut coir is one of lignocellulosic food wastes, which is abundant in Indonesia. Bioethanol production from such materials consists of more than one step. Pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis is crucial steps to produce sugar which can then be fermented into bioethanol. In this research, ground coconut coir was pretreated using dilute sulfuric acid at 121°C. This pretreatment had increased the cellulose content and decreased the lignin content of coconut coir. The pretreated coconut coir was hydrolyzed using a mix of two commercial cellulase enzymes at pH of 4.8 and temperature of 50°C. The enzymatic hydrolysis was conducted at several initial coconut coir slurry concentrations (0.1-2 g/100 mL) and reaction times (2-72 hours). The reducing sugar concentration profiles had been produced and can be used to obtain reaction rates. The highest reducing sugar concentration obtained was 1,152.567 mg/L, which was produced at initial slurry concentration of 2 g/100 mL and 72 hours reaction time. In this paper, the reducing sugar concentrations were empirically modeled as a function of reaction time using power equations. Michaelis-Menten kinetic model for enzymatic hydrolysis reaction is adopted. The kinetic parameters of that model for sulfuric acid-pretreated coconut coir enzymatic hydrolysis had been obtained which are Vm of 3.587×104 mg/L.h, and KM of 130.6 mg/L.

  4. Enzymatic Catalytic Beds For Oxidation Of Alcohols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolly, Clifford D.; Schussel, Leonard J.

    1993-01-01

    Modules containing beds of enzymatic material catalyzing oxidation of primary alcohols and some other organic compounds developed for use in wastewater-treatment systems of future spacecraft. Designed to be placed downstream of multifiltration modules, which contain filters and sorbent beds removing most of non-alcoholic contaminants but fail to remove significant amounts of low-molecular-weight, polar, nonionic compounds like alcohols. Catalytic modules also used on Earth to oxidize primary alcohols and other compounds in wastewater streams and industrial process streams.

  5. Fundamental factors affecting biomass enzymatic reactivity.

    PubMed

    Chang, V S; Holtzapple, M T

    2000-01-01

    Poplar wood was treated with peracetic acid, KOH, and ball milling to produce 147 model lignocelluloses with a broad spectrum of lignin contents, acetyl contents, and crystallinity indices (CrIs), respectively. An empirical model was identified that describes the roles of these three properties in enzymatic hydrolysis. Lignin content and CrI have the greatest impact on biomass digestibility, whereas acetyl content has a minor impact. The digestibility of several lime-treated biomass samples agreed with the empirical model. Lime treatment removes all acetyl groups and a moderate amount of lignin and increases CrI slightly; lignin removal is the dominant benefit from lime treatment.

  6. STEP Experiment Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brumfield, M. L. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    A plan to develop a space technology experiments platform (STEP) was examined. NASA Langley Research Center held a STEP Experiment Requirements Workshop on June 29 and 30 and July 1, 1983, at which experiment proposers were invited to present more detailed information on their experiment concept and requirements. A feasibility and preliminary definition study was conducted and the preliminary definition of STEP capabilities and experiment concepts and expected requirements for support services are presented. The preliminary definition of STEP capabilities based on detailed review of potential experiment requirements is investigated. Topics discussed include: Shuttle on-orbit dynamics; effects of the space environment on damping materials; erectable beam experiment; technology for development of very large solar array deployers; thermal energy management process experiment; photovoltaic concentrater pointing dynamics and plasma interactions; vibration isolation technology; flight tests of a synthetic aperture radar antenna with use of STEP.

  7. Achieving world class performance step by step.

    PubMed

    Kerr, L J

    1992-02-01

    Bridgestone of Japan acquired Firestone, a United States corporation, in early 1988. This article describes the integration process of the two organizations' cultures. There are many lessons in the approach that should apply to a variety of organizations. The Strategic Improvement Process, a rather highly structured approach, harnesses the strengths of both the Japanese and American organizations and starts the manufacturing and technical departments on the road to excellence.

  8. Computational study on a puzzle in the biosynthetic pathway of anthocyanin: Why is an enzymatic oxidation/ reduction process required for a simple tautomerization?

    PubMed

    Sato, Hajime; Wang, Chao; Yamazaki, Mami; Saito, Kazuki; Uchiyama, Masanobu

    2018-01-01

    In the late stage of anthocyanin biosynthesis, dihydroflavonol reductase (DFR) and anthocyanidin synthase (ANS) mediate a formal tautomerization. However, such oxidation/reduction process requires high energy and appears to be unnecessary, as the oxidation state does not change during the transformation. Thus, a non-enzymatic pathway of tautomerization has also been proposed. To resolve the long-standing issue of whether this non-enzymatic pathway is the main contributor for the biosynthesis, we carried out density functional theory (DFT) calculations to examine this non-enzymatic pathway from dihydroflavonol to anthocyanidin. We show here that the activation barriers for the proposed non-enzymatic tautomerization are too high to enable the reaction to proceed under normal aqueous conditions in plants. The calculations also explain the experimentally observed requirement for acidic conditions during the final step of conversion of 2-flaven-3,4-diol to anthocyanidin; a thermodynamically and kinetically favorable concerted pathway can operate under these conditions.

  9. Computational study on a puzzle in the biosynthetic pathway of anthocyanin: Why is an enzymatic oxidation/ reduction process required for a simple tautomerization?

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Hajime; Wang, Chao; Yamazaki, Mami; Saito, Kazuki; Uchiyama, Masanobu

    2018-01-01

    In the late stage of anthocyanin biosynthesis, dihydroflavonol reductase (DFR) and anthocyanidin synthase (ANS) mediate a formal tautomerization. However, such oxidation/reduction process requires high energy and appears to be unnecessary, as the oxidation state does not change during the transformation. Thus, a non-enzymatic pathway of tautomerization has also been proposed. To resolve the long-standing issue of whether this non-enzymatic pathway is the main contributor for the biosynthesis, we carried out density functional theory (DFT) calculations to examine this non-enzymatic pathway from dihydroflavonol to anthocyanidin. We show here that the activation barriers for the proposed non-enzymatic tautomerization are too high to enable the reaction to proceed under normal aqueous conditions in plants. The calculations also explain the experimentally observed requirement for acidic conditions during the final step of conversion of 2-flaven-3,4-diol to anthocyanidin; a thermodynamically and kinetically favorable concerted pathway can operate under these conditions. PMID:29897974

  10. Enzymatically crosslinked silk-hyaluronic acid hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Raia, Nicole R; Partlow, Benjamin P; McGill, Meghan; Kimmerling, Erica Palma; Ghezzi, Chiara E; Kaplan, David L

    2017-07-01

    In this study, silk fibroin and hyaluronic acid (HA) were enzymatically crosslinked to form biocompatible composite hydrogels with tunable mechanical properties similar to that of native tissues. The formation of di-tyrosine crosslinks between silk fibroin proteins via horseradish peroxidase has resulted in a highly elastic hydrogel but exhibits time-dependent stiffening related to silk self-assembly and crystallization. Utilizing the same method of crosslinking, tyramine-substituted HA forms hydrophilic and bioactive hydrogels that tend to have limited mechanics and degrade rapidly. To address the limitations of these singular component scaffolds, HA was covalently crosslinked with silk, forming a composite hydrogel that exhibited both mechanical integrity and hydrophilicity. The composite hydrogels were assessed using unconfined compression and infrared spectroscopy to reveal of the physical properties over time in relation to polymer concentration. In addition, the hydrogels were characterized by enzymatic degradation and for cytotoxicity. Results showed that increasing HA concentration, decreased gelation time, increased degradation rate, and reduced changes that were observed over time in mechanics, water retention, and crystallization. These hydrogel composites provide a biologically relevant system with controllable temporal stiffening and elasticity, thus offering enhanced tunable scaffolds for short or long term applications in tissue engineering. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Enzymatically Controlled Vacancies in Nanoparticle Crystals

    SciT

    Barnaby, Stacey N.; Ross, Michael B.; Thaner, Ryan V.

    In atomic systems, the mixing of metals results in distinct phase behavior that depends on the identity and bonding characteristics of the atoms. In nanoscale systems, the use of oligonucleotides as programmable “bonds” that link nanoparticle “atoms” into superlattices allows for the decoupling of atom identity and bonding. While much research in atomic systems is dedicated to understanding different phase behavior of mixed metals, it is not well understood on the nanoscale how changes in the nanoscale “bond” affect the phase behavior of nanoparticle crystals. In this work, the identity of the atom is kept the same but the chemicalmore » nature of the bond is altered, which is not possible in atomic systems, through the use of DNA and RNA bonding elements. These building blocks assemble into single crystal nanoparticle superlattices with mixed DNA and RNA bonding elements throughout. The nanoparticle crystals can be dynamically changed through the selective and enzymatic hydrolysis of the RNA bonding elements, resulting in superlattices that retain their crystalline structure and habit, while incorporating up to 35% random vacancies generated from the nanoparticles removed. Therefore, the bonding elements of nanoparticle crystals can be enzymatically and selectively addressed without affecting the nature of the atom.« less

  12. Fluorometric enzymatic assay of L-arginine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stasyuk, Nataliya; Gayda, Galina; Yepremyan, Hasmik; Stepien, Agnieszka; Gonchar, Mykhailo

    2017-01-01

    The enzymes of L-arginine (further - Arg) metabolism are promising tools for elaboration of selective methods for quantitative Arg analysis. In our study we propose an enzymatic method for Arg assay based on fluorometric monitoring of ammonia, a final product of Arg splitting by human liver arginase I (further - arginase), isolated from the recombinant yeast strain, and commercial urease. The selective analysis of ammonia (at 415 nm under excitation at 360 nm) is based on reaction with o-phthalaldehyde (OPA) in the presence of sulfite in alkali medium: these conditions permit to avoid the reaction of OPA with any amino acid. A linearity range of the fluorometric arginase-urease-OPA method is from 100 nM to 6 μМ with a limit of detection of 34 nM Arg. The method was used for the quantitative determination of Arg in the pooled sample of blood serum. The obtained results proved to be in a good correlation with the reference enzymatic method and literature data. The proposed arginase-urease-OPA method being sensitive, economical, selective and suitable for both routine and micro-volume formats, can be used in clinical diagnostics for the simultaneous determination of Arg as well as urea and ammonia in serum samples.

  13. Perinatal Depression Algorithm: A Home Visitor Step-by-Step Guide for Advanced Management of Perinatal Depressive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laszewski, Audrey; Wichman, Christina L.; Doering, Jennifer J.; Maletta, Kristyn; Hammel, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Early childhood professionals do many things to support young families. This is true now more than ever, as researchers continue to discover the long-term benefits of early, healthy, nurturing relationships. This article provides an overview of the development of an advanced practice perinatal depression algorithm created as a step-by-step guide…

  14. A Conductometric Indium Oxide Semiconducting Nanoparticle Enzymatic Biosensor Array

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dongjin; Ondrake, Janet; Cui, Tianhong

    2011-01-01

    We report a conductometric nanoparticle biosensor array to address the significant variation of electrical property in nanomaterial biosensors due to the random network nature of nanoparticle thin-film. Indium oxide and silica nanoparticles (SNP) are assembled selectively on the multi-site channel area of the resistors using layer-by-layer self-assembly. To demonstrate enzymatic biosensing capability, glucose oxidase is immobilized on the SNP layer for glucose detection. The packaged sensor chip onto a ceramic pin grid array is tested using syringe pump driven feed and multi-channel I–V measurement system. It is successfully demonstrated that glucose is detected in many different sensing sites within a chip, leading to concentration dependent currents. The sensitivity has been found to be dependent on the channel length of the resistor, 4–12 nA/mM for channel lengths of 5–20 μm, while the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant is 20 mM. By using sensor array, analytical data could be obtained with a single step of sample solution feeding. This work sheds light on the applicability of the developed nanoparticle microsensor array to multi-analyte sensors, novel bioassay platforms, and sensing components in a lab-on-a-chip. PMID:22163696

  15. Radical-Mediated Enzymatic Carbon Chain Fragmentation-Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Li, Yuxue; Chen, Dandan; Yu, Yi; Duan, Lian; Shen, Ben; Liu, Wen

    2010-01-01

    The radical S-adenosylmethionine (S-AdoMet) superfamily contains thousands of proteins that catalyze highly diverse conversions, most of which are poorly understood due to a lack of information regarding chemical products and radical-dependent transformations. We here report that NosL, involved in forming the indole side ring of the thiopeptide nosiheptide (NOS), is a radical S-AdoMet 3-methyl-2-indolic acid (MIA) synthase. NosL catalyzed an unprecedented carbon chain reconstitution of L-Trp to give MIA, showing removal of the Cα-N unit and shift of the carboxylate to the indole ring. Dissection of the enzymatic process upon the identification of products and a putative glycyl intermediate uncovered a radical-mediated, unusual fragmentation-recombination reaction. This finding unveiled a key step in radical S-AdoMet enzyme-catalyzed structural rearrangements during complex biotransformations. Additionally, NosL tolerated fluorinated L-Trps as the substrates, allowing for production of a regiospecifically halogenated thiopeptide that has not been found in over 80 entity-containing, naturally occurring thiopeptide family. PMID:21240261

  16. Engineering of vault nanocapsules with enzymatic and fluorescent properties

    PubMed Central

    Kickhoefer, Valerie A.; Garcia, Yvette; Mikyas, Yeshi; Johansson, Erik; Zhou, Jing C.; Raval-Fernandes, Sujna; Minoofar, Payam; Zink, Jeffrey I.; Dunn, Bruce; Stewart, Phoebe L.; Rome, Leonard H.

    2005-01-01

    One of the central issues facing the emerging field of nanotechnology is cellular compatibility. Nanoparticles have been proposed for diagnostic and therapeutic applications, including drug delivery, gene therapy, biological sensors, and controlled catalysis. Viruses, liposomes, peptides, and synthetic and natural polymers have been engineered for these applications, yet significant limitations continue to prevent their use. Avoidance of the body's natural immune system, lack of targeting specificity, and the inability to control packaging and release are remaining obstacles. We have explored the use of a naturally occurring cellular nanoparticle known as the vault, which is named for its morphology with multiple arches reminiscent of cathedral ceilings. Vaults are 13-MDa ribonucleoprotein particles with an internal cavity large enough to sequester hundreds of proteins. Here, we report a strategy to target and sequester biologically active materials within the vault cavity. Attachment of a vault-targeting peptide to two proteins, luciferase and a variant of GFP, resulted in their sequestration within the vault cavity. The targeted proteins confer enzymatic and fluorescent properties on the recombinant vaults, both of which can be detected by their emission of light. The modified vaults are compatible with living cells. The ability to engineer vault particles with designed properties and functionalities represents an important step toward development of a biocompatible nanocapsule. PMID:15753293

  17. Engineering of vault nanocapsules with enzymatic and fluorescent properties.

    PubMed

    Kickhoefer, Valerie A; Garcia, Yvette; Mikyas, Yeshi; Johansson, Erik; Zhou, Jing C; Raval-Fernandes, Sujna; Minoofar, Payam; Zink, Jeffrey I; Dunn, Bruce; Stewart, Phoebe L; Rome, Leonard H

    2005-03-22

    One of the central issues facing the emerging field of nanotechnology is cellular compatibility. Nanoparticles have been proposed for diagnostic and therapeutic applications, including drug delivery, gene therapy, biological sensors, and controlled catalysis. Viruses, liposomes, peptides, and synthetic and natural polymers have been engineered for these applications, yet significant limitations continue to prevent their use. Avoidance of the body's natural immune system, lack of targeting specificity, and the inability to control packaging and release are remaining obstacles. We have explored the use of a naturally occurring cellular nanoparticle known as the vault, which is named for its morphology with multiple arches reminiscent of cathedral ceilings. Vaults are 13-MDa ribonucleoprotein particles with an internal cavity large enough to sequester hundreds of proteins. Here, we report a strategy to target and sequester biologically active materials within the vault cavity. Attachment of a vault-targeting peptide to two proteins, luciferase and a variant of GFP, resulted in their sequestration within the vault cavity. The targeted proteins confer enzymatic and fluorescent properties on the recombinant vaults, both of which can be detected by their emission of light. The modified vaults are compatible with living cells. The ability to engineer vault particles with designed properties and functionalities represents an important step toward development of a biocompatible nanocapsule.

  18. Middle School STEP Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Kaine, Tim [D-VA

    2014-09-10

    Senate - 09/10/2014 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  19. Focal cryotherapy: step by step technique description

    PubMed Central

    Redondo, Cristina; Srougi, Victor; da Costa, José Batista; Baghdad, Mohammed; Velilla, Guillermo; Nunes-Silva, Igor; Bergerat, Sebastien; Garcia-Barreras, Silvia; Rozet, François; Ingels, Alexandre; Galiano, Marc; Sanchez-Salas, Rafael; Barret, Eric; Cathelineau, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction and objective: Focal cryotherapy emerged as an efficient option to treat favorable and localized prostate cancer (PCa). The purpose of this video is to describe the procedure step by step. Materials and methods: We present the case of a 68 year-old man with localized PCa in the anterior aspect of the prostate. Results: The procedure is performed under general anesthesia, with the patient in lithotomy position. Briefly, the equipment utilized includes the cryotherapy console coupled with an ultrasound system, argon and helium gas bottles, cryoprobes, temperature probes and an urethral warming catheter. The procedure starts with a real-time trans-rectal prostate ultrasound, which is used to outline the prostate, the urethra and the rectal wall. The cryoprobes are pretested and placed in to the prostate through the perineum, following a grid template, along with the temperature sensors under ultrasound guidance. A cystoscopy confirms the right positioning of the needles and the urethral warming catheter is installed. Thereafter, the freeze sequence with argon gas is started, achieving extremely low temperatures (-40°C) to induce tumor cell lysis. Sequentially, the thawing cycle is performed using helium gas. This process is repeated one time. Results among several series showed a biochemical disease-free survival between 71-93% at 9-70 month- follow-up, incontinence rates between 0-3.6% and erectile dysfunction between 0-42% (1–5). Conclusions: Focal cryotherapy is a feasible procedure to treat anterior PCa that may offer minimal morbidity, allowing good cancer control and better functional outcomes when compared to whole-gland treatment. PMID:28727387

  20. Focal cryotherapy: step by step technique description.

    PubMed

    Redondo, Cristina; Srougi, Victor; da Costa, José Batista; Baghdad, Mohammed; Velilla, Guillermo; Nunes-Silva, Igor; Bergerat, Sebastien; Garcia-Barreras, Silvia; Rozet, François; Ingels, Alexandre; Galiano, Marc; Sanchez-Salas, Rafael; Barret, Eric; Cathelineau, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Focal cryotherapy emerged as an efficient option to treat favorable and localized prostate cancer (PCa). The purpose of this video is to describe the procedure step by step. We present the case of a 68 year-old man with localized PCa in the anterior aspect of the prostate. The procedure is performed under general anesthesia, with the patient in lithotomy position. Briefly, the equipament utilized includes the cryotherapy console coupled with an ultrasound system, argon and helium gas bottles, cryoprobes, temperature probes and an urethral warming catheter. The procedure starts with a real-time trans-rectal prostate ultrasound, which is used to outline the prostate, the urethra and the rectal wall. The cryoprobes are pretested and placed in to the prostate through the perineum, following a grid template, along with the temperature sensors under ultrasound guidance. A cystoscopy confirms the right positioning of the needles and the urethral warming catheter is installed. Thereafter, the freeze sequence with argon gas is started, achieving extremely low temperatures (-40ºC) to induce tumor cell lysis. Sequentially, the thawing cycle is performed using helium gas. This process is repeated one time. Results among several series showed a biochemical disease-free survival between 71-93% at 9-70 month- follow-up, incontinence rates between 0-3.6% and erectile dysfunction between 0-42% (1-5). Focal cryotherapy is a feasible procedure to treat anterior PCa that may offer minimal morbidity, allowing good cancer control and better functional outcomes when compared to whole-gland treatment. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  1. STEPPED GEAR SYNCHRONIZERS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The book concerns Soviet and foreign experience in the design and use of synchronizers in the step gear boxes of transport vehicles. Side by side...with description of the basic steps in the development of the gear engagement mechanisms and of the design used in synchronizers of domestic and foreign...manufacture, in this work much attention is devoted to the theory of gear engagement in gear boxes equipped with synchronizers , and to figuring out

  2. Conditional iron and pH-dependent activity of a non-enzymatic glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway.

    PubMed

    Keller, Markus A; Zylstra, Andre; Castro, Cecilia; Turchyn, Alexandra V; Griffin, Julian L; Ralser, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the evolutionary origins of metabolism. However, key biochemical reactions of glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), ancient metabolic pathways central to the metabolic network, have non-enzymatic pendants that occur in a prebiotically plausible reaction milieu reconstituted to contain Archean sediment metal components. These non-enzymatic reactions could have given rise to the origin of glycolysis and the PPP during early evolution. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and high-content metabolomics that allowed us to measure several thousand reaction mixtures, we experimentally address the chemical logic of a metabolism-like network constituted from these non-enzymatic reactions. Fe(II), the dominant transition metal component of Archean oceanic sediments, has binding affinity toward metabolic sugar phosphates and drives metabolism-like reactivity acting as both catalyst and cosubstrate. Iron and pH dependencies determine a metabolism-like network topology and comediate reaction rates over several orders of magnitude so that the network adopts conditional activity. Alkaline pH triggered the activity of the non-enzymatic PPP pendant, whereas gentle acidic or neutral conditions favored non-enzymatic glycolytic reactions. Fe(II)-sensitive glycolytic and PPP-like reactions thus form a chemical network mimicking structural features of extant carbon metabolism, including topology, pH dependency, and conditional reactivity. Chemical networks that obtain structure and catalysis on the basis of transition metals found in Archean sediments are hence plausible direct precursors of cellular metabolic networks.

  3. Conditional iron and pH-dependent activity of a non-enzymatic glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Markus A.; Zylstra, Andre; Castro, Cecilia; Turchyn, Alexandra V.; Griffin, Julian L.; Ralser, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the evolutionary origins of metabolism. However, key biochemical reactions of glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), ancient metabolic pathways central to the metabolic network, have non-enzymatic pendants that occur in a prebiotically plausible reaction milieu reconstituted to contain Archean sediment metal components. These non-enzymatic reactions could have given rise to the origin of glycolysis and the PPP during early evolution. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and high-content metabolomics that allowed us to measure several thousand reaction mixtures, we experimentally address the chemical logic of a metabolism-like network constituted from these non-enzymatic reactions. Fe(II), the dominant transition metal component of Archean oceanic sediments, has binding affinity toward metabolic sugar phosphates and drives metabolism-like reactivity acting as both catalyst and cosubstrate. Iron and pH dependencies determine a metabolism-like network topology and comediate reaction rates over several orders of magnitude so that the network adopts conditional activity. Alkaline pH triggered the activity of the non-enzymatic PPP pendant, whereas gentle acidic or neutral conditions favored non-enzymatic glycolytic reactions. Fe(II)-sensitive glycolytic and PPP-like reactions thus form a chemical network mimicking structural features of extant carbon metabolism, including topology, pH dependency, and conditional reactivity. Chemical networks that obtain structure and catalysis on the basis of transition metals found in Archean sediments are hence plausible direct precursors of cellular metabolic networks. PMID:26824074

  4. Pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corredor, Deisy Y.

    The performance of soybean hulls and forage sorghum as feedstocks for ethanol production was studied. The main goal of this research was to increase fermentable sugars' yield through high-efficiency pretreatment technology. Soybean hulls are a potential feedstock for production of bio-ethanol due to their high carbohydrate content (≈50%) of nearly 37% cellulose. Soybean hulls could be the ideal feedstock for fuel ethanol production, because they are abundant and require no special harvesting and additional transportation costs as they are already in the plant. Dilute acid and modified steam-explosion were used as pretreatment technologies to increase fermentable sugars yields. Effects of reaction time, temperature, acid concentration and type of acid on hydrolysis of hemicellulose in soybean hulls and total sugar yields were studied. Optimum pretreatment parameters and enzymatic hydrolysis conditions for converting soybean hulls into fermentable sugars were identified. The combination of acid (H2SO4, 2% w/v) and steam (140°C, 30 min) efficiently solubilized the hemicellulose, giving a pentose yield of 96%. Sorghum is a tropical grass grown primarily in semiarid and dry parts of the world, especially in areas too dry for corn. The production of sorghum results in about 30 million tons of byproducts mainly composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Forage sorghum such as brown midrib (BMR) sorghum for ethanol production has generated much interest since this trait is characterized genetically by lower lignin concentrations in the plant compared with conventional types. Three varieties of forage sorghum and one variety of regular sorghum were characterized and evaluated as feedstock for fermentable sugar production. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-Ray diffraction were used to determine changes in structure and chemical composition of forage sorghum before and after pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis

  5. Two-step protocol for isolation and culture of cardiospheres.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lijuan; Pan, Yaohua; Zhang, Lan; Wang, Yingjie; Weintraub, Neal; Tang, Yaoliang

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac progenitor cells (CPC) are a unique pool of progenitor cells residing in the heart that play an important role in cardiac homeostasis and physiological cardiovascular cell turnover during acute myocardial infarction (MI). Transplanting CPC into the heart has shown promise in two recent clinical trials of cardiac repair (SCIPIO & CADUCEUS). CSCs were originally isolated directly from enzymatically digested hearts followed by cell sorting using stem cell markers. However, long exposure to enzymatic digestion can affect the integrity of stem cell markers on the cell surface and also compromise stem cell function. Here, we describe a two-step procedure in which a large number of intact cardiac progenitor cells can be purified from small amount of heart tissue.

  6. Geraniol hydroxylase and hydroxygeraniol oxidase activities of the CYP76 family of cytochrome P450 enzymes and potential for engineering the early steps of the (seco)iridoid pathway.

    PubMed

    Höfer, René; Dong, Lemeng; André, François; Ginglinger, Jean-François; Lugan, Raphael; Gavira, Carole; Grec, Sebastien; Lang, Gerhard; Memelink, Johan; Van der Krol, Sander; Bouwmeester, Harro; Werck-Reichhart, Danièle

    2013-11-01

    The geraniol-derived (seco)iridoid skeleton is a precursor for a large group of bioactive compounds with diverse therapeutic applications, including the widely used anticancer molecule vinblastine. Despite of this economic prospect, the pathway leading to iridoid biosynthesis from geraniol is still unclear. The first geraniol hydroxylation step has been reported to be catalyzed by cytochrome P450 enzymes such as CYP76B6 from Catharanthus roseus and CYP76C1 from Arabidopsis thaliana. In the present study, an extended functional analysis of CYP76 family members was carried-out to identify the most effective enzyme to be used for pathway reconstruction. This disproved CYP76C1 activity and led to the characterization of CYP76C4 from A. thaliana as a geraniol 9- or 8-hydroxylase. CYP76B6 emerged as a highly specialized multifunctional enzyme catalyzing two sequential oxidation steps leading to the formation of 8-oxogeraniol from geraniol. This dual function was confirmed in planta using a leaf-disc assay. The first step, geraniol hydroxylation, was very efficient and fast enough to outcompete geraniol conjugation in plant tissues. When the enzyme was expressed in leaf tissues, 8-oxogeraniol was converted into further oxidized and/or reduced compounds in the absence of the next enzyme of the iridoid pathway. Copyright © 2013 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Enantioselective Syntheses of (−)-Alloyohimbane and (−)-Yohimbane by an Efficient Enzymatic Desymmetrization Process

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Sarkar, Anindya

    2016-01-01

    Enantioselective syntheses of (−)-alloyohimbane and (−)-yohimbane was accomplished in a convergent manner. The key step involved a modified mild protocol for the enantioselective enzymatic desymmetrization of meso-diacetate. The protocol provided convenient access to an optically active monoacetate in multi-gram scale in high enantiomeric purity. This monoacetate was converted to (−)-alloyohimbane. Reductive amination of the derived aldehyde causes the isomerization leading to the trans-product and allows the synthesis of (−)-yohimbane. PMID:28757804

  8. Biosynthetic machinery of ionophore polyether lasalocid: enzymatic construction of polyether skeleton.

    PubMed

    Minami, Atsushi; Oguri, Hiroki; Watanabe, Kenji; Oikawa, Hideaki

    2013-08-01

    Diversity of natural polycyclic polyethers originated from very simple yet versatile strategy consisting of epoxidation of linear polyene followed by epoxide opening cascade. To understand two-step enzymatic transformations at molecular basis, a flavin containing monooxygenase (EPX) Lsd18 and an epoxide hydrolase (EH) Lsd19 were selected as model enzymes for extensive investigation on substrate specificity, catalytic mechanism, cofactor requirement and crystal structure. This pioneering study on prototypical lasalocid EPX and EH provides insight into detailed mechanism of ionophore polyether assembly machinery and clarified remaining issues for polyether biosynthesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Rapid enzymatic analysis of plasma for tyrosine.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, H; Taniguchi, K; Sugiyama, M; Kanno, T

    1990-01-01

    In this rapid, simple, and convenient enzymatic method for measurement of tyrosine in plasma, tyrosine is converted to tyramine by action of tyrosine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.25) and the tyramine produced is oxidized to p-hydroxybenzyl aldehyde and hydrogen peroxide by action of tyramine oxidase (EC 1.4.3.9). The hydrogen peroxide is reacted with 4-aminoantipyrine and N-ethyl-N-(2-hydroxy-3-sulfopropyl)-m-toluidine in the presence of peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) to obtain quinoneimine dye, the absorbance of which is measured at 570 nm. Thus tyrosine is measured in the visible range. The CV was 4.6% or less, and the measurement was unaffected by other amino acids, except for phenylalanine. The values obtained (y) correlated well with those obtained with an amino acid analyzer (x): y = 0.902x + 3.92 mumol/L (Syx = 12.3; r = 0.985; n = 54).

  10. Fungal biodegradation and enzymatic modification of lignin

    PubMed Central

    Dashtban, Mehdi; Schraft, Heidi; Syed, Tarannum A.; Qin, Wensheng

    2010-01-01

    Lignin, the most abundant aromatic biopolymer on Earth, is extremely recalcitrant to degradation. By linking to both hemicellulose and cellulose, it creates a barrier to any solutions or enzymes and prevents the penetration of lignocellulolytic enzymes into the interior lignocellulosic structure. Some basidiomycetes white-rot fungi are able to degrade lignin efficiently using a combination of extracellular ligninolytic enzymes, organic acids, mediators and accessory enzymes. This review describes ligninolytic enzyme families produced by these fungi that are involved in wood decay processes, their molecular structures, biochemical properties and the mechanisms of action which render them attractive candidates in biotechnological applications. These enzymes include phenol oxidase (laccase) and heme peroxidases [lignin peroxidase (LiP), manganese peroxidase (MnP) and versatile peroxidase (VP)]. Accessory enzymes such as H2O2-generating oxidases and degradation mechanisms of plant cell-wall components in a non-enzymatic manner by production of free hydroxyl radicals (·OH) are also discussed. PMID:21968746

  11. Thermal stability of bioactive enzymatic papers.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohidus Samad; Li, Xu; Shen, Wei; Garnier, Gil

    2010-01-01

    The thermal stability of two enzymes adsorbed on paper, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP), was measured using a colorimetric technique quantifying the intensity of the product complex. The enzymes adsorbed on paper retained their functionality and selectivity. Adsorption on paper increased the enzyme thermal stability by 2-3 orders of magnitude compared to the same enzyme in solution. ALP and HRP enzymatic papers had half-lives of 533 h and 239 h at 23 degrees C, respectively. The thermal degradation of adsorbed enzyme was found to follow two sequential first-order reactions, indication of a reaction system. A complex pattern of enzyme was printed on paper using a thermal inkjet printer. Paper and inkjet printing are ideal material and process to manufacture low-cost-high volume bioactive surfaces.

  12. Structure of the enzymatically synthesized fructan inulin.

    PubMed

    Heyer, A G; Schroeer, B; Radosta, S; Wolff, D; Czapla, S; Springer, J

    1998-12-15

    Construction, purification and characterization of a fusion protein of maltose-binding protein of Escherichia coli and the fructosyltransferase of Streptococcus mutans is described. With the purified protein, in vitro synthesis of inulin was performed. The obtained polysaccharide was characterized by high-performance size-exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) and static light scattering (SLS) in dilute aqueous and dimethyl sulfoxide solution. For all samples very high molecular weights between 60 x 10(6) and 90 x 10(6) g/mol and a remarkable small polydispersity index of 1.1 have been determined. Small root-mean-square radii of gyration point to a compact conformation in dilute solution. No difference between native and enzymatically synthesized inulin was observed by X-ray powder diffraction and thermoanalysis of solid samples.

  13. Additives enhancing enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Martín, Javier; Martinez-Bernal, Claudio; Pérez-Cobas, Yolanda; Reyes-Sosa, Francisco Manuel; García, Bruno Díez

    2017-11-01

    Linked to the development of cellulolytic enzyme cocktails from Myceliophthora thermophila, we studied the effect of different additives on the enzymatic hydrolysis yield. The hydrolysis of pretreated corn stover (PCS), sugar cane straw (PSCS) and microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel) was performed under industrial conditions using high solid loadings, limited mixing, and low enzyme dosages. The addition of polyethylene glycol (PEG4000) allowed to increase the glucose yields by 10%, 7.5%, and 32%, respectively in the three materials. PEG4000 did not have significant effect on the stability of the main individual enzymes but increased beta-glucosidase and endoglucanase activity by 20% and 60% respectively. Moreover, the presence of PEG4000 accelerated cellulase-catalyzed hydrolysis reducing up to 25% the liquefaction time. However, a preliminary economical assessment concludes that even with these improvements, a lower contribution of PEG4000 to the 2G bioethanol production costs would be needed to reach commercial feasibility. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Zinc oxide inverse opal enzymatic biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Xueqiu; Pikul, James H.; King, William P.; Pak, James J.

    2013-06-01

    We report ZnO inverse opal- and nanowire (NW)-based enzymatic glucose biosensors with extended linear detection ranges. The ZnO inverse opal sensors have 0.01-18 mM linear detection range, which is 2.5 times greater than that of ZnO NW sensors and 1.5 times greater than that of other reported ZnO sensors. This larger range is because of reduced glucose diffusivity through the inverse opal geometry. The ZnO inverse opal sensors have an average sensitivity of 22.5 μA/(mM cm2), which diminished by 10% after 35 days, are more stable than ZnO NW sensors whose sensitivity decreased by 10% after 7 days.

  15. Non-enzymatic Fluorescent Biosensor for Glucose Sensing Based on ZnO Nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, Hong Hanh; Pham, Van Thanh; Nguyen, Viet Tuyen; Sai, Cong Doanh; Hoang, Chi Hieu; Nguyen, The Binh

    2017-06-01

    We have developed a non-enzymatic fluorescent biosensor for glucose sensing based on ZnO nanorods. ZnO nanorods of high density, high crystallinity, and good alignment were grown on low-cost industrial copper substrates at low temperature. To grow them directly on the substrates without using a seed layer, we utilized a simple one-step seedless hydrothermal method, which is based on galvanic cell structure. Herein, the glucose-treated ZnO nanorods together with the ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of the sample during the photoluminescent measurement played the role of a catalyst. They decomposed glucose into hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and gluconic acid, which is similar to the glucose oxidase enzyme (GOx) used in enzymatic sensors. Due to the formation of H2O2, the photoluminescence intensity of the UV emission peak of ZnO nanorods decreased as the glucose concentration increased from 1 mM to 100 mM. In comparison with glucose concentration of a normal human serum, which is in the range of 4.4-6.6 mM, the obtained results show potential of non-enzymatic fluorescent biosensors in medical applications.

  16. Modeling enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic substrates using confocal fluorescence microscopy I: filter paper cellulose.

    PubMed

    Luterbacher, Jeremy S; Moran-Mirabal, Jose M; Burkholder, Eric W; Walker, Larry P

    2015-01-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis is one of the critical steps in depolymerizing lignocellulosic biomass into fermentable sugars for further upgrading into fuels and/or chemicals. However, many studies still rely on empirical trends to optimize enzymatic reactions. An improved understanding of enzymatic hydrolysis could allow research efforts to follow a rational design guided by an appropriate theoretical framework. In this study, we present a method to image cellulosic substrates with complex three-dimensional structure, such as filter paper, undergoing hydrolysis under conditions relevant to industrial saccharification processes (i.e., temperature of 50°C, using commercial cellulolytic cocktails). Fluorescence intensities resulting from confocal images were used to estimate parameters for a diffusion and reaction model. Furthermore, the observation of a relatively constant bound enzyme fluorescence signal throughout hydrolysis supported our modeling assumption regarding the structure of biomass during hydrolysis. The observed behavior suggests that pore evolution can be modeled as widening of infinitely long slits. The resulting model accurately predicts the concentrations of soluble carbohydrates obtained from independent saccharification experiments conducted in bulk, demonstrating its relevance to biomass conversion work. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Simultaneous sonochemical-enzymatic coating of medical textiles with antibacterial ZnO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Petkova, Petya; Francesko, Antonio; Perelshtein, Ilana; Gedanken, Aharon; Tzanov, Tzanko

    2016-03-01

    The antimicrobial finishing is a must for production of medical textiles, aiming at reducing the bioburden in clinical wards and consequently decreasing the risk of hospital-acquired infections. This work reports for the first time on a simultaneous sonochemical/enzymatic process for durable antibacterial coating of cotton with zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs). The novel technology goes beyond the "stepwise" concept we proposed recently for enzymatic pre-activation of the fabrics and subsequent sonochemical nano-coating, and is designed to produce "ready-to-use" antibacterial medical textiles in a single step. A multilayer coating of uniformly dispersed NPs was obtained in the process. The enzymatic treatment provides better adhesion of the ZnO NPs and, as a consequence, enhanced coating stability during exploitation. The NPs-coated cotton fabrics inhibited the growth of the medically relevant Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli respectively by 67% and 100%. The antibacterial efficiency of these textile materials resisted the intensive laundry regimes used in hospitals, though only 33% of the initially deposited NPs remained firmly fixed onto the fabrics after multiple washings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The Enzymatic Oxidation of Graphene Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Kotchey, Gregg P.; Allen, Brett L.; Vedala, Harindra; Yanamala, Naveena; Kapralov, Alexander A.; Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Kagan, Valerian E.; Star, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Two-dimensional graphitic carbon is a new material with many emerging applications, and studying its chemical properties is an important goal. Here, we reported a new phenomenon – the enzymatic oxidation of a single layer of graphitic carbon by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). In the presence of low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (~40 µM), HRP catalyzed the oxidation of graphene oxide, which resulted in the formation of holes on its basal plane. During the same period of analysis, HRP failed to oxidize chemically reduced graphene oxide (RGO). The enzymatic oxidation was characterized by Raman, UV-Vis, EPR and FT-IR spectroscopy, TEM, AFM, SDS-PAGE, and GC-MS. Computational docking studies indicated that HRP was preferentially bound to the basal plane rather than the edge for both graphene oxide and RGO. Due to the more dynamic nature of HRP on graphene oxide, the heme active site of HRP was in closer proximity to graphene oxide compared to RGO, thereby facilitating the oxidation of the basal plane of graphene oxide. We also studied the electronic properties of the reduced intermediate product, holey reduced graphene oxide (hRGO), using field-effect transistor (FET) measurements. While RGO exhibited a V-shaped transfer characteristic similar to a single layer of graphene that was attributed to its zero band gap, hRGO demonstrated a p-type semiconducting behavior with a positive shift in the Dirac points. This p-type behavior rendered hRGO, which can be conceptualized as interconnected graphene nanoribbons, as a potentially attractive material for FET sensors. PMID:21344859

  19. The enzymatic oxidation of graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Kotchey, Gregg P; Allen, Brett L; Vedala, Harindra; Yanamala, Naveena; Kapralov, Alexander A; Tyurina, Yulia Y; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Kagan, Valerian E; Star, Alexander

    2011-03-22

    Two-dimensional graphitic carbon is a new material with many emerging applications, and studying its chemical properties is an important goal. Here, we reported a new phenomenon--the enzymatic oxidation of a single layer of graphitic carbon by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). In the presence of low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (∼40 μM), HRP catalyzed the oxidation of graphene oxide, which resulted in the formation of holes on its basal plane. During the same period of analysis, HRP failed to oxidize chemically reduced graphene oxide (RGO). The enzymatic oxidation was characterized by Raman, ultraviolet-visible, electron paramagnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Computational docking studies indicated that HRP was preferentially bound to the basal plane rather than the edge for both graphene oxide and RGO. Owing to the more dynamic nature of HRP on graphene oxide, the heme active site of HRP was in closer proximity to graphene oxide compared to RGO, thereby facilitating the oxidation of the basal plane of graphene oxide. We also studied the electronic properties of the reduced intermediate product, holey reduced graphene oxide (hRGO), using field-effect transistor (FET) measurements. While RGO exhibited a V-shaped transfer characteristic similar to a single layer of graphene that was attributed to its zero band gap, hRGO demonstrated a p-type semiconducting behavior with a positive shift in the Dirac points. This p-type behavior rendered hRGO, which can be conceptualized as interconnected graphene nanoribbons, as a potentially attractive material for FET sensors.

  20. A dual enzymatic-biosensor for simultaneous determination of glucose and cholesterol in serum and peritoneal macrophages of diabetic mice: evaluation of the diabetes-accelerated atherosclerosis risk.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qilin; An, Yarui; Tang, Linlin; Jiang, Xiaoli; Chen, Hua; Bi, Wenji; Wang, Zhongchuan; Zhang, Wen

    2011-11-30

    In this paper, a novel dual enzymatic-biosensor is described for simultaneous determination of glucose and cholesterol in serum and peritoneal macrophages (PMs) of diabetic mice to evaluate the risk of diabetes-accelerated atherosclerosis. The biosensor was constructed by a three-step method. First, a poly-thionine (PTH) film was assembled on the surface of glassy carbon electrode by cyclic voltammetric electropolymerization of thionine, which serves as an electron transfer mediator (ETM). Second, gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were covered on the surface of PTH facilitating the electron transfer between glucose oxidase (GOx), cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) and electrode. Finally, the enzymes, GOx, cholesterol esterase (ChE), and ChOx, were covalently attached to the PTH layer through a chitosan (CH) linker. The PTH coupled with GNPs provides good selectivity, high sensitivity and little crosstalk for the dual enzymatic-biosensor. The developed biosensor had good electrocatalytic activity toward the oxidations of glucose and cholesterol, exhibiting a linear range from 0.008 mM to 6.0 mM for glucose with a detection limit of 2.0 μM, and a linear range from 0.002 mM to 1.0 mM for cholesterol with a detection limit of 0.6 μM. The results of the diabetic mice demonstrated that the cholesterol level did not change obviously with the increase of glucose level in serum, while the cholesterol level was induced with the increase of the glucose level in PMs. Previous studies have shown that the large accumulation of cholesterol in macrophage could lead to macrophage foam cell formation, which is the hallmark of early atherosclerosis. This study provides useful further evidences for the development of diabetes-accelerated atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Early Child Care and Education: HHS and Education Are Taking Steps to Improve Workforce Data and Enhance Worker Quality. Report to the Chairman, Committee on Finance, U.S. Senate. GAO-12-248

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Kay E.

    2012-01-01

    Research shows that well trained and educated early child care and education (ECCE) workers are key to helping children in care reach their full developmental potential. Federal and state governments spend billions of dollars each year to improve ECCE programs, including the quality of its caregivers and teachers. Because of the importance of this…

  2. Enzymatic hydrolysis of biomimetic bacterial cellulose-hemicellulose composites.

    PubMed

    Penttilä, Paavo A; Imai, Tomoya; Hemming, Jarl; Willför, Stefan; Sugiyama, Junji

    2018-06-15

    The production of biofuels and other chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass is limited by the inefficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis. Here a biomimetic composite material consisting of bacterial cellulose and wood-based hemicelluloses was used to study the effects of hemicelluloses on the enzymatic hydrolysis with a commercial cellulase mixture. Bacterial cellulose synthesized in the presence of hemicelluloses, especially xylan, was found to be more susceptible to enzymatic hydrolysis than hemicellulose-free bacterial cellulose. The reason for the easier hydrolysis could be related to the nanoscale structure of the substrate, particularly the packing of cellulose microfibrils into ribbons or bundles. In addition, small-angle X-ray scattering was used to show that the average nanoscale morphology of bacterial cellulose remained unchanged during the enzymatic hydrolysis. The reported easier enzymatic hydrolysis of bacterial cellulose produced in the presence of wood-based xylan offers new insights to overcome biomass recalcitrance through genetic engineering. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Maltodextrin-powered enzymatic fuel cell through a non-natural enzymatic pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhiguang; Wang, Yiran; Minteer, Shelley D.; Percival Zhang, Y.-H.

    Enzymatic fuel cells (EFCs) use a variety of fuels to generate electricity through oxidoreductase enzymes, such as oxidases or dehydrogenases, as catalysts on electrodes. We have developed a novel synthetic enzymatic pathway containing two free enzymes (maltodextrin phosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase) and one immobilized glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase that can utilize an oligomeric substrate maltodextrin for producing electrons mediated via a diaphorase and vitamin K 3 electron shuttle system. Three different enzyme immobilization approaches were compared based on electrostatic force entrapment, chemical cross-linking, and cross-linking with the aid of carbon nanotubes. At 10 mM glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) as a substrate concentration, the maximum power density of 0.06 mW cm -2 and retaining 42% of power output after 11 days were obtained through the method of chemical cross-linking with carbon nanotubes, approximately 6-fold and 3.5-fold better than those of the electrostatic force-based method, respectively. When changed to maltodextrin (degree of polymerization = 19) as the substrate, the EFC achieved a maximum power density of 0.085 mW cm -2. With the advantages of stable, low cost, high energy density, non-inhibitor to enzymes, and environmental friendly, maltodextrin is suggested to be an ideal fuel to power enzymatic fuel cells.

  4. The Seven Step Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffer, Connie

    2017-01-01

    Many well-intended instructors use Socratic or leveled questioning to facilitate the discussion of an assigned reading. While this engages a few students, most can opt to remain silent. The seven step strategy described in this article provides an alternative to classroom silence and engages all students. Students discuss a single reading as they…

  5. Stepped inlet optical panel

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2001-01-01

    An optical panel includes stacked optical waveguides having stepped inlet facets collectively defining an inlet face for receiving image light, and having beveled outlet faces collectively defining a display screen for displaying the image light channeled through the waveguides by internal reflection.

  6. Supporting Early Learning Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Himes, James A. [D-CT-4

    2014-02-03

    House - 06/13/2014 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  7. Early Learning Innovation Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Himes, James A. [D-CT-4

    2009-10-29

    House - 12/08/2009 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  8. Early Learning Alignment Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Altmire, Jason [D-PA-4

    2010-09-29

    House - 11/18/2010 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  9. Selection of Yeasts as Starter Cultures for Table Olives: A Step-by-Step Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Bevilacqua, Antonio; Corbo, Maria Rosaria; Sinigaglia, Milena

    2012-01-01

    The selection of yeasts intended as starters for table olives is a complex process, including a characterization step at laboratory level and a validation at lab level and factory-scale. The characterization at lab level deals with the assessment of some technological traits (growth under different temperatures and at alkaline pHs, effect of salt, and for probiotic strains the resistance to preservatives), enzymatic activities, and some new functional properties (probiotic traits, production of vitamin B-complex, biological debittering). The paper reports on these traits, focusing both on their theoretical implications and lab protocols; moreover, there are some details on predictive microbiology for yeasts of table olives and on the use of multivariate approaches to select suitable starters. PMID:22666220

  10. [On the enzymatics of the microbial breakdown of pyrazone (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Sauber, K; Blobel, F; Haug, S; Eberspächer, J

    1976-07-01

    From samples of earth taken in different parts of the world bacteria were isolated which grow on pyrazone as the only source of carbon. When these bacteria are grown in a pyrazone mineral salt medium, four compounds are excreted into the medium. The structures of these compounds furnish information on the catabolic route of pyrazone. Since the suggested scheme of breakdown was incomplete, enzymatic tests were carried out to clarify the matter. It was possible to carry out the first steps of breakdown also in the cell-free extract of the pyrazone-degrading bacteria. For the second step of pyrazone breakdown, 2 different enzymes of the same catalytic activity were identified. For the oxidative cleavage of the pyrocatechole derivative 2 different enzymes were found: an ortho- and a meta-clearing enzyme. The 2-hydroxy muconic acid decarboxylase was identified as a further enzyme. The importance of this enzyme is discussed in connection with the further breakdown.

  11. The digital step edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haralick, R. M.

    1982-01-01

    The facet model was used to accomplish step edge detection. The essence of the facet model is that any analysis made on the basis of the pixel values in some neighborhood has its final authoritative interpretation relative to the underlying grey tone intensity surface of which the neighborhood pixel values are observed noisy samples. Pixels which are part of regions have simple grey tone intensity surfaces over their areas. Pixels which have an edge in them have complex grey tone intensity surfaces over their areas. Specially, an edge moves through a pixel only if there is some point in the pixel's area having a zero crossing of the second directional derivative taken in the direction of a non-zero gradient at the pixel's center. To determine whether or not a pixel should be marked as a step edge pixel, its underlying grey tone intensity surface was estimated on the basis of the pixels in its neighborhood.

  12. Total enzymatic synthesis of cholecystokinin CCK-5.

    PubMed

    Xiang, H; Xiang, G Y; Lu, Z M; Guo, L; Eckstein, H

    2004-08-01

    This paper describes the enzymatic synthesis of the C-terminal fragment H-Gly-Trp-Met-Asp-Phe-NH2 of cholecystokinin. Immobilized enzymes were used for the formation of all peptide bonds except thermolysin. Beginning the synthesis with phenylacetyl (PhAc) glycine carboxamidomethyl ester (OCam) and H-Trp-OMe by using immobilized papain as biocatalyst in buffered ethyl acetate, the dipeptide methyl ester was then coupled directly with Met-OEt.HCl by alpha-chymotrypsin/Celite 545 in a solvent free system. For the 3+2 coupling PhAc-Gly-Trp-Met-OEt had to be converted into its OCam ester. The other fragment H-Asp(OMe)-Phe-NH2 resulted from the coupling of Cbo-Asp(OMe)-OH with H-Phe-NH2.HCl and thermolysin as catalyst, followed by catalytic hydrogenation. Finally PhAc-Gly-Trp-Met-Asp-Phe-NH2 was obtained in a smooth reaction from PhAc-Gly-Trp-Met-OCam and H-Asp(OMe)-Phe-NH2 with alpha-chymotrypsin/Celite 545 in acetonitrile, followed by basic hydrolysis of the beta-methyl ester. The PhAc-group is removed with penicillin G amidase and CCK-5 is obtained in an overall isolated yield of 19.6%.

  13. Enzymatic Purification of Microplastics in Environmental Samples.

    PubMed

    Löder, Martin G J; Imhof, Hannes K; Ladehoff, Maike; Löschel, Lena A; Lorenz, Claudia; Mintenig, Svenja; Piehl, Sarah; Primpke, Sebastian; Schrank, Isabella; Laforsch, Christian; Gerdts, Gunnar

    2017-12-19

    Micro-Fourier transform infrared (micro-FTIR) spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy enable the reliable identification and quantification of microplastics (MPs) in the lower micron range. Since concentrations of MPs in the environment are usually low, the large sample volumes required for these techniques lead to an excess of coenriched organic or inorganic materials. While inorganic materials can be separated from MPs using density separation, the organic fraction impedes the ability to conduct reliable analyses. Hence, the purification of MPs from organic materials is crucial prior to conducting an identification via spectroscopic techniques. Strong acidic or alkaline treatments bear the danger of degrading sensitive synthetic polymers. We suggest an alternative method, which uses a series of technical grade enzymes for purifying MPs in environmental samples. A basic enzymatic purification protocol (BEPP) proved to be efficient while reducing 98.3 ± 0.1% of the sample matrix in surface water samples. After showing a high recovery rate (84.5 ± 3.3%), the BEPP was successfully applied to environmental samples from the North Sea where numbers of MPs range from 0.05 to 4.42 items m -3 . Experiences with different environmental sample matrices were considered in an improved and universally applicable version of the BEPP, which is suitable for focal plane array detector (FPA)-based micro-FTIR analyses of water, wastewater, sediment, biota, and food samples.

  14. Computational Investigations on Enzymatic Catalysis and Inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simard, Daniel

    Enzymes are the bimolecular "workhorses" of the cell due to their range of functions and their requirement for cellular success. The atomistic details of how they function can provide key insights into the fundamentals of catalysis and in turn, provide a blueprint for biotechnological advances. A wide range of contemporary computational techniques has been applied with the aim to characterize recently discovered intermediates or to provide insights into enzymatic mechanisms and inhibition. More specifically, an assessment of methods was conducted to evaluate the presence of the growing number 3-- and 4--coordinated sulfur intermediates in proteins/enzymes. Furthermore, two mechanisms have been investigated, the mu-OH mechanism of the hydrolysis of dimethylphosphate in Glycerophosphodiesterase (GpdQ) using five different homonuclear metal combinations Zn(II)/Zn(II), Co(II)/Co(II), Mn(II)/Mn(II), Cd(II)/Cd(II) and Ca(II)/Ca(II) as well as a preliminary study into the effectivness of boron as an inhibitor in the serine protease reaction of class A TEM-1 beta-lactamases.

  15. Step 3: Manage Your Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Type 2 Diabetes Step 3: Manage Your Diabetes Past Issues / Fall 2014 ... 2 Diabetes" Articles Diabetes Is Serious But Manageable / Step 1: Learn About Diabetes / Step 2: Know Your ...

  16. Enzymatic Digestion for Improved Bacteria Separation from Leafy Green Vegetables.

    PubMed

    Wang, Danhui; Wang, Ziyuan; He, Fei; Kinchla, Amanda J; Nugen, Sam R

    2016-08-01

    An effective and rapid method for the separation of bacteria from food matrix remains a bottleneck for rapid bacteria detection for food safety. Bacteria can strongly attach to a food surface or internalize within the matrix, making their isolation extremely difficult. Traditional methods of separating bacteria from food routinely involve stomaching, blending, and shaking. However, these methods may not be efficient at removing all the bacteria from complex matrices. Here, we investigate the benefits of using enzyme digestion followed by immunomagnetic separation to isolate Salmonella from spinach and lettuce. Enzymatic digestion using pectinase and cellulase was able to break down the structure of the leafy green vegetables, resulting in the detachment and release of Salmonella from the leaves. Immunomagnetic separation of Salmonella from the liquefied sample allowed an additional separation step to achieve a more pure sample without leaf debris that may benefit additional downstream applications. We have investigated the optimal combination of pectinase and cellulase for the digestion of spinach and lettuce to improve sample detection yields. The concentrations of enzymes used to digest the leaves were confirmed to have no significant effect on the viability of the inoculated Salmonella. Results reported that the recovery of the Salmonella from the produce after enzyme digestion of the leaves was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than traditional sample preparation methods to separate bacteria (stomaching and manually shaking). The results demonstrate the potential for use of enzyme digestion prior to separation can improve the efficiency of bacteria separation and increase the likelihood of detecting pathogens in the final detection assay.

  17. Step of Dichlorvos Inhibition in the Pathway of Aflatoxin Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Raymond C.; Hsieh, Dennis P. H.

    1974-01-01

    Dichlorvos (dimethyl 2,2-dichlorovinyl phosphate) inhibits the biosynthesis of aflatoxin by Aspergillus parasiticus. Cultures treated with dichlorvos excrete an orange pigment which can be converted into aflatoxin B1 by the untreated mycelia. The orange pigment was partially identified as an acetyl derivative of versiconol-type compound. In the presence of dichlorvos, sterigmatocystin is converted into aflatoxin B1 without being interfered, but averufin is converted into the orange pigment instead of aflatoxin B1. Therefore, dichlorvos appears to block an enzymatic step in the aflatoxin biosynthetic pathway, which lies beyond averufin but before sterigmatocystin, at the formation of the orange pigment. PMID:4844267

  18. Power Tweeting: Next Steps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rethlefsen, Melissa L.

    2009-01-01

    When product pipeline first covered Twitter back in July 2007, the tool was so novel that only a very few libraries and librarians were experimenting with it. Now, over two years later, Twitter has gone mainstream, thanks to promotion by high-profile stars. From its early beginnings as a microblogging application, Twitter morphed into a…

  19. Impact of the redox-cycling herbicide diquat on transcript expression and antioxidant enzymatic activities of the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis.

    PubMed

    Bouétard, Anthony; Besnard, Anne-Laure; Vassaux, Danièle; Lagadic, Laurent; Coutellec, Marie-Agnès

    2013-01-15

    significantly (or non-significantly for cat) after 5 h of exposure, and went back to control levels afterwards, suggesting the onset of an early response to oxidative stress associated to the unbalance of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in hepatocytes. Although increases obtained for Gred and SOD activities were globally consistent with their respective transcript expressions, up-regulation of transcription was not always correlated with increase of enzymatic activity, indicating that diquat might affect steps downstream of transcription. However, constitutive levels of enzymatic activities were at least maintained. In conclusion, diquat was shown to affect expression of the whole set of studied transcripts, reflecting their suitability as markers of early response to oxidative stress in L. stagnalis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Extended follow-up confirms early vaccine-enhanced risk of HIV acquisition and demonstrates waning effect over time among participants in a randomized trial of recombinant adenovirus HIV vaccine (Step Study).

    PubMed

    Duerr, Ann; Huang, Yunda; Buchbinder, Susan; Coombs, Robert W; Sanchez, Jorge; del Rio, Carlos; Casapia, Martin; Santiago, Steven; Gilbert, Peter; Corey, Lawrence; Robertson, Michael N

    2012-07-15

    The Step Study tested whether an adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5)-vectored human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine could prevent HIV acquisition and/or reduce viral load set-point after infection. At the first interim analysis, nonefficacy criteria were met. Vaccinations were halted; participants were unblinded. In post hoc analyses, more HIV infections occurred in vaccinees vs placebo recipients in men who had Ad5-neutralizing antibodies and/or were uncircumcised. Follow-up was extended to assess relative risk of HIV acquisition in vaccinees vs placebo recipients over time. We used Cox proportional hazard models for analyses of vaccine effect on HIV acquisition and vaccine effect modifiers, and nonparametric and semiparametric methods for analysis of constancy of relative risk over time. One hundred seventy-two of 1836 men were infected. The adjusted vaccinees vs placebo recipients hazard ratio (HR) for all follow-up time was 1.40 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.92; P= .03). Vaccine effect differed by baseline Ad5 or circumcision status during first 18 months, but neither was significant for all follow-up time. The HR among uncircumcised and/or Ad5-seropositive men waned with time since vaccination. No significant vaccine-associated risk was seen among circumcised, Ad5-negative men (HR, 0.97; P=1.0) over all follow-up time. The vaccine-associated risk seen in interim analysis was confirmed but waned with time from vaccination.

  1. Steps to the moon

    ,; Dale, Alvin E.

    1976-01-01

    On July 20, 1969, man walked on the surface of the Moon and began a new chapter of his studies that will eventually disclose the geologic nature of the Earth's nearest neighbor. Although he has finally reached the Moon and sampled its substance, much work and study remain before he will know the full scientific significance of the first landing. This booklet briefly summarizes the steps man has taken to understand the Moon and what he thinks he has learned to date as a result of his centuries-long speculations and studies.

  2. Synergistic enzymatic and microbial lignin conversion

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Cheng; Xie, Shangxian; Pu, Yunqiao; ...

    2015-10-02

    We represent the utilization of lignin for fungible fuels and chemicals and it's one of the most imminent challenges in modern biorefineries. However, bioconversion of lignin is highly challenging due to its recalcitrant nature as a phenolic heteropolymer. This study addressed the challenges by revealing the chemical and biological mechanisms for synergistic lignin degradation by a bacterial and enzymatic system, which significantly improved lignin consumption, cell growth and lipid yield. The Rhodococcus opacus cell growth increased exponentially in response to the level of laccase treatment, indicating the synergy between laccase and bacterial cells in lignin degradation. Other treatments like ironmore » and hydrogen peroxide showed limited impact on cell growth. Chemical analysis of lignin under various treatments further confirmed the synergy between laccase and cells at the chemical level. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) suggested that laccase, R. opacus cell and Fenton reaction reagents promoted the degradation of different types of lignin functional groups, elucidating the chemical basis for the synergistic effects. 31P NMR further revealed that laccase treatment had the most significant impact for degrading the abundant chemical groups. The results were further confirmed by the molecular weight analysis and lignin quantification by the Prussian blue assay. The cell–laccase fermentation led to a 17-fold increase of lipid production. Overall, the study indicated that laccase and R. opacus can synergize to degrade lignin efficiently, likely through rapid utilization of monomers generated by laccase to promote the reaction toward depolymerization. The study provided a potential path for more efficient lignin conversion and development of consolidated lignin conversion.« less

  3. Synergistic enzymatic and microbial lignin conversion

    SciT

    Zhao, Cheng; Xie, Shangxian; Pu, Yunqiao

    We represent the utilization of lignin for fungible fuels and chemicals and it's one of the most imminent challenges in modern biorefineries. However, bioconversion of lignin is highly challenging due to its recalcitrant nature as a phenolic heteropolymer. This study addressed the challenges by revealing the chemical and biological mechanisms for synergistic lignin degradation by a bacterial and enzymatic system, which significantly improved lignin consumption, cell growth and lipid yield. The Rhodococcus opacus cell growth increased exponentially in response to the level of laccase treatment, indicating the synergy between laccase and bacterial cells in lignin degradation. Other treatments like ironmore » and hydrogen peroxide showed limited impact on cell growth. Chemical analysis of lignin under various treatments further confirmed the synergy between laccase and cells at the chemical level. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) suggested that laccase, R. opacus cell and Fenton reaction reagents promoted the degradation of different types of lignin functional groups, elucidating the chemical basis for the synergistic effects. 31P NMR further revealed that laccase treatment had the most significant impact for degrading the abundant chemical groups. The results were further confirmed by the molecular weight analysis and lignin quantification by the Prussian blue assay. The cell–laccase fermentation led to a 17-fold increase of lipid production. Overall, the study indicated that laccase and R. opacus can synergize to degrade lignin efficiently, likely through rapid utilization of monomers generated by laccase to promote the reaction toward depolymerization. The study provided a potential path for more efficient lignin conversion and development of consolidated lignin conversion.« less

  4. Enzymatic reduction of azo and indigoid compounds.

    PubMed

    Pricelius, S; Held, C; Murkovic, M; Bozic, M; Kokol, V; Cavaco-Paulo, A; Guebitz, G M

    2007-11-01

    A customer- and environment-friendly method for the decolorization azo dyes was developed. Azoreductases could be used both to bleach hair dyed with azo dyes and to reduce dyes in vat dyeing of textiles. A new reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent azoreductase of Bacillus cereus, which showed high potential for reduction of these dyes, was purified using a combination of ammonium sulfate precipitation and chromatography and had a molecular mass of 21.5 kDa. The optimum pH of the azoreductase depended on the substrate and was within the range of pH 6 to 7, while the maximum temperature was reached at 40 degrees C. Oxygen was shown to be an alternative electron acceptor to azo compounds and must therefore be excluded during enzymatic dye reduction. Biotransformation of the azo dyes Flame Orange and Ruby Red was studied in more detail using UV-visible spectroscopy, high-performance liquid chromatography, and mass spectrometry (MS). Reduction of the azo bonds leads to cleavage of the dyes resulting in the cleavage product 2-amino-1,3 dimethylimidazolium and N approximately 1 approximately ,N approximately 1 approximately -dimethyl-1,4-benzenediamine for Ruby Red, while only the first was detected for Flame Orange because of MS instability of the expected 1,4-benzenediamine. The azoreductase was also found to reduce vat dyes like Indigo Carmine (C.I. Acid Blue 74). Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) as an oxidizing agent was used to reoxidize the dye into the initial form. The reduction and oxidation mechanism of Indigo Carmine was studied using UV-visible spectroscopy.

  5. Extended Follow-up Confirms Early Vaccine-Enhanced Risk of HIV Acquisition and Demonstrates Waning Effect Over Time Among Participants in a Randomized Trial of Recombinant Adenovirus HIV Vaccine (Step Study)

    PubMed Central

    Duerr, Ann; Huang, Yunda; Buchbinder, Susan; Coombs, Robert W.; Sanchez, Jorge; del Rio, Carlos; Casapia, Martin; Santiago, Steven; Gilbert, Peter; Corey, Lawrence; Robertson, Michael N.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The Step Study tested whether an adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5)–vectored human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine could prevent HIV acquisition and/or reduce viral load set-point after infection. At the first interim analysis, nonefficacy criteria were met. Vaccinations were halted; participants were unblinded. In post hoc analyses, more HIV infections occurred in vaccinees vs placebo recipients in men who had Ad5-neutralizing antibodies and/or were uncircumcised. Follow-up was extended to assess relative risk of HIV acquisition in vaccinees vs placebo recipients over time. Methods. We used Cox proportional hazard models for analyses of vaccine effect on HIV acquisition and vaccine effect modifiers, and nonparametric and semiparametric methods for analysis of constancy of relative risk over time. Results. One hundred seventy-two of 1836 men were infected. The adjusted vaccinees vs placebo recipients hazard ratio (HR) for all follow-up time was 1.40 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03–1.92; P = .03). Vaccine effect differed by baseline Ad5 or circumcision status during first 18 months, but neither was significant for all follow-up time. The HR among uncircumcised and/or Ad5-seropositive men waned with time since vaccination. No significant vaccine-associated risk was seen among circumcised, Ad5-negative men (HR, 0.97; P = 1.0) over all follow-up time. Conclusions. The vaccine-associated risk seen in interim analysis was confirmed but waned with time from vaccination. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT00095576. PMID:22561365

  6. Bioelectrocatalytic NAD+/NADH inter-conversion: transformation of an enzymatic fuel cell into an enzymatic redox flow battery.

    PubMed

    Quah, Timothy; Milton, Ross D; Abdellaoui, Sofiene; Minteer, Shelley D

    2017-07-25

    Diaphorase and a benzylpropylviologen redox polymer were combined to create a bioelectrode that can both oxidize NADH and reduce NAD + . We demonstrate how bioelectrocatalytic NAD + /NADH inter-conversion can transform a glucose/O 2 enzymatic fuel cell (EFC) with an open circuit potential (OCP) of 1.1 V into an enzymatic redox flow battery (ERFB), which can be rapidly recharged by operation as an EFC.

  7. A comparison of the distribution of enzymatically and non-enzymatically produced lead phosphate in insect flight muscle.

    PubMed

    Tice, L W

    1969-01-01

    Lead phosphate precipitates were produced in indirect flight muscles of Phormia regina by sequential incubation in solutions containing lead and inorganic phosphate and their distribution was compared with those produced by ATP hydrolysis in the presence of lead. Enzymatically produced precipitates were associated almost exclusively with thick filaments. Non-enzymatically produced precipitates were associated with thick filaments but were also found associated with thin filaments in significant numbers.

  8. SPAR-H Step-by-Step Guidance

    SciT

    W. J. Galyean; A. M. Whaley; D. L. Kelly

    This guide provides step-by-step guidance on the use of the SPAR-H method for quantifying Human Failure Events (HFEs). This guide is intended to be used with the worksheets provided in: 'The SPAR-H Human Reliability Analysis Method,' NUREG/CR-6883, dated August 2005. Each step in the process of producing a Human Error Probability (HEP) is discussed. These steps are: Step-1, Categorizing the HFE as Diagnosis and/or Action; Step-2, Rate the Performance Shaping Factors; Step-3, Calculate PSF-Modified HEP; Step-4, Accounting for Dependence, and; Step-5, Minimum Value Cutoff. The discussions on dependence are extensive and include an appendix that describes insights obtained from themore » psychology literature.« less

  9. Promoting Optimal Physical Exercise for Life (PROPEL): aerobic exercise and self-management early after stroke to increase daily physical activity-study protocol for a stepped-wedge randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Avril; Brooks, Dina; Tang, Ada; Taylor, Denise; Inness, Elizabeth L; Kiss, Alex; Middleton, Laura; Biasin, Louis; Fleck, Rebecca; French, Esmé; LeBlanc, Kathryn; Aqui, Anthony; Danells, Cynthia

    2017-06-30

    Physical exercise after stroke is essential for improving recovery and general health, and reducing future stroke risk. However, people with stroke are not sufficiently active on return to the community after rehabilitation. We developed the Promoting Optimal Physical Exercise for Life (PROPEL) programme, which combines exercise with self-management strategies within rehabilitation to promote ongoing physical activity in the community after rehabilitation. This study aims to evaluate the effect of PROPEL on long-term participation in exercise after discharge from stroke rehabilitation. We hypothesise that individuals who complete PROPEL will be more likely to meet recommended frequency, duration and intensity of exercise compared with individuals who do not complete the programme up to 6 months post discharge from stroke rehabilitation. Individuals undergoing outpatient stroke rehabilitation at one of six hospitals will be recruited (target n=192 total). A stepped-wedge design will be employed; that is, the PROPEL intervention (group exercise plus self-management) will be 'rolled out' to each site at a random time within the study period. Prior to roll-out of the PROPEL intervention, sites will complete the control intervention (group aerobic exercise only). Participation in physical activity for 6 months post discharge will be measured via activity and heart rate monitors, and standardised physical activity questionnaire. Adherence to exercise guidelines will be evaluated by (1) number of 'active minutes' per week (from the activity monitor), (2) amount of time per week when heart rate is within a target range (ie, 55%-80% of age-predicted maximum) and (3) amount of time per week completing 'moderate' or 'strenuous' physical activities (from the questionnaire). We will compare the proportion of active and inactive individuals at 6 months post intervention using mixed-model logistic regression, with fixed effects of time and phase and random effect of cluster

  10. Promoting Optimal Physical Exercise for Life (PROPEL): aerobic exercise and self-management early after stroke to increase daily physical activity—study protocol for a stepped-wedge randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, Avril; Brooks, Dina; Tang, Ada; Taylor, Denise; Inness, Elizabeth L; Kiss, Alex; Middleton, Laura; Biasin, Louis; Fleck, Rebecca; French, Esmé; LeBlanc, Kathryn; Aqui, Anthony; Danells, Cynthia

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Physical exercise after stroke is essential for improving recovery and general health, and reducing future stroke risk. However, people with stroke are not sufficiently active on return to the community after rehabilitation. We developed the Promoting Optimal Physical Exercise for Life (PROPEL) programme, which combines exercise with self-management strategies within rehabilitation to promote ongoing physical activity in the community after rehabilitation. This study aims to evaluate the effect of PROPEL on long-term participation in exercise after discharge from stroke rehabilitation. We hypothesise that individuals who complete PROPEL will be more likely to meet recommended frequency, duration and intensity of exercise compared with individuals who do not complete the programme up to 6 months post discharge from stroke rehabilitation. Methods and analysis Individuals undergoing outpatient stroke rehabilitation at one of six hospitals will be recruited (target n=192 total). A stepped-wedge design will be employed; that is, the PROPEL intervention (group exercise plus self-management) will be ‘rolled out’ to each site at a random time within the study period. Prior to roll-out of the PROPEL intervention, sites will complete the control intervention (group aerobic exercise only). Participation in physical activity for 6 months post discharge will be measured via activity and heart rate monitors, and standardised physical activity questionnaire. Adherence to exercise guidelines will be evaluated by (1) number of ‘active minutes’ per week (from the activity monitor), (2) amount of time per week when heart rate is within a target range (ie, 55%–80% of age-predicted maximum) and (3) amount of time per week completing ‘moderate’ or ‘strenuous’ physical activities (from the questionnaire). We will compare the proportion of active and inactive individuals at 6 months post intervention using mixed-model logistic regression, with fixed

  11. Chemo-enzymatic synthesis of vinyl and l-ascorbyl phenolates and their inhibitory effects on advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Seung Hwan; Wang, Zhiqiang; Lim, Soon Sung

    2017-01-01

    This study successfully established the feasibility of a two-step chemo-enzymatic synthesis of l-ascorbyl phenolates. Intermediate vinyl phenolates were first chemically produced and then underwent trans-esterification with l-ascorbic acid in the presence of Novozyme 435® (Candida Antarctica lipase B) as a catalyst. Twenty vinyl phenolates and 11 ascorbyl phenolates were subjected to in vitro bioassays to investigate their inhibitory activity against advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Among them, vinyl 4-hydroxycinnamate (17VP), vinyl 4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamate (18VP), vinyl 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxycinnamate (20VP), ascorbyl 4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamate (18AP) and ascorbyl 3,4-dimethoxycinnamate (19AP) showed 2-10 times stronger inhibitory activities than positive control (aminoguanidine and its precursors). These results indicated that chemo-enzymatically synthesized compounds have AGE inhibitory effect and thus are effective in either preventing or retarding glycation protein formation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. NACOA: Burford steps down

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    Anne M. Burford, who had been appointed early last month by President Ronald Reagan to chair the National Advisory Committee on Oceans and Atmosphere (NACOA), asked the president on August 1 to withdraw her appointment. John A. Knauss, of the University of Rhode Island's Graduate School of Oceanography, will retain his position as NACOA chairman. He has been on the committee for 6 years.President Reagan agreed to her request the afternoon before Burford was to chair her first meeting. The new NACOA members (Eos, July 17, 1984, p. 442) were sworn in on August 2, although the meeting was postponed until September 20, a NACOA official told Eos.

  13. Highly efficient enzymatic synthesis of 2-monoacylglycerides and structured lipids and their production on a technical scale.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, Jan; Freund, Andreas; Bel-Rhlid, Rachid; Hansen, Carl-Erik; Reuss, Matthias; Schmid, Rolf D; Maurer, Steffen C

    2007-10-01

    We report here a two-step process for the high-yield enzymatic synthesis of 2-monoacylglycerides (2-MAG) of saturated as well as unsaturated fatty acids with different chain lengths. The process consists of two steps: first the unselective esterification of fatty acids and glycerol leading to a triacylglyceride followed by an sn1,3-selective alcoholysis reaction yielding 2-monoacylglycerides. Remarkably, both steps can be catalyzed by lipase B from Candida antarctica (CalB). The whole process including esterification and alcoholysis was scaled up in a miniplant to a total volume of 10 l. With this volume, a two-step process catalyzed by CalB for the synthesis of 1,3-oleoyl-2-palmitoylglycerol (OPO) using tripalmitate as starting material was established. On a laboratory scale, we obtained gram quantities of the synthesized 2-monoacylglycerides of polyunsaturated fatty acids such as arachidonic-, docosahexaenoic- and eicosapentaenoic acids and up to 96.4% of the theoretically possible yield with 95% purity. On a technical scale (>100 g of product, >5 l of reaction volume), 97% yield was reached in the esterification and 73% in the alcoholysis and a new promising process for the enzymatic synthesis of OPO was established.

  14. Redox polymer mediation for enzymatic biofuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallaway, Joshua

    Mediated biocatalytic cathodes prepared from the oxygen-reducing enzyme laccase and redox-conducting osmium hydrogels were characterized for use as cathodes in enzymatic biofuel cells. A series of osmium-based redox polymers was synthesized with redox potentials spanning the range from 0.11 V to 0.85 V (SHE), and the resulting biocatalytic electrodes were modeled to determine reaction kinetic constants using the current response, measured osmium concentration, and measured apparent electron diffusion. As in solution-phase systems, the bimolecular rate constant for mediation was found to vary greatly with mediator potential---from 250 s-1M-1 when mediator and enzyme were close in potential to 9.4 x 10 4 s-1M-1 when this overpotential was large. Optimum mediator potential for a cell operating with a non-limiting platinum anode and having no mass transport limitation from bulk solution was found to be 0.66 V (SHE). Redox polymers were synthesized under different concentrations, producing osmium variation. An increase from 6.6% to 7.2% osmium increased current response from 1.2 to 2.1 mA/cm2 for a planar film in 40°C oxygen-saturated pH 4 buffer, rotating at 900 rpm. These results translated to high surface area electrodes, nearly doubling current density to 13 mA/cm2, the highest to date for such an electrode. The typical fungal laccase from Trametes versicolor was replaced by a bacterially-expressed small laccase from Streptomyces coelicolor, resulting in biocatalytic films that reduced oxygen at increased pH, with full functionality at pH 7, producing 1.5 mA/cm 2 in planar configuration. Current response was biphasic with pH, matching the activity profile of the free enzyme in solution. The mediated enzyme electrode system was modeled with respect to apparent electron diffusion, mediator concentration, and transport of oxygen from bulk solution, all of which are to some extent controlled by design. Each factor was found to limit performance in certain circumstances

  15. An Improved Enzymatic Indirect Method for Simultaneous Determinations of 3-MCPD Esters and Glycidyl Esters in Fish Oils.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Kinuko; Koyama, Kazuo

    2017-10-01

    The enzymatic indirect method for simultaneous determinations of 3-chloro-1, 2-propanediol fatty acid esters (3-MCPD-Es) and glycidyl fatty acid esters (Gly-Es) make use of lipase from Candida cylindracea (previously referred to as C. rugosa). Because of low substrate specificity of the lipase for esters of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), fish oils high in PUFAs are currently excluded from the range of application of the method. The objective of this study was to make the enzymatic indirect method applicable to fats and oils containing PUFAs. By using a Burkholderia cepacia lipase, and by removing sodium bromide from hydrolysis step and adding it after completion of the hydrolysis step, satisfactory recovery rates of 91-109% for 3-MCPD, and 91-110% for glycidol (Gly) were obtained from an EPA and DHA concentrated sardine oil, three DHA concentrated tuna oils, two fish oils, and five fish-oil based dietary supplements spiked with DHA-esters or oleic acid-esters of 3-MCPD and Gly at 20 mg/kg. Further, results from unspiked samples of seven fish oil based dietary supplements and five DHA concentrated tuna oils analyzed by the improved enzymatic indirect method were compared with the results analyzed by AOCS Cd 29a. For all 3-MCPD, 2-MCPD and Gly, the 95% confidence intervals determined by the weighted Deming regression for slopes and intercepts contained the value of 1 and 0, respectively. It was therefore concluded that the results from the two methods were not statistically different. These results suggest that fish oils high in PUFAs may be included in the range of application for the improved enzymatic indirect method for simultaneous determinations of 3-MCPD and Gly esters in fats and oils.

  16. Determination of glucose and ethanol after enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of biomass using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shih, Chien-Ju; Smith, Emily A

    2009-10-27

    Raman spectroscopy has been used for the quantitative determination of the conversion efficiency at each step in the production of ethanol from biomass. The method requires little sample preparation; therefore, it is suitable for screening large numbers of biomass samples and reaction conditions in a complex sample matrix. Dilute acid or ammonia-pretreated corn stover was used as a model biomass for these studies. Ammonia pretreatment was suitable for subsequent measurements with Raman spectroscopy, but dilute acid-pretreated corn stover generated a large background signal that surpassed the Raman signal. The background signal is attributed to lignin, which remains in the plant tissue after dilute acid pretreatment. A commercial enzyme mixture was used for the enzymatic hydrolysis of corn stover, and glucose levels were measured with a dispersive 785 nm Raman spectrometer. The glucose detection limit in hydrolysis liquor by Raman spectroscopy was 8 g L(-1). The mean hydrolysis efficiency for three replicate measurements obtained with Raman spectroscopy (86+/-4%) was compared to the result obtained using an enzymatic reaction with UV-vis spectrophotometry detection (78+/-8%). The results indicate good accuracy, as determined using a Student's t-test, and better precision for the Raman spectroscopy measurement relative to the enzymatic detection assay. The detection of glucose in hydrolysis broth by Raman spectroscopy showed no spectral interference, provided the sample was filtered to remove insoluble cellulose prior to analysis. The hydrolysate was further subjected to fermentation to yield ethanol. The detection limit for ethanol in fermentation broth by Raman spectroscopy was found to be 6 g L(-1). Comparison of the fermentation efficiencies measured by Raman spectroscopy (80+/-10%) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (87+/-9%) were statistically the same. The work demonstrates the utility of Raman spectroscopy for screening the entire conversion process to

  17. A novel multicomponent redox polymer nanobead based high performance non-enzymatic glucose sensor.

    PubMed

    Gopalan, A I; Muthuchamy, N; Komathi, S; Lee, K-P

    2016-10-15

    The fabrication of a highly sensitive electrochemical non-enzymatic glucose sensor based on copper nanoparticles (Cu NPs) dispersed in a graphene (G)-ferrocene (Fc) redox polymer multicomponent nanobead (MCNB) is reported. The preparation of MCNB involves three major steps, namely: i) the preparation of a poly(aniline-co-anthranilic acid)-grafted graphene (G-PANI(COOH), ii) the covalent linking of ferrocene to G-PANI(COOH) via a polyethylene imine (PEI), and iii) the electrodeposition of Cu NPs. The prepared MCNB (designated as G-PANI(COOH)-PEI-Fc/Cu-MCNB), contains a conductive G-PANI(COOH), electron mediating Fc, and electrocatalytic Cu NPs that make it suitable for ultrasensitive non-enzymatic electrochemical sensing. The morphology, structure, and electro activities of MCNB were characterized. Electrochemical measurements showed that the G-PANI(COOH)-PEI-Fc/Cu-MCNB/GCE modified electrode exhibited good electrocatalytic behavior towards the detection of glucose in a wide linear range (0.50 to 15mM), with a low detection limit (0.16mM) and high sensitivity (14.3µAmM(-1)cm(-2)). Besides, the G-PANI(COOH)-PEI-Fc/Cu-MCNB/GCE sensor electrode did not respond to the presence of electroactive interferrants (such as uric acid, ascorbic acid, and dopamine) and saccharides or carbohydrates (fructose, lactose, d-isoascorbic acid, and dextrin), demonstrating its selectivity towards glucose. The fabricated NEG sensor exhibited high precision for measuring glucose in serum samples, with an average RSD of 4.3% and results comparable to those of commercial glucose test strips. This reliability and stability of glucose sensing indicates that G-PANI(COOH)-PEI-Fc/Cu-MCNB/GCE would be a promising material for the non-enzymatic detection of glucose in physiological fluids. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Green Schools Energy Project: A Step-by-Step Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quigley, Gwen

    This publication contains a step-by-step guide for implementing an energy-saving project in local school districts: the installation of newer, more energy-efficient "T-8" fluorescent tube lights in place of "T-12" lights. Eleven steps are explained in detail: (1) find out what kind of lights the school district currently uses;…

  19. Alkali pretreated of wheat straw and its enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Han, Lirong; Feng, Juntao; Zhang, Shuangxi; Ma, Zhiqing; Wang, Yonghong; Zhang, Xing

    2012-01-01

    The efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose can be improved by various pretreatments of the substrate. In order to increase the efficiency of enzymatic saccharification of the wheat straw, we determined the effect of different pretreatments on the physical structure, chemical components and enzymatic saccharification of wheat straw. Our results showed that combination of grinding and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) treatment had high effect on the enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straws. The optimal pretreatment condition was to grind the wheat straws into the sizes of 120 meshes followed by treatment with 1.0% NaOH for 1.5 h (121°C/15psi). Under this condition, the cellulose content of wheat straw was increased by 44.52%, while the content of hemicellulose and lignin was decreased by 44.15% and 42.52%, respectively. Scanning Electronic Microscopy and infrared spectrum analyses showed that significant changes occurred in the structure of wheat straws after pretreatment, which is favorable for the hydrolysis and saccharification. Cellulase produced by Penicillium waksmanii F10-2 was used to hydrolyze the pretreated wheat straw and the optimal condition was determined to be 30 h of enzymatic reaction under the temperature of 55°C, pH 5.5 and substrate concentration of 3%.

  20. Efficacy of enzymatic debridement of deeply burned hands.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Yuval; Bogdanov-Berezovsky, Alexander; Gurfinkel, Reuven; Silberstein, Eldad; Sagi, Amiram; Rosenberg, Lior

    2012-02-01

    The burned hand is a common and difficult to care-for entity in the field of burns. Due to the anatomy of the hand (important and delicate structures crowded in a small limited space without sub-dermal soft tissue), surgical debridement of the burned tissue is technically difficult and may cause considerable complications and, therefore, should be performed judiciously. Selective enzymatic debridement of the burn wound can preserve the spontaneous epithelialisation potential and reduce the added injury to the traumatised tissue added by a surgical debridement. The aim of the study was to assess the implication of a selective enzymatic compound (Debrase(®) - Ds) in the special field of deep hand burns, by comparing the actual burn area that required surgical coverage after enzymatic debridement to the burn area clinically judged to require skin grafting prior to debridement. This was a retrospective data collection and analysis from 154 complete files of prospective, open-label study in 275 hospitalised, Ds-treated burn patients. A total of 69 hand burns diagnosed as 'deep' was analysed; 36% of the wounds required surgical intervention after enzymatic debridement; 28.6% of the total burned area estimated initially as deep was covered by skin graft (statistically significant p<0.001). Debridement of deep-hand burns with a selective enzymatic agent decreased the perceived full-thickness wound area and skin-graft use. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  1. Sulfate radicals enable a non-enzymatic Krebs cycle precursor

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Markus A.; Kampjut, Domen; Harrison, Stuart A.; Ralser, Markus

    2017-01-01

    The evolutionary origins of the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA), or Krebs cycle, are so far unclear. Despite a few years ago, the existence of a simple non-enzymatic Krebs-cycle catalyst has been dismissed ‘as an appeal to magic’, citrate and other intermediates have meanwhile been discovered on a carbonaceous meteorite and do interconvert non-enzymatically. To identify the non-enzymatic Krebs cycle catalyst, we used combinatorial, quantitative high-throughput metabolomics to systematically screen iron and sulfate reaction milieus that orient on Archean sediment constituents. TCA cycle intermediates are found stable in water and in the presence of most iron and sulfate species, including simple iron-sulfate minerals. However, we report that TCA intermediates undergo 24 interconversion reactions in the presence of sulfate radicals that form from peroxydisulfate. The non-enzymatic reactions critically cover a topology as present in the Krebs cycle, the glyoxylate shunt and the succinic semialdehyde pathways. Assembled in a chemical network, the reactions achieve more than ninety percent carbon recovery. Our results show that a non-enzymatic precursor for the Krebs cycle is biologically sensible, efficient, and forms spontaneously in the presence of sulfate radicals. PMID:28584880

  2. One-step microlithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahlen, Franz-Josef; Sankaranarayanan, Srikanth; Kar, Aravinda

    1997-09-01

    Subject of this investigation is a one-step rapid machining process to create miniaturized 3D parts, using the original sample material. An experimental setup where metal powder is fed to the laser beam-material interaction region has been built. The powder is melted and forms planar, 2D geometries as the substrate is moved under the laser beam in XY- direction. After completing the geometry in the plane, the substrate is displaced in Z-direction, and a new layer of material is placed on top of the just completed deposit. By continuous repetition of this process, 3D parts wee created. In particular, the impact of the focal spot size of the high power laser beam on the smallest achievable structures was investigated. At a translation speed of 51 mm/s a minimum material thickness of 590 micrometers was achieved. Also, it was shown that a small Z-displacement has a negligible influence on the continuity of the material deposition over this power range. A high power CO2 laser was used as energy source, the material powder under investigation was stainless steel SS304L. Helium was used as shield gas at a flow rate of 15 1/min. The incident CO2 laser beam power was varied between 300 W and 400 W, with the laser beam intensity distribute in a donut mode. The laser beam was focused to a focal diameter of 600 (Mu) m.

  3. STEP and fundamental physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overduin, James; Everitt, Francis; Worden, Paul; Mester, John

    2012-09-01

    The Satellite Test of the Equivalence Principle (STEP) will advance experimental limits on violations of Einstein's equivalence principle from their present sensitivity of two parts in 1013 to one part in 1018 through multiple comparison of the motions of four pairs of test masses of different compositions in a drag-free earth-orbiting satellite. We describe the experiment, its current status and its potential implications for fundamental physics. Equivalence is at the heart of general relativity, our governing theory of gravity and violations are expected in most attempts to unify this theory with the other fundamental interactions of physics, as well as in many theoretical explanations for the phenomenon of dark energy in cosmology. Detection of such a violation would be equivalent to the discovery of a new force of nature. A null result would be almost as profound, pushing upper limits on any coupling between standard-model fields and the new light degrees of freedom generically predicted by these theories down to unnaturally small levels.

  4. Combining autohydrolysis and ionic liquid microwave treatment to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis of Eucalyptus globulus wood.

    PubMed

    Rigual, Victoria; Santos, Tamara M; Domínguez, Juan Carlos; Alonso, M Virginia; Oliet, Mercedes; Rodriguez, Francisco

    2018-03-01

    The combination of autohydrolysis and ionic liquid microwave treatments of eucalyptus wood have been studied to facilitate sugar production in a subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis step. Three autohydrolysis conditions (150 °C, 175 °C and 200 °C) in combination with two ionic liquid temperatures (80 °C and 120 °C) were compared in terms of chemical composition, enzymatic digestibility and sugar production. Morphology was measured (using SEM) and the biomass surface was visualized with confocal fluorescence microscopy. The synergistic cooperation of both treatments was demonstrated, enhancing cellulose accessibility. At intermediate autohydrolysis conditions (175 °C) and low ionic liquid temperature (80 °C), a glucan digestibility of 84.4% was obtained. Using SEM micrographs, fractal dimension (as a measure of biomass complexity) and lacunarity (as a measure of homogeneity) were calculated before and after pretreatment. High fractals dimensions and low lacunarities correspond to morphologically complex and homogeneous samples, that are better digested by enzyme cocktails. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Kinetics of enzymatic high-solid hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass studied by calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Søren N; Lumby, Erik; McFarland, Kc; Borch, Kim; Westh, Peter

    2011-03-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of high-solid biomass (>10% w/w dry mass) has become increasingly important as a key step in the production of second-generation bioethanol. To this end, development of quantitative real-time assays is desirable both for empirical optimization and for detailed kinetic analysis. In the current work, we have investigated the application of isothermal calorimetry to study the kinetics of enzymatic hydrolysis of two substrates (pretreated corn stover and Avicel) at high-solid contents (up to 29% w/w). It was found that the calorimetric heat flow provided a true measure of the hydrolysis rate with a detection limit of about 500 pmol glucose s(-1). Hence, calorimetry is shown to be a highly sensitive real-time method, applicable for high solids, and independent on the complexity of the substrate. Dose-response experiments with a typical cellulase cocktail enabled a multidimensional analysis of the interrelationships of enzyme load and the rate, time, and extent of the reaction. The results suggest that the hydrolysis rate of pretreated corn stover is limited initially by available attack points on the substrate surface (<10% conversion) but becomes proportional to enzyme dosage (excess of attack points) at later stages (>10% conversion). This kinetic profile is interpreted as an increase in polymer end concentration (substrate for CBH) as the hydrolysis progresses, probably due to EG activity in the enzyme cocktail. Finally, irreversible enzyme inactivation did not appear to be the source of reduced hydrolysis rate over time.

  6. Peracetic acid-ionic liquid pretreatment to enhance enzymatic saccharification of lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Uju; Abe, Kojiro; Uemura, Nobuyuki; Oshima, Toyoji; Goto, Masahiro; Kamiya, Noriho

    2013-06-01

    To enhance enzymatic saccharification of pine biomass, the pretreatment reagents peracetic acid (PAA) and ionic liquid (IL) were validated in single reagent pretreatments or combination pretreatments with different sequences. In a 1h saccharification, 5-25% cellulose conversion was obtained from the single pretreatment of PAA or IL. In contrast, a marked enhancement in conversion rates was achieved by PAA-IL combination pretreatments (45-70%). The PAA followed by IL (PAA+IL) pretreatment sequence was the most effective for preparing an enzymatic digestible regenerated biomass with 250-fold higher glucose formation rates than untreated biomass and 2- to 12-fold higher than single pretreatments with PAA or IL alone. Structural analysis confirmed that this pretreatment resulted in biomass with highly porous structural fibers associated with the reduction of lignin content and acetyl groups. Using the PAA+IL sequence, biomass loading in the pretreatment step can be increased from 5% to 15% without significant decrease in cellulose conversion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Enzymatic specificity of three ribosome-inactivating proteins against fungal ribosomes, and correlation with antifungal activity.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Wook; Stevens, Noah M; Vivanco, Jorge M

    2002-12-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are enzymes that cleave a specific adenine base from the highly conserved sarcin/ricin (S/R) loop of the large ribosomal RNA, thus arresting protein synthesis at the translocation step. In the present study, we employed three RIPs to dissect the antifungal activity of RIPs as plant defense proteins. We measured the catalytic activity of RAT (the catalytic A-chain of ricin from Ricinus communis L.), saporin-S6 (from Saponaria officinalis L.), and ME (RIP from Mirabilis expansa R&P) against intact ribosomal substrates isolated from various pathogenic fungi. We further determined the enzymatic specificity of these three RIPs against fungal ribosomes, from Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn, Alternaria solani Sorauer, Trichoderma reesei Simmons and Candida albicans Berkhout, and correlated the data with antifungal activity. RAT showed the strongest toxicity against all tested fungal ribosomes, except for the ribosomes isolated from C. albicans, which were most susceptible to saporin. RAT and saporin showed higher enzymatic activity than ME against ribosomes from all of the fungal species assayed, but did not show detectable antifungal activity. In contrast, ME showed substantial inhibitory activity against fungal growth. Using N-hydroxysuccinimide-fluorescein labeling of RIPs and fluorescence microscopy, we determined that ME was targeted to the surface of fungal cells and transferred into the cells. Thus, ME caused ribosome depurination and subsequent fungal mortality. In contrast, saporin did not interact with fungal cells, correlating with its lack of antifungal activity.

  8. A Compartmentalized Out-of-Equilibrium Enzymatic Reaction Network for Sustained Autonomous Movement

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Every living cell is a compartmentalized out-of-equilibrium system exquisitely able to convert chemical energy into function. In order to maintain homeostasis, the flux of metabolites is tightly controlled by regulatory enzymatic networks. A crucial prerequisite for the development of lifelike materials is the construction of synthetic systems with compartmentalized reaction networks that maintain out-of-equilibrium function. Here, we aim for autonomous movement as an example of the conversion of feedstock molecules into function. The flux of the conversion is regulated by a rationally designed enzymatic reaction network with multiple feedforward loops. By compartmentalizing the network into bowl-shaped nanocapsules the output of the network is harvested as kinetic energy. The entire system shows sustained and tunable microscopic motion resulting from the conversion of multiple external substrates. The successful compartmentalization of an out-of-equilibrium reaction network is a major first step in harnessing the design principles of life for construction of adaptive and internally regulated lifelike systems. PMID:27924313

  9. A low-cost solid–liquid separation process for enzymatically hydrolyzed corn stover slurries

    DOE PAGES

    Sievers, David A.; Lischeske, James J.; Biddy, Mary J.; ...

    2015-07-01

    Solid-liquid separation of intermediate process slurries is required in some process configurations for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to transportation fuels. Thermochemically pretreated and enzymatically hydrolyzed corn stover slurries have proven difficult to filter due to formation of very low permeability cakes that are rich in lignin. Treatment of two different slurries with polyelectrolyte flocculant was demonstrated to increase mean particle size and filterability. Filtration flux was greatly improved, and thus scaled filter unit capacity was increased approximately 40-fold compared with unflocculated slurry. Although additional costs were accrued using polyelectrolyte, techno-economic analysis revealed that the increase in filter capacity significantlymore » reduced overall production costs. Fuel production cost at 95% sugar recovery was reduced by $1.35 US per gallon gasoline equivalent for dilute-acid pretreated and enzymatically hydrolyzed slurries and $3.40 for slurries produced using an additional alkaline de-acetylation preprocessing step that is even more difficult to natively filter.« less

  10. Enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis of waste paper for ethanol production using separate saccharification and fermentation.

    PubMed

    Guerfali, Mohamed; Saidi, Adel; Gargouri, Ali; Belghith, Hafedh

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol produced from lignocellulosic biomass is a renewable alternative to diminishing petroleum-based liquid fuels. In this study, the feasibility of ethanol production from waste paper using the separate hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF) was investigated. Two types of waste paper materials, newspaper and office paper, were evaluated for their potential to be used as a renewable feedstock for the production of fermentable sugars via enzymatic hydrolysis of their cellulose fractions. Hydrolysis step was conducted with a mixture of cellulolytic enzymes produced locally by Trichoderma reesei Rut-C30 (cellulase-overproducing mutant) and Aspergillus niger F38 cultures. Surfactant pretreatment effect on waste paper enzymatic digestibility was studied and Triton X-100 at 0.5 % (w w(-1)) has improved the digestibility of newspaper about 45 %. The effects of three factors (dry matter quantity, phosphoric acid pretreatment and hydrolysis time) on the extent of saccharification were also assessed and quantified by using a methodical approach based on response surface methodology. Under optimal hydrolysis conditions, maximum degrees of saccharification of newspaper and office paper were 67 and 92 %, respectively. Sugars released from waste paper were subsequently converted into ethanol (0.38 g ethanol g(-1) sugar) with Saccharomyces cerevisiae CTM-30101.

  11. Friction of atomically stepped surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dikken, R. J.; Thijsse, B. J.; Nicola, L.

    2017-03-01

    The friction behavior of atomically stepped metal surfaces under contact loading is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. While real rough metal surfaces involve roughness at multiple length scales, the focus of this paper is on understanding friction of the smallest scale of roughness: atomic steps. To this end, periodic stepped Al surfaces with different step geometry are brought into contact and sheared at room temperature. Contact stress that continuously tries to build up during loading, is released with fluctuating stress drops during sliding, according to the typical stick-slip behavior. Stress release occurs not only through local slip, but also by means of step motion. The steps move along the contact, concurrently resulting in normal migration of the contact. The direction of migration depends on the sign of the step, i.e., its orientation with respect to the shearing direction. If the steps are of equal sign, there is a net migration of the entire contact accompanied by significant vacancy generation at room temperature. The stick-slip behavior of the stepped contacts is found to have all the characteristic of a self-organized critical state, with statistics dictated by step density. For the studied step geometries, frictional sliding is found to involve significant atomic rearrangement through which the contact roughness is drastically changed. This leads for certain step configurations to a marked transition from jerky sliding motion to smooth sliding, making the final friction stress approximately similar to that of a flat contact.

  12. Powerlessness Reinterpreted: Reframing Step One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Susan L.

    The 12 steps of the well-known mutual help group, Alcoholics Anonymous (AA), begin with Step One, admitting powerlessness. Although Step One has helped many problem drinkers and other addicts, its spiritual concepts have been criticized. The possibility of reconceptualizing powerlessness as empowering, not only within AA and its offshoot programs,…

  13. Multiple stage miniature stepping motor

    DOEpatents

    Niven, William A.; Shikany, S. David; Shira, Michael L.

    1981-01-01

    A stepping motor comprising a plurality of stages which may be selectively activated to effect stepping movement of the motor, and which are mounted along a common rotor shaft to achieve considerable reduction in motor size and minimum diameter, whereby sequential activation of the stages results in successive rotor steps with direction being determined by the particular activating sequence followed.

  14. Enzymatic saccharification of brown seaweed for production of fermentable sugars.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sandeep; Horn, Svein Jarle

    2016-08-01

    This study shows that high drying temperatures negatively affect the enzymatic saccharification yield of the brown seaweed Saccharina latissima. The optimal drying temperature of the seaweed in terms of enzymatic sugar release was found to be 30°C. The enzymatic saccharification process was optimized by investigating factors such as kinetics of sugar release, enzyme dose, solid loading and different blend ratios of cellulases and an alginate lyase. It was found that the seaweed biomass could be efficiently hydrolysed to fermentable sugars using a commercial cellulase cocktail. The inclusion of a mono-component alginate lyase was shown to improve the performance of the enzyme blend, in particular at high solid loadings. At 25% dry matter loading a combined glucose and mannitol concentration of 74g/L was achieved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Biocolloids with ordered urease multilayer shells as enzymatic reactors.

    PubMed

    Lvov, Y; Caruso, F

    2001-09-01

    The preparation of biocolloids with organized enzyme-containing multilayer shells for exploitation as colloidal enzymatic nanoreactors is described. Urease multilayers were assembled onto submicrometer-sized polystyrene spheres by the sequential adsorption of urease and polyelectrolyte, in a predetermined order, utilizing electrostatic interactions for layer growth. The catalytic activity of the biocolloids increased proportionally with the number of urease layers deposited on the particles, demonstrating that biocolloid particles with tailored enzymatic activities can be produced. It was further found that precoating the latex spheres with nanoparticles (40-nm silica or 12-nm magnetite) enhanced both the stability (with respect to adsorption) and enzymatic activity of the urease multilayers. The presence of the magnetite nanoparticle coating also provided a magnetic function that allowed the biocolloids to be easily and rapidly separated with a permanent magnet. The fabrication of such colloids opens new avenues for the application of bioparticles and represents a promising route for the creation of complex catalytic particles.

  16. High volumetric power density, non-enzymatic, glucose fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Oncescu, Vlad; Erickson, David

    2013-01-01

    The development of new implantable medical devices has been limited in the past by slow advances in lithium battery technology. Non-enzymatic glucose fuel cells are promising replacement candidates for lithium batteries because of good long-term stability and adequate power density. The devices developed to date however use an "oxygen depletion design" whereby the electrodes are stacked on top of each other leading to low volumetric power density and complicated fabrication protocols. Here we have developed a novel single-layer fuel cell with good performance (2 μW cm⁻²) and stability that can be integrated directly as a coating layer on large implantable devices, or stacked to obtain a high volumetric power density (over 16 μW cm⁻³). This represents the first demonstration of a low volume non-enzymatic fuel cell stack with high power density, greatly increasing the range of applications for non-enzymatic glucose fuel cells.

  17. An update on enzymatic cocktails for lignocellulose breakdown.

    PubMed

    de Mello Lopes, Andreza; Ferreira Filho, Edivaldo Ximenes; de Souza Moreira, Leonora Rios

    2018-05-22

    Alternative energy sources have received increasing attention in recent years. The possibility of adding value to agricultural wastes, by producing biofuels and other products with economic value from lignocellulosic biomass by enzymatic hydrolysis, has been widely explored. Lignocellulosic biomass, as well as being an abundant residue, is a complex recalcitrant structure that requires a consortium of enzymes for its complete degradation. Pools of enzymes with different specificities acting together usually produce an increase in hydrolysis yield. Enzymatic cocktails have been widely studied due to their potential industrial application for the bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass. This review presents an overview of enzymes required to degrade the plant cell wall, paying particular attention to the latest advances in enzymatic cocktail production and the main results obtained with cocktails used to degrade a variety of types of biomass, as well as some future perspectives within this field. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Differential cDNA cloning by enzymatic degrading subtraction (EDS).

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, J; Gorski, R A; Hamer, D

    1994-01-01

    We describe a new method, called enzymatic degrading subtraction (EDS), for the construction of subtractive libraries from PCR amplified cDNA. The novel features of this method are that i) the tester DNA is blocked by thionucleotide incorporation; ii) the rate of hybridization is accelerated by phenol-emulsion reassociation; and iii) the driver cDNA and hybrid molecules are enzymatically removed by digestion with exonucleases III and VII rather than by physical partitioning. We demonstrate the utility of EDS by constructing a subtractive library enriched for cDNAs expressed in adult but not in embryonic rat brains. Images PMID:7971268

  19. Study on beta-galactosidase enzymatic activity of herbal yogurt.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Banani Ray; Chakraborty, Runu; Raychaudhuri, Utpal

    2008-03-01

    Different types of herbal yogurts were developed by mixing standardized milk with pretreated herbs, namely tulsi leaf (Ocimum sanctum), pudina leaf (Mentha arvensis) and coriander leaf (Coriandrum sativum), with leaves separately and a 1:1 (v/v) mixture of the strains of lactic starter cultures---Lactobacillus acidophilus (NCIM 2903) and Lactobacillus plantarum (NCIM 2083)-followed by incubation at 40 degrees C for 6 h. The beta-galactosidase enzymatic activity of the abovementioned herbal yogurts was determined and interestingly noted to exhibit higher enzymatic activity compared with the control yogurt (without any herbs). Among all herbal yogurts, tulsi yogurt had the maximum beta-galactosidase activity.

  20. Exploiting Enzymatic Dynamic Reductive Kinetic Resolution (DYRKR) in Stereocontrolled Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Applegate, Gregory A.; Berkowitz, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, the domains of both frontline synthetic organic chemistry and process chemistry and have seen an increase in crosstalk between asymmetric organic/organometallic approaches and enzymatic approaches to stereocontrolled synthesis. This review highlights the particularly auspicious role for dehydrogenase enzymes in this endeavor, with a focus on dynamic reductive kinetic resolutions (DYRKR) to “deracemize” building blocks, often setting two stereocenters in so doing. The scope and limitations of such dehydrogenase-mediated processes are overviewed, as are future possibilities for the evolution of enzymatic DYRKR. PMID:26622223

  1. Adhesion improvement of lignocellulosic products by enzymatic pre-treatment.

    PubMed

    Widsten, Petri; Kandelbauer, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Enzymatic bonding methods, based on laccase or peroxidase enzymes, for lignocellulosic products such as medium-density fiberboard and particleboard are discussed with reference to the increasing costs of presently used petroleum-based adhesives and the health concerns associated with formaldehyde emissions from current composite products. One approach is to improve the self-bonding properties of the particles by oxidation of their surface lignin before they are fabricated into boards. Another method involves using enzymatically pre-treated lignins as adhesives for boards and laminates. The application of this technology to achieve wet strength characteristics in paper is also reviewed.

  2. Modeling myosin VI stepping dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tehver, Riina

    Myosin VI is a molecular motor that transports intracellular cargo as well as acts as an anchor. The motor has been measured to have unusually large step size variation and it has been reported to make both long forward and short inchworm-like forward steps, as well as step backwards. We have been developing a model that incorporates this diverse stepping behavior in a consistent framework. Our model allows us to predict the dynamics of the motor under different conditions and investigate the evolutionary advantages of the large step size variation.

  3. Automated assay for screening the enzymatic release of reducing sugars from micronized biomass.

    PubMed

    Navarro, David; Couturier, Marie; da Silva, Gabriela Ghizzi Damasceno; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Rouau, Xavier; Asther, Marcel; Bignon, Christophe

    2010-07-16

    To reduce the production cost of bioethanol obtained from fermentation of the sugars provided by degradation of lignocellulosic biomass (i.e., second generation bioethanol), it is necessary to screen for new enzymes endowed with more efficient biomass degrading properties. This demands the set-up of high-throughput screening methods. Several methods have been devised all using microplates in the industrial SBS format. Although this size reduction and standardization has greatly improved the screening process, the published methods comprise one or more manual steps that seriously decrease throughput. Therefore, we worked to devise a screening method devoid of any manual steps. We describe a fully automated assay for measuring the amount of reducing sugars released by biomass-degrading enzymes from wheat-straw and spruce. The method comprises two independent and automated steps. The first step is the making of "substrate plates". It consists of filling 96-well microplates with slurry suspensions of micronized substrate which are then stored frozen until use. The second step is an enzymatic activity assay. After thawing, the substrate plates are supplemented by the robot with cell-wall degrading enzymes where necessary, and the whole process from addition of enzymes to quantification of released sugars is autonomously performed by the robot. We describe how critical parameters (amount of substrate, amount of enzyme, incubation duration and temperature) were selected to fit with our specific use. The ability of this automated small-scale assay to discriminate among different enzymatic activities was validated using a set of commercial enzymes. Using an automatic microplate sealer solved three main problems generally encountered during the set-up of methods for measuring the sugar-releasing activity of plant cell wall-degrading enzymes: throughput, automation, and evaporation losses. In its present set-up, the robot can autonomously process 120 triplicate wheat

  4. Automated assay for screening the enzymatic release of reducing sugars from micronized biomass

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To reduce the production cost of bioethanol obtained from fermentation of the sugars provided by degradation of lignocellulosic biomass (i.e., second generation bioethanol), it is necessary to screen for new enzymes endowed with more efficient biomass degrading properties. This demands the set-up of high-throughput screening methods. Several methods have been devised all using microplates in the industrial SBS format. Although this size reduction and standardization has greatly improved the screening process, the published methods comprise one or more manual steps that seriously decrease throughput. Therefore, we worked to devise a screening method devoid of any manual steps. Results We describe a fully automated assay for measuring the amount of reducing sugars released by biomass-degrading enzymes from wheat-straw and spruce. The method comprises two independent and automated steps. The first step is the making of "substrate plates". It consists of filling 96-well microplates with slurry suspensions of micronized substrate which are then stored frozen until use. The second step is an enzymatic activity assay. After thawing, the substrate plates are supplemented by the robot with cell-wall degrading enzymes where necessary, and the whole process from addition of enzymes to quantification of released sugars is autonomously performed by the robot. We describe how critical parameters (amount of substrate, amount of enzyme, incubation duration and temperature) were selected to fit with our specific use. The ability of this automated small-scale assay to discriminate among different enzymatic activities was validated using a set of commercial enzymes. Conclusions Using an automatic microplate sealer solved three main problems generally encountered during the set-up of methods for measuring the sugar-releasing activity of plant cell wall-degrading enzymes: throughput, automation, and evaporation losses. In its present set-up, the robot can autonomously

  5. Step-by-step mechanism of DNA damage recognition by human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Alexandra A; Kuznetsov, Nikita A; Ishchenko, Alexander A; Saparbaev, Murat K; Fedorova, Olga S

    2014-01-01

    Extensive structural studies of human DNA glycosylase hOGG1 have revealed essential conformational changes of the enzyme. However, at present there is little information about the time scale of the rearrangements of the protein structure as well as the dynamic behavior of individual amino acids. Using pre-steady-state kinetic analysis with Trp and 2-aminopurine fluorescence detection the conformational dynamics of hOGG1 wild-type (WT) and mutants Y203W, Y203A, H270W, F45W, F319W and K249Q as well as DNA-substrates was examined. The roles of catalytically important amino acids F45, Y203, K249, H270, and F319 in the hOGG1 enzymatic pathway and their involvement in the step-by-step mechanism of oxidative DNA lesion recognition and catalysis were elucidated. The results show that Tyr-203 participates in the initial steps of the lesion site recognition. The interaction of the His-270 residue with the oxoG base plays a key role in the insertion of the damaged base into the active site. Lys-249 participates not only in the catalytic stages but also in the processes of local duplex distortion and flipping out of the oxoG residue. Non-damaged DNA does not form a stable complex with hOGG1, although a complex with a flipped out guanine base can be formed transiently. The kinetic data obtained in this study significantly improves our understanding of the molecular mechanism of lesion recognition by hOGG1. © 2013.

  6. An integrated green process: Subcritical water, enzymatic hydrolysis, and fermentation, for biohydrogen production from coconut husk.

    PubMed

    Muharja, Maktum; Junianti, Fitri; Ranggina, Dian; Nurtono, Tantular; Widjaja, Arief

    2018-02-01

    The objective of this work is to develop an integrated green process of subcritical water (SCW), enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of coconut husk (CCH) to biohydrogen. The maximum sugar yield was obtained at mild severity factor. This was confirmed by the degradation of hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin. The tendency of the changing of sugar yield as a result of increasing severity factor was opposite to the tendency of pH change. It was found that CO 2 gave a different tendency of severity factor compared to N 2 as the pressurizing gas. The result of SEM analysis confirmed the structural changes during SCW pretreatment. This study integrated three steps all of which are green processes which ensured an environmentally friendly process to produce a clean biohydrogen. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Non-Enzymatic Detection of Bacterial Genomic DNA Using the Bio-Barcode Assay

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Haley D.; Vega, Rafael A.; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2011-01-01

    The detection of bacterial genomic DNA through a non-enzymatic nanomaterials based amplification method, the bio-barcode assay, is reported. The assay utilizes oligonucleotide functionalized magnetic microparticles to capture the target of interest from the sample. A critical step in the new assay involves the use of blocking oligonucleotides during heat denaturation of the double stranded DNA. These blockers bind to specific regions of the target DNA upon cooling, and prevent the duplex DNA from re-hybridizing, which allows the particle probes to bind. Following target isolation using the magnetic particles, oligonucleotide functionalized gold nanoparticles act as target recognition agents. The oligonucleotides on the nanoparticle (barcodes) act as amplification surrogates. The barcodes are then detected using the Scanometric method. The limit of detection for this assay was determined to be 2.5 femtomolar, and this is the first demonstration of a barcode type assay for the detection of double stranded, genomic DNA. PMID:17927207

  8. Release of antioxidant capacity from five plant foods during a multistep enzymatic digestion protocol.

    PubMed

    Papillo, Valentina Azzurra; Vitaglione, Paola; Graziani, Giulia; Gokmen, Vural; Fogliano, Vincenzo

    2014-05-07

    This study aimed at elucidating the influence of food matrix on the release of antioxidant activity from five plant foods (apple, spinach, walnut, red bean, and whole wheat). To this purpose a protocol based on sequential enzymatic digestion was adopted. The total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of both solubilized and insoluble materials was measured at each step. Results showed that the overall TAC obtained by enzyme treatments was usually higher than that obtained by chemical extraction-based methods. In apple most of the TAC was released upon water washing and after pepsin treatment, whereas in spinach, beans, and whole wheat the TAC released by treatments with bacterial enzymes was prominent. Walnut had the highest TAC value, which was mainly released after pancreatin treatment. Therefore, the enzyme treatment is fundamental to estimate the overall potential TAC of foods having a high amount of polyphenols bound to dietary fiber or entrapped in the food matrix.

  9. Influence of fluid dynamic conditions on enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass: Effect of mass transfer rate.

    PubMed

    Wojtusik, Mateusz; Zurita, Mauricio; Villar, Juan C; Ladero, Miguel; Garcia-Ochoa, Felix

    2016-09-01

    The effect of fluid dynamic conditions on enzymatic hydrolysis of acid pretreated corn stover (PCS) has been assessed. Runs were performed in stirred tanks at several stirrer speed values, under typical conditions of temperature (50°C), pH (4.8) and solid charge (20% w/w). A complex mixture of cellulases, xylanases and mannanases was employed for PCS saccharification. At low stirring speeds (<150rpm), estimated mass transfer coefficients and rates, when compared to chemical hydrolysis rates, lead to results that clearly show low mass transfer rates, being this phenomenon the controlling step of the overall process rate. However, for stirrer speed from 300rpm upwards, the overall process rate is controlled by hydrolysis reactions. The ratio between mass transfer and overall chemical reaction rates changes with time depending on the conditions of each run. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging of the Enzymatic Degradation of Cellulose Microfibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Kyle; Raegen, Adam; Clarke, Anthony; Lipkowski, Jacek; Dutcher, John

    2012-02-01

    As the largest component of biomass on Earth, cellulose represents a significant potential energy reservoir. Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose into fermentable sugars, an integral step in the production of biofuel, is a challenging problem on an industrial scale. More efficient conversion processes may be developed by an increased understanding of the action of the cellulolytic enzymes involved in cellulose degradation. We have used our recently developed quantitative, angle-scanning surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) device to study the degradation of cellulose microfibrils upon exposure to cellulosic enzymes. In particular, we have studied the action of individual enzymes, and combinations of enzymes, from the Hypocrea Jecorina cellulase system on heterogeneous, industrially-relevant cellulose substrates. This has allowed us to define a characteristic time of action for the enzymes for different degrees of surface coverage of the cellulose microfibrils.

  11. Enzymatic production of single-molecule FISH and RNA capture probes.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Imre; Wippich, Frank; Ephrussi, Anne

    2017-10-01

    Arrays of singly labeled short oligonucleotides that hybridize to a specific target revolutionized RNA biology, enabling quantitative, single-molecule microscopy analysis and high-efficiency RNA/RNP capture. Here, we describe a simple and efficient method that allows flexible functionalization of inexpensive DNA oligonucleotides by different fluorescent dyes or biotin using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase and custom-made functional group conjugated dideoxy-UTP. We show that (i) all steps of the oligonucleotide labeling-including conjugation, enzymatic synthesis, and product purification-can be performed in a standard biology laboratory, (ii) the process yields >90%, often >95% labeled product with minimal carryover of impurities, and (iii) the oligonucleotides can be labeled with different dyes or biotin, allowing single-molecule FISH, RNA affinity purification, and Northern blot analysis to be performed. © 2017 Gaspar et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  12. A fully automatable enzymatic method for DNA extraction from plant tissues

    PubMed Central

    Manen, Jean-François; Sinitsyna, Olga; Aeschbach, Lorène; Markov, Alexander V; Sinitsyn, Arkady

    2005-01-01

    Background DNA extraction from plant tissues, unlike DNA isolation from mammalian tissues, remains difficult due to the presence of a rigid cell wall around the plant cells. Currently used methods inevitably require a laborious mechanical grinding step, necessary to disrupt the cell wall for the release of DNA. Results Using a cocktail of different carbohydrases, a method was developed that enables a complete digestion of the plant cell walls and subsequent DNA release. Optimized conditions for the digestion reaction minimize DNA shearing and digestion, and maximize DNA release from the plant cell. The method gave good results in 125 of the 156 tested species. Conclusion In combination with conventional DNA isolation techniques, the new enzymatic method allows to obtain high-yield, high-molecular weight DNA, which can be used for many applications, including genome characterization by AFLP, RAPD and SSR. Automation of the protocol (from leaf disks to DNA) is possible with existing workstations. PMID:16269076

  13. Isolation and purification of arctigenin from Fructus Arctii by enzymatic hydrolysis combined with high-speed counter-current chromatography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Xi, Xingjun; Wang, Mei; Fan, Li; Geng, Yanling; Wang, Xiao

    2014-02-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis pretreatment combined with high-speed counter-current chromatography for the transformation and isolation of arctigenin from Fructus Arctii was successfully developed. In the first step, the extract solution of Fructus Arctii was enzymatic hydrolyzed by β-glucosidase. The optimal hydrolysis conditions were 40°C, pH 5.0, 24 h of hydrolysis time, and 1.25 mg/mL β-glucosidase concentration. Under these conditions, the content of arctigenin was transformed from 2.60 to 12.59 mg/g. In the second step, arctigenin in the hydrolysis products was separated and purified by high-speed counter-current chromatography with a two-phase solvent system composed of petroleum ether/ethyl acetate/methanol/water (10:25:15:20, v/v), and the fraction was analyzed by HPLC, ESI-MS, and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Finally, 102 mg of arctigenin with a purity of 98.9% was obtained in a one-step separation from 200 mg of hydrolyzed sample. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Temperature induced decoupling of enzymatic hydrolysis and carbon remineralization in long-term incubations of Arctic and temperate sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robador, Alberto; Brüchert, Volker; Steen, Andrew D.; Arnosti, Carol

    2010-04-01

    Extracellular enzymatic hydrolysis of high-molecular weight organic matter is the initial step in sedimentary organic carbon degradation and is often regarded as the rate-limiting step. Temperature effects on enzyme activities may therefore exert an indirect control on carbon mineralization. We explored the temperature sensitivity of enzymatic hydrolysis and its connection to subsequent steps in anoxic organic carbon degradation in long-term incubations of sediments from the Arctic and the North Sea. These sediments were incubated under anaerobic conditions for 24 months at temperatures of 0, 10, and 20 °C. The short-term temperature response of the active microbial community was tested in temperature gradient block incubations. The temperature optimum of extracellular enzymatic hydrolysis, as measured with a polysaccharide (chondroitin sulfate), differed between Arctic and temperate habitats by about 8-13 °C in fresh sediments and in sediments incubated for 24 months. In both Arctic and temperate sediments, the temperature response of chondroitin sulfate hydrolysis was initially similar to that of sulfate reduction. After 24 months, however, hydrolysis outpaced sulfate reduction rates, as demonstrated by increased concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and total dissolved carbohydrates. This effect was stronger at higher incubation temperatures, particularly in the Arctic sediments. In all experiments, concentrations of volatile fatty acids (VFA) were low, indicating tight coupling between VFA production and consumption. Together, these data indicate that long-term incubation at elevated temperatures led to increased decoupling of hydrolytic DOC production relative to fermentation. Temperature increases in marine sedimentary environments may thus significantly affect the downstream carbon mineralization and lead to the increased formation of refractory DOC.

  15. Effects of walking speed on the step-by-step control of step width.

    PubMed

    Stimpson, Katy H; Heitkamp, Lauren N; Horne, Joscelyn S; Dean, Jesse C

    2018-02-08

    Young, healthy adults walking at typical preferred speeds use step-by-step adjustments of step width to appropriately redirect their center of mass motion and ensure mediolateral stability. However, it is presently unclear whether this control strategy is retained when walking at the slower speeds preferred by many clinical populations. We investigated whether the typical stabilization strategy is influenced by walking speed. Twelve young, neurologically intact participants walked on a treadmill at a range of prescribed speeds (0.2-1.2 m/s). The mediolateral stabilization strategy was quantified as the proportion of step width variance predicted by the mechanical state of the pelvis throughout a step (calculated as R 2 magnitude from a multiple linear regression). Our ability to accurately predict the upcoming step width increased over the course of a step. The strength of the relationship between step width and pelvis mechanics at the start of a step was reduced at slower speeds. However, these speed-dependent differences largely disappeared by the end of a step, other than at the slowest walking speed (0.2 m/s). These results suggest that mechanics-dependent adjustments in step width are a consistent component of healthy gait across speeds and contexts. However, slower walking speeds may ease this control by allowing mediolateral repositioning of the swing leg to occur later in a step, thus encouraging slower walking among clinical populations with limited sensorimotor control. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Smart Hydrogel Particles: Biomarker Harvesting: One-step affinity purification, size exclusion, and protection against degradation

    PubMed Central

    Luchini, Alessandra; Geho, David H.; Bishop, Barney; Tran, Duy; Xia, Cassandra; Dufour, Robert; Jones, Clint; Espina, Virginia; Patanarut, Alexis; Zhu, Weidong; Ross, Mark; Tessitore, Alessandra; Petricoin, Emanuel; Liotta, Lance A.

    2010-01-01

    Disease-associated blood biomarkers exist in exceedingly low concentrations within complex mixtures of high-abundance proteins such as albumin. We have introduced an affinity bait molecule into N-isopropylacrylamide to produce a particle that will perform three independent functions within minutes, in one step, in solution: a) molecular size sieving b) affinity capture of all solution phase target molecules, and c) complete protection of harvested proteins from enzymatic degradation. The captured analytes can be readily electroeluted for analysis. PMID:18076201

  17. Peptide Bond Synthesis by a Mechanism Involving an Enzymatic Reaction and a Subsequent Chemical Reaction*

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Tomoko; Hashimoto, Yoshiteru; Zhuang, Ye; Ge, Yin; Kumano, Takuto; Kobayashi, Michihiko

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported that an amide bond is unexpectedly formed by an acyl-CoA synthetase (which catalyzes the formation of a carbon-sulfur bond) when a suitable acid and l-cysteine are used as substrates. DltA, which is homologous to the adenylation domain of nonribosomal peptide synthetase, belongs to the same superfamily of adenylate-forming enzymes, which includes many kinds of enzymes, including the acyl-CoA synthetases. Here, we demonstrate that DltA synthesizes not only N-(d-alanyl)-l-cysteine (a dipeptide) but also various oligopeptides. We propose that this enzyme catalyzes peptide synthesis by the following unprecedented mechanism: (i) the formation of S-acyl-l-cysteine as an intermediate via its “enzymatic activity” and (ii) subsequent “chemical” S → N acyl transfer in the intermediate, resulting in peptide formation. Step ii is identical to the corresponding reaction in native chemical ligation, a method of chemical peptide synthesis, whereas step i is not. To the best of our knowledge, our discovery of this peptide synthesis mechanism involving an enzymatic reaction and a subsequent chemical reaction is the first such one to be reported. This new process yields peptides without the use of a thioesterified fragment, which is required in native chemical ligation. Together with these findings, the same mechanism-dependent formation of N-acyl compounds by other members of the above-mentioned superfamily demonstrated that all members most likely form peptide/amide compounds by using this novel mechanism. Each member enzyme acts on a specific substrate; thus, not only the corresponding peptides but also new types of amide compounds can be formed. PMID:26586916

  18. Saccharification of biomass using whole solid-state fermentation medium to avoid additional separation steps.

    PubMed

    Pirota, Rosangela D P B; Baleeiro, Flávio C F; Farinas, Cristiane S

    2013-01-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis of steam-exploded sugarcane bagasse (SESB) was investigated using enzymatic extracts (EE) and whole fermentation media (WM), produced in-house, from Aspergillus niger 3T5B8 and Trichoderma reesei Rut-C30 cultivated on wheat bran under solid-state fermentation (SSF). A detailed and quantitative comparison of the different hydrolysis conditions tested was carried out using the Chrastil approach for modeling enzymatic reactions by fitting the experimental data of total reducing sugar (TRS) released according to hydrolysis time. Conversion of SESB using A. niger enzymatic complex were up to 3.2-fold higher (in terms of TRS) than T. reesei at similar enzyme loadings, which could be correlated to the higher β-glucosidase levels (up to 35-fold higher) of A. niger enzymatic complex. Conversion yields after 72 h exceeded 40% in terms of TRS when the WM was supplemented with a low dosage of a commercial enzyme preparation. When the combination of WM (from either T. reesei or A. niger) and commercial cellulase was used, the dosage of the commercial enzyme could be reduced by half, while still providing a hydrolysis that was up to 36% more efficient. Furthermore, SESB hydrolysis using either EE or WM resulted in similar yields, indicating that the enzyme extraction/filtration steps could be eliminated from the overall process. This procedure is highly advantageous in terms of reduced enzyme and process costs, and also avoids the generation of unnecessary effluent streams. Thus, the enzymatic conversion of SESB using the WM from SSF is cost-effective and compatible with the biorefinery concept. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  19. Simulated remodeling of loaded collagen networks via strain-dependent enzymatic degradation and constant-rate fiber growth

    PubMed Central

    Hadi, M.F.; Sander, E.A.; Ruberti, J.W.; Barocas, V. H.

    2011-01-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that enzymatic degradation of collagen fibers exhibits strain-dependent kinetics. Conceptualizing how the strain dependence affects remodeling of collagenous tissues is vital to our understanding of collagen management in native and bioengineered tissues. As a first step towards this goal, the current study puts forward a multiscale model for enzymatic degradation and remodeling of collagen networks for two sample geometries we routinely use in experiments as model tissues. The multiscale model, driven by microstructural data from an enzymatic decay experiment, includes an exponential strain-dependent kinetic relation for degradation and constant growth. For a dogbone sample under uniaxial load, the model predicted that the distribution of fiber diameters would spread over the course of degradation because of variation in individual fiber load. In a cross-shaped sample, the central region, which experiences smaller, more isotropic loads, showed more decay and less spread in fiber diameter compared to the arms. There was also a slight shift in average orientation in different regions of the cruciform. PMID:22180691

  20. Harnessing surface-bound enzymatic reactions to organize microcapsules in solution

    PubMed Central

    Shklyaev, Oleg E.; Shum, Henry; Sen, Ayusman; Balazs, Anna C.

    2016-01-01

    By developing new computational models, we examine how enzymatic reactions on an underlying surface can be harnessed to direct the motion and organization of reagent-laden microcapsules in a fluid-filled microchannel. In the presence of appropriate reagents, surface-bound enzymes can act as pumps, which drive large-scale fluid flows. When the reagents diffuse through the capsules’ porous shells, they can react with enzymatic sites on the bottom surface. The ensuing reaction generates fluid density variations, which result in fluid flows. These flows carry the suspended microcapsules and drive them to aggregate into “colonies” on and near the enzyme-covered sites. This aggregation continues until the reagent has been depleted and the convection stops. We show that the shape of the assembled colonies can be tailored by patterning the distribution of enzymes on the surface. This fundamental physicochemical mechanism could have played a role in the self-organization of early biological cells (protocells) and can be used to regulate the autonomous motion and targeted delivery of microcarriers in microfluidic devices. PMID:27034990

  1. Phonemic Awareness: A Step by Step Approach for Success in Early Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Idalia Rodriguez

    2008-01-01

    This guide will help teach phonemic awareness to Pre K-3 students. It presents phonemic awareness as a sophisticated branch of phonological awareness through interactive activities that allows the student to succeed in learning the sounds represented by the letters of the alphabet. The book is designed to provide easy-to-follow suggestions for:…

  2. Two step esterification-transesterification process of wet greasy sewage sludge for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Urrutia, C; Sangaletti-Gerhard, N; Cea, M; Suazo, A; Aliberti, A; Navia, R

    2016-01-01

    Sewage sludge generated in municipal wastewater treatment plants was used as a feedstock for biodiesel production via esterification/transesterification in a two-step process. In the first esterification step, greasy and secondary sludge were tested using acid and enzymatic catalysts. The results indicate that both catalysts performed the esterification of free fatty acids (FFA) simultaneously with the transesterification of triacylglycerols (TAG). Acid catalyst demonstrated better performance in FFA esterification compared to TAG transesterification, while enzymatic catalyst showed the ability to first hydrolyze TAG in FFA, which were esterified to methyl esters. In addition, FAME concentration using greasy sludge were higher (63.9% and 58.7%), compared with those of secondary sludge (11% and 16%), using acid and enzymatic catalysts, respectively. Therefore, only greasy sludge was used in the second step of alkaline transesterification. The alkaline transesterification of the previously esterified greasy sludge reached a maximum FAME concentration of 65.4% when using acid catalyst. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Early Steps in Automated Behavior Mapping via Indoor Sensors.

    PubMed

    Arsan, Taner; Kepez, Orcun

    2017-12-16

    Behavior mapping (BM) is a spatial data collection technique in which the locational and behavioral information of a user is noted on a plan layout of the studied environment. Among many indoor positioning technologies, we chose Wi-Fi, BLE beacon and ultra-wide band (UWB) sensor technologies for their popularity and investigated their applicability in BM. We tested three technologies for error ranges and found an average error of 1.39 m for Wi-Fi in a 36 m² test area (6 m × 6 m), 0.86 m for the BLE beacon in a 37.44 m² test area (9.6 m × 3.9 m) and 0.24 m for ultra-wide band sensors in a 36 m² test area (6 m × 6 m). We simulated the applicability of these error ranges for real-time locations by using a behavioral dataset collected from an active learning classroom. We used two UWB tags simultaneously by incorporating a custom-designed ceiling system in a new 39.76 m² test area (7.35 m × 5.41 m). We considered 26 observation points and collected data for 180 s for each point (total 4680) with an average error of 0.2072 m for 23 points inside the test area. Finally, we demonstrated the use of ultra-wide band sensor technology for BM.

  4. Early Steps in Automated Behavior Mapping via Indoor Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Arsan, Taner

    2017-01-01

    Behavior mapping (BM) is a spatial data collection technique in which the locational and behavioral information of a user is noted on a plan layout of the studied environment. Among many indoor positioning technologies, we chose Wi-Fi, BLE beacon and ultra-wide band (UWB) sensor technologies for their popularity and investigated their applicability in BM. We tested three technologies for error ranges and found an average error of 1.39 m for Wi-Fi in a 36 m2 test area (6 m × 6 m), 0.86 m for the BLE beacon in a 37.44 m2 test area (9.6 m × 3.9 m) and 0.24 m for ultra-wide band sensors in a 36 m2 test area (6 m × 6 m). We simulated the applicability of these error ranges for real-time locations by using a behavioral dataset collected from an active learning classroom. We used two UWB tags simultaneously by incorporating a custom-designed ceiling system in a new 39.76 m2 test area (7.35 m × 5.41 m). We considered 26 observation points and collected data for 180 s for each point (total 4680) with an average error of 0.2072 m for 23 points inside the test area. Finally, we demonstrated the use of ultra-wide band sensor technology for BM. PMID:29258178

  5. Trends in ecosystem service research: early steps and current drivers.

    PubMed

    Vihervaara, Petteri; Rönkä, Mia; Walls, Mari

    2010-06-01

    Over the past 50 years, human beings have influenced ecosystems more rapidly than at any similar time in human history, drastically altering ecosystem functioning. Along with ecosystem transformation and degradation, a number of studies have addressed the functioning, assessment and management of ecosystems. The concept of ecosystem services has been developed in the scientific literature since the end of the 1970s. However, ecosystem service research has focused on certain service categories, ecosystem types, and geographical areas, while substantial knowledge gaps remain concerning several aspects. We assess the development and current status of ecosystem service research on the basis of publications collected from the Web of Science. The material consists of (1) articles (n = 353) from all the years included in the Web of Science down to the completion of the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment and (2) more recent articles (n = 687) published between 2006 and 2008. We also assess the importance of international processes, such as the Convention on Biological Diversity, the Kyoto Protocol and the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment, as drivers of ecosystem service research. Finally, we identify future prospects and research needs concerning the assessment and management of ecosystem services.

  6. Network Modeling Reveals Steps in Angiotensin Peptide Processing

    PubMed Central

    Schwacke, John H.; Spainhour, John Christian G.; Ierardi, Jessalyn L.; Chaves, Jose M.; Arthur, John M.; Janech, Michael G.; Velez, Juan Carlos Q.

    2015-01-01

    New insights into the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) have modified our traditional view of the system. However, many finer details of this network of peptides and associated peptidases remain unclear. We hypothesized that a computational systems biology approach, applied to peptidomic data, could help to unravel the network of enzymatic conversions. We built and refined a Bayesian network model and a dynamic systems model starting from a skeleton created with established elements of the RAS and further developed it with archived MALDI-TOF mass spectra from experiments conducted in mouse podocytes exposed to exogenous angiotensin (Ang) substrates. The model-building process suggested previously unrecognized steps, three of which were confirmed in vitro, including the conversion of Ang(2-10) to Ang(2-7) by neprilysin (NEP), and Ang(1-9) to Ang(2-9) and Ang(1-7) to Ang(2-7) by aminopeptidase A (APA). These data suggest a wider role of NEP and APA in glomerular formation of bioactive Ang peptides and/or shunting their formation. Other steps were also suggested by the model and supporting evidence for those steps was evaluated using model-comparison methods. Our results demonstrate that systems biology methods applied to peptidomic data are effective in identifying novel steps in the Ang peptide processing network, and these findings improve our understanding of the glomerular RAS. PMID:23283355

  7. Enzymatic reactivity of glucose oxidase confined in nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiachao; Zhang, Yuanjian; Liu, Songqin

    2014-05-15

    The construction of nanodevices coupled with an integrated real-time detection system for evaluation of the function of biomolecules in biological processes, and enzymatic reaction kinetics occurring at the confined space or interface is a significant challenge. In this work, a nanochannel-enzyme system in which the enzymatic reaction could be investigated with an electrochemical method was constructed. The model system was established by covalently linking glucose oxidase (GOD) onto the inner wall of the nanochannels of the porous anodic alumina (PAA) membrane. An Au disc was attached at the end of the nanochannels of the PAA membrane as the working electrode for detection of H2O2 product of enzymatic reaction. The effects of ionic strength, amount of immobilized enzyme and pore diameter of the nanochannels on the enzymatic reaction kinetics were illustrated. The GOD confined in nanochannels showed high stability and reactivity. Upon addition of glucose to the nanochannel-enzyme system, the current response had a calibration range span from 0.005 to 2 mM of glucose concentration. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (K(m)(app)) of GOD confined in nanochannel was 0.4 mM. The presented work provided a platform for real-time monitoring of the enzyme reaction kinetics confined in nanospaces. Such a nanochannel-enzyme system could also help design future biosensors and enzyme reactors with high sensitivity and efficiency. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. MICROCHIP ENZYMATIC ASSAY OF ORGANOPHOSPHATE NERVE AGENTS. (R830900)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An on-chip enzymatic assay for screening organophosphate (OP) nerve agents, based on a pre-column reaction of organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH), electrophoretic separation of the phosphonic acid products, and their contactless-conductivity detection, is described. Factors affec...

  9. Short-time ultrasonication treatment in enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass

    Zengqian Shi; Zhiyong Cai; Siqun Wang; Qixin Zhong; Joseph J. Bozell

    2013-01-01

    To improve the conversion of enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass in an energy-efficient manner, two shorttime ultrasonication strategies were applied on six types of biomass with different structures and components. The strategies include pre-sonication before the hydrolysis and intermittent sonication during the ongoing hydrolysis. The microstructures of each type of...

  10. Ionic Liquid Pretreatment of Lignocellulosic Biomass for Enhanced Enzymatic Delignification.

    PubMed

    Moniruzzaman, Muhammad; Goto, Masahiro

    2018-05-10

    Ionic liquids (ILs), a potentially attractive "green," recyclable alternative to environmentally harmful volatile organic compounds, have been increasingly exploited as solvents and/or cosolvents and/or reagents in a wide range of applications, including pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass for further processing. The enzymatic delignification of biomass to degrade lignin, a complex aromatic polymer, has received much attention as an environmentally friendly process for clean separation of biopolymers including cellulose and lignin. For this purpose, enzymes are generally isolated from naturally occurring fungi or genetically engineered fungi and used in an aqueous medium. However, enzymatic delignification has been found to be very slow in these conditions, sometimes taking several months for completion. In this chapter, we highlight an environmentally friendly and efficient approach for enzymatic delignification of lignocellulosic biomass using room temperature ionic liquids (ILs) as (co)solvents or/and pretreatment agents. The method comprises pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass in IL-aqueous systems before enzymatic delignification, with the aim of overcoming the low delignification efficiency associated with low enzyme accessibility to the solid substrate and low substrate and product solubilities in aqueous systems. We believe the processes described here can play an important role in the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass-the most abundant renewable biomaterial in the world-to biomaterials, biopolymers, biofuels, bioplastics, and hydrocarbons. Graphical Abstract.

  11. A survey of synthetic nicotinamide cofactors in enzymatic processes.

    PubMed

    Paul, Caroline E; Hollmann, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Synthetic nicotinamide cofactors are analogues of the natural cofactors used by oxidoreductases as redox intermediates. Their ability to be fine-tuned makes these biomimetics an attractive alternative to the natural cofactors in terms of stability, reactivity, and cost. The following mini-review focuses on the current state of the art of those biomimetics in enzymatic processes.

  12. A Multiplex Enzymatic Machinery for Cellular Protein S-nitrosylation.

    PubMed

    Seth, Divya; Hess, Douglas T; Hausladen, Alfred; Wang, Liwen; Wang, Ya-Juan; Stamler, Jonathan S

    2018-02-01

    S-nitrosylation, the oxidative modification of Cys residues by nitric oxide (NO) to form S-nitrosothiols (SNOs), modifies all main classes of proteins and provides a fundamental redox-based cellular signaling mechanism. However, in contrast to other post-translational protein modifications, S-nitrosylation is generally considered to be non-enzymatic, involving multiple chemical routes. We report here that endogenous protein S-nitrosylation in the model organism E. coli depends principally upon the enzymatic activity of the hybrid cluster protein Hcp, employing NO produced by nitrate reductase. Anaerobiosis on nitrate induces both Hcp and nitrate reductase, thereby resulting in the S-nitrosylation-dependent assembly of a large interactome including enzymes that generate NO (NO synthase), synthesize SNO-proteins (SNO synthase), and propagate SNO-based signaling (trans-nitrosylases) to regulate cell motility and metabolism. Thus, protein S-nitrosylation by NO in E. coli is essentially enzymatic, and the potential generality of the multiplex enzymatic mechanism that we describe may support a re-conceptualization of NO-based cellular signaling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Negative dendritic effect on enzymatic hydrolysis of dendrimer conjugates.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhengwei; Cong, Mei; Li, Mengyao; Tintaru, Aura; Li, Jia; Yao, Jianhua; Xia, Yi; Peng, Ling

    2018-06-08

    Dendrimers possess intriguing "dendritic effects", which are unique characteristics that stem from the dendrimer generation and size. Here we report a "negative dendritic effect" observed during enzymatic hydrolysis of dendrimer conjugates. Such negative dendritic effects, though rarely reported, may be explored for tailored and generation-dependent drug release.

  14. Galactomannan Enzymatic Immunoassay Cross-Reactivity Caused by Prototheca Species

    PubMed Central

    Van den Bossche, D.; Hendrickx, M.; De Becker, A.; Jacobs, R.; Naessens, A.; Piérard, D.

    2012-01-01

    We report a reactive Aspergillus galactomannan enzymatic immunoassay against the serum of a patient with invasive Prototheca zopfii infection. Analysis of the supernatants of suspensions of P. zopfii and other Prototheca isolates revealed positive results as well. These data suggest cross-reactivity with the serum Aspergillus galactomannan assay in invasive protothecosis. PMID:22837317

  15. Allergenic Properties of Enzymatically Hydrolyzed Peanut Flour Extracts

    Peanut flour is a high protein, low oil, powdered material prepared from roasted 21 peanut seed. In addition to being a well-established food ingredient, peanut flour is also the 22 active ingredient in peanut oral immunotherapy trials. Enzymatic hydrolysis was evaluated as a 23 processing strategy ...

  16. Effect of particle size on enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated Miscanthus

    Particle size reduction is a crucial factor in transportation logistics as well as cellulosic conversion. The effect of particle size on enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated Miscanthus x giganteus was determined. Miscanthus was ground using a hammer mill equipped with screens having 0.08, 2.0 or 6.0...

  17. Recalcitrant carbohydrates after enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Alcántara, María Ángeles Bermúdez; Dobruchowska, Justyna; Azadi, Parastoo; García, Bruno Díez; Molina-Heredia, Fernando P; Reyes-Sosa, Francisco Manuel

    2016-01-01

    To reduce the cost of the enzymes for the hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass, two main strategies have been followed: one, the reduction of enzyme dosing by the use of more efficient and stable enzymatic cocktails; another, to include accessory enzymes in the cocktails to increase yields by reducing the recalcitrant carbohydrate fraction remaining at the end of the process. To guide this second strategy, we have explored the chemical bond composition of different fractions of recalcitrant carbohydrates after enzymatic hydrolysis. Two lignocellulosic feedstocks of relevance for the biofuels industry have been analyzed, corn stover and sugarcane straw. On comparing the composition of chemical bonds of the starting pretreated material with samples after standard and forced hydrolysis (with enzyme overdosing), we obtained similar sugar and chemical bond composition. This suggests that the current enzymatic cocktails bear the set of enzymes needed to hydrolyze these feedstocks. From our point of view, the results show the need for a parallel fine-tuning of the enzymatic cocktails with the pretreatment process to maximize sugar release yield.

  18. Robust and efficient enzymatic saccharification of softwoods by SPORL

    J.Y. Zhu; X.J. Pan; W. Zhu; G.S. Wang; R. Gleisner

    2009-01-01

    This study demonstrated Sulfite Pretreatment to Overcome Recalcitrance of Lignocellulose (SPORL) for robust conversion of softwood through enzymatic hydrolysis. At a sodium bisulfite charge around 9%, over 90% cellulose conversion could be achieved when spruce wood chips were pretreated at 180°C with pH near 2. For lodgepole pine, pretreatment liquor initial...

  19. Recalcitrant carbohydrates after enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass

    SciT

    Alcantara, Maria Angeles Bermudez; Dobruchowska, Justyna; Azadi, Parastoo

    To reduce the cost of the enzymes for the hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass, two main strategies have been followed: one, the reduction of enzyme dosing by the use of more efficient and stable enzymatic cocktails; another, to include accessory enzymes in the cocktails to increase yields by reducing the recalcitrant carbohydrate fraction remaining at the end of the process. To guide this second strategy, we have explored the chemical bond composition of different fractions of recalcitrant carbohydrates after enzymatic hydrolysis. As a result, two lignocellulosic feedstocks of relevance for the biofuels industry have been analyzed, corn stover and sugarcane straw.more » On comparing the composition of chemical bonds of the starting pretreated material with samples after standard and forced hydrolysis (with enzyme overdosing), we obtained similar sugar and chemical bond composition. In conclusion, this suggests that the current enzymatic cocktails bear the set of enzymes needed to hydrolyze these feedstocks. From our point of view, the results show the need for a parallel fine-tuning of the enzymatic cocktails with the pretreatment process to maximize sugar release yield.« less

  20. Recalcitrant carbohydrates after enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass

    DOE PAGES

    Alcantara, Maria Angeles Bermudez; Dobruchowska, Justyna; Azadi, Parastoo; ...

    2016-10-06

    To reduce the cost of the enzymes for the hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass, two main strategies have been followed: one, the reduction of enzyme dosing by the use of more efficient and stable enzymatic cocktails; another, to include accessory enzymes in the cocktails to increase yields by reducing the recalcitrant carbohydrate fraction remaining at the end of the process. To guide this second strategy, we have explored the chemical bond composition of different fractions of recalcitrant carbohydrates after enzymatic hydrolysis. As a result, two lignocellulosic feedstocks of relevance for the biofuels industry have been analyzed, corn stover and sugarcane straw.more » On comparing the composition of chemical bonds of the starting pretreated material with samples after standard and forced hydrolysis (with enzyme overdosing), we obtained similar sugar and chemical bond composition. In conclusion, this suggests that the current enzymatic cocktails bear the set of enzymes needed to hydrolyze these feedstocks. From our point of view, the results show the need for a parallel fine-tuning of the enzymatic cocktails with the pretreatment process to maximize sugar release yield.« less

  1. Antagonists' impact on enzymatic response in wilt infected cotton plants

    A number of PR-proteins possess enzymatic activity. As such, these proteins maybe indicators of defensive response of plants. Thus, we have conducted a comparative analysis of beta-1,3-glucanase, peroxidase and xylanase activity in cotton plants to determine how these enzymes are affected by the pat...

  2. The Preparation and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of a Library of Esters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanford, Elizabeth M.; Smith, Traci L.

    2008-01-01

    An investigative case study involving the preparation of a library of esters using Fischer esterification and alcoholysis of acid chlorides and their subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis by pig liver esterase and orange peel esterase is described. Students work collaboratively to prepare and characterize the library of esters and complete and evaluate…

  3. Enzymatic browning reactions in apple and apple products.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, J J; Richard-Forget, F C; Goupy, P M; Amiot, M J; Aubert, S Y

    1994-01-01

    This review examines the parameters of enzymatic browning in apple and apple products that is, phenolic compounds, polyphenoloxidases, and other factors (ascorbic acid and peroxidases), both qualitatively and quantitatively. Then the relationships between intensity of browning and the browning parameters are discussed, including a paragraph on the methods used for browning evaluation. Finally, the different methods for the control of browning are presented.

  4. An enantioselective enzymatic desymmetrization route to hexahydro-4H-furopyranol, a high-affinity ligand for HIV-1 protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arun K; Sarkar, Anindya

    2017-08-16

    An enantioselective synthesis of ( 3 a S , 4S , 7 a R )-hexahydro-4 H -furo[2,3- b ]pyran-4-ol, a high-affinity nonpeptide ligand for a variety of potent HIV-1 protease inhibitors is described. The key steps involved a highly enantioselective enzymatic desymmetrization of meso -diacetate, an efficient transacetalization, and a highly diastereoselective reduction of a ketone. This route is amenable to large-scale synthesis using readily available starting materials.

  5. Enzymatic reaction paths as determined by transition path sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masterson, Jean Emily

    Enzymes are biological catalysts capable of enhancing the rates of chemical reactions by many orders of magnitude as compared to solution chemistry. Since the catalytic power of enzymes routinely exceeds that of the best artificial catalysts available, there is much interest in understanding the complete nature of chemical barrier crossing in enzymatic reactions. Two specific questions pertaining to the source of enzymatic rate enhancements are investigated in this work. The first is the issue of how fast protein motions of an enzyme contribute to chemical barrier crossing. Our group has previously identified sub-picosecond protein motions, termed promoting vibrations (PVs), that dynamically modulate chemical transformation in several enzymes. In the case of human heart lactate dehydrogenase (hhLDH), prior studies have shown that a specific axis of residues undergoes a compressional fluctuation towards the active site, decreasing a hydride and a proton donor--acceptor distance on a sub-picosecond timescale to promote particle transfer. To more thoroughly understand the contribution of this dynamic motion to the enzymatic reaction coordinate of hhLDH, we conducted transition path sampling (TPS) using four versions of the enzymatic system: a wild type enzyme with natural isotopic abundance; a heavy enzyme where all the carbons, nitrogens, and non-exchangeable hydrogens were replaced with heavy isotopes; and two versions of the enzyme with mutations in the axis of PV residues. We generated four separate ensembles of reaction paths and analyzed each in terms of the reaction mechanism, time of barrier crossing, dynamics of the PV, and residues involved in the enzymatic reaction coordinate. We found that heavy isotopic substitution of hhLDH altered the sub-picosecond dynamics of the PV, changed the favored reaction mechanism, dramatically increased the time of barrier crossing, but did not have an effect on the specific residues involved in the PV. In the mutant systems

  6. Leading Change Step-by-Step: Tactics, Tools, and Tales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiro, Jody

    2010-01-01

    "Leading Change Step-by-Step" offers a comprehensive and tactical guide for change leaders. Spiro's approach has been field-tested for more than a decade and proven effective in a wide variety of public sector organizations including K-12 schools, universities, international agencies and non-profits. The book is filled with proven tactics for…

  7. The NIST Step Class Library (Step Into the Future)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    Figure 6. Excerpt from a STEP exclange file based on the Geometry model 1be NIST STEP Class Libary Page 13 An issue of concern in this...Scheifler, R., Gettys, J., and Newman, P., X Window System: C Library and Protocol Reference. Digital Press, Bedford, Mass, 1988. [Schenck90] Schenck, D

  8. Step by Step to Smoke-Free Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanSciver, James H.; Roberts, H. Earl

    1989-01-01

    This ERIC digest discusses ways of effectively banning smoking in schools so that controversies do not continue after implementation of the policy. By advocating a process approach, the document cites steps taken by the Lake Forest School Board to prohibit smoking in and around school grounds. Step one involved committee planning involving…

  9. Step-by-Step Visual Manuals: Design and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urata, Toshiyuki

    2004-01-01

    The types of handouts and manuals that are used in technology training vary. Some describe procedures in a narrative way without graphics; some employ step-by-step instructions with screen captures. According to Thirlway (1994), a training manual should be like a tutor that permits a student to learn at his own pace and gives him confidence for…

  10. Preparation of icariside II from icariin by enzymatic hydrolysis method.

    PubMed

    Xia, Quan; Xu, Dujuan; Huang, Zhaogang; Liu, Jianjun; Wang, Xinqun; Wang, Xiu; Liu, Shangquan

    2010-07-01

    It has been reported that icariin and icariside II, two flavonoid glycosides coming from herba epimedii, which have a closely structural relationship, show some pharmacological effects such as preventing osteoporosis, cancer and depression. The content of natural icariside II is very low in herba epimedii, but it is the main component in vivo after the administration of herba epimedii. More icariside II can be obtained from icariin by enzymatic hydrolysis method than by traditional isolation method. This study focuses on finding a simple and feasible method to prepare icariside II from icariin by enzymatic hydrolysis, so as to meet the request for further pharmacologic actions study. Icariin was obtained successively with 90% ethanol extraction, isolation on macroporous resin and purification on silica gel chromatography. Enzymatic hydrolysis conditions were tested for the bioconversion of icariin into icariside II by orthogonal array design. The structures of isolated icariin and produced icariside II were identified by UV, IR, ESIMS, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, and DEPT spectroscope. Enzymatic hydrolysis experiment showed that icariin could be transformed into icariside II with the action of beta-glucosidase and the optimum reaction conditions were determined as follows: 50 degrees C, 0.2 M disodium hydrogen phosphate and citric acid buffer system (pH6.0), the ratio of icariin/enzyme is 1:1 and reaction time 5 h. By using this enzymatic condition, 95.5 mg icariside II (with the purity of 99.1%) was obtained eventually by transforming 200 mg icariin. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Ultrasound assisted enzymatic depolymerization of aqueous guar gum solution.

    PubMed

    Prajapat, Amrutlal L; Subhedar, Preeti B; Gogate, Parag R

    2016-03-01

    The present work investigates the effectiveness of application of low intensity ultrasonic irradiation for the intensification of enzymatic depolymerization of aqueous guar gum solution. The extent of depolymerization of guar gum has been analyzed in terms of intrinsic viscosity reduction. The effect of ultrasonic irradiation on the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters related to the enzyme activity as well as the intrinsic viscosity reduction of guar gum using enzymatic approach has been evaluated. The kinetic rate constant has been found to increase with an increase in the temperature and cellulase loading. It has been observed that application of ultrasound not only enhances the extent of depolymerization but also reduces the time of depolymerization as compared to conventional enzymatic degradation technique. In the presence of cellulase enzyme, the maximum extent of depolymerization of guar gum has been observed at 60 W of ultrasonic rated power and ultrasonic treatment time of 30 min. The effect of ultrasound on the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters as well as the molecular structure of cellulase enzyme was evaluated with the help of the chemical reaction kinetics model and fluorescence spectroscopy. Application of ultrasound resulted in a reduction in the thermodynamic parameters of activation energy (Ea), enthalpy (ΔH), entropy (ΔS) and free energy (ΔG) by 47%, 50%, 65% and 1.97%, respectively. The changes in the chemical structure of guar gum treated using ultrasound assisted enzymatic approach in comparison to the native guar gum were also characterized by FTIR. The results revealed that enzymatic depolymerization of guar gum resulted in a polysaccharide with low degree of polymerization, viscosity and consistency index without any change in the core chemical structure which could make it useful for incorporation in food products. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of enzymatic hydrolysis on native starch granule structure.

    PubMed

    Blazek, Jaroslav; Gilbert, Elliot Paul

    2010-12-13

    Enzymatic digestion of six starches of different botanical origin was studied in real time by in situ time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and complemented by the analysis of native and digested material by X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, small-angle X-ray scattering, and scanning electron microscopy with the aim of following changes in starch granule nanostructure during enzymatic digestion. This range of techniques enables coverage over five orders of length-scale, as is necessary for this hierarchically structured material. Starches studied varied in their digestibility and displayed structural differences in the course of enzymatic digestion. The use of time-resolved SANS showed that solvent-drying of digested residues does not induce any structural artifacts on the length scale followed by small-angle scattering. In the course of digestion, the lamellar peak intensity gradually decreased and low-q scattering increased. These trends were more substantial for A-type than for B-type starches. These observations were explained by preferential digestion of the amorphous growth rings. Hydrolysis of the semicrystalline growth rings was explained on the basis of a liquid-crystalline model for starch considering differences between A-type and B-type starches in the length and rigidity of amylopectin spacers and branches. As evidenced by differing morphologies of enzymatic attack among varieties, the existence of granular pores and channels and physical penetrability of the amorphous growth ring affect the accessibility of the enzyme to the substrate. The combined effects of the granule microstructure and the nanostructure of the growth rings influence the opportunity of the enzyme to access its substrate; as a consequence, these structures determine the enzymatic digestibility of granular starches more than the absolute physical densities of the amorphous growth rings and amorphous and crystalline regions of the semicrystalline

  13. Development and evaluation of an in-house single step loop-mediated isothermal amplification (SS-LAMP) assay for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in sputum samples from Moroccan patients.

    PubMed

    Bentaleb, El Mehdi; Abid, Mohammed; El Messaoudi, My Driss; Lakssir, Brahim; Ressami, El Mostafa; Amzazi, Saaïd; Sefrioui, Hassan; Ait Benhassou, Hassan

    2016-09-27

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major global health problem and remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Routinely used TB diagnostic methods, in most endemic areas, are time-consuming, often less-sensitive, expensive and inaccessible to most patients. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of early, easy to use and effective diagnosis tools of TB, which can be effectively integrated into resource limited settings, to anticipate the early treatment and limit further spread of the disease. Over the last decade, Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assays have become a powerful tool for rapid diagnosis of infectious diseases because of the simplicity of device requirements. Indeed, LAMP is a simple, quick and cost effective Isothermal Nucleic Acid Amplification diagnostic test (INAAT) that has the potential to be used in TB endemic settings of resource-poor countries. In the present study, we have developed a simple and rapid TB molecular diagnostic test using a Single-Step Loop-mediated isothermal DNA amplification (SS-LAMP) method for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) strains, with a simplified sample preparation procedure, eliminating DNA extraction prior to LAMP amplification, DNA initial denaturation and enzymatic inactivation steps during the amplification process. To perform our in-house SS-LAMP assay, a set of six specific primers was specifically designed to recognize eight distinct regions on the MTBC species-specific repetitive insertion sequence 6110 (IS6110). The amplification of the targeted DNA was carried out under isothermal conditions at 65 °C within 1 h. Our protocol was firstly optimized using 60 of confirmed MTBC isolates and a recombinant pGEMeasy-IS6110 vector for sensitivity testing. Thereafter, the assay was evaluated on liquefied sputum specimens collected from 157 Moroccan patients suspected of having TB. Our SS-LAMP developed assay was able to detect MTBC DNA

  14. Effects of Peach Cultivar on Enzymatic Browning Following Cell Damage from High-Pressure Processing.

    PubMed

    Techakanon, Chukwan; Gradziel, Thomas M; Barrett, Diane M

    2016-10-12

    Peach cultivars contribute to unique product characteristics and may affect the degree of browning after high-pressure processing (HPP). Nine peach cultivars were subjected to HPP at 0, 100, and 400 MPa for 10 min. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1 H NMR) relaxometry, light microscopy, color, polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity, and total phenols were evaluated. The development of enzymatic browning during refrigerated storage occurred because of damage during HPP that triggered loss of cell integrity, allowing substrates to interact with enzymes. Increasing pressure levels resulted in greater damage, as determined by shifts in transverse relaxation time (T 2 ) and by light micrographs. Discoloration was triggered by membrane decompartmentalization but limited by PPO activity, which was found to correlate to cultivar harvest time (early, mid, and late season). Outcomes from the microstructure, 1 H NMR ,and PPO activity evaluation were an effective means of determining membrane decompartmentalization and allowed for prediction of browning scenarios.

  15. Stimulation and inhibition of enzymatic hydrolysis by organosolv lignins as determined by zeta potential and hydrophobicity

    Yang Huang; Shaolong Sun; Chen Huang; Qiang Yong; Thomas Elder; Maobing Tu

    2017-01-01

    Background: Lignin typically inhibits enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass, but certain organosolv lignins or lignosulfonates enhance enzymatic hydrolysis. The hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions between lignin and cellulases play critical roles in the enzymatic hydrolysis process. However, how to incorporate these two...

  16. Evaluation of physical structural features on influencing enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency of micronized wood

    Jinxue Jiang; Jinwu Wang; Xiao Zhang; Michael Wolcott

    2016-01-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass is highly dependent on the changes in structural features after pretreatment. Mechanical milling pretreatment is an effective approach to alter the physical structure of biomass and thus improve enzymatic hydrolysis. This study examined the influence of structural characteristics on the enzymatic hydrolysis of micronized...

  17. Physical modeling of stepped spillways

    Stepped spillways applied to embankment dams are becoming popular for addressing the rehabilitation of aging watershed dams, especially those situated in the urban landscape. Stepped spillways are typically placed over the existing embankment, which provides for minimal disturbance to the original ...

  18. FAA Loran early implementation project

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1990-03-01

    The Early Implementation Project (EIP), established by FAA Administrator Admiral : Donald C. Engen, was the initial step in the process of Loran integration into the : National Airsace System (NAS). The EIP was designed to give the FAA and the Loran ...

  19. Starting Early Starting Right Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Baldwin, Tammy [D-WI-2

    2009-12-16

    House - 02/23/2010 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  20. Rural Early Education Access Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Hare, Phil [D-IL-17

    2009-03-26

    House - 05/14/2009 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  1. Alkaline-sulfite pretreatment and use of surfactants during enzymatic hydrolysis to enhance ethanol production from sugarcane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Jéssica Faria; Ferraz, André; Aguiar, André

    2016-03-01

    Sugarcane bagasse is a by-product from the sugar and ethanol industry which contains approximately 70 % of its dry mass composed by polysaccharides. To convert these polysaccharides into fuel ethanol it is necessary a pretreatment step to increase the enzymatic digestibility of the recalcitrant raw material. In this work, sugarcane bagasse was pretreated by an alkaline-sulfite chemithermomechanical process for increasing its enzymatic digestibility. Na2SO3 and NaOH ratios were fixed at 2:1, and three increasing chemical loads, varying from 4 to 8 % m/m Na2SO3, were used to prepare the pretreated materials. The increase in the alkaline-sulfite load decreased the lignin content in the pretreated material up to 35.5 % at the highest chemical load. The pretreated samples presented enhanced glucose yields during enzymatic hydrolysis as a function of the pretreatment severity. The maximum glucose yield (64 %) was observed for the samples pretreated with the highest chemical load. The use of 2.5 g l(-1) Tween 20 in the hydrolysis step further increased the glucose yield to 75 %. Semi-simultaneous hydrolysis and fermentation of the pretreated materials indicated that the ethanol yield was also enhanced as a function of the pretreatment severity. The maximum ethanol yield was 56 ± 2 % for the sample pretreated with the highest chemical load. For the sample pretreated with the lowest chemical load (2 % m/m NaOH and 4 % m/m Na2SO3), adding Tween 20 during the hydrolysis process increased the ethanol yield from 25 ± 3 to 39.5 ± 1 %.

  2. Analytical evaluation of three enzymatic assays for measuring total bile acids in plasma using a fully-automated clinical chemistry platform.

    PubMed

    Danese, Elisa; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Negrini, Davide; Brocco, Giorgio; Montagnana, Martina; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Although the clinical significance of measuring bile acids concentration in plasma or serum has been recognized for long in patients with hepatobiliary disease and/or bile acid malabsorption, the reference separation techniques are expensive and mostly unsuitable for early diagnosis and for measuring large volumes of samples. Therefore, this study was aimed to evaluate the analytical performance of three commercial enzymatic techniques for measuring total bile acids in plasma using a fully-automated clinical chemistry platform. Three commercial enzymatic assays (from Diazyme, Randox and Sentinel) were adapted for use on a Cobas Roche c501. We performed imprecision and linearity studies, and we compared results with those obtained using a reference liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) technique on an identical set of lithium-heparin plasma samples. Total imprecision was optimal, always equal or lower than 3%. All assays had optimal linearity between 3-138 μmol/L. The comparison studies showed good correlation with LC-MS data (Spearman's correlation coefficients always >0.92), but all plasma samples values were significantly underestimated using the commercial enzymatic assays (-44% for Diazyme, -16% for Randox and -12% for Sentinel). The agreement at the 10 and 40 μmol/L diagnostic thresholds of total bile acids in plasma ranged between 86-92%. This discrepancy was found to be mainly attributable to a heterogeneous composition in terms of bile acids content of the three assay calibrators. This study suggests that the analytical performance of the three commercial enzymatic assays is excellent, thus confirming that automation of this important test by means of enzymatic assessment may be feasible, practical, reliable and supposedly cheap. Nevertheless, the underestimation of values compared to the reference LC-MS also suggests that the local definition and validation of reference ranges according to the combination between the specific enzymatic assay

  3. Steps Toward Understanding Mitochondrial Fe/S Cluster Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Melber, Andrew; Winge, Dennis R

    2018-01-01

    Iron-sulfur clusters (Fe/S clusters) are essential cofactors required throughout the clades of biology for performing a myriad of unique functions including nitrogen fixation, ribosome assembly, DNA repair, mitochondrial respiration, and metabolite catabolism. Although Fe/S clusters can be synthesized in vitro and transferred to a client protein without enzymatic assistance, biology has evolved intricate mechanisms to assemble and transfer Fe/S clusters within the cellular environment. In eukaryotes, the foundation of all cellular clusters starts within the mitochondria. The focus of this review is to detail the mitochondrial Fe/S biogenesis (ISC) pathway along with the Fe/S cluster transfer steps necessary to mature Fe/S proteins. New advances in our understanding of the mitochondrial Fe/S biogenesis machinery will be highlighted. Additionally, we will address various experimental approaches that have been successful in the identification and characterization of components of the ISC pathway. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Improving the enzymatic hydrolysis of thermo-mechanical fiber from Eucalyptus urophylla by a combination of hydrothermal pretreatment and alkali fractionation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shaoni; Cao, Xuefei; Sun, Shaolong; Xu, Feng; Song, Xianliang; Sun, Run-Cang; Jones, Gwynn Lloyd

    2014-01-01

    The recalcitrance of lignocellulosic biomass is a major limitation for its conversion into biofuels by enzymatic hydrolysis. The use of a pretreatment technology is an essential step to diminish biomass recalcitrance for bioethanol production. In this study, a two-step pretreatment using hydrothermal pretreatment at various temperatures and alkali fractionation was performed on eucalyptus fiber. The detailed chemical composition, physicochemical characteristics, and morphology of the pretreated fibers in each of the fractions were evaluated to advance the performance of eucalyptus fiber in enzymatic digestibility. The hydrothermal pretreatment (100 to 220°C) significantly degraded hemicelluloses, resulting in an increased crystallinity of the pretreated fibers. However, as the pretreatment temperature reached 240°C, partial cellulose was degraded, resulting in a reduced crystallinity of cellulose. As compared to the hydrothermal pretreatment alone, a combination of hydrothermal and alkali treatments significantly removed hemicelluloses and lignin, resulting in an improved enzymatic hydrolysis of the cellulose-rich fractions. As compared with the raw fiber, the enzymatic hydrolysis rate increased 1.1 to 8.5 times as the hydrothermal pretreatment temperature increased from 100 to 240°C. Interestingly, after a combination of hydrothermal pretreatment and alkali fractionation, the enzymatic hydrolysis rate increased 3.7 to 9.2 times. Taking into consideration the consumption of energy and the production of xylo-oligosaccharides and lignin, an optimum pretreatment condition was found to be hydrothermal pretreatment at 180°C for 30 min and alkali fractionation with 2% NaOH at 90°C for 2.5 h, in which 66.3% cellulose was converted into glucose by enzymatic hydrolysis. The combination of hydrothermal pretreatment and alkali fractionation was a promising method to remove hemicelluloses and lignin as well as overcome the biomass recalcitrance for enzymatic hydrolysis

  5. Group sequential designs for stepped-wedge cluster randomised trials.

    PubMed

    Grayling, Michael J; Wason, James Ms; Mander, Adrian P

    2017-10-01

    The stepped-wedge cluster randomised trial design has received substantial attention in recent years. Although various extensions to the original design have been proposed, no guidance is available on the design of stepped-wedge cluster randomised trials with interim analyses. In an individually randomised trial setting, group sequential methods can provide notable efficiency gains and ethical benefits. We address this by discussing how established group sequential methodology can be adapted for stepped-wedge designs. Utilising the error spending approach to group sequential trial design, we detail the assumptions required for the determination of stepped-wedge cluster randomised trials with interim analyses. We consider early stopping for efficacy, futility, or efficacy and futility. We describe first how this can be done for any specified linear mixed model for data analysis. We then focus on one particular commonly utilised model and, using a recently completed stepped-wedge cluster randomised trial, compare the performance of several designs with interim analyses to the classical stepped-wedge design. Finally, the performance of a quantile substitution procedure for dealing with the case of unknown variance is explored. We demonstrate that the incorporation of early stopping in stepped-wedge cluster randomised trial designs could reduce the expected sample size under the null and alternative hypotheses by up to 31% and 22%, respectively, with no cost to the trial's type-I and type-II error rates. The use of restricted error maximum likelihood estimation was found to be more important than quantile substitution for controlling the type-I error rate. The addition of interim analyses into stepped-wedge cluster randomised trials could help guard against time-consuming trials conducted on poor performing treatments and also help expedite the implementation of efficacious treatments. In future, trialists should consider incorporating early stopping of some kind into

  6. Group sequential designs for stepped-wedge cluster randomised trials

    PubMed Central

    Grayling, Michael J; Wason, James MS; Mander, Adrian P

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims: The stepped-wedge cluster randomised trial design has received substantial attention in recent years. Although various extensions to the original design have been proposed, no guidance is available on the design of stepped-wedge cluster randomised trials with interim analyses. In an individually randomised trial setting, group sequential methods can provide notable efficiency gains and ethical benefits. We address this by discussing how established group sequential methodology can be adapted for stepped-wedge designs. Methods: Utilising the error spending approach to group sequential trial design, we detail the assumptions required for the determination of stepped-wedge cluster randomised trials with interim analyses. We consider early stopping for efficacy, futility, or efficacy and futility. We describe first how this can be done for any specified linear mixed model for data analysis. We then focus on one particular commonly utilised model and, using a recently completed stepped-wedge cluster randomised trial, compare the performance of several designs with interim analyses to the classical stepped-wedge design. Finally, the performance of a quantile substitution procedure for dealing with the case of unknown variance is explored. Results: We demonstrate that the incorporation of early stopping in stepped-wedge cluster randomised trial designs could reduce the expected sample size under the null and alternative hypotheses by up to 31% and 22%, respectively, with no cost to the trial’s type-I and type-II error rates. The use of restricted error maximum likelihood estimation was found to be more important than quantile substitution for controlling the type-I error rate. Conclusion: The addition of interim analyses into stepped-wedge cluster randomised trials could help guard against time-consuming trials conducted on poor performing treatments and also help expedite the implementation of efficacious treatments. In future, trialists should

  7. Determination of optimal biomass pretreatment strategies for biofuel production: investigation of relationships between surface-exposed polysaccharides and their enzymatic conversion using carbohydrate-binding modules.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Vinay; Meddeb-Mouelhi, Fatma; Adjallé, Kokou; Barnabé, Simon; Beauregard, Marc

    2018-01-01

    Pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass (LCB) is a key step for its efficient bioconversion into ethanol. Determining the best pretreatment and its parameters requires monitoring its impacts on the biomass material. Here, we used fluorescent protein-tagged carbohydrate-binding modules method (FTCM)-depletion assay to study the relationship between surface-exposed polysaccharides and enzymatic hydrolysis of LCB. Our results indicated that alkali extrusion pretreatment led to the highest hydrolysis rates for alfalfa stover, cattail stems and flax shives, despite its lower lignin removal efficiency compared to alkali pretreatment. Corn crop residues were more sensitive to alkali pretreatments, leading to higher hydrolysis rates. A clear relationship was consistently observed between total surface-exposed cellulose detected by the FTCM-depletion assay and biomass enzymatic hydrolysis. Comparison of bioconversion yield and total composition analysis (by NREL/TP-510-42618) of LCB prior to or after pretreatments did not show any close relationship. Lignin removal efficiency and total cellulose content (by NREL/TP-510-42618) led to an unreliable prediction of enzymatic polysaccharide hydrolysis. Fluorescent protein-tagged carbohydrate-binding modules method (FTCM)-depletion assay provided direct evidence that cellulose exposure is the key determinant of hydrolysis yield. The clear and robust relationships that were observed between the cellulose accessibility by FTCM probes and enzymatic hydrolysis rates change could be evolved into a powerful prediction tool that might help develop optimal biomass pretreatment strategies for biofuel production.

  8. Rational design of functional and tunable oscillating enzymatic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Sergey N.; Wong, Albert S. Y.; van der Made, R. Martijn; Postma, Sjoerd G. J.; Groen, Joost; van Roekel, Hendrik W. H.; de Greef, Tom F. A.; Huck, Wilhelm T. S.

    2015-02-01

    Life is sustained by complex systems operating far from equilibrium and consisting of a multitude of enzymatic reaction networks. The operating principles of biology's regulatory networks are known, but the in vitro assembly of out-of-equilibrium enzymatic reaction networks has proved challenging, limiting the development of synthetic systems showing autonomous behaviour. Here, we present a strategy for the rational design of programmable functional reaction networks that exhibit dynamic behaviour. We demonstrate that a network built around autoactivation and delayed negative feedback of the enzyme trypsin is capable of producing sustained oscillating concentrations of active trypsin for over 65 h. Other functions, such as amplification, analog-to-digital conversion and periodic control over equilibrium systems, are obtained by linking multiple network modules in microfluidic flow reactors. The methodology developed here provides a general framework to construct dissipative, tunable and robust (bio)chemical reaction networks.

  9. Dynamic Disorder in Quasi-Equilibrium Enzymatic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Srabanti; Igoshin, Oleg A.

    2010-01-01

    Conformations and catalytic rates of enzymes fluctuate over a wide range of timescales. Despite these fluctuations, there exist some limiting cases in which the enzymatic catalytic rate follows the macroscopic rate equation such as the Michaelis-Menten law. In this paper we investigate the applicability of macroscopic rate laws for fluctuating enzyme systems in which catalytic transitions are slower than ligand binding-dissociation reactions. In this quasi-equilibrium limit, for an arbitrary reaction scheme we show that the catalytic rate has the same dependence on ligand concentrations as obtained from mass-action kinetics even in the presence of slow conformational fluctuations. These results indicate that the timescale of conformational dynamics – no matter how slow – will not affect the enzymatic rate in quasi-equilibrium limit. Our numerical results for two enzyme-catalyzed reaction schemes involving multiple substrates and inhibitors further support our general theory. PMID:20808776

  10. Non-enzymatic cyclization of creatine ethyl ester to creatinine.

    PubMed

    Giese, Matthew W; Lecher, Carl S

    2009-10-16

    Creatine ethyl ester was incubated at 37 degrees C in both water and phosphate-buffered saline and the diagnostic methylene resonances in the (1)H NMR spectrum were used to identify the resultant products. It was found that mild aqueous conditions result in the cyclization of creatine ethyl ester to provide inactive creatinine as the exclusive product, and this transformation becomes nearly instantaneous as the pH approaches 7.4. This study demonstrates that mild non-enzymatic conditions are sufficient for the cyclization of creatine ethyl ester into creatinine, and together with previous results obtained under enzymatic conditions suggests that there are no physiological conditions that would result in the production of creatine. It is concluded that creatine ethyl ester is a pronutrient for creatinine rather than creatine under all physiological conditions encountered during transit through the various tissues, thus no ergogenic effect is to be expected from supplementation.

  11. Enzymatic network for production of ether amines from alcohols.

    PubMed

    Palacio, Cyntia M; Crismaru, Ciprian G; Bartsch, Sebastian; Navickas, Vaidotas; Ditrich, Klaus; Breuer, Michael; Abu, Rohana; Woodley, John M; Baldenius, Kai; Wu, Bian; Janssen, Dick B

    2016-09-01

    We constructed an enzymatic network composed of three different enzymes for the synthesis of valuable ether amines. The enzymatic reactions are interconnected to catalyze the oxidation and subsequent transamination of the substrate and to provide cofactor recycling. This allows production of the desired ether amines from the corresponding ether alcohols with inorganic ammonium as the only additional substrate. To examine conversion, individual and overall reaction equilibria were established. Using these data, it was found that the experimentally observed conversions of up to 60% observed for reactions containing 10 mM alcohol and up to 280 mM ammonia corresponded well to predicted conversions. The results indicate that efficient amination can be driven by high concentrations of ammonia and may require improving enzyme robustness for scale-up. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1853-1861. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Mechanism of lignin inhibition of enzymatic biomass deconstruction

    DOE PAGES

    Vermaas, Josh V.; Petridis, Loukas; Qi, Xianghong; ...

    2015-12-01

    The conversion of plant biomass to ethanol via enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis offers a potentially sustainable route to biofuel production. However, the inhibition of enzymatic activity in pretreated biomass by lignin severely limits the efficiency of this process. By performing atomic-detail molecular dynamics simulation of a biomass model containing cellulose, lignin, and cellulases (TrCel7A), we elucidate detailed lignin inhibition mechanisms. We find that lignin binds preferentially both to the elements of cellulose to which the cellulases also preferentially bind (the hydrophobic faces) and also to the specific residues on the cellulose-binding module of the cellulase that are critical for cellulose bindingmore » of TrCel7A (Y466, Y492, and Y493). In conclusion, lignin thus binds exactly where for industrial purposes it is least desired, providing a simple explanation of why hydrolysis yields increase with lignin removal.« less

  13. Thermal and enzymatic recovering of proteins from untanned leather waste.

    PubMed

    Bajza, Z; Vrucek, V

    2001-01-01

    The laboratory trials of a process to treat untanned leather waste to isolate valuable protein products are presented. In this comparative study, both thermal and enzymatic treatments of leather waste were performed. The enzymatic method utilizes commercially available alkaline protease at moderate temperatures and for short periods of time. The concentration of the enzyme was 500 units per gram of leather waste which makes the method cost-effective. Amino acid composition in the hydrolysate obtained by the enzyme hydrolysis of untanned leather waste is determined. Chemical and physical properties of protein powder products from untanned leather waste were evaluated by spectrophotometric and chromatographic methods and by use of electron microscope. The results of microbiological assays confirm that these products agree to food safety standards. This relatively simple treatment of untanned leather waste may provide a practical and economical solution to the disposal of potentially dangerous waste.

  14. Influence of magnetic field on enzymatic ONOO- production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dranova, T.; Petrovskii, D.; Ershov, N.; Slepneva, I.; Stass, D.

    2017-08-01

    Enzymatic oxidation of L-arginine catalyzed by inducible nitric oxide synthase gives nitric oxide as the main product and superoxide anion as a side reaction product. Recombination of these radicals gives a very reactive species - peroxynitrite, which is involved in many biochemical processes. In the current work it was shown that such a system can be a usable model system for investigating the influence of magnetic field on enzymatic peroxynitrite formation. Using a selective fluorescent probe for peroxynitrite - coumarin boronic acid and an adopted for the experimental purpose incubation mixture, magnetic field experiments have been done at 11.7T. The averaged magnetic field effect is equal to 2.8±0.9%.

  15. Improving biogas production from microalgae by enzymatic pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Passos, Fabiana; Hom-Diaz, Andrea; Blanquez, Paqui; Vicent, Teresa; Ferrer, Ivet

    2016-01-01

    In this study, enzymatic pretreatment of microalgal biomass was investigated under different conditions and evaluated using biochemical methane potential (BMP) tests. Cellulase, glucohydrolase and an enzyme mix composed of cellulase, glucohydrolase and xylanase were selected based on the microalgae cell wall composition (cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin and glycoprotein). All of them increased organic matter solubilisation, obtaining high values already after 6h of pretreatment with an enzyme dose of 1% for cellulase and the enzyme mix. BMP tests with pretreated microalgae showed a methane yield increase of 8 and 15% for cellulase and the enzyme mix, respectively. Prospective research should evaluate enzymatic pretreatments in continuous anaerobic reactors so as to estimate the energy balance and economic cost of the process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Perspectives for the industrial enzymatic production of glycosides.

    PubMed

    de Roode, B Mattheus; Franssen, Maurice C R; van der Padt, Albert; Boom, Remko M

    2003-01-01

    Glycosides are of commercial interest for industry in general and specifically for the pharmaceutical and food industry. Currently chemical preparation of glycosides will not meet EC food regulations, and therefore chemical preparation of glycosides is not applicable in the food industry. Thus, enzyme-catalyzed reactions are a good alternative. However, until now the low yields obtained by enzymatic methods prevent the production of glycosides on a commercial scale. Therefore, high yields should be established by a combination of optimum reaction conditions and continuous removal of the product. Unfortunately, a bioreactor for the commercial scale production of glycosides is not available. The aim of this article is to discuss the literature with respect to enzymatic production of glycosides and the design of an industrially viable bioreactor system.

  17. Bioremediation of uranium contamination with enzymatic uranium reduction

    Lovley, D.R.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1992-01-01

    Enzymatic uranium reduction by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans readily removed uranium from solution in a batch system or when D. desulfuricans was separated from the bulk of the uranium-containing water by a semipermeable membrane. Uranium reduction continued at concentrations as high as 24 mM. Of a variety of potentially inhibiting anions and metals evaluated, only high concentrations of copper inhibited uranium reduction. Freeze-dried cells, stored aerobically, reduced uranium as fast as fresh cells. D. desulfuricans reduced uranium in pH 4 and pH 7.4 mine drainage waters and in uraniumcontaining groundwaters from a contaminated Department of Energy site. Enzymatic uranium reduction has several potential advantages over other bioprocessing techniques for uranium removal, the most important of which are as follows: the ability to precipitate uranium that is in the form of a uranyl carbonate complex; high capacity for uranium removal per cell; the formation of a compact, relatively pure, uranium precipitate.

  18. Refining each process step to accelerate the development of biorefineries

    DOE PAGES

    Chandra, Richard P.; Ragauskas, Art J.

    2016-06-21

    Research over the past decade has been mainly focused on overcoming hurdles in the pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, and fermentation steps of biochemical processing. Pretreatments have improved significantly in their ability to fractionate and recover the cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin components of biomass while producing substrates containing carbohydrates that can be easily broken down by hydrolytic enzymes. There is a rapid movement towards pretreatment processes that incorporate mechanical treatments that make use of existing infrastructure in the pulp and paper industry, which has experienced a downturn in its traditional markets. Enzyme performance has also made great strides with breakthrough developments inmore » nonhydrolytic protein components, such as lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases, as well as the improvement of enzyme cocktails.The fermentability of pretreated and hydrolyzed sugar streams has been improved through strategies such as the use of reducing agents for detoxification, strain selection, and strain improvements. Although significant progress has been made, tremendous challenges still remain to advance each step of biochemical conversion, especially when processing woody biomass. In addition to technical and scale-up issues within each step of the bioconversion process, biomass feedstock supply and logistics challenges still remain at the forefront of biorefinery research.« less

  19. CO(2) fixation through hydrogenation by chemical or enzymatic methods.

    PubMed

    Beller, Matthias; Bornscheuer, Uwe T

    2014-04-25

    Two birds with one stone: The simulaneous fixation of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide and storage of the alternative fuel hydrogen can be accomplished with the formation of formic acid. In principle, this is now possible either with an enzymatic system based on a newly discovered bacterial hydrogen-dependent carbon dioxide reductase or by using organometallic catalysts at room temperature and ambient pressure. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Recent Trends in Quantum Chemical Modeling of Enzymatic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Himo, Fahmi

    2017-05-24

    The quantum chemical cluster approach is a powerful method for investigating enzymatic reactions. Over the past two decades, a large number of highly diverse systems have been studied and a great wealth of mechanistic insight has been developed using this technique. This Perspective reviews the current status of the methodology. The latest technical developments are highlighted, and challenges are discussed. Some recent applications are presented to illustrate the capabilities and progress of this approach, and likely future directions are outlined.

  1. Rapid non-enzymatic extraction method for isolating PCR-quality camelpox virus DNA from skin.

    PubMed

    Yousif, A Ausama; Al-Naeem, A Abdelmohsen; Al-Ali, M Ahmad

    2010-10-01

    Molecular diagnostic investigations of orthopoxvirus (OPV) infections are performed using a variety of clinical samples including skin lesions, tissues from internal organs, blood and secretions. Skin samples are particularly convenient for rapid diagnosis and molecular epidemiological investigations of camelpox virus (CMLV). Classical extraction procedures and commercial spin-column-based kits are time consuming, relatively expensive, and require multiple extraction and purification steps in addition to proteinase K digestion. A rapid non-enzymatic procedure for extracting CMLV DNA from dried scabs or pox lesions was developed to overcome some of the limitations of the available DNA extraction techniques. The procedure requires as little as 10mg of tissue and produces highly purified DNA [OD(260)/OD(280) ratios between 1.47 and 1.79] with concentrations ranging from 6.5 to 16 microg/ml. The extracted CMLV DNA was proven suitable for virus-specific qualitative and, semi-quantitative PCR applications. Compared to spin-column and conventional viral DNA extraction techniques, the two-step extraction procedure saves money and time, and retains the potential for automation without compromising CMLV PCR sensitivity. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Enzymatic saccharification and fermentation of cellulosic date palm wastes to glucose and lactic acid

    PubMed Central

    Alrumman, Sulaiman A.

    2016-01-01

    The bioconversion of cellulosic wastes into high-value bio-products by saccharification and fermentation processes is an important step that can reduce the environmental pollution caused by agricultural wastes. In this study, enzymatic saccharification of treated and untreated date palm cellulosic wastes by the cellulases from Geobacillus stearothermophilus was optimized. The alkaline pre-treatment of the date palm wastes was found to be effective in increasing the saccharification percentage. The maximum rate of saccharification was found at a substrate concentration of 4% and enzyme concentration of 30 FPU/g of substrate. The optimum pH and temperature for the bioconversions were 5.0 and 50 °C, respectively, after 24 h of incubation, with a yield of 31.56 mg/mL of glucose at a saccharification degree of 71.03%. The saccharification was increased to 94.88% by removal of the hydrolysate after 24 h by using a two-step hydrolysis. Significant lactic acid production (27.8 mg/mL) was obtained by separate saccharification and fermentation after 72 h of incubation. The results indicate that production of fermentable sugar and lactic acid is feasible and may reduce environmental pollution by using date palm wastes as a cheap substrate. PMID:26887233

  3. Enzymatic saccharification and fermentation of cellulosic date palm wastes to glucose and lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Alrumman, Sulaiman A

    2016-01-01

    The bioconversion of cellulosic wastes into high-value bio-products by saccharification and fermentation processes is an important step that can reduce the environmental pollution caused by agricultural wastes. In this study, enzymatic saccharification of treated and untreated date palm cellulosic wastes by the cellulases from Geobacillus stearothermophilus was optimized. The alkaline pre-treatment of the date palm wastes was found to be effective in increasing the saccharification percentage. The maximum rate of saccharification was found at a substrate concentration of 4% and enzyme concentration of 30 FPU/g of substrate. The optimum pH and temperature for the bioconversions were 5.0 and 50°C, respectively, after 24h of incubation, with a yield of 31.56mg/mL of glucose at a saccharification degree of 71.03%. The saccharification was increased to 94.88% by removal of the hydrolysate after 24h by using a two-step hydrolysis. Significant lactic acid production (27.8mg/mL) was obtained by separate saccharification and fermentation after 72h of incubation. The results indicate that production of fermentable sugar and lactic acid is feasible and may reduce environmental pollution by using date palm wastes as a cheap substrate. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Numerical study on flow over stepped spillway using Lagrangian method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junmin; Fu, Lei; Xu, Haibo; Jin, Yeechung

    2018-02-01

    Flow over stepped spillway has been studied for centuries, due to its unstable and the characteristics of cavity, the simulation of this type of spillway flow is always difficult. Most of the early studies of flow over stepped spillway are based on experiment, while in the recent decades, numerical studies of flow over stepped spillway draw most of the researchers’ attentions due to its simplicity and efficiency. In this study, a new Lagrangian based particle method is introduced to reproduce the phenomenon of flow over stepped spillway, the inherent advantages of this particle based method provide a convincing free surface and velocity profiles compared with previous experimental data. The capacity of this new method is proved and it is anticipated to be an alternative tool of traditional mesh based method in environmental engineering field such as the simulation of flow over stepped spillway.

  5. Path Sampling Methods for Enzymatic Quantum Particle Transfer Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Dzierlenga, M.W.; Varga, M.J.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms of enzymatic reactions are studied via a host of computational techniques. While previous methods have been used successfully, many fail to incorporate the full dynamical properties of enzymatic systems. This can lead to misleading results in cases where enzyme motion plays a significant role in the reaction coordinate, which is especially relevant in particle transfer reactions where nuclear tunneling may occur. In this chapter, we outline previous methods, as well as discuss newly developed dynamical methods to interrogate mechanisms of enzymatic particle transfer reactions. These new methods allow for the calculation of free energy barriers and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) with the incorporation of quantum effects through centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) and the full complement of enzyme dynamics through transition path sampling (TPS). Recent work, summarized in this chapter, applied the method for calculation of free energy barriers to reaction in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH). It was found that tunneling plays an insignificant role in YADH but plays a more significant role in LDH, though not dominant over classical transfer. Additionally, we summarize the application of a TPS algorithm for the calculation of reaction rates in tandem with CMD to calculate the primary H/D KIE of YADH from first principles. It was found that the computationally obtained KIE is within the margin of error of experimentally determined KIEs, and corresponds to the KIE of particle transfer in the enzyme. These methods provide new ways to investigate enzyme mechanism with the inclusion of protein and quantum dynamics. PMID:27497161

  6. Bio-nanogate controlled enzymatic reaction for virus sensing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ronghui; Xu, Lizhou; Li, Yanbin

    2015-05-15

    The objective of this study was to develop an aptamer-based bifunctional bio-nanogate, which could selectively respond to target molecules, and control enzymatic reaction for electrochemical measurements. It was successfully applied for sensitive, selective, rapid, quantitative, and label-free detection of avian influenza viruses (AIV) H5N1. A nanoporous gold film with pore size of ~20 nm was prepared by a metallic corrosion method, and the purity was checked by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) study. To improve the performance of the bio-nanogate biosensor, its main analytical parameters were studied and optimized. We demonstrated that the developed bio-nanogate was capable of controlling enzymatic reaction for AIV H5N1 sensing within 1h with a detection limit of 2(-9)HAU (hemagglutination units). The enzymatic reaction was able to cause significant current change due to the presence of target AIV. A linear relationship was found in the virus titer range of 2(-10)-2(2)HAU. No interference was observed from non-target AIV subtypes such as H1N1, H2N2, H4N8 and H7N2. The developed approach could be adopted for sensing of other viruses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Elucidation of Factors Effecting Enzymatic Saccharification using Transgenic Hardwoods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Douyong

    Three groups of transgenic wood samples were used as starting materials to elucidate the recalcitrance of enzymatic saccharification with/without pretreatments. The first group of transgenic wood samples is low lignin P. trichocarpa. The second group is low xylan P. trichocarpa. The third one is 12 hybrid poplars which have different levels of S/V ratio and lignin content. Four pretreatments were carried out in this research including dilute sulfuric acid, green liquor, auto hydrolysis and ozone delignification. The behavior among pretreatments as a function of removal of lignin appears to be different. Lignin is the major factor of recalcitrance of the lignocellulosic material to ethanol conversion process. Xylan also plays key role in this process. In addition, the crude milled wood lignin was isolated from these three groups of transgenic samples. Lignin carbohydrate complexes was characterized by 1H-13C HMQC and 13C NMR. Thus the effect of LCCs on enzymatic saccharification was elucidated. High S/V ratio propels the lignin removal during pretreatments however; high S/V ratio retards the enzymatic saccharification on the lignocellulosic material without pretreatments. The level of LCCs linkages accounts for additional recalcitrance of the lignocellulosic material to ethanol conversion process. The amount of LCCs linkages is affected by xylan content, lignin content and S/V ratio.

  8. High volumetric power density, non-enzymatic, glucose fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    Oncescu, Vlad; Erickson, David

    2013-01-01

    The development of new implantable medical devices has been limited in the past by slow advances in lithium battery technology. Non-enzymatic glucose fuel cells are promising replacement candidates for lithium batteries because of good long-term stability and adequate power density. The devices developed to date however use an “oxygen depletion design” whereby the electrodes are stacked on top of each other leading to low volumetric power density and complicated fabrication protocols. Here we have developed a novel single-layer fuel cell with good performance (2 μW cm−2) and stability that can be integrated directly as a coating layer on large implantable devices, or stacked to obtain a high volumetric power density (over 16 μW cm−3). This represents the first demonstration of a low volume non-enzymatic fuel cell stack with high power density, greatly increasing the range of applications for non-enzymatic glucose fuel cells. PMID:23390576

  9. Recent Research Trends on the Enzymatic Synthesis of Structured Lipids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung Hee; Akoh, Casimir C

    2015-08-01

    Structured lipids (SLs) are lipids that have been chemically or enzymatically modified from their natural biosynthetic form. Because SLs are made to possess desired nutritional, physicochemical, or textural properties for various applications in the food industry, many research activities have been aimed at their commercialization. The production of SLs by enzymatic procedures has a great potential in the future market because of the specificity of lipases and phospholipases used as the biocatalysts. The aim of this review is to provide concise information on the recent research trends on the enzymatic synthesis of SLs of commercial interest, such as medium- and long-chain triacylglycerols, human milk fat substitutes, cocoa butter equivalents, trans-free or low-trans plastic fats (such as margarines and shortenings), low-calorie fats/oils, health-beneficial fatty acid-rich fats/oils, mono- or diacylglycerols, and structurally modified phospholipids. This limited review covers 108 research articles published between 2010 and 2014 which were searched in Web of Science. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  10. Enzymatic treatment to improve the quality of black tea extracts.

    PubMed

    Chandini, S K; Rao, L Jaganmohan; Gowthaman, M K; Haware, D J; Subramanian, R

    2011-08-01

    Enzymatic extraction was investigated to improve the quality of black tea extracts with pretreatment of pectinase and tannase independently, successively and simultaneously. Pectinase improved the extractable-solids-yield (ESY) up to 11.5%, without much of an improvement in polyphenols recovery, while tannase pre-treatment showed a significant improvement in polyphenols recovery (14.3%) along with an 11.1% improvement in ESY. Among the four treatments, tannase-alone treatment showed the maximum improvement in tea quality, with higher polyphenols-in-extracted solids. Treatments involving tannase resulted in the significant release of gallic acid, due to its hydrolytic activity, leading to greater solubility besides favourably improving TF/TR ratio. The results suggested that employing a single enzyme, tannase, for the pre-treatment of black tea is desirable. Enzymatic extraction may be preferred over enzymatic clarification as it not only displayed reduction in tea cream and turbidity but also improved the recovery of polyphenols and ESY in the extract, as well as maintaining a good balance of tea quality. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Enzymatic and free radical formation of cis- and trans- epoxyeicosatrienoic acids in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Aliwarga, Theresa; Raccor, Brianne S; Lemaitre, Rozenn N; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Gharib, Sina A; Xu, Libin; Totah, Rheem A

    2017-11-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are metabolites of arachidonic acid (AA) oxidation that have important cardioprotective and signaling properties. AA is an ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) that is prone to autoxidation. Although hydroperoxides and isoprostanes are major autoxidation products of AA, EETs are also formed from the largely overlooked peroxyl radical addition mechanism. While autoxidation yields both cis- and trans-EETs, cytochrome P450 (CYP) epoxygenases have been shown to exclusively catalyze the formation of all regioisomer cis-EETs, on each of the double bonds. In plasma and red blood cell (RBC) membranes, cis- and trans-EETs have been observed, and both have multiple physiological functions. We developed a sensitive ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) assay that separates cis- and trans- isomers of EETs and applied it to determine the relative distribution of cis- vs. trans-EETs in reaction mixtures of AA subjected to free radical oxidation in benzene and liposomes in vitro. We also determined the in vivo distribution of EETs in several tissues, including human and mouse heart, and RBC membranes. We then measured EET levels in heart and RBC of young mice compared to old. Formation of EETs in free radical reactions of AA in benzene and in liposomes exhibited time- and AA concentration-dependent increase and trans-EET levels were higher than cis-EETs under both conditions. In contrast, cis-EET levels were overall higher in biological samples. In general, trans-EETs increased with mouse age more than cis-EETs. We propose a mechanism for the non-enzymatic formation of cis- and trans-EETs involving addition of the peroxyl radical to one of AA's double bonds followed by bond rotation and intramolecular homolytic substitution (S H i). Enzymatic formation of cis-EETs by cytochrome P450 most likely occurs via a one-step concerted mechanism that does not allow bond rotation. The ability to accurately measure

  12. Evaluation of lime and hydrothermal pretreatments for efficient enzymatic hydrolysis of raw sugarcane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Maira Prearo; Marques, Marina Paganini; Laluce, Cecília; Cilli, Eduardo Maffud; Sponchiado, Sandra Regina Pombeiro

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol production from sugarcane bagasse requires a pretreatment step to disrupt the cellulose-hemicellulose-lignin complex and to increase biomass digestibility, thus allowing the obtaining of high yields of fermentable sugars for the subsequent fermentation. Hydrothermal and lime pretreatments have emerged as effective methods in preparing the lignocellulosic biomass for bioconversion. These pretreatments are advantageous because they can be performed under mild temperature and pressure conditions, resulting in less sugar degradation compared with other pretreatments, and also are cost-effective and environmentally sustainable. In this study, we evaluated the effect of these pretreatments on the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis of raw sugarcane bagasse obtained directly from mill without prior screening. In addition, we evaluated the structure and composition modifications of this bagasse after lime and hydrothermal pretreatments. The highest cellulose hydrolysis rate (70 % digestion) was obtained for raw sugarcane bagasse pretreated with lime [0.1 g Ca(OH)2/g raw] for 60 min at 120 °C compared with hydrothermally pretreated bagasse (21 % digestion) under the same time and temperature conditions. Chemical composition analyses showed that the lime pretreatment of bagasse promoted high solubilization of lignin (30 %) and hemicellulose (5 %) accompanied by a cellulose accumulation (11 %). Analysis of pretreated bagasse structure revealed that lime pretreatment caused considerable damage to the bagasse fibers, including rupture of the cell wall, exposing the cellulose-rich areas to enzymatic action. We showed that lime pretreatment is effective in improving enzymatic digestibility of raw sugarcane bagasse, even at low lime loading and over a short pretreatment period. It was also demonstrated that this pretreatment caused alterations in the structure and composition of raw bagasse, which had a pronounced effect on the enzymes accessibility to the

  13. Measurement of citrate in urine using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry: comparison with an enzymatic method.

    PubMed

    Keevil, B G; Owen, L; Thornton, S; Kavanagh, J

    2005-09-01

    Measurement of urine citrate is used to assess the risk of further urinary stone formation and to assess the benefit of treatment in affected individuals. We wanted to develop a simple and rapid liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for the analysis of urinary citrate and to compare it with our current enzymatic assay. For the LC-MS/MS assay, samples were prepared in a deep-well block by adding 10 microL of urine and 20 microL of internal standard to 400 microL of water. After mixing, 3 microL of the diluted sample was injected into the LC-MS/MS system. An LC system was used to isocratically elute a C18 column (50 x 2.1 mm) with 0.4 mL/min water containing 2 mmol/L ammonium acetate and 0.1% (v/v) formic acid. A step gradient of 100% methanol containing 2 mmol/L ammonium acetate and 0.1% (v/v) formic acid was used to wash the column. The retention times were 1.4 min for citrate and 1.4 min for d4-citrate. Cycle time was 4.0 min, injection to injection. The analytes were monitored using a tandem mass spectrometer operated in multiple reaction monitoring mode using the following transitions, citrate m/z 191.0>111.0 and d4-citrate m/z 195.0>113.0. Within and between-batch coefficients of variation were <3% over the range 480-3800 micromol/L. The lower limit of quantification was 24.0 micromol/L. Regression analysis showed LC-MS/MS = 0.8781 (enzymatic assay) + 102.5, r = 0.964, n = 73. We have developed a simple LC-MS/MS method for urinary citrate measurement that shows acceptable performance.

  14. Ethanol production from cashew apple bagasse: improvement of enzymatic hydrolysis by microwave-assisted alkali pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Tigressa Helena Soares; Rocha, Maria Valderez Ponte; de Macedo, Gorete Ribeiro; Gonçalves, Luciana R B

    2011-07-01

    In this work, the potential of microwave-assisted alkali pretreatment in order to improve the rupture of the recalcitrant structures of the cashew able bagasse (CAB), lignocellulosic by-product in Brazil with no commercial value, is obtained from cashew apple process to juice production, was studied. First, biomass composition of CAB was determined, and the percentage of glucan and lignin was 20.54 ± 0.70% and 33.80 ± 1.30%, respectively. CAB content in terms of cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin, 19.21 ± 0.35%, 12.05 ± 0.37%, and 38.11 ± 0.08%, respectively, was also determined. Results showed that, after enzymatic hydrolysis, alkali concentration exerted influence on glucose formation, after pretreatment with 0.2 and 1.0 mo L(-1) of NaOH (372 ± 12 and 355 ± 37 mg g(glucan)(-1) ) when 2% (w/v) of cashew apple bagasse pretreated by microwave-assisted alkali pretreatment (CAB-M) was used. On the other hand, pretreatment time (15-30 min) and microwave power (600-900 W) exerted no significant effect on hydrolysis. On enzymatic hydrolysis step, improvement on solid percentage (16% w/v) and enzyme load (30 FPU g (CAB-M) (-1) ) increased glucose concentration to 15 g L(-1). The fermentation of the hydrolyzate by Saccharomyces cerevesiae resulted in ethanol concentration and productivity of 5.6 g L(-1) and 1.41 g L(-1) h(-1), respectively.

  15. Flow electrochemical biosensors based on enzymatic porous reactor and tubular detector of silver solid amalgam.

    PubMed

    Josypčuk, Bohdan; Barek, Jiří; Josypčuk, Oksana

    2013-05-17

    A flow amperometric enzymatic biosensor for the determination of glucose was constructed. The biosensor consists of a flow reactor based on porous silver solid amalgam (AgSA) and a flow tubular detector based on compact AgSA. The preparation of the sensor and the determination of glucose occurred in three steps. First, a self-assembled monolayer of 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) was formed at the porous surface of the reactor. Second, enzyme glucose oxidase (GOx) was covalently immobilized at MUA-layer using N-ethyl-N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carboimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide chemistry. Finally, a decrease of oxygen concentration (directly proportional to the concentration of glucose) during enzymatic reaction was amperometrically measured on the tubular detector under flow injection conditions. The following parameters of glucose determination were optimized with respect to amperometric response: composition of the mobile phase, its concentration, the potential of detection and the flow rate. The calibration curve of glucose was linear in the concentration range of 0.02-0.80 mmol L(-1) with detection limit of 0.01 mmol L(-1). The content of glucose in the sample of honey was determined as 35.5±1.0 mass % (number of the repeated measurements n=7; standard deviation SD=1.2%; relative standard deviation RSD=3.2%) which corresponds well with the declared values. The tested biosensor proved good long-term stability (77% of the current response of glucose was retained after 35 days). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Enzymatic catalysis of formation of Z-aspartame in ionic liquid - An alternative to enzymatic catalysis in organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Erbeldinger, M; Mesiano, A J; Russell, A J

    2000-01-01

    We present the first report of enzymatic catalysis in an ionic liquid. The virtually nonexistent vapor pressure makes ionic liquids an exciting new alternative for enzyme-catalyzed syntheses in environmentally friendly environments. Z-aspartame was synthesized in a thermolysin-catalyzed reaction of carbobenzoxy-L-aspartate and L-phenylalanine methyl ester hydrochloride in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BP6). Ionic liquids such as BP6 are thermally stable and have a remarkable range of temperatures over which they remain liquid (300 degrees C). With an initial rate of 1.2 +/- 0.1 nmol min(-)(1) mg(-)(1), we observed a competitive rate in comparison to that of enzymatic synthesis in organic solvent. Additionally, the enzyme exhibits outstanding stability, which would normally require immobilization.

  17. Evaluation of in vitro enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant properites of leaf extract from Alpinia Purpurata (Vieill.) K. Schum.

    PubMed

    Raj, Chinthamony Arul; Ragavendran, Paramasivam; Sophia, Dominic; Starlin, Thangarajan; Rathi, Muthian Ahalliya; Gopalakrishnan, Velliyur Kanniappan

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants of leaf extract from Alpinia purpurata. One gram of fresh leaf of Alpinia purpurata was grinded in 2 mL of 50% ethanol and centrifuged at 10,000×g at 4°C for 10 min. The supernatant obtained was used within 4 h for various enzymatic antioxidants assays like superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione S-transferase (GST), ascorbate oxidase, peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and non-enzymatic antioxidants such as vitamin C, total reduced glutathione (TRG) and lipid peroxidation (LPO). The leaf extract of Alpinia purpurata possess antioxidants like vitamin C 472.92±6.80 μg/mg protein, GST 372.11±5.70 μmol of 1-chloro 2,4 dinitrobenzene (CDNB)-reduced glutathione (GSH) conjugate formed/min/mg protein, GPx 281.69±6.43 μg of glutathione oxidized/min/mg protein, peroxidases 173.12±9.40 μmol/g tissue, TRG 75.27±3.55 μg/mg protein, SOD 58.03±2.11 U/mg protein, CAT 46.70±2.35 μmol of H2O2 consumed/min/mg protein in high amount whereas ascorbate oxidase 17.41±2.46 U/g tissue, LPO 2.71±0.14 nmol/L of malondialdehyde formed/min/mg protein and PPO 1.14±0.11 μmol/g tissue in moderate amount. Alpinia purpurata has the potential to scavenge the free radicals and protect against oxidative stress causing diseases. In future, Alpinia purpurata may serve as a good pharmacotherapeutic agent.

  18. Swimming training attenuates oxidative damage and increases enzymatic but not non-enzymatic antioxidant defenses in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Nonato, L F; Rocha-Vieira, E; Tossige-Gomes, R; Soares, A A; Soares, B A; Freitas, D A; Oliveira, M X; Mendonça, V A; Lacerda, A C; Massensini, A R; Leite, H R

    2016-09-29

    Although it is well known that physical training ameliorates brain oxidative function after injuries by enhancing the levels of neurotrophic factors and oxidative status, there is little evidence addressing the influence of exercise training itself on brain oxidative damage and data is conflicting. This study investigated the effect of well-established swimming training protocol on lipid peroxidation and components of antioxidant system in the rat brain. Male Wistar rats were randomized into trained (5 days/week, 8 weeks, 30 min; n=8) and non-trained (n=7) groups. Forty-eight hours after the last session of exercise, animals were euthanized and the brain was collected for oxidative stress analysis. Swimming training decreased thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) levels (P<0.05) and increased the activity of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) (P<0.05) with no effect on brain non-enzymatic total antioxidant capacity, estimated by FRAP (ferric-reducing antioxidant power) assay (P>0.05). Moreover, the swimming training promoted metabolic adaptations, such as increased maximal workload capacity (P<0.05) and maintenance of body weight. In this context, the reduced TBARS content and increased SOD antioxidant activity induced by 8 weeks of swimming training are key factors in promoting brain resistance. In conclusion, swimming training attenuated oxidative damage and increased enzymatic antioxidant but not non-enzymatic status in the rat brain.

  19. Step-by-step integration for fractional operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colinas-Armijo, Natalia; Di Paola, Mario

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, an approach based on the definition of the Riemann-Liouville fractional operators is proposed in order to provide a different discretisation technique as alternative to the Grünwald-Letnikov operators. The proposed Riemann-Liouville discretisation consists of performing step-by-step integration based upon the discretisation of the function f(t). It has been shown that, as f(t) is discretised as stepwise or piecewise function, the Riemann-Liouville fractional integral and derivative are governing by operators very similar to the Grünwald-Letnikov operators. In order to show the accuracy and capabilities of the proposed Riemann-Liouville discretisation technique and the Grünwald-Letnikov discrete operators, both techniques have been applied to: unit step functions, exponential functions and sample functions of white noise.

  20. A novel two-step procedure to expand Sca-1+ cells clonally

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yao Liang; Shen, Leping; Qian, Keping; Phillips, M. Ian

    2007-01-01

    Resident cardiac stem cells (CSCs) are characterized by their capacity to self-renew in culture, and are multi-potent for forming normal cell types in hearts. CSCs were originally isolated directly from enzymatically digested hearts using stem cell markers. However, long exposure to enzymatic digestion can affect the integrity of stem cell markers on the cell surface, and also compromise stem cell function. Alternatively resident CSCs can migrate from tissue explant and form cardiospheres in culture. However, fibroblast contamination can easily occur during CSC culture. To avoid these problems, we developed a two-step procedure by growing the cells before selecting the Sca1+ cells and culturing in cardiac fibroblast conditioned medium, they avoid fibroblast overgrowth. PMID:17577582

  1. Nature and position of functional group on thiopurine substrates influence activity of xanthine oxidase--enzymatic reaction pathways of 6-mercaptopurine and 2-mercaptopurine are different.

    PubMed

    Tamta, Hemlata; Kalra, Sukirti; Thilagavathi, Ramasamy; Chakraborti, Asit K; Mukhopadhyay, Anup K

    2007-02-01

    Xanthine oxidase-catalyzed hydroxylation reactions of the anticancer drug 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) and its analog 2-mercaptopurine (2-MP) as well as 6-thioxanthine (6-TX) and 2-thioxanthine (2-TX) have been studied using UV-spectroscopy, high pressure liquid chromatography, photodiode array, and liquid chromatography-based mass spectral analysis. It is shown that 6-MP and 2-MP are oxidatively hydroxylated through different pathways. Enzymatic hydroxylation of 6-MP forms 6-thiouric acid in two steps involving 6-TX as the intermediate, whereas 2-MP is converted to 8-hydroxy-2-mercaptopurine as the expected end product in one step. Surprisingly, in contrast to the other thiopurines, enzymatic hydroxylation of 2-MP showed a unique hyperchromic effect at 264 nm as the reaction proceeded. However, when 2-TX is used as the substrate, it is hydroxylated to 2-thiouric acid. The enzymatic hydroxylation of 2-MP is considerably faster than that of 6-MP, while 6-TX and 2-TX show similar rates under identical reaction conditions. The reason why 2-MP is a better substrate than 6-MP and how the chemical nature and position of the functional groups present on the thiopurine substrates influence xanthine oxidase activity are discussed.

  2. Partial Return Yoke for MICE Step IV and Final Step

    SciT

    Witte, Holger; Plate, Stephen; Berg, J.Scott

    2015-06-01

    This paper reports on the progress of the design and construction of a retro-fitted return yoke for the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). MICE is a proof-of-principle experiment aiming to demonstrate ionization cooling experimentally. In earlier studies we outlined how a partial return yoke can be used to mitigate stray magnetic field in the experimental hall; we report on the progress of the construction of the partial return yoke for MICE Step IV. We also discuss an extension of the Partial Return Yoke for the final step of MICE; we show simulation results of the expected performance.

  3. Partial return yoke for MICE step IV and final step

    SciT

    Witte, H.; Plate, S.; Berg, J. S.

    2015-05-03

    This paper reports on the progress of the design and construction of a retro-fitted return yoke for the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). MICE is a proof-of-principle experiment aiming to demonstrate ionization cooling experimentally. In earlier studies we outlined how a partial return yoke can be used to mitigate stray magnetic field in the experimental hall; we report on the progress of the construction of the partial return yoke for MICE Step IV. We also discuss an extension of the Partial Return Yoke for the final step of MICE; we show simulation results of the expected performance.

  4. A step-by-step methodology for enterprise interoperability projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalmeta, Ricardo; Pazos, Verónica

    2015-05-01

    Enterprise interoperability is one of the key factors for enhancing enterprise competitiveness. Achieving enterprise interoperability is an extremely complex process which involves different technological, human and organisational elements. In this paper we present a framework to help enterprise interoperability. The framework has been developed taking into account the three domains of interoperability: Enterprise Modelling, Architecture and Platform and Ontologies. The main novelty of the framework in comparison to existing ones is that it includes a step-by-step methodology that explains how to carry out an enterprise interoperability project taking into account different interoperability views, like business, process, human resources, technology, knowledge and semantics.

  5. Step-by-step growth of complex oxide microstructures

    SciT

    Datskos, Panos G.; Cullen, David A.; Sharma, Jaswinder K.

    The synthesis of complex and hybrid oxide microstructures is of fundamental interest and practical applications. However, the design and synthesis of such structures is a challenging task. A solution-phase process to synthesize complex silica and silica-titania hybrid microstructures was developed by exploiting the emulsion-droplet-based step-by-step growth featuring shape control. Lastly, the strategy is robust and can be extended to the preparation of complex hybrid structures consisting of two or more materials, with each having its own shape.

  6. Step-by-step growth of complex oxide microstructures

    DOE PAGES

    Datskos, Panos G.; Cullen, David A.; Sharma, Jaswinder K.

    2015-06-10

    The synthesis of complex and hybrid oxide microstructures is of fundamental interest and practical applications. However, the design and synthesis of such structures is a challenging task. A solution-phase process to synthesize complex silica and silica-titania hybrid microstructures was developed by exploiting the emulsion-droplet-based step-by-step growth featuring shape control. Lastly, the strategy is robust and can be extended to the preparation of complex hybrid structures consisting of two or more materials, with each having its own shape.

  7. Step Bunching: Influence of Impurities and Solution Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, A. A.; Vekilov, P. G.; Coriell, S. R.; Murray, B. T.; McFadden, G. B.

    1999-01-01

    Step bunching results in striations even at relatively early stages of its development and in inclusions of mother liquor at the later stages. Therefore, eliminating step bunching is crucial for high crystal perfection. At least 5 major effects causing and influencing step bunching are known: (1) Basic morphological instability of stepped interfaces. It is caused by concentration gradient in the solution normal to the face and by the redistribution of solute tangentially to the interface which redistribution enhances occasional perturbations in step density due to various types of noise; (2) Aggravation of the above basic instability by solution flowing tangentially to the face in the same directions as the steps or stabilization of equidistant step train if these flows are antiparallel; (3) Enhanced bunching at supersaturation where step velocity v increases with relative supersaturation s much faster than linear. This v(s) dependence is believed to be associated with impurities. The impurities of which adsorption time is comparable with the time needed to deposit one lattice layer may also be responsible for bunching; (4) Very intensive solution flow stabilizes growing interface even at parallel solution and step flows; (5) Macrosteps were observed to nucleate at crystal corners and edges. Numerical simulation, assuming step-step interactions via surface diffusion also show that step bunching may be induced by random step nucleation at the facet edge and by discontinuity in the step density (a ridge) somewhere in the middle of a face. The corresponding bunching patterns produce the ones observed in experiment. The nature of step bunching generated at the corners and edges and by dislocation step sources, as well as the also relative importance and interrelations between mechanisms 1-5 is not clear, both from experimental and theoretical standpoints. Furthermore, several laws controlling the evolution of existing step bunches have been suggested, though

  8. High accuracy step gauge interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byman, V.; Jaakkola, T.; Palosuo, I.; Lassila, A.

    2018-05-01

    Step gauges are convenient transfer standards for the calibration of coordinate measuring machines. A novel interferometer for step gauge calibrations implemented at VTT MIKES is described. The four-pass interferometer follows Abbe’s principle and measures the position of the inductive probe attached to a measuring head. The measuring head of the instrument is connected to a balanced boom above the carriage by a piezo translation stage. A key part of the measuring head is an invar structure on which the inductive probe and the corner cubes of the measuring arm of the interferometer are attached. The invar structure can be elevated so that the probe is raised without breaking the laser beam. During probing, the bending of the probe and the interferometer readings are recorded and the measurement face position is extrapolated to zero force. The measurement process is fully automated and the face positions of the steps can be measured up to a length of 2 m. Ambient conditions are measured continuously and the refractive index of air is compensated for. Before measurements the step gauge is aligned with an integrated 2D coordinate measuring system. The expanded uncertainty of step gauge calibration is U=\\sqrt{{{(64 nm)}2}+{{(88× {{10}-9}L)}2}} .

  9. Oxidative stress induced oligomerization inhibits the activity of the non-receptor tyrosine phosphatase STEP61

    PubMed Central

    Deb, Ishani; Poddar, Ranjana; Paul, Surojit

    2011-01-01

    The neuron-specific tyrosine phosphatase STEP (STriatal Enriched Phosphatase) is emerging as an important mediator of glutamatergic transmission in the brain. STEP is also thought to be involved in the etiology of neurodegenerative disorders that are linked to oxidative stress such as Alzheimer's disease and cerebral ischemia. However the mechanism by which oxidative stress can modulate STEP activity is still unclear. In the present study we have investigated whether dimerization may play a role in regulating the activity of STEP. Our findings show that STEP61, the membrane associated isoform, can undergo homodimerization under basal conditions in neurons. Dimerization of STEP61 involves intermolecular disulfide bond formation between two cysteine residues (Cys 65 and Cys 76 respectively) present in the hydrophobic region at the N-terminus specific to STEP61. Oxidative stress-induced by hydrogen peroxide leads to a significant increase in the formation of dimers and higher order oligomers of STEP61. Using two substrates, para-nitrophenylphosphate and ERK MAPK we further demonstrate that oligomerization leads to a significant reduction in its enzymatic activity. PMID:21198639

  10. First Step to Success. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2012

    2012-01-01

    "First Step to Success" is an early intervention program designed to help children who are at risk for developing aggressive or antisocial behavioral patterns. The program uses a trained behavior coach who works with each student and his or her class peers, teacher, and parents for approximately 50 to 60 hours over a three-month period.…

  11. From raw material to dish: pasta quality step by step.

    PubMed

    Sicignano, Angelo; Di Monaco, Rossella; Masi, Paolo; Cavella, Silvana

    2015-10-01

    Pasta is a traditional Italian cereal-based food that is popular worldwide because of its convenience, versatility, sensory and nutritional value. The aim of this review is to present a step-by-step guide to facilitate the understanding of the most important events that can affect pasta characteristics, directing the reader to the appropriate production steps. Owing to its unique flavor, color, composition and rheological properties, durum wheat semolina is the best raw material for pasta production. Although pasta is traditionally made from only two ingredients, sensory quality and chemical/physical characteristics of the final product may vary greatly. Starting from the same ingredients, there are a lot of different events in each step of pasta production that can result in the development of varieties of pasta with different characteristics. In particular, numerous studies have demonstrated the importance of temperature and humidity conditions of the pasta drying operation as well as the significance of the choice of raw material and operating conditions on pasta quality. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Step-by-step management of refractory gastresophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Hershcovici, T; Fass, R

    2013-01-01

    Up to a third of the patients who receive proton pump inhibitor (PPI) once daily will demonstrate lack or partial response to treatment. There are various mechanisms that contribute to PPI failure and they include residual acid reflux, weakly acidic and weakly alkaline reflux, esophageal hypersensitivity, and psychological comorbidity, among others. Some of these underlying mechanisms may coincide in the same patient. Evaluation for proper compliance and adequate dosing time of PPIs should be the first management step before ordering invasive diagnostic tests. Doubling the PPI dose or switching to another PPI is the second step of management. Upper endoscopy and pH testing appear to have limited diagnostic value in patients who failed PPI treatment. In contrast, esophageal impedance with pH testing (multichannel intraluminal impedance MII-pH) on therapy appears to provide the most insightful information about the subsequent management of these patients (step 3). In step 4, treatment should be tailored to the specific underlying mechanism of patient's PPI failure. For those who demonstrate weakly acidic or weakly alkaline reflux as the underlying cause of their residual symptoms, transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation reducers, endoscopic treatment, antireflux surgery and pain modulators should be considered. In those with functional heartburn, pain modulators are the cornerstone of therapy. © 2012 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  13. Step by Step to Your New Camp Brochure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Bill

    1993-01-01

    Describes steps in developing camp brochures: examining brochures of competing camps; deciding on a message; hiring professional designers and photographers; writing the copy; determining marketing strategies and quantity of brochures needed; reviewing final photo choices; evaluating the brochure; and planning for brochure mailings. (LP)

  14. Piezoelectric step-motion actuator

    DOEpatents

    Mentesana,; Charles, P [Leawood, KS

    2006-10-10

    A step-motion actuator using piezoelectric material to launch a flight mass which, in turn, actuates a drive pawl to progressively engage and drive a toothed wheel or rod to accomplish stepped motion. Thus, the piezoelectric material converts electrical energy into kinetic energy of the mass, and the drive pawl and toothed wheel or rod convert the kinetic energy of the mass into the desired rotary or linear stepped motion. A compression frame may be secured about the piezoelectric element and adapted to pre-compress the piezoelectric material so as to reduce tensile loads thereon. A return spring may be used to return the mass to its resting position against the compression frame or piezoelectric material following launch. Alternative embodiment are possible, including an alternative first embodiment wherein two masses are launched in substantially different directions, and an alternative second embodiment wherein the mass is eliminated in favor of the piezoelectric material launching itself.

  15. A mechanism for leader stepping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, U.; Carlson, B. E.; Koehn, C.

    2013-12-01

    The stepping of negative leaders is well observed, but not well understood. A major problem consists of the fact that the streamer corona is typically invisible within a thunderstorm, but determines the evolution of a leader. Motivated by recent observations of streamer and leader formation in the laboratory by T.M.P. Briels, S. Nijdam, P. Kochkin, A.P.J. van Deursen et al., by recent simulations of these processes by J. Teunissen, A. Sun et al., and by our theoretical understanding of the process, we suggest how laboratory phenomena can be extrapolated to lightning leaders to explain the stepping mechanism.

  16. Chemical and morphological characterization of sugarcane bagasse submitted to a delignification process for enhanced enzymatic digestibility

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In recent years, biorefining of lignocellulosic biomass to produce multi-products such as ethanol and other biomaterials has become a dynamic research area. Pretreatment technologies that fractionate sugarcane bagasse are essential for the successful use of this feedstock in ethanol production. In this paper, we investigate modifications in the morphology and chemical composition of sugarcane bagasse submitted to a two-step treatment, using diluted acid followed by a delignification process with increasing sodium hydroxide concentrations. Detailed chemical and morphological characterization of the samples after each pretreatment condition, studied by high performance liquid chromatography, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance, diffuse reflectance Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, is reported, together with sample crystallinity and enzymatic digestibility. Results Chemical composition analysis performed on samples obtained after different pretreatment conditions showed that up to 96% and 85% of hemicellulose and lignin fractions, respectively, were removed by this two-step method when sodium hydroxide concentrations of 1% (m/v) or higher were used. The efficient lignin removal resulted in an enhanced hydrolysis yield reaching values around 100%. Considering the cellulose loss due to the pretreatment (maximum of 30%, depending on the process), the total cellulose conversion increases significantly from 22.0% (value for the untreated bagasse) to 72.4%. The delignification process, with consequent increase in the cellulose to lignin ratio, is also clearly observed by nuclear magnetic resonance and diffuse reflectance Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy experiments. We also demonstrated that the morphological changes contributing to this remarkable improvement occur as a consequence of lignin removal from the sample. Bagasse unstructuring is favored by the loss of cohesion between neighboring cell walls, as

  17. On the levels of enzymatic substrate specificity: Implications for the early evolution of metabolic pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazcano, A.; Diaz-Villagomez, E.; Mills, T.; Oro, J.

    1995-01-01

    The most frequently invoked explanation for the origin of metabolic pathways is the retrograde evolution hypothesis. In contrast, according to the so-called 'patchwork' theory, metabolism evolved by the recruitment of relatively inefficient small enzymes of broad specificity that could react with a wide range of chemically related substrates. In this paper it is argued that both sequence comparisons and experimental results on enzyme substrate specificity support the patchwork assembly theory. The available evidence supports previous suggestions that gene duplication events followed by a gradual neoDarwinian accumulation of mutations and other minute genetic changes lead to the narrowing and modification of enzyme function in at least some primordial metabolic pathways.

  18. Peptide hydrogelation triggered by enzymatic induced pH switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wei; Li, Ying

    2016-07-01

    It remains challenging to develop methods that can precisely control the self-assembling kinetics and thermodynamics of peptide hydrogelators to achieve hydrogels with optimal properties. Here we report the hydrogelation of peptide hydrogelators by an enzymatically induced pH switch, which involves the combination of glucose oxidase and catalase with D-glucose as the substrate, in which both the gelation kinetics and thermodynamics can be controlled by the concentrations of D-glucose. This novel hydrogelation method could result in hydrogels with higher mechanical stability and lower hydrogelation concentrations. We further illustrate the application of this hydrogelation method to differentiate different D-glucose levels.

  19. Non-enzymatic oxidation of NADH by quinones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherbak, Nikolai; Strid, Åke; Eriksson, Leif A.

    2005-10-01

    Non-enzymatic oxidation of NADH by a large number of different quinones has been explored both theoretically and experimentally. It is concluded that the smaller benzo- and naphtho-quinones are capable of oxidising NADH in aqueous solution, whereas the larger anthraquinone is not. The mechanisms of stepwise electron and proton transfers are explored, and ruled out in favour of direct hydride transfer. For menadione (2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone), no reaction is observed experimentally; theoretically we find that there is a very close balance between the energetic cost of hydride removal from NADH and the energy gain of formation of the menadione semiquinone radical anion.

  20. Polymersome nanoreactors for enzymatic ring-opening polymerization.

    PubMed

    Nallani, Madhavan; de Hoog, Hans-Peter M; Cornelissen, Jeroen J L M; Palmans, Anja R A; van Hest, Jan C M; Nolte, Roeland J M

    2007-12-01

    Polystyrene-polyisocyanopeptide (PS-PIAT) polymersomes containing CALB in two different locations, one in the aqueous inner compartment and one in the bilayer, were investigated for enzymatic ring-opening polymerization of lactones in water. It is shown that the monomers 8-octanolactone and dodecalactone yield oligomers with this polymersome system. It is also observed that the polymerization activity is dependent on the position of the enzyme in the polymersome. SEM investigations show that the polymersome structures were destabilized during the polymerization. Further investigations show that the vesicular morphology of the polymersomes was destabilized only in the case of polymer product formation.

  1. Enzymatic degradation of somatostatin by rat plasma and hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Dupont, A; Alvarado-Urbina, G; Côté, J; Labrie, F

    1978-10-01

    A highly sensitive and specific radioimmunoassay for somatostatin has been used to study inactivation of the neurohormone by plasma and hypothalamic peptidase(s). Specificity of the inactivation process was indicated by the absence of interference by addition of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, oxytocin, or substance P. The inactivating ability of hypothalamic tissue and plasma was destroyed by heating and the protease inhibitor benzamidine prevented plasma activity, thus suggesting the enzymatic nature of the processes involved. The present data suggest that the inactivation of somatostatin by hypothalamus and plasma could be an important factor in the regulation of circulating somatostatin levels.

  2. One-Step Coal Liquefaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qader, S. A.

    1984-01-01

    Steam injection improves yield and quality of product. Single step process for liquefying coal increases liquid yield and reduces hydrogen consumption. Principal difference between this and earlier processes includes injection of steam into reactor. Steam lowers viscosity of liquid product, so further upgrading unnecessary.

  3. 10 Steps for Implementing Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsee, Jeff

    2002-01-01

    Offers steps for adapting the change process to institutional culture: align leadership style with organizational culture, don't overuse change missionaries, protect change agents, define the problem, maintain focus when the project drifts, identify and remove barriers before implementing action plans, assign responsibilities to individuals,…

  4. Stepping Stones to Communal Integrity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellsworth, J'Anne; Peterson, Patricia

    1997-01-01

    Using the example of a Navajo student teacher late for the first day of mentoring, steps are presented that enable parties with divergent perspectives to prevent or resolve conflicts by gaining second-person perspective, establishing a calm reflective ambiance, and seeking points of convergence. Presents 10 elements for reaching higher ground in…

  5. Design of converging stepped spillways

    Roller compacted concrete (RCC) stepped spillways are growing in popularity for providing overtopping protection for aging watershed dams with inadequate auxiliary spillway capacity and for the construction of new dams. Unobtainable land rights, topographic features, and land use changes caused by ...

  6. Cascade catalysis in membranes with enzyme immobilization for multi-enzymatic conversion of CO2 to methanol.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jianquan; Meyer, Anne S; Mateiu, R V; Pinelo, Manuel

    2015-05-25

    Facile co-immobilization of enzymes is highly desirable for bioconversion methods involving multi-enzymatic cascade reactions. Here we show for the first time that three enzymes can be immobilized in flat-sheet polymeric membranes simultaneously or separately by simple pressure-driven filtration (i.e. by directing membrane fouling formation), without any addition of organic solvent. Such co-immobilization and sequential immobilization systems were examined for the production of methanol from CO2 with formate dehydrogenase (FDH), formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FaldDH) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). Enzyme activity was fully retained by this non-covalent immobilization strategy. The two immobilization systems had similar catalytic efficiencies because the second reaction (formic acid→formaldehyde) catalyzed by FaldDH was found to be the cascade bottleneck (a threshold substrate concentration was required). Moreover, the trade-off between the mitigation of product inhibition and low substrate concentration for the adjacent enzymes probably made the co-immobilization meaningless. Thus, sequential immobilization could be used for multi-enzymatic cascade reactions, as it allowed the operational conditions for each single step to be optimized, not only during the enzyme immobilization but also during the reaction process, and the pressure-driven mass transfer (flow-through mode) could overcome the diffusion resistance between enzymes. This study not only offers a green and facile immobilization method for multi-enzymatic cascade systems, but also reveals the reaction bottleneck and provides possible solutions for the bioconversion of CO2 to methanol. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Pressure Modulation of the Enzymatic Activity of Phospholipase A2, A Putative Membrane-Associated Pressure Sensor.

    PubMed

    Suladze, Saba; Cinar, Suleyman; Sperlich, Benjamin; Winter, Roland

    2015-10-07

    Phospholipases A2 (PLA2) catalyze the hydrolysis reaction of sn-2 fatty acids of membrane phospholipids and are also involved in receptor signaling and transcriptional pathways. Here, we used pressure modulation of the PLA2 activity and of the membrane's physical-chemical properties to reveal new mechanistic information about the membrane association and subsequent enzymatic reaction of PLA2. Although the effect of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on aqueous soluble and integral membrane proteins has been investigated to some extent, its effect on enzymatic reactions operating at the water/lipid interface has not been explored, yet. This study focuses on the effect of HHP on the structure, membrane binding and enzymatic activity of membrane-associated bee venom PLA2, covering a pressure range up to 2 kbar. To this end, high-pressure Fourier-transform infrared and high-pressure stopped-flow fluorescence spectroscopies were applied. The results show that PLA2 binding to model biomembranes is not significantly affected by pressure and occurs in at least two kinetically distinct steps. Followed by fast initial membrane association, structural reorganization of α-helical segments of PLA2 takes place at the lipid water interface. FRET-based activity measurements reveal that pressure has a marked inhibitory effect on the lipid hydrolysis rate, which decreases by 75% upon compression up to 2 kbar. Lipid hydrolysis under extreme environmental conditions, such as those encountered in the deep sea where pressures up to the kbar-level are encountered, is hence markedly affected by HHP, rendering PLA2, next to being a primary osmosensor, a good candidate for a sensitive pressure sensor in vivo.

  8. Tricuspid Clip: Step-by-Step and Clinical Data.

    PubMed

    Tang, Gilbert H L

    2018-01-01

    Symptomatic severe tricuspid regurgitation (TR), if untreated, carries a dismal prognosis. These patients are at very high risk for surgical repair or replacement and transcatheter options to treat TR are emerging. More than 300 transcatheter tricuspid repairs with the MitraClip system have been performed worldwide with promising results. The TriClip system, with the MitraClip NT delivered via a dedicated tricuspid steerable guide catheter, is currently under investigation. This article describes the step-by-step technique on using the MitraClip system to perform transcatheter tricuspid repair using echocardiographic and fluoroscopic guidance. The latest data on worldwide experience with tricuspid clipping are also discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Enzymatic and non-enzymatic comparison of two different industrial tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) varieties against drought stress.

    PubMed

    Çelik, Özge; Ayan, Alp; Atak, Çimen

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the tolerance mechanisms of two industrial tomato varieties (X5671R and 5MX12956) under drought stress. 14 days-old tomato seedlings were subjected to 7 days-long drought stress by withholding irrigation. The effects of stress were determined by enzymatic and non-enzymatic parameters. The physiological damages were evaluated via lipid peroxidation ratio, total protein content, relative water content, chlorophyll content and proline accumulation. Enzymatic responses were determined by biochemical analysis and electrophoresis of SOD, APX, POX and CAT enzymes. Relative water contents of X5671R and 5MX12956 varieties at 7th day of drought were decreased to 8.4 and 12.2%, respectively. Applied drought decreased all photosynthetic pigments of X5671R and 5MX12956 varieties during the treatment period significantly comparing to the Day 0 as the control. Total protein content, lipid peroxidation and proline accumulation presented increased values in both varieties in accordance with the increasing stress intensity. According to lipid peroxidation analysis, 5MX12956 tomato variety was found more drought sensitive than X5671R variety. Antioxidative enzyme activities showed increases in both varieties as a response to drought stress, although CAT and APX activities presented decrease on the 7th day of applied stress. 7 days long drought stress differentially altered POX, APX and SOD isozyme patterns. Same POX bands were observed in both varieties with different band intensities. However, main isozyme pattern differences were obtained for SOD and APX. APX1, Fe-SOD and Cu/Zn-SOD2 isozyme bands should be evaluated to define their main role in the tolerance mechanism of both tomato varieties.

  10. Association between enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant defense mechanism with apolipoprotein E genotypes in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Kharrazi, Hadi; Vaisi-Raygani, Asad; Rahimi, Zohreh; Tavilani, Haidar; Aminian, Mahdi; Pourmotabbed, Tayebeh

    2008-08-01

    There are evidence suggesting that APOE-varepsilon4 allele play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) by reducing peripheral levels and activities of a broad spectrum of nonenzymatic and enzymatic antioxidants systems. However, the link between APOE genotype, oxidative stress, and AD has yet to be established. In this study we examined whether antioxidant defense mechanism exacerbates the risk of AD in individual carrying APOE-varepsilon4 allele in a population from Tehran, Iran. We determined the enzymatic activities of the erythrocyte Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (Cu-Zn SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), catalase (CAT) and serum level of total antioxidant status(TAS) in various APOE genotypes in 91 patients with AD and 91 healthy subjects as control group (age and sex-matched). The results showed that the TAS level and the activities of enzymatic antioxidants CAT and GSH-Px were significantly lower and the SOD activity was significantly higher in AD patients compared to controls. The AD patients with APOE-varepsilon4 allele genotype had significantly lower serum TAS concentration and lower erythrocytes GSH-Px and CAT activities (p=0.001) but significantly higher erythrocytes Cu-Zn SOD activity (p=0.001) than the non-APOE-varepsilon4 carrier AD and the control group. In addition, the association observed between the factors involved in an antioxidant defense mechanism and APOE-varepsilon4 allele in AD increased with age of the subjects. These data indicate that the reduced serum level of TAS and activity of CAT, GSH-Px and increased SOD exacerbate the risk of AD in individuals carrying APOE-varepsilon4 allele. The reduced antioxidants defense in APOE-varepsilon4 allele carrier may contribute to beta-amyloidosis. This effect, however, is more pronounced in the AD patients older than 75 years of age. This suggests that a therapeutic modality should be considered for these subjects.

  11. Evaluation of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants in seminal plasma of men with genitourinary infections, varicocele and idiopathic infertility.

    PubMed

    Micheli, L; Cerretani, D; Collodel, G; Menchiari, A; Moltoni, L; Fiaschi, A I; Moretti, E

    2016-05-01

    This study was aimed to assess the antioxidant enzymatic and non-enzymatic compounds in semen of infertile men. Seventy-four infertile patients were grouped according to their clinical diagnosis: genitourinary infection, varicocele, idiopathic infertility. Semen samples of fertile men represent the control. Semen characteristics were evaluated by light and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM data was quantified with a mathematical formula, which provides numerical scores. Spectrophotometric and HPLC methods were used to measure the amount of reduced (GSH), oxidised glutathione (GSSG), ascorbic acid (AA) and malondialdehyde (MDA, marker of lipid peroxidation) and the activity of glutathione reductase, catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase. Infertile groups showed significantly decreased values of sperm parameters vs. In infection and varicocele groups, the seminal MDA levels were significantly increased when compared to controls (p < 0.001), indicating an alteration of oxidative status and a peroxidative damage. In infection and varicocele groups, AA levels were reduced (p < 0.05) vs. control; in the varicocele group, the GSH levels were also decreased (p < 0.05). Significantly higher CAT activity was observed in infection and varicocele groups vs. fertile men (p < 0.001 and p < 0.05 respectively). The GSH/GSSG ratio was significantly decreased in varicocele and idiopathic infertility groups vs. control (p < 0.01). The study of the alteration of a single parameter of oxidative stress or of the antioxidant system may not have a relevant clinical value to estimate male fertilising potential and the background of infertility causes, since complex and multifactorial mechanisms are involved in different pathologies. In our study, each pathology is characterised by a definite pattern of markers such as MDA and enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant compounds. In the different pathologies related to infertility, the identification of the complex of

  12. Increasing Running Step Rate Reduces Patellofemoral Joint Forces

    PubMed Central

    Lenhart, Rachel L.; Thelen, Darryl G.; Wille, Christa M.; Chumanov, Elizabeth S.; Heiderscheit, Bryan C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Increasing step rate has been shown to elicit changes in joint kinematics and kinetics during running, and has been suggested as a possible rehabilitation strategy for runners with patellofemoral pain. The purpose of this study was to determine how altering step rate affects internal muscle forces and patellofemoral joint loads, and then to determine what kinematic and kinetic factors best predict changes in joint loading. Methods We recorded whole body kinematics of 30 healthy adults running on an instrumented treadmill at three step rate conditions (90%, 100%, and 110% of preferred step rate). We then used a 3D lower extremity musculoskeletal model to estimate muscle, patellar tendon, and patellofemoral joint forces throughout the running gait cycles. Additionally, linear regression analysis allowed us to ascertain the relative influence of limb posture and external loads on patellofemoral joint force. Results Increasing step rate to 110% of preferred reduced peak patellofemoral joint force by 14%. Peak muscle forces were also altered as a result of the increased step rate with hip, knee and ankle extensor forces, and hip abductor forces all reduced in mid-stance. Compared to the 90% step rate condition, there was a concomitant increase in peak rectus femoris and hamstring loads during early and late swing, respectively, at higher step rates. Peak stance phase knee flexion decreased with increasing step rate, and was found to be the most important predictor of the reduction in patellofemoral joint loading. Conclusion Increasing step rate is an effective strategy to reduce patellofemoral joint forces and could be effective in modulating biomechanical factors that can contribute to patellofemoral pain. PMID:23917470

  13. Enzymatic modification of egg lecithin to improve properties.

    PubMed

    Asomaning, Justice; Curtis, Jonathan M

    2017-04-01

    This research studied the enzymatic modification of egg yolk phospholipids and its effect on physicochemical properties. Egg yolk lipids were extracted with food grade ethanol and egg phospholipids (ePL) produced by deoiling with acetone. Vegetable oils were used to interesterify ePL utilizing Lipozyme®: sn-1,3 specific lipase. The enzymatic interesterification resulted in a single phase liquid product, whereas simple blending of the ePL and vegetable oil resulted in a product with two phases. In addition solid fat content decreased by 50% at -10°C and 94% at 35°C when compared with egg yolk lipids extract. A decrease in melting temperature resulted from the interesterification process. Interesterification improved emulsion stability index when used as an emulsifier in oil-in-water emulsion and compared to the native and soy lecithin. Enzyme reusability test showed retention of 63% activity after 10 cycles. Overall, the properties of native egg phospholipids were significantly enhanced in a potentially useful manner through interesterification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of grinding processes on enzymatic degradation of wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Silva, Gabriela Ghizzi D; Couturier, Marie; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Buléon, Alain; Rouau, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    The effectiveness of wheat straw fine to ultra-fine grindings at pilot scale was studied. The produced powders were characterised by their particle-size distribution (laser diffraction), crystallinity (WAXS) and enzymatic degradability (Trichoderma reesei enzymatic cocktail). A large range of wheat-straw powders was produced: from coarse (median particle size ∼800 μm) to fine particles (∼50 μm) using sieve-based grindings, then ultra-fine particles ∼20 μm by jet milling and ∼10 μm by ball milling. The wheat straw degradability was enhanced by the decrease of particle size until a limit: ∼100 μm, up to 36% total carbohydrate and 40% glucose hydrolysis yields. Ball milling samples overcame this limit up to 46% total carbohydrate and 72% glucose yields as a consequence of cellulose crystallinity reduction (from 22% to 13%). Ball milling appeared to be an effective pretreatment with similar glucose yield and superior carbohydrate yield compared to steam explosion pretreatment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Fluorescent pyrimidine ribonucleotide: synthesis, enzymatic incorporation and utilization

    PubMed Central

    Srivatsan, Seergazhi G.

    2008-01-01

    Fluorescent nucleobase analogs that respond to changes in their microenvironment are valuable for studying RNA structure, dynamics and recognition. The most commonly used fluorescent ribonucleoside is 2-aminopurine, a highly responsive purine analog. Responsive isosteric fluorescent pyrimidine analogs are, however, rare. Appending 5-membered aromatic heterocycles at the 5-position on a pyrimidine core has recently been found to provide a family of responsive fluorescent nucleoside analogs with emission in the visible range. To explore the potential utility of this chromophore for studying RNA–ligand interactions, an efficient incorporation method is necessary. Here we describe the synthesis of the furan-containing ribonucleoside and its triphosphate, as well as their basic photophysical characteristics. We demonstrate that T7 RNA polymerase accepts this fluorescent ribonucleoside triphosphate as a substrate in in vitro transcription reactions and very efficiently incorporates it into RNA oligonucleotides, generating fluorescent constructs. Furthermore, we utilize this triphosphate for the enzymatic preparation of a fluorescent bacterial A-site, an RNA construct of potential therapeutic utility. We show that the binding of this RNA target to aminoglycoside antibiotics, its cognate ligands, can be effectively monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy. These observations are significant since isosteric emissive U derivatives are scarce and the trivial synthesis and effective enzymatic incorporation of the furan-containing U triphosphate make it accessible to the biophysical community. PMID:17256858

  16. Direct enzymatic bioelectrocatalysis: differentiating between myth and reality

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Enzymatic bioelectrocatalysis is being increasingly exploited to better understand oxidoreductase enzymes, to develop minimalistic yet specific biosensor platforms, and to develop alternative energy conversion devices and bioelectrosynthetic devices for the production of energy and/or important chemical commodities. In some cases, these enzymes are able to electronically communicate with an appropriately designed electrode surface without the requirement of an electron mediator to shuttle electrons between the enzyme and electrode. This phenomenon has been termed direct electron transfer or direct bioelectrocatalysis. While many thorough studies have extensively investigated this fascinating feat, it is sometimes difficult to differentiate desirable enzymatic bioelectrocatalysis from electrocatalysis deriving from inactivated enzyme that may have also released its catalytic cofactor. This article will review direct bioelectrocatalysis of several oxidoreductases, with an emphasis on experiments that provide support for direct bioelectrocatalysis versus denatured enzyme or dissociated cofactor. Finally, this review will conclude with a series of proposed control experiments that could be adopted to discern successful direct electronic communication of an enzyme from its denatured counterpart. PMID:28637918

  17. Enzymatic production of pectic oligosaccharides from onion skins.

    PubMed

    Babbar, Neha; Baldassarre, Stefania; Maesen, Miranda; Prandi, Barbara; Dejonghe, Winnie; Sforza, Stefano; Elst, Kathy

    2016-08-01

    Onion skins are evaluated as a new raw material for the enzymatic production of pectic oligosaccharides (POS) with a targeted degree of polymerization (DP). The process is based on a two-stage process consisting of a chelator-based crude pectin extraction followed by a controlled enzymatic hydrolysis. Treatment of the extracted crude onion skin's pectin with various enzymes (EPG-M2, Viscozyme and Pectinase) shows that EPG-M2 is the most appropriate enzyme for tailored POS production. The experiments reveal that the highest amount of DP2 and DP3 is obtained at a time scale of 75-90min with an EPG-M2 concentration of 26IU/mL. At these conditions the production amounts 2.5-3.0% (w/w) d.m for DP2 and 5.5-5.6% (w/w) d.m for DP3 respectively. In contrast, maximum DP4 production of 5.2-5.5% (w/w) d.m. is obtained with 5.2IU/mL at a time scale of 15-30min. Detailed LC-MS analysis reveals the presence of more methylated oligomers compared to acetylated forms in the digests. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Enzymatic degradation of oligosaccharides in pinto bean flour.

    PubMed

    Song, Danfeng; Chang, Sam K C

    2006-02-22

    The use of dry edible beans is limited due to the presence of flatulence factors, the raffinose oligosaccharides. Our objective was to investigate the process for the removal of oligosaccharides from pinto bean using enzymatic treatment and to compare it to removal by soaking and cooking methods. Crude enzyme preparation was produced by six fungal species on wheat bran- and okara-based substrates with soy tofu whey. The loss of raffinose oligosaccharides after soaking pinto beans for 16 h at the room temperature was 10%, after cooking for 90 min was 52%, and after autoclaving for 30 min was 58%. On the other hand, the treatment using crude alpha-galactosidase (60 U mL(-1)) produced by Aspergillus awamori NRRL 4869 from wheat bran-based substrate with soy tofu whey on pinto bean flour for 2 h completely hydrolyzed raffinose oligosaccharides. These results supported that the enzymatic treatment was the most effective among various processing methods tested for removing the raffinose oligosaccharides, and hence, crude alpha-galactosidases from fungi have potential use in the food industry.

  19. Enzymatic Digestion of Chronic Wasting Disease Prions Bound to Soil

    PubMed Central

    SAUNDERS, SAMUEL E.; BARTZ, JASON C.; VERCAUTEREN, KURT C.; BARTELT-HUNT, SHANNON L.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) and sheep scrapie can be transmitted via indirect environmental routes, and it is known that soil can serve as a reservoir of prion infectivity. Given the strong interaction between the prion protein (PrP) and soil, we hypothesized that binding to soil enhances prion resistance to enzymatic digestion, thereby facilitating prion longevity in the environment and providing protection from host degradation. We characterized the performance of a commercially available subtilisin enzyme, the Prionzyme, to degrade soil-bound and unbound CWD and HY TME PrP as a function of pH, temperature, and treatment time. The subtilisin enzyme effectively degraded PrP adsorbed to a wide range of soils and soil minerals below the limits of detection. Signal loss occurred rapidly at high pH (12.5) and within 7 d under conditions representative of the natural environment (pH 7.4, 22°C). We observed no apparent difference in enzyme effectiveness between bound and unbound CWD PrP. Our results show that although adsorbed prions do retain relative resistance to enzymatic digestion compared with other brain homogenate proteins, they can be effectively degraded when bound to soil. Our results also suggest a topical application of a subtilisin enzyme solution may be an effective decontamination method to limit disease transmission via environmental ‘hot spots’ of prion infectivity. PMID:20450190

  20. An Enzymatic Platform for the Synthesis of Isoprenoid Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Sofia B.; Leyh, Thomas S.

    2014-01-01

    The isoprenoid family of compounds is estimated to contain ∼65,000 unique structures including medicines, fragrances, and biofuels. Due to their structural complexity, many isoprenoids can only be obtained by extraction from natural sources, an inherently risky and costly process. Consequently, the biotechnology industry is attempting to genetically engineer microorganisms that can produce isoprenoid-based drugs and fuels on a commercial scale. Isoprenoid backbones are constructed from two, five-carbon building blocks, isopentenyl 5-pyrophosphate and dimethylallyl 5-pyrophosphate, which are end-products of either the mevalonate or non-mevalonate pathways. By linking the HMG-CoA reductase pathway (which produces mevalonate) to the mevalonate pathway, these building block can be synthesized enzymatically from acetate, ATP, NAD(P)H and CoA. Here, the enzymes in these pathways are used to produce pathway intermediates and end-products in single-pot reactions and in remarkably high yield, ∼85%. A strategy for the regio-specific incorporation of isotopes into isoprenoid backbones is developed and used to synthesize a series of isotopomers of diphosphomevalonate, the immediate end-product of the mevalonate pathway. The enzymatic system is shown to be robust and capable of producing quantities of product in aqueous solutions that meet or exceed the highest levels achieved using genetically engineered organisms in high-density fermentation. PMID:25153179

  1. Multicenter evaluation of an enzymatic method for glycated albumin.

    PubMed

    Paleari, Renata; Bonetti, Graziella; Callà, Cinzia; Carta, Mariarosa; Ceriotti, Ferruccio; Di Gaetano, Nicola; Ferri, Marilisa; Guerra, Elena; Lavalle, Gabriella; Cascio, Claudia Lo; Martino, Francesca Gabriela; Montagnana, Martina; Moretti, Marco; Santini, Gabriele; Scribano, Donata; Testa, Roberto; Vero, Anna; Mosca, Andrea

    2017-06-01

    The use of glycated albumin (GA) has been proposed as an additional glycemic control marker particularly useful in intermediate-term monitoring and in situation when HbA 1c test is not reliable. We have performed the first multicenter evaluation of the analytical performance of the enzymatic method quantILab Glycated Albumin assay implemented on the most widely used clinical chemistry analyzers (i.e. Abbott Architect C8000, Beckman Coulter AU 480 and 680, Roche Cobas C6000, Siemens ADVIA 2400 and 2400 XPT). The repeatability of the GA measurement (expressed as CV, %) implemented in the participating centers ranged between 0.9% and 1.2%. The within-laboratory CVs ranged between 1.2% and 1.6%. A good alignment between laboratories was found, with correlation coefficients from 0.996 to 0.998. Linearity was confirmed in the range from 7.6 to 84.7%. The new enzymatic method for glycated albumin evaluated by our investigation is suitable for clinical use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. THE ENZYMATIC RESPONSE OF ASTROCYTES TO VARIOUS IONS IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Friede, Reinhard L.

    1964-01-01

    The effect of environmental ion concentration on the enzyme activity of astrocytes was investigated in tissue cultures of rat cerebral cortex. It was found that the oxidative enzymatic activity (succinic dehydrogenase, DPN-diaphorase, and several other enzymes) of astrocytes depended on the concentration of NaCl in the environment. This response was not specific for NaCl, but was also elicited by MgCl2 and LiCl; the response was less consistent, and often questionable for KCl. However, only NaCl could elicit enzymatic changes in astrocytes at concentrations known to be present in a living organism. Astrocytes were the only cells which responded this way; it appeared that the foot-plates were particularly involved in the response since increase of enzyme activity occurred earlier in the foot-plates than in the perikarya. It was concluded that astrocytes are metabolically involved in the maintenance of the ionic and osmotic environment of the central nervous system, particularly in regard to the active transport of sodium. PMID:14105217

  3. Use of enzymatic cleaners on US Navy ships. Research report

    SciT

    Venkatachalam, R.S.

    1996-03-01

    The Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division, conducted a study to determine the feasibility of using enzymatic and bacterial products in cleaning applications aboard U.S. Navy ships. A review of the most recent technical literature and a survey of potential suppliers were conducted. In addition, shipboard systems, subsystems and housekeeping processes were evaluated to identify suitable applications for enzymatic and bacterial cleaners. The study identified numerous commercial products that, based on manufacturers` claims, would be effective and safe for use aboard ship to clean walls, floors, galley work surfaces, engine and machine parts, drains, pipes, grease traps, collection, holding andmore » transfer (CHT) tanks, ballast tanks and bilge areas. However, the study also revealed the absence of standardized test protocols essential for validation of manufacturers` claims, and recommended the cooperative development of such protocols by representatives from the commercial sector, Government and academia. The need to obtain meaningful cost information based on actual use scenarios and to investigate any permitting issues associated with the discharge of related wastes to pierside facilities was also identified.« less

  4. Enzymatic and chemical synthesis of new anticoagulant peptides.

    PubMed

    Origone, Anabella; Bersi, Grisel; Illanes, Andrés; Sturniolo, Héctor; Liggieri, Constanza; Guzmán, Fanny; Barberis, Sonia

    2018-06-08

    In this study we report the enzymatic synthesis of N-α-[Carbobenzyloxy]-Tyr-Gln-Gln (Z-YQQ), a new anticoagulant tripeptide. It was obtained using phytoproteases from the stems and petioles of Asclepias curassavica L. as catalyst in an aqueous-organic biphasic system formed by 50% (v/v) ethyl acetate and 0.1 M Tris - HCl buffer pH 8. The resulting peptide was compared with the analogous peptide Tyr-Gln-Gln (YQQ) produced by solid-phase chemical synthesis. The in vitro anticoagulant activity of the above mentioned peptides was determined using Wiener Lab Test (Wiener, Argentina). The toxicological activity of the peptides was also determined. The enzymatically synthesized Z-YQQ peptide acted on the extrinsic pathway of the coagulation cascade, delaying the conversion time of prothrombin to thrombin and fibrinogen to fibrin by 136% and 50%, respectively, with respect to the controls. The chemically synthesized YQQ peptide acted specifically on the intrinsic pathway of the coagulation cascade, affecting factors VIII, IX, XI and XII from such cascade, and increasing the coagulation time by 105% with respect to the control. The results suggest that two new anticoagulant peptides (Z-YQQ and YQQ) can be useful for safe pharmaceutical applications. Nevertheless, some aspects related to peptide production should be optimized. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  5. Enzymatic cybernetics: an unpublished work by Jacques Monod.

    PubMed

    Gayon, Jean

    2015-06-01

    In 1959, Jacques Monod wrote a manuscript entitled Cybernétique enzymatique [Enzymatic cybernetics]. Never published, this unpublished manuscript presents a synthesis of how Monod interpreted enzymatic adaptation just before the publication of the famous papers of the 1960s on the operon. In addition, Monod offers an example of a philosophy of biology immersed in scientific investigation. Monod's philosophical thoughts are classified into two categories, methodological and ontological. On the methodological side, Monod explicitly hints at his preferences regarding the scientific method in general: hypothetical-deductive method, and use of theoretical models. He also makes heuristic proposals regarding molecular biology: the need to analyse the phenomena in question at the level of individual cells, and the dual aspect of all biological explanation, functional and evolutionary. Ontological issues deal with the notions of information and genetic determinism, "cellular memory", the irrelevance of the notion of "living matter", and the usefulness of a cybernetic comprehension of molecular biology. Copyright © 2015 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of ultrasound-induced inertial cavitation on enzymatic thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yueh-Hsun; Cheng, Po-Wen; Chen, Szu-Chia; Ruan, Jia-Ling; Li, Pai-Chi

    2010-04-01

    Cavitation induced by ultrasound enhances enzymatic fibrinolysis by increasing the transport of reactants. However, the effects of cavitation need to be fully understood before sonothrombolysis can be applied clinically. In order to understand the underlying mechanisms, we examined the effects of combining ultrasound, microbubbles and thrombolytic enzymes on thrombolysis. First, we evaluated the relations between inertial cavitation and the reduction in the weight of a blood clot. Inertial cavitation was varied by changing the amplitude and duration of the transmitted acoustic wave as well as the concentration of microbubbles used to induce cavitation. Second, we studied the combined effects of streptokinase and inertial cavitation on thrombolysis. The results show that inertial cavitation increases the weight reduction of a blood clot by up to 33.9%. With linear regression fitting, the measured differential inertial cavitation dose and the weight reduction had a correlation coefficient of 0.66. Microscopically, enzymatic thrombolysis effects manifest as multiple large cavities within the clot that are uniformly distributed on the side exposed to ultrasound. This suggests that inertial cavitation plays an important role in producing cavities, while microjetting of the microbubbles induces pits on the clot surface. These observations preliminarily demonstrate the clinical potential of sonothrombolysis. The use of the differential inertial cavitation dose as an indicator of blood clot weight loss for controlled sonothrombolysis is also possible and will be further explored.

  7. Durable antimicrobial cotton textiles coated sonochemically with ZnO nanoparticles embedded in an in-situ enzymatically generated bioadhesive.

    PubMed

    Salat, Marc; Petkova, Petya; Hoyo, Javier; Perelshtein, Ilana; Gedanken, Aharon; Tzanov, Tzanko

    2018-06-01

    An important preventive measure for providing a bacteria-free environment for the patients is the introduction of highly efficient and durable antibacterial textiles in hospitals. This work describes a single step sono-enzymatic process for coating of cotton medical textiles with antibacterial ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) and gallic acid (GA) to produce biocompatible fabrics with durable antibacterial properties. Cellulose substrates, however, need pre-activation to achieve sufficient stability of the NPs on their surface. Herein, this drawback is overcome by the simultaneous sonochemical deposition of ZnO NPs and the synthesis of a bio-based adhesive generated by the enzymatic cross-linking of GA in which the NPs were embedded. GA possesses the multiple functions of an antibacterial agent, a building block of the cross-linked phenolic network, and as a compound providing the safe contact of the coated materials with human skin. The ZnO NPs-GA coated fabrics maintained above 60% antibacterial efficacy even after 60 washing cycles at 75 °C hospital laundry regime. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Structural Elucidation of Enzymatically Synthesized Galacto-oligosaccharides Using Ion-Mobility Spectrometry-Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Carević, Milica; Bezbradica, Dejan; Banjanac, Katarina; Milivojević, Ana; Fanuel, Mathieu; Rogniaux, Hélène; Ropartz, David; Veličković, Dušan

    2016-05-11

    Galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) represent a diverse group of well-characterized prebiotic ingredients derived from lactose in a reaction catalyzed with β-galactosidases. Enzymatic transgalactosylation results in a mixture of compounds of various degrees of polymerization and types of linkages. Because structure plays an important role in terms of prebiotic activity, it is of crucial importance to provide an insight into the mechanism of transgalactosylation reaction and occurrence of different types of β-linkages during GOS synthesis. Our study proved that a novel one-step method, based on ion-mobility spectrometry-tandem mass spectrometry (IMS-MS/MS), enables complete elucidation of GOS structure. It has been shown that β-galactosidase from Aspergillus oryzae has the highest affinity toward formation of β-(1→3) or β-(1→6) linkages. Additionally, it was observed that the occurrence of different linkages varies during the reaction course, indicating that tailoring favorable GOS structures with improved prebiotic activity can be achieved by adequate control of enzymatic synthesis.

  9. Step 2: Know Your Diabetes ABCs

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Type 2 Diabetes Step 2: Know Your Diabetes ABCs Past Issues / Fall ... 2 Diabetes" Articles Diabetes Is Serious But Manageable / Step 1: Learn About Diabetes / Step 2: Know Your ...

  10. Vascular corrosion casting technique steps.

    PubMed

    Verli, Flaviana Dornela; Rossi-Schneider, Tissiana Raquel; Schneider, Felipe Luís; Yurgel, Liliane Soares; de Souza, Maria Antonieta Lopes

    2007-01-01

    The vascular corrosion casting technique produces a replica of vascular beds of normal or pathological tissues. Once associated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), this technique provides details of the three-dimensional anatomic arrangement of the vascular replica, which is the main advantage of this method. The present study is intended to describe the steps of the vascular corrosion casting technique and the different ways to perform them. them.

  11. Template-Independent Enzymatic Oligonucleotide Synthesis (TiEOS): Its History, Prospects, and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Michael A; Davis, Ronald W

    2018-03-27

    There is a growing demand for sustainable methods in research and development, where instead of hazardous chemicals, an aqueous medium is chosen to perform biological reactions. In this Perspective, we examine the history and current methodology of using enzymes to generate artificial single-stranded DNA. By using traditional solid-phase phosphoramidite chemistry as a metric, we also explore criteria for the method of template-independent enzymatic oligonucleotide synthesis (TiEOS). As its key component, we delve into the biology of one of the most enigmatic enzymes, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT). As TdT is found to exponentially increase antigen receptor diversity in the vertebrate immune system by adding nucleotides in a template-free manner, researchers have exploited this function as an alternative to the phosphoramidite synthesis method. Though TdT is currently the preferred enzyme for TiEOS, its random nucleotide incorporation presents a barrier in synthesis automation. Taking a closer look at the TiEOS cycle, particularly the coupling step, we find it is comprised of additions > n+1 and deletions. By tapping into the physical and biochemical properties of TdT, we strive to further elucidate its mercurial behavior and offer ways to better optimize TiEOS for production-grade oligonucleotide synthesis.

  12. Study of hepatitis B virus gene mutations with enzymatic colorimetry-based DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Mao, Hailei; Wang, Huimin; Zhang, Donglei; Mao, Hongju; Zhao, Jianlong; Shi, Jian; Cui, Zhichu

    2006-01-01

    To establish a modified microarray method for detecting HBV gene mutations in the clinic. Site-specific oligonucleotide probes were immobilized to microarray slides and hybridized to biotin-labeled HBV gene fragments amplified from two-step PCR. Hybridized targets were transferred to nitrocellulose membranes, followed by intensity measurement using BCIP/NBT colorimetry. HBV genes from 99 Hepatitis B patients and 40 healthy blood donors were analyzed. Mutation frequencies of HBV pre-core/core and basic core promoter (BCP) regions were found to be significantly higher in the patient group (42%, 40% versus 2.5%, 5%, P < 0.01). Compared with a traditional fluorescence method, the colorimetry method exhibited the same level of sensitivity and reproducibility. An enzymatic colorimetry-based DNA microarray assay was successfully established to monitor HBV mutations. Pre-core/core and BCP mutations of HBV genes could be major causes of HBV infection in HBeAg-negative patients and could also be relevant to chronicity and aggravation of hepatitis B.

  13. Design of Enzymatically Cleavable Prodrugs of a Potent Platinum-Containing Anticancer Agent

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Song; Pickard, Amanda J.; Kucera, Gregory L.

    2014-01-01

    Using a versatile synthetic approach, a new class of potential ester prodrugs of highly potent, but systemically too toxic, platinum–acridine anticancer agents was generated. The new hybrids contain a hydroxyl group, which has been masked with a cleavable lipophilic acyl moiety. Both butanoic (butyric) and bulkier 2-propanepentanoic (valproic) esters were introduced. The goals of this design were to improve the drug-like properties (e.g., logD) and to reduce the systemic toxicity of the pharmacophore. Two distinct pathways by which the target compounds undergo effective ester hydrolysis, the proposed activating step, have been confirmed: platinum-assisted, self-immolative ester cleavage in a low-chloride environment (LC-ESMS, NMR spectroscopy) and enzymatic cleavage by human carboxylesterase-2 (hCES-2) (LC-ESMS). The valproic acid ester derivatives are the first example of a metal-containing agent cleavable by the pro-drug-converting enzyme. They show excellent chemical stability and reduced systemic toxicity. Preliminary results from screening in lung adenocarcinoma cell lines (A549, NCI-H1435) suggest that the mechanism of the valproic esters may involve intracellular deesterification. PMID:25303639

  14. Improved pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass using enzymatically-generated peracetic acid.

    PubMed

    Yin, DeLu Tyler; Jing, Qing; AlDajani, Waleed Wafa; Duncan, Shona; Tschirner, Ulrike; Schilling, Jonathan; Kazlauskas, Romas J

    2011-04-01

    Release of sugars from lignocellulosic biomass is inefficient because lignin, an aromatic polymer, blocks access of enzymes to the sugar polymers. Pretreatments remove lignin and disrupt its structure, thereby enhancing sugar release. In previous work, enzymatically generated peracetic acid was used to pretreat aspen wood. This pretreatment removed 45% of the lignin and the subsequent saccharification released 97% of the sugars remaining after pretreatment. In this paper, the amount of enzyme needed is reduced tenfold using first, an improved enzyme variant that makes twice as much peracetic acid and second, a two-phase reaction to generate the peracetic acid, which allows enzyme reuse. In addition, the eight pretreatment cycles are reduced to only one by increasing the volume of peracetic acid solution and increasing the temperature to 60 °C and the reaction time to 6h. For the pretreatment step, the weight ratio of peracetic acid to wood determines the amount of lignin removed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Synthesis of docosapentaenoic acid-enriched diacylglycerols by enzymatic glycerolysis of Schizochytrium sp. oil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaosan; Wang, Xiaohan; Wang, Wei; Jin, Qingzhe; Wang, Xingguo

    2018-04-17

    Utilization of algae oil and glycerol for preparation of value-added products is vital for sustainable development of related industries. In this study, we aimed to prepare highly pure diacylglycerols (DAG) rich in docosapentaenoic acid (DPA). First, content of DPA in form of triacylglycerols (TAG) increased from 16.4% to 28.1% after low-temperature crystallization of Schizochytrium sp. oil at -80 °C for 6 h. Subsequently, DPA-enriched DAG was prepared by the enzymatic glycerolysis of the enriched oil. Under the optimum conditions, there was 48.4% DAG produced in the crude mixture. To remove polar impurities from the crude product, a novel two-step purification was developed and the final product consisted of 75.1% DAG and 24.9% TAG with a low peroxide value. The current method for the synthesis of DAG rich DPA is effective and relatively mild and the successful preparation of value-added product will reduce production costs for algae and biodiesel industries. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A coupled CFD and two-phase substrate kinetic model for enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danes, Nicholas; Sitaraman, Hariswaran; Stickel, Jonathan; Sprague, Michael

    2017-11-01

    Cost-effective production of fuels from lignocellulosic biomass is an important subject of research in order to meet the world's current and future energy demands. Enzymatic hydrolysis is one of the several steps in the biochemical conversion of biomass into fuels. This process involves the interplay of non-Newtonian fluid dynamics that happen over tens of seconds coupled with chemical reactions that happen over several hours. In this work, we present a coupled CFD-reaction model for conversion of cellulose to sugars in a benchtop mixer reactor. A subcycling approach is used to circumvent the large time scale disparity between fluid dynamics and reactions. We will present a validation study of our simulations with experiments for well-mixed and stratified reactor scenarios along with predictions for conversion rates and product concentrations at varying impeller speeds and in scaled-up reactors. This work is funded by the Bioenergy Technology Office of DOE and the NSF's Enriched Doctoral Training program (DMS-1551229).

  17. Enzymatic saccharification and bioethanol production from Cynara cardunculus pretreated by steam explosion.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Maria C; Ferro, Miguel D; Paulino, Ana F C; Mendes, Joana A S; Gravitis, Janis; Evtuguin, Dmitry V; Xavier, Ana M R B

    2015-06-01

    The correct choice of the specific lignocellulosic biomass pretreatment allows obtaining high biomass conversions for biorefinery implementations and cellulosic bioethanol production from renewable resources. Cynara cardunculus (cardoon) pretreated by steam explosion (SE) was involved in second-generation bioethanol production using separate hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF) or simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) processes. Steam explosion pretreatment led to partial solubilisation of hemicelluloses and increased the accessibility of residual polysaccharides towards enzymatic hydrolysis revealing 64% of sugars yield against 11% from untreated plant material. Alkaline extraction after SE pretreatment of cardoon (CSEOH) promoted partial removal of degraded lignin, tannins, extractives and hemicelluloses thus allowing to double glucose concentration upon saccharification step. Bioethanol fermentation in SSF mode was faster than SHF process providing the best results: ethanol concentration 18.7 g L(-1), fermentation efficiency of 66.6% and a yield of 26.6g ethanol/100 g CSEOH or 10.1 g ethanol/100 g untreated cardoon. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Silicateins--a novel paradigm in bioinorganic chemistry: enzymatic synthesis of inorganic polymeric silica.

    PubMed

    Müller, Werner E G; Schröder, Heinz C; Burghard, Zaklina; Pisignano, Dario; Wang, Xiaohong

    2013-05-03

    The inorganic matrix of the siliceous skeletal elements of sponges, that is, spicules, is formed of amorphous biosilica. Until a decade ago, it remained unclear how the hard biosilica monoliths of the spicules are formed in sponges that live in a silica-poor (<50 μM) aquatic environment. The following two discoveries caused a paradigm shift and allowed an elucidation of the processes underlying spicule formation; first the discovery that in the spicules only one major protein, silicatein, exists and second, that this protein displays a bio-catalytical, enzymatic function. These findings caused a paradigm shift, since silicatein is the first enzyme that catalyzes the formation of an inorganic polymer from an inorganic monomeric substrate. In the present review the successive steps, following the synthesis of the silicatein product, biosilica, and resulting in the formation of the hard monolithic spicules is given. The new insight is assumed to open new horizons in the field of biotechnology and also in biomedicine. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Stepped frequency ground penetrating radar

    DOEpatents

    Vadnais, Kenneth G.; Bashforth, Michael B.; Lewallen, Tricia S.; Nammath, Sharyn R.

    1994-01-01

    A stepped frequency ground penetrating radar system is described comprising an RF signal generating section capable of producing stepped frequency signals in spaced and equal increments of time and frequency over a preselected bandwidth which serves as a common RF signal source for both a transmit portion and a receive portion of the system. In the transmit portion of the system the signal is processed into in-phase and quadrature signals which are then amplified and then transmitted toward a target. The reflected signals from the target are then received by a receive antenna and mixed with a reference signal from the common RF signal source in a mixer whose output is then fed through a low pass filter. The DC output, after amplification and demodulation, is digitized and converted into a frequency domain signal by a Fast Fourier Transform. A plot of the frequency domain signals from all of the stepped frequencies broadcast toward and received from the target yields information concerning the range (distance) and cross section (size) of the target.

  20. Real-time, single-step bioassay using nanoplasmonic resonator with ultra-high sensitivity

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Xiang; Ellman, Jonathan A; Chen, Fanqing Frank; Su, Kai-Hang; Wei, Qi-Huo; Sun, Cheng

    2014-04-01

    A nanoplasmonic resonator (NPR) comprising a metallic nanodisk with alternating shielding layer(s), having a tagged biomolecule conjugated or tethered to the surface of the nanoplasmonic resonator for highly sensitive measurement of enzymatic activity. NPRs enhance Raman signals in a highly reproducible manner, enabling fast detection of protease and enzyme activity, such as Prostate Specific Antigen (paPSA), in real-time, at picomolar sensitivity levels. Experiments on extracellular fluid (ECF) from paPSA-positive cells demonstrate specific detection in a complex bio-fluid background in real-time single-step detection in very small sample volumes.