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Sample records for early gastric cancers

  1. Redefining early gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Savio G; Windsor, John A

    2016-01-01

    The problem is that current definitions of early gastric cancer allow the inclusion of regional lymph node metastases. The increasing use of endoscopic submucosal dissection to treat early gastric cancer is a concern because regional lymph nodes are not addressed. The aim of the study was thus to critically evaluate current evidence with regard to tumour-specific factors associated with lymph node metastases in "early gastric cancer" to develop a more precise definition and improve clinical management. A systematic and comprehensive search of major reference databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed and the Cochrane Library) was undertaken using a combination of text words "early gastric cancer", "lymph node metastasis", "factors", "endoscopy", "surgery", "lymphadenectomy" "mucosa", "submucosa", "lymphovascular invasion", "differentiated", "undifferentiated" and "ulcer". All available publications that described tumour-related factors associated with lymph node metastases in early gastric cancer were included. The initial search yielded 1494 studies, of which 42 studies were included in the final analysis. Over time, the definition of early gastric cancer has broadened and the indications for endoscopic treatment have widened. The mean frequency of lymph node metastases increased on the basis of depth of infiltration (mucosa 6% vs. submucosa 28%), presence of lymphovascular invasion (absence 9% vs. presence 53%), tumour differentiation (differentiated 13% vs. undifferentiated 34%) and macroscopic type (elevated 13% vs. flat 26%) and tumour diameter (≤2 cm 8% vs. >2 cm 25%). There is a need to re-examine the diagnosis and staging of early gastric cancer to ensure that patients with one or more identifiable risk factor for lymph node metastases are not denied appropriate chemotherapy and surgical resection.

  2. Gastric cancer: Prevention, screening and early diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Pasechnikov, Victor; Chukov, Sergej; Fedorov, Evgeny; Kikuste, Ilze; Leja, Marcis

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer continues to be an important healthcare problem from a global perspective. Most of the cases in the Western world are diagnosed at late stages when the treatment is largely ineffective. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a well-established carcinogen for gastric cancer. While lifestyle factors are important, the efficacy of interventions in their modification, as in the use of antioxidant supplements, is unconvincing. No organized screening programs can be found outside Asia (Japan and South Korea). Although several screening approaches have been proposed, including indirect atrophy detection by measuring pepsinogen in the circulation, none of them have so far been implemented, and more study data is required to justify any implementation. Mass eradication of H. pylori in high-risk areas tends to be cost-effective, but its adverse effects and resistance remain a concern. Searches for new screening biomarkers, including microRNA and cancer-autoantibody panels, as well as detection of volatile organic compounds in the breath, are in progress. Endoscopy with a proper biopsy follow-up remains the standard for early detection of cancer and related premalignant lesions. At the same time, new advanced high-resolution endoscopic technologies are showing promising results with respect to diagnosing mucosal lesions visually and targeting each biopsy. New histological risk stratifications (classifications), including OLGA and OLGIM, have recently been developed. This review addresses the current means for gastric cancer primary and secondary prevention, the available and emerging methods for screening, and new developments in endoscopic detection of early lesions of the stomach. PMID:25320521

  3. Sensitive and specific detection of early gastric cancer with DNA methylation analysis of gastric washes.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Kim, Hyun Soo; Castoro, Ryan J; Chung, Woonbok; Estecio, Marcos R H; Kondo, Kimie; Guo, Yi; Ahmed, Saira S; Toyota, Minoru; Itoh, Fumio; Suk, Ki Tae; Cho, Mee-Yon; Shen, Lanlan; Jelinek, Jaroslav; Issa, Jean-Pierre J

    2009-06-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation is an early and frequent process in gastric carcinogenesis and could be useful for detection of gastric neoplasia. We hypothesized that methylation analysis of DNA recovered from gastric washes could be used to detect gastric cancer. We studied 51 candidate genes in 7 gastric cancer cell lines and 24 samples (training set) and identified 6 for further studies. We examined the methylation status of these genes in a test set consisting of 131 gastric neoplasias at various stages. Finally, we validated the 6 candidate genes in a different population of 40 primary gastric cancer samples and 113 nonneoplastic gastric mucosa samples. Six genes (MINT25, RORA, GDNF, ADAM23, PRDM5, MLF1) showed frequent differential methylation between gastric cancer and normal mucosa in the training, test, and validation sets. GDNF and MINT25 were most sensitive molecular markers of early stage gastric cancer, whereas PRDM5 and MLF1 were markers of a field defect. There was a close correlation (r = 0.5-0.9, P = .03-.001) between methylation levels in tumor biopsy and gastric washes. MINT25 methylation had the best sensitivity (90%), specificity (96%), and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (0.961) in terms of tumor detection in gastric washes. These findings suggest MINT25 is a sensitive and specific marker for screening in gastric cancer. Additionally, we have developed a new method for gastric cancer detection by DNA methylation in gastric washes.

  4. Glycoprofiling of Early Gastric Cancer Using Lectin Microarray Technology.

    PubMed

    Li, Taijie; Mo, Cuiju; Qin, Xue; Li, Shan; Liu, Yinkun; Liu, Zhiming

    2018-01-01

    Recently, studies have reported that protein glycosylation plays an important role in the occurrence and development of cancer. Gastric cancer is a common cancer with high morbidity and mortality owing to most gastric cancers are discovered only at an advanced stage. Here, we aim to discover novel specific serum glycanbased biomarkers for gastric cancer. A lectin microarray with 50 kinds of tumor-associated lectin was used to detect the glycan profiles of serum samples between early gastric cancer and healthy controls. Then lectin blot was performed to validate the differences. The result of the lectin microarray showed that the signal intensities of 13 lectins showed significant differences between the healthy controls and early gastric cancer. Compared to the healthy, the normalized fluorescent intensities of the lectins PWA, LEL, and STL were significantly increased, and it implied that their specifically recognized GlcNAc showed an especially elevated expression in early gastric cancer. Moreover, the binding affinity of the lectins EEL, RCA-II, RCA-I, VAL, DSA, PHA-L, UEA, and CAL were higher in the early gastric cancer than in healthy controls. These glycan structures containing GalNAc, terminal Galβ 1-4 GlcNAc, Tri/tetraantennary N-glycan, β-1, 6GlcNAc branching structure, α-linked fucose residues, and Tn antigen were elevated in gastric cancer. While the two lectins CFL GNL reduced their binding ability. In addition, their specifically recognized N-acetyl-D-galactosamine structure and (α-1,3) mannose residues were decreased in early gastric cancer. Furthermore, lectin blot results of LEL, STL, PHA-L, RCA-I were consistent with the results of the lectin microarray. The findings of our study clarify the specific alterations for glycosylation during the pathogenesis of gastric cancer. The specific high expression of GlcNAc structure may act as a potential early diagnostic marker for gastric cancer.

  5. Sensitive and Specific Detection of Early Gastric Cancer Using DNA Methylation Analysis of Gastric Washes

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Kim, Hyun Soo; Castoro, Ryan J.; Chung, Woonbok; Estecio, Marcos R. H.; Kondo, Kimie; Guo, Yi; Ahmed, Saira S.; Toyota, Minoru; Itoh, Fumio; Suk, Ki Tae; Cho, Mee-Yon; Shen, Lanlan; Jelinek, Jaroslav; Issa, Jean-Pierre J.

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims Aberrant DNA methylation is an early and frequent process in gastric carcinogenesis and could be useful for detection of gastric neoplasia. We hypothesized that methylation analysis of DNA recovered from gastric washes could be used to detect gastric cancer. Methods We studied 51 candidate genes in 7 gastric cancer cell lines and 24 samples (training set) and identified 6 for further studies. We examined the methylation status of these genes in a test set consisting of 131 gastric neoplasias at various stages. Finally, we validated the 6 candidate genes in a different population of 40 primary gastric cancer samples and 113 non-neoplastic gastric mucosa samples. Results 6 genes (MINT25, RORA, GDNF, ADAM23, PRDM5, MLF1) showed frequent differential methylation between gastric cancer and normal mucosa in the training, test and validation sets. GDNF and MINT25 were most sensitive molecular markers of early stage gastric cancer while PRDM5 and MLF1 were markers of a field defect. There was a close correlation (r=0.5 to 0.9, p=0.03 to 0.001) between methylation levels in tumor biopsy and gastric washes. MINT25 methylation had the best sensitivity (90%), specificity (96%), and area under the ROC curve (0.961) in terms of tumor detection in gastric washes. Conclusions These findings suggest MINT25 is a sensitive and specific marker for screening in gastric cancer. Additionally we have developed a new methodology for gastric cancer detection by DNA methylation in gastric washes. PMID:19375421

  6. Breast cancer metastasis to the stomach resembling early gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Eo, Wan Kyu

    2008-12-01

    Breast cancer metastases to the stomach are infrequent, with an estimated incidence rate of approximately 0.3%. Gastric metastases usually are derived from lobular rather than from ductal breast cancer. The most frequent type of a breast cancer metastasis as seen on endoscopy to the stomach is linitis plastica; features of a metastatic lesion that resemble early gastric cancer (EGC) are extremely rare. In this report, we present a case of a breast cancer metastasis to the stomach from an infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast in a 48-year-old woman. The patient had undergone a left modified radical mastectomy with axillary dissection nine years prior. A gastric endoscopy performed for evaluation of nausea and anorexia showed the presence of a slightly elevated mucosal lesion in the cardia, suggestive of a type IIa EGC. A histological examination revealed nests of a carcinoma in the subepithelial lymphatics, and immunohistochemical staining for estrogen receptor was positive. This is an extremely rare case with features of type IIa EGC, but the lesion was finally identified as a cancer metastasis to the cardia of the stomach from an IDC of the breast.

  7. Endoscopic mucosal resection for early gastric cancer. A case report.

    PubMed

    Gheorghe, Cristian; Sporea, Ioan; Becheanu, Gabriel; Gheorghe, Liana

    2002-03-01

    European experience in endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) for early gastric cancer is still relatively low, since early stomach cancer is diagnosed at a much lower rate in Europe than in Japan and generally operable patients are referred to surgery for radical resection. Endoscopic mucosal resection or mucosectomy was developed as a promising technology to diagnose and treat mucosal lesions in the esophagus, stomach and colon. In contrast to surgical resection, EMR allows "early cancers" to be removed with a minimal cost, morbidity and mortality. We present the case of a patient with hepatic cirrhosis incidentally diagnosed with an elevated-type IIa early gastric cancer. Echoendoscopy was performed in order to assess the depth of invasion into the gastric wall confirming the only mucosal involvement. We performed an EMR using "cup and suction" method. After the procedure, the patient experienced an acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding from the ulcer bed requiring argon plasma coagulation. The histopathological examination confirmed an early cancer, without involvement of muscularis mucosae. The patient has had an uneventful evolution being well at six months after the procedure

  8. Multi-disciplinary team for early gastric cancer diagnosis improves the detection rate of early gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Di, Lianjun; Wu, Huichao; Zhu, Rong; Li, Youfeng; Wu, Xinglong; Xie, Rui; Li, Hongping; Wang, Haibo; Zhang, Hua; Xiao, Hong; Chen, Hui; Zhen, Hong; Zhao, Kui; Yang, Xuefeng; Xie, Ming; Tuo, Bigung

    2017-12-06

    Gastric cancer is a frequent malignant tumor worldwide and its early detection is crucial for curing the disease and enhancing patients' survival rate. This study aimed to assess whether the multi-disciplinary team (MDT) can improve the detection rate of early gastric cancer (EGC). The detection rate of EGC at the Digestive Endoscopy Center, Affiliated Hospital, Zunyi Medical College, China between September 2013 and September 2015 was analyzed. MDT for the diagnosis of EGC in the hospital was established in September 2014. The study was divided into 2 time periods: September 1, 2013 to August 31, 2014 (period 1) and September 1, 2014 to September 1, 2015 (period 2). A total of 60,800 patients' gastroscopies were performed during the two years. 61 of these patients (0.1%) were diagnosed as EGC, accounting for 16.44% (61/371) of total patients with gastric cancer. The EGC detection rate before MDT (period 1) was 0.05% (16/29403), accounting for 9.09% (16/176) of total patients with gastric cancer during this period. In comparison, the EGC detection rate during MDT (period 2) was 0.15% (45/31397), accounting for 23% (45/195) of total patients with gastric cancer during this period (P < 0.05). Univariate and multivariate logistic analyses showed that intensive gastroscopy for high risk patients of gastric cancer enhanced the detection rate of EGC in cooperation with Department of Pathology (OR = 10.1, 95% CI 2.39-43.3, P < 0.05). MDT could improve the endoscopic detection rate of EGC.

  9. Sentinel lymph node navigation surgery for early stage gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Mitsumori, Norio; Nimura, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Naoto; Kawamura, Masahiko; Aoki, Hiroaki; Shida, Atsuo; Omura, Nobuo; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2014-05-21

    We attempted to evaluate the history of sentinel node navigation surgery (SNNS), technical aspects, tracers, and clinical applications of SNNS using Infrared Ray Electronic Endoscopes (IREE) combined with Indocyanine Green (ICG). The sentinel lymph node (SLN) is defined as a first lymph node (LN) which receives cancer cells from a primary tumor. Reports on clinical application of SNNS for gastric cancers started to appear since early 2000s. Two prospective multicenter trials of SNNS for gastric cancer have also been accomplished in Japan. Kitagawa et al reported that the endoscopic dual (dye and radioisotope) tracer method for SN biopsy was confirmed acceptable and effective when applied to the early-stage gastric cancer (EGC). We have previously reported the usefulness of SNNS in gastrointestinal cancer using ICG as a tracer, combined with IREE (Olympus Optical, Tokyo, Japan) to detect SLN. LN metastasis rate of EGC is low. Hence, clinical application of SNNS for EGC might lead us to avoid unnecessary LN dissection, which could preserve the patient's quality of life after operation. The most ideal method of SNNS should allow secure and accurate detection of SLN, and real time observation of lymphatic flow during operation.

  10. Sentinel lymph node navigation surgery for early stage gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mitsumori, Norio; Nimura, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Naoto; Kawamura, Masahiko; Aoki, Hiroaki; Shida, Atsuo; Omura, Nobuo; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2014-01-01

    We attempted to evaluate the history of sentinel node navigation surgery (SNNS), technical aspects, tracers, and clinical applications of SNNS using Infrared Ray Electronic Endoscopes (IREE) combined with Indocyanine Green (ICG). The sentinel lymph node (SLN) is defined as a first lymph node (LN) which receives cancer cells from a primary tumor. Reports on clinical application of SNNS for gastric cancers started to appear since early 2000s. Two prospective multicenter trials of SNNS for gastric cancer have also been accomplished in Japan. Kitagawa et al reported that the endoscopic dual (dye and radioisotope) tracer method for SN biopsy was confirmed acceptable and effective when applied to the early-stage gastric cancer (EGC). We have previously reported the usefulness of SNNS in gastrointestinal cancer using ICG as a tracer, combined with IREE (Olympus Optical, Tokyo, Japan) to detect SLN. LN metastasis rate of EGC is low. Hence, clinical application of SNNS for EGC might lead us to avoid unnecessary LN dissection, which could preserve the patient’s quality of life after operation. The most ideal method of SNNS should allow secure and accurate detection of SLN, and real time observation of lymphatic flow during operation. PMID:24914329

  11. A novel approach for the detection of early gastric cancer: fluorescence spectroscopy of gastric juice.

    PubMed

    Deng, Kai; Zhou, Li Ya; Lin, San Ren; Li, Yuan; Chen, Mo; Geng, Qiu Ming; Li, Yu Wen

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of fluorescence spectroscopy of gastric juice for early gastric cancer (EGC) screening. Gastric juice was collected from 101 participants who underwent endoscopy in the Outpatient Endoscopy Center of Peking University Third Hospital. The participants were divided into three groups: the normal mucosa or chronic non-atrophic gastritis (NM-CNAG) group (n = 35), advanced gastric cancer (AGC) group (n = 33) and EGC group (n = 33). Fluorescence spectroscopic analysis was performed in all the gastric juice samples and the maximum fluorescence intensity of the first peak (P1 FI) was measured. The mean fluorescence intensity of P1 FI of gastric juice in AGC (92.1 ± 10.7) and EGC (90.8 ± 12.0) groups was significantly higher than that in the NM-CNAG group (55.7 ± 7.5) (AGC vs NM-CNAG, P = 0.006 and EGC vs NM-CNAG, P = 0.015, respectively). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves for the detection of AGC and EGC were 0.681 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.553-0.810, P = 0.010) and 0.655 (95% CI 0.522-0.787, P = 0.028). With the P1 FI of ≥47.7, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for detecting EGC were 69.7%, 57.1% and 63.2%, respectively. The enhancement of P1 FI of gastric juice occurs at the early stage of gastric cancer. Fluorescence spectroscopy of gastric juice may be used as a novel screening tool for the early detection of gastric cancer. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Digestive Diseases © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd and Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine.

  12. Clinical outcomes of endoscopic submucosal dissection for early gastric cancer in remnant stomach or gastric tube.

    PubMed

    Nishide, N; Ono, H; Kakushima, N; Takizawa, K; Tanaka, M; Matsubayashi, H; Yamaguchi, Y

    2012-06-01

    Little information exists regarding the optimal treatment of early gastric cancer (EGC) in a remnant stomach or gastric tube. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and clinical outcomes of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for EGC in a remnant stomach and gastric tube. Between September 2002 and December 2009, ESD was performed in 62 lesions in 59 patients with EGC in a remnant stomach (48 lesions) or gastric tube (14 lesions). Clinicopathological data were retrieved retrospectively to assess the en bloc resection rate, complications, and outcomes. Treatment results were assessed according to the indications for endoscopic resection, and were compared with those of ESD performed in a whole stomach during the same study period. The en bloc resection rates for lesions within the standard and expanded indication were 100 % and 93 %, respectively. Postoperative bleeding occurred in five patients (8 %). The perforation rate was significantly higher (18 %, 11 /62) than that of ESD in a whole stomach (5 %, 69 /1479). Among the perforation cases, eight lesions involved the anastomotic site or stump line, and ulcerative changes were observed in five lesions. The 3-year overall survival rate was 85 %, with eight deaths due to other causes and no deaths from gastric cancer. A high en bloc resection rate was achieved by ESD for EGC in a remnant stomach or gastric tube; however, this procedure is still technically demanding due to the high complication rate of perforation. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Current role of minimally invasive approaches in the treatment of early gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    El-Sedfy, Abraham; Brar, Savtaj S; Coburn, Natalie G

    2014-01-01

    Despite declining incidence, gastric cancer remains one of the most common cancers worldwide. Early detection in population-based screening programs has increased the number of cases of early gastric cancer, representing approximately 50% of newly detected gastric cancer cases in Asian countries. Endoscopic mucosal resection and endoscopic submucosal dissection have become the preferred therapeutic techniques in Japan and Korea for the treatment of early gastric cancer patients with a very low risk of lymph node metastasis. Laparoscopic and robotic resections for early gastric cancer, including function-preserving resections, have propagated through advances in technology and surgeon experience. The aim of this paper is to discuss the recent advances in minimally invasive approaches in the treatment of early gastric cancer. PMID:24833843

  14. [A Case of Early Gastric Cancer with Nodular Tumor-like Scalp Metastasis].

    PubMed

    Song, Young Wook; Kim, Woo Sub; Yun, Gee Young; Park, Sun Wook; Kang, Sun Hyung; Moon, Hee Seok; Sung, Jae Kyu; Jeong, Hyun Yong

    2016-07-25

    Many neoplasms, including lung cancer, breast cancer, melanoma, and gastrointestinal tract malignancy, possess potential for skin metastasis. Skin metastases can represent the first presentation of such malignancies and may be observed incidentally during routine exam. Skin metastases from gastric adenocarcinoma are uncommon, with a prevalence rate of 0.04-0.8%. Cutaneous metastases from gastric cancer are generally observed as the initial symptom of advanced gastric cancer. Early detection and treatment can increase patient survival. A 42-year-old woman visited our department with nodule about 1 cm in size on the right frontal scalp noticed incidentally after laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy and adjuvant systemic chemo-therapy for early gastric cancer about 16 months prior. The patient was diagnosed with skin metastasis from gastric adenocarcinoma. Complete excision of the skin lesion and additional chemotherapy were performed. Herein, we report a case of nodular tumor-like scalp metastasis from early gastric cancer with a brief review of the literature.

  15. Importance of early nutritional screening in patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Gavazzi, Cecilia; Colatruglio, Silvia; Sironi, Alessandro; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Miceli, Rosalba

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the relationship between nutritional status, disease stage and quality of life (QoL) in 100 patients recently diagnosed with gastric carcinoma. The patients' nutritional status was investigated with anthropometric, biochemical, inflammatory and functional variables; and we also evaluated the nutritional risk with the Nutritional Risk Screening 2002. Oncological staging was standard. QoL was evaluated using the Functional Assessment of Anorexia/Cachexia Therapy questionnaire. The statistical correlation between nutritional risk score (NRS) and oncological characteristics or QoL was evaluated using both univariable and multivariable analyses. Weight loss and reduction of food intake were the most frequent pathological nutritional indicators, while biochemical, inflammatory and functional variables were in the normal range. According to NRS, thirty-six patients were malnourished or at risk for malnutrition. Patients with NRS ≥ 3 presented a significantly greater percentage of stage IV gastric cancer and pathological values of C-reactive protein, while no correlation was found with the site of tumour. NRS was negatively associated with QoL (P < 0·001) and this relation was independent from oncological and inflammatory variables as confirmed by multivariable analysis. In the present study, we found that in patients with gastric cancer malnutrition is frequent at diagnosis and this is likely due to reduction in food intake. Moreover, NRS is directly correlated with tumour stage and inversely correlated with QoL, which makes it a useful tool to identify patients in need of an early nutritional intervention during oncological treatments.

  16. Systematic alphanumeric-coded endoscopy versus chromoendoscopy for the detection of precancerous gastric lesions and early gastric cancer in subjects at average risk for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Mendoza, A; Zárate-Guzmán, Á M; Galvis García, E S; Sobrino Cossío, S; Djamus Birch, J

    Gastric cancer is one of the main causes of cancer worldwide, but there is currently no global screening strategy for the disease. Endoscopy is the screening method of choice in some Asian countries, but no standardized technique has been recognized. Systematic alphanumeric-coded endoscopy can increase gastric lesion detection. The aim of the present article was to compare the usefulness of systematic alphanumeric-coded endoscopy with conventional endoscopy for the detection of premalignant lesions and early gastric cancer in subjects at average risk for gastric cancer. A cross-sectional, comparative, prospective, randomized study was conducted on patients at average risk for gastric cancer (40-50 years of age, no history of H. pylori infection, intestinal metaplasia, gastric atrophy, or gastrointestinal surgery). Before undergoing endoscopy, the patients had gastric preparation (200mg of oral acetylcysteine or 50mg of oral dimethicone). Conventional chromoendoscopy was performed with indigo carmine dye for contrast enhancement. Fifty consecutive cases (mean age 44.4 ± 3.34 years, 60% women, BMI 27.6 ± 5.82 kg/m 2 ) were evaluated. Endoscopic imaging quality was satisfactory in all the cases, with no differences between methods (p = 0.817). The detection rate of premalignant lesions and early gastric cancer was 14% (6 cases of intestinal metaplasia and one case of gastric adenocarcinoma). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and diagnostic accuracy were 100, 95, 80, 100 and 96%, respectively, for systematic alphanumeric-coded endoscopy, and 100, 45, 20, 100, and 52%, respectively, for conventional endoscopy. Lesion detection through systematic alphanumeric-coded endoscopy was superior to that of conventional endoscopy (p = 0.003; OR = 12). Both techniques were effective, but systematic alphanumeric-coded endoscopy significantly reduced the false positive rate. Copyright © 2018 Asociación Mexicana de

  17. Early enteral nutrition after total gastrectomy for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Zhang, Zheng; Xiong, Maoming; Meng, Xiangling; Dai, Fen; Fang, Jun; Wan, Hong; Wang, Miaofeng

    2014-01-01

    To assess the difference between early enteral nutrition (EEN group) and total parenteral nutrition (TPN group) after total gastrectomy for gastric cancer. The nutrition index, liver function, patient generated subjective global assessment (PG-SGA) score, the post-operation complications, the hospital stay and hospitalization expense of the postoperative patient after total gastrectomy, admitted to our Department of Surgery from May 2011 to May 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. A total of 72 patients including 37 cases in the EEN group and 35 cases in the TPN group were recruited. Hypoalbuminemia gradually improved in the EEN group about 3-5 days, but it did not increase until average 21 days in the TPN group. The body weight decreased in the EEN group during the first 2 weeks and recovered gradually in 21 days; body weight in the TPN group was significantly lower than the EEN group at 21 days (p<0.05). There were significant differences in both the groups (p<0.05) in nutrition indicators. The incidence of complications in the EEN group and TPN group were 8.1% and 25.7% respectively, with no significant differences (p>0.05). The days of hospital stays in the EEN and in the TPN group were up to 12.2 ± 2.5 d vs 14.9 ± 2.9 d (p<0.05) and the hospitalization expenses were 36472 ± 4833 CNY vs 40140 ± 3927 CNY (p<0.05), respectively. Compared with TPN, EEN was safe and well tolerated and can shorten the hospital stay as well as reduce costs incurred with total gastrectomy for gastric cancer.

  18. Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Request Permissions Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 10/2017 What is hereditary diffuse gastric cancer? Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is a rare ...

  19. Large early gastric cancers treated by endoscopic submucosal dissection with an insulation-tipped diathermic knife.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chun-Chao; Tiong, Cheng; Fang, Chia-Lang; Pan, Shiann; Liu, Jean-Dean; Lou, Horng-Yuan; Hsieh, Ching-Ruey; Chen, Sheng-Hsuan

    2007-03-01

    It is difficult to remove a large early gastric cancer (> or = 3 cm) in one-piece resection using conventional endoscopic mucosal resection. We tried to use an insulation-tipped (IT) diathermic knife to dissect these lesions. IT-endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) was performed in four aging patients with gastric malignancy. All lesions could be removed in one-piece resection by IT-ESD, although three of them exhibited remarkable fibrosis and ulceration. Three cases experienced curative treatment with IT-ESD after the pathologic evaluation, but it was not curative in one case because the pathology showed angiolymphatic invasion. This patient refused additional surgery in consideration of existing major systemic diseases. At 3 months to 1 year of follow-up, endoscopy showed no evidence of residual cancer. IT-ESD is effective in the treatment of large early gastric cancer and is an alternative treatment for early gastric cancer patients who are at risk for major operation.

  20. Hybrid light transport model based bioluminescence tomography reconstruction for early gastric cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xueli; Liang, Jimin; Hu, Hao; Qu, Xiaochao; Yang, Defu; Chen, Duofang; Zhu, Shouping; Tian, Jie

    2012-03-01

    Gastric cancer is the second cause of cancer-related death in the world, and it remains difficult to cure because it has been in late-stage once that is found. Early gastric cancer detection becomes an effective approach to decrease the gastric cancer mortality. Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) has been applied to detect early liver cancer and prostate cancer metastasis. However, the gastric cancer commonly originates from the gastric mucosa and grows outwards. The bioluminescent light will pass through a non-scattering region constructed by gastric pouch when it transports in tissues. Thus, the current BLT reconstruction algorithms based on the approximation model of radiative transfer equation are not optimal to handle this problem. To address the gastric cancer specific problem, this paper presents a novel reconstruction algorithm that uses a hybrid light transport model to describe the bioluminescent light propagation in tissues. The radiosity theory integrated with the diffusion equation to form the hybrid light transport model is utilized to describe light propagation in the non-scattering region. After the finite element discretization, the hybrid light transport model is converted into a minimization problem which fuses an l1 norm based regularization term to reveal the sparsity of bioluminescent source distribution. The performance of the reconstruction algorithm is first demonstrated with a digital mouse based simulation with the reconstruction error less than 1mm. An in situ gastric cancer-bearing nude mouse based experiment is then conducted. The primary result reveals the ability of the novel BLT reconstruction algorithm in early gastric cancer detection.

  1. Improving the Endoscopic Detection Rate in Patients with Early Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopists should ideally possess both sufficient knowledge of the endoscopic gastrointestinal disease findings and an appropriate attitude. Before performing endoscopy, the endoscopist must identify several risk factors of gastric cancer, including the patient's age, comorbidities, and drug history, a family history of gastric cancer, previous endoscopic findings of atrophic gastritis or intestinal metaplasia, and a history of previous endoscopic treatments. During endoscopic examination, the macroscopic appearance is very important for the diagnosis of early gastric cancer; therefore, the endoscopist should have a consistent and organized endoscope processing technique and the ability to comprehensively investigate the entire stomach, even blind spots. PMID:26240801

  2. Accuracy of endoscopic ultrasonography for diagnosing ulcerative early gastric cancers

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Seok; Kim, Hyungkil; Bang, Byongwook; Kwon, Kyesook; Shin, Youngwoon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is the first-choice imaging modality for predicting the invasion depth of early gastric cancer (EGC), the prediction accuracy of EUS is significantly decreased when EGC is combined with ulceration. The aim of present study was to compare the accuracy of EUS and conventional endoscopy (CE) for determining the depth of EGC. In addition, the various clinic-pathologic factors affecting the diagnostic accuracy of EUS, with a particular focus on endoscopic ulcer shapes, were evaluated. We retrospectively reviewed data from 236 consecutive patients with ulcerative EGC. All patients underwent EUS for estimating tumor invasion depth, followed by either curative surgery or endoscopic treatment. The diagnostic accuracy of EUS and CE was evaluated by comparing the final histologic result of resected specimen. The correlation between accuracy of EUS and characteristics of EGC (tumor size, histology, location in stomach, tumor invasion depth, and endoscopic ulcer shapes) was analyzed. Endoscopic ulcer shapes were classified into 3 groups: definite ulcer, superficial ulcer, and ill-defined ulcer. The overall accuracy of EUS and CE for predicting the invasion depth in ulcerative EGC was 68.6% and 55.5%, respectively. Of the 236 patients, 36 patients were classified as definite ulcers, 98 were superficial ulcers, and 102 were ill-defined ulcers, In univariate analysis, EUS accuracy was associated with invasion depth (P = 0.023), tumor size (P = 0.034), and endoscopic ulcer shapes (P = 0.001). In multivariate analysis, there is a significant association between superficial ulcer in CE and EUS accuracy (odds ratio: 2.977; 95% confidence interval: 1.255–7.064; P = 0.013). The accuracy of EUS for determining tumor invasion depth in ulcerative EGC was superior to that of CE. In addition, ulcer shape was an important factor that affected EUS accuracy. PMID:27472672

  3. [Laparoscopic Proximal Gastrectomy as a Surgical Treatment for Upper Third Early Gastric Cancer].

    PubMed

    Park, Do Joong; Park, Young Suk; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Kim, Hyung Ho

    2017-09-25

    Recently, the incidence of upper third gastric cancer has increased, and with it the number of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) procedures performed has been increasing. However, if ESD is not indicated or non-curable, surgical treatment may be necessary. In the case of lower third gastric cancer, it is possible to preserve the upper part of the stomach; however, in the case of upper third gastric cancer, total gastrectomy is still the standard treatment option, regardless of the stage. This is due to the complications associated with upper third gastric cancer, such as gastroesophageal reflux after proximal gastrectomy rather than oncologic problems. Recently, the introduction of the double tract reconstruction method after proximal gastrectomy has become one of the surgical treatment methods for upper third early gastric cancer. However, since there has not been a prospective comparative study evaluating its efficacy, the ongoing multicenter prospective randomized controlled trial (KLASS-05) comparing laparoscopic proximal gastrectomy with double tract reconstruction and laparoscopic total gastrectomy is expected to be important for determining the future of treatment of upper third early gastric cancer.

  4. A Novel Electrochemical Microfluidic Chip Combined with Multiple Biomarkers for Early Diagnosis of Gastric Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yao; Zhi, Xiao; Su, Haichuan; Wang, Kan; Yan, Zhen; He, Nongyue; Zhang, Jingpu; Chen, Di; Cui, Daxiang

    2015-12-01

    Early diagnosis is very important to improve the survival rate of patients with gastric cancer and to understand the biology of cancer. In order to meet the clinical demands for early diagnosis of gastric cancer, we developed a disposable easy-to-use electrochemical microfluidic chip combined with multiple antibodies against six kinds of biomarkers (carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), Helicobacter pylori CagA protein (H.P.), P53oncoprotein (P53), pepsinogen I (PG I), and PG-II). The six kinds of biomarkers related to gastric cancer can be detected sensitively and synchronously in a short time. The specially designed three electrodes system enables cross-contamination to be avoided effectively. The linear ranges of detection of the electrochemical microfluidic chip were as follows: 0.37-90 ng mL-1 for CEA, 10.75-172 U mL-1 for CA19-9, 10-160 U L-1 for H.P., 35-560 ng mL-1 for P53, 37.5-600 ng mL-1 for PG I, and 2.5-80 ng mL-1for PG II. This method owns better sensitivity compared with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) results of 394 specimens of gastric cancer sera. Furthermore, we established a multi-index prediction model based on the six kinds of biomarkers for predicting risk of gastric cancer. In conclusion, the electrochemical microfluidic chip for detecting multiple biomarkers has great potential in applications such as early screening of gastric cancer patients, and therapeutic evaluation, and real-time dynamic monitoring the progress of gastric cancer in near future.

  5. Helicobacter pylori Eradication for Prevention of Metachronous Recurrence after Endoscopic Resection of Early Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bang, Chang Seok; Baik, Gwang Ho; Shin, In Soo; Kim, Jin Bong; Suk, Ki Tae; Yoon, Jai Hoon; Kim, Yeon Soo; Kim, Dong Joon

    2015-06-01

    Controversies persist regarding the effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication on the development of metachronous gastric cancer after endoscopic resection of early gastric cancer (EGC). The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of Helicobacter pylori eradication after endoscopic resection of EGC for the prevention of metachronous gastric cancer. A systematic literature review and meta-analysis were conducted using the core databases PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library. The rates of development of metachronous gastric cancer between the Helicobacter pylori eradication group vs. the non-eradication group were extracted and analyzed using risk ratios (RRs). A random effect model was applied. The methodological quality of the enrolled studies was assessed by the Risk of Bias table and by the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Publication bias was evaluated through the funnel plot with trim and fill method, Egger's test, and by the rank correlation test. Ten studies (2 randomized and 8 non-randomized/5,914 patients with EGC or dysplasia) were identified and analyzed. Overall, the Helicobacter pylori eradication group showed a RR of 0.467 (95% CI: 0.362-0.602, P < 0.001) for the development of metachronous gastric cancer after endoscopic resection of EGC. Subgroup analyses showed consistent results. Publication bias was not detected. Helicobacter pylori eradication after endoscopic resection of EGC reduces the occurrence of metachronous gastric cancer.

  6. Health economics evaluation of a gastric cancer early detection and treatment program in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Yuan, Yuan; Sun, Li-Ping; Fang, Xue; Zhou, Bao-Sen

    2014-01-01

    To use health economics methodology to assess the screening program on gastric cancer in Zhuanghe, China, so as to provide the basis for health decision on expanding the program of early detection and treatment. The expense of an early detection and treatment program for gastric cancer in patients found by screening, and also costs of traditional treatment in a hospital of Zhuanghe were assessed. Three major techniques of medical economics, namely cost-effective analysis (CEA), cost-benefit analysis (CBA) and cost-utility analysis (CUA), were used to assess the screening program. RESULTS from CEA showed that investing every 25, 235 Yuan on screening program in Zhuanghe area, one gastric cancer patient could be saved. Data from CUA showed that it was cost 1, 370 Yuan per QALY saved. RESULTS from CBA showed that: the total cost was 1,945,206 Yuan with a benefit as 8,669,709 Yuan and an CBR of 4.46. The early detection and treatment program of gastric cancer appears economic and society-beneficial. We suggest that it should be carry out in more high risk areas for gastric cancer.

  7. Endoscopic therapy for early gastric cancer: Standard techniques and recent advances in ESD

    PubMed Central

    Kume, Keiichiro

    2014-01-01

    The technique of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is now a well-known endoscopic therapy for early gastric cancer. ESD was introduced to resect large specimens of early gastric cancer in a single piece. ESD can provide precision of histologic diagnosis and can also reduce the recurrence rate. However, the drawback of ESD is its technical difficulty, and, consequently, it is associated with a high rate of complications, the need for advanced endoscopic techniques, and a lengthy procedure time. Various advances in the devices and techniques used for ESD have contributed to overcoming these drawbacks. PMID:24914364

  8. A case report of prostate cancer metastasis to the stomach resembling undifferentiated-type early gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Chiaki; Suzuki, Takuto; Kitagawa, Yoshiyasu; Hara, Taro; Yamaguchi, Taketo

    2017-08-07

    Occurrence of metastatic cancer to the stomach is rare, particularly in patients with prostate cancer. Gastric metastasis generally presents as a solitary and submucosal lesion with a central depression. We describe a case of gastric metastasis arising from prostate cancer, which is almost indistinguishable from the undifferentiated-type gastric cancer. A definitive diagnosis was not made until endoscopic resection. On performing both conventional and magnifying endoscopies, the lesion appeared to be slightly depressed and discolored area and it could not be distinguished from undifferentiated early gastric cancer. Biopsy from the lesion was negative for immunohistochemical staining of prostate-specific antigen, a sensitive and specific marker for prostate cancer. Thus, false initial diagnosis of an early primary gastric cancer was made and endoscopic submucosal dissection was performed. Pathological findings from the resected specimen aroused suspicion of a metastatic lesion. Consequently, immunostaining was performed. The lesion was positive for prostate-specific acid phosphatase and negative for prostate-specific antigen, cytokeratin 7, and cytokeratin 20. Accordingly, the final diagnosis was a metastatic gastric lesion originating from prostate cancer. In this patient, the definitive diagnosis as a metastatic lesion was difficult due to its unusual endoscopic appearance and the negative stain for prostate-specific antigen. We postulate that both of these are consequences of hormonal therapy against prostate cancer.

  9. Overexpression of early growth response-1 as a metastasis-regulatory factor in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Yamada, Mikako; Kamagata, Chinatsu; Kaneko, Reiko; Tsuji, Naoki; Nakamura, Masashi; Yagihashi, Atsuhito; Watanabe, Naoki

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the potential role of a nuclear transcription factor, early growth response-1 (Egr-1), in formation and progression of gastric cancer, we compared its expression in gastric cancers with that in non-cancerous tissues. Egr-1 mRNA expression was measured using TaqMan RT-PCR. The corresponding protein expression was examined immunohistochemically. Egr-1 mRNA expression was significantly higher in gastric cancer tissues than in normal mucosa (p < 0.0005). These differences were also reflected by protein product expression. Moreover, Egr-1 mRNA expression was higher in cases with metastasis to lymph nodes or remote organs. In cultured gastric cancer cells known to have a high metastatic potential, expression of this mRNA was higher than that of parental cells. It was suggested that Egr-1 has a significant role in carcinogenesis and in cancer progression, especially metastasis. Measurement of this mRNA should be useful for evaluation of the metastatic potential of gastric cancer.

  10. The predictive factors for lymph node metastasis in early gastric cancer: A clinical study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinzhong

    2015-01-01

    To detect the clinicopathological factors associated with lymph node metastases in early gastric cancer. We retrospectively evaluated the distribution of metastatic nodes in 198 patients with early gastric cancer treated in our hospital between May 2008 and January 2015, the clinicopathological factors including age, gender, tumor location, tumor size, macroscopic type, depth of invasion, histological type and venous invasion were studied, and the relationship between various parameters and lymph node metastases was analyzed. In this study, one hundred and ninety-eight patients with early gastric cancer were included, and lymph node metastasis was detected in 28 patients. Univariate analysis revealed a close relationship between tumor size, depth of invasion, histological type, venous invasion, local ulceration and lymph node metastases. Multivariate analysis revealed that the five factors were independent risk factors for lymph node metastases. The clinicopathological parameters including tumor size, depth of invasion, local ulceration, histological type and venous invasion are closely correlated with lymph node metastases, should be paid high attention in early gastric cancer patients.

  11. CEACAM6 is upregulated by Helicobacter pylori CagA and is a biomarker for early gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Supriya; Samanta, Animesh; Sharma, Neel; Tan, Kar Tong; Yang, Henry; Voon, Dominic C.; Pang, Brendan; Teh, Ming; Murata-Kamiya, Naoko; Hatakeyama, Masanori; Chang, Young-Tae; Yong, Wei Peng; Ito, Yoshiaki; Ho, Khek Yu; Tan, Patrick; Soong, Richie; Koeffler, Phillip H.; Yeoh, Khay Guan; Jeyasekharan, Anand D.

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of gastric cancers saves lives, but remains a diagnostic challenge. In this study, we aimed to identify cell-surface biomarkers of early gastric cancer. We hypothesized that a subset of plasma membrane proteins induced by the Helicobacter pylori oncoprotein CagA will be retained in early gastric cancers through non-oncogene addiction. An inducible system for expression of CagA was used to identify differentially upregulated membrane protein transcripts in vitro. The top hits were then analyzed in gene expression datasets comparing transcriptome of gastric cancer with normal tissue, to focus on markers retained in cancer. Among the transcripts enriched upon CagA induction in vitro, a significant elevation of CEACAM6 was noted in gene expression datasets of gastric cancer. We used quantitative digital immunohistochemistry to measure CEACAM6 protein levels in tissue microarrays of gastric cancer. We demonstrate an increase in CEACAM6 in early gastric cancers, when compared to matched normal tissue, with an AUC of 0.83 for diagnostic validity. Finally, we show that a fluorescently conjugated CEACAM6 antibody binds avidly to freshly resected gastric cancer xenograft samples and can be detected by endoscopy in real time. Together, these results suggest that CEACAM6 upregulation is a cell surface response to H. pylori CagA, and is retained in early gastric cancers. They highlight a novel link between CEACAM6 expression and CagA in gastric cancer, and suggest CEACAM6 to be a promising biomarker to aid with the fluorescent endoscopic diagnosis of early neoplastic lesions in the stomach. PMID:27421133

  12. Risk factors associated with delayed gastric emptying after subtotal gastrectomy with Billroth-I anastomosis using circular stapler for early gastric cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Han; Jung, Ghap Joong

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Gastric surgery may potentiate delayed gastric emptying. Billroth I gastroduodenostomy using a circular stapler is the most preferable reconstruction method. The purpose of this study is to analyze the risk factors associated with delayed gastric emptying after radical subtotal gastrectomy with Billroth I anastomosis using a stapler for early gastric cancer. Methods Three hundred and seventy-eight patients who underwent circular stapled Billroth I gastroduodenostomy after subtotal gastrectomy due to early gastric cancer were analyzed retrospectively. One hundred and eighty-two patients had Billroth I anastomosis using a 25 mm diameter circular stapler, and 196 patients had anastomosis with a 28 or 29 mm diameter circular stapler. Clinicopathological features and postoperative outcomes were evaluated and compared between the two groups. Delayed gastric emptying was diagnosed by symptoms and simple abdomen X-ray with or without upper gastrointestinal series or endoscopy. Results Postoperative delayed gastric emptying was found in 12 (3.2%) of the 378 patients. Among all the variables, distal margin and circular stapler diameter were significantly different between the cases with delayed gastric emptying and no delayed gastric emptying. There were statistically significant differences in sex, body mass index, comorbidity, complication, and operation type according to circular stapler diameter. In both univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses, only the stapler diameter was found to be a significant factor affecting delayed gastric emptying (P = 0.040). Conclusion In this study, the circular stapler diameter was one of the most significant predictable factors of delayed gastric emptying for Billroth I gastroduodenostomy. The use of a 28 or 29 mm diameter circular stapler rather than a 25 mm diameter stapler in stapled gastroduodenostomy for early gastric cancer can reduce postoperative delayed gastric emptying associated with anastomosic stenosis

  13. Risk factors associated with delayed gastric emptying after subtotal gastrectomy with Billroth-I anastomosis using circular stapler for early gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Han; Kim, Min Chan; Jung, Ghap Joong

    2012-11-01

    Gastric surgery may potentiate delayed gastric emptying. Billroth I gastroduodenostomy using a circular stapler is the most preferable reconstruction method. The purpose of this study is to analyze the risk factors associated with delayed gastric emptying after radical subtotal gastrectomy with Billroth I anastomosis using a stapler for early gastric cancer. Three hundred and seventy-eight patients who underwent circular stapled Billroth I gastroduodenostomy after subtotal gastrectomy due to early gastric cancer were analyzed retrospectively. One hundred and eighty-two patients had Billroth I anastomosis using a 25 mm diameter circular stapler, and 196 patients had anastomosis with a 28 or 29 mm diameter circular stapler. Clinicopathological features and postoperative outcomes were evaluated and compared between the two groups. Delayed gastric emptying was diagnosed by symptoms and simple abdomen X-ray with or without upper gastrointestinal series or endoscopy. Postoperative delayed gastric emptying was found in 12 (3.2%) of the 378 patients. Among all the variables, distal margin and circular stapler diameter were significantly different between the cases with delayed gastric emptying and no delayed gastric emptying. There were statistically significant differences in sex, body mass index, comorbidity, complication, and operation type according to circular stapler diameter. In both univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses, only the stapler diameter was found to be a significant factor affecting delayed gastric emptying (P = 0.040). In this study, the circular stapler diameter was one of the most significant predictable factors of delayed gastric emptying for Billroth I gastroduodenostomy. The use of a 28 or 29 mm diameter circular stapler rather than a 25 mm diameter stapler in stapled gastroduodenostomy for early gastric cancer can reduce postoperative delayed gastric emptying associated with anastomosic stenosis or edema with relative safety.

  14. Metachronous solitary splenic metastasis arising from early gastric cancer: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Namikawa, Tsutomu; Kawanishi, Yasuhiro; Fujisawa, Kazune; Munekage, Eri; Munekage, Masaya; Sugase, Takahito; Maeda, Hiromichi; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Kumon, Tatsuya; Hiroi, Makoto; Kobayashi, Michiya; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2017-08-29

    The metastasis of malignant tumors to the spleen is rare, and only a small percentage of cases can be treated surgically, as splenic metastases generally occur in the context of multivisceral metastatic cancer at a terminal stage. We report a rare case of metachronous solitary splenic metastasis arising from early gastric cancer. A 75-year-old man was initially referred to our hospital for examination of gastric cancer, diagnosed at a medical check-up. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed a slightly elevated lesion with a central irregular depression in the upper-third of the stomach. Biopsy specimens of the lesion showed a moderately-differentiated adenocarcinoma, and abdominal computed tomography showed no evidence of distant metastases. Endoscopic submucosal dissection was performed, with histological confirmation of a moderately-differentiated adenocarcinoma invading the submucosal layer. The patient subsequently underwent laparoscopic total gastrectomy with regional lymph node dissection, resulting in no residual carcinoma and no lymph node metastasis. Computed tomography, 28 months later, showed a well-defined mass measuring 4.2 cm in diameter in the spleen, and the patient underwent a splenectomy, since there was no evidence of further metastatic lesions in any other organs. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of a poorly-differentiated adenocarcinoma originating from the previous gastric cancer. The patient was alive 2 months after surgical resection of the splenic metastasis without any recurrence. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the second case of a solitary splenic metastasis from early gastric cancer to be reported in the English literature. The present case suggests surgical resection may be the preferred treatment of choice for patients with a solitary splenic metastasis from gastric cancer.

  15. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori-related chronic gastritis, gastric adenoma and early gastric cancer by magnifying endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Soma, Nei

    2016-10-01

    Evaluating the prevalence and severity of gastritis by endoscopy is useful for estimating the risk of gastric cancer (GC). Moreover, understanding the endoscopic appearances of gastritis is important for diagnosing GC due to the fact that superficial mucosal lesions mimicing gastritis (gastritis-like lesions) are quite difficult to be detected even with optimum preparation and the best technique, and in such cases tissue biopsy is often not very accurate for the diagnosis of gastric epithelial neoplasia. Magnifying endoscopy is a highly accurate technique for the detection of early gastric cancer (EGC). Recent reports have described that various novel endoscopic markers which, visualized by magnifying endoscopy with image-enhanced system (ME-IEE), can predict specific histopathological findings. Using ME-IEE with vessels and surface classification system (VSCS) may represent an excellent diagnostic performance with high confidence and good reproducibility to the endoscopists if performed under consistent conditions, including observation under maximal magnification. The aim of this review was to discuss how to identify high-risk groups for GC by endoscopy, and how to detect effectively signs of suspicious lesions by conventional white light imaging (C-WLI) or chromoendoscopy (CE). Furthermore, to characterize suspicious lesions using ME-IEE using the criteria and classification of EGC based upon VSCS. © 2016 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. Familial Gastric Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Setia, Namrata; Clark, Jeffrey W.; Duda, Dan G.; Hong, Theodore S.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Mullen, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Although the majority of gastric carcinomas are sporadic, approximately 10% show familial aggregation, and a hereditary cause is determined in 1%–3% cases. Of these, hereditary diffuse gastric cancer is the most recognized predisposition syndrome. Although rare, the less commonly known syndromes also confer a markedly increased risk for development of gastric cancer. Identification and characterization of these syndromes require a multidisciplinary effort involving oncologists, surgeons, genetic counselors, biologists, and pathologists. This article reviews the molecular genetics, clinical and pathologic features, surveillance guidelines, and preventive measures of common and less common hereditary gastric cancer predisposition syndromes. Implications for Practice: Although the majority of gastric adenocarcinomas are sporadic with many of those related to chronic Helicobacter pylori infection, approximately 10% of the cases show familial aggregation, and a specific hereditary cause is determined in 1%–3% cases. This review describes the molecular genetics, clinical and pathologic features, surveillance guidelines, and preventive measures of common and less common hereditary gastric cancer predisposition syndromes. Ultimately, a better understanding of the biology of these conditions should allow early identification and intervention as part of a multidisciplinary approach involving oncologists, surgeons, genetic counselors, and pathologists. PMID:26424758

  17. Diagnosis of extent of early gastric cancer using flexible spectral imaging color enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Osawa, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Hironori; Miura, Yoshimasa; Yoshizawa, Mitsuyo; Sunada, Keijiro; Satoh, Kiichi; Sugano, Kentaro

    2012-01-01

    The demarcation line between the cancerous lesion and the surrounding area could be easily recognized with flexible spectral imaging color enhancement (FICE) system compared with conventional white light images. The characteristic finding of depressed-type early gastric cancer (EGC) in most cases was revealed as reddish lesions distinct from the surrounding yellowish non-cancerous area without magnification. Conventional endoscopic images provide little information regarding depressed lesions located in the tangential line, but FICE produces higher color contrast of such cancers. Histological findings in depressed area with reddish color changes show a high density of glandular structure and an apparently irregular microvessel in intervening parts between crypts, resulting in the higher color contrast of FICE image between cancer and surrounding area. Some depressed cancers are shown as whitish lesion by conventional endoscopy. FICE also can produce higher color contrast between whitish cancerous lesions and surrounding atrophic mucosa. For nearly flat cancer, FICE can produce an irregular structural pattern of cancer distinct from that of the surrounding mucosa, leading to a clear demarcation. Most elevated-type EGCs are detected easily as yellowish lesions with clearly contrasting demarcation. In some cases, a partially reddish change is accompanied on the tumor surface similar to depressed type cancer. In addition, the FICE system is quite useful for the detection of minute gastric cancer, even without magnification. These new contrasting images with the FICE system may have the potential to increase the rate of detection of gastric cancers and screen for them more effectively as well as to determine the extent of EGC. PMID:22912909

  18. Gastric cancer and family history.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoon Jin; Kim, Nayoung

    2016-11-01

    Gastric cancer is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates worldwide. Identifying individuals at high risk is important for surveillance and prevention of gastric cancer. Having first-degree relatives diagnosed with gastric cancer is a strong and consistent risk factor for gastric cancer, but the pathogenic mechanisms behind this familial aggregation are unclear. Against this background, we reviewed the risk factors for gastric cancer in those with a first-degree relative with gastric cancer, and the possible causes for familial clustering of gastric cancer including bacterial factors, inherited genetic susceptibility, environmental factors or a combination thereof. Among individuals with a family history, current or past Helicobacter pylori infection, having two or more first-degree affected relatives or female gender was associated with an increased risk of developing gastric cancer. To date, no specific single nucleotide polymorphism has been shown to be associated with familial clustering of gastric cancer. H. pylori eradication is the most important strategy for preventing gastric cancer in first-degree relatives of gastric cancer patients, particularly those in their 20s and 30s. Early H. pylori eradication could prevent the progression to intestinal metaplasia and reduce the synergistic effect on gastric carcinogenesis in individuals with both H. pylori infection and a family history. Endoscopic surveillance is also expected to benefit individuals with a family history. Further large-scale, prospective studies are warranted to evaluate the cost-effectiveness and optimal time point for endoscopy in this population. Moreover, genome-wide association studies that incorporate environmental and dietary factors on a 'big data' basis will increase our understanding of the pathogenesis of gastric cancer.

  19. Clinicopathological features of alpha-fetoprotein producing early gastric cancer with enteroblastic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kohei; Ueyama, Hiroya; Matsumoto, Kenshi; Akazawa, Yoichi; Komori, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Tsutomu; Murakami, Takashi; Asaoka, Daisuke; Hojo, Mariko; Tomita, Natsumi; Nagahara, Akihito; Kajiyama, Yoshiaki; Yao, Takashi; Watanabe, Sumio

    2016-09-28

    To investigate clinicopathological features of early stage gastric cancer with enteroblastic differentiation (GCED). We retrospectively investigated data on 6 cases of early stage GCED and 186 cases of early stage conventional gastric cancer (CGC: well or moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma) who underwent endoscopic submucosal dissection or endoscopic mucosal resection from September 2011 to February 2015 in our hospital. GCED was defined as a tumor having a primitive intestine-like structure composed of cuboidal or columnar cells with clear cytoplasm and immunohistochemical positivity for either alpha-fetoprotein, Glypican 3 or SALL4. The following were compared between GCED and CGC: age, gender, location and size of tumor, macroscopic type, ulceration, depth of invasion, lymphatic and venous invasion, positive horizontal and vertical margin, curative resection rate. Six cases (5 males, 1 female; mean age 75.7 years; 6 lesions) of early gastric cancer with a GCED component and 186 cases (139 males, 47 females; mean age 72.7 years; 209 lesions) of early stage CGC were investigated. Mean tumor diameters were similar but rates of submucosal invasion, lymphatic invasion, venous invasion, and non-curative resection were higher in GCED than CGC (66.6% vs 11.4%, 33.3% vs 2.3%, 66.6% vs 0.4%, 83.3% vs 11% respectively, P < 0.01). Deep submucosal invasion was not revealed endoscopically or by preoperative biopsy. Histologically, in GCED the superficial mucosal layer was covered with a CGC component. The GCED component tended to exist in the deeper part of the mucosa to the submucosa by lymphatic and/or venous invasion, without severe stromal reaction. In addition, Glypican 3 was the most sensitive marker for GCED (positivity, 83.3%), immunohistochemically. Even in the early stage GCED has high malignant potential, and preoperative diagnosis is considered difficult. Endoscopists and pathologists should know the clinicopathological features of this highly malignant type

  20. Early or late antibiotic intervention prevents Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric cancer in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Songhua; Lee, Dong Soo; Morrissey, Rhiannon; Aponte-Pieras, Jose R; Rogers, Arlin B; Moss, Steven F

    2014-12-01

    H. pylori infection causes gastritis, peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. Eradicating H. pylori prevents ulcers, but to what extent this prevents cancer remains unknown, especially if given after intestinal metaplasia has developed. H. pylori infected wild-type (WT) mice do not develop cancer, but mice lacking the tumor suppressor p27 do so, thus providing an experimental model of H. pylori-induced cancer. We infected p27-deficient mice with H. pylori strain SS1 at 6-8 weeks of age. Persistently H. pylori-infected WT C57BL/6 mice served as controls. Mice in the eradication arms received antimicrobial therapy (omeprazole, metronidazole and clarithromycin) either "early" (at 15 weeks post infection, WPI) or "late" at 45 WPI. At 70 WPI, mice were euthanized for H. pylori determination, histopathology and cytokine/chemokine expression. Persistently infected mice developed premalignant lesions including high-grade dysplasia, whereas those given antibiotics did not. Histologic activity scores in the eradication groups were similar to each other, and were significantly decreased compared with controls for inflammation, epithelial defects, hyperplasia, metaplasia, atrophy and dysplasia. IP-10 and MIG levels in groups that received antibiotics were significantly lower than controls. There were no significant differences in expression of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, RANTES, MCP-1, MIP-1α or MIP-1β among the three groups. Thus, H. pylori eradication given either early or late after infection significantly attenuated gastric inflammation, gastric atrophy, hyperplasia, and dysplasia in the p27-deficient mice model of H. pylori-induced gastric cancer, irrespective of the timing of antibiotic administration. This was associated with reduced expression of IP-10 and MIG. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. p16 promoter hypermethylation: A useful serum marker for early detection of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Abbaszadegan, Mohammad Reza; Moaven, Omeed; Sima, Hamid Reza; Ghafarzadegan, Kamran; A'rabi, Azadeh; Forghani, Mohammad Naser; Raziee, Hamid Reza; Mashhadinejad, Ali; Jafarzadeh, Mostafa; Esmaili-Shandiz, Ehsan; Dadkhah, Ezzat

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To determine p16 promoter hypermethylation in gastric tumoral tissue and serum samples, its impact on p16-protein expression, and correlation with clinical and histological features. METHODS: Samples were obtained from 52 histologically confirmed cases of gastric adenocarcinoma. Gastric tissue and serum of 50 age- and sex-matched individuals with normal gastroscopy and biopsy were obtained as control samples. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP) was used to evaluate methylation status of p16 promoter. p16-protein expression was analyzed by immunohistochemical staining on paraffin-embedded sections. RESULTS: Methylation was detected in 44.2% (23/52) of tumoral tissues. 60.9% of them were also methylated in serum, i.e., 26.9% of all patients (14/52). Methylation was not detected in tissue and sera of control samples. p16-protein expression was decreased in 61.5% of cases (32/52), and was significantly associated with promoter hypermethylation (P < 0.001). Methylation was significantly more frequent in higher pathological grades (P < 0.05). Methylation was not associated with other clinicopathological features and environmental factors including H pylori infection and smoking. CONCLUSION: p16 promoter hypermethylation is an important event in gastric carcinogenesis. It is the principle mechanism of p16 gene silencing. It is related to malignant tumor behavior. Detection of DNA methylation in serum may be a biomarker for early detection of gastric cancer. PMID:18395906

  2. Perigastric lymph node metastasis from papillary thyroid carcinoma in a patient with early gastric cancer: the first case report.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Gui-Ae; Kim, Hyung-Chul; Kim, Hee-Kyung; Cho, Gyu-Seok

    2014-09-01

    Distant metastasis from papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), particularly from papillary thyroid microcarcinoma, is rare. We present a case of perigastric lymph node metastasis from PTC in a patient with early gastric cancer and breast cancer. During post-surgical follow-up for breast cancer, a 56-year-old woman was diagnosed incidentally with early gastric cancer and synchronous left thyroid cancer. Therefore, laparoscopic distal gastrectomy with lymph node dissection and left thyroidectomy were performed. On the basis of the pathologic findings of the surgical specimens, the patient was diagnosed to have papillary thyroid microcarcinoma with perigastric lymph node metastasis and early gastric cancer with mucosal invasion. Finally, on the basis of immunohistochemical staining with galectin-3, the diagnosis of perigastric lymph node metastasis from PTC was made. When a patient has multiple primary malignancies with lymph node metastasis, careful pathologic examination of the surgical specimen is necessary; immunohistochemical staining may be helpful in determining the primary origin of lymph node metastasis.

  3. Risk prediction for early-onset gastric carcinoma: a case-control study of polygenic gastric cancer in Han Chinese with hereditary background.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jiajia; Li, Yanyan; Tian, Tiantian; Li, Na; Zhu, Yan; Zou, Jianling; Gao, Jing; Shen, Lin

    2016-06-07

    Recent genomewide studies have identified several germline variations associated with gastric cancer. The aim of the present study was to identify, in a Chinese Han population, the individual and combined effects of those single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that increase the risk of early-onset gastric cancer. We conducted a case-control study comprising 116 patients with gastric cancer as well as 102 sex- and age-matched controls and confirmed that the SNPs MUC1 (mucin 1) rs9841504 and ZBTB20 (zinc finger and BTB domain containing 20) rs4072037 were associated with an increased gastric cancer risk. Of the 116 patients diagnosed with cancer, 65 had at least 1 direct lineal relative with carcinoma of the digestive system or breast/ovarian cancer. These 65 had another 4 SNPs associated with gastric cancer susceptibility: PSCA (prostate stem cell antigen) rs2294008, PLCE1 (phospholipase C epsilon 1) rs2274223, PTGER4/PRKAA1 (prostaglandin E receptor 4/ protein kinase AMP-activated catalytic subunit alpha 1) rs13361707, and TYMS (thymidylate synthetase) rs2790. However, each of these low-penetrance susceptibility polymorphisms alone is not considered influential enough to predict the absolute risk of early-onset gastric cancer. Thus we decided to study different combinations of polygenes as they affected for our population. Those subjects with both the risk alleles MUC1 rs9841504 and ZBTB20 rs4072037 had a greater than 3-fold increased risk of gastric cancer. Also those with a hereditary background including the risk alleles PLCE1 rs2274223 and PTGER4/PRKAA1 rs13361707 were 3 times more susceptible to cardia cancer than those without. These findings show that the study of combined polymorphisms, instead of single low-penetrance variations in susceptibility, may lead to a high-risk classification for a specific population.

  4. Risk prediction for early-onset gastric carcinoma: a case-control study of polygenic gastric cancer in Han Chinese with hereditary background

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jiajia; Li, Yanyan; Tian, Tiantian; Li, Na; Zhu, Yan; Zou, Jianling; Gao, Jing; Shen, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Recent genomewide studies have identified several germline variations associated with gastric cancer. The aim of the present study was to identify, in a Chinese Han population, the individual and combined effects of those single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that increase the risk of early-onset gastric cancer. We conducted a case-control study comprising 116 patients with gastric cancer as well as 102 sex- and age-matched controls and confirmed that the SNPs MUC1 (mucin 1) rs9841504 and ZBTB20 (zinc finger and BTB domain containing 20) rs4072037 were associated with an increased gastric cancer risk. Of the 116 patients diagnosed with cancer, 65 had at least 1 direct lineal relative with carcinoma of the digestive system or breast/ovarian cancer. These 65 had another 4 SNPs associated with gastric cancer susceptibility: PSCA (prostate stem cell antigen) rs2294008, PLCE1 (phospholipase C epsilon 1) rs2274223, PTGER4/PRKAA1 (prostaglandin E receptor 4/protein kinase AMP-activated catalytic subunit alpha 1) rs13361707, and TYMS (thymidylate synthetase) rs2790. However, each of these low-penetrance susceptibility polymorphisms alone is not considered influential enough to predict the absolute risk of early-onset gastric cancer. Thus we decided to study different combinations of polygenes as they affected for our population. Those subjects with both the risk alleles MUC1 rs9841504 and ZBTB20 rs4072037 had a greater than 3-fold increased risk of gastric cancer. Also those with a hereditary background including the risk alleles PLCE1 rs2274223 and PTGER4/PRKAA1 rs13361707 were 3 times more susceptible to cardia cancer than those without. These findings show that the study of combined polymorphisms, instead of single low-penetrance variations in susceptibility, may lead to a high-risk classification for a specific population. PMID:27127881

  5. [Application of pylorus-vagus-preserving gastrectomy in early gastric cancer in middle third of stomach].

    PubMed

    Hu, Junfeng; Shao, Qinshu; Sun, Yuanshui; Xu, Xiaodong; Xu, Ji

    2015-04-14

    To evaluate the long-term outcomes of pylorus-vagus-preserving partial gastrectomy for early gastric cancer in middle third of stomach. Between January 2004 and June 2009, 46 patients with early gastric cancer in middle third of stomach underwent pylorus-vagus-preserving partial gastrectomy (PPG) while another 85 patients had conventional distal gastrectomy (DG). Clinicopathologic data and follow-up results of two groups were analyzed retrospectively, including the results of subjective nutritional assessments, laboratory blood biochemical data, endoscopic findings of remnant stomach and total 5-year survival rates. Postprandial dumping syndrome occurred in 7 patients (8.2%) in DG group while no syndrome occurred in PPG group. The incidence of gallbladder stones at 18 months after operation in DG group was higher than that in PPG group. Significant difference existed between two groups (P<0.05). Even though no significant difference existed in laboratory blood biochemical data and endoscopic findings, PPG group recovered better and regurgitation was frequently found in DG group. Food residue in gastric remnant was frequently observed in PPG (31.1%) than in DG (10.8%, P<0.05) by endoscopic findings. At 2 years post-operation, the postoperative 5-year recurrence rate was 6.5% (2/46) in PPG group versus 8.2% (7/85) in DG group. However no significant difference existed between 2 groups (P=0.724). No significant difference existed between PPG group (91.3%) and DG group (90.6%) in overall 5-year survival rate. For early gastric cancer in middle third of stomach, pylorus-vagus-preserving partial gastrectomy is effective in maintaining postoperative function. And it has the same postoperative survival rate as conventional distal gastrectomy.

  6. Clinicopathological characteristics of clinical early gastric cancer in the upper-third stomach.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Daisuke; Komatsu, Shuhei; Kosuga, Toshiyuki; Konishi, Hirotaka; Okamoto, Kazuma; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Otsuji, Eigo

    2015-12-07

    To elucidate the clinicopathological characteristics of clinically early gastric cancer in the upper-third stomach and to clarify treatment precautions. A total of 683 patients with clinical early gastric cancer were enrolled in this retrospective study, 128 of whom had gastric cancer in the upper-third stomach (U group). All patients underwent a double contrast barium examination, endoscopy, and computed tomography (CT), and were diagnosed preoperatively based on the findings obtained. The clinicopathological features of these patients were compared with those of patients with gastric cancer in the middle- and lower-third stomach (ML group). We also compared clinicopathological factors between accurate-diagnosis and under-diagnosis groups in order to identify factors affecting the accuracy of a preoperative diagnosis of tumor depth. Patients in the U group were older (P = 0.029), had a higher ratio of males to females (P = 0.015), and had more histologically differentiated tumors (P = 0.007) than patients in the ML group. A clinical under-diagnosis occurred in 57 out of 683 patients (8.3%), and was more frequent in the U group than in the ML group (16.4% vs 6.3%, P < 0.0001). Therefore, the rates of lymph node metastasis and lymphatic invasion were slightly higher in the U group than in the ML group (P = 0.071 and 0.082, respectively). An under-diagnosis was more frequent in histologically undifferentiated tumors (P = 0.094) and in those larger than 4 cm (P = 0.024). The median follow-up period after surgery was 56 mo (range, 1-186 mo). Overall, survival and disease-specific survival rates were significantly lower in the U group than in the ML group (P = 0.016 and 0.020, respectively). However, limited operation-related cancer recurrence was not detected in the U group in the present study. Clinical early gastric cancer in the upper-third stomach has distinguishable characteristics that increase the risk of a clinical under-diagnosis, especially in patients with

  7. Endoscopic laser-induced steam generator: a new method of treatment for early gastric cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Takuya; Arai, Tsunenori; Tajiri, Hisao; Nogami, Yashiroh; Hino, Kunihiko; Kikuchi, Makoto

    1996-05-01

    The minimum invasive endoscopic treatment for early gastric cancer has been popular in Japan. The endoscopic mucosal resection and laser coagulation by Nd:YAG laser irradiation has been the popular treatment method in this field. However, the submucosal cancer has not been successfully treated by these methods. To treat the submucosal cancer endoscopically, we developed a new coagulation therapy using hot steam generated by Nd:YAG laser. The steam of which temperature was over 10 deg. in Celsius was generated by the laser power of 30 W with 5 ml/min. of saline. The steam was emitted to canine gastric wall under laparotomy or endoscopy for 50 s respectively. Follow up endoscopy was performed on 3, 7, 14, 28 days after the treatment. Histological examination was studied on 7, 28 days, and just after the emission. In the acute observation, the submucosal layer was totally coagulated. On the 7th day, ulceration with white coat was seen. The mucosal defect, submucosal coagulation, and marked edema without muscle degeneration were found by the histological study. On the 14th day, the ulcer advanced in the scar stage. On the 28th day, it completely healed into white scar with mucosal regeneration and mucosal muscle thickening. We could obtain reproducible coagulation up to deep submucosal layer with large area in a short operation time. Moreover there were no degeneration of proper muscle. This treatment effectiveness could be easily controlled by the steam temperature and emission duration. We think that this method can be applied to early gastric cancer including the submucosal cancer, in particular poor risk case for operation. Further study should be done to apply this method to clinical therapy.

  8. Is screening and surveillance for early detection of gastric cancer needed in Korean Americans?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gwang Ha; Bang, Sung Jo; Ende, Alexander R.; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2015-01-01

    The incidence rate of gastric cancer in Korean Americans is over five times higher than that in non-Hispanic whites, and is similar to the incidence of colorectal cancer in the overall United States population. In Korea, the National Cancer Screening Program recommends endoscopy or upper gastrointestinal series for people aged 40 years and older every 2 years. However, the benefit of gastric cancer screening in Korean Americans has not been evaluated. Based on epidemiologic studies, Korean Americans appear to have more similar gastric cancer risk factors to Koreans as opposed to Americans of European descent, though the risk of gastric cancer appears to decrease for subsequent generations. Therefore, in accordance with recent recommendations regarding screening for gastric cancer in Korea, endoscopic screening for gastric cancer in Korean Americans should be considered, especially in those with known atrophic gastritis/intestinal metaplasia or a family history of gastric cancer. In the future, additional studies will needed to assess whether a screening program for gastric cancer in Korean Americans will result in a survival benefit. PMID:26552450

  9. Proteomic Profiling of Paraffin-Embedded Samples Identifies Metaplasia-Specific and Early-Stage Gastric Cancer Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Josane F.; Ham, Amy-Joan L.; Whitwell, Corbin; Nam, Ki Taek; Lee, Hyuk-Joon; Yang, Han-Kwang; Kim, Woo Ho; Zhang, Bing; Li, Ming; LaFleur, Bonnie; Liebler, Daniel C.; Goldenring, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Early diagnosis and curative resection are the predominant factors associated with increased survival in patients with gastric cancer. However, most gastric cancer cases are still diagnosed at later stages. Since most pathologic specimens are archived as FFPE samples, the ability to use them to generate expression profiles can greatly improve cancer biomarker discovery. We sought to uncover new biomarkers for stomach preneoplastic metaplasias and neoplastic lesions by generating proteome profiles using FFPE samples. We combined peptide isoelectric focusing and liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry analysis to generate proteomic profiles from FFPE samples of intestinal-type gastric cancer, metaplasia, and normal mucosa. The expression patterns of selected proteins were analyzed by immunostaining first in single tissue sections from normal stomach, metaplasia, and gastric cancer and later in larger tissue array cohorts. We detected 60 proteins up-regulated and 87 proteins down-regulated during the progression from normal mucosa to metaplasia to gastric cancer. Two of the up-regulated proteins, LTF and DMBT1, were validated as specific markers for spasmolytic polypeptide–expressing metaplasia and intestinal metaplasia, respectively. In cancers, significantly lower levels of DMBT1 or LTF correlated with more advanced disease and worse prognosis. Thus, proteomic profiling using FFPE samples has led to the identification of two novel markers for stomach metaplasias and gastric cancer prognosis. PMID:22944598

  10. Impact of early postoperative enteral nutrition on clinical outcomes in patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, B; Liu, H Y; Guo, S H; Sun, P; Gong, F M; Jia, B Q

    2015-06-29

    The impact of early enteral nutrition (EEN) on clinical outcomes of gastric cancer patients was investigated. Three hundred pa-tients undergoing gastric cancer surgery from July 2010 to May 2014 were randomly divided into experimental and control groups (n = 150/group). Experimental group patients received enteral nutrition in water during the early postoperative period. Control group patients received conventional perioperative treatment. Patients' clinical outcomes, post-operative immune function, and nutritional statuses were compared, which revealed that the postoperative fever duration (80.2 ± 6.0 vs 88.1 ± 8.1 h, P < 0.05), anal exhaust time (78.8 ± 9.3 vs 85.3 ± 8.4 h, P < 0.05), and length of hospitalization (7.73 ± 2.13 vs 9.77 ± 1.76 days, P < 0.01) differed significantly. Treatment costs in thousands of dol-lars were 31.24 ± 3.21 for the experimental group and 35.61 ± 2.32 for the control group; this difference was statistically significant (P < 0.01). The incidence of postoperative complications did not significantly differ between the experimental and control groups [14.0% (21/150) vs 17.3% (26/150), P > 0.05]. At postoperative days 3 and 7, the CD3(+), CD4(+), natural killer cell, albumin, and prealbumin levels and CD4(+)/CD8(+) ra-tio were significantly higher in the experimental group than the control group (all P < 0.05). CD8(+) cell counts were significantly lower in the experimental group than the control group (P < 0.05). Postsurgical oral EEN can improve nutritional status and immune function and promote early recovery of intestinal function in patients with gastric cancer.

  11. Cell kinetics and genetic instabilities in differentiated type early gastric cancers with different mucin phenotype.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Naomi; Watari, Jiro; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Tanno, Satoshi; Saitoh, Yusuke; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2003-01-01

    To clarify the biological impact and molecular pathogenesis of cellular phenotype in differentiated-type gastric cancers (DGCs), we investigated cell kinetics and genetic instabilities in early stage of DGCs. A total of 43 early gastric cancers (EGCs) were studied. EGCs were divided into 3 phenotypic categories: gastric (G type, n = 11), ordinary (O type, n = 20), and complete intestinal (CI type, n = 12) based on the combination of HGM, ConA, MUC2, and CD10. Proliferative index (PI), apoptotic index (AI), and p53 overexpression were investigated by immunohistochemical staining with anti-Ki-67, the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling method, and p53 antibody, respectively. Using a high-resolution fluorescent microsatellite analysis system, microsatellite instability (MSI) and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) were examined. Frameshift mutation analysis of transforming growth factor-beta type II receptor (TGF-betaRII) and bcl-2-associated X (BAX) in cancers with MSI was also performed. The mean AI/PI ratio values were 0.04 for G-type, 0.10 for O-type, and 0.13 for CI-type cancers--significantly lower in G type than in O and CI types (P = 0.02 and P = 0.001, respectively). No difference in the incidence of MSI and LOH was seen among the 3 cellular phenotypes. However, the major pattern of MSI, which showed drastic and widely dispersed changes and is related to an increased risk for cancer, was significantly higher in G and O types than in CI type (P <0.005). No frame shift mutations of TGF-betaRII or BAX were found in CI-type cancers. These results indicate that G-type cancers are likely to show more aggressive behaviors than CI-type cancers, and that O-type cancers show the intermediate characteristics of both types. However, the molecular pathogenesis of each phenotypic cancer is not associated with microsatellite alterations. Copyright 2003, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  12. A computer system to be used with laser-based endoscopy for quantitative diagnosis of early gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Miyaki, Rie; Yoshida, Shigeto; Tanaka, Shinji; Kominami, Yoko; Sanomura, Yoji; Matsuo, Taiji; Oka, Shiro; Raytchev, Bisser; Tamaki, Toru; Koide, Tetsushi; Kaneda, Kazufumi; Yoshihara, Masaharu; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of a newly devised computer system for use with laser-based endoscopy in differentiating between early gastric cancer, reddened lesions, and surrounding tissue. Narrow-band imaging based on laser light illumination has come into recent use. We devised a support vector machine (SVM)-based analysis system to be used with the newly devised endoscopy system to quantitatively identify gastric cancer on images obtained by magnifying endoscopy with blue-laser imaging (BLI). We evaluated the usefulness of the computer system in combination with the new endoscopy system. We evaluated the system as applied to 100 consecutive early gastric cancers in 95 patients examined by BLI magnification at Hiroshima University Hospital. We produced a set of images from the 100 early gastric cancers; 40 flat or slightly depressed, small, reddened lesions; and surrounding tissues, and we attempted to identify gastric cancer, reddened lesions, and surrounding tissue quantitatively. The average SVM output value was 0.846 ± 0.220 for cancerous lesions, 0.381 ± 0.349 for reddened lesions, and 0.219 ± 0.277 for surrounding tissue, with the SVM output value for cancerous lesions being significantly greater than that for reddened lesions or surrounding tissue. The average SVM output value for differentiated-type cancer was 0.840 ± 0.207 and for undifferentiated-type cancer was 0.865 ± 0.259. Although further development is needed, we conclude that our computer-based analysis system used with BLI will identify gastric cancers quantitatively.

  13. Upgrading the definition of early gastric cancer: better staging means more appropriate treatment.

    PubMed

    Saragoni, Luca

    2015-12-01

    Since Murakami defined early gastric cancer (EGC) as a "carcinoma limited to the gastric mucosa and/or submucosa regardless of the lymph node status", several authors have focused on the most influential histopathological parameters for predicting the development of lymph node metastases by considering the lymph node status as an important prognostic factor. A few authors have also considered the depth of invasion as one of the keys to explaining the existence of subgroups of patients affected by EGC with poor prognoses. In any case, EGC is still considered an initial phase of tumor progression with good prognosis. The introduction of modern endoscopic devices has allowed a precise diagnosis of early lesions, which can lead to improved definitions of tumors that can be radically treated with endoscopic mucosal resection or endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). Given the widespread use of these techniques, the Japanese Gastric Cancer Association (JGCA) identified in 2011 the standard criteria that should exclude the presence of lymph node metastases. At that time, EGCs with nodal involvement should have been asserted as no longer fitting the definition of an early tumor. Some authors have also demonstrated that the morphological growth pattern of a tumor, according to Kodama's classification, is one of the most important prognostic factors, thereby suggesting the need to report it in histopathological drafts. Notwithstanding the acquired knowledge regarding the clinical behavior of EGC, Murakami's definition is still being used. This definition needs to be upgraded according to the modern staging of the disease so that the appropriate treatment would be selected.

  14. Gene methylation in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yiping; Dang, Siwen; Hou, Peng

    2013-09-23

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies and remains the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Over 70% of new cases and deaths occur in developing countries. In the early years of the molecular biology revolution, cancer research mainly focuses on genetic alterations, including gastric cancer. Epigenetic mechanisms are essential for normal development and maintenance of tissue-specific gene expression patterns in mammals. Disruption of epigenetic processes can lead to altered gene function and malignant cellular transformation. Recent advancements in the rapidly evolving field of cancer epigenetics have shown extensive reprogramming of every component of the epigenetic machinery in cancer, including DNA methylation, histone modifications, nucleosome positioning, noncoding RNAs, and microRNAs. Aberrant DNA methylation in the promoter regions of gene, which leads to inactivation of tumor suppressor and other cancer-related genes in cancer cells, is the most well-defined epigenetic hallmark in gastric cancer. The advantages of gene methylation as a target for detection and diagnosis of cancer in biopsy specimens and non-invasive body fluids such as serum and gastric washes have led to many studies of application in gastric cancer. This review focuses on the most common and important phenomenon of epigenetics, DNA methylation, in gastric cancer and illustrates the impact epigenetics has had on this field. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. NOSE laparoscopic gastrectomies for early gastric cancer may reduce morbidity and hospital stay: early results from a prospective nonrandomized study.

    PubMed

    Hüscher, Cristiano G S; Lirici, Marco Maria; Ponzano, Cecilia

    2017-04-01

    Natural orifice specimen extraction - NOSE laparoscopy is a promising technique that avoids mini-laparotomy, possibly reducing postoperative pain, wound infections and hospital stay. Recent systematic reviews have shown that postoperative morbidity associated with laparoscopically assisted gastrectomies is similar to that after open gastrectomies. More specifically, there is no difference in wound infection rate. The study objective was to evaluate whether postoperative morbidity and hospital stay may be reduced by transoral specimen extraction after laparoscopically assisted gastrectomy for early gastric cancer (EGC). A prospective, nonrandomized study was carried out starting in August 2012. Data from all patients operated on during the first year, with minimum 18 months follow-up, were collected to assess feasibility, oncologic results, postoperative morbidity, hospital stay and functional results. Overall, 14 patients were included and followed-up. After gastric resection, a 3 cm opening was created on the gastric stump, and the specimen, divided into three segments stitched one to each other, was sutured to the gastric tube and retrieved through the mouth. Postoperative morbidity was 7.14% (1/14): one case of pneumonia. No wound infection occurred. The mean postoperative hospital stay was 4.7 ± 1.0 days. NOSE laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy is feasible and safe, with similar oncologic results as LAG, but decreased morbidity and hospital stay.

  16. Autoimmunity and Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bizzaro, Nicola; Antico, Antonio; Villalta, Danilo

    2018-01-01

    Alterations in the immune response of patients with autoimmune diseases may predispose to malignancies, and a link between chronic autoimmune gastritis and gastric cancer has been reported in many studies. Intestinal metaplasia with dysplasia of the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa and hyperplasia of chromaffin cells, which are typical features of late-stage autoimmune gastritis, are considered precursor lesions. Autoimmune gastritis has been associated with the development of two types of gastric neoplasms: intestinal type and type I gastric carcinoid. Here, we review the association of autoimmune gastritis with gastric cancer and other autoimmune features present in gastric neoplasms. PMID:29373557

  17. Feasibility and Nutritional Benefits of Laparoscopic Proximal Gastrectomy for Early Gastric Cancer in the Upper Stomach.

    PubMed

    Kosuga, Toshiyuki; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Komatsu, Shuhei; Okamoto, Kazuma; Konishi, Hirotaka; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Otsuji, Eigo

    2015-12-01

    Laparoscopic proximal gastrectomy (LPG) has recently been applied for early gastric cancer (EGC) in the upper stomach as a minimally invasive and function-preserving surgery. This study aimed to clarify the feasibility and nutritional benefits of LPG over laparoscopic total gastrectomy (LTG). This was a retrospective study of 77 patients with clinical stage I gastric cancer in the upper stomach. Of these patients, 25 underwent LPG, while 52 underwent LTG. Surgical outcomes and postoperative nutritional status such as changes in body weight and blood chemistries were compared between LPG and LTG. Intraoperative blood loss and C-reactive protein levels at 3 and 7 days after surgery were significantly lower in LPG than in LTG (p = 0.018, 0.036, and 0.042, respectively). No significant differences were observed in postoperative early or late complication rates between LPG and LTG. The incidence of Los Angeles Grade B or more severe reflux esophagitis after LPG was 9.1 %, which was similar to that after LTG (9.3 %). Postoperative changes in body weight at 6 months and 1 and 2 years after surgery were consistently less in LPG than in LTG (p = 0.001, 0.022, and 0.001, respectively). Moreover, postoperative levels of hemoglobin and serum albumin and total lymphocyte count were also higher in LPG than in LTG. LPG may be a better choice for EGC in the upper stomach than LTG because it has distinct advantages in terms of surgical invasiveness and postoperative nutritional status.

  18. Endoscopic submucosal dissection as treatment for early gastric cancer: Experience at two centers in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Chirinos Vega, J A; Vargas, G; Alcántara, C; Zapata, J

    2018-02-09

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) and determine the clinical and pathologic characteristics of early gastric cancers and premalignant lesions treated with that technique at the Hospital Nacional of the Department of Health and a private clinic in Lima, Peru. A descriptive study of all pre-malignant and malignant gastric lesions treated with ESD at the Gastroenterology Service of the Hospital Arzobispo Loayza and the Clínica Angloamericana was conducted within the time frame of January 2012 and January 2017. A total of 13 lesions were resected through ESD: 8 adenocarcinomas (61.53%), 3 adenomas with high-grade dysplasia (23%), and 2 adenomas with low-grade dysplasia (15.38%). Twelve lesions (92.3%) were located in the lower third of the stomach. Slightly elevated lesions (Paris classification IIa) (4 lesions, 30.76%) and mixed slightly elevated lesions with a depressed component (IIa+IIc) (4 lesions, 30.76%) predominated. The mean size of the resected specimens was 35mm. Complete resection of all lesions was achieved in 11 cases (84.6%) and en bloc resection was carried out in 11 cases (84.6%). Resection was curative in 6 cases (75%), from the total of 8 resected adenocarcinomas. One case of perforation was the only complication reported (7.6%) and it was surgically resolved. The feasibility and efficacy of ESD for the treatment of early gastric cancer was demonstrated at two healthcare centers in Lima, Peru. The complication rate was similar to that reported in the international medical literature. Copyright © 2018 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  19. [Current Status of Endoscopic Resection of Early Gastric Cancer in Korea].

    PubMed

    Jung, Hwoon Yong

    2017-09-25

    Endoscopic resection (Endoscopic mucosal resection [EMR] and endoscopic submucosal dissection [ESD]) is already established as a first-line treatment modality for selected early gastric cancer (EGC). In Korea, the number of endoscopic resection of EGC was explosively increased because of a National Cancer Screening Program and development of devices and techniques. There were many reports on the short-term and long-term outcomes after endoscopic resection in patients with EGC. Long-term outcome in terms of recurrence and death is excellent in both absolute and selected expanded criteria. Furthermore, endoscopic resection might be positioned as primary treatment modality replacing surgical gastrectomy. To obtain these results, selection of patients, perfect en bloc procedure, thorough pathological examination of resected specimen, accurate interpretation of whole process of endoscopic resection, and rational strategy for follow-up is necessary.

  20. Laparoscopic HIPEC for Peritoneal Carcinomatosis from Gastric Cancer - Technique and Early Outcomes of Our First Cases.

    PubMed

    Bălescu, Irina; Godoroja, Daniela; Gongu, Mircea; Tomulescu, Victor; Copăescu, Cătălin

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains one of the most aggressive malignancies, being associated with very poor therapeutic outcomes, especially in the advanced disease patients. Due to this evidence, finding a better treatment, a better control and higher survival rates is the current scientific focus of the medical community. Once the benefits of cytoreductive surgery in association with intraperitoneal hyperthermy (HIPEC) have been widely demonstrated in patients presenting peritoneal carcinomatosis from colorectal or ovarian origin,attention was focused on the possible benefit of this method in patients diagnosed with peritoneal carcinomatosis with gastric origin. Moreover, using laparoscopy for the cytoreductive surgery (L-CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (L-HIPEC), the advantages of minimal invasive surgery (MIS) are expected to contribute to improved postoperative outcomes. In this way, the patients benefit from a faster administration of the adjuvant chemotherapeutic treatment, whenever is necessary. to present the technique of L-CRS + L-HIPEC and the early therapeutic outcomes in a case series of two patients diagnosed with peritoneal carcinomatosis from gastric cancer. A complete investigational work-up including diagnostic laparoscopy to evaluate the Peritoneal Carcinomatosis Index (PCI) was fulfilled in all the cases. The institutional Tumor Board decided the therapeutic strategy: laparoscopic radical resection and HIPEC (L-CRS +L-HIPEC). The procedures were performed into a private setting (Ponderas Academic Hospital). Results: Two male patients,46 and 69years old, presenting carcinomatosis from gastric cancer were included into the study. Initial PCI was assessed by laparoscopy and it was 18 and 7, respectively. Both cases underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy. D2 laparoscopic radical gastrectomy and L-HIPEC was then performed. Time of procedure was360 and 320 minutes, respectively. The intraperitoneal temperature varied between 41 and 42°C, while the

  1. Acquisition of histologic diversity contributes to not only invasiveness but also lymph node metastasis in early gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyoun Wook; Kim, Kyungeun

    2017-09-01

    As more endoscopic resections are performed in early gastric cancer, the pretreatment prediction of lymph node metastasis (LNM) becomes more important. Some tumor characteristics including histologic type, invasion depth, ulceration, size, and lymphovascular invasion have been used to determine the endoscopic resectability of early gastric cancer; however, a more detailed analysis between clinicopathologic factors and lymph node metastasis is needed. We analyzed the correlation between the clinicopathological findings and LNM with 310 cases of early gastric cancer by dividing invasion depths in detail. LNM occurred in 3.2% and 16.2% of the T1a and T1b tumors, respectively. LNM was associated with invasion depth (p=0.002) and lymphatic (p<0.001) and perineural (p=0.013) invasion. Among them, lymphatic invasion was the most powerful factor associated with LNM and significantly constant in T1a and T1b. The rate of LNM increased gradually as the tumor invaded deeper, and invasion of the muscularis mucosae layer was associated with an increased mixed adenocarcinoma incidence, suggesting that histologic diversity was associated with tumor invasiveness. We demonstrated that lymphatic invasion was the most important and powerful parameter for LNM in early gastric cancers. In addition, tumor invasiveness into the muscularis mucosae was accompanied by tumor histologic diversity. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  2. [AFP-producing gastric cancer and hepatoid gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Wang, Y K; Zhang, X T

    2017-11-23

    AFP-producing gastric cancer(AFPGC) and hepatoid adenocarcinoma of the stomach (HAS) are two special subtypes of gastric cancer. There are both correlation and difference between them. AFPGC is usually identified as primary gastric cancer with serum AFP level more than 20 ng/ml or showed AFP positive staining by immunohistochemistry. The diagnosis of HAS is mainly dependent on the pathological character of hepatocellular carcinoma-like differentiation of gastric cancer. The morbidity of AFPGC and HAS are rather low, especially the incidence of HAS is about 1%. The prognoses of these two subtypes are poorer than that of common gastric adenocarcinoma, due to a high incidence rate of liver metastasis and lymph node metastasis. With the development of next-generation sequencing and other genomic technologies, gastric cancers, including these two rare subtypes, are now being investigated in more detail at the molecular level. Treatment remains the biggest challenge, early diagnosis and radical resection can dramatically improve patients'prognosis. Monitoring serum AFP and abdominal imaging examination during follow-up is important for early detection of liver metastasis. In combination with local treatment methods such as transarterial chemoembolization and radiofrequency ablation of liver may further extend patients'survival time. Targeted therapy owes a great potential value in the future.

  3. Solo Intracorporeal Esophagojejunostomy Reconstruction Using a Laparoscopic Scope Holder in Single-Port Laparoscopic Total Gastrectomy for Early Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sang-Hoon; Son, Sang-Yong; Jung, Do Hyun; Park, Young Suk; Shin, Dong Joon; Park, Do Joong; Kim, Hyung-Ho

    2015-06-01

    Single-incision laparoscopic total gastrectomy for gastric cancer has recently been reported by Seoul National University Bundang Hospital. However, this is not a popular procedure primarily because of the technical difficulties involved in achieving consistent intracorporeal esophagojejunostomy. At Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, we recently introduced a simple, easy-to-use, low-profile laparoscopic manual scope holder that enables the maintenance of a stable field of view, the most demanding condition in single-port gastrectomy. In this technical report, we describe in detail the world's first solo single-incision laparoscopic total gastrectomy with D1+ lymph node dissection and intracorporeal esophagojejunostomy for proximal early gastric cancer.

  4. Solo Intracorporeal Esophagojejunostomy Reconstruction Using a Laparoscopic Scope Holder in Single-Port Laparoscopic Total Gastrectomy for Early Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sang-Hoon; Son, Sang-Yong; Jung, Do Hyun; Park, Young Suk; Shin, Dong Joon; Park, Do Joong

    2015-01-01

    Single-incision laparoscopic total gastrectomy for gastric cancer has recently been reported by Seoul National University Bundang Hospital. However, this is not a popular procedure primarily because of the technical difficulties involved in achieving consistent intracorporeal esophagojejunostomy. At Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, we recently introduced a simple, easy-to-use, low-profile laparoscopic manual scope holder that enables the maintenance of a stable field of view, the most demanding condition in single-port gastrectomy. In this technical report, we describe in detail the world's first solo single-incision laparoscopic total gastrectomy with D1+ lymph node dissection and intracorporeal esophagojejunostomy for proximal early gastric cancer. PMID:26161287

  5. Familial Gastric Cancers.

    PubMed

    Setia, Namrata; Clark, Jeffrey W; Duda, Dan G; Hong, Theodore S; Kwak, Eunice L; Mullen, John T; Lauwers, Gregory Y

    2015-12-01

    Although the majority of gastric carcinomas are sporadic, approximately 10% show familial aggregation, and a hereditary cause is determined in 1%-3% cases. Of these, hereditary diffuse gastric cancer is the most recognized predisposition syndrome. Although rare, the less commonly known syndromes also confer a markedly increased risk for development of gastric cancer. Identification and characterization of these syndromes require a multidisciplinary effort involving oncologists, surgeons, genetic counselors, biologists, and pathologists. This article reviews the molecular genetics, clinical and pathologic features, surveillance guidelines, and preventive measures of common and less common hereditary gastric cancer predisposition syndromes. ©AlphaMed Press.

  6. Clinical features and outcomes of delayed perforation after endoscopic submucosal dissection for early gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, N; Uedo, N; Ishihara, R; Higashino, K; Takeuchi, Y; Inoue, T; Chatani, R; Hanafusa, M; Tsujii, Y; Kanzaki, H; Kawada, N; Iishi, H; Tatsuta, M; Tomita, Y; Miyashiro, I; Yano, M

    2010-12-01

    Perforation is a major complication of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for early gastric cancer (EGC). However, there have been no reports on delayed perforation after ESD for EGC. We aimed to elucidate the incidence and outcomes of delayed perforation after ESD. Clinical courses in 1159 consecutive patients with 1329 EGCs who underwent ESD were investigated. Delayed perforation occurred in six patients (0.45 %). All these patients had complete en bloc resection without intraoperative perforation during ESD. Five of six perforations were located in the upper third of the stomach, while one lesion was found in the middle third. Symptoms of peritoneal irritation with rebound tenderness presented within 24 h after ESD in all cases. One patient did not require surgery because the symptoms were localized, and recovered with conservative antibiotic therapy by nasogastric tube placement. The remaining five patients required emergency surgery. There was no mortality in this case series. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. The postoperative clinical outcomes and safety of early enteral nutrition in operated gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Liu, Hong-Yi; Guo, Shao-Hua; Sun, Peng; Gong, Fang-Ming; Jia, Bao-Qing

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of early enteral nutrition (EEN) on the clinical outcomes of gastric cancer patients after radical gastrectomy. Four hundred gastric cancer patients undergoing radical gastrectomy of any extend with D2 nodal dissection were randomly divided into an experimental and a control group with 200 cases in each group. Patients in the control group received postoperative parenteral nutrition (PN), while patients in the experimental group received postoperative EEN. After treatment, the clinical outcomes, postoperative immune function, and nutritional status of the two groups were evaluated. The postoperative fever time, intestinal function recovery time, anal exhaust time, and the length of hospital stay for patients in the experimental group were significantly shorter than those of the control group. We did not find significant differences in anastomotic leak, postoperative ileus and regurgitation between the two groups. The activities of multiple immune cell types, including CD3⁺, CD4⁺, CD4⁺/CD8⁺, and natural killer (NK) cells, were significantly lower in both groups on postoperative day 1 when compared with the preoperative levels (p<0.05). The level of CD8⁺ was not significantly different between the two groups (p>0.05). After treatment, levels of CD3⁺, CD4⁺, CD4⁺/CD8⁺, and NK cells in the experimental group patients were 35.6 ± 4.2, 42.2 ± 3.0, 1.7 ± 0.3, and 27.3 ± 5.3%, respectively, on postoperative day 7, which were similar to the preoperative levels. The immune cell levels from the control group patients remained significantly lower when compared with preoperative values; in addition, these values were also significantly lower when compared with the EEN patients (p<0.05) CONCLUSION: For gastric cancer patients undergoing radical gastrectomy, the clinical outcome, immune function and nutritional status after EEN were significantly improved. These data suggest the widespread use of EEN in clinical practice.

  8. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for early gastric cancer in the remnant stomach after gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Satoru; Oda, Ichiro; Makazu, Makomo; Haruyama, Shin; Abe, Seiichiro; Suzuki, Haruhisa; Yoshinaga, Shigetaka; Nakajima, Takeshi; Kushima, Ryoji; Saito, Yutaka

    2013-07-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for early gastric cancer (EGC) after surgical gastrectomy is a technically difficult procedure because of the limited working space in the remnant stomach as well as the presence of severe gastric fibrosis and staples under the suture line. We evaluated clinical results including long-term outcomes to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of ESD for EGC in the remnant stomach of patients after gastrectomy. Retrospective study. National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. We investigated patients undergoing ESD for EGC in the remnant stomach from 1997 to 2011. We examined the patient characteristics, endoscopic findings, technical results, adverse events, and histopathologic results including curability and evaluations of Helicobacter pylori gastritis in addition to the rates of local recurrence, metachronous gastric cancer, overall survival, and cause-specific survival. A total of 128 consecutive patients with 139 lesions had previously undergone 87 distal (68%), 25 proximal (19.5%) and 16 pylorus-preserving gastrectomies (12.5%). The median period from the original gastrectomy to the subsequent ESD for EGC in the remnant stomach was 5.7 years (range 0.6-51 years), the median tumor size was 13 mm (range 1-60 mm), and the median procedure time was 60 minutes (range 15-310 minutes). There were 131 en bloc resections (94%), with curative resections achieved for 109 lesions (78%); 22 lesions (16%) resulted in non-curative resections, and 8 lesions (6%) had only a horizontal margin positive or had inconclusive results. A total of 118 patients (92%) were assessed as H pylori gastritis-positive, with 7 patients (5%) negative. Adverse events included 2 cases of delayed bleeding (1.4%) and 2 perforations (1.4%), with 1 patient requiring emergency surgery. The 5-year overall and cause-specific survival rates were 87.3% and 100%, respectively, during a median follow-up period of 4.5 years (range 0-13.7 years), with no deaths from

  9. Improving early detection of gastric cancer: a novel systematic alphanumeric-coded endoscopic approach.

    PubMed

    Emura, Fabian; Gralnek, Ian; Baron, Todd H

    2013-01-01

    Despite extensive worldwide use of standard esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) examinations, gastric cancer (GC) is one of the most common forms of cancer and ranks as the most common malignant tumor in East Asia, Eastern Europe and parts of Latin America. Current limitations of using non systematic examination during standard EGD could be at least partially responsible for the low incidence of early GC diagnosis in countries with a high prevalence of the disease. Originally proposed by Emura et al., systematic alphanumeric-coded endoscopy (SACE) is a novel method that facilitates complete examination of the upper GI tract based on sequential systematic overlapping photo-documentation using an endoluminal alphanumeric-coded nomenclature comprised of eight regions and 28 areas covering the entire surface upper GI surface. For precise localization or normal or abnormal areas, SACE incorporates a simple coordinate system based on the identification of certain natural axes, walls, curvatures and anatomical endoluminal landmarks. Efectiveness of SACE was recently demonstrated in a screening study that diagnosed early GC at a frequency of 0.30% (2/650) in healthy, average-risk volunteer subjects. Such a novel approach, if uniformly implemented worldwide, could significantly change the way we practice upper endoscopy in our lifetimes.

  10. Molecular classification of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Röcken, Christoph

    2017-03-01

    Gastric cancer is among the most common cancers worldwide. Despite declining incidences, the prognosis remains dismal in Western countries and is better in Asian countries with national cancer screening programs. Complete endoscopic or surgical resection of the primary tumor with or without lymphadenectomy offers the only chance of cure in the early stage of the disease. Survival of more locally advanced gastric cancers was improved by the introduction of perioperative, adjuvant and palliative chemotherapy. However, the identification and usage of novel predictive and diagnostic targets is urgently needed. Areas covered: Recent comprehensive molecular profiling of gastric cancer proposed four molecular subtypes, i.e. Epstein-Barr virus-associated, microsatellite instable, chromosomal instable and genomically stable carcinomas. The new molecular classification will spur clinical trials exploring novel targeted therapeutics. This review summarizes recent advancements of the molecular classification, and based on that, putative pitfalls for the development of tissue-based companion diagnostics, i.e. prevalence of actionable targets and therapeutic efficacy, tumor heterogeneity and tumor evolution, impact of ethnicity on gastric cancer biology, and standards of care in the East and West. Expert commentary: The overall low prevalence of actionable targets and tumor heterogeneity are the two main obstacles of precision medicine for gastric cancer.

  11. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for early gastric cancer on the lesser curvature in upper third of the stomach is a risk factor for postoperative delayed gastric emptying.

    PubMed

    Yoshizaki, Tetsuya; Obata, Daisuke; Aoki, Yasuhiro; Okamoto, Norihiro; Hashimura, Hiroki; Kano, Chise; Matsushita, Megumi; Kanamori, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Kei; Tsujimae, Masahiro; Momose, Kenji; Eguchi, Takaaki; Okuyama, Shunsuke; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Fujita, Mikio; Okada, Akihiko

    2018-02-07

    Advances in Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) technology have established ESD for early gastric cancer as a safe and stable technique. However, ESD may induce delayed gastric emptying and the cause of food residue retention in the stomach after ESD is not clear. This study aimed to clarify risk factors for delayed gastric emptying with food retention after gastric ESD. We retrospectively examined for food residue in the stomach 1 week after ESD was performed for early gastric carcinoma at Osaka Saiseikai Nakatsu Hospital from February 2008 to November 2016. Food residue was observed in 68 (6.1%) of 1114 patients who underwent gastric ESD. The percentage of lesions located on the lesser curvature of the upper third of the stomach was 45.6% (31/68) in the food residue group and 3.5% (37/1046) in the non-food residue group, which was significantly different (P < 0.01). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that lesions on the lesser curvature of the upper third of the stomach (Odds ratio [OR] 23.31, 95% confidence interval [CI] 12.60-43.61, P < 0.01), post-ESD bleeding (OR 4.25, 95%CI 1.67-9.80, P < 0.01), submucosal invasion (OR 2.80, 95%CI 1.34-5.63, P < 0.01), and age over 80 years (OR 2.34, 95%CI 1.28-4.22, P < 0.01) were independent risk factors for food retention after gastric ESD. Of the 68 patients, 3 had food residue in the stomach on endoscopic examination for follow-up observation after the ESD ulcer had healed. Delayed gastric emptying with food retention after gastric ESD was associated with lesions located in the lesser curvature of the upper stomach, submucosal invasion of the lesion, age older than 80 years, and post-ESD bleeding, though it was temporary in most cases.

  12. Effects of administration of a proton pump inhibitor before endoscopic submucosal dissection for differentiated early gastric cancer with ulcer.

    PubMed

    Myung, Yu Sik; Hong, Su Jin; Han, Jae Pil; Park, Kyung Woo; Ko, Bong Min; Lee, Moon Sung

    2017-01-01

    In ulcerative early gastric cancer, improvement and exacerbation of ulceration repeat as a malignant cycle. Moreover, early gastric cancer combined with ulcer is associated with a low curative resection rate and high risk of adverse events. The aim of this study was to investigate the ulcer healing rate and clinical outcomes with the administration of a proton pump inhibitor before endoscopic submucosal dissection for differentiated early gastric cancer with ulcer. A total of 136 patients with differentiated early gastric cancer with ulcer who met the expanded indications for endoscopic submucosal dissection were reviewed between June 2005 and June 2014. Eighty-one patients were given PPI before endoscopic submucosal dissection and 55 patients were not given PPI. The complete ulcer healing rate was significantly different between the two groups (59.3 % vs. 23.6 %, P < 0.001). The procedure time was 38.1 ± 35.7 and 50.8 ± 50.2 min (P = 0.047). However, no significant differences were detected in the en bloc resection rate, complete resection rate, and adverse events including bleeding and perforation. Multivariate analysis showed that administration of PPI (OR = 10.83, P < 0.001) and mucosal invasion (OR = 24.43, P < 0.001) were independent factors that predicted complete healing of ulceration. The calculated accuracy for whether complete healing of the ulcer after PPI administration can differentiate mucosal from submucosal invasion was 75.3 %. Administration of PPI before ESD in differentiated EGC meeting the expanded criteria is effective to heal the ulcer lesion and reduce the mean procedure time. Complete healing of the ulcer after PPI administration suggests mucosal cancer.

  13. Does immunohistochemical staining have a clinical impact in early gastric cancer conducted endoscopic submucosal dissection?

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Seong Ran; Cho, Joo Young; Bok, Gene Hyun; Lee, Tae Hee; Kim, Hyun Gun; Cho, Won Young; Jin, So Young; Kim, Yeon Soo

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate clinicopathologic parameters and the clinical significance related lymphovascular invasion (LVI) by immunohistochemical staining (IHCS) in endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). METHODS: Between May 2005 and May 2010, a total of 348 lesions from 321 patients (mean age 63 ± 10 years, men 74.6%) with early gastric cancer (EGC) who met indication criteria after ESD were analyzed retrospectively. The 348 lesions were divided into the absolute (n = 100, differentiated mucosal cancer without ulcer ≤ 20 mm) and expanded (n = 248) indication groups after ESD. The 248 lesions were divided into four subgroups according to the expanded ESD indication. The presence of LVI was determined by factor VIII-related antigen and D2-40 assessment. We compared LVI IHCS-negative group with LVI IHCS-positive in each group. RESULTS: LVI by hematoxylin-eosin staining (HES) and IHCS were all negative in the absolute group, while was observed in only the expanded groups. The positive rate of LVI by IHCS was higher than that of LVI by HES (n = 1, 0.4% vs n = 11, 4.4%, P = 0.044). LVI IHCS-positivity was observed when the cancer invaded to the mucosa 3 (M3) or submucosa 1 (SM1) levels, with a predominance of 63.6% in the subgroup that included only SM1 cancer (P < 0.01). In a univariate analysis, M3 or SM1 invasion by the tumor was significantly associated with a higher rate of LVI by IHCS, but no factor was significant in a multivariate analysis. There were no cases of tumor recurrence or metastasis during the median 26 mo follow-up. CONCLUSION: EGCs of the absolute group are immunohistochemically stable. The presence of LVI may be carefully examined by IHCS in an ESD expanded indication group with an invasion depth of M3 or greater. PMID:22969232

  14. Single-incision laparoscopic distal gastrectomy for early gastric cancer through a homemade single port access device.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Shu; Wang, Gang; Zhao, Kun; Liu, Jiang; Ning, Li; Li, Jieshou

    2015-01-01

    We presented a series of single-incision laparoscopic distal gastrectomies for early gastric cancer patients through a type of homemade single port access device and some other conventional laparoscopic instruments. A single-incision laparoscopic distal gastrectomy with D1 + α lymph node dissection was performed on a 46 years old male patient who had an early gastric cancer. This single port access device has facilitated the conventional laparoscopic instruments to accomplish the surgery and we made in only 6 minutes. Total operating time for this surgery was 240 minutes. During the operation, there were about 100 milliliters of blood loss, and 17 lymph-nodes were retrieved. This homemade single port access device shows its superiority in economy and convenience for complex single-incision surgeries. Single-incision laparoscopic distal gastrectomy for early gastric cancer can be conducted by experienced laparoscopic surgeons. Fully take advantage of both SILS and fast track surgery plan can bring to successful surgeries with minimal postoperative pain, quicker mobilization, early recovery of intestinal function, and better cosmesis effect for the patients.

  15. Subtotal gastrectomy for gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Roberto; Ettorre, Giuseppe Maria; Santoro, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    Although a steady decline in the incidence and mortality rates of gastric carcinoma has been observed in the last century worldwide, the absolute number of new cases/year is increasing because of the aging of the population. So far, surgical resection with curative intent has been the only treatment providing hope for cure; therefore, gastric cancer surgery has become a specialized field in digestive surgery. Gastrectomy with lymph node (LN) dissection for cancer patients remains a challenging procedure which requires skilled, well-trained surgeons who are very familiar with the fast-evolving oncological principles of gastric cancer surgery. As a matter of fact, the extent of gastric resection and LN dissection depends on the size of the disease and gastric cancer surgery has become a patient and “disease-tailored” surgery, ranging from endoscopic resection to laparoscopic assisted gastrectomy and conventional extended multivisceral resections. LN metastases are the most important prognostic factor in patients that undergo curative resection. LN dissection remains the most challenging part of the operation due to the location of LN stations around major retroperitoneal vessels and adjacent organs, which are not routinely included in the resected specimen and need to be preserved in order to avoid dangerous intra- and postoperative complications. Hence, the surgeon is the most important non-TMN prognostic factor in gastric cancer. Subtotal gastrectomy is the treatment of choice for middle and distal-third gastric cancer as it provides similar survival rates and better functional outcome compared to total gastrectomy, especially in early-stage disease with favorable prognosis. Nonetheless, the resection range for middle-third gastric cancer cases and the extent of LN dissection at early stages remains controversial. Due to the necessity of a more extended procedure at advanced stages and the trend for more conservative treatments in early gastric cancer, the

  16. Five common tumor biomarkers and CEA for diagnosing early gastric cancer: A protocol for a network meta-analysis of diagnostic test accuracy.

    PubMed

    Shen, Minghui; Wang, Hui; Wei, Kongyuan; Zhang, Jianling; You, Chongge

    2018-05-01

    Although surgical resection is the recommended treatment for the patients with gastric cancer, lots of patients show advanced or metastatic gastric cancer at the time of diagnosis. Detection of gastric cancer at early stages is a huge challenge because of lack of appropriate detection tests. Unfortunately, existing clinical guidelines focusing on early diagnosis of gastric cancer do not provide consistent and prudent evidence. Serum carcinoembryonic antigen was considered as a complementary test, although it is not good enough to diagnose early gastric cancer. There are no other tumor markers recommended for diagnosing early gastric cancer. This study aims to evaluate and compare the diagnostic accuracy of 5 common tumor biomarkers (CA19-9, CA125, PG, IncRNA, and DNA methylation) and CEA and their combinations for diagnosing gastric cancer through network meta-analysis method, and to rank these tests using a superiority index. PubMed, EMBASE.com, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) will be searched from their inception to March 2018. We will include diagnostic tests which assessed the accuracy of the above-mentioned tumor biomarkers and CEA for diagnosing gastric cancer. The risk of bias for each study will be independently assessed as low, moderate, or high using criteria adapted from Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies 2 (QUADAS-2). Network meta-analysis will be performed using STATA 12.0 and R 3.4.1 software. The competing diagnostic tests will be ranked by a superiority index. This study is ongoing and will be submitted to a peer-reviewed journal for publication. This study will provide systematically suggestions to select different tumor biomarkers for detecting the early gastric cancer.

  17. Analysis of cell cycle-related proteins in gastric intramucosal differentiated-type cancers based on mucin phenotypes: a novel hypothesis of early gastric carcinogenesis based on mucin phenotype

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Abnormalities of cell cycle regulators are common features in human cancers, and several of these factors are associated with the early development of gastric cancers. However, recent studies have shown that gastric cancer tumorigenesis was characterized by mucin expression. Thus, expression patterns of cell cycle-related proteins were investigated in the early phase of differentiated-type gastric cancers to ascertain any mechanistic relationships with mucin phenotypes. Methods Immunostaining for Cyclins D1, A, E, and p21, p27, p53 and β-catenin was used to examine impairments of the cell cycle in 190 gastric intramucosal differentiated-type cancers. Mucin phenotypes were determined by the expressions of MUC5AC, MUC6, MUC2 and CD10. A Ki-67 positive rate (PR) was also examined. Results Overexpressions of p53, cyclin D1 and cyclin A were significantly more frequent in a gastric phenotype than an intestinal phenotype. Cyclin A was overexpressed in a mixed phenotype compared with an intestinal phenotype, while p27 overexpression was more frequent in an intestinal phenotype than in a mixed phenotype. Reduction of p21 was a common feature of the gastric intramucosal differentiated-type cancers examined. Conclusions Our results suggest that the levels of some cell cycle regulators appear to be associated with mucin phenotypes of early gastric differentiated-type cancers. PMID:20525401

  18. Occupation and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Raj, A; Mayberry, J; Podas, T

    2003-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality. There are several risk factors, with occupation emerging as one of these. There is considerable evidence that occupations in coal and tin mining, metal processing, particularly steel and iron, and rubber manufacturing industries lead to an increased risk of gastric cancer. Other "dusty" occupations—for example, wood processing, or work in high temperature environments have also been implicated but the evidence is not strong. The mechanism of pathogenesis of gastric cancer is unclear and the identification of causative agents can be difficult. Dust is thought to be a contributor to the pathological process, but well known carcinogens such as N-nitroso compounds have been detected in some environments. Further research on responsible agents is necessary and screening for detection of precursor gastric cancer lesions at the workplace merits consideration. PMID:12782770

  19. Telomerase activity in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Hiyama, E; Yokoyama, T; Tatsumoto, N; Hiyama, K; Imamura, Y; Murakami, Y; Kodama, T; Piatyszek, M A; Shay, J W; Matsuura, Y

    1995-08-01

    Although many genetic alterations have been reported in gastric cancer, it is not known whether all gastric tumors are capable of indefinite proliferative potential, e.g., immortality. The expression of telomerase and stabilization of telomeres are concomitant with the attainment of immortality in tumor cells; thus, the measurement of telomerase activity in clinically obtained tumor samples may provide important information useful both as a diagnostic marker to detect immortal cancer cells in clinical materials and as a prognostic indicator of patient outcome. Telomerase activity was analyzed in 66 primary gastric cancers with the use of a PCR-based assay. The majority of tumors (85%) displayed telomerase activity, but telomerase was undetectable in 10 tumors (15%), 8 of which were early stage tumors. Most of the tumors with telomerase activity were large and of advanced stages, including metastases. Survival rate of patients of tumors with detectable telomerase activity was significantly shorter than that of those without telomerase activity. Alterations of telomere length (reduced/elongated terminal restriction fragments) were detected in 14 of 66 (21%) gastric cancers, and all 14 had telomerase activity. Cellular DNA contents revealed that all 22 aneuploid tumors had detectable telomerase activity. The present results indicate that telomerase activation may be required as a critical step in the multigenetic process of tumorigenesis, and that telomerase is frequently but not always activated as a late event in gastric cancer progression.

  20. Early-stage gastric cancers represented as dysplasia in a previous forceps biopsy: the importance of clinical management.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Seok; Hong, Su Jin; Han, Jae Pil; Kang, Myung Soo; Kim, Hee Kyung; Kwak, Jeong Ja; Ko, Bong Min; Cho, Joo Young; Lee, Joon Seong; Lee, Moon Sung

    2013-02-01

    Because histological examination of gastric lesions by forceps biopsy is of limited accuracy, management on the basis of histological results is occasionally controversial. We examined the characteristics of early gastric cancers that presented as dysplasia resulting from a previous forceps biopsy. Between April 2007 and December 2010, 341 gastric adenocarcinoma lesions from 330 patients previously diagnosed histologically via endoscopic submucosal dissection were examined. We retrospectively assessed the characteristics of early gastric cancer according to their initial forceps biopsy results. In total, 183 EGCs were diagnosed as dysplasia (53.7%; 89 low-grade and 94 high-grade) and 158 (46.3%) as carcinoma by forceps biopsy before endoscopic submucosal dissection. Significant differences were noted with respect to histologic differentiation of carcinomas, Lauren histologic type, depth of invasion, lymphovascular invasion, and en bloc resection between the dysplastic group and carcinoma group, based on forceps biopsy results. A forceps biopsy result is not fully representative of the entire lesion and, thus, endoscopic submucosal dissection should be considered for lesions diagnosed as dysplasia via forceps biopsy in order to avoid the risk of missed carcinomas. Copyright © 2012 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Magnifying Endoscopy with Narrow Band Imaging of Early Gastric Cancer: Correlation with Histopathology and Mucin Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Ok, Kyung-Sun; Kim, Gwang Ha; Park, Do Youn; Lee, Hyun Jeong; Jeon, Hye Kyung; Baek, Dong Hoon; Lee, Bong Eun; Song, Geun Am

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Magnifying endoscopy with narrow band imaging (ME-NBI) is a useful modality for the detailed visualization of microsurface (MS) and microvascular (MV) structures in the gastrointestinal tract. This study aimed to determine whether the MS and MV patterns in ME-NBI differ according to the histologic type, invasion depth, and mucin phenotype of early gastric cancers (EGCs). Methods The MS and MV patterns of 160 lesions in 160 patients with EGC who underwent ME-NBI before endoscopic or surgical resection were prospectively collected and analyzed. EGCs were categorized as either differentiated or undifferentiated and as either mucosal or submucosal, and their mucin phenotypes were determined via immunohistochemistry of the tumor specimens. Results Differentiated tumors mainly displayed an oval and/or tubular MS pattern and a fine network or loop MV pattern, whereas undifferentiated tumors mainly displayed an absent MS pattern and a corkscrew MV pattern. The destructive MS pattern was associated with submucosal invasion, and this association was more prominent in the differentiated tumors than in the undifferentiated tumors. MUC5AC expression was increased in lesions with either a papillary or absent MS pattern and a corkscrew MV pattern, whereas MUC6 expression was increased in lesions with a papillary MS pattern and a loop MV pattern. CD10 expression was more frequent in lesions with a fine network MV pattern. Conclusions ME-NBI can be useful for predicting the histopathology and mucin phenotype of EGCs. PMID:27021504

  2. Diagnosis of early gastric cancer using narrow band imaging and acetic acid

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Ken; Takedatsu, Hidetoshi; Mukasa, Michita; Sumie, Hiroaki; Yoshida, Hikaru; Watanabe, Yasutomo; Akiba, Jun; Nakahara, Keita; Tsuruta, Osamu; Torimura, Takuji

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether the endoscopic findings of depressed-type early gastric cancers (EGCs) could precisely predict the histological type. METHODS: Ninety depressed-type EGCs in 72 patients were macroscopically and histologically identified. We evaluated the microvascular (MV) and mucosal surface (MS) patterns of depressed-type EGCs using magnifying endoscopy (ME) with narrow-band imaging (NBI) (NBI-ME) and ME enhanced by 1.5% acetic acid, respectively. First, depressed-type EGCs were classified according to MV pattern by NBI-ME. Subsequently, EGCs unclassified by MV pattern were classified according to MS pattern by enhanced ME (EME) images obtained from the same angle. RESULTS: We classified the depressed-type EGCs into the following 2 MV patterns using NBI-ME: a fine-network pattern that indicated differentiated adenocarcinoma (25/25, 100%) and a corkscrew pattern that likely indicated undifferentiated adenocarcinoma (18/23, 78.3%). However, 42 of the 90 (46.7%) lesions could not be classified into MV patterns by NBI-ME. These unclassified lesions were then evaluated for MS patterns using EME, which classified 33 (81.0%) lesions as MS patterns, diagnosed as differentiated adenocarcinoma. As a result, 76 of the 90 (84.4%) lesions were matched with histological diagnoses using a combination of NBI-ME and EME. CONCLUSION: A combination of NBI-ME and EME was useful in predicting the histological type of depressed-type EGC. PMID:25632201

  3. The Implications of Endoscopic Ulcer in Early Gastric Cancer: Can We Predict Clinical Behaviors from Endoscopy?

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoo Jin; Kim, Jie-Hyun; Park, Jae Jun; Youn, Young Hoon; Park, Hyojin; Kim, Jong Won; Choi, Seung Ho; Noh, Sung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    The presence of ulcer in early gastric cancer (EGC) is important for the feasibility of endoscopic resection, only a few studies have examined the clinicopathological implications of endoscopic ulcer in EGC. To determine the role of endoscopic ulcer as a predictor of clinical behaviors in EGC. Data of 3,270 patients with EGC who underwent surgery between January 2005 and December 2012 were reviewed. Clinicopathological characteristics were analyzed in relation to the presence and stage of ulcer in EGC. Based on endoscopic findings, the stage of ulcer was categorized as active, healing, or scar. Logistic regression analysis was performed to analyze factors associated with lymph node metastasis (LNM). 2,343 (71.7%) patients had endoscopic findings of ulceration in EGC. Submucosal (SM) invasion, LNM, lymphovascular invasion (LVI), perineural invasion, and undifferentiated-type histology were significantly higher in ulcerative than non-ulcerative EGC. Comparison across different stages of ulcer revealed that SM invasion, LNM, and LVI were significantly associated with the active stage, and that these features exhibited significant stage-based differences, being most common at the active stage, and least common at the scar stage. The presence of endoscopic ulcer and active status of the ulcer were identified as independent risk factors for LNM. Ulcerative EGC detected by endoscopy exhibited more aggressive behaviors than non-ulcerative EGC. Additionally, the endoscopic stage of ulcer may predict the clinicopathological behaviors of EGC. Therefore, the appearance of ulcers should be carefully evaluated to determine an adequate treatment strategy for EGC.

  4. Location characteristics of early gastric cancer treated with endoscopic submucosal dissection.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dae Hwan; Choi, Cheol Woong; Kim, Hyung Wook; Park, Su Bum; Kim, Su Jin; Nam, Hyeong Seok; Ryu, Dae Gon

    2017-11-01

    The timely detection of early gastric cancer (EGC) is important in performing endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). We attempted to determine the location characteristics of regions where EGC is frequently detected and analyzed the EGC characteristics associated with that location. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with EGC treated by ESD between November 2008 and August 2016. We retrospectively investigated and analyzed 647 EGC lesions. The patients' mean age was 66.7 ± 10.8 years. The patient population was predominantly male (77.1%, 499/647). A well-to-moderately differentiated carcinoma was observed in 97.2% of patients. The common site of carcinoma occurrence was the lower part of the stomach (the antrum and lower third of body, 89.6%). Among the stomach hemispheres, the lesser curvature side was the most frequent site of EGC (43.9%). The posterior side of EGC was more frequent than anterior side of EGC (20.4 vs. 15.6%, respectively). Submucosal invasive EGC was more frequent in the mid-to-upper parts of stomach than lower part of stomach (odds ratio 1.919; confidence interval 1.014-3.623; p = 0.045). Most EGCs that are resectable with ESD were found in the lower part and in the lesser curvature of the stomach. The submucosal invasive EGC was more frequent in the mid-to-upper part of stomach.

  5. Current status of endoscopic submucosal dissection for early gastric cancer in Korea: role and benefits.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Gyun; Lyu, Da Hyun; Park, Chan Mi; Lee, Na Rae; Kim, Jiyoung; Cha, Youngju; Jung, Hwoon-Yong

    2018-06-21

    This study was aimed to investigate the current clinical status of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for early gastric cancer (EGC) in Korea based on a National Health Insurance (NHI) database between 2011 and 2014. The claims data of ESD for EGC in Korean NHI were reviewed using material codes of Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service between November 2011 and December 2014. The current clinical status was analyzed in terms of treatment pattern, in-hospital length of stay (LOS), total medical costs, and en bloc resection rate according to the hospital type. A total of 23,828 cases of ESD for EGC were evaluated. ESD was performed in 67.4% of cases in tertiary care hospitals, 31.8% in general hospitals, and 0.8% in hospitals, respectively. The median LOS was 5 days, and total median medical costs was approximately 1,300 US dollars. En bloc resection rate was 99%; 8.5% of cases underwent additional treatment within 90 days ESD, and 5.5% in 91 to 365 days after ESD. The clinical status was not significantly different according to the year and hospital type. A majority of ESD for EGC were performed in tertiary care hospitals in Korea. The clinical status showed excellent clinical outcomes and did not differ by the year and between the types of hospitals in Korea.

  6. General Information about Gastric Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Gastric Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Gastric Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  7. Endoscopic submucosal dissection vs endoscopic mucosal resection for early gastric cancer: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Facciorusso, Antonio; Antonino, Matteo; Di Maso, Marianna; Muscatiello, Nicola

    2014-11-16

    To compare endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) and endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) for early gastric cancer (EGC). Computerized bibliographic search was performed on PubMed/Medline, Embase, Google Scholar and Cochrane library databases. Quality of each included study was assessed according to current Cochrane guidelines. Primary endpoints were en bloc resection rate and histologically complete resection rate. Secondary endpoints were length of procedure, post-treatment bleeding, post-procedural perforation and recurrence rate. Comparisons between the two treatment groups across all the included studies were performed by using Mantel-Haenszel test for fixed-effects models (in case of low heterogeneity) or DerSimonian and Laird test for random-effects models (in case of high heterogeneity). Ten retrospective studies (8 full text and 2 abstracts) were included in the meta-analysis. Overall data on 4328 lesions, 1916 in the ESD and 2412 in the EMR group were pooled and analyzed. The mean operation time was longer for ESD than for EMR (standardized mean difference 1.73, 95%CI: 0.52-2.95, P = 0.005) and the "en bloc" and histological complete resection rates were significantly higher in the ESD group [OR = 9.69 (95%CI: 7.74-12.13), P < 0.001 and OR = 5.66, (95%CI: 2.92-10.96), P < 0.001, respectively]. As a consequence of its greater radicality, ESD provided lower recurrence rate [OR = 0.09, (95%CI: 0.05-0.17), P < 0.001]. Among complications, perforation rate was significantly higher after ESD [OR = 4.67, (95%CI, 2.77-7.87), P < 0.001] whereas the bleeding incidences did not differ between the two techniques [OR = 1.49 (0.6-3.71), P = 0.39]. In the endoscopic therapy of EGC, ESD showed a superior efficacy but higher complication rate with respect to EMR.

  8. Endoscopic submucosal dissection vs endoscopic mucosal resection for early gastric cancer: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Facciorusso, Antonio; Antonino, Matteo; Di Maso, Marianna; Muscatiello, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To compare endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) and endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) for early gastric cancer (EGC). METHODS: Computerized bibliographic search was performed on PubMed/Medline, Embase, Google Scholar and Cochrane library databases. Quality of each included study was assessed according to current Cochrane guidelines. Primary endpoints were en bloc resection rate and histologically complete resection rate. Secondary endpoints were length of procedure, post-treatment bleeding, post-procedural perforation and recurrence rate. Comparisons between the two treatment groups across all the included studies were performed by using Mantel-Haenszel test for fixed-effects models (in case of low heterogeneity) or DerSimonian and Laird test for random-effects models (in case of high heterogeneity). RESULTS: Ten retrospective studies (8 full text and 2 abstracts) were included in the meta-analysis. Overall data on 4328 lesions, 1916 in the ESD and 2412 in the EMR group were pooled and analyzed. The mean operation time was longer for ESD than for EMR (standardized mean difference 1.73, 95%CI: 0.52-2.95, P = 0.005) and the “en bloc” and histological complete resection rates were significantly higher in the ESD group [OR = 9.69 (95%CI: 7.74-12.13), P < 0.001 and OR = 5.66, (95%CI: 2.92-10.96), P < 0.001, respectively]. As a consequence of its greater radicality, ESD provided lower recurrence rate [OR = 0.09, (95%CI: 0.05-0.17), P < 0.001]. Among complications, perforation rate was significantly higher after ESD [OR = 4.67, (95%CI, 2.77-7.87), P < 0.001] whereas the bleeding incidences did not differ between the two techniques [OR = 1.49 (0.6-3.71), P = 0.39]. CONCLUSION: In the endoscopic therapy of EGC, ESD showed a superior efficacy but higher complication rate with respect to EMR. PMID:25400870

  9. Fundoplication with 180-Degree Wrap During Esophagogastrostomy After Robotic Proximal Gastrectomy for Early Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ojima, Toshiyasu; Nakamori, Mikihito; Nakamura, Masaki; Hayata, Keiji; Maruoka, Shimpei; Yamaue, Hiroki

    2018-04-20

    Compared with total gastrectomy, proximal gastrectomy (PG) has potential advantages from a nutritional perspective, such as anemia and postoperative loss of body weight. However, PG is associated with some postoperative functional disorders, such as reflux esophagus (13-31%) and anastomotic stenosis (3-29%).1 We therefore developed a new procedure for fundoplication during esophago-gastrostomy after robotic PG (RPG). We performed RPG for early gastric cancer localized in the upper third of the stomach using the da Vinci Surgical System (Intuitive, Sunnyvale, CA). After RPG conclusion, intracorporeal esophago-gastrostomy was performed by side-to-side anastomosis using a linear 45 mm stapling device, Endo GIA purple cartridge.2 The post-excisional hole in the esophago-gastrostomy was closed with interrupted single-layered sutures by robotic suturing technique. Fundoplication was created by wrapping the remnant stomach around 180 degrees of the circumference of the esophagus; the remnant stomach was wrapped from the esophageal posterior wall towards the esophageal anterior wall. Four stitches were used for fixation. We did not add a bougie of esophago-gastrostomy when fashioning the wrap. In addition, we did not perform pyloroplasty. In our series with 15 patients, there were no postoperative complications. No patients had reflux symptoms. Our technique using the fundoplication with "clockwise" rotation attempts to prevent reflux by use of intragastric pressure to flatten the lower end of the esophagus into a valvate shape. Indeed, in fluoroscopic findings 4 days after surgery, there was no reflux to the esophagus of the contrast medium. In endoscopic findings 3 months after surgery, anastomotic stenosis was absent. We observed no endoscopic findings of reflux esophagitis. Formation of the pseudo-fornix was confirmed by wrapping the remnant stomach. RPG followed by fundoplication with 180-degree wrap may be a promising procedure for reflux esophagitis prevention.3

  10. The Implications of Endoscopic Ulcer in Early Gastric Cancer: Can We Predict Clinical Behaviors from Endoscopy?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoo Jin; Kim, Jie-Hyun; Park, Jae Jun; Youn, Young Hoon; Park, Hyojin; Kim, Jong Won; Choi, Seung Ho; Noh, Sung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background The presence of ulcer in early gastric cancer (EGC) is important for the feasibility of endoscopic resection, only a few studies have examined the clinicopathological implications of endoscopic ulcer in EGC. Objectives To determine the role of endoscopic ulcer as a predictor of clinical behaviors in EGC. Methods Data of 3,270 patients with EGC who underwent surgery between January 2005 and December 2012 were reviewed. Clinicopathological characteristics were analyzed in relation to the presence and stage of ulcer in EGC. Based on endoscopic findings, the stage of ulcer was categorized as active, healing, or scar. Logistic regression analysis was performed to analyze factors associated with lymph node metastasis (LNM). Results 2,343 (71.7%) patients had endoscopic findings of ulceration in EGC. Submucosal (SM) invasion, LNM, lymphovascular invasion (LVI), perineural invasion, and undifferentiated-type histology were significantly higher in ulcerative than non-ulcerative EGC. Comparison across different stages of ulcer revealed that SM invasion, LNM, and LVI were significantly associated with the active stage, and that these features exhibited significant stage-based differences, being most common at the active stage, and least common at the scar stage. The presence of endoscopic ulcer and active status of the ulcer were identified as independent risk factors for LNM. Conclusions Ulcerative EGC detected by endoscopy exhibited more aggressive behaviors than non-ulcerative EGC. Additionally, the endoscopic stage of ulcer may predict the clinicopathological behaviors of EGC. Therefore, the appearance of ulcers should be carefully evaluated to determine an adequate treatment strategy for EGC. PMID:27741275

  11. Development of an e-learning system for teaching endoscopists how to diagnose early gastric cancer: basic principles for improving early detection.

    PubMed

    Yao, Kenshi; Uedo, Noriya; Muto, Manabu; Ishikawa, Hideki

    2017-03-01

    We developed an internet e-learning system in order to improve the ability of endoscopists to diagnose gastric cancer at an early stage. The efficacy of this system at expanding knowledge and providing invaluable experience regarding the endoscopic detection of early gastric cancer was demonstrated through an international multicenter randomized controlled trial. However, the contents of the system have not yet been fully described in the literature. Accordingly, we herein introduce the contents and their principles, which comprise three main subjects: technique, knowledge, and experience. Since all the e-learning contents and principles are based on conventional white-light endoscopy alone, which is commonly available throughout the world, they should provide a good reference point for any endoscopist who wishes to devise learning materials and guidelines for improving their own clinical practice.

  12. [Effects of Early Enteral Immunonutrition on Postoperative Immune Function and Rehabilitation of Patients with Gastric Cancer and Nutritional Risk].

    PubMed

    Peng, Chang-Bing; Li, Wen-Zhong; Xu, Rui; Zhuang, Wen

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the effects of early enteral immunonutrition on postoperative immune function and rehabilitation of gastric cancer patients with nutritional risk. New hospitalized patients with gastric cancer were evaluated the nutrient status based on NRS 2002. The patients who scored between 3 to 5 points were randomized into two groups(30 cases for each group), and those in experimental group were given 7-d early postoperative enteral immune nutrition, those in control group were given normal nutrition. The immune indexes (CD3 + , CD4 + , CD8 + and CD4 + /CD8 + ) and nutritional indexes(transferrin, pre-albumin, albumin) were measured before operation and at the 3 rd and 7 th day postoperatively. In addition, the first flatus time, gastrointestinal adverse reactions and complications, length of hospital stays were compared between the two groups. The level of CD4 + /CD8 + and transferrin, pre-albumin, albumin in experimental group were significantly higher than those in control group at the third and seventh day postoperatively ( P <0.05).Compared with the control group, the experimental group had shorter first flatus time after surgery, which were (63.5±7.3) h vs. (72.8±8.6 ) h respectively ( P <0.05).There were no statistically difference on pneumonia, anastomosis leakage, severe abdominal distension, inflammatory bowel obstruction and total postoperative hospitalization time between the two groups ( P >0.05). Early enteral immunonutrition can effectively promote the recovery of nutritional status and immune function in gastric cancer patients with nutrition risk.

  13. Genome-wide analysis of DNA copy number alterations in early and advanced gastric cancers.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Noriyuki; Sugai, Tamotsu; Habano, Wataru; Eizuka, Makoto; Sugimoto, Ryo; Akasaka, Risaburo; Toya, Yosuke; Yamamoto, Eiichiro; Koeda, Keisuke; Sasaki, Akira; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Suzuki, Hiromu

    2017-02-01

    To better understand progressive changes in gastric cancer (GC), early and advanced GCs (EGC and AGC, respectively) were examined for copy number alterations (CNAs). A crypt isolation method was used to isolate DNA from tumors and normal glands in 20 AGCs, and fresh tumor samples were obtained from 45 EGCs. We assessed CNAs for differentiated-type GCs using an Infinium HumanCytoSNP-12v2.1 BeadChip in EGCs and AGCs. The most frequent aberrations in EGC were gains at 8q23.3 (42.2%) and 8q23.2 (40%), and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at 3p14.2 (24.2%), suggesting that these CNAs were involved in the development of EGC. On the other hand, the highest frequencies of gains in AGC were found at 8q24.21 (65%) and 8q24.3 (60%). The most frequent LOHs in AGC were at 11q24.3-25, 11q23.2-24.1, 11q14.1, and 12p11.21-13.33, whereas that in EGC was at 3p14.2. In addition, regions of copy-neutral LOHs in AGC were detected at 11q21, 11q13.3-14.3, 11q11, 11p13-15.3, 12q21.1, 12q12-13.3 and 5q33.3-35.1. Comparisons of gains in EGC and AGC showed significant differences at 12q22-q23.2, 12q21.33, 11p12, 11p14.1, 12q21.31-32.32, 3p12.3, 3p14.1, 10p15.1, 1q24.2 and 2q12.1. Copy neutral LOHs were significantly higher in AGC than in EGC at 14q32.11-32.33, 14q21.3, 14q11.2, 5q11.2, 5q 13.3, 14q21.1-23.2, 14q13.2-13.3, 5q12.1-12.3, 5q11.1, and 17p13.3. The total lengths of the CNAs were significantly greater in AGC than in EGC. We found that the pattern of CNAs in AGC was quite different from that in EGC. We suggest that increasing numbers of CNAs are associated with disease progression from EGC to AGC. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Molecular diagnostics in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Bornschein, Jan; Leja, Marcis; Kupcinskas, Juozas; Link, Alexander; Weaver, Jamie; Rugge, Massimo; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent advances in individualised targeted therapy, gastric cancer remains one of the most challenging diseases in gastrointestinal oncology. Modern imaging techniques using endoscopic filter devices and in vivo molecular imaging are designed to enable early detection of the cancer and surveillance of patients at risk. Molecular characterisation of the tumour itself as well as of the surrounding inflammatory environment is more sophisticated in the view of tailored therapies and individual prognostic assessment. The broad application of high throughput techniques for the description of genome wide patterns of structural (copy number aberrations, single nucleotide polymorphisms, methylation pattern) and functional (gene expression profiling, proteomics, miRNA) alterations in the cancer tissue lead not only to a better understanding of the tumour biology but also to a description of gastric cancer subtypes independent from classical stratification systems. Biostatistical means are required for the interpretation of the massive amount of data generated by these approaches. In this review we give an overview on the current knowledge of diagnostic methods for detection, description and understanding of gastric cancer disease.

  15. Therapeutic outcomes of endoscopic submucosal dissection of differentiated early gastric cancer in a Western endoscopy setting (with video).

    PubMed

    Emura, Fabian; Mejía, Juan; Donneys, Alberto; Ricaurte, Orlando; Sabbagh, Luis; Giraldo-Cadavid, Luis; Oda, Ichiro; Saito, Yutaka; Osorio, Camilo

    2015-11-01

    Large multicenter gastric cancer endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) studies conducted at major Japanese institutions have reported en bloc resection, en bloc tumor-free margin resection, and curative resection rates of 92.7% to 96.1%, 82.6% to 94.5%, and 73.6% to 85.4%, respectively, with delayed bleeding and perforation rates of 0.6% to 6.0% and 3.6% to 4.7%, respectively. Although ESD is currently an alternative treatment in some countries, particularly in Asia, it remains uncertain whether ESD therapeutic outcomes in Western endoscopy settings can be comparable to those achieved in Japan. To evaluate the ESD therapeutic outcomes for differentiated early gastric cancer (EGC) in a Western endoscopy setting. Consecutive case series performed by an expertly trained Western endoscopist. Fifty-three patients with 54 lesions. ESD for early gastric cancers (T1) satisfying expanded inclusion criteria. En bloc resection, en bloc tumor-free margin resection, and curative resection rates were 98%, 93%, and 83%, respectively. The delayed bleeding rate was 7%, and the perforation rate was 4%. The mean patient age was 67 years, and the mean tumor size was 19.8 mm, with 54% of the lesions located in the lesser curvature. The median procedure time was 61 minutes, with ESD procedures 60 minutes or longer associated with submucosal fibrosis (P < .001) and tumor size 25 mm or larger (P = .03). In every ESD procedure, both circumferential incision and submucosal dissection were performed by using a single knife. Two of the 4 delayed bleeding cases required surgery, and all perforations were successfully managed by using endoscopic clips. Long-term outcome data are currently unavailable. ESD for differentiated EGC resulted in favorable therapeutic outcomes in a Western endoscopy setting comparable to those achieved at major Japanese institutions. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Photoacoustic imaging of early gastric cancer diagnosis based on long focal area ultrasound transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huaqin; Li, Zuoran; Liu, Lantian; Li, Zhifang; Wu, Shulian; Li, Hui

    2017-06-01

    We illustrated a novel imaging method to diagnose gastric neoplasms via photoacoustic tomography (PAT). Depending on the structural characteristics of gastric cavity, we used column diffusion fiber to irradiate the stomach tissue through the esophagus, and the externally placed telecentric focus ultrasonic transducer detected photoacoustic signals from the gastric tissue. We reconstructed the distribution of light energy deposition of the simulated gastric tumor, and obtained the location and size information of gastric tumor.

  17. Molecular biology of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, A; Rodríguez Braun, E; Pérez Fidalgo, A; Chirivella González, I

    2007-04-01

    Despite its decreasing incidence overall, gastric cancer is still a challenging disease. Therapy is based mainly upon surgical resection when the tumour remains localised in the stomach. Conventional chemotherapy may play a role in treating micrometastatic disease and is effective as palliative therapy for recurrent or advanced disease. However, the knowledge of molecular pathways implicated in gastric cancer pathogenesis is still in its infancy and the contribution of molecular biology to the development of new targeted therapies in gastric cancer is far behind other more common cancers such as breast, colon or lung. This review will focus first on the difference of two well defined types of gastric cancer: intestinal and diffuse. A discussion of the cell of origin of gastric cancer with some intriguing data implicating bone marrow derived cells will follow, and a comprehensive review of different genetic alterations detected in gastric cancer, underlining those that may have clinical, therapeutic or prognostic implications.

  18. Recurrent candidiasis and early-onset gastric cancer in a patient with a genetically defined partial MYD88 defect.

    PubMed

    Vogelaar, Ingrid P; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; van der Post, Rachel S; de Voer, Richarda M; Kets, C Marleen; Jansen, Trees J G; Jacobs, Liesbeth; Schreibelt, Gerty; de Vries, I Jolanda M; Netea, Mihai G; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline

    2016-04-01

    Gastric cancer is caused by both genetic and environmental factors. A woman who suffered from recurrent candidiasis throughout her life developed diffuse-type gastric cancer at the age of 23 years. Using whole-exome sequencing we identified a germline homozygous missense variant in MYD88. Immunological assays on peripheral blood mononuclear cells revealed an impaired immune response upon stimulation with Candida albicans, characterized by a defective production of the cytokine interleukin-17. Our data suggest that a genetic defect in MYD88 results in an impaired immune response and may increase gastric cancer risk.

  19. [Comparison of CT findings between gastric cancer and gastric lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Fan, Wei-Jun; Lu, Yan-Chun; Liu, Li-Zhi; Shen, Jing-Xian; Xie, Chuan-Miao; Li, Xian; Zhang, Liang

    2008-05-01

    It is difficult to discriminate progressive gastric cancer and gastric lymphoma by CT imaging, because incrassate gastric wall, lump in gastric cavity, confined gastric cavity, intumescent lymph node, and distant metastasis can be displayed in both of them. This study was to compare the CT findings between gastric cancer and gastric lymphoma to improve diagnosis of gastric tumors, especially for gastric lymphoma. CT images of 27 patients with pathologically proved progressive gastric cancer and 25 patients with pathologically proved gastric lymphoma were reviewed. Tumor location, appearance, scope of involvement, gastric wall thickness, mucous membrane, mucosal fold, serosa membrane, necrosis, enhancement degree and uniformity, involvement of other organs, and abdominal lymph nodes were observed. White line sign was observed in 23 cases (85.2%) of gastric cancer, but not in the 25 cases of gastric lymphoma. The extent of white line sign in gastric cancers was larger in portal vein phase than in arterial phase. Enhancement degree outside the white line was higher in portal vein phase than in arterial phase in 13 cases (48.1%) of gastric cancer. The extent of involved gastric wall was smaller than 50% of the whole gastric wall in all the 27 cases of gastric cancer, while it was larger than 75% in 23 cases (85.2%) of gastric lymphoma. Gastric mucous membrane ulcer was found in all of the 27 cases (100%) of gastric cancer, while it was found in only 1 case (4.0%) of gastric lymphoma. Intumescent lymph nodes in two or more areas were found in 11 cases (40.0%) of gastric lymphoma, but not in gastric cancer. Intumescent lymph nodes in the retroperitoneal space below renal hilum were found in 8 cases (32%) of gastric lymphoma, but not in gastric cancer. There are some different CT features between gastric cancer and gastric lymphoma, such as white line sign, gastric mucous membrane ulcer, extent of involved gastric wall, location of intumescent lymph nodes surrounding the

  20. Glucose metabolism in gastric cancer: The cutting-edge

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Lian-Wen; Yamashita, Hiroharu; Seto, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Glucose metabolism in gastric cancer cells differs from that of normal epithelial cells. Upregulated aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect) in gastric cancer meeting the demands of cell proliferation is associated with genetic mutations, epigenetic modification and proteomic alteration. Understanding the mechanisms of aerobic glycolysis may contribute to our knowledge of gastric carcinogenesis. Metabolomic studies offer novel, convenient and practical tools in the search for new biomarkers for early detection, diagnosis, prognosis, and chemosensitivity prediction of gastric cancer. Interfering with the process of glycolysis in cancer cells may provide a new and promising therapeutic strategy for gastric cancer. In this article, we present a brief review of recent studies of glucose metabolism in gastric cancer, with primary focus on the clinical applications of new biomarkers and their potential therapeutic role in gastric cancer. PMID:26877609

  1. Usefulness of Demarcation of Differentiated-Type Early Gastric Cancers after Helicobacter pylori Eradication by Magnifying Endoscopy with Narrow-Band Imaging.

    PubMed

    Akazawa, Yoichi; Ueyama, Hiroya; Yao, Takashi; Komori, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Tsutomu; Matsumoto, Kohei; Matsumoto, Kenshi; Asaoka, Daisuke; Hojo, Mariko; Watanabe, Sumio; Nagahara, Akihito

    2018-06-05

    Early gastric cancer after Helicobacter pylori (Hp) eradication is difficult to demarcate. We used the vessel plus surface classification system (VSCS) to determine whether magnifying endoscopy with narrow-band imaging (ME-NBI) could demarcate differentiated-type early gastric cancers after Hp eradication, and to identify causes of an unclear demarcation line (DL). Among 100 lesions of differentiated-type early gastric cancer resected endoscopically, 34 lesions in the Hp-eradicated group and 66 in the Hp-infected group were retrospectively compared. Clinicopathological factors and ME-NBI findings, including the presence or absence of the DL, were examined. Histopathologically, histological gastritis, the surface structure at the tumor border, well-differentiated adenocarcinoma with low-grade atypia (tub1-low), and non-neoplastic epithelium (NE) coverage rate on the tumor surface and at the tumor border were evaluated. DL (-) cases were more frequent in the Hp-eradicated group (11.8%, 4/34) than in the Hp-infected group (1.5%, 1/66; p < 0.05). The Hp-eradicated group had a higher NE coverage rate than the Hp-infected group (p < 0.05). All DL (-) cases had tub1-low or NE at the tumor border. ME-NBI with VSCS can identify the DL in most patients (88.2%) with differentiated-type early gastric cancer after Hp eradication. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. [Gastric Cancer in Early Stage: study of 371 lesions in 340 patients in the E. Rebagliati National, Lima-Peru].

    PubMed

    Espejo Romero, Hernán; Navarrete Siancas, Jesús

    2005-01-01

    The first concrete description of the Gastric Cancer in Early Stage is attributed to the German, M. Versé in 1903, in his book Die Histogenese der Schleimhautcarcinome, but the first to use the term, was the French, Bayle in 1833, calling it First Stage Gastric Cancer. From 1963 to 2002, 5118 gastric cancers were histologically diagnosed, in our hospital from which 2337 (46%) were resected in 340 of the resected specimens, 371 early gastric cancers (EGC) (15.87%) were found. For every five periods, the number and proportion of early cancers increases, from 10 (6.8%) in the first five years to 78 (21.0%) in the last one. AGE: The average is: 64 years old for men and 58 for women with a global average of 61 years old. The youngest case was in a woman of 23 years old. The oldest case in men was 93 years old, and in women, 81 years old. SEX: 235 males and 105 females, with a ratio of 2,2:1. elevated type: Type l 70 (18.9%) Ila 66 (17.8%) Ila+Ilc 26 (7.0%) lla+l 1 (0.3%) I+lla 0 (0.0) IIa+III 1 (0.3%) IIa+IIb 1 (0.3%). Global average of the elevated type: 44.6%. llb 17 (4.6%), DEPRESSED TYPE: llb+llc 10 (2.7%), llc 127 (34.2%), llc+l 0 (0.0%) llc+lll 43 (11.6%) lll 3 (0.8%) lll+llc 5 (1.3%) llc+lla 1 (0.3%) lla+llb 0 (0.0%). The global average of the depressed type is: 50.9%. Antrum 171 (46.1%) body 138 (37.3%) bottom 46 (12.3%) antrum-body 12 (3%) and body-bottom 3 (1%). SIZE: Maximum 90 mm, minimum 1.5 mm, average 24.9 mm; 25 (8%) diminute (microcarcinomas), 58 (21%) small. Differentiated 219 (64%) undifferentiated 121 (36%). Degree of differentiation in men 74% and in women 26%. Degree of differentiation in diminutes 92%, in small 79% and in large 69%. DEPTH: 204(55%) in mucous, 167(45%) in mucous/submucous. In differentiated 182 (63%) in mucous, 108 (37%) in mucous/submucous. In the 187 located in mucous, 13 (3.8%) were positive, in the 153 located in mucous/submucous 30 (8.8%) were positive. Global percentage of positive ganglions: 12.3%. General in synchronic

  3. Mouse Models of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Yoku; Fox, James G.; Gonda, Tamas; Worthley, Daniel L.; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Wang, Timothy C.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models have greatly enriched our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of numerous types of cancers. Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, with a poor prognosis and high incidence of drug-resistance. However, most inbred strains of mice have proven resistant to gastric carcinogenesis. To establish useful models which mimic human gastric cancer phenotypes, investigators have utilized animals infected with Helicobacter species and treated with carcinogens. In addition, by exploiting genetic engineering, a variety of transgenic and knockout mouse models of gastric cancer have emerged, such as INS-GAS mice and TFF1 knockout mice. Investigators have used the combination of carcinogens and gene alteration to accelerate gastric cancer development, but rarely do mouse models show an aggressive and metastatic gastric cancer phenotype that could be relevant to preclinical studies, which may require more specific targeting of gastric progenitor cells. Here, we review current gastric carcinogenesis mouse models and provide our future perspectives on this field. PMID:24216700

  4. Expression of AID, P53, and Mlh1 proteins in endoscopically resected differentiated-type early gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Yohei; Yashima, Kazuo; Hayashi, Akihiro; Sasaki, Shuji; Kawaguchi, Koichiro; Harada, Kenichi; Murawaki, Yoshikazu; Ito, Hisao

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the expression of the tumor-related proteins in differentiated-type early gastric carcinoma (DEGC) samples. METHODS: Tumor specimens were obtained from 102 patients (75 males and 27 females) who had received an endoscopic tumor resection at Tottori University Hospital between 2007 and 2009. Ninety-one cancer samples corresponded to noninvasive or intramucosal carcinoma according to the Vienna classification system, and 11 samples were submucosal invasive carcinomas. All of the EGCs were histologically differentiated carcinomas. All patients were classified as having Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infections by endoscopic atrophic changes or by testing seropositive for H. pylori IgG. All of the samples were histopathologically classified as either tubular or papillary adenocarcinoma according to their structure. The immunohistochemical staining was performed in a blinded manner with respect to the clinical information. Two independent observers evaluated protein expression. All data were statistically analyzed then. RESULTS: The rates of aberrant activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) expression and P53 overexpression were both 34.3% in DEGCs. The expression of Mlh1 was lost in 18.6% of DEGCs. Aberrant AID expression was not significantly associated with P53 overexpression in DEGCs. However, AID expression was associated with the severity of mononuclear cell activity in the non-cancerous mucosa adjacent to the tumor (P = 0.064). The rate of P53 expression was significantly greater in flat or depressed tumors than in elevated tumors. The frequency of Mlh1 loss was significantly increased in distal tumors, elevated gross-type tumors, papillary histological-type tumors, and tumors with a severe degree of endoscopic atrophic gastritis (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Aberrant AID expression, P53 overexpression, and the loss of Mlh1 were all associated with clinicopathological features and gastric mucosal alterations in DEGCs. The aberrant expression of AID

  5. Inflammation, atrophy, and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fox, James G.; Wang, Timothy C.

    2006-01-01

    The association between chronic inflammation and cancer is now well established. This association has recently received renewed interest with the recognition that microbial pathogens can be responsible for the chronic inflammation observed in many cancers, particularly those originating in the gastrointestinal system. A prime example is Helicobacter pylori, which infects 50% of the world’s population and is now known to be responsible for inducing chronic gastric inflammation that progresses to atrophy, metaplasia, dysplasia, and gastric cancer. This Review provides an overview of recent progress in elucidating the bacterial properties responsible for colonization of the stomach, persistence in the stomach, and triggering of inflammation, as well as the host factors that have a role in determining whether gastritis progresses to gastric cancer. We also discuss how the increased understanding of the relationship between inflammation and gastric cancer still leaves many questions unanswered regarding recommendations for prevention and treatment. PMID:17200707

  6. Recapitulating Human Gastric Cancer Pathogenesis: Experimental Models of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Lin; El Zaatari, Mohamad

    2017-01-01

    Overview Gastric cancer has been traditionally defined by the Correa paradigm as a progression of sequential pathological events that begins with chronic inflammation [1]. Infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the typical explanation for why the stomach becomes chronically inflamed. Acute gastric inflammation then leads to chronic gastritis, atrophy particularly of acid-secreting parietal cells, metaplasia due to mucous neck cell expansion from trans-differentiation of zymogenic cells to dysplasia and eventually carcinoma [2]. The chapter contains an overview of gastric anatomy and physiology to set the stage for signaling pathways that play a role in gastric tumorigenesis. Finally, the major known mouse models of gastric transformation are critiqued in terms of the rationale behind their generation and contribution to our understanding of human cancer subtypes. PMID:27573785

  7. Risk factors and management of positive horizontal margin in early gastric cancer resected by en bloc endoscopic submucosal dissection.

    PubMed

    Numata, Norifumi; Oka, Shiro; Tanaka, Shinji; Kagemoto, Kenichi; Sanomura, Yoji; Yoshida, Shigeto; Arihiro, Koji; Shimamoto, Fumio; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2015-04-01

    Although endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is a widely accepted treatment for early gastric cancer (EGC), there is no consensus regarding the management of positive horizontal margin (HM) despite en bloc ESD. The aim of the current study was to identify the risk factors and optimal management of positive HM in EGCs resected by en bloc ESD. A total of 890 consecutive patients with 1,053 intramucosal EGCs resected by en bloc ESD between April 2005 and June 2011. Clinicopathological data were retrieved retrospectively to assess the positive HM rate, local recurrence rate, risk factors for positive HM, and outcomes of treatment for local recurrent tumor. Positive HM was defined as a margin with direct tumor invasion (type A), the presence of cancerous cells on either end of 2-mm-thick cut sections (type B), or an unclear tumor margin resulting from crush or burn damage (type C). The positive HM rate was 2.0% (21/1,053). The local recurrence rate was 0.3% (3/1,053). All local recurrent tumors were intramucosal carcinomas, and were resected curatively by re-ESD. Multivariate analysis with logistic regression showed tumor location in the upper third of the stomach and lesions not matching the absolute indication to be independent risk factors for positive HM. The risk factors for HM positivity in cases of EGC resected by en bloc ESD are tumor location in the upper third of the stomach and dissatisfaction of the absolute indication for curative ESD.

  8. Diagnosis and Management of High Risk Group for Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Hyuk; Kim, Nayoung

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is associated with high morbidity and mortality worldwide. To reduce the socioeconomic burden related to gastric cancer, it is very important to identify and manage high risk group for gastric cancer. In this review, we describe the general risk factors for gastric cancer and define high risk group for gastric cancer. We discuss strategies for the effective management of patients for the prevention and early detection of gastric cancer. Atrophic gastritis (AG) and intestinal metaplasia (IM) are the most significant risk factors for gastric cancer. Therefore, the accurate selection of individuals with AG and IM may be a key strategy for the prevention and/or early detection of gastric cancer. Although endoscopic evaluation using enhanced technologies such as narrow band imaging-magnification, the serum pepsinogen test, Helicobacter pylori serology, and trefoil factor 3 have been evaluated, a gold standard method to accurately select individuals with AG and IM has not emerged. In terms of managing patients at high risk of gastric cancer, it remains uncertain whether H. pylori eradication reverses and/or prevents the progression of AG and IM. Although endoscopic surveillance in high risk patients is expected to be beneficial, further prospective studies in large populations are needed to determine the optimal surveillance interval. PMID:25547086

  9. Totally laparoscopic pylorus-preserving gastrectomy for early gastric cancer in the middle stomach: technical report and surgical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Koshi; Hiki, Naoki; Nunobe, Souya; Sekikawa, Sayuri; Chiba, Takehiro; Kiyokawa, Takashi; Jiang, Xiaohua; Tanimura, Shinya; Sano, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Toshiharu

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility, safety, and improved quality of postoperative life following laparoscopy-assisted pylorus-preserving gastrectomy (LAPPG) with a hand-sewn anastomosis via a mini-laparotomy for early gastric cancer (EGC) have been previously established. Here we describe the surgical procedure of totally laparoscopic pylorus-preserving gastrectomy (TLPPG) using an intracorporeal delta-shaped anastomosis technique, and the short-term surgical outcomes of 60 patients with EGC in the middle stomach are reported. After lymphadenectomy and mobilization of the stomach, intraoperative gastroscopy was performed in order to verify the location of the tumor, and then the distal and proximal transecting lines were established, 5 cm from the pyloric ring and just proximal to Demel's line, respectively. Following transection of the stomach, a delta-shaped intracorporeal gastrogastrostomy was made with linear staplers. There were no intraoperative complications or conversions to open surgery. Mean operation time and blood loss were 259 min and 28 mL, respectively. Twelve patients (20.0%) experienced postoperative complications classified as grade II using the Clavien-Dindo classification, with the most frequent complication being gastric stasis (6 cases, 10.0 %). The incidence of severe complications classified as grade III or above was 1.7%; only one patient required reoperation and intensive care due to postoperative intraabdominal bleeding and subsequent multiple organ failure. TLPPG with an intracorporeal delta-shaped anastomosis was found to be a safe procedure, although it tended to require a longer operating time than the well-established LAPPG with a hand-sewn gastrogastrostomy.

  10. Prognostic significance of aberrant gene methylation in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jing; Zhang, Guanjun; Yao, Demao; Liu, Wei; Wang, Na; Ji, Meiju; He, Nongyue; Shi, Bingyin; Hou, Peng

    2012-01-01

    Promoter methylation acts as an important alternative to genetic alterations for gene inactivation in gastric carcinogenesis. Although a number of gastric cancer-associated genes have been found to be methylated in gastric cancer, valuable methylation markers for early diagnosis and prognostic evaluation of this cancer remain largely unknown. In the present study, we used methylation-specific PCR (MSP) to analyze promoter methylation of 9 gastric cancer-associated genes, including MLF1, MGMT, p16, RASSF2, hMLH1, HAND1, HRASLS, TM, and FLNc, and their association with clinicopathological characteristics and clinical outcome in a large cohort of gastric cancers. Our data showed that all of these genes were aberrantly methylated in gastric cancer, ranging from 8% to 51%. Moreover, gene methylation was strongly associated with certain clinicopathological characteristics, such as tumor differentiation, lymph node metastasis, and cancer-related death. Of interest, methylation of MGMT, p16, RASSF2, hMLH1, HAND1, and FLNc was closely associated with poor survival in gastric cancer, particularly MGMT, p16, RASSF2 and FLNc. Thus, our findings suggested these epigenetic events may contribute to the initiation and progression of gastric cancer. Importantly, methylation of some genes were closely relevant to poor prognosis in gastric cancer, providing the strong evidences that these hypermethylated genes may be served as valuable biomarkers for prognostic evaluation in this cancer.

  11. Prognostic significance of aberrant gene methylation in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jing; Zhang, Guanjun; Yao, Demao; Liu, Wei; Wang, Na; Ji, Meiju; He, Nongyue; Shi, Bingyin; Hou, Peng

    2012-01-01

    Promoter methylation acts as an important alternative to genetic alterations for gene inactivation in gastric carcinogenesis. Although a number of gastric cancer-associated genes have been found to be methylated in gastric cancer, valuable methylation markers for early diagnosis and prognostic evaluation of this cancer remain largely unknown. In the present study, we used methylation-specific PCR (MSP) to analyze promoter methylation of 9 gastric cancer-associated genes, including MLF1, MGMT, p16, RASSF2, hMLH1, HAND1, HRASLS, TM, and FLNc, and their association with clinicopathological characteristics and clinical outcome in a large cohort of gastric cancers. Our data showed that all of these genes were aberrantly methylated in gastric cancer, ranging from 8% to 51%. Moreover, gene methylation was strongly associated with certain clinicopathological characteristics, such as tumor differentiation, lymph node metastasis, and cancer-related death. Of interest, methylation of MGMT, p16, RASSF2, hMLH1, HAND1, and FLNc was closely associated with poor survival in gastric cancer, particularly MGMT, p16, RASSF2 and FLNc. Thus, our findings suggested these epigenetic events may contribute to the initiation and progression of gastric cancer. Importantly, methylation of some genes were closely relevant to poor prognosis in gastric cancer, providing the strong evidences that these hypermethylated genes may be served as valuable biomarkers for prognostic evaluation in this cancer. PMID:22206050

  12. DBGC: A Database of Human Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Jun; Cai, Mingdeng; Zhu, Zhenggang; Gu, Wenjie; Yu, Yingyan; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    The Database of Human Gastric Cancer (DBGC) is a comprehensive database that integrates various human gastric cancer-related data resources. Human gastric cancer-related transcriptomics projects, proteomics projects, mutations, biomarkers and drug-sensitive genes from different sources were collected and unified in this database. Moreover, epidemiological statistics of gastric cancer patients in China and clinicopathological information annotated with gastric cancer cases were also integrated into the DBGC. We believe that this database will greatly facilitate research regarding human gastric cancer in many fields. DBGC is freely available at http://bminfor.tongji.edu.cn/dbgc/index.do PMID:26566288

  13. Cost comparison between surgical treatments and endoscopic submucosal dissection in patients with early gastric cancer in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Younhee; Kim, Young Woo; Choi, Il Ju; Cho, Joo Young; Kim, Jong Hee; Kwon, Jin Won; Lee, Ja Youn; Lee, Na Rae; Seol, Sang Yong

    2015-03-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate whether medical costs can be reduced using endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) instead of conventional surger-ies in patients with early gastric cancer (EGC). Pa-tients who underwent open gastrectomy (OG), laparoscopy-assisted gastrectomy (LAG), and ESD for EGC were recruited from three medical institutions in 2009. For macro-costing, the medical costs for each patient were derived from the ex-penses incurred during the patient's hospital stay and 1-year follow-up. The overall costs in micro-costing were determined by multiplying the unit cost with the resources used during the patients' hospitalization. A total of 194 patients were included in this study. The hospital stay for ESD was 5 to 8 days and was significantly shorter than the 12-day hospital stay for OG or the 11- to 17-day stay for LAG. Using macro-costing, the average medical costs for ESD during the hospital stay ranged from 2.1 to 3.4 million Korean Won (KRW) per patient, and the medical costs for conventional surgeries were estimated to be between 5.1 million and 8.2 million KRW. There were no significant differences in the 1-year follow-up costs between ESD and conventional surger-ies. ESD patients had lower medical costs than those patients who had conventional surgeries for EGC with conservative indications. (Gut Liver, 2015;9174-180).

  14. Pure single-port laparoscopic distal gastrectomy for early gastric cancer: comparative study with multi-port laparoscopic distal gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sang-Hoon; Son, Sang-Yong; Jung, Do Hyun; Park, Do Joong; Kim, Hyung-Ho

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to show the feasibility and safety of pure single-port laparoscopic distal gastrectomy (SDG) by comparing its short-term outcomes with those of conventional multiport totally laparoscopic distal gastrectomy (TLDG). Prospectively collected data of 50 gastric cancer patients who underwent pure SDG from November 2011 through October 2013 were compared with the matched data of 50 TLDG patients. Mean operation time (144.5 vs 140.3 minutes; p = 0.561) and number of harvested lymph nodes (51.7 ± 16.3 vs 52.4 ± 17.9; p = 0.836) were comparable. Estimated blood loss was lower in the SDG patients (50.5 ± 31.5 mL vs 87.5 ± 79.6 mL; p = 0.007). Postoperative recovery was faster in the SDG patients in terms of lower maximum pain score on the operative day (6.1 ± 1.4 vs 6.9 ± 1.5; p = 0.015) and postoperative day 1 (4.6 ± 1.0 vs 5.5 ± 1.4; p < 0.001), less use of parenteral analgesics (0.8 ± 1.0 vs 1.4 ± 1.0; p = 0.020), and less increase in C-reactive protein level on postoperative day 5 (4.57 ± 6.26 mg/L vs 8.51 ± 5.25 mg/L; p = 0.008). Postoperative morbidity occurred in 6 (12%) and 5 (10%) patients in the SDG and TLDG group, respectively. This study showed that pure SDG is both safe and feasible for early gastric cancer, with similar operation time and better short-term outcomes than TLDG in terms of postoperative pain, estimated blood loss, inflammatory reaction, and cosmetic result. Copyright © 2014 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Sentinel Node Mapping Using a Fluorescent Dye and Visible Light During Laparoscopic Gastrectomy for Early Gastric Cancer: Result of a Prospective Study From a Single Institute.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang Min; Park, Sungsoo; Park, Seong-Heum; Jung, Sung Woo; Choe, Jung Wan; Sul, Ji-Young; Jang, You Jin; Mok, Young-Jae; Kim, Jong-Han

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of sentinel node mapping using a fluorescent dye and visible light in patients with gastric cancer. Recently, fluorescent imaging technology offers improved visibility with the possibility of better sensitivity or accuracy in sentinel node mapping. Twenty patients with early gastric cancer, for whom laparoscopic distal gastrectomy with standard lymphadenectomy had been planned, were enrolled in this study. Before lymphadenectomy, the patients received a gastrofiberoscopic peritumoral injection of fluorescein solution. The sentinel basin was investigated via laparoscopic fluorescent imaging under blue light (wavelength of 440-490 nm) emitted from an LED curing light. The detection rate and lymph node status were analyzed in the enrolled patients. In addition, short-term clinical outcomes were also investigated. No hypersensitivity to the dye was identified in any enrolled patients. Sentinel nodes were detected in 19 of 20 enrolled patients (95.0%), and metastatic lymph nodes were found in 2 patients. The latter lymph nodes belonged to the sentinel basin of each patient. Meanwhile, 1 patient (5.0%) experienced a postoperative complication that was unrelated to sentinel node mapping. No mortality was recorded among enrolled cases. Sentinel node mapping with visible light fluorescence was a feasible method for visualizing sentinel nodes in patients with early gastric cancer. In addition, this method is advantageous in terms of visualizing the concrete relationship between the sentinel nodes and surrounding structures.

  16. Development of an E-learning System for the Endoscopic Diagnosis of Early Gastric Cancer: An International Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Yao, K; Uedo, N; Muto, M; Ishikawa, H; Cardona, H J; Filho, E C Castro; Pittayanon, R; Olano, C; Yao, F; Parra-Blanco, A; Ho, S H; Avendano, A G; Piscoya, A; Fedorov, E; Bialek, A P; Mitrakov, A; Caro, L; Gonen, C; Dolwani, S; Farca, A; Cuaresma, L F; Bonilla, J J; Kasetsermwiriya, W; Ragunath, K; Kim, S E; Marini, M; Li, H; Cimmino, D G; Piskorz, M M; Iacopini, F; So, J B; Yamazaki, K; Kim, G H; Ang, T L; Milhomem-Cardoso, D M; Waldbaum, C A; Carvajal, W A Piedra; Hayward, C M; Singh, R; Banerjee, R; Anagnostopoulos, G K; Takahashi, Y

    2016-07-01

    In many countries, gastric cancer is not diagnosed until an advanced stage. An Internet-based e-learning system to improve the ability of endoscopists to diagnose gastric cancer at an early stage was developed and was evaluated for its effectiveness. The study was designed as a randomized controlled trial. After receiving a pre-test, participants were randomly allocated to either an e-learning or non-e-learning group. Only those in the e-learning group gained access to the e-learning system. Two months after the pre-test, both groups received a post-test. The primary endpoint was the difference between the two groups regarding the rate of improvement of their test results. 515 endoscopists from 35 countries were assessed for eligibility, and 332 were enrolled in the study, with 166 allocated to each group. Of these, 151 participants in the e-learning group and 144 in the non-e-learning group were included in the analysis. The mean improvement rate (standard deviation) in the e-learning and non-e-learning groups was 1·24 (0·26) and 1·00 (0·16), respectively (P<0·001). This global study clearly demonstrated the efficacy of an e-learning system to expand knowledge and provide invaluable experience regarding the endoscopic detection of early gastric cancer (R000012039). Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Epidemiology, surgical management and early postoperative outcome in a cohort of gastric cancer patients of a tertiary referral center in relation to multi-center quality assurance studies.

    PubMed

    Garlipp, Benjamin; Schwalenberg, Jens; Adolf, Daniela; Lippert, Hans; Meyer, Frank

    2011-03-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze epidemiologic parameters, treatment-related data and prognostic factors in the management of gastric cancer patients of a university surgical center under conditions of routine clinical care before the onset of the era of multimodal therapies. By analyzing our data in relation with multi-center quality assurance trials [German Gastric Cancer Study - GGCS (1992) and East German Gastric Cancer Study - EGGCS (2004)] we aimed at providing an instrument of internal quality control at our institution as well as a base for comparison with future analyses taking into account the implementation of evolving (multimodal) therapies and their influence on treatment results. Retrospective analysis of prospectively gathered data of gastric cancer patients treated at a single institution during a defined 10-year time period with multivariate analysis of risk factors for early postoperative outcome. From 04/01/1993 through 03/31/2003, a total of 328 gastric cancer patients were treated. In comparison with the EGGCS cohort there was a larger proportion of patients with locally advanced and proximally located tumors. 272 patients (82.9%) underwent surgery with curative intent; in 88.4% of these an R0 resection was achieved (EGGCS/GGCS: 82.5%/71.5%). 68.2% of patients underwent preoperative endoluminal ultrasound (EUS) (EGGCS: 27.4%); the proportion of patients undergoing EUS increased over the study period. Diagnostic accuracy of EUS for T stage was 50.6% (EGGCS: 42.6%). 77.2% of operated patients with curative intent underwent gastrectomy (EGGCS/GGCS: 79.8%/71.1%). Anastomotic leaks at the esophagojejunostomy occurred slightly more frequently (8.8%) than in the EGGCS (5.9%) and GGCS (7.2%); however, postoperative morbidity (36.1%) and early postoperative mortality (5.3%) were not increased compared to the multi-center quality assurance study results (EGGCS morbidity, 45%); EGGCS/GGCS mortality, 8%/8.9%). D2 lymphadenectomy was performed in 72

  18. [A case of a collision tumor comprising mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and early gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Isosaka, Mai; Adachi, Takeya; Iida, Tomoya; Mitsuhashi, Kei; Tanaka, Michihiro; Kondou, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Takashi; Tanuma, Tokuma; Kasai, Kiyoshi

    2014-07-01

    A 60-year-old woman underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for an abnormality identified during routine examination. The lower gastric corpus showed a type 0-I elevated lesion with a faded mucosa and an area of converging mucosal folds in contact with the lesion. Biopsy indicated the former to be a high-grade adenoma and the latter to be a mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. At the same time, Helicobacter pylori infection was diagnosed. Eradication therapy was administered to manage the MALT lymphoma; this resulted in improvement after 3 months. Endoscopic submucosal dissection was performed for the elevated lesion, and subsequent histopathology showed contact between the MALT lymphoma and gastric cancer. Therefore, the patient was diagnosed with a collision tumor. Concurrent cancers are increasingly reported and should be considered during examination.

  19. 64Cu DOTA-Trastuzumab PET/CT in Studying Patients With Gastric Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-12-11

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Stage IA Gastric Cancer; Stage IB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  20. Epidemiology of gastric cancer in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, M; Tsugane, S

    2005-01-01

    Despite its decreasing trend in Japan, gastric cancer remains an important public health problem. Although the age standardised rates of gastric cancer have been declining for decades, the absolute numbers are increasing because of the rapid aging of the population. A large proportion of Japanese gastric cancers are detected at an early stage, with a better overall survival rate. As with Western developed countries, a change in the social environment such as reduced salt use and increased fresh vegetable and fruit intake as well as improvement of food storage may play an important part in the decline. Differences in Helicobacter pylori infection rates between generations presumably have contributed to the generation related variation in the declining trends. It is expected that most gastric cancers in Japan may be preventable by lifestyle modification such as salt reduction and increased fruit and vegetable intake, together with avoidance of smoking and countermeasures against H pylori infection so that the level now evident in Western developed countries can be reached. PMID:15998815

  1. Predictive factors for lymph node metastasis in poorly differentiated early gastric cancer and their impact on the surgical strategy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hua; Lu, Ping; Lu, Yang; Liu, Cai-Gang; Xu, Hui-Mian; Wang, Shu-Bao; Chen, Jun-Qing

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To identify the predictive clinicopathological factors for lymph node metastasis (LNM) in poorly differentiated early gastric cancer (EGC) and to further expand the possibility of using endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) for the treatment of poorly differentiated EGC. METHODS: Data were collected from 85 poorly-differentiated EGC patients who were surgically treated. Association between the clinicopathological factors and the presence of LNM was retrospectively analyzed by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: Univariate analysis showed that tumor size (OR = 5.814, 95% CI = 1.050 - 32.172, P = 0.044), depth of invasion (OR = 10.763, 95% CI = 1.259 - 92.026, P = 0.030) and lymphatic vessel involvement (OR = 61.697, 95% CI = 2.144 - 175.485, P = 0.007) were the significant and independent risk factors for LNM. The LNM rate was 5.4%, 42.9% and 50%, respectively, in poorly differentiated EGC patients with one, two and three of the risk factors, respectively. No LNM was found in 25 patients without the three risk factors. Forty-four lymph nodes were found to have metastasis, 29 (65.9%) and 15 (34.1%) of the lymph nodes involved were within N1 and beyond N1, respectively, in 12 patients with LNM. CONCLUSION: Endoscopic mucosal resection alone may be sufficient to treat poorly differentiated intramucosal EGC (≤ 2.0 cm in diameter) with no histologically-confirmed lymphatic vessel involvement. When lymphatic vessels are involved, lymph node dissection beyond limited (D1) dissection or D1+ lymph node dissection should be performed depending on the tumor location. PMID:18636670

  2. Probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy in the margin delineation of early gastric cancer for endoscopic submucosal dissection.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun Chul; Park, Yehyun; Kim, Hyun Ki; Jo, Jeong-Hyeon; Park, Chan Hyuk; Kim, Eun Hye; Jung, Da Hyun; Chung, Hyunsoo; Shin, Sung Kwan; Lee, Sang Kil; Lee, Yong Chan

    2017-05-01

    We evaluated probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) in the margin delineation of early gastric cancer (EGC) for endoscopic submucosal dissection in comparison with white-light imaging with chromoendoscopy (CE). We conducted a prospective, randomized controlled study from November 2013 to October 2014 in a tertiary referral hospital. A total of 101 patients scheduled for endoscopic submucosal dissection due to differentiated EGC were randomized into pCLE and CE groups (pCLE 51, CE 50). Markings were made by electrocautery at the proximal and distal tumor margins, as determined by either pCLE or CE. The distance from the marking to the tumor margin was measured in the resected specimen histopathologically and was compared between the two groups by a linear mixed model. Among 104 lesions, 80 lesions with 149 markings (pCLE 68, CE 81) were analyzed after excluding undifferentiated EGCs (n = 8) and unidentifiable markings (n = 13). Although the complete resection rate showed no difference between the groups (94.6% vs 93.2%, P = 1.000), the median distance from the marking to the margin was shorter in the pCLE group (1.3 vs 1.8 mm, P = 0.525) and the proportion of the distance <1 mm was higher (43.9% vs 27.6%, P = 0.023) in the pCLE group. Finally, subgroup analysis with superficial flat lesions (18 lesions, 31 marking dots) showed a significantly decreased distance in the pCLE group (0.5 vs 3.1 mm, P = 0.007). Among EGCs with superficial flat morphology, in which the accurate evaluation of lateral extent is difficult with CE, pCLE would be useful for more precise margin delineation. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  3. Feasibility and nutritional impact of laparoscopy-assisted subtotal gastrectomy for early gastric cancer in the upper stomach.

    PubMed

    Kosuga, Toshiyuki; Hiki, Naoki; Nunobe, Souya; Noma, Hisashi; Honda, Michitaka; Tanimura, Shinya; Sano, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Toshiharu

    2014-06-01

    Laparoscopy-assisted total gastrectomy (LATG) is commonly performed for early gastric cancer (EGC) in the upper stomach; however, the incidence of anastomotic complications remains high, and postoperative nutritional status is not satisfactory. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and nutritional impact of a novel surgical procedure, laparoscopy-assisted subtotal gastrectomy (LAsTG). This was a retrospective study of 167 patients with EGC in the upper stomach. Of these, 57 patients underwent LAsTG, while 110 patients underwent LATG. Postoperative change in body weight, and serum concentration of albumin (Alb) and total protein (TP) were compared between the LAsTG and LATG groups. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to assess the influence of potential confounding factors. Frequency of anastomotic complications was significantly higher in the LATG group (16.3 %) than in the LAsTG group (5.3 %, P = 0.040). Postoperative recovery of body weight at 12 months after surgery was significantly better in the LAsTG group (89.8 ± 1.4 %) than in the LATG group (82.1 ± 1.0 %, P < 0.001). By ANCOVA, adjusted mean differences of Alb and TP at 12 months after surgery between the LAsTG and LATG groups were 0.226 g/dl (95 % CI 0.141-0.312; P < 0.001) and 0.380 g/dl (95 % CI 0.265-0.495; P < 0.001); thus, the surgical procedure was significantly associated with the postoperative Alb and TP levels. LAsTG could be a better choice than LATG for EGC in the upper stomach as a result of improvements in the incidence of anastomotic complications and postoperative nutritional status.

  4. Novel strategy of endoscopic submucosal dissection using an insulation-tipped knife for early gastric cancer: near-side approach method

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Genki; Nonaka, Satoru; Oda, Ichiro; Abe, Seiichiro; Suzuki, Haruhisa; Yoshinaga, Shigetaka; Nakajima, Takeshi; Saito, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) using insulation-tipped knives (IT knives) to treat gastric lesions located on the greater curvature of the gastric body remains technically challenging because of the associated bleeding, control of which can be difficult and time consuming. To eliminate these difficulties, we developed a novel strategy which we have called the “near-side approach method” and assessed its utility. Patients and methods: We reviewed patients who underwent ESD for solitary early gastric cancer located on the greater curvature of the gastric body from January 2003 to September 2014. The technical results of ESD were compared between the group treated with the novel near-side approach method and the group treated with the conventional method. Results: This study included 238 patients with 238 lesions, 118 of which were removed using the near-side approach method and 120 of which were removed using the conventional method. The median procedure time was 92 minutes for the near-side approach method and 120 minutes for the conventional method. The procedure time was significantly shorter in the near-side approach method arm. Although, the procedure time required by an experienced endoscopist was not significantly different between the two groups (100 vs. 110 minutes), the near-side approach group showed significantly shorter procedure time for a less-experienced endoscopist (90 vs. 120 minutes). Conclusions: The near-side approach method appears to require less time to complete gastric ESD than the conventional method using IT knives for technically challenging lesions located on the greater curvature of the gastric body, especially if the procedure is performed by less-experienced endoscopists. PMID:26528496

  5. [A case of gastric cancer accompanied by disseminated carcinomatosis of bone marrow wherein long-term chemotherapy was enabled by early supportive palliative care].

    PubMed

    Yamagiwa, Tetsuya; Amakawa, Ryuichi; Takeda, Yasuhiro; Fukuda, Akiko; Ito, Satoko; Nakayama, Shinya; Shiotani, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Go; Kita, Kenkichi; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2014-02-01

    Here we report gastric cancer accompanied by bone marrow carcinomatosis in a patient for whom long-term chemotherapy was enabled by early pain-relief therapy. A 45-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of back pain associated with multiple spinal tumors in June 2011. Blood tests showed a trend toward disseminated intravascular coagulation(DIC) and gastric cancer was suspected as the primary lesion. Because pain was severe, emergency pain relief was provided by flurbiprofen axetil and a continuous subcutaneous infusion of fentanyl citrate. After bone marrow examination gave a diagnosis of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, we performed sequential methotrexate(MTX)and 5-fluorouracil(5-FU)therapy. The therapy successfully decreased tumor marker levels, and alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase levels normalized. Finally, gastric cancer accompanied by bone marrow carcinomatosis was diagnosed. Because the patient had anxiety and spiritual pain from the time of admission, psychiatric care was also required. In November 2011, the tumor recurred, and we switched therapy to a combination of S-1 and cisplatin. The patient's pain was controlled by combined treatment with a fentanyl patch and etodolac, and he was discharged in December 2011. However, severe pain recurred and pain therapy was continued. DIC developed in February 2012 and transiently resolved after resuming combination therapy with MTX and 5-FU; however, it subsequently recurred, leading to the patient's death in May 2012.

  6. E-Cadherin and Gastric Cancer: Cause, Consequence, and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin

    2014-01-01

    E-cadherin (epithelial-cadherin), encoded by the CDH1 gene, is a transmembrane glycoprotein playing a crucial role in maintaining cell-cell adhesion. E-cadherin has been reported to be a tumor suppressor and to be down regulated in gastric cancer. Besides genetic mutations in CDH1 gene to induce hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC), epigenetic factors such as DNA hypermethylation also contribute to the reduction of E-cadherin in gastric carcinogenesis. In addition, expression of E-cadherin could be mediated by infectious agents such as H. pylori (Helicobacter pylori). As E-cadherin is vitally involved in signaling pathways modulating cell proliferation, survival, invasion, and migration, dysregulation of E-cadherin leads to dysfunction of gastric epithelial cells and contributes to gastric cancer development. Moreover, changes in its expression could reflect pathological conditions of gastric mucosa, making its role in gastric cancer complicated. In this review, we summarize the functions of E-cadherin and the signaling pathways it regulates. We aim to provide comprehensive perspectives in the molecular mechanism of E-cadherin and its involvement in gastric cancer initiation and progression. We also focus on its applications for early diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy in gastric cancer in order to open new avenues in this field. PMID:25184143

  7. MUC4 and MUC1 expression in adenocarcinoma of the stomach correlates with vessel invasion and lymph node metastasis: an immunohistochemical study of early gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Yukihiro; Higashi, Michiyo; Kitamoto, Sho; Yokoyama, Seiya; Osako, Masahiko; Horinouchi, Michiko; Shimizu, Takeshi; Tabata, Mineo; Batra, Surinder K; Goto, Masamichi; Yonezawa, Suguru

    2012-01-01

    We have previously reported that MUC4 expression is a poor prognostic factor in various carcinomas. Our previous study also showed that MUC1 expression in gastric cancers, including the early and advanced stages is a poor prognostic factor. In the present study, the expression profiles of MUC4 and MUC1 were examined by immunohistochemistry (IHC) using two anti-MUC4 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), 8G7 and 1G8, and anti-MUC1 MAb DF3 in 104 gastrectomy specimens of early gastric adenocarcinoma with submucosal invasion (pT1b2), including 197 histological subtype lesions. Before the IHC study of the human specimens, we evaluated the specificity of the two MAbs by Western blotting and IHC of two MUC4 mRNA expressing gastric cancer cell lines. MAb 8G7 reacted clearly, whereas MAb 1G8 did not show any reactivity, in either Western blotting or IHC. In the IHC of the gastric cancers, the expression rates of MUC4/8G7 detected by MAb 8G7, MUC4/1G8 detected by MAb 1G8 and MUC1/DF3 detected by MAb DF3 in well differentiated types (70%, 38/54; 67%, 36/54; 52%, 28/54) were significantly higher than those in poorly differentiated types (18%, 10/55; 36%, 20/55; 13%, 7/55) (P<0.0001; P = 0.0021; P<0.0001), respectively. The MUC4/8G7 expression was related with lymphatic invasion (r = 0.304, P = 0.033). On the other hand, the MUC4/1G8 expression was related with lymphatic invasion (r = 0.395, P = 0.001) and lymph node metastasis (r = 0.296, P = 0.045). The MUC1/DF3 expression was related with lymphatic invasion (r = 0.357, P = 0.032) and venous invasion (r = 0.377, P = 0.024). In conclusion, the expression of MUC4 as well as MUC1 in early gastric cancers is a useful marker to predict poor prognostic factors related with vessel invasion.

  8. MUC4 and MUC1 Expression in Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach Correlates with Vessel Invasion and Lymph Node Metastasis: An Immunohistochemical Study of Early Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kitamoto, Sho; Yokoyama, Seiya; Osako, Masahiko; Horinouchi, Michiko; Shimizu, Takeshi; Tabata, Mineo; Batra, Surinder K.; Goto, Masamichi; Yonezawa, Suguru

    2012-01-01

    We have previously reported that MUC4 expression is a poor prognostic factor in various carcinomas. Our previous study also showed that MUC1 expression in gastric cancers, including the early and advanced stages is a poor prognostic factor. In the present study, the expression profiles of MUC4 and MUC1 were examined by immunohistochemistry (IHC) using two anti-MUC4 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), 8G7 and 1G8, and anti-MUC1 MAb DF3 in 104 gastrectomy specimens of early gastric adenocarcinoma with submucosal invasion (pT1b2), including 197 histological subtype lesions. Before the IHC study of the human specimens, we evaluated the specificity of the two MAbs by Western blotting and IHC of two MUC4 mRNA expressing gastric cancer cell lines. MAb 8G7 reacted clearly, whereas MAb 1G8 did not show any reactivity, in either Western blotting or IHC. In the IHC of the gastric cancers, the expression rates of MUC4/8G7 detected by MAb 8G7, MUC4/1G8 detected by MAb 1G8 and MUC1/DF3 detected by MAb DF3 in well differentiated types (70%, 38/54; 67%, 36/54; 52%, 28/54) were significantly higher than those in poorly differentiated types (18%, 10/55; 36%, 20/55; 13%, 7/55) (P<0.0001; P = 0.0021; P<0.0001), respectively. The MUC4/8G7 expression was related with lymphatic invasion (r = 0.304, P = 0.033). On the other hand, the MUC4/1G8 expression was related with lymphatic invasion (r = 0.395, P = 0.001) and lymph node metastasis (r = 0.296, P = 0.045). The MUC1/DF3 expression was related with lymphatic invasion (r = 0.357, P = 0.032) and venous invasion (r = 0.377, P = 0.024). In conclusion, the expression of MUC4 as well as MUC1 in early gastric cancers is a useful marker to predict poor prognostic factors related with vessel invasion. PMID:23152882

  9. Estrogen receptors in gastric cancer: Advances and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ur Rahman, Muhammad Saif; Cao, Jiang

    2016-02-28

    Worldwide, gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies with high mortality. Various aspects of the development and progression of gastric cancer continue to be extensively investigated in order to further our understanding and provide more effective means for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of the disease. Estrogen receptors (ERs) are steroid hormone receptors that regulate cellular activities in many physiological and pathological processes in different tissues. There are two distinct forms of ERs, namely ERα and ERβ, with several alternative-splicing isoforms for each. They show distinct tissue distribution patterns and exert different biological functions. Dysregulation of ERs has been found to be associated closely with many diseases, including cancer. A number of studies have been conducted to investigate the role of ERs in gastric cancer, the possible mechanisms underlying these roles, and the clinical relevance of deregulated ERs in gastric cancer patients. To date, inconsistent associations of different ERs with gastric cancer have been reported. These inconsistencies may be caused by variations in in vitro cell models and clinical samples, including assay conditions and protocols with regard to different forms of ERs. Given the potential of the deregulated ERs as diagnostic/prognostic markers or therapeutic targets for gastric cancer, it will be important to identify/confirm the association of each ER isoform with gastric cancer, to determine the specific roles and interactions that these individual ER isoforms play under specific conditions in the development and/or progression of gastric cancer, and to elucidate precisely these mechanisms. In this review, we summarize the achievements from early ER studies in gastric cancer to the most up-to-date discoveries, with an effort to provide a comprehensive understanding of the role of ERs roles in gastric cancer and its possible mechanisms. Furthermore, we propose directions for future

  10. [Current standards in the treatment of gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Hacker, Ulrich; Lordick, Florian

    2015-08-01

    Endoscopic resection is established in the treatment of early gastric cancer. More advanced gastric cancer requires gastrectomy and D2 lymphadenectomy. Perioperative chemotherapy improves overall survival in locally advanced gastric cancer representing a standard of care. Locally advanced adenocarcinomas of the esophago-gastric junction can alternatively be treated with concurrent radiochemotherapy. In metastatic disease, systemic chemotherapy improves survival, quality of life and symptom control. Trastuzumab plus chemotherapy should be used together with first-line chemotherapy in HER2 positive gastric cancer patients. Second- and third-line therapy is now well established. The anti-VEGFR2 antibody Ramucirumab improves survival in second line treatment both as a monotherapy and in combination with paclitaxel and represents a novel treatment option. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. The corpus-predominant gastritis index can be an early and reversible marker to identify the gastric cancer risk of Helicobacter pylori-infected nonulcer dyspepsia.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hsiu-Chi; Tsai, Yu-Ching; Yang, Hsiao-Bai; Yeh, Yi-Chun; Chang, Wei-Lun; Kuo, Hsin-Yu; Lu, Cheng-Chan; Sheu, Bor-Shyang

    2017-08-01

    Corpus-predominant gastritis index (CGI) is an early histological marker to identify Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric cancer relatives at risk of cancer. This study validated whether CGI is more prevalent in H. pylori-infected nonulcer dyspepsia (NUD) subjects than in duodenal ulcer (DU) controls and whether it is reversible after H. pylori eradication or is correlated with noninvasive biomarkers. In this longitudinal cohort study, 573 H. pylori-infected subjects were enrolled, including 349 NUD and 224 DU. Gastric specimens were provided to assess CGI, spasmolyic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia (SPEM), and Operative Link on Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia assessment (OLGIM). Serum pepsinogen I and II levels were assessed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. CGI subjected were followed up at least 1 year after H. pylori eradication. NUD subjects had higher prevalence rates of CGI (47.0% vs 29.9%, P<.001) and OLGIM stages III-IV (24.1% vs 15.2%, P=.01) than controls. CGI was highly prevalent in NUD subjects after the age of 40, which was 10 years earlier than atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia. NUD subjects with CGI had higher risk of SPEM (OR 2.86, P<.001) and lower serum pepsinogen I/II ratios (P<.001) than those without CGI. Serum pepsinogen I/II ratios <9 could predict CGI modestly (AUROC 0.69, 95% CI: 0.63-0.74). CGI was regressed after eradication (P<.001). CGI was more prevalent in H. pylori-infected NUD subjects than in controls, was correlated with SPEM, and may serve as a marker earlier than OLGIM to indicate risk of gastric cancer. Moreover, CGI could be regressed after eradication. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. HNF4α is a therapeutic target that links AMPK to WNT signalling in early-stage gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hae Ryung; Nam, Seungyoon; Kook, Myeong-Cherl; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Liu, Xiuping; Yao, Hui; Jung, Hae Rim; Lemos, Robert; Seo, Hye Hyun; Park, Hee Seo; Gim, Youme; Hong, Dongwan; Huh, Iksoo; Kim, Young-Woo; Tan, Dongfeng; Liu, Chang-Gong; Powis, Garth; Park, Taesung; Liang, Han; Kim, Yon Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background Worldwide, gastric cancer (GC) is the fourth most common malignancy and the most common cancer in East Asia. Development of targeted therapies for this disease has focused on a few known oncogenes but has had limited effects. Objective To determine oncogenic mechanisms and novel therapeutic targets specific for GC by identifying commonly dysregulated genes from the tumours of both Asian-Pacific and Caucasian patients. Methods We generated transcriptomic profiles of 22 Caucasian GC tumours and their matched non-cancerous samples and performed an integrative analysis across different GC gene expression datasets. We examined the inhibition of commonly overexpressed oncogenes and their constituent signalling pathways by RNAi and/or pharmacological inhibition. Results Hepatocyte nuclear factor-4α (HNF4α) upregulation was a key signalling event in gastric tumours from both Caucasian and Asian patients, and HNF4α antagonism was antineoplastic. Perturbation experiments in GC tumour cell lines and xenograft models further demonstrated that HNF4α is downregulated by AMPKα signalling and the AMPK agonist metformin; blockade of HNF4α activity resulted in cyclin downregulation, cell cycle arrest and tumour growth inhibition. HNF4α also regulated WNT signalling through its target gene WNT5A, a potential prognostic marker of diffuse type gastric tumours. Conclusions Our results indicate that HNF4α is a targetable oncoprotein in GC, is regulated by AMPK signalling through AMPKα and resides upstream of WNT signalling. HNF4α may regulate ‘metabolic switch’ characteristic of a general malignant phenotype and its target WNT5A has potential prognostic values. The AMPKα-HNF4α-WNT5A signalling cascade represents a potentially targetable pathway for drug development. PMID:25410163

  13. Splash M-knife versus Flush Knife BT in the technical outcomes of endoscopic submucosal dissection for early gastric cancer: a propensity score matching analysis.

    PubMed

    Esaki, Mitsuru; Suzuki, Sho; Hayashi, Yasuyo; Yokoyama, Azusa; Abe, Shuichi; Hosokawa, Taizo; Ogino, Haruei; Akiho, Hirotada; Ihara, Eikichi; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2018-02-27

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is a standard treatment for early gastric cancer. A new multi-functional ESD device was developed to achieve complete ESD with a single device. A metal plate attached to its distal sheath achieves better hemostasis during the procedure than the other needle-knife device, Flush Knife BT®, that has been conventionally used. The aim of this study was to compare the technical outcomes of ESD for early gastric cancer using the Splash M-Knife® with those using the Flush Knife BT. We conducted a retrospective review of the case records of 149 patients with early gastric cancer treated with ESD using the needle-type ESD knives between January 2012 and August 2016 at Kitakyushu Municipal Medical Center. Lesions treated with ESD using the Splash M-knife (ESD-M) and the Flush Knife BT (ESD-F) were compared. Multivariate analyses and propensity score matching were used to compensate for the differences in age, gender, underlying disease, antithrombotic drug use, lesion location, lesion position, macroscopic type, tumor size, presence of ulceration, operator level and types of electrosurgical unit used. The primary endpoint was the requirement to use hemostatic forceps in the two groups. The secondary endpoints of procedure time, en bloc and complete resection rates, and adverse events rates were evaluated for the two groups. There were 73 patients in the ESD-M group, and 76 patients in the ESD-F group. Propensity score matching analysis created 45 matched pairs. Adjusted comparisons between the two groups showed a significantly lower usage rate of hemostatic forceps in the ESD-M group than in the ESD-F group (6.7% vs 84.4%, p < 0.001). Treatment outcomes showed an en bloc resection rate of 100% in both groups; complete resection rate of 95.6% vs 100%, p = 0.49; median procedure time of 74.0 min vs 71.0 min, p = 0.90; post-procedure bleeding of 2.2% vs 2.2%, p = 1, in the ESD-M and ESD-F groups, respectively. There were

  14. Successful treatment of refractory hepatic lymphorrhea after gastrectomy for early gastric cancer, using surgical ligation and subsequent OK-432 (Picibanil) sclerotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kouji; Ohmori, Yukinari; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Tonouchi, Hitoshi; Suematsu, Mina; Taguchi, Yukiko; Adachi, Yukihiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2004-01-01

    Postoperative hepatic lymphorrhea is a very rare complication after abdominal surgery. Hepatic lymphorrhea, not containing chyle, involves an internal lymph fistula between the lymphatic channels toward the cisterna chyli and the peritoneal cavity. Over the past 20 years, 17 cases have been reported in Japan. Here, we report a further case, of a patient with successfully treated intractable hepatic lymphorrhea following gastrectomy for early gastric cancer. We review 18 cases, including the present case, with respect to the management of postoperative lymphorrhea refractory to conventional medical treatment.

  15. [Experience and present situation of Western China Gastric Cancer Collaboration].

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiankun; Zhang, Weihan; Western China Gastric Cancer Collaboration, China

    2017-03-25

    The Western China Gastric Cancer Collaboration (WCGCC) was founded in Chongqing, China in 2011. At the early stage of the collaboration, there were only about 20 centers. While now, there are 36 centers from western area of China, including Sichuan, Chongqing, Yunnan, Shanxi, Guizhou, Gansu, Qinghai, Xinjiang, Ningxia and Tibet. During the past few years, the WCGCC organized routinely gastric cancer standardized treatment tours, training courses of mini-invasive surgical treatment of gastric cancer and the clinical research methodology for members of the collaboration. Meanwhile, the WCGCC built a multicenter database of gastric cancer since 2011 and the entering and management refer to national gastric cancer registration entering system of Japan Gastric Cancer Association. During the entering and collection of data, 190 items of data have unified definition and entering standard from Japan Gastric Cancer Guidelines. Nowadays, this database included about 11 872 gastric cancer cases, and in this paper we will introduce the initial results of these cases. Next, the collaboration will conduct some retrospective studies based on this database to analyze the clinicopathological characteristics of patients in the western area of China. Besides, the WCGCC performed a prospective study, also. The first randomized clinical trial of the collaboration aims to compare the postoperative quality of life between different reconstruction methods for total gastrectomy(WCGCC-1202, ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02110628), which began in 2015, and now this study is in the recruitment period. In the next steps, we will improve the quality of the database, optimize the management processes. Meanwhile, we will engage in more exchanges and cooperation with the Chinese Cochrane Center, reinforce the foundation of the clinical trials research methodology. In aspect of standardized surgical treatment of gastric cancer, we will further strengthen communication with other international

  16. Management of gastric cancer in Asia: resource-stratified guidelines.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lin; Shan, Yan-Shen; Hu, Huang-Ming; Price, Timothy J; Sirohi, Bhawna; Yeh, Kun-Huei; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Sano, Takeshi; Yang, Han-Kwang; Zhang, Xiaotian; Park, Sook Ryun; Fujii, Masashi; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Chen, Li-Tzong

    2013-11-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cancer globally, and is the second most common cause of death from cancer worldwide. About three-quarters of newly diagnosed cases in 2008 were from Asian countries. With a high mortality-to-incidence ratio, management of gastric cancer is challenging. We discuss evidence for optimum management of gastric cancer in aspects of screening and early detection, diagnosis, and staging; endoscopic and surgical intervention; and the concepts of perioperative, postoperative, and palliative chemotherapy and use of molecularly targeted therapy. Recommendations are formulated on the basis of the framework provided by the Breast Health Global Initiative, using the categories of basic, limited, enhanced, and maximum level. We aim to provide a stepwise strategy for management of gastric cancer applicable to different levels of health-care resources in Asian countries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Additive treatment improves survival in elderly patients after non-curative endoscopic resection for early gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Jung, Da Hyun; Lee, Yong Chan; Kim, Jie-Hyun; Lee, Sang Kil; Shin, Sung Kwan; Park, Jun Chul; Chung, Hyunsoo; Park, Jae Jun; Youn, Young Hoon; Park, Hyojin

    2017-03-01

    Endoscopic resection (ER) is accepted as a curative treatment option for selected cases of early gastric cancer (EGC). Although additional surgery is often recommended for patients who have undergone non-curative ER, clinicians are cautious when managing elderly patients with GC because of comorbid conditions. The aim of the study was to investigate clinical outcomes in elderly patients following non-curative ER with and without additive treatment. Subjects included 365 patients (>75 years old) who were diagnosed with EGC and underwent ER between 2007 and 2015. Clinical outcomes of three patient groups [curative ER (n = 246), non-curative ER with additive treatment (n = 37), non-curative ER without additive treatment (n = 82)] were compared. Among the patients who underwent non-curative ER with additive treatment, 28 received surgery, three received a repeat ER, and six experienced argon plasma coagulation. Patients who underwent non-curative ER alone were significantly older than those who underwent additive treatment. Overall 5-year survival rates in the curative ER, non-curative ER with treatment, and non-curative ER without treatment groups were 84, 86, and 69 %, respectively. No significant difference in overall survival was found between patients in the curative ER and non-curative ER with additive treatment groups. The non-curative ER groups were categorized by lymph node metastasis risk factors to create a high-risk group that exhibited positive lymphovascular invasion or deep submucosal invasion greater than SM2 and a low-risk group without risk factors. Overall 5-year survival rate was lowest (60 %) in the high-risk group with non-curative ER and no additive treatment. Elderly patients who underwent non-curative ER with additive treatment showed better survival outcome than those without treatment. Therefore, especially with LVI or deep submucosal invasion, additive treatment is recommended in patients undergoing non-curative ER, even if they are

  18. Apatinib for the treatment of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Roviello, Giandomenico; Ravelli, Andrea; Fiaschi, Anna Ida; Cappelletti, Maria Rosa; Gobbi, Angela; Senti, Chiara; Zanotti, Laura; Polom, Karol; Reynolds, Andrew R; Fox, Stephen B; Generali, Daniele

    2016-08-01

    Apatinib, a small-molecule inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, has demonstrated encouraging anti-cancer activity in gastric cancer within both in vitro and in vivo models. Apatinib's efficacy, tolerability and safety have been evaluated in one Phase II and one Phase III study in metastatic/advanced gastric cancer. In this review, we focus on the mechanism of action of apatinib, its pharmacokinetic profile and its clinical activity in the treatment of advanced/metastatic gastric cancer. Expert commentary: Unfortunately, as yet, there is no definitive biomarker data for apatinib in gastric cancer.

  19. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... of stomach cancer have decreased in the U.S. Dietary supplements It is not known if taking certain vitamins , minerals , and other dietary supplements helps lower the risk of stomach cancer. In ...

  20. IKKε and TBK1 expression in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Eun; Hong, Mineui; Cho, Junhun; Lee, Jeeyun; Kim, Kyoung-Mee

    2017-03-07

    Inhibitor of kappa B kinase epsilon (IKKε) and TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) are non-canonical IKKs. IKKε and TBK1 share the kinase domain and are similar in their ability to activate the nuclear factor-kappa B signaling pathway. IKKε and TBK1 are overexpressed through multiple mechanisms in various human cancers. However, the expression of IKKε and TBK1 in gastric cancer and their role in prognosis have not been studied.To investigate overexpression of the IKKε and TBK1 proteins in gastric cancer and their relationship with clinicopathologic factors, we performed immunohistochemical staining using a tissue microarray. Tissue microarray samples were obtained from 1,107 gastric cancer patients who underwent R0 gastrectomy with extensive lymph node dissection and adjuvant chemotherapy.We identified expression of IKKε in 150 (13.6%) and TBK1 in 38 (3.4%) gastric cancers. Furthermore, co-expression of IKKε and TBK1 was identified in 1.5% of cases. Co-expression of IKKε and TBK1 was associated with differentiated intestinal histology and earlier T stage. In a multivariate binary logistic regression model, intestinal histologic type by Lauren classification and early AJCC stage were significant predictors for expression of IKKε and TBK1 proteins in gastric cancer. Changes in IKKε and TBK1 expression may be involved in the development of intestinal-type gastric cancer. The overexpression of IKKε and TBK1 should be considered in selected patients with intestinal-type gastric cancer.In conclusion, this is the first large-scale study investigating the relationships between expression of IKKε and TBK1 and clinicopathologic features of gastric cancer. The role of IKKε and TBK1 in intestinal-type gastric cancer pathogenesis should be elucidated by further investigation.

  1. Using gastric juice lncRNA-ABHD11-AS1 as a novel type of biomarker in the screening of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yunben; Shao, Yongfu; Zhu, Mengying; Li, Qier; Yang, Fang; Lu, Xuwen; Xu, Chunjing; Xiao, Bingxiu; Sun, Yanke; Guo, Junming

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play vital roles in tumorigenesis. However, the diagnostic values of most lncRNAs are largely unknown. To investigate whether gastric juice lncRNA-ABHD11-AS1 can be a potential biomarker in the screening of gastric cancer, 173 tissue samples and 130 gastric juice from benign lesion, gastric dysplasia, gastric premalignant lesions, and gastric cancer were collected. ABHD11-AS1 levels were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Then, the relationships between ABHD11-AS1 levels and clinicopathological factors of patients with gastric cancer were investigated. The results showed that ABHD11-AS1 levels in gastric cancer tissues were significantly higher than those in other tissues. Its levels in gastric juice from gastric cancer patients were not only significantly higher than those from cases of normal mucosa or minimal gastritis, atrophic gastritis, and gastric ulcers but also associated with gender, tumor size, tumor stage, Lauren type, and blood carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels. More importantly, when using gastric juice ABHD11-AS1 as a marker, the positive detection rate of early gastric cancer patients was reached to 71.4 %. Thanks to the special origin of gastric juice, these results indicate that gastric juice ABHD11-AS1 may be a potential biomarker in the screening of gastric cancer.

  2. Roadmap to eliminate gastric cancer with Helicobacter pylori eradication and consecutive surveillance in Japan.

    PubMed

    Asaka, Masahiro; Kato, Mototsugu; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2014-01-01

    In Japan, the annual number of deaths from gastric cancer is approximately 50,000 and there has been no change over the last 50 years. So far, all efforts have been directed toward improving the detection of early gastric cancer by barium X-ray and endoscopy, since early cancer has a good prognosis, resulting in Japan having the best diagnostic capability for early gastric cancer worldwide. The 5-year survival rate of gastric cancer patients exceeds 60 % in Japan and is much higher than that in Europe and the US (20 %) because of this superior diagnosis of early gastric cancer. In February 2013, national health insurance coverage for Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy to treat H. pylori-associated chronic gastritis became available in Japan. H. pylori-associated gastritis leads to development of gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric polyps. Therefore, providing treatment for gastritis is likely to substantially decrease the prevalence of both gastric and duodenal ulcers and polyps. Because treatment for H. pylori-associated gastritis, which leads to atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer, is now covered by health insurance in Japan, a strategy to eliminate gastric cancer-related deaths by taking advantage of this innovation was planned. According to this strategy, patients with gastritis will be investigated for H. pylori infection and those who are positive will receive eradication therapy followed by periodic surveillance. If this strategy is implemented, deaths from gastric cancer in Japan will decrease dramatically after 10-20 years.

  3. Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for stomach (gastric) cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  4. Interleukin-10 -1082 promoter polymorphism and gastric cancer risk in a Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Hu, Wen; Zhuang, Wen; Wu, Xiaoting

    2011-01-01

    Studies investigating the association between interleukin-10 (IL-10) -1082 promoter polymorphism and gastric cancer risk report conflicting results. Our recent meta-analysis suggests that the IL-10 -1082 promoter polymorphism may be associated with gastric cancer among Asians. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between IL-10 -1082 promoter polymorphism and gastric cancer risk in Chinese Han patients. We extracted the peripheral blood samples in 150 patients with gastric cancer and 150 controls. PCR-RFLP analysis was performed to detect IL-10 -1082 promoter polymorphism in these patients. Patients with gastric cancer had a significantly lower frequency of AA (OR = 0.45, 95% CI = 0.27, 0.76; P = 0.003) than controls. Patients with cardia gastric cancer had a significantly higher frequency of GG (OR = 2.17, 95% CI = 1.08, 4.38; P = 0.03) than those with noncardia gastric cancer. Patients with advanced gastric cancer had a significantly higher frequency of AA (OR = 5.21, 95% CI = 1.71, 15.87; P = 0.004) than those with early gastric cancer. When stratified by the Lauren's classification, histological differentiation of gastric cancer, no statistically significant results were observed. This study suggests that the IL-10 -1082 promoter polymorphism may be associated with gastric cancer in Chinese Han patients, and that difference in genotype distribution may be associated with the location and stage of gastric cancer.

  5. Chilean Gastric Cancer Task Force

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Gareth I.; Pinto, Mauricio P.; Retamal, Ignacio N.; Fernádez, María F.; Cisternas, Betzabe; Mondaca, Sebastian; Sanchez, Cesar; Galindo, Hector; Nervi, Bruno; Ibañez, Carolina; Acevedo, Francisco; Madrid, Jorge; Peña, José; Bravo, Maria Loreto; Maturana, Maria Jose; Cordova-Delgado, Miguel; Romero, Diego; de la Jara, Nathaly; Torres, Javiera; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Maria; Espinoza, Manuel; Balmaceda, Carlos; Freire, Matías; Gárate-Calderón, Valentina; Crovari, Fernando; Jimenez-Fonseca, Paula; Carmona-Bayonas, Alberto; Zwenger, Ariel; Armisen, Ricardo; Corvalan, Alejandro H.; Garrido, Marcelo

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Gastric cancer (GC) is the world's second-leading cause of neoplastic mortality. Genetic alterations, response to treatments, and mortality rates are highly heterogeneous across different regions. Within Latin America, GC is the leading cause of cancer death in Chile, affecting 17.6 per 100,000 people and causing >3000 deaths/y. Clinical outcomes and response to “one size fits all” therapies are highly heterogeneous and thus a better stratification of patients may aid cancer treatment and response. The Gastric Cancer Task Force is a Chilean collaborative, noninterventional study that seeks to stratify gastric adenocarcinomas using clinical outcomes and genomic, epigenomic, and protein alterations in a cohort of 200 patients. Tumor samples from the Pathology Department and the Cancer Center at UC-Christus healthcare network, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile will be analyzed using a panel of 143 known cancer genes (Oncomine Comprehensive Assay) at the Center of Excellence in Precision Medicine in Santiago, Chile. In addition, promoter methylation for selected genes will be performed along with tissue microarray for clinically relevant proteins (e.g., PD-L1, Erb-2, VEGFR2, among others) and Helicobacter pylori and Epstein–Barr virus status. Obtained data will be correlated to 120 clinical parameters retrieve from medical records, including general patient information, cancer history, laboratory studies, comorbidity index, chemotherapy, targeted therapies, efficacy, and follow-up. The development of a clinically meaningful classification that encompasses comprehensive clinical and molecular parameters may improve patient treatment, predict clinical outcomes, aid patient selection/stratification for clinical trials and may offer insights into future preventive and/or therapeutic strategies in patients from Latin America region. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03158571, Registered on May 18, 2017. PMID:29668600

  6. Host pathogen interactions in Helicobacter pylori related gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chmiela, Magdalena; Karwowska, Zuzanna; Gonciarz, Weronika; Allushi, Bujana; Stączek, Paweł

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), discovered in 1982, is a microaerophilic, spiral-shaped gram-negative bacterium that is able to colonize the human stomach. Nearly half of the world's population is infected by this pathogen. Its ability to induce gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma has been confirmed. The susceptibility of an individual to these clinical outcomes is multifactorial and depends on H. pylori virulence, environmental factors, the genetic susceptibility of the host and the reactivity of the host immune system. Despite the host immune response, H. pylori infection can be difficult to eradicate. H. pylori is categorized as a group I carcinogen since this bacterium is responsible for the highest rate of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Early detection of cancer can be lifesaving. The 5-year survival rate for gastric cancer patients diagnosed in the early stages is nearly 90%. Gastric cancer is asymptomatic in the early stages but always progresses over time and begins to cause symptoms when untreated. In 97% of stomach cancer cases, cancer cells metastasize to other organs. H. pylori infection is responsible for nearly 60% of the intestinal-type gastric cancer cases but also influences the development of diffuse gastric cancer. The host genetic susceptibility depends on polymorphisms of genes involved in H. pylori-related inflammation and the cytokine response of gastric epithelial and immune cells. H. pylori strains differ in their ability to induce a deleterious inflammatory response. H. pylori-driven cytokines accelerate the inflammatory response and promote malignancy. Chronic H. pylori infection induces genetic instability in gastric epithelial cells and affects the DNA damage repair systems. Therefore, H. pylori infection should always be considered a pro-cancerous factor. PMID:28321154

  7. Host pathogen interactions in Helicobacter pylori related gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Chmiela, Magdalena; Karwowska, Zuzanna; Gonciarz, Weronika; Allushi, Bujana; Stączek, Paweł

    2017-03-07

    Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ), discovered in 1982, is a microaerophilic, spiral-shaped gram-negative bacterium that is able to colonize the human stomach. Nearly half of the world's population is infected by this pathogen. Its ability to induce gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma has been confirmed. The susceptibility of an individual to these clinical outcomes is multifactorial and depends on H. pylori virulence, environmental factors, the genetic susceptibility of the host and the reactivity of the host immune system. Despite the host immune response, H. pylori infection can be difficult to eradicate. H. pylori is categorized as a group I carcinogen since this bacterium is responsible for the highest rate of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Early detection of cancer can be lifesaving. The 5-year survival rate for gastric cancer patients diagnosed in the early stages is nearly 90%. Gastric cancer is asymptomatic in the early stages but always progresses over time and begins to cause symptoms when untreated. In 97% of stomach cancer cases, cancer cells metastasize to other organs. H. pylori infection is responsible for nearly 60% of the intestinal-type gastric cancer cases but also influences the development of diffuse gastric cancer. The host genetic susceptibility depends on polymorphisms of genes involved in H. pylori -related inflammation and the cytokine response of gastric epithelial and immune cells. H. pylori strains differ in their ability to induce a deleterious inflammatory response. H. pylori -driven cytokines accelerate the inflammatory response and promote malignancy. Chronic H. pylori infection induces genetic instability in gastric epithelial cells and affects the DNA damage repair systems. Therefore, H. pylori infection should always be considered a pro-cancerous factor.

  8. Helicobacter pylori Therapy for the Prevention of Metachronous Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Choi, Il Ju; Kook, Myeong-Cherl; Kim, Young-Il; Cho, Soo-Jeong; Lee, Jong Yeul; Kim, Chan Gyoo; Park, Boram; Nam, Byung-Ho

    2018-03-22

    Patients with early gastric cancers that are limited to gastric mucosa or submucosa usually have an advanced loss of mucosal glandular tissue (glandular atrophy) and are at high risk for subsequent (metachronous) development of new gastric cancer. The long-term effects of treatment to eradicate Helicobacter pylori on histologic improvement and the prevention of metachronous gastric cancer remain unclear. In this prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial, we assigned 470 patients who had undergone endoscopic resection of early gastric cancer or high-grade adenoma to receive either H. pylori eradication therapy with antibiotics or placebo. Two primary outcomes were the incidence of metachronous gastric cancer detected on endoscopy performed at the 1-year follow-up or later and improvement from baseline in the grade of glandular atrophy in the gastric corpus lesser curvature at the 3-year follow-up. A total of 396 patients were included in the modified intention-to-treat analysis population (194 in the treatment group and 202 in placebo group). During a median follow-up of 5.9 years, metachronous gastric cancer developed in 14 patients (7.2%) in the treatment group and in 27 patients (13.4%) in the placebo group (hazard ratio in the treatment group, 0.50; 95% confidence interval, 0.26 to 0.94; P=0.03). Among the 327 patients in the subgroup that underwent histologic analysis, improvement from baseline in the atrophy grade at the gastric corpus lesser curvature was observed in 48.4% of the patients in the treatment group and in 15.0% of those in the placebo group (P<0.001). There were no serious adverse events; mild adverse events were more common in the treatment group (42.0% vs. 10.2%, P<0.001). Patients with early gastric cancer who received H. pylori treatment had lower rates of metachronous gastric cancer and more improvement from baseline in the grade of gastric corpus atrophy than patients who received placebo. (Funded by the National

  9. History of Helicobacter pylori, duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Graham, David Y

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection underlies gastric ulcer disease, gastric cancer and duodenal ulcer disease. The disease expression reflects the pattern and extent of gastritis/gastric atrophy (i.e., duodenal ulcer with non-atrophic and gastric ulcer and gastric cancer with atrophic gastritis). Gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric cancer have been known for thousands of years. Ulcers are generally non-fatal and until the 20th century were difficult to diagnose. However, the presence and pattern of gastritis in past civilizations can be deduced based on the diseases present. It has been suggested that gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer both arose or became more frequent in Europe in the 19th century. Here, we show that gastric cancer and gastric ulcer were present throughout the 17th to 19th centuries consistent with atrophic gastritis being the predominant pattern, as it proved to be when it could be examined directly in the late 19th century. The environment before the 20th century favored acquisition of H. pylori infection and atrophic gastritis (e.g., poor sanitation and standards of living, seasonal diets poor in fresh fruits and vegetables, especially in winter, vitamin deficiencies, and frequent febrile infections in childhood). The latter part of the 19th century saw improvements in standards of living, sanitation, and diets with a corresponding decrease in rate of development of atrophic gastritis allowing duodenal ulcers to become more prominent. In the early 20th century physician’s believed they could diagnose ulcers clinically and that the diagnosis required hospitalization for “surgical disease” or for “Sippy” diets. We show that while H. pylori remained common and virulent in Europe and the United States, environmental changes resulted in changes of the pattern of gastritis producing a change in the manifestations of H. pylori infections and subsequently to a rapid decline in transmission and a rapid decline in all H. pylori

  10. History of Helicobacter pylori, duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Graham, David Y

    2014-05-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection underlies gastric ulcer disease, gastric cancer and duodenal ulcer disease. The disease expression reflects the pattern and extent of gastritis/gastric atrophy (i.e., duodenal ulcer with non-atrophic and gastric ulcer and gastric cancer with atrophic gastritis). Gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric cancer have been known for thousands of years. Ulcers are generally non-fatal and until the 20th century were difficult to diagnose. However, the presence and pattern of gastritis in past civilizations can be deduced based on the diseases present. It has been suggested that gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer both arose or became more frequent in Europe in the 19th century. Here, we show that gastric cancer and gastric ulcer were present throughout the 17th to 19th centuries consistent with atrophic gastritis being the predominant pattern, as it proved to be when it could be examined directly in the late 19th century. The environment before the 20th century favored acquisition of H. pylori infection and atrophic gastritis (e.g., poor sanitation and standards of living, seasonal diets poor in fresh fruits and vegetables, especially in winter, vitamin deficiencies, and frequent febrile infections in childhood). The latter part of the 19th century saw improvements in standards of living, sanitation, and diets with a corresponding decrease in rate of development of atrophic gastritis allowing duodenal ulcers to become more prominent. In the early 20th century physician's believed they could diagnose ulcers clinically and that the diagnosis required hospitalization for "surgical disease" or for "Sippy" diets. We show that while H. pylori remained common and virulent in Europe and the United States, environmental changes resulted in changes of the pattern of gastritis producing a change in the manifestations of H. pylori infections and subsequently to a rapid decline in transmission and a rapid decline in all H. pylori-related diseases.

  11. Robot-assisted laparoscopic gastrectomy for gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Stefano; Franceschini, Franco; Patriti, Alberto; Roviello, Franco; Annecchiarico, Mario; Ceccarelli, Graziano; Coratti, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Phase III evidence in the shape of a series of randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses has shown that laparoscopic gastrectomy is safe and gives better short-term results with respect to the traditional open technique for early-stage gastric cancer. In fact, in the East laparoscopic gastrectomy has become routine for early-stage gastric cancer. In contrast, the treatment of advanced gastric cancer through a minimally invasive way is still a debated issue, mostly due to worries about its oncological efficacy and the difficulty of carrying out an extended lymphadenectomy and intestinal reconstruction after total gastrectomy laparoscopically. Over the last ten years the introduction of robotic surgery has implied overcoming some intrinsic drawbacks found to be present in the conventional laparoscopic procedure. Robot-assisted gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy has been shown to be safe and feasible for the treatment of gastric cancer patients. But unfortunately, most available studies investigating the robotic gastrectomy for gastric cancer compared to laparoscopic and open technique are so far retrospective and there have not been phase III trials. In the present review we looked at scientific evidence available today regarding the new high-tech surgical robotic approach, and we attempted to bring to light the real advantages of robot-assisted gastrectomy compared to the traditional laparoscopic and open technique for the treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:28101302

  12. Early detection of gastric cancer using global, genome-wide and IRF4, ELMO1, CLIP4 and MSC DNA methylation in endoscopic biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Torres, Sebastian; Friess, Leah; Michailidi, Christina; Cok, Jaime; Combe, Juan; Vargas, Gloria; Prado, William; Soudry, Ethan; Pérez, Jimena; Yudin, Tikki; Mancinelli, Andrea; Unger, Helen; Ili-Gangas, Carmen; Brebi-Mieville, Priscilla; Berg, Douglas E.; Hayashi, Masamichi; Sidransky, David; Gilman, Robert H.; Guerrero-Preston, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    Clinically useful molecular tools to triage gastric cancer patients are not currently available. We aimed to develop a molecular tool to predict gastric cancer risk in endoscopy-driven biopsies obtained from high-risk gastric cancer clinics in low resource settings. We discovered and validated a DNA methylation biomarker panel in endoscopic samples obtained from 362 patients seen between 2004 and 2009 in three high-risk gastric cancer clinics in Lima, Perú, and validated it in 306 samples from the Cancer Genome Atlas project (“TCGA”). Global, epigenome wide and gene-specific DNA methylation analyses were used in a Phase I Biomarker Development Trial to identify a continuous biomarker panel that combines a Global DNA Methylation Index (GDMI) and promoter DNA methylation levels of IRF4, ELMO1, CLIP4 and MSC. We observed an inverse association between the GDMI and histological progression to gastric cancer, when comparing gastritis patients without metaplasia (mean = 5.74, 95% CI, 4.97−6.50), gastritis patients with metaplasia (mean = 4.81, 95% CI, 3.77−5.84), and gastric cancer cases (mean = 3.38, 95% CI, 2.82−3.94), respectively (p < 0.0001). Promoter methylation of IRF4 (p < 0.0001), ELMO1 (p < 0.0001), CLIP4 (p < 0.0001), and MSC (p < 0.0001), is also associated with increasing severity from gastritis with no metaplasia to gastritis with metaplasia and gastric cancer. Our findings suggest that IRF4, ELMO1, CLIP4 and MSC promoter methylation coupled with a GDMI>4 are useful molecular tools for gastric cancer risk stratification in endoscopic biopsies. PMID:28418867

  13. [Clinical trials of laparoscopic gastric cancer surgery in South Korea: review and prospect].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chunchao; Zhao, Gang; Cao, Hui

    2018-02-25

    Laparoscopic technology is gradually accepted in gastric cancer surgery, whose efficacy has been demonstrated by some clinical researches. Randomized controlled trials (RCT) are considered as the most important evidence to prove clinical outcomes of laparoscopic surgery for gastric cancer. Korean gastric surgeons have made great contributions to RCT in laparoscopic gastric cancer surgery. KLASS (Korean Laparoscopic Gastrointestinal Surgery Study Group) is one of the most important forerunner and global leader of clinical trials of gastric cancer treatment. KLASS series clinical trials are attracting global attention because of the significant value of surgical treatment for gastric cancer. The RCTs in Korea involve in many aspects of laparoscopic gastrectomy for gastric cancer, including laparoscopy application in early gastric cancer (KLASS-01, KLASS-03 and KLASS-07), advanced gastric cancer (KLASS-02 and KLASS-06), function-preserving gastrectomy (KLASS-04,KLASS-05) and sentinel node navigation surgery (SENORITA trial). In order to share some informations of these RCTs, we review and prospect some important clinical trials of laparoscopic gastric cancer surgery in Korea. With the experience of Korean gastric surgeons, we can make more progress in our own clinical trials of laparoscopic gastric cancer surgery.

  14. Helicobacter pylori Diversity and Gastric Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gastric cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Helicobacter pylori infection is the strongest known risk factor for this malignancy. An important goal is to identify H. pylori-infected persons at high risk for gastric cancer, so that these individuals can be targeted for therapeutic intervention. H. pylori exhibits a high level of intraspecies genetic diversity, and over the past two decades, many studies have endeavored to identify strain-specific features of H. pylori that are linked to development of gastric cancer. One of the most prominent differences among H. pylori strains is the presence or absence of a 40-kb chromosomal region known as the cag pathogenicity island (PAI). Current evidence suggests that the risk of gastric cancer is very low among persons harboring H. pylori strains that lack the cag PAI. Among persons harboring strains that contain the cag PAI, the risk of gastric cancer is shaped by a complex interplay among multiple strain-specific bacterial factors as well as host factors. This review discusses the strain-specific properties of H. pylori that correlate with increased gastric cancer risk, focusing in particular on secreted proteins and surface-exposed proteins, and describes evidence from cell culture and animal models linking these factors to gastric cancer pathogenesis. Strain-specific features of H. pylori that may account for geographic variation in gastric cancer incidence are also discussed. PMID:26814181

  15. The role of leptin in gastric cancer: Clinicopathologic features and molecular mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kang Nyeong; Choi, Ho Soon, E-mail: hschoi96@hanyang.ac.kr; Yang, Sun Young

    Highlights: • Leptin and Ob-R are expressed in gastric adenoma and early and advanced cancer. • Leptin is more likely associated with differentiated gastric cancer or cardia cancer. • Leptin proliferates gastric cancer cells via activating the STAT3 and ERK1/2 pathways. - Abstract: Obesity is associated with certain types of cancer, including gastric cancer. However, it is still unclear whether obesity-related cytokine, leptin, is implicated in gastric cancer. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the role of leptin in gastric cancer. The expression of leptin and its receptor, Ob-R, was assessed by immunohistochemical staining and was compared in patients with gastricmore » adenoma (n = 38), early gastric cancer (EGC) (n = 38), and advanced gastric cancer (AGC) (n = 38), as a function of their clinicopathological characteristics. Gastric cancer cell lines were studied to investigate the effects of leptin on the signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) and extracellular receptor kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling pathways using MTT assays, immunoblotting, and inhibition studies. Leptin was expressed in gastric adenomas (42.1%), EGCs (47.4%), and AGCs (43.4%). Ob-R expression tended to increase from gastric adenoma (2%), through EGC (8%), to AGC (18%). Leptin induced the proliferation of gastric cancer cells by activating STAT3 and ERK1/2 and up-regulating the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Blocking Ob-R with pharmacological inhibitors and by RNAi decreased both the leptin-induced activation of STAT3 and ERK1/2 and the leptin-induced expression of VEGF. Leptin plays a role in gastric cancer by stimulating the proliferation of gastric cancer cells via activating the STAT3 and ERK1/2 pathways.« less

  16. [Interleukin-10-1082 promoter polymorphism and the risk of gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Yin, Yi-qiong; Liu, Chun-juan; Zhang, Ming-ming; Zhou, Yong

    2012-05-01

    To investigate the association between Interleukin-10 (IL-10) promoter polymorphism and the gastric cancer risk in Chinese Han patients. DNA was extracted from blood samples of gastric cancer patients (n = 75) and controls (n = 75). IL-10 -1082 promoter polymorphism in both patient and control group (three genotypes distribution: AA, AG and GG) was identified by PCR-RFLP and its relationship with gastric cancer risk, clinic and pathologic features was also analyzed. Patients with gastric cancer had a significantly lower frequency of AA (OR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.20, 0.92; P = 0.03) than controls. Patients with proximal gastric cancer had a significantly higher frequency of GG (OR = 3.06, 95% CI = 1.12, 8.36; P = 0.03) than those with distant gastric cancer. Patients with advanced (stage II/IV) gastric cancer had a significantly higher frequency of AA (OR = 5.09, 95% CI = 1.05, 24.70; P = 0.04) than those with early (stage I /IV) gastric cancer. When stratified by the Lauren's classification, histological differentiation of gastric cancer, no statistically significant results was observed. This study suggests that the IL-1 1082 promoter polymorphism may be associated with gastric cancer in Chinese Han patients, and the difference in genotype distribution may be associated with the location and stage of gastric cancer.

  17. AMPKα Modulation in Cancer Progression: Multilayer Integrative Analysis of the Whole Transcriptome in Asian Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jae Yong; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Kim, Hoguen; Li, Min; Downey, Thomas J.; Dyer, Matthew D.; Sun, Yongming; Sun, Jingtao; Beasley, Ellen M.; Chung, Hyun Cheol; Noh, Sung Hoon; Weinstein, John N.; Liu, Chang-Gong; Powis, Garth

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the most common cancer in Asia and most developing countries. Despite the use of multimodality therapeutics, it remains the second leading cause of cancer death in the world. To identify the molecular underpinnings of gastric cancer in the Asian population, we applied an RNA-sequencing approach to gastric tumor and noncancerous specimens, generating 680 million informative short reads to quantitatively characterize the entire transcriptome of gastric cancer (including mRNAs and microRNAs). A multi-layer analysis was then developed to identify multiple types of transcriptional aberrations associated with different stages of gastric cancer, including differentially expressed mRNAs, recurrent somatic mutations and key differentially expressed microRNAs. Through this approach, we identified the central metabolic regulator AMPK-α as a potential functional target in Asian gastric cancer. Further, we experimentally demonstrated the translational relevance of this gene as a potential therapeutic target for early-stage gastric cancer in Asian patients. Together, our findings not only provide a valuable information resource for identifying and elucidating the molecular mechanisms of Asian gastric cancer, but also represent a general integrative framework to develop more effective therapeutic targets. PMID:22434430

  18. How to stomach an epigenetic insult: the gastric cancer epigenome.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Nisha; Ushijima, Toshikazu; Tan, Patrick

    2017-08-01

    Gastric cancer is a deadly malignancy afflicting close to a million people worldwide. Patient survival is poor and largely due to late diagnosis and suboptimal therapies. Disease heterogeneity is a substantial obstacle, underscoring the need for precision treatment strategies. Studies have identified different subgroups of gastric cancer displaying not just genetic, but also distinct epigenetic hallmarks. Accumulating evidence suggests that epigenetic abnormalities in gastric cancer are not mere bystander events, but rather promote carcinogenesis through active mechanisms. Epigenetic aberrations, induced by pathogens such as Helicobacter pylori, are an early component of gastric carcinogenesis, probably preceding genetic abnormalities. This Review summarizes our current understanding of the gastric cancer epigenome, highlighting key advances in recent years in both tumours and pre-malignant lesions, made possible through targeted and genome-wide technologies. We focus on studies related to DNA methylation and histone modifications, linking these findings to potential therapeutic opportunities. Lessons learned from the gastric cancer epigenome might also prove relevant for other gastrointestinal cancers.

  19. Downregulation of STARD8 in gastric cancer and its involvement in gastric cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jinguo; Chen, Jing; Zhi, Yu; Li, Zhenhua; Dai, Dongqiu

    2018-01-01

    Objective Rho-GTPases play a pivotal role in a wide variety of signal transduction pathways and are associated with a great number of human carcinomas. STARD8, which is a Rho-GTPase-activating protein, has been proposed as a tumor suppressor gene, but its role in gastric cancer remains elusive. In this study, we investigate the expression of STARD8 in gastric cancer and its association with gastric cancer progression. Materials and methods One normal gastric mucosa cell line for example GES1 and six human gastric cancer cell lines such as AGS, MGC803, MKN45, SGC7901, HGC27 and BGC823 were utilized to analyze STARD8 mRNA and protein levels by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot. A total of 70 paired gastric tissues including corresponding nonmalignant gastric tissues and cancer tissues were utilized to analyze the protein expression of STARD8 using immunohistochemistry, and the correlation between STARD8 level and clinicopathological features was also evaluated. Results STARD8 was found to be downregulated in primary gastric cancer cells and tissues compared with the normal gastric mucosa cell line, GES1, and corresponding nonmalignant gastric tissues, while its decreased expression was significantly associated with TNM stage, lymph node metastasis and differentiation (p<0.05). Conclusion There is significantly decreased expression of STARD8 in gastric cancer cells and tissues, and its expression may contribute to gastric tumorigenesis. PMID:29849465

  20. Hypermethylation of the TSLC1 Gene Promoter in Primary Gastric Cancers and Gastric Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Teiichiro; Waki, Takayoshi; Jin, Zhe; Sato, Kiyoshi; Motoyama, Teiichi; Kawata, Sumio; Kimura, Wataru; Nishizuka, Satoshi; Murakami, Yoshinori

    2002-01-01

    The TSLC1 (tumor suppressor in lung cancer–1) gene is a novel tumor suppressor gene on chromosomal region 11q23.2, and is frequently inactivated by concordant promoter hypermethylation and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in non‐small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Because LOH on 11q has also been observed frequently in other human neoplasms including gastric cancer, we investigated the promoter methylation status of TSLC1 in 10 gastric cancer cell lines and 97 primary gastric cancers, as well as the corresponding non‐cancerous gastric tissues, by bisulfite‐SSCP analysis followed by direct sequencing. Allelic status of the TSLC1 gene was also investigated in these cell lines and primary gastric cancers. The TSLC1 promoter was methylated in two gastric cancer cell lines, KATO‐III and ECC10, and in 15 out of 97 (16%) primary gastric cancers. It was not methylated in non‐cancerous gastric tissues, suggesting that this hypermethylation is a cancer‐specific alteration. KATO‐III and ECC10 cells retained two alleles of TSLC1, both of which showed hypermethylation, associated with complete loss of gene expression. Most of the primary gastric cancers with promoter methylation also retained heterozygosity at the TSLC1 locus on 11q23.2. These data indicate that bi‐allelic hypermethylation of the TSLC1 promoter and resulting gene silencing occur in a subset of primary gastric cancers. PMID:12716461

  1. Effect of early oral feeding on length of hospital stay following gastrectomy for gastric cancer: a Japanese multicenter, randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Nobuyuki; Oki, Eiji; Tanizawa, Yutaka; Suzuki, Yutaka; Aikou, Susumu; Kunisaki, Chikara; Tsuchiya, Takashi; Fukushima, Ryoji; Doki, Yuichiro; Natsugoe, Shoji; Nishida, Yasunori; Morita, Masaru; Hirabayashi, Naoki; Hatao, Fumihiko; Takahashi, Ikuo; Choda, Yasuhiro; Iwasaki, Yoshiaki; Seto, Yasuyuki

    2018-05-02

    This multicenter, randomized controlled study evaluates the safety of early oral feeding following gastrectomy, and its effect on the length of postoperative hospital stay. The subjects of this study were patients who underwent distal gastrectomy (DG) or total gastrectomy (TG) for gastric cancer between January 2014 and December 2015. Patients were randomly assigned to the early oral feeding group (intervention group) or the conventional postoperative management group (control group) for each procedure. We evaluated the length of postoperative hospital stay and the incidence of postoperative complications in each group. No significant differences in length of postoperative stay were found between the intervention and control groups of the patients who underwent DG. The incidence of postoperative complications was significantly greater in the DG intervention group. In contrast, the length of postoperative stay was significantly shorter in the TG intervention group, although the TG group did not attain the established target sample size. Early oral feeding did not shorten the postoperative hospital stay after DG. The higher incidence of postoperative complications precluded the unselected adoption of early oral feeding for DG patients. Further confirmative studies are required to definitively establish the potential benefits of early oral feeding for TG patients.

  2. Early enteral nutrition and total parenteral nutrition on the nutritional status and blood glucose in patients with gastric cancer complicated with diabetes mellitus after radical gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junli; Zhao, Jiamin; Zhang, Yanling; Liu, Chong

    2018-07-01

    Effects of early enteral nutrition (EEN) or total parenteral nutrition (TPN) support on nutritional status and blood glucose in patients with gastric cancer complicated with diabetes mellitus after radical gastrectomy were investigated. One hundred and twenty-nine patients with gastric cancer complicated with diabetes mellitus type 2 admitted to the First People's Hospital of Jinan (Jinan, China), from June 2012 to June 2016 were selected into the study. According to different nutrition support pathways, these patients were randomly divided into the EEN group and the TPN group. The improvement of nutritional indexes, postoperative complications, gastrointestinal function recovery and perioperative blood glucose fluctuation were compared between the two groups. On the 4th day after operation, the improvement levels of total bilirubin (TBL), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), total protein (TP), prealbumin (PAB), hemoglobin (HGB) and weight (Wt) in the EEN group were significantly higher than those in the conventional group (P<0.05). There were no significant differences between the two groups on the 8th day after operation (P>0.05). No patients had complications in the EEN group, while a total of 29 patients in the TPN group suffered adverse reactions, indicating that the incidence rate of complications in the EEN group was significantly lower than that in the TPN group (P<0.05). The postoperative evacuation time was earlier, hospitalization time was shorter and cost of postoperative hospitalization was less in the EEN group than those in the TPN group, and the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). The blood glucose fluctuation values at fasting and 2 h after a meal in the TPN group were higher than those in the EEN group within 8 days after operation, and the differences were statistically significant (χ 2 =13.219, P=0.002; χ 2 =20.527, P<0.001). EEN support provides nutrition for patients with gastric cancer complicated

  3. Advances in molecular biomarkers for gastric cancer: miRNAs as emerging novel cancer markers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hua-Hsi; Lin, Wen-chang; Tsai, Kuo-Wang

    2014-01-23

    Carcinoma of the stomach is one of the most prevalent cancer types in the world. Although the incidence of gastric cancer is declining, the outcomes of gastric cancer patients remain dismal because of the lack of effective biomarkers to detect early gastric cancer. Modern biomedical research has explored many potential gastric cancer biomarker genes by utilising serum protein antigens, oncogenic genes or gene families through improving molecular biological technologies, such as microarray, RNA-Seq and the like. Recently, the small noncoding microRNAs (miRNAs) have been suggested to be critical regulators in the oncogenesis pathways and to serve as useful clinical biomarkers. This new class of biomarkers is emerging as a novel molecule for cancer diagnosis and prognosis, including gastric cancer. By translational suppression of target genes, miRNAs play a significant role in the gastric cancer cell physiology and tumour progression. There are potential implications of previously discovered gastric cancer molecular biomarkers and their expression modulations by respective miRNAs. Therefore, many miRNAs are found to play oncogenic roles or tumour-suppressing functions in human cancers. With the surprising stability of miRNAs in tissues, serum or other body fluids, miRNAs have emerged as a new type of cancer biomarker with immeasurable clinical potential.

  4. Totally Laparoscopic Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Theodorous, Arianne N.; Train, William W.; Goldfarb, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Recent studies have supported minimally invasive techniques as a viable alternative to open surgery in the treatment of gastric cancer. The goal of this study is to review our institution's experience with totally laparoscopic gastrectomy for the treatment of both early- and advanced-stage gastric cancer. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted to examine the short-term outcomes of laparoscopic gastrectomy performed at Monmouth Medical Center between May 2003 and June 2012. We reviewed postoperative complications, surgical margins, number of resected lymph nodes, estimated blood loss, length of stay, narcotic use, and recurrence rate. Results: Forty patients were included in the study. There were 21 cases of adenocarcinoma, 15 cases of gastrointestinal stromal tumor, 2 cases of carcinoid, 1 case of small cell neuroendocrine tumor, and 1 case of squamous cell carcinoma. The mean operative time was 220 minutes (range, 67–450 minutes). The median length of stay was 6 days (range, 1–37 days). The mean number of harvested lymph nodes was 11. Early postoperative complications occurred in 7 patients and included anastomotic stricture, wound infection, intra-abdominal abscess, bowel obstruction, and esophageal pneumatosis. There were two deaths. The Kaplan-Meier 5-year overall and recurrence-free survival rate for all cases of adenocarcinoma was 63.2%. Conclusions: Totally laparoscopic gastrectomy is a reasonable option for the treatment of gastric malignancy, with early data showing acceptable survival rates and perioperative outcomes. Large-scale randomized trials are still needed to confirm oncologic equivalency to open gastrectomy in patients with advanced disease. PMID:24398204

  5. Nutritional Recovery after Open and Laparoscopic Distal Gastrectomy for Early Gastric Cancer: A Prospective Multicenter Comparative Trial (CCOG1204).

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Hidenobu; Tanaka, Chie; Murotani, Kenta; Misawa, Kazunari; Ito, Seiji; Ito, Yuichi; Kanda, Mitsuro; Mochizuki, Yoshinari; Ishigure, Kiyoshi; Yaguchi, Toyohisa; Teramoto, Jin; Nakayama, Hiroshi; Kawase, Yoshihisa; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Kodera, Yasuhiro

    2018-01-01

    Little information from prospective clinical trials is available on the influences of surgical approaches on postoperative body compositions and nutritional status. We designed a prospective non-randomized trial to compare postoperative chronological changes in body composition and nutritional status between laparoscopic and open distal gastrectomy for stage I gastric cancer (GC). Body compositions and nutritional indicators in blood tests were measured at the baseline and at the 1st, 3rd, 6th, and 12th postoperative months (POM). The primary end point was the decrease relative to the baseline in the body muscle mass at POM 6. Ninety-six patients for the laparoscopic group and 52 for the open group were eligible for data analysis. No significant differences were found in any baseline demographics, body compositions, and nutritional indicators between the groups. The changes of body muscle mass at POM 6 were similar in both groups. Overall, no significant differences between the groups were observed in any of the body composition and nutritional indicators during the first year after surgery. Postoperative body compositions and nutritional status were not affected by surgical approaches during the first 12 months after surgery in patients who underwent distal gastrectomy for stage I GC. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Robot-Assisted Versus Laparoscopy-Assisted Proximal Gastrectomy for Early Gastric Cancer in the Upper Location: Comparison of Oncological Outcomes, Surgical Stress, and Nutritional Status.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kecheng; Huang, Xiaohui; Gao, Yunhe; Liang, Wenquan; Xi, Hongqing; Cui, Jianxin; Li, Jiyang; Zhu, Minghua; Liu, Guoxiao; Zhao, Huazhou; Hu, Chong; Liu, Yi; Qiao, Zhi; Wei, Bo; Chen, Lin

    2018-01-01

    An increasing amount of attention has been paid to minimally invasive function-preserving gastrectomy, with an increase in incidence of early gastric cancer in the upper stomach. This study aimed to compare oncological outcomes, surgical stress, and nutritional status between robot-assisted proximal gastrectomy (RAPG) and laparoscopy-assisted proximal gastrectomy (LAPG). Eighty-nine patients were enrolled in this retrospective study between November 2011 and December 2013. Among them, 27 patients underwent RAPG and 62 underwent LAPG. Perioperative parameters, surgical stress, nutritional status, disease-free survival, and overall survival were compared between the 2 groups. Sex, age, and comorbidity were similar in the RAPG and LAPG groups. There were also similar perioperative outcomes regarding operation time, complications, and length of hospital stay between the groups. The reflux esophagitis rates following RAPG and LAPG were 18.5% and 14.5%, respectively ( P = .842). However, patients in the RAPG group had less blood loss ( P = .024), more harvested lymph nodes ( P = .021), and higher costs than those in the LAPG group ( P < .001). With regard to surgical stress, no significant differences were observed in C-reactive protein concentrations and white blood cell count on postoperative days 1, 3, and 7 between the groups ( Ps > .05). There appeared to be higher hemoglobin levels at 6 months ( P = .053) and a higher body mass index at 12 months ( P = .056) postoperatively in patients in the RAPG group compared with those in the LAPG group, but this difference was not significant. Similar disease-free survival and overall survival rates were observed between the groups. RAPG could be an alternative to LAPG for patients with early gastric cancer in the upper stomach with comparable oncological safety and nutritional status. Further well-designed, prospective, large-scale studies are needed to validate these results.

  7. Intracorporeal reconstruction after laparoscopic pylorus-preserving gastrectomy for middle-third early gastric cancer: a hybrid technique using linear stapler and manual suturing.

    PubMed

    Koeda, Keisuke; Chiba, Takehiro; Noda, Hironobu; Nishinari, Yutaka; Segawa, Takenori; Akiyama, Yuji; Iwaya, Takeshi; Nishizuka, Satoshi; Nitta, Hiroyuki; Otsuka, Koki; Sasaki, Akira

    2016-05-01

    Laparoscopy-assisted pylorus-preserving gastrectomy has been increasingly reported as a treatment for early gastric cancer located in the middle third of the stomach because of its low invasiveness and preservation of pyloric function. Advantages of a totally laparoscopic approach to distal gastrectomy, including small wound size, minimal invasiveness, and safe anastomosis, have been recently reported. Here, we introduce a new procedure for intracorporeal gastro-gastrostomy combined with totally laparoscopic pylorus-preserving gastrectomy (TLPPG). The stomach is transected after sufficient lymphadenectomy with preservation of infrapyloric vessels and vagal nerves. The proximal stomach is first transected near the Demel line, and the distal side is transected 4 to 5 cm from the pyloric ring. To create end-to-end gastro-gastrostomy, the posterior wall of the anastomosis is stapled with a linear stapler and the anterior wall is made by manual suturing intracorporeally. We retrospectively assessed the postoperative surgical outcomes via medical records. The primary endpoint in the present study is safety. Sixteen patients underwent TLPPG with intracorporeal reconstruction. All procedures were successfully performed without any intraoperative complications. The mean operative time was 275 min, with mean blood loss of 21 g. With the exception of one patient who had gastric stasis, 15 patients were discharged uneventfully between postoperative days 8 and 11. Our novel hybrid technique for totally intracorporeal end-to-end anastomosis was performed safely without mini-laparotomy. This technique requires prospective validation.

  8. Gastric cancer stem cells: A novel therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shree Ram

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains one of the leading causes of global cancer mortality. Multipotent gastric stem cells have been identified in both mouse and human stomachs, and they play an essential role in the self-renewal and homeostasis of gastric mucosa. There are several environmental and genetic factors known to promote gastric cancer. In recent years, numerous in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that gastric cancer may originate from normal stem cells or bone marrow–derived mesenchymal cells, and that gastric tumors contain cancer stem cells. Cancer stem cells are believed to share a common microenvironment with normal niche, which play an important role in gastric cancer and tumor growth. This mini-review presents a brief overview of the recent developments in gastric cancer stem cell research. The knowledge gained by studying cancer stem cells in gastric mucosa will support the development of novel therapeutic strategies for gastric cancer. PMID:23583679

  9. Does remnant gastric cancer really differ from primary gastric cancer? A systematic review of the literature by the Task Force of Japanese Gastric Cancer Association.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Hideaki; Fukagawa, Takeo; Haga, Yoshio; Oba, Koji

    2016-04-01

    Remnant gastric cancer, most frequently defined as cancer detected in the remnant stomach after distal gastrectomy for benign disease and those cases after surgery of gastric cancer at least 5 years after the primary surgery, is often reported as a tumor with poor prognosis. The Task Force of Japanese Gastric Cancer Association for Research Promotion evaluated the clinical impact of remnant gastric cancer by systematically reviewing publications focusing on molecular carcinogenesis, lymph node status, patient survival, and surgical complications. A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed/MEDLINE with the keywords "remnant," "stomach," and "cancer," revealing 1154 relevant reports published up to the end of December 2014. The mean interval between the initial surgery and the diagnosis of remnant gastric cancer ranged from 10 to 30 years. The incidence of lymph node metastases at the splenic hilum for remnant gastric cancer is not significantly higher than that for primary proximal gastric cancer. Lymph node involvement in the jejunal mesentery is a phenomenon peculiar to remnant gastric cancer after Billroth II reconstruction. Prognosis and postoperative morbidity and mortality rates seem to be comparable to those for primary proximal gastric cancer. The crude 5-year mortality for remnant gastric cancer was 1.08 times higher than that for primary proximal gastric cancer, but this difference was not statistically significant. In conclusion, although no prospective cohort study has yet evaluated the clinical significance of remnant gastric cancer, our literature review suggests that remnant gastric cancer does not adversely affect patient prognosis and postoperative course.

  10. Gastric Cancer: Descriptive Epidemiology, Risk Factors, Screening, and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Parisa; Islami, Farhad; Anandasabapathy, Sharmila; Freedman, Neal D.; Kamangar, Farin

    2014-01-01

    Less than a century ago, gastric cancer (GC) was the most common cancer in the United States and perhaps throughout the world. Despite its worldwide decline in incidence over the past century, GC remains a major killer across the globe. This article reviews the epidemiology, screening, and prevention of gastric cancer. We first discuss the descriptive epidemiology of GC, including its incidence, survival, and mortality, including trends over time. Next, we characterize the risk factors for gastric cancer, both environmental and genetic. Serological markers and histological precursor lesions of GC and early detection of GC of using these markers is reviewed. Finally, we discuss prevention strategies and provide suggestions for further research. PMID:24618998

  11. Is the eCura system useful for selecting patients who require radical surgery after noncurative endoscopic submucosal dissection for early gastric cancer? A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Hatta, Waku; Gotoda, Takuji; Oyama, Tsuneo; Kawata, Noboru; Takahashi, Akiko; Yoshifuku, Yoshikazu; Hoteya, Shu; Nakagawa, Masahiro; Hirano, Masaaki; Esaki, Mitsuru; Matsuda, Mitsuru; Ohnita, Ken; Yamanouchi, Kohei; Yoshida, Motoyuki; Dohi, Osamu; Takada, Jun; Tanaka, Keiko; Yamada, Shinya; Tsuji, Tsuyotoshi; Ito, Hirotaka; Hayashi, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Nakaya, Naoki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2018-05-01

    We have established a risk-scoring system, termed the "eCura system," for the risk stratification of lymph node metastasis in patients who have received noncurative endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for early gastric cancer (EGC). We aimed to clarify whether this system contributes to the selection of patients requiring radical surgery after ESD. Between 2000 and 2011, 1,969 patients with noncurative ESD for EGC were included in this multicenter study. Depending on the treatment strategy after ESD, we had patients with no additional treatment (n = 905) and those with radical surgery after ESD (n = 1,064). After the application of the eCura system to these patients, cancer recurrence and cancer-specific mortality in each risk category of the system were compared between the two patient groups. Multivariate Cox analysis revealed that in the high-risk category, cancer recurrence was significantly higher (hazard ratio = 3.13, p = 0.024) and cancer-specific mortality tended to be higher (hazard ratio = 2.66, p = 0.063) in patients with no additional treatment than in those with radical surgery after ESD, whereas no significant differences were observed in the intermediate-risk and low-risk categories. In addition, cancer-specific survival in the low-risk category was high in both patient groups (99.6 and 99.7%). A limitation of this study is that it included a small number of cases with undifferentiated-type EGC (292 cases). The eCura system is a useful aid for selecting the appropriate treatment strategy after noncurative ESD for EGC. However, caution is needed when applying this system to patients with undifferentiated-type EGC.

  12. Updates on esophageal and gastric cancers.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Amy; Cha, Charles

    2006-05-28

    Esophageal and gastric cancers are both common and deadly. Patients present most often after disease progression and survival is therefore poor. Due to demographic variability and recent changes in disease incidence, much emphasis has been placed on studying risk factors for both esophageal and gastric cancers. However, with increasing understanding of these diseases, low survival rates persist and continued intensive studies are necessary to optimize treatment plans. This review article discusses updates in the evolving epidemiology, clinical presentation, risk factors, and diagnostic and treatment modalities of esophageal and gastric cancers.

  13. Gastric cancer-derived MSC-secreted PDGF-DD promotes gastric cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Huang, Feng; Wang, Mei; Yang, Tingting; Cai, Jie; Zhang, Qiang; Sun, Zixuan; Wu, Xiaodan; Zhang, Xu; Zhu, Wei; Qian, Hui; Xu, Wenrong

    2014-11-01

    This study was designed to investigate the role of PDGF-DD secreted by gastric cancer-derived mesenchymal stem cells (GC-MSCs) in human gastric cancer progression. Gastric cancer cells were indirectly co-cultured with GC-MSCs in a transwell system. The growth and migration of gastric cancer cells were evaluated by cell colony formation assay and transwell migration assay, respectively. The production of PDGF-DD in GC-MSCs was determined by using Luminex and ELISA. Neutralization of PDGFR-β by su16f and siRNA interference of PDGF-DD in GC-MSCs was used to demonstrate the role of PDGF-DD produced by GC-MSCs in gastric cancer progression. GC-MSC conditioned medium promoted gastric cancer cell proliferation and migration in vitro and in vivo. Co-culture with GC-MSCs increased the phosphorylation of PDGFR-β in SGC-7901 cells. Neutralization of PDGFR-β by su16f blocked the promoting role of GC-MSC conditioned medium in gastric cancer cell proliferation and migration. Recombinant PDGF-DD duplicated the effects of GC-MSC conditioned medium on gastric cancer cells. Knockdown of PDGF-DD in GC-MSCs abolished its effects on gastric cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. PDGF-DD secreted by GC-MSCs is capable of promoting gastric cancer cell progression in vitro and in vivo. Targeting the PDGF-DD/PDGFR-β interaction between MSCs and gastric cancer cells may represent a novel strategy for gastric cancer therapy.

  14. Apatinib for the treatment of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Geng, Ruixuan; Li, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Antiangiogenesis therapy plays an important role in cancer treatment. Apatinib mesylate, a small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, has been recommended as third-line treatment for metastatic gastric cancer patients. The current review summarizes the publications and conference reports relating to apatinib from preclinical and clinical research in gastric cancer. Apatinib showed good safety, tolerance and treatment efficacy in Phase I/II studies. In a Phase III study, apatinib prolonged the median overall survival of patients with chemotherapy-refractory metastatic gastric cancer by 55 days and the median progression-free survival by 25 days compared with placebo. Apatinib is a new treatment option for advanced gastric cancer. Apatinib is expected to have a broader application when it has been evaluated worldwide. The key issues are to find biomarkers and overcome drug resistance.

  15. Quantitative assessment model for gastric cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kun; Yu, Wei-Ping; Song, Liang; Zhu, Yi-Min

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To set up a mathematic model for gastric cancer screening and to evaluate its function in mass screening for gastric cancer. METHODS: A case control study was carried on in 66 patients and 198 normal people, then the risk and protective factors of gastric cancer were determined, including heavy manual work, foods such as small yellow-fin tuna, dried small shrimps, squills, crabs, mothers suffering from gastric diseases, spouse alive, use of refrigerators and hot food, etc. According to some principles and methods of probability and fuzzy mathematics, a quantitative assessment model was established as follows: first, we selected some factors significant in statistics, and calculated weight coefficient for each one by two different methods; second, population space was divided into gastric cancer fuzzy subset and non gastric cancer fuzzy subset, then a mathematic model for each subset was established, we got a mathematic expression of attribute degree (AD). RESULTS: Based on the data of 63 patients and 693 normal people, AD of each subject was calculated. Considering the sensitivity and specificity, the thresholds of AD values calculated were configured with 0.20 and 0.17, respectively. According to these thresholds, the sensitivity and specificity of the quantitative model were about 69% and 63%. Moreover, statistical test showed that the identification outcomes of these two different calculation methods were identical (P>0.05). CONCLUSION: The validity of this method is satisfactory. It is convenient, feasible, economic and can be used to determine individual and population risks of gastric cancer. PMID:15655813

  16. Gastric cancer following highly selective vagotomy.

    PubMed Central

    Houghton, P. W.; Leaper, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    A case of gastric cancer occurring seven years after a highly selective vagotomy is described. This operation may not be the appropriate choice for the surgical treatment of gastric ulcers and H2 blockers should be used with caution in these patients. PMID:3671228

  17. Human gastric cancer modelling using organoids.

    PubMed

    Seidlitz, Therese; Merker, Sebastian R; Rothe, Alexander; Zakrzewski, Falk; von Neubeck, Cläre; Grützmann, Konrad; Sommer, Ulrich; Schweitzer, Christine; Schölch, Sebastian; Uhlemann, Heike; Gaebler, Anne-Marlene; Werner, Kristin; Krause, Mechthild; Baretton, Gustavo B; Welsch, Thilo; Koo, Bon-Kyoung; Aust, Daniela E; Klink, Barbara; Weitz, Jürgen; Stange, Daniel E

    2018-04-27

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths and the fifth most common malignancy worldwide. In this study, human and mouse gastric cancer organoids were generated to model the disease and perform drug testing to delineate treatment strategies. Human gastric cancer organoid cultures were established, samples classified according to their molecular profile and their response to conventional chemotherapeutics tested. Targeted treatment was performed according to specific druggable mutations. Mouse gastric cancer organoid cultures were generated carrying molecular subtype-specific alterations. Twenty human gastric cancer organoid cultures were established and four selected for a comprehensive in-depth analysis. Organoids demonstrated divergent growth characteristics and morphologies. Immunohistochemistry showed similar characteristics to the corresponding primary tissue. A divergent response to 5-fluoruracil, oxaliplatin, irinotecan, epirubicin and docetaxel treatment was observed. Whole genome sequencing revealed a mutational spectrum that corresponded to the previously identified microsatellite instable, genomic stable and chromosomal instable subtypes of gastric cancer. The mutational landscape allowed targeted therapy with trastuzumab for ERBB2 alterations and palbociclib for CDKN2A loss. Mouse cancer organoids carrying Kras and Tp53 or Apc and Cdh1 mutations were characterised and serve as model system to study the signalling of induced pathways. We generated human and mouse gastric cancer organoids modelling typical characteristics and altered pathways of human gastric cancer. Successful interference with activated pathways demonstrates their potential usefulness as living biomarkers for therapy response testing. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. Environmental and lifestyle risk factors of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeong Yeh; Derakhshan, Mohammad H

    2013-06-01

    Effective prevention and early diagnostic strategies are the most important public health interventions in gastric cancer, which remains a common malignancy worldwide. Preventive strategies require identification and understanding of environmental risk factors that lead to carcinogenesis. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the primary carcinogen as this ancient bacterium has a complex ability to interact with its human host. Smoking and salt are strong independent risk factors for gastric cancer whereas alcohol is only a risk when it is heavily consumed. Red meat and high fat increase the risk of gastric cancer however fresh fruits, vegetables (allium family) and certain micronutrients (selenium, vitamin C) reduce the risk, with evidence lacking for fish, coffee and tea. Foods that inhibit H. pylori viability, colonization and infection may reduce cancer risk. Obesity is increasingly recognized as a contributory factor in gastric cardia carcinogenesis. Therefore, modest daily physical activities can be protective against cancer. Foundry workers are at risk for developing gastric cancer with dust iron being an important cause. Other risk factors include Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), possibly JC virus and radiation but the effects of these are likely to remain small.

  19. Impact of Early Enteral Nutrition on Nutritional and Immunological Outcomes of Gastric Cancer Patients Undergoing Gastrostomy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Nikniaz, Zeinab; Somi, Mohammad Hossein; Nagashi, Shahnaz; Nikniaz, Leila

    2017-07-01

    The present systematic review and meta-analysis study evaluated the impact of early enteral nutrition (EN) on postoperative nutritional and immunological outcomes of gastric cancer (GC) patients. The databases of PubMed, Embase, Springer, and Cochrane library were searched till September 2016 to identify studies which evaluated the effects of EN compared with parenteral nutrition (PN) on postoperative immunological and nutritional status and hospitalization time in GC patients. Mean difference (MD) or standard mean difference (SMD) was calculated and I-square statistic test was used for heterogeneity analysis. The present systematic review and meta-analysis have consisted of seven trials, containing 835 GC patients. According to the result of meta-analysis, compared with PN, EN significantly resulted in more increase in the level of albumin [MD = 2.07 (0.49, 3.64)], prealbumin [MD = 9.41 (049, 33.55)], weight [MD = 1.52 (0.32, 2.72)], CD3+ [SMD = 1.96 (1.50, 2.43)], CD4+ [SMD = 2.45 (1.97, 2.93)], natural killers [MD = 5.80 (3.75, 7.85)], and also a decrease in the hospitalization time [MD=-2.39 (-2.74, -2.03)]. The results demonstrated that early administration of EN is more effective in improving postsurgical nutrition status and immune index in GC patients. So, based on these results, postoperative early administration of EN is recommended for GC patients where possible.

  20. Molecular biomarkers in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Elimova, Elena; Wadhwa, Roopma; Shiozaki, Hironori; Sudo, Kazuki; Estrella, Jeannelyn S; Badgwell, Brian D; Das, Prajnan; Matamoros, Aurelio; Song, Shumei; Ajani, Jaffer A

    2015-04-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) represents a serious health problem on a global scale. Despite some recent advances in the field, the prognosis in metastatic GC remains poor. Even in localized disease the adjunctive therapies improve overall survival (OS) by only approximately 10%. A better understanding of molecular biology, which would lead to improved treatment options, is needed and is the basis for this review. Many potential biomarkers of prognostic significance have been identified, including ALDH, SHH, Sox9, HER2, EGFR, VEGF, Hippo/YAP, and MET. However, inhibition of only HER2 protein has led to a modest survival benefit. A new approach to GC treatment, which is a disease influenced by inflammation, is the exploitation of the immune system to fight disease. Two interesting targets/prognostic markers that bear further investigation in GC are PD1 and PDL, particularly given their success in the treatment of other inflammation/immune-associated malignancies.

  1. Gastric mucosa in Mongolian and Japanese patients with gastric cancer and Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Matsuhisa, Takeshi; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Uchida, Tomohisa; Duger, Davaadorj; Adiyasuren, Battulga; Khasag, Oyuntsetseg; Tegshee, Tserentogtokh; Tsogt-Ochir, Byambajav

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the characteristics of gastric cancer and gastric mucosa in a Mongolian population by comparison with a Japanese population. METHODS: A total of 484 Mongolian patients with gastric cancer were enrolled to study gastric cancer characteristics in Mongolians. In addition, a total of 208 Mongolian and 3205 Japanese consecutive outpatients who underwent endoscopy, had abdominal complaints, no history of gastric operation or Helicobacter pylori eradication treatment, and no use of gastric secretion inhibitors such as histamine H2-receptor antagonists or proton pump inhibitors were enrolled. This study was conducted with the approval of the ethics committees of all hospitals. The triple-site biopsy method was used for the histologic diagnosis of gastritis and H. pylori infection in all Mongolian and Japanese cases. The infection rate of H. pylori and the status of gastric mucosa in H. pylori-infected patients were compared between Mongolian and Japanese subjects. Age (± 5 years), sex, and endoscopic diagnosis were matched between the two countries. RESULTS: Approximately 70% of Mongolian patients with gastric cancer were 50-79 years of age, and approximately half of the cancers were located in the upper part of the stomach. Histologically, 65.7% of early cancers exhibited differentiated adenocarcinoma, whereas 73.9% of advanced cancers displayed undifferentiated adenocarcinoma. The infection rate of H. pylori was higher in Mongolian than Japanese patients (75.9% vs 48.3%, P < 0.0001). When stratified by age, the prevalence was highest among young patients, and tended to decrease in patients aged 50 years or older. The anti-East-Asian CagA-specific antibody was negative in 99.4% of H. pylori-positive Mongolian patients. Chronic inflammation, neutrophil activity, glandular atrophy, and intestinal metaplasia scores were significantly lower in Mongolian compared to Japanese H. pylori-positive patients (P < 0.0001), with the exception of the intestinal

  2. Gastric mucosa in Mongolian and Japanese patients with gastric cancer and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Matsuhisa, Takeshi; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Uchida, Tomohisa; Duger, Davaadorj; Adiyasuren, Battulga; Khasag, Oyuntsetseg; Tegshee, Tserentogtokh; Tsogt-Ochir, Byambajav

    2015-07-21

    To investigate the characteristics of gastric cancer and gastric mucosa in a Mongolian population by comparison with a Japanese population. A total of 484 Mongolian patients with gastric cancer were enrolled to study gastric cancer characteristics in Mongolians. In addition, a total of 208 Mongolian and 3205 Japanese consecutive outpatients who underwent endoscopy, had abdominal complaints, no history of gastric operation or Helicobacter pylori eradication treatment, and no use of gastric secretion inhibitors such as histamine H2-receptor antagonists or proton pump inhibitors were enrolled. This study was conducted with the approval of the ethics committees of all hospitals. The triple-site biopsy method was used for the histologic diagnosis of gastritis and H. pylori infection in all Mongolian and Japanese cases. The infection rate of H. pylori and the status of gastric mucosa in H. pylori-infected patients were compared between Mongolian and Japanese subjects. Age (± 5 years), sex, and endoscopic diagnosis were matched between the two countries. Approximately 70% of Mongolian patients with gastric cancer were 50-79 years of age, and approximately half of the cancers were located in the upper part of the stomach. Histologically, 65.7% of early cancers exhibited differentiated adenocarcinoma, whereas 73.9% of advanced cancers displayed undifferentiated adenocarcinoma. The infection rate of H. pylori was higher in Mongolian than Japanese patients (75.9% vs 48.3%, P < 0.0001). When stratified by age, the prevalence was highest among young patients, and tended to decrease in patients aged 50 years or older. The anti-East-Asian CagA-specific antibody was negative in 99.4% of H. pylori-positive Mongolian patients. Chronic inflammation, neutrophil activity, glandular atrophy, and intestinal metaplasia scores were significantly lower in Mongolian compared to Japanese H. pylori-positive patients (P < 0.0001), with the exception of the intestinal metaplasia score of

  3. Gastric tumor from metastasis of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, D; Yoshida, H; Sumida, K; Ueyama, Y; Kanematsu, S; Shoji, T; Sueoka, N; Tanaka, K; Tsubota, Y; Kon, M

    2010-09-01

    Metastatic tumours of the stomach have been reported to result from various types of cancer. Among them, gastric metastasis from breast cancer has been recognised in 0.3-18% patients (1-4). Here, a rare case of metastatic gastric tumour derived from breast carcinoma is reported. Gastric endoscopy confirmed a large, friable mass (approximately 5 cm in diameter) in the upper part of the gastric body. The mass within the stomach was difficult to distinguish from primary gastric cancer, although biopsies of this lesion revealed the characteristics of adenocarcinoma. In addition, immunohistochemistry showed the positive expression of mammaglobin. Taken together, the evidence pointed to metastasis of breast cancer to the stomach. The patient was treated with hormonal therapy (letrozole), and the size of the metastasis in the stomach was markedly reduced. Therefore, a gastric metastasis from breast cancer was diagnosed successfully using immunohistochemistry and unnecessary surgery was avoided. In conclusion, although gastric metastatic tumours derived from breast carcinoma are rare, their accurate pre-operative diagnosis and appropriate systemic treatment is essential.

  4. Molecular classification of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Chia, N-Y; Tan, P

    2016-05-01

    Gastric cancer (GC), a heterogeneous disease characterized by epidemiologic and histopathologic differences across countries, is a leading cause of cancer-related death. Treatment of GC patients is currently suboptimal due to patients being commonly treated in a uniform fashion irrespective of disease subtype. With the advent of next-generation sequencing and other genomic technologies, GCs are now being investigated in great detail at the molecular level. High-throughput technologies now allow a comprehensive study of genomic and epigenomic alterations associated with GC. Gene mutations, chromosomal aberrations, differential gene expression and epigenetic alterations are some of the genetic/epigenetic influences on GC pathogenesis. In addition, integrative analyses of molecular profiling data have led to the identification of key dysregulated pathways and importantly, the establishment of GC molecular classifiers. Recently, The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) network proposed a four subtype classification scheme for GC based on the underlying tumor molecular biology of each subtype. This landmark study, together with other studies, has expanded our understanding on the characteristics of GC at the molecular level. Such knowledge may improve the medical management of GC in the future. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Assessment of nutritional status in laparoscopic gastrectomy for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Son, Young-Gil; Kwon, In Gyu; Ryu, Seung Wan

    2017-01-01

    Malnutrition is very common in gastric cancer patients and can be detected in up to 85% of patients with gastric cancer. Malnutrition is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, prolonged hospital stay, poor treatment tolerance, and lower survival rate. Malnutrition also has an impact on quality of life. The early detection of nutritional risk with appropriate nutritional care can significantly reduce patient's postoperative morbidity and mortality. Because there is no gold standard tool, appropriate tools should be selected and applied depending on one's institutional conditions. And, it is recommended that nutritional assessment should be achieved for every patient at pre/post-operative period.

  6. Robot-assisted surgery for gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Procopiuc, Livia; Tudor, Ştefan; Mănuc, Mircea; Diculescu, Mircea; Vasilescu, Cătălin

    2016-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery for gastric cancer is a relatively new research field, with convincing results mostly stemming from Asian countries. The use of the robotic surgery platform, thus far assessed as a safe procedure, which is also easier to learn, sets the background for a wider spread of minimally invasive technique in the treatment of gastric cancer. This review will cover the literature published so far, analyzing the pros and cons of robotic surgery and highlighting the remaining study questions. PMID:26798433

  7. Incidence of metachronous gastric cancer in the remnant stomach after synchronous multiple cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Isao; Hato, Shinji; Kobatake, Takaya; Ohta, Koji; Kubo, Yoshirou; Nishimura, Rieko; Kurita, Akira

    2014-01-01

    In the preoperative evaluation for gastric cancer, high-resolution endoscopic technologies allow us to detect small accessory lesions. However, it is not known if the gastric remnant after partial gastrectomy for synchronous multiple gastric cancers has a greater risk for metachronous cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of metachronous cancer in this patient subset compared with that after solitary cancer surgery. Data on a consecutive series of 1,281 patients gastrectomized for early gastric cancer from 1991 to 2007 were analyzed retrospectively. The 715 gastric remnants after distal gastrectomy were periodically surveyed by endoscopic examination in Shikoku Cancer Center. Among those surveyed cases, 642 patients were pathologically diagnosed with solitary lesion (SO group) and 73 patients with synchronous multiple lesions (MU group) at the time of the initial surgery. In the follow-up period, 15 patients in the SO group and 3 patients in the MU group were diagnosed as having metachronous cancer in the gastric remnant. The cumulative 4-year incidence rate was 1.9 % in the SO group and 5.5 % in the MU group. The difference did not reach the significant level by the log-rank test. The incidence of metachronous cancer is higher after multiple cancer surgery; however, the difference is not statistically significant.

  8. Considerations about gastric cancer proteomics.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Carlos Eduardo; McCormick, Thaís Messias; Carvalho, Paulo Costa; Fischer, Juliana DE Saldanha DA Gama; Aquino, Priscila Ferreira DE; Bravo, Guilherme Pinto; Carvalho, Maria DA Glória DA Costa

    2016-01-01

    The frequency of molecular studies aimed to analyze promoter methylation of tumor suppressor genes and global proteomics in gastric carcinogenesis is increasing. Nonetheless, only a few considered the different types of stomach cells, the tumor location and the influence of Helicobacter pylori and Epstein Barr virus infection (EBV). Molecular differences relating to anatomical and histological tumor areas were also recently described. The authors propose a molecular classification of gastric cancer, dividing it into four subtypes: tumors positive for EBV; microsatellite unstable tumors; genomically stable tumors and tumors with chromosomal instability. RESUMO A frequência de estudos moleculares visando a analisar os promotores de metilação de genes supressores de tumor e proteômica globais na carcinogênese gástrica está aumentando. No entanto, apenas alguns consideraram os diferentes tipos de células do estômago, a localização do tumor e a influência da infecção por Helicobacter pylori e pelo vírus Epstein-Barr (EBV). Diferenças moleculares relacionadas com áreas tumorais anatômicas e histológicas também foram recentemente descritas. Os autores propõem uma classificação molecular de câncer gástrico, dividindo-o em quatro subtipos: tumores positivos para o EBV; tumores microssatélite instáveis; tumores genomicamente estáveis ​​e tumores com instabilidade cromossômica.

  9. Gastric metastasis from invasive lobular breast cancer, mimicking primary gastric cancer: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Hoon; Son, Seung-Myoung; Choi, Young Jin

    2018-03-01

    Gastric metastasis from invasive lobular breast cancer is relatively rare, commonly presented among multiple metastases, several years after primary diagnosis of breast cancer. Importantly, gastric cancer that is synchronously presented with lobular breast cancer can be misdiagnosed as primary gastric cancer; therefore, accurate differential diagnosis is required. A 39-year-old woman was visited to our hospital because of right breast mass and progressive dyspepsia. Invasive lobular carcinoma of breast was diagnosed on core needle biopsy. Gastroscopy revealed a diffuse scirrhous mass at the prepyloric antrum and diagnosed as poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma on biopsy. Synchronous double primary breast and gastric cancers were considered. Detailed pathological analysis focused on immunohistochemical studies of selected antibodies, including those of estrogen receptors, gross cystic disease fluid protein-15, and caudal-type homeobox transcription factor 2, were studied. As a result, gastric lesion was diagnosed as metastatic gastric cancer originating from breast. Right breast conserving surgery was performed, and duodenal stent was inserted under endoscopic guidance to relieve the patient's symptoms. Systemic chemotherapy with combined administration of paclitaxel and trastuzumab was initiated. Forty-one months after the diagnosis, the patient is still undergoing the same therapy. No recurrent lesion has been identified in the breast and evidence of a partial remission of gastric wall thickening has been observed on follow-up studies without new metastatic lesions. Clinical suspicion, repeat endoscopic biopsy, and detailed histological analysis, including immunohistochemistry, are necessary for diagnosis of metastatic gastric cancer from the breast.

  10. Epacadostat and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Gastroesophageal Junction or Gastric Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-19

    Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Esophageal Carcinoma; Recurrent Gastric Carcinoma; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Gastric Cancer AJCC v7; Unresectable Esophageal Carcinoma

  11. Additive endoscopic resection may be sufficient for patients with a positive lateral margin after endoscopic resection of early gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hae Won; Kim, Jie-Hyun; Park, Jun Chul; Jeon, Mi Young; Lee, Yong Chan; Lee, Sang Kil; Shin, Sung Kwan; Chung, Hyun Soo; Noh, Sung Hoon; Kim, Jong Won; Choi, Seung Ho; Park, Jae Jun; Youn, Young Hoon; Park, Hyojin

    2017-11-01

    No well-established treatment strategies exist for lateral margin positivity (LM+) alone after endoscopic resection (ER) of early gastric cancer (EGC). Thus, we aimed to clarify a treatment strategy for non-curative resection (non-CR) with LM+ alone after ER in EGC. Among 2065 patients with EGC treated by ER, 76 (3.6%) with only LM+ after non-CR of EGC were reviewed retrospectively. Of these, 28 underwent gastrectomy, 25 underwent argon plasma coagulation (APC), and 23 underwent repeat ER (re-ER). We analyzed the clinicopathologic characteristics of all patients and compared those who underwent additive surgery, APC, or re-ER. Of the 76 patients, 28 (36.8%) fulfilled the absolute criteria and 48 (63.2%) the expanded criteria for ER. Among the latter patients, the proportion undergoing additive surgery was 75.0%, higher than that of patients in the former group (P = .014). Residual cancer cells were observed in 70.6% of patients after additive surgery or re-ER. Residual cancer cells were observed significantly more often in patients with undifferentiated-type than in those with differentiated-type EGC (P = .02). However, no lymph node metastasis was observed in any patient after additive surgery. Our results suggest that endoscopic treatment may be a sufficient additive therapy for patients with LM+ alone after ER, irrespective of whether the absolute or expanded ER criteria are used. However, as complete ablation of remnant cells cannot be guaranteed, re-ER is a better additive treatment than APC. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Expression of p27 and proliferative (MIB-1), mitotic (MI) and apoptotic indices in early-phase (EGF) gastric carcinoma. Results of a study by the Italian Gastric Cancer Research Group (IRGGC)].

    PubMed

    Saragoni, L; Morgagni, P; De Manzoni, G; Tomezzoli, A; Roviello, F; Marrelli, D; Di Leo, A; Vindigni, C; Kurihara, H; Fociani, P

    2003-02-01

    Since the Japanese Society for Gastroenterology and Endoscopy (JSGE) introduced the definition of Early Gastric Cancer (EGC), much more and deeper studies were done, which demonstrated that EGC was a more complex phase of the neoplastic disease with different morphologic characteristics, tightly linked to the prognosis. We evaluated the clinical impact of some prognostic factors, known being important in the advanced lesions, in a series of EGC patients with special reference to the clinicomorphological features. We analysed the mitotic (MI) and apoptotic (AI) indices and the immunohistochemical expression of p27 and MIB-1 in 83 EGC cases consecutively recruited in the hospitals of Forlì, Verona, Siena and Milan (IRGGC) in the period 1994-95. The classifications of JSGE, Lauren and Kodama were used to define the macroscopic, microscopic and growth pattern types, respectively. Decreased p27 expression correlated with the macroscopic escavated lesions and diffused mixed histotypes; the increase of MIB-1 detection with tumour size larger than 2 cm, but lesser than 4 cm; MI with intestinal histologic types and AI with mucosal and penetrating lesions, according to Kodama. Statistical analysis showed significative correlations among MIB-1, MI and AI, but not with p27 and the other variables. All these factors did not influence the prognosis of our patients. In our series, p27, MIB-1, MI, and AI did not add any useful clinical. So, in EGC patients the morphological features have still the most important role in influencing the prognosis and treatment of patients.

  13. Gastric Cancer Screening by Combined Determination of Serum Helicobacter pylori Antibody and Pepsinogen Concentrations: ABC Method for Gastric Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xian-Zhe; Huang, Cheng-Zhi; Hu, Wei-Xian; Liu, Ying; Yao, Xue-Qing

    2018-05-20

    Gastroscopy combined with gastric mucosa biopsies is currently regarded as a gold standard for diagnosis of gastric cancer. However, its application is restricted in clinical practice due to its invasive property. A new noninvasive population screening process combining the assay of anti-Helicobacter pylori antibody and serum pepsinogen (PG) (ABC method) is adopted to recognize the high-risk patients for further endoscopy examination, avoiding the unnecessary gastroscopy for most population and saving the cost consumption for mass screening annually. Nevertheless, controversies exist for the grouping of ABC method and the intervals of gastroscopy surveillance for each group. In this review, we summarized these popular concerned topics for providing useful references to the healthcare practitioner in clinical practice. The PubMed databases were systematically searched from the inception dates to November 22, 2017, using the keywords "Helicobacter pylori," "Pepsinogens," and "Stomach Neoplasms." Original articles and reviews on the topics were selected. Anti-H. pylori antibody and serum PG concentration showed significant changes under the different status of H. pylori infection and the progression of atrophic gastritis, which can be used for risk stratification of gastric cancer in clinic. In addition, anti-H. pylori antibody titer can be used for further risk stratification of gastric cancer contributing to determine better endoscopy surveillance interval. The early detection and diagnosis of gastric cancer benefit from the risk stratification, but the cutoff values for H. pylori antibody and serum PG concentration require further modification.

  14. The Role of an Undifferentiated Component in Submucosal Invasion and Submucosal Invasion Depth After Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for Early Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Miyahara, Koji; Hatta, Waku; Nakagawa, Masahiro; Oyama, Tsuneo; Kawata, Noboru; Takahashi, Akiko; Yoshifuku, Yoshikazu; Hoteya, Shu; Hirano, Masaaki; Esaki, Mitsuru; Matsuda, Mitsuru; Ohnita, Ken; Shimoda, Ryo; Yoshida, Motoyuki; Dohi, Osamu; Takada, Jun; Tanaka, Keiko; Yamada, Shinya; Tsuji, Tsuyotoshi; Ito, Hirotaka; Aoyagi, Hiroyuki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2018-06-05

    The role of an undifferentiated component in submucosal invasion and submucosal invasion depth (SID) for lymph node metastasis (LNM) of early gastric cancer (EGC) with deep submucosal invasion (SID ≥500 μm from the muscularis mucosa) after endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has not been fully understood. This study aimed to clarify the risk factors (RFs), including these factors, for LNM in such patients. We enrolled 513 patients who underwent radical surgery after ESD for EGC with deep submucosal invasion. We evaluated RFs for LNM, including an undifferentiated component in submucosal invasion and the SID, which was subdivided into 500-999, 1,000-1,499, 1,500-1,999, and ≥2,000 µm. LNM was detected in 7.6% of patients. Multivariate analysis revealed that an undifferentiated component in submucosal invasion (OR 2.22), in addition to tumor size >30 mm (OR 2.51) and lymphatic invasion (OR 3.07), were the independent RFs for LNM. However, the SID was not significantly associated with LNM. An undifferentiated component in submucosal invasion was one of the RFs for LNM, in contrast to SID, in patients who underwent ESD for EGC with deep submucosal invasion. This insight would be helpful in managing such patients. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. MicroRNA‑499 rs3746444 A/G polymorphism functions as a biomarker to predict recurrence following endoscopic submucosal dissection in primary early gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Huiyong; Yang, Xiangshan; Zhen, Yanan; Huo, Shoujun; Xiao, Ruixue; Xu, Zhongfa

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular mechanism, including the potential regulatory and signaling pathways, of platelet‑derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRB), which underlies the recurrence of early gastric cancer (EGC) following endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). Online microRNA (miRNA) target prediction tools were used, which identified PDGFRB as the candidate target gene of miR‑499a in gastric cancer cells, and PFGRBR was then confirmed as the direct gene using a luciferase reporter assay system. The Kaplan‑Meier method was used to plot recurrence‑free curves, which were compared between genotype groups. A negative regulatory association between miR‑499a and PDGFRB was established by investigating the relative luciferase activity at different concentrations of miR‑499a mimics. Furthermore, as the rs3746444 polymorphism has been previously reported to interfere with the expression of miR‑499a, the present study investigated the expression levels of different genotypes, including TT (n=20), TC (n=9) and CC (n=3), the results of which supported the hypothesis that the presence of the minor allele (C) of the rs3746444 polymorphism compromised the expression of miR‑499a. The present study also performed polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses to examine the mRNA and protein expression levels of PFGRBR among different genotypes or cells treated with different concentrations of miR‑499a mimics/inhibitors, which indicated the negative regulatory association between miR‑499a and PDGFRB. The present study also investigated the relative viabilities of EGC cells transfected with miR‑499a mimics (50 and 100 nM) and miR‑499a inhibitors (100 nM), and confirmed that miR‑499a negatively interfered with the viability of the EGC cells. The miR‑499a rs3746444 polymorphism was also recognized as a biomarker to predict recurrence following ESD in patients with EGC via analyzing the recurrence‑free rates

  16. Chronic myelocytic leukemia and gastric cancer in the same patient.

    PubMed Central

    Butala, A.; Kalra, J.; Rosner, F.

    1989-01-01

    The association of chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML) and gastric cancer is very rare. We report a case of CML associated with gastric cancer and review the pertinent literature of 15 previously reported cases. PMID:2661837

  17. Gastric Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Gastric cancer treatment options depend on extent of disease and may include radical surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, and immunotherapy. Get detailed information about the diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of newly diagnosed and recurrent gastric cancer in this clinician summary.

  18. Use of lectin microarray to differentiate gastric cancer from gastric ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei-Li; Li, Yang-Guang; Lv, Yong-Chen; Guan, Xiao-Hui; Ji, Hui-Fan; Chi, Bao-Rong

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the feasibility of lectin microarray for differentiating gastric cancer from gastric ulcer. METHODS: Twenty cases of human gastric cancer tissue and 20 cases of human gastric ulcer tissue were collected and processed. Protein was extracted from the frozen tissues and stored. The lectins were dissolved in buffer, and the sugar-binding specificities of lectins and the layout of the lectin microarray were summarized. The median of the effective data points for each lectin was globally normalized to the sum of medians of all effective data points for each lectin in one block. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded gastric cancer tissues and their corresponding gastric ulcer tissues were subjected to Ag retrieval. Biotinylated lectin was used as the primary antibody and HRP-streptavidin as the secondary antibody. The glycopatterns of glycoprotein in gastric cancer and gastric ulcer specimens were determined by lectin microarray, and then validated by lectin histochemistry. Data are presented as mean ± SD for the indicated number of independent experiments. RESULTS: The glycosylation level of gastric cancer was significantly higher than that in ulcer. In gastric cancer, most of the lectin binders showed positive signals and the intensity of the signals was stronger, whereas the opposite was the case for ulcers. Significant differences in the pathological score of the two lectins were apparent between ulcer and gastric cancer tissues using the same lectin. For MPL and VVA, all types of gastric cancer detected showed stronger staining and a higher positive rate in comparison with ulcer, especially in the case of signet ring cell carcinoma and intra-mucosal carcinoma. GalNAc bound to MPL showed a significant increase. A statistically significant association between MPL and gastric cancer was observed. As with MPL, there were significant differences in VVA staining between gastric cancer and ulcer. CONCLUSION: Lectin microarray can differentiate the different

  19. New advances in targeted gastric cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Lazăr, Daniela Cornelia; Tăban, Sorina; Cornianu, Marioara; Faur, Alexandra; Goldiş, Adrian

    2016-08-14

    Despite a decrease in incidence over past decades, gastric cancer remains a major global health problem. In the more recent period, survival has shown only minor improvement, despite significant advances in diagnostic techniques, surgical and chemotherapeutic approaches, the development of novel therapeutic agents and treatment by multidisciplinary teams. Because multiple genetic mutations, epigenetic alterations, and aberrant molecular signalling pathways are involved in the development of gastric cancers, recent research has attempted to determine the molecular heterogeneity responsible for the processes of carcinogenesis, spread and metastasis. Currently, some novel agents targeting a part of these dysfunctional molecular signalling pathways have already been integrated into the standard treatment of gastric cancer, whereas others remain in phases of investigation within clinical trials. It is essential to identify the unique molecular patterns of tumours and specific biomarkers to develop treatments targeted to the individual tumour behaviour. This review analyses the global impact of gastric cancer, as well as the role of Helicobacter pylori infection and the efficacy of bacterial eradication in preventing gastric cancer development. Furthermore, the paper discusses the currently available targeted treatments and future directions of research using promising novel classes of molecular agents for advanced tumours.

  20. New advances in targeted gastric cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lazăr, Daniela Cornelia; Tăban, Sorina; Cornianu, Marioara; Faur, Alexandra; Goldiş, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Despite a decrease in incidence over past decades, gastric cancer remains a major global health problem. In the more recent period, survival has shown only minor improvement, despite significant advances in diagnostic techniques, surgical and chemotherapeutic approaches, the development of novel therapeutic agents and treatment by multidisciplinary teams. Because multiple genetic mutations, epigenetic alterations, and aberrant molecular signalling pathways are involved in the development of gastric cancers, recent research has attempted to determine the molecular heterogeneity responsible for the processes of carcinogenesis, spread and metastasis. Currently, some novel agents targeting a part of these dysfunctional molecular signalling pathways have already been integrated into the standard treatment of gastric cancer, whereas others remain in phases of investigation within clinical trials. It is essential to identify the unique molecular patterns of tumours and specific biomarkers to develop treatments targeted to the individual tumour behaviour. This review analyses the global impact of gastric cancer, as well as the role of Helicobacter pylori infection and the efficacy of bacterial eradication in preventing gastric cancer development. Furthermore, the paper discusses the currently available targeted treatments and future directions of research using promising novel classes of molecular agents for advanced tumours. PMID:27570417

  1. Ion Chromatography Based Urine Amino Acid Profiling Applied for Diagnosis of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jing; Hong, Jing; Hu, Jun-Duo; Chen, Jin-Lian

    2012-01-01

    Aim. Amino acid metabolism in cancer patients differs from that in healthy people. In the study, we performed urine-free amino acid profile of gastric cancer at different stages and health subjects to explore potential biomarkers for diagnosing or screening gastric cancer. Methods. Forty three urine samples were collected from inpatients and healthy adults who were divided into 4 groups. Healthy adults were in group A (n = 15), early gastric cancer inpatients in group B (n = 7), and advanced gastric cancer inpatients in group C (n = 16); in addition, two healthy adults and three advanced gastric cancer inpatients were in group D (n = 5) to test models. We performed urine amino acids profile of each group by applying ion chromatography (IC) technique and analyzed urine amino acids according to chromatogram of amino acids standard solution. The data we obtained were processed with statistical analysis. A diagnostic model was constructed to discriminate gastric cancer from healthy individuals and another diagnostic model for clinical staging by principal component analysis. Differentiation performance was validated by the area under the curve (AUC) of receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Results. The urine-free amino acid profile of gastric cancer patients changed to a certain degree compared with that of healthy adults. Compared with healthy adult group, the levels of valine, isoleucine, and leucine increased (P < 0.05), but the levels of histidine and methionine decreased (P < 0.05), and aspartate decreased significantly (P < 0.01). The urine amino acid profile was also different between early and advanced gastric cancer groups. Compared with early gastric cancer, the levels of isoleucine and valine decreased in advanced gastric cancer (P < 0.05). A diagnosis model constructed for gastric cancer with AUC value of 0.936 tested by group D showed that 4 samples could coincide with it. Another diagnosis model for clinical staging with an AUC value of 0

  2. A comparative study of grasping-type scissors forceps and insulated-tip knife for endoscopic submucosal dissection of early gastric cancer: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Kengo; Uedo, Noriya; Yamashina, Takeshi; Matsui, Fumi; Matsuura, Noriko; Ito, Takashi; Yamamoto, Sachiko; Hanaoka, Noboru; Takeuchi, Yoji; Higashino, Koji; Ishihara, Ryu; Iishi, Hiroyasu

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for early gastric cancer (EGC) is technically difficult for beginners. Few comparative studies of technical feasibility, efficacy, and safety using various devices have been reported. This study evaluated the feasibility, efficacy, and safety of ESD for EGC < 2 cm using grasping-type scissors forceps (GSF) or insulated-tip knife (IT2) for three resident endoscopists. Patients and methods: This was a randomized phase II study in a cancer referral center. A total of 108 patients with 120 EGCs were enrolled with the following characteristics: differentiated-type mucosal EGC, without ulcers or scars, < 2 cm (86 men, 22 women; median age 72 years). All lesions were stratified according to operator and tumor location (antrum or corpus), assigned randomly to two groups (GSF or IT2), and resected by ESD. Self-completion rate, complete resection rate, procedure time, and adverse events were evaluated as main outcome measures. Results: There was no difference in self-completion rate between the IT2 group (77 %, 47/61, P = 0.187) and the GSF group (66 %, 37/56). Also, there were no differences in en bloc resection rate (98 %, 60/61 vs. 93 %, 52/56, P = 0.195) and adverse events (3.3 %, 2/61 vs. 7.1 %, 4/56, P = 0.424). Median (min [range]) procedure time in the IT2 group (47 [33 – 67], P = 0.003) was shorter than that in the GSF group (66 [40 – 100]). Limitations of this study were the small sample size and single center design. Conclusions: ESD with GSF did not show a statistically significant advantage in improvement of self-completion rate over IT2. (Study registration: UMIN 000005048) PMID:27556074

  3. Advances in Systemic Therapy for Metastatic or Advanced Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shitara, Kohei; Ohtsu, Atsushi

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, various new agents have been investigated for the treatment of advanced gastric cancer (AGC). The anti-HER2 antibody trastuzumab has been shown to prolong the overall survival of patients with HER2-positive AGC and has become a standard treatment. However, lapatinib, or ado-trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1), did not show survival benefit in AGC, although it has shown remarkable efficacy for HER2-positive breast cancer. The efficacy of the anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody ramucirumab for pretreated gastric cancer is a milestone for antiangiogenic therapy for AGC. Early clinical trials of TAS-118, TAS-102, and STAT3 inhibitors; IMAB362 (anti-Claudin 18.2); and immune checkpoint inhibitors are all encouraging. These findings warrant further evaluation in larger clinical trials. Copyright © 2016 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  4. High rates of advanced gastric cancer in community of Flushing, New York.

    PubMed

    Dinani, Amreen; Desai, Amit; Kohn, Nina; Gutkin, Ellen; Nussbaum, Michel; Somnay, Kaumudi

    2012-03-01

    Gastric cancer remains a major public health issue and is a leading cause of death worldwide, accounting for 600,000 deaths annually. Over the last decades, there has been a steady decline in the incidence rates of gastric cancer. Furthermore, the incidence rates of gastric cancer in different parts of the country vary due to epidemiological and migration trends. Despite these trends, several studies that have continued to observe high rates of gastric cancer in populations that come from high-risk regions. The aim of the study was to describe the gastric cancer patients presenting NYHQ with an emphasis on those presenting at a young age and advanced disease. A subanalysis of the Asian population was also done, which is considered a high-risk group. Consecutive chart review of patients admitted with gastric cancer from January 2000 to August 2008 was extracted from the Oncology registry at NYHQ. Parameters that were evaluated were age, sex, race, type of gastric cancer, and stage of gastric cancer at initial presentation. The SAS/PC software package (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC) was employed for statistical analyses. Four hundred fifty-seven patients were diagnosed with gastric cancer. Approximately one third of the total patients were younger than 60 years of age. Of the Asian patients, almost half the patients (48.8%) had advanced disease of which two thirds were under the age of 60 years. The rates of advanced gastric cancer observed at NYHQ are significant and comparable to recent epidemiology literature on rates in Asian populations in Asia. Communities, like Flushing, NY, may benefit from early detection of gastric cancers, similar to those instituted in Japan and Taiwan.

  5. Estimation of population-based utility weights for gastric cancer-related health states.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeon-Jeong; Ock, Minsu; Kim, Kyu-Pyo; Jo, Min-Woo

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to generate utility weights of gastric cancer-related health states from the perspective of the Korean general population. The Korean adults (age ≥19 years) included in the study were sampled using multistage quota sampling methods stratified by sex, age, and education level. Nine scenarios for hypothetical gastric cancer-related health states were developed and reviewed. After consenting to participate, the subjects were surveyed by trained interviewers using a computer-assisted personal interview method. Participants were asked to perform standard gamble tasks to measure the utility weights of 5 randomly assigned health states (from among nine scenarios). The mean utility weight was calculated for each health state. Three hundred twenty-six of the 407 adults who completed this study were included in the analysis. The mean utility weights from the standard gamble were 0.857 (no gastric cancer with Helicobacter pylori infection), 0.773 (early gastric cancer [EGC] with endoscopic surgery), 0.779 (EGC with subtotal gastrectomy), 0.767 (EGC with total gastrectomy), 0.602 (advanced gastric cancer with subtotal gastrectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy), 0.643 (advanced gastric cancer with total gastrectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy), 0.522 (advanced gastric cancer with extended gastrectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy), 0.404 (metastatic gastric cancer with palliative chemotherapy), and 0.399 (recurrent gastric cancer with palliative chemotherapy). This study was the first to comprehensively estimate the utility weights of gastric cancer-related health states in a general population. The utility weights derived from this study could be useful for future economic evaluations related to gastric cancer interventions.

  6. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer: surgery, surveillance and unanswered questions.

    PubMed

    Cisco, Robin M; Norton, Jeffrey A

    2008-08-01

    Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is an inherited cancer-susceptibility syndrome characterized by autosomal dominance and high penetrance. In 30-50% of cases, a causative germline mutation in CDH1, the E-cadherin gene, may be identified. Female carriers of CDH1 mutations also have an increased (20-40%) risk of lobular breast cancer. Endoscopic surveillance of patients with CDH1 mutations is ineffective because early foci of HDGC are typically small and underlie normal mucosa. CDH1 mutation carriers are therefore offered the option of prophylactic gastrectomy, which commonly reveals early foci of invasive signet-ring cell cancer. We review recommendations for genetic testing, surveillance and prophylactic surgery in HDGC. Areas for future research are discussed, including development of new screening modalities, optimal timing of prophylactic gastrectomy, identification of additional causative mutations in HDGC, management of patients with CDH1 missense mutations and prevention/early detection of lobular breast cancer in CDH1 mutation carriers.

  7. Clinical epidemiology of gastric cancer in Hehuang valley of China: A 10-year epidemiological study of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Su; Li, Bin; Bai, Zhen-Zhong; Wu, Jun-Qi; Xie, Da-Wei; Ma, Ying-Cai; Ma, Xu-Xiang; Zhao, Jun-Hui; Guo, Xin-Jian

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the clinical epidemiological characteristics of gastric cancer in the Hehuang valley, China, to provide a reference for treatment and prevention of regional gastric cancer. METHODS: Between February 2003 and February 2013, the records of 2419 patients with gastric cancer were included in this study. The patient’s characteristics, histological and pathological features, as well as the dietary habits of the patients, were investigated. RESULTS: The clinical data showed that adenocarcinoma was the leading histological type of gastric cancer in this area. Characteristics of gastric cancer in different ethnic groups and age showed that the 60.55-65.50 years group showed the high incidence of gastric cancer in all ethnic groups. There were more male gastric cancer patients than female. Intestinal was the most common type of gastric cancer in the Hehuang valley. There was no significant difference in the proportion of sex in terms of Helicobacter pylori infection. The impact of dietary habits on gastric cancer showed that regular consumption of fried or grilled food, consumption of high-salt, high-fat and spicy food and drinking strong Boiled brick-tea were three important factors associated with gastric cancer in males and females. CONCLUSION: Differences existed in race, sex, and age of patients according to the epidemiology of gastric cancer in the Hehuang valley. Moreover, dietary habits was also an important factor contributing to gastric cancer. PMID:25132766

  8. Gastrointestinal Cancers: Screening and Early Detection.

    PubMed

    Griffin-Sobel, Joyce P

    2017-05-01

    To present an overview of current practices in the screening and early detection of gastrointestinal cancers. Literature reviews. Screening for gastrointestinal cancers is less than desirable, particularly in underserved populations. There are inadequate methods of screening for early detection of esophageal and gastric cancers. Education of patients is needed to reinforce the importance of screening for gastrointestinal cancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. HAI-178 antibody-conjugated fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles for targeted imaging and simultaneous therapy of gastric cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Can; Bao, Chenchen; Liang, Shujing; Zhang, Lingxia; Fu, Hualin; Wang, Yutian; Wang, Kan; Li, Chao; Deng, Min; Liao, Qiande; Ni, Jian; Cui, Daxiang

    2014-05-01

    The successful development of safe and highly effective nanoprobes for targeted imaging and simultaneous therapy of in vivo gastric cancer is a great challenge. Herein we reported for the first time that anti-α-subunit of ATP synthase antibody, HAI-178 monoclonal antibody-conjugated fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles, was successfully used for targeted imaging and simultaneous therapy of in vivo gastric cancer. A total of 172 specimens of gastric cancer tissues were collected, and the expression of α-subunit of ATP synthase in gastric cancer tissues was investigated by immunohistochemistry method. Fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles were prepared and conjugated with HAI-178 monoclonal antibody, and the resultant HAI-178 antibody-conjugated fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles (HAI-178-FMNPs) were co-incubated with gastric cancer MGC803 cells and gastric mucous GES-1 cells. Gastric cancer-bearing nude mice models were established, were injected with prepared HAI-178-FMNPs via tail vein, and were imaged by magnetic resonance imaging and small animal fluorescent imaging system. The results showed that the α-subunit of ATP synthase exhibited high expression in 94.7% of the gastric cancer tissues. The prepared HAI-178-FMNPs could target actively MGC803 cells, realized fluorescent imaging and magnetic resonance imaging of in vivo gastric cancer, and actively inhibited growth of gastric cancer cells. In conclusion, HAI-178 antibody-conjugated fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles have a great potential in applications such as targeted imaging and simultaneous therapy of in vivo early gastric cancer cells in the near future.

  10. Implication of Gastric Cancer Molecular Genetic Markers in Surgical Practice.

    PubMed

    Nemtsova, Marina V; Strelnikov, Vladimir V; Tanas, Alexander S; Bykov, Igor I; Zaletaev, Dmitry V; Rudenko, Viktoria V; Glukhov, Alexander I; Kchorobrich, Tatiana V; Li, Yi; Tarasov, Vadim V; Barreto, George E; Aliev, Gjumrakch

    2017-10-01

    We have investigated aberrant methylation of genes CDH1, RASSF1A, MLH1, N33, DAPK, expression of genes hTERT, MMP7, MMP9, BIRC5 (survivin), PTGS2, and activity of telomerase of 106 gastric tumor samples obtained intra-operatively and 53 gastric tumor samples from the same group of patients obtained endoscopically before surgery. Biopsy specimens obtained from 50 patients with chronic calculous cholecystitis were used as a control group. Together with tissue samples obtained from different sites remote to tumors, a total of 727 samples have been studied. The selected parameters comprise a system of molecular markers that can be used in both diagnostics of gastric cancer and in dynamic monitoring of patients after surgery. Special attention was paid to the use of molecular markers for the diagnostics of malignant process in the material obtained endoscopically since the efficacy of morphological diagnostics in biopsies is compromised by intratumoral heterogeneity, which may prevent reliable identification of tumor cells in the sampling. Our data indicated that certain molecular genetic events provided more sensitive yet specific markers of the tumor. We demonstrated that molecular profiles detected in preoperative biopsies were confirmed by the material obtained intra-operatively. The use of endoscopic material facilitates gastric tumors pre-operative diagnostics, improving early detection of gastric cancer and potential effective treatment strategies.

  11. Identifying module biomarkers from gastric cancer by differential correlation network

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoping; Chang, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (stomach cancer) is a severe disease caused by dysregulation of many functionally correlated genes or pathways instead of the mutation of individual genes. Systematic identification of gastric cancer biomarkers can provide insights into the mechanisms underlying this deadly disease and help in the development of new drugs. In this paper, we present a novel network-based approach to predict module biomarkers of gastric cancer that can effectively distinguish the disease from normal samples. Specifically, by assuming that gastric cancer has mainly resulted from dysfunction of biomolecular networks rather than individual genes in an organism, the genes in the module biomarkers are potentially related to gastric cancer. Finally, we identified a module biomarker with 27 genes, and by comparing the module biomarker with known gastric cancer biomarkers, we found that our module biomarker exhibited a greater ability to diagnose the samples with gastric cancer. PMID:27703371

  12. Prevalence of deleterious ATM germline mutations in gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dong-Sheng; Tao, Hou-Quan; He, Xu-Jun; Long, Ming; Yu, Sheng; Xia, Ying-Jie; Wei, Zhang; Xiong, Zikai; Jones, Sian; He, Yiping; Yan, Hai; Wang, Xiaoyue

    2015-12-01

    Besides CDH1, few hereditary gastric cancer predisposition genes have been previously reported. In this study, we discovered two germline ATM mutations (p.Y1203fs and p.N1223S) in a Chinese family with a history of gastric cancer by screening 83 cancer susceptibility genes. Using a published exome sequencing dataset, we found deleterious germline mutations of ATM in 2.7% of 335 gastric cancer patients of different ethnic origins. The frequency of deleterious ATM mutations in gastric cancer patients is significantly higher than that in general population (p=0.0000435), suggesting an association of ATM mutations with gastric cancer predisposition. We also observed biallelic inactivation of ATM in tumors of two gastric cancer patients. Further evaluation of ATM mutations in hereditary gastric cancer will facilitate genetic testing and risk assessment.

  13. Sarcopenia and Visceral Obesity in Esophageal and Gastric Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-17

    Esophageal Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Sarcopenia; Sarcopenic Obesity; Obesity; Visceral Obesity; Quality of Life; Surgery; Complication of Treatment; Chemotherapeutic Toxicity; Physical Activity; Oncology

  14. [Assessment of lymph node metastasis in gastric cancer: status quo, recent advances and new perspectives].

    PubMed

    Tu, Min; Zhu, Zhen-shu; Shi, Lin-sen; Jiang, Xi-qun; Wang, Hao; Guan, Wen-xian

    2012-02-01

    The precondition of accurate gastric cancer surgery is precise assessment of lymph node metastasis. To date, no imaging modality achieves both high sensitivity and high specificity in detecting lymph node metastasis in gastric cancer. Intraoperative sentinel node tracing and biopsy are the most popular method to identify the localization of tumor cell, but is limited to early gastric cancer. Nano-composite materials, designed for tumor imaging and tracing, show us a newly emerging domain for tumor detection in gastric cancer. The function of these nano-composite materials to detect lymph node metastasis in gastric cancer relies on the effective backflow of lymph system. However, the lymph vessels can be obstructed by tumor cells in advanced gastric cancer, which may restrain the application of these nanoparticles. Therefore, more methods to detect lymph node metastasis in gastric cancer should be explored. This review summarizes the characteristic of the targeted nanosphere. Based on the reported studies, a novel idea is conceived that targeted multifunctional nanosphere may be a potential method to achieve precise assessment of lymph node metastasis in gastric cancer.

  15. Novel Immunotherapeutic Strategies of Gastric Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Amedei, Amedeo; Benagiano, Marisa; della Bella, Chiara; Niccolai, Elena; D'Elios, Mario M.

    2011-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the fourth most common cancer and the second most frequent cause of cancer-related deaths, accounting for 10.4% of cancer deaths worldwide. Despite the improvements, estimated cure rates for patients with advanced stages remain poor, and in the metastatic setting, chemotherapy is the mainstay of palliative therapy and results in objective response rates (ORRs) of only 20–40% and median overall survivals (OS) of 8–10 months. Therefore, many investigators believe that the potential for making significant progress lies in understanding and exploiting the molecular biology of these tumors to investigate new therapeutic strategies to combat GC, such as specific immunotherapy. In this paper, we analyze the different approaches used for immune-based (especially dendritic and T cells) therapies to gastric cancer treatment and discuss the results obtained in preclinical models as in clinical trials. PMID:22253528

  16. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pennell E, MacMillan A, Fernandez B, Keller G, Lynch H, Shah SP, Guilford P, Gallinger S, Corso G, Roviello F, Caldas C, Oliveira C, Pharoah PD, Huntsman DG. Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Syndrome: CDH1 Mutations and Beyond. JAMA Oncol. 2015 Apr; ...

  17. NCI International EBV-Gastric Cancer Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    A collaboration among NCI and extramural investigators, established by DCEG in 2006, that utilizes data and biospecimens from completed and ongoing case series and observational studies of gastric cancer to replicate and extend findings from previous studies hindered by small numbers of EBV-positive cases, and to stimulate multidisciplinary research in this area.

  18. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    For stomach (gastric) cancer, there is no standard or routine screening test for the general U.S. population. Review the evidence on the benefits and harms of screening for gastric cancer using barium-meal photofluorography, gastric endoscopy, or serum pepsinogen in this expert-reviewed summary.

  19. Current status in remnant gastric cancer after distal gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ohira, Masaichi; Toyokawa, Takahiro; Sakurai, Katsunobu; Kubo, Naoshi; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Muguruma, Kazuya; Yashiro, Masakazu; Onoda, Naoyoshi; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2016-01-01

    Remnant gastric cancer (RGC) and gastric stump cancer after distal gastrectomy (DG) are recognized as the same clinical entity. In this review, the current knowledges as well as the non-settled issues of RGC are presented. Duodenogastric reflux and denervation of the gastric mucosa are considered as the two main factors responsible for the development of RGC after benign disease. On the other hand, some precancerous circumstances which already have existed at the time of initial surgery, such as atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia, are the main factors associated with RGC after gastric cancer. Although eradication of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in remnant stomach is promising, it is still uncertain whether it can reduce the risk of carcinogenesis. Periodic endoscopic surveillance after DG was reported useful in detecting RGC at an early stage, which offers a chance to undergo minimally invasive endoscopic treatment or laparoscopic surgery and leads to an improved prognosis in RGC patients. Future challenges may be expected to elucidate the benefit of eradication of H. pylori in the remnant stomach if it could reduce the risk for RGC, to build an optimal endoscopic surveillance strategy after DG by stratifying the risk for development of RGC, and to develop a specific staging system for RGC for the standardization of the treatment by prospecting the prognosis. PMID:26937131

  20. [Hereditary gastric and pancreatic cancer predisposition syndromes].

    PubMed

    Leoz, María Liz; Sánchez, Ariadna; Carballal, Sabela; Ruano, Lucía; Ocaña, Teresa; Pellisé, María; Castells, Antoni; Balaguer, Francesc; Moreira, Leticia

    2016-01-01

    The most common hereditary gastrointestinal cancers are colorectal, mainly hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch syndrome) and familial adenomatous polyposis. Other extracolonic neoplasms, including the gastric and pancreatic adenocarcinomas, are less well known and studied because they account for a relatively small percentage of hereditary gastrointestinal cancers. Nonetheless, they merit special attention because of the high associated morbidity and mortality rates. We review the hereditary and familial syndromes associated with gastric and pancreatic cancers with a view to improving knowledge and understanding of these diseases, in order to heighten diagnostic suspicion and thus implement appropriate diagnostic strategies, screening, surveillance and treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  1. Gastric cancer arising from the remnant stomach after distal gastrectomy: a review.

    PubMed

    Takeno, Shinsuke; Hashimoto, Tatsuya; Maki, Kenji; Shibata, Ryosuke; Shiwaku, Hironari; Yamana, Ippei; Yamashita, Risako; Yamashita, Yuichi

    2014-10-14

    Gastric stump carcinoma was initially reported by Balfore in 1922, and many reports of this disease have since been published. We herein review previous reports of gastric stump carcinoma with respect to epidemiology, carcinogenesis, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, Epstein-Barr virus infection, clinicopathologic characteristics and endoscopic treatment. In particular, it is noteworthy that no prognostic differences are observed between gastric stump carcinoma and primary upper third gastric cancer. In addition, endoscopic submucosal dissection has recently been used to treat gastric stump carcinoma in the early stage. In contrast, many issues concerning gastric stump carcinoma remain to be clarified, including molecular biological characteristics and the carcinogenesis of H. pylori infection. We herein review the previous pertinent literature and summarize the characteristics of gastric stump carcinoma reported to date.

  2. Investigation of gastric cancers in nude mice using X-ray in-line phase contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Tao, Qiang; Luo, Shuqian

    2014-07-24

    This paper is to report the new imaging of gastric cancers without the use of imaging agents. Both gastric normal regions and gastric cancer regions can be distinguished by using the principal component analysis (PCA) based on the gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM). Human gastric cancer BGC823 cells were implanted into the stomachs of nude mice. Then, 3, 5, 7, 9 or 11 days after cancer cells implantation, the nude mice were sacrificed and their stomachs were removed. X-ray in-line phase contrast imaging (XILPCI), an X-ray phase contrast imaging method, has greater soft tissue contrast than traditional absorption radiography and generates higher-resolution images. The gastric specimens were imaged by an XILPCIs' charge coupled device (CCD) of 9 μm image resolution. The PCA of the projective images' region of interests (ROIs) based on GLCM were extracted to discriminate gastric normal regions and gastric cancer regions. Different stages of gastric cancers were classified by using support vector machines (SVMs). The X-ray in-line phase contrast images of nude mice gastric specimens clearly show the gastric architectures and the details of the early gastric cancers. The phase contrast computed tomography (CT) images of nude mice gastric cancer specimens are better than the traditional absorption CT images without the use of imaging agents. The results of the PCA of the texture parameters based on GLCM of normal regions is (F1+F2) >8.5, but those of cancer regions is (F1+F2) <8.5. The classification accuracy is 83.3% that classifying gastric specimens into different stages using SVMs. This is a very preliminary feasibility study. With further researches, XILPCI could become a noninvasive method for future the early detection of gastric cancers or medical researches.

  3. Investigation of gastric cancers in nude mice using X-ray in-line phase contrast imaging

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This paper is to report the new imaging of gastric cancers without the use of imaging agents. Both gastric normal regions and gastric cancer regions can be distinguished by using the principal component analysis (PCA) based on the gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM). Methods Human gastric cancer BGC823 cells were implanted into the stomachs of nude mice. Then, 3, 5, 7, 9 or 11 days after cancer cells implantation, the nude mice were sacrificed and their stomachs were removed. X-ray in-line phase contrast imaging (XILPCI), an X-ray phase contrast imaging method, has greater soft tissue contrast than traditional absorption radiography and generates higher-resolution images. The gastric specimens were imaged by an XILPCIs’ charge coupled device (CCD) of 9 μm image resolution. The PCA of the projective images’ region of interests (ROIs) based on GLCM were extracted to discriminate gastric normal regions and gastric cancer regions. Different stages of gastric cancers were classified by using support vector machines (SVMs). Results The X-ray in-line phase contrast images of nude mice gastric specimens clearly show the gastric architectures and the details of the early gastric cancers. The phase contrast computed tomography (CT) images of nude mice gastric cancer specimens are better than the traditional absorption CT images without the use of imaging agents. The results of the PCA of the texture parameters based on GLCM of normal regions is (F1 + F2) > 8.5, but those of cancer regions is (F1 + F2) < 8.5. The classification accuracy is 83.3% that classifying gastric specimens into different stages using SVMs. Conclusions This is a very preliminary feasibility study. With further researches, XILPCI could become a noninvasive method for future the early detection of gastric cancers or medical researches. PMID:25060352

  4. Advances in the treatment of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Ilson, David H

    2017-11-01

    To review recent studies in esophagogastric cancer. Positive emission tomography (PET) scan in follow-up after curative treatment of esophagogastric cancer did not lead to improved survival. In the preoperative treatment of esophagogastric cancer, the addition of the antivascular endothelial growth factor agent bevacizumab to perioperative chemotherapy with combination epirubicin, cisplatinum, and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU; ECF) failed to improve survival compared with chemotherapy alone. In a head-to-head comparison of preoperative chemotherapy for locally advanced gastric and esophagogastric adenocarcinoma, FLOT (fluorouracil, leucovorin, oxaliplatin, and docetaxel) significantly improved overall survival compared with ECF. Assessing response to induction chemotherapy prior to combined preoperative chemoradiotherapy in PET nonresponding patients allowed a change in chemotherapy during subsequent radiotherapy with improved rates of pathologic complete response. In human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-positive advanced esophagogastric adenocarcinoma, second-line treatment with the chemotherapy/trastuzumab drug conjugate emtansine/trastuzumab failed to improve response or overall survival compared with treatment using paclitaxel chemotherapy. The immune checkpoint inhibitor, nivolumab, improved survival in refractory gastric cancer. Recent studies in gastric cancer clarify the optimal preoperative chemotherapy regimen and the use of PET scan as a response measure of preoperative therapy in esophagogastric cancer, and the role of targeted agents and immune checkpoint inhibitors in metastatic disease.

  5. Alterations in mtDNA, gastric carcinogenesis and early diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues-Antunes, S; Borges, B N

    2018-05-26

    Gastric cancer remains one of the most prevalent cancers in the world. Due to this, efforts are being made to improve the diagnosis of this neoplasm and the search for molecular markers that may be involved in its genesis. Within this perspective, the mitochondrial DNA is considered as a potential candidate, since it has several well documented changes and is readily accessible. However, numerous alterations have been reported in mtDNA, not facilitating the visualization of which alterations and molecular markers are truly involved with gastric carcinogenesis. This review presents a compilation of the main known changes relating mtDNA to gastric cancer and their clinical significance.

  6. Results of surgery on 6589 gastric cancer patients and immunochemosurgery as the best treatment of advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J P; Kwon, O J; Oh, S T; Yang, H K

    1992-01-01

    Results of 6589 gastric cancer operations at the Department of Surgery, Seoul National University Hospital, from 1970 to 1990 were reported. About two thirds (76.6%) were advanced gastric cancer (stages III and IV). The 5-year survival rate of operated stage III gastric cancer was only 30.6%, with frequent recurrence. Conversely, cell-mediated immunities of advanced gastric cancer patients were significantly decreased. Therefore, to improve the cure rate and to prevent or delay recurrence, curative surgery with confirmation of free resection margins and systematic lymph node dissection of perigastric vessels were performed and followed by early postoperative immunotherapy and chemotherapy (immunochemosurgery) in stage III patients. To evaluate the effect of immunochemosurgery, two randomized trials were studied in 1976 and 1981. In first trial, 5-fluorouracil, mitomycin C, and cytosine arabinoside for chemotherapy and OK 432 for immunotherapy were used. The 5-year survival rates for surgery alone (n = 64) and immunochemosurgery (n = 73) were 23.4% and 44.6%, respectively, a significant difference. In the second trial, there were three groups: group I, immunochemosurgery (n = 159); group II, surgery and chemotherapy (n = 77); and group III, surgery alone (n = 94). 5-Fluorouracil and mitomycin C for chemotherapy and OK-432 for immunotherapy were administered for 2 years. The 5-year survival rate of group I was 45.3%, significantly higher than the 29.8% of group II and than the 24.4% of group III. The postoperative 1-chloro-2.4-dinitrobenzene test, T-lymphocyte percentage, phytohemagglutinin- and con-A-stimulated lymphoblastogenesis and the antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity test showed more favorable values in the immunochemosurgery group. Therefore, immunochemosurgery is the best multimodality treatment for advanced gastric cancer. PMID:1417176

  7. Evaluation of altered expression of miR-9 and miR-106a as an early diagnostic approach in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Shirmohammadi, Khadije; Sohrabi, Sareh; Jafarzadeh Samani, Zahra; Effatpanah, Hosein; Yadegarazari, Reza; Saidijam, Massoud

    2018-02-01

    The role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in cellular processes such as growth, apoptosis, differentiation and proliferation verifies the importance of miRNAs in carcinogenesis. Moreover, levels of miRNAs are dysregulated in cancer cells, so they could be used as novel classes of biomarkers for diagnosing cancer. The oncogenic role of miR-106a and its increased expression have been demonstrated in some cancers. In contrast, there is no consensus for miR-9 expression rate in different cancers. Therefore, this study was done to investigate the role of miR-106a and miR-9 in gastric cancer (GC). The current study was performed on 31 GC tissues as case, and 31 healthy adjacent tissues as a control group. Quantitative reverse transcriptase (q-RT) PCR was used for studying the expression rate of both miR-106a and miR-9 . The expression rate of both miRNAs in cancerous tissues was significantly higher than healthy adjacent tissues (≈10 folds) (P<0.05). The results showed that the expression rate of both markers was significantly increased in cancerous tissues. Therefore, they can be suggested as potential biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and prognosis as well as targets for therapy.

  8. Gene Expression Profiling of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marimuthu, Arivusudar; Jacob, Harrys K.C.; Jakharia, Aniruddha; Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Keerthikumar, Shivakumar; Kashyap, Manoj Kumar; Goel, Renu; Balakrishnan, Lavanya; Dwivedi, Sutopa; Pathare, Swapnali; Dikshit, Jyoti Bajpai; Maharudraiah, Jagadeesha; Singh, Sujay; Sameer Kumar, Ghantasala S; Vijayakumar, M.; Veerendra Kumar, Kariyanakatte Veeraiah; Premalatha, Chennagiri Shrinivasamurthy; Tata, Pramila; Hariharan, Ramesh; Roa, Juan Carlos; Prasad, T.S.K; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Kumar, Rekha Vijay; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide, both in men and women. A genomewide gene expression analysis was carried out to identify differentially expressed genes in gastric adenocarcinoma tissues as compared to adjacent normal tissues. We used Agilent’s whole human genome oligonucleotide microarray platform representing ~41,000 genes to carry out gene expression analysis. Two-color microarray analysis was employed to directly compare the expression of genes between tumor and normal tissues. Through this approach, we identified several previously known candidate genes along with a number of novel candidate genes in gastric cancer. Testican-1 (SPOCK1) was one of the novel molecules that was 10-fold upregulated in tumors. Using tissue microarrays, we validated the expression of testican-1 by immunohistochemical staining. It was overexpressed in 56% (160/282) of the cases tested. Pathway analysis led to the identification of several networks in which SPOCK1 was among the topmost networks of interacting genes. By gene enrichment analysis, we identified several genes involved in cell adhesion and cell proliferation to be significantly upregulated while those corresponding to metabolic pathways were significantly downregulated. The differentially expressed genes identified in this study are candidate biomarkers for gastric adenoacarcinoma. PMID:27030788

  9. Endoscopic gastric atrophy is strongly associated with gastric cancer development after Helicobacter pylori eradication.

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, Osamu; Yamaji, Yutaka; Yoshida, Shuntaro; Matsumoto, Shuhei; Yamashita, Hiroharu; Kanazawa, Takamitsu; Hata, Keisuke

    2017-05-01

    Risk factors for gastric cancer during continuous infection with Helicobacter pylori have been well documented; however, little has been reported on the risk factors for primary gastric cancer after H. pylori eradication. We conducted a retrospective, endoscopy-based, long-term, large-cohort study to clarify the risk factors for gastric cancer following H. pylori eradication. Patients who achieved successful H. pylori eradication and periodically underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy surveillance thereafter at Toyoshima Endoscopy Clinic were enrolled. The primary endpoint was the development of gastric cancer. Statistical analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox's proportional hazards models. Gastric cancer developed in 15 of 1232 patients. The cumulative incidence rates were 1.0 % at 2 years, 2.6 % at 5 years, and 6.8 % at 10 years. Histology showed that all gastric cancers (17 lesions) in the 15 patients were of the intestinal type, within the mucosal layer, and <20 mm in diameter. Based on univariate analysis, older age and higher endoscopic grade of gastric atrophy were significantly associated with gastric cancer development after eradication of H. pylori, and gastric ulcers were marginally associated. Multivariate analysis identified higher grade of gastric atrophy (hazard ratio 1.77; 95 % confidence interval 1.12-2.78; P = 0.01) as the only independently associated parameter. Endoscopic gastric atrophy is a major risk factor for gastric cancer development after H. pylori eradication. Further long-term studies are required to determine whether H. pylori eradication leads to regression of H. pylori-related gastritis and reduces the risk of gastric cancer.

  10. Comparison between early enteral feeding with a transnasal tube and parenteral nutrition after total gastrectomy for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Eiji; Lee, Sang-Woong; Kawai, Masaru; Hara, Hitoshi; Nabeshima, Kazuhito; Nakamura, Kenji; Uchiyama, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective study evaluated 21 patients with early enteral feeding (EEF group) and 22 patients without early enteral feeding (non-EEF group) who underwent open total gastrectomy followed by Roux en Y reconstruction and were RO resectable cases. METHDOLOGY: Postoperative complications and course, postoperative/preoperative body weight, whole meal intake, and nutritional, inflammatory, and immunological parameters were recorded and evaluated in both groups. Postoperative meal intake was significantly higher and the first day of defecation was significantly earlier in the EEF group than in the non-EEF group. There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in the blood laboratory data and the rate of complications. In patients with complications, lymphocyte counts and postoperative body weights were compared as indicators of immunostimulation. The lymphocyte counts 7 days after operation and postoperative/preoperative body weight were significantly higher in the EEF group than in the non-EEF group. Although immunostimulation-like findings were observed in the patients with complications after surgery in the present study, the significance of EEF was not clarified because of the lack of cases whose conditions were severe. EEF should be used especially for patients in whom severe disease is possible and avoidance of TPN is desirable.

  11. Impact of endoscopic screening on mortality reduction from gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hamashima, Chisato; Ogoshi, Kazuei; Narisawa, Rintarou; Kishi, Tomoki; Kato, Toshiyuki; Fujita, Kazutaka; Sano, Masatoshi; Tsukioka, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate mortality reduction from gastric cancer based on the results of endoscopic screening. METHODS: The study population consisted of participants of gastric cancer screening by endoscopy, regular radiography, and photofluorography at Niigata city in 2005. The observed numbers of cumulative deaths from gastric cancers and other cancers were accumulated by linkage with the Niigata Prefectural Cancer Registry. The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) of gastric cancer and other cancer deaths in each screening group was calculated by applying the mortality rate of the reference population. RESULTS: Based on the results calculated from the mortality rate of the population of Niigata city, the SMRs of gastric cancer death were 0.43 (95%CI: 0.30-0.57) for the endoscopic screening group, 0.68 (95%CI: 0.55-0.79) for the regular radiographic screening group, and 0.85 (95%CI: 0.71-0.94) for the photofluorography screening group. The mortality reduction from gastric cancer was higher in the endoscopic screening group than in the regular radiographic screening group despite the nearly equal mortality rates of all cancers except gastric cancer. CONCLUSION: The 57% mortality reduction from gastric cancer might indicate the effectiveness of endoscopic screening for gastric cancer. Further studies and prudent interpretation of results are needed. PMID:25741155

  12. The current situation for gastric cancer in Chile

    PubMed Central

    Caglevic, Christian; Silva, Shirley; Mahave, Mauricio; Rolfo, Christian; Gallardo, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a neoplasm with a high incidence and mortality rate in Chile where more than 3000 people die every year from this type of cancer. This study shows the clinical and epidemiological considerations of this disease, information about translational research on this pathology in Chile, the contribution of Chilean doctors to the development of gastric cancer management awareness and the general situation of gastric cancer in Chile. PMID:28105078

  13. The current situation for gastric cancer in Chile.

    PubMed

    Caglevic, Christian; Silva, Shirley; Mahave, Mauricio; Rolfo, Christian; Gallardo, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a neoplasm with a high incidence and mortality rate in Chile where more than 3000 people die every year from this type of cancer. This study shows the clinical and epidemiological considerations of this disease, information about translational research on this pathology in Chile, the contribution of Chilean doctors to the development of gastric cancer management awareness and the general situation of gastric cancer in Chile.

  14. Targeting BRCAness in Gastric Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-10-01

    modified CRISPR system using dCas9-KRAB expressing variants of these cells, and validated them for CRISPRi screening. These reagents will next be used...OE19 Adherent Stable Oesophagus/ gastric cardia - - - OE33 Adherent Stable Esophageal adenocarcinoma - - - Figure 2. Validation of CRISPR ...project planning and reporting Patrick O’Leary Postdoctoral Fellow UCSF PH.D. Design, execution, and interpretation of CRISPR experiments

  15. Molecular Signaling in Tumorigenesis of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed

    Molaei, Fatemeh; Forghanifard, Mohammad Mahdi; Fahim, Yasaman; Abbaszadegan, Mohammad Reza

    2018-07-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is regarded as the fifth most common cancer and the third cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Mechanism of GC pathogenesis is still unclear and relies on multiple factors, including environmental and genetic characteristics. One of the most important environmental factors of GC occurrence is infection with Helicobacter pylori that is classified as class one carcinogens. Dysregulation of several genes and pathways play an essential role during gastric carcinogenesis. Dysregulation of developmental pathways such as Wnt/β-catenin signaling, Hedgehog signaling, Hippo pathway, Notch signaling, nuclear factor-kB, and epidermal growth factor receptor have been found in GC. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition, as an important process during embryogenesis and tumorigenesis, is supposed to play a role in initiation, invasion, metastasis, and progression of GC. Although surgery is the main therapeutic modality of the disease, the understanding of biological processes of cell signaling pathways may help to develop new therapeutic targets for GC.

  16. Resveratrol: A potential challenger against gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zulueta, Aida; Caretti, Anna; Signorelli, Paola; Ghidoni, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the fourth most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the world. Late diagnosis and classical therapeutic approaches such as surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy make this disease a still threatening tumor. Genetic asset, environmental stress, dietary habit and infections caused by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) are the major causes concurring to GC initiation. A common mechanism is induction of radicals resulting in gastric mucosal injury. A regular food intake of antioxidant and radical scavenging agents has been proposed to exert protection against tumorigenesis. Resveratrol belongs to the polyphenol flavonoids class of antioxidants produced by a restricted number of plants. Resveratrol exerts bactericidal activity against H. pylori and is a powerful antioxidant, thus acting as a tumor preventive agent. Resveratrol intracellular signaling results in growth arrest and apoptosis, so that it can be directed against tumor progression. Resveratrol therapeutic potential against GC initiation and progression are reviewed here. PMID:26457023

  17. Laparoscopic splenic hilar lymphadenectomy for advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Hosogi, Hisahiro; Okabe, Hiroshi; Shinohara, Hisashi; Tsunoda, Shigeru; Hisamori, Shigeo; Sakai, Yoshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic distal gastrectomy has recently become accepted as a surgical option for early gastric cancer in the distal stomach, but laparoscopic total gastrectomy (LTG) has not become widespread because of technical difficulties of esophagojejunal anastomosis and splenic hilar lymphadenectomy. Splenic hilar lymphadenectomy should be employed in the treatment of advanced proximal gastric cancer to complete D2 dissection, but laparoscopically it is technically difficult even for skilled surgeons. Based on the evidence that prophylactic combined resection of spleen in total gastrectomy increased the risk of postoperative morbidity with no survival impact, surgeons have preferred laparoscopic spleen-preserving splenic hilar lymphadenectomy (LSPL) for advanced tumors without metastasis to splenic hilar nodes or invasion to the greater curvature of the stomach, and reports with LSPL have been increasing rather than LTG with splenectomy. In this paper, recent reports with laparoscopic splenic hilar lymphadenectomy were reviewed.

  18. The Rs4938723 Polymorphism Reduces Expression of MicroRNA-34b and Increases the Risk of Recurrence after Endoscopic Dissection in Early Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kuaiyun

    2017-01-01

    In respect to the effect of MET1 upon the recurrence of Early gastric cancer (EGC) after endoscopic dissection (ESD) treatment, we aimed to investigate the molecular mechanism, including the potential regulator and signaling pathways of MET1 in this study. We searched the miRNA database online (www.mirdb.org) with the "seed sequence" located within the 3'-UTR of the target gene, and then validated MET1 to be the direct gene via luciferase reporter assay system. Real-time PCR and western-blot were used to determine the expression of miR-34b mRNA and MET1 mRNA and protein in different treating group. MET1 was the direct gene of miR-34b by searching the miRNA database online and constructing luciferase reporter. We also investigated the negative regulatory relationship between miR-34b and MET1 via studying the relative luciferase activity at different concentrations of miR-34b mimics. Further, since rs4938723 polymorphism was previously reported to be interfering with the expression of miR-34b, we investigated the expression level of different genotypes including TT (N=20), TC (N=9) and CC (N=3), which supported the hypothesis that the presence of minor allele (C) of rs4938723 polymorphism compromised the expression of miR-34b. Meanwhile, we also conducted real time PCR and Western blot analysis to study the mRNA and protein expression level of MET1 among different genotypes or cells treated with different concentration of miR-34b mimics/inhibitors, indicating the negative regulatory relationship between miR-34b and MET1.We also investigated the relative viability of EGC cells when transfected with miR-34b mimics (50nM and 100nM) and miR-34b inhibitors (100nM) to validate miR-34b to be negatively interfering with the viability of EGC cells. These data confirmed miR-34b rs4938723 polymorphism was also recognized as a biomarker to predict recurrence after ESD in EGC patients via analysis upon the recurrence-free rate among different genotypes of EGC patients. © 2017

  19. Long-term outcomes of endoscopic submucosal dissection versus surgery in early gastric cancer meeting expanded indication including undifferentiated-type tumors: a criteria-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sunpyo; Choi, Kee Don; Han, Minkyu; Na, Hee Kyong; Ahn, Ji Yong; Jung, Kee Wook; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Do Hoon; Song, Ho June; Lee, Gin Hyug; Yook, Jeong-Hwan; Kim, Byung Sik; Jung, Hwoon-Yong

    2018-05-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for early gastric cancer (EGC) meeting the expanded indication is considered investigational. We aimed to compare long-term outcomes of ESD and surgery for EGC in the expanded indication based on each criterion. This study included 1823 consecutive EGC patients meeting expanded indication conditions and treated at a tertiary referral center: 916 and 907 patients underwent surgery or ESD, respectively. The expanded indication included four discrete criteria: (I) intramucosal differentiated tumor, without ulcers, size >2 cm; (II) intramucosal differentiated tumor, with ulcers, size ≤3 cm; (III) intramucosal undifferentiated tumor, without ulcers, size ≤2 cm; and (IV) submucosal invasion <500 μm (sm1), differentiated tumor, size ≤3 cm. We selected 522 patients in each group by propensity score matching and retrospectively evaluated each group. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS); the secondary outcomes were disease-specific survival (DSS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and treatment-related complications. In all patients and subgroups meeting each criterion, OS and DSS were not significantly different between groups (OS and DSS, all patients: p = 0.354 and p = 0.930; criteria I: p = 0.558 and p = 0.688; criterion II: p = 1.000 and p = 1.000; criterion III: p = 0.750 and p = 0.799; and criterion IV: p = 0.599 and p = 0.871). RFS, in all patients and criterion I, was significantly shorter in the ESD group than in the surgery group (p < 0.001 and p < 0.003, respectively). The surgery group showed higher rates of late and severe treatment-related complications than the ESD group. ESD may be an alternative treatment option to surgery for EGCs meeting expanded indications, including undifferentiated-type tumors.

  20. Early presence of anti-angiogenesis-related adverse events as a potential biomarker of antitumor efficacy in metastatic gastric cancer patients treated with apatinib: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinyang; Qin, Shukui; Wang, Zhichao; Xu, Jianming; Xiong, Jianping; Bai, Yuxian; Wang, Zhehai; Yang, Yan; Sun, Guoping; Wang, Liwei; Zheng, Leizhen; Xu, Nong; Cheng, Ying; Guo, Weijian; Yu, Hao; Liu, Tianshu; Lagiou, Pagona; Li, Jin

    2017-09-05

    Reliable biomarkers of apatinib response in gastric cancer (GC) are lacking. We investigated the association between early presence of common adverse events (AEs) and clinical outcomes in metastatic GC patients. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using data on 269 apatinib-treated GC patients in two clinical trials. AEs were assessed at baseline until 28 days after the last dose of apatinib. Clinical outcomes were compared between patients with and without hypertension (HTN), proteinuria, or hand and foot syndrome (HFS) in the first 4 weeks. Time-to-event variables were assessed using Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazard regression models. Binary endpoints were assessed using logistic regression models. Landmark analyses were performed as sensitivity analyses. Predictive model was analyzed, and risk scores were calculated to predict overall survival. Presence of AEs in the first 4 weeks was associated with prolonged median overall survival (169 vs. 103 days, log-rank p = 0.0039; adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 0.64, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.64-0.84, p = 0.001), prolonged median progression-free survival (86.5 vs. 62 days, log-rank p = 0.0309; adjusted HR 0.69, 95% CI 0.53-0.91, p = 0.007), and increased disease control rate (54.67 vs. 32.77%; adjusted odds ratio 2.67, p < 0.001). Results remained significant in landmark analyses. The onset of any single AE or any combinations of the AEs were all statistically significantly associated with prolonged OS, except for the presence of proteinuria. An AE-based prediction model and subsequently derived scoring system showed high calibration and discrimination in predicting overall survival. Presence of HTN, proteinuria, or HFS during the first cycle of apatinib treatment was a viable biomarker of antitumor efficacy in metastatic GC patients.

  1. Molecular pathology of gastric cancer: research and practice.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Wataru; Sentani, Kazuhiro; Sakamoto, Naoya; Anami, Katsuhiro; Naito, Yutaka; Oue, Naohide

    2011-10-15

    Recent advances in the understanding of molecular stomach carcinogenesis are reviewed. As to molecular events in individual mucin phenotypes of gastric cancer, the CDX2-Reg IV-SOX9 pathway is associated with the intestinal mucin phenotype, while OLFM4 and CLDN18 are novel markers for the gastric phenotype. microRNAs play an important role in epigenetic deregulation in gastric cancer. Many microRNAs are up-regulated and down-regulated, and some of these are associated with histological differentiation and cancer progression. Reduced miR-200 may participate in the genesis of diffuse type gastric cancer by reducing E-cadherin expression. Genetic polymorphism is a crucial endogenous cause and a fundamental factor of cancer risk. PSCA polymorphism alters the susceptibility to diffuse type gastric cancer through modulation of cell proliferation activity. Cancer stem cells possess the capacity for self-renewal and cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells. Cancer stem cells also show resistance to anti-tumor chemotherapy. Only a minor population of gastric cancer cells reveals the properties of cancer stem cells, and CD44 is one of the markers for gastric cancer stem cells. The origin of gastric cancer stem cells remains to be elucidated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Risk of Gastric Cancer Among Patients With Intestinal Metaplasia of the Stomach in a US Integrated Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Kavya M; Chang, Jonathan I; Shi, Jiaxiao M; Wu, Bechien U

    2016-10-01

    Gastric intestinal metaplasia (GIM) is a common finding from routine endoscopies. Although GIM is an early step in gastric carcinogenesis, there is controversy regarding routine surveillance of patients with GIM in regions with a low prevalence of gastric cancer. We aimed to determine the incidence of gastric cancer among patients with GIM and risk factors for gastric cancer. We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients from the Kaiser Permanente Southern California region diagnosed with GIM from 2000 through 2011. GIM was identified by a keyword search of pathology reports; gastric cancer cases were identified by cross-reference with an internal cancer registry. The incidence of gastric cancer in patients with GIM (n = 923; median age at diagnosis, 68 y) was compared with that of an age- and sex-matched reference population (controls). Risk factors such as ethnicity, smoking status, history of Helicobacter pylori infection, and family history of gastric cancer were evaluated by individual Cox proportional hazards regression. We then performed a second case-cohort study to evaluate the risk of gastric cancer based on the location and extent of GIM. The median duration of follow-up evaluation was 4.6 years (interquartile range, 3.0-6.7 y). We identified 25 patients with GIM who developed gastric cancers. Seventeen cases of cancer were diagnosed at the same time as the diagnosis of GIM. Eight cases of cancer were identified within a median time period of 4.6 years after a diagnosis of GIM (interquartile range, 2-5.7 y). The overall incidence rate for the cohort was 1.72 (95% confidence interval, 0.74-3.39). Among the risk factors evaluated, only family history (hazard ratio, 3.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.5-9.7; P = .012) and extent of GIM (odds ratio, 9.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.8-50.4) increased the risk for gastric cancer. The incidence rate for gastric cancer in patients with a positive family history was 8.12 (95% confidence interval, 1

  3. Lessons Learned From a Case of Gastric Cancer After Liver Transplantation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kun; Zhu, Hong; Chen, Chong-Cheng; Wen, Tian-Fu; Zhang, Wei-Han; Liu, Kai; Chen, Xin-Zu; Guo, Dong-Jiao; Zhou, Zong-Guang; Hu, Jian-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nowadays, de novo malignancies have become an important cause of death after transplantation. According to the accumulation of cases with liver transplantation, the incidence of de novo gastric cancer is anticipated to increase among liver transplant recipients in the near future, especially in some East Asian countries where both liver diseases requiring liver transplantation and gastric cancer are major burdens. Unfortunately, there is limited information regarding the relationship between de novo gastric cancer and liver transplantation. Herein, we report a case of stage IIIc gastric cancer after liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma, who was successfully treated by radical distal gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy but died 15 months later due to tumor progression. Furthermore, we extract some lessons to learn from the case and review the literatures. The incidence of de novo gastric cancer following liver transplantations is increasing and higher than the general population. Doctors should be vigilant in early detection and control the risk factors causing de novo gastric cancer after liver transplantation. Curative gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy is still the mainstay of treatment for such patients. Preoperative assessments, strict postoperative monitoring, and managements are mandatory. Limited chemotherapy could be given to the patients with high risk of recurrence. Close surveillance, early detection, and treatment of posttransplant cancers are extremely important and essential to improve the survival. PMID:26886605

  4. Sentinel lymph node navigation surgery for gastric cancer: Does it really benefit the patient?

    PubMed

    Tani, Tohru; Sonoda, Hiromichi; Tani, Masaji

    2016-03-14

    Sentinel lymph node (SLN) navigation surgery is accepted as a standard treatment procedure for malignant melanoma and breast cancer. However, the benefit of reduced lymphadenectomy based on SLN examination remains unclear in cases of gastric cancer. Here, we review previous studies to determine whether SLN navigation surgery is beneficial for gastric cancer patients. Recently, a large-scale prospective study from the Japanese Society of Sentinel Node Navigation Surgery reported that the endoscopic dual tracer method, using a dye and radioisotope for SLN biopsy, was safe and effective when applied to cases of superficial and relatively small gastric cancers. SLN mapping with SLN basin dissection was preferred for early gastric cancer since it is minimally invasive. However, previous studies reported that limited gastrectomy and lymphadenectomy may not improve the patient's postoperative quality of life (QOL). As a result, the benefit of SLN navigation surgery for gastric cancer patients, in terms of their QOL, is limited. Thus, endoscopic and laparoscopic limited gastrectomy combined with SLN navigation surgery has the potential to become the standard minimally invasive surgery in early gastric cancer.

  5. Gastric cancer research in Mexico: a public health priority.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Clara Luz; Mora, Mauricio

    2014-04-28

    This study aimed review studies conducted on Mexican patients diagnosed with gastric cancer and/or diseases associated with its development, in which at least one Mexican institute has participated, and to assess their contributions to the primary and secondary prevention of this disease. A search of the Medline database was conducted using the following keywords: gastric/stomach cancer, Mexico. Studies of the Mexican population were selected in which at least one Mexican Institute had participated and where the findings could support public policy proposals directed towards the primary or secondary prevention of gastric cancer. Of the 148 studies found in the Medline database, 100 were discarded and 48 were reviewed. According to the analysis presented, these studies were classified as: epidemiology of gastric cancer (5/48); risk factors and protectors relating to gastric cancer (9/48); relationship between Helicobacter pylori and pathologies associated with gastric cancer and the development of the disease (16/48); relationship between the Epstein-Barr virus and pathologies associated with gastric cancer and the development of the disease (3/48); molecular markers for the development of diseases associated with gastric cancer and gastric cancer (15/48). Mexico requires a program for the prevention and control of gastric cancer based on national health indicators. This should be produced by a multidisciplinary committee of experts who can propose actions that are relevant in the current national context. The few studies of gastric cancer conducted on the Mexican population in national institutes highlight the poor connection that currently exists between the scientific community and the health sector in terms of resolving this health issue. Public policies for health research should support projects with findings that can be translated into benefits for the population. This review serves to identify national research groups studying gastric cancer in the Mexican

  6. Gastric cancer research in Mexico: A public health priority

    PubMed Central

    Sampieri, Clara Luz; Mora, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed review studies conducted on Mexican patients diagnosed with gastric cancer and/or diseases associated with its development, in which at least one Mexican institute has participated, and to assess their contributions to the primary and secondary prevention of this disease. A search of the Medline database was conducted using the following keywords: gastric/stomach cancer, Mexico. Studies of the Mexican population were selected in which at least one Mexican Institute had participated and where the findings could support public policy proposals directed towards the primary or secondary prevention of gastric cancer. Of the 148 studies found in the Medline database, 100 were discarded and 48 were reviewed. According to the analysis presented, these studies were classified as: epidemiology of gastric cancer (5/48); risk factors and protectors relating to gastric cancer (9/48); relationship between Helicobacter pylori and pathologies associated with gastric cancer and the development of the disease (16/48); relationship between the Epstein-Barr virus and pathologies associated with gastric cancer and the development of the disease (3/48); molecular markers for the development of diseases associated with gastric cancer and gastric cancer (15/48). Mexico requires a program for the prevention and control of gastric cancer based on national health indicators. This should be produced by a multidisciplinary committee of experts who can propose actions that are relevant in the current national context. The few studies of gastric cancer conducted on the Mexican population in national institutes highlight the poor connection that currently exists between the scientific community and the health sector in terms of resolving this health issue. Public policies for health research should support projects with findings that can be translated into benefits for the population. This review serves to identify national research groups studying gastric cancer in the Mexican

  7. Randomized trials and quality assurance in gastric cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Dikken, Johan L; Cats, Annemieke; Verheij, Marcel; van de Velde, Cornelis J H

    2013-03-01

    A D2 lymphadenectomy can be considered standard of surgical care for advanced resectable gastric cancer. Currently, several multimodality strategies are used, including postoperative monochemotherapy in Asia, postoperative chemoradiotherapy in the United States, and perioperative chemotherapy in Europe. As the majority of gastric cancer patients are treated outside the framework of clinical trials, quality assurance programs, including referral to high-volume centers and clinical auditing are needed to improve gastric cancer care on a nationwide level. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Cancer-adipose tissue interaction and fluid flow synergistically modulate cell kinetics, HER2 expression, and trastuzumab efficacy in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Akutagawa, Takashi; Aoki, Shigehisa; Yamamoto-Rikitake, Mihoko; Iwakiri, Ryuichi; Fujimoto, Kazuma; Toda, Shuji

    2018-04-25

    Early local tumor invasion in gastric cancer results in likely encounters between cancer cells and submucosal and subserosal adipose tissue, but these interactions remain to be clarified. Microenvironmental mechanical forces, such as fluid flow, are known to modulate normal cell kinetics, but the effects of fluid flow on gastric cancer cells are poorly understood. We analyzed the cell kinetics and chemosensitivity in gastric cancer using a simple in vitro model that simultaneously replicated the cancer-adipocyte interaction and physical microenvironment. Gastric cancer cells (MKN7 and MKN74) were seeded on rat adipose tissue fragment-embedded discs or collagen discs alone. To generate fluid flow, samples were placed on a rotatory shaker in a CO 2 incubator. Proliferation, apoptosis, invasion, and motility-related molecules were analyzed by morphometry and immunostaining. Proteins were evaluated by western blot analysis. Chemosensitivity was investigated by trastuzumab treatment. Adipose tissue and fluid flow had a positive synergistic effect on the proliferative potential and invasive capacity of gastric cancer cells, and adipose tissue inhibited apoptosis in these cells. Adipose tissue upregulated ERK1/2 signaling in gastric cancer cells, but downregulated p38 signaling. Notably, adipose tissue and fluid flow promoted membranous and cytoplasmic HER2 expression and modulated chemosensitivity to trastuzumab in gastric cancer cells. We have demonstrated that cancer-adipocyte interaction and physical microenvironment mutually modulate gastric cancer cell kinetics. Further elucidation of the microenvironmental regulation in gastric cancer will be very important for the development of strategies involving molecular targeted therapy.

  9. Why is the coexistence of gastric cancer and duodenal ulcer rare? Examination of factors related to both gastric cancer and duodenal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Ubukata, Hideyuki; Nagata, Hiroyuki; Tabuchi, Takanobu; Konishi, Satoru; Kasuga, Teruhiko; Tabuchi, Takafumi

    2011-03-01

    The coexistence of gastric cancer with duodenal ulcer has been found empirically to be rare, but why it is rare is difficult to explain satisfactorily. To elucidate this question, we carried out a literature review of the subject. The frequency with which the two diseases coexist is 0.1-1.7%, and the main factor associated with both gastric cancer and duodenal ulcer is Helicobacter pylori infection. However, there are marked differences between the disorders of hyperchlorhydria in duodenal ulcer, and hypochlorhydria in gastric cancer. The most acceptable view of the reason for the difference may be that the acquisition of H. pylori infection occurs mainly in childhood, so that the time of acquisition of atrophic gastritis may be the most important, and if atrophic gastritis is not acquired early, high levels of gastric acid may occur, and consequently acute antral gastritis and duodenal ulcer may occur in youth, whereas, in elderly individuals, persistent H. pylori infections and the early appearance of atrophic gastritis may be the causes of low gastric acid, and consequently gastric cancer may occur. In patients with duodenal ulcer, factors such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and dupA-H. pylori strains may contribute to preventing the early acquisition of atrophic gastritis, while acid-suppressive therapy and vascular endothelial growth factor and other entities may inhibit atrophic gastritis. In contrast, in gastric cancer, factors such as excessive salt intake, acid-suppressive therapy, polymorphisms of inflammatory cytokines, and the homB-H. pylori strain may contribute to the early acquisition of atrophic gastritis, while factors such as NSAIDs; fruits and vegetables; vitamins A, C, and E; and good nutrition may inhibit it.

  10. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Screening (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Cancer.gov

    There is no standard or routine screening test for stomach (gastric) cancer. Stomach (gastric) cancer is not common in the U.S. Learn about tests that have been studied to detect or screen for stomach cancer in this expert-reviewed summary.

  11. Clinical significance of the pattern of lymph node metastasis depending on the location of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Han, Ki Bin; Jang, You Jin; Kim, Jong Han; Park, Sung Soo; Park, Seong Heum; Kim, Seung Joo; Mok, Young Jae; Kim, Chong Suk

    2011-06-01

    When performing a laparoscopic assisted gastrectomy, a function-preserving gastrectomy is performed depending on the location of the primary gastric cancer. This study examined the incidence of lymph node metastasis by the lymph node station number by tumor location to determine the optimal extent of the lymph node dissection. The subjects consisted of 1,510 patients diagnosed with gastric cancer who underwent a gastrectomy between 1996 and 2005. The patients were divided into three groups: upper, middle and lower third, depending on the location of the primary tumor. The lymph node metastasis patterns were analyzed in the total and early gastric cancer patients. In all patients, lymph node station numbers 1, 2, 3, 7, 10 and 11 metastases were dominant in the cancer originating in the upper third, whereas station numbers 4, 5, 6 and 8 were dominant in the lower third. In early gastric cancer patients, the station number of lymph nodes with a metastasis did not show a significant difference in stage pT1a disease. On the other hand, a metastasis in lymph node station number 6 was dominant in stage pT1b disease that originated in the lower third of the stomach. When performing a laparoscopic-assisted gastrectomy for early gastric cancer, a limited lymphadenectomy is considered adequate during a function-preserving gastrectomy in mucosal (T1a) cancer. On the other hand, for submucosal (T1b) cancer, a number 6 node dissection should be performed when performing a pylorus preserving gastrectomy.

  12. Alterations of telomerase activity and terminal restriction fragment in gastric cancer and its premalignant lesions.

    PubMed

    Yang, S M; Fang, D C; Luo, Y H; Lu, R; Battle, P D; Liu, W W

    2001-08-01

    In order to explore the role of alterations of telomerase activity and terminal restriction fragment (TRF) length in the development and progression of gastric cancer. Telomerase activity was detected in 176 specimens of gastric mucosa obtained through an operation or endoscopical biopsy by using the telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay. Meanwhile, the mean length of TRF was measured with the use of a Southern blot in part of those samples. Telomerase activity was detected in 14 of 57 (24.6%) chronic atrophy gastritis patients, six of 18 (33.3%) intestinal metaplasia patients, three of eight (37.5%) dysplasia patients and 60 of 65 (92.3%) gastric cancer patients, respectively. Normal gastric mucosa revealed no telomerase activity. No association was found between telomerase activity and any clinicopathological parameters. The mean TRF length was decreased gradually with age in normal mucosa and in gastric cancer tissue. Regression analysis demonstrated that the reduction rate in these tissues was 41 +/- 12 base pairs/year. Among 35 gastric cancers, TRF length was shown to be shorter in 20 cases (57.1%), similar in 12 cases (34.3%) and elongated in three cases (7.6%), compared to the corresponding adjacent tissues. The mean TRF length tended to decrease as the mucosa underwent chronic atrophy gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia and into gastric cancer. The mean TRF length in gastric cancer was not statistically correlated with clinicopathological parameters and telomerase activity. Our results suggest that telomerase is expressed during the early stage of gastric carcinogenesis, and that the clinical significance of TRF length appears to be limited in gastric cancer.

  13. Favoring D2-Lymphadenectomy in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Karavokyros, Ioannis; Michalinos, Adamantios

    2018-01-01

    The role of extended lymphadenectomy in the surgical treatment of gastric cancer has been debated for many years. So far six prospective randomized trials and a number of meta-analyses comparing D1- to D2-lymphadenectomy in open surgery have been published with contradicting results. The possible oncologic benefit of radical lymphadenectomy has been blurred by a number of reasons. In most of the trials the strategies under comparison were made similar after protocol violations. Imperfect design of the trials could not exclude the influence of cofounding factors. Inappropriate endpoints could not detect evidently the difference between the two surgical strategies. On the other hand radical lymphadenectomy was characterized by increased morbidity and mortality. This was mostly caused by the addition of pancreatico-splenectomy in all D2-dissections, even when not indicated. A careful analysis of the available evidence indicates that D2-lymphadenectomy performed by adequately trained surgeons without resection of the pancreas and/or spleen, unless otherwise indicated, decreases Gastric Cancer Related Deaths and increases Disease Specific Survival. This evidence is not compelling but cannot be ignored. D2-lymphadendctomy is nowadays considered to be the standard of care for resectable gastric cancer. PMID:29930941

  14. Favoring D2-Lymphadenectomy in Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Karavokyros, Ioannis; Michalinos, Adamantios

    2018-01-01

    The role of extended lymphadenectomy in the surgical treatment of gastric cancer has been debated for many years. So far six prospective randomized trials and a number of meta-analyses comparing D 1 - to D 2 -lymphadenectomy in open surgery have been published with contradicting results. The possible oncologic benefit of radical lymphadenectomy has been blurred by a number of reasons. In most of the trials the strategies under comparison were made similar after protocol violations. Imperfect design of the trials could not exclude the influence of cofounding factors. Inappropriate endpoints could not detect evidently the difference between the two surgical strategies. On the other hand radical lymphadenectomy was characterized by increased morbidity and mortality. This was mostly caused by the addition of pancreatico-splenectomy in all D 2 -dissections, even when not indicated. A careful analysis of the available evidence indicates that D 2 -lymphadenectomy performed by adequately trained surgeons without resection of the pancreas and/or spleen, unless otherwise indicated, decreases Gastric Cancer Related Deaths and increases Disease Specific Survival. This evidence is not compelling but cannot be ignored. D 2 -lymphadendctomy is nowadays considered to be the standard of care for resectable gastric cancer.

  15. Microsatellite Instability of Gastric and Colorectal Cancers as a Predictor of Synchronous Gastric or Colorectal Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Beak; Lee, Sun-Young; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Sung, In-Kyung; Park, Hyung Seok; Shim, Chan Sup; Han, Hye Seung

    2016-03-01

    Microsatellite instability (MSI) plays a crucial role in gastrointestinal carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to clarify whether MSI is a useful marker for predicting synchronous gastric and colorectal neoplasms. Consecutive patients who underwent both esophagogastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy before the resection of gastric or colorectal cancers were included. MSI was analyzed using two mononucleotide and three dinucleotide markers. In total, 434 gastric cancers (372 microsatellite stability [MSS], 21 low incidence of MSI [MSI-L], and 41 high incidence of MSI [MSI-H]) and 162 colorectal cancers (138 MSS, 9 MSI-L, and 15 MSI-H) were included. Patients with MSI gastric cancer had a higher prevalence of synchronous colorectal cancer, colorectal adenoma, and gastric adenoma than those with MSS gastric cancers (4.8% vs 0.5%, p=0.023; 11.3% vs 3.2%, p=0.011; 3.2% vs 1.2%, p=0.00, respectively). The prevalence of synchronous colorectal adenomas was highest in MSI-L gastric cancers (19.0%), compared with MSI-H (7.3%) or MSS (3.2%) gastric cancers (p=0.002). In addition, there were no significant differences in the prevalence rates of synchronous colorectal adenoma among the MSI-H (13.3%), MSI-L (11.1%), and MSS (12.3%) colorectal cancers (p=0.987). The presence of MSI in gastric cancer may be a predictor of synchronous gastric and colorectal neoplasms, whereas MSI in colorectal cancer is not a predictor of synchronous colorectal adenoma.

  16. Microsatellite Instability of Gastric and Colorectal Cancers as a Predictor of Synchronous Gastric or Colorectal Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Beak; Lee, Sun-Young; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Sung, In-Kyung; Park, Hyung Seok; Shim, Chan Sup; Han, Hye Seung

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Microsatellite instability (MSI) plays a crucial role in gastrointestinal carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to clarify whether MSI is a useful marker for predicting synchronous gastric and colorectal neoplasms. Methods Consecutive patients who underwent both esophagogastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy before the resection of gastric or colorectal cancers were included. MSI was analyzed using two mononucleotide and three dinucleotide markers. Results In total, 434 gastric cancers (372 microsatellite stability [MSS], 21 low incidence of MSI [MSI-L], and 41 high incidence of MSI [MSI-H]) and 162 colorectal cancers (138 MSS, 9 MSI-L, and 15 MSI-H) were included. Patients with MSI gastric cancer had a higher prevalence of synchronous colorectal cancer, colorectal adenoma, and gastric adenoma than those with MSS gastric cancers (4.8% vs 0.5%, p=0.023; 11.3% vs 3.2%, p=0.011; 3.2% vs 1.2%, p=0.00, respectively). The prevalence of synchronous colorectal adenomas was highest in MSI-L gastric cancers (19.0%), compared with MSI-H (7.3%) or MSS (3.2%) gastric cancers (p=0.002). In addition, there were no significant differences in the prevalence rates of synchronous colorectal adenoma among the MSI-H (13.3%), MSI-L (11.1%), and MSS (12.3%) colorectal cancers (p=0.987). Conclusions The presence of MSI in gastric cancer may be a predictor of synchronous gastric and colorectal neoplasms, whereas MSI in colorectal cancer is not a predictor of synchronous colorectal adenoma. PMID:26087787

  17. Precordial skin burns after endoscopic submucosal dissection for gastric tube cancer.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Motoshi; Yoshio, Toshiyuki; Hirasawa, Toshiaki; Ishiyama, Akiyoshi; Yamamoto, Yorimasa; Tsuchida, Tomohiro; Fujisaki, Junko; Igarashi, Masahiro

    2015-11-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is useful as a minimally invasive treatment option for early gastric cancer. ESD is also used in the management of postoperative remnant gastric cancers in the stomach and gastric tube cancers. Perforation and delayed bleeding have been the main complications of ESD reported in the management of gastric tube cancer. However, in the current literature, there is no description of precordial skin burns caused by electrical coagulation. While we treated 22 patients with gastric tube cancers by ESD from 2005 to 2014, we experienced five skin burns in four patients after ESD. We retrospectively analyzed clinical characteristics of precordial skin burn as a complication of ESD. All skin burns occurred in patients reconstructed using a presternal route, whose incidence of precordial skin burn was 55.6%. In all cases, lesions were located in the upper or middle third of gastric tubes irrespective of their direction. Skin burn developed on postoperative day (POD) 1 or POD 2, taking 4-7 days to heal and was accompanied by high fever in 60% of cases. The present study suggests that when carrying out ESD for gastric tube cancer using the presternal route, it is necessary to consider the occurrence of a precordial skin burn as a possible complication. © 2015 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2015 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  18. Gastritis, nitrosamines, and gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Stemmermann, G.N.; Mower, H.

    1981-01-01

    Gastritis is associated with peptic ulcer, gastroenterostomy, pernicious anemia, and exposure to nitrosamines. Once established, the process may be self-perpetuating, resulting in atrophy, metaplasia, dysplasia, and neoplasia. This can be explained by the process of endogenous nitrosation of amines in the inflamed gastric mucosa. Evidence is presented to support this hypothesis. Several drugs given parenterally have been identified as mutagenic nitroso compounds in homogenates of human and canine antral mucosa. Nitrite for this process is apparently derived from the inflamed mucosa. Different amines appear to be nitrosated at different places in the antrum, suggesting the presence of site-specific enzymes thatmore » control these reactions.« less

  19. TCGA divides gastric cancer into four molecular subtypes: implications for individualized therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei

    2014-10-01

    Gastric cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths in the world. The treatment of gastric cancer is challenging because of its highly heterogeneous etiology and clinical characteristics. Recent genomic and molecular characterization of gastric cancer, especially the findings reported by the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), have shed light on the heterogeneity and potential targeted therapeutics for four different subtypes of gastric cancer.

  20. Outcome and status of microsatellite stability in Japanese atomic bomb survivors with early gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Manabu; Taguchi, Kenichi; Yamanaka, Takeharu; Matsuyama, Ayumi; Yoshinaga, Keiji; Tsutsui, Shinichi; Ishida, Teruyoshi

    2013-03-01

    In the decade after the 1945 atomic bombing of Hiroshima, a high incidence of leukemia was observed among atomic bomb survivors. However, the incidence of other cancers gradually increased, while that of leukemia decreased after this period. We evaluated the clinical outcome of early gastric cancer and microsatellite stability over a long-term period in atomic bomb survivors. The results of surgical treatment for early gastric cancer were reviewed for 117 atomic bomb survivors and 394 control patients between 1995 and 2006. In addition, immunohistochemical staining for hMSH2 and hMLH1 expression was performed to evaluate the status of microsatellite stability in 57 atomic bomb survivors and 82 control patients. The long-term survival rate for early gastric cancer in atomic bomb survivors was significantly lower than that in control patients (p < 0.01). Multivariable analysis revealed that age and sex were significant and independent prognostic factors for early gastric cancer. Defective hMSH2 and/or hMLH1 expression was also significantly higher in survivors than in control patients (p < 0.001). Logistic regression analysis revealed that atomic bomb survivorship was related to defective hMSH2 and/or hMLH1 expression. The prognosis of early gastric cancer in atomic bomb survivors was poor and was related to age and sex, rather than to being an atomic bomb survivor. Furthermore, a higher rate of defective hMSH2 and/or hMLH1 expression was observed in the survivors.

  1. Risk Factors for Gastric Cancer: A Systematic Review

    PubMed

    Yusefi, Ali Reza; Bagheri Lankarani, Kamran; Bastani, Peivand; Radinmanesh, Maryam; Kavosi, Zahra

    2018-03-27

    Objective: Gastric cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide, with many influences contributing to the disease. The aim of this study was to identify the most important risk factors. Methods: This study was conducted in 2017 with a structured overview in the Science Directe, Scopus, PubMed, Cochrane, Web of Science (ISI) databases. In the first step, articles were extracted based on their titles and abstracts; the quality of 43 articles was evaluated using the STORBE tool. Inclusion criteria were studies carried out on human, English language (first step), year of the study and the study type (second step). Results: Finally, 1,381 articles were found, of which 1,269 were excluded in primary and secondary screening. In reviewing the references of the remaining 44 papers, 4 studies were added. Finally, 43 articles were selected for the quality assessment process. A total of 52 risk factors for gastric cancer were identified and classified into nine important categories: diet, lifestyle, genetic predisposition, family history, treatment and medical conditions, infections, demographic characteristics, occupational exposures and ionizing radiation’. Conclusion: Several environmental and genetic factors are involved in the development of gastric cancer. Regarding the role of changes in ‘diet and lifestyle’, considering appropriate nutrition and improving the level of education and awareness of people is vital for early diagnosis and timely treatment of this disease, especially in people with a family history and genetic predisposition. Creative Commons Attribution License

  2. Expansion of lymph node metastasis in mixed-type submucosal invasive gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Koji; Hirano, Yukiko; Futami, Kitaro; Maekawa, Takafumi

    2017-07-18

    Mixed-type early gastric cancer (differentiated and undifferentiated components) incurs a higher risk of lymph node metastasis than pure-type early gastric cancer (only differentiated or only undifferentiated components). Therefore, we investigated the expansion of lymph node metastasis in mixed-type submucosal invasive gastric cancer in order to establish the most appropriate treatment for mixed-type cancer. We retrospectively analyzed 279 consecutive patients with submucosal invasive gastric cancer who underwent curative gastrectomy for gastric cancer between 1996 and 2015. We classified the patients into the mixed-type and pure-type groups according to histologic examination and evaluated the expansion of lymph node metastasis. The rate of lymph node metastasis was 23.7% (66/279) in the total patients, 36.4% (36/99) in the mixed-type group, and 16.6% (30/180) in the pure-type group. The significant independent risk factors for lymph node metastasis were tumor size ≥2.0 cm (P = 0.014), mixed-type gastric cancer (P < 0.001), and lymphatic invasion (P < 0.001). Lymphatic invasion and lymph node metastasis had a strong relationship in mixed-type group. The rates of no. 7 lymph node metastasis in the total patients and mixed-type group were 2.9% (8/279) and 5.1% (5/99), respectively; the rates of no. 8a lymph node metastasis were 1.4% (4/279) and 4.0% (4/99), respectively. Mixed histological type is an independent risk factor for lymph node metastasis. Lymph node metastasis in mixed-type gastric cancer involves expansion to the no. 7 and no. 8a lymph nodes. Therefore, lymphadenectomy for mixed-type submucosal invasive gastric cancer requires D1+ or D2 dissection. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  3. Prevention of Gastric Cancer: Eradication of Helicobacter pylori and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Nakagawa, Mitsuru; Kiriyama, Yuka; Toyoda, Takeshi; Cao, Xueyuan

    2017-01-01

    Although its prevalence is declining, gastric cancer remains a significant public health issue. The bacterium Helicobacter pylori is known to colonize the human stomach and induce chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and gastric cancer. Results using a Mongolian gerbil model revealed that H. pylori infection increased the incidence of carcinogen-induced adenocarcinoma, whereas curative treatment of H. pylori significantly lowered cancer incidence. Furthermore, some epidemiological studies have shown that eradication of H. pylori reduces the development of metachronous cancer in humans. However, other reports have warned that human cases of atrophic metaplastic gastritis are already at risk for gastric cancer development, even after eradication of these bacteria. In this article, we discuss the effectiveness of H. pylori eradication and the morphological changes that occur in gastric dysplasia/cancer lesions. We further assess the control of gastric cancer using various chemopreventive agents. PMID:28771198

  4. CDH1 mutations in gastric cancer patients from northern Brazil identified by Next- Generation Sequencing (NGS)

    PubMed Central

    El-Husny, Antonette; Raiol-Moraes, Milene; Amador, Marcos; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, André M.; Montagnini, André; Barbosa, Silvanira; Silva, Artur; Assumpção, Paulo; Ishak, Geraldo; Santos, Sidney; Pinto, Pablo; Cruz, Aline; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gastric cancer is considered to be the fifth highest incident tumor worldwide and the third leading cause of cancer deaths. Developing regions report a higher number of sporadic cases, but there are only a few local studies related to hereditary cases of gastric cancer in Brazil to confirm this fact. CDH1 germline mutations have been described both in familial and sporadic cases, but there is only one recent molecular description of individuals from Brazil. In this study we performed Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) to assess CDH1 germline mutations in individuals who match the clinical criteria for Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer (HDGC), or who exhibit very early diagnosis of gastric cancer. Among five probands we detected CDH1 germline mutations in two cases (40%). The mutation c.1023T > G was found in a HDGC family and the mutation c.1849G > A, which is nearly exclusive to African populations, was found in an early-onset case of gastric adenocarcinoma. The mutations described highlight the existence of gastric cancer cases caused by CDH1 germline mutations in northern Brazil, although such information is frequently ignored due to the existence of a large number of environmental factors locally. Our report represent the first CDH1 mutations in HDGC described from Brazil by an NGS platform. PMID:27192129

  5. Design a Fuzzy Rule-based Expert System to Aid Earlier Diagnosis of Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Safdari, Reza; Arpanahi, Hadi Kazemi; Langarizadeh, Mostafa; Ghazisaiedi, Marjan; Dargahi, Hossein; Zendehdel, Kazem

    2018-01-01

    Screening and health check-up programs are most important sanitary priorities, that should be undertaken to control dangerous diseases such as gastric cancer that affected by different factors. More than 50% of gastric cancer diagnoses are made during the advanced stage. Currently, there is no systematic approach for early diagnosis of gastric cancer. to develop a fuzzy expert system that can identify gastric cancer risk levels in individuals. This system was implemented in MATLAB software, Mamdani inference technique applied to simulate reasoning of experts in the field, a total of 67 fuzzy rules extracted as a rule-base based on medical expert's opinion. 50 case scenarios were used to evaluate the system, the information of case reports is given to the system to find risk level of each case report then obtained results were compared with expert's diagnosis. Results revealed that sensitivity was 92.1% and the specificity was 83.1%. The results show that is possible to develop a system that can identify High risk individuals for gastric cancer. The system can lead to earlier diagnosis, this may facilitate early treatment and reduce gastric cancer mortality rate.

  6. Current issues and future perspectives of gastric cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Hamashima, Chisato

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. About half of the incidence of gastric cancer is observed in East Asian countries, which show a higher mortality than other countries. The effectiveness of 3 new gastric cancer screening techniques, namely, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, serological testing, and “screen and treat” method were extensively reviewed. Moreover, the phases of development for cancer screening were analyzed on the basis of the biomarker development road map. Several observational studies have reported the effectiveness of endoscopic screening in reducing mortality from gastric cancer. On the other hand, serologic testing has mainly been used for targeting the high-risk group for gastric cancer. To date, the effectiveness of new techniques for gastric cancer screening has remained limited. However, endoscopic screening is presently in the last trial phase of development before their introduction to population-based screening. To effectively introduce new techniques for gastric cancer screening in a community, incidence and mortality reduction from gastric cancer must be initially and thoroughly evaluated by conducting reliable studies. In addition to effectiveness evaluation, the balance of benefits and harms must be carefully assessed before introducing these new techniques for population-based screening. PMID:25320514

  7. Treatment Option Overview (Gastric Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... liquid that contains barium (a silver-white metallic compound ). The liquid coats the esophagus and stomach, and ... tissues so they can be viewed under a microscope to check for signs of cancer. A biopsy ...

  8. A nanomaterial-based breath test for distinguishing gastric cancer from benign gastric conditions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z-q; Broza, Y Y; Ionsecu, R; Tisch, U; Ding, L; Liu, H; Song, Q; Pan, Y-y; Xiong, F-x; Gu, K-s; Sun, G-p; Chen, Z-d; Leja, M; Haick, H

    2013-03-05

    Upper digestive endoscopy with biopsy and histopathological evaluation of the biopsy material is the standard method for diagnosing gastric cancer (GC). However, this procedure may not be widely available for screening in the developing world, whereas in developed countries endoscopy is frequently used without major clinical gain. There is a high demand for a simple and non-invasive test for selecting the individuals at increased risk that should undergo the endoscopic examination. Here, we studied the feasibility of a nanomaterial-based breath test for identifying GC among patients with gastric complaints. Alveolar exhaled breath samples from 130 patients with gastric complaints (37 GC/32 ulcers / 61 less severe conditions) that underwent endoscopy/biopsy were analyzed using nanomaterial-based sensors. Predictive models were built employing discriminant factor analysis (DFA) pattern recognition, and their stability against possible confounding factors (alcohol/tobacco consumption; Helicobacter pylori) was tested. Classification success was determined (i) using leave-one-out cross-validation and (ii) by randomly blinding 25% of the samples as a validation set. Complementary chemical analysis of the breath samples was performed using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Three DFA models were developed that achieved excellent discrimination between the subpopulations: (i) GC vs benign gastric conditions, among all the patients (89% sensitivity; 90% specificity); (ii) early stage GC (I and II) vs late stage (III and IV), among GC patients (89% sensitivity; 94% specificity); and (iii) ulcer vs less severe, among benign conditions (84% sensitivity; 87% specificity). The models were insensitive against the tested confounding factors. Chemical analysis found that five volatile organic compounds (2-propenenitrile, 2-butoxy-ethanol, furfural, 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one and isoprene) were significantly elevated in patients with GC and/or peptic ulcer, as compared

  9. A Phase I/II Study of Oblimersen Plus Cisplatin and Fluorouracil in Gastric & Esophageal Junction Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-10

    Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus; Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Diffuse Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Intestinal Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Mixed Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus; Stage III Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  10. Induction of a pathological complete response by four courses of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for gastric cancer: early results of the randomized phase II COMPASS trial.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Takaki; Tanabe, Kazuaki; Nishikawa, Kazuhiro; Ito, Yuichi; Matsui, Takanori; Kimura, Yutaka; Hirabayashi, Naoki; Mikata, Shoki; Iwahashi, Makoto; Fukushima, Ryoji; Takiguchi, Nobuhiro; Miyashiro, Isao; Morita, Satoshi; Miyashita, Yumi; Tsuburaya, Aakira; Sakamoto, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    The prognosis for stage 3 gastric cancer is not satisfactory, even with S-1 adjuvant chemotherapy. A randomized phase II trial was conducted to compare two and four courses of neoadjuvant S-1/cisplatin (SC) and paclitaxel/cisplatin (PC) using a two-by-two factorial design for locally advanced gastric cancer. The primary endpoint was overall survival. We clarified the impact of these regimens on the secondary endpoints, including the clinical and pathological responses, chemotherapy-related toxicities, and surgical results. Patients received S-1 (80 mg/m(2) for 21 days with 1 week's rest)/cisplatin (60 mg/m(2) at day 8) or paclitaxel/cisplatin (80 and 25 mg/m(2), respectively, on days 1, 8, and 15 with 1 week's rest) as neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Eighty-three patients were assigned to arm A (two courses of SC, n = 21), arm B (four courses of SC, n = 20), arm C (two courses of PC, n = 21), and arm D (four courses of PC, n = 21). Pathological response rate was 43 % in arm A, 40 % in arm B, 29 % in arm C, and 38 % in arm D. Pathological complete response was only observed in arms B (10 %) and D (10 %). Most bone marrow toxicities, nausea, vomiting, alopecia, and fatigue were slightly higher but acceptable in arms B and D. Grade 3/4 surgical morbidities were not commonly observed in all four arms. Pathological complete response could be induced by four courses of neoadjuvant chemotherapy without a marked increase of toxicities, regardless of a SC or PC regimen.

  11. Systematic review: gastric cancer incidence in pernicious anaemia.

    PubMed

    Vannella, L; Lahner, E; Osborn, J; Annibale, B

    2013-02-01

    Pernicious anaemia (PA) has an increased risk for gastric cancer (GC). It is not established whether PA patients need to undergo endoscopic/histological follow-up. To provide a systematic overview of the literature on PA and the development of gastric cancer, to estimate the gastric cancer incidence-rate. According to PRISMA, we identified studies on PA patients reporting the incidence of gastric cancer. Quality of studies was evaluated using the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale. Meta-analysis on annual gastric cancer incidence rates was performed. Twenty-seven studies met eligibility criteria. 7 studies were of high, 6 of medium, 10 of low and 4 of very low quality. Gastric cancer incidence-rates ranged from 0% to 0.2% per person-years in 7 American, from 0% to 0.5% in 2 Asiatic, from 0% to 1.2% in 11 Northern European studies and from 0% to 0.9% in 7 studies from other European countries. The incidence-rates of gastric cancer ranged from 0% to 1.2% per person-years in studies which used gastroscopy, from 0.1% to 0.9% in those based on International Classification of Disease. Heterogeneity between studies was not statistically significant at the 5% level (Chi-squared test = 17.9, P = 0.08). The calculated pooled gastric cancer incidence-rate was 0.27% per person-years. Meta-analysis showed overall gastric cancer relative risk in PA as 6.8 (95% CI: 2.6-18.1). This systematic review shows a pooled gastric cancer incidence-rate in pernicious anaemia of 0.27% per person-years and an estimated nearly sevenfold relative risk of gastric cancer in pernicious anaemia patients. Further high quality studies are needed to confirm this higher risk. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Gastric cancer stem cells in gastric carcinogenesis, progression, prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kang; Dan, Zeng; Nie, Yu-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, the study of the mechanism of tumorigenesis has brought much progress to cancer treatment. However, cancer stem cell (CSC) theory has changed previous views of tumors, and has provided a new method for treatment of cancer. The discovery of CSCs and their characteristics have contributed to understanding the molecular mechanism of tumor genesis and development, resulting in a new effective strategy for cancer treatment. Gastric CSCs (GCSCs) are the basis for the onset of gastric cancer. They may be derived from gastric stem cells in gastric tissues, or bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. As with other stem cells, GCSCs highly express drug-resistance genes such as aldehyde dehydrogenase and multidrug resistance, which are resistant to chemotherapy and thus form the basis of drug resistance. Many specific molecular markers such as CD44 and CD133 have been used for identification and isolation of GCSCs, diagnosis and grading of gastric cancer, and research on GCSC-targeted therapy for gastric cancer. Therefore, discussion of the recent development and advancements in GCSCs will be helpful for providing novel insight into gastric cancer treatment. PMID:24833872

  13. Circulating microRNA-22-3p Predicts the Malignant Progression of Precancerous Gastric Lesions from Intestinal Metaplasia to Early Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tsung-Hsing; Chiu, Cheng-Tang; Lee, Chieh; Chu, Yin-Yi; Cheng, Hao-Tsai; Hsu, Jun-Te; Wu, Ren-Chin; Yeh, Ta-Sen; Lin, Kwang-Huei

    2018-05-07

    Gastric cancer has a poor outcome and identifying useful biomarkers from peripheral blood or tissue could allow its early detection, or potentially precancerous changes, thus improving the curative rates. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to offer great potential in cancer diagnosis and prediction. Here, we investigated the role of plasma miRNAs in the natural course of gastric cancer, from intestinal metaplasia to early cancer. The findings were used to understand whether patients at a high risk of malignancy could be given appropriate interventions in the early disease process, such as using endoscopic submucosal dissection to treat gastric dysplasia or early gastric cancer. Participants were divided into healthy control, intestinal metaplasia (IM), and dysplasia/early cancer (pT1a/b) groups. Microarray was used to select potential markers in tissue. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction data showed circulating miRNA-22-3p had significantly different expression in patients with precancerous lesions or gastric adenocarcinoma. The areas under the curve of incomplete IM versus healthy control, low-grade/high-grade dysplasia, early gastric cancer, and GED were 0.8080, 0.8040, 0.8494, and 0.8095, respectively (all P values < 0.05). Circulating miRNA-22-3p could be a potential biomarker for gastric precancerous dysplasia and early cancer detection.

  14. Association of Helicobacter pylori infection with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Alexander, G A; Brawley, O W

    2000-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori has generated public health interest since its identification in 1983. Past studies have suggested that the bacterium plays a role in the pathogenesis of gastric cancer. More recent studies support the conclusion that the association of H. pylori with gastric cancer is causal. The purpose of this article is to review the available evidence supporting the association of H. pylori with gastric cancer. We performed a critical review of the relevant literature published in the English language on H. pylori and gastric cancer using MEDLINE, Index Medicus for the years 1985 to 1997. The reference lists of selected articles also were reviewed to capture citations for further pertinent studies. H. pylori is thought to be the major cause of chronic atrophic gastritis. H. pylori gastritis is worldwide in distribution. H. pylori is now categorized by the International Agency for Cancer Research as a group 1 carcinogen, i.e., an agent that is carcinogenic to humans. Several reports from the United States have found the highest frequencies of gastric cancer in geographic areas and populations with the highest rates of acquisition of H. pylori infection. The high prevalence of H. pylori infection has been documented most notably in blacks and Hispanics, who also are at high risk for gastric cancer. New studies that focus on the epidemiology and pathology of H. pylori improve our understanding of its relationship with gastric cancer and advance the development of gastric cancer prevention and control strategies that are proposed.

  15. Genomic landscape of gastric cancer: molecular classification and potential targets.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jiawei; Yu, Weiwei; Su, Hui; Pang, Xiufeng

    2017-02-01

    Gastric cancer imposes a considerable health burden worldwide, and its mortality ranks as the second highest for all types of cancers. The limited knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying gastric cancer tumorigenesis hinders the development of therapeutic strategies. However, ongoing collaborative sequencing efforts facilitate molecular classification and unveil the genomic landscape of gastric cancer. Several new drivers and tumorigenic pathways in gastric cancer, including chromatin remodeling genes, RhoA-related pathways, TP53 dysregulation, activation of receptor tyrosine kinases, stem cell pathways and abnormal DNA methylation, have been revealed. These newly identified genomic alterations await translation into clinical diagnosis and targeted therapies. Considering that loss-of-function mutations are intractable, synthetic lethality could be employed when discussing feasible therapeutic strategies. Although many challenges remain to be tackled, we are optimistic regarding improvements in the prognosis and treatment of gastric cancer in the near future.

  16. Local steroid injection into the artificial ulcer created by endoscopic submucosal dissection for gastric cancer: prevention of gastric deformity.

    PubMed

    Mori, H; Rafiq, K; Kobara, H; Fujihara, S; Nishiyama, N; Kobayashi, M; Himoto, T; Haba, R; Hagiike, M; Izuishi, K; Okano, K; Suzuki, Y; Masaki, T

    2012-07-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) of large gastric lesions results in an extensive artificial ulcer that can lead to marked gastric deformity. The aim of the current study was to evaluate therapeutic efficacy in the prevention of gastric deformity of local triamcinolone acetonide (TCA) injection into the extensive artificial ulcer following ESD. A total of 45 patients who were diagnosed with early gastric cancer were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned by the sealed-envelope randomization method to either local TCA injections (n = 21) or sham-control (n = 20) groups. Two clips were placed at the two maximum outer edges of the artificial ulcer after the lesion had been resected (Day 0). Local TCA injections were performed on postoperative Day 5 and Day 12. The distance between the two clips was measured by endoscopic measuring forceps on Days 5, 12, 30, and 60. Granulation formation and gastric deformity were evaluated by visual analog scale (VAS) on Days 30 and 60. Local TCA injection did not alter clip-to-clip distance on postoperative Day 60, and formation of flat granulation tissue over the ulcer was followed by regenerative mucosa without any gastric deformity. The sham-control group showed significant shortening of clip-to-clip distance compared with the local steroid-injected group and protruded forms of granulation tissue with mucosal convergence. Histological evaluation revealed prominent growth of neovessels, swelling, and marked increases in endothelial cells in the local steroid-injected group compared with the sham-control group. Local steroid injection into the floor of a post-ESD artificial ulcer promotes the formation of granulation tissue at an early stage of the healing process leading to regeneration of gastric mucosa without mucosal convergence or gastric deformity. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Minimally invasive approaches for gastric cancer-Korean experience.

    PubMed

    Yang, Han-Kwang; Suh, Yun-Suhk; Lee, Hyuk-Joon

    2013-03-01

    Laparoscopic surgery in Korea increased rapidly because of the early detection of gastric cancer by the development of diagnostic tools and nationwide screening. The Korean Laparoscopic Gastrointestinal Surgery Study Group (KLASS group) played a leading role in various projects related with minimally invasive surgery. The justification of minimally invasive procedures including robotic surgery, sentinel-node biopsy, or single-port surgery/Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery (NOTES) must be predetermined by the clinical trial before a wide application, and the medical industry as well as surgeons should have great responsibility. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Efficacy of the Kyoto Classification of Gastritis in Identifying Patients at High Risk for Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Ban, Hiromitsu; Ichikawa, Hitomi; Sahara, Shu; Otsuka, Taketo; Inatomi, Osamu; Bamba, Shigeki; Furuta, Takahisa; Andoh, Akira

    2017-01-01

    Objective The Kyoto gastritis classification categorizes the endoscopic characteristics of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection-associated gastritis and identifies patterns associated with a high risk of gastric cancer. We investigated its efficacy, comparing scores in patients with H. pylori-associated gastritis and with gastric cancer. Methods A total of 1,200 patients with H. pylori-positive gastritis alone (n=932), early-stage H. pylori-positive gastric cancer (n=189), and successfully treated H. pylori-negative cancer (n=79) were endoscopically graded according to the Kyoto gastritis classification for atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, fold hypertrophy, nodularity, and diffuse redness. Results The prevalence of O-II/O-III-type atrophy according to the Kimura-Takemoto classification in early-stage H. pylori-positive gastric cancer and successfully treated H. pylori-negative cancer groups was 45.1%, which was significantly higher than in subjects with gastritis alone (12.7%, p<0.001). Kyoto gastritis scores of atrophy and intestinal metaplasia in the H. pylori-positive cancer group were significantly higher than in subjects with gastritis alone (all p<0.001). No significant differences were noted in the rates of gastric fold hypertrophy or diffuse redness between the two groups. In a multivariate analysis, the risks for H. pylori-positive gastric cancer increased with intestinal metaplasia (odds ratio: 4.453, 95% confidence interval: 3.332-5.950, <0.001) and male sex (1.737, 1.102-2.739, p=0.017). Conclusion Making an appropriate diagnosis and detecting patients at high risk is crucial for achieving total eradication of gastric cancer. The scores of intestinal metaplasia and atrophy of the scoring system in the Kyoto gastritis classification may thus be useful for detecting these patients.

  19. Efficacy of the Kyoto Classification of Gastritis in Identifying Patients at High Risk for Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Ban, Hiromitsu; Ichikawa, Hitomi; Sahara, Shu; Otsuka, Taketo; Inatomi, Osamu; Bamba, Shigeki; Furuta, Takahisa; Andoh, Akira

    2017-01-01

    Objective The Kyoto gastritis classification categorizes the endoscopic characteristics of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection-associated gastritis and identifies patterns associated with a high risk of gastric cancer. We investigated its efficacy, comparing scores in patients with H. pylori-associated gastritis and with gastric cancer. Methods A total of 1,200 patients with H. pylori-positive gastritis alone (n=932), early-stage H. pylori-positive gastric cancer (n=189), and successfully treated H. pylori-negative cancer (n=79) were endoscopically graded according to the Kyoto gastritis classification for atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, fold hypertrophy, nodularity, and diffuse redness. Results The prevalence of O-II/O-III-type atrophy according to the Kimura-Takemoto classification in early-stage H. pylori-positive gastric cancer and successfully treated H. pylori-negative cancer groups was 45.1%, which was significantly higher than in subjects with gastritis alone (12.7%, p<0.001). Kyoto gastritis scores of atrophy and intestinal metaplasia in the H. pylori-positive cancer group were significantly higher than in subjects with gastritis alone (all p<0.001). No significant differences were noted in the rates of gastric fold hypertrophy or diffuse redness between the two groups. In a multivariate analysis, the risks for H. pylori-positive gastric cancer increased with intestinal metaplasia (odds ratio: 4.453, 95% confidence interval: 3.332-5.950, <0.001) and male sex (1.737, 1.102-2.739, p=0.017). Conclusion Making an appropriate diagnosis and detecting patients at high risk is crucial for achieving total eradication of gastric cancer. The scores of intestinal metaplasia and atrophy of the scoring system in the Kyoto gastritis classification may thus be useful for detecting these patients. PMID:28321054

  20. Metaplasia in the Stomach—Precursor of Gastric Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Hiroto; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Despite a significant decrease in the incidence of gastric cancer in Western countries over the past century, gastric cancer is still one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Most human gastric cancers develop after long-term Helicobacter pylori infection via the Correa pathway: the progression is from gastritis, atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, to cancer. However, it remains unclear whether metaplasia is a direct precursor of gastric cancer or merely a marker of high cancer risk. Here, we review human studies on the relationship between metaplasia and cancer in the stomach, data from mouse models of metaplasia regarding the mechanism of metaplasia development, and the cellular responses induced by H. pylori infection. PMID:28953255

  1. Metaplasia in the Stomach-Precursor of Gastric Cancer?

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Hiroto; Hayakawa, Yoku; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2017-09-27

    Despite a significant decrease in the incidence of gastric cancer in Western countries over the past century, gastric cancer is still one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Most human gastric cancers develop after long-term Helicobacter pylori infection via the Correa pathway: the progression is from gastritis, atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, to cancer. However, it remains unclear whether metaplasia is a direct precursor of gastric cancer or merely a marker of high cancer risk. Here, we review human studies on the relationship between metaplasia and cancer in the stomach, data from mouse models of metaplasia regarding the mechanism of metaplasia development, and the cellular responses induced by H. pylori infection.

  2. Genomic and epigenomic heterogeneity in molecular subtypes of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Lim, Byungho; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Kim, Mirang; Kim, Seon-Young

    2016-01-21

    Gastric cancer is a complex disease that is affected by multiple genetic and environmental factors. For the precise diagnosis and effective treatment of gastric cancer, the heterogeneity of the disease must be simplified; one way to achieve this is by dividing the disease into subgroups. Toward this effort, recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technology have revealed four molecular subtypes of gastric cancer, which are classified as Epstein-Barr virus-positive, microsatellite instability, genomically stable, and chromosomal instability subtypes. We anticipate that this molecular subtyping will help to extend our knowledge for basic research purposes and will be valuable for clinical use. Here, we review the genomic and epigenomic heterogeneity of the four molecular subtypes of gastric cancer. We also describe a mutational meta-analysis and a reanalysis of DNA methylation that were performed using previously reported gastric cancer datasets.

  3. Mouse models for gastric cancer: Matching models to biological questions

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Ashleigh R; O'Donoghue, Robert J J

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer‐related mortality worldwide. This is in part due to the asymptomatic nature of the disease, which often results in late‐stage diagnosis, at which point there are limited treatment options. Even when treated successfully, gastric cancer patients have a high risk of tumor recurrence and acquired drug resistance. It is vital to gain a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying gastric cancer pathogenesis to facilitate the design of new‐targeted therapies that may improve patient survival. A number of chemically and genetically engineered mouse models of gastric cancer have provided significant insight into the contribution of genetic and environmental factors to disease onset and progression. This review outlines the strengths and limitations of current mouse models of gastric cancer and their relevance to the pre‐clinical development of new therapeutics. PMID:26809278

  4. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography findings of gastric lymphoma: Comparisons with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiang; Zhu, Hong; Li, Kai; Wang, Xin-Gang; Gui, Yi; Lu, Guang-Ming

    2014-10-01

    The role of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET/CT) in numerous malignant tumors, including gastric lymphoma, is well-established. However, there have been few studies with regard to the 18 F-FDG PET/CT features of gastric lymphoma. The aim of the present study was to characterize the 18 F-FDG PET/CT features of gastric lymphoma, which were compared with those of gastric cancer. Prior to treatment, 18 F-FDG PET/CT was performed on 24 patients with gastric lymphoma and 43 patients with gastric cancer. The 18 F-FDG PET/CT pattern of gastric wall lesions was classified as one of three types: Type I, diffuse thickening of the gastric wall with increased FDG uptake infiltrating more than one-third of the total stomach; type II, segmental thickening of the gastric wall with elevated FDG uptake involving less than one-third of the total stomach; and type III, local thickening of the gastric wall with focal FDG uptake. The incidence of the involvement of more than one region of the stomach was higher in the patients with gastric lymphoma than in those with gastric cancer. Gastric FDG uptake was demonstrated in 23 of the 24 patients (95.8%) with gastric lymphoma and in 40 of the 43 patients (93.0%) with gastric cancer. Gastric lymphoma predominantly presented with type I and II lesions, whereas gastric cancer mainly presented with type II and III lesions. The maximal thickness was larger and the maximal standard uptake value (SUV max ) was higher in the patients with gastric lymphoma compared with those with gastric cancer. A positive correlation between the maximal thickness and SUV max was confirmed for the gastric cancer lesions, but not for the gastric lymphoma lesions. There was no difference in the maximal thickness and SUV max of the gastric wall lesions between the patients without and with extragastric involvement, for gastric lymphoma and gastric cancer. Overall, certain differences exist in the findings between

  5. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography findings of gastric lymphoma: Comparisons with gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    WU, JIANG; ZHU, HONG; LI, KAI; WANG, XIN-GANG; GUI, YI; LU, GUANG-MING

    2014-01-01

    The role of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) in numerous malignant tumors, including gastric lymphoma, is well-established. However, there have been few studies with regard to the 18F-FDG PET/CT features of gastric lymphoma. The aim of the present study was to characterize the 18F-FDG PET/CT features of gastric lymphoma, which were compared with those of gastric cancer. Prior to treatment, 18F-FDG PET/CT was performed on 24 patients with gastric lymphoma and 43 patients with gastric cancer. The 18F-FDG PET/CT pattern of gastric wall lesions was classified as one of three types: Type I, diffuse thickening of the gastric wall with increased FDG uptake infiltrating more than one-third of the total stomach; type II, segmental thickening of the gastric wall with elevated FDG uptake involving less than one-third of the total stomach; and type III, local thickening of the gastric wall with focal FDG uptake. The incidence of the involvement of more than one region of the stomach was higher in the patients with gastric lymphoma than in those with gastric cancer. Gastric FDG uptake was demonstrated in 23 of the 24 patients (95.8%) with gastric lymphoma and in 40 of the 43 patients (93.0%) with gastric cancer. Gastric lymphoma predominantly presented with type I and II lesions, whereas gastric cancer mainly presented with type II and III lesions. The maximal thickness was larger and the maximal standard uptake value (SUVmax) was higher in the patients with gastric lymphoma compared with those with gastric cancer. A positive correlation between the maximal thickness and SUVmax was confirmed for the gastric cancer lesions, but not for the gastric lymphoma lesions. There was no difference in the maximal thickness and SUVmax of the gastric wall lesions between the patients without and with extragastric involvement, for gastric lymphoma and gastric cancer. Overall, certain differences exist in the findings between gastric

  6. [Risk groups as related to gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Vartan'ian, M G; Zhandarova, L F; Korzhenskiĭ, F P

    1979-01-01

    Under examination were the features of life, labour, habits, inheritance pattern, a type of diet, the course of the disease in 440 gastric cancer patients. The most typical and frequently observed factors were singled out. The material obtained was processed by an electronic computer. The informative value of the risk factors was checked by selection, using questionnaires of patients irrespective of the reason of their referring to the clinic. The age of patients over 40 and the character of work should become the basic indication for limiting the number of persons subject to a gastrological examination.

  7. Gastric cancer and Helicobacter pylori infection in the eastern Libya: a descriptive epidemiological study.

    PubMed

    Elzouki, Abdel-Naser Y; Buhjab, Soad I; Alkialani, Akram; Habel, Salah; Sasco, Annie J

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the pattern of histologically-proven gastric cancer in Eastern Libya and explore its association with Helicobacter pylori infection. The registries of the Departments of Histopathology, Faculty of Medicine, Benghazi University and Oncology, Al-Jomhoria Hospital, Benghazi, were reviewed for cases with primary gastrointestinal cancer from January 2000 to December 2002 (sole Histopathology and Oncology Departments in Eastern Libya). Slides of hematoxylin and eosin stain of gastric cancer patients were re-stained to detect H. pylori. The American Joint Committee on Cancer Tumor, Node, Metastasis staging was used for clinical and pathologic staging. Gastric cancer biopsy materials were classified into intestinal or diffuse type according to Lauren criteria. One hundred and fourteen cases of gastric cancer were diagnosed. Tumor stages were: 2 (14%), 3 (21%), 4 (57%) and unknown (8%). Most common site of involvement was the antrum (48%). Diffuse adenocarcinoma occurred in 56 patients (49.1%), intestinal adenocarcinoma in 46 (40.4%) and malignant gastric lymphoma in 12 (10.5%). The overall frequency of H. pylori infection was 63.2% (72/114), more frequent in intestinal adenocarcinoma (71.7%) and malignant lymphoma (66.6%) than diffuse adenocarcinoma (55.3%). The frequency of gastric cancer increased throughout the three years of study. The majority of the patients were diagnosed in locally advanced or metastatic stage. Clearly more efforts need to be given to early detection. We showed a stronger association of H. pylori infection with intestinal type gastric adenocarcinoma and malignant lymphoma than diffuse adenocarcinoma suggesting that H. pylori infection is the most probable causal factor of gastric cancer in this part of Libya. Copyright © 2012 Arab Journal of Gastroenterology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular classification of gastric cancer: a new paradigm.

    PubMed

    Shah, Manish A; Khanin, Raya; Tang, Laura; Janjigian, Yelena Y; Klimstra, David S; Gerdes, Hans; Kelsen, David P

    2011-05-01

    Gastric cancer may be subdivided into 3 distinct subtypes--proximal, diffuse, and distal gastric cancer--based on histopathologic and anatomic criteria. Each subtype is associated with unique epidemiology. Our aim is to test the hypothesis that these distinct gastric cancer subtypes may also be distinguished by gene expression analysis. Patients with localized gastric adenocarcinoma being screened for a phase II preoperative clinical trial (National Cancer Institute, NCI #5917) underwent endoscopic biopsy for fresh tumor procurement. Four to 6 targeted biopsies of the primary tumor were obtained. Macrodissection was carried out to ensure more than 80% carcinoma in the sample. HG-U133A GeneChip (Affymetrix) was used for cDNA expression analysis, and all arrays were processed and analyzed using the Bioconductor R-package. Between November 2003 and January 2006, 57 patients were screened to identify 36 patients with localized gastric cancer who had adequate RNA for expression analysis. Using supervised analysis, we built a classifier to distinguish the 3 gastric cancer subtypes, successfully classifying each into tightly grouped clusters. Leave-one-out cross-validation error was 0.14, suggesting that more than 85% of samples were classified correctly. Gene set analysis with the false discovery rate set at 0.25 identified several pathways that were differentially regulated when comparing each gastric cancer subtype to adjacent normal stomach. Subtypes of gastric cancer that have epidemiologic and histologic distinctions are also distinguished by gene expression data. These preliminary data suggest a new classification of gastric cancer with implications for improving our understanding of disease biology and identification of unique molecular drivers for each gastric cancer subtype. ©2011 AACR.

  9. [A Case of Removable Self-Expandable Metallic Stent(SEMS)Placement for Gastric Tube Stenosis after Esophageal Cancer Resection].

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Yukihiro; Yoshikawa, Masato; Kawabata, Ryohei; Yoshida, Yuta; Kawada, Masahiro; Yasuyama, Akinobu; Watase, Chikashi; Koga, Chikato; Hitora, Toshiki; Murakami, Masahiro; Hirota, Masaki; Ikenaga, Masakazu; Shimizu, Junzo; Hasegawa, Junichi

    2015-11-01

    A 68-year-old man underwent esophagectomy for early esophageal cancer. Postoperative upper gastrointestinal series and esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed gastric tube stenosis. To improve passage, a removable self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) was placed across the stenotic lesion. Two weeks later, the stent was removed, and passage through the gastric tube improved. The patient has no symptoms of stenosis. A removable SEMS could be an option for the treatment of gastric tube stenosis after esophagectomy.

  10. Essential role of gastric gland mucin in preventing gastric cancer in mice

    PubMed Central

    Karasawa, Fumitoshi; Shiota, Akira; Goso, Yukinobu; Kobayashi, Motohiro; Sato, Yoshiko; Masumoto, Junya; Fujiwara, Maiko; Yokosawa, Shuichi; Muraki, Takashi; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Ueda, Masatsugu; Fukuda, Michiko N.; Fukuda, Minoru; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Nakayama, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Gastric gland mucin secreted from the lower portion of the gastric mucosa contains unique O-linked oligosaccharides (O-glycans) having terminal α1,4-linked N-acetylglucosamine residues (αGlcNAc). Previously, we identified human α1,4-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (α4GnT), which is responsible for the O-glycan biosynthesis and characterized αGlcNAc function in suppressing Helicobacter pylori in vitro. In the present study, we engineered A4gnt–/– mice to better understand its role in vivo. A4gnt–/– mice showed complete lack of αGlcNAc expression in gastric gland mucin. Surprisingly, all the mutant mice developed gastric adenocarcinoma through a hyperplasia-dysplasia-carcinoma sequence in the absence of H. pylori infection. Microarray and quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed upregulation of genes encoding inflammatory chemokine ligands, proinflammatory cytokines, and growth factors, such as Ccl2, Il-11, and Hgf in the gastric mucosa of A4gnt–/– mice. Further supporting an important role for this O-glycan in cancer progression, we also observed significantly reduced αGlcNAc in human gastric adenocarcinoma and adenoma. Our results demonstrate that the absence of αGlcNAc triggers gastric tumorigenesis through inflammation-associated pathways in vivo. Thus, αGlcNAc-terminated gastric mucin plays dual roles in preventing gastric cancer by inhibiting H. pylori infection and also suppressing tumor-promoting inflammation. PMID:22307328

  11. Current approaches to gastric cancer in Peru and Mexico.

    PubMed

    Santos, Erlan

    2017-01-01

    In Peru, the incidence of gastric cancer is reported to be around 15.8 per 100,000 inhabitants and it is the second most common oncological disease in men and the third one in women. Additionally, a high mortality index was reported, especially among poor people. To address this issue, in 2008, Peru initiated several insurance treatment plans of oncological diseases with promising results. In Mexico, there is a high predominance of gastric cancer in male gender compared to female gender, even reaching a 2/1 ratio, and the detection rate of early gastric cancer is low (10% to 20%) which results in a mainly palliative treatment with an overall survival rate in 5 years about 10% to 15% only. In Peru, the average age at diagnosis is around 62.96±14.75 years old and the most frequent symptoms includes abdominal pain, indigestion, loss of appetite, weight loss and gastrointestinal bleeding, while in Mexico, some studies reported an average age at diagnosis around 60.3±4.1 years old (range, 23-78 years old) and the most frequent symptoms were postprandial fullness (74.4%), abdominal pain (37.2%), weight loss (18.6%), and melena (4.6%). The anemia rate was 65.1% with a mean Hb level of 6.14 g/dL. In Peru, the most common gastric cancer type is the intestinal-type adenocarcinoma (around 34%), followed by the diffuse-type adenocarcinoma (18.7%), whilst among Mexicans, the diffuse-type was reported in 55.2% of cases, the intestinal-type was reported in 28.2% and the undifferentiated-type corresponded to 6%. In both, Peru and Mexico, 90% of the associated factors includes tabaquismo, diets rich in salt, smoked foods, and a sedentary lifestyle. Family inheritance and advanced age and pharmacological-resistant Helicobacter pylori infection are also important. Poverty has been heavily associated with a higher incidence of gastric cancer. The management of gastric cancer patients in Peru is carried out by general surgeons or general surgical oncologists. In recent years, efforts

  12. Current approaches to gastric cancer in Peru and Mexico

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    In Peru, the incidence of gastric cancer is reported to be around 15.8 per 100,000 inhabitants and it is the second most common oncological disease in men and the third one in women. Additionally, a high mortality index was reported, especially among poor people. To address this issue, in 2008, Peru initiated several insurance treatment plans of oncological diseases with promising results. In Mexico, there is a high predominance of gastric cancer in male gender compared to female gender, even reaching a 2/1 ratio, and the detection rate of early gastric cancer is low (10% to 20%) which results in a mainly palliative treatment with an overall survival rate in 5 years about 10% to 15% only. In Peru, the average age at diagnosis is around 62.96±14.75 years old and the most frequent symptoms includes abdominal pain, indigestion, loss of appetite, weight loss and gastrointestinal bleeding, while in Mexico, some studies reported an average age at diagnosis around 60.3±4.1 years old (range, 23–78 years old) and the most frequent symptoms were postprandial fullness (74.4%), abdominal pain (37.2%), weight loss (18.6%), and melena (4.6%). The anemia rate was 65.1% with a mean Hb level of 6.14 g/dL. In Peru, the most common gastric cancer type is the intestinal-type adenocarcinoma (around 34%), followed by the diffuse-type adenocarcinoma (18.7%), whilst among Mexicans, the diffuse-type was reported in 55.2% of cases, the intestinal-type was reported in 28.2% and the undifferentiated-type corresponded to 6%. In both, Peru and Mexico, 90% of the associated factors includes tabaquismo, diets rich in salt, smoked foods, and a sedentary lifestyle. Family inheritance and advanced age and pharmacological-resistant Helicobacter pylori infection are also important. Poverty has been heavily associated with a higher incidence of gastric cancer. The management of gastric cancer patients in Peru is carried out by general surgeons or general surgical oncologists. In recent years

  13. Lymph node involvement in gastric cancer for different tumor sites and T stage: Italian Research Group for Gastric Cancer (IRGGC) experience.

    PubMed

    Di Leo, Alberto; Marrelli, Daniele; Roviello, Franco; Bernini, Marco; Minicozzi, AnnaMaria; Giacopuzzi, Simone; Pedrazzani, Corrado; Baiocchi, Luca Gian; de Manzoni, Giovanni

    2007-09-01

    The aim of lymphadenectomy is to clear all the metastatic nodes achieving a complete removal of the tumor; nevertheless, its role in gastric cancer has been very much debated. The frequency of node metastasis in each lymphatic station according to the International Gastric Cancer Association, was studied in 545 patients who underwent D2 or D3 lymphadenectomy from June 1988 to December 2002. Upper third early cancers have shown an involvement of N2 celiac nodes in 25%. In advanced cancers, there was a high frequency of metastasis in the right gastroepiploic (from 10% in T2 to 50% in T4) and in the paraaortic nodes (26% in T2, 32% in T3, 38 % in T4). N3 left paracardial nodes involvement was observed in an important share of middle third tumors (17% in T3, 36% in T4). Splenic hilum nodes metastasis were common in T3 and T4 cancers located in the upper (39%) and middle (17%) stomach. N2 nodal involvement was frequent in lower third advanced cancers. Metastasis in M left paracardial and short gastric nodes were observed in a small percentage of cases. Given the nodal diffusion in our gastric cancer patients, extended lymphadenectomy is still a rationale to obtain radical resection.

  14. Gastric cancer in FAP: a concerning rise in incidence.

    PubMed

    Mankaney, Gautam; Leone, Pamela; Cruise, Michael; LaGuardia, Lisa; O'Malley, Margaret; Bhatt, Amit; Church, James; Burke, Carol A

    2017-07-01

    The highest cancer risks in familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) include colorectal, duodenal, and thyroid for which surveillance is recommended. Nearly all patients with FAP have gastric fundic gland polyposis (FGP), but gastric cancers are rarely reported with a similar incidence as the general population. We describe a recent, sudden increase in the incidence of gastric cancer in FAP. Seven of the ten cases were diagnosed in the last 20 months. Comparing our population to the SEER database for gastric cancer, the standardized incidence ratio is 140. All cases arose in patients with a carpeting of FGP and associated with large mounds of proximal gastric polyps. Nearly all patients were under upper endoscopic surveillance. This is a concerning observation and reflects a change in the phenotypic presentation of FAP in Western patients.

  15. Characteristics of gastric cancer in Asia.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Rubayat; Asombang, Akwi W; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2014-04-28

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the fourth most common cancer in the world with more than 70% of cases occur in the developing world. More than 50% of cases occur in Eastern Asia. GC is the second leading cause of cancer death in both sexes worldwide. In Asia, GC is the third most common cancer after breast and lung and is the second most common cause of cancer death after lung cancer. Although the incidence and mortality rates are slowly declining in many countries of Asia, GC still remains a significant public health problem. The incidence and mortality varies according to the geographic area in Asia. These variations are closely related to the prevalence of GC risk factors; especially Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and its molecular virulent characteristics. The gradual and consistent improvements in socioeconomic conditions in Asia have lowered the H. pylori seroprevalence rates leading to a reduction in the GC incidence. However, GC remains a significant public health and an economic burden in Asia. There has been no recent systemic review of GC incidence, mortality, and H. pylori molecular epidemiology in Asia. The aim of this report is to review the GC incidence, mortality, and linkage to H. pylori in Asia.

  16. Characteristics of gastric cancer in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Rubayat; Asombang, Akwi W; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the fourth most common cancer in the world with more than 70% of cases occur in the developing world. More than 50% of cases occur in Eastern Asia. GC is the second leading cause of cancer death in both sexes worldwide. In Asia, GC is the third most common cancer after breast and lung and is the second most common cause of cancer death after lung cancer. Although the incidence and mortality rates are slowly declining in many countries of Asia, GC still remains a significant public health problem. The incidence and mortality varies according to the geographic area in Asia. These variations are closely related to the prevalence of GC risk factors; especially Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and its molecular virulent characteristics. The gradual and consistent improvements in socioeconomic conditions in Asia have lowered the H. pylori seroprevalence rates leading to a reduction in the GC incidence. However, GC remains a significant public health and an economic burden in Asia. There has been no recent systemic review of GC incidence, mortality, and H. pylori molecular epidemiology in Asia. The aim of this report is to review the GC incidence, mortality, and linkage to H. pylori in Asia. PMID:24782601

  17. [Investigation of gastric cancers detected at a medical check-up center].

    PubMed

    Kura, T; Kumaki, T; Matsuhisa, T; Tanaka, S

    1996-06-01

    Most of the gastric cancers investigated in this study were detected during mass screening at a Medical Check-up Center. The research period was 5 years, from 1990 to 1994. The total number of patients undergoing initial gastric examinations was 300,658. Four point eight percent of these needed detailed examinations, and 77.2% actually underwent detailed examinations. Over the 5 years, the number of gastric cancers detected was 253. The rate of detection of these cancers was almost unchanged every year, with the average rate of change being 0.11%. The rate of detected gastric cancers was investigated according to age and sex. No cancers were found below age 29, and the rate gradually rose over age 30. Over age 50, the rate in males was twice that in females. The rate of early gastric cancers was 66.4% of all reported cancers. As regards location of 253 cases, 16.5% were in the C-area, 45.8% in the M-area, 36.2% in the A-area; 19.2% were in the greater curvature, 33.9% were in the lesser curvature, 17.3% in the anterior wall, and 26.1% in the posterior wall. The sizes of the lesions were as follows: 11.5% were below 1.0 cm, 29.6% were from 1.1 cm to 2.0 cm, 46.6% were from 2.1 cm to 5.0 cm, and 12.3% were over 5.1 cm. It was considered that indirect X-rays were slightly inferior to direct X-rays in detecting early gastric cancer. The X-ray positionings in which cancers were detected were: 75.7% by supine double contrast and 48.6% by compression in 144 cases of early cancer. On the other hand, the rate were 75.6% by supine double contrast, and 51.2% by compression in 82 cases of advanced cancer. A similar tendency was found in one-shot X-ray positioning which revealed cancers. The rate of gastric cancer notdetected by X-ray pictures was 5.9% of the 253 cases. The size of the cancers notdetected by X-ray was within 2.0 cm in all cases. 58.7% of the 155 early cancer patients and 48.2% of the 83 advanced cancer patients had examinations the previous year. Therefore, it

  18. Incidence trends and mortality rates of gastric cancer in Israel.

    PubMed

    Lavy, Ron; Kapiev, Andronik; Poluksht, Natan; Halevy, Ariel; Keinan-Boker, Lital

    2013-04-01

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common malignancy worldwide. The incidence trends and mortality rates of gastric cancer in Israel have not been studied in depth. The aim of our study was to try and investigate the aforementioned issues in Israel in different ethnic groups. This retrospective study is based on the data of The Israel National Cancer Registry and The Central Bureau of Statistics. Published data from these two institutes were collected, summarized, and analyzed in this study. Around 650 new cases of gastric cancer are diagnosed yearly in Israel. While we noticed a decline during the period 1990-2007 in the incidence in the Jewish population (13.6-8.9 and 6.75-5.42 cases per 100,000 in Jewish men and women, respectively), an increase in the Arab population was noticed (7.7-10.2 and 3.7-4.2 cases per 100,000 in men and women, respectively). Age-adjusted mortality rates per 10,000 cases of gastric cancer decreased significantly, from 7.21 in 1990 to 5.46 in 2007, in the total population. The 5-year relative survival showed a slight increase for both men and women. There is a difference in the incidence and outcome of gastric cancer between the Jewish and Arab populations in Israel. The grim prognosis of gastric cancer patients in Israel is probably due to the advanced stage at which gastric cancer is diagnosed in Israel.

  19. Helicobacter pylori eradication: gastric cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Leontiadis, Grigorios I; Ford, Alexander Charles

    2015-12-01

    The principal effect of Helicobacter pylori infection is lifelong chronic gastritis, affecting up to 20% of younger adults but 50% to 80% of adults born in resource-rich countries before 1950. We conducted a systematic overview, aiming to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of H pylori eradication treatment on the risk of developing gastric cancer? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to July 2014 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). At this update, searching of electronic databases retrieved 208 studies. After deduplication and removal of conference abstracts, 166 records were screened for inclusion in the overview. Appraisal of titles and abstracts led to the exclusion of 124 studies and the further review of 42 full publications. Of the 42 full articles evaluated, one systematic review was added at this update. We performed a GRADE evaluation for two PICO combinations. In this systematic overview, we categorised the efficacy for one intervention based on information about the effectiveness and safety of H pylori eradication treatment for the prevention of gastric cancer.

  20. Testicular Cancer Presenting as Gastric Variceal Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Mejía, Carlos Eduardo; Hernández-Barajas, David; Llerena-Hernández, Edio; González-Vela, José Luis; Contreras-Salcido, María Inés; González-Gutiérrez, Adriana; Borjas-Almaguer, Omar David; Pérez-Arredondo, Luis Alberto; Wimer-Castillo, Blanca Otilia

    2017-01-01

    Testicular cancer is the most common solid malignancy affecting males between the ages of 15 and 35. The symptomatology caused by this tumor varies according to the site of metastasis. We present the case of a 26-year-old male who arrived to the emergency department with hematemesis. He had no previous medical history. On arrival, we noted enlargement of the left scrotal sac. There was also a mass in the left scrotum which provoked displacement of the penis and right testis. The serum alpha-fetoprotein level was 17,090 ng/mL, lactate dehydrogenase was 1480 U/L, and human chorionic gonadotropin was 287.4 IU/mL. Upper endoscopy revealed a type 1 isolated gastric varix, treated with cyanoacrylate. A CT scan showed extrinsic compression of the portal vein by lymphadenopathy along with splenic vein partial thrombosis, which caused left-sided portal hypertension. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was started with etoposide and cisplatin, and seven days later the patient underwent left radical orchiectomy. A postoperative biopsy revealed a pure testicular teratoma. Noncirrhotic left portal hypertension with bleeding from an isolated gastric varix secondary to metastasic testicular cancer has not been described before. Clinicians must consider the possibility of malignancy in the differential diagnosis of a young man presenting with unexplained gastrointestinal bleeding.

  1. Mucins in Gastric Cancer – An Update

    PubMed Central

    Boltin, Doron; Niv, Yaron

    2013-01-01

    Mucins are high-molecular-weight glycoproteins expressed throughout the gastrointestinal tract, with a key role in mucosal protection and function. In gastric cancer expression of MUC5AC and MUC1 is reduced and denovo expression of MUC2 occurs. With progressive loss of tumor differentiation and increased tumor stage, expression of MUC5AC and MUC1 is further reduced, and MUC2 decreases. Isolated MUC2 expression (the intestinal phenotype) correlates with metastatic spread and poor survival. There is emerging evidence that MUC1 acts as an oncoprotein when overexpressed. The cytoplasmic tail of MUC1 interacts with the H. pylori virulence factor cagA and is a major effector of the wnt-β catenin intracellular signalling cascade. Polymorphism in the MUC1 gene has been identified in gastric cancer patients and may have a prospective role in the stratification of high-risk subjects. The MUC1 gene also mediates resistance to the recombinant HER2/neu antibody trastuzumab. Future research efforts will examine targeting MUC1 for therapeutic purposes. PMID:24077811

  2. Molecular Classification of Gastric Cancer: A new paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Manish A.; Khanin, Raya; Tang, Laura; Janjigian, Yelena Y.; Klimstra, David S.; Gerdes, Hans; Kelsen, David P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Gastric cancer may be subdivided into three distinct subtypes –proximal, diffuse, and distal gastric cancer– based on histopathologic and anatomic criteria. Each subtype is associated with unique epidemiology. Our aim is to test the hypothesis that these distinct gastric cancer subtypes may also be distinguished by gene expression analysis. Experimental Design Patients with localized gastric adenocarcinoma being screened for a phase II preoperative clinical trial (NCI 5917) underwent endoscopic biopsy for fresh tumor procurement. 4–6 targeted biopsies of the primary tumor were obtained. Macrodissection was performed to ensure >80% carcinoma in the sample. HG-U133A GeneChip (Affymetrix) was used for cDNA expression analysis, and all arrays were processed and analyzed using the Bioconductor R-package. Results Between November 2003 and January 2006, 57 patients were screened to identify 36 patients with localized gastric cancer who had adequate RNA for expression analysis. Using supervised analysis, we built a classifier to distinguish the three gastric cancer subtypes, successfully classifying each into tightly grouped clusters. Leave-one-out cross validation error was 0.14, suggesting that >85% of samples were classified correctly. Gene set analysis with the False Discovery Rate set at 0.25 identified several pathways that were differentially regulated when comparing each gastric cancer subtype to adjacent normal stomach. Conclusions Subtypes of gastric cancer that have epidemiologic and histologic distinction are also distinguished by gene expression data. These preliminary data suggest a new classification of gastric cancer with implications for improving our understanding of disease biology and identification of unique molecular drivers for each gastric cancer subtype. PMID:21430069

  3. Gastric washing by distilled water can reduce free gastric cancer cells exfoliated into the stomach lumen.

    PubMed

    Ohki, Atsuko; Abe, Nobutsugu; Yoshimoto, Eri; Hashimoto, Yoshikazu; Takeuchi, Hirohisa; Nagao, Gen; Masaki, Tadahiko; Mori, Toshiyuki; Ohkura, Yasuo; Sugiyama, Masanori

    2018-04-25

    Intragastric free cancer cells in patients with gastric cancer have rarely been studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate the detection rate of intragastric free cancer cells in gastric washes using two types of solutions during endoscopic examination. We further clarified risk factors affecting the presence of exfoliated free cancer cells. A total of 175 patients with gastric cancer were enrolled. Lactated Ringer's solution (N = 89) or distilled water (DW; N = 86) via endoscopic working channel was sprayed onto the tumor surface, and the resultant fluid was collected for cytological examination. We compared the cancer-cell positivity rate between the two (Ringer and DW) groups. We also tested the correlation between cancer-cell positivity and clinicopathological factors in the Ringer group to identify risk factors for the presence of exfoliated cancer cells. The cancer-cell positivity rate was significantly higher in the Ringer group than that in the DW group (58 vs 6%). Cytomorphology in the Ringer group was well maintained, but not in the DW group. The larger tumor size (≥ 20 mm) and positive lymphatic involvement were significant risk factors of exfoliated free cancer cells. Cancer cells can be highly exfoliated from the tumor surface into the gastric lumen by endoscopic irrigation in large gastric cancer with lymphatic involvement. Gastric washing by DW can lead to cytoclasis of free cancer cells; therefore, it may minimize the possibility of cancer-cell seeding in procedures carrying potential risks of tumor-cell seeding upon transluminal communication, such as endoscopic full-thickness resection and laparoscopy-endoscopy cooperative surgery.

  4. Companion diagnostics for the targeted therapy of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Changhoon; Park, Young Soo

    2015-10-21

    Gastric cancer is the fourth most common type of cancer and represents a major cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. With recent biomedical advances in our understanding of the molecular characteristics of gastric cancer, many genetic alterations have been identified as potential targets for its treatment. Multiple novel agents are currently under development as the demand for active agents that improve the survival of gastric cancer patients constantly increases. Based on lessons from previous trials of targeted agents, it is now widely accepted that the establishment of an optimal diagnostic test to select molecularly defined patients is of equal importance to the development of active agents against targetable genetic alterations. Herein, we highlight the current status and future perspectives of companion diagnostics in the treatment of gastric cancer.

  5. Optimal Roux-en-Y reconstruction after distal gastrectomy for early gastric cancer as assessed using the newly developed PGSAS-45 scale.

    PubMed

    Kawahira, Hiroshi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Hiki, Naoki; Takahashi, Masazumi; Itoh, Seiji; Mitsumori, Norio; Kawashima, Yoshiyuki; Namikawa, Tsutomu; Inada, Takao; Nakada, Koji

    2015-10-01

    The optimal surgical procedure for distal gastrectomy with Roux-en-Y reconstruction (DGRY) remains to be determined. Recently, a self-report assessment instrument, the Postgastrectomy Syndrome Assessment Scale-45 (PGSAS-45), was compiled to evaluate symptoms, the living status and the quality of life of patients who have undergone gastrectomy. We used this scale to evaluate procedures used for DGRY. The subjects included 475 patients who underwent DGRY for stage IA/IB gastric cancer. We evaluated whether the size of the remnant stomach, length of the Roux limb, reconstruction route and anastomotic procedure affected the patients' symptoms, living status and quality of life assessed using the PGSAS-45. Patients with a residual stomach of more than half had significantly worse esophageal reflux scores than the patients with a smaller residual stomach (P = 0.0462); a residual stomach of one-third or one-fourth was favorable. A shorter length of the Roux limb was shown to be preferable to a longer Roux limb based on the results of the PGSAS-45. In addition, antecolic reconstruction and the anastomotic procedure using a linear stapler were found to be more favorable. The size of the remnant stomach and the length and route of the Roux limb significantly influence the patient-reported DGRY outcomes.

  6. [Eleven Patients with Gastric Cancer Who Received Chemotherapy after Stent Placement for Gastric Outlet Obstruction].

    PubMed

    Endo, Shunji; Nakagawa, Tomo; Konishi, Ken; Ikenaga, Masakazu; Ohta, Katsuya; Nakashima, Shinsuke; Matsumoto, Kenichi; Nishikawa, Kazuhiro; Ohmori, Takeshi; Yamada, Terumasa

    2017-01-01

    Endoscopic placement of self-expandable metallic stents is reportedly effective for gastric outlet obstructions due to advanced gastric cancer, and is less invasive than gastrojejunostomy. For patients who have good performance status, we administer chemotherapy after stent placement, although the safety and feasibility of this chemotherapy have not yet been discussed in full. Between 2011 and 2015, 15 patients at our institution underwent endoscopic gastroduodenal stent placement for gastric outlet obstruction due to gastric cancer. Eleven of these patients were administered chemotherapy after stent placement. In our case series, we did not observe any specific adverse event caused by stent placement plus chemotherapy. Adverse events after chemotherapy included anemia of CTCAE Grade 3 in 7 patients. Stent-in-stent placement was needed in 2 patients. Neither stent migration nor perforation was observed. Therefore, chemotherapy after stent placement for gastric outlet obstruction due to gastric cancer was considered safe and feasible. Stent placement is useful not only as palliative care for patients with terminal-stage disease, but also as one of the multimodal therapeutic strategies for gastric cancer.

  7. Clinical significance of lymph node metastasis in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jing-Yu; Liang, Han

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer, one of the most common malignancies in the world, frequently reveals lymph node, peritoneum, and liver metastases. Most of gastric cancer patients present with lymph node metastasis when they were initially diagnosed or underwent surgical resection, which results in poor prognosis. Both the depth of tumor invasion and lymph node involvement are considered as the most important prognostic predictors of gastric cancer. Although extended lymphadenectomy was not considered a survival benefit procedure and was reported to be associated with high mortality and morbidity in two randomized controlled European trials, it showed significant superiority in terms of lower locoregional recurrence and disease related deaths compared to limited lymphadenectomy in a 15-year follow-up study. Almost all clinical investigators have reached a consensus that the predictive efficiency of the number of metastatic lymph nodes is far better than the extent of lymph node metastasis for the prognosis of gastric cancer worldwide, but other nodal metastatic classifications of gastric cancer have been proposed as alternatives to the number of metastatic lymph nodes for improving the predictive efficiency for patient prognosis. It is still controversial over whether the ratio between metastatic and examined lymph nodes is superior to the number of metastatic lymph nodes in prognostic evaluation of gastric cancer. Besides, the negative lymph node count has been increasingly recognized to be an important factor significantly associated with prognosis of gastric cancer. PMID:24744586

  8. [Significance of CEA in gastric and colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Uehara, K; Miyamoto, Y; Izuo, M; Shiozaki, H; Aiba, S; Matsumoto, H

    1985-04-01

    The determination of serum CEA (Sandwich method) and CEA staining (PAP method) of excised specimens were performed in patients with gastric or colorectal cancer, and the biological characteristics of each cancer and the factors to increase serum CEA were studied with the following results: As colonic cancer has strong CEA productivity, serum CEA can be useful for the detection of cancer, and especially effective for the postoperative observation. Gastric cancer has weak CEA productivity, and serum CEA is not so useful in the detection of cancer and the judgement of resectability. The CEA positive rate of tissue with CEA staining was 80% in gastric cancer, 100% in colonic cancer, and were nearly equal to the CEA positive rate of serum in the group of terminal stage. In the mode of CEA staining of cancerous cells, IV type was observed most frequently in gastric cancer, and I type in colonic cancer. Among the resected cases showing more than 7ng/ml serum CEA, differentiated type, lymph node metastasis (+), the degree of tissue staining with CEA staining, the mode of cell staining O or I type in gastric cancer and I type in colonic cancer were observed in common.

  9. The relevance of gastric cancer biomarkers in prognosis and pre- and post- chemotherapy in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Muhammad; Habib, Murad; Naveed, Muhammad; Karthik, Kumaragurubaran; Dhama, Kuldeep; Shi, Meiqi; Dingding, Chen

    2017-11-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one among the major cancer types, causing human deaths and present noticeable heterogeneity. The incidences and mortality rates are higher in males in comparison to females with a male to female ratio of 2.3:1. A lot of studies have revealed out the molecular basis, pathogenesis, invasion and metastasis related findings of gastric stomach cancer. Present review encompasses the salient information on various biomarkers for the early diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of gastric cancer elaborate the clinical importance of serum tumor markers in patients with this cancer as well as checking the growths, together with epigenetic changes and genetic polymorphisms. A deep and rigorous search was carried out in Pub Med/MEDLINE using specific key words; "gastric cancer", with "tumor marker". Our search yielded 4947 important reports about related topic from books and articles that were published before the end of August 2017. Conclusively, Scientists are utilizing high time and resource to salvage this nemesis which is of global importance and cause health burden. Classical and novel biomarkers are important for treatment as well as pre- and post- diagnosis of GC. Major causes for GC are cigarette smoking, infection by Helicobacter pylori, atrophic gastritis, sex/gender, and high salt intake. Early diagnoses of GC is important for the management, treatment, pathological diagnoses by stage prognosis and metastatic setting; although the treatment outcome proved to be not much fruitful following chemotherapy, and oral medication with oxaliplatin, capecitabine, cisplatin and 5- fluorouracil (5-FU). More research studies and exploring the practical usage of gastric cancer biomarkers in diagnosis, prognosis and pre- and post- chemotherapy in clinical practice for countering gastric cancers would alleviate to some extent the ill health sufferings of humans being caused by this important and common cancerous condition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS

  10. Discrimination of premalignant lesions and cancer tissues from normal gastric tissues using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Shuwen; Chen, Changshui; Mao, Hua; Jin, Shaoqin

    2013-06-01

    The feasibility of early detection of gastric cancer using near-infrared (NIR) Raman spectroscopy (RS) by distinguishing premalignant lesions (adenomatous polyp, n=27) and cancer tissues (adenocarcinoma, n=33) from normal gastric tissues (n=45) is evaluated. Significant differences in Raman spectra are observed among the normal, adenomatous polyp, and adenocarcinoma gastric tissues at 936, 1003, 1032, 1174, 1208, 1323, 1335, 1450, and 1655 cm-1. Diverse statistical methods are employed to develop effective diagnostic algorithms for classifying the Raman spectra of different types of ex vivo gastric tissues, including principal component analysis (PCA), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), and naive Bayesian classifier (NBC) techniques. Compared with PCA-LDA algorithms, PCA-NBC techniques together with leave-one-out, cross-validation method provide better discriminative results of normal, adenomatous polyp, and adenocarcinoma gastric tissues, resulting in superior sensitivities of 96.3%, 96.9%, and 96.9%, and specificities of 93%, 100%, and 95.2%, respectively. Therefore, NIR RS associated with multivariate statistical algorithms has the potential for early diagnosis of gastric premalignant lesions and cancer tissues in molecular level.

  11. Significance of aquaporins’ expression in the prognosis of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thapa, Saroj; Chetry, Mandika; Huang, Kaiyu; Peng, Yangpei; Wang, Jinsheng; Wang, Jiaoni; Zhou, Yingying; Shen, Yigen; Xue, Yangjing; Ji, Kangting

    2018-01-01

    Gastric carcinoma is one of the most lethal malignancy at present with leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Aquaporins (AQPs) are a family of small, integral membrane proteins, which have been evidenced to play a crucial role in cell migration and proliferation of different cancer cells including gastric cancers. However, the aberrant expression of specific AQPs and its correlation to detect predictive and prognostic significance in gastric cancer remains elusive. In the present study, we comprehensively explored immunohistochemistry based map of protein expression profiles in normal tissues, cancer and cell lines from publicly available Human Protein Atlas (HPA) database. Moreover, to improve our understanding of general gastric biology and guide to find novel predictive prognostic gastric cancer biomarker, we also retrieved ‘The Kaplan–Meier plotter’ (KM plotter) online database with specific AQPs mRNA to overall survival (OS) in different clinicopathological features. We revealed that ubiquitous expression of AQPs protein can be effective tools to generate gastric cancer biomarker. Furthermore, high level AQP3, AQP9, and AQP11 mRNA expression were correlated with better OS in all gastric patients, whereas AQP0, AQP1, AQP4, AQP5, AQP6, AQP8, and AQP10 mRNA expression were associated with poor OS. With regard to the clinicopathological features including Laurens classification, clinical stage, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status, and different treatment strategy, we could illustrate significant role of individual AQP mRNA expression in the prognosis of gastric cancer patients. Thus, our results indicated that AQP’s protein and mRNA expression in gastric cancer patients provide effective role to predict prognosis and act as an essential agent to therapeutic strategy. PMID:29678898

  12. Pembrolizumab, Combination Chemotherapy, and Radiation Therapy Before Surgery in Treating Adult Patients With Locally Advanced Gastroesophageal Junction or Gastric Cardia Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-04-13

    Gastric Cardia Adenocarcinoma; Gastroesophageal Junction Adenocarcinoma; Stage IB Gastric Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Gastric Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer AJCC v7

  13. Pembrolizumab, Capecitabine, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Mismatch-Repair Deficient and Epstein-Barr Virus Positive Gastric Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-11-15

    Epstein-Barr Virus Positive; Gastric Adenocarcinoma; Mismatch Repair Protein Deficiency; Stage IB Gastric Cancer AJCC v7; Stage II Gastric Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer AJCC v7; Stage III Gastric Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer AJCC v7

  14. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer: implications of genetic testing for screening and prophylactic surgery.

    PubMed

    Cisco, Robin M; Ford, James M; Norton, Jeffrey A

    2008-10-01

    Approximately 10% of patients with gastric cancer show familial clustering, and 3% show autosomal dominance and high penetrance. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is an autosomal-dominant, inherited cancer syndrome in which affected individuals develop diffuse-type gastric cancer at a young age. Inactivating mutations in the E-cadherin gene CDH1 have been identified in 30% to 50% of patients. CDH1 mutation carriers have an approximately 70% lifetime risk of developing DGC, and affected women carry an additional 20% to 40% risk of developing lobular breast cancer. Because endoscopic surveillance is ineffective in identifying early HDGC, gene-directed prophylactic total gastrectomy currently is offered for CDH1 mutation carriers. In series of asymptomatic individuals undergoing total gastrectomy for CDH1 mutations, the removed stomachs usually contain small foci of early DGC, making surgery not prophylactic but curative. The authors of this review recommend consideration of total gastrectomy in CDH1 mutation carriers at an age 5 years younger than the youngest family member who developed gastric cancer. Individuals who choose not to undergo prophylactic gastrectomy should be followed with biannual chromoendoscopy, and women with CDH1 mutations also should undergo regular surveillance with magnetic resonance imaging studies of the breast. Because of the emergence of gene-directed gastrectomy for HDGC, today, a previously lethal disease is detected by molecular techniques, allowing curative surgery at an early stage.

  15. IMPLEMENTATION OF GASTRIC CANCER SCREENING – THE GLOBAL EXPERIENCE

    PubMed Central

    Leja, Mārcis; You, Weicheng; Camargo, M. Constanza; Saito, Hiroshi

    2018-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is still an important global healthcare problem, and in absolute figures it is going to remain at the present level in foreseeable future. In general, survival of patients with GC is poor mainly due to advanced-stage diagnosis. Early-stage GC can be cured by endoscopic resection or less invasive surgical treatment. Unfortunately, there is no appropriate screening strategy available for global application. This article provides a description of established national and regional GC screening programs and the screening modalities used. This review also summarizes current approaches to develop cancer-screening biomarkers. Although candidates with initial promising results have been suggested, moving discovery into clinical practice is still a major challenge. Well-designed biomarker studies, with systematic validation steps, are needed to decrease the burden of this fatal disease. PMID:25439074

  16. Diagnosis and evaluation of gastric cancer by positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chen-Xi; Zhu, Zhao-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. The diagnosis of gastric cancer has been significantly improved with the broad availability of gastrointestinal endoscopy. Effective technologies for accurate staging and quantitative evaluation are still in demand to merit reasonable treatment and better prognosis for the patients presented with advanced disease. Preoperative staging using conventional imaging tools, such as computed tomography (CT) and endoscopic ultrasonography, is inadequate. Positron emission tomography (PET), using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) as a tracer and integrating CT for anatomic localization, holds a promise to detect unsuspected metastasis and has been extensively used in a variety of malignancies. However, the value of FDG PET/CT in diagnosis and evaluation of gastric cancer is still controversial. This article reviews the current literature in diagnosis, staging, response evaluation, and relapse monitoring of gastric cancer, and discusses the current understanding, improvement, and future prospects in this area. PMID:24782610

  17. Transgenic and gene knockout mice in gastric cancer research

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yannan; Yu, Yingyan

    2017-01-01

    Mouse models are useful tool for carcinogenic study. They will greatly enrich the understanding of pathogenesis and molecular mechanisms for gastric cancer. However, only few of mice could develop gastric cancer spontaneously. With the development and improvement of gene transfer technology, investigators created a variety of transgenic and knockout/knockin mouse models of gastric cancer, such as INS-GAS mice and gastrin knockout mice. Combined with helicobacter infection and carcinogens treatment, these transgenic/knockout/knockin mice developed precancerous or cancerous lesions, which are proper for gene function study or experimental therapy. Here we review the progression of genetically engineered mouse models on gastric cancer research, and emphasize the effects of chemical carcinogens or infectious factors on carcinogenesis of genetically modified mouse. We also emphasize the histological examination on mouse stomach. We expect to provide researchers with some inspirations on this field. PMID:27713138

  18. Lauren classification and individualized chemotherapy in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Junli; Shen, Hong; Kapesa, Linda; Zeng, Shan

    2016-05-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. During the last 50 years, the histological classification of gastric carcinoma has been largely based on Lauren's criteria, in which gastric cancer is classified into two major histological subtypes, namely intestinal type and diffuse type adenocarcinoma. This classification was introduced in 1965, and remains currently widely accepted and employed, since it constitutes a simple and robust classification approach. The two histological subtypes of gastric cancer proposed by the Lauren classification exhibit a number of distinct clinical and molecular characteristics, including histogenesis, cell differentiation, epidemiology, etiology, carcinogenesis, biological behaviors and prognosis. Gastric cancer exhibits varied sensitivity to chemotherapy drugs and significant heterogeneity; therefore, the disease may be a target for individualized therapy. The Lauren classification may provide the basis for individualized treatment for advanced gastric cancer, which is increasingly gaining attention in the scientific field. However, few studies have investigated individualized treatment that is guided by pathological classification. The aim of the current review is to analyze the two major histological subtypes of gastric cancer, as proposed by the Lauren classification, and to discuss the implications of this for personalized chemotherapy.

  19. Pathobiology of Helicobacter pylori-induced Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Amieva, Manuel; Peek, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Colonization of the human stomach by Helicobacter pylori and its role in causing gastric cancer is one of the richest examples of complex relationship among human cells, microbes, and their environment. It is also a puzzle of enormous medical importance given the incidence and lethality of gastric cancer worldwide. We review recent findings that have changed how we view these relationships and affected the direction of gastric cancer research. For example, recent data indicate that subtle mismatches between host and microbe genetic traits greatly affect risk of gastric cancer. The ability of H pylori and its oncoprotein CagA to reprogram epithelial cells and activate properties of stemness demonstrates the sophisticated relationship among H pylori and progenitor cells in the gastric mucosa. The observation that cell-associated H pylori can colonize the gastric glands and directly affect precursor and stem cells supports these observations. The ability to mimic these interactions in human gastric organoid cultures as well as animal models will allow investigators to more fully unravel the extent of H pylori control on the renewing gastric epithelium. Finally, our realization that external environmental factors, such as dietary components and essential micronutrients, as well as the gastrointestinal microbiota, can change the balance between H pylori’s activity as a commensal or a pathogen has provided direction to studies aimed at defining the full carcinogenic potential of this organism. PMID:26385073

  20. Salt taste preference, sodium intake and gastric cancer in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Xiefu

    2011-01-01

    The risk factors mostly strongly associated with gastric cancer are gastric bacteria Helicobacter pylori and diet. By using a case-control study among residents in China, we examined the association between sodium intake, presence of H,pylori, and gastric cancer risk. A population-based case-control study including 235 cases and 410 controls were used. Potential risk factors of gastric cancer were interview for cases and controls by questionnaire, salt taste preference was measured for all subjects, and IgG antibodies to H,pylori was used for H.pylori infection. Risk measures were calculated using unconditional logistic regression. H.pylori infection and smoking increased the risk of gastric cancer, with the OR(95%CI) of 1.91(1.32-2.79) and 1.47(1.05- 2.05), respectively. Dietary sodium intake independently increased the risk of gastric cancer. Participants with the highest sodium intake(>5g/day) had a high gastric cancer risk [OR(95%CI)= 3.78(1.74-5.44)]. Participants with the salt taste preference at 7.3g/L and ≥ 14.6g/L showed higher risk of gastric cancer [OR(95%) for 7.3g/L and ≥ 14.6g/L were 5.36(2.72-10.97) and 4.75(2.43-8.85), respectively]. A significantly interaction was found between salt taste preference and H.pylori infection (p=0.037). Salt taste preference was significantly correlated with sodium intake (Correlation coefficient=0.46, p< 0.001). Salt taste preference test could be a simple way to evaluate an inherited characteristic of sodium intake, and our study confirms the gastric cancer is associated with sodium intake and H.pylori.

  1. MDGA2 is a novel tumour suppressor cooperating with DMAP1 in gastric cancer and is associated with disease outcome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kunning; Liang, Qiaoyi; Li, Xiaoxing; Tsoi, Ho; Zhang, Jingwan; Wang, Hua; Go, Minnie Y Y; Chiu, Philip W Y; Ng, Enders K W; Sung, Joseph J Y; Yu, Jun

    2016-10-01

    Using the promoter methylation assay, we have shown that MDGA2 (MAM domain containing glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor 2) is preferentially methylated in gastric cancer. We analysed its biological effects and prognostic significance in gastric cancer. MDGA2 methylation status was evaluated by combined bisulfite restriction analysis and bisulfite genomic sequencing. The effects of MDGA2 re-expression or knockdown on cell proliferation, apoptosis and the cell cycle were determined. MDGA2 interacting protein was identified by mass spectrometry and MDGA2-related cancer pathways by reporter activity and PCR array analyses. The clinical impact of MDGA2 was assessed in 218 patients with gastric cancer. MDGA2 was commonly silenced in gastric cancer cells (10/11) and primary gastric cancers due to promoter hypermethylation. MDGA2 significantly inhibited cell proliferation by causing G1-S cell cycle arrest and inducing cell apoptosis in vitro, and suppressed xenograft tumour growth in both subcutaneous and orthotopic xenograft mouse models (both p<0.001). The anti-tumorigenic effect of MDGA2 was mediated through direct stabilising of DNA methyltransferase 1 associated protein 1 (DMAP1), which played a tumour suppressive role in gastric cancer. This interaction activated their downstream key elements of p53/p21 signalling cascades. Moreover, promoter methylation of MDGA2 was detected in 62.4% (136/218) of gastric cancers. Multivariate analysis showed that patients with MDGA2 hypermethylation had a significantly decreased survival (p=0.005). Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed that MDGA2 hypermethylation was significantly associated with shortened survival in patients with early gastric cancer. MDGA2 is a critical tumour suppressor in gastric carcinogenesis; its hypermethylation is an independent prognostic factor in patients with gastric cancer. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to

  2. MDGA2 is a novel tumour suppressor cooperating with DMAP1 in gastric cancer and is associated with disease outcome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kunning; Liang, Qiaoyi; Li, Xiaoxing; Tsoi, Ho; Zhang, Jingwan; Wang, Hua; Go, Minnie Y Y; Chiu, Philip W Y; Ng, Enders K W; Sung, Joseph J Y; Yu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background Using the promoter methylation assay, we have shown that MDGA2 (MAM domain containing glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor 2) is preferentially methylated in gastric cancer. We analysed its biological effects and prognostic significance in gastric cancer. Methods MDGA2 methylation status was evaluated by combined bisulfite restriction analysis and bisulfite genomic sequencing. The effects of MDGA2 re-expression or knockdown on cell proliferation, apoptosis and the cell cycle were determined. MDGA2 interacting protein was identified by mass spectrometry and MDGA2-related cancer pathways by reporter activity and PCR array analyses. The clinical impact of MDGA2 was assessed in 218 patients with gastric cancer. Results MDGA2 was commonly silenced in gastric cancer cells (10/11) and primary gastric cancers due to promoter hypermethylation. MDGA2 significantly inhibited cell proliferation by causing G1–S cell cycle arrest and inducing cell apoptosis in vitro, and suppressed xenograft tumour growth in both subcutaneous and orthotopic xenograft mouse models (both p<0.001). The anti-tumorigenic effect of MDGA2 was mediated through direct stabilising of DNA methyltransferase 1 associated protein 1 (DMAP1), which played a tumour suppressive role in gastric cancer. This interaction activated their downstream key elements of p53/p21 signalling cascades. Moreover, promoter methylation of MDGA2 was detected in 62.4% (136/218) of gastric cancers. Multivariate analysis showed that patients with MDGA2 hypermethylation had a significantly decreased survival (p=0.005). Kaplan–Meier survival curves showed that MDGA2 hypermethylation was significantly associated with shortened survival in patients with early gastric cancer. Conclusions MDGA2 is a critical tumour suppressor in gastric carcinogenesis; its hypermethylation is an independent prognostic factor in patients with gastric cancer. PMID:26206665

  3. Prognostic Significance of Signet Ring Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Taghavi, Sharven; Jayarajan, Senthil N.; Davey, Adam; Willis, Alliric I.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Studies in Asia have questioned the dictum that signet ring cell carcinoma (SRC) has a worse prognosis than other forms of gastric cancer. Our study determined differences in presentation and outcomes between SRC and gastric adenocarcinoma (AC) in the United States. Patients and Methods The National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database was reviewed for SRC and AC from 2004 to 2007. Results We reviewed 10,246 cases of patients with gastric cancer, including 2,666 of SRC and 7,580 of AC. SRC presented in younger patients (61.9 v 68.7 years; P < .001) and less often in men (52.7% v 68.7%; P < .001). SRC patients were more frequently black (11.3% v 10.9%), Asian (16.4% v 13.2%), American Indian/Alaska Native (0.9% v 0.8%), or Hispanic (23.3% v 14.0%; P < .001). SRC was more likely to be stage T3-4 (45.8% v 33.3%), have lymph node spread (59.7% v 51.8%), and distant metastases (40.2% v 37.6%; P < .001). SRC was more likely to be found in the lower (30.7% v 24.2%) and middle stomach (30.6% v 20.7%; P < .001). Median survival was not different between the two (AC, 14.0 months v SRC, 13.0 months; P = .073). Multivariable analyses demonstrated SRC was not associated with mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 1.05; 95% CI, 0.96 to 1.11; P = .150). Mortality was associated with age (HR, 1.01; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.02; P < .001), black race (HR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.20; P = .026), and tumor grade. Variables associated with lower mortality risk included Asian race (HR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.77 to 0.91; P < .001) and surgery (HR, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.34 to 0.39; P < .001). Conclusion In the United States, SRC significantly differs from AC in extent of disease at presentation. However, when adjusted for stage, SRC does not portend a worse prognosis. PMID:22927530

  4. Current molecular markers for gastric progenitor cells and gastric cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Xiaotan T; Gumucio, Deborah L

    2011-07-01

    Gastric stem and progenitor cells (GPC) play key roles in the homeostatic renewal of gastric glands and are instrumental in epithelial repair after injury. Until very recently, the existence of GPC could only be inferred by indirect labeling strategies. The last few years have seen significant progress in the identification of biomarkers that allow prospective identification of GPC. The analysis of these unique cell populations is providing new insights into the molecular underpinnings of gastric epithelial homeostasis and repair. Of closely related interest is the potential to identify so-called cancer stem cells, a rare subpopulation of tumor-initiating cells. Here, we review the current useful biomarkers for GPC, including: (a) those that have been demonstrated by lineage tracing to give rise to all gastric cell lineages (e.g., the villin-transgene marker as well as Lgr5); (b) those that give rise to a subset of gastric lineages (e.g., TFF2); (c) markers that recognize cryptic progenitors for metaplasia (e.g., MIST1), and (d) markers that have not yet been analyzed by lineage tracing (e.g., DCKL1/DCAMKL1, CD133/PROM1, and CD44). The study of these markers has been mostly limited to the mouse model, but the hope is that the rapid pace of recent breakthroughs in this animal model will soon lead to a greater understanding of human gastric stem cell biology and to new insights into gastric cancer, the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide.

  5. Somatic mitochondrial mutation in gastric cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Burgart, L. J.; Zheng, J.; Shu, Q.; Strickler, J. G.; Shibata, D.

    1995-01-01

    Likely hot spots for mutations are mitochondrial sequences as there is less repair and more damage by carcinogens compared with nuclear sequences. A somatic 50-bp mitochondrial D-loop deletion was detected in four gastric adenocarcinomas. The deletion included the CSB2 region and was flanked by 9-bp direct repeats. The deletion was more frequent in adenocarcinomas arising from the gastroesophageal junction (4/32, 12.5%) compared with more distal tumors (0/45). Topographical analysis revealed the absence of the deletion from normal tissues except in focal portions of smooth muscle in one case. In two cases, apparent mutant homoplasmy was present throughout two tumors, including their metastases. In the two other cases, the mutation was present in only minor focal portions ( < 5%) of their primary tumors. These findings document the presence of somatic mitochondrial alterations in gastric cancer, which may reflect the environmental and genetic influences operative during tumor progression. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7573355

  6. Pathogenesis of Gastric Cancer: Genetics and Molecular Classification.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Ceu; Camargo, M C; Leite, Marina; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M; Rabkin, Charles S; Machado, José C

    Gastric cancer is the fifth most incident and the third most common cause of cancer-related death in the world. Infection with Helicobacter pylori is the major risk factor for this disease. Gastric cancer is the final outcome of a cascade of events that takes decades to occur and results from the accumulation of multiple genetic and epigenetic alterations. These changes are crucial for tumor cells to expedite and sustain the array of pathways involved in the cancer development, such as cell cycle, DNA repair, metabolism, cell-to-cell and cell-to-matrix interactions, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and immune surveillance. Comprehensive molecular analyses of gastric cancer have disclosed the complex heterogeneity of this disease. In particular, these analyses have confirmed that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive gastric cancer is a distinct entity. The identification of gastric cancer subtypes characterized by recognizable molecular profiles may pave the way for a more personalized clinical management and to the identification of novel therapeutic targets and biomarkers for screening, prognosis, prediction of response to treatment, and monitoring of gastric cancer progression.

  7. Epstein–Barr Virus Infection and Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin-Zu; Chen, Hongda; Castro, Felipe A.; Hu, Jian-Kun; Brenner, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infection is found in a subset of gastric cancers. Previous reviews have exclusively focused on EBV-encoded small RNA (EBER) positivity in gastric cancer tissues, but a comprehensive evaluation of other type of studies is lacking. We searched the PubMed database up to September, 2014, and performed a systematic review. We considered studies comparing EBV nucleic acids positivity in gastric cancer tissue with positivity in either adjacent non-tumor tissue of cancer patients or non-tumor mucosa from healthy individuals, patients with benign gastric diseases, or deceased individuals. We also considered studies comparing EBV antibodies in serum from cancer patients and healthy controls. Selection of potentially eligible studies and data extraction were performed by 2 independent reviewers. Due to the heterogeneity of studies, we did not perform formal meta-analysis. Forty-seven studies (8069 cases and 1840 controls) were identified. EBER positivity determined by in situ hybridization (ISH) was significantly higher in cancer tissues (range 5.0%–17.9%) than in adjacent mucosa from the same patients or biopsies from all control groups (almost 0%). High EBV nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1) positivity by PCR was found in gastric cancer tissues, but most were not validated by ISH or adjusted for inflammatory severity and lymphocyte infiltration. Only 4 studies tested for EBV antibodies, with large variation in the seropositivities of different antibodies in both cases and controls, and did not find an association between EBV seropositivity and gastric cancer. In summary, tissue-based ISH methods strongly suggest an association between EBV infection and gastric cancer, but PCR method alone is invalid to confirm such association. Very limited evidence from serological studies and the lack of novel antibodies warrant further investigations to identify potential risk factors of EBV for gastric cancer. PMID:25997049

  8. Gene-expression signatures can distinguish gastric cancer grades and stages.

    PubMed

    Cui, Juan; Li, Fan; Wang, Guoqing; Fang, Xuedong; Puett, J David; Xu, Ying

    2011-03-18

    Microarray gene-expression data of 54 paired gastric cancer and adjacent noncancerous gastric tissues were analyzed, with the aim to establish gene signatures for cancer grades (well-, moderately-, poorly- or un-differentiated) and stages (I, II, III and IV), which have been determined by pathologists. Our statistical analysis led to the identification of a number of gene combinations whose expression patterns serve well as signatures of different grades and different stages of gastric cancer. A 19-gene signature was found to have discerning power between high- and low-grade gastric cancers in general, with overall classification accuracy at 79.6%. An expanded 198-gene panel allows the stratification of cancers into four grades and control, giving rise to an overall classification agreement of 74.2% between each grade designated by the pathologists and our prediction. Two signatures for cancer staging, consisting of 10 genes and 9 genes, respectively, provide high classification accuracies at 90.0% and 84.0%, among early-, advanced-stage cancer and control. Functional and pathway analyses on these signature genes reveal the significant relevance of the derived signatures to cancer grades and progression. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first study on identification of genes whose expression patterns can serve as markers for cancer grades and stages.

  9. Validation of a gastric cancer nomogram using a cancer registry.

    PubMed

    Ashfaq, Awais; Kidwell, John T; McGhan, Lee J; Dueck, Amylou C; Pockaj, Barbara A; Gray, Richard J; Bagaria, Sanjay P; Wasif, Nabil

    2015-09-01

    A Memorial Sloan Kettering (MSKCC) nomogram predicts disease specific survival (DSS) for gastric adenocarcinoma. The goal of this study is to use a cancer registry to compare nomogram predicted survival with actual survival in the general population. All patients undergoing surgery for gastric adenocarcinoma from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database (1988-2012) were studied. 6954 patients were identified. Majority of cancers were in the antrum (30.2%), and had intestinal histology (73.7%). Median follow-up was 8.2 years. Five year DSS for nomogram risk groups (0-25%, 26-50%, 51-75%, and 76-100%) was 23%, 48%, 57%, and 81% respectively. Actual DSS was 7-15% lower than nomogram predicted DSS. Relative to patients in the 76-100% 5-year DSS risk group, patients in the 0-25%, 26-50%, and 51-75% groups had significantly higher risks of death with hazard ratios of 6.84 (95%CI 6.12-7.65), 3.30 (95%CI 2.83-3.86), and 2.64 (95%CI 2.30-3.03), respectively (all P < 0.001). The concordance index for 5-year nomogram predicted DSS was 0.68 (95%CI 0.67-0.69). The MSKCC gastric cancer nomogram over-estimates DSS from gastric cancer in the general population and has a moderate concordance index. Predictive tools generated at specialized institutions may not perform as well in the general population. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Insights into next developments in advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Obermannová, Radka; Lordick, Florian

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of the review is to delineate novel approaches for biology-based treatment in advanced gastric cancer. We reviewed the latest translational and clinical research articles and congress presentations. A new molecular classification of gastric cancer based on histology, genetic and proteomic alterations has evolved. It provides a roadmap for development of new drugs and combinations and for patient stratification. Anti-HER2 treatment, which is an effective strategy in metastatic gastric cancer, is now also being studied in the perioperative setting. However, resistance mechanisms in advanced disease are poorly understood and optimal patient selection remains challenging. Targeting angiogenesis is an emerging concept in the management of advanced gastric cancer, and ramucirumab has prolonged survival in the second line either as a monotherapy or in combination with paclitaxel. Biomarkers for selecting patients who benefit from ramucirumab are still lacking. Immune checkpoint blockade and inhibition of cancer stemness targets are other emerging directions for the medical treatment of gastric cancer. Large-scale international studies are ongoing. Promising biology-based treatment strategies are evolving. But tumor heterogeneity which is an inherent feature of gastric cancer challenges the development of molecularly targeted and personalized treatment strategies.

  11. Molecular targeted therapy for the treatment of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenting; Yang, Zhen; Lu, Nonghua

    2016-01-04

    Despite the global decline in the incidence and mortality of gastric cancer, it remains one of the most common malignant tumors of the digestive system. Although surgical resection is the preferred treatment for gastric cancer, chemotherapy is the preferred treatment for recurrent and advanced gastric cancer patients who are not candidates for reoperation. The short overall survival and lack of a standard chemotherapy regimen make it important to identify novel treatment modalities for gastric cancer. Within the field of tumor biology, molecular targeted therapy has attracted substantial attention to improve the specificity of anti-cancer efficacy and significantly reduce non-selective resistance and toxicity. Multiple clinical studies have confirmed that molecular targeted therapy acts on various mechanisms of gastric cancer, such as the regulation of epidermal growth factor, angiogenesis, immuno-checkpoint blockade, the cell cycle, cell apoptosis, key enzymes, c-Met, mTOR signaling and insulin-like growth factor receptors, to exert a stronger anti-tumor effect. An in-depth understanding of the mechanisms that underlie molecular targeted therapies will provide new insights into gastric cancer treatment.

  12. Changing strategies for target therapy in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Suk-Young; Oh, Sang Cheul

    2016-01-21

    In spite of a worldwide decrease in the incidence of gastric cancer, this malignancy still remains one of the leading causes of cancer mortality. Great efforts have been made to improve treatment outcomes in patients with metastatic gastric cancer, and the introduction of trastuzumab has greatly improved the overall survival. The trastuzumab treatment took its first step in opening the era of molecular targeted therapy, however several issues still need to be resolved to increase the efficacy of targeted therapy. Firstly, many patients with metastatic gastric cancer who receive trastuzumab in combination with chemotherapeutic agents develop resistance to the targeted therapy. Secondly, many clinical trials testing novel molecular targeted agents with demonstrated efficacy in other malignancies have failed to show benefit in patients with metastatic gastric cancer, suggesting the importance of the selection of appropriate indications according to molecular characteristics in application of targeted agents. Herein, we review the molecular targeted agents currently approved and in use, and clinical trials in patients with metastatic gastric cancer, and demonstrate the limitations and future direction in treatment of advanced gastric cancer.

  13. Advances of Molecular Targeted Therapy in Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Bulent; Gumusay, Ozge; Cengiz, Mustafa; Ozet, Ahmet

    2016-06-01

    Gastric cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death in the world, and its prognosis remains poor with a median overall survival of 12 months for advanced disease. Advances in the understanding of molecular genetics have led to the development of directed molecular targeted therapy in gastric cancer, leading to improve patient outcomes and quality of life. In the treatment of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive gastric cancer, the addition of trastuzumab significantly improves survival in the first-line setting of therapy. Ramucirumab, an antibody directed against vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, significantly improved progression-free and overall survival and has been approved for second-line treatment of gastric cancer. Anti-mesenchymal-epithelial transition (c-MET), mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors, and polo-like kinase 1 inhibitors are under investigation as a novel therapeutic option for the treatment of gastric cancer. The novel therapies target the key immune checkpoint interaction between a T cell co-inhibitory receptor called programmed death 1 (PD-1) and one of its immunosuppressive ligands, PD-L1. This article reviews molecular targeted therapies in gastric cancer, in light of recent advances.

  14. Gastric cancer presenting with solitary gigantic pelvic metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qi; Nan, Kejun; Yao, Yu

    2012-07-01

    Bone metastasis of gastric cancer is relatively uncommon in clinical practice. Moreover, it is all the more unusual for the primary presentation of gastric malignancy to be bone metastasis. Here, we describe a male patient who complained of pain and edema in his right lower extremity. Further assessment by computed tomography and positron emission tomography revealed an abnormally thickened gastric cardia and a giant neoplasm in the right pelvis with bone damage. Consequently, the finding of adenocarcinoma cells in pelvic and cardia biopsy specimens contributed to the diagnosis of pelvic metastasis from gastric cancer. This case report illustrates that stomach cancer has the potential, although far less than breast, prostate and lung cancers, to metastasize to bone. In addition, it highlights the peculiarity of this bone metastasis which is pelvic, solitary and huge.

  15. Occupation and gastric cancer in Spain.

    PubMed

    González, C A; Sanz, M; Marcos, G; Pita, S; Brullet, E; Vida, F; Agudo, A; Hsieh, C C

    1991-08-01

    The association between occupational exposure and stomach cancer was investigated in a multicenter case-referent study conducted in Spain on 354 histologically confirmed cases and 354 hospital referents, matched by age, gender, and residence. An increased risk of gastric cancer was found for coal mining workers [odds ratio (OR) 11.8], but the number of workers was small, and therefore the 95% confidence interval (95% CI) was wide (95% CI 1.36-103). An increased risk was observed for wood and furniture workers (OR 1.76), construction workers (OR 1.68), and glass and ceramic workers (OR 2.18), but none of these risks were statistically significant. According to an occupation-exposure linkage system an increased risk was found for occupations associated with exposure to silica and mineral dust (OR 1.80, 95% CI 0.90-3.59). All of the OR estimates were adjusted for the confounding factors socioprofessional status and dietary habits. The possibility of a causal association between stomach cancer and coal and mineral dust is supported by the results.

  16. Postoperative fever predicts poor prognosis of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Feng, Fan; Tian, Yangzi; Yang, Xuewen; Sun, Li; Hong, Liu; Yang, Jianjun; Guo, Man; Lian, Xiao; Fan, Daiming; Zhang, Hongwei

    2017-09-22

    Data about prognostic value of postoperative fever in gastric cancer was lacking. Thus, the present study aims to investigate the prognostic value of postoperative fever in gastric cancer. From September 2008 to March 2015, 2938 gastric cancer patients were enrolled in the present study. Clinicopathological features were recoded. The association between postoperative fever and prognosis of gastric cancer were analyzed. There were 2294 male (78.1%) and 644 female (21.9%). Seven hundred and fifty-six patients suffered from fever. Among them, the duration of fever less than 48h occurred in 508 cases, and duration of fever over 48h occurred in 248 cases. Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that postoperative fever was an independent risk factor for prognosis of gastric cancer ( P < 0.001). For the entire cohort, duration of fever over 48h was significantly associated with decreased survival ( P < 0.001). In subgroup analysis, duration of fever over 48h was significantly associated with poor prognosis of stage I and II gastric cancer (both P < 0.001). However, postoperative fever was not associated with the prognosis of stage III gastric cancer ( P = 0.334). Considering the type of gastrectomy, postoperative fever was not associated with the prognosis of patients with proximal ( P = 0.318) and distal gastrectomy ( P = 0.806), but duration of fever over 48h was significantly associated with poor prognosis of patients with total gastrectomy ( P = 0.004). In conclusion, postoperative fever was associated with poor prognosis of gastric cancer.

  17. Splenectomy combined with gastrectomy and immunotherapy for advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Miwa, H; Orita, K

    1983-06-01

    We studied the effects of a splenectomy in combination with immunotherapy on the survival of patients who had undergone a total gastrectomy. It was found that a splenectomy was not effective against advanced gastric cancer at stage III, and that the spleen should be retained for immunotherapy. Splenectomy for gastric cancer at terminal stage IV, particularly in combination with immunotherapy, produced not only augmentation of cellular immunity, but also increased survival.

  18. Review of Atrophic Gastritis and Intestinal Metaplasia as a Premalignant Lesion of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yo Han; Kim, Nayoung

    2015-01-01

    Atrophic gastritis (AG) and intestinal metaplasia (IM) are the main precursor lesions of gastric cancer as the incidence of gastric cancer increases in the gastric mucosa involved with AG and IM. The prevalence of AG and IM vary depending on countries, even it represents diverse results in the same nation. Usually AG is antecedent of IM but the etiologies of AG and IM are not always the same. The sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic methods to detect AG and IM are different. Furthermore, the management strategy of AG and IM has not been established, yet. Helicobacter pylori infection has been proved as the most important cause of AG and IM. Thus the eradication of H. pylori is very important to prevent the progression to gastric cancer which is still placed in the high rank in morbidity and mortality among cancers. However, the reversibility of AG and IM by eradication of H. pylori which was assumed to be certain by meta-analysis is; however, controversial now. Therefore, the understanding and early diagnosis of AG and IM are very important, especially, in high incidence area of gastric cancer such as Republic of Korea. PMID:25853101

  19. Differential Proteomic Analysis of Noncardia Gastric Cancer from Individuals of Northern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Chung, Janete; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Demachki, Samia; da Silva, Ismael Dale Cotrim Guerreiro; Chammas, Roger; Burbano, Rommel Rodríguez; de Arruda Cardoso Smith, Marília

    2012-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. The identification of new cancer biomarkers is necessary to reduce the mortality rates through the development of new screening assays and early diagnosis, as well as new target therapies. In this study, we performed a proteomic analysis of noncardia gastric neoplasias of individuals from Northern Brazil. The proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. For the identification of differentially expressed proteins, we used statistical tests with bootstrapping resampling to control the type I error in the multiple comparison analyses. We identified 111 proteins involved in gastric carcinogenesis. The computational analysis revealed several proteins involved in the energy production processes and reinforced the Warburg effect in gastric cancer. ENO1 and HSPB1 expression were further evaluated. ENO1 was selected due to its role in aerobic glycolysis that may contribute to the Warburg effect. Although we observed two up-regulated spots of ENO1 in the proteomic analysis, the mean expression of ENO1 was reduced in gastric tumors by western blot. However, mean ENO1 expression seems to increase in more invasive tumors. This lack of correlation between proteomic and western blot analyses may be due to the presence of other ENO1 spots that present a slightly reduced expression, but with a high impact in the mean protein expression. In neoplasias, HSPB1 is induced by cellular stress to protect cells against apoptosis. In the present study, HSPB1 presented an elevated protein and mRNA expression in a subset of gastric cancer samples. However, no association was observed between HSPB1 expression and clinicopathological characteristics. Here, we identified several possible biomarkers of gastric cancer in individuals from Northern Brazil. These biomarkers may be useful for the assessment of prognosis and stratification for therapy if validated in larger clinical study

  20. Association between gastric cancer and the Kyoto classification of gastritis.

    PubMed

    Shichijo, Satoki; Hirata, Yoshihiro; Niikura, Ryota; Hayakawa, Yoku; Yamada, Atsuo; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2017-09-01

    Histological gastritis is associated with gastric cancer, but its diagnosis requires biopsy. Many classifications of endoscopic gastritis are available, but not all are useful for risk stratification of gastric cancer. The Kyoto Classification of Gastritis was proposed at the 85th Congress of the Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society. This cross-sectional study evaluated the usefulness of the Kyoto Classification of Gastritis for risk stratification of gastric cancer. From August 2013 to September 2014, esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed and the gastric findings evaluated according to the Kyoto Classification of Gastritis in a total of 4062 patients. The following five endoscopic findings were selected based on previous reports: atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, enlarged folds, nodularity, and diffuse redness. A total of 3392 patients (1746 [51%] men and 1646 [49%] women) were analyzed. Among them, 107 gastric cancers were diagnosed. Atrophy was found in 2585 (78%) and intestinal metaplasia in 924 (27%). Enlarged folds, nodularity, and diffuse redness were found in 197 (5.8%), 22 (0.6%), and 573 (17%), respectively. In univariate analyses, the severity of atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, diffuse redness, age, and male sex were associated with gastric cancer. In a multivariate analysis, atrophy and male sex were found to be independent risk factors. Younger age and severe atrophy were determined to be associated with diffuse-type gastric cancer. Endoscopic detection of atrophy was associated with the risk of gastric cancer. Thus, patients with severe atrophy should be examined carefully and may require intensive follow-up. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. The risk of gastric cancer in carriers of CHEK2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Teodorczyk, Urszula; Cybulski, Cezary; Wokołorczyk, Dominika; Jakubowska, Anna; Starzyńska, Teresa; Lawniczak, Małgorzata; Domagała, Paweł; Ferenc, Katarzyna; Marlicz, Krzysztof; Banaszkiewicz, Zbigniew; Wiśniowski, Rafał; Narod, Steven A; Lubiński, Jan

    2013-09-01

    CHEK2 is a tumor suppressor gene whose functions are central to the induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis following DNA damage. Mutations in CHEK2 have been associated with cancers at many sites, including breast and prostate cancers, but the relationship between CHEK2 and gastric cancer has not been extensively studied. In Poland, there are four known founder alleles of CHEK2; three alleles are protein truncating (1100delC, IVS2G>A, del5395) and the other is a missense variant (I157T). We examined the frequencies of four Polish founder mutations in the CHEK2 gene in 658 unselected gastric cancer patients, in 154 familial gastric cancer patients and in 8,302 controls. A CHEK2 mutation was seen in 57 of 658 (8.7 %) unselected patients with gastric cancer compared to 480 of 8,302 (5.8 %) controls (OR 1.6, p = 0.004). A CHEK2 mutation was present in 19 of 154 (12.3 %) familial cases (OR = 2.3, p = 0.001). The odds ratio for early onset (<50 years) gastric cancer was higher (2.1, p = 0.01), than for cases diagnosed at age of 50 or above (OR 1.4, p = 0.05). Truncating mutations of CHEK2 were associated with higher risk (OR = 2.1, p = 0.02) than the missense mutation I157T (OR = 1.4, p = 0.04). CHEK2 mutations predispose to gastric cancer, in particular to young-onset cases.

  2. Development of gastric cancer associated with Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2004-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with histological gastritis, gastric atrophy, gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma in the stomach. However, gastric cancer only develops in a minority of infected individuals. Such clinical diversity is caused by variations in the interactions between H. pylori pathogenicity, host susceptibility, and environmental factors. Based on evidence from three prospective epidemiological studies, the International Agency for Research on Cancer and the World Health Organization (IARC/WHO) concluded in 1994 that H. pylori has a causal linkage to gastric carcinogenesis and is a definite carcinogen in humans. Two large-scale, prospective, epidemiological studies have recently been reported in Japan and have confirmed that H. pylori infection constitutes a high risk factor for the development of gastric cancer, at least in males. In order to obtain evidence that eradication of H. pylori leads to a reduction in the occurrence of gastric cancer, reversibility of precancerous lesions, gastric atrophy or intestinal metaplasia should be proven after eradication treatment. A biopsy specimen from the lesser curvature of the corpus is the most sensitive for evaluating the regression of gastric atrophy on histology, and the evaluation needs be conducted at least 13 months after treatment. In a Mongolian gerbil model with or without low-dose chemical carcinogens, it has been demonstrated that H. pylori can lead to the development of gastric cancer. Experimental studies have elucidated that virulence factors of H. pylori interact with gastric epithelial cell signaling related to carcinogenesis. The cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI) is a major virulence gene cluster; it encodes the type IV secretion machinery system forming a cylinder-like structure. The CagA protein is translocated into target cells via this secretion system and induces a hummingbird phenotype, a growth factor-like effect. The other gene products are

  3. Stromal-Based Signatures for the Classification of Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Uhlik, Mark T; Liu, Jiangang; Falcon, Beverly L; Iyer, Seema; Stewart, Julie; Celikkaya, Hilal; O'Mahony, Marguerita; Sevinsky, Christopher; Lowes, Christina; Douglass, Larry; Jeffries, Cynthia; Bodenmiller, Diane; Chintharlapalli, Sudhakar; Fischl, Anthony; Gerald, Damien; Xue, Qi; Lee, Jee-Yun; Santamaria-Pang, Alberto; Al-Kofahi, Yousef; Sui, Yunxia; Desai, Keyur; Doman, Thompson; Aggarwal, Amit; Carter, Julia H; Pytowski, Bronislaw; Jaminet, Shou-Ching; Ginty, Fiona; Nasir, Aejaz; Nagy, Janice A; Dvorak, Harold F; Benjamin, Laura E

    2016-05-01

    Treatment of metastatic gastric cancer typically involves chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies targeting HER2 (ERBB2) and VEGFR2 (KDR). However, reliable methods to identify patients who would benefit most from a combination of treatment modalities targeting the tumor stroma, including new immunotherapy approaches, are still lacking. Therefore, we integrated a mouse model of stromal activation and gastric cancer genomic information to identify gene expression signatures that may inform treatment strategies. We generated a mouse model in which VEGF-A is expressed via adenovirus, enabling a stromal response marked by immune infiltration and angiogenesis at the injection site, and identified distinct stromal gene expression signatures. With these data, we designed multiplexed IHC assays that were applied to human primary gastric tumors and classified each tumor to a dominant stromal phenotype representative of the vascular and immune diversity found in gastric cancer. We also refined the stromal gene signatures and explored their relation to the dominant patient phenotypes identified by recent large-scale studies of gastric cancer genomics (The Cancer Genome Atlas and Asian Cancer Research Group), revealing four distinct stromal phenotypes. Collectively, these findings suggest that a genomics-based systems approach focused on the tumor stroma can be used to discover putative predictive biomarkers of treatment response, especially to antiangiogenesis agents and immunotherapy, thus offering an opportunity to improve patient stratification. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2573-86. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Chromosomal Instability in Gastric Cancer Biology.

    PubMed

    Maleki, Saffiyeh Saboor; Röcken, Christoph

    2017-05-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the fifth most common cancer in the world and accounts for 7% of the total cancer incidence. The prognosis of GC is dismal in Western countries due to late diagnosis: approximately 70% of the patients die within 5 years following initial diagnosis. Recently, integrative genomic analyses led to the proposal of a molecular classification of GC into four subtypes, i.e.,microsatellite-instable, Epstein-Barr virus-positive, chromosomal-instable (CIN), and genomically stable GCs. Molecular classification of GC advances our knowledge of the biology of GC and may have implications for diagnostics and patient treatment. Diagnosis of microsatellite-instable GC and Epstein-Barr virus-positive GC is more or less straightforward. Microsatellite instability can be tested by immunohistochemistry (MLH1, PMS2, MSH2, and MSH6) and/or molecular-biological analysis. Epstein-Barr virus-positive GC can be tested by in situ hybridization (Epstein-Barr virus encoded small RNA). However, with regard to CIN, testing may be more complicated and may require a more in-depth knowledge of the underlying mechanism leading to CIN. In addition, CIN GC may not constitute a distinct subgroup but may rather be a compilation of a more heterogeneous group of tumors. In this review, we aim to clarify the definition of CIN and to point out the molecular mechanisms leading to this molecular phenotype and the challenges faced in characterizing this type of cancer. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Alternative RNA splicing and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Yuan, Yuan

    2017-07-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) linked to diseases, especially to tumors. Recently, more and more studies focused on the relationship between AS and gastric cancer (GC). This review surveyed the hot topic from four aspects: First, the common types of AS in cancer, including exon skipping, intron retention, mutually exclusive exon, alternative 5 ' or 3' splice site, alternative first or last exon and alternative 3' untranslated regions. Second, basic mechanisms of AS and its relationship with cancer. RNA splicing in eukaryotes follows the GT-AG rule by both cis-elements and trans-acting factors regulatory. Through RNA splicing, different proteins with different forms and functions can be produced and may be associated with carcinogenesis. Third, AS types of GC-related genes and their splicing variants. In this paper, we listed 10 common genes with AS and illustrated its possible molecular mechanisms owing to genetic variation (mutation and /or polymorphism). Fourth, the splicing variants of GC-associated genes and gastric carcinogenesis, invasion and metastasis. Many studies have found that the different splicing variants of the same gene are differentially expressed in GC and its precancerous diseases, suggesting AS has important implications in GC development. Taking together, this review highlighted the role of AS and splicing variants in the process of GC. We hope that this is not only beneficial to advances in the study field of GC, but also can provide valuable information to other similar tumor research.Although we already know some gene splicing and splicing variants play an important role in the development of GC, but many phenomena and mechanisms are still unknown. For example, how the tumor microenvironment and signal transduction pathway effect the forming and function of AS? Unfortunately, this review did not cover the contents because the current study is limited. It is no doubt that clarifying the phenomena and mechanisms of these unknown may help to reveal

  6. Early results of a randomized two-by-two factorial phase II trial comparing neoadjuvant chemotherapy with two and four courses of cisplatin/S-1 and docetaxel/cisplatin/S-1 as neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, T; Nishikawa, K; Fujitani, K; Tanabe, K; Ito, S; Matsui, T; Miki, A; Nemoto, H; Sakamaki, K; Fukunaga, T; Kimura, Y; Hirabayashi, N; Yoshikawa, T

    2017-08-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is a promising method of improving the survival of resectable gastric cancer. Cisplatin/S-1 (CS) and docetaxel/cisplatin/S-1 (DCS) are both effective against metastatic gastric cancer. This report clarified the impact of these regimens on early endpoints, including the pathological responses, chemotherapy-related toxicities, and surgical results. Patients with M0 and either T4 or T3 in case of junctional cancer or scirrhous type received two or four courses of cisplatin (60 mg/m2 at day 8)/S-1 (80 mg/m2 for 21 days with 1 week rest) or docetaxel (40 mg/m2 at day 1)/cisplatin (60 mg/m2 at day 1)/S-1 (80 mg/m2 for 14 days with 2 weeks rest) as NAC. Patients then underwent D2 gastrectomy and adjuvant S-1 chemotherapy for 1 year. The primary endpoint was the 3-year overall survival. Between October 2011 and September 2014, 132 patients were assigned to receive CS (n = 66; 33 in 2 courses and 33 in 4 courses) or DCS (n = 66; 33 in 2 courses and 33 in 4 courses). The respective major grade 3 or 4 hematological toxicities (CS/DCS) were leukocytopenia (14.1%/26.2%), neutropenia (29.7%/47.7%), anemia (14.1%/12.3%), and platelet reduction (3.1%/1.5%). The rate of pathological response, defined as a complete response or < 10% residual cancer remaining, was 19.4% in the CS group and 15.4% in the DCS group, and 15.6% in the two-course group and 19.0% in the 4-course group. The R0 resection rate was 72.7% in the CS group and 81.8% in the DCS group and 80.3% in the two-course group and the 74.2% in the four-course group. No treatment-related deaths were observed. Our results do not support three-drug therapy with a taxane over two-drug therapy, or any further treatment beyond two cycles as an attractive candidate for the test arm of NAC. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Personalizing gene therapy in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Vogiatzi, P; Cassone, M; Claudio, P P

    2006-11-01

    Gene therapy was proposed many decades ago as a more straightforward and definitive way of curing human diseases, but only recently technical advancements and improved knowledge have allowed its active development as a broad and promising research field. After the first successes in the cure of genetic and infectious diseases, it has been actively investigated as a means to decrease the burden and suffering generated by cancer. The field of gastric cancer is witnessing an impressive flourishing of studies testing the possibilities and actual efficacy of the many different strategies employed in gene therapy, and overall results seem to be two-sided: while original ideas and innovative protocols are providing extremely interesting contributions with great potential, more advanced-phase studies concluded so far have fallen short of expectations regarding efficacy, although invariably demonstrating little or no toxicity. An overview of the major efforts in this field is provided here, and a critical discussion is presented on the single strategies undertaken and on the overall balance between potentiality and pitfalls. Copyright 2006 Prous Science. All rights reserved.

  8. A case-control study of gastric cancer in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, N; Plummer, M; Vivas, J; Moreno, V; De Sanjosé, S; Lopez, G; Oliver, W

    2001-08-01

    A case-control study to evaluate risk factors for gastric cancer was carried out among 292 cases of gastric cancer and 485 controls in a high-risk area of Venezuela. Subjects were interviewed using a structured questionnaire, which elicited information on residential history, socio-economic status, family history of gastric diseases, smoking, drinking and dietary habits. Habitual diet was estimated from a meal-structured food frequency questionnaire on 75 food items. There was a strong inverse association with social class, as measured by education and by indicators of poverty. The results of the dietary analysis suggest that a diet high in starch and low in meat, fish and fresh vegetables increases risk of gastric cancer. A protective effect was observed for frequent consumption of allium vegetables. Inverse associations were found with height, which may reflect nutritional status in childhood, and with refrigerator use in the first two decades of life. Alcohol and tobacco consumption was investigated among males only, since the prevalence of alcohol and tobacco use was very low in females. Alcohol drinkers were at higher risk than non-drinkers and there was a small excess risk for current smokers compared with never smokers. There was some evidence of familial aggregation of gastric cancer. These findings will have important implications in planning preventive strategies for gastric cancer in Venezuela. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Local resection of the stomach for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kinami, Shinichi; Funaki, Hiroshi; Fujita, Hideto; Nakano, Yasuharu; Ueda, Nobuhiko; Kosaka, Takeo

    2017-06-01

    The local resection of the stomach is an ideal method for preventing postoperative symptoms. There are various procedures for performing local resection, such as the laparoscopic lesion lifting method, non-touch lesion lifting method, endoscopic full-thickness resection, and laparoscopic endoscopic cooperative surgery. After the invention and widespread use of endoscopic submucosal dissection, local resection has become outdated as a curative surgical technique for gastric cancer. Nevertheless, local resection of the stomach in the treatment of gastric cancer in now expected to make a comeback with the clinical use of sentinel node navigation surgery. However, there are many issues associated with local resection for gastric cancer, other than the normal indications. These include gastric deformation, functional impairment, ensuring a safe surgical margin, the possibility of inducing peritoneal dissemination, and the associated increase in the risk of metachronous gastric cancer. In view of these issues, there is a tendency to regard local resection as an investigative treatment, to be applied only in carefully selected cases. The ideal model for local resection of the stomach for gastric cancer would be a combination of endoscopic full-thickness resection of the stomach using an ESD device and hand sutured closure using a laparoscope or a surgical robot, for achieving both oncological safety and preserved functions.

  10. Gastric metastasis of breast cancer: a single centre retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Almubarak, Maher M; Laé, Marick; Cacheux, Wulfran; de Cremoux, Patricia; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Reyal, Fabien; Bennett, Simon P; Falcou, Marie-Christine; Salmon, Remy J; Baranger, Bernard; Mariani, Pascale

    2011-10-01

    Digestive metastasis of breast cancer are rare but when they do occur the stomach is one of the commoner sites. To describe the clinical, endoscopic, pathological features and treatment. 35 cases of gastric metastasis were identified retrospectively between 1980 and 2008. The location of the gastric metastasis was fundus (n=15, 43%), antrum (n=15, 43%) or both (n=5, 14%). The histological subtype of primary breast cancer was invasive lobular carcinoma in 34 patients (97%). Hormonal receptors were positive in 19 out of 24 cases (79%), two out of 22 analysed were HER2 positive (9%). There were 16 (46%) patients with peritoneal carcinosis. The treatment was chemotherapy (n=13, 37%), hormonotherapy (n=2, 6%) or both (n=13, 37%). The 2-year survival rate after gastric metastasis diagnosis was 53% with a median follow up of 31 months [7-84 months]. Ninety-seven percent of gastric metastasis from breast cancers are derived from invasive lobular carcinoma. Seventy-nine percent of these are HER+ and comparison with the original histopathological slides of primary breast carcinoma should be performed to differentiate gastric metastasis from primary gastric carcinoma. Peritoneal carcinomatosis accompanied gastric metastasis in almost half the cases in this series and treatment was generally chemotherapy. Copyright © 2011 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. New agents on the horizon in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Lordick, F; Shitara, K; Janjigian, Y Y

    2017-08-01

    Conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy has been the backbone of advanced gastric cancer treatment for decades and still represents a key element of the therapeutic armamentarium. However, only small increments in survival outcomes have been reached. A better understanding of genetic alterations and molecular signatures of gastric cancer has been reached in the last years. It will serve as a roadmap for better treatment stratification and future drug development. We reviewed preclinical and clinical studies that assessed novel treatment targets and emerging drug therapies in gastric cancer. We performed research via PubMed, and the congress webpages of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, European Society of Medical Oncology and the Japanese Society of Medical Oncology. HER2-targeting with trastuzumab is effective in HER2-positive metastatic gastric cancer; combined HER2 targeting strategies are being investigated. Studies assessing the role of HER2 targeting in the perioperative setting are ongoing. Novel treatment targets include inhibition of cancer stemness-related signaling pathways like STAT3. DNA damage repair and Claudin 18.2, a tight junction protein with high expression in gastric cancers are also novel molecular drug targets. Modification of the tumor microenvironment, including activation of immune response by PD-1/PD-L1 checkpoint inhibitors and stroma modification by matrix metalloproteinase-9 inhibition, led to first promising treatment results. Novel treatment options for gastric cancer patients are emerging. They involve novel mechanisms of action, and are based on our constantly increasing understanding of tumor biology and better molecular stratification of gastric cancer patients. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Overview of Current Concepts in Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia and Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Jason D.; Borum, Marie L.; Koh, Joyce M.; Stephen, Sindu

    2018-01-01

    Gastric intestinal metaplasia is a precancerous change of the mucosa of the stomach with intestinal epithelium, and is associated with an increased risk of dysplasia and cancer. The pathogenesis to gastric cancer is proposed by the Correa hypothesis as the transition from normal gastric epithelium to invasive cancer via inflammation followed by intramucosal cancer and invasion. Multiple risk factors have been associated with the development of gastric intestinal metaplasia interplay, including Helicobacter pylori infection and associated genomics, host genetic factors, environmental milieu, rheumatologic disorders, diet, and intestinal microbiota. Globally, screening guidelines have been established in countries with high incidence. In the United States, no such guidelines have been developed due to lower, albeit increasing, incidence. The American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy recommends a case-by-case patient assessment based upon epidemiology, genetics, and environmental risk factors. Studies have examined the use of a serologic biopsy to stratify risk based upon factors such as H pylori status and virulence factors, along with serologic markers of chronic inflammation including pepsinogen I, pepsinogen II, and gastrin. High-risk patients may then be advised to undergo endoscopic evaluation with mapping biopsies from the antrum (greater curvature, lesser curvature), incisura angularis, and corpus (greater curvature, lesser curvature). Surveillance guidelines have not been firmly established for patients with known gastric intestinal metaplasia, but include repeat endoscopy at intervals according to the histologic risk for malignant transformation. PMID:29606921

  13. Overview of Current Concepts in Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia and Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jencks, David S; Adam, Jason D; Borum, Marie L; Koh, Joyce M; Stephen, Sindu; Doman, David B

    2018-02-01

    Gastric intestinal metaplasia is a precancerous change of the mucosa of the stomach with intestinal epithelium, and is associated with an increased risk of dysplasia and cancer. The pathogenesis to gastric cancer is proposed by the Correa hypothesis as the transition from normal gastric epithelium to invasive cancer via inflammation followed by intramucosal cancer and invasion. Multiple risk factors have been associated with the development of gastric intestinal metaplasia interplay, including Helicobacter pylori infection and associated genomics, host genetic factors, environmental milieu, rheumatologic disorders, diet, and intestinal microbiota. Globally, screening guidelines have been established in countries with high incidence. In the United States, no such guidelines have been developed due to lower, albeit increasing, incidence. The American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy recommends a case-by-case patient assessment based upon epidemiology, genetics, and environmental risk factors. Studies have examined the use of a serologic biopsy to stratify risk based upon factors such as H pylori status and virulence factors, along with serologic markers of chronic inflammation including pepsinogen I, pepsinogen II, and gastrin. High-risk patients may then be advised to undergo endoscopic evaluation with mapping biopsies from the antrum (greater curvature, lesser curvature), incisura angularis, and corpus (greater curvature, lesser curvature). Surveillance guidelines have not been firmly established for patients with known gastric intestinal metaplasia, but include repeat endoscopy at intervals according to the histologic risk for malignant transformation.

  14. Molecular Dimensions of Gastric Cancer: Translational and Clinical Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoon Young; Noh, Sung Hoon; Cheong, Jae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a global health burden and has the highest incidence in East Asia. This disease is complex in nature because it arises from multiple interactions of genetic, local environmental, and host factors, resulting in biological heterogeneity. This genetic intricacy converges on molecular characteristics reflecting the pathophysiology, tumor biology, and clinical outcome. Therefore, understanding the molecular characteristics at a genomic level is pivotal to improving the clinical care of patients with gastric cancer. A recent landmark study, The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project, showed the molecular landscape of gastric cancer through a comprehensive molecular evaluation of 295 primary gastric cancers. The proposed molecular classification divided gastric cancer into four subtypes: Epstein-Barr virus-positive, microsatellite unstable, genomic stable, and chromosomal instability. This information will be taken into account in future clinical trials and will be translated into clinical therapeutic decisions. To fully realize the clinical benefit, many challenges must be overcome. Rapid growth of high-throughput biology and functional validation of molecular targets will further deepen our knowledge of molecular dimensions of this cancer, allowing for personalized precision medicine.

  15. Towards personalized perioperative treatment for advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Ru-Lin; Wu, Ai-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers worldwide. Although the rate of gastric cancer has declined dramatically over the past decades in most developed Western countries, it has not declined in East Asia. Currently, a radical gastrectomy is still the only curative treatment for gastric cancer. Over the last twenty years, however, surgery alone has been replaced by a multimodal perioperative approach. To achieve the maximum benefit from the perioperative treatment, a thorough evaluation of the tumor must first be performed. A complete assessment of gastric cancer is divided into two parts: staging and histology. According to the stage and histology of the cancer, perioperative chemotherapy or radiochemotherapy can be implemented, and perioperative targeted therapies such as trastuzumab may also play a role in this field. However, perioperative treatment approaches have not been widely accepted until a series of clinical trials were performed to evaluate the value of perioperative treatment. Although multimodal perioperative treatment has been widely applied in clinical practice, personalization of perioperative treatment represents the next stage in the treatment of gastric cancer. Genomic-guided treatment and efficacy prediction using molecular biomarkers in perioperative treatment are of great importance in the evolution of treatment and may become an ideal treatment method. PMID:25206266

  16. in Mapping of Gastric Cancer Incidence in Iran

    PubMed

    Asmarian, Naeimehossadat; Jafari-Koshki, Tohid; Soleimani, Ali; Taghi Ayatollahi, Seyyed Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    Background: In many countries gastric cancer has the highest incidence among the gastrointestinal cancers and is the second most common cancer in Iran. The aim of this study was to identify and map high risk gastric cancer regions at the county-level in Iran. Methods: In this study we analyzed gastric cancer data for Iran in the years 2003-2010. Areato- area Poisson kriging and Besag, York and Mollie (BYM) spatial models were applied to smoothing the standardized incidence ratios of gastric cancer for the 373 counties surveyed in this study. The two methods were compared in term of accuracy and precision in identifying high risk regions. Result: The highest smoothed standardized incidence rate (SIR) according to area-to-area Poisson kriging was in Meshkinshahr county in Ardabil province in north-western Iran (2.4,SD=0.05), while the highest smoothed standardized incidence rate (SIR) according to the BYM model was in Ardabil, the capital of that province (2.9,SD=0.09). Conclusion: Both methods of mapping, ATA Poisson kriging and BYM, showed the gastric cancer incidence rate to be highest in north and north-west Iran. However, area-to-area Poisson kriging was more precise than the BYM model and required less smoothing. According to the results obtained, preventive measures and treatment programs should be focused on particular counties of Iran. Creative Commons Attribution License

  17. A novel method of intracorporeal end-to-end gastrogastrostomy in laparoscopic pylorus-preserving gastrectomy for early gastric cancer, including a unique anastomotic technique: piercing the stomach with a linear stapler.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Manabu; Hiki, Naoki; Ida, Satoshi; Kumagai, Koshi; Nunobe, Souya; Sano, Takeshi

    2018-05-21

    Delta-shaped anastomosis is usually applied for an intracorporeal gastrogastrostomy in totally laparoscopic pylorus-preserving gastrectomy (TLPPG). However, the remnant stomach is slightly twisted around the anastomosis because it connects in side-to-side fashion. To realize an intracorporeal end-to-end gastrogastrostomy using an endoscopic linear stapler, we invented a novel method including a unique anastomotic technique. In this new approach, we first made small gastrotomies at the greater and lesser curvatures of the transected antrum and then pierced it using an endoscopic linear stapler. After the pierced antrum and the proximal remnant stomach were mechanically connected, the gastrotomies and stapling lines were transected using an endoscopic linear stapler, creating an intracorporeal end-to-end gastrogastrostomy. We have named this technique the "piercing method" because piercing the stomach is essential to its implementation. Between October 2015 and June 2017, 26 patients who had clinically early gastric cancer at the middle third of the stomach without clinical evidence of lymph node metastasis underwent TLPPG involving the novel method. The 26 patients successfully underwent an intracorporeal mechanical end-to-end gastrogastrostomy by the piercing method. The median operation time of the 26 patients was 272 min (range 209-357 min). With the exception of one gastric stasis, no problems associated with the piercing method were encountered during and after surgery. The piercing method can safely create an intracorporeal mechanical end-to-end gastrogastrostomy in TLPPG. Piercing the stomach using an endoscopic linear stapler is a new technique for gastrointestinal anastomosis. This method should be considered if the surgical aim is creation of an intracorporeal end-to-end gastrogastrostomy in TLPPG.

  18. Effectiveness of gastric cancer screening programs in South Korea: Organized vs opportunistic models

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Beom Jin; Heo, Chae; Kim, Byoung Kwon; Kim, Jae Yeol; Kim, Jae Gyu

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the outcome and effectiveness of two screening programs, National Cancer Screening Program (NCSP) and opportunistic screening (OS), for the detection of gastric cancer. METHODS: A total of 45  654 subjects underwent upper endoscopy as part of the NCSP or OS at the Chung-Ang University Healthcare System in Korea between January 2007 and December 2010. The study population was comprised of subjects over the age of 40 years. More specifically, subjects who took part in the NCSP were Medicaid recipients and beneficiaries of the National Health Insurance Corporation. Still photographs from the endoscopies diagnosed as gastric cancer were reviewed by two experienced endoscopists. RESULTS: The mean age of the screened subjects was 55 years for men and 54 years for women. A total of 126 cases (0.28%) of gastric cancer were detected from both screening programs; 100 cases (0.3%) from NCSP and in 26 cases (0.2%) from OS. The proportion of early gastric cancer (EGC) detected in NCSP was higher than that in OS (74.0% vs 53.8%, P = 0.046). Among the 34  416 screenees in NCSP, 6585 (19.1%) underwent upper endoscopy every other year as scheduled. Among the 11  238 screenees in OS, 3050 (27.1%) underwent upper endoscopy at least once every two years during the study period. The detection rate of gastric cancer was found to be significantly higher during irregular follow-up than during regular follow-up in both screening programs (0.3% vs 0.2%, P = 0.036). A higher incidence of EGC than advanced gastric cancer was observed during regular follow-up compared with irregular follow-up. CONCLUSION: Compliance to the screening program is more important than the type of screening system used. PMID:23430471

  19. Predictive model for survival in patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Goshayeshi, Ladan; Hoseini, Benyamin; Yousefli, Zahra; Khooie, Alireza; Etminani, Kobra; Esmaeilzadeh, Abbas; Golabpour, Amin

    2017-12-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers in the world. Characterized by poor prognosis, it is a frequent cause of cancer in Iran. The aim of the study was to design a predictive model of survival time for patients suffering from gastric cancer. This was a historical cohort conducted between 2011 and 2016. Study population were 277 patients suffering from gastric cancer. Data were gathered from the Iranian Cancer Registry and the laboratory of Emam Reza Hospital in Mashhad, Iran. Patients or their relatives underwent interviews where it was needed. Missing values were imputed by data mining techniques. Fifteen factors were analyzed. Survival was addressed as a dependent variable. Then, the predictive model was designed by combining both genetic algorithm and logistic regression. Matlab 2014 software was used to combine them. Of the 277 patients, only survival of 80 patients was available whose data were used for designing the predictive model. Mean ?SD of missing values for each patient was 4.43?.41 combined predictive model achieved 72.57% accuracy. Sex, birth year, age at diagnosis time, age at diagnosis time of patients' family, family history of gastric cancer, and family history of other gastrointestinal cancers were six parameters associated with patient survival. The study revealed that imputing missing values by data mining techniques have a good accuracy. And it also revealed six parameters extracted by genetic algorithm effect on the survival of patients with gastric cancer. Our combined predictive model, with a good accuracy, is appropriate to forecast the survival of patients suffering from Gastric cancer. So, we suggest policy makers and specialists to apply it for prediction of patients' survival.

  20. [Search for potential gastric cancer biomarkers using low molecular weight blood plasma proteome profiling by mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Shevchenko, V E; Arnotskaia, N E; Ogorodnikova, E V; Davydov, M M; Ibraev, M A; Turkin, I N; Davydov, M I

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer, one of the most widespread malignant tumors, still lacks reliable serum/plasma biomarkers of its early detection. In this study we have developed, unified, and tested a new methodology for search of gastric cancer biomarkers based on profiling of low molecular weight proteome (LMWP) (1-17 kDa). This approach included three main components: sample pre-fractionation, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), data analysis by a bioinformatics software package. Applicability and perspectives of the developed approach for detection of potential gastric cancer markers during LMWP analysis have been demonstrated using 69 plasma samples from patients with gastric cancer (stages I-IV) and 238 control samples. The study revealed peptides/polypeptides, which may be potentially used for detection of this pathology.

  1. Helicobacter pylori Update: Gastric Cancer, Reliable Therapy, and Possible Benefits

    PubMed Central

    Graham, David Y.

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection contributes to development of diverse gastric and extra-gastric diseases. The infection is necessary but not sufficient for development of gastric adenocarcinoma. Its eradication would eliminate a major worldwide cause of cancer death, so there is much interest in identifying how, if, and when this can be accomplished. There are several mechanisms by which H pylori contributes to development of gastric cancer. Gastric adenocarcinoma is one of many cancers associated with inflammation, which is induced by H pylori infection, yet the bacteria also cause genetic and epigenetic changes that lead to genetic instability in gastric epithelial cells. H pylori eradication reduces both. However, many factors must be considered in determining whether treating this bacterial infection will prevent cancer or only reduce its risk—these must be considered in designing reliable and effective eradication therapies. Furthermore, H pylori infection has been proposed to provide some benefits, such as reducing the risks of obesity or childhood asthma, although there are no convincing data to support the benefits of H pylori infections. PMID:25655557

  2. MET amplification as a potential therapeutic target in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Hisato; Okamoto, Isamu; Arao, Tokuzo; Okamoto, Wataru; Matsumoto, Kazuko; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Kuwata, Kiyoko; Yamaguchi, Haruka; Nishio, Kazuto; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Yamada, Yasuhide

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate both the prevalence of MET amplification in gastric cancer as well as the potential of this genetic alteration to serve as a therapeutic target in gastric cancer. MET amplification was assessed by initial screening with a PCR-based copy number assay followed by confirmatory FISH analysis in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens of gastric cancer obtained at surgery. The effects of MET tyrosine kinase inhibitors (MET-TKIs) in gastric cancer cells with or without MET amplification were also examined. The median MET copy number in 266 cases of gastric cancer was 1.7, with a range of 0.41 to 21.3. We performed FISH analysis for the 15 cases with the highest MET copy numbers. MET amplification was confirmed in the four assessable cases with a MET copy number of at least 4, whereas MET amplification was not detected in those with a gene copy number of <4. The prevalence of MET amplification was thus 1.5% (4 out of 266 cases). Inhibition of MET by MET-TKIs resulted in the induction of apoptosis accompanied by attenuation of downstream MET signaling in gastric cancer cell lines with MET amplification but not in those without this genetic change. MET amplification identifies a small but clinically important subgroup of gastric cancer patients who are likely to respond to MET-TKIs. Furthermore, screening with a PCR-based copy number assay is an efficient way to reduce the number of patients requiring confirmation of MET amplification by FISH analysis. PMID:23327903

  3. Decreased levels of active SMAD2 correlate with poor prognosis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yijun; Li, Qi; Zhou, Xinhui; Yu, Jiren; Mu, Yunchuan; Munker, Stefan; Xu, Chengfu; Shen, Zhe; Müllenbach, Roman; Liu, Yan; Li, Li; Gretz, Norbert; Zieker, Derek; Li, Jun; Matsuzaki, Kouichi; Li, Youming; Dooley, Steven; Weng, Honglei

    2012-01-01

    TGF-β plays a dual role in the progression of human cancer. During the early stages of carcinogenesis, TGF-β functions as a tumor suppressor. During the late stages of tumor development, however, TGF-β can promote tumor growth and metastasis. A shift in Smad2/3 phosphorylation from the carboxy terminus to linker sites is a key event determining biological function of TGF-β in colorectal and hepatocellular carcinoma. In the present study, we investigated the potential role of differential Smad2/3 phosphorylation in gastric adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical staining with anti-P-Smad2/3C and P-Smad2/3L antibodies was performed on 130 paraffin-embedded gastric adenocarcinoma specimens. The relationship between P-Smad2/3C and P-Smad2/3L immunohistochemical score and clinicopathologic characteristics of patients was analyzed. Real time PCR was used to measure mRNA expression of Smad2 and Smad3 in cancer and surrounding non-tumor tissue. No significant P-Smad2L and/or P-Smad3L positive staining was detected in the majority of specimens (positive staining in 18/130 samples). Positive P-Smad2/3L staining was not associated with a decrease in carboxyterminal phosphorylation staining. Loss of P-Smad2C remarkably correlated with depth of tumor infiltration and poor differentiation of cancer cells in patients with gastric cancer. No correlation was detectable between P-Smad3C and clinicopathologic characteristics of gastric adenocarcinoma. However, co-staining analysis revealed that P-Smad3C co-localised with α-SMA and collagen I in gastric cancer cells, indicating a potential link between P-Smad3C and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of cancer. Real time PCR demonstrated reduced mRNA expression of Smad2 in gastric cancer when compared with surrounding non-tumor tissue in 15/16 patients. Loss of P-Smad2C tightly correlated with cancer invasion and poor differentiation in gastric cancer. Contrary to colorectal and hepatocellular carcinoma, canonical carboxy

  4. Epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhimin; Liu, Lina; Li, Mei; Wang, Zhaohui; Feng, Lu; Zhang, Qiuping; Cheng, Shihua; Lu, Shen

    2011-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Kirsten-RAS (KRAS) mutations have been identified as predictors of response to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in non-small cell lung cancer. We aimed to screen the mutations of both genes in gastric carcinoma to detect the suitability of EGFR TKIs for patients with gastric carcinoma. We screened EGFR mutation in exons 19-21 and KRAS mutation in exon 2 in 58 gastric adenocarcinomas from China using high resolution melting analysis (HRMA). Positive samples were confirmed by DNA sequencing. Three EGFR missense mutations (5.2%) and 22 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP, Q787Q, 37.9%) were identified. To our knowledge, we report for the first time three mutation patterns of EGFR, Y801C, L858R and G863D, in gastric carcinoma. Two samples with EGFR mutation were mucinous adenocarcinoma. These three samples were collected from male patients aged over 75 years old. The frequency of KRAS mutation was 10.3% (6/58). The exclusiveness of EGFR and KRAS mutations was proven for the first time in gastric cancer. Gastric carcinoma of the mucinous adenocarcinoma type collected from older male patients may harbour EGFR mutations. The small subset of gastric adenocarcinoma patients may respond to EGFR TKIs.

  5. Gastric cancer mortality trends in Spain, 1976-2005, differences by autonomous region and sex

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of oncologic death worldwide. One of the most noteworthy characteristics of this tumor's epidemiology is the marked decline reported in its incidence and mortality in almost every part of the globe in recent decades. This study sought to describe gastric cancer mortality time trends in Spain's regions for both sexes. Methods Mortality data for the period 1976 through 2005 were obtained from the Spanish National Statistics Institute. Cases were identified using the International Classification of Diseases 9th and 10th revision (codes 151 and C16, respectively). Crude and standardized mortality rates were calculated by geographic area, sex, and five-year period. Joinpoint regression analyses were performed to ascertain whether changes in gastric cancer mortality trends had occurred, and to estimate the annual percent change by sex and geographic area. Results Gastric cancer mortality decreased across the study period, with the downward trend being most pronounced in women and in certain regions situated in the interior and north of mainland Spain. Across the study period, there was an overall decrease of 2.90% per annum among men and 3.65% per annum among women. Generally, regions in which the rate of decline was sharpest were those that had initially registered the highest rates. However, the rate of decline was not constant throughout the study period: joinpoint analysis detected a shift in trend for both sexes in the early 1980s. Conclusion Gastric cancer mortality displayed in both sexes a downward trend during the study period, both nationally and regionally. The different trend in rates in the respective geographic areas translated as greater regional homogeneity in gastric cancer mortality by the end of the study period. In contrast, rates in women fell more than did those in men. The increasing differences between the sexes could indicate that some risk factors may be modifying the sex-specific pattern of

  6. Molecular targeted therapy for advanced gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Gwang

    2013-03-01

    Although medical treatment has been shown to improve quality of life and prolong survival, no significant progress has been made in the treatment of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) within the last two decades. Thus, the optimum standard first-line chemotherapy regimen for AGC remains debatable, and most responses to chemotherapy are partial and of short duration; the median survival is approximately 7 to 11 months, and survival at 2 years is exceptionally > 10%. Recently, remarkable progress in tumor biology has led to the development of new agents that target critical aspects of oncogenic pathways. For AGC, many molecular targeting agents have been evaluated in international randomized studies, and trastuzumab, an anti-HER-2 monoclonal antibody, has shown antitumor activity against HER-2-positive AGC. However, this benefit is limited to only ~20% of patients with AGC (patients with HER-2-positive AGC). Therefore, there remains a critical need for both the development of more effective agents and the identification of molecular predictive and prognostic markers to select those patients who will benefit most from specific chemotherapeutic regimens and targeted therapies.

  7. How Can Gastric Cancer Molecular Profiling Guide Future Therapies?

    PubMed

    Corso, Simona; Giordano, Silvia

    2016-07-01

    Gastric cancer is the third greatest global cause of cancer-related deaths. Despite its high prevalence, only recently have comprehensive genomic surveys shed light on its molecular alterations. As surgery is the only curative treatment strategy and chemotherapy has shown limited efficacy, new treatments are urgently needed. Many molecular therapies for gastric cancer have entered clinical trials but-apart from Trastuzumab and Ramucirumab-all have failed. We analyze the current knowledge of the genetic 'landscape' of gastric cancers, elaborating on novel, preclinical approaches. We posit that this knowledge lays the basis for identifying bona fide molecular targets and developing solid therapeutic approaches, requiring accurate patient selection and taking advantage of preclinical models to assist clinical development of novel combination strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Impact of infectious complications on gastric cancer recurrence.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Tsutomu; Yoshikawa, Takaki; Aoyama, Toru; Hasegawa, Shinichi; Yamada, Takanobu; Tsuchida, Kazuhito; Fujikawa, Hirohito; Sato, Tsutomu; Ogata, Takashi; Cho, Haruhiko; Oshima, Takashi; Rino, Yasushi; Masuda, Munetaka

    2015-04-01

    Postoperative infectious complications increase disease recurrence in colorectal cancer patients. We herein investigated the impact of infectious complications on gastric cancer recurrence after curative surgery. In total, 502 patients who underwent R0 resection for gastric cancer were reviewed. Patients were classified into those with infectious complications (IC group) and those without infectious complications (NO group). The risk factors for recurrence-free survival (RFS) were identified. Infectious complications, which occurred in 52 patients (10.4%), included pneumonia, ileus with a systemic inflammatory reaction, anastomotic leakage, and intraperitoneal abscess. The overall 5-year RFS rate was 83% in the NO group and 58% in the IC group (p = 0.000). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that age, ASA score, stage, and infectious complications were significant predictors of RFS. Infectious complications were a risk factor for gastric cancer recurrence. To avoid causing infectious complications, the surgical procedure, surgical strategy, and perioperative care should be carefully planned.

  9. Terahertz spectral unmixing based method for identifying gastric cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yuqi; Huang, Pingjie; Li, Xian; Ge, Weiting; Hou, Dibo; Zhang, Guangxin

    2018-02-01

    At present, many researchers are exploring biological tissue inspection using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) techniques. In this study, based on a modified hard modeling factor analysis method, terahertz spectral unmixing was applied to investigate the relationships between the absorption spectra in THz-TDS and certain biomarkers of gastric cancer in order to systematically identify gastric cancer. A probability distribution and box plot were used to extract the distinctive peaks that indicate carcinogenesis, and the corresponding weight distributions were used to discriminate the tissue types. The results of this work indicate that terahertz techniques have the potential to detect different levels of cancer, including benign tumors and polyps.

  10. Survival Analysis of Patients with Interval Cancer Undergoing Gastric Cancer Screening by Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hamashima, Chisato; Shabana, Michiko; Okamoto, Mikizo; Osaki, Yoneatsu; Kishimoto, Takuji

    2015-01-01

    Aims Interval cancer is a key factor that influences the effectiveness of a cancer screening program. To evaluate the impact of interval cancer on the effectiveness of endoscopic screening, the survival rates of patients with interval cancer were analyzed. Methods We performed gastric cancer-specific and all-causes survival analyses of patients with screen-detected cancer and patients with interval cancer in the endoscopic screening group and radiographic screening group using the Kaplan-Meier method. Since the screening interval was 1 year, interval cancer was defined as gastric cancer detected within 1 year after a negative result. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to investigate the risk factors associated with gastric cancer-specific and all-causes death. Results A total of 1,493 gastric cancer patients (endoscopic screening group: n = 347; radiographic screening group: n = 166; outpatient group: n = 980) were identified from the Tottori Cancer Registry from 2001 to 2008. The gastric cancer-specific survival rates were higher in the endoscopic screening group than in the radiographic screening group and the outpatients group. In the endoscopic screening group, the gastric cancer-specific survival rate of the patients with screen-detected cancer and the patients with interval cancer were nearly equal (P = 0.869). In the radiographic screening group, the gastric cancer-specific survival rate of the patients with screen-detected cancer was higher than that of the patients with interval cancer (P = 0.009). For gastric cancer-specific death, the hazard ratio of interval cancer in the endoscopic screening group was 0.216 for gastric cancer death (95%CI: 0.054-0.868) compared with the outpatient group. Conclusion The survival rate and the risk of gastric cancer death among the patients with screen-detected cancer and patients with interval cancer were not significantly different in the annual endoscopic screening. These results suggest the potential of

  11. Identification of IL11RA and MELK amplification in gastric cancer by comprehensive genomic profiling of gastric cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Takeno, Sylvia Santomi; Gigek, Carolina Oliveira; Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Wisnieski, Fernanda; Chen, Elizabeth Suchi; Araújo, Taíssa Maíra Thomaz; Lima, Eleonidas Moura; Melaragno, Maria Isabel; Demachki, Samia; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez; Smith, Marília Cardoso

    2016-01-01

    AIM To identify common copy number alterations on gastric cancer cell lines. METHODS Four gastric cancer cell lines (ACP02, ACP03, AGP01 and PG100) underwent chromosomal comparative genome hybridization and array comparative genome hybridization. We also confirmed the results by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis using the bacterial artificial chromosome clone and quantitative real time PCR analysis. RESULTS The amplification of 9p13.3 was detected in all cell lines by both methodologies. An increase in the copy number of 9p13.3 was also confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. Moreover, the interleukin 11 receptor alpha (IL11RA) and maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) genes, which are present in the 9p13.3 amplicon, revealed gains of the MELK gene in all the cell lines studied. Additionally, a gain in the copy number of IL11RA and MELK was observed in 19.1% (13/68) and 55.9% (38/68) of primary gastric adenocarcinoma samples, respectively. CONCLUSION The characterization of a small gain region at 9p13.3 in gastric cancer cell lines and primary gastric adenocarcinoma samples has revealed MELK as a candidate target gene that is possibly related to the development of gastric cancer. PMID:27920471

  12. Stomach (Gastric) Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Risk factors for stomach (gastric) cancer include certain health conditions (e.g., atrophic gastritis, pernicious anemia, H. pylori infection), genetic factors (e.g., Li-Fraumeni syndrome), or environmental factors (e.g., diet, smoking). Review the evidence on these and other risk factors and interventions to prevent stomach cancer in this expert-reviewed summary.

  13. Helicobacter pylori Eradication Prevents Progression of Gastric Cancer in Hypergastrinemic INS-GAS Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chung-Wei; Rickman, Barry; Rogers, Arlin B.; Ge, Zhongming; Wang, Timothy C.; Fox, James G.

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection results in chronic gastritis, which may progress to gastric cancer. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of H. pylori eradication in preventing the progression of gastritis to gastric cancer in H. pylori–infected transgenic INS-GAS mice. H. pylori infection induced severe dysplasia and gastric cancer classified as high-grade and low-grade gastrointestinal intraepithelial neoplasia (GIN) in INS-GAS mice at 28 weeks postinfection (WPI). H. pylori eradication therapy using omeprazole, metronidazole, and clarithromycin was administered p.o. at 8, 12, or 22 WPI. Compared with untreated infected mice, H. pylori eradication at 8, 12, and 22 WPI significantly reduced the severity of dysplasia (P < 0.01). Moreover, H. pylori eradication at 8 WPI completely prevented the development of GIN (P < 0.001). Although not as effective as early antimicrobial treatment, prevention of progression to high-grade GIN was achieved by H. pylori eradication at 12 and 22 WPI (P < 0.05). Consistent with reduced gastric pathology, H. pylori eradication at all time points significantly down-regulated gastric Interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and Reg 1 mRNA levels (P < 0.05) and reduced epithelial proliferation in the corpus (P < 0.01) compared with untreated infected mice. We concluded that H. pylori eradication prevented gastric cancer to the greatest extent when antibiotics are given at an early point of infection, but that eradication therapy given at a later time point delayed the development of severe dysplastic lesions. PMID:18441088

  14. KITENIN is associated with tumor progression in human gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Ho-Seong; Park, Young-Lan; Park, Su-Jin; Lee, Ji-Hee; Cho, Sung-Bum; Lee, Wan-Sik; Chung, Ik-Joo; Kim, Kyung-Keun; Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Kweon, Sun-Seog; Joo, Young-Eun

    2010-09-01

    KAI1 COOH-terminal interacting tetraspanin (KITENIN) promotes tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis in colon, bladder, head and neck cancer. The aims of current study were to evaluate whether KITENIN affects tumor cell behavior in human gastric cancer cell line and to document the expression of KITENIN in a well-defined series of gastric tumors, including complete long-term follow-up, with special reference to patient prognosis. To evaluate the impact of KITENIN knockdown on behavior of a human gastric cancer cell line, AGS, migration, invasion and proliferation assays using small-interfering RNA were performed. The expression of activator protein-1 (AP-1) target genes and AP-1 transcriptional activity were evaluated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and luciferase reporter assay. The expression of KITENIN and AP-1 target genes by RT-PCR and Western blotting or immunohistochemistry was also investigated in human gastric cancer tissues. The knockdown of KITENIN suppressed tumor cell migration, invasion and proliferation in AGS cells. The mRNA expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), MMP-3, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and CD44 was reduced by knockdown of KITENIN in AGS. AP-1 transcriptional activity was significantly decreased by knockdown of KITENIN in AGS cells. KITENIN expression was significantly increased in human cancer tissues at RNA and protein levels. Expression of MMP-1, MMP-3, COX-2 and CD44 were significantly increased in human gastric cancer tissues. Immunostaining of KITENIN was predominantly identified in the cytoplasm of cancer cells. Expression of KITENIN was significantly associated with tumor size, Lauren classification, depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis, tumor stage and poor survival. These results indicate that KITENIN plays an important role in human gastric cancer progression by AP-1 activation.

  15. MET expression and amplification in patients with localized gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Janjigian, Yelena Y.; Tang, Laura H.; Coit, Daniel G.; Kelsen, David P.; Francone, Todd D.; Weiser, Martin R.; Jhanwar, Suresh C.; Shah, Manish A.

    2013-01-01

    Background MET, the receptor for hepatocyte growth factor has been proposed as a therapeutic target in gastric cancer. This study assessed the incidence of MET expression and gene amplification in tumors of Western patients with gastric cancer. Methods Tumor specimens from patients enrolled on a preoperative chemotherapy study (NCI 5700) were examined for presence of MET gene amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), MET mRNA expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, MET overexpression by immunohistochemistry (IHC), and for evidence of MET pathway activation by p-MET IHC. Results Although high-level of MET protein and mRNA were commonly encountered (in 63% and 50% of resected tumor specimens, respectively), none of these tumors had MET gene amplification by FISH, and only 6.6% had evidence of MET tyrosine kinase activity by p-MET IHC. Conclusions In this cohort of patients with localized gastric cancer, the presence of high MET protein and RNA expression does not correlate with MET gene amplification or pathway activation as evidenced by the absence of amplification by FISH and negative p-MET IHC analysis. Impact This paper demonstrates a lack of MET amplification and pathway activation in a cohort of 38 patients with localized gastric cancer, suggesting that MET-driven gastric cancers are relatively rare in Western patients. PMID:21393565

  16. Concurrent apatinib and local radiation therapy for advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ming; Deng, Weiye; Cao, Xiaoci; Shi, Xiaoming; Zhao, Huanfen; Duan, Zheping; Lv, Bonan; Liu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Apatinib is a novel anti-angiogenic agent targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, which is effective in patients with chemotherapy-refractory gastric cancer. There are no reports of concurrent apatinib with local radiation therapy in elderly patients with advanced gastric cancer. Patient concerns and Diagnoses: we present the first published report of a 70-year-old male patient with advanced gastric cancer who received concurrent apatinib and local radiation therapy after failure of oxaliplatin and S-1 chemotherapy. Interventions and Outcomes: The patient received concurrent apatinib and local radiation therapy and was followed up 7 months after therapy without disease progress, 14 months later indicated extensive metastasis and this patient died of pulmonary infection. Lessons: Elderly patients with advanced gastric cancer may benefit from concurrent apatinib with local radiation therapy when chemotherapy is not tolerated or successful. Further studies are needed to investigate the clinical outcomes and toxicities associated with concurrent apatinib and radiation therapy in gastric cancer. PMID:28248891

  17. Gastric Cancer in Asia: Unique Features and Management.

    PubMed

    Irino, Tomoyuki; Takeuchi, Hiroya; Terashima, Masanori; Wakai, Toshifumi; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) poses a burden to patients across the globe as the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Incidence of GC is particularly high in Asian countries, which is attributed to the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and has prompted the establishment of unique treatment strategies. D2 gastrectomy, which was established in the 1950s in Japan, has served as a gold standard for locally advanced GC for over half a century. Since the beginning of the 21st century, endoscopic resection (ER) techniques and minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery have greatly changed the treatment of patients with early GC. S-1, which showed a striking survival benefit in a large randomized trial in Japan, has been used as adjuvant therapy for the last decade. Likewise, S-1-based chemotherapy regimens are currently the standard of care for the treatment of unresectable/metastatic GC in Asia. Along with the development of standardized therapy, novel techniques and new drugs have been rapidly brought into clinical practice. State-of-the-art sentinel node (SN) navigation surgery enables clinicians to perform truly minimally invasive surgery for early GC, and appropriate chemotherapy regimens are now determined by a tumor's molecular expression. New classifications based on gene signatures are proposed and may replace conventional clinical classifications. Such highly individualized treatment has the potential to alter our clinical practice in GC in the near future. The best practice in each geographic region should be shared and integrated, resulting in the best practice without borders.

  18. Discriminating gastric cancer and gastric ulcer using human plasma amino acid metabolic profile.

    PubMed

    Jing, Fangyu; Hu, Xin; Cao, Yunfeng; Xu, Minghao; Wang, Yuanyuan; Jing, Yu; Hu, Xiaodan; Gao, Yu; Zhu, Zhitu

    2018-06-01

    Patients with gastric ulcer (GU) have a significantly higher risk of developing gastric cancer (GC), especially within 2 years after diagnosis. The main way to improve the prognosis of GC is to predict the tumorigenesis and metastasis in the early stage. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the ability of human plasma amino acid metabolic profile for discriminating GC and GU. In this study, we first used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry technique to characterize the plasma amino acid metabolism in GC and GU patients. Plasma samples were collected from 84 GC patients and 82 GU patients, and 22 amino acids were detected in each patient. Partial least squares-discriminant analysis model was performed to analyze the data of these amino acids. We observed seven differential amino acids between GC and GU. A regression analysis model was established using these seven amino acids. Finally, a panel of five differential amino acids, including glutamine, ornithine, histidine, arginine and tryptophan, was identified for discriminating GC and GU with good specificity and sensitivity. The receiver operating characteristic curve was used to evaluate diagnostic ability of the regression model and area under the curve was 0.922. In conclusion, this study demonstrated the potential values of plasma amino acid metabolic profile and metabolomic analysis technique in assisting diagnosis of GC. More studies are needed to highlight the theoretical strengths of metabolomics to understand the potential metabolic mechanisms in GC. © 2018 IUBMB Life, 70(6):553-562, 2018. © 2018 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  19. Nutritional Care of Gastric Cancer Patients with Clinical Outcomes and Complications: A Review.

    PubMed

    Choi, Wook Jin; Kim, Jeongseon

    2016-04-01

    The incidence and mortality of gastric cancer have been steadily decreased over the past few decades. However, gastric cancer is still one of the leading causes of cancer deaths across many regions of the world, particularly in Asian countries. In previous studies, nutrition has been considered one of significant risk factors in gastric cancer patients. Especially, malnourished patients are at greater risk of adverse clinical outcomes (e.g., longer hospital stay) and higher incidence of complications (e.g., wound/infectious complications) compared to well-nourished patients. Malnutrition is commonly found in advanced gastric cancer patients due to poor absorption of essential nutrients after surgery. Therefore, nutritional support protocols, such as early oral and enternal feeding, have been proposed in many studies, to improve unfavorable clinical outcomes and to reduce complications due to delayed application of oral nutritional support or parental feeding. Also, the supplied with enternal immune-enriched diet had more benefits in improving clinical outcomes and fewer complications compared to a group supplied with control formula. Using nutritional screening tools, such as nutritional risk index (NRI) and nutritional risk screening (NRS 2002), malnourished patients showed higher incidence of complications and lower survival rates than non-malnourished patients. However, a long-term nutritional intervention, such as nutritional counseling, was not effective in the patients. Therefore, early assessment of nutritional status in patients using a proper nutritional screening tool is suggested to prevent malnutrition and adverse health outcomes. Further studies with numerous ethnic groups may provide stronger scientific evidences in association between nutritional care and recovery from surgery in patients with gastric cancer.

  20. The role of red cell distribution width in the prognosis of patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Yazici, Pinar; Demir, Uygar; Bozkurt, Emre; Isil, Gurhan R; Mihmanli, Mehmet

    2017-01-01

    Although the red cell distribution width (RDW) has been reported as a reliable predictor of prognosis in several types of cancer, to our knowledge the prognostic value of RDW in gastric carcinoma has not been studied, so far. We aimed to investigate the role of red cell distribution width (RDW) in predicting prognosis in gastric cancer patients. All gastric cancer patients who underwent curative surgery (n= 172, 110M/62F) over a five-year study period were evaluated. Data on demographics, preoperative RDW levels, tumor characteristics (early stage: I and II, advanced stage: IIIA-B-C), disease-free (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were classified as high RDW group (RDW ≥ 16, n= 62) or low RDW group (RDW < 16, n= 110). Overall mortality and postoperative 60-day mortality in both groups were 55% and 14%, respectively. A borderline significant association between RDW (0.063) and mortality was noted. Preoperative RDW levels were significantly higher in patients with short-term mortality (17.9 ± 4.3 vs. 16 ± 3.2, p= 0.015). In high RDW group, the incidence of advanced gastric cancer was significantly higher (75 vs. 51%, p= 0.002), whereas DFS (0.035) and OS (p= 0.04) were lower. The frequency of advanced cancer was high in patients with high RDWvalues. High RDW values were strongly associated with short-term mortality although only a borderline relationship with overall survival was observed.

  1. Is there any relationship between food habits in the last two decades and gastric cancer in North-Western Iran?

    PubMed

    Somi, Mohammad Hossein; Mousavi, Seyed Mohsen; Naghashi, Shahnaz; Faramarzi, Elnaz; Jafarabadi, Mohammad Asghari; Ghojazade, Morteza; Majdi, Alireza; Naseri Alavi, Seyed Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this case-control study were to assess the correlation between some food habits in the last two decades and gastric cancer in East Azerbaijan of Iran. In this hospital based case control study, 616 patients (212 gastric cancer patients, 404 cancer free patients) were recruited. Food habits of patients over the past two decades were assessed with a structured questionnaire. We used conditional logistic regression analysis for estimating crude and adjusted odds ratios (OR) and their respective 95% confidence intervals (95%CI). In this study, over-eating, consumption of high fat milk and yogurt and especial types of cheese increased the risk of gastric cancer (All<0.05). Consumption of such especial cheeses such as Koze and Khiki increased the risk of gastric cancer by 12.6 fold (95% CI:1.99-79.36) and 7.36 fold (95% CI:1.33- 40.54), respectively. In addition, high fat food, moldy food, and pickled vegetables consumption as well as reuse of cooking oil for frying were significantly associated with gastric cancer risk. Furthermore, intake of Ghorme (deep fried meat) was positively correlated with gastric cancer risk (OR:1.31;95%CI: 0.91-1.87). It can be confirmed that particular food habits which have been very common in East-Azerbaijan in the last two past decades increase risk of gastric cancer. According to our results and taking into account the long latency period of gastric cancer it can be concluded that nutrition education for a healthy diet should be performed from early childhood. However, further well designed cohort studies are needed to achieve more clear results.

  2. Contribution of DNA Repair Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group D Genotype to Gastric Cancer Risk in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong-Xue; Chang, Wen-Shin; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Wang, Ju-Yu; Huang, Nai-Kuei; Lee, An-Sheng; Shen, Ming-Yi; Chen, Wei-Yu; Chiang, Yao-Chang; Shih, Tzu-Ching; Hsu, Chin-Mu; Bau, Da-Tian

    2015-09-01

    It has been proposed that genetic variations of DNA repair genes confer susceptibility to cancer, and the DNA repair gene xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD), the caretaker of genome stability, is thought to play a major role in the nucleotide excision repair system. We investigated three genotypes of XPD, at promoter -114 (rs3810366), and codon 312 (rs1799793), 751 (rs13181), and their associated with gastric cancer susceptibility in a Taiwanese population. In the present study, 121 patients with gastric cancer and 363 gender- and age-matched healthy controls were recruited and genotyped for XPD by polymerase chain reaction-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) methodology, and the association of XPD genotype with gastric cancer risk was investigated. We found a significant difference in the distribution of A allele-bearing XPD codon 312 genotypes [odds ratio (OR)=1.64, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.20-2.25, p=0.0019], but not in XPD codon 751 or promoter -114 sites, between the gastric cancer and control groups. Those who had G/A or A/A at XPD codon 312 had a 1.83-fold (95% CI=1.14-2.95, p=0.0159) and 1.87-fold (95% CI=1.04-3.34, p=0.0378) increased risk of gastric cancer compared to those with G/G. The risk for G/A and A/A genotypes had synergistic effects with alcohol drinking (OR=11.27, 95% CI=3.72-34.17, p=0.0001), cigarette smoking (OR=23.20, 95% CI=6.24-86.23, p=0.0001) and Helicobacter pylori infection (OR=5.38, 95% CI=2.76-10.52, p=0.0001) on gastric cancer susceptibility. Our findings suggest that the A allele of XPD codon 312 may contribute to gastric carcinogenesis and may be useful for early detection and prevention of gastric cancer. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  3. Beyond precision surgery: Molecularly motivated precision care for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y Y; Cheong, J-H

    2017-05-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Despite the high disease prevalence, gastric cancer research has not gained much attention. Recently, genome-scale technology has made it possible to explore the characteristics of gastric cancer at the molecular level. Accordingly, gastric cancer can be classified into molecular subtypes that convey more detailed information of tumor than histopathological characteristics, and these subtypes are associated with clinical outcomes. Furthermore, this molecular knowledge helps to identify new actionable targets and develop novel therapeutic strategies. To advance the concept of precision patient care in the clinic, patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models have recently been developed. PDX models not only represent histology and genomic features, but also predict responsiveness to investigational drugs in patient tumors. Molecularly curated PDX cohorts will be instrumental in hypothesis generation, biomarker discovery, and drug screening and testing in proof-of-concept preclinical trials for precision therapy. In the era of precision medicine, molecularly tailored therapeutic strategies should be individualized for cancer patients. To improve the overall clinical outcome, a multimodal approach is indispensable for advanced cancer patients. Careful, oncological principle-based surgery, combined with a molecularly guided multidisciplinary approach, will open new horizons in surgical oncology. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Expression of claudin-11, -23 in different gastric tissues and its relationship with the risk and prognosis of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Liping; Gong, Yuehua; Chen, Moye; Wang, Zeyang; Yuan, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Claudins play an important role in regulating the permeability of epithelial and endothelial cells and in the maintenance of cell polarity. We aimed to investigate expression of claudin-11, -23 in different gastric tissues and its relationship with clinicopathologic parameters and prognosis of gastric cancer. We compared their expression levels in the paired cancerous tissues versus those in the adjacent noncancerous tissues by real-time PCR, western blotting and immunohistochemistry. The results showed that the expression of claudin-11, -23 was greatly increased in paracancerous gastric tissue compared with cancerous tissue. We also compared their expression levels of tissues from gastric cancer, superficial gastritis, and atrophic gastritis by immunohistochemistry. The results indicated that the expression of claudin-11 and 23 was significantly higher in superficial gastritis than that in atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer. The expression of claudin-23 was significantly lower in atrophic gastritis than that in gastric cancer, but no obviously difference was observed for claudin-11. As for analysis of clinicopathologic parameters of gastric cancer, logistic multiple regression indicated that claudin-11 was significantly associated with sex, smoking, alcohol, H. pylori infection and Borrmann classification while claudin-23 was significantly associated with vessel cancer embolus. Cox multivariate survival analysis indicated that gastric cancer patients with negative claudin-23 expression had significantly longer overall survival. In conclusion, the expression of claudin-11, -23 was remarkably downregulated in gastric cancer. Abnormal expression of these proteins was significantly correlated with some clinicopathologic parameters. In particular, claudin-23 positive expression was associated with poor prognostic outcomes of gastric cancer patients and may therefore serve as an independent prognosticator of patient survival. PMID:28350854

  5. Expression of claudin-11, -23 in different gastric tissues and its relationship with the risk and prognosis of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Youzhu; Jing, Jingjing; Sun, Liping; Gong, Yuehua; Chen, Moye; Wang, Zeyang; Sun, Mingjun; Yuan, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Claudins play an important role in regulating the permeability of epithelial and endothelial cells and in the maintenance of cell polarity. We aimed to investigate expression of claudin-11, -23 in different gastric tissues and its relationship with clinicopathologic parameters and prognosis of gastric cancer. We compared their expression levels in the paired cancerous tissues versus those in the adjacent noncancerous tissues by real-time PCR, western blotting and immunohistochemistry. The results showed that the expression of claudin-11, -23 was greatly increased in paracancerous gastric tissue compared with cancerous tissue. We also compared their expression levels of tissues from gastric cancer, superficial gastritis, and atrophic gastritis by immunohistochemistry. The results indicated that the expression of claudin-11 and 23 was significantly higher in superficial gastritis than that in atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer. The expression of claudin-23 was significantly lower in atrophic gastritis than that in gastric cancer, but no obviously difference was observed for claudin-11. As for analysis of clinicopathologic parameters of gastric cancer, logistic multiple regression indicated that claudin-11 was significantly associated with sex, smoking, alcohol, H. pylori infection and Borrmann classification while claudin-23 was significantly associated with vessel cancer embolus. Cox multivariate survival analysis indicated that gastric cancer patients with negative claudin-23 expression had significantly longer overall survival. In conclusion, the expression of claudin-11, -23 was remarkably downregulated in gastric cancer. Abnormal expression of these proteins was significantly correlated with some clinicopathologic parameters. In particular, claudin-23 positive expression was associated with poor prognostic outcomes of gastric cancer patients and may therefore serve as an independent prognosticator of patient survival.

  6. Gastric cancer screening of a high-risk population in Japan using serum pepsinogen and barium digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Ohata, Hiroshi; Oka, Masashi; Yanaoka, Kimihiko; Shimizu, Yasuhito; Mukoubayashi, Chizu; Mugitani, Kouichi; Iwane, Masataka; Nakamura, Hideya; Tamai, Hideyuki; Arii, Kenji; Nakata, Hiroya; Yoshimura, Noriko; Takeshita, Tetsuya; Miki, Kazumasa; Mohara, Osamu; Ichinose, Masao

    2005-10-01

    With the aim of developing more efficient gastric cancer screening programs for use in Japan, we studied a new screening program that combines serum pepsinogen (PG) testing and barium digital radiography (DR). A total of 17 647 middle-aged male subjects underwent workplace screening over a 7-year period using a combination of PG testing and DR. This program's effectiveness, as well as other characteristics of the program, was analyzed. Forty-nine cases of gastric cancer were detected (comprising 88% early cancer cases). The detection rate was 0.28%, and the positive predictive value was 0.85%. The PG test detected 63.3% of cases, DR detected 69.4% of cases, and both tests were positive in 32.7% of cancer cases. The two methods were almost equally effective, and were considerably more effective than conventional screening using photofluorography. Each screening method detected a distinct gastric cancer subgroup; the PG test efficiently detected asymptomatic small early cancer with intestinal type histology, while DR was efficient at detecting cancers with depressed or ulcerated morphology and diffuse type histology. The cost for the detection of a single cancer was much less than that for conventional screening. In fact, it is possible to further reduce the cost of detecting a single cancer to a cost comparable to that of surgically resecting a single gastric cancer. Thus, it is probable that a highly efficient gastric cancer screening system can be implemented by combining the two screening methods. Such a screening program would be beneficial in a population at high risk for gastric cancer.

  7. Nutrition in Patients with Gastric Cancer: An Update.

    PubMed

    Rosania, Rosa; Chiapponi, Costanza; Malfertheiner, Peter; Venerito, Marino

    2016-05-01

    Nutritional management of patients with gastric cancer (GC) represents a challenge. This review provides an overview of the present evidence on nutritional support in patients with GC undergoing surgery as well as in those with advanced disease. For patients undergoing surgery, the preoperative nutritional condition directly affects postoperative prognosis, overall survival and disease-specific survival. Perioperative nutritional support enriched with immune-stimulating nutrients reduces overall complications and hospital stay but not mortality after major elective gastrointestinal surgery. Early enteral nutrition after surgery improves early and long-term postoperative nutritional status and reduces the length of hospitalization as well. Vitamin B12 and iron deficiency are common metabolic sequelae after gastrectomy and warrant appropriate replacement. In malnourished patients with advanced GC, short-term home complementary parenteral nutrition improves the quality of life, nutritional status and functional status. Total home parenteral nutrition represents the only modality of caloric intake for patients with advanced GC who are unable to take oral or enteral nutrition. Early evaluations of nutritional status and nutritional support represent key aspects in the management of GC patients with both operable and advanced disease.

  8. Combined modality treatment of gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gunderson, L.L.; Hoskins, R.B.; Cohen, A.C.

    1983-07-01

    In a series of 46 patients with localized gastric cancer treated at Massachusetts General Hospital, problems with excessive acute or chronic toxicity due to combination treatment with irradiation (XRT) and chemotherapy (CT) were not seen. Forty of the 46 received combined treatment with 2 regimens: (1) irradiation plus concomitant 3 days of 5-FU followed by maintenance 5-FU or combined drugs-26 patients; (2) in the other 14 patients, the sequence of irradiation and chemotherapy was altered. A single course of combined drug chemotherapy was given prior to irradiation and 5 to 6 additional courses were administered after completion of XRT (CT-XRT-CT).more » The drug combination was initially 5-FU-BGNU but this was changed to FAM (5-FU, Adriamycin, Mitomycin C). In this series, there were no cases of septicemia or any deaths related to treatment. A 3 year survival rate of about 20% was achieved for the total group of patients and 43% in the group with resection but at high risk for later failure. Our inability to improve these numbers is undoubtedly a result of dose limitations with external beam irradiation combined with a systemic failure problem. When irradiation is combined with surgical resection of all or a majority of tumor, both survival and local control appear to be better than in the unresected patient group. Only 4 of 29 patients (14%) with curative resection, or resection but residual disease, had later evidence of failure within the irradiation field as opposed to 6 of 9 or 66% in the group with unresectable disease.« less

  9. Gastric cancer, nutritional status, and outcome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuechao; Qiu, Haibo; Kong, Pengfei; Zhou, Zhiwei; Sun, Xiaowei

    2017-01-01

    We aim to investigate the prognostic value of several nutrition-based indices, including the prognostic nutritional index (PNI), performance status, body mass index, serum albumin, and preoperative body weight loss in patients with gastric cancer (GC). We retrospectively analyzed the records of 1,330 consecutive patients with GC undergoing curative surgery between October 2000 and September 2012. The relationship between nutrition-based indices and overall survival (OS) was examined using Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression model. Following multivariate analysis, the PNI and preoperative body weight loss were the only nutritional-based indices independently associated with OS (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.356, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.051-1.748, P =0.019; HR: 1.152, 95% CI: 1.014-1.310, P =0.030, retrospectively). In stage-stratified analysis, multivariate analysis revealed that preoperative body weight loss was identified as an independent prognostic factor only in patients with stage III GC (HR: 1.223, 95% CI: 1.065-1.405, P =0.004), while the prognostic significance of PNI was not significant (all P >0.05). In patients with stage III GC, preoperative body weight loss stratified 5-year OS from 41.1% to 26.5%. When stratified by adjuvant chemotherapy, the prognostic significance of preoperative body weight loss was maintained in patients treated with surgery plus adjuvant chemotherapy and in patients treated with surgery alone ( P <0.001; P =0.003). Preoperative body weight loss is an independent prognostic factor for OS in patients with GC, especially in stage III disease. Preoperative body weight loss appears to be a superior predictor of outcome compared with other established nutrition-based indices.

  10. The remarkable geographical pattern of gastric cancer mortality in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Montero-Oleas, Nadia; Núñez-González, Solange; Simancas-Racines, Daniel

    2017-12-01

    This study was aimed to describe the gastric cancer mortality trend, and to analyze the spatial distribution of gastric cancer mortality in Ecuador, between 2004 and 2015. Data were collected from the National Institute of Statistics and Census (INEC) database. Crude gastric cancer mortality rates, standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) and indirect standardized mortality rates (ISMRs) were calculated per 100,000 persons. For time trend analysis, joinpoint regression was used. The annual percentage rate change (APC) and the average annual percent change (AAPC) was computed for each province. Spatial age-adjusted analysis was used to detect high risk clusters of gastric cancer mortality, from 2010 to 2015, using Kulldorff spatial scan statistics. In Ecuador, between 2004 and 2015, gastric cancer caused a total of 19,115 deaths: 10,679 in men and 8436 in women. When crude rates were analyzed, a significant decline was detected (AAPC: -1.8%; p<0.001). ISMR also decreased, but this change was not statistically significant (APC: -0.53%; p=0.36). From 2004 to 2007 and from 2008 to 2011 the province with the highest ISMR was Carchi; and, from 2012 to 2015, was Cotopaxi. The most likely high occurrence cluster included Bolívar, Los Ríos, Chimborazo, Tungurahua, and Cotopaxi provinces, with a relative risk of 1.34 (p<0.001). There is a substantial geographic variation in gastric cancer mortality rates among Ecuadorian provinces. The spatial analysis indicates the presence of high occurrence clusters throughout the Andes Mountains. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Genetic Alterations in Gastric Cancer Associated with Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Ortiz, Claudia I; Lopez-Vidal, Yolanda; Arredondo-Hernandez, Luis Jose Rene; Castillo-Rojas, Gonzalo

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a world health problem and depicts the fourth leading mortality cause from malignancy in Mexico. Causation of gastric cancer is not only due to the combined effects of environmental factors and genetic variants. Recent molecular studies have transgressed a number of genes involved in gastric carcinogenesis. The aim of this review is to understand the recent basics of gene expression in the development of the process of gastric carcinogenesis. Genetic variants, polymorphisms, desoxyribonucleic acid methylation, and genes involved in mediating inflammation have been associated with the development of gastric carcinogenesis. Recently, these genes (interleukin 10, Il-17, mucin 1, β-catenin, CDX1, SMAD4, SERPINE1, hypoxia-inducible factor 1 subunit alpha, GSK3β, CDH17, matrix metalloproteinase 7, RUNX3, RASSF1A, TFF1, HAI-2, and COX-2) have been studied in association with oncogenic activation or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. All these mechanisms have been investigated to elucidate the process of gastric carcinogenesis, as well as their potential use as biomarkers and/or molecular targets to treatment of disease.

  12. Genetic Alterations in Gastric Cancer Associated with Helicobacter pylori Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rivas-Ortiz, Claudia I.; Lopez-Vidal, Yolanda; Arredondo-Hernandez, Luis Jose Rene; Castillo-Rojas, Gonzalo

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a world health problem and depicts the fourth leading mortality cause from malignancy in Mexico. Causation of gastric cancer is not only due to the combined effects of environmental factors and genetic variants. Recent molecular studies have transgressed a number of genes involved in gastric carcinogenesis. The aim of this review is to understand the recent basics of gene expression in the development of the process of gastric carcinogenesis. Genetic variants, polymorphisms, desoxyribonucleic acid methylation, and genes involved in mediating inflammation have been associated with the development of gastric carcinogenesis. Recently, these genes (interleukin 10, Il-17, mucin 1, β-catenin, CDX1, SMAD4, SERPINE1, hypoxia-inducible factor 1 subunit alpha, GSK3β, CDH17, matrix metalloproteinase 7, RUNX3, RASSF1A, TFF1, HAI-2, and COX-2) have been studied in association with oncogenic activation or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. All these mechanisms have been investigated to elucidate the process of gastric carcinogenesis, as well as their potential use as biomarkers and/or molecular targets to treatment of disease. PMID:28512631

  13. Unmet needs and challenges in gastric cancer: the way forward.

    PubMed

    Lordick, Florian; Allum, William; Carneiro, Fátima; Mitry, Emmanuel; Tabernero, Josep; Tan, Patrick; Van Cutsem, Eric; van de Velde, Cornelis; Cervantes, Andrés

    2014-07-01

    Although the incidence of gastric cancer has fallen steadily in developed countries over the past 50 years, outcomes in Western countries remain poor, primarily due to the advanced stage of the disease at presentation. While earlier diagnosis would help to improve outcomes for patients with gastric cancer, better understanding of the biology of the disease is also needed, along with advances in therapy. Indeed, progress in the treatment of gastric cancer has been limited, mainly because of its genetic complexity and heterogeneity. As a result, there is an urgent need to apply precision medicine to the management of the disease in order to ensure that individuals receive the most appropriate treatment. This article suggests a number of strategies that may help to accelerate progress in treating patients with gastric cancer. Incorporation of some of these approaches could help to improve the quality of life and survival for patients diagnosed with the disease. Standardisation of care across Europe through expansion of the European Registration of Cancer Care (EURECCA) registry - a European cancer audit that aims to improve quality and decrease variation in care across the region - may also be expected to lead to improved outcomes for those suffering from this common malignancy. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Long-Term Coffee Consumption and Risk of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Shao-Bo; Weng, Hong; Zhou, Meng; Duan, Xiao-Li; Shen, Xian-Feng; Zeng, Xian-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Association between coffee consumption and gastric cancer risk remains controversial. Hence, we performed a meta-analysis to investigate and quantify the potential dose–response association between long-term coffee consumption and risk of gastric cancer. Pertinent studies were identified by searching PubMed and Embase from January 1996 through February 10, 2015 and by reviewing the reference lists of retrieved publications. Prospective cohort studies in which authors reported effect sizes and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of gastric cancer for 3 or more categories of coffee consumption were eligible. Results from eligible studies were aggregated using a random effect model. All analyses were carried out using the STATA 12.0 software. Nine studies involving 15 independent prospective cohorts were finally included. A total of 2019 incident cases of gastric cancer were ascertained among 1,289,314 participants with mean follow-up periods ranging from 8 to 18 years. No nonlinear relationship of coffee consumption with gastric cancer risk was indentified (P for nonlinearity = 0.53; P for heterogeneity = 0.004). The linear regression model showed that the combined relative risk (RR) of every 3 cups/day increment of total coffee consumption was 1.07 (95% CI = 0.95–1.21). Compared with the lowest category of coffee consumption, the RR of gastric cancer was 1.18 (95% CI = 0.90–1.55) for the highest (median 6.5 cups/day) category, 1.06 (95% CI = 0.85–1.32) for the second highest category (median 3.5 cups/day), and 0.97 (95% CI = 0.79–1.20) for the third highest category (median 1.5 cups/day). Subgroup analysis showed an elevated risk in the US population (RR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.06–1.75) and no adjustment for smoking (RR = 1.67, 95% CI = 1.08–2.59) for 6.5 cups/day. Current evidence indicated there was no nonlinear association between coffee consumption and gastric cancer risk. However, high

  15. Drug sensitivity testing platforms for gastric cancer diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Lau, Vianne; Wong, Andrea Li-Ann; Ng, Christopher; Mok, Yingting; Lakshmanan, Manikandan; Yan, Benedict

    2016-02-01

    Gastric cancer diagnostics has traditionally been histomorphological and primarily the domain of surgical pathologists. Although there is an increasing usage of molecular and genomic techniques for clinical diagnostics, there is an emerging field of personalised drug sensitivity testing. In this review, we describe the various personalised drug sensitivity testing platforms and discuss the challenges facing clinical adoption of these assays for gastric cancer. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  16. Resection line involvement after gastric cancer surgery: clinical outcome in nonsurgically retreated patients.

    PubMed

    Morgagni, P; Garcea, D; Marrelli, D; De Manzoni, G; Natalini, G; Kurihara, H; Marchet, A; Saragoni, L; Scarpi, E; Pedrazzani, C; Di Leo, A; De Santis, F; Panizzo, V; Nitti, D; Roviello, F

    2008-12-01

    Resection line infiltration (RLI) after surgical treatment represents an unfavorable prognostic factor in advanced gastric cancer. We performed a retrospective analysis of 89 patients with resection line involvement who did not undergo reoperation. On behalf of the Italian Research Group for Gastric Cancer, we present the characteristics and outcome of 89 patients who were submitted to surgical resection for gastric cancer from 1988 to 2001 and did not undergo reoperation because of disease extension or associated pathologies. RLI was significantly higher in patients with T4 tumors and diffuse histological type. Anastomotic leakages were observed in 4.8% of infiltrated esophageal resection margins, whereas 1.9% of infiltrated duodenal resection lines showed duodenal fistulas. Five-year overall survival of patients with RLI was 29%. Prognosis was not affected by RLI in early forms (100% 5-year survival); however, 5-year survival in T2 and T3 stages was significantly lower with respect to the same stages without residual tumor. The influence of RLI on prognosis was confirmed in N0 as well as in N1 and N2 patients. RLI also was an independent prognostic at multivariate analysis (odds ratio = 1.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-2.08; P = 0.0144). RLI significantly affects long-term survival of advanced gastric cancer. The impact on prognosis is independent of lymph node involvement. Patients in good general condition for whom radical surgery is possible should be considered for reoperation.

  17. The metastasis suppressor SOX11 is an independent prognostic factor for improved survival in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    QU, YING; ZHOU, CHENFEI; ZHANG, JIANIAN; CAI, QU; LI, JIANFANG; DU, TAO; ZHU, ZHENGGANG; CUI, XIAOJIANG; LIU, BINGYA

    2014-01-01

    SOX11 is involved in gastrulation and in malignant diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of SOX11 in gastric cancer and its expression pattern and clinical significance. SOX11 overexpression cell model was used to examine in vitro and in vivo the role of SOX11 in cell growth and metastasis. Cell cycle analysis and Annexin V/PI double staining were used to investigate the effect of SOX11 on cell cycle progression and apoptosis. The expression of SOX11 in human gastric cancer was examined by immunohistochemistry. The correlation of SOX11 expression with clinicopathological characteristics and survival of patients was analyzed by Pearson’s χ2 and Kaplan-Meier analyses, respectively. Cox’s proportional hazard model was employed in multivariate analysis. SOX11 overexpression did not inhibit cell growth but strongly suppressed cell migration/invasion in vitro and in vivo. We found a significant correlation between high SOX11 protein levels and Lauren’s classification (intestinal type), differentiation status (high and medium), and early TNM stage. SOX11 is an independent prognostic factor for improved survival in gastric cancer patients. SOX11 was a potential tumor-suppressor and an independent positive prognostic factor in gastric cancer patients with less advanced clinicopathological features. PMID:24604109

  18. EARLY POSTOPERATIVE COMPLICATIONS IN ROUX-EN-Y GASTRIC BYPASS

    PubMed Central

    STOLL, Aluisio; ROSIN, Leandro; DIAS, Mariana Fernandes; MARQUIOTTI, Bruna; GUGELMIN, Giovana; STOLL, Gabriela Fanezzi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is one of the most common bariatric surgery and leads to considerable weight loss in the first months. Aim: To quantify the main early postoperative complications in patients submitted to the gastric bypass. Method: Observational retrospective cohort. Data of 1051 patients with class II obesity associated with comorbidities or class III obesity submitted to the gastric bypass with 30 days of follow-up starting from the date of the surgery. Results: The age average was 36 years with a predominance of females (81.1%). The mean preoperative body mass index was 43 kg/m². The major complication was fistula (2.3%), followed by intestinal obstruction (0.5%) and pulmonary embolism (0.5%). Death occurred in 0.6% of the cases. Conclusion: In the period of 30 days after surgery the overall complication rate was 3.8%; reoperation was necessary in 2.6% and death occurred in 0.6%. Fistula was the main complication and the leading cause of hospitalization in intensive care unit, reoperation and death. PMID:27683781

  19. The economic burden of advanced gastric cancer in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jihyung; Tsai, Yiling; Novick, Diego; Hsiao, Frank Chi-Huang; Cheng, Rebecca; Chen, Jen-Shi

    2017-09-16

    Gastric cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths in both sexes worldwide, especially in Eastern Asia. This study aimed to estimate the economic burden of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) in Taiwan. The costs of AGC in 2013 were estimated using resource use data from a chart review study (n = 122 with AGC) and national statistics. Annual per-patient costs, where patients' follow-up periods were adjusted for, were estimated with 82 patients who had complete resource use data. The costs were composed of direct medical costs, direct non-medical costs (healthcare travel and caregiver costs), morbidity costs, and mortality costs. Relevant unit costs were retrieved mainly from literature and national statistics, and applied to the resource use data. A broad definition of morbidity and mortality costs was employed to value the productivity loss in patients with unpaid employment, economically inactive and unemployed as well as the life years after the age of retirement. Their narrow definitions were also used in sensitivity analyses, using age- and/or sex-specific employment rates. Forgone future earnings/productivity loss were discounted at 3%. Annual per-patient costs were projected to estimate the total costs of AGC at the national level with an estimated number of patients with AGC (N = 2611) in Taiwan in 2013. The mean age of the 82 patients was 59.3 (SD: 11.9) years, and 67.1% were male. Per-patient costs were US$26,431 for direct medical costs, US$4669 for direct non-medical costs, US$5758 for morbidity costs, and US$145,990 for mortality costs (per death). These per-patient costs were projected to incur total AGC costs of US$423 million at the national-level. Mortality costs accounted for 77.3% of the total costs, followed by direct medical costs (16.3%), morbidity costs (3.6%), and direct non-medical costs (2.9%). AGC was found to exert a significant economic burden in Taiwan, incurring US$423 million in 2013. This represents about 0.08% of

  20. Dysregulation of non-coding RNAs in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qing; Zhang, Ren-Wen; Sui, Peng-Cheng; He, Hai-Tao; Ding, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the most common cancers in the world and a significant threat to the health of patients, especially those from China and Japan. The prognosis for patients with late stage GC receiving the standard of care treatment, including surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, remains poor. Developing novel treatment strategies, identifying new molecules for targeted therapy, and devising screening techniques to detect this cancer in its early stages are needed for GC patients. The discovery of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), primarily microRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), helped to elucidate the mechanisms of tumorigenesis, diagnosis and treatment of GC. Recently, significant research has been conducted on non-coding RNAs and how the regulatory dysfunction of these RNAs impacts the tumorigenesis of GC. In this study, we review papers published in the last five years concerning the dysregulation of non-coding RNAs, especially miRNAs and lncRNAs, in GC. We summarize instances of aberrant expression of the ncRNAs in GC and their effect on survival-related events, including cell cycle regulation, AKT signaling, apoptosis and drug resistance. Additionally, we evaluate how ncRNA dysregulation affects the metastatic process, including the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, stem cells, transcription factor activity, and oncogene and tumor suppressor expression. Lastly, we determine how ncRNAs affect angiogenesis in the microenvironment of GC. We further discuss the use of ncRNAs as potential biomarkers for use in clinical screening, early diagnosis and prognosis of GC. At present, no ideal ncRNAs have been identified as targets for the treatment of GC. PMID:26494954

  1. Potential capacity of endoscopic screening for gastric cancer in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hamashima, Chisato; Goto, Rei

    2017-01-01

    In 2016, the Japanese government decided to introduce endoscopic screening for gastric cancer as a national program. To provide endoscopic screening nationwide, we estimated the proportion of increase in the number of endoscopic examinations with the introduction of endoscopic screening, based on a national survey. The total number of endoscopic examinations has increased, particularly in clinics. Based on the national survey, the total number of participants in gastric cancer screening was 3 784 967. If 30% of the participants are switched from radiographic screening to endoscopic screening, approximately 1 million additional endoscopic examinations are needed. In Japan, the participation rates in gastric cancer screening and the number of hospitals and clinics offering upper gastrointestinal endoscopy vary among the 47 prefectures. If the participation rates are high and the numbers of hospitals and clinics are small, the proportion of increase becomes larger. Based on the same assumption, 50% of big cities can provide endoscopic screening with a 5% increase in the total number of endoscopic examinations. However, 16.7% of the medical districts are available for endoscopic screening within a 5% increase in the total number of endoscopic examinations. Despite the Japanese government's decision to introduce endoscopic screening for gastric cancer nationwide, its immediate introduction remains difficult because of insufficient medical resources in rural areas. This implies that endoscopic screening will be initially introduced to big cities. To promote endoscopic screening for gastric cancer nationwide, the disparity of medical resources must first be resolved. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  2. miR-185 is an independent prognosis factor and suppresses tumor metastasis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhiqin; Jiang, Hao; Wu, Youhua; Xie, Liming; Dai, Wenxiang; Tang, Hailin; Tang, Sanyuan

    2014-01-01

    miR-185 has been identified as an important factor in several cancers such as breast cancer, ovarial cancer, and prostate cancer. However, its effect and prognostic value in gastric cancer are still poorly known. In this study, we found that the expression levels of miR-185 were strongly downregulated in gastric cancer and associated with clinical stage and the presence of lymph node metastases. Moreover, miR-185 might independently predict OS and RFS in gastric cancer. We further found that upregulation of miR-185 inhibited the proliferation and metastasis of gastric cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that the miR-185 is important for gastric cancer initiation and progression and holds promise as a prognostic biomarker to predict survival and relapse in gastric cancer. It is also a potential therapeutic tool to improve clinical outcomes in the above disease.

  3. Identifying therapeutic targets in gastric cancer: the current status and future direction

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Beiqin; Xie, Jingwu

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Our basic understanding of gastric cancer biology falls behind that of many other cancer types. Current standard treatment options for gastric cancer have not changed for the last 20 years. Thus, there is an urgent need to establish novel strategies to treat this deadly cancer. Successful clinical trials with Gleevec in CML and gastrointestinal stromal tumors have set up an example for targeted therapy of cancer. In this review, we will summarize major progress in classification, therapeutic options of gastric cancer. We will also discuss molecular mechanisms for drug resistance in gastric cancer. In addition, we will attempt to propose potential future directions in gastric cancer biology and drug targets. PMID:26373844

  4. Advances in the Management of Gastric and Gastroesophageal Cancers.

    PubMed

    Kamran, Sophia C; Hong, Theodore S; Wo, Jennifer Y

    2016-02-01

    Management of gastric and gastroesophageal cancers is a complex, evolving paradigm. Involvement of multimodality specialties is the key. In gastric cancer, data are conflicting with regard to the specific roles of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation, particularly between Asian and Western studies. However, current ongoing phase III trials will further elucidate the optimal treatment for this heterogeneous disease. For resectable gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) tumors, the publication of a landmark study in 2012 out of the Netherlands revealed a clear benefit in the utilization of trimodality therapy. This changed practice almost immediately around the world. In unresectable gastroesophageal disease, chemoradiation has been firmly established as a paradigm for treatment. The optimal chemotherapy regimen is still in flux. However, for both gastric and GEJ tumors, technological breakthroughs in genomics and pharmacologic targeting will soon provide physicians more options in the armamentarium to fight these diseases and, one day, individually personalize treatment.

  5. Identifying and targeting cancer stem cells in the treatment of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; El-Rayes, Bassel

    2017-04-15

    Current treatment regimens for gastric cancer are not adequate. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) may be a key driving factor for growth and metastasis of this tumor type. In contrast to the conventional clonal evolution hypothesis, CSCs can initiate tumor formation, self-renew, and differentiate into tumor-propagating cells. Because gastric cancer can originate from CSCs, it is necessary to review current targets of signaling pathways for CSCs in gastric cancer that are being studied in clinical trials. These pathways are known to regulate the self-renewal and differentiation process in gastric CSCs. A better understanding of the clinical results of trials that target gastric CSCs will lead to better outcomes for patients with gastric cancer. Cancer 2017;123:1303-1312. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Cancer Society. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited and is not used for commercial purposes. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Cancer Society.

  6. A true orthotopic gastric cancer murine model using electrocoagulation.

    PubMed

    Bhullar, Jasneet Singh; Makarawo, Tafadzwa; Subhas, Gokulakkrishna; Alomari, Ahmed; Silberberg, Boris; Tilak, Jacqueline; Decker, Milessa; Mittal, Vijay K

    2013-07-01

    Orthotopic mouse models of human gastric cancer represent an important in vivo tool for testing chemotherapeutic agents and for studying intraluminal factors. Currently, orthotopic mouse models of gastric cancer require an operative procedure involving either injection or implantation of tumor cells in stomach layers. The resultant tumor does not grow from the stomach's mucosal surface, so it does not mimic the human disease process. A low-dose gastric mucosal coagulation was done transorally in the body of stomach using a specially designed polyethylene catheter in 16 female severe combined immunodeficient mice. This was followed by the instillation of SNU-16 human gastric cancer tumor cells (1 × 10(6) cells). Five mice each were euthanized at 1 and 2 months, and 6 mice were euthanized at 3 months. Three control mice underwent electrocoagulation alone and 3 mice underwent cell line instillation alone. Tumors were detected in 11 of 16 experimental mice, but not in the control mice. Tumors were noted in mice at 1 month. Over time, there was an increase in tumor growth and metastasis to lymph nodes and surrounding organs. Histopathologic evaluation showed that the tumors grew from the gastric mucosa. Our model is easy to create and overcomes the limitations of the existing models, as the tumor arises from the stomach's mucosal layer and mimics the human disease in terms of morphology and biologic behavior. This is the first report of a true orthotopic gastric cancer murine model. This model opens new doors for additional studies that were not possible earlier. Copyright © 2013 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Integrated multigene expression panel to prognosticate patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Mitsuro; Murotani, Kenta; Tanaka, Haruyoshi; Miwa, Takashi; Umeda, Shinichi; Tanaka, Chie; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Hayashi, Masamichi; Hattori, Norifumi; Suenaga, Masaya; Yamada, Suguru; Nakayama, Goro; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Kodera, Yasuhiro

    2018-04-10

    Most of the proposed individual markers had limited clinical utility due to the inherent biological and genetic heterogeneity of gastric cancer. We aimed to build a new molecular-based model to predict prognosis in patients with gastric cancer. A total of 200 patients who underwent gastric resection for gastric cancer were divided into learning and validation cohorts using a table of random numbers in a 1:1 ratio. In the learning cohort, mRNA expression levels of 15 molecular markers in gastric tissues were analyzed and concordance index (C-index) values of all single and combinations of the 15 candidate markers for overall survival were calculated. The multigene expression panel was designed according to C-index values and the subpopulation index. Expression scores were determined with weighting according to the coefficient of each constituent. The reproducibility of the panel was evaluated in the validation cohort. C-index values of the 15 single candidate markers ranged from 0.506-0.653. Among 32,767 combinations, the optimal and balanced expression panel comprised four constituents ( MAGED2, SYT8, BTG1 , and FAM46 ) and the C-index value was 0.793. Using this panel, patients were provisionally categorized with scores of 1-3, and clearly stratified into favorable, intermediate, and poor overall survival groups. In the validation cohort, both overall and disease-free survival rates decreased incrementally with increasing expression scores. Multivariate analysis revealed that the expression score was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival after curative gastrectomy. We developed an integrated multigene expression panel that simply and accurately stratified risk of patients with gastric cancer.

  8. Lgr5High/DCLK1High phenotype is more common in early stage and intestinal subtypes of gastric carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kalantari, Elham; Asadi Lari, Mohammad Hossein; Roudi, Raheleh; Korourian, Alireza; Madjd, Zahra

    2017-12-06

    Gastric carcinoma is the third most common malignancy and is one of the main causes of cancer deaths worldwide. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a subpopulation of tumour cells capable of self-renewal and differentiation, likely responsible for the initiation, recurrence, metastasis and chemo/radio-resistance. This study was conducted to evaluate the expression patterns and clinicopathologic significance of putative CSC markers, Lgr5 and DCLK1, in gastric carcinoma. The expression levels of Lgr5 and DCLK1 were examined in a well-defined series of gastric carcinoma tissues, including 75 (80%) from intestinal and 19 (20%) from diffuse subtypes, using tissue microarray (TMA). In addition, the correlation of the expression of these markers with clinicopathological factors was explored. Higher expressions of Lgr5 and DCLK1 were mainly detected in intestinal subtypes of gastric carcinomas compared to diffuse subtypes (P= 0.005 and P= 0.050, respectively). We also found a higher expression of Lgr5 and DCLK1 more frequently in well-differentiated gastric carcinoma cases (P< 0.001 and P= 0.007). The combined analysis demonstrated that the co-expression of Lgr5 and DCLK1 (Lgr5High/DCLK1High) was more common in intestinal subtypes (P= 0.025) and well-differentiated gastric carcinoma samples (P< 0.001). Interestingly, there was a significant correlation between Lgr5High/DCLK1High phenotype and early-stage gastric carcinoma specimens (P= 0.045). Our findings indicated that the Lgr5High/DCLK1High expression pattern may be considered as a signature phenotype for intestinal subtypes of gastric carcinoma.

  9. The self-renewal signaling pathways utilized by gastric cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ying; Li, Hui; Hao, Xishan

    2017-04-01

    Gastric cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Cancer stem cells are the source of tumor recurrence and metastasis. Self-renewal is a marker of cancer stem cells and also the basis of long-lasting survival and tumor progression. Although the mechanism of gastric cancer stem cell self-renewal is not clear, there are several signaling pathways and environmental factors known to be involved. This mini review describes recent developments in the self-renewal signaling pathway of gastric cancer stem cell research. Advancements made in this field of research will likely support the development of novel therapeutic strategies for gastric cancer.

  10. Noncoding Genomics in Gastric Cancer and the Gastric Precancerous Cascade: Pathogenesis and Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Bloj, Benjamin; Fry, Jacqueline; Wichmann, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the fifth most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer-related death, whose patterns vary among geographical regions and ethnicities. It is a multifactorial disease, and its development depends on infection by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), host genetic factors, and environmental factors. The heterogeneity of the disease has begun to be unraveled by a comprehensive mutational evaluation of primary tumors. The low-abundance of mutations suggests that other mechanisms participate in the evolution of the disease, such as those found through analyses of noncoding genomics. Noncoding genomics includes single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), regulation of gene expression through DNA methylation of promoter sites, miRNAs, other noncoding RNAs in regulatory regions, and other topics. These processes and molecules ultimately control gene expression. Potential biomarkers are appearing from analyses of noncoding genomics. This review focuses on noncoding genomics and potential biomarkers in the context of gastric cancer and the gastric precancerous cascade. PMID:26379360

  11. Prognostic Factors for Survival in Patients with Gastric Cancer using a Random Survival Forest

    PubMed

    Adham, Davoud; Abbasgholizadeh, Nategh; Abazari, Malek

    2017-01-01

    Background: Gastric cancer is the fifth most common cancer and the third top cause of cancer related death with about 1 million new cases and 700,000 deaths in 2012. The aim of this investigation was to identify important factors for outcome using a random survival forest (RSF) approach. Materials and Methods: Data were collected from 128 gastric cancer patients through a historical cohort study in Hamedan-Iran from 2007 to 2013. The event under consideration was death due to gastric cancer. The random survival forest model in R software was applied to determine the key factors affecting survival. Four split criteria were used to determine importance of the variables in the model including log-rank, conversation?? of events, log-rank score, and randomization. Efficiency of the model was confirmed in terms of Harrell’s concordance index. Results: The mean age of diagnosis was 63 ±12.57 and mean and median survival times were 15.2 (95%CI: 13.3, 17.0) and 12.3 (95%CI: 11.0, 13.4) months, respectively. The one-year, two-year, and three-year rates for survival were 51%, 13%, and 5%, respectively. Each RSF approach showed a slightly different ranking order. Very important covariates in nearly all the 4 RSF approaches were metastatic statu