Science.gov

Sample records for early glycemic control

  1. Early glycemic control in critically ill patients with burn injury.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Claire V; Coffey, Rebecca; Cook, Charles H; Gerlach, Anthony T; Miller, Sidney F

    2011-01-01

    Glucose management in patients with burn injury is often difficult because of their hypermetabolic state with associated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance. Recent studies suggest that time to glycemic control is associated with improved outcomes. The authors sought to determine the influence of early glycemic control on the outcomes of critically ill patients with burn injury. A retrospective analysis was performed at the Ohio State University Medical Center. Patients hospitalized with burn injury were enrolled if they were admitted to the intensive care unit between March 1, 2006, and February 28, 2009. Early glycemic control was defined as the achievement of a mean daily blood glucose of ≤150 mg/dl for at least two consecutive days by postburn day 3. Forty-six patients made up the study cohort with 26 achieving early glycemic control and 20 who did not. The two groups were similar at baseline with regard to age, pre-existing diabetes, APACHE II score and burn size and depth. There were no differences in number of surgical interventions, infectious complications, or length of stay between patients who achieved or failed early glycemic control. Failure of early glycemic control was, however, associated with significantly higher mortality both by univariate (35.0 vs 7.7%, P = .03) and multivariate analyses (hazard ratio 6.754 [1.16-39.24], P = .03) adjusting for age, TBSA, and inhalation injury. Failure to achieve early glycemic control in patients with burn injury is associated with an increased risk of mortality. However, further prospective controlled trials are needed to establish causality of this association.

  2. Understanding basic carbohydrate counting, glycemic index, and glycemic load for improved glycemic control in Hispanic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Lidia Guadalupe Compeán; Berry, Diane C; Ruiz, Octelina Castillo; González, Eunice Reséndiz; Pérez, Paulina Aguilera; Rivas, Elva Del Ángel

    2014-01-01

    Hispanic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus generally have poor glycemic control. Constant hyperglycemia in individuals with type 2 diabetes can cause microvascular and macrovascular complications that lead to early morbidity and mortality. Good glycemic control requires a balance between diet, exercise, and medication, but dietary balance is difficult to achieve for many patients. Of the macronutrients, carbohydrates mostly affect blood glucose levels. Basic carbohydrate counting, glycemic index, and glycemic load are important tools for patients to master to control their blood glucose levels.

  3. Incretin therapies: effects beyond glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Mudaliar, Sunder; Henry, Robert R

    2009-07-01

    Impaired insulin secretion plays a major role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus, and progressive loss of beta-cell function is a pathophysiologic hallmark of type 2 diabetes. Recent science has elaborated on the role of the incretin hormones on beta-cell function and insulin secretion, as well as the role that incretin-based pharmacotherapies may have on glycemic control and beta-cell function, possibly altering the progressive loss of beta-cell function and possibly reversing/halting disease progression. However, incretin-based therapies may also have benefits extending beyond glycemic control and insulin secretion. In this review we examine some of those "beyond-glycemic" benefits, including presentation of data on weight reduction, blood pressure lowering, beneficial changes in the lipid profile, and improvements in myocardial and endothelial function. We investigate how those effects may help ameliorate the cardiovascular burden in patients with diabetes.

  4. Practice of strict glycemic control in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Marcus J; de Graaff, Mart J; Royakkers, Annic A N M; van Braam Houckgeest, Floris; van der Sluijs, Johannes P; Kieft, Hans; Spronk, Peter E

    2008-11-01

    Blood glucose control aiming at normoglycemia, frequently referred to as "strict glycemic control", decreases mortality and morbidity of critically ill patients. We searched the medical literature for export opinions, surveys, and clinical reports on blood glucose control in intensive care medicine. While strict glycemic control has been recommended standard of care for critically ill patients, the risk of severe hypoglycemia with strict glycemic control is frequently mentioned by experts. Some rationalize this risk, though others strongly point out the high incidence of hypoglycemia to be (one) reason not to perform strict glycemic control. Implementation of strict glycemic control is far from complete in intensive care units across the world. Frequently local guidelines accept higher blood glucose levels than those with strict glycemic control. Only a minority of retrieved manuscripts are on blood glucose regimens with the lower targets as with strict glycemic control. Hypoglycemia certainly is encountered with blood glucose control, in particular with strict glycemic control. Reports show intensive care-nurses can adequately and safely perform strict glycemic control. Implementation of strict glycemic control is far from complete, at least in part because of the feared risks of hypoglycemia. The preference for hyperglycemia over intermittent hypoglycemia is irrational, however, because there is causal evidence of harm for the former but only associative evidence of harm for the latter. For several reasons it is wise to have strict glycemic control being a nurse-based strategy.

  5. Tight Glycemic Control in Critically Ill Children.

    PubMed

    Agus, Michael S D; Wypij, David; Hirshberg, Eliotte L; Srinivasan, Vijay; Faustino, E Vincent; Luckett, Peter M; Alexander, Jamin L; Asaro, Lisa A; Curley, Martha A Q; Steil, Garry M; Nadkarni, Vinay M

    2017-02-23

    Background In multicenter studies, tight glycemic control targeting a normal blood glucose level has not been shown to improve outcomes in critically ill adults or children after cardiac surgery. Studies involving critically ill children who have not undergone cardiac surgery are lacking. Methods In a 35-center trial, we randomly assigned critically ill children with confirmed hyperglycemia (excluding patients who had undergone cardiac surgery) to one of two ranges of glycemic control: 80 to 110 mg per deciliter (4.4 to 6.1 mmol per liter; lower-target group) or 150 to 180 mg per deciliter (8.3 to 10.0 mmol per liter; higher-target group). Clinicians were guided by continuous glucose monitoring and explicit methods for insulin adjustment. The primary outcome was the number of intensive care unit (ICU)-free days to day 28. Results The trial was stopped early, on the recommendation of the data and safety monitoring board, owing to a low likelihood of benefit and evidence of the possibility of harm. Of 713 patients, 360 were randomly assigned to the lower-target group and 353 to the higher-target group. In the intention-to-treat analysis, the median number of ICU-free days did not differ significantly between the lower-target group and the higher-target group (19.4 days [interquartile range {IQR}, 0 to 24.2] and 19.4 days [IQR, 6.7 to 23.9], respectively; P=0.58). In per-protocol analyses, the median time-weighted average glucose level was significantly lower in the lower-target group (109 mg per deciliter [IQR, 102 to 118]; 6.1 mmol per liter [IQR, 5.7 to 6.6]) than in the higher-target group (123 mg per deciliter [IQR, 108 to 142]; 6.8 mmol per liter [IQR, 6.0 to 7.9]; P<0.001). Patients in the lower-target group also had higher rates of health care-associated infections than those in the higher-target group (12 of 349 patients [3.4%] vs. 4 of 349 [1.1%], P=0.04), as well as higher rates of severe hypoglycemia, defined as a blood glucose level below 40 mg per

  6. Early enhancements of hepatic and later of peripheral insulin sensitivity combined with increased postprandial insulin secretion contribute to improved glycemic control after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Bojsen-Møller, Kirstine N; Dirksen, Carsten; Jørgensen, Nils B; Jacobsen, Siv H; Serup, Annette K; Albers, Peter H; Hansen, Dorte L; Worm, Dorte; Naver, Lars; Kristiansen, Viggo B; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F P; Kiens, Bente; Holst, Jens J; Richter, Erik A; Madsbad, Sten

    2014-05-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) improves glycemic control within days after surgery, and changes in insulin sensitivity and β-cell function are likely to be involved. We studied 10 obese patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and 10 obese glucose-tolerant subjects before and 1 week, 3 months, and 1 year after RYGB. Participants were included after a preoperative diet-induced total weight loss of -9.2 ± 1.2%. Hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity were assessed using the hyperinsulinemic- euglycemic clamp combined with the glucose tracer technique, and β-cell function was evaluated in response to an intravenous glucose-glucagon challenge as well as an oral glucose load. Within 1 week, RYGB reduced basal glucose production, improved basal hepatic insulin sensitivity, and increased insulin clearance, highlighting the liver as an important organ responsible for early effects on glucose metabolism after surgery. Insulin-mediated glucose disposal and suppression of fatty acids did not improve immediately after surgery but increased at 3 months and 1 year; this increase likely was related to the reduction in body weight. Insulin secretion increased after RYGB only in patients with T2D and only in response to oral glucose, underscoring the importance of the changed gut anatomy.

  7. Glycemic control and outcome related to cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Thiessen, Steven; Vanhorebeek, Ilse; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2015-06-01

    Perioperative hyperglycemia, aggravated by cardiopulmonary bypass, is associated with adverse outcome in adult and pediatric patients. Whereas hyperglycemia was originally perceived as an adaptive response to surgical stress, it is now clear that glycemic control is a strategy to reduce adverse outcomes after cardiac surgery and cardiopulmonary bypass. The optimal blood glucose target, whether or not glycemic control should be initiated already intraoperatively, and whether or not perioperative glucose administration affects the impact of glycemic control on ischemia-reperfusion damage remain open questions. Hypoglycemia, the risk of which is increased with glycemic control, is also associated with adverse outcomes. However, it remains controversial whether brief episodes of hypoglycemia, rapidly corrected during glycemic control, have adverse effects on outcome. This review gives an overview of the currently available literature on glycemic control during and after cardiac surgery and focuses on the indicated open questions about this intervention for this specific patient population.

  8. Glycemic goals in diabetes: trade-off between glycemic control and iatrogenic hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Cryer, Philip E

    2014-07-01

    The selection of a glycemic goal in a person with diabetes is a compromise between the documented upside of glycemic control-the partial prevention or delay of microvascular complications-and the documented downside of glycemic control-the recurrent morbidity and potential mortality of iatrogenic hypoglycemia. The latter is not an issue if glycemic control is accomplished with drugs that do not cause hypoglycemia or with substantial weight loss. However, hypoglycemia becomes an issue if glycemic control is accomplished with a sulfonylurea, a glinide, or insulin, particularly in the setting of absolute endogenous insulin deficiency with loss of the normal decrease in circulating insulin and increase in glucagon secretion and attenuation of the sympathoadrenal response as plasma glucose concentrations fall. Then the selection of a glycemic goal should be linked to the risk of hypoglycemia. A reasonable individualized glycemic goal is the lowest A1C that does not cause severe hypoglycemia and preserves awareness of hypoglycemia, preferably with little or no symptomatic or even asymptomatic hypoglycemia, at a given stage in the evolution of the individual's diabetes.

  9. Development of perioperative glycemic control using an artificial endocrine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Hanazaki, Kazuhiro; Namikawa, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that tight glycemic control (TGC) in patients with diabetes mellitus is the most important to reduce complications, such as nephropathy, neuropathy, and retinopathy. Also, surgical stress induced hyperglycemia leading to glucose toxicity is the main cause of infectious complications after surgery. Recently perioperative TGC has been proven an effective method to reduce postoperative infectious complications and accelerate enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS), with the main purpose of short staying hospital. However, conventional TGC with open-loop glycemic control system is likely to induce not only occurrence of hypoglycemia but also unstable glycemic control. To solve these problems, we have involved introduction of novel glycemic control using an artificial pancreas (AP) with closed-loop glycemic control system since 2006. To date, this novel perioperative glycemic control was performed in more than 400 surgical patients. As a result, we established stable and safe TGC using an AP to improve surgical outcomes without hypoglycemia. In this paper, we report current scientific evidence focusing on perioperative glycemic control using an AP.

  10. Association between depression and glycemic control among type 2 diabetes patients in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Crispín‐Trebejo, Brenda; Bernabé‐Ortiz, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction There is limited and controversial information regarding the potential impact of depression on glycemic control. This study aims to evaluate the association between depression and poor glycemic control. In addition, the prevalence of depression and rates of poor glycemic control were determined. Methods Cross‐sectional study performed in the endocrinology unit of two hospitals of ESSALUD in Peru. The outcome of interest was poor glycemic control, evaluated by glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c: < 7% versus ≥ 7%), whereas the exposure of interest was depression defined as 15 or more points in the Patient Health Questionnaire‐9 tool. The association of interest was evaluated using Poisson regression models with robust standard errors reporting prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) adjusting for potential confounders. Results A total of 277 participants, 184 (66.4%) males, mean age 59.0 (SD: 4.8), and 7.1 (SD: 6.8) years of disease were analyzed. Only 31 participants (11.2%; 95% CI: 7.5%–14.9%) had moderately severe or severe depression, whereas 70 (25.3%; 95% CI 20.3%–30.8%) had good glycemic control. Depression increased the probability of having poor glycemic control (PR = 1.32; 95% CI 1.15–1.51) after adjusting for several potential confounders. Conclusions There is an association between depression and poor glycemic control among type 2 diabetes patients. Our results suggest that early detection of depression might be important to facilitate appropriate glycemic control and avoid further metabolic complications. PMID:26037488

  11. Pollution by metals: Is there a relationship in glycemic control?

    PubMed

    González-Villalva, Adriana; Colín-Barenque, Laura; Bizarro-Nevares, Patricia; Rojas-Lemus, Marcela; Rodríguez-Lara, Vianey; García-Pelaez, Isabel; Ustarroz-Cano, Martha; López-Valdez, Nelly; Albarrán-Alonso, Juan Carlos; Fortoul, Teresa I

    2016-09-01

    There are evidences of environmental pollution and health effects. Metals are pollutants implicated in systemic toxicity. One of the least studied effects, but which is currently becoming more important, is the effect of metals on glycemic control. Metals have been implicated as causes of chronic inflammation and oxidative stress and are associated to obesity, hyperglycemia and even diabetes. Arsenic, iron, mercury, lead, cadmium and nickel have been studied as a risk factor for hyperglycemia and diabetes. There is another group of metals that causes hypoglycemia such as vanadium, chromium, zinc and magnesium by different mechanisms. Zinc, magnesium and chromium deficiency is associated with increased risk of diabetes. This review summarizes some metals involved in glycemic control and pretends to alert health professionals about considering environmental metals as an important factor that could explain the poor glycemic control in patients. Further studies are needed to understand this poorly assessed problem.

  12. Type 2 diabetes mellitus, glycemic control, and cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Onitilo, Adedayo A; Stankowski, Rachel V; Berg, Richard L; Engel, Jessica M; Glurich, Ingrid; Williams, Gail M; Doi, Suhail A

    2014-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized by prolonged hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and progressive hyperglycemia. Disease management relies on glycemic control through diet, exercise, and pharmacological intervention. The goal of the present study was to examine the effects of glycemic control and the use of glucose-lowering medication on the risk of breast, prostate, and colon cancer. Patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus (N=9486) between 1 January 1995 and 31 December 2009 were identified and data on glycemic control (hemoglobin A1c, glucose), glucose-lowering medication use (insulin, metformin, sulfonylurea), age, BMI, date of diabetes diagnosis, insurance status, comorbidities, smoking history, location of residence, and cancer diagnoses were electronically abstracted. Cox proportional hazards regression modeling was used to examine the relationship between glycemic control, including medication use, and cancer risk. The results varied by cancer type and medication exposure. There was no association between glycemic control and breast or colon cancer; however, prostate cancer risk was significantly higher with better glycemic control (hemoglobin A1c ≤ 7.0%). Insulin use was associated with increased colon cancer incidence in women, but not with colon cancer in men or breast or prostate cancer risk. Metformin exposure was associated with reduced breast and prostate cancer incidence, but had no association with colon cancer risk. Sulfonylurea exposure was not associated with risk of any type of cancer. The data reported here support hyperinsulinemia, rather than hyperglycemia, as a major diabetes-related factor associated with increased risk of breast and colon cancer. In contrast, hyperglycemia appears to be protective in the case of prostate cancer.

  13. Top 10 Facts to Know About Inpatient Glycemic Control.

    PubMed

    Horton, William B; Subauste, Jose S

    2016-02-01

    Uncontrolled hyperglycemia in hospitalized patients with or without a previous diagnosis of diabetes is associated with adverse outcomes and longer lengths of hospital stay. It is estimated that one-third of hospitalized patients will experience significant hyperglycemia, and the cost associated with hospitalization for patients with diabetes accounts for half of all health care expenditures for this disease. Optimizing glycemic control should be a priority for all health care providers in the inpatient setting. Appropriate management strategies should include identification of appropriate glycemic targets, prevention of hypoglycemia, initiation of appropriate basal-plus-bolus insulin regimens, and planning for the transition from inpatient to outpatient therapy before hospital discharge.

  14. Glycemic control in diabetic patients served by community health centers.

    PubMed

    Maizlish, Neil A; Shaw, Beryl; Hendry, Khati

    2004-01-01

    The Community Health Center Network measured the prevalence of glycemic control in diabetic patients at 7 community health centers as part of its clinical quality improvement program. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in a random sample of 1817 diabetic patients having 1 or more encounters from October 1, 2000 to September 30, 2001. Computerized laboratory results for hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) tests were available for half the sample. Manual review of medical charts was carried out for the rest. The proportion of diabetic patients with 1 or more HbA1c tests in the measurement year was 91% (CI95%: 90-93%) and poor glycemic control (HbA1c > 9%) occurred in 27% (CIM%: 25-30%). The mean of the most recent test was 7.8%. The frequency of testing varied significantly by clinic from 79% to 94% and increased with the number of encounters. Poor glycemic control also varied significantly by clinic (17-48%) and was significantly better in females and older patients. Measures of glycemic control were not associated with ethnicity or insurance status in multivariate analyses. A high proportion of diabetic patients received appropriate care, and this care was not associated with ethnicity or insurance status. The data warehouse was an essential tool for the clinical quality improvement program.

  15. Boost glycemic control in teen diabetics through 'family focused teamwork'.

    PubMed

    2003-09-01

    While family conflict during the teenaged years is typical, it can have long-term health consequences when it involves an adolescent with diabetes. However, researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston have developed a low-cost intervention that aims to remove conflict from disease management responsibilities--and a new study shows that it can boost glycemic control as well.

  16. Prevalence of microalbuminuria in relation to glycemic control in type-2 diabetic patients in Mymensingh.

    PubMed

    Hasan, M J; Muqueet, A; Sharmeen, A; Hoque, M R

    2015-01-01

    Microalbuminuria is a renal marker of generalized vascular endothelial damage and early atherosclerosis. Patients with microalbuminuria are at increased risk of microvascular and macrovascular complications of diabetes mellitus like myocardial infarction, stroke and nephropathy. Poor glycemic control increases the risk of microalbuminuria. This study was conducted to determine the frequency of microalbuminuria in type 2 diabetes and compare the frequency of microalbuminuria in poor and good glycemic control in type 2 diabetes. One Hundred and twenty two type 2 diabetic patients were included in the study. Data on age, gender, duration of diabetes, microalbuminuria and HbA1c were recorded. Urine and blood samples were collected and analyzed for microalbuminuria, blood glucose and HbA1c. All patients of both genders with type 2 diabetes for over 2 years were selected in this study. Patients with other causes of proteinuria were excluded. Out of 120 cases 93(77.5%) were male and 27(22.5%) were female. Mean age of patients was 57.8±14.7 years and average duration of diabetes was 9.2 years. Microalbuminuria was found 76.9% of male and 23.1% of female. Patients with poor glycemic control and good glycemic control have frequency of microalbuminuria of 55% and 54% respectively. Uncontrolled diabetes is strongly associated with prevalence of microalbuminuria. Screening for microalbuminuria and HbA1c test should be done both in newly and already diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients as an early marker of renal dysfunction and glycemic control.

  17. The Glycemic Indices in Dialysis Evaluation (GIDE) study: Comparative measures of glycemic control in diabetic dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mark E; Mittman, Neal; Ma, Lin; Brennan, Julia I; Mooney, Ann; Johnson, Curtis D; Jani, Chinu M; Maddux, Franklin W; Lacson, Eduardo

    2015-10-01

    The validity of hemoglobin A1c (HgbA1c) is undergoing increasing scrutiny in the advanced CKD/ESRD (chronic kidney disease/end-stage renal disease) population, where it appears to be discordant from other glycemic indices. In the Glycemic Indices in Dialysis Evaluation (GIDE) Study, we sought to assess correlation of HgbA1c with casual glucose, glycated albumin, and serum fructosamine in a large group of diabetic patients on dialysis. From 26 dialysis facilities in the United States, 1758 diabetic patients (hemodialysis = 1476, peritoneal dialysis = 282) were enrolled in the first quarter of 2013. The distributions of HgbA1c and the other glycemic indices were analyzed. Intra-patient coefficients of variation and correlations among the four glycemic indices were determined. Patients with low HgbA1c values were both on higher erythropoietin (ESA) doses and more anemic. Serum glucose exhibited the highest intra-patient variability over a 3-month period; variability was modest among the other glycemic indices, and least with HgbA1c. Statistical analyses inclusive of all glycemic markers indicated modest to strong correlations. HgbA1c was more likely to be in the target range than glycated albumin or serum fructosamine, suggesting factors which may or may not be directly related to glycemic control, including anemia, ESA management, and iron administration, in interpreting HgbA1c values. These initial results from the GIDE Study clarify laboratory correlations among glycemic indices and add to concerns about reliance on HgbA1c in patients with diabetes and advanced kidney disease.

  18. Effects of glycemic control on refraction in diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai-Yan; Luo, Guo-Chun; Guo, Jiang; Liang, Zhen

    2010-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the effects of glycemic control on refraction in diabetic patients. METHODS Twenty newly diagnosed diabetic patients were included in this study. The random blood glucose, HbA1c levels, fasting C-peptide and postprandial 2h C-peptide were measured before treatment. The patients with random blood glucose higher than 12.0mmol/L and HbA1c level higher than 10.0% were selected. Refraction, intraocular pressure, radius of the anterior corneal curvature, depth of the anterior chamber, lens thickness, vitreous length, and axial length were measured on admission and at the end of week 1, 2, 3 and 4 during glycemic control. RESULTS A transient hyperopic change occurred in all the patients receiving glycemic control. The maximum hyperopic change was 1.60D (range 0.50±3.20D). Recovery of the previous refraction occurred between two and four weeks after insulin treatment. There was a positive correlation between the maximum hyperopic changes and the HbA1c levels on admission (r=0.84, P<0.05). There was a positive correlation between the maximum hyperopic changes and the daily rate of blood glucose reduction over the first 7 days of the treatment (r=0.53, P<0.05). During transient hyperopia, no significant changes were observed in the intraocular pressure, radius of the anterior corneal curvature, depth of the anterior chamber, lens thickness, vitreous length and axial length. CONCLUSION Transient hyperopic changes occur after glycemic control in diabetic patients with severe hyperglycemia. The degrees of transient hyperopia are highly dependent on HbA1c levels before treatment and the rate of reduction of the blood glucose level. PMID:22553542

  19. Identifying older diabetic patients at risk of poor glycemic control

    PubMed Central

    Incalzi, Raffaele Antonelli; Corsonello, Andrea; Pedone, Claudio; Corica, Francesco; Carosella, Luciana; Mazzei, Bruno; Perticone, Francesco; Carbonin, PierUgo

    2002-01-01

    Background Optimal glycemic control prevents the onset of diabetes complications. Identifying diabetic patients at risk of poor glycemic control could help promoting dedicated interventions. The purpose of this study was to identify predictors of poor short-term and long-term glycemic control in older diabetic in-patients. Methods A total of 1354 older diabetic in-patients consecutively enrolled in a multicenter study formed the training population (retrospective arm); 264 patients consecutively admitted to a ward of general medicine formed the testing population (prospective arm). Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) was measured on admission and one year after the discharge in the testing population. Independent correlates of a discharge glycemia ≥ 140 mg/dl in the training population were assessed by logistic regression analysis and a clinical prediction rule was developed. The ability of the prediction rule and that of admission HbA1c to predict discharge glycemia ≥ 140 mg/dl and HbA1c > 7% one year after discharge was assessed in the testing population. Results Selected admission variables (diastolic arterial pressure < 80 mmHg, glycemia = 143–218 mg/dl, glycemia > 218 mg/dl, history of insulinic or combined hypoglycemic therapy, Charlson's index > 2) were combined to obtain a score predicting a discharge fasting glycemia ≥ 140 mg/dl in the training population. A modified score was obtained by adding 1 if admission HbA1c exceeded 7.8%. The modified score was the best predictor of both discharge glycemia ≥ 140 mg/dl (sensitivity = 79%, specificity = 63%) and 1 year HbA1c > 7% (sensitivity = 72%, specificity = 71%) in the testing population. Conclusion A simple clinical prediction rule might help identify older diabetic in-patients at risk of both short and long term poor glycemic control. PMID:12194701

  20. Impact of postoperative glycemic control and nutritional status on clinical outcomes after total pancreatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hao-Jun; Jin, Chen; Fu, De-Liang

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the impact of glycemic control and nutritional status after total pancreatectomy (TP) on complications, tumor recurrence and overall survival. METHODS Retrospective records of 52 patients with pancreatic tumors who underwent TP were collected from 2007 to 2015. A series of clinical parameters collected before and after surgery, and during the follow-up were evaluated. The associations of glycemic control and nutritional status with complications, tumor recurrence and long-term survival were determined. Risk factors for postoperative glycemic control and nutritional status were identified. RESULTS High early postoperative fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels (OR = 4.074, 95%CI: 1.188-13.965, P = 0.025) and low early postoperative prealbumin levels (OR = 3.816, 95%CI: 1.110-13.122, P = 0.034) were significantly associated with complications after TP. Postoperative HbA1c levels over 7% (HR = 2.655, 95%CI: 1.299-5.425, P = 0.007) were identified as one of the independent risk factors for tumor recurrence. Patients with postoperative HbA1c levels over 7% had much poorer overall survival than those with HbA1c levels less than 7% (9.3 mo vs 27.6 mo, HR = 3.212, 95%CI: 1.147-8.999, P = 0.026). Patients with long-term diabetes mellitus (HR = 15.019, 95%CI: 1.278-176.211, P = 0.031) and alcohol history (B = 1.985, SE = 0.860, P = 0.025) tended to have poor glycemic control and lower body mass index levels after TP, respectively. CONCLUSION At least 3 mo are required after TP to adapt to diabetes and recover nutritional status. Glycemic control appears to have more influence over nutritional status on long-term outcomes after TP. Improvement in glycemic control and nutritional status after TP is important to prevent early complications and tumor recurrence, and improve survival. PMID:28127200

  1. Tight glycemic control in the ICU - is the earth flat?

    PubMed

    Steil, Garry M; Agus, Michael S D

    2014-06-27

    Tight glycemic control in the ICU has been shown to reduce mortality in some but not all prospective randomized control trials. Confounding the interpretation of these studies are differences in how the control was achieved and underlying incidence of hypoglycemia, which can be expected to be affected by the introduction of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). In this issue of Critical Care, a consensus panel provides a list of the research priorities they believe are needed for CGM to become routine practice in the ICU. We reflect on these recommendations and consider the implications for using CGM today.

  2. Vasculogenesis and Diabetic Erectile Dysfunction: How Relevant Is Glycemic Control?

    PubMed

    Castela, Angela; Gomes, Pedro; Silvestre, Ricardo; Guardão, Luísa; Leite, Liliana; Chilro, Rui; Rodrigues, Ilda; Vendeira, Pedro; Virag, Ronald; Costa, Carla

    2017-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a complication of diabetes, condition responsible for causing endothelial dysfunction (EDys) and hampering repair mechanisms. However, scarce information is available linking vasculogenesis mediated by Endothelial Progenitor Cells (EPCs) and diabetes-associated ED. Furthermore, it remains to be elucidated if glycemic control plays a role on EPCs functions, EPCs modulators, and penile vascular health. We evaluated the effects of diabetes and insulin therapy on bone marrow (BM) and circulating EPCs, testosterone, and systemic/penile Stromal Derived Factor-1 alpha (SDF-1α) expression. Male Wistar rats were divided into groups: age-matched controls, 8-weeks streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetics, and insulin-treated 8-weeks diabetics. EPCs were identified by flow cytometry for CD34/CD133/VEGFR2/CXCR4 antigens. Systemic SDF-1α and testosterone levels were evaluated by ELISA. Penile SDF-1α protein expression was assessed, in experimental and human diabetic cavernosal samples, by immunohistochemical techniques. Diabetic animals presented a reduction of BM-derived EPCs and an increase in putative circulating endothelial cells (CECs) sloughed from vessels wall. These alterations were rescued by insulin therapy. In addition, glycemic control promoted an increase in systemic testosterone and SDF-1α levels, which were significantly decreased in animals with diabetes. SDF-1α protein expression was reduced in experimental and human cavernosal diabetic samples, an effect prevented by insulin in treated animals. Insulin administration rescued the effects of diabetes on BM function, CECs levels, testosterone, and plasmatic/penile SDF-1α protein expression. This emphasizes the importance of glycemic control in the prevention of diabetes-induced systemic and penile EDys, by the amelioration of endothelial damage, and increase in protective pathways. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 82-91, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Children's glycemic control: mother's knowledge and socioeconomic status.

    PubMed

    Al-Odayani, Abdulrahman Nasser; Alsharqi, Omar Zayyan; Ahmad, Alaeddin Mohammad Khalaf; Khalaf Ahmad, Ala'eddin Mohammad; Al-Borie, Hussein Mohammad; Qattan, Ameerah M N

    2013-10-29

    The present study was designed to examine the role of socioeconomic status (SES) of the mother's knowledge about different aspects of diabetes and the glycemic control of type 1 children with diabetes. Samples were taken from successive admissions to the outpatient diabetes clinics in Prince Sultan Medical Military City (PSMMC), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. A well designed questionnaire covering different aspects including demographic data, educational background, and socioeconomic status of the care providers was used to collect information from mothers of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) children. The questionnaire was designed on the basis of the Michigan diabetes knowledge scale and also on the basis of food habits of Saudi Arabia and it was validated. The questionnaire was completed after interviewing the mothers during visits to the PSMMC hospital. Every mother was asked with those particular questions. Glycemic control was assessed by glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c). The socio-demographic data of mothers was recorded by self-report. It was found that, there was significant variation in the knowledge of diabetes among mothers with different ages (P 0.05). No significant results were observed between family income and diabetes knowledge (p>0.05).However, a positive relationship was observed with higher income and higher knowledge. There was a significant association between mothers knowledge of diabetes and HbA1C level (r = -0.1739, p.<0.05) indicating that, higher knowledge ultimately leads to greater control of HbA1c level. A significant association was also observed between education and HbA1c level (r=-02538, p<0.05) with children of mothers with higher level of education showing a better control of glycated haemoglobin levels. However, no significant association was found between monthly family income and HbA1C level. In conclusion, the current study illustrated that, mothers with more knowledge of diabetes and with better education were maintaining a better

  4. Glycemic Control and Urinary Incontinence in Women with Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Karter, Andrew J.; Thai, Julie N.; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K.; Huang, Elbert S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Although many studies have shown that diabetes increases the risk for urinary incontinence, it is unclear whether poor glycemic control in women with diabetes is associated with incontinence. This study aims to determine the relationship between the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level and urinary incontinence in a large, diverse cohort of older women. Methods We examined 6026 older women who responded to a survey (62% response rate) and were enrolled in the Diabetes and Aging Study, an ethnically stratified random sample of patients with diabetes enrolled in Kaiser Permanente Northern California. Our primary independent variable was the mean of all HbA1c measurements in the year preceding the survey. Outcomes included the presence/absence of incontinence and limitations in daily activities due to incontinence. We used modified Poisson regression and ordinal logistic regression models to account for age, race, body mass index, parity, diabetes treatment, duration of diabetes, and comorbidity. Results Sixty-five percent of women reported incontinence (mean age 59±10 years). After adjustment, HbA1c levels were not associated with the presence or absence of incontinence. However, among women reporting incontinence, HbA1c ≥9% was associated with more limitations due to incontinence than HbA1c <6% (adjusted odds ratio 1.67, 95% confidence interval: 1.09–2.57). Conclusion In this cross-sectional analysis, HbA1c level is not associated with the presence or absence of incontinence. However, for women with incontinence, poor glycemic control (HbA1c ≥9%) is associated with more limitations in daily activities due to incontinence. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine whether improving glycemic control to HbA1c <9% leads to fewer limitations in daily activities due to incontinence. PMID:24032999

  5. Effect of Fructose on Glycemic Control in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cozma, Adrian I.; Sievenpiper, John L.; de Souza, Russell J.; Chiavaroli, Laura; Ha, Vanessa; Wang, D. David; Mirrahimi, Arash; Yu, Matt E.; Carleton, Amanda J.; Di Buono, Marco; Jenkins, Alexandra L.; Leiter, Lawrence A.; Wolever, Thomas M.S.; Beyene, Joseph; Kendall, Cyril W.C.; Jenkins, David J.A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The effect of fructose on cardiometabolic risk in humans is controversial. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled feeding trials to clarify the effect of fructose on glycemic control in individuals with diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library (through 22 March 2012) for relevant trials lasting ≥7 days. Data were aggregated by the generic inverse variance method (random-effects models) and expressed as mean difference (MD) for fasting glucose and insulin and standardized MD (SMD) with 95% CI for glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and glycated albumin. Heterogeneity was assessed by the Cochran Q statistic and quantified by the I2 statistic. Trial quality was assessed by the Heyland methodological quality score (MQS). RESULTS Eighteen trials (n = 209) met the eligibility criteria. Isocaloric exchange of fructose for carbohydrate reduced glycated blood proteins (SMD −0.25 [95% CI −0.46 to −0.04]; P = 0.02) with significant intertrial heterogeneity (I2 = 63%; P = 0.001). This reduction is equivalent to a ∼0.53% reduction in HbA1c. Fructose consumption did not significantly affect fasting glucose or insulin. A priori subgroup analyses showed no evidence of effect modification on any end point. CONCLUSIONS Isocaloric exchange of fructose for other carbohydrate improves long-term glycemic control, as assessed by glycated blood proteins, without affecting insulin in people with diabetes. Generalizability may be limited because most of the trials were <12 weeks and had relatively low MQS (<8). To confirm these findings, larger and longer fructose feeding trials assessing both possible glycemic benefit and adverse metabolic effects are required. PMID:22723585

  6. The Risks and Benefits of Implementing Glycemic Control Guidelines in Frail Elders with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sei J.; Boscardin, W. John; Cenzer, Irena Stijacic; Huang, Elbert S.; Rice-Trumble, Kathy; Eng, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES To determine the hypo- and hyper-glycemic outcomes associated with implementing the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) guideline for Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c)<8% in frail older patients with diabets. DESIGN/SETTING Guideline Implementation in PACE (Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly) PARTICIPANTS All patients in the Before (10/02–12/04, n=338), Early (1/05–6/06, n=289) and Late phases of guideline implementation (7/06–12/08, n=385) with a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and at least one HbA1c measurement. INTERVENTION Clinician education in 2005 with annual monitoring of the proportion of each clinician’s patients with diabetes with HbA1c<8%. MEASUREMENTS Hypoglycemia (Blood sugar or BS<50), hyperglycemia (BS>400) and severe hypoglycemia (Emergency room or ER visit for hypoglycemia) RESULTS Before, Early and Late groups were similar in mean age, race/ethnicity, comorbidity and functional dependency. Antihyperglycemic medication use increased with more patients using metformin (28% Before versus 42% Late, p<0.001) and insulin (23% Before versus 34% Late, p<0.001), with more patients achieving the AGS glycemic target of HbA1c<8% (74% Before versus 84% Late, p<0.001). Episodes of hyperglycemia (per 100 person-years) decreased dramatically (159 Before versus 46 Late, p<0.001) and episodes of hypoglycemia were unchanged (10.1 versus 9.3, p=0.50). Episodes of severe hypoglycemia were increased in the Early period (1.1 Before versus 2.9 Early, p=0.03). CONCLUSION Implementing the AGS glycemic control guideline for frail elders led to fewer hyperglycemic episodes, but more severe hypoglycemic episodes requiring ER visits in the Early implementation period. Future glycemic control guideline implementation efforts should be coupled with close monitoring for severe hypoglycemia in the early implementation period. PMID:21480838

  7. Trace elements, oxidative stress and glycemic control in young people with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Chiang; Huang, Hsiu-Hua; Hu, Chiung-Wen; Chen, Bai-Hsiun; Chong, Inn-Wen; Chao, Yu-Ying; Huang, Yeou-Lih

    2014-01-01

    Trace elements and oxidative stress are associated with glycemic control and diabetic complications in type 1 diabetes mellitus. In this study, we analyzed the levels of serum copper, zinc, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and malondialdehyde (MDA) and urinary MDA and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) in 33 type 1 diabetic patients with optimal and suboptimal glycemic control (HbA1C<9.0%) and 40 patients with poor glycemic control (HbA1C≥9%) and 27 age- and sex-matched non-diabetic controls to evaluate the differences between these markers in different glycemic control states. Diabetic patients, especially poor-glycemic-control subjects (HbA1C≥9%), exhibited significantly lower levels of serum zinc and increased levels of serum copper (and, therefore, increased serum copper-to-zinc ratios), serum SOD, blood MDA, and urinary MDA and 8-OHdG, relative to non-diabetic subjects. Furthermore, significant correlations existed in these patients between the serum copper, serum copper-to-zinc ratio, and urinary MDA (all p<0.001) and the levels of urinary 8-OHdG (p=0.007) and HbA1C. Our results suggest that high serum copper levels and oxidative stress correlate with glycemic control. Therefore, strict glycemic control, decreased oxidative stress, and a lower copper concentration might prevent diabetic complications in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  8. Relationship between vitamin D and glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Olt, Serdar

    2015-01-01

    Herein I investigated the impact of vitamin D on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. 128 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus were enrolled in this study (mean (S.D) age: 57.7±10 years, 26.6% were female). It was collected clinical and laboratory characteristics of patients from hospital records retrospectively. Patients were divided into two groups according to the HBA1c values: good glycemic control (HbA1c≤7%) and poor glycemic control (HbA1c>7%). It was compared 25 hydroxyvitamin (OH) D and other collected laboratory parameters between the two groups. The vitamin D deficiency rate was 98.3%. In the result with ROC curve analyzes and Mann Whitney U test vitamin D was'nt significantly associated with glycemic control (P value >0.05). Among other parameters result with ROC curve analyzes and student t test RDW-CV was found to be significantly associated with glycemic control (P value <0.05). Although high level of vitamin D deficiency, present study indicated that vitamin D was'nt significantly related to glycemic control in type 2 diyabetes mellitus. Even so RDW-CV was significantly related to glycemic control.

  9. Assessing inpatient glycemic control: what are the next steps?

    PubMed

    Cook, Curtiss B; Wellik, Kay E; Kongable, Gail L; Shu, Jianfen

    2012-03-01

    Despite the emergence of glucometrics (i.e., systematic analysis of data on blood glucose levels of inpatients) as a subject of high interest, there remains a lack of standardization on how glucose parameters are measured and reported. This dilemma must be resolved before a national benchmarking process can be developed that will allow institutions to track and compare inpatient glucose control performance against established guidelines and that can also be supported by quality care organizations. In this article, we review some of the questions that need to be resolved through consensus and review of the evidence, and discuss some of the limitations in analyzing and reporting inpatient glucose data that must be addressed (or at least accepted as limitations) before hospitals can commit resources to gathering, compiling, and presenting inpatient glucose statistics as a health care quality measure. Standards must include consensus on which measures to report, the unit of analysis, definitions of targets for hyperglycemia treatment, a definition of hypoglycemia, determination of how data should be gathered (from chart review or from laboratory information systems), and which type of sample (blood or point of care) should be used for analysis of glycemic control. Hospitals and/or their representatives should be included in the discussion. For inpatient glucose control to remain a focus of interest, further dialogue and consensus on the topic are needed.

  10. Tight glycemic control using an artificial endocrine pancreas may play an important role in preventing infection after pancreatic resection.

    PubMed

    Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2012-08-07

    It is well known that perioperative hyperglycemia is the main cause of infectious complications after surgery. To improve perioperative glycemic control, we wish to highlight and comment on an interesting paper published recently by the Annals of Surgery entitled: "Early postoperative hyperglycemia is associated with postoperative complications after pancreatoduodenectomy (PD)" by Eshuis et al. The authors concluded that early postoperative glucose levels more than 140 mg/dL was significantly associated with complications after PD. Since we recommend that perioperative tight glycemic control (TGC) is an effective method to prevent postoperative complications including surgical site infection after distal, proximal, and total pancreatic resection, we support strongly this conclusion drawn in this article. However, if early postoperative glucose control in patients undergoing PD was administrated by conventional method such as sliding scale approach as described in this article, it is difficult to maintain TGC. Therefore, we introduce a novel perioperative glycemic control using an artificial endocrine pancreas against pancreatogenic diabetes after pancreatic resection including PD.

  11. Almond consumption improved glycemic control and lipid profiles in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Almond consumption is associated with ameliorations in obesity, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and hyperglycemia. The hypothesis of this 12-wk randomized crossover clinical trial was that almond consumption would improve glycemic control and decrease risk to cardiovascular disease in 20 Chinese type ...

  12. Veganism Is a Viable Alternative to Conventional Diet Therapy for Improving Blood Lipids and Glycemic Control.

    PubMed

    Trepanowski, John F; Varady, Krista A

    2015-01-01

    The American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) have each outlined a set of dietary recommendations aimed at improving glycemic control and blood lipids, respectively. However, traditional vegan diets (low-fat diets that proscribe animal product consumption) are also effective at improving glycemic control, and dietary portfolios (vegan diets that contain prescribed amounts of plant sterols, viscous fibers, soy protein, and nuts) are also effective at improving blood lipids. The purpose of this review was to compare the effects of traditional vegan diets and dietary portfolios with ADA and NCEP diets on body weight, blood lipids, blood pressure, and glycemic control. The main findings are that traditional vegan diets appear to improve glycemic control better than ADA diets in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), while dietary portfolios have been consistently shown to improve blood lipids better than NCEP diets in hypercholesterolemic individuals.

  13. Impact of hyperbaric oxygen on diabetic ulcers is unaffected by glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Bakhtiani, Parkash; Bahktiani, Parkash; Mansuri, Owaise; Yadav, Abhijeet; Osuoha, Chima; Knight, Patty; Baynosa, Richard; McLafferty, Robert; Jakoby, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) therapy is an established intervention for treating chronic diabetic lower extremity ulcers, but the impact of glycemic control on its efficacy has not been determined. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of blood glucose control at initiation of HBO2 treatment on wound healing. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was measured at start of HBO2 therapy for 22 patients undergoing treatment of chronic lower extremity ulcers at two regional wound care centers. Patients with HbA1c < 7.5% were stratified into a "good glycemic control" group (n = 12, mean HbA1c 6.5 ± 0.8%), and patients with HbA1c ≥ 7.5% were stratified into a "poor glycemic control" group (n = 10, mean HbA1c 8.8 ± 1.4%, p = 0.004 compared to "good glycemic control group"). After 20 HBO2 sessions over 30 days in addition to standard wound care interventions, there was no difference in wound healing between the two glycemic control groups as indicated by. reduction from baseline in ulcer surface area, depth, or volume. The diabetic lower extremity wound response to HBO2 therapy is unaffected by glycemic control prior to treatment, and HBO2 treatment should not be delayed for suboptimal blood glucose control.

  14. Glycemic control and antidiabetic drugs in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with renal complications

    PubMed Central

    Huri, Hasniza Zaman; Lim, Lay Peng; Lim, Soo Kun

    2015-01-01

    Background Good glycemic control can delay the progression of kidney diseases in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients with renal complications. To date, the association between antidiabetic agents and glycemic control in this specific patient population is not well established. Purpose This study aimed to identify antidiabetic regimens as well as other factors that associated with glycemic control in T2DM patients with different stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Patients and methods This retrospective, cross-sectional study involved 242 T2DM inpatients and outpatients with renal complications from January 2009 to March 2014 and was conducted in a tertiary teaching hospital in Malaysia. Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) was used as main parameter to assess patients’ glycemic status. Patients were classified to have good (A1C <7%) or poor glycemic control (A1C ≥7%) based on the recommendations of the American Diabetes Association. Results Majority of the patients presented with CKD stage 4 (43.4%). Approximately 55.4% of patients were categorized to have poor glycemic control. Insulin (57.9%) was the most commonly prescribed antidiabetic medication, followed by sulfonylureas (43%). Of all antidiabetic regimens, sulfonylureas monotherapy (P<0.001), insulin therapy (P=0.005), and combination of biguanides with insulin (P=0.038) were found to be significantly associated with glycemic control. Other factors including duration of T2DM (P=0.004), comorbidities such as anemia (P=0.024) and retinopathy (P=0.033), concurrent medications such as erythropoietin therapy (P=0.047), α-blockers (P=0.033), and antigouts (P=0.003) were also correlated with A1C. Conclusion Identification of factors that are associated with glycemic control is important to help in optimization of glucose control in T2DM patients with renal complication. PMID:26300627

  15. Frequency and predictors of suboptimal glycemic control in an African diabetic population

    PubMed Central

    Kibirige, Davis; Akabwai, George Patrick; Kampiire, Leaticia; Kiggundu, Daniel Ssekikubo; Lumu, William

    2017-01-01

    Background Persistent suboptimal glycemic control is invariably associated with onset and progression of acute and chronic diabetic complications in diabetic patients. In Uganda, studies documenting the magnitude and predictors of suboptimal glycemic control in adult ambulatory diabetic patients are limited. This study aimed at determining the frequency and predictors of suboptimal glycemic control in adult diabetic patients attending three urban outpatient diabetic clinics in Uganda. Methods In this hospital-based cross-sectional study, eligible ambulatory adult diabetic patients attending outpatient diabetic clinics of three urban hospitals were consecutively enrolled over 11 months. Suboptimal glycemic control was defined as glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level ≥7%. Multivariable analysis was applied to determine the predictors. Results The mean age of the study participants was 52.2±14.4 years, and the majority of them were females (283, 66.9%). The median (interquartile range) HbA1c level was 9% (6.8%–12.4%). Suboptimal glycemic control was noted in 311 study participants, accounting for 73.52% of the participants. HbA1c levels of 7%–8%, 8.1%–9.9%, and ≥10% were noted in 56 (13.24%), 76 (17.97%), and 179 (42.32%) study participants, respectively. The documented predictors of suboptimal glycemic control were metformin monotherapy (odds ratio: 0.36, 95% confidence interval: 0.21–0.63, p<0.005) and insulin therapy (odds ratio: 2.41, 95% confidence interval: 1.41–4.12, p=0.001). Conclusion Suboptimal glycemic control was highly prevalent in this study population with an association to metformin monotherapy and insulin therapy. Strategies aimed at improving glycemic control in diabetes care in Uganda should be enhanced. PMID:28260942

  16. Effect of current glycemic control on qualitative body composition in sedentary ambulatory Type 2 diabetics

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Jayesh Dalpatbhai; Makwana, Amit H.; Mehta, Hemant B.; Kamdar, Panna; Gokhale, Pradnya A.; Shah, Chinmay J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Obesity and Type 2 diabetes mellitus are on rise with cause–effect relationship. Diabetics monitor blood sugar, neglecting qualitative body composition, leaving residual threat of ectopic fat unattended. We tried to correlate glycemic triad with parameters of body composition derived objectively by bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA). Materials and Methods: A sample of 78 under treatment sedentary Type 2 diabetics of either sex with known glycemic and lipidemic control from our city. Following baseline assessment measurement was done by instrument Omron Karada Scan (Model HBF-510, China) using the principle of tetra poplar BIA to derive parameters of body composition. We tried to correlate glycemic triad with these parameters, both directly as well as after defining them as per established cutoff norms. Results: We found poor glycemic control in the study group (20% for Hb1AC), high body mass index, subcutaneous fat, visceral fat (VF), total body fat (TBF), and lesser mass of skeletal muscle in Type 2 diabetics. However, there were small, insignificant, and inconsistent difference of these parameters while directly correlating with the fasting blood sugar, postprandial blood sugar, and glycosylated hemoglobin. On qualitative assessment, the impact of glycemic control as per standard norms, the risk of high VF, high TBF, low skeletal muscle mass was though high (between 1 and 2) in Type 2 diabetics with poor glycemic control as compared to good glycemics, but each strength lacks statistical significance. Conclusion: BIA reveals that Type 2 diabetics have more ectopic fat on expense of skeletal muscle that do not correlate with current glycemic status, both quantitatively and qualitatively. Measurement of body composition can be included and subjects can be motivated for lifestyle modification strategies while managing metabolic derangements of Type 2 diabetes. PMID:27185972

  17. Anxiety Symptoms in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes: Association with Blood Glucose Monitoring and Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Herzer, Michele

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine the prevalence of anxiety symptoms and their association with blood glucose monitoring (BGM) and glycemic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Methods 276 adolescents and their caregivers completed measures of anxiety symptoms. Adolescents completed a measure of depressive symptoms. Demographic and family characteristics were obtained from caregiver report. Diabetes duration, regimen type, BGM frequency, and glycemic control were also collected. Results Trait anxiety symptoms that suggest further clinical assessment is needed were present in 17% of adolescents; the rate was 13% for state anxiety symptoms. Higher levels of state anxiety symptoms were associated with less frequent BGM F(14, 261) = 6.35, p < .0001, R2 = .25, and suboptimal glycemic control, F(15, 260) = 7.97, p < .0001, R2 = .32. State anxiety symptoms were correlates of BGM frequency and glycemic control independent of depressive symptoms. Conclusions State anxiety symptoms are associated with less frequent BGM and suboptimal glycemic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. PMID:19684117

  18. Acute effects of dietary glycemic index on antioxidant capacity in nutrient-controlled feeding study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidative stress, caused by an imbalance between antioxidant capacity and reactive oxygen species, may be an early event in a metabolic cascade elicited by a high glycemic index (GI) diet, ultimately increasing the risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. We conducted a feeding study to evalua...

  19. Effects of a Psychoeducational Group on Mood and Glycemic Control in Adults with Diabetes and Visual Impairments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trozzolino, Linda; Thompson, Pamela S.; Tansman, Mara S.; Azen, Stanley P.

    2003-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of a 12-week psychoeducational group therapy program in improving mood and glycemic control in 48 adults with diabetes and visual impairments. Participants made statistically significant gains in glycemic control. There was a significant positive relationship between control and improvement in depression, but…

  20. Diabetes and cardiovascular disease: changing the focus from glycemic control to improving long-term survival.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cecilia C Low; Reusch, Jane E B

    2012-11-06

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is the fifth-leading cause of death worldwide and contributes to leading causes of death, cancer and cardiovascular disease, including CAD, stroke, peripheral vascular disease, and other vascular disease. While glycemic management remains a cornerstone of DM care, the co-management of hypertension, atherosclerosis, cardiovascular risk reduction, and prevention of long-term consequences associated with DM are now well recognized as essential to improve long-term survival. Clinical trial evidence substantiates the importance of glycemic control, low-density cholesterol-lowering therapy, blood pressure lowering, control of albuminuria, and comprehensive approaches targeting multiple risk factors to reduce cardiovascular risk. This article presents a review of the role of DM in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and cardiac dysfunction, recent evidence on the degree of glycemic control and mortality, and available evidence for a multifaceted approach to improve long-term outcomes for patients.

  1. Breaking down patient and physician barriers to optimize glycemic control in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ross, Stuart A

    2013-09-01

    Approximately half of patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) do not achieve globally recognized blood glucose targets, despite the availability of a wide range of effective glucose-lowering therapies. Failure to maintain good glycemic control increases the risk of diabetes-related complications and long-term health care costs. Patients must be brought under glycemic control to improve treatment outcomes, but existing barriers to optimizing glycemic control must first be overcome, including patient nonadherence to treatment, the failure of physicians to intensify therapy in a timely manner, and inadequacies in the health care system itself. The reasons for such barriers include treatment side effects, complex treatment regimens, needle anxiety, poor patient education, and the absence of an adequate patient care plan; however, newer therapies and devices, combined with comprehensive care plans involving adequate patient education, can help to minimize barriers and improve treatment outcomes.

  2. Nutrition Support Team-Led Glycemic Control Program for Critically Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Roland N; Maish, George O; Minard, Gayle; Brown, Rex O

    2014-08-01

    Glycemic control is an important component of the metabolic management of the critically ill patient. Nutrition support teams are frequently challenged by complicated patients who exhibit multiple concurrent etiologies for hyperglycemia. Nutrition support teams can serve in a pivotal role in the development and evaluation of safe and effective techniques for achieving glycemic control. This review describes the efforts of a nutrition support team in achieving safe and effective glycemic control at their institution. Identification of target blood glucose concentration range, development, initiation, monitoring of a continuous intravenous insulin infusion algorithm, nursing adherence to the algorithm, modification of the algorithm based on the presence of conditions that alter insulin metabolism and glucose homeostasis, and transition of the patient who receives continuous enteral nutrition from a continuous intravenous insulin infusion to intermittent subcutaneous insulin therapy are discussed.

  3. Ethnic Disparities in Glycemic Control Among Rural Older Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Quandt, Sara A.; Bell, Ronny A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Smith, Shannon L.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Wetmore, Lindsay K.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2006-01-01

    Glycemic control is a predictor of diabetes-related morbidity and mortality. However, little is known about how well older adults in rural communities, with limited access to self-care resources and specialty care practitioners, control their diabetes. Even less is known about whether minority, older, rural adults are at increased risk for poor glycemic control. We analyzed data from a cross-sectional survey of randomly selected older (≥65 years) adults with type 2 diabetes in rural North Carolina. Participants (N=693) were men and women from three ethnic groups: African American, Native American, and White. Capillary blood samples were collected for HbA1C analysis. HbA1C levels (<7%, 7%–<8%, and ≥8%) were compared across ethnic and gender groups. Two multiple logistic regression models (model 1: personal characteristics; model 2: personal and health characteristics) were used to evaluate potential predictors of HbA1C ≥7%. Overall, 36.4% had HbA1C ≥7%. Native Americans and African-American men had the highest proportion at levels of poor glycemic control (≥7%), and African-American women and White men had the lowest. In bivariate analysis, ethnicity, living arrangements, use of medications for diabetes, having a diabetes-related healthcare visit in the past year, and duration of diabetes were significantly associated with glycemic control. In multivariate analysis (model 1), being Native American, having low income without Medicaid, and being married were associated with poor glycemic control. Adding health characteristics (model 2), longer diabetes duration and diabetes medication therapy were significant predictors. These data indicate that older ethnic minorities in rural communities are at increased risk for diabetes complications and need diabetes management strategies to improve glycemic control. PMID:16259490

  4. Evaluation of glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Chinese communities: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Shan, Shan; Gu, Liubao; Lou, Qinglin; Ouyang, Xiaojun; Yu, Yun; Wu, Haidi; Bian, Rongwen

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the glycemic levels in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and to explore the factors related to the results of glycemic control. A total of 2454 T2DM patients from 11 communities were examined for glycosylated hemoglobin levels and glycemic control options. Potential factors related to the results of glycemic control were analyzed using logistic regression. Of all the patients, 55.3 % achieved the glycemic control target of HbA1c < 7 %. Multivariate analysis showed that male sex (OR 1.345, 95 % CI 1.022-1.769; P = 0.034), higher levels of fasting blood glucose (OR 1.954, 95 % CI 1.778-2.147; P < 0.001), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (OR 1.181, 95 % CI 1.020-1.367; P = 0.026) were significantly associated with poor glycemic control. The complexity of antidiabetics was also associated with poor glycemic control (P < 0.05). Compared to diet and exercise, insulin injection was most strongly associated with poor glycemic control (OR 6.210, 95 % CI 4.054-9.514; P < 0.001). Male patients with higher levels of total cholesterol, lower levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, or longer diabetic durations showed poor glycemic control, which was not found in female patients. Glycemic control was not satisfactory in T2DM patients of Nanjing communities. Various factors are associated with poor results of glycemic control.

  5. Taking a low glycemic index multi-nutrient supplement as breakfast improves glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Li, Di; Zhang, Peiwen; Guo, Honghui; Ling, Wenhua

    2014-12-10

    Dietary therapy is the mainstay of treatment for diabetes. This study examined the effect of a low glycemic index (GI) multi-nutrient supplement, consumed in place of breakfast, on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A total of 71 participants were randomized at a 2:1 ratio into either a breakfast replacement group or a normal breakfast group for a 12-week interventional study. The primary outcome measure was change in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). Nutrition status and somatometry were studied as secondary outcomes. The breakfast replacement group displayed a -0.2% absolute reduction in HbA1c (95% CI (confidence interval), -0.38% to -0.07%, p = 0.004), while the HbA1c of the control group increased 0.3% (95% CI, 0.1% to 0.5%, p = 0.005). The baseline Mini Nutritional Assessment score for both groups was 26.0 and no significant changes occurred following intervention. However, there was a statistically significant difference in body mass index between the treatment and control groups (p = 0.032) due to the weight gain in the control group (increased 0.5 kg, 95% CI was 0.2 to 0.9, p = 0.007). These data suggest that breakfast replacement with a low GI multi-nutrient supplement can improve glycemic and weight control in T2DM.

  6. Taking a Low Glycemic Index Multi-Nutrient Supplement as Breakfast Improves Glycemic Control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Li, Di; Zhang, Peiwen; Guo, Honghui; Ling, Wenhua

    2014-01-01

    Dietary therapy is the mainstay of treatment for diabetes. This study examined the effect of a low glycemic index (GI) multi-nutrient supplement, consumed in place of breakfast, on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A total of 71 participants were randomized at a 2:1 ratio into either a breakfast replacement group or a normal breakfast group for a 12-week interventional study. The primary outcome measure was change in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). Nutrition status and somatometry were studied as secondary outcomes. The breakfast replacement group displayed a −0.2% absolute reduction in HbA1c (95% CI (confidence interval), −0.38% to −0.07%, p = 0.004), while the HbA1c of the control group increased 0.3% (95% CI, 0.1% to 0.5%, p = 0.005). The baseline Mini Nutritional Assessment score for both groups was 26.0 and no significant changes occurred following intervention. However, there was a statistically significant difference in body mass index between the treatment and control groups (p = 0.032) due to the weight gain in the control group (increased 0.5 kg, 95% CI was 0.2 to 0.9, p = 0.007). These data suggest that breakfast replacement with a low GI multi-nutrient supplement can improve glycemic and weight control in T2DM. PMID:25514391

  7. Hope matters to the glycemic control of adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Santos, Fábio R M; Sigulem, Daniel; Areco, Kelsy C N; Gabbay, Monica A L; Dib, Sergio A; Bernardo, Viviane

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the association of hope and its factors with depression and glycemic control in adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes. A total of 113 patients were invited to participate. Significant negative correlations were found between hope and HbA1c and also between hope and depression. Hope showed a significant association with HbA1c and depression in the stepwise regression model. Among the hope factors, "inner positive expectancy" was significantly associated with HbA1c and depression. This study supports that hope matters to glycemic control and depression. Intervention strategies focusing on hope should be further explored.

  8. The Importance of Social Support on Glycemic Control in Low-Income Latinos with Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotberg, Britt; Junqueira, Yasmine; Gosdin, Lucas; Mejia, Roberto; Umpierrez, Guillermo E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The U.S. Latino population exhibits poorer glycemic control than the white population, leading to more frequent health complications and greater disease severity. Social support has been shown a significant factor in health and well-being. Purpose: To determine the association between glycemic control and social support in patients…

  9. Molecular variants and derivatives of insulin for improved glycemic control in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Sonika; Srivastava, Deepa; Jayadev, M S K; Dubey, A K

    2006-07-01

    Insulin is a historic molecule. It presents many first instances, such as the first protein to be fully sequenced, one of the first proteins to be crystallized in pure form, one among the early proteins whose structure was investigated using X-ray crystallography, the first protein to be chemically synthesized and the first Biotech drug. Therefore, the development of insulin in the early years is intricately intertwined with the progress in molecular and structural biology. In recent years, development of a range of insulin analogs has led to better control of glucose levels, thus preventing secondary complications and improving the quality of life in diabetic patients. Such analogs were obtained by modification of the native insulin sequence. They vary with regard to their pharmacokinetic profile, stability, tissue specificity and mode of administration. In addition, alterations involving incorporation of various chemical moieties in insulin and its co-crystallization with insoluble derivatives are used to modulate the time-action profile of the drug. This article traces the development of molecular variants and derivatives of insulin. It discusses future directions for further improvement in their properties to produce still better insulin therapeutics for tight glycemic control.

  10. The effect of glycemic control on CEA, CA 19-9, amylase and lipase levels

    PubMed Central

    Ata, Naim; Dal, Kürşat; Kucukazman, Metin; Karakaya, Serdar; Unsal, Oktay; Dagdeviren, Murat; Akın, Kadir O.; Baser, Salih; Beyan, Esin; Ertugrul, Derun T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus is closely related to pancreas cancer. In this study we aimed to investigate the effect of hyperglycemia on tumor and inflammation markers, as well as pancreatic exocrine functions. Methods A total of 98 consecutive diabetic patients with poor glycemic control, and 50 healthy controls were included in the study. We measured hsCRP, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), CA19-9, CEA, amylase and lipase in addition to routine biochemistry tests, before and after euglycemia was achieved. Results Fasting blood glucose, HbA1c, CA19-9, CEA, hsCRP, ESR, triglycerides, AST, ALT, GGT, ALP, total cholesterol and LDL-C levels decreased significantly with the regulation of glycemic control. Amylase and lipase levels increased with the regulation of glycemic control. After glycemic control, CA19-9 and CEA levels were still higher, whereas amylase and lipase levels were still lower in the diabetic group compared with the control group. Basal HbA1c showed significant correlation with CA19-9, CEA, amylase and lipase. Conclusions We propose to repeat observations of tumor markers after hyperglycemia is resolved, in order to avoid unnecessary invasive tests. Our data also suggest that pancreatic exocrine function was improved with lowering blood glucose in a short period of time. PMID:28352671

  11. Cross-sectional study of glycemic control among adults with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Amarasekara, Amarasekara Appuhamillage Thamara Dilhani; Fongkaew, Warunee; Wimalasekera, Savithri Wasundara; Turale, Sue; Chanprasit, Chawapornpan

    2015-06-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a chronic condition, a global concern, and a serious issue in Sri Lanka, where there is little data regarding the influence of dietary control, exercise, and adherence to medication behaviors among adults diabetes. In this cross-sectional, descriptive study, we identified current factors influencing glycemic control and glycemic control behavior among adults with diabetes. A total of 230 people attending diabetes clinics in a tertiary hospital and a primary care institute were administered the self-report Diabetes Information Form, assessing their socioeconomic and medical information and glycemic control behaviors. Data were analyzed by frequency distribution, percentages, mean scores, and standard deviation. The results indicated that most participants had not achieved the recommended fasting blood glucose level (< 126 mg/dL). Although dietary control was practised by 72%, regular exercise was not practised by 85%, and while 77% reported adhering to regular medication, they still had poor glycemic control. The findings highlight the need for health professionals to adopt new strategies for diabetes education to overcome issues related to misconceptions and barriers in providing diabetes care in Sri Lanka.

  12. Interactions between Starch, Lipids, and Proteins in Foods: Microstructure Control for Glycemic Response Modulation.

    PubMed

    Parada, Javier; Santos, Jose L

    2016-10-25

    In real food, starch is usually forming part of a matrix with lipids and proteins. However, research on this ternary system and interactions between such food components has been scarce so far. The control of food microstructure is crucial to determine the product properties, including sensorial and nutritionals ones. This paper reviews the microstructural principles of interactions between starch, lipids, and proteins in foods as well as their effect on postprandial glycemic response, considering human intrinsic differences on postprandial glycemic responses. Several lines of research support the hypothesis that foods without rapidly digestible starch will not mandatorily generate the lowest postprandial glycemic response, highlighting that the full understanding of food microstructure, which modulates starch digestion, plays a key role on food design from a nutritional viewpoint.

  13. Utility of different glycemic control metrics for optimizing management of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kohnert, Klaus-Dieter; Heinke, Peter; Vogt, Lutz; Salzsieder, Eckhard

    2015-01-01

    The benchmark for assessing quality of long-term glycemic control and adjustment of therapy is currently glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Despite its importance as an indicator for the development of diabetic complications, recent studies have revealed that this metric has some limitations; it conveys a rather complex message, which has to be taken into consideration for diabetes screening and treatment. On the basis of recent clinical trials, the relationship between HbA1c and cardiovascular outcomes in long-standing diabetes has been called into question. It becomes obvious that other surrogate and biomarkers are needed to better predict cardiovascular diabetes complications and assess efficiency of therapy. Glycated albumin, fructosamin, and 1,5-anhydroglucitol have received growing interest as alternative markers of glycemic control. In addition to measures of hyperglycemia, advanced glucose monitoring methods became available. An indispensible adjunct to HbA1c in routine diabetes care is self-monitoring of blood glucose. This monitoring method is now widely used, as it provides immediate feedback to patients on short-term changes, involving fasting, preprandial, and postprandial glucose levels. Beyond the traditional metrics, glycemic variability has been identified as a predictor of hypoglycemia, and it might also be implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular diabetes complications. Assessment of glycemic variability is thus important, but exact quantification requires frequently sampled glucose measurements. In order to optimize diabetes treatment, there is a need for both key metrics of glycemic control on a day-to-day basis and for more advanced, user-friendly monitoring methods. In addition to traditional discontinuous glucose testing, continuous glucose sensing has become a useful tool to reveal insufficient glycemic management. This new technology is particularly effective in patients with complicated diabetes and provides the opportunity to characterize

  14. Achieving glycemic control in special populations in hospital: perspectives in practice.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Alice Y Y

    2014-04-01

    Achieving and maintaining glycemic control in patients with diabetes admitted to hospital is challenging because of the many competing factors of nutrition, pharmacotherapy and other patient-related and systemic factors. For patients receiving enteral or parenteral feeding, eating irregularly or receiving glucocorticoid therapy, the challenges are even greater. The basic principles to follow when managing glycemia in these populations are as follows: 1) Recognition of those at risk for hyperglycemia; 2) frequent bedside glucose monitoring; 3) a proactive approach with routine insulin administration based on the predicted glucose patterns; 4) constant reassessment of the glycemic status and titration of the routine insulin accordingly.

  15. Association between Social Relationship and Glycemic Control among Older Japanese: JAGES Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Kawachi, Ichiro; Kondo, Katsunori; Kondo, Naoki; Nagamine, Yuiko; Tani, Yukako; Shirai, Kokoro; Tazuma, Susumu

    2017-01-01

    Aim The present study examined whether social support, informal socializing and social participation are associated with glycemic control in older people. Methods Data for this population-based cross-sectional study was obtained from the Japan Gerontological Evaluation Study (JAGES) 2010 linked to the annual health check-up data in Japan. We analyzed 9,554 individuals aged ≥65 years without the certification of needed long-term care. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to assess the effect of social support, informal socializing and social participations on glycemic control. The outcome measure was HbA1c ≥8.4%. Results 1.3% of the participants had a level of HbA1c over 8.4%. Better glycemic control was significantly associated with meeting with friends one to four times per month (odds ratio [OR] 0.51, 95% confidence interval [CI]0.30–0.89, compared to meeting with friends a few times per year or less) and participation in sports groups (OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.26–0.97) even after adjusting for other variables. Meeting with friends more than twice per week, receiving social support, and being married were not associated with better control of diabetes. Conclusions Meeting with friends occasionally is associated with better glycemic control among older people. PMID:28060887

  16. Physician and patient management of type 2 diabetes and factors related to glycemic control in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Yurgin, Nicole Rae; Boye, Kristina Secnik; Dilla, Tatiana; Suriñach, Núria Lara; Llach, Xavier Badia

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess current treatment patterns, blood glucose test strip usage, and treatment compliance in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in primary care centers in Spain, and to assess factors related to glycemic control. We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients with T2DM and measured treatment compliance using the Morisky-Green questionnaire. 294 patients were included in the study from a population of patients attending 30 primary care centers throughout Spain. Results showed that the majority of patients were treated with oral monotherapy (36%) and oral combination therapy (35%). Less than half of the patients had good glycemic control (HbA1c ≤ 6.5%). Half of the patients treated pharmacologically reported good compliance with treatment. Logistic regression analyses performed to identify factors associated with glycemic control showed that high body mass index (BMI) and poor compliance were the strongest predictors of poor HbA1c control (OR: 2.198 and 1.789, respectively, p < 0.05). In conclusion, in the course of managing diabetes, physicians and patients should attempt to improve compliance and lower BMI, which could lead to better glycemic control. PMID:19920948

  17. Determinants of glycemic control in youth with type 2 diabetes at randomization in the TODAY study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate insulin sensitivity and secretion indices and determinants of glycemic control in youth with recent-onset type 2 diabetes (T2DM) at randomization in the TODAY study, the largest study of youth with T2DM to date. We examined estimates of insulin sensitivit...

  18. Association of Exercise Stages of Change with Glycemic Control in Individuals with Type 2 Diabetes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natarajan, Sundar; Clyburn, Ernest B.; Brown, Ronald T.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated the distribution of diabetic patients' stages of change to follow an exercise regimen, examining whether later stages of change were associated with better glycemic control. Data on participants from a primary care clinic (who were predominantly black, female, and indigent) indicated that over half of were in pre-contemplation,…

  19. Glycemic Control in a Clinic-Based Sample of Diabetics in M'Bour Senegal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BeLue, Rhonda; Ndiaye, Khadidiatou; NDao, Fatou; Ba, Fatou Niass Niang; Diaw, Mor

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) including Senegal is faced with a significant and increasing burden of type 2 diabetes. However, little information is available about diabetes management among Senegalese diabetics. Purpose: The current study aims to describe the level of glycemic control among a convenience sample of diabetics who receive…

  20. The effects of glycemic control on seizures and seizure-induced excitotoxic cell death

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Epilepsy is the most common neurological disorder after stroke, affecting more than 50 million persons worldwide. Metabolic disturbances are often associated with epileptic seizures, but the pathogenesis of this relationship is poorly understood. It is known that seizures result in altered glucose metabolism, the reduction of intracellular energy metabolites such as ATP, ADP and phosphocreatine and the accumulation of metabolic intermediates, such as lactate and adenosine. In particular, it has been suggested that the duration and extent of glucose dysregulation may be a predictor of the pathological outcome of status. However, little is known about neither the effects of glycemic control on brain metabolism nor the effects of managing systemic glucose concentrations in epilepsy. Results In this study, we examined glycemic modulation of kainate-induced seizure sensitivity and its neuropathological consequences. To investigate the relationship between glycemic modulation, seizure susceptibility and its neuropathological consequences, C57BL/6 mice (excitotoxin cell death resistant) were subjected to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia, followed by systemic administration of kainic acid to induce seizures. Glycemic modulation resulted in minimal consequences with regard to seizure severity but increased hippocampal pathology, irrespective of whether mice were hypoglycemic or hyperglycemic prior to kainate administration. Moreover, we found that exogenous administration of glucose following kainic acid seizures significantly reduced the extent of hippocampal pathology in FVB/N mice (excitotoxin cell death susceptible) following systemic administration of kainic acid. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that modulation of the glycemic index can modify the outcome of brain injury in the kainate model of seizure induction. Moreover, modulation of the glycemic index through glucose rescue greatly diminishes the extent of seizure-induced cell death following kainate

  1. Hindbrain DPP-IV inhibition improves glycemic control and promotes negative energy balance.

    PubMed

    Mietlicki-Baase, Elizabeth G; McGrath, Lauren E; Koch-Laskowski, Kieran; Krawczyk, Joanna; Pham, Tram; Lhamo, Rinzin; Reiner, David J; Hayes, Matthew R

    2017-05-01

    The beneficial glycemic and food intake-suppressive effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) have made this neuroendocrine system a leading target for pharmacological approaches to the treatment of diabetes and obesity. One strategy to increase the activity of endogenous GLP-1 is to prevent the rapid degradation of the hormone by the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV). However, despite the expression of both DPP-IV and GLP-1 in the brain, and the clear importance of central GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) signaling for glycemic and energy balance control, the metabolic effects of central inhibition of DPP-IV activity are unclear. To test whether hindbrain DPP-IV inhibition suppresses blood glucose, feeding, and body weight gain, the effects of 4th intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of the FDA-approved DPP-IV inhibitor sitagliptin were evaluated. Results indicate that hindbrain delivery of sitagliptin improves glycemic control in a GLP-1R-dependent manner, suggesting that this effect is due at least in part to increased endogenous brainstem GLP-1 activity after sitagliptin administration. Furthermore, 4th ICV injection of sitagliptin reduced 24h body weight gain and energy intake, with a selective suppression of high-fat diet, but not chow, intake. These data reveal a novel role for hindbrain GLP-1R activation in glycemic control and also demonstrate that DPP-IV inhibition in the caudal brainstem promotes negative energy balance.

  2. Revisiting tight glycemic control in perioperative and critically ill patients: when one size may not fit all.

    PubMed

    Abdelmalak, Basem B; Lansang, M Cecilia

    2013-09-01

    Glycemic control has received intense scrutiny in the last decade as an important aspect of patient care. Earlier studies suggested that tight glycemic control (target level of 80 - 110 mg/dL) improved outcomes in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Subsequent trials did not confirm the same benefit. Moreover, increased mortality was found in association with such tight control compared with a less strict target. As a result, tight glucose control has become less popular. The interaction between diabetic status and outcomes in relation to glucose control strategies and/or chronic glycemic state in perioperative and critically ill patients was examined. Tight glucose control appears to be more beneficial in patients without diabetes than in those with known diabetes. It also may be more beneficial in improving outcomes in surgical rather than nonsurgical ICU patients, and in decreasing sepsis rather than mortality. Tight glycemic control was associated with a high incidence of hypoglycemia, which may offset some of its potential benefits. Tight glycemic control in the perioperative and intensive care settings should not be totally abandoned either as a clinical practice or as a subject of future research. Beneficial effects of tight glycemic control may be demonstrated when the appropriate glycemic targets are matched to the appropriate population.

  3. Low Glycemic Index Carbohydrates versus All Types of Carbohydrates for Treating Diabetes in Pregnancy: A Randomized Clinical Trial to Evaluate the Effect of Glycemic Control.

    PubMed

    Perichart-Perera, Otilia; Balas-Nakash, Margie; Rodríguez-Cano, Ameyalli; Legorreta-Legorreta, Jennifer; Parra-Covarrubias, Adalberto; Vadillo-Ortega, Felipe

    2012-01-01

    Background. Due to the higher prevalence of obesity and diabetes mellitus (DM), more pregnant women complicated with diabetes are in need of clinical care. Purpose. Compare the effect of including only low glycemic index (GI) carbohydrates (CHO) against all types of CHO on maternal glycemic control and on the maternal and newborn's nutritional status of women with type 2 DM and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Methods. Women (n = 107, ≤29 weeks of gestation) were randomly assigned to one of two nutrition intervention groups: moderate energy and CHO restriction (Group 1: all types of CHO, Group 2: low GI foods). Results. No baseline differences in clinical data were observed. Capillary glucose concentrations throughout pregnancy were similar between groups. Fewer women in Group 2 exceeded weight gain recommendations. Higher risk of prematurity was observed in women in Group 2. No differences in glycemic control were observed between women with type 2 DM and those with GDM. Conclusions. Inclusion of low GI CHO as part of a comprehensive nutrition intervention is equally effective in improving glycemic control as compared to all types of CHO. This strategy had a positive effect in preventing excessive maternal weight gain but increased the risk of prematurity.

  4. Low Glycemic Index Carbohydrates versus All Types of Carbohydrates for Treating Diabetes in Pregnancy: A Randomized Clinical Trial to Evaluate the Effect of Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Perichart-Perera, Otilia; Balas-Nakash, Margie; Rodríguez-Cano, Ameyalli; Legorreta-Legorreta, Jennifer; Parra-Covarrubias, Adalberto; Vadillo-Ortega, Felipe

    2012-01-01

    Background. Due to the higher prevalence of obesity and diabetes mellitus (DM), more pregnant women complicated with diabetes are in need of clinical care. Purpose. Compare the effect of including only low glycemic index (GI) carbohydrates (CHO) against all types of CHO on maternal glycemic control and on the maternal and newborn's nutritional status of women with type 2 DM and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Methods. Women (n = 107, ≤29 weeks of gestation) were randomly assigned to one of two nutrition intervention groups: moderate energy and CHO restriction (Group 1: all types of CHO, Group 2: low GI foods). Results. No baseline differences in clinical data were observed. Capillary glucose concentrations throughout pregnancy were similar between groups. Fewer women in Group 2 exceeded weight gain recommendations. Higher risk of prematurity was observed in women in Group 2. No differences in glycemic control were observed between women with type 2 DM and those with GDM. Conclusions. Inclusion of low GI CHO as part of a comprehensive nutrition intervention is equally effective in improving glycemic control as compared to all types of CHO. This strategy had a positive effect in preventing excessive maternal weight gain but increased the risk of prematurity. PMID:23251152

  5. Impact of Glycemic Control on Heart Rate Variability in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes: The SEARCH CVD Study

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Mamta; Fingerlin, Tasha E.; Urbina, Elaine M.; Wadwa, R. Paul; Talton, Jennifer W.; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Hamman, Richard F.; Daniels, Stephen R.; Marcovina, Santica M.; Dolan, Larry M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aim: This study explored the role of glycemic control on cardiac autonomic function, measured by heart rate variability (HRV), in youth with type 1 diabetes. Patients and Methods: A retrospective cohort of 345 youth with type 1 diabetes (mean age, 18.5 years; duration, 10 years) participating in the SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study were enrolled in the ancillary SEARCH Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) study. Anthropometric, metabolic, and HRV parameters were collected at the current research visit. Glycemic control over time was assessed by the mean glycated hemoglobin (A1c) levels collected over the past 6 years. Multiple linear regression analysis assessed the association between A1c over time and HRV parameters, independent of demographic and CVD risk factors. Participants were categorized into four glycemic control categories based on their mean A1c over time: Group 1, optimal (mean A1c, ≤7.4%); Group 2 (mean A1c, 7.5–8.4%); Group 3 (mean A1c, 8.5–9.4%), and Group 4, poor (mean A1c, ≥9.5%), and a linear trend was explored across these categories. Results: For every 1% increase in the average A1c over 6 years there was a 5% decrease in the SD of the normal RR interval (SDNN) (P=0.02) and 7% decrease in the root mean square successive difference of the RR interval (RMSSD) (P=0.02), independent of demographic and traditional CVD risk factors. A dose–response relationship between worsening glucose control categories and measures of overall reduced HRV was found. Conclusions: Chronic hyperglycemia is the main determinant of early cardiac autonomic dysfunction, manifested as reduced overall HRV and parasympathetic loss, among youth with type 1 diabetes. PMID:24010960

  6. Diabetes management at the end of life: transitioning from tight glycemic control to comfort.

    PubMed

    Tice, Martha A

    2006-05-01

    Tight glycemic control has become the standard of care for prevention of the long-term side effects of diabetes mellitus. When individuals with diabetes approach the end of life from advanced cancer or another chronic illness, they often become anorexic. The result is an increased risk for hypoglycemic episodes. It is appropriate to shift the goal of therapy from tight control of blood sugar to maintaining comfort and enhancing quality of life.

  7. Community Interventions to Improve Glycemic Control in African Americans With Type 2 Diabetes: A Systemic Review

    PubMed Central

    Smalls, Brittany L.; Walker, Rebekah J.; Bonilha, Heather S.; Campbell, Jennifer A.; Egede, Leonard E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review of published community interventions to evaluate different components of community interventions and their ability to positively impact glycemic control in African Americans with T2DM. Methods: Medline, PsychInfo, and CINAHL were searched for potentially eligible studies published from January 2000 through January 2012. The following inclusion criteria were established for publications: (1) describe a community intervention, not prevention; (2) specifically indicate, in data analysis and results, the impact of the community intervention on African American adults, 18 years and older; (3) measure glycemic control (HbA1C) as an outcome measure; and (4) involve patients in a community setting, which excludes hospitals and hospital clinics. Results: Thirteen studies out of 9,233 articles identified in the search met the predetermined inclusion criteria. There were 5 randomized control trials and 3 reported improved glycemic control in the intervention group compared to the control group at the completion of the study. Of the 8 studies that were not randomized control trials, 6 showed a statistically significant change in HbA1C. Conclusion: In general, the community interventions assessed led to significant reductions in HbA1C in African Americans with type 2 diabetes. Community health workers did not have a greater impact on glycemic control in this sample. The findings of this study provides insight for designing community-based interventions in the future, such as including use of multiple delivery methods, consideration of mobile device software, nutritionist educator, and curriculum-based approaches. PMID:26156923

  8. Evaluation of a novel artificial pancreas: closed loop glycemic control system with continuous blood glucose monitoring.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Yuuki; Kinoshita, Yoshihiko; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Munekage, Masaya; Munekage, Eri; Takezaki, Yuka; Yatabe, Tomoaki; Yamashita, Koichi; Yamazaki, Rie; Okabayashi, Takehiro; Tarumi, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Masaki; Mishina, Suguru; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2013-04-01

    A closed-loop glycemic control system using an artificial pancreas has been applied with many clinical benefits in Japan since 1987. To update this system incorporating user-friendly features, we developed a novel artificial pancreas (STG-55). The purpose of this study was to evaluate STG-55 for device usability, performance of blood glucose measurement, glycemic control characteristics in vivo in animal experiments, and evaluate its clinical feasibility. There are several features for usability improvement based on the design concepts, such as compactness, display monitor, batteries, guidance function, and reduction of the preparation time. All animal study data were compared with a clinically available artificial pancreas system in Japan (control device: STG-22). We examined correlations of both blood glucose levels between two groups (STG-55 vs. control) using Clarke's error grid analysis, and also compared mean glucose infusion rate (GIR) during glucose clamp. The results showed strong correlation in blood glucose concentrations (Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient: 0.97; n = 1636). Clarke's error grid analysis showed that 98.4% of the data fell in Zones A and B, which represent clinically accurate or benign errors, respectively. The difference in mean GIRs was less than 0.2 mg/kg/min, which was considered not significant. Clinical feasibility study demonstrated sufficient glycemic control maintaining target glucose range between 80 and 110 (mg/dL), and between 140 and 160 without any hypoglycemia. In conclusion, STG-55 was a clinically acceptable artificial pancreas with improved interface and usability. A closed-loop glycemic control system with STG-55 would be a useful tool for surgical and critical patients in intensive care units, as well as diabetic patients.

  9. [Dapagliflozin: Beyond glycemic control in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Sanz-Serra, Pol; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Flores-Le Roux, Juana A; Benaiges, David; Chillarón, Juan J

    2015-01-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have a high or very high cardiovascular risk. The clinical practice guidelines focus on the need to achieve optimal glycemic control, and strategies for a multifactorial therapeutic approach have shown significant cardiovascular benefits in these patients. Inhibitors of sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT-2) are a new class of orally administered drugs in the treatment of T2DM, which act by inhibiting reabsorption of glucose in the renal proximal tubule with consequent glycosuric effect and lowering of blood glucose. Dapagliflozin, SGLT-2 inhibitor marketed in Europe and Australia, has been shown to achieve glycosylated hemoglobin reductions similar to other oral agents, as well as beneficial effects on major comorbidities associated with T2DM. Therefore, it is considered of interest to review the clinical efficacy of this new oral hypoglycemic on glycemic control, risk of hypoglycemia, and its impact on body weight, blood pressure, lipid profile and renal function.

  10. Impact of Long-Term Poor and Good Glycemic Control on Metabolomics Alterations in Type 1 Diabetic People

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Tumpa; Kudva, Yogish C.; Persson, Xuan-Mai T.; Schenck, Louis A.; Ford, G. Charles; Singh, Ravinder J.; Carter, Rickey

    2016-01-01

    Context: Poor glycemic control in individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D) is associated with both micro- and macrovascular complications, but good glycemic control does not fully prevent the risk of these complications. Objective: The objective of the study was to determine whether T1D with good glycemic control have persistent abnormalities of metabolites and pathways that exist in T1D with poor glycemic control. Design: We compared plasma metabolites in T1D with poor (glycated hemoglobin ≥ 8.5%, T1D[−] and good (glycated hemoglobin < 6.5%, T1D[+]) glycemic control with nondiabetic controls (ND). Setting: The study was conducted at the clinical research unit. Patients or Other Participants: T1D with poor (n = 14), T1D(−) and good, T1D(+) (n = 15) glycemic control and matched (for age, sex, and body mass index) ND participants were included in the study. Intervention(s): There were no intervention. Main Outcome Measure(s): Comparison of qualitative and quantitative profiling of metabolome was performed. Results: In T1D(−), 347 known metabolites belonging to 38 metabolic pathways involved in cholesterol, vitamin D, tRNA, amino acids (AAs), bile acids, urea, tricarboxylic acid cycle, immune response, and eicosanoids were different from ND. In T1D(+),154 known metabolites belonging to 26 pathways including glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, bile acids, tRNA biosynthesis, AAs, branch-chain AAs, retinol, and vitamin D metabolism remained altered from ND. Targeted measurements of AA metabolites, trichloroacetic acid, and free fatty acids showed directional changes similar to the untargeted metabolomics approach. Conclusions: Comprehensive metabolomic profiling identified extensive metabolomic abnormalities in T1D with poor glycemic control. Chronic good glycemic control failed to normalize many of these perturbations, suggesting a potential role for these persistent abnormalities in many complications in T1D. PMID:26796761

  11. The association between glycemic control and microalbuminuria in Type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Showail, Anwar Ali; Ghoraba, Medhat

    2016-05-01

    Microalbuminuria is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular and renal out- come in a patient with Type 2 diabetes. The evidence that intensive glycemic control reduces the microvascular complications of diabetes is based almost exclusively on prevention of micro- albuminuria. To evaluate the association between microalbuminuria and glycemic control and other factors in Type 2 diabetes, we studied retrospectively 551 patients with Type 2 diabetes. The patients were divided into two groups: 175 patients with microalbuminuria in the case group and 376 with normal urine albumin-creatinine ratio in the control group. Our data indicated that there was a significant association between the uncontrolled glycemia and development of microalbuminuria and that was more obvious if HbA1c level was >11%. Our data also indicate that there was a statistical significant association between male gender, age, the systolic and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) levels, and the microalbuminuria in crude odds ratios (ORs). We conclude that there was a clear association between the glycemic control and microalbuminuria, and microalbuminuria was associated with older age, male gender, and systolic and DBP in crude ORs.

  12. Association between Responsible Pet Ownership and Glycemic Control in Youths with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) a chronic characterized by an absolute insulin deficiency requires conscientious patient self-management to maintain glucose control within a normal range. Family cohesion and adaptability, positive coping strategies, social support and adequate self-regulatory behavior are found to favorably influence glycemic control. Our hypothesis was that the responsible care of a companion animal is associated with these positive attributes and correlated with the successful management of a chronic illness such as type 1 diabetes. We recruited 223 youths between 9 and 19 years of age from the Pediatric Diabetes clinic at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, reviewed the status of their glycemic control (using three consecutive A1c values) and asked them questions about the presence of a pet at home, and their level of involvement with its care. Multivariate analyses show that children who care actively for one or more pets at home are 2.5 times more likely to have control over their glycemic levels than children who do not care for a pet, adjusting for duration of disease, socio-economic status, age and self-management [1.1 to 5.8], pWald = 0.032. A separate model involving the care of a petdog only yielded comparable results (ORa = 2.6 [1.1 to 5.9], pWald = 0.023). PMID:27104736

  13. Association between Responsible Pet Ownership and Glycemic Control in Youths with Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Maranda, Louise; Gupta, Olga T

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) a chronic characterized by an absolute insulin deficiency requires conscientious patient self-management to maintain glucose control within a normal range. Family cohesion and adaptability, positive coping strategies, social support and adequate self-regulatory behavior are found to favorably influence glycemic control. Our hypothesis was that the responsible care of a companion animal is associated with these positive attributes and correlated with the successful management of a chronic illness such as type 1 diabetes. We recruited 223 youths between 9 and 19 years of age from the Pediatric Diabetes clinic at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, reviewed the status of their glycemic control (using three consecutive A1c values) and asked them questions about the presence of a pet at home, and their level of involvement with its care. Multivariate analyses show that children who care actively for one or more pets at home are 2.5 times more likely to have control over their glycemic levels than children who do not care for a pet, adjusting for duration of disease, socio-economic status, age and self-management [1.1 to 5.8], pWald = 0.032. A separate model involving the care of a petdog only yielded comparable results (ORa = 2.6 [1.1 to 5.9], pWald = 0.023).

  14. Overcoming barriers to glycemic control in African Americans with type-2 diabetes: benefits of insulin therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Merville C.

    2007-01-01

    A disproportionate number of African-American men and women are affected by obesity and diabetes. The documented rate of poor glycemic control in the African-American population may contribute to the high rate of morbidity and mortality due to diabetes observed in these patients. Since the benefits of strict glycemic control have been demonstrated in multiple large trials, the aim of treatment should be to achieve the goals set forth by the American Diabetes Association. Insulin remains an essential therapeutic agent for helping patients achieve glycemic control and preventing long-term comorbidities. However, barriers to insulin therapy exist for both the physician and patient. Strategies to counter this resistance include identifying barriers to treatment, restoring the patient's sense of control, utilizing simple regimens, and reviewing the benefits of insulin and the risk of hypoglycemia. In treating African-American patients with diabetes, providers of various racial and ethnic backgrounds may maximize treatment efficacy by attempting to understand and practice culturally competent care. PMID:17722663

  15. Improved glycemic control in mice lacking Sglt1 and Sglt2.

    PubMed

    Powell, David R; DaCosta, Christopher M; Gay, Jason; Ding, Zhi-Ming; Smith, Melinda; Greer, Jennifer; Doree, Deon; Jeter-Jones, Sabrina; Mseeh, Faika; Rodriguez, Lawrence A; Harris, Angela; Buhring, Lindsey; Platt, Kenneth A; Vogel, Peter; Brommage, Robert; Shadoan, Melanie K; Sands, Arthur T; Zambrowicz, Brian

    2013-01-15

    Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) is the major, and SGLT1 the minor, transporter responsible for renal glucose reabsorption. Increasing urinary glucose excretion (UGE) by selectively inhibiting SGLT2 improves glycemic control in diabetic patients. We generated Sglt1 and Sglt2 knockout (KO) mice, Sglt1/Sglt2 double-KO (DKO) mice, and wild-type (WT) littermates to study their relative glycemic control and to determine contributions of SGLT1 and SGLT2 to UGE. Relative to WTs, Sglt2 KOs had improved oral glucose tolerance and were resistant to streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Sglt1 KOs fed glucose-free high-fat diet (G-free HFD) had improved oral glucose tolerance accompanied by delayed intestinal glucose absorption and increased circulating glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), but had normal intraperitoneal glucose tolerance. On G-free HFD, Sglt2 KOs had 30%, Sglt1 KOs 2%, and WTs <1% of the UGE of DKOs. Consistent with their increased UGE, DKOs had lower fasting blood glucose and improved intraperitoneal glucose tolerance than Sglt2 KOs. In conclusion, 1) Sglt2 is the major renal glucose transporter, but Sglt1 reabsorbs 70% of filtered glucose if Sglt2 is absent; 2) mice lacking Sglt2 display improved glucose tolerance despite UGE that is 30% of maximum; 3) Sglt1 KO mice respond to oral glucose with increased circulating GLP-1; and 4) DKO mice have improved glycemic control over mice lacking Sglt2 alone. These data suggest that, in patients with type 2 diabetes, combining pharmacological SGLT2 inhibition with complete renal and/or partial intestinal SGLT1 inhibition may improve glycemic control over that achieved by SGLT2 inhibition alone.

  16. Sputum glucose and glycemic control in cystic fibrosis-related diabetes: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Van Sambeek, Lindsey; Cowley, Elise S; Newman, Dianne K; Kato, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes affects up to half of cystic fibrosis patients and is associated with increased mortality and more frequent pulmonary exacerbations. However, it is unclear to what degree good glycemic control might mitigate these risks and clinical outcomes have not previously been studied in relation to glucose from the lower airways, the site of infection and CF disease progression. We initially hypothesized that diabetic cystic fibrosis patients with glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) > 6.5% have worse pulmonary function, longer and more frequent exacerbations and also higher sputum glucose levels than patients with HbA(1c) ≤ 6.5% or cystic fibrosis patients without diabetes. To test this, we analyzed spontaneously expectorated sputum samples from 88 cystic fibrosis patients. The median sputum glucose concentration was 0.70 mM (mean, 4.75 mM; range, 0-64.6 mM). Sputum glucose was not correlated with age, sex, body mass index, diabetes diagnosis, glycemic control, exacerbation frequency or length, or pulmonary function. Surprisingly, sputum glucose was highest in subjects with normal glucose tolerance, suggesting the dynamics of glycemic control, sputum glucose and pulmonary infections are more complex than previously thought. Two-year mean HbA(1c) was positively correlated with the length of exacerbation admission (p < 0.01), and negatively correlated with measures of pulmonary function (p < 0.01). While total number of hospitalizations for exacerbations were not significantly different, subjects with an HbA(1c) > 6.5% were hospitalized on average 6 days longer than those with HbA(1c) ≤ 6.5% (p < 0.01). Current clinical care guidelines for cystic fibrosis-related diabetes target HbA(1c) ≤ 7% to limit long-term microvascular damage, but more stringent glycemic control (HbA(1c) ≤ 6.5%) may further reduce the short-term pulmonary complications.

  17. IMPROVING GLYCEMIC CONTROL SAFELY IN CRITICAL CARE PATIENTS A COLLABORATIVE SYSTEMS APPROACH IN NINE HOSPITALS.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Gregory A; Holdych, Janet; Kendall, Heather; Harrison, Karen; Montgomery, Patricia A; Kulasa, Kristen

    2017-02-22

    Objective Safely improve glycemic control in the critical care units of nine hospitals. Methods Critical care adult inpatients from nine hospitals with ≥ 4 point-of-care (POC) blood glucose (BG) readings over ≥ 2 days were targeted by collaborative improvement efforts to reduce hyper- and hypo-glycemia. Balanced glucometric goals for each hospital were set targeting improvement from baseline, or goals deemed desirable from Society of Hospital Medicine (SHM) benchmarking data. Collaborative interventions included standardized insulin infusion protocols, hypoglycemia prevention bundles, audit and feedback, education, and measure-vention (coupling measurement of patients "off protocol" with concurrent interventions to correct suboptimal care). Results All sites improved glycemic control. Six reached pre-specified levels of improvement of the day-weighted mean (DWM) BG. The DWM BG for the cohort decreased by 7.7 mg/dL [95% CI 7.0 - 8.4] to 151.3 mg/dL. Six of nine sites showed improvement in the percent ICU days with severe hyperglycemia (any BG > 299 mg/dL). ICU severe hyperglycemic days declined from 8.6% to 7.2% for the cohort [RR 0.84, 95% CI 0.80 - 0.88]. Patient days with any BG < 70 mg / dL were reduced by 0.4% [95% CI 0.06 - 0.6%] from 4.5% to 4.1% for a small but statistically significant reduction in hypoglycemia. Seven of nine sites showed improvement. Conclusion Multi-hospital improvements in ICU glycemic control, severe hyperglycemia, and hypoglycemia are feasible. Balanced goals for glycemic control and hypoglycemia in the ICU using SHM benchmarks and metrics enhanced successful improvement efforts with good staff acceptance and sustainability.

  18. α-2-Macroglobulin in Saliva Is Associated with Glycemic Control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Aitken, Juan Pablo; Ortiz, Carolina; Morales-Bozo, Irene; Rojas-Alcayaga, Gonzalo; Baeza, Mauricio; Beltran, Caroll

    2015-01-01

    Background. Subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) require an adequate glycemic control to avoid diabetic complications. Currently, saliva biomarkers are used as a diagnostic tool and can be indicative of the degree of progression and control of various diseases. Several studies indicate that α-2-macroglobulin levels are elevated in diabetic patients. Methods. 120 subjects with DM2 were enrolled and classified into two groups according to their glycemic control (percentage of glycated hemoglobin-A1c (HbA1c), <7% adequate glycemic control group; >7% inadequate glycemic control group). The relationship between α-2-macroglobulin levels from saliva samples and HbA1c was subsequently evaluated. Results. We found a positive correlation between α-2-macroglobulin and HbA1c (r = 0.778 and P < 0.0001). Area under the receivers operating characteristic (ROC) curve of α-2-macroglobulin indicated a positive discrimination threshold of α-2-macroglobulin (AUC = 0.903, CI 95%: 0.847–0.959, P < 0.0001) to diagnose glycemic control. Conclusions. Our data strongly suggest that the level of saliva α-2-macroglobulin is an indicator for the degree of glycemic control in diabetic patients and represents a promising alternative method to evaluate this parameter. PMID:25821337

  19. Socioeconomic status and glycemic control in adult patients with type 2 diabetes: a mediation analysis

    PubMed Central

    Houle, Janie; Lauzier-Jobin, François; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Meunier, Sophie; Coulombe, Simon; Côté, José; Lespérance, François; Chiasson, Jean-Louis; Bherer, Louis; Lambert, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to examine the contribution of health behaviors (self-management and coping), quality of care, and individual characteristics (depressive symptoms, self-efficacy, illness representations) as mediators in the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and glycemic control. Methods A sample of 295 adult patients with type 2 diabetes was recruited at the end of a diabetes education course. Glycemic control was evaluated through glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Living in poverty and education level were used as indicators of SES. Results Bootstrapping analysis showed that the significant effects of poverty and education level on HbA1c were mediated by avoidance coping and depressive symptoms. The representation that diabetes is unpredictable significantly mediated the relationship between living in poverty and HbA1c, while healthy diet mediated the relationship between education level and HbA1c. Conclusions To improve glycemic control among patients with low SES, professionals should regularly screen for depression, offering treatment when needed, and pay attention to patients' illness representations and coping strategies for handling stress related to their chronic disease. They should also support patients in improving their self-management skills for a healthy diet. PMID:27239316

  20. Comparison between a novel and conventional artificial pancreas for perioperative glycemic control using a closed-loop system.

    PubMed

    Namikawa, Tsutomu; Munekage, Masaya; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Yatabe, Tomoaki; Maeda, Hiromichi; Tsukamoto, Yuuki; Hirano, Kenichi; Asano, Takuji; Kinoshita, Yoshihiko; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2017-03-01

    This clinical study aimed to compare a novel and conventional artificial pancreas (AP) used in surgical patients for perioperative glycemic control, with respect to usability, blood glucose measurements, and glycemic control characteristics. From July in 2010 to March in 2015, 177 patients underwent perioperative glycemic control using a novel AP. Among them, 166 patients were eligible for inclusion in this study. Intensive insulin therapy (IIT) targeting a blood glucose range of 80-110 mg/dL was implemented in 82 patients (49 %), and the remaining 84 patients (51 %) received a less-intensive regime of insulin therapy. Data were collected prospectively and were reviewed or analyzed retrospectively. A comparison study of 324 patients undergoing IIT for glycemic control using a novel (n = 82) or conventional AP (n = 242) was conducted retrospectively. All patients had no hypoglycemia. The comparison study revealed no significant differences in perioperative mean blood glucose level, achievement rates for target blood glucose range, and variability in blood glucose level achieved with IIT between the novel AP and conventional AP groups. The usability, performance with respect to blood glucose measurement, and glycemic control characteristics of IIT were comparable between novel and conventional AP systems. However, the novel AP was easier to manipulate than the conventional AP due to its smaller size, lower weight, and shorter time for preparation. In the near future, this novel AP system might be accepted worldwide as a safe and useful device for use in perioperative glycemic control.

  1. Diabetic nephropathy: new approaches for improving glycemic control and reducing risk.

    PubMed

    Schernthaner, Guntram; Schernthaner, Gerit Holger

    2013-01-01

    Nephropathy is a common consequence of diabetes, with a high prevalence in patients with type 1 (15%-25%) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM; 30%-40%). Nephropathy is associated with a poor prognosis and high economic burden. The risk of developing nephropathy increases with the duration of diabetes, and early diagnosis and treatment of risk factors for nephropathy (e.g., tight control of glycemia and hypertension) can reduce the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of renal complications associated with diabetes and the etiology of nephropathy have identified additional risk factors for nephropathy, and novel therapeutic options are being explored. This review discusses the pathophysiology of diabetic nephropathy and common risk factors. Furthermore, we discuss emerging treatments for T2DM that could potentially slow or prevent the progression of diabetic nephropathy. The use of incretin-based therapies, such as the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogs, is growing in patients with T2DM, due to their efficacy and tolerability profiles. As renal safety is a key factor when choosing treatment options to manage patients with T2DM, drugs that are suitable for use in patients with varying degrees of renal impairment without a requirement for dose adjustment, such as the DPP-4 inhibitor linagliptin, are of particular use. The ongoing advances in T2DM therapy may allow optimization of glycemic control in a wide range of patients, thereby helping to reduce the increasing morbidity and mortality associated with diabetic nephropathy.

  2. Acute effects of dietary glycemic index on antioxidant capacity in a nutrient-controlled feeding study.

    PubMed

    Botero, Diego; Ebbeling, Cara B; Blumberg, Jeffrey B; Ribaya-Mercado, Judy D; Creager, Mark A; Swain, Janis F; Feldman, Henry A; Ludwig, David S

    2009-09-01

    Oxidative stress, caused by an imbalance between antioxidant capacity and reactive oxygen species, may be an early event in a metabolic cascade elicited by a high glycemic index (GI) diet, ultimately increasing the risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. We conducted a feeding study to evaluate the acute effects of low-GI compared with high-GI diets on oxidative stress and cardiovascular disease risk factors. The crossover study comprised two 10-day in-patient admissions to a clinical research center. For the admissions, 12 overweight or obese (BMI: 27-45 kg/m(2)) male subjects aged 18-35 years consumed low-GI or high-GI diets controlled for potentially confounding nutrients. On day 7, after an overnight fast and then during a 5-h postprandial period, we assessed total antioxidant capacity (total and perchloric acid (PCA) protein-precipitated plasma oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay) and oxidative stress status (urinary F(2alpha)-isoprostanes (F(2)IP)). On day 10, we measured cardiovascular disease risk factors. Under fasting conditions, total antioxidant capacity was significantly higher during the low-GI vs. high-GI diet based on total ORAC (11,736 +/- 668 vs. 10,381 +/- 612 micromol Trolox equivalents/l, P = 0.002) and PCA-ORAC (1,276 +/- 96 vs. 1,210 +/- 96 micromol Trolox equivalents/l, P = 0.02). Area under the postprandial response curve also differed significantly between the two diets for total ORAC and PCA-ORAC. No diet effects were observed for the other variables. Enhancement in plasma total antioxidant capacity occurs within 1 week on a low-GI diet, before changes in other risk factors, raising the possibility that this phenomenon may mediate, at least in part, the previously reported effects of GI on health.

  3. The role of parent-adolescent attachment in the glycemic control of adolescents with Type 1 diabetes: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Tziporah; Shields, Cleveland G

    2009-09-01

    This pilot study explored the associations between parent and adolescent reports of adolescent attachment and glycemic control in adolescents with Type 1 diabetes. We hypothesized that more secure attachment would correlate with more optimal diabetes control. Thirty-one families completed written self-report questionnaires about adolescent attachment, demographic data, and diabetes control. Adolescents and parents reported on their perceptions of adolescents' attachment to mothers and fathers. Mean HbA1c for the sample was 7.6% (SD = 1.14). Mothers' perceptions of adolescents' attachment were significantly correlated with adolescents' hemoglobin A1c (r = -.42, p = .022), indicating that maternal perceptions of more secure attachment was associated with better glycemic control. Neither fathers' perceptions nor adolescents' reports of attachment was significantly correlated with glycemic control. Attachment appears to be associated with glycemic control in this population though the mechanisms are unclear. Mothers' perceptions of attachment had the strongest associations with control, not adolescent reports. Further research is needed to understand the mechanisms through which parent reports of adolescent attachment are associated with glycemic control.

  4. Outpatient Glycemic Control with a Bionic Pancreas in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Manasi; Magyar, Kendra L.; McKeon, Katherine; Goergen, Laura G.; Balliro, Courtney; Hillard, Mallory A.; Nathan, David M.; Damiano, Edward R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The safety and effectiveness of automated glycemic management have not been tested in multiday studies under unrestricted outpatient conditions. METHODS In two random-order, crossover studies with similar but distinct designs, we compared glycemic control with a wearable, bihormonal, automated, “bionic” pancreas (bionic-pancreas period) with glycemic control with an insulin pump (control period) for 5 days in 20 adults and 32 adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus. The automatically adaptive algorithm of the bionic pancreas received data from a continuous glucose monitor to control subcutaneous delivery of insulin and glucagon. RESULTS Among the adults, the mean plasma glucose level over the 5-day bionic-pancreas period was 138 mg per deciliter (7.7 mmol per liter), and the mean percentage of time with a low glucose level (<70 mg per deciliter [3.9 mmol per liter]) was 4.8%. After 1 day of automatic adaptation by the bionic pancreas, the mean (±SD) glucose level on continuous monitoring was lower than the mean level during the control period (133±13 vs. 159±30 mg per deciliter [7.4±0.7 vs. 8.8±1.7 mmol per liter], P<0.001) and the percentage of time with a low glucose reading was lower (4.1% vs. 7.3%, P = 0.01). Among the adolescents, the mean plasma glucose level was also lower during the bionic-pancreas period than during the control period (138±18 vs. 157±27 mg per deciliter [7.7±1.0 vs. 8.7±1.5 mmol per liter], P = 0.004), but the percentage of time with a low plasma glucose reading was similar during the two periods (6.1% and 7.6%, respectively; P = 0.23). The mean frequency of interventions for hypoglycemia among the adolescents was lower during the bionic-pancreas period than during the control period (one per 1.6 days vs. one per 0.8 days, P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS As compared with an insulin pump, a wearable, automated, bihormonal, bionic pancreas improved mean glycemic levels, with less frequent hypoglycemic episodes, among both

  5. Effect of proton pump inhibitors on glycemic control in patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Takebayashi, Kohzo; Inukai, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Gastrin is a linear peptide hormone which is secreted mostly in the stomach pyloric antrum G cells. Although the main role of this hormone is the promotion of the secretion of gastric acid from the stomach parietal cells, gastrin can also behave as a growth factor and stimulate gastric cell proliferation. It is also reported that gastrin promotes β cell neogenesis in the pancreatic ductal complex, modest pancreatic β cell replication, and improvement of glucose tolerance in animal models, in which the remodeling of pancreatic tissues is promoted. These findings suggest the possibility that gastrin has the potential to promote an increase of β cell mass in pancreas, and therefore that gastrin may improve glucose tolerance. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are wildly used clinically for the therapy of gastro-esophageal reflex disease, gastritis due to excess stomach acid, and gastric ulcers. PPIs indirectly elevate serum gastrin levels via a negative feedback effect. Recent evidence has revealed the beneficial effect of PPIs on glycemic control especially in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), probably via the elevation of the levels of serum gastrin, although the detailed mechanism remains unclear. In addition, the beneficial effects of a combination therapy of gastrin or a PPI with a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist on glycemic control in animal models have been demonstrated. Although PPIs may be possible candidates for a new approach in the therapy of diabetes, a prospective, long-term, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study is needed to establish the effect of PPIs on glycemic control in a large number of patients with T2DM. PMID:26322158

  6. Oral salmon calcitonin improves fasting and postprandial glycemic control in lean healthy rats.

    PubMed

    Feigh, M; Nielsen, R H; Hansen, C; Henriksen, K; Christiansen, C; Karsdal, M A

    2012-02-01

    A novel oral form of salmon calcitonin (sCT) was recently demonstrated to improve both fasting and postprandial glycemic control and induce weight loss in diet-induced obese and insulin-resistant rats. To further explore the glucoregulatory efficacy of oral sCT, irrespective of obesity and metabolic dysfunction, the present study investigated the effect of chronic oral sCT treatment on fasting and postprandial glycemic control in male lean healthy rats. 20 male rats were divided equally into a control group receiving oral vehicle or an oral sCT (2 mg/kg) group. All rats were treated twice daily for 5 weeks. Body weight and food intake were monitored during the study period and fasting blood glucose, plasma insulin and insulin sensitivity were determined and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) performed at study end. Compared with the vehicle group, rats receiving oral sCT had improved fasting glucose homeostasis and insulin resistance, as measured by homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), with no change in body weight or fasting plasma insulin. In addition, the rats receiving oral sCT had markedly reduced glycemia and insulinemia during OGTT. This is the first report showing that chronic oral sCT treatment exerts a glucoregulatory action in lean healthy rats, irrespective of influencing body weight. Importantly, oral sCT seems to exert a dual treatment effect by improving fasting and postprandial glycemic control and insulin sensitivity. This and previous studies suggest oral sCT is a promising agent for the treatment of obesity-related insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.

  7. Glycemic control and pregnancy outcomes in patients with diabetes in pregnancy: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Buhary, Badurudeen Mahmood; Almohareb, Ohoud; Aljohani, Naji; Alzahrani, Saad H.; Elkaissi, Samer; Sherbeeni, Suphia; Almaghamsi, Abdulrahman; Almalki, Mussa

    2016-01-01

    Context: Diabetes in pregnancy (DIP) is either pregestational or gestational. Aims: To determine the relationship between glycemic control and pregnancy outcomes in a cohort of DIP patients. Settings and Design: In this 12-month retrospective study, a total of 325 Saudi women with DIP who attended the outpatient clinics at a tertiary center Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, were included. Subjects and Methods: The patients were divided into two groups, those with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) ≤6.5% (48 mmol/mol) and those with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) above 6.5%. The two groups were compared for differences in maternal and fetal outcomes. Statistical Analysis Used: Independent Student's t-test and analysis of variance were performed for comparison of continuous variables and Chi-square test for frequencies. Odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using logistic regression. Results: Patients with higher HbA1c were older (P = 0.0077), had significantly higher blood pressure, proteinuria (P < 0.0001), and were multiparous (P = 0.0269). They had significantly shorter gestational periods (P = 0.0002), more preterm labor (P < 0.0001), more perineal tears (P = 0.0406), more miscarriages (P < 0.0001), and more operative deliveries (P < 0.0001). Their babies were significantly of greater weight, had more Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) admissions, hypoglycemia, and macrosomia. Conclusions: Poor glycemic control during pregnancy is associated with adverse maternal and fetal outcomes (shortened gestational period, greater risk of miscarriage, increased likelihood of operative delivery, hypoglycemia, macrosomia, and increased NICU admission). Especially at risk are those with preexisting diabetes, who would benefit from earlier diabetes consultation and tighter glycemic control before conception. PMID:27366714

  8. Body mass index and glycemic control influences lipoproteins in children with type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Vaid, Shalini; Hanks, Lynae; Griffin, Russell; Ashraf, Ambika P.

    2017-01-01

    Background Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) have an extremely high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality. It is well-known that dyslipidemia is a subclinical manifestation of atherosclerosis. Objective To analyze presence and predicting factors of lipoprotein abnormalities prevalent in children with T1DM and whether race specific differences exists between non-Hispanic White (NHW) and non-Hispanic Black (NHB) in the lipoprotein characteristics. Methods A retrospective electronic chart review including 600 (123 NHB and 477 NHW ) T1DM patients, ages 7.85 ± 3.75 years who underwent lipoprotein analysis. Results Relative to NHW counterparts, NHB T1DM subjects had a higher HbA1c, total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), apoB 100, lipoprotein (a), and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL), HDL-2 and -3. Body mass index (BMI) was positively associated with TC, LDL, apoB 100, and non-HDL and inversely associated with HDL, HDL-2, and HDL-3. HbA1c was positively associated with TC, LDL, apoB100, non-HDL, and HDL-3. Multilinear regression analysis demonstrated that HbA1c was positively associated with apoB 100 in both NHB and NHW, and BMI was a positive determinant of apoB 100 in NHW only. Conclusion Poor glycemic control and high BMI may contribute to abnormal lipoprotein profiles. Glycemic control (in NHB and NHW) and weight management (in NHW) may have significant implications in T1DM. ApoB100 concentrations in subjects with T1DM were determined by modifiable risk factors, BMI, HbA1C, and blood pressure, indicating the importance of adequate weight-, glycemic-, and blood pressure control for better diabetes care, and likely lower CVD risk. PMID:27678442

  9. Factors associated with glycemic control in adult type 1 diabetes patients treated with insulin pump therapy.

    PubMed

    Matejko, Bartłomiej; Skupien, Jan; Mrozińska, Sandra; Grzanka, Małgorzata; Cyganek, Katarzyna; Kiec-Wilk, Beata; Malecki, Maciej T; Klupa, Tomasz

    2015-02-01

    Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) by insulin pump seems to improve glycemia and quality of life as compared to conventional insulin therapy in type 1 diabetes (T1DM). However, while many T1DM subjects achieve excellent glycemic control, some others cannot reach recommended goals. In a retrospective analysis, we searched for factors associated with glycemic control in T1DM patients treated with insulin pump therapy. Data from 192 patients (133 women and 59 men) treated with personal insulin pumps at the Department of Metabolic Diseases, University Hospital, Krakow, Poland were analyzed. Sources of information included medical records, memory read-outs from insulin pumps and data from glucose meters. Univariate, multivariate linear and logistic regression analysis for the association with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level were performed. The mean age of the subjects was 28.9 (±11.2) years, the mean duration of T1DM-14.6 (±7.6) years, mean body mass index-23.5 (±3.1) kg/m2. The mean HbA1c level in the entire study group was 7.4% (57 mmol/mol). In the multivariate linear regression analysis, HbA1c correlated with the mean number of daily blood glucose measurements, number of hypoglycemic episodes per 100 blood glucose measurements, age at the examination, and continuous glucose monitoring system use. Multivariate logistic regression analysis for reaching the therapeutic target of HbA1c<7.0% (53 mmol/mol) showed that the independent predictors of achieving this goal included the same four variables. In a large clinical observation, we identified that patient-related and technological factors associated with glycemic control in adult pump-treated T1DM subjects.

  10. Effect of Selenium Supplementation on Glycemic Control and Lipid Profiles in Patients with Diabetic Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Bahmani, Fereshteh; Kia, Mahsa; Soleimani, Alireza; Asemi, Zatollah; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad

    2016-08-01

    To our knowledge, data on the effects of selenium supplementation on glycemic control and lipid concentrations in patients with diabetic nephropathy (DN) are scarce. The current study was done to determine the effects of selenium supplementation on glycemic control and lipid concentrations in patients with DN. This was a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial in which 60 patients with DN were randomly allocated into two groups to receive either 200 μg of selenium supplements (n = 30) or placebo (n = 30) daily for 12 weeks. Blood sampling was performed for the quantification of glycemic indicators and lipid profiles at the onset of the study and after 12 weeks of intervention. Selenium supplementation for 12 weeks resulted in a significant decrease in serum insulin levels (P = 0.01), homeostasis model of assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (P = 0.02), homeostasis model of assessment-estimated B cell function (HOMA-B) (P = 0.009) and a significant rise in plasma glutathione peroxidase (GPx) (P = 0.001) compared with the placebo. Taking selenium supplements had no significant effects on fasting plasma glucose (FPG), quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) and lipid profiles compared with the placebo. Overall, our study demonstrated that selenium supplementation for 12 weeks among patients with DN had beneficial effects on plasma GPx, serum insulin levels, HOMA-IR, and HOMA-B, while it did not affect FPG, QUICKI, and lipid profiles.

  11. Chromium supplements for glycemic control in type 2 diabetes: limited evidence of effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Costello, Rebecca B; Dwyer, Johanna T; Bailey, Regan L

    2016-07-01

    Some adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) believe that chromium-containing supplements will help control their disease, but the evidence is mixed. This narrative review examines the efficacy of chromium supplements for improving glycemic control as measured by decreases in fasting plasma glucose (FPG) or hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). Using systematic search criteria, 20 randomized controlled trials of chromium supplementation in T2DM patients were identified. Clinically meaningful treatment goals were defined as an FPG of ≤7.2 mmol/dL, a decline in HbA1c to ≤7%, or a decrease of ≥0.5% in HbA1c. In only a few randomized controlled trials did FPG (5 of 20), HbA1c (3 of 14), or both (1 of 14) reach the treatment goals with chromium supplementation. HbA1c declined by ≥0.5% in 5 of 14 studies. On the basis of the low strength of existing evidence, chromium supplements have limited effectiveness, and there is little rationale to recommend their use for glycemic control in patients with existing T2DM. Future meta-analyses should include only high-quality studies with similar forms of chromium and comparable inclusion/exclusion criteria to provide scientifically sound recommendations for clinicians.

  12. Barriers to achieving optimal glycemic control in a multi-ethnic society: a US focus.

    PubMed

    Dagogo-Jack, Samuel; Funnell, Martha M; Davidson, Jaime

    2006-08-01

    The increasing prevalence of diabetes is particularly apparent in certain ethnic groups, such as African and Hispanic Americans. These groups generally also have poorer glycemic control and outcomes. To better understand the issues surrounding these problems and possible methods to overcome them we performed a literature review from the past 15 years on barriers to glycemic control with a focus on US data. The literature reveals that barriers may be inherent (eg, genetic, cultural, and language/communication) or acquired (eg, those associated with changes in lifestyle and socioeconomic factors). Healthcare interventions that take into consideration cultural and population-specific characteristics can reduce the prevalence and severity of diabetes and its resulting complications. Implementing such strategies will require suitable education for patients and providers, the availability of culturally-sensitive, patient-centered healthcare teams, the creation of collaborative relationships between providers and patients, better use of community resources, and assistance for patients to make informed decisions about available treatment options. There is also evidence suggesting that at the same level of glucose control Hispanics and African Americans have the same degree of complications as whites; therefore, good control is essential for the future well-being of all patients. Addressing these issues may help to decrease the ethnic disparities that currently exist in diabetes care.

  13. Differentiating Approaches to Diabetes Self-Management of Multi-ethnic Rural Older Adults at the Extremes of Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Brewer-Lowry, Aleshia Nichol; Arcury, Thomas A.; Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: This study identified approaches to diabetes self-management that differentiate persons with well-controlled from poorly controlled diabetes. Previous research has focused largely on persons participating in self-management interventions. Design and Methods: In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 48 adults, drawn from a population-based sample aged 65 years or older with diabetes. The sample was stratified by sex and ethnic group (African American, American Indian, and White) from the low (A1C <6%) and high (A1C >8%) extremes of the glycemic control distribution. Case-based text analysis was guided by a model, including six self-management domains and four resource types (self-care, informal support, formal services, and medical care). Results: A “structured” approach to self-management differentiated respondents in good glycemic control from those in poor glycemic control. Those in good glycemic control were more likely to practice specific food behaviors to limit food consumption and practice regular blood glucose monitoring with specific target values. This approach was facilitated by a greater use of home aides to assist with diabetes care. Respondents in poor glycemic control demonstrated less structure, naming general food categories and checking blood glucose in reaction to symptoms. Implications: Results provide evidence that degree of structure differentiates self-management approaches of persons with good and poor glycemic control. Findings should provide a foundation for further research to develop effective self-management programs for older adults with diabetes. PMID:20110333

  14. Low prevalence of glucokinase gene mutations in gestational diabetic patients with good glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Frigeri, H R; Santos, I C R; Réa, R R; Almeida, A C R; Fadel-Picheth, C M T; Pedrosa, F O; Souza, E M; Rego, F G M; Picheth, G

    2012-05-18

    Glucokinase (GCK) plays a key role in glucose homeostasis. Gestational diabetes mellitus increases the risk of gestational complications in pregnant women and fetuses. We screened for mutations in coding and flanking regions of the GCK gene in pregnant women with or without gestational diabetes in a Brazilian population. A sample of 200 pregnant women classified as healthy (control, N = 100) or with gestational diabetes (N = 100) was analyzed for mutations in the GCK gene. All gestational diabetes mellitus patients had good glycemic control maintained by diet alone and no complications during pregnancy. Mutations were detected by single-strand conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing. Thirteen of the 200 subjects had GCK gene mutations. The mutations detected were in intron 3 (c.43331A>G, new), intron 6 (c.47702T>C, rs2268574), intron 9 (c.48935C>T, rs2908274), and exon 10 (c.49620G>A, rs13306388). None of these GCK mutations were found to be significantly associated with gestational diabetes mellitus. In summary, we report a low frequency of GCK mutations in a pregnant Brazilian population and describe a new intronic variation (c.43331A>G, intron 3). We conclude that mutations in GCK introns and in non-translatable regions of the GCK gene do not affect glycemic control and are not correlated with gestational diabetes mellitus.

  15. Analysis of alternatives for insulinizing patients to achieve glycemic control and avoid accompanying risks of hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jialin; Xiong, Qianyin; Miao, Jun; Zhang, Yao; Xia, Libing; Lu, Meiqin; Zhang, Binhua; Chen, Yueping; Zhang, Ansu; Yu, Cui; Wang, Li-Zhuo

    2015-05-01

    The aims of the present study were to explore the efficacy of glycemic control and the risks of hypoglycemia with different methods of insulin therapy, and to provide reference data for the clinical treatment of diabetes. In this retrospective study, hospitalized patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes between March and December 2014, in the Department of Endocrinology in the First Affiliated Hospital of Wannan Medical College, were divided into three groups, including an intensive insulin analogue therapy group, a premixed insulin analogue treatment group and a premixed human insulin therapy group. The efficacy of glycemic control and the incidence of hypoglycemia were determined in each of the insulin treatment groups. Compared with the other treatment groups, the intensive insulin analogue therapy group was associated with superior blood glucose control, shorter time to reach standard insulin regimen, shorter hospitalization time, fewer fluctuations in blood glucose levels and lower insulin dosage on discharge from hospital. However, this treatment was also associated with a high risk of hypoglycemia. In conclusion, when combined with the effective prevention of hypoglycemia and appropriate nursing care (especially in hospital care), intensive insulin analogue therapy may provide the greatest benefit to patients.

  16. Antioxidant alpha-tocopherol ameliorates glycemic control of GK rats, a model of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Y; Yamada, Y; Toyokuni, S; Miyawaki, K; Ban, N; Adachi, T; Kuroe, A; Iwakura, T; Kubota, A; Hiai, H; Seino, Y

    2000-05-04

    We have shown recently that oxidative stress by chronic hyperglycemia damages the pancreatic beta-cells of GK rats, a model of non-obese type 2 diabetes, which may worsen diabetic condition and suggested the administration of antioxidants as a supportive therapy. To determine if natural antioxidant alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E) has beneficial effects on the glycemic control of type 2 diabetes, GK rats were fed a diet containing 0, 20 or 500 mg/kg diet alpha-tocopherol. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test revealed a significant increment of insulin secretion at 30 min and a significant decrement of blood glucose levels at 30 and 120 min after glucose loading in the GK rats fed with high alpha-tocopherol diet. The levels of glycated hemoglobin A1c, an indicator of glycemic control, were also reduced. Vitamin E supplementation clearly ameliorated diabetic control of GK rats, suggesting the importance of not only dietary supplementation of natural antioxidants but also other antioxidative intervention as a supportive therapy of type 2 diabetic patients.

  17. Testing a self-determination theory process model for promoting glycemic control through diabetes self-management.

    PubMed

    Williams, Geoffrey C; McGregor, Holly A; Zeldman, Allan; Freedman, Zachary R; Deci, Edward L

    2004-01-01

    A longitudinal study tested the self-determination theory (SDT) process model of health behavior change for glycemic control within a randomized trial of patient activation versus passive education. Glycosylated hemoglobin for patients with Type 2 diabetes (n=159) was assessed at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months. Autonomous motivation and perceived competence were assessed at baseline and 6 months, and the autonomy supportiveness of clinical practitioners was assessed at 3 months. Perceptions of autonomy and competence were promoted by perceived autonomy support, and changes in perceptions of autonomy and competence, in turn, predicted change in glycemic control. Self-management behaviors mediated the relation between change in perceived competence and change in glycemic control. The self-determination process model fit the data well.

  18. Actions of insulin beyond glycemic control: a perspective on insulin detemir.

    PubMed

    Tibaldi, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The physiologic effects of insulin on carbohydrate metabolism in health in general and in diabetes are well known. Less understood, but far more intriguing, are the extrapancreatic effects of insulin that go beyond glycemic control to help sense, integrate, and maintain energy balance. Virtually every organ, including the brain, is a target for insulin action. When exogenous insulin is administered directly into the brains of experimental animals, the net effect is anorectic; however, patients with type 2 diabetes who transition to insulin therapy often gain weight--a tendency that opposes good glycemic control and overall therapeutic goals. After the brief review of extrapancreatic insulin--signaling pathways presented here, the physiologic impact of developing insulin resistance in relation to body weight is considered. Attention is then focused on insulin detemir, a longacting insulin analog that has consistently been associated with less weight gain than conventional formulations such as neutral protamine Hagedorn insulin. Mechanisms offered to explain this effect include the lower incidence of hypoglycemia and less within-patient variability associated with insulin detemir; however, recent observations and considerations of insulin-signaling pathways have shed light on other important properties of insulin detemir that may impart these weight-neutral effects. Namely, albumin binding, faster transport across the bloodbrain barrier, and preferential activity in brain and liver are characteristics of insulin detemir that potentially explain the observed weight benefit seen in clinical trials, as well as in the real-world practice setting.

  19. Glycemic control in hospitalized patients not in intensive care: beyond sliding-scale insulin.

    PubMed

    Nau, Konrad C; Lorenzetti, Rosemarie C; Cucuzzella, Mark; Devine, Timothy; Kline, Jonathan

    2010-05-01

    Glycemic control in hospitalized patients who are not in intensive care remains unsatisfactory. Despite persistent expert recommendations urging its abandonment, the use of sliding-scale insulin remains pervasive in U.S. hospitals. Evidence for the effectiveness of sliding-scale insulin is lacking after more than 40 years of use. New physiologic subcutaneous insulin protocols use basal, nutritional, and correctional insulin. The initial total daily dose of subcutaneous insulin is calculated using a factor of 0.3 to 0.6 units per kg body weight, with one half given as long-acting insulin (the basal insulin dose), and the other one half divided daily over three meals as short-acting insulin doses (nutritional insulin doses). A correctional insulin dose provides a final insulin adjustment based on the preprandial glucose value. This correctional dose resembles a sliding scale, but is only a small fine-tuning of therapy, as opposed to traditional sliding-scale insulin alone. Insulin sensitivity, nutritional intake, and total daily dosing review can alter the physiologic insulin-dosing schedule. Prospective trials have demonstrated reductions in hyperglycemic measurements, hypoglycemia, and adjusted hospital length of stay when physiologic subcutaneous insulin protocols are used. Transitions in care require special considerations and attention to glycemic control medications. Changing the sliding-scale insulin culture requires a multidisciplinary effort to improve patient safety and outcomes.

  20. Vascularized tissue-engineered chambers promote survival and function of transplanted islets and improve glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Knight, K R; Uda, Y; Findlay, M W; Brown, D L; Cronin, K J; Jamieson, E; Tai, T; Keramidaris, E; Penington, A J; Rophael, J; Harrison, L C; Morrison, W A

    2006-03-01

    We have developed a chamber model of islet engraftment that optimizes islet survival by rapidly restoring islet-extracellular matrix relationships and vascularization. Our aim was to assess the ability of syngeneic adult islets seeded into blood vessel-containing chambers to correct streptozotocin-induced diabetes in mice. Approximately 350 syngeneic islets suspended in Matrigel extracellular matrix were inserted into chambers based on either the splenic or groin (epigastric) vascular beds, or, in the standard approach, injected under the renal capsule. Blood glucose was monitored weekly for 7 weeks, and an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test performed at 6 weeks in the presence of the islet grafts. Relative to untreated diabetic animals, glycemic control significantly improved in all islet transplant groups, strongly correlating with islet counts in the graft (P<0.01), and with best results in the splenic chamber group. Glycemic control deteriorated after chambers were surgically removed at week 8. Immunohistochemistry revealed islets with abundant insulin content in grafts from all groups, but with significantly more islets in splenic chamber grafts than the other treatment groups (P<0.05). It is concluded that hyperglycemia in experimental type 1 diabetes can be effectively treated by islets seeded into a vascularized chamber functioning as a "pancreatic organoid."

  1. Physical activity, glycemic control, and diabetic peripheral neuropathy: a national sample.

    PubMed

    Loprinzi, Paul D; Hager, Kathy K; Ramulu, Pradeep Y

    2014-01-01

    To determine if physical activity and/or blood glycohemoglobin (HbA1c) are associated with the prevalence of peripheral neuropathy (PN) in a representative population of diabetics. Three hundred thirty-nine diabetic participants (40-85 yrs) taking part in 2003-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were studied. Participants were defined as having peripheral neuropathy if examination determined ≥1 insensate area in either foot. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was objectively-measured using accelerometry. After adjustments, MVPA was not significantly associated with PN (OR=1.16; 95% CI: 0.48-2.78), nor was HbA1c (OR=0.55; 95% CI: 0.28-1.04). However, there was evidence of statistical interaction (OR=0.24; 95% CI: 0.06-0.87) between MVPA and HbA1c status, showing that diabetics engaging in higher levels of MVPA and having normal HgbA1c levels were less likely to have PN than what would be expected based on the individual effects of MVPA and HbA1c alone. Although MVPA was not directly associated with PN, these findings suggest that proper physical activity, coupled with good glycemic control, is associated with less neuropathy. Future longitudinal studies are required to evaluate whether physical activity and improved glycemic control may help prevent or slow the progression of diabetic end-organ damage, particularly diabetic neuropathy.

  2. Eating disinhibition and vagal tone moderate the postprandial response to glycemic load: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Young, Hayley A.; Watkins, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Reducing the glycemic load (GL) of the diet may benefit appetite control but its utility is complicated by psychological influences on eating. Disinhibited behaviour, a risk factor for overconsumption, is characterized by reduced prefrontal cortex activity, which in turn modulates vagal tone; a phenomenon associated with glucoregulation. This double blind randomised controlled trial explored for the first time the influence of disinhibited eating and vagal tone (heart rate variability (HRV)) on hunger and the postprandial response to GL. Blood glucose (BG) and hunger were measured 30 and 150 min after consumption of water, glucose or isomaltulose (low glycemic sugar). After consuming glucose, independently of BMI or habitual diet, those with the highest levels of disinhibition had higher BG levels after thirty minutes (B = 0.192, 95% CI LL. 086, UL 0.297), and lower BG after one hundred and fifty minutes (B = −0.240, 95% CI LL −0.348, UL −0.131). BG was related to hunger but only in low disinhibited eaters. Disinhibited eaters were characterised by a reduced HRV which was related to greater BG excursions (B = 0.407, 95% CI LL 0.044, UL 1.134). These findings highlight novel mechanisms by which disinhibited eating leads to obesity and insulin resistance. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov NCT02827318. PMID:27761024

  3. The Consumption of Bicarbonate-Rich Mineral Water Improves Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Shinnosuke; Goto, Yasuaki; Ito, Kyo; Hayasaka, Shinya; Kurihara, Shigeo; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Tomita, Masaru; Fukuda, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Hot spring water and natural mineral water have been therapeutically used to prevent or improve various diseases. Specifically, consumption of bicarbonate-rich mineral water (BMW) has been reported to prevent or improve type 2 diabetes (T2D) in humans. However, the molecular mechanisms of the beneficial effects behind mineral water consumption remain unclear. To elucidate the molecular level effects of BMW consumption on glycemic control, blood metabolome analysis and fecal microbiome analysis were applied to the BMW consumption test. During the study, 19 healthy volunteers drank 500 mL of commercially available tap water (TW) or BMW daily. TW consumption periods and BMW consumption periods lasted for a week each and this cycle was repeated twice. Biochemical tests indicated that serum glycoalbumin levels, one of the indexes of glycemic controls, decreased significantly after BMW consumption. Metabolome analysis of blood samples revealed that 19 metabolites including glycolysis-related metabolites and 3 amino acids were significantly different between TW and BMW consumption periods. Additionally, microbiome analysis demonstrated that composition of lean-inducible bacteria was increased after BMW consumption. Our results suggested that consumption of BMW has the possible potential to prevent and/or improve T2D through the alterations of host metabolism and gut microbiota composition. PMID:26798400

  4. The Consumption of Bicarbonate-Rich Mineral Water Improves Glycemic Control.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Shinnosuke; Goto, Yasuaki; Ito, Kyo; Hayasaka, Shinya; Kurihara, Shigeo; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Tomita, Masaru; Fukuda, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Hot spring water and natural mineral water have been therapeutically used to prevent or improve various diseases. Specifically, consumption of bicarbonate-rich mineral water (BMW) has been reported to prevent or improve type 2 diabetes (T2D) in humans. However, the molecular mechanisms of the beneficial effects behind mineral water consumption remain unclear. To elucidate the molecular level effects of BMW consumption on glycemic control, blood metabolome analysis and fecal microbiome analysis were applied to the BMW consumption test. During the study, 19 healthy volunteers drank 500 mL of commercially available tap water (TW) or BMW daily. TW consumption periods and BMW consumption periods lasted for a week each and this cycle was repeated twice. Biochemical tests indicated that serum glycoalbumin levels, one of the indexes of glycemic controls, decreased significantly after BMW consumption. Metabolome analysis of blood samples revealed that 19 metabolites including glycolysis-related metabolites and 3 amino acids were significantly different between TW and BMW consumption periods. Additionally, microbiome analysis demonstrated that composition of lean-inducible bacteria was increased after BMW consumption. Our results suggested that consumption of BMW has the possible potential to prevent and/or improve T2D through the alterations of host metabolism and gut microbiota composition.

  5. The Potential for Glycemic Control Monitoring and Screening for Diabetes at Dental Visits Using Oral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Rosedale, Mary T.; Pesce, Michael A.; Rindskopf, David M.; Kaur, Navjot; Juterbock, Caroline M.; Wolff, Mark S.; Malaspina, Dolores; Danoff, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the potential for glycemic control monitoring and screening for diabetes in a dental setting among adults (n = 408) with or at risk for diabetes. Methods. In 2013 and 2014, we performed hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) tests on dried blood samples of gingival crevicular blood and compared these with paired “gold-standard” HbA1c tests with dried finger-stick blood samples in New York City dental clinic patients. We examined differences in sociodemographics and diabetes-related risk and health care characteristics for 3 groups of at-risk patients. Results. About half of the study sample had elevated HbA1c values in the combined prediabetes and diabetes ranges, with approximately one fourth of those in the diabetes range. With a correlation of 0.991 between gingival crevicular and finger-stick blood HbA1c, measures of concurrence between the tests were extremely high for both elevated HbA1c and diabetes-range HbA1c levels. Persons already diagnosed with diabetes and undiagnosed persons aged 45 years or older could especially benefit from HbA1c testing at dental visits. Conclusions. Gingival crevicular blood collected at the dental visit can be used to screen for diabetes and monitor glycemic control for many at-risk patients. PMID:25713975

  6. Colonic Fermentation of Unavailable Carbohydrates from Unripe Banana and its Influence over Glycemic Control.

    PubMed

    Dan, Milana C T; Cardenette, Giselli H L; Sardá, Fabiana A H; Giuntini, Eliana Bistriche; Bello-Pérez, Luis Arturo; Carpinelli, Ângelo R; Lajolo, Franco M; Menezes, Elizabete Wenzel

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the colonic fermentation of unavailable carbohydrates from unripe banana (mass - UBM - and starch - UBS) over parameters related to glucose and insulin response in rats. Wistar male rats were fed either a control diet, a UBM diet (5 % resistant starch - RS) or a UBS diet (10 % RS) for 28 days. In vivo (oral glucose tolerance test) and in vitro (cecum fecal fermentation, pancreatic islet insulin secretion) analyses were performed. The consumption of UBM and UBS diets by Wistar rats for 28 days improved insulin/glucose ratio. Also, pancreatic islets isolated from the test groups presented significant lower insulin secretion compared to the control group, when the same in vitro glucose stimulation was done. Total short chain fatty acids produced were higher in both experimental groups in relation to the control group. These findings suggest that UBM and UBS diets promote colonic fermentation and can influence glycemic control, improving insulin sensitivity in rats.

  7. Higher glycemic index and glycemic load diet is associated with increased risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Eslamian, Ghazaleh; Jessri, Mahsa; Hajizadeh, Bahareh; Ibiebele, Torukiri I; Rashidkhani, Bahram

    2013-09-01

    Several studies have indicated the association between intake of foods high in dietary glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) with an increased risk of digestive tract cancers. We hypothesized that GI and GL may be associated with risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) in a high-risk population in Iran. In total, we interviewed 47 cases with incident of ESCC and 96 frequency-matched hospital controls, then calculated the average dietary GI and GL via a validated food frequency questionnaire. Dietary GL was calculated as a function of GI, carbohydrate content, and frequency of intake of certain foods. Dietary GI and GL levels were significantly higher among the ESCC cases compared with the controls (P < .05). After adjustment for potential confounders, those in the highest tertile of dietary GI had 2.95 times higher risk of ESCC compared with those in the lowest (95% confidence interval, 1.68-3.35; P for trend = .002). In addition, being in the highest tertile of dietary GL was positively associated with an ESCC risk (odds ratio, 3.49; 95% confidence interval, 2.98-4.41; P for trend = .001). Findings of the present study indicate that diets with high GI and GL might have potentially unfavorable effects on ESCC risk and suggest a possible role for excess circulating insulin and related insulin-like growth factor 1 in esophageal cancer development.

  8. Effect of low glycemic load diet on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in poorly-controlled diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Ziaee, Amir; Afaghi, Ahmad; Sarreshtehdari, Majied

    2011-12-29

    Different carbohydrate diets have been administrated to diabetic patients to evaluate the glycemic response, while Poor-controlled diabetes is increasing world wide. To investigate the role of an alternative carbohydrate diet on glycemic control, we explored the effect of a low glycemic load (Low GL)-high fat diet on glycemic response and also glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) of poor-controlled diabetes patients. Hundred poorly-controlled diabetes patients, HbA1c > 8, age 52.8 ± 4.5 y, were administrated a low GL diet , GL = 67 (Energy 1800 kcal; total fat 36%; fat derived from olive oil and nuts 15%; carbohydrate 42%; protein 22%) for 10 weeks. Patients did their routine life style program during intervention. Fasting blood glucose and HbA1c before and after intervention with significant reduction were: 169 ± 17, 141 ± 12; 8.85% (73 mmol/mol) ± 0.22%, and 7.81% (62 mmol/mol) ± 0.27%; respectively (P < 0.001). Mean fasting blood glucose reduced by 28.1 ± 12.5 and HbA1c by 1.1% (11 mmol/mol) ± 0.3% (P=0.001). There was positive moderate correlation between HbA1c concentration before intervention and FBS reduction after intervention (P < 0.001, at 0.01 level, R =0.52), and strong positive correlation between FBS before intervention and FBS reduction (P < 0.001, at 0.01 level, R = 0.70). This study demonstrated that our alternative low glycemic load diet can be effective in glycemic control.

  9. Glycemic Control in the Burn Intensive Care Unit: Focus on the Role of Anemia in Glucose Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Elizabeth A.; Mora, Alejandra G.; Pidcoke, Heather F.; Wolf, Steven E.; Wade, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    Glycemic control with intensive insulin therapy (IIT) has received widespread adoption secondary to findings of improved clinical outcomes and survival in the burn population. Severe burn as a model for trauma is characterized by a hypermetabolic state, hyperglycemia, and insulin resistance. In this article, we review the findings of a burn center research facility in terms of understanding glucose management. The conferred benefits from IIT, our findings of poor outcomes associated with glycemic variability, advantages from preserved diurnal variation of glucose and insulin, and impacts of glucometer error and hematocrit correction factor are discussed. We conclude with direction for further study and the need for a reliable continuous glucose monitoring system. Such efforts will further the endeavor for achieving adequate glycemic control in order to assess the efficacy of target ranges and use of IIT. PMID:20144386

  10. Lifestyle and glycemic control in Japanese adults receiving diabetes treatment: an analysis of the 2009 Japan Society of Ningen Dock database.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Eiko; Moriyama, Kengo; Yamakado, Minoru

    2014-05-01

    We investigated the level of glycemic control in 7020 patients treated with diabetes medications. We found that the overall mean HbA1c was 7.3% (56 mmol/mol). Over half had HbA1c levels ≥7.0% (53 mmol/mol) and poorer glycemic control was associated with unhealthy lifestyle habits.

  11. A Mixed Methods Study Exploring the Factors and Behaviors That Affect Glycemic Control Following a Structured Education Program: The Irish DAFNE Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Dympna; O'Hara, Mary Clare; Meehan, Ben; Byrne, Molly; Dinneen, Sean F.; Murphy, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To explain the factors affecting glycemic control (measured by HbA1c) following the Dose Adjustment for Normal Eating (DAFNE) program. Background: DAFNE is a structured education program designed to assist persons with type 1 diabetes mellitus achieve optimal glycemic control. However, not all participants reach this goal. Few studies…

  12. Improving Glycemic Control and Insulin Ordering Efficiency for Hospitalized Patients With Diabetes Through Carbohydrate Counting.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Kristina K; Reiland, Sarah A; Meara, John G O; Brown, Julie K; Fedraw, Leslie A; Mapes, David L

    2016-01-01

    Glycemic control in hospitalized patients is challenging but important for optimal outcomes. Insulin dosing through carbohydrate counting may address patient, provider, and institutional factors that complicate hospital glycemic management. On two surgical units at a tertiary care teaching hospital, we pilot tested postmeal insulin dosing based on carbohydrate counting (plus basal insulin) rather than the current process of ordering scheduled premeal insulin without knowledge of the patient's consumption. Analysis assessed hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, insulin orders, and nurse and provider satisfaction and confidence. On general surgery, mean glucose level improved from 188 to 137 mg/dl (p < .001). On cardiovascular surgery, mean glucose improved only mildly from 177 to 175 mg/dl (p < .28). No hypoglycemia was reported. Efficiency of mealtime insulin dosing improved through reduced average number of insulin orders per meal from 1.1 to 0.09. Process satisfaction improved for providers (preintervention, 60%; postintervention, 100%), general surgery nurses (preintervention, 72%; postintervention, 100%), and cardiovascular surgery nurses (preintervention, 69%; postintervention, 84%). Confidence in insulin dose accuracy improved for providers (preintervention, 50%; postintervention, 100%), general surgery nurses (preintervention, 59%; postintervention, 100%), and cardiovascular surgery nurses (preintervention, 48%; postintervention, 84%). Carbohydrate counting is effective and efficient and improved staff satisfaction and confidence in hospital mealtime insulin dosing.

  13. THE CONTENT OF MICROELEMENTS IN BLOOD SERUM AND ERYTHROCYTES IN CHILDREN WITH DIABETES MELLITUS TYPE I DEPENDING ON LEVEL OF GLYCEMIC CONTROL.

    PubMed

    Gluschenko, N; Vasylyshyn, Kh; Roschupkin, A; Lekishvili, S; Gladchenko, O

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the content of chromium, cobalt and nickel in serum and erythrocytes in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus, depending on the level of glycemic control. The study was conducted on 68 children with type 1 diabetes mellitus. The patients were divided into four groups based on glycemic control. Group I was composed of 9 children with optimal level of glycemic control. Group II - 25 children with suboptimal level of glycemic control. Group III - 34 children with a high risk to life level of glycemic control. Group IV (control group) consisted of 30 healthy children. Compensation state of type 1 diabetes was evaluated according to ISPAD (Consensus for the Management of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus in Children and Adolescens 2000). The content of trace elements in biological agents was determined by atomic absorbtion spectrophotometry method with C-115M1 mass-spectrophotometer, manufactured by «Selmi» enterprise (Ukraine). It is found that there is a decrease in serum concentrations of chromium and erythrocyte content of cobalt in patients with optimal level of glycemic control. The deficiency of chromium is accompanied by the deficiency of cobalt in patients with suboptimal level of glycemic control. The lower levels of cobalt and nickel are recorded simultaneously, but there is theexcess of chromium in the erythrocytes of these patients. Patients, who suffer from 1 type diabetes mellitus and high risk for life level of glycemic control have considerable polideficiency of cobalt, nickel and chromium in serum.The increasing level of chromium was recorded only in the erythrocytes. The level of glycemic control and the duration of 1 type diabetes mellitus are important in the forecasting of the development of chronic diabetic complications. It is found that the duration of 1 type diabetes mellitus influences the levels of cobalt and nickel in serum mostly, while the level of glycemic control influences the chromium content.

  14. Safety and efficacy of saxagliptin for glycemic control in non-critically ill hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Rajesh; Schuman, Brooke; Hurwitz, Shelley; Metzger, Cheyenne; Bhandari, Shreya

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether saxagliptin is non-inferior to basal-bolus insulin therapy for glycemic control in patients with controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) admitted to hospital with non-critical illnesses. Research design and methods This was an open-label, randomized controlled clinical trial. Patients received either saxagliptin or basal-bolus insulin, both with correctional insulin doses. The main study outcome was the mean daily blood glucose (BG) after the first day of randomization. Results Of 66 patients completing the study, 33 (age 69±10 years, 40% men) were randomized to saxagliptin and 33 (age 67±10 years, 52% men) to basal-bolus insulin therapy. The mean daily BG was 149.8±22.0 mg/dL in the saxagliptin group and 146.9±30.5 mg/dL in the insulin group (p=0.59). With an observed group difference of 2.9 mg/dL and an a priori margin of 20 mg/dL, inferiority of saxagliptin was rejected in favor of non-inferiority (p=0.007). There was no significant difference in the percentage of high or low BG values. The insulin group received a higher number of insulin injections (2.3±1.7/day vs 1.2±1.9/day; p<0.001) as well as a higher daily insulin dose (13.3±12.9 units/day vs 2.4±3.3 units/day; p<0.001) than did the saxagliptin group. Continuous BG monitoring showed that glycemic variability was lower in the saxagliptin group as compared to the insulin group. Patient satisfaction scores were similar in the two groups. Conclusions We conclude that saxagliptin use is non-inferior to basal-bolus insulin in non-critically ill hospitalized patients with T2DM controlled on 0–2 oral agents without insulin. Saxagliptin use may decrease glycemic variability in these patients. Trial registration number NCT02182895.

  15. Glibenclamide or metformin combined with honey improves glycemic control in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Erejuwa, Omotayo Owomofoyon; Sulaiman, Siti Amrah; Wahab, Mohd Suhaimi Ab; Sirajudeen, Kuttulebbai Nainamohammed Salam; Salleh, Md Salzihan Md; Gurtu, Sunil

    2011-03-14

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with deterioration of glycemic control and progressive metabolic derangements. This study investigated the effect of honey as an adjunct to glibenclamide or metformin on glycemic control in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced in rats by streptozotocin. The diabetic rats were randomized into six groups and administered distilled water, honey, glibenclamide, glibenclamide and honey, metformin or metformin and honey. The animals were treated orally once daily for four weeks. The diabetic control rats showed hypoinsulinemia (0.27 ± 0.01 ng/ml), hyperglycemia (22.4 ± 1.0 mmol/L) and increased fructosamine (360.0 ± 15.6 µmol/L). Honey significantly increased insulin (0.41 ± 0.06 ng/ml), decreased hyperglycemia (12.3 ± 3.1 mmol/L) and fructosamine (304.5 ± 10.1 µmol/L). Although glibenclamide or metformin alone significantly (p < 0.05) reduced hyperglycemia, glibenclamide or metformin combined with honey produced significantly much lower blood glucose (8.8 ± 2.9 or 9.9 ± 3.3 mmol/L, respectively) compared to glibenclamide or metformin alone (13.9 ± 3.4 or 13.2 ± 2.9 mmol/L, respectively). Similarly, glibenclamide or metformin combined with honey produced significantly (p < 0.05) lower fructosamine levels (301.3 ± 19.5 or 285.8 ± 22.6 µmol/L, respectively) whereas glibenclamide or metformin alone did not decrease fructosamine (330.0 ± 29.9 or 314.6 ± 17.9 µmol/L, respectively). Besides, these drugs or their combination with honey increased insulin levels. Glibenclamide or metformin combined with honey also significantly reduced the elevated levels of creatinine, bilirubin, triglycerides, and VLDL cholesterol. These results indicate that combination of glibenclamide or metformin with honey improves glycemic control, and provides additional metabolic benefits, not achieved with either glibenclamide or metformin alone.

  16. Improvement of Glycemic Control in Insulin-Dependent Diabetics with Depression by Concomitant Treatment with Antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Radojkovic, Jana; Sikanic, Natasa; Bukumiric, Zoran; Tadic, Marijana; Kostic, Nada; Babic, Rade

    2016-01-01

    Background It is still disputable whether negative effects of comorbid depression in diabetics can be diminished by successful treatment of depression. The primary aim of this study was to assess whether addition of antidepressants to existing insulin treatment would further improve glycemic control in these patients. A secondary objective was to assess whether such treatment impairs their lipid and inflammatory status. Material/Methods Total of 192 patients with poorly controlled diabetes (defined as HbA1c ≥8%) in the absence of any uncontrolled medical condition entered the 6-month run-in phase with optimization of diabetic therapy. Depression status was screened at the end of this phase by BDI-II depression testing. Patients with BDI-II ≥14 and psychiatric confirmation of depression (58 patients) entered the 6-month interventional phase with SSRI class antidepressants. Results Fifty patients completed the study. During the run-in phase, HbA1c dropped from 10.0±1.8% to 8.5±1.2% (p<0.001), and during the interventional phase it dropped from 8.5±1.2% to 7.7±0.7% (p<0.001). BDI-II scores improved significantly from 30.4±13.2 to 23.5±11.0 (p=0.02) during the interventional phase. A positive linear correlation between improvement in depression scale and improvement in glycemic control was observed (R2=0.139, p=0.008). Lipid profile and inflammatory status did not change significantly during the interventional phase. Conclusions Patients with poorly controlled diabetes and comorbid depression might benefit from screening and treatment of depression with SSRI antidepressants by achieving an incremental effect on glycoregulation. This therapy did not have any adverse effects on lipid profile or inflammatory status. PMID:27329213

  17. Reductions in regimen distress are associated with improved management and glycemic control over time.

    PubMed

    Hessler, Danielle; Fisher, Lawrence; Glasgow, Russell E; Strycker, Lisa A; Dickinson, L Miriam; Arean, Patricia A; Masharani, Umesh

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations among regimen distress (RD), self-management, and glycemic control were undertaken to explore mechanisms of operation among these variables. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In a behavioral randomized control trial (RCT) to reduce RD, 392 adults with type 2 diabetes were assessed for RD, diet, exercise, medication adherence, and HbA1c at baseline and at 4 and 12 months. Associations among RD, self-management, and HbA1c were examined in cross-sectional analyses at baseline, in prospective analyses using baseline values to predict change over time, and in time-varying analyses. RESULTS At baseline, greater RD and poorer medication adherence were independently associated with higher HbA1c (P = 0.05 and P < 0.001, respectively), and greater RD was associated with poorer medication adherence (P = 0.03). No consistent pattern of significant prospective associations was found. Significant time-varying findings showed that decreases in RD were associated with improvements in medication adherence (P < 0.01), physical activity (P < 0.001), and HbA1c (P = 0.02) over time following intervention. Changes in self-management were not associated with changes in HbA1c over time. CONCLUSIONS In the context of an RCT to reduce distress, RD, self-management, and HbA1c were interrelated in cross-sectional and time-varying analyses. Decreases in RD were associated with improvements in both self-management and HbA1c over 12 months. Findings point to the complex and likely multifaceted pathways of association among these key constructs, with results indicating significant linkages between RD and both self-management and glycemic control over time.

  18. Evaluation of nutritional profiles of starch and dry matter from early potato varieties and its estimated glycemic impact.

    PubMed

    Pinhero, Reena Grittle; Waduge, Renuka Nilmini; Liu, Qiang; Sullivan, J Alan; Tsao, Rong; Bizimungu, Benoit; Yada, Rickey Y

    2016-07-15

    To identify healthier potatoes with respect to starch profiles, fourteen early varieties were evaluated for their dietary fiber, total starch, rapidly digestible (RDS), slowly digestible (SDS), and resistant (RS) starch for nutrition and with regard to estimated glycemic index (eGI) and glycemic load (eGL). While all these profiles were highly dependent on the potato variety, eleven out of fourteen varieties were classified as low GL foods (p<0.05). A strong positive correlation was observed with eGI and RDS (r=0.975-1.00, 0.96-1.00 and 0.962-0.997 for uncooked, cooked and retrograded varieties, respectively), whereas a strong negative correlation was observed between eGI and RS (r=-0.985 to -0.998, -0.96 to -1.00 and -0.983 to -0.999 for uncooked, cooked and retrograded varieties respectively, p<0.05). For the cultivars examined, the present study identified RDS and RS as major starch factors contributing to eGI.

  19. Pilot Study of the SPRINT Glycemic Control Protocol in a Hungarian Medical Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Benyo, Balazs; Illyés, Attila; Némedi, Noémi Szabó; Le Compte, Aaron J.; Havas, Attila; Kovacs, Levente; Fisk, Liam; Shaw, Geoffrey M.; Chase, J. Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Stress-induced hyperglycemia increases morbidity and mortality. Tight control can reduce mortality but has proven difficult to achieve. The SPRINT (Specialized Relative Insulin and Nutrition Tables) protocol is the only protocol that reduced both mortality and hypoglycemia by modulating both insulin and nutrition, but it has not been tested in independent hospitals. Methods SPRINT was used for 12 adult intensive care unit patients (949 h) at Kálmán Pándy Hospital (Gyula, Hungary) as a clinical practice assessment. Insulin recommendations (0–6 U/h) were administered via constant infusion rather than bolus delivery. Nutrition was administered per local standard protocol, weaning parenteral to enteral nutrition, but was modulated per SPRINT recommendations. Measurement was every 1 to 2 h, per protocol. Glycemic performance is assessed by percentage of blood glucose (BG) measurements in glycemic bands for the cohort and per patient. Safety from hypoglycemia is assessed by numbers of patients with BG < 2.2 (severe) and %BG < 3.0 and < 4.0 mmol/liter (moderate and light). Clinical effort is assessed by measurements per day. Results are median (interquartile range). Results There were 742 measurements over 1088 h of control (16.4 measurements/day), which is similar to clinical SPRINT results (16.2/day). Per-patient hours of control were 65 (50–95) h. Initial per-patient BG was 10.5 (7.9–11.2) mmol/liter. All patients (100%) reached 6.1 mmol/liter. Cohort BG was 6.3 (5.5–7.5) mmol/liter, with 42.2%, 65.1% and 77.6% of BG in the 4.0–6.1, 4.0–7.0, and 4.0–8.0 mmol/liter bands. Per-patient, median percentage time in these bands was 40.2 (26.7–51.5)%, 62.5 (46.0–75.7)%, and 74.7 (61.6.8–87.8)%, respectively. No patients had BG < 2.2 mmol/liter, and the %BG < 4.0 mmol/liter was 1.9%. These results were achieved using 3.0 (3.0–5.0) U/h of insulin with 7.4 (4.4–10.2) g/h of dextrose administration (all sources) for the cohort. Per

  20. Biopsychosocial pathways linking subjective socioeconomic disadvantage to glycemic control in youths with type I diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zilioli, Samuele; Ellis, Deborah A; Carré, Justin M; Slatcher, Richard B

    2017-04-01

    Older adolescent and young adults (OAYA) with type 1 diabetes (T1D) living in contexts of socio-economic disadvantage (SED) suffer disproportionately from poor glycemic control and related health complications. Although SED may convey a variety of risks, it may exacerbate diabetes-related stress levels, which in turn may account for observed disparities in health outcomes. The primary goal of the present study was to investigate the relationship between subjective SED, diabetes-related perceived stress, and diurnal cortisol secretion in urban OAYA with T1D. A secondary goal was to determine if cortisol was related to measures of blood glucose (HbA1c and mean blood glucose). Analyses were conducted among OAYA ages 17-20 years (n=61) affected by T1D, who provided daily saliva samples for four days, measures of glycemic control (i.e., HbA1c and mean blood glucose assessed via Continuous Glucose Monitor), and completed psychosocial questionnaires. We found that subjective SED was associated with a flatter diurnal cortisol rhythm via diabetes-related stress. Flattened cortisol rhythm was, in turn, associated with higher levels of HbA1c, but not with mean blood glucose assessed via Continuous Glucose Monitor. These results represent some of the first empirical evidence on how distal social factors (i.e., subjective SED) and proximal psychological processes (diabetes-related perceived stress) are connected to condition-relevant biological mechanisms (i.e., elevated HbA1c), via broad biological pathways implicated in health (i.e., flatter cortisol slope).

  1. Sustainability of Improved Glycemic Control After Diabetes Self-Management Education.

    PubMed

    Nicoll, Katie G; Ramser, Kristie L; Campbell, Jennifer D; Suda, Katie J; Lee, Marilyn D; Wood, G Christopher; Sumter, Robert; Hamann, Gale L

    2014-08-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to evaluate glycemic control as measured by A1C during a 2-year period after patients received diabetes self-management education (DSME). Methods. Patients who completed DSME in 2009 and received medical follow-up with A1C measurements for at least 2 years after DSME were included in the evaluation. Primary endpoints were changes in A1C from before to immediately after, 1 year after, and 2 years after DSME. Secondary outcomes included the effects of the following factors on change in A1C: sex, duration of diabetes, uncontrolled diabetes (A1C ≥ 9%), health insurance coverage, and self-reported education level. Results. Forty-three patients were included in the evaluation. Mean A1C before DSME was 10.2 ± 3.7%. Mean A1C after DSME was 7.8 ± 2.2% (P < 0.0001), a 23.5% reduction. Mean A1C at 1 and 2 years after DSME was 7.8 ± 2.1% for each year and remained unchanged from just after DSME to 1 and 2 years after DSME (P > 0.05). Patients with a duration of diabetes of < 1 year had a significantly greater reduction in mean A1C than those with a duration of diabetes ≥ 1 year (28.7 and 20.2%, respectively, P = 0.001). Conclusion. DSME improved glycemic control to a substantial degree, and the effect was sustained for up to 2 years. Although the reduction in A1C was significant for all patients receiving DSME, there was a significantly greater reduction for patients who had a duration of diabetes of < 1 year than for those with a duration of diabetes > 1 year.

  2. Potential Overtreatment of Diabetes Mellitus in Older Adults With Tight Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Lipska, Kasia J.; Ross, Joseph S.; Miao, Yinghui; Shah, Nilay D.; Lee, Sei J.; Steinman, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE In older adults with multiple serious comorbidities and functional limitations, the harms of intensive glycemic control likely exceed the benefits. OBJECTIVES To examine glycemic control levels among older adults with diabetes mellitus by health status and to estimate the prevalence of potential overtreatment of diabetes. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Cross-sectional analysis of the data on 1288 older adults (≥65 years) with diabetes from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 2001 through 2010 who had a hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) measurement. All analyses incorporated complex survey design to produce nationally representative estimates. EXPOSURES Health status categories: very complex/poor, based on difficulty with 2 or more activities of daily living or dialysis dependence; complex/intermediate, based on difficulty with 2 or more instrumental activities of daily living or presence of 3 or more chronic conditions; and relatively healthy if none of these were present. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Tight glycemic control (HbA1c level, <7%) and use of diabetes medications likely to result in hypoglycemia (insulin or sulfonylureas). RESULTS Of 1288 older adults with diabetes, 50.7% (95% CI, 46.6%–54.8%), representing 3.1 million (95% CI, 2.7–3.5), were relatively healthy, 28.1% (95% CI, 24.8%–31.5%), representing 1.7 million (95% CI, 1.4–2.0), had complex/intermediate health, and 21.2% (95% CI, 18.3%–24.4%), representing 1.3 million (95% CI, 1.1–1.5), had very complex/poor health. Overall, 61.5% (95% CI, 57.5%–65.3%), representing 3.8 million (95% CI, 3.4–4.2), had an HbA1c level of less than 7%; this proportion did not differ across health status categories (62.8% [95% CI, 56.9%–68.3%]) were relatively healthy, 63.0% (95% CI, 57.0%–68.6%) had complex/intermediate health, and 56.4% (95% CI, 49.7%–62.9%) had very complex/poor health (P = .26). Of the older adults with an HbA1c level of less than 7%, 54.9% (95

  3. The impact of measurement frequency on the domains of glycemic control in the critically ill--a Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Krinsley, James S; Bruns, David E; Boyd, James C

    2015-03-01

    The role of blood glucose (BG) measurement frequency on the domains of glycemic control is not well defined. This Monte Carlo mathematical simulation of glycemic control in a cohort of critically ill patients modeled sets of 100 patients with simulated BG-measuring devices having 5 levels of measurement imprecision, using 2 published insulin infusion protocols, for 200 hours, with 3 different BG-measurement intervals-15 minutes (Q15'), 1 hour (Q1h), and 2 hours (Q2h)-resulting in 1,100,000 BG measurements for 3000 simulated patients. The model varied insulin sensitivity, initial BG value and rate of gluconeogenesis. The primary outcomes included rates of hyperglycemia (BG > 180 mg/dL), hypoglycemia (BG < 70 and 40 mg/dL), proportion of patients with elevated glucose variability (within-patient coefficient of variation [CV] > 20%), and time in range (BG ranges 80-150 mg/dL and 80-180 mg/dL). Percentages of hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia at both thresholds, and patients with elevated glucose variability as well as time outside glycemic targets were substantially higher in simulations with measurement interval Q2h compared to those with measurement interval Q1h and moderately higher in simulations with Q1h than in those with Q15'. Higher measurement frequency mitigated the deleterious effect of high measurement imprecision, defined as CV ≥ 15%. This Monte Carlo simulation suggests that glycemic control in critically ill patients is more optimal with a BG measurement interval no longer than 1h, with further benefit obtained with use of measurement interval of 15'. These findings have important implications for the development of glycemic control standards.

  4. Glycemic Control in Kenyan Children and Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Ngwiri, Thomas; Were, Fred; Predieri, Barbara; Ngugi, Paul; Iughetti, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Background. Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is the most common endocrine disorder in children and adolescents worldwide. While data about prevalence, treatment, and complications are recorded in many countries, few data exist for Sub-Saharan Africa. The aim of this study was to determine the degree of control in patients with T1DM aged 1–19 years over a 6-month period in 3 outpatient Kenyan clinics. It also sought to determine how control was influenced by parameters of patient and treatment. Methods. Eighty-two children and adolescents with T1DM were included in the study. Clinical history regarding duration of illness, type and dose of insulin, and recent symptoms of hypoglycemia/hyperglycemia were recorded. Glycaemia, HbA1c, and ketonuria were tested. HbA1c of 8.0% and below was defined as the cut-off for acceptable control. Results. The median HbA1c for the study population was 11.1% (range: 6.3–18.8). Overall, only 28% of patients had reasonable glycemic control as defined in this study. 72% therefore had poor control. It was also found that age above 12 years was significantly associated with poor control. Conclusions. African children and with T1DM are poorly controlled particularly in adolescents. Our data strongly support the necessity of Kenya children to receive more aggressive management and follow-up. PMID:26494998

  5. Prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and relation to glycemic control therapies at baseline in the BARI 2D cohort

    PubMed Central

    Pop-Busui, Rodica; Lu, Jiang; Lopes, Neuza; Jones, Teresa L. Z.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the associations between glycemic therapies and prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) at baseline among participants in the Bypass-Angioplasty-Revascularization-Investigation-2-Diabetes (BARI 2D) trial on medical and revascularization therapies for coronary artery disease (CAD) and on insulin-sensitizing versus insulin-providing treatments for diabetes. 2368 patients with type 2 diabetes and CAD were evaluated. DPN was defined as clinical examination score >2 using the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI). DPN odds ratios across different groups of glycemic therapy were evaluated by multiple logistic regression, adjusted for multiple covariates including age, sex, HbA1c, diabetes duration. 51% BARI 2D subjects with valid baseline characteristics and MNSI scores had DPN. After adjusting for all variables, use of insulin was significantly associated with DPN (OR1.57, 1.15, 2.13). Patients on sulfonylurea or combination of sulfonylurea/metformin/TZD had marginally higher rates of DPN than the metformin/TZD group. This cross-sectional study in a cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes and CAD showed association of insulin use with higher DPN prevalence, independent of disease duration, glycemic control and other characteristics. The causality between a glycemic control strategy and DPN cannot be evaluated in this cross-sectional study, but continued assessment of DPN and randomized therapies in BARI 2D trial may provide further explanations on the development of DPN. PMID:19335534

  6. Effect of glycemic control on corneal nerves and peripheral neuropathy in streptozotocin-induced diabetic C57Bl/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Yorek, Matthew S; Obrosov, Alexander; Shevalye, Hanna; Lupachyk, Sergey; Harper, Matthew M; Kardon, Randy H; Yorek, Mark A

    2014-09-01

    We sought to determine the impact that duration of hyperglycemia and control has on corneal nerve fiber density in relation to standard diabetic neuropathy endpoints. Control and streptozotocin-diabetic C57Bl/6J mice were analyzed after 4, 8, 12, and 20 weeks. For the 20-week time point, five groups of mice were compared: control, untreated diabetic, and diabetic treated with insulin designated as having either poor glycemic control, good glycemic control, or poor glycemic control switched to good glycemic control. Hyperglycemia was regulated by use of insulin-releasing pellets. Loss of corneal nerves in the sub-epithelial nerve plexus or corneal epithelium progressed slowly in diabetic mice requiring 20 weeks to reach statistical significance. In comparison, slowing of motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity developed rapidly with significant difference compared with control mice observed after 4 and 8 weeks of hyperglycemia, respectively. In diabetic mice with good glycemic control, average blood glucose levels over the 20-week experimental period were lowered from 589 ± 2 to 251 ± 9 mg/dl. All diabetic neuropathy endpoints examined were improved in diabetic mice with good glycemic control compared with untreated diabetic mice. However, good control of blood glucose was not totally sufficient in preventing diabetic neuropathy.

  7. Defective production of interleukin-1 beta in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: Restoration by proper glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Kousathana, Foteini; Georgitsi, Marianna; Lambadiari, Vaia; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J; Dimitriadis, George; Mouktaroudi, Maria

    2017-02-01

    The underlying immune defect of susceptibility in diabetes mellitus type 2 to infections remains unknown. The qualitative changes in cytokine biosynthesis by circulating mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and its modulation by glycemic control were investigated. PBMCs were isolated from 39 patients and 25 controls. They were stimulated with purified ligands and heat-killed bacteria in the absence/presence of glucose and NLPR3 inflammasome ligands. Experiments were repeated after 3 and 6months. Cytokine production was measured in cell supernatants; pro-interleukin(IL)-1 β was measured in cell lysates. Gene expression of IL-1β and activity of caspase-1 were measured as well. Adequate release of interleukin (IL)-1β was found in 42.9% of patients compared to 90% of controls (p: 0.0001). This was related with down-regulation of the NLRP3 inflammasome since gene expression of IL-1β remained unaltered whereas both the ratio of IL-1β to the intracellular pro-IL-1β and the activity of caspase-1 was lower in patients than controls. Addition of glucose did not modify defective IL-1β production. IL-6 production was increased after stimulation with Pam3Cys, phytohemagglutinin and C. albicans. After proper glycemic control, release of IL-1β was increased and of IL-6 decreased; cells of patients with improved glycemic control responded better to LPS stimulation under increased concentrations of glucose. It is concluded that diabetes type 2 is characterized by defective production of IL-1β from circulating monocytes due to impaired activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and increased production of the anti-inflammatory IL-6. Defects are restored with proper glycemic control.

  8. Periprocedural glycemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus undergoing coronary angiography with possible percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Shah, Binita; Berger, Jeffrey S; Amoroso, Nicholas S; Mai, Xingchen; Lorin, Jeffrey D; Danoff, Ann; Schwartzbard, Arthur Z; Lobach, Iryna; Guo, Yu; Feit, Frederick; Slater, James; Attubato, Michael J; Sedlis, Steven P

    2014-05-01

    Periprocedural hyperglycemia is an independent predictor of mortality in patients who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). However, periprocedural management of blood glucose is not standardized. The effects of routinely continuing long-acting glucose-lowering medications before coronary angiography with possible PCI on periprocedural glycemic control have not been investigated. Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM; n = 172) were randomized to continue (Continue group; n = 86) or hold (Hold group; n = 86) their clinically prescribed long-acting glucose-lowering medications before the procedure. The primary end point was glucose level on procedural access. In a subset of patients (no DM group: n = 25; Continue group: n = 25; and Hold group: n = 25), selected measures of platelet activity that change acutely were assessed. Patients with DM randomized to the Continue group had lower blood glucose levels on procedural access compared with those randomized to the Hold group (117 [97 to 151] vs 134 [117 to 172] mg/dl, p = 0.002). There were two hypoglycemic events in the Continue group and none in the Hold group, and no adverse events in either group. Selected markers of platelet activity differed across the no DM, Continue, and Hold groups (leukocyte platelet aggregates: 8.1% [7.2 to 10.4], 8.7% [6.9 to 11.4], 10.9% [8.6 to 14.7], p = 0.007; monocyte platelet aggregates: 14.0% [10.3 to 16.3], 20.8% [16.2 to 27.0], 22.5% [15.2 to 35.4], p <0.001; soluble p-selectin: 51.9 ng/ml [39.7 to 74.0], 59.1 ng/ml [46.8 to 73.2], 72.2 ng/ml [58.4 to 77.4], p = 0.014). In conclusion, routinely continuing clinically prescribed long-acting glucose-lowering medications before coronary angiography with possible PCI help achieve periprocedural euglycemia, appear safe, and should be considered as a strategy for achieving periprocedural glycemic control.

  9. Glycemic management in ESRD and earlier stages of CKD.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mark E; Garg, Rajesh

    2014-02-01

    The management of hyperglycemia in patients with kidney failure is complex, and the goals and methods regarding glycemic control in chronic kidney disease (CKD) are not clearly defined. Although aggressive glycemic control seems to be advantageous in early diabetic nephropathy, outcome data supporting tight glycemic control in patients with advanced CKD (including end-stage renal disease [ESRD]) are lacking. Challenges in the management of such patients include therapeutic inertia, monitoring difficulties, and the complexity of available treatments. In this article, we review the alterations in glucose homeostasis that occur in kidney failure, current views on the value of glycemic control and issues with its determination, and more recent approaches to monitor or measure glycemic control. Hypoglycemia and treatment options for patients with diabetes and ESRD or earlier stages of CKD also are addressed, discussing the insulin and noninsulin agents that currently are available, along with their indications and contraindications. The article provides information to help clinicians in decision making in order to provide individualized glycemic goals and appropriate therapy for patients with ESRD or earlier stages of CKD.

  10. Acarbose improves glycemic control and reduces body weight: Subanalysis data of South Asia region.

    PubMed

    Kalra, S; Sahay, R K; Schnell, O; Sheu, W H H; Grzeszczak, W; Watada, H; Soegondo, S; Yamamoto, N; Weng, J; Rathod, R

    2013-10-01

    Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors (AGIs) are widely used especially in Asian countries as a treatment option for type 2 diabetes patients with high postprandial glycaemia. However, data from South Asia region is very limited. In order to examine the effect of AGI in real-life setting, 10 PMS/NIS from all over the world from the launch of acarbose to date were pooled in one database and exploratory analysis was performed for glycemic parameters and weight. In total 62,905 patients were pooled from 21 countries and regions. Mean follow up (± SD) was 12.2 ± 4.8 weeks (range 0.1-108.9). From South Asia region (India and Pakistan), 8,738 Asian patients were enrolled. Mean PPG decreased from 240.0 and 261.1 mg/dl at baseline by 70.26 ± 65.10 and 82.96 ± 56.59 mg/dl at the last visit in total and South Asian populations, respectively (n = 53,883; n = 7,991, P < 0.0001 for both). Mean FPG decreased from 171.6 and 176.5 mg/dl at baseline by 38.48 ± 47.83 and 49.59 ± 41.41 mg/dl at the last visit in total and South Asian populations, respectively (n = 56,672; n = 7,837, P < 0.0001 for both). Mean HbA1c decreased from 8.4 and 8.4% at baseline by 1.11 ± 1.31% and 0.91 ± 0.93% at the last visit in total and South Asian populations, respectively (n = 38,843; n = 2,343, P < 0.0001 for both). Mean relative reduction of body weight (BW) was 1.40 ± 3.28% and 1.10 ± 3.39% at the last visit for mean baseline BW 73.6 and 74.2 kg in total and South Asian populations, respectively (n = 54,760; n = 7,718, P < 0.0001 for both). Consistent with RCT meta-analyses, post-hoc analysis of real-life data showed acarbose treatment improved glycaemic control and reduced the BW. Acarbose treatment in real life setting showed significant reductions in all glycemic parameters and BW in Asian patients from South Asia region.

  11. Current topics in glycemic control by wearable artificial pancreas or bedside artificial pancreas with closed-loop system.

    PubMed

    Hanazaki, Kazuhiro; Munekage, Masaya; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Yatabe, Tomoaki; Munekage, Eri; Shiga, Mai; Maeda, Hiromichi; Namikawa, Tsutomu

    2016-09-01

    The incidence of diabetes is increasing at an unprecedented pace and has become a serious health concern worldwide during the last two decades. Despite this, adequate glycemic control using an artificial pancreas has not been established, although the 21st century has seen rapid developments in this area. Herein, we review current topics in glycemic control for both the wearable artificial pancreas for type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients and the bedside artificial pancreas for surgical diabetic patients. In type 1 diabetic patients, nocturnal hypoglycemia associated with insulin therapy remains a serious problem that could be addressed by the recent development of a wearable artificial pancreas. This smart phone-like device, comprising a real-time, continuous glucose monitoring system and insulin pump system, could potentially significantly reduce nocturnal hypoglycemia compared with conventional glycemic control. Of particular interest in this space are the recent inventions of a low-glucose suspend feature in the portable systems that automatically stops insulin delivery 2 h following a glucose sensor value <70 mg/dL and a bio-hormonal pump system consisting of insulin and glucagon pumps. Perioperative tight glycemic control using a bedside artificial pancreas with the closed-loop system has also proved safe and effective for not only avoiding hypoglycemia, but also for reducing blood glucose level variability resulting in good surgical outcomes. We hope that a more sophisticated artificial pancreas with closed-loop system will now be taken up for routine use worldwide, providing enormous relief for patients suffering from uncontrolled hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, and/or variability in blood glucose concentrations.

  12. Glycemic Control in the Burn Intensive Care Unit: Focus on the Role of Anemia in Glucose Measurement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    1319 Glycemic Control in the Burn Intensive Care Unit: Focus on the Role of Anemia in Glucose Measurement MAJ Elizabeth A. Mann, R.N., M.S...outcomes and survival in the burn population. Severe burn as a model for trauma is characterized by a hypermetabolic state, hyperglycemia, and insulin...resistance. In this article, we review the findings of a burn center research facility in terms of understanding glucose management. The conferred

  13. Impact of Glycemic Control and Metformin Use on the Recurrence and Progression of Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the potential relationships of glycemic control and use of metformin with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer characteristics. We reviewed data from 645 patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer between January 2004 and May 2015. We analyzed the association of pre and post-operative glycemic control and use of metformin with clinical characteristics of bladder tumors. We also analyzed the association of glycemic control and use of metformin with recurrence-free and progression-free survivals. Diabetes mellitus patients showed decreased recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio 1.42; 95% confidence interval 1.1–1.9; P = 0.021) and progression-free survival (hazard ratio 1.79; 95% confidence interval 1.1–2.8; P = 0.013). Diabetes mellitus patients with a HbA1c ≥ 7.0% demonstrated a higher rate of progression (P = 0.026). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that progression-free survival rate was associated with poor baseline glycemic control (P = 0.026) and post-operative glycemic control (P = 0.025). However, use of metformin had no impact on the recurrence (P = 1.00) and progression (P = 0.282). In conclusion, poor baseline and post-operative glycemic control was related with shorter progression-free survival of patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. Use of metformin had no impact on the recurrence and progression. Therefore, tight glycemic control and close follow-up for bladder tumor may be beneficial in patients with poor glycemic control. PMID:27510392

  14. Improved Glycemic Control in Intensively Treated Adult Subjects with Type 1 Diabetes Using Insulin Guidance Software

    PubMed Central

    Bookout, Tevin R.; McFann, Kim K.; Kelly, William C.; Beatson, Christie; Ellis, Samuel L.; Gutin, Raymond S.; Gottlieb, Peter A.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Management of type 1 diabetes could be significantly improved with the availability of computerized insulin algorithms for home use. Methods This was a 1-year open label randomized control trial involving 123 adult subjects with type 1 diabetes (hemoglobin A1c values 7.5–11%) assigned to either the insulin guidance software (ACCU-CHEK® [Roche, Indianapolis, IN] Advisor) for personal data assistant (experimental group) or the control group. The primary aim of the study was to see if subjects using insulin dosing advisor software will improve glucose control over 1 year. The principal end point was an improvement in A1c at 6 and 12 months by ≥0.4%. Results Baseline demographics were similar in the two groups. Mean A1c was 8.54 ± 0.11% in the control group and 8.42 ± 0.11% (P = 0.4265) in the experimental group. The mean A1c was significantly lower from 3 to 12 months in the experimental group (P < 0.02). A1c reduction of ≥0.6% was maintained at 12 months in the experimental group. Also, a significantly higher number of subjects achieved A1c <7.5% in the experimental group from 3 to 9 months. Within target range glycemia (70–150 mg/dL) was higher in the experimental group at 3–9 months without any change in insulin dose or weight. Above target range glycemia was lower in the experimental group throughout the study. Frequency of testing per day was higher in the experimental group. Nocturnal hypoglycemia was not different between groups; however, the experimental group experienced more severe hypoglycemic events. Conclusions This is the first report that shows improved glycemic control can be maintained over 12 months in patients with type 1 diabetes by using Advisor with no change in insulin dose and weight. PMID:18715213

  15. Preserving Mafa expression in diabetic islet β-cells improves glycemic control in vivo.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Taka-aki; Kaneto, Hideaki; Kawashima, Satoshi; Miyatsuka, Takeshi; Tochino, Yoshihiro; Yoshikawa, Atsushi; Imagawa, Akihisa; Miyazaki, Jun-ichi; Gannon, Maureen; Stein, Roland; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2015-03-20

    The murine Mafa transcription factor is a key regulator of postnatal islet β-cell activity, affecting insulin transcription, insulin secretion, and β-cell mass. Human MAFA expression is also markedly decreased in islet β-cells of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients. Moreover, levels are profoundly reduced in db/db islet β-cells, a mouse model of T2DM. To examine the significance of this key islet β-cell-enriched protein to glycemic control under diabetic conditions, we generated transgenic mice that conditionally and specifically produced Mafa in db/db islet β-cells. Sustained expression of Mafa resulted in significantly lower plasma glucose levels, higher plasma insulin, and augmented islet β-cell mass. In addition, there was increased expression of insulin, Slc2a2, and newly identified Mafa-regulated genes involved in reducing β-cell stress, like Gsta1 and Gckr. Importantly, the levels of human GSTA1 were also compromised in T2DM islets. Collectively, these results illustrate how consequential the reduction in Mafa activity is to islet β-cell function under pathophysiological conditions.

  16. Management of diabetes mellitus in individuals with chronic kidney disease: therapeutic perspectives and glycemic control

    PubMed Central

    Betônico, Carolina C R; Titan, Silvia M O; Correa-Giannella, Maria Lúcia C; Nery, Márcia; Queiroz, Márcia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic options for diabetes treatment and their potential side effects, in addition to analyzing the risks and benefits of tight glycemic control in patients with diabetic kidney disease. For this review, a search was performed using several pre-defined keyword combinations and their equivalents: “diabetes kidney disease” and “renal failure” in combination with “diabetes treatment” and “oral antidiabetic drugs” or “oral hypoglycemic agents.” The search was performed in PubMed, Endocrine Abstracts and the Cochrane Library from January 1980 up to January 2015. Diabetes treatment in patients with diabetic kidney disease is challenging, in part because of progression of renal failure-related changes in insulin signaling, glucose transport and metabolism, favoring both hyperglycemic peaks and hypoglycemia. Additionally, the decline in renal function impairs the clearance and metabolism of antidiabetic agents and insulin, frequently requiring reassessment of prescriptions. The management of hyperglycemia in patients with diabetic kidney disease is even more difficult, requiring adjustment of antidiabetic agents and insulin doses. The health team responsible for the follow-up of these patients should be vigilant and prepared to make such changes; however, unfortunately, there are few guidelines addressing the nuances of the management of this specific population. PMID:26872083

  17. Polyunsaturated fatty acids and type 2 diabetes: impact on the glycemic control mechanism.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Olívia Gonçalves Leão; da Silva, Bárbara Pereira; Rocha, Daniela Mayumi Usuda Prado; Lopes, Lílian Lelis; Alfenas, Rita de Cássia Gonçalves

    2016-02-06

    There is a growing mortality related to co-morbidities associated with diabetes mellitus (DM). Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) intake has been associated with low cardiometabolic risk and reduction of inflammatory process. The objective of this paper is to review the impact of PUFA intake on glycemic control in diabetic patients, as well as elucidate the possible mechanisms involved. Medline/PubMed electronic database was searched to identify studies published within the last 5 years regarding the effect of PUFA intake on glucose metabolism in type 2 diabetics. The search terms used were: "polyunsaturated fatty acid (s)", "PUFA", and "diabetes." We included only intervetion studies that assessed the effects of PUFA intake on glucose metabolism - fasting glucose, serum insulin, HbA1c and HOMA-IR assessment- in type 2 diabetics. Initially, 48 articles were identified, which 1 was not available and 41 did not match the inclusion criteria. Within the selected studies, 3 showed an improvement on fasting blood glucose, 2 showed an increase on fasting glycemia and there was no effect of the intervention in only 1. Based on the analyzed clinical intervention studies, supplementation of 0,42-5,2 g PUFA/day for at least 8 weeks may be an alternative treatment for T2DM, particularly to Asian people.

  18. Beyond glycemic control in diabetes mellitus: effects of incretin-based therapies on bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ceccarelli, Elena; Guarino, Elisa G; Merlotti, Daniela; Patti, Aurora; Gennari, Luigi; Nuti, Ranuccio; Dotta, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and osteoporosis (OP) are common disorders with a significant health burden, and an increase in fracture risk has been described both in type 1 (T1DM) and in type 2 (T2DM) diabetes. The pathogenic mechanisms of impaired skeletal strength in diabetes remain to be clarified in details and they are only in part reflected by a variation in bone mineral density. In T2DM, the occurrence of low bone turnover together with a decreased osteoblast activity and compromised bone quality has been shown. Of note, some antidiabetic drugs (e.g., thiazolidinediones, insulin) may deeply affect bone metabolism. In addition, the recently introduced class of incretin-based drugs (i.e., GLP-1 receptor agonists and DPP-4 inhibitors) is expected to exert potentially beneficial effects on bone health, possibly due to a bone anabolic activity of GLP-1, that can be either direct or indirect through the involvement of thyroid C cells. Here we will review the established as well as the putative effects of incretin hormones and of incretin-based drugs on bone metabolism, both in preclinical models and in man, taking into account that such therapeutic strategy may be effective not only to achieve a good glycemic control, but also to improve bone health in diabetic patients.

  19. Management of diabetes mellitus in individuals with chronic kidney disease: therapeutic perspectives and glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Betônico, Carolina C R; Titan, Silvia M O; Correa-Giannella, Maria Lúcia C; Nery, Márcia; Queiroz, Márcia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic options for diabetes treatment and their potential side effects, in addition to analyzing the risks and benefits of tight glycemic control in patients with diabetic kidney disease. For this review, a search was performed using several pre-defined keyword combinations and their equivalents: "diabetes kidney disease" and "renal failure" in combination with "diabetes treatment" and "oral antidiabetic drugs" or "oral hypoglycemic agents." The search was performed in PubMed, Endocrine Abstracts and the Cochrane Library from January 1980 up to January 2015. Diabetes treatment in patients with diabetic kidney disease is challenging, in part because of progression of renal failure-related changes in insulin signaling, glucose transport and metabolism, favoring both hyperglycemic peaks and hypoglycemia. Additionally, the decline in renal function impairs the clearance and metabolism of antidiabetic agents and insulin, frequently requiring reassessment of prescriptions. The management of hyperglycemia in patients with diabetic kidney disease is even more difficult, requiring adjustment of antidiabetic agents and insulin doses. The health team responsible for the follow-up of these patients should be vigilant and prepared to make such changes; however, unfortunately, there are few guidelines addressing the nuances of the management of this specific population.

  20. Effect of Poor Glycemic Control in Newly Diagnosed Patients with Smear-Positive Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Mahishale, Vinay; Avuthu, Sindhuri; Patil, Bhagyashri; Lolly, Mitchelle; Eti, Ajith; Khan, Sujeer

    2017-01-01

    Background: There is growing evidence that diabetes mellitus (DM) is an important risk factor for tuberculosis (TB). A significant number of DM patients have poor glycemic control. This study was carried out to find the impact of poor glycemic control on newly diagnosed smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus in a tertiary care hospital. Methods: In a hospital-based prospective study, newly diagnosed smear-positive pulmonary TB with DM patients were classified as poorly controlled diabetes (HBA1C≥7%) and optimal control diabetics (HbA1c<7%). Patients were started on anti-TB treatment and followed for 2 years for severity and treatment outcome. ANOVA was used for numerical variables in the univariable analysis. Logistic regression analysis was used for multivariable analysis of treatment outcome. The significance level was kept at a P≤0.05. Results: A total of 630 individuals who met the inclusion criteria were analyzed; of which 423 patients had poor glycemic control (PGC) and 207 patients had optimal glycemic control (OGC). The average HbA1c was 10±2.6 and 5±1.50 in the PGC and OGC groups, respectively. The mean symptom score was significantly higher in the PGC group compared with patients in the OGC group (4.55±0.80 vs. 2.70±0.82, P<0.001). PGC was associated with more extensive lung disease, lung cavitation, and positive sputum smear at the baseline. In PGC, sputum smears were significantly more likely to remain positive after 2 months of treatment. PGC patients had significantly higher rates of treatment failure (adj. OR 0.72, 95% CI 0.58-0.74, P<0.001) and relapse (adj. OR 2.83, 95% CI 2.60-2.92, P<0.001). Conclusion: Poor glycemic control is associated with an increased risk of advanced and more severe TB disease in the form of lung cavitations, positive sputum smear, and slower smear conversion. It has a profound negative effect on treatment completion, cure, and relapse rates in patients with pulmonary

  1. Smoking, Central Adiposity, and Poor Glycemic Control Increase Risk of Hearing Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Cruickshanks, Karen J.; Nondahl, David M.; Dalton, Dayna S.; Fischer, Mary E.; Klein, Barbara E.K.; Klein, Ronald; Nieto, F. Javier; Schubert, Carla R.; Tweed, Ted S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine associations between smoking, adiposity, diabetes, and other cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and the 15-yr incidence of hearing impairment (HI). Design The Epidemiology of Hearing Loss Study (EHLS) is a longitudinal population-based cohort study (1993–95 to 2009–2010). Setting Beaver Dam, WI. Participants Participants in the Beaver Dam Eye Study (1988–90; residents of Beaver Dam, WI ages 43–84 years in 1987–88) were eligible for the EHLS. There were 1925 participants with normal hearing at baseline. Measurements 15-year cumulative incidence of HI (pure-tone average (PTA) of hearing thresholds at 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 kHz > 25 decibels Hearing Level (dB HL) in either ear). Cigarette smoking, exercise, and other factors were ascertained by questionnaire. Blood pressure, waist circumference, body mass index and glycosylated hemoglobin were measured. Results Follow-up examinations (≥1) were obtained from 87.2% (n=1678; mean baseline age 61 years). The 15-year cumulative incidence of HI was 56.8%. Adjusting for age and sex, current smoking (Hazard Ratio (HR) =1.31, p=0.048), education (<16 yrs; HR=1.35, p=0.01), waist circumference (HR=1.08 per 10 cm, p=0.017), and poorly controlled diabetes (HR=2.03, p=0.048) were associated with increased risk of HI. Former smokers and people with better controlled diabetes were not at increased risk. Conclusion Smoking, central adiposity and poorly controlled diabetes predicted incident HI. These well-known CVD risk factors, suggest vascular changes may contribute to HI in aging. Interventions targeting reductions in smoking and adiposity, and improved glycemic control in people with diabetes, may help to prevent or delay the onset of HI. PMID:25953199

  2. An unbiased lipidomics approach identifies early second trimester lipids predictive of Maternal Glycemic Traits and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Liangjian; Koulman, Albert; Petry, Clive J.; Jenkins, Benjamin; Matthews, Lee; Hughes, Ieuan A.; Acerini, Carlo L.; Ong, Ken K.; Dunger, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between early second trimester serum lipidomic variation and maternal glycemic traits at 28 weeks, and to identify predictive lipid biomarkers for Gestational Diabetes (GDM). Research Design and Methods Prospective study of 817 pregnant women (Discovery cohort, n=200; Validation cohort, n=617) who provided an early second trimester serum sample, and underwent oral glucose tolerance testing (OGTT) at 28 weeks. In the discovery cohort, lipids were measured using direct infusion mass spectrometry, and correlated with OGTT results. Variable Importance in Projection (VIP) scores were used to identify candidate lipid biomarkers. Candidate biomarkers were measured in the validation cohort using Liquid Chromatography- Mass Spectrometry, and tested for associations with OGTT results and GDM status. Results Early second trimester lipidomic variation was associated with 1-hour post-load glucose levels, but not with fasting plasma glucose. Of the 13 lipid species identified by VIP scores, 10 had nominally significant associations with post-load glucose levels. In the validation cohort, 5 of these 10 lipids had significant associations with post-load glucose levels independent of maternal age and BMI, i.e. TG(51:1), TG(48:1), PC(32:1), PCae(40:3) and PCae(40:4). All except the last were also associated with maternal GDM status. Together, these 4 lipid biomarkers had moderate ability to predict GDM (Area under curve (AUC)= 0.71±0.04, p=4.85×10-7), and improved the prediction of GDM by age and BMI alone from AUC 0.69 to AUC 0.74. Conclusions Specific early second trimester lipid biomarkers can predict maternal GDM status independent of maternal age and BMI, potentially enhancing risk factor-based screening. PMID:27703025

  3. Prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and relation to glycemic control therapies at baseline in the BARI 2D cohort.

    PubMed

    Pop-Busui, Rodica; Lu, Jiang; Lopes, Neuza; Jones, Teresa L Z

    2009-03-01

    We evaluated the associations between glycemic therapies and prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) at baseline among participants in the Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) trial on medical and revascularization therapies for coronary artery disease (CAD) and on insulin-sensitizing vs. insulin-providing treatments for diabetes. A total of 2,368 patients with type 2 diabetes and CAD was evaluated. DPN was defined as clinical examination score >2 using the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI). DPN odds ratios across different groups of glycemic therapy were evaluated by multiple logistic regression adjusted for multiple covariates including age, sex, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), and diabetes duration. Fifty-one percent of BARI 2D subjects with valid baseline characteristics and MNSI scores had DPN. After adjusting for all variables, use of insulin was significantly associated with DPN (OR = 1.57, 95% CI: 1.15-2.13). Patients on sulfonylurea (SU) or combination of SU/metformin (Met)/thiazolidinediones (TZD) had marginally higher rates of DPN than the Met/TZD group. This cross-sectional study in a cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes and CAD showed association of insulin use with higher DPN prevalence, independent of disease duration, glycemic control, and other characteristics. The causality between a glycemic control strategy and DPN cannot be evaluated in this cross-sectional study, but continued assessment of DPN and randomized therapies in BARI 2D trial may provide further explanations on the development of DPN.

  4. Effect of the carbohydrate counting method on glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The importance of achieving and maintaining an appropriate metabolic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) has been established in many studies aiming to prevent the development of chronic complications. The carbohydrate counting method can be recommended as an additional tool in the nutritional treatment of diabetes, allowing patients with DM1 to have more flexible food choices. This study aimed to evaluate the influence of nutrition intervention and the use of multiple short-acting insulin according to the carbohydrate counting method on clinical and metabolic control in patients with DM1. Methods Our sample consisted of 51 patients with DM1, 32 females, aged 25.3 ± 1.55 years. A protocol of nutritional status evaluation was applied and laboratory analysis was performed at baseline and after a three-month intervention. After the analysis of the food records, a balanced diet was prescribed using the carbohydrate counting method, and short-acting insulin was prescribed based on the total amount of carbohydrate per meal (1 unit per 15 g of carbohydrate). Results A significant decrease in A1c levels was observed from baseline to the three-month evaluation after the intervention (10.40 ± 0.33% and 9.52 ± 0.32%, respectively, p = 0.000). It was observed an increase in daily insulin dose after the intervention (0.99 ± 0.65 IU/Kg and 1.05 ± 0.05 IU/Kg, respectively, p = 0.003). No significant differences were found regarding anthropometric evaluation (BMI, waist, hip or abdominal circumferences and waist to hip ratio) after the intervention period. Conclusions The use of short-acting insulin based on the carbohydrate counting method after a short period of time resulted in a significant improvement of the glycemic control in patients with DM1 with no changes in body weight despite increases in the total daily insulin doses. PMID:20716374

  5. Sleep Pattern, Duration and Quality in Relation with Glycemic Control in People with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Gozashti, Mohammad Hossein; Eslami, Nazanin; Radfar, Mohammad Hadi; Pakmanesh, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disturbances have been shown to be associated with diabetes control, but the relation between planned wakings or napping with glycemic indices has not been evaluated yet. This study evaluated the relation between sleep quality, duration, and pattern, including daytime napping of people with diabetes and their glycemic control. A cross-sectional correlation research design was used for this study. We enrolled 118 people with type 2 diabetes receiving oral agents without major complications at the Shahid Bahonar Center, Kerman. The age, weight, height, serum HbA1c, as well as other glycemic indices and lipid profile were measured. BMI was also calculated. All participants were requested to fill in the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) questionnaire to evaluate their sleep quality. In addition, they were inquired about their sleep schedule during day and night. Pearson correlation and multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine the correlation between HbA1c and sleep pattern variables. The variables were also compared between participants with or without napping using t-test. All analyses were performed with the SPSS version 19 (SPSS, Chicago, IL, USA). The mean age was 58±11 years and mean HbA1c (%) was 7.8±11 (62±13 mmol/mol). Sleep duration and the number of sleep segments significantly predicted HbA1c (F (2,114)=5.232, P=0.007, R2=0.084). A one-hour increment in sleep duration was associated with a 0.174% (1.4 mmol/mol) decrement in HbA1c. PSQI score did not contribute to the regression model. Moreover, participants who napped (66%) had a lower HbA1c (7.6±1) compared to others (8.1±1.3) (P=0.04). We concluded that napping and segmented sleep are associated with a better glycemic control in type 2 diabetes and there is a linear correlation between sleep duration and better glycemic control. PMID:27853334

  6. The benefits of tight glycemic control in critical illness: Sweeter than assumed?

    PubMed

    Gardner, Andrew John

    2014-12-01

    Hyperglycemia has long been observed amongst critically ill patients and associated with increased mortality and morbidity. Tight glycemic control (TGC) is the clinical practice of controlling blood glucose (BG) down to the "normal" 4.4-6.1 mmol/L range of a healthy adult, aiming to avoid any potential deleterious effects of hyperglycemia. The ground-breaking Leuven trials reported a mortality benefit of approximately 10% when using this technique, which led many to endorse its benefits. In stark contrast, the multi-center normoglycemia in intensive care evaluation-survival using glucose algorithm regulation (NICE-SUGAR) trial, not only failed to replicate this outcome, but showed TGC appeared to be harmful. This review attempts to re-analyze the current literature and suggests that hope for a benefit from TGC should not be so hastily abandoned. Inconsistencies in study design make a like-for-like comparison of the Leuven and NICE-SUGAR trials challenging. Inadequate measures preventing hypoglycemic events are likely to have contributed to the increased mortality observed in the NICE-SUGAR treatment group. New technologies, including predictive models, are being developed to improve the safety of TGC, primarily by minimizing hypoglycemia. Intensive Care Units which are unequipped in trained staff and monitoring capacity would be unwise to attempt TGC, especially considering its yet undefined benefit and the deleterious nature of hypoglycemia. International recommendations now advise clinicians to ensure critically ill patients maintain a BG of <10 mmol/L. Despite encouraging evidence, currently we can only speculate and remain optimistic that the benefit of TGC in clinical practice is sweeter than assumed.

  7. Comparative effects of energy restriction and resveratrol intake on glycemic control improvement.

    PubMed

    Milton-Laskibar, I; Aguirre, L; Macarulla, M T; Etxeberria, U; Milagro, F I; Martínez, J A; Contreras, J; Portillo, M P

    2017-02-20

    Resveratrol (RSV) has been proposed as an energy restriction mimetic. This study aimed to compare the effects of RSV and energy restriction on insulin resistance induced by an obesogenic diet. Any additive effect of both treatments was also analyzed. Rats were fed a high-fat high-sucrose diet for 6 weeks. They were then distributed in four experimental groups which were either fed a standard control diet (C), or treated with RSV (30 mg/kg/d), or submitted to energy restriction (R, 15%), or treated with RSV and submitted to energy restriction (RR). A glucose tolerance test was performed, and serum glucose, insulin, fructosamine, adiponectin, and leptin concentrations determined. Muscle triacylglycerol content and protein expression of insulin receptor (IRβ), protein kinase B (Akt), Akt substrate of 160 kDa (AS160) and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT-4) were measured. In RSV rats, fructosamine concentrations were reduced, HOMA-IR remained unchanged, but glucose tolerance was improved, without changes in phosphorylation of IRβ, Akt, and AS160 or in GLUT-4 protein expression. Rats under energy restriction showed an improvement in all the markers related to glycemic control, as well as increased phosphorylation of AS160 and protein expression of GLUT-4. In rats from RR group the results were similar to R group, with the exception of IRβ and Akt phosphorylation, which were increased. In conclusion, mild energy restriction is more efficient than intake of RSV within a standard balanced diet, and acts by means of a different mechanism from that of RSV. No additive effects between RSV and energy restriction were observed. © 2016 BioFactors, 2016.

  8. Assessment of an educational intervention in the management of non-critical inpatient glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Huelgas, R; Lopez-Carmona, M D; Jansen-Chaparro, S; Sobrino, B; Chaves, M; Martin-Gallardo, P; Garcia-Fernandez, C; Bernal-Lopez, M R

    2014-01-01

    In hospitalized diabetic patients, the recommended insulin therapy is basal bolus plus correction-dose regimen instead of sliding-scale insulin. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the implementation of a new protocol based on basal bolus therapy on managing diabetes in a university hospital setting. We performed a cross-sectional study before and 12 months after a 4-month intervention period to implement a basal bolus regimen in hospitalized patients. Non-critical patients admitted into the hospital for at least 72 h were included. Changes in prescribing habits, glucose control and incidence of hypoglycemia were evaluated. An increase in the use of the new protocol and a decrease in sliding scale were observed after the intervention. In the pre-intervention group, a total of 59.2% glucose readings were between 70 and 180 mg/dL versus 57.1% after the intervention, without observing statistical differences. Significant reductions in hypoglycemia between pre- and post-intervention (13.04 vs. 4.08%, p = 0.0215) were observed. The percentage of hospitalized diabetic patients who had HbA1c was 10.43 and 4.08% in pre- and post-intervention phases, respectively. The protocol showed beneficial outcomes in terms of fewer hypoglycemia episodes and reflected a change in prescription habits, but it did not improve glycemic control. Furthermore, the percentage of patients who had an HbA1c test during their hospitalization remained very low after the intervention. This fact may seriously limit the correct management of hyperglycemia after the hospital discharge.

  9. Supported Telemonitoring and Glycemic Control in People with Type 2 Diabetes: The Telescot Diabetes Pragmatic Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Sarah H.; Hanley, Janet; Lewis, Stephanie C.; McKnight, John A.; Padfield, Paul L.; Parker, Richard A.; Pinnock, Hilary; Sheikh, Aziz; McKinstry, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Background Self-monitoring of blood glucose among people with type 2 diabetes not treated with insulin does not appear to be effective in improving glycemic control. We investigated whether health professional review of telemetrically transmitted self-monitored glucose results in improved glycemic control in people with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes. Methods and Findings We performed a randomized, parallel, investigator-blind controlled trial with centralized randomization in family practices in four regions of the United Kingdom among 321 people with type 2 diabetes and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) >58 mmol/mol. The supported telemonitoring intervention involved self-measurement and transmission to a secure website of twice-weekly morning and evening glucose for review by family practice clinicians who were not blinded to allocation group. The control group received usual care, with at least annual review and more frequent reviews for people with poor glycemic or blood pressure control. HbA1c assessed at 9 mo was the primary outcome. Intention-to-treat analyses were performed. 160 people were randomized to the intervention group and 161 to the usual care group between June 6, 2011, and July 19, 2013. HbA1c data at follow-up were available for 146 people in the intervention group and 139 people in the control group. The mean (SD) HbA1c at follow-up was 63.0 (15.5) mmol/mol in the intervention group and 67.8 (14.7) mmol/mol in the usual care group. For primary analysis, adjusted mean HbA1c was 5.60 mmol/mol / 0.51% lower (95% CI 2.38 to 8.81 mmol/mol/ 95% CI 0.22% to 0.81%, p = 0·0007). For secondary analyses, adjusted mean ambulatory systolic blood pressure was 3.06 mmHg lower (95% CI 0.56–5.56 mmHg, p = 0.017) and mean ambulatory diastolic blood pressure was 2.17 mmHg lower (95% CI 0.62–3.72, p = 0.006) among people in the intervention group when compared with usual care after adjustment for baseline differences and minimization strata. No significant

  10. Characterization of Factors Affecting Attainment of Glycemic Control in Asian Americans With Diabetes in a Culturally Specific Program

    PubMed Central

    Le, Hung; Wong, Sophia; Iftikar, Tracy; Keenan, Hillary; King, George L.; Hsu, William C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to examine the effectiveness of a culturally specific pilot clinic for Asian Americans (AA) in reaching glycemic target and to characterize factors affecting the attainment of glycemic control in comparison with white counterparts. Methods This electronic health record review included all new AA patients with type 2 diabetes (n = 109) in a culturally specific program and a randomly selected sample of new white patients with type 2 diabetes (n = 218) in the adult clinic within the same time period and diabetes center. Results AA and whites had a comparable proportion of patients with A1C ≤7% (32.1%, 34.9%; P = .621) at baseline and after 12 months of care (48.6%, 56.0%; P = .210), with a similar A1C decline (−0.9% ± 1.6%, −0.8% ± 1.7%, P = .710) by 12 months. Factors associated with the lack of success in reaching target in AA but not in whites included older age, lower educational attainment, less likelihood of having health insurance, and a need for more educational visits. The percentage of AA reaching A1C ≤7%, as compared to whites, worsened among those with highest initial A1C when stratified by ascending quartiles (96.7% vs 85.2%, P = .101; 61.9% vs 58.9%, P = .813; 24.0% vs 37.7%, P = .230; 15.2% vs 35.4%, P = .044). Conclusion While a culturally specific diabetes program in a specialty setting achieved a similar glycemic outcome for AA compared with whites, reasons for not reaching glycemic target differed. The findings suggest that the elimination of diabetes disparities requires not only culturally and linguistically specific programs, but must also identify and address the socio-environmental differences unique to each population. PMID:23771841

  11. The impact of prediabetes on glycemic control and clinical outcomes postburn injury.

    PubMed

    Somerset, Amy; Coffey, Rebecca; Jones, Larry; Murphy, Claire V

    2014-01-01

    Poor glucose control and clinical outcomes have been observed in diabetic versus nondiabetic patients postburn injury. Prediabetes is a precursor to diabetes. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of prediabetes on postinjury glucose control and clinical outcomes. A retrospective review was conducted comparing prediabetics and euglycemic controls. Patients who were admitted for burn care were 18 to 89 years of age and had a hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) obtained on admission. Prediabetics were defined by an HbA1c of 5.7 to 6.4% and controls by HbA1c < 5.7%. Inpatient glucose levels were recorded, in addition to clinical outcomes. Two hundred eight patients were included: 54 prediabetics and 154 controls. The prediabetic population was older (50.7 vs 39 years; P < .001) with more hypertensives (44.4 vs 16.9%; P < .001), consisted of more African-Americans (20.4 vs 12%; P = .04), and had larger areas of full-thickness burns (4.5 vs 1.75%; P = .02). Median admission HbA1c was 5.9 (5.7-6.0)% among prediabetics and 5.3 (5-5.45)% among controls (P < .001). Prediabetics had significantly higher time-weighted glucose levels (127.7 [105.5-147.6] vs 108.0 [97.1-122.2] mg/dl; P < .001) and more had an average inpatient glucose >150 mg/dl (20.4 vs 9.1%; P = .028). There was no difference in rates of hypoglycemia (glucose <70 mg/dl) or glycemic variability. Prediabetics had lower survival rates (92.6 vs 98.7%; P = .041), but similar rates of unplanned readmission (1.9 vs 3.9%; P = .68), intensive care unit admission (29.6 vs 23.4%; P = .36), mechanical ventilation (24.1 vs 16.2%; P = .20), length of hospital stay (4 [2-8] vs 3 [2-11]; P = .71), and infection (11.1 vs 11.7%; P = .99). Prediabetic status has a significant impact on glucose control and mortality after burn injury.

  12. Glycemic control and alveolar bone loss progression in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Taylor, G W; Burt, B A; Becker, M P; Genco, R J; Shlossman, M

    1998-07-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that the risk for alveolar bone loss is greater, and bone loss progression more severe, for subjects with poorly controlled (PC) type 2 diabetes mellitus (type 2 DM) compared to those without type 2 DM or with better controlled (BC) type 2 DM. The PC group had glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1) > or = 9%; the BC group had HbA1 < 9%. Data from the longitudinal study of the oral health of residents of the Gila River Indian Community were analyzed. Of the 359 subjects, aged 15 to 57 with less than 25% radiographic bone loss at baseline, 338 did not have type 2 DM, 14 were BC, and 7 were PC. Panoramic radiographs were used to assess interproximal bone level. Bone scores (scale 0-4) corresponding to bone loss of 0%, 1% to 24%, 25% to 49%, 50% to 74%, or > or = 75% were used to identify the worst bone score (WBS) in the dentition. Change in worst bone score at follow-up, the outcome, was specified on a 4-category ordinal scale as no change, or a 1-, 2-, 3-, or 4-category increase over baseline WBS (WBS1). Poorly controlled diabetes, age, calculus, time to follow-up examination, and WBS1 were statistically significant explanatory variables in ordinal logistic regression models. Poorly controlled type 2 DM was positively associated with greater risk for a change in bone score (compared to subjects without type 2 DM) when the covariates were included in the model. The cumulative odds ratio (COR) at each threshold of the ordered response was 11.4 (95% CI = 2.5, 53.3). When contrasted with subjects with BC type 2 DM, the COR for those in the PC group was 5.3 (95% CI = 0.8, 53.3). The COR for subjects with BC type 2 DM was 2.2 (95% CI = 0.7, 6.5), when contrasted to those without type 2 DM. These results suggest that poorer glycemic control leads to both an increased risk for alveolar bone loss and more severe progression over those without type 2 DM, and that there may be a gradient, with the risk for bone loss progression for those with better

  13. The Association of English Ability and Glycemic Control among Latinos with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Baig, Arshiya A.; Locklin, Cara A.; Foley, Edward; Ewigman, Bernard; Meltzer, David O.; Huang, Elbert S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Language barriers may be significant contributors to diabetes disparities. We sought to assess the association of English speaking ability with glycemic control among Latinos with diabetes. Methods We analyzed 167 Latinos from a cross-sectional survey of adults with type 2 diabetes. The main outcome was HbA1c ≥7.0%. The main predictor was self-reported English speaking ability. Adjusted analyses accounted for age, gender, education, annual income, health insurance status, duration of diabetes, birth in the U.S., and years in the U.S. Results In unadjusted analyses, point estimates for the odds of having a high HbA1c revealed a U-shaped curve with English speaking ability. Those who spoke English very well (OR=2.32, 95% CI, 1.00–5.41) or not at all (OR=4.11, 95% CI 1.35–12.54) had higher odds of having an elevated HbA1c than those who spoke English well, although this was only statistically significant for those who spoke no English. In adjusted analyses, the U-shaped curve persisted with the highest odds among those who spoke English very well (OR=3.20, 95% CI 1.05–9.79) or not at all (OR 4.95, 95% CI 1.29–18.92). Conclusions The relationship between English speaking ability and diabetes management is more complex than previously described. Interventions aimed at improving diabetes outcomes may need to be tailored to specific subgroups within the Latino population. PMID:24620445

  14. Use of a Uniform Treatment Algorithm Abolishes Racial Disparities in Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Mary K.; Ziemer, David C.; Caudle, Jane; Kolm, Paul; Phillips, Lawrence S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to compare glycemic control between blacks and whites in a setting where patient and provider behavior is assessed, and where a uniform treatment algorithm is used to guide care. Methods This observational cohort study was conducted in 3542 patients (3324 blacks, 218 whites) with type 2 diabetes with first and 1-year follow-up visits to a municipal diabetes clinic; a subset had 2-year follow-up. Patient adherence and provider management were determined. The primary endpoint was A1c. Results At presentation, A1c was higher in blacks than whites (8.9% vs 8.3%; P < .001), even after adjusting for demographic and clinical characteristics. During 1 year of follow-up, patient adherence to scheduled visits and medications was comparable in both groups, and providers intensified medications with comparable frequency and amount. After 1 year, A1c differences decreased but remained significant (7.7% vs 7.3%; P = .029), even in multivariable analysis (P = .003). However, after 2 years, A1c differences were no longer observed by univariate (7.6% vs 7.5%; P = .51) or multivariable analysis (P = .18). Conclusions Blacks have higher A1c than whites at presentation, but differences narrow after 1 year and disappear after 2 years of care in a setting where patient and provider behavior are comparable and that emphasizes uniform intensification of therapy. Presumably, racial disparities at presentation reflected prior inequalities in management. Use of uniform care algorithms nationwide should help to reduce disparities in diabetes outcomes. PMID:18669807

  15. Clinical review: Consensus recommendations on measurement of blood glucose and reporting glycemic control in critically ill adults

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The management reporting and assessment of glycemic control lacks standardization. The use of different methods to measure the blood glucose concentration and to report the performance of insulin treatment yields major disparities and complicates the interpretation and comparison of clinical trials. We convened a meeting of 16 experts plus invited observers from industry to discuss and where possible reach consensus on the most appropriate methods to measure and monitor blood glucose in critically ill patients and on how glycemic control should be assessed and reported. Where consensus could not be reached, recommendations on further research and data needed to reach consensus in the future were suggested. Recognizing their clear conflict of interest, industry observers played no role in developing the consensus or recommendations from the meeting. Consensus recommendations were agreed for the measurement and reporting of glycemic control in clinical trials and for the measurement of blood glucose in clinical practice. Recommendations covered the following areas: How should we measure and report glucose control when intermittent blood glucose measurements are used? What are the appropriate performance standards for intermittent blood glucose monitors in the ICU? Continuous or automated intermittent glucose monitoring - methods and technology: can we use the same measures for assessment of glucose control with continuous and intermittent monitoring? What is acceptable performance for continuous glucose monitoring systems? If implemented, these recommendations have the potential to minimize the discrepancies in the conduct and reporting of clinical trials and to improve glucose control in clinical practice. Furthermore, to be fit for use, glucose meters and continuous monitoring systems must match their performance to fit the needs of patients and clinicians in the intensive care setting. See related commentary by Soto-Rivera and Agus, http://ccforum.com/content/17

  16. Effects of diets differing in glycemic index and glycemic load on cardiovascular risk factors: review of randomized controlled-feeing trials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite a considerable amount of data available on the relationship between dietary glycemic index (GI) or load (GL) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, in aggregate, the area remains unsettled. The aim of the present review was to summarize the effect of diets differing in GI/GL on CVD r...

  17. Brief intervention to promote smoking cessation and improve glycemic control in smokers with type 2 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Li, William H. C.; Wang, M. P.; LAM, T. H.; Cheung, Yannes T. Y.; Cheung, Derek Y. T.; Suen, Y. N.; Ho, K. Y.; Tan, Kathryn C. B.; CHAN, Sophia S. C.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effects of a brief stage-matched smoking cessation intervention group compared with a control group (with usual care) in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients who smoked by randomized controlled trial. There were 557 patients, randomized either into the intervention group (n = 283) who received brief (20- minute) individualized face-to-face counseling by trained nurses and a diabetes mellitus-specific leaflet, or a control group (n = 274) who received standard care. Patient follow-ups were at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months via telephone, and assessment of smoking status from 2012 to 2014. Patients smoked an average of 14 cigarettes per day for more than 37 years, and more than 70% were in the precontemplation stage of quitting. The primary outcome showed that both the intervention and control groups had similar 7-day point-prevalence smoking abstinence (9.2% vs. 13.9%; p = 0.08). The secondary outcome showed that HbA1c levels with 7.95% [63 mmol/mol] vs. 8.05% [64 mmol/mol], p = 0.49 at 12 months, respectively. There was no evidence for effectiveness in promoting the brief stage-matched smoking cessation or improving glycemic control in smokers with type 2 diabetes mellitus, particularly those in the pre-contemplation stage. PMID:28378764

  18. Plasma concentrations of asymmetric-dimethyl-arginine in type 2 diabetes associate with glycemic control and glomerular filtration rate but not with risk factors of vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Päivä, Hannu; Lehtimäki, Terho; Laakso, Juha; Ruokonen, Inkeri; Rantalaiho, Vappu; Wirta, Ole; Pasternack, Amos; Laaksonen, Reijo

    2003-03-01

    Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) is an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Increased plasma levels of ADMA may indicate endothelial dysfunction and increased risk of angiopathy. The relation of ADMA to diabetes, glycemic control, and renal function, especially early diabetic hyperfiltration, remains unknown. We tried to evaluate whether there is an association between ADMA and glycosylated hemoglobin (GHbA(1c)) on the one hand and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) on the other hand in diabetic subjects with normal or slightly increased GFR. We also studied whether plasma ADMA is associated with some risk factors of vasculopathy (hypercholesterolemia and hypertension). The study subjects consisted of 86 patients with type 2 diabetes and 65 control subjects. Plasma ADMA levels were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography as o-pthalaldehyde (OPA) derivatives and GFR was determined by the plasma clearance of chromium 51-EDTA. The diabetic patients had lower plasma ADMA levels than the nondiabetic control subjects (0.29 +/- 0.15 v 0.34 +/- 0.16 micromol/L, P <.03). In the diabetic subjects, plasma ADMA concentrations were inversely correlated with GHbA(1c) (R = -0.28, P =.01). In a multivariate linear model, significant predictors of ADMA were GFR (R = -0.32, P =.008) in diabetic subjects and GHbA(1c) (R = -0.19, P =.03) and GFR (R = -0.19, P =.02) in all subjects. Plasma ADMA was not associated with risk factors of vasculopathy. We conclude that diabetic patients with a normal or slightly increased GFR have lower circulating ADMA concentrations than nondiabetic control subjects. In type 2 diabetic patients high GFR and poor glycemic control were related to low plasma ADMA concentrations.

  19. Language Barriers, Physician-Patient Language Concordance, and Glycemic Control Among Insured Latinos with Diabetes: The Diabetes Study of Northern California (DISTANCE)

    PubMed Central

    Schillinger, Dean; Warton, E. Margaret; Adler, Nancy; Moffet, Howard H.; Schenker, Yael; Salgado, M. Victoria; Ahmed, Ameena; Karter, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND A significant proportion of US Latinos with diabetes have limited English proficiency (LEP). Whether language barriers in health care contribute to poor glycemic control is unknown. OBJECTIVE To assess the association between limited English proficiency (LEP) and glycemic control and whether this association is modified by having a language-concordant physician. DESIGN Cross-sectional, observational study using data from the 2005–2006 Diabetes Study of Northern California (DISTANCE). Patients received care in a managed care setting with interpreter services and self-reported their English language ability and the Spanish language ability of their physician. Outcome was poor glycemic control (glycosylated hemoglobin A1c > 9%). KEY RESULTS The unadjusted percentage of patients with poor glycemic control was similar among Latino patients with LEP (n = 510) and Latino English-speakers (n = 2,683), and higher in both groups than in whites (n = 3,545) (21% vs 18% vs. 10%, p < 0.005). This relationship differed significantly by patient-provider language concordance (p < 0.01 for interaction). LEP patients with language-discordant physicians (n = 115) were more likely than LEP patients with language-concordant physicians (n = 137) to have poor glycemic control (27.8% vs 16.1% p = 0.02). After controlling for potential demographic and clinical confounders, LEP Latinos with language-concordant physicians had similar odds of poor glycemic control as Latino English speakers (OR 0.89; CI 0.53–1.49), whereas LEP Latinos with language-discordant physicians had greater odds of poor control than Latino English speakers (OR 1.76; CI 1.04–2.97). Among LEP Latinos, having a language discordant physician was associated with significantly poorer glycemic control (OR 1.98; CI 1.03–3.80). CONCLUSIONS Language barriers contribute to health disparities among Latinos with diabetes. Limited English proficiency is an independent

  20. Glycemic variability: Clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Satya Krishna, Surabhi Venkata; Kota, Sunil K.; Modi, Kirtikumar D.

    2013-01-01

    Glycemic control and its benefits in preventing microvascular diabetic complications are convincingly proved by various prospective trials. Diabetes control and complications trial (DCCT) had reported variable glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) as a cause of increased microvascular complications in conventional glycemic control group versus intensive one. However, in spite of several indirect evidences, its link with cardiovascular events or macrovascular complications is still not proved. Glycemic variability (GV) is one more tool to explain relation between hyperglycemia and increased cardiovascular risk in diabetic patients. In fact GV along with fasting blood sugar, postprandial blood sugar, HbA1C, and quality of life has been proposed to form glycemic pentad, which needs to be considered in diabetes management. Postprandial spikes in blood glucose as well as hypoglycemic events, both are blamed for increased cardiovascular events in Type 2 diabetics. GV includes both these events and hence minimizing GV can prevent future cardiovascular events. Modern diabetes management modalities including improved sulfonylureas, glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-based therapy, newer basal insulins, and modern insulin pumps address the issue of GV effectively. This article highlights mechanism, clinical implications, and measures to control GV in clinical practice. PMID:23961476

  1. Associations between nocturnal urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin, obstructive sleep apnea severity and glycemic control in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Reutrakul, Sirimon; Siwasaranond, Nantaporn; Nimitphong, Hataikarn; Saetung, Sunee; Chirakalwasan, Naricha; Chailurkit, La-Or; Srijaruskul, Kriangsuk; Ongphiphadhanakul, Boonsong; Thakkinstian, Ammarin

    2017-01-01

    Reduced nocturnal secretion of melatonin, a pineal hormone under circadian control, and obstructive sleep apnea have been both identified as risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Whether they interact to impact glycemic control in patients with existing type 2 diabetes is not known. Therefore, this study explores the relationships between obstructive sleep apnea, melatonin and glycemic control in type 2 diabetes. As diabetic retinopathy may affect melatonin secretion, we also explore the relationship between retinopathy, melatonin and glycemic control. Fifty-six non-shift workers with type 2 diabetes, who were not using beta-blockers, participated. Most recent hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels and the results of ophthalmologic examinations were obtained from medical records. Obstructive sleep apnea was diagnosed using an ambulatory device. Sleep duration and fragmentation were recorded by 7-day wrist actigraphy. The urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin/creatinine ratio, an indicator of nocturnal melatonin secretion, was measured in an overnight urine sample. Mediation analyses were applied to explore whether low nocturnal urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin/creatinine ratio could be a causal link between increasing obstructive sleep apnea severity [as measured by an Apnea Hypopnea Index (AHI)] and poorer glycemic control, and between the presence of retinopathy and glycemic control. AHI and HbA1c were log-scale (ln) transformed. Obstructive sleep apnea was found in 76.8%, and 25.5% had diabetic retinopathy. The median (interquartile range) of urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin/creatinine ratio was 12.3 (6.0, 20.1) ng/mg. Higher lnHbA1c significantly correlated with lower 6-sulfatoxymelatonin/creatinine ratio (p = 0.04) but was not directly associated with OSA severity. More severe obstructive sleep apnea (lnAHI, p = 0.01), longer diabetes duration (p = 0.02), retinopathy (p = 0.01) and insulin use (p = 0.03) correlated with lower urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin

  2. GLYCEMIC CONTROL AND URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS IN WOMEN WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES: RESULTS FROM THE DCCT/EDIC

    PubMed Central

    Lenherr, Sara M.; Clemens, J. Quentin; Braffett, Barbara H.; Cleary, Patricia A.; Dunn, Rodney L.; Hotaling, James M.; Jacobson, Alan M.; Kim, Catherine; Herman, William; Brown, Jeanette S.; Wessells, Hunter; Sarma, Aruna V.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We examined the relationship between glycemic control and urinary tract infections (UTI) in women with type 1 diabetes mellitus. MATERIALS AND METHODS Women enrolled in the Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) study, the observational follow-up of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) were surveyed to assess the rate of physician-diagnosed UTI in the preceding 12 months. The relationship between HbA1c levels and number of UTIs in the previous 12 months was assessed using a multivariable Poisson regression model. RESULTS At EDIC Year 17, 572 women were evaluated: mean age 50.7 ± 7.2 years, mean body mass index (BMI) 28.6 ± 5.9 kg/m2, type 1 diabetes duration 29.8 ± 5.0 years, and mean HbA1c 8.0 ± 0.9%. Of these, 86 (15.0%) reported at least one physician diagnosed UTI during the past 12 months. Higher HbA1c levels were significantly associated with number of UTIs, such that for every unit increase (1%) in recent HbA1c level, there was a 21% (p=0.02) increase in UTI frequency in the previous 12 months after adjusting for race, hysterectomy status, urinary incontinence (UI), sexual activity in the past 12 months, peripheral and autonomic neuropathy and nephropathy. CONCLUSIONS The frequency of UTI increases with poor glycemic control in women with type 1 diabetes. This relationship is independent of other well-described predictors of UTI and suggests that factors directly related to glycemic control may influence the risk of lower urinary tract infections. PMID:27131462

  3. Intensive glycemic control and thiazolidinedione use: effects on cortical and trabecular bone at the radius and tibia.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Ann V; Vittinghoff, Eric; Margolis, Karen L; Scibora, Lesley M; Palermo, Lisa; Ambrosius, Walter T; Hue, Trisha F; Ensrud, Kristine E

    2013-05-01

    Factors that contribute to bone fragility in type 2 diabetes are not well understood. We assessed the effects of intensive glycemic control, thiazolidinediones (TZDs), and A1C levels on bone geometry and strength at the radius and tibia. In a substudy of the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes trial, peripheral quantitative computed tomographic (pQCT) scans of the radius and tibia were obtained 2 years after randomization on 73 participants (intensive n = 35, standard n = 38). TZD use and A1C levels were measured every 4 months during the trial. Effects of intervention assignment, TZD use, and A1C on pQCT parameters were assessed in linear regression models. Intensive, compared with standard, glycemic control was associated with 1.3 % lower cortical volumetric BMD at the tibia in men (p = 0.02) but not with other pQCT parameters. In women, but not men, each additional year of TZD use was associated with an 11 % lower polar strength strain index (SSIp) at the radius (p = 0.04) and tibia (p = 0.002) in models adjusted for A1C levels. In women, each additional 1 % increase in A1C was associated with an 18 % lower SSIp at the ultradistal radius (p = 0.04) in models adjusted for TZD use. There was no consistent evidence of an effect of intensive, compared with standard, glycemic control on bone strength at the radius or tibia. In women, TZD use may reduce bone strength at these sites. Higher A1C may also be associated with lower bone strength at the radius, but not tibia, in women.

  4. The glycemic index: methodology and use.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Cyril W C; Augustin, Livia S A; Emam, Azadeh; Josse, Andrea R; Saxena, Nishta; Jenkins, David J A

    2006-01-01

    The glycemic index concept owes much to the dietary fiber hypothesis that fiber would reduce the rate of nutrient absorption and increase the value of carbohydrate foods in the maintenance of health and treatment of disease. However, properties and components of food other than its fiber content contribute to the glycemic and endocrine responses postprandially. The aim of the glycemic index classification of foods was therefore to assist in the physiological classification of carbohydrate foods which, it was hoped, would be of relevance in the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases such as diabetes. Over the past two decades low glycemic index diets have been reported to improve glycemic control in diabetic subjects, to reduce serum lipids in hyperlipidemic subjects and possibly to aid in weight control. In large cohort studies, low glycemic index or glycemic load diets (glycemic index multiplied by total carbohydrate) have also been associated with higher levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, reduced C-reactive protein concentrations and with a decreased risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. More recently, some case-control and cohort studies have also found positive associations between the dietary glycemic index and the risk of colon, breast and other cancers. While the glycemic index concept continues to be debated and there remain inconsistencies in the data, sufficient positive findings have emerged to suggest that the glycemic index is an aspect of diet of potential importance in the treatment and prevention of chronic diseases.

  5. Dyadic measures of the parent-child relationship during the transition to adolescence and glycemic control in children with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Barbara J; Holmbeck, Grayson; Iannotti, Ronald J; McKay, Siripoom V; Lochrie, Amanda; Volkening, Lisa K; Laffel, Lori

    2009-06-01

    To identify aspects of family behavior associated with glycemic control in youth with type 1 diabetes mellitus during the transition to adolescence, the authors studied 121 9- to 14-year-olds (M = 12.1 yrs) and their parents, who completed the Diabetes Family Conflict Scale (DFCS) and the Diabetes Family Responsibility Questionnaire (DFRQ). From the DFRQ, the authors derived 2 dyadic variables, frequency of agreement (exact parent and child concurrence about who was responsible for a task) and frequency of discordance (opposite parent and child reports about responsibility). The authors divided the cohort into Younger (n = 57, M = 10.6 yrs) and Older (n = 64, M = 13.5 yrs) groups. Family conflict was significantly related to glycemic control in the entire cohort and in both the Younger and Older groups. However, only in the Younger group was Agreement related to glycemic control, with higher Agreement associated with better glycemic control. Findings suggest that Agreement about sharing of diabetes responsibilities may be an important target for family-based interventions aiming to optimize glycemic control in preteen youth.

  6. Self-efficacy, self-care behaviors and glycemic control among type-2 diabetes patients attending two private clinics in Yangon, Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Wynn Nyunt, Sandhi; Howteerakul, Nopporn; Suwannapong, Nawarat; Rajatanun, Thitipat

    2010-07-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to estimate the prevalence of glycemic control and its associated factors among type-2 diabetes patients attending two private clinics in Yangon, Myanmar. Two hundred sixty-six diabetes patients attending two private diabetes clinics in Yangon during February and March, 2009 were included in the study. The participants completed a structured questionnaire. HbA(1c) was used as the index for glycemic control. The prevalence of successful glycemic control (HbA(1c) < or =7%) was 27.1%. The median HbA(1c) value was 7.8%. About 62.0% of patients had high self-efficacy levels, and 30.8% had good self-care behavior. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed four variables associated with glycemic control: age > or =60 years (OR 2.46, 95% CI 1.17-5.21), taking one oral hypoglycemic agent (OHA) (OR 2.56, 95% CI 1.26-5.19), being overweight (OR 2.01, 95% CI 1.02-3.95) and having a high self-efficacy level (OR 5.29, 95% CI 2.20-12.75). Interventions to increase diabetic patient self-efficacy levels and self-care behavior, especially related to diet and exercise, are needed to reduce poor glycemic control.

  7. The impact of knowledge about diabetes, resilience and depression on glycemic control: a cross-sectional study among adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between glycemic control and the factors of knowledge about diabetes, resilience, depression and anxiety among Brazilian adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes. Methods This cross-sectional study included 85 adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes, aged between 11–22 years, with an average age of 17.7 ± 3.72 years. Glycemic control degree was evaluated through HbA1c. To assess psychosocial factors, the following questionnaires were used: resilience (Resilience Scale, RS) and anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, HADS). The Diabetes Knowledge Assessment Scale (DKNA) was used to assess knowledge about diabetes. Results Significant correlations were found between HbA1c and resilience, anxiety and depression. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that the only variable which presented significant association with the value of HbA1c was depression. Conclusions Depression has a significant association with higher HbA1c levels, as demonstrated in a regression analysis. The results suggest that depression, anxiety and resilience should be considered in the design of a multidisciplinary approach to type 1 diabetes, as these factors were significantly correlated with glycemic control. Glycemic control was not correlated with knowledge of diabetes, suggesting that theoretical or practical understanding of this disease is not by itself significantly associated with appropriate glycemic control (HbA1c ≤ 7.5%). PMID:24289093

  8. Effect of Vitamin D3 Supplement in Glycemic Control of Pediatrics with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus and Vitamin D Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadian, Sakineh; Zaeri, Hossein; Vakili, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Glycemic control prevents microvascular complications in patients with type I diabetes mellitus such as retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy that influences quality of life. Some studies show the immunomodulatory effect of vitamin D in synthesis and secretion of insulin. Aims: In this study we evaluate glycemic changes after vitamin D3 supplement in children with type I diabetes mellitus and vitamin D deficiency. Materials and Methods: In children with type I diabetes mellitus, level of vitamin D and HbA1C was measured. Patients with type I diabetes mellitus who had vitamin D deficiency (25OHD < 50 nmol/lit) treated with 300,000 units of vitamin D3. Calcium supplement (40mg/kg/day) divided in two doses in order to avoid hungry bone was also used. After three months, 25OHD and HbA1C were measured again. Differences, in mean ± SD HbA1C and 25OHD were evaluated before and after the study. Results: Mean ± SD HbA1C was 9.73±1.85 before the study which was diminished to 8.55±1.91 after vitamin D3 supplement treatment. This decline has a significant difference (p-value < 0.0001). Mean ± SD 25OHD was 17.33±8.97 nmol/lit before the study which is increased to 39.31±14.38 nmol/lit after treatment with vitamin D3 supplement. This increase also has a significant difference (p-value < 0.0001). Vitamin D3 supplement causes the improvement of HbA1C in all groups of glycemic control including HbA1C <7.8, 7.8-9.9, and >9.9. This supplement transfer patients toward better glycemic control for the entire group (p-value < 0.0001). Conclusion: Vitamin D3 supplement improves HbA1C in pediatrics with type I diabetes mellitus and vitamin D deficiency. PMID:25954674

  9. Study of Adiponectin Level in Diabetic Adolescent Girls in Relation to Glycemic Control and Complication of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Dayem, Soha M. Abd El; Nazif, Hayam K.; EI-Kader, Mona Abd; El-Tawil, Maha

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the relation between adiponectin level with glycemic control and complication of diabetes. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study included 40 female adolescent type 1 diabetic patients and 40 healthy volunteers of the same age and sex. Blood sample was taken for assessment of glycosylated hemoglobin, lipid profile and adiponectine. Urine sample was taken for assessment of albumin/creatinine ratio. RESULTS: Diabetic patients had a significantly higher diastolic blood pressure, triglyceride, total cholesterol, LDL and adiponectin than controls. Patients with diabetes complication had a significant lower BMI and HDL. On the other hand, they had higher disease duration, total cholesterol, HbA1, albumin/creatinine ratio and adiponectin. Patients with microalbuminuria had a lower BMI, higher disease duration, diastolic blood pressure and adiponectin. Patients with diabetic retinopathy had higher disease duration, insulin dose, HbA1, microalbuminuria and adiponectin. Adiponectin in diabetic patients had a significant negative correlation with BMI and positive correlation with systolic blood pressure and microlabuminuria. CONCLUSION: Serum adiponectin level is high in adolescent type 1 diabetic girls. It can be used as a predictor of diabetes complications rather than a sensitive biochemical marker for glycemic control. PMID:27275296

  10. Low glycemic index treatment for seizure control in Angelman syndrome: A case series from the Center for Dietary Therapy of Epilepsy at the Massachusetts General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Grocott, Olivia R; Herrington, Katherine S; Pfeifer, Heidi H; Thiele, Elizabeth A; Thibert, Ronald L

    2017-03-01

    The low glycemic index treatment, a dietary therapy that focuses on glycemic index and reduced carbohydrate intake, has been successful in reducing seizure frequency in the general epilepsy population. Epilepsy is a common feature of Angelman syndrome and seizures are often refractory to multiple medications, especially in those with maternal deletions. Dietary therapy has become a more frequently used option for treating epilepsy, often in combination with other antiepileptic drugs, due to its efficacy and favorable side effect profile. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of the low glycemic index treatment for seizure control in Angelman syndrome. Through a retrospective medical record review of 23 subjects who utilized the low glycemic index treatment at the Clinic and Center for Dietary Therapy of Epilepsy at the Massachusetts General Hospital, we found that the high level of seizure control and favorable side effect profile make the low glycemic index treatment a viable treatment for seizures in Angelman syndrome. The majority of subjects in our cohort experienced some level of seizure reduction after initiating the diet, 5 (22%) maintained complete seizure freedom, 10 (43%) maintained seizure freedom except in the setting of illness or non-convulsive status epilepticus, 7 (30%) had a decrease in seizure frequency, and only 1 (4%) did not have enough information to determine seizure control post-initiation. The low glycemic index treatment monotherapy was successful for some subjects in our cohort but most subjects used an antiepileptic drug concurrently. Some subjects were able to maintain the same level of seizure control on a liberalized version of the low glycemic index treatment which included a larger amount of low glycemic carbohydrates. No correlation between the level of carbohydrate restriction and level of seizure control was found. Few subjects experienced side effects and those that did found them to be mild and easily treated. The

  11. EFFECT OF HIGH-DOSE VITAMIN D REPLETION ON GLYCEMIC CONTROL IN AFRICAN AMERICAN MEN WITH PREDIABETES AND HYPOVITAMINOSIS D

    PubMed Central

    Barengolts, Elena; Manickam, Buvana; Eisenberg, Yuval; Akbar, Arfana; Kukreja, Subhash; Ciubotaru, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Objective This double blind, randomized, controlled trial evaluated 12 months high dose vitamin D2 supplementation for improving insulin sensitivity, secretion and glycemic status. Methods African American men with prediabetes (A1C 5.7 – 6.4%), hypovitaminosis D (25OHD 5 – 29 ng/ml), and prevalent medical problems were supplemented with vitamin D3 (400 IU/day) and then randomized to weekly placebo or vitamin D2 (50,000 IU). The primary outcome was the change in oral glucose insulin sensitivity (OGIS, from oral glucose tolerance test) after 12 months of treatment. Secondary outcomes included other glycemic indices, A1C and incident diabetes. Results Baseline characteristics were similar in vitamin D-supplemented (n = 87) and placebo (n = 86) subjects completing the trial with average concentrations 14.4 ng/ml, 362 and 6.1% for 25OHD, OGIS and A1C, respectively. After 12 months vitamin D-supplemented group had a change in serum 25OHD +35 vs +6 ng/ml for placebo, p<0.001; OGIS +7.8 vs −16.0 for placebo, p = 0.026; and A1C −0.01 vs +0.01% for placebo, p = 0.66; while 10% in both groups progressed to diabetes. A post hoc analysis of participants with baseline impaired fasting glucose showed that more subjects in the vitamin D subgroup (31.6%) than placebo (8.3%) returned to normal glucose tolerance, but the difference did not reach significance (p=0.13). Conclusion The trial does not provide evidence that 12 months of high-dose D2 repletion improves clinically relevant glycemic outcomes in subjects with prediabetes and hypovitaminosis D (NCT01375660). PMID:25716637

  12. Inflammatory biomarkers in type 2 diabetic patients: effect of glycemic control and impact of ldl subfraction phenotype

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is associated with higher cardiovascular risk partly related to an increase in inflammatory parameters. The aim of this study was to determine the association of inflammatory biomarkers with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) subfraction phenotype and glycemic control in subjects with T2D and poor glycemic control. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed comparing 122 subjects with T2D (59 ± 11 years old, body mass index 30.2 ± 5.6 kg/m2) with 54 control subjects. Patients with T2D were classified according to their LDL subfraction phenotype and inflammatory biomarkers (C-reactive protein, Interleukin-6, Interleukin-8, Transforming growth factor β1, Monocyte chemotactic protein 1, Leptin, Adiponectin) were evaluated according to the degree of glycemic control, LDL phenotype and other clinical characteristics. Forty-two subjects with T2D were studied before and after 3 months of improving glycemic control by different strategies. Results Patients with T2D had higher C-reactive protein (CRP) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP1) levels and lower adiponectin concentration, compared to controls. T2D subjects with body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m2 had higher CRP levels (5.2 ± 4.8 mg/l vs 3.7 ± 4.3 mg/l; p < 0.05). The presence of LDL phenotype B was related to higher levels of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) (53.92 ± 52.82 ng/l vs 31.35 ± 33.74 ng/l; p < 0.05) and lower levels of adiponectin (3663 ± 3044 ng/l vs 2723 ± 1776 ng/l; p < 0.05). The reduction of HbA1c from 9.5 ± 1.8% at baseline to 7.4 ± 0.8% was associated with a significant reduction of TGF-β1 (41.86 ± 32.84 ng/l vs 26.64 ± 26.91 ng/l; p = 0.02). Conclusions Subjects with T2D, especially those with LDL phenotype B and obesity, have higher levels of inflammatory biomarkers. Improvement of glycemic control reduces TGF-β1 levels, which may contribute partly to its renoprotective

  13. Continuous vs interval training on glycemic control and macro- and microvascular reactivity in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Mitranun, W; Deerochanawong, C; Tanaka, H; Suksom, D

    2014-04-01

    To determine the effects of continuous aerobic exercise training (CON) vs interval aerobic exercise training (INT) on glycemic control and endothelium-dependent vasodilatation, 43 participants with type 2 diabetes were randomly allocated to the sedentary, CON, and INT groups. The CON and INT exercise training programs were designed to yield the same energy expenditure/exercise session and included walking on treadmill for 30 and 40 min/day, 3 times/week for 12 weeks. Body fatness and heart rate at rest decreased and leg muscle strength increased (all P < 0.05) in both the CON and INT groups. Fasting blood glucose levels decreased (P < 0.05) in both exercise groups but glycosylated hemoglobin levels decreased (P < 0.05) only in the INT group. Maximal aerobic capacity, flow-mediated dilation, and cutaneous reactive hyperemia increased significantly in both exercise groups; however, the magnitude of improvements was greater in the INT group. Only the INT group experienced reductions in erythrocyte malondialdehyde and serum von Willebrand factor and increases in plasma glutathione peroxidase and nitric oxide (all P < 0.05). We concluded that both continuous and interval training were effective in improving glycemic control, aerobic fitness, and endothelium-dependent vasodilation, but the interval training program appears to confer greater improvements than the continuous training program.

  14. Intensive glycemic control after heart transplantation is safe and effective for diabetic and non-diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Cristina; Wallia, Amisha; Gupta, Suruchi; Schmidt, Kathleen; Malekar-Raikar, Shilpa; Johnson Oakes, Diana; Aleppo, Grazia; Grady, Kathleen; McGee, Edwin; Cotts, William; Andrei, Adin-Cristian; Molitch, Mark E

    2013-01-01

    Some studies have shown increased mortality, infection, and rejection rates among diabetic (DM) compared to non-diabetic (non-DM) patients undergoing heart transplant (HT). This is a retrospective chart review of adult patients (DM, n = 26; non-DM, n = 66) undergoing HT between June 1, 2005, and July 31, 2009. Glycemic control used intravenous (IV) and subcutaneous (SQ) insulin protocols with a glucose target of 80-110 mg/dL. There were no significant differences between DM and non-DM patients in mean glucose levels on the IV and SQ insulin protocols. Severe hypoglycemia (glucose <40 mg/dL) did not occur on the IV protocol and was experienced by only 3 non-DM patients on the SQ protocol. Moderate hypoglycemia (glucose >40 and <60 mg/dL) occurred in 17 (19%) patients on the IV protocol and 24 (27%) on the SQ protocol. There were no significant differences between DM and non-DM patients within 30 d of surgery in all-cause mortality, treated HT rejection episodes, reoperation, prolonged ventilation, 30-d readmissions, ICU readmission, number of ICU hours, hospitalization days after HT, or infections. This study demonstrates that DM and non-DM patients can achieve excellent glycemic control post-HT with IV and SQ insulin protocols with similar surgical outcomes and low hypoglycemia rates.

  15. Status of serum magnesium in Egyptian children with type 1 diabetes and its correlation to glycemic control and lipid profile.

    PubMed

    Shahbah, Doaa; El Naga, Amr Abo; Hassan, Tamer; Zakaria, Marwa; Beshir, Mohamed; Al Morshedy, Salah; Abdalhady, Mohamed; Kamel, Ezzat; Rahman, Doaa Abdel; Kamel, Lamiaa; Abdelkader, May

    2016-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus has been suggested to be the most common metabolic disorder associated with magnesium deficiency, having 25% to 39% prevalence. This deficit could be associated with the development of late diabetic complications, especially macroangiopathy.We aimed to evaluate the status of serum Mg in children with type 1 diabetes and assess its relation to glycemic control and lipid profile.We included 71 Egyptian children with type 1diabetes having their follow-up at Pediatric Endocrinology outpatient clinic, Zagazig University Hospital and 71 age- and sex-matched control. We measured Serum magnesium, HbA1c, and lipid profile in all study subjects.Diabetic children had significantly lower serum magnesium level compared to control children (1.83 ± .27 mg/dL in diabetic children versus 2.00 ± .16 mg/dL in control children). Taking cut-off level of serum magnesium <1.7 mg/dL for definition of hypomagnesemia, hypomagnesemia was detected in 28.2% of diabetic children compared to 9.9% of control children. In diabetic patients, there was statistically significant difference in HbA1c between hypomagnesemic and normomagnesemic group being higher in the low magnesium group, as it is mean ± SD was 11.93 ± 3.17 mg/dL in group I versus 8.92 ± 0.93 mg/dL in the normomagnesemic group. Serum magnesium was found to be positively correlated with HDL (P < 0.001), and negatively correlated with age, HbA1c, triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL, and duration of diabetes (P < 0.001).We concluded that total serum magnesium was frequently low in Egyptian children with type 1 diabetes and it is correlated with HbA1c and with lipid profile. Hypomagnesemia was more evident in patients with poor diabetic control and those with higher atherogenic lipid parameters. We suggest that low serum magnesium may be included in pathogenesis of poor glycemic control and abnormal lipid profile in children with type 1 diabetes. We need to perform further

  16. Status of serum magnesium in Egyptian children with type 1 diabetes and its correlation to glycemic control and lipid profile

    PubMed Central

    Shahbah, Doaa; El Naga, Amr Abo; Hassan, Tamer; Zakaria, Marwa; Beshir, Mohamed; Al Morshedy, Salah; Abdalhady, Mohamed; Kamel, Ezzat; Rahman, Doaa Abdel; Kamel, Lamiaa; Abdelkader, May

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Diabetes mellitus has been suggested to be the most common metabolic disorder associated with magnesium deficiency, having 25% to 39% prevalence. This deficit could be associated with the development of late diabetic complications, especially macroangiopathy. We aimed to evaluate the status of serum Mg in children with type 1 diabetes and assess its relation to glycemic control and lipid profile. We included 71 Egyptian children with type 1diabetes having their follow-up at Pediatric Endocrinology outpatient clinic, Zagazig University Hospital and 71 age- and sex-matched control. We measured Serum magnesium, HbA1c, and lipid profile in all study subjects. Diabetic children had significantly lower serum magnesium level compared to control children (1.83 ± .27 mg/dL in diabetic children versus 2.00 ± .16 mg/dL in control children). Taking cut-off level of serum magnesium <1.7 mg/dL for definition of hypomagnesemia, hypomagnesemia was detected in 28.2% of diabetic children compared to 9.9% of control children. In diabetic patients, there was statistically significant difference in HbA1c between hypomagnesemic and normomagnesemic group being higher in the low magnesium group, as it is mean ± SD was 11.93 ± 3.17 mg/dL in group I versus 8.92 ± 0.93 mg/dL in the normomagnesemic group. Serum magnesium was found to be positively correlated with HDL (P < 0.001), and negatively correlated with age, HbA1c, triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL, and duration of diabetes (P < 0.001). We concluded that total serum magnesium was frequently low in Egyptian children with type 1 diabetes and it is correlated with HbA1c and with lipid profile. Hypomagnesemia was more evident in patients with poor diabetic control and those with higher atherogenic lipid parameters. We suggest that low serum magnesium may be included in pathogenesis of poor glycemic control and abnormal lipid profile in children with type 1 diabetes. We need to perform

  17. Glycemic Control Modifies Difference in Mortality Risk Between Hemodialysis and Peritoneal Dialysis in Incident Dialysis Patients With Diabetes: Results From a Nationwide Prospective Cohort in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Jung; Kwon, Young Eun; Park, Kyoung Sook; Kee, Youn Kyung; Yoon, Chang-Yun; Han, In Mee; Han, Seung Gyu; Oh, Hyung Jung; Park, Jung Tak; Han, Seung Hyeok; Yoo, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Yong-Lim; Kim, Yon Su; Yang, Chul Woo; Kim, Nam-Ho; Kang, Shin-Wook

    2016-03-01

    Although numerous studies have tried to elucidate the best dialysis modality in end-stage renal disease patients with diabetes, results were inconsistent and varied with the baseline characteristics of patients. Furthermore, none of the previous studies on diabetic dialysis patients accounted for the impact of glycemic control. We explored whether glycemic control had modifying effect on mortality between hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD) in incident dialysis patients with diabetes. A total of 902 diabetic patients who started dialysis between August 2008 and December 2013 were included from a nationwide prospective cohort in Korea. Based on the interaction analysis between hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and dialysis modalities for patient survival (P for interaction = 0.004), subjects were stratified into good and poor glycemic control groups (HbA1c< or ≥8.0%). Differences in survival rates according to dialysis modalities were ascertained in each glycemic control group after propensity score matching. During a median follow-up duration of 28 months, the relative risk of death was significantly lower in PD compared with HD in the whole cohort and unmatched patients (whole cohort, hazard ratio [HR] = 0.65, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.47-0.90, P = 0.01; patients with available HbA1c [n = 773], HR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.46-0.91, P = 0.01). In the good glycemic control group, there was a significant survival advantage of PD (HbA1c <8.0%, HR = 0.59, 95% CI = 0.37-0.94, P = 0.03). However, there was no significant difference in survival rates between PD and HD in the poor glycemic control group (HbA1c ≥8.0%, HR = 1.21, 95% CI = 0.46-2.76, P = 0.80). This study demonstrated that the degree of glycemic control modified the mortality risk between dialysis modalities, suggesting that glycemic control might partly contribute to better survival of PD in incident dialysis patients with diabetes.

  18. Orange Pomace Improves Postprandial Glycemic Responses: An Acute, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind, Crossover Trial in Overweight Men

    PubMed Central

    Chen, C.-Y. Oliver; Rasmussen, Helen; Kamil, Alison; Du, Peng; Blumberg, Jeffrey B.

    2017-01-01

    Orange pomace (OP), a fiber-rich byproduct of juice production, has the potential for being formulated into a variety of food products. We hypothesized that OP would diminish postprandial glycemic responses to a high carbohydrate/fat breakfast and lunch. We conducted an acute, randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind, crossover trial with 34 overweight men who consumed either a 255 g placebo (PLA), a low (35% OP (LOP)), or a high (77% (HOP)) dose OP beverage with breakfast. Blood was collected at 0, 10, 20, 30, and 45 min and at 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 5, 5.5, 6, 6.5, 7, and 8 h. Lunch was consumed after the 5.5-h blood draw. OP delayed the time (Tmax1) to the maximum concentration (Cmax1) of serum glucose during the 2-h period post breakfast by ≥36% from 33 (PLA) to 45 (HOP) and 47 (LOP) min (p = 0.055 and 0.013, respectively). OP decreased post-breakfast insulin Cmax1 by ≥10% and LOP delayed the Tmax1 by 14 min, compared to PLA at 46 min (p ≤ 0.05). HOP reduced the first 2-h insulin area under concentration time curve (AUC) by 23% compared to PLA. Thus, OP diminishes postprandial glycemic responses to a high carbohydrate/fat breakfast and the second meal in overweight men. PMID:28208806

  19. Orange Pomace Improves Postprandial Glycemic Responses: An Acute, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind, Crossover Trial in Overweight Men.

    PubMed

    Chen, C-Y Oliver; Rasmussen, Helen; Kamil, Alison; Du, Peng; Blumberg, Jeffrey B

    2017-02-13

    Orange pomace (OP), a fiber-rich byproduct of juice production, has the potential for being formulated into a variety of food products. We hypothesized that OP would diminish postprandial glycemic responses to a high carbohydrate/fat breakfast and lunch. We conducted an acute, randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind, crossover trial with 34 overweight men who consumed either a 255 g placebo (PLA), a low (35% OP (LOP)), or a high (77% (HOP)) dose OP beverage with breakfast. Blood was collected at 0, 10, 20, 30, and 45 min and at 1, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 5, 5.5, 6, 6.5, 7, and 8 h. Lunch was consumed after the 5.5-h blood draw. OP delayed the time (Tmax1) to the maximum concentration (Cmax1) of serum glucose during the 2-h period post breakfast by ≥36% from 33 (PLA) to 45 (HOP) and 47 (LOP) min (p = 0.055 and 0.013, respectively). OP decreased post-breakfast insulin Cmax1 by ≥10% and LOP delayed the Tmax1 by 14 min, compared to PLA at 46 min (p ≤ 0.05). HOP reduced the first 2-h insulin area under concentration time curve (AUC) by 23% compared to PLA. Thus, OP diminishes postprandial glycemic responses to a high carbohydrate/fat breakfast and the second meal in overweight men.

  20. Association Between Specific Depression Symptoms and Glycemic Control Among Patients With Comorbid Type 2 Diabetes and Provisional Depression

    PubMed Central

    Czech, Stephanie J.; Orsillo, Susan M.; Pirraglia, Paul A.; English, Thomas M.; Connell, Alexa J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether specific depression symptoms are associated with glycemic control independent of potential demographic and clinical covariates among primary care patients with comorbid type 2 diabetes and provisional threshold or subthreshold depression. Method: We examined a convenience sample of patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and provisional threshold or subthreshold depression (N = 82) at 2 family health centers. Cases were identified using a population-based registry of patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (ICD-9 codes 250.00 for controlled type 2 diabetes and 250.02 for uncontrolled type 2 diabetes). Data from patients with a primary care provider appointment from the beginning of April 2011 through the end of June 2012 and with at least one 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) depression screener and a glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) laboratory test between 2 weeks before and 10 weeks after PHQ-9 screening were eligible for inclusion. We defined provisional threshold or subthreshold depression using PHQ-9 scoring criteria, which were designed to yield provisional diagnostic information about major depressive disorder based on DSM-5 diagnostic criteria. Results: Patients reporting higher severity of sleep problems on the PHQ-9 had significantly higher HbA1c levels (mean = 8.48, SD = 2.17) compared to patients reporting lower severity or absence of this symptom (mean = 7.19, SD = 1.34, t48.88 = −3.13, P = .003). Problems with sleep contributed unique variance on glycemic control (β = 0.27, P = .02) when controlling for potential clinical and demographic covariates, with those reporting more sleep difficulties having higher HbA1c levels. Conclusions: For patients with type 2 diabetes and provisional threshold or subthreshold depression, it may be prudent to aggressively address sleep problems as a potential mechanism toward improving diabetes control. PMID:26835160

  1. Preliminary Study Characterizing the Use of Sitagliptin for Glycemic Control in Healthy Beagle Dogs with Normal Gluco-Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    ODA, Hitomi; MORI, Akihiro; LEE, Peter; SAEKI, Kaori; ARAI, Toshiro; SAKO, Toshinori

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sitagliptin is a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor aimed at treating Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and T1DM, by increasing blood levels of Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and insulin. The objective of this preliminary study is to characterize Sitagliptin’s ability for glycemic control, in healthy dogs under an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) environment. Overall, Sitagliptin did not result in any significant changes to temporal glucose and insulin concentrations. However, a ~55% increase in median total GLP-1 AUC0–120min was observed, as compared to baseline control in healthy dogs (n=5), thus indicating a similar mode of action of Sitagliptin between healthy dogs and humans. Future studies to validate the use of Sitagliptin with dogs suffering from insulin independent diabetes are warranted. PMID:24931645

  2. Effect of Computer-Generated Tailored Feedback on Glycemic Control in People With Diabetes in the Community

    PubMed Central

    Sherifali, Diana; Greb, Janet L.; Amirthavasar, Gaya; Hunt, Dereck; Haynes, R. Brian; Harper, William; Holbrook, Anne; Capes, Sarah; Goeree, Ron; O’Reilly, Daria; Pullenayegum, Eleanor; Gerstein, Hertzel C.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE It is unknown whether computer-generated, patient-tailored feedback leads to improvements in glycemic control in people with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We recruited people with type 2 diabetes aged ≥40 years with a glycated hemoglobin (A1C) ≥7%, living in Hamilton, Canada, who were enrolled in a community-based program (Diabetes Hamilton) that provided regular evidence-based information and listings of community resources designed to facilitate diabetes self-management. After completing a questionnaire, participants were randomly allocated to either receive or not receive periodic computer-generated, evidence-based feedback on the basis of their questionnaire responses and designed to facilitate improved glycemic control and diabetes self-management. The primary outcome was a change in A1C after 1 year. RESULTS A total of 465 participants (50% women, mean age 62 years, and mean A1C 7.83%) were randomly assigned, and 12-month A1C values were available in 96% of all participants, at which time the A1C level had decreased by an absolute amount of 0.24 and 0.15% in the intervention and control groups, respectively. The difference in A1C reduction for the intervention versus control group was 0.09% (95% CI −0.08 to 0.26; P = 0.3). No between-group differences in measures of quality of life, diabetes self-management behaviors, or clinical outcomes were observed. CONCLUSIONS Providing computer-generated tailored feedback to registrants of a generic, community-based program that supports diabetes self-management does not lead to lower A1C levels or a better quality of life than participation in the community-based program (augmented by periodic A1C testing) alone. PMID:21680723

  3. Association between glycemic control and morning blood surge with vascular endothelial dysfunction in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    PubMed Central

    Nuthalapati, Rama Kumari; Indukuri, Bhaskara Raju

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Morning blood pressure surge (MBPS) is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events. However, little is known about the association between glycemic control and MBPS, and its effect on vascular injury in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The current study examined the association between glycemic control and MBPS and the involvement of MBPS in the development of vascular dysfunction in T2DM patients. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty-two consecutive T2DM outpatients from the Department of Cardiology and Endocrinology were enrolled in this study. We did MBPS in T2DM patients, 85 (male) (69.7%) patients and 37 (female) patients (30.3%); mean age 60.1 ± 9.39; (n = 122) using 24 h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and assessed vascular function by brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and nitroglycerin-mediated dilation (NMD). Results: The correlation between MBPS and various clinical variables were examined by single regression analysis in all subjects. MBPS showed significant and positive correlation with pulse rate (P = 0.01), fasting blood sugar (P = 0.002), and postprandial blood sugar (P = 0.05). To further confirm the association of insulin resistance (IR) with MBPS in T2DM patients, we examined the correlation between homeostasis model assessment-IR (HOMA-IR), an established marker of IR and MBPS in diabetic (DM) patients who were not taking insulin no significant association with MBPS in T2DM patients (P = 0.41), angiotensin-converting enzyme/angiotensin receptor blocker (P = 0.07). We examined the relationship between MBPS and vascular injury by measuring endothelium-dependent FMD and endothelium-independent NMD in T2DM patients. Among the various traditional risk factors for atherosclerosis such as DM duration (P = 0.04), platelet reactivity (P = 0.04) and morning surge (P = 0.002) emerged as significant factors. HOMA-IR was a negative correlation with FMD. Conclusions: The current study demonstrated that

  4. Oral magnesium supplementation improves glycemic control and lipid profile in children with type 1 diabetes and hypomagnesaemia

    PubMed Central

    Shahbah, Doaaa; Hassan, Tamer; Morsy, Saeed; Saadany, Hosam El; Fathy, Manar; Al-Ghobashy, Ashgan; Elsamad, Nahla; Emam, Ahmed; Elhewala, Ahmed; Ibrahim, Boshra; Gebaly, Sherief El; Sayed, Hany El; Ahmed, Hanan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Dietary supplementation with magnesium (Mg) in addition to classical therapies for diabetes may help in prevention or delaying of diabetic complications. We aimed to evaluate the status of serum Mg in children with type 1 diabetes and assessing its relationship to glycemic control and lipid profile. Then evaluating the effect of oral Mg supplementation on glycemic control and lipid parameters. We included 71 children at Pediatric Endocrinology Outpatient Clinic, Zagazig University, Egypt with type 1 diabetes and assessed HBA1c, lipid profile, and serum Mg at the start of study. Patients with serum Mg level < 1.7 mg/dL were given 300 mg Mg oxide for 3 months. After that we reevaluated HBA1c, lipid profile, and serum Mg in all patients. The study included 71 patients with type 1 diabetes (32 males and 39 females); their mean age was 9.68 ± 3.99 years. The mean serum Mg level was 1.83 ± .27 mg/dL. Hypomagnesemia was detected in 28.2% study patients. Serum Mg was found to be positively correlated with high density lipoprotein, mean corpuscular volume and platelet count (P < 0.001), and negatively correlated with age, HbA1c, triglycerides, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein, and duration of diabetes (P < 0.001). There was significant reduction in HBA1c in group given Mg supplementation. HBA1c was initially 10.11% ± 0.87%. After 3 months of oral Mg supplementation it is reduced to 7.88% ± 0.42% (P < 0.001). There was statistically significant difference in lipid parameters in hypomagnesemic diabetic patients before and after Mg supplementation with significant reduction in serum triglycerides, LDL, and total cholesterol following Mg supplementation with P < 0.001. Although HDL shows a significant increase after Mg supplementation in hypomagnesemic diabetic children with P < 0.001. Correction of hypomagnesemia in type 1 diabetic children with oral Mg supplements is associated with optimization of glycemic

  5. Achieving glycemic control in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes: a critical comparison of current options

    PubMed Central

    Du, Ye-Fong; Ou, Horng-Yih; Beverly, Elizabeth A; Chiu, Ching-Ju

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is increasing in the elderly. Because of the unique characteristics of elderly people with T2DM, therapeutic strategy and focus should be tailored to suit this population. This article reviews the guidelines and studies related to older people with T2DM worldwide. A few important themes are generalized: 1) the functional and cognitive status is critical for older people with T2DM considering their life expectancy compared to younger counterparts; 2) both severe hypoglycemia and persistent hyperglycemia are deleterious to older adults with T2DM, and both conditions should be avoided when determining therapeutic goals; 3) recently developed guidelines emphasize the avoidance of hypoglycemic episodes in older people, even in the absence of symptoms. In addition, we raise the concern of glycemic variability, and discuss the rationale for the selection of current options in managing this patient population. PMID:25429208

  6. Effects of exercise on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus in Koreans: the fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES V)

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji-Hye; Lee, Young-Eun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of exercise on glycemic control using data from fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and to provide appropriate exercise guidelines for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Korea. [Subjects and Methods] We selected 1,328 patients from the fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey database who had type 2 diabetes and ranged in age from 30 to 90 years. Statistical analyses included χ2 tests, multiple linear regression, and logistic regression. [Results] Factors found to be significantly related to glycemic control included income level, physical activity based on intensity of aerobic exercise, use of diabetes medicine, presence of hypertension, duration of diabetes, and waist circumference. In addition, engaging in combined low- and moderate-intensity aerobic exercise when adjusted for resistance exercise was found to lower the risk of glycemic control failure. [Conclusion] Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Korea should engage in combined low- and moderate-intensity aerobic exercise such as walking for 30 minutes or more five times a week. Physical activity is likely to improve glycemic control and thus prevent the acute and chronic complications of diabetes mellitus. PMID:26696738

  7. Four-year change in cardiorespiratory fitness and influence on glycemic control in adults with Type 2 diabetes in a randomized trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVE To examine an intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) compared with diabetes support and education (DSE) on 4-year change in fitness and physical activity (PA), and to examine the effect of change in fitness and PA, adjusting for potential confounders, on glycemic control in the Look AHEAD ...

  8. Three 15-min bouts of moderate postmeal walking significantly improves 24-h glycemic control in older people at risk for impaired glucose tolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of three 15-min bouts of postmeal walking with 45 min of sustained walking on 24-h glycemic control in older persons at risk for glucose intolerance. Inactive older (=60 years of age) participants (N = 10) were recruited from the community a...

  9. Effects of exercise on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus in Koreans: the fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES V).

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Hye; Lee, Young-Eun

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of exercise on glycemic control using data from fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and to provide appropriate exercise guidelines for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Korea. [Subjects and Methods] We selected 1,328 patients from the fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey database who had type 2 diabetes and ranged in age from 30 to 90 years. Statistical analyses included χ(2) tests, multiple linear regression, and logistic regression. [Results] Factors found to be significantly related to glycemic control included income level, physical activity based on intensity of aerobic exercise, use of diabetes medicine, presence of hypertension, duration of diabetes, and waist circumference. In addition, engaging in combined low- and moderate-intensity aerobic exercise when adjusted for resistance exercise was found to lower the risk of glycemic control failure. [Conclusion] Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Korea should engage in combined low- and moderate-intensity aerobic exercise such as walking for 30 minutes or more five times a week. Physical activity is likely to improve glycemic control and thus prevent the acute and chronic complications of diabetes mellitus.

  10. Effect of metformin added to insulin on glycemic control among overweight/obese adolescents with type 1 diabetes: A randomized clinical trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies assessing the effect of metformin on glycemic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes have produced inconclusive results. To assess the efficacy and safety of metformin as an adjunct to insulin in treating overweight adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Multicenter (26 pediatric en...

  11. Adenovirus 36 Attenuates Weight Loss from Exercise but Improves Glycemic Control by Increasing Mitochondrial Activity in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Michael B.; Park, Sooho; Kim, In-Beom; Nam, Jae-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Human adenovirus type 36 (Ad36) as an obesity agent induces adiposity by increasing glucose uptake and promoting chronic inflammation in fat tissues; in contrast, exercise reduces total body fat and inflammation. Our objective was to determine the association between Ad36 and the effects of exercise on inflammation and glycemic control. In the human trials (n = 54), Korean children (aged 12–14 years) exercised for 60 min on three occasions each week for 2 months. We compared the body mass index (BMI) Z-scores before and after exercise. C57BL/6 mice were infected with Ad36 and Ad2 as a control, and these mice exercised for 12 weeks postinfection. After the exercise period, we determined the serum parameters and assessed the presence of inflammation and the mitochondrial function in the organs. Ad36-seropositive children who were subjected to a supervised exercise regimen had high BMI Z-scores whereas Ad36-seronegative children had lower scores. Similarly, Ad36-infected mice were resistant to weight loss and exhibited chronic inflammation of their adipose tissues despite frequent exercise. However, Ad36 combined with exercise reduced the levels of serum glucose, nonesterified fatty acids, total cholesterol, and insulin in virus-infected mice. Interestingly, virus infection increased the mitochondrial function in the liver, as demonstrated by the numbers of mitochondria, cytochrome c oxidase activity, and transcription of key mitochondrial genes. Therefore Ad36 counteracts the weight-loss effect of exercise and maintains the chronic inflammatory state, but glycemic control is improved by exercise synergistically because of increased mitochondrial activity in the liver. PMID:25479564

  12. Do Cinnamon Supplements Have a Role in Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes? A Narrative Review.

    PubMed

    Costello, Rebecca B; Dwyer, Johanna T; Saldanha, Leila; Bailey, Regan L; Merkel, Joyce; Wambogo, Edwina

    2016-11-01

    Cinnamon (Cinnamomum sp) has been suggested to help patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) achieve better glycemic control, although conclusions from meta-analyses are mixed. To evaluate whether the use of cinnamon dietary supplements by adults with T2DM had clinically meaningful effects on glycemic control, as measured by changes in fasting plasma glucose (FPG) or hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), a comprehensive PubMed literature search was performed. Eleven randomized controlled trials were identified that met our inclusion criteria that enrolled 694 adults with T2DM receiving hypoglycemic medications or not. In 10 of the studies, participants continued to take their hypoglycemic medications during the cinnamon intervention period. Studies ranged from 4 to 16 weeks in duration; seven studies were double-blind. Cinnamon doses ranged from 120 to 6,000 mg/day. The species of cinnamon used varied: seven used Cinnamomum cassia or Cinnamomum aromaticum, one used Cinnamomum zeylanicum, and three did not disclose the species. Because of the heterogeneity of the studies, a meta-analysis was not conducted. All 11 of the studies reported some reductions in FPG during the cinnamon intervention, and of the studies measuring HbA1c very modest decreases were also apparent with cinnamon, whereas changes in the placebo groups were minimal. However, only four studies achieved the American Diabetes Association treatment goals (FPG <7.2 mmol/L [130 mg/dL] and/or HbAlc <7.0). We conclude that cinnamon supplements added to standard hypoglycemic medications and other lifestyle therapies had modest effects on FPG and HbA1c. Until larger and more rigorous studies are available, registered dietitian nutritionists and other health care professionals should recommend that patients continue to follow existing recommendations of authoritative bodies for diet, lifestyle changes, and hypoglycemic drugs.

  13. A Comparative Study of Diet in Good and Poor Glycemic Control Groups in Elderly Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Mi-Hye; Park, Soojin; Woo, Jeong-Taek

    2010-01-01

    Background Identification of dietary patterns is important for glycemic management in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods Elderly T2DM patients (> 65 years of age, n = 48) were categorized based on their concentration of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Subjects with HbA1c levels below 7% were placed in the good control (GC) group and those with HbA1c levels equal to or above 8% were placed in the poor control (PC) group. Anthropometric data, blood parameters, and dietary intake records were compared between the groups. Statistical analysis included Student's t-test, chi-square test, and Pearson correlation coefficient test. Results Anthropometric data, including body mass index (24.7 ± 2.9 kg/m2), did not differ between the GC and PC groups. Significant abnormalities in blood glucose levels (P < 0.01), lean body mass (P < 0.01), and plasma protein and albumin levels (P < 0.05, P < 0.01) were found in the PC group. In contrast to the GC group, the PC group depended on carbohydrate (P = 0.014) rather than protein (P = 0.013) or fat (P = 0.005) as a major source of energy, and had a lower index of nutritional quality for nutrients such as protein (P = 0.001), and all vitamins and minerals (P < 0.001, 0.01, or 0.05 for individual nutrients), except vitamin C, in their usual diet. Negative correlations between HbA1c levels and protein (r = -0.338, P < 0.05) or fat (r = -0.385, P < 0.01) intakes were also found. Conclusions Healthcare professionals should encourage elderly diabetic patients to consume a balanced diet to maintain good glycemic control. PMID:21076578

  14. Epigenetic Changes in Endothelial Progenitors as a Possible Cellular Basis for Glycemic Memory in Diabetic Vascular Complications.

    PubMed

    Rajasekar, Poojitha; O'Neill, Christina L; Eeles, Lydia; Stitt, Alan W; Medina, Reinhold J

    2015-01-01

    The vascular complications of diabetes significantly impact the quality of life and mortality in diabetic patients. Extensive evidence from various human clinical trials has clearly established that a period of poor glycemic control early in the disease process carries negative consequences, such as an increase in the development and progression of vascular complications that becomes evident many years later. Importantly, intensive glycemic control established later in the disease process cannot reverse or slow down the onset or progression of diabetic vasculopathy. This has been named the glycemic memory phenomenon. Scientists have successfully modelled glycemic memory using various in vitro and in vivo systems. This review emphasizes that oxidative stress and accumulation of advanced glycation end products are key factors driving glycemic memory in endothelial cells. Furthermore, various epigenetic marks have been proposed to closely associate with vascular glycemic memory. In addition, we comment on the importance of endothelial progenitors and their role as endogenous vasoreparative cells that are negatively impacted by the diabetic milieu and may constitute a "carrier" of glycemic memory. Considering the potential of endothelial progenitor-based cytotherapies, future studies on their glycemic memory are warranted to develop epigenetics-based therapeutics targeting diabetic vascular complications.

  15. Epigenetic Changes in Endothelial Progenitors as a Possible Cellular Basis for Glycemic Memory in Diabetic Vascular Complications

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekar, Poojitha; O'Neill, Christina L.; Eeles, Lydia; Stitt, Alan W.; Medina, Reinhold J.

    2015-01-01

    The vascular complications of diabetes significantly impact the quality of life and mortality in diabetic patients. Extensive evidence from various human clinical trials has clearly established that a period of poor glycemic control early in the disease process carries negative consequences, such as an increase in the development and progression of vascular complications that becomes evident many years later. Importantly, intensive glycemic control established later in the disease process cannot reverse or slow down the onset or progression of diabetic vasculopathy. This has been named the glycemic memory phenomenon. Scientists have successfully modelled glycemic memory using various in vitro and in vivo systems. This review emphasizes that oxidative stress and accumulation of advanced glycation end products are key factors driving glycemic memory in endothelial cells. Furthermore, various epigenetic marks have been proposed to closely associate with vascular glycemic memory. In addition, we comment on the importance of endothelial progenitors and their role as endogenous vasoreparative cells that are negatively impacted by the diabetic milieu and may constitute a “carrier” of glycemic memory. Considering the potential of endothelial progenitor-based cytotherapies, future studies on their glycemic memory are warranted to develop epigenetics-based therapeutics targeting diabetic vascular complications. PMID:26106624

  16. [Indicators of glycemic control --hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), glycated albumin (GA), and 1,5-anhydroglucitol (1,5-AG)].

    PubMed

    Sato, Asako

    2014-01-01

    The clinical goal of diabetes management is a good quality of life that is not different from that of a healthy subjects. To fulfill the goal, prevention of complications is needed under good glycemic control. Although blood glucose measurement is essential for glycemic control, there are diurnal variations in blood glucose levels. An indicator of long-term glycemic control is necessary. HbA1c is the gold standard measurement for the assessment of glycemic control, and worldwide large scale clinical studies of diabetes complications have greatly valued HbA1c as an indicator of glycemic control. In addition, recently, HbA1c was recommended for use in the diagnosis of diabetes in Japan and in the United States. Although HbA1c is used widely and internationally, international standardization of the HbA1c value has not been achieved. In Japan, from April 2014, it has been decided to adopt the National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program (NGSP) value, which is used by many countries globally, as the first step toward internationalization. Recently, cardiovascular disease in diabetic patients has been increasing in Japan. Relationships between postprandial hyperglycemia and cardiovascular disease have been noted. Therefore, the correction of postprandial hyperglycemia is one of the important goals of glycemic control to prevent cardiovascular disease. HbA1c or glycated albumin (GA) results from the glycation of hemoglobin or serum albumin and represents 2-month or 2-week glycemia, respectively. In addition, the glycation speed of GA is ten times faster than HbA1c, so GA is likely to reflect the variation in blood glucose and postprandial hyperglycemia in combination with HbA1c and its value. 1,5-anhydroglucitol (AG) is a marker of glycemia-induced glycosuria, since reabsorption of filtered 1,5-AG in the proximal tubule is competitively inhibited by glucose. It is an indicator to identify rapid changes in hyperglycemia. Understanding the characteristics of the

  17. Sodium–glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitor combination therapy to optimize glycemic control and tolerability in patients with type 2 diabetes: focus on dapagliflozin–metformin

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Stanley S; Katz, Arie

    2016-01-01

    In type 2 diabetes (T2D), early combination therapy using agents that target a number of the underlying pathophysiologic defects contributing to hyperglycemia may improve patient outcomes. For many patients, the combination of metformin with a sodium–glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitor may be a good option because these agents have complementary mechanisms of action, neutral-to-positive effects on body weight, and a low risk of hypoglycemia. This review focuses on the combination of metformin with dapagliflozin, a member of the SGLT-2 inhibitor class of antidiabetes agents. In clinical trials, the combination of dapagliflozin with metformin produced significant and sustained reductions in glycated hemoglobin and body weight in a broad range of adult patients with T2D, including those initiating pharmacotherapy and those with more advanced disease. These reductions were accompanied by modest decreases in blood pressure. Dapagliflozin as add-on therapy to metformin was well tolerated and associated with low rates of hypoglycemia. Genital infections and, in some studies, urinary tract infections were more frequent with dapagliflozin than with placebo. Early combination therapy with dapagliflozin and metformin may be a safe and appropriate treatment option that enables patients with T2D to achieve individualized glycemic goals as either initial combination therapy in treatment-naïve patients or as dapagliflozin add-on in patients inadequately controlled with metformin therapy. PMID:27042132

  18. Effect of carbohydrate counting using bolus calculators on glycemic control in type 1 diabetes patients during continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Eijiro; Okada, Shuichi; Nakajima, Yasuyo; Bastie, Claire C; Tagaya, Yuko; Osaki, Aya; Shimoda, Yoko; Shibusawa, Ryo; Saito, Tsugumichi; Ozawa, Atsushi; Yamada, Masanobu

    2016-11-29

    The present study examined the long-term efficacy of insulin pump therapy for type 1 diabetes patients when carried out using carbohydrate counting with bolus calculators for 1 year. A total of 22 type 1 diabetes patients who had just started continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion were examined and divided into two groups: one that was educated about carbohydrate counting using bolus calculators (n = 14); and another that did not use bolus calculators (n = 8). After 1 year, the hemoglobin A1c levels of the patient group that used bolus calculators decreased persistently and significantly (P = 0.0297), whereas those of the other group did not. The bodyweight, total daily dose of insulin and bolus percentage of both groups did not change. Carbohydrate counting using bolus calculators is necessary to achieve optimal and persistent glycemic control in patients undergoing continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion.

  19. Successful implementation of a perioperative glycemic control protocol in cardiac surgery: barrier analysis and intervention using lean six sigma.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Elizabeth A; Chavez-Valdez, Raul; Holt, Natalie F; Grogan, Kelly L; Khalifeh, Katherine W; Slater, Tammy; Winner, Laura E; Moyer, Jennifer; Lehmann, Christoph U

    2011-01-01

    Although the evidence strongly supports perioperative glycemic control among cardiac surgical patients, there is scant literature to describe the practical application of such a protocol in the complex ICU environment. This paper describes the use of the Lean Six Sigma methodology to implement a perioperative insulin protocol in a cardiac surgical intensive care unit (CSICU) in a large academic hospital. A preintervention chart audit revealed that fewer than 10% of patients were admitted to the CSICU with glucose <200 mg/dL, prompting the initiation of the quality improvement project. Following protocol implementation, more than 90% of patients were admitted with a glucose <200 mg/dL. Key elements to success include barrier analysis and intervention, provider education, and broadening the project scope to address the intraoperative period.

  20. Successful Implementation of a Perioperative Glycemic Control Protocol in Cardiac Surgery: Barrier Analysis and Intervention Using Lean Six Sigma

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Elizabeth A.; Chavez-Valdez, Raul; Holt, Natalie F.; Grogan, Kelly L.; Khalifeh, Katherine W.; Slater, Tammy; Winner, Laura E.; Moyer, Jennifer; Lehmann, Christoph U.

    2011-01-01

    Although the evidence strongly supports perioperative glycemic control among cardiac surgical patients, there is scant literature to describe the practical application of such a protocol in the complex ICU environment. This paper describes the use of the Lean Six Sigma methodology to implement a perioperative insulin protocol in a cardiac surgical intensive care unit (CSICU) in a large academic hospital. A preintervention chart audit revealed that fewer than 10% of patients were admitted to the CSICU with glucose <200 mg/dL, prompting the initiation of the quality improvement project. Following protocol implementation, more than 90% of patients were admitted with a glucose <200 mg/dL. Key elements to success include barrier analysis and intervention, provider education, and broadening the project scope to address the intraoperative period. PMID:22091218

  1. Obstructive sleep apnea in Type 2 diabetes and impact of continuous positive airway pressure therapy on glycemic control

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Javid Ahmad; Masoodi, Shariq Rashid; Shoib, Sheikh

    2017-01-01

    Background: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are two interacting epidemics both with high prevalence and morbidity. Both epidemiologic and clinical studies suggest that the majority of patients with T2DM also have OSA and untreated OSA in these patients results in poor glycemic control leading to acceleration of diabetes-related complications. Objectives: To assess the prevalence and severity of OSA in T2DM patients and to assess the impact of OSA treatment on presenting symptoms and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). Methods: We performed polysomnography (PSG) studies and measured HbA1c in 62 consecutive patients with T2DM that were referred from various subspecialty clinics from July 2011 to August 2013. Results: In our 62 diabetic patients, 59 (95.2%) had abnormal PSG. Based on Apnea–Hypopnea Index (AHI) score, 3 (5.1%) patients had mild, 28 (47.5%) had moderate, and 28 (47.5%) had severe OSA. The mean AHI of diabetic patients was significantly more than nondiabetic patients, i.e., 25.7 versus 19.7 (P = 0.001). Variables that significantly correlated with the presence of OSA include age, gender, body mass index (BMI), hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease (P < 0.05); however, on logistic regression only BMI, hypertension, and nocturia correlated with OSA. Overall, 59% of diabetic patients showed improvement in their glycemic control as measured by HbA1c with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment. Significant, moderate, and mild categories of treatment response were respectively observed in 7%, 20%, and 32% of patients. Conclusion: Treatment of OSA with CPAP reduces HbA1c in a significant number of diabetics. PMID:28217508

  2. Zinc transporter gene expression and glycemic control in post-menopausal women with Type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Foster, Meika; Chu, Anna; Petocz, Peter; Samman, Samir

    2014-10-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated often with underlying zinc deficiency and nutritional supplements such as zinc may be of therapeutic benefit in the disease. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 12-week trial in postmenopausal women (n=48) with Type 2 DM we investigated the effects of supplementation with zinc (40mg/d) and flaxseed oil (FSO; 2g/d) on the gene expression of zinc transporters (ZnT1, ZnT5, ZnT6, ZnT7, ZnT8, Zip1, Zip3, Zip7, and Zip10) and metallothionein (MT-1A, and MT-2A), and markers of glycemic control (glucose, insulin, glycosylated hemoglobin [HbA1c]). The homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated. No significant effects of zinc or FSO supplementation were observed on glycemic marker concentrations, HOMA-IR or fold change over 12 weeks in zinc transporter and metallothionein gene expression. In multivariate analysis, the change over 12 weeks in serum glucose concentrations (P=0.001) and HOMA-IR (P=0.001) predicted the fold change in Zip10. In secondary analysis, marginal statistical significance was observed with the change in both serum glucose concentrations (P=0.003) and HOMA-IR (P=0.007) being predictive of the fold change in ZnT6. ZnT8 mRNA expression was variable; HbA1c levels were higher (P=0.006) in participants who exhibited ZnT8 expression compared to those who did not. The significant predictive relationships between Zip10, ZnT6, serum glucose and HOMA-IR are preliminary, as is the relationship between HbA1c and ZnT8; nevertheless the observations support an association between Type 2 DM and zinc homeostasis that requires further exploration.

  3. Effect of Replacing Animal Protein with Plant Protein on Glycemic Control in Diabetes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Viguiliouk, Effie; Stewart, Sarah E.; Jayalath, Viranda H.; Ng, Alena Praneet; Mirrahimi, Arash; de Souza, Russell J.; Hanley, Anthony J.; Bazinet, Richard P.; Blanco Mejia, Sonia; Leiter, Lawrence A.; Josse, Robert G.; Kendall, Cyril W.C.; Jenkins, David J.A.; Sievenpiper, John L.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research on the effect of replacing sources of animal protein with plant protein on glycemic control has been inconsistent. We therefore conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to assess the effect of this replacement on glycemic control in individuals with diabetes. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases through 26 August 2015. We included RCTs ≥ 3-weeks comparing the effect of replacing animal with plant protein on HbA1c, fasting glucose (FG), and fasting insulin (FI). Two independent reviewers extracted relevant data, assessed study quality and risk of bias. Data were pooled by the generic inverse variance method and expressed as mean differences (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Heterogeneity was assessed (Cochran Q-statistic) and quantified (I2-statistic). Thirteen RCTs (n = 280) met the eligibility criteria. Diets emphasizing a replacement of animal with plant protein at a median level of ~35% of total protein per day significantly lowered HbA1c (MD = −0.15%; 95%-CI: −0.26, −0.05%), FG (MD = −0.53 mmol/L; 95%-CI: −0.92, −0.13 mmol/L) and FI (MD = −10.09 pmol/L; 95%-CI: −17.31, −2.86 pmol/L) compared with control arms. Overall, the results indicate that replacing sources of animal with plant protein leads to modest improvements in glycemic control in individuals with diabetes. Owing to uncertainties in our analyses there is a need for larger, longer, higher quality trials. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov registration number: NCT02037321. PMID:26633472

  4. In situ application of hydrogel-type fibrin-islet composite optimized for rapid glycemic control by subcutaneous xenogeneic porcine islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Sik; Lim, Jong-Hyung; Nam, Hye-Young; Lim, Hyun-Ju; Shin, Jun-Seop; Shin, Jin-Young; Ryu, Ju-Hee; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kwon, Ick-Chan; Jin, Sang-Man; Kim, Hang-Rae; Kim, Sang-Joon; Park, Chung-Gyu

    2012-09-10

    Maximum engraftment of transplanted islets is essential for the clinical application of a subcutaneous site. Significant barriers to the current approaches are associated with their low effectiveness, complexity and unproven biosafety. Here, we evaluated and optimized a fibrin-islet composite for effective glycemic control in a subcutaneous site whose environment is highly hypoxic due to low vascularization potential. In the setting of xenogeneic porcine islet transplantation into the subcutaneous space of a diabetic mouse, the in vivo islet functions were greatly affected by the concentrations of fibrinogen and thrombin. The optimized hydrogel-type fibrin remarkably reduced the marginal islet mass to approximately one tenth that of islets without fibrin. This marginal islet mass was comparable to that in the setting of the subcapsular space of the kidney, which is a highly vascularized organ. Highly vascularized structures were generated inside and on the outer surface of the grafts. A hydrogel-type fibrin-islet composite established early diabetic control within an average of 3.4days after the transplantation. In the mechanistic studies, fibrin promoted local angiogenesis, enhanced islet viability and prevented fragmentation of islets into single cells. In conclusion, in situ application of hydrogel-type fibrin-islet composite may be a promising modality in the clinical success of subcutaneous islet transplantation.

  5. Effect of Tree Nuts on Glycemic Control in Diabetes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Dietary Trials

    PubMed Central

    Viguiliouk, Effie; Kendall, Cyril W. C.; Blanco Mejia, Sonia; Cozma, Adrian I.; Ha, Vanessa; Mirrahimi, Arash; Jayalath, Viranda H.; Augustin, Livia S. A.; Chiavaroli, Laura; Leiter, Lawrence A.; de Souza, Russell J.; Jenkins, David J. A.; Sievenpiper, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Tree nut consumption has been associated with reduced diabetes risk, however, results from randomized trials on glycemic control have been inconsistent. Objective To provide better evidence for diabetes guidelines development, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials to assess the effects of tree nuts on markers of glycemic control in individuals with diabetes. Data Sources MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Cochrane databases through 6 April 2014. Study Selection Randomized controlled trials ≥3 weeks conducted in individuals with diabetes that compare the effect of diets emphasizing tree nuts to isocaloric diets without tree nuts on HbA1c, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and HOMA-IR. Data Extraction and Synthesis Two independent reviewer’s extracted relevant data and assessed study quality and risk of bias. Data were pooled by the generic inverse variance method and expressed as mean differences (MD) with 95% CI’s. Heterogeneity was assessed (Cochran Q-statistic) and quantified (I2). Results Twelve trials (n = 450) were included. Diets emphasizing tree nuts at a median dose of 56 g/d significantly lowered HbA1c (MD = −0.07% [95% CI:−0.10, −0.03%]; P = 0.0003) and fasting glucose (MD = −0.15 mmol/L [95% CI: −0.27, −0.02 mmol/L]; P = 0.03) compared with control diets. No significant treatment effects were observed for fasting insulin and HOMA-IR, however the direction of effect favoured tree nuts. Limitations Majority of trials were of short duration and poor quality. Conclusions Pooled analyses show that tree nuts improve glycemic control in individuals with type 2 diabetes, supporting their inclusion in a healthy diet. Owing to the uncertainties in our analyses there is a need for longer, higher quality trials with a focus on using nuts to displace high-glycemic index carbohydrates. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01630980 PMID:25076495

  6. Glycemic Control among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Countries of Arabic Gulf

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rasheedi, Ahmad Ali

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a growing, worldwide public health concern. The countries of Arabic Gulf appear to have a higher prevalence of diabetes than the global average. The recent and rapid socio-economic development of these countries has been associated with this rising prevalence. Although the rate of type 2 diabetes management based on glycosylated hemoglobin level in the countries of Arabic Gulf is labeled as poor, the outcomes are almost similar to those reported from elsewhere. Unfortunately, overweight and obesity are driving the global diabetes epidemic. A minority of patients with type 2 diabetes had a normal body weight which might make the control of diabetes difficult. Anyhow, Greater efforts are urgently needed to properly manage diabetes early in order to prevent short and long-term complications. Practical strategies aimed at more effective management of type 2 diabetes patients are strongly needed. PMID:26609299

  7. The glycemic index: physiological significance.

    PubMed

    Esfahani, Amin; Wong, Julia M W; Mirrahimi, Arash; Srichaikul, Korbua; Jenkins, David J A; Kendall, Cyril W C

    2009-08-01

    The glycemic index (GI) is a physiological assessment of a food's carbohydrate content through its effect on postprandial blood glucose concentrations. Evidence from trials and observational studies suggests that this physiological classification may have relevance to those chronic Western diseases associated with overconsumption and inactivity leading to central obesity and insulin resistance. The glycemic index classification of foods has been used as a tool to assess potential prevention and treatment strategies for diseases where glycemic control is of importance, such as diabetes. Low GI diets have also been reported to improve the serum lipid profile, reduce C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations, and aid in weight control. In cross-sectional studies, low GI or glycemic load diets (mean GI multiplied by total carbohydrate) have been associated with higher levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), with reduced CRP concentrations, and, in cohort studies, with decreased risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In addition, some case-control and cohort studies have found positive associations between dietary GI and risk of various cancers, including those of the colon, breast, and prostate. Although inconsistencies in the current findings still need to be resolved, sufficient positive evidence, especially with respect to renewed interest in postprandial events, suggests that the glycemic index may have a role to play in the treatment and prevention of chronic diseases.

  8. A Novel Behavioral Intervention in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Improves Glycemic Control: Preliminary Results from a Pilot Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Maranda, Louise; Lau, May; Stewart, Sunita M; Gupta, Olga T

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to develop and pilot an innovative behavioral intervention in adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) incorporating structured care of a pet to improve glycemic control. Methods Twenty-eight adolescents with A1C > 8.5% (69 mmol/mol) were randomly assigned to either the intervention group (care of a Betta splendens pet fish) or the control group (usual care). Adolescents in the intervention group were given instructions to associate daily and weekly fish care duties with diabetes self-management tasks including blood glucose testing and parent-adolescent communication. Results After 3 months the participants in the intervention group exhibited a statistically significant decrease in A1C levels (−0.5%) compared to their peers in the control group who had an increase in A1C levels (0.8%)(p = 0.04). The younger adolescents (ages 10–13) demonstrated a greater response to the intervention which was statistically significant (−1.5% vs. 0.6%, p = 0.04) compared with the older adolescents (ages 14–17). Conclusions Structured care of a pet fish can improve glycemic control in adolescents with T1DM, likely by providing cues to perform diabetes self-management behaviors. PMID:25614529

  9. First pilot trial of the STAR-Liege protocol for tight glycemic control in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Penning, Sophie; Le Compte, Aaron J; Moorhead, Katherine T; Desaive, Thomas; Massion, Paul; Preiser, Jean-Charles; Shaw, Geoffrey M; Chase, J Geoffrey

    2012-11-01

    Tight glycemic control (TGC) has shown benefits in ICU patients, but been difficult to achieve consistently due to inter- and intra- patient variability that requires more adaptive, patient-specific solutions. STAR (Stochastic TARgeted) is a flexible model-based TGC framework accounting for patient variability with a stochastically derived maximum 5% risk of blood glucose (BG) below 72 mg/dL. This research describes the first clinical pilot trial of the STAR approach and the post-trial analysis of the models and methods that underpin the protocol. The STAR framework works with clinically specified targets and intervention guidelines. The clinically specified glycemic target was 125 mg/dL. Each trial was 24 h with BG measured 1-2 hourly. Two-hourly measurement was used when BG was between 110-135 mg/dL for 3 h. In the STAR approach, each intervention leads to a predicted BG level and outcome range (5-95th percentile) based on a stochastic model of metabolic patient variability. Carbohydrate intake (all sources) was monitored, but not changed from clinical settings except to prevent BG<100 mg/dL when no insulin was given. Insulin infusion rates were limited (6 U/h maximum), with limited increases based on current infusion rate (0.5-2.0 U/h), making this use of the STAR framework an insulin-only TGC approach. Approval was granted by the Ethics Committee of the Medical Faculty of the University of Liege (Liege, Belgium). Nine patient trials were undertaken after obtaining informed consent. There were 205 measurements over all 9 trials. Median [IQR] per-patient results were: BG: 138.5 [130.6-146.0]mg/dL; carbohydrate administered: 2-11 g/h; median insulin:1.3 [0.9-2.4]U/h with a maximum of 6.0 [4.7-6.0]U/h. Median [IQR] time in the desired 110-140 mg/dL band was: 50.0 [31.2-54.2]%. Median model prediction errors ranged: 10-18%, with larger errors due to small meals and other clinical events. The minimum BG was 63 mg/dL and no other measurement was below 72 mg/dL, so

  10. Short- and Longterm Glycemic Control of Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats Using Different Insulin Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Luippold, Gerd; Bedenik, Jessica; Voigt, Anke; Grempler, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    The chemical induction of diabetes with STZ has gained popularity because of the relative ease of rendering normal animals diabetic. Insulin substitution is required in STZ-rats in long-term studies to avoid ketoacidosis and consequently loss of animals. Aim of the present studies was to test different insulin preparations and different ways of administration in their ability to reduce blood glucose in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Single dosing of the long-acting insulin analogue glargine was able to dose-dependently reduce blood glucose over 4 h towards normoglycemia in STZ-treated rats. However, this effect was not sustained until 8 h post injection. A more sustained glucose-lowering effect was achieved using insulin-releasing implants. In STZ-rats, 1 insulin implant moderately lowered blood glucose levels 10 days after implantation, while 2 implants induced normoglycemia over the whole day. According to the glucose-lowering effect 1 as well as 2 insulin implants significantly reduced HbA1c measured after 26 days of implantation. In line with the improved glucose homeostasis due to the implants, urinary glucose excretion was also blunted in STZ-treated rats with 2 implants. Since diabetic nephropathy is one of the complications of longterm diabetes, renal function was characterized in the STZ-rat model. Increases in creatinine clearance and urinary albumin excretion resemble early signs of diabetic nephropathy. These functional abnormalities of the kidney could clearly be corrected with insulin-releasing implants 27 days after implantation. The data show that diabetic STZ-rats respond to exogenous insulin with regard to glucose levels as well as kidney parameters and a suitable dose of insulin implants for glucose control was established. This animal model together with the insulin dosing regimen is suitable to address diabetes-induced early diabetic nephropathy and also to study combination therapies with insulin for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. PMID:27253523

  11. Abnormal expression and function of Dectin-1 receptor in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with poor glycemic control (HbA1c>8%).

    PubMed

    Cortez-Espinosa, Nancy; García-Hernández, Mariana H; Reynaga-Hernández, Elizabeth; Cortés-García, J Diego; Corral-Fernández, Nancy E; Rodríguez-Rivera, J Guillermo; Bravo-Ramírez, Anamaría; González-Amaro, Roberto; Portales-Pérez, Diana P

    2012-11-01

    Dectin-1 is a key innate receptor involved in various cellular responses and may have a direct role in chronic inflammatory conditions such as type 2 diabetes mellitus. The aim of this work was to evaluate the expression and function of Dectin-1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from T2D patients. Dectin-1 expression was analyzed by flow cytometry and RT-PCR in monocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations from T2D patients (n=34) and healthy subjects (n=29). Functional assays were used to assess cytokine synthesis, ROS levels and oxidative stress ratio. We found increased expression (MFI) of Dectin-1 in monocytes from T2D patients. Significantly higher Dectin-1 expression was also detected in CD4(+) T, CD8(+) T, B cells and NK cells from T2D patients compared to controls. In contrast, monocytes from T2D patients with poor glycemic control (HbA1c>8%) showed a diminished percentage of Dectin-1(+)/TLR2(+) cells. Negative correlations between the percent of Dectin-1(+)/TLR2(+) cells and fasting plasma glucose levels (FPG) and HbA1c levels were found. A significant reduction in basal levels of IL-10 was observed in patients with poor glycemic control (HbA1c>8%) compared to patients with appropriate glycemic control (HbA1c≤6.5%) and healthy controls, an effect that was not observed in monocytes stimulated with zymosan. Higher ROS levels in zymosan-stimulated cells from patients with poor glycemic control positively correlated with FPG levels, and the oxidative stress ratio was higher in T2D cells compared with controls. Our data indicate that Dectin-1 may be involved in the abnormal immune responses that are observed in patients with T2D.

  12. Peri-procedural Glycemic Control in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus Undergoing Coronary Angiography with Possible Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Binita; Berger, Jeffrey S.; Amoroso, Nicholas S.; Mai, Xingchen; Lorin, Jeffrey D.; Danoff, Ann; Schwartzbard, Arthur Z.; Lobach, Iryna; Guo, Yu; Feit, Frederick; Slater, James; Attubato, Michael J.; Sedlis, Steven P.

    2014-01-01

    Peri-procedural hyperglycemia is an independent predictor of mortality in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). However, peri-procedural management of blood glucose is not standardized. The effects of routinely continuing long-acting glucose-lowering medications prior to coronary angiography with possible PCI on peri-procedural glycemic control have not been investigated. Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) (n=172) were randomized to continue (Continue group; n=86) or hold (Hold group; n=86) their clinically prescribed long-acting glucose-lowering medications prior to procedure. The primary endpoint was glucose level on procedural access. In a subset of patients (no DM group, n=25, Continue group, n=25, and Hold group, n=25), selected measures of platelet activity that change acutely were assessed. Patients with DM randomized to the Continue group had lower blood glucose levels on procedural access compared with those randomized to the Hold group (117 [97–151] vs 134 [117–172] mg/dL, p=0.002). There were 2 hypoglycemic events in the Continue group and none in the Hold group, and no adverse events in either group. Selected markers of platelet activity differed across the no DM, Continue, and Hold groups (leukocyte platelet aggregates: 8.1% [7.2–10.4], 8.7% [6.9–11.4], 10.9% [8.6–14.7], p=0.007; monocyte platelet aggregates: 14.0% [10.3–16.3], 20.8% [16.2–27.0], 22.5% [15.2–35.4], p<0.001; soluble p-selectin: 51.9ng/mL [39.7–74.0], 59.1ng/mL [46.8–73.2], 72.2ng/mL [58.4–77.4], p=0.014). In conclusion, routinely continuing clinically prescribed long-acting glucose-lowering medications prior to coronary angiography with possible PCI helps achieve peri-procedural euglycemia, appears safe, and should be considered as a strategy for achieving peri-procedural glycemic control. PMID:24630791

  13. Correlation Between Glycemic Control and the Incidence of Peritoneal and Catheter Tunnel and Exit-Site Infections in Diabetic Patients Undergoing Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Carmona, Ana; Pérez-Fontán, Miguel; López-Muñiz, Andrés; Ferreiro-Hermida, Tamara; García-Falcón, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    ♦ Background: Diabetes mellitus, especially if complicated by poor glycemic control, portends an increased risk of infection. The significance of this association in the case of diabetic patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD) has not been assessed. ♦ Methods: Using a retrospective observational design, we analyzed the association between glycemic control at the start of PD (estimated from glycosylated hemoglobin levels) and the risk of peritoneal and catheter tunnel and exit-site infections during follow-up in 183 incident patients on PD. We used the median value of glycosylated hemoglobin to classify patients into good (group A) or poor (group B) glycemic control groups. We applied multivariate strategies of analysis to control for other potential predictors of PD-related infection. ♦ Results: Groups A and B differed significantly in age, dialysis vintage, use of insulin, and rate of Staphylococcus aureus carriage. Neither the incidence (0.60 episodes in group A vs 0.56 episodes in group B per patient-year) nor the time to a first peritoneal infection (median: 42 months vs 38 months) differed significantly between the study groups. In contrast, group B had a significantly higher incidence of catheter tunnel and exit-site infections (0.23 episodes vs 0.12 episodes per patient-year) and shorter time to a first infection episode (64 months vs 76 months, p = 0.004). The difference persisted in multivariate analysis (adjusted hazard ratio: 2.65; 95% confidence interval: 1.13 to 6.05; p = 0.013). We observed no differences between the study groups in the spectrum of causative organisms or in the outcomes of PD-related infections. ♦ Conclusions: Poor glycemic control is a consistent predictor of subsequent risk of catheter tunnel and exit-site infection, but not of peritoneal infection, among diabetic patients starting PD therapy. PMID:23818005

  14. Dietary glycemic index and glycemic load in relation to HbA1c in Japanese obese adults: a cross-sectional analysis of the Saku Control Obesity Program

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dietary glycemic index or load is thought to play an important role in glucose metabolism. However, few studies have investigated the relation between glycemic index (GI) or load (GL) and glycemia in Asian populations. In this cross-sectional analysis of a randomized controlled trial, the Saku Control Obesity Program, we examined the relation between the baseline GI or GL and glycemia (HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose [FPG] levels), insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), β-cell function (HOMA-β), and other metabolic risk factors (lipid levels, diastolic and systolic blood pressure, and adiposity measures). Methods The participants were 227 obese Japanese women and men. We used multiple linear regression models and logistic regression models to adjust for potential confounding factors such as age, sex, visceral fat area, total energy intake, and physical activity levels. Results After adjustments for potential confounding factors, GI was not associated with HbA1c, but GL was positively associated with HbA1c. For increasing quartiles of GI, the adjusted mean HbA1c were 6.3%, 6.7%, 6.4%, and 6.4% (P for trend = 0.991). For increasing quartiles of GL, the adjusted mean HbA1c were 6.2%, 6.2%, 6.6%, and 6.5% (P for trend = 0.044). In addition, among participants with HbA1c ≥ 7.0%, 20 out of 28 (71%) had a high GL (≥ median); the adjusted odds ratio for HbA1c ≥ 7.0% among participants with higher GL was 3.1 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.2 to 8.1) compared to the participants with a lower GL (glycemic control

  15. Non-High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Children with Diabetes: Proposed Treatment Recommendations Based on Glycemic Control, Body Mass Index, Age, Sex, and Generally Accepted Cut Points.

    PubMed

    Schwab, K Otfried; Doerfer, Jürgen; Hungele, Andreas; Scheuing, Nicole; Krebs, Andreas; Dost, Axel; Rohrer, Tilman R; Hofer, Sabine; Holl, Reinhard W

    2015-12-01

    Percentile-based non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were analyzed by glycemic control, weight, age, and sex of children with type 1 diabetes (n = 26,358). Ten percent of all children and 25% of overweight adolescent girls require both immediate lipid-lowering medication and lifestyle changes to achieve non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels <120 mg/dL and cardiovascular risk reduction.

  16. Plasma Proteins Modified by Advanced Glycation End Products (AGEs) Reveal Site-specific Susceptibilities to Glycemic Control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Greifenhagen, Uta; Frolov, Andrej; Blüher, Matthias; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2016-04-29

    Protein glycation refers to the reversible reaction between aldoses (or ketoses) and amino groups yielding relatively stable Amadori (or Heyns) products. Consecutive oxidative cleavage reactions of these products or the reaction of amino groups with other reactive substances (e.g. α-dicarbonyls) yield advanced glycation end products (AGEs) that can alter the structures and functions of proteins. AGEs have been identified in all organisms, and their contents appear to rise with some diseases, such as diabetes and obesity. Here, we report a pilot study using highly sensitive and specific proteomics approach to identify and quantify AGE modification sites in plasma proteins by reversed phase HPLC mass spectrometry in tryptic plasma digests. In total, 19 AGE modification sites corresponding to 11 proteins were identified in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus under poor glycemic control. The modification degrees of 15 modification sites did not differ among cohorts of normoglycemic lean or obese and type 2 diabetes mellitus patients under good and poor glycemic control. The contents of two amide-AGEs in human serum albumin and apolipoprotein A-II were significantly higher in patients with poor glycemic control, although the plasma levels of both proteins were similar among all plasma samples. These two modification sites might be useful to predict long term, AGE-related complications in diabetic patients, such as impaired vision, increased arterial stiffness, or decreased kidney function.

  17. Glycemic control with insulin prevents progression of dental caries and caries-related periodontitis in diabetic WBN/KobSlc rats.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Yutaka; Sano, Tomoya; Kodama, Yasushi; Ozaki, Kiyokazu; Matsuura, Tetsuro

    2013-07-01

    We have previously reported that dental caries progress in spontaneously and chemically induced diabetic rodent models. The aim of this study was to clarify the relationship between hyperglycemia and dental caries by evaluating the preventive effect of glycemic control with insulin on the progression of the lesions in diabetic rats. Male WBN/KobSlc rats aged 15 weeks were divided into groups of spontaneously diabetic rats (intact group), spontaneously diabetic rats with insulin treatment (INS group), alloxan-induced prolonged diabetic rats (AL group), and alloxan-induced prolonged diabetic rats with insulin treatment (AL + INS group). The animals were killed at 90 weeks of age, and their oral tissue was examined. Dental caries and periodontitis were frequently detected in the intact group, and the lesions were enhanced in the AL group (in which there was an increased duration of diabetes). Meanwhile, glycemic control with insulin reduced the incidence and severity of dental caries and periodontitis in the INS group, and the effects became more pronounced in the AL + INS group. In conclusion, glycemic control by insulin prevented the progression of dental caries and caries-related periodontitis in the diabetic rats.

  18. Hydrogen improves glycemic control in type1 diabetic animal model by promoting glucose uptake into skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Amitani, Haruka; Asakawa, Akihiro; Cheng, Kaichun; Amitani, Marie; Kaimoto, Kaori; Nakano, Masako; Ushikai, Miharu; Li, Yingxiao; Tsai, Minglun; Li, Jiang-Bo; Terashi, Mutsumi; Chaolu, Huhe; Kamimura, Ryozo; Inui, Akio

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen (H(2)) acts as a therapeutic antioxidant. However, there are few reports on H(2) function in other capacities in diabetes mellitus (DM). Therefore, in this study, we investigated the role of H(2) in glucose transport by studying cultured mouse C2C12 cells and human hepatoma Hep-G2 cells in vitro, in addition to three types of diabetic mice [Streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1 diabetic mice, high-fat diet-induced type 2 diabetic mice, and genetically diabetic db/db mice] in vivo. The results show that H(2) promoted 2-[(14)C]-deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG) uptake into C2C12 cells via the translocation of glucose transporter Glut4 through activation of phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI3K), protein kinase C (PKC), and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), although it did not stimulate the translocation of Glut2 in Hep G2 cells. H(2) significantly increased skeletal muscle membrane Glut4 expression and markedly improved glycemic control in STZ-induced type 1 diabetic mice after chronic intraperitoneal (i.p.) and oral (p.o.) administration. However, long-term p.o. administration of H(2) had least effect on the obese and non-insulin-dependent type 2 diabetes mouse models. Our study demonstrates that H(2) exerts metabolic effects similar to those of insulin and may be a novel therapeutic alternative to insulin in type 1 diabetes mellitus that can be administered orally.

  19. The potent synergistic effects of the combination of liraglutide and canagliflozin on glycemic control and weight loss

    PubMed Central

    Bell, David S.H.

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Male, 57 Final Diagnosis: Diabetes mellitus type 2 Symptoms: Weight loss Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Endocrinology and Metabolic Objective: Unusual or unexpected effect of treatment Background: Studies of the efficacy of the combination of the incretin mimetic liraglutide and the SGLT2 inhibitor canagliflozin or indeed studies of the combination of any incretin mimetic with an SGLT2 inhibitor have neither been performed nor published. Pharmacologically, the combination of an incretin-mimetic and an SGLT2-receptor blocker should result in a more significant weight loss and a greater reduction in postprandial glucose and HbA1c. Case Report: An insulin-dependent type 2 diabetic patient with multiple diabetic complications was placed on the combination of liraglutide and canagliflozin and 4 weeks later was able to discontinue insulin. In addition, in spite of discontinuing insulin, his HbA1c dropped from 7.0% to 6.8%, and he had reductions in body (weight from 247 to 218 lbs), BMI (from 34 to 29.5 Kg/m2), waist circumference (from 47 to 44 ½ inches), and neck circumference (from 19 ½ to 18 ¼ inches). Conclusions: The combination of an SGLT2 inhibitor and an incretin mimetic/analog results in improved glycemic control accompanied by significant weight loss. This combination needs to be studied in a prospective randomized trial because the effect of each of the components of this combination is synergistically magnified by the addition of the partner drug. PMID:24753783

  20. Chemical Composition and the Effect of Walnut Hydrosol on Glycemic Control of Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Moravej, Hossein; Salehi, Alireza; Razavi, Zahra; Moein, Mahmood Reza; Etemadfard, Hamed; Karami, Forough; Ghahremani, Forough

    2016-01-01

    Background Walnut hydrosol (WH) is used extensively by Iranian people with diabetes in order to control blood sugar (BS). There are few data regarding the effect of walnut on controlling diabetes. Objectives A pilot study to determine the efficacy and safety of WH in patients with type 1 diabetes. Materials and Methods Eight patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) type 1 were enrolled in the study. They did not use any medicine except insulin. They were advised to drink 250 mL WH after meals twice a day for four weeks. Their BS level was measured and their insulin dose was changed according to their BS. After four weeks, they discontinued WH use and their BS level was checked for two weeks. Descriptive statistics was used to analyze the data. Also, the essential oil of the sample was extracted using a liquid extractor and then analysis of the constituents was performed. Results The average daily BS level and insulin dose decreased in seven subjects. Two subjects developed generalized pruritic erythematous skin rash. One patient presented hypoglycemic coma. She had no other coma risk factor. Seven compounds were identified in the walnut essential oil and the rate of monoterpenoid and sesquiterpenes hydrocarbons were 53.45% and 5.95%, respectively. The main constituents of the oil were carvacrol (33.21%), thymol (16%) and homoveratrole (15.83%). Conclusions WH may control the glycemic level in people with diabetes, but it may be associated with minor and major side effects. Further in vitro studies, using these seven compounds, are recommended to determine the efficacy and complications of WH in people with diabetes. PMID:27335580

  1. POOR GLYCEMIC CONTROL IS ASSOCIATED WITH REDUCED PROSTATE-SPECIFIC ANTIGEN CONCENTRATIONS IN MEN WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES

    PubMed Central

    Sarma, Aruna V.; Hotaling, James; Dunn, Rodney L.; Cleary, Patricia A.; Braffett, Barbara H.; Kim, Catherine; Martin, Catherine; Herman, William; Gatcomb, Patricia; Jacobson, Alan M.; Holt, Sarah K.; Wessells, Hunter

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Previous studies have demonstrated lower prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentrations in men with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), paralleling the reported lower prevalence of prostate cancer among diabetic men. Data on PSA in men with type 1 diabetes (T1DM), in whom insulin and obesity profiles differ from those in T2DM, are lacking. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between long-term glycemic control and PSA in men with T1DM. MATERIALS & METHODS Total PSA was measured at one time in 639 men in the Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) study, the observational follow up of participants in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT). The relationship between DCCT/EDIC weighted mean HbA1c and log PSA was assessed using linear regression modeling after adjusting for age, body mass index (BMI), total testosterone, statin and thiazide medication use, diabetes duration, and DCCT randomization arm and cohort. RESULTS The subjects had a median age of 52 years, BMI of 28.4 kg/m2 and DCCT/EDIC time weighted HbA1c of 7.9%. Total median (interquartile range) for PSA levels was 0.64 (0.43, 1.05). PSA levels increased significantly with age (p<0.0001) and with lower time weighted HbA1c (p<0.0001). Each 10% increase in HbA1c was accompanied by an 11% reduction in PSA (p=0.0001). CONCLUSIONS PSA levels decrease as HbA1c increases in men with T1DM. This relationship is independent of age, BMI, androgen levels, medication use and measures of diabetes severity, which suggest that factors related to glycemia may be directly affecting PSA levels. PMID:25218922

  2. Liraglutide Improves Glycemic and Blood Pressure Control and Ameliorates Progression of Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus on Peritoneal Dialysis.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Takeyuki; Ozeki, Akiko; Asai, Kazuki; Saka, Marie; Hobo, Akinori; Furuta, Shinji

    2015-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a multifactorial disease associated with cardiovascular complications. Patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis also experience an increased incidence of cardiovascular disease. To prevent progression of cardiovascular complications in DM patients, glycemic control is important. In this study, we examined the efficacy and safety of the glucagon-like peptide analog liraglutide for treating type 2 diabetes patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis. Sixteen type 2 diabetes patients on peritoneal dialysis were enrolled. Before liraglutide initiation, 11 patients were on insulin therapy, three were on oral antidiabetic agents, and two were on diet therapy. Of the 16 patients, 12 had switched to liraglutide because of severe hypoglycemia and four because of hyperglycemia. Echocardiography was performed at baseline and 12 months after liraglutide initiation. Hemoglobin A1c, glycosylated albumin, and fasting/postprandial glucose levels gradually decreased after liraglutide initiation. After 6 and 12 months of treatment, postprandial glucose levels showed a significant difference from baseline. Moreover, the mean daily glucose level and glycemic fluctuations decreased. Systolic blood pressure upon waking also decreased. In addition, after 12 months, left ventricular mass index (LVMI) decreased and left ventricular ejection fraction increased. Changes in LVMI positively correlated with morning systolic blood pressure and fasting glucose levels. One patient restarted insulin because of anorexia but severe hypoglycemia was not observed. These findings suggest that liraglutide therapy in type 2 diabetes patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis is safe and effective for decreasing glucose levels, glycemic fluctuations, and blood pressure, apart from improving left ventricular function.

  3. Perceptions of disease severity and barriers to self-care predict glycemic control in Aboriginal persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Mark; Messer, Lynne C

    2002-01-01

    The Health Belief Model (HBM) was evaluated for secondary prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus in an Aboriginal population in British Columbia. Glycemic markers (glycated hemoglobin [HbA1c]), insulin and post-load glucose), diabetes health beliefs (susceptibility, severity, benefits and barriers), knowledge and behaviour were measured for 16 men and 18 women with diabetes (age [SD]=57.7 [11.6]). Eighteen months later, HbA1c and behaviour were measured for all participants, and health beliefs obtained for 17 of them. Perceived severity and perceived barriers were related to glycemic status at baseline and follow up, and predicted reduction in HbA1c (b[SE] |0.40| [0.18], p <0.05). The results support a therapeutic emphasis on belief in the severity of diabetes complications, and the complementary belief that barriers to therapeutic behaviour can be overcome in efforts to support Aboriginal persons with diabetes to manage their disease. The empirical utility of the HBM in glycemic control was partially upheld.

  4. Combined intensive blood pressure and glycemic control does not produce an additive benefit on microvascular outcomes in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Ismail-Beigi, Faramarz; Craven, Timothy E; O'Connor, Patrick J; Karl, Diane; Calles-Escandon, Jorge; Hramiak, Irene; Genuth, Saul; Cushman, William C; Gerstein, Hertzel C; Probstfield, Jeffrey L; Katz, Lois; Schubart, Ulrich

    2012-03-01

    A reduction of either blood pressure or glycemia decreases some microvascular complications of type 2 diabetes, and we studied here their combined effects. In total, 4733 older adults with established type 2 diabetes and hypertension were randomly assigned to intensive (systolic blood pressure less than 120 mm Hg) or standard (systolic blood pressure less than 140 mm Hg) blood pressure control, and separately to intensive (HbA1c less than 0.060) or standard (HbA1c 0.070-0.079) glycemic control. Prespecified microvascular outcomes were a composite of renal failure and retinopathy and nine single outcomes. Proportional hazard regression models were used without correction for type I error due to multiple tests. During a mean follow-up of 4.7 years, the primary outcome occurred in 11.4% of intensive and 10.9% of standard blood pressure patients (hazard ratio 1.08), and in 11.1% of intensive and 11.2% of standard glycemia control patients. Intensive blood pressure control only reduced the incidence of microalbuminuria (hazard ratio 0.84), and intensive glycemic control reduced the incidence of macroalbuminuria and a few other microvascular outcomes. There was no interaction between blood pressure and glycemic control, and neither treatment prevented renal failure. Thus, in older patients with established type 2 diabetes and hypertension, intensive blood pressure control improved only 1 of 10 prespecified microvascular outcomes. None of the outcomes were significantly reduced by simultaneous intensive treatment of glycemia and blood pressure, signifying the lack of an additional beneficial effect from combined treatment.

  5. Glycemic Targets in Diabetes Care: Emerging Clarity after Accord

    PubMed Central

    Buse, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Through the 1990s convincing evidence emerged from studies involving relatively recent onset diabetes that glycemic control achieving glycated hemoglobin A1c levels of approximately 7% was associated with improved microvascular outcomes. Based on advocacy groups' statements encouraging lower targets and recognition of cardiovascular disease as the leading cause of death in diabetes, the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) study was funded in 1999 to explore more intensive targets and techniques in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Most surprisingly, intensive management targeting normal levels of glycemia was associated with increased mortality and the ACCORD trial was terminated early in 2008. Post hoc analyses have allowed the emergence of some clarity around the role of glycemic management and targets in diabetes care and are the subject of this review. PMID:26330660

  6. Orange pomace improves postprandial glycemic responses: an acute, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover trial in overweight men

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Orange pomace (OP), a fiber-rich byproduct of juice production, has the potential for being formulated into a variety of food products. We hypothesized that OP would diminish postprandial glycemic responses to a high carbohydrate/fat breakfast and lunch. We conducted an acute, randomized, placebo-co...

  7. The Acute Effects of Interval-Type Exercise on Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes Subjects: Importance of Interval Length. A Controlled, Counterbalanced, Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Ida; Solomon, Thomas P. J.

    2016-01-01

    Interval-type exercise is effective for improving glycemic control, but the optimal approach is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the importance of the interval length on changes in postprandial glycemic control following a single exercise bout. Twelve subjects with type 2 diabetes completed a cross-over study with three 1-hour interventions performed in a non-randomized but counter-balanced order: 1) Interval walking consisting of repeated cycles of 3 min slow (aiming for 54% of Peak oxygen consumption rate [VO2peak]) and 3 min fast (aiming for 89% of VO2peak) walking (IW3); 2) Interval walking consisting of repeated cycles of 1 min slow and 1 min fast walking (IW1) and 3) No walking (CON). The exercise interventions were matched with regards to walking speed, and VO2 and heart rate was assessed throughout all interventions. A 4-hour liquid mixed meal tolerance test commenced 30 min after each intervention, with blood samples taken regularly. IW3 and IW1 resulted in comparable mean VO2 and heart rates. Overall mean postprandial blood glucose levels were lower after IW3 compared to CON (10.3±3.0 vs. 11.1±3.3 mmol/L; P < 0.05), with no significant differences between IW1 (10.5±2.8 mmol/L) and CON or IW3 and IW1 (P > 0.05 for both). Conversely blood glucose levels at specific time points during the MMTT differed significantly following both IW3 and IW1 as compared to CON. Our findings support the previously found blood glucose lowering effect of IW3 and suggest that reducing the interval length, while keeping the walking speed and time spend on fast and slow walking constant, does not result in additional improvements. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02257190 PMID:27695119

  8. Effect of natural honey from Ilam and metformin for improving glycemic control in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Nasrolahi, Ozra; Heidari, Reza; Rahmani, Fatima; Farokhi, Farah

    2012-01-01

    Objective(s): Diabetes mellitus is a public health problem and one of the five leading causes of death globally. In the present study, the effect of Metformin with natural honey was investigated on glycemia in the Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Materials and Methods: Thirty Wistar male rats were randomly divided into six groups including C: non diabetic rats received distilled water, CH: non diabetic rats received honey, CD: diabetic rats administered with distilled water, DM: Metformin treated diabetic rats, DH: honey treated diabetic rats, and DMH: diabetic rats treated with a combination of Metformin and natural honey. Diabetes was induced by a single dose of Streptozotocin (65 mg/kg; i.p.). The animals were treated by oral gavage once daily for four weeks. At the end of the treatment period, the animals were sacrificed and their blood samples collected. Amount of glucose, triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, VLDL cholesterol, total bilirubin, and albumin were determined in serum. Results: Group CD: showed hyperglycemia (252.2±4.1 mg/dl), while level of blood glucose was significantly (p<0.01) reduced in groups DH (124.2±2.7 mg/dl), DM (108.0±3.4 mg/dl), and DMH (115.4±2.1 mg/dl). Honey in combination with Metformin significantly (p<0.01) reduced level of bilirubin but Metformin alone did not reduce bilirubin. Honey alone and in combination with Metformin also significantly reduced triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL, VLDL and increased HDL, but Metformin did not reduced triglycerides and increased HDL. Conclusion: The results of the present study demonstrated that consuming natural honey with Metformin improves glycemic control and is more useful than consuming Metformin alone. The higher therapeutic effect of Ilam honey on lipid abnormalities than Tualang honey was also evident. PMID:25050251

  9. Effects of soy vs. casein protein on body weight and glycemic control in female monkeys and their offspring.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Janice D; Jorgensen, Matthew J; Cline, J Mark; Lees, Cynthia J; Franke, Adrian A; Zhang, Li; Ayers, Melissa R; Schultz, Carrie; Kaplan, Jay R

    2009-09-01

    Nutritional interventions are important for reducing obesity and related conditions. Soy is a good source of protein and also contains isoflavones that may affect plasma lipids, body weight, and insulin action. Described here are data from a monkey breeding colony in which monkeys were initially fed a standard chow diet that is low fat with protein derived from soy. Monkeys were then randomized to a defined diet with a fat content similar to the typical American diet (TAD) containing either protein derived from soy (TAD soy) or casein-lactalbumin (TAD casein). The colony was followed for over two years to assess body weight, and carbohydrate and lipid measures in adult females (n=19) and their offspring (n=25). Serum isoflavone concentrations were higher with TAD soy than TAD casein, but not as high as when monkey chow was fed. Offspring consuming TAD soy had higher serum isoflavone concentrations than adults consuming TAD soy. Female monkeys consuming TAD soy had better glycemic control, as determined by fructosamine concentrations, but no differences in lipids or body weight compared with those consuming diets with TAD casein. Offspring born to dams consuming TAD soy had similar body weights at birth but over a two-year period weighed significantly less, had significantly lower triglyceride concentrations, and like adult females, had significantly lower fructosamine concentrations compared to TAD casein. Glucose tolerance tests in adult females were not significantly different with diet, but offspring eating TAD soy had increased glucose disappearance with overall lower glucose and insulin responses to the glucose challenge compared with TAD casein. Potential reasons for the additional benefits of TAD soy observed in offspring but not in adults may be related to higher serum isoflavone concentrations in offspring, presence of the diet differences throughout more of their lifespan (including gestation), or different tissue susceptibilities in younger animals.

  10. Oxamate Improves Glycemic Control and Insulin Sensitivity via Inhibition of Tissue Lactate Production in db/db Mice.

    PubMed

    Ye, Weiran; Zheng, Yijia; Zhang, Shanshan; Yan, Li; Cheng, Hua; Wu, Muchao

    2016-01-01

    Oxamate (OXA) is a pyruvate analogue that directly inhibits the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)-catalyzed conversion process of pyruvate into lactate. Earlier and recent studies have shown elevated blood lactate levels among insulin-resistant and type 2 diabetes subjects and that blood lactate levels independently predicted the development of incident diabetes. To explore the potential of OXA in the treatment of diabetes, db/db mice were treated with OXA in vivo. Treatment of OXA (350-750 mg/kg of body weight) for 12 weeks was shown to decrease body weight gain and blood glucose and HbA1c levels and improve insulin secretion, the morphology of pancreatic islets, and insulin sensitivity in db/db mice. Meanwhile, OXA reduced the lactate production of adipose tissue and skeletal muscle and serum lactate levels and decreased serum levels of TG, FFA, CRP, IL-6, and TNF-α in db/db mice. The PCR array showed that OXA downregulated the expression of Tnf, Il6, leptin, Cxcr3, Map2k1, and Ikbkb, and upregulated the expression of Irs2, Nfkbia, and Pde3b in the skeletal muscle of db/db mice. Interestingly, LDH-A expression increased in the islet cells of db/db mice, and both treatment of OXA and pioglitazone decreased LDH-A expression, which might be related to the improvement of insulin secretion. Taken together, increased lactate production of adipose tissue and skeletal muscle may be at least partially responsible for insulin resistance and diabetes in db/db mice. OXA improved glycemic control and insulin sensitivity in db/db mice primarily via inhibition of tissue lactate production. Oxamic acid derivatives may be a potential drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  11. [Glycemic control through physical exercise in type 2 diabetes systematic review].

    PubMed

    Quílez Llopiz, Pablo; Reig García-Galbis, Manuel

    2015-04-01

    INTRODUCCIÓN: En España, cerca del 14% de la población es diabética y el 95% corresponde a Diabetes Mellitus tipo 2. Un pobre control glucémico provoca un aumento de la morbilidad y mortalidad. Tres son los pilares en el tratamiento de la DM2: la dieta, la medicación y el ejercicio físico, sin embargo, el potencial de la prescripción de entrenamiento físico no ha sido totalmente explotado.

  12. Antecedent glycemic control reduces severe hypoglycemia-induced neuronal damage in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Reno, Candace M; Tanoli, Tariq; Bree, Adam; Daphna-Iken, Dorit; Cui, Chen; Maloney, Susan E; Wozniak, David F; Fisher, Simon J

    2013-06-15

    Brain damage due to severe hypoglycemia occurs in insulin-treated people with diabetes. This study tests the hypothesis that chronic insulin therapy that normalizes elevated blood glucose in diabetic rats would be neuroprotective against brain damage induced by an acute episode of severe hypoglycemia. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were split into three groups: 1) control, non-diabetic; 2) STZ-diabetic; and 3) insulin-treated STZ-diabetic. After 3 wk of chronic treatment, unrestrained awake rats underwent acute hyperinsulinemic severe hypoglycemic (10-15 mg/dl) clamps for 1 h. Rats were subsequently analyzed for brain damage and cognitive function. Severe hypoglycemia induced 15-fold more neuronal damage in STZ-diabetic rats compared with nondiabetic rats. Chronic insulin treatment of diabetic rats, which nearly normalized glucose levels, markedly reduced neuronal damage induced by severe hypoglycemia. Fortunately, no cognitive defects associated with the hypoglycemia-induced brain damage were observed in any group. In conclusion, antecedent blood glucose control represents a major modifiable therapeutic intervention that can afford diabetic subjects neuroprotection against severe hypoglycemia-induced brain damage.

  13. The association of depression and anxiety with glycemic control among Mexican Americans with diabetes living near the U.S.-Mexico border

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of diabetes is alarmingly high among Mexican American adults residing near the U.S.-Mexico border. Depression is also common among Mexican Americans with diabetes, and may have a negative influence on diabetes management. Thus, the purpose of the current study was to evaluate the associations of depression and anxiety with the behavioral management of diabetes and glycemic control among Mexican American adults living near the border. Methods The characteristics of Mexican Americans with diabetes living in Brownsville, TX (N = 492) were compared by depression/anxiety status. Linear regression models were conducted to evaluate the associations of depression and anxiety with BMI, waist circumference, physical activity, fasting glucose, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Results Participants with clinically significant depression and/or anxiety were of greater age, predominantly female, less educated, more likely to have been diagnosed with diabetes, and more likely to be taking diabetes medications than those without depression or anxiety. In addition, anxious participants were more likely than those without anxiety to have been born in Mexico and to prefer study assessments in Spanish rather than English. Greater depression and anxiety were associated with poorer behavioral management of diabetes (i.e., greater BMI and waist circumference; engaging in less physical activity) and poorer glycemic control (i.e., higher fasting glucose, HbA1c). Conclusions Overall, depression and anxiety appear to be linked with poorer behavioral management of diabetes and glycemic control. Findings highlight the need for comprehensive interventions along the border which target depression and anxiety in conjunction with diabetes management. PMID:24548487

  14. Effects of regular exercise on obesity and type 2 diabete mellitus in Korean children: improvements glycemic control and serum adipokines level.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Soo; Kang, Sunghwun

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the study was to clarify the effects of regular exercise on lipid profiles and serum adipokines in Korean children. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were divided into controls (n=10), children who were obese (n=10), and children with type 2 diabetes mellitus (n=10). Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), body composition, lipid profiles, glucagon, insulin and adipokines (leptin, resistin, visfatin and retinol binding protein 4) were measured before to and after a 12-week exercise program. [Results] Body weight, body mass index, and percentage body fat were significantly higher in the obese and diabetes groups compared with the control group. Total cholesterol, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and glycemic control levels were significantly decreased after the exercise program in the obese and diabetes groups, while high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were significantly increased. Adipokines were higher in the obese and diabetes groups compared with the control group prior to the exercise program, and were significantly lower following completion. [Conclusion] These results suggest that regular exercise has positive effects on obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus in Korean children by improving glycemic control and reducing body weight, thereby lowering cardiovascular risk factors and adipokine levels.

  15. Eight Weeks of Cosmos caudatus (Ulam Raja) Supplementation Improves Glycemic Status in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shi-Hui; Ismail, Amin; Anthony, Joseph; Ng, Ooi Chuan; Hamid, Azizah Abdul; Barakatun-Nisak, Mohd Yusof

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Optimizing glycemic control is crucial to prevent type 2 diabetes related complications. Cosmos caudatus is reported to have promising effect in improving plasma blood glucose in an animal model. However, its impact on human remains ambiguous. This study was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of C. caudatus on glycemic status in patients with type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods. In this randomized controlled trial with two-arm parallel-group design, a total of 101 subjects with type 2 diabetes were randomly allocated to diabetic-ulam or diabetic controls for eight weeks. Subjects in diabetic-ulam group consumed 15 g of C. caudatus daily for eight weeks while diabetic controls abstained from taking C. caudatus. Both groups received the standard lifestyle advice. Results. After 8 weeks of supplementation, C. caudatus significantly reduced serum insulin (-1.16 versus +3.91), reduced HOMA-IR (-1.09 versus +1.34), and increased QUICKI (+0.05 versus -0.03) in diabetic-ulam group compared with the diabetic controls. HbA1C level was improved although it is not statistically significant (-0.76% versus -0.37%). C. caudatus was safe to consume. Conclusions. C. caudatus supplementation significantly improves insulin resistance and insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  16. Effect of tighter glycemic control on cardiac function, exercise capacity, and muscle strength in heart failure patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Roni; Wiggers, Henrik; Thomsen, Henrik Holm; Bovin, Ann; Refsgaard, Jens; Abrahamsen, Jan; Møller, Niels; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Nørrelund, Helene

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and heart failure (HF), the optimal glycemic target is uncertain, and evidence-based data are lacking. Therefore, we performed a randomized study on the effect of optimized glycemic control on left ventricular function, exercise capacity, muscle strength, and body composition. Design and methods 40 patients with T2D and HF (left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) 35±12% and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) 8.4±0.7% (68±0.8 mmol/mol)) were randomized to either 4-month optimization (OPT group) or non-optimization (non-OPT group) of glycemic control. Patients underwent dobutamine stress echocardiography, cardiopulmonary exercise test, 6 min hall-walk test (6-MWT), muscle strength examination, and dual X-ray absorptiometry scanning at baseline and at follow-up. Results 39 patients completed the study. HbA1c decreased in the OPT versus the non-OPT group (8.4±0.8% (68±9 mmol/mol) to 7.6±0.7% (60±7 mmol/mol) vs 8.3±0.7% (67±10 mmol/mol) to 8.4±1.0% (68±11 mmol/mol); p<0.001). There was no difference between the groups with respect to changes in myocardial contractile reserve (LVEF (p=0.18)), oxygen consumption (p=0.55), exercise capacity (p=0.12), and 6-MWT (p=0.84). Muscle strength decreased in the non-OPT compared with the OPT group (37.2±8.1 to 34.8±8.3 kg vs 34.9±10.2 to 35.4±10.7 kg; p=0.01), in line with a non-significant decrease in lean (p=0.07) and fat (p=0.07) tissue mass in the non-OPT group. Hypoglycemia and fluid retention did not differ between groups. Conclusions 4 months of optimization of glycemic control was associated with preserved muscle strength and lean body mass in patients with T2D and HF compared with lenient control, and had no deleterious effect on left ventricular contractile function and seemed to be safe. Trial registration number NCT01213784; pre-results. PMID:27158520

  17. Health-Care Costs, Glycemic Control and Nutritional Status in Malnourished Older Diabetics Treated with a Hypercaloric Diabetes-Specific Enteral Nutritional Formula.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Paris, Alejandro; Boj-Carceller, Diana; Lardies-Sanchez, Beatriz; Perez-Fernandez, Leticia; Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J

    2016-03-09

    Diabetes-specific formulas are an effective alternative for providing nutrients and maintaining glycemic control. This study assesses the effect of treatment with an oral enteral nutrition with a hypercaloric diabetes-specific formula (HDSF) for one year, on health-care resources use, health-care costs, glucose control and nutritional status, in 93 type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) malnourished patients. Changes in health-care resources use and health-care costs were collected the year before and during the year of intervention. Glucose status and nutritional laboratory parameters were analyzed at baseline and one-year after the administration of HDSF. The administration of HDSF was significantly associated with a reduced use of health-care resources, fewer hospital admissions (54.7%; p < 0.001), days spent at hospital (64.1%; p < 0.001) and emergency visits (57.7%; p < 0.001). Health-care costs were reduced by 65.6% (p < 0.001) during the intervention. Glycemic control (short- and long-term) and the need of pharmacological treatment did not change, while some nutritional parameters were improved at one year (albumin: +10.6%, p < 0.001; hemoglobin: +6.4%, p = 0.026). In conclusion, using HDSF in malnourished older type-2 diabetic patients may allow increasing energy intake while maintaining glucose control and improving nutritional parameters. The use of health-care resources and costs were significantly reduced during the nutritional intervention.

  18. Walking behaviour and glycemic control in type 2 diabetes: seasonal and gender differences-Study design and methods

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Kaberi; Chan, Cathy; Da Costa, Deborah; Pilote, Louise; De Civita, Mirella; Ross, Nancy; Strachan, Ian; Sigal, Ronald; Joseph, Lawrence

    2007-01-01

    Background The high glucose levels typically occurring among adults with type 2 diabetes contribute to blood vessel injury and complications such as blindness, kidney failure, heart disease, and stroke. Higher physical activity levels are associated with improved glycemic control, as measured by hemoglobin A1C. A 1% absolute increase in A1C is associated with an 18% increased risk for heart disease or stroke. Among Canadians with type 2 diabetes, we postulate that declines in walking associated with colder temperatures and inclement weather may contribute to annual post-winter increases in A1C levels. Methods During this prospective cohort study being conducted in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, 100 men and 100 women with type 2 diabetes will undergo four assessments (once per season) over a one-year period of observation. These assessments include (1) use of a pedometer with a concealed viewing window for a two-week period to measure walking (2) a study centre visit during which venous blood is sampled for A1C, anthropometrics are assessed, and questionnaires are completed for measurement of other factors that may influence walking and/or A1C (e.g. food frequency, depressive symptomology, medications). The relationship between spring-fall A1C difference and winter-summer difference in steps/day will be examined through multivariate linear regression models adjusted for possible confounding. Interpretation of findings by researchers in conjunction with potential knowledge "users" (e.g. health professionals, patient groups) will guide knowledge translation efforts. Discussion Although we cannot alter weather patterns to favour active lifestyles, we can design treatment strategies that take seasonal and weather-related variations into account. For example, demonstration of seasonal variation of A1C levels among Canadian men and women with T2D and greater understanding of its determinants could lead to (1) targeting physical activity levels to remain at or exceed peak

  19. Peer Support Training Improved the Glycemic Control, Insulin Management, and Diabetic Behaviors of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes in Rural Communities of Central China: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Kaiqin; Ren, Yanlei; Luo, Zhongmei; Du, Kun; Zhang, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Background The efficacy of peer support in Chinese diabetes patients is still uncertain. The purpose of this study was to observe the effects of a peer support program on the outcomes of patients with type 2 diabetes who received community-based insulin therapy in rural communities of central China. Material/Methods Two hundred and eight eligible patients with type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned into the traditional training group (control group, n=111) and peer support intervention group (peer group, n=97) between June 2013 and January 2014 in 2 rural communities of Jingzhou area, China. Both groups received 3-month traditional training, followed by another 4-month traditional training or peer support training, respectively. At baseline and 7 months after treatment, the blood glycemic level was evaluated by biochemical detection. Capacities of self-management and knowledge related to insulin usage were assessed by questionnaire survey. Results Ninety-seven and ninety patients completed this study in the control group and peer group, respectively. There was no significant difference in age, gender, diabetes duration, insulin usage time, and complications between the 2 groups at baseline (P>0.05). Compared with the control group, peer group patients achieved a more significant decrease in blood glycosylated hemoglobin levels (P<0.05), increase in knowledge related to insulin usage, and increase of diabetes self-management ability (P<0.05). Conclusions Peer support intervention effectively improves outcomes of patients with type 2 diabetes in rural communities of central China. PMID:26808489

  20. Egg ingestion in adults with type 2 diabetes: effects on glycemic control, anthropometry, and diet quality—a randomized, controlled, crossover trial

    PubMed Central

    Njike, Valentine Y; Ayettey, Rockiy G; Rajebi, Hamid; Treu, Judith A; Katz, David L

    2016-01-01

    Background The inclusion of eggs as part of a healthful diet for adults with diabetes is controversial. We examined the effects of including eggs in the diet of adults with type 2 diabetes on cardiometabolic risk factors. Methods Randomized, controlled, single-blind, crossover trial of 34 adults (mean age 64.5 years; 14 postmenopausal women, 20 men) with type 2 diabetes assigned to one of two possible sequence permutations of two different 12-week treatments (two eggs/day inclusion or egg exclusion), with 6-week washout periods. For the egg inclusion phase, participants received advice from a dietitian on how to preserve an isocaloric condition relative to the egg exclusion phase. The primary outcome was glycemic control as measured by glycated hemoglobin. Secondary measures included anthropometry, blood pressure, and diet quality. Results Compared with the exclusion of eggs in the habitual diet, the inclusion of eggs did not measurably affect glycated hemoglobin (0.01±0.5% vs −0.24±0.7%; p=0.115) and systolic blood pressure (−0.8±13.0 vs −3.0±10.0 mm Hg; p=0.438); and significantly reduced body mass index (0.06±0.8 vs −0.4±0.8 kg/m²; p=0.013) and visceral fat rating (0.2±1.1 vs −0.4±1.0; p=0.016). The inclusion of eggs in the habitual diet of diabetics significantly reduced waist circumference (−0.4±1.2 cm; p=0.004) and percent body fat (−0.7±1.8; p=0.033) from baseline. Conclusions Short-term daily inclusion of eggs in the habitual diet of adults with type 2 diabetes does not improve glycemic control but can improve anthropometric measures. Trial registration number NCT02052037; results. PMID:28074139

  1. Polyphenols and Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoona; Keogh, Jennifer B.; Clifton, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence from animal studies supports the anti-diabetic properties of some dietary polyphenols, suggesting that dietary polyphenols could be one dietary therapy for the prevention and management of Type 2 diabetes. This review aims to address the potential mechanisms of action of dietary polyphenols in the regulation of glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity based on in vitro and in vivo studies, and to provide a comprehensive overview of the anti-diabetic effects of commonly consumed dietary polyphenols including polyphenol-rich mixed diets, tea and coffee, chocolate and cocoa, cinnamon, grape, pomegranate, red wine, berries and olive oil, with a focus on human clinical trials. Dietary polyphenols may inhibit α-amylase and α-glucosidase, inhibit glucose absorption in the intestine by sodium-dependent glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1), stimulate insulin secretion and reduce hepatic glucose output. Polyphenols may also enhance insulin-dependent glucose uptake, activate 5′ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), modify the microbiome and have anti-inflammatory effects. However, human epidemiological and intervention studies have shown inconsistent results. Further intervention studies are essential to clarify the conflicting findings and confirm or refute the anti-diabetic effects of dietary polyphenols. PMID:26742071

  2. Polyphenols and Glycemic Control.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoona; Keogh, Jennifer B; Clifton, Peter M

    2016-01-05

    Growing evidence from animal studies supports the anti-diabetic properties of some dietary polyphenols, suggesting that dietary polyphenols could be one dietary therapy for the prevention and management of Type 2 diabetes. This review aims to address the potential mechanisms of action of dietary polyphenols in the regulation of glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity based on in vitro and in vivo studies, and to provide a comprehensive overview of the anti-diabetic effects of commonly consumed dietary polyphenols including polyphenol-rich mixed diets, tea and coffee, chocolate and cocoa, cinnamon, grape, pomegranate, red wine, berries and olive oil, with a focus on human clinical trials. Dietary polyphenols may inhibit α-amylase and α-glucosidase, inhibit glucose absorption in the intestine by sodium-dependent glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1), stimulate insulin secretion and reduce hepatic glucose output. Polyphenols may also enhance insulin-dependent glucose uptake, activate 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), modify the microbiome and have anti-inflammatory effects. However, human epidemiological and intervention studies have shown inconsistent results. Further intervention studies are essential to clarify the conflicting findings and confirm or refute the anti-diabetic effects of dietary polyphenols.

  3. The role of genetic factors and kidney and liver function in glycemic control in type 2 diabetes patients on long-term metformin and sulphonylurea cotreatment.

    PubMed

    Klen, Jasna; Goričar, Katja; Janež, Andrej; Dolžan, Vita

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of genetic polymorphisms of metformin transporters on long-term glycemic control and lipid status in type 2 diabetes patients in the everyday clinical setting. In total 135 patients treated with combination of metformin and sulphonylurea for at least 6 months were genotyped for SLC22A1 rs628031 and SLC47A1 rs2289669 polymorphisms. Relatively good blood glucose control with median HbA1c 6.9 (6.4-7.6) % was achieved on prescribed metformin dosage of 2550 (2000-2550) mg per day. Only 28 (20.7%) patients experienced mild hypoglycemia events, while no severe hypoglycemia events were observed. Most patients had normal or mildly impaired renal function. Parameters indicating renal function were not correlated with fasting glucose, HbA1c, or lipid parameters. Rs628031 and rs2289669 had minor allele frequencies of 0.385 and 0.355, respectively, and were not associated with HbA1c levels. Rs628031 was marginally associated with risk for hypoglycemia events (P = 0.046; OR = 0.51; 95% CI 0.26-0.99), while significant correlation was observed between rs2289669 and total cholesterol levels (P = 0.018). In conclusion, in patients on long-term metformin and sulphonylurea combination treatment, metformin transporters polymorphisms do not play a major role in glycemic control; however, they may influence lipid status.

  4. The Role of Genetic Factors and Kidney and Liver Function in Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes Patients on Long-Term Metformin and Sulphonylurea Cotreatment

    PubMed Central

    Klen, Jasna; Janež, Andrej; Dolžan, Vita

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of genetic polymorphisms of metformin transporters on long-term glycemic control and lipid status in type 2 diabetes patients in the everyday clinical setting. In total 135 patients treated with combination of metformin and sulphonylurea for at least 6 months were genotyped for SLC22A1 rs628031 and SLC47A1 rs2289669 polymorphisms. Relatively good blood glucose control with median HbA1c 6.9 (6.4–7.6) % was achieved on prescribed metformin dosage of 2550 (2000–2550) mg per day. Only 28 (20.7%) patients experienced mild hypoglycemia events, while no severe hypoglycemia events were observed. Most patients had normal or mildly impaired renal function. Parameters indicating renal function were not correlated with fasting glucose, HbA1c, or lipid parameters. Rs628031 and rs2289669 had minor allele frequencies of 0.385 and 0.355, respectively, and were not associated with HbA1c levels. Rs628031 was marginally associated with risk for hypoglycemia events (P = 0.046; OR = 0.51; 95% CI 0.26–0.99), while significant correlation was observed between rs2289669 and total cholesterol levels (P = 0.018). In conclusion, in patients on long-term metformin and sulphonylurea combination treatment, metformin transporters polymorphisms do not play a major role in glycemic control; however, they may influence lipid status. PMID:25025077

  5. Therapeutic silencing of fat-specific protein 27 improves glycemic control in mouse models of obesity and insulin resistance[S

    PubMed Central

    Langhi, Cédric; Arias, Noemí; Rajamoorthi, Ananthi; Basta, Jeannine; Lee, Richard G.; Baldán, Ángel

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is a component of the metabolic syndrome, mechanistically linked to diabetes, fatty liver disease, and cardiovascular disease. Proteins that regulate the metabolic fate of intracellular lipid droplets are potential therapeutic candidates to treat obesity and its related consequences. CIDEC (cell death-inducing DFFA-like effector C), also known in mice as Fsp27 (fat-specific protein 27), is a lipid droplet-associated protein that prevents lipid mobilization and promotes intracellular lipid storage. The consequences of complete loss of FSP27 on hepatic metabolism and on insulin resistance are controversial, as both healthy and deleterious lipodystrophic phenotypes have been reported in Fsp27−/− mice. To test whether therapeutic silencing of Fsp27 might be useful to improve obesity, fatty liver, and glycemic control, we used antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) in both nutritional (high-fat diet) and genetic (leptin-deficient ob/ob) mouse models of obesity, hyperglycemia, and hepatosteatosis. We show that partial silencing Fsp27 in either model results in the robust decrease in visceral fat, improved insulin sensitivity and whole-body glycemic control, and tissue-specific changes in transcripts controlling lipid oxidation and synthesis. These data suggest that partial reduction of FSP27 activity (e.g., using ASOs) might be exploited therapeutically in insulin-resistant obese or overweight patients. PMID:27884961

  6. Glycemic responses, appetite ratings and gastrointestinal hormone responses of most common breads consumed in Spain. A randomized control trial in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Anton, Carolina; Rico, Maria C; Sanchez-Rodriguez, Estefania; Ruiz-Lopez, Maria D; Gil, Angel; Mesa, Maria D

    2015-05-27

    The present study was carried out to determine the glycemic index (GI), glycemic load (GL), insulinemic index (InI), appetite ratings and postprandial plasma concentrations of gastrointestinal hormones related to the control of food intake after the ingestion of the five most common breads consumed in Spain with different compositions and manufacturing processes. Twenty-two healthy adults participated in a randomized crossover study. The breads tested were Ordinary, Precooked-Frozen, Candeal-flour, Alfacar whites and Wholemeal. All breads portions were calculated to supply 50 g of available carbohydrates. In addition, 50 g of glucose was used as a reference. A linear mixed-effects model was used to compare data calculated for all breads with glucose load. The GI value varied from 61 for the Wholemeal, to Alfacar 68, Ordinary 76, and 78 and 86 for the Precooked-Frozen and Candeal-flour breads, respectively. Wholemeal and Alfacar had lower GI than glucose. All tested breads had a lower GL (ranged 9 to 18) compared with glucose. Wholemeal GL was similar to Alfacar, but lower than the other white breads. InI were significantly lower for all breads (ranged 68 to 73) compared with glucose, and similar among them. The intake of the Wholemeal bread led to a higher release of gastric inhibitory polypeptide compared with the Ordinary and Precooked breads and to a higher release of pancreatic polypeptide compared with the Precooked-Frozen bread. All breads affected appetite ratings similarly. In conclusion, based on GL, the Wholemeal bread would be expected to exert a favorable glycemic response.

  7. Glycemic Responses, Appetite Ratings and Gastrointestinal Hormone Responses of Most Common Breads Consumed in Spain. A Randomized Control Trial in Healthy Humans

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Anton, Carolina; Rico, Maria C.; Sanchez-Rodriguez, Estefania; Ruiz-Lopez, Maria D.; Gil, Angel; Mesa, Maria D.

    2015-01-01

    The present study was carried out to determine the glycemic index (GI), glycemic load (GL), insulinemic index (InI), appetite ratings and postprandial plasma concentrations of gastrointestinal hormones related to the control of food intake after the ingestion of the five most common breads consumed in Spain with different compositions and manufacturing processes. Twenty-two healthy adults participated in a randomized crossover study. The breads tested were Ordinary, Precooked-Frozen, Candeal-flour, Alfacar whites and Wholemeal. All breads portions were calculated to supply 50 g of available carbohydrates. In addition, 50 g of glucose was used as a reference. A linear mixed-effects model was used to compare data calculated for all breads with glucose load. The GI value varied from 61 for the Wholemeal, to Alfacar 68, Ordinary 76, and 78 and 86 for the Precooked-Frozen and Candeal-flour breads, respectively. Wholemeal and Alfacar had lower GI than glucose. All tested breads had a lower GL (ranged 9 to 18) compared with glucose. Wholemeal GL was similar to Alfacar, but lower than the other white breads. InI were significantly lower for all breads (ranged 68 to 73) compared with glucose, and similar among them. The intake of the Wholemeal bread led to a higher release of gastric inhibitory polypeptide compared with the Ordinary and Precooked breads and to a higher release of pancreatic polypeptide compared with the Precooked-Frozen bread. All breads affected appetite ratings similarly. In conclusion, based on GL, the Wholemeal bread would be expected to exert a favorable glycemic response. PMID:26024293

  8. Glycemic index and disease.

    PubMed

    Pi-Sunyer, F Xavier

    2002-07-01

    It has been suggested that foods with a high glycemic index are detrimental to health and that healthy people should be told to avoid these foods. This paper takes the position that not enough valid scientific data are available to launch a public health campaign to disseminate such a recommendation. This paper explores the glycemic index and its validity and discusses the effect of postprandial glucose and insulin responses on food intake, obesity, type 1 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Presented herein are the reasons why it is premature to recommend that the general population avoid foods with a high glycemic index.

  9. Glycemic Control among U.S. Hispanics/Latinos with Diabetes from the HCHS/SOL Sociocultural Ancillary Study: Do Structural and Functional Social Support Play a Role?

    PubMed Central

    Fortmann, Addie L.; Roesch, Scott C.; Penedo, Frank J.; Isasi, Carmen R.; Carnethon, Mercedes R.; Corsino, Leonor; Schneiderman, Neil; Daviglus, Martha L.; Teng, Yanping; Giachello, Aida; Gonzalez, Franklyn; Gallo, Linda C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Social support is one potential source of health-related resiliency in Hispanics with diabetes. Purpose This study examined relationships of structural (i.e., social integration) and functional (i.e., perceived) social support with glycemic control (glycosylated hemoglobin; HbA1c) in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Hispanics (HCHS/SOL) Sociocultural Ancillary Study. Methods This study included 766 men and women representing multiple Hispanic ethnic backgrounds, aged 18-74 years, with diagnosed diabetes who completed fasting blood draw, medication review, and measures of sociodemographic factors, medical history, structural support (Cohen Social Network Index), and functional support (Interpersonal Support Evaluation List-12). Results After adjusting for sociodemographic covariates and medication, a one standard deviation increase in functional support was related to an 0.18 % higher HbA1c (p = 0.04). A similar trend was observed for structural support; however, this effect was non-significant in adjusted models. Conclusion Greater functional support was associated with poorer glycemic control in Hispanics. PMID:25107503

  10. Efficacy and Acceptability of Glycemic Control of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonists among Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhixia; Zhang, Yuan; Quan, Xiaochi; Yang, Zhirong; Zeng, Xiantao; Ji, Linong

    2016-01-01

    Objective To synthesize current evidence of the impact of Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) on hypoglycemia, treatment discontinuation and glycemic level in patients with type 2 diabetes. Design Systematic review and network meta-analysis. Data Sources Literature search (Medline, Embase, the Cochrane library), website of clinical trial, bibliographies of published systematic reviews. Eligibility Criteria Randomized controlled trials with available data comparing GLP-1 RAs with placebo or traditional anti-diabetic drugs in patients with type 2 diabetes. Data Synthesis Traditional pairwise meta-analyses within DerSimonian-Laird random effects model and network meta-analysis within a Bayesian framework were performed to calculate odds ratios for the incidence of hypoglycemia, treatment discontinuation, HbA1c<7.0% and HbA1c<6.5%. Ranking probabilities for all treatments were estimated to obtain a treatment hierarchy using the surface under the cumulative ranking curve (SUCRA) and mean ranks. Results 78 trials with 13 treatments were included. Overall, all GLP-1 RAs except for albiglutide increased the risk of hypoglycemia when compared to placebo. Reduction in the incidence of hypoglycemia was found for all GLP-1 RAs versus insulin (except for dulaglutide) and sulphonylureas. For the incidence of treatment discontinuation, increase was found for exenatide, liraglutide, lixisenatide and taspoglutide versus placebo, insulin and sitagliptin. For glycemic level, decrease was found for all GLP-1 RAs versus placebo. Dulaglutide, exenatide long-acting release (exe_lar), liraglutide and taspoglutide had significant lowering effect when compared with sitagliptin (HbA1c<7.0%) and insulin (HbA1c<6.5%). Finally, according to SUCRAs, placebo, thiazolidinediones and albiglutide had the best decrease effect on hypoglycemia; sulphanylureas, sitagliptin and insulin decrease the incidence of treatment discontinuation most; exe_lar and dulaglutide had the highest

  11. The Impact of Patient Education on Anthropometric, Lipidemic, and Glycemic Parameters Among Patients With Poorly Controlled Type II Diabetes Mellitus: A 3-Month Prospective Single-Center Turkish Study.

    PubMed

    Cander, Soner; Gul, Ozen Oz; Gul, Cuma B; Keles, Saadet B; Yavas, Sibel; Ersoy, Canan

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluated the impact of patient education on adherence to a diabetes care plan (e.g., anthropometric, lipidemic, and glycemic parameters) among adults with type II diabetes mellitus without adequate glycemic control. A total of 61 ambulatory adults with type II diabetes mellitus (mean age: 53.6 ± 8.2 years, 70.5% female) were evaluated for anthropometrics, duration of diabetes mellitus, type of anti-diabetic treatment, blood biochemistry, and glycemic parameters in this 3-month prospective observational single-center study. During the course of the study, participants demonstrated a significant decrease in body weight and fat percentage and HbA1c (p < .001 for each). None of the factors evaluated was a significant determinant for glycemic parameters. These findings revealed that adults with type II diabetes mellitus who received education on adherence to routine self-monitoring of blood glucose, standard diabetic diet, and an exercise program delivered by certified diabetes educators had better glycemic control and significant decrease in body weight and fat percentage over a 3-month monitoring period.

  12. Effects of pistachios on the lipid/lipoprotein profile, glycemic control, inflammation, and endothelial function in type 2 diabetes: a randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Sauder, Katherine A.; McCrea, Cindy E.; Ulbrecht, Jan S.; Kris-Etherton, Penny M.; West, Sheila G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The health benefits of regular nut consumption have been well-documented; however, effects on cardiovascular risk in diabetes are emerging. This study examined the effects of daily pistachio consumption on the lipid/lipoprotein profile, glycemic control, markers of inflammation, and endothelial function in adults with type 2 diabetes. Materials/Methods We enrolled 30 adults (40–74 years) with well-controlled type 2 diabetes (mean glycated hemoglobin 6.2%) in a randomized, crossover, controlled feeding study. After a 2-week run-in period, participants consumed nutritionally-adequate diets with pistachios (contributing 20% of total energy) or without pistachios for 4 weeks each, separated by a 2-week washout. We assessed fasting lipids/lipoproteins, glycemic measures (while fasted and during a 75g oral glucose tolerance test), inflammatory markers, and endothelial function after each diet period. Results Total cholesterol and the ratio of total to HDL cholesterol were significantly lower (p<0.05) following the pistachio diet (4.00 mmol/L and 4.06, respectively) compared to the control diet (4.15 mmol/L and 4.37, respectively). Triglycerides were significantly lower (p=0.003) following the pistachio diet (1.56 mmol/L) compared to the control diet (1.84 mmol/L). There were no treatment differences in fasting glucose and insulin, but fructosamine was significantly lower (p=0.03) following the pistachio diet (228.5 μmol/l) compared to the control diet (233.5 μmol/l). Inflammatory markers and endothelial function were unchanged. Conclusion Daily pistachio consumption can improve some cardiometabolic risk factors in adults with well-controlled type 2 diabetes. Our findings support recommendations that individuals with diabetes follow healthy dietary patterns that include nuts. PMID:26383493

  13. [Current controversies in glycemic control targets. What do the results of the latest clinical trials tell us about the approach to type 2 diabetes mellitus?].

    PubMed

    Mauricio, Dídac; Rius, Ferran

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this article is to discuss the implications of the results obtained in the latest large-scale clinical trials designed to evaluate the effect of intensive glycemic control on the vascular complications associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The current scientific evidence is reviewed and the implications of the ACCORD (The Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes study group), ADVANCE (Action in Diabetes and Vascular disease: Preterax and Diamicron Modified Release Control Evaluation) and VADT (Veterans Affairs Diabetes Trial) clinical trials are discussed. General concerns of the studies and their implications for clinical practice and the management of type 2 diabetes, as well as the questions which still need to be answered by future clinical research are discussed.

  14. Consumption of a high glycemic load but not a high glycemic index diet is marginally associated with oxidative stress in young women.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, Andrea Y; Jakits, Holly E; Flood, Andrew; Thomas, William; Gross, Myron; Schmitz, Kathryn H; Kurzer, Mindy S

    2015-01-01

    Research studies have suggested that chronic consumption of high glycemic index foods may lead to chronically high oxidative stress. This is important because oxidative stress is suspected to be an early event in the etiology of many disease processes. We hypothesized that dietary glycemic index and glycemic load were positively associated with oxidative stress assessed by plasma F2-isoprostanes in healthy, premenopausal women (body mass index [BMI] = 24.7 ± 4.8 kg/m(2) and age 25.3 ± 3.5 years, mean ± SD). We measured plasma F2-isoprostanes in 306 healthy premenopausal women at the baseline visit for the Women In Steady Exercise Research study, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Dietary glycemic index and load were calculated from the National Cancer Institute Diet History Questionnaire, and participants were divided into quartiles of dietary glycemic index and of glycemic load. Plasma F2-isoprostanes were compared across quartile groups of dietary glycemic index and glycemic load using linear regression models. Plasma F2-isoprostanes (pg/mL) increased with quartile of glycemic load (test for linear trend, P = .033), and also increased with quartile of glycemic index in participants with BMI ≥ 25 (P = .035) but not in those with BMI <25 (P = .924). After adjustment for BMI, alcohol consumption and total energy intake, both these positive trends remained marginally significant (P = .123 for quartiles of glycemic index and P = .065 for quartiles of glycemic load).

  15. Impact of intensive glycemic control on the incidence of atrial fibrillation and associated cardiovascular outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (from the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes Study).

    PubMed

    Fatemi, Omid; Yuriditsky, Eugene; Tsioufis, Costas; Tsachris, Demetrios; Morgan, Timothy; Basile, Jan; Bigger, Thomas; Cushman, William; Goff, David; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Thomas, Abraham; Papademetriou, Vasilios

    2014-10-15

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is prevalent in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and is associated with markers of poor glycemic control; however, the impact of glycemic control on incident AF and outcomes is unknown. The aims of this study were to prospectively evaluate if intensive glycemic control in patients with DM affects incident AF and to evaluate morbidity and mortality in patients with DM and incident AF. A total of 10,082 patients with DM from the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) cohort were studied in a randomized, double-blind fashion. Participants were randomized to an intensive therapeutic strategy targeting a glycated hemoglobin level of <6.0% or a standard strategy targeting a glycated hemoglobin level of 7.0% to 7.9%. Incident AF occurred in 159 patients (1.58%) over the follow-up period, at a rate of 5.9 per 1,000 patient-years in the intensive-therapy group and a rate of 6.37 per 1,000 patient-years in the standard-therapy group (p = 0.52). In a multivariate model, predictors of incident AF were age, weight, diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, and heart failure history. Patients with DM and new-onset AF had a hazard ratio of 2.65 for all-cause mortality (95% confidence interval 1.8 to 3.86, p <0.0001), a hazard ratio of 2.1 for myocardial infarction (95% confidence interval 1.33 to 3.31, p = 0.0015), and a hazard ratio of 3.80 for the development of heart failure (95% confidence interval 2.48 to 5.84, p <0.0001). In conclusion, intensive glycemic control did not affect the rate of new-onset AF. Patients with DM and incident AF had an increased risk for morbidity and mortality compared with those without AF.

  16. High glycemic load diet, milk and ice cream consumption are related to acne vulgaris in Malaysian young adults: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The role of dietary factors in the pathophysiology of acne vulgaris is highly controversial. Hence, the aim of this study was to determine the association between dietary factors and acne vulgaris among Malaysian young adults. Methods A case–control study was conducted among 44 acne vulgaris patients and 44 controls aged 18 to 30 years from October 2010 to January 2011. Comprehensive acne severity scale (CASS) was used to determine acne severity. A questionnaire comprising items enquiring into the respondent’s family history and dietary patterns was distributed. Subjects were asked to record their food intake on two weekdays and one day on a weekend in a three day food diary. Anthropometric measurements including body weight, height and body fat percentage were taken. Acne severity was assessed by a dermatologist. Results Cases had a significantly higher dietary glycemic load (175 ± 35) compared to controls (122 ± 28) (p < 0.001). The frequency of milk (p < 0.01) and ice-cream (p < 0.01) consumptions was significantly higher in cases compared to controls. Females in the case group had a higher daily energy intake compared to their counterparts in the control group, 1812 ± 331 and 1590 ± 148 kcal respectively (p < 0.05). No significant difference was found in other nutrient intakes, Body Mass Index, and body fat percentage between case and control groups (p > 0.05). Conclusions Glycemic load diet and frequencies of milk and ice cream intake were positively associated with acne vulgaris. PMID:22898209

  17. Glycemic control influences lung membrane diffusion and oxygen saturation in exercise-trained subjects with type 1 diabetes: alveolar-capillary membrane conductance in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Courtney M; Baldi, James C; Cassuto, Nicholas A; Foxx-Lupo, William T; Snyder, Eric M

    2011-03-01

    Lung diffusing capacity (DLCO) is influenced by alveolar-capillary membrane conductance (D (M)) and pulmonary capillary blood volume (V (C)), both of which can be impaired in sedentary type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) subjects due to hyperglycemia. We sought to determine if T1DM, and glycemic control, affected DLNO, DLCO, D (M), V (C) and SaO(2) during maximal exercise in aerobically fit T1DM subjects. We recruited 12 T1DM subjects and 18 non-diabetic subjects measuring DLNO, DLCO, D (M), and V (C) along with SaO(2) and cardiac output (Q) at peak exercise. The T1DM subjects had significantly lower DLCO/Q and D (M)/Q with no difference in Q, DLNO, DLCO, D (M), or V (C) (DLCO/Q = 2.1 ± 0.4 vs. 1.7 ± 0.3, D (M)/Q = 2.8 ± 0.6 vs. 2.4 ± 0.5, non-diabetic and T1DM, p < 0.05). In addition, when considering all subjects there was a relationship between DLCO/Q and SaO(2) at peak exercise (r = 0.46, p = 0.01). Within the T1DM group, the optimal glycemic control group (HbA1c <7%, n = 6) had higher DLNO, DLCO, and D (M)/Q than the poor glycemic control subjects (HbA1c ≥ 7%, n = 6) at peak exercise (DLCO = 38.3 ± 8.0 vs. 28.5 ± 6.9 ml/min/mmHg, DLNO = 120.3 ± 24.3 vs. 89.1 ± 21.0 ml/min/mmHg, D (M)/Q = 3.8 ± 0.8 vs. 2.7 ± 0.2, optimal vs. poor control, p < 0.05). There was a negative correlation between HbA1c with DLCO, D (M) and D (M)/Q at peak exercise (DLCO: r = -0.70, p = 0.01; D (M): r = -0.70, p = 0.01; D (M)/Q: r = -0.68, p = 0.02). These results demonstrate that there is a reduction in lung diffusing capacity in aerobically fit athletes with T1DM at peak exercise, but suggests that maintaining near-normoglycemia potentially averts lung diffusion impairments.

  18. Ethnic Variability in Glycemic Response to Sucrose and Isomaltulose.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wei Shuan Kimberly; Tan, Sze-Yen; Henry, Christiani Jeyakumar

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the glycemic response of Caucasians and Asians to two disaccharides of different glycemic index (GI), and to examine if ethnic groups that showed the largest glycemic response to sucrose would benefit the most when it is replaced with isomaltulose. Forty healthy participants (10 Chinese; 10 Malays; 10 Caucasians; and 10 Indians) consumed beverages containing 50 g of sucrose or isomaltulose on two separate occasions using a randomized crossover design. Capillary blood glucose was measured in a fasted state and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min after beverage ingestion. Glycemic response to sucrose was significantly higher in Malays compared to Caucasians (p = 0.041), but did not differ between Caucasians vs. Chinese (p = 0.145) or vs. Indians (p = 0.661). When sucrose was replaced with isomaltulose, glycemic responses were significantly reduced in all ethnic groups, with the largest reduction in glycemic response being observed in Malays. Malays, who had the greatest glycemic response to sucrose, also showed the greatest improvement in glycemic response when sucrose was replaced with isomaltulose. This implies that Malays who are more susceptible to type 2 diabetes mellitus may benefit from strategies that replace high GI carbohydrate with lower GI alternatives to assist in glycemic control.

  19. Patient-Centered Community Diabetes Education Program Improves Glycemic Control in African-American Patients with Poorly Controlled Type 2 Diabetes: Importance of Point of Care Metabolic Measurements.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Trudy; Amponsah, Grace; Osei, Kwame

    2015-07-01

    African-Americans with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) have higher morbidity and mortality partly attributed to poor glucose control and lack of formal diabetes self-management education and support (DSMES) programs compared to Whites. Therefore, the objective of this study was to compare the clinical and metabolic parameters during DSMES vs. standard care in African-Americans with T2DM attending primary care inner city clinics. We recruited 124 African-American patients with T2DM, randomized into Group 1-DSMES (n = 58) and Group 2-standard care group (n = 38) for 6 months. Body weight, blood pressure, random blood sugars and point-of-care (POC) hemoglobin A1C (A1C) and lipids/lipoproteins were measured at 0, 3, and 6 months. At 6 months, Group 1 had significant reduction in A1C (8.2 ± 1.4% vs. 7.5 ± 1.5%, p = 0.02) and random glucose (190.4 ± 77.6 vs. 160.6 ± 59.8 mg/dl, p = 0.03). However, there were no changes in body weight, blood pressure, or lipids/lipoprotein levels. We found no significant changes in the clinical/metabolic parameters in Group 2. We concluded that DSMES, supplemented with POC testing, was associated with significant improvements in glycemic control without changes in body weight, blood pressure, or lipids/lipoproteins. We recommend the inclusion of DSMES with POC testing in managing African-American patients with T2DM attending inner city primary care clinics.

  20. Effect of improving glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on low-density lipoprotein size, electronegative low-density lipoprotein and lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 distribution.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Quesada, José L; Vinagre, Irene; de Juan-Franco, Elena; Sánchez-Hernández, Juan; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Ordóñez-Llanos, Jordi; Pérez, Antonio

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of intensified hypoglycemic therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on the distribution of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) activity between high-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and its relation with the lipid profile and other qualitative properties of LDL. Forty-two patients with type 2 diabetes on the basis of poor glycemic control and normal or near normal LDL cholesterol were recruited. Lifestyle counseling and pharmacologic hypoglycemic therapy were intensified to improve glycemic control, but lipid-lowering therapy was unchanged. At 4 ± 2 months, glycosylated hemoglobin had decreased by a mean of 2.1%, but the only effect on the lipid profile were statistically significant decreases in nonesterified fatty acids and apolipoprotein B concentration. LDL size increased and the proportion of electronegative LDL decreased significantly. In parallel, total Lp-PLA2 activity decreased significantly, promoting a redistribution of Lp-PLA2 activity toward a higher proportion in high-density lipoprotein. Improvements in glycemic control led to more marked changes in Lp-PLA2 activity and distribution in patients with diabetes who had not received previous lipid-lowering therapy. In conclusion, optimizing glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes promotes atheroprotective changes, including larger LDL size, decreased electronegative LDL, and a higher proportion of Lp-PLA2 activity in high-density lipoprotein.

  1. Long-term study of patients with type 2 diabetes and moderate renal impairment shows that dapagliflozin reduces weight and blood pressure but does not improve glycemic control

    PubMed Central

    Kohan, Donald E; Fioretto, Paola; Tang, Weihua; List, James F

    2014-01-01

    In patients with diabetes, glycemic improvement by sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibition depends on the kidney's ability to filter glucose. Dapagliflozin, a sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitor, reduces hyperglycemia in patients with diabetes and normal or mildly impaired renal function. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study we assessed daily treatment with dapagliflozin in 252 patients with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes and moderate renal impairment. The primary endpoint, the mean change in HbA1c, was not statistically different from placebo after 24 weeks (−0.41% and −0.44% for 5- and 10-mg doses, respectively, and −0.32% for placebo). The mean weight change from baseline was −1.54 and −1.89 kg for the 5- and 10-mg doses, respectively, and +0.21 kg for placebo. The mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased in the dapagliflozin groups compared to placebo. Through 104 weeks, 13 patients receiving dapagliflozin and no patients receiving placebo experienced bone fracture. At 1 week, the mean serum creatinine increased with dapagliflozin 5 mg (+0.13 mg/dl) and 10 mg (+0.18 mg/dl) and did not change further after 104 weeks. Mean serum electrolytes did not change in any group, and there were fewer episodes of hyperkalemia with dapagliflozin than placebo. Thus, in patients with moderate renal impairment, dapagliflozin did not improve glycemic control, but reduced weight and blood pressure. PMID:24067431

  2. Effect of scaling and root planing on serum interleukin-10 levels and glycemic control in chronic periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Anirudh Balakrishna; Thakur, Srinath; Muddapur, Mahadevayya Veerayya

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Chronic periodontal disease (CPD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) share common pathogenic pathways involving the cytokine network resulting in increased susceptibility to both diseases, leading to increased inflammatory destruction, insulin resistance, and poor glycemic control. Periodontal treatment may improve glycemic control. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of scaling and root planing (SRP) of T2DM patients with CPD on hyperglycemia and the levels of serum interleukin-10 (IL-10). Materials and Methods: Forty-five subjects were divided into three groups comprising 15 subjects each as Group 1 (healthy controls), Group 2 (CPD patients), and Group 3 (T2DM patients with CPD). Plaque index, gingival index (GI), probing pocket depths (PPD), clinical attachment loss (AL), bleeding on probing (BoP), random blood sugar, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C), and serum IL-10 were measured at baseline; SRP was performed on Groups 2 and 3 and the selected parameters recorded again at 6 months. Results: Statistically significant (P < 0.05) differences were observed in the variables at baseline and 6 months after SRP between the three groups using one-way ANOVA. The paired samples t-test for PPD and AL in Group 3 was statistically significant. Group 3 revealed positive correlations between PPD and HbA1C, BoP and IL-10, respectively, at 6 months and a predictable association of HbA1C with PPD and GI, and IL-10 levels with BoP, respectively, at 6 months. Conclusion: Scaling and root planing is effective in reducing blood glucose levels in T2DM patient with pocket depths and effective in elevating systemic IL-10 levels in CPD patients and CPD patients with T2DM. PMID:26015670

  3. The glycemic index.

    PubMed

    Wolever, T M

    1990-01-01

    Different starchy foods produce different glycemic responses when fed individually, and there is evidence that this also applies in the context of the mixed meal. Methods of processing, and other factors unrelated to the nutrient composition of foods may also have major effects on the glycemic response. The reason for differences in glycemic response appears to relate to the rate at which the foods are digested and the many factors influencing this. The glycemic index (GI) is a system of classification in which the glycemic responses of foods are indexed against a standard (white bread). This allows the results of different investigators to be pooled. GI values also depend upon a number of nonfood-related variables. The method of calculation of the glycemic response area is most important, but the method of blood sampling and length of time of studies also may have effects. Variability of glycemic responses arises from day-to-day variation in the same subject and variation between different subjects. There is less variability between the GI values of different subjects than there is within the same subject from day to day. Therefore, the mean GI values of foods are independent of the glucose tolerance status of the subjects being tested. Potentially clinically useful starchy foods producing relatively flat glycemic responses have been identified, including legumes, pasta, barley, bulgur, parboiled rice and whole grain breads such as pumpernickel. Specific incorporation of these foods into diets have been associated with reduced blood glucose, insulin, and lipid levels. Low-GI foods may influence amino acid metabolism although the implications of these are unknown. In addition, low GI foods increase colonic fermentation. The physiologic and metabolic implications of this relate to increased bacterial urea utilization, and to the production and absorption of short chain fatty acids in the colon. The application of the GI to therapeutic diets should be in the context

  4. The hypoglycemic effect of pumpkin seeds, Trigonelline (TRG), Nicotinic acid (NA), and D-Chiro-inositol (DCI) in controlling glycemic levels in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Adams, Gary G; Imran, Shahwar; Wang, Sheng; Mohammad, Abubaker; Kok, M Samil; Gray, David A; Channell, Guy A; Harding, Stephen E

    2014-01-01

    In the contemporary society, diabetes mellitus is considered as a common, growing, serious, costly, and potentially preventable public health problem. It is forecasted that in 2030, the number of people with diabetes will go up from 117 million in 2000 to 366 million in 2030. The prevalence of diabetes will place a huge burden on health and financial structures of countries, and these will impact on individuals, as well as families and nations. Polysaccharides, para-aminobenzoic acid, fixed oils, sterol, proteins, and peptides are biologically active ingredients, which are found in pumpkins. The chemicals within pumpkins such as the fruit pulp, oil from ungerminated seeds, and protein from germinated seeds have hypoglycemic properties. Preliminary investigation showed that pumpkin seeds, and the macromolecules, therein, such as Trigonelline (TRG), Nicotinic acid (NA), and D-chiro-inositol (DCI), possess hypoglycemic properties and could assist in maintaining glycemic control.

  5. Bromocriptine mesylate: Food and Drug Administration approved new approach in therapy of non-insulin dependant diabetes mellitus with poor glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Keche, Yogendra

    2010-04-01

    Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved bromocriptine mesylate, a quick release formulation, 0.8 mg tablets, as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Bromocriptine products were previously approved by the FDA for the treatment of pituitary tumors and Parkinson's disease. Bromocriptine is thought to act on circadian neuronal activities within the hypothalamus to reset abnormally elevated hypothalamic drive for increased plasma glucose, triglyceride, and free fatty acid levels in fasting and postprandial states in insulin-resistant patients. Adverse events most commonly reported in clinical trials of bromocriptine included nausea, fatigue, vomiting, headache, and dizziness. These events lasted a median of 14 days and were more likely to occur during initial titration of the drug. Due to novel mechanism of action, single daily dose, and lower incidence of stroke, myocardial infarction and vascular events, bromocriptine may act as landmark in treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  6. Impact of the 8-week Administration of Tofogliflozin for Glycemic Control and Body Composition in Japanese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, Sachie; Nakajima, Shinsuke; Iwahashi, Yasuyuki; Seo, Akane; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Tamori, Yoshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Objective The adverse effects of selective sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors generally appear within about two or three months after treatment initiation in Japan. Therefore, we investigated the impact of tofogliflozin, a class of SGLT2 inhibitors, on glycemic control and body composition during this period in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods This single-arm open-label study enrolled 20 patients. Patients received tofogliflozin 20 mg once daily for 8 weeks. At week 8, changes from baseline in body weight, serum metabolic markers, and body composition were evaluated. Results A total of 17 patients completed the 8-week administration of tofogliflodin. No serious adverse events were noted. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) decreased significantly, from 7.8% to 7.3% with 8-week administration of tofogliflozin. Both the body weight and body mass index (BMI) also decreased. In addition, a decreased renal function of the boundary zone and hemoconcentration were detected. As for body composition, the free fat mass, total body water, extracellular water and intracellular water were all decreased significantly. Interestingly, the amount of fat mass did not change. The degree of improvement in HbA1c was correlated with the baseline fat mass and BMI. Conclusion An eight-week administration of tofogliflozin improved glycemic control and reduced the body weight and free fat mass in type 2 diabetic patients without affecting the fat mass. In this period, the hematocrit level and renal function should be monitored to guard against hemoconcentration and renal impairment, respectively. PMID:27853064

  7. Impact of an education program on patient anxiety, depression, glycemic control, and adherence to self-care and medication in Type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Al Hayek, Ayman A.; Robert, Asirvatham A.; Al Dawish, Mohamed A.; Zamzami, Marwan M.; Sam, Asirvatham E.; Alzaid, Aus A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM) requires continuous medical care, patients’ self-management, education, and adherence to prescribed medication to reduce the risk of long-term complications. The aim of this study was to assess the benefits of an education program on diabetes, patient self-management, adherence to medication, anxiety, depression and glycemic control in type 2 diabetics in Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study, conducted among 104 diabetic patients at a major tertiary hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, between May 2011 and October 2012. Education materials given to diabetic patients included pamphlets/handouts written in Arabic, the national language. Special videotapes about DM were made and distributed to all participants. In addition, specific educational programs through the diabetes educators and one-on-one counseling sessions with the doctor were also arranged. Patients were interviewed using a structured interview schedule both during the baseline, and after 6 months of the program. The interview schedule included, socio-demographics, clinical characteristics, diabetes self-management, adherence to medication, anxiety, and depression. Glycemic control was considered poor, if hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was ≥ 7%. Results: The mean age of the study population was 57.3 ± 14.4 years. Seventy one were males (68.3%) and 33 (31.7%) were females. After six months of the diabetes education program, there were significant improvements in patients’ dietary plan (P = 0.0001), physical exercise (P = 0.0001), self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) (P = 0.0001), HbA1c (P = 0.04), adherence to medication (P = 0.007), and depression (P = 0.03). Conclusions: Implementation of education programs on diabetes among type 2 diabetic patients is associated with better outcomes such as their dietary plan, physical exercise, SMBG, adherence to medication, HbA1c and depression. PMID:23983558

  8. A proprietary alpha-amylase inhibitor from white bean (Phaseolus vulgaris): a review of clinical studies on weight loss and glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Marilyn L; Udani, Jay K

    2011-03-17

    Obesity, and resultant health hazards which include diabetes, cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome, are worldwide medical problems. Control of diet and exercise are cornerstones of the management of excess weight. Foods with a low glycemic index may reduce the risk of diabetes and heart disease as well as their complications. As an alternative to a low glycemic index diet, there is a growing body of research into products that slow the absorption of carbohydrates through the inhibition of enzymes responsible for their digestion. These products include alpha-amylase and glucosidase inhibitors. The common white bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) produces an alpha-amylase inhibitor, which has been characterized and tested in numerous clinical studies. A specific and proprietary product named Phase 2® Carb Controller (Pharmachem Laboratories, Kearny, NJ) has demonstrated the ability to cause weight loss with doses of 500 to 3000 mg per day, in either a single dose or in divided doses. Clinical studies also show that Phase 2 has the ability to reduce the post-prandial spike in blood glucose levels. Experiments conducted incorporating Phase 2 into food and beverage products have found that it can be integrated into various products without losing activity or altering the appearance, texture or taste of the food. There have been no serious side effects reported following consumption of Phase 2. Gastro-intestinal side effects are rare and diminish upon extended use of the product. In summary, Phase 2 has the potential to induce weight loss and reduce spikes in blood sugar caused by carbohydrates through its alpha-amylase inhibiting activity.

  9. Influence of glycemic control on the levels of subgingival periodontal pathogens in patients with generalized chronic periodontitis and type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    MIRANDA, Tamires Szeremeske; FERES, Magda; RETAMAL-VALDÉS, Belén; PEREZ-CHAPARRO, Paula Juliana; MACIEL, Suellen Silva; DUARTE, Poliana Mendes

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective This study evaluated the influence of glycemic control on the levels and frequency of subgingival periodontal pathogens in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and generalized chronic periodontitis (ChP). Material and Methods Fifty-six patients with generalized ChP and type 2 DM were assigned according to the levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) into one of the following groups: HbA1c<8% (n=28) or HbA1c≥8% (n=28). Three subgingival biofilm samples from sites with probing depth (PD)<5 mm and three samples from sites with PD≥5 mm were analyzed by quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) for the presence and levels of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, Eubacterium nodatum, Parvimona micra, Fusobacterium nucleatum ssp. and Prevotella intermedia. Results The mean counts of F. nucleatum ssp. were statistically significantly higher in the sites with PD≥5 mm of the HbA1c≥8% group (p<0.05). Frequencies of detection of T. forsythia, E. nodatum, P. micra and F. nucleatum ssp. were all higher in the sites with PD≥5 mm of the patients with HbA1c≥8%, compared with those of patients with HbA1c<8% (p<0.05). Frequency of detection of P. intermedia was higher in the sites with PD<5 mm of the patients with HbA1c≥8% than those of the patients with HbA1c<8% (p<0.05). Conclusions Poor glycemic control, as indicated by HbA1c≥8%, is associated with increased levels and frequencies of periodontal pathogens in the subgingival biofilm of subjects with type 2 DM and ChP. PMID:28198980

  10. A proprietary alpha-amylase inhibitor from white bean (Phaseolus vulgaris): A review of clinical studies on weight loss and glycemic control

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Obesity, and resultant health hazards which include diabetes, cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome, are worldwide medical problems. Control of diet and exercise are cornerstones of the management of excess weight. Foods with a low glycemic index may reduce the risk of diabetes and heart disease as well as their complications. As an alternative to a low glycemic index diet, there is a growing body of research into products that slow the absorption of carbohydrates through the inhibition of enzymes responsible for their digestion. These products include alpha-amylase and glucosidase inhibitors. The common white bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) produces an alpha-amylase inhibitor, which has been characterized and tested in numerous clinical studies. A specific and proprietary product named Phase 2® Carb Controller (Pharmachem Laboratories, Kearny, NJ) has demonstrated the ability to cause weight loss with doses of 500 to 3000 mg per day, in either a single dose or in divided doses. Clinical studies also show that Phase 2 has the ability to reduce the post-prandial spike in blood glucose levels. Experiments conducted incorporating Phase 2 into food and beverage products have found that it can be integrated into various products without losing activity or altering the appearance, texture or taste of the food. There have been no serious side effects reported following consumption of Phase 2. Gastro-intestinal side effects are rare and diminish upon extended use of the product. In summary, Phase 2 has the potential to induce weight loss and reduce spikes in blood sugar caused by carbohydrates through its alpha-amylase inhibiting activity. PMID:21414227

  11. Altered expression of O-GlcNAc-modified proteins in a mouse model whose glycemic status is controlled by a low carbohydrate ketogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Tetsuya; Fukui, Asami; Morita, Naoki

    2013-11-01

    Abnormal modification of proteins by O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) is known to be associated with the pathology induced by hyperglycemia. However, the dynamic mechanism of O-GlcNAc modification under hyperglycemic conditions in vivo has not been fully characterized. To understand the mechanism, we established an animal model in which the glycemic status is controlled by the diet. A mutant mouse (ob/ob) which exhibits diet-induced hyperglycemia when fed a regular chow (chow) was used to establish this model; the mice were fed a very low carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD) to improve hyperglycemia. Using this model, we evaluated the levels of O-GlcNAc-modified proteins in tissues under a hyperglycemic or its improved condition. ELISA and Western blot analyses revealed that altered expression of certain proteins modified by O-GlcNAc were found in the mice tissues, although global O-GlcNAc levels in the tissues remained unaltered by improvement of hyperglycemia. We also found the Akt protein kinase was modified by O-GlcNAc in the liver of ob/ob mice, and the modification levels were decreased by improvement of hyperglycemia. Furthermore, aberrant phosphorylation of Akt was found in the liver of ob/ob mice under hyperglycemic condition. In conclusion, our established mouse model is useful for evaluating the dynamics of O-GlcNAc-modified proteins in tissues associated with glycemic status. This study revealed that the expression level of certain proteins modified by O-GlcNAc is altered when KD improves the hyperglycemia. These proteins could be prospective indexes for nutritional therapy for hyperglycemia-associated diseases, such as diabetes mellitus.

  12. The emerging role of telemedicine in managing glycemic control and psychobehavioral aspects of pregnancy complicated by diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chilelli, Nino Cristiano; Dalfrà, Maria Grazia; Lapolla, Annunziata

    2014-01-01

    There is a gradual decline in concern of specialists who follow up the care of pregnant women with diabetes. In addition, due to the dwindling economic resources allocated to health services, access to specialized healthcare facilities is becoming more difficult. Telemedicine, or medicine practiced at a distance, is inserted in this context with applications differing for type of interaction (real-time or deferred, i.e., videoconferencing versus store-and-forward data transmission), type of monitoring (automatic versus requesting cooperation from the patient), and type of devices used (web connections and use of mobile phones or smartphones). Telemedicine can cope with the current lack of ability to ensure these patients frequent direct contact with their caregivers. This approach may have an impact not only on the classical maternal-fetal outcome, but also on some underestimated aspects of patients with diabetes in pregnancy, in this case their quality of life, the perception of "diabetes self-efficacy," and the glycemic variability. In this paper, we will analyze the current evidence regarding the use of telemedicine in pregnancies complicated by diabetes, trying to highlight the main limitations of these studies and possible strategies to overcome them in order to improve the effectiveness of future clinical interventions with these medical applications.

  13. Effect of Tocotrienols enriched canola oil on glycemic control and oxidative status in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Vafa, Mohammadreza; Haghighat, Neda; Moslehi, Nazanin; Eghtesadi, Shahriar; Heydari, Iraj

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tocotrienols have been shown to improve glycemic control and redox balance in an animal study, but their effects on patients with diabetes are unknown. The study aimed to investigate whether tocotrienols improves glycemic control, insulin sensitivity, and oxidative stress in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Materials and Methods: This study was a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized trial. A total of 50 patients, aged 35-60 years, with T2DM treated by noninsulin hypoglycemic drugs were randomly assigned to receive either 15 mL/day tocotrienols (200 mg) enriched canola oil (n = 25) or pure canola oil (n = 25) for 8 weeks. Fasting blood sugar (FBS), fasting insulin, total antioxidant capacity (TAC), malondialdehyde (MDA), and homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were determined before and after the intervention. The data were compared between and within groups, before and after the intervention. Results: Baseline characteristics of participants including age, sex, physical activity, disease duration, and type of drug consumption were not significantly different between the two groups. In tocotrienol enriched canola oil, FBS (mean percent change: –15.4% vs. 3.9%; P = 0.006) and MDA (median percent change: –35.6% vs. 16.3%; P = 0.003) were significantly reduced while TAC was significantly increased (median percent change: 21.4% vs. 2.3%; P = 0.001) compared to pure canola oil. At the end of the study, patients who treated with tocotrienols had lower FBS (P = 0.023) and MDA (P = 0.044) compared to the pure canola oil group. However, tocotrienols had no effect on insulin concentrations and HOMA-IR. Conclusion: Tocotrienols can improve FBS concentrations and modifies redox balance in T2DM patients with poor glycemic control and can be considered in combination with hypoglycemic drugs to better control of T2DM. PMID:26600828

  14. Glycemic index, glycemic load and childhood obesity: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Rouhani, Mohammad Hossein; Kelishadi, Roya; Hashemipour, Mahin; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad; Azadbakht, Leila

    2014-01-01

    Background: Several evidences have been reported so far in terms of the relationship between obesity and glycemic index and glycemic load in children. However, the number of review studies that have dealt with recent findings is quite low. The purpose of present study is to review the existing evidences in this regard. Materials and Methods: First of all, the phrases: “Glycaemic index”, “Glycaemic load”, “Glycemic index” OR “Glycemic load” accompanied by one of the words: “Adolescent”, “Young”, “Youth” “Children” OR “Child” were searched in texts of articles existing in ISI and PUBMED databases which were obtained out of 1001 articles. Among these, some articles, which reviewed the relationship of obesity with glycemic index and glycemic load, were selected. Finally, 20 articles were studied in current review study. Results: The majority of cross-sectional studies have found children's obesity directly linked with glycemic index and glycemic load; however, cohort studies found controversial results. Also, the intervention studies indicate the negative effect of glycemic index and glycemic load on obesity in children. Conclusion: Published evidences reported inconsistent results. It seems that existing studies are not sufficient and more studies are needed in this regard. PMID:24627855

  15. Effect of Linagliptin on Glycemic Control in Chinese Patients with Newly-Diagnosed, Drug-Naïve Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenjun; Li, Ying; Chen, Xiong; Lin, Dini; Xiang, Songying; Shen, Feixia; Gu, Xuemei

    2015-09-09

    BACKGROUND This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of linagliptin (a novel dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitor) on glucose metabolism and β-cell function in Chinese patients with newly-diagnosed, drug-naïve type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). MATERIAL AND METHODS Newly-diagnosed and drug-naïve T2DM patients were enrolled. After 4-week lifestyle modulation and 2-week placebo run-in, 57 patients were randomized to double-blind treatment with linagliptin (n=34) or placebo (n=23). The primary endpoint was the change from baseline in glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) after 24 weeks. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2-h postprandial plasma glucose (2h-PPG), fasting insulin, proinsulin-to-insulin ratio, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and homeostasis model assessment of β-cell function (HOMA-β) were also evaluated. RESULTS Baseline characteristics were similar between the 2 groups. Compared with placebo, linagliptin therapy resulted in a significant decrease in HbA1C (-1.2±0.7% vs. -0.4±0.4%, P<0.001), FBG (-0.98±1.17 vs. -0.32±0.51 mmol/L, P=0.011, and 2h-PPG (-2.02±0.94 vs. -0.97±0.63 mmol/L, P<0.001). Significant differences were observed for the proinsulin/insulin ratio (P<0.001) and HOMA-β index (P=0.001). Rates of adverse events were similar between the 2 groups (30.3% vs. 27.3%). All adverse events were mild. One patient discontinued participation due to pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS Linagliptin treatment resulted in a significant and clinically meaningful improvement of glycemic control in drug-naïve Chinese patients with T2DM, as well as improved parameters of b-cell function. Linagliptin had an excellent safety profile.

  16. Demographic analyses of the effects of carvedilol vs metoprolol on glycemic control and insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes and hypertension in the Glycemic Effects in Diabetes Mellitus: Carvedilol-Metoprolol Comparison in Hypertensives (GEMINI) study.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Robert A; Fonseca, Vivian; Katholi, Richard E; McGill, Janet B; Messerli, Franz H; Bell, David S H; Raskin, Philip; Wright, Jackson T; Iyengar, Malini; Anderson, Karen M; Lukas, Mary Ann; Bakris, George L

    2008-01-01

    In the Glycemic Effects in Diabetes Mellitus: Carvedilol-Metoprolol Comparison in Hypertensives (GEMINI) trial, carvedilol added to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers had neutral or beneficial effects on glycemic measures compared with metoprolol tartrate. For the 1235 diabetic hypertensive GEMINI patients, the authors assessed treatment differences by race (white/black/other), age (continuous variable), and sex on hemoglobin A(1c), insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance [HOMA-IR]), and blood pressure. Both treatments significantly reduced blood pressure in all subgroups, but the metabolic effects of carvedilol were more beneficial in subgroups of race and sex. Carvedilol did not affect hemoglobin A(1c) but improved HOMA-IR results in all subgroups, significantly in males and "other race" subgroups. Metoprolol significantly increased hemoglobin A(1c) in all subgroups except "other race," with no effect on HOMA-IR findings. Differences vs metoprolol significantly favored carvedilol for hemoglobin A(1c) in white and female subgroups and favored carvedilol for HOMA-IR in black, "other race," and male subgroups. Carvedilol effects were favorable to adjustment of age as a covariate. In hypertensive patients with diabetes, carvedilol may be a more appropriate choice when beta-blockade is indicated.

  17. Islet antigen specific IL-10+ immune responses but not CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ cells at diagnosis predict glycemic control in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sanda, Srinath; Roep, Bart O; von Herrath, Matthias

    2008-05-01

    The immune phenotype of the partial remission phase or "honeymoon phase" of type 1 diabetes is not well defined. We compared flow cytometry and cytokine production by ELISPOT assays in children with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes and children in the partial remission phase of type 1 diabetes. Newly diagnosed children had higher levels of FoxP3 expression in CD4 CD25 double positive cells (56.1%+/-24.9 vs. 24.9%+/-24.6 p=0.03) and higher mean numbers of IL-10 producing cells (7.3 cells/2x10(5) cells+/-6.6 vs. 0.86 cells/2x10(5)+/-0.36 p=0.0043) compared to partial remission patients. Higher FoxP3 expression at diagnosis predicted worse future glycemic control while higher mean numbers of IL-10 cells were associated with better future glucose control. These data provide an immune phenotype of the honeymoon phase and suggest that analyzing IL-10 and FoxP3 at diagnosis may identify patients that will experience better glucose control.

  18. Effect of Vitamin D3 Supplementation on Inflammatory Markers and Glycemic Measures among Overweight or Obese Adults: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Zuk, Aleksandra; Fitzpatrick, Tiffany; Rosella, Laura C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity induced low-grade chronic inflammation disrupts proper immune and metabolic function. Vitamin D deficiency increases inflammation, which is associated with cardiometabolic risk. This systematic review examines the association between oral vitamin D (VD) supplementation and circulating inflammatory biomarkers and glycemic outcomes from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of overweight and/or obese adults. Methods MEDLINE OVID, EMBASE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched according to a predefined protocol. Eligible RCTs included adults randomized to receive either oral VD or placebo. Two reviewers independently assessed RCTs for inclusion. Bias was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration risk of bias tool. Mean differences were calculated comparing end-of-study sample means between the independent VD and placebo groups. Results Eleven unique RCTs met inclusion criteria from a total of 3,383 identified citations, including 79 screened articles and 14 full text data extractions. Inflammatory and glycemic measures were reported in 7 and 10 RCTs, respectively. Most trial findings were non-significant with considerable heterogeneity in design, participants and outcomes. All but one trial was rated as either high or unclear risk of bias. Two RCTs reported significant changes in inflammatory biomarkers; however, the mean difference between groups was not statistically significant: C-reactive protein 0.19 mg/L (p = 0.88); Tumor Necrosis Factor -0.54 pg/ml (p = 0.20). Two other trials found significant mean differences in fasting plasma glucose -0.32 mmol/L (p = 0.03), Hemoglobin A1c -0.13% (p = 0.04), and Homeostatic Model Assessment -0.86 (p = 0.02) following VD supplementation. Conclusions Overall, there is no clear established benefit of VD supplementation on inflammatory biomarkers among overweight/obese adults. Baseline serum VD possibly influences the effect of VD repletion on inflammatory markers. Risk of bias was

  19. Association of adherence to a Mediterranean diet with glycemic control and cardiovascular risk factors in youth with type 1 diabetes: The SEARCH Nutrition Ancillary Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Victor W.; Lamichhane, Archana P.; Crandell, Jamie L.; Couch, Sarah C.; Liese, Angela D.; The, Natalie S.; Tzeel, Benjamin A.; Dabelea, Dana; Lawrence, Jean M.; Marcovina, Santica M.; Kim, Grace; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives This study aimed to determine the association between a Mediterranean diet and glycemic control and other cardiovascular risk factors among youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Subjects/Methods Incident T1D cases aged <20 years at diagnosis between 2002 and 2005 were included. Participants were seen at baseline (N=793), 1-year (N=512) and 5-year follow-up visits (N=501). Mediterranean diet score was assessed using a modified KIDMED index (mKIDMED). Multivariate linear regression and longitudinal mixed model were applied to determine the association between mKIDMED score and log-HbA1c, lipids, blood pressure (BP), and obesity. Results In cross-sectional analyses using baseline data, for individuals with an HbA1c of 7.5%, a two-point higher mKIDMED score (one standard deviation) was associated with 0.15% lower HbA1c (P=0.02). A two-point higher mKIDMED score was associated with 4.0 mg/dL lower total cholesterol (TC) (P=0.006), 3.4 mg/dL lower low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-C (P=0.004), 3.9 mg/dL lower non-high-density lipoprotein (non-HDL)-C (P=0.004), and 0.07 lower LDL-C/HDL-C ratio (P=0.02). Using longitudinal data, a two-point increase in mKIDMED score was associated with 0.01% lower log-HbA1c (P=0.07), 1.8 mg/dL lower TC (P=0.05), 1.6 mg/dL lower LDL-C (P=0.03), and 1.8 mg/dL lower non-HDL-C (P=0.03) than would otherwise have been expected. HbA1c mediated about 20% of the association for lipids in both cross-sectional and longitudinal models. An unexpected positive association between mKIDMED score and systolic BP was found among non-Hispanic white youth in cross-sectional analyses (P=0.009). Mediterranean diet was not associated with obesity. Conclusions Mediterranean diet may improve glycemic control and cardiovascular health in T1D youth. PMID:26908421

  20. Impact of Baseline BMI on Glycemic Control and Weight Change with Metformin Monotherapy in Chinese Type 2 Diabetes Patients: Phase IV Open-Label Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Linong; Li, Hongmei; Guo, Xiaohui; Li, Yan; Hu, Renming; Zhu, Zhengying

    2013-01-01

    Background Differences exist between treatment recommendations regarding the choice of metformin as first-line therapy for type 2 diabetes patients according to body mass index (BMI). This study compared the efficacy of metformin monotherapy among normal-weight, overweight, and obese patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes. Methods In this prospective, multicenter, open-label study in China, patients aged 23–77 years were enrolled 1∶1:1 according to baseline BMI: normal-weight (BMI 18.5−23.9 kg/m2; n = 125); overweight (BMI 24.0−27.9 kg/m2; n = 122) or obese (BMI ≥28 kg/m2; n = 124). Extended-release metformin was administered for 16 weeks (500 mg/day, up-titrated weekly to a maximum 2,000 mg/day). The primary efficacy endpoint was the effect of baseline BMI on glycemic control with metformin monotherapy, measured as the change from baseline in glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) at week 16 compared among BMI groups using ANCOVA. Other endpoints included comparisons of metformin’s effects on fasting plasma glucose (FPG), lipid levels and body weight. Results Mean HbA1c decreases at week 16, adjusted for baseline values, were –1.84%, –1.78% and –1.78% in normal-weight, overweight and obese patients, (P = 0.664); body weight decreased by 2.4%, 3.9% and 3.5%, respectively. FPG levels decreased similarly over time in all BMI groups (P = 0.461) and changes from baseline in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) did not differ significantly among BMI groups at week 16 (P = 0.143 and 0.451, respectively). Conclusions Baseline BMI had no impact on glycemic control, weight change or other efficacy measures with metformin monotherapy. These data suggest that normal-weight type 2 diabetes patients would derive the same benefits from first-line treatment with metformin as overweight and obese patients, and are not at increased risk of excess weight loss. Trial Registration

  1. Glycemic index and heart disease.

    PubMed

    Leeds, Anthony R

    2002-07-01

    A diet high in carbohydrates with high glycemic indexes (GI) and glycemic load were linked to risk of coronary heart disease development in women in a large prospective study. Two cross-sectional studies showed that low-GI diets are associated with high HDL-cholesterol concentrations, especially in women. In a tightly controlled study of patients with type 2 diabetes, serum total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B concentrations fell more significantly after a low-GI diet than after a high-GI diet. In the same study, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 concentrations were reduced by 58% after the low-GI diet. Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by adipocytes was significantly higher in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery after 4 wk of consuming a low-GI diet than after consuming a high-GI diet. The effects of low-GI diets may be mediated by changes in postprandial fatty acid concentrations or by hormonal signals from adipocytes, but a possible association of low-GI diets with some other dietary factor such as chromium must not be excluded. Proof of the clinical value of low-GI diets awaits prospective trials, which should include short-term observations covering periods of metabolic stress induced by surgery as well as long-term trials with clinical endpoints.

  2. Metformin powder formulation compared to metformin tablets on glycemic control and on treatment satisfaction in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Derosa, Giuseppe; Romano, Davide; Bianchi, Lucio; D'Angelo, Angela; Maffioli, Pamela

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if the new metformin powder formulation improves the treatment satisfaction in patients with type 2 diabetes, in a case-control clinical trial. We enrolled 602 subjects in therapy with metformin in tablets formulation and instructed them to take the same dose of metformin in the new powder formulation. At baseline, and after 6 months since the assumption of metformin powder, each patient answered the following questionnaires: the SF-36 Health Survey, the Diabetes Quality Of Life questionnaire Modified (DQOL/Mod), and the Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (DTSQ). We also assessed the following at baseline, at 3 and 6 months: fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and postprandial glucose (PPG), glycated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)), fasting plasma insulin (FPI), and homeostasis model assessment index of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). We observed a statistically significant reduction in HbA(1c), FPG, PPG, FPI, and HOMA-IR (P < .05 for all) with metformin powder. The DTSQ questionnaire showed a higher level of satisfaction linked to the assumption of metformin powder compared to the tablets formulation. In conclusion, metformin powder formulation seems to be more appropriate for the treatment of diabetic patients. The improvement of glycemic control suggests a better adherence to the powder formulation.

  3. Self-Care Behaviors and Glycemic Control in Low-Income Adults in México With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus May Have Implications for Patients of Mexican Heritage Living in the United States.

    PubMed

    Compeán Ortiz, Lidia G; Del Ángel Pérez, Beatriz; Reséndiz González, Eunice; Piñones Martínez, Socorro; González Quirarte, Nora H; Berry, Diane C

    2016-04-01

    This study examined self-care behaviors and their relationship to glycemic control in low-income Mexican adults with type 2 diabetes in Southeastern Tamaulipas, México. A total of 135 patients were enrolled from 17 community health centers. The most frequent self-care behavior was medication management (80%), and the least frequent self-care behavior was self blood glucose monitoring (7%). All the patients demonstrated poor glycemic control, with glycated hemoglobin > 7%. Self-care behaviors were associated with fasting blood glucose (rs = .223, p = .005). Medication management was influenced by cognitive performance, F(1, 130) = 4.49, p = .036, and depression, F(1, 130) = 8.22, p = .005. Dietary behaviors were influenced by previous diabetes education, F(1, 130) = 6.73, p = .011. These findings indicate that education and cognitive behavioral interventions in Spanish for Mexican adults with type 2 diabetes are urgently needed.

  4. Improvement of glycemic control in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats by Atlantic salmon skin gelatin hydrolysate as the dipeptidyl-peptidase IV inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, C H; Wang, T Y; Hung, C C; Chen, M C; Hsu, K C

    2015-06-01

    In our previous study, Atlantic salmon skin gelatin hydrolysed with flavourzyme possessed 42.5% dipeptidyl-peptidase (DPP)-IV inhibitory activity at a concentration of 5 mg mL(-1). The oral administration of the hydrolysate (FSGH) at a single dose of 300 mg per day in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats for 5 weeks was evaluated for its antidiabetic effect. During the 5-week experiment, body weight increased, and the food and water intake was reduced by FSGH in diabetic rats. The daily administration of FSGH for 5 weeks was effective for lowering the blood glucose levels of diabetic rats during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). After the 5-week treatment, plasma DPP-IV activity was inhibited; the plasma activity of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), insulin, and the insulin-to-glucagon ratio were increased by FSGH in diabetic rats. The results indicate that FSGH has the function of inhibiting GLP-1 degradation by DPP-IV, resulting in the enhancement of insulin secretion and improvement of glycemic control in STZ-induced diabetic rats.

  5. DNA aptamer raised against advanced glycation end products (AGEs) improves glycemic control and decreases adipocyte size in fructose-fed rats by suppressing AGE-RAGE axis.

    PubMed

    Ojima, A; Matsui, T; Nakamura, N; Higashimoto, Y; Ueda, S; Fukami, K; Okuda, S; Yamagishi, S

    2015-04-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) decrease adiponectin expression and suppress insulin signaling in cultured adipocytes through the interaction with a receptor for AGEs (RAGE) via oxidative stress generation. We have recently found that high-affinity DNA aptamer directed against AGE (AGE-aptamer) prevents the progression of experimental diabetic nephropathy by blocking the harmful actions of AGEs in the kidney. This study examined the effects of AGE-aptamer on adipocyte remodeling, AGE-RAGE-oxidative stress axis, and adiponectin expression in fructose-fed rats. Although AGE-aptamer treatment by an osmotic mini pump for 8 weeks did not affect serum insulin levels, it significantly decreased average fasting blood glucose and had a tendency to inhibit body weight gain in fructose-fed rats. Furthermore, AGE-aptamer significantly suppressed the increase in adipocyte size and prevented the elevation in AGEs, RAGE, and an oxidative stress marker, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), levels in adipose tissues of fructose-fed rats at 14-week-old, while it restored the decrease in adiponectin mRNA levels. Our present study suggests that AGE-aptamer could improve glycemic control and prevent adipocyte remodeling in fructose-fed rats partly by suppressing the AGE-RAGE-mediated oxidative stress generation. AGE-aptamer might be a novel therapeutic strategy for fructose-induced metabolic derangements.

  6. Long-term ketogenic diet contributes to glycemic control but promotes lipid accumulation and hepatic steatosis in type 2 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Qin, Juliang; Zhao, Yihan; Shi, Jueping; Lan, Rong; Gan, Yunqiu; Ren, Hua; Zhu, Bing; Qian, Min; Du, Bing

    2016-04-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) has been widely used in weight and glycemic control, although potential side effects of long-term KD treatment have caused persistent concern. In this study, we hypothesized that the KD would ameliorate the progression of diabetes but lead to disruptions in lipid metabolism and hepatic steatosis in a mouse model of diabetes. In type 2 diabetic mouse model, mice were fed a high-fat diet and administered streptozotocin treatment before given the test diets for 8 weeks. Subsequently, ameliorated glucose and insulin tolerance in KD-fed diabetic mice was found, although the body weight of high-fat diet- and KD-fed mice was similar. Interestingly, the weight of adipose tissue in KD mice was greater than in the other groups. The KD diet resulted in higher serum triacylglycerol and cholesterol levels in diabetic mice. Moreover, the KD-fed mice showed greater hepatic lipid accumulation. Mice fed the KD showed significant changes in several key genes such as sterol regulatory element-binding protein, fibroblast growth factor 21, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α, which are all important in metabolism. In summary, KD ameliorates glucose and insulin tolerance in a mouse model of diabetes, but severe hepatic lipid accumulation and hepatic steatosis were observed, which should be considered carefully in the long-term application of KD.

  7. The impact of sleep amount and sleep quality on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shaun Wen Huey; Ng, Khuen Yen; Chin, Weng Khong

    2017-02-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have suggested that there is an association between glycemic control and sleep disturbances in patients with type 2 diabetes, but the extent is unclear. A systematic literature search was performed in nine electronic databases from inception until August 2015 without any language restriction. The search identified 20 studies (eight studies reporting duration of sleep and 15 studies evaluating sleep quality), and 15 were included in the meta-analysis. Short and long sleep durations were associated with an increased hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) (weighted mean difference (WMD): 0.23% [0.10-0.36], short sleep; WMD: 0.13% [0.02-0.25], long sleep) compared to normal sleep, suggesting a U-shaped dose-response relationship. Similarly, poor sleep quality was associated with an increased HbA1c (WMD: 0.35% [0.12-0.58]). Results of this study suggest that amount of sleep as well as quality of sleep is important in the metabolic function of type 2 diabetes patients. Further studies are needed to identify for the potential causal role between sleep and altered glucose metabolism.

  8. Patterns of Family Functioning and Diabetes-Specific Conflict in Relation to Glycemic Control and Health-Related Quality of Life Among Youth With Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rybak, Tiffany M; Ali, Jeanelle S; Berlin, Kristoffer S; Klages, Kimberly L; Banks, Gabrielle G; Kamody, Rebecca C; Ferry, Robert J; Alemzadeh, Ramin; Diaz-Thomas, Alicia M

    2016-08-28

    OBJECTIVE : General and diabetes-specific family functioning may be associated with youth's adaptation to type 1 diabetes (T1D); however, empirically derived patterns of family functioning and diabetes-specific conflict among youth have not been explored in relation to T1D adaptation.  METHODS:  Youth (N = 161, aged 12-18) with T1D and caregivers completed measures of family functioning and diabetes-specific conflict that served as indicators in latent profile analyses. Differences in glycemic control (measured by hemoglobin A1cs [HbA1c] and health-related quality of life [HRQoL]) were compared across profiles.  RESULTS : Four profiles that varied by levels of family functioning, diabetes-specific conflict, and congruence between youth and caregiver perspectives emerged and related to T1D adaptation differently. Greater agreement between caregiver and youth and lower diabetes-specific conflict was associated with lower HbA1c and greater HRQoL.  CONCLUSIONS : Person-centered approaches are useful to quantify how many individuals fit into a particular pattern and determine how specific family dynamics may function together differently in relation to T1D adaptation for various subgroups of the population.

  9. Adiponectin levels in south Indian children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and nondiabetic children and its correlation with anthropometry and glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Solomon, J Ritchie Sharon; Varadarajan, Poovazhagi; Varadarajan, V Poovazhagi

    2013-09-01

    Studies have reported high adiponectin levels in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Adiponectin has been found to have anti-atherogenic action and other protective functions. We wanted to estimate adiponectin level in south Indian T1DM children and compare it with that of non-diabetic children and study its correlation with anthropometry and glycemic status. Sixty children with T1DM and forty non-diabetic children of age less than 15 years were analysed. Mean adiponectin level was higher in T1DM group than in non diabetic group (p < 0.001) irrespective of the age group or sex. Negative correlation was observed between SFT- triceps and adiponectin in diabetic and control group. Multiple regression coefficient analysis of various parameters showed SFT- triceps as a statistically significant predictor of adiponectin level (p = 0.001). We conclude that, children with T1DM had higher adiponectin level than non-diabetic children. Low SFT- triceps measuremet may be a predictor of higher adiponectin level.

  10. The Type 2 Deiodinase Thr92Ala Polymorphism Is Associated with Worse Glycemic Control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jie; Han, Wenqing; Peng, Shiqiao; Shan, Zhongyan

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Type 2 deiodinase (Dio2) is an enzyme responsible for the conversion of T4 to T3. The Thr92Ala polymorphism has been shown related to an increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The aim of this study is to assess the association between this polymorphism and glycemic control in T2DM patients as marked by the HbA1C levels. Design and Methods. The terms “rs225014,” “thr92ala,” “T92A,” or “dio2 a/g” were used to search for eligible studies in the PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane databases and Google Scholar. A systematic review and meta-analysis of studies including both polymorphism testing and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) assays were performed. Results. Four studies were selected, totaling 2190 subjects. The pooled mean difference of the studies was 0.48% (95% CI, 0.18–0.77%), indicating that type 2 diabetics homozygous for the Dio2 Thr92Ala polymorphism had higher HbA1C levels. Conclusions. Homozygosity for the Dio2 Thr92Ala polymorphism is associated with higher HbA1C levels in T2DM patients. To confirm this conclusion, more studies of larger populations are needed. PMID:27777960

  11. Immunoneutralization of endogenous glucagon reduces hepatic glucose output and improves long-term glycemic control in diabetic ob/ob mice.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Heidi; Brand, Christian L; Neschen, Susanne; Holst, Jens Juul; Fosgerau, Keld; Nishimura, Erica; Shulman, Gerald I

    2006-10-01

    In type 2 diabetes, glucagon levels are elevated in relation to the prevailing insulin and glucose levels. The relative hyperglucagonemia is linked to increased hepatic glucose output (HGO) and hyperglycemia. Antagonizing the effects of glucagon is therefore considered an attractive target for treatment of type 2 diabetes. In the current study, effects of eliminating glucagon signaling with a glucagon monoclonal antibody (mAb) were investigated in the diabetic ob/ob mouse. Acute effects of inhibiting glucagon action were studied by an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and by measurement of HGO. In addition, the effects of subchronic (5 and 14 days) glucagon mAb treatment on plasma glucose, insulin, triglycerides, and HbA1c (A1C) levels were investigated. Glucagon mAb treatment reduced the area under the curve for glucose after an OGTT, reduced HGO, and increased the rate of hepatic glycogen synthesis. Glucagon mAb treatment for 5 days lowered plasma glucose and triglyceride levels, whereas 14 days of glucagon mAb treatment reduced A1C. In conclusion, acute and subchronic neutralization of endogenous glucagon improves glycemic control, thus supporting the contention that glucagon antagonism may represent a beneficial treatment of diabetes.

  12. Fixed-dose combination of alogliptin/pioglitazone improves glycemic control in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus independent of body mass index.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Chie; Suzuki, Kunihiro; Kuroda, Hisamoto; Sagara, Masaaki; Shimizu, Masanori; Kasai, Kikuo; Aso, Yoshimasa

    2017-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of switching from combination therapy with either alogliptin (Alo) or pioglitazone (Pio) to fixed-dose combination therapy (FDCT) with alogliptin and pioglitazone (Alo-Pio FDCT). The usefulness and efficacy of Alo-Pio FDCT were investigated. A total of 50 outpatients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) treated with Alo and 47 outpatients with T2DM treated with Pio were switched to Alo-Pio FDCT, and its efficacy and usefulness were evaluated. Significant improvements were observed in hemoglobinA1c (HbA1c), alanine transaminase (ALT), and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) levels after switching to Alo-Pio FDCT for 16 weeks in both groups. Only the group switching from Alo to Alo-Pio FDCT showed significant improvements in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) levels and triglyceride levels. In a multivariate logistic regression model of the variation in the change of HbA1c at 16 weeks, ALT and GGT were independent predictors of the change of HbA1c at 16 weeks. In addition, the switch to Alo-Pio FDCT improved glycemic control to a certain degree regardless of BMI. Switching from either Alo or Pio to Alo-PIO FDCT may, unlike monotherapy with a DPP-4 inhibitor, be effective for patients with T2DM regardless of whether they are obese or lean.

  13. Effects of the nephrilin peptide on post-burn glycemic control, renal function, fat and lean body mass, and wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Mascarenhas, Desmond D; Ayadi, Amina El; Wetzel, Michael; Prasai, Anesh; Mifflin, Randy; Jay, Jayson; Herndon, David N; Finnerty, Celeste C

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the effects of severe burn trauma are not well understood. We previously demonstrated the ability of nephrilin peptide (an iron-binding peptide believed to enter cells through iron-uptake pathways) to suppress aspects of the neuroinflammatory response in a rat scald model, as well as sepsis mortality in a mouse model. This study explores the effect of nephrilin on other clinically relevant outcomes in the rat scald model. In a rat scald model, animals were treated with nephrilin either in week 1 or week 2 post-burn. Measurements were made of serum glucose and creatinine as well as wound area by planimetry and body composition by DEXA. Given the potential role of iron, results were analyzed both for the entire cohort of animals and for the normoferremic (>100 ug/dL serum iron) subset of animals. Nephrilin improved body composition, wound healing, kidney function, and glycemic control. The first two effects were significant in normoferremic but not in hypoferremic animals suggesting an effect of iron status on burn injury outcomes. Nephrilin treatment modulates a number of relevant variables in the rat scald model. PMID:28078180

  14. Fixed-dose combination of alogliptin/pioglitazone improves glycemic control in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus independent of body mass index

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Chie; Suzuki, Kunihiro; Kuroda, Hisamoto; Sagara, Masaaki; Shimizu, Masanori; Kasai, Kikuo; Aso, Yoshimasa

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study investigated the effects of switching from combination therapy with either alogliptin (Alo) or pioglitazone (Pio) to fixed-dose combination therapy (FDCT) with alogliptin and pioglitazone (Alo-Pio FDCT). The usefulness and efficacy of Alo-Pio FDCT were investigated. A total of 50 outpatients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) treated with Alo and 47 outpatients with T2DM treated with Pio were switched to Alo-Pio FDCT, and its efficacy and usefulness were evaluated. Significant improvements were observed in hemoglobinA1c (HbA1c), alanine transaminase (ALT), and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) levels after switching to Alo-Pio FDCT for 16 weeks in both groups. Only the group switching from Alo to Alo-Pio FDCT showed significant improvements in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) levels and triglyceride levels. In a multivariate logistic regression model of the variation in the change of HbA1c at 16 weeks, ALT and GGT were independent predictors of the change of HbA1c at 16 weeks. In addition, the switch to Alo-Pio FDCT improved glycemic control to a certain degree regardless of BMI. Switching from either Alo or Pio to Alo-PIO FDCT may, unlike monotherapy with a DPP-4 inhibitor, be effective for patients with T2DM regardless of whether they are obese or lean. PMID:28303056

  15. Markers of glycemic control in the mouse: comparisons of 6-h- and overnight-fasted blood glucoses to Hb A1c.

    PubMed

    Han, Byoung Geun; Hao, Chuan-Ming; Tchekneva, Elena E; Wang, Ying-Ying; Lee, Chieh Allen; Ebrahim, Benyamin; Harris, Raymond C; Kern, Timothy S; Wasserman, David H; Breyer, Matthew D; Qi, Zhonghua

    2008-10-01

    The present studies examined the relationship between fasting blood glucose and Hb A(1c) in C57BL/6J, DBA/2J, and KK/HlJ mice with and without diabetes mellitus. Daily averaged blood glucose levels based on continuous glucose monitoring and effects of 6-h vs. overnight fasting on blood glucose were determined. Daily averaged blood glucose levels were highly correlated with Hb A(1c), as determined with a hand-held automated device using an immunodetection method. R(2) values were 0.90, 0.95, and 0.99 in KK/HIJ, C57BL/6J, and DBA/2J, respectively. Six-hour fasting blood glucose correlated more closely with the level of daily averaged blood glucose and with Hb A(1c) than did blood glucose following an overnight fast. To validate the immunoassay-determined Hb A(1c), we also measured total glycosylated hemoglobin using boronate HPLC. Hb A(1c) values correlated well with total glycosylated hemoglobin in all three strains but were relatively lower than total glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetic DBA/2J mice. These results show that 6-h fasting glucose provides a superior index of glycemic control and correlates more closely with Hb A(1c) than overnight-fasted blood glucose in these strains of mice.

  16. Group of Signs: A New Method to Evaluate Glycemic Variability

    PubMed Central

    Zaccardi, Francesco; Stefano, Paola Di; Busetto, Elena; Federici, Marco Orsini; Manto, Andrea; Infusino, Fabio; Lanza, Gaetano Antonio; Pitocco, Dario; Ghirlanda, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    Background Glycemic variability is an important parameter used to resolve potential clinical problems in diabetic patients. It is known that glycemic variability generates oxidative stress and potentially contributes to the development of macro- and microvascular complications in diabetes. By controlling glycemic variability, it is possible to reduce these complications and to set the therapy for all patients with diabetes. The aims of this study were to (1) propose a new standardized, objective, and flexible approach to measure glycemic variability by a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS)—the group of signs (GOS) method; (2) compare the correlation between mean amplitude of glucose excursion (MAGE), a well-known index of glycemic variability calculated by the physician and the MAGE defined with the GOS method, in order to validate the GOS; and (3) suggest new indexes of glycemic variability. Methods We tested the GOS algorithm on data collected by a CGMS every 5 minutes for 24 hours on 50 patients. Consequently, for 8 patients we calculated and compared the physician's MAGE in the standard way and by the GOS method. Results Comparison between the two methods has shown high correlations, from a minimum correlation of 86% to a maximum of 98%, with p values <0.01 (Pearson test). Conclusions Preliminary data suggest that the proposed algorithm is a valid, efficient, and reliable method able to calculate the standard MAGE on CGMS data systematically and to create other alternative glycemic variability indexes. PMID:19885294

  17. Canagliflozin Compared With Sitagliptin for Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Who Do Not Have Adequate Glycemic Control With Metformin Plus Sulfonylurea

    PubMed Central

    Schernthaner, Guntram; Gross, Jorge L.; Rosenstock, Julio; Guarisco, Michael; Fu, Min; Yee, Jacqueline; Kawaguchi, Masato; Canovatchel, William; Meininger, Gary

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the efficacy and safety of canagliflozin, a sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor, compared with sitagliptin in subjects with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled with metformin plus sulfonylurea. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In this 52-week, randomized, double-blind, active-controlled, phase 3 study, subjects using stable metformin plus sulfonylurea (N = 755) received canagliflozin 300 mg or sitagliptin 100 mg daily. Primary end point was change from baseline in A1C at 52 weeks. Secondary end points included change in fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and systolic blood pressure (BP), and percent change in body weight, triglycerides, and HDL cholesterol. Safety was assessed based on adverse event (AE) reports. RESULTS At 52 weeks, canagliflozin 300 mg demonstrated noninferiority and, in a subsequent assessment, showed superiority to sitagliptin 100 mg in reducing A1C (−1.03% [−11.3 mmol/mol] and −0.66% [−7.2 mmol/mol], respectively; least squares mean difference between groups, −0.37% [95% CI, −0.50 to −0.25] or −4.0 mmol/mol [−5.5 to −2.7]). Greater reductions in FPG, body weight, and systolic BP were observed with canagliflozin versus sitagliptin (P < 0.001). Overall AE rates were similar with canagliflozin (76.7%) and sitagliptin (77.5%); incidence of serious AEs and AE-related discontinuations was low for both groups. Higher incidences of genital mycotic infections and osmotic diuresis–related AEs were observed with canagliflozin, which led to one discontinuation. Hypoglycemia rates were similar in both groups. CONCLUSIONS Findings suggest that canagliflozin may be a new therapeutic tool providing better improvement in glycemic control and body weight reduction than sitagliptin, but with increased genital infections in subjects with type 2 diabetes using metformin plus sulfonylurea. PMID:23564919

  18. A global study of the unmet need for glycemic control and predictor factors among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who have achieved optimal fasting plasma glucose control on basal insulin

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Engels; Colagiuri, Stephen; Gaàl, Zsolt; Lavalle, Fernando; Mkrtumyan, Ashot; Nikonova, Elena; Tentolouris, Nikolaos; Vidal, Josep; Davies, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background This study used data from different sources to identify the extent of the unmet need for postprandial glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) after the initiation of basal insulin therapy in Europe, Asia Pacific, the United States, and Latin America. Methods Different levels of evidence were used as available for each country/region, with data extracted from seven randomized controlled trials (RCTs), three clinical trial registries (CTRs), and three electronic medical record (EMR) databases. Glycemic status was categorized as “well controlled” (glycated hemoglobin [HbA1c] at target [<7%]), “residual hyperglycemia” (fasting plasma glucose [FPG] but not HbA1c at target [FPG <7.2/7.8 mmol/L, <130/140 mg/dL, depending on country‐specific recommendations]), or “uncontrolled” (both FPG and HbA1c above target). Predictor factors were identified from the RCT data set using logistic regression analysis. Results RCT data showed that 16.9% to 28.0%, 42.7% to 54.4%, and 16.9% to 38.1% of patients with T2DM had well‐controlled glycemia, residual hyperglycemia, and uncontrolled hyperglycemia, respectively. In CTRs, respective ranges were 21.8% to 33.6%, 31.5% to 35.6%, and 30.7% to 46.8%, and in EMR databases were 4.4% to 21.0%, 23.9% to 31.8%, and 53.6% to 63.8%. Significant predictor factors of residual hyperglycemia identified from RCT data included high baseline HbA1c (all countries/regions except Brazil), high baseline FPG (United Kingdom/Japan), longer duration of diabetes (Brazil), and female sex (Europe/Latin America). Conclusions Irrespective of intrinsic differences between data sources, 24% to 54% of patients with T2DM globally had residual hyperglycemia with HbA1c not at target, despite achieving FPG control, indicating a significant unmet need for postprandial glycemic control. PMID:27606888

  19. Differentiating Approaches to Diabetes Self-Management of Multi-Ethnic Rural Older Adults at the Extremes of Glycemic Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer-Lowry, Aleshia Nichol; Arcury, Thomas A.; Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: This study identified approaches to diabetes self-management that differentiate persons with well-controlled from poorly controlled diabetes. Previous research has focused largely on persons participating in self-management interventions. Design and Methods: In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 48 adults, drawn…

  20. Insulin pump use and glycemic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes: Predictors of change in method of insulin delivery across two years.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jenise C; Dolan, Lawrence M; Yang, Tony T; Hood, Korey K

    2015-12-01

    Few studies have explored durability of insulin pump use, and none have explored the link between depression and pump discontinuation. To examine the relationship between depressive symptoms [measured by the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI)], method of insulin delivery, and hemoglobin A1c (A1c), mixed models were used with data from 150 adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and visits every 6 months for 2 years. Of the 63% who used a pump, compared with multiple daily injections (MDI) at baseline, there were higher proportions who were non-minorities, had caregivers with a college degree, private insurance, and two caregivers in the home (p ≤ 0.01). After adjusting for time, sex, age, T1D duration, frequency of blood glucose monitoring, ethnicity, insurance, and caregiver number and education, baseline pump use was associated with -0.79% lower mean A1c [95% confidence interval (CI): -1.48, -0.096; p = 0.03]. For those using a pump at baseline, but switching to MDI during the study (n = 9), mean A1c was 1.38% higher (95% CI: 0.68, 2.08; p < 0.001) than that for those who did not switch method of delivery. A 10-point increase in CDI was associated with a 0.39% increase in A1c (95% CI: 0.16, 0.61; p = 0.001), independent of pump use. Regarding the temporal relationship between CDI score and changing method of insulin delivery, prior higher CDI score was associated with switching from pump to MDI (odds ratio = 1.21; 95% CI: 1.05, 1.39; p = 0.007). Clinicians should be aware of the associations between depressive symptoms, change in insulin delivery method, and the effect on glycemic control.

  1. Impact of Information Technology–Based Interventions for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus on Glycemic Control: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Alharbi, Nouf Sahal; Alsubki, Nada; Jones, Simon; Khunti, Kamlesh; Munro, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Background Information technology–based interventions are increasingly being used to manage health care. However, there is conflicting evidence regarding whether these interventions improve outcomes in people with type 2 diabetes. Objective The objective of this study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical trials, assessing the impact of information technology on changes in the levels of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and mapping the interventions with chronic care model (CCM) elements. Methods Electronic databases PubMed and EMBASE were searched to identify relevant studies that were published up until July 2016, a method that was supplemented by identifying articles from the references of the articles already selected using the electronic search tools. The study search and selection were performed by independent reviewers. Of the 1082 articles retrieved, 32 trials (focusing on a total of 40,454 patients) were included. A random-effects model was applied to estimate the pooled results. Results Information technology–based interventions were associated with a statistically significant reduction in HbA1c levels (mean difference −0.33%, 95% CI −0.40 to −0.26, P<.001). Studies focusing on electronic self-management systems demonstrated the largest reduction in HbA1c (0.50%), followed by those with electronic medical records (0.17%), an electronic decision support system (0.15%), and a diabetes registry (0.05%). In addition, the more CCM-incorporated the information technology–based interventions were, the more improvements there were in HbA1c levels. Conclusions Information technology strategies combined with the other elements of chronic care models are associated with improved glycemic control in people with diabetes. No clinically relevant impact was observed on low-density lipoprotein levels and blood pressure, but there was evidence that the cost of care was lower. PMID:27888169

  2. Excretion rates of 1,5-anhydro-D-glucitol, uric acid and microalbuminuria as glycemic control indexes in patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Cong; Sheng, Junqin; Liu, Zhiwen; Guo, Minghao

    2017-01-01

    1,5-anhydroglucitol (1,5-AG), uric acid and urinary proteins are excreted into the urine with increasing glucosuria. In the present retrospective study we analyzed whether these factors could be used as indicators for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) glucose control in 6,766 (T2DM) patients. There were 3,988 cases (58.9%) with HbA1c ≤ 6.5%, 853 cases (12.61%) with HbA1c levels ranging from 6.5% to 7% and 1,925 cases (28.5%) with HbA1c > 7%. HbA1c percentages were correlated with age, MA and 1,5-AG serum concentrations (P < 0.001). The serum uric acid concentration (P < 0.001) was significantly lower in elevated MA (P < 0.001) and 24-hour urinary protein (P = 0.024) patients. Hb1Ac percentages (P < 0.001) were significantly enhanced in patients with 1,5-AG serum concentrations ≤10 mg/L compared to >10 mg/L. With a derived receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, a 1,5-AG cut-off value of 11.55 mg/L for hyperglycemia could be diagnosed with a specificity of 71.2 (69.7–72.6) and a sensitivity of 75.3 (73.6–76.9). The serum 1,5-AG concentration is a marker for hyperglycemia and may be particularly useful as an indicator for short-term glycemic excursions in order to improve treatments in T2DM patients. PMID:28281675

  3. COH-SR4 Reduces Body Weight, Improves Glycemic Control and Prevents Hepatic Steatosis in High Fat Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Figarola, James Lester; Singhal, Preeti; Rahbar, Samuel; Gugiu, Bogdan Gabriel; Awasthi, Sanjay; Singhal, Sharad S.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic metabolic disorder caused by imbalance between energy intake and expenditure, and is one of the principal causative factors in the development of metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cancer. COH-SR4 (“SR4”) is a novel investigational compound that has anti-cancer and anti-adipogenic properties. In this study, the effects of SR4 on metabolic alterations in high fat diet (HFD)-induced obese C57BL/J6 mice were investigated. Oral feeding of SR4 (5 mg/kg body weight.) in HFD mice for 6 weeks significantly reduced body weight, prevented hyperlipidemia and improved glycemic control without affecting food intake. These changes were associated with marked decreases in epididymal fat mass, adipocyte hypertrophy, increased plasma adiponectin and reduced leptin levels. SR4 treatment also decreased liver triglycerides, prevented hepatic steatosis, and normalized liver enzymes. Western blots demonstrated increased AMPK activation in liver and adipose tissues of SR4-treated HFD obese mice, while gene analyses by real time PCR showed COH-SR4 significantly suppressed the mRNA expression of lipogenic genes such as sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (Srebf1), acetyl-Coenzyme A carboxylase (Acaca), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (Pparg), fatty acid synthase (Fasn), stearoyl-Coenzyme A desaturase 1 (Scd1), carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a (Cpt1a) and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (Hmgcr), as well as gluconeogenic genes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (Pck1) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6pc) in the liver of obese mice. In vitro, SR4 activates AMPK independent of upstream kinases liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ). Together, these data suggest that SR4, a novel AMPK activator, may be a promising therapeutic compound for treatment of obesity, fatty liver disease, and related metabolic disorders. PMID:24376752

  4. The Effects of Disease Management on Glycemic Control and Adherence to American Diabetes Association Guidelines in an Air Force Population

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-04-24

    diagnosis , a higher proportion of type 2 diabetics demonstrate microalbuminuria and overt nephropathy shortly after diagnosis . This is strong evidence of the...Management 3 In pregnancy , diabetes is associated with fetal birth abnormalities, newborn death, macrosomia (large birth weight), hydramnios (excess amniotic...fluid), and toxemia of pregnancy . Optimal blood glucose control from conception through birth is essential for the health of the mother and baby

  5. Serum Visfatin and Fetuin-A Levels and Glycemic Control in Patients with Obese Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Gunduz, Fethiye Oztop; Temizel, Mustafa; Faki, Yilmaz; Cakmak, Mustafa; Durmuscan, Mustafa; Sezgin, Funda

    2011-01-01

    Background Visfatin is an adipokine produced by visceral adipose tissue and has insulin-mimicking effects. Fetuin-A is a hepatic secretory protein that binds the insulin receptor and inhibits insulin action both in vivo and in vitro. The authors of the present study aimed to investigate the levels of serum visfatin and fetuin-A and their correlation with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and urine albumin levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods A total of 40 obese patients with T2DM (11 males and 29 females; age, 54.47±10.83 years and 23 obese nondiabetic controls (8 males and 15 females; age, 53.04±11.33 years) were included in the study. Age, sex, and body mass index were similar in the 2 groups. Serum visfatin and fetuin-A levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. HbA1c and urine albumin levels were measured by high performance liquid chromatography and nephelometric method, respectively. Results Serum levels of visfatin in patients with T2DM (4.03±2.44 ng/mL) were similar to the control group (3.65±3.02 ng/mL). Serum fetuin-A levels were significantly lower in patients with T2DM than the controls (298.75±78.86 and 430.73±94.46 µg/mL, respectively). HbA1c levels were significantly higher in the T2DM group compared with controls (7.33±1.32 and 5.44±0.84%, respectively). Correlations between visfatin, fetuin-A and HbA1c levels were not observed. Conclusion The present study suggests fetuin-A may play a role in the pathogenesis of T2DM. PMID:22111044

  6. Medicinal mushrooms for glycemic control in diabetes mellitus: history, current status, future perspectives, and unsolved problems (review).

    PubMed

    Lo, Hui-Chen; Wasser, Solomon P

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic metabolic disease characterized by hyperglycemia with defects in insulin secretion and/or insulin resistance. Despite great efforts that have been made in the understanding and management of diabetes, its prevalence continues to grow. Recent discoveries have opened up an exciting opportunity for developing new types of therapeutics from medicinal mushrooms to control DM and its complications. To date, more and more active components including polysaccharides and their protein complexes, dietary fibers, and other compounds extracted from fruiting bodies, cultured mycelium, or cultured broth of medicinal mushrooms have been reported as to having anti-hyperglycemic activity. These compounds exhibit their antidiabetic activity via different mechanisms. This article presents an overview of the multiple aspects of diabetes mellitus and the efficacy and mechanism of medicinal mushrooms for glucose control in diabetes, including the inhibition of glucose absorption, protection of beta-cell damage, increase of insulin release, enhancement of antioxidant defense, attenuation of inflammation, modulation of carbohydrate metabolism pathway, and regulation of insulin-dependent and insulin-independent signaling pathways. However, there is insufficient evidence to draw definitive conclusions about the efficacy of individual medicinal mushrooms for diabetes. In addition, the wide variability, the lack of standards for production, and the lack of testing protocols to assess product quality are still problems in producing medicinal mushroom products. Moreover, well-designed randomized controlled trials with long-term consumption are needed to guarantee the bioactivity and safety of medicinal mushroom products for diabetic patients.

  7. Dietary carbohydrate intake, glycemic load, glycemic index and ovarian cancer risk in African-American women

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Bo; Moorman, Patricia G.; Alberg, Anthony J.; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Bondy, Melissa; Cote, Michelle L.; Funkhouser, Ellen; Peters, Edward S.; Schwartz, Ann G.; Terry, Paul; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Bandera, Elisa V.

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiologic evidence regarding the association between carbohydrate intake, glycemic load and glycemic index and risk of ovarian cancer has been mixed. Little is known about their impact on ovarian cancer risk in African-American women. Associations between carbohydrate quantity and quality and ovarian cancer risk were investigated among 406 cases and 609 controls using data from the African American Cancer Epidemiology Study (AACES). AACES is an ongoing population-based case-control study of ovarian cancer in African Americans in the US. Cases were identified through rapid case ascertainment and age- and site-matched controls were identified by random-digit-dialing. Dietary information over the year preceding diagnosis or the reference date was obtained using a food frequency questionnaire. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for covariates. The ORs comparing the highest quartile of total carbohydrate intake and total sugars intake versus the lowest quartile were 1.57 (95% CI 1.08, 2.28; p-trend=0.03) and 1.61 (95% CI 1.12, 2.30; p-trend<0.01) respectively. A suggestion of an inverse association was found for fiber intake. Higher glycemic load was positively associated with the risk of ovarian cancer (OR 1.18 for each 10 units/1,000 kcal; 95% CI 1.04, 1.33). No associations were observed for starch or glycemic index. Our findings suggest that high intake of total sugars and glycemic load are associated with greater risk of ovarian cancer in African-American women. PMID:26669283

  8. Glycemic control and lipid profile of children and adolescents undergoing two different dietetic treatments for type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Dalsgaard, Haline; Saunders, Cláudia; Padilha, Patrícia de C; Luescher, Jorge Luiz; Szundy Berardo, Renata; Accioly, Elizabeth

    2014-03-01

    Objetivo: Comparar el control glucémico y el perfil lipídico de niños y adolescentes sometidos a dos tratamientos dietéticos distintos para la diabetes mellitus tipo 1 atendidos en el Centro de Salud para Niños y Adolescentes con Diabetes Mellitus-UFRJ. Métodos: Estudio longitudinal retrospectivo realizado entre 2002 y 2006. Evaluamos a los mismos individuos en dos momentos distintos: tras un año en tratamiento para diabetes (TD) y posteriormente tras un año con conteo de hidratos de carbono (CHC). La evolución del estado nutricional durante los tratamientos dietéticos se evaluó empleando el índice de masa corporal (IMC) para la edad. El panel de lípidos se evaluó de acuerdo con la 1ª Guía para la prevención de la aterosclerosis en la infancia y adolescencia, empleada en Brasil, y el control glucémico se evaluó midiendo la hemoglobina glucosilada (HbA1c). Resultados: Evaluamos a 93 individuos, 38,7 % niños y 61,3 % adolescentes. La edad promedio en el momento de entrada en el estudio fue de 11,1 (± 2,66) años y la el promedio de duración de la enfermedad fue de 6,1 (± 3,2) años. Se encontró una diferencia significativa en el porcentaje de adecuación de la HbA1c (p = 0,000) y en los valores del colesterol plasmático total (p = 0,043) tras un año de dieta con CHC, lo cual no ocurrió durante el periodo de observación de TD. La evolución del estado nutricional antropométrico no mostró diferencias significativas entre el inicio y el final de ninguno de los tratamientos dietéticos. Conclusión: Los resultados de este estudio sugieren que un programa de orientación alimentaria más flexible puede contribuir a la mejora de la glucemia sin producir un deterioro del perfil lipídico en comparación con el TD.

  9. Resveratrol increases glucose induced GLP-1 secretion in mice: a mechanism which contributes to the glycemic control.

    PubMed

    Dao, Thi-Mai Anh; Waget, Aurélie; Klopp, Pascale; Serino, Matteo; Vachoux, Christelle; Pechere, Laurent; Drucker, Daniel J; Champion, Serge; Barthélemy, Sylvain; Barra, Yves; Burcelin, Rémy; Sérée, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Resveratrol (RSV) is a potent anti-diabetic agent when used at high doses. However, the direct targets primarily responsible for the beneficial actions of RSV remain unclear. We used a formulation that increases oral bioavailability to assess the mechanisms involved in the glucoregulatory action of RSV in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed diabetic wild type mice. Administration of RSV for 5 weeks reduced the development of glucose intolerance, and increased portal vein concentrations of both Glucagon-like peptid-1 (GLP-1) and insulin, and intestinal content of active GLP-1. This was associated with increased levels of colonic proglucagon mRNA transcripts. RSV-mediated glucoregulation required a functional GLP-1 receptor (Glp1r) as neither glucose nor insulin levels were modulated in Glp1r-/- mice. Conversely, levels of active GLP-1 and control of glycemia were further improved when the Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor sitagliptin was co-administered with RSV. In addition, RSV treatment modified gut microbiota and decreased the inflammatory status of mice. Our data suggest that RSV exerts its actions in part through modulation of the enteroendocrine axis in vivo.

  10. Resveratrol Increases Glucose Induced GLP-1 Secretion in Mice: A Mechanism which Contributes to the Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Dao, Thi-Mai Anh; Waget, Aurélie; Klopp, Pascale; Serino, Matteo; Vachoux, Christelle; Pechere, Laurent; Drucker, Daniel J.; Champion, Serge; Barthélemy, Sylvain; Barra, Yves; Burcelin, Rémy; Sérée, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Resveratrol (RSV) is a potent anti-diabetic agent when used at high doses. However, the direct targets primarily responsible for the beneficial actions of RSV remain unclear. We used a formulation that increases oral bioavailability to assess the mechanisms involved in the glucoregulatory action of RSV in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed diabetic wild type mice. Administration of RSV for 5 weeks reduced the development of glucose intolerance, and increased portal vein concentrations of both Glucagon-like peptid-1 (GLP-1) and insulin, and intestinal content of active GLP-1. This was associated with increased levels of colonic proglucagon mRNA transcripts. RSV-mediated glucoregulation required a functional GLP-1 receptor (Glp1r) as neither glucose nor insulin levels were modulated in Glp1r-/- mice. Conversely, levels of active GLP-1 and control of glycemia were further improved when the Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor sitagliptin was co-administered with RSV. In addition, RSV treatment modified gut microbiota and decreased the inflammatory status of mice. Our data suggest that RSV exerts its actions in part through modulation of the enteroendocrine axis in vivo. PMID:21673955

  11. Differences in glycemic control across world regions: a post-hoc analysis in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on dual antidiabetes drug therapy

    PubMed Central

    Brath, H; Paldánius, P M; Bader, G; Kolaczynski, W M; Nilsson, P M

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This post-hoc analysis of the EDGE (Effectiveness of Diabetes control with vildaGliptin and vildagliptin/mEtformin) study assessed inter-regional differences in baseline characteristics and response to treatment intensification with dual oral antidiabetes drugs (OADs) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods: Patients with T2DM inadequately controlled with first-line monotherapy were assigned to receive a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, vildagliptin, or comparator OADs as add-on dual therapy. The primary effectiveness end point (PEP) was achieving glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) reduction >0.3% without hypoglycemia, peripheral edema, discontinuation owing to gastrointestinal events or weight gain ⩾5% at 12 months. The secondary effectiveness end point (SEP) was achieving HbA1c of <7% without hypoglycemia or weight gain ⩾3% at 12 months. Results: Baseline characteristics of patients (N=43 791), including mean HbA1c (8.2%), varied across regions. Baseline age (62.3 years) and T2DM duration (6.3 years) were greater in patients from Europe than those from India and the Middle East (age: 51.8 and 52.1 years; T2DM duration: 4.3 and 4.2 years, respectively). The probability of achieving PEP with dual therapy was higher in India (odds ratio (OR): 1.5), Latin America (OR: 1.2) and Middle East (OR: 2.0) than in Europe (OR: 0.8) and East Asia (OR: 0.3). Achievement of SEP in patients receiving dual therapy was greater in Latin America (OR: 1.7) and Middle East (OR: 1.7). Vildagliptin add-on therapy allowed more patients to achieve SEP across regions. Women aged ⩾45 years less often attained glycemic target (HbA1c<7%) without significant weight gain ⩾5% compared with women aged <45 years (OR: 0.876, 95% confidence interval: 0.774, 0.992; P=0.037). Conclusions: Baseline HbA1c and T2DM duration differed considerably across all regions. Treatment intensification with second OAD, particularly with a DPP-4 inhibitor vildagliptin, resulted

  12. Real-world evaluation of glycemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus treated with canagliflozin versus dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Thayer, Sarah; Chow, Wing; Korrer, Stephanie; Aguilar, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Objective To evaluate glycemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) treated with canagliflozin (CANA) vs. dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors. Methods Using integrated claims and lab data from a US health plan of commercial and Medicare Advantage enrollees, this matched-control cohort study assessed adult T2DM patients receiving treatment with CANA or DPP-4 inhibitors (1 April 2013-31 December 2013). Cohorts were chosen hierarchically; the first pharmacy claim for CANA was identified as the index date; then the first pharmacy claim for a DPP-4 inhibitor was identified and index date set. Eligible patients had 6 months of continuous health plan enrollment before the index date (baseline) and 9 months after (follow-up) and no evidence of index drug in baseline. Patients were matched 1:1 using propensity score matching. Changes in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and percentages of patients with HbA1c <8% and <7% during the follow-up were evaluated. Results The matched CANA and DPP-4 inhibitor cohorts (53.2% treated with sitagliptin) included 2766 patients each (mean age: 55.7 years). Among patients with baseline and follow-up HbA1c results, mean baseline HbA1c values were similar, 8.62% and 8.57% (p = 0.615) for the CANA (n = 729) and DPP-4 inhibitor (n = 710) cohorts, respectively. Change in HbA1c was greater among patients in the CANA cohort than for those in the DPP-4 inhibitor cohort (-0.92% vs. -0.63%, p < 0.001), and also among the subset of patients with baseline HbA1c ≥7% (-1.07% [n = 624] vs. -0.79% [n = 603], p = 0.004). During follow-up, greater percentages of the CANA cohort relative to the DPP-4 inhibitor cohort achieved HbA1c of <8% (66.0% vs. 58.6%, p = 0.004) and <7% (35.4% vs. 29.9%, p = 0.022). Limitations This study was observational and residual confounding remains a possibility. Conclusions In this real-world study of patients with T2DM, CANA use was associated with greater HbA1c

  13. What do herbalists suggest to diabetic patients in order to improve glycemic control? Evaluation of scientific evidence and potential risks.

    PubMed

    Cicero, A F G; Derosa, G; Gaddi, A

    2004-09-01

    In the course of 12 continuing education seminars given in different regions of Italy in 2001, we distributed a questionnaire to all the attending herbalists asking information about the herbal remedy and dietary supplement they mainly recommended to subjects who required a "natural" treatment to control glycemia. We distributed 720 questionnaires and we received 685 completed ones. We have compiled a short review on the efficacy and safety of the 10 most frequently advised products for each category. The 10 more frequently suggested herbal remedies were gymnema, psyllium, fenugreek, bilberry, garlic, Chinese ginseng, dandelion, burdock, prickly pear cactus, and bitter melon. The 10 most frequently recommended dietary supplements were biotin, vanadium, chromium, vitamin B6, vitamin C, vitamin E, zinc, selenium, alpha-lipoic acid, and fructooligosaccharides. The majority of the products recommended by Italian herbalists may be efficacious in reducing glycemia. If a diabetic patient is already assuming products that even slightly reduce glycemia, we risk to underestimate the level of glucose intolerance, while if the patient stops the complementary treatment after initiating pharmaceutical therapy, in the subsequent visit we may underestimate the effect of our prescription. Therefore, if doctors are to have a role in gate-keeping or advising patients about complementary and alternative medicine, they need to be familiar with this type of medicine. If they choose otherwise, then the provision of complementary and alternative medicine will continue to be patchy and largely outside the conventional care framework, perhaps through a growing network of parallel care providers involving a large number of non-medically qualified practitioners, who patients will continue to access directly.

  14. Determinants of the Changes in Glycemic Control with Exercise Training in Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhengyu; Earnest, Conrad P.; Smith, Steven R.; Church, Timothy S.; Ravussin, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Aims To assess the determinants of exercise training-induced improvements in glucose control (HbA1C) including changes in serum total adiponectin and FFA concentrations, and skeletal muscle peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) protein content. Methods A sub-cohort (n = 35; 48% men; 74% Caucasian) from the HART-D study undertaking muscle biopsies before and after 9 months of aerobic (AT), resistance (RT), or combination training (ATRT). Results Changes in HbA1C were associated with changes in adiponectin (r = −0.45, P = 0.007). Participants diagnosed with type 2 diabetes for a longer duration had the largest increase in PGC-1α (r = 0.44, P = 0.008). Statistical modeling examining changes in HbA1C suggested that male sex (P = 0.05), non-Caucasian ethnicity (P = 0.02), duration of type 2 diabetes (r = 0.40; P<0.002) and changes in FFA (r = 0.36; P<0.004), adiponectin (r = −0.26; P<0.03), and PGC-1α (r = −0.28; P = 0.02) explain ∼65% of the variability in the changes in HbA1C. Conclusions Decreases in HbA1C after 9 months of exercise were associated with shorter duration of diabetes, lowering of serum FFA concentrations, increasing serum adiponectin concentrations and increasing skeletal muscle PGC-1α protein expression. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00458133 PMID:23805175

  15. Systematic review and assessment of systematic reviews examining the effect of periodontal treatment on glycemic control in patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Iguchi, Shinya; Suzuki, Daigo; Kawano, Eisuke; Sato, Shuichi

    2017-01-01

    Objetives There have been several systematic reviews(SRs) on whether periodontal treatment for an individual with both periodontal disease and diabetes can improve diabetes outcomes. The purpose of this investigation was to conduct a systematic review (SR) of previous meta-analyses, and to assess the methodological quality of the SRs examining the effects of periodontal treatment and diabetes. (PROSPERO Registration # CRD 42015023470). Study Design We searched five electronic databases and identified previous meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials published through July 2015. In cases where the meta-analysis did not meet our criteria, the meta-analyses were recalculated. General characteristics of each included trial were abstracted, analyzed, and compared. The mean difference, 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and the I2 statistic were abstracted or recalculated. The Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews Instrument (AMSTAR) was used to assess methodological quality. Results Of the 475 citations screened, nine systematic reviews were included. In total, 13 meta-analyses included in nine SRs were examined. In comparability analyses, meta-analyses in four SRs did not meet our criteria, and were recalcuated. Of these 13 meta-analyses, 10 suggested significant effects of periodontal treatment on HbA1c improvement. Mean differences found in the 13 meta-analyses ranged from -0.93 to 0.13. AMSTAR assessment revealed six SRs with moderate and three with high overall quality. Conclusions We can conclude that there is a significant effect of periodontal treatment on improvement of HbA1c in diabetes patients, although the effect size is extremely small. In addition to the small effect size, not all SRs could be considered of high quality. Key words:Periodontal treatment, diabetes, HbA1c, systematic review, systematic review of systematic reviews, evidence-based medicine, AMSTAR. PMID:28160589

  16. Association of Thiazide-Type Diuretics With Glycemic Changes in Hypertensive Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaodan; Zhao, Qingyu

    2016-04-01

    Patients receiving thiazide diuretics have a higher risk of impaired glucose tolerance or even incident diabetes, but the change of blood glucose level varies across different trials. The aim of this study was to investigate the glycemic changes in hypertensive patients with thiazide-type diuretics. Twenty-six randomized trials involving 16,162 participants were included. Thiazide-type diuretics were found to increase fasting plasma glucose (FPG) compared with nonthiazide agents or placebo or nontreatment (mean difference [MD], 0.27 mmol/L [4.86 mg/dL]; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.15-0.39). Patients receiving lower doses of thiazides (hydrochlorothiazide or chlorthalidone ≤25 mg daily) had less change in FPG (MD, 0.15 mmol/L [2.7 mg/dL]; 95% CI, 0.03-0.27) than those receiving higher doses (MD, 0.60 mmol/L [10.8 mg/dL]; 95% CI, 0.39-0.82), revealed by the subgroup analysis of thiazides vs calcium channel blockers. Thiazide-type diuretics are associated with significant but small adverse glycemic effects in hypertensive patients. Treatment with a lower dose might reduce or avoid glycemic changes.

  17. Effect of Glycemic Control on Chylomicron Metabolism and Correlation between Postprandial Metabolism of Plasma Glucose and Chylomicron in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Treated with Basal-bolus Insulin Therapy with or without Vildagliptin

    PubMed Central

    Emoto, Naoya; Kato, Katsuhito; Sugihara, Hitoshi

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Glucagon-like peptide-1 can reduce both postprandial plasma glucose (PG) and chylomicron (CM) levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. However, there have been no reports regarding the relationship between the postprandial metabolism of PG and CM. Methods: Patients with type 2 diabetes who were admitted for glycemic control were randomized to insulin alone (Ins; n = 16) or insulin plus vildagliptin 100 mg (InsV; n = 16) groups. The insulin dose was adjusted to maintain normal blood glucose levels. The daily profiles of serum TG, remnant lipoprotein cholesterol (RemL-C), and apolipoprotein B48 (ApoB48) were estimated by frequent blood collection on admission and before discharge, and the daily glucose fluctuation profile was also estimated using continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) before discharge. Results: The daily profiles of serum TG and RemL-C indicated a significant decrease before discharge compared with on admission; however, no significant changes in serum ApoB48 levels were observed in either group. At discharge, daily glucose fluctuation profile and the change in the serum ApoB48 level from fasting to the peak of the daily profile was significantly smaller in the InsV group than in the Ins group. The increment of serum ApoB48 level was significantly correlated with the mean amplitude of glycemic excursions calculated using CGM data only in the Ins group (R2 = 0.5242, P <0.001). Conclusions: Short-term glycemic control decreased serum TG and RemL-C levels, but not ApoB48 levels, and the postprandial metabolism of PG and CM might be regulated by the same mechanism except GLP-1 effect. PMID:27397060

  18. Relationship between adherence to diet, glycemic control and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with type 1 diabetes: a nationwide survey in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To determine the relationship between adherence to the diet reported by patients with type 1 diabetes under routine clinical care in Brazil, and demographic, socioeconomic status, glycemic control and cardiovascular risk factors. Methods This was a cross-sectional, multicenter study conducted between December 2008 and December 2010 in 28 public clinics in 20 Brazilian cities. The data was obtained from 3,180 patients, aged 22 ± 11.8 years (56.3% females, 57.4% Caucasians and 43.6% non-Caucasians). The mean time since diabetes diagnosis was 11.7 ± 8.1 years. Results Overall, 1,722 (54.2%) of the patients reported to be adherent to the diet without difference in gender, duration of diabetes and socioeconomic status. Patients who reported adherence to the diet had lower BMI, HbA1c, triglycerides, LDL-cholesterol, non HDL-cholesterol and diastolic blood pressure and had more HbA1c at goal, performed more frequently self-monitoring of blood glucose (p < 0.001), and reported less difficulties to follow specific schedules of diet plans (p < 0.001). Less patients who reported to be adherent were obese or overweight (p = 0.005). The quantity of food and time schedule of the meals were the most frequent complaints. Logistic regression analysis showed that ethnicity, (Caucasians, (OR 1.26 [1.09-1.47]), number of medical clinical visits in the last year (OR 1.10 [1.06-1.15]), carbohydrate counting, (OR 2.22 [1.49-3.30]) and diets recommended by diabetes societies’, (OR 1.57 [1.02-2.41]) were related to greater patients’ adherence (p < 0.05) and age, [adolescents (OR 0.60 [0.50-0.72]), high BMI (OR 0.58 [0.94-0.98]) and smoking (OR 0.58 [0.41-0.84]) with poor patients’ adherence (p < 0.01). Conclusions Our results suggest that it is necessary to rethink medical nutrition therapy in order to help patients to overcome barriers that impair an optimized adherence to the diet. PMID:24607084

  19. Glycemic load effect on fasting and post-prandial serum glucose, insulin, IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 in a randomized, controlled feeding study

    PubMed Central

    Runchey, Shauna S.; Pollak, Michael N.; Valsta, Liisa M.; Coronado, Gloria D.; Schwarz, Yvonne; Breymeyer, Kara L.; Wang, Chiachi; Wang, Ching-Yun; Lampe, Johanna W.; Neuhouser, Marian L.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Objectives The effect of a low glycemic load (GL) diet on insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) concentration is still unknown but may contribute to lower chronic disease risk. We aimed to assess the impact of GL on concentrations of IGF-1 and IGFBP-3. Subjects/Methods We conducted a randomized, controlled crossover feeding trial in 84 overweight-obese and normal weight healthy individuals using two 28-day weight-maintaining high- and low-GL diets. Measures were fasting and post-prandial concentrations of insulin, glucose, IGF-1 and IGFBP-3. 20 participants completed post-prandial testing by consuming a test breakfast at the end of each feeding period. We used paired t-tests for diet-component and linear mixed models for biomarker analyses. Results The 28-day low-GL diet led to 4% lower fasting concentrations of IGF-1 (10.6 ng/mL, p=0.04) and a 4% lower ratio of IGF-1/IGFBP-3 (0.24, p=0.01) compared to the high-GL diet. The low-GL test breakfast led to 43% and 27% lower mean post-prandial glucose and insulin responses, respectively; mean incremental areas under the curve for glucose and insulin, respectively, were 64.3±21.8 (mmol/L/240min) (p<0.01) and 2253±539 (μU/mL/240min) (p<0.01) lower following the low- compared to the high-GL test meal. There was no effect of GL on mean HOMA-IR or on mean integrated post-prandial concentrations of glucose-adjusted insulin, IGF-1 or IGFBP-3. We did not observe modification of the dietary effect by adiposity. Conclusions Low-GL diets resulted in 43% and 27% lower post-prandial responses of glucose and insulin, respectively, and modestly lower fasting IGF-1 concentrations. Further intervention studies are needed to weigh the impact of dietary GL on risk for chronic disease. PMID:22892437

  20. Glycemic control and safety in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who switched from premixed insulin to insulin glargine plus oral antidiabetics: a large, prospective, observational study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Zhao, Jing; Yang, Wenying

    2017-03-01

    In some circumstances, the premixed insulin should be switched to alternative therapy. The effectiveness and the safety of switching from premixed insulin to insulin glargine plus oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs) in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have not been clarified and, hence, will be assessed in this study. Chinese patients with T2DM (2013 men and women aged 18-75 years) who had received premixed insulin ± OADs for ≥3 months with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) ≤ 10% were enrolled in a prospective, observational study conducted at 53 hospitals across China. At baseline and at the discretion of the physician, patients switched from premixed insulin to insulin glargine plus OADs. Changes in HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2-hour postprandial glucose (PPG), treatment satisfaction, and the incidence of hypoglycemia were assessed for 16 weeks. In total, 1850 patients completed the study. Mean HbA1c level for the group decreased significantly (from 7.8% ± 1.2% at week 1 to 7.0% ± 1.0% at week 16; P < .0001), and 55.2% of patients achieved HbA1c < 7% at week 16. Mean FPG and 2-hour PPG decreased significantly (-1.4 ± 2.2 and -2.1 ± 3.9 mmol/L, respectively; both P < .0001), whereas patient satisfaction improved significantly. Adverse events were reported in 18.7% of patients. Chinese patients with T2DM who switched from premixed insulin to insulin glargine plus OADs achieved significantly improved glycemic control and treatment satisfaction with a low incidence of hypoglycemia. Patients who are most likely to achieve the HbA1c target less than 7% are younger, have shorter disease duration, and have lower baseline HbA1c and FPG levels.

  1. Evaluating Quality of Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is need for readily understandable graphical displays of glucose data to facilitate interpretation by clinicians and researchers. Methods: (1) Display of the percentage of glucose values above a specified threshold for hyperglycemia (%High) versus percentage of glucose values below a specified threshold for hypoglycemia (%Low). If all glucose values fell within the target range, then all data points would fall at the origin. (2) After an intervention, one can plot the change in percentage of glucose values above a specified threshold for hyperglycemia versus the change in percentage of glucose values below a specified threshold defining hypoglycemia: The quadrants of this graph correspond to (a) increased risk of both hyper- and hypoglycemia, (b) decreased hyperglycemia but increased risk of hypoglycemia, (c) decreases in both hypo- and hyperglycemia, and (d) decreased hypoglycemia but increased hyperglycemia. (3) A 2-dimensional triangular graph can be used for simultaneous display of %High, %Low, and percentage in target range. (4) Display of risk of hyper- versus risk of hypoglycemia based on both frequency and severity of departures from the target range can be used. (5) Graphs (1) and (4) can also be presented using percentile scores relative to a reference population. (6) It is also useful to analyze %Hypoglycemia or risk of hypoglycemia versus mean glucose. Results: These methods are illustrated with examples from representative cases and shown to be feasible, practical, and informative. Conclusions: These new types of graphical displays can facilitate rapid analysis of risks of hypo- and hypoglycemia simultaneously and responses to therapeutic interventions for individuals or in clinical trials. PMID:25316714

  2. Relationships among different glycemic variability indices obtained by continuous glucose monitoring.

    PubMed

    Saisho, Yoshifumi; Tanaka, Chihiro; Tanaka, Kumiko; Roberts, Rachel; Abe, Takayuki; Tanaka, Masami; Meguro, Shu; Irie, Junichiro; Kawai, Toshihide; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the relationships among indices of glycemic variability obtained by continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). CGM was performed in 88 patients with diabetes (20 type 1 and 68 type 2 diabetes, age 59 ± 15 years) admitted to our hospital (Keio University Hospital, Tokyo, Japan) between 2010 and 2012. Mean glucose, glucose standard deviation (SDglu) and other glycemic indices such as index of glycemic control (ICG), J-index, mean of daily differences (MODD), continuous overlapping net glycemic action 1 (CONGA1), mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (MAGE) and M value were calculated from CGM data, and the correlations among these indices were assessed. There were strong correlations between SDglu and the indices MAGE, CONGA1, MODD and M value (all r > 0.8, P < 0.05). On the other hand, mean glucose was strongly correlated with J index and M value (both r > 0.8, P < 0.05). SDglu and other glycemic variability indices were more strongly correlated with hypoglycemia than was mean glucose, and the combination of mean glucose and SDglu was useful for predicting hypoglycemia in patients with diabetes. In this study, we demonstrated the characteristics of various glycemic variability indices in relation to mean glucose and SDglu. This information will help physicians to understand the characteristics of various glycemic variability indices and to select an appropriate index for their purpose. Our results also underpin the importance of glycemic variability in relation to risk of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetes.

  3. Dulce Wireless Tijuana: A Randomized Control Trial Evaluating the Impact of Project Dulce and Short-Term Mobile Technology on Glycemic Control in a Family Medicine Clinic in Northern Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Sonia; Vargas-Ojeda, Adriana; Menchaca-Díaz, Rufino; Fortmann, Addie; Philis-Tsimikas, Athena

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The global epidemic of diabetes calls for innovative interventions. This study evaluated the effectiveness of the Project Dulce model, with and without wireless technology, on glycemic control and other clinical and self-reported outcomes in patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes in Mexico. Subjects and Methods: Adults with type 2 diabetes and a glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level of ≥8% were recruited from Family Medical Unit #27 of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS) in Tijuana, México, and randomly assigned to one of three groups: Project Dulce–only (PD); Project Dulce technology-enhanced with mobile tools (PD-TE); or IMSS standard of care/control group (CG). Clinical and self-reported outcomes were assessed at baseline, Month 4, and Month 10. Time-by-group interactions and within-group changes were analyzed. Results: HbA1c reductions from baseline to Month 10 were significantly greater in PD-TE (−3.0% [−33 mmol/mol]) and PD (−2.6% [−28.7 mmol/mol]) compared with CG (−1.3% [−14.2 mmol/mol]) (P = 0.009 and 0.001, respectively). PD-TE and PD also exhibited significant improvement in diabetes knowledge when compared with CG (P < 0.05 for both). No statistically significant differences were detected between PD and PD-TE on these indicators (P = 0.54 and 0.86, respectively). Several within-group improvements were observed on other clinical and self-report indicators but did not vary significantly across groups. Conclusions: Project Dulce with and without wireless technology substantially improved glycemic control and diabetes knowledge in high-risk patients with type 2 diabetes in a Mexican family medical unit, suggesting that integrating peer-led education, nurse coordination, and 3G wireless technology is an effective approach for improving diabetes outcomes in high-risk populations. PMID:26914371

  4. Effects of long-term testosterone replacement therapy, with a temporary intermission, on glycemic control of nine hypogonadal men with type 1 diabetes mellitus - a series of case reports.

    PubMed

    Saad, Farid; Yassin, Aksam; Almehmadi, Yousef; Doros, Gheorghe; Gooren, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is often associated with obesity and subnormal serum testosterone (T) levels. Until 5 years ago there was no indication that men with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) had subnormal serum T. But recent studies indicate that about 10% of men with T1DM suffer from hypogonadism, as a rule aged men and men with obesity. While hypogonadal men with T2DM benefit from normalization of their serum T, this has not been investigated in men with T1DM. Nine men with T1DM, erectile dysfunction and hypogonadism (total testosterone ≤ 12 nmol/L) received testosterone replacement therapy (TRT). In seven men TRT was intermitted: one man with prostate malignancy and six men because of problems of reimbursement. Incidentally, this provided an opportunity to monitor the effects of withdrawal and of the reinstatement of TRT. In all men, glycemic control (serum glucose and HbA1c), weight, waist circumference, lipid profiles and erectile function improved upon TRT. The seven men whose TRT was intermitted showed a deterioration which improved again upon reinstatement of TRT. The data suggest that aging and obese men with T1DM might have subnormal T levels and that their glycemic control, lipid profiles and erectile function might benefit from TRT.

  5. GLYCEMIC INDEX, CHOLECYSTOKININ, SATIETY AND DISINHIBITION: IS THERE AN UNAPPRECIATED PARADOX FOR OVERWEIGHT WOMEN?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The clinical utility of a low glycemic index (GI) diet for appetite and food intake control is controversial. Complicating the issue is psychological and behavioral influences related to eating. The aim of the present study was to investigate the satiety and glycemic response to high and low GI meal...

  6. Mobile App-Based Interventions to Support Diabetes Self-Management: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials to Identify Functions Associated with Glycemic Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuan; Yao, Xun; Vespasiani, Giacomo; Nicolucci, Antonio; Dong, Yajie; Kwong, Joey; Li, Ling; Sun, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Background Mobile health apps for diabetes self-management have different functions. However, the efficacy and safety of each function are not well studied, and no classification is available for these functions. Objective The aims of this study were to (1) develop and validate a taxonomy of apps for diabetes self-management, (2) investigate the glycemic efficacy of mobile app-based interventions among adults with diabetes in a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs), and (3) explore the contribution of different function to the effectiveness of entire app-based interventions using the taxonomy. Methods We developed a 3-axis taxonomy with columns of clinical modules, rows of functional modules and cells of functions with risk assessments. This taxonomy was validated by reviewing and classifying commercially available diabetes apps. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, and ClinicalTrials.gov from January 2007 to May 2016. We included RCTs of adult outpatients with diabetes that compared using mobile app-based interventions with usual care alone. The mean differences (MDs) in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) concentrations and risk ratios of adverse events were pooled using a random-effects meta-analysis. After taxonomic classification, we performed exploratory subgroup analyses of the presence or absence of each module across the included app-based interventions. Results Across 12 included trials involving 974 participants, using app-based interventions was associated with a clinically significant reduction of HbA1c (MD 0.48%, 95% CI 0.19%-0.77%) without excess adverse events. Larger HbA1c reductions were noted among patients with type 2 diabetes than those with type 1 diabetes (MD 0.67%, 95% CI 0.30%-1.03% vs MD 0.36%, 95% CI 0.08%-0.81%). Having a complication prevention module in app-based interventions was associated with a greater HbA1c reduction (with complication

  7. Is Ramadan fasting safe in type 2 diabetic patients in view of the lack of significant effect of fasting on clinical and biochemical parameters, blood pressure, and glycemic control?

    PubMed

    M'guil, M; Ragala, M A; El Guessabi, L; Fellat, S; Chraibi, A; Chabraoui, L; Chebraoui, L; Israili, Z H; Lyoussi, B

    2008-07-01

    The study objective was to determine if Ramadan fasting was safe in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), based upon a determination of the effect of fasting on a broad range of physiological and clinical parameters, including markers of glycemic control and blood pressure. The study was carried out in Ramadan 1422 (December 2001-January 2002) at the Diabetology Services, Hopital Ibn Sina, Rabat, Morocco. One hundred and twenty T2D Moroccan patients (62 women, 58 men), aged 48-60 yrs with well-controlled diabetes through diet and/or oral hypoglycemic drugs (OHD), received dietary instructions and readjustment of the timing of the dose of OHD (gliclazide modified release) according to the fasting/eating periods. Anthropometric indices and physiological parameters (blood pressure, lipid, hematological, and serum electrolyte profiles, as well as markers of glycemic control, nutrition, renal and hepatic function) were measured on the day before Ramadan and then on the 15(th) and 29(th) day of fasting and thereafter 15 days later. Statistical analysis was done by standard methods. Ramadan fasting had no major effect on energy intake, body weight, body mass index, blood pressure, and liver enzymes. Fasting and post-prandial glucose levels decreased, while insulin levels increased. Diabetes was well controlled, as indicated by HbA1c, fructosamine, C-peptide, HOMA-IR, and IGF-1 values. There were fluctuations in some lipid and hematological parameters, creatinine, urea, uric acid, total protein, bilirubin, and electrolytes; however, all values stayed within the proper physiological range. In conclusion, diabetes was well-controlled in patients with dietary/medical management, without serious complications. With a regimen adjustment of OHD, diet control, and physical activity, most patients with T2D whose diabetes was well-controlled before Ramadan can safely observe Ramadan fasting.

  8. Reply #1 to: Glycemic Choreoballism

    PubMed Central

    Cosentino, Carlos; Torres, Luis; Nuñez, Yesenia; Suarez, Rafael; Velez, Miriam; Flores, Martha

    2016-01-01

    In Response To: Lee D, Ahn TB. Glycemic choreoballism. Tremor Other Hyperkinet Mov. 2016; 6. doi: 10.7916/D8QJ7HNF Original Article: Cosentino C, Torres L, Nuñez Y, et al. Hemichorea/hemiballism associated with hyperglycemia: report of twenty cases. Tremor Other Hyperkinet Mov. 2016; 6. doi: 10.7916/D8DN454P PMID:28071768

  9. Reply #1 to: Glycemic Choreoballism.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, Carlos; Torres, Luis; Nuñez, Yesenia; Suarez, Rafael; Velez, Miriam; Flores, Martha

    2016-01-01

    In Response To: Lee D, Ahn TB. Glycemic choreoballism. Tremor Other Hyperkinet Mov. 2016; 6. doi: 10.7916/D8QJ7HNF Original Article: Cosentino C, Torres L, Nuñez Y, et al. Hemichorea/hemiballism associated with hyperglycemia: report of twenty cases. Tremor Other Hyperkinet Mov. 2016; 6. doi: 10.7916/D8DN454P.

  10. Today`s control systems evolved from early pioneers` dreams

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.J.

    1996-04-01

    In the last 100 years, power plant controls have evolved from manual operation and simple instruments to automatic state-of-the-art computerized control systems using smart instruments. This article traces the evolution of controls. The topics of the article include early control systems, developments in the early 20th century, Bailey controls, and developments in the late 20th century.

  11. Maternal control of early embryogenesis in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kun; Smith, George W.

    2015-01-01

    Oocyte quality is a critical factor limiting the efficiency of assisted reproductive technologies (ART) and pregnancy success in farm animals and humans. ART success is diminished with increased maternal age, suggesting a close link between poor oocyte quality and ovarian-aging. However, the regulation of oocyte quality remains poorly understood. Oocyte quality is functionally linked to ART success because the maternal-to-embryonic transition is dependent on stored maternal factors, which are accumulated in oocytes during oocyte development and growth. The maternal-to-embryonic transition consists of critical developmental processes including maternal RNA depletion and embryonic genome activation. In recent years, key maternal proteins encoded by maternal-effect genes have been determined, primarily using genetically modified mouse models. These proteins are implicated in various aspects of early embryonic development including maternal mRNA degradation, epigenetic reprogramming, signal transduction, protein translation and initiation of embryonic genome activation. Species differences exist in number of cell divisions encompassing the maternal-to-embryonic transition and maternal-effect genes controlling this developmental window. Perturbations of maternal control result in decreased oocyte quality, some of which are associated with ovarian aging. PMID:25695370

  12. Effects of a Multicomponent Life-Style Intervention on Weight, Glycemic Control, Depressive Symptoms, and Renal Function in Low-Income, Minority Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: Results of the Community Approach to Lifestyle Modification for Diabetes Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Moncrieft, Ashley E.; Llabre, Maria M.; McCalla, Judith Rey; Gutt, Miriam; Mendez, Armando J.; Gellman, Marc D.; Goldberg, Ronald B.; Schneiderman, Neil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective Few interventions have combined life-style and psychosocial approaches in the context of Type 2 diabetes management. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a multicomponent behavioral intervention on weight, glycemic control, renal function, and depressive symptoms in a sample of overweight/obese adults with Type 2 diabetes and marked depressive symptoms. Methods A sample of 111 adults with Type 2 diabetes were randomly assigned to a 1-year intervention (n = 57) or usual care (n = 54) in a parallel groups design. Primary outcomes included weight, glycosylated hemoglobin, and Beck Depression Inventory II score. Estimated glomerular filtration rate served as a secondary outcome. All measures were assessed at baseline and 6 and 12 months after randomization by assessors blind to randomization. Latent growth modeling was used to examine intervention effects on each outcome. Results The intervention resulted in decreased weight (mean [M] = 0.322 kg, standard error [SE] = 0.124 kg, p = .010) and glycosylated hemoglobin (M = 0.066%, SE = 0.028%, p = .017), and Beck Depression Inventory II scores (M = 1.009, SE = 0.226, p < .001), and improved estimated glomerular filtration rate (M = 0.742 ml·min−1·1.73 m−2, SE = 0.318 ml·min−1·1.73 m−2, p = .020) each month during the first 6 months relative to usual care. Conclusions Multicomponent behavioral interventions targeting weight loss and depressive symptoms as well as diet and physical activity are efficacious in the management of Type 2 diabetes. Trial Registration: This study is registered at Clinicaltrials.gov ID: NCT01739205. PMID:27359176

  13. Influence of HbA1c levels on platelet function profiles associated with tight glycemic control in patients presenting with hyperglycemia and an acute coronary syndrome. A subanalysis of the CHIPS Study ("Control de HIperglucemia y Actividad Plaquetaria en Pacientes con Síndrome Coronario Agudo").

    PubMed

    Vivas, David; García-Rubira, Juan C; Bernardo, Esther; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Martín, Patricia; Calle-Pascual, Alfonso; Núñez-Gil, Iván; Macaya, Carlos; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio

    2013-02-01

    Patients with hyperglycemia, an acute coronary syndrome and poor glycemic control have increased platelet reactivity and poor prognosis. However, it is unclear the influence of a tight glycemic control on platelet reactivity in these patients. This is a subanalysis of the CHIPS study. This trial randomized patients with hyperglycemia to undergo an intensive glucose control (target blood glucose 80-120 mg/dL), or conventional glucose control (target blood glucose <180 mg/dL). We analyzed platelet function at discharge on the subgroup of patients with poor glycemic control, defined with admission levels of HbA1c higher than 6.5%. The primary endpoint was maximal platelet aggregation following stimuli with 20 μM ADP. We also measured aggregation following collagen, epinephrine, and thrombin receptor-activated peptide, as well as P2Y12 reactivity index and surface expression of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa and P-selectin. A total of 67 patients presented HbA1c ≥ 6.5% (37 intensive, 30 conventional), while 42 had HbA1c < 6.5% (20 intensive, 22 conventional). There were no differences in baseline characteristics between groups. At discharge, patients with HbA1c ≥6.5% had significantly reduced MPA with intensive glucose control compared with conventional control (46.1 ± 22.3 vs. 60.4 ± 20.0%; p = 0.004). Similar findings were shown with other measures of platelet function. However, glucose control strategy did not affect platelet function parameters in patients with HbA1c < 6.5%. Intensive glucose control in patients presenting with an acute coronary syndrome and hyperglycemia results in a reduction of platelet reactivity only in the presence of elevated HbA1c levels.

  14. Preserved Insulin Secretory Capacity and Weight Loss Are the Predominant Predictors of Glycemic Control in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Randomized to Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Kim T; Billington, Charles J; Vella, Adrian; Wang, Qi; Ahmed, Leaque; Bantle, John P; Bessler, Marc; Connett, John E; Inabnet, William B; Thomas, Avis; Ikramuddin, Sayeed; Korner, Judith

    2015-09-01

    Improvement in type 2 diabetes after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) has been attributed partly to weight loss, but mechanisms beyond weight loss remain unclear. We performed an ancillary study to the Diabetes Surgery Study to assess changes in incretins, insulin sensitivity, and secretion 1 year after randomization to lifestyle modification and intensive medical management (LS/IMM) alone (n = 34) or in conjunction with RYGB (n = 34). The RYGB group lost more weight and had greater improvement in HbA1c. Fasting glucose was lower after RYGB than after LS/IMM, although the glucose area under the curve decreased comparably for both groups. Insulin sensitivity increased in both groups. Insulin secretion was unchanged after LS/IMM but decreased after RYGB, except for a rapid increase during the first 30 min after meal ingestion. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) was substantially increased after RYGB, while gastric inhibitory polypeptide and glucagon decreased. Lower HbA1c was most strongly correlated with the percentage of weight loss for both groups. At baseline, a greater C-peptide index and 90-min postprandial C-peptide level were predictive of lower HbA1c at 1 year after RYGB. β-Cell glucose sensitivity, which improved only after RYGB, and improved disposition index were associated with lower HbA1c in both groups, independent of weight loss. Weight loss and preserved β-cell function both predominantly determine the greatest glycemic benefit after RYGB.

  15. Improving Symptom Control in Early Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) are caused by a severe loss of pigmented dopamine-producing nigro-striatal neurons. Symptomatic therapies provide benefit for motor features by restoring dopamine receptor stimulation. Studies have demonstrated that delaying the introduction of dopaminergic medical therapy is associated with a rapid decline in quality of life. Nonmotor symptoms, such as depression, are common in early PD and also affect quality of life. Therefore, dopaminergic therapy should typically be initiated at, or shortly following, diagnosis. Monamine oxidase-B inhibitors provide mild symptomatic benefit, have excellent side effect profiles, and may improve long-term outcomes, making them an important first-line treatment option. Dopamine agonists (DAs) provide moderate symptomatic benefit but are associated with more side effects than levodopa. However, they delay the development of motor complications by delaying the need for levodopa. Levodopa (LD) is the most efficacious medication, but its chronic use is associated with the development of motor complications that can be difficult to resolve. Younger patients are more likely to develop levodopa-induced motor complications and they are therefore often treated with a DA before levodopa is added. For older patients, levodopa provides good motor benefit with a relatively low-risk of motor complications. Using levodopa with a dopa-decarboxylase inhibitor lessens adverse effects, and further adding a catechol-O-methyl transferase inhibitor can improve symptom control. PMID:21180628

  16. The influence of chromium chloride-containing milk to glycemic control of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Pei, Dee; Hsieh, Chang-Hsun; Hung, Yi-Jen; Li, Jer-Chuang; Lee, Chien-Hsing; Kuo, Shi-Wen

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect and safety of chromium-containing milk powder in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in Taiwan. A total of 60 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, aged 30 to 75 years, and on a dose of gliclazide sulfonylurea agent (< or =160 mg/d) for at least 3 months were enrolled. Their glycosylated hemoglobin ranged from 7.5% to 12%, fasting plasma glucose (FPG) from 140 to 250 mg/dL, and body mass index from 20 to 35 kg/m(2). The subjects were divided into 2 groups, one group to receive chromium-containing milk powder (chromium 200 microg/20 g milk powder) and the other to receive placebo twice a day for 16 weeks. Frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) was performed before and after treatment. The chromium group demonstrated a lower FPG and fasting insulin (-38.1 +/- 9.2 vs 63 +/- 8. 5 mg/dL and -1.7 +/- 0.2 vs 1.9 +/- 0.3 microU/mL, respectively; P < .05), especially in male patients (-41 +/- 9.2 vs 85 +/- 11.7 mg/dL and -2.7 +/- 0.2 vs 3.1 +/- 0.3 microU/mL, respectively; P < .01), at the end of the study. Lower glycosylated hemoglobin was observed in chromium-treated male patients (-1.1 +/- 0. 5 vs 0.7 +/- 0. 2; P < .05). However, there were no significant changes in other metabolic parameters (lipid profiles including total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol), except improvement of insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance and insulin sensitivity index from frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test) observed in male patients (-2.1 +/- 1.1 vs -0.41 +/- 1.12 and 0.18 +/- 0.11 vs -0.15 +/- 0. 2, respectively; P < .05). There were no adverse events in both groups, except for mild complaints in the chromium group on constipation (5%) and flatulence (5%). Intake of milk powder containing 400 microg/d of chromium for 16 weeks

  17. Long–Term Effects of Energy-Restricted Diets Differing in Glycemic Load on Metabolic Adaptation and Body Composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A randomized controlled trial of high glycemic load (HG) and low glycemic load (LG) diets with food provided for 6 months and self-administered for 6 additional months at 30% caloric restriction (CR) was performed in 29 overweight adults (mean+/-SD, age 35+/-5y; BMI 27.5+/-1.5 kg/m2). Total energy e...

  18. Acute Low-Volume High-Intensity Interval Exercise and Continuous Moderate-Intensity Exercise Elicit a Similar Improvement in 24-h Glycemic Control in Overweight and Obese Adults.

    PubMed

    Parker, Lewan; Shaw, Christopher S; Banting, Lauren; Levinger, Itamar; Hill, Karen M; McAinch, Andrew J; Stepto, Nigel K

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute exercise reduces postprandial oxidative stress and glycemia; however, the effects of exercise intensity are unclear. We investigated the effect of acute low-volume high-intensity interval-exercise (LV-HIIE) and continuous moderate-intensity exercise (CMIE) on glycemic control and oxidative stress in overweight and obese, inactive adults. Methods: Twenty-seven adults were randomly allocated to perform a single session of LV-HIIE (9 females, 5 males; age: 30 ± 1 years; BMI: 29 ± 1 kg·m(-2); mean ± SEM) or CMIE (8 females, 5 males; age: 30 ± 2.0; BMI: 30 ± 2.0) 1 h after consumption of a standard breakfast. Plasma redox status, glucose and insulin were measured. Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) was conducted during the 24-h period before (rest day) and after exercise (exercise day). Results: Plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS; 29 ±13%, p < 0.01; mean percent change ±90% confidence limit), hydrogen peroxide (44 ± 16%, p < 0.01), catalase activity (50 ± 16%, p < 0.01), and superoxide dismutase activity (21 ± 6%, p < 0.01) significantly increased 1 h after breakfast (prior to exercise) compared to baseline. Exercise significantly decreased postprandial glycaemia in whole blood (-6 ± 5%, p < 0.01), irrespective of the exercise protocol. Only CMIE significantly decreased postprandial TBARS (CMIE: -33 ± 8%, p < 0.01; LV-HIIE: 11 ± 22%, p = 0.34) and hydrogen peroxide (CMIE: -25 ± 15%, p = 0.04; LV-HIIE: 7 ± 26%; p = 0.37). Acute exercise provided a similar significant improvement in 24-h average glucose levels (-5 ± 2%, p < 0.01), hyperglycemic excursions (-37 ± 60%, p < 0.01), peak glucose concentrations (-8 ± 4%, p < 0.01), and the 2-h postprandial glucose response to dinner (-9 ± 4%, p < 0.01), irrespective of the exercise protocol. Conclusion: Despite elevated postprandial oxidative stress compared to CMIE, LV-HIIE is an equally effective exercise mode for improving 24-h glycemic control in overweight and obese

  19. Acute Low-Volume High-Intensity Interval Exercise and Continuous Moderate-Intensity Exercise Elicit a Similar Improvement in 24-h Glycemic Control in Overweight and Obese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Lewan; Shaw, Christopher S.; Banting, Lauren; Levinger, Itamar; Hill, Karen M.; McAinch, Andrew J.; Stepto, Nigel K.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Acute exercise reduces postprandial oxidative stress and glycemia; however, the effects of exercise intensity are unclear. We investigated the effect of acute low-volume high-intensity interval-exercise (LV-HIIE) and continuous moderate-intensity exercise (CMIE) on glycemic control and oxidative stress in overweight and obese, inactive adults. Methods: Twenty-seven adults were randomly allocated to perform a single session of LV-HIIE (9 females, 5 males; age: 30 ± 1 years; BMI: 29 ± 1 kg·m−2; mean ± SEM) or CMIE (8 females, 5 males; age: 30 ± 2.0; BMI: 30 ± 2.0) 1 h after consumption of a standard breakfast. Plasma redox status, glucose and insulin were measured. Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) was conducted during the 24-h period before (rest day) and after exercise (exercise day). Results: Plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS; 29 ±13%, p < 0.01; mean percent change ±90% confidence limit), hydrogen peroxide (44 ± 16%, p < 0.01), catalase activity (50 ± 16%, p < 0.01), and superoxide dismutase activity (21 ± 6%, p < 0.01) significantly increased 1 h after breakfast (prior to exercise) compared to baseline. Exercise significantly decreased postprandial glycaemia in whole blood (−6 ± 5%, p < 0.01), irrespective of the exercise protocol. Only CMIE significantly decreased postprandial TBARS (CMIE: −33 ± 8%, p < 0.01; LV-HIIE: 11 ± 22%, p = 0.34) and hydrogen peroxide (CMIE: −25 ± 15%, p = 0.04; LV-HIIE: 7 ± 26%; p = 0.37). Acute exercise provided a similar significant improvement in 24-h average glucose levels (−5 ± 2%, p < 0.01), hyperglycemic excursions (−37 ± 60%, p < 0.01), peak glucose concentrations (−8 ± 4%, p < 0.01), and the 2-h postprandial glucose response to dinner (−9 ± 4%, p < 0.01), irrespective of the exercise protocol. Conclusion: Despite elevated postprandial oxidative stress compared to CMIE, LV-HIIE is an equally effective exercise mode for improving 24-h glycemic control in

  20. The relationship between the frequency of self-monitoring of blood glucose and glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus on continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion or on multiple daily injections

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Takashi; Tsuzaki, Kokoro; Yoshioka, Fumi; Okada, Hiroshi; Kishi, Junichiro; Yamada, Kazunori; Sakane, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Introduction We investigated the relationship between the frequency of self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) and glycemic control in type 1 diabetes mellitus patients on continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) or on multiple daily injections (MDI) using data management software. Materials and Methods We recruited 148 adult type 1 diabetes mellitus patients (CSII n = 42, MDI n = 106) and downloaded their SMBG records to the MEQNET™ SMBG Viewer software (Arkray Inc., Kyoto, Japan). The association between the SMBG frequency and the patients' hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels was analyzed using the χ2-test and linear regression analysis was carried out to clarify their relationship. Results The odds ratio of achieving a target HbA1c level of <8% (63.9 mmol/mol) was significantly higher in subjects with SMBG frequencies of ≥3.5 times/day compared with those with SMBG frequencies of <3.5 times/day in the CSII group (odds ratio 7.00, 95% confidence interval 1.72–28.54), but not in the MDI group (odds ratio 1.35, 95% CI 0.62–2.93). A significant correlation between SMBG frequency and the HbA1c level was detected in the CSII group (HbA1c [%] = –0.24 × SMBG frequency [times/day] + 8.60 [HbA1c {mmol/L} = –2.61 × SMBG frequency {times/day} + 70.5], [r = –0.384, P = 0.012]), but not in the MDI group. Conclusions A SMBG frequency of <3.5 times per day appeared to be a risk factor for poor glycemic control (HbA1c ≥8%) in type 1 diabetes mellitus patients on CSII. PMID:26543543

  1. Factors associated with improved glycemic control following continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes uncontrolled with bolus-basal insulin regimens: an analysis from the OpT2mise randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Muriel; Castañeda, Javier; Reznik, Yves; Giorgino, Francesco; Conget, Ignacio; Aronson, Ronnie; de Portu, Simona; Runzis, Sarah; Lee, Scott W; Cohen, Ohad

    2017-04-04

    This analysis investigated factors associated with the decrease in HbA1c in patients receiving continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) in the OpT2mise randomized trial. In this study, patients with type 2 diabetes and HbA1C >8% following multiple daily injections (MDI) optimization were randomized to receive CSII (n = 168) or MDI (n = 163) for 6 months. Patient-related and treatment-related factors associated with decreased HbA1c in the CSII arm were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. CSII produced a significantly greater reduction in HbA1c than MDI, and the treatment difference increased with baseline HbA1c . In the CSII arm, the only factors significantly associated with decreased HbA1C were higher baseline HbA1C (P<0.001), geographical region (P<0.001), higher educational level (P=0.012), higher total cholesterol level (P=0.002), lower variability of baseline glucose values on continuous glucose monitoring (P<0.001), and the decrease in average fasting self-monitored blood glucose at 6 months (P<0.001). These findings suggest that CSII offers an option to improve glycemic control in a broad range of type 2 diabetes patients in whom control cannot be achieved with MDI. OpT2mise ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT01182493 (https://clinicaltrials.gov/).

  2. Effects of Liraglutide Combined with Short-Term Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion on Glycemic Control and Beta Cell Function in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Ke, Weijian; Liu, Liehua; Liu, Juan; Chen, Ailing; Deng, Wanping; Zhang, Pengyuan; Cao, Xiaopei; Liao, Zhihong; Xiao, Haipeng; Liu, Jianbin; Li, Yanbing

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the effects of liraglutide in combination with short-term continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) therapy on glycemic control and beta cell function in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Thirty-nine eligible newly diagnosed T2DM patients were recruited and randomized to receive either of two therapies: short-term CSII alone (CSII alone group) or CSII in combination with liraglutide (CSII + Lira group) for 12 weeks. Blood glucose control, homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) indices, and acute insulin response (AIR) were compared between the two groups. The patients in CSII + Lira group achieved euglycemia with equivalent insulin dosage in shorter time (1 (0) versus 2 (3) days, P = 0.039). HbA1c at the end of study was comparable between two groups (6.3 ± 0.7% versus 6.0 ± 0.5%, for CSII alone group and CSII + Lira group, resp., P = 0.325). The increment of AIR was higher in CSII + Lira group (177.58 (351.57) μU · min/mL versus 58.15 (51.30) μU · min/mL, P < 0.001). However, after stopping liraglutide, its effect on beta cell function disappeared completely. Liraglutide combined with short-term CSII was effective in further improving beta cell function, but the beneficial effects did not sustain after suspension of the therapy.

  3. Genetic Risk Score Modelling for Disease Progression in New-Onset Type 1 Diabetes Patients: Increased Genetic Load of Islet-Expressed and Cytokine-Regulated Candidate Genes Predicts Poorer Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    Brorsson, Caroline A.; Nielsen, Lotte B.; Andersen, Marie Louise; Kaur, Simranjeet; Bergholdt, Regine; Hansen, Lars; Mortensen, Henrik B.; Pociot, Flemming; Størling, Joachim; Hvidoere Study Group on Childhood Diabetes

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified over 40 type 1 diabetes risk loci. The clinical impact of these loci on β-cell function during disease progression is unknown. We aimed at testing whether a genetic risk score could predict glycemic control and residual β-cell function in type 1 diabetes (T1D). As gene expression may represent an intermediate phenotype between genetic variation and disease, we hypothesized that genes within T1D loci which are expressed in islets and transcriptionally regulated by proinflammatory cytokines would be the best predictors of disease progression. Two-thirds of 46 GWAS candidate genes examined were expressed in human islets, and 11 of these significantly changed expression levels following exposure to proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β + IFNγ + TNFα) for 48 h. Using the GWAS single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from each locus, we constructed a genetic risk score based on the cumulative number of risk alleles carried in children with newly diagnosed T1D. With each additional risk allele carried, HbA1c levels increased significantly within first year after diagnosis. Network and gene ontology (GO) analyses revealed that several of the 11 candidate genes have overlapping biological functions and interact in a common network. Our results may help predict disease progression in newly diagnosed children with T1D which can be exploited for optimizing treatment. PMID:26904692

  4. Mindfulness and Inhibitory Control in Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberle, Eva; Schonert-Reichl, Kimberly A.; Lawlor, Molly Stewart; Thomson, Kimberly C.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between the executive control process of inhibition and self-reported dispositional mindfulness, controlling for gender, grade, and cortisol levels in 99 (43% female) fourth- and fifth-graders ([X-bar] = 10.23 years, SD = 0.53). Students completed a measure of mindful attention awareness and a computerized…

  5. Low-glycemic load decreases postprandial insulin and glucose and increases postprandial ghrelin in white but not black women.

    PubMed

    Brownley, Kimberly A; Heymen, Steve; Hinderliter, Alan L; Galanko, Joseph; Macintosh, Beth

    2012-07-01

    Alterations in appetite hormones favoring increased postprandial satiety have been implicated in both the glycemic control and potential weight-loss benefits of a low-glycemic diet. Racial differences exist in dietary glycemic load and appetite hormone concentrations. This study examined the impact of glycemic load on appetite hormones in 20 black women [10 normal weight, BMI = 22.8 ± 1.42 (mean ± SD); 10 obese, BMI = 35.1 ± 2.77] and 20 white women (10 normal weight, BMI = 22.9 ± 1.45; 10 obese, BMI = 34.3 ± 2.77). Each woman completed two 4.5-d weight-maintenance, mixed-macronutrient, high-glycemic vs. low-glycemic load diets that concluded with a test meal of identical composition. Blood samples collected before and serially for 3 h after each test meal were assayed for plasma ghrelin and serum insulin and glucose concentrations. Compared with the high-glycemic load meal, the low-glycemic load meal was associated with lower insulin(AUC) (P = 0.02), glucose(AUC) (P = 0.01), and urge to eat ratings (P = 0.05) but with higher ghrelin(AUC) (P = 0.008). These results suggest the satiating effect of a low-glycemic load meal is not directly linked to enhanced postprandial suppression of ghrelin. Notably, these effects were significant among white but not black women, suggesting that black women may be less sensitive than white women to the glucoregulatory effects of a low-glycemic load. These findings add to a growing literature demonstrating racial differences in postprandial appetite hormone responses. If reproducible, these findings have implications for individualized diet prescription for the purposes of glucose or weight control in women.

  6. Relation of Dietary Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load to Coronary Artery Calcium in Asymptomatic Korean Adults.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yuni; Chang, Yoosoo; Ryu, Seungho; Cho, Juhee; Kim, Mi Kyung; Ahn, Younjhin; Lee, Jung Eun; Sung, Eunju; Kim, Boyoung; Ahn, Jiin; Kim, Chan-Won; Rampal, Sanjay; Zhao, Di; Zhang, Yiyi; Pastor-Barriuso, Roberto; Lima, Joao A C; Chung, Eun Chul; Shin, Hocheol; Guallar, Eliseo

    2015-08-15

    The relation between glycemic index, glycemic load, and subclinical coronary atherosclerosis is unknown. The aim of the study was to evaluate the associations between energy-adjusted glycemic index, glycemic load, and coronary artery calcium (CAC). This study was cross-sectional analysis of 28,429 asymptomatic Korean men and women (mean age 41.4 years) without a history of diabetes or cardiovascular disease. All participants underwent a health screening examination between March 2011 and April 2013, and dietary intake over the preceding year was estimated using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Cardiac computed tomography was used for CAC scoring. The prevalence of detectable CAC (CAC score >0) was 12.4%. In multivariable-adjusted models, the CAC score ratios (95% confidence intervals) comparing the highest to the lowest quintile of glycemic index and glycemic load were 1.74 (1.08 to 2.81; p trend = 0.03) and 3.04 (1.43 to 6.46; p trend = 0.005), respectively. These associations did not differ by clinical subgroups, including the participants at low cardiovascular risk. In conclusion, these findings suggest that high dietary glycemic index and glycemic load were associated with a greater prevalence and degree of CAC, with glycemic load having a stronger association.

  7. Control Networks and Neuromodulators of Early Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Michael I.; Rothbart, Mary K.; Sheese, Brad E.; Voelker, Pascale

    2012-01-01

    In adults, most cognitive and emotional self-regulation is carried out by a network of brain regions, including the anterior cingulate, insula, and areas of the basal ganglia, related to executive attention. We propose that during infancy, control systems depend primarily upon a brain network involved in orienting to sensory events that includes…

  8. Effects of Glycemic Regulation on Chronic Postischemia Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ross-Huot, Marie-Christine; Laferrière, André; Gi, Cho Min; Khorashadi, Mina; Schricker, Thomas; Coderre, Terence J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injuries consist of enhanced oxidative and inflammatory responses along with microvascular dysfunction following prolonged ischemia and reperfusion. Since I/R injuries induce chronic postischemia pain (CPIP) in laboratory animals, it is possible that surgical procedures utilizing prolonged ischemia may result in chronic postoperative pain. Glycemic modulation during ischemia and reperfusion could impact pain following I/R injury, as glucose triggers oxidative, inflammatory and thrombotic reactions, whereas insulin has anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory and vasodilatory properties. Methods 110 rats underwent a 3-h period of ischemia followed by reperfusion to produce CPIP. CPIP rats had previously been divided into 6 groups with differing glycemic-modulation paradigms: 1) normal feeding; 2) fasting; 3) fasting with normal saline administration; 4) fasting with dextrose administration; 5) normal feeding with insulin administration; and 6) normal feeding with dextrose and insulin administration. Blood glucose levels were assessed during ischemia and reperfusion in these separate groups of rats, and they were tested for mechanical and cold allodynia over the following 21 days (on days 2, 5, 7, 9, 12 and 21 post-I/R injury). Results I/R injury in rats with normoglycemia or relative hyperglycemia (groups 1, 4) led to significant mechanical and cold allodynia; conversely, relative hypoglycemia associated with insulin treatment or fasting (groups 2, 3, and 5) reduced allodynia induced by I/R injury. Importantly, insulin treatment did not reduce allodynia when administered to fed rats given dextrose (group 6). Conclusion Our results suggest that glycemic levels at the time of I/R injury significantly modulate postinjury pain thresholds in CPIP rats. Strict glycemic control during I/R injury significantly reduces CPIP pain and, and conversely, hyperglycemia significantly enhances it, which could have potential clinical applications

  9. Glycemic response of mashed potato containing high-viscocity hydroxypropylmethylcellulose.

    PubMed

    Lightowler, Helen J; Henry, C Jeya K

    2009-08-01

    Potatoes generally have one of the highest glycemic index values of any food. Relatively small differences in the glycemic response (GR) of regularly consumed starch foods have shown beneficial effects on health. Lowering the GR of a potato-based meal has potentially wide-reaching health benefits. High-viscosity hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HV-HPMC) is a modified cellulose dietary fiber extensively used in the food industry. We hypothesized that the GR of a high-glycemic index product such as mashed potato would be lower with the addition of HV-HPMC. In a nonblind, randomized, repeat-measure, crossover controlled trial, 15 healthy adults consumed portions of mashed potato with different doses (0%, 1%, 2%, and 4%) of a specially selected and optimized HV-HPMC and a reference food (glucose) on separate occasions. Five subjects were excluded from the final analysis due to noncompliance with study procedures. Capillary blood glucose was measured in fasted subjects and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after starting to eat. For each sample, the incremental area under the blood glucose response curve was calculated and the GR determined. There was a significant lowering effect of HV-HPMC on GR (P < .001) of mashed potato. Glycemic responses for all mashed potato samples with the HV-HPMC were significantly lower than the standard mashed potato: 1% level (P < .05), 2% level (P < .05), and 4% level (P < .05). However, there was no significant effect of the HV-HPMC dose on GR. We conclude that addition of select HV-HPMC to mashed potato blunts GR.

  10. Understanding the Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load and Their Practical Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarim, Fernanda Lorenzi; Stancanelli, Mirtes; Brenzikofer, Rene; de Macedo, Denise Vaz

    2009-01-01

    We have introduced the study of synthesis pathways using two experiments: 1--the determination of the glycemic index (GI) of some foods and the effects of fiber and fat on the GI; 2--the determination of blood glucose levels after the ingestion of meals with high and low glycemic loads (GL). After a practice assembly, when the foods and meals that…

  11. Effects of high-intensity interval exercise versus continuous moderate-intensity exercise on postprandial glycemic control assessed by continuous glucose monitoring in obese adults.

    PubMed

    Little, Jonathan P; Jung, Mary E; Wright, Amy E; Wright, Wendi; Manders, Ralph J F

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of acute high-intensity interval training (HIIT) compared with continuous moderate-intensity (CMI) exercise on postprandial hyperglycemia in overweight or obese adults. Ten inactive, overweight or obese adults (41 ± 11 yrs, BMI = 36 ± 7 kg/m(2)) performed an acute bout of HIIT (10 × 1 min at approximately 90% peak heart rate (HRpeak) with 1-min recovery periods) or matched work CMI (30 min at approximately 65% HRpeak) in a randomized, counterbalanced fashion. Exercise was performed 2 h after breakfast, and glucose control was assessed by continuous glucose monitoring under standardized dietary conditions over 24 h. Postprandial glucose (PPG) responses to lunch, dinner, and the following day's breakfast were analyzed and compared with a no-exercise control day. Exercise did not affect the PPG responses to lunch, but performing both HIIT and CMI in the morning significantly reduced the PPG incremental area under the curve (AUC) following dinner when compared with control (HIIT = 110 ± 35, CMI = 125 ± 34, control = 162 ± 46 mmol/L × 2 h, p < 0.05). The PPG AUC (HIIT = 125 ± 53, CMI = 186 ± 55, control = 194 ± 96 mmol/L × 2 h) and the PPG spike (HIIT = Δ2.1 ± 0.9, CMI = Δ3.0 ± 0.9, control = Δ3.0 ± 1.5 mmol/l) following breakfast on the following day were significantly lower following HIIT compared with both CMI and control (p < 0.05). Absolute AUC and absolute glucose spikes were not different between HIIT, CMI, or control for any meal (p > 0.05 for all). We conclude that a single session of HIIT has greater and more lasting effects on reducing incremental PPG when compared with CMI.

  12. Metabolic Risk Factors of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Correlated Glycemic Control/Complications: A Cross-Sectional Study between Rural and Urban Uygur Residents in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Hua; Zhu, Jun; Ma, Qi; Tuerdi, Ablikm; He, Xiao-dong; Wang, Li; Wang, Zhi-qiang; Xiao, Shan; Wang, Shu-xia; Su, Li-ping

    2016-01-01

    Background Diabetes is a major global public health problem driven by a high prevalence of metabolic risk factors. Objective To describe the differences of metabolic risk factors of type 2 diabetes, as well as glycemic control and complicated diabetic complications between rural and urban Uygur residents in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of China. Methods This comparative cross-sectional study, conducted among 2879 urban and 918 rural participants in Xinjiang, China, assessed the metabolic risk factors of diabetes and related complications differences between urban and rural settlements. Results Compared to rural areas, urban participants had higher education level and more average income, little physical activity, less triglycerides and higher HDL-c (p < 0.05 respectively). Differences in metabolic risk factors by urban/rural residence included overweight or obesity, triglycerides (≥1.71mmol/l), HDL-c (< 1.04 mmol/l), alcohol intake, and physical inactivity (p < 0.01 respectively). There was significant difference regarding the prevalence of HbA1c >8% (48.1% versus 54.5%, p = 0.019) between rural and urban diabetic participants. No significant difference in the prevalence of type 2 diabetic complications between urban and rural participants (74.9% versus 72.2%; p = 0.263) was detected. Compared to rural participants, the most prevalent modifiable risk factors associated with diabetic complications in urban participants were obesity (BMI ≥ 28 Kg/m2), HDL-c (< 1.04 mmol/l), physical inactivity and irregular eating habits (p = 0.035, p = 0.001, p < 0.001, and p = 0.013, respectively). Conclusions Urban settlers were significantly more likely to have metabolic risk factors highlighting the need for public health efforts to improve health outcomes for these vulnerable populations. Diabetes related complications risk factors were prevalent amongst rural and urban diabetes settlers. PMID:27622506

  13. Effects of the antitumor drug OSI-906, a dual inhibitor of IGF-1 receptor and insulin receptor, on the glycemic control, β-cell functions, and β-cell proliferation in male mice.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, Jun; Okuyama, Tomoko; Yoshida, Eiko; Shimizu, Mari; Horigome, Yuka; Tuno, Takayuki; Hayasaka, Moe; Abe, Shiori; Fuse, Masahiro; Togashi, Yu; Terauchi, Yasuo

    2014-06-01

    The IGF-1 receptor has become a therapeutic target for the treatment of cancer. The efficacy of OSI-906 (linstinib), a dual inhibitor of IGF-1 receptor and insulin receptor, for solid cancers has been examined in clinical trials. The effects of OSI-906, however, on the blood glucose levels and pancreatic β-cell functions have not yet been reported. We investigated the impact of OSI-906 on glycemic control, insulin secretion, β-cell mass, and β-cell proliferation in male mice. Oral administration of OSI-906 worsened glucose tolerance in a dose-dependent manner in the wild-type mice. OSI-906 at a dose equivalent to the clinical daily dose (7.5 mg/kg) transiently evoked glucose intolerance and hyperinsulinemia. Insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-2-deficient mice and mice with diet-induced obesity, both models of peripheral insulin resistance, exhibited more severe glucose intolerance after OSI-906 administration than glucokinase-haploinsufficient mice, a model of impaired insulin secretion. Phloridzin improved the hyperglycemia induced by OSI-906 in mice. In vitro, OSI-906 showed no effect on insulin secretion from isolated islets. After daily administration of OSI-906 for a week to mice, the β-cell mass and β-cell proliferation rate were significantly increased. The insulin signals in the β-cells were apparently unaffected in those mice. Taken together, the results suggest that OSI-906 could exacerbate diabetes, especially in patients with insulin resistance. On the other hand, the results suggest that the β-cell mass may expand in response to chemotherapy with this drug.

  14. A Comparison of Food-grade Folium mori (桑葉 Sāng Yè) Extract and 1-Deoxynojirimycin for Glycemic Control and Renal Function in Streptozotocin-induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shiang-Suo; Yan, Yi-Hui; Ko, Chien-Hui; Chen, Ke-Ming; Lee, Shih-Chieh; Liu, Cheng-Tzu

    2014-01-01

    Folium mori (桑葉 Sāng Yè, leaf of Morus alba L.; FM) is known to possess hypoglycemic effects, and 1-deoxynojirimycin (1-DNJ) has been proposed as an important functional compound in FM. However, the hypoglycemic activity of purified 1-DNJ has been rarely studied. It is also not known how FM and 1-DNJ affect the development of DM nephropathy. This study compared the antidiabetic effect of a commercial FM product with that of purified 1-DNJ in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Seven days after induction, the diabetic rats were gavaged with FM (1, 3, 10, and 30 mg/kg/day), 1-DNJ (30 mg/kg/day), or vehicle (distilled deionized water; 2 ml/kg/day) for 7 days. All doses of FM ameliorated fasting and post-prandial blood glucose concomitantly with an increase in peripheral and pancreatic levels of insulin and improved homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR) in diabetic rats in a dose-dependent manner. Increased thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and nitrate/nitrite levels in the kidney, liver, and muscle of diabetic rats were reversed by all doses of FM. The renal function of the diabetic rats was normalized by all doses of FM, while blood pressure changes were reversed by FM at doses of 3 mg/kg and above. Moreover, most of the above-mentioned parameters were improved by FM at doses of 3 mg/kg and above to a similar extent as that of 1-DNJ. The results showed superior antidiabetic potential of the commercial FM product for glycemic control and protection against the development of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:25161921

  15. Oxidative stress and glycemic regulation.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A

    2000-02-01

    Oxidative stress is an acknowledged pathogenetic mechanism in diabetic complications. Hyperglycemia is a widely known cause of enhanced free radical concentration, whereas oxidative stress involvement in glycemic regulation is still debated. Glucose transport is a cascade of events starting from the interaction of insulin with its own receptor at the plasma membrane and ending with intracellular glucose metabolism. In this complex series of events, each step plays an important role and can be inhibited by a negative effect of oxidative stress. Several studies show that an acute increase in the blood glucose level may impair the physiological homeostasis of many systems in living organisms. The mechanisms through which acute hyperglycemia exerts these effects may be identified in the production of free radicals. It has been suggested that insulin resistance may be accompanied by intracellular production of free radicals. In adipocytes cultured in vitro, insulin increases the production of hydrogen peroxide, which has been shown to mimic the action of insulin. These data allow us to hypothesize that a vicious circle between hyperinsulinemia and free radicals could be operating: insulin resistance might cause elevated plasma free radical concentrations, which, in turn, might be responsible for a deterioration of insulin action, with hyperglycemia being a contributory factor. Data supporting this hypothesis are available. Vitamin E improves insulin action in healthy, elderly, and non-insulin-dependent diabetic subjects. Similar results can be obtained by vitamin C administration.

  16. Early diabetic neuropathy: Triggers and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Dobretsov, Maxim; Romanovsky, Dmitry; Stimers, Joseph R

    2007-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy, and specifically distal peripheral neuropathy (DPN), is one of the most frequent and troublesome complications of diabetes mellitus. It is the major reason for morbidity and mortality among diabetic patients. It is also frequently associated with debilitating pain. Unfortunately, our knowledge of the natural history and pathogenesis of this disease remains limited. For a long time hyperglycemia was viewed as a major, if not the sole factor, responsible for all symptomatic presentations of DPN. Multiple clinical observations and animal studies supported this view. The control of blood glucose as an obligatory step of therapy to delay or reverse DPN is no longer an arguable issue. However, while supporting evidence for the glycemic hypothesis has accumulated, multiple controversies accumulated as well. It is obvious now that DPN cannot be fully understood without considering factors besides hyperglycemia. Some symptoms of DPN may develop with little, if any, correlation with the glycemic status of a patient. It is also clear that identification of these putative non-glycemic mechanisms of DPN is of utmost importance for our understanding of failures with existing treatments and for the development of new approaches for diagnosis and therapy of DPN. In this work we will review the strengths and weaknesses of the glycemic hypothesis, focusing on clinical and animal data and on the pathogenesis of early stages and triggers of DPN other than hyperglycemia. PMID:17226897

  17. Cheonggukjang, a soybean paste fermented with B. licheniformis-67 prevents weight gain and improves glycemic control in high fat diet induced obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Joo-Hee; Pichiah, P.B.Tirupathi; Kim, Min-Jung; Cha, Youn-Soo

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the anti-obesity effects of soybean paste—Cheonggukjang, fermented with poly gamma glutamic acid producing Bacillus licheniformis-67 in diet induced obese C57BL/6J mice. Forty male C57BL/6J mice aged 4 weeks were divided into four dietary groups; normal diet control, high fat diet control, high fat diet containing 30% of unfermented soybean and high fat diet containing 30% Cheonggukjang fermented with Bacillus licheniformis-67. After 13 weeks of dietary intervention the mice were sacrificed; serum and tissue samples were examined. Serum and hepatic lipid profile, blood glucose, insulin, leptin level were lower (<0.05) along with the body weight and epididymal fat pad weight in the 30% Cheonggukjang supplemented group compared with the high fat diet control group. The expression level of lipid anabolic gene was significantly decreased; whereas the expression level of lipid catabolic genes were significantly increased in the 30% Cheonggukjang supplemented group compared to the high fat diet control group. Collectively, these results suggested that intake of Cheonggukjang fermented with Bacillus licheniformis-67 significantly prevents obesity related parameters. PMID:27499576

  18. [Glycemic variability and continuous monitoring of glycemia].

    PubMed

    Prázný, Martin; Soupal, Jan

    2014-09-01

    Blood glucose levels are not constant in ther human body even in physiological status. It fluctuates depending on food intake, exercise, psychological and other factors. Normally it fluctuates between 3.9 to 7.5 mmol/l and in fasting in the standard conditions it does not exceed even more narrow range 3.9 to 5.5 mmol/l. Fluctuations are more pronounced in patient with diabetes. Hyperglycemia is a common and basic pathology in diabetes, however, antidiabetic drug often cause hypoglycemia, both increasing the range for glucose fluctuations. The level of glucose fluctuation is called glycemic variability (GV). Glycemic variability is now a favorite target of scientific research in dia-betology. Increased glycemic variability is associated with hypoglycemia, possibly may contribute to chronic dia-betes complications and negatively influences quality of life of diabetic patients. Last but not least, thanks to the new technology of continuous glucose monitoring, we can better describe and measure it. Finally, glycemic variability emerges as a potentially important therapeutical target.Key words: continuous glucose monitoring - glycemic variability - insulin pump - sensor augmented pump.

  19. Temperament, Executive Control, and ADHD across Early Development

    PubMed Central

    Rabinovitz, Beth B.; O’Neill, Sarah; Rajendran, Khushmand; Halperin, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Research examining factors linking early temperament and later ADHD is limited by cross-sectional approaches and having the same informant rate both temperament and psychopathology. We used multi-informant/multi-method longitudinal data to test the hypothesis that negative emotionality during preschool is positively associated with ADHD symptom severity in middle childhood, but developing executive control mediates this relation. Children (N=161) with and without ADHD were evaluated three times: Parent and teacher temperament ratings and NEPSY Visual Attention at ages 3–4 years; WISC-IV Working Memory Index and NEPSY Response Set at age 6 years; and ADHD symptoms using the Kiddie-SADS at age 7 years. Parent and teacher ratings of preschoolers’ temperament were combined to form an Anger/Frustration composite. Similarly, an Executive Functioning composite was derived from age 6 measures. Bootstrapping was used to determine whether age 6 Executive Functioning mediated the relation between early Anger/Frustration and later ADHD symptom severity, while controlling for early executive functioning. Preschoolers’ Anger/Frustration was significantly associated with later ADHD symptoms, with this relation partially mediated by age 6 Executive Functioning. Developing executive control mediates the relation between early Anger/Frustration and later ADHD symptom severity, suggesting that Anger/Frustration influences ADHD symptom severity through its impact on developing executive control. Early interventions targeting the harmful influences of negative emotionality or enhancing executive functioning may diminish later ADHD severity. PMID:26854505

  20. Conjugated linoleic acid improves glycemic response, lipid profile, and oxidative stress in obese patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi-Mameghani, Mehrangiz; Jamali, Haleh; Mahdavi, Reza; Kakaei, Farzad; Abedi, Rana; Kabir-Mamdooh, Bita

    2016-01-01

    Aim To investigate if conjugated linoleic acid supplementation (CLA) affects metabolic factors and oxidative stress in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Methods The study was a randomized, controlled clinical trial conducted in specialized and subspecialized clinics of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences from January 2014 to March 2015. 38 obese NAFLD patients were randomly allocated into either the intervention group, receiving three 1000 mg softgel of CLA with a weight loss diet and 400 IU vitamin E, or into the control group, receiving only weight loss diet and 400 IU vitamin E for eight weeks. Dietary data and physical activity, as well as anthropometric, body composition, metabolic factors, and oxidative stress were assessed at baseline and at the end of the study. Results Weight, body composition, and serum oxidative stress, insulin, and lipid profile significantly improved in both groups, while hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels (P = 0.004), total cholesterol to high density lipoprotein ratio (P = 0.008), low density lipoprotein to high density lipoprotein ratio (LDL/HDL) (P = 0.002), and alanine aminotransferase to aspartate aminotransferase (ALT/AST) ratio (P = 0.025) significantly decreased in the intervention group. At the end of the study, fat mass (P = 0.001), muscle mass (P = 0.023), total body water (P = 0.004), HbA1c (P < 0.001), triglycerides (P = 0.006), LDL/HDL ratio (P = 0.027), and ALT/AST ratio (P = 0.046) were significantly better in the CLA group than in the control group. Conclusion CLA improved insulin resistance, lipid disturbances, oxidative stress, and liver function in NAFLD. Therefore, it could be considered as an effective complementary treatment in NAFLD. Registration number: IRCT2014020516491N1. PMID:27586548

  1. Continuous glucose monitors: use of waveform versus glycemic values in the improvements of glucose control, quality of life, and fear of hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Walker, Tomas C; Yucha, Carolyn B

    2014-05-01

    How patients are benefitting from continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) remains poorly understood. The focus on numerical glucose values persists, even though access to the glucose waveform and rate of change may contribute more to improved control. This pilot study compared outcomes of patients using CGMs with or without access to the numerical values on their CGM. Ten persons with type 1 diabetes, naïve to CGM use, enrolled in a 12-week study. Subjects were randomly assigned to either unmodified CGM receivers, or to CGM receivers that had their numerical values obscured but otherwise functioned normally. HbA1c, quality of life (QLI-D), and fear of hypoglycemia (HFS) were assessed, at baseline and at week 12. Baseline HbA1c for the entire group was 7.46 ± 1.27%. At week 12 the experimental group HbA1c reduction was 1.5 ± 0.9% (p < .05), the control group's reduction was 0.06 ± 0.61% (p > .05). Repeated measures testing revealed no significant difference in HbA1c reduction between groups. Both groups had reductions in HFS; these reductions were statistically significant within groups (p < .05), but not between groups. QLI-D indices demonstrated improvements (p < .05) in QLI-D total and the health and family subscales, but not between groups. The results of this pilot study suggest that benefits of CGM extend beyond reductions in HbA1c to reductions in fear of hypoglycemia and improvements in quality of life. The display of a numerical glucose value did not improve control when compared to numerically blinded units.

  2. Effect of green tea catechins on the postprandial glycemic response to starches differing in amylose content.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Wang, Mingzhu; Peng, Shanli; Zhang, Genyi

    2011-05-11

    The effect of tea polyphenols (TPLs), specifically tea catechins, on the postprandial glycemic response to cooked starches differing in amylose contents was investigated. The in vivo test using a mouse model showed a moderate reduction of the postprandial glycemic response to co-cooked normal (containing 27.8% amylose) or waxy corn starch with 10% TPLs (dry weight of starch), while an augmented glycemic response with a delayed blood glucose peak was observed when high amylose corn starch (HAC, containing 79.4% amylose) was used as the starch component. Enzyme kinetics results demonstrated that TPLs noncompetitively inhibit the digestion of waxy or normal corn starch, while the digestion rate of HAC starch was increased in the presence of TPLs, which supports the observed postprandial glycemic responses. Further studies using X-ray powder diffraction showed that the diffraction intensity (area under the diffraction curves) of normal and HAC starch was increased by 45% and 74%, respectively, whereas no change was observed for waxy corn starch. Consistently, dynamic laser light scattering studies using a solution of pure amylose showed an increased hydrodynamic radius of amylose molecules from ∼54 nm to ∼112 nm in the presence of TPLs. These experimental results indicate that there might exist an interaction between TPLs and amylose, which facilitates the association of amylose molecules to form a special nonordered structure that can produce a high and sustained postprandial glycemic response. Thus, a combination of tea polyphenols and specific starches could be used to manipulate postprandial glycemic response for glycemic control and optimal health.

  3. Family system dynamics and type 1 diabetic glycemic variability: a vector-auto-regressive model.

    PubMed

    Günther, Moritz Philipp; Winker, Peter; Böttcher, Claudia; Brosig, Burkhard

    2013-06-01

    Statistical approaches rooted in econometric methodology, so far foreign to the psychiatric and psychological realms have provided exciting and substantial new insights into complex mind-body interactions over time and individuals. Over 120 days, this structured diary study explored the mutual interactions of emotions within a classic 3-person family system with its Type 1 diabetic adolescent's daily blood glucose variability. Glycemic variability was measured through daily standard deviations of blood glucose determinations (at least 3 per day). Emotions were captured individually utilizing the self-assessment manikin on affective valence (negative-positive), activation (calm-excited), and control (dominated-dominant). Auto- and cross-correlating the stationary absolute (level) values of the mutually interacting parallel time series data sets through vector autoregression (VAR, grounded in econometric theory) allowed for the formulation of 2 concordant models. Applying Cholesky Impulse Response Analysis at a 95% confidence interval, we provided evidence for an adolescent being happy, calm, and in control to exhibit less glycemic variability and hence diabetic derailment. A nondominating mother and a happy father seemed to also reduce glycemic variability. Random shocks increasing glycemic variability affected only the adolescent and her father: In 1 model, the male parent felt in charge; in the other, he calmed down while his daughter turned sad. All reactions to external shocks lasted for less than 4 full days. Extant literature on affect and glycemic variability in Type 1 diabetic adolescents as well as challenges arising from introducing econometric theory to the field were discussed.

  4. Kidney function decline in metformin versus sulfonylurea initiators: assessment of time-dependent contribution of weight, blood pressure and glycemic control

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Adriana M.; Roumie, Christianne L.; Greevy, Robert A.; Liu, Xulei; Grijalva, Carlos G.; Murff, Harvey J.; Griffin, Marie R.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective We recently reported that kidney function declined faster among initiators of sulfonylureas compared to metformin; however, sulfonylurea compared to metformin use was also associated with increases in body mass index (BMI) and systolic blood pressure (SBP). We sought to determine if differences between sulfonylureas and metformin on kidney function decline were mediated by differential effects on BMI, SBP, or glucose control. Methods We identified 13238 veterans who initiated sulfonylurea or metformin treatment (2000–2007) with a baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) >60 ml/min, and followed them until a study event occurred, non-persistence on treatment, loss of follow-up or end of the study. The composite outcome was a sustained decline from baseline eGFR of ≥25%, end stage renal disease, or death. We estimated the association of cumulative measurements of potential mediators including BMI, SBP and glycated hemoglobin on the study outcome. We determined if controlling for these time-varying covariates accounted for the differences in outcome between sulfonylurea and metformin initiators. Results Compared to sulfonylurea use, metformin use was associated with a lower risk for renal function decline or death [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 0.82, 95% confidence interval 0.70, 0.97]. This protective association remained significant [aHR 0.83 (0.70–0.98)] when accounting for the cumulative time varying measurements of the three mediators of interest. Conclusion Metformin initiation was associated with a lower risk of kidney function decline or death compared to sulfonylureas which appeared to be independent of changes in BMI, SBP and glycated hemoglobin over time. PMID:23592561

  5. Multi-Scale Glycemic Variability: A Link to Gray Matter Atrophy and Cognitive Decline in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xingran; Abduljalil, Amir; Manor, Brad D.; Peng, Chung-Kang; Novak, Vera

    2014-01-01

    Objective Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) accelerates brain aging and cognitive decline. Complex interactions between hyperglycemia, glycemic variability and brain aging remain unresolved. This study investigated the relationship between glycemic variability at multiple time scales, brain volumes and cognition in type 2 DM. Research Design and Methods Forty-three older adults with and 26 without type 2 DM completed 72-hour continuous glucose monitoring, cognitive tests and anatomical MRI. We described a new analysis of continuous glucose monitoring, termed Multi-Scale glycemic variability (Multi-Scale GV), to examine glycemic variability at multiple time scales. Specifically, Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition was used to identify five unique ultradian glycemic variability cycles (GVC1–5) that modulate serum glucose with periods ranging from 0.5–12 hrs. Results Type 2 DM subjects demonstrated greater variability in GVC3–5 (period 2.0–12 hrs) than controls (P<0.0001), during the day as well as during the night. Multi-Scale GV was related to conventional markers of glycemic variability (e.g. standard deviation and mean glycemic excursions), but demonstrated greater sensitivity and specificity to conventional markers, and was associated with worse long-term glycemic control (e.g. fasting glucose and HbA1c). Across all subjects, those with greater glycemic variability within higher frequency cycles (GVC1–3; 0.5–2.0 hrs) had less gray matter within the limbic system and temporo-parietal lobes (e.g. cingulum, insular, hippocampus), and exhibited worse cognitive performance. Specifically within those with type 2 DM, greater glycemic variability in GVC2–3 was associated with worse learning and memory scores. Greater variability in GVC5 was associated with longer DM duration and more depression. These relationships were independent of HbA1c and hypoglycemic episodes. Conclusions Type 2 DM is associated with dysregulation of glycemic variability over multiple

  6. Glycemic control and oxidative stress markers and their relationship with the thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP) gene in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Andrews Guzmán, Mónica; Arredondo Olguín, Miguel; Olivares Gronhert, Manuel

    2014-09-12

    Objetivo: Investigar la relación existente entre parámetros bioquímicos y de estrés oxidativo y la expresión de TXNIP, IL-6, IL-1y TNF-en células mononucleares periféricas (CMPs) de sujetos diabéticos. Material y métodos: Se estudió 60 sujetos hombres: 20 con peso normal y diabetes tipo 2 (NW), 20 sujetos obesos con diabetes (OB) y 20 sujetos controles (C). Se evaluaron parámetros bioquímicos y de estrés oxidativo. Además se aislaron CMPs para la extracción de RNA total y se determinó la expresión de los genes TXNIP, IL-6, IL- 1y TNF-mediante PCR de tiempo real cuantitativo. Resultados: Los OB presentaron mayor IMC y circunferencia abdominal que los NW y los C (ANOVA de una vía, p.

  7. Oral L-glutamine increases active GLP-1 (7-36) amide secretion and improves glycemic control in stretpozotocin-nicotinamide induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Badole, Sachin L; Bagul, Pranita P; Mahamuni, Sagar P; Khose, Rekha D; Joshi, Anuja C; Jangam, Ganesh B; Ghule, Arvindkumar E; Raut, Chandrashekhar G; Khedkar, Vijay M; Coutinho, Evans C

    2013-04-25

    L-glutamine is a non-essential amino acid. It decreased blood sugar, stimulated insulin secretion in type 2 diabetic patients. The objective of the present investigation was to evaluate L-glutamine increases glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) (7-36) amide secretion in streptozotocin-nicotinamide (STZ-NTM) induced diabetic Sprague Dawley rats. Molecular docking study was performed to elucidate the molecular basis for GLP-1 receptor agonistic activity. Type 2 diabetes was induced in overnight fasted Sprague Dawley rats pre-treated with nicotinamide (100 mg/kg, i.p.) followed by 20 min after administration of streptozotocin (55 mg/kg, i.p.). The rats were divided into; I - nondiabetic, II - diabetic control, III - sitagliptin (5 mg/kg, p.o.), IV - L-glutamine (250 mg/kg, p.o.), V - L-glutamine (500 mg/kg, p.o.) and VI - L-glutamine (1000 mg/kg, p.o.). The L-glutamine and sitagliptin treatment was 8 week. Plasma glucose was estimated every week. Body weight, food and water intake were recorded daily. Glycosylated haemoglobin, lipid profile, plasma and colonic active (GLP-1) (7-36) amide, mRNA expression of proglucagon GLP-1, plasma and pancreatic insulin, histology of pancreata and biomarkers of oxidative stress (superoxidase dismutase, reduced glutathione, malondialdehyde, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione S transferase) were measured after 8 week. In acute study, the rats were divided into I - glucose (2.5 g/kg, p.o.), II - sitagliptin (5 mg/kg, p.o.), III - L-glutamine (250 mg/kg, p.o.), IV - L-glutamine (500 mg/kg, p.o.) and V - L-glutamine (1000 mg/kg, p.o.). Plasma glucose, active GLP-1 (7-36) amide concentration and insulin levels were measured after glucose loading. The docking data indicated that l-glutamine bind to the GLP-1 receptor. L-glutamine decreased plasma glucose, increased plasma and pancreatic insulin, increased plasma and colonic active GLP-1 (7-36) amide secretion as well as decreased oxidative stress in streptozotocin-nicotinamide induced diabetic

  8. Improved Postprandial Glycemic Control with Faster-Acting Insulin Aspart in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Using Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Joseph A.; Hyveled, Liselotte; Tamer, Søren C.; Demissie, Marek

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Faster aspart is insulin aspart (IAsp) in a new formulation, which in continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) in subjects with type 1 diabetes has shown a faster onset and offset of glucose-lowering effect than IAsp. Methods: This double-blind, randomized, crossover active-controlled trial compared 2-h postprandial plasma glucose (PPG) response, following 2 weeks of CSII with faster aspart or IAsp. Primary endpoint: mean change in PPG 2 h after a standardized meal test (ΔPGav,0–2h). Subjects (n = 43) had masked continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) throughout. Results: Faster aspart provided a statistically significantly greater glucose-lowering effect following the meal versus IAsp: ΔPGav,0–2h: 3.03 mmol/L versus 4.02 mmol/L (54.68 mg/dL vs. 72.52 mg/dL); estimated treatment difference (ETD) [95% CI]: −0.99 mmol/L [–1.95; −0.03] (−17.84 mg/dL [–35.21; −0.46]; P = 0.044). One hour postmeal, PG levels were −1.64 mmol/L (−29.47 mg/dL) lower with faster aspart versus IAsp (P = 0.006). Interstitial glucose (IG) profiles supported these findings; the largest differences were observed at breakfast: 9.08 versus 9.56 mmol/L (163.57 vs. 172.19 mg/dL; ETD [95% CI]: −0.48 mmol/L [–0.97; 0.01]; −8.62 mg/dL [–17.49; 0.24]; P = 0.057). Duration of low IG levels (≤3.9 mmol/L [70 mg/dL] per 24 h) was statistically significantly shorter for faster aspart versus IAsp (2.03 h vs. 2.45 h; ETD [95% CI]: −0.42 [–0.72; −0.11]; P = 0.008). No unexpected safety findings were observed. Conclusions: CSII delivery of faster aspart had a greater glucose-lowering effect than IAsp after a meal test. CGM results recorded throughout all meals supported this finding, with less time spent with low IG levels. PMID:28055230

  9. Progressive zinc-induced changes in glycemic responses in lean and obese LAIN-cp rats

    SciTech Connect

    Zwick, D.; Frimpong, N.A.; Tulp, O.L. )

    1991-03-15

    The effect of diet and phenotype on glycemic status was studied in 9-17 week (wk) old female LAIN-cp rats fed isoenergetic diets containing 0, 20 (control), or 100 ppm Zn. At 9, 13 and 17 wks of age, fasting glucose (FG) of obese > lean. At age 13 wks, Fg of obese + 0 ppm Zn < control obese, and by 17 weeks, lean + 0 ppm Zn < controls, consistent with both diet and phenotype effects on FG. Four point glucose tolerance tests were determined via both intraperitoneal (ipGTT) and oral (OGT) routes at periodic intervals. ipGTT glycemic responses of control obese > lean at all ages, and at both 13 and 17 weeks, obese rats fed both 0 ppm and 100 ppm Zn diets had greater glycemic excursions at +30, +60, and +120 minutes than obese controls, and the glycemic excursions became progressively more impaired as the dietary regimens progressed. In contrast, the corresponding plasma glucoses following ipGTT in lean rats fed 0 or 100 ppm Zn diets and the OGT responses of all rats of both phenotypes remained similar to lean controls at those point. Plasma insulin concentrations of obese 0 ppm Zn < controls following ipGTT, and became progressively more impaired in obese rats fed 0 ppm Zn diet as the duration of treatment continued. These observations suggest that the progressive deterioration of glucose homeostasis when fed diets deficient or excessive in Zn content may be due to impaired pancreatic secretion and/or release of insulin.

  10. Influence of glycemic index and glycemic load of the diet on the risk of overweight and adiposity in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Kellen Cristine; Nobre, Luciana Neri; Vicente, Sofia Emanuelle de Castro Ferreira; Moreira, Lidiane Lopes; Lessa, Angelina do Carmo; Lamounier, Joel Alves

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To investigate the association between the glycemic index and the glycemic load of the diet with the risk of overweight and high adiposity in children with 5 years of age. Methods: Cross-sectional study nested in a cohort of 232 children born and living in Diamantina (MG, Brazil). Parents and/or guardians provided the food intake data, using a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire, past history and socioeconomic conditions. Anthropometric and fatness data were collected from the children. The dietary glycemic index and the glycemic load were calculated from the food intake. The glycemic index and glycemic load effect on overweight and adiposity in children was assessed by the Poisson regression (p<0.05). Results: The prevalence of overweight by body mass index was 17.3%, and high adiposity was observed in 3.4% and 6.9% by triceps skinfold and subscapular skinfold, respectively. No difference was reported between the mean body mass index, triceps skinfold and subscapular skinfold according to the glycemic index and glycemic load tertiles; however, the overweight group presented a higher carbohydrate intake (p=0.04). No association was found between glycemic index and glycemic load with overweight and adiposity among the children assessed. Conclusions: The glycemic index and glycemic load of the diet were not identified as risk factors for overweight and adiposity in this cross-sectional study. PMID:27215968

  11. Dietary carbohydrate intake, glycemic index, and glycemic load and endometrial cancer risk: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Helen G; Kitahara, Cari M; Murray, Liam J; Dodd, Kevin W; Black, Amanda; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z; Cantwell, Marie M

    2014-01-01

    Endometrial cancer risk has been directly associated with glycemic load. However, few studies have investigated this link, and the etiological role of specific dietary carbohydrate components remains unclear. Our aim was to investigate associations of carbohydrate intake, glycemic index, and glycemic load with endometrial cancer risk in the US Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. Recruitment took place in 1993-2001. Over a median of 9.0 years of follow-up through 2009, 386 women developed endometrial cancer among 36,115 considered in the analysis. Dietary intakes were assessed using a 124-item diet history questionnaire. Cox proportional hazards models were applied to calculate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Significant inverse associations were detected between endometrial cancer risk and total available carbohydrate intake (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.66, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.49, 0.90), total sugars intake (HR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.52, 0.96), and glycemic load (HR = 0.63, 95% CI: 0.46, 0.84) when women in the highest quartile of intake were compared with those in the lowest. These inverse associations were strongest among overweight and obese women. No associations with endometrial cancer risk were observed for glycemic index or dietary fiber. Our findings contrast with previous evidence and suggest that high carbohydrate intakes and glycemic loads are protective against endometrial cancer development. Further clarification of these associations is warranted.

  12. Effect of cooling of cooked white rice on resistant starch content and glycemic response.

    PubMed

    Sonia, Steffi; Witjaksono, Fiastuti; Ridwan, Rahmawati

    2015-01-01

    Cooling of cooked starch is known to cause starch retrogradation which increases resistant starch content. This study aimed to determine the effect of cooling of cooked white rice on resistant starch content and glycemic response in healthy subjects. Resistant starch contents were analyzed on freshly cooked white rice (control rice), cooked white rice cooled for 10 hours at room temperature (test rice I), and cooked white rice cooled for 24 hours at 4°C then reheated (test rice II). The results showed that resistant starch contents in control rice, test rice I, and test rice II were 0.64 g/100 g, 1.30 g/100 g, and 1.65 g/100 g, respectively. Test rice II had higher resistant starch content than test rice I, hence used in the clinical study along with control rice to characterize glycemic response in 15 healthy adults. The clinical study was a randomized, single-blind crossover study. In the clinical study, test rice II significantly lowered glycemic response compared with control rice (125±50.1 vs 152±48.3 mmol.min/L, respectively; p=0.047). In conclusion, cooling of cooked white rice increased resistant starch content. Cooked white rice cooled for 24 hours at 4°C then reheated lowered glycemic response compared with freshly cooked white rice.

  13. Verification of glycemic profiles using continuous glucose monitoring: cases with steroid use, liver cirrhosis, enteral nutrition, or late dumping syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Miyako; Noda, Mitsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Glycemic control is often difficult to achieve in patients with diabetes, especially in the presence of comorbid diseases or conditions such as steroid-use or liver cirrhosis, or in patients receiving enteral nutrition. Moreover, reactive hypoglycemia due to late dumping syndrome in people having undergone gastrectomy is also a matter of concern. Empirically and theoretically, the typical glycemic profiles associated with these conditions have been determined; however, what actually happens during a 24-h span is still somewhat obscure. In order to verify and provide information about the 24-h glycemic profiles associated with these conditions, 8 patients with the 4 above-mentioned conditions were monitored using a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS). For all 8 patients, CGMS provided detailed information regarding the 24-h glycemic profiles. The CGM results showed typical glycemic patterns for each condition, and we were moreover able to observe the effects of various practical treatments. Based on these cases, we conclude that the CGMS is highly useful for determining the glycemic patterns of patients with the aforementioned conditions in a practical setting; and this system may be used to monitor the treatment success of such cases.

  14. Treatment intensification in patients with inadequate glycemic control on basal insulin: rationale and clinical evidence for the use of short‐acting and other glucagon‐like peptide‐1 receptor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Bonadonna, Riccardo C.; Gentile, Sandro; Vettor, Roberto; Pozzilli, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Summary A substantial proportion of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus do not reach glycemic targets, despite treatment with oral anti‐diabetic drugs and basal insulin therapy. Several options exist for treatment intensification beyond basal insulin, and the treatment paradigm is complex. In this review, the options for treatment intensification will be explored, focusing on drug classes that act via the incretin system and paying particular attention to the short‐acting glucagon‐like peptide‐1 receptor agonists exenatide and lixisenatide. Current treatment guidelines will be summarized and discussed. © 2016 The Authors. Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26787264

  15. Effect of one year continuous subcutaneous infusion of a somatostatin analogue, octreotide, on early retinopathy, metabolic control and thyroid function in Type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kirkegaard, C; Nørgaard, K; Snorgaard, O; Bek, T; Larsen, M; Lund-Andersen, H

    1990-06-01

    Growth hormone is assumed to be involved in the development of diabetic retinopathy. In a randomized study we evaluated the possible effects of one year treatment with a somatostatin (SRIH) analogue, octreotide, on early retinopathy and on metabolism in Type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. Eleven patients were allocated to treatment with a continuous sc infusion of 400 micrograms octreotide per day and 9 served as controls. Only 7 patients from each group completed the study. Three octreotide-treated patients left the study owing to severe diarrhea. The subjects were evaluated at entry, after 2, 6 and 12 months treatment, and 2 months after withdrawal. Octreotide induced a decrease in GH secretion, expressed as the area under the 24 h serum GH profiles (p less than 0.05), and of the serum levels of IGF-I (p less than 0.05). The entire decline in GH levels occurred during the daytime, whereas the nocturnal levels were unaffected. Retinopathy, as assessed by determination of the blood retina barrier permeability, by colour fundus photography, and flurescein angiography was unchanged in both groups. Apart from a decline in insulin requirements, octreotide had no major effect on glycemic control, but induced a mild transient pituitary hypothyroidism, not clinically relevant. We conclude that treatment with octreotide for one year has modest effects on GH, IGF-I, and glucose metabolism, but has no significant effect on early retinopathy in Type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes.

  16. Archean komatiite volcanism controlled by the evolution of early continents

    PubMed Central

    Mole, David R.; Fiorentini, Marco L.; Thebaud, Nicolas; Cassidy, Kevin F.; McCuaig, T. Campbell; Kirkland, Christopher L.; Romano, Sandra S.; Doublier, Michael P.; Belousova, Elena A.; Barnes, Stephen J.; Miller, John

    2014-01-01

    The generation and evolution of Earth’s continental crust has played a fundamental role in the development of the planet. Its formation modified the composition of the mantle, contributed to the establishment of the atmosphere, and led to the creation of ecological niches important for early life. Here we show that in the Archean, the formation and stabilization of continents also controlled the location, geochemistry, and volcanology of the hottest preserved lavas on Earth: komatiites. These magmas typically represent 50–30% partial melting of the mantle and subsequently record important information on the thermal and chemical evolution of the Archean–Proterozoic Earth. As a result, it is vital to constrain and understand the processes that govern their localization and emplacement. Here, we combined Lu-Hf isotopes and U-Pb geochronology to map the four-dimensional evolution of the Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia, and reveal the progressive development of an Archean microcontinent. Our results show that in the early Earth, relatively small crustal blocks, analogous to modern microplates, progressively amalgamated to form larger continental masses, and eventually the first cratons. This cratonization process drove the hottest and most voluminous komatiite eruptions to the edge of established continental blocks. The dynamic evolution of the early continents thus directly influenced the addition of deep mantle material to the Archean crust, oceans, and atmosphere, while also providing a fundamental control on the distribution of major magmatic ore deposits. PMID:24958873

  17. Archean komatiite volcanism controlled by the evolution of early continents.

    PubMed

    Mole, David R; Fiorentini, Marco L; Thebaud, Nicolas; Cassidy, Kevin F; McCuaig, T Campbell; Kirkland, Christopher L; Romano, Sandra S; Doublier, Michael P; Belousova, Elena A; Barnes, Stephen J; Miller, John

    2014-07-15

    The generation and evolution of Earth's continental crust has played a fundamental role in the development of the planet. Its formation modified the composition of the mantle, contributed to the establishment of the atmosphere, and led to the creation of ecological niches important for early life. Here we show that in the Archean, the formation and stabilization of continents also controlled the location, geochemistry, and volcanology of the hottest preserved lavas on Earth: komatiites. These magmas typically represent 50-30% partial melting of the mantle and subsequently record important information on the thermal and chemical evolution of the Archean-Proterozoic Earth. As a result, it is vital to constrain and understand the processes that govern their localization and emplacement. Here, we combined Lu-Hf isotopes and U-Pb geochronology to map the four-dimensional evolution of the Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia, and reveal the progressive development of an Archean microcontinent. Our results show that in the early Earth, relatively small crustal blocks, analogous to modern microplates, progressively amalgamated to form larger continental masses, and eventually the first cratons. This cratonization process drove the hottest and most voluminous komatiite eruptions to the edge of established continental blocks. The dynamic evolution of the early continents thus directly influenced the addition of deep mantle material to the Archean crust, oceans, and atmosphere, while also providing a fundamental control on the distribution of major magmatic ore deposits.

  18. Translational Control of Protein Synthesis: The Early Years

    PubMed Central

    Lodish, Harvey F.

    2012-01-01

    For the past fifty-five years, much of my research has focused on the function and biogenesis of red blood cells, including the cloning and study of many membrane proteins such as glucose and anion transporters and the erythropoietin receptor. We have also elucidated the mechanisms of membrane insertion, folding, and maturation of many plasma membrane and secreted proteins. Despite all of this work and more, I remain extremely proud of our very early work on the regulation of mRNA translation: work on bacteriophage f2 RNA in the 1960s and on translation of α- and β-globin mRNAs in the early 1970s. Using techniques hopelessly antiquated by today's standards, we correctly elucidated many important aspects of translational control, and I thought readers would be interested in learning how we did these experiments. PMID:22988251

  19. Translational control of protein synthesis: the early years.

    PubMed

    Lodish, Harvey F

    2012-10-19

    For the past fifty-five years, much of my research has focused on the function and biogenesis of red blood cells, including the cloning and study of many membrane proteins such as glucose and anion transporters and the erythropoietin receptor. We have also elucidated the mechanisms of membrane insertion, folding, and maturation of many plasma membrane and secreted proteins. Despite all of this work and more, I remain extremely proud of our very early work on the regulation of mRNA translation: work on bacteriophage f2 RNA in the 1960s and on translation of α- and β-globin mRNAs in the early 1970s. Using techniques hopelessly antiquated by today's standards, we correctly elucidated many important aspects of translational control, and I thought readers would be interested in learning how we did these experiments.

  20. Maternal control of pattern formation in early Caenorhabditis elegans embryos.

    PubMed

    Bowerman, B

    1998-01-01

    Genetic screens for recessive, maternal-effect, embryonic-lethal mutations have identified about 25 genes that control early steps of pattern formation in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. These maternal genes are discussed as belonging to one of three groups. The par group genes establish and maintain polarity in the one-cell zygote in response to sperm entry, defining an anterior/posterior body axis at least in part through interactions with the cyto-skeleton mediated by cortically localized proteins. Blastomere identity group genes act down-stream of the par group to specify the identities of individual embryonic cells, or blastomeres, using both cell autonomous and non-cell autonomous mechanisms. Requirements for the blastomere identity genes are consistent with previous studies suggesting that early asymmetric cleavages in the C. elegans embryo generate six "founder" cells that account for much of the C. elegans body plan. Intermediate group genes, most recently identified, may link the establishment of polarity in the zygote by par group genes to the localization of blastomere identity group gene functions. This review summarizes the known requirements for the members of each group, although it seems clear that additional regulatory genes controlling pattern formation in the early embryo have yet to be identified. An emerging challenge is to link the function of the genes in these three groups into interacting pathways that can account for the specification of the six founder cell identities in the early embryo, five of which produce somatic cell types and one of which produces the germline.

  1. Alliance for a Healthy Border: factors related to weight reduction and glycemic success.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohui; Ghaddar, Suad; Brown, Cynthia; Pagán, José A; Balboa, Marvelia

    2012-04-01

    We examined the factors related to success in achieving weight reduction and glycemic control in Alliance for a Healthy Border (AHB), a chronic disease prevention program implemented from 2006 to 2009 through 12 federally qualified community health centers serving primarily Hispanics in communities located along the US-Mexico border region. We analyzed data from Phase I of AHB using logistic regression to examine the determinants of success in achieving weight reduction and glycemic control among the participants in AHB programs. Factors affecting weight reduction success were sex, age, employment status, income, insurance, diabetes, baseline body mass index (BMI), smoking status, family history of diabetes, session type, program duration, and physical activity changes. Factors affecting achievement of glycemic success included sex, age, employment status, diabetes, baseline BMI, family history of diabetes, program duration, and physical activity changes. We found that the AHB interventions were more successful in reducing participants' HbA1c level than BMI. In addition to sociodemographic factors, participants with better baseline health conditions (ie, participants without diabetes or family history of diabetes, normal BMI, former smokers) were more likely to achieve success after the interventions. Of the 4 key features defining each of the 12 interventions, session type and program duration were associated with success. Within a relatively short time period, physical activity improvements had a stronger effect on weight reduction and glycemic success than improvements in dietary habits. The effectiveness of diabetes and cardiovascular disease prevention programs can be improved substantially by considering these factors during program design and structure.

  2. The effect of magnesium supplements on early post-transplantation glucose metabolism: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Van Laecke, Steven; Nagler, Evi Vanessa; Taes, Youri; Van Biesen, Wim; Peeters, Patrick; Vanholder, Raymond

    2014-09-01

    Post-transplantation hypomagnesemia is common and predicts diabetes. Magnesium improves glycemic control in diabetics and insulin sensitivity in insulin resistant subjects. We aimed to assess the effectiveness of oral magnesium for improving glycemic control and insulin sensitivity at 3 months post-transplantation. We conducted a single-center, open-label, randomized parallel group study. We included adults with serum magnesium <1.7 mg/dl within 2 weeks after kidney transplantation. We randomized participants to 450 mg magnesium oxide up to three times daily or no treatment. The primary endpoint was the mean difference in fasting glycemia. Secondary endpoints were the mean difference in area under the curve (AUC) of glucose during an oral glucose tolerance test and insulin resistance measured by Homeostasis Model of Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR). Analyses were on intention-to-treat basis. In patients randomized to magnesium oxide (N = 27) versus no treatment (N = 27), fasting glycemia on average was 11.5 mg/dl lower (95% CI 1.7 to 21.3; P = 0.02). There was no difference between the two groups neither for 2 h AUC, where the mean value was 1164 mg/dl/min (95% CI -1884 to 4284; P = 0.45) lower in the treatment group nor for HOMA-IR. Magnesium supplements modestly improved fasting glycemia without effect on insulin resistance. Higher baseline glycemia among patients in the control group may have driven the positive outcome (ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT01889576).

  3. Cassava Flour Substitution Modulates Glycemic Responses and Glycemic Index of Wheat Breads in Apparent Healthy Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Ebelechukwu N; Erukainure, Ochuko L; Ozumba, Augusta U; Adewale, Chris O; Kayode, Funmi O; Asieba, Godfrey O; Adesegha, Olubukola I; Elemo, Gloria N

    2017-07-04

    Different carbohydrate foods produce different glycemic responses even with little or no difference in macronutrient composition. Cassava constitutes one of the major staples in Nigeria. Four blends of cassava-wheat bread samples with 0, 10, 15, and 20% cassava flour inclusion were fed individually to groups of healthy human volunteers. Subjects were studied on separate occasions in the morning after a 10-12-hr overnight fast. Blood glucose responses were measured at intervals of 30 min over a period of 2 hr. Glucose was used as a reference food. There were normal glucose responses to the bread samples studied. Increase in cassava incorporation led to less significant glycemic responses. The glycemic index values ranged from 91-94. Results from this study indicate that the inclusion of cassava flour in bread production might not pose a threat to blood glucose response of individuals.

  4. Effect of the glycemic index of carbohydrates on Acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Rebecca C; Lee, Stephen; Choi, James Y J; Atkinson, Fiona S; Stockmann, Karola S; Petocz, Peter; Brand-Miller, Jennie C

    2010-10-01

    Acne vulgaris may be improved by dietary factors that increase insulin sensitivity. We hypothesized that a low-glycemic index diet would improve facial acne severity and insulin sensitivity. Fifty-eight adolescent males (mean age ± standard deviation 16.5 ± 1.0 y and body mass index 23.1 ± 3.5 kg/m(2)) were alternately allocated to high or low glycemic index diets. Severity of inflammatory lesions on the face, insulin sensitivity (homeostasis modeling assessment of insulin resistance), androgens and insulin-like growth factor-1 and its binding proteins were assessed at baseline and at eight weeks, a period corresponding to the school term. Forty-three subjects (n = 23 low glycemic index and n = 20 high glycemic index) completed the study. Diets differed significantly in glycemic index (mean ± standard error of the mean, low glycemic index 51 ± 1 vs. high glycemic index 61 ± 2, p = 0.0002), but not in macronutrient distribution or fiber content. Facial acne improved on both diets (low glycemic index -26 ± 6%, p = 0.0004 and high glycemic index -16 ± 7%, p = 0.01), but differences between diets did not reach significance. Change in insulin sensitivity was not different between diets (low glycemic index 0.2 ± 0.1 and high glycemic index 0.1 ± 0.1, p = 0.60) and did not correlate with change in acne severity (Pearson correlation r = -0.196, p = 0.244). Longer time frames, greater reductions in glycemic load or/and weight loss may be necessary to detect improvements in acne among adolescent boys.

  5. Influence of high glycemic index and glycemic load diets on blood pressure during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Bamini; Flood, Victoria M; Rochtchina, Elena; Baur, Louise A; Smith, Wayne; Mitchell, Paul

    2012-06-01

    We aimed to prospectively examine the association between the glycemic index and glycemic load of foods consumed and the dietary intakes of carbohydrates, sugars, fiber, and principal carbohydrate-containing food groups (eg, breads, cereals, and sugary drinks) with changes in blood pressure during adolescence. A total of 858 students aged 12 years at baseline (422 girls and 436 boys) were examined from 2004-2005 to 2009-2011. Dietary data were assessed from validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaires. Blood pressure was measured using a standard protocol. In girls, after adjusting for age, ethnicity, parental education, parental history of hypertension, baseline height, baseline blood pressure, change in body mass index, and time spent in physical and sedentary activities, each 1-SD (1-SD = 7.10 g/d) increase in baseline dietary intake of total fiber was associated with a 0.96-, 0.62-, and 0.75-mmHg decrease in mean systolic (P = 0.02), diastolic (P = 0.01), and arterial blood pressures (P = 0.002), respectively, 5 years later. In girls, each 1-SD increase in dietary glycemic index, glycemic load, carbohydrate, and fructose was concurrently related to increases of 1.81 (P = 0.001), 4.02 (P = 0.01), 4.74 (P = 0.01), and 1.80 mm Hg (P = 0.03) in systolic blood pressure, respectively, >5 years. Significant associations between carbohydrate nutrition variables and blood pressure were not observed among boys. Excessive dietary intake of carbohydrates, specifically from high glycemic index/glycemic load foods, could adversely influence blood pressure, particularly in girls, whereas fiber-rich diets may be protective against elevated blood pressure during adolescence.

  6. Post-transcriptional control in the early mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Braude, P; Pelham, H; Flach, G; Lobatto, R

    1979-11-01

    The earliest stages of mouse embryogenesis, from fertilisation to the two-cell stage, are characterised by an extremely low level of RNA synthesis. Indeed, during this period, RNA polymerase II activity and incorporation of labelled precurosrs into heterogeneous RNA are not detectable, and there is no increase in the poly(A) content of the embryo, but rather a slight decrease. The rate of protein synthesis remains low and relatively constant throughout the one- and two-cell stages. However, qualitative analysis of the protein synthetic profile on SDS gels has revealed changes which appear around the late one-cell to early two-cell stage. This early change in the pattern of polypeptide synthesis represents the first major qualitative molecular change found so far in development. We present evidence which suggests that the increased synthesis at the early two-cell stage of a small number of polypeptides of molecular weight 35,000 is not dependent on transcription, but rather represents control at a post-transcriptional level using mRNAs synthesised before fertilisation.

  7. Dissociable early attentional control mechanisms underlying cognitive and affective conflicts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Taolin; Kendrick, Keith M.; Feng, Chunliang; Sun, Shiyue; Yang, Xun; Wang, Xiaogang; Luo, Wenbo; Yang, Suyong; Huang, Xiaoqi; Valdés-Sosa, Pedro A.; Gong, Qiyong; Fan, Jin; Luo, Yue-Jia

    2016-01-01

    It has been well documented that cognitive conflict is sensitive to the relative proportion of congruent and incongruent trials. However, few studies have examined whether affective conflict processing is modulated as a function of proportion congruency (PC). To address this question we recorded event-related potentials (ERP) while subjects performed both cognitive and affective face-word Stroop tasks. By varying the proportion of congruent and incongruent trials in each block, we examined the extent to which PC impacts both cognitive and affective conflict control at different temporal stages. Results showed that in the cognitive task an anteriorly localized early N2 component occurred predominantly in the low proportion congruency context, whereas in the affective task it was found to occur in the high proportion congruency one. The N2 effects across the two tasks were localized to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, where responses were increased in the cognitive task but decreased in the affective one. Furthermore, high proportions of congruent items produced both larger amplitude of a posteriorly localized sustained potential component and a larger behavioral Stroop effect in cognitive and affective tasks. Our findings suggest that cognitive and affective conflicts engage early dissociable attentional control mechanisms and a later common conflict response system. PMID:27892513

  8. Dissociable early attentional control mechanisms underlying cognitive and affective conflicts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Taolin; Kendrick, Keith M; Feng, Chunliang; Sun, Shiyue; Yang, Xun; Wang, Xiaogang; Luo, Wenbo; Yang, Suyong; Huang, Xiaoqi; Valdés-Sosa, Pedro A; Gong, Qiyong; Fan, Jin; Luo, Yue-Jia

    2016-11-28

    It has been well documented that cognitive conflict is sensitive to the relative proportion of congruent and incongruent trials. However, few studies have examined whether affective conflict processing is modulated as a function of proportion congruency (PC). To address this question we recorded event-related potentials (ERP) while subjects performed both cognitive and affective face-word Stroop tasks. By varying the proportion of congruent and incongruent trials in each block, we examined the extent to which PC impacts both cognitive and affective conflict control at different temporal stages. Results showed that in the cognitive task an anteriorly localized early N2 component occurred predominantly in the low proportion congruency context, whereas in the affective task it was found to occur in the high proportion congruency one. The N2 effects across the two tasks were localized to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, where responses were increased in the cognitive task but decreased in the affective one. Furthermore, high proportions of congruent items produced both larger amplitude of a posteriorly localized sustained potential component and a larger behavioral Stroop effect in cognitive and affective tasks. Our findings suggest that cognitive and affective conflicts engage early dissociable attentional control mechanisms and a later common conflict response system.

  9. Estimated glycemic index and dietary fiber content of cookies elaborated with extruded wheat bran.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Pérez, Faviola; Salazar-García, María Guadalupe; Romero-Baranzini, Ana Lourdes; Islas-Rubio, Alma Rosa; Ramírez-Wong, Benjamín

    2013-03-01

    The increasing demand for high-fiber products has favored the design of numerous bakery products rich in fiber such as bread, cookies, and cakes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the dietary fiber and estimated glycemic index of cookies containing extruded wheat bran. Wheat bran was subjected to extrusion process under three temperature profiles: TP1;(60, 75, 85 and 100 °C), TP2;(60, 80, 100 and 120 °C), and TP3;(60, 80, 110 and 140 °C) and three moisture contents: (15, 23, and 31 %). Cookies were elaborated using extruded wheat bran (30 %), separated into two fractions (coarse and fine). The dietary fiber content of cookies elaborated with extruded wheat bran was higher than the controls; C0 (100 % wheat flour) and C1 (30 % of no extruded bran coarse fraction) and C2 (30 % of no extruded bran fine fraction). The higher values of dietary fiber were observed on cookies from treatments 5 (TP1, 31 % moisture content and coarse fraction) and 11 (TP2, 31 % moisture content and coarse fraction). The estimated glycemic index of cookies ranged from 68.54 to 80.16. The dietary fiber content of cookies was increased and the lowest glycemic index corresponded to the cookies elaborated with extruded wheat bran. Cookie made with the treatment 11 had a better dietary fiber content and lower estimated glycemic index.

  10. Impact of a low glycemic index diet in pregnancy on markers of maternal and fetal metabolism and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Jennifer M; Mahony, Rhona M; Culliton, Marie; Foley, Michael E; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M

    2014-11-01

    This is a secondary analysis of 621 women in ROLO study, a randomized control trial of low glycemic index (GI) diet in pregnancy to prevent the recurrence of macrosomia, which aims to assess the effect of the diet on maternal and fetal insulin resistance, leptin, and markers of inflammation. In early pregnancy and at 28 weeks, serum was analyzed for insulin, leptin, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), and interleukin 6 (IL-6). At delivery, cord blood concentrations of leptin, TNF-α, IL-6, and C-peptide were recorded. We found no difference between those who did or did not receive low GI advice with respect to the concentrations of any marker in early pregnancy, at 28 weeks or in cord blood. Women in the intervention arm of the study did have a lower overall rise in insulin concentrations from early pregnancy to 28 weeks gestation, P = .04. Of the women in the intervention arm, 20% were in the highest quartile for insulin change (28-week insulin - insulin at booking) compared to 29% of controls (P = .02). In conclusion, a low GI diet in pregnancy has little effect on leptin and markers of inflammation although an attenuated response to the typical increase in insulin resistance seen in pregnancy with advancing gestation was seen in those who received the low GI advice.

  11. Plasma adiponectin concentrations are associated with dietary glycemic index in Malaysian patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Loh, Beng-In; Sathyasuryan, Daniel Robert; Mohamed, Hamid Jan Jan

    2013-01-01

    Adiponectin, an adipocyte-derived hormone has been implicated in the control of blood glucose and chronic inflammation in type 2 diabetes. However, limited studies have evaluated dietary factors on plasma adiponectin levels, especially among type 2 diabetic patients in Malaysia. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of dietary glycemic index on plasma adiponectin concentrations in patients with type 2 diabetes. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 305 type 2 diabetic patients aged 19-75 years from the Penang General Hospital, Malaysia. Socio-demographic information was collected using a standard questionnaire while dietary details were determined by using a pre-validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. Anthropometry measurement included weight, height, BMI and waist circumference. Plasma adiponectin concentrations were measured using a commercial ELISA kit. Data were analyzed using multiple linear regression. After multivariate adjustment, dietary glycemic index was inversely associated with plasma adiponectin concentrations (β =-0.272, 95% CI -0.262, - 0.094; p<0.001). It was found that in individuals who consumed 1 unit of foods containing high dietary glycemic index that plasma adiponectin level reduced by 0.3 μg/mL. Thirty two percent (31.9%) of the variation in adiponectin concentrations was explained by age, sex, race, smoking status, BMI, waist circumference, HDL-C, triglycerides, magnesium, fiber and dietary glycemic index according to the multiple linear regression model (R2=0.319). These results support the hypothesis that dietary glycemic index influences plasma adiponectin concentrations in patients with type 2 diabetes. Controlled clinical trials are required to confirm our findings and to elucidate the underlying mechanism.

  12. Glucose sensor evaluation of glycemic instability in pediatric type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Alemzadeh, Ramin; Loppnow, Cindy; Parton, Elaine; Kirby, Midge

    2003-01-01

    Maintaining blood glucose (BG) levels within the target range can be an elusive goal in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). To identify factor(s) that may contribute to glycemic instability, we analyzed the Continuous Glucose Monitoring System (CGMS) (Medtronic MiniMed, Northridge, CA) profiles of a group of children with type 1 DM and a history of frequent BG fluctuations and hypoglycemia. A total of 30 (17 girls, 13 boys) pediatric patients with a history of frequent BG fluctuations and hypoglycemia (mean age, 10.5 +/- 0.7 years; duration, 5.0 +/- 0.6 years), on three to four injections of insulin daily or insulin pump therapy, were evaluated by the CGMS. The mean BG (MBG), absolute means of daily differences (MODD), mean amplitude of glycemic excursion (MAGE), and number of hypoglycemic events (BG <60 mg/dL) for 48 h were calculated in each patient. There was a significant correlation between MBG and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) (r(2) = 0.22, p < 0.009). There was also a significant correlation between severity of lipohypertrophy and glycemic control (HbA1c) (r(2) = 0.20, p < 0.01). The MODD values had a positive correlation with the severity of injection site lipohypertrophy (r(2) = 0.37, p < 0.0003). The MAGE values had a positive correlation with bolus:basal insulin ratio (r(2) = 0.22, p < 0.009) and number of hypoglycemic events (r(2) = 0.21, p < 0.008), independent of age, MBG, and glycemic control. The 48-h CGMS profile can help characterize day-to-day and within-day BG variability and identify factors influencing glycemic instability in pediatric type 1 DM.

  13. Landslide Geohazard Monitoring, Early Warning and Stabilization Control Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednarczyk, Zbigniew

    2014-03-01

    This paper is a presentation of landslide monitoring, early warning and remediation methods recommended for the Polish Carpathians. Instrumentation included standard and automatic on-line measurements with the real-time transfer of data to an Internet web server. The research was funded through EU Innovative Economy Programme and also by the SOPO Landslide Counteraction Project. The landslides investigated were characterized by relatively low rates of the displacements. These ranged from a few millimetres to several centimetres per year. Colluviums of clayey flysch deposits were of a soil-rock type with a very high plasticity and moisture content. The instrumentation consisted of 23 standard inclinometers set to depths of 5-21 m. The starting point of monitoring measurements was in January 2006. These were performed every 1-2 months over the period of 8 years. The measurements taken detected displacements from several millimetres to 40 cm set at a depth of 1-17 m. The modern, on-line monitoring and early warning system was installed in May 2010. The system is the first of its kind in Poland and only one of several such real-time systems in the world. The installation was working with the Local Road Authority in Gorlice. It contained three automatic field stations for investigation of landslide parameters to depths of 12-16 m and weather station. In-place tilt transducers and innovative 3D continuous inclinometer systems with sensors located every 0.5 m were used. It has the possibility of measuring a much greater range of movements compared to standard systems. The conventional and real-time data obtained provided a better recognition of the triggering parameters and the control of geohazard stabilizations. The monitoring methods chosen supplemented by numerical modelling could lead to more reliable forecasting of such landslides and could thus provide better control and landslide remediation possibilities also to stabilization works which prevent landslides.

  14. Glycemic Variation in Tumor Patients with Total Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jin-Cheng; Dai, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Li-Ming; Xie, Yi-Bin; Zhou, Hai-Yan; Li, Guo-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hyperglycemia is associated with poor clinical outcomes and mortality in several patients. However, studies evaluating hyperglycemia variation in tumor patients receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) are scarce. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between glycemia and tumor kinds with TPN by monitoring glycemic variation in tumor patients. Methods: This retrospective clinical trial selected 312 patients with various cancer types, whose unique nutrition treatment was TPN during the monitoring period. All patients had blood glucose (BG) values assessed at least six times daily during the TPN infusion. The glycemic variation before and after TPN was set as the indicator to evaluate the factors influencing BG. Results: The clinical trial lasted 7.5 ± 3.0 days adjusted for age, gender, family cancer history and blood types. There were six cancer types: Hepatic carcinoma (HC, 21.8%), rectal carcinoma (17.3%), colon carcinoma (CC, 14.7%), gastric carcinoma (29.8%), pancreatic carcinoma (11.5%), and duodenal carcinoma (DC, 4.8%). The patients were divided into diabetes and nondiabetes groups. No statistical differences in TPN glucose content between diabetes and nondiabetes groups were found; however, the tumor types affected by BG values were obvious. With increasing BG values, DC, HC and CC were more represented than other tumor types in this sequence in diabetic individuals, as well as in the nondiabetic group. BG was inclined to be more easily influenced in the nondiabetes group. Other factors did not impact BG values, including gender, body mass index, and TPN infusion duration time. Conclusions: When tumor patients are treated with TPN, BG levels should be monitored according to different types of tumors, besides differentiating diabetes or nondiabetes patients. Special BG control is needed for DC, HC and CC in both diabetic and nondiabetic patients. If BG overtly increases, positive measurements are needed to control BG values. The

  15. Effects of High vs Low Glycemic Index of Dietary Carbohydrate on Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Insulin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, Frank M.; Carey, Vincent J.; Anderson, Cheryl A. M.; Miller, Edgar R.; Copeland, Trisha; Charleston, Jeanne; Harshfield, Benjamin J.; Laranjo, Nancy; McCarron, Phyllis; Swain, Janis; White, Karen; Yee, Karen; Appel, Lawrence J.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Foods that have similar carbohydrate content can differ in the amount they raise blood glucose. The effects of this property, called the glycemic index, on risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes are not well understood. OBJECTIVE To determine the effect of glycemic index and amount of total dietary carbohydrate on risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Randomized crossover-controlled feeding trial conducted in research units in academic medical centers, in which 163 overweight adults (systolic blood pressure, 120–159 mm Hg) were given 4 complete diets that contained all of their meals, snacks, and calorie-containing beverages, each for 5 weeks, and completed at least 2 study diets. The first participant was enrolled April 1, 2008; the last participant finished December 22, 2010. For any pair of the 4 diets, there were 135 to 150 participants contributing at least 1 primary outcome measure. INTERVENTIONS (1) A high–glycemic index (65% on the glucose scale), high-carbohydrate diet (58% energy); (2) a low–glycemic index (40%), high-carbohydrate diet; (3) a high–glycemic index, low-carbohydrate diet (40% energy); and (4) a low–glycemic index, low-carbohydrate diet. Each diet was based on a healthful DASH-type diet. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The 5 primary outcomes were insulin sensitivity, determined from the areas under the curves of glucose and insulin levels during an oral glucose tolerance test; levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and triglycerides; and systolic blood pressure. RESULTS At high dietary carbohydrate content, the low– compared with high–glycemic index level decreased insulin sensitivity from 8.9 to 7.1 units (−20%, P = .002); increased LDL cholesterol from 139 to 147 mg/dL (6%, P ≤ .001); and did not affect levels of HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, or blood pressure. At low carbohydrate content, the

  16. Relation between Breast Cancer and High Glycemic Index or Glycemic Load: A Meta-analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies.

    PubMed

    Mullie, Patrick; Koechlin, Alice; Boniol, Mathieu; Autier, Philippe; Boyle, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the commonest form of cancer in women worldwide. It has been suggested that chronic hyperinsulinemia associated with insulin resistance plays a role in breast cancer etiology. To test the hyperinsulinemia hypothesis, a dietary pattern associated with a high glycemic index and glycemic load, both proxies for chronic hyperinsulinemia, should be associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. A meta-analysis restricted to prospective cohort studies was undertaken using a random effects model with tests for statistical significance, publication bias and heterogeneity. The metric for analysis was the risk of breast cancer in the highest relative to the lowest glycemic index and glycemic load dietary pattern. A dietary pattern with a high glycemic index was associated with a summary relative risk (SRR) of 1.05 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.11), and a high glycemic load with a SRR of 1.06 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.13). Adjustments for body mass index [BMI], physical activity and other lifestyle factors did not influence the SRR, nor did menopausal status and estrogen receptor status of the tumor. In conclusion, the current evidence supports a modest association between a dietary pattern with high glycemic index or glycemic load and the risk of breast cancer.

  17. A Randomized Trial about Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load Improves Outcomes among Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Carla K.; Gutschall, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    Glycemic index (GI) represents the postprandial glucose response of carbohydrate foods, and glycemic load (GL) represents the quantity and quality of carbohydrate consumed. A diet lower in GI and GL may improve diabetes management. A 9-week intervention regarding GI and GL was evaluated among adults in the age range of 40-70 years who had had type…

  18. Cbl controls EGFR fate by regulating early endosome fusion.

    PubMed

    Visser Smit, Gina D; Place, Trenton L; Cole, Sara L; Clausen, Kathryn A; Vemuganti, Soumya; Zhang, Guojuan; Koland, John G; Lill, Nancy L

    2009-12-22

    Amino acid residues 1 to 434 of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Cbl control signaling of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) by enhancing its ubiquitination, down-regulation, and lysosomal degradation. This region of Cbl comprises a tyrosine kinase-binding domain, a linker region, a really interesting new gene finger (RF), and a subset of the residues of the RF tail. In experiments with full-length alanine substitution mutants, we demonstrated that the RF tail of Cbl regulated biochemically distinct checkpoints in the endocytosis of EGFR. The Cbl- and ubiquitin-dependent degradation of the regulator of internalization hSprouty2 was compromised by the Val(431)--> Ala mutation, whereas the Cbl- and EGFR-dependent dephosphorylation or degradation of the endosomal trafficking regulator Hrs was compromised by the Phe(434)--> Ala mutation. Deregulated phosphorylation of Hrs correlated with inhibition of the fusion of early endosomes and of the degradation of EGFR. This study provides the first evidence that Cbl regulates receptor fate by controlling the fusion of sorting endosomes. We postulate that it does so by modulating the abundance of tyrosine-phosphorylated Hrs.

  19. CBL CONTROLS EGF RECEPTOR FATE BY REGULATING EARLY ENDOSOME FUSION#

    PubMed Central

    Visser Smit, Gina D.; Place, Trenton L.; Cole, Sara L.; Clausen, Kathryn A.; Vemuganti, Soumya; Zhang, Guojuan; Koland, John G.; Lill, Nancy L.

    2010-01-01

    Residues 1-434 of the ubiquitin ligase Cbl control epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) signaling by enhancing receptor ubiquitination, downregulation, and lysosomal degradation. Cbl 1-434 comprises a tyrosine kinase-binding domain, linker region, RING finger (RF), and a subset of the RF tail amino acids 420-436. Using full-length alanine substitution mutants, we demonstrate that the Cbl RF tail regulates biochemically distinct EGF-R endocytosis checkpoints: 1) Cbl- and ubiquitin-dependent degradation of hSprouty2 upstream of EGF-R ubiquitination (compromised by Cbl V431A); and 2) Cbl- and EGF-R-dependent dephosphorylation or degradation of the endosomal trafficking regulator Hrs (compromised by Cbl F434A). Deregulated Hrs phosphorylation correlates with the inhibition of both early endosome fusion and EGF-R degradation. This is the first evidence that Cbl can regulate receptor fate by controlling the fusion of sorting endosomes. We postulate that it does so by modulating the generation and loss of tyrosine phosphorylated Hrs. PMID:20029031

  20. 76 FR 30723 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and... for breast and cervical cancer screening; updates on the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early... Health and Human Services, and the Director, CDC, regarding the early detection and control of breast...

  1. Gelsolin activity controls efficient early HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV-1 entry into target lymphocytes requires the activity of actin adaptors that stabilize and reorganize cortical F-actin, like moesin and filamin-A. These alterations are necessary for the redistribution of CD4-CXCR4/CCR5 to one pole of the cell, a process that increases the probability of HIV-1 Envelope (Env)-CD4/co-receptor interactions and that generates the tension at the plasma membrane necessary to potentiate fusion pore formation, thereby favouring early HIV-1 infection. However, it remains unclear whether the dynamic processing of F-actin and the amount of cortical actin available during the initial virus-cell contact are required to such events. Results Here we show that gelsolin restructures cortical F-actin during HIV-1 Env-gp120-mediated signalling, without affecting cell-surface expression of receptors or viral co-receptor signalling. Remarkably, efficient HIV-1 Env-mediated membrane fusion and infection of permissive lymphocytes were impaired when gelsolin was either overexpressed or silenced, which led to a loss or gain of cortical actin, respectively. Indeed, HIV-1 Env-gp120-induced F-actin reorganization and viral receptor capping were impaired under these experimental conditions. Moreover, gelsolin knockdown promoted HIV-1 Env-gp120-mediated aberrant pseudopodia formation. These perturbed-actin events are responsible for the inhibition of early HIV-1 infection. Conclusions For the first time we provide evidence that through its severing of cortical actin, and by controlling the amount of actin available for reorganization during HIV-1 Env-mediated viral fusion, entry and infection, gelsolin can constitute a barrier that restricts HIV-1 infection of CD4+ lymphocytes in a pre-fusion step. These findings provide important insights into the complex molecular and actin-associated dynamics events that underlie early viral infection. Thus, we propose that gelsolin is a new factor that can limit HIV-1 infection acting at a pre-fusion step

  2. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists as insulin add-on therapy in patients with inadequate glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus: lixisenatide as a new therapeutic option.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Huelgas, Ricardo; Azriel, Sharona; Puig-Domingo, Manel; Vidal, Josep; de Pablos-Velasco, Pedro

    2015-03-01

    Despite the variety of therapeutic options for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus, many patients fail to meet glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) targets. The relative contribution of postprandial plasma glucose (PPG) to overall HbA1c is estimated at 40-60%, with the effect of PPG on HbA1c being prominent in patients on basal insulin. The development of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) has been an important achievement in diabetes management and has become an established treatment. Of available GLP-1RAs, lixisenatide is a once-daily prandial GLP-1RA that has been shown to produce a reduction in HbA1c with a pronounced postprandial effect, suggesting a complementary effect between lixisenatide and basal insulin on PPG and fasting plasma glucose, resulting in a beneficial effect on body weight in all populations. Therefore, lixisenatide will make an important addition to current options for treating diabetes, especially for patients not achieving glycemic targets with basal insulin therapy.

  3. Pathogenesis and glycemic management of type 2 diabetes mellitus: a physiological approach.

    PubMed

    Ismail-Beigi, Faramarz

    2012-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is an incompletely understood chronic, progressive multifactorial disease with insulin resistance and decreased β-cell function playing dominant roles in its genesis.  The worldwide incidence of the disease is rapidly increasing to pandemic proportions.  The increase in incidence of T2DM is attributable to changes in lifestyle, diet and obesity, but other causes remain to be defined.  The disease is a major cause of early mortality due to atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD), and is the leading cause of blindness, leg amputations, and chronic renal disease.  Hyperglycemia inT2DM becomes manifest once insulin secretion is no longer adequate for the metabolic demands of the individual. The approach to glycemic management of the disease is increasingly based on understanding the underlying pathophysiology.  Efforts to maintain and preserve β-cell function during the earlier phases of the disease may have important implications in prevention of subsequent complications of T2DM.  Finally, the approach to glycemic management of the disease should be individualized by considering the psycho-socio-economic condition of each patient, and glycemic targets should reflect presence of comorbid conditions, age of the patient, the stage of their disease in terms of duration, presence of macro- and micro-vascular complications, and propensity for severe hypoglycemia.

  4. Glycemic index, glycemic load, wellness and beauty: the state of the art.

    PubMed

    Berra, Bruno; Rizzo, Angela Maria

    2009-01-01

    The glycemic index (GI) is a ranking system for carbohydrates' effect on blood glucose levels. It compares available carbohydrates gram for gram in individual foods, providing a numerical, evidence-based index of postprandial glycemia. The glycemic load (GL) is a ranking system for carbohydrate content in food portions based on their GI and the portion size. These two markers increasingly are being used to prevent typical diseases of the Western world, including type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and acne. Data on the efficacy of GI and GL in the treatment of Western population diseases are discussed and critically evaluated, with a particular focus on acne and other skin disorders.

  5. [Glycemic response to consumption of a cereals and legume (Phaseolus vulgaris) bar on healthy individuals].

    PubMed

    Zambrano, Rosaura; Granito, Marisela; Valero, Yolmar

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this work was to formulate a cereals and legume (Phaseolus vulgaris) bar and assess its impact on the glycemic response of healthy individuals, in order to contribute to the healthy food supply beneficial to consumers. A mixture of cereals (corn and oats) and different percentages (20 and 30%) of Phaseolus vulgaris was used to formulate the bar. Additionally, a legume cereal bar without legumes (bar control) was prepared. The bar with 30% of Phaseolus vulgaris was selected through sensory evaluation, being scored with better flavor and texture. This combination of cereals and legumes aminoacid improves complementation and reaches the formulation criteria previously established. Chemical characterization indicated a higher protein content in the bar with 30% of Phaseolus vulgaris (13.55%) relative to the bar control (8.5%). The contents of fat, ash and dietary fiber did not differ between the two bars evaluated. However, the soluble fiber and resistant starch of the selected bar was a 32.05% and 18.67%, respectively, than in the control bar; this may contribute to decreasing the rate of glucose uptake. The selected bar presented a low glycemic index (49) and intermediate glycemic load (12.0) in healthy volunteers, which could lead to a possible reduction in the rate of absorption of glucose into the bloodstream, associated with a carbohydrate content of slow absorption. This bar represents a proposal of a healthy snack for the consumer.

  6. DIETARY HYPERGLYCEMIA, GLYCEMIC INDEX AND METABOLIC RETINAL DISEASES

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chung-Jung; Taylor, Allen

    2014-01-01

    The glycemic index (GI) indicates how fast blood glucose is raised after consuming a carbohydrate-containing food. Human metabolic studies indicate that GI is related to patho-physiological responses after meals. Compared with a low-GI meal, a high-GI meal is characterized with hyperglycemia during the early postprandial stage (0~2 h) and a compensatory hyperlipidemia associated with counter-regulatory hormone responses during late postprandial stage (4~6 h). Over the past three decades, several human health disorders have been related to GI. The strongest relationship suggests that consuming low-GI foods prevents diabetic complications. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a complication of diabetes. In this aspect, GI appears to be useful as a practical guideline to help diabetic people choose foods. Abundant epidemiological evidence also indicates positive associations between GI and risk for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and more recently, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in people without diabetes. Although data from randomized controlled intervention trials are scanty, these observations are strongly supported by evolving molecular mechanisms which explain the pathogenesis of hyperglycemia. This wide range of evidence implies that dietary hyperglycemia is etiologically related to human aging and diseases, including DR and AMD. In this context, these diseases can be considered metabolic retinal diseases. Molecular theories that explain hyperglycemic pathogenesis involve a mitochondria-associated pathway and four glycolysis-associated pathways, including advanced glycation end products formation, protein kinase C activation, polyol pathway, and hexosamine pathway. While the four glycolysis-associated pathways appear to be universal for both normoxic and hypoxic conditions, the mitochondria-associated mechanism appears to be most relevant to the hyperglycemic, normoxic pathogenesis. For diseases that affect tissues with highly active metabolism and that

  7. Lower glycemic load meals reduce diurnal glycemic oscillations in women with risk factors for gestational diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kizirian, Nathalie V; Goletzke, Janina; Brodie, Shannon; Atkinson, Fiona S; Markovic, Tania P; Ross, Glynis P; Buyken, Anette; Brand-Miller, Jennie P

    2017-01-01

    Objective Maternal glycemia plays a key role in fetal growth. We hypothesized that lower glycemic load (GL) meals (lower glycemic index, modestly lower carbohydrate) would substantially reduce day-long glucose variability in women at risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Research design and methods A crossover study of 17 women (mean±SD age 34.8±4 years; gestational weeks 29.3±1.3; body mass index 23.8±4.7 kg/m2) who consumed a low GL or a high GL diet in random order, 1-day each, over 2 consecutive days. Diets were energy-matched and fiber-matched with 5 meals per 24 hours. All food was provided. Continuous glucose monitoring was used to assess diurnal glycemia. Results Maternal glucose levels were 51% lower on the low GL day with lower incremental area under the curve (iAUC±SEM 549±109 vs 1120±198 mmol/L min, p=0.015). Glycemic variability was significantly lower on the low GL day, as demonstrated by a lower average SD (0.7±0.1 vs 0.9±0.1, p<0.001) and lower mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (2.1±0.2 vs 2.7±0.2 mmol/L, p<0.001). Conclusions A lower GL meal plan in pregnancy acutely halves day-long maternal glucose levels and reduces glucose variability, providing further evidence to support the utility of a low GL diet in pregnancy.

  8. Glycemic index, glycemic load and mammographic breast density: the EPIC Florence longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Masala, Giovanna; Assedi, Melania; Bendinelli, Benedetta; Ermini, Ilaria; Occhini, Daniela; Sieri, Sabina; Brighenti, Furio; Del Turco, Marco Rosselli; Ambrogetti, Daniela; Palli, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    A few studies have evaluated the association between diet and mammographic breast density (MBD) and results are inconsistent. MBD, a well-recognized risk factor for breast cancer, has been proposed as a marker of cumulative exposure to hormones and growth factors. Diets with a high glycemic index (GI) or glycemic load (GL) may increase breast cancer risk, via an effect on the insulin-like growth factor axis. We have investigated the association between carbohydrate intake, GI, GL and MBD in a prospective study. We identified a large series of women, in the frame of the EPIC-Florence cohort, with a mammogram taken five years after enrolment, when detailed information on dietary and lifestyle habits and anthropometric measurements had been collected. Mammograms have been retrieved (1,668, 83%) and MBD assessed according to Wolfe's classification. We compared women with high MBD (P2+DY Wolfe's categories) with those with low MBD (N1+P1) through logistic models adjusted for age, education, body mass index, menopause, number of children, breast feeding, physical activity, non-alcohol energy, fibers, saturated fat and alcohol. A direct association between GL and high MBD emerged in the highest quintile of intake in comparison with the lowest quintile (OR = 1.73, 95%CI 1.13-2.67, p for trend = 0.048) while no association with glycemic index was evident. These results were confirmed after exclusion of women reporting to be on a diet or affected with diabetes, and when Hormone Replacement Therapy at the date of mammographic examination used to assess MBD was considered. The effect was particularly evident among leaner women, although no interaction was found. A positive association was suggested for increasing simple sugar and total carbohydrates intakes limited to the highest quintiles. In this Italian population we observed an association between glycemic load, total and rapidly absorbed carbohydrates and high MBD. These novel results warrant further investigations.

  9. The effects of hormonal contraceptives on glycemic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cortés, Manuel E.; Alfaro, Andrea A.

    2014-01-01

    A number of side effects have been linked to the use of hormonal contraceptives, among others, alterations in glucose levels. Hence, the objective of this mini-review is to show the main effects of hormonal contraceptive intake on glycemic regulation. First, the most relevant studies on this topic are described, then the mechanisms that might be accountable for this glycemic regulation impairment as exerted by hormonal contraceptives are discussed. Finally, we briefly discuss the ethical responsibility of health professionals to inform about the potential risks on glycemic homeostasis regarding hormonal contraceptive intake. PMID:25249703

  10. The Development of Emotional and Behavioral Control in Early Childhood: Heterotypic Continuity and Relations to Early School Adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hyein; Shaw, Daniel S; Cheong, JeeWon

    2015-01-01

    We examined heterotypic continuity of emotional and behavioral control (EBC) across early childhood and related early manifestations of EBC to children’s school adjustment in 310 low-income, ethnically diverse boys. Multiple informants and methods were used to measure different indicators of EBC at 18, 24, 42, and 60 months, which were chosen to reflect salient regulatory challenges children face across development. Teachers rated boys’ externalizing and internalizing behaviors, and social skills at 72 months. Results indicated a modest degree of heterotypic continuity of EBC, with different constructs of EBC associated between adjacent time points and, in some instances, across more distant time points. Further, children who had struggled with early EBC demonstrated higher externalizing problems and lower social skills in school. Findings suggest that early deficits in EBC may be a target for early identification and prevention, as they may forecast continued difficulty in later-developing EBC skills and socioemotional problems. PMID:26550611

  11. Metabolic and Glycemic Sequelae of Sleep Disturbances in Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Koren, Dorit; O'Sullivan, Katie L.; Mokhlesi, Babak

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity in adults and children has increased greatly in the past three decades, as have metabolic sequelae, such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Sleep disturbances are increasingly recognized as contributors to this widespread epidemic in adults, and data are emerging in children as well. The categories of sleep disturbances that contribute to obesity and its glycemic co-morbidities include the following: (1) alterations of sleep duration, chronic sleep restriction and excessive sleep; (2) alterations in sleep architecture; (3) sleep fragmentation; (4) circadian rhythm disorders and disruption (i.e., shift work); and (5) obstructive sleep apnea. This article reviews current evidence supporting the contributions that these sleep disorders play in the development of obesity, insulin resistance, and T2DM as well as possibly influences on glycemic control in type 1 diabetes, with a special focus on data in pediatric populations. PMID:25398202

  12. Metabolic and glycemic sequelae of sleep disturbances in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Koren, Dorit; O'Sullivan, Katie L; Mokhlesi, Babak

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity in adults and children has increased greatly in the past three decades, as have metabolic sequelae, such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Sleep disturbances are increasingly recognized as contributors to this widespread epidemic in adults, and data are emerging in children as well. The categories of sleep disturbances that contribute to obesity and its glycemic co-morbidities include the following: (1) alterations of sleep duration, chronic sleep restriction and excessive sleep; (2) alterations in sleep architecture; (3) sleep fragmentation; (4) circadian rhythm disorders and disruption (i.e., shift work); and (5) obstructive sleep apnea. This article reviews current evidence supporting the contributions that these sleep disorders play in the development of obesity, insulin resistance, and T2DM as well as possibly influences on glycemic control in type 1 diabetes, with a special focus on data in pediatric populations.

  13. 24-Hour Glucose Profiles on Diets Varying in Protein Content and Glycemic Index

    PubMed Central

    van Baak, Marleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence is increasing that the postprandial state is an important factor contributing to the risk of chronic diseases. Not only mean glycemia, but also glycemic variability has been implicated in this effect. In this exploratory study, we measured 24-h glucose profiles in 25 overweight participants in a long-term diet intervention study (DIOGENES study on Diet, Obesity and Genes), which had been randomized to four different diet groups consuming diets varying in protein content and glycemic index. In addition, we compared 24-h glucose profiles in a more controlled fashion, where nine other subjects followed in random order the same four diets differing in carbohydrate content by 10 energy% and glycemic index by 20 units during three days. Meals were provided in the lab and had to be eaten at fixed times during the day. No differences in mean glucose concentration or glucose variability (SD) were found between diet groups in the DIOGENES study. In the more controlled lab study, mean 24-h glucose concentrations were also not different. Glucose variability (SD and CONGA1), however, was lower on the diet combining a lower carbohydrate content and GI compared to the diet combining a higher carbohydrate content and GI. These data suggest that diets with moderate differences in carbohydrate content and GI do not affect mean 24-h or daytime glucose concentrations, but may result in differences in the variability of the glucose level in healthy normal weight and overweight individuals. PMID:25093276

  14. Effect of macronutrients and fiber on postprandial glycemic responses and meal glycemic index and glycemic load value determinations.

    PubMed

    Meng, Huicui; Matthan, Nirupa R; Ausman, Lynne M; Lichtenstein, Alice H

    2017-02-15

    Background: The potential confounding effect of different amounts and proportions of macronutrients across eating patterns on meal or dietary glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) value determinations has remained partially unaddressed.Objective: The study aimed to determine the effects of different amounts of macronutrients and fiber on measured meal GI and GL values.Design: Four studies were conducted during which participants [n = 20-22; women: 50%; age: 50-80 y; body mass index (in kg/m(2)): 25-30)] received food challenges containing different amounts of the variable nutrient in a random order. Added to the standard 50 g available carbohydrate from white bread was 12.5, 25, or 50 g carbohydrate; 12.5, 25, or 50 g protein; and 5.6, 11.1, or 22.2 g fat from rice cereal, tuna, and unsalted butter, respectively, and 4.8 or 9.6 g fiber from oat cereal. Arterialized venous blood was sampled for 2 h, and measured meal GI and GL and insulin index (II) values were calculated by using the incremental area under the curve (AUCi) method.Results: Adding carbohydrate to the standard white-bread challenge increased glucose AUCi (P < 0.0001), measured meal GI (P = 0.0066), and mean GL (P < 0.0001). Adding protein (50 g only) decreased glucose AUCi (P = 0.0026), measured meal GI (P = 0.0139), and meal GL (P = 0.0140). Adding fat or fiber had no significant effect on these variables. Adding carbohydrate (50 g), protein (50 g), and fat (11.1 g) increased the insulin AUCi or II; fiber had no effect.Conclusions: These data indicate that uncertainty in the determination of meal GI and GL values is introduced when carbohydrate-containing foods are consumed concurrently with protein (equal amount of carbohydrate challenge) but not with carbohydrate-, fat-, or fiber-containing foods. Future studies are needed to evaluate whether this uncertainty also influences the prediction of average dietary GI and GL values for eating patterns. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials

  15. The goal of blood pressure control for prevention of early diabetic microvascular complications.

    PubMed

    Williams, Mark E

    2011-08-01

    Lowering blood pressure may confer a benefit to diabetic microvascular complications comparable with glycemic control. Hypertension is causally related to kidney outcomes and is a risk factor for the development of diabetic retinopathy. The prevalence of hypertension increases as kidney disease progresses, so that it coexists with diabetes in up to 80% of those with overt nephropathy. A significant number of patients have hypertension or rising blood pressures in earlier stages, or even before microvascular complications appear. Because microalbuminuria markedly increases the risk of overt nephropathy as well as of cardiovascular complications, primary prevention (i.e., preventing or delaying the onset of microalbuminuria) continues to be explored, predominantly through use of renin-angiotensin blockade. Available data reviewed suggest that primary prevention through blood pressure reduction is more likely to benefit select groups (those with hypertension, cardiovascular risks, or old age). This review discusses the relationship between hypertension, diabetes, and kidney disease, the rationale for primary prevention, and the data that led to that conclusion.

  16. Hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia and glycemic variability in the elderly: a fatal triad?

    PubMed

    Monami, Matteo; Aleffi, Sara

    2016-06-22

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most important causes of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality; the incidence of chronic complications of diabetes appears to be closely related to the degree of hyperglycaemia. However, results of clinical trials showed that intensive treatment of hyperglycaemia prevents microvascular complications, but has little or no effect on the incidence of cardiovascular events. Different hypoglycaemic drugs show different effects on cardiovascular risk. However, those trials have shown a neutral effect on cardiovascular mortality. This paradoxical result could be explained with the frequent use, in the past, of glucose-lowering agents capable of increasing the risk of hypoglicemia, glycemic variability and weight gain. In conclusion, an adequate glycemic control, in particular in elderly patients, should be achieved, whenever possible, using agents not inducing hypogycemia, glucose fluctuations, and weight gain. In fact, hypoglycaemia and glucose variability should be considered as independent cardiovascular risk factors to a similar extent to hyperglycemia. In this article, the author will review literature supporting the hypothesis that hyperglycemia, hypoglycaemia and glycemic variability are a fatal triad capable of increasing morbidity and mortality in patients with diabetes mellitus.

  17. Effects of formulation and surfactant on control of early leaf spot of peanut with tebuconazole

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prior to 1997, control of early leaf spot with the DMI fungicide tebuconazole, applied in a block of 4 mid-season applications scheduled between 2 applications of chlorothalonil, was similar to a full-season program with chlorothalonil. Periodically since 1997, control of early leaf spot with tebuc...

  18. Metabolic and inflammatory responses to the common sweetener stevioside and a glycemic challenge in horses with equine metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Elzinga, S E; Rohleder, B; Schanbacher, B; McQuerry, K; Barker, V D; Adams, A A

    2017-02-04

    Extracts derived from the leaves of the stevia plant (stevioside) are commonly used as sweeteners for humans and horses. Stevioside appears to be safe for human consumption, including for individuals with insulin dysregulation. In the horse, the safety or metabolic effects of stevioside on normal animals or on those with metabolic dysfunction are unknown. Furthermore, the inflammatory response to a glycemic challenge or to stevioside in horses is not well defined. Therefore, the objective of this study was to measure the effects of stevioside and a glycemic challenge on insulin, glucose, and inflammatory responses in horses with a common metabolic dysfunction (equine metabolic syndrome or EMS) compared with non-EMS controls. To accomplish this, 15 horses were selected; 8 EMS and 7 age-matched controls. An oral sugar test was performed using Karo corn syrup (karo) or stevioside in a random crossover design. Horses were given 0.15 mL/kg body weight of karo or its equivalent grams of sugar in stevia dissolved in water. Blood samples were collected by jugular venipuncture before administration of either stevia or karo and at 60 and 240 min after administration. Serum was used for glucose and insulin determination and plasma for isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) for inflammatory cytokine analysis via flow cytometry and reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). Stevia appeared to stimulate lower glycemic and insulinemic responses when compared to karo, in particular in EMS horses. EMS and control horses had inverse inflammatory responses to administration of either stevia or karo with EMS horses having a proinflammatory response (P ≤ 0.05). These data provide evidence as to why horses with EMS may be predisposed to developing laminitis, potentially as a result of an exaggerated inflammatory response to glycemic and insulinemic responses. Furthermore, the data provide new avenues for exploring mechanisms behind the syndrome, in particular when using a

  19. Adherence to Glycemic Monitoring in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Patton, Susana R.

    2015-01-01

    Glucose monitoring either by self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) or continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) plays an important role in diabetes management and in reducing risk for diabetes-related complications. However, despite evidence supporting the role of glucose monitoring in better patient health outcomes, studies also reveal relatively poor adherence rates to SMBG and CGM use and numerous patient-reported barriers. Fortunately, some promising intervention strategies have been identified that promote at least short-term improvements in patients’ adherence to SMBG. These include education, problem solving, contingency management, goal setting, cognitive behavioral therapy, and motivational interviewing. Specific to CGM, interventions to promote greater use among patients are currently under way, yet one pilot study provides data suggesting better maintenance of CGM use in patients showing greater readiness for behavior change. The purpose of this review is to summarize the literature specific to glucose monitoring in patients with diabetes focusing specifically on current adherence rates, barriers to monitoring, and promising intervention strategies that may be ready to deploy now in the clinic setting to promote greater patient adherence to glucose monitoring. Yet, to continue to help patients with diabetes adhere to glucose monitoring, future research is needed to identify the treatment strategies and the intervention schedules that most likely lead to long-term maintenance of optimal glycemic monitoring levels. PMID:25591853

  20. Dietary glycemic index and glycemic load and their relationship to cardiovascular risk factors in Chinese children.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyu; Zhu, Yanna; Cai, Li; Ma, Lu; Jing, Jin; Guo, Li; Jin, Yu; Ma, Yinghua; Chen, Yajun

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the cross-sectional associations between dietary glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in Chinese children. A total of 234 Chinese schoolchildren aged 8-11 years in Guangdong participated in the study. Dietary intake was assessed via a 3-day dietary record. Seven established cardiovascular indicators were analyzed in this study: fasting plasma glucose (FPG), fasting triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure. Higher dietary GI was significantly associated with higher TG levels (P = 0.037) and lower HDL-C levels (P = 0.005) after adjusting for age, sex, nutritional intake, physical activity, and body mass index z score. LDL-C was found to differ across tertiles of dietary GL. The middle tertile tended to show the highest level of LDL-C. TC, FPG, and blood pressure were independent of both dietary GI and GL. Our findings suggest that higher dietary GI is differentially associated with some CVD risk factors, including lower HDL-C and higher TG, in school-aged children from south China.

  1. [Glycemic, insulinemic index, glycemic load of soy beverage with low and high content of carbohydrates].

    PubMed

    Torres y Torres, Nimbe; Palacios-González, Berenice; Noriega-López, Lilia; Tovar-Palacio, Armando R

    2006-01-01

    Consumption of soy has increased in Western countries due to the benefits on health and the attitude of the people to consume natural products as alternative to the use of pharmacological therapies. However, there is no evidence whether the consumption of 25 g of soy protein as recommended by the Food and Drug Administration has some effect on glucose absorption and consequently on insulin secretion. The aim of the present study was to determine glycemic index (GI), insulinemic index (InIn), and glycemic load (GL) of several soy beverages containing low or high concentration of carbohydrates, and compare them with other foods such as peanuts, whole milk, soluble fiber and a mixed meal on GI and InIn. The results showed that soy beverages had low or moderate GI, depending of the presence of other compounds like carbohydrates and fiber. Consumption of soy beverages with low concentration of carbohydrates produced the lowest insulin secretion. Therefore, these products can be recommended in obese and diabetic patients. Finally soy beverages should contain low maltodextrins concentration and be added of soluble fiber.

  2. Carbohydrate Intake, Glycemic Index, Glycemic Load, and Stroke: A Meta-analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xianlei; Wang, Chen; Wang, Shan; Cao, Gaoyang; Jin, Chao; Yu, Jiawei; Li, Xiuyang; Yan, Jing; Wang, Fudi; Yu, Wei; Ding, Fang

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate associations between carbohydrate intake/glycemic index (GI)/glycemic load (GL) and stroke risk. A literature search of MEDLINE, Embase, Web of Science, and CBM databases was performed to retrieve eligible studies published up to March 2014. Pooled relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to evaluate the strength of this association. Publication bias was assessed by the Egger's regression asymmetry test and Begg's rank correlation test with Begg's funnel plot. All analyses were conducted using software STATA 12.0 (StataCorp LP, College Station, TX) and SAS version 9.1 (SAS Institute Inc, Cary, NC). We identified 7 prospective studies that met the inclusion criteria and processed data from cohort studies to update available evidence. There were 25 independent estimates and 225 000 participants free of diabetes from 6 different countries; 3046 stroke events were included; and the follow-up range was 5 to 18 years. High GI was not associated with risk of stroke events (pooled RR = 1.10; 95% CI: 0.99-1.21); GL was a risk factor for stroke (pooled RR = 1.19; 95% CI: 1.05-1.36). There was no significant association between high carbohydrate intake and stroke risk (RR = 1.12; 95% CI: 0.93-1.35). A daily high GL diet is the risk factor of stroke event, and further researches need to verify the meta-analyses results and study associated mechanisms.

  3. Dietary Glycemic Index, Dietary Glycemic Load, Blood Lipids, and Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Denova-Gutiérrez, Edgar; Huitrón-Bravo, Gerardo; Talavera, Juan O.; Castañón, Susana; Gallegos-Carrillo, Katia; Flores, Yvonne; Salmerón, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To examine the associations of dietary glycemic index (GI) and dietary glycemic load (GL) with blood lipid concentrations and coronary heart disease (CHD) in nondiabetic participants in the Health Worker Cohort Study (HWCS). Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional analysis was performed, using data from adults who participated in the HWCS baseline assessment. We collected information on participants' socio-demographic conditions, dietary patterns and physical activity via self-administered questionnaires. Dietary GI and dietary GL were measured using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Anthropometric and clinical measurements were assessed with standardized procedures. CHD risk was estimated according to the sex-specific Framingham prediction algorithms. Results. IIn the 5,830 individuals aged 20 to 70 who were evaluated, dietary GI and GL were significantly associated with HDL-C, LDL-C, LDL-C/HDL-C ratio, and triglycerides serum levels. Subjects with high dietary GI have a relative risk of 1.56 (CI 95%; 1.13–2.14), and those with high dietary GL have a relative risk of 2.64 (CI 95%; 1.15–6.58) of having an elevated CHD risk than those who had low dietary GI and GL. Conclusions. Our results suggest that high dietary GI and dietary GL could have an unfavorable effect on serum lipid levels, which are in turn associated with a higher CHD risk. PMID:20700407

  4. Glycemic responses to sweetened dried and raw cranberries in humans with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Ted; Luebke, Justin L; Morcomb, Erin F; Carrell, Emily J; Leveranz, Megan C; Kobs, Lisa; Schmidt, Travis P; Limburg, Paul J; Vorsa, Nicholi; Singh, Ajay P

    2010-10-01

    This study assessed the metabolic response to sweetened dried cranberries (SDC), raw cranberries (RC), and white bread (WB) in humans with type 2 diabetes. Development of palatable cranberry preparations associated with lower glycemic responses may be useful for improving fruit consumption and glycemic control among those with diabetes. In this trial, type 2 diabetics (n= 13) received WB (57 g, 160 cal, 1 g fiber), RC (55 g, 21 cal, 1 g fiber), SDC (40 g, 138 cal, 2.1 g fiber), and SDC containing less sugar (SDC-LS, 40 g, 113 cal, 1.8 g fiber + 10 g polydextrose). Plasma glucose (mmol/L) peaked significantly at 60 min for WB, and at 30 min for RC, SDC, and SDC-LS at 9.6 ± 0.4, 7.0 ± 0.4, 9.6 ± 0.5, and 8.7 ± 0.5, respectively, WB remained significantly elevated from the other treatments at 120 min. Plasma insulin (pmol/mL) peaked at 60 min for WB and SDC and at 30 min for RC and SDC-LS at 157 ± 15, 142 ± 27, 61 ± 8, and 97 ± 11, respectively. Plasma insulin for SDC-LS was significantly lower at 60 min than either WB or SDC. Insulin area under the curve (AUC) values for RC and SDC-LS were both significantly lower than WB or SDC. Phenolic content of SDC and SDC-LS was determined following extraction with 80% acetone prior to high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and electronspray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and found to be rich in 5-caffeoylquinic cid, quercetin-3-galactoside, and quercetin-3-galactoside, and the proanthocyanidin dimer epicatechin. In conclusion, SDC-LS was associated with a favorable glycemic and insulinemic response in type 2 diabetics. Practical Application: This study compares phenolic content and glycemic responses among different cranberry products. The study seeks to expand the palatable and portable healthy food choices for persons with type 2 diabetes. The novel use of polydextrose as a bulking agent making possible a reduction in caloric content and potential glycemic response is also characterized in this study.

  5. [The glycemic index of some foods common in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Frati-Munari, A C; Roca-Vides, R A; López-Pérez, R J; de Vivero, I; Ruiz-Velazco, M

    1991-01-01

    To investigate the increase of glycemia due to the ingestion of usual food in Mexico, portions with 50 g of carbohydrate form white corn tortilla, yellow corn tortilla, spaghetti, rice, potatoes, beans brown and black, nopal (prickle pear cactus) and peanuts, compared with white bread, were given to 21 healthy and 27 non-insulin-dependent diabetic subjects. Serum glucose and insulin were measured every 30 min for 180 min long. Glycemic index was obtained as: (area under curve of glucose with test food/area under curve of glucose with white bread) X 100. A corrected index was calculated subtracting the area corresponding to initial values. Insulin index was obtained similarly. Each sample was studied 14-18 times. Glycemic and insulin indexes of white and yellow corn tortilla, spaghetti, rice and potatoes were not different from bread (P greater than 0.05). Corrected glycemic indexes of brown beans (54 +/- 15, +/- SE) and black beans (43 +/- 17) were low (p less than 0.05), as well as corrected insulin indexes (69 +/- 11 and 64 +/- 10 respectively, (P less than 0.02). Peanuts had low glycemic (33 +/- 17, P less than 0.01), but normal insulin index. Nopal had very low glycemic and insulin indexes (10 +/- 17 and 10 +/- 16, P less than 0.0001). These data might be useful in prescribing diets for diabetic subjects.

  6. Predictors of Longitudinal Growth in Inhibitory Control in Early Childhood