Science.gov

Sample records for early flare response

  1. FlareLab: early results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltwisch, H.; Kempkes, P.; Mackel, F.; Stein, H.; Tenfelde, J.; Arnold, L.; Dreher, J.; Grauer, R.

    2010-12-01

    The FlareLab experiment at Bochum University has been constructed to generate and investigate plasma-filled magnetic flux tubes similar to arch-shaped solar prominences, which often result in coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In its first version, the device has been used to reproduce and extend previous studies of Bellan et al (1998 Phys. Plasmas 5 1991). Here the plasma source consists of two electrodes, which can be connected to a 1.0 kJ capacitor bank, and of a horseshoe magnet, which provides an arch-shaped guiding field. The discharge is ignited in a cloud of hydrogen gas that has been puffed into the space above the electrodes. In the first few microseconds the plasma current rises at a rate of several kA µs-1, causing the plasma column to pinch along the guiding B-field and to form an expanding loop structure. The observed dynamics of the magnetic flux tubes is analysed by means of three-dimensional MHD simulations in order to determine the influence of parameters like the initial magnetic field geometry on magnetic stability. At present, FlareLab is redesigned to mimic a model that was proposed by Titov and Démoulin (1999 Astron. Astrophys. 351 707) to investigate twisted magnetic configurations in solar flares.

  2. X-ray flares in early GRB afterglows.

    PubMed

    Burrows, D N; Falcone, A; Chincarini, G; Morris, D; Romano, P; Hill, J E; Godet, O; Moretti, A; Krimm, H; Osborne, J P; Racusin, J; Mangano, V; Page, K; Perri, M; Stroh, M

    2007-05-15

    The Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) has discovered that flares are quite common in early X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), being observed in roughly 50% of afterglows with prompt follow-up observations. The flares range in fluence from a few per cent to approximately 100% of the fluence of the prompt emission (the GRB). Repetitive flares are seen, with more than four successive flares detected by the XRT in some afterglows. The rise and fall times of the flares are typically considerably smaller than the time since the burst. These characteristics suggest that the flares are related to the prompt emission mechanism, but at lower photon energies. We conclude that the most likely cause of these flares is late-time activity of the GRB central engine.

  3. REMOTE OSCILLATORY RESPONSES TO A SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Andic, A.; McAteer, R. T. J.

    2013-07-20

    The processes governing energy storage and release in the Sun are both related to the solar magnetic field. We demonstrate the existence of a magnetic connection between the energy released by a flare and increased oscillatory power in the lower solar atmosphere. The oscillatory power in active regions tends to increase in response to explosive events at other locations, but not in the active region itself. We carry out timing studies and show that this effect is probably caused by a large-scale magnetic connection between the regions, instead of a globally-propagating wave. We show that oscillations tend to exist in longer-lived wave trains with short periods (P < 200 s) at the time of a flare. These wave trains may be mechanisms by which flare energy can be redistributed throughout the solar atmosphere.

  4. Predicting the Response of the Mars Ionosphere to Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallows, K.; Withers, P.; Gonzalez, G.

    2015-12-01

    The increased soft X-ray irradiance during solar flares generates increased electron densities in the lower ionosphere of Mars. The relative changes in electron density during a flare are greater for larger flares and also at lower altitudes and larger flares, due to the wavelength dependence of both the flux increase during the flare and the absorption of flux by the neutral atmosphere. These relationships have been explored [Bougher et al. 2001, Fox et al. 2004, Mendillo et al. 2006, Mahajan et al. 2011, Lollo et al. 2012] but not quantified, which has impeded the validation of simulations of the ionospheric effects of solar flares. Such simulations are necessary for developing accurate descriptions of the physical processes governing ionospheric behavior under extreme conditions. We present a response function, a mathematical expression for the change in electron density during a solar flare as a function of the change in solar flux and an optical depth proxy. This response function is based on analysis of 20 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) radio occultation electron density profiles measured during solar flares. Characterizing the response as a function of optical depth, rather than altitude, provides the best description of ionospheric variability during a flare; otherwise non-negligible solar zenith angle effects are present. We demonstrate that the response function can be used to predict ionospheric electron densities during a specified solar flare by reproducing profiles known to be disturbed by a solar flare. We also demonstrate that the response function can be used to infer the strength of solar flares not visible at Earth by finding the flux enhancement required to reproduce an apparently flare affected profile given an undisturbed profile on the same date.

  5. PLASMA HEATING IN THE VERY EARLY PHASE OF SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Siarkowski, M.; Falewicz, R.; Rudawy, P. E-mail: falewicz@astro.uni.wroc.p

    2009-11-10

    In this Letter, we analyze soft X-ray (SXR) and hard X-ray (HXR) emission of the 2002 September 20 M1.8 GOES class solar flare observed by the RHESSI and GOES satellites. In this flare event, SXR emission precedes the onset of the main bulk HXR emission by approx5 minutes. This suggests that an additional heating mechanism may be at work at the early beginning of the flare. However, RHESSI spectra indicate a presence of the non-thermal electrons also before the impulsive phase. So, we assumed that a dominant energy transport mechanism during the rise phase of solar flares is electron-beam-driven evaporation. We used non-thermal electron beams derived from RHESSI spectra as the heating source in a hydrodynamic model of the analyzed flare. We showed that energy delivered by non-thermal electron beams is sufficient to heat the flare loop to temperatures in which it emits SXR closely following the GOES 1-8 A light curve. We also analyze the number of non-thermal electrons, the low-energy cutoff, electron spectral indices, and the changes of these parameters with time.

  6. Flare Ribbons In The Early Phase Of An SDO Flare: Emission Measure And Energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Lyndsay; Hannah, I. G.; Hudson, H. S.; Innes, D. E.

    2012-05-01

    We report on the M1.0 flare of 7th August 2010, which displayed extended early phase chromospheric ribbons, well observed by SDO/AIA and RHESSI. Most large flares saturate rapidly in the high-temperature AIA channels, however this event could be followed in unsaturated AIA images for ten minutes in the build-up to and first few minutes of the impulsive phase. Analysis of GOES, RHESSI and SDO/AIA demonstrates the presence of high temperature ( 10MK), compact plasma volumes in the chromospheric flare ribbons, with a column emission measure of on average 3-7 x 1028 cm-5. We construct a time-resolved energy budget for the ribbon plasma, including also SDO/EVE data, and discuss the implications of the observed ribbon properties for flare energisation. This work was supported by the UK’s Science and Technology Facilities Council (ST/1001801), and by the European Commission through the FP7 HESPE project (FP7-2010-SPACE-263086).

  7. Seismic Response to Solar Flares Observed SOHO/MDI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkova, V. V.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    First observations with the SOHO Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) of seismic effects in the solar atmosphere in response to solar flares are investigated in the complex environment using X-ray (Yohkoh), white light (LASCO) and magnetographic observations. Solar flares are found to produce the outgoing circular waves which can be detected on MDI dopplergrams visually. The time-distance diagrams for the first three azimuthal components of the flare seismogram are constructed from 1 minute velocity differences. These observations were compared with the theoretical models of a seismic response to solar flares using the thick target model with electron beam injection. Some discrepancies were found as for the energy momentum of flare's shock waves being able to produce a noticeable seismic response, so for the observed travel time of seismic waves in comparison with the theoretical predictions. Possible mechanisms of such discrepancies are discussed.

  8. FLARE RIBBON ENERGETICS IN THE EARLY PHASE OF AN SDO FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, L.; Hannah, I. G.; Hudson, H. S.; Innes, D. E.

    2013-07-10

    The sites of chromospheric excitation during solar flares are marked by extended extreme ultraviolet ribbons and hard X-ray (HXR) footpoints. The standard interpretation is that these are the result of heating and bremsstrahlung emission from non-thermal electrons precipitating from the corona. We examine this picture using multi-wavelength observations of the early phase of an M-class flare SOL2010-08-07T18:24. We aim to determine the properties of the heated plasma in the flare ribbons, and to understand the partition of the power input into radiative and conductive losses. Using GOES, SDO/EVE, SDO/AIA, and RHESSI, we measure the temperature, emission measure (EM), and differential emission measure of the flare ribbons, and deduce approximate density values. The non-thermal EM, and the collisional thick target energy input to the ribbons are obtained from RHESSI using standard methods. We deduce the existence of a substantial amount of plasma at 10 MK in the flare ribbons, during the pre-impulsive and early-impulsive phase of the flare. The average column EM of this hot component is a few times 10{sup 28} cm{sup -5}, and we can calculate that its predicted conductive losses dominate its measured radiative losses. If the power input to the hot ribbon plasma is due to collisional energy deposition by an electron beam from the corona then a low-energy cutoff of {approx}5 keV is necessary to balance the conductive losses, implying a very large electron energy content. Independent of the standard collisional thick-target electron beam interpretation, the observed non-thermal X-rays can be provided if one electron in 10{sup 3}-10{sup 4} in the 10 MK (1 keV) ribbon plasma has an energy above 10 keV. We speculate that this could arise if a non-thermal tail is generated in the ribbon plasma which is being heated by other means, for example, by waves or turbulence.

  9. Models of the Solar Atmospheric Response to Flare Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allred, Joel

    2011-01-01

    I will present models of the solar atmospheric response to flare heating. The models solve the equations of non-LTE radiation hydrodynamics with an electron beam added as a flare energy source term. Radiative transfer is solved in detail for many important optically thick hydrogen and helium transitions and numerous optically thin EUV lines making the models ideally suited to study the emission that is produced during flares. I will pay special attention to understanding key EUV lines as well the mechanism for white light production. I will also present preliminary results of how the model solar atmosphere responds to Fletcher & Hudson type flare heating. I will compare this with the results from flare simulations using the standard thick target model.

  10. Olopatadine hydrochloride inhibits capsaicin-induced flare response in humans.

    PubMed

    Shindo, Masahisa; Yoshida, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Osamu

    2011-01-01

    Capsaicin, a vanilloid, has the potential for releasing substance P (SP) from sensory nerves. Topical application of capsaicin induces a flare response in the skin. However, it has not been clarified whether the release of SP is involved in the process of flare response or not. A potent antihistamine drug, olopatadine hydrochloride, is known to have inhibitory action against the release of SP. We examined the effects of olopatadine (at a dose of 5 mg) on skin reaction induced by topical application of capsaicin in 10 healthy subjects. The scores of capsaicin-induced flare responses after olopatadine administration were significantly lower at 30 min than at baseline. Our findings suggest that olopatadine hydrochloride could inhibit capsaicin-induced flare responses. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Variability of Thermosphere and Ionosphere Responses to Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qian, Liying; Burns, Alan G.; Chamberlin, Philip C.; Solomon, Stanley C.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated how the rise rate and decay rate of solar flares affect the thermosphere and ionosphere responses to them. Model simulations and data analysis were conducted for two flares of similar magnitude (X6.2 and X5.4) that had the same location on the solar limb, but the X6.2 flare had longer rise and decay times. Simulated total electron content (TEC) enhancements from the X6.2 and X5.4 flares were 6 total electron content units (TECU) and approximately 2 TECU, and the simulated neutral density enhancements were approximately 15% -20% and approximately 5%, respectively, in reasonable agreement with observations. Additional model simulations showed that for idealized flares with the same magnitude and location, the thermosphere and ionosphere responses changed significantly as a function of rise and decay rates. The Neupert Effect, which predicts that a faster flare rise rate leads to a larger EUV enhancement during the impulsive phase, caused a larger maximum ion production enhancement. In addition, model simulations showed that increased E x B plasma transport due to conductivity increases during the flares caused a significant equatorial anomaly feature in the electron density enhancement in the F region but a relatively weaker equatorial anomaly feature in TEC enhancement, owing to dominant contributions by photochemical production and loss processes. The latitude dependence of the thermosphere response correlated well with the solar zenith angle effect, whereas the latitude dependence of the ionosphere response was more complex, owing to plasma transport and the winter anomaly.

  12. Variability of Thermosphere and Ionosphere Responses to Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qian, Liying; Burns, Alan G.; Chamberlin, Philip C.; Solomon, Stanley C.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated how the rise rate and decay rate of solar flares affect the thermosphere and ionosphere responses to them. Model simulations and data analysis were conducted for two flares of similar magnitude (X6.2 and X5.4) that had the same location on the solar limb, but the X6.2 flare had longer rise and decay times. Simulated total electron content (TEC) enhancements from the X6.2 and X5.4 flares were 6 total electron content units (TECU) and approximately 2 TECU, and the simulated neutral density enhancements were approximately 15% -20% and approximately 5%, respectively, in reasonable agreement with observations. Additional model simulations showed that for idealized flares with the same magnitude and location, the thermosphere and ionosphere responses changed significantly as a function of rise and decay rates. The Neupert Effect, which predicts that a faster flare rise rate leads to a larger EUV enhancement during the impulsive phase, caused a larger maximum ion production enhancement. In addition, model simulations showed that increased E x B plasma transport due to conductivity increases during the flares caused a significant equatorial anomaly feature in the electron density enhancement in the F region but a relatively weaker equatorial anomaly feature in TEC enhancement, owing to dominant contributions by photochemical production and loss processes. The latitude dependence of the thermosphere response correlated well with the solar zenith angle effect, whereas the latitude dependence of the ionosphere response was more complex, owing to plasma transport and the winter anomaly.

  13. FLARES PRODUCING WELL-ORGANIZED POST-FLARE ARCADES (SLINKIES) HAVE EARLY PRECURSORS

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutova, M. P.

    2011-06-01

    Exploding loop systems producing X-ray flares often, but not always, bifurcate into a long-living, well-organized system of multi-threaded loop arcades resembling solenoidal slinkies. The physical conditions that cause or prevent this process are not known. To address this problem, we examined most of the major (X-class) flares that occurred during the last decade and found that the flares that bifurcate into long-living slinky arcades have different signatures than those that do not 'produce' such structures. The most striking difference is that, in all cases of slinky formation, GOES high energy proton flux becomes significantly enhanced 10-24 hr before the flare occurs. No such effect was found prior to the 'non-slinky' flares. This fact may be associated with the difference between energy production by a given active region and the amount of energy required to bring the entire system into the form of well-organized, self-similar loop arcades. As an example illustrating the process of post-flare slinky formation, we present observations taken with the Hinode satellite, in several wavelengths, showing a time sequence of pre-flare and flare activity, followed by the formation of dynamically stable, well-organized structures. One of the important features revealed is that post-flare coronal slinky formation is preceded by scale invariant structure formation in the underlying chromosphere/transition region. We suggest that the observed regularities can be understood within the framework of self-organized critical dynamics characterized by scale invariant structure formation with critical parameters largely determined by energy saturation level. The observed regularities per se may serve as a long-term precursor of strong flares and may help to study predictability of system behavior.

  14. Solar Flare Response in the Topside, Equatorial Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrell, A. G.; Zhu, J.; Ridley, A. J.; Stoneback, R.

    2012-12-01

    During solar flares, the sudden increase in the X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance leads to sudden changes in the global ionospheric state. Near the geomagnetic equator, these changes are thought to be heavily influenced by alterations to the E-region density, which in turn changes the E×B drift. Although departures from climatological values are small for ionospheric characteristics, the topside ionosphere is expected to take much longer to recover from the influence of solar flares than the bottomside does. Using data from the Coupled Ion Neutral Dynamics Investigation (CINDI) mission onboard the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System (C/NOFS) satellite and simulations from the Global Ionosphere-Thermosphere Model (GITM), the response of the topside equatorial ionosphere to several solar flares will be examined. Comparing the modeled and measured responses of ion characteristics will help elucidate the influence of the E×B drift, the neutral wind, and the pressure gradient in shaping the ionospheric response to increased levels of solar X-ray and EUV irradiance.

  15. Nonthermal X-ray Spectral Flattening toward Low Energies in Early Impulsive Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2007-01-01

    The determination of the low-energy cutoff to nonthermal electron distributions is critical to the calculation of the nonthermal energy in solar flares. The most direct evidence for low-energy cutoffs is flattening of the power-law, nontherma1 X-ray spectra at low energies. However, because of the plasma preheating often seen in flares, the thermal emissions at low energies may hide such spectral flattening of the nonthermal component. We select a category of flares, which we call "early impulsive flares", in which the > 25 keV hard X-ray (HXR) flux increase is delayed by less than 30 s after the flux increase at lower energies. Thus, the plasma preheating in these flares is minimal, so the nonthermal spectrum can be determined to lower energies than in flares with significant preheating. Out of a sample of 33 early impulsive flares observed by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopy Imager (RHESSI), 9 showed spectral flattening toward low energies. In these events, the break energy of the double power-law fit to the HXR spectra lies in the range of 10-50 keV, significantly lower than the value we have seen for other flares that do not show such early impulsive emissions. In particular, it correlates with the HXR flux. After correcting the spatially-integrated spectra for albedo from isotropically emitted X-rays and using RHESSI imaging spectroscopy to exclude the extended albedo halo, we find that albedo associated with isotropic or nearly isotropic electrons can only account for the spectral flattening in 3 flares near Sun center. The spectral flattening in the remaining 6 flares is found to be consistent with the existence of a low-energy cutoff in the electron spectrum, falling in the range of 15-50 keV, which also correlates with the HXR flux.

  16. Solar flares as proxy for the young Sun: satellite observed thermosphere response to an X17.2 flare of Earth's upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, S.; Fichtinger, B.; Lammer, H.; Hausleitner, W.; Kulikov, Yu. N.; Ribas, I.; Shematovich, V. I.; Bisikalo, D.; Lichtenegger, H. I. M.; Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Khodachenko, M. L.; Hanslmeier, A.

    2012-08-01

    We analyzed the measured thermospheric response of an extreme solar X17.2 flare that irradiated the Earth's upper atmosphere during the so-called Halloween events in late October/early November 2003. We suggest that such events can serve as proxies for the intense electromagnetic and corpuscular radiation environment of the Sun or other stars during their early phases of evolution. We applied and compared empirical thermosphere models with satellite drag measurements from the GRACE satellites and found that the Jacchia-Bowman 2008 model can reproduce the drag measurements very well during undisturbed solar conditions but gets worse during extreme solar events. By analyzing the peak of the X17.2 flare spectra and comparing it with spectra of young solar proxies, our results indicate that the peak flare radiation flux corresponds to a hypothetical Sun-like star or the Sun at the age of approximately 2.3 Gyr. This implies that the peak extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation is enhanced by a factor of about 2.5 times compared to today's Sun. On the assumption that the Sun emitted an EUV flux of that magnitude and by modifying the activity indices in the Jacchia-Bowman 2008 model, we obtain an average exobase temperature of 1950 K, which corresponds with previous theoretical studies related to thermospheric heating and expansion caused by the solar EUV flux.

  17. Are Complex Magnetic Field Structures Responsible for the Confined X-class Flares in Super Active Region 12192?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Li, Ting; Chen, Huadong

    2017-08-01

    From 2014 October 19 to 27, six X-class flares occurred in super active region (AR) 12192. They were all confined flares and were not followed by coronal mass ejections. To examine the structures of the four flares close to the solar disk center from October 22 to 26, we firstly employ composite triple-time images in each flare process to display the stratified structure of these flare loops. The loop structures of each flare in both the lower (171 Å) and higher (131 Å) temperature channels are complex, e.g., the flare loops rooting at flare ribbons are sheared or twisted (enwound) together, and the complex structures were not destroyed during the flares. For the first flare, although the flare loop system appears as a spindle shape, we can estimate its structures from observations, with lengths ranging from 130 to 300 Mm, heights from 65 to 150 Mm, widths at the middle part of the spindle from 40 to 100 Mm, and shear angles from 16° to 90°. Moreover, the flare ribbons display irregular movements, such as the left ribbon fragments of the flare on October 22 sweeping a small region repeatedly, and both ribbons of the flare on October 26 moved along the same direction instead of separating from each other. These irregular movements also imply that the corresponding flare loops are complex, e.g., several sets of flare loops are twisted together. Although previous studies have suggested that the background magnetic fields prevent confined flares from erupting,based on these observations, we suggest that complex flare loop structures may be responsible for these confined flares.

  18. Spectral response of the solar atmosphere to an X-class flare event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacatus, Daniela Adriana; Donea, Alina

    2016-05-01

    The only X-class flare of 2015 observed by IRIS occurred at 16:22 UT on 11 March 2015, in AR 12297. This flare generated significant seismic transients in the photosphere at the eastern location of the flare. IRIS observations of the chromosphere and transition region help us understand the physics of the sunquake. In this work we will analyse this event using data from IRIS, SDO, and RHESSI. The IRIS rasters scanned the area between the main footpoints of the solar flare, and a wealth of chromospheric information has been inferred about the dynamics of the event. The main X-ray emission dominates the eastern flare footpoint, being missed by the IRIS slit. Significant enhancements in the chromospheric and TR lines intensities were identified. The forbidden line of Fe XXI 1354.1 Å is detected after the flare peak revealing the coronal responses to the flare. Plasma downflows of up to 300 km/s were identified in the majority of the observed lines, consistent with magnetic field local reconfiguration. We have also analysed an erupting filament developing at an earlier time, which moved rapidly towards the eastern part of the active region. We discuss the possibility that this filament might have pre-conditioned the chromosphere for the flare process.

  19. Where is the chromospheric response to conductive energy input from a hot pre-flare coronal loop?

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, Marina; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Simões, Paulo J. A.

    2014-07-01

    Before the onset of a flare is observed in hard X-rays, there is often a prolonged pre-flare or pre-heating phase with no detectable hard X-ray emission but pronounced soft X-ray emission, which suggests that energy is already being released and deposited into the corona and chromosphere at this stage. This work analyzes the temporal evolution of coronal source heating and the chromospheric response during this pre-heating phase to investigate the origin and nature of early energy release and transport during a solar flare. Simultaneous X-ray, EUV, and microwave observations of a well-observed flare with a prolonged pre-heating phase are analyzed to study the time evolution of the thermal emission and to determine the onset of particle acceleration. During the 20 minute duration of the pre-heating phase we find no hint of accelerated electrons in either hard X-rays or microwave emission. However, the total energy budget during the pre-heating phase suggests that energy must be supplied to the flaring loop to sustain the observed temperature and emission measure. Under the assumption of this energy being transported toward the chromosphere via thermal conduction, significant energy deposition at the chromosphere is expected. However, no detectable increase of the emission in the AIA wavelength channels sensitive to chromospheric temperatures is observed. The observations suggest energy release and deposition in the flaring loop before the onset of particle acceleration, yet a model in which energy is conducted to the chromosphere and subsequent heating of the chromosphere is not supported by the observations.

  20. The response of the chromosphere during a stellar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawley, Suzanne L.

    1991-01-01

    A set of chromospheric models was developed, having a coronal loop geometry, energy balance through the entire loop from photosphere to corona, and a rigorous treatment of the radiative transfer in the important, optically thick, chromospheric emission lines. The models show that the soft X-ray emission and thermal conduction from a long lived hot corona are effective heating agents in the lower atmosphere during the gradual phase of stellar flares. The model predictions show the correct order of magnitude for the emission lines produced during the gradual phase of the flare with a reasonable coronal temperature evolution.

  1. The Atmospheric Response to High Nonthermal Electron Beam Fluxes in Solar Flares. I. Modeling the Brightest NUV Footpoints in the X1 Solar Flare of 2014 March 29

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Allred, Joel C.; Daw, Adrian; Cauzzi, Gianna; Carlsson, Mats

    2017-02-01

    The 2014 March 29 X1 solar flare (SOL20140329T17:48) produced bright continuum emission in the far- and near-ultraviolet (NUV) and highly asymmetric chromospheric emission lines, providing long-sought constraints on the heating mechanisms of the lower atmosphere in solar flares. We analyze the continuum and emission line data from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of the brightest flaring magnetic footpoints in this flare. We compare the NUV spectra of the brightest pixels to new radiative-hydrodynamic predictions calculated with the RADYN code using constraints on a nonthermal electron beam inferred from the collisional thick-target modeling of hard X-ray data from Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager. We show that the atmospheric response to a high beam flux density satisfactorily achieves the observed continuum brightness in the NUV. The NUV continuum emission in this flare is consistent with hydrogen (Balmer) recombination radiation that originates from low optical depth in a dense chromospheric condensation and from the stationary beam-heated layers just below the condensation. A model producing two flaring regions (a condensation and stationary layers) in the lower atmosphere is also consistent with the asymmetric Fe ii chromospheric emission line profiles observed in the impulsive phase.

  2. A COMPREHENSIVE STUDY OF GAMMA-RAY BURST OPTICAL EMISSION. I. FLARES AND EARLY SHALLOW-DECAY COMPONENT

    SciTech Connect

    Li Liang; Liang Enwei; Tang Qingwen; Chen Jiemin; Xi Shaoqiang; Zhang Bing; Lu Ruijing; Lue Lianzhong; Lue Houjun; Gao He; Zhang Jin; Wei Jianyan; Yi Shuangxi E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2012-10-10

    Well-sampled optical light curves of 146 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are compiled from the literature. By empirical fitting, we identify eight possible emission components and summarize the results in a 'synthetic' light curve. Both optical flare and early shallow-decay components are likely related to long-term central engine activities. We focus on their statistical properties in this paper. Twenty-four optical flares are obtained from 19 GRBs. The isotropic R-band energy is smaller than 1% of E{sub {gamma},iso}. The relation between the isotropic luminosities of the flares and gamma rays follows L{sup F}{sub R,iso}{proportional_to}L {sup 1.11{+-}0.27}{sub {gamma},iso}. Later flares tend to be wider and dimmer, i.e., w{sup F} {approx} t{sup F}{sub p}/2 and L{sup F}{sub R,iso}{proportional_to}[t{sup F}{sub p}/(1 + z)]{sup -1.15{+-}0.15}. The detection probability of the optical flares is much smaller than that of X-ray flares. An optical shallow-decay segment is observed in 39 GRBs. The relation between the break time and break luminosity is a power law, with an index of -0.78 {+-} 0.08, similar to that derived from X-ray flares. The X-ray and optical breaks are usually chromatic, but a tentative correlation is found. We suggest that similar to the prompt optical emission that tracks {gamma}-rays, the optical flares are also related to the erratic behavior of the central engine. The shallow-decay component is likely related to a long-lasting spinning-down central engine or piling up of flare materials onto the blast wave. Mixing of different emission components may be the reason for the diverse chromatic afterglow behaviors.

  3. Observations of X-ray and EUV fluxes during X-class solar flares and response of upper ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, K. K.; Lodhi, Neelesh K.; Upadhayaya, Arun K.

    2010-12-01

    Most studies dealing with solar flare effects in the upper ionosphere, where ionization is caused by EUV photons, have been based upon X-ray fluxes measured by the SOLRAD and GOES series of satellites. To check the validity of such studies, we compare simultaneous observations of GOES X-ray fluxes and SOHO EUV fluxes for 10 X-class solar flares which occurred during the maximum phase of sunspot cycle 23. These include the greatest flare of 4 November 2003, the fourth greatest flare of 28 October 2003 and the 14 July 2000 Bastille Day flare. We find that the peak intensities of the X-ray and EUV fluxes for these flares are poorly correlated, and this poor correlation is again seen when larger data containing 70 X-class flares, which occurred during the period January 1996 to December 2006, are examined. However, this correlation improves vastly when the central meridian distance (CMD) of the flare location is taken into account. We also study the response of the upper ionosphere to these fluxes by using the midday total electron content (TEC), observed for these flares by Liu et al. (2006). We find that peak enhancement in TEC is highly correlated with peak enhancement in EUV flux. The correlation, though poor with the X-ray flux, improves greatly when the CMD of flare location is considered.

  4. Comparative inhibition by bilastine and cetirizine of histamine-induced wheal and flare responses in humans.

    PubMed

    Church, Martin K

    2011-12-01

    Comparison of bilastine and cetirizine in inhibiting skin wheal and flare responses over 24 h. Twenty-one healthy male volunteers (aged 19-44 years). Volunteers were randomised to receive single oral doses of 20 or 50 mg bilastine, 10 mg cetirizine or placebo before provocation of wheal and flare responses to 100 mg/ml histamine by skin prick 1.5, 4, 8, 12 and 24 h later. There were no significant differences between overall inhibitions of wheal or flare by 20 mg bilastine and 10 mg cetirizine. Bilastine was faster in onset than cetirizine, inhibitions of wheal and flare at 1.5 h being 89 ± 3 versus 44 ± 14% (P = 0.011) and 85 ± 4 versus 45 ± 14% (P = 0.016), respectively (Student's t test). At 1.5 h, both wheals and flares were inhibited by >70% in 11/12 volunteers taking bilastine and 3/11 taking cetirizine (P = 0.003, Fisher's exact test). There were no significant differences between the drugs at later times. Bilastine 50 mg had a longer duration of action than bilastine 20 mg. Both 20 mg bilastine and 10 mg cetirizine are effective and of long duration in reducing histamine-induced wheal and flare responses, the major difference between the two drugs being the more rapid onset of action of bilastine.

  5. Study of the Influences of the Ionospheric Responses to the Solar Flares by the Solar Flare Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Ridley, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Electron densities in the ionosphere increase during solar flares due to the sudden increase in the solar irradiance at soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet wavelengths. In this study, we perform simulations for a list of solar flares with different classes and locations on the solar disk (center-to-limb variations) using the Global Ionosphere and Thermosphere Model (GITM). First, we make an analysis of magnitudes and distribution of the TEC perturbations due to different solar flares. Solar flares occurring in different seasons are chosen from the list in order to examine how perturbations of electron densities depend on altitudes (E and F regions), latitudes (seasonal variations) and longitudes (sunrise, dayside and sunset), as well as the time dependences of the increasing and decaying of the electron densities around the flares. Also, we investigate the TEC data by the global GPS network from the Madrigal database for the solar flares on the list, determining the characteristics of solar flare that would allow them to be detected by the ground-based GPS observations. The TEC data by GPS and by GITM are compared to determine how well the modeling and observations match each other during different solar flares.

  6. Terrestrial Response to Eruptive Solar Flares: Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    1995-01-01

    During the interval of August 1979 - December 1979, 56 unambiguous fast forward shocks were identified using magnetic field and plasma data collected by the ISEE-3 spacecraft. Because this interval is a solar maximum we assume the streams causing these shocks are associated with coronal mass ejections and eruptive solar flares. For these shocks we shall describe the shock-storm relationship for the level of intense storms (Dst < -100 nT). Then, we will discuss the interplanetary structures that are associated with the large-amplitude and long-duration negative Bz fields, which are found in the sheath field and/or driver gas regions of the shock and are thought to be the main cause of the intense storms.

  7. Terrestrial Response to Eruptive Solar Flares: Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    1995-01-01

    During the interval of August 1979 - December 1979, 56 unambiguous fast forward shocks were identified using magnetic field and plasma data collected by the ISEE-3 spacecraft. Because this interval is a solar maximum we assume the streams causing these shocks are associated with coronal mass ejections and eruptive solar flares. For these shocks we shall describe the shock-storm relationship for the level of intense storms (Dst < -100 nT). Then, we will discuss the interplanetary structures that are associated with the large-amplitude and long-duration negative Bz fields, which are found in the sheath field and/or driver gas regions of the shock and are thought to be the main cause of the intense storms.

  8. The Discovery of an X-Ray/UV Stellar Flare from the Late-K/Early-M Dwarf LMC 335

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, B. T. H.; Pun, C. S. J.; Di Stefano, R.; Li, K. L.; Kong, A. K. H.

    2012-08-01

    We report the discovery of an X-ray/UV stellar flare from the source LMC 335, captured by XMM-Newton in the field of the Large Magellanic Cloud. The flare event was recorded continuously in X-ray for its first 10 hr from the precursor to the late decay phases. The observed fluxes increased by more than two orders of magnitude at its peak in X-ray and at least one in the UV as compared to quiescence. The peak 0.1-7.0 keV X-ray flux is derived from the two-temperature APEC model to be ~(8.4 ± 0.6) × 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1. Combining astrometric information from multiple X-ray observations in the quiescent and flare states, we identify the NIR counterpart of LMC 335 as the Two Micron All Sky Survey source J05414534-6921512. The NIR color relations and spectroscopic parallax characterize the source as a Galactic K7-M4 dwarf at a foreground distance of (100-264) pc, implying a total energy output of the entire event of ~(0.4-2.9) × 1035 erg. This report comprises detailed analyses of this late-K/early-M dwarf flare event that has the longest time coverage yet reported in the literature. The flare decay can be modeled with two exponential components with timescales of ~28 minutes and ~4 hr, with a single-component decay firmly ruled out. The X-ray spectra during flare can be described by two components, a dominant high-temperature component of ~40-60 MK and a low-temperature component of ~10 MK, with a flare loop length of about 1.1-1.3 stellar radius.

  9. Flare Observations.

    PubMed

    Benz, Arnold O

    Solar flares are observed at all wavelengths from decameter radio waves to gamma-rays at 100 MeV. This review focuses on recent observations in EUV, soft and hard X-rays, white light, and radio waves. Space missions such as RHESSI, Yohkoh, TRACE, and SOHO have enlarged widely the observational base. They have revealed a number of surprises: Coronal sources appear before the hard X-ray emission in chromospheric footpoints, major flare acceleration sites appear to be independent of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), electrons, and ions may be accelerated at different sites, there are at least 3 different magnetic topologies, and basic characteristics vary from small to large flares. Recent progress also includes improved insights into the flare energy partition, on the location(s) of energy release, tests of energy release scenarios and particle acceleration. The interplay of observations with theory is important to deduce the geometry and to disentangle the various processes involved. There is increasing evidence supporting reconnection of magnetic field lines as the basic cause. While this process has become generally accepted as the trigger, it is still controversial how it converts a considerable fraction of the energy into non-thermal particles. Flare-like processes may be responsible for large-scale restructuring of the magnetic field in the corona as well as for its heating. Large flares influence interplanetary space and substantially affect the Earth's lower ionosphere. While flare scenarios have slowly converged over the past decades, every new observation still reveals major unexpected results, demonstrating that solar flares, after 150 years since their discovery, remain a complex problem of astrophysics including major unsolved questions. Supplementary material is available for this article at 10.12942/lrsp-2008-1.

  10. Study of latitudinal response of solar x-ray flares associated with strong radio bursts using multi-technique observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, M.; Astafyeva, E.

    2013-12-01

    The ionospheric effects due to solar flares (SF) have been intensively studied for several decades. It is now known that the SF effects can be observed from pre-dawn to post-dusk regions, with most pronounced signatures in the noon region (solar zenith angle is close to zero). It is generally demonstrated that enhancements in X-ray or EUV during solar flares cause an abrupt increase of the ionospheric electron density throughout the whole sunlit hemisphere. However, investigations of the ionospheric response to solar flares suggest that their impact on the ionosphere varies from event to event. The solar radio bursts (SRBs), a source of radio frequency interference are also generally associated with x-ray solar flare and acts as a threat to the trans-ionospheric signals. Considering this, we examined the SRBs using Nobeyama observations and found 34 radio burst events (>1000 sfu at 1GHz) to be closely associated with x-ray flares and CMEs during 2000-2012. We found 2 C-, 18 M- and 14 X-class solar flares are associated with these events. The 8 events out of these are very strong radio events (>10,000 sfu) and occurred with X-class of solar flares. The response of these flares on the ionosphere is investigated by using the data of vertical total electron content (TEC) measured by satellite altimeters TOPEX, Jason-1 and Jason-2. The preliminary results of observations from satellite altimeters show that the sudden enhancement in TEC is not simultaneous at the same time at all regions when the flare occurs and this also varies with the strength of the flare. In most of M and C- class flare events, we found an increase in TEC at most of the latitudes and time during the flare. We found that some of the X-class solar events weaken the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) moving equator ward and then disappears with the decrease in TEC. Other X-class events, on the contrary, showed a tendency to increase the EIA. To understand and support our results, multi

  11. PLASMA HEATING IN THE VERY EARLY AND DECAY PHASES OF SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Falewicz, R.; Rudawy, P.; Siarkowski, M. E-mail: rudawy@astro.uni.wroc.pl

    2011-05-20

    In this paper, we analyze the energy budgets of two single-loop solar flares under the assumption that non-thermal electrons (NTEs) are the only source of plasma heating during all phases of both events. The flares were observed by RHESSI and GOES on 2002 September 20 and 2002 March 17, respectively. For both investigated flares we derived the energy fluxes contained in NTE beams from the RHESSI observational data constrained by observed GOES light curves. We showed that energy delivered by NTEs was fully sufficient to fulfill the energy budgets of the plasma during the pre-heating and impulsive phases of both flares as well as during the decay phase of one of them. We concluded that in the case of the investigated flares there was no need to use any additional ad hoc heating mechanisms other than heating by NTEs.

  12. Early stages of solar flares - Current status of our understanding and opportunities for future observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, B. R.

    1986-01-01

    Current models of the energy release and transport mechanisms occurring in solar flares are updated to include the input from data collected with the SMM satellite. The new data cover numerous solar flares observed in X-ray and gamma ray bands over a 6 yr period, combined with data from the Japanese Hinori satellite in 1981-82 and ground-based radio observations. The 300 keV gamma ray data have been instrumental in revealing a 152-158 day period in the frequency of solar flares. Recent analysis has indicated that the periodicity is connected to the rotational spectrum of g-modes in the sun. Other data have shown that hard X-rays are emitted from the footpoints and interactions among coronal magnetic loops, where electron acceleration processes occur that are not well understood. The footpoint emission appear in impulsive events, while the interaction emissions are connected with gradual flares.

  13. Effect of early coronal flaring on working length change in curved canals using rotary nickel-titanium versus stainless steel instruments.

    PubMed

    Davis, R Dean; Marshall, J Gordon; Baumgartner, J Craig

    2002-06-01

    This in vitro investigation examined pre- and postinstrumentation working length (WL) measurements in curved root canals. The conditions compared were combinations of (a) stainless steel hand files + Gates Glidden drills (SS) versus nickel-titanium rotary files (Ni-Ti); and (b) early coronal flaring (flaring completed before WL determination) versus late coronal flaring (flaring completed after WL determination). Coronal flaring was accomplished for the SS group using Gates Glidden drills and for the Ni-Ti group using rotary Ni-Ti files (n = 15/group). WL was determined before coronal flaring, immediately after coronal flaring, and again after canal preparation. Results indicated that WL decreased for all canals as a result of canal preparation. The mean decrease in WL was significantly greater for the SS group (-0.48 mm +/- 0.32) than for the Ni-Ti group (-0.22 mm +/- 0.26). Less change in WL occurred in both groups when initial WL was determined after coronal flaring (SS: -0.12 mm +/- 0.13, Ni-Ti: -0.14 mm +/- 0.25).

  14. Solar Flare Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmahl, Edward J.; Kundu, Mukul R.

    2000-01-01

    During the past year we have been working with the HESSI (High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager) team in preparation for launch in early 2001. HESSI has as its primary scientific goal photometric imaging and spectroscopy of solar flares in hard X-rays and gamma-rays with an approx. 2 sec angular resolution, approx. keV energy resolution and approx. 2 s time resolution over the 6 keV to 15 MeV energy range. We have performed tests of the imager using a specially designed experiment which exploits the second-harmonic response of HESSI's sub-collimators to an artificial X-ray source at a distance of 1550 cm from its front grids. Figures show the response to X-rays at energies in the range where HESSI is expected to image solar flares. To prepare the team and the solar user community for imaging flares with HESSI, we have written a description of the major imaging concepts. This paper will be submitted for publication in a referred journal.

  15. Extreme Postinjection Flare in Response to Intra-Articular Triamcinolone Acetonide (Kenalog).

    PubMed

    Young, Porter; Homlar, Kelly C

    2016-01-01

    As intra-articular corticosteroid injections (CSIs) are a common treatment for osteoarthritis, physicians must well understand their potential side effects. Postinjection flares are an acute side effect of intra-articular CSIs, with symptoms ranging from mild joint effusion to disabling pain. The present case involved a severe postinjection flare that occurred after the patient, a 56-year-old woman with moderate osteoarthritis in the left knee, received 2 mL of 1% lidocaine and 2 mL (40 mg) of triamcinolone acetonide (Kenalog). Two hours after injection, she experienced swelling and intense pain in the knee and was unable to ambulate. The knee was aspirated with a return of 25 mL of "butterscotch"-colored fluid. This case is novel in that its acuity of onset, severity of symptoms, and synovial fluid analysis mimicked septic arthritis, which was ultimately ruled out with negative cultures and confirmation of triamcinolone acetonide crystals in the synovial aspirate, viewed by polarized light microscopy. Thus, the patient's reaction represents an acute crystal-induced inflammatory response. Although reactions to an intra-articular CSI of this severity are rare, it is important for treating physicians to inform patients of this potential side effect.

  16. Observation of Sudden Ionospheric Disturbances over Istanbul in Response to X-Ray Flare Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceren Kalafatoglu Eyiguler, Emine; Kaymaz, Zerefsan; Ceren Moral, Aysegul

    2016-07-01

    Sudden ionospheric disturbances (SID) are the enhanced electron density structures in the D region ionosphere which occur in response to the increase in X-ray flares and EUV flux. SIDs can be monitored using Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio signals (3-30 kHz) which travel between the D-region and the surface of the Earth. In this study, we use SID monitors obtained from the Stanford University Solar Center and two antennas which were built at the Istanbul Technical University to track the ionospheric disturbances in the VLF range. Our antennas are capable of capturing signals from several VLF transmitting stations. In this work, we focus on the variations in the signal strength of the closest VLF transmitting station 'TBB' which is operating at 26.7 kHz frequency at BAFA, Turkey (37.43N, 27.15E). We present ITU SID observations from both antennas; show the daily variation, general structure and the typical patterns we observe as well as case studies of significant events. Our initial analysis shows close relationship between observed X-ray flares from geosynchronous GOES 13 and GOES 15 satellites and VLF station signal strength received by the monitors.

  17. THE LOCATION OF NON-THERMAL VELOCITY IN THE EARLY PHASES OF LARGE FLARES-REVEALING PRE-ERUPTION FLUX ROPES

    SciTech Connect

    Harra, Louise K.; Matthews, Sarah; Culhane, J. L.; Cheung, Mark C. M.; Hara, Hirohisa

    2013-09-10

    Non-thermal velocity measurements of the solar atmosphere, particularly from UV and X-ray emission lines have demonstrated over the decades that this parameter is important in understanding the triggering of solar flares. Enhancements have often been observed before intensity enhancements are seen. However, until the launch of Hinode, it has been difficult to determine the spatial location of the enhancements to better understand the source region. The Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer has the spectral and spatial resolution to allow us to probe the early stages of flares in detail. We analyze four events, all of which are GOES M- or X-classification flares, and all are located toward the limb for ease of flare geometry interpretation. Three of the flares were eruptive and one was confined. In all events, pre-flare enhancement in non-thermal velocity at the base of the active region and its surroundings has been found. These enhancements seem to be consistent with the footpoints of the dimming regions, and hence may be highlighting the activation of a coronal flux rope for the three eruptive events. In addition, pre-flare enhancements in non-thermal velocity were found above the looptops for the three eruptive events.

  18. Content and Construct Validity, Reliability, and Responsiveness of the Rheumatoid Arthritis Flare Questionnaire: OMERACT 2016 Workshop Report.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Susan J; Barbic, Skye P; Bykerk, Vivian P; Choy, Ernest H; Alten, Rieke; Christensen, Robin; den Broeder, Alfons; Fautrel, Bruno; Furst, Daniel E; Guillemin, Francis; Hewlett, Sarah; Leong, Amye L; Lyddiatt, Anne; March, Lyn; Montie, Pamela; Pohl, Christoph; Scholte Voshaar, Marieke; Woodworth, Thasia G; Bingham, Clifton O

    2017-08-15

    The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Flare Group was established to develop a reliable way to identify and measure RA flares in randomized controlled trials (RCT). Here, we summarized the development and field testing of the RA Flare Questionnaire (RA-FQ), and the voting results at OMERACT 2016. Classic and modern psychometric methods were used to assess reliability, validity, sensitivity, factor structure, scoring, and thresholds. Interviews with patients and clinicians also assessed content validity, utility, and meaningfulness of RA-FQ scores. People with RA in observational trials in Canada (n = 896) and France (n = 138), and an RCT in the Netherlands (n = 178) completed 5 items (11-point numerical rating scale) representing RA Flare core domains. There was moderate to high evidence of reliability, content and construct validity, and responsiveness. Factor analysis supported unidimensionality. Rasch analysis showed acceptable fit to the Rasch model, with items and people covering a broad measurement continuum and evidence of appropriate targeting of items to people, ordered thresholds, minimal differential item functioning by language, sex, or age. A summative score across items is defensible, yielding an interval score (0-50) where higher scores reflect worsening flare. The RA-FQ received endorsement from 88% of attendees that it passed the OMERACT Filter 2.0 "Eyeball Test" for instrument selection. The RA-FQ has been developed to identify and measure RA flares. Its review through OMERACT Filter 2.0 shows evidence of reliability, content and construct validity, and responsiveness. These properties merit its further validation as an outcome for clinical trials.

  19. Fibromyalgia Flares: A Qualitative Analysis.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Ann; Whipple, Mary O; Rhudy, Lori M

    2016-03-01

    Patients with fibromyalgia report periods of symptom exacerbation, colloquially referred to as "flares" and despite clinical observation of flares, no research has purposefully evaluated the presence and characteristics of flares in fibromyalgia. The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe fibromyalgia flares in a sample of patients with fibromyalgia. Using seven open-ended questions, patients were asked to describe how they perceived fibromyalgia flares and triggers and alleviating factors associated with flares. Patients were also asked to describe how a flare differs from their typical fibromyalgia symptoms and how they cope with fibromyalgia flares. Content analysis was used to analyze the text. A total of 44 participants completed the survey. Responses to the seven open-ended questions revealed three main content areas: causes of flares, flare symptoms, and dealing with a flare. Participants identified stress, overdoing it, poor sleep, and weather changes as primary causes of flares. Symptoms characteristic of flares included flu-like body aches/exhaustion, pain, fatigue, and variety of other symptoms. Participants reported using medical treatments, rest, activity and stress avoidance, and waiting it out to cope with flares. Our results demonstrate that periods of symptom exacerbation (i.e., flares) are commonly experienced by patients with fibromyalgia and symptoms of flares can be differentiated from every day or typical symptoms of fibromyalgia. Our study is the first of its kind to qualitatively explore characteristics, causes, and management strategies of fibromyalgia flares. Future studies are needed to quantitatively characterize fibromyalgia flares and evaluate mechanisms of flares. © 2015 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Genesis of Infrared Decoy Flares: The Early Years from 1950 into the 1970s. First Edition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-26

    thermodynamic search of fluorides, phosphides, sulphides , carbides, nitrides, nitrates, borides, silicides, chlorides, oxides, peroxides, chlorates...Corporation put a 1000 cubic foot vacuum chamber into operation to support the decoy flare research. It could be evacuated to 500 µm of mercury and could...by a special patented mercury amalgam process. The particle size of the zirconium required careful control for reproducible results. However, the

  1. Magnetic vector rotation in response to the energetic electron beam during a flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Kwangsu, Ahn; Jing, Ju; Liu, Chang; Chae, Jongchul; Huang, Nengyi; Deng, Na; Gary, Dale E.; Wang, Haimin

    2017-08-01

    As one of the most violent forms of eruption on the Sun, flares are believed to be powered by magnetic reconnection, by which stored magnetic energy is released. The fundamental physical processes involving the release, transfer and deposition of energy in multiple layers of the solar atmosphere have been studied extensively with significant progress. Taking advantage of recent developments in observing facilities, new phenomena are continually revealed, bringing new understanding of solar flares. Here we report the discovery of a transient rotation of vector magnetic fields associated with a flare observed by the 1.6-m New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory. After ruling out the possibility that the rotation is caused by line profile changes due to flare heating, our observation shows that the transverse field rotateded by about 12-20 degrees counterclockwise, and returned quickly to previous values after the flare ribbons swept through. More importantly, as a consequence of the rotation, the flare loops untwisted and became more potential. The vector magnetograms were obtained in the near infrared at 1560 nm, which is minimally affected by flare emission and no intensity profile change was detected. Therefore, we believe that these transient changes are real, and conclude the high energy electron beams play an crucial role in the field changes. A straightforward and instructive explanation is that the induced magnetic field of the electron beam superimposed on the pre-flare field leads to a transient rotation of the overall field.

  2. Martian upper atmosphere response to solar EUV flux and soft X-ray flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Sonal; Stewart, Ian; Schneider, Nicholas M.; Deighan, Justin; Stiepen, Arnaud; Evans, J. Scott; Stevens, Michael H.; Chaffin, Michael S.; Crismani, Matteo; McClintock, William; Montmessin, Franck; Thiemann, E. M.; Eparvier, Frank; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Jacosky, Bruce

    2016-10-01

    Planetary upper atmosphere energetics is mainly governed by absorption of solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation. Understanding the response of planetary upper atmosphere to the daily, long and short term variation in solar flux is very important to quantify energy budget of upper atmosphere. We report a comprehensive study of Mars dayglow observations made by the IUVS instrument aboard the MAVEN spacecraft, focusing on upper atmospheric response to solar EUV flux. Our analysis shows both short and long term effect of solar EUV flux on Martian thermospheric temperature. We find a significant drop (> 100 K) in thermospheric temperature between Ls = 218° and Ls = 140°, attributed primarily to the decrease in solar activity and increase in heliocentric distance. IUVS has observed response of Martian thermosphere to the 27-day solar flux variation due to solar rotation.We also report effect of two solar flare events (19 Oct. 2014 and 24 March 2015) on Martian dayglow observations. IUVS observed about ~25% increase in observed brightness of major ultraviolet dayglow emissions below 120 km, where most of the high energy photons (< 10 nm) deposit their energy. The results presented in this talk will help us better understand the role of EUV flux in total heat budget of Martian thermosphere.

  3. Forecasting the Ionosphere Response to Solar Flares from Satellite Measurements of X-ray and EUV Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallen, C. T.; Bristow, W. A.; Nicolls, M. J.; Viereck, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    An X4.9-class solar flare occurred at approximately 01:00 hours UTC on 25 February 2014 causing widespread dayside blackouts of HF communication and radar, including SuperDARN. Nearly complete disruption persisted for about 10 minutes. The UHF Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR) measured significant plasma density enhancements in the D, E, and lower F regions during the flare event which occurred during PFISR Ion Neutral Observations of the Thermosphere (PINOT) campaign measurements. In this case study, X-ray flux measurements from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-15) were used with the Self Consistent Ionosphere Model (SCIM) to calculate the ionosphere plasma density, temperature, and composition response over Poker Flat, Alaska. Under the assumption that the flare X-ray flux enhancement was confined to GOES-measured X-ray wavelengths between 0.05 and 0.8 nm, the calculated ionosphere plasma density perturbation above Poker Flat was restricted to the D region, contrary to the ISR measurements which in addition showed significant E- and lower F-region electron density enhancements. Incorporating measurements into the model from the GOES-15 and Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) extreme ultraviolet (EUV) sensors covering spectral bands between 5 and 36 nm improves the agreement between the modeled electron densities and its measurements but is not entirely sufficient, particularly in upper E and lower F regions. Increasing the model soft X-ray energy flux in the 0.8 to 2.3 nm wavelength band by two orders of magnitude, consistent with TIMED-SEE measurement surveys of previous X-class flares, brings the calculated ionosphere response to good agreement with PFISR measurements. Finally, PFISR measurements made during the 7 January 2014 X1-class solar flare are shown that demonstrate some X-class flares produce only moderate electron density enhancements in the D and lower E regions, but not the upper E and lower F regions. This

  4. Solar Flares: Magnetohydrodynamic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Kazunari; Magara, Tetsuya

    2011-12-01

    This paper outlines the current understanding of solar flares, mainly focused on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes responsible for producing a flare. Observations show that flares are one of the most explosive phenomena in the atmosphere of the Sun, releasing a huge amount of energy up to about 1032 erg on the timescale of hours. Flares involve the heating of plasma, mass ejection, and particle acceleration that generates high-energy particles. The key physical processes for producing a flare are: the emergence of magnetic field from the solar interior to the solar atmosphere (flux emergence), local enhancement of electric current in the corona (formation of a current sheet), and rapid dissipation of electric current (magnetic reconnection) that causes shock heating, mass ejection, and particle acceleration. The evolution toward the onset of a flare is rather quasi-static when free energy is accumulated in the form of coronal electric current (field-aligned current, more precisely), while the dissipation of coronal current proceeds rapidly, producing various dynamic events that affect lower atmospheres such as the chromosphere and photosphere. Flares manifest such rapid dissipation of coronal current, and their theoretical modeling has been developed in accordance with observations, in which numerical simulations proved to be a strong tool reproducing the time-dependent, nonlinear evolution of a flare. We review the models proposed to explain the physical mechanism of flares, giving an comprehensive explanation of the key processes mentioned above. We start with basic properties of flares, then go into the details of energy build-up, release and transport in flares where magnetic reconnection works as the central engine to produce a flare.

  5. Modeling High Resolution Flare Spectra Using Hydrodynamic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Harry; Doschek, G.

    2006-06-01

    Understanding the hydrodynamic response of the solar atmosphere to the release of energy during a flare has been a long standing problem in solar physics. Early time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations were able to reproduce the high temperatures and densities observed in solar flares, but were not able to model the observations in any detail. For example, these simulations could not account for the relatively slow decay of the observed emission or the absence of blueshifts in high spectral resolution line profiles at flare onset. We have found that by representing the flare as a succession of independently heated filaments it is possible to reproduce both the evolution of line intensity and the shape of the line profile using hydrodynamic simulations. Here we present detailed comparisons between our simulation results and several flares observed with the Yohkoh Bragg Crystal Spectrometer (BCS). Comparisons with 3D MHD simulations will also be discussed.

  6. Solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.

    1974-01-01

    A review of the knowledge about solar flares which has been obtained through observations from the earth and from space by various methods. High-resolution cinematography is best carried out at H-alpha wavelengths to reveal the structure, time history, and location of flares. The classification flares in H alpha according to either physical or morphological criteria is discussed. The study of flare morphology, which shows where, when, and how flares occur, is important for evaluating theories of flares. Consideration is given to studies of flares by optical spectroscopy, radio emissions, and at X-ray and XUV wavelengths. Research has shown where and possibly why flares occur, but the physics of the instability involved, of the particle acceleration, and of the heating are still not understood.

  7. Dynamics of Electric Currents, Magnetic Field Topology, and Helioseismic Response of a Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharykin, I. N.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2015-07-01

    The solar flare on 2011 July 30 was of a modest X-ray class (M9.3), but it made a strong photospheric impact and produced a “sunquake,” which was observed with the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory. In addition to the helioseismic waves, the flare caused a large expanding area of white-light emission and was accompanied by the rapid formation of a sunspot structure in the flare region. The flare produced hard X-ray (HXR) emission less then 300 keV and no coronal mass ejection (CME). The absence of CME rules out magnetic rope eruption as a mechanism of helioseismic waves. The sunquake impact does not coincide with the strongest HXR source, which contradicts the standard beam-driven mechanism of sunquake generation. We discuss the connectivity of the flare energy release with the electric currents dynamics and show the potential importance of high-speed plasma flows in the lower solar atmosphere during the flare energy release.

  8. DYNAMICS OF ELECTRIC CURRENTS, MAGNETIC FIELD TOPOLOGY, AND HELIOSEISMIC RESPONSE OF A SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Sharykin, I. N.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2015-07-20

    The solar flare on 2011 July 30 was of a modest X-ray class (M9.3), but it made a strong photospheric impact and produced a “sunquake,” which was observed with the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory. In addition to the helioseismic waves, the flare caused a large expanding area of white-light emission and was accompanied by the rapid formation of a sunspot structure in the flare region. The flare produced hard X-ray (HXR) emission less then 300 keV and no coronal mass ejection (CME). The absence of CME rules out magnetic rope eruption as a mechanism of helioseismic waves. The sunquake impact does not coincide with the strongest HXR source, which contradicts the standard beam-driven mechanism of sunquake generation. We discuss the connectivity of the flare energy release with the electric currents dynamics and show the potential importance of high-speed plasma flows in the lower solar atmosphere during the flare energy release.

  9. A weak thermal response on a strong electron acceleration in a ‘cold’ flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Motorina, Galina; Nita, Gelu M.; Kontar, Eduard

    2017-08-01

    Solar flares are sudden explosive processes in the solar atmosphere, which demonstrate remarkable variety of the partitions between various energy components. Understanding the flare acceleration site requires knowledge of exactly how flare energization works and what is the partition between nonthermal, thermal and kinetic energies. These partitions are known to vary broadly resulting in both ‘entirely thermal’ and primarily nonthermal, so-called ‘cold’ flares. These ‘cold flares’ are characterized by domination of nonthermal component, but very weak thermal emission and almost no soft X-ray enhancement; thus GOES often does not recognize such events as flares. Here we attempt to quantify the thermal and nonthermal energies and their evolving relationship in a 2013-Nov-05 cold flare. For nonthermal diagnostics we use the RHESSI data, while the AIA data are employed for the thermal diagnostics. We applied RHESSI spectral fits, with both ‘cold’ and ‘warm’ target to bracketing the low-energy cutoff, to quantify the rate of the nonthermal energy deposition in this flare as well to characterize a (tiny) hot component. We then computed evolving differential emission measure maps using the regularized inversion method and derived from them the emission measure and temperature maps. These inputs allowed us to accurately calculate the evolving thermal energy in the flare. This thermal energy was compared with the mentioned above rate of the nonthermal energy deposition. This comparison suggests that the observed plasma heating is entirely supplied by the loss of the nonthermal energy released in the impulsive phase of the flare. Using vector magnetic data from SDO/HMI we created a nonlinear force-free field reconstruction of the region of interest, and, using the available X-ray and EUV data set as a constraint, we developed a 3D model of the flare capable of correctly reproducing the data set. To validate the model, we used microwave data from Nobeyama

  10. Early Results from a Multi-Thermal Model for the Cooling of Post-Flare Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, K. K.; Warren, H. P.

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a multi-thermal model for the cooling of post-flare loops. The model consists of an arcade of many nested loops that reconnect and begin cooling at slightly different times, and have different cooling profiles because of the different loop lengths across the arcade. Cooling due to both conductive and radiative processes is taken into account. The free parameters in the model include initial temperature and density in the loop, loop width and the initial loop length. The results from the model are then compared to TRACE and SXT observations. Our many-loop model does a much better job of predicting the SXT and TRACE light curves than a similar model with only one loop.

  11. The FLARE mission: deep and wide-field 1-5um imaging and spectroscopy for the early universe: a proposal for M5 cosmic vision call

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgarella, D.; Levacher, P.; Vives, S.; Dohlen, K.; Pascal, S.

    2016-07-01

    FLARE (First Light And Reionization Explorer) is a space mission that will be submitted to ESA (M5 call). Its primary goal (~80% of lifetime) is to identify and study the universe before the end of the reionization at z > 6. A secondary objective (~20% of lifetime) is to survey star formation in the Milky Way. FLARE's strategy optimizes the science return: imaging and spectroscopic integral-field observations will be carried out simultaneously on two parallel focal planes and over very wide instantaneous fields of view. FLARE will help addressing two of ESA's Cosmic Vision themes: a) << How did the universe originate and what is it made of? » and b) « What are the conditions for planet formation and the emergence of life? >> and more specifically, << From gas and dust to stars and planets >>. FLARE will provide to the ESA community a leading position to statistically study the early universe after JWST's deep but pin-hole surveys. Moreover, the instrumental development of wide-field imaging and wide-field integral-field spectroscopy in space will be a major breakthrough after making them available on ground-based telescopes.

  12. Flare energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.; Dejager, C.; Dennis, B. R.; Hudson, H. S.; Simnett, G. M.; Strong, K. T.; Bentley, R. D.; Bornmann, P. L.; Bruner, M. E.; Cargill, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    In this investigation of flare energetics, researchers sought to establish a comprehensive and self-consistent picture of the sources and transport of energy within a flare. To achieve this goal, they chose five flares in 1980 that were well observed with instruments on the Solar Maximum Mission, and with other space-borne and ground-based instruments. The events were chosen to represent various types of flares. Details of the observations available for them and the corresponding physical parameters derived from these data are presented. The flares were studied from two perspectives, the impulsive and gradual phases, and then the results were compared to obtain the overall picture of the energics of these flares. The role that modeling can play in estimating the total energy of a flare when the observationally determined parameters are used as the input to a numerical model is discussed. Finally, a critique of the current understanding of flare energetics and the methods used to determine various energetics terms is outlined, and possible future directions of research in this area are suggested.

  13. Sub-second optical flaring in GX 339-4 during the 2017 outburst early rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, P.; Kotze, M. M.; Buckley, D. A. H.; Paice, J. A.; Altamirano, D.; Charles, P. A.; Russell, D. M.; Fabian, A. C.

    2017-10-01

    The black hole X-ray binary GX 339-4 has been caught at the early stage of a new outburst. According to optical monitoring, the outburst began between 2017-08-24 and 2017-09-14, presumably in the outer disc (ATel #10797).

  14. Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Sabrina

    2013-01-01

    Because the Earth resides in the atmosphere of our nearest stellar neighbor, events occurring on the Sun's surface directly affect us by interfering with satellite operations and communications, astronaut safety, and, in extreme circumstances, power grid stability. Solar flares, the most energetic events in our solar system, are a substantial source of hazardous space weather affecting our increasingly technology-dependent society. While flares have been observed using ground-based telescopes for over 150 years, modern space-bourne observatories have provided nearly continuous multi-wavelength flare coverage that cannot be obtained from the ground. We can now probe the origins and evolution of flares by tracking particle acceleration, changes in ionized plasma, and the reorganization of magnetic fields. I will walk through our current understanding of why flares occur and how they affect the Earth and also show several examples of these fantastic explosions.

  15. Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Solar flares accelerate both ions and electrons to high energies, and their X-ray and gamma-ray signatures not only probe the relationship between their respective acceleration, but also allow for the measurement of accelerated and ambient abundances. RHESSI observations have shown a striking close linear correlation of gamma-ray line fluence from accelerated ions > approx.20 MeV and bremsstrahlung emission from relativistic accelerated electrons >300 keV, when integrated over complete flares, suggesting a common acceleration mechanism. SMM/GRS observations, however, show a weaker correlation, and this discrepancy might be associated with previously observed electron-rich episodes within flares and/or temporal variability of gamma-ray line fluxes over the course of flares. We use the latest RHESSI gamma-ray analysis techniques to study the temporal behavior of the RHESSI flares, and determine what changes can be attributed to an evolving acceleration mechanism or to evolving abundances.

  16. The 26 December 2001 Solar Event Responsible for GLE63. I. Observations of a Major Long-Duration Flare with the Siberian Solar Radio Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechnev, V. V.; Kochanov, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    Ground level enhancements (GLEs) of cosmic-ray intensity occur, on average, once a year. Because they are rare, studying the solar sources of GLEs is especially important to approach understanding their origin. The SOL2001-12-26 eruptive-flare event responsible for GLE63 seems to be challenging in some aspects. Deficient observations limited our understanding of it. Analysis of additional observations found for this event provided new results that shed light on the flare configuration and evolution. This article addresses the observations of this flare with the Siberian Solar Radio Telescope (SSRT). Taking advantage of its instrumental characteristics, we analyze the detailed SSRT observations of a major long-duration flare at 5.7 GHz without cleaning the images. The analysis confirms that the source of GLE63 was associated with an event in active region 9742 that comprised two flares. The first flare (04:30 - 05:03 UT) reached a GOES importance of about M1.6. Two microwave sources were observed, whose brightness temperatures at 5.7 GHz exceeded 10 MK. The main flare, up to an importance of M7.1, started at 05:04 UT and occurred in strong magnetic fields. The observed microwave sources reached a brightness temperature of about 250 MK. They were not static. After appearing on the weaker-field periphery of the active region, the microwave sources moved toward each other nearly along the magnetic neutral line, approaching the stronger-field core of the active region, and then moved away from the neutral line like expanding ribbons. These motions rule out an association of the non-thermal microwave sources with a single flaring loop.

  17. Early detection and rapid response

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westbrooks, Randy G.; Eplee, Robert E.; Simberloff, Daniel; Rejmánek, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    Prevention is the first line of defense against introduced invasive species - it is always preferable to prevent the introduction of new invaders into a region or country. However, it is not always possible to detect all alien hitchhikers imported in cargo, or to predict with any degree of certainty which introduced species will become invasive over time. Fortunately, the majority of introduced plants and animals don't become invasive. But, according to scientists at Cornell University, costs and losses due to species that do become invasive are now estimated to be over $137 billion/year in the United States. Early detection and rapid response (EDRR) is the second line of defense against introduced invasive species - EDRR is the preferred management strategy for preventing the establishment and spread of invasive species. Over the past 50 years, there has been a gradual shift away from large and medium scale federal/state single-agency-led weed eradication programs in the United States, to smaller interagency-led projects involving impacted and potential stakeholders. The importance of volunteer weed spotters in detecting and reporting suspected new invasive species has also been recognized in recent years.

  18. Global response of the low-latitude to midlatitude ionosphere due to the Bastille Day flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huba, J. D.; Warren, H. P.; Joyce, G.; Pi, X.; Iijima, B.; Coker, C.

    2005-08-01

    The first global simulation study and comparison to data of the ionospheric effects associated with the enhanced EUV irradiance of the Bastille Day flare are presented. This is done by incorporating a time-dependent EUV spectrum, based on data and hydrodynamic modeling, into the NRL ionosphere model SAMI3. The simulation results indicate that the total electron content (TEC) increases to over 7 TEC units in the daytime, low-latitude ionosphere. In addition, it is predicted that the maximum density in the F-layer (NmF2) increases by $\\lesssim$20% and that the height of the maximum electron density (HmF2) decreases by $\\lesssim$20%. These results are explained by the increased ionization at altitudes <400 km which increases TEC and NmF2 while decreasing HmF2. The results are in reasonably good agreement with data obtained from GPS satellites and the TOPEX satellite.

  19. Combined Modeling of Acceleration, Transport, and Hydrodynamic Response in Solar Flares. 1; The Numerical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Wei; Petrosian, Vahe; Mariska, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Acceleration and transport of high-energy particles and fluid dynamics of atmospheric plasma are interrelated aspects of solar flares, but for convenience and simplicity they were artificially separated in the past. We present here self consistently combined Fokker-Planck modeling of particles and hydrodynamic simulation of flare plasma. Energetic electrons are modeled with the Stanford unified code of acceleration, transport, and radiation, while plasma is modeled with the Naval Research Laboratory flux tube code. We calculated the collisional heating rate directly from the particle transport code, which is more accurate than those in previous studies based on approximate analytical solutions. We repeated the simulation of Mariska et al. with an injection of power law, downward-beamed electrons using the new heating rate. For this case, a -10% difference was found from their old result. We also used a more realistic spectrum of injected electrons provided by the stochastic acceleration model, which has a smooth transition from a quasi-thermal background at low energies to a non thermal tail at high energies. The inclusion of low-energy electrons results in relatively more heating in the corona (versus chromosphere) and thus a larger downward heat conduction flux. The interplay of electron heating, conduction, and radiative loss leads to stronger chromospheric evaporation than obtained in previous studies, which had a deficit in low-energy electrons due to an arbitrarily assumed low-energy cutoff. The energy and spatial distributions of energetic electrons and bremsstrahlung photons bear signatures of the changing density distribution caused by chromospheric evaporation. In particular, the density jump at the evaporation front gives rise to enhanced emission, which, in principle, can be imaged by X-ray telescopes. This model can be applied to investigate a variety of high-energy processes in solar, space, and astrophysical plasmas.

  20. Combined Modeling of Acceleration, Transport, and Hydrodynamic Response in Solar Flares. 1; The Numerical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Wei; Petrosian, Vahe; Mariska, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Acceleration and transport of high-energy particles and fluid dynamics of atmospheric plasma are interrelated aspects of solar flares, but for convenience and simplicity they were artificially separated in the past. We present here self consistently combined Fokker-Planck modeling of particles and hydrodynamic simulation of flare plasma. Energetic electrons are modeled with the Stanford unified code of acceleration, transport, and radiation, while plasma is modeled with the Naval Research Laboratory flux tube code. We calculated the collisional heating rate directly from the particle transport code, which is more accurate than those in previous studies based on approximate analytical solutions. We repeated the simulation of Mariska et al. with an injection of power law, downward-beamed electrons using the new heating rate. For this case, a -10% difference was found from their old result. We also used a more realistic spectrum of injected electrons provided by the stochastic acceleration model, which has a smooth transition from a quasi-thermal background at low energies to a non thermal tail at high energies. The inclusion of low-energy electrons results in relatively more heating in the corona (versus chromosphere) and thus a larger downward heat conduction flux. The interplay of electron heating, conduction, and radiative loss leads to stronger chromospheric evaporation than obtained in previous studies, which had a deficit in low-energy electrons due to an arbitrarily assumed low-energy cutoff. The energy and spatial distributions of energetic electrons and bremsstrahlung photons bear signatures of the changing density distribution caused by chromospheric evaporation. In particular, the density jump at the evaporation front gives rise to enhanced emission, which, in principle, can be imaged by X-ray telescopes. This model can be applied to investigate a variety of high-energy processes in solar, space, and astrophysical plasmas.

  1. Ambient ultrafine particles provide a strong adjuvant effect in the secondary immune response: implication for traffic-related asthma flares.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Harkema, Jack R; Lewandowski, Ryan P; Wang, Meiying; Bramble, Lori A; Gookin, Glenn R; Ning, Zhi; Kleinman, Michael T; Sioutas, Constantinos; Nel, Andre E

    2010-09-01

    We have previously demonstrated that intranasal administration of ambient ultrafine particles (UFP) acts as an adjuvant for primary allergic sensitization to ovalbumin (OVA) in Balb/c mice. It is important to find out whether inhaled UFP exert the same effect on the secondary immune response as a way of explaining asthma flares in already-sensitized individuals due to traffic exposure near a freeway. The objective of this study is to determine whether inhalation exposure to ambient UFP near an urban freeway could enhance the secondary immune response to OVA in already-sensitized mice. Prior OVA-sensitized animals were exposed to concentrated ambient UFP at the time of secondary OVA challenge in our mobile animal laboratory in Los Angeles. OVA-specific antibody production, airway morphometry, allergic airway inflammation, cytokine gene expression, and oxidative stress marker were assessed. As few as five ambient UFP exposures were sufficient to promote the OVA recall immune response, including generating allergic airway inflammation in smaller and more distal airways compared with the adjuvant effect of intranasally instilled UFP on the primary immune response. The secondary immune response was characterized by the T helper 2 and IL-17 cytokine gene expression in the lung. In summary, our results demonstrated that inhalation of prooxidative ambient UFP could effectively boost the secondary immune response to an experimental allergen, indicating that vehicular traffic exposure could exacerbate allergic inflammation in already-sensitized subjects.

  2. Ambient ultrafine particles provide a strong adjuvant effect in the secondary immune response: implication for traffic-related asthma flares

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Harkema, Jack R.; Lewandowski, Ryan P.; Wang, Meiying; Bramble, Lori A.; Gookin, Glenn R.; Ning, Zhi; Kleinman, Michael T.; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2010-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that intranasal administration of ambient ultrafine particles (UFP) acts as an adjuvant for primary allergic sensitization to ovalbumin (OVA) in Balb/c mice. It is important to find out whether inhaled UFP exert the same effect on the secondary immune response as a way of explaining asthma flares in already-sensitized individuals due to traffic exposure near a freeway. The objective of this study is to determine whether inhalation exposure to ambient UFP near an urban freeway could enhance the secondary immune response to OVA in already-sensitized mice. Prior OVA-sensitized animals were exposed to concentrated ambient UFP at the time of secondary OVA challenge in our mobile animal laboratory in Los Angeles. OVA-specific antibody production, airway morphometry, allergic airway inflammation, cytokine gene expression, and oxidative stress marker were assessed. As few as five ambient UFP exposures were sufficient to promote the OVA recall immune response, including generating allergic airway inflammation in smaller and more distal airways compared with the adjuvant effect of intranasally instilled UFP on the primary immune response. The secondary immune response was characterized by the T helper 2 and IL-17 cytokine gene expression in the lung. In summary, our results demonstrated that inhalation of prooxidative ambient UFP could effectively boost the secondary immune response to an experimental allergen, indicating that vehicular traffic exposure could exacerbate allergic inflammation in already-sensitized subjects. PMID:20562226

  3. Early and Late Responses to Ion Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte, Reinhard; Ling, Ted

    Early and late responses to ion beam therapy (IBT) are the result of complex interactions between host, dose volume, and radiobiological factors. Our understanding of these early and late tissue responses has improved greatly with the accumulation of laboratory and clinical experience with proton and heavy ion irradiation. With photon therapy becoming increasingly conformal, many concepts developed for 3D conformal radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy with photons are also applicable to IBT. This chapter reviews basic concepts and experimental data of early and late tissue responses to protons and ions.

  4. Pain, PSA flare, and bone scan response in a patient with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated with radium-223, a case report.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Megan A; George, Daniel J

    2015-05-07

    Radium-223 has been shown to improve overall survival in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer with symptomatic bone metastases. The bone scan response to radium-223 has only been described in one single center trial of 14 patients, none of whom achieved the outstanding bone scan response presented in the current case. In this case report, we describe a 75 year-old white man with extensively pre-treated metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer and symptomatic bone metastases who experienced a flare in pain and prostate-specific antigen, followed by dramatic clinical (pain), biochemical (prostate-specific antigen), and imaging (bone scan) response. The flare phenomena and bone scan response we observed have not previously been described with radium-223. This case suggests that the degree and duration of bone scan response may be predictive of overall survival benefit.

  5. KEPLER FLARES. II. THE TEMPORAL MORPHOLOGY OF WHITE-LIGHT FLARES ON GJ 1243

    SciTech Connect

    Davenport, James R. A.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Johnson, Emily C.; Peraza, Jesus; Jansen, Tiffany C.; Larsen, Daniel M.; Hebb, Leslie; Wisniewski, John P.; Malatesta, Michael; Keil, Marcus; Silverberg, Steven M.; Scheffler, Matthew S.; Berdis, Jodi R.; Kowalski, Adam F.; Hilton, Eric J.

    2014-12-20

    We present the largest sample of flares ever compiled for a single M dwarf, the active M4 star GJ 1243. Over 6100 individual flare events, with energies ranging from 10{sup 29} to 10{sup 33} erg, are found in 11 months of 1 minute cadence data from Kepler. This sample is unique for its completeness and dynamic range. We have developed automated tools for finding flares in short-cadence Kepler light curves, and performed extensive validation and classification of the sample by eye. From this pristine sample of flares we generate a median flare template. This template shows that two exponential cooling phases are present during the white-light flare decay, providing fundamental constraints for models of flare physics. The template is also used as a basis function to decompose complex multi-peaked flares, allowing us to study the energy distribution of these events. Only a small number of flare events are not well fit by our template. We find that complex, multi-peaked flares occur in over 80% of flares with a duration of 50 minutes or greater. The underlying distribution of flare durations for events 10 minutes and longer appears to follow a broken power law. Our results support the idea that sympathetic flaring may be responsible for some complex flare events.

  6. Fine Structure in Solar Flares.

    PubMed

    Warren

    2000-06-20

    We present observations of several large two-ribbon flares observed with both the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) and the soft X-ray telescope on Yohkoh. The high spatial resolution TRACE observations show that solar flare plasma is generally not confined to a single loop or even a few isolated loops but to a multitude of fine coronal structures. These observations also suggest that the high-temperature flare plasma generally appears diffuse while the cooler ( less, similar2 MK) postflare plasma is looplike. We conjecture that the diffuse appearance of the high-temperature flare emission seen with TRACE is due to a combination of the emission measure structure of these flares and the instrumental temperature response and does not reflect fundamental differences in plasma morphology at the different temperatures.

  7. Combined Modeling of Acceleration, Transport, and Hydrodynamic Response in Solar Flares. II. Inclusion of Radiative Transfer with RADYN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio da Costa, Fatima; Liu, Wei; Petrosian, Vahé; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-11-01

    Solar flares involve complex processes that are coupled and span a wide range of temporal, spatial, and energy scales. Modeling such processes self-consistently has been a challenge in the past. Here we present results from simulations that couple particle kinetics with hydrodynamics (HD) of the atmospheric plasma. We combine the Stanford unified Fokker-Planck code that models particle acceleration and transport with the RADYN HD code that models the atmospheric response to collisional heating by accelerated electrons through detailed radiative transfer calculations. We perform simulations using two different electron spectra, one an ad hoc power law and the other predicted by the model of stochastic acceleration by turbulence or plasma waves. Surprisingly, the later model, even with energy flux \\ll {10}10 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 {{cm}}-2, can cause “explosive” chromospheric evaporation and drive stronger up- and downflows (and HD shocks). This is partly because our acceleration model, like many others, produces a spectrum consisting of a quasi-thermal component plus a power-law tail. We synthesize emission-line profiles covering different heights in the lower atmosphere, including Hα 6563 Å, He ii 304 Å, Ca ii K 3934 Å, and Si iv 1393 Å. One interesting result is the unusual high temperature (up to a few times 105 K) of the formation site of He ii 304 Å, which is expected owing to photoionization-recombination under flare conditions, compared to those in the quiet Sun dominated by collisional excitation. When compared with observations, our results can constrain the properties of nonthermal electrons and thus the poorly understood particle acceleration mechanism.

  8. Implications of X-Ray Observations for Electron Acceleration and Propagation in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, G. D.; Aschwanden, M. J.; Aurass, H.; Battaglia, M.; Grigis, P. C.; Kontar, E. P.; Liu, W.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Zharkova, V. V.

    2011-01-01

    High-energy X-rays and gamma-rays from solar flares were discovered just over fifty years ago. Since that time, the standard for the interpretation of spatially integrated flare X-ray spectra at energies above several tens of keV has been the collisional thick-target model. After the launch of the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) in early 2002, X-ray spectra and images have been of sufficient quality to allow a greater focus on the energetic electrons responsible for the X-ray emission, including their origin and their interactions with the flare plasma and magnetic field. The result has been new insights into the flaring process, as well as more quantitative models for both electron acceleration and propagation, and for the flare environment with which the electrons interact. In this article we review our current understanding of electron acceleration, energy loss, and propagation in flares. Implications of these new results for the collisional thick-target model, for general flare models, and for future flare studies are discussed.

  9. Classification of solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, T.; Sturrock, P. A.

    The historical background of solar flare classification before the SMM launch is reviewed along with recent developments made by observations with SMM, Hinotori, and other contemporary satellite and ground-based observations. Based on these recent findings, solar flares are grouped into five classes: thermal hard X-ray flares, nonthermal hard X-ray flares, impulsive gamma-ray/proton flares, gradual gamma-ray/proton flares, and quiescent filament-eruption flares. The roles of filament eruptions in flare development are examined, and theoretical ideas related to processes occurring in different flare classes are discussed.

  10. Particle/fluid simulations of an eruptive flare: Identifying the field-aligned currents responsible for the hard x-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    While magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) can provide a reasonable description of the overall magnetic reconnection that is believed to drive flares, additional, and often separate processes have to be envoked to in order to explain the electron acceleration that is responsible for many of the observed flare emissions. A new model that incorporates the dynamic coronal current sheets, the reconnection site, and possible electron acceleration processes is developed through the use of two-dimensional particle and modified two-fluid simulations. The specific example of an eruptive flare driven by the coalescence of flux tubes supported by prescribed photospheric current elements is evaluated. It is shown that the electrons and ions have differential trajectories through the coronal current sheet which leads to the development of additonal plasma currents that flow around the surface of the current sheet. These surface currents are explicitly neglected in MHD but they are vital to the flare dynamics because they divert current from the coronal current sheet into the chromosphere, producing an effective resistivity that aids the development of fast reconnection. Because the surface currents are in the plane of the magnetic field, electrons in them experience strong acceleration and can account for the observed hard X-ray emissions. Model predictions are compared with observed time profiles of hard X-ray emissions and Doppler shifts seen in soft X-ray line emissions and are able to account for such features as (1) the asymmetry in the rise and decay time of the hard X-rays, (2) the apparent delay between the largest Doppler shifts and the hard X-ray peak, and (3) the relatively low intensity of the blue-shifted component. The use of particle and fluid simulations is important because it provides different, but complementary treatments of the electron acceleration, the global magnetic morphology, and the flare current system.

  11. The inhibition by levocetirizine and fexofenadine of the histamine-induced wheal and flare response in healthy Caucasian and Japanese volunteers.

    PubMed

    Schoepke, Nicole; Church, Martin K; Maurer, Marcus

    2013-05-01

    This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study compared inhibition by one 5 mg dose of levocetirizine with two 60 mg doses of fexofenadine separated by 12 h of histamine-induced wheal and flare responses in 9 Caucasian and 9 Japanese healthy male volunteers. Levocetirizine was more inhibitory than fexofenadine on wheal, flare and pruritus (p < 0.005). Variability, evaluated from the standard deviation of inhibition, ranged from 14% to 23.2% for levocetirizine and 65.4% to 112.4% for fexofenadine. Levocetirizine had a faster onset of action (30-90 min versus 2 h), shorter time to maximum effect (3-4 versus 3-6 h) and longer duration of action (at least 24 h versus ~12 h) than fexofenadine. The plasma levels of levocetirizine rose more quickly, reached higher levels, were more consistent and decreased slower than those of fexofenadine. There were no clinically significant ethnic differences in responsiveness to the drugs.

  12. Aqueous Flare as an Indicator of Response to Dexamethasone Treatment in Retinal Vein Occlusions: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Demirel, Sibel; Yanık, Özge; Batıoğlu, Figen; Özmert, Emin; Baş, Zeynep

    2016-05-01

    To investigate aqueous flare change patterns in retinal vein occlusions (RVO) following intravitreal application of dexamethasone implant. To evaluate the correlations between central macular thickness (CMT), best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and aqueous flare values. This prospective, interventional pilot study included 40 eyes of 40 patients with macular edema associated with RVO. All patients received intravitreal injection of dexamethasone implant at baseline visit. Full ophthalmologic examination, CMT and aqueous flare measurements were performed prior to injection and repeated at months 1, 3, and 5. Aqueous flare, BCVA and CMT changes between visits were assessed. Further statistical analysis was performed to investigate correlations between these three parameters. The patients consist of 23 (57.5%) men and 17 (42.5%) women with a mean age of 65.7 ± 6.2 years. Of the 40 eyes, 24 (60%) had branch retinal vein occlusion and 16 (40%) had central retinal vein occlusion. BCVA (log MAR) was significantly correlated with aqueous flare at each visit (r = 0.436, p  = 0.005; r = 0.349, p = 0.027; r = 0.357, p = 0.024; r = 0.551, p = 0.000, respectively). Flare values were also correlated with CMT measurements in 3rd and 5th months (r = 0.324, p = 0.042; r = 0.556, p = 0.000, respectively). Comparing the percentage change in CMT and flare values over time, the change in CMT from baseline to 3rd and 5th months (r = 0.441, p = 0.004, r = 0.448, p = 0.004), from 1st month to 3rd and 5th months (r = 0.441, p = 0.004; r = 0.461, p = 0.003) and from 3rd month to 5th month were directly correlated with aqueous flare changes (r = 0.584, p = 0.000). Twenty-two eyes (55%) required second dexamethasone implant application at 5th month. Considering the inflammatory base of RVO, dexamethasone implants effectively decreased the flare values in the anterior chamber. The CMT change was

  13. Responsive Early Childhood Education Program (RECEP).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsboro City Schools, NC.

    The Goldsboro City Schools' Responsive Early Childhood Education Program (RECEP) is a program of language, mathematics, and problem-solving for economically disadvantaged children in kindergarten and the primary grades. The project was designed to: (1) increase children's learning of basic language and mathematics skills; (2) develop children's…

  14. Hard X-Ray Emission from the February 15, 2011 Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Andrew; Smith, D. M.; Krucker, S.; Glesener, L.

    2013-07-01

    The February 15, 2011 solar flare was the first X-class flare of Solar Cycle 24, and as such has received much attention in the literature. This flare has many interesting features, including the presence of a sun-quake, a large coronal mass ejection, and a distinct “pre-impulsive” phase during which the thermal emission rises appreciably before any significant rise in non-thermal flux. It is presently unknown why certain flares exhibit pre-impulsive behavior, or what heating or particle acceleration mechanisms are responsible for these events. In addition, there has been limited analysis of the hard x-ray emission from this particular flare. We present x-ray images, spectra, and analysis of RHESSI data from this event with particular focus on the pre-impulsive phase. Additional SDO AIA and HMI images will be used to determine the context of the RHESSI observations. Looking at the early stages of this and similar flares presents excellent opportunities to constrain acceleration and heating modes and to learn more about what physical processes underlie flare and CME initiation.

  15. Rapid fluctuations in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, Peter A.

    1986-01-01

    Study of rapid fluctuations in the emission of radiation from solar flares provides a promising approach for probing the magneto-plasma structure and plasma processes that are responsible for a flare. It is proposed that elementary flare bursts in X-ray and microwave emission may be attributed to fine structure of the coronal magnetic field, related to the aggregation of photospheric magnetic field into magnetic knots. Fluctuations that occur on a subsecond time-scale may be due to magnetic islands that develop in current sheets during magnetic reconnection. The impulsive phase may sometimes represent the superposition of a large number of the elementary energy-release processes responsible for elementary flare bursts. If so, the challenge of trying to explain the properties of the impulsive phase in terms of the properties of the elementary processes must be faced. Magnetic field configurations that might produce solar flares are divided into a number of categories, depending on: whether or not there is a filament; whether there is no current sheet, a closed current sheet, or an open current sheet; and whether the filament erupts into the corona, or is ejected completely from the Sun's atmosphere. Analysis of the properties of these possible configurations is compared with different types of flares, and to Bai's subdivision of gamma-ray/proton events.

  16. On the source of flare-ejecta responsible for geomagnetic storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakurai, K.

    1974-01-01

    It is shown that magnetic bottles as the sources of moving metric type 4 bursts are not responsible for the development of geomagnetic storms, despite the fact that shock waves producing type 2 bursts are the sources of the interplanetary shock waves, which produce SSC's on the geomagnetic field. These magnetic bottles, in general, tend to move in the solar envelope with the speed of several hundred Km/sec at most, which is much slower than that of the motion of type 2 radio sources.

  17. A Rayleigh Scatter-Based Ocular Flare Analysis Meter for Flare Photometry of the Anterior Chamber

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Deborah L.; Axtelle, Jim; Rath, Susan; Dyer, Andrew; Harrison, Benjamin; Rogers, Claude; Menon, Naresh; Van Gelder, Russell N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Existing flare photometers are based on the Tyndall effect, which requires sophisticated laser photometry. The ocular flare analysis meter (OFAM) is a nonlaser photometer that uses quantitative Rayleigh scatter and absorption from visible light to compute a flare value. This study is designed to correlate OFAM measurements with qualitative measurements of flare in vitro and in vivo. Methods Following validation of the device on artificial anterior chambers containing known protein concentrations, flare readings were obtained from 90 subjects (46 with and 44 without uveitis) in one eye. Subjects were graded by the Standardization of Uveitis Nomenclature (SUN) working group flare scoring system and received the OFAM flare measurements. Results The OFAM showed linear response in vitro to protein concentrations ranging from 0 to 0.5 mg/ml. In clinical use in subjects ranging from SUN flare scores of 0+ to 2+, OFAM showed statistically significant measurement accuracy (P = 0.0008 of flare 0 versus flare 2; P = 0.031 of flare 0 versus flare 1). Distinction of SUN scores 1 and 2 was borderline significant (P = 0.057). Conclusion The OFAM photometry correlates with the standard SUN scoring system. This method may provide an objective method to diagnosis and monitor uveitis. Further longitudinal studies are warranted. Translational Relevance Currently, ocular flare is assessed qualitatively in most clinical settings. The existing methodology uses only Tyndall effect to measure flare. The OFAM uses an alternate, nonlaser means for measurement of anterior chamber flare by measure of Raleigh scatter. This pilot clinical study suggests that the OFAM device may be useful in measurement of uveitis activity. PMID:26688778

  18. A Rayleigh Scatter-Based Ocular Flare Analysis Meter for Flare Photometry of the Anterior Chamber.

    PubMed

    Lam, Deborah L; Axtelle, Jim; Rath, Susan; Dyer, Andrew; Harrison, Benjamin; Rogers, Claude; Menon, Naresh; Van Gelder, Russell N

    2015-12-01

    Existing flare photometers are based on the Tyndall effect, which requires sophisticated laser photometry. The ocular flare analysis meter (OFAM) is a nonlaser photometer that uses quantitative Rayleigh scatter and absorption from visible light to compute a flare value. This study is designed to correlate OFAM measurements with qualitative measurements of flare in vitro and in vivo. Following validation of the device on artificial anterior chambers containing known protein concentrations, flare readings were obtained from 90 subjects (46 with and 44 without uveitis) in one eye. Subjects were graded by the Standardization of Uveitis Nomenclature (SUN) working group flare scoring system and received the OFAM flare measurements. The OFAM showed linear response in vitro to protein concentrations ranging from 0 to 0.5 mg/ml. In clinical use in subjects ranging from SUN flare scores of 0+ to 2+, OFAM showed statistically significant measurement accuracy (P = 0.0008 of flare 0 versus flare 2; P = 0.031 of flare 0 versus flare 1). Distinction of SUN scores 1 and 2 was borderline significant (P = 0.057). The OFAM photometry correlates with the standard SUN scoring system. This method may provide an objective method to diagnosis and monitor uveitis. Further longitudinal studies are warranted. Currently, ocular flare is assessed qualitatively in most clinical settings. The existing methodology uses only Tyndall effect to measure flare. The OFAM uses an alternate, nonlaser means for measurement of anterior chamber flare by measure of Raleigh scatter. This pilot clinical study suggests that the OFAM device may be useful in measurement of uveitis activity.

  19. Response of the equatorial and low-latitude ionosphere over the West Pacific Ocean Sector to an X1.2 solar flare on 15 May 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Tian; Sun, Lingfeng; Wang, Yungang; She, Chengli; Xiong, Bo; Hu, Lianhuan

    2017-09-01

    On the basis of multiple observations of ionosondes, meteor radars, magnetometers and GNSS receivers, we present the response of the equatorial and low latitude ionosphere over the West Pacific Ocean Sector to an X1.2 solar flare that peaked at 1:48 UT on 15 May 2013. The geomagnetic H component observations indicate the equatorial electrojet strength over the East Asia region is obviously enhancement during the flare. After the end time of solar flare, the ionosonde observations at Guam, an ionosonde station near the geomagnetic equatorial region, show the decrease of the peak height of ionospheric F2 layer which is related to the decrease of the eastward electric field. Simultaneous strong southern wind is observed by meteor radar over Sanya, a geomagnetic low latitude station, which probably product the westward dynamo electric field and further result in the decrease of vertical drift velocity over the geomagnetic equatorial region. In addition, GNSS total electron content (TEC) observations from six stations in the researching region show the TEC enhancement only appears nearby the geomagnetic equator region.

  20. SU-D-202-01: Functional Lung Avoidance and Response-Adaptive Escalation (FLARE) RT: Feasibility of a Precision Radiation Oncology Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, S; Lee, E; Miyaoka, R; Kinahan, P; Sandison, G; Vesselle, H; Rengan, R; Zeng, J; Saini, J; Wong, T

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: NSCLC patient RT is planned without consideration of spatial heterogeneity in lung function or tumor response, which may have contributed to failed uniform dose escalation in a randomized trial. The feasibility of functional lung avoidance and response-adaptive escalation (FLARE) RT to reduce dose to [{sup 99m}Tc]MAA-SPECT/CT perfused lung while redistributing 74Gy within [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET/CT biological target volumes was assessed. Methods: Eight Stage IIB–IIIB NSCLC patients underwent FDG-PET/CT and MAA-SPECT/CT treatment planning scans. Perfused lung objectives were derived from scatter/collimator/attenuation-corrected MAA-SPECT uptake relative to ITV-subtracted lung to maintain <20Gy mean lung dose (MLD). Prescriptions included 60Gy to PTV and concomitant boost of 74Gy mean to biological target volumes (BTV=GTV+PET margin) scaled to each BTV voxel by relative FDG-PET SUV. Dose-painting-by-numbers prescriptions were integrated into commercial TPS via previously reported ROI discretization. Dose constraints for lung, heart, cord, and esophagus were defined. FLARE RT plans were optimized with VMAT, proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) with 3%-3mm robust optimization, and combination PBS (avoidance) plus VMAT (escalation). Dosimetric differences were evaluated by Friedman non-parametric paired test with multiple sampling correction. Results: PTV and normal tissue objectives were not violated in 24 FLARE RT plans. Population median of mean BTV dose was 73.7Gy (68.5–75.5Gy), mean FDG-PET peak dose was 89.7Gy (73.5–103Gy), MLD was 12.3Gy (7.5–19.6Gy), and perfused MLD was 4.8Gy (0.9–12.1Gy). VMAT achieved higher dose to the FDG-PET peak subvolume (p=0.01), while PBS delivered lower dose to lung (p<0.001). Voxelwise linear correlation between BTV dose and FDG-PET uptake was higher for VMAT (R=0.93) and PBS+VMAT (R=0.94) compared to PBS alone (R=0.89). Conclusion: FLARE RT is feasible with VMAT and PBS. A combination of PBS for functional lung avoidance

  1. Identifying flares in rheumatoid arthritis: reliability and construct validation of the OMERACT RA Flare Core Domain Set

    PubMed Central

    Bykerk, Vivian P; Bingham, Clifton O; Choy, Ernest H; Lin, Daming; Alten, Rieke; Christensen, Robin; Furst, Daniel E; Hewlett, Sarah; Leong, Amye; March, Lyn; Woodworth, Thasia; Boire, Gilles; Haraoui, Boulos; Hitchon, Carol; Jamal, Shahin; Keystone, Edward C; Pope, Janet; Tin, Diane; Thorne, J Carter

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the reliability of concurrent flare identification using 3 methods (patient, rheumatologist and Disease Activity Score (DAS)28 criteria), and construct validity of candidate items representing the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT) RA Flare Core Domain Set. Methods Candidate flare questions and legacy measures were administered at consecutive visits to Canadian Early Arthritis Cohort (CATCH) patients between November 2011 and November 2014. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) core set indicators were recorded. Concordance to identify flares was assessed using the agreement coefficient. Construct validity of flare questions was examined: convergent (Spearman's r); discriminant (mean differences between flaring/non-flaring patients); and consequential (proportions with prior treatment reductions and intended therapeutic change postflare). Results The 849 patients were 75% female, 81% white, 42% were in remission/low disease activity (R/LDA), and 16–32% were flaring at the second visit. Agreement of flare status was low–strong (κ's 0.17–0.88) and inversely related to RA disease activity level. Flare domains correlated highly (r's≥0.70) with each other, patient global (r's≥0.66) and corresponding measures (r's 0.49–0.92); and moderately highly with MD and patient-reported joint counts (r's 0.29–0.62). When MD/patients agreed the patient was flaring, mean flare domain between-group differences were 2.1–3.0; 36% had treatment reductions prior to flare, with escalation planned in 61%. Conclusions Flares are common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and are often preceded by treatment reductions. Patient/MD/DAS agreement of flare status is highest in patients worsening from R/LDA. OMERACT RA flare questions can discriminate between patients with/without flare and have strong evidence of construct and consequential validity. Ongoing work will identify optimal scoring and cut points to identify RA flares. PMID

  2. Early Screening for Tetrahydrobiopterin Responsiveness in Phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Porta, Francesco; Spada, Marco; Ponzone, Alberto

    2017-08-01

    Since 2007, synthetic tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) has been approved as a therapeutic option in BH4-responsive phenylketonuria (PKU) and since 2015 extended to infants younger than 4 years in Europe. The current definition of BH4 responsiveness relies on the observation of a 20% to 30% blood phenylalanine (Phe) decrease after BH4 administration, under nonstandardized conditions. By this definition, however, patients with the same genotype or even the same patients were alternatively reported as responsive or nonresponsive to the cofactor. These inconsistencies are troubling, as frustrating patient expectations and impairing cost-effectiveness of BH4-therapy. Here we tried a quantitative procedure through the comparison of the outcome of a simple Phe and a combined Phe plus BH4 loading in a series of infants with PKU, most of them harboring genotypes already reported as BH4 responsive. Under these ideal conditions, blood Phe clearance did not significantly differ after the 2 types of loading, and a 20% to 30% decrease of blood Phe occurred irrespective of BH4 administration in milder forms of PKU. Such early screening for BH4 responsiveness, based on a quantitative assay, is essential for warranting an evidence-based and cost-effective therapy in those patients with PKU eventually but definitely diagnosed as responsive to the cofactor. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  3. Early cytokine responses during intestinal parasitic infections.

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, N; Goyal, P K; Mahida, Y R; Li, K F; Wakelin, D

    1998-01-01

    Infections with gastro-intestinal nematodes elicit immune and inflammatory responses mediated by cytokines released from T-helper type-2 (Th2) cells. In vitro assays of cells from the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) of experimentally infected rodents confirm that, after about 1 week, the dominant cytokine responses to mitogens and antigens are those associated with this Th-cell subset. Polarization of the Th response in this way implies an initial local cytokine environment that favours Th2 development. However, experimental infections with Trichinella spiralis and Nippostrongylus brasiliensis show that, within 2 days of worms reaching the intestine, MLN cells (MLNC) respond with a Th1 rather than a Th2 response [i.e. there is an increase in mRNA for the type 1 cytokine interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), and mitogen-stimulated MLNC release IFN-gamma rather than interleukin-5 (IL-5)]. Antigen stimulation at this time does not elicit IFN-gamma release and the MLNC cannot adoptively transfer immunity. Within a few days the MLNC phenotype changes. There is a Th2 response (IL-5 release) to both mitogen and antigen stimulation and MLNC can adoptively transfer immunity. Early release of IFN-gamma is T-cell dependent, with CD4+ T cells playing the major role. The data are discussed in relation to factors regulating the mucosal response to invasion by parasites. PMID:9616376

  4. MWA targeted campaign of nearby, flaring M dwarf stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, C.; Murphy, T.; Kaplan, D. L.

    2017-01-01

    Flaring activity is a common characteristic of magnetically active stellar systems. Flare events produce emission throughout the electromagnetic spectrum, implying a range of physical processes. Early 100 - 200 MHz observations of M dwarf flare stars detected bright (>100 mJy) flares with occurrence rates between 0.06 - 0.8 flares per hour. These rates imply that observing 100 - 200 MHz flares from M dwarf stars is fairly easy with many detections expected for modern low-frequency telescopes. However, long observational campaigns using these modern telescopes have not reproduced these early detections. This could be because the rates are over estimated and contaminated by radio frequency interference. Recently Lynch et al. (submitted) detected four flares from UV Ceti at 154 MHz using the Murchison Widefield Array. The flares have flux densities between 10-65 mJy -- a factor of 100 fainter than most flares in the literature at these frequencies -- and are only detected in circular polarization. The flare rates for these newly detected flares are roughly consistent with earlier rates however the uncertainties are large. Building off this result we propose a 102 hour survey of the closet six M dwarf stars with observed magnetic activity traced in X-rays and 100 - 200 MHz emission. The rates measured from this survey would inform the duration required for future blind surveys for flares from M dwarf stars.

  5. Ionospheric response to magnetar flare: signature of SGR J1550-5418 on coherent ionospheric Doppler radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahrous, Ayman

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents observational evidence of frequent ionospheric perturbations caused by the magnetar flare of the source SGR J1550-5418, which took place on 22 January 2009. These ionospheric perturbations are observed in the relative change of the total electron content (ΔTEC/Δt) measurements from the coherent ionospheric Doppler radar (CIDR). The CIDR system makes high-precision measurements of the total electron content (TEC) change along ray-paths from ground receivers to low Earth-orbiting (LEO) beacon spacecraft. These measurements can be integrated along the orbital track of the beacon satellite to construct the relative spatial, not temporal, TEC profiles that are useful for determining the large-scale plasma distribution. The observed spatial TEC changes reveal many interesting features of the magnetar signatures in the ionosphere. The onset phase of the magnetar flare was during the CIDR's nighttime satellite passage. The nighttime small-scale perturbations detected by CIDR, with ΔTEC/Δt ≥ 0.05 TECU s-1, over the eastern Mediterranean on 22 January 2009 were synchronized with the onset phase of the magnetar flare and consistent with the emission of hundreds of bursts detected from the source. The maximum daytime large-scale perturbation measured by CIDR over northern Africa and the eastern Mediterranean was detected after ˜ 6 h from the main phase of the magnetar flare, with ΔTEC/Δt ≤ 0.10 TECU s-1. These ionospheric perturbations resembled an unusual poleward traveling ionospheric disturbance (TID) caused by the extraterrestrial source. The TID's estimated virtual velocity is 385.8 m s-1, with ΔTEC/Δt ≤ 0.10 TECU s-1.

  6. SWUSV: a microsatellite mission for space weather early forecasting of major flares and CMEs and the complete monitoring of the ultraviolet solar variability influence on climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damé, Luc

    The SWUSV (Space Weather & Ultraviolet Solar Variability) proposed microsatellite mission encompasses three major scientific objectives: (1) Space Weather including the prediction and detection of major eruptions and coronal mass ejections (using Lyman-Alpha and Herzberg continuum imaging and H-Alpha ground support); (2) solar forcing on the climate through radiation and their interactions with the local stratosphere (UV spectral irradiance from 180 to 400 nm by bands of 10 to 20 nm, including ozone, plus Lyman-Alpha and the CN bandhead); (3) simultaneous local radiative budget of the Earth, UV to IR, with an accuracy better than 1% in differential. The mission is on a sun-synchronous polar orbit and proposes 5 instruments to the model payload: SUAVE (Solar Ultraviolet Advanced Variability Experiment), an optimized telescope for FUV (Lyman-Alpha) and MUV (200-220 nm Herzberg continuum) imaging (sources of variability); UPR (Ultraviolet Passband Radiometers), with 64 UV filter radiometers; a vector magnetometer; thermal plasma measurements and Langmuir probes; and a total and spectral solar irradiance and Earth radiative budget ensemble (SERB, Solar irradiance & Earth Radiative Budget). SWUSV is proposed as a small mission to CNES and to ESA for a possible flight as early as 2020-2021. With opening to Chinese collaboration (ESA-CAS Small Mission) a further instrument could be added (HEBS, High Energy Burst Spectrometers) to reinforced Space Weather flares prediction objectives.

  7. KEPLER FLARES. I. ACTIVE AND INACTIVE M DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, Suzanne L.; Davenport, James R. A.; Kowalski, Adam F.; Wisniewski, John P.; Deitrick, Russell; Hilton, Eric J.; Hebb, Leslie

    2014-12-20

    We analyzed Kepler short-cadence M dwarf observations. Spectra from the Astrophysical Research Consortium 3.5 m telescope identify magnetically active (Hα in emission) stars. The active stars are of mid-M spectral type, have numerous flares, and have well-defined rotational modulation due to starspots. The inactive stars are of early M type, exhibit less starspot signature, and have fewer flares. A Kepler to U-band energy scaling allows comparison of the Kepler flare frequency distributions with previous ground-based data. M dwarfs span a large range of flare frequency and energy, blurring the distinction between active and inactive stars designated solely by the presence of Hα. We analyzed classical and complex (multiple peak) flares on GJ 1243, finding strong correlations between flare energy, amplitude, duration, and decay time, with only a weak dependence on rise time. Complex flares last longer and have higher energy at the same amplitude, and higher energy flares are more likely to be complex. A power law fits the energy distribution for flares with log E{sub K{sub p}}> 31 erg, but the predicted number of low-energy flares far exceeds the number observed, at energies where flares are still easily detectable, indicating that the power-law distribution may flatten at low energy. There is no correlation of flare occurrence or energy with starspot phase, the flare waiting time distribution is consistent with flares occurring randomly in time, and the energies of consecutive flares are uncorrelated. These observations support a scenario where many independent active regions on the stellar surface are contributing to the observed flare rate.

  8. COPD flare-ups

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms and signs of a COPD flare-up. Warning Signs of COPD Flare-up Signs of a ... 21810710 . Vestbo J, Hurd SS, Agusti AG, et al. Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD). Global ...

  9. Understanding Solar Flare Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheatland, M. S.

    2005-12-01

    A review is presented of work aimed at understanding solar flare statistics, with emphasis on the well known flare power-law size distribution. Although avalanche models are perhaps the favoured model to describe flare statistics, their physical basis is unclear, and they are divorced from developing ideas in large-scale reconnection theory. An alternative model, aimed at reconciling large-scale reconnection models with solar flare statistics, is revisited. The solar flare waiting-time distribution has also attracted recent attention. Observed waiting-time distributions are described, together with what they might tell us about the flare phenomenon. Finally, a practical application of flare statistics to flare prediction is described in detail, including the results of a year of automated (web-based) predictions from the method.

  10. Mass motion in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A.

    1973-01-01

    Mass motions in solar flares are here considered in terms of a previously proposed model. Particle acceleration occurs during reconnection of a current sheet located at coronal heights. The downward component of the particle flux produces an impulsive hard X-ray burst and heats the upper layers of the chromosphere sufficiently to lead to explosive evaporation. Some of the evaporated gas remains trapped in newly closed magnetic field lines and is responsible for the soft thermal component of X-ray emission. Gas which flows along open magnetic field lines subsequently forms a plasmoid which is ejected by magnetic stresses into interplanetary space and may subsequently cause a geomagnetic storm. Analysis of a highly simplified model leads to formulas for the density, temperature, and other parameters of the flare-produced plasma in terms of a length scale and mean magnetic field strength for the flare.

  11. Understanding flaring solar-type stars seen by Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderblom, David

    2012-02-01

    The early Kepler data show unambiguous and dramatic evidence of large-scale, massive white-light stellar flares on G and early-K dwarfs. The energies released in these flares are at least 103?104 times that of the largest solar flares ever seen, meaning that they put substantial energy into their circumstellar environments, and much of that energy may be in hard x-rays. At the same time, it is not clear from the Kepler data alone why these particular stars flare because there are many other stars with no evident flares that have similar rotation periods and amplitudes of variation. Are bouts of massive flaring episodic? Do the flaring stars have other properties (activity, v sin i, lithium, inter alia) that distinguish them? Are the flaring stars in close binaries? Keck HIRES spectra can address all these questions and more, and help us to more fully understand this important phenomenon that has critical implications for the formation and evolution of planets and, e! specially, for chemistry and astrobiology in those regions. These stars are also of potential great importance for understanding the flaring behavior of the Sun because white-light flares have not been seen on G stars before, and it is crucial to understand if these flaring stars are unusually young, in close pairs, or if they represent a broader phenomenon that has not yet been appreciated.

  12. Sunspot waves and flare energy release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sych, R.; Karlický, M.; Altyntsev, A.; Dudík, J.; Kashapova, L.

    2015-05-01

    Context. We study the possibility of flare process triggering by waves propagating from the sunspot along a magnetic loop (channel) to a nearby flare site. Aims: We present a relationship between the dynamics of ~3-min slow magnetoacoustic waves in the sunspot and flare emergence process. Waves propagating in the magnetic channel whose one foot is anchored in the umbra represent the disturbing agent responsible for triggering the flare energy release. Methods: We applied time-distance plots and pixel wavelet filtration methods to obtain spatio-temporal distribution of wave power variations in radio and SDO/AIA data. To find the magnetic channel, we used potential magnetic field extrapolation of SDO/HMI magnetograms. The propagation velocity of wave fronts was measured from wave locations at specific times. Results: In the correlation curves of the 17 GHz (NoRH) radio emission, we found a monotonous energy amplification of the 3-min waves in the sunspot umbra before the 2012 June 7 flare. This amplification was associated with an increase in the length of the oscillatory wakes in coronal loops (SDO/AIA, 171 Å) prior to the flare onset. A peculiarity of the flare is the constant level of the flare emission in soft X-rays (RHESSI, 3-25 keV) for ~10 min after the short impulsive phase, which indicates continuing energy release. Throughout this time, we found transverse oscillations of the flare loop with a 30 s period in the radio-frequency range (NoRH, 17 GHz). This period appears to be related to the 3-min waves from the sunspot. The magnetic field extrapolation based on SDO/HMI magnetograms shows the existence of the magnetic channel (waveguide) connecting the sunspot with the energy release region. Conclusions: We analysed the sunspot 3-min wave dynamics and found a correlation between the oscillation power amplification and flare triggering in the region connected to the sunspot through the magnetic channel. We propose that this amplified wave flux triggered the

  13. Equatorial ionospheric electrodynamics during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruilong; Liu, Libo; Le, Huijun; Chen, Yiding

    2017-05-01

    Previous investigations on ionospheric responses to solar flares focused mainly on the photoionization caused by the increased X-rays and extreme ultraviolet irradiance. However, little attention was paid to the related electrodynamics. In this letter, we explored the equatorial electric field (EEF) and electrojet (EEJ) in the ionosphere at Jicamarca during flares from 1998 to 2008. It is verified that solar flares increase dayside eastward EEJ but decrease dayside eastward EEF, revealing a negative correlation between EEJ and EEF. The decreased EEF weakens the equatorial fountain effect and depresses the low-latitude electron density. During flares, the enhancement in the Cowling conductivity may modulate ionospheric dynamo and decrease the EEF. Besides, the decreased EEF is closely related to the enhanced ASY-H index that qualitatively reflects Region 2 field-aligned current (R2 FAC). We speculated that solar flares may also decrease EEF through enhancing R2 FAC that leads to an overshielding-like effect.

  14. Energy input and response from prompt and early optical afterglow emission in gamma-ray bursts.

    PubMed

    Vestrand, W T; Wren, J A; Wozniak, P R; Aptekar, R; Golentskii, S; Pal'shin, V; Sakamoto, T; White, R R; Evans, S; Casperson, D; Fenimore, E

    2006-07-13

    The taxonomy of optical emission detected during the critical first few minutes after the onset of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) defines two broad classes: prompt optical emission correlated with prompt gamma-ray emission, and early optical afterglow emission uncorrelated with the gamma-ray emission. The standard theoretical interpretation attributes prompt emission to internal shocks in the ultra-relativistic outflow generated by the internal engine; early afterglow emission is attributed to shocks generated by interaction with the surrounding medium. Here we report on observations of a bright GRB that, for the first time, clearly show the temporal relationship and relative strength of the two optical components. The observations indicate that early afterglow emission can be understood as reverberation of the energy input measured by prompt emission. Measurements of the early afterglow reverberations therefore probe the structure of the environment around the burst, whereas the subsequent response to late-time impulsive energy releases reveals how earlier flaring episodes have altered the jet and environment parameters. Many GRBs are generated by the death of massive stars that were born and died before the Universe was ten per cent of its current age, so GRB afterglow reverberations provide clues about the environments around some of the first stars.

  15. X-Ray Source Motions and Their Implications for Flare Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2008-01-01

    RHESSI observations have revealed a downward contraction of solar flare loops followed by upward expansion. In some flares a pair of above-the-looptop sources is observed, one just above the top of the cooler flare loops and the other a discrete source well above the looptops characterized by an effective temperature gradient increasing toward lower altitudes. In one flare the higher, temperature-inverted coronal source sped outward at a speed consistent with that of a coronal mass ejection associated with the flare. In some flares with minimal preheating (early impulsive flares), nonthermal X-ray sources have been observed to propagate downward and then upward along the legs of the flare loop. I will discuss the implications of all of these X-ray source motions for flare models, and their use as diagnostics of the evolution of the physical conditions in flares.

  16. Elongation of Flare Ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jiong; Longcope, Dana W.; Cassak, Paul A.; Priest, Eric R.

    2017-03-01

    We present an analysis of the apparent elongation motion of flare ribbons along the polarity inversion line (PIL), as well as the shear of flare loops in several two-ribbon flares. Flare ribbons and loops spread along the PIL at a speed ranging from a few to a hundred km s‑1. The shear measured from conjugate footpoints is consistent with the measurement from flare loops, and both show the decrease of shear toward a potential field as a flare evolves and ribbons and loops spread along the PIL. Flares exhibiting fast bidirectional elongation appear to have a strong shear, which may indicate a large magnetic guide field relative to the reconnection field in the coronal current sheet. We discuss how the analysis of ribbon motion could help infer properties in the corona where reconnection takes place.

  17. Solar Flares and their Effects on Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward Francis; Engle, Scott G.

    2015-08-01

    The effects of flares from the Sun on Earth and other solar-system planets are discussed. The strong X-ray - UV radiation and high plasma fluxes from flares can strongly effect solar system planets even as far out as the Jovian planets and their moons. Data from our "Sun in Time" program are used to study the flare properties of the Sun and solar-type stars from youth to old age. These data imply that the young Sun had numerous, very powerful flares that may have played major roles in the development and evolution of the early atmospheres of Earth and other terrestiral planets. These strong X-UV fluxes from flares can greatly effect the photochemistry of planetary atmospheres as well as ionizing and possibly eroding their atmospheres. Some examples are given. Also briefly discussed are effects of large flares from the present Sun on the Earth. Even though strong solar flares are rarer and less powerful than from the youthful Sun, they can cause significant damage to our communication and satellite systems, electrical networks, and threaten the lives of astronauts in space.This research is supported by grants from NASA (HST and Chandra) and NSF. We gratefully acknowledge this support

  18. Whether solar flares can trigger earthquakes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, R.

    2007-05-01

    We present the study of 682 earthquakes of ¡Ý4.0 magnitude observed during January 1991 to January 2007 in the light of solar flares observed by GOES and SOXS missions in order to explore the possibility of any association between solar flares and earthquakes. Our investigation preliminarily shows that each earthquake under study was preceded by a solar flare of GOES importance B to X class by 10-100 hrs. However, each flare was not found followed by earthquake of magnitude ¡Ý4.0. We classified the earthquake events with respect to their magnitude and further attempted to look for their correlation with GOES importance class and delay time. We found that with the increasing importance of flares the delay in the onset of earthquake reduces. The critical X-ray intensity of the flare to be associated with earthquake is found to be ~10-6 Watts/m2. On the other hand no clear evidence could be established that higher importance flares precede high magnitude earthquakes. Our detailed study of 50 earthquakes associated with solar flares observed by SOXS mission and other wavebands revealed many interesting results such as the location of the flare on the Sun and the delay time in the earthquake and its magnitude. We propose a model explaining the charged particles accelerated during the solar flare and released in the space that undergone further acceleration by interplanetary shocks and produce the ring current in the earth's magnetosphere, which may enhance the process of tectonics plates motion abruptly at fault zones. It is further proposed that such sudden enhancement in the process of tectonic motion of plates in fault zones may increase abruptly the heat gradients on spatial (dT/dx) and temporal (dT/dt) scales responsible for earthquakes.

  19. Simulation Training in Early Emergency Response (STEER).

    PubMed

    Generoso, Jose Roberto; Latoures, Renee Elizabeth; Acar, Yahya; Miller, Dean Scott; Ciano, Mark; Sandrei, Renan; Vieira, Marlon; Luong, Sean; Hirsch, Jan; Fidler, Richard Lee

    2016-06-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ISSUE Instructions: 1.3 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded after you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. In order to obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Simulation Training in Early Emergency Response (STEER)," found on pages 255-263, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name, contact information, and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until May 31, 2019. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. OBJECTIVES Define the purpose of the Simulation Training in Early Emergency Response (STEER) study. Review the outcome of the STEER study. DISCLOSURE

  20. Predictions of active region flaring probability using subsurface helicity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinard, A. A.; Komm, R.; Hill, F.

    2010-12-01

    Solar flares are responsible for a number of hazardous effects on the earth such as disabling high-frequency radio communications, interfering with GPS measurements, and disrupting satellites. However, forecasting flare occurrence is currently very difficult. One possible means for predicting flare occurrence lies in helioseismology, i.e. analysis of the region below the active region for signs of an impending flare. Time series helioseismic data collected by the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) has been analyzed for a subset of active regions that produce large flares and a subset with very high magnetic field strength that produce no flares. A predictive parameter has been developed and analyzed using discriminant analysis as well as traditional forecasting tools such as the Heidke skill score. Preliminary results show that this parameter predicts the flaring probability of an active region 2-3 days in advance with a relatively high degree of success.

  1. Using subsurface helicity measurements to predict flare occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinard, A. A.; Henthorn, J.; Komm, R.; Hill, F.

    2009-12-01

    Solar flares are responsible for a number of hazardous effects including disabling high-frequency radio communications, interfering with GPS measurements, and disrupting satellites. Forecasting flare occurrence is very difficult, giving little advanced notice of these events. One possible means for predicting flare occurrence lies in helioseismology, i.e. analysis of the region below the active region for signs of an impending flare. Time series helioseismic data collected by the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) have been analyzed for a subset of active regions that produce large flares and a subset with very high magnetic field strength that produce no flares. A predictive parameter has been developed and analyzed using discriminant analysis as well as traditional forecasting tools such as the Heidke skill score. Preliminary results indicate this parameter predicts flare occurrence with a high success rate.

  2. A Statistical Analysis of Loop-Top Motion in Solar Limb Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Sui, Linhui; Brosius, D. G.; Dennis, Brian R.

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies of hot, thermal solar flare loops imaged with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) have identified several flares for which the loop top shrinks downward early in the impulsive phase and then expands upward later in the impulsive phase (Sui & Holman 2003; Sui, Holman & Dennis 2004; Veronig et al. 2005). This early downward motion is not predicted by flare models. We study a statistical sample of RHESSI flares to assess how common this evolution is and to better characterize it. In a sample of 88 flares near the solar lin$ that show identifiable loop structure in RHESSI images, 66% (58 flares) showed downward loop-top motion followed by upward motion. We therefore conclude that the early downward motion is a frequent characteristic of flare loops. We obtain the distribution of the timing of the change from downward to upward motion relative to flare start and peak times. We also obtain the distributions of downward and upward speeds.

  3. A Statistical Analysis of Loop-Top Motion in Solar Limb Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Sui, Linhui; Brosius, D. G.; Dennis, Brian R.

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies of hot, thermal solar flare loops imaged with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) have identified several flares for which the loop top shrinks downward early in the impulsive phase and then expands upward later in the impulsive phase (Sui & Holman 2003; Sui, Holman & Dennis 2004; Veronig et al. 2005). This early downward motion is not predicted by flare models. We study a statistical sample of RHESSI flares to assess how common this evolution is and to better characterize it. In a sample of 88 flares near the solar lin$ that show identifiable loop structure in RHESSI images, 66% (58 flares) showed downward loop-top motion followed by upward motion. We therefore conclude that the early downward motion is a frequent characteristic of flare loops. We obtain the distribution of the timing of the change from downward to upward motion relative to flare start and peak times. We also obtain the distributions of downward and upward speeds.

  4. Major Solar Flare

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-11

    A large sunspot was the source of a powerful solar flare (an X 9.3) and a coronal mass ejection (Sept. 6, 2017). The flare was the largest solar flare of the last decade. For one thing, it created a strong shortwave radio blackout over Europe, Africa and the Atlantic Ocean. Sunspot 2673 has been also the source of several other smaller to medium-sized solar flares over the past few days. Data from the SOHO spacecraft shows the large cloud of particles blasting into space just after the flare. Note: the bright vertical line and the other rays with barred lines are aberrations in our instruments caused by the bright flash of the flare. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21949

  5. Flare Data in High Temporal Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaparová, J.

    Analysis of the September 23, 1998 flare H? spectra and filtergrams is presented. Spectra were obtained using multichannel flare spectrograph (MFS) at the Astronomical Institute in Ond?ejov, Czech Republic, having a temporal resolution of 25 frames/s and a spatial resolution of ?1? decreased by seeing to 3? - 5?. High temporal resolution was firstly used for detecting of the chromosphere response to the pulse beam heating.

  6. Particle acceleration in flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Arnold O.; Kosugi, Takeo; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benka, Steve G.; Chupp, Edward L.; Enome, Shinzo; Garcia, Howard; Holman, Gordon D.; Kurt, Victoria G.; Sakao, Taro

    1994-01-01

    Particle acceleration is intrinsic to the primary energy release in the impulsive phase of solar flares, and we cannot understand flares without understanding acceleration. New observations in soft and hard X-rays, gamma-rays and coherent radio emissions are presented, suggesting flare fragmentation in time and space. X-ray and radio measurements exhibit at least five different time scales in flares. In addition, some new observations of delayed acceleration signatures are also presented. The theory of acceleration by parallel electric fields is used to model the spectral shape and evolution of hard X-rays. The possibility of the appearance of double layers is further investigated.

  7. Flares, CMEs and sunquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkov, Sergei; Matthews, Sarah A.; Green, Lucie M.; Zharkova, Valentina

    Solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are believed to be manifestations of a sudden and rapid release of the accumulated magnetic energy in the corona. Only recently, the photospheric changes due to the reconnection and coronal magnetic field reconfiguration have been seriously considered from the theoretical point of view. Analysis of seismic emission (sun-quakes) induced in the solar interior in the vicinity of flares offers us an opportunity to explore the physical processes of energy transport in flaring atmospheres. Only a limited number of M and X-class flares have been reported to show seismic signatures in the form or ripples or egression sources, revealing that some of the most powerful flares often do not produce any seismic signatures. In fact, the most powerful signatures were recorded from an M-class flare. This raises important questions about how the flare energy and momentum are transported to the solar surface and interior in order to produce sun-quakes. Using observations by Hinode, RHESSI and SDO we analyse and test the new theories, gaining insight into the flare physics using flare seismology.

  8. Flares in Profile

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-04-11

    An active region at the sun's edge produced several M5-class (medium sized) flares over a ten-hour period (Apr. 3, 2017). The most dramatic flare occurs about half way through the video clip, when it shoots up a bright towering plume of plasma. These were the strongest flares of the year so far. Some coronal mass ejections (which hurled clouds of plasma into space) were also associated with some of these flares. The images were taken in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. Movies are available at https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21584

  9. Particle acceleration in flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, Arnold O.; Kosugi, Takeo; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Benka, Steve G.; Chupp, Edward L.; Enome, Shinzo; Garcia, Howard; Holman, Gordon D.; Kurt, Victoria G.; Sakao, Taro

    1994-01-01

    Particle acceleration is intrinsic to the primary energy release in the impulsive phase of solar flares, and we cannot understand flares without understanding acceleration. New observations in soft and hard X-rays, gamma-rays and coherent radio emissions are presented, suggesting flare fragmentation in time and space. X-ray and radio measurements exhibit at least five different time scales in flares. In addition, some new observations of delayed acceleration signatures are also presented. The theory of acceleration by parallel electric fields is used to model the spectral shape and evolution of hard X-rays. The possibility of the appearance of double layers is further investigated.

  10. Hot-Wiring Flare Stars: Optical Flare Rates and Properties from Time-Domain Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, A.

    Flares are thought to result from the reconnection of magnetic fields in the upper layers (coronae) of stellar atmospheres. The highly dynamic atmospheric response produces radiation across the electromagnetic spectrum, from the radio to X-rays, on a range of timescales, from seconds to days. Due to their high flare rates and energies combined with a large contrast against the background quiescent emission, the low-mass M dwarfs are the primary target for studying flare rates in the Galaxy. However, high-precision monitoring campaigns using Kepler and the Hubble Space Telescope have recently revealed important information on the flare rates of earlier- type, more massive stars. In this talk, I will focus on the properties of flares and flare stars in the optical and near-ultraviolet wavelength regimes as revealed from time-domain surveys, such as the repeat observations of the Sloan Digital Sky Surveys Stripe 82. I will discuss the importance of spectroscopic follow-up characterization of the quiescent and flare emission, and I will highlight new radiative-hydrodynamic modeling results that have enhanced our understanding of impulsive phase U-band flare emission.

  11. Advances In Understanding Solar And Stellar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Adam F.

    2016-07-01

    Flares result from the sudden reconnection and relaxation of magnetic fields in the coronae of stellar atmospheres. The highly dynamic atmospheric response produces radiation across the electromagnetic spectrum, from the radio to X-rays, on a range of timescales, from seconds to days. New high resolution data of solar flares have revealed the intrinsic spatial properties of the flaring chromosphere, which is thought to be where the majority of the flare energy is released as radiation in the optical and near-UV continua and emission lines. New data of stellar flares have revealed the detailed properties of the broadband (white-light) continuum emission, which provides straightforward constraints for models of the transformation of stored magnetic energy in the corona into thermal energy of the lower atmosphere. In this talk, we discuss the physical processes that produce several important spectral phenomena in the near-ultraviolet and optical as revealed from new radiative-hydrodynamic models of flares on the Sun and low mass stars. We present recent progress with high-flux nonthermal electron beams in reproducing the observed optical continuum color temperature of T 10,000 K and the Balmer jump properties in the near-ultraviolet. These beams produce dense, heated chromospheric condensations, which can explain the shape and strength of the continuum emission in M dwarf flares and the red-wing asymmetries in the chromospheric emission lines in recent observations of solar flares from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph. Current theoretical challenges and future modeling directions will be discussed, as well as observational synergies between solar and stellar flares.

  12. New Data on mid-Miocene Rhyolite Volcanism in Eastern Oregon Extend Early, co-CRBG Rhyolite Flare up and Constrain Storage Sites of Grande Ronde Flood Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streck, M. J.; Ferns, M. L.; McIntosh, W. C.

    2015-12-01

    The classical view of relating mid-Miocene rhyolites of the tri-state area of Oregon, Nevada, and Idaho to the flood basalts of the Columbia River Basalt was that a mantle plume impinging along the Oregon-Idaho border first causes eruption of the flood basalts but shortly thereafter causes generation of rhyolites at the McDermitt volcanic field from which then hot-spot track rhyolites developed progressively younging towards Yellowstone. More recent work reveals rhyolites as old as found at McDermitt (~16.5 Ma) to occur along a wide E-W tangent along the Oregon-Nevada-Idaho border. And now, our data extend such early rhyolites (>16 Ma) to several locations further north within and in the periphery of the Lake Owyhee Volcanic Field (LOVF) adding to the geographically orphaned old age of 16.7 Ma of the Silver City Rhyolite, Idaho. Hence, the rhyolite flare-up associated with flood basalt magmatism occurred within a circular area of ~400 km centered 100 km NNE of McDermitt. Consequently, no south-to-north progression exists in the onset of rhyolite volcanism; instead, rhyolites started up at the same time over this large area. Province-wide rhyolite volcanism was strongest between ~16.4 and 15.4 Ma coincident with eruptions of the most voluminous member of the CRBG - the Grande Ronde Basalt (GRB). Field evidence for such bimodal volcanism consists of intercalated local GRB units with the Dinner Creek Tuff and Littlefield Rhyolite in the Malheur River Gorge corridor. GRB eruption sites exist and were likely fed from reservoirs residing below or near rhyolitic chambers. Presently, we have petrological evidence for pinning down GRB storages sites to areas from where rhyolites of the Dinner Creek Tuff and lava flows of the Littlefield Rhyolite erupted. In summary, input of GRG and other CRBG magmas were driving co-CRBG rhyolite volcanism which in turn may have influenced whether flood basalt magmas erupted locally or travelled in dikes to more distally located areas.

  13. GeV flares observations with GLAST LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, A.; Omodei, N.; Piro, L.

    2007-07-12

    Early X-ray afterglow observations show that X-ray flares are very common features in GRB light curves. X-ray flares may reflect long duration central engine activity. The delayed flare photons are expected to interact with relativistic electrons by Inverse Compton giving delayed high energy counterparts that potentially will be detected by GLAST LAT, which could observe GRB from 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV. The nature oh high energy spectral components from GRB detected by EGRET is still debated. Observations with GLAST LAT will give useful information to constrain the origin of X-ray flares. In this work we simulate a set of possible GeV emitting flares in the context of External Shock model to study the capability of GLAST LAT to detect GeV flares at different intensities and durations.

  14. Magnetic Variations Associated With Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosian, Vahe

    2005-01-01

    A report summarizes an investigation of helioseismic waves and magnetic variations associated with solar flares, involving analysis of data acquired by the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) aboard the Solar and Heliocentric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft, the Yohkoh spacecraft, and the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) spacecraft. Reconstruction of x-ray flare images from RHESSI data and comparison of them with MDI magnetic maps were performed in an attempt to infer the changes in the geometry of the magnetic field. It was established that in most flares observed with MDI, downward propagating shocks were much weaker than was one observed in the July 9, 1996 flare, which caused a strong helioseismic response. It was concluded that most of the observed impulsive variations result from direct impact of high-energy particles. Computer codes were developed for further study of these phenomena.

  15. Reconceptualizing Early Childhood Education: A Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubeck, Sally

    1991-01-01

    Assesses articles in this special issue on reconceptualizing early childhood education. Maintains articles are based on conception of education in which teachers are not concerned with adopting a canon but with developing sensitivity needed to see children's place in their community and society and to structure classroom activities that encourage…

  16. Properties of the 15 February 2011 Flare Seismic Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkov, S.; Green, L. M.; Matthews, S. A.; Zharkova, V. V.

    2013-06-01

    The first near-side X-class flare of Solar Cycle 24 occurred in February 2011 (SOL2011-02-05T01:55) and produced a very strong seismic response in the photosphere. One sunquake was reported by Kosovichev ( Astrophys. J. Lett. 734, L15, 2011), followed by the discovery of a second sunquake by Zharkov, Green, Matthews et al. ( Astrophys. J. Lett. 741, L35, 2011). The flare had a two-ribbon structure and was associated with a flux-rope eruption and a halo coronal mass ejection (CME) as reported in the CACTus catalogue. Following the discovery of the second sunquake and the spatial association of both sources with the locations of the feet of the erupting flux rope (Zharkov, Green, Matthews et al., Astrophys. J. Lett. 741, L35, 2011), we present here a more detailed analysis of the observed photospheric changes in and around the seismic sources. These sunquakes are quite unusual, taking place early in the impulsive stage of the flare, with the seismic sources showing little hard X-ray (HXR) emission, and strongest X-ray emission sources located in the flare ribbons. We present a directional time-distance diagram computed for the second source, which clearly shows a ridge corresponding to the travelling acoustic-wave packet and find that the sunquake at the second source happened about 45 seconds to one minute earlier than the first source. Using acoustic holography we report different frequency responses of the two sources. We find strong downflows at both seismic locations and a supersonic horizontal motion at the second site of acoustic-wave excitation.

  17. Solar Flare Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, T.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Like weather forecasting, solar flare forecasting (or forecasting solar activity in general) is motivated by pragmatic needs. Solar flares, coronal mass ejections, solar winds and other solar activity intimately influence the near-Earth space environment. All kinds of spacecraft including weather and communication satellites are orbiting Earth, and their performance and lifetimes are greatly infl...

  18. Solar flare energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, R. P.

    A review is presented regarding the current knowledge of the energetics of solar flares. Recent observations by the Solar Maximum Mission and by balloon-borne instrumentation indicate that the flare hard X-ray emission arises from nonthermal bremsstrahlung - the collisions of fast electrons into a cold ambient medium (Ee much greater than kT). Under this interpretation, most of the energy released for many flares is initially contained in the energetic electrons. These electrons can produce most of the observed flare phenomena via interactions with the solar atmosphere. In large flares a shock wave may result from explosive heating of the solar atmosphere by these electrons. This shock wave can accelerate nuclei to relativistic energies. It is argued that recent SMM observations of fast gamma-ray bursts are consistent with this picture of shock acceleration of nuclei.

  19. Solar flare energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.

    1982-01-01

    A review is presented regarding the current knowledge of the energetics of solar flares. Recent observations by the Solar Maximum Mission and by balloon-borne instrumentation indicate that the flare hard X-ray emission arises from nonthermal bremsstrahlung - the collisions of fast electrons into a cold ambient medium (Ee much greater than kT). Under this interpretation, most of the energy released for many flares is initially contained in the energetic electrons. These electrons can produce most of the observed flare phenomena via interactions with the solar atmosphere. In large flares a shock wave may result from explosive heating of the solar atmosphere by these electrons. This shock wave can accelerate nuclei to relativistic energies. It is argued that recent SMM observations of fast gamma-ray bursts are consistent with this picture of shock acceleration of nuclei.

  20. Flares in childhood eczema.

    PubMed

    Langan, S M

    2009-01-01

    Eczema is a major public health problem affecting children worldwide. Few studies have directly assessed triggers for disease flares. This paper presents evidence from a published systematic review and a prospective cohort study looking at flare factors in eczema. This systematic review suggested that foodstuffs in selected groups, dust exposure, unfamiliar pets, seasonal variation, stress, and irritants may be important in eczema flares. We performed a prospective cohort study that focused on environmental factors and identified associations between exposure to nylon clothing, dust, unfamiliar pets, sweating, shampoo, and eczema flares. Results from this study also demonstrated some new key findings. First, the effect of shampoo was found to increase in cold weather, and second, combinations of environmental factors were associated with disease exacerbation, supporting a multiple component disease model. This information is likely to be useful to families and may lead to the ability to reduce disease flares in the future.

  1. Comparative efficacy of bilastine, desloratadine and rupatadine in the suppression of wheal and flare response induced by intradermal histamine in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Antonijoan, Rosa; Coimbra, Jimena; García-Gea, Consuelo; Puntes, Montserrat; Gich, Ignasi; Campo, Cristina; Valiente, Román; Labeaga, Luis

    2017-01-01

    To compare the peripheral antihistaminic activity of bilastine, rupatadine and desloratadine in inhibiting the histamine-induced wheal and flare (W&F) response. Twenty-four healthy volunteers aged 18-40 years participated in this crossover, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study. Subjects received single doses of bilastine 20 mg, desloratadine 5 mg, rupatadine 10 mg and placebo. W&F responses induced by intradermal injection of histamine 5 μg were evaluated before treatment (basal value) and at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 9, 12 and 24 hours after treatment. Fifteen minutes after histamine injection, W&F surface areas (cm(2)) were quantified using the Visitrak System. Itching sensation was evaluated using a 100 mm visual analog scale. EudraCT number: 2015-000790-13. The primary outcome measure was the percentage reduction in W&F areas after each active treatment compared with corresponding basal values. Bilastine induced the greatest inhibition in wheal area and was significantly superior to desloratadine and rupatadine from 1 to 12 hours (both p < .001). Rupatadine and desloratadine were better than placebo without differences between them. Maximum wheal inhibition occurred at 6 hours (bilastine 83%, desloratadine 38%, rupatadine 37%). Onset of action was 1 hour for bilastine and 4 hours for desloratadine and rupatadine. Bilastine was significantly superior to desloratadine and rupatadine for flare inhibition from 1-24 hours (both p < .001) with an onset of action at 30 minutes. Bilastine was significantly better than desloratadine (2-12 hours; at least p < .05) and rupatadine (2-9 hours; at least p < .01) for reducing itching sensation. Neither desloratadine nor rupatadine significantly reduced itching compared to placebo. All active treatments were well tolerated. Bilastine 20 mg induced significantly greater inhibition of the W&F response compared with desloratadine 5 mg and rupatadine 10 mg throughout

  2. Flare-associated Energy Exchange Between the Photosphere and Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramenko, Valentyna; Harra, L.

    2012-05-01

    In recent decades, it has been clearly demonstrated that strong flares in ARs (referred before as chromospheric flares) are not restricted to some closed volume in the chromosphere but rather involve a huge volume from deep sub-photospheric layers to the outer heliosphere. Undoubtedly, there exists interaction and energy exchange between different parts of the volume occupied by a flare, e.g., reconnection between up-welling loops and the pre-existing flux, waves and shocks, seismic response to a flare, momentum distribution and Lorentz Force acting, accelerated particle, heat, X-ray propagation, Poynting flux transport, etc. However, mechanisms of the processes, as well as their relationship with the flare itself (is a phenomenon a prelude to the flare, its consequence or non of such) is not well understood yet. We explore new metrics of the photospheric magnetic field: we monitor the magnetic energy dissipation rate. For three strong flares, we found that the magnetic energy dissipation rate sets to a monotonous ceasing several hours before the flare onset. Assuming nearly gradual energy input, the reduction of the energy dissipation rate implies that somewhere in the active region, the energy is being accumulated. The non-dissipated and accumulated energy amounts to (3 - 10) x 1032 ergs. We presume that at least part of the energy accumulated immediately before the flare is transferred into the corona and further drives the corona to a trigger point when flare occurs.

  3. Does pre-treatment with micronized progesterone affect the ovarian response to a gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist flare-up protocol?

    PubMed

    Loutradis, D; Stefanidis, K; Drakakis, P; Kallianidis, K; El Sheikh, A; Milingos, S; Siskos, K; Michalas, S

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the ovarian response and the receptivity of the endometrium in women pre-treated with micronized progesterone. Eighty-two normogonodotropic women undergoing in vitro fertilization were studied. Thirty received micronized progesterone 1500 mg/day from day 21 of the cycle for a minimum of 2 weeks, and 52 did not receive micronized progesterone (control group). A gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist (GnRH-a) was administered to all the patients in the follicular phase (flare-up). Twenty-five cycles were cancelled for fertilization failure due to male factor, 12 (40%) in the progesterone group and 13 (25%) in the control group (p = 0.271). There was no difference in the number of oocytes retrieved (7.3 +/- 5 vs. 8.2 +/- 4), fertilization rate (50.8% vs. 65%), clinical pregnancy rate (16.6% vs. 25%) or implantation rate (8% vs. 14%). In the progesterone group cases without fertilization, we performed two biopsies to evaluate the receptivity of the endometrium. Pinopode expression was noted 7 days after oocyte retrieval. It seems that the administration of micronized progesterone in the previous cycle does not affect the ovarian response to the combination of follicular phase GnRH-a and gonadotropins, nor the receptivity of the endometrium.

  4. Flare build-up study - Homologous flares group. I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martres, M.-J.; Mein, N.; Mouradian, Z.; Rayrole, J.; Schmieder, B.; Simon, G.; Soru-Escaut, I.; Woodgate, B. E.

    1984-01-01

    Solar Maximum Mission observations have been used to study the origin and amount of energy, mechanism of storage and release, and conditions for the occurrence of solar flares, and some results of these studies as they pertain to homologous flares are briefly discussed. It was found that every set of flares produced 'rafales' of homologous flares, i.e., two, three, four, or more flares separated in time by an hour or less. No great changes in macroscopic photospheric patterns were observed during these flaring periods. A quantitative brightness parameter of the relation between homologous flares is defined. Scale changes detected in the dynamic spectrum of flare sites are in good agreement with a theoretical suggestion by Sturrock. Statistical results for different homologous flare active regions show the existence in homologous flaring areas of a 'pivot' of previous filaments interpreted as a signature of an anomaly in the solar rotation.

  5. Response to Intervention: Implications for Early Childhood Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Sarah; Pretti-Frontczak, Kristie; Harjusola-Webb, Sanna; Grisham-Brown, Jennifer; Romani, Jeanne M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to discuss the importance of building strong early childhood communities of interdisciplinary practice in the application of a comprehensive curriculum framework. A curriculum framework is proposed as a means of applying and extending the principles of response to intervention (RtI) to early childhood…

  6. COMPTEL solar flare observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. M.; Aarts, H.; Bennett, K.; Debrunner, H.; Devries, C.; Denherder, J. W.; Eymann, G.; Forrest, D. J.; Diehl, R.; Hermsen, W.

    1992-01-01

    COMPTEL as part of a solar target of opportunity campaign observed the sun during the period of high solar activity from 7-15 Jun. 1991. Major flares were observed on 9 and 11 Jun. Although both flares were large GOES events (greater than or = X10), they were not extraordinary in terms of gamma-ray emission. Only the decay phase of the 15 Jun. flare was observed by COMPTEL. We report the preliminary analysis of data from these flares, including the first spectroscopic measurement of solar flare neutrons. The deuterium formation line at 2.223 MeV was present in both events and for at least the 9 Jun. event, was comparable to the flux in the nuclear line region of 4-8 MeV, consistent with Solar-Maximum Mission (SSM) Observations. A clear neutron signal was present in the flare of 9 Jun. with the spectrum extending up to 80 MeV and consistent in time with the emission of gamma-rays, confirming the utility of COMPTEL in measuring the solar neutron flux at low energies. The neutron flux below 100 MeV appears to be lower than that of the 3 Jun. 1982 flare by more than an order of magnitude. The neutron signal of the 11 Jun. event is under study. Severe dead time effects resulting from the intense thermal x-rays require significant corrections to the measured flux which increase the magnitude of the associated systematic uncertainties.

  7. The chromosphere and transition region. [during solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, R. C.; Brown, J. C.; Craig, I. J. D.; Brueckner, G. E.; Cook, J. W.; Doschek, G. A.; Emslie, A. G.; Machado, M. E.; Henoux, J.-C.; Lites, B. W.

    1980-01-01

    The physical processes occurring as a result of the transfer of energy and momentum from the primary solar flare energy release site in the corona to the underlying chromosphere and transition region during the course of the flare are investigated through a comparison of theoretical models and observational data. Static, dynamic and hydrodynamic models of the lower-temperature chromospheric flare are reviewed. The roles of thermal conduction, radiation, fast particles and mass motion in chromosphere-corona interactions are analyzed on the basis of Skylab UV, EUV and X-ray data, and empirical and synthetic models of the chromospheric and upper photospheric responses to flares are developed. The canonical model of chromospheric heating during flares as a result of primary energy release elsewhere is found to be justified in the chromosphere as a whole, although not entirely as the temperature minimum, and a simplified model of horizontal chromospheric flare structure based on results obtained is presented.

  8. Comment on 'The solar flare myth' by J. T. Gosling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Hugh; Haisch, Bernhard; Strong, Keith T.

    1995-01-01

    In a recent paper Gosling (1993) claims that solar flares are relatively unimportant for understanding the terrestrial consequences of solar activity, and argues that coronal mass ejections (CMEs) produce the most powerful terrestrial disturbances. This opinion conflicts with observation, as it is well known that CMEs and flares are closely associated, and we disagree with Gosling's insistence on a simplistic cause-and-effect description of the interrelated phenomena of a solar flare. In this brief response we present new Yohkoh data and review older results that demonstrate the close relationships among CMEs, flares, filament eruptions, and other forms of energy release such as particle acceleration.

  9. Comment on 'The solar flare myth' by J. T. Gosling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Hugh; Haisch, Bernhard; Strong, Keith T.

    1995-01-01

    In a recent paper Gosling (1993) claims that solar flares are relatively unimportant for understanding the terrestrial consequences of solar activity, and argues that coronal mass ejections (CMEs) produce the most powerful terrestrial disturbances. This opinion conflicts with observation, as it is well known that CMEs and flares are closely associated, and we disagree with Gosling's insistence on a simplistic cause-and-effect description of the interrelated phenomena of a solar flare. In this brief response we present new Yohkoh data and review older results that demonstrate the close relationships among CMEs, flares, filament eruptions, and other forms of energy release such as particle acceleration.

  10. Imaging Observations of Magnetic Reconnection in a Solar Eruptive Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Sun, X.; Ding, M. D.; Qiu, J.; Priest, E. R.

    2017-02-01

    Solar flares are among the most energetic events in the solar atmosphere. It is widely accepted that flares are powered by magnetic reconnection in the corona. An eruptive flare is usually accompanied by a coronal mass ejection, both of which are probably driven by the eruption of a magnetic flux rope (MFR). Here we report an eruptive flare on 2016 March 23 observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The extreme-ultraviolet imaging observations exhibit the clear rise and eruption of an MFR. In particular, the observations reveal solid evidence of magnetic reconnection from both the corona and chromosphere during the flare. Moreover, weak reconnection is observed before the start of the flare. We find that the preflare weak reconnection is of tether-cutting type and helps the MFR to rise slowly. Induced by a further rise of the MFR, strong reconnection occurs in the rise phases of the flare, which is temporally related to the MFR eruption. We also find that the magnetic reconnection is more of 3D-type in the early phase, as manifested in a strong-to-weak shear transition in flare loops, and becomes more 2D-like in the later phase, as shown by the apparent rising motion of an arcade of flare loops.

  11. Major Solar Flare

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-18

    The Sun erupted with an X8 solar flare, one of the largest of the current solar cycle (Sept. 10, 2017). Its source was the same sunspot region that produced an X9 flare last week. This is shown in two wavelengths of extreme ultraviolet light at the same time and each reveals different features. Both are colorized to identify in which wavelength they were observed. The coils of loops after the flare are the magnetic field lines reorganizing themselves after the eruption. The video clip covers about six hours. Movies are available at https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21958

  12. Exploring early public responses to geoengineering.

    PubMed

    Pidgeon, Nick; Corner, Adam; Parkhill, Karen; Spence, Alexa; Butler, Catherine; Poortinga, Wouter

    2012-09-13

    Proposals for geoengineering the Earth's climate are prime examples of emerging or 'upstream' technologies, because many aspects of their effectiveness, cost and risks are yet to be researched, and in many cases are highly uncertain. This paper contributes to the emerging debate about the social acceptability of geoengineering technologies by presenting preliminary evidence on public responses to geoengineering from two of the very first UK studies of public perceptions and responses. The discussion draws upon two datasets: qualitative data (from an interview study conducted in 42 households in 2009), and quantitative data (from a subsequent nationwide survey (n=1822) of British public opinion). Unsurprisingly, baseline awareness of geoengineering was extremely low in both cases. The data from the survey indicate that, when briefly explained to people, carbon dioxide removal approaches were preferred to solar radiation management, while significant positive correlations were also found between concern about climate change and support for different geoengineering approaches. We discuss some of the wider considerations that are likely to shape public perceptions of geoengineering as it enters the media and public sphere, and conclude that, aside from technical considerations, public perceptions are likely to prove a key element influencing the debate over questions of the acceptability of geoengineering proposals.

  13. What Causes Lupus Flares?

    PubMed

    Fernandez, David; Kirou, Kyriakos A

    2016-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the prototypic systemic autoimmune disease, follows a chronic disease course, punctuated by flares. Disease flares often occur without apparent cause, perhaps from progressive inherent buildup of autoimmunity. However, there is evidence that certain environmental factors may trigger the disease. These include exposure to UV light, infections, certain hormones, and drugs which may activate the innate and adaptive immune system, resulting in inflammation, cytotoxic effects, and clinical symptoms. Uncontrolled disease flares, as well as their treatment, especially with glucocorticoids, can cause significant organ damage. Tight surveillance and timely control of lupus flares with judicial use of effective treatments to adequately suppress the excessive immune system activation are required to bring about long term remission of the disease. We hope that new clinical trials will soon offer additional effective and target-specific biologic treatments for SLE.

  14. Solar flare particle radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics of the solar particles accelerated by solar flares and subsequently observed near the orbit of the earth are studied. Considered are solar particle intensity-time profiles, the composition and spectra of solar flare events, and the propagation of solar particles in interplanetary space. The effects of solar particles at the earth, riometer observations of polar cap cosmic noise absorption events, and the production of solar cell damage at synchronous altitudes by solar protons are also discussed.

  15. The solar flare myth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Many years of research have demonstrated that large, nonrecurrent geomagnetic storms, shock wave disturbances in the solar wind, and energetic particle events in interplanetary space often occur in close association with large solar flares. This result has led to a pradigm of cause and effect - that large solar flares are the fundamental cause of these events in the near-Earth space environmemt. This paradigm, which I call 'the solar flare myth,' dominates the popular perception of the relationship between solar activity and interplanetary and geomagnetic events and has provided much of the pragmatic rationale for the study of the solar flare phenomenon. Yet there is good evidence that this paradigm is wrong and that flares do not generally play a central role in producing major transient disturbances in the near-Earth space environment. In this paper I outline a different paradigm of cause and effect that removes solar flares from their central position in the chain of events leading from the Sun to near-Earth space. Instead, this central role is given to events known as coronal mass ejections.

  16. The solar flare myth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Many years of research have demonstrated that large, nonrecurrent geomagnetic storms, shock wave disturbances in the solar wind, and energetic particle events in interplanetary space often occur in close association with large solar flares. This result has led to a pradigm of cause and effect - that large solar flares are the fundamental cause of these events in the near-Earth space environmemt. This paradigm, which I call 'the solar flare myth,' dominates the popular perception of the relationship between solar activity and interplanetary and geomagnetic events and has provided much of the pragmatic rationale for the study of the solar flare phenomenon. Yet there is good evidence that this paradigm is wrong and that flares do not generally play a central role in producing major transient disturbances in the near-Earth space environment. In this paper I outline a different paradigm of cause and effect that removes solar flares from their central position in the chain of events leading from the Sun to near-Earth space. Instead, this central role is given to events known as coronal mass ejections.

  17. The dependence of solar flare energetics on flare volumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.

    1978-01-01

    The sizes of 45 X-ray flares observed on Skylab have been measured and compared to flare rise times, energies, and energy release rates as determined from Solard and XREA X-ray data. The X-ray rise time is correlated with the length and volume of the flare. The energy of the flare and the rate of increase of that energy are correlated with flare length and volume. Both the energy per unit volume and the rate of energy increase per unit volume are inversely correlated with flare length and volume. There is no correlation between the emission measure and the volume.

  18. Modelling the impulsive phase of solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio da Costa, F.; Petrosian, V.; Liu, W.; Carlsson, M.

    2013-12-01

    Solar flares are the most energetic events in the solar system. In order to study this sudden release of energy and evaluate the response of the solar chromosphere to the deposition of thermal energy, we simulate the conditions of the solar atmosphere by creating a 1D plane-parallel atmospheric model and analyze the energy transport of a beam of non-thermal electrons that is injected at the top of the coronal loop. This is done using a numerical model which combines the radiative hydrodynamic equations (RADYN code - Carlsson & Stein, 1992) with the calculation of particle acceleration and transport (Flare code - Petrosian & Liu, 2004). With this model, it is for example possible to compare the emission of solar flares in several lines with available observations. The assemblage of high resolution chromospheric flare observations from the IRIS imaging spectrograph makes it an excellent time for this work. We discuss how accelerated particle heating and energy deposition rate are affected by the variation of cut-off energy and flux of non-thermal electrons as well as spectral index and investigate the response of the atmosphere to the acceleration of particles. Our flare simulation treats each atom in non-LTE condition and calculates in detail the transitions between its energy levels. It also assumes an optically thick atmosphere, which is crucial for understanding how energy is transported from the chromosphere deep into the photosphere.

  19. B cells enhance early innate immune responses during bacterial sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Kelly-Scumpia, Kindra M.; Scumpia, Philip O.; Weinstein, Jason S.; Delano, Matthew J.; Cuenca, Alex G.; Nacionales, Dina C.; Wynn, James L.; Lee, Pui Y.; Kumagai, Yutaro; Efron, Philip A.; Akira, Shizuo; Wasserfall, Clive; Atkinson, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Microbes activate pattern recognition receptors to initiate adaptive immunity. T cells affect early innate inflammatory responses to viral infection, but both activation and suppression have been demonstrated. We identify a novel role for B cells in the early innate immune response during bacterial sepsis. We demonstrate that Rag1−/− mice display deficient early inflammatory responses and reduced survival during sepsis. Interestingly, B cell–deficient or anti-CD20 B cell–depleted mice, but not α/β T cell–deficient mice, display decreased inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production and reduced survival after sepsis. Both treatment of B cell–deficient mice with serum from wild-type (WT) mice and repletion of Rag1−/− mice with B cells improves sepsis survival, suggesting antibody-independent and antibody-dependent roles for B cells in the outcome to sepsis. During sepsis, marginal zone and follicular B cells are activated through type I interferon (IFN-I) receptor (IFN-α/β receptor [IFNAR]), and repleting Rag1−/− mice with WT, but not IFNAR−/−, B cells improves IFN-I–dependent and –independent early cytokine responses. Repleting B cell–deficient mice with the IFN-I–dependent chemokine, CXCL10 was also sufficient to improve sepsis survival. This study identifies a novel role for IFN-I–activated B cells in protective early innate immune responses during bacterial sepsis. PMID:21746813

  20. Laser flare photometry in the therapeutic management of bacterial chronic pseudophakic endophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Fardeau, Christine; Herbort, Carl P; Nghiem, Sylvia; Jarlier, Vincent; Lehoang, Phuc

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate laser flare photometry in measuring aqueous humor inflammation in chronic pseudophakic endophthalmitis. Department of Ophthalmology, Pitié Salpétrière Hospital, Paris, France. This retrospective review comprised eyes with chronic pseudophakic endophthalmitis that were evaluated by slitlamp and laser flare photometry at admission and during follow-up. Nine eyes of 8 patients were reviewed. The laser flare photometry values were significantly reduced by antibiotic treatment in all eyes. The laser flare photometry values increased after antibiotic treatment was withdrawn in 7 eyes. Early detection of the relapse by laser flare photometry was confirmed at the slitlamp examination in the following days. Laser flare photometry, a noninvasive objective tool, was useful in monitoring the evolution of chronic pseudophakic endophthalmitis. Early detection of an increase in flare could lead to a close follow-up. The prompt modification of therapeutic intervention could help preserve a favorable visual outcome.

  1. Implications of RHESSI Flare Observations for Magnetic Reconnection Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Sui, Linhui; Dennis, Brian R.

    2004-01-01

    The Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observations of the 2002 April 15 solar flare and related flares provide compelling evidence for the formation of a large-scale, reconnecting current sheet in at least some flares. We describe the observed evolution of the April 15 flare in terms of magnetic reconnection models. We argue that the flare most likely evolved through magnetic geometries associated with super-slow reconnection (early rise phase), fast reconnection (impulsive phase), and slow reconnection (gradual phase). We also provide evidence for X-ray brightenings within the evolving current sheet, possibly induced by the tearing mode instability. This work was supported in part by the RHESSI Program and NASA's Sun-Earth Connection Program. This work would not have been possible without the dedicated efforts of the entire RHESSI team.

  2. Urologic Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome Symptom Flares: Characterization of the Full Spectrum of Flares at Two Sites of the Mapp Research Network

    PubMed Central

    Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Colditz, Graham A.; Goodman, Melody S.; Pakpahan, Ratna; Vetter, Joel; Ness, Timothy J.; Andriole, Gerald L.; Lai, H. Henry

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To describe the full spectrum of symptom exacerbations defined by interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome patients as flares, and to investigate their associated health-care utilization and bother at two sites of the Trans-Multidisciplinary Approaches to the Study of Chronic Pelvic Pain (Trans-MAPP) Epidemiology and Phenotyping study. Patients and methods Participants completed a flare survey that asked them: 1) whether they had ever had flares (“symptoms that are much worse than usual”) that lasted <1 hr, >1 hr and <1 day, and >1 day; and 2) for each duration of flare, to report their: a) average length and frequency; b) typical levels of urologic and pelvic pain symptoms; and c) levels of health-care utilization and bother. We compared participants' responses to their non-flare Trans-MAPP values and across flares using generalized linear mixed models. Results Seventy six of 85 participants (89.4%) completed the flare survey, 72 of whom reported having flares (94.7%). Flares varied widely in terms of their duration (seconds to months), frequency (several times per day to once per year or less), and intensity and type of symptoms (e.g., pelvic pain versus urologic symptoms). Flares of all duration were associated with greater pelvic pain, urologic symptoms, disruption to participants' activities, and bother, with increasing severity of each of these factors as the duration of flares increased. Days-long flares were also associated with greater health-care utilization. In addition to duration, symptoms (pelvic pain, in particular) were also significant determinants of flare-related bother. Conclusions Our findings suggest that flares are common and associated with greater symptoms, health-care utilization, disruption, and bother. Our findings also inform the characteristics of flares most bothersome to patients (i.e., increased pelvic pain and duration), and thus of greatest importance to

  3. A solar tornado triggered by flares?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panesar, N. K.; Innes, D. E.; Tiwari, S. K.; Low, B. C.

    2013-01-01

    Context. Solar tornados are dynamical, conspicuously helical magnetic structures that are mainly observed as a prominence activity. Aims: We investigate and propose a triggering mechanism for the solar tornado observed in a prominence cavity by SDO/AIA on September 25, 2011. Methods: High-cadence EUV images from the SDO/AIA and the Ahead spacecraft of STEREO/EUVI are used to correlate three flares in the neighbouring active-region (NOAA 11303) and their EUV waves with the dynamical developments of the tornado. The timings of the flares and EUV waves observed on-disk in 195 Å are analysed in relation to the tornado activities observed at the limb in 171 Å. Results: Each of the three flares and its related EUV wave occurred within ten hours of the onset of the tornado. They have an observed causal relationship with the commencement of activity in the prominence where the tornado develops. Tornado-like rotations along the side of the prominence start after the second flare. The prominence cavity expands with the accelerating tornado motion after the third flare. Conclusions: Flares in the neighbouring active region may have affected the cavity prominence system and triggered the solar tornado. A plausible mechanism is that the active-region coronal field contracted by the "Hudson effect" through the loss of magnetic energy as flares. Subsequently, the cavity expanded by its magnetic pressure to fill the surrounding low corona. We suggest that the tornado is the dynamical response of the helical prominence field to the cavity expansion. Movies are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  4. Spectral Hardening and Geoeffectiveness of Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, R.; Kumar, S.; Dave, H.; Deshpande, M. R.

    We present the results of a few typical flares that observed by the first space borne solar astronomy experiment of India namely "Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS)" mission, which has completed one year of its successful operation in geostationary orbit. The SOXS mission onboard GSAT-2 Indian spacecraft was launched successfully by GSLV-D2 rocket on 08 May 2003 to study the energy release and particle acceleration in solar flares. The SOXS is composed of two independent payloads viz. SOXS Low Energy Detector (SLD) payload, and SOXS High Energy Detector (SHD) payload. We restrict our presentation to SLD payload that designed, developed and fabricated by Physical Research Laboratory (PRL) in collaboration with Space Application Centre (SAC), Ahmedabad and ISRO Satellite Centre (ISAC), Bangalore of Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO). We briefly present the scientific objectives and instrumentation of the SLD payload. The SLD payload employs the state-of-art solid state detectors viz. Si PIN and CZT detectors, which reveal sub-keV spectral and 100ms temporal resolution characteristics that are necessary to study the spectral response of the flare components. The dynamic range of Si and CZT detectors is 4-25 and 4-56 keV respectively. The SLD has observed more than 140 flares of C and M class since its commissioning in the orbit. We present the X-ray emission characteristics of a few typical flares in view of their spectral hardening and geo-effectiveness. We extend our study of these flares to optical and radio waveband observations in order to improve the relationship of X-ray spectral hardening and geo-effectiveness. The flares with harder spectra and associated with small or large CME, and radio emission at frequencies above 10 GHz are found geo-effective.

  5. F-region enhancements induced by solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donnelly, R. F.; Davies, K.; Grubb, R. N.; Fritz, R. B.

    1976-01-01

    ATS-6 total electron content (NT) observations during solar flares exhibit four types of response: (1) a sudden increase in NT (SITEC) for about 2 min with several maxima in growth rate, then a maximum or a distinct slowing in growth, followed by a slow smooth increase to a flat peak, and finally a slow decay in NT; (2) a SITEC that occurs during ionospheric storms, where NT decays abruptly after the first maximum; (3) slow enhancements devoid of distinct impulsive structure in growth rate; and (4) no distinct response in NT, even for relatively large soft X-ray flares. Flare-induced increases in NT are dominated by low-loss F2 ionization produced by 90-911-A emission. The impulsive flare component is relatively intense in the 90-911-A range, but is short lived and weak for flares near the edge of the visible solar disk and for certain slow flares. The impulsive flare component produces the rapid rise, the sharp maxima in growth rate, and the first maximum in SITECs. The slow flare components are strong in the 1-90-A range but relatively weak in the 90-911-A range and accumulatively contribute to the second maximum in type 1 and 3 events, except during storms when F2 loss rates are abnormally high in type 2 events.

  6. FLARING PATTERNS IN BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Paggi, A.; Cavaliere, A.; Tavani, M.; Vittorini, V.; D'Ammando, F.

    2011-08-01

    Blazars radiate from relativistic jets launched by a supermassive black hole along our line of sight; the subclass of flat spectrum radio quasars exhibits broad emission lines, a telltale sign of a gas-rich environment and high accretion rate, contrary to the other subclass of the BL Lacertae objects. We show that this dichotomy of the sources in physical properties is enhanced in their flaring activity. The BL Lac flares yielded spectral evidence of being driven by further acceleration of highly relativistic electrons in the jet. Here, we discuss spectral fits of multi-{lambda} data concerning strong flares of the two flat spectrum radio quasars 3C 454.3 and 3C 279 recently detected in {gamma}-rays by the AGILE and Fermi satellites. We find that optimal spectral fits are provided by external Compton radiation enhanced by increasing production of thermal seed photons by growing accretion. We find such flares to trace patterns on the jet-power-electron-energy plane that diverge from those followed by flaring BL Lac objects and discuss why these occur.

  7. Flare Plasma Iron Abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Dan, Chau; Jain, Rajmal; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    The equivalent width of the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV seen in flare X-ray spectra suggests that the iron abundance of the hottest plasma at temperatures >approx.10 MK may sometimes be significantly lower than the nominal coronal abundance of four times the photospheric value that is commonly assumed. This conclusion is based on X-ray spectral observations of several flares seen in common with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) on the second Indian geostationary satellite, GSAT-2. The implications of this will be discussed as it relates to the origin of the hot flare plasma - either plasma already in the corona that is directly heated during the flare energy release process or chromospheric plasma that is heated by flare-accelerated particles and driven up into the corona. Other possible explanations of lower-than-expected equivalent widths of the iron-line complex will also be discussed.

  8. Understanding Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.; Karpen, J. T.; DeVore, C. R.

    2012-05-01

    Solar flares and their associated coronal mass ejections are the most energetic explosions in the solar system. The largest events pose the greatest space weather dangers to life and civilization, and are of extreme importance to human space exploration. They also provide the best opportunity to study the universal processes of magnetic reconnection and particle acceleration that underlie most solar activity. The two great mysteries of solar flares are: how can so much energy be released so quickly, and how can such a large fraction (50% or more) end up in energetic particles. We present results from recent numerical modeling that sheds new light on these mysteries. These calculations use the highest spatial resolution yet achieved in order to resolve the flare dynamics as clearly as possible. We conclude from this work that magnetic island formation is the defining property of magnetic reconnection in the solar corona, at least, in the large-scale current sheet required for a solar flare. Furthermore, we discuss the types of future observations and modeling that will be required to solve definitively the solar flare mysteries. This work was supported, in part, by the NASA TR&T and SR&T Programs.

  9. Flare build-up study: Homologous flares group - Interim report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodgate, B. E.

    1982-01-01

    When homologous flares are broadly defined as having footpoint structures in common, it is found that a majority of flares fall into homologous sets. Filament eruptions and mass ejection in members of an homologous flare set show that maintainance of the magnetic structure is not a necessary condition for homology.

  10. Generation Mechanisms of Quasi-parallel and Quasi-circular Flare Ribbons in a Confined Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Perez, Aaron; Thalmann, Julia K.; Veronig, Astrid M.; Su, Yang; Gömöry, Peter; Dickson, Ewan C.

    2017-10-01

    We analyze a confined multiple-ribbon M2.1 flare (SOL2015-01-29T11:42) that originated from a fan-spine coronal magnetic field configuration, within active region NOAA 12268. The observed ribbons form in two steps. First, two primary ribbons form at the main flare site, followed by the formation of secondary ribbons at remote locations. We observe a number of plasma flows at extreme-ultraviolet temperatures during the early phase of the flare (as early as 15 minutes before the onset) propagating toward the formation site of the secondary ribbons. The secondary ribbon formation is co-temporal with the arrival of the pre-flare generated plasma flows. The primary ribbons are co-spatial with Ramaty High Energy Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) hard X-ray sources, whereas no enhanced X-ray emission is detected at the secondary ribbon sites. The (E)UV emission, associated with the secondary ribbons, peaks ∼1 minute after the last RHESSI hard X-ray enhancement. A nonlinear force-free model of the coronal magnetic field reveals that the secondary flare ribbons are not directly connected to the primary ribbons, but to regions nearby. Detailed analysis suggests that the secondary brightenings are produced due to dissipation of kinetic energy of the plasma flows (heating due to compression), and not due to non-thermal particles accelerated by magnetic reconnection, as is the case for the primary ribbons.

  11. Solar Flare Impacts on Ionospheric Electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qian, Liying; Burns, Alan G.; Solomon, Stanley C.; Chamberlin, Phillip C.

    2012-01-01

    The sudden increase of X-ray and extreme ultra-violet irradiance during flares increases the density of the ionosphere through enhanced photoionization. In this paper, we use model simulations to investigate possible additional contributions from electrodynamics, finding that the vertical E X B drift in the magnetic equatorial region plays a significant role in the ionosphere response to solar flares. During the initial stage of flares, upward E X B drifts weaken in the magnetic equatorial region, causing a weakened equatorial fountain effect, which in turn causes lowering of the peak height of the F2 region and depletion of the peak electron density of the F2 region. In this initial stage, total electron content (TEC) enhancement is predominantly determined by solar zenith angle control of photoionization. As flares decay, upward E X B drifts are enhanced in the magnetic equatorial region, causing increases of the peak height and density of the F2 region. This process lasts for several hours, causing a prolonged F2-region disturbance and TEC enhancement in the magnetic equator region in the aftermath of flares. During this stage, the global morphology of the TEC enhancement becomes predominantly determined by these perturbations to the electrodynamics of the ionosphere.

  12. Solar Flare Impacts on Ionospheric Electrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qian, Liying; Burns, Alan G.; Solomon, Stanley C.; Chamberlin, Phillip C.

    2012-01-01

    The sudden increase of X-ray and extreme ultra-violet irradiance during flares increases the density of the ionosphere through enhanced photoionization. In this paper, we use model simulations to investigate possible additional contributions from electrodynamics, finding that the vertical E X B drift in the magnetic equatorial region plays a significant role in the ionosphere response to solar flares. During the initial stage of flares, upward E X B drifts weaken in the magnetic equatorial region, causing a weakened equatorial fountain effect, which in turn causes lowering of the peak height of the F2 region and depletion of the peak electron density of the F2 region. In this initial stage, total electron content (TEC) enhancement is predominantly determined by solar zenith angle control of photoionization. As flares decay, upward E X B drifts are enhanced in the magnetic equatorial region, causing increases of the peak height and density of the F2 region. This process lasts for several hours, causing a prolonged F2-region disturbance and TEC enhancement in the magnetic equator region in the aftermath of flares. During this stage, the global morphology of the TEC enhancement becomes predominantly determined by these perturbations to the electrodynamics of the ionosphere.

  13. Flare model sensitivity of the Balmer spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falchi, A.; Falciani, R.; Smaldone, L. A.; Tozzi, G. P.

    1989-01-01

    Careful studies of various chromospheric spectral signatures are very important in order to explore their possible sensitivity to the modifications of the thermodynamic quantities produced by the flare occurrence. Pioneer work of Canfield and co-workers have shown how the H alpha behavior is able to indicate different changes in the atmospheric parameters structure associated to the flare event. It was decided to study the behavior of the highest Balmer lines and of the Balmer continuum in different solar flare model atmospheres. These spectral features, originating in the deep photosphere in a quiet area, may have a sensitivity different from H alpha to the modification of a flare atmosphere. The details of the method used to compute the Stark profile of the higher Balmer line (n is greater than or equal to 6) and their merging were extensively given elsewhere (Donati-Falchi et al., 1985; Falchi et al., 1989). The models used were developed by Ricchiazzi in his thesis (1982) evaluating the chromospheric response to both the nonthermal electron flux, for energy greater than 20 kev, (F sub 20) and to the thermal conduction, (F sub c). The effect of the coronal pressure values (P sub O) at the apex of the flare loop is also included.

  14. Observations and Modelling of the Pre-flare Period of the 29 March 2014 X1 Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, M. M.; Harra, L. K.; Matthews, S. A.; Mackay, D. H.; Dacie, S.; Long, D. M.

    2017-02-01

    On 29 March 2014, NOAA Active Region (AR) 12017 produced an X1 flare that was simultaneously observed by an unprecedented number of observatories. We have investigated the pre-flare period of this flare from 14:00 UT until 19:00 UT using joint observations made by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrometer (IRIS) and the Hinode Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). Spectral lines providing coverage of the solar atmosphere from the chromosphere to the corona were analysed to investigate pre-flare activity within the AR. The results of the investigation have revealed evidence of strongly blue-shifted plasma flows, with velocities up to 200 km s^{-1}, being observed 40 minutes prior to flaring. These flows are located along the filament present in the active region and are both spatially discrete and transient. In order to constrain the possible explanations for this activity, we undertake non-potential magnetic field modelling of the active region. This modelling indicates the existence of a weakly twisted flux rope along the polarity inversion line in the region where a filament and the strong pre-flare flows are observed. We then discuss how these observations relate to the current models of flare triggering. We conclude that the most likely drivers of the observed activity are internal reconnection in the flux rope, early onset of the flare reconnection, or tether-cutting reconnection along the filament.

  15. Early adversity and brain response to faces in young adulthood.

    PubMed

    Lieslehto, Johannes; Kiviniemi, Vesa; Mäki, Pirjo; Koivukangas, Jenni; Nordström, Tanja; Miettunen, Jouko; Barnett, Jennifer H; Jones, Peter B; Murray, Graham K; Moilanen, Irma; Paus, Tomáš; Veijola, Juha

    2017-09-01

    Early stressors play a key role in shaping interindividual differences in vulnerability to various psychopathologies, which according to the diathesis-stress model might relate to the elevated glucocorticoid secretion and impaired responsiveness to stress. Furthermore, previous studies have shown that individuals exposed to early adversity have deficits in emotion processing from faces. This study aims to explore whether early adversities associate with brain response to faces and whether this association might associate with the regional variations in mRNA expression of the glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1). A total of 104 individuals drawn from the Northern Finland Brith Cohort 1986 participated in a face-task functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study. A large independent dataset (IMAGEN, N = 1739) was utilized for reducing fMRI data-analytical space in the NFBC 1986 dataset. Early adversities were associated with deviant brain response to fearful faces (MANCOVA, P = 0.006) and with weaker performance in fearful facial expression recognition (P = 0.01). Glucocorticoid receptor gene expression (data from the Allen Human Brain Atlas) correlated with the degree of associations between early adversities and brain response to fearful faces (R(2)  = 0.25, P = 0.01) across different brain regions. Our results suggest that early adversities contribute to brain response to faces and that this association is mediated in part by the glucocorticoid system. Hum Brain Mapp 38:4470-4478, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Comparative study of x ray and microwave emissions during solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, Robert M.

    1993-01-01

    The work supported by the grant consisted of two projects. The first project involved making detailed case studies of two flares using SMM data in conjunction with ground based observations. The first flare occurred at 1454 UT on June 20, 1989 and involved the eruption of a prominence near the limb. In the study we used data from many wavelength regimes including the radio, H-alpha, hard X-rays, and soft X-rays. We used a full gyrosynchrotron code to model the apparent presence of a 1.4 GHz source early in the flare that was in the form of a large coronal loop. The model results lead us to conclude that the initial acceleration occurs in small, dense loops which also produced the flare's hard X-ray emission. We also found evidence that a source at 1.4 GHz later in the event was due to second harmonic plasma emission. This source was adjacent to a leg of the prominence and comes from a dense column of material in the magnetic structure supporting the prominence. Finally, we investigated a source of microwaves and soft X-rays, occurring approximately 10 min after the hard X-ray peak, and calculate a lower limit for the density of the source. The second flare that was studied occurred at 2156 UT on June 20, 1989 and was observed with the VLA and the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO) Frequency Agile Array. We have developed a gyrosynchrotron model of the sources at flare peak using a new gyrosynchrotron approximation which is valid at very low harmonics of the gyrofrequency. We found that the accelerated particle densities of the sources decreased much more with radius from the source center than had been supposed in previous work, while the magnetic field varied less. We also used the available data to analyze a highly polarized source which appeared late in the flare. The second project involved compiling a statistical base for the relative timing of the hard X-ray peak, the turbulent and blue-shift velocities inferred from soft X-ray line emissions observed by

  17. Towards understanding solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acton, L. W.

    1982-05-01

    Instrumentation and spacecraft payloads developed at Lockheed for solar flare studies are reviewed, noting the significance of the observations for adding to a data base for eventual prediction of the occurrence of flares and subsequent radiation hazards to people in space. Developmental work on the two solar telescopes on board the Skylab pallet was performed at a Lockheed facility, as was the fabrication of very-large-area proportional counter for flights on the Aerobee rocket in 1967. The rocket work led to the fabrication of the Mapping X Ray Heliometer on the Orbiting Solar Observatory and the X Ray Polychromator for the Solar Maximum Mission. The Polychromator consists of a bent crystal spectrometer for high time resolution flare studies over a wide field of view, and a flat crystal spectrometer for simultaneous polychromatic imaging at 7 different X ray wavelengths.

  18. Chromosphere flare models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avrett, E. H.; Kurucz, R. L.; Machado, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    Further calculated results based on the F1 and F2 chromospheric models of Machado et al. (1980) are presented in addition to results from a model with enhanced temperatures relative to the weak-flare model F1 in the upper photosphere and low chromosphere, and from a model with enhanced temperatures relative to the strong flare model F2 in the upper chromosphere. The coupled equations of statistical equilibrium and radiative transfer for H, H(-), He I-II, C I-IV, Si I-II, Mg I-II, Fe, Al, O I-II, Na, and Ca II are solved, and the overall absorption and emission of radiation by lines throughout the spectrum are determined by means of a reduced set of opacities taken from a compilation of over 10 million lines. Semiempirical models show that the white light flare continuum may arise by extreme chromospheric overheating, as well as by an enhancement of the minimum temperature region.

  19. Chromosphere flare models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrett, E. H.; Kurucz, R. L.; Machado, M. E.

    1985-08-01

    Further calculated results based on the F1 and F2 chromospheric models of Machado et al. (1980) are presented in addition to results from a model with enhanced temperatures relative to the weak-flare model F1 in the upper photosphere and low chromosphere, and from a model with enhanced temperatures relative to the strong flare model F2 in the upper chromosphere. The coupled equations of statistical equilibrium and radiative transfer for H, H(-), He I-II, C I-IV, Si I-II, Mg I-II, Fe, Al, O I-II, Na, and Ca II are solved, and the overall absorption and emission of radiation by lines throughout the spectrum are determined by means of a reduced set of opacities taken from a compilation of over 10 million lines. Semiempirical models show that the white light flare continuum may arise by extreme chromospheric overheating, as well as by an enhancement of the minimum temperature region.

  20. Solar flare model atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawley, Suzanne L.; Fisher, George H.

    1993-01-01

    Solar flare model atmospheres computed under the assumption of energetic equilibrium in the chromosphere are presented. The models use a static, one-dimensional plane parallel geometry and are designed within a physically self-consistent coronal loop. Assumed flare heating mechanisms include collisions from a flux of non-thermal electrons and x-ray heating of the chromosphere by the corona. The heating by energetic electrons accounts explicitly for variations of the ionized fraction with depth in the atmosphere. X-ray heating of the chromosphere by the corona incorporates a flare loop geometry by approximating distant portions of the loop with a series of point sources, while treating the loop leg closest to the chromospheric footpoint in the plane-parallel approximation. Coronal flare heating leads to increased heat conduction, chromospheric evaporation and subsequent changes in coronal pressure; these effects are included self-consistently in the models. Cooling in the chromosphere is computed in detail for the important optically thick HI, CaII and MgII transitions using the non-LTE prescription in the program MULTI. Hydrogen ionization rates from x-ray photo-ionization and collisional ionization by non-thermal electrons are included explicitly in the rate equations. The models are computed in the 'impulsive' and 'equilibrium' limits, and in a set of intermediate 'evolving' states. The impulsive atmospheres have the density distribution frozen in pre-flare configuration, while the equilibrium models assume the entire atmosphere is in hydrostatic and energetic equilibrium. The evolving atmospheres represent intermediate stages where hydrostatic equilibrium has been established in the chromosphere and corona, but the corona is not yet in energetic equilibrium with the flare heating source. Thus, for example, chromospheric evaporation is still in the process of occurring.

  1. Fields, Flares, And Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucheron, L.; Al-Ghraibah, Amani; McAteer, J.; Cao, H.; Jackiewicz, J.; McNamara, B.; Voelz, D.; Calabro, B.; DeGrave, K.; Kirk, M.; Madadi, A.; Petsov, A.; Taylor, G.

    2011-05-01

    Solar active regions are the source of many energetic and geo-effective events such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Understanding how these complex source regions evolve and produce these events is of fundamental importance, not only to solar physics, but also to the demands of space weather forecasting. We propose to investigate the physical properties of active region magnetic fields using fractal-, gradient-, neutral line-, emerging flux-, wavelet- and general image-based techniques, and to correlate them to solar activity. The combination of these projects with solarmonitor.org and the international Max Millenium Campaign presents an opportunity for accurate and timely flare predictions for the first time. Many studies have attempted to relate solar flares to their concomitant magnetic field distributions. However, a consistent, causal relationship between the magnetic field on the photosphere and the production of solar flares is unknown. Often the local properties of the active region magnetic field - critical in many theories of activity - are lost in the global definition of their diagnostics, in effect smoothing out variations that occur on small spatial scales. Mindful of this, our overall goal is to create measures that are sensitive to both the global and the small-scale nature of energy storage and release in the solar atmosphere in order to study solar flare prediction. This set of active region characteristics will be automatically explored for discriminating features through the use of feature selection methods. Such methods search a feature space while optimizing a criterion - the prediction of a flare in this case. The large size of the datasets used in this project make it well suited for an exploration of a large feature space. This work is funded through a New Mexico State University Interdisciplinary Research Grant.

  2. Conceptualizing Developmentally Responsive Teaching in Early Field Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Penny B.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive qualitative study was to examine case study as a pedagogical tool used to scaffold the conceptualization of developmentally responsive pedagogy for middle level preservice teachers in early field experiences. Child study projects (CSP) completed by middle level preservice candidates were analyzed to determine if…

  3. A Framework for Providing Culturally Responsive Early Intervention Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a framework that offers a way for early intervention (EI) service providers to better meet the needs of the culturally diverse children and families they serve. This framework was created to organize existing research and literature on cultural responsiveness in a way that fit the unique context of EI. The…

  4. A Framework for Providing Culturally Responsive Early Intervention Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a framework that offers a way for early intervention (EI) service providers to better meet the needs of the culturally diverse children and families they serve. This framework was created to organize existing research and literature on cultural responsiveness in a way that fit the unique context of EI. The…

  5. A Comparison of Responsive Interventions on Kindergarteners' Early Reading Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Mary E.; Rawlinson, D'Ann; Simmons, Deborah C.; Kim, Minjung; Kwok, Oi-man; Hagan-Burke, Shanna; Simmons, Leslie E.; Fogarty, Melissa; Oslund, Eric; Coyne, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the effects of Tier 2 reading interventions that operated in response-to-intervention contexts. Kindergarten children (N = 90) who were identified as at risk for reading difficulties were stratified by school and randomly assigned to receive (a) Early Reading Intervention (ERI; Pearson/Scott Foresman, 2004) modified in response…

  6. A Comparison of Responsive Interventions on Kindergarteners' Early Reading Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Mary E.; Rawlinson, D'Ann; Simmons, Deborah C.; Kim, Minjung; Kwok, Oi-man; Hagan-Burke, Shanna; Simmons, Leslie E.; Fogarty, Melissa; Oslund, Eric; Coyne, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the effects of Tier 2 reading interventions that operated in response-to-intervention contexts. Kindergarten children (N = 90) who were identified as at risk for reading difficulties were stratified by school and randomly assigned to receive (a) Early Reading Intervention (ERI; Pearson/Scott Foresman, 2004) modified in response…

  7. Early Twentieth Century Responses to the Drug Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfennig, Dennis Joseph

    1991-01-01

    Describes early twentieth-century responses to the drug problem in the United States. Discusses pressure from the media and reformers to control the availability of drugs such as opium and cocaine that were widely available in over-the-counter medications. Focuses on New York State, which took the lead in enacting drug control legislation. (DK)

  8. Early Twentieth Century Responses to the Drug Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfennig, Dennis Joseph

    1991-01-01

    Describes early twentieth-century responses to the drug problem in the United States. Discusses pressure from the media and reformers to control the availability of drugs such as opium and cocaine that were widely available in over-the-counter medications. Focuses on New York State, which took the lead in enacting drug control legislation. (DK)

  9. The Solar Flare Complex Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheibi, Akbar; Safari, Hossein; Javaherian, Mohsen

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the characteristics of the solar flare complex network. The limited predictability, nonlinearity, and self-organized criticality of the flares allow us to study systems of flares in the field of the complex systems. Both the occurrence time and the location of flares detected from 2006 January 1 to 2016 July 21 are used to design the growing flares network. The solar surface is divided into cells with equal areas. The cells, which include flares, are considered nodes of the network. The related links are equivalent to sympathetic flaring. The extracted features demonstrate that the network of flares follows quantitative measures of complexity. The power-law nature of the connectivity distribution with a degree exponent greater than three reveals that flares form a scale-free and small-world network. A large value for the clustering coefficient, a small characteristic path length, and a slow change of the diameter are all characteristics of the flares network. We show that the degree correlation of the flares network has the characteristics of a disassortative network. About 11% of the large energetic flares (M and X types in GOES classification) that occurred in the network hubs cover 3% of the solar surface.

  10. Valentines Day X2 Flare

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Active region 1158 let loose with an X2.2 flare at 0153 UT or 8:50 pm ET on February 15, 2011, the largest flare since Dec. 2006 and the biggest flare so far in Solar Cycle 24. This video was taken...

  11. Activation of solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Cargill, P.J.; Migliuolo, S.; Hood, A.W.

    1984-11-01

    The physics of the activation of two-ribbon solar flares via the MHD instability of coronal arcades is presented. The destabilization of a preflare magnetic field is necessary for a rapid energy release, characteristic of the impulsive phase of the flare, to occur. The stability of a number of configurations are examined, and the physical consequences and relative importance of varying pressure profiles and different sets of boundary conditions (involving field-line tying) are discussed. Instability modes, driven unstable by pressure gradients, are candidates for instability. Shearless vs. sheared equilibria are also discussed. (ESA)

  12. THERMAL FRONTS IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Karlický, Marian

    2015-12-01

    We studied the formation of a thermal front during the expansion of hot plasma into colder plasma. We used a three-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell model that includes inductive effects. In early phases, in the area of the expanding hot plasma, we found several thermal fronts, which are defined as a sudden decrease of the local electron kinetic energy. The fronts formed a cascade. Thermal fronts with higher temperature contrast were located near plasma density depressions, generated during the hot plasma expansion. The formation of the main thermal front was associated with the return-current process induced by hot electron expansion and electrons backscattered at the front. A part of the hot plasma was trapped by the thermal front while another part, mainly with the most energetic electrons, escaped and generated Langmuir and electromagnetic waves in front of the thermal front, as shown by the dispersion diagrams. Considering all of these processes and those described in the literature, we show that anomalous electric resistivity is produced at the location of the thermal front. Thus, the thermal front can contribute to energy dissipation in the current-carrying loops of solar flares. We estimated the values of such anomalous resistivity in the solar atmosphere together with collisional resistivity and electric fields. We propose that the slowly drifting reverse drift bursts, observed at the beginning of some solar flares, could be signatures of the thermal front.

  13. Recent Advances in Plant Early Signaling in Response to Herbivory

    PubMed Central

    Arimura, Gen-Ichiro; Ozawa, Rika; Maffei, Massimo E.

    2011-01-01

    Plants are frequently attacked by herbivores and pathogens and therefore have acquired constitutive and induced defenses during the course of their evolution. Here we review recent progress in the study of the early signal transduction pathways in host plants in response to herbivory. The sophisticated signaling network for plant defense responses is elicited and driven by both herbivore-induced factors (e.g., elicitors, effectors, and wounding) and plant signaling (e.g., phytohormone and plant volatiles) in response to arthropod factors. We describe significant findings, illuminating the scenario by providing broad insights into plant signaling involved in several arthropod-host interactions. PMID:21747702

  14. Determinants of early life immune responses to RSV infection.

    PubMed

    Ruckwardt, Tracy J; Morabito, Kaitlyn M; Graham, Barney S

    2016-02-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus causes significant morbidity and mortality in both developed and developing countries, and a vaccine that adequately protects from severe disease remains an important unmet need. RSV disease has an inordinate impact on the very young, and the physical and immunological immaturity of early life complicates vaccine design. Defining and targeting the functional capacities of early life immune responses and controlling responses during primary antigen exposure with selected vaccine delivery approaches will be important for protecting infants by active immunization. Alternatively, vaccination of older children and pregnant mothers may ameliorate disease burden indirectly until infants reach about six months of age, when they can generate more effective anti-RSV immune responses.

  15. A Chromospheric Flare Model Consisting of Two Dynamical Layers: Critical Tests from IRIS Data of Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Adam; Allred, Joel C.; Daw, Adrian N.; Cauzzi, Gianna; Carlsson, Mats; Inglis, Andrew; O'Neill, Aaron; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Uitenbroek, Han

    2017-01-01

    Recent 1D radiative-hydrodynamic simulations of flares have shown that a heated, chromospheric compression layer and a stationary layer, just below the compression, are produced in response to high flux electron beam heating. The hot blackbody-like continuum and redshifted intensity in singly ionized chromospheric lines in these model predictions are generally consistent with broad wavelength coverage spectra of M dwarf flares and with high spectral resolution observations of solar flares, respectively. We critically test this two-component chromospheric flare model against the Fe II profiles and NUV continuum brightness for several X-class solar flares observed with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). We present several new predictions for the Daniel K. Inoue Solar Telescope (DKIST).

  16. A search for flare stars with the GPO astrograph.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aniol, R.; Duerbeck, H. W.; Seitter, W. C.; Tsvetkov, M. K.

    1988-06-01

    The first systematic investigation of flare stars by the Mexican astronomer Guillermo Haro marks the beginning of long-term, multi-site studies of these objects in young stellar aggregates. His first series of observations with the Schmidt telescope of the Tonantzintla Observatory already showed the close relation between stars in the T Tauri stage and cool dwarf stars with enhaneed UV activity (= flare stars), both types of objects being still in their early stages of evolution.

  17. Statistical aspects of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    1987-01-01

    A survey of the statistical properties of 850 H alpha solar flares during 1975 is presented. Comparison of the results found here with those reported elsewhere for different epochs is accomplished. Distributions of rise time, decay time, and duration are given, as are the mean, mode, median, and 90th percentile values. Proportions by selected groupings are also determined. For flares in general, mean values for rise time, decay time, and duration are 5.2 + or - 0.4 min, and 18.1 + or 1.1 min, respectively. Subflares, accounting for nearly 90 percent of the flares, had mean values lower than those found for flares of H alpha importance greater than 1, and the differences are statistically significant. Likewise, flares of bright and normal relative brightness have mean values of decay time and duration that are significantly longer than those computed for faint flares, and mass-motion related flares are significantly longer than non-mass-motion related flares. Seventy-three percent of the mass-motion related flares are categorized as being a two-ribbon flare and/or being accompanied by a high-speed dark filament. Slow rise time flares (rise time greater than 5 min) have a mean value for duration that is significantly longer than that computed for fast rise time flares, and long-lived duration flares (duration greater than 18 min) have a mean value for rise time that is significantly longer than that computed for short-lived duration flares, suggesting a positive linear relationship between rise time and duration for flares. Monthly occurrence rates for flares in general and by group are found to be linearly related in a positive sense to monthly sunspot number. Statistical testing reveals the association between sunspot number and numbers of flares to be significant at the 95 percent level of confidence, and the t statistic for slope is significant at greater than 99 percent level of confidence. Dependent upon the specific fit, between 58 percent and 94 percent of

  18. Electron beams in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Dennis, Brian R.; Benz, Arnold O.

    1994-01-01

    A list of publications resulting from this program includes 'The Timing of Electron Beam Signatures in Hard X-Ray and Radio: Solar Flare Observations by BATSE/Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory and PHOENIX'; 'Coherent-Phase or Random-Phase Acceleration of Electron Beams in Solar Flares'; 'Particle Acceleration in Flares'; 'Chromospheric Evaporation and Decimetric Radio Emission in Solar Flares'; 'Sequences of Correlated Hard X-Ray and Type 3 Bursts During Solar Flares'; and 'Solar Electron Beams Detected in Hard X-Rays and Radiowaves.' Abstracts and reprints of each are attached to this report.

  19. Replicated evolution of integrated plastic responses during early adaptive divergence.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Kevin J; Robinson, Beren W

    2006-04-01

    Colonization of a novel environment is expected to result in adaptive divergence from the ancestral population when selection favors a new phenotypic optimum. Local adaptation in the new environment occurs through the accumulation and integration of character states that positively affect fitness. The role played by plastic traits in adaptation to a novel environment has generally been ignored, except for variable environments. We propose that if conditions in a relatively stable but novel environment induce phenotypically plastic responses in many traits, and if genetic variation exists in the form of those responses, then selection may initially favor the accumulation and integration of functionally useful plastic responses. Early divergence between ancestral and colonist forms will then occur with respect to their plastic responses across the gradient bounded by ancestral and novel environmental conditions. To test this, we compared the magnitude, integration, and pattern of plastic character responses in external body form induced by shallow versus open water conditions between two sunfish ecomorphs that coexist in four postglacial lakes. The novel sunfish ecomorph is present in the deeper open water habitat, whereas the ancestral ecomorph inhabits the shallow waters along the lake margin. Plastic responses by open water ecomorphs were more correlated than those of their local shallow water ecomorph in two of the populations, whereas equal levels of correlated plastic character responses occurred between ecomorphs in the other two populations. Small but persistent differences occurred between ecomorph pairs in the pattern of their character responses, suggesting a recent divergence. Open water ecomorphs shared some similarities in the covariance among plastic responses to rearing environment. Replication in the form of correlated plastic responses among populations of open water ecomorphs suggests that plastic character states may evolve under selection

  20. Response to intervention: implications for early childhood professionals.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Sarah; Pretti-Frontczak, Kristie; Harjusola-Webb, Sanna; Grisham-Brown, Jennifer; Romani, Jeanne M

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the importance of building strong early childhood communities of interdisciplinary practice in the application of a comprehensive curriculum framework. A curriculum framework is proposed as a means of applying and extending the principles of response to intervention (RtI) to early childhood education providers working with young children, including speech-language pathologists (SLPs). The article presents information regarding the elements of a curriculum framework and suggestions for practice. Literature related to RtI was reviewed to identify common principles of practice. The resulting principles were then aligned to early childhood education recommended practices in order to illustrate the overlapping beliefs. Rationale and support for a curriculum framework as an early childhood education RtI model was then gathered to identify appropriate practices for working with young children who are served in a variety of early childhood settings. SLPs are important members of early educational teams, particularly when applying the principles of RtI using a curriculum framework. SLPs bring the expertise needed to ensure that children achieve critical outcomes. Implementation of the curriculum framework is made possible when everyone involved in supporting young children understands how to apply the elements of a curriculum framework.

  1. Solar flares: an overview.

    PubMed

    Rust, D M

    1992-01-01

    This is a survey of solar phenomena and physical models that may be useful for improving forecasts of solar flares and proton storms in interplanetary space. Knowledge of the physical processes that accelerate protons has advanced because of gamma-ray and X-ray observations from the Solar Maximum Mission telescopes. Protons are accelerated at the onset of flares, but the duration of any subsequent proton storm at 1 AU depends on the structure of the interplanetary fields. X-ray images of the solar corona show possible fast proton escape paths. Magnetographs and high-resolution visible-band images show the magnetic field structure near the acceleration region and the heating effects of sunward-directed protons. Preflare magnetic field growth and shear may be the most important clues to the physical processes that generate high energy solar particles. Any dramatic improvement in flare forecasts will require high resolution solar telescopes in space. Several possibilities for improvements in the art of flare forecasting are presented, among them: the use of acoustic tomography to probe for subsurface magnetic fields; a satellite-borne solar magnetograph; and an X-ray telescope to monitor the corona for eruptions.

  2. Smokeless, efficient, nontoxic flaring

    SciTech Connect

    Leite, O.C. )

    1991-03-01

    The primary function of a flare is to dispose of toxic, corrosive or flammable vapors safely, under relief conditions, by converting them into less objectional products by combustion. Toxic limits are the greatest concentration of a poisonous substance that can be tolerated in the air for a length of time without danger. Most emergencies causing overpressure on safety relief valves can be controlled within 5 to 10 minutes, for example, by shutting down a pump or compressor. A period of 10 to 30 minutes should be sufficient to control any emergency situation short of a catastrophe. Atmospheric discharge of hydrocarbons or other flammables should be designed to avoid the formation of flammable mixtures and exposure of personnel to toxic or corrosive vapors at grade level or on elevated structures. Either elevated flares or ground flares can accomplish efficiently the discharges to atmosphere when properly designed. Proper design is based on the characteristics of waste gas, heat radiation, noise levels, smoke and atmospheric dispersion. Smokeless flares use smoke suppression systems, like stream injection, forced draft air fans, high pressure gas injection and other devices to reduce the smoking tendency of certain fuels, improving air entrainment and mixing.

  3. Orthostatic intolerance and the cardiovascular response to early postoperative mobilization.

    PubMed

    Bundgaard-Nielsen, M; Jørgensen, C C; Jørgensen, T B; Ruhnau, B; Secher, N H; Kehlet, H

    2009-06-01

    A key element in enhanced postoperative recovery is early mobilization which, however, may be hindered by orthostatic intolerance, that is, an inability to sit or stand because of symptoms of cerebral hypoperfusion as intolerable dizziness, nausea and vomiting, feeling of heat, or blurred vision. We assessed orthostatic tolerance in relation to the postural cardiovascular responses before and shortly after open radical prostatectomy. Orthostatic tolerance and the cardiovascular response to sitting and standing were evaluated on the day before surgery and 6 and 22 h after operation in 16 patients. Non-invasive systolic (SAP) and diastolic arterial pressure (DAP) (Finometer), heart rate, cardiac output (CO, Modelflow), total peripheral resistance (TPR), and central venous oxygen saturation (Scv(O2)) were monitored. Before surgery, no patients had symptoms of orthostatic intolerance. In contrast, 8 (50%) and 2 (12%) patients were orthostatic intolerant at 6 and approximately 22 h after surgery, respectively. Before surgery, SAP, DAP, and TPR increased (P<0.05), whereas CO did not change (P>0.05) and Scv(O2) decreased (P<0.05) upon mobilization. At 6 h after operation, SAP and DAP declined with mobilization (P<0.05) and the arterial pressure response differed from the preoperative response both upon sitting (P<0.05) and standing (P<0.05) due to both impaired TPR and CO. At approximately 22 h, the SAP and DAP responses to mobilization did not differ from the preoperative evaluation (P>0.05). The early postoperative postural cardiovascular response is impaired after radical prostatectomy with a risk of orthostatic intolerance, limiting early postoperative mobilization. The pathogenic mechanisms include both impaired TPR and CO responses.

  4. Gamma-ray burst flares: X-ray flaring. II

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, C. A.; Roming, P. W. A.

    2014-06-10

    We present a catalog of 498 flaring periods found in gamma-ray burst (GRB) light curves taken from the online Swift X-Ray Telescope GRB Catalogue. We analyzed 680 individual light curves using a flare detection method developed and used on our UV/optical GRB Flare Catalog. This method makes use of the Bayesian Information Criterion to analyze the residuals of fitted GRB light curves and statistically determines the optimal fit to the light curve residuals in an attempt to identify any additional features. These features, which we classify as flares, are identified by iteratively adding additional 'breaks' to the light curve. We find evidence of flaring in 326 of the analyzed light curves. For those light curves with flares, we find an average number of ∼1.5 flares per GRB. As with the UV/optical, flaring in our sample is generally confined to the first 1000 s of the afterglow, but can be detected to beyond 10{sup 5} s. Only ∼50% of the detected flares follow the 'classical' definition of Δt/t ≤ 0.5, with many of the largest flares exceeding this value.

  5. X-ray studies of flaring magnetic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, Christopher Philip

    This thesis studies non-thermal emission from flaring magnetic structures by looking at HXR emission from flare footpoints at a faint X-ray source above a flare loop and finally at radio emission generated by eruptions. By complementing high quality data from recent missions with data from older instrumentation, studies were performed to compare with accepted models. The relation between Hard X-ray footpoint emission and magnetic field strength in a sample of 32 flares was studied in order to investigate the effects of the magnetic field on the transport of accelerated electrons. It was found that one third of compact flares studied had stronger footpoints in stronger magnetic regions whereas the reverse is anticipated from magnetic trapping arguments. On 16th April 2002, a limb flare was studied in many wavelengths. This provided an opportunity to study an erupting filament from the low corona and into interplanetary space. RHESSI identified a moving X-ray source associated with a rising filament, confirming the plasmoid definition of Tsuneta (1997). The velocity profile of the filament was determined along with its exponential acceleration. This suggested that an instability was responsible for eruption, possibly the kink instability. Doppler shifts were observed on either side of the filament as it crossed the slit field of view, suggesting helical flows and thus a flux rope. A succession of quadrupolar flares, followed by an LDE were then studied. An associated CME was seen and appeared linked to the quadrupolar flares which should re main confined. The flaring region triggered loop expansion, which interacted with a neighbouring large-scale streamer. This led to a fast CME front, which weakened the restraining field above the active region filaments allowing a partial filament eruption. Although at first glance the observations appeared contradictory it was demonstrated that the quadrupolar flares remained confined while triggering a large-scale eruption.

  6. Implementation of responsiveness to intervention in early education settings.

    PubMed

    Justice, Laura M; McGinty, Anita; Guo, Ying; Moore, Douglas

    2009-05-01

    This article provides an overview of how response to intervention (RTI) may be used effectively within early childhood settings. Discussion is organized to address such issues regarding RTI implementation as (1) how to design and implement a high-quality Tier 1 learning environment that systematically improves children's language and literacy outcomes, (2) how to design and implement a high-quality Tier 2 supplemental learning intervention that systematically improves the language and literacy outcomes of children who are unresponsive to Tier 1, and (3) how to design and implement a comprehensive and cohesive assessment system that appropriately identifies children who show inadequate response to the Tier 1 and Tier 2 learning opportunities. A model for implementing RTI using the supplemental curriculum by Justice and McGinty, READ IT AGAIN-PREK! (2008), is presented. This tool was developed to meet the needs of early childhood programs as they seek to implement RIA in a cost-effective and scalable manner.

  7. Relativistic-Electron-Dominated Solar Flares Observed by Fermi/GBM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, A. Y.; Schwartz, R. A.; Dennis, B. R.

    2013-12-01

    Up to tens of percent of the energy released in solar flares goes into accelerating electrons above ~10 keV and ions above ~1 MeV, and the impulsive heating of the ambient solar atmosphere by these particles is partially or wholly responsible for the production of hot flare plasmas (up to ~50 MK). Although flares can accelerate electrons to relativistic energies, in even large flares the typical falling power-law energy spectrum means that the plasma is primarily heated by the much larger number of low-energy electrons. However, there have been flares observed where the electron energy spectra have high low-energy cutoffs (well above ~100 keV), which significantly changes the electron energies responsible for heating and modifies the usual conception of energy transport in a flare. A systematic study of a range of relativistic-electron-dominated flares can improve our understanding of the relevant acceleration processes and how they may differ from those in "typical" flares. We search the Fermi/GBM data set for such flares based on the electron-associated X-ray/gamma-ray bremsstrahlung emission, making use of an improved background-subtraction approach to improve the ability to detect weaker flares. We present the fitted parameters for the relativistic-electron spectrum and their evolution over time, and compare against RHESSI observations and other instruments when available. We also discuss these events in the context of previously observed correlations between relativistic-electron acceleration and ion acceleration in flares.

  8. Energetics of impulsive solar flares: Correlating BATSE hard x-ray bursts and the solar atmosphere's soft x-ray response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, Elizabeth

    1996-01-01

    This investigation has involved the correlation of BATSE-observed solar hard X-ray emission with the characteristics of soft X-ray emitting plasma observed by the Yohkoh Bragg Crystal Spectrometers. The goal was to test the hypothesis that localized electron beam heating is the dominant energy transport mechanism in impulsive flares, as formulated in the thick-target electron-heated model of Brown.

  9. Early responses of vascular endothelial cells to topographic cues.

    PubMed

    Dreier, Britta; Gasiorowski, Joshua Z; Morgan, Joshua T; Nealey, Paul F; Russell, Paul; Murphy, Christopher J

    2013-08-01

    Vascular endothelial cells in vivo are exposed to multiple biophysical cues provided by the basement membrane, a specialized extracellular matrix through which vascular endothelial cells are attached to the underlying stroma. The importance of biophysical cues has been widely reported, but the signaling pathways that mediate cellular recognition and response to these cues remain poorly understood. Anisotropic topographically patterned substrates with nano- through microscale feature dimensions were fabricated to investigate cellular responses to topographic cues. The present study focuses on early events following exposure of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to these patterned substrates. In serum-free medium and on substrates without protein coating, HUVECs oriented parallel to the long axis of underlying ridges in as little as 30 min. Immunocytochemistry showed clear differences in the localization of the focal adhesion proteins Src, p130Cas, and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in HUVECs cultured on topographically patterned surfaces and on planar surfaces, suggesting involvement of these proteins in mediating the response to topographic features. Knockdown experiments demonstrated that FAK was not necessary for HUVEC alignment in response to topographic cues, although FAK knockdown did modulate HUVEC migration. These data identify key events early in the cellular response to biophysical stimuli.

  10. Solar flare gamma-ray spectroscopy with CGRO-COMPTEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Christopher Alex

    2001-08-01

    with a 1 a range of 1.96e-04 to 1.75e-05 for this flare using this new model. This is larger than all previous values reported. In addition, we presented an additional flare observation from COMPTEL. In response to a BACODINE cosmic gamma-ray burst alert, COMPTEL on the CGRO recorded gamma rays above 1 MeV from the C4 flare at 0221 UT 20 January 2000. This event, though at the limits of COMPTEL's sensitivity, clearly shows a nuclear line excess above the continuum. Using new spectroscopy techniques we were able to resolve individual lines. This allowed us to make a basic comparison of this event with the GRL (gamma ray line) flare distribution from SMM and also compare this flare with a well-observed large GRL flare seen by OSSE. We showed this flare is normal, i.e., it is a natural extension of the SMM distribution of flares. The analysis of this flare means there is no evidence for a lower flare size for proton acceleration. Protons even in small flares contain a large part of the accelerated particle energy.

  11. Presence of early stage cancer does not impair the early protein metabolic response to major surgery.

    PubMed

    Engelen, Mariëlle P K J; Klimberg, V Suzanne; Allasia, Arianna; Deutz, Nicolaas Ep

    2017-06-01

    Combined bilateral mastectomy and reconstruction is a common major surgical procedure in women with breast cancer and in those with a family history of breast cancer. As this large surgical procedure induces muscle protein loss, a preserved anabolic response to nutrition is warranted for optimal recovery. It is unclear whether the presence of early stage cancer negatively affects the protein metabolic response to major surgery as this would mandate perioperative nutritional support. In nine women with early stage (Stage II) breast malignancy and nine healthy women with a genetic predisposition to breast cancer undergoing the same large surgical procedure, we examined whether surgery influences the catabolic response to overnight fasting and the anabolic response to nutrition differently. Prior to and within 24 h after combined bilateral mastectomy and reconstruction surgery, whole body protein synthesis and breakdown rates were assessed after overnight fasting and after meal intake by stable isotope methodology to enable the calculation of net protein catabolism in the post-absorptive state and net protein anabolic response to a meal. Major surgery resulted in an up-regulation of post-absorptive protein synthesis and breakdown rates (P < 0.001) and lower net protein catabolism (P < 0.05) and was associated with insulin resistance and increased systemic inflammation (P < 0.01). Net anabolic response to the meal was reduced after surgery (P < 0.05) but higher in cancer (P < 0.05) indicative of a more preserved meal efficiency. The significant relationship between net protein anabolism and the amount of amino acids available in the circulation (R(2)  = 0.85, P < 0.001) was independent of the presence of non-cachectic early stage breast cancer or surgery. The presence of early stage breast cancer does not enhance the normal catabolic response to major surgery or further attenuates the anabolic response to meal intake within 24 h after

  12. Predictions and observations of HF radio propagation in the northerly ionosphere: The effect of the solar flares and a weak CME in early January 2014.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallam, Jonathan; Stocker, Alan J.; Warrington, Mike; Siddle, Dave; Zaalov, Nikolay; Honary, Farideh; Rogers, Neil; Boteler, David; Danskin, Donald

    2014-05-01

    We have previously reported on a significant new multi-national project to provide improved predictions and forecasts of HF radio propagation for commercial aircraft operating on trans-polar routes. In these regions, there are limited or no VHF air-traffic control facilities and geostationary satellites are below the horizon. Therefore HF radio remains important in maintaining communications with the aircraft at all times. Space weather disturbances can have a range of effects on the ionosphere and hence HF radio propagation - particularly in the polar cap. While severe space weather effects can lead to a total loss of communications (i.e. radio blackout), less intense events can still cause significant disruption. In this paper we will present the effect of a series of M and X class solar flares and a relatively weak CME on HF radio performance from 6 to 13 January 2014. This is an interesting interval from the point of view of HF radio propagation because while the solar effects on the ionosphere are significant, except for an interval of approximately 12 hours duration, they are not so intense as to produce a complete radio blackout on all paths. Observations of the signal-to-noise ratio, direction of arrival, and time of flight of HF radio signals on six paths (one entirely within the polar cap, three trans-auroral, and two sub-auroral) will be presented together with riometer measurements of the ionospheric absorption. Global maps of D-region absorption (D-region absorption prediction, DRAP) inferred from satellite measurements of the solar wind parameters will be compared with the HF and riometer observations. In addition, a ray-tracing model using a realistic background ionosphere and including localised features found in the ionospheric polar cap (e.g. polar patches and arcs) will be used to model the expected and observed HF radio propagation characteristics.

  13. Radio Optical Multiwavelength Stellar Flares and Constraints on the Electron Population from a Joint Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osten, Rachel; Kowalski, Adam

    2017-05-01

    The accelerated particles produced in stellar magnetic reconnection events are important in shaping the habitable environment around the star. Radio gyrosynchrotron flares trace the presence and action of accelerated electrons high in the stellar atmosphere, while flares observed at optical wavelengths probe the response lower in the stellar atmosphere to the heating provided by electron beams. We present the results of a several day multi wavelength observing campaign on the nearby flare star EV Lac. The multifrequency radio observations probe the non thermal particle energy and its dependence on the index of the power-law distribution of particle energy as well as the magnetic field strength, while optical observations constrain optical radiated energy and limits on total bolometric flare radiated energy. We discuss how the spectral shape of the optical flares can potentially constrain the lower limit of the electron population, and what the coincidence or lack thereof of simultaneously observed flares tells us about the generalness of flare processes.

  14. The Early Endocrine Stress Response in Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Nyberg, Christoffer; Karlsson, Torbjörn; Hillered, Lars; Stridsberg, Mats; Ronne Engström, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In patients with severe illness, such as aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), a physiologic stress response is triggered. This includes activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the sympathetic nervous system. The aim of this study was to investigate the very early responses of these systems. Methods A porcine animal model of aneurysmal SAH was used. In this model, blood is injected slowly to the basal cisterns above the anterior skull base until the cerebral perfusion pressure is 0 mm Hg. Sampling was done from blood and urine at -10, +15, +75 and +135 minutes from time of induction of SAH. Analyses of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol, aldosterone, catecholamines and chromogranin-A were performed. Results Plasma ACTH, serum cortisol and plasma aldosterone increased in the samples following induction of SAH, and started to decline after 75 minutes. Urine cortisol also increased after SAH. Urine catecholamines and their metabolites were found to increase after SAH. Many samples were however below detection level, not allowing for statistical analysis. Plasma chromogranin-A peaked at 15 minutes after SAH, and thereafter decreased. Conclusions The endocrine stress response after aneurysmal SAH was found to start within 15 minutes in the HPA axis with early peak values of ACTH, cortisol and aldosterone. The fact that the concentrations of the HPA axis hormones decreased 135 minutes after SAH may suggest that a similar pattern exists in SAH patients, thus making it difficult to catch these early peak values. There were also indications of early activation of the sympathetic nervous system, but the small number of valid samples made interpretation difficult. PMID:27007694

  15. The Solar Flare Myth in solar-terrestrial physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gosling, J.T.

    1993-07-01

    Early observations of associations between solar flares and large non- recurrent geomagnetic storms, large {open_quote}solar{close_quote} energetic particle events, and transient shock wave disturbances in the solar wind led to a paradigm of cause and effect that gave flares a central position in the chain of events leading from solar activity to major transient disturbances in the near-earth space environment. However, research in the last two decades shows that this emphasis on flares is misplaced. In this paper the author outlines briefly the rationale for a different paradigm of cause and effect in solar- terrestrial physics that removes solar flares from their central position as the {open_quote}cause{close_quote} of major disturbances in the near-earth space environment. Instead, this central role of {open_quote}cause{close_quote} is played by events now known as coronal mass ejections, or CMEs.

  16. Stomatal Blue Light Response Is Present in Early Vascular Plants.

    PubMed

    Doi, Michio; Kitagawa, Yuki; Shimazaki, Ken-ichiro

    2015-10-01

    Light is a major environmental factor required for stomatal opening. Blue light (BL) induces stomatal opening in higher plants as a signal under the photosynthetic active radiation. The stomatal BL response is not present in the fern species of Polypodiopsida. The acquisition of a stomatal BL response might provide competitive advantages in both the uptake of CO2 and prevention of water loss with the ability to rapidly open and close stomata. We surveyed the stomatal opening in response to strong red light (RL) and weak BL under the RL with gas exchange technique in a diverse selection of plant species from euphyllophytes, including spermatophytes and monilophytes, to lycophytes. We showed the presence of RL-induced stomatal opening in most of these species and found that the BL responses operated in all euphyllophytes except Polypodiopsida. We also confirmed that the stomatal opening in lycophytes, the early vascular plants, is driven by plasma membrane proton-translocating adenosine triphosphatase and K(+) accumulation in guard cells, which is the same mechanism operating in stomata of angiosperms. These results suggest that the early vascular plants respond to both RL and BL and actively regulate stomatal aperture. We also found three plant species that absolutely require BL for both stomatal opening and photosynthetic CO2 fixation, including a gymnosperm, C. revoluta, and the ferns Equisetum hyemale and Psilotum nudum. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Bright Solar Flare

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    A bright solar flare is captured by the EIT 195Å instrument on 1998 May 2. A solar flare (a sudden, rapid, and intense variation in brightness) occurs when magnetic energy that has built up in the solar atmosphere is suddenly released, launching material outward at millions of km per hour. The Sun’s magnetic fields tend to restrain each other and force the buildup of tremendous energy, like twisting rubber bands, so much that they eventually break. At some point, the magnetic lines of force merge and cancel in a process known as magnetic reconnection, causing plasma to forcefully escape from the Sun. Credit: NASA/GSFC/SOHO/ESA To learn more go to the SOHO website: sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/home.html To learn more about NASA's Sun Earth Day go here: sunearthday.nasa.gov/2010/index.php

  18. Factors affecting response to national early warning score (NEWS).

    PubMed

    Kolic, Ivana; Crane, Smiley; McCartney, Suzanne; Perkins, Zane; Taylor, Alex

    2015-05-01

    The NEWS is a physiological score, which prescribes an appropriate response for the deteriorating patient in need of urgent medical care. However, it has been suggested that compliance with early warning scoring systems for identifying patient deterioration may vary out of hours. We aimed to (1) assess the scoring accuracy and the adequacy of the prescribed clinical responses to NEWS and (2) assess whether responses were affected by time of day, day of week and score severity. We performed a prospective observational study of 370 adult patients admitted to an acute medical ward in a London District General Hospital. Patient characteristics, NEW score, time of day, day of week and clinical response data were collected for the first 24h of admission. Patients with less than a 12h hospital stay were excluded. We analysed data with univariate and multivariate logistic regression. In 70 patients (18.9%) the NEW score was calculated incorrectly. There was a worsening of the clinical response with increasing NEW score. An appropriate clinical response to the NEWS was observed in 274 patients (74.1%). Patients admitted on the weekend were more likely to receive an inadequate response, compared to patients admitted during the week (p<0.0001). After adjusting for confounders, increasing NEWS score remained significantly associated with an inadequate clinical response. Furthermore, our results demonstrate a small increase in inadequate NEWS responses at night, however this was not clinically or statistically significant. The high rate of incorrectly calculated NEW scores has implications for the prescribed actions. Clinical response to NEWS score triggers is significantly worse at weekends, highlighting an important patient safety concern. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Gene regulation in the immediate-early response process.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Shahram; Drabløs, Finn

    2016-09-01

    Immediate-early genes (IEGs) can be activated and transcribed within minutes after stimulation, without the need for de novo protein synthesis, and they are stimulated in response to both cell-extrinsic and cell-intrinsic signals. Extracellular signals are transduced from the cell surface, through receptors activating a chain of proteins in the cell, in particular extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and members of the RhoA-actin pathway. These communicate through a signaling cascade by adding phosphate groups to neighboring proteins, and this will eventually activate and translocate TFs to the nucleus and thereby induce gene expression. The gene activation also involves proximal and distal enhancers that interact with promoters to simulate gene expression. The immediate-early genes have essential biological roles, in particular in stress response, like the immune system, and in differentiation. Therefore they also have important roles in various diseases, including cancer development. In this paper we summarize some recent advances on key aspects of the activation and regulation of immediate-early genes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Spectroscopic Exploration of Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibeck, D. G.; Paxton, L. J.; Woods, T. N.

    2016-12-01

    Professor Eugene Parker has educated and inspired the heliophysics community since the 1950s about the Parker spiral path for the solar wind, magnetic reconnection throughout the heliosphere, and coronal heating by nano-flares. Solar flares, as well as their often eruptive companions called coronal mass ejections (CMEs), have been studied for decades. While most of these studies involve imaging the Sun, observations of the Sun as a star (full-disk irradiance) have also revealed interesting results through exploring the spectral variability during flare events. Some of the new results from such studies include understanding the flare variability over all wavelengths from the energetic X-rays to the visible, discovering and classifying different flare phases, using coronal dimming measurements to predict CME properties of mass and velocity, and exploring the role of Parker's nano-flares in continual heating of active regions.

  1. PRECURSOR FLARES IN OJ 287

    SciTech Connect

    Pihajoki, P.; Berdyugin, A.; Lindfors, E.; Reinthal, R.; Sillanpaeae, A.; Takalo, L.; Valtonen, M.; Nilsson, K.; Zola, S.; Koziel-Wierzbowska, D.; Liakos, A.; Drozdz, M.; Winiarski, M.; Ogloza, W.; Provencal, J.; Santangelo, M. M. M.; Salo, H.; Chandra, S.; Ganesh, S.; Baliyan, K. S.; and others

    2013-02-10

    We have studied three most recent precursor flares in the light curve of the blazar OJ 287 while invoking the presence of a precessing binary black hole in the system to explain the nature of these flares. Precursor flare timings from the historical light curves are compared with theoretical predictions from our model that incorporate effects of an accretion disk and post-Newtonian description for the binary black hole orbit. We find that the precursor flares coincide with the secondary black hole descending toward the accretion disk of the primary black hole from the observed side, with a mean z-component of approximately z{sub c} = 4000 AU. We use this model of precursor flares to predict that precursor flare of similar nature should happen around 2020.96 before the next major outburst in 2022.

  2. PRE-FLARE ACTIVITY AND MAGNETIC RECONNECTION DURING THE EVOLUTIONARY STAGES OF ENERGY RELEASE IN A SOLAR ERUPTIVE FLARE

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Bhuwan; Veronig, Astrid M.; Bong, Su-Chan; Cho, Kyung-Suk; Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar

    2011-12-20

    In this paper, we present a multi-wavelength analysis of an eruptive white-light M3.2 flare that occurred in active region NOAA 10486 on 2003 November 1. The excellent set of high-resolution observations made by RHESSI and the TRACE provides clear evidence of significant pre-flare activities for {approx}9 minutes in the form of an initiation phase observed at EUV/UV wavelengths followed by an X-ray precursor phase. During the initiation phase, we observed localized brightenings in the highly sheared core region close to the filament and interactions among short EUV loops overlying the filament, which led to the opening of magnetic field lines. The X-ray precursor phase is manifested in RHESSI measurements below {approx}30 keV and coincided with the beginning of flux emergence at the flaring location along with early signatures of the eruption. The RHESSI observations reveal that both plasma heating and electron acceleration occurred during the precursor phase. The main flare is consistent with the standard flare model. However, after the impulsive phase, an intense hard X-ray (HXR) looptop source was observed without significant footpoint emission. More intriguingly, for a brief period, the looptop source exhibited strong HXR emission with energies up to {approx}50-100 keV and significant non-thermal characteristics. The present study indicates a causal relation between the activities in the pre-flare and the main flare. We also conclude that pre-flare activities, occurring in the form of subtle magnetic reorganization along with localized magnetic reconnection, played a crucial role in destabilizing the active region filament, leading to a solar eruptive flare and associated large-scale phenomena.

  3. Early prediction of blonanserin response in Japanese patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Kishi, Taro; Matsuda, Yuki; Fujita, Kiyoshi; Iwata, Nakao

    2014-01-01

    Background Blonanserin is a second-generation antipsychotic used for the treatment of schizophrenia in Japan and Korea. The present study aimed to examine early prediction of blonanserin in patients with schizophrenia. Methods An 8-week, prospective, single-arm, flexible-dose clinical trial of blonanserin in patients with schizophrenia was conducted under real-world conditions. The inclusion criteria were antipsychotic naïve, and first-episode schizophrenia patients or schizophrenia patients with no consumption of any antipsychotic medication for more than 4 weeks before enrollment in this study. The positive predictive value, negative predictive value, sensitivity, specificity, and predictive power were calculated for the response status at week 4 to predict the subsequent response at week 8. Results Thirty-seven patients were recruited (56.8% of them had first-episode schizophrenia), and 28 (75.7%) completed the trial. At week 8, blonanserin was associated with a significant improvement in the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total score (P<0.0001) and in positive (P<0.0001), negative (P<0.0001), and general subscale scores (P<0.0001). In terms of percentage improvement of PANSS total scores from baseline to week 8, 64.9% of patients showed a ≥20% reduction in the PANSS total score and 48.6% showed a ≥30% reduction. However, 8.1% of patients experienced at least one adverse event. Using the 20% reduction in the PANSS total score at week 4 as a definition of an early response, the negative predictive values for later responses (ie, reductions of ≥30 and ≥40 in the PANSS total scores) were 88.9% and 94.1%, respectively. The specificities were 80.0% and 51.6%, respectively. Conclusion Our results suggest that the blonanserin response at week 4 could predict the later response at week 8. PMID:25285009

  4. Early prediction of blonanserin response in Japanese patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Taro; Matsuda, Yuki; Fujita, Kiyoshi; Iwata, Nakao

    2014-01-01

    Blonanserin is a second-generation antipsychotic used for the treatment of schizophrenia in Japan and Korea. The present study aimed to examine early prediction of blonanserin in patients with schizophrenia. An 8-week, prospective, single-arm, flexible-dose clinical trial of blonanserin in patients with schizophrenia was conducted under real-world conditions. The inclusion criteria were antipsychotic naïve, and first-episode schizophrenia patients or schizophrenia patients with no consumption of any antipsychotic medication for more than 4 weeks before enrollment in this study. The positive predictive value, negative predictive value, sensitivity, specificity, and predictive power were calculated for the response status at week 4 to predict the subsequent response at week 8. Thirty-seven patients were recruited (56.8% of them had first-episode schizophrenia), and 28 (75.7%) completed the trial. At week 8, blonanserin was associated with a significant improvement in the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total score (P<0.0001) and in positive (P<0.0001), negative (P<0.0001), and general subscale scores (P<0.0001). In terms of percentage improvement of PANSS total scores from baseline to week 8, 64.9% of patients showed a ≥20% reduction in the PANSS total score and 48.6% showed a ≥30% reduction. However, 8.1% of patients experienced at least one adverse event. Using the 20% reduction in the PANSS total score at week 4 as a definition of an early response, the negative predictive values for later responses (ie, reductions of ≥30 and ≥40 in the PANSS total scores) were 88.9% and 94.1%, respectively. The specificities were 80.0% and 51.6%, respectively. Our results suggest that the blonanserin response at week 4 could predict the later response at week 8.

  5. Temperature Dependence of the Flare Fluence Scaling Exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretzschmar, M.

    2015-12-01

    Solar flares result in an increase of the solar irradiance at all wavelengths. While the distribution of the flare fluence observed in coronal emission has been widely studied and found to scale as f(E)˜ E^{-α}, with α slightly below 2, the distribution of the flare fluence in chromospheric lines is poorly known. We used the solar irradiance measurements observed by the SDO/EVE instrument at a 10 s cadence to investigate the dependency of the scaling exponent on the formation region of the lines (or temperature). We analyzed all flares above the C1 level since the start of the EVE observations (May 2010) to determine the flare fluence distribution in 16 lines covering a wide range of temperatures, several of which were not studied before. Our results show a weak downward trend with temperature of the scaling exponent of the PDF that reaches from above 2 at lower temperature (a few 104 K) to {˜ }1.8 for hot coronal emission (several 106 K). However, because colder lines also have fainter contrast, we cannot exclude that this behavior is caused by including more noise for smaller flares for these lines. We discuss the method and its limitations and tentatively associate this possible trend with the different mechanisms responsible for the heating of the chromosphere and corona during flares.

  6. EGRET High Energy Capability and Multiwavelength Flare Studies and Solar Flare Proton Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, Edward L.

    1997-01-01

    UNH was assigned the responsibility to use their accelerator neutron measurements to verify the TASC response function and to modify the TASC fitting program to include a high energy neutron contribution. Direct accelerator-based measurements by UNH of the energy-dependent efficiencies for detecting neutrons with energies from 36 to 720 MeV in NaI were compared with Monte Carlo TASC calculations. The calculated TASC efficiencies are somewhat lower (by about 20%) than the accelerator results in the energy range 70-300 MeV. The measured energy-loss spectrum for 207 MeV neutron interactions in NaI were compared with the Monte Carlo response for 200 MeV neutrons in the TASC indicating good agreement. Based on this agreement, the simulation was considered to be sufficiently accurate to generate a neutron response library to be used by UNH in modifying the TASC fitting program to include a neutron component in the flare spectrum modeling. TASC energy-loss data on the 1991 June 11 flare was transferred to UNH. Also included appendix: Gamma-rays and neutrons as a probe of flare proton spectra: the solar flare of 11 June 1991.

  7. Correlative Studies of Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, Harold

    1996-01-01

    In October 1992, post-doc Haimin Wang was awarded a Compton GRO Fellowship by NASA to study the flares observed simultaneously by BATSE (Burst and Transient Experiment), OVRO (Owens Valley Radio Observatory), Yohkoh, and BBSO (Big Bear Solar Observatory). During the past four years, a number of flares have been analyzed in detail. Substantial information on the physics of flares came out of these studies.

  8. Energy release in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, John C.; Correia, Emilia; Farnik, Frantisek; Garcia, Howard; Henoux, Jean-Claude; La Rosa, Ted N.; Machado, Marcos E. (Compiler); Nakajima, Hiroshi; Priest, Eric R.

    1994-01-01

    Team 2 of the Ottawa Flares 22 Workshop dealt with observational and theoretical aspects of the characteristics and processes of energy release in flares. Main results summarized in this article stress the global character of the flaring phenomenon in active regions, the importance of discontinuities in magnetic connectivity, the role of field-aligned currents in free energy storage, and the fragmentation of energy release in time and space.

  9. Energy release in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, John C.; Correia, Emilia; Farnik, Frantisek; Garcia, Howard; Henoux, Jean-Claude; La Rosa, Ted N.; Machado, Marcos E. (Compiler); Nakajima, Hiroshi; Priest, Eric R.

    1994-01-01

    Team 2 of the Ottawa Flares 22 Workshop dealt with observational and theoretical aspects of the characteristics and processes of energy release in flares. Main results summarized in this article stress the global character of the flaring phenomenon in active regions, the importance of discontinuities in magnetic connectivity, the role of field-aligned currents in free energy storage, and the fragmentation of energy release in time and space.

  10. Explosive evaporation in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, George H.

    1987-01-01

    This paper develops a simple analytical model for the phenomenon of 'explosive evaporation' driven by nonthermal electron heating in solar flares. The model relates the electron energy flux and spectrum, plus details of the preflare atmosphere, to the time scale for explosive evaporation to occur, the maximum pressure and temperature to be reached, rough estimates for the UV pulse emission flux and duration, and the evolution of the blueshifted component of the soft X-ray lines. An expression is given for the time scale for buildup to maximum pressures and the onset of rapid motion of the explosively evaporating plasma. This evaporation can excite a rapid response of UV line and continuum emission. The emission lines formed in the plasma approach a given emissivity-weighted blueshift speed.

  11. Exploring Solar Flares with Gamma Rays and Neutrons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    the next- generation high- energy gamma- ray observatory covering the photon energy range from 10 keV to more than 100 GeV. NRL was responsible for...model. We describe these dependences and construct a self-consistent approach to the analysis of high- energy flare data that provides an optimum set...electromagnetic spec- trum: radio, visible, UV, X-rays, and gamma rays. The energy released in a solar flare can be greater than 1032 ergs, enough

  12. The flares of August 1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.; Tanaka, K.

    1972-01-01

    Analysis is made of observations of the August, 1972 flares at Big Bear and Tel Aviv, involving monochromatic movies, magnetograms, and spectra. In each flare the observations fit a model of particle acceleration in the chromosphere with emission produced by impart and by heating by the energetic electrons and protons. The region showed twisted flux and high gradients from birth, and flares appear due to strong magnetic shears and gradients across the neutral line produced by sunspot motions. Post flare loops show a strong change from sheared, force-free fields parallel to potential-field-like loops, perpendicular to the neutral line above the surface.

  13. Solar Flares with some Flair

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-07-23

    The Sun produced three M-class (medium-sized) flares in less than 13 hours and the third one had an interesting flourish at the end (July 22-23, 2016). These were the largest flares the Sun had produced this year. The first two flares occurred in quick succession. The third one (see the still taken at 5:38 UT on the 23rd), besides the familiar bright flash of a flare, also spewed out into space a curving string of plasma. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA17912

  14. Cytokine response after severe RSV bronchiolitis in early life

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Mario; Schweiger, Toni; Yin-DeClue, Huiquing; Ramkumar, Thiruvamoor P; Christie, Chandrika; Zheng, Jie; Cohen, Rebecca; Schechtman, Kenneth B; Strunk, Robert; Bacharier, Leonard B.

    2008-01-01

    Background Immune response following viral infection usually involves Th1-mediated response; however, severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection appears to be associated with the development of asthma, a Th2-predominant phenotype. Objective To understand the early and subsequent immunologic response to a serious RSV infection in children over time. Methods 206 previously healthy infants hospitalized with severe RSV bronchiolitis were enrolled in a prospective cohort called the RSV Bronchiolitis in Early Life (RBEL) study. Peripheral blood T cells were obtained immediately following RSV infection and at 2, 4 and 6 years of age, stimulated with PMA and ionomycin, and analyzed for interleukin (IL)-2, -4, and - 13 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) by flow cytometry and real time PCR. Results 48% (n=97) of the children developed asthma (physician-diagnosed) and 48% (n=97) had eczema by age 6. 32% (n=48 of 150) developed allergic sensitization by 3 yrs of age. Children with asthma had lower IL-13 expression at 6 yrs of age than those without (p=0.001). IFN-γ, IL-2 and -4 levels did not differ by asthma or eczema status during follow-up (all p>0.05). Allergic sensitization was not associated with differences in cytokine levels during follow-up (all p>0.05). Conclusion Severe RSV infection early in life is associated with a high incidence of asthma and eczema. Contrary to expectations, subsequent immunologic development in those who developed asthma, eczema or allergic sensitization was not associated with a Th2 phenotype in the peripheral blood. PMID:18760461

  15. The 26 December 2001 Solar Eruptive Event Responsible for GLE63. II. Multi-Loop Structure of Microwave Sources in a Major Long-Duration Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechnev, V.; Uralov, A. M.; Kiselev, V. I.; Kochanov, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Our analysis of the observations of the SOL2001-12-26 event, which was related to ground-level enhancement of cosmic-ray intensity GLE63, including microwave spectra and images from the Nobeyama Radioheliograph at 17 and 34 GHz, from the Siberian Solar Radio Telescope at 5.7 GHz, and from the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer in 1600 Å, has led to the following results: A flare ribbon overlapped with the sunspot umbra, which is typical of large particle events. Atypical were i) the long duration of the flare, which lasted more than one hour; ii) the moderate intensity of the microwave burst, which was about 104 sfu; iii) the low peak frequency of the gyrosynchrotron spectrum, which was about 6 GHz; and its insensitivity to the flux increase by more than one order of magnitude. This was accompanied by a nearly constant ratio of the flux emitted by the volume in the high-frequency part of the spectrum to its elevated low-frequency part determined by the area of the source. With the self-similarity of the spectrum, a similarity was observed between the moving microwave sources and the brightest parts of the flare ribbons in 1600 Å images. We compared the 17 GHz and 1600 Å images and confirm that the microwave sources were associated with multiple flare loops, whose footpoints appeared in the ultraviolet as intermittent bright kernels. To understand the properties of the event, we simulated its microwave emission using a system of several homogeneous gyrosynchrotron sources above the ribbons. The scatter between the spectra and the sizes of the individual sources is determined by the inhomogeneity of the magnetic field within the ribbons. The microwave flux is mainly governed by the magnetic flux passing through the ribbons and the sources. The apparent simplicity of the microwave structures is caused by a poorer spatial resolution and dynamic range of the microwave imaging. The results indicate that microwave manifestations of accelerated electrons correspond

  16. Workshop on Impulsive Solar Flares, 2nd, University of New Hampshire, Durham, Sept. 26-28, 1988, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Papers on impulsive solar flares are presented, covering topics such as the optical properties of impulsive flares, soft X-ray spectroscopy of solar flares, the energy release process in impulsive bursts, high-velocity evaporation and a high-speed shock wave during the impulsive phase of the April 24, 1984 flare, nonpotential magnetic fields at sites of gamma-ray flares, and meter-decimeter and microwave radio observations of solar flares. Other topics include rise times in solar radio bursts, removal of the gradual component in analyses of solar impulsive bursts, ion and relativistic electron transport in solar flares, neutrons and gamma-ray emission on June 3, 1982, emission characteristics of three intense solar flares in cycle 21, and solar flare gamma-ray observations with the Hinotori satellite. Additional topics include spectra of relativistic solar proton ground-level events recorded in Antarctica, a 153-d periodicity in the occurrence of solar flares producing energetic interplanetary electrons, a search for solar neutron response in neutron monitor data, neutral beams in two-ribbon flares and in the geomagnetic tail, beam heating in solar flares, and solar flare gamma-ray line shapes.

  17. Characteristics of Gamma-Ray Line Flares,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    Sauna -ray line flares now identified, can yield valuable insight that is not obtainable from studying the few Sana-ray line flares observed before...Spectrometer (HUBS; cf., Orwig, Dennis, and Frost 1980) and found that the Sauna -ray line flares are very intense hard X-ray flares. For comparison, we...found that all the Sauna -ray line flares produced hard X-ray emissions with RXRBS peak count rates > 7500 counts s"- (all but two flares were > 104

  18. Temporal Evolution of Chromospheric Oscillations in Flaring Regions: A Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsue, T.; Hill, F.; Stassun, K. G.

    2016-10-01

    We have analyzed Hα intensity images obtained at a 1 minute cadence with the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) system to investigate the properties of oscillations in the 0-8 mHz frequency band at the location and time of strong M- and X-class flares. For each of three subregions within two flaring active regions, we extracted time series from multiple distinct positions, including the flare core and quieter surrounding areas. The time series were analyzed with a moving power-map analysis to examine power as a function of frequency and time. We find that, in the flare core of all three subregions, the low-frequency power (˜1-2 mHz) is substantially enhanced immediately prior to and after the flare, and that power at all frequencies up to 8 mHz is depleted at flare maximum. This depletion is both frequency- and time-dependent, which probably reflects the changing depths visible during the flare in the bandpass of the filter. These variations are not observed outside the flare cores. The depletion may indicate that acoustic energy is being converted into thermal energy at flare maximum, while the low-frequency enhancement may arise from an instability in the chromosphere and provide an early warning of the flare onset. Dark lanes of reduced wave power are also visible in the power maps, which may arise from the interaction of the acoustic waves and the magnetic field.

  19. Risk of tumor flare after nivolumab treatment in patients with irradiated field recurrence.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tatsuya; Furuta, Hiromi; Hida, Toyoaki

    2017-03-01

    Nivolumab offers a statistically superior survival benefit over docetaxel in patients with advanced, previously treated squamous and non-squamous non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, we unexpectedly encountered "tumor flare" that was associated with initially increased tumor lesion size and subsequently decreased tumor burden in patients with NSCLC treated with nivolumab, which is known as pseudoprogression. Tumor flare with rapid progression related to accelerated progression after nivolumab treatment has also been observed. Here we report two patients having early irradiated field recurrence who experienced "tumor flare" that showed pseudoprogression and rapid progression. In addition, we present a brief literature review on "tumor flare" after nivolumab treatment.

  20. Responsiveness of the core set, response criteria, and utilities in early rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Verhoeven, A; Boers, M; van der Linden, S

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Validation of responsiveness and discriminative power of the World Health Organisation/International League of Associations for Rheumatology (WHO/ILAR) core set, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), and European League for Rheumatology (EULAR) criteria for improvement/response, and other single and combined measures (indices) in a trial in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
METHODS—Ranking of measures by response (standardised response means and effect sizes) and between-group discrimination (unpaired t test and χ2 values) at two time points in the COBRA study. This study included 155 patients with early RA randomly allocated to two treatment groups with distinct levels of expected response: combined treatment, high response; sulfasalazine treatment, moderate response.
RESULTS—At week 16, standardised response means of core set measures ranged between 0.8 and 3.5 for combined treatment and between 0.4 and 1.2 for sulfasalazine treatment (95% confidence interval ±0.25). Performance of patient oriented measures (for example, pain, global assessment) was best when the questions were focused on the disease. The most responsive single measure was the patient's assessment of change in disease activity, at 3.5. Patient utility, a generic health status measure, was moderately (rating scale) to poorly (standard gamble) responsive. Response means of most indices (combined measures) exceeded 2.0, the simple count of core set measures improved by 20% was most responsive at 4.1. Discrimination performance yielded similar but not identical results: best discrimination between treatment groups was achieved by the EULAR response and ACR improvement criteria (at 20% and other percentage levels), the pooled index, and the disease activity score (DAS), but also by the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and grip strength.
CONCLUSIONS—Responsiveness and discrimination between levels of response are not identical concepts, and

  1. The flares of August 1972. [solar flare characteristics and spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.; Tanaka, K.

    1973-01-01

    Observations of the August, 1972 flares at Big Bear and Tel Aviv, involving monochromatic movies, magnetograms, and spectra, are analyzed. The region (McMath 11976) showed inverted polarity from its inception on July 11; the great activity was due to extremely high shear and gradients in the magnetic field, as well as a constant invasion of one polarity into the opposite; observations in lambda 3835 show remarkable fast flashes in the impulsive flare of 18:38 UT on Aug. 2 with lifetimes of 5 sec, which may be due to dumping of particles in the lower chromosphere. Flare loops show evolutionary increases of their tilts to the neutral line in the flares of Aug. 4 and 7. Spectroscopic observations show red asymmetry and red shift of the H alpha emission in the flash phase of the Aug. 7 flare, as well as substantial velocity shear in the photosphere during the flare, somewhat like earthquake movement along a fault. Finally the total H alpha emission of the Aug. 7 flare could be measured accurately as about 2.5 x 10 to the 30th power erg, considerably less than coarser previous estimates for great flares.

  2. The flares of August 1972. [solar flare characteristics and spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.; Tanaka, K.

    1973-01-01

    Observations of the August, 1972 flares at Big Bear and Tel Aviv, involving monochromatic movies, magnetograms, and spectra, are analyzed. The region (McMath 11976) showed inverted polarity from its inception on July 11; the great activity was due to extremely high shear and gradients in the magnetic field, as well as a constant invasion of one polarity into the opposite; observations in lambda 3835 show remarkable fast flashes in the impulsive flare of 18:38 UT on Aug. 2 with lifetimes of 5 sec, which may be due to dumping of particles in the lower chromosphere. Flare loops show evolutionary increases of their tilts to the neutral line in the flares of Aug. 4 and 7. Spectroscopic observations show red asymmetry and red shift of the H alpha emission in the flash phase of the Aug. 7 flare, as well as substantial velocity shear in the photosphere during the flare, somewhat like earthquake movement along a fault. Finally the total H alpha emission of the Aug. 7 flare could be measured accurately as about 2.5 x 10 to the 30th power erg, considerably less than coarser previous estimates for great flares.

  3. Thermodynamic Spectrum of Solar Flares Based on SDO/EVE Observations: Techniques and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuming; Zhou, Zhenjun; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Kai; Liu, Rui; Shen, Chenglong; Chamberlin, Phillip C.

    2016-03-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) provides rich information on the thermodynamic processes of solar activities, particularly on solar flares. Here, we develop a method to construct thermodynamic spectrum (TDS) charts based on the EVE spectral lines. This tool could potentially be useful for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) astronomy to learn about the eruptive activities on distant astronomical objects. Through several cases, we illustrate what we can learn from the TDS charts. Furthermore, we apply the TDS method to 74 flares equal to or greater than the M5.0 class, and reach the following statistical results. First, EUV peaks are always behind the soft X-ray (SXR) peaks and stronger flares tend to have faster cooling rates. There is a power-law correlation between the peak delay times and the cooling rates, suggesting a coherent cooling process of flares from SXR to EUV emissions. Second, there are two distinct temperature drift patterns, called Type I and Type II. For Type I flares, the enhanced emission drifts from high to low temperature like a quadrilateral, whereas for Type II flares the drift pattern looks like a triangle. Statistical analysis suggests that Type II flares are more impulsive than Type I flares. Third, for late-phase flares, the peak intensity ratio of the late phase to the main phase is roughly correlated with the flare class, and the flares with a strong late phase are all confined. We believe that the re-deposition of the energy carried by a flux rope, which unsuccessfully erupts out, into thermal emissions is responsible for the strong late phase found in a confined flare. Furthermore, we show the signatures of the flare thermodynamic process in the chromosphere and transition region in the TDS charts. These results provide new clues to advance our understanding of the thermodynamic processes of solar flares and associated solar eruptions, e.g., coronal mass ejections.

  4. Thermodynamic Spectrum of Solar Flares Based on SDO/EVE Observations: Techniques and First Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yuming; Zhou, Zhenjun; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Kai; Liu, Rui; Shen, Chenglong; Chamberlin, Phillip C.

    2016-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) provides rich information on the thermodynamic processes of solar activities, particularly on solar flares. Here, we develop a method to construct thermodynamic spectrum (TDS) charts based on the EVE spectral lines. This tool could potentially be useful for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) astronomy to learn about the eruptive activities on distant astronomical objects. Through several cases, we illustrate what we can learn from the TDS charts. Furthermore, we apply the TDS method to 74 flares equal to or greater than the M5.0 class, and reach the following statistical results. First, EUV peaks are always behind the soft X-ray (SXR) peaks and stronger flares tend to have faster cooling rates. There is a power-law correlation between the peak delay times and the cooling rates, suggesting a coherent cooling process of flares from SXR to EUV emissions. Second, there are two distinct temperature drift patterns, called Type I and Type II. For Type I flares, the enhanced emission drifts from high to low temperature like a quadrilateral, whereas for Type II flares the drift pattern looks like a triangle. Statistical analysis suggests that Type II flares are more impulsive than Type I flares. Third, for late-phase flares, the peak intensity ratio of the late phase to the main phase is roughly correlated with the flare class, and the flares with a strong late phase are all confined. We believe that the re-deposition of the energy carried by a flux rope, which unsuccessfully erupts out, into thermal emissions is responsible for the strong late phase found in a confined flare. Furthermore, we show the signatures of the flare thermodynamic process in the chromosphere and transition region in the TDS charts. These results provide new clues to advance our understanding of the thermodynamic processes of solar flares and associated solar eruptions, e.g., coronal mass ejections.

  5. Properties of Solar Flare Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Title, Alan; DeRosa, Marc

    The continuous full disk observations provided by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) give an observer the impression that flare and filament eruptions are related. However, both detailed analysis of a number of events as well as a number of statistical studies have provided only rare examples of clear causal behavior. But the mechanisms of flare triggering are not well understood, so the lack of hard evidence is not surprising. Here we have examined the waiting-time statistics of GOES X-ray flares of magnitude C5 or greater during the last sunspot cycle with the aim of assessing the degree to which flares are clustered in time. Clusters are groups of flares in which all successive flares occur within a fixed separation time - the linking window. While many of the flares in a cluster may come from the same active region, the clusters that last more than a disk passage must result from flares in multiple active regions. The longest cluster of the last cycle lasted more than 42 days. None of the flares were separated by more than 36 hours. Since that cluster lasted more than three disk passages, it could not have been caused by a single region. We find that during the last maximum, eight clusters contributed 44% of all flares. All of these clusters spanned multiple disk passages, but occupied only 16.5% of the cycle duration. Two of the clusters provided 34% of the flares. We suggest that this behavior implies that a component of the observed coordinated behavior has its origin in the solar dynamo.

  6. Evasion of early antiviral responses by herpes simplex viruses.

    PubMed

    Suazo, Paula A; Ibañez, Francisco J; Retamal-Díaz, Angello R; Paz-Fiblas, Marysol V; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M; González, Pablo A

    2015-01-01

    Besides overcoming physical constraints, such as extreme temperatures, reduced humidity, elevated pressure, and natural predators, human pathogens further need to overcome an arsenal of antimicrobial components evolved by the host to limit infection, replication and optimally, reinfection. Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) and herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) infect humans at a high frequency and persist within the host for life by establishing latency in neurons. To gain access to these cells, herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) must replicate and block immediate host antiviral responses elicited by epithelial cells and innate immune components early after infection. During these processes, infected and noninfected neighboring cells, as well as tissue-resident and patrolling immune cells, will sense viral components and cell-associated danger signals and secrete soluble mediators. While type-I interferons aim at limiting virus spread, cytokines and chemokines will modulate resident and incoming immune cells. In this paper, we discuss recent findings relative to the early steps taking place during HSV infection and replication. Further, we discuss how HSVs evade detection by host cells and the molecular mechanisms evolved by these viruses to circumvent early antiviral mechanisms, ultimately leading to neuron infection and the establishment of latency.

  7. Evasion of Early Antiviral Responses by Herpes Simplex Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Suazo, Paula A.; Ibañez, Francisco J.; Retamal-Díaz, Angello R.; Paz-Fiblas, Marysol V.; Bueno, Susan M.; Kalergis, Alexis M.; González, Pablo A.

    2015-01-01

    Besides overcoming physical constraints, such as extreme temperatures, reduced humidity, elevated pressure, and natural predators, human pathogens further need to overcome an arsenal of antimicrobial components evolved by the host to limit infection, replication and optimally, reinfection. Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) and herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) infect humans at a high frequency and persist within the host for life by establishing latency in neurons. To gain access to these cells, herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) must replicate and block immediate host antiviral responses elicited by epithelial cells and innate immune components early after infection. During these processes, infected and noninfected neighboring cells, as well as tissue-resident and patrolling immune cells, will sense viral components and cell-associated danger signals and secrete soluble mediators. While type-I interferons aim at limiting virus spread, cytokines and chemokines will modulate resident and incoming immune cells. In this paper, we discuss recent findings relative to the early steps taking place during HSV infection and replication. Further, we discuss how HSVs evade detection by host cells and the molecular mechanisms evolved by these viruses to circumvent early antiviral mechanisms, ultimately leading to neuron infection and the establishment of latency. PMID:25918478

  8. Detection of early plant stress responses in hyperspectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behmann, Jan; Steinrücken, Jörg; Plümer, Lutz

    2014-07-01

    Early stress detection in crop plants is highly relevant, but hard to achieve. We hypothesize that close range hyperspectral imaging is able to uncover stress related processes non-destructively in the early stages which are invisible to the human eye. We propose an approach which combines unsupervised and supervised methods in order to identify several stages of progressive stress development from series of hyperspectral images. Stress of an entire plant is detected by stress response levels at pixel scale. The focus is on drought stress in barley (Hordeum vulgare). Unsupervised learning is used to separate hyperspectral signatures into clusters related to different stages of stress response and progressive senescence. Whereas all such signatures may be found in both, well watered and drought stressed plants, their respective distributions differ. Ordinal classification with Support Vector Machines (SVM) is used to quantify and visualize the distribution of progressive stages of senescence and to separate well watered from drought stressed plants. For each senescence stage a distinctive set of most relevant Vegetation Indices (VIs) is identified. The method has been applied on two experiments involving potted barley plants under well watered and drought stress conditions in a greenhouse. Drought stress is detected up to ten days earlier than using NDVI. Furthermore, it is shown that some VIs have overall relevance, while others are specific to particular senescence stages. The transferability of the method to the field is illustrated by an experiment on maize (Zea mays).

  9. Plasma-Sprayed Titanium Patterns for Enhancing Early Cell Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yunqi; Xie, Youtao; Pan, Houhua; Zheng, Xuebin; Huang, Liping; Ji, Fang; Li, Kai

    2016-06-01

    Titanium coating has been widely used as a biocompatible metal in biomedical applications. However, the early cell responses and long-term fixation of titanium implants are not satisfied. To obviate these defects, in this paper, micro-post arrays with various widths (150-1000 μm) and intervals (100-300 μm) were fabricated on the titanium substrate by template-assisted plasma spraying technology. In vitro cell culture experiments showed that MC3T3-E1 cells exhibited significantly higher osteogenic differentiation as well as slightly improved adhesion and proliferation on the micro-patterned coatings compared with the traditional one. The cell number on the pattern with 1000 µm width reached 130% after 6 days of incubation, and the expressions of osteopontin (OPN) as well as osteocalcin (OC) were doubled. No obvious difference was found in cell adhesion on various size patterns. The present micro-patterned coatings proposed a new modification method for the traditional plasma spraying technology to enhance the early cell responses and convenience for the bone in-growth.

  10. Capabilities of GRO/OSSE for observing solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurfess, J. D.; Johnson, W. N.; Share, G. H.; Hulburt, E. O.; Matz, S. M.; Murphy, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    The launch of the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) near solar maximum makes solar flare studies early in the mission particularly advantageous. The Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE) on GRO, covering the energy range 0.05 to 150 MeV, has some significant advantages over the previous generation of satellite-borne gamma-ray detectors for solar observations. The OSSE detectors will have about 10 times the effective area of the Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) for both photons and high-energy neutrons. The OSSE also has the added capability of distinguishing between high-energy neutrons and photons directly. The OSSE spectral accumulation time (approx. 4s) is four times faster than that of the SMM/GRS; much better time resolution is available in selected energy ranges. These characteristics will allow the investigation of particle acceleration in flares based on the evolution of the continuum and nuclear line components of flare spectra, nuclear emission in small flares, the anisotropy of continuum emission in small flares, and the relative intensities of different nuclear lines. The OSSE observational program will be devoted primarily to non-solar sources. Therefore, solar observations require planning and special configurations. The instrumental and operational characteristics of OSSE are discussed in the context of undertaking solar observations. The opportunities for guest investigators to participate in solar flare studies with OSSE is also presented.

  11. An Investigation of Flare Footpoint DEMs using AIA Diffraction Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raftery, Claire; Bain, Hazel; Schwartz, Richard; Torre, Gabriele; Krucker, Sam

    2015-04-01

    The heating of flare footpoints by accelerated electrons is a well-established component of the standard flare model. However, limitations of current instruments make it challenging to obtain high cadence, high resolution observations of the brightest footpoint regions, predominantly due to low cadence, or pixel saturation.In moderate and large flares observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory’s Atmospheric Imaging Assembly, CCD pixels in the footpoint regions are frequently saturated despite the automatic exposure control. Using the method of Schwartz et al. (2014), we reconstruct saturated footpoint kernels in the brightest flaring regions and investigate the evolving footpoint differential emission measure at the full 12 second AIA cadence. This is compared to the changing electron fluxes observed with the Reuven Ramaty Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) to investigate the relationship between the non-thermal electron energy flux and the footpoint thermal response.(Schwartz, R. A., Torre, G., & Piana, M. (2014), Astrophysical Journal Letters, 793, LL23 )

  12. Particle acceleration by a solar flare termination shock.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; Bastian, Timothy S; Shen, Chengcai; Gary, Dale E; Krucker, Säm; Glesener, Lindsay

    2015-12-04

    Solar flares--the most powerful explosions in the solar system--are also efficient particle accelerators, capable of energizing a large number of charged particles to relativistic speeds. A termination shock is often invoked in the standard model of solar flares as a possible driver for particle acceleration, yet its existence and role have remained controversial. We present observations of a solar flare termination shock and trace its morphology and dynamics using high-cadence radio imaging spectroscopy. We show that a disruption of the shock coincides with an abrupt reduction of the energetic electron population. The observed properties of the shock are well reproduced by simulations. These results strongly suggest that a termination shock is responsible, at least in part, for accelerating energetic electrons in solar flares. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  13. Solar Flare Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-20

    y-ray production is 9! 30 MeV, it is conceivable to have a proton energy spectrum concentrated around 10-20 MeV. As stated above, these energies...of the spectrograph slits drifted across any flare kernel until that time. The best one can do in these circumstances is to utilize the fact that as a...Orrall, F. Q. and Zirker, 1. R.: 1976, Astrophys. 1. 208, 618. Packer, 1. G., Patterson, N. P., Mango , S. A., and Tousey, R.:. 1977 NRL M emorandum

  14. Classification of Solar Flares

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-01

    Svestka, Z . 1985. Sol. Phys. 100: 435-63 45. Decker, R. B., Viahos, L. 1986. Ap. J. 306: 710-29 46. Dennis, B. R. 1985. Sol. Phys. 100: 465-90 47...169-224 51. Dungey, J. W. 1953. Phil. Mag. Ser. 7,44: 725-38 53 52. Dwivedi, B. N., Hudson, H. S., Kane, S. R., Svestka, Z . 1984. Sol. Phys. 90: 331...57 95. Kiepenheuer, K. 0. 1964. in The Physics of Solar Flares, ed. W. N. Hess (NASA SP-50), 323-31 96. Kippehahn, R., Schluter, A. 1957. Z . Astrophys

  15. Wound Magnetostatics and Flaring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boily, C. M.; Lynden-Bell, D.

    1996-03-01

    We discuss the winding of a force-free axisymmetric magnetic field rooted on a heavy conductor onz=0. In quadrupolar symmetry the field expands in the half-spacez>0 and the toroidal flux concentrates on a conical surface. After a mean twist of 208°, the conical layer hosts large toroidal current loops with reversal of the magnetic flux on either side. The evolution of the field structure is described by scale-free static solutionsB˜r -(p+2), withp taking values between 0 and 2. The large expansion factor of the field structure is suggestive of flaring originating on the solar photosphere.

  16. Selection for early response to photostimulation in broiler breeders.

    PubMed

    Tyler, N C; Gous, R M

    2011-08-01

    1. To determine if selection for early response to photostimulation could be successful, 150 male broiler breeders were photostimulated at 8 weeks of age. The first 20 to produce a semen sample and have a reddened comb with an area > 10 cm2 were selected as responders (R) and 20 birds that did not show these signs of sexual development were chosen as non-responders (NR). Once sexually mature, 8 birds from each group that consistently produced a semen sample were mated with both egg-type hybrids and broiler breeder females to observe the response to 8-week photostimulation in the as-hatched offspring. 2. The AFE of the F1 females with NR or R paternity and egg-type hybrid layer maternity (F1L) were similar, but AFE was advanced in birds from R relative to NR paternity when they had broiler breeder maternity (F1B). 3. Date following a normal distribution of AFE were extracted from the overall data set. This group included offspring from both NR and R paternity, but AFE in F1L and F1B females with R paternity was advanced compared to those with NR paternity. 4. Mean testis weights, or age at most rapid testis growth predicted using parameters from Tyler and Gous (2009), of F1 males were not significantly different in birds with NR or R paternity. A strong correlation was found between predicted age at most rapid growth and AFE of full sibs and so it is likely that an advance in AFE in female offspring would also result in an advance in age of testis development of males. 5. There was no significant difference in 21-d body weight of F1B females of NR or R paternity, but the 21-d body weights of F1L females were higher from R than from NR sires, suggesting that although fertility and meat-type traits are often negatively correlated, there was no adverse effect of selection for responsiveness to early photostimulation and broiler growth rates to 21 d. 6. These findings showed that the response to early stimulation is heritable, and should be useful to the broiler breeder

  17. Nuclear processes in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaty, R.

    1982-03-01

    The theory of solar gamma-ray line production is reviewed and new calculations of line production yields are presented. Observations, carried out with gamma-ray spectrometers on OSO-7, HEAO-1, HEAO-3 and SMM are reviewed and compared with theory. These observations provide direct evidence for nuclear reactions in flares and furnish unique information on particle acceleration and flare mechanisms.

  18. Nuclear processes in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.

    1982-01-01

    The theory of solar gamma-ray line production is reviewed and new calculations of line production yields are presented. Observations, carried out with gamma-ray spectrometers on OSO-7, HEAO-1, HEAO-3 and SMM are reviewed and compared with theory. These observations provide direct evidence for nuclear reactions in flares and furnish unique information on particle acceleration and flare mechanisms.

  19. Maternal circulating leukocytes display early chemotactic responsiveness during late gestation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Parturition has been widely described as an immunological response; however, it is unknown how this is triggered. We hypothesized that an early event in parturition is an increased responsiveness of peripheral leukocytes to chemotactic stimuli expressed by reproductive tissues, and this precedes expression of tissue chemotactic activity, uterine activation and the systemic progesterone/estradiol shift. Methods Tissues and blood were collected from pregnant Long-Evans rats on gestational days (GD) 17, 20 and 22 (term gestation). We employed a validated Boyden chamber assay, flow cytometry, quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Results We found that GD20 maternal peripheral leukocytes migrated more than those from GD17 when these were tested with GD22 uterus and cervix extracts. Leukocytes on GD20 also displayed a significant increase in chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (Ccl2) gene expression and this correlated with an increase in peripheral granulocyte proportions and a decrease in B cell and monocyte proportions. Tissue chemotactic activity and specific chemokines (CCL2, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1/CXCL1, and CXCL10) were mostly unchanged from GD17 to GD20 and increased only on GD22. CXCL10 peaked on GD20 in cervical tissues. As expected, prostaglandin F2α receptor and oxytocin receptor gene expression increased dramatically between GD20 and 22. Progesterone concentrations fell and estradiol-17β concentrations increased in peripheral serum, cervical and uterine tissue extracts between GD20 and 22. Conclusion Maternal circulating leukocytes display early chemotactic responsiveness, which leads to their infiltration into the uterus where they may participate in the process of parturition. PMID:23445935

  20. Helium /3/ rich solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colgate, S. A.; Audouze, J.; Fowler, W. A.

    1978-01-01

    Several aspects of a solar flare model that emphasizes evidence for the formation of current filaments as mechanisms of field dissipation are discussed. The origin of flare magnetic fields is considered, along with the thermal distribution, electron density, and high-energy X ray emission of flares. It is suggested that the extreme He-3 enrichment in some solar flares is due to spallation and the subsequent confinement of spallation products in a high-temperature high-density plasma associated with the magnetic instability that produces the flare. A current filament is assumed to produce the spallation and maintain the temperature that yields the high-energy X-ray spectrum and depletes the isotopes D, Li, Be, and B, as observed.

  1. Parameterization of solar flare dose

    SciTech Connect

    Lamarche, A.H.; Poston, J.W.

    1996-12-31

    A critical aspect of missions to the moon or Mars will be the safety and health of the crew. Radiation in space is a hazard for astronauts, especially high-energy radiation following certain types of solar flares. A solar flare event can be very dangerous if astronauts are not adequately shielded because flares can deliver a very high dose in a short period of time. The goal of this research was to parameterize solar flare dose as a function of time to see if it was possible to predict solar flare occurrence, thus providing a warning time. This would allow astronauts to take corrective action and avoid receiving a dose greater than the recommended limit set by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP).

  2. The Flares of Proxima Cen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashyap, Vinay; Wargelin, Bradford J.; Drake, Jeremy J.; Saar, Steven H.

    2017-06-01

    The corona of Proxima Cen has been observed with a variety of high-energy instruments (ASCA/SIS, XMM/MOS, XMM/pn, Swift/XRT, Swift/UVOT, Chandra/HRC-I, Chandra/ACIS-S) covering different levels of activity as the star goes through a stellar cycle. The data exhibit numerous strong flares as well as lower level flaring activity. In analogy with the solar case, flare intensities are expected to be scale-free and distributed as a power-law. We have modeled the flare distributions separately for each observation in order to explore their dependence on the energy environment defined by the stellar activity. We find that the flare distribution indices differ considerably, ranging from ≈1.4-2, and discuss the causes of such variations, including dependences on spectral hardness and activity levels.

  3. H-alpha flare of 14 March, 1984 -- Evidence for reconnection?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundara Raman, K.; Aleem, S. M.; Singh, Jagdev; Selvendran, R.; Thiagarajan, R.

    1994-01-01

    Kodaikanal H-alpha monochromatic and white-light observations are used to study the circular flare of 14 March, 1984. We report here the dynamic activity of the H-alpha filament, which attained a severe twist before erupting as a 4B flare. We feel that the relative motion between the emerging spot field and its neighboring field is responsible for the field line reconnection, which triggered the flare.

  4. Does early responsive parenting have a special importance for children's development or is consistency across early childhood necessary?

    PubMed

    Landry, S H; Smith, K E; Swank, P R; Assel, M A; Vellet, S

    2001-05-01

    The role of early versus ongoing maternal responsiveness in predicting cognitive and social development was examined in home visits for mothers, full-term children (n = 103), and medically low-risk (n = 102) and high-risk (n = 77) preterm children at 5 ages. There were 4 maternal clusters based on warm and contingent responsiveness behaviors observed early (at 6, 12, and 24 months) and late (at 3 and 4 years): high early, high late; high early, low late; low early, moderate late; and low early, low late. Children, especially preterm children, showed faster cognitive growth when mothers were consistently responsive. Social growth was similar in the consistently responsive (high-high) and the early-responsive inconsistent (high-low) clusters, but greater deceleration at 4 years among children with mothers in the inconsistent cluster refuted the notion of a unique role for early responsiveness. The importance of consistent responsiveness, defined by an affective-emotional construct, was evident even when a broader constellation of parenting behaviors was considered.

  5. Signatures of Accelerated Electrons in Solar and Stellar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benz, Arnold O.

    2015-08-01

    Flares energize electrons (and ions) to supra-thermal energies. In most cases the final distribution in momentum or energy space is non-Maxwellian. The non-thermal part of the energy can be the source for various emissions, including hard X-rays, synchrotron radiation and coherent radio emission. Such non-thermal emissions may contain information on the acceleration process. Several acceleration scenarios have been proposed: electric DC field, stochastic, and shock acceleration. There is observational evidence for all three scenarios. The new data come from SDO, X-ray (RHESSI), radio observations (Nobeyama, VLA and e-Callisto). Solar energetic particles are an additional channel of information.Tiny solar microflares and huge stellar flares in binary systems (RS CVns) and dMe dwarfs differ by more than 10 orders of magnitude in released energy. Yet the relation between peak luminosity in thermal (soft) X-ray and non-thermal synchrotron (radio) emission is surprisingly constant. This observational fact indicates that flare acceleration scales with energy release over a large range. Electron acceleration in flares seems to be a universal process. The constraint on simultaneous thermal X-rays and non-thermal (radio) synchrotron emission seems to select on particular kind of flare. In this subset, there seems to be only one type of acceleration.Yet, small deviations are noted: Small solar flares are softer in hard X-rays. Solar nanoflares are relatively weak in synchrotron emission. The recently noted case of radio-poor preflares will also be presented. The deviations suggest that the acceleration is less efficient in small flares and in the early phase of flares. Larger deviations are reported occasionally for solar flares and more often from stellar flares, where either thermal or non-thermal emission seems to be missing completely.The location of the acceleration in solar flares remains disputed. Observations suggesting acceleration in the soft X-ray top-tops, above

  6. Circumstellar magnetic activity, flares and mass ejections in young stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, B. H.; Collier-Cameron, A.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Houdebine, E.

    1990-11-01

    Stellar activity studies are used for information on the early Sun and its environment, and for estimating activity effects on the young solar nebula. Large scale active structures are diagnosed from their rotational modulation signature, and reconstructed in three dimensions, using topographic or Doppler imaging techniques. Young stars undergo violent flares associated with coronal mass ejections leading to mass loss rates that can affect the stellar environment and stellar evolution. Young stars show large coronal condensations, magnetically linked with the stellar surface, that can be destabilized by energetic flares. From a joint ESA/AAT/IUE campaign, masses of such circumstellar clouds around the young star AB Doradus are estimated. These studies allow the problems of the link between circumstellar structures and magnetic activity and the role of mass ejections and flares in the context of mass loss and angular momentum braking in young stars, and early stellar evolution to be addressed.

  7. Enhancing early child care quality and learning for toddlers at risk: the responsive early childhood program.

    PubMed

    Landry, Susan H; Zucker, Tricia A; Taylor, Heather B; Swank, Paul R; Williams, Jeffrey M; Assel, Michael; Crawford, April; Huang, Weihua; Clancy-Menchetti, Jeanine; Lonigan, Christopher J; Phillips, Beth M; Eisenberg, Nancy; Spinrad, Tracy L; de Villiers, Jill; de Villiers, Peter; Barnes, Marcia; Starkey, Prentice; Klein, Alice

    2014-02-01

    Despite reports of positive effects of high-quality child care, few experimental studies have examined the process of improving low-quality center-based care for toddler-age children. In this article, we report intervention effects on child care teachers' behaviors and children's social, emotional, behavioral, early literacy, language, and math outcomes as well as the teacher-child relationship. The intervention targeted the use of a set of responsive teacher practices, derived from attachment and sociocultural theories, and a comprehensive curriculum. Sixty-five childcare classrooms serving low-income 2- and 3-year-old children were randomized into 3 conditions: business-as-usual control, Responsive Early Childhood Curriculum (RECC), and RECC plus explicit social-emotional classroom activities (RECC+). Classroom observations showed greater gains for RECC and RECC+ teachers' responsive practices including helping children manage their behavior, establishing a predictable schedule, and use of cognitively stimulating activities (e.g., shared book reading) compared with controls; however, teacher behaviors did not differ for focal areas such as sensitivity and positive discipline supports. Child assessments demonstrated that children in the interventions outperformed controls in areas of social and emotional development, although children's performance in control and intervention groups was similar for cognitive skills (language, literacy, and math). Results support the positive impact of responsive teachers and environments providing appropriate support for toddlers' social and emotional development. Possible explanations for the absence of systematic differences in children's cognitive skills are considered, including implications for practice and future research targeting low-income toddlers.

  8. Early Biventricular Molecular Responses to an Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Erdal, Cenk; Karakülah, Gökhan; Fermancı, Emel; Kunter, İmge; Silistreli, Erdem; Canda, Tülay; Erdal, Esra; Hepaguslar, Hasan

    2012-01-01

    Background: Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) remains as one of the most common lethal diseases in the world and therefore it is necessary to understand its effect on molecular basis. Genome-wide microarray analysis provides us to predict potential biomarkers and signaling pathways for this purpose. Objectives: The aim of this study is to understand the molecular basis of the immediate right ventricular cellular response to left ventricular AMI. Material and Methods: A rat model of left anterior descending coronary artery ligation was used to assess the effect of left ventricular AMI on both the right ventricle as a remote zone and the left ventricle as an ischemic/infarct zone. Microarray technology was applied to detect the gene expression. Gene Ontology and KEGG pathways analysis were done to identify effected pathways and related genes. Results: We found that immune response, cell chemotaxis, inflammation, cytoskeleton organization are significantly deregulated in ischemic zone as early response within 30 min. Unexpectedly, there were several affected signaling pathways such as cell chemotaxis, regulation of endothelial cell proliferation, and regulation of caveolea regulation of anti-apoptosis, regulation of cytoskeleton organization and cell adhesion on the remote zone in the right ventricle. Conclusion: This data demonstrates that there is an immediate molecular response in both ventricles after an AMI. Although the ischemia did not histologically involve the right ventricle; there is a clear molecular response to the infarct in the left ventricle. This provides us new insights to understand molecular mechanisms behind AMI and to find more effective drug targets. PMID:22211093

  9. A Statistical Analysis of Loop-Top Motion in Solar Limb Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, G. D.; Sui, L.; Brosius, D. G.; Dennis, B. R.

    2005-12-01

    Previous studies of hot, thermal solar flare loops imaged with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) have identified several flares for which the loop top shrinks downward early in the impulsive phase and then expands upward later in the impulsive phase (Sui & Holman 2003; Sui, Holman & Dennis 2004; Veronig et al. 2005). This early downward motion is not predicted by flare models. We study a statistical sample of RHESSI flares to assess how common this evolution is and to better characterize it. In a sample of 88 flares near the solar limb that show identifiable loop structure in RHESSI images, 66% (58 flares) showed downward loop-top motion followed by upward motion. We therefore conclude that the early downward motion is a frequent characteristic of flare loops. We obtain the distribution of the timing of the change from downward to upward motion relative to flare start and peak times. We also obtain the distributions of downward and upward speeds. This work was supported in part by NASA SEC Guest Investigator Grant 370-16-20-16 and by the RHESSI project.

  10. Human Macrophage Response to L. (Viannia) panamensis: Microarray Evidence for an Early Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Ricardo; Ettinger, Nicholas A.; Tikhonova, Irina; Alexander, Neal D.; Valderrama, Liliana; Hager, Janet; Wilson, Mary E.; Lin, Aiping; Zhao, Hongyu; Saravia, Nancy G.; McMahon-Pratt, Diane

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous findings indicate that susceptibility to Leishmania (Viannia) panamensis infection of monocyte-derived macrophages from patients and asymptomatically infected individuals were associated with the adaptive immune response and clinical outcome. Methodology/Principal Findings To understand the basis for this difference we examined differential gene expression of human monocyte-derived macrophages following exposure to L. (V.) panamensis. Gene activation profiles were determined using macrophages from healthy volunteers cultured with or without stationary phase promastigotes of L. (V.) panamensis. Significant changes in expression (>1.5-fold change; p<0.05; up- or down-regulated) were identified at 0.5, 4 and 24 hours. mRNA abundance profiles varied over time, with the highest level of activation occurring at earlier time points (0.5 and 4 hrs). In contrast to observations for other Leishmania species, most significantly changed mRNAs were up- rather than down-regulated, especially at early time points. Up-regulated transcripts over the first 24 hours belonged to pathways involving eicosanoid metabolism, oxidative stress, activation of PKC through G protein coupled receptors, or mechanism of gene regulation by peroxisome proliferators via PPARα. Additionally, a marked activation of Toll-receptor mediated pathways was observed. Comparison with published microarray data from macrophages infected with L. (Leishmania) chagasi indicate differences in the regulation of genes involved in signaling, motility and the immune response. Conclusions Results show that the early (0.5 to 24 hours) human monocyte-derived macrophage response to L. (Viannia) panamensis is not quiescent, in contrast to published reports examining later response times (48–96 hours). Early macrophage responses are important for the developing cellular response at the site of infection. The kinetics and the mRNA abundance profiles induced by L. (Viannia) panamensis illustrate the

  11. Response to Early AED Therapy and Its Prognostic Implications

    PubMed Central

    French, Jacqueline A.

    2002-01-01

    Determining the prognosis of patients when they first present with epilepsy is a difficult task. Several clinical studies have shed light on this very important topic. Potential predictors of the refractory state, including seizure etiology, duration of epilepsy before treatment, and epilepsy type, have not been successful indicators of long-term outcome. One predictor of the refractory state appears to be early response to AED therapy. Inadequate seizure control after initial treatment is a poor prognostic sign. Recent research into genetic causes of the refractory state has included investigation of the multiple drug resistance gene, and polymorphisms at drug targets. More work is needed to determine the causes and predictors of drug resistance. PMID:15309146

  12. Infusing Culturally Responsive Science Curriculum into Early Childhood Teacher Preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jiyoon; Martin, Leisa A.

    2017-08-01

    Previous research studies in early childhood teacher education have indicated that teacher candidates are not adequately prepared to demonstrate the knowledge and skills needed to teach science to all children including culturally and linguistically diverse students. To address this issue, the researchers provided 31 early childhood teacher candidates with instructions through a culturally responsive science education curriculum that integrates American and Korean science curriculum corresponding to the American and Korean standards for teacher education. The results showed a statistically significant increase in their Personal Science Teaching Efficacy (PSTE). In addition, the teacher candidates were able to create a multicultural/diverse lesson in the developing and proficiency levels based on Ambrosio's lesson matrix. This study provides teacher candidates' knowledge as well as an additional resource for developing their self-efficacy and understanding the role of multicultural/diverse lesson planning for science instruction. Also, teacher candidates could be better prepared by understanding how other countries approach science education and integrating this knowledge to enrich their own science instruction.

  13. Temporal Evolution and Spatial Distribution of White-light Flare Kernels in a Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawate, T.; Ishii, T. T.; Nakatani, Y.; Ichimoto, K.; Asai, A.; Morita, S.; Masuda, S.

    2016-12-01

    On 2011 September 6, we observed an X2.1-class flare in continuum and Hα with a frame rate of about 30 Hz. After processing images of the event by using a speckle-masking image reconstruction, we identified white-light (WL) flare ribbons on opposite sides of the magnetic neutral line. We derive the light curve decay times of the WL flare kernels at each resolution element by assuming that the kernels consist of one or two components that decay exponentially, starting from the peak time. As a result, 42% of the pixels have two decay-time components with average decay times of 15.6 and 587 s, whereas the average decay time is 254 s for WL kernels with only one decay-time component. The peak intensities of the shorter decay-time component exhibit good spatial correlation with the WL intensity, whereas the peak intensities of the long decay-time components tend to be larger in the early phase of the flare at the inner part of the flare ribbons, close to the magnetic neutral line. The average intensity of the longer decay-time components is 1.78 times higher than that of the shorter decay-time components. If the shorter decay time is determined by either the chromospheric cooling time or the nonthermal ionization timescale and the longer decay time is attributed to the coronal cooling time, this result suggests that WL sources from both regions appear in 42% of the WL kernels and that WL emission of the coronal origin is sometimes stronger than that of chromospheric origin.

  14. Temporal Evolution and Spatial Distribution of White-light Flare Kernels in a Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawate, Tomoko; Ishii, Takako; Nakatani, Yoshikazu; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Asai, Ayumi; Morita, Satoshi; Masuda, Satoshi

    2017-08-01

    On 2011 September 6, we observed an X2.1-class flare in continuum and Hα with a frame rate of about 30 Hz. After processing images of the event by using a speckle-masking image reconstruction, we identified white-light (WL) flare ribbons on opposite sides of the magnetic neutral line. We derive the light curve decay times of the WL flare kernels at each resolution element by assuming that the kernels consist of one or two components that decay exponentially, starting from the peak time. As a result, 42% of the pixels have two decay-time components with average decay times of 15.6 and 587 s, whereas the average decay time is 254 s for WL kernels with only one decay-time component. The peak intensities of the shorter decay-time component exhibit good spatial correlation with the WL intensity, whereas the peak intensities of the long decay-time components tend to be larger in the early phase of the flare at the inner part of the flare ribbons, close to the magnetic neutral line. The average intensity of the longer decay-time components is 1.78 times higher than that of the shorter decay-time components. If the shorter decay time is determined by either the chromospheric cooling time or the nonthermal ionization timescale and the longer decay time is attributed to the coronal cooling time, this result suggests that WL sources from both regions appear in 42% of the WL kernels and that WL emission of the coronal origin is sometimes stronger than that of chromospheric origin.

  15. SATURATION LEVELS FOR WHITE-LIGHT FLARES OF FLARE STARS: VARIATION OF MINIMUM FLARE DURATION FOR SATURATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dal, H. A.; Evren, S.

    2011-02-15

    Taking into account results obtained from models and from statistical analyses of obtained parameters, we discuss flare activity levels and flare characteristics of five UV Ceti stars. We present the parameters of unpublished flares detected over two years of observations of V1005 Ori. We compare parameters of the U-band flares detected over several seasons of observations of AD Leo, EV Lac, EQ Peg, V1054 Oph, and V1005 Ori. Flare frequencies calculated for all program stars and maximum energy levels of the flares are compared, and we consider which is the most correct parameter as an indicator of flare activity levels. Using the One Phase Exponential Association function, the distributions of flare equivalent duration versus flare total duration are modeled for each program star. We use the Independent Samples t-Test in the statistical analyses of the parameters obtained from the models. The results reveal some properties of flare processes occurring on the surfaces of UV Ceti type stars. (1) Flare energies cannot be higher than a specific value regardless of the length of the flare total duration. This must be a saturation level for white-light flares occurring in flare processes observed in the U band. Thus, for the first time it is shown that white-light flares have a saturation in a specific energy range. (2) The span values, which are the difference between the equivalent durations of flares with the shortest and longest total durations, are almost equal for each star. (3) The half-life values, minimum flare durations for saturation, increase toward the later spectral types. (4) Both maximum total durations and maximum rise times computed from the observed flares decrease toward the later spectral types among the UV Ceti stars. According to the maximum energy levels obtained from the models, both EV Lac and EQ Peg are more active than the other three program stars, while AD Leo is the most active flare star according to the flare frequencies.

  16. Very Early PSA Response to Abiraterone in mCRPC Patients: A Novel Prognostic Factor Predicting Overall Survival.

    PubMed

    Facchini, Gaetano; Caffo, Orazio; Ortega, Cinzia; D'Aniello, Carmine; Di Napoli, Marilena; Cecere, Sabrina C; Della Pepa, Chiara; Crispo, Anna; Maines, Francesca; Ruatta, Fiorella; Iovane, Gelsomina; Pisconti, Salvatore; Montella, Maurizio; Berretta, Massimiliano; Pignata, Sandro; Cavaliere, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Abiraterone Acetate (AA) is approved for the treatment of mCRPC after failure of androgen deprivation therapy in whom chemotherapy is not yet clinically indicated and for treatment of mCRPC progressed during or after docetaxel-based chemotherapy regimen. The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of early PSA decline for detection of therapy success or failure in mCRPC patients treated with AA in post chemotherapy setting. We retrospectively evaluated 87 patients with mCRPC treated with AA. Serum PSA levels were evaluated after 15, 90 days and then monthly. The PSA flare phenomenon was evaluated, according to a confirmation value at least 1 week apart. The primary endpoint was to demonstrate that an early PSA decline correlates with a longer progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). The secondary endpoind was to demonstrate a correlation between better outcome and demographic and clinical patient characteristics. We have collected data of 87 patients between Sep 2011 and Sep 2014. Early PSA response (≥50% from baseline at 15 days) was found in 56% evaluated patients and confirmed in 29 patients after 90 days. The median PFS was 5.5 months (4.6-6.5) and the median OS was 17.1 months (8.8-25.2). In early responders patients (PSA RR ≥ 50% at 15 days), we found a significant statistical advantage in terms of PFS at 1 year, HR 0.28, 95%CI 0.12-0.65, p = 0.003, and OS, HR 0.21 95% CI 0.06-0.72, p = 0.01. The results in PFS at 1 years and OS reached statistical significance also in the evaluation at 90 days. A significant proportion (78.6%) of patients achieved a rapid response in terms of PSA decline. Early PSA RR (≥50% at 15 days after start of AA) can provide clinically meaningful information and can be considered a surrogate of longer PFS and OS.

  17. The evolution of the width of X-ray flares with time in Gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, Maria Grazia; Chincarini, Guido; Margutti, Raffaella

    2010-10-01

    We present one of the most intriguing results obtained with an updated catalog of 113 early time (i.e. tpk<~1000 s) and 36 late time (i.e. tpk>~1000 s) X-ray flares detected by Swift in the afterglows of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB): the evolution of the width of the flares with time. This result, together with other properties investigated on early and late time flares and bright flares, provides a clear observational property that every model aiming at explaining the GRB emission has to face.

  18. FINE STRUCTURE OF FLARE RIBBONS AND EVOLUTION OF ELECTRIC CURRENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Sharykin, I. N.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2014-06-10

    Emission of solar flares across the electromagnetic spectrum is often observed in the form of two expanding ribbons. The standard flare model explains flare ribbons as footpoints of magnetic arcades, emitting due to interaction of energetic particles with the chromospheric plasma. However, the physics of this interaction and properties of the accelerated particles are still unknown. We present results of multiwavelength observations of the C2.1 flare of 2013 August 15, observed with the New Solar Telescope of the Big Bear Solar Observatory, and the Solar Dynamics Observatory, GOES, and Fermi spacecraft. The observations reveal previously unresolved sub-arcsecond structure of flare ribbons in regions of strong magnetic field consisting from numerous small-scale bright knots. We observe a red-blue asymmetry of H{sub α} flare ribbons with a width as small as ∼100 km. We discuss the relationship between the ribbons and vertical electric currents estimated from vector magnetograms, and show that Joule heating can be responsible for energization of H{sub α} knots in the ribbons.

  19. Observations and modeling of plasma flows driven by solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brannon, Sean Robert

    One of the fundamental statements that can be made about the solar atmosphere is that it is structured. This structuring is generally believed to be the result of both the arrangement of the magnetic field in the corona and the distribution of plasma along magnetic loops. The standard model of solar flares involves plasma transported into coronal loops via a process known as chromospheric evaporation, and the resulting evolution of the flare loops is believed to be sensitive to the physical mechanism of energy input into the chromosphere by the flare. We present here the results of three investigations into chromospheric plasma flows driven by solar flare energy release and transport. First, we develop a 1-D hydrodynamic code to simulate the response of a simplified model chromosphere to energy input via thermal conduction from reconnection-driven shocks. We use the results from a set of simulations spanning a parameter space in both shock speed and chromospheric-to-coronal temperature ratio to infer power-law relationships between these quantities and observable evaporation properties. Second, we use imaging and spectral observations of a quasi-periodic oscillation of a flare ribbon to determine the phase relationship between Doppler shifts of the ribbon plasma and the oscillation. The phase difference we find leads us to suggest an origin in a current sheet instability. Finally, we use imaging and spectral data of an on-disk flare event and resulting flare loop plasma flows to generally validate the standard picture of flare loop evolution, including evaporation, cooling time, and draining downflows, and we use a simple free-fall model to produce the first direct comparison between observed and synthetic downflow spectra.

  20. Temporal variations of the Venus ionosphere during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesugi, A.; Fujiwara, H.; Fukunishi, H.

    2006-12-01

    The effects of long-term solar activity changes such as 11-year cycle and 27-day cycle on the Venus ionosphere have been investigated by a number of researchers using data obtained from some spacecrafts. However, the effects of short-term solar activity changes, particularly the effect of solar flares, are still unknown because there are no simultaneous observations of the Venus ionosphere and solar flares. The past observations of the Earth's ionosphere suggest significant and instantaneous changes of the Venus ionosphere during solar flares. Recently, Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) revealed the temporal variations of the Mars ionosphere during solar flares. The electron density of the Mars ionosphere was enhanced by ~10% at the main peak and 200% at the secondary peak at that time. The recent satellite observations of the solar X- rays enable us to model the Earth's and planetary ionospheres more exactly. In order to investigate the temporal variations of the Venus ionosphere during solar flares, we have developed a 1-D photochemical model for estimating vertical profiles of ions and electrons. We have also modeled temporal variations of solar flare using the EUV/X-rays data obtained by TIMED/SEE (0.1-194 nm) and GOES (0.1-0.8 nm) on October 28, 2003. Using the photochemical and solar flare models, we have calculated temporal variations of ion composition in the dayside Venus ionosphere. In addition, time constants for production and loss of ionospheric compositions through the photochemical reactions can be examined. We discuss differences of the response to solar flare among three planets, Venus, Earth and Mars. Then, the characteristics of the Venus ionosphere will be clarified.

  1. SCATTERING POLARIZATION IN SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Štěpán, Jiří; Heinzel, Petr

    2013-11-20

    There is ongoing debate about the origin and even the very existence of a high degree of linear polarization of some chromospheric spectral lines observed in solar flares. The standard explanation of these measurements is in terms of the impact polarization caused by non-thermal proton and/or electron beams. In this work, we study the possible role of resonance line polarization due to radiation anisotropy in the inhomogeneous medium of the flare ribbons. We consider a simple two-dimensional model of the flaring chromosphere and we self-consistently solve the non-LTE problem taking into account the role of resonant scattering polarization and of the Hanle effect. Our calculations show that the horizontal plasma inhomogeneities at the boundary of the flare ribbons can lead to a significant radiation anisotropy in the line formation region and, consequently, to a fractional linear polarization of the emergent radiation of the order of several percent. Neglecting the effects of impact polarization, our model can provide a clue for resolving some of the common observational findings, namely: (1) why a high degree of polarization appears mainly at the edges of the flare ribbons; (2) why polarization can also be observed during the gradual phase of a flare; and (3) why polarization is mostly radial or tangential. We conclude that radiation transfer in realistic multi-dimensional models of solar flares needs to be considered as an essential ingredient for understanding the observed spectral line polarization.

  2. X-rays from stellar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    1991-01-01

    A summary of X-ray observations of flares on dMe, active spectroscopic binaries and young stars is presented. Consideration is given to the energy associated with the X-ray emission and its relation to other components of the flare energy budget, the time behavior of the flaring plasma as seen by the X-ray emission, and comparisons of stellar flare parameters with solar compact and two ribbon flares. Flares are easily detected when the contrast in the emission from the flaring plasma relative to the stellar photosphere is large as in the X-ray, microwave, and UV regions of the spectrum.

  3. EGRET High Energy Capability and Multiwavelength Flare Studies and Solar Flare Proton Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, Edward L.

    1998-01-01

    The accomplishments of the participation in the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Guest investigator program is summarized in this report. The work involved the study of Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET)/Total Absorption Shower Counter(TASC) flare data. The specific accomplishments were the use of the accelerator neutron measurements obtained at the University of New Hampshire to verify the TASC response function and to modify the TASC fitting program to include a high energy neutron contribution, and to determine a high energy neutron contribution to the emissions from the 1991 June 11, solar flare. The next step in the analysis of this event was doing fits to the TASC energy-loss spectra as a function of time. A significant hardening of the solar proton spectrum over time was found for the flare. Further data was obtained from the Yohkoh HXT time histories and images for the 1991 October 27 flare. The results to date demonstrate that the TASC spectral analysis contributes crucial information on the particle spectrum interacting at the Sun. The report includes a paper accepted for publication, a draft of a paper to be delivered at the 26th International Cosmic Ray Conference and an abstract of a paper to be presented at the Meeting of the American Physical Society.

  4. Chromospheric Evolution and the Flare Activity of Super-Active Region NOAA 6555

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    PrasadC, Debi; Ambastha, Ashok; Srivastava, Nandita; Tripathy, Sushanta C.; Hagyard, Mona J.

    1997-01-01

    Super-active region NOAA 6555 was highly flare productive during the period March 21st - 27th, 1991 of its disk passage. We have studied its chromospheric activity using high spatial resolution H alpha filtergrams taken at Udaipur along with MSFC vector magnetograms. A possible relationship of flare productivity and the variation in shear has been explored. Flares were generally seen in those subareas of the active region which possessed closed magnetic field configuration, whereas only minor flares and/or surges occurred in subareas showing open magnetic field configuration. Physical mechanisms responsible for the observed surges are also discussed.

  5. The early antibody-forming response to Salmonella antigens

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Pamela J.; Diener, E.

    1970-01-01

    This paper describes a new method for the morphological study of individual antibody-forming cells (AFC) on cell smears of the quality of normal haematological preparations. The early AFC response to polymerized flagellin of S. adelaide was studied in vivo using C57BL mice, which have very low background levels of AFC and in vitro using dispersed spleen cell cultures from CBA mice. AFC, arising as a result of in vivo or in vitro stimulation were found to comprise a heterogeneous population, including basophilic mononuclear cells, lymphocytes of most sizes, immature blast cells and occasional plasma cells. The earliest AFC detected comprised a high percentage (28 per cent in vivo, 31 per cent in vitro) of small lymphocyte-like cells. Studies of the incorporation of [3H]thymidine showed that most AFC arose by proliferation but that a proportion of AFC, the small lymphocyte-like cells, arose by differentiation of precursor cells not involving cell division. The effects of antigen concentration on the kinetics of AFC were investigated in vitro. Subtolerogenic antigen doses caused a delayed and decreased AFC response. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 4 PMID:5529118

  6. The early epigenetic response to ozone: impacts on DNA ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Epigenetics have been increasingly recognized as a mechanism linking environment and gene expression. Despite awareness of the role of DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation as potential drivers of the response to air pollutants, very little work has been performed investigating the direct epigenetic effects following exposure to ambient air pollution. Thus the purpose of this study was to investigate the early epigenetic response to ozone in comparison to the epigenetic modifier 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza) in rats. 12 week old, male Long-Evans rats (n=16) were exposed to 4 hours of whole-body 1.0 ppm ozone or air and immediately euthanized. A subset of animals were additionally treated with 5-Aza (n=16) to serve as an epigenetic control to ozone exposure. Neither 5-Aza nor ozone by itself induced changes to the global methylome or hydroxmethylome of the lung measured by ELISA. Despite this finding, ozone exposure induced a significant increase in the activity of the DNA methyltransferase enzymes in the lung which was reversed with 5-Aza treatment. Interestingly, a significant interaction between 5-Aza treatment and ozone exposure was found in a large array of data. The interaction between 5-Aza and ozone produced indicators of pulmonary edema and elevated lung damage. Along with these adverse changes, expression of major epigenetic enzymes (Tet 1-3, Dnmt3 a-b) were found to be perturbed in both the lung and hepatic tissues. While ozone exposure appears to in

  7. Slipping magnetic reconnection during an X-class solar flare observed by SDO/AIA

    SciTech Connect

    Dudík, J.; Del Zanna, G.; Mason, H. E.; Janvier, M.; Aulanier, G.; Schmieder, B.; Karlický, M. E-mail: mjanvier@maths.dundee.ac.uk

    2014-04-01

    We present SDO/AIA observations of an eruptive X-class flare of 2012 July 12, and compare its evolution with the predictions of a three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulation. We focus on the dynamics of flare loops that are seen to undergo slipping reconnection during the flare. In the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 131 Å observations, lower parts of 10 MK flare loops exhibit an apparent motion with velocities of several tens of km s{sup –1} along the developing flare ribbons. In the early stages of the flare, flare ribbons consist of compact, localized bright transition-region emission from the footpoints of the flare loops. A differential emission measure analysis shows that the flare loops have temperatures up to the formation of Fe XXIV. A series of very long, S-shaped loops erupt, leading to a coronal mass ejection observed by STEREO. The observed dynamics are compared with the evolution of magnetic structures in the 'standard solar flare model in 3D.' This model matches the observations well, reproducing the apparently slipping flare loops, S-shaped erupting loops, and the evolution of flare ribbons. All of these processes are explained via 3D reconnection mechanisms resulting from the expansion of a torus-unstable flux rope. The AIA observations and the numerical model are complemented by radio observations showing a noise storm in the metric range. Dm-drifting pulsation structures occurring during the eruption indicate plasmoid ejection and enhancement of the reconnection rate. The bursty nature of radio emission shows that the slipping reconnection is still intermittent, although it is observed to persist for more than an hour.

  8. Flare physics at high energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.

    1990-01-01

    High-energy processes, involving a rich variety of accelerated particle phenomena, lie at the core of the solar flare problem. The most direct manifestation of these processes are high-energy radiations, gamma rays, hard X-rays and neutrons, as well as the accelerated particles themselves, which can be detected in interplanetary space. In the study of astrophysics from the moon, the understanding of these processes should have great importance. The inner solar system environment is strongly influenced by activity on the sun; the physics of solar flares is of great intrinsic interest; and much high-energy astrophysics can be learned from investigations of flare physics at high energies.

  9. Pre-flare coronal dimmings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q. M.; Su, Y. N.; Ji, H. S.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Coronal dimmings are regions of decreased extreme-ultravoilet (EUV) and/or X-ray (originally Skylab, then Yohkoh/SXT) intensities, which are often associated with flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The large-scale impulsive dimmings have been thoroughly observed and investigated. The pre-flare dimmings before the flare impulsive phase, however, have rarely been studied in detail. Aims: We focus on the pre-flare coronal dimmings. We report our multiwavelength observations of the GOES X1.6 solar flare and the accompanying halo CME that was produced by the eruption of a sigmoidal magnetic flux rope (MFR) in NOAA active region (AR) 12158 on 2014 September 10. Methods: The eruption was observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). The photospheric line-of-sight magnetograms were observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board SDO. The soft X-ray (SXR) fluxes were recorded by the GOES spacecraft. The halo CME was observed by the white-light coronagraphs of the Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) on board SOHO. Results: About 96 min before the onset of the flare/CME, narrow pre-flare coronal dimmings appeared at the two ends of the twisted MFR. They extended very slowly, with their intensities decreasing with time, while their apparent widths (8-9 Mm) continued to be nearly constant. During the impulsive and decay phases of flare, typical fan-like twin dimmings appeared and expanded, with a much larger extent and lower intensities than the pre-flare dimmings. The percentage of the 171 Å intensity decrease reaches 40%. The pre-flare dimmings are most striking in 171, 193, and 211 Å with formation temperatures of 0.6-2.5 MK. The northern part of the pre-flare dimmings could also be recognized in 131 and 335 Å. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first detailed study of pre-flare coronal dimmings; they can be explained by density depletion as a result of the gradual

  10. Solar Flare Physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmahl, Edward J.; Kundu, Mukul R.

    1998-01-01

    We have continued our previous efforts in studies of fourier imaging methods applied to hard X-ray flares. We have performed physical and theoretical analysis of rotating collimator grids submitted to GSFC(Goddard Space Flight Center) for the High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI). We have produced simulation algorithms which are currently being used to test imaging software and hardware for HESSI. We have developed Maximum-Entropy, Maximum-Likelihood, and "CLEAN" methods for reconstructing HESSI images from count-rate profiles. This work is expected to continue through the launch of HESSI in July, 2000. Section 1 shows a poster presentation "Image Reconstruction from HESSI Photon Lists" at the Solar Physics Division Meeting, June 1998; Section 2 shows the text and viewgraphs prepared for "Imaging Simulations" at HESSI's Preliminary Design Review on July 30, 1998.

  11. Flares and dynamic aspects. [solar physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanssen, E. T.

    1981-01-01

    Theory of the dynamic nature of solar flares, eruptive prominences, and coronal transients is surveyed. Two types of flare are considered: compact eruptions (small flares) which are probably loops, and large eruptions of double filament flares. The physical sense of this classification is justified, using solar observations. Even leaving the question unanswered of whether a coronal transient is a loop of ejected matter or a shock wave, the important, perhaps fundamental, role of mass motion in flare physics is evidenced.

  12. Building Big Flares: Constraining Generating Processes of Solar Flare Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyse Jackson, T.; Kashyap, V.; McKillop, S.

    2015-12-01

    We address mechanisms which seek to explain the observed solar flare distribution, dN/dE ~ E1.8. We have compiled a comprehensive database, from GOES, NOAA, XRT, and AIA data, of solar flares and their characteristics, covering the year 2013. These datasets allow us to probe how stored magnetic energy is released over the course of an active region's evolution. We fit power-laws to flare distributions over various attribute groupings. For instance, we compare flares that occur before and after an active region reaches its maximum area, and show that the corresponding flare distributions are indistinguishable; thus, the processes that lead to magnetic reconnection are similar in both cases. A turnover in the distribution is not detectable at the energies accessible to our study, suggesting that a self-organized critical (SOC) process is a valid mechanism. However, we find changes in the distributions that suggest that the simple picture of an SOC where flares draw energy from an inexhaustible reservoir of stored magnetic energy is incomplete. Following the evolution of the flare distribution over the lifetimes of active regions, we find that the distribution flattens with time, and for larger active regions, and that a single power-law model is insufficient. This implies that flares that occur later in the lifetime of the active region tend towards higher energies. We conclude that the SOC process must have an upper bound. Increasing the scope of the study to include data from other years and more instruments will increase the robustness of these results. This work was supported by the NSF-REU Solar Physics Program at SAO, grant number AGS 1263241, NASA Contract NAS8-03060 to the Chandra X-ray Center and by NASA Hinode/XRT contract NNM07AB07C to SAO

  13. Developing a construct to evaluate flares in rheumatoid arthritis: a conceptual report of the OMERACT RA Flare Definition Working Group.

    PubMed

    Alten, Rieke; Pohl, Christof; Choy, Ernest H; Christensen, Robin; Furst, Daniel E; Hewlett, Sarah E; Leong, Amye; May, James E; Sanderson, Tessa C; Strand, Vibeke; Woodworth, Thasia G; Bingham, Clifton O

    2011-08-01

    this outcome/response, thus expanding an understanding of the true impact of a therapy to limit disease activity. Clinically, this approach is intended to enhance patient-HCP communication. This article describes the conceptual framework being used by the OMERACT RA Flare Definition Working Group in developing a standardized method for description and measurement of "flare in RA" to guide individual patient treatment.

  14. The role of eruption in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, Peter A.

    1989-01-01

    This article focuses on two problems involved in the development of models of solar flares. The first concerns the mechanism responsible for eruptions, such as erupting filaments or coronal mass ejections, that are sometimes involved in the flare process. The concept of 'loss of equilibrium' is considered and it is argued that the concept typically arises in thought-experiments that do not represent acceptable physical behavior of the solar atmosphere. It is proposed instead that such eruptions are probably caused by an instability of a plasma configuration. The instability may be purely MHD, or it may combine both MHD and resistive processes. The second problem concerns the mechanism of energy release of the impulsive (or gradual) phase. It is proposed that this phase of flares may be due to current interruption, as was originally proposed by Alfven and Carlqvist. However, in order for this process to be viable, it seems necessary to change one's ideas about the heating and structure of the corona in ways that are outlined briefly.

  15. Choline PET for Monitoring Early Tumor Response to Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Baowei; Wang, Hesheng; Wu, Chunying; Chiu, Song-mao

    2010-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a relatively new therapy that has shown promise for treating various cancers in both preclinical and clinical studies. The present study evaluated the potential use of PET with radiolabeled choline to monitor early tumor response to PDT in animal models. Methods Two human prostate cancer models (PC-3 and CWR22) were studied in athymic nude mice. A second-generation photosensitizer, phthalocyanine 4 (Pc 4), was delivered to each animal by a tail vein injection 48 h before laser illumination. Small-animal PET images with 11C-choline were acquired before PDT and at 1, 24, and 48 h after PDT. Time–activity curves of 11C-choline uptake were analyzed before and after PDT. The percentage of the injected dose per gram of tissue was quantified for both treated and control tumors at each time point. In addition, Pc 4-PDT was performed in cell cultures. Cell viability and 11C-choline uptake in PDT-treated and control cells were measured. Results For treated tumors, normalized 11C-choline uptake decreased significantly 24 and 48 h after PDT, compared with the same tumors before PDT (P < 0.001). For the control tumors, normalized 11C-choline uptake increased significantly. For mice with CWR22 tumors, the prostate-specific antigen level decreased 24 and 48 h after PDT. Pc 4-PDT in cell culture showed that the treated tumor cells, compared with the control cells, had less than 50% 11C-choline activity at 5, 30, and 45 min after PDT, whereas the cell viability test showed that the treated cells were viable longer than 7 h after PDT. Conclusion PET with 11C-choline is sensitive for detecting early changes associated with Pc 4-PDT in mouse models of human prostate cancer. Choline PET has the potential to determine whether a PDT-treated tumor responds to treatment within 48 h after therapy. PMID:20008981

  16. A Cold Flare with Delayed Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Pal'shin, Valentin D.; Meshalkina, Natalia; Lysenko, Alexandra L.; Kashapova, Larisa K.; Altyntsev, Alexander T.

    2016-05-01

    Recently, a number of peculiar flares have been reported that demonstrate significant nonthermal particle signatures with low, if any, thermal emission, which implies a close association of the observed emission with the primary energy release/electron acceleration region. This paper presents a flare that appears “cold” at the impulsive phase, while displaying delayed heating later on. Using hard X-ray data from Konus-Wind, microwave observations by SSRT, RSTN, NoRH, and NoRP, context observations, and three-dimensional modeling, we study the energy release, particle acceleration, and transport, and the relationships between the nonthermal and thermal signatures. The flaring process is found to involve the interaction between a small loop and a big loop with the accelerated particles divided roughly equally between them. Precipitation of the electrons from the small loop produced only a weak thermal response because the loop volume was small, while the electrons trapped in the big loop lost most of their energy in the coronal part of the loop, which resulted in coronal plasma heating but no or only weak chromospheric evaporation, and thus unusually weak soft X-ray emission. The energy losses of the fast electrons in the big tenuous loop were slow, which resulted in the observed delay of the plasma heating. We determined that the impulsively accelerated electron population had a beamed angular distribution in the direction of the electric force along the magnetic field of the small loop. The accelerated particle transport in the big loop was primarily mediated by turbulent waves, which is similar to other reported cold flares.

  17. Effects of single therapeutic doses of promethazine, fexofenadine and olopatadine on psychomotor function and histamine-induced wheal- and flare-responses: a randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled study in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Hiroyuki; Isaji, Ami; Noda, Yukihiro; Ishikawa, Kazuhiro; Senzaki, Koji; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Sugiura, Kazumitsu; Tomita, Yasushi; Nabeshima, Toshitaka

    2012-05-01

    Since most first-generation antihistamines have undesirable sedative effects on the central nervous systems (CNS), newer (second-generation) antihistamines have been developed to improve patients' quality of life. However, there are few reports that directly compare the antihistaminic efficacy and impairment of psychomotor functions. We designed a double-blind, placebo controlled, crossover study to concurrently compare the clinical effectiveness of promethazine, a first-generation antihistamine, and fexofenadine and olopatadine, second-generation antihistamines, by measuring their potency as peripheral inhibitors of histamine-induced wheal and flare. Further, we investigated their sedative effects on the CNS using a battery of psychomotor tests. When single therapeutic doses of fexofenadine (60 mg), olopatadine (5 mg) and promethazine (25 mg) were given in a double-blind manner to 24 healthy volunteers, all antihistamines produced a significant reduction in the wheal and flare responses induced by histamine. In the comparison among antihistamines, olopatadine showed a rapid inhibitory effect compared with fexofenadine and promethazine, and had a potent effect compared with promethazine. In a battery of psychomotor assessments using critical flicker fusion, choice reaction time, compensatory tracking, rapid visual information processing and a line analogue rating scale as a subjective assessment of sedation, promethazine significantly impaired psychomotor function. Fexofenadine and olopatadine had no significant effect in any of the psychomotor tests. Promethazine, fexofenadine and olopatadine did not affect behavioral activity, as measured by wrist actigraphy. These results suggest that olopatadine at a therapeutic dose has greater antihistaminergic activity than promethazine, and olopatadine and fexofenadine did not cause cognitive or psychomotor impairment.

  18. LAMOST Observations of Flaring M Dwarfs in the Kepler Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, H.-Y.; Song, Y.-H.; Luo, A.-L.; Huang, L.-C.; Ip, W.-H.; Fu, J.-N.; Zhang, Y.; Hou, Y.-H.; Cao, Z.-H.; Wang, Y.-F.

    2017-01-01

    A sample of the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fibre Spectroscopic Telescope spectra of early-type M0-M3 dwarfs is compared with Kepler observations. It is found that M dwarfs with strong chromospheric emission in {{{H}}}α have large flare activity in general. The rotational periods derived from the Kepler measurements have close correlations with the sizes of the flares, the power-law distribution index, and the equivalent widths of the {{{H}}}α emission. A clear trend exists for higher magnetic activities being detected in faster-rotating M dwarfs (rotation periods < 20 days).

  19. Cardenas receives, 2011 Early Career Hydrologic Sciences Award: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, M. Bayani

    2012-06-01

    Meinhard Bayani Cardenas received the 2011 Early Career Hydrologic Sciences Award at the 2011 AGU Fall Meeting, held 5-9 December in San Francisco, Calif. The award is for significant early career contributions to hydrologic science.

  20. Flaring Red Dwarf Star (Illustration)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-06-06

    This illustration shows a red dwarf star orbited by a hypothetical exoplanet. Red dwarfs tend to be magnetically active, displaying gigantic arcing prominences and a wealth of dark sunspots. Red dwarfs also erupt with intense flares that could strip a nearby planet's atmosphere over time, or make the surface inhospitable to life as we know it. By mining data from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) spacecraft, a team of astronomers identified dozens of flares at a range of durations and strengths. The team measured events with less total energy than many previously detected flares from red dwarfs. This is important because, although individually less energetic and therefore less hostile to life, smaller flares might be much more frequent and add up over time to produce a cumulative effect on an orbiting planet. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21473

  1. Radiation hydrodynamics in solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, G.H.

    1985-10-18

    Solar flares are rather violent and extremely complicated phenomena, and it should be made clear at the outset that a physically complete picture describing all aspects of flares does not exist. From the wealth of data which is available, it is apparent that many different types of physical processes are involved during flares: energetic particle acceleration, rapid magnetohydrodynamic motion of complex field structures, magnetic reconnection, violent mass motion along magnetic field lines, and the heating of plasma to tens of millions of degrees, to name a few. The goal of this paper is to explore just one aspect of solar flares, namely, the interaction of hydrodynamics and radiation processes in fluid being rapidly heated along closed magnetic field lines. The models discussed are therefore necessarily restrictive, and will address only a few of the observed or observable phenomena. 46 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Spectrum of solar flare protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorny, I. M.; Balabin, Yu. V.; Podgorny, A. I.; Vashenyuk, E. V.

    2010-08-01

    Most of big solar flares are accompanied by relativistic protons. The prompt component of relativistic protons moves along the interplanetary magnetic field lines and arrives at the Earth's orbit when the flare favorably located in the western solar hemisphere. The neutron monitor measurements reveal an exponential law energy spectrum. Calculations of relativistic proton acceleration in the flare current sheet with magnetic and electric fields found from 3D MHD simulations also demonstrate an exponential law spectrum. A comparison of the measured and calculated spectra permits to estimate the rate of reconnection in the Bastille flare (14 July 2000) as ˜107cm/s. The delay component of relativistic protons exhibits a power law energy spectrum.

  3. Chandra Monitors the Flaring Crab

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Scientists hoped that NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory would locate X-ray sources correlated to the gamma-ray flares seen by Fermi and Italy's AGILE satellites. Two observations were made during th...

  4. Mass ejections. [during solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.; Hildner, E.; Hansen, R. T.; Dryer, M.; Mcclymont, A. N.; Mckenna-Lawlor, S. M. P.; Mclean, D. J.; Schmahl, E. J.; Steinolfson, R. S.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.

    1980-01-01

    Observations and model simulations of solar mass ejection phenomena are examined in an investigation of flare processes. Consideration is given to Skylab and other observations of flare-associated sprays, eruptive prominences, surges and coronal transients, and to MHD, gas dynamic and magnetic loop models developed to account for them. Magnetic forces are found to confine spray material, which originates in preexisting active-region filaments, within steadily expanding loops, while surges follow unmoving, preexisting magnetic field lines. Simulations of effects of a sudden pressure pulse at the bottom of the corona are found to exhibit many characteristics of coronal transients associated with flares, and impulsive heating low in the chromosphere is found to be able to account for surges. The importance of the magnetic field as the ultimate source of energy which drives eruptive phenomena as well as flares is pointed out.

  5. Timing signatures of solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Lynch, C.; Henry, T.; Nitta, N.; Hurlburt, N. E.; Slater, G. L.

    2016-12-01

    We compare the timing signatures of solar flares observed with the GOES X-ray and the SDO/AIA instruments between the years 2010-2015. From this comparison we find that: (i) the rise-time of flares (time difference from the background to peak) is inversely correlated with the solar cycle, i.e. longer lasting rise times occur during the solar minimum. This implies that a higher thermal state of the outer solar atmosphere, during solar maximum, is far more receptive to being heated than during a solar minimum. (ii) From an analysis of rise-times, statistically, we find that 171 A appears to detect the earliest flares, providing clues to fact that this might be layer where reconnections are first triggered. We discuss the implications of these and other statistical results in terms of forecasting of solar flares.

  6. Flaring Black Hole Artist Concept

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-09-20

    This artist concept illustrates what the flaring black hole called GX 339-4 might look like. Infrared observations from NASA WISE reveal the best information yet on the chaotic and extreme environments of this black hole jets.

  7. Spatio-temporal Dynamics of Sources of Hard X-Ray Pulsations in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, S. A.; Zimovets, I. V.; Morgachev, A. S.; Struminsky, A. B.

    2016-11-01

    flares we studied are eruptive events. This gives a strong indication that eruptive processes play an important role in the generation of HXR pulsations in flares. We suggest that an erupting flux rope can act as a trigger of the flare energy release. Its successive interaction with different loops of a parent active region can lead to apparent motion of HXR sources and to a series of HXR pulsations. However, the exact mechanism responsible for generating the pulsations remains unclear and requires a more detailed investigation.

  8. Is the Ultimate Treatment Response Predictable with Early Response in Major Depressive Episode?

    PubMed Central

    ÇİFTÇİ, Aslı; ULAŞ, Halis; TOPUZOĞLU, Ahmet; TUNCA, Zeliha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction New evidence suggests that the efficacy of antidepressants occurs within the first weeks of treatment and this early response predicts the later response. The purpose of the present study was to investigate if the partial response in the first week predicts the response at the end of treatment in patients with major depressive disorder who are treated with either antidepressant medication or electroconvulsive therapy. Methods Inpatients from Dokuz Eylül University Hospital with a major depressive episode, treated with antidepressant medication (n=52) or electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) (n=48), were recruited for the study. The data were retrospectively collected to decide whether a 25% decrease in the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) score at the first week of treatment predicts a 50% decrease at the third week using validity analysis. In addition, the effects of socio-demographic and clinical variables on the treatment response were assessed. Results A 25% decrease in the HDRS score in the first week of treatment predicted a 50% decrease in the HDRS score in the third week with a 78.3% positive predictive value, 62.1% negative predictive value, 62.1% sensitivity, and 78.3% specificity for antidepressant medications and an 88% positive predictive value, 52.2% negative predictive value, 66.7% sensitivity, and 80% specificity for ECT. The number of previous hospitalizations, comorbid medical illnesses, number of depressive episodes, duration of illness, and duration of the current episode were related to the treatment response. Conclusion Treatment response in the first week predicted the response in the third week with a high specificity and a high positive predictive value. Close monitoring of the response from the first week of treatment may thus help the clinician to predict the subsequent response. PMID:28373802

  9. Scaling Laws of Solar and Stellar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Stern, Robert A.; Güdel, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    In this study we compile for the first time comprehensive data sets of solar and stellar flare parameters, including flare peak temperatures Tp, flare peak volume emission measures EMp, and flare durations τf from both solar and stellar data, as well as flare length scales L from solar data. Key results are that both the solar and stellar data are consistent with a common scaling law of EMp propto T4.7p, but the stellar flares exhibit ≈250 times higher emission measures (at the same flare peak temperature). For solar flares we observe also systematic trends for the flare length scale L(Tp) propto T0.9p and the flare duration τF(Tp) propto T0.9p as a function of the flare peak temperature. Using the theoretical RTV scaling law and the fractal volume scaling observed for solar flares, i.e., V(L) propto L2.4, we predict a scaling law of EMp propto T4.3p, which is consistent with observations, and a scaling law for electron densities in flare loops, np propto T2p/L propto T1.1p. The RTV-predicted electron densities were also found to be consistent with densities inferred from total emission measures, np = (EMp/qVV)1/2, using volume filling factors of qV = 0.03-0.08 constrained by fractal dimensions measured in solar flares. Solar and stellar flares are expected to have similar electron densities for equal flare peak temperatures Tp, but the higher emission measures of detected stellar flares most likely represent a selection bias of larger flare volumes and higher volume filling factors, due to low detector sensitivity at higher temperatures. Our results affect also the determination of radiative and conductive cooling times, thermal energies, and frequency distributions of solar and stellar flare energies.

  10. Responses to Developmental and Family Changes in Early Adolescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Anne C.; And Others

    Research has identified several factors which may be stressful in early adolescence, including school change, puberty, and family changes. This study used a longitudinal cohort sequential design to examine whether stressful changes in early adolescence have impact beyond early adolescence. Of the 335 sixth graders initially sampled, 169 were…

  11. Simulating VIIRS Observed Gas Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, F. C.

    2015-12-01

    VIIRS Nightfire (VNF) had been proved being able to effectively detect gas flares at night, and characterize their temperature and source size. [1] However, limited access to generally confidential gas flare operation measurements made it difficult to verify the output. Although flared gas volume is occasionally available, it is not common to log the temperature and flames size which directly links to VNF output. To understand the mechanism of gas flare and how VIIRS perceives the event, a platform is proposed to simulate the gas flare being observed by VIIRS. The methodology can be described in three steps. (1) Use CFD simulation software ISIS-3D to simulate a simple gas flare. [2] Scalar fields of temperature and species concentration related to combustion are extracted from the simulation. The instantaneous scalar can be determined from time-averaging or guess by stochastic time and space series (TASS) from single-point statistics [3]. (2) Model spectral radiance intensity of simulated gas flare using RADCAL. [4] RADCAL developed by NIST can accurately model the spectral radiance emitted on the direction of lineof-sight given the spatial profile of temperature and concentration of species. (3) Use radiative transfer modeling to calculate the energy propagated to VIIRS. The modeled radiation will then be weighted by the MODTRAN [5] modeled transmissivity over predefined atmosphere to the satellite, with geometrical effects considered. Such platform can help understanding how exactly VNF is measuring gas flares, and thus lead to more precise characterization of combustion events. [1] C. D. Elvidge et al, Remote Sensing, 2013[2] IRSN ISIS-3D[3] M. E. Kounalakis et al, ASME J. Heat Transfer, 1991 [4] W. L. Grosshandler, NIST Technical Note 1402, 1993 [5] A. Berk et al, MODTRAN 5.2.0.0 User's Manual

  12. Immune response parameters during labor and early neonatal life.

    PubMed

    Protonotariou, Efthimia; Chrelias, Charalampos; Kassanos, Demetrios; Kapsambeli, Helen; Trakakis, Eftihios; Sarandakou, Angeliki

    2010-01-01

    Selected cytokines, associated with Th1 and Th2 immune response and inflammation, were studied in order to evaluate the relation between their release into maternal and neonatal circulation, during labour, and after birth, in comparison with those in adults. Cytokine concentrations were determined by very sensitive immunoassays, in maternal serum (MS), umbilical cord (UC), neonatal serum, the 1st (1N) and 5th (5N) day postpartum and in adult controls. Both IL-2 and IL-4 cytokine concentrations in UC were markedly elevated, compared to adult and MS ones. IL-2 decreased significantly in 5N, while IL-4 remained unchanged. IFN-gamma UC values were significantly lower than those in adults and MS, increasing significantly in 5N. Neonatal serum sIL-2R and sIL-4R were markedly higher than those in adults and MS. IL-1beta, IL-6, sIL-6R, sTNFRI and sTNFRII concentrations in MS and all with TNF-alpha in neonatal serum were significantly higher than in adults. IFN-gamma, IL-1beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha, IL-2R, IL-4R concentrations in MS, 1N and 5N were dependent on the mode of delivery. The results of this comparative study are indicative for a meaningful role for the studied cytokines and their receptors in: i) the development of neonatal immune system, ii) the regulation of immune response during labour and early life, and iii) the initiation of the processes of labour.

  13. Early Transcriptional Response of Soybean Contrasting Accessions to Root Dehydration

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira Neto, José Ribamar Costa; Pandolfi, Valesca; Guimaraes, Francismar Corrêa Marcelino; Benko-Iseppon, Ana Maria; Romero, Cynara; Silva, Roberta Lane de Oliveira; Rodrigues, Fabiana Aparecida; Abdelnoor, Ricardo Vilela; Nepomuceno, Alexandre Lima; Kido, Ederson Akio

    2013-01-01

    Drought is a significant constraint to yield increase in soybean. The early perception of water deprivation is critical for recruitment of genes that promote plant tolerance. DeepSuperSAGE libraries, including one control and a bulk of six stress times imposed (from 25 to 150 min of root dehydration) for drought-tolerant and sensitive soybean accessions, allowed to identify new molecular targets for drought tolerance. The survey uncovered 120,770 unique transcripts expressed by the contrasting accessions. Of these, 57,610 aligned with known cDNA sequences, allowing the annotation of 32,373 unitags. A total of 1,127 unitags were up-regulated only in the tolerant accession, whereas 1,557 were up-regulated in both as compared to their controls. An expression profile concerning the most representative Gene Ontology (GO) categories for the tolerant accession revealed the expression “protein binding” as the most represented for “Molecular Function”, whereas CDPK and CBL were the most up-regulated protein families in this category. Furthermore, particular genes expressed different isoforms according to the accession, showing the potential to operate in the distinction of physiological behaviors. Besides, heat maps comprising GO categories related to abiotic stress response and the unitags regulation observed in the expression contrasts covering tolerant and sensitive accessions, revealed the unitags potential for plant breeding. Candidate genes related to “hormone response” (LOX, ERF1b, XET), “water response” (PUB, BMY), “salt stress response” (WRKY, MYB) and “oxidative stress response” (PER) figured among the most promising molecular targets. Additionally, nine transcripts (HMGR, XET, WRKY20, RAP2-4, EREBP, NAC3, PER, GPX5 and BMY) validated by RT-qPCR (four different time points) confirmed their differential expression and pointed that already after 25 minutes a transcriptional reorganization started in response to the new condition, with

  14. Energetic particles in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Paizis, C.; Colgate, S. A.; Dulk, G. A.; Hoyng, P.; Knight, J. W.; Lin, R. P.; Melrose, D. B.; Orrall, F.; Shapiro, P. R.

    1980-01-01

    The various manifestations of energetic particles in solar flares are examined, and possible mechanisms for the acceleration of these particles are considered. Hard X-ray observations and possible mechanisms for the production of the dominant form of solar energetic particles, electrons with energies between 10 and 100 keV, are discussed, with consideration of thin-target models, thick-target models and thick-target models with reverse currents, and first-phase acceleration mechanisms for energetic electrons emitting impulsive microwave and fast-drift Type III radio bursts as well as impulsive hard X rays, which are detected themselves 20 min after the flare at 1 AU are considered. Radio evidence on the number, energy and pitch-angle distributions of energetic particles produced during solar flares is summarized, and observations at 1 AU of proton and electron energy spectra, the proton/electron ratio and energetic particle events rich in He-3 from solar flares are discussed. Finally, consideration is given to gamma-ray evidence of nuclear reactions in flares and white-light flares

  15. Flare stars at radio wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Kenneth R.

    1990-01-01

    The radio emission from dMe flare stars is discussed using Very Large Array and Arecibo observations as examples. Active flare stars emit weak, unpolarized, quiescent radio radiation that may be always present. Although thermal bremsstrahlung and/or thermal gyroresonance radiation account for the slowly-varying, quiescent radio radiation of solar active regions, these processes cannot account for the long-wavelength quiescent radiation observed from nearby dMe flare stars. It has been attributed to nonthermal gyrosynchrotron radiation, but some as yet unexplained mechanism must be continually producing the energetic electrons. Long duration, narrow-band radiation is also emitted from some nearby dMe stars at 20 cm wavelength. Such radiation may be attributed to coherent plasma radiation or to coherent electron-cyclotron masers. Impulsive stellar flares exhibit rapid variations that require radio sources that are smaller than the star in size, and high brightness temperatures greater than 10(exp 15) K that are also explained by coherent radiation processes. Quasi-periodic temporal fluctuations suggest pulsations during some radio flares. Evidence for frequency structure and positive or negative frequency drifts during radio flares from dMe stars is also presented.

  16. Polarimetric Observations of Flare Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskin, G.; Karpov, S.; Plokhotnichenko, V.; Stepanov, A.; Tsap, Yu.

    2017-06-01

    Here we present the results of our long-term observations of flaring stars with MANIA high temporal resolution equipment in polarimetric regime. More than forty flares from UV Ceti, EV Lacertae, Wolf 424 and CN Leo have been observed, and upper limits on its polarization have been derived on the level of about 1%, except for the one unique event — the giant flare of UV Ceti in 2008 with the amplitude of about 3 magnitudes in U-band. Near flare maximum more than a dozen of spike bursts have been discovered with sub-second durations and intrinsic polarizations exceeding 30-40%. We argue that these events are synchrotron emission of electron beams with the energies of several hundred MeV moving in the magnetic field of about 1.4 kG. Emission from such ultrarelativistic (with energies far exceeding 10 MeV) particles is being routinely observed in solar flares, but has never been detected from UV Ceti type stars. This is the first ever detection of linearly polarized optical light from the UV Ceti-type stars which indicates that at least some fraction of the flaring events on these stars are powered by a non-thermal synchrotron emission mechanism.

  17. Flare stars at radio wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Kenneth R.

    1989-01-01

    The radio emission from dMe flare stars is discussed using Very Large Array and Arecibo observations as examples. Active flare stars emit weak, unpolarized, quiescent radio radiation that may be always present. Although thermal bremsstrahlung and/or thermal gyroresonance radiation account for the slowly-varying, quiescent radio radiation of solar active regions, these processes cannot account for the long-wavelength quiescent radiation observed from nearby dMe flare stars. It has been attributed to nonthermal gyrosynchrotron radiation, but some as yet unexplained mechanism must be continually producing the energetic electrons. Long duration, narrow-band radiation is also emitted from some nearby dMe stars at 20 cm wavelength. Such radiation may be attributed to coherent plasma radiation or to coherent electron-cyclotron masers. Impulsive stellar flares exhibit rapid variations that require radio sources that are smaller than the star in size, and high brightness temperatures greater than 10(exp 15) K that are also explained by coherent radiation processes. Quasi-periodic temporal fluctuations suggest pulsations during some radio flares. Evidence for frequency structure and positive or negative frequency drifts during radio flares from dMe stars is also presented.

  18. Conduction-driven chromospheric evaporation in a solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zarro, Dominic M.; Lemen, James R.

    1988-01-01

    Observations of gentle chromospheric evaporation during the cooling phase of a solar flare are presented. Line profiles of the low-temperature (T of about 6 x 10 to the 6th K) coronal Mg XI line, observed with the X-Ray Polychromator on the Solar Maximum Mission, show a blueshift that persisted for several minutes after the impulsive heating phase. This result represents the first detection of an evaporation signature in a soft X-ray line formed at this low temperature. By combining the Mg XI blueshift velocity data with simultaneous measurements of the flare temperature derived from Ca XIX observations, it is demonstrated that the upward flux of enthalpy transported by this gently evaporating plasma varies linearly with the downward flux of thermal energy conducted from the corona. This relationship is consistent with models of solar flares in which thermal conduction drives chromospheric evaporation during the early part of the cooling phase.

  19. Language experience enhances early cortical pitch-dependent responses

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Ananthanarayan; Gandour, Jackson T.; Ananthakrishnan, Saradha; Vijayaraghavan, Venkatakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Pitch processing at cortical and subcortical stages of processing is shaped by language experience. We recently demonstrated that specific components of the cortical pitch response (CPR) index the more rapidly-changing portions of the high rising Tone 2 of Mandarin Chinese, in addition to marking pitch onset and sound offset. In this study, we examine how language experience (Mandarin vs. English) shapes the processing of different temporal attributes of pitch reflected in the CPR components using stimuli representative of within-category variants of Tone 2. Results showed that the magnitude of CPR components (Na-Pb and Pb-Nb) and the correlation between these two components and pitch acceleration were stronger for the Chinese listeners compared to English listeners for stimuli that fell within the range of Tone 2 citation forms. Discriminant function analysis revealed that the Na-Pb component was more than twice as important as Pb-Nb in grouping listeners by language affiliation. In addition, a stronger stimulus-dependent, rightward asymmetry was observed for the Chinese group at the temporal, but not frontal, electrode sites. This finding may reflect selective recruitment of experience-dependent, pitch-specific mechanisms in right auditory cortex to extract more complex, time-varying pitch patterns. Taken together, these findings suggest that long-term language experience shapes early sensory level processing of pitch in the auditory cortex, and that the sensitivity of the CPR may vary depending on the relative linguistic importance of specific temporal attributes of dynamic pitch. PMID:25506127

  20. Preliminary Criteria for Global Flares in Childhood-Onset Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Hermine I.; Mina, Rina; Pilkington, Clarissa; Beresford, Michael W.; Reiff, Andreas; Levy, Deborah M.; Tucker, Lori B.; Eberhard, B. Anne; Ravelli, Angelo; Schanberg, Laura E.; Saad-Magalhaes, Claudia; Higgins, Gloria C.; Onel, Karen; Singer, Nora G.; von Scheven, Emily; Itert, Lukasz; Klein-Gitelman, Marisa S.; Punaro, Marilynn; Ying, Jun; Giannini, Edward H.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To develop widely acceptable preliminary criteria of global flare for childhood-onset SLE (cSLE). Methods Pediatric rheumatologists (n=138) rated a total of 358 unique patient profiles (PP) with information about the cSLE flare descriptors (cSLE-FD) from two consecutive visits: patient global assessment of well-being, physician global assessment of disease activity (MD-global), health-related quality of life, anti-dsDNA antibodies, disease activity index score, protein/creatinine (P/C) ratio, complement levels and ESR. Based on 2996 rater responses about the course of cSLE (baseline vs. follow-up) the accuracy (sensitivity, specificity, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve) of candidate flare criteria was assessed. An international consensus conference was held to rank these candidate flare criteria as per the ACR-recommendations for the development and validation of criteria sets. Results The highest ranked candidate criteria considered absolute changes (Δ) of the SLEDAI or BILAG, MD-global, P/C ratio, and ESR; Flare scores can be calculated [0.5 × ΔSLEDAI + 0.45 × ΔP/C ratio + 0.5 × ΔMD-global + 0.02 × ΔESR], where values ≥ 1.04 are reflective of a flare. Similarly, BILAG-based flare scores [0.4 × ΔBILAG + 0.65 × ΔP/C ratio + 0.5 × ΔMD-global + 0.02 × ΔESR] of ≥ 1.15 were diagnostic of a flare. Flare scores increase with flare severity. Conclusions Consensus has been reached on preliminary criteria for global flares in cSLE. Further validation studies are needed to confirm the usefulness of the cSLE flare criteria in research and for clinical care. PMID:21618452

  1. X-Ray Flare Candidates in Short Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margutti, R.; Chincarini, G.; Granot, J.; Guidorzi, C.; Berger, E.; Bernardini, M. G.; Geherls, N.; Soderberg, A. M.; Stamatikos, M.; Zaninoni, E.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first systematic study of X-ray flare candidates in short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) exploiting the large 6-year Swift database with the aim to constrain the physical nature of such fluctuations. We find that flare candidates appear in different types of SGRB host galaxy environments and show no clear correlation with the X-ray afterglow lifetime; flare candidates are detected both in SGRBs with a bright extended emission in the soft gamma-rays and in SGRBs which do not show such component. We furthermore show that SGRB X-ray flare candidates only partially share the set of observational properties of long GRB (LGRB) flares. In particular, the main parameter driving the duration evolution of X-ray variability episodes in both classes is found to be the elapsed time from the explosion, with very limited dependence on the different progenitors, environments, central engine life-times, prompt variability time-scales and energy budgets. On the contrary, SGRB flare candidates significantly differ from LGRB flares in terms of peak luminosity, isotropic energy, flare-to-prompt luminosity ratio and relative variability flux. However, these differences disappear when the central engine time-scales and energy budget are accounted for, suggesting that (i) flare candidates and prompt pulses in SGRBs likely have a common origin; (ii) similar dissipation and/or emission mechanisms are responsible for the prompt and flare emission in long and short GRBs, with SGRBs being less energetic albeit faster evolving versions of the long class. Finally, we show that in strict analogy to the SGRB prompt emission, flares candidates fall off the lag-luminosity relation defined by LGRBs, thus strengthening the SGRB flare-prompt pulse connection.

  2. Preliminary criteria for global flares in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Hermine I; Mina, Rina; Pilkington, Clarissa; Beresford, Michael W; Reiff, Andreas; Levy, Deborah M; Tucker, Lori B; Eberhard, B Anne; Ravelli, Angelo; Schanberg, Laura E; Saad-Magalhaes, Claudia; Higgins, Gloria C; Onel, Karen; Singer, Nora G; von Scheven, Emily; Itert, Lukasz; Klein-Gitelman, Marisa S; Punaro, Marilynn; Ying, Jun; Giannini, Edward H

    2011-09-01

    To develop widely acceptable preliminary criteria of global flare for childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE). Pediatric rheumatologists (n = 138) rated a total of 358 unique patient profiles with information about the cSLE flare descriptors from 2 consecutive visits: patient global assessment of well-being, physician global assessment of disease activity (MD-global), health-related quality of life, anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies, disease activity index scores, protein:creatinine (P:C) ratio, complement levels, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). Based on 2,996 rater responses about the course of cSLE (baseline versus followup), the accuracy (sensitivity, specificity, and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve) of candidate flare criteria was assessed. An international consensus conference was held to rank these candidate flare criteria as per the American College of Rheumatology recommendations for the development and validation of criteria sets. The highest-ranked candidate criteria considered absolute changes (Δ) of the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) or British Isles Lupus Assessment Group (BILAG), MD-global, P:C ratio, and ESR; flare scores can be calculated (0.5 × ΔSLEDAI + 0.45 × ΔP:C ratio + 0.5 × ΔMD-global + 0.02 × ΔESR), where values of ≥1.04 are reflective of a flare. Similarly, BILAG-based flare scores (0.4 × ΔBILAG + 0.65 × ΔP:C ratio + 0.5 × ΔMD-global + 0.02 × ΔESR) of ≥1.15 were diagnostic of a flare. Flare scores increased with flare severity. Consensus has been reached on preliminary criteria for global flares in cSLE. Further validation studies are needed to confirm the usefulness of the cSLE flare criteria in research and for clinical care. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  3. FLARES IN LONG AND SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon E-mail: arnon@physics.technion.ac.i

    2010-04-01

    The many similarities between the prompt emission pulses in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and X-ray flares during the fast decay and afterglow (AG) phases of GRBs suggest a common origin. In the cannonball (CB) model of GRBs, this common origin is mass accretion episodes of fall-back matter on a newly born compact object. The prompt emission pulses are produced by a bipolar jet of highly relativistic plasmoids (CBs) ejected in the early, major episodes of mass accretion. As the accretion material is consumed, one may expect the engine's activity to weaken. X-ray flares ending the prompt emission and during the AG phase are produced in such delayed episodes of mass accretion. The common engine, environment, and radiation mechanisms (inverse Compton scattering and synchrotron radiation) produce their observed similarities. Flares in both long GRBs and short hard gamma-ray bursts (SHBs) can also be produced by bipolar ejections of CBs following a phase transition in compact objects due to loss of angular momentum and/or cooling. Optical flares, however, are mostly produced in collisions of CBs with massive stellar winds/ejecta or with density bumps along their path. In this paper, we show that the master formulae of the CB model of GRBs and SHBs, which reproduce very well their prompt emission pulses and their smooth AGs, seem to reproduce also very well the light curves and spectral evolution of the prominent X-ray and optical flares that are well sampled.

  4. Flares in Long and Short Gamma-ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon

    2010-04-01

    The many similarities between the prompt emission pulses in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and X-ray flares during the fast decay and afterglow (AG) phases of GRBs suggest a common origin. In the cannonball (CB) model of GRBs, this common origin is mass accretion episodes of fall-back matter on a newly born compact object. The prompt emission pulses are produced by a bipolar jet of highly relativistic plasmoids (CBs) ejected in the early, major episodes of mass accretion. As the accretion material is consumed, one may expect the engine's activity to weaken. X-ray flares ending the prompt emission and during the AG phase are produced in such delayed episodes of mass accretion. The common engine, environment, and radiation mechanisms (inverse Compton scattering and synchrotron radiation) produce their observed similarities. Flares in both long GRBs and short hard gamma-ray bursts (SHBs) can also be produced by bipolar ejections of CBs following a phase transition in compact objects due to loss of angular momentum and/or cooling. Optical flares, however, are mostly produced in collisions of CBs with massive stellar winds/ejecta or with density bumps along their path. In this paper, we show that the master formulae of the CB model of GRBs and SHBs, which reproduce very well their prompt emission pulses and their smooth AGs, seem to reproduce also very well the light curves and spectral evolution of the prominent X-ray and optical flares that are well sampled.

  5. A Maltese cross-shaped flare of June 15, 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotrč, P.; Kupryakov, Yu. A.

    2002-12-01

    The solar flare in NOAA 9502 began on June 15, 2001 at 10:01 UT (S26E41). Its importance was 1N in optical band, M6.3 in X-rays and in radio band it was accompanied by a burst of 5800 units at 245 MHz and 130 units at 300 MHz. Spectra in D3 of He, Hα and Ca II 8542 Å lines including the slit-jaw images were detected at the Multichannel Flare spectrograph (MFS) from the early beginning of the flare with temporal resolutions 25 images per second. In addition, in Hα line the series of Stokes U/I parameter were observed. To the most spectacular features of the flare belongs the symmetric shape of emission ribbons configured into a Maltese cross. While at the cross arms one could detect standard emission line profiles, there appeared a compact feature with a very broad emission line profile in the center of the cross. It gives us an evidence about a certain type of singularity of this particular point. The very broad emission profile can be explained as by means of a high microturbulence. We describe and discuss another characteristics and particularities of this flare including the result of spectropolarimetric measurements that can be an evidence for the accelerated particle beams interaction with dense chromospheric layers.

  6. High-resolution Observations of Photospheric Structural Evolution Associated with a Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chang; Xu, Yan; Ahn, Kwangsu; Jing, Ju; Deng, Na; Cao, Wenda; Wang, Haimin

    2017-08-01

    The structural evolution of the photosphere not only play an important role in contributing to the accumulation of free energy in the corona that powers solar flares, but also may response to the restructuring of coronal field as a result of flare energy release. A better understanding of these issues may be achieved by high-resolution observations of the photospheric structure covering the entire flaring period, which are, however, still rare. Here we present photospheric vector magnetograms and TiO images (at 0.2" and 0.09" resolution, respectively) from before to after a major flare, taken by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory. In the pre-flare state, a small-scale magnetic structure of opposite-polarity configuration is seen near the footpoints of sheared magnetic loops; its magnetic fluxes and currents enhance till the flare start time and decline afterwards. During the main phase, as one flare ribbon sweeps across a sunspot, its different portions accelerate at different times corresponding to peaks of flare hard X-ray emission. We suggest that the small-scale flux emergence between the two sheared flux systems triggers the flare reconnection, and that the sunspot rotation is driven by the surface Lorentz-force change due to the coronal back reaction.

  7. CONFINED FLARES IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGION 12192 FROM 2014 OCTOBER 18 TO 29

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Huadong; Zhang, Jun; Yang, Shuhong; Li, Leping; Huang, Xin; Xiao, Junmin; Ma, Suli

    2015-07-20

    Using the observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we investigate 6 X-class and 29 M-class flares occurring in solar active region (AR) 12192 from October 18 to 29. Among them, 30 (including 6 X- and 24 M-class) flares originated from the AR core, and the other 5 M-flares appeared at the AR periphery. Four of the X-flares exhibited similar flaring structures, indicating they were homologous flares with an analogous triggering mechanism. The possible scenario is that photospheric motions of emerged magnetic fluxes lead to shearing of the associated coronal magnetic field, which then yields a tether-cutting favorable configuration. Among the five periphery M-flares, four were associated with jet activities. The HMI vertical magnetic field data show that the photospheric fluxes of opposite magnetic polarities emerged, converged, and canceled with each other at the footpoints of the jets before the flares. Only one M-flare from the AR periphery was followed by a coronal mass ejection (CME). From October 20 to 26, the mean decay index of the horizontal background field within the height range of 40–105 Mm is below the typical threshold for torus instability onset. This suggests that a strong confinement from the overlying magnetic field might be responsible for the poor CME production of AR 12192.

  8. Modeling the Emission from the 15 February 2011 Solar Flare using Multi-Filamented Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allred, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The 15 February 2011 X-class solar flare was observed by numerous instruments in many spectral regimes making it an ideal case for studying the origins of flare emission. We have developed detailed 1D models describing the transport of flare-accelerated electrons and ions through magnetic flux loops in the solar atmosphere, how these particles heat the ambient plasma, and the emission produced from the flaring loops. However, because of their 1D geometry these models do not include important spatial information. For example, the flare impulsive phase may last several hundred seconds, but it is unlikely that flare-accelerated particles precipitate down a single flux loop for the duration of the entire impulsive phase. In fact, from high-resolution spatial observations we know that many filaments are successively heated in the impulsive phase. We will describe a novel approach which uses the timing of pulses in hard and soft X-ray fluxes observed during the 15 February 2011 flare as a proxy for the lifetime of the impulsive phase on individual loops. We will combine many loops simulated with our 1D flare loop model to construct a multi-filamented model of the Sun's atmospheric response and emission produced during this flare. We will compare this predicted emission to observations of obtained by the EVE, AIA and RHESSI instruments.

  9. Modeling the Soft X-Ray During Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leaman, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    Solar Radiation can effect our communication and navigation systems here on Earth. In particular, solar X-ray (SXR) and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation is responsible for ionizing (charging) earth's upper atmosphere, and sudden changes in the ionosphere can disrupt high frequency communication systems (e.g. airplane-to-ground) and degrade the location accuracy for GPS navigation. New soft X-ray flare data are needed to study the sources for the SXR radiation and variability of the solar flares and thus help to answer questions if all flares follow the same trend or have different plasma characteristics? In December 2015, the Miniature X-Ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) launched from Cape Canaveral Florida to answer those questions. The MinXSS CubeSat is a miniature satellite that was designed to measure the soft X-ray spectra and study flares in the 1-15 Å wavelength range. So far, the CubeSat has observed more than ten flares. The MinXSS flare data are plotted in energy vs irradiance to display the soft X-ray spectra, and these spectra are compared with different types of CHIANTI models of the soft X-ray radiation. One comparison is for non-flaring spectra using AIA EUV images to identify solar features called active regions, coronal holes, and quiet sun, and then using the fractional area of each feature to calculate a CHIANTI-based spectrum. This comparison reveals how important the active region radiation is for the SXR spectra. A second comparison is for flare spectra to several isothermal models that were created using CHIANTI. The isothermal model comparisons were done with both the raw count spectra from MinXSS and the derived irradiance spectra. This dual comparison helps to validate the irradiance conversion algorithm for MinXSS. Comparisons of the MinXSS data to the models show that flares tend to follow a temperature pattern. Analysis of the MinXSS data can help us understand our sun better, could lead to better forecasts of solar flares, and thus

  10. Automatic prediction of solar flares and super geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hui

    Space weather is the response of our space environment to the constantly changing Sun. As the new technology advances, mankind has become more and more dependent on space system, satellite-based services. A geomagnetic storm, a disturbance in Earth's magnetosphere, may produce many harmful effects on Earth. Solar flares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are believed to be the major causes of geomagnetic storms. Thus, establishing a real time forecasting method for them is very important in space weather study. The topics covered in this dissertation are: the relationship between magnetic gradient and magnetic shear of solar active regions; the relationship between solar flare index and magnetic features of solar active regions; based on these relationships a statistical ordinal logistic regression model is developed to predict the probability of solar flare occurrences in the next 24 hours; and finally the relationship between magnetic structures of CME source regions and geomagnetic storms, in particular, the super storms when the D st index decreases below -200 nT is studied and proved to be able to predict those super storms. The results are briefly summarized as follows: (1) There is a significant correlation between magnetic gradient and magnetic shear of active region. Furthermore, compared with magnetic shear, magnetic gradient might be a better proxy to locate where a large flare occurs. It appears to be more accurate in identification of sources of X-class flares than M-class flares; (2) Flare index, defined by weighting the SXR flares, is proved to have positive correlation with three magnetic features of active region; (3) A statistical ordinal logistic regression model is proposed for solar flare prediction. The results are much better than those data published in the NASA/SDAC service, and comparable to the data provided by the NOAA/SEC complicated expert system. To our knowledge, this is the first time that logistic regression model has been applied

  11. A comparative study between clinical grading of anterior chamber flare and flare reading using the Kowa laser flare meter.

    PubMed

    Konstantopoulou, Kallirroi; Del'Omo, Roberto; Morley, Anne M; Karagiannis, Dimitris; Bunce, Catey; Pavesio, Carlos

    2015-10-01

    To assess the accuracy of standard clinical grading of aqueous flare in uveitis according to the Standardization of Uveitis Nomenclature consensus, and compare the results with the readings of the laser flare meter, Kowa 500. Two examiners clinically graded the flare in 110 eyes. The flare was then measured using the Kowa laser flare meter. Twenty-nine eyes were graded as anterior chamber flare +2; for 18 of these, the clinicians were in agreement, the rest differed by the order of one grade. The range of the laser flare meter for these eyes was 5.2-899.1 photons/ms. The median value was 41.4. Seventy-four eyes were graded with flare +1. Agreement was established in 51 of these eyes. Disagreement for the rest was again by the order of 1, and the flare meter range was 1.1-169.9 photons/ms, median value 18.4. For the clinical measure of flare 0, the clinicians disagreed on three out of five eyes. The flare meter readings ranged from 2.5 to 14.1 photons/ms, median value 9.9. Only two eyes were graded with flare +3 and there was one step disagreement on both of them. We found little evidence of association between the flare readings and intraocular pressure or age. Our findings suggest that clinical evaluation of aqueous flare is subjective. Compared with the Kowa laser flare meter's numeric readings, the discrepancies observed indicate that clinical grading is an approximate science. The laser flare meter provides an accurate, reproducible, non-invasive assessment of aqueous flare that can prove valuable in research and clinical decisions.

  12. Does Early Responsive Parenting Have a Special Importance for Children's Development or Is Consistency across Early Childhood Necessary?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landry, Susan H.; Smith, Karen E.; Swank, Paul R.; Assel, Mike A.; Vellet, Sonya

    2001-01-01

    Examined the role of early versus ongoing maternal responsiveness in predicting cognitive and social development for full-term and preterm children (low- and high-risk) at five ages. Found that children, especially preterm children, showed faster cognitive growth when mothers were consistently responsive. Social growth was similar in the…

  13. An Exceptional Radio Flare in Markarian 421

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Joseph; Hovatta, T.; Savolainen, T.; Lister, M. L.; Readhead, A. C.; Aller, M. F.; Aller, H. D.; Fuhrmann, L.; Angelakis, E.; Giroletti, M.

    2013-06-01

    In September 2012, the high-spectral-peaked (HSP) blazar Mkn 421 underwent a rapid wideband radio flare, reaching nearly twice its brightest level in over three decades of monitoring by the University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory (UMRAO). Rapid radio variations are unprecedented in this object and are surprising in an HSP BL Lac object. In this flare, the 15 GHz flux density measured by the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO) blazar monitoring program increased by about a factor of two with an exponential doubling time of about 9 days, comparable with the fastest large-amplitude cm-band radio variability observed in any blazar. Similar increases were detected at radio frequencies up to mm-band by the F-GAMMA program. This radio flare followed about two months after a similarly unprecedented GeV gamma-ray flare (reaching a daily E>100 MeV flux of (1.2+/-0.7)x10^-6 ph cm^-2 s^-1) reported by the Fermi collaboration, which was accompanied by a tentative near-simultaneous TeV detection by ARGO-YBJ. In response to this radio flare, we carried out a five epoch cm- to mm-band multifrequency Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) monitoring campaign to investigate possible changes in parsec-scale kinematics, structural variations, and polarization behavior in the aftermath of this emission event. Preliminary results show significant brightening in the compact core region. The OVRO 40-m monitoring program is supported in part by NSF grants AST-0808050 and AST-1109911, and NASA grants NNX08AW31G and NNX11A043G. UMRAO was supported in part by NSF grant AST-0607523, and NASA Fermi GI grants NNX09AU16G, NNX10AP16G, and NNX11AO13G. Funds for operation of the UMRAO were provided by the University of Michigan. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  14. Automatic Prediction of Super Geomagnetic Storms and Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hui; Yurchyshyn, V.; Tan, C.; Jing, J.; Wang, H.

    2007-05-01

    In this study we first investigated the relationship between magnetic structures of coronal mass ejection (CME) source regions and geomagnetic storms, in particular, the super storms when the Dst index decreases below -200 nT. By examining all full halo CMEs that erupted between 1996 and 2004, we selected 73 events associated with M-class and X-class solar flares, which have a clearly identifiable source region. By analyzing daily full-disk MDI magnetograms, we found that the horizontal gradient of the line-of-sight magnetic field is a viable parameter to identify a flaring magnetic neutral line and thus can be used to predict the possible source region of CMEs. We report that for about 92% of super storms the orientation angle of the magnetic structures of source regions was found to be southward. Our findings demonstrate that this approach can be used to perform an automatic prediction of the occurrence of large X-class flares and super geomagnetic storms. In order to further extend our prediction of flares, we next used the ordinal logistic regression method to establish a prediction model, which estimates the probability for each active region to produce X-, M- or C-class flares during the next 1-day time period. Three predictive parameters are: total unsigned magnetic flux Tflux, the length of strong gradient neutral line Lgnl, and total magnetic dissipation Ediss. The ordinal response variable is the different level of solar flares magnitude. Compared the results with the current predictions methods used by NASA SDAC and NOAA SEC, the ordinal logistic model using Lgnl and Tflux as predictors demonstrated its automaticity, simpleness and fairly high prediction accuracy. To our knowledge, this is the first time the ordinal logistic regression model was used in solar physics to predict solar flares.

  15. Solar flare protection for manned lunar missions - Analysis of the October 1989 proton flare event

    SciTech Connect

    Simonsen, L.C.; Nealy, J.E.; Townsend, L.W.; Sauer, H.H. NOAA, Space Environment Laboratory, Boulder, CL )

    1991-07-01

    Several large solar proton events occurred in the latter half of 1989. For a moderately shielded spacecraft in free space, the potential exposure would have been greatest for the flare which occurred between October 19 to 27, 1989. The temporal variations of the proton energy spectra at approximately 1 AU were monitored by the GOES-7 satellite. These data, recorded and processed at the NOAA-Boulder Space Environment Laboratory, provide the opportunity to analyze dose rates and cumulative doses which might be incurred by astronauts in transit to, or on, the moon. Of particular importance in such an event is the time development of exposure in the early phases of the flare, for which dose rates may range over many orders of magnitude in the first few hours. The cumulative dose as a function of time for the entire event is also predicted. In addition to basic shield calculations, dose rate contours are constructed for flare shelters in free-space and on the lunar surface. 14 refs.

  16. Early skin toxicity predicts better outcomes, and early tumor shrinkage predicts better response after cetuximab treatment in advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kogawa, T; Doi, A; Shimokawa, M; Fouad, T M; Osuga, T; Tamura, F; Mizushima, T; Kimura, T; Abe, S; Ihara, H; Kukitsu, T; Sumiyoshi, T; Yoshizaki, N; Hirayama, M; Sasaki, T; Kawarada, Y; Kitashiro, S; Okushiba, S; Kondo, H; Tsuji, Y

    2015-03-01

    Cetuximab-containing treatments for metastatic colorectal cancer have been shown to have higher overall response rates and longer progression-free and overall survival than other systemic therapies. Cetuximab-related manifestations, including severe skin toxicity and early tumor shrinkage, have been shown to be predictors of response to cetuximab. We hypothesized that early skin toxicity is a predictor of response and better outcomes in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma. We retrospectively evaluated 62 patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma who had unresectable tumors and were treated with cetuximab in our institution. Skin toxicity grade was evaluated on each treatment day. Tumor size was evaluated using computed tomography prior to treatment and 4-8 weeks after the start of treatment with cetuximab.Patients with early tumor shrinkage after starting treatment with cetuximab had a significantly higher overall response rate (P = 0.0001). Patients with early skin toxicity showed significantly longer overall survival (P = 0.0305), and patients with higher skin toxicity grades had longer progression-free survival (P = 0.0168).We have shown that early tumor shrinkage, early onset of skin toxicity, and high skin toxicity grade are predictors of treatment efficacy and/or outcome in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma treated with cetuximab.

  17. High Energy Solar Flare Emission as Measured by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, J.

    1992-05-01

    During the period of 1991 June 8 to June 15 , the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory observed the Sun as a ``Target of Opportunity'' and as part of a Max '91 campaign. OSSE and BATSE observed the Sun as early as June 4. All instruments made important and significant measurements of solar flare emissions from a series of large and energetic flares from active region 6659. Gamma ray emissions above 100 MeV were measured by OSSE from the flares of June 4 and 11 in addition to high energy neutrons on June 4. The hard X-ray flux of the June 4 event as measured by BATSE was greater than that of any flare of the SMM era. OSSE also made detailed line measurements of all the larger flares. Medium energy neutrons were measured with COMPTEL from the 9 June flare and were found to be cotemporaneous with the MeV gamma ray emission. Extended (> 1 hour) gamma ray emission was measured by COMPTEL for the June 15 flare in the MeV range and by EGRET for the 11 June flare above 50 MeV, implying prolonged particle acceleration or trapping. These and other noteworthy observations will be reviewed.

  18. NuSTAR Observations of Bright X-ray Flares from Young Stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vievering, Juliana; Glesener, Lindsay; Grefenstette, Brian; Smith, David

    2016-05-01

    Bright x-ray flares are observed to occur on young stellar objects (YSOs) and are presumed to be driven by similar processes as those seen on our sun. Observations of the flaring activity of YSOs can add to our understanding of the early lives of stars and the development of planetary systems. In particular, x-ray observations of these stellar flares are essential for probing the youngest stars, as these stars are most obscured by dense molecular clouds. One such cloud complex of YSOs, rho Ophiuchi, has been a past target for soft x-ray (SXR) missions, including Chandra and XMM-Newton. However, the energy ranges covered by these missions drop off prior to the hard x-ray (HXR) regime, where the crossover to a dominant nonthermal component could be observed. Whether or not this nonthermal emission is strong enough to be observed could then be an indicator of how large an influence these flares have on the surrounding protoplanetary disk. To begin investigating this HXR emission, two 50ks observations of rho Ophiuchi have been taken with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), which is optimized over the energy range of 3-79 keV. Multiple stellar flares have been identified in the observations; here we present the preliminary analysis, including light curves and spectra, of the brightest of these flaring events. We explore the implications of the data for flaring activity of YSOs and compare the results to typical flaring activity of the sun.

  19. Magnetic Flux Transients during Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramaniam, K. S.; Delgado, F.; Hock, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    Solar flares result from the sudden release of energy stored in the magnetic field of the solar atmosphere, attributed to magnetic reconnection. In this work, we use line-of-sight magnetograms to study the changes in photospheric magnetic field during large solar flares. The magnetograms are derived from observations using NASA's Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, and have a cadence of 3 minutes at a 0.5 arcsecond spatial resolution. We studied the inferred magnetic flux changes in 11 X-class flares from (2011-2012) and 26 M-class flares (2011). Of the 37 flares, 32 exhibited short-lived (less than 30 minutes) magnetic flux transients (MFTs) during the progress of the flare, similar to those by Maurya et al. (2012). We note that MFTs were co-temporal with GOES X-ray peaks. Flares with rapid rises (impulsive flares) had stronger transients while those with slower rises (gradual flares) had weak or no MFTs. Finally, flares with stronger GOES X-ray peaks (flare class) showed stronger MFTs. We believe that these changes are non-physical because the changes in the magnetic field are transient (the magnetic field returns to the pre-flare state) and coincide with the impulsive phase of the flare. This work supported by the US Airforce Office of Scientific Research and the AFRL/RV Space Scholar Program.

  20. THE SOLAR FLARE IRON ABUNDANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, K. J. H.; Dennis, B. R. E-mail: Brian.R.Dennis@nasa.gov

    2012-03-20

    The abundance of iron is measured from emission line complexes at 6.65 keV (Fe line) and 8 keV (Fe/Ni line) in RHESSI X-ray spectra during solar flares. Spectra during long-duration flares with steady declines were selected, with an isothermal assumption and improved data analysis methods over previous work. Two spectral fitting models give comparable results, viz., an iron abundance that is lower than previous coronal values but higher than photospheric values. In the preferred method, the estimated Fe abundance is A(Fe) = 7.91 {+-} 0.10 (on a logarithmic scale, with A(H) = 12) or 2.6 {+-} 0.6 times the photospheric Fe abundance. Our estimate is based on a detailed analysis of 1898 spectra taken during 20 flares. No variation from flare to flare is indicated. This argues for a fractionation mechanism similar to quiet-Sun plasma. The new value of A(Fe) has important implications for radiation loss curves, which are estimated.

  1. IMPULSIVITY PARAMETER FOR SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Fajardo-Mendieta, W. G.; Alvarado-Gómez, J. D.; Calvo-Mozo, B.; Martinez-Oliveros, J. C. E-mail: bcalvom@unal.edu.co E-mail: jalvarad@eso.org

    2016-02-10

    Three phases are typically observed during solar flares: the preflare, impulsive, and decay phases. During the impulsive phase, it is believed that the electrons and other particles are accelerated after the stored energy in the magnetic field is released by reconnection. The impulsivity of a solar flare is a quantifiable property that shows how quickly this initial energy release occurs. It is measured via the impulsivity parameter, which we define as the inverse of the overall duration of the impulsive phase. We take the latter as the raw width of the most prominent nonthermal emission of the flare. We computed this observable over a work sample of 48 M-class events that occurred during the current Solar Cycle 24 by using three different methods. The first method takes into account all of the nonthermal flare emission and gives very accurate results, while the other two just cover fixed energy intervals (30–40 keV and 25–50 keV) and are useful for fast calculations. We propose an alternative way to classify solar flares according to their impulsivity parameter values, defining three different types of impulsivity, namely, high, medium, and low. This system of classification is independent of the manner used to calculated the impulsivity parameter. Lastly, we show the relevance of this tool as a discriminator of different HXR generation processes.

  2. Largest Solar Flare on Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The largest solar flare ever recorded occurred at 4:51 p.m. EDT, on Monday, April 2, 2001. as Observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite. Solar flares, among the solar systems mightiest eruptions, are tremendous explosions in the atmosphere of the Sun capable of releasing as much energy as a billion megatons of TNT. Caused by the sudden release of magnetic energy, in just a few seconds, solar flares can accelerate solar particles to very high velocities, almost to the speed of light, and heat solar material to tens of millions of degrees. The recent explosion from the active region near the sun's northwest limb hurled a coronal mass ejection into space at a whopping speed of roughly 7.2 million kilometers per hour. Luckily, the flare was not aimed directly towards Earth. Second to the most severe R5 classification of radio blackout, this flare produced an R4 blackout as rated by the NOAA SEC. This classification measures the disruption in radio communications. Launched December 2, 1995 atop an ATLAS-IIAS expendable launch vehicle, the SOHO is a cooperative effort involving NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA). (Image courtesy NASA Goddard SOHO Project office)

  3. Ultraviolet Spectral Comparison of "Quiescent" M-dwarf Flares with Solar and "Active" M-dwarf Flares and the Implications for an Earth-like Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parke Loyd, R. O.; France, Kevin; Youngblood, Allison

    2015-08-01

    All flares are not created equal. In particular, flares on low-mass stars are notable for their diversity, even between events on the same star. To better characterize these differences and the range of flare morphologies possible on low-mass stars, we analyzed a sample of such flares in detail using temporally resolved UV spectroscopy from the growing body of MUSCLES Treasury Survey data. Specifically, we used the data to analyze the response of several UV emission lines (e.g. C II, Si III, Si IV) and the UV continuum following each impulsive event. From this analysis, we present a qualitative picture of energy deposition and propagation in the stellar atmosphere during a few representative events. These data also permitted a spectral comparison with flares typical of the Sun, and we describe the most prominent differences that emerged from this comparison. Additionally, by including flares from all the observed MUSCLES stars, we create an energy-frequency plot for flares on “quiescent” M-dwarfs and compare it to that of the Sun and of well-studied “active” M-dwarfs such as AD Leo. Flares like those we detected and analyzed can strip some atmosphere from closely orbiting planets, adversely affecting the long-term habitability of planets that might have initially supported liquid surface water. To gauge the amplitude of this effect, we used the flare data to make an empirically driven estimate of how much mass each representative flare might remove from the atmosphere of an Earth-like planet.

  4. Early growth response 1 mediates the systemic and hepatic inflammatory response initiated by hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Prince, Jose M; Ming, Mei Jian; Levy, Ryan M; Liu, Shubing; Pinsky, David J; Vodovotz, Yoram; Billiar, Timothy R

    2007-02-01

    Hemorrhagic shock (HS) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in trauma patients. The early growth response 1 (Egr-1) transcription factor is induced by a variety of cellular stresses, including hypoxia, and may function as a master switch to trigger the expression of numerous key inflammatory mediators. We hypothesized that HS would induce hepatic expression of Egr-1 and that Egr-1 upregulates the inflammatory response after HS. The Egr-1 mice and wild-type (WT) controls (n>or=5 for all groups) were subjected to HS alone or HS followed by resuscitation (HS/R). Other mice were subjected to a sham procedure which included general anesthesia and vessel cannulation but no shock (sham). After the HS, HS/R, or sham procedures, mice were euthanized for determination of serum concentrations of interleukin (IL) 6, IL-10, and alanine aminotransferase. Northern blot analysis was performed to evaluate Egr-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) expression. Liver whole cell lysates were evaluated for Egr-1 protein expression by Western blot analysis. Hepatic expression of IL-6, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and intracellular adhesion molecule 1 mRNA was determined by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The Egr-1 DNA binding was assessed using the electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Hemorrhagic shock results in a rapid and transient hepatic expression of Egr-1 mRNA in WT mice by 1 h, whereas protein and DNA binding activity was evident by 2.5 h. The Egr-1 mRNA expression diminished after 4 h of resuscitation, whereas Egr-1 protein expression and DNA binding activity persisted through resuscitation. The Egr-1 mice exhibited decreased levels of hepatic inflammatory mediators compared with WT controls with a decrease in hepatic mRNA levels of IL-6 by 42%, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor by 39%, and intracellular adhesion molecule 1 by 43%. Similarly, Egr-1 mice demonstrated a decreased systemic inflammatory response and hepatic injury after HS

  5. A Unified Computational Model for Solar and Stellar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allred, Joel; Kowalski, Adam; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-04-01

    We describe a unified computational framework which can be used to model impulsive flares on the Sun and on dMe stars. The models are constructed assuming that the flare impulsive phase is caused by a beam of charged particles (primarily electrons and protons) that is accelerated in the corona and propagates downward depositing energy and momentum along the way. This rapidly heats the lower stellar atmosphere causing it to explosively expand and emission to dramatically brighten. Our models consist of flux tubes that extend from the sub-photosphere into the corona. We simulate how these flare-accelerated particles propagate down one dimensional flux tubes and heat the stellar atmosphere using Fokker-Planck kinetic theory. Detailed radiative transfer is included so that model predictions can be directly compared with observations. The flux of flare-accelerated particles drives return currents which additionally heat the stellar atmosphere, and these effects are also included in our models. We examine the impact of the flare-accelerated particle beams on model solar and dMe stellar atmospheres and perform parameter studies varying the injected particle energy spectra. We find the atmospheric response is strongly dependent on the accelerated particle cutoff energy and spectral index.

  6. A Unified Computational Model for Solar and Stellar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allred, Joel C.; Kowalski, Adam F.; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-08-01

    We present a unified computational framework that can be used to describe impulsive flares on the Sun and on dMe stars. The models assume that the flare impulsive phase is caused by a beam of charged particles that is accelerated in the corona and propagates downward depositing energy and momentum along the way. This rapidly heats the lower stellar atmosphere causing it to explosively expand and dramatically brighten. Our models consist of flux tubes that extend from the sub-photosphere into the corona. We simulate how flare-accelerated charged particles propagate down one-dimensional flux tubes and heat the stellar atmosphere using the Fokker-Planck kinetic theory. Detailed radiative transfer is included so that model predictions can be directly compared with observations. The flux of flare-accelerated particles drives return currents which additionally heat the stellar atmosphere. These effects are also included in our models. We examine the impact of the flare-accelerated particle beams on model solar and dMe stellar atmospheres and perform parameter studies varying the injected particle energy spectra. We find the atmospheric response is strongly dependent on the accelerated particle cutoff energy and spectral index.

  7. A Unified Computational Model for Solar and Stellar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allred, Joel C.; Kowalski, Adam F.; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-01-01

    We present a unified computational framework that can be used to describe impulsive flares on the Sun and on dMe stars. The models assume that the flare impulsive phase is caused by a beam of charged particles that is accelerated in the corona and propagates downward depositing energy and momentum along the way. This rapidly heats the lower stellar atmosphere causing it to explosively expand and dramatically brighten. Our models consist of flux tubes that extend from the sub-photosphere into the corona. We simulate how flare-accelerated charged particles propagate down one-dimensional flux tubes and heat the stellar atmosphere using the Fokker-Planck kinetic theory. Detailed radiative transfer is included so that model predictions can be directly compared with observations. The flux of flare-accelerated particles drives return currents which additionally heat the stellar atmosphere. These effects are also included in our models. We examine the impact of the flare-accelerated particle beams on model solar and dMe stellar atmospheres and perform parameter studies varying the injected particle energy spectra. We find the atmospheric response is strongly dependent on the accelerated particle cutoff energy and spectral index.

  8. International consensus for a definition of disease flare in lupus.

    PubMed

    Ruperto, N; Hanrahan, L M; Alarcón, G S; Belmont, H M; Brey, R L; Brunetta, P; Buyon, J P; Costner, M I; Cronin, M E; Dooley, M A; Filocamo, G; Fiorentino, D; Fortin, P R; Franks, A G; Gilkeson, G; Ginzler, E; Gordon, C; Grossman, J; Hahn, B; Isenberg, D A; Kalunian, K C; Petri, M; Sammaritano, L; Sánchez-Guerrero, J; Sontheimer, R D; Strand, V; Urowitz, M; von Feldt, J M; Werth, V P; Merrill, J T

    2011-04-01

    The Lupus Foundation of America (LFA) convened an international working group to obtain a consensus definition of disease flare in lupus. With help from the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organization (PRINTO), two web-based Delphi surveys of physicians were conducted. Subsequently, the LFA held a second consensus conference followed by a third Delphi survey to reach a community-wide agreement for flare definition. Sixty-nine of the 120 (57.5%) polled physicians responded to the first survey. Fifty-nine of the responses were available to draft 12 preliminary statements, which were circulated in the second survey. Eighty-seven of 118 (74%) physicians completed the second survey, with an agreement of 70% for 9/12 (75%) statements. During the second conference, three alternative flare definitions were consolidated and sent back to the international community. One hundred and sixteen of 146 (79.5%) responded, with agreement by 71/116 (61%) for the following definition: "A flare is a measurable increase in disease activity in one or more organ systems involving new or worse clinical signs and symptoms and/or laboratory measurements. It must be considered clinically significant by the assessor and usually there would be at least consideration of a change or an increase in treatment." The LFA proposes this definition for lupus flare on the basis of its high face validity.

  9. A Unified Computational Model for Solar and Stellar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allred, Joel C.; Kowalski, Adam F.; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-01-01

    We present a unified computational framework that can be used to describe impulsive flares on the Sun and on dMe stars. The models assume that the flare impulsive phase is caused by a beam of charged particles that is accelerated in the corona and propagates downward depositing energy and momentum along the way. This rapidly heats the lower stellar atmosphere causing it to explosively expand and dramatically brighten. Our models consist of flux tubes that extend from the sub-photosphere into the corona. We simulate how flare-accelerated charged particles propagate down one-dimensional flux tubes and heat the stellar atmosphere using the Fokker-Planck kinetic theory. Detailed radiative transfer is included so that model predictions can be directly compared with observations. The flux of flare-accelerated particles drives return currents which additionally heat the stellar atmosphere. These effects are also included in our models. We examine the impact of the flare-accelerated particle beams on model solar and dMe stellar atmospheres and perform parameter studies varying the injected particle energy spectra. We find the atmospheric response is strongly dependent on the accelerated particle cutoff energy and spectral index.

  10. A UNIFIED COMPUTATIONAL MODEL FOR SOLAR AND STELLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Allred, Joel C.; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-08-10

    We present a unified computational framework that can be used to describe impulsive flares on the Sun and on dMe stars. The models assume that the flare impulsive phase is caused by a beam of charged particles that is accelerated in the corona and propagates downward depositing energy and momentum along the way. This rapidly heats the lower stellar atmosphere causing it to explosively expand and dramatically brighten. Our models consist of flux tubes that extend from the sub-photosphere into the corona. We simulate how flare-accelerated charged particles propagate down one-dimensional flux tubes and heat the stellar atmosphere using the Fokker–Planck kinetic theory. Detailed radiative transfer is included so that model predictions can be directly compared with observations. The flux of flare-accelerated particles drives return currents which additionally heat the stellar atmosphere. These effects are also included in our models. We examine the impact of the flare-accelerated particle beams on model solar and dMe stellar atmospheres and perform parameter studies varying the injected particle energy spectra. We find the atmospheric response is strongly dependent on the accelerated particle cutoff energy and spectral index.

  11. Flare stars in star clusters, associations and the solar vicinity; Proceedings of the 137th IAU Symposium, Byurakan, Armenian SSR, Oct. 23-27, 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzoian, L. V.; Pettersen, B. R.; Tsvetkov, M. K.

    Various papers on flare stars are presented. Individual topics addressed include: statistics of flares observed for UV Ceti type stars, automatic search for flare stars in southern stellar aggregates of different ages, slow flares in stellar aggregates and solar vicinity, flare stars as age indicators in open clusters, flare stars at radio wavelengths, broadband spectral radio observations of flare stars, X-ray variability in the Orion nebula, axial rotation of BY Dra-type stars and related objects, flares on T Tauri stars. Also discussed are: FU Orionis eruptions and early stellar evolution, H2O megamaser in Orion KL, flares of radio line emission H2O in Ori A and W49N, FIR emission from post-T Tauri stars, residual extinction effects in spectra of newly formed stars, hydrogen atom kinetics in flare star chromospheres, pinch model of flares and its observational consequences, gamma activity of stellar flares, origin of dwarf stars, magnetic activity and evolution of low-mass young stars.

  12. The Flare Genesis Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.

    2002-01-01

    Using the Flare Genesis Experiment (FGE), a balloon-borne observatory with an 80-cm solar telescope we observed the active region NOAA 8844 on January 25, 2000 for several hours. FGE was equipped with a vector polarimeter and a tunable Fabry-Perot narrow-band filter. It recorded time series of filtergrams, vector magnetograms, and Dopplergrams at the Ca(I) 6122.2 angstrom line, and H-alpha filtergrams with a cadence between 2.5 and 7.5 minutes. At the time of the observations, NOAA 8844 was located at approximately 5 N 30 W. The region was rapidly growing during the observations; new magnetic flux was constantly emerging in three supergranules near its center. We describe in detail how the FGE data were analyzed and report on the structure and behavior of peculiar moving dipolar features (MDFs) observed in the active region. In longitudinal magnetograms, the MDFs appeared to be small dipoles in the emerging fields. The east-west orientation of their polarities was opposite that of the sunspots. The dipoles were oriented parallel to their direction of motion, which was in most cases towards the sunspots. Previously, dipolar moving magnetic features have only been observed flowing out from sunspots. Vector magnetograms show that the magnetic field of each MDF negative part was less inclined to the local horizontal than the ones of the positive part. We identify the MDFs as undulations, or stitches, where the emerging flux ropes are still tied to the photosphere. We present a U-loop model that can account for their unusual structure and behavior, and it shows how emerging flux can shed its entrained mass.

  13. What's an Asthma Flare-Up?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old What's an Asthma Flare-Up? KidsHealth > For Parents > What's an Asthma ... of a straw that's being pinched. Causes of Asthma Flare-Ups People with asthma have airways that ...

  14. Cycle 23 Variation in Solar Flare Productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Hugh; Fletcher, Lyndsay; McTiernan, Jim

    2014-04-01

    The NOAA listings of solar flares in cycles 21 - 24, including the GOES soft X-ray magnitudes, enable a simple determination of the number of flares each flaring active region produces over its lifetime. We have studied this measure of flare productivity over the interval 1975 - 2012. The annual averages of flare productivity remained approximately constant during cycles 21 and 22, at about two reported M- or X-flares per region, but then increased significantly in the declining phase of cycle 23 (the years 2004 - 2005). We have confirmed this by using the independent RHESSI flare catalog to check the NOAA events listings where possible. We note that this measure of solar activity does not correlate with the solar cycle. The anomalous peak in flare productivity immediately preceded the long solar minimum between cycles 23 and 24.

  15. Anvil for Flaring PCB Guide Pins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winn, E.; Turner, R.

    1985-01-01

    Spring-loaded anvil results in fewer fractured pins. New anvil for flaring guide pins in printed-circuit boards absorbs approximately 80 percent of press force. As result fewer pins damaged, and work output of flaring press greatly increased.

  16. Energetic electrons as an energy transport mechanism in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. G.

    1983-01-01

    A review is conducted of the observations and theory relating to the role of energetic electrons in the solar flare, with particular emphasis on discriminating between 'thermal' and 'nonthermal' origins of these electrons. Diagnostics in hard X-rays, especially those relating to the recent observations of the SMM and Hinotori satellites are discussed. Attention is briefly given to the response of the atmosphere to energy input in the form of high energy electrons, in particular through the diagnostics of both the Fe K-alpha feature and optically thin transition region lines such as OV. Finally, the relative roles of electron and proton heating in gamma-ray flare events are discussed.

  17. Energetic electrons as an energy transport mechanism in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emslie, A. G.

    1983-07-01

    A review is conducted of the observations and theory relating to the role of energetic electrons in the solar flare, with particular emphasis on discriminating between 'thermal' and 'nonthermal' origins of these electrons. Diagnostics in hard X-rays, especially those relating to the recent observations of the SMM and Hinotori satellites are discussed. Attention is briefly given to the response of the atmosphere to energy input in the form of high energy electrons, in particular through the diagnostics of both the Fe K-alpha feature and optically thin transition region lines such as OV. Finally, the relative roles of electron and proton heating in gamma-ray flare events are discussed.

  18. Energetic electrons as an energy transport mechanism in solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon Emslie, A.

    1983-07-01

    We review the observations and theory relating to the role of energetic electrons in the solar flare, with particular emphasis on discriminating between “thermal” and “nonthermal” origins of these electrons. We discuss diagnostics in hard X-rays, especially those relating to the recent observations of the SMM and HINOTORI satellites. We also briefly address the response of the atmosphere to energy input in the form of high energy electrons, in particular through the diagnostics of both the Fe Kα feature and optically thin transition region lines such as 0V. Finally, we discuss the relative roles of electron and proton heating in γ-ray flare events.

  19. Are All Flare Ribbons Simply Connected to the Corona?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judge, Philip G.; Paraschiv, Alin; Lacatus, Daniela; Donea, Alina; Lindsey, Charlie

    2017-04-01

    We consider the observational basis for the belief that flare ribbons in the chromosphere result from energy transport from the overlying corona. We study ribbons of small flares using magnetic and intensity data from the Hinode, Solar Dynamics Observatory, and IRIS missions. While most ribbons appear connected to the corona and overlie regions of significant vertical magnetic field, we examine one ribbon with no clear evidence for such connections. Evolving horizontal magnetic fields seen with Hinode suggest that reconnection with preexisting fields below the corona can explain the data. The identification of just one, albeit small, ribbon, with no apparent connection to the corona, leads us to conclude that at least two mechanisms are responsible for the heating that leads to flare ribbon emission. The National Center for Atmospheric Research is sponsored by the National Science Foundation.

  20. Elevated Amygdala Response to Faces Following Early Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Tottenham, N.; Hare, T.A.; Millner, A.; Gilhooly, T.; Zevin, J.; Casey, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    A functional neuroimaging study examined the long-term neural correlates of early adverse rearing conditions in humans as they relate to socio-emotional development. Previously institutionalized (PI) children and a same-aged comparison group were scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing an Emotional Face Go/Nogo task. PI children showed heightened activity of the amygdala, a region that supports emotional learning and reactivity to emotional stimuli, and corresponding decreases in cortical regions that support perceptual and cognitive functions. Amygdala activity was associated with decreased eye-contact as measured by eye-tracking methods and during a live dyadic interaction. The association between early rearing environment and subsequent eye-contact was mediated by amygdala activity. These data support the hypothesis that early adversity alters human brain development in a way that can persist into childhood, and they offer insight into the socio-emotional disturbances in human behavior following early adversity. PMID:21399712

  1. Altered Evoked Gamma-Band Responses Reveal Impaired Early Visual Processing in ADHD Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenz, Daniel; Krauel, Kerstin; Flechtner, Hans-Henning; Schadow, Jeanette; Hinrichs, Hermann; Herrmann, Christoph S.

    2010-01-01

    Neurophysiological studies yield contrary results whether attentional problems of patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are related to early visual processing deficits or not. Evoked gamma-band responses (GBRs), being among the first cortical responses occurring as early as 90 ms after visual stimulation in human EEG, have…

  2. Altered Evoked Gamma-Band Responses Reveal Impaired Early Visual Processing in ADHD Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenz, Daniel; Krauel, Kerstin; Flechtner, Hans-Henning; Schadow, Jeanette; Hinrichs, Hermann; Herrmann, Christoph S.

    2010-01-01

    Neurophysiological studies yield contrary results whether attentional problems of patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are related to early visual processing deficits or not. Evoked gamma-band responses (GBRs), being among the first cortical responses occurring as early as 90 ms after visual stimulation in human EEG, have…

  3. Evidence for Magnetic Reconnection in Three Homologous Solar Flares Observed by RHESSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, Lin-Hui; Holman, Gordon D.; Dennis, Brian R.

    2004-01-01

    We present RHESSI observF5oss of three homologous flares, which occurred between April 14 and 16, 2002. We find that the RHESSI images of all three flares at energies between 6 and 25 keV had some common features: (1) A. separate coronal source up to approx. 30 deg. above the flare loop appeared in the early impulsive phase and stayed stationary for several minutes. (2) Before the flare loop moved upward; previously reported by others, the flare loop-top centroid moved downward for 2-4 minutes during the early impulsive phase of the Ears: falling by 13 - 30% of its initial height with a speed between 8 and 23 km/s. We conclude that these features are associated with the formation and development of a current sheet between the loop-top and the coronal source. In the April 14-15 flare, we find that the hard X-ray flux (greater than 25 keV) is correlated with the rate at which the flare loop moves upward, indicating that the faster the loop grows, the faster the reconnection rate, and therefore, the greater the flux of accelerated electrons. Subject headings: Sun: L'iaies-Sun: X-1-ay-s -

  4. Solar flare predictions and warnings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, K. P., III; Mayfield, E. B.

    1973-01-01

    The real-time solar monitoring information supplied to support SPARCS-equipped rocket launches, the routine collection and analysis of 3.3-mm solar radio maps, short-term flare forecasts based on these maps, longer-term forecasts based on the recurrence of active regions, and results of the synoptic study of solar active regions at 3.3-mm wavelength are presented. Forecasted flares in the 24-hour forecasts were 81% accurate, and those in the 28-day forecasts were 97% accurate. Synoptic radio maps at 3.3-mm wavelength are presented for twenty-three solar rotations in 1967 and 1968, as well as synoptic flare charts for the same period.

  5. Chasing White-Light Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, H. S.

    2016-05-01

    In this memoir I describe my life in research, mostly in the area of solar physics. The recurring theme is "white-light flares," and several sections of this paper deal with this and related phenomena; I wind up describing how I see the state of the art in this still-interesting and crucially important (as it has been since 1859) area of flare research. I also describe my participation in two long-lived satellite programs dedicated to solar observations ( Yohkoh and RHESSI) and elaborate on their discoveries. These have both helped with white-light flares both directly and also with closely related X-ray and γ-ray emissions), with the result that this article leans heavily in that direction.

  6. 6Li from Solar Flares.

    PubMed

    Ramaty; Tatischeff; Thibaud; Kozlovsky; Mandzhavidze

    2000-05-10

    By introducing a hitherto ignored 6Li producing process, due to accelerated 3He reactions with 4He, we show that accelerated particle interactions in solar flares produce much more 6Li than 7Li. By normalizing our calculations to gamma-ray data, we demonstrate that the 6Li produced in solar flares, combined with photospheric 7Li, can account for the recently determined solar wind lithium isotopic ratio, obtained from measurements in lunar soil, provided that the bulk of the flare-produced lithium is evacuated by the solar wind. Further research in this area could provide unique information on a variety of problems, including solar atmospheric transport and mixing, solar convection and the lithium depletion issue, and solar wind and solar particle acceleration.

  7. Mid-level Solar Flare

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    SDO View of M7.3 Class Solar Flare on Oct. 2, 2014 NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory captured this image of an M7.3 class solar flare on Oct. 2, 2014. The solar flare is the bright flash of light on the right limb of the sun. A burst of solar material erupting out into space can be seen just below it. Credit: NASA/Goddard/SDO NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  8. Hooked Flare Ribbons and Flux-rope-related QSL Footprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jie; Gilchrist, Stuart A.; Aulanier, Guillaume; Schmieder, Brigitte; Pariat, Etienne; Li, Hui

    2016-05-01

    We studied the magnetic topology of active region 12158 on 2014 September 10 and compared it with the observations before and early in the flare that begins at 17:21 UT (SOL2014-09-10T17:45:00). Our results show that the sigmoidal structure and flare ribbons of this active region observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly can be well reproduced from a Grad-Rubin nonlinear force-free field extrapolation method. Various inverse-S- and inverse-J-shaped magnetic field lines, which surround a coronal flux rope, coincide with the sigmoid as observed in different extreme-ultraviolet wavelengths, including its multithreaded curved ends. Also, the observed distribution of surface currents in the magnetic polarity where it was not prescribed is well reproduced. This validates our numerical implementation and setup of the Grad-Rubin method. The modeled double inverse-J-shaped quasi-separatrix layer (QSL) footprints match the observed flare ribbons during the rising phase of the flare, including their hooked parts. The spiral-like shape of the latter may be related to a complex pre-eruptive flux rope with more than one turn of twist, as obtained in the model. These ribbon-associated flux-rope QSL footprints are consistent with the new standard flare model in 3D, with the presence of a hyperbolic flux tube located below an inverse-teardrop-shaped coronal QSL. This is a new step forward forecasting the locations of reconnection and ribbons in solar flares and the geometrical properties of eruptive flux ropes.

  9. Well-observed dynamics of flaring and peripheral coronal magnetic loops during an M-class limb flare

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Jinhua; Zhou, Tuanhui; Ji, Haisheng; Feng, Li; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Inhester, Bernd

    2014-08-20

    In this paper, we present a variety of well-observed dynamic behaviors for the flaring and peripheral magnetic loops of the M6.6 class extreme limb flare that occurred on 2011 February 24 (SOL2011-02-24T07:20) from EUV observations by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory and X-ray observations by RHESSI. The flaring loop motion confirms the earlier contraction-expansion picture. We find that the U-shaped trajectory delineated by the X-ray corona source of the flare roughly follows the direction of a filament eruption associated with the flare. Different temperature structures of the coronal source during the contraction and expansion phases strongly suggest different kinds of magnetic reconnection processes. For some peripheral loops, we discover that their dynamics are closely correlated with the filament eruption. During the slow rising to abrupt, fast rising of the filament, overlying peripheral magnetic loops display different responses. Two magnetic loops on the elbow of the active region had a slow descending motion followed by an abrupt successive fast contraction, while magnetic loops on the top of the filament were pushed outward, slowly being inflated for a while and then erupting as a moving front. We show that the filament activation and eruption play a dominant role in determining the dynamics of the overlying peripheral coronal magnetic loops.

  10. Well-observed Dynamics of Flaring and Peripheral Coronal Magnetic Loops during an M-class Limb Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jinhua; Zhou, Tuanhui; Ji, Haisheng; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Inhester, Bernd; Feng, Li

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we present a variety of well-observed dynamic behaviors for the flaring and peripheral magnetic loops of the M6.6 class extreme limb flare that occurred on 2011 February 24 (SOL2011-02-24T07:20) from EUV observations by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory and X-ray observations by RHESSI. The flaring loop motion confirms the earlier contraction-expansion picture. We find that the U-shaped trajectory delineated by the X-ray corona source of the flare roughly follows the direction of a filament eruption associated with the flare. Different temperature structures of the coronal source during the contraction and expansion phases strongly suggest different kinds of magnetic reconnection processes. For some peripheral loops, we discover that their dynamics are closely correlated with the filament eruption. During the slow rising to abrupt, fast rising of the filament, overlying peripheral magnetic loops display different responses. Two magnetic loops on the elbow of the active region had a slow descending motion followed by an abrupt successive fast contraction, while magnetic loops on the top of the filament were pushed outward, slowly being inflated for a while and then erupting as a moving front. We show that the filament activation and eruption play a dominant role in determining the dynamics of the overlying peripheral coronal magnetic loops.

  11. Flare angles measured with ball gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleghorn, D.; Wall, W. A.

    1968-01-01

    Precision tungsten carbide balls measure the internal angle of flared joints. Measurements from small and large balls in the flare throat to an external reference point are made. The difference in distances and diameters determine the average slope of the flare between the points of ball contact.

  12. Rapid Fluctuations in Solar Flares. Proceedings of a Workshop Held in Lanham, Maryland on September 30-October 4, 1985

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    work in solar flare X-ray polarimetry was done in a series of satellite experiments by Tindo and his collaborators in the Soviet Union; initial results...that a satellite instrument with the necessary sen- sitivity and high energy response to sake meaningful and important measure- ments is well within...flare without recourse to any data from a different flare. The pioneering observational work in solar X-ray polarisetry was done in a series of satellite

  13. FNAS/solar flare energetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Machado, M. E.

    1992-01-01

    We have performed an extensive study of solar flare energy buildup and release, concentrating in two aspects: (1) relationship with 3D field topology and measured electric currents; and (2) flare onset characteristics as determined from combined x ray and ultraviolet observations. We extended our previous studies on the characteristic topology of flaring regions, by following the evolution of an active region over three consecutive days. From comparison with flare observations in x rays and h alpha, we found further support for the hypothesis that flares were triggered by taking place at the separators (3D generalization of and x-type neutral point). Furthermore, we found that emerging in flux at a site within the active regions where no (or little) activity was previously observed, caused the appearance of a secondary separator and thereon continuous triggering of activity at such site. Our topology arguments were then applied to a study of sympathetic activity between two regions within an active complex. Here again we found that interacting field structures along separators and separatrices, which act as pathways for recurrent flaring to spread between the regions, could be used to understand how activity spread to potentially explosive sites with the complex. We also finished our study of flare onset characteristics as determined from combined x ray and ultraviolet observations. Using a quasi-static modeling approach, we find that this phase is characterized by a relatively low level of energy release, 10 exp 26-27 erg/s, which is sufficient to produce 'gentle' evaporation, a shift in the location of the transition zone as compared to pre-flare conditions, and an increase in the temperature and density of coronal loops. All these changes have profound implications on the observed signatures of impulsive phase phenomena, which had been neglected in the past. As a follow-up of this investigation, we now plan to apply our results to the interpretation of high

  14. Characterization of total flare energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.

    1986-01-01

    It is concluded that the estimates of total energy in the prime flares lie well below the Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor upper limits. This is consistent with our knowledge of the energy distribution in solar flares. Insufficient data exist for us to be very firm about this conclusion, however, and major energetic components could exist undetected, especially in the EUV-XUV and optical bands. In addition, the radiant energy cannot quantitatively be compared at this time with non-radiant terms because of even larger uncertainties in the latter.

  15. Effect of an X-Class Solar Flare on the OI 630 nm Dayglow Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, Uma; Pallamraju, Duggirala; Chakrabarti, Supriya

    2010-01-01

    We present a striking event that shows a prompt effect of an X-class solar flare (X6.2/3B) in the neutral optical dayglow emissions. This flare occurred on 13 December 2001 at 1424 UT and peaked at 1430 UT. The peak-to pre-flare X-ray intensity ratio as observed by GOES-10 was greater than 300 and the EUV flux observed by SEM/SOHO was greater by around 60%. As a response to this flare, the daytime redline (OI 630 nm) column integrated emission intensity measured from Carmen Alto (23.16degS, 70.66degW), in Chile, showed a prompt increase of around 50%. Our results show that this prompt enhancement in the thermospheric dayglow seems to be caused mainly due to an increase in photoelectrons due to a sudden increase in the solar EUV flux associated with this flare.

  16. Effect of an X-Class Solar Flare on the OI 630 nm Dayglow Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, Uma; Pallamraju, Duggirala; Chakrabarti, Supriya

    2010-01-01

    We present a striking event that shows a prompt effect of an X-class solar flare (X6.2/3B) in the neutral optical dayglow emissions. This flare occurred on 13 December 2001 at 1424 UT and peaked at 1430 UT. The peak-to pre-flare X-ray intensity ratio as observed by GOES-10 was greater than 300 and the EUV flux observed by SEM/SOHO was greater by around 60%. As a response to this flare, the daytime redline (OI 630 nm) column integrated emission intensity measured from Carmen Alto (23.16degS, 70.66degW), in Chile, showed a prompt increase of around 50%. Our results show that this prompt enhancement in the thermospheric dayglow seems to be caused mainly due to an increase in photoelectrons due to a sudden increase in the solar EUV flux associated with this flare.

  17. A dynamic flare with anomalously dense flare loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svestka, Z.; Fontenla, J. M.; Machado, M. E.; Martin, S. F.; Neidig, D. F.

    1986-01-01

    The dynamic flare of November 6, 1980 developed a rich system of growing loops which could be followed in H-alpha for 1.5 hours. Throughout the flare, these loops, near the limb, were seen in emission against the disk. Theoretical computations of b-values for a hydrogen atom reveal that this requires electron densities in the loops to be close to 10 to the 12th per cu cm. From measured widths of higher Balmer lines the density at the tops of the loops was found to be 4 x 10 to the 12th per cu cm if no nonthermal motions were present. It is now general knowledge that flare loops are initially observed in X-rays and become visible in H-alpha only after cooling. For such a high density a loop would cool through radiation from 10 to the 7th K to 10 to the 4th K within a few minutes so that the dense H-alpha loops should have heights very close to the heights of the X-ray loops. This, however, contradicts the observations obtained by the HXIS and FCS instruments on board SMM which show the X-ray loops at much higher altitudes than the loops in H-alpha. Therefore, the density must have been significantly smaller when the loops were formed and the flare loops were apparently both shrinking and becoming denser while cooling.

  18. PREDICTION OF SOLAR FLARE SIZE AND TIME-TO-FLARE USING SUPPORT VECTOR MACHINE REGRESSION

    SciTech Connect

    Boucheron, Laura E.; Al-Ghraibah, Amani; McAteer, R. T. James

    2015-10-10

    We study the prediction of solar flare size and time-to-flare using 38 features describing magnetic complexity of the photospheric magnetic field. This work uses support vector regression to formulate a mapping from the 38-dimensional feature space to a continuous-valued label vector representing flare size or time-to-flare. When we consider flaring regions only, we find an average error in estimating flare size of approximately half a geostationary operational environmental satellite (GOES) class. When we additionally consider non-flaring regions, we find an increased average error of approximately three-fourths a GOES class. We also consider thresholding the regressed flare size for the experiment containing both flaring and non-flaring regions and find a true positive rate of 0.69 and a true negative rate of 0.86 for flare prediction. The results for both of these size regression experiments are consistent across a wide range of predictive time windows, indicating that the magnetic complexity features may be persistent in appearance long before flare activity. This is supported by our larger error rates of some 40 hr in the time-to-flare regression problem. The 38 magnetic complexity features considered here appear to have discriminative potential for flare size, but their persistence in time makes them less discriminative for the time-to-flare problem.

  19. Characteristics of the photospheric magnetic field associated with solar flare initiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ya-Hui; Chen, P. F.; Hsieh, Min-Shiu; Wu, S. T.; He, Han; Tsai, Tsung-Che E-mail: chenpf@nju.edu.cn E-mail: wus@uah.edu E-mail: tctsai@narlabs.org.tw

    2014-05-01

    The physical environment governing the solar flare initiation is not fully understood, although there are significant efforts to address the relationship between magnetic non-potential parameters and early flare signatures. In this study, we attempt to characterize the flare initiation based on the processed Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager vector magnetograms, Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 1600 Å, and RHESSI hard X-ray observations. Three flare events, the M6.6 flare on 2011 February 13, the X2.2 flare on 2011 February 15, and the X2.1 flare on 2011 September 6, in two active regions AR 11158 and AR 11283 are investigated. We analyze the source field strength in the photosphere, which is defined as the magnitude of the observed magnetic field deviation from the potential field. It is found that one of the strong source field regions above the magnetic polarity inversion line well connects the initial bright kernels of two conjugate ribbons. The results imply that the distribution of the photospheric source field strength can be used to locate the initiation site of flaring loops regardless of the configuration of pre-flare magnetic fields or the evolution of active regions. Moreover, the field configuration in the strong source field regions tends to become more inclined after flares, which is consistent with the coronal implosion scenario. We also employ a fast method to derive the total current density from the photospheric vector magnetogram in the framework of force-free field. This method can provide fast estimation of photospheric current density within a reasonable accuracy without appealing for the more accurate calculation from a model extrapolation.

  20. Unprecedented Fine Structure of a Solar Flare Revealed by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Ju; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Liu, Chang; Gary, Dale; Wang, Haimin

    2016-01-01

    Solar flares signify the sudden release of magnetic energy and are sources of so called space weather. The fine structures (below 500 km) of flares are rarely observed and are accessible to only a few instruments world-wide. Here we present observation of a solar flare using exceptionally high resolution images from the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) equipped with high order adaptive optics at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The observation reveals the process of the flare in unprecedented detail, including the flare ribbon propagating across the sunspots, coronal rain (made of condensing plasma) streaming down along the post-flare loops, and the chromosphere’s response to the impact of coronal rain, showing fine-scale brightenings at the footpoints of the falling plasma. Taking advantage of the resolving power of the NST, we measure the cross-sectional widths of flare ribbons, post-flare loops and footpoint brighenings, which generally lie in the range of 80–200 km, well below the resolution of most current instruments used for flare studies. Confining the scale of such fine structure provides an essential piece of information in modeling the energy transport mechanism of flares, which is an important issue in solar and plasma physics. PMID:27071459

  1. Unprecedented Fine Structure of a Solar Flare Revealed by the 1.6~m New Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Ju; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Liu, Chang; Gary, Dale E.; Wang, Haimin

    2016-05-01

    Solar flares signify the sudden release of magnetic energy and are sources of so called space weather. The fine structures (below 500 km) of flares are rarely observed and are accessible to only a few instruments world-wide. Here we present observation of a solar flare using exceptionally high resolution images from the 1.6~m New Solar Telescope (NST) equipped with high order adaptive optics at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The observation reveals the process of the flare in unprecedented detail, including the flare ribbon propagating across the sunspots, coronal rain (made of condensing plasma) streaming down along the post-flare loops, and the chromosphere's response to the impact of coronal rain, showing fine-scale brightenings at the footpoints of the falling plasma. Taking advantage of the resolving power of the NST, we measure the cross-sectional widths of flare ribbons, post-flare loops and footpoint brighenings, which generally lie in the range of 80-200 km, well below the resolution of most current instruments used for flare studies. Confining the scale of such fine structure provides an essential piece of information in modeling the energy transport mechanism of flares, which is an important issue in solar and plasma physics.

  2. Unprecedented Fine Structure of a Solar Flare Revealed by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Ju; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Liu, Chang; Gary, Dale; Wang, Haimin

    2016-04-01

    Solar flares signify the sudden release of magnetic energy and are sources of so called space weather. The fine structures (below 500 km) of flares are rarely observed and are accessible to only a few instruments world-wide. Here we present observation of a solar flare using exceptionally high resolution images from the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) equipped with high order adaptive optics at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The observation reveals the process of the flare in unprecedented detail, including the flare ribbon propagating across the sunspots, coronal rain (made of condensing plasma) streaming down along the post-flare loops, and the chromosphere’s response to the impact of coronal rain, showing fine-scale brightenings at the footpoints of the falling plasma. Taking advantage of the resolving power of the NST, we measure the cross-sectional widths of flare ribbons, post-flare loops and footpoint brighenings, which generally lie in the range of 80–200 km, well below the resolution of most current instruments used for flare studies. Confining the scale of such fine structure provides an essential piece of information in modeling the energy transport mechanism of flares, which is an important issue in solar and plasma physics.

  3. Unprecedented Fine Structure of a Solar Flare Revealed by the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope.

    PubMed

    Jing, Ju; Xu, Yan; Cao, Wenda; Liu, Chang; Gary, Dale; Wang, Haimin

    2016-04-13

    Solar flares signify the sudden release of magnetic energy and are sources of so called space weather. The fine structures (below 500 km) of flares are rarely observed and are accessible to only a few instruments world-wide. Here we present observation of a solar flare using exceptionally high resolution images from the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) equipped with high order adaptive optics at Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). The observation reveals the process of the flare in unprecedented detail, including the flare ribbon propagating across the sunspots, coronal rain (made of condensing plasma) streaming down along the post-flare loops, and the chromosphere's response to the impact of coronal rain, showing fine-scale brightenings at the footpoints of the falling plasma. Taking advantage of the resolving power of the NST, we measure the cross-sectional widths of flare ribbons, post-flare loops and footpoint brighenings, which generally lie in the range of 80-200 km, well below the resolution of most current instruments used for flare studies. Confining the scale of such fine structure provides an essential piece of information in modeling the energy transport mechanism of flares, which is an important issue in solar and plasma physics.

  4. Central Engine of Late-time X-Ray Flares with Internal Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Hui-Jun; Gu, Wei-Min; Hou, Shu-Jin; Liu, Tong; Lin, Da-Bin; Yi, Tuan; Liang, En-Wei; Lu, Ju-Fu

    2016-12-01

    This work focuses on a sample of seven extremely late-time X-ray flares with peak time {t}{{p}}\\gt {10}4 {{s}}, among which two flares can be confirmed as the late-time activity of central engine. The main purpose is to investigate the mechanism of such late-time flares based on the internal origin assumption. In the hyper-accreting black hole (BH) scenario, we study the possibility of two well-known mechanisms acting as the central engine to power such X-ray flares, i.e., the neutrino-antineutrino annihilation and the Blandford-Znajek (BZ) process. Our results show that the annihilation luminosity is far below the observational data. Thus, the annihilation mechanism cannot account for such late-time flares. For the BZ process, if the role of outflows is taken into consideration, the inflow mass rate near the horizon will be quite low such that the magnetic field will probably be too weak to power the observed X-ray flares. We therefore argue that, for the late-time flares with internal origin, the central engine is unlikely to be associated with BHs. On the contrary, a fast rotating neutron star with strong bipolar magnetic fields may be responsible for such flares.

  5. Wavelength Dependence of Solar Flare Irradiation and its Influence on the Thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Yanshi; Richmond, Arthur D.; Deng, Yue; Qian, L.; Solomon, S.; Chamberlin, P.

    2012-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of solar flare enhancement is one of the important factors determining how the Thermosphere-Ionosphere (T-I) system response to flares. To investigate the wavelength dependence of solar flare, the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) has been run for 34 X-class flares. The results show that the percentage increases of solar irradiance at flare peak comparing to pre-flare condition have a clear wavelength dependence. In the wavelength range between 0 - 195 nm, it can vary from 1% to 10000%. The solar irradiance enhancement is largest ( 1000%) in the XUV range (0 - 25 nm), and is about 100% in EUV range (25 - 120 nm). The influence of different wavebands on the T-I system during the October 28th, 2003 flare (X17.2-class) has also been examined using the latest version of National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Thermosphere- Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIE-GCM). While the globally integrated solar energy deposition is largest in the 0 - 14 nm waveband, the impact of solar irradiance enhancement on the thermosphere at 400 km is largest for 25 - 105 nm waveband. The effect of 122 - 195 nm is small in magnitude, but it decays slowly.

  6. Biggest Solar Flare on Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    View an animation from the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT). At 4:51 p.m. EDT, on Monday, April 2, 2001, the sun unleashed the biggest solar flare ever recorded, as observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite. The flare was definitely more powerful than the famous solar flare on March 6, 1989, which was related to the disruption of power grids in Canada. This recent explosion from the active region near the sun's northwest limb hurled a coronal mass ejection into space at a whopping speed of roughly 7.2 million kilometers per hour. Luckily, the flare was not aimed directly towards Earth. Solar flares, among the solar system's mightiest eruptions, are tremendous explosions in the atmosphere of the Sun capable of releasing as much energy as a billion megatons of TNT. Caused by the sudden release of magnetic energy, in just a few seconds flares can accelerate solar particles to very high velocities, almost to the speed of light, and heat solar material to tens of millions of degrees. Solar ejections are often associated with flares and sometimes occur shortly after the flare explosion. Coronal mass ejections are clouds of electrified, magnetic gas weighing billions of tons ejected from the Sun and hurled into space with speeds ranging from 12 to 1,250 miles per second. Depending on the orientation of the magnetic fields carried by the ejection cloud, Earth-directed coronal mass ejections cause magnetic storms by interacting with the Earth's magnetic field, distorting its shape, and accelerating electrically charged particles (electrons and atomic nuclei) trapped within. Severe solar weather is often heralded by dramatic auroral displays, northern and southern lights, and magnetic storms that occasionally affect satellites, radio communications and power systems. The flare and solar ejection has also generated a storm of high-velocity particles, and the number of particles with ten million electron-volts of energy in the space near

  7. Biggest Solar Flare on Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    View an animation from the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT). At 4:51 p.m. EDT, on Monday, April 2, 2001, the sun unleashed the biggest solar flare ever recorded, as observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite. The flare was definitely more powerful than the famous solar flare on March 6, 1989, which was related to the disruption of power grids in Canada. This recent explosion from the active region near the sun's northwest limb hurled a coronal mass ejection into space at a whopping speed of roughly 7.2 million kilometers per hour. Luckily, the flare was not aimed directly towards Earth. Solar flares, among the solar system's mightiest eruptions, are tremendous explosions in the atmosphere of the Sun capable of releasing as much energy as a billion megatons of TNT. Caused by the sudden release of magnetic energy, in just a few seconds flares can accelerate solar particles to very high velocities, almost to the speed of light, and heat solar material to tens of millions of degrees. Solar ejections are often associated with flares and sometimes occur shortly after the flare explosion. Coronal mass ejections are clouds of electrified, magnetic gas weighing billions of tons ejected from the Sun and hurled into space with speeds ranging from 12 to 1,250 miles per second. Depending on the orientation of the magnetic fields carried by the ejection cloud, Earth-directed coronal mass ejections cause magnetic storms by interacting with the Earth's magnetic field, distorting its shape, and accelerating electrically charged particles (electrons and atomic nuclei) trapped within. Severe solar weather is often heralded by dramatic auroral displays, northern and southern lights, and magnetic storms that occasionally affect satellites, radio communications and power systems. The flare and solar ejection has also generated a storm of high-velocity particles, and the number of particles with ten million electron-volts of energy in the space near

  8. Prediction of antidepressant response to venlafaxine by a combination of early response assessment and therapeutic drug monitoring.

    PubMed

    Stamm, T J; Becker, D; Sondergeld, L M; Wiethoff, K; Hiemke, C; O'Malley, G; Ricken, R; Bauer, M; Adli, M

    2014-07-01

    Early assessment of a therapeutic response is a central goal in antidepressant treatment. The present study examined the potential for therapeutic drug monitoring and symptom rating to predict venlafaxine treatment efficacy (measured by overall patient response and remission). 88 patients were uptitrated homogenously to 225 mg/day venlafaxine. Serum concentrations of venlafaxine (VEN) and its active metabolite O-desmethylvenlafaxine (ODV) were measured at week 2. Continuous psychopathometric ratings were measured for up to 6 weeks by independent study raters. An early improvement was significantly more common in venlafaxine responders than non-responders (χ(2); p=0.007). While ODV serum levels were significantly higher in responders (t test; p=0.006), VEN serum levels, sum level of VEN+ODV and the ratio of ODV/VEN levels were not. Moreover, patients who showed an early response combined with an ODV serum level above the median of 222 ng/mL were significantly more likely to achieve full response (binary logistic model; p<0.01). Sensitivity (84% for early response) and specificity (81% for combination of early response and therapeutic drug monitoring) were sufficient to qualify as a reasonable screening instrument. Our results indicate that early improvement and ODV serum concentration are predictive of therapeutic outcome and can thus be used to guide use of the antidepressant venlafaxine. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. The influence of the energy emitted by solar flare soft X-ray bursts on the propagation of their associated interplanetary shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinter, S.; Dryer, M.

    1985-01-01

    The relationship between the thermal energy released from 29 solar flares and the propagation features of their associated interplanetary shock waves that were detected at 1 AU is investigated. The 29 interplanetary shock waves were identified unambiguously and their tracking from each solar flare was deduced by tracking their associated interplanetary type-II radio emission. The thermal energy released in the solar flares was estimated from the time-intensity profiles of 1-8 A soft X-ray bursts from each flare. A good relationship is found between the flares' thermal energy with the IP shock-waves' transient velocity and arrival time at the earth - that is, the largest flare energy released is associated with the faster shock waves. Finally, a possible scenario of formation of a shock wave during the early phase of the flare and its propagation features is discussed.

  10. The influence of the energy emitted by solar flare soft X-ray bursts on the propagation of their associated interplanetary shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinter, S.; Dryer, M.

    1985-01-01

    The relationship between the thermal energy released from 29 solar flares and the propagation features of their associated interplanetary shock waves that were detected at 1 AU is investigated. The 29 interplanetary shock waves were identified unambiguously and their tracking from each solar flare was deduced by tracking their associated interplanetary type-II radio emission. The thermal energy released in the solar flares was estimated from the time-intensity profiles of 1-8 A soft X-ray bursts from each flare. A good relationship is found between the flares' thermal energy with the IP shock-waves' transient velocity and arrival time at the earth - that is, the largest flare energy released is associated with the faster shock waves. Finally, a possible scenario of formation of a shock wave during the early phase of the flare and its propagation features is discussed.

  11. Elevated Amygdala Response to Faces following Early Deprivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tottenham, N.; Hare, T. A.; Millner, A.; Gilhooly, T.; Zevin, J. D.; Casey, B. J.

    2011-01-01

    A functional neuroimaging study examined the long-term neural correlates of early adverse rearing conditions in humans as they relate to socio-emotional development. Previously institutionalized (PI) children and a same-aged comparison group were scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing an Emotional Face Go/Nogo…

  12. Elevated Amygdala Response to Faces following Early Deprivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tottenham, N.; Hare, T. A.; Millner, A.; Gilhooly, T.; Zevin, J. D.; Casey, B. J.

    2011-01-01

    A functional neuroimaging study examined the long-term neural correlates of early adverse rearing conditions in humans as they relate to socio-emotional development. Previously institutionalized (PI) children and a same-aged comparison group were scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing an Emotional Face Go/Nogo…

  13. Investigating Early Years Teachers' Understanding and Response to Children's Preconceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kambouri, Maria

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on young children's scientific preconceptions and discusses teachers' identification of these preconceptions when teaching science in the early years, on which research is still limited. This paper is based on the theoretical framework of constructivism and it defines preconceptions as children's erroneous concepts prior to…

  14. Investigating Early Years Teachers' Understanding and Response to Children's Preconceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kambouri, Maria

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on young children's scientific preconceptions and discusses teachers' identification of these preconceptions when teaching science in the early years, on which research is still limited. This paper is based on the theoretical framework of constructivism and it defines preconceptions as children's erroneous concepts prior to…

  15. Singaporean Early Childhood Teachers' Responses to Myths about Child Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Freda; Potter, Gillian K.

    2004-01-01

    Prior to attending seminars on child abuse and domestic violence, 86 kindergarten and 64 special education (early childhood) teachers completed a questionnaire seeking views relating to the accuracy of statements relating to all forms of child abuse. This was designed to identify the accuracy of teachers' knowledge of child abuse and neglect…

  16. Large-scale brightenings associated with flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandrini, Cristina H.; Machado, Marcos E.

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that large-scale brightenings (LSBs) associated with solar flares, similar to the 'giant arches' discovered by Svestka et al. (1982) in images obtained by the SSM HXIS hours after the onset of two-ribbon flares, can also occur in association with confined flares in complex active regions. For these events, a clear link between the LSB and the underlying flare is clearly evident from the active-region magnetic field topology. The implications of these findings are discussed within the framework of the interacting loops of flares and the giant arch phenomenology.

  17. Helicobacter pylori Antigens Inducing Early Immune Response in Infants.

    PubMed

    Seo, Ji Hyun; Youn, Jong Hyuk; Kim, Eun A; Jun, Jin Su; Park, Ji Sook; Yeom, Jung Sook; Lim, Jae Young; Woo, Hyang Ok; Youn, Hee Shang; Ko, Gyung Hyuck; Park, Jin Sik; Baik, Seung Chul; Lee, Woo Kon; Cho, Myung Je; Rhee, Kwang Ho

    2017-07-01

    To identify the Helicobacter pylori antigens operating during early infection in sera from infected infants using proteomics and immunoblot analysis. Two-dimensional (2D) large and small gel electrophoresis was performed using H. pylori strain 51. We performed 2D immunoglobulin G (IgG), immunoglobulin A (IgA), and immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibody immunoblotting using small gels on sera collected at the Gyeongsang National University Hospital from 4-11-month-old infants confirmed with H. pylori infection by pre-embedding immunoelectron microscopy. Immunoblot spots appearing to represent early infection markers in infant sera were compared to those of the large 2D gel for H. pylori strain 51. Corresponding spots were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). The peptide fingerprints obtained were searched in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database. Eight infant patients were confirmed with H. pylori infection based on urease tests, histopathologic examinations, and pre-embedding immunoelectron microscopy. One infant showed a 2D IgM immunoblot pattern that seemed to represent early infection. Immunoblot spots were compared with those from whole-cell extracts of H. pylori strain 51 and 18 spots were excised, digested in gel, and analyzed by MALDI-TOF-MS. Of the 10 peptide fingerprints obtained, the H. pylori proteins flagellin A (FlaA), urease β subunit (UreB), pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (POR), and translation elongation factor Ts (EF-Ts) were identified and appeared to be active during the early infection periods. These results might aid identification of serological markers for the serodiagnosis of early H. pylori infection in infants. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  18. Magnetic Reconnection in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Terry G.

    2016-05-01

    Reconnection has at least three possible roles in solar flares: First, it may contribute to the build-up of magnetic energy in the solar corona prior to flare onset; second, it may directly trigger the onset of the flare; and third, it may allow the release of magnetic energy by relaxing the magnetic field configuration to a lower energy state. Although observational support for the first two roles is somewhat limited, there is now ample support for the third. Within the last few years EUV and X-ray instruments have directly observed the kind of plasma flows and heating indicative of reconnection. Continued improvements in instrumentation will greatly help to determine the detailed physics of the reconnection process in the solar atmosphere. Careful measurement of the reconnection outflows will be especially helpful in this regard. Current observations suggest that in some flares the jet outflows are accelerated within a short diffusion region that is more characteristic of Petschek-type reconnection than Sweet-Parker reconnection. Recent resistive MHD theoretical and numerical analyses predict that the length of the diffusion region should be just within the resolution range of current X-ray and EUV telescopes if the resistivity is uniform. On the other hand, if the resistivity is not uniform, the length of the diffusion region could be too short for the outflow acceleration region to be observable.

  19. Solar Flare Aimed at Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    At the height of the solar cycle, the Sun is finally displaying some fireworks. This image from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) shows a large solar flare from June 6, 2000 at 1424 Universal Time (10:24 AM Eastern Daylight Savings Time). Associated with the flare was a coronal mass ejection that sent a wave of fast moving charged particles straight towards Earth. (The image was acquired by the Extreme ultaviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT), one of 12 instruments aboard SOHO) Solar activity affects the Earth in several ways. The particles generated by flares can disrupt satellite communications and interfere with power transmission on the Earth's surface. Earth's climate is tied to the total energy emitted by the sun, cooling when the sun radiates less energy and warming when solar output increases. Solar radiation also produces ozone in the stratosphere, so total ozone levels tend to increase during the solar maximum. For more information about these solar flares and the SOHO mission, see NASA Science News or the SOHO home page. For more about the links between the sun and climate change, see Sunspots and the Solar Max. Image courtesy SOHO Extreme ultaviolet Imaging Telescope, ESA/NASA

  20. Solar Flare Aimed at Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    At the height of the solar cycle, the Sun is finally displaying some fireworks. This image from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) shows a large solar flare from June 6, 2000 at 1424 Universal Time (10:24 AM Eastern Daylight Savings Time). Associated with the flare was a coronal mass ejection that sent a wave of fast moving charged particles straight towards Earth. (The image was acquired by the Extreme ultaviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT), one of 12 instruments aboard SOHO) Solar activity affects the Earth in several ways. The particles generated by flares can disrupt satellite communications and interfere with power transmission on the Earth's surface. Earth's climate is tied to the total energy emitted by the sun, cooling when the sun radiates less energy and warming when solar output increases. Solar radiation also produces ozone in the stratosphere, so total ozone levels tend to increase during the solar maximum. For more information about these solar flares and the SOHO mission, see NASA Science News or the SOHO home page. For more about the links between the sun and climate change, see Sunspots and the Solar Max. Image courtesy SOHO Extreme ultaviolet Imaging Telescope, ESA/NASA

  1. Sunspot 1504 is Spitting Flares

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This movie from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) shows the M class flare on June 14, 2012 from 9:15 AM to 2:00 PM EDT. The sun is shown here in teal as this is the color typically used to repre...

  2. Pre-Flare Flows in the Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, A. J.; Harra, L. K.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Green, L. M.; Matthews, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    Solar flares take place in regions of strong magnetic fields and are generally accepted to be the result of a resistive instability leading to magnetic reconnection. When new flux emerges into a pre-existing active region it can act as a flare and coronal mass ejection trigger. In this study we observed active region 10955 after the emergence of small-scale additional flux at the magnetic inversion line. We found that flaring began when additional positive flux levels exceeded 1.38×1020 Mx (maxwell), approximately 7 h after the initial flux emergence. We focussed on the pre-flare activity of one B-class flare that occurred on the following day. The earliest indication of activity was a rise in the non-thermal velocity one hour before the flare. 40 min before flaring began, brightenings and pre-flare flows were observed along two loop systems in the corona, involving the new flux and the pre-existing active region loops. We discuss the possibility that reconnection between the new flux and pre-existing loops before the flare drives the flows by either generating slow mode magnetoacoustic waves or a pressure gradient between the newly reconnected loops. The subsequent B-class flare originated from fast reconnection of the same loop systems as the pre-flare flows.

  3. Ion Acceleration in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James A.; Weir, Sue B.

    1996-01-01

    Solar flares are among the most energetic and interesting phenomena in the Solar system, releasing up to 1032 ergs of energy on timescales of several tens of seconds to several tens of minutes. Much of this energy is in the form of suprathermal electrons and ions, which remain trapped at the Sun and produce a wide variety of radiations, as well as escape into interplanetary space, where they can be directly observed. The radiation from trapped particles consists in general of (1) continuum emission; (2) narrow gamma-ray nuclear deexcitation lines; and (3) high-energy neutrons observed in space or by ground-based neutron monitors. The particles that escape into space consist of both electrons and ions, which often have compositions quite different than that of the ambient solar atmosphere. Flares thus present many diagnostics of the particle acceleration mechanism(s), the identification of which is the ultimate goal of flare research. Moreover, flares in fact offer the only opportunity in astrophysics to study the simultaneous energization of both electrons and ions. Hopefully, an understanding of flares with their wealth of diagnostic data will lead to a better understanding of particle acceleration at other sites in the Universe. It is now generally accepted that flares are roughly divided into two classes: impulsive and gradual. Gradual events are large, occur high in the corona, have long-duration soft and hard X-rays and gamma rays, are electron poor, are associated with Type II radio emission and coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and produce energetic ions with coronal abundance ratios. Impulsive events are more compact, occur lower in the corona, produce short-duration radiation, and exhibit dramatic abundance enhancements in the energetic ions. Their He-3/He-4 ratio is - 1, which is a huge increase over the coronal value of about 5 x 10(exp -4), and they also posses smaller but still significant enhancements of Ne, Mg, Si, and Fe relative to He-4, C, N, and O

  4. GONG Inter-site Hα Flare Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giersch, Owen

    2013-06-01

    A challenge of the past few decades for the Solar Observing Optical Network (SOON), operated by the United States Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA), has been to obtain consistent flare brightness reporting for the same flare from different sites. Flare area is usually considered to be a more reliable measure, but significant variation of values between sites still occurs. The Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) deployed a Hα patrol system in 2010. This provides a modern system with near identical equipment to compare flares from six different sites. The classification of flares and techniques of flare measurement will be briefly discussed. The results presented here suggest that even though different GONG sites report different flare areas and brightnesses, for some sites they vary in a consistent way allowing correction factors to be applied.

  5. Towards the circuit theory of solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, V. V.; Stepanov, A. V.

    1992-06-01

    The coalescence of a flare loop and a filament is presently used to illustrate magnetic-loop reemergence and the correct application of the generalized form of Ohm's law for solar flares. Flare energy release entails large current values, a nonsteady-state process, and the existence of a neutral component in a flare plasma. Current dissipation furnishes effective Joule heating of the plasma and particle acceleration in a solar flare. Due to the decisive role played in the energy release process by ion-atom collisions, flare loop resistance can grow by 8-10 orders of magnitude. The energy release from the upper part of a flare loop stimulates powerful energy release from the chromospheric level.

  6. The dynamo theory of solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, V. V.; Stepanov, A. V.

    1991-04-01

    It is shown that the main problems of the dynamo theory of solar flares; namely, the unrealistically great current growth time and the current interruption mechanism, can be solved by assuming the emergence of magnetic loops with current and by the correct application of Ohm's law. A generalized Ohm's law for solar flares is obtained, and prerequisites for flare energy release are proposed. Coalescence of a flare loop and of a filament is considered as an example, and it is shown that the current dissipation increases dramatically as compared with that in completely ionized plasma, providing effective Joule heating of the plasma and particle acceleration in a solar flare. The ion-atom collisions play the decisive role in the energy release process, leading to an 8-10-order-of-magnitude increase in the flare loop resistance. The energy release emerging from the upper part of a flare loop stimulates a powerful energy release in the chromosphere.

  7. The Nature of CME-flare-Associated Coronal Dimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, J. X.; Qiu, J.

    2016-07-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are often accompanied by coronal dimming that is evident in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray observations. The locations of dimming are sometimes considered to map footpoints of the erupting flux rope. As the emitting material expands in the corona, the decreased plasma density leads to reduced emission observed in spectral and irradiance measurements. Therefore, signatures of dimming may reflect the properties of CMEs in the early phase of their eruption. In this study, we analyze the event of flare, CME, and coronal dimming on 2011 December 26. We use the data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory for disk observations of the dimming, and analyze images taken by EUVI, COR1, and COR2 on board the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory to obtain the height and velocity of the associated CMEs observed at the limb. We also measure the magnetic reconnection rate from flare observations. Dimming occurs in a few locations next to the flare ribbons, and it is observed in multiple EUV passbands. Rapid dimming starts after the onset of fast reconnection and CME acceleration, and its evolution tracks the CME height and flare reconnection. The spatial distribution of dimming exhibits cores of deep dimming with a rapid growth, and their light curves are approximately linearly scaled with the CME height profile. From the dimming analysis we infer the process of the CME expansion, and estimate properties of the CME.

  8. Nature of CME-flare Associated Coronal Dimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jianxia; Qiu, Jiong

    2016-04-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are often accompanied by coronal dimming evident in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray observations. The locations of dimming are sometimes considered to map footpoints of the erupting flux rope. As emitting material expands in the corona, the decreased plasma density leads to reduced emission observed in spectral and irradiance measurements. Therefore, signatures of dimming may reflect properties of CMEs in the early phase of eruption. We analyze the event of flare, CME, and coronal dimming on December 26, 2011. Data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on Solar Dynamics Observatories (SDO) are used for disk observations of the dimming, and images taken by EUVI, COR1, and COR2 onboard the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatories are used to obtain height and velocity of the associated CMEs observed at the limb. We also calculate magnetic reconnection rate from flare observations. Dimming occurs in a few locations next to flare ribbons, and is observed in multiple EUV passbands. Rapid dimming starts after onset of fast reconnection and CME acceleration, and its evolution well tracks the CME height and flare reconnection. Spatial distribution of dimming exhibits cores of deep dimming with rapid growth, and their light curves are approximately linearly scaled with the CME height profile. From dimming analysis, we infer the process of CME expansion, and estimate properties of the CME.

  9. THERMODYNAMIC SPECTRUM OF SOLAR FLARES BASED ON SDO/EVE OBSERVATIONS: TECHNIQUES AND FIRST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yuming; Zhou, Zhenjun; Liu, Kai; Liu, Rui; Shen, Chenglong; Zhang, Jie; Chamberlin, Phillip C.

    2016-03-15

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) provides rich information on the thermodynamic processes of solar activities, particularly on solar flares. Here, we develop a method to construct thermodynamic spectrum (TDS) charts based on the EVE spectral lines. This tool could potentially be useful for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) astronomy to learn about the eruptive activities on distant astronomical objects. Through several cases, we illustrate what we can learn from the TDS charts. Furthermore, we apply the TDS method to 74 flares equal to or greater than the M5.0 class, and reach the following statistical results. First, EUV peaks are always behind the soft X-ray (SXR) peaks and stronger flares tend to have faster cooling rates. There is a power-law correlation between the peak delay times and the cooling rates, suggesting a coherent cooling process of flares from SXR to EUV emissions. Second, there are two distinct temperature drift patterns, called Type I and Type II. For Type I flares, the enhanced emission drifts from high to low temperature like a quadrilateral, whereas for Type II flares the drift pattern looks like a triangle. Statistical analysis suggests that Type II flares are more impulsive than Type I flares. Third, for late-phase flares, the peak intensity ratio of the late phase to the main phase is roughly correlated with the flare class, and the flares with a strong late phase are all confined. We believe that the re-deposition of the energy carried by a flux rope, which unsuccessfully erupts out, into thermal emissions is responsible for the strong late phase found in a confined flare. Furthermore, we show the signatures of the flare thermodynamic process in the chromosphere and transition region in the TDS charts. These results provide new clues to advance our understanding of the thermodynamic processes of solar flares and associated solar eruptions, e.g., coronal mass ejections.

  10. Early and late mammalian responses to heavy charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ainsworth, E. J.

    1986-01-01

    This overview summarizes murine results on acute lethality responses, inactivation of marrow CFU-S and intestinal microcolonies, testes weight loss, life span shortening, and posterior lens opacification in mice irradiated with heavy charged particles. RBE-LET relationships for these mammalian responses are compared with results from in vitro studies. The trend is that the maximum RBE for in vivo responses tends to be lower and occurs at a lower LET than for inactivation of V79 and T-1 cells in culture. Based on inactivation cross sections, the response of CFU-S in vivo conforms to expectations from earlier studies with prokaryotic systems and mammalian cells in culture. Effects of heavy ions are compared with fission spectrum neutrons, and the results are consistent with the interpretation that RBEs are lower than for fission neutrons at about the same LET, probably due to differences in track structure.

  11. Early and late mammalian responses to heavy charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ainsworth, E. J.

    1986-01-01

    This overview summarizes murine results on acute lethality responses, inactivation of marrow CFU-S and intestinal microcolonies, testes weight loss, life span shortening, and posterior lens opacification in mice irradiated with heavy charged particles. RBE-LET relationships for these mammalian responses are compared with results from in vitro studies. The trend is that the maximum RBE for in vivo responses tends to be lower and occurs at a lower LET than for inactivation of V79 and T-1 cells in culture. Based on inactivation cross sections, the response of CFU-S in vivo conforms to expectations from earlier studies with prokaryotic systems and mammalian cells in culture. Effects of heavy ions are compared with fission spectrum neutrons, and the results are consistent with the interpretation that RBEs are lower than for fission neutrons at about the same LET, probably due to differences in track structure.

  12. Communication and Alert Maintenance Program for Early Response Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Richardson, Laura [D-CA-37

    2011-09-07

    House - 09/27/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response and Communications. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  13. Statistical Analyses of White-Light Flares: Two Main Results about Flare Behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal, Hasan Ali

    2012-08-01

    We present two main results, based on models and the statistical analyses of 1672 U-band flares. We also discuss the behaviour of white-light flares. In addition, the parameters of the flares detected from two years of observations on CR Dra are presented. By comparing with flare parameters obtained from other UV Ceti-type stars, we examine the behaviour of the optical flare processes along with the spectral types. Moreover, we aimed, using large white-light flare data, to analyse the flare time-scales with respect to some results obtained from X-ray observations. Using SPSS V17.0 and GraphPad Prism V5.02 software, the flares detected from CR Dra were modelled with the OPEA function, and analysed with the t-Test method to compare similar flare events in other stars. In addition, using some regression calculations in order to derive the best histograms, the time-scales of white-light flares were analysed. Firstly, CR Dra flares have revealed that white-light flares behave in a similar way as their counterparts observed in X-rays. As can be seen in X-ray observations, the electron density seems to be a dominant parameter in white-light flare process, too. Secondly, the distributions of the flare time-scales demonstrate that the number of observed flares reaches a maximum value in some particular ratios, which are 0.5, or its multiples, and especially positive integers. The thermal processes might be dominant for these white-light flares, while non-thermal processes might be dominant in the others. To obtain better results for the behaviour of the white-light flare process along with the spectral types, much more stars in a wide spectral range, from spectral type dK5e to dM6e, must be observed in white-light flare patrols.

  14. ANTERIOR CHAMBER FLARE DURING BEVACIZUMAB TREATMENT IN EYES WITH EXUDATIVE AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION.

    PubMed

    Hautamäki, Asta; Luoma, Arto; Immonen, Ilkka

    2016-11-01

    To study the anterior chamber flare during bevacizumab treatment of exudative age-related macular degeneration. During a 2-year prospective follow-up, 50 patients recently diagnosed with exudative age-related macular degeneration were treated at once-a-month visits if subretinal or intraretinal fluid or a new hemorrhage was present in the lesion area. Flare was measured weekly during the first month and then monthly in both eyes. Higher flare was associated with older age (P = 0.007, Linear Mixed Model), higher number of smoking pack-years (P = 0.019), macular cysts (P = 0.041), and pseudophakia (P = 0.003). The levels gradually increased during the follow-up (P < 0.0001) but less in the eyes with classic CNV (P = 0.011). Flare decreased during treatment-free periods lasting for at least two consecutive visits (P = 0.005). A peak in flare was observed 1 week after the first injection (P = 0.034, Wilcoxon signed rank test). In the fellow eyes, higher flare values in the beginning of the follow-up were associated with later conversion into exudative age-related macular degeneration (P = 0.015, Mann-Whitney U test). Anterior chamber flare correlated poorly with the CNV activity. Higher levels may, however, precede or exist early in the process that leads to the development of exudative age-related macular degeneration.

  15. Early Hemostatic Responses to Trauma Identified Using Hierarchical Clustering Analysis

    PubMed Central

    White, N.J.; Contaifer, D.; Martin, E.J.; Newton, J.C.; Mohammed, B.M.; Bostic, J.L.; Brophy, G.M.; Spiess, B.D.; Pusateri, A.E.; Ward, K.R.; Brophy, D.F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Trauma-induced coagulopathy is a complex multifactorial hemostatic response that is poorly understood. Objectives Identify distinct hemostatic responses to trauma and identify key components of the hemostatic system that vary between responses. Patients/Methods Cross-sectional observational study of adult trauma patients at an urban Level I trauma center Emergency Department. Hierarchical clustering analysis was used to identify distinct clusters of similar subjects using vital signs, injury/shock severity, and by comprehensive assessment of coagulation, clot formation, platelet function, and thrombin generation. Results Of 84 total trauma patients included in the model, three distinct trauma clusters were identified. Cluster 1 (N=57) displayed platelet activation, preserved peak thrombin generation, plasma coagulation dysfunction, moderately decreased fibrinogen concentration, and normal clot formation relative to healthy controls. Cluster 2 (N=18) displayed platelet activation, preserved peak thrombin generation, and preserved fibrinogen concentration with normal clot formation. Cluster 3 (N=9) was the most severely injured and shocked and displayed a strong inflammatory and bleeding phenotype. Platelet dysfunction, thrombin inhibition, plasma coagulation dysfunction, and decreased fibrinogen concentration were present in this cluster. Fibrinolytic activation was present in all clusters, but increased more so in Cluster 3. Trauma clusters were different most noticeably in their relative fibrinogen concentration, peak thrombin generation, and platelet-induced clot contraction. Conclusions Hierarchical clustering analysis identified 3 distinct hemostatic responses to trauma. Further insight into the underlying hemostatic mechanisms responsible for these responses is needed. PMID:25816845

  16. Observations and Modeling of Solar Flare Atmospheric Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.

    2015-09-01

    spectral lines at the first point are mostly blueshifted, with the hotter lines showing a dominant blueshifted component over the stationary one. At the second point, however, only weak upflows are detected; instead, notable downflows appear at high temperatures (up to 2.5-5.0 MK). The third point is similar to the second one except that it shows evidence of multi-component downflows. While the evaporated plasma falling back down as warm rain is a possible cause of the redshifts at the second and third points, the different patterns of chromospheric evaporation at the three points imply the existence of different heating mechanisms in the flaring region. Then, we study the flare heating and dynamics using the ``enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops'' (EBTEL) model. We analyze an M1.0 flare on 2011 February 16. This flare is composed of two distinctive loop systems observed in EUV images. The UV 1600 Å emission at the feet of these loops exhibits a rapid rise, followed by enhanced emission in different EUV channels observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Such a behavior is indicative of impulsive energy deposit, and the subsequent response of overlying coronal loops. Using the method recently developed, we infer empirical heating functions from the rapid rise of the UV light curves for the two loop systems, respectively, treated as two big loops with cross-sectional area of 5'' by 5'', and compute the plasma evolution in the loops using the EBTEL model. We further compute the synthetic EUV light curves, which, with the limitation of the model, agree reasonably with the observed light curves obtained in multiple AIA channels and EIS lines: they show the same evolution trend, and their magnitudes are comparable within a factor of two. We also compare the computed mean enthalpy flow velocity with the Doppler shifts of EIS lines during the decay phase of the two loops. Our results suggest that the two different

  17. Implications for energy transport in solar flares from the recent observations of sun-quakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, S. A.; Zharkov, S.; Zharkova, V. V.; Green, L.; Pedram, E.

    2011-12-01

    Analysis of seismic emission (sun-quakes) induced in the solar interior in the vicinity of flares offers us an opportunity to explore the physical processes of energy transport in flaring atmospheres. Only about 17 M and X-class flares have been reported to show seismic signatures in the form or ripples or egression sources, revealing that some of the most powerful flares often do not produce any seismic signatures. In addition, the most powerful signatures were recorded from an M-class flare. This raises important questions about how the flare energy and momentum are transported to the solar surface and interior in order to produce sun-quakes. Observations of ripples associated with the first few sun-quakes suggested that hydrodynamic shocks arising from a hydrodynamic response of the ambient plasma to precipitation of energetic particles (electrons or protons) are plausible sources of the seismic emission. Later, noting that sun-quakes are often co-spatial with hard X-ray and white light, another source of seismic emission was proposed related to back-warming of the photosphere by the enhanced chromospheric and coronal radiation caused by physical processes in flares. A third mechanism proposed to account for sun-quakes is related to possible Lorentz force transients that occur as a result of the coronal restructuring of the magnetic field in flares. Recent work comparing samples of white-light flares with and without sun-quakes, and new observations with GONG, Hinode and SDO of seismic emission associated with the X-class flares of 14 December 2006 and 15 February 2011 demonstrate inconsistencies with some existing models. In this paper these inconsistencies are explored and possible alternative scenarios are discussed.

  18. Detection of the Acceleration Site in a Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleishman, Gregory D.; Kontar, E. P.; Nita, G. M.; Gary, D. E.

    2011-05-01

    We report the observation of an unusual cold, tenuous solar flare (ApJL, v. 731, p. L19, 2011), which reveals itself via numerous and prominent non-thermal manifestations, while lacking any noticeable thermal emission signature. RHESSI hard X-rays and 0.1-18 GHz radio data from OVSA and Phoenix-2 show copious electron acceleration (1035 electrons per second above 10 keV) typical for GOES M-class flares with electrons energies up to 100 keV, but GOES temperatures not exceeding 6.1 MK. The HXR footpoints and coronal radio sources belong, supposedly, to a single magnetic loop, which departs strongly from the corresponding potential loop (obtained from a photospheric extrapolation) in agreement with the apparent need of a non-potential magnetic field structure to produce a flare. The imaging, temporal, and spectral characteristics of the flare have led us to a firm conclusion that the bulk of the microwave continuum emission from this flare was produced directly in the acceleration region. We found that the electron acceleration efficiency is very high in the flare, so almost all available thermal electrons are eventually accelerated. However, given a relatively small flaring volume and rather low thermal density at the flaring loop, the total energy release turned out to be insufficient for a significant heating of the coronal plasma or for a prominent chromospheric response giving rise to chromospheric evaporation. Some sort of stochastic acceleration process is needed to account for an approximately energy-independent lifetime of about 3 s for the electrons in the acceleration region. This work was supported in part by NSF grants AGS-0961867, AST-0908344, and NASA grants NNX10AF27G and NNX11AB49G to New Jersey Institute of Technology. This work was supported by a UK STFC rolling grant, STFC/PPARC Advanced Fellowship, and the Leverhulme Trust, UK. Financial support by the European Commission through the SOLAIRE and HESPE Networks is gratefully acknowledged.

  19. Truncated disc surface brightness profiles produced by flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borlaff, Alejandro; Eliche-Moral, M. Carmen; Beckman, John; Font, Joan

    2017-03-01

    Previous studies have discarded that flares in galactic discs may explain the truncation that are frequently observed in highly-inclined galaxies (Kregel et al. 2002). However, no study has systematically analysed this hypothesis using realistic models for the disc, the flare and the bulge. We derive edge-on and face-on surface brightness profiles for a series of realistic galaxy models with flared discs that sample a wide range of structural and photometric parameters across the Hubble Sequence, accordingly to observations. The surface brightness profile for each galaxy model has been simulated for edge-on and face-on views to find out whether the flared disc produces a significant truncation in the disc in the edge-on view compared to the face-on view or not. In order to simulate realistic images of disc galaxies, we have considered the observational distribution of the photometric parameters as a function of the morphological type for three mass bins (10 < log10(M/M ⊙) < 10.7, 10.7 < log10(M/M ⊙) < 11 and log10(M/M ⊙) > 11), and four morphological type bins (S0-Sa, Sb-Sbc, Sc-Scd and Sd-Sdm). For each mass bin, we have restricted the photometric and structural parameters of each modelled galaxy to their characteristic observational ranges (μ0, disc, μeff, bulge, B/T, M abs, r eff, n bulge, h R, disc) and the flare in the disc (h z, disc/h R, disc, ∂h z, disc/∂R, see de Grijs & Peletier 1997, Graham 2001, López-Corredoira et al. 2002, Yoachim & Dalcanton 2006, Bizyaev et al. 2014, Mosenkov et al. 2015). Contrary to previous claims, the simulations show that realistic flared disks can be responsible for the truncations observed in many edge-on systems, preserving the profile of the non-flared analogous model in face-on view. These breaks reproduce the properties of the weak-to-intermediate breaks observed in many real Type-II galaxies in the diagram relating the radial location of the break (R brkII) in units of the inner disk scale-length with the

  20. Nutritional programming affects hypothalamic organization and early response to leptin.

    PubMed

    Coupé, Bérengère; Amarger, Valérie; Grit, Isabelle; Benani, Alexandre; Parnet, Patricia

    2010-02-01

    Nutritional programming, taking place in utero or early after birth, is closely linked with metabolic and appetite disorders in adulthood. Following the hypothesis that nutritional programming impacts hypothalamic neuronal organization, we report on discrepancies of multiple molecular and cellular early events that take place in the hypothalamus of rats submitted to intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Expression screening performed on hypothalami from IUGR rats at birth and at postnatal d 12 identified changes in gene expression of neurodevelopmental process (cell differentiation and cytoskeleton organization). Additionally, a slight reduction of agouti-related protein and a strong reduction of alpha-MSH-immunoreactive efferent fibers were demonstrated in the paraventricular nucleus of IUGR rats. Rapid catch-up growth of IUGR rats, 5 d after birth, had a positive effect on neurodevelopmental factors and on neuronal projections emanating from the arcuate nucleus. The molecular and cellular anomalies detected in IUGR rats can be related to the reduced and delayed plasma leptin surge from d 0-16 when compared with control and IUGR rats with catch-up growth. However, the ability of leptin to activate intracellular signaling in arcuate nucleus neurons was not reduced in IUGR rats. Other mechanism such as epigenetic regulation of the major appetite-regulating neuropeptides genes was analyzed in parallel with their mRNA expression during postnatal development. This study reveals the importance of an early catch-up growth that reduces abnormal organization of hypothalamic pathways involved in energy homeostasis, whereas protein restriction, maintained during postnatal development leads to an important immaturity of the hypothalamus.

  1. Thompson Receives 2013 Early Career Hydrologic Science Award: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Sally

    2014-08-01

    My most sincere thanks to AGU; the Hydrology section and its chair, Eric Wood; those who were kind enough to nominate me for this award; and, of course, the inimitable Gaby Katul for their support and for this recognition. Receiving the Early Career Hydrologic Science Award is an unexpected and humbling pleasure. After seven schizophrenic years of physical scientists accusing me of being an ecologist and ecologists telling me firmly that I'm an engineer, it's wonderful to be able to come to rest where I have always self-identified—as a hydrologist!

  2. Cellular Immune Responses and Viral Diversity in Individuals Treated during Acute and Early HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Altfeld, Marcus; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Shankarappa, Raj; Mukherjee, Joia S.; Hecht, Frederick M.; Eldridge, Robert L.; Addo, Marylyn M.; Poon, Samuel H.; Phillips, Mary N.; Robbins, Gregory K.; Sax, Paul E.; Boswell, Steve; Kahn, James O.; Brander, Christian; Goulder, Philip J.R.; Levy, Jay A.; Mullins, James I.; Walker, Bruce D.

    2001-01-01

    Immune responses induced during the early stages of chronic viral infections are thought to influence disease outcome. Using HIV as a model, we examined virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), T helper cells, and viral genetic diversity in relation to duration of infection and subsequent response to antiviral therapy. Individuals with acute HIV-1 infection treated before seroconversion had weaker CTL responses directed at fewer epitopes than persons who were treated after seroconversion. However, treatment-induced control of viremia was associated with the development of strong T helper cell responses in both groups. After 1 yr of antiviral treatment initiated in acute or early infection, all epitope-specific CTL responses persisted despite undetectable viral loads. The breadth and magnitude of CTL responses remained significantly less in treated acute infection than in treated chronic infection, but viral diversity was also significantly less with immediate therapy. We conclude that early treatment of acute HIV infection leads to a more narrowly directed CTL response, stronger T helper cell responses, and a less diverse virus population. Given the need for T helper cells to maintain effective CTL responses and the ability of virus diversification to accommodate immune escape, we hypothesize that early therapy of primary infection may be beneficial despite induction of less robust CTL responses. These data also provide rationale for therapeutic immunization aimed at broadening CTL responses in treated primary HIV infection. PMID:11148221

  3. Modeling Solar Flare Hard X-ray Images and Spectra Observed with RHESSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, Linhui

    2005-01-01

    predictions of the standard flare models: the downward motion of flare loops in the early impulsive phase of each flare, and an initially stationary coronal source above the loops. These features me believed to be related to the formation and development of a current sheet. In particular, the downward loop motion seem to be a common phenomenon in flares, suggesting the necessity for modifications to the existing standard flare. models. Finally, thanks to the broad energy coverage of the RHESSI spectra, a low-energy cutoff of 28 (plus or minus 2) keV in the nonthermal electron distribution was determined for the April 15, 2002, flare. As a result, the energy carried by the nonthermal electrons is found to be comparable to the thermal energy of the flare, but one order of magnitude larger than the kinetic energy of the associated coronal mass ejection. The method used to deduce the electron low-energy cutoff will be useful in the analyses of similar events.

  4. Modeling Solar Flare Hard X-ray Images and Spectra Observed with RHESSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, Linhui

    2005-01-01

    predictions of the standard flare models: the downward motion of flare loops in the early impulsive phase of each flare, and an initially stationary coronal source above the loops. These features me believed to be related to the formation and development of a current sheet. In particular, the downward loop motion seem to be a common phenomenon in flares, suggesting the necessity for modifications to the existing standard flare. models. Finally, thanks to the broad energy coverage of the RHESSI spectra, a low-energy cutoff of 28 (plus or minus 2) keV in the nonthermal electron distribution was determined for the April 15, 2002, flare. As a result, the energy carried by the nonthermal electrons is found to be comparable to the thermal energy of the flare, but one order of magnitude larger than the kinetic energy of the associated coronal mass ejection. The method used to deduce the electron low-energy cutoff will be useful in the analyses of similar events.

  5. Response to therapy following retreatment of serofast early syphilis patients with benzathine penicillin.

    PubMed

    Seña, Arlene C; Wolff, Mark; Behets, Frieda; Van Damme, Kathleen; Martin, David H; Leone, Peter; McNeil, Linda; Hook, Edward W

    2013-02-01

    Persistent nontreponemal titers after treatment are common among patients with early syphilis. We retreated 82 human immunodeficiency virus-negative early syphilis participants who were serofast at 6 months using benzathine penicillin. Only 27% exhibited serological response after retreatment and after an additional 6 months of follow-up.

  6. Frameworks for Response to Intervention in Early Childhood: Description and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Communication Disorders Quarterly, 2014

    2014-01-01

    In February, 2013, the Division of Early Childhood, the National Association for the Education of Young Children, and the National Head Start Association released a collaborative paper to provide clarification and assistance regarding the relationship of response to intervention (RTI) with the field of early childhood (EC). In addition to…

  7. Parent Involvement in Early Intervening and Responsiveness to Invention (RTI). A Primer for Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mountain Plains Regional Resource Center (MPRRC), 2007

    2007-01-01

    The focus of this primer is to explain Responsiveness to Intervention (RTI) and Early Intervening Services as they pertain to parents and children who are at risk for academic and behavioral problems, explaining changes to special education law and how parents should be involved in each process. Emphasis on early intervening services allows action…

  8. Measuring Early Childhood Teacher Candidates' Conceptualizations of a Culturally Responsive Classroom Ecology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Belinda Bustos; Riojas-Cortez, Mari

    2009-01-01

    With the increase of Latino preschoolers, it is pressing that early childhood teachers are prepared to create a high quality environment in which all children can succeed. Using the frameworks of cultural responsiveness and classroom management, we developed the Early Childhood Ecology Scale (ECES) as an observational and reflective tool to…

  9. Multidecadal response of naturally regenerated southern pine to early competition control and commercial thinning

    Treesearch

    Andrew S. Nelson; Don C. Bragg

    2016-01-01

    Multidecadal responses to early competition control are poorly documented in naturally regenerated southern pine stands. This study examined the effects of the following early herbicide treatments in thinned southern pine stands through age 31: (1) no control (CK), (2) herbaceous vegetation control only (HC), (3) woody vegetation control only (WC), and (4) total (woody...

  10. The Kepler Catalog of Stellar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, James R. A.

    2016-09-01

    A homogeneous search for stellar flares has been performed using every available Kepler light curve. An iterative light curve de-trending approach was used to filter out both astrophysical and systematic variability to detect flares. The flare recovery completeness has also been computed throughout each light curve using artificial flare injection tests, and the tools for this work have been made publicly available. The final sample contains 851,168 candidate flare events recovered above the 68% completeness threshold, which were detected from 4041 stars, or 1.9% of the stars in the Kepler database. The average flare energy detected is ˜1035 erg. The net fraction of flare stars increases with g - i color, or decreasing stellar mass. For stars in this sample with previously measured rotation periods, the total relative flare luminosity is compared to the Rossby number. A tentative detection of flare activity saturation for low-mass stars with rapid rotation below a Rossby number of ˜0.03 is found. A power-law decay in flare activity with Rossby number is found with a slope of -1, shallower than typical measurements for X-ray activity decay with Rossby number.

  11. Defining Clinical Response Criteria and Early Response Criteria for Precision Oncology: Current State-of-the-Art and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Subbiah, Vivek; Chuang, Hubert H.; Gambhire, Dhiraj; Kairemo, Kalevi

    2017-01-01

    In this era of precision oncology, there has been an exponential growth in the armamentarium of genomically targeted therapies and immunotherapies. Evaluating early responses to precision therapy is essential for “go” versus “no go” decisions for these molecularly targeted drugs and agents that arm the immune system. Many different response assessment criteria exist for use in solid tumors and lymphomas. We reviewed the literature using the Medline/PubMed database for keywords “response assessment” and various known response assessment criteria published up to 2016. In this article we review the commonly used response assessment criteria. We present a decision tree to facilitate selection of appropriate criteria. We also suggest methods for standardization of various response assessment criteria. The relevant response assessment criteria were further studied for rational of development, key features, proposed use and acceptance by various entities. We also discuss early response evaluation and provide specific case studies of early response to targeted therapy. With high-throughput, advanced computing programs and digital data-mining it is now possible to acquire vast amount of high quality imaging data opening up a new field of “omics in radiology”—radiomics that complements genomics for personalized medicine. Radiomics is rapidly evolving and is still in the research arena. This cutting-edge technology is poised to move soon to the mainstream clinical arena. Novel agents with new mechanisms of action require advanced molecular imaging as imaging biomarkers. There is an urgent need for development of standardized early response assessment criteria for evaluation of response to precision therapy. PMID:28212290

  12. Defining Clinical Response Criteria and Early Response Criteria for Precision Oncology: Current State-of-the-Art and Future Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Subbiah, Vivek; Chuang, Hubert H; Gambhire, Dhiraj; Kairemo, Kalevi

    2017-02-15

    In this era of precision oncology, there has been an exponential growth in the armamentarium of genomically targeted therapies and immunotherapies. Evaluating early responses to precision therapy is essential for "go" versus "no go" decisions for these molecularly targeted drugs and agents that arm the immune system. Many different response assessment criteria exist for use in solid tumors and lymphomas. We reviewed the literature using the Medline/PubMed database for keywords "response assessment" and various known response assessment criteria published up to 2016. In this article we review the commonly used response assessment criteria. We present a decision tree to facilitate selection of appropriate criteria. We also suggest methods for standardization of various response assessment criteria. The relevant response assessment criteria were further studied for rational of development, key features, proposed use and acceptance by various entities. We also discuss early response evaluation and provide specific case studies of early response to targeted therapy. With high-throughput, advanced computing programs and digital data-mining it is now possible to acquire vast amount of high quality imaging data opening up a new field of "omics in radiology"-radiomics that complements genomics for personalized medicine. Radiomics is rapidly evolving and is still in the research arena. This cutting-edge technology is poised to move soon to the mainstream clinical arena. Novel agents with new mechanisms of action require advanced molecular imaging as imaging biomarkers. There is an urgent need for development of standardized early response assessment criteria for evaluation of response to precision therapy.

  13. The Development of Attention and Response Inhibition in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartgis, Jami; Thomas, David G.; Lefler, Elizabeth K.; Hartung, Cynthia M.

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the development of attention and response inhibition from ages 5 to 7. Forty children (20 5-year-olds and 20 7-year-olds) completed four counterbalanced phases of a continuous performance task. Phase 1 was designed to measure attention without distraction, Phase 2 was designed to measure attention with…

  14. The Effects of Flare Definitions on the Statistics of Derived Flare Distrubtions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Daniel; Dominique, Marie; Seaton, Daniel B.; Stegen, Koen; White, Arthur

    2016-05-01

    The statistical examination of solar flares is crucial to revealing their global characteristics and behaviour. However, statistical flare studies are often performed using standard but basic flare detection algorithms relying on arbitrary thresholds which may affect the derived flare distributions. We explore the effect of the arbitrary thresholds used in the GOES event list and LYRA Flare Finder algorithms. We find that there is a small but significant relationship between the power law exponent of the GOES flare peak flux frequency distribution and the algorithms’ flare start thresholds. We also find that the power law exponents of these distributions are not stable but appear to steepen with increasing peak flux. This implies that the observed flare size distribution may not be a power law at all. We show that depending on the true value of the exponent of the flare size distribution, this deviation from a power law may be due to flares missed by the flare detection algorithms. However, it is not possible determine the true exponent from GOES/XRS observations. Additionally we find that the PROBA2/LYRA flare size distributions are clearly non-power law. We show that this is consistent with an insufficient degradation correction which causes LYRA absolute irradiance values to be unreliable. This means that they should not be used for flare statistics or energetics unless degradation is adequately accounted for. However they can be used to study time variations over shorter timescales and for space weather monitoring.

  15. DNA Microarray Analysis of Human Monocytes Early Response Genes upon Infection with Rickettsia rickettsii

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-11-15

    DNA Microarray Analysis of Human Monocytes Early Response Genes upon Infection with Rickettsia rickettsii Chien-Chung Chao Rickettsiae Diseases...TITLE AND SUBTITLE DNA Microarray Analysis of Human Monocytes Early Response Genes upon Infection with Rickettsia rickettsii 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...ANSI Std Z39-18 Rickettsiae • Gram negative coccobacillary bacteria • Obligate intracellular organisms • Arthropod-borne • Cause febrile diseases (mild

  16. Electron impact polarization expected in solar EUV lines from flaring chromospheres/transition regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fineschi, S.; Fontenla, Juan M.; Macneice, P.; Ljepojevic, N. N.

    1991-01-01

    We have evaluated lower bounds on the degree of impact Extreme Ultraviolet/Ultraviolet (EUV/UV) line polarization expected during solar flares. This polarization arises from collisional excitation by energetic electrons with non-Maxwellian velocity distributions. Linear polarization was observed in the S I 1437 A line by the Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter/Solar Maximum Mission (UVSP/SMM) during a flare on 15 July 1980. An early interpretation suggested that impact excitation by electrons propagating through the steep temperature gradient of the flaring transition region/high chromosphere produced this polarization. Our calculations show that the observed polarization in this UV line cannot be due to this effect. We find instead that, in some flare models, the energetic electrons can produce an impact polarization of a few percent in EUV neutral helium lines (i.e., lambda lambda 522, 537, and 584 A).

  17. Helium (3) Rich Solar Flares

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Colgate, S. A.; Audouze, J.; Fowler, W. A.

    1977-05-03

    The extreme enrichment of {sup 3} He {sup 4} He greater than or equal to 1 in some solar flares as due to spallation and the subsequent confinement of the products in a high temperature, kT approx. = 200 keV, high density, n{sub e} approx. = 3 x 10{sup 15} cm {sup -3} plasma associated with the magnetic instability producing the flare is interpreted. The pinch or filament is a current of high energy protons that creates the spallation and maintains the temperature that produces the high energy x-ray spectrum and depletes other isotopes D, Li, Be, and B as observed. Finally the high temperature plasma is a uniquely efficient spallation target that is powered by the interaction of stellar convection and self generated magnetic field.

  18. Mid-level Solar Flare

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory captured these images of a solar flare on Oct. 2, 2014. The solar flare is the bright flash of light on the right limb of the sun. A burst of solar material erupting out into space can be seen just below it. Read more: 1.usa.gov/1mW8rel Credit: NASA/Goddard/SDO NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  19. Magnetic Reconnection and Energy Release in Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Jiong

    2017-04-01

    In the past twenty years, solar flare observations have demonstrated a few fascinating aspects of fast reconnection responsible for impulsive energy release in the solar corona. A flare consists of a cluster of sequentially formed coronal loops and chromosphere bright kernels mapping the feet of these loops. These are believed to reflect the intermittent nature of reconnection, indicating that reconnection and subsequent energy release are temporally and spatially fragmented. What is the physical nature of the fragmentation? What are the basic scales of these fragments? Can observational measurements at present or in the near future provide the elementary quantities of reconnection and energy release? On the other hand, observations of the apparently ordered spread of brightening of flare kernels or loops suggest that the flare, or reconnection, progress is not entirely sporadic. What are the causes or consequences of such an organization? Whereas nature's purpose of reconnection is to release energy, the link between reconnection and energy release has been largely missing. It has not been clear how, and by how much, the free magnetic energy accessible via reconnection is released in packets and converted to other forms. This talk will report some recent effort to study reconnection dynamics and measure energy released in reconnection events.

  20. LONG DURATION FLARE EMISSION: IMPULSIVE HEATING OR GRADUAL HEATING?

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Jiong; Longcope, Dana W.

    2016-03-20

    Flare emissions in X-ray and EUV wavelengths have previously been modeled as the plasma response to impulsive heating from magnetic reconnection. Some flares exhibit gradually evolving X-ray and EUV light curves, which are believed to result from superposition of an extended sequence of impulsive heating events occurring in different adjacent loops or even unresolved threads within each loop. In this paper, we apply this approach to a long duration two-ribbon flare SOL2011-09-13T22 observed by the Atmosphere Imaging Assembly (AIA). We find that to reconcile with observed signatures of flare emission in multiple EUV wavelengths, each thread should be heated in two phases, an intense impulsive heating followed by a gradual, low-rate heating tail that is attenuated over 20–30 minutes. Each AIA resolved single loop may be composed of several such threads. The two-phase heating scenario is supported by modeling with both a zero-dimensional and a 1D hydrodynamic code. We discuss viable physical mechanisms for the two-phase heating in a post-reconnection thread.

  1. The challenges of the models of solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, A. V.; Zaitsev, V. V.

    2016-12-01

    The challenges of `standard' model of solar flares motivated by new observations with the spacecrafts and ground-based telescopes are presented. The most important problems are in situ heating of photospheric and chromospheric loop footpoints up to the coronal temperatures without precipitating particle beams accelerated in the corona, and the sunquakes which are unlikely to be explained by the impact of highenergy particles producing hard X-ray emission. There is also the long-standing `number problem' in the physics of solar flares. It is shown that modern observations favored an important role of the electric currents in the energy release processes in the low solar atmosphere. Particle acceleration mechanism in the electric fields driven by the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the chromosphere is proposed. The electric current value I ≥ 1010 A, needed for the excitation of super-Dreicer electric fields in the chromosphere is determined. It is shown that both Joule dissipation of the electric currents and the particles accelerated in the chromosphere can be responsible for in situ heating of the low solar atmosphere. Alternative model of the solar flare based on the analogy between the flaring loop and an equivalent electric circuit which is good tool for the electric current diagnostics is presented. Interaction of a current-carrying loop with the partially-ionized plasma of prominence in the context of particle acceleration is considered. The role of plasma radiation mechanism in the sub-THz emission from the chromosphere is discussed.

  2. 3D flare particle model for ShipIR/NTCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, Srinivasan; Vaitekunas, David A.

    2016-05-01

    A key component in any soft-kill response to an incoming guided missile is the flare /chaff decoy used to distract or seduce the seeker homing system away from the naval platform. This paper describes a new 3D flare particle model in the naval threat countermeasure simulator (NTCS) of the NATO-standard ship signature model (ShipIR), which provides independent control over the size and radial distribution of its signature. The 3D particles of each flare sub-munition are modelled stochastically and rendered using OpenGL z-buffering, 2D projection, and alpha-blending to produce a unique and time varying signature. A sensitivity analysis on each input parameter provides the data and methods needed to synthesize a model from an IR measurement of a decoy. The new model also eliminated artifacts and deficiencies in our previous model which prevented reliable tracks from the adaptive track gate algorithm already presented by Ramaswamy and Vaitekunas (2015). A sequence of scenarios are used to test and demonstrate the new flare model during a missile engagement.

  3. Modeling Repeatedly Flaring δ Sunspots.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Piyali; Hansteen, Viggo; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-03-11

    Active regions (ARs) appearing on the surface of the Sun are classified into α, β, γ, and δ by the rules of the Mount Wilson Observatory, California on the basis of their topological complexity. Amongst these, the δ sunspots are known to be superactive and produce the most x-ray flares. Here, we present results from a simulation of the Sun by mimicking the upper layers and the corona, but starting at a more primitive stage than any earlier treatment. We find that this initial state consisting of only a thin subphotospheric magnetic sheet breaks into multiple flux tubes which evolve into a colliding-merging system of spots of opposite polarity upon surface emergence, similar to those often seen on the Sun. The simulation goes on to produce many exotic δ sunspot associated phenomena: repeated flaring in the range of typical solar flare energy release and ejective helical flux ropes with embedded cool-dense plasma filaments resembling solar coronal mass ejections.

  4. Stellar x-ray flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haisch, B.; Uchida, Y.; Kosugi, T.; Hudson, H. S.

    1995-01-01

    What is the importance of stellar X-ray flares to astrophysics, or even more, to the world at large? In the case of the Sun, changes in solar activity at the two temporal extremes can have quite significant consequences. Longterm changes in solar activity, such as the Maunder Minimum, can apparently lead to non-negligible alterations of the earth's climate. The extreme short term changes are solar flares, the most energetic of which can cause communications disruptions, power outages and ionizing radiation levels amounting to medical X-ray dosages on long commercial flights and even potentially lethal exposures for unshielded astronauts. Why does the Sun exhibit such behaviour? Even if we had a detailed knowledge of the relevant physical processes on the Sun - which we may be on the way to having in hand as evidenced by these Proceedings- our understanding would remain incomplete in regard to fundamental causation so long as we could not say whether the Sun is, in this respect, unique among the stars. This current paper discusses the stellar x-ray flare detections and astronomical models (quasi-static cooling model and two-ribbon model) that are used to observe the x-ray emission.

  5. Modeling Repeatedly Flaring δ Sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Piyali; Hansteen, Viggo; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-03-01

    Active regions (ARs) appearing on the surface of the Sun are classified into α , β , γ , and δ by the rules of the Mount Wilson Observatory, California on the basis of their topological complexity. Amongst these, the δ sunspots are known to be superactive and produce the most x-ray flares. Here, we present results from a simulation of the Sun by mimicking the upper layers and the corona, but starting at a more primitive stage than any earlier treatment. We find that this initial state consisting of only a thin subphotospheric magnetic sheet breaks into multiple flux tubes which evolve into a colliding-merging system of spots of opposite polarity upon surface emergence, similar to those often seen on the Sun. The simulation goes on to produce many exotic δ sunspot associated phenomena: repeated flaring in the range of typical solar flare energy release and ejective helical flux ropes with embedded cool-dense plasma filaments resembling solar coronal mass ejections.

  6. Electron acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Droge, Wolfgang; Meyer, Peter; Evenson, Paul; Moses, Dan

    1989-01-01

    For the period Spetember 1978 to December 1982, 55 solar flare particle events for which the instruments on board the ISEE-3 spacecraft detected electrons above 10 MeV. Combining data with those from the ULEWAT spectrometer electron spectra in the range from 0.1 to 100 MeV were obtained. The observed spectral shapes can be divided into two classes. The spectra of the one class can be fit by a single power law in rigidity over the entire observed range. The spectra of the other class deviate from a power law, instead exhibiting a steepening at low rigidities and a flattening at high rigidities. Events with power-law spectra are associated with impulsive (less than 1 hr duration) soft X-ray emission, whereas events with hardening spectra are associated with long-duration (more than 1 hr) soft X-ray emission. The characteristics of long-duration events are consistent with diffusive shock acceleration taking place high in the corona. Electron spectra of short-duration flares are well reproduced by the distribution functions derived from a model assuming simultaneous second-order Fermi acceleration and Coulomb losses operating in closed flare loops.

  7. Solar flares and energetic particles.

    PubMed

    Vilmer, Nicole

    2012-07-13

    Solar flares are now observed at all wavelengths from γ-rays to decametre radio waves. They are commonly associated with efficient production of energetic particles at all energies. These particles play a major role in the active Sun because they contain a large amount of the energy released during flares. Energetic electrons and ions interact with the solar atmosphere and produce high-energy X-rays and γ-rays. Energetic particles can also escape to the corona and interplanetary medium, produce radio emissions (electrons) and may eventually reach the Earth's orbit. I shall review here the available information on energetic particles provided by X-ray/γ-ray observations, with particular emphasis on the results obtained recently by the mission Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager. I shall also illustrate how radio observations contribute to our understanding of the electron acceleration sites and to our knowledge on the origin and propagation of energetic particles in the interplanetary medium. I shall finally briefly review some recent progress in the theories of particle acceleration in solar flares and comment on the still challenging issue of connecting particle acceleration processes to the topology of the complex magnetic structures present in the corona.

  8. Solar flares controlled by helicity conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliner, Erast B.; Osherovich, Vladimir A.

    1995-01-01

    The energy release in a class of solar flares is studied on the assumption that during burst events in highly conducting plasma the magnetic helicity of plasma is approximately conserved. The available energy release under a solar flare controlled by the helicity conservation is shown to be defined by the magnetic structure of the associated prominence. The approach throws light on some solar flare enigmas: the role of the associated prominence. The approach throws light on some solar flare enigmas: the role of the associated prominences; the discontinuation of the reconnection of magnetic lines long before the complete reconnection of participated fields occurs; the existence of quiet prominences which, in spite of their usual optical appearance, do not initiate any flare events; the small energy release under a solar flare in comparison with the stockpile of magnetic energy in surrounding fields. The predicted scale of the energy release is in a fair agreement with observations.

  9. Pre-flare dynamics of sunspot groups

    SciTech Connect

    Korsós, M. B.; Baranyi, T.; Ludmány, A. E-mail: baranyi.tunde@csfk.mta.hu

    2014-07-10

    Several papers provide evidence that the most probable sites of flare onset are the regions of high horizontal magnetic field gradients in solar active regions. Besides the localization of flare-producing areas, this work intends to reveal the characteristic temporal variations in these regions prior to flares. This study uses sunspot data instead of magnetograms and follows the behavior of a suitable defined proxy measure representing the horizontal magnetic field gradient. The source of the data is the SDD (SOHO/MDI-Debrecen Data) sunspot catalog. The most promising pre-flare signatures are the following properties of gradient variation: (1) steep increase, (2) high maximum, (3) significant fluctuation, and (4) a gradual decrease between the maximum and the flare onset that can be related to the 'pull mode' of the current layer. These properties may yield a tool for the assessment of flare probability and intensity within the following 8-10 hr.

  10. Primary energy release. [during solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S.; Spicer, D.; Uchida, Y.; Zirin, H.

    1980-01-01

    The physical processes by which the magnetic energy of a solar active region is converted to other forms of energy in the appearance of a solar flare are discussed. Observations of the secondary manifestations of flare energy release, such as thermal plasmas and energetic particle emissions, are presented, with particular attention given to the temporal variations of flare radiation, the various forms of energy release, flare energy density, flare locations and sizes, energy distributions and H alpha, hard X-ray and microwave burst events. Current models of the primary energy release process are surveyed, and the models of Spicer (1976, 1977), which explains rapid flare energy release in terms of multiple tearing modes causing reconnection in sheared magnetic fields, and Uchida and Sakurai (1976, 1978), which attributes primary energy release to dynamic collapse caused by the interchange instability of the neutral sheet, are examined in detail.

  11. Solar flares controlled by helicity conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliner, Erast B.; Osherovich, Vladimir A.

    1995-01-01

    The energy release in a class of solar flares is studied on the assumption that during burst events in highly conducting plasma the magnetic helicity of plasma is approximately conserved. The available energy release under a solar flare controlled by the helicity conservation is shown to be defined by the magnetic structure of the associated prominence. The approach throws light on some solar flare enigmas: the role of the associated prominence. The approach throws light on some solar flare enigmas: the role of the associated prominences; the discontinuation of the reconnection of magnetic lines long before the complete reconnection of participated fields occurs; the existence of quiet prominences which, in spite of their usual optical appearance, do not initiate any flare events; the small energy release under a solar flare in comparison with the stockpile of magnetic energy in surrounding fields. The predicted scale of the energy release is in a fair agreement with observations.

  12. Using Sdo's AIA to Investigate Energy Transport from a Flare's Energy Release Site to the Chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brosius, Jeffrey W.; Holman, Gordon D.

    2012-01-01

    Coordinated observations of a GOES B4.8 microflare with SDOs Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the RamatyHigh Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) on 2010 July 31 show that emission in all seven of AIAs EUV channels brightened simultaneously nearly 6 min before RHESSI or GOES detected emission from plasma at temperatures around 10 MK. Aims. To help interpret these and AIA flare observations in general, we characterized the expected temporal responses of AIAs 94, 131, 171, 193, 211, and 335 channels to solar flare brightenings by combining (1) AIAs nominal temperature response functions available through SSWIDL with (2) EUV spectral line data observed in a flare loop Coordinated observations of a GOES B4.8 microflare with SDOs Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and the RamatyHigh Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) on 2010 July 31 show that emission in all seven of AIAs EUV channels brightenedsimultaneously nearly 6 min before RHESSI or GOES detected emission from plasma at temperatures around 10 MK.Aims. To help interpret these and AIA flare observations in general, we characterized the expected temporal responses of AIAs 94,131, 171, 193, 211, and 335 channels to solar flare brightenings by combining (1) AIAs nominal temperature response functionsavailable through SSWIDL with (2) EUV spectral line data observed in a flare loop

  13. Early tissue response to transscleral neodymium: YAG cyclophotocoagulation.

    PubMed

    Blasini, M; Simmons, R; Shields, M B

    1990-06-01

    Transscleral cyclophotocoagulation was performed with a neodymium: YAG laser on five patients 24-72 hr before enucleation for a blind, painful eye. The thermal mode at 20 ms and a maximum offset between aiming and therapeutic beams were kept constant. Variable parameters evaluated were energy levels between 2 and 8 J and distance from the limbus of 0.5-3.0 mm. Because of the underlying distortion in three of the eyes, meaningful interpretation by light microscopic evaluation was possible only in the other two. This suggested that the early histologic hallmark of the procedure is similar to that previously observed in human autopsy eyes with ciliary epithelial damage and elevation from underlying tissue. In addition, fibrin and scant inflammatory cells were seen in the space between ciliary epithelium and stroma. Minimal damage was observed in the ciliary muscle. These findings suggest that direct damage to the ciliary epithelium is the most likely mechanism of reduced aqueous production by this cyclodestructive procedure. The findings also support the concept that an anterior placement of approximately 1.0-1.5 mm posterior to the limbus is most likely to damage the ciliary epithelium of the pars plicata.

  14. Activation of oxidative stress-responsive signaling pathways in early splenotoxic response of aniline

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jianling; Wang Gangduo; Ansari, G.A.S.; Khan, M. Firoze

    2008-07-15

    Aniline exposure causes toxicity to the spleen, which leads to a variety of sarcomas, and fibrosis appears to be an important preneoplastic lesion. However, early molecular mechanisms in aniline-induced toxicity to the spleen are not known. Previously, we have shown that aniline exposure results in iron overload and induction of oxidative stress in the spleen, which can cause transcriptional upregulation of fibrogenic/inflammatory cytokines via activation of oxidative stress (OS)-responsive signaling pathways. To test this mechanism, male SD rats were treated with aniline (1mmol/kg/day via gavage) for 7days, an experimental condition that precedes the appearance of fibrosis. Significant increases in both NF-{kappa}B and AP-1 binding activity was observed in the nuclear extracts of splenocytes from aniline-treated rats as determined by ELISAs, and supported by Western blot data showing increases in p-I{kappa}B{alpha}, p-p65 and p-c-Jun. To understand the upstream signaling events which could account for the activation of NF-{kappa}B and AP-1, phosphorylation patterns of I{kappa}B kinases (IKK{alpha} and IKK{beta}) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) were pursued. Our data showed remarkable increases in both p-IKK{alpha} and p-IKK{beta} in the splenocytes from aniline-treated rats, suggesting their role in the phosphorylation of both I{kappa}B{alpha} and p65 subunits. Furthermore, aniline exposure led to activation of all three classes of MAPKs, as evident from increased phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK1/2) and p38 MAPKs, which could potentially contribute to the observed activation of both AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B. Activation of upstream signaling molecules was also associated with simultaneous increases in gene transcription of cytokines IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-{alpha}. The observed sequence of events following aniline exposure could initiate a fibrogenic and/or tumorigenic response in the spleen.

  15. Ultraviolet spectrophotometry of flares on ``quiescent'' M and K dwarf exoplanet hosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyd, R. O. Parke; France, Kevin; Youngblood, Allison

    We present an analysis of a sample of flares on ``quiescent'' (i.e. non-flare) M and K stars using temporally resolved UV spectroscopy from the growing body of MUSCLES Treasury Survey data. Specifically, our analysis quantified the response of the far-UV C II, Si III, Si IV, and N V emission lines and the far-UV continuum during the flares. Using these tracers, we examined one representative event on GJ 832. In concordance with flares recorded on the Sun and AD Leo, the MUSCLES flares are well fit by a power law relationship of similar slope in frequency versus energy. Flares can strip atmospheric mass from orbiting planets, adversely affecting their long-term habitability. To gauge the amplitude of this effect, we computed an energy-balance upper-limit on the amount of atmosphere a large flare might remove from an orbiting Earth due purely to elevated EUV flux and found this limit to be modest relative to Earth's atmospheric mass.

  16. COMPTEL gamma-ray observations of the C4 solar flare on 20 January 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, C. A.; Arndt, M. B.; Bennett, K.; Connors, A.; Debrunner, H.; Diehl, R.; McConnell, M.; Miller, R. S.; Rank, G.; Ryan, J. M.; Schoenfelder, V.; Winkler, C.

    2001-10-01

    The ``Pre-SMM'' (Vestrand and Miller 1998) picture of gamma-ray line (GRL) flares was that they are relatively rare events. This picture was quickly put in question with the launch of the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM). Over 100 GRL flares were seen with sizes ranging from very large GOES class events (X12) down to moderately small events (M2). It was argued by some (Bai 1986) that this was still consistent with the idea that GRL events are rare. Others, however, argued the opposite (Vestrand 1988; Cliver, Crosby and Dennis 1994), stating that the lower end of this distribution was just a function of SMM's sensitivity. They stated that the launch of the Compton Gamma-ray Observatory (CGRO) would in fact continue this distribution to show even smaller GRL flares. In response to a BACODINE cosmic gamma-ray burst alert, COMPtonTELescope on the CGRO recorded gamma rays above 1 MeV from the C4 flare at 0221 UT 20 January 2000. This event, though at the limits of COMPTEL's sensitivity, clearly shows a nuclear line excess above the continuum. Using new spectroscopy techniques we were able to resolve individual lines. This has allowed us to make a basic comparison of this event with the GRL flare distribution from SMM and also compare this flare with a well-observed large GRL flare seen by OSSE. .

  17. Diagnostics of electron-heated solar flare models. III - Effects of tapered loop geometry and preheating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. G.; Li, Peng; Mariska, John T.

    1992-01-01

    A series of hydrodynamic numerical simulations of nonthermal electron-heated solar flare atmospheres and their corresponding soft X-ray Ca XIX emission-line profiles, under the conditions of tapered flare loop geometry and/or a preheated atmosphere, is presented. The degree of tapering is parameterized by the magnetic mirror ratio, while the preheated atmosphere is parameterized by the initial upper chromospheric pressure. In a tapered flare loop, it is found that the upward motion of evaporated material is faster compared with the case where the flare loop is uniform. This is due to the diverging nozzle seen by the upflowing material. In the case where the flare atmosphere is preheated and the flare geometry is uniform, the response of the atmosphere to the electron collisional heating is slow. The upward velocity of the hydrodynamic gas is reduced due not only to the large coronal column depth, but also to the increased inertia of the overlying material. It is concluded that the only possible electron-heated scenario in which the predicted Ca XIX line profiles agree with the BCS observations is when the impulsive flare starts in a preheated dense corona.

  18. Diagnostics of electron-heated solar flare models. III - Effects of tapered loop geometry and preheating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emslie, A. G.; Li, Peng; Mariska, John T.

    1992-01-01

    A series of hydrodynamic numerical simulations of nonthermal electron-heated solar flare atmospheres and their corresponding soft X-ray Ca XIX emission-line profiles, under the conditions of tapered flare loop geometry and/or a preheated atmosphere, is presented. The degree of tapering is parameterized by the magnetic mirror ratio, while the preheated atmosphere is parameterized by the initial upper chromospheric pressure. In a tapered flare loop, it is found that the upward motion of evaporated material is faster compared with the case where the flare loop is uniform. This is due to the diverging nozzle seen by the upflowing material. In the case where the flare atmosphere is preheated and the flare geometry is uniform, the response of the atmosphere to the electron collisional heating is slow. The upward velocity of the hydrodynamic gas is reduced due not only to the large coronal column depth, but also to the increased inertia of the overlying material. It is concluded that the only possible electron-heated scenario in which the predicted Ca XIX line profiles agree with the BCS observations is when the impulsive flare starts in a preheated dense corona.

  19. Abnormal endothelium-dependent responses in early radiation nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Juncos, L I; Cornejo, J C; Gomes, J; Baigorria, S; Juncos, L A

    1997-09-01

    While arterial hypertension and renal dysfunction are well recognized complications of renal irradiation, the mechanisms that trigger the development of these complications are unknown. Recently, it was reported that the endothelium is a major target in radiation injury. Because dysfunction of the endothelial cells may lead or contribute to the development of hypertension and renal dysfunction in radiation nephropathy, we tested the hypothesis that endothelium-dependent vasodilation is impaired in radiated kidneys prior to the onset of hypertension. To test this hypothesis, we used Long-Evans rats that had undergone left nephrectomy (3 weeks earlier) and irradiation (3000 r's) to the right kidney 8 days earlier (mean blood pressures in the irradiated rats were not different than in the controls). We then measured the changes in renal blood flow (RBF) induced by endothelium-dependent (acetylcholine and bradykinin) and -independent (nitroprusside, norepinephrine, and angiotensin II) vasoactive agents. We found that the increases in RBF induced by the endothelium-dependent but not independent vasodilators were markedly impaired in the irradiated kidneys. Blocking nitric oxide synthesis with nitro L-arginine methyl ester in sham rats mimicked the blunted responsiveness of the irradiated rats, whereas indomethacin (an inhibitor of prostaglandin synthesis) had no effect on either sham or irradiated rats. Finally, the RBF responses to the endothelium-independent vasoconstrictors, norepinephrine and angiotensin II, were not altered in the irradiated kidneys. These results suggest that renal irradiation causes endothelial dysfunction (prior to the onset of hypertension) but spares the vascular smooth muscle cells.

  20. Interplanetary shock waves associated with solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, J. K.; Sakurai, K.

    1974-01-01

    The interaction of the earth's magnetic field with the solar wind is discussed with emphasis on the influence of solar flares. The geomagnetic storms are considerered to be the result of the arrival of shock wave generated by solar flares in interplanetary space. Basic processes in the solar atmosphere and interplanetary space, and hydromagnetic disturbances associated with the solar flares are discussed along with observational and theoretical problems of interplanetary shock waves. The origin of interplanetary shock waves is also discussed.

  1. Sun Emits a Mid-Level Flare

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Caption: A burst of solar material leaps off the left side of the sun in what’s known as a prominence eruption. This image combines three images from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory captured on May 3, 2013, at 1:45 pm EDT, just as an M-class solar flare from the same region was subsiding. The images include light from the 131, 171 and 304 Angstrom wavelengths. Credit: NASA/Goddard/SDO --- The sun emitted a mid-level solar flare, peaking at 1:32 pm EDT on May 3, 2013. Solar flares are powerful bursts of radiation. Harmful radiation from a flare cannot pass through Earth's atmosphere to physically affect humans on the ground, however -- when intense enough -- they can disturb the atmosphere in the layer where GPS and communications signals travel. This disrupts the radio signals for as long as the flare is ongoing, and the radio blackout for this flare has already subsided. This flare is classified as an M5.7 class flare. M-class flares are the weakest flares that can still cause some space weather effects near Earth. Increased numbers of flares are quite common at the moment, since the sun's normal 11-year activity cycle is ramping up toward solar maximum, which is expected in late 2013. Updates will be provided as they are available on the flare and whether there was an associated coronal mass ejection (CME), another solar phenomenon that can send solar particles into space and affect electronic systems in satellites and on Earth. NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  2. Multispectral observations of chromospheric evaporation in the 1991 November 15 X-class solar flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wulser, Jean-Pierre; Canfield, Richard C.; Acton, Loren W.; Culhane, J. Leonard; Phillips, Andrew; Fludra, Andrzej; Sakao, Taro; Masuda, Satoshi; Kosugi, Takeo; Tsuneta, Saku

    1994-01-01

    We analyze simultaneous H(alpha) images and spectra (from Mees Solar Observatory), and soft and hard X-ray images and spectra (from YOHKOH) during the early phase of an X1.5/3B flare. We investigate the morphological relationship between chromospheric downflows, coronal upflows, and particle precipitation sites, and the energetic relationship between conductive heating, nonthermal particle heating, and the chromospheric response. We find that the observations consistently fit the chromospheric evaporation model. In particular, we demonstrate that the observed upflowing coronal and downflowing chromospheric plasma components originate in the same locations, and we show that our unique set of optical and X-ray observations can clearly distinguish between conductively driven and electron beam driven evaporation.

  3. Ultraheavy element enrichment in impulsive solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Eichler, David

    2014-10-10

    Particle acceleration by cascading Alfvén wave turbulence was suggested as being responsible for energetic particle populations in {sup 3}He-rich solar flares. In particular, it was noted that the damping of the turbulence by the tail of the particle distribution in rigidity naturally leads to the dramatic enhancement of a pre-accelerated species—as {sup 3}He is posited to be—and superheavy elements. The subsequent detection of large enrichment of ultraheavies, relative to iron, has apparently confirmed this prediction, lending support to the original idea. It is shown here that this picture could be somewhat sharpened by progress in understanding the three-dimensional geometrical details of cascading Alfvén turbulence. The mechanism may be relevant in other astrophysical environments where the source of turbulence is nonmagnetic, such as clusters of galaxies.

  4. Storey building early monitoring based on rapid seismic response analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julius, Musa, Admiral; Sunardi, Bambang; Rudyanto, Ariska

    2016-05-01

    Within the last decade, advances in the acquisition, processing and transmission of data from seismic monitoring has contributed to the growth in the number structures instrumented with such systems. An equally important factor for such growth can be attributed to the demands by stakeholders to find rapid answers to important questions related to the functionality or state of "health" of structures during and immediately of a seismic events. Consequently, this study aims to monitor the storey building based on seismic response i. e. earthquake and tremor analysis at short time lapse using accelerographs data. This study used one of storey building (X) in Jakarta city that suffered the effects of Kebumen earthquake January 25th 2014, Pandeglang earthquake July 9th 2014, and Lebak earthquake November 8th 2014. Tremors used in this study are tremors after the three following earthquakes. Data processing used to determine peak ground acceleration (PGA), peak ground velocity (PGV), peak ground displacement (PGD), spectral acceleration (SA), spectral velocity (SV), spectral displacement (SD), A/V ratio, acceleration amplification and effective duration (te). Then determine the natural frequency (f0) and peak of H/V ratio using H/V ratio method.The earthquakes data processing result shows the value of peak ground motion, spectrum response, A/V ratio and acceleration amplification increases with height, while the value of the effective duration give a different viewpoint of building dynamic because duration of Kebumen earthquake shows the highest energy in the highest floor but Pandeglang and Lebak earthquake in the lowest floor. Then, tremors data processing result one month after each earthquakes shows the natural frequency of building in constant value. Increasing of peak ground motion, spectrum response, A/V ratio, acceleration amplification, then decrease of effective duration following the increase of building floors shows that the building construction supports the

  5. Statistical studies of low-power solar flares. Distribution of flares by area, brightness, and classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovik, Aleksandr; Zhdanov, Alexey

    2017-04-01

    An electronic database has been created for 123801 solar flares that occurred on the Sun over the period from 1972 to 2010. It is based on catalogs of the Solar Geophysical Data (SGD) and Quarterly Bulletin on Solar Activity. A software package has been used for statistical data preprocessing. The first results revealed a number of new features in the distribution of parameters of solar flares, which differ from those obtained previously. We have found that more than 90% of all solar flares are low-power. The most numerous class comprises SF flares (64%). Flare activity shows a pronounced cyclicity and high correlation with Wolf numbers. The highest correlation coefficients indicate S and 1 solar flares. There is also a high correlation between individual flare classes: S and 1, 1 and (2-4). The results obtained previously [Mitra et al., 1972] which provide evidence of the prevalence of SN solar flares (47%) and the existence of significant peaks for SN and 1N flares, have not been confirmed. The distribution of the number of solar flares with increasing optical importance smoothly decreases without significant deviations. With increasing optical importance, solar flares are gradually redistributed toward an increase in brightness class. The excess of the number of SN and 1N solar flares present in the distributions obtained in [Mitra et al., 1972] are most likely associated with poor statistics.

  6. Radiative backwarming in white-light flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Machado, Marcos E.; Emslie, A. Gordon; Avrett, Eugene H.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to empirical atmospheric structures that are consistent with enhanced white-light continuum emission in solar flares. Results are presented from calculations of radiative transfer in lines and continua in empirical white-light flare model atmospheres, showing that flares with strong emission in the Balmer lines and continuum must show increases at longer wavelengths due to H(-) emission from overheated photospheric levels, which the Paschen continuum contribution in the same wavelength range is neglible. Also, plausible heating mechanisms that can lead to white-light flare emission are examined.

  7. OBSERVATIONS OF CHROMOSPHERIC FLARE RE-BRIGHTENINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Miklenic, C. H.; Veronig, A. M.; Vrsnak, B.; Barta, M.

    2010-08-20

    We investigate an active region that produced three C-class flares and one M-class flare within 2.5 hr. The morphology and location of the C-flares indicate that these events constitute a set of homologous flares. Radio observations indicate the occurrence of a downward-moving plasmoid during the impulsive phase of the M flare. We use TRACE 1700 A filtergrams and SOHO Michelson Doppler Imager magnetograms to examine the character of the UV brightenings; i.e., we search for re-brightenings of former flare areas both across the series of events and within one and the same event. We find that essentially the same footpoints re-brighten in each C flare. Based on the progression of both the derived magnetic flux change rate and the observed Radio Solar Telescope Network microwave emission, we speculate about a further re-brightening during the decay phase of the M flare as a further member of the series of homologous flares. We conclude that the 'postflare' field is driven to repeated eruption by continuous, shear-increasing, horizontal, photospheric flows, as one end of the involved magnetic arcade is anchored in the penumbra of a large sunspot. The observed motion pattern of the UV kernels indicates that the arcade evolves during the series of events from a both highly sheared and heavily entangled state to a still sheared but more organized state.

  8. Predictors of Responsiveness to Early Literacy Intervention: A 10-Year Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Elizabeth A.; McMaster, Kristen L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to update previous reviews on factors related to students' responsiveness to early literacy intervention. The 14 studies in this synthesis used experimental designs, provided small-group or one-on-one reading interventions, and analyzed factors related to responsiveness to those interventions. Participants were…

  9. The Role Played by the Family in Shaping Early and Middle Adolescent Civic Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenzi, Michela; Vieno, Alessio; Santinello, Massimo; Nation, Maury; Voight, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Adopting a multi-informant methodology, the current study examines the relative influence of multiple parental characteristics (civic responsibility, encouragement of civic action, parent-youth closeness) on adolescents' civic responsibility (local and global). The participants were 384 early and middle adolescents (47.9% male), randomly selected…

  10. Effect of the Responsive Environment Early Education Program for Low Birth Weight Children of Preschool Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askins, Billy E.; And Others

    This paper describes an external evaluation study of the Responsive Environment Early Education Program (formerly known as the Responsive Environment Program for Spanish American Children), an educational intervention program for "high risk" (low birth weight) 3-, 4-, and 5-year-old children in Clovis, New Mexico. Major goals of the…

  11. Mother-Child Mutually Responsive Orientation and Conscience Development: From Toddler to Early School Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kochanska, Grazyna; Murray, Kathleen T.

    2000-01-01

    Examined the long-term consequences of mother-child mutually responsive orientation for the development of conscience at early school age. Found that mutually responsive orientation at toddler and preschool ages predicted children's conscience, even after controlling for developmental continuity of conscience. Toddler mutually responsive…

  12. Predictors of Responsiveness to Early Literacy Intervention: A 10-Year Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Elizabeth A.; McMaster, Kristen L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to update previous reviews on factors related to students' responsiveness to early literacy intervention. The 14 studies in this synthesis used experimental designs, provided small-group or one-on-one reading interventions, and analyzed factors related to responsiveness to those interventions. Participants were…

  13. Response of Cross-biome Productivity to the Early 21st Century Drought

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The response of ecosystem productivity to contemporary drought coupled with record warming presents important challenges to predictive ecological modeling. In this study, we investigated the response of annual above-ground net primary production (ANPP) to precipitation variability during the early ...

  14. The Role Played by the Family in Shaping Early and Middle Adolescent Civic Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenzi, Michela; Vieno, Alessio; Santinello, Massimo; Nation, Maury; Voight, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Adopting a multi-informant methodology, the current study examines the relative influence of multiple parental characteristics (civic responsibility, encouragement of civic action, parent-youth closeness) on adolescents' civic responsibility (local and global). The participants were 384 early and middle adolescents (47.9% male), randomly selected…

  15. Preterm Children at Early Adolescence and Continuity and Discontinuity in Maternal Responsiveness from Infancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckwith, Leila; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Children whose mothers were consistently more responsive during the children's infancy and early adolescence achieved higher IQ and arithmetic scores, had more positive self-esteem, and were reported by teachers to exhibit fewer behavior problems than children of mothers who were consistently less responsive. (BC)

  16. Pathways of impending disease flare in African-American systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    PubMed

    Munroe, Melissa E; Vista, Evan S; Merrill, Joan T; Guthridge, Joel M; Roberts, Virginia C; James, Judith A

    2017-03-01

    Immune dysregulation in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) contributes to increased disease activity. African-American (AA) SLE patients have an increased prevalence of complications from disease flares and end-organ damage that leads to increased morbidity and early mortality. We previously reported alterations in inflammatory and regulatory immune mediator levels prior to disease flare in European American (EA) SLE patients. In the current study, we assessed baseline and follow-up plasma levels of 52 soluble mediators, including innate, adaptive, chemokine, and TNF superfamily members, in AA SLE patients who developed SELENA-SLEDAI defined flare 6 or 12 weeks after baseline assessment. These patients were compared to themselves during a comparable, clinically stable period (SNF, n = 18), or to demographically matched SLE patients without impending disease flare (NF, n = 13 per group). We observed significant (q < 0.05) alterations in 34 soluble mediators at baseline, with increased levels of both innate (IL-1α and type I interferons [IFN]) and adaptive cytokines (Th1-, Th2-, and Th17-type), as well as IFN-associated chemokines and soluble TNF superfamily members weeks before clinical disease flare. In contrast, stable SLE patients exhibited increased levels of the regulatory mediators IL-10 (q ≤ 0.0045) and TGF-β (q ≤ 0.0004). Because heterogeneous immune pathways were altered prior to clinical disease flare, we developed a soluble mediator score that encapsulates all mediators tested. This score is the sum of all log transformed, standardized soluble mediator levels assessed at baseline (pre-flare), weighted by their Spearman correlation coefficients for association with the SELENA-SLEDAI score at time of concurrent flare. While baseline SELENA-SLEDAI scores were similar between flare vs. NF (p = 0.7214) and SNF (p = 0.5387), the SMS was significantly higher in pre-flare SLE patients (Flare vs NF or SNF, p < 0.0001). By capturing

  17. Early genetic responses in rat vascular tissue after simulated diving.

    PubMed

    Eftedal, Ingrid; Jørgensen, Arve; Røsbjørgen, Ragnhild; Flatberg, Arnar; Brubakk, Alf O

    2012-12-18

    Diving causes a transient reduction of vascular function, but the mechanisms behind this are largely unknown. The aim of this study was therefore to analyze genetic reactions that may be involved in acute changes of vascular function in divers. Rats were exposed to 709 kPa of hyperbaric air (149 kPa Po(2)) for 50 min followed by postdive monitoring of vascular bubble formation and full genome microarray analysis of the aorta from diving rats (n = 8) and unexposed controls (n = 9). Upregulation of 23 genes was observed 1 h after simulated diving. The differential gene expression was characteristic of cellular responses to oxidative stress, with functions of upregulated genes including activation and fine-tuning of stress-responsive transcription, cytokine/cytokine receptor signaling, molecular chaperoning, and coagulation. By qRT-PCR, we verified increased transcription of neuron-derived orphan receptor-1 (Nr4a3), plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (Serpine1), cytokine TWEAK receptor FN14 (Tnfrsf12a), transcription factor class E basic helix-loop-helix protein 40 (Bhlhe40), and adrenomedullin (Adm). Hypoxia-inducible transcription factor HIF1 subunit HIF1-α was stabilized in the aorta 1 h after diving, and after 4 h there was a fivefold increase in total protein levels of the procoagulant plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI1) in blood plasma from diving rats. The study did not have sufficient power for individual assessment of effects of hyperoxia and decompression-induced bubbles on postdive gene expression. However, differential gene expression in rats without venous bubbles was similar to that of all the diving rats, indicating that elevated Po(2) instigated the observed genetic reactions.

  18. Early immune response and regulation of IL-2 receptor subunits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, Millie; Sugano, Eiko; Schopper, Thomas; Li, Chai-Fei; Boonyaratanakornkit, J. B.; Cogoli, Augusto

    2005-01-01

    MAPK pathways plays a role in early T-cell activation and induction of IL-2, IL-2R(alpha) and IFN(gamma) gene expression.

  19. Early immune response and regulation of IL-2 receptor subunits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, Millie; Sugano, Eiko; Schopper, Thomas; Li, Chai-Fei; Boonyaratanakornkit, J. B.; Cogoli, Augusto

    2005-01-01

    MAPK pathways plays a role in early T-cell activation and induction of IL-2, IL-2R(alpha) and IFN(gamma) gene expression.

  20. Prediction and set-dependent scaling of early postural responses in cerebellar patients.

    PubMed

    Timmann, D; Horak, F B

    1997-02-01

    We reported previously that patients with cerebellar deficits were unable to scale the magnitude of their early automatic postural responses to the predicted amplitudes of surface translations based on central set from prior experience. The present study investigated whether this deficit in set-dependent amplitude scaling was based predominantly on the cerebellar patient's disability (i) to predict perturbation amplitudes on the basis of prior experience, (ii) to scale the gain or magnitude of upcoming postural responses or (iii) to habituate postural responses. The increase in size of the early postural response when a larger than actual platform amplitude was expected and decrease when a smaller one was expected was defined as a measure of set-dependent amplitude prediction. The suppression of the postural response when the same platform velocity was repeated was used as a measure of habituation. The correlation between the size of early postural responses and platform amplitudes when presented serially, but not randomly, tested the ability to scale the gain of postural responses based on prior experience. Results show that although cerebellar patients could predict perturbation amplitudes based on prior experience, they could not use this prediction to modify precisely the gain of responses. The ability to habituate the magnitude of postural responses was not affected by cerebellar lesions. Thus, the cerebellum might not be critical for predicting upcoming events or for habituating to repeated postural stimuli, although it is important for accurate tuning of response gain based on prediction.

  1. Efficacy of fexofenadine versus desloratadine in suppressing histamine-induced wheal and flare.

    PubMed

    Meltzer, Eli O; Gillman, Sherwin A

    2007-01-01

    To date, no published articles exist comparing the H1-receptor antagonist activities of fexofenadine and desloratadine using the histamine-induced skin wheal-and-flare model. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of fexofenadine versus desloratadine in suppressing histamine-induced skin flares and wheals in adults and adolescents. This was a two-center, randomized, placebo-controlled, complete-crossover study. Subjects were administered either single-dose fexofenadine HCl, 180 mg; desloratadine, 5 mg; or placebo and their response to skin-prick testing with histamine and diluent was recorded at predetermined time intervals. The primary end point was change in size of histamine-induced summation skin flares. Secondary end points included change in skin wheal summation measurements, onset, duration, maximum percent suppression, and time to maximum suppression of flares and wheals. Fexofenadine suppressed skin flares significantly more than desloratadine from 2 to 6 hours, and wheals from 2 to 4 hours, 6 to 9 hours, and 12 hours posttreatment. In addition, fexofenadine suppressed flares more than placebo at all time points from 2 to 24 hours and wheals more than placebo at all time points from 2 to 12 hours posttreatment. Desloratadine suppressed flares significantly more than placebo from 6 to 10 hours and at 12 and 24 hours but suppressed wheals significantly versus placebo only at 10 hours. Fexofenadine had a faster onset of flare suppression than desloratadine (1 hour versus 5 hours) and an equally rapid onset of wheal suppression. Fexofenadine HCl, 180 mg, was superior to desloratadine, 5 mg, in histamine-induced wheal-and-flare suppression, suggesting increased in vivo H1-receptor antagonist potency of fexofenadine versus desloratadine.

  2. Modeling Innate Immune Response to Early Mycobacterium Infection

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Rafael V.; Kleijn, Jetty; Meijer, Annemarie H.

    2012-01-01

    In the study of complex patterns in biology, mathematical and computational models are emerging as important tools. In addition to experimental approaches, these modeling tools have recently been applied to address open questions regarding host-pathogen interaction dynamics, including the immune response to mycobacterial infection and tuberculous granuloma formation. We present an approach in which a computational model represents the interaction of the Mycobacterium infection with the innate immune system in zebrafish at a high level of abstraction. We use the Petri Net formalism to model the interaction between the key host elements involved in granuloma formation and infection dissemination. We define a qualitative model for the understanding and description of causal relations in this dynamic process. Complex processes involving cell-cell or cell-bacteria communication can be modeled at smaller scales and incorporated hierarchically into this main model; these are to be included in later elaborations. With the infection mechanism being defined on a higher level, lower-level processes influencing the host-pathogen interaction can be identified, modeled, and tested both quantitatively and qualitatively. This systems biology framework incorporates modeling to generate and test hypotheses, to perform virtual experiments, and to make experimentally verifiable predictions. Thereby it supports the unraveling of the mechanisms of tuberculosis infection. PMID:23365620

  3. Early IFN type I response: Learning from microbial evasion strategies.

    PubMed

    Coccia, Eliana M; Battistini, Angela

    2015-03-01

    Type I interferon (IFN) comprises a class of cytokines first discovered more than 50 years ago and initially characterized for their ability to interfere with viral replication and restrict locally viral propagation. As such, their induction downstream of germ-line encoded pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) upon recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) is a hallmark of the host antiviral response. The acknowledgment that several PAMPs, not just of viral origin, may induce IFN, pinpoints at these molecules as a first line of host defense against a number of invading pathogens. Acting in both autocrine and paracrine manner, IFN interferes with viral replication by inducing hundreds of different IFN-stimulated genes with both direct anti-pathogenic as well as immunomodulatory activities, therefore functioning as a bridge between innate and adaptive immunity. On the other hand an inverse interference to escape the IFN system is largely exploited by pathogens through a number of tactics and tricks aimed at evading, inhibiting or manipulating the IFN pathway, that result in progression of infection or establishment of chronic disease. In this review we discuss the interplay between the IFN system and some selected clinically important and challenging viruses and bacteria, highlighting the wide array of pathogen-triggered molecular mechanisms involved in evasion strategies.

  4. Some comments on flares after many years of observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodson, H. W.; Hedeman, E. R.

    1976-01-01

    Ground based observations of flares are reviewed in search of information on flare build up on either a long or a short time scale. Plots of flare frequency and importance for certain individual centers of activity suggest a possible crescendo in flare occurrence days and hours before the development of large and significant flares. The X-ray records follow the same pattern of apparent build-up. A possible dependence between successive major flares, as phases one and two of a single complex flare event, suggests that the time scale in which the total flare event takes place may exhibit extreme variation.

  5. Sun Emits a Mid-Level Flare

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Caption: NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) captured this image of an M5.7 class flare on May 3, 2013 at 1:30 p.m. EDT. This image shows light in the 131 Angstrom wavelength, a wavelength of light that can show material at the very hot temperatures of a solar flare and that is typically colorized in teal. Caption: NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) captured this image of an M5.7 class flare on May 3, 2013 at 1:30 p.m. EDT. This image shows light in the 131 Angstrom wavelength, a wavelength of light that can show material at the very hot temperatures of a solar flare and that is typically colorized in teal. Credit: NASA/Goddard/SDO --- The sun emitted a mid-level solar flare, peaking at 1:32 pm EDT on May 3, 2013. Solar flares are powerful bursts of radiation. Harmful radiation from a flare cannot pass through Earth's atmosphere to physically affect humans on the ground, however -- when intense enough -- they can disturb the atmosphere in the layer where GPS and communications signals travel. This disrupts the radio signals for as long as the flare is ongoing, and the radio blackout for this flare has already subsided. This flare is classified as an M5.7 class flare. M-class flares are the weakest flares that can still cause some space weather effects near Earth. Increased numbers of flares are quite common at the moment, since the sun's normal 11-year activity cycle is ramping up toward solar maximum, which is expected in late 2013. Updates will be provided as they are available on the flare and whether there was an associated coronal mass ejection (CME), another solar phenomenon that can send solar particles into space and affect electronic systems in satellites and on Earth. NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling

  6. CIRCULAR RIBBON FLARES AND HOMOLOGOUS JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Haimin; Liu Chang

    2012-12-01

    Solar flare emissions in the chromosphere often appear as elongated ribbons on both sides of the magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL), which has been regarded as evidence of a typical configuration of magnetic reconnection. However, flares having a circular ribbon have rarely been reported, although it is expected in the fan-spine magnetic topology involving reconnection at a three-dimensional (3D) coronal null point. We present five circular ribbon flares with associated surges, using high-resolution and high-cadence H{alpha} blue wing observations obtained from the recently digitized films of Big Bear Solar Observatory. In all the events, a central parasitic magnetic field is encompassed by the opposite polarity, forming a circular PIL traced by filament material. Consequently, a flare kernel at the center is surrounded by a circular flare ribbon. The four homologous jet-related flares on 1991 March 17 and 18 are of particular interest, as (1) the circular ribbons brighten sequentially, with cospatial surges, rather than simultaneously, (2) the central flare kernels show an intriguing 'round-trip' motion and become elongated, and (3) remote brightenings occur at a region with the same magnetic polarity as the central parasitic field and are co-temporal with a separate phase of flare emissions. In another flare on 1991 February 25, the circular flare emission and surge activity occur successively, and the event could be associated with magnetic flux cancellation across the circular PIL. We discuss the implications of these observations combining circular flare ribbons, homologous jets, and remote brightenings for understanding the dynamics of 3D magnetic restructuring.

  7. The effects of different solar flare characteristics on the global thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlowski, David J.; Ridley, Aaron J.

    2011-08-01

    Given the ability of global models of the upper atmosphere to utilize high-resolution solar spectra to specify the solar soft X-ray and EUV irradiance, researchers now have the ability to perform detailed theoretical analysis of the response of the upper atmosphere to dynamic solar forcing more completely than ever before. Therefore, it is possible to develop a more quantitative understanding of the response of the thermosphere to solar flares. In this study, the effect of different characteristics of solar flares on the thermosphere is investigated. This is done in a theoretical manner, using synthetic solar irradiance data that is based on observations as input to the global ionosphere-thermosphere model (GITM). Specifically, the neutral response to the total incident energy, peak flare magnitude, background irradiance magnitude, duration of the impulsive phase, and decay time is investigated. It is found that the density response at 400 km altitude is linearly dependent on the total integrated energy above the background level being deposited into the atmosphere, and that the day-side response is strongly dependent on both the total incident energy into the system and the peak flare magnitude. Also, the decay time of the flare is important in determining the time at which the maximum global response occurs. Finally, the duration of the impulsive phase is found to have little effect on the global response of the system.

  8. Rabbit intraocular reactivity to endotoxin measured by slit-lamp biomicroscopy and laser flare photometry.

    PubMed

    Nussenblatt, Robert B; Calogero, Don; Buchen, Shelley Y; Leder, Henry A; Goodkin, Margot; Eydelman, Malvina B

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate the ocular reactivity of the rabbit to an intracameral injection of a dispersive ophthalmic viscosurgical device (OVD) containing various levels of bacterial endotoxin using slit-lamp biomicroscopy and laser flare photometry. Experimental, randomized, masked animal study. Thirty Dutch-Belted rabbits. The rabbits were randomized into 6 groups to receive 0.05 ml of a hydroxypropyl methylcellulose-based dispersive OVD to which had been added one of 5 different doses of bacterial endotoxin ranging from 0.02 to 1.4 endotoxin units (EUs) or a vehicle control to both eyes. The eyes were evaluated for anterior segment inflammation at baseline and 3, 6, 9, 24, 48, and 72 hours after injection using slit-lamp biomicroscopy and laser flare photometry. Corneal clarity and anterior chamber (AC) inflammation. All the corneas remained clear throughout the study. Anterior chamber cells were seen at 6, 9, and 24 hours in 60% to 100% of the eyes intracamerally injected with endotoxin-containing OVD, and the response declined rapidly after 24 hours. A dose-response effect was seen between the concentration of endotoxin and the AC cell response. The aqueous flare response in eyes injected with the 2 highest doses of endotoxin was significantly greater (P<0.05) than that of controls. The amounts of fibrin observed in the AC were random, with no apparent dose-response effect seen. The flare values as obtained by laser flare photometry were consistent with the slit-lamp biomicroscopy flare findings up to grade 3+. However, the increase in laser flare value seemed to level off in eyes with more than 3+ flare. Neither measure of flare correlated with endotoxin level. Among the parameters evaluated in this study, the AC cell response, evaluated by slit-lamp biomicroscopy and graded using a standard grading system, was found to be the most reliable indicator of the amount of endotoxin in the dispersive OVD. The use of laser flare photometry alone does not seem to be useful in

  9. Global Health Security: Building Capacities for Early Event Detection, Epidemiologic Workforce, and Laboratory Response.

    PubMed

    Balajee, S Arunmozhi; Arthur, Ray; Mounts, Anthony W

    The Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA) was launched in February 2014 to bring countries with limited capacity into compliance with the International Health Regulations (IHR) (2005). Recent international public health events, such as the appearance of Middle Eastern respiratory syndrome coronavirus and the reappearance of Ebola in West Africa, have highlighted the importance of early detection of disease events and the interconnectedness of countries. Surveillance systems that allow early detection and recognition of signal events, a public health infrastructure that allows rapid notification and information sharing within countries and across borders, a trained epidemiologic workforce, and a laboratory network that can respond appropriately and rapidly are emerging as critical components of an early warning and response system. This article focuses on 3 aspects of the GHSA that will lead to improved capacities for the detection and response to outbreaks as required by the IHR: (1) early detection and reporting of events, (2) laboratory capacity, and (3) a trained epidemiologic workforce.

  10. High Energy Flares Of FSRQs: The Connection Of Flaring States With The Accretion Disk Luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacciani, Luigi; Tavecchio, F.; Donnarumma, I.; Stamerra, A.

    2016-10-01

    High-Energy gamma-ray flares (E>10 GeV) of Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars (FSRQ) give us strong constraints on jet-physics, and on the surrounding-mediumWe performed the first study of these flares, examining FERMI-LAT archival-data, and triggering 40 ToO-observations from near-ir to TeV (e.g., for PKS 1441+25), at the occurrence of new flaresWe identified about 270 gamma-ray HE flares, and we already investigated peculiar and short-flares of 3C 454.3, CTA 102 and other 10 HE-flares, showing remarkably hard gamma-ray spectra. We argued that these flares originate at parsec distance from the Supermassive Black-Hole (distant scenario), possibly powered by magnetic-reconnections or turbulence in the flowFor the whole sample of 270 flares, we will show here spectral and temporal propertiesFurthermore, we compared the sub-sample of HE-flares with the whole sample of gamma-ray flares. We will show and discuss that jet luminosities and disks correlate not only on years averaged time-scales, but also during High-Energy gamma-ray flares (time-resolved within this investigation with time-scale of the order of 10 days or less).

  11. Motion of 3-6 keV Nonthermal Sources Along the Legs of a Flare Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sui, Linhui; Holman, Gordon D.; Dennis, Brian R.

    2007-01-01

    Observations of nonthermal X-ray sources me critical to studying electron acceleration and transport in solar flares. Strong thermal emission radiated from the preheated plasma before the flare impulsive phase often makes it difficult to detect low-energy X-ray sources that are produced by relatively low-energy nonthermal electrons. Knowledge of the distribution of these low-energy nonthermal electrons is particularly important in determining the total nonthermal electron energy in solar flares. We report on an 'early impulsive flare' in which impulsive hard X-ray emission was seen early in the flare before the soft X-ray emission had risen significantly, indicating limited plasma pre-heating. Early in the flare, RHESSI < 25 keV images show coronal sources that moved first downward and then upwards along the legs of a flare loop. In particular, the 3-6 keV source appeared as a single coronal source at the start of the flare, and then it involved into two coronal sources moving down along the two legs of the loop. After nearly reaching the two footpoints at the hard X-ray peak, the two sources moved back up to the looptop again. RHESSI images and light curves all indicate that nonthermal emission dominated at energies as low as 3-6 keV. We suggest that the evolution of both the spectral index and the low-energy cutoff of the injected electron distribution could result in the accelerated electrons reaching a lower altitude along the legs of the dense flare loop and hence result in the observed downward and upward motions of the nonthermal sources.

  12. Simulating the Mg II NUV Spectra & C II Resonance Lines During Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Graham Stewart; Allred, Joel C.; Leenaarts, Jorrit; Butler, Elizabeth; Kowalski, Adam

    2017-08-01

    The solar chromosphere is the origin of the bulk of the enhanced radiative output during solar flares, and so comprehensive understanding of this region is important if we wish to understand energy transport in solar flares. It is only relatively recently, however, with the launch of IRIS that we have routine spectroscopic flarea observations of the chromsphere and transition region. Since several of the spectral lines observed by IRIS are optically thick, it is necessary to use forward modelling to extract the useful information that these lines carry about the flaring chromosphere and transition region. We present the results of modelling the formation properties Mg II resonance lines & subordinate lines, and the C II resonance lines during solar flares. We focus on understanding their relation to the physical strucutre of the flaring atmosphere, exploiting formation height differences to determine if we can extract information about gradients in the atmosphere. We show the effect of degrading the profiles to the resolution of the IRIS, and that the usual observational techniques used to identify the line centroid do a poor job in the early stages of the flare (partly due to multiple optically thick line components). Finally, we will tentatively comment on the effects that 3D radiation transfer may have on these lines.

  13. Are Homologous Flare-Coronal Mass Ejection Events Triggered by Moving Magnetic Features?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Wang, Jingxiu

    2002-02-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) often present destabilization and eruption of a global (or large-scale) magnetic structure in the solar atmosphere. Furthermore, the Earth-directed CMEs are the primary driver of the disastrous space weather. Here we report on five homologous CMEs. They initiated in the early phase of five homologous X-class flares seen in NOAA Active Region 9236 on 2000 November 24-26. The flares appeared between the main sunspot with positive magnetic field and the moat of the active region. We examined the magnetic evolution in the source active region for the first three of the five flare-CME events and found that the main magnetic changes are magnetic flux emergence in the form of moving magnetic features (MMFs) in the vicinity of the main positive magnetic field. There are three peaks in the flux (number) distribution of the emerging MMFs. If each peak corresponds to an X-class flare and associated halo CME, there is a time lag of 10 hr between flux emergence and flaring. The flux appearing in the form of MMFs is 1.1×1022 Mx, with a net flux of -2.1×1021 Mx. Around the main spot region, about 9.1×1021 Mx of flux disappeared in the 2 day interval. This is indicative that the repeated flare-CME activities are triggered by the continuous emergence of MMFs.

  14. Steroid therapy in clinically stable but serologically active systemic lupus erythematosus prevents severe disease flares.

    PubMed

    Cardiel, Mario H; Almagro, Raúl Menor

    2007-05-01

    Evaluation of: Tseng CE, Buyon JP, Kim M et al. The effect of moderate-dose corticosteroids in preventing severe flares in patients with serologically active, but clinically stable, systemic lupus erythematosus: findings of a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Arthritis Rheum. 54, 3623-3632 (2006). Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune disease of unknown origin. Flares and remissions are commonly seen in clinical settings. These clinical flares can have several degrees of severity, some of which require intensive immunosuppressive treatment and/or hospitalization. Clinicians treating these patients have looked at different strategies for prevention, early detection and prompt treatment of a lupus flare. Clinical information and laboratory findings have been proposed to reach these goals and preventive steroid adjustment has even been used in some cases without convincing results. This paper presents results from a controlled, multicenter, double-blind clinical trial evaluating the effectiveness of short-term corticosteroid treatment for preventing severe flares in which elevations of C3a by 50% were accompanied by a 25% increase in the anti-double-stranded DNA titer in patients with inactive or stable/active systemic lupus erythematosus. Results suggest that this strategy can prevent severe lupus flares.

  15. The Queen's flare - Its structure and development; precursors, pre-flare brightenings, and aftermaths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Jager, C.; Schadee, A.; Svestka, Z.; Van Tend, W.; Machado, M. E.; Strong, K. T.; Woodgate, B. E.

    1983-01-01

    A limb flare, which started at about 20:20 UT on April 30, 1980, was observed by several of the instruments on the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) spacecraft. This flare has been the subject of a joint analysis of the SMM instruments. The present investigation represents a continuation of research reported in part by Woodgate et al. (1981) and Gabriel et al. (1981). Several questions are explored regarding the preflare activity, the evolution of the flare, and its decay. It is concluded that the X-ray brightenings observed before the flare were indicative only of the generally high level of activity from this region. They were not connected with the build-up of energy before the flare since similar brightenings were observed in the region after the flare. At least one brightening occurred at the site of the kernel before the flare. There is also some evidence of a tongue.

  16. Molecular Mechanisms of Sulfur Mustard Vesicant-Induced Cell Death: Early and Late Cell Responses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    Mechanisms of Sulfur Mustard Vesicant-Induced Cell Death : Early and late cell responses 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...It possess mutagenic, carcinogenic, cytotoxic, vesicating effects, and results in cell death . However, the biomedical mechanism of cell death induced... cell death via apoptosis: • In early stage, It induces JNK activity and then triggers apoptosis pathway. • In late stage, sulphur mustard attacks the

  17. Quantitative airborne assessment of gas flaring combustion efficiency in the Bakken Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvakharia, A.; Kort, E. A.; Sweeney, C.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Brandt, A. R.; Smith, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    The Bakken shale formation in North Dakota is a prolific source of oil and natural gas, producing 361 million barrels of oil in 2014. Drilling activities in the Bakken largely focus on oil, though co-production of natural gas is abundant. Up to 1/3 of the natural gas produced in this play is not captured, but is instead flared. The US EPA considers flare combustion efficiency to be 98%, indicating fugitive emissions of 2% of flared natural gas due to incomplete combustion. Studies of flaring combustion efficiency have been primarily laboratory-based, with minimal real-world analysis in the field. A recent study [Caulton et al., 2014] analyzed ten flares in the Bakken and found extremely high combustion efficiency of over 99.8%.Differences between this field study and the EPA standard have potentially significant implications for methane emissions from flaring, but given the small sample size, further in-field sampling is needed to quantify combustion efficiency in real conditions and assess why it may be different from laboratory studies.Here we will present a study on flaring combustion efficiency of methane and ethane in the Bakken field using continuous in-situ airborne observations of methane, ethane, and carbon dioxide. Over thirty flare plumes were observed during a three-week period in the Bakken formation in May 2014 in a range of wind conditions. For each flare we calculate the destruction efficiency and emission factors for methane and ethane. Preliminary results suggest combustion efficiency comparable with the EPA value of 98%, notably lower than the previous study. In addition, we calculate the corresponding mass flux of methane from incomplete flare combustion for the entire field using gas flare volume information and compare to the total emissions from the field calculated using our flight data and a mass-balance approach. Using the combustion efficiency from our study suggests methane emissions from incomplete combustion during flaring could be

  18. Mechanisms for fast flare reconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanhoven, G.; Deeds, D.; Tachi, T.

    1988-01-01

    Normal collisional-resistivity mechanisms of magnetic reconnection have the drawback that they are too slow to explain the fast rise of solar flares. Two methods are examined which are proposed for the speed-up of the magnetic tearing instability: the anomalous enhancement of resistivity by the injection of MHD turbulence and the increase of Coulomb resistivity by radiative cooling. The results are described for nonlinear numerical simulations of these processes which show that the first does not provide the claimed effects, while the second yields impressive rates of reconnection, but low saturated energy outputs.

  19. AR 1121 Unleases X-ray Flare

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Increasingly active sunspot 1121 has unleashed one of the brightest x-ray solar flares in years, an M5.4-class eruption at 15:36 UT on Nov. 6th. This close-up video shows the detail of the flare an...

  20. Sun Unleashes Mid-level Flare

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    The sun emitted a mid-level solar flare, peaking at 2:23 EDT on June 22, 2015. NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the sun constantly, captured an image of the event. Solar flares are powerful bursts of radiation. Harmful radiation from a flare cannot pass through Earth's atmosphere to physically affect humans on the ground, however -- when intense enough -- they can disturb the atmosphere in the layer where GPS and communications signals travel. To see how this event may affect Earth, please visit NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center at spaceweather.gov, the U.S. government's official source for space weather forecasts, alerts, watches and warnings. This flare is classified as a M6.6 flare. M-class flares are a tenth the size of the most intense flares, the X-class flares. The number provides more information about its strength. An M2 is twice as intense as an M1, an M3 is three times as intense, etc. Credit: NASA/Goddard/SDO NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  1. The physics of solar flares. Proceedings.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culhane, J. L.; Jordan, C.

    First published in Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London, Ser A, Vol. 336, No. 1643, p. 321 - 495 (1991). The purpose of this volume is to review the contribution of the three spacecraft (P78-1, SMM, and Hinotori) to the study of solar flares. It also includes discussions of the current theoretical basis of some aspects of solar flares (including magnetic energy conversion).

  2. FLARES AND THEIR UNDERLYING MAGNETIC COMPLEXITY

    SciTech Connect

    Engell, Alexander J.; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Siarkowski, Marek; Gryciuk, Magda; Sylwester, Janusz; Sylwester, Barbara; Cirtain, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    SphinX (Solar PHotometer IN X-rays), a full-disk-integrated spectrometer, observed 137 flare-like/transient events with active region (AR) 11024 being the only AR on disk. The Hinode X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and Solar Optical Telescope observe 67 of these events and identified their location from 12:00 UT on July 3 through 24:00 UT 2009 July 7. We find that the predominant mechanisms for flares observed by XRT are (1) flux cancellation and (2) the shearing of underlying magnetic elements. Point- and cusp-like flare morphologies seen by XRT all occur in a magnetic environment where one polarity is impeded by the opposite polarity and vice versa, forcing the flux cancellation process. The shearing is either caused by flux emergence at the center of the AR and separation of polarities along a neutral line or by individual magnetic elements having a rotational motion. Both mechanisms are observed to contribute to single- and multiple-loop flares. We observe that most loop flares occur along a large portion of a polarity inversion line. Point- and cusp-like flares become more infrequent as the AR becomes organized with separation of the positive and negative polarities. SphinX, which allows us to identify when these flares occur, provides us with a statistically significant temperature and emission scaling law for A and B class flares: EM = 6.1 x 10{sup 33} T{sup 1.9{+-}0.1}.

  3. Sun Releases X-class Solar Flare

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This movie shows the July 6, 2012 X1.1 flare in the 171 Angstrom wavelength as captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). AR1515 was the source for this flare. AR1515 has been active ...

  4. Flares and MHD Jets in Protostar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, M.; Shibata, K.; Matsumoto, R.

    We present a magnetic reconnection model for hard X-ray emission and flare-like hard X-ray variabilities associated with protostars detected by ASCA. The energy released by protostellar flares is 102 - 105 times larger than solar flares. Moreover, the spectrum is harder. A new ingredient in protostellar flare is the existence of a protostellar disk which can twist the magnetic fields threading the protostellar disk. We carried out magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the disk-star interaction. The closed magnetic loops connecting the central star and the disk are twisted by the rotation of the disk. In the presence of resistivity, magnetic reconnection takes place in the current sheet formed inside the expanding loops. Hot, outgoing plasmoid and post flare loops are formed as a result of the reconnection. Numerical results are consistent with the observed plasma temperature (107 - 108K), the length of the flaring loop (1011-1012cm), the total energy of X-ray flares (~1035-36erg). Furthermore, along the opening magnetic loops, hot jet is ejected in bipolar directions with speed 200-400 km/s. The speed and mass flow rate of the jet is consistent with those of optical jets. Our model can explain both the X-ray flare-like variability and mass outflow in star forming region.

  5. 40 CFR 65.147 - Flares.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... standard cubic meter (300 British thermal units per standard cubic foot) or greater if the flare is steam... standard cubic meter (200 British thermal units per standard cubic foot) or greater if the flare is... being combusted is greater than 37.3 megajoules per standard cubic meter (1,000 British thermal units...

  6. 40 CFR 65.147 - Flares.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... standard cubic meter (300 British thermal units per standard cubic foot) or greater if the flare is steam... standard cubic meter (200 British thermal units per standard cubic foot) or greater if the flare is... being combusted is greater than 37.3 megajoules per standard cubic meter (1,000 British thermal units...

  7. Handling an Asthma Flare-Up

    MedlinePlus

    ... up in the emergency room . Can I Prevent Asthma Flare-Ups? You also have the power to prevent flare-ups, at least some of the time. Here's what you can do: Always have your inhaler and spacer with you. Stay away from things that may ...

  8. What's an Asthma Flare-Up?

    MedlinePlus

    ... inside the airway for air to flow. This swelling in the airways gets worse during an asthma flare-up , making it hard to breathe. During a flare-up, also called an asthma attack or episode, the lungs also may produce a lot of sticky mucus, ...

  9. Exposure to dim light at night during early development increases adult anxiety-like responses.

    PubMed

    Borniger, Jeremy C; McHenry, Zachary D; Abi Salloum, Bachir A; Nelson, Randy J

    2014-06-22

    Early experiences produce effects that may persist throughout life. Therefore, to understand adult phenotype, it is important to investigate the role of early environmental stimuli in adult behavior and health. Artificial light at night (LAN) is an increasingly common phenomenon throughout the world. However, animals, including humans, evolved under dark night conditions. Many studies have revealed affective, immune, and metabolic alterations provoked by aberrant light exposure and subsequent circadian disruption. Pups are receptive to entraining cues from the mother and then light early during development, raising the possibility that the early life light environment may influence subsequent behavior. Thus, to investigate potential influences of early life exposure to LAN on adult phenotype, we exposed mice to dim (~5 lux; full spectrum white light) or dark (~0 lux) nights pre- and/or postnatally. After weaning at 3 weeks of age, all mice were maintained in dark nights until adulthood (9 weeks of age) when behavior was assessed. Mice exposed to dim light in early life increased anxiety-like behavior and fearful responses on the elevated plus maze and passive avoidance tests. These mice also displayed reduced growth rates, which ultimately normalized during adolescence. mRNA expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin previously linked to early life environment and adult phenotype, was not altered in the prefrontal cortex or hippocampus by early life LAN exposure. Serum corticosterone concentrations were similar between groups at weaning, suggesting that early life LAN does not elicit a long-term physiologic stress response. Dim light exposure did not influence behavior on the open field, novel object, sucrose anhedonia, or forced swim tests. Our data highlight the potential deleterious consequences of low levels of light during early life to development and subsequent behavior. Whether these changes are due to altered maternal behavior

  10. Coronal mass ejections and associated X-ray flare durations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.; Liggett, M.

    1989-01-01

    It is found that 22 percent of a sample of M1 or greater impulsive soft X-ray flares were associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) observed in the Solwind coronagraph. These flares were more energetic than similar impulsive flares without CMEs, and the associated CMEs were narrow (5-40 deg) in angular width. A survey of all CMEs associated with M1 or greater X-ray flares reveals a good correlation between flare duration CME angular width. The H-alpha characteristics of impulsive, CME-associated flares suggest that they are not the dynamic or eruptive flares presumed to be associated with CMEs, but rather, are confined flares. The H-alpha flare locations are neither centered under the CME legs. The disparity in size scales between the CMEs and their associated flares leaves the basis of the correlation between CME width and X-ray flare duration unresolved.

  11. Early and late rate of force development: differential adaptive responses to resistance training?

    PubMed

    Andersen, L L; Andersen, J L; Zebis, M K; Aagaard, P

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the potentially opposing influence of qualitative and quantitative muscular adaptations in response to high-intensity resistance training on contractile rate of force development (RFD) in the early (<100 ms) and later phases (>200 ms) of rising muscle force. Fifteen healthy young males participated in a 14-week resistance training intervention for the lower body and 10 matched subjects participated as controls. Maximal muscle strength (MVC) and RFD were measured during maximal voluntary isometric contraction of the quadriceps femoris muscle. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis. The main findings were that RFD in the late phase of rising muscle force increased in response to resistance training whereas early RFD remained unchanged and early relative RFD (i.e., RFD/MVC) decreased. Quantitatively, muscle fiber cross-sectional area and MVC increased whereas, qualitatively, the relative proportion of type IIX muscle fibers decreased. Multiple regression analysis showed that while increased MVC positively influenced both early and late RFD, decreased-type IIX negatively influenced early RFD only. In conclusion, early and late RFD responded differently to high-intensity resistance training due to differential influences of qualitative and quantitative muscular adaptations on early and later phases of rising muscle force.

  12. Cost effectiveness of responsive stimulation and nutrition interventions on early child development outcomes in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Gowani, Saima; Yousafzai, Aisha K; Armstrong, Robert; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2014-01-01

    Early childhood programs are heralded as a way to improve children's health and educational outcomes. However, few studies in developing countries calculate the effectiveness of quality early childhood interventions. Even fewer estimate the associated costs of such interventions. The study here looks at the costs and effectiveness of a cluster-randomized effectiveness trial on children from birth to 24 months in rural Sindh, Pakistan. Responsive stimulation and/or enhanced nutrition interventions were integrated in the Lady Health Worker program in Pakistan. Outcomes suggest that children who receive responsive stimulation had significantly better development outcomes at 24 months than those who only received enhanced nutrition intervention. A cost-effectiveness analysis of the results verifies that early childhood interventions that include responsive stimulation are more cost effective than a nutrition intervention alone in promoting children's early development. Costs of a responsive stimulation intervention integrated in an existing community-based service providing basic health and nutrition care is approximately US$4 per month per child. We discuss these findings and make recommendations about scaling up and costs for future early child development programs.

  13. On the flaring of cometary plasma tails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ershkovich, A. I.; Niedner, M. B., Jr.; Brandt, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    Assuming that hypersonic pressure balance with the solar wind governs the shape of plasma tails, it is found that the gas pressure of tail ions and the magnetic field strength at the flanks of the ionopause control the flaring state. The gas pressure exhibits the larger effect: for constant pressures above a certain critical value, the tail flares essentially without limit, while for smaller values the tail flares only near the head (becoming cylindrical at greater distances). The influence of the magnetic field is that the tail flares to larger distances the higher the field strength at the flanks of the ionopause. The observed variability in flaring (and the implied differences in gas pressure and magnetic field) are throught to be the result of changes in the position and shape of the sunward cometary ionopause. Insertion of reasonable comet and solar wind parameters into the pressure balance equations is found to give good agreement with the observations.

  14. Neural Correlates of Response Inhibition in Early Childhood: Evidence From a Go/No-Go Task.

    PubMed

    Abdul Rahman, Aishah; Carroll, Daniel J; Espy, Kimberly Andrews; Wiebe, Sandra A

    2017-01-01

    We examined the neural correlates underlying response inhibition in early childhood. Five-year-old children completed a Go/No-go task with or without time pressure (Fast vs. Slow condition) while scalp EEG was recorded. On No-go trials where inhibition was required, the left frontal N2 and posterior P3 were enhanced relative to Go trials. Time pressure was detrimental to behavioral performance and modulated the early-occurring P1 component. The topography of ERPs related to response inhibition differed from patterns typically seen in adults, and may indicate a compensatory mechanism to make up for immature inhibition networks in children.

  15. Responsiveness and sensitivity of the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale to primary dental care for early childhood caries.

    PubMed

    Arrow, Peter

    2016-02-01

    This study examined the responsiveness of the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (ECOHIS) to dental treatment of early childhood caries (ECC) in a primary dental care setting. Parents of children participating in a randomized controlled trial completed the ECOHIS at baseline and follow-up, and rated the global oral health transition of their child at follow-up ('worsened', 'no change', 'improved'). Change scores were calculated and longitudinal construct validity assessed by examining the association between change scores and global oral health transition groups. ECOHIS changes from baseline to follow-up within global transition groups were also evaluated. Effect sizes, minimally important difference, and Guyatt's responsiveness index were calculated to examine the scale's sensitivity and responsiveness. After 11.3 months, complete questionnaire data were available for 189 participants; 59% reported 'improved' oral health. The follow-up scores were significantly lower in the child psychology, parental distress and family impact section, P < 0.001, and in the child social interaction, family function and the total ECOHIS scores, P < 0.05, Wilcoxon signed-rank test. There was a significant difference in changed scores among the global transition groups, P < 0.05, Kruskal-Wallis test, and the difference was significant between 'worsened' and 'improved' groups for the family impact and the total ECOHIS scores, Dunn test, P < 0.05. Effect sizes were small, 0.17, 0.33, 0.30 for the child impact, family impact and total ECOHIS scores, respectively, for those reporting 'improved' oral health. The responsiveness of the ECOHIS to the treatment of ECC in primary dental care settings was modest, and its use to measure treatment effects in primary care settings requires further investigations. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The development of X-ray flare onsets near active region filaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahler, S. W.

    1981-01-01

    Skylab X-ray images of the early phases of six active region transient brightenings were compared with simultaneous H-alpha images to study the spatial relationships between filaments and the X-ray brightenings. When the X-ray loops were roughly perpendicular to the axes of the H-alpha filaments, the filaments did not disappear. X-ray loops which appeared nearly parallel to the filaments were generally associated with the disappearances of those filaments. It is suggested that the perpendicular loops correspond to the class I X-ray flares of Pallavicinic et al. (1977) while the parallel loops are the early phases of their class II flares characterized in the decay phases by arcades of large loops with low energy densities. Both kinds of X-ray flares can be associated with impulsive phases.

  17. Transcriptional Dynamics Reveal Critical Roles for Non-coding RNAs in the Immediate-Early Response

    PubMed Central

    Aitken, Stuart; Magi, Shigeyuki; Alhendi, Ahmad M. N.; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Daub, Carsten O.; Arner, Erik; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Khachigian, Levon M.; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Semple, Colin A.

    2015-01-01

    The immediate-early response mediates cell fate in response to a variety of extracellular stimuli and is dysregulated in many cancers. However, the specificity of the response across stimuli and cell types, and the roles of non-coding RNAs are not well understood. Using a large collection of densely-sampled time series expression data we have examined the induction of the immediate-early response in unparalleled detail, across cell types and stimuli. We exploit cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE) time series datasets to directly measure promoter activities over time. Using a novel analysis method for time series data we identify transcripts with expression patterns that closely resemble the dynamics of known immediate-early genes (IEGs) and this enables a comprehensive comparative study of these genes and their chromatin state. Surprisingly, these data suggest that the earliest transcriptional responses often involve promoters generating non-coding RNAs, many of which are produced in advance of canonical protein-coding IEGs. IEGs are known to be capable of induction without de novo protein synthesis. Consistent with this, we find that the response of both protein-coding and non-coding RNA IEGs can be explained by their transcriptionally poised, permissive chromatin state prior to stimulation. We also explore the function of non-coding RNAs in the attenuation of the immediate early response in a small RNA sequencing dataset matched to the CAGE data: We identify a novel set of microRNAs responsible for the attenuation of the IEG response in an estrogen receptor positive cancer cell line. Our computational statistical method is well suited to meta-analyses as there is no requirement for transcripts to pass thresholds for significant differential expression between time points, and it is agnostic to the number of time points per dataset. PMID:25885578

  18. Transcriptional dynamics reveal critical roles for non-coding RNAs in the immediate-early response.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Stuart; Magi, Shigeyuki; Alhendi, Ahmad M N; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Daub, Carsten O; Arner, Erik; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R R; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Khachigian, Levon M; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Semple, Colin A

    2015-04-01

    The immediate-early response mediates cell fate in response to a variety of extracellular stimuli and is dysregulated in many cancers. However, the specificity of the response across stimuli and cell types, and the roles of non-coding RNAs are not well understood. Using a large collection of densely-sampled time series expression data we have examined the induction of the immediate-early response in unparalleled detail, across cell types and stimuli. We exploit cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE) time series datasets to directly measure promoter activities over time. Using a novel analysis method for time series data we identify transcripts with expression patterns that closely resemble the dynamics of known immediate-early genes (IEGs) and this enables a comprehensive comparative study of these genes and their chromatin state. Surprisingly, these data suggest that the earliest transcriptional responses often involve promoters generating non-coding RNAs, many of which are produced in advance of canonical protein-coding IEGs. IEGs are known to be capable of induction without de novo protein synthesis. Consistent with this, we find that the response of both protein-coding and non-coding RNA IEGs can be explained by their transcriptionally poised, permissive chromatin state prior to stimulation. We also explore the function of non-coding RNAs in the attenuation of the immediate early response in a small RNA sequencing dataset matched to the CAGE data: We identify a novel set of microRNAs responsible for the attenuation of the IEG response in an estrogen receptor positive cancer cell line. Our computational statistical method is well suited to meta-analyses as there is no requirement for transcripts to pass thresholds for significant differential expression between time points, and it is agnostic to the number of time points per dataset.

  19. Maternal responsiveness and infant intentional communication: implications for the early communicative and linguistic development.

    PubMed

    Paavola, L; Kunnari, S; Moilanen, I

    2005-11-01

    Maternal responsiveness has been found to have an important role in early language acquisition. From early on, children can also be regarded as active participants in interaction who demonstrate increasing competence in conveying messages to their interactive partners. Hence, in order to demonstrate consistent effects of maternal responses, it is important to take into account individual differences among children. In the present study, the relation between the frequencies of maternal responses and infant intentional communicative acts as well as their predictive validity to subsequent early communicative and linguistic skills was examined. The participants were 27 Finnish-speaking mothers and their healthy firstborn infants. Maternal and infant interactive behaviour was analysed from 20-min samples of free play collected during home visits at the infants' age of 10 months. At 12 months the children were assessed for their communicative and linguistic skills by using the Finnish version of the MacArthur Communicative Development Inventories and the Communication and Symbolic Behaviour Scales. The frequencies of maternal responses and infant intentional communicative acts were not intercorrelated. As for subsequent communicative and linguistic skills, the results of regression analyses indicated that both maternal responsiveness and infant intentional communication predict early comprehensive skills, whereas expressive skills--the use of both verbal and gestural communicative means--are predicted only by infant intentional communication. The results of the present study suggest that maternal responsiveness during the prelinguistic stage is not necessarily dependent on children's communicative competence. As predictors of early communicative and linguistic skills, both maternal responsiveness and infant intentional communication make a distinctive contribution.