Science.gov

Sample records for early flare response

  1. FlareLab: early results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltwisch, H.; Kempkes, P.; Mackel, F.; Stein, H.; Tenfelde, J.; Arnold, L.; Dreher, J.; Grauer, R.

    2010-12-01

    The FlareLab experiment at Bochum University has been constructed to generate and investigate plasma-filled magnetic flux tubes similar to arch-shaped solar prominences, which often result in coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In its first version, the device has been used to reproduce and extend previous studies of Bellan et al (1998 Phys. Plasmas 5 1991). Here the plasma source consists of two electrodes, which can be connected to a 1.0 kJ capacitor bank, and of a horseshoe magnet, which provides an arch-shaped guiding field. The discharge is ignited in a cloud of hydrogen gas that has been puffed into the space above the electrodes. In the first few microseconds the plasma current rises at a rate of several kA µs-1, causing the plasma column to pinch along the guiding B-field and to form an expanding loop structure. The observed dynamics of the magnetic flux tubes is analysed by means of three-dimensional MHD simulations in order to determine the influence of parameters like the initial magnetic field geometry on magnetic stability. At present, FlareLab is redesigned to mimic a model that was proposed by Titov and Démoulin (1999 Astron. Astrophys. 351 707) to investigate twisted magnetic configurations in solar flares.

  2. Olopatadine hydrochloride inhibits capsaicin-induced flare response in humans.

    PubMed

    Shindo, Masahisa; Yoshida, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Osamu

    2011-01-01

    Capsaicin, a vanilloid, has the potential for releasing substance P (SP) from sensory nerves. Topical application of capsaicin induces a flare response in the skin. However, it has not been clarified whether the release of SP is involved in the process of flare response or not. A potent antihistamine drug, olopatadine hydrochloride, is known to have inhibitory action against the release of SP. We examined the effects of olopatadine (at a dose of 5 mg) on skin reaction induced by topical application of capsaicin in 10 healthy subjects. The scores of capsaicin-induced flare responses after olopatadine administration were significantly lower at 30 min than at baseline. Our findings suggest that olopatadine hydrochloride could inhibit capsaicin-induced flare responses.

  3. FLARES PRODUCING WELL-ORGANIZED POST-FLARE ARCADES (SLINKIES) HAVE EARLY PRECURSORS

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutova, M. P.

    2011-06-01

    Exploding loop systems producing X-ray flares often, but not always, bifurcate into a long-living, well-organized system of multi-threaded loop arcades resembling solenoidal slinkies. The physical conditions that cause or prevent this process are not known. To address this problem, we examined most of the major (X-class) flares that occurred during the last decade and found that the flares that bifurcate into long-living slinky arcades have different signatures than those that do not 'produce' such structures. The most striking difference is that, in all cases of slinky formation, GOES high energy proton flux becomes significantly enhanced 10-24 hr before the flare occurs. No such effect was found prior to the 'non-slinky' flares. This fact may be associated with the difference between energy production by a given active region and the amount of energy required to bring the entire system into the form of well-organized, self-similar loop arcades. As an example illustrating the process of post-flare slinky formation, we present observations taken with the Hinode satellite, in several wavelengths, showing a time sequence of pre-flare and flare activity, followed by the formation of dynamically stable, well-organized structures. One of the important features revealed is that post-flare coronal slinky formation is preceded by scale invariant structure formation in the underlying chromosphere/transition region. We suggest that the observed regularities can be understood within the framework of self-organized critical dynamics characterized by scale invariant structure formation with critical parameters largely determined by energy saturation level. The observed regularities per se may serve as a long-term precursor of strong flares and may help to study predictability of system behavior.

  4. Nonthermal X-ray Spectral Flattening toward Low Energies in Early Impulsive Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2007-01-01

    The determination of the low-energy cutoff to nonthermal electron distributions is critical to the calculation of the nonthermal energy in solar flares. The most direct evidence for low-energy cutoffs is flattening of the power-law, nontherma1 X-ray spectra at low energies. However, because of the plasma preheating often seen in flares, the thermal emissions at low energies may hide such spectral flattening of the nonthermal component. We select a category of flares, which we call "early impulsive flares", in which the > 25 keV hard X-ray (HXR) flux increase is delayed by less than 30 s after the flux increase at lower energies. Thus, the plasma preheating in these flares is minimal, so the nonthermal spectrum can be determined to lower energies than in flares with significant preheating. Out of a sample of 33 early impulsive flares observed by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopy Imager (RHESSI), 9 showed spectral flattening toward low energies. In these events, the break energy of the double power-law fit to the HXR spectra lies in the range of 10-50 keV, significantly lower than the value we have seen for other flares that do not show such early impulsive emissions. In particular, it correlates with the HXR flux. After correcting the spatially-integrated spectra for albedo from isotropically emitted X-rays and using RHESSI imaging spectroscopy to exclude the extended albedo halo, we find that albedo associated with isotropic or nearly isotropic electrons can only account for the spectral flattening in 3 flares near Sun center. The spectral flattening in the remaining 6 flares is found to be consistent with the existence of a low-energy cutoff in the electron spectrum, falling in the range of 15-50 keV, which also correlates with the HXR flux.

  5. Ionosphere Transient Response To Solar Flares: Hf Radio Monitoring Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebreton, J.-P.; Telljohann, U.; Witasse, O.; Sanderson, T. R.

    We use a simple and low cost method to monitor the ionospheric reflection of commer- cial HF radio transmissions. It only requires a standard HF radio receiver with Single Side Band capability, a computer with a sound card, and appropriate audio signal spectral analysis software. We tune the radio receiver such that the carrier frequency of the transmission appears as a ~ 1kHz tone at the output of the radio receiver. The output signal of the radio receiver is processed with appropriate software that allows real time recording of high frequency resolution dynamic spectrograms of the audio spectrum in the 0-5 kHz range. Voice modulation is also present in the audio spectrum and appears as both upper and lower side bands but it is not considered in this study. HF radio signals reach the receiving station after being reflected by ionospheric layers. Any change in the ionospheric layers that affects HF wave reflection is detectable. In this paper, we particularly discuss our observations related to the transient response of the ionosphere to solar flare ionizing radiation. Enhanced ionization due to EUV and soft X-rays may produce a transient perturbation of the ionosphere which lasts typically one to few minutes. The signature of the transient response depends upon local time, solar flare intensity and the rise time of the solar flare ionizing radiation. We discuss both a few typical examples and a preliminary analysis of our 1-year sta- tistical analysis of observed events at 17.640 MHz. The method is easily accessible to amateur scientists. Possible use of the method for spaceweather-related research and outreach and educational activities is discussed.

  6. Solar flares as proxy for the young Sun: satellite observed thermosphere response to an X17.2 flare of Earth's upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, S.; Fichtinger, B.; Lammer, H.; Hausleitner, W.; Kulikov, Yu. N.; Ribas, I.; Shematovich, V. I.; Bisikalo, D.; Lichtenegger, H. I. M.; Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Khodachenko, M. L.; Hanslmeier, A.

    2012-08-01

    We analyzed the measured thermospheric response of an extreme solar X17.2 flare that irradiated the Earth's upper atmosphere during the so-called Halloween events in late October/early November 2003. We suggest that such events can serve as proxies for the intense electromagnetic and corpuscular radiation environment of the Sun or other stars during their early phases of evolution. We applied and compared empirical thermosphere models with satellite drag measurements from the GRACE satellites and found that the Jacchia-Bowman 2008 model can reproduce the drag measurements very well during undisturbed solar conditions but gets worse during extreme solar events. By analyzing the peak of the X17.2 flare spectra and comparing it with spectra of young solar proxies, our results indicate that the peak flare radiation flux corresponds to a hypothetical Sun-like star or the Sun at the age of approximately 2.3 Gyr. This implies that the peak extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation is enhanced by a factor of about 2.5 times compared to today's Sun. On the assumption that the Sun emitted an EUV flux of that magnitude and by modifying the activity indices in the Jacchia-Bowman 2008 model, we obtain an average exobase temperature of 1950 K, which corresponds with previous theoretical studies related to thermospheric heating and expansion caused by the solar EUV flux.

  7. ASASSN-16ae: A Powerful White-light Flare on an Early-L Dwarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Sarah J.; Shappee, Benjamin J.; Gagné, Jonathan; Stanek, K. Z.; Prieto, José L.; Holoien, Thomas W.-S.; Kochanek, C. S.; Chomiuk, Laura; Dong, Subo; Seibert, Mark; Strader, Jay

    2016-09-01

    We report the discovery and classification of SDSS J053341.43+001434.1 (SDSS0533), an early-L dwarf first discovered during a powerful ΔV < ‑11 magnitude flare observed as part of the ASAS-SN survey. Optical and infrared spectroscopy indicate a spectral type of L0 with strong Hα emission and a blue NIR spectral slope. Combining the photometric distance, proper motion, and radial velocity of SDSS0533 yields three-dimensional velocities of (U, V, W) = (14 ± 13, ‑35 ± 14, ‑94 ± 22) km s‑1, indicating that it is most likely part of the thick disk population and probably old. The three detections of SDSS0533 obtained during the flare are consistent with a total V-band flare energy of at least 4.9 × 1033 erg (corresponding to a total thermal energy of at least E tot > 3.7 × 1034 erg), placing it among the strongest detected M dwarf flares. The presence of this powerful flare on an old L0 dwarf may indicate that stellar-type magnetic activity persists down to the end of the main sequence and on older ML transition dwarfs.

  8. Detecting early IR emission from dust heated by a tidal disruption flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Velzen, Sjoert; Gezari, Suvi; Hung, Tiara; Cenko, Bradley; Gorjian, Varoujan

    2016-06-01

    A stellar tidal disruption flare (TDF) occurs when a star gets too close to a supermassive black hole and is shredded into streams that are accreted. New TDFs can be discovered by their transient optical or X-ray emission. We have recently made a discovery that opens a new wavelength regime for the study of these flares: transient emission at 3 micron in WISE multi-epoch imaging. This emission is best understood as originating from dust that has been heated by the intense UV and X-ray emission of the flare. However, the 6-month cadence of the WISE observations is too low to critically test this dust reprocessing model. Using optical observations of the iPTF survey, we recently discovered a very strong TDF candidate that is currenlty only a few weeks past maximum light. Since TDFs are rare, this new source provides an unique oppurtunity for Spitzer to make a very important contribution to this field. We proposed 7 Spitzer follow-up observations of this flare, which would yield the first early-time light curve of IR emission from a tidal flare. This data will be crucial to estabilish (or rule-out) dust reprocessing as the origin of IR emission from TDFs.

  9. ASASSN-16ae: A Powerful White-light Flare on an Early-L Dwarf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Sarah J.; Shappee, Benjamin J.; Gagné, Jonathan; Stanek, K. Z.; Prieto, José L.; Holoien, Thomas W.-S.; Kochanek, C. S.; Chomiuk, Laura; Dong, Subo; Seibert, Mark; Strader, Jay

    2016-09-01

    We report the discovery and classification of SDSS J053341.43+001434.1 (SDSS0533), an early-L dwarf first discovered during a powerful ΔV < -11 magnitude flare observed as part of the ASAS-SN survey. Optical and infrared spectroscopy indicate a spectral type of L0 with strong Hα emission and a blue NIR spectral slope. Combining the photometric distance, proper motion, and radial velocity of SDSS0533 yields three-dimensional velocities of (U, V, W) = (14 ± 13, -35 ± 14, -94 ± 22) km s-1, indicating that it is most likely part of the thick disk population and probably old. The three detections of SDSS0533 obtained during the flare are consistent with a total V-band flare energy of at least 4.9 × 1033 erg (corresponding to a total thermal energy of at least E tot > 3.7 × 1034 erg), placing it among the strongest detected M dwarf flares. The presence of this powerful flare on an old L0 dwarf may indicate that stellar-type magnetic activity persists down to the end of the main sequence and on older ML transition dwarfs.

  10. Spectral response of the solar atmosphere to an X-class flare event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacatus, Daniela Adriana; Donea, Alina

    2016-05-01

    The only X-class flare of 2015 observed by IRIS occurred at 16:22 UT on 11 March 2015, in AR 12297. This flare generated significant seismic transients in the photosphere at the eastern location of the flare. IRIS observations of the chromosphere and transition region help us understand the physics of the sunquake. In this work we will analyse this event using data from IRIS, SDO, and RHESSI. The IRIS rasters scanned the area between the main footpoints of the solar flare, and a wealth of chromospheric information has been inferred about the dynamics of the event. The main X-ray emission dominates the eastern flare footpoint, being missed by the IRIS slit. Significant enhancements in the chromospheric and TR lines intensities were identified. The forbidden line of Fe XXI 1354.1 Å is detected after the flare peak revealing the coronal responses to the flare. Plasma downflows of up to 300 km/s were identified in the majority of the observed lines, consistent with magnetic field local reconfiguration. We have also analysed an erupting filament developing at an earlier time, which moved rapidly towards the eastern part of the active region. We discuss the possibility that this filament might have pre-conditioned the chromosphere for the flare process.

  11. Where is the chromospheric response to conductive energy input from a hot pre-flare coronal loop?

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, Marina; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Simões, Paulo J. A.

    2014-07-01

    Before the onset of a flare is observed in hard X-rays, there is often a prolonged pre-flare or pre-heating phase with no detectable hard X-ray emission but pronounced soft X-ray emission, which suggests that energy is already being released and deposited into the corona and chromosphere at this stage. This work analyzes the temporal evolution of coronal source heating and the chromospheric response during this pre-heating phase to investigate the origin and nature of early energy release and transport during a solar flare. Simultaneous X-ray, EUV, and microwave observations of a well-observed flare with a prolonged pre-heating phase are analyzed to study the time evolution of the thermal emission and to determine the onset of particle acceleration. During the 20 minute duration of the pre-heating phase we find no hint of accelerated electrons in either hard X-rays or microwave emission. However, the total energy budget during the pre-heating phase suggests that energy must be supplied to the flaring loop to sustain the observed temperature and emission measure. Under the assumption of this energy being transported toward the chromosphere via thermal conduction, significant energy deposition at the chromosphere is expected. However, no detectable increase of the emission in the AIA wavelength channels sensitive to chromospheric temperatures is observed. The observations suggest energy release and deposition in the flaring loop before the onset of particle acceleration, yet a model in which energy is conducted to the chromosphere and subsequent heating of the chromosphere is not supported by the observations.

  12. Response of the Dip Equatorial Lower Thermosphere to Intense Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekharan Nair, Vineeth; Bhardwaj, Anil; Pant, Tarun

    2016-07-01

    The response of the Equatorial Electrojet (EEJ) induced geomagnetic field over a dip equatorial station to solar flares of varying strength occurred during different local times has been analyzed. It has been observed that, in general, the geomagnetic field response very rapidly to most of the intense flares, which occurred in different geomagnetic conditions. On an average 30-40 nT enhancement is observed in the geomagnetic field during the solar flares. However, there were extreme cases, which exhibit enhancements as high as ~100 nT. The response time of the magnetic field to the flares found to be varying between 4-50 minutes depending upon the class of the flares, their time of occurrence and the geomagnetic conditions. The extent of the field enhancement is found to be proportional to the intensity of the flare. During morning hours, an average time delay of ~10-15 minutes is observed during the morning flares and average time delay of 15-25 minutes is observed during the noon time. On the other hand, the time delay is found to be minimum during the evening hours (~5 minutes). This study discusses these aspects in detail.

  13. The response of the chromosphere during a stellar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawley, Suzanne L.

    1991-01-01

    A set of chromospheric models was developed, having a coronal loop geometry, energy balance through the entire loop from photosphere to corona, and a rigorous treatment of the radiative transfer in the important, optically thick, chromospheric emission lines. The models show that the soft X-ray emission and thermal conduction from a long lived hot corona are effective heating agents in the lower atmosphere during the gradual phase of stellar flares. The model predictions show the correct order of magnitude for the emission lines produced during the gradual phase of the flare with a reasonable coronal temperature evolution.

  14. Xrt And Shinx Joint Flare Study: Ar 11024

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engell, Alexander; Sylwester, J.; Siarkowski, M.

    2010-05-01

    From 12:00 UT on July 3 through July 7, 2009 SphinX (Solar Photometer IN X-rays) observes 130 flares with active region (AR) 11024 being the only AR on disk. XRT (X-Ray Telescope) is able to observe 64 of these flare events. The combination of both instruments results in a flare study revealing (1) a relationship between flux emergence and flare rate, (2) that the presence of active region loops typically results in different flare morphologies (single and multiple loop flares) then when there is a lack of an active region loop environment where more cusp and point-like flares are observed, (3) cusp and point-like flares often originate from the same location, and (4) a distribution of flare temperatures corresponding to the different flare morphologies. The differences between the observed flare morphologies may occur as the result of the heated plasma through the flaring process being confined by the proximity of loop structures as for the single and multiple loop flares, while for cusp and point-like flares they occur in an early-phase environment that lack loop presence. The continuing flux emergence of AR 11024 likely provides different magnetic interactions and may be the source responsible for all of the flares.

  15. A COMPREHENSIVE STUDY OF GAMMA-RAY BURST OPTICAL EMISSION. I. FLARES AND EARLY SHALLOW-DECAY COMPONENT

    SciTech Connect

    Li Liang; Liang Enwei; Tang Qingwen; Chen Jiemin; Xi Shaoqiang; Zhang Bing; Lu Ruijing; Lue Lianzhong; Lue Houjun; Gao He; Zhang Jin; Wei Jianyan; Yi Shuangxi E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2012-10-10

    Well-sampled optical light curves of 146 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are compiled from the literature. By empirical fitting, we identify eight possible emission components and summarize the results in a 'synthetic' light curve. Both optical flare and early shallow-decay components are likely related to long-term central engine activities. We focus on their statistical properties in this paper. Twenty-four optical flares are obtained from 19 GRBs. The isotropic R-band energy is smaller than 1% of E{sub {gamma},iso}. The relation between the isotropic luminosities of the flares and gamma rays follows L{sup F}{sub R,iso}{proportional_to}L {sup 1.11{+-}0.27}{sub {gamma},iso}. Later flares tend to be wider and dimmer, i.e., w{sup F} {approx} t{sup F}{sub p}/2 and L{sup F}{sub R,iso}{proportional_to}[t{sup F}{sub p}/(1 + z)]{sup -1.15{+-}0.15}. The detection probability of the optical flares is much smaller than that of X-ray flares. An optical shallow-decay segment is observed in 39 GRBs. The relation between the break time and break luminosity is a power law, with an index of -0.78 {+-} 0.08, similar to that derived from X-ray flares. The X-ray and optical breaks are usually chromatic, but a tentative correlation is found. We suggest that similar to the prompt optical emission that tracks {gamma}-rays, the optical flares are also related to the erratic behavior of the central engine. The shallow-decay component is likely related to a long-lasting spinning-down central engine or piling up of flare materials onto the blast wave. Mixing of different emission components may be the reason for the diverse chromatic afterglow behaviors.

  16. Response of the auroral lower ionosphere to solar flares in March 2012 according to ELF observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebed', O. M.; Fedorenko, Yu. V.; Larchenko, A. V.; Pil'gaev, S. V.

    2015-11-01

    The response of the lower ionosphere to the solar flares that occurred in March 2012 is considered. Measurements of the propagation velocity and wave impedance of ELF electromagnetic pulses (atmospherics) performed at Lovozero and Barentsburg high-latitude observatories were used to estimate this response. It was shown that the daily average propagation velocity of atmospherics decreased by 20-30 thousand km/s under disturbed heliogeophysical conditions as compared to the velocity measured under quiet conditions. This is related to a decrease in the effective waveguide height that results from the change in the ionospheric conductivity profile during a solar flare. It was detected that pronounced bursts of wave impedance, the maximums of which exceed the impedance average value by a factor of more than 2, are observed during strong heliogeophysical disturbances. This fact cannot be explained in the scope of a spherically layered model; consequently, such deviations indicate an increase in the D-layer conductivity inhomogeneities.

  17. Response of the equatorial electrojet to solar flare related X-ray flux enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manju, G.; Viswanathan, K. S.

    2005-03-01

    The response of ionospheric E-region electric fields and currents to solar flare related X-ray flux enhancements are studied at the magnetic equatorial location of Trivandrum (8.5°N, 77°E; dip 0.5°N) using VHF (54.95 MHz) coherent backscatter radar observations in the altitude region of 95-110 km conducted during daytime. The amplitude of the Solar Flare Effects (SFE) observed in the earth's magnetic field variations at Trivandrum have been examined in relation to that at Alibag and it is found that the ratio of the SFE amplitudes at the two stations lies in the range of 1.8-2.6. The backscattered power of the VHF radar showed a substantial reduction during the peak phase of all the strong X-rank flares studied. It has also been observed that there is a sharp fall in the ratio of the field line integrated Hall conductivity (σ2) to the field line integrated Pedersen conductivity (σ1) in the dynamo region during strong flare times in relation to normal times. The time variations of mean Doppler frequency ( f D ) of the backscattered signals have been observed to indicate a fall close to the peak phase of the strong flare events. Another new result is the radar observed presence of westward electric field for a long duration of 2-3 hours during a partial counter electrojet (CEJ) event that occurred on one of the days (8 July 1992) studied. The implications of the observations are discussed in detail.

  18. PLASMA HEATING IN THE VERY EARLY AND DECAY PHASES OF SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Falewicz, R.; Rudawy, P.; Siarkowski, M. E-mail: rudawy@astro.uni.wroc.pl

    2011-05-20

    In this paper, we analyze the energy budgets of two single-loop solar flares under the assumption that non-thermal electrons (NTEs) are the only source of plasma heating during all phases of both events. The flares were observed by RHESSI and GOES on 2002 September 20 and 2002 March 17, respectively. For both investigated flares we derived the energy fluxes contained in NTE beams from the RHESSI observational data constrained by observed GOES light curves. We showed that energy delivered by NTEs was fully sufficient to fulfill the energy budgets of the plasma during the pre-heating and impulsive phases of both flares as well as during the decay phase of one of them. We concluded that in the case of the investigated flares there was no need to use any additional ad hoc heating mechanisms other than heating by NTEs.

  19. Flare Response versus Disease Progression in Patients with Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Al-Nabhani, Khalsa; Syed, Rizwan; Haroon, Athar; Almukhailed, Omar; Bomanji, Jamshed

    2012-01-01

    We present a case report of a patient with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who had a series of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) scans for assessment of response to treatment. A restaging 18F-FDG PET/CT scan after six cycles showed increased FDG activity in the bone lesions with reduced activity in the lung and liver lesions. The increased bone activity was considered to be due to flare phenomenon rather than metastasis. A short interval follow up scan after 1 month was advised to confirm this interpretation but this repeat scan showed disease relapse. Although the flare phenomenon does exist, caution should be exercised in attributing increased tracer uptake in the lesions in patients with adenocarcinoma of lung and especially those who have received erlotinib during the course of their treatment. Distinguishing the 'flare phenomenon' and 'disease progression' is at times difficult but is important since misdiagnosis may result in an unnecessary delay in patient management. PMID:23372867

  20. THE LOCATION OF NON-THERMAL VELOCITY IN THE EARLY PHASES OF LARGE FLARES-REVEALING PRE-ERUPTION FLUX ROPES

    SciTech Connect

    Harra, Louise K.; Matthews, Sarah; Culhane, J. L.; Cheung, Mark C. M.; Hara, Hirohisa

    2013-09-10

    Non-thermal velocity measurements of the solar atmosphere, particularly from UV and X-ray emission lines have demonstrated over the decades that this parameter is important in understanding the triggering of solar flares. Enhancements have often been observed before intensity enhancements are seen. However, until the launch of Hinode, it has been difficult to determine the spatial location of the enhancements to better understand the source region. The Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer has the spectral and spatial resolution to allow us to probe the early stages of flares in detail. We analyze four events, all of which are GOES M- or X-classification flares, and all are located toward the limb for ease of flare geometry interpretation. Three of the flares were eruptive and one was confined. In all events, pre-flare enhancement in non-thermal velocity at the base of the active region and its surroundings has been found. These enhancements seem to be consistent with the footpoints of the dimming regions, and hence may be highlighting the activation of a coronal flux rope for the three eruptive events. In addition, pre-flare enhancements in non-thermal velocity were found above the looptops for the three eruptive events.

  1. On the unique divergent response of the equatorial electrojet vertical polarization electric field to different solar flare events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manju, G.

    2016-02-01

    The response of ionospheric E region to different flare events is investigated using coherent HF backscatter radar to bring out divergent observations. The study reveals the following aspects: (i) increase of absolute mean Doppler frequency by ~25-52% during the initial phase of the morning time flares of 9 September 2005 with concurrent fall in backscattered power and (ii) decrease of absolute mean Doppler frequency by ~11.6-16.2% during the initial phase of the flare of 20 February 2002 with concurrent fall in backscattered power. The Doppler frequency is directly related to vertical polarization electric field. Therefore, these observations are unique and in contrast to earlier works which have, in general, reported only a decrease in equatorial electrojet (EEJ) vertical polarization electric field during the initial phase of flare events. The present study also brings out the possible important role played by the height-integrated conductivities in producing the divergent response of the EEJ. The large reduction in backscattered power for weak M class flare events is also observed in this study. In view of the importance of the ionosphere as a major source of error in GPS-based navigation, the present result assumes significance.

  2. Observation of Sudden Ionospheric Disturbances over Istanbul in Response to X-Ray Flare Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceren Kalafatoglu Eyiguler, Emine; Kaymaz, Zerefsan; Ceren Moral, Aysegul

    2016-07-01

    Sudden ionospheric disturbances (SID) are the enhanced electron density structures in the D region ionosphere which occur in response to the increase in X-ray flares and EUV flux. SIDs can be monitored using Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio signals (3-30 kHz) which travel between the D-region and the surface of the Earth. In this study, we use SID monitors obtained from the Stanford University Solar Center and two antennas which were built at the Istanbul Technical University to track the ionospheric disturbances in the VLF range. Our antennas are capable of capturing signals from several VLF transmitting stations. In this work, we focus on the variations in the signal strength of the closest VLF transmitting station 'TBB' which is operating at 26.7 kHz frequency at BAFA, Turkey (37.43N, 27.15E). We present ITU SID observations from both antennas; show the daily variation, general structure and the typical patterns we observe as well as case studies of significant events. Our initial analysis shows close relationship between observed X-ray flares from geosynchronous GOES 13 and GOES 15 satellites and VLF station signal strength received by the monitors.

  3. Extreme Postinjection Flare in Response to Intra-Articular Triamcinolone Acetonide (Kenalog).

    PubMed

    Young, Porter; Homlar, Kelly C

    2016-01-01

    As intra-articular corticosteroid injections (CSIs) are a common treatment for osteoarthritis, physicians must well understand their potential side effects. Postinjection flares are an acute side effect of intra-articular CSIs, with symptoms ranging from mild joint effusion to disabling pain. The present case involved a severe postinjection flare that occurred after the patient, a 56-year-old woman with moderate osteoarthritis in the left knee, received 2 mL of 1% lidocaine and 2 mL (40 mg) of triamcinolone acetonide (Kenalog). Two hours after injection, she experienced swelling and intense pain in the knee and was unable to ambulate. The knee was aspirated with a return of 25 mL of "butterscotch"-colored fluid. This case is novel in that its acuity of onset, severity of symptoms, and synovial fluid analysis mimicked septic arthritis, which was ultimately ruled out with negative cultures and confirmation of triamcinolone acetonide crystals in the synovial aspirate, viewed by polarized light microscopy. Thus, the patient's reaction represents an acute crystal-induced inflammatory response. Although reactions to an intra-articular CSI of this severity are rare, it is important for treating physicians to inform patients of this potential side effect.

  4. Solar Flare Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmahl, Edward J.; Kundu, Mukul R.

    2000-01-01

    During the past year we have been working with the HESSI (High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager) team in preparation for launch in early 2001. HESSI has as its primary scientific goal photometric imaging and spectroscopy of solar flares in hard X-rays and gamma-rays with an approx. 2 sec angular resolution, approx. keV energy resolution and approx. 2 s time resolution over the 6 keV to 15 MeV energy range. We have performed tests of the imager using a specially designed experiment which exploits the second-harmonic response of HESSI's sub-collimators to an artificial X-ray source at a distance of 1550 cm from its front grids. Figures show the response to X-rays at energies in the range where HESSI is expected to image solar flares. To prepare the team and the solar user community for imaging flares with HESSI, we have written a description of the major imaging concepts. This paper will be submitted for publication in a referred journal.

  5. Characterising the immune profile of the kidney biopsy at lupus nephritis flare differentiates early treatment responders from non-responders

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Samir V; Malvar, Ana; Song, Huijuan; Alberton, Valeria; Lococo, Bruno; Vance, Jay; Zhang, Jianying; Yu, Lianbo; Rovin, Brad H

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The kidney biopsy is used to diagnose and guide initial therapy in patients with lupus nephritis (LN). Kidney histology does not correlate well with clinical measurements of kidney injury or predict how patients will respond to standard-of-care immunosuppression. We postulated that the gene expression profile of kidney tissue at the time of biopsy may differentiate patients who will from those who will not respond to treatment. Methods The expression of 511 immune-response genes was measured in kidney biopsies from 19 patients with proliferative LN and 4 normal controls. RNA was extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded kidney biopsies done at flare. After induction therapy, 5 patients achieved a complete clinical response (CR), 10 had a partial response (PR) and 4 patients were non-responders (NRs). Transcript expression was compared with normal controls and between renal response groups. Results A principal component analysis showed that intrarenal transcript expression from normal kidney, CR biopsies and NR biopsies segregated from each other. The top genes responsible for CR clustering included several interferon pathway genes (STAT1, IRF1, IRF7, MX1, STAT2, JAK2), while complement genes (C1R, C1QB, C6, C9, C5, MASP2) were mainly responsible for NR clustering. Overall, 35 genes were uniquely expressed in NR compared with CR. Pathway analysis revealed that interferon signalling and complement activation pathways were upregulated in both groups, while BAFF, APRIL, nuclear factor-κB and interleukin-6 signalling were increased in CR but suppressed in NR. Conclusions These data suggest that molecular profiling of the kidney biopsy at LN flare may be useful in predicting treatment response to induction therapy. PMID:26629350

  6. Flare Hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomczak, M.; Dubieniecki, P.

    2015-12-01

    On the basis of the Solar Maximum Mission observations, Švestka ( Solar Phys. 121, 399, 1989) introduced a new class of flares, the so-called flare hybrids. When they start, they look like typical compact flares (phase 1), but later on, they look like flares with arcades of magnetic loops (phase 2). We summarize the characteristic features of flare hybrids in soft and hard X-rays as well as in the extreme ultraviolet; these features allow us to distinguish flare hybrids from other flares. In this article, additional energy release or long plasma cooling timescales are suggested as possible causes of phase 2. We estimate the frequency of flare hybrids, and study the magnetic configurations favorable for flare hybrid occurrence. Flare hybrids appear to be quite frequent, and the difference between the lengths of magnetic loops in the two interacting loop systems seem to be a crucial parameter for determining their characteristics.

  7. Martian upper atmosphere response to solar EUV flux and soft X-ray flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Sonal; Stewart, Ian; Schneider, Nicholas M.; Deighan, Justin; Stiepen, Arnaud; Evans, J. Scott; Stevens, Michael H.; Chaffin, Michael S.; Crismani, Matteo; McClintock, William; Montmessin, Franck; Thiemann, E. M.; Eparvier, Frank; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Jacosky, Bruce

    2016-10-01

    Planetary upper atmosphere energetics is mainly governed by absorption of solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. Understanding the response of planetary upper atmosphere to the daily, long and short term variation in solar flux is very important to quantify energy budget of upper atmosphere. We report a comprehensive study of Mars dayglow observations made by the IUVS instrument aboard the MAVEN spacecraft, focusing on upper atmospheric response to solar EUV flux. Our analysis shows both short and long term effect of solar EUV flux on Martian thermospheric temperature. We find a significant drop (> 100 K) in thermospheric temperature between Ls = 218° and Ls = 140°, attributed primarily to the decrease in solar activity and increase in heliocentric distance. IUVS has observed response of Martian thermosphere to the 27-day solar flux variation due to solar rotation.We also report effect of two solar flare events (19 Oct. 2014 and 24 March 2015) on Martian dayglow observations. IUVS observed about ~25% increase in observed brightness of major ultraviolet dayglow emissions below 120 km, where most of the high energy photons (< 10 nm) deposit their energy. The results presented in this talk will help us better understand the role of EUV flux in total heat budget of Martian thermosphere.

  8. Solar Flares: Magnetohydrodynamic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Kazunari; Magara, Tetsuya

    2011-12-01

    This paper outlines the current understanding of solar flares, mainly focused on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes responsible for producing a flare. Observations show that flares are one of the most explosive phenomena in the atmosphere of the Sun, releasing a huge amount of energy up to about 10^32 erg on the timescale of hours. Flares involve the heating of plasma, mass ejection, and particle acceleration that generates high-energy particles. The key physical processes for producing a flare are: the emergence of magnetic field from the solar interior to the solar atmosphere (flux emergence), local enhancement of electric current in the corona (formation of a current sheet), and rapid dissipation of electric current (magnetic reconnection) that causes shock heating, mass ejection, and particle acceleration. The evolution toward the onset of a flare is rather quasi-static when free energy is accumulated in the form of coronal electric current (field-aligned current, more precisely), while the dissipation of coronal current proceeds rapidly, producing various dynamic events that affect lower atmospheres such as the chromosphere and photosphere. Flares manifest such rapid dissipation of coronal current, and their theoretical modeling has been developed in accordance with observations, in which numerical simulations proved to be a strong tool reproducing the time-dependent, nonlinear evolution of a flare. We review the models proposed to explain the physical mechanism of flares, giving an comprehensive explanation of the key processes mentioned above. We start with basic properties of flares, then go into the details of energy build-up, release and transport in flares where magnetic reconnection works as the central engine to produce a flare.

  9. Solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.

    1974-01-01

    A review of the knowledge about solar flares which has been obtained through observations from the earth and from space by various methods. High-resolution cinematography is best carried out at H-alpha wavelengths to reveal the structure, time history, and location of flares. The classification flares in H alpha according to either physical or morphological criteria is discussed. The study of flare morphology, which shows where, when, and how flares occur, is important for evaluating theories of flares. Consideration is given to studies of flares by optical spectroscopy, radio emissions, and at X-ray and XUV wavelengths. Research has shown where and possibly why flares occur, but the physics of the instability involved, of the particle acceleration, and of the heating are still not understood.

  10. Early detection and rapid response

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westbrooks, Randy G.; Eplee, Robert E.; Simberloff, Daniel; Rejmánek, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    Prevention is the first line of defense against introduced invasive species - it is always preferable to prevent the introduction of new invaders into a region or country. However, it is not always possible to detect all alien hitchhikers imported in cargo, or to predict with any degree of certainty which introduced species will become invasive over time. Fortunately, the majority of introduced plants and animals don't become invasive. But, according to scientists at Cornell University, costs and losses due to species that do become invasive are now estimated to be over $137 billion/year in the United States. Early detection and rapid response (EDRR) is the second line of defense against introduced invasive species - EDRR is the preferred management strategy for preventing the establishment and spread of invasive species. Over the past 50 years, there has been a gradual shift away from large and medium scale federal/state single-agency-led weed eradication programs in the United States, to smaller interagency-led projects involving impacted and potential stakeholders. The importance of volunteer weed spotters in detecting and reporting suspected new invasive species has also been recognized in recent years.

  11. RESPONSE OF THE PHOTOSPHERIC MAGNETIC FIELD TO THE X2.2 FLARE ON 2011 FEBRUARY 15

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shuo; Liu Chang; Liu Rui; Deng Na; Wang Haimin; Liu Yang

    2012-02-15

    It is well known that the long-term evolution of the photospheric magnetic field plays an important role in building up free energy to power solar eruptions. Observations, despite being controversial, have also revealed a rapid and permanent variation of the photospheric magnetic field in response to the coronal magnetic field restructuring during the eruption. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager instrument (HMI) on board the newly launched Solar Dynamics Observatory produces seeing-free full-disk vector magnetograms at consistently high resolution and high cadence, which finally makes possible an unambiguous and comprehensive study of this important back-reaction process. In this study, we present a near disk-center, GOES-class X2.2 flare, which occurred in NOAA AR 11158 on 2011 February 15. Using the magnetic field measurements made by HMI, we obtained the first solid evidence of a rapid (in about 30 minutes) and irreversible enhancement in the horizontal magnetic field at the flaring magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL) by a magnitude of {approx}30%. It is also shown that the photospheric field becomes more sheared and more inclined. This field evolution is unequivocally associated with the flare occurrence in this sigmoidal active region, with the enhancement area located in between the two chromospheric flare ribbons and the initial conjugate hard X-ray footpoints. These results strongly corroborate our previous conjecture that the photospheric magnetic field near the PIL must become more horizontal after eruptions, which could be related to the newly formed low-lying fields resulting from the tether-cutting reconnection.

  12. The FLARE mission: deep and wide-field 1-5um imaging and spectroscopy for the early universe: a proposal for M5 cosmic vision call

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgarella, D.; Levacher, P.; Vives, S.; Dohlen, K.; Pascal, S.

    2016-07-01

    FLARE (First Light And Reionization Explorer) is a space mission that will be submitted to ESA (M5 call). Its primary goal (~80% of lifetime) is to identify and study the universe before the end of the reionization at z > 6. A secondary objective (~20% of lifetime) is to survey star formation in the Milky Way. FLARE's strategy optimizes the science return: imaging and spectroscopic integral-field observations will be carried out simultaneously on two parallel focal planes and over very wide instantaneous fields of view. FLARE will help addressing two of ESA's Cosmic Vision themes: a) << How did the universe originate and what is it made of? » and b) « What are the conditions for planet formation and the emergence of life? >> and more specifically, << From gas and dust to stars and planets >>. FLARE will provide to the ESA community a leading position to statistically study the early universe after JWST's deep but pin-hole surveys. Moreover, the instrumental development of wide-field imaging and wide-field integral-field spectroscopy in space will be a major breakthrough after making them available on ground-based telescopes.

  13. The 26 December 2001 Solar Event Responsible for GLE63. I. Observations of a Major Long-Duration Flare with the Siberian Solar Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechnev, V. V.; Kochanov, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    Ground level enhancements (GLEs) of cosmic-ray intensity occur, on average, once a year. Because they are rare, studying the solar sources of GLEs is especially important to approach understanding their origin. The SOL2001-12-26 eruptive-flare event responsible for GLE63 seems to be challenging in some aspects. Deficient observations limited our understanding of it. Analysis of additional observations found for this event provided new results that shed light on the flare configuration and evolution. This article addresses the observations of this flare with the Siberian Solar Radio Telescope (SSRT). Taking advantage of its instrumental characteristics, we analyze the detailed SSRT observations of a major long-duration flare at 5.7 GHz without cleaning the images. The analysis confirms that the source of GLE63 was associated with an event in active region 9742 that comprised two flares. The first flare (04:30 - 05:03 UT) reached a GOES importance of about M1.6. Two microwave sources were observed, whose brightness temperatures at 5.7 GHz exceeded 10 MK. The main flare, up to an importance of M7.1, started at 05:04 UT and occurred in strong magnetic fields. The observed microwave sources reached a brightness temperature of about 250 MK. They were not static. After appearing on the weaker-field periphery of the active region, the microwave sources moved toward each other nearly along the magnetic neutral line, approaching the stronger-field core of the active region, and then moved away from the neutral line like expanding ribbons. These motions rule out an association of the non-thermal microwave sources with a single flaring loop.

  14. Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Sabrina

    2013-01-01

    Because the Earth resides in the atmosphere of our nearest stellar neighbor, events occurring on the Sun's surface directly affect us by interfering with satellite operations and communications, astronaut safety, and, in extreme circumstances, power grid stability. Solar flares, the most energetic events in our solar system, are a substantial source of hazardous space weather affecting our increasingly technology-dependent society. While flares have been observed using ground-based telescopes for over 150 years, modern space-bourne observatories have provided nearly continuous multi-wavelength flare coverage that cannot be obtained from the ground. We can now probe the origins and evolution of flares by tracking particle acceleration, changes in ionized plasma, and the reorganization of magnetic fields. I will walk through our current understanding of why flares occur and how they affect the Earth and also show several examples of these fantastic explosions.

  15. Ambient ultrafine particles provide a strong adjuvant effect in the secondary immune response: implication for traffic-related asthma flares.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Harkema, Jack R; Lewandowski, Ryan P; Wang, Meiying; Bramble, Lori A; Gookin, Glenn R; Ning, Zhi; Kleinman, Michael T; Sioutas, Constantinos; Nel, Andre E

    2010-09-01

    We have previously demonstrated that intranasal administration of ambient ultrafine particles (UFP) acts as an adjuvant for primary allergic sensitization to ovalbumin (OVA) in Balb/c mice. It is important to find out whether inhaled UFP exert the same effect on the secondary immune response as a way of explaining asthma flares in already-sensitized individuals due to traffic exposure near a freeway. The objective of this study is to determine whether inhalation exposure to ambient UFP near an urban freeway could enhance the secondary immune response to OVA in already-sensitized mice. Prior OVA-sensitized animals were exposed to concentrated ambient UFP at the time of secondary OVA challenge in our mobile animal laboratory in Los Angeles. OVA-specific antibody production, airway morphometry, allergic airway inflammation, cytokine gene expression, and oxidative stress marker were assessed. As few as five ambient UFP exposures were sufficient to promote the OVA recall immune response, including generating allergic airway inflammation in smaller and more distal airways compared with the adjuvant effect of intranasally instilled UFP on the primary immune response. The secondary immune response was characterized by the T helper 2 and IL-17 cytokine gene expression in the lung. In summary, our results demonstrated that inhalation of prooxidative ambient UFP could effectively boost the secondary immune response to an experimental allergen, indicating that vehicular traffic exposure could exacerbate allergic inflammation in already-sensitized subjects. PMID:20562226

  16. Combined Modeling of Acceleration, Transport, and Hydrodynamic Response in Solar Flares. 1; The Numerical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Wei; Petrosian, Vahe; Mariska, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Acceleration and transport of high-energy particles and fluid dynamics of atmospheric plasma are interrelated aspects of solar flares, but for convenience and simplicity they were artificially separated in the past. We present here self consistently combined Fokker-Planck modeling of particles and hydrodynamic simulation of flare plasma. Energetic electrons are modeled with the Stanford unified code of acceleration, transport, and radiation, while plasma is modeled with the Naval Research Laboratory flux tube code. We calculated the collisional heating rate directly from the particle transport code, which is more accurate than those in previous studies based on approximate analytical solutions. We repeated the simulation of Mariska et al. with an injection of power law, downward-beamed electrons using the new heating rate. For this case, a -10% difference was found from their old result. We also used a more realistic spectrum of injected electrons provided by the stochastic acceleration model, which has a smooth transition from a quasi-thermal background at low energies to a non thermal tail at high energies. The inclusion of low-energy electrons results in relatively more heating in the corona (versus chromosphere) and thus a larger downward heat conduction flux. The interplay of electron heating, conduction, and radiative loss leads to stronger chromospheric evaporation than obtained in previous studies, which had a deficit in low-energy electrons due to an arbitrarily assumed low-energy cutoff. The energy and spatial distributions of energetic electrons and bremsstrahlung photons bear signatures of the changing density distribution caused by chromospheric evaporation. In particular, the density jump at the evaporation front gives rise to enhanced emission, which, in principle, can be imaged by X-ray telescopes. This model can be applied to investigate a variety of high-energy processes in solar, space, and astrophysical plasmas.

  17. BATSE Solar Flare Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, R. A.

    1998-01-01

    This final report describes the progress originally proposed: (1) the continued improvement of a software and database environment capable of supporting all users of BATSE solar data as well as providing scientific expertise and effort to the BATSE solar community; (2) the continued participation with the PI team and other guest investigators in the detailed analysis of the BATSE detectors' response at low energies; (3) using spectroscopic techniques to fully exploit the potential of electron time-of-flight studies; and, (4) a full search for flare gamma-ray line emission at 2.2 MeV from all GOES X-class flares observed with BATSE.

  18. Flare-antenna unit for system in which flare is remotely activated by radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiltz, Frederick F.; Wilson, Charles E.

    1995-06-01

    A flare-antenna assembly has flare material enclosed in a cylindrical antenna and forms part of a marker beacon. The flare aids in the search for the marker beacon by providing means for both visual and infrared detection. The flare is actuated in response to a specific remote radio signal being received by the antenna. The received signal is decoded by the electronic system within the marker beacon. If the received signal meets the necessary criteria the electronic system generates an electrical signal that detonates a squib embedded in the flare material. The detonation of the squib activates the flare.

  19. Fine Structure in Solar Flares.

    PubMed

    Warren

    2000-06-20

    We present observations of several large two-ribbon flares observed with both the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) and the soft X-ray telescope on Yohkoh. The high spatial resolution TRACE observations show that solar flare plasma is generally not confined to a single loop or even a few isolated loops but to a multitude of fine coronal structures. These observations also suggest that the high-temperature flare plasma generally appears diffuse while the cooler ( less, similar2 MK) postflare plasma is looplike. We conjecture that the diffuse appearance of the high-temperature flare emission seen with TRACE is due to a combination of the emission measure structure of these flares and the instrumental temperature response and does not reflect fundamental differences in plasma morphology at the different temperatures.

  20. KEPLER FLARES. II. THE TEMPORAL MORPHOLOGY OF WHITE-LIGHT FLARES ON GJ 1243

    SciTech Connect

    Davenport, James R. A.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Johnson, Emily C.; Peraza, Jesus; Jansen, Tiffany C.; Larsen, Daniel M.; Hebb, Leslie; Wisniewski, John P.; Malatesta, Michael; Keil, Marcus; Silverberg, Steven M.; Scheffler, Matthew S.; Berdis, Jodi R.; Kowalski, Adam F.; Hilton, Eric J.

    2014-12-20

    We present the largest sample of flares ever compiled for a single M dwarf, the active M4 star GJ 1243. Over 6100 individual flare events, with energies ranging from 10{sup 29} to 10{sup 33} erg, are found in 11 months of 1 minute cadence data from Kepler. This sample is unique for its completeness and dynamic range. We have developed automated tools for finding flares in short-cadence Kepler light curves, and performed extensive validation and classification of the sample by eye. From this pristine sample of flares we generate a median flare template. This template shows that two exponential cooling phases are present during the white-light flare decay, providing fundamental constraints for models of flare physics. The template is also used as a basis function to decompose complex multi-peaked flares, allowing us to study the energy distribution of these events. Only a small number of flare events are not well fit by our template. We find that complex, multi-peaked flares occur in over 80% of flares with a duration of 50 minutes or greater. The underlying distribution of flare durations for events 10 minutes and longer appears to follow a broken power law. Our results support the idea that sympathetic flaring may be responsible for some complex flare events.

  1. Implications of X-Ray Observations for Electron Acceleration and Propagation in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, G. D.; Aschwanden, M. J.; Aurass, H.; Battaglia, M.; Grigis, P. C.; Kontar, E. P.; Liu, W.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Zharkova, V. V.

    2011-01-01

    High-energy X-rays and gamma-rays from solar flares were discovered just over fifty years ago. Since that time, the standard for the interpretation of spatially integrated flare X-ray spectra at energies above several tens of keV has been the collisional thick-target model. After the launch of the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) in early 2002, X-ray spectra and images have been of sufficient quality to allow a greater focus on the energetic electrons responsible for the X-ray emission, including their origin and their interactions with the flare plasma and magnetic field. The result has been new insights into the flaring process, as well as more quantitative models for both electron acceleration and propagation, and for the flare environment with which the electrons interact. In this article we review our current understanding of electron acceleration, energy loss, and propagation in flares. Implications of these new results for the collisional thick-target model, for general flare models, and for future flare studies are discussed.

  2. Flare models: Chapter 9 of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    By reviewing the properties of solar flares analyzed by each of the seven teams of the Skylab workshop, a set of primary and secondary requirements of flare models are derived. A number of flare models are described briefly and their properties compared with the primary requirements. It appears that, at this time, each flare model has some strong points and some weak points. It has not yet been demonstrated that any one flare model meets all the proposed requirements.

  3. Particle/fluid simulations of an eruptive flare: Identifying the field-aligned currents responsible for the hard x-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    While magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) can provide a reasonable description of the overall magnetic reconnection that is believed to drive flares, additional, and often separate processes have to be envoked to in order to explain the electron acceleration that is responsible for many of the observed flare emissions. A new model that incorporates the dynamic coronal current sheets, the reconnection site, and possible electron acceleration processes is developed through the use of two-dimensional particle and modified two-fluid simulations. The specific example of an eruptive flare driven by the coalescence of flux tubes supported by prescribed photospheric current elements is evaluated. It is shown that the electrons and ions have differential trajectories through the coronal current sheet which leads to the development of additonal plasma currents that flow around the surface of the current sheet. These surface currents are explicitly neglected in MHD but they are vital to the flare dynamics because they divert current from the coronal current sheet into the chromosphere, producing an effective resistivity that aids the development of fast reconnection. Because the surface currents are in the plane of the magnetic field, electrons in them experience strong acceleration and can account for the observed hard X-ray emissions. Model predictions are compared with observed time profiles of hard X-ray emissions and Doppler shifts seen in soft X-ray line emissions and are able to account for such features as (1) the asymmetry in the rise and decay time of the hard X-rays, (2) the apparent delay between the largest Doppler shifts and the hard X-ray peak, and (3) the relatively low intensity of the blue-shifted component. The use of particle and fluid simulations is important because it provides different, but complementary treatments of the electron acceleration, the global magnetic morphology, and the flare current system.

  4. Ionospheric response to X-class solar flares in the ascending half of the subdued solar cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazarika, Rumajyoti; Kalita, Bitap Raj; Bhuyan, Pradip Kumar

    2016-08-01

    The signature of 11 X-class solar flares that occurred during the ascending half of the present subdued solar cycle 24 from 2009 to 2013 on the ionosphere over the low- and mid-latitude station, Dibrugarh (27.5∘N, 95∘E; magnetic latitude 17.6∘N), are examined. Total electron content (TEC) data derived from Global Positioning System satellite transmissions are used to study the effect of the flares on the ionosphere. A nonlinear significant correlation (R 2 = 0.86) has been observed between EUV enhancement (ΔEUV) and corresponding enhancement in TEC (ΔTEC). This nonlinearity is triggered by a rapid increase in ΔTEC beyond the threshold value ˜1.5 (×1010 ph cm-2 s-1) in ΔEUV. It is also found that this nonlinear relationship between TEC and EUV flux is driven by a similar nonlinear relationship between flare induced enhancement in X-ray and EUV fluxes. The local time of occurrence of the flares determines the magnitude of enhancement in TEC for flares originating from nearly similar longitudes on the solar disc, and hence proximity to the central meridian alone may not play the dominating role. Further, the X-ray peak flux, when corrected for the earth zenith angle effect, did not improve the correlation between ΔX-ray and ΔTEC.

  5. Ionospheric response to X-class solar flares in the ascending half of the subdued solar cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazarika, Rumajyoti; Kalita, Bitap Raj; Bhuyan, Pradip Kumar

    2016-08-01

    The signature of 11 X-class solar flares that occurred during the ascending half of the present subdued solar cycle 24 from 2009 to 2013 on the ionosphere over the low- and mid-latitude station, Dibrugarh (27.5∘N, 95∘E; magnetic latitude 17.6∘N), are examined. Total electron content (TEC) data derived from Global Positioning System satellite transmissions are used to study the effect of the flares on the ionosphere. A nonlinear significant correlation ( R 2 = 0.86) has been observed between EUV enhancement (ΔEUV) and corresponding enhancement in TEC (ΔTEC). This nonlinearity is triggered by a rapid increase in ΔTEC beyond the threshold value ˜1.5 (×1010 ph cm-2 s-1) in ΔEUV. It is also found that this nonlinear relationship between TEC and EUV flux is driven by a similar nonlinear relationship between flare induced enhancement in X-ray and EUV fluxes. The local time of occurrence of the flares determines the magnitude of enhancement in TEC for flares originating from nearly similar longitudes on the solar disc, and hence proximity to the central meridian alone may not play the dominating role. Further, the X-ray peak flux, when corrected for the earth zenith angle effect, did not improve the correlation between ΔX-ray and ΔTEC.

  6. Rapid fluctuations in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, Peter A.

    1986-01-01

    Study of rapid fluctuations in the emission of radiation from solar flares provides a promising approach for probing the magneto-plasma structure and plasma processes that are responsible for a flare. It is proposed that elementary flare bursts in X-ray and microwave emission may be attributed to fine structure of the coronal magnetic field, related to the aggregation of photospheric magnetic field into magnetic knots. Fluctuations that occur on a subsecond time-scale may be due to magnetic islands that develop in current sheets during magnetic reconnection. The impulsive phase may sometimes represent the superposition of a large number of the elementary energy-release processes responsible for elementary flare bursts. If so, the challenge of trying to explain the properties of the impulsive phase in terms of the properties of the elementary processes must be faced. Magnetic field configurations that might produce solar flares are divided into a number of categories, depending on: whether or not there is a filament; whether there is no current sheet, a closed current sheet, or an open current sheet; and whether the filament erupts into the corona, or is ejected completely from the Sun's atmosphere. Analysis of the properties of these possible configurations is compared with different types of flares, and to Bai's subdivision of gamma-ray/proton events.

  7. Blood flow in histamine- and allergen-induced weal and flare responses, effects of an H1 antagonist, alpha-adrenoceptor agonist and a topical glucocorticoid.

    PubMed

    Hammarlund, A; Olsson, P; Pipkorn, U

    1990-01-01

    Allergen has previously been shown to induce a continuous increase in local dermal blood flow after a prick test in allergic subjects, whereas histamine induced, initially, similar peak increases in blood flow of much shorter duration. Blood flow changes induced by histamine and allergen have now been evaluated (i) after pretreatment with a local corticosteroid cream, clobetasole-17-propionate; (ii) after oral administration of the H1-antihistamine loratadine; and (iii) after oral pretreatment with the alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist pseudoephedrine. Blinded placebo-controlled designs were used in the substudies. Laser doppler flowmetry was used for non-invasive recording of changes in local blood flow intermittently for 24 h after the topical corticosteroid, 6 h for the substudies on loratadine and pseudoephedrine. The size of the immediate weal and flare reactions, as well as late phase reactions, were also determined. Pretreatment with clobetasole-17-propionate cream on the skin for 1 week prior to prick tests did not affect the blood flow response elicited by histamine or allergen, in either the initial part (up to 1 h) or the protracted 24 h determinations. The size of the weal and flare reactions decreased. Loratadine and pseudoephedrine did not reduce the initial allergen-induced increase in blood flow, while lower blood flow compared with placebo pretreatment was noted for the protracted (1-6 h) determinations. Blood flow changes after histamine were unaffected. The histamine-induced weal and flare was inhibited by loratadine more effectively than the corresponding allergen-induced reaction. The weal and flare reactions after histamine and allergen were not changed after pseudoephedrine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Responsibility of a Filament Eruption for the Initiation of a Flare, CME, and Blast Wave, and its Possible Transformation into a Bow Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechnev, V. V.; Uralov, A. M.; Kuzmenko, I. V.; Kochanov, A. A.; Chertok, I. M.; Kalashnikov, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-instrument observations of two filament eruptions on 24 February and 11 May 2011 suggest the following updated scenario for eruptive flare, coronal mass ejection (CME), and shock wave evolution. An initial destabilization of a filament results in stretching out of the magnetic threads belonging to its body that are rooted in the photosphere along the inversion line. Their reconnection leads to i) heating of parts of the filament or its environment, ii) an initial development of the flare cusp, arcade, and ribbons, iii) an increasing similarity of the filament to a curved flux rope, and iv) to its acceleration. Then the pre-eruption arcade enveloping the filament becomes involved in reconnection according to the standard model and continues to form the flare arcade and ribbons. The poloidal magnetic flux in the curved rope developing from the filament progressively increases and forces its toroidal expansion. This flux rope impulsively expands and produces a magnetohydrodynamical disturbance, which rapidly steepens into a shock. The shock passes through the arcade that expands above the filament and then freely propagates for some time ahead of the CME like a decelerating blast wave. If the CME is slow, then the shock eventually decays. Otherwise, the frontal part of the shock changes into the bow-shock regime. This was observed for the first time in the 24 February 2011 event. When reconnection ceases, the flux rope relaxes and constitutes the CME core-cavity system. The expanding arcade develops into the CME frontal structure. We also found that reconnection in the current sheet of a remote streamer forced by the shock passage results in a running flare-like process within the streamer responsible for a type II burst. The development of dimming and various associated phenomena are discussed.

  9. Early growth response-1 in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Khachigian, Levon M

    2016-07-01

    This article reviews the regulatory roles of the immediate-early gene product and prototypic zinc finger transcription factor, early growth response-1 in models of cardiovascular pathobiology, focusing on insights using microRNA, DNAzymes, small hairpin RNA, small interfering RNA, oligonucleotide decoy strategies and mice deficient in early growth response-1. PMID:27251707

  10. Solar flare discovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Hugh S.

    1987-01-01

    This paper considers the discoveries that have appreciably changed our understanding of the physics of solar flares. A total of 42 discoveries from all disciplines, ranging from Galileo's initial observation of faculae to the recent discovery of strong limb brightening in 10-MeV gamma-radiation, are identified. The rate of discovery increased dramatically over the past four decades as new observational tools became available. The assessment of significance suggests that recent discoveries -though more numerous - are individually less significant; perhaps this is because the minor early discoveries tend to be taken for granted.

  11. Identifying flares in rheumatoid arthritis: reliability and construct validation of the OMERACT RA Flare Core Domain Set

    PubMed Central

    Bykerk, Vivian P; Bingham, Clifton O; Choy, Ernest H; Lin, Daming; Alten, Rieke; Christensen, Robin; Furst, Daniel E; Hewlett, Sarah; Leong, Amye; March, Lyn; Woodworth, Thasia; Boire, Gilles; Haraoui, Boulos; Hitchon, Carol; Jamal, Shahin; Keystone, Edward C; Pope, Janet; Tin, Diane; Thorne, J Carter

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the reliability of concurrent flare identification using 3 methods (patient, rheumatologist and Disease Activity Score (DAS)28 criteria), and construct validity of candidate items representing the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT) RA Flare Core Domain Set. Methods Candidate flare questions and legacy measures were administered at consecutive visits to Canadian Early Arthritis Cohort (CATCH) patients between November 2011 and November 2014. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) core set indicators were recorded. Concordance to identify flares was assessed using the agreement coefficient. Construct validity of flare questions was examined: convergent (Spearman's r); discriminant (mean differences between flaring/non-flaring patients); and consequential (proportions with prior treatment reductions and intended therapeutic change postflare). Results The 849 patients were 75% female, 81% white, 42% were in remission/low disease activity (R/LDA), and 16–32% were flaring at the second visit. Agreement of flare status was low–strong (κ's 0.17–0.88) and inversely related to RA disease activity level. Flare domains correlated highly (r's≥0.70) with each other, patient global (r's≥0.66) and corresponding measures (r's 0.49–0.92); and moderately highly with MD and patient-reported joint counts (r's 0.29–0.62). When MD/patients agreed the patient was flaring, mean flare domain between-group differences were 2.1–3.0; 36% had treatment reductions prior to flare, with escalation planned in 61%. Conclusions Flares are common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and are often preceded by treatment reductions. Patient/MD/DAS agreement of flare status is highest in patients worsening from R/LDA. OMERACT RA flare questions can discriminate between patients with/without flare and have strong evidence of construct and consequential validity. Ongoing work will identify optimal scoring and cut points to identify RA flares. PMID

  12. Simulation Training in Early Emergency Response (STEER).

    PubMed

    Generoso, Jose Roberto; Latoures, Renee Elizabeth; Acar, Yahya; Miller, Dean Scott; Ciano, Mark; Sandrei, Renan; Vieira, Marlon; Luong, Sean; Hirsch, Jan; Fidler, Richard Lee

    2016-06-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ISSUE Instructions: 1.3 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded after you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. In order to obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Simulation Training in Early Emergency Response (STEER)," found on pages 255-263, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name, contact information, and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until May 31, 2019. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. OBJECTIVES Define the purpose of the Simulation Training in Early Emergency Response (STEER) study. Review the outcome of the STEER study. DISCLOSURE

  13. The inhibition by levocetirizine and fexofenadine of the histamine-induced wheal and flare response in healthy Caucasian and Japanese volunteers.

    PubMed

    Schoepke, Nicole; Church, Martin K; Maurer, Marcus

    2013-05-01

    This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study compared inhibition by one 5 mg dose of levocetirizine with two 60 mg doses of fexofenadine separated by 12 h of histamine-induced wheal and flare responses in 9 Caucasian and 9 Japanese healthy male volunteers. Levocetirizine was more inhibitory than fexofenadine on wheal, flare and pruritus (p < 0.005). Variability, evaluated from the standard deviation of inhibition, ranged from 14% to 23.2% for levocetirizine and 65.4% to 112.4% for fexofenadine. Levocetirizine had a faster onset of action (30-90 min versus 2 h), shorter time to maximum effect (3-4 versus 3-6 h) and longer duration of action (at least 24 h versus ~12 h) than fexofenadine. The plasma levels of levocetirizine rose more quickly, reached higher levels, were more consistent and decreased slower than those of fexofenadine. There were no clinically significant ethnic differences in responsiveness to the drugs. PMID:23147964

  14. KEPLER FLARES. I. ACTIVE AND INACTIVE M DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, Suzanne L.; Davenport, James R. A.; Kowalski, Adam F.; Wisniewski, John P.; Deitrick, Russell; Hilton, Eric J.; Hebb, Leslie

    2014-12-20

    We analyzed Kepler short-cadence M dwarf observations. Spectra from the Astrophysical Research Consortium 3.5 m telescope identify magnetically active (Hα in emission) stars. The active stars are of mid-M spectral type, have numerous flares, and have well-defined rotational modulation due to starspots. The inactive stars are of early M type, exhibit less starspot signature, and have fewer flares. A Kepler to U-band energy scaling allows comparison of the Kepler flare frequency distributions with previous ground-based data. M dwarfs span a large range of flare frequency and energy, blurring the distinction between active and inactive stars designated solely by the presence of Hα. We analyzed classical and complex (multiple peak) flares on GJ 1243, finding strong correlations between flare energy, amplitude, duration, and decay time, with only a weak dependence on rise time. Complex flares last longer and have higher energy at the same amplitude, and higher energy flares are more likely to be complex. A power law fits the energy distribution for flares with log E{sub K{sub p}}> 31 erg, but the predicted number of low-energy flares far exceeds the number observed, at energies where flares are still easily detectable, indicating that the power-law distribution may flatten at low energy. There is no correlation of flare occurrence or energy with starspot phase, the flare waiting time distribution is consistent with flares occurring randomly in time, and the energies of consecutive flares are uncorrelated. These observations support a scenario where many independent active regions on the stellar surface are contributing to the observed flare rate.

  15. Metabolic responses on the early shift.

    PubMed

    Padilha, Heloisa Guarita; Crispim, Cibele Aparecida; Zimberg, Ioná Zalcman; Folkard, Simon; Tufik, Sérgio; de Mello, Marco Túlio

    2010-07-01

    Shiftwork has been associated with a higher propensity for the development of metabolic disorders and obesity. The aim of the study was to investigate concentrations of glucose, cortisol, and insulin among fixed night workers (n = 9), fixed early morning workers (n = 6), and day workers (n = 7). Food intake was recorded for 7 days using a diary. Blood samples were collected every 4 h over the course of 24 h, yielding six samples. Total carbohydrate intake was lowest (p < .0005), whereas fat (p = .03) and protein (p < .0005) were highest on the early morning shifts. Early morning workers also had overall elevated cortisol levels relative to the other two groups. Cortisol levels appeared to be more influenced by time since waking prior to the shift than by time-of-day. Cortisol was highest for the early morning group than the day group 12 h after waking, and both the early morning and night groups had higher levels than the day group 16 h after waking (p < .05 in all cases). In contrast, the homesostatsis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) appeared to be more influenced by time-of-day than by time since waking prior to the shift. The early morning group had higher levels of HOMA-IR at 08:00 h than the other groups (p < .05). In conclusion, the early morning group had the highest overall concentrations of cortisol and tended to have higher levels of HOMA-IR, indicating that more attention should be given to these workers. Moreover, all three groups showed pronounced cortisol levels on awakening, suggesting that they may have adjusted to their awaking time. (Author: heloguarita@rgnutri.com.br ).

  16. Understanding Solar Flare Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatland, M. S.

    2005-12-01

    A review is presented of work aimed at understanding solar flare statistics, with emphasis on the well known flare power-law size distribution. Although avalanche models are perhaps the favoured model to describe flare statistics, their physical basis is unclear, and they are divorced from developing ideas in large-scale reconnection theory. An alternative model, aimed at reconciling large-scale reconnection models with solar flare statistics, is revisited. The solar flare waiting-time distribution has also attracted recent attention. Observed waiting-time distributions are described, together with what they might tell us about the flare phenomenon. Finally, a practical application of flare statistics to flare prediction is described in detail, including the results of a year of automated (web-based) predictions from the method.

  17. Solar Flares and their Effects on Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward Francis; Engle, Scott G.

    2015-08-01

    The effects of flares from the Sun on Earth and other solar-system planets are discussed. The strong X-ray - UV radiation and high plasma fluxes from flares can strongly effect solar system planets even as far out as the Jovian planets and their moons. Data from our "Sun in Time" program are used to study the flare properties of the Sun and solar-type stars from youth to old age. These data imply that the young Sun had numerous, very powerful flares that may have played major roles in the development and evolution of the early atmospheres of Earth and other terrestiral planets. These strong X-UV fluxes from flares can greatly effect the photochemistry of planetary atmospheres as well as ionizing and possibly eroding their atmospheres. Some examples are given. Also briefly discussed are effects of large flares from the present Sun on the Earth. Even though strong solar flares are rarer and less powerful than from the youthful Sun, they can cause significant damage to our communication and satellite systems, electrical networks, and threaten the lives of astronauts in space.This research is supported by grants from NASA (HST and Chandra) and NSF. We gratefully acknowledge this support

  18. Early cellular signaling responses to axonal injury

    PubMed Central

    Lukas, Thomas J; Wang, Ai Ling; Yuan, Ming; Neufeld, Arthur H

    2009-01-01

    Background We have used optic nerve injury as a model to study early signaling events in neuronal tissue following axonal injury. Optic nerve injury results in the selective death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). The time course of cell death takes place over a period of days with the earliest detection of RGC death at about 48 hr post injury. We hypothesized that in the period immediately following axonal injury, there are changes in the soma that signal surrounding glia and neurons and that start programmed cell death. In the current study, we investigated early changes in cellular signaling and gene expression that occur within the first 6 hrs post optic nerve injury. Results We found evidence of cell to cell signaling within 30 min of axonal injury. We detected differences in phosphoproteins and gene expression within the 6 hrs time period. Activation of TNFα and glutamate receptors, two pathways that can initiate cell death, begins in RGCs within 6 hrs following axonal injury. Differential gene expression at 6 hrs post injury included genes involved in cytokine, neurotrophic factor signaling (Socs3) and apoptosis (Bax). Conclusion We interpret our studies to indicate that both neurons and glia in the retina have been signaled within 30 min after optic nerve injury. The signals are probably initiated by the RGC soma. In addition, signals activating cellular death pathways occur within 6 hrs of injury, which likely lead to RGC degeneration. PMID:19284657

  19. Early Campus Response to Disruptive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stump, Linda J.; Zdziarski, Eugene L.

    2008-01-01

    As major events define generations and tragedies define and refine protocol response to significant incidents, a sense of comfort and confidence is attained as the authors train individually and organizationally to respond to extreme events, and yet those who have experienced them know that no plan goes as it should. There are, however, steps or…

  20. New Data on mid-Miocene Rhyolite Volcanism in Eastern Oregon Extend Early, co-CRBG Rhyolite Flare up and Constrain Storage Sites of Grande Ronde Flood Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streck, M. J.; Ferns, M. L.; McIntosh, W. C.

    2015-12-01

    The classical view of relating mid-Miocene rhyolites of the tri-state area of Oregon, Nevada, and Idaho to the flood basalts of the Columbia River Basalt was that a mantle plume impinging along the Oregon-Idaho border first causes eruption of the flood basalts but shortly thereafter causes generation of rhyolites at the McDermitt volcanic field from which then hot-spot track rhyolites developed progressively younging towards Yellowstone. More recent work reveals rhyolites as old as found at McDermitt (~16.5 Ma) to occur along a wide E-W tangent along the Oregon-Nevada-Idaho border. And now, our data extend such early rhyolites (>16 Ma) to several locations further north within and in the periphery of the Lake Owyhee Volcanic Field (LOVF) adding to the geographically orphaned old age of 16.7 Ma of the Silver City Rhyolite, Idaho. Hence, the rhyolite flare-up associated with flood basalt magmatism occurred within a circular area of ~400 km centered 100 km NNE of McDermitt. Consequently, no south-to-north progression exists in the onset of rhyolite volcanism; instead, rhyolites started up at the same time over this large area. Province-wide rhyolite volcanism was strongest between ~16.4 and 15.4 Ma coincident with eruptions of the most voluminous member of the CRBG - the Grande Ronde Basalt (GRB). Field evidence for such bimodal volcanism consists of intercalated local GRB units with the Dinner Creek Tuff and Littlefield Rhyolite in the Malheur River Gorge corridor. GRB eruption sites exist and were likely fed from reservoirs residing below or near rhyolitic chambers. Presently, we have petrological evidence for pinning down GRB storages sites to areas from where rhyolites of the Dinner Creek Tuff and lava flows of the Littlefield Rhyolite erupted. In summary, input of GRG and other CRBG magmas were driving co-CRBG rhyolite volcanism which in turn may have influenced whether flood basalt magmas erupted locally or travelled in dikes to more distally located areas.

  1. Neutral pion production in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, D. J.; Vestrand, W. T.; Chupp, E. L.; Rieger, E.; Cooper, J. F.; Share, G. H.

    1985-01-01

    The Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on SMM has detected more than 130 flares with emission approx 300 keV. More than 10 of these flares were detected at photon energies 10 MeV. Although the majority of the emission at 10 MeV must be from electron bremsstrahlung, at least two of the flares have spectral properties 40 MeV that require gamma rays from the decay of neutral pions. It is found that pion production can occur early in the impulsive phase as defined by hard X-rays near 100 keV. It is also found in one of these flares that a significant portion of this high-energy emission is produced well after the impulsive phase. This extended production phase, most clearly observed at high energies, may be a signature of the acceleration process which produces solar energetic particles (SEP's) in space.

  2. Exploring early public responses to geoengineering.

    PubMed

    Pidgeon, Nick; Corner, Adam; Parkhill, Karen; Spence, Alexa; Butler, Catherine; Poortinga, Wouter

    2012-09-13

    Proposals for geoengineering the Earth's climate are prime examples of emerging or 'upstream' technologies, because many aspects of their effectiveness, cost and risks are yet to be researched, and in many cases are highly uncertain. This paper contributes to the emerging debate about the social acceptability of geoengineering technologies by presenting preliminary evidence on public responses to geoengineering from two of the very first UK studies of public perceptions and responses. The discussion draws upon two datasets: qualitative data (from an interview study conducted in 42 households in 2009), and quantitative data (from a subsequent nationwide survey (n=1822) of British public opinion). Unsurprisingly, baseline awareness of geoengineering was extremely low in both cases. The data from the survey indicate that, when briefly explained to people, carbon dioxide removal approaches were preferred to solar radiation management, while significant positive correlations were also found between concern about climate change and support for different geoengineering approaches. We discuss some of the wider considerations that are likely to shape public perceptions of geoengineering as it enters the media and public sphere, and conclude that, aside from technical considerations, public perceptions are likely to prove a key element influencing the debate over questions of the acceptability of geoengineering proposals.

  3. Exploring early public responses to geoengineering.

    PubMed

    Pidgeon, Nick; Corner, Adam; Parkhill, Karen; Spence, Alexa; Butler, Catherine; Poortinga, Wouter

    2012-09-13

    Proposals for geoengineering the Earth's climate are prime examples of emerging or 'upstream' technologies, because many aspects of their effectiveness, cost and risks are yet to be researched, and in many cases are highly uncertain. This paper contributes to the emerging debate about the social acceptability of geoengineering technologies by presenting preliminary evidence on public responses to geoengineering from two of the very first UK studies of public perceptions and responses. The discussion draws upon two datasets: qualitative data (from an interview study conducted in 42 households in 2009), and quantitative data (from a subsequent nationwide survey (n=1822) of British public opinion). Unsurprisingly, baseline awareness of geoengineering was extremely low in both cases. The data from the survey indicate that, when briefly explained to people, carbon dioxide removal approaches were preferred to solar radiation management, while significant positive correlations were also found between concern about climate change and support for different geoengineering approaches. We discuss some of the wider considerations that are likely to shape public perceptions of geoengineering as it enters the media and public sphere, and conclude that, aside from technical considerations, public perceptions are likely to prove a key element influencing the debate over questions of the acceptability of geoengineering proposals. PMID:22869796

  4. Identification of Candidate Predictors of Lupus Flare.

    PubMed

    Crow, Mary K; Olferiev, Mikhail; Kirou, Kyriakos A

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus, the prototype systemic autoimmune disease, is characterized by extensive self-reactivity, inflammation, and organ system damage. Sustained production of type I interferon is seen in many patients and contributes to immune dysregulation. Disease activity fluctuates with periods of relative quiescence or effective management by immunosuppressive drugs, followed by disease flares. Tissue damage accumulates over time, with kidneys and cardiovascular system particularly affected. Identification of the underlying molecular mechanisms that precede clinical exacerbations, allowing prediction of future flare, could lead to therapeutic interventions that prevent severe disease. We generated gene expression data from a longitudinal cohort of lupus patients, some showing at least one period of severe flare and others with relatively stable disease over the period of study. Candidate predictors of future clinical flare were identified based on analysis of differentially expressed gene transcripts between the flare and non-flare groups at a time when all patients had relatively quiescent clinical disease activity. Our results suggest the hypothesis that altered regulation of genome stability and nucleic acid fidelity may be important molecular precursors of future clinical flare, generating endogenous nucleic acid triggers that engage intracellular mechanisms that mimic a chronic host response to viral infection.

  5. Emergency flare tip repair

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, G.A.

    1982-07-01

    Two damaged propane storage tank flares serving a large LPG storage facility near the Arabian Gulf were given emergency service. A diagram of over-all layout and spatial relationships between tanks and piping, and tables with general information relevant to selecting an acceptable radiant heat load factor and flare line flow characteristics were presented. The general equation for predicting radiant heat flux from a point source was used. The ignition of the temporary flare was discussed.

  6. Particle acceleration in flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Arnold O.; Kosugi, Takeo; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benka, Steve G.; Chupp, Edward L.; Enome, Shinzo; Garcia, Howard; Holman, Gordon D.; Kurt, Victoria G.; Sakao, Taro

    1994-01-01

    Particle acceleration is intrinsic to the primary energy release in the impulsive phase of solar flares, and we cannot understand flares without understanding acceleration. New observations in soft and hard X-rays, gamma-rays and coherent radio emissions are presented, suggesting flare fragmentation in time and space. X-ray and radio measurements exhibit at least five different time scales in flares. In addition, some new observations of delayed acceleration signatures are also presented. The theory of acceleration by parallel electric fields is used to model the spectral shape and evolution of hard X-rays. The possibility of the appearance of double layers is further investigated.

  7. Solar flares. [plasma physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    The present paper deals with explosions in a magnetized solar plasma, known as flares, whose effects are seen throughout the electromagnetic spectrum, from gamma-rays through the visible and to the radio band. The diverse phenomena associated with flares are discussed, along with the physical mechanisms that have been advanced to explain them. The impact of solar flare research on the development of plasma physics and magnetohydrodynamics is noted. The rapid development of solar flare research during the past 20 years, owing to the availability of high-resolution images, detailed magnetic field measurements, and improved spectral data, is illustrated.

  8. Flared tube attachment fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkire, I. D.; King, J. P., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Tubes can be flared first, then attached to valves and other flow line components, with new fitting that can be disassembled and reused. Installed fitting can be disassembled so parts can be inspected. It can be salvaged and reused without damaging flared tube; tube can be coated, tempered, or otherwise treated after it has been flared, rather than before, as was previously required. Fitting consists of threaded male portion with conical seating surface, hexagonal nut with hole larger than other diameter of flared end of tube, and split ferrule.

  9. Diagnosis and treatment of lupus nephritis flares--an update.

    PubMed

    Sprangers, Ben; Monahan, Marianne; Appel, Gerald B

    2012-12-01

    Relapses or flares of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are frequent and observed in 27-66% of patients. SLE flares are defined as an increase in disease activity, in general, requiring alternative treatment or intensification of therapy. A renal flare is indicated by an increase in proteinuria and/or serum creatinine concentration, abnormal urine sediment or a reduction in creatinine clearance rate as a result of active disease. The morbidity associated with renal flares is derived from both the kidney damage due to lupus nephritis and treatment-related toxic effects. Current induction treatment protocols achieve remission in the majority of patients with lupus nephritis; however, few studies focus on treatment interventions for renal flares in these patients. The available data, however, suggest that remission can be induced again in a substantial percentage of patients experiencing a lupus nephritis flare. Lupus nephritis flares are independently associated with an increased risk of deterioration in renal function; prevention of renal flares might, therefore, also decrease long-term morbidity and mortality. Appropriate immunosuppressive maintenance therapy might lead to a decrease in the occurrence of renal and extrarenal flares in patients with SLE, and monitoring for the early detection and treatment of renal flares could improve their outcomes.

  10. Characterization of early host responses in adults with dengue disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background While dengue-elicited early and transient host responses preceding defervescence could shape the disease outcome and reveal mechanisms of the disease pathogenesis, assessment of these responses are difficult as patients rarely seek healthcare during the first days of benign fever and thus data are lacking. Methods In this study, focusing on early recruitment, we performed whole-blood transcriptional profiling on denguevirus PCR positive patients sampled within 72 h of self-reported fever presentation (average 43 h, SD 18.6 h) and compared the signatures with autologous samples drawn at defervescence and convalescence and to control patients with fever of other etiology. Results In the early dengue fever phase, a strong activation of the innate immune response related genes were seen that was absent at defervescence (4-7 days after fever debut), while at this second sampling genes related to biosynthesis and metabolism dominated. Transcripts relating to the adaptive immune response were over-expressed in the second sampling point with sustained activation at the third sampling. On an individual gene level, significant enrichment of transcripts early in dengue disease were chemokines CCL2 (MCP-1), CCL8 (MCP-2), CXCL10 (IP-10) and CCL3 (MIP-1α), antimicrobial peptide β-defensin 1 (DEFB1), desmosome/intermediate junction component plakoglobin (JUP) and a microRNA which may negatively regulate pro-inflammatory cytokines in dengue infected peripheral blood cells, mIR-147 (NMES1). Conclusions These data show that the early response in patients mimics those previously described in vitro, where early assessment of transcriptional responses has been easily obtained. Several of the early transcripts identified may be affected by or mediate the pathogenesis and deserve further assessment at this timepoint in correlation to severe disease. PMID:21810247

  11. Properties of the 15 February 2011 Flare Seismic Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkov, S.; Green, L. M.; Matthews, S. A.; Zharkova, V. V.

    2013-06-01

    The first near-side X-class flare of Solar Cycle 24 occurred in February 2011 (SOL2011-02-05T01:55) and produced a very strong seismic response in the photosphere. One sunquake was reported by Kosovichev ( Astrophys. J. Lett. 734, L15, 2011), followed by the discovery of a second sunquake by Zharkov, Green, Matthews et al. ( Astrophys. J. Lett. 741, L35, 2011). The flare had a two-ribbon structure and was associated with a flux-rope eruption and a halo coronal mass ejection (CME) as reported in the CACTus catalogue. Following the discovery of the second sunquake and the spatial association of both sources with the locations of the feet of the erupting flux rope (Zharkov, Green, Matthews et al., Astrophys. J. Lett. 741, L35, 2011), we present here a more detailed analysis of the observed photospheric changes in and around the seismic sources. These sunquakes are quite unusual, taking place early in the impulsive stage of the flare, with the seismic sources showing little hard X-ray (HXR) emission, and strongest X-ray emission sources located in the flare ribbons. We present a directional time-distance diagram computed for the second source, which clearly shows a ridge corresponding to the travelling acoustic-wave packet and find that the sunquake at the second source happened about 45 seconds to one minute earlier than the first source. Using acoustic holography we report different frequency responses of the two sources. We find strong downflows at both seismic locations and a supersonic horizontal motion at the second site of acoustic-wave excitation.

  12. Magnetic Variations Associated With Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, Vahe

    2005-01-01

    A report summarizes an investigation of helioseismic waves and magnetic variations associated with solar flares, involving analysis of data acquired by the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) aboard the Solar and Heliocentric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft, the Yohkoh spacecraft, and the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) spacecraft. Reconstruction of x-ray flare images from RHESSI data and comparison of them with MDI magnetic maps were performed in an attempt to infer the changes in the geometry of the magnetic field. It was established that in most flares observed with MDI, downward propagating shocks were much weaker than was one observed in the July 9, 1996 flare, which caused a strong helioseismic response. It was concluded that most of the observed impulsive variations result from direct impact of high-energy particles. Computer codes were developed for further study of these phenomena.

  13. T-cell activation and early gene response in dogs.

    PubMed

    Mortlock, Sally-Anne; Wei, Jerry; Williamson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    T-cells play a crucial role in canine immunoregulation and defence against invading pathogens. Proliferation is fundamental to T-cell differentiation, homeostasis and immune response. Initiation of proliferation following receptor mediated stimuli requires a temporally programmed gene response that can be identified as immediate-early, mid- and late phases. The immediate-early response genes in T-cell activation engage the cell cycle machinery and promote subsequent gene activation events. Genes involved in this immediate-early response in dogs are yet to be identified. The present study was undertaken to characterise the early T-cell gene response in dogs to improve understanding of the genetic mechanisms regulating immune function. Gene expression profiles were characterised using canine gene expression microarrays and quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR), and paired samples from eleven dogs. Significant functional annotation clusters were identified following stimulation with phytohemagluttinin (PHA) (5μg/ml), including the Toll-like receptor signaling pathway and phosphorylation pathways. Using strict statistical criteria, 13 individual genes were found to be differentially expressed, nine of which have ontologies that relate to proliferation and cell cycle control. These included, prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2/COX2), early growth response 1 (EGR1), growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible gene (GADD45B), phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced protein 1 (PMAIP1), V-FOS FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog (FOS), early growth response 2 (EGR2), hemogen (HEMGN), polo-like kinase 2 (PLK2) and polo-like kinase 3 (PLK3). Differential gene expression was re-examined using qRT-PCR, which confirmed that EGR1, EGR2, PMAIP1, PTGS2, FOS and GADD45B were significantly upregulated in stimulated cells and ALAS2 downregulated. PTGS2 and EGR1 showed the highest levels of response in these dogs. Both of these genes are involved in cell cycle

  14. Flares in childhood eczema.

    PubMed

    Langan, S M

    2009-01-01

    Eczema is a major public health problem affecting children worldwide. Few studies have directly assessed triggers for disease flares. This paper presents evidence from a published systematic review and a prospective cohort study looking at flare factors in eczema. This systematic review suggested that foodstuffs in selected groups, dust exposure, unfamiliar pets, seasonal variation, stress, and irritants may be important in eczema flares. We performed a prospective cohort study that focused on environmental factors and identified associations between exposure to nylon clothing, dust, unfamiliar pets, sweating, shampoo, and eczema flares. Results from this study also demonstrated some new key findings. First, the effect of shampoo was found to increase in cold weather, and second, combinations of environmental factors were associated with disease exacerbation, supporting a multiple component disease model. This information is likely to be useful to families and may lead to the ability to reduce disease flares in the future. PMID:20054505

  15. Early Twentieth Century Responses to the Drug Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfennig, Dennis Joseph

    1991-01-01

    Describes early twentieth-century responses to the drug problem in the United States. Discusses pressure from the media and reformers to control the availability of drugs such as opium and cocaine that were widely available in over-the-counter medications. Focuses on New York State, which took the lead in enacting drug control legislation. (DK)

  16. The Reasons behind Early Adolescents' Responses to Peer Victimization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellmore, Amy; Chen, Wei-Ting; Rischall, Emily

    2013-01-01

    Victims of school-based peer harassment face a range of risks including psycho-social, physical, and academic harm. The aim of the present study was to examine the behavioral coping responses used by early adolescents when they face peer victimization. To meet this aim, 216 sixth grade students (55% girls) from two urban middle schools and 254…

  17. Global Early Care and Education: Challenges, Responses, and Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuman, Michelle J.

    2005-01-01

    This article presents some pressing challenges facing early care and education policy and practice around the world and then highlights diverse country responses to these challenges with the goal of informing American decision-making. It focuses on three key cross-national challenges that are particularly relevant to current debates in the United…

  18. Conceptualizing Developmentally Responsive Teaching in Early Field Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Penny B.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive qualitative study was to examine case study as a pedagogical tool used to scaffold the conceptualization of developmentally responsive pedagogy for middle level preservice teachers in early field experiences. Child study projects (CSP) completed by middle level preservice candidates were analyzed to determine if…

  19. A Framework for Providing Culturally Responsive Early Intervention Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a framework that offers a way for early intervention (EI) service providers to better meet the needs of the culturally diverse children and families they serve. This framework was created to organize existing research and literature on cultural responsiveness in a way that fit the unique context of EI. The…

  20. A Comparison of Responsive Interventions on Kindergarteners' Early Reading Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Mary E.; Rawlinson, D'Ann; Simmons, Deborah C.; Kim, Minjung; Kwok, Oi-man; Hagan-Burke, Shanna; Simmons, Leslie E.; Fogarty, Melissa; Oslund, Eric; Coyne, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the effects of Tier 2 reading interventions that operated in response-to-intervention contexts. Kindergarten children (N = 90) who were identified as at risk for reading difficulties were stratified by school and randomly assigned to receive (a) Early Reading Intervention (ERI; Pearson/Scott Foresman, 2004) modified in response…

  1. Structures in the Algol Corona: Searching for Flare Eclipses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favata, Fabio

    Our recent successful observation of a total eclipse of a large flare on Algol (with BeppoSAX) has demonstrated the diagnostic power of flare eclipses, allowing for the first time to derive the size of the coronal structure responsible for a stellar flare (and thus by inference the size of coronal structures in general) on purely geometrical grounds. The loop is compact, much smaller than deduced by the analysis of the flare decay, and located on the pole of the active star. We propose to observe Algol for two binary orbits searching for similar flare eclipses. Further detections of flare eclipses (for which RXTE, with its large effective area is ideally suited) will allow to directly constrain the characteristic sized of structures in the Algol corona.

  2. Comment on 'The solar flare myth' by J. T. Gosling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Hugh; Haisch, Bernhard; Strong, Keith T.

    1995-01-01

    In a recent paper Gosling (1993) claims that solar flares are relatively unimportant for understanding the terrestrial consequences of solar activity, and argues that coronal mass ejections (CMEs) produce the most powerful terrestrial disturbances. This opinion conflicts with observation, as it is well known that CMEs and flares are closely associated, and we disagree with Gosling's insistence on a simplistic cause-and-effect description of the interrelated phenomena of a solar flare. In this brief response we present new Yohkoh data and review older results that demonstrate the close relationships among CMEs, flares, filament eruptions, and other forms of energy release such as particle acceleration.

  3. COMPTEL solar flare observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. M.; Aarts, H.; Bennett, K.; Debrunner, H.; Devries, C.; Denherder, J. W.; Eymann, G.; Forrest, D. J.; Diehl, R.; Hermsen, W.

    1992-01-01

    COMPTEL as part of a solar target of opportunity campaign observed the sun during the period of high solar activity from 7-15 Jun. 1991. Major flares were observed on 9 and 11 Jun. Although both flares were large GOES events (greater than or = X10), they were not extraordinary in terms of gamma-ray emission. Only the decay phase of the 15 Jun. flare was observed by COMPTEL. We report the preliminary analysis of data from these flares, including the first spectroscopic measurement of solar flare neutrons. The deuterium formation line at 2.223 MeV was present in both events and for at least the 9 Jun. event, was comparable to the flux in the nuclear line region of 4-8 MeV, consistent with Solar-Maximum Mission (SSM) Observations. A clear neutron signal was present in the flare of 9 Jun. with the spectrum extending up to 80 MeV and consistent in time with the emission of gamma-rays, confirming the utility of COMPTEL in measuring the solar neutron flux at low energies. The neutron flux below 100 MeV appears to be lower than that of the 3 Jun. 1982 flare by more than an order of magnitude. The neutron signal of the 11 Jun. event is under study. Severe dead time effects resulting from the intense thermal x-rays require significant corrections to the measured flux which increase the magnitude of the associated systematic uncertainties.

  4. Early growth and postprandial appetite regulatory hormone responses.

    PubMed

    Perälä, Mia-Maria; Kajantie, Eero; Valsta, Liisa M; Holst, Jens J; Leiviskä, Jaana; Eriksson, Johan G

    2013-11-14

    Strong epidemiological evidence suggests that slow prenatal or postnatal growth is associated with an increased risk of CVD and other metabolic diseases. However, little is known whether early growth affects postprandial metabolism and, especially, the appetite regulatory hormone system. Therefore, we investigated the impact of early growth on postprandial appetite regulatory hormone responses to two high-protein and two high-fat content meals. Healthy, 65-75-year-old volunteers from the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study were recruited; twelve with a slow increase in BMI during the first year of life (SGI group) and twelve controls. Subjects ate a test meal (whey meal, casein meal, SFA meal and PUFA meal) once in a random order. Plasma glucose, insulin, TAG, NEFA, ghrelin, peptide tyrosine-tyrosine (PYY), glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide, glucagon-like peptide-1 and a satiety profile were measured in the fasting state and for 4 h after each test meal. Compared with the controls, the SGI group had about 1·5-fold higher insulin responses after the whey meal (P= 0·037), casein meal (P= 0·023) and PUFA meal (P= 0·002). TAG responses were 34-69 % higher for the SGI group, but only the PUFA-meal responses differed significantly between the groups. The PYY response of the SGI group was 44 % higher after the whey meal (P= 0·046) and 115 % higher after the casein meal (P= 0·025) compared with the controls. No other statistically significant differences were seen between the groups. In conclusion, early growth may have a role in programming appetite regulatory hormone secretion in later life. Slow early growth is also associated with higher postprandial insulin and TAG responses but not with incretin levels.

  5. Cell-mediated immune responses to COPV early proteins.

    PubMed

    Jain, Suchitra; Moore, Richard A; Anderson, Davina M; Gough, Gerald W; Stanley, Margaret A

    Cell-mediated immunity plays a key role in the regression of papillomavirus-induced warts and intra-epithelial lesions but the target antigens that induce this response are not clear. Canine oral papillomavirus (COPV) infection of the oral cavity in dogs is a well-characterized model of mucosal papillomavirus infection that permits analysis of the immune events during the infectious cycle. In this study we show that during the COPV infectious cycle, systemic T cell responses to peptides of several early proteins particularly the E2 protein, as assayed by delayed type hypersensitivity, lymphoproliferation and IFN-gamma ELISPOT, can be detected. The maximal response occurs in a narrow time window that coincides with maximal viral DNA replication and wart regression: thereafter, systemic T cell responses to early proteins decline quite rapidly. Vaccination using particle-mediated immunotherapeutic delivery (PMID) of codon-modified COPV E2 and E1 genes induces strong antigen-specific cell-mediated immune responses in the vaccinated animals. These data show that therapeutic immunization by PMID with codon-modified E2 is completely effective, that to E1 is partially protective, that this correlates with the intensity of antigen-specific cell-mediated immune responses and, further, they emphasize the importance of these responses and the route of immunization in the generation of protective immunity. PMID:16949120

  6. Tube flare inspection tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meunier, G. E.

    1980-01-01

    Flare angle and symmetry of tube ends can be checked by simple tool that consists of two stainless steel pins bonded to rubber plug. Primary function of tool is to inspect tubes before they are installed, thereby eliminating expense and inconvenience of repairing leaks caused by imperfect flares. Measuring hole tapers, countersink angles, and bearing race angles are other possible uses. Tool is used with optical comparator. Axis of tool is alined with centerline of tube. Shadow of seated pins on comparator screen allows operator to verify flare angle is within tolerance.

  7. What Causes Lupus Flares?

    PubMed

    Fernandez, David; Kirou, Kyriakos A

    2016-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the prototypic systemic autoimmune disease, follows a chronic disease course, punctuated by flares. Disease flares often occur without apparent cause, perhaps from progressive inherent buildup of autoimmunity. However, there is evidence that certain environmental factors may trigger the disease. These include exposure to UV light, infections, certain hormones, and drugs which may activate the innate and adaptive immune system, resulting in inflammation, cytotoxic effects, and clinical symptoms. Uncontrolled disease flares, as well as their treatment, especially with glucocorticoids, can cause significant organ damage. Tight surveillance and timely control of lupus flares with judicial use of effective treatments to adequately suppress the excessive immune system activation are required to bring about long term remission of the disease. We hope that new clinical trials will soon offer additional effective and target-specific biologic treatments for SLE.

  8. Implementation of responsiveness to intervention in early education settings.

    PubMed

    Justice, Laura M; McGinty, Anita; Guo, Ying; Moore, Douglas

    2009-05-01

    This article provides an overview of how response to intervention (RTI) may be used effectively within early childhood settings. Discussion is organized to address such issues regarding RTI implementation as (1) how to design and implement a high-quality Tier 1 learning environment that systematically improves children's language and literacy outcomes, (2) how to design and implement a high-quality Tier 2 supplemental learning intervention that systematically improves the language and literacy outcomes of children who are unresponsive to Tier 1, and (3) how to design and implement a comprehensive and cohesive assessment system that appropriately identifies children who show inadequate response to the Tier 1 and Tier 2 learning opportunities. A model for implementing RTI using the supplemental curriculum by Justice and McGinty, READ IT AGAIN-PREK! (2008), is presented. This tool was developed to meet the needs of early childhood programs as they seek to implement RIA in a cost-effective and scalable manner.

  9. The solar flare myth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Many years of research have demonstrated that large, nonrecurrent geomagnetic storms, shock wave disturbances in the solar wind, and energetic particle events in interplanetary space often occur in close association with large solar flares. This result has led to a pradigm of cause and effect - that large solar flares are the fundamental cause of these events in the near-Earth space environmemt. This paradigm, which I call 'the solar flare myth,' dominates the popular perception of the relationship between solar activity and interplanetary and geomagnetic events and has provided much of the pragmatic rationale for the study of the solar flare phenomenon. Yet there is good evidence that this paradigm is wrong and that flares do not generally play a central role in producing major transient disturbances in the near-Earth space environment. In this paper I outline a different paradigm of cause and effect that removes solar flares from their central position in the chain of events leading from the Sun to near-Earth space. Instead, this central role is given to events known as coronal mass ejections.

  10. Urologic Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome Symptom Flares: Characterization of the Full Spectrum of Flares at Two Sites of the Mapp Research Network

    PubMed Central

    Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Colditz, Graham A.; Goodman, Melody S.; Pakpahan, Ratna; Vetter, Joel; Ness, Timothy J.; Andriole, Gerald L.; Lai, H. Henry

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To describe the full spectrum of symptom exacerbations defined by interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome patients as flares, and to investigate their associated health-care utilization and bother at two sites of the Trans-Multidisciplinary Approaches to the Study of Chronic Pelvic Pain (Trans-MAPP) Epidemiology and Phenotyping study. Patients and methods Participants completed a flare survey that asked them: 1) whether they had ever had flares (“symptoms that are much worse than usual”) that lasted <1 hr, >1 hr and <1 day, and >1 day; and 2) for each duration of flare, to report their: a) average length and frequency; b) typical levels of urologic and pelvic pain symptoms; and c) levels of health-care utilization and bother. We compared participants' responses to their non-flare Trans-MAPP values and across flares using generalized linear mixed models. Results Seventy six of 85 participants (89.4%) completed the flare survey, 72 of whom reported having flares (94.7%). Flares varied widely in terms of their duration (seconds to months), frequency (several times per day to once per year or less), and intensity and type of symptoms (e.g., pelvic pain versus urologic symptoms). Flares of all duration were associated with greater pelvic pain, urologic symptoms, disruption to participants' activities, and bother, with increasing severity of each of these factors as the duration of flares increased. Days-long flares were also associated with greater health-care utilization. In addition to duration, symptoms (pelvic pain, in particular) were also significant determinants of flare-related bother. Conclusions Our findings suggest that flares are common and associated with greater symptoms, health-care utilization, disruption, and bother. Our findings also inform the characteristics of flares most bothersome to patients (i.e., increased pelvic pain and duration), and thus of greatest importance to

  11. A solar tornado triggered by flares?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panesar, N. K.; Innes, D. E.; Tiwari, S. K.; Low, B. C.

    2013-01-01

    Context. Solar tornados are dynamical, conspicuously helical magnetic structures that are mainly observed as a prominence activity. Aims: We investigate and propose a triggering mechanism for the solar tornado observed in a prominence cavity by SDO/AIA on September 25, 2011. Methods: High-cadence EUV images from the SDO/AIA and the Ahead spacecraft of STEREO/EUVI are used to correlate three flares in the neighbouring active-region (NOAA 11303) and their EUV waves with the dynamical developments of the tornado. The timings of the flares and EUV waves observed on-disk in 195 Å are analysed in relation to the tornado activities observed at the limb in 171 Å. Results: Each of the three flares and its related EUV wave occurred within ten hours of the onset of the tornado. They have an observed causal relationship with the commencement of activity in the prominence where the tornado develops. Tornado-like rotations along the side of the prominence start after the second flare. The prominence cavity expands with the accelerating tornado motion after the third flare. Conclusions: Flares in the neighbouring active region may have affected the cavity prominence system and triggered the solar tornado. A plausible mechanism is that the active-region coronal field contracted by the "Hudson effect" through the loss of magnetic energy as flares. Subsequently, the cavity expanded by its magnetic pressure to fill the surrounding low corona. We suggest that the tornado is the dynamical response of the helical prominence field to the cavity expansion. Movies are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  12. Inhibited early immunologic response is associated with hypertrophic scarring.

    PubMed

    Butzelaar, Liselotte; Schooneman, Dennis P M; Soykan, Ezgi A; Talhout, Wendy; Ulrich, Magda M W; van den Broek, Lenie J; Gibbs, Susan; Beelen, Robert H J; Mink van der Molen, Aebele B; Niessen, Frank B

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to examine changes in the inflammatory response in early hypertrophic compared to normal wound healing. The immune system is thought to be involved in hypertrophic scar formation. However, the exact mechanism and time of onset of the derailment remain unknown. In a prospective observational study, skin biopsies were taken directly postwounding and 3 hours later from patients who had elective cardiothoracic surgery. The skin biopsies were analysed for mRNA, proteins and cells involved in the early inflammatory phase of wound healing. The endpoint was scar outcome (hypertrophic (HTS) or normal (NTS)) at one year after surgery. There were significant differences between the NTS and HTS groups regarding the fold changes of mRNA expression of P-selectin during surgery. Postoperative skin concentrations of inflammatory proteins IL-6, IL-8 and CCL2 were significantly lower in the HTS compared to the NTS group. Also, a trend of higher pre-operative M2 macrophage numbers was observed in the HTS group. Neutrophil numbers increased equally during surgery in both groups. The increase of P-selectin mRNA in hypertrophic wound healing could affect leucocyte migration. The decreased concentrations of inflammatory proteins in hypertrophic wound healing indicate a reduced inflammatory response, which has consequences for the treatment of hypertrophic scarring during the early inflammatory phase. In a conclusion, alterations of wound healing associated with hypertrophic scarring are visible as early as 3 hours postwounding and include a reduced rather than increased inflammatory protein response. PMID:27249786

  13. Stomatal Blue Light Response Is Present in Early Vascular Plants.

    PubMed

    Doi, Michio; Kitagawa, Yuki; Shimazaki, Ken-ichiro

    2015-10-01

    Light is a major environmental factor required for stomatal opening. Blue light (BL) induces stomatal opening in higher plants as a signal under the photosynthetic active radiation. The stomatal BL response is not present in the fern species of Polypodiopsida. The acquisition of a stomatal BL response might provide competitive advantages in both the uptake of CO2 and prevention of water loss with the ability to rapidly open and close stomata. We surveyed the stomatal opening in response to strong red light (RL) and weak BL under the RL with gas exchange technique in a diverse selection of plant species from euphyllophytes, including spermatophytes and monilophytes, to lycophytes. We showed the presence of RL-induced stomatal opening in most of these species and found that the BL responses operated in all euphyllophytes except Polypodiopsida. We also confirmed that the stomatal opening in lycophytes, the early vascular plants, is driven by plasma membrane proton-translocating adenosine triphosphatase and K(+) accumulation in guard cells, which is the same mechanism operating in stomata of angiosperms. These results suggest that the early vascular plants respond to both RL and BL and actively regulate stomatal aperture. We also found three plant species that absolutely require BL for both stomatal opening and photosynthetic CO2 fixation, including a gymnosperm, C. revoluta, and the ferns Equisetum hyemale and Psilotum nudum. PMID:26307440

  14. Stomatal Blue Light Response Is Present in Early Vascular Plants.

    PubMed

    Doi, Michio; Kitagawa, Yuki; Shimazaki, Ken-ichiro

    2015-10-01

    Light is a major environmental factor required for stomatal opening. Blue light (BL) induces stomatal opening in higher plants as a signal under the photosynthetic active radiation. The stomatal BL response is not present in the fern species of Polypodiopsida. The acquisition of a stomatal BL response might provide competitive advantages in both the uptake of CO2 and prevention of water loss with the ability to rapidly open and close stomata. We surveyed the stomatal opening in response to strong red light (RL) and weak BL under the RL with gas exchange technique in a diverse selection of plant species from euphyllophytes, including spermatophytes and monilophytes, to lycophytes. We showed the presence of RL-induced stomatal opening in most of these species and found that the BL responses operated in all euphyllophytes except Polypodiopsida. We also confirmed that the stomatal opening in lycophytes, the early vascular plants, is driven by plasma membrane proton-translocating adenosine triphosphatase and K(+) accumulation in guard cells, which is the same mechanism operating in stomata of angiosperms. These results suggest that the early vascular plants respond to both RL and BL and actively regulate stomatal aperture. We also found three plant species that absolutely require BL for both stomatal opening and photosynthetic CO2 fixation, including a gymnosperm, C. revoluta, and the ferns Equisetum hyemale and Psilotum nudum.

  15. Flares and habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrevaya, Ximena C.; Cortón, Eduardo; Mauas, Pablo J. D.

    2012-07-01

    At present, dwarf M stars are being considered as potential hosts for habitable planets. However, an important fraction of these stars are flare stars, which among other kind of radiation, emit large amounts of UV radiation during flares, and it is unknown how this events can affect life, since biological systems are particularly vulnerable to UV. In this work we evaluate a well known dMe star, EV Lacertae (GJ 873) as a potential host for the emergence and evolution of life, focusing on the effects of the UV emission associated with flare activity. Since UV-C is particularly harmful for living organisms, we studied the effect of UV-C radiation on halophile archaea cultures. The halophile archaea or haloarchaea are extremophile microorganisms, which inhabit in hypersaline environments and which show several mechanisms to cope with UV radiation since they are naturally exposed to intense solar UV radiation on Earth. To select the irradiance to be tested, we considered a moderate flare on this star. We obtained the mean value for the UV-C irradiance integrating the IUE spectrum in the impulsive phase, and considering a hypothetical planet in the center of the liquid water habitability zone. To select the irradiation times we took the most frequent duration of flares on this star which is from 9 to 27 minutes. Our results show that even after considerable UV damage, the haloarchaeal cells survive at the tested doses, showing that this kind of life could survive in a relatively hostile UV environment.

  16. FLARING PATTERNS IN BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Paggi, A.; Cavaliere, A.; Tavani, M.; Vittorini, V.; D'Ammando, F.

    2011-08-01

    Blazars radiate from relativistic jets launched by a supermassive black hole along our line of sight; the subclass of flat spectrum radio quasars exhibits broad emission lines, a telltale sign of a gas-rich environment and high accretion rate, contrary to the other subclass of the BL Lacertae objects. We show that this dichotomy of the sources in physical properties is enhanced in their flaring activity. The BL Lac flares yielded spectral evidence of being driven by further acceleration of highly relativistic electrons in the jet. Here, we discuss spectral fits of multi-{lambda} data concerning strong flares of the two flat spectrum radio quasars 3C 454.3 and 3C 279 recently detected in {gamma}-rays by the AGILE and Fermi satellites. We find that optimal spectral fits are provided by external Compton radiation enhanced by increasing production of thermal seed photons by growing accretion. We find such flares to trace patterns on the jet-power-electron-energy plane that diverge from those followed by flaring BL Lac objects and discuss why these occur.

  17. Flare Plasma Iron Abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Dan, Chau; Jain, Rajmal; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    The equivalent width of the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV seen in flare X-ray spectra suggests that the iron abundance of the hottest plasma at temperatures >approx.10 MK may sometimes be significantly lower than the nominal coronal abundance of four times the photospheric value that is commonly assumed. This conclusion is based on X-ray spectral observations of several flares seen in common with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) on the second Indian geostationary satellite, GSAT-2. The implications of this will be discussed as it relates to the origin of the hot flare plasma - either plasma already in the corona that is directly heated during the flare energy release process or chromospheric plasma that is heated by flare-accelerated particles and driven up into the corona. Other possible explanations of lower-than-expected equivalent widths of the iron-line complex will also be discussed.

  18. Early immune responses accompanying human asymptomatic Ebola infections

    PubMed Central

    Leroy, E M; Baize, S; Debre, P; Lansoud-Soukate, J; Mavoungou, E

    2001-01-01

    In a recent study we identified certain asymptomatic individuals infected by Ebola virus (EBOV) who mounted specific IgG and early and strong inflammatory responses. Here, we further characterized the primary immune response to EBOV during the course of asymptomatic infection in humans. Inflammatory responses occurred in temporal association with anti-inflammatory phase composed by soluble antagonist IL-1RA, circulating TNF receptors, IL-10 and cortisol. At the end of the inflammatory process, mRNA expression of T-cell cytokines (IL-2 and IL-4) and activation markers (CD28, CD40L and CTLA4) was up-regulated, strongly suggesting T-cell activation. This T-cell activation was followed by EBOV-specific IgG responses (mainly IgG3 ang IgG1), and by marked and sustained up-regulation of IFNγ, FasL and perforin mRNA expression, suggesting activation of cytotoxic cells. The terminal down-regulation of these latter markers coincided with the release of the apoptotic marker 41/7 NMP in blood and with the disappearance of viral RNA from PBMC, suggesting that infected cells are eliminated by cytotoxic mechanisms. Finally, RT-PCR analysis of TCR-Vβ repertoire usage showed that TCR-Vβ12 mRNA was never expressed during the infection. Taken together, these findings improve our understanding about immune response during human asymptomatic Ebola infection, and throw new light on protection against Ebola virus. PMID:11472407

  19. THERMAL FRONTS IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Karlický, Marian

    2015-12-01

    We studied the formation of a thermal front during the expansion of hot plasma into colder plasma. We used a three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell model that includes inductive effects. In early phases, in the area of the expanding hot plasma, we found several thermal fronts, which are defined as a sudden decrease of the local electron kinetic energy. The fronts formed a cascade. Thermal fronts with higher temperature contrast were located near plasma density depressions, generated during the hot plasma expansion. The formation of the main thermal front was associated with the return-current process induced by hot electron expansion and electrons backscattered at the front. A part of the hot plasma was trapped by the thermal front while another part, mainly with the most energetic electrons, escaped and generated Langmuir and electromagnetic waves in front of the thermal front, as shown by the dispersion diagrams. Considering all of these processes and those described in the literature, we show that anomalous electric resistivity is produced at the location of the thermal front. Thus, the thermal front can contribute to energy dissipation in the current-carrying loops of solar flares. We estimated the values of such anomalous resistivity in the solar atmosphere together with collisional resistivity and electric fields. We propose that the slowly drifting reverse drift bursts, observed at the beginning of some solar flares, could be signatures of the thermal front.

  20. Thermal Fronts in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlický, Marian

    2015-12-01

    We studied the formation of a thermal front during the expansion of hot plasma into colder plasma. We used a three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell model that includes inductive effects. In early phases, in the area of the expanding hot plasma, we found several thermal fronts, which are defined as a sudden decrease of the local electron kinetic energy. The fronts formed a cascade. Thermal fronts with higher temperature contrast were located near plasma density depressions, generated during the hot plasma expansion. The formation of the main thermal front was associated with the return-current process induced by hot electron expansion and electrons backscattered at the front. A part of the hot plasma was trapped by the thermal front while another part, mainly with the most energetic electrons, escaped and generated Langmuir and electromagnetic waves in front of the thermal front, as shown by the dispersion diagrams. Considering all of these processes and those described in the literature, we show that anomalous electric resistivity is produced at the location of the thermal front. Thus, the thermal front can contribute to energy dissipation in the current-carrying loops of solar flares. We estimated the values of such anomalous resistivity in the solar atmosphere together with collisional resistivity and electric fields. We propose that the slowly drifting reverse drift bursts, observed at the beginning of some solar flares, could be signatures of the thermal front.

  1. Fields, Flares, And Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucheron, L.; Al-Ghraibah, Amani; McAteer, J.; Cao, H.; Jackiewicz, J.; McNamara, B.; Voelz, D.; Calabro, B.; DeGrave, K.; Kirk, M.; Madadi, A.; Petsov, A.; Taylor, G.

    2011-05-01

    Solar active regions are the source of many energetic and geo-effective events such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Understanding how these complex source regions evolve and produce these events is of fundamental importance, not only to solar physics, but also to the demands of space weather forecasting. We propose to investigate the physical properties of active region magnetic fields using fractal-, gradient-, neutral line-, emerging flux-, wavelet- and general image-based techniques, and to correlate them to solar activity. The combination of these projects with solarmonitor.org and the international Max Millenium Campaign presents an opportunity for accurate and timely flare predictions for the first time. Many studies have attempted to relate solar flares to their concomitant magnetic field distributions. However, a consistent, causal relationship between the magnetic field on the photosphere and the production of solar flares is unknown. Often the local properties of the active region magnetic field - critical in many theories of activity - are lost in the global definition of their diagnostics, in effect smoothing out variations that occur on small spatial scales. Mindful of this, our overall goal is to create measures that are sensitive to both the global and the small-scale nature of energy storage and release in the solar atmosphere in order to study solar flare prediction. This set of active region characteristics will be automatically explored for discriminating features through the use of feature selection methods. Such methods search a feature space while optimizing a criterion - the prediction of a flare in this case. The large size of the datasets used in this project make it well suited for an exploration of a large feature space. This work is funded through a New Mexico State University Interdisciplinary Research Grant.

  2. Solar flare model atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawley, Suzanne L.; Fisher, George H.

    1993-01-01

    Solar flare model atmospheres computed under the assumption of energetic equilibrium in the chromosphere are presented. The models use a static, one-dimensional plane parallel geometry and are designed within a physically self-consistent coronal loop. Assumed flare heating mechanisms include collisions from a flux of non-thermal electrons and x-ray heating of the chromosphere by the corona. The heating by energetic electrons accounts explicitly for variations of the ionized fraction with depth in the atmosphere. X-ray heating of the chromosphere by the corona incorporates a flare loop geometry by approximating distant portions of the loop with a series of point sources, while treating the loop leg closest to the chromospheric footpoint in the plane-parallel approximation. Coronal flare heating leads to increased heat conduction, chromospheric evaporation and subsequent changes in coronal pressure; these effects are included self-consistently in the models. Cooling in the chromosphere is computed in detail for the important optically thick HI, CaII and MgII transitions using the non-LTE prescription in the program MULTI. Hydrogen ionization rates from x-ray photo-ionization and collisional ionization by non-thermal electrons are included explicitly in the rate equations. The models are computed in the 'impulsive' and 'equilibrium' limits, and in a set of intermediate 'evolving' states. The impulsive atmospheres have the density distribution frozen in pre-flare configuration, while the equilibrium models assume the entire atmosphere is in hydrostatic and energetic equilibrium. The evolving atmospheres represent intermediate stages where hydrostatic equilibrium has been established in the chromosphere and corona, but the corona is not yet in energetic equilibrium with the flare heating source. Thus, for example, chromospheric evaporation is still in the process of occurring.

  3. Valentines Day X2 Flare

    NASA Video Gallery

    Active region 1158 let loose with an X2.2 flare at 0153 UT or 8:50 pm ET on February 15, 2011, the largest flare since Dec. 2006 and the biggest flare so far in Solar Cycle 24. This video was taken...

  4. Responsiveness of the core set, response criteria, and utilities in early rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Verhoeven, A; Boers, M; van der Linden, S

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Validation of responsiveness and discriminative power of the World Health Organisation/International League of Associations for Rheumatology (WHO/ILAR) core set, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), and European League for Rheumatology (EULAR) criteria for improvement/response, and other single and combined measures (indices) in a trial in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
METHODS—Ranking of measures by response (standardised response means and effect sizes) and between-group discrimination (unpaired t test and χ2 values) at two time points in the COBRA study. This study included 155 patients with early RA randomly allocated to two treatment groups with distinct levels of expected response: combined treatment, high response; sulfasalazine treatment, moderate response.
RESULTS—At week 16, standardised response means of core set measures ranged between 0.8 and 3.5 for combined treatment and between 0.4 and 1.2 for sulfasalazine treatment (95% confidence interval ±0.25). Performance of patient oriented measures (for example, pain, global assessment) was best when the questions were focused on the disease. The most responsive single measure was the patient's assessment of change in disease activity, at 3.5. Patient utility, a generic health status measure, was moderately (rating scale) to poorly (standard gamble) responsive. Response means of most indices (combined measures) exceeded 2.0, the simple count of core set measures improved by 20% was most responsive at 4.1. Discrimination performance yielded similar but not identical results: best discrimination between treatment groups was achieved by the EULAR response and ACR improvement criteria (at 20% and other percentage levels), the pooled index, and the disease activity score (DAS), but also by the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and grip strength.
CONCLUSIONS—Responsiveness and discrimination between levels of response are not identical concepts, and

  5. Plasma-Sprayed Titanium Patterns for Enhancing Early Cell Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yunqi; Xie, Youtao; Pan, Houhua; Zheng, Xuebin; Huang, Liping; Ji, Fang; Li, Kai

    2016-06-01

    Titanium coating has been widely used as a biocompatible metal in biomedical applications. However, the early cell responses and long-term fixation of titanium implants are not satisfied. To obviate these defects, in this paper, micro-post arrays with various widths (150-1000 μm) and intervals (100-300 μm) were fabricated on the titanium substrate by template-assisted plasma spraying technology. In vitro cell culture experiments showed that MC3T3-E1 cells exhibited significantly higher osteogenic differentiation as well as slightly improved adhesion and proliferation on the micro-patterned coatings compared with the traditional one. The cell number on the pattern with 1000 µm width reached 130% after 6 days of incubation, and the expressions of osteopontin (OPN) as well as osteocalcin (OC) were doubled. No obvious difference was found in cell adhesion on various size patterns. The present micro-patterned coatings proposed a new modification method for the traditional plasma spraying technology to enhance the early cell responses and convenience for the bone in-growth.

  6. Detection of early plant stress responses in hyperspectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behmann, Jan; Steinrücken, Jörg; Plümer, Lutz

    2014-07-01

    Early stress detection in crop plants is highly relevant, but hard to achieve. We hypothesize that close range hyperspectral imaging is able to uncover stress related processes non-destructively in the early stages which are invisible to the human eye. We propose an approach which combines unsupervised and supervised methods in order to identify several stages of progressive stress development from series of hyperspectral images. Stress of an entire plant is detected by stress response levels at pixel scale. The focus is on drought stress in barley (Hordeum vulgare). Unsupervised learning is used to separate hyperspectral signatures into clusters related to different stages of stress response and progressive senescence. Whereas all such signatures may be found in both, well watered and drought stressed plants, their respective distributions differ. Ordinal classification with Support Vector Machines (SVM) is used to quantify and visualize the distribution of progressive stages of senescence and to separate well watered from drought stressed plants. For each senescence stage a distinctive set of most relevant Vegetation Indices (VIs) is identified. The method has been applied on two experiments involving potted barley plants under well watered and drought stress conditions in a greenhouse. Drought stress is detected up to ten days earlier than using NDVI. Furthermore, it is shown that some VIs have overall relevance, while others are specific to particular senescence stages. The transferability of the method to the field is illustrated by an experiment on maize (Zea mays).

  7. Implementation of responsiveness to intervention in early education settings.

    PubMed

    Justice, Laura M; McGinty, Anita; Guo, Ying; Moore, Douglas

    2009-05-01

    This article provides an overview of how response to intervention (RTI) may be used effectively within early childhood settings. Discussion is organized to address such issues regarding RTI implementation as (1) how to design and implement a high-quality Tier 1 learning environment that systematically improves children's language and literacy outcomes, (2) how to design and implement a high-quality Tier 2 supplemental learning intervention that systematically improves the language and literacy outcomes of children who are unresponsive to Tier 1, and (3) how to design and implement a comprehensive and cohesive assessment system that appropriately identifies children who show inadequate response to the Tier 1 and Tier 2 learning opportunities. A model for implementing RTI using the supplemental curriculum by Justice and McGinty, READ IT AGAIN-PREK! (2008), is presented. This tool was developed to meet the needs of early childhood programs as they seek to implement RIA in a cost-effective and scalable manner. PMID:19399693

  8. GAMMA-RAY BURST FLARES: ULTRAVIOLET/OPTICAL FLARING. I

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, C. A.; Roming, P. W. A.; De Pasquale, M.; Oates, S. R.

    2013-09-01

    We present a previously unused method for the detection of flares in gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves and use this method to detect flares in the ultraviolet/optical. The algorithm makes use of the Bayesian Information Criterion to analyze the residuals of the fitted light curve, removing all major features, and to determine the statistically best fit to the data by iteratively adding additional ''breaks'' to the light curve. These additional breaks represent the individual components of the detected flares: T{sub start}, T{sub stop}, and T{sub peak}. We present the detection of 119 unique flaring periods detected by applying this algorithm to light curves taken from the Second Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) GRB Afterglow Catalog. We analyzed 201 UVOT GRB light curves and found episodes of flaring in 68 of the light curves. For those light curves with flares, we find an average number of {approx}2 flares per GRB. Flaring is generally restricted to the first 1000 s of the afterglow, but can be observed and detected beyond 10{sup 5} s. More than 80% of the flares detected are short in duration with {Delta}t/t of <0.5. Flares were observed with flux ratios relative to the underlying light curve of between 0.04 and 55.42. Many of the strongest flares were also seen at greater than 1000 s after the burst.

  9. Statistical aspects of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    1987-01-01

    A survey of the statistical properties of 850 H alpha solar flares during 1975 is presented. Comparison of the results found here with those reported elsewhere for different epochs is accomplished. Distributions of rise time, decay time, and duration are given, as are the mean, mode, median, and 90th percentile values. Proportions by selected groupings are also determined. For flares in general, mean values for rise time, decay time, and duration are 5.2 + or - 0.4 min, and 18.1 + or 1.1 min, respectively. Subflares, accounting for nearly 90 percent of the flares, had mean values lower than those found for flares of H alpha importance greater than 1, and the differences are statistically significant. Likewise, flares of bright and normal relative brightness have mean values of decay time and duration that are significantly longer than those computed for faint flares, and mass-motion related flares are significantly longer than non-mass-motion related flares. Seventy-three percent of the mass-motion related flares are categorized as being a two-ribbon flare and/or being accompanied by a high-speed dark filament. Slow rise time flares (rise time greater than 5 min) have a mean value for duration that is significantly longer than that computed for fast rise time flares, and long-lived duration flares (duration greater than 18 min) have a mean value for rise time that is significantly longer than that computed for short-lived duration flares, suggesting a positive linear relationship between rise time and duration for flares. Monthly occurrence rates for flares in general and by group are found to be linearly related in a positive sense to monthly sunspot number. Statistical testing reveals the association between sunspot number and numbers of flares to be significant at the 95 percent level of confidence, and the t statistic for slope is significant at greater than 99 percent level of confidence. Dependent upon the specific fit, between 58 percent and 94 percent of

  10. Electron beams in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Dennis, Brian R.; Benz, Arnold O.

    1994-01-01

    A list of publications resulting from this program includes 'The Timing of Electron Beam Signatures in Hard X-Ray and Radio: Solar Flare Observations by BATSE/Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory and PHOENIX'; 'Coherent-Phase or Random-Phase Acceleration of Electron Beams in Solar Flares'; 'Particle Acceleration in Flares'; 'Chromospheric Evaporation and Decimetric Radio Emission in Solar Flares'; 'Sequences of Correlated Hard X-Ray and Type 3 Bursts During Solar Flares'; and 'Solar Electron Beams Detected in Hard X-Rays and Radiowaves.' Abstracts and reprints of each are attached to this report.

  11. Diagnostics of Solar Flare Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallik, Procheta; Brown, J. C.; MacKinnon, A. L.

    2009-05-01

    For work on my thesis dissertation, we have been studying some energetic processes in solar flares. On our work on Hard X-ray (HXR) emission from flares, we have shown that recombination emission can exceed the bremsstrahlung HXR flux for certain flare conditions. We will show some spectral features characteristic of non-thermal recombination HXR emission and will suggest how it plays a significant role in the flare HXR continuum, something that has been ignored in the past. It is important to note that these results could demand a reconsideration of the numbers of accelerated electrons since recombination can be much more efficient in producing HXR photons than bremsstrahlung. In related work on diagnosing particle acceleration in flares, we also have an interest in studying solar neutrons. To this end, we will present our work done with new-age neutron detectors developed by our colleagues at the University of New Hampshire. Using laboratory and simulated data from the detector to produce its response matrix, we then employ regularisation and deconvolution techniques to produce encouraging results for data inversion. As a corollary, we have also been reconsidering the role of inverse Compton (IC) scattering of photospheric photons. Gamma-ray observations clearly show the presence of 100 MeV electrons and positrons in the solar corona, by-products of GeV energy ions. Here we will present results of IC scattering of such photons taking proper account of radiation field geometry near the solar surface. If observed, such radiation would let us determine the number of secondary positrons produced in large flares, contributing to a full picture of ion acceleration and to predicting neutron fluxes to be encountered by future inner heliosphere space missions. This work is supported by a UK STFC Rolling Grant and a Dorothy Hodgkin's Scholarship (PM).

  12. Solar flares: an overview.

    PubMed

    Rust, D M

    1992-01-01

    This is a survey of solar phenomena and physical models that may be useful for improving forecasts of solar flares and proton storms in interplanetary space. Knowledge of the physical processes that accelerate protons has advanced because of gamma-ray and X-ray observations from the Solar Maximum Mission telescopes. Protons are accelerated at the onset of flares, but the duration of any subsequent proton storm at 1 AU depends on the structure of the interplanetary fields. X-ray images of the solar corona show possible fast proton escape paths. Magnetographs and high-resolution visible-band images show the magnetic field structure near the acceleration region and the heating effects of sunward-directed protons. Preflare magnetic field growth and shear may be the most important clues to the physical processes that generate high energy solar particles. Any dramatic improvement in flare forecasts will require high resolution solar telescopes in space. Several possibilities for improvements in the art of flare forecasting are presented, among them: the use of acoustic tomography to probe for subsurface magnetic fields; a satellite-borne solar magnetograph; and an X-ray telescope to monitor the corona for eruptions.

  13. Enhancing early child care quality and learning for toddlers at risk: the responsive early childhood program.

    PubMed

    Landry, Susan H; Zucker, Tricia A; Taylor, Heather B; Swank, Paul R; Williams, Jeffrey M; Assel, Michael; Crawford, April; Huang, Weihua; Clancy-Menchetti, Jeanine; Lonigan, Christopher J; Phillips, Beth M; Eisenberg, Nancy; Spinrad, Tracy L; de Villiers, Jill; de Villiers, Peter; Barnes, Marcia; Starkey, Prentice; Klein, Alice

    2014-02-01

    Despite reports of positive effects of high-quality child care, few experimental studies have examined the process of improving low-quality center-based care for toddler-age children. In this article, we report intervention effects on child care teachers' behaviors and children's social, emotional, behavioral, early literacy, language, and math outcomes as well as the teacher-child relationship. The intervention targeted the use of a set of responsive teacher practices, derived from attachment and sociocultural theories, and a comprehensive curriculum. Sixty-five childcare classrooms serving low-income 2- and 3-year-old children were randomized into 3 conditions: business-as-usual control, Responsive Early Childhood Curriculum (RECC), and RECC plus explicit social-emotional classroom activities (RECC+). Classroom observations showed greater gains for RECC and RECC+ teachers' responsive practices including helping children manage their behavior, establishing a predictable schedule, and use of cognitively stimulating activities (e.g., shared book reading) compared with controls; however, teacher behaviors did not differ for focal areas such as sensitivity and positive discipline supports. Child assessments demonstrated that children in the interventions outperformed controls in areas of social and emotional development, although children's performance in control and intervention groups was similar for cognitive skills (language, literacy, and math). Results support the positive impact of responsive teachers and environments providing appropriate support for toddlers' social and emotional development. Possible explanations for the absence of systematic differences in children's cognitive skills are considered, including implications for practice and future research targeting low-income toddlers. PMID:23772822

  14. Forecasting Cell Death Dose-Response from Early Signal Transduction Responses In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Vrana, Julie A.; Currie, Holly N.; Han, Alice A.; Boyd, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    The rapid pharmacodynamic response of cells to toxic xenobiotics is primarily coordinated by signal transduction networks, which follow a simple framework: the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation cycle mediated by kinases and phosphatases. However, the time course from initial pharmacodynamic response(s) to cell death following exposure can have a vast range. Viewing this time lag between early signaling events and the ultimate cellular response as an opportunity, we hypothesize that monitoring the phosphorylation of proteins related to cell death and survival pathways at key, early time points may be used to forecast a cell's eventual fate, provided that we can measure and accurately interpret the protein responses. In this paper, we focused on a three-phased approach to forecast cell death after exposure: (1) determine time points relevant to important signaling events (protein phosphorylation) by using estimations of adenosine triphosphate production to reflect the relationship between mitochondrial-driven energy metabolism and kinase response, (2) experimentally determine phosphorylation values for proteins related to cell death and/or survival pathways at these significant time points, and (3) use cluster analysis to predict the dose-response relationship between cellular exposure to a xenobiotic and plasma membrane degradation at 24 h post-exposure. To test this approach, we exposed HepG2 cells to two disparate treatments: a GSK-3β inhibitor and a MEK inhibitor. After using our three-phased approach, we were able to accurately forecast the 24 h HepG2 plasma membrane degradation dose-response from protein phosphorylation values as early as 20 min post-MEK inhibitor exposure and 40 min post-GSK-3β exposure. PMID:24824809

  15. Forecasting cell death dose-response from early signal transduction responses in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vrana, Julie A; Currie, Holly N; Han, Alice A; Boyd, Jonathan

    2014-08-01

    The rapid pharmacodynamic response of cells to toxic xenobiotics is primarily coordinated by signal transduction networks, which follow a simple framework: the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation cycle mediated by kinases and phosphatases. However, the time course from initial pharmacodynamic response(s) to cell death following exposure can have a vast range. Viewing this time lag between early signaling events and the ultimate cellular response as an opportunity, we hypothesize that monitoring the phosphorylation of proteins related to cell death and survival pathways at key, early time points may be used to forecast a cell's eventual fate, provided that we can measure and accurately interpret the protein responses. In this paper, we focused on a three-phased approach to forecast cell death after exposure: (1) determine time points relevant to important signaling events (protein phosphorylation) by using estimations of adenosine triphosphate production to reflect the relationship between mitochondrial-driven energy metabolism and kinase response, (2) experimentally determine phosphorylation values for proteins related to cell death and/or survival pathways at these significant time points, and (3) use cluster analysis to predict the dose-response relationship between cellular exposure to a xenobiotic and plasma membrane degradation at 24 h post-exposure. To test this approach, we exposed HepG2 cells to two disparate treatments: a GSK-3β inhibitor and a MEK inhibitor. After using our three-phased approach, we were able to accurately forecast the 24 h HepG2 plasma membrane degradation dose-response from protein phosphorylation values as early as 20 min post-MEK inhibitor exposure and 40 min post-GSK-3β exposure.

  16. Gamma-ray burst flares: X-ray flaring. II

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, C. A.; Roming, P. W. A.

    2014-06-10

    We present a catalog of 498 flaring periods found in gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves taken from the online Swift X-Ray Telescope GRB Catalogue. We analyzed 680 individual light curves using a flare detection method developed and used on our UV/optical GRB Flare Catalog. This method makes use of the Bayesian Information Criterion to analyze the residuals of fitted GRB light curves and statistically determines the optimal fit to the light curve residuals in an attempt to identify any additional features. These features, which we classify as flares, are identified by iteratively adding additional 'breaks' to the light curve. We find evidence of flaring in 326 of the analyzed light curves. For those light curves with flares, we find an average number of ∼1.5 flares per GRB. As with the UV/optical, flaring in our sample is generally confined to the first 1000 s of the afterglow, but can be detected to beyond 10{sup 5} s. Only ∼50% of the detected flares follow the 'classical' definition of Δt/t ≤ 0.5, with many of the largest flares exceeding this value.

  17. A statistic study of ionospheric solar flare activity indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Bo; Ding, Feng; Ning, Baiqi; Wan, Weixing; Yu, You; Hu, Lianhuan

    According to the Chapman ionization theory, an ionospheric solar flare activity indicator (ISFAI) is given by the solar zenith angle and the variation rate of ionospheric vertical total electron content, which is measured from a global network of dual-frequency GPS receivers. The ISFAI is utilized to statistically analyze the ionospheric responses to 1439 M-class and 126 X-class solar flares during solar cycle 23 (1996-2008). The statistical results show that the occurrence of ISFAI peak increases obviously at 3.2 total electron content unit (TECU)/h (1 TECU = 1016 elm-2) and reaches the maximum at 10 TECU/h during M-class flares and 10 TECU/h and 40 TECU/h for X-class flares. ISFAI is closely correlated with the 26-34 nm extreme ultraviolet flux but poorly related to the 0.1-0.8 nm X-ray flux. The central meridian distance (CMD) of flare location is an important reason for depressing relationship between ISFAI and X-ray Flux. Through the CMD effect modification, the ISFAI has a significant dependence on the X-ray flux with a correlation coefficient of 0.76. The ISFAI sensitivity enables to detect the extreme X-class flares, as well as the variations of one order of magnitude or even smaller (such as for C-class flares). Meanwhile, ISFAI is helpful to the calibration of the X-ray flux at 0.1-0.8 nm observed by GOES during some flares. In addition, statistical results demonstrate that ISFAI can detect 80% of all M-class flares and 92% for all X-class ones during 1996-2008. Owing to the high sensitivity and temporal resolution, ISFAI can be utilized as a solar flare detection parameter to monitor space weather.

  18. The progress of early growth response factor 1 and leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jing; Li, Ziwei; Han, Yang; Jiang, Tao; Song, Xiaoming; Jiang, Guosheng

    2016-01-01

    Summary Early growth response gene-1 (EGR1) widely exists in the cell nucleus of such as, zebrafish, mice, chimpanzees and humans, an it also can be observed in the cytoplasm of some tumors. EGR1 was named just after its brief and rapid expression of different stimuli. Accumulating studies have extensively demonstrated that the widespread dysregulation of EGR1 is involved in hematological malignancies such as human acute myeloid leukemia (AML), chronic myelogenous leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, multiple myeloma, and B cell lymphoma. With the deep research on EGR1, its expression, function and regulatory mechanism has been gradually elucidated, and provides more possibilities for treatment strategies of patients with leukemia. Herein, we summarize the roles of EGR1 in its biological function and relationship with leukemia. PMID:27195189

  19. Early disaster response in Haiti: the Israeli field hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Kreiss, Yitshak; Merin, Ofer; Peleg, Kobi; Levy, Gad; Vinker, Shlomo; Sagi, Ram; Abargel, Avi; Bartal, Carmi; Lin, Guy; Bar, Ariel; Bar-On, Elhanan; Schwaber, Mitchell J; Ash, Nachman

    2010-07-01

    The earthquake that struck Haiti in January 2010 caused an estimated 230,000 deaths and injured approximately 250,000 people. The Israel Defense Forces Medical Corps Field Hospital was fully operational on site only 89 hours after the earthquake struck and was capable of providing sophisticated medical care. During the 10 days the hospital was operational, its staff treated 1111 patients, hospitalized 737 patients, and performed 244 operations on 203 patients. The field hospital also served as a referral center for medical teams from other countries that were deployed in the surrounding areas. The key factor that enabled rapid response during the early phase of the disaster from a distance of 6000 miles was a well-prepared and trained medical unit maintained on continuous alert. The prompt deployment of advanced-capability field hospitals is essential in disaster relief, especially in countries with minimal medical infrastructure. The changing medical requirements of people in an earthquake zone dictate that field hospitals be designed to operate with maximum flexibility and versatility regarding triage, staff positioning, treatment priorities, and hospitalization policies. Early coordination with local administrative bodies is indispensable.

  20. Oviductal response to gametes and early embryos in mammals.

    PubMed

    Maillo, Veronica; Sánchez-Calabuig, Maria Jesus; Lopera-Vasquez, Ricaurte; Hamdi, Meriem; Gutierrez-Adan, Alfonso; Lonergan, Patrick; Rizos, Dimitrios

    2016-10-01

    The oviduct is a complex and organized thin tubular structure connecting the ovary with the uterus. It is the site of final sperm capacitation, oocyte fertilization and, in most species, the first 3-4days of early embryo development. The oviductal epithelium is made up of ciliary and secretory cells responsible for the secretion of proteins and other factors which contribute to the formation of the oviductal fluid. Despite significant research, most of the pathways and oviductal factors implicated in the crosstalk between gametes/early embryo and the oviduct remain unknown. Therefore, studying the oviductal environment is crucial to improve our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms controlling fertilization and embryo development. In vitro systems are a valuable tool to study in vivo pathways and mechanisms, particularly those in the oviducts which in livestock species are challenging to access. In studies of gamete and embryo interaction with the reproductive tract, oviductal epithelial cells, oviductal fluid and microvesicles co-cultured with gametes/embryos represent the most appropriate in vitro models to mimic the physiological conditions in vivo. PMID:27512123

  1. Hammerhead and nose-cylinder-flare aeroelastic stability revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reding, J. Peter; Ericsson, Lars E.

    1995-01-01

    The flow mechanism responsible for the recently discovered buffet-producing critical cylinder length for hammerheads is discussed. For short cylinder lengths, the upstream effects of the hammerhead wake are able to affect the terminal shock location, driving flow separation to the nose-cylinder shoulder. This has the potential to cause aeroelastic instability leading to structural failure. A similar critical-cylinder-length effect exists for cone-cylinder-flare configurations. This too involves an upstream flow effect. In this case the flare-induced pressure rise drives the shock-induced flow separation to the cone-cylinder shoulder. Neither of these effects is recognized in the existing NASA guidelines for elastic vehicle design. Some currently proposed designs for heavy lift launch vehicles incorporate dangerously blunt noses, in violation of the NASA aeroelastic design criterion. A reexamination of these nose effects indicates the possibility of aeroelastic instability and structural failure. It is the conclusion of this study that it is imperative to consider aeroelastic stability effects early in the design process in order to avoid the possibility of a flight failure or a costly redesign later in the development cycle if the presence of an aeroelastic stability problem is discovered.

  2. Multi-wavelength Solar Flare Observations with Ground- and Space-based Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleint, Lucia

    2016-07-01

    Solar flares affect a wide range of atmospheric heights from the corona to the photosphere. Solar instruments are generally designed for high-resolution observations in limited spectral windows and therefore only capture part of the flare. To obtain a more complete flare picture from coronal reconnection to the atmospheric response of the chromosphere and photosphere, it is necessary to combine data from multiple instruments. I will review multi-wavelength flare observations with ground- and space-based observatories. By taking the X1 flare on March 29, 2014 as an example, which was observed with an unprecedented number of telescopes, I will demonstrate how to investigate the origin of the flare by looking at a filament eruption, the chromospheric evaporation by means of spectroscopy, the flare heating by analyzing continuum emission, and the changes of chromospheric magnetic fields using polarimetric data.

  3. The Solar Flare Myth in solar-terrestrial physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gosling, J.T.

    1993-07-01

    Early observations of associations between solar flares and large non- recurrent geomagnetic storms, large {open_quote}solar{close_quote} energetic particle events, and transient shock wave disturbances in the solar wind led to a paradigm of cause and effect that gave flares a central position in the chain of events leading from solar activity to major transient disturbances in the near-earth space environment. However, research in the last two decades shows that this emphasis on flares is misplaced. In this paper the author outlines briefly the rationale for a different paradigm of cause and effect in solar- terrestrial physics that removes solar flares from their central position as the {open_quote}cause{close_quote} of major disturbances in the near-earth space environment. Instead, this central role of {open_quote}cause{close_quote} is played by events now known as coronal mass ejections, or CMEs.

  4. Solar gamma rays. [in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Kozlovsky, B.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The theory of gamma ray production in solar flares is treated in detail. Both lines and continuum are produced. Results show that the strongest line predicted at 2.225 MeV with a width of less than 100 eV and detected at 2.24 + or - 2.02 MeV, is due to neutron capture by protons in the photosphere. Its intensity is dependent on the photospheric He-3 abundance. The neutrons are produced in nuclear reactions of flare accelerated particles which also produce positrons and prompt nuclear deexcitation lines. The strongest prompt lines are at 4.43 MeV from c-12 and at approximately 6.2 from 0-16 and N-15. The gamma ray continuum, produced by electron bremsstrahlung, allows the determination of the spectrum and number of accelerated electrons in the MeV region. From the comparison of the line and continuum intensities a proton-to-electron ratio of about 10 to 100 at the same energy for the 1972, August 4 flare. For the same flare the protons above 2.5 MeV which are responsible for the gamma ray emission produce a few percent of the heat generated by the electrons which make the hard X rays above 20 keV.

  5. Flares as Avalanches?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonneau, P.

    2003-05-01

    In 1991, E.T. Lu and R. Hamilton (ApJ 380, L89) suggested that flares could be interpreted as avalanches of reconnection events in coronal magnetic structures driven to a self-organized critical state. Physical underpinning for the simple cellular automaton model they used to illustrate their idea can be readily found in the nanoflare conjecture for coronal heating championed over the past two decades by E.N. Parker (e.g., ApJ 330, 474 [1988]). In this lecture I will give a brief overview of Lu & Hamilton's avalanche model, and describe how it can be physically interpreted in the context of Parker's nanoflare conjecture. After discussing some illustrative model results, I will focus on recent comparisons of the model's predictions with flare observations. Finally, I will discuss some recent attempts at quantitatively exploring the physical relationship between model components and the physics of magnetic reconnection.

  6. Very Early PSA Response to Abiraterone in mCRPC Patients: A Novel Prognostic Factor Predicting Overall Survival

    PubMed Central

    Facchini, Gaetano; Caffo, Orazio; Ortega, Cinzia; D'Aniello, Carmine; Di Napoli, Marilena; Cecere, Sabrina C.; Della Pepa, Chiara; Crispo, Anna; Maines, Francesca; Ruatta, Fiorella; Iovane, Gelsomina; Pisconti, Salvatore; Montella, Maurizio; Berretta, Massimiliano; Pignata, Sandro; Cavaliere, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Background: Abiraterone Acetate (AA) is approved for the treatment of mCRPC after failure of androgen deprivation therapy in whom chemotherapy is not yet clinically indicated and for treatment of mCRPC progressed during or after docetaxel-based chemotherapy regimen. The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of early PSA decline for detection of therapy success or failure in mCRPC patients treated with AA in post chemotherapy setting. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 87 patients with mCRPC treated with AA. Serum PSA levels were evaluated after 15, 90 days and then monthly. The PSA flare phenomenon was evaluated, according to a confirmation value at least 1 week apart. The primary endpoint was to demonstrate that an early PSA decline correlates with a longer progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). The secondary endpoind was to demonstrate a correlation between better outcome and demographic and clinical patient characteristics. Results: We have collected data of 87 patients between Sep 2011 and Sep 2014. Early PSA response (≥50% from baseline at 15 days) was found in 56% evaluated patients and confirmed in 29 patients after 90 days. The median PFS was 5.5 months (4.6–6.5) and the median OS was 17.1 months (8.8–25.2). In early responders patients (PSA RR ≥ 50% at 15 days), we found a significant statistical advantage in terms of PFS at 1 year, HR 0.28, 95%CI 0.12–0.65, p = 0.003, and OS, HR 0.21 95% CI 0.06–0.72, p = 0.01. The results in PFS at 1 years and OS reached statistical significance also in the evaluation at 90 days. Conclusion: A significant proportion (78.6%) of patients achieved a rapid response in terms of PSA decline. Early PSA RR (≥50% at 15 days after start of AA) can provide clinically meaningful information and can be considered a surrogate of longer PFS and OS. PMID:27242530

  7. Pre-flare Activity and Magnetic Reconnection during the Evolutionary Stages of Energy Release in a Solar Eruptive Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Bhuwan; Veronig, Astrid M.; Lee, Jeongwoo; Bong, Su-Chan; Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we present a multi-wavelength analysis of an eruptive white-light M3.2 flare that occurred in active region NOAA 10486 on 2003 November 1. The excellent set of high-resolution observations made by RHESSI and the TRACE provides clear evidence of significant pre-flare activities for ~9 minutes in the form of an initiation phase observed at EUV/UV wavelengths followed by an X-ray precursor phase. During the initiation phase, we observed localized brightenings in the highly sheared core region close to the filament and interactions among short EUV loops overlying the filament, which led to the opening of magnetic field lines. The X-ray precursor phase is manifested in RHESSI measurements below ~30 keV and coincided with the beginning of flux emergence at the flaring location along with early signatures of the eruption. The RHESSI observations reveal that both plasma heating and electron acceleration occurred during the precursor phase. The main flare is consistent with the standard flare model. However, after the impulsive phase, an intense hard X-ray (HXR) looptop source was observed without significant footpoint emission. More intriguingly, for a brief period, the looptop source exhibited strong HXR emission with energies up to ~50-100 keV and significant non-thermal characteristics. The present study indicates a causal relation between the activities in the pre-flare and the main flare. We also conclude that pre-flare activities, occurring in the form of subtle magnetic reorganization along with localized magnetic reconnection, played a crucial role in destabilizing the active region filament, leading to a solar eruptive flare and associated large-scale phenomena.

  8. EGRET High Energy Capability and Multiwavelength Flare Studies and Solar Flare Proton Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, Edward L.

    1997-01-01

    UNH was assigned the responsibility to use their accelerator neutron measurements to verify the TASC response function and to modify the TASC fitting program to include a high energy neutron contribution. Direct accelerator-based measurements by UNH of the energy-dependent efficiencies for detecting neutrons with energies from 36 to 720 MeV in NaI were compared with Monte Carlo TASC calculations. The calculated TASC efficiencies are somewhat lower (by about 20%) than the accelerator results in the energy range 70-300 MeV. The measured energy-loss spectrum for 207 MeV neutron interactions in NaI were compared with the Monte Carlo response for 200 MeV neutrons in the TASC indicating good agreement. Based on this agreement, the simulation was considered to be sufficiently accurate to generate a neutron response library to be used by UNH in modifying the TASC fitting program to include a neutron component in the flare spectrum modeling. TASC energy-loss data on the 1991 June 11 flare was transferred to UNH. Also included appendix: Gamma-rays and neutrons as a probe of flare proton spectra: the solar flare of 11 June 1991.

  9. PRECURSOR FLARES IN OJ 287

    SciTech Connect

    Pihajoki, P.; Berdyugin, A.; Lindfors, E.; Reinthal, R.; Sillanpaeae, A.; Takalo, L.; Valtonen, M.; Nilsson, K.; Zola, S.; Koziel-Wierzbowska, D.; Liakos, A.; Drozdz, M.; Winiarski, M.; Ogloza, W.; Provencal, J.; Santangelo, M. M. M.; Salo, H.; Chandra, S.; Ganesh, S.; Baliyan, K. S.; and others

    2013-02-10

    We have studied three most recent precursor flares in the light curve of the blazar OJ 287 while invoking the presence of a precessing binary black hole in the system to explain the nature of these flares. Precursor flare timings from the historical light curves are compared with theoretical predictions from our model that incorporate effects of an accretion disk and post-Newtonian description for the binary black hole orbit. We find that the precursor flares coincide with the secondary black hole descending toward the accretion disk of the primary black hole from the observed side, with a mean z-component of approximately z{sub c} = 4000 AU. We use this model of precursor flares to predict that precursor flare of similar nature should happen around 2020.96 before the next major outburst in 2022.

  10. Temperature Dependence of the Flare Fluence Scaling Exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretzschmar, M.

    2015-12-01

    Solar flares result in an increase of the solar irradiance at all wavelengths. While the distribution of the flare fluence observed in coronal emission has been widely studied and found to scale as f(E)˜ E^{-α}, with α slightly below 2, the distribution of the flare fluence in chromospheric lines is poorly known. We used the solar irradiance measurements observed by the SDO/EVE instrument at a 10 s cadence to investigate the dependency of the scaling exponent on the formation region of the lines (or temperature). We analyzed all flares above the C1 level since the start of the EVE observations (May 2010) to determine the flare fluence distribution in 16 lines covering a wide range of temperatures, several of which were not studied before. Our results show a weak downward trend with temperature of the scaling exponent of the PDF that reaches from above 2 at lower temperature (a few 104 K) to {˜ }1.8 for hot coronal emission (several 106 K). However, because colder lines also have fainter contrast, we cannot exclude that this behavior is caused by including more noise for smaller flares for these lines. We discuss the method and its limitations and tentatively associate this possible trend with the different mechanisms responsible for the heating of the chromosphere and corona during flares.

  11. Explosive evaporation in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, George H.

    1987-01-01

    This paper develops a simple analytical model for the phenomenon of 'explosive evaporation' driven by nonthermal electron heating in solar flares. The model relates the electron energy flux and spectrum, plus details of the preflare atmosphere, to the time scale for explosive evaporation to occur, the maximum pressure and temperature to be reached, rough estimates for the UV pulse emission flux and duration, and the evolution of the blueshifted component of the soft X-ray lines. An expression is given for the time scale for buildup to maximum pressures and the onset of rapid motion of the explosively evaporating plasma. This evaporation can excite a rapid response of UV line and continuum emission. The emission lines formed in the plasma approach a given emissivity-weighted blueshift speed.

  12. Energy release in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, John C.; Correia, Emilia; Farnik, Frantisek; Garcia, Howard; Henoux, Jean-Claude; La Rosa, Ted N.; Machado, Marcos E. (Compiler); Nakajima, Hiroshi; Priest, Eric R.

    1994-01-01

    Team 2 of the Ottawa Flares 22 Workshop dealt with observational and theoretical aspects of the characteristics and processes of energy release in flares. Main results summarized in this article stress the global character of the flaring phenomenon in active regions, the importance of discontinuities in magnetic connectivity, the role of field-aligned currents in free energy storage, and the fragmentation of energy release in time and space.

  13. Observational Constraints on Stellar Flares and Prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarnio, Alicia

    2016-07-01

    Multi-wavelength surveys have catalogued a wealth of stellar flare data for stars representing a broad range of masses and ages. Young solar analogs inform our understanding of the Sun's evolution and the influence of its activity on early solar system formation, while field star observations allow us to place its current activity into context within a statistical ensemble of main-sequence G-type stars. At the same time, stellar observations probe a variety of interior and coronal conditions, providing constraints on models of equilibrium (and loss thereof!) for magnetic structures. In this review, I will focus on our current understanding of stellar flares, prominences, and coronal mass ejections as a function of stellar parameters. As our interpretation of stellar data relies heavily on solar-stellar analogy, I will explore how far into extreme stellar parameter spaces this comparison can be invoked.

  14. Optical flares in SS433

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irsmambetova, T. R.

    2014-03-01

    An analysis of the precessional and orbital variability separately in active and quiescent states was carried out by using the photometric database in V-band of the SAI. The main orbital light curves in the active and quiet states in different precessional phases are approximately the same - primary and secondary eclipses are also observed. There are 30 most bright flares that have been studied on phase diagrams. The phase diagrams show the dependence of the flares' appearance on combination between the nodding phases and the precession phases. An analysis of the above results suggests that the flares originate in jets. Perhaps variations in jet speed cause flares activity in SS433.

  15. Early Transcriptional Response of Soybean Contrasting Accessions to Root Dehydration

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira Neto, José Ribamar Costa; Pandolfi, Valesca; Guimaraes, Francismar Corrêa Marcelino; Benko-Iseppon, Ana Maria; Romero, Cynara; Silva, Roberta Lane de Oliveira; Rodrigues, Fabiana Aparecida; Abdelnoor, Ricardo Vilela; Nepomuceno, Alexandre Lima; Kido, Ederson Akio

    2013-01-01

    Drought is a significant constraint to yield increase in soybean. The early perception of water deprivation is critical for recruitment of genes that promote plant tolerance. DeepSuperSAGE libraries, including one control and a bulk of six stress times imposed (from 25 to 150 min of root dehydration) for drought-tolerant and sensitive soybean accessions, allowed to identify new molecular targets for drought tolerance. The survey uncovered 120,770 unique transcripts expressed by the contrasting accessions. Of these, 57,610 aligned with known cDNA sequences, allowing the annotation of 32,373 unitags. A total of 1,127 unitags were up-regulated only in the tolerant accession, whereas 1,557 were up-regulated in both as compared to their controls. An expression profile concerning the most representative Gene Ontology (GO) categories for the tolerant accession revealed the expression “protein binding” as the most represented for “Molecular Function”, whereas CDPK and CBL were the most up-regulated protein families in this category. Furthermore, particular genes expressed different isoforms according to the accession, showing the potential to operate in the distinction of physiological behaviors. Besides, heat maps comprising GO categories related to abiotic stress response and the unitags regulation observed in the expression contrasts covering tolerant and sensitive accessions, revealed the unitags potential for plant breeding. Candidate genes related to “hormone response” (LOX, ERF1b, XET), “water response” (PUB, BMY), “salt stress response” (WRKY, MYB) and “oxidative stress response” (PER) figured among the most promising molecular targets. Additionally, nine transcripts (HMGR, XET, WRKY20, RAP2-4, EREBP, NAC3, PER, GPX5 and BMY) validated by RT-qPCR (four different time points) confirmed their differential expression and pointed that already after 25 minutes a transcriptional reorganization started in response to the new condition, with

  16. Temporal Evolution of Chromospheric Oscillations in Flaring Regions: A Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsue, T.; Hill, F.; Stassun, K. G.

    2016-10-01

    We have analyzed Hα intensity images obtained at a 1 minute cadence with the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) system to investigate the properties of oscillations in the 0-8 mHz frequency band at the location and time of strong M- and X-class flares. For each of three subregions within two flaring active regions, we extracted time series from multiple distinct positions, including the flare core and quieter surrounding areas. The time series were analyzed with a moving power-map analysis to examine power as a function of frequency and time. We find that, in the flare core of all three subregions, the low-frequency power (˜1-2 mHz) is substantially enhanced immediately prior to and after the flare, and that power at all frequencies up to 8 mHz is depleted at flare maximum. This depletion is both frequency- and time-dependent, which probably reflects the changing depths visible during the flare in the bandpass of the filter. These variations are not observed outside the flare cores. The depletion may indicate that acoustic energy is being converted into thermal energy at flare maximum, while the low-frequency enhancement may arise from an instability in the chromosphere and provide an early warning of the flare onset. Dark lanes of reduced wave power are also visible in the power maps, which may arise from the interaction of the acoustic waves and the magnetic field.

  17. Language experience enhances early cortical pitch-dependent responses

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Ananthanarayan; Gandour, Jackson T.; Ananthakrishnan, Saradha; Vijayaraghavan, Venkatakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Pitch processing at cortical and subcortical stages of processing is shaped by language experience. We recently demonstrated that specific components of the cortical pitch response (CPR) index the more rapidly-changing portions of the high rising Tone 2 of Mandarin Chinese, in addition to marking pitch onset and sound offset. In this study, we examine how language experience (Mandarin vs. English) shapes the processing of different temporal attributes of pitch reflected in the CPR components using stimuli representative of within-category variants of Tone 2. Results showed that the magnitude of CPR components (Na-Pb and Pb-Nb) and the correlation between these two components and pitch acceleration were stronger for the Chinese listeners compared to English listeners for stimuli that fell within the range of Tone 2 citation forms. Discriminant function analysis revealed that the Na-Pb component was more than twice as important as Pb-Nb in grouping listeners by language affiliation. In addition, a stronger stimulus-dependent, rightward asymmetry was observed for the Chinese group at the temporal, but not frontal, electrode sites. This finding may reflect selective recruitment of experience-dependent, pitch-specific mechanisms in right auditory cortex to extract more complex, time-varying pitch patterns. Taken together, these findings suggest that long-term language experience shapes early sensory level processing of pitch in the auditory cortex, and that the sensitivity of the CPR may vary depending on the relative linguistic importance of specific temporal attributes of dynamic pitch. PMID:25506127

  18. A statistic study of ionospheric solar flare activity indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Bo; Wan, Weixing; Ning, Baiqi; Ding, Feng; Hu, Lianhuan; Yu, You

    2014-01-01

    According to the Chapman ionization theory, an ionospheric solar flare activity indicator (ISFAI) is given by the solar zenith angle and the variation rate of ionospheric vertical total electron content, which is measured from a global network of dual-frequency GPS receivers. The ISFAI is utilized to statistically analyze the ionospheric responses to 1439 M-class and 126 X-class solar flares during solar cycle 23 (1996-2008). The statistical results show that the occurrence of ISFAI peak increases obviously at 3.2 total electron content unit (TECU)/h (1 TECU = 1016 el m-2) and reaches the maximum at 10 TECU/h during M-class flares and 10 TECU/h and 40 TECU/h for X-class flares. ISFAI is closely correlated with the 26-34 nm extreme ultraviolet flux but poorly related to the 0.1-0.8 nm X-ray flux. The central meridian distance (CMD) of flare location is an important reason for depressing relationship between ISFAI and X-ray Flux. Through the CMD effect modification, the ISFAI has a significant dependence on the X-ray flux with a correlation coefficient of 0.76. The ISFAI sensitivity enables to detect the extreme X-class flares, as well as the variations of one order of magnitude or even smaller (such as for C-class flares). Meanwhile, ISFAI is helpful to the calibration of the X-ray flux at 0.1-0.8 nm observed by GOES during some flares. In addition, the statistical results demonstrate that ISFAI can detect 80% of all M-class flares and 92% for all X-class ones during 1996-2008.

  19. Thermodynamic Spectrum of Solar Flares Based on SDO/EVE Observations: Techniques and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuming; Zhou, Zhenjun; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Kai; Liu, Rui; Shen, Chenglong; Chamberlin, Phillip C.

    2016-03-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) provides rich information on the thermodynamic processes of solar activities, particularly on solar flares. Here, we develop a method to construct thermodynamic spectrum (TDS) charts based on the EVE spectral lines. This tool could potentially be useful for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) astronomy to learn about the eruptive activities on distant astronomical objects. Through several cases, we illustrate what we can learn from the TDS charts. Furthermore, we apply the TDS method to 74 flares equal to or greater than the M5.0 class, and reach the following statistical results. First, EUV peaks are always behind the soft X-ray (SXR) peaks and stronger flares tend to have faster cooling rates. There is a power-law correlation between the peak delay times and the cooling rates, suggesting a coherent cooling process of flares from SXR to EUV emissions. Second, there are two distinct temperature drift patterns, called Type I and Type II. For Type I flares, the enhanced emission drifts from high to low temperature like a quadrilateral, whereas for Type II flares the drift pattern looks like a triangle. Statistical analysis suggests that Type II flares are more impulsive than Type I flares. Third, for late-phase flares, the peak intensity ratio of the late phase to the main phase is roughly correlated with the flare class, and the flares with a strong late phase are all confined. We believe that the re-deposition of the energy carried by a flux rope, which unsuccessfully erupts out, into thermal emissions is responsible for the strong late phase found in a confined flare. Furthermore, we show the signatures of the flare thermodynamic process in the chromosphere and transition region in the TDS charts. These results provide new clues to advance our understanding of the thermodynamic processes of solar flares and associated solar eruptions, e.g., coronal mass ejections.

  20. The flares of August 1972. [solar flare characteristics and spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.; Tanaka, K.

    1973-01-01

    Observations of the August, 1972 flares at Big Bear and Tel Aviv, involving monochromatic movies, magnetograms, and spectra, are analyzed. The region (McMath 11976) showed inverted polarity from its inception on July 11; the great activity was due to extremely high shear and gradients in the magnetic field, as well as a constant invasion of one polarity into the opposite; observations in lambda 3835 show remarkable fast flashes in the impulsive flare of 18:38 UT on Aug. 2 with lifetimes of 5 sec, which may be due to dumping of particles in the lower chromosphere. Flare loops show evolutionary increases of their tilts to the neutral line in the flares of Aug. 4 and 7. Spectroscopic observations show red asymmetry and red shift of the H alpha emission in the flash phase of the Aug. 7 flare, as well as substantial velocity shear in the photosphere during the flare, somewhat like earthquake movement along a fault. Finally the total H alpha emission of the Aug. 7 flare could be measured accurately as about 2.5 x 10 to the 30th power erg, considerably less than coarser previous estimates for great flares.

  1. Early treatment response predicted subsequent clinical response in patients with schizophrenia taking paliperidone extended-release.

    PubMed

    Yeh, En-Chi; Huang, Ming-Chyi; Tsai, Chang-Jer; Chen, Chun-Tse; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chiu, Chih-Chiang

    2015-11-30

    This 6-week open-labeled study investigated whether early treatment response in patients receiving paliperidone extended-release (paliperidone ER) can facilitate prediction of responses at Week 6. Patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were administered 9mg/day of paliperidone ER during the first 2 weeks, after which the dose was adjusted clinically. They were assessed on Days 0, 4, 7, 14, 28, and 42 by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). The serum concentrations of 9-hydroxyrisperidone were examined on Days 14 and 42. Among the 41 patients enrolled, 26 were classified as responders (≧50% improvement on total PANSS scores at Week 6). In the receiver-operator curves (ROC) analyses, the changes in total PANSS scores at Week 2 appeared to show more accurate predictability compared to Day 4 and Day 7. At Week 6, no significant correlation was observed between blood 9-hydroxyrisperidone concentration and the total score or changes of PANSS scores. The results suggest that early treatment response to paliperidone ER, particularly at Week 2, can serve as a suitable outcome predictor at Week 6. Using 9mg/day paliperidone ER as an initial dose for schizophrenia treatment exhibited relatively favorable tolerability and feasibility.

  2. Particle acceleration by a solar flare termination shock.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Bastian, Timothy S; Shen, Chengcai; Gary, Dale E; Krucker, Säm; Glesener, Lindsay

    2015-12-01

    Solar flares--the most powerful explosions in the solar system--are also efficient particle accelerators, capable of energizing a large number of charged particles to relativistic speeds. A termination shock is often invoked in the standard model of solar flares as a possible driver for particle acceleration, yet its existence and role have remained controversial. We present observations of a solar flare termination shock and trace its morphology and dynamics using high-cadence radio imaging spectroscopy. We show that a disruption of the shock coincides with an abrupt reduction of the energetic electron population. The observed properties of the shock are well reproduced by simulations. These results strongly suggest that a termination shock is responsible, at least in part, for accelerating energetic electrons in solar flares.

  3. Particle acceleration by a solar flare termination shock.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Bastian, Timothy S; Shen, Chengcai; Gary, Dale E; Krucker, Säm; Glesener, Lindsay

    2015-12-01

    Solar flares--the most powerful explosions in the solar system--are also efficient particle accelerators, capable of energizing a large number of charged particles to relativistic speeds. A termination shock is often invoked in the standard model of solar flares as a possible driver for particle acceleration, yet its existence and role have remained controversial. We present observations of a solar flare termination shock and trace its morphology and dynamics using high-cadence radio imaging spectroscopy. We show that a disruption of the shock coincides with an abrupt reduction of the energetic electron population. The observed properties of the shock are well reproduced by simulations. These results strongly suggest that a termination shock is responsible, at least in part, for accelerating energetic electrons in solar flares. PMID:26785486

  4. Early skin toxicity predicts better outcomes, and early tumor shrinkage predicts better response after cetuximab treatment in advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kogawa, T; Doi, A; Shimokawa, M; Fouad, T M; Osuga, T; Tamura, F; Mizushima, T; Kimura, T; Abe, S; Ihara, H; Kukitsu, T; Sumiyoshi, T; Yoshizaki, N; Hirayama, M; Sasaki, T; Kawarada, Y; Kitashiro, S; Okushiba, S; Kondo, H; Tsuji, Y

    2015-03-01

    Cetuximab-containing treatments for metastatic colorectal cancer have been shown to have higher overall response rates and longer progression-free and overall survival than other systemic therapies. Cetuximab-related manifestations, including severe skin toxicity and early tumor shrinkage, have been shown to be predictors of response to cetuximab. We hypothesized that early skin toxicity is a predictor of response and better outcomes in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma. We retrospectively evaluated 62 patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma who had unresectable tumors and were treated with cetuximab in our institution. Skin toxicity grade was evaluated on each treatment day. Tumor size was evaluated using computed tomography prior to treatment and 4-8 weeks after the start of treatment with cetuximab.Patients with early tumor shrinkage after starting treatment with cetuximab had a significantly higher overall response rate (P = 0.0001). Patients with early skin toxicity showed significantly longer overall survival (P = 0.0305), and patients with higher skin toxicity grades had longer progression-free survival (P = 0.0168).We have shown that early tumor shrinkage, early onset of skin toxicity, and high skin toxicity grade are predictors of treatment efficacy and/or outcome in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma treated with cetuximab.

  5. Parental responsiveness moderates the association between early-life stress and reduced telomere length.

    PubMed

    Asok, A; Bernard, K; Roth, T L; Rosen, J B; Dozier, M

    2013-08-01

    Early-life stress, such as maltreatment, institutionalization, and exposure to violence, is associated with accelerated telomere shortening. Telomere shortening may thus represent a biomarker of early adversity. Previous studies have suggested that responsive parenting may protect children from the negative biological and behavioral consequences of early adversity. This study examined the role of parental responsiveness in buffering children from telomere shortening following experiences of early-life stress. We found that high-risk children had significantly shorter telomeres than low-risk children, controlling for household income, birth weight, gender, and minority status. Further, parental responsiveness moderated the association between risk and telomere length, with more responsive parenting associated with longer telomeres only among high-risk children. These findings suggest that responsive parenting may have protective benefits on telomere shortening for young children exposed to early-life stress. Therefore, this study has important implications for early parenting interventions. PMID:23527512

  6. Early response of wheat seminal roots growing under copper excess.

    PubMed

    Pena, Liliana B; Méndez, Andrea A E; Matayoshi, Carolina L; Zawoznik, Myriam S; Gallego, Susana M

    2015-02-01

    Growth reduction caused by copper excess during plant photoautotrophic metabolism has been widely investigated, but information regarding early responses of root apical meristem (RAM) to toxic concentrations of this metal at the initial heterotrophic stage is certainly scarce. We analysed some determinants of seminal root growth in developing wheat seedlings germinated in the presence of 1, 5 and 10 μM CuCl2, focussing on oxidative damage to cell membrane and to proteins, and investigated the expression patterns of some genes relevant to cell cycle progression and cell expansion. The proliferation zone of the RAM was shorter under 5 and 10 μM CuCl2. Cyclin D and CDKA levels remained unchanged in the root apexes of wheat seedlings grown under these Cu(2+) concentrations, but more carbonylated levels of both proteins and less ubiquitinated-cyclin D was detected under 10 μM CuCl2. Increased levels of ROS were revealed by fluorescent probes at this Cu(2+) dose, and severe cell membrane damage took place at 5 and 10 μM CuCl2. Several genes related to retinoblastome phosphorylation and therefore involved in the transition from G1 to S cell cycle stage were found to be downregulated at 10 μM CuCl2, while most expansin genes here analysed were upregulated, even at a non-toxic concentration of 1 μM. These results together with previous findings suggest that a "common" signal which involves oxidative posttranslational modifications of specific cell cycle proteins may be necessary to induce root growth arrest under Cd(2+) and Cu(2+) stress.

  7. Signatures of Accelerated Electrons in Solar and Stellar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benz, Arnold O.

    2015-08-01

    Flares energize electrons (and ions) to supra-thermal energies. In most cases the final distribution in momentum or energy space is non-Maxwellian. The non-thermal part of the energy can be the source for various emissions, including hard X-rays, synchrotron radiation and coherent radio emission. Such non-thermal emissions may contain information on the acceleration process. Several acceleration scenarios have been proposed: electric DC field, stochastic, and shock acceleration. There is observational evidence for all three scenarios. The new data come from SDO, X-ray (RHESSI), radio observations (Nobeyama, VLA and e-Callisto). Solar energetic particles are an additional channel of information.Tiny solar microflares and huge stellar flares in binary systems (RS CVns) and dMe dwarfs differ by more than 10 orders of magnitude in released energy. Yet the relation between peak luminosity in thermal (soft) X-ray and non-thermal synchrotron (radio) emission is surprisingly constant. This observational fact indicates that flare acceleration scales with energy release over a large range. Electron acceleration in flares seems to be a universal process. The constraint on simultaneous thermal X-rays and non-thermal (radio) synchrotron emission seems to select on particular kind of flare. In this subset, there seems to be only one type of acceleration.Yet, small deviations are noted: Small solar flares are softer in hard X-rays. Solar nanoflares are relatively weak in synchrotron emission. The recently noted case of radio-poor preflares will also be presented. The deviations suggest that the acceleration is less efficient in small flares and in the early phase of flares. Larger deviations are reported occasionally for solar flares and more often from stellar flares, where either thermal or non-thermal emission seems to be missing completely.The location of the acceleration in solar flares remains disputed. Observations suggesting acceleration in the soft X-ray top-tops, above

  8. Parameterization of solar flare dose

    SciTech Connect

    Lamarche, A.H.; Poston, J.W.

    1996-12-31

    A critical aspect of missions to the moon or Mars will be the safety and health of the crew. Radiation in space is a hazard for astronauts, especially high-energy radiation following certain types of solar flares. A solar flare event can be very dangerous if astronauts are not adequately shielded because flares can deliver a very high dose in a short period of time. The goal of this research was to parameterize solar flare dose as a function of time to see if it was possible to predict solar flare occurrence, thus providing a warning time. This would allow astronauts to take corrective action and avoid receiving a dose greater than the recommended limit set by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP).

  9. Solar Flares and the Chromosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Lyndsay

    2015-08-01

    During a solar flare, the chromosphere emits across a large fraction of the electromagnetic spectrum, providing diagnostic information on heating, dynamics and flare energy transport by both thermal and non-thermal means. The evolution of chromospheric ribbons and footpoints also traces the progress of coronal reconnection, and links radiation output with magnetic evolution. Since the chromosphere emits the majority of a flare's radiation, the current emphasis on chromospheric observations by missions such as IRIS, and future large facilities such as the DKIST, is very beneficial to flare research. In this talk I will overview recent developments in observations and theory of flaring chromospheres and make some suggestions about profitable future avenues for research.

  10. Alteration of somatosensory response in adulthood by early life stress.

    PubMed

    Takatsuru, Yusuke; Koibuchi, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    Early life stress is well-known as a critical risk factor for mental and cognitive disorders in adulthood. Such disorders are accompanied by altered neuro- (synapto-) genesis and gene expression. Because psychosomatic disorders induced by early life stress (e.g., physical and/or sexual abuse, and neglect) have become a socio-economic problem, it is very important to clarify the mechanisms underlying these changes. However, despite of intensive clinical and animal studies, such mechanisms have not yet been clarified. Although the disturbance of glucocorticoid and glutamate homeostasis by stress has been well-documented, it has not yet been clarified whether such disturbance by early life stress persists for life. Furthermore, since previous studies have focused on the detection of changes in specific brain regions, such as the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex, it has not been clarified whether early life stress induced changes in the sensory/motor system. Thus, in this review, we introduce recent studies on functional/structural changes in the somatosensory cortex induced by early life stress. We believe that this review provides new insights into the functional alteration of the somatosensory system induced by early life stress. Such information may have clinical relevance in terms of providing effective therapeutic interventions to early life stressed individuals. PMID:26041988

  11. Complex linguistic rules modulate early auditory brain responses.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yue; Giavazzi, Maria; Adda-Decker, Martine; Barbosa, Leonardo S; Kouider, Sid; Bachoud-Lévi, Anne-Catherine; Jacquemot, Charlotte; Peperkamp, Sharon

    2015-10-01

    During speech perception, listeners compensate for phonological rules of their language. For instance, English place assimilation causes green boat to be typically pronounced as greem boat; English listeners, however, perceptually compensate for this rule and retrieve the intended sound (n). Previous research using EEG has focused on rules with clear phonetic underpinnings, showing that perceptual compensation occurs at an early stage of speech perception. We tested whether this early mechanism also accounts for the compensation for more complex rules. We examined compensation for French voicing assimilation, a rule with abstract phonological restrictions on the contexts in which it applies. Our results reveal that perceptual compensation for this rule by French listeners modulates an early ERP component. This is evidence that early stages of speech sound categorization are sensitive to complex phonological rules of the native language.

  12. Altered Evoked Gamma-Band Responses Reveal Impaired Early Visual Processing in ADHD Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenz, Daniel; Krauel, Kerstin; Flechtner, Hans-Henning; Schadow, Jeanette; Hinrichs, Hermann; Herrmann, Christoph S.

    2010-01-01

    Neurophysiological studies yield contrary results whether attentional problems of patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are related to early visual processing deficits or not. Evoked gamma-band responses (GBRs), being among the first cortical responses occurring as early as 90 ms after visual stimulation in human EEG, have…

  13. Gage tests tube flares quickly and accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, F. D.

    1966-01-01

    Flared tube gage with a test cone that is precisely made with a tapering surface to complement the tube flare is capable of determining the accuracy of a tube flare efficiently and economically. This device should improve the speed, efficiency, and accuracy of tube flare inspections.

  14. FINE STRUCTURE OF FLARE RIBBONS AND EVOLUTION OF ELECTRIC CURRENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Sharykin, I. N.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2014-06-10

    Emission of solar flares across the electromagnetic spectrum is often observed in the form of two expanding ribbons. The standard flare model explains flare ribbons as footpoints of magnetic arcades, emitting due to interaction of energetic particles with the chromospheric plasma. However, the physics of this interaction and properties of the accelerated particles are still unknown. We present results of multiwavelength observations of the C2.1 flare of 2013 August 15, observed with the New Solar Telescope of the Big Bear Solar Observatory, and the Solar Dynamics Observatory, GOES, and Fermi spacecraft. The observations reveal previously unresolved sub-arcsecond structure of flare ribbons in regions of strong magnetic field consisting from numerous small-scale bright knots. We observe a red-blue asymmetry of H{sub α} flare ribbons with a width as small as ∼100 km. We discuss the relationship between the ribbons and vertical electric currents estimated from vector magnetograms, and show that Joule heating can be responsible for energization of H{sub α} knots in the ribbons.

  15. Observations and modeling of plasma flows driven by solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brannon, Sean Robert

    One of the fundamental statements that can be made about the solar atmosphere is that it is structured. This structuring is generally believed to be the result of both the arrangement of the magnetic field in the corona and the distribution of plasma along magnetic loops. The standard model of solar flares involves plasma transported into coronal loops via a process known as chromospheric evaporation, and the resulting evolution of the flare loops is believed to be sensitive to the physical mechanism of energy input into the chromosphere by the flare. We present here the results of three investigations into chromospheric plasma flows driven by solar flare energy release and transport. First, we develop a 1-D hydrodynamic code to simulate the response of a simplified model chromosphere to energy input via thermal conduction from reconnection-driven shocks. We use the results from a set of simulations spanning a parameter space in both shock speed and chromospheric-to-coronal temperature ratio to infer power-law relationships between these quantities and observable evaporation properties. Second, we use imaging and spectral observations of a quasi-periodic oscillation of a flare ribbon to determine the phase relationship between Doppler shifts of the ribbon plasma and the oscillation. The phase difference we find leads us to suggest an origin in a current sheet instability. Finally, we use imaging and spectral data of an on-disk flare event and resulting flare loop plasma flows to generally validate the standard picture of flare loop evolution, including evaporation, cooling time, and draining downflows, and we use a simple free-fall model to produce the first direct comparison between observed and synthetic downflow spectra.

  16. Chromospheric Evolution and the Flare Activity of Super-Active Region NOAA 6555

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    PrasadC, Debi; Ambastha, Ashok; Srivastava, Nandita; Tripathy, Sushanta C.; Hagyard, Mona J.

    1997-01-01

    Super-active region NOAA 6555 was highly flare productive during the period March 21st - 27th, 1991 of its disk passage. We have studied its chromospheric activity using high spatial resolution H alpha filtergrams taken at Udaipur along with MSFC vector magnetograms. A possible relationship of flare productivity and the variation in shear has been explored. Flares were generally seen in those subareas of the active region which possessed closed magnetic field configuration, whereas only minor flares and/or surges occurred in subareas showing open magnetic field configuration. Physical mechanisms responsible for the observed surges are also discussed.

  17. Solar flare predictions and warnings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, K. P., III

    1972-01-01

    The real-time solar monitoring information supplied to support SPARCS equipped rocket launches, the routine collection and analysis of 3.3-mm solar radio maps, short-term flare forecasts based on these maps, longer-term forecasts based on the recurrence of active regions, and an extension of the flare forecasting technique are summarized. Forecasts for expectation of a solar flare of class or = 2F are given and compared with observed flares. A total of 52 plage regions produced all the flares of class or = 1N during the study period. The following results are indicated: of the total of 21 positive forecasts, 3 were correct and 18 were incorrect; of the total of 31 negative forecasts, 3 were incorrect and 28 were correct; of a total of 6 plage regions producing large flares, 3 were correctly forecast and 3 were missed; and of 46 regions not producing any large flares, 18 were incorrectly forecast and 28 were correctly forecast.

  18. SCATTERING POLARIZATION IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Štěpán, Jiří; Heinzel, Petr

    2013-11-20

    There is ongoing debate about the origin and even the very existence of a high degree of linear polarization of some chromospheric spectral lines observed in solar flares. The standard explanation of these measurements is in terms of the impact polarization caused by non-thermal proton and/or electron beams. In this work, we study the possible role of resonance line polarization due to radiation anisotropy in the inhomogeneous medium of the flare ribbons. We consider a simple two-dimensional model of the flaring chromosphere and we self-consistently solve the non-LTE problem taking into account the role of resonant scattering polarization and of the Hanle effect. Our calculations show that the horizontal plasma inhomogeneities at the boundary of the flare ribbons can lead to a significant radiation anisotropy in the line formation region and, consequently, to a fractional linear polarization of the emergent radiation of the order of several percent. Neglecting the effects of impact polarization, our model can provide a clue for resolving some of the common observational findings, namely: (1) why a high degree of polarization appears mainly at the edges of the flare ribbons; (2) why polarization can also be observed during the gradual phase of a flare; and (3) why polarization is mostly radial or tangential. We conclude that radiation transfer in realistic multi-dimensional models of solar flares needs to be considered as an essential ingredient for understanding the observed spectral line polarization.

  19. EGRET High Energy Capability and Multiwavelength Flare Studies and Solar Flare Proton Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, Edward L.

    1998-01-01

    The accomplishments of the participation in the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Guest investigator program is summarized in this report. The work involved the study of Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET)/Total Absorption Shower Counter(TASC) flare data. The specific accomplishments were the use of the accelerator neutron measurements obtained at the University of New Hampshire to verify the TASC response function and to modify the TASC fitting program to include a high energy neutron contribution, and to determine a high energy neutron contribution to the emissions from the 1991 June 11, solar flare. The next step in the analysis of this event was doing fits to the TASC energy-loss spectra as a function of time. A significant hardening of the solar proton spectrum over time was found for the flare. Further data was obtained from the Yohkoh HXT time histories and images for the 1991 October 27 flare. The results to date demonstrate that the TASC spectral analysis contributes crucial information on the particle spectrum interacting at the Sun. The report includes a paper accepted for publication, a draft of a paper to be delivered at the 26th International Cosmic Ray Conference and an abstract of a paper to be presented at the Meeting of the American Physical Society.

  20. Slipping magnetic reconnection during an X-class solar flare observed by SDO/AIA

    SciTech Connect

    Dudík, J.; Del Zanna, G.; Mason, H. E.; Janvier, M.; Aulanier, G.; Schmieder, B.; Karlický, M. E-mail: mjanvier@maths.dundee.ac.uk

    2014-04-01

    We present SDO/AIA observations of an eruptive X-class flare of 2012 July 12, and compare its evolution with the predictions of a three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulation. We focus on the dynamics of flare loops that are seen to undergo slipping reconnection during the flare. In the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 131 Å observations, lower parts of 10 MK flare loops exhibit an apparent motion with velocities of several tens of km s{sup –1} along the developing flare ribbons. In the early stages of the flare, flare ribbons consist of compact, localized bright transition-region emission from the footpoints of the flare loops. A differential emission measure analysis shows that the flare loops have temperatures up to the formation of Fe XXIV. A series of very long, S-shaped loops erupt, leading to a coronal mass ejection observed by STEREO. The observed dynamics are compared with the evolution of magnetic structures in the 'standard solar flare model in 3D.' This model matches the observations well, reproducing the apparently slipping flare loops, S-shaped erupting loops, and the evolution of flare ribbons. All of these processes are explained via 3D reconnection mechanisms resulting from the expansion of a torus-unstable flux rope. The AIA observations and the numerical model are complemented by radio observations showing a noise storm in the metric range. Dm-drifting pulsation structures occurring during the eruption indicate plasmoid ejection and enhancement of the reconnection rate. The bursty nature of radio emission shows that the slipping reconnection is still intermittent, although it is observed to persist for more than an hour.

  1. The sun's spots and flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, David M.

    1987-01-01

    The Solar Maximum Mission (SMM), designed to study the solar activity, was launched on February 14, 1980, just before the 1980 peak of sunspot and flare activity. The seven instruments aboard the SMM, information received by each of the instruments, and the performance of these instruments are described, together with the repair mission carried out to replace the attitude control module and the defective electronics in the satellite's observatory. The highlights of the scientific results obtained by the SMM mission and the new discoveries made are discussed, with special attention given to the flare loops, flare loop interactions, and the mass ejection events recorded.

  2. Solar Flare Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmahl, Edward J.; Kundu, Mukul R.

    1998-01-01

    We have continued our previous efforts in studies of fourier imaging methods applied to hard X-ray flares. We have performed physical and theoretical analysis of rotating collimator grids submitted to GSFC(Goddard Space Flight Center) for the High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI). We have produced simulation algorithms which are currently being used to test imaging software and hardware for HESSI. We have developed Maximum-Entropy, Maximum-Likelihood, and "CLEAN" methods for reconstructing HESSI images from count-rate profiles. This work is expected to continue through the launch of HESSI in July, 2000. Section 1 shows a poster presentation "Image Reconstruction from HESSI Photon Lists" at the Solar Physics Division Meeting, June 1998; Section 2 shows the text and viewgraphs prepared for "Imaging Simulations" at HESSI's Preliminary Design Review on July 30, 1998.

  3. Building Big Flares: Constraining Generating Processes of Solar Flare Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyse Jackson, T.; Kashyap, V.; McKillop, S.

    2015-12-01

    We address mechanisms which seek to explain the observed solar flare distribution, dN/dE ~ E1.8. We have compiled a comprehensive database, from GOES, NOAA, XRT, and AIA data, of solar flares and their characteristics, covering the year 2013. These datasets allow us to probe how stored magnetic energy is released over the course of an active region's evolution. We fit power-laws to flare distributions over various attribute groupings. For instance, we compare flares that occur before and after an active region reaches its maximum area, and show that the corresponding flare distributions are indistinguishable; thus, the processes that lead to magnetic reconnection are similar in both cases. A turnover in the distribution is not detectable at the energies accessible to our study, suggesting that a self-organized critical (SOC) process is a valid mechanism. However, we find changes in the distributions that suggest that the simple picture of an SOC where flares draw energy from an inexhaustible reservoir of stored magnetic energy is incomplete. Following the evolution of the flare distribution over the lifetimes of active regions, we find that the distribution flattens with time, and for larger active regions, and that a single power-law model is insufficient. This implies that flares that occur later in the lifetime of the active region tend towards higher energies. We conclude that the SOC process must have an upper bound. Increasing the scope of the study to include data from other years and more instruments will increase the robustness of these results. This work was supported by the NSF-REU Solar Physics Program at SAO, grant number AGS 1263241, NASA Contract NAS8-03060 to the Chandra X-ray Center and by NASA Hinode/XRT contract NNM07AB07C to SAO

  4. A Cold Flare with Delayed Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Pal'shin, Valentin D.; Meshalkina, Natalia; Lysenko, Alexandra L.; Kashapova, Larisa K.; Altyntsev, Alexander T.

    2016-05-01

    Recently, a number of peculiar flares have been reported that demonstrate significant nonthermal particle signatures with low, if any, thermal emission, which implies a close association of the observed emission with the primary energy release/electron acceleration region. This paper presents a flare that appears “cold” at the impulsive phase, while displaying delayed heating later on. Using hard X-ray data from Konus-Wind, microwave observations by SSRT, RSTN, NoRH, and NoRP, context observations, and three-dimensional modeling, we study the energy release, particle acceleration, and transport, and the relationships between the nonthermal and thermal signatures. The flaring process is found to involve the interaction between a small loop and a big loop with the accelerated particles divided roughly equally between them. Precipitation of the electrons from the small loop produced only a weak thermal response because the loop volume was small, while the electrons trapped in the big loop lost most of their energy in the coronal part of the loop, which resulted in coronal plasma heating but no or only weak chromospheric evaporation, and thus unusually weak soft X-ray emission. The energy losses of the fast electrons in the big tenuous loop were slow, which resulted in the observed delay of the plasma heating. We determined that the impulsively accelerated electron population had a beamed angular distribution in the direction of the electric force along the magnetic field of the small loop. The accelerated particle transport in the big loop was primarily mediated by turbulent waves, which is similar to other reported cold flares.

  5. Early feeding and early life housing conditions influence the response towards a noninfectious lung challenge in broilers.

    PubMed

    Simon, K; de Vries Reilingh, G; Bolhuis, J E; Kemp, B; Lammers, A

    2015-09-01

    Early life conditions such as feed and water availability immediately post hatch (PH) and housing conditions may influence immune development and therefore immune reactivity later in life. The current study addressed the consequences of a combination of these 2 early life conditions for immune reactivity, i.e., the specific antibody response towards a non-infectious lung challenge. Broiler chicks received feed and water either immediately p.h. or with a 72 h delay and were either reared in a floor or a cage system. At 4 weeks of age, chicks received either an intra-tracheally administered Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/Human Serum Albumin (HUSA) challenge or a placebo, and antibody titers were measured up to day 14 after administration of the challenge. Chicks housed on the floor and which had a delayed access to feed p.h. showed the highest antibody titers against HuSA. These chicks also showed the strongest sickness response and poorest performance in response to the challenge, indicating that chicks with delayed access to feed might be more sensitive to an environment with higher antigenic pressure. In conclusion, results from the present study show that early life feeding strategy and housing conditions influence a chick's response to an immune challenge later in life. These 2 early life factors should therefore be taken into account when striving for a balance between disease resistance and performance in poultry.

  6. Successful Use of Higher-Dose Etanercept for Multirefractory Systemic Flare of Adult-Onset Still's Disease with Liver Failure with No Response to Tocilizumab Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tamechika, Shinya; Iwagaitsu, Shiho; Maeda, Shinji; Togawa, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    A 21-year-old woman with refractory systemic flare of adult-onset Still's disease with liver failure despite high-dose corticosteroids, cyclosporine, tacrolimus, and tocilizumab, was successfully treated with additional use of etanercept. Etanercept at a dose of 50 mg weekly was partially effective but could not reduce the dose of concomitant betamethasone from 5 mg/day. Etanercept at a dose of 75 mg weekly could lead her to clinical remission and enabled successful tapering off the corticosteroids and discontinuation of etanercept. Normalization of serum C-reactive protein and interleukin 6 and persistent elevation of serum tumor necrosis factor α under the treatment with high-dose corticosteroids and immunosuppressants suggest that tumor necrosis factor α was more deeply involved than at least interleukin 6 in the pathogenesis of refractoriness of the disease in this patient, and these findings might be indicative of potential efficacy for adjunctive use of a tumor necrosis factor inhibitor rather than an interleukin 6 inhibitor. PMID:24455384

  7. Elevated Amygdala Response to Faces following Early Deprivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tottenham, N.; Hare, T. A.; Millner, A.; Gilhooly, T.; Zevin, J. D.; Casey, B. J.

    2011-01-01

    A functional neuroimaging study examined the long-term neural correlates of early adverse rearing conditions in humans as they relate to socio-emotional development. Previously institutionalized (PI) children and a same-aged comparison group were scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing an Emotional Face Go/Nogo…

  8. Panel 2.2: surveillance, early warning alert, and response: communicable and vector-borne diseases.

    PubMed

    Roure, Collette; Khalakdina, Asheena; Ungchusak, Kumnuan; Yulizar, Media; Ravindran, P; Watson, John; Pinto, Augusto

    2005-01-01

    This is a summary of the presentations and discussion of Surveillance, Early Warning Alert and Response at the Conference, Health Aspects of the Tsunami Disaster in Asia, convened by the World Health Organization (WHO) in Phuket, Thailand, 04-06 May 2005. The topics discussed included issues related to the surveillance, early warning alert, and response to communicable and vector-borne diseases as pertaining to the responses to the damage created by the Tsunami. It is presented in the following major sections: (1) key questions; (2) needs assessment; (3) coordination; (4) gap filling; and (5) capacity building. The key questions section is presented in six sub-sections: (1) communicable diseases; (2) early warning; (3) laboratory capacity and referral networking; (4) coordination of disease surveillance, early warning, and response; (5) health infrastructure rebuilding; and (6) using existing national surveillance plans to enhance disease surveillance and early warning systems. PMID:16496622

  9. Spatio-temporal Dynamics of Sources of Hard X-Ray Pulsations in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, S. A.; Zimovets, I. V.; Morgachev, A. S.; Struminsky, A. B.

    2016-09-01

    flares we studied are eruptive events. This gives a strong indication that eruptive processes play an important role in the generation of HXR pulsations in flares. We suggest that an erupting flux rope can act as a trigger of the flare energy release. Its successive interaction with different loops of a parent active region can lead to apparent motion of HXR sources and to a series of HXR pulsations. However, the exact mechanism responsible for generating the pulsations remains unclear and requires a more detailed investigation.

  10. Radiation hydrodynamics in solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, G.H.

    1985-10-18

    Solar flares are rather violent and extremely complicated phenomena, and it should be made clear at the outset that a physically complete picture describing all aspects of flares does not exist. From the wealth of data which is available, it is apparent that many different types of physical processes are involved during flares: energetic particle acceleration, rapid magnetohydrodynamic motion of complex field structures, magnetic reconnection, violent mass motion along magnetic field lines, and the heating of plasma to tens of millions of degrees, to name a few. The goal of this paper is to explore just one aspect of solar flares, namely, the interaction of hydrodynamics and radiation processes in fluid being rapidly heated along closed magnetic field lines. The models discussed are therefore necessarily restrictive, and will address only a few of the observed or observable phenomena. 46 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Chandra Monitors the Flaring Crab

    NASA Video Gallery

    Scientists hoped that NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory would locate X-ray sources correlated to the gamma-ray flares seen by Fermi and Italy's AGILE satellites. Two observations were made during th...

  12. Mass ejections. [during solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.; Hildner, E.; Hansen, R. T.; Dryer, M.; Mcclymont, A. N.; Mckenna-Lawlor, S. M. P.; Mclean, D. J.; Schmahl, E. J.; Steinolfson, R. S.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.

    1980-01-01

    Observations and model simulations of solar mass ejection phenomena are examined in an investigation of flare processes. Consideration is given to Skylab and other observations of flare-associated sprays, eruptive prominences, surges and coronal transients, and to MHD, gas dynamic and magnetic loop models developed to account for them. Magnetic forces are found to confine spray material, which originates in preexisting active-region filaments, within steadily expanding loops, while surges follow unmoving, preexisting magnetic field lines. Simulations of effects of a sudden pressure pulse at the bottom of the corona are found to exhibit many characteristics of coronal transients associated with flares, and impulsive heating low in the chromosphere is found to be able to account for surges. The importance of the magnetic field as the ultimate source of energy which drives eruptive phenomena as well as flares is pointed out.

  13. Conduction-driven chromospheric evaporation in a solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zarro, Dominic M.; Lemen, James R.

    1988-01-01

    Observations of gentle chromospheric evaporation during the cooling phase of a solar flare are presented. Line profiles of the low-temperature (T of about 6 x 10 to the 6th K) coronal Mg XI line, observed with the X-Ray Polychromator on the Solar Maximum Mission, show a blueshift that persisted for several minutes after the impulsive heating phase. This result represents the first detection of an evaporation signature in a soft X-ray line formed at this low temperature. By combining the Mg XI blueshift velocity data with simultaneous measurements of the flare temperature derived from Ca XIX observations, it is demonstrated that the upward flux of enthalpy transported by this gently evaporating plasma varies linearly with the downward flux of thermal energy conducted from the corona. This relationship is consistent with models of solar flares in which thermal conduction drives chromospheric evaporation during the early part of the cooling phase.

  14. Second-stage acceleration in a limb-occulted flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.; Lin, R. P.; Stewart, R. T.

    1982-01-01

    From radio observations it is known that two distinct groups of phenomena occur in large solar flares. The phenomena are related to an impulsive phase of approximately 100 s duration in the early stage of a flare and a following second phase lasting for tens of minutes. A study is presented of the limb-occulted flare event of July 22, 1972, giving particular attention to the second stage particle acceleration. The study takes into account hard X-ray, energetic particle, and radio observations. The conducted analysis shows that second stage acceleration is physically distinct from the impulsive phase, and is characterized by continuous and widespread electron acceleration to high energies, most likely by the type II burst shock wave.

  15. Particle acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Forman, M. A.

    1987-01-01

    The most direct signatures of particle acceleration in flares are energetic particles detected in interplanetary space and in the Earth atmosphere, and gamma rays, neutrons, hard X-rays, and radio emissions produced by the energetic particles in the solar atmosphere. The stochastic and shock acceleration theories in flares are reviewed and the implications of observations on particle energy spectra, particle confinement and escape, multiple acceleration phases, particle anistropies, and solar atmospheric abundances are discussed.

  16. Simulating VIIRS Observed Gas Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, F. C.

    2015-12-01

    VIIRS Nightfire (VNF) had been proved being able to effectively detect gas flares at night, and characterize their temperature and source size. [1] However, limited access to generally confidential gas flare operation measurements made it difficult to verify the output. Although flared gas volume is occasionally available, it is not common to log the temperature and flames size which directly links to VNF output. To understand the mechanism of gas flare and how VIIRS perceives the event, a platform is proposed to simulate the gas flare being observed by VIIRS. The methodology can be described in three steps. (1) Use CFD simulation software ISIS-3D to simulate a simple gas flare. [2] Scalar fields of temperature and species concentration related to combustion are extracted from the simulation. The instantaneous scalar can be determined from time-averaging or guess by stochastic time and space series (TASS) from single-point statistics [3]. (2) Model spectral radiance intensity of simulated gas flare using RADCAL. [4] RADCAL developed by NIST can accurately model the spectral radiance emitted on the direction of lineof-sight given the spatial profile of temperature and concentration of species. (3) Use radiative transfer modeling to calculate the energy propagated to VIIRS. The modeled radiation will then be weighted by the MODTRAN [5] modeled transmissivity over predefined atmosphere to the satellite, with geometrical effects considered. Such platform can help understanding how exactly VNF is measuring gas flares, and thus lead to more precise characterization of combustion events. [1] C. D. Elvidge et al, Remote Sensing, 2013[2] IRSN ISIS-3D[3] M. E. Kounalakis et al, ASME J. Heat Transfer, 1991 [4] W. L. Grosshandler, NIST Technical Note 1402, 1993 [5] A. Berk et al, MODTRAN 5.2.0.0 User's Manual

  17. X-Ray Flare Candidates in Short Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margutti, R.; Chincarini, G.; Granot, J.; Guidorzi, C.; Berger, E.; Bernardini, M. G.; Geherls, N.; Soderberg, A. M.; Stamatikos, M.; Zaninoni, E.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first systematic study of X-ray flare candidates in short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) exploiting the large 6-year Swift database with the aim to constrain the physical nature of such fluctuations. We find that flare candidates appear in different types of SGRB host galaxy environments and show no clear correlation with the X-ray afterglow lifetime; flare candidates are detected both in SGRBs with a bright extended emission in the soft gamma-rays and in SGRBs which do not show such component. We furthermore show that SGRB X-ray flare candidates only partially share the set of observational properties of long GRB (LGRB) flares. In particular, the main parameter driving the duration evolution of X-ray variability episodes in both classes is found to be the elapsed time from the explosion, with very limited dependence on the different progenitors, environments, central engine life-times, prompt variability time-scales and energy budgets. On the contrary, SGRB flare candidates significantly differ from LGRB flares in terms of peak luminosity, isotropic energy, flare-to-prompt luminosity ratio and relative variability flux. However, these differences disappear when the central engine time-scales and energy budget are accounted for, suggesting that (i) flare candidates and prompt pulses in SGRBs likely have a common origin; (ii) similar dissipation and/or emission mechanisms are responsible for the prompt and flare emission in long and short GRBs, with SGRBs being less energetic albeit faster evolving versions of the long class. Finally, we show that in strict analogy to the SGRB prompt emission, flares candidates fall off the lag-luminosity relation defined by LGRBs, thus strengthening the SGRB flare-prompt pulse connection.

  18. Early life socioeconomic position and immune response to persistent infections among elderly Latinos.

    PubMed

    Meier, Helen C S; Haan, Mary N; Mendes de Leon, Carlos F; Simanek, Amanda M; Dowd, Jennifer B; Aiello, Allison E

    2016-10-01

    Persistent infections, such as cytomegalovirus (CMV), herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1), Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), and Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii), are common in the U.S. but their prevalence varies by socioeconomic status. It is unclear if early or later life socioeconomic position (SEP) is a more salient driver of disparities in immune control of these infections. Using data from the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging, we examined whether early or later life SEP was the strongest predictor of immune control later in life by contrasting two life course models, the critical period model and the chain of risk model. Early life SEP was measured as a latent variable, derived from parental education and occupation, and food availability. Indicators for SEP in later life included education level and occupation. Individuals were categorized by immune response to each pathogen (seronegative, low, medium and high) with increasing immune response representing poorer immune control. Cumulative immune response was estimated using a latent profile analysis with higher total immune response representing poorer immune control. Structural equation models were used to examine direct, indirect and total effects of early life SEP on each infection and cumulative immune response, controlling for age and gender. The direct effect of early life SEP on immune response was not statistically significant for the infections or cumulative immune response. Higher early life SEP was associated with lower immune response for T. gondii, H. pylori and cumulative immune response through pathways mediated by later life SEP. For CMV, higher early life SEP was both directly associated and partially mediated by later life SEP. No association was found between SEP and HSV-1. Findings from this study support a chain of risk model, whereby early life SEP acts through later life SEP to affect immune response to persistent infections in older age.

  19. Early life socioeconomic position and immune response to persistent infections among elderly Latinos.

    PubMed

    Meier, Helen C S; Haan, Mary N; Mendes de Leon, Carlos F; Simanek, Amanda M; Dowd, Jennifer B; Aiello, Allison E

    2016-10-01

    Persistent infections, such as cytomegalovirus (CMV), herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1), Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), and Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii), are common in the U.S. but their prevalence varies by socioeconomic status. It is unclear if early or later life socioeconomic position (SEP) is a more salient driver of disparities in immune control of these infections. Using data from the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging, we examined whether early or later life SEP was the strongest predictor of immune control later in life by contrasting two life course models, the critical period model and the chain of risk model. Early life SEP was measured as a latent variable, derived from parental education and occupation, and food availability. Indicators for SEP in later life included education level and occupation. Individuals were categorized by immune response to each pathogen (seronegative, low, medium and high) with increasing immune response representing poorer immune control. Cumulative immune response was estimated using a latent profile analysis with higher total immune response representing poorer immune control. Structural equation models were used to examine direct, indirect and total effects of early life SEP on each infection and cumulative immune response, controlling for age and gender. The direct effect of early life SEP on immune response was not statistically significant for the infections or cumulative immune response. Higher early life SEP was associated with lower immune response for T. gondii, H. pylori and cumulative immune response through pathways mediated by later life SEP. For CMV, higher early life SEP was both directly associated and partially mediated by later life SEP. No association was found between SEP and HSV-1. Findings from this study support a chain of risk model, whereby early life SEP acts through later life SEP to affect immune response to persistent infections in older age. PMID:27543684

  20. Confined Flares in Solar Active Region 12192 from 2014 October 18 to 29

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huadong; Zhang, Jun; Ma, Suli; Yang, Shuhong; Li, Leping; Huang, Xin; Xiao, Junmin

    2015-07-01

    Using the observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we investigate 6 X-class and 29 M-class flares occurring in solar active region (AR) 12192 from October 18 to 29. Among them, 30 (including 6 X- and 24 M-class) flares originated from the AR core, and the other 5 M-flares appeared at the AR periphery. Four of the X-flares exhibited similar flaring structures, indicating they were homologous flares with an analogous triggering mechanism. The possible scenario is that photospheric motions of emerged magnetic fluxes lead to shearing of the associated coronal magnetic field, which then yields a tether-cutting favorable configuration. Among the five periphery M-flares, four were associated with jet activities. The HMI vertical magnetic field data show that the photospheric fluxes of opposite magnetic polarities emerged, converged, and canceled with each other at the footpoints of the jets before the flares. Only one M-flare from the AR periphery was followed by a coronal mass ejection (CME). From October 20 to 26, the mean decay index of the horizontal background field within the height range of 40-105 Mm is below the typical threshold for torus instability onset. This suggests that a strong confinement from the overlying magnetic field might be responsible for the poor CME production of AR 12192.

  1. CONFINED FLARES IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGION 12192 FROM 2014 OCTOBER 18 TO 29

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Huadong; Zhang, Jun; Yang, Shuhong; Li, Leping; Huang, Xin; Xiao, Junmin; Ma, Suli

    2015-07-20

    Using the observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we investigate 6 X-class and 29 M-class flares occurring in solar active region (AR) 12192 from October 18 to 29. Among them, 30 (including 6 X- and 24 M-class) flares originated from the AR core, and the other 5 M-flares appeared at the AR periphery. Four of the X-flares exhibited similar flaring structures, indicating they were homologous flares with an analogous triggering mechanism. The possible scenario is that photospheric motions of emerged magnetic fluxes lead to shearing of the associated coronal magnetic field, which then yields a tether-cutting favorable configuration. Among the five periphery M-flares, four were associated with jet activities. The HMI vertical magnetic field data show that the photospheric fluxes of opposite magnetic polarities emerged, converged, and canceled with each other at the footpoints of the jets before the flares. Only one M-flare from the AR periphery was followed by a coronal mass ejection (CME). From October 20 to 26, the mean decay index of the horizontal background field within the height range of 40–105 Mm is below the typical threshold for torus instability onset. This suggests that a strong confinement from the overlying magnetic field might be responsible for the poor CME production of AR 12192.

  2. Early and late mammalian responses to heavy charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ainsworth, E. J.

    1986-01-01

    This overview summarizes murine results on acute lethality responses, inactivation of marrow CFU-S and intestinal microcolonies, testes weight loss, life span shortening, and posterior lens opacification in mice irradiated with heavy charged particles. RBE-LET relationships for these mammalian responses are compared with results from in vitro studies. The trend is that the maximum RBE for in vivo responses tends to be lower and occurs at a lower LET than for inactivation of V79 and T-1 cells in culture. Based on inactivation cross sections, the response of CFU-S in vivo conforms to expectations from earlier studies with prokaryotic systems and mammalian cells in culture. Effects of heavy ions are compared with fission spectrum neutrons, and the results are consistent with the interpretation that RBEs are lower than for fission neutrons at about the same LET, probably due to differences in track structure.

  3. Early Hemostatic Responses to Trauma Identified Using Hierarchical Clustering Analysis

    PubMed Central

    White, N.J.; Contaifer, D.; Martin, E.J.; Newton, J.C.; Mohammed, B.M.; Bostic, J.L.; Brophy, G.M.; Spiess, B.D.; Pusateri, A.E.; Ward, K.R.; Brophy, D.F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Trauma-induced coagulopathy is a complex multifactorial hemostatic response that is poorly understood. Objectives Identify distinct hemostatic responses to trauma and identify key components of the hemostatic system that vary between responses. Patients/Methods Cross-sectional observational study of adult trauma patients at an urban Level I trauma center Emergency Department. Hierarchical clustering analysis was used to identify distinct clusters of similar subjects using vital signs, injury/shock severity, and by comprehensive assessment of coagulation, clot formation, platelet function, and thrombin generation. Results Of 84 total trauma patients included in the model, three distinct trauma clusters were identified. Cluster 1 (N=57) displayed platelet activation, preserved peak thrombin generation, plasma coagulation dysfunction, moderately decreased fibrinogen concentration, and normal clot formation relative to healthy controls. Cluster 2 (N=18) displayed platelet activation, preserved peak thrombin generation, and preserved fibrinogen concentration with normal clot formation. Cluster 3 (N=9) was the most severely injured and shocked and displayed a strong inflammatory and bleeding phenotype. Platelet dysfunction, thrombin inhibition, plasma coagulation dysfunction, and decreased fibrinogen concentration were present in this cluster. Fibrinolytic activation was present in all clusters, but increased more so in Cluster 3. Trauma clusters were different most noticeably in their relative fibrinogen concentration, peak thrombin generation, and platelet-induced clot contraction. Conclusions Hierarchical clustering analysis identified 3 distinct hemostatic responses to trauma. Further insight into the underlying hemostatic mechanisms responsible for these responses is needed. PMID:25816845

  4. Early Response to Antipsychotic Drug Therapy as a Clinical Marker of Subsequent Response in the Treatment of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Kinon, Bruce J; Chen, Lei; Ascher-Svanum, Haya; Stauffer, Virginia L; Kollack-Walker, Sara; Zhou, Wei; Kapur, Shitij; Kane, John M

    2010-01-01

    Our objective was to prospectively assess whether early (ie, 2 weeks) response to an antipsychotic predicts later (12-week) response and whether ‘switching' early non-responders to another antipsychotic is a better strategy than ‘staying'. This randomized, double-blind, flexible-dosed, 12-week study enrolled 628 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. All initiated treatment with risperidone. Early response was defined as ⩾20% improvement on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total score following 2 weeks of treatment. Early responders (ERs) continued on risperidone, whereas early non-responders (ENRs) were randomized (1 : 1) to continue on risperidone 2–6 mg/day or switch to olanzapine 10–20 mg/day for 10 additional weeks. Compared with ENRs, risperidone ERs showed significantly greater reduction in PANSS total score (end point; p<001). Early response/non-response was highly predictive of subsequent clinical outcomes. Switching risperidone ENRs to olanzapine at week 2 resulted in a small but significantly greater reduction in PANSS total score (end point; p=0.020) and in depressive symptoms (end point; p=0.004); the reduction in PANSS was greater among those who were still moderately ill at 2 weeks. Switching risperidone ENRs to olanzapine also resulted in significantly greater increases in triglycerides, a significantly greater decrease in prolactin, and significantly less treatment-emergent dyskinesia. This is the first study to prospectively show that early response/non-response to an antipsychotic (risperidone) is a reliable clinical marker of subsequent clinical outcomes and that a ‘switching' strategy based on this information may lead to greater clinical improvement than staying on a drug for a longer period in some patients. PMID:19890258

  5. A comparative study between clinical grading of anterior chamber flare and flare reading using the Kowa laser flare meter.

    PubMed

    Konstantopoulou, Kallirroi; Del'Omo, Roberto; Morley, Anne M; Karagiannis, Dimitris; Bunce, Catey; Pavesio, Carlos

    2015-10-01

    To assess the accuracy of standard clinical grading of aqueous flare in uveitis according to the Standardization of Uveitis Nomenclature consensus, and compare the results with the readings of the laser flare meter, Kowa 500. Two examiners clinically graded the flare in 110 eyes. The flare was then measured using the Kowa laser flare meter. Twenty-nine eyes were graded as anterior chamber flare +2; for 18 of these, the clinicians were in agreement, the rest differed by the order of one grade. The range of the laser flare meter for these eyes was 5.2-899.1 photons/ms. The median value was 41.4. Seventy-four eyes were graded with flare +1. Agreement was established in 51 of these eyes. Disagreement for the rest was again by the order of 1, and the flare meter range was 1.1-169.9 photons/ms, median value 18.4. For the clinical measure of flare 0, the clinicians disagreed on three out of five eyes. The flare meter readings ranged from 2.5 to 14.1 photons/ms, median value 9.9. Only two eyes were graded with flare +3 and there was one step disagreement on both of them. We found little evidence of association between the flare readings and intraocular pressure or age. Our findings suggest that clinical evaluation of aqueous flare is subjective. Compared with the Kowa laser flare meter's numeric readings, the discrepancies observed indicate that clinical grading is an approximate science. The laser flare meter provides an accurate, reproducible, non-invasive assessment of aqueous flare that can prove valuable in research and clinical decisions.

  6. Measuring Early Childhood Teacher Candidates' Conceptualizations of a Culturally Responsive Classroom Ecology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Belinda Bustos; Riojas-Cortez, Mari

    2009-01-01

    With the increase of Latino preschoolers, it is pressing that early childhood teachers are prepared to create a high quality environment in which all children can succeed. Using the frameworks of cultural responsiveness and classroom management, we developed the Early Childhood Ecology Scale (ECES) as an observational and reflective tool to…

  7. Starspots on flare stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    Sizes of starspots on flare stars can be derived from the author's convection-cell hypothesis. The sizes are in fair agreement with those observed on YY Gem, CC Eri, and BY Dra by Bopp and Evans (1973). The hypothesis predicts that periodic brightness variations due to starspots are restricted to stars brighter than a critical absolute visual magnitude. A convective model of a starspot on YY Gem has been computed, assuming that the missing flux is in the form of Alfven waves. It is found that the surface field must exceed 10,000 G, and is probably less than about 30,000 G. With a surface field of 20,000 G, the effective temperature of the spot is in the range from 1590 to 1890 K, depending on the field gradient. These figures are to be compared with an effective temperature of 2000 K estimated from observations by Bopp and Evans. Efficient dynamo action is shown to be a possible mechanism for generating such large surface fields. There is a possibility that tidal effects may influence starspot formation.

  8. Solar flare protection for manned lunar missions - Analysis of the October 1989 proton flare event

    SciTech Connect

    Simonsen, L.C.; Nealy, J.E.; Townsend, L.W.; Sauer, H.H. NOAA, Space Environment Laboratory, Boulder, CL )

    1991-07-01

    Several large solar proton events occurred in the latter half of 1989. For a moderately shielded spacecraft in free space, the potential exposure would have been greatest for the flare which occurred between October 19 to 27, 1989. The temporal variations of the proton energy spectra at approximately 1 AU were monitored by the GOES-7 satellite. These data, recorded and processed at the NOAA-Boulder Space Environment Laboratory, provide the opportunity to analyze dose rates and cumulative doses which might be incurred by astronauts in transit to, or on, the moon. Of particular importance in such an event is the time development of exposure in the early phases of the flare, for which dose rates may range over many orders of magnitude in the first few hours. The cumulative dose as a function of time for the entire event is also predicted. In addition to basic shield calculations, dose rate contours are constructed for flare shelters in free-space and on the lunar surface. 14 refs.

  9. Solar and Stellar Flares over Time: Effects on Hosted Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward F.; DeWarf, Laurence E.; Engle, Scott G.; Gropp, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    The effects of flares from the Sun on Earth and other solar-system planets are presented. Also discussed are the flare properties of cooler, commonplace main-sequence K-M stars. Data from our "Sun in Time" program are used to study the flare properties of the Sun and solar-type stars from youth to old age. These studies are based on ground-based observations, UV and X-ray space missions (IUE & HST, ROSAT & Chandra) as well as a wealth of data from the Kepler Mission. The ultra-high precision photometry available from the Kepler Mission (and K2) has made it possible to study starspots, flare properties, and rotations of thousands of G, K, M stars. Superflares (defined as E > 10+33 ergs ~X-100 flares) on hundreds of mostly G and K stars have been found. (See e.g. Shibayama et al. 2013; Maehara et al. 2015; Notsu et al. 2013/15; Saar et al. 2015; Guinan et al. 2015). Using our Age-Rotation relations, we determine correlations of flares properties of the Sun and solar-type over a wide range of ages. We also compare these flare histories with the cooler, more common K- and M-type stars. The analysis of these datasets imply that the young Sun had numerous, very powerful flares that may have played major roles the evolution of the early atmospheres of Earth and other terrestrial planets. The strong X-UV fluxes and proton fluences from flares and associated plasmas from coronal mass ejection events can greatly affect the photochemistry of planetary atmospheres as well as ionizing and possibly eroding their atmospheres. Some examples are given. Also discussed are the effects of superflares from the present Sun on the Earth. Even though solar superflares are rarer (~1 per 300-500 yrs) than from the young Sun (> 1-2 per year), they could cause significant damage to our communication and satellite systems, electrical networks, and threaten the lives of astronauts in space..This research is supported by grants from NSF/RUI and NASA: NSF, AST 1009903; Chandra GO2-13020X, HST GO

  10. The Development of Attention and Response Inhibition in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartgis, Jami; Thomas, David G.; Lefler, Elizabeth K.; Hartung, Cynthia M.

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the development of attention and response inhibition from ages 5 to 7. Forty children (20 5-year-olds and 20 7-year-olds) completed four counterbalanced phases of a continuous performance task. Phase 1 was designed to measure attention without distraction, Phase 2 was designed to measure attention with…

  11. Early Responsivity to Moral Events: Physiological and Behavioral Correlates?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Sharon; And Others

    This study investigated toddlers' reactions to morally related events to determine whether age was a factor in emotional reaction, whether the middle of the second year was a salient time for the emergence of emotional reactions to such events, and whether heart rate change could be used as a new measure of moral responsivity. While their heart…

  12. Oxidative burst: an early plant response to pathogen infection.

    PubMed Central

    Wojtaszek, P

    1997-01-01

    As plants are confined to the place where they grow, they have to develop a broad range of defence responses to cope with pathogenic infections. The oxidative burst, a rapid, transient, production of huge amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS), is one of the earliest observable aspects of a plant's defence strategy. First this Review describes the chemistry of ROS (superoxide radical, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical). Secondly, the role of ROS in defence responses is demonstrated, and some important issues are considered, such as: (1) which of the ROS is a major building element of the oxidative burst; (2) the spatial and temporal regulation of the oxidative burst; and (3) differences in the plant's responses to biotic and abiotic elicitation. Thirdly, the relationships between the oxidative burst and other plant defence responses are indicated. These include: (1) an oxygen consumption, (2) the production of phytoalexins, (3) systemic acquired resistance, (4) immobilization of plant cell wall proteins, (5) changes in membrane permeability and ion fluxes and (6) a putative role in hypersensitive cell death. Wherever possible, the comparisons with models applicable to animal systems are presented. Finally, the question of the origin of ROS in the oxidative burst is considered, and two major hypotheses, (1) the action of NADPH oxidase system analogous to that of animal phagocytes, and (2) the pH-dependent generation of hydrogen peroxide by a cell wall peroxidase, are presented. On the basis of this material, a third 'unifying' hypothesis is presented, where transient changes in the pH of the cell wall compartment are indicated as a core phenomenon in evoking ROS production. Additionally, a germin/oxalate oxidase system which generates H2O2 in response to pathogenic infection is also described. PMID:9148737

  13. An early electrophysiological response associated with expertise in letter perception.

    PubMed

    Wong, Alan C N; Gauthier, Isabel; Woroch, Brion; DeBuse, Casey; Curran, Tim

    2005-09-01

    Expertise with print is likely to optimize visual processes for recognizing characters of a familiar writing system. Although brain activations have been identified for words and letter strings in contrast with other stimuli, relatively little work has focused on the neural basis of single-letter perception. English readers and Chinese-English bilinguals participated in an ERP study and performed a 1-back identity judgment on Roman letters, Chinese characters, pseudofonts, and their string versions. The Chinese-English bilinguals showed an enhanced N170 for both Roman letters and Chinese characters relative to pseudofonts. For the non-Chinese readers, the N170 amplitude was larger for Roman letters relative to Chinese characters and pseudofonts. Our results suggest that changes in relatively early visual processes underlie expert letter perception.

  14. Ultraviolet Spectral Comparison of "Quiescent" M-dwarf Flares with Solar and "Active" M-dwarf Flares and the Implications for an Earth-like Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parke Loyd, R. O.; France, Kevin; Youngblood, Allison

    2015-08-01

    All flares are not created equal. In particular, flares on low-mass stars are notable for their diversity, even between events on the same star. To better characterize these differences and the range of flare morphologies possible on low-mass stars, we analyzed a sample of such flares in detail using temporally resolved UV spectroscopy from the growing body of MUSCLES Treasury Survey data. Specifically, we used the data to analyze the response of several UV emission lines (e.g. C II, Si III, Si IV) and the UV continuum following each impulsive event. From this analysis, we present a qualitative picture of energy deposition and propagation in the stellar atmosphere during a few representative events. These data also permitted a spectral comparison with flares typical of the Sun, and we describe the most prominent differences that emerged from this comparison. Additionally, by including flares from all the observed MUSCLES stars, we create an energy-frequency plot for flares on “quiescent” M-dwarfs and compare it to that of the Sun and of well-studied “active” M-dwarfs such as AD Leo. Flares like those we detected and analyzed can strip some atmosphere from closely orbiting planets, adversely affecting the long-term habitability of planets that might have initially supported liquid surface water. To gauge the amplitude of this effect, we used the flare data to make an empirically driven estimate of how much mass each representative flare might remove from the atmosphere of an Earth-like planet.

  15. International consensus for a definition of disease flare in lupus.

    PubMed

    Ruperto, N; Hanrahan, L M; Alarcón, G S; Belmont, H M; Brey, R L; Brunetta, P; Buyon, J P; Costner, M I; Cronin, M E; Dooley, M A; Filocamo, G; Fiorentino, D; Fortin, P R; Franks, A G; Gilkeson, G; Ginzler, E; Gordon, C; Grossman, J; Hahn, B; Isenberg, D A; Kalunian, K C; Petri, M; Sammaritano, L; Sánchez-Guerrero, J; Sontheimer, R D; Strand, V; Urowitz, M; von Feldt, J M; Werth, V P; Merrill, J T

    2011-04-01

    The Lupus Foundation of America (LFA) convened an international working group to obtain a consensus definition of disease flare in lupus. With help from the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organization (PRINTO), two web-based Delphi surveys of physicians were conducted. Subsequently, the LFA held a second consensus conference followed by a third Delphi survey to reach a community-wide agreement for flare definition. Sixty-nine of the 120 (57.5%) polled physicians responded to the first survey. Fifty-nine of the responses were available to draft 12 preliminary statements, which were circulated in the second survey. Eighty-seven of 118 (74%) physicians completed the second survey, with an agreement of 70% for 9/12 (75%) statements. During the second conference, three alternative flare definitions were consolidated and sent back to the international community. One hundred and sixteen of 146 (79.5%) responded, with agreement by 71/116 (61%) for the following definition: "A flare is a measurable increase in disease activity in one or more organ systems involving new or worse clinical signs and symptoms and/or laboratory measurements. It must be considered clinically significant by the assessor and usually there would be at least consideration of a change or an increase in treatment." The LFA proposes this definition for lupus flare on the basis of its high face validity.

  16. A Unified Computational Model for Solar and Stellar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allred, Joel C.; Kowalski, Adam F.; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-01-01

    We present a unified computational framework that can be used to describe impulsive flares on the Sun and on dMe stars. The models assume that the flare impulsive phase is caused by a beam of charged particles that is accelerated in the corona and propagates downward depositing energy and momentum along the way. This rapidly heats the lower stellar atmosphere causing it to explosively expand and dramatically brighten. Our models consist of flux tubes that extend from the sub-photosphere into the corona. We simulate how flare-accelerated charged particles propagate down one-dimensional flux tubes and heat the stellar atmosphere using the Fokker-Planck kinetic theory. Detailed radiative transfer is included so that model predictions can be directly compared with observations. The flux of flare-accelerated particles drives return currents which additionally heat the stellar atmosphere. These effects are also included in our models. We examine the impact of the flare-accelerated particle beams on model solar and dMe stellar atmospheres and perform parameter studies varying the injected particle energy spectra. We find the atmospheric response is strongly dependent on the accelerated particle cutoff energy and spectral index.

  17. A UNIFIED COMPUTATIONAL MODEL FOR SOLAR AND STELLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Allred, Joel C.; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-08-10

    We present a unified computational framework that can be used to describe impulsive flares on the Sun and on dMe stars. The models assume that the flare impulsive phase is caused by a beam of charged particles that is accelerated in the corona and propagates downward depositing energy and momentum along the way. This rapidly heats the lower stellar atmosphere causing it to explosively expand and dramatically brighten. Our models consist of flux tubes that extend from the sub-photosphere into the corona. We simulate how flare-accelerated charged particles propagate down one-dimensional flux tubes and heat the stellar atmosphere using the Fokker–Planck kinetic theory. Detailed radiative transfer is included so that model predictions can be directly compared with observations. The flux of flare-accelerated particles drives return currents which additionally heat the stellar atmosphere. These effects are also included in our models. We examine the impact of the flare-accelerated particle beams on model solar and dMe stellar atmospheres and perform parameter studies varying the injected particle energy spectra. We find the atmospheric response is strongly dependent on the accelerated particle cutoff energy and spectral index.

  18. THE SOLAR FLARE IRON ABUNDANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, K. J. H.; Dennis, B. R. E-mail: Brian.R.Dennis@nasa.gov

    2012-03-20

    The abundance of iron is measured from emission line complexes at 6.65 keV (Fe line) and 8 keV (Fe/Ni line) in RHESSI X-ray spectra during solar flares. Spectra during long-duration flares with steady declines were selected, with an isothermal assumption and improved data analysis methods over previous work. Two spectral fitting models give comparable results, viz., an iron abundance that is lower than previous coronal values but higher than photospheric values. In the preferred method, the estimated Fe abundance is A(Fe) = 7.91 {+-} 0.10 (on a logarithmic scale, with A(H) = 12) or 2.6 {+-} 0.6 times the photospheric Fe abundance. Our estimate is based on a detailed analysis of 1898 spectra taken during 20 flares. No variation from flare to flare is indicated. This argues for a fractionation mechanism similar to quiet-Sun plasma. The new value of A(Fe) has important implications for radiation loss curves, which are estimated.

  19. Largest Solar Flare on Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The largest solar flare ever recorded occurred at 4:51 p.m. EDT, on Monday, April 2, 2001. as Observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite. Solar flares, among the solar systems mightiest eruptions, are tremendous explosions in the atmosphere of the Sun capable of releasing as much energy as a billion megatons of TNT. Caused by the sudden release of magnetic energy, in just a few seconds, solar flares can accelerate solar particles to very high velocities, almost to the speed of light, and heat solar material to tens of millions of degrees. The recent explosion from the active region near the sun's northwest limb hurled a coronal mass ejection into space at a whopping speed of roughly 7.2 million kilometers per hour. Luckily, the flare was not aimed directly towards Earth. Second to the most severe R5 classification of radio blackout, this flare produced an R4 blackout as rated by the NOAA SEC. This classification measures the disruption in radio communications. Launched December 2, 1995 atop an ATLAS-IIAS expendable launch vehicle, the SOHO is a cooperative effort involving NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA). (Image courtesy NASA Goddard SOHO Project office)

  20. Shock Wave and EUV Transient During a Flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Kaiser, M. L.; Sato, J.; Pick, Monique

    2000-01-01

    A metric type II burst and a 'brow' type enhancement in EUV were observed during the hard X-ray flare of 1997 April 15 from a newly emerging region, AR 8032. The position of the type II burst obtained from the Nancay radioheliograph coincided with the EUV transient. The type II burst and the EUV transient were in the equatorial streamer region to the north of the flaring region. This observation suggests that the EUV transient may be the manifestation of the MHD shock responsible for the type II burst.

  1. Evidence for Magnetic Reconnection in Three Homologous Solar Flares Observed by RHESSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, Lin-Hui; Holman, Gordon D.; Dennis, Brian R.

    2004-01-01

    We present RHESSI observF5oss of three homologous flares, which occurred between April 14 and 16, 2002. We find that the RHESSI images of all three flares at energies between 6 and 25 keV had some common features: (1) A. separate coronal source up to approx. 30 deg. above the flare loop appeared in the early impulsive phase and stayed stationary for several minutes. (2) Before the flare loop moved upward; previously reported by others, the flare loop-top centroid moved downward for 2-4 minutes during the early impulsive phase of the Ears: falling by 13 - 30% of its initial height with a speed between 8 and 23 km/s. We conclude that these features are associated with the formation and development of a current sheet between the loop-top and the coronal source. In the April 14-15 flare, we find that the hard X-ray flux (greater than 25 keV) is correlated with the rate at which the flare loop moves upward, indicating that the faster the loop grows, the faster the reconnection rate, and therefore, the greater the flux of accelerated electrons. Subject headings: Sun: L'iaies-Sun: X-1-ay-s -

  2. Photoacoustic imaging of early inflammatory response using gold nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kang; Huang, Sheng-Wen; Ashkenazi, Shai; O'Donnell, Matthew; Agarwal, Ashish; Kotov, Nicholas A.; Denny, Michael F.; Kaplan, Mariana J.

    2007-05-01

    Gold nanorods have unusually strong absorption in near infrared, which can be utilized for an optical imaging with nanocolloids. The feasibility of photoacoustic imaging of inflammatory responses using bioconjugated gold nanorods is demonstrated. To target the stimulated cells, gold nanorods were conjugated to anti-intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) which binds to cell surfaces over expressing ICAM-1. A monolayer of stimulated endothelial cells labeled with bioconjugated gold nanorods was scanned using a high frequency transducer. Photoacoustic images differentiated inflamed cells from control cells and matched well with fluorescence images. This technology may permit identification of critical inflammation sites such as blood vessels.

  3. Astrophysics: Unexpected X-ray flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campana, Sergio

    2016-10-01

    Two sources of highly energetic flares have been discovered in archival X-ray data of 70 nearby galaxies. These flares have an undetermined origin and might represent previously unknown astrophysical phenomena. See Letter p.356

  4. What's an Asthma Flare-Up?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy What's an Asthma Flare-Up? KidsHealth > For Parents > What's an Asthma ... of a straw that's being pinched. Causes of Asthma Flare-Ups People with asthma have airways that ...

  5. The Flare Genesis Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.

    2002-01-01

    Using the Flare Genesis Experiment (FGE), a balloon-borne observatory with an 80-cm solar telescope we observed the active region NOAA 8844 on January 25, 2000 for several hours. FGE was equipped with a vector polarimeter and a tunable Fabry-Perot narrow-band filter. It recorded time series of filtergrams, vector magnetograms, and Dopplergrams at the Ca(I) 6122.2 angstrom line, and H-alpha filtergrams with a cadence between 2.5 and 7.5 minutes. At the time of the observations, NOAA 8844 was located at approximately 5 N 30 W. The region was rapidly growing during the observations; new magnetic flux was constantly emerging in three supergranules near its center. We describe in detail how the FGE data were analyzed and report on the structure and behavior of peculiar moving dipolar features (MDFs) observed in the active region. In longitudinal magnetograms, the MDFs appeared to be small dipoles in the emerging fields. The east-west orientation of their polarities was opposite that of the sunspots. The dipoles were oriented parallel to their direction of motion, which was in most cases towards the sunspots. Previously, dipolar moving magnetic features have only been observed flowing out from sunspots. Vector magnetograms show that the magnetic field of each MDF negative part was less inclined to the local horizontal than the ones of the positive part. We identify the MDFs as undulations, or stitches, where the emerging flux ropes are still tied to the photosphere. We present a U-loop model that can account for their unusual structure and behavior, and it shows how emerging flux can shed its entrained mass.

  6. Hooked Flare Ribbons and Flux-rope-related QSL Footprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jie; Gilchrist, Stuart A.; Aulanier, Guillaume; Schmieder, Brigitte; Pariat, Etienne; Li, Hui

    2016-05-01

    We studied the magnetic topology of active region 12158 on 2014 September 10 and compared it with the observations before and early in the flare that begins at 17:21 UT (SOL2014-09-10T17:45:00). Our results show that the sigmoidal structure and flare ribbons of this active region observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly can be well reproduced from a Grad–Rubin nonlinear force-free field extrapolation method. Various inverse-S- and inverse-J-shaped magnetic field lines, which surround a coronal flux rope, coincide with the sigmoid as observed in different extreme-ultraviolet wavelengths, including its multithreaded curved ends. Also, the observed distribution of surface currents in the magnetic polarity where it was not prescribed is well reproduced. This validates our numerical implementation and setup of the Grad–Rubin method. The modeled double inverse-J-shaped quasi-separatrix layer (QSL) footprints match the observed flare ribbons during the rising phase of the flare, including their hooked parts. The spiral-like shape of the latter may be related to a complex pre-eruptive flux rope with more than one turn of twist, as obtained in the model. These ribbon-associated flux-rope QSL footprints are consistent with the new standard flare model in 3D, with the presence of a hyperbolic flux tube located below an inverse-teardrop-shaped coronal QSL. This is a new step forward forecasting the locations of reconnection and ribbons in solar flares and the geometrical properties of eruptive flux ropes.

  7. Well-observed dynamics of flaring and peripheral coronal magnetic loops during an M-class limb flare

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Jinhua; Zhou, Tuanhui; Ji, Haisheng; Feng, Li; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Inhester, Bernd

    2014-08-20

    In this paper, we present a variety of well-observed dynamic behaviors for the flaring and peripheral magnetic loops of the M6.6 class extreme limb flare that occurred on 2011 February 24 (SOL2011-02-24T07:20) from EUV observations by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory and X-ray observations by RHESSI. The flaring loop motion confirms the earlier contraction-expansion picture. We find that the U-shaped trajectory delineated by the X-ray corona source of the flare roughly follows the direction of a filament eruption associated with the flare. Different temperature structures of the coronal source during the contraction and expansion phases strongly suggest different kinds of magnetic reconnection processes. For some peripheral loops, we discover that their dynamics are closely correlated with the filament eruption. During the slow rising to abrupt, fast rising of the filament, overlying peripheral magnetic loops display different responses. Two magnetic loops on the elbow of the active region had a slow descending motion followed by an abrupt successive fast contraction, while magnetic loops on the top of the filament were pushed outward, slowly being inflated for a while and then erupting as a moving front. We show that the filament activation and eruption play a dominant role in determining the dynamics of the overlying peripheral coronal magnetic loops.

  8. Activation of oxidative stress-responsive signaling pathways in early splenotoxic response of aniline

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jianling; Wang Gangduo; Ansari, G.A.S.; Khan, M. Firoze

    2008-07-15

    Aniline exposure causes toxicity to the spleen, which leads to a variety of sarcomas, and fibrosis appears to be an important preneoplastic lesion. However, early molecular mechanisms in aniline-induced toxicity to the spleen are not known. Previously, we have shown that aniline exposure results in iron overload and induction of oxidative stress in the spleen, which can cause transcriptional upregulation of fibrogenic/inflammatory cytokines via activation of oxidative stress (OS)-responsive signaling pathways. To test this mechanism, male SD rats were treated with aniline (1mmol/kg/day via gavage) for 7days, an experimental condition that precedes the appearance of fibrosis. Significant increases in both NF-{kappa}B and AP-1 binding activity was observed in the nuclear extracts of splenocytes from aniline-treated rats as determined by ELISAs, and supported by Western blot data showing increases in p-I{kappa}B{alpha}, p-p65 and p-c-Jun. To understand the upstream signaling events which could account for the activation of NF-{kappa}B and AP-1, phosphorylation patterns of I{kappa}B kinases (IKK{alpha} and IKK{beta}) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) were pursued. Our data showed remarkable increases in both p-IKK{alpha} and p-IKK{beta} in the splenocytes from aniline-treated rats, suggesting their role in the phosphorylation of both I{kappa}B{alpha} and p65 subunits. Furthermore, aniline exposure led to activation of all three classes of MAPKs, as evident from increased phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK1/2) and p38 MAPKs, which could potentially contribute to the observed activation of both AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B. Activation of upstream signaling molecules was also associated with simultaneous increases in gene transcription of cytokines IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-{alpha}. The observed sequence of events following aniline exposure could initiate a fibrogenic and/or tumorigenic response in the spleen.

  9. Storey building early monitoring based on rapid seismic response analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julius, Musa, Admiral; Sunardi, Bambang; Rudyanto, Ariska

    2016-05-01

    Within the last decade, advances in the acquisition, processing and transmission of data from seismic monitoring has contributed to the growth in the number structures instrumented with such systems. An equally important factor for such growth can be attributed to the demands by stakeholders to find rapid answers to important questions related to the functionality or state of "health" of structures during and immediately of a seismic events. Consequently, this study aims to monitor the storey building based on seismic response i. e. earthquake and tremor analysis at short time lapse using accelerographs data. This study used one of storey building (X) in Jakarta city that suffered the effects of Kebumen earthquake January 25th 2014, Pandeglang earthquake July 9th 2014, and Lebak earthquake November 8th 2014. Tremors used in this study are tremors after the three following earthquakes. Data processing used to determine peak ground acceleration (PGA), peak ground velocity (PGV), peak ground displacement (PGD), spectral acceleration (SA), spectral velocity (SV), spectral displacement (SD), A/V ratio, acceleration amplification and effective duration (te). Then determine the natural frequency (f0) and peak of H/V ratio using H/V ratio method.The earthquakes data processing result shows the value of peak ground motion, spectrum response, A/V ratio and acceleration amplification increases with height, while the value of the effective duration give a different viewpoint of building dynamic because duration of Kebumen earthquake shows the highest energy in the highest floor but Pandeglang and Lebak earthquake in the lowest floor. Then, tremors data processing result one month after each earthquakes shows the natural frequency of building in constant value. Increasing of peak ground motion, spectrum response, A/V ratio, acceleration amplification, then decrease of effective duration following the increase of building floors shows that the building construction supports the

  10. Chasing White-Light Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, H. S.

    2016-05-01

    In this memoir I describe my life in research, mostly in the area of solar physics. The recurring theme is "white-light flares," and several sections of this paper deal with this and related phenomena; I wind up describing how I see the state of the art in this still-interesting and crucially important (as it has been since 1859) area of flare research. I also describe my participation in two long-lived satellite programs dedicated to solar observations ( Yohkoh and RHESSI) and elaborate on their discoveries. These have both helped with white-light flares both directly and also with closely related X-ray and γ-ray emissions), with the result that this article leans heavily in that direction.

  11. 6Li from Solar Flares.

    PubMed

    Ramaty; Tatischeff; Thibaud; Kozlovsky; Mandzhavidze

    2000-05-10

    By introducing a hitherto ignored 6Li producing process, due to accelerated 3He reactions with 4He, we show that accelerated particle interactions in solar flares produce much more 6Li than 7Li. By normalizing our calculations to gamma-ray data, we demonstrate that the 6Li produced in solar flares, combined with photospheric 7Li, can account for the recently determined solar wind lithium isotopic ratio, obtained from measurements in lunar soil, provided that the bulk of the flare-produced lithium is evacuated by the solar wind. Further research in this area could provide unique information on a variety of problems, including solar atmospheric transport and mixing, solar convection and the lithium depletion issue, and solar wind and solar particle acceleration.

  12. Effect of the Responsive Environment Early Education Program for Low Birth Weight Children of Preschool Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askins, Billy E.; And Others

    This paper describes an external evaluation study of the Responsive Environment Early Education Program (formerly known as the Responsive Environment Program for Spanish American Children), an educational intervention program for "high risk" (low birth weight) 3-, 4-, and 5-year-old children in Clovis, New Mexico. Major goals of the program are:…

  13. The structure of the temperature minimum region in solar flares and its significance for flare heating mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Machado, M. E.; Emslie, A. G.; Brown, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    The paper analyzes Ca II K-line profiles of one flare and EUV continuum observations of two other flares in an effort to obtain values for temperature enhancements over active region values produced in the upper photosphere around and above the temperature minimum region. Results show that the flare temperature minimum is depressed some two scale heights below its preflare level and that substantial temperature enhancements are produced even at this depth. Consideration is also given to possible heating mechanisms which might be responsible for the observed enhancements, including (1) heating by EUV radiation, (2) heating by proton beams with low dispersion energy spectra centered at 10-20 MeV, and (3) localized heating at temperature minimum levels.

  14. The smallest hard X-ray flare?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glesener, Lindsay; Krucker, Sam; Hannah, Iain; Smith, David M.; Grefenstette, Brian; Marsh, Andrew; Hudson, Hugh S.; White, Stephen M.; Chen, Bin

    2016-05-01

    We report a NuSTAR observation of a small solar flare on 2015 September 1, estimated to be on the order of a GOES class A.05 flare in brightness. This flare is fainter than any hard X-ray (HXR) flares in the existing literature, and with a peak rate of only ˜5 counts s-1 detector-1 observed by RHESSI, is effectively the smallest that can just barely be detected by the current standard (indirectly imaging) solar HXR instrumentation, though we expect that smaller flares will continue to be discovered as instrumental and observational techniques progress. The flare occurred during a solar observation by the highly sensitive NuSTAR astrophysical HXR spacecraft, which used its direct focusing optics to produce detailed flare spectra and images. The flare exhibits properties commonly observed in larger flares, including a fast rise and more gradual decay, and similar spatial dimensions to the RHESSI microflares. We will discuss the presence of non-thermal (flare-accelerated) electrons during the impulsive phase. The flare is small in emission measure, temperature, and energy, though not in physical dimensions. Its presence is an indication that flares do indeed scale down to smaller energies and retain what we customarily think of as “flarelike” properties.

  15. Forming tool improves quality of tubing flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Punch and die set improves the quality of tubing flares for use with standard flared-tube fittings in high-pressure systems. It forges a dimensionally accurate flare in the tubing and forces more tubing material into the high-stress areas to improve the strength and tightness of the tubing connection.

  16. Early immune response and regulation of IL-2 receptor subunits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, Millie; Sugano, Eiko; Schopper, Thomas; Li, Chai-Fei; Boonyaratanakornkit, J. B.; Cogoli, Augusto

    2005-01-01

    MAPK pathways plays a role in early T-cell activation and induction of IL-2, IL-2R(alpha) and IFN(gamma) gene expression.

  17. Slipping Magnetic Reconnection, Chromospheric Evaporation, Implosion, and Precursors in the 2014 September 10 X1.6-Class Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudík, Jaroslav; Polito, Vanessa; Janvier, Miho; Mulay, Sargam M.; Karlický, Marian; Aulanier, Guillaume; Del Zanna, Giulio; Dzifčáková, Elena; Mason, Helen E.; Schmieder, Brigitte

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the occurrence of slipping magnetic reconnection, chromospheric evaporation, and coronal loop dynamics in the 2014 September 10 X-class flare. Slipping reconnection is found to be present throughout the flare from its early phase. Flare loops are seen to slip in opposite directions toward both ends of the ribbons. Velocities of 20–40 km s‑1 are found within time windows where the slipping is well resolved. The warm coronal loops exhibit expanding and contracting motions that are interpreted as displacements due to the growing flux rope that subsequently erupts. This flux rope existed and erupted before the onset of apparent coronal implosion. This indicates that the energy release proceeds by slipping reconnection and not via coronal implosion. The slipping reconnection leads to changes in the geometry of the observed structures at the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph slit position, from flare loop top to the footpoints in the ribbons. This results in variations of the observed velocities of chromospheric evaporation in the early flare phase. Finally, it is found that the precursor signatures, including localized EUV brightenings as well as nonthermal X-ray emission, are signatures of the flare itself, progressing from the early phase toward the impulsive phase, with the tether-cutting being provided by the slipping reconnection. The dynamics of both the flare and outlying coronal loops is found to be consistent with the predictions of the standard solar flare model in three dimensions.

  18. Arches showing UV flaring activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontenla, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    The UVSP data obtained in the previous maximum activity cycle show the frequent appearance of flaring events in the UV. In many cases these flaring events are characterized by at least two footpoints which show compact impulsive non-simultaneous brightenings and a fainter but clearly observed arch developes between the footpoints. These arches and footpoints are observed in line corresponding to different temperatures, as Lyman alpha, N V, and C IV, and when observed above the limb display large Doppler shifts at some stages. The size of the arches can be larger than 20 arcsec.

  19. Characteristics of the photospheric magnetic field associated with solar flare initiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ya-Hui; Chen, P. F.; Hsieh, Min-Shiu; Wu, S. T.; He, Han; Tsai, Tsung-Che E-mail: chenpf@nju.edu.cn E-mail: wus@uah.edu E-mail: tctsai@narlabs.org.tw

    2014-05-01

    The physical environment governing the solar flare initiation is not fully understood, although there are significant efforts to address the relationship between magnetic non-potential parameters and early flare signatures. In this study, we attempt to characterize the flare initiation based on the processed Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager vector magnetograms, Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 1600 Å, and RHESSI hard X-ray observations. Three flare events, the M6.6 flare on 2011 February 13, the X2.2 flare on 2011 February 15, and the X2.1 flare on 2011 September 6, in two active regions AR 11158 and AR 11283 are investigated. We analyze the source field strength in the photosphere, which is defined as the magnitude of the observed magnetic field deviation from the potential field. It is found that one of the strong source field regions above the magnetic polarity inversion line well connects the initial bright kernels of two conjugate ribbons. The results imply that the distribution of the photospheric source field strength can be used to locate the initiation site of flaring loops regardless of the configuration of pre-flare magnetic fields or the evolution of active regions. Moreover, the field configuration in the strong source field regions tends to become more inclined after flares, which is consistent with the coronal implosion scenario. We also employ a fast method to derive the total current density from the photospheric vector magnetogram in the framework of force-free field. This method can provide fast estimation of photospheric current density within a reasonable accuracy without appealing for the more accurate calculation from a model extrapolation.

  20. Early IFN type I response: Learning from microbial evasion strategies.

    PubMed

    Coccia, Eliana M; Battistini, Angela

    2015-03-01

    Type I interferon (IFN) comprises a class of cytokines first discovered more than 50 years ago and initially characterized for their ability to interfere with viral replication and restrict locally viral propagation. As such, their induction downstream of germ-line encoded pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) upon recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) is a hallmark of the host antiviral response. The acknowledgment that several PAMPs, not just of viral origin, may induce IFN, pinpoints at these molecules as a first line of host defense against a number of invading pathogens. Acting in both autocrine and paracrine manner, IFN interferes with viral replication by inducing hundreds of different IFN-stimulated genes with both direct anti-pathogenic as well as immunomodulatory activities, therefore functioning as a bridge between innate and adaptive immunity. On the other hand an inverse interference to escape the IFN system is largely exploited by pathogens through a number of tactics and tricks aimed at evading, inhibiting or manipulating the IFN pathway, that result in progression of infection or establishment of chronic disease. In this review we discuss the interplay between the IFN system and some selected clinically important and challenging viruses and bacteria, highlighting the wide array of pathogen-triggered molecular mechanisms involved in evasion strategies. PMID:25869307

  1. Early IFN type I response: Learning from microbial evasion strategies.

    PubMed

    Coccia, Eliana M; Battistini, Angela

    2015-03-01

    Type I interferon (IFN) comprises a class of cytokines first discovered more than 50 years ago and initially characterized for their ability to interfere with viral replication and restrict locally viral propagation. As such, their induction downstream of germ-line encoded pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) upon recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) is a hallmark of the host antiviral response. The acknowledgment that several PAMPs, not just of viral origin, may induce IFN, pinpoints at these molecules as a first line of host defense against a number of invading pathogens. Acting in both autocrine and paracrine manner, IFN interferes with viral replication by inducing hundreds of different IFN-stimulated genes with both direct anti-pathogenic as well as immunomodulatory activities, therefore functioning as a bridge between innate and adaptive immunity. On the other hand an inverse interference to escape the IFN system is largely exploited by pathogens through a number of tactics and tricks aimed at evading, inhibiting or manipulating the IFN pathway, that result in progression of infection or establishment of chronic disease. In this review we discuss the interplay between the IFN system and some selected clinically important and challenging viruses and bacteria, highlighting the wide array of pathogen-triggered molecular mechanisms involved in evasion strategies.

  2. Unprecedented Fine Structure of a Solar Flare Revealed by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope.

    PubMed

    Jing, Ju; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Liu, Chang; Gary, Dale; Wang, Haimin

    2016-01-01

    Solar flares signify the sudden release of magnetic energy and are sources of so called space weather. The fine structures (below 500 km) of flares are rarely observed and are accessible to only a few instruments world-wide. Here we present observation of a solar flare using exceptionally high resolution images from the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) equipped with high order adaptive optics at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The observation reveals the process of the flare in unprecedented detail, including the flare ribbon propagating across the sunspots, coronal rain (made of condensing plasma) streaming down along the post-flare loops, and the chromosphere's response to the impact of coronal rain, showing fine-scale brightenings at the footpoints of the falling plasma. Taking advantage of the resolving power of the NST, we measure the cross-sectional widths of flare ribbons, post-flare loops and footpoint brighenings, which generally lie in the range of 80-200 km, well below the resolution of most current instruments used for flare studies. Confining the scale of such fine structure provides an essential piece of information in modeling the energy transport mechanism of flares, which is an important issue in solar and plasma physics. PMID:27071459

  3. Unprecedented Fine Structure of a Solar Flare Revealed by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Ju; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Liu, Chang; Gary, Dale; Wang, Haimin

    2016-04-01

    Solar flares signify the sudden release of magnetic energy and are sources of so called space weather. The fine structures (below 500 km) of flares are rarely observed and are accessible to only a few instruments world-wide. Here we present observation of a solar flare using exceptionally high resolution images from the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) equipped with high order adaptive optics at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The observation reveals the process of the flare in unprecedented detail, including the flare ribbon propagating across the sunspots, coronal rain (made of condensing plasma) streaming down along the post-flare loops, and the chromosphere’s response to the impact of coronal rain, showing fine-scale brightenings at the footpoints of the falling plasma. Taking advantage of the resolving power of the NST, we measure the cross-sectional widths of flare ribbons, post-flare loops and footpoint brighenings, which generally lie in the range of 80–200 km, well below the resolution of most current instruments used for flare studies. Confining the scale of such fine structure provides an essential piece of information in modeling the energy transport mechanism of flares, which is an important issue in solar and plasma physics.

  4. Unprecedented Fine Structure of a Solar Flare Revealed by the 1.6~m New Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Ju; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Liu, Chang; Gary, Dale E.; Wang, Haimin

    2016-05-01

    Solar flares signify the sudden release of magnetic energy and are sources of so called space weather. The fine structures (below 500 km) of flares are rarely observed and are accessible to only a few instruments world-wide. Here we present observation of a solar flare using exceptionally high resolution images from the 1.6~m New Solar Telescope (NST) equipped with high order adaptive optics at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The observation reveals the process of the flare in unprecedented detail, including the flare ribbon propagating across the sunspots, coronal rain (made of condensing plasma) streaming down along the post-flare loops, and the chromosphere's response to the impact of coronal rain, showing fine-scale brightenings at the footpoints of the falling plasma. Taking advantage of the resolving power of the NST, we measure the cross-sectional widths of flare ribbons, post-flare loops and footpoint brighenings, which generally lie in the range of 80-200 km, well below the resolution of most current instruments used for flare studies. Confining the scale of such fine structure provides an essential piece of information in modeling the energy transport mechanism of flares, which is an important issue in solar and plasma physics.

  5. Unprecedented Fine Structure of a Solar Flare Revealed by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope.

    PubMed

    Jing, Ju; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Liu, Chang; Gary, Dale; Wang, Haimin

    2016-04-13

    Solar flares signify the sudden release of magnetic energy and are sources of so called space weather. The fine structures (below 500 km) of flares are rarely observed and are accessible to only a few instruments world-wide. Here we present observation of a solar flare using exceptionally high resolution images from the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) equipped with high order adaptive optics at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The observation reveals the process of the flare in unprecedented detail, including the flare ribbon propagating across the sunspots, coronal rain (made of condensing plasma) streaming down along the post-flare loops, and the chromosphere's response to the impact of coronal rain, showing fine-scale brightenings at the footpoints of the falling plasma. Taking advantage of the resolving power of the NST, we measure the cross-sectional widths of flare ribbons, post-flare loops and footpoint brighenings, which generally lie in the range of 80-200 km, well below the resolution of most current instruments used for flare studies. Confining the scale of such fine structure provides an essential piece of information in modeling the energy transport mechanism of flares, which is an important issue in solar and plasma physics.

  6. Unprecedented Fine Structure of a Solar Flare Revealed by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Ju; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Liu, Chang; Gary, Dale; Wang, Haimin

    2016-01-01

    Solar flares signify the sudden release of magnetic energy and are sources of so called space weather. The fine structures (below 500 km) of flares are rarely observed and are accessible to only a few instruments world-wide. Here we present observation of a solar flare using exceptionally high resolution images from the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) equipped with high order adaptive optics at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The observation reveals the process of the flare in unprecedented detail, including the flare ribbon propagating across the sunspots, coronal rain (made of condensing plasma) streaming down along the post-flare loops, and the chromosphere’s response to the impact of coronal rain, showing fine-scale brightenings at the footpoints of the falling plasma. Taking advantage of the resolving power of the NST, we measure the cross-sectional widths of flare ribbons, post-flare loops and footpoint brighenings, which generally lie in the range of 80–200 km, well below the resolution of most current instruments used for flare studies. Confining the scale of such fine structure provides an essential piece of information in modeling the energy transport mechanism of flares, which is an important issue in solar and plasma physics. PMID:27071459

  7. Wavelength Dependence of Solar Flare Irradiation and its Influence on the Thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Yanshi; Richmond, Arthur D.; Deng, Yue; Qian, L.; Solomon, S.; Chamberlin, P.

    2012-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of solar flare enhancement is one of the important factors determining how the Thermosphere-Ionosphere (T-I) system response to flares. To investigate the wavelength dependence of solar flare, the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) has been run for 34 X-class flares. The results show that the percentage increases of solar irradiance at flare peak comparing to pre-flare condition have a clear wavelength dependence. In the wavelength range between 0 - 195 nm, it can vary from 1% to 10000%. The solar irradiance enhancement is largest ( 1000%) in the XUV range (0 - 25 nm), and is about 100% in EUV range (25 - 120 nm). The influence of different wavebands on the T-I system during the October 28th, 2003 flare (X17.2-class) has also been examined using the latest version of National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Thermosphere- Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIE-GCM). While the globally integrated solar energy deposition is largest in the 0 - 14 nm waveband, the impact of solar irradiance enhancement on the thermosphere at 400 km is largest for 25 - 105 nm waveband. The effect of 122 - 195 nm is small in magnitude, but it decays slowly.

  8. A dynamic flare with anomalously dense flare loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svestka, Z.; Fontenla, J. M.; Machado, M. E.; Martin, S. F.; Neidig, D. F.

    1986-01-01

    The dynamic flare of November 6, 1980 developed a rich system of growing loops which could be followed in H-alpha for 1.5 hours. Throughout the flare, these loops, near the limb, were seen in emission against the disk. Theoretical computations of b-values for a hydrogen atom reveal that this requires electron densities in the loops to be close to 10 to the 12th per cu cm. From measured widths of higher Balmer lines the density at the tops of the loops was found to be 4 x 10 to the 12th per cu cm if no nonthermal motions were present. It is now general knowledge that flare loops are initially observed in X-rays and become visible in H-alpha only after cooling. For such a high density a loop would cool through radiation from 10 to the 7th K to 10 to the 4th K within a few minutes so that the dense H-alpha loops should have heights very close to the heights of the X-ray loops. This, however, contradicts the observations obtained by the HXIS and FCS instruments on board SMM which show the X-ray loops at much higher altitudes than the loops in H-alpha. Therefore, the density must have been significantly smaller when the loops were formed and the flare loops were apparently both shrinking and becoming denser while cooling.

  9. PREDICTION OF SOLAR FLARE SIZE AND TIME-TO-FLARE USING SUPPORT VECTOR MACHINE REGRESSION

    SciTech Connect

    Boucheron, Laura E.; Al-Ghraibah, Amani; McAteer, R. T. James

    2015-10-10

    We study the prediction of solar flare size and time-to-flare using 38 features describing magnetic complexity of the photospheric magnetic field. This work uses support vector regression to formulate a mapping from the 38-dimensional feature space to a continuous-valued label vector representing flare size or time-to-flare. When we consider flaring regions only, we find an average error in estimating flare size of approximately half a geostationary operational environmental satellite (GOES) class. When we additionally consider non-flaring regions, we find an increased average error of approximately three-fourths a GOES class. We also consider thresholding the regressed flare size for the experiment containing both flaring and non-flaring regions and find a true positive rate of 0.69 and a true negative rate of 0.86 for flare prediction. The results for both of these size regression experiments are consistent across a wide range of predictive time windows, indicating that the magnetic complexity features may be persistent in appearance long before flare activity. This is supported by our larger error rates of some 40 hr in the time-to-flare regression problem. The 38 magnetic complexity features considered here appear to have discriminative potential for flare size, but their persistence in time makes them less discriminative for the time-to-flare problem.

  10. Biggest Solar Flare on Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    View an animation from the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT). At 4:51 p.m. EDT, on Monday, April 2, 2001, the sun unleashed the biggest solar flare ever recorded, as observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite. The flare was definitely more powerful than the famous solar flare on March 6, 1989, which was related to the disruption of power grids in Canada. This recent explosion from the active region near the sun's northwest limb hurled a coronal mass ejection into space at a whopping speed of roughly 7.2 million kilometers per hour. Luckily, the flare was not aimed directly towards Earth. Solar flares, among the solar system's mightiest eruptions, are tremendous explosions in the atmosphere of the Sun capable of releasing as much energy as a billion megatons of TNT. Caused by the sudden release of magnetic energy, in just a few seconds flares can accelerate solar particles to very high velocities, almost to the speed of light, and heat solar material to tens of millions of degrees. Solar ejections are often associated with flares and sometimes occur shortly after the flare explosion. Coronal mass ejections are clouds of electrified, magnetic gas weighing billions of tons ejected from the Sun and hurled into space with speeds ranging from 12 to 1,250 miles per second. Depending on the orientation of the magnetic fields carried by the ejection cloud, Earth-directed coronal mass ejections cause magnetic storms by interacting with the Earth's magnetic field, distorting its shape, and accelerating electrically charged particles (electrons and atomic nuclei) trapped within. Severe solar weather is often heralded by dramatic auroral displays, northern and southern lights, and magnetic storms that occasionally affect satellites, radio communications and power systems. The flare and solar ejection has also generated a storm of high-velocity particles, and the number of particles with ten million electron-volts of energy in the space near

  11. Study of the behaviour of the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Malini; Astafyeva, Elvira

    2014-05-01

    A solar flare occurring in the sun's chromosphere is observed in various wavebands (radio to x-rays). The response of the solar flare which causes sudden changes in the earth's ionosphere is not yet well understood though investigations suggested that its impact depends on the size and location of occurrence of solar flare on sun. Considering this, we have carried an investigation to study the response of two strong and gradual solar flares: 2 Apr 2001 (X20, limb) and 7 Feb 2010 (M6.4, disk) on the earth's equatorial-low latitude regions using multi-technique observations of satellite and ground-based instruments. We found a weakening of strength of equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) in total electron content during both the flares as observed by TOPEX, JASON-1 and JASON-2 altimeter measurements. The H component of the geomagnetic field also shows a sudden change at equatorial and low latitude stations in the sunlit hemisphere during the flare. The observations of ionosonde at low-latitudes indicate a strong absorption of higher-frequency radio signals. The detail response of these flare on EIA of the earth's ionosphere will be presented and discussed.

  12. Large-scale brightenings associated with flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandrini, Cristina H.; Machado, Marcos E.

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that large-scale brightenings (LSBs) associated with solar flares, similar to the 'giant arches' discovered by Svestka et al. (1982) in images obtained by the SSM HXIS hours after the onset of two-ribbon flares, can also occur in association with confined flares in complex active regions. For these events, a clear link between the LSB and the underlying flare is clearly evident from the active-region magnetic field topology. The implications of these findings are discussed within the framework of the interacting loops of flares and the giant arch phenomenology.

  13. Magnetic Reconnection in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Terry G.

    2016-05-01

    Reconnection has at least three possible roles in solar flares: First, it may contribute to the build-up of magnetic energy in the solar corona prior to flare onset; second, it may directly trigger the onset of the flare; and third, it may allow the release of magnetic energy by relaxing the magnetic field configuration to a lower energy state. Although observational support for the first two roles is somewhat limited, there is now ample support for the third. Within the last few years EUV and X-ray instruments have directly observed the kind of plasma flows and heating indicative of reconnection. Continued improvements in instrumentation will greatly help to determine the detailed physics of the reconnection process in the solar atmosphere. Careful measurement of the reconnection outflows will be especially helpful in this regard. Current observations suggest that in some flares the jet outflows are accelerated within a short diffusion region that is more characteristic of Petschek-type reconnection than Sweet-Parker reconnection. Recent resistive MHD theoretical and numerical analyses predict that the length of the diffusion region should be just within the resolution range of current X-ray and EUV telescopes if the resistivity is uniform. On the other hand, if the resistivity is not uniform, the length of the diffusion region could be too short for the outflow acceleration region to be observable.

  14. Solar Flare Aimed at Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    At the height of the solar cycle, the Sun is finally displaying some fireworks. This image from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) shows a large solar flare from June 6, 2000 at 1424 Universal Time (10:24 AM Eastern Daylight Savings Time). Associated with the flare was a coronal mass ejection that sent a wave of fast moving charged particles straight towards Earth. (The image was acquired by the Extreme ultaviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT), one of 12 instruments aboard SOHO) Solar activity affects the Earth in several ways. The particles generated by flares can disrupt satellite communications and interfere with power transmission on the Earth's surface. Earth's climate is tied to the total energy emitted by the sun, cooling when the sun radiates less energy and warming when solar output increases. Solar radiation also produces ozone in the stratosphere, so total ozone levels tend to increase during the solar maximum. For more information about these solar flares and the SOHO mission, see NASA Science News or the SOHO home page. For more about the links between the sun and climate change, see Sunspots and the Solar Max. Image courtesy SOHO Extreme ultaviolet Imaging Telescope, ESA/NASA

  15. Sunspot 1504 is Spitting Flares

    NASA Video Gallery

    This movie from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) shows the M class flare on June 14, 2012 from 9:15 AM to 2:00 PM EDT. The sun is shown here in teal as this is the color typically used to repre...

  16. A FLARE for the Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aschbacher, Pamela

    1996-01-01

    Although arts programs have been cut from many school budgets, an innovative program in Pasadena, California, is keeping art and artists in classrooms. Project FLARE (Fun with Language, Arts, and Reading) pairs classroom teachers with local artists, who together develop an integrated language and visual arts curriculum. Students also take field…

  17. Functional diffusion map: a noninvasive MRI biomarker for early stratification of clinical brain tumor response.

    PubMed

    Moffat, Bradford A; Chenevert, Thomas L; Lawrence, Theodore S; Meyer, Charles R; Johnson, Timothy D; Dong, Qian; Tsien, Christina; Mukherji, Suresh; Quint, Douglas J; Gebarski, Stephen S; Robertson, Patricia L; Junck, Larry R; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Ross, Brian D

    2005-04-12

    Assessment of radiation and chemotherapy efficacy for brain cancer patients is traditionally accomplished by measuring changes in tumor size several months after therapy has been administered. The ability to use noninvasive imaging during the early stages of fractionated therapy to determine whether a particular treatment will be effective would provide an opportunity to optimize individual patient management and avoid unnecessary systemic toxicity, expense, and treatment delays. We investigated whether changes in the Brownian motion of water within tumor tissue as quantified by using diffusion MRI could be used as a biomarker for early prediction of treatment response in brain cancer patients. Twenty brain tumor patients were examined by standard and diffusion MRI before initiation of treatment. Additional images were acquired 3 weeks after initiation of chemo- and/or radiotherapy. Images were coregistered to pretreatment scans, and changes in tumor water diffusion values were calculated and displayed as a functional diffusion map (fDM) for correlation with clinical response. Of the 20 patients imaged during the course of therapy, 6 were classified as having a partial response, 6 as stable disease, and 8 as progressive disease. The fDMs were found to predict patient response at 3 weeks from the start of treatment, revealing that early changes in tumor diffusion values could be used as a prognostic indicator of subsequent volumetric tumor response. Overall, fDM analysis provided an early biomarker for predicting treatment response in brain tumor patients. PMID:15805192

  18. The Nature of CME-flare-Associated Coronal Dimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, J. X.; Qiu, J.

    2016-07-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are often accompanied by coronal dimming that is evident in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray observations. The locations of dimming are sometimes considered to map footpoints of the erupting flux rope. As the emitting material expands in the corona, the decreased plasma density leads to reduced emission observed in spectral and irradiance measurements. Therefore, signatures of dimming may reflect the properties of CMEs in the early phase of their eruption. In this study, we analyze the event of flare, CME, and coronal dimming on 2011 December 26. We use the data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory for disk observations of the dimming, and analyze images taken by EUVI, COR1, and COR2 on board the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory to obtain the height and velocity of the associated CMEs observed at the limb. We also measure the magnetic reconnection rate from flare observations. Dimming occurs in a few locations next to the flare ribbons, and it is observed in multiple EUV passbands. Rapid dimming starts after the onset of fast reconnection and CME acceleration, and its evolution tracks the CME height and flare reconnection. The spatial distribution of dimming exhibits cores of deep dimming with a rapid growth, and their light curves are approximately linearly scaled with the CME height profile. From the dimming analysis we infer the process of the CME expansion, and estimate properties of the CME.

  19. Exposure to dim light at night during early development increases adult anxiety-like responses.

    PubMed

    Borniger, Jeremy C; McHenry, Zachary D; Abi Salloum, Bachir A; Nelson, Randy J

    2014-06-22

    Early experiences produce effects that may persist throughout life. Therefore, to understand adult phenotype, it is important to investigate the role of early environmental stimuli in adult behavior and health. Artificial light at night (LAN) is an increasingly common phenomenon throughout the world. However, animals, including humans, evolved under dark night conditions. Many studies have revealed affective, immune, and metabolic alterations provoked by aberrant light exposure and subsequent circadian disruption. Pups are receptive to entraining cues from the mother and then light early during development, raising the possibility that the early life light environment may influence subsequent behavior. Thus, to investigate potential influences of early life exposure to LAN on adult phenotype, we exposed mice to dim (~5 lux; full spectrum white light) or dark (~0 lux) nights pre- and/or postnatally. After weaning at 3 weeks of age, all mice were maintained in dark nights until adulthood (9 weeks of age) when behavior was assessed. Mice exposed to dim light in early life increased anxiety-like behavior and fearful responses on the elevated plus maze and passive avoidance tests. These mice also displayed reduced growth rates, which ultimately normalized during adolescence. mRNA expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin previously linked to early life environment and adult phenotype, was not altered in the prefrontal cortex or hippocampus by early life LAN exposure. Serum corticosterone concentrations were similar between groups at weaning, suggesting that early life LAN does not elicit a long-term physiologic stress response. Dim light exposure did not influence behavior on the open field, novel object, sucrose anhedonia, or forced swim tests. Our data highlight the potential deleterious consequences of low levels of light during early life to development and subsequent behavior. Whether these changes are due to altered maternal behavior

  20. Statistical study of spatio-temporal distribution of precursor solar flares associated with major flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyenge, N.; Ballai, I.; Baranyi, T.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present investigation is to study the spatio-temporal distribution of precursor flares during the 24 h interval preceding M- and X-class major flares and the evolution of follower flares. Information on associated (precursor and follower) flares is provided by Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). Flare list, while the major flares are observed by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) system satellites between 2002 and 2014. There are distinct evolutionary differences between the spatio-temporal distributions of associated flares in about one-day period depending on the type of the main flare. The spatial distribution was characterized by the normalized frequency distribution of the quantity δ (the distance between the major flare and its precursor flare normalized by the sunspot group diameter) in four 6 h time intervals before the major event. The precursors of X-class flares have a double-peaked spatial distribution for more than half a day prior to the major flare, but it changes to a lognormal-like distribution roughly 6 h prior to the event. The precursors of M-class flares show lognormal-like distribution in each 6 h subinterval. The most frequent sites of the precursors in the active region are within a distance of about 0.1 diameter of sunspot group from the site of the major flare in each case. Our investigation shows that the build-up of energy is more effective than the release of energy because of precursors.

  1. Multifractal analysis of visualized room impulse response for detecting early reflections.

    PubMed

    Pavlović, Milan; Ristić, Dragan M; Reljin, Irini; Mijić, Miomir

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes an improved method for detecting early reflections in the initial part of the room impulse response using multifractals. The proposed method uses the two-dimensional multifractal analysis. The room impulse response is visualized as a spectrogram image which is then subjected to the multifractal analysis. The algorithm is based on describing local regularity in the image using distribution of Hölder exponents. The time positions of the selected Hölder exponents in the image are utilized in detecting early reflections. The obtained results show better efficiency of the proposed algorithm compared to the previous one-dimensional multifractal analysis based algorithm. PMID:27250194

  2. Observations and Modeling of Solar Flare Atmospheric Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.

    2015-09-01

    spectral lines at the first point are mostly blueshifted, with the hotter lines showing a dominant blueshifted component over the stationary one. At the second point, however, only weak upflows are detected; instead, notable downflows appear at high temperatures (up to 2.5-5.0 MK). The third point is similar to the second one except that it shows evidence of multi-component downflows. While the evaporated plasma falling back down as warm rain is a possible cause of the redshifts at the second and third points, the different patterns of chromospheric evaporation at the three points imply the existence of different heating mechanisms in the flaring region. Then, we study the flare heating and dynamics using the ``enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops'' (EBTEL) model. We analyze an M1.0 flare on 2011 February 16. This flare is composed of two distinctive loop systems observed in EUV images. The UV 1600 Å emission at the feet of these loops exhibits a rapid rise, followed by enhanced emission in different EUV channels observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Such a behavior is indicative of impulsive energy deposit, and the subsequent response of overlying coronal loops. Using the method recently developed, we infer empirical heating functions from the rapid rise of the UV light curves for the two loop systems, respectively, treated as two big loops with cross-sectional area of 5'' by 5'', and compute the plasma evolution in the loops using the EBTEL model. We further compute the synthetic EUV light curves, which, with the limitation of the model, agree reasonably with the observed light curves obtained in multiple AIA channels and EIS lines: they show the same evolution trend, and their magnitudes are comparable within a factor of two. We also compare the computed mean enthalpy flow velocity with the Doppler shifts of EIS lines during the decay phase of the two loops. Our results suggest that the two different

  3. Early Response in Cellulitis: A Prospective Study of Dynamics and Predictors

    PubMed Central

    Bruun, Trond; Oppegaard, Oddvar; Hufthammer, Karl Ove; Langeland, Nina; Skrede, Steinar

    2016-01-01

    Background. Skin and soft tissue infections are common reasons for medical care. Use of broad-spectrum therapy and costs have increased. Assessment of early treatment response has been given a central role both in clinical trials and everyday practice. However, there is a paucity of data on the dynamics of response, causes of early nonresponse, and how early nonresponse affects resource use and predicts outcome. Methods. We prospectively enrolled 216 patients hospitalized with cellulitis. Clinical and biochemical response data during the first 3 days of treatment were analyzed in relation to baseline factors, antibiotic use, surgery, and outcome. Multivariable analysis included logistic lasso regression. Results. Clinical or biochemical response was observed in the majority of patients the day after treatment initiation. Concordance between clinical and biochemical response was strongest at days 2 and 3. Female sex, cardiovascular disease, higher body mass index, shorter duration of symptoms, and cellulitis other than typical erysipelas were predictors of nonresponse at day 3. In contrast, baseline factors were not predictive of clinical failure assessed posttreatment. Among cases with antibiotic treatment escalation by day 2, 90% (37/41) had nonresponse at day 1, but only 5% (2/40) had inappropriate initial therapy. Nonresponse at day 3 was a predictor of treatment duration >14 days, but not of clinical failure. Conclusions. Nonpharmacological factors had a major impact on early response dynamics. Delayed response was rarely related to inappropriate therapy but strongly predictive of early treatment escalation, suggesting that broadening antibiotic treatment may often be premature. PMID:27402819

  4. Transcriptional dynamics reveal critical roles for non-coding RNAs in the immediate-early response.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Stuart; Magi, Shigeyuki; Alhendi, Ahmad M N; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Daub, Carsten O; Arner, Erik; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R R; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Khachigian, Levon M; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Semple, Colin A

    2015-04-01

    The immediate-early response mediates cell fate in response to a variety of extracellular stimuli and is dysregulated in many cancers. However, the specificity of the response across stimuli and cell types, and the roles of non-coding RNAs are not well understood. Using a large collection of densely-sampled time series expression data we have examined the induction of the immediate-early response in unparalleled detail, across cell types and stimuli. We exploit cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE) time series datasets to directly measure promoter activities over time. Using a novel analysis method for time series data we identify transcripts with expression patterns that closely resemble the dynamics of known immediate-early genes (IEGs) and this enables a comprehensive comparative study of these genes and their chromatin state. Surprisingly, these data suggest that the earliest transcriptional responses often involve promoters generating non-coding RNAs, many of which are produced in advance of canonical protein-coding IEGs. IEGs are known to be capable of induction without de novo protein synthesis. Consistent with this, we find that the response of both protein-coding and non-coding RNA IEGs can be explained by their transcriptionally poised, permissive chromatin state prior to stimulation. We also explore the function of non-coding RNAs in the attenuation of the immediate early response in a small RNA sequencing dataset matched to the CAGE data: We identify a novel set of microRNAs responsible for the attenuation of the IEG response in an estrogen receptor positive cancer cell line. Our computational statistical method is well suited to meta-analyses as there is no requirement for transcripts to pass thresholds for significant differential expression between time points, and it is agnostic to the number of time points per dataset. PMID:25885578

  5. Transcriptional dynamics reveal critical roles for non-coding RNAs in the immediate-early response.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Stuart; Magi, Shigeyuki; Alhendi, Ahmad M N; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Daub, Carsten O; Arner, Erik; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R R; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Khachigian, Levon M; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Semple, Colin A

    2015-04-01

    The immediate-early response mediates cell fate in response to a variety of extracellular stimuli and is dysregulated in many cancers. However, the specificity of the response across stimuli and cell types, and the roles of non-coding RNAs are not well understood. Using a large collection of densely-sampled time series expression data we have examined the induction of the immediate-early response in unparalleled detail, across cell types and stimuli. We exploit cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE) time series datasets to directly measure promoter activities over time. Using a novel analysis method for time series data we identify transcripts with expression patterns that closely resemble the dynamics of known immediate-early genes (IEGs) and this enables a comprehensive comparative study of these genes and their chromatin state. Surprisingly, these data suggest that the earliest transcriptional responses often involve promoters generating non-coding RNAs, many of which are produced in advance of canonical protein-coding IEGs. IEGs are known to be capable of induction without de novo protein synthesis. Consistent with this, we find that the response of both protein-coding and non-coding RNA IEGs can be explained by their transcriptionally poised, permissive chromatin state prior to stimulation. We also explore the function of non-coding RNAs in the attenuation of the immediate early response in a small RNA sequencing dataset matched to the CAGE data: We identify a novel set of microRNAs responsible for the attenuation of the IEG response in an estrogen receptor positive cancer cell line. Our computational statistical method is well suited to meta-analyses as there is no requirement for transcripts to pass thresholds for significant differential expression between time points, and it is agnostic to the number of time points per dataset.

  6. Transcriptional Dynamics Reveal Critical Roles for Non-coding RNAs in the Immediate-Early Response

    PubMed Central

    Aitken, Stuart; Magi, Shigeyuki; Alhendi, Ahmad M. N.; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Daub, Carsten O.; Arner, Erik; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Khachigian, Levon M.; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Semple, Colin A.

    2015-01-01

    The immediate-early response mediates cell fate in response to a variety of extracellular stimuli and is dysregulated in many cancers. However, the specificity of the response across stimuli and cell types, and the roles of non-coding RNAs are not well understood. Using a large collection of densely-sampled time series expression data we have examined the induction of the immediate-early response in unparalleled detail, across cell types and stimuli. We exploit cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE) time series datasets to directly measure promoter activities over time. Using a novel analysis method for time series data we identify transcripts with expression patterns that closely resemble the dynamics of known immediate-early genes (IEGs) and this enables a comprehensive comparative study of these genes and their chromatin state. Surprisingly, these data suggest that the earliest transcriptional responses often involve promoters generating non-coding RNAs, many of which are produced in advance of canonical protein-coding IEGs. IEGs are known to be capable of induction without de novo protein synthesis. Consistent with this, we find that the response of both protein-coding and non-coding RNA IEGs can be explained by their transcriptionally poised, permissive chromatin state prior to stimulation. We also explore the function of non-coding RNAs in the attenuation of the immediate early response in a small RNA sequencing dataset matched to the CAGE data: We identify a novel set of microRNAs responsible for the attenuation of the IEG response in an estrogen receptor positive cancer cell line. Our computational statistical method is well suited to meta-analyses as there is no requirement for transcripts to pass thresholds for significant differential expression between time points, and it is agnostic to the number of time points per dataset. PMID:25885578

  7. Detection of the Acceleration Site in a Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Kontar, E. P.; Nita, G. M.; Gary, D. E.

    2011-05-01

    We report the observation of an unusual cold, tenuous solar flare (ApJL, v. 731, p. L19, 2011), which reveals itself via numerous and prominent non-thermal manifestations, while lacking any noticeable thermal emission signature. RHESSI hard X-rays and 0.1-18 GHz radio data from OVSA and Phoenix-2 show copious electron acceleration (1035 electrons per second above 10 keV) typical for GOES M-class flares with electrons energies up to 100 keV, but GOES temperatures not exceeding 6.1 MK. The HXR footpoints and coronal radio sources belong, supposedly, to a single magnetic loop, which departs strongly from the corresponding potential loop (obtained from a photospheric extrapolation) in agreement with the apparent need of a non-potential magnetic field structure to produce a flare. The imaging, temporal, and spectral characteristics of the flare have led us to a firm conclusion that the bulk of the microwave continuum emission from this flare was produced directly in the acceleration region. We found that the electron acceleration efficiency is very high in the flare, so almost all available thermal electrons are eventually accelerated. However, given a relatively small flaring volume and rather low thermal density at the flaring loop, the total energy release turned out to be insufficient for a significant heating of the coronal plasma or for a prominent chromospheric response giving rise to chromospheric evaporation. Some sort of stochastic acceleration process is needed to account for an approximately energy-independent lifetime of about 3 s for the electrons in the acceleration region. This work was supported in part by NSF grants AGS-0961867, AST-0908344, and NASA grants NNX10AF27G and NNX11AB49G to New Jersey Institute of Technology. This work was supported by a UK STFC rolling grant, STFC/PPARC Advanced Fellowship, and the Leverhulme Trust, UK. Financial support by the European Commission through the SOLAIRE and HESPE Networks is gratefully acknowledged.

  8. Auditory-neurophysiological responses to speech during early childhood: Effects of background noise.

    PubMed

    White-Schwoch, Travis; Davies, Evan C; Thompson, Elaine C; Woodruff Carr, Kali; Nicol, Trent; Bradlow, Ann R; Kraus, Nina

    2015-10-01

    Early childhood is a critical period of auditory learning, during which children are constantly mapping sounds to meaning. But this auditory learning rarely occurs in ideal listening conditions-children are forced to listen against a relentless din. This background noise degrades the neural coding of these critical sounds, in turn interfering with auditory learning. Despite the importance of robust and reliable auditory processing during early childhood, little is known about the neurophysiology underlying speech processing in children so young. To better understand the physiological constraints these adverse listening scenarios impose on speech sound coding during early childhood, auditory-neurophysiological responses were elicited to a consonant-vowel syllable in quiet and background noise in a cohort of typically-developing preschoolers (ages 3-5 yr). Overall, responses were degraded in noise: they were smaller, less stable across trials, slower, and there was poorer coding of spectral content and the temporal envelope. These effects were exacerbated in response to the consonant transition relative to the vowel, suggesting that the neural coding of spectrotemporally-dynamic speech features is more tenuous in noise than the coding of static features-even in children this young. Neural coding of speech temporal fine structure, however, was more resilient to the addition of background noise than coding of temporal envelope information. Taken together, these results demonstrate that noise places a neurophysiological constraint on speech processing during early childhood by causing a breakdown in neural processing of speech acoustics. These results may explain why some listeners have inordinate difficulties understanding speech in noise. Speech-elicited auditory-neurophysiological responses offer objective insight into listening skills during early childhood by reflecting the integrity of neural coding in quiet and noise; this paper documents typical response

  9. Auditory-neurophysiological responses to speech during early childhood: Effects of background noise

    PubMed Central

    White-Schwoch, Travis; Davies, Evan C.; Thompson, Elaine C.; Carr, Kali Woodruff; Nicol, Trent; Bradlow, Ann R.; Kraus, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Early childhood is a critical period of auditory learning, during which children are constantly mapping sounds to meaning. But learning rarely occurs under ideal listening conditions—children are forced to listen against a relentless din. This background noise degrades the neural coding of these critical sounds, in turn interfering with auditory learning. Despite the importance of robust and reliable auditory processing during early childhood, little is known about the neurophysiology underlying speech processing in children so young. To better understand the physiological constraints these adverse listening scenarios impose on speech sound coding during early childhood, auditory-neurophysiological responses were elicited to a consonant-vowel syllable in quiet and background noise in a cohort of typically-developing preschoolers (ages 3–5 yr). Overall, responses were degraded in noise: they were smaller, less stable across trials, slower, and there was poorer coding of spectral content and the temporal envelope. These effects were exacerbated in response to the consonant transition relative to the vowel, suggesting that the neural coding of spectrotemporally-dynamic speech features is more tenuous in noise than the coding of static features—even in children this young. Neural coding of speech temporal fine structure, however, was more resilient to the addition of background noise than coding of temporal envelope information. Taken together, these results demonstrate that noise places a neurophysiological constraint on speech processing during early childhood by causing a breakdown in neural processing of speech acoustics. These results may explain why some listeners have inordinate difficulties understanding speech in noise. Speech-elicited auditory-neurophysiological responses offer objective insight into listening skills during early childhood by reflecting the integrity of neural coding in quiet and noise; this paper documents typical response properties

  10. Viral evasion mechanisms of early antiviral responses involving regulation of ubiquitin pathways.

    PubMed

    Rajsbaum, Ricardo; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2013-08-01

    Early innate and cell-intrinsic responses are essential to protect host cells against pathogens. In turn, viruses have developed sophisticated mechanisms to establish productive infections by counteracting host innate immune responses. Increasing evidence indicates that these antiviral factors may have a dual role by directly inhibiting viral replication as well as by sensing and transmitting signals to induce antiviral cytokines. Recent studies have pointed at new, unappreciated mechanisms of viral evasion of host innate protective responses including manipulating the host ubiquitin (Ub) system. Virus-mediated inhibition of antiviral factors by Ub-dependent degradation is emerging as a crucial mechanism for evading the antiviral response. In addition, recent studies have uncovered new mechanisms by which virus-encoded proteins inhibit Ub and Ub-like (Ubl) modification of host proteins involved in innate immune signaling pathways. Here we discuss recent findings and novel strategies that viruses have developed to counteract these early innate antiviral defenses.

  11. Modeling solar flare hard X-ray images and spectra observed with RHESSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Linhui

    2004-12-01

    predictions of the standard flare models: the downward motion of flare loops in the early impulsive phase of each flare, and an initially stationary coronal source above the loops. These features are believed to be related to the formation and development of a current sheet. In particular, the downward loop motion seems to be a common phenomenon in flares, suggesting the necessity for modifications to the existing standard flare models. Finally, thanks to the broad energy coverage of the RHESSI spectra, a low- energy cutoff of 28(+/-2) keV in the nonthermal electron distribution was determined for the April 15, 2002, flare. As a result, the energy carried by the nonthermal electrons is found to be comparable to the thermal energy of the flare, but one order of magnitude larger than the kinetic energy of the associated coronal mass ejection. The method used to deduce the electron low- energy cutoff will be useful in the analyses of similar events.

  12. Population Response Profiles in Early Visual Cortex Are Biased in Favor of More Valuable Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Saproo, Sameer

    2010-01-01

    Voluntary and stimulus-driven shifts of attention can modulate the representation of behaviorally relevant stimuli in early areas of visual cortex. In turn, attended items are processed faster and more accurately, facilitating the selection of appropriate behavioral responses. Information processing is also strongly influenced by past experience and recent studies indicate that the learned value of a stimulus can influence relatively late stages of decision making such as the process of selecting a motor response. However, the learned value of a stimulus can also influence the magnitude of cortical responses in early sensory areas such as V1 and S1. These early effects of stimulus value are presumed to improve the quality of sensory representations; however, the nature of these modulations is not clear. They could reflect nonspecific changes in response amplitude associated with changes in general arousal or they could reflect a bias in population responses so that high-value features are represented more robustly. To examine this issue, subjects performed a two-alternative forced choice paradigm with a variable-interval payoff schedule to dynamically manipulate the relative value of two stimuli defined by their orientation (one was rotated clockwise from vertical, the other counterclockwise). Activation levels in visual cortex were monitored using functional MRI and feature-selective voxel tuning functions while subjects performed the behavioral task. The results suggest that value not only modulates the relative amplitude of responses in early areas of human visual cortex, but also sharpens the response profile across the populations of feature-selective neurons that encode the critical stimulus feature (orientation). Moreover, changes in space- or feature-based attention cannot easily explain the results because representations of both the selected and the unselected stimuli underwent a similar feature-selective modulation. This sharpening in the population

  13. The Kepler Catalog of Stellar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, James R. A.

    2016-09-01

    A homogeneous search for stellar flares has been performed using every available Kepler light curve. An iterative light curve de-trending approach was used to filter out both astrophysical and systematic variability to detect flares. The flare recovery completeness has also been computed throughout each light curve using artificial flare injection tests, and the tools for this work have been made publicly available. The final sample contains 851,168 candidate flare events recovered above the 68% completeness threshold, which were detected from 4041 stars, or 1.9% of the stars in the Kepler database. The average flare energy detected is ˜1035 erg. The net fraction of flare stars increases with g - i color, or decreasing stellar mass. For stars in this sample with previously measured rotation periods, the total relative flare luminosity is compared to the Rossby number. A tentative detection of flare activity saturation for low-mass stars with rapid rotation below a Rossby number of ˜0.03 is found. A power-law decay in flare activity with Rossby number is found with a slope of -1, shallower than typical measurements for X-ray activity decay with Rossby number.

  14. X-Ray Flaring on the dMe Star, Ross 154

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wargelin, B. J.; Kashyap, V. L.; Drake, J. J.; García-Alvarez, D.; Ratzlaff, P. W.

    2008-03-01

    We present results from two Chandra imaging observations of Ross 154, a nearby flaring M dwarf star. During a 61 ks ACIS-S exposure, a very large flare occurred (the equivalent of a solar X3400 event, with LX = 1.8 × 1030 ergs s-1) in which the count rate increased by a factor of over 100. The early phase of the flare shows evidence for the Neupert effect, followed by a further rise and then a two-component exponential decay. A large flare was also observed at the end of a later 48 ks HRC-I observation. Emission from the nonflaring phases of both observations was analyzed for evidence of low-level flaring. From these temporal studies we find that microflaring probably accounts for most of the "quiescent" emission and that, unlike for the Sun and the handful of other stars that have been studied, the distribution of flare intensities does not appear to follow a power law with a single index. Analysis of the ACIS spectra, which was complicated by exclusion of the heavily piled-up source core, suggests that the quiescent Ne/O abundance ratio is enhanced by a factor of ~2.5 compared to the commonly adopted solar abundance ratio and that the Ne/O ratio and overall coronal metallicity during the flare appear to be enhanced relative to quiescent abundances. Based on the temperatures and emission measures derived from the spectral fits, we estimate the length scales and plasma densities in the flaring volume and also track the evolution of the flare in color-intensity space. Lastly, we searched for a stellar wind charge exchange X-ray halo around the star but without success; because of the relationship between mass-loss rate and the halo surface brightness, not even an upper limit on the stellar mass-loss rate can be determined.

  15. Evidence for an Early Origin of Vernalization Responsiveness in Temperate Pooideae Grasses1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    McKeown, Meghan; Fjellheim, Siri

    2016-01-01

    The ability of plants to match their reproductive output with favorable environmental conditions has major consequences both for lifetime fitness and geographic patterns of diversity. In temperate ecosystems, some plant species have evolved the ability to use winter nonfreezing cold (vernalization) as a cue to ready them for spring flowering. However, it is unknown how important the evolution of vernalization responsiveness has been for the colonization and subsequent diversification of taxa within the northern and southern temperate zones. Grasses of subfamily Pooideae, including several important crops, such as wheat (Triticum aestivum), barley (Hordeum vulgare), and oats (Avena sativa), predominate in the northern temperate zone, and it is hypothesized that their radiation was facilitated by the early evolution of vernalization responsiveness. Predictions of this early origin hypothesis are that a response to vernalization is widespread within the subfamily and that the genetic basis of this trait is conserved. To test these predictions, we determined and reconstructed vernalization responsiveness across Pooideae and compared expression of wheat vernalization gene orthologs VERNALIZATION1 (VRN1) and VRN3 in phylogenetically representative taxa under cold and control conditions. Our results demonstrate that vernalization responsive Pooideae species are widespread, suggesting that this trait evolved early in the lineage and that at least part of the vernalization gene network is conserved throughout the subfamily. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the evolution of vernalization responsiveness was important for the initial transition of Pooideae out of the tropics and into the temperate zone. PMID:27474116

  16. Evidence for an Early Origin of Vernalization Responsiveness in Temperate Pooideae Grasses.

    PubMed

    McKeown, Meghan; Schubert, Marian; Marcussen, Thomas; Fjellheim, Siri; Preston, Jill C

    2016-09-01

    The ability of plants to match their reproductive output with favorable environmental conditions has major consequences both for lifetime fitness and geographic patterns of diversity. In temperate ecosystems, some plant species have evolved the ability to use winter nonfreezing cold (vernalization) as a cue to ready them for spring flowering. However, it is unknown how important the evolution of vernalization responsiveness has been for the colonization and subsequent diversification of taxa within the northern and southern temperate zones. Grasses of subfamily Pooideae, including several important crops, such as wheat (Triticum aestivum), barley (Hordeum vulgare), and oats (Avena sativa), predominate in the northern temperate zone, and it is hypothesized that their radiation was facilitated by the early evolution of vernalization responsiveness. Predictions of this early origin hypothesis are that a response to vernalization is widespread within the subfamily and that the genetic basis of this trait is conserved. To test these predictions, we determined and reconstructed vernalization responsiveness across Pooideae and compared expression of wheat vernalization gene orthologs VERNALIZATION1 (VRN1) and VRN3 in phylogenetically representative taxa under cold and control conditions. Our results demonstrate that vernalization responsive Pooideae species are widespread, suggesting that this trait evolved early in the lineage and that at least part of the vernalization gene network is conserved throughout the subfamily. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the evolution of vernalization responsiveness was important for the initial transition of Pooideae out of the tropics and into the temperate zone. PMID:27474116

  17. Electron impact polarization expected in solar EUV lines from flaring chromospheres/transition regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fineschi, S.; Fontenla, Juan M.; Macneice, P.; Ljepojevic, N. N.

    1991-01-01

    We have evaluated lower bounds on the degree of impact Extreme Ultraviolet/Ultraviolet (EUV/UV) line polarization expected during solar flares. This polarization arises from collisional excitation by energetic electrons with non-Maxwellian velocity distributions. Linear polarization was observed in the S I 1437 A line by the Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter/Solar Maximum Mission (UVSP/SMM) during a flare on 15 July 1980. An early interpretation suggested that impact excitation by electrons propagating through the steep temperature gradient of the flaring transition region/high chromosphere produced this polarization. Our calculations show that the observed polarization in this UV line cannot be due to this effect. We find instead that, in some flare models, the energetic electrons can produce an impact polarization of a few percent in EUV neutral helium lines (i.e., lambda lambda 522, 537, and 584 A).

  18. The Effects of Flare Definitions on the Statistics of Derived Flare Distrubtions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Daniel; Dominique, Marie; Seaton, Daniel B.; Stegen, Koen; White, Arthur

    2016-05-01

    The statistical examination of solar flares is crucial to revealing their global characteristics and behaviour. However, statistical flare studies are often performed using standard but basic flare detection algorithms relying on arbitrary thresholds which may affect the derived flare distributions. We explore the effect of the arbitrary thresholds used in the GOES event list and LYRA Flare Finder algorithms. We find that there is a small but significant relationship between the power law exponent of the GOES flare peak flux frequency distribution and the algorithms’ flare start thresholds. We also find that the power law exponents of these distributions are not stable but appear to steepen with increasing peak flux. This implies that the observed flare size distribution may not be a power law at all. We show that depending on the true value of the exponent of the flare size distribution, this deviation from a power law may be due to flares missed by the flare detection algorithms. However, it is not possible determine the true exponent from GOES/XRS observations. Additionally we find that the PROBA2/LYRA flare size distributions are clearly non-power law. We show that this is consistent with an insufficient degradation correction which causes LYRA absolute irradiance values to be unreliable. This means that they should not be used for flare statistics or energetics unless degradation is adequately accounted for. However they can be used to study time variations over shorter timescales and for space weather monitoring.

  19. The epicardium as modulator of the cardiac autonomic response during early development.

    PubMed

    Kelder, Tim P; Duim, Sjoerd N; Vicente-Steijn, Rebecca; Végh, Anna M D; Kruithof, Boudewijn P T; Smits, Anke M; van Bavel, Thomas C; Bax, Noortje A M; Schalij, Martin J; Gittenberger-de Groot, Adriana C; DeRuiter, Marco C; Goumans, Marie-José; Jongbloed, Monique R M

    2015-12-01

    The cardiac autonomic nervous system (cANS) modulates heart rate, contraction force and conduction velocity. The embryonic chicken heart already responds to epinephrine prior to establishment of the cANS. The aim of this study was to define the regions of the heart that might participate in modulating the early autonomic response to epinephrine. Immunofluorescence analysis reveals expression of neural markers tubulin beta-3 chain and neural cell adhesion molecule in the epicardium during early development. In addition, expression of the β2 adrenergic receptor, the receptor for epinephrine, was found in the epicardium. Ex-ovo micro-electrode recordings in hearts with inhibition of epicardial outgrowth showed a significantly reduced response of the heart rate to epinephrine compared to control hearts. This study suggests a role for the epicardium as autonomic modulator during early cardiac development. PMID:26527381

  20. Early Detection Rapid Response Program Targets New Noxious Weed Species in Washington State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andreas, Jennifer E.; Halpern, Alison D.; DesCamp, Wendy C.; Miller, Timothy W.

    2015-01-01

    Early detection, rapid response is a critical component of invasive plant management. It can be challenging, however, to detect new invaders before they become established if landowners cannot identify species of concern. In order to increase awareness, eye-catching postcards were developed in Washington State as part of a noxious weed educational…

  1. Caregiver Responsiveness during Preschool Supports Cooperation in Kindergarten: Moderation by Children's Early Compliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Megan E.; Lipscomb, Shannon T.; McClelland, Megan M.

    2016-01-01

    Research Findings: The current study examined how children's parent-reported compliance at age 3 (36 months) moderated the effects of 2 dimensions of directly observed early care and education (ECE) process quality (positivity/responsivity and cognitive stimulation) during the prekindergarten year (54 months) on teacher reports of children's…

  2. Designing a Measurement Framework for Response to Intervention in Early Childhood Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnell, Scott R.; Wackerle-Hollman, Alisha K.; Roloff, Tracy A.; Rodriguez, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The overall architecture and major components of a measurement system designed and evaluated to support Response to Intervention (RTI) in the areas of language and literacy in early childhood programs are described. Efficient and reliable measurement is essential for implementing any viable RTI system, and implementing such a system in early…

  3. Response to Intervention: Implications for the Proficiency of Early Childhood Special Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mack, Faite R-P.; Smith, Vernon G.; Straight, Holly

    2010-01-01

    Collaboration seems to be an almost inherent theme in most current trends and theories shaping early childhood special education reform; so much so, that we possibly reference these theories only in terms of their collaborative nature, without fully understanding them. Response to Intervention is currently getting a great deal of attention, not…

  4. Pre-Service Teacher Disposition Development: Cultural Reciprocity and Responsivity in Early Childhood Special Education Practica

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Steenberg, Vicki

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative Case Study explored the integrative process of pre-service teachers' disposition development for cultural reciprocity and responsiveness. Over the course of ten months, pre-service teachers completed two Early Childhood Special Education practica in diverse urban communities. The pre-service teachers were placed in public…

  5. The Confluence of Adverse Early Experience and Puberty on the Cortisol Awakening Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quevedo, Karina; Johnson, Anna E.; Loman, Michelle L.; LaFavor, Theresa L.; Gunnar, Megan

    2012-01-01

    Associations between early deprivation/neglect in the form of institutional care with the cortisol awakening response (CAR) were examined as a function of pubertal status among 12- and 13-year-old postinstitutionalized youth. CARs indexed hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical reactivity. Postinstitutionalized youth were compared to youth adopted…

  6. Responsive Teaching: Early Intervention for Children with Down Syndrome and Other Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Gerald; Perales, Frida; Wiggers, Bridgette; Herman, Bob

    2006-01-01

    Responsive Teaching is an early intervention curriculum designed to address the cognitive, language, and social emotional needs of young children with developmental problems. This innovative intervention model was derived from research conducted primarily with children with Down syndrome and their mothers. Results from these studies indicated that…

  7. Effectiveness of Community-Based Early Intervention Based on Pivotal Response Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Isabel M.; Flanagan, Helen E.; Garon, Nancy; Bryson, Susan E.

    2015-01-01

    Preschoolers (n = 118) with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) participated in this prospective effectiveness study of an early intervention program. Treatment entailed parent training and therapist-implemented components, incorporating Pivotal Response Treatment and Positive Behaviour Support. Standardized ability and behavioural measures were…

  8. Responsive Parenting: Establishing Early Foundations for Social, Communication, and Independent Problem-Solving Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landry, Susan H.; Smith, Karen E.; Swank, Paul R.

    2006-01-01

    Mothers whose infants varied in early biological characteristics (born at term, n = 120; born at very low birth weight [VLBW], n = 144) were randomized to a target group (n = 133) or developmental feedback comparison group (n = 131) to determine whether learning responsive behaviors would facilitate infant development. The target condition…

  9. Assessment of flares in lupus patients enrolled in a phase II/III study of rituximab (EXPLORER).

    PubMed

    Merrill, Jt; Buyon, Jp; Furie, Ra; Latinis, Km; Gordon, C; Hsieh, H-J; Brunetta, P

    2011-06-01

    The EXPLORER study was designed to assess the response to rituximab versus placebo in patients with moderate to severe extrarenal systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) receiving background immunosuppression. The definition of response required reduced clinical activity without subsequent flares over 52 weeks, and the study did not meet its efficacy endpoint. The current exploratory analysis assessed flare rates in patients who achieved initial low disease activity response (British Isles Lupus Assessment Group [BILAG] C or better in all organs) during the study. Exploratory reanalysis of data from the EXPLORER trial was conducted, considering alternative definitions for flare. No difference was found between rituximab and placebo in preventing or delaying moderate to severe flares. However, when severe (BILAG A) flares alone were examined, rituximab reduced the risk of a subsequent first A flare (hazard ratio = 0.61; p = 0.052) and lowered mean ± SD annualized A flare rates (0.86 ± 1.47 vs. 1.41 ± 2.14; p = 0.038). Eighty-four (49.7%) rituximab-treated patients achieved low disease activity without subsequent A flares versus 31 (35.2%) placebo-treated patients (p = 0.027). Prednisone rescue for A flares was similar in rituximab- (24%) and placebo-treated (14%) patients (p = 0.204). This post hoc analysis evaluates the hypothesis that assessment of BILAG A flares may distinguish potential treatment effects with greater sensitivity than assessment of BILAG B flares.

  10. Ethological concepts revisited: immediate early gene induction in response to sexual stimuli in birds.

    PubMed

    Ball, G F; Balthazar, J

    2001-05-01

    Courtship behaviors were interpreted by ethologists as being examples of 'sign stimuli' that would act as 'releasers' of stereotypic species-typical behaviors in conspecifics. A key component of the sign stimulus concept is that some form of stimulus filtering occurs that is responsible for the marked selective behavioral responsiveness. Studies of immediate early gene induction in the avian brain in response to conspecific stimuli associated with courtship and mating reveal that such gene induction is highly selective. In male Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica), studies of the immediate early gene c-fos or zenk have been conducted in birds engaging in both appetitive and consummatory aspects of male sexual behavior. High induction of immediate early genes occurs in hypothalamic and limbic areas such as the medial preoptic nucleus, bed nucleus striae terminalis and parts of the archistriatum in birds who had copulated and/or who had expressed a learned social proximity response, reflecting appetitive sexual behavior. Immediate early gene expression was also increased in telencephalic areas such as the hyperstriatum ventrale that presumably plays a role in the integration of sensory cues related to female recognition. In European starlings, studies of zenk induction have been conducted in females who hear male-typical courtship song. Clayton and Mello had shown that zenk is induced in the auditory telencephalon of canaries and zebra finches at high levels specifically in response to conspecific song. Immediate early genes such as fos and zenk are also expressed in song control nuclei specifically in association with song production. In starlings it was found that song was effective in rapidly inducing zenk expression in the auditory telencephalon in males and in females in the breeding as well as in the non-breeding season. Thus, the expression is not greater in females who use song to choose mates or during the breeding season when females are choosing mates

  11. Multispectral observations of chromospheric evaporation in the 1991 November 15 X-class solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wulser, Jean-Pierre; Canfield, Richard C.; Acton, Loren W.; Culhane, J. Leonard; Phillips, Andrew; Fludra, Andrzej; Sakao, Taro; Masuda, Satoshi; Kosugi, Takeo; Tsuneta, Saku

    1994-01-01

    We analyze simultaneous H(alpha) images and spectra (from Mees Solar Observatory), and soft and hard X-ray images and spectra (from YOHKOH) during the early phase of an X1.5/3B flare. We investigate the morphological relationship between chromospheric downflows, coronal upflows, and particle precipitation sites, and the energetic relationship between conductive heating, nonthermal particle heating, and the chromospheric response. We find that the observations consistently fit the chromospheric evaporation model. In particular, we demonstrate that the observed upflowing coronal and downflowing chromospheric plasma components originate in the same locations, and we show that our unique set of optical and X-ray observations can clearly distinguish between conductively driven and electron beam driven evaporation.

  12. White-light flares, Hard X-Rays, and Heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez Oliveros, Juan Carlos; Hudson, Hugh S.; Krucker, Sam

    2016-05-01

    The white-light continuum of a solar flare was the first manifestation of a solar flare ever detected. Nevertheless, its mechanisms remain unknown, even today. Improved observations confirm the identification of white-light continuum emission and hard X-rays during the impulsive phase of a solar flare, both in space and in time, to within the observational limits. Two events observed near the limb, but not occulted by it (SOL2011-02-24 and SOL2012-02-18), show that these emissions appear to have physical heights lower than predicted by models by hundreds of kms, referring height to the location of optical-depth unity at disk center in the 500 nm continuum. We describe these results and place them in the context of the three extreme-limb events (within about 1o) reported by Krucker et al. (2015). The electrons responsible for hard X-ray bremsstrahlung coincide with the most intense flare energy release, but we do not presently understand the physics of energy transport nor the nature of particle acceleration apparently taking place at heights below the preflare temperature minimum.

  13. 3D flare particle model for ShipIR/NTCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, Srinivasan; Vaitekunas, David A.

    2016-05-01

    A key component in any soft-kill response to an incoming guided missile is the flare /chaff decoy used to distract or seduce the seeker homing system away from the naval platform. This paper describes a new 3D flare particle model in the naval threat countermeasure simulator (NTCS) of the NATO-standard ship signature model (ShipIR), which provides independent control over the size and radial distribution of its signature. The 3D particles of each flare sub-munition are modelled stochastically and rendered using OpenGL z-buffering, 2D projection, and alpha-blending to produce a unique and time varying signature. A sensitivity analysis on each input parameter provides the data and methods needed to synthesize a model from an IR measurement of a decoy. The new model also eliminated artifacts and deficiencies in our previous model which prevented reliable tracks from the adaptive track gate algorithm already presented by Ramaswamy and Vaitekunas (2015). A sequence of scenarios are used to test and demonstrate the new flare model during a missile engagement.

  14. Helium (3) Rich Solar Flares

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Colgate, S. A.; Audouze, J.; Fowler, W. A.

    1977-05-03

    The extreme enrichment of {sup 3} He {sup 4} He greater than or equal to 1 in some solar flares as due to spallation and the subsequent confinement of the products in a high temperature, kT approx. = 200 keV, high density, n{sub e} approx. = 3 x 10{sup 15} cm {sup -3} plasma associated with the magnetic instability producing the flare is interpreted. The pinch or filament is a current of high energy protons that creates the spallation and maintains the temperature that produces the high energy x-ray spectrum and depletes other isotopes D, Li, Be, and B as observed. Finally the high temperature plasma is a uniquely efficient spallation target that is powered by the interaction of stellar convection and self generated magnetic field.

  15. Particle Acceleration in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosian, V.

    Several new observations notably high spatial and spectral X-ray observations of impulsive phase of solar flares by YOHKOH and RHESSI, and Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) spectra by ACE have provided strong evidence in favor of stochastic acceleration of electrons, protons and other ions by plasma waves or turbulence. Theoretical arguments also favor such a model if the seed particles come from the background thermal plasma. I will describe these evidences and the theoretical framework for evaluation of the accelerated particle spectra, their transport and radiation. The predictions of the models will be compared with several features of the observations with specific emphasize on heating vs acceleration by turbulence, thermal vs nonthermal electron spectra, looptop vs footpoint emission fro flaring loops, electron vs proton acceleration rates and 3He vs 4He (and other ion) abundances in SEPs.

  16. Using Sdo's AIA to Investigate Energy Transport from a Flare's Energy Release Site to the Chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brosius, Jeffrey W.; Holman, Gordon D.

    2012-01-01

    Coordinated observations of a GOES B4.8 microflare with SDOs Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the RamatyHigh Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) on 2010 July 31 show that emission in all seven of AIAs EUV channels brightened simultaneously nearly 6 min before RHESSI or GOES detected emission from plasma at temperatures around 10 MK. Aims. To help interpret these and AIA flare observations in general, we characterized the expected temporal responses of AIAs 94, 131, 171, 193, 211, and 335 channels to solar flare brightenings by combining (1) AIAs nominal temperature response functions available through SSWIDL with (2) EUV spectral line data observed in a flare loop Coordinated observations of a GOES B4.8 microflare with SDOs Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the RamatyHigh Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) on 2010 July 31 show that emission in all seven of AIAs EUV channels brightenedsimultaneously nearly 6 min before RHESSI or GOES detected emission from plasma at temperatures around 10 MK.Aims. To help interpret these and AIA flare observations in general, we characterized the expected temporal responses of AIAs 94,131, 171, 193, 211, and 335 channels to solar flare brightenings by combining (1) AIAs nominal temperature response functionsavailable through SSWIDL with (2) EUV spectral line data observed in a flare loop

  17. Abnormal early brain responses during visual search are evident in schizophrenia but not bipolar affective disorder.

    PubMed

    VanMeerten, Nicolaas J; Dubke, Rachel E; Stanwyck, John J; Kang, Seung Suk; Sponheim, Scott R

    2016-01-01

    People with schizophrenia show deficits in processing visual stimuli but neural abnormalities underlying the deficits are unclear and it is unknown whether such functional brain abnormalities are present in other severe mental disorders or in individuals who carry genetic liability for schizophrenia. To better characterize brain responses underlying visual search deficits and test their specificity to schizophrenia we gathered behavioral and electrophysiological responses during visual search (i.e., Span of Apprehension [SOA] task) from 38 people with schizophrenia, 31 people with bipolar disorder, 58 biological relatives of people with schizophrenia, 37 biological relatives of people with bipolar disorder, and 65 non-psychiatric control participants. Through subtracting neural responses associated with purely sensory aspects of the stimuli we found that people with schizophrenia exhibited reduced early posterior task-related neural responses (i.e., Span Endogenous Negativity [SEN]) while other groups showed normative responses. People with schizophrenia exhibited longer reaction times than controls during visual search but nearly identical accuracy. Those individuals with schizophrenia who had larger SENs performed more efficiently (i.e., shorter reaction times) on the SOA task suggesting that modulation of early visual cortical responses facilitated their visual search. People with schizophrenia also exhibited a diminished P300 response compared to other groups. Unaffected first-degree relatives of people with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia showed an amplified N1 response over posterior brain regions in comparison to other groups. Diminished early posterior brain responses are associated with impaired visual search in schizophrenia and appear to be specifically associated with the neuropathology of schizophrenia.

  18. Causal effects of the early caregiving environment on development of stress response systems in children

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Katie A.; Sheridan, Margaret A.; Tibu, Florin; Fox, Nathan A.; Zeanah, Charles H.; Nelson, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Disruptions in stress response system functioning are thought to be a central mechanism by which exposure to adverse early-life environments influences human development. Although early-life adversity results in hyperreactivity of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis in rodents, evidence from human studies is inconsistent. We present results from the Bucharest Early Intervention Project examining whether randomized placement into a family caregiving environment alters development of the autonomic nervous system and HPA axis in children exposed to early-life deprivation associated with institutional rearing. Electrocardiogram, impedance cardiograph, and neuroendocrine data were collected during laboratory-based challenge tasks from children (mean age = 12.9 y) raised in deprived institutional settings in Romania randomized to a high-quality foster care intervention (n = 48) or to remain in care as usual (n = 43) and a sample of typically developing Romanian children (n = 47). Children who remained in institutional care exhibited significantly blunted SNS and HPA axis responses to psychosocial stress compared with children randomized to foster care, whose stress responses approximated those of typically developing children. Intervention effects were evident for cortisol and parasympathetic nervous system reactivity only among children placed in foster care before age 24 and 18 months, respectively, providing experimental evidence of a sensitive period in humans during which the environment is particularly likely to alter stress response system development. We provide evidence for a causal link between the early caregiving environment and stress response system reactivity in humans with effects that differ markedly from those observed in rodent models. PMID:25902515

  19. Prediction and warning system of SEP events and solar flares for risk estimation in space launch operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Rigo, Alberto; Núñez, Marlon; Qahwaji, Rami; Ashamari, Omar; Jiggens, Piers; Pérez, Gustau; Hernández-Pajares, Manuel; Hilgers, Alain

    2016-07-01

    A web-based prototype system for predicting solar energetic particle (SEP) events and solar flares for use by space launch operators is presented. The system has been developed as a result of the European Space Agency (ESA) project SEPsFLAREs (Solar Events Prediction system For space LAunch Risk Estimation). The system consists of several modules covering the prediction of solar flares and early SEP Warnings (labeled Warning tool), the prediction of SEP event occurrence and onset, and the prediction of SEP event peak and duration. In addition, the system acquires data for solar flare nowcasting from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS)-based techniques (GNSS Solar Flare Detector, GSFLAD and the Sunlit Ionosphere Sudden Total Electron Content Enhancement Detector, SISTED) as additional independent products that may also prove useful for space launch operators.

  20. Electron acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Droge, Wolfgang; Meyer, Peter; Evenson, Paul; Moses, Dan

    1989-01-01

    For the period Spetember 1978 to December 1982, 55 solar flare particle events for which the instruments on board the ISEE-3 spacecraft detected electrons above 10 MeV. Combining data with those from the ULEWAT spectrometer electron spectra in the range from 0.1 to 100 MeV were obtained. The observed spectral shapes can be divided into two classes. The spectra of the one class can be fit by a single power law in rigidity over the entire observed range. The spectra of the other class deviate from a power law, instead exhibiting a steepening at low rigidities and a flattening at high rigidities. Events with power-law spectra are associated with impulsive (less than 1 hr duration) soft X-ray emission, whereas events with hardening spectra are associated with long-duration (more than 1 hr) soft X-ray emission. The characteristics of long-duration events are consistent with diffusive shock acceleration taking place high in the corona. Electron spectra of short-duration flares are well reproduced by the distribution functions derived from a model assuming simultaneous second-order Fermi acceleration and Coulomb losses operating in closed flare loops.

  1. Modeling Repeatedly Flaring δ Sunspots.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Piyali; Hansteen, Viggo; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-03-11

    Active regions (ARs) appearing on the surface of the Sun are classified into α, β, γ, and δ by the rules of the Mount Wilson Observatory, California on the basis of their topological complexity. Amongst these, the δ sunspots are known to be superactive and produce the most x-ray flares. Here, we present results from a simulation of the Sun by mimicking the upper layers and the corona, but starting at a more primitive stage than any earlier treatment. We find that this initial state consisting of only a thin subphotospheric magnetic sheet breaks into multiple flux tubes which evolve into a colliding-merging system of spots of opposite polarity upon surface emergence, similar to those often seen on the Sun. The simulation goes on to produce many exotic δ sunspot associated phenomena: repeated flaring in the range of typical solar flare energy release and ejective helical flux ropes with embedded cool-dense plasma filaments resembling solar coronal mass ejections.

  2. Solar flares and energetic particles.

    PubMed

    Vilmer, Nicole

    2012-07-13

    Solar flares are now observed at all wavelengths from γ-rays to decametre radio waves. They are commonly associated with efficient production of energetic particles at all energies. These particles play a major role in the active Sun because they contain a large amount of the energy released during flares. Energetic electrons and ions interact with the solar atmosphere and produce high-energy X-rays and γ-rays. Energetic particles can also escape to the corona and interplanetary medium, produce radio emissions (electrons) and may eventually reach the Earth's orbit. I shall review here the available information on energetic particles provided by X-ray/γ-ray observations, with particular emphasis on the results obtained recently by the mission Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager. I shall also illustrate how radio observations contribute to our understanding of the electron acceleration sites and to our knowledge on the origin and propagation of energetic particles in the interplanetary medium. I shall finally briefly review some recent progress in the theories of particle acceleration in solar flares and comment on the still challenging issue of connecting particle acceleration processes to the topology of the complex magnetic structures present in the corona.

  3. Characteristics of gamma-ray line flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, T.; Dennis, B.

    1983-01-01

    Observations of solar gamma rays by the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) demonstrate that energetic protons and ions are rapidly accelerated during the impulsive phase. To understand the acceleration mechanisms for these particles, the characteristics of the gamma ray line flares observed by SMM were studied. Some very intense hard X-ray flares without detectable gamma ray lines were also investigated. Gamma ray line flares are distinguished from other flares by: (1) intense hard X-ray and microwave emissions; (2) delay of high energy hard X-rays; (3) emission of type 2 and/or type 4 radio bursts; and (4) flat hard X-ray spectra (average power law index: 3.1). The majority of the gamma ray line flares shared all these characteristics, and the remainder shared at least three of them. Positive correlations were found between durations of spike bursts and spatial sizes of flare loops as well as between delay times and durations of spike bursts.

  4. Pre-flare dynamics of sunspot groups

    SciTech Connect

    Korsós, M. B.; Baranyi, T.; Ludmány, A. E-mail: baranyi.tunde@csfk.mta.hu

    2014-07-10

    Several papers provide evidence that the most probable sites of flare onset are the regions of high horizontal magnetic field gradients in solar active regions. Besides the localization of flare-producing areas, this work intends to reveal the characteristic temporal variations in these regions prior to flares. This study uses sunspot data instead of magnetograms and follows the behavior of a suitable defined proxy measure representing the horizontal magnetic field gradient. The source of the data is the SDD (SOHO/MDI-Debrecen Data) sunspot catalog. The most promising pre-flare signatures are the following properties of gradient variation: (1) steep increase, (2) high maximum, (3) significant fluctuation, and (4) a gradual decrease between the maximum and the flare onset that can be related to the 'pull mode' of the current layer. These properties may yield a tool for the assessment of flare probability and intensity within the following 8-10 hr.

  5. Reduced anticipatory dopamine responses to food in rats exposed to high fat during early development.

    PubMed

    Naef, L; Moquin, L; Gratton, A; Walker, C-D

    2013-06-01

    We have previously demonstrated that exposure to high fat (HF) during early development alters the presynaptic regulation of mesolimbic dopamine (DA), and increases incentive motivation for HF food rewards. The goal of the present experiments was to examine the long-term consequences of early exposure to HF on anticipatory and consumatory nucleus accumbens (NAc) DA responses to HF food rewards. Mothers were maintained on a HF (30% fat) or control diet (CD; 5% fat) from gestation day 13 to postnatal day 22 when offspring from both diet groups were weaned and maintained on the CD until adulthood. In vivo NAc DA responses to food anticipation and consumption were measured in a Pavlovian conditioning paradigm using voltammetry in freely moving rats. HF-exposed offspring displayed reduced NAc DA responses to a tone previously paired with the delivery of HF food rewards. In an unconditioned protocol, consumatory NAc DA responses could be isolated, and were similar in HF and control offspring. These data demonstrate that exposure to HF through maternal diet during early development might program behavioral and functional responses associated with mesolimbic DA neurotransmission, thus leading to an increased HF feeding and obesity.

  6. Cell-Type Specific Responses to DNA Replication Stress in Early C. elegans Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Holly; Williams, Ashley B.

    2016-01-01

    To better understand how the cellular response to DNA replication stress is regulated during embryonic development, we and others have established the early C. elegans embryo as a model system to study this important problem. As is the case in most eukaryotic cell types, the replication stress response is controlled by the ATR kinase in early worm embryos. In this report we use RNAi to systematically characterize ATR pathway components for roles in promoting cell cycle delay during a replication stress response, and we find that these genetic requirements vary, depending on the source of stress. We also examine how individual cell types within the embryo respond to replication stress, and we find that the strength of the response, as defined by duration of cell cycle delay, varies dramatically within blastomeres of the early embryo. Our studies shed light on how the replication stress response is managed in the context of embryonic development and show that this pathway is subject to developmental regulation. PMID:27727303

  7. Early redox, Src family kinase, and calcium signaling integrate wound responses and tissue regeneration in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sa Kan; Freisinger, Christina M; LeBert, Danny C; Huttenlocher, Anna

    2012-10-15

    Tissue injury can lead to scar formation or tissue regeneration. How regenerative animals sense initial tissue injury and transform wound signals into regenerative growth is an unresolved question. Previously, we found that the Src family kinase (SFK) Lyn functions as a redox sensor in leukocytes that detects H(2)O(2) at wounds in zebrafish larvae. In this paper, using zebrafish larval tail fins as a model, we find that wounding rapidly activated SFK and calcium signaling in epithelia. The immediate SFK and calcium signaling in epithelia was important for late epimorphic regeneration of amputated fins. Wound-induced activation of SFKs in epithelia was dependent on injury-generated H(2)O(2). A SFK member, Fynb, was responsible for fin regeneration. This work provides a new link between early wound responses and late regeneration and suggests that redox, SFK, and calcium signaling are immediate "wound signals" that integrate early wound responses and late epimorphic regeneration.

  8. Early redox, Src family kinase, and calcium signaling integrate wound responses and tissue regeneration in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Sa Kan; Freisinger, Christina M.; LeBert, Danny C.

    2012-01-01

    Tissue injury can lead to scar formation or tissue regeneration. How regenerative animals sense initial tissue injury and transform wound signals into regenerative growth is an unresolved question. Previously, we found that the Src family kinase (SFK) Lyn functions as a redox sensor in leukocytes that detects H2O2 at wounds in zebrafish larvae. In this paper, using zebrafish larval tail fins as a model, we find that wounding rapidly activated SFK and calcium signaling in epithelia. The immediate SFK and calcium signaling in epithelia was important for late epimorphic regeneration of amputated fins. Wound-induced activation of SFKs in epithelia was dependent on injury-generated H2O2. A SFK member, Fynb, was responsible for fin regeneration. This work provides a new link between early wound responses and late regeneration and suggests that redox, SFK, and calcium signaling are immediate “wound signals” that integrate early wound responses and late epimorphic regeneration. PMID:23045550

  9. Electron precipitation in solar flares - Collisionless effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Rowland, H. L.

    1984-01-01

    A large fraction of the electrons which are accelerated during the impulsive phase of solar flares stream towards the chromosphere and are unstable to the growth of plasma waves. The linear and nonlinear evolution of plasma waves as a function of time is analyzed with a set of rate equations that follows, in time, the nonlinearly coupled system of plasma waves-ion fluctuations. As an outcome of the fast transfer of wave energy from the beam to the ambient plasma, nonthermal electron tails are formed which can stabilize the anomalous Doppler resonance instability responsible for the pitch angle scattering of the beam electrons. The non-collisional losses of the precipitating electrons are estimated, and the observational implication of these results are discussed.

  10. Ultraheavy element enrichment in impulsive solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Eichler, David

    2014-10-10

    Particle acceleration by cascading Alfvén wave turbulence was suggested as being responsible for energetic particle populations in {sup 3}He-rich solar flares. In particular, it was noted that the damping of the turbulence by the tail of the particle distribution in rigidity naturally leads to the dramatic enhancement of a pre-accelerated species—as {sup 3}He is posited to be—and superheavy elements. The subsequent detection of large enrichment of ultraheavies, relative to iron, has apparently confirmed this prediction, lending support to the original idea. It is shown here that this picture could be somewhat sharpened by progress in understanding the three-dimensional geometrical details of cascading Alfvén turbulence. The mechanism may be relevant in other astrophysical environments where the source of turbulence is nonmagnetic, such as clusters of galaxies.

  11. Early COPD patients with lung hyperinflation associated with poorer lung function but better bronchodilator responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chunlan; Jian, Wenhua; Gao, Yi; Xie, Yanqing; Song, Yan; Zheng, Jinping

    2016-01-01

    Background It is unknown whether aggressive medication strategies should be used for early COPD with or without lung hyperinflation. We aimed to explore the characteristics and bronchodilator responsiveness of early COPD patients (stages I and II) with/without lung hyperinflation. Methods Four hundred and six patients with COPD who performed both lung volume and bronchodilation tests were retrospectively analyzed. Residual volume to total lung capacity >120% of predicted values indicated lung hyperinflation. The characteristics and bronchodilator responsiveness were compared between the patients with and without lung hyperinflation across all stages of COPD. Results The percentages of patients with lung hyperinflation were 72.7% in the entire cohort, 19.4% in stage I, 68.5% in stage II, 95.3% in stage III, and 100.0% in stage IV. The patients with lung hyperinflation exhibited poorer lung function but better bronchodilator responsiveness of both forced expiratory volume in 1 second and forced vital capacity than those without lung hyperinflation during early COPD (t=2.21–5.70, P=0.000–0.029), especially in stage I, while age, body mass index, smoking status, smoking history, and disease duration were similar between the two subgroups in the same stages. From stages I to IV of subgroups with lung hyperinflation, stage I patients had the best bronchodilator responsiveness. Use of bronchodilator responsiveness of forced vital capacity to detect the presence of lung hyperinflation in COPD patients showed relatively high sensitivities (69.5%–75.3%) and specificities (70.3%–75.7%). Conclusion We demonstrated the novel finding that early COPD patients with lung hyperinflation are associated with poorer lung function but better bronchodilator responsiveness and established a simple method for detecting lung hyperinflation. PMID:27785008

  12. Interplanetary shock waves associated with solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, J. K.; Sakurai, K.

    1974-01-01

    The interaction of the earth's magnetic field with the solar wind is discussed with emphasis on the influence of solar flares. The geomagnetic storms are considerered to be the result of the arrival of shock wave generated by solar flares in interplanetary space. Basic processes in the solar atmosphere and interplanetary space, and hydromagnetic disturbances associated with the solar flares are discussed along with observational and theoretical problems of interplanetary shock waves. The origin of interplanetary shock waves is also discussed.

  13. Augmentation of sensory-evoked hemodynamic response in an early Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinho; Jeong, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Based on enlarged blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses in cognitively normal subjects at risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD), compensatory neuronal hyperactivation has been proposed as an early marker for diagnosis of AD. The BOLD response results from neurovascular coupling, i.e., hemodynamic response induced by neuronal activity. However, there has been no evidence of task-induced increases in hemodynamic response in animal models of AD. Here, we observed an augmented hemodynamic response pattern in a transgenic AβPP(SWE)/PS1ΔE9 mouse model of AD using three in vivo imaging methods: intrinsic optical signal imaging, multi-photon laser scanning microscopy, and laser Doppler flowmetry. Sensory stimulation resulted in augmented and prolonged hemodynamic responses in transgenic mice evidenced by changes in total, oxygenated, and deoxygenated hemoglobin concentration. This difference between transgenic and wild-type mice was significant at 7 months of age when amyloid plaques and cerebral amyloid angiopathy had developed but not at younger or older ages. Correspondingly, sensory stimulation-induced pial arteriole diameter was also augmented and prolonged in transgenic mice at 7 months of age. Cerebral blood flow response in transgenic mice was augmented but not prolonged. These results are consistent with the existence of BOLD signal hyperactivation in non-demented AD-risk human subjects, supporting its potential use as an early diagnostic marker of AD.

  14. Using physiology and behaviour to understand the responses of fish early life stages to toxicants.

    PubMed

    Sloman, K A; McNeil, P L

    2012-12-01

    The use of early life stages of fishes (embryos and larvae) in toxicity testing has been in existence for a long time, generally utilizing endpoints such as morphological defects and mortality. Behavioural endpoints, however, may represent a more insightful evaluation of the ecological effects of toxicants. Indeed, recent years have seen a considerable increase in the use of behavioural measurements in early life stages reflecting a substantial rise in zebrafish Danio rerio early life-stage toxicity testing and the development of automated behavioural monitoring systems. Current behavioural endpoints identified for early life stages in response to toxicant exposure include spontaneous activity, predator avoidance, capture of live food, shoaling ability and interaction with other individuals. Less frequently used endpoints include measurement of anxiogenic behaviours and cognitive ability, both of which are suggested here as future indicators of toxicant disruption. For many simple behavioural endpoints, there is still a need to link behavioural effects with ecological relevance; currently, only a limited number of studies have addressed this issue. Understanding the physiological mechanisms that underlie toxicant effects on behaviour so early in life has received far less attention, perhaps because physiological measurements can be difficult to carry out on individuals of this size. The most commonly established physiological links with behavioural disruption in early life stages are similar to those seen in juveniles and adults including sensory deprivation (olfaction, lateral line and vision), altered neurogenesis and neurotransmitter concentrations. This review highlights the importance of understanding the integrated behavioural and physiological response of early life stages to toxicants and identifies knowledge gaps which present exciting areas for future research.

  15. OBSERVATIONS OF CHROMOSPHERIC FLARE RE-BRIGHTENINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Miklenic, C. H.; Veronig, A. M.; Vrsnak, B.; Barta, M.

    2010-08-20

    We investigate an active region that produced three C-class flares and one M-class flare within 2.5 hr. The morphology and location of the C-flares indicate that these events constitute a set of homologous flares. Radio observations indicate the occurrence of a downward-moving plasmoid during the impulsive phase of the M flare. We use TRACE 1700 A filtergrams and SOHO Michelson Doppler Imager magnetograms to examine the character of the UV brightenings; i.e., we search for re-brightenings of former flare areas both across the series of events and within one and the same event. We find that essentially the same footpoints re-brighten in each C flare. Based on the progression of both the derived magnetic flux change rate and the observed Radio Solar Telescope Network microwave emission, we speculate about a further re-brightening during the decay phase of the M flare as a further member of the series of homologous flares. We conclude that the 'postflare' field is driven to repeated eruption by continuous, shear-increasing, horizontal, photospheric flows, as one end of the involved magnetic arcade is anchored in the penumbra of a large sunspot. The observed motion pattern of the UV kernels indicates that the arcade evolves during the series of events from a both highly sheared and heavily entangled state to a still sheared but more organized state.

  16. Densities of Stellar Flares from Spectral Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra-Kraev, U.

    2006-08-01

    We present detailed analyses of spectral changes during X-ray flares. During flares the plasma is known to become hotter, but also changes in density are anticipated, as flares will rather be compact and dense than large and tenuous. We search for indications of changes in density in the spectra of Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) data. However, as flares usually last for at most up to one hour, only very bright flares will produce enough photons for a sufficiently well exposed spectrum. We chose long Chandra observations of flare stars which covered periods of time with flare activity that can be combined to compile one quiescent-only spectrum to be compared with a spectrum that is affected by flare activity. We show that with careful data analysis it is possible with the presently available instruments to detect spectral line changes between quiescent and flaring states, notably in the density- and temperature-sensitive lines of the He-like OVII triplet (21.6/21.8/22.1 A). Using cumulative distribution functions, we are also able to give solid statistical confidence limits. We also briefly discuss the diagnostic capabilities of other He-like line triplets and of observations carried out with the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS).

  17. Mitochondrial response to oxidative and nitrosative stress in early stages of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Noriega-Cisneros, Ruth; Cortés-Rojo, Christian; Manzo-Avalos, Salvador; Clemente-Guerrero, Mónica; Calderón-Cortés, Elizabeth; Salgado-Garciglia, Rafael; Montoya-Pérez, Rocío; Boldogh, Istvan; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo

    2013-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with increased production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species; consequently, an increase in lipid peroxidation and a decrease in antioxidants resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction. Using a rat model of DM induced by streptozotocin, we show the opposite: an increase in NO levels, S-nitrosylation, aconitase activity, and total glutathione and a decrease in lipid peroxidation at early stages of diabetes. These data imply that the decrease in lipid peroxidation is a vital early response to hyperglycemia to prevent escalation of ROS generation in mitochondria. These results also suggest a need for novel therapeutic targets to prevent the neurological consequences of diabetes.

  18. Immune adjuvants in early life: targeting the innate immune system to overcome impaired adaptive response.

    PubMed

    de Brito, Cyro Alves; Goldoni, Adriana Letícia; Sato, Maria Notomi

    2009-09-01

    The neonatal phase is a transitory period characterized by an absence of memory cells, favoring a slow adaptive response prone to tolerance effects and the development of Th2-type responses. However, when appropriately stimulated, neonates may achieve an immune response comparable with adult counterparts. One strategy to stimulate the immunological response of neonates or children in early infancy has been to explore natural or synthetic ligands of cell receptors to stimulate innate immunity. The use of adjuvants for activating different cell receptors may be the key to enhancing neonatal adaptive immunity. This review highlights recent advances in the emerging field of molecular adjuvants of innate immune response and their implications for the development of immunotherapies, with particular focus on the neonatal period.

  19. Apparent Motion Suppresses Responses in Early Visual Cortex: A Population Code Model

    PubMed Central

    Van Humbeeck, Nathalie; Putzeys, Tom; Wagemans, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Two stimuli alternately presented at different locations can evoke a percept of a stimulus continuously moving between the two locations. The neural mechanism underlying this apparent motion (AM) is thought to be increased activation of primary visual cortex (V1) neurons tuned to locations along the AM path, although evidence remains inconclusive. AM masking, which refers to the reduced detectability of stimuli along the AM path, has been taken as evidence for AM-related V1 activation. AM-induced neural responses are thought to interfere with responses to physical stimuli along the path and as such impair the perception of these stimuli. However, AM masking can also be explained by predictive coding models, predicting that responses to stimuli presented on the AM path are suppressed when they match the spatio-temporal prediction of a stimulus moving along the path. In the present study, we find that AM has a distinct effect on the detection of target gratings, limiting the maximum performance at high contrast levels. This masking is strongest when the target orientation is identical to the orientation of the inducers. We developed a V1-like population code model of early visual processing, based on a standard contrast normalization model. We find that AM-related activation in early visual cortex is too small to either cause masking or to be perceived as motion. Our model instead predicts strong suppression of early sensory responses during AM, consistent with the theoretical framework of predictive coding. PMID:27783622

  20. Girls’ Challenging Social Experiences in Early Adolescence Predict Neural Response to Rewards and Depressive Symptoms1

    PubMed Central

    Casement, Melynda D.; Guyer, Amanda E.; Hipwell, Alison; McAloon, Rose L.; Hoffmann, Amy M.; Keenan, Kathryn; Forbes, Erika E.

    2014-01-01

    Developmental models of psychopathology posit that exposure to social stressors may confer risk for depression in adolescent girls by disrupting neural reward circuitry. The current study tested this hypothesis by examining the relationship between early adolescent social stressors and later neural reward processing and depressive symptoms. Participants were 120 girls from an ongoing longitudinal study of precursors to depression across adolescent development. Low parental warmth, peer victimization, and depressive symptoms were assessed when the girls were 11 and 12 years old, and participants completed a monetary reward guessing fMRI task and assessment of depressive symptoms at age 16. Results indicate that low parental warmth was associated with increased response to potential rewards in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), striatum, and amygdala, whereas peer victimization was associated with decreased response to potential rewards in the mPFC. Furthermore, concurrent depressive symptoms were associated with increased reward anticipation response in mPFC and striatal regions that were also associated with early adolescent psychosocial stressors, with mPFC and striatal response mediating the association between social stressors and depressive symptoms. These findings are consistent with developmental models that emphasize the adverse impact of early psychosocial stressors on neural reward processing and risk for depression in adolescence. PMID:24397999

  1. Early response evaluation and prediction in neoadjuvant-treated patients with esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Theisen, Joerg; Krause, Bernd; Peschel, Christian; Schmid, Roland; Geinitz, Hans; Friess, Helmut

    2009-01-01

    Since the introduction of multimodal therapy regimens, the prognosis of esophageal cancer has improved. There is undoubtedly true for patients with surgically resected tumors in the case of a response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiation. Important conclusions can be drawn from this regarding the indication for perioperative therapies, the radicality of surgery, or the surgical indications. Thus, most of the current research in this field is aimed at the early identification of this subset of patients, at the beginning of, or even before, neoadjuvant treatment. Conventional staging tools have failed to predict responses to neoadjuvant therapy. However, molecular imaging methods, e.g. positron emission tomography (PET)-scans, have shown promising results in the early selection of responders and non-responders during the course of neoadjuvant therapy, allowing physicians to alter the treatment plan accordingly. Even more desirable is the identification of potential responders before the start of neoadjuvant therapy. Preliminary molecular data on biopsy specimens demonstrate the possibility of early response prediction in these patients. We present the current knowledge on response evaluation and prediction in esophageal cancer and draw conclusions for future clinical practice and studies in this review. PMID:21160793

  2. Quantitative Proteomic Profiling of Early and Late Responses to Salicylic Acid in Cucumber Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liang; Shang, Qing-Mao

    2016-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is an important phytohormone that plays vital regulatory roles in plant growth, development, and stress responses. However, studies on the molecular mechanism of SA, especially during the early SA responses, are lagging behind. In this study, we initiated a comprehensive isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based proteomic analysis to explore the early and late SA-responsive proteins in leaves of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) seedlings. Upon SA application through the roots, endogenous SA accumulated in cucumber leaves. By assaying the changes in marker gene expression and photosynthetic rate, we collected samples at 12 h and 72 h post treatment (hpt) to profile the early and late SA responsiveness, respectively. The iTRAQ assay followed by tandem mass spectrometry revealed 135 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) at 12 hpt and 301 DEPs at 72 hpt. The functional categories for these SA-responsive proteins included in a variety of biochemical processes, including photosynthesis, redox homeostasis, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, lipid metabolism, transport, protein folding and modification, proteolysis, cell wall organization, and the secondary phenylpropanoid pathway. Conclusively, based on the abundant changes of these DEPs, together with their putative functions, we proposed a possible SA-responsive protein network. It appears that SA could elicit reactive oxygen species (ROS) production via enhancing the photosynthetic electron transferring, and then confer some growth-promoting and stress-priming effects on cells during the late phase, including enhanced photosynthesis and ROS scavenging, altered carbon metabolic flux for the biosynthesis of amino acids and nucleotides, and cell wall reorganization. Overall, the present iTRAQ assay provides higher proteome coverage and deepened our understanding of the molecular basis of SA-responses. PMID:27551830

  3. Quantitative Proteomic Profiling of Early and Late Responses to Salicylic Acid in Cucumber Leaves.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chun-Juan; Cao, Ning; Li, Liang; Shang, Qing-Mao

    2016-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is an important phytohormone that plays vital regulatory roles in plant growth, development, and stress responses. However, studies on the molecular mechanism of SA, especially during the early SA responses, are lagging behind. In this study, we initiated a comprehensive isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based proteomic analysis to explore the early and late SA-responsive proteins in leaves of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) seedlings. Upon SA application through the roots, endogenous SA accumulated in cucumber leaves. By assaying the changes in marker gene expression and photosynthetic rate, we collected samples at 12 h and 72 h post treatment (hpt) to profile the early and late SA responsiveness, respectively. The iTRAQ assay followed by tandem mass spectrometry revealed 135 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) at 12 hpt and 301 DEPs at 72 hpt. The functional categories for these SA-responsive proteins included in a variety of biochemical processes, including photosynthesis, redox homeostasis, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, lipid metabolism, transport, protein folding and modification, proteolysis, cell wall organization, and the secondary phenylpropanoid pathway. Conclusively, based on the abundant changes of these DEPs, together with their putative functions, we proposed a possible SA-responsive protein network. It appears that SA could elicit reactive oxygen species (ROS) production via enhancing the photosynthetic electron transferring, and then confer some growth-promoting and stress-priming effects on cells during the late phase, including enhanced photosynthesis and ROS scavenging, altered carbon metabolic flux for the biosynthesis of amino acids and nucleotides, and cell wall reorganization. Overall, the present iTRAQ assay provides higher proteome coverage and deepened our understanding of the molecular basis of SA-responses. PMID:27551830

  4. Incomplete immune response to coxsackie B viruses associates with early autoimmunity against insulin.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Michelle P; Eugster, Anne; Walther, Denise; Daehling, Natalie; Riethausen, Stephanie; Kuehn, Denise; Klingel, Karin; Beyerlein, Andreas; Zillmer, Stephanie; Ziegler, Anette-Gabriele; Bonifacio, Ezio

    2016-09-08

    Viral infections are associated with autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes. Here, we asked whether this association could be explained by variations in host immune response to a putative type 1 etiological factor, namely coxsackie B viruses (CVB). Heterogeneous antibody responses were observed against CVB capsid proteins. Heterogeneity was largely defined by different binding to VP1 or VP2. Antibody responses that were anti-VP2 competent but anti-VP1 deficient were unable to neutralize CVB, and were characteristic of children who developed early insulin-targeting autoimmunity, suggesting an impaired ability to clear CVB in early childhood. In contrast, children who developed a GAD-targeting autoimmunity had robust VP1 and VP2 antibody responses to CVB. We further found that 20% of memory CD4(+) T cells responding to the GAD65247-266 peptide share identical T cell receptors to T cells responding to the CVB4 p2C30-51 peptide, thereby providing direct evidence for the potential of molecular mimicry as a mechanism for GAD autoimmunity. Here, we highlight functional immune response differences between children who develop insulin-targeting and GAD-targeting autoimmunity, and suggest that children who lose B cell tolerance to insulin within the first years of life have a paradoxical impaired ability to mount humoral immune responses to coxsackie viruses.

  5. Incomplete immune response to coxsackie B viruses associates with early autoimmunity against insulin

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, Michelle P.; Eugster, Anne; Walther, Denise; Daehling, Natalie; Riethausen, Stephanie; Kuehn, Denise; Klingel, Karin; Beyerlein, Andreas; Zillmer, Stephanie; Ziegler, Anette-Gabriele; Bonifacio, Ezio

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections are associated with autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes. Here, we asked whether this association could be explained by variations in host immune response to a putative type 1 etiological factor, namely coxsackie B viruses (CVB). Heterogeneous antibody responses were observed against CVB capsid proteins. Heterogeneity was largely defined by different binding to VP1 or VP2. Antibody responses that were anti-VP2 competent but anti-VP1 deficient were unable to neutralize CVB, and were characteristic of children who developed early insulin-targeting autoimmunity, suggesting an impaired ability to clear CVB in early childhood. In contrast, children who developed a GAD-targeting autoimmunity had robust VP1 and VP2 antibody responses to CVB. We further found that 20% of memory CD4+ T cells responding to the GAD65247-266 peptide share identical T cell receptors to T cells responding to the CVB4 p2C30-51 peptide, thereby providing direct evidence for the potential of molecular mimicry as a mechanism for GAD autoimmunity. Here, we highlight functional immune response differences between children who develop insulin-targeting and GAD-targeting autoimmunity, and suggest that children who lose B cell tolerance to insulin within the first years of life have a paradoxical impaired ability to mount humoral immune responses to coxsackie viruses. PMID:27604323

  6. Incomplete immune response to coxsackie B viruses associates with early autoimmunity against insulin.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Michelle P; Eugster, Anne; Walther, Denise; Daehling, Natalie; Riethausen, Stephanie; Kuehn, Denise; Klingel, Karin; Beyerlein, Andreas; Zillmer, Stephanie; Ziegler, Anette-Gabriele; Bonifacio, Ezio

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections are associated with autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes. Here, we asked whether this association could be explained by variations in host immune response to a putative type 1 etiological factor, namely coxsackie B viruses (CVB). Heterogeneous antibody responses were observed against CVB capsid proteins. Heterogeneity was largely defined by different binding to VP1 or VP2. Antibody responses that were anti-VP2 competent but anti-VP1 deficient were unable to neutralize CVB, and were characteristic of children who developed early insulin-targeting autoimmunity, suggesting an impaired ability to clear CVB in early childhood. In contrast, children who developed a GAD-targeting autoimmunity had robust VP1 and VP2 antibody responses to CVB. We further found that 20% of memory CD4(+) T cells responding to the GAD65247-266 peptide share identical T cell receptors to T cells responding to the CVB4 p2C30-51 peptide, thereby providing direct evidence for the potential of molecular mimicry as a mechanism for GAD autoimmunity. Here, we highlight functional immune response differences between children who develop insulin-targeting and GAD-targeting autoimmunity, and suggest that children who lose B cell tolerance to insulin within the first years of life have a paradoxical impaired ability to mount humoral immune responses to coxsackie viruses. PMID:27604323

  7. Implementation of an Alert and Response System in Haiti during the Early Stage of the Response to the Cholera Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Santa-Olalla, Patricia; Gayer, Michelle; Magloire, Roc; Barrais, Robert; Valenciano, Marta; Aramburu, Carmen; Poncelet, Jean Luc; Gustavo Alonso, Juan Carlos; Van Alphen, Dana; Heuschen, Florence; Andraghetti, Roberta; Lee, Robert; Drury, Patrick; Aldighieri, Sylvain

    2013-01-01

    The start of the cholera epidemic in Haiti quickly highlighted the necessity of the implementation of an Alert and Response (A&R) System to complement the existing national surveillance system. The national system had been able to detect and confirm the outbreak etiology but required external support to monitor the spread of cholera and coordinate response, because much of the information produced was insufficiently timely for real-time monitoring and directing of a rapid, targeted response. The A&R System was designed by the Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization in collaboration with the Haiti Ministry of Health, and it was based on a network of partners, including any institution, structure, or individual that could identify, verify, and respond to alerts. The defined objectives were to (1) save lives through early detection and treatment of cases and (2) control the spread through early intervention at the community level. The operational structure could be broken down into three principle categories: (1) alert (early warning), (2) verification and assessment of the information, and (3) efficient and timely response in coordination with partners to avoid duplication. Information generated by the A&R System was analyzed and interpreted, and the qualitative information was critical in qualifying the epidemic and defining vulnerable areas, particularly because the national surveillance system reported incomplete data for more than one department. The A&R System detected a number of alerts unrelated to cholera and facilitated rapid access to that information. The sensitivity of the system and its ability to react quickly was shown in May of 2011, when an abnormal increase in alerts coming from several communes in the Sud-Est Department in epidemiological weeks (EWs) 17 and 18 were noted and disseminated network-wide and response activities were implemented. The national cholera surveillance system did not register the increase until EWs 21 and

  8. Implementation of an alert and response system in Haiti during the early stage of the response to the cholera epidemic.

    PubMed

    Santa-Olalla, Patricia; Gayer, Michelle; Magloire, Roc; Barrais, Robert; Valenciano, Marta; Aramburu, Carmen; Poncelet, Jean Luc; Gustavo Alonso, Juan Carlos; Van Alphen, Dana; Heuschen, Florence; Andraghetti, Roberta; Lee, Robert; Drury, Patrick; Aldighieri, Sylvain

    2013-10-01

    The start of the cholera epidemic in Haiti quickly highlighted the necessity of the implementation of an Alert and Response (A&R) System to complement the existing national surveillance system. The national system had been able to detect and confirm the outbreak etiology but required external support to monitor the spread of cholera and coordinate response, because much of the information produced was insufficiently timely for real-time monitoring and directing of a rapid, targeted response. The A&R System was designed by the Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization in collaboration with the Haiti Ministry of Health, and it was based on a network of partners, including any institution, structure, or individual that could identify, verify, and respond to alerts. The defined objectives were to (1) save lives through early detection and treatment of cases and (2) control the spread through early intervention at the community level. The operational structure could be broken down into three principle categories: (1) alert (early warning), (2) verification and assessment of the information, and (3) efficient and timely response in coordination with partners to avoid duplication. Information generated by the A&R System was analyzed and interpreted, and the qualitative information was critical in qualifying the epidemic and defining vulnerable areas, particularly because the national surveillance system reported incomplete data for more than one department. The A&R System detected a number of alerts unrelated to cholera and facilitated rapid access to that information. The sensitivity of the system and its ability to react quickly was shown in May of 2011, when an abnormal increase in alerts coming from several communes in the Sud-Est Department in epidemiological weeks (EWs) 17 and 18 were noted and disseminated network-wide and response activities were implemented. The national cholera surveillance system did not register the increase until EWs 21 and

  9. Factors associated with early response to olanzapine and clinical and functional outcomes of early responders treated for schizophrenia in the People’s Republic of China

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Wenyu; Montgomery, William; Kadziola, Zbigniew; Liu, Li; Xue, Haibo; Stensland, Michael D; Treuer, Tamas

    2014-01-01

    Background The aims of this analysis were to identify factors associated with early response (at 4 weeks) to olanzapine treatment and to assess whether early response is associated with better longer-term outcomes for patients with schizophrenia in the People’s Republic of China. Methods A post hoc analysis of a multi-country, 6-month, prospective, observational study of outpatients with schizophrenia or bipolar mania who initiated or switched to treatment with oral olanzapine was conducted using data from the Chinese schizophrenia subgroup (n=330). Factors associated with early response were identified using a stepwise logistic regression with baseline clinical characteristics, baseline participation in a weight control program, and adherence with antipsychotics during the first 4 weeks of treatment. Mixed models for repeated measures with baseline covariates were used to compare outcomes over time between early responders and early nonresponders to olanzapine. Results One hundred and thirty patients (40%) achieved an early response. Early response was independently predicted by higher baseline Clinical Global Impressions-Severity score (odds ratio [OR] 1.51, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.15–1.97), fewer years since first diagnosis (OR 0.94, CI 0.90–0.98), a greater number of social activities (OR 1.22, CI 1.05–1.40), participation in a weight control program (OR 1.81, CI 1.04–3.15), and high adherence with antipsychotics during the first 4 weeks of treatment (OR 2.98, CI 1.59–5.58). Relative to early nonresponders, early responders were significantly more likely to meet treatment response criteria at endpoint, had significantly greater symptom improvement (Clinical Global Impressions-Severity), and had significantly greater improvement in functional outcomes (all P<0.05). Conclusion High levels of adherence to prescribed antipsychotics and participation in a weight control program were associated with early response to olanzapine in Chinese patients

  10. Response of transgenic rice at germination and early seedling growth under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Jamil, Muhammad; Rha, Eui Shik

    2007-12-01

    The response of germination and early seedling growth of different transgenic rice lines (T-99, T-112, T-115 and T-121) were examined in different levels of salinity (0, 50, 100 and 150 mM NaCl). Final germination, germination rate (1/t50, where t50 is the time to 50% of germination) and early seedling growth were assessed. Final germination percentage was inhibited with increasing salt concentrations. The required time for germination also increased with increasing salinity levels. The seedling growth was also reduced by salt concentrations, particularly at 150 mM. Root and shoot lengths, root/shoot ratio, fresh weights of root and shoot were also decreased with increasing salt stress. T-99 and T-112 had shown greater performance at germination and early seedling growth as compared to other transgenic lines.

  11. Differential neural control in early bilinguals and monolinguals during response inhibition.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Pujadas, Aina; Sanjuán, Ana; Fuentes, Paola; Ventura-Campos, Noelia; Barrós-Loscertales, Alfonso; Ávila, César

    2014-05-01

    We tested the hypothesis that early bilinguals and monolinguals use different brain areas when performing nonlinguistic executive control tasks. For this, we explored brain activity of early bilinguals and monolinguals during a manual stop-signal paradigm. Behaviorally, bilinguals and monolinguals did not show significant differences in the task, which led us to compare brain activation that cannot be attributed to differences in performance. Analyses demonstrated that monolinguals activated the anterior cingulate cortex more than bilinguals when performing the stop-signal task. These results offer direct support for the notion that early bilingualism exerts an effect on neural circuitry responsible for executive control. Consistent with recent reports, we found that bilinguals used the anterior cingulate more efficiently than monolinguals to monitor nonlinguistic cognitive conflicts.

  12. Innate immune gene expression differentiates the early avian intestinal response between Salmonella and Campylobacter.

    PubMed

    Shaughnessy, Ronan G; Meade, Kieran G; Cahalane, Sarah; Allan, Brenda; Reiman, Carla; Callanan, John J; O'Farrelly, Cliona

    2009-12-15

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Campylobacter jejuni are major human pathogens, yet colonise chickens without causing pathology. The aim of this study was to compare intestinal innate immune responses to both bacterial species, in a 4-week-old broiler chicken model. Challenged and control birds were sacrificed and tissue samples taken for histopathology and RNA extraction. No significant clinical or pathological changes were observed in response to infection with either bacterial species. Expression of selected genes involved in pathogen detection and the innate immune response were profiled in caecal tissues by quantitative real-time PCR. TLR4 and TLR21 gene expression was transiently increased in response to both bacterial species (P<0.05). Significant increases in TLR5 and TLR15 gene expression were detected in response to S. Typhimurium but not to C. jejuni. Transient increases of proinflammatory cytokine (IL6 and IFNG) and chemokine (IL8 and K60) genes increased as early as 6h in response to S. Typhimurium. Minimal cytokine gene expression was detected in response to C. jejuni after 20h. IL8 gene expression however, was significantly increased by 24-fold (P<0.01). The differential expression profiles of innate immune genes in both infection models shed light on the tailored responses of the host immune system to specific microbes. It is further evidence that innate regulation of these responses is an important prerequisite to preventing development of disease.

  13. Motion of 3-6 keV Nonthermal Sources Along the Legs of a Flare Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, Linhui; Holman, Gordon D.; Dennis, Brian R.

    2007-01-01

    Observations of nonthermal X-ray sources me critical to studying electron acceleration and transport in solar flares. Strong thermal emission radiated from the preheated plasma before the flare impulsive phase often makes it difficult to detect low-energy X-ray sources that are produced by relatively low-energy nonthermal electrons. Knowledge of the distribution of these low-energy nonthermal electrons is particularly important in determining the total nonthermal electron energy in solar flares. We report on an 'early impulsive flare' in which impulsive hard X-ray emission was seen early in the flare before the soft X-ray emission had risen significantly, indicating limited plasma pre-heating. Early in the flare, RHESSI < 25 keV images show coronal sources that moved first downward and then upwards along the legs of a flare loop. In particular, the 3-6 keV source appeared as a single coronal source at the start of the flare, and then it involved into two coronal sources moving down along the two legs of the loop. After nearly reaching the two footpoints at the hard X-ray peak, the two sources moved back up to the looptop again. RHESSI images and light curves all indicate that nonthermal emission dominated at energies as low as 3-6 keV. We suggest that the evolution of both the spectral index and the low-energy cutoff of the injected electron distribution could result in the accelerated electrons reaching a lower altitude along the legs of the dense flare loop and hence result in the observed downward and upward motions of the nonthermal sources.

  14. CIRCULAR RIBBON FLARES AND HOMOLOGOUS JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Haimin; Liu Chang

    2012-12-01

    Solar flare emissions in the chromosphere often appear as elongated ribbons on both sides of the magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL), which has been regarded as evidence of a typical configuration of magnetic reconnection. However, flares having a circular ribbon have rarely been reported, although it is expected in the fan-spine magnetic topology involving reconnection at a three-dimensional (3D) coronal null point. We present five circular ribbon flares with associated surges, using high-resolution and high-cadence H{alpha} blue wing observations obtained from the recently digitized films of Big Bear Solar Observatory. In all the events, a central parasitic magnetic field is encompassed by the opposite polarity, forming a circular PIL traced by filament material. Consequently, a flare kernel at the center is surrounded by a circular flare ribbon. The four homologous jet-related flares on 1991 March 17 and 18 are of particular interest, as (1) the circular ribbons brighten sequentially, with cospatial surges, rather than simultaneously, (2) the central flare kernels show an intriguing 'round-trip' motion and become elongated, and (3) remote brightenings occur at a region with the same magnetic polarity as the central parasitic field and are co-temporal with a separate phase of flare emissions. In another flare on 1991 February 25, the circular flare emission and surge activity occur successively, and the event could be associated with magnetic flux cancellation across the circular PIL. We discuss the implications of these observations combining circular flare ribbons, homologous jets, and remote brightenings for understanding the dynamics of 3D magnetic restructuring.

  15. Differential host response, rather than early viral replication efficiency, correlates with pathogenicity caused by influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Askovich, Peter S; Sanders, Catherine J; Rosenberger, Carrie M; Diercks, Alan H; Dash, Pradyot; Navarro, Garnet; Vogel, Peter; Doherty, Peter C; Thomas, Paul G; Aderem, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Influenza viruses exhibit large, strain-dependent differences in pathogenicity in mammalian hosts. Although the characteristics of severe disease, including uncontrolled viral replication, infection of the lower airway, and highly inflammatory cytokine responses have been extensively documented, the specific virulence mechanisms that distinguish highly pathogenic strains remain elusive. In this study, we focused on the early events in influenza infection, measuring the growth rate of three strains of varying pathogenicity in the mouse airway epithelium and simultaneously examining the global host transcriptional response over the first 24 hours. Although all strains replicated equally rapidly over the first viral life-cycle, their growth rates in both lung and tracheal tissue strongly diverged at later times, resulting in nearly 10-fold differences in viral load by 24 hours following infection. We identified separate networks of genes in both the lung and tracheal tissues whose rapid up-regulation at early time points by specific strains correlated with a reduced viral replication rate of those strains. The set of early-induced genes in the lung that led to viral growth restriction is enriched for both NF-κB binding site motifs and members of the TREM1 and IL-17 signaling pathways, suggesting that rapid, NF-κB -mediated activation of these pathways may contribute to control of viral replication. Because influenza infection extending into the lung generally results in severe disease, early activation of these pathways may be one factor distinguishing high- and low-pathogenicity strains.

  16. Photospheric, Chromospheric and Helioseismic Signatures of a Large Flare in Super-active Region NOAA 10486

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambastha, Ashok

    2006-09-01

    NOAA 10486 produced several powerful flares, including the 4B/X17.2 superflare of October 28, 2003/11:10 UT. This flare was extensively covered by the Hα and GONG instruments operated at the Udaipur Solar Observatory (USO). The central location of the active region on October 28, 2003 was well-suited for the ring diagram analysis to obtain the 3-D power spectra and search for helioseismic response of this large flare on the amplitude, frequency and width of the p-modes. Further, using USO observations, we have identified the sites of new flux emergences, large proper motions and line-of-sight velocity flows in the active region and their relationship with the flare.

  17. Malignant gliomas: current perspectives in diagnosis, treatment, and early response assessment using advanced quantitative imaging methods.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Rafay; Oborski, Matthew J; Hwang, Misun; Lieberman, Frank S; Mountz, James M

    2014-01-01

    Malignant gliomas consist of glioblastomas, anaplastic astrocytomas, anaplastic oligodendrogliomas and anaplastic oligoastrocytomas, and some less common tumors such as anaplastic ependymomas and anaplastic gangliogliomas. Malignant gliomas have high morbidity and mortality. Even with optimal treatment, median survival is only 12-15 months for glioblastomas and 2-5 years for anaplastic gliomas. However, recent advances in imaging and quantitative analysis of image data have led to earlier diagnosis of tumors and tumor response to therapy, providing oncologists with a greater time window for therapy management. In addition, improved understanding of tumor biology, genetics, and resistance mechanisms has enhanced surgical techniques, chemotherapy methods, and radiotherapy administration. After proper diagnosis and institution of appropriate therapy, there is now a vital need for quantitative methods that can sensitively detect malignant glioma response to therapy at early follow-up times, when changes in management of nonresponders can have its greatest effect. Currently, response is largely evaluated by measuring magnetic resonance contrast and size change, but this approach does not take into account the key biologic steps that precede tumor size reduction. Molecular imaging is ideally suited to measuring early response by quantifying cellular metabolism, proliferation, and apoptosis, activities altered early in treatment. We expect that successful integration of quantitative imaging biomarker assessment into the early phase of clinical trials could provide a novel approach for testing new therapies, and importantly, for facilitating patient management, sparing patients from weeks or months of toxicity and ineffective treatment. This review will present an overview of epidemiology, molecular pathogenesis and current advances in diagnoses, and management of malignant gliomas.

  18. Establishing an early warning alert and response network following the Solomon Islands tsunami in 2013

    PubMed Central

    Bilve, Augustine; Nogareda, Francisco; Joshua, Cynthia; Ross, Lester; Betcha, Christopher; Durski, Kara; Fleischl, Juliet

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Problem On 6 February 2013, an 8.0 magnitude earthquake generated a tsunami that struck the Santa Cruz Islands, Solomon Islands, killing 10 people and displacing over 4700. Approach A post-disaster assessment of the risk of epidemic disease transmission recommended the implementation of an early warning alert and response network (EWARN) to rapidly detect, assess and respond to potential outbreaks in the aftermath of the tsunami. Local setting Almost 40% of the Santa Cruz Islands’ population were displaced by the disaster, and living in cramped temporary camps with poor or absent sanitation facilities and insufficient access to clean water. There was no early warning disease surveillance system. Relevant changes By 25 February, an EWARN was operational in five health facilities that served 90% of the displaced population. Eight priority diseases or syndromes were reported weekly; unexpected health events were reported immediately. Between 25 February and 19 May, 1177 target diseases or syndrome cases were reported. Seven alerts were investigated. No sustained transmission or epidemics were identified. Reporting compliance was 85%. The EWARN was then transitioned to the routine four-syndrome early warning disease surveillance system. Lesson learnt It was necessary to conduct a detailed assessment to evaluate the risk and potential impact of serious infectious disease outbreaks, to assess whether and how enhanced early warning disease surveillance should be implemented. Local capacities and available resources should be considered in planning EWARN implementation. An EWARN can be an opportunity to establish or strengthen early warning disease surveillance capabilities. PMID:25378746

  19. Quantitative airborne assessment of gas flaring combustion efficiency in the Bakken Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvakharia, A.; Kort, E. A.; Sweeney, C.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Brandt, A. R.; Smith, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    The Bakken shale formation in North Dakota is a prolific source of oil and natural gas, producing 361 million barrels of oil in 2014. Drilling activities in the Bakken largely focus on oil, though co-production of natural gas is abundant. Up to 1/3 of the natural gas produced in this play is not captured, but is instead flared. The US EPA considers flare combustion efficiency to be 98%, indicating fugitive emissions of 2% of flared natural gas due to incomplete combustion. Studies of flaring combustion efficiency have been primarily laboratory-based, with minimal real-world analysis in the field. A recent study [Caulton et al., 2014] analyzed ten flares in the Bakken and found extremely high combustion efficiency of over 99.8%.Differences between this field study and the EPA standard have potentially significant implications for methane emissions from flaring, but given the small sample size, further in-field sampling is needed to quantify combustion efficiency in real conditions and assess why it may be different from laboratory studies.Here we will present a study on flaring combustion efficiency of methane and ethane in the Bakken field using continuous in-situ airborne observations of methane, ethane, and carbon dioxide. Over thirty flare plumes were observed during a three-week period in the Bakken formation in May 2014 in a range of wind conditions. For each flare we calculate the destruction efficiency and emission factors for methane and ethane. Preliminary results suggest combustion efficiency comparable with the EPA value of 98%, notably lower than the previous study. In addition, we calculate the corresponding mass flux of methane from incomplete flare combustion for the entire field using gas flare volume information and compare to the total emissions from the field calculated using our flight data and a mass-balance approach. Using the combustion efficiency from our study suggests methane emissions from incomplete combustion during flaring could be

  20. Early Eocene cyclicity at the Wilkes Land Margin, Antarctica: Orbital forcing and environmental response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehl, U.; Bijl, P.; Jiménez, F.; Pross, J.; Contreras, L.; Tauxe, L.; Bohaty, S. M.; Bendle, J.; Brinkhuis, H.; IODP Expedition 318 Scientists

    2011-12-01

    The early Eocene Greenhouse interval (~56-49 Ma) was punctuated by multiple transient global warming events, or hyperthermals - the most prominent of which was the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM). Additional thermal maxima identified in Eocene records exhibit negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs), carbonate dissolution horizons, and biotic perturbations, although of reduced magnitude and duration relative to the PETM. Many hyperthermals have been identified or postulated in the early Eocene, but it is unclear which of these events are normal carbon-cycle variations that occurred at orbital frequencies and which are exceptional events outside the normal range of Eocene carbon-cycle variability. Here we present a high-resolution cyclostratigraphy for a new early Eocene drillcore from the Wilkes Land Margin in direct proximity to the Antarctic continent (Site U1356 drilled during IODP Expedition 318). Site U1356 was situated in a mid-shelf setting during the early Eocene and is characterized by a superb magnetostratigraphy and a robust biostratigraphic age control. Our investigation includes XRF core scanning and ICP-MS data as well as bulk organic carbon isotope ratios (delta13Corg) in combination with the concentration of the total organic carbon (TOC). The early Eocene at Site U1356 consists of well developed cyclic claystones including the interval of magnetochron C24 which is ideal to re-evaluate the early Eocene part of the Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale (GPTS) and to provide new insights into the environmental responses as well as orbital configuration of early Eocene climatic cycles.

  1. Susceptibility and resistance to Echinococcus granulosus infection: Associations between mouse strains and early peritoneal immune responses.

    PubMed

    Mourglia-Ettlin, Gustavo; Merlino, Alicia; Capurro, Rafael; Dematteis, Sylvia

    2016-03-01

    In helminth infections, there are no easy associations between host susceptibility and immune responses. Interestingly, immunity to cestodes - unlike most helminths - seems to require Th1-type effectors. In this sense, we reported recently that Balb/c and C57Bl/6 mice are high and low susceptible strains, respectively, to experimental infection by Echinococcus granulosus. However, the role of the early cellular peritoneal response in such differential susceptibility is unknown. Here, we analyzed the kinetics of cytokines expression and cellular phenotypes in peritoneal cells from infected Balb/c and C57Bl/6 mice. Additionally, Principal Components Analysis (PCA) were conducted to highlight the most relevant differences between strains. Finally, the anti-parasite activities of peritoneal cells were assessed through in vitro systems. PCAs clustered C57Bl/6 mice by their early mixed IL-5/TNF-α responses and less intense expression of Th2-type cytokines. Moreover, they exhibited lower counts of eosinophils and higher numbers of macrophages and B cells. Functional studies showed that peritoneal cells from infected C57Bl/6 mice displayed greater anti-parasite activities, in accordance with higher rates of NO production and more efficient ADCC responses. In conclusion, mild Th2-responses and active cellular mechanisms are key determinants in murine resistance to E. granulosus infection, supporting the cestode immune exception among helminth parasites. PMID:26658113

  2. Susceptibility and resistance to Echinococcus granulosus infection: Associations between mouse strains and early peritoneal immune responses.

    PubMed

    Mourglia-Ettlin, Gustavo; Merlino, Alicia; Capurro, Rafael; Dematteis, Sylvia

    2016-03-01

    In helminth infections, there are no easy associations between host susceptibility and immune responses. Interestingly, immunity to cestodes - unlike most helminths - seems to require Th1-type effectors. In this sense, we reported recently that Balb/c and C57Bl/6 mice are high and low susceptible strains, respectively, to experimental infection by Echinococcus granulosus. However, the role of the early cellular peritoneal response in such differential susceptibility is unknown. Here, we analyzed the kinetics of cytokines expression and cellular phenotypes in peritoneal cells from infected Balb/c and C57Bl/6 mice. Additionally, Principal Components Analysis (PCA) were conducted to highlight the most relevant differences between strains. Finally, the anti-parasite activities of peritoneal cells were assessed through in vitro systems. PCAs clustered C57Bl/6 mice by their early mixed IL-5/TNF-α responses and less intense expression of Th2-type cytokines. Moreover, they exhibited lower counts of eosinophils and higher numbers of macrophages and B cells. Functional studies showed that peritoneal cells from infected C57Bl/6 mice displayed greater anti-parasite activities, in accordance with higher rates of NO production and more efficient ADCC responses. In conclusion, mild Th2-responses and active cellular mechanisms are key determinants in murine resistance to E. granulosus infection, supporting the cestode immune exception among helminth parasites.

  3. Proteomic identification of early salicylate- and flg22-responsive redox-sensitive proteins in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pei; Zhang, Huoming; Yu, Boying; Xiong, Liming; Xia, Yiji

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is one of the early defense responses against pathogen infection in plants. The mechanism about the initial and direct regulation of the defense signaling pathway by ROS remains elusive. Perturbation of cellular redox homeostasis by ROS is believed to alter functions of redox-sensitive proteins through their oxidative modifications. Here we report an OxiTRAQ-based proteomic study in identifying proteins whose cysteines underwent oxidative modifications in Arabidopsis cells during the early response to salicylate or flg22, two defense pathway elicitors that are known to disturb cellular redox homeostasis. Among the salicylate- and/or flg22-responsive redox-sensitive proteins are those involved in transcriptional regulation, chromatin remodeling, RNA processing, post-translational modifications, and nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. The identification of the salicylate-/flg22-responsive redox-sensitive proteins provides a foundation from which further study can be conducted toward understanding biological significance of their oxidative modifications during the plant defense response. PMID:25720653

  4. Perimenstrual Flare of Adult Acne

    PubMed Central

    Geller, Lauren; Rosen, Jamie; Frankel, Amylynne; Goldenberg, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acne is typically regarded as an adolescent disease. A significant body of literature suggests a post-adolescent or adult form of acne. Female patients are known to experience perimenstrual acne flares, the exact prevalence of which is unknown. Objective: To establish a pattern of perimenstrual acne flare in adult women in order to better characterize the disorder. Methods: Subjects aged 18 and over were recruited during previously scheduled visits with their dermatologist at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York. An anonymous survey was distributed to women who reported their first menses at least six months earlier and had a complaint of acne within the last 30 days. Women <18 years of age and postmenopausal women were excluded from the study population. Results: Participants included women 18- to 29-years old (67%) and women 30- to 49-years old (33%). The ethnicity of respondents was Caucasian (50%), African American (20%), Latino (19%), Asian (5%), and Other (6%). The majority of participants with perimenstrual acne reported the onset of acne between the ages of 12 and 18 years. Sixty-five percent of participants reported that their acne symptoms were worse with their menses. Of those who reported perimenstrual acne symptoms, 56 percent reported worsening symptoms in the week preceding their menses, 17 percent reported worsening symptoms during their menses, three percent reported worsening symptoms after their menses, and 24 percent reported worsening symptoms throughout their cycle. Thirty-five percent of patients with perimenstrual acne reported oral contraceptive pill use. Conclusion: A significant number of adult women have perimenstrual acne symptoms. This study has proven to be useful in characterizing perimenstrual acne flare and is one of the first qualitative documentations of the presence and degree of this disorder. PMID:25161758

  5. Sexually Dimorphic Responses to Early Adversity: Implications for Affective Problems and Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Elysia Poggi; Pfaff, Donald

    2014-01-01

    During gestation, development proceeds at a pace that is unmatched by any other stage of the lifecycle. For these reason the human fetus is particularly susceptible not only to organizing influences, but also to pathogenic disorganizing influences. Growing evidence suggests that exposure to prenatal adversity leads to neurological changes that underlie lifetime risks for mental illness. Beginning early in gestation, males and females show differential developmental trajectories and responses to stress. It is likely that sex-dependent organization of neural circuits during the fetal period influences differential vulnerability to mental health problems. We consider in this review evidence that sexually dimorphic responses to early life stress are linked to two developmental disorders: affective problems (greater female prevalence) and autism spectrum disorder (greater male prevalence). Recent prospective studies illustrating the neurodevelopmental consequences of fetal exposure to stress and stress hormones for males and females are considered here. Plausible biological mechanisms including the role of the sexually differentiated placenta are discussed. We consider in this review evidence that sexually dimorphic responses to early life stress are linked to two sets of developmental disorders: affective problems (greater female prevalence) and autism spectrum disorders (greater male prevalence). PMID:25038479

  6. Reconstruction of the Structure of Accretion Disks in Dwarf Novae from the Multi-Band Light Curves of Early Superhumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Makoto; Kato, Taichi; Ohshima, Tomohito; Maehara, Hiroyuki

    2012-10-01

    We propose a new method to reconstruct the structure of accretion disks in dwarf novae using multi-band light curves of early superhumps. Our model assumes that early superhumps are caused by the rotation effect of non-axisymmetrically flaring disks. We have developed a Bayesian model for this reconstruction, in which a smoother disk-structure tends to have a higher prior probability. We analyzed simultaneous optical and near-infrared photometric data of early superhumps of the dwarf nova, V455 And using this technique. The reconstructed disk has two flaring parts in the outermost region of the disk. These parts are responsible for the primary and secondary maxima of the light curves. The height-to-radius ratio is h/r 0.20-0.25 in the outermost region. In addition to the outermost flaring structures, flaring arm-like patterns can be seen in an inner region of the reconstructed disk. The overall profile of the reconstructed disk is reminiscent of the disk structure that is deformed by the tidal effect. However, an inner arm-like pattern, which is responsible for the secondary minimum in the light curve, cannot be reproduced only by the tidal effect. It implies the presence of another mechanism that deforms the disk structure. Alternatively, the temperature distribution of the disk could be non-axisymmetric. We demonstrate that the disk structure with weaker arm-like patterns is optimal in the model including the irradiation effect. However, the strongly irradiated disk gives quite blue colors, which may conflict with the observation. Our results suggest that the amplitude of early superhumps depends mainly on the height of the outermost flaring regions of the disk. We predict that early superhumps can be detected with an amplitude of > 0.02 mag in about 90% of WZ Sge stars.

  7. Particle acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klecker, Berndt; Cliver, Ed; Kahler, Steve; Cane, Hilary

    Particle acceleration in solar flares was the topic of a workshop held at the University of Tasmania in Hobart, Australia, January 24-26, 1990. The workshop was held in conjunction with the 21st International Cosmic Ray Conference in Adelaide, South Australia, January 6-19, 1990. Forty-six scientists participated in the workshop, which was organized by Hilary Cane and John Humble of the University of Tasmania; Marc Duldig, Australian Antarctic Division, University of Tasmania; Ed Cliver, Geophysics Laboratory, U.S. Air Force Systems Command; and Steve Kahler, Boston College, Mass.

  8. Sun Releases X-class Solar Flare

    NASA Video Gallery

    This movie shows the July 6, 2012 X1.1 flare in the 171 Angstrom wavelength as captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). AR1515 was the source for this flare. AR1515 has been active ...

  9. Flares and Their Underlying Magnetic Complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engell, Alexander J.; Siarkowski, Marek; Gryciuk, Magda; Sylwester, Janusz; Sylwester, Barbara; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Cirtain, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    SphinX (Solar PHotometer IN X-rays), a full-disk-integrated spectrometer, observed 137 flare-like/transient events with active region (AR) 11024 being the only AR on disk. The Hinode X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and Solar Optical Telescope observe 67 of these events and identified their location from 12:00 UT on July 3 through 24:00 UT 2009 July 7. We find that the predominant mechanisms for flares observed by XRT are (1) flux cancellation and (2) the shearing of underlying magnetic elements. Point- and cusp-like flare morphologies seen by XRT all occur in a magnetic environment where one polarity is impeded by the opposite polarity and vice versa, forcing the flux cancellation process. The shearing is either caused by flux emergence at the center of the AR and separation of polarities along a neutral line or by individual magnetic elements having a rotational motion. Both mechanisms are observed to contribute to single- and multiple-loop flares. We observe that most loop flares occur along a large portion of a polarity inversion line. Point- and cusp-like flares become more infrequent as the AR becomes organized with separation of the positive and negative polarities. SphinX, which allows us to identify when these flares occur, provides us with a statistically significant temperature and emission scaling law for A and B class flares: EM = 6.1 × 1033 T 1.9±0.1.

  10. AR 1121 Unleases X-ray Flare

    NASA Video Gallery

    Increasingly active sunspot 1121 has unleashed one of the brightest x-ray solar flares in years, an M5.4-class eruption at 15:36 UT on Nov. 6th. This close-up video shows the detail of the flare an...

  11. FLARES AND THEIR UNDERLYING MAGNETIC COMPLEXITY

    SciTech Connect

    Engell, Alexander J.; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Siarkowski, Marek; Gryciuk, Magda; Sylwester, Janusz; Sylwester, Barbara; Cirtain, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    SphinX (Solar PHotometer IN X-rays), a full-disk-integrated spectrometer, observed 137 flare-like/transient events with active region (AR) 11024 being the only AR on disk. The Hinode X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and Solar Optical Telescope observe 67 of these events and identified their location from 12:00 UT on July 3 through 24:00 UT 2009 July 7. We find that the predominant mechanisms for flares observed by XRT are (1) flux cancellation and (2) the shearing of underlying magnetic elements. Point- and cusp-like flare morphologies seen by XRT all occur in a magnetic environment where one polarity is impeded by the opposite polarity and vice versa, forcing the flux cancellation process. The shearing is either caused by flux emergence at the center of the AR and separation of polarities along a neutral line or by individual magnetic elements having a rotational motion. Both mechanisms are observed to contribute to single- and multiple-loop flares. We observe that most loop flares occur along a large portion of a polarity inversion line. Point- and cusp-like flares become more infrequent as the AR becomes organized with separation of the positive and negative polarities. SphinX, which allows us to identify when these flares occur, provides us with a statistically significant temperature and emission scaling law for A and B class flares: EM = 6.1 x 10{sup 33} T{sup 1.9{+-}0.1}.

  12. MAGNETIC RECONNECTION DURING THE TWO-PHASE EVOLUTION OF A SOLAR ERUPTIVE FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Bhuwan; Cho, K.-S.; Bong, S.-C.; Kim, Y.-H.; Veronig, Astrid; Moon, Y.-J.; Lee, Jeongwoo; Manoharan, P. K.

    2009-12-01

    We present a detailed multi-wavelength analysis and interpretation of the evolution of an M7.6 flare that occurred near the southeast limb on 2003 October 24. Pre-flare images at TRACE 195 A show that the bright and complex system of coronal loops already existed at the flaring site. The X-ray observations of the flare taken from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) spacecraft reveal two phases of the flare evolution. The first phase is characterized by the altitude decrease of the X-ray looptop (LT) source for approx11 minutes. Such a long duration of the descending LT source motion is reported for the first time. The EUV loops, located below the X-ray LT source, also undergo contraction with similar speed (approx15 km s{sup -1}) in this interval. During the second phase the two distinct hard X-ray footpoint (FP) sources are observed which correlate well with UV and Halpha flare ribbons. The X-ray LT source now exhibits upward motion as anticipated from the standard flare model. The RHESSI spectra during the first phase are soft and indicative of hot thermal emission from flaring loops with temperatures T > 25 MK at the early stage. On the other hand, the spectra at high energies (epsilon approx> 25 keV) follow hard power laws during the second phase (gamma = 2.6-2.8). We show that the observed motion of the LT and FP sources can be understood as a consequence of three-dimensional magnetic reconnection at a separator in the corona. During the first phase of the flare, the reconnection releases an excess of magnetic energy related to the magnetic tensions generated before a flare by the shear flows in the photosphere. The relaxation of the associated magnetic shear in the corona by the reconnection process explains the descending motion of the LT source. During the second phase, the ordinary reconnection process dominates describing the energy release in terms of the standard model of large eruptive flares with increasing FP separation

  13. Expression of Putative Immune Response Genes during Early Ontogeny in the Coral Acropora millepora

    PubMed Central

    Puill-Stephan, Eneour; Seneca, François O.; Miller, David J.; van Oppen, Madeleine J. H.; Willis, Bette L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Corals, like many other marine invertebrates, lack a mature allorecognition system in early life history stages. Indeed, in early ontogeny, when corals acquire and establish associations with various surface microbiota and dinoflagellate endosymbionts, they do not efficiently distinguish between closely and distantly related individuals from the same population. However, very little is known about the molecular components that underpin allorecognition and immunity responses or how they change through early ontogeny in corals. Methodology/Principal Findings Patterns in the expression of four putative immune response genes (apextrin, complement C3, and two CELIII type lectin genes) were examined in juvenile colonies of Acropora millepora throughout a six-month post-settlement period using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Expression of a CELIII type lectin gene peaked in the fourth month for most of the coral juveniles sampled and was significantly higher at this time than at any other sampling time during the six months following settlement. The timing of this increase in expression levels of putative immune response genes may be linked to allorecognition maturation which occurs around this time in A.millepora. Alternatively, the increase may represent a response to immune challenges, such as would be involved in the recognition of symbionts (such as Symbiodinium spp. or bacteria) during winnowing processes as symbioses are fine-tuned. Conclusions/Significance Our data, although preliminary, are consistent with the hypothesis that lectins may play an important role in the maturation of allorecognition responses in corals. The co-expression of lectins with apextrin during development of coral juveniles also raises the possibility that these proteins, which are components of innate immunity in other invertebrates, may influence the innate immune systems of corals through a common pathway or system. However, further studies investigating the expression of

  14. Over-and-Out Coronal Mass Ejections: Blowouts of Magnetic Arches by Ejective Flares in One Foot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2006-01-01

    Streamer puffs from compact ejective flares in the foot of an outer loop of the magnetic arcade under a streamer were recently identified as a new variety of coronal mass ejection (CME) (Bemporad, Sterling, Moore, & Poletto 2006, ApJ Letters, in press). In the reported examples, the compact flares produced only weak to moderate soft X-ray bursts having peak intensities no stronger than GOES class C3. Here, we present two examples of this type of CME in which the compact flare in the flank of the steamer base is much stronger (one M-class, the other X-class in GOES X-rays) and the resulting streamer puff is wider and brighter than in the discovery examples. Coronal dimming observed in SOHOBIT Fe XII images in the launching of each of these two CMEs M e r supports the view that these CMEs are produced by a high loop of the steamer arcade being blown out by magnetoplasma ejecta exploding up the leg of the loop from the flare. In addition, we present evidence that this same type of CME occurs on larger scales than in the above examples. We examine a sequence of flare eruptions seated on the north side of AR 8210 as it rotated across the southern hemisphere in late April and early May 1998. Each flare occurs in synchrony with the launching of a large CME centered on the equator. Coronal dimming in EIT Fe XII images shows the trans-equatorial footprints of these CMEs extending north from the flare site. The set of flare-with-CME events includes the trans-equatorial loop eruptions reported by Khan & Hudson (1998, GRL, 27, 1083). Our observations indicate that these CMEs were not driven by the self-eruption of the transequatorial loops, but that these loops were part of a trans-equatorial magnetic arch that was blown open by ejecta from the flares on the north side of AR 8210. Thus, a relatively compact ejective flare can be the driver of a CME that is much larger in lateral extent than the flare and is laterally far offset from the flare. It has previously been thought

  15. The milk yield response to frequent milking in early lactation of dairy cows is locally regulated.

    PubMed

    Wall, E H; McFadden, T B

    2007-02-01

    Frequent milking during early lactation of dairy cows increases milk production throughout lactation; however, whether this response is regulated systemically via lactogenic hormones, locally in the mammary gland, or both is unknown. We hypothesized that the effects of frequent milking on milk production during early lactation are regulated via local mechanisms. Ten multiparous cows were assigned at parturition to unilateral frequent milking [UFM; twice daily milking of the left udder half (2x), or 4 times daily milking of the right udder half (4x)] for d 1 to 21 of lactation. After treatment, cows were milked twice daily for the remainder of lactation. At the first milking after calving, milk yield from individual quarters was measured to verify that udder halves produced equal amounts of milk prior to treatment. Thereafter, individual quarters were milked on d 3 and 7, weekly for the first 5 wk of lactation, and once every 3 mo for the remainder of lactation. During UFM, cows produced 3.9 +/- 0.7 kg/d more from the side milked 4x than the side milked 2x. Upon cessation of treatment, milk production from the side milked 4x decreased, but remained at 1.8 +/- 0.5 kg/d more than the side milked 2x for the remainder of lactation. After milk yield was corrected to the equivalent of a whole-udder basis, acute milk yield responses to frequent milking were found to be consistent with previous reports. Moreover, we observed greater persistency in the milk yield response, which lasted throughout lactation. We conclude that both immediate and persistent effects on milk production of frequent milking during early lactation are regulated at the level of the mammary gland. Our results demonstrate that UFM is a valid and efficient model for investigating the effects of frequent milking during early lactation in dairy cows.

  16. Early photoperiod history and short-day responsiveness in Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Sharry L; Goldman, Bruce D

    2003-03-01

    Siberian hamsters exhibit seasonal, photoperiod influenced cycles of reproductive activity, body size, pelage characteristics, and thermoregulatory behavior. Laboratory populations generally exhibit inter-individual variability in expression of photoperiod responsiveness, with a subset of individuals that fail to show the species typical responses to short photoperiod. This variability is partly explained by a genetic component, as it has been possible to increase the number of short-day nonresponders by artificial selection. Responsiveness to short photoperiod is also substantially influenced by photoperiod history in this species; hamsters that have been raised under long (16L) or very long (18L) day lengths are less likely to exhibit winter-type responses to short days as compared to hamsters raised under an intermediate (14L) day length. In the present experiment, we examined effects of age and early photoperiod history in a strain of Siberian hamsters that had been selected for short-day nonresponsiveness. Hamsters transferred into short photoperiod on the day of birth were uniform in exhibiting winter-type responses. However, hamsters raised until 25 days of age in either continuous illumination or in 16L exhibited variation in responsiveness when subsequently moved into short photoperiod. We conclude that virtually all hamsters of the short-day nonresponsive strain are born responsive to short days. Subsequent development of resistance to potential short day effects is dependent on age and/or photoperiod history.

  17. Temperament and Parenting Styles in Early Childhood Differentially Influence Neural Response to Peer Evaluation in Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Guyer, Amanda E.; Jarcho, Johanna M.; Pérez-Edgar, Koraly; Degnan, Kathryn A.; Pine, Daniel S.; Fox, Nathan A.; Nelson, Eric E.

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral inhibition (BI) is a temperament characterized by social reticence and withdrawal from unfamiliar or novel contexts and conveys risk for social anxiety disorder. Developmental outcomes associated with this temperament can be influenced by children’s caregiving context. The convergence of a child’s temperamental disposition and rearing environment is ultimately expressed at both the behavioral and neural levels in emotional and cognitive response patterns to social challenges. The present study used functional neuroimaging to assess the moderating effects of different parenting styles on neural response to peer rejection in two groups of adolescents characterized by their early childhood temperament (Mage = 17.89 years, N= 39, 17 males, 22 females; 18 with BI; 21 without BI). The moderating effects of authoritarian and authoritative parenting styles were examined in three brain regions linked with social anxiety: ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC), striatum, and amygdala. In youth characterized with BI in childhood, but not in those without BI, diminished responses to peer rejection in vlPFC were associated with higher levels of authoritarian parenting. In contrast, all youth showed decreased caudate response to peer rejection at higher levels of authoritative parenting. These findings indicate that BI in early life relates to greater neurobiological sensitivity to variance in parenting styles, particularly harsh parenting, in late adolescence. These results are discussed in relation to biopsychosocial models of development. PMID:25588884

  18. Onset and early development of hypoxic ventilatory responses and branchial neuroepithelial cells in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tien-Chien F; Burggren, Warren W

    2010-12-01

    Onset and ontogeny of the O₂ chemoreceptive control of ventilation was investigated in Xenopus laevis. The density and size of branchial serotonin-immunoreactive neuroepithelial cells (5-HT-IR NECs) were also determined using confocal immunofluorescent microscopy. Larvae started gill ventilation at 3 days post-fertilization (dpf), and, at this early stage, acute hypoxic exposure produced an increase in frequency from 28 ± 4 to 60 ± 2 beats x min⁻¹. Concurrent with the onset of ventilatory responses, 5-HT-IR NECs appeared in the gill filament bud. Lung ventilation began at 5 dpf and exhibited a 3-fold increase in frequency during acute hypoxia. At 10 dpf, gill ventilatory sensitivity to hypoxia increased, as did NEC density, from 15 ± 1 (5 dpf) to 29 ± 2 (10 dpf) cells x mm of filament⁻¹. Unlike ventilation frequency, gill ventilation amplitude and lung expired volume were unaltered by acute hypoxia. Chronic exposure to moderate hypoxia, at a P(O₂) of 110 mmHg, attenuated acute responses to moderate hypoxia at 10 and 14 dpf but had no effect at more severe hypoxia or at other stages. Chronic hypoxia also stimulated 5-HT-IR NECs growth at 21 dpf. Collectively, larvae at 5 dpf exhibited strong O₂-driven gill and lung ventilatory responses, and between 10 and 21 dpf, the early hypoxic responses can be shaped by the ambient P(O₂).

  19. Temperament and Parenting Styles in Early Childhood Differentially Influence Neural Response to Peer Evaluation in Adolescence.

    PubMed

    Guyer, Amanda E; Jarcho, Johanna M; Pérez-Edgar, Koraly; Degnan, Kathryn A; Pine, Daniel S; Fox, Nathan A; Nelson, Eric E

    2015-07-01

    Behavioral inhibition (BI) is a temperament characterized by social reticence and withdrawal from unfamiliar or novel contexts and conveys risk for social anxiety disorder. Developmental outcomes associated with this temperament can be influenced by children's caregiving context. The convergence of a child's temperamental disposition and rearing environment is ultimately expressed at both the behavioral and neural levels in emotional and cognitive response patterns to social challenges. The present study used functional neuroimaging to assess the moderating effects of different parenting styles on neural response to peer rejection in two groups of adolescents characterized by their early childhood temperament (M(age) = 17.89 years, N = 39, 17 males, 22 females; 18 with BI; 21 without BI). The moderating effects of authoritarian and authoritative parenting styles were examined in three brain regions linked with social anxiety: ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC), striatum, and amygdala. In youth characterized with BI in childhood, but not in those without BI, diminished responses to peer rejection in vlPFC were associated with higher levels of authoritarian parenting. In contrast, all youth showed decreased caudate response to peer rejection at higher levels of authoritative parenting. These findings indicate that BI in early life relates to greater neurobiological sensitivity to variance in parenting styles, particularly harsh parenting, in late adolescence. These results are discussed in relation to biopsychosocial models of development.

  20. Temperament and Parenting Styles in Early Childhood Differentially Influence Neural Response to Peer Evaluation in Adolescence.

    PubMed

    Guyer, Amanda E; Jarcho, Johanna M; Pérez-Edgar, Koraly; Degnan, Kathryn A; Pine, Daniel S; Fox, Nathan A; Nelson, Eric E

    2015-07-01

    Behavioral inhibition (BI) is a temperament characterized by social reticence and withdrawal from unfamiliar or novel contexts and conveys risk for social anxiety disorder. Developmental outcomes associated with this temperament can be influenced by children's caregiving context. The convergence of a child's temperamental disposition and rearing environment is ultimately expressed at both the behavioral and neural levels in emotional and cognitive response patterns to social challenges. The present study used functional neuroimaging to assess the moderating effects of different parenting styles on neural response to peer rejection in two groups of adolescents characterized by their early childhood temperament (M(age) = 17.89 years, N = 39, 17 males, 22 females; 18 with BI; 21 without BI). The moderating effects of authoritarian and authoritative parenting styles were examined in three brain regions linked with social anxiety: ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC), striatum, and amygdala. In youth characterized with BI in childhood, but not in those without BI, diminished responses to peer rejection in vlPFC were associated with higher levels of authoritarian parenting. In contrast, all youth showed decreased caudate response to peer rejection at higher levels of authoritative parenting. These findings indicate that BI in early life relates to greater neurobiological sensitivity to variance in parenting styles, particularly harsh parenting, in late adolescence. These results are discussed in relation to biopsychosocial models of development. PMID:25588884

  1. Stomatal Blue Light Response Is Present in Early Vascular Plants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Michio; Kitagawa, Yuki; Shimazaki, Ken-ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Light is a major environmental factor required for stomatal opening. Blue light (BL) induces stomatal opening in higher plants as a signal under the photosynthetic active radiation. The stomatal BL response is not present in the fern species of Polypodiopsida. The acquisition of a stomatal BL response might provide competitive advantages in both the uptake of CO2 and prevention of water loss with the ability to rapidly open and close stomata. We surveyed the stomatal opening in response to strong red light (RL) and weak BL under the RL with gas exchange technique in a diverse selection of plant species from euphyllophytes, including spermatophytes and monilophytes, to lycophytes. We showed the presence of RL-induced stomatal opening in most of these species and found that the BL responses operated in all euphyllophytes except Polypodiopsida. We also confirmed that the stomatal opening in lycophytes, the early vascular plants, is driven by plasma membrane proton-translocating adenosine triphosphatase and K+ accumulation in guard cells, which is the same mechanism operating in stomata of angiosperms. These results suggest that the early vascular plants respond to both RL and BL and actively regulate stomatal aperture. We also found three plant species that absolutely require BL for both stomatal opening and photosynthetic CO2 fixation, including a gymnosperm, C. revoluta, and the ferns Equisetum hyemale and Psilotum nudum. PMID:26307440

  2. Histochemical characterization of early response to Cochliobolus sativus infection in selected barley genotypes.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Decuadro, Susana; Silva, Paula; Bentancur, Oscar; Gamba, Fernanda; Pritsch, Clara

    2014-07-01

    Much effort is being made to breed barley with durable resistance to leaf spot blotch incited by Bipolaris sorokiniana (teleomorph: Cochliobolus sativus). We hypothesized that susceptibility and resistance traits in 11 diverse barley genotypes inoculated with a single C. sativus isolate might specify a range of distinct host cell responses. Quantitative descriptions of interaction microphenotypes exhibited by different barley genotype seedlings after infection with C. sativus are provided. Early oxidative responses occurring in epidermis and mesophyll leaf tissue were monitored by histochemical analysis of H2O2 accumulation at 8, 24, and 48 h after inoculation. Cell wall apposition (CWA) in epidermal cells and hypersensitive reaction (HR) of epidermal or mesophyll tissue were early defenses in both resistant and susceptible genotypes. There were differences in level, duration, and frequency of occurrence for CWA and HR for the different barley genotypes. Occurrence of HR in epidermal cells at post-penetration stages was indicative of compatibility. Patterns of cell responses were microphenotypically diverse between different resistant and susceptible genotypes. This suggests that timing and level of response are key features of microphenotypic diversity that distinguish different functional mechanisms of resistance and susceptibility present in barley.

  3. Early practical experience and the social responsiveness of clinical education: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Littlewood, Sonia; Ypinazar, Valmae; Margolis, Stephen A; Scherpbier, Albert; Spencer, John; Dornan, Tim

    2005-01-01

    Objectives To find how early experience in clinical and community settings (“early experience”) affects medical education, and identify strengths and limitations of the available evidence. Design A systematic review rating, by consensus, the strength and importance of outcomes reported in the decade 1992-2001. Data sources Bibliographical databases and journals were searched for publications on the topic, reviewed under the auspices of the recently formed Best Evidence Medical Education (BEME) collaboration. Selection of studies All empirical studies (verifiable, observational data) were included, whatever their design, method, or language of publication. Results Early experience was most commonly provided in community settings, aiming to recruit primary care practitioners for underserved populations. It increased the popularity of primary care residencies, albeit among self selected students. It fostered self awareness and empathic attitudes towards ill people, boosted students' confidence, motivated them, gave them satisfaction, and helped them develop a professional identity. By helping develop interpersonal skills, it made entering clerkships a less stressful experience. Early experience helped students learn about professional roles and responsibilities, healthcare systems, and health needs of a population. It made biomedical, behavioural, and social sciences more relevant and easier to learn. It motivated and rewarded teachers and patients and enriched curriculums. In some countries, junior students provided preventive health care directly to underserved populations. Conclusion Early experience helps medical students learn, helps them develop appropriate attitudes towards their studies and future practice, and orientates medical curriculums towards society's needs. Experimental evidence of its benefit is unlikely to be forthcoming and yet more medical schools are likely to provide it. Effort could usefully be concentrated on evaluating the methods and

  4. Millimeter emission of solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagnibeda, V. G.; Smirnova, V. V.; Ryzhov, V. S.; Zhiltsov, A. V.

    2013-06-01

    We analyzed two unique radio observations of millimeter solar flares at 93 and 140 GHz with the THz component in these spectra. Data were obtained from ground-based radio-telescope RT-7.5 operated by Bauman Moscow State Technical University (BMSTU) with the spacial resolution of 2.5 and 1.5 arc-minutes. We analyzed temporal structure of observed radio-bursts and their dynamics in comparison with soft and hard X-ray light-curves obtained from GOES and RHESSI space-based observations. It was found the 140 GHz emission enhancement at the spectra that is new independent confirmation of the THz component existance. Also, we analyzed data of microwave solar flares with the emission enhanced at 35 GHz obtained from Nobeyama radioheliograph (NoRH) and radiopolarimeter (NoRP). It was found that the maximum of the flux density spectra was shifted toward high frequencies that didn't agree with the model spectrum obtained from microwave observations. We assumed, that such kind of spectra are associated with the gyro-synchrotron radiation of the significant number of high-energetic electrons emission with energies of about 500 keV. The emission mechanism at millimeter waves is the gyro-synchrotron radiation. However, if the energetic electrons are not enough the thermal emission mechanism could be dominant factor at millimeter radiation that could also explain the spectral maximum shift to high frequencies.

  5. A mechanism for deep chromospheric heating during solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Machado, M. E.; Emslie, A. G.; Mauas, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    The role of the negative hydrogen ion, H(-), in the energy balance of the deep solar chromosphere is reexamined and it is found, in contrast with earlier authors, that H(-) is a source of heating at these levels. The response of this region to an ionizing flux of flare-associated UV radiation (1500 to 1900 A) is then addressed: it is found that the excess ionization of Si to Si(+) increases the local electron number density considerably, since most species are largely neutral at deep chromospheric levels. This in turn increases the electron-hydrogen atom association rate, the H(-) abundance, and the rate of absorption of photospheric radiation by this ion. It is found that the excess absorption by this process may lead to a substantial temperature enhancement at temperature minimum levels during flares.

  6. High-Energy Aspects of Solar Flares: Observations and Models

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Guo, Fan

    2015-07-21

    The paper begins by describing the structure of the Sun, with emphasis on the corona. The Sun is a unique plasma laboratory, which can be probed by Sun-grazing comets, and is the driver of space weather. Energization and particle acceleration mechanisms in solar flares is presented; magnetic reconnection is key is understanding stochastic acceleration mechanisms. Then coupling between kinetic and fluid aspects is taken up; the next step is feedback of atmospheric response to the acceleration process – rapid quenching of acceleration. Future challenges include applications of stochastic acceleration to solar energetic particles (SEPs), Fermi γ-rays observations, fast-mode magnetosonic wave trains in a funnel-shaped wave guide associated with flare pulsations, and the new SMEX mission IRIS (Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph),

  7. Very rapid virologic response and early HCV response kinetics, as quick measures to compare efficacy and guide a personalized response-guided therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yakoot, Mostafa; Abdo, Alaa M; Yousry, Ahmed; Helmy, Sherine

    2016-01-01

    Background This is the second and final report for our study designed to compare two generic sofosbuvir products for the degree and speed of virologic response to a dual anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment protocol. We aimed to test the applicability of the early virus response kinetics and the very rapid virologic response (vRVR) rate as quick outcome measures for accelerated comparative efficacy studies and as a foundation for a personalized response-guided therapy. Methods Fifty eligible chronic HCV patients were randomized to either one of two generic sofosbuvir products (Gratisovir or Grateziano) at a daily dose of one 400 mg tablet plus a weight-based ribavirin dose. Data were compared between the groups for early virus response kinetics and vRVR rates in relation to the rates of final sustained virologic response at week 12 posttreatment (SVR12). Results The Log10 transformed virus load (Log polymerase chain reaction) curves showed fairly similar rapid decline during the first 2 weeks, with no significant difference between the groups at four analysis points throughout the study by repeated-measures factorial analysis of variance test (P=0.48). The SVR12 rates were 96% (95% confidence interval, 79.6%–99.9%) in Gratisovir group (24/25) and 95.7% (95% confidence interval, 78%–99.9%) in Grateziano group (22/23). There was no statistically significant difference found by exact test (P>0.999). There was a significant association between the vRVR and the SVR12, with 100% positive predictive value (38/38 of those who had vRVR, achieved a final SVR12) and 82.6% sensitivity (among the total 46 with SVR12, 38 were having vRVR). Conclusion We can conclude from our study that the early HCV response kinetics and the vRVR rates could be used as sensitive quick markers for efficacy (with a very high positive predictive value for SVR12), based on our accelerated comparative efficacy research model. This might open the way for new models of accelerated equivalence

  8. Very rapid virologic response and early HCV response kinetics, as quick measures to compare efficacy and guide a personalized response-guided therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yakoot, Mostafa; Abdo, Alaa M; Yousry, Ahmed; Helmy, Sherine

    2016-01-01

    Background This is the second and final report for our study designed to compare two generic sofosbuvir products for the degree and speed of virologic response to a dual anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment protocol. We aimed to test the applicability of the early virus response kinetics and the very rapid virologic response (vRVR) rate as quick outcome measures for accelerated comparative efficacy studies and as a foundation for a personalized response-guided therapy. Methods Fifty eligible chronic HCV patients were randomized to either one of two generic sofosbuvir products (Gratisovir or Grateziano) at a daily dose of one 400 mg tablet plus a weight-based ribavirin dose. Data were compared between the groups for early virus response kinetics and vRVR rates in relation to the rates of final sustained virologic response at week 12 posttreatment (SVR12). Results The Log10 transformed virus load (Log polymerase chain reaction) curves showed fairly similar rapid decline during the first 2 weeks, with no significant difference between the groups at four analysis points throughout the study by repeated-measures factorial analysis of variance test (P=0.48). The SVR12 rates were 96% (95% confidence interval, 79.6%–99.9%) in Gratisovir group (24/25) and 95.7% (95% confidence interval, 78%–99.9%) in Grateziano group (22/23). There was no statistically significant difference found by exact test (P>0.999). There was a significant association between the vRVR and the SVR12, with 100% positive predictive value (38/38 of those who had vRVR, achieved a final SVR12) and 82.6% sensitivity (among the total 46 with SVR12, 38 were having vRVR). Conclusion We can conclude from our study that the early HCV response kinetics and the vRVR rates could be used as sensitive quick markers for efficacy (with a very high positive predictive value for SVR12), based on our accelerated comparative efficacy research model. This might open the way for new models of accelerated equivalence

  9. Alarm pheromone induces immediate-early gene expression and slow behavioral response in honey bees.

    PubMed

    Alaux, Cédric; Robinson, Gene E

    2007-07-01

    Primer and releaser pheromones are molecules used for communication that induce species-specific responses. In contrast to primer pheromones, it is not known whether the quicker-acting releaser pheromones can affect brain gene expression. We show here that isopentyl acetate (IPA), a releaser pheromone that communicates alarm in honey bees, not only provokes a quick defensive response but also influences behavior for a longer period of time and affects brain gene expression. Exposure to IPA affected behavioral responsiveness to subsequent exposures to IPA and induced the expression of the immediate early gene and transcription factor c-Jun in the antennal lobes. Our findings blur the long-standing distinction between primer and releaser pheromone and highlight the pervasiveness of environmental regulation of brain gene expression. PMID:17505874

  10. Population responses to contour integration: early encoding of discrete elements and late perceptual grouping.

    PubMed

    Gilad, Ariel; Meirovithz, Elhanan; Slovin, Hamutal

    2013-04-24

    The neuronal mechanisms underlying perceptual grouping of discrete, similarly oriented elements are not well understood. To investigate this, we measured neural population responses using voltage-sensitive dye imaging in V1 of monkeys trained on a contour-detection task. By mapping the contour and background elements onto V1, we could study their neural processing. Population response early in time showed activation patches corresponding to the contour/background individual elements. However, late increased activity in the contour elements, along with suppressed activity in the background elements, enabled us to visualize in single trials a salient continuous contour "popping out" from a suppressed background. This modulated activity in the contour and in background extended beyond the cortical representation of individual contour or background elements. Finally, the late modulation was correlated with behavioral performance of contour saliency and the monkeys' perceptual report. Thus, opposing responses in the contour and background may underlie perceptual grouping in V1.

  11. Comparative responses to endocrine disrupting compounds in early life stages of Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar.

    PubMed

    Duffy, T A; Iwanowicz, L R; McCormick, S D

    2014-07-01

    Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) are endangered anadromous fish that may be exposed to feminizing endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) during early development, potentially altering physiological capacities, survival and fitness. To assess differential life stage sensitivity to common EDCs, we carried out short-term (4 day) exposures using three doses each of 17 α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), 17 β-estradiol (E2), and nonylphenol (NP) on four early life stages; embryos, yolk-sac larvae, feeding fry and 1 year old smolts. Differential response was compared using vitellogenin (Vtg, a precursor egg protein) gene transcription. Smolts were also examined for impacts on plasma Vtg, cortisol, thyroid hormones (T4/T3) and hepatosomatic index (HSI). Compound-related mortality was not observed in any life stage, but Vtg mRNA was elevated in a dose-dependent manner in yolk-sac larvae, fry and smolts but not in embryos. The estrogens EE2 and E2 were consistently stronger inducers of Vtg than NP. Embryos responded significantly to the highest concentration of EE2 only, while older life stages responded to the highest doses of all three compounds, as well as intermediate doses of EE2 and E2. Maximal transcription was greater for fry among the three earliest life stages, suggesting fry may be the most responsive life stage in early development. Smolt plasma Vtg was also significantly increased, and this response was observed at lower doses of each compound than was detected by gene transcription suggesting plasma Vtg is a more sensitive indicator at this life stage. HSI was increased at the highest doses of EE2 and E2, and plasma T3 was decreased at the highest dose of EE2. Our results indicate that all life stages are potentially sensitive to endocrine disruption by estrogenic compounds and that physiological responses were altered over a short window of exposure, indicating the potential for these compounds to impact fish in the wild. PMID:24713117

  12. Comparative responses to endocrine disrupting compounds in early life stages of Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffy, Tara A.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; McCormick, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) are endangered anadromous fish that may be exposed to feminizing endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) during early development, potentially altering physiological capacities, survival and fitness. To assess differential life stage sensitivity to common EDCs, we carried out short-term (four day) exposures using three doses each of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), 17β-estradiol (E2), and nonylphenol (NP) on four early life stages; embryos, yolk-sac larvae, feeding fry and one year old smolts. Differential response was compared using vitellogenin (Vtg, a precursor egg protein) gene transcription. Smolts were also examined for impacts on plasma Vtg, cortisol, thyroid hormones (T4/T3) and hepatosomatic index (HSI). Compound-related mortality was not observed in any life stage, but Vtg mRNA was elevated in a dose-dependent manner in yolk-sac larvae, fry and smolts but not in embyos. The estrogens EE2 and E2 were consistently stronger inducers of Vtg than NP. Embryos responded significantly to the highest concentration of EE2 only, while older life stages responded to the highest doses of all three compounds, as well as intermediate doses of EE2 and E2. Maximal transcription was greater for fry among the three earliest life stages, suggesting fry may be the most responsive life stage in early development. Smolt plasma Vtg was also significantly increased, and this response was observed at lower doses of each compound than was detected by gene transcription suggesting this is a more sensitive indicator at this life stage. HSI was increased at the highest doses of EE2 and E2 and plasma T3 decreased at the highest dose of EE2. Our results indicate that all life stages after hatching are potentially sensitive to endocrine disruption by estrogenic compounds and that physiological responses were altered over a short window of exposure, indicating the potential for these compounds to impact fish in the wild.

  13. Jasmonate signaling is activated in the very early stages of iron deficiency responses in rice roots.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takanori; Itai, Reiko Nakanishi; Senoura, Takeshi; Oikawa, Takaya; Ishimaru, Yasuhiro; Ueda, Minoru; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Nishizawa, Naoko K

    2016-07-01

    Under low iron availability, plants induce the expression of various genes involved in iron uptake and translocation at the transcriptional level. This iron deficiency response is affected by various plant hormones, but the roles of jasmonates in this response are not well-known. We investigated the involvement of jasmonates in rice iron deficiency responses. High rates of jasmonate-inducible genes were induced during the very early stages of iron deficiency treatment in rice roots. Many jasmonate-inducible genes were also negatively regulated by the ubiquitin ligases OsHRZ1 and OsHRZ2 and positively regulated by the transcription factor IDEF1. Ten out of 35 genes involved in jasmonate biosynthesis and signaling were rapidly induced at 3 h of iron deficiency treatment, and this induction preceded that of known iron deficiency-inducible genes involved in iron uptake and translocation. Twelve genes involved in jasmonate biosynthesis and signaling were also upregulated in HRZ-knockdown roots. Endogenous concentrations of jasmonic acid and jasmonoyl isoleucine tended to be rapidly increased in roots in response to iron deficiency treatment, whereas these concentrations were higher in HRZ-knockdown roots under iron-sufficient conditions. Analysis of the jasmonate-deficient cpm2 mutant revealed that jasmonates repress the expression of many iron deficiency-inducible genes involved in iron uptake and translocation under iron sufficiency, but this repression is partly canceled under an early stage of iron deficiency. These results indicate that jasmonate signaling is activated during the very early stages of iron deficiency, which is partly regulated by IDEF1 and OsHRZs.

  14. Early childhood attention deficit hyperactivity disorder predicts poorer response to acute lithium therapy in adolescent mania.

    PubMed

    Strober, M; DeAntonio, M; Schmidt-Lackner, S; Freeman, R; Lampert, C; Diamond, J

    1998-11-01

    We compared the response to acute lithium therapy in 30 adolescents, 13-17 years of age, with mania and a prior history of early childhood attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to a sex- and age-matched control group of adolescent manics without premorbid psychiatric illness. Response to treatment was assessed daily over the course of 28 days using measures of global clinical improvement and severity ratings on the Bech-Rafaelsen Mania Scale (BRMS). BRMS scores decreased by a mean of 24.3 in the subgroup without prior ADHD compared to 16.7 in patients with ADHD (P = 0.0005). The average percent drop in BRMS scores over the study period in these two subgroups was 80.6% and 57.7%, respectively (P = 0.0005). Time to onset of sustained global clinical improvement was also assessed using Kaplan-Meier survival methods and possible covariates of time to improvement were tested in a Cox proportional hazards model. Median time to onset of sustained improvement was lengthened significantly in patients with early ADHD (23 days) compared to those without it (17 days; log rank chi2 = 7.2, P = 0.007). The results suggest that early childhood ADHD defines an important source of heterogeneity in bipolar illness with developmental, clinical, and neuropharmacogenetic implications. PMID:10743847

  15. Neurotrophic and neuroimmune responses to early-life Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Silvia; Scuri, Mario; Samsell, Lennie; Ducatman, Barbara; Bejarano, Pablo; Auais, Alexander; Doud, Melissa; Mathee, Kalai; Piedimonte, Giovanni

    2010-09-01

    Early-life respiratory infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is common in children with cystic fibrosis or immune deficits. Although many of its clinical manifestations involve neural reflexes, little information is available on the peripheral nervous system of infected airways. This study sought to determine whether early-life infection triggers a neurogenic-mediated immunoinflammatory response, the mechanisms of this response, and its relationship with other immunoinflammatory pathways. Weanling and adult rats were inoculated with suspensions containing P. aeruginosa (PAO1) coated on alginate microspheres suspended in Tris-CaCl(2) buffer. Five days after infection, rats were injected with capsaicin to stimulate nociceptive nerves in the airway mucosa, and microvascular permeability was measured using Evans blue as a tracer. PAO1 increased neurogenic inflammation in the extra- and intrapulmonary compartments of weanlings but not in adults. The mechanism involves selective overexpression of NGF, which is critical for the local increase in microvascular permeability and for the infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes into infected lung parenchyma. These effects are mediated in part by induction of downstream inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, especially IL-1beta, IL-18, and leptin. Our data suggest that neurogenic-mediated immunoinflammatory mechanisms play important roles in airway inflammation and hyperreactivity associated with P. aeruginosa when infection occurs early in life. PMID:20543002

  16. Tumor interstitial fluid pressure as an early-response marker for anticancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Stephane; Allegrini, Peter R; Becquet, Mike M; McSheehy, Paul Mj

    2009-09-01

    Solid tumors have a raised interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) due to high vessel permeability, low lymphatic drainage, poor perfusion, and high cell density around the blood vessels. To investigate tumor IFP as an early-response biomarker, we have tested the effect of seven anticancer chemotherapeutics including cytotoxics and targeted cytostatics in 13 experimental tumor models. IFP was recorded with the wick-in-needle method. Models were either ectopic or orthotopic and included mouse and rat syngeneic as well as human xenografts in nude mice. The mean basal IFP was between 4.4 and 15.2mm Hg; IFP was lowest in human tumor xenografts and highest in rat syngeneic models. Where measured, basal IFP correlated positively with relative tumor blood volume (rTBV) determined by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Most chemotherapeutics sooner (2 or 3 days) or later (6 or 7 days) lowered tumor IFP significantly, and the cytotoxic patupilone caused the greatest decrease in IFP. In rat mammary orthotopic BN472 tumors, significant drug-induced decreases in IFP and rTBV correlated positively with each other for both patupilone and the cytostatic vatalanib. In the two orthotopic models studied, early decreases in IFP were significantly (P < or = .005) correlated with late changes in tumor volume. Thus, drug-induced decreases in tumor IFP are an early marker of response to therapy, which could aid clinical development. PMID:19724681

  17. Heating and Cooling of Flare Loops in a C5.7 Two-ribbon Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Sarah; Qiu, Jiong

    2016-05-01

    Heating and cooling of flare plasmas can be studied using models constrained by observations. In this work, we analyze and model thermal evolution of a C5.7 two-ribbon flare that occurred on December 26, 2011. The flare was observed by AIA. Two hundred flare loops are identified, which formed sequentially during one hour. Light curves of these flare loops in multiple EUV bands are analyzed to derive the duration and timing of flare emission in each bandpass. These timescales usually reflect cooling of flare plasmas from 10~MK to successively lower temperatures. We then use a zero-dimensional enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops (EBTEL) model to study flare heating and cooling. Several variations on the EBTEL model are assessed. The first model uses an impulsive heating function inferred from the rapid rise of the foot-point UV emission. Synthetic emission from this model evolves and decays more quickly than the observations, as many models do. Two other variations on the model are analyzed, in an attempt to counter this. In one variation the heating function is a combination of an impulsive pulse followed by an extended tail (i.e., continuous heating). The other model uses reduced thermal conduction to slow the flares evolution. These models are compared with one another and the observations, to evaluate effects of different mechanisms governing the thermal evolution of flare plasmas.

  18. Recognition of Immune Response for the Early Diagnosis and Treatment of Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kandahari, Adrese M; Yang, Xinlin; Dighe, Abhijit S; Pan, Dongfeng; Cui, Quanjun

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a common and debilitating joint disease that affects up to 30 million Americans, leading to significant disability, reduction in quality of life, and costing the United States tens of billions of dollars annually. Classically, osteoarthritis has been characterized as a degenerative, wear-and-tear disease, but recent research has identified it as an immunopathological disease on a spectrum between healthy condition and rheumatoid arthritis. A systematic literature review demonstrates that the disease pathogenesis is driven by an early innate immune response which progressively catalyzes degenerative changes that ultimately lead to an altered joint microenvironment. It is feasible to detect this infiltration of cells in the early, and presumably asymptomatic, phase of the disease through noninvasive imaging techniques. This screening can serve to aid clinicians in potentially identifying high-risk patients, hopefully leading to early effective management, vast improvements in quality of life, and significant reductions in disability, morbidity, and cost related to osteoarthritis. Although the diagnosis and treatment of osteoarthritis routinely utilize both invasive and non-invasive strategies, imaging techniques specific to inflammatory cells are not commonly employed for these purposes. This review discusses this paradigm and aims to shift the focus of future osteoarthritis-related research towards early diagnosis of the disease process.

  19. Early Traumatic Stress Responses in Parents Following a Serious Illness in Their Child: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Woolf, Claudia; Muscara, Frank; Anderson, Vicki A; McCarthy, Maria C

    2016-03-01

    A systematic review of the literature investigating the early traumatic stress responses in parents of children diagnosed with a serious illness/injury. A literature review was conducted (September 2013) using Medline, PsycINFO, and CINAHL databases. Twenty-four studies related to parents of children hospitalized due to diagnosis of cancer, type 1 diabetes, meningococcal disease, trauma or serious injury, preterm birth and other serious illnesses requiring admission to intensive care were included. Parents were assessed for early traumatic stress symptoms within 3 months of their child's diagnosis/hospitalization. Prevalence rates of acute stress disorder in parents ranged from 12 to 63%. Prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder ranged from 8 to 68%. Variability was related to methodological factors including differences in study design, timing of assessments, measurement tools, and scoring protocols. Psychosocial factors rather than medical factors predicted parent distress. This review integrates and compares early traumatic reactions in parents with children suffering a range of serious illnesses. Findings suggest a high prevalence of acute and posttraumatic stress symptoms in parents. Methodological inconsistencies made comparison of early traumatic stress prevalence rates difficult. Risk factors associated with traumatic stress symptoms were identified.

  20. High prevalence of abnormal adrenal response in girls with central precocious puberty at early pubertal stages.

    PubMed

    Lazar, L; Kauli, R; Bruchis, C; Nordenberg, J; Galatzer, A; Pertzelan, A

    1995-10-01

    Abnormal adrenal response is often observed in girls with precocious adrenarche (1). We studied the adrenal response in 112 girls with idiopathic true central precocious puberty (CPP) at early stages of puberty compared to that in 21 girls with normal puberty (controls). The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of abnormal adrenal response at early stages of puberty, the possible correlation of abnormal adrenal response with pubertal signs at onset of puberty and with plasma androgen levels, and a possible association with the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. All participants underwent a combined i.v. adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) test at Tanner stage 2-3: 62 of the CPP girls before and 50 during treatment with GnRH analog. The stimulated levels of 17-hydroxypregnenolone (17OHPreg) and the stimulated 17OHPreg/17-hydroxyprogesterone ratio were analyzed and compared to previously reported norms. The result revealed three patterns of adrenal response: normal (17OHPreg < or = 24 nmol/l and 17OHPreg/17OHP ratio < or = 7) in 50/112 (44.6%) CPP patients and 17/21 (80.9%) controls; exaggerated (17OHPreg > 24 nmol/l, 17OHPreg/17OHP ratio < or = 7) in 50/112 (44.6%) CPP patients and 3/21 (14.3%) controls; and non-classical 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase deficiency (17OHPreg > 24 nmol/l and 17OHPreg/17OHP ratio > 7) in 12/112 (10.8%) CPP patients and 1/21 (4.8%) controls. The clinical features at onset of puberty were comparable in all girls with the CPP in spite of the different adrenal response patterns.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Responsive parenting: establishing early foundations for social, communication, and independent problem-solving skills.

    PubMed

    Landry, Susan H; Smith, Karen E; Swank, Paul R

    2006-07-01

    Mothers whose infants varied in early biological characteristics (born at term, n = 120; born at very low birth weight [VLBW], n = 144) were randomized to a target group (n = 133) or developmental feedback comparison group (n = 131) to determine whether learning responsive behaviors would facilitate infant development. The target condition included videotaped examples, problem-solving activities, and mothers' critique of their own behaviors through video procedures across 10 home visits. All target versus comparison mothers showed greater increases across multiple responsiveness behaviors observed in 4 assessments conducted across 6-13 months of age; changes in emotionally supportive behaviors were strongest for target mothers of infants born at VLBW. Increased maternal responsiveness facilitated greater growth in target infants' social, emotional, communication, and cognitive competence, supporting a causal role for responsiveness on infant development. Although benefits were generally comparable across risk groups, aspects of social and emotional skills showed greater change for those born at VLBW. Evidence for responsiveness as a multidimensional construct was provided as well as the importance of different aspects of responsiveness mediating the effect of the intervention on different infant skill domains.

  2. Evolution of Magnetic and Velocity Fields in Super-active Region NOAA10486 and the Large 4B/X17.2 Flare of October 28, 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambastha, A.

    2007-08-01

    We have used high cadence GONG + photospheric magnetograms, dopplergrams and Udaipur Solar Observatory (USO) chromospheric Hα-filtergrams to study the spatial and temporal evolution of the active region NOAA 10486 in relation to the X17.2/4B flare of October 28, 2003. New flux emergences, large proper motions and development of steady velocity flows have been identified around the flare site. In addition, filament activation and eruption leading to fast CMEs were noticed. During the flare, NOAA 10486 was located near the disk-center; well suited for the ring diagram analysis. Therefore, we have obtained the 3-D power spectra to search for helioseismic response of the large flare on the amplitude, frequency and width of the p-modes. Power enhancement was found during the post-flare phase, and NOAA 10486 possessed steep gradient in the meridional velocity as compared to the less flare-productive active regions.

  3. A STATISTICAL STUDY OF SPECTRAL HARDENING IN SOLAR FLARES AND RELATED SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Grayson, James A.; Krucker, Saem; Lin, R. P. E-mail: krucker@ssl.berkeley.ed

    2009-12-20

    Using hard X-ray observations from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), we investigate the reliability of spectral hardening during solar flares as an indicator of related solar energetic particle (SEP) events at Earth. All RHESSI data are analyzed, from 2002 February through the end of Solar Cycle 23, thereby expanding upon recent work on a smaller sample of flares. Previous investigations have found very high success when associating soft-hard-harder (SHH) spectral behavior with energetic proton events, and confirmation of this link would suggest a correlation between electron acceleration in solar flares and SEPs seen in interplanetary space. In agreement with these past findings, we find that of 37 magnetically well-connected flares (W30-W90), 12 of 18 flares with SHH behavior produced SEP events and none of 19 flares without SHH behavior produced SEPs. This demonstrates a statistically significant dependence of SHH and SEP observations, a link that is unexplained in the standard scenario of SEP acceleration at the shock front of coronal mass ejections and encourages further investigation of the mechanisms which could be responsible.

  4. A Study of Sympathetic Flaring Using a Full-Sun Event Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, P. A.; Schrijver, C. J.; Title, A. M.; Bloomfield, D.; Gallagher, P.

    2013-12-01

    There has been a trove of papers published on the statistics of flare occurrence. These studies are trying to answer the question of whether or not subsequent solar flares are related. The majority of these works have not included both flare location information and the physical properties of the regions responsible for the eruptions, and none have taken advantage of full-Sun event coverage. Now that SDO/AIA is available and the STEREO spacecraft have progressed past 90 degrees from Earth's heliographic longitude, this new information is available to us. This work aims to quantify how common sympathetic events are, and how important they are in the forecasting of solar flares. A 3D plot of detected and clustered flare events for a full solar rotation, including the Valentine's Day Event of 2011. A full-Sun image in the EUV (304A) including both STEREO view points and AIA. The GOES X-ray light curves during the February period of 2011 are shown in the bottom panel. Detected flare events are indicated by the green dashed lines and the time stamp of this image is denoted by the red line.

  5. Wavelet analysis of CME, X-ray flare, and sunspot series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedes, M. R. G.; Pereira, E. S.; Cecatto, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    Context. Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares are the most energetic transient phenomena taking place at the Sun. Together they are principally responsible for disturbances in outer geospace. Coronal mass ejections and solar flares are believed to be correlated with the solar cycle, which is mainly characterized by sunspot numbers. Aims: Here, we search for pattern identification in CMEs, X-ray solar flares, and sunspot number time series using a new data mining process and a quantitative procedure to correlate these series. Methods: This new process consists of the combination of a decomposition method with the wavelet transform technique applied to the series ranging from 2000 until 2012. A simple moving average is used for the time-series decomposition as a high-pass filter. A continuous wavelet transform is applied to the series in sequence, which permits us to uncover signals previously masked by the original time series. We made use of the wavelet coherence to find some correlation between the data. Results: The results have shown the existence of periodic and intermittent signals in the CMEs, flares, and sunspot time series. For the CME and flare series, few and relatively short time intervals without any signal were observed. Signals with an intermittent character take place during some epochs of the maximum and descending phases of the solar cycle 23 and rising phase of solar cycle 24. A comparison among X-ray flares, sunspots, and CME time series shows a stronger relation between flare and CMEs, although during some short intervals (four-eight months) and in a relatively narrow band. Yet, in contrast we have obtained a fainter or even absent relation between the X-ray flares and sunspot number series as well as between the CMEs and sunspot number series.

  6. The Effect of Magnetic Topology on the Escape of Flare Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antiochos, S. K.; Masson, S.; DeVore, C. R.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection in the solar atmosphere is believed to be the driver of most solar explosive phenomena. Therefore, the topology of the coronal magnetic field is central to understanding the solar drivers of space weather. Of particular importance to space weather are the impulsive Solar Energetic particles that are associated with some CME/eruptive flare events. Observationally, the magnetic configuration of active regions where solar eruptions originate appears to agree with the standard eruptive flare model. According to this model, particles accelerated at the flare reconnection site should remain trapped in the corona and the ejected plasmoid. However, flare-accelerated particles frequently reach the Earth long before the CME does. We present a model that may account for the injection of energetic particles onto open magnetic flux tubes connecting to the Earth. Our model is based on the well-known 2.5D breakout topology, which has a coronal null point (null line) and a four-flux system. A key new addition, however, is that we include an isothermal solar wind with open-flux regions. Depending on the location of the open flux with respect to the null point, we find that the flare reconnection can consist of two distinct phases. At first, the flare reconnection involves only closed field, but if the eruption occurs close to the open field, we find a second phase involving interchange reconnection between open and closed. We argue that this second reconnection episode is responsible for the injection of flare-accelerated particles into the interplanetary medium. We will report on our recent work toward understanding how flare particles escape to the heliosphere. This work uses high-resolution 2.5D MHD numerical simulations performed with the Adaptively Refined MHD Solver (ARMS).

  7. EVIDENCE OF SOLAR FLARE TRIGGERING DUE TO LOOP-LOOP INTERACTION CAUSED BY FOOTPOINT SHEAR MOTION

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pankaj; Srivastava, A. K.; Uddin, Wahab; Somov, B. V.; Manoharan, P. K.; Erdelyi, R. E-mail: aks@aries.res.i

    2010-11-10

    We analyze multi-wavelength data of an M7.9/1N class solar flare which occurred on 2006 April 27 in AR NOAA 10875. GOES soft X-ray images provide the most likely signature of two interacting loops and their reconnection, which triggers the solar flare. TRACE 195 A images also reveal the loop-loop interaction and the formation of 'X' points with converging motion ({approx}30 km s{sup -1}) at the reconnection site in between this interacting loop system. This provides evidence of progressive reconnection and flare maximization at the interaction site in the active region. The absence of type III radio bursts during this time period indicates no opening of magnetic field lines during the flare energy release, which implies that the change of field line connectivity/orientation occurred only during the loop-loop interaction and reconnection process. The Ondrejov dynamic radio spectrum shows an intense decimetric (DCIM) radio burst (2.5-4.5 GHz, duration {approx}3 minutes) during the flare initiation, which reveals the signature of particle acceleration from the reconnection site during loop-loop interaction. The double-peak structures at 4.9 and 8.8 GHz provide the most likely confirmatory signature of the loop-loop interaction at the flare site in the active region. RHESSI hard X-ray images also show the loop-top and footpoint sources of the corresponding two-loop system, which act like current-carrying flux tubes with resultant opposite magnetic fields and net force of attraction, and their coalescence during the flare maximum. We also suggest that the shear motion/rotation of the footpoint of the smaller loop, which is anchored in the opposite polarity spot, may be responsible for the flare energy buildup and its eventual release due to the loop-loop interaction.

  8. Hepatitis B flares in chronic hepatitis B: pathogenesis, natural course, and management.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ming-Ling; Liaw, Yun-Fan

    2014-12-01

    Hepatitis B flare, defined as an event with abrupt rise of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels to >5 times the upper limit of normal during chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, is considered to be the result of a human leukocyte antigen-I restricted, cytotoxic T lymphocyte mediated immune response against HBV and its downstream mechanisms. It may occur spontaneously, during or after antiviral therapy and in the setting of immunosuppression and/or chemotherapy. The clinical spectrum of hepatitis B flares varies from asymptomatic to symptomatic and typical overt acute hepatitis, even with hepatic decompensation or failure. Flares may also occur in viraemic patients with cirrhosis with higher incidence of decompensation/mortality, hence requiring immediate antiviral therapy. An upsurge of serum HBV DNA and hepatitis B surface antigen levels usually precedes the abrupt rise of ALT levels. Rising or stable and high HBV DNA during flares represent ineffective immune clearance and further hepatocytolysis, even hepatic decompensation, may occur. Such patients require immediate antiviral therapy. In contrast, bridging hepatic necrosis and/or alpha-fetoprotein levels >100 ng/ml or decreasing HBV DNA during flares represent a more effective immune clearance and frequently leads to seroclearance of HBV DNA and/or hepatitis B e antigen with remission. If patients are non-cirrhotic and there is no concern of developing decompensation, patients may be observed for 3-6 months before deciding on the need of antiviral therapy. Severe and repeated flares are prone to develop into decompensation or lead to the development of cirrhosis, thus a timely treatment to prevent the hepatitis B flare is better than to cope with the flare. Screening, monitoring and prophylactic or pre-emptive antiviral therapy is mandatory for patients who are going to receive immunosuppressants or chemotherapy.

  9. Response of Late Carboniferous and Early Permian Plant Communities to Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimichele, William A.; Pfefferkorn, Hermann W.; Gastaldo, Robert A.

    Late Carboniferous and Early Permian strata record the transition from a cold interval in Earth history, characterized by the repeated periods of glaciation and deglaciation of the southern pole, to a warm-climate interval. Consequently, this time period is the best available analogue to the Recent in which to study patterns of vegetational response, both to glacial-interglacial oscillation and to the appearance of warm climate. Carboniferous wetland ecosystems were dominated by spore-producing plants and early gymnospermous seed plants. Global climate changes, largely drying, forced vegetational changes, resulting in a change to a seed plant-dominated world, beginning first at high latitudes during the Carboniferous, reaching the tropics near the Permo-Carboniferous boundary. For most of this time plant assemblages were very conservative in their composition. Change in the dominant vegetation was generally a rapid process, which suggests that environmental thresholds were crossed, and involved little mixing of elements from the wet and dry floras.

  10. Dynamical response of the tropical Pacific Ocean to solar forcing during the early Holocene.

    PubMed

    Marchitto, Thomas M; Muscheler, Raimund; Ortiz, Joseph D; Carriquiry, Jose D; van Geen, Alexander

    2010-12-01

    We present a high-resolution magnesium/calcium proxy record of Holocene sea surface temperature (SST) from off the west coast of Baja California Sur, Mexico, a region where interannual SST variability is dominated today by the influence of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Temperatures were lowest during the early to middle Holocene, consistent with documented eastern equatorial Pacific cooling and numerical model simulations of orbital forcing into a La Niña-like state at that time. The early Holocene SSTs were also characterized by millennial-scale fluctuations that correlate with cosmogenic nuclide proxies of solar variability, with inferred solar minima corresponding to El Niño-like (warm) conditions, in apparent agreement with the theoretical "ocean dynamical thermostat" response of ENSO to exogenous radiative forcing. PMID:21127251

  11. Dynamical Response of the Tropical Pacific Ocean to Solar Forcing During the Early Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchitto, Thomas M.; Muscheler, Raimund; Ortiz, Joseph D.; Carriquiry, Jose D.; van Geen, Alexander

    2010-12-01

    We present a high-resolution magnesium/calcium proxy record of Holocene sea surface temperature (SST) from off the west coast of Baja California Sur, Mexico, a region where interannual SST variability is dominated today by the influence of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Temperatures were lowest during the early to middle Holocene, consistent with documented eastern equatorial Pacific cooling and numerical model simulations of orbital forcing into a La Niña-like state at that time. The early Holocene SSTs were also characterized by millennial-scale fluctuations that correlate with cosmogenic nuclide proxies of solar variability, with inferred solar minima corresponding to El Niño-like (warm) conditions, in apparent agreement with the theoretical “ocean dynamical thermostat” response of ENSO to exogenous radiative forcing.

  12. Solar flare leaves sun quaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-05-01

    Dr. Alexander G. Kosovichev, a senior research scientist from Stanford University, and Dr. Valentina V. Zharkova from Glasgow (United Kingdom) University found the tell-tale seismic signature in data on the Sun's surface collected by the Michelson Doppler Imager onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft immediately following a moderate-sized flare on July 9, 1996. "Although the flare was a moderate one, it still released an immense amount of energy," said Dr. Craig Deforest, a researcher with the SOHO project. "The energy released is equal to completely covering the Earth's continents with a yard of dynamite and detonating it all at once." SOHO is a joint project of the European Space Agency and NASA. The finding is reported in the May 28 issue of the journal Nature, and is the subject of a press conference at the spring meeting of the American Geophysical Union in Boston, Mass., May 27. The solar quake that the science team recorded looks much like ripples spreading from a rock dropped into a pool of water. But over the course of an hour, the solar waves traveled for a distance equal to 10 Earth diameters before fading into the fiery background of the Sun's photosphere. Unlike water ripples that travel outward at a constant velocity, the solar waves accelerated from an initial speed of 22,000 miles per hour to a maximum of 250,000 miles per hour before disappearing. "People have looked for evidence of seismic waves from flares before, but they didn't have a theory so they didn't know where to look," says Kosovichev. Several years ago Kosovichev and Zharkova developed a theory that can explain how a flare, which explodes in space above the Sun's surface, can generate a major seismic wave in the Sun's interior. According to the currently accepted model of solar flares, the primary explosion creates high-energy electrons (electrically charged subatomic particles). These are funneled down into a magnetic flux tube, an invisible tube of magnetic

  13. Measurements of Continuum Flux in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotrč, P.; Heinzel, P.; Procházka, O.

    2016-04-01

    A broad-band diagnostics of chromospheric flare plasma needs to analyze spectra covering many spectral lines and various continuum features. The flare spectra are well detected on the background of the solar disk, but the detection of flare line emission from the Sun-as-a-star in optical is much more difficult due to a strong background radiation. When the flare/background radiation contrast is strong enough to be detected, we need a device for measuring the flux from a selected part of the flaring region. Here we present technical demands for such an instrument and its brief description. This device denoted as Image Selector is a post-focus instrument installed at the horizontal solar telescope HSFA2 of the Ondřejov observatory, described by Kotrč (2009). Its core consists of a system of diaphragms, imaging Hα telescope and a fast spectrometer with dispersion of 3 px per Å but with cadency reaching up to 50 frames per second. The first solar flares observed recently by this novel technique provide quite interesting results. Our analysis of the data proves that the described device is sufficiently sensitive to detect variations in the Balmer continuum during solar flares.

  14. How big was the Carrington 1859 Flare?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Svalgaard, L.; Neidig, D. F.

    2004-05-01

    The 1859 space weather event was distinguished by its great geomagnetic storm, widespread low-latitude aurora, and intense solar energetic particle event (inferred from the NO3 concentration in polar ice cores). Arguably each of these three effects was the largest ever observed. What can we say about the size of the associated solar flare? We have two observations with which to make such an assessment: (1) Carrington's and Hodgson's report of the white-light flare and (2) the solar flare effect or magnetic crochet observed in the Kew and Greenwich magnetograms. Estimates of the area, duration, spectrum, and intensity of the white-light emission indicate a large (~2 x 1030 erg) but not unequalled event (the white-light emission of the 24 April 1984 >X13 flare contained ~6 x 1030 erg). The magnetic crochet of 130 nT in the horizontal force, however, exceeds that for all >X10 soft X-ray flares observed from 1984-2002 (we are presently compiling magnetic data for the recent October-November 2003 activity for comparison with the 1859 event). Thus at this point, we can conservatively say that Carrington's flare likely had a soft X-ray classification >X10 and was at least comparable to the largest flares recorded during the spacecraft era.

  15. Avalanches and the distribution of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Edward T.; Hamilton, Russell J.

    1991-01-01

    The solar coronal magnetic field is proposed to be in a self-organized critical state, thus explaining the observed power-law dependence of solar-flare-occurrence rate on flare size which extends over more than five orders of magnitude in peak flux. The physical picture that arises is that solar flares are avalanches of many small reconnection events, analogous to avalanches of sand in the models published by Bak and colleagues in 1987 and 1988. Flares of all sizes are manifestations of the same physical processes, where the size of a given flare is determined by the number of elementary reconnection events. The relation between small-scale processes and the statistics of global-flare properties which follows from the self-organized magnetic-field configuration provides a way to learn about the physics of the unobservable small-scale reconnection processes. A simple lattice-reconnection model is presented which is consistent with the observed flare statistics. The implications for coronal heating are discussed and some observational tests of this picture are given.

  16. Adiponectin treatment attenuates inflammatory response during early sepsis in obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, XianFeng; Buechler, Nancy L; Yoza, Barbara K; McCall, Charles E; Vachharajani, Vidula

    2016-01-01

    Background Morbid obesity increases the cost of care in critically ill patients. Sepsis is the leading cause of death in noncoronary intensive care units. Circulating cell–endothelial cell interactions in microcirculation are the rate-determining factors in any inflammation; obesity increases these interactions further. Adiponectin deficiency is implicated in increased cardiovascular risk in obese patients. We have shown that adiponectin deficiency increases microvascular dysfunction in early sepsis. In the present study, we investigated the effect of adiponectin replacement on nutritionally obese mice with early sepsis. Methods We used cecal ligation and puncture model of sepsis in mice with diet-induced obesity (DIO) vs control diet (CTRL), with or without adiponectin treatment. We studied leukocyte/platelet adhesion in the cerebral microcirculation in early sepsis. We also studied the effect of adiponectin on free fatty acid (FFA)-fed and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) for mechanistic studies. Results Leukocyte and platelet adhesion increased in the cerebral microcirculation of DIO and CTRL mice with early sepsis vs. sham; moreover cell adhesion in DIO-sepsis group was significantly higher than in the CTRL-sepsis group. Adiponectin replacement decreased leukocyte/platelet adhesion in CTRL and DIO mice. In FFA-fed BMDM, adiponectin treatment decreased tumor necrosis factor-alpha mRNA expression and increased sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) mRNA expression. Furthermore, using BMDM from SIRT1 knockout mice, we showed that the adiponectin treatment decreased inflammatory response in FFA-fed BMDM via SIRT1-dependent and -independent pathways. Conclusion Adiponectin replacement attenuates microvascular inflammation in DIO-sepsis mice. Mechanistically, adiponectin treatment in FFA-fed mouse macrophages attenuates inflammatory response via SIRT1-dependent and -independent pathways. PMID:27785087

  17. Regulation of early and delayed radiation responses in rat small intestine by capsaicin-sensitive nerves

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Junru; Zheng Huaien; Kulkarni, Ashwini; Ou Xuemei; Hauer-Jensen, Martin . E-mail: mhjensen@life.uams.edu

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: Mast cells protect against the early manifestations of intestinal radiation toxicity, but promote chronic intestinal wall fibrosis. Intestinal sensory nerves are closely associated with mast cells, both anatomically and functionally, and serve an important role in the regulation of mucosal homeostasis. This study examined the effect of sensory nerve ablation on the intestinal radiation response in an established rat model. Methods and Materials: Rats underwent sensory nerve ablation with capsaicin or sham ablation. Two weeks later, a localized segment of ileum was X-irradiated or sham irradiated. Structural, cellular, and molecular changes were examined 2 weeks (early injury) and 26 weeks (chronic injury) after irradiation. The mast cell dependence of the effect of sensory nerve ablation on intestinal radiation injury was assessed using c-kit mutant (Ws/Ws) mast cell-deficient rats. Results: Capsaicin treatment caused a baseline reduction in mucosal mast cell density, crypt cell proliferation, and expression of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide, two neuropeptides released by sensory neurons. Sensory nerve ablation strikingly exacerbated early intestinal radiation toxicity (loss of mucosal surface area, inflammation, intestinal wall thickening), but attenuated the development of chronic intestinal radiation fibrosis (collagen I accumulation and transforming growth factor {beta} immunoreactivity). In mast cell-deficient rats, capsaicin treatment exacerbated postradiation epithelial injury (loss of mucosal surface area), but none of the other aspects of radiation injury were affected by capsaicin treatment. Conclusions: Ablation of capsaicin-sensitive enteric neurons exacerbates early intestinal radiation toxicity, but attenuates development of chronic fibroproliferative changes. The effect of capsaicin treatment on the intestinal radiation response is partly mast cell dependent.

  18. Left-lateralized early neurophysiological response for Chinese characters in young primary school children.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaohua; Li, Su; Zhao, Jing; Lin, Si'en; Weng, Xuchu

    2011-04-01

    Adult readers consistently show an enhanced early event-related potential (ERP) response, N170, for visual words compared with other stimuli at left posterior electrodes. Developmental studies with words in alphabetic languages showed that this neurophysiological specialization for print develops rapidly from 6 to 10-years of age and becomes established around 10-11 years of age. Here we report for the first time the development of the word-related N170 in Chinese children learning to read Chinese, a logographic writing system radically different from alphabetic scripts in visual and linguistic features. We recorded ERP responses elicited by Chinese characters and line drawings of common objects in three groups of primary school children at 7, 9, and 11 years of age as well as college students. Results showed that the amplitude of N170 evoked by Chinese characters in the 7-year-old group was significantly larger than that in the 11-year-old group and the adult readers. Remarkably, all four age groups - even the youngest group - showed an increased and left-lateralized N170 response for Chinese characters, as compared with line drawings, suggesting that a relatively specialized mechanism for processing Chinese characters is already emergent by as early as 7 years of age. Our results, combined with studies of non-Chinese child readers suggest that the developmental pattern of word-related N170 is highly similar across different scripts, possibly reflecting increased visual processing expertise that children acquire through everyday reading. PMID:21310213

  19. The p66Shc Adaptor Protein Controls Oxidative Stress Response in Early Bovine Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Betts, Dean H.; Bain, Nathan T.; Madan, Pavneesh

    2014-01-01

    The in vitro production of mammalian embryos suffers from high frequencies of developmental failure due to excessive levels of permanent embryo arrest and apoptosis caused by oxidative stress. The p66Shc stress adaptor protein controls oxidative stress response of somatic cells by regulating intracellular ROS levels through multiple pathways, including mitochondrial ROS generation and the repression of antioxidant gene expression. We have previously demonstrated a strong relationship with elevated p66Shc levels, reduced antioxidant levels and greater intracellular ROS generation with the high incidence of permanent cell cycle arrest of 2–4 cell embryos cultured under high oxygen tensions or after oxidant treatment. The main objective of this study was to establish a functional role for p66Shc in regulating the oxidative stress response during early embryo development. Using RNA interference in bovine zygotes we show that p66Shc knockdown embryos exhibited increased MnSOD levels, reduced intracellular ROS and DNA damage that resulted in a greater propensity for development to the blastocyst stage. P66Shc knockdown embryos were stress resistant exhibiting significantly reduced intracellular ROS levels, DNA damage, permanent 2–4 cell embryo arrest and diminished apoptosis frequencies after oxidant treatment. The results of this study demonstrate that p66Shc controls the oxidative stress response in early mammalian embryos. Small molecule inhibition of p66Shc may be a viable clinical therapy to increase the developmental potential of in vitro produced mammalian embryos. PMID:24475205

  20. Proteomic Analysis of Early Response Lymph Node Proteins in Mice Treated with Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yuan; Gopee, Neera V.; Howard, Paul C.; Yu, Li-Rong

    2011-01-01

    Human exposure to nanoparticles is inevitable from natural and anthropogenic sources. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles are increasingly being used in pharmaceutical and cosmetic products. Previous studies revealed that TiO2 levels were significantly increased in tissues (e.g., lymph nodes) after mice were injected with nanosized TiO2. To identify early response lymph node proteins to TiO2 nanoparticles, groups of mice were intradermally injected with a low dose of DeGussa P25 TiO2 nanoparticles or vehicle alone. The proteomes of lymph nodes at 24 h were quantitatively analyzed using trypsin-catalyzed 16O/18O labeling in conjunction with two-dimensional liquid chromatography separation and tandem mass spectrometry (2DLC-MS/MS). A total of 33 proteins were significantly changed (over 1.3-fold, p<0.05) in the mice treated with TiO2 nanoparticles, which accounted for approximately 1% of the total proteins identified. The differentially expressed proteins mainly involve the immune response (e.g., inflammation), lipid and fatty acid metabolism, mRNA processing, and nucleosome assembly. Regulation of functionally distinct classes of proteins could be mediated by estrogen receptor (ESR1), PPARγ, and c-Myc signalings, etc. The differentially expressed proteins identified in this experiment could represent early response proteins to TiO2 nanoparticle treatment in mouse lymph nodes. PMID:21884834

  1. Transcriptome Analysis of Early Responsive Genes in Rice during Magnaporthe oryzae Infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiming; Kwon, Soon Jae; Wu, Jingni; Choi, Jaeyoung; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Tamogami, Shigeru; Rakwal, Randeep; Park, Sang-Ryeol; Kim, Beom-Gi; Jung, Ki-Hong; Kang, Kyu Young; Kim, Sang Gon; Kim, Sun Tae

    2014-12-01

    Rice blast disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most serious diseases of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L.) in most rice-growing regions of the world. In order to investigate early response genes in rice, we utilized the transcriptome analysis approach using a 300 K tilling microarray to rice leaves infected with compatible and incompatible M. oryzae strains. Prior to the microarray experiment, total RNA was validated by measuring the differential expression of rice defense-related marker genes (chitinase 2, barwin, PBZ1, and PR-10) by RT-PCR, and phytoalexins (sakuranetin and momilactone A) with HPLC. Microarray analysis revealed that 231 genes were up-regulated (>2 fold change, p < 0.05) in the incompatible interaction compared to the compatible one. Highly expressed genes were functionally characterized into metabolic processes and oxidation-reduction categories. The oxidative stress response was induced in both early and later infection stages. Biotic stress overview from MapMan analysis revealed that the phytohormone ethylene as well as signaling molecules jasmonic acid and salicylic acid is important for defense gene regulation. WRKY and Myb transcription factors were also involved in signal transduction processes. Additionally, receptor-like kinases were more likely associated with the defense response, and their expression patterns were validated by RT-PCR. Our results suggest that candidate genes, including receptor-like protein kinases, may play a key role in disease resistance against M. oryzae attack.

  2. Early vs. asymptotic growth responses of herbaceous plants to elevated CO[sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, S.C.; Jasienski, M.; Bazzaz, F.A. . Dept. of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology)

    1999-07-01

    Although many studies have examined the effects of elevated carbon dioxide on plant growth,'' the dynamics of growth involve at least two parameters, namely, an early rate of exponential size increase and an asymptotic size reached late in plant ontogeny. The common practice of quantifying CO[sub 2] responses as a single response ratio thus obscures two qualitatively distinct kinds of effects. The present experiment examines effects of elevated CO[sub 2] on both early and asymptotic growth parameters in eight C[sub 3] herbaceous plant species (Abutilon theophrasti, Cassia obtusifolia, Plantago major, Rumex crispus, Taraxacum officinale, Dactylis glomerata, Lolium multiflorum, and Panicum dichotomoflorum). Plants were grown for 118--172 d in a factorial design of CO[sub 2] (350 and 700 [micro]L/L) and plant density (individually grown vs. high-density monocultures) under edaphic conditions approximating those of coastal areas in Massachusetts. For Abutilon theophrasti, intraspecific patterns of plant response were also assessed using eight genotypes randomly sampled from a natural population and propagated as inbred lines.

  3. The flare kernel in the impulsive phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejager, C.

    1986-01-01

    The impulsive phase of a flare is characterized by impulsive bursts of X-ray and microwave radiation, related to impulsive footpoint heating up to 50 or 60 MK, by upward gas velocities (150 to 400 km/sec) and by a gradual increase of the flare's thermal energy content. These phenomena, as well as non-thermal effects, are all related to the impulsive energy injection into the flare. The available observations are also quantitatively consistent with a model in which energy is injected into the flare by beams of energetic electrons, causing ablation of chromospheric gas, followed by convective rise of gas. Thus, a hole is burned into the chromosphere; at the end of impulsive phase of an average flare the lower part of that hole is situated about 1800 km above the photosphere. H alpha and other optical and UV line emission is radiated by a thin layer (approx. 20 km) at the bottom of the flare kernel. The upward rising and outward streaming gas cools down by conduction in about 45 s. The non-thermal effects in the initial phase are due to curtailing of the energy distribution function by escape of energetic electrons. The single flux tube model of a flare does not fit with these observations; instead we propose the spaghetti-bundle model. Microwave and gamma-ray observations suggest the occurrence of dense flare knots of approx. 800 km diameter, and of high temperature. Future observations should concentrate on locating the microwave/gamma-ray sources, and on determining the kernel's fine structure and the related multi-loop structure of the flaring area.

  4. Bayesian model comparison of solar flare spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, J.; Holman, G.

    2012-12-01

    The detailed understanding of solar flares requires an understanding of the physics of accelerated electrons, since electrons carry a large fraction of the total energy released in a flare. Hard X-ray energy flux spectral observations of solar flares can be fit with different parameterized models of the interaction of the flare-accelerated electrons with the solar plasma. Each model describes different possible physical effects that may occur in solar flares. Bayesian model comparison provides a technique for assessing which model best describes the data. The advantage of this technique over others is that it can fully account for the different number and type of parameters in each model. We demonstrate this using Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) spectral data from the GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) X4.8 flare of 23-July-2002. We suggest that the observed spectrum can be reproduced using two different parameterized models of the flare electron content. The first model assumes that the flare-accelerated electron spectrum consisting of a single power law with a fixed low energy cutoff assumed to be below the range of fitted X-ray energies, interacting with a non-uniformly ionized target. The second model assumes that the flare-accelerated electron spectrum has a broken power law and a low energy cutoff, which interacts with a fully ionized target plasma. The low energy cutoff in this model is a parameter used in fitting the data. We will introduce and use Bayesian model comparison techniques to decide which model best explains the observed data. This work is funded by the NASA Solar and Heliospheric Physics program.

  5. Early establishment of trees at the alpine treeline: idiosyncratic species responses to temperature-moisture interactions

    PubMed Central

    Loranger, Hannah; Zotz, Gerhard; Bader, Maaike Y.

    2016-01-01

    On a global scale, temperature is the main determinant of arctic and alpine treeline position. However on a local scale, treeline form and position vary considerably due to other climatic factors, tree species ecology and life-stage-dependent responses. For treelines to advance poleward or uphill, the first steps are germination and seedling establishment. These earliest life stages may be major bottlenecks for treeline tree populations and will depend differently on climatic conditions than adult trees. We investigated the effect of soil temperature and moisture on germination and early seedling survival in a field experiment in the French Alps near the local treeline (2100 m a.s.l.) using passive temperature manipulations and two watering regimes. Five European treeline tree species were studied: Larix decidua, Picea abies, Pinus cembra, Pinus uncinata and Sorbus aucuparia. In addition, we monitored the germination response of three of these species to low temperatures under controlled conditions in growth chambers. The early establishment of these trees at the alpine treeline was limited either by temperature or by moisture, the sensitivity to one factor often depending on the intensity of the other. The results showed that the relative importance of the two factors and the direction of the effects are highly species-specific, while both factors tend to have consistent effects on both germination and early seedling survival within each species. We show that temperature and water availability are both important contributors to establishment patterns of treeline trees and hence to species-specific forms and positions of alpine treelines. The observed idiosyncratic species responses highlight the need for studies including several species and life-stages to create predictive power concerning future treeline dynamics. PMID:27402618

  6. Circulating tumor DNA as an early marker of therapeutic response in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tie, J.; Kinde, I.; Wang, Y.; Wong, H. L.; Roebert, J.; Christie, M.; Tacey, M.; Wong, R.; Singh, M.; Karapetis, C. S.; Desai, J.; Tran, B.; Strausberg, R. L.; Diaz, L. A.; Papadopoulos, N.; Kinzler, K. W.; Vogelstein, B.; Gibbs, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Early indicators of treatment response in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) could conceivably be used to optimize treatment. We explored early changes in circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) levels as a marker of therapeutic efficacy. Patients and methods This prospective study involved 53 mCRC patients receiving standard first-line chemotherapy. Both ctDNA and CEA were assessed in plasma collected before treatment, 3 days after treatment and before cycle 2. Computed tomography (CT) scans were carried out at baseline and 8–10 weeks and were centrally assessed using RECIST v1.1 criteria. Tumors were sequenced using a panel of 15 genes frequently mutated in mCRC to identify candidate mutations for ctDNA analysis. For each patient, one tumor mutation was selected to assess the presence and the level of ctDNA in plasma samples using a digital genomic assay termed Safe-SeqS. Results Candidate mutations for ctDNA analysis were identified in 52 (98.1%) of the tumors. These patient-specific candidate tissue mutations were detectable in the cell-free DNA from the plasma of 48 of these 52 patients (concordance 92.3%). Significant reductions in ctDNA (median 5.7-fold; P < 0.001) levels were observed before cycle 2, which correlated with CT responses at 8–10 weeks (odds ratio = 5.25 with a 10-fold ctDNA reduction; P = 0.016). Major reductions (≥10-fold) versus lesser reductions in ctDNA precycle 2 were associated with a trend for increased progression-free survival (median 14.7 versus 8.1 months; HR = 1.87; P = 0.266). Conclusions ctDNA is detectable in a high proportion of treatment naïve mCRC patients. Early changes in ctDNA during first-line chemotherapy predict the later radiologic response. PMID:25851626

  7. Early establishment of trees at the alpine treeline: idiosyncratic species responses to temperature-moisture interactions.

    PubMed

    Loranger, Hannah; Zotz, Gerhard; Bader, Maaike Y

    2016-01-01

    On a global scale, temperature is the main determinant of arctic and alpine treeline position. However on a local scale, treeline form and position vary considerably due to other climatic factors, tree species ecology and life-stage-dependent responses. For treelines to advance poleward or uphill, the first steps are germination and seedling establishment. These earliest life stages may be major bottlenecks for treeline tree populations and will depend differently on climatic conditions than adult trees. We investigated the effect of soil temperature and moisture on germination and early seedling survival in a field experiment in the French Alps near the local treeline (2100 m a.s.l.) using passive temperature manipulations and two watering regimes. Five European treeline tree species were studied: Larix decidua, Picea abies, Pinus cembra, Pinus uncinata and Sorbus aucuparia In addition, we monitored the germination response of three of these species to low temperatures under controlled conditions in growth chambers. The early establishment of these trees at the alpine treeline was limited either by temperature or by moisture, the sensitivity to one factor often depending on the intensity of the other. The results showed that the relative importance of the two factors and the direction of the effects are highly species-specific, while both factors tend to have consistent effects on both germination and early seedling survival within each species. We show that temperature and water availability are both important contributors to establishment patterns of treeline trees and hence to species-specific forms and positions of alpine treelines. The observed idiosyncratic species responses highlight the need for studies including several species and life-stages to create predictive power concerning future treeline dynamics. PMID:27402618

  8. Early life stress dampens stress responsiveness in adolescence: Evaluation of neuroendocrine reactivity and coping behavior.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Young-Ming; Tsai, Tsung-Chih; Lin, Yu-Ting; Chen, Chien-Chung; Huang, Chiung-Chun; Hsu, Kuei-Sen

    2016-05-01

    Stressful experiences during early life (ELS) can affect brain development, thereby exerting a profound and long-lasting influence on mental development and psychological health. The stress inoculation hypothesis presupposes that individuals who have early experienced an attenuated form of stressors may gain immunity to its more virulent forms later in life. Increasing evidence demonstrates that ELS may promote the development of subsequent stress resistance, but the mechanisms underlying such adaptive changes are not fully understood. The present study evaluated the impact of fragmented dam-pup interactions by limiting the bedding and nesting material in the cage during postnatal days 2-9, a naturalistic animal model of chronic ELS, on the physiological and behavioral responses to different stressors in adolescent mice and characterized the possible underlying mechanisms. We found that ELS mice showed less social interaction deficits after chronic social defeat stress and acute restraint-tailshock stress-induced impaired long-term potentiation (LTP) and enhanced long-term depression (LTD) in hippocampal CA1 region compared with control mice. The effects of ELS on LTP and LTD were rescued by adrenalectomy. While ELS did not cause alterations in basal emotional behaviors, it significantly enhanced stress coping behaviors in both the tail suspension and the forced swimming tests. ELS mice exhibited a significant decrease in corticosterone response and trafficking of glucocorticoid receptors to the nucleus in response to acute restraint stress. Altogether, our data support the hypothesis that stress inoculation training, via early exposure to manageable stress, may enhance resistance to other unrelated extreme stressors in adolescence. PMID:26881834

  9. Transcriptomic Responses During Early Development Following Arsenic Exposure in Western Clawed Frogs, Silurana tropicalis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Koch, Iris; Gibson, Laura A; Loughery, Jennifer R; Martyniuk, Christopher J; Button, Mark; Caumette, Guilhem; Reimer, Kenneth J; Cullen, William R; Langlois, Valerie S

    2015-12-01

    Arsenic compounds are widespread environmental contaminants and exposure elicits serious health issues, including early developmental anomalies. Depending on the oxidation state, the intermediates of arsenic metabolism interfere with a range of subcellular events, but the fundamental molecular events that lead to speciation-dependent arsenic toxicity are not fully elucidated. This study therefore assesses the impact of arsenic exposure on early development by measuring speciation and gene expression profiles in the developing Western clawed frog (Silurana tropicalis) larvae following the environmental relevant 0.5 and 1 ppm arsenate exposure. Using HPLC-ICP-MS, arsenate, dimethylarsenic acid, arsenobetaine, arsenocholine, and tetramethylarsonium ion were detected. Microarray and pathway analyses were utilized to characterize the comprehensive transcriptomic responses to arsenic exposure. Clustering analysis of expression data showed distinct gene expression patterns in arsenate treated groups when compared with the control. Pathway enrichment revealed common biological themes enriched in both treatments, including cell signal transduction, cell survival, and developmental pathways. Moreover, the 0.5 ppm exposure led to the enrichment of pathways and biological processes involved in arsenic intake or efflux, as well as histone remodeling. These compensatory responses are hypothesized to be responsible for maintaining an in-body arsenic level comparable to control animals. With no appreciable changes observed in malformation and mortality between control and exposed larvae, this is the first study to suggest that the underlying transcriptomic regulations related to signal transduction, cell survival, developmental pathways, and histone remodeling may contribute to maintaining ongoing development while coping with the potential arsenic toxicity in S. tropicalis during early development. PMID:26427749

  10. Th1 and Th17 hypercytokinemia as early host response signature in severe pandemic influenza

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Human host immune response following infection with the new variant of A/H1N1 pandemic influenza virus (nvH1N1) is poorly understood. We utilize here systemic cytokine and antibody levels in evaluating differences in early immune response in both mild and severe patients infected with nvH1N1. Methods We profiled 29 cytokines and chemokines and evaluated the haemagglutination inhibition activity as quantitative and qualitative measurements of host immune responses in serum obtained during the first five days after symptoms onset, in two cohorts of nvH1N1 infected patients. Severe patients required hospitalization (n = 20), due to respiratory insufficiency (10 of them were admitted to the intensive care unit), while mild patients had exclusively flu-like symptoms (n = 15). A group of healthy donors was included as control (n = 15). Differences in levels of mediators between groups were assessed by using the non parametric U-Mann Whitney test. Association between variables was determined by calculating the Spearman correlation coefficient. Viral load was performed in serum by using real-time PCR targeting the neuraminidase gene. Results Increased levels of innate-immunity mediators (IP-10, MCP-1, MIP-1β), and the absence of anti-nvH1N1 antibodies, characterized the early response to nvH1N1 infection in both hospitalized and mild patients. High systemic levels of type-II interferon (IFN-γ) and also of a group of mediators involved in the development of T-helper 17 (IL-8, IL-9, IL-17, IL-6) and T-helper 1 (TNF-α, IL-15, IL-12p70) responses were exclusively found in hospitalized patients. IL-15, IL-12p70, IL-6 constituted a hallmark of critical illness in our study. A significant inverse association was found between IL-6, IL-8 and PaO2 in critical patients. Conclusions While infection with the nvH1N1 induces a typical innate response in both mild and severe patients, severe disease with respiratory involvement is characterized by early secretion of Th17

  11. Serum Regulation of In Vitro Lymphocyte Responses in Early Experimental Syphilis

    PubMed Central

    Baker-Zander, Sharon A.; Sell, Stewart; Lukehart, Sheila A.

    1982-01-01

    Sera from rabbits with early experimental syphilis were tested for their effect on in vitro lymphocyte transformation responses to related specific antigens (sonicated T. pallidum), unrelated specific antigens (sheep erythrocytes), and the T cell mitogen, concanavalin A. Results were compared with responses in preinfection sera and in sera from sham-infected rabbits. Titration experiments in which normal serum was used indicated that optimal lymphocyte responsiveness is obtained with a final serum concentration of 1%. Under these conditions, no differences in concanavalin A stimulation were observed in cultures with syphilitic sera. Responses to sonicated T. pallidum were inhibited, but only by 17 to 25% when compared with the response in preinfection sera. In cultures containing 10% serum, inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation to sonicated T. pallidum antigens was evident with sera from all syphilitic animals from day 10 (55% inhibition) through day 31 (80% inhibition) of infection. Responses to concanavalin A and sheep erythrocytes were significantly inhibited by day 10 sera; only 20% of the sera tested demonstrated substantial nonspecific inhibitory capacity. No differences were evident among sera from any of the sham-infected animals or among the preinfection sera from either group. Pooled serum with high inhibitory activity was fractionated by ammonium sulfate precipitation, DEAE ion exchange chromatography, and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration. Two separate inhibitors were identified: (i) a low-molecular-weight, ammonium sulfate-soluble, nonspecific inhibitory fraction containing albumin and alpha-globulins with the capacity to inhibit both antigen and mitogen responses and (ii) a high-molecular-weight, ammonium sulfate-precipitable, inhibitory fraction containing alpha-globulin and FTA-ABS-reactive immunoglobulin M which affected only the antigen-specific response to sonicated T. pallidum. Immunodiffusion failed to detect immunoglobulin or T. pallidum antigens

  12. New flare diagnostics from loop modeling of a stellar flare observedwith XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reale, F.

    XMM-Newton data of an X-ray flare observed on Proxima Centauri provide detailed and challenging constraints for flare modeling. The comparison of the data with the results of time-dependent hydrodynamic loop modeling of this flare allows us to constrain not only the loop morphology, but also the details of the heating function. The results show that even a complex flare event like this can be described with a relatively few - though constrained - components: two loop systems, i.e. a single loop and an arcade, and two heat components, an intense pulse probably located at the loop footpoints followed by a low gradual decay distributed in the coronal part of the loop. The similarity to at least one solar event (the Bastille Day flare in 2000) indicate that this pattern may be common to solar and stellar flares.

  13. Flare diagnostics from loop modeling of a stellar flare observed with XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reale, Fabio

    2006-01-01

    XMM-Newton data of an X-ray flare observed on Proxima Centauri provide detailed and challenging constraints for flare modeling. The comparison of the data with the results of time-dependent hydrodynamic loop modeling of this flare allows us to constrain not only the loop morphology, but also the details of the heating function. The results show that even a complex flare event like this can be described with a relatively few though constrained components: two loop systems, i.e., a single loop and an arcade, and two heat components, an intense pulse probably located at the loop footpoints followed by a low gradual decay distributed in the coronal part of the loop. The similarity to at least one solar event (the Bastille Day flare in 2000) indicates that this pattern may be common to solar and stellar flares.

  14. He-3-rich flares - A possible explanation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisk, L. A.

    1978-01-01

    A plasma mechanism is proposed to explain the dramatic enhancements in He-3 observed in He-3-rich flares. It is shown that a common current instability in the corona may heat ambient He-3(2+) over any other ion and thus may preferentially inject He-3 into the flare acceleration process. This mechanism operates when the abundance of He-4 and heavier elements is larger than normal in the coronal plasma. It may also preferentially heat and thus inject certain ions of iron. The mechanism thus provides a possible explanation for the observed correlation between He-3 and heavy enhancements in He-3-rich flares.

  15. Neutrons and Gamma Rays from Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    The theory of neutron and gamma-ray production in flares is reviewed and comparisons of the calculations with data are made. The principal conclusions pertain to the accelerated proton and electron numbers and spectra in flares and to the interaction site of these particles in the solar atmosphere. For the June 21, 1980 flare, from which high-energy neutrons and high-energy ( MeV) photons were seen, the electron-to-proton ratio is energy dependent and much smaller than unity at energies greater than 1 MeV. The interaction site of these particles appears to be the solar chromosphere.

  16. Repeated allergen exposure reduce early phase airway response and leukotriene release despite upregulation of 5-lipoxygenase pathways

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Allergen induced early phase airway response and airway plasma exudation are predominantly mediated by inflammatory mast cell mediators including histamine, cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs) and thromboxane A2 (TXA2). The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether repeated allergen exposure affects early phase airway response to allergen challenge. Methods A trimellitic anhydride (TMA) sensitized guinea pig model was used to investigate the effects of low dose repeated allergen exposure on cholinergic airway responsiveness, early phase airway response and plasma exudation, as well as local airway production of mast cell derived cysteinyl leukotrienes and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) after allergen challenge. Results Repeated low dose allergen exposure increased cholinergic airway responsiveness. In contrast, early phase airway response and plasma exudation in response to a high-dose allergen challenge were strongly attenuated after repeated low dose allergen exposure. Inhibition of the airway response was unspecific to exposed allergen and independent of histamine receptor blocking. Furthermore, a significant reduction of cysteinyl leukotrienes and TXB2 was found in the airways of animals repeatedly exposed to a low dose allergen. However, in vitro stimulation of airway tissue from animals repeatedly exposed to a low dose allergen with arachidonic acid and calcium ionophore (A23187) induced production of cysteinyl leukotrienes and TXB2, suggesting enhanced activity of 5-lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase pathways. Conclusions The inhibition of the early phase airway response, cysteinyl leukotriene and TXB2 production after repeated allergen exposure may result from unresponsive effector cells. PMID:22439792

  17. Planetary Protection: X-ray Super-Flares Aid Formation of "Solar Systems"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-05-01

    New results from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory imply that X-ray super-flares torched the young Solar System. Such flares likely affected the planet-forming disk around the early Sun, and may have enhanced the survival chances of Earth. By focusing on the Orion Nebula almost continuously for 13 days, a team of scientists used Chandra to obtain the deepest X-ray observation ever taken of this or any star cluster. The Orion Nebula is the nearest rich stellar nursery, located just 1,500 light years away. These data provide an unparalleled view of 1400 young stars, 30 of which are prototypes of the early Sun. The scientists discovered that these young suns erupt in enormous flares that dwarf - in energy, size, and frequency -- anything seen from the Sun today. Illustration of Large Flares Illustration of Large Flares "We don't have a time machine to see how the young Sun behaved, but the next best thing is to observe Sun-like stars in Orion," said Scott Wolk of Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass. "We are getting a unique look at stars between one and 10 million years old - a time when planets form." A key result is that the more violent stars produce flares that are a hundred times as energetic as the more docile ones. This difference may specifically affect the fate of planets that are relatively small and rocky, like the Earth. "Big X-ray flares could lead to planetary systems like ours where Earth is a safe distance from the Sun," said Eric Feigelson of Penn State University in University Park, and principal investigator for the international Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project. "Stars with smaller flares, on the other hand, might end up with Earth-like planets plummeting into the star." Animation of X-ray Flares from a Young Sun Animation of X-ray Flares from a "Young Sun" According to recent theoretical work, X-ray flares can create turbulence when they strike planet-forming disks, and this affects the position of rocky planets as they

  18. Vestibular activation differentially modulates human early visual cortex and V5/MT excitability and response entropy.

    PubMed

    Seemungal, Barry M; Guzman-Lopez, Jessica; Arshad, Qadeer; Schultz, Simon R; Walsh, Vincent; Yousif, Nada

    2013-01-01

    Head movement imposes the additional burdens on the visual system of maintaining visual acuity and determining the origin of retinal image motion (i.e., self-motion vs. object-motion). Although maintaining visual acuity during self-motion is effected by minimizing retinal slip via the brainstem vestibular-ocular reflex, higher order visuovestibular mechanisms also contribute. Disambiguating self-motion versus object-motion also invokes higher order mechanisms, and a cortical visuovestibular reciprocal antagonism is propounded. Hence, one prediction is of a vestibular modulation of visual cortical excitability and indirect measures have variously suggested none, focal or global effects of activation or suppression in human visual cortex. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced phosphenes to probe cortical excitability, we observed decreased V5/MT excitability versus increased early visual cortex (EVC) excitability, during vestibular activation. In order to exclude nonspecific effects (e.g., arousal) on cortical excitability, response specificity was assessed using information theory, specifically response entropy. Vestibular activation significantly modulated phosphene response entropy for V5/MT but not EVC, implying a specific vestibular effect on V5/MT responses. This is the first demonstration that vestibular activation modulates human visual cortex excitability. Furthermore, using information theory, not previously used in phosphene response analysis, we could distinguish between a specific vestibular modulation of V5/MT excitability from a nonspecific effect at EVC.

  19. ALD1 Regulates Basal Immune Components and Early Inducible Defense Responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Cecchini, Nicolás M; Jung, Ho Won; Engle, Nancy L; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Greenberg, Jean T

    2015-04-01

    Robust immunity requires basal defense machinery to mediate timely responses and feedback cycles to amplify defenses against potentially spreading infections. AGD2-LIKE DEFENSE RESPONSE PROTEIN 1 (ALD1) is needed for the accumulation of the plant defense signal salicylic acid (SA) during the first hours after infection with the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae and is also upregulated by infection and SA. ALD1 is an aminotransferase with multiple substrates and products in vitro. Pipecolic acid (Pip) is an ALD1-dependent bioactive product induced by P. syringae. Here, we addressed roles of ALD1 in mediating defense amplification as well as the levels and responses of basal defense machinery. ALD1 needs immune components PAD4 and ICS1 (an SA synthesis enzyme) to confer disease resistance, possibly through a transcriptional amplification loop between them. Furthermore, ALD1 affects basal defense by controlling microbial-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) receptor levels and responsiveness. Vascular exudates from uninfected ALD1-overexpressing plants confer local immunity to the wild type and ald1 mutants yet are not enriched for Pip. We infer that, in addition to affecting Pip accumulation, ALD1 produces non-Pip metabolites that play roles in immunity. Thus, distinct metabolite signals controlled by the same enzyme affect basal and early defenses versus later defense responses, respectively.

  20. Transcriptome Analysis of Silkworm, Bombyx mori, during Early Response to Beauveria bassiana Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Chengxiang; Qin, Guangxing; Liu, Ting; Geng, Tao; Gao, Kun; Pan, Zhonghua; Qian, Heying; Guo, Xijie

    2014-01-01

    Host–pathogen interactions are complex processes and it is a central challenge to reveal these interactions. Fungal infection of silkworm, Bombyx mori, may induce a variety of responsive reaction. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of silkworm immune response against the fungal infection. To obtain an overview of the interaction between silkworm and an entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana, Digital Gene Expression profiling, a tag based high-throughput transcriptome sequencing method, was employed to screen and identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs, FDR≤0.001, ∣log2ratio∣≥1) of silkworm larvae during early response against B. bassiana infection. Total 1430 DEGs including 960 up-regulated and 470 down-regulated ones were identified, of which 627 DEGs can be classified into GO categories by Gene Ontology (GO) analysis. KEGG pathways analysis of these DEGs suggested that many biological processes, such as defense and response, signal transduction, phagocytosis, regulation of gene expression, RNA splicing, biosynthesis and metabolism, protein transport etc. were involved in the interaction between the silkworm and B. bassiana. A number of differentially expressed fungal genes were also identified by mapping the sequencing tags to B. bassiana genome. These results provided new insights to the molecular mechanism of silkworm immune response to B. bassiana infection. PMID:24618587

  1. The landing flare: An analysis and flight-test investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seckel, E.

    1975-01-01

    Results are given of an extensive investigation of conventional landing flares in general aviation type airplanes. A wide range of parameters influencing flare behavior are simulated in experimental landings in a variable-stability Navion. The most important feature of the flare is found to be the airplane's deceleration in the flare. Various effects on this are correlated in terms of the average flare load factor. Piloting technique is extensively discussed. Design criteria are presented.

  2. Positron annihilation in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crannell, C. J.; Ramaty, R.; Werntz, C.

    1975-01-01

    The gamma ray line at 0.51 MeV originates from the annihilation of positrons. When a fraction of the positrons annihilate from bound states of positronium, the 0.51-MeV line is accompanied by a continuum of 3-gamma annihilation radiation at energies up to 0.51 MeV. Accurate calculations of the rates of free annihilation and positronium formation in a solar flare plasma are presented and positronium formation by charge exchange is discussed. The observability of the 3-gamma annihilation is increased by the inherent delay in the production and slowing down time of the positrons. It was concluded that such radiation could be detected at times late in solar gamma ray events when the continuum and prompt line emissions have essentially disappeared.

  3. Development of Daily Solar Maximum Flare Flux Forecast Models for Strong Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seulki; Chu, Hyoungseok

    2015-08-01

    We have developed a set of daily solar maximum flare flux forecast models for strong flares using Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) methods. We consider input parameters as solar activity data from January 1996 to December 2013 such as sunspot area, X-ray maximum flare flux and weighted total flux of the previous day, and mean flare rates of McIntosh sunspot group (Zpc) and Mount Wilson magnetic classification. For a training data set, we use the same number of 61 events for each C-, M-, and X-class from Jan. 1996 to Dec. 2004, while other previous models use all flares. For a testing data set, we use all flares from Jan. 2005 to Nov. 2013. The statistical parameters from contingency tables show that the ANN models are better for maximum flare flux forecasting than the MLR models. A comparison between our maximum flare flux models and the previous ones based on Heidke Skill Score (HSS) shows that our all models for X-class flare are much better than the other models. According to the Hitting Fraction (HF), which is defined as a fraction of events satisfying that the absolute differences of predicted and observed flare flux in logarithm scale are less than equal to 0.5, our models successfully forecast the maximum flare flux of about two-third events for strong flares. Since all input parameters for our models are easily available, the models can be operated steadily and automatically on daily basis for space weather service.

  4. Solar flare count periodicities in different X-ray flare classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng-Xin; Xu, Jing-Chen

    2016-04-01

    Using the Morlet wavelet transform and the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), we investigate the periodic behaviours of C, M and X-class flare counts, respectively, recorded by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) from 1983 May to 2014 December, which cover the two complete solar cycles (SCs) 22 and 23 as well as the part of declining phase of SC 21 and rise and maximum phases of SC 24. Analyses show that the periodic behaviours of various class flare counts are different. (1) Not all periods of various class flare counts appear dominant during the cycle maxima. For C-class flares, during SC 23, periods appear dominant during the maximum phase, however, compared to those during SC 23, there are more periods during the declining phase of SC 22; for M-class flares, during SCs 22 and 23, periods appear dominant during the cycle maxima; for X-class flares, during SC 22, almost all periods appear during the maximum phase; however, during SC 23, there are more periods during the declining phase compared to those during SC 22. (2) For C-class flares, the appearance of periods do not follow the amplitude of C-class flare cycles; while, for M and X-class flares, the appearance of periods follows the amplitude of the investigated corresponding class flare cycles. (3) From the overall trends, the 10 yr and longer time-scale trends of the monthly numbers of M and X-class flares, we can infer that the maximum values of the monthly M and X-class flare numbers would increase during SC 25.

  5. ANTI-PHASE SIGNATURE OF FLARE GENERATED TRANSVERSE LOOP OSCILLATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. S.; Verwichte, E.; Foullon, C.

    2013-09-10

    Transverse loop oscillations observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft are studied after an impulsive solar flare eruption on 2012 May 8. We have found that a transversely oscillating coronal loop seen in the 171 A bandpass oscillates in anti-phase with respect to adjacent larger loops seen in the 193 A and 211 A bandpasses. These unusual oscillations are analyzed to investigate the excitation mechanism responsible for their initial inwardly directed anti-phase behavior. The transverse oscillations are analyzed by constructing space-time diagrams from cuts made parallel to the projected loop displacements. The displacement time oscillation profiles are background subtracted and fitted with a damped cosine curve that includes a linear change in the period with time. The local magnetic topology of the active region is modeled using potential field source surface extrapolation. It reveals that the loops are anchored in different topological regions with foot point locations identified on either side of the EUV flare peak emission source. In this context, the oscillation characteristics indicate that the excitation mechanism is closely linked to the local magnetic field topology and the reconnection generated wave dynamics in the active region rather than following an external flare blast wave. We discuss how observations such as these may serve to identify reconnection processes in similar quadrupolar active regions.

  6. Early Growth Response Gene 1 ("EGR-1") Is Required for New and Reactivated Fear Memories in the Lateral Amygdala

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maddox, Stephanie A.; Monsey, Melissa S.; Schafe, Glenn E.

    2011-01-01

    The immediate-early gene early growth response gene-1 (EGR-1, zif-268) has been extensively studied in synaptic plasticity and memory formation in a variety of memory systems. However, a convincing role for EGR-1 in amygdala-dependent memory consolidation processes has yet to emerge. In the present study, we have examined the role of EGR-1 in the…

  7. River salinity variations in response to discharge: Examples from Western United States during early 1900s

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, D.H.; Dettinger, M.D.; Cayan, D.R.; DiLeo, J.; Isaacs, C.; Riddle, L.; Smith, R.

    1996-01-01

    Major controls on river salinity (total dissolved solids) in the western United States are climate, geology, and human activity.  Climate, in general, influences soil-river salinity via salt-balance variations.  When climate becomes wetter, river discharge increases and soil-river salinity descreases; when climate becomes drier river discharge decreases and soil-river salinity increases.  This study characterizes the river salinity response to discharge using statistical-dynamical methods.  An exploratory analysis of river salinity, using early 1900s water quality surveys in the western United States, shows much river salinity variability is in response to storm and annual discharge.  Presumably this is because river discharge is largely supported by surface flow.

  8. Early detection of disease program: Evaluation of the cellular immune response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, B. S.; Knight, V.; Martin, R. R.; Kasel, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    The early cellular responses of specific components of the leukocyte and epithelial cell populations to foreign challenges of both an infectious and noninfectious character were evaluated. Procedures for screening potential flight crews were developed, documented, and tested on a control population. Methods for preparing suitable populations of lymphocytes, polymorphonuclear leukocytes, macrophages, and epithelial cells were first established and evaluated. Epithelial cells from viral infected individuals were screened with a number of anti-viral antisera. This procedure showed the earliest indication of disease as well as providing a specific diagnosis to the physicians. Both macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes were studied from normal individuals, smokers, and patients with viral infections. Newer techniques enabling better definition of lymphocyte subpopulations were then developed, namely the E and EAC rosette procedures for recognition of T (thymus-derived) and B (bone-marrow-derived) lymphocyte subpopulations. Lymphocyte and lymphocyte subpopulation response to multiple mitogens have been evaluated.

  9. Early educational foundations for the development of civic responsibility: an African experience.

    PubMed

    Serpell, Robert; Mumba, Paul; Chansa-Kabali, Tamara

    2011-01-01

    An innovative curriculum designed to foster the development of social responsibility among pre-adolescent children was introduced at a rural Zambian primary school. The curriculum invoked Child-to-Child principles focusing on health education, advancing a synthesis of Western psychological theories and African cultural traditions. The teacher sought to democratize the educational process through cooperative learning in mixed-gender, mixed-social-class, and mixed-ability study groups. Learners engaged in community service activities and contributed to the nurturant care of younger children. Young adults interviewed seventeen years after completing the program recalled their experience and reflected on how it had promoted their personal agency, cooperative disposition, and civic responsibility in early adulthood.

  10. Comparisons of early transcriptome responses to low-oxygen environments in three dicotyledonous plant species

    PubMed Central

    Christianson, Jed A; Llewellyn, Danny J; Dennis, Elizabeth S

    2010-01-01

    Waterlogging is a serious impediment to crop productivity worldwide which acts to reduce oxygen levels in the rhizosphere due to the low diffusion rate of molecular oxygen in water. Plants respond to low oxygen through rapid and specific changes at both the transcriptional and translational levels. Transcriptional changes to low-oxygen (hypoxia) stress have been studied in a number of plant species using whole genome microarrays. Using transcriptome data from root tissue from early time points (4–5 h) from cotton (Gossypium hirsutum), Arabidopsis and gray poplar (Populus x canescens), we have identified a core set of orthologous genes that responded to hypoxia in similar ways between species, and others that showed species specific responses. Responses to hypoxia were most similar between Arabidopsis and cotton, while the waterlogging tolerant poplar species exhibited some significant differences. PMID:20724824

  11. Development of Daily Maximum Flare-Flux Forecast Models for Strong Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seulki; Lee, Jin-Yi; Moon, Yong-Jae; Chu, Hyoungseok; Park, Jongyeob

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a set of daily maximum flare-flux forecast models for strong flares (M- and X-class) using multiple linear regression (MLR) and artificial neural network (ANN) methods. Our input parameters are solar-activity data from January 1996 to December 2013 such as sunspot area, X-ray maximum, and weighted total flare flux of the previous day, as well as mean flare rates of McIntosh sunspot group (Zpc) and Mount Wilson magnetic classifications. For a training dataset, we used 61 events each of C-, M-, and X-class from January 1996 to December 2004. For a testing dataset, we used all events from January 2005 to November 2013. A comparison between our maximum flare-flux models and NOAA model based on true skill statistics (TSS) shows that the MLR model for X-class and the average of all flares (M{+}X-class) are much better than the NOAA model. According to the hitting fraction (HF), which is defined as a fraction of events satisfying the condition that the absolute differences of predicted and observed flare flux on a logarithm scale are smaller than or equal to 0.5, our models successfully forecast the maximum flare flux of about two-thirds of the events for strong flares. Since all input parameters for our models are easily available, the models can be operated steadily and automatically on a daily basis for space-weather services.

  12. Non-invasive in vivo imaging of early metabolic tumor response to therapies targeting choline metabolism.

    PubMed

    Mignion, Lionel; Danhier, Pierre; Magat, Julie; Porporato, Paolo E; Masquelier, Julien; Gregoire, Vincent; Muccioli, Giulio G; Sonveaux, Pierre; Gallez, Bernard; Jordan, Bénédicte F

    2016-04-15

    The cholinic phenotype, characterized by elevated phosphocholine and a high production of total-choline (tCho)-containing metabolites, is a metabolic hallmark of cancer. It can be exploited for targeted therapy. Non-invasive imaging biomarkers are required to evaluate an individual's response to targeted anticancer agents that usually do not rapidly cause tumor shrinkage. Because metabolic changes can manifest at earlier stages of therapy than changes in tumor size, the aim of the current study was to evaluate (1)H-MRS and diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) as markers of tumor response to the modulation of the choline pathway in mammary tumor xenografts. Inhibition of choline kinase activity was achieved with the direct pharmacological inhibitor H-89, indirect inhibitor sorafenib and down-regulation of choline-kinase α (ChKA) expression using specific short-hairpin RNA (shRNA). While all three strategies significantly decreased tCho tumor content in vivo, only sorafenib and anti-ChKA shRNA significantly repressed tumor growth. The increase of apparent-diffusion-coefficient of water (ADCw) measured by DW-MRI, was predictive of the induced necrosis and inhibition of the tumor growth in sorafenib treated mice, while the absence of change in ADC values in H89 treated mice predicted the absence of effect in terms of tumor necrosis and tumor growth. In conclusion, (1)H-choline spectroscopy can be useful as a pharmacodynamic biomarker for choline targeted agents, while DW-MRI can be used as an early marker of effective tumor response to choline targeted therapies. DW-MRI combined to choline spectroscopy may provide a useful non-invasive marker for the early clinical assessment of tumor response to therapies targeting choline signaling. PMID:26595604

  13. Experimental acidification of Little Rock Lake (Wisconsin): Fish research approach and early responses

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, W.A.; McCormick, J.H.; Simonson, T.D.; Jensen, K.M.; Eaton, J.G.

    1989-01-01

    One goal of research at Little Rock Lake, Wisconsin is to enhance understanding of lake-acidification effects on warm- and cool-water fishery resources. The Little Rock Lake fish assemblage is characteristic of many acid-sensitive waters in North America and is dominated by yellow perch (Percidae) and sunfishes (Centrarchidae). Analyses of reproduction, early survival, and growth rates in the field were designed around the differing reproductive modes of these taxa. Complementary laboratory research on early-life stages was conducted to assist in isolating direct effect mechanisms and to determine the reliability of laboratory results in predicting field response. Preliminary findings suggest that lake acidification to pH 5.6 has not influenced reproductive activity of the four most abundant fish species. However, the field results suggest that year-class failure of rock bass (Ambloplites rupestris) may be occurring due to reduced survival of early-life stages. Reduced growth and food-conversion efficiency of Age 0 largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) is also suggested. The laboratory bioassays indicate rock bass is the most acid-sensitive Little Rock Lake species tested. However, rock bass fry survival was not significantly affected until pH was reduced from 5.6 to 5.0.

  14. Defensive Responses to Early Memories with Peers: a Possible Pathway to Disordered Eating.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Cláudia; Marta-Simões, Joana; Trindade, Inês A

    2016-07-18

    Childhood and early adolescence experiences, specifically those that provide an adulthood enriched with warm and safe memories, are consistently stated in literature as powerful emotional regulators. In contrast, individuals who scarcely recall positive experiences may begin to believe that others see the self as inferior, inadequate and unattractive. In order to cope with a perceived loss of social desirability and achieve other's acceptance, individuals may become submissive, and women, particularly, may resort to the presentation of a perfect body image. Both mechanisms are defensive responses suggested to be associated with mental health difficulties, particularly disordered eating behaviors. The present study aimed at exploring the association between early memories of warmth and safeness with peers and eating psychopathology. Also, a path analysis was conducted to investigate the mediator role of submissiveness and perfectionistic self-presentation focused on body image on this association, in a sample of 342 female students. Results revealed that the absence of early positive memories with peers holds a significant effect over eating psychopathology's severity, and also that this effect is mediated through submissiveness and body image-related perfectionistic self-presentation. This model accounted for 13%, 19% and 51% of submissiveness, perfectionistic self-presentation of body image and eating psychopathology's variances, respectively, and showed excellent model fit.

  15. Early hemorrhage triggers metabolic responses that build up during prolonged shock

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Hunter B.; Moore, Ernest E.; Wither, Matthew; Nemkov, Travis; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Slaughter, Anne; Fragoso, Miguel; Hansen, Kirk C.; Silliman, Christopher C.; Banerjee, Anirban

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic staging after trauma/hemorrhagic shock is a key driver of acidosis and directly relates to hypothermia and coagulopathy. Metabolic responses to trauma/hemorrhagic shock have been assayed through classic biochemical approaches or NMR, thereby lacking a comprehensive overview of the dynamic metabolic changes occurring after shock. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent progressive hemorrhage and shock. Baseline and postshock blood was collected, and late hyperfibrinolysis was assessed (LY30 >3%) in all of the tested rats. Extreme and intermediate time points were collected to assay the dynamic changes of the plasma metabolome via ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Sham controls were used to determine whether metabolic changes could be primarily attributable to anesthesia and supine positioning. Early hemorrhage-triggered metabolic changes that built up progressively and became significant during sustained hemorrhagic shock. Metabolic phenotypes either resulted in immediate hypercatabolism, or late hypercatabolism, preceded by metabolic deregulation during early hemorrhage in a subset of rats. Hemorrhagic shock consistently promoted hyperglycemia, glycolysis, Krebs cycle, fatty acid, amino acid, and nitrogen metabolism (urate and polyamines), and impaired redox homeostasis. Early dynamic changes of the plasma metabolome are triggered by hemorrhage in rats. Future studies will determine whether metabolic subphenotypes observed in rats might be consistently observed in humans and pave the way for tailored resuscitative strategies. PMID:25876652

  16. Early prediction of outcome and response to alemtuzumab therapy in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rawstron, Andy C; Kennedy, Ben; Moreton, Paul; Dickinson, Anita J; Cullen, Matthew J; Richards, Stephen J; Jack, Andrew S; Hillmen, Peter

    2004-03-15

    Alemtuzumab therapy is effective for some refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), but identifying responders requires at least 8 weeks of therapy. Early identification of nonresponders would minimize toxicity and/or facilitate more effective strategies. The aim of this study was to identify a minimally invasive method for early prediction of response and relapse. Flow cytometric monitoring was performed in 887 blood samples and 201 marrow samples from 43 patients undergoing intravenous alemtuzumab therapy. Although the absolute lymphocytosis was resolved in all patients by week 4, significant depletion of bone marrow tumor only occurred if circulating B-lymphocyte counts were persistently less than 0.001 x 10(9)/L, which was rare in nonresponders. The majority of patients (16/28) who did not benefit from a full course of therapy were identified with 100% positive predictive value using the following algorithm: peripheral B-cell count greater than 0.001 x 10(9)/L at week 2 with less than 1 log depletion of circulating B cells between weeks 2 and 4. Monitoring CLL levels after treatment identified patients at risk of early disease progression and could potentially improve patient management. During alemtuzumab therapy, bone marrow CLL depletion only occurs after abrogation of circulating tumor, requiring close monitoring of circulating B-cell levels. If validated in prospective studies, blood monitoring at 2 and 4 weeks may be used to optimize therapy.

  17. An INDEHISCENT-Controlled Auxin Response Specifies the Separation Layer in Early Arabidopsis Fruit.

    PubMed

    van Gelderen, Kasper; van Rongen, Martin; Liu, An'an; Otten, Anne; Offringa, Remko

    2016-06-01

    Seed dispersal is an important moment in the life cycle of a plant species. In Arabidopsis thaliana, it is dependent on transcription factor INDEHISCENT (IND)-mediated specification of a separation layer in the dehiscence zone found in the margin between the valves (carpel walls) and the central replum of the developing fruit. It was proposed that IND specifies the separation layer by inducing a local auxin minimum at late stages of fruit development. Here we show that morphological differences between the ind mutant and wild-type fruit already arise at early stages of fruit development, coinciding with strong IND expression in the valve margin. We show that IND-reduced PIN-FORMED3 (PIN3) auxin efflux carrier abundance leads to an increased auxin response in the valve margin during early fruit development, and that the concomitant cell divisions that form the dehiscence zone are lacking in ind mutant fruit. Moreover, IND promoter-driven ectopic expression of the AGC kinases PINOID (PID) and WAG2 induced indehiscence by expelling auxin from the valve margin at stages 14-16 of fruit development through increased PIN3 abundance. Our results show that IND, besides its role at late stages of Arabidopsis fruit development, functions at early stages to facilitate the auxin-triggered cell divisions that form the dehiscence zone. PMID:26995296

  18. Experimental acidification of Little Rock Lake (Wisconsin): fish research approach and early responses.

    PubMed

    Swenson, W A; McCormick, J H; Simonson, T D; Jensen, K M; Eaton, J G

    1989-01-01

    One goal of research at Little Rock Lake, Wisconsin, is to enhance understanding of lake acidification effects on warm- and cool-water fishery resources. The Little Rock Lake fish assemblage is characteristic of many acid sensitive waters in North America and is dominated by yellow perch (Percidae) and sunfishes (Centrarchidae). Analyses of reproduction, early survival and growth rates in the field were designed around the differing reproductive modes of these taxa. Complementary laboratory research on early life stages was conducted to assist in isolating direct effect mechanisms and to determine the reliability of laboratory results in predicting field response. Preliminary findings suggest that lake acidification to pH 5.6 has not influenced reproductive activity of the four most abundant fish species. However, the field results suggest that year-class failure of rock bass (Ambloplites rupestris) may be occurring due to reduced survival of early life stages. Reduced growth and food conversion efficiency of Age 0 largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) is also suggested. The laboratory bioassays indicate rock bass is the most acid-sensitive Little Rock Lake species tested. However, rock bass fry survival was not significantly affected until pH was reduced from 5.6 to 5.0.

  19. Defensive Responses to Early Memories with Peers: a Possible Pathway to Disordered Eating.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Cláudia; Marta-Simões, Joana; Trindade, Inês A

    2016-01-01

    Childhood and early adolescence experiences, specifically those that provide an adulthood enriched with warm and safe memories, are consistently stated in literature as powerful emotional regulators. In contrast, individuals who scarcely recall positive experiences may begin to believe that others see the self as inferior, inadequate and unattractive. In order to cope with a perceived loss of social desirability and achieve other's acceptance, individuals may become submissive, and women, particularly, may resort to the presentation of a perfect body image. Both mechanisms are defensive responses suggested to be associated with mental health difficulties, particularly disordered eating behaviors. The present study aimed at exploring the association between early memories of warmth and safeness with peers and eating psychopathology. Also, a path analysis was conducted to investigate the mediator role of submissiveness and perfectionistic self-presentation focused on body image on this association, in a sample of 342 female students. Results revealed that the absence of early positive memories with peers holds a significant effect over eating psychopathology's severity, and also that this effect is mediated through submissiveness and body image-related perfectionistic self-presentation. This model accounted for 13%, 19% and 51% of submissiveness, perfectionistic self-presentation of body image and eating psychopathology's variances, respectively, and showed excellent model fit. PMID:27425603

  20. Early hemorrhage triggers metabolic responses that build up during prolonged shock.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Angelo; Moore, Hunter B; Moore, Ernest E; Wither, Matthew; Nemkov, Travis; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Slaughter, Anne; Fragoso, Miguel; Hansen, Kirk C; Silliman, Christopher C; Banerjee, Anirban

    2015-06-15

    Metabolic staging after trauma/hemorrhagic shock is a key driver of acidosis and directly relates to hypothermia and coagulopathy. Metabolic responses to trauma/hemorrhagic shock have been assayed through classic biochemical approaches or NMR, thereby lacking a comprehensive overview of the dynamic metabolic changes occurring after shock. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent progressive hemorrhage and shock. Baseline and postshock blood was collected, and late hyperfibrinolysis was assessed (LY30 >3%) in all of the tested rats. Extreme and intermediate time points were collected to assay the dynamic changes of the plasma metabolome via ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Sham controls were used to determine whether metabolic changes could be primarily attributable to anesthesia and supine positioning. Early hemorrhage-triggered metabolic changes that built up progressively and became significant during sustained hemorrhagic shock. Metabolic phenotypes either resulted in immediate hypercatabolism, or late hypercatabolism, preceded by metabolic deregulation during early hemorrhage in a subset of rats. Hemorrhagic shock consistently promoted hyperglycemia, glycolysis, Krebs cycle, fatty acid, amino acid, and nitrogen metabolism (urate and polyamines), and impaired redox homeostasis. Early dynamic changes of the plasma metabolome are triggered by hemorrhage in rats. Future studies will determine whether metabolic subphenotypes observed in rats might be consistently observed in humans and pave the way for tailored resuscitative strategies. PMID:25876652

  1. The Usefulness of Serum CXCR3 Ligands for Evaluating the Early Treatment Response in Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Wou Young; Yoon, Dukyong; Lee, Keu Sung; Jung, Yun Jung; Kim, Young Sun; Sheen, Seung Soo; Park, Kwang Joo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cell-mediated immunity plays an important role in the pathobiology of tuberculosis (TB). The ligands for CXC chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3) activate the T-helper type 1 lymphocyte pathway. The CXCR3 ligands are reportedly useful clinical markers for the diagnosis and follow-up of TB. The objective of this study was to assess the utility of CXCR3 ligands for evaluating early treatment responses in TB. We recruited 88 patients who underwent antituberculous chemotherapy. The serum levels of interferon (IFN)-γ and the CXCR3 ligands CXCL9 (monokine induced by IFN-γ [MIG]), CXCL10 (IFN-γ-inducible 10-kDa protein [IP-10]), and CXCL11 (IFN-inducible T-cell α chemoattractant [I-TAC]) were measured before and 2 months after the start of treatment. Treatment responses were divided into “fast” and “slow” based on the clinical, radiological, and bacteriological improvement at 2 months. A change in level of 20% or more at 2 months was defined as “significant.” In patients with treatment success, 58 patients exhibited a fast response and 20 patients exhibited a slow response. Treatment failure occurred in 5 patients, and the diagnoses were changed to non-TB diseases in 5 patients. The levels of all CXCR3 ligands significantly decreased in the fast-response group (P < 0.01) but did not decrease in the other groups. IFN-γ levels showed no significant changes. The ability of significant decreases in marker levels to predict a fast response was evaluated. CXCL9 showed a sensitivity of 83%, and CXCL10 showed a specificity of 100%. Use of various combinations of CXCR3 ligands resulted in improvements in sensitivity (88%–93%), while specificity (92%–96%) was similar to that using single CXCR3 ligands. The decreases in CXCR3 ligand levels were less marked in the 2-month Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture-positive group than in the culture-negative group. There were significant differences in treatment outcomes in terms of 2-month culture positivity (P

  2. Functional response of U.S. grasslands to the early 21st-century drought.

    PubMed

    Moran, M Susan; Ponce-Campos, Guillermo E; Huete, Alfredo; McClaran, Mitchel P; Zhang, Yongguang; Hamerlynck, Erik P; Augustine, David J; Gunter, Stacey A; Kitchen, Stanley G; Peters, Debra P C; Starks, Patrick J; Hernandez, Mariano

    2014-08-01

    Grasslands across the United States play a key role in regional livelihood and national food security. Yet, it is still unclear how this important resource will respond to the prolonged warm droughts and more intense rainfall events predicted with climate change. The early 21st-century drought in the southwestern United States resulted in hydroclimatic conditions that are similar to those expected with future climate change. We investigated the impact of the early 21st-century drought on aboveground net primary production (ANPP) of six desert and plains grasslands dominated by C4 (warm season) grasses in terms of significant deviations between observed and expected ANPP. In desert grasslands, drought-induced grass mortality led to shifts in the functional response to annual total precipitation (P(T)), and in some cases, new species assemblages occurred that included invasive species. In contrast, the ANPP in plains grasslands exhibited a strong linear function of the current-year P(T) and the previous-year ANPP, despite prolonged warm drought. We used these results to disentangle the impacts of interannual total precipitation, intra-annual precipitation patterns, and grassland abundance on ANPP, and thus generalize the functional response of C4 grasslands to predicted climate change. This will allow managers to plan for predictable shifts in resources associated with climate change related to fire risk, loss of forage, and ecosystem services.

  3. Long Non-coding RNA in Neurons: New Players in Early Response to BDNF Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Aliperti, Vincenza; Donizetti, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin family member that is highly expressed and widely distributed in the brain. BDNF is critical for neural survival and plasticity both during development and in adulthood, and dysfunction in its signaling may contribute to a number of neurodegenerative disorders. Deep understanding of the BDNF-activated molecular cascade may thus help to find new biomarkers and therapeutic targets. One interesting direction is related to the early phase of BDNF-dependent gene expression regulation, which is responsible for the activation of selective gene programs that lead to stable functional and structural remodeling of neurons. Immediate-early coding genes activated by BDNF are under investigation, but the involvement of the non-coding RNAs is largely unexplored, especially the long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). lncRNAs are emerging as key regulators that can orchestrate different aspects of nervous system development, homeostasis, and plasticity, making them attractive candidate markers and therapeutic targets for brain diseases. We used microarray technology to identify differentially expressed lncRNAs in the immediate response phase of BDNF stimulation in a neuronal cell model. Our observations on the putative functional role of lncRNAs provide clues to their involvement as master regulators of gene expression cascade triggered by BDNF. PMID:26973456

  4. Functional response of U.S. grasslands to the early 21st-century drought.

    PubMed

    Moran, M Susan; Ponce-Campos, Guillermo E; Huete, Alfredo; McClaran, Mitchel P; Zhang, Yongguang; Hamerlynck, Erik P; Augustine, David J; Gunter, Stacey A; Kitchen, Stanley G; Peters, Debra P C; Starks, Patrick J; Hernandez, Mariano

    2014-08-01

    Grasslands across the United States play a key role in regional livelihood and national food security. Yet, it is still unclear how this important resource will respond to the prolonged warm droughts and more intense rainfall events predicted with climate change. The early 21st-century drought in the southwestern United States resulted in hydroclimatic conditions that are similar to those expected with future climate change. We investigated the impact of the early 21st-century drought on aboveground net primary production (ANPP) of six desert and plains grasslands dominated by C4 (warm season) grasses in terms of significant deviations between observed and expected ANPP. In desert grasslands, drought-induced grass mortality led to shifts in the functional response to annual total precipitation (P(T)), and in some cases, new species assemblages occurred that included invasive species. In contrast, the ANPP in plains grasslands exhibited a strong linear function of the current-year P(T) and the previous-year ANPP, despite prolonged warm drought. We used these results to disentangle the impacts of interannual total precipitation, intra-annual precipitation patterns, and grassland abundance on ANPP, and thus generalize the functional response of C4 grasslands to predicted climate change. This will allow managers to plan for predictable shifts in resources associated with climate change related to fire risk, loss of forage, and ecosystem services. PMID:25230464

  5. Noninvasive Dynamic Imaging of Tumor Early Response to Nanoparticle-mediated Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Cao, Jianbo; Chen, Xiao; Yang, Kai; Zhu, Lei; Fu, Guifeng; Huang, Xinglu; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    In spite of rapidly increasing interest in the use of nanoparticle-mediated photothermal therapy (PTT) for treatment of different types of tumors, very little is known on early treatment-related changes in tumor response. Using graphene oxide (GO) as a model nanoparticle (NP), in this study, we tracked the changes in tumors after GO NP-mediated PTT by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and quantitatively identified MRI multiple parameters to assess the dynamic changes of MRI signal in tumor at different heating levels and duration. We found a time- and temperature-dependent dynamic change of the MRI signal intensity in intratumor microenvironment prior to any morphological change of tumor, mainly due to quick and effective eradication of tumor blood vessels. Based on the distribution of GO particles, we also demonstrated that NP-medited PTT caused heterogeneous thermal injury of tumor. Overall, these new findings provide not only a clinical-related method for non-invasive early tracking, identifying, and monitoring treatment response of NP-mediated PTT but also show a new vision for better understanding mechanisms of NP-mediated PTT.

  6. Early detection of oil-induced stress in crops using spectral and thermal responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emengini, Ebele Josephine; Blackburn, George Alan; Theobald, Julian Charles

    2013-01-01

    Oil pollution is a major source of environmental degradation, and requires accurate monitoring and timely detection for an effective control of its occurrence. This paper examines the potential of a remote sensing approach using the spectral and thermal responses of crops for the early detection of stress caused by oil pollution. In a glasshouse, pot-grown maize was treated with oil at sublethal and lethal applications. Thereafter, leaf thermal, spectral and physiological measurements were taken every two to three days to monitor the development of stress responses. Our results indicate that absolute leaf temperature was a poor indicator of developing stress. However, a derived thermal index (IG) responded consistently in the early stages of physiological damage. Various spectral reflectance features were highly sensitive to oil-induced stress. A narrow-band index using wavelengths in the near-infrared and red-edge region, (R755-R716)/(R755+R716), was optimal for previsual detection of oil-induced stress. This index had a strong linear relationship with photosynthetic rate. This indicates that by detecting vegetation stress, thermal and hyperspectral remote sensing has considerable potential for the timely detection of oil pollution in the environment.

  7. Solanum lycopersicum AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 9 regulates cell division activity during early tomato fruit development

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Maaike; Wolters-Arts, Mieke; Schimmel, Bernardus C. J.; Stultiens, Catharina L. M.; de Groot, Peter F. M.; Powers, Stephen J.; Tikunov, Yury M.; Bovy, Arnoud G.; Mariani, Celestina; Vriezen, Wim H.; Rieu, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    The transformation of the ovary into a fruit after successful completion of pollination and fertilization has been associated with many changes at transcriptomic level. These changes are part of a dynamic and complex regulatory network that is controlled by phytohormones, with a major role for auxin. One of the auxin-related genes differentially expressed upon fruit set and early fruit development in tomato is Solanum lycopersicum AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 9 (SlARF9). Here, the functional analysis of this ARF is described. SlARF9 expression was found to be auxin-responsive and SlARF9 mRNA levels were high in the ovules, placenta, and pericarp of pollinated ovaries, but also in other plant tissues with high cell division activity, such as the axillary meristems and root meristems. Transgenic plants with increased SlARF9 mRNA levels formed fruits that were smaller than wild-type fruits because of reduced cell division activity, whereas transgenic lines in which SlARF9 mRNA levels were reduced showed the opposite phenotype. The expression analysis, together with the phenotype of the transgenic lines, suggests that, in tomato, ARF9 negatively controls cell division during early fruit development. PMID:25883382

  8. The early inflammatory response after flexor tendon healing: A gene expression and histological analysis

    PubMed Central

    Manning, CN; Havlioglu, N; Knutsen, E; Sakiyama-Elbert, SE; Silva, MJ; Thomopoulos, S; Gelberman, RH

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in surgical techniques over the past three decades, tendon repairs remain prone to poor clinical outcomes. Previous attempts to improve tendon healing have focused on the later stages of healing (i.e., proliferation and matrix synthesis). The early inflammatory phase of tendon healing, however, is not fully understood and its modulation during healing has not yet been studied. Therefore, the purpose of this work was to characterize the early inflammatory phase of flexor tendon healing with the goal of identifying inflammation-related targets for future treatments. Canine flexor tendons were transected and repaired using techniques identical to those used clinically. The inflammatory response was monitored for 9 days. Temporal changes in immune cell populations and gene expression of inflammation-, matrix degradation-, and extracellular matrix-related factors were examined. Gene expression patterns paralleled changes in repair-site cell populations. Of the observed changes, the most dramatic effect was a greater than 4000-fold up-regulation in the expression of the pro-inflammatory factor IL-1β. While an inflammatory response is likely necessary for healing to occur, high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines may result in collateral tissue damage and impaired tendon healing. These findings suggest that future tendon treatment approaches consider modulation of the inflammatory phase of healing. PMID:24464937

  9. Vascular-mediated signalling involved in early phosphate stress response in plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaoliang; Zheng, Yi; Ham, Byung-Kook; Chen, Jieyu; Yoshida, Akiko; Kochian, Leon V; Fei, Zhangjun; Lucas, William J

    2016-01-01

    Depletion of finite global rock phosphate (Pi) reserves will impose major limitations on future agricultural productivity and food security. Hence, modern breeding programmes seek to develop Pi-efficient crops with sustainable yields under reduced Pi fertilizer inputs. In this regard, although the long-term responses of plants to Pi stress are well documented, the early signalling events have yet to be elucidated. Here, we show plant tissue-specific responses to early Pi stress at the transcription level and a predominant role of the plant vascular system in this process. Specifically, imposition of Pi stress induces rapid and major changes in the mRNA population in the phloem translocation stream, and grafting studies have revealed that many hundreds of phloem-mobile mRNAs are delivered to specific sink tissues. We propose that the shoot vascular system acts as the site of root-derived Pi stress perception, and the phloem serves to deliver a cascade of signals to various sinks, presumably to coordinate whole-plant Pi homeostasis.

  10. Nutritional influences on early white matter development: response to Anderson and Burggren.

    PubMed

    Deoni, Sean C L; Dean, Douglas C; Walker, Lindsay; Dirks, Holly; O'Muircheartaigh, Jonathan

    2014-10-15

    Does breastfeeding alter early brain development? In a recent retrospective study, our group examined the cross-sectional relationship between early infant feeding practice and white matter maturation and cognitive development. In groups matched for child and mother age, gestation duration, birth weight, gender distribution, and socio-economic status; we observed that children who were breastfed exclusively for at least 3 months showed, on average, increased white matter myelin development compared to children who either were exclusively formula-fed, or received a mixture of breast milk and formula. In secondary analysis on sub-sets of these children, again matched for important confounding variables, we found improved cognitive test scores of receptive language in the exclusively breast-fed children compared to formula or formula+breast-fed children; and that prolonged breastfeeding was associated with increased motor, language, and visual functioning in exclusively breast-fed children. In response to this work, Anderson and Burggren have questioned our methodology and, by association, our findings. Further, they use their critique as a platform for advancing an alternative interpretation of our findings: that observed results were not associated with prolonged breast-feeding, but rather delayed the introduction of cow's milk. In this response, we address and clarify some of the misconceptions presented by Anderson and Burggren.

  11. Vascular-mediated signalling involved in early phosphate stress response in plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaoliang; Zheng, Yi; Ham, Byung-Kook; Chen, Jieyu; Yoshida, Akiko; Kochian, Leon V; Fei, Zhangjun; Lucas, William J

    2016-01-01

    Depletion of finite global rock phosphate (Pi) reserves will impose major limitations on future agricultural productivity and food security. Hence, modern breeding programmes seek to develop Pi-efficient crops with sustainable yields under reduced Pi fertilizer inputs. In this regard, although the long-term responses of plants to Pi stress are well documented, the early signalling events have yet to be elucidated. Here, we show plant tissue-specific responses to early Pi stress at the transcription level and a predominant role of the plant vascular system in this process. Specifically, imposition of Pi stress induces rapid and major changes in the mRNA population in the phloem translocation stream, and grafting studies have revealed that many hundreds of phloem-mobile mRNAs are delivered to specific sink tissues. We propose that the shoot vascular system acts as the site of root-derived Pi stress perception, and the phloem serves to deliver a cascade of signals to various sinks, presumably to coordinate whole-plant Pi homeostasis. PMID:27249565

  12. Expression Pattern of Early Growth Response Gene 1 during Olive Flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) Embryonic Development

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Ho; Noh, Jae Koo; Kim, Hyun Chul; Park, Choul-Ji; Park, Jong-Won; Kim, Kyung-Kil

    2014-01-01

    The early growth response protein 1 (Egr-1) is a widely reported zinc finger protein and a well known transcription factor encoded by the Egr-1 gene, which plays key roles in many aspects of vertebrate embryogenesis and in adult vertebrates. The Egr-1 expression is important in the formation of the gill vascular system in flounders, which develops during the post-hatching phase and is essential for survival during the juvenile period. However, the complete details of Egr-1 expression during embryo development in olive flounder are not available. We assessed the expression patterns of Egr-1 during the early development of olive flounders by using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. Microscopic observations showed that gill filament formation corresponded with the Egr-1 expression. Thus, we showed that Egr-1 plays a vital role in angiogenesis in the gill filaments during embryogenesis. Further, Egr-1 expression was found to be strong at 5 days after hatching (DAH), in the development of the gill vascular system, and this strong expression level was maintained throughout all the development stages. Our findings have important implications with respect to the biological role of Egr-1 and evolution of the first respiratory blood vessels in the gills of olive flounder. Further studies are required to elucidate the Egr-1-mediated stress response and to decipher the functional role of Egr-1 in developmental stages. PMID:25949193

  13. Solanum lycopersicum AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 9 regulates cell division activity during early tomato fruit development.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Maaike; Wolters-Arts, Mieke; Schimmel, Bernardus C J; Stultiens, Catharina L M; de Groot, Peter F M; Powers, Stephen J; Tikunov, Yury M; Bovy, Arnoud G; Mariani, Celestina; Vriezen, Wim H; Rieu, Ivo

    2015-06-01

    The transformation of the ovary into a fruit after successful completion of pollination and fertilization has been associated with many changes at transcriptomic level. These changes are part of a dynamic and complex regulatory network that is controlled by phytohormones, with a major role for auxin. One of the auxin-related genes differentially expressed upon fruit set and early fruit development in tomato is Solanum lycopersicum AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 9 (SlARF9). Here, the functional analysis of this ARF is described. SlARF9 expression was found to be auxin-responsive and SlARF9 mRNA levels were high in the ovules, placenta, and pericarp of pollinated ovaries, but also in other plant tissues with high cell division activity, such as the axillary meristems and root meristems. Transgenic plants with increased SlARF9 mRNA levels formed fruits that were smaller than wild-type fruits because of reduced cell division activity, whereas transgenic lines in which SlARF9 mRNA levels were reduced showed the opposite phenotype. The expression analysis, together with the phenotype of the transgenic lines, suggests that, in tomato, ARF9 negatively controls cell division during early fruit development.

  14. Noninvasive Dynamic Imaging of Tumor Early Response to Nanoparticle-mediated Photothermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Cao, Jianbo; Chen, Xiao; Yang, Kai; Zhu, Lei; Fu, Guifeng; Huang, Xinglu; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    In spite of rapidly increasing interest in the use of nanoparticle-mediated photothermal therapy (PTT) for treatment of different types of tumors, very little is known on early treatment-related changes in tumor response. Using graphene oxide (GO) as a model nanoparticle (NP), in this study, we tracked the changes in tumors after GO NP-mediated PTT by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and quantitatively identified MRI multiple parameters to assess the dynamic changes of MRI signal in tumor at different heating levels and duration. We found a time- and temperature-dependent dynamic change of the MRI signal intensity in intratumor microenvironment prior to any morphological change of tumor, mainly due to quick and effective eradication of tumor blood vessels. Based on the distribution of GO particles, we also demonstrated that NP-medited PTT caused heterogeneous thermal injury of tumor. Overall, these new findings provide not only a clinical-related method for non-invasive early tracking, identifying, and monitoring treatment response of NP-mediated PTT but also show a new vision for better understanding mechanisms of NP-mediated PTT. PMID:26681988

  15. AR1429 Releases X1 Class Flare

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory captured the X1 flare, shown here in the 171 Angstrom wavelength, a wavelength typically shown in the color gold. This movie runs from 10 PM ET March 4 to 3 AM March ...

  16. Solar Eruptions: Coronal Mass Ejections and Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2012-01-01

    This lecture introduces the topic of Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares, collectively known as solar eruptions. During solar eruptions, the released energy flows out from the Sun in the form of magnetized plasma and electromagnetic radiation. The electromagnetic radiation suddenly increases the ionization content of the ionosphere, thus impacting communication and navigation systems. Flares can be eruptive or confined. Eruptive flares accompany CMEs, while confined flares hav only electromagnetic signature. CMEs can drive MHD shocks that accelerate charged particles to very high energies in the interplanetary space, which pose radiation hazard to astronauts and space systems. CMEs heading in the direction of Earth arrive in about two days and impact Earth's magnetosphere, producing geomagnetic storms. The magnetic storms result in a number of effects including induced currnts that can disrupt power grids, railroads, and underground pipelines

  17. 2011 Valentines Day X-Class Flare

    NASA Video Gallery

    The video clip of the large X2 flare seen by Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) in extreme ultraviolet light on February 15, 2011, has been enlarged and superimposed on a video of SOHO's C2 coronagra...

  18. SDO Sees Late Phase in Solar Flares

    NASA Video Gallery

    On May 5, 2010, shortly after the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) began normal operation, the sun erupted with numerous coronal loops and flares. Many of these showed a previously unseen "late pha...

  19. C3-class Solar Flare Eruption

    NASA Video Gallery

    Just as sunspot 1105 was turning away from Earth on Sept. 8, the active region erupted, producing a C3-class solar flare (peak @ 2330 UT) and a fantastic prominence. This is a three color closeup o...

  20. Magnetic Fields in Limb Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozitsky, V. G.; Lozitska, N. I.; Botygina, O. A.

    2013-02-01

    Two limb solar flares, of 14 July 2005 and 19 July 2012, of importance X1.2 and M7.7, are analyzed at present work. Magnetic field strength in named flares are investigated by Stokes I±V profiles of Hα and D3 HeI lines. There are direct evidences to the magnetic field inhomogeneity in flares, in particular, non-paralelism of bisectors in I+V and I-V profiles. In some flare places, the local maximums of bisectors splitting were found in both lines. If these bisector splittings are interpreted as Zeeman effect manifestation, the following magnetic field strengths reach up to 2200 G in Hα and 1300 G in D3. According to calculations, the observed peculiarities of line profiles may indicate the existence of optically thick emissive small-scale elements with strong magnetic fields and lowered temperature.

  1. Associative conditioning with leg cycling and inspiratory resistance enhances the early exercise ventilatory response in humans.

    PubMed

    Turner, Duncan; Stewart, Jamie D

    2004-12-01

    Repeated trials of hypercapnic exercise [deltaPET CO2 = 7 (1) mmHg] augment the increase in inspired minute ventilation and tidal volume (V(T)) in the early phase of subsequent trials of unencumbered exercise alone. The increase in V(T) in the first 20 s of exercise was correlated to the increase in V(T) evoked during hypercapnic exercise trials, suggesting that the evoked increase in V(T) during conditioning may be a factor in mediating associative conditioning. To test this hypothesis, inspiratory resistive loading (IRL) was employed to evoke an increase in V(T) [deltaV(T) = 0.4 (0.1) I(BTPS)] during conditioning exercise trials [IRL + EX; deltaP(ET)CO2 = 2 (l) mmHg]. IRL + EX associative conditioning elicited a significant augmentation of the early minute ventilation (+46%) and V(T) (+100%) responses to subsequent unencumbered exercise. The latter was correlated to the evoked increase in V(T) during associative conditioning with IRL + EX. The results support the hypothesis that an evoked increase in V(T) during associative conditioning could be a factor in eliciting long-term modulation of minute ventilation in subsequent unencumbered exercise. The results further indicated that the modulation of ventilation early in exercise is not due to sensitisation to repeated trials of either IRL or exercise alone. Associative conditioning may shape the ventilatory response to exercise through a process of motor learning. Data are presented as mean (SEM) unless otherwise stated.

  2. Apoptosis of Oligodendrocytes during Early Development Delays Myelination and Impairs Subsequent Responses to Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Caprariello, Andrew V.; Batt, Courtney E.; Zippe, Ingrid; Romito-DiGiacomo, Rita R.; Karl, Molly

    2015-01-01

    During mammalian development, myelin-forming oligodendrocytes are generated and axons ensheathed according to a tightly regulated sequence of events. Excess premyelinating oligodendrocytes are eliminated by apoptosis and the timing of the onset of myelination in any specific CNS region is highly reproducible. Although the developing CNS recovers more effectively than the adult CNS from similar insults, it is unknown whether early loss of oligodendrocyte lineage cells leads to long-term functional deficits. To directly assess whether the loss of oligodendrocytes during early postnatal spinal cord development impacted oligodendrogenesis, myelination, and remyelination, transgenic mouse lines were generated in which a modified caspase-9 molecule allowed spatial and temporal control of the apoptotic pathway specifically in mature, myelin basic protein expressing oligodendrocytes (MBP-iCP9). Activating apoptosis in MBP+ cells of the developing spinal cord during the first postnatal week inhibited myelination. This inhibition was transient, and the levels of myelination largely returned to normal after 2 weeks. Despite robust developmental plasticity, MBP-iCP9-induced oligodendrocyte apoptosis compromised the rate and extent of adult remyelination. Remyelination failure correlated with a truncated proliferative response of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, suggesting that depleting the oligodendrocyte pool during critical developmental periods compromises the regenerative response to subsequent demyelinating lesions. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This manuscript demonstrates that early insults leading to oligodendrocyte apoptosis result in the impairment of recovery from demyelinating diseases in the adult. These studies begin to provide an initial understanding of the potential failure of recovery in insults, such as periventricular leukomalacia and multiple sclerosis. PMID:26468203

  3. Prespecified dose-response analysis for A Very Early Rehabilitation Trial (AVERT)

    PubMed Central

    Churilov, Leonid; Ellery, Fiona; Collier, Janice; Chamberlain, Jan; Langhorne, Peter; Lindley, Richard I.; Moodie, Marj; Dewey, Helen; Thrift, Amanda G.; Donnan, Geoff

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Our prespecified dose-response analyses of A Very Early Rehabilitation Trial (AVERT) aim to provide practical guidance for clinicians on the timing, frequency, and amount of mobilization following acute stroke. Methods: Eligible patients were aged ≥18 years, had confirmed first (or recurrent) stroke, and were admitted to a stroke unit within 24 hours of stroke onset. Patients were randomized to receive very early and frequent mobilization, commencing within 24 hours, or usual care. We used regression analyses and Classification and Regression Trees (CART) to investigate the effect of timing and dose of mobilization on efficacy and safety outcomes, irrespective of assigned treatment group. Results: A total of 2,104 patients were enrolled, of whom 2,083 (99.0%) were followed up at 3 months. We found a consistent pattern of improved odds of favorable outcome in efficacy and safety outcomes with increased daily frequency of out-of-bed sessions (odds ratio [OR] 1.13, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09 to 1.18, p < 0.001), keeping time to first mobilization and mobilization amount constant. Increased amount (minutes per day) of mobilization reduced the odds of a good outcome (OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.91 to 0.97, p < 0.001). Session frequency was the most important variable in the CART analysis, after prognostic variables age and baseline stroke severity. Conclusion: These data suggest that shorter, more frequent mobilization early after acute stroke is associated with greater odds of favorable outcome at 3 months when controlling for age and stroke severity. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that shorter, more frequent early mobilization improves the chance of regaining independence after stroke. PMID:26888985

  4. Can we explain atypical solar flares?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalmasse, K.; Chandra, R.; Schmieder, B.; Aulanier, G.

    2015-02-01

    Context. We used multiwavelength high-resolution data from ARIES, THEMIS, and SDO instruments to analyze a non-standard, C3.3 class flare produced within the active region NOAA 11589 on 2012 October 16. Magnetic flux emergence and cancellation were continuously detected within the active region, the latter leading to the formation of two filaments. Aims: Our aim is to identify the origins of the flare taking the complex dynamics of its close surroundings into account. Methods: We analyzed the magnetic topology of the active region using a linear force-free field extrapolation to derive its 3D magnetic configuration and the location of quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs), which are preferred sites for flaring activity. Because the active region's magnetic field was nonlinear force-free, we completed a parametric study using different linear force-free field extrapolations to demonstrate the robustness of the derived QSLs. Results: The topological analysis shows that the active region presented a complex magnetic configuration comprising several QSLs. The considered data set suggests that an emerging flux episode played a key role in triggering the flare. The emerging flux probably activated the complex system of QSLs, leading to multiple coronal magnetic reconnections within the QSLs. This scenario accounts for the observed signatures: the two extended flare ribbons developed at locations matched by the photospheric footprints of the QSLs and were accompanied with flare loops that formed above the two filaments, which played no important role in the flare dynamics. Conclusions: This is a typical example of a complex flare that can a priori show standard flare signatures that are nevertheless impossible to interpret with any standard model of eruptive or confined flare. We find that a topological analysis, however, permitted us to unveil the development of such complex sets of flare signatures. Movies associated to Figs. 1, 3, and 9 are only available at the CDS via

  5. Early Improvement in One Week Predicts the Treatment Response to Escitalopram in Patients with Social Anxiety Disorder: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Kang-Seob; Shin, Eunsook; Ha, Juwon; Shin, Dongwon; Shin, Youngchul; Lim, Se-Won

    2016-01-01

    Objective Social anxiety disorder (SAD) shows relatively delayed responses to pharmacotherapy when compared to other anxiety disorders. Therefore, more effective early therapeutic decisions can be made if the therapeutic response is predictable as early as possible. We studied whether the therapeutic response at 12 weeks is predictable based on the early improvement with escitalopram at 1 week. Methods The subjects were 28 outpatients diagnosed with SAD. The subjects took 10–20 mg/day of escitalopram. The results of the Liebowitz social anxiety scale (LSAS), Hamilton anxiety rating scale, and Montgomery-Asberg depression rating scale were evaluated at 0, 1, 4, 8, and 12 weeks of treatment. Early improvement was defined as a ≥10% reduction in the LSAS total at 1 week of treatment, and endpoint response was defined as a ≥35% reduction in the LSAS total score. The correlation between clinical characteristics and therapeutic responses was analyzed by simple linear regression. The correlation between early improvement responses and endpoint responses was analyzed by multivariate logistic regression analysis and receiver operating characteristic curves. Results When we adjusted the influence of a ≥35% reduction in the LSAS total endpoint score on a ≥10% reduction of the LSAS total score at 1 week of treatment for the patients’ age, the early improvement group at 1 week of treatment was expected to show stronger endpoint responses compared to the group with no early improvement. Conclusion The results suggest that a ≥10% reduction in the LSAS total score in a week can predict endpoint treatment response. PMID:27121427

  6. Transcription profiling of the early gravitropic response in Arabidopsis using high-density oligonucleotide probe microarrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseyko, Nick; Zhu, Tong; Chang, Hur-Song; Wang, Xun; Feldman, Lewis J.

    2002-01-01

    Studies of plant tropisms, the directed growth toward or away from external stimuli such as light and gravity, began more than a century ago. Yet biochemical, physiological, and especially molecular mechanisms of plant tropic responses remain for the most part unclear. We examined expression of 8,300 genes during early stages of the gravitropic response using high-density oligonucleotide probe microarrays. Approximately 1.7% of the genes represented on the array exhibited significant expression changes within the first 30 min of gravity stimulation. Among gravity-induced genes were a number of genes previously implicated to be involved in gravitropism. However, a much larger number of the identified genes have not been previously associated with gravitropism. Because reorientation of plants may also expose plants to mechanical perturbations, we also compared the effects of a gentle mechanical perturbation on mRNA levels during the gravity response. It was found that approximately 39% of apparently gravity-regulated genes were also regulated by the mechanical perturbation caused by plant reorientation. Our study revealed the induction of complex gene expression patterns as a consequence of gravitropic reorientation and points to an interplay between the gravitropic and mechanical responses and to the extreme sensitivity of plants to even very gentle mechanical perturbations.

  7. Broad CTL Response in Early HIV Infection Drives Multiple Concurrent CTL Escapes.

    PubMed

    Leviyang, Sivan; Ganusov, Vitaly V

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the ability of HIV to escape from cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses that concurrently target multiple viral epitopes. Yet, the viral dynamics involved in such escape are incompletely understood. Previous analyses have made several strong assumptions regarding HIV escape from CTL responses such as independent or non-concurrent escape from individual CTL responses. Using experimental data from evolution of HIV half genomes in four patients we observe concurrent viral escape from multiple CTL responses during early infection (first 100 days of infection), providing confirmation of a recent result found in a study of one HIV-infected patient. We show that current methods of estimating CTL escape rates, based on the assumption of independent escapes, are biased and perform poorly when CTL escape proceeds concurrently at multiple epitopes. We propose a new method for analyzing longitudinal sequence data to estimate the rate of CTL escape across multiple epitopes; this method involves few parameters and performs well in simulation studies. By applying our novel method to experimental data, we find that concurrent multiple escapes occur at rates between 0.03 and 0.4 day(-1), a relatively broad range that reflects uncertainty due to sparse sampling and wide ranges of parameter values. However, we show that concurrent escape at rates 0.1-0.2 day(-1) across multiple epitopes is consistent with our patient datasets.

  8. Flare and CME onset: UV spectra show fast 3-D flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innes, D. E.

    We present observations taken in the corona above a flare that occurred on the west limb of the Sun. SUMER spectra show large red (400 km/s) and blue (700 km/s) Dopplershifts in Fe XX (107 K), Cr XVI (5×106 K), Si IX (106 K) and O III (105 K) emission lines. These shifts are associated with a fast moving (500 km/s) optical emission front detected in high cadence images, taken with the coronagraph MICA. Yohkoh images, taken 8 min after the hard X-ray peak, show fast soft X-ray ejecta that can be extrapolated back to the position of pre-flare coronal arcade structure seen in EIT 195 images. The observations are interpreted as evidence of a blast wave propagating through the active region coronal loop structure very early in the flare evolution.

  9. Universal newborn hearing screening and early identification of deafness: parents' responses to knowing early and their expectations of child communication development.

    PubMed

    Young, Alys; Tattersall, Helen

    2007-01-01

    This article presents results from an interview study of 45 parents/caregivers (representing 27 families) whose infants were correctly identified as deaf during the first phase of the implementation of the national universal Newborn Hearing Screening Programme in England. Average age of children when parents were interviewed was 25 weeks. Two issues are explored: (a) how parents talk about significance of knowing early that their child is deaf and (b) parents' expectations of their child's development in light of early identification. Although results demonstrate clear support from parents' perspective of knowing early, they also identify the psychological complexities of recognizing both the grief and reassurance that early knowledge brings; the risks of early knowledge-inducing timetables of expectations that create distress when not met speedily; the extent to which parental models of the developmental advantages of early identification are underpinned by notions of normal speech and the possibility of being like hearing children; and the pervasiveness of deficit and illness models associated with having identified deafness early. Implications for parental support and professional responses are also discussed.

  10. Optically thick line widths in pyrotechnic flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douda, B. E.; Exton, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    Experimentally determined sodium line widths for pyrotechnic flares are compared with simple analytical, optically-thick-line-shape calculations. Three ambient pressure levels are considered (760, 150 and 30 torr) for three different flare compositions. The measured line widths range from 1.3 to 481 A. The analytic procedure emphasizes the Lorentz line shape as observed under optically-thick conditions. Calculated widths are in good agreement with the measured values over the entire range.

  11. Composition of energetic particles from solar flares.

    PubMed

    Garrard, T L; Stone, E C

    1994-10-01

    We present a model for composition of heavy ions in the solar energetic particles (SEP). The SEP composition in a typical large solar particle event reflects the composition of the Sun, with adjustments due to fractionation effects which depend on the first ionization potential (FIP) of the ion and on the ratio of ionic charge to mass (Q/M). Flare-to-flare variations in composition are represented by parameters describing these fractionation effects and the distributions of these parameters are presented.

  12. Analysis of gene expression during parabolic flights reveals distinct early gravity responses in Arabidopsis roots.

    PubMed

    Aubry-Hivet, D; Nziengui, H; Rapp, K; Oliveira, O; Paponov, I A; Li, Y; Hauslage, J; Vagt, N; Braun, M; Ditengou, F A; Dovzhenko, A; Palme, K

    2014-01-01

    Plant roots are among most intensively studied biological systems in gravity research. Altered gravity induces asymmetric cell growth leading to root bending. Differential distribution of the phytohormone auxin underlies root responses to gravity, being coordinated by auxin efflux transporters from the PIN family. The objective of this study was to compare early transcriptomic changes in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana wild type, and pin2 and pin3 mutants under parabolic flight conditions and to correlate these changes to auxin distribution. Parabolic flights allow comparison of transient 1-g, hypergravity and microgravity effects in living organisms in parallel. We found common and mutation-related genes differentially expressed in response to transient microgravity phases. Gene ontology analysis of common genes revealed lipid metabolism, response to stress factors and light categories as primarily involved in response to transient microgravity phases, suggesting that fundamental reorganisation of metabolic pathways functions upstream of a further signal mediating hormonal network. Gene expression changes in roots lacking the columella-located PIN3 were stronger than in those deprived of the epidermis and cortex cell-specific PIN2. Moreover, repetitive exposure to microgravity/hypergravity and gravity/hypergravity flight phases induced an up-regulation of auxin responsive genes in wild type and pin2 roots, but not in pin3 roots, suggesting a critical function of PIN3 in mediating auxin fluxes in response to transient microgravity phases. Our study provides important insights towards understanding signal transduction processes in transient microgravity conditions by combining for the first time the parabolic flight platform with the transcriptome analysis of different genetic mutants in the model plant, Arabidopsis.

  13. Early cytokine and antibody responses against Coxiella burnetii in aerosol infection of BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Schoffelen, Teske; Self, Joshua S.; Fitzpatrick, Kelly A.; Netea, Mihai G.; van Deuren, Marcel; Joosten, Leo A. B.; Kersh, Gilbert J.

    2016-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii, a Gram-negative intracellular bacterium, can give rise to Q fever in humans and is transmitted mainly by inhalation of infected aerosols from animal reservoirs. Serology is commonly used to diagnose Q fever, but the early cellular immune response –i.e. C. burnetii-specific interferon(IFN)-γ production in response to antigen challenge– might be an additional diagnostic. Detection of IFN-γ responses has been used to identify past and chronic Q fever infections, but the IFN-γ response in acute Q fever has not been described. By challenging immunocompetent BALB/c mice with aerosols containing phase I C. burnetii, the timing and extent of IFN-γ recall responses was evaluated in an acute C. burnetii infection. Other cytokines were also measured in an effort to identify other potential diagnostic markers. The data show that after initial expansion of bacteria first in lungs and then in other tissues, the infection was cleared from day 10 onwards as reflected by the decreasing number of bacteria. The antigen-induced IFN-γ production by splenocytes coincided with emergence of IgM phase II-antibodies at day 10 post-infection, and preceded appearance of IgG-antibodies. This was accompanied by the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-6, KC and IP-10, followed by MCP-1, but not by IL-1β and TNF-α, and only very low production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. These data suggest that analysis of antigen-specific IFN-γ responses could be a useful tool for diagnosis of acute Q-fever. Moreover, the current model of C.burnetii infection could be used to give new insights into immunological factors that predispose to development of persistent infection. PMID:25618420

  14. The ability of early changes in motivation to predict later antidepressant treatment response

    PubMed Central

    Gorwood, Philip; Vaiva, Guillaume; Corruble, Emmanuelle; Llorca, Pierre-Michel; Baylé, Franck J; Courtet, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Baseline values and early changes of emotional reactivity, cognitive speed, psychomotor function, motivation, and sensory perception have not been studied to any extent in unipolar depression, although they could help to characterize different dimensions of illness that are harder to capture by clinicians, give new insights on how patients improve, and offer new early clinical markers for later treatment response. Methods About 1,565 adult outpatients with major depressive disorder receiving agomelatine completed the clinician-rated 16-item quick inventory of depressive symptoms, Clinical Global Impression, and Multidimensional Assessment of Thymic States (MAThyS) rating scales at inclusion, Week 2 and Week 6. The MAThyS includes a 20-item self-rated visual analog scale (from inhibition [0] to activation [10], with [5] representing the usual state) leading to five a priori dimensions (emotional reactivity, cognitive speed, psychomotor function, motivation, and sensory perception). Results All MAThyS dimension scores increased from inclusion to Week 2 and from inclusion to Week 6 (P<0.001). Improvement was around 2 points (out of 10) for motivation, 1.5 points for psychomotor function, and 0.5 points for other dimensions. Motivation showed a trend to being more severely impaired at inclusion in future nonresponders (t=1.25, df=1,563, P=0.10). Its improvement at Week 2 was the most discriminating MAThyS dimension between future responders and nonresponders, and represents the best predictor of future response, with the highest area under the receptor operating characteristic curve (area under curve =0.616, 95% confidence interval [0.588–0.643], P<0.001). Finally, improvements in motivation correlated the most strongly with clinician-rated 16-item quick inventory of depressive symptoms improvement (r=−0.491, df=1,563, P<0.001). Conclusion Motivation had the most capacity for early improvement, the best predictive value for response, and the largest

  15. The EVE Doppler Sensitivity and Flare Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.; Woods, T. N.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Didkovsky, L.; Del Zanna, G.

    2011-01-01

    The Extreme-ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) obtains continuous EUV spectra of the Sun viewed as a star. Its primary objective is the characterization of solar spectral irradiance, but its sensitivity and stability make it extremely interesting for observations of variability on time scales down to the limit imposed by its basic 10 s sample interval. In this paper we characterize the Doppler sensitivity of the EVE data. We find that the 30.4 nm line of He II has a random Doppler error below 0.001 nm (1 pm, better than 10 km/s as a redshift), with ample stability to detect the orbital motion of its satellite, the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Solar flares also displace the spectrum, both because of Doppler shifts and because of EVE's optical layout, which (as with a slitless spectrograph) confuses position and wavelength. As a flare develops, the centroid of the line displays variations that reflect Doppler shifts and therefore flare dynamics. For the impulsive phase of the flare SOL2010-06-12, we find the line centroid to have a redshift of 16.8 +/- 5.9 km/s relative to that of the flare gradual phase (statistical errors only). We find also that high-temperature lines, such as Fe XXIV 19.2 nm, have well-determined Doppler components for major flares, with decreasing apparent blueshifts as expected from chromospheric evaporation flows.

  16. Global ionospheric flare detection system (GIFDS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Daniela; Jakowski, Norbert; Berdermann, Jens; Mayer, Christoph; Valladares, Cesar; Heber, Bernd

    2016-02-01

    The Global Ionospheric Flare Detection System (GIFDS) is currently under development at the German Aerospace Center as a ground based detector for continuous monitoring of the solar flare activity in order to provide real time warnings on solar X-ray events. GIFDS is using Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio transmissions in the northern hemisphere which respond to enhanced ionization in the bottomside ionosphere caused by X-ray flares. Since solar flares can only be detected during daytime, VLF receivers have to be installed around the globe to guarantee continuous records at the dayside sector. GIFDS consists of a network of Perseus SDR (Software Defined Radio) receivers equipped with a MiniWhip antenna each. Reliable detection of solar flares is ensured by recording multiple frequency channels ranging from 0 to 500 kHz. The applicability of the system is demonstrated in a first analysis by comparing VLF measurements with GOES's (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) X-ray flux data. The high potential of GIFDS for a permanent monitoring of solar flares in near real time is discussed.

  17. The energy spectra of solar flare electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evenson, P. A.; Hovestadt, D.; Meyer, P.; Moses, D.

    1985-01-01

    A survey of 50 electron energy spectra from .1 to 100 MeV originating from solar flares was made by the combination of data from two spectrometers onboard the International Sun Earth Explorer-3 spacecraft. The observed spectral shapes of flare events can be divided into two classes through the criteria of fit to an acceleration model. This standard two step acceleration model, which fits the spectral shape of the first class of flares, involves an impulsive step that accelerates particles up to 100 keV and a second step that further accelerates these particles up to 100 MeV by a single shock. This fit fails for the second class of flares that can be characterized as having excessively hard spectra above 1 MeV relative to the predictions of the model. Correlations with soft X-ray and meter radio observations imply that the acceleration of the high energy particles in the second class of flares is dominated by the impulsive phase of the flares.

  18. The October 28, 2003 extreme EUV solar flare and resultant extreme ionospheric effects: Comparison to other Halloween events and the Bastille Day event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Judge, D. L.; Guarnieri, F. L.; Gangopadhyay, P.; Jones, A. R.; Nuttall, J.; Zambon, G. A.; Didkovsky, L.; Mannucci, A. J.; Iijima, B.; Meier, R. R.; Immel, T. J.; Woods, T. N.; Prasad, S.; Floyd, L.; Huba, J.; Solomon, S. C.; Straus, P.; Viereck, R.

    2005-01-01

    Some of the most intense solar flares measured in 0.1 to 0.8 nm x-rays in recent history occurred near the end of 2003. The Nov 4 event is the largest in the NOAA records (X28) and the Oct 28 flare was the fourth most intense (X17). The Oct 29 flare was class X7. These flares are compared and contrasted to the July 14, 2000 Bastille Day (X10) event using the SOHO SEM 26.0 to 34.0 nm EUV and TIMED SEE 0.1-194 nm data. High time resolution, ~30s ground-base GPS data and the GUVI FUV dayglow data are used to examine the flare-ionosphere relationship. In the 26.0 to 34.0 nm wavelength range, the Oct 28 flare is found to have a peak intensity greater than twice that of the Nov 4 flare, indicating strong spectral variability from flare-to-flare. Solar absorption of the EUV portion of the Nov 4 limb event is a possible cause. The dayside ionosphere responds dramatically (~2.5 min 1/e rise time) to the x-ray and EUV input by an abrupt increase in total electron content (TEC). The Oct 28 TEC ionospheric peak enhancement at the subsolar point is ~25 TECU (25 × 1012 electrons/cm2) or 30% above background. In comparison, the Nov 4, Oct 29 and the Bastille Day events have ~5-7 TECU peak enhancements above background. The Oct 28 TEC enhancement lasts ~3 hrs, far longer than the flare duration. This latter ionospheric feature is consistent with increased electron production in the middle altitude ionosphere, where recombination rates are low. It is the EUV portion of the flare spectrum that is responsible for photoionization of this region. Further modeling will be necessary to fully understand the detailed physics and chemistry of flare-ionosphere coupling.

  19. Early responses of tobacco suspension cells to rhizobacterial elicitors of induced systemic resistance.

    PubMed

    van Loon, Leendert C; Bakker, Peter A H M; van der Heijdt, Walter H W; Wendehenne, David; Pugin, Alain

    2008-12-01

    Colonization of roots by selected strains of fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. can trigger induced systemic resistance (ISR) against foliar pathogens in a plant species-specific manner. It has been suggested that early responses in cell suspension cultures in response to rhizobacterial elicitors, such as generation of active oxygen species (AOS) and extracellular medium alkalinization (MA), are linked to the development of ISR in whole plants. Perception of flagellin was demonstrated to elicit ISR in Arabidopsis, and bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) have been shown to elicit several defense responses and to act as bacterial determinants of ISR in various plant species. In the present study, the LPS-containing cell walls, the pyoverdine siderophores, and the flagella of Pseudomonas putida WCS358, P. fluorescens WCS374, and P. fluorescens WCS417, which are all known to act as elicitors of ISR in selected plant species, were tested for their effects on the production of AOS, MA, elevation of cytoplasmic Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](cyt)), and defense-related gene expression in tobacco suspension cells. The LPS of all three strains, the siderophore of WCS374, and the flagella of WCS358 induced a single, transient, early burst of AOS, whereas the siderophores of WCS358 and WCS417 and the flagella of WCS374 and WCS417 did not. None of the compounds caused cell death. Once stimulated by the active compounds, the cells became refractory to further stimulation by any of the active elicitors, but not to the elicitor cryptogein from the oomycete Phytophthora cryptogea, indicating that signaling upon perception of the different rhizobacterial compounds rapidly converges into a common response pathway. Of all compounds tested, only the siderophores of WCS358 and WCS417 did not induce MA; the flagella of WCS374 and WCS417, although not active as elicitors of AOS, did induce MA. These results were corroborated by using preparations from relevant bacterial mutants. The active rhizobacterial

  20. Using Two-Ribbon Flare Observations and MHD Simulations to Constrain Flare Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazachenko, Maria D.; Lynch, Benjamin J.; Welsch, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Flare ribbons are emission structures that are frequently observed during flares in transition-region and chromospheric radiation. These typically straddle a polarity inversion line (PIL) of the radial magnetic field at the photosphere, and move apart as the flare progresses. The ribbon flux - the amount of unsigned photospheric magnetic flux swept out by flare ribbons - is thought to be related to the amount coronal magnetic reconnection, and hence provides a key diagnostic tool for understanding the physical processes at work in flares and CMEs. Previous measurements of the magnetic flux swept out by flare ribbons required time-consuming co-alignment between magnetograph and intensity data from different instruments, explaining why those studies only analyzed, at most, a few events. The launch of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), both aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), presented a rare opportunity to compile a much larger sample of flare-ribbon events than could readily be assembled before. We created a dataset of 363 events of both flare ribbon positions and fluxes, as a function of time, for all C9.-class and greater flares within 45 degrees of disk center observed by SDO from June 2010 till April 2015. For this purpose, we used vector magnetograms (2D magnetic field maps) from HMI and UV images from AIA. A critical problem with using unprocessed AIA data is the existence of spurious intensities in AIA data associated with strong flare emission, most notably "blooming" (spurious smearing of saturated signal into neighboring pixels, often in streaks). To overcome this difficulty, we have developed an algorithmic procedure that effectively excludes artifacts like blooming. We present our database and compare statistical properties of flare ribbons, e.g. evolutions of ribbon reconnection fluxes, reconnection flux rates and vertical currents with the properties from MHD simulations.

  1. Effects of flare definitions on the statistics of derived flare distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, D. F.; Dominique, M.; Seaton, D.; Stegen, K.; White, A.

    2016-08-01

    The statistical examination of solar flares is crucial to revealing their global characteristics and behaviour. Such examinations can tackle large-scale science questions or give context to detailed single-event studies. However, they are often performed using standard but basic flare detection algorithms relying on arbitrary thresholds. This arbitrariness may lead to important scientific conclusions being drawn from results caused by subjective choices in algorithms rather than the true nature of the Sun. In this paper, we explore the effect of the arbitrary thresholds used in the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) event list and Large Yield RAdiometer (LYRA) Flare Finder algorithms. We find that there is a small but significant relationship between the power law exponent of the GOES flare peak flux frequency distribution and the flare start thresholds of the algorithms. We also find that the power law exponents of these distributions are not stable, but appear to steepen with increasing peak flux. This implies that the observed flare size distribution may not be a power law at all. We show that depending on the true value of the exponent of the flare size distribution, this deviation from a power law may be due to flares missed by the flare detection algorithms. However, it is not possible determine the true exponent from GOES/XRS observations. Additionally we find that the PROBA2/LYRA flare size distributions are artificially steep and clearly non-power law. We show that this is consistent with an insufficient degradation correction. This means that PROBA2/LYRA should not be used for flare statistics or energetics unless degradation is adequately accounted for. However, it can be used to study variations over shorter timescales and for space weather monitoring.

  2. Oilfield Flare Gas Electricity Systems (OFFGASES Project)

    SciTech Connect

    Rachel Henderson; Robert Fickes

    2007-12-31

    The Oilfield Flare Gas Electricity Systems (OFFGASES) project was developed in response to a cooperative agreement offering by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under Preferred Upstream Management Projects (PUMP III). Project partners included the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) as lead agency working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the California Oil Producers Electric Cooperative (COPE). The project was designed to demonstrate that the entire range of oilfield 'stranded gases' (gas production that can not be delivered to a commercial market because it is poor quality, or the quantity is too small to be economically sold, or there are no pipeline facilities to transport it to market) can be cost-effectively harnessed to make electricity. The utilization of existing, proven distribution generation (DG) technologies to generate electricity was field-tested successfully at four marginal well sites, selected to cover a variety of potential scenarios: high Btu, medium Btu, ultra-low Btu gas, as well as a 'harsh', or high contaminant, gas. Two of the four sites for the OFFGASES project were idle wells that were shut in because of a lack of viable solutions for the stranded noncommercial gas that they produced. Converting stranded gas to useable electrical energy eliminates a waste stream that has potential negative environmental impacts to the oil production operation. The electricity produced will offset that which normally would be purchased from an electric utility, potentially lowering operating costs and extending the economic life of the oil wells. Of the piloted sites, the most promising technologies to handle the range were microturbines that have very low emissions. One recently developed product, the Flex-Microturbine, has the potential to handle the entire range of oilfield gases. It is deployed at an oilfield near Santa Barbara to run on waste gas that is only 4% the

  3. The relationship between early ego strength and adolescent responses to the threat of nuclear war

    SciTech Connect

    Andrekus, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    Ego resiliency and ego control, measured when subjects were 3 or 4 years old, were related to expectation of war, concern for the future, and activism in response to the threat of nuclear war, measured when subjects were 18 years old. Data from 92 participants in a longitudinal study of ego and cognitive development conducted by Jeanne and Jack Block at the University of California, Berkeley were used to test hypotheses. Assessments with the California Child Q-set, composited across multiple independent observers, provide measures of ego resiliency and ego control. Adolescent interviews regarding the perception of likelihood of nuclear war, how this affects their future, and their antinuclear and general political activism were scaled and rated. Early ego resiliency and ego under control were hypothesized to account for the variance in adolescent nuclear responses and activism. The only significant longitudinal relationships were in the female sample, where ego under control was found to be a significant predictor of both general political activism (p<.01) and ideas of the future being affected by the nuclear threat (p<.05). Among males, the relationship between early ego resiliency and adolescent antinuclear activism approached significance (p<.10). Adolescent personality was significantly related to several measures of nuclear response. In girls, adolescent ego under control related to perception of likelihood of nuclear war (p<.05) and antinuclear activism (p<.05), and the interaction of ego resiliency and ego under control predicted general political activism (p<.0005). In boys, adolescent ego resiliency correlated with antinuclear activism (p<.05). These findings were discussed in terms of antecedent parenting styles, and conceptual links were drawn between children's ego resiliency and security of attachment, perspective taking, and moral development.

  4. Responses in early visual areas to contour integration are context dependent.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Cheng; Burton, Philip C; Kersten, Daniel; Olman, Cheryl A

    2016-06-01

    It has been shown that early visual areas are involved in contour processing. However, it is not clear how local and global context interact to influence responses in those areas, nor has the interarea coordination that yields coherent structural percepts been fully studied, especially in human observers. In this study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure activity in early visual cortex while observers performed a contour detection task in which alignment of Gabor elements and background clutter were manipulated. Six regions of interest (two regions, containing either the cortex representing the target or the background clutter, in each of areas V1, V2, and V3) were predefined using separate target versus background functional localizer scans. The first analysis using a general linear model showed that in the presence of background clutter, responses in V1 and V2 target regions of interest were significantly stronger to aligned than unaligned contours, whereas when background clutter was absent, no significant difference was observed. The second analysis using interarea correlations showed that with background clutter, there was an increase in V1-V2 coordination within the target regions when perceiving aligned versus unaligned contours; without clutter, however, correlations between V1 and V2 were similar no matter whether aligned contours were present or not. Both the average response magnitude and the connectivity analysis suggest different mechanisms support contour processing with or without background distractors. Coordination between V1 and V2 may play a major role in coherent structure perception, especially with complex scene organization.

  5. Responses in early visual areas to contour integration are context dependent

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Cheng; Burton, Philip C.; Kersten, Daniel; Olman, Cheryl A.

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that early visual areas are involved in contour processing. However, it is not clear how local and global context interact to influence responses in those areas, nor has the interarea coordination that yields coherent structural percepts been fully studied, especially in human observers. In this study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure activity in early visual cortex while observers performed a contour detection task in which alignment of Gabor elements and background clutter were manipulated. Six regions of interest (two regions, containing either the cortex representing the target or the background clutter, in each of areas V1, V2, and V3) were predefined using separate target versus background functional localizer scans. The first analysis using a general linear model showed that in the presence of background clutter, responses in V1 and V2 target regions of interest were significantly stronger to aligned than unaligned contours, whereas when background clutter was absent, no significant difference was observed. The second analysis using interarea correlations showed that with background clutter, there was an increase in V1–V2 coordination within the target regions when perceiving aligned versus unaligned contours; without clutter, however, correlations between V1 and V2 were similar no matter whether aligned contours were present or not. Both the average response magnitude and the connectivity analysis suggest different mechanisms support contour processing with or without background distractors. Coordination between V1 and V2 may play a major role in coherent structure perception, especially with complex scene organization. PMID:27366994

  6. Early Symptom Improvement as a Predictor of Response to Extended Release Quetiapine in Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Roger S.; Gorwood, Philip; Thase, Michael E.; Liss, Charlie; Desai, Dhaval; Chen, Ji; Bauer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this post-hoc analysis was to determine whether early symptom improvement with extended release quetiapine (quetiapine XR) may predict treatment outcome in patients with major depressive disorder. Data were from 6, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies of quetiapine XR (2 fixed-dose and 2 flexible-dose monotherapy and 2 adjunct studies) in adult patients with major depressive disorder. Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and Clinical Global Impression-Severity Score (CGI-S) were assessed at baseline, weeks 2, 4, and 6. Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) was assessed at baseline and week 6. The MADRS improvement at week 2 (15%, 20%, 25%, 30%) was used to predict response and remission, based on MADRS (50% improvement; total score ≤ 12) or HAM-D (50% improvement; total score ≤ 7). The CGI-S improvement (1 point) at week 2 was used to predict final outcome (CGI-S score ≤ 2). The predictive value for early improvement with quetiapine XR was found to be “very strong” (Yule’s Q coefficient, a combined measure of sensitivity and specificity) using 30% MADRS improvement as the threshold. This was relatively comparable for response and remission and for fixed-dose, flexible-dose, and adjunct studies. This was also observed for placebo. Exceptions were: adjunct studies (where predictivity was lower for ongoing antidepressant/placebo), and for remission (predictivity for remission appeared lower than for response with placebo). In conclusion, outcome at week 6 with quetiapine XR for a major depressive episode could be predicted by 30% improvement after 2 weeks, a finding that could give doctors confidence to continue treatment and may facilitate adherence in patients. PMID:26474010

  7. Metabolic flare phenomenon on 18 fluoride-fluorodeoxy glucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography scans in a patient with bilateral breast cancer treated with second-line chemotherapy and bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian Harisankar, Chidambaram Natrajan; Preethi, Rajalakshmi; John, Jijoe

    2015-01-01

    Increase in radiopharmaceutical uptake is an indicator of progression of disease. Paradoxical increase in the radiopharmaceutical uptake also occurs during favorable response to therapy, which is designated as flare phenomenon. Flare phenomenon is well documented on bone scinitgraphy when initially noted lesions show increased radiotracer uptake after therapy is instituted. This happens despite favorable response to the treatment. The osteoblastic activity associated with healing response of bone tumors is the cause of flare phenomenon. Recently, metabolic flare phenomenon has been described in patients with breast cancer who undergo hormonal therapy. Changes in the hormonal level during initial part of the treatment is the cause of metabolic flare. We describe a patient with bilateral breast cancer who underwent second line chemotherapy along with bevacizumab. Serial positron emission tomography scans done showed interesting phenomenon of metabolic flare. PMID:25829734

  8. Metabolic flare phenomenon on 18 fluoride-fluorodeoxy glucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography scans in a patient with bilateral breast cancer treated with second-line chemotherapy and bevacizumab

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian Harisankar, Chidambaram Natrajan; Preethi, Rajalakshmi; John, Jijoe

    2015-01-01

    Increase in radiopharmaceutical uptake is an indicator of progression of disease. Paradoxical increase in the radiopharmaceutical uptake also occurs during favorable response to therapy, which is designated as flare phenomenon. Flare phenomenon is well documented on bone scinitgraphy when initially noted lesions show increased radiotracer uptake after therapy is instituted. This happens despite favorable response to the treatment. The osteoblastic activity associated with healing response of bone tumors is the cause of flare phenomenon. Recently, metabolic flare phenomenon has been described in patients with breast cancer who undergo hormonal therapy. Changes in the hormonal level during initial part of the treatment is the cause of metabolic flare. We describe a patient with bilateral breast cancer who underwent second line chemotherapy along with bevacizumab. Serial positron emission tomography scans done showed interesting phenomenon of metabolic flare. PMID:25829734

  9. Broad early immune response of porcine epithelial jejunal IPI-2I cells to Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Meurens, François; Girard-Misguich, Fabienne; Melo, Sandrine; Grave, Aurore; Salmon, Henri; Guillén, Nancy

    2009-02-01

    Amoebiasis caused by Entamoebahistolytica triggers an acute inflammatory response at early stages of intestinal infection. The patho-physiological study of intestinal amoebiasis requires the development of powerful animal models. Swine provide robust model for human diseases and they could be used to study intestinal amoebiasis. Here, we introduce an in vitro model of swine intestinal epithelial cell (IPI-2I) co-cultured with E. histolytica. Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) have crucial roles in sensing pathogens and initiating innate immune response, which qualitatively influence adaptive immune response against them. The contact between the two cells induces marked macroscopic lesions of IEC monolayer and striking alteration of the IPI-2I cell phenotype including blebbing, such as loss of attachment before to be phagocyte by the trophozoite. Increase in Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) levels in the culture supernatant of IECs was observed when ameba is present and could reflect the cellular cytotoxicity exerted by the parasite. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we identified the up-regulation of cytokines/chemokines implicated in neutrophil chemoattraction and inflammation, such as CCL2, CCL20, CXCL2, CXCL3, GM-CSF, IL1 alpha, IL6 and IL8, in response to the parasite that can further regulate the immunoregulatory functions of the immune cells of the host. The study points a cardinal role of these pro-inflammatory compounds as central mediators in the interaction IECs/ameba and suggests mechanisms by which they coordinate intestinal immune response. This will focus future efforts on delineating the molecular and cellular mechanisms of other cell partners by the way of in vivo infection of swine.

  10. Early and late healing responses of normal canine artery to excimer laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Prevosti, L G; Leon, M B; Smith, P D; Dodd, J T; Bonner, R F; Robinowitz, M; Clark, R E; Virmani, R

    1988-07-01

    Acute in vitro histologic studies have shown that the pulsed xenon chloride excimer laser causes precise microablation without the surrounding thermal tissue injury associated with frequently used continuous-wave lasers such as the argon, carbon dioxide, and neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet lasers. However, the in vivo healing response of artery wall to excimer laser injury is not known. Accordingly, a xenon chloride excimer laser (308 nm, 40 nsec pulse width, 39 mJ/mm2/pulse) was transmitted via a 600 micron fused silica fiber to create 420 craters of varying depths (30 to 270 micron) in 21 normal canine femoral and carotid arteries. At 2 hours, 2 days, 10 days, and 42 days after excimer laser ablation, the artery segments were perfusion fixed in situ and analyzed by light, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy. At 2 hours, craters were covered by a carpet of platelets and entrapped red blood cells. Fibrin and exposed collagen fibers were seen at the crater base. There was a sharp demarcation of the crater-artery wall interface without lateral laser tissue injury. At 2 days, adherent platelets persisted with thrombus covering the base of the craters. Early healing responses were present, consisting of polymorphonucleated leukocytes and new endothelial cells, which extended over the crater rims. At 10 days, no thrombi were seen, and healing continued with almost complete reendothelialization. Macrophages, fibroblasts, fibrin, and entrapped red blood cells were present below the reendothelialized surface. At 42 days, healing was complete with obliteration of the craters by fibrointimal ingrowth. The surface was completely covered by a smooth monolayer of axially aligned endothelial cells. There were no aneurysms or surface hyperplastic responses. These favorable healing responses in normal canine arteries suggest that pulsed lasers with high tissue absorption coefficients, such as the xenon chloride excimer laser, may be suitable energy sources for

  11. Early Immune Responses in Rainbow Trout Liver upon Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus (VHSV) Infection

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Rosario; Abós, Beatriz; Pignatelli, Jaime; von Gersdorff Jørgensen, Louise; González Granja, Aitor; Buchmann, Kurt; Tafalla, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    Among the essential metabolic functions of the liver, in mammals, a role as mediator of systemic and local innate immunity has also been reported. Although the presence of an important leukocyte population in mammalian liver is well documented, the characterization of leukocyte populations in the teleost liver has been only scarcely addressed. In the current work, we have confirmed the presence of IgM+, IgD+, IgT+, CD8α+, CD3+ cells, and cells expressing major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver by flow cytometry and/or immunohistochemistry analysis. Additionally, the effect of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) on the liver immune response was assessed. First, we studied the effect of viral intraperitoneal injection on the transcription of a wide selection of immune genes at days 1, 2 and 5 post-infection. These included a group of leukocyte markers genes, pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), chemokines, chemokine receptor genes, and other genes involved in the early immune response and in acute phase reaction. Our results indicate that T lymphocytes play a key role in the initial response to VHSV in the liver, since CD3, CD8, CD4, perforin, Mx and interferon (IFN) transcription levels were up-regulated in response to VHSV. Consequently, flow cytometry analysis of CD8α+ cells in liver and spleen at day 5 post-infection revealed a decrease in the number of CD8α+ cells in the spleen and an increased population in the liver. No differences were found however in the percentages of B lymphocyte (IgM+ or IgD+) populations. In addition, a strong up-regulation in the transcription levels of several PRRs and chemokines was observed from the second day of infection, indicating an important role of these factors in the response of the liver to viral infections. PMID:25338079

  12. Fine specificity of cellular immune responses in humans to human cytomegalovirus immediate-early 1 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Alp, N J; Allport, T D; Van Zanten, J; Rodgers, B; Sissons, J G; Borysiewicz, L K

    1991-01-01

    Cell-mediated immunity is important in maintaining the virus-host equilibrium in persistent human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection. The HCMV 72-kDa major immediate early 1 protein (IE1) is a target for CD8+ cytotoxic T cells in humans, as is the equivalent 89-kDa protein in mouse. Less is known about responses against this protein by CD4+ T cells, which may be important as direct effector cells or helper cells for antibody and CD8+ responses. Proliferative-T-cell responses to HCMV IE1 were studied in normal seropositive subjects. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 85% of seropositive subjects proliferated in response to HCMV from infected fibroblasts, and of these, 73% responded to recombinant baculovirus IE1. Responding cells were predominantly CD3+ CD4+. IE1 antigen preparations, including baculovirus recombinant protein, transfected rat cell nuclei, and synthetic peptides, induced IE1-specific T-cell lines which cross-reacted between the preparations. The fine specificity of these IE1-specific T-cell lines was studied by using overlapping synthetic peptides encompassing the entire sequence of the IE1 protein. The regions of the IE1 molecule recognized were identified and these varied between individuals, possibly reflecting differences in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II haplotype. In one subject, the peptide specificities of proliferative and MHC class I-restricted cytotoxic determinants on IE1 were spatially distinct. Thus, no single immunodominant T-cell determinant within HCMV IE1 was identified, suggesting that multiple peptides or a region of the 72-kDa IE1 protein would be required to induce specific T-cell responses in humans. PMID:1714519

  13. Early response of gene clusters is associated with mouse lung resistance or sensitivity to cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Cavarra, Eleonora; Fardin, Paolo; Fineschi, Silvia; Ricciardi, Annamaria; De Cunto, Giovanna; Sallustio, Fabio; Zorzetto, Michele; Luisetti, Maurizio; Pfeffer, Ulrich; Lungarella, Giuseppe; Varesio, Luigi

    2009-03-01

    We have investigated the effects of cigarette smoke exposure in three different strains of mice. DBA/2 and C57BL/6J are susceptible to smoke and develop different lung changes in response to chronic exposure, whereas ICR mice are resistant to smoke and do not develop emphysema. The present study was carried out to determine early changes in the gene expression profile of mice exposed to cigarette smoke with either a susceptible or resistant phenotype. The three strains of mice were exposed to smoke from three cigarettes per day, 5 days/wk, for 4 wk. Microarray analysis was carried out on total RNA extracted from the lung using the Affymetrix platform. Cigarette smoke modulates several clusters of genes (i.e., proemphysematous, acute phase response, and cell adhesion) in smoke-sensitive DBA/2 or C57BL/6J strains, but the same genes are not altered by smoke in ICR resistant mice. Only a few genes were commonly modulated by smoke in the three strains of mice. This pattern of gene expression suggests that the response to smoke is strain-dependent and may involve different molecular signaling pathways. Real-time quantitative PCR was used to verify the pattern of modulation of selected genes and their potential biological relevance. We conclude that gene expression response to smoke is highly dependent on the mouse genetic background. We speculate that the definition of gene clusters associated, to various degrees, with mouse susceptibility or resistance to smoke may be instrumental in defining the molecular basis of the individual response to smoke-induced lung injury in humans.

  14. Effect of hemorrhage rate on early hemodynamic responses in conscious sheep.

    PubMed

    Scully, Christopher G; Daluwatte, Chathuri; Marques, Nicole R; Khan, Muzna; Salter, Michael; Wolf, Jordan; Nelson, Christina; Salsbury, John; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Kinsky, Michael; Kramer, George C; Strauss, David G

    2016-04-01

    Physiological compensatory mechanisms can mask the extent of hemorrhage in conscious mammals, which can be further complicated by individual tolerance and variations in hemorrhage onset and duration. We assessed the effect of hemorrhage rate on tolerance and early physiologic responses to hemorrhage in conscious sheep. Eight Merino ewes (37.4 ± 1.1 kg) were subjected to fast (1.25 mL/kg/min) and slow (0.25 mL/kg/min) hemorrhages separated by at least 3 days. Blood was withdrawn until a drop in mean arterial pressure (MAP) of >30 mmHg and returned at the end of the experiment. Continuous monitoring includedMAP, central venous pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, pulse oximetry, and tissue oximetry. Cardiac output by thermodilution and arterial blood samples were also measured. The effects of fast versus slow hemorrhage rates were compared for total volume of blood removed and stoppage time (whenMAP < 30 mmHg of baseline) and physiological responses during and after the hemorrhage. Estimated blood volume removed whenMAPdropped 30 mmHg was 27.0 ± 4.2% (mean ± standard error) in the slow and 27.3 ± 3.2% in the fast hemorrhage (P = 0.47, pairedttest between rates). Pressure and tissue oximetry responses were similar between hemorrhage rates. Heart rate increased at earlier levels of blood loss during the fast hemorrhage, but hemorrhage rate was not a significant factor for individual hemorrhage tolerance or hemodynamic responses. In 5/16 hemorrhages MAP stopping criteria was reached with <25% of blood volume removed. This study presents the physiological responses leading up to a significant drop in blood pressure in a large conscious animal model and how they are altered by the rate of hemorrhage. PMID:27044850

  15. Ibuprofen treatment blunts early translational signaling responses in human skeletal muscle following resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Markworth, James F; Vella, Luke D; Figueiredo, Vandre C; Cameron-Smith, David

    2014-07-01

    Cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 pathway-derived prostaglandins (PGs) have been implicated in adaptive muscle responses to exercise, but the role of PGs in contraction-induced muscle signaling has not been determined. We investigated the effect of inhibition of cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 activities with the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen on human muscle signaling responses to resistance exercise. Subjects orally ingested 1,200 mg ibuprofen (or placebo control) in three 400-mg doses administered ∼30 min before and ∼6 h and ∼12 h following a bout of unaccustomed resistance exercise (80% one repetition maximum). Muscle biopsies were obtained at rest (preexercise), immediately postexercise (0 h), 3 h postexercise, and at 24 h of recovery. In the placebo (PLA) group, phosphorylation of ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204), ribosomal protein S6 kinase (RSK, Ser380), mitogen-activated kinase 1 (Mnk1, Thr197/202), and p70S6 kinase (p70S6K, Thr421/Ser424) increased at both 0 and 3 h postexercise, with delayed elevation of phospho (p)-p70S6K (Thr389) and p-rpS6 (Ser235/S36 and Ser240/244) at 3 h postexercise. Only p-ERK1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204) remained significantly elevated in the 24-h postexercise biopsy. Ibuprofen treatment prevented sustained elevation of MEK-ERK signaling at 3 h (p-ERK1/2, p-RSK, p-Mnk1, p-p70S6K Thr421/Ser424) and 24 h (p-ERK1/2) postexercise, and this was associated with suppressed phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (Ser235/236 and Ser240/244). Early contraction-induced p-Akt (Ser473) and p-p70S6K (Thr389) were not influenced by ibuprofen, but p-p70S6K (Thr389) remained elevated 24 h postexercise only in those receiving ibuprofen treatment. Early muscle signaling responses to resistance exercise are, in part, ibuprofen sensitive, suggesting that PGs are important signaling molecules during early postexercise recovery.

  16. Feasibility of flare gas reformation to practical energy in Farashband gas refinery: no gas flaring.

    PubMed

    Rahimpour, Mohammad Reaza; Jokar, Seyyed Mohammad

    2012-03-30

    A suggested method for controlling the level of hazardous materials in the atmosphere is prevention of combustion in flare. In this work, three methods are proposed to recover flare gas instead of conventional gas-burning in flare at the Farashband gas refinery. These methods aim to minimize environmental and economical disadvantages of burning flare gas. The proposed methods are: (1) gas to liquid (GTL) production, (2) electricity generation with a gas turbine and, (3) compression and injection into the refinery pipelines. To find the most suitable method, the refinery units that send gas to the flare as well as the required equipment for the three aforementioned methods are simulated. These simulations determine the amount of flare gas, the number of GTL barrels, the power generated by the gas turbine and the required compression horsepower. The results of simulation show that 563 barrels/day of valuable GTL products is produced by the first method. The second method provides 25 MW electricity and the third method provides a compressed natural gas with 129 bar pressure for injection to the refinery pipelines. In addition, the economics of flare gas recovery methods are studied and compared. The results show that for the 4.176MMSCFD of gas flared from the Farashband gas refinery, the electricity production gives the highest rate of return (ROR), the lowest payback period, the highest annual profit and mild capital investment. Therefore, the electricity production is the superior method economically.

  17. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Enhance Early Inflammatory Response in Sendai Virus-Induced Asthma Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Akk, Antonina; Springer, Luke E; Pham, Christine T N

    2016-01-01

    Paramyxoviral infection in childhood has been linked to a significant increased rate of asthma development. In mice, paramyxoviral infection with the mouse parainfluenza virus type I, Sendai virus (Sev), causes a limited bronchiolitis followed by persistent asthma traits. We have previously shown that the absence of cysteine protease dipeptidyl peptidase I (DPPI) dampened the acute lung inflammatory response and the subsequent asthma phenotype induced by Sev. Adoptive transfer of wild-type neutrophils into DPPI-deficient mice restored leukocyte influx, the acute cytokine response, and the subsequent mucous cell metaplasia that accompanied Sev-induced asthma phenotype. However, the exact mechanism by which DPPI-sufficient neutrophils promote asthma development following Sev infection is still unknown. We hypothesize that neutrophils recruited to the alveolar space following Sev infection elaborate neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) that propagate the inflammatory cascade, culminating in the eventual asthma phenotype. Indeed, we found that Sev infection was associated with NET formation in the lung and release of cell-free DNA complexed to myeloperoxidase in the alveolar space and plasma that peaked on day 2 post infection. Absence of DPPI significantly attenuated Sev-induced NET formation in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, concomitant administration of DNase 1, which dismantled NETs, or inhibition of peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4), an essential mediator of NET formation, suppressed the early inflammatory responses to Sev infection. Lastly, NETs primed bone marrow-derived cells to release cytokines that can amplify the inflammatory cascade. PMID:27617014

  18. Impaired Early-Response Inhibition in Overweight Females with and without Binge Eating Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Svaldi, Jennifer; Naumann, Eva; Biehl, Stefanie; Schmitz, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Objective Several studies report increased reward sensitivity towards food in overweight individuals. By contrast, data is inconclusive with respect to response inhibition in overweight individuals without binge eating disorder (BED). Hence, the latter was addressed in the present study in a group of overweight/obese females with and without BED and a normal-weight control group without eating disorders. Method A group of women with BED (n = 29), a group of overweight women without BED (n = 33) and normal-weight females (n = 30) participated in a pictorial priming paradigm, with food items (relevant primes) and office utensils (neutral primes) and color blobs (neutral primes) as stimuli. Increased response priming effects (i.e. priming with switches between stimulus categories) were taken as indicators of deficient behavioral inhibition. Results Priming effects for neutral primes were moderate and comparable across all groups. However, primes associated with the food task set lead to increased priming effects in both overweight groups. But, effects were comparable for overweight/obese participants with and without BED. Discussion Results suggest that early response inhibition in the context of food is impaired in overweight individuals compared to normal-weight individuals. PMID:26201025

  19. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Enhance Early Inflammatory Response in Sendai Virus-Induced Asthma Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Akk, Antonina; Springer, Luke E.; Pham, Christine T. N.

    2016-01-01

    Paramyxoviral infection in childhood has been linked to a significant increased rate of asthma development. In mice, paramyxoviral infection with the mouse parainfluenza virus type I, Sendai virus (Sev), causes a limited bronchiolitis followed by persistent asthma traits. We have previously shown that the absence of cysteine protease dipeptidyl peptidase I (DPPI) dampened the acute lung inflammatory response and the subsequent asthma phenotype induced by Sev. Adoptive transfer of wild-type neutrophils into DPPI-deficient mice restored leukocyte influx, the acute cytokine response, and the subsequent mucous cell metaplasia that accompanied Sev-induced asthma phenotype. However, the exact mechanism by which DPPI-sufficient neutrophils promote asthma development following Sev infection is still unknown. We hypothesize that neutrophils recruited to the alveolar space following Sev infection elaborate neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) that propagate the inflammatory cascade, culminating in the eventual asthma phenotype. Indeed, we found that Sev infection was associated with NET formation in the lung and release of cell-free DNA complexed to myeloperoxidase in the alveolar space and plasma that peaked on day 2 post infection. Absence of DPPI significantly attenuated Sev-induced NET formation in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, concomitant administration of DNase 1, which dismantled NETs, or inhibition of peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4), an essential mediator of NET formation, suppressed the early inflammatory responses to Sev infection. Lastly, NETs primed bone marrow-derived cells to release cytokines that can amplify the inflammatory cascade.

  20. Developmental changes in brain activation and functional connectivity during response inhibition in the early childhood brain.

    PubMed

    Mehnert, Jan; Akhrif, Atae; Telkemeyer, Silke; Rossi, Sonja; Schmitz, Christoph H; Steinbrink, Jens; Wartenburger, Isabell; Obrig, Hellmuth; Neufang, Susanne

    2013-11-01

    Response inhibition is an attention function which develops relatively early during childhood. Behavioral data suggest that by the age of 3, children master the basic task requirements for the assessment of response inhibition but performance improves substantially until the age of 7. The neuronal mechanisms underlying these developmental processes, however, are not well understood. In this study, we examined brain activation patterns and behavioral performance of children aged between 4 and 6 years compared to adults by applying a go/no-go paradigm during near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) brain imaging. We furthermore applied task-independent functional connectivity measures to the imaging data to identify maturation of intrinsic neural functional networks. We found a significant group×condition related interaction in terms of inhibition-related reduced right fronto-parietal activation in children compared to adults. In contrast, motor-related activation did not differ between age groups. Functional connectivity analysis revealed that in the children's group, short-range coherence within frontal areas was stronger, and long-range coherence between frontal and parietal areas was weaker, compared to adults. Our findings show that in children aged from 4 to 6 years fronto-parietal brain maturation plays a crucial part in the cognitive development of response inhibition. PMID:23265620

  1. Response of Cross-biome Productivity to the Early 21st Century Drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce-Campos, G. E.; Moran, S. M.; Huete, A. R.; Zhang, Y.; Bresloff, C. J.; Huxman, T. E.; Bosch, D. D.; Buda, A. R.; Gunter, S. A.; Kitchen, S. G.; McNab, W.; McClaran, M. P.; Morgan, J. A.; Peters, D. P.; Sadler, E.; Seyfried, M. S.; Starks, P. J.; Montoya, D. S.; Heartsill, T.; Eamus, D.

    2012-12-01

    The response of ecosystem productivity to contemporary drought coupled with record warming presents important challenges to predictive ecological modeling. In this study, we investigated the response of annual above-ground net primary production (ANPP) to precipitation variability during the early 21st century drought (2000-2009). The analysis combined satellite estimates of vegetation greenness with meteorological data from in situ climate network stations at experimental sites across a range of biomes from grassland to forest in Northern and Southern Hemispheres. We found that despite enduring prolonged warm drought conditions, all biomes retained their ANPP sensitivities to mean annual precipitation. Rain use efficiencies (RUE = ANPP/precipitation) were highest for the grassland and decreased with higher precipitation over the humid forest sites. For the most extreme drought conditions in the driest years, cross-biome RUE converged to a common, maximum rain use efficiency (RUEmax) that exceeded values previously reported. These results have implications for predicting productivity responses to potential climate change across a range of terrestrial biomes. The satellite-based approach demonstrated here may provide a means of monitoring productivity at experimental sites to better understand the consequences of predicted climate change on food security and resource management.

  2. Keratinocyte nicotinic acetylcholine receptor activation modulates early TLR2-mediated wound healing responses.

    PubMed

    Kishibe, Mari; Griffin, Tina M; Radek, Katherine A

    2015-11-01

    The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway spans several macro- and micro-environments to control inflammation via α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Physiologic inflammation is necessary for normal wound repair and is triggered, in part, via Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Here, we demonstrate that keratinocyte nAChR activation dampens TLR2-mediated migration and pro-inflammatory cytokine and antimicrobial peptide (AMP) production, which is restored by a α7-selective nAChR antagonist. The mechanism of this response occurs by blocking the NF-κB and Erk1/2 pathway during early and late wound healing. In a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus wound infection, topical nAChR activation reduces wound AMP and TLR2 production to augment bacterial survival in wild-type mice. These findings suggest that aberrant α7 nAChR activation may impair normal wound healing responses, and that pharmacologic administration of topical nAChR antagonists may improve wound healin