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Sample records for early inhaled nitric

  1. Inhaled nitric oxide in chronic obstructive lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Tiihonen, J.; Hakola, P.; Paanila, J.; Turtiainen . Dept. of Forensic Psychiatry)

    1993-01-30

    During an investigation of the effect of nitric oxide on the pulmonary circulation the authors had the opportunity to give nitric oxide to a patient with longstanding obstructive airway disease, with successful results. A 72-year-old man with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was referred to the institution for assessment of pulmonary vascular reactivity to acetylcholine and nitric oxide. Acetylcholine was infused into the main pulmonary artery followed 15 min later by an inhalation of 80 parts per million (ppm) nitric oxide. Heart rate and systemic arterial and pulmonary arterial pressures were continuously monitored. Throughout the study the inspired oxygen concentration was kept constant at 98%. Nitrogen dioxide and nitric oxide concentrations were monitored while nitric oxide was delivered. The infusion of acetylcholine resulted in a small increase in pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance. Nitric oxide produced a substantial fall in pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance with a concomitant increase in systemic arterial oxygen tension. These results suggest that endothelium-dependent relaxation of the pulmonary vasculature was impaired in the patient and that exogenous nitric oxide was an effective pulmonary vasodilator. In-vitro investigation of explanted airways disease suggests not only that endothelium-dependent pulmonary artery relaxation is impaired but also that the dysfunction is related to pre-existing hypoxemia and hypercapnia. Nitric oxide inhibits proliferation of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells and might alter the pulmonary vascular remodeling characteristic of patients with chronic obstructive airways disease.

  2. Inhaled Nitric Oxide in Acute Lung Disease.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-01-01

    seems likely ECMO extracorporeal membrane oxygenation EDRF endothelial-derived relaxing factor that the potent dose-related selective pulmonary GBS... ECMO ). To evaluate the dose response and time inhaled NO. (Fig. 7). The significant decrease in oxy- course of the pulmonary effects of NO., inspiratory...effects (39, 40). In many of these chil- dren, ECMO has been avoided. Similar improvement _0 has been noted in adult patients undergoing cardio- LPS NO

  3. Use of inhaled nitric oxide in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Praveen

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide, an important signaling molecule with multiple regulatory effects throughout the body, is an important tool for the treatment of full-term and late-preterm infants with persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn and hypoxemic respiratory failure. Several randomized controlled trials have evaluated its role in the management of preterm infants ≤ 34 weeks' gestational age with varying results. The purpose of this clinical report is to summarize the existing evidence for the use of inhaled nitric oxide in preterm infants and provide guidance regarding its use in this population.

  4. [Recommendations for inhaled nitric oxide treatment in the newborn diseases].

    PubMed

    2001-09-01

    The recommendations in this document highlight current indications for inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) treatment in the newborn by clearly differentiating between those that are supported by scientific evidence and those for which evidence is still lacking. However, the use of this treatment in preterm infants and in those with congenital heart disease has not yet been scientifically approved. We discuss the methodology, dosage and adverse effects of iNO administration, as well as the reasons for its ineffectiveness.

  5. [Recommendations for inhaled nitric oxide treatment in the newborn].

    PubMed

    Figueras Aloy, J; Castillo Salinas, F; Elorza Fernández, D; Sánchez-Luna, M; Pérez Rodríguez, J

    2006-03-01

    The recommendations in this document describe the current indications for inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) treatment in the newborn and clearly distinguish between those supported by scientific evidence and those for which evidence is still lacking, such as its use in preterm infants. The methodology for iNO administration, its dosage and the main secondary effects are discussed, and the reasons for lack of response to this treatment are analyzed.

  6. Effects of inhaled nitric oxide on regional blood flow are consistent with intravascular nitric oxidedelivery

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Richard O.; Schechter, Alan N.; Panza, Julio A.; Ognibene, Frederick P.; Pease-Fye, Margaret E.; Waclawiw, Myron A.; Shelhamer, James H.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2001-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) may be stabilized by binding to hemoglobin, by nitrosating thiol-containing plasma molecules, or by conversion to nitrite, all reactions potentially preserving its bioactivity in blood. Here we examined the contribution of blood-transported NO to regional vascular tone in humans before and during NO inhalation. While breathing room air and then room air with NO at 80 parts per million, forearm blood flow was measured in 16 subjects at rest and after blockade of forearm NO synthesis with NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) followed by forearm exercise stress. L-NMMA reduced blood flow by 25% and increased resistance by 50%, an effect that was blocked by NO inhalation. With NO inhalation, resistance was significantly lower during L-NMMA infusion, both at rest and during repetitive hand-grip exercise. S-nitrosohemoglobin and plasma S-nitrosothiols did not change with NO inhalation. Arterial nitrite levels increased by 11% and arterial nitrosyl(heme)hemoglobin levels increased tenfold to the micromolar range, and both measures were consistently higher in the arterial than in venous blood. S-nitrosohemoglobin levels were in the nanomolar range, with no significant artery-to-vein gradients. These results indicate that inhaled NO during blockade of regional NO synthesis can supply intravascular NO to maintain normal vascular function. This effect may have application for the treatment of diseases characterized by endothelial dysfunction. PMID:11457881

  7. Inhaled nitric oxide induces cerebrovascular effects in anesthetized pigs.

    PubMed

    Kuebler, W M; Kisch-Wedel, H; Kemming, G I; Meisner, F; Bruhn, S; Koehler, C; Flondor, M; Messmer, K; Zwissler, B

    2003-09-11

    Although inhaled nitric oxide (NO(i)) is considered to act selectively on pulmonary vessels, EEG abnormalities and even occasional neurotoxic effects of NO(i) have been proposed. Here, we investigated cerebrovascular effects of increasing concentrations of 5, 10 and 50 ppm NO(i) in seven anesthetized pigs. Cerebral hemodynamics were assessed non-invasively by use of near-infared spectroscopy and indicator dilution techniques. NO(i) increased cerebral blood volume significantly and reversibly. This effect was not attributable to changes of macrohemodynamic parameters or arterial blood gases. Simultaneously, cerebral transit time increased while cerebral blood flow remained unchanged. These data demonstrate a vasodilatory action of NO(i) in the cerebral vasculature, which may occur preferentially in the venous compartment.

  8. Effects of nitric oxide inhalation on pulmonary serial vascular resistances in ARDS.

    PubMed

    Rossetti, M; Guénard, H; Gabinski, C

    1996-11-01

    The pulmonary vasculature site of action of nitric oxide (NO) in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is still unknown. Seven patients were studied during the early stage of ARDS. The bedside pulmonary artery single-occlusion technique, which allows estimation of the pulmonary capillary pressure (Pcap) and segmental pulmonary vascular resistance, was used without NO or with increasing inhaled NO concentrations (15 and 25 parts per million [ppm]). Systemic circulatory parameters remained unaltered during 15 ppm NO inhalation, whereas 25 ppm NO inhalation slightly decreased mean systemic arterial pressure from 76.7 +/- 5.1 (mean +/- SEM) to 69 +/- 5.2 mm Hg (p < 0.01). Mean pulmonary arterial pressure (Ppam) and mean pulmonary capillary pressure (Pcapm) fell during 25 ppm NO inhalation from 27.4 +/- 3.5 to 21 +/- 2.2 mm Hg (p < 0.001) and from 14.8 +/- 1.5 to 10.7 +/- 1.4 mm Hg (p < 0.001) respectively, the total pulmonary resistance decreased by 28% (p < 0.01). The resistance of the capillary-venous compartment fell during 25 ppm NO inhalation from 100 +/- 16 to 47 +/- 16 dyn x s x m(2) x cm(-5) (p < 0.01), whereas the pulmonary arterial resistance was unchanged. In these patients NO inhalation during the early stage of ARDS reduces selectively Ppam and Pcapm by decreasing the pulmonary capillary-venous resistance. This latter effect may reduce the filtration through the capillary bed and hence alveolar edema during ARDS.

  9. Therapeutic application of inhaled nitric oxide in adult cardiac surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Makker, Robina; Mehta, Yatin; Trehan, Naresh; Bapna, Rk

    2006-01-01

    Increased pulmonary vascular resistance can be detrimental to the cardiac output in post-operative cardiac surgical patients. Pulmonary vasodilator therapy by systemic pharmacologic agents is non-selective. Inhaled nitric oxide is a selective pulmonary vasodilator and does not cause systemic hypotension. In this prospective study, 14 adult post-operative cardiac surgical patients with pulmonary hypertension underwent inhaled nitric oxide therapy and their hemodynamic changes were evaluated. Inhaled nitric oxide was administered in doses of 5 ppm-25 ppm. The result was a decrease in pulmonary vascular resistance from 456.57 +/- 137.13 to 357.64 +/- 119.80 dynes-sec- Continued. - See Free Full Text.

  10. Use of nitric oxide inhalation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Ashutosh, K.; Phadke, K.; Jackson, J. F.; Steele, D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Inhalation of nitric oxide with oxygen could be a promising treatment in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and pulmonary hypertension. However, the current methods of delivery of NO are cumbersome and unsuitable for long term use. The present study was undertaken to investigate the safety and efficacy of a mixture of nitric oxide (NO) and oxygen administered via a nasal cannula for 24 hours in patients with oxygen dependent COPD.
METHODS—Twenty five parts per million (ppm) of NO was administered by inhalation combined with supplemental oxygen at a flow rate of 2 l/min via a nasal cannula for 24 hours to 11 ambulatory men with stable, oxygen dependent COPD. Room air with supplemental oxygen at 2 l/min was administered in an identical manner for another 24 hours as control therapy in a randomised, double blind, crossover fashion to all patients. Pulmonary function tests, exercise tolerance, dyspnoea grade, and lung volumes were measured at baseline, 24, and 48 hours. Pulmonary artery pressure (PAP), cardiac output (CO), pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), arterial blood gas tensions, and minute ventilation were measured at baseline, after 30 minutes and 24 hours of breathing NO and oxygen. Venous admixture ratio (Qs/Qt) and dead space ratio (Vd/Vt) were also calculated. Concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and NO in the inhaled and ambient air were monitored continuously. Differences in pulmonary function, arterial blood gas tensions, pulmonary haemodynamics, exercise tolerance, and dyspnoea between oxygen and NO breathing periods were analysed for significance using paired t tests.
RESULTS—A significant (p<0.05) fall was observed in PVR (183.1 (116.05) and 137.2 (108.4) dynes.s.cm-3 before and after breathing NO for 24 hours, respectively) with NO administration without significant changes in symptoms, pulmonary function, arterial oxygen tension, or exercise tolerance.
CONCLUSIONS—NO at a concentration of 25 ppm

  11. Effect of nitric oxide inhalation on gas exchange in acute severe pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Federico P; Amado, Veronica M; Roca, Josep; Torres, Antoni; Nicolas, Josep M; Rodriguez-Roisin, Robert; Barberà, Joan A

    2013-06-15

    Inhaled nitric oxide (NO) causes selective pulmonary vasodilatation and may improve gas exchange. The study was aimed to evaluate the acute effects of inhaled NO on pulmonary gas exchange in severe unilateral pneumonia, where hypoxemia results from increased intrapulmonary shunt. We studied 8 patients without preexisting lung disease (59±18 yr; 4M/4F) with early unilateral severe pneumonia and respiratory failure. Pulmonary and systemic hemodynamics and gas exchange, including ventilation-perfusion (V;A/Q;) distributions, were measured at baseline and while breathing 5 and 40 parts per million (ppm) of NO. Inhaled NO caused a dose-dependent fall in pulmonary vascular resistance (by 12% and 21%, with 5 and 40ppm, respectively; p<0.01, each) and improvement of PaO2 (by 25% and 23%; p<0.05, each), owing to the reduction of intrapulmonary shunt (by 23% and 27%; p<0.05, each), without changes in the amount of perfusion to low V;A/Q; ratio alveolar units. Patients with greater baseline intrapulmonary shunt exhibited greater improvement in arterial oxygenation (r(2)=0.55, p<0.05). We conclude that low doses of inhaled NO improve pulmonary gas exchange in acute severe pneumonia.

  12. Inhaled nitric oxide in premature infants: effect on tracheal aspirate and plasma nitric oxide metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Posencheg, M A; Gow, A J; Truog, W E; Ballard, R A; Cnaan, A; Golombek, S G; Ballard, P L

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) is a potential new therapy for prevention of bronchopulmonary dysplasia and brain injury in premature infants. This study examined dose-related effects of iNO on NO metabolites as evidence of NO delivery. Study Design: A subset of 102 premature infants in the NO CLD trial, receiving 24 days of iNO (20 p.p.m. decreasing to 2 p.p.m.) or placebo, were analyzed. Tracheal aspirate (TA) and plasma samples collected at enrollment and at intervals during study gas were analyzed for NO metabolites. Result: iNO treatment increased NO metabolites in TA at 20 and 10 p.p.m. (1.7- to 2.3-fold vs control) and in plasma at 20, 10, and 5 p.p.m. (1.6- to 2.3-fold). In post hoc analysis, treated infants with lower metabolite levels at entry had an improved clinical outcome. Conclusion: iNO causes dose-related increases in NO metabolites in the circulation as well as lung fluid, as evidenced by TA analysis, showing NO delivery to these compartments. PMID:19812581

  13. Inhaled nitric oxide decreases pulmonary endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression and activity in normal newborn rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Hua-Huy, Thông; Duong-Quy, Sy; Pham, Hoa; Pansiot, Julien; Mercier, Jean-Christophe; Baud, Olivier; Dinh-Xuan, Anh Tuan

    2016-01-01

    Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) is commonly used in the treatment of very ill pre-term newborns. Previous studies showed that exogenous NO could affect endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) activity and expression in vascular endothelial cell cultures or adult rat models, but this has never been fully described in newborn rat lungs. We therefore aimed to assess the effects of iNO on eNOS expression and activity in newborn rats. Rat pups, post-natal day (P) 0 to P7, and their dams were placed in a chamber containing NO at 5 ppm (iNO-5 ppm group) or 20 ppm (iNO-20 ppm group), or in room air (control group). Rat pups were sacrificed at P7 and P14 for evaluation of lung eNOS expression and activity. At P7, eNOS protein expression in total lung lysates, in bronchial and arterial sections, was significantly decreased in the iNO-20 ppm versus control group. At P14, eNOS expression was comparable among all three groups. The amounts of eNOS mRNA significantly differed at P7 between the iNO-20 ppm and control groups. NOS activity decreased in the iNO-20 ppm group at P7 and returned to normal levels at P14. There was an imbalance between superoxide dismutase and NOS activities in the iNO-20 ppm group at P7. Inhalation of NO at 20 ppm early after birth decreases eNOS gene transcription, protein expression and enzyme activity. This decrease might account for the rebound phenomenon observed in patients treated with iNO.

  14. Two-Year Neurodevelopmental Outcomes of Ventilated Preterm Infants Treated with Inhaled Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Michele C.; Hibbs, Anna Maria; Martin, Camilia R.; Cnaan, Avital; Keller, Roberta L.; Vittinghoff, Eric; Martin, Richard J.; Truog, William E.; Ballard, Philip L.; Zadell, Arlene; Wadlinger, Sandra R.; Coburn, Christine E.; Ballard, Roberta A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective In a randomized multi-center trial, we demonstrated that inhaled nitric oxide begun between 7 and 21 days and treated for 24 days significantly increased survival without bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in ventilated premature infants weighing < 1250 g. Since some preventative BPD treatments are associated with neurodevelopmental impairment, we designed a follow-up study to assess the safety of nitric oxide. Study design Our hypothesis was that inhaled nitric oxide will not increase neurodevelopmental impairment compared with placebo. We prospectively evaluated neurodevelopmental and growth outcomes at 24 months PMA in 477 (89%) of 535 surviving infants enrolled in the trial. Results In the treated group, 109 of 243 children (45%) had neurodevelopmental impairment (moderate or severe cerebral palsy, bilateral blindness, bilateral hearing loss or score of less than 70 on the Bayley Scales II), compared with 114 of 234 (49%) in the placebo group (Relative Risk 0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.75 to 1.12; p = 0.39). No differences on any subcomponent of neurodevelopmental impairment or growth variables were found between inhaled nitric oxide or placebo. Conclusions Inhaled nitric oxide improved survival free of bronchopulmonary dysplasia with no adverse neurodevelopmental effects at 2 years of age. PMID:20138299

  15. Extrapulmonary effects of inhaled nitric oxide: role of reversible S-nitrosylation of erythrocytic hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Timothy J; Doctor, Allan

    2006-04-01

    Early applications of inhaled nitric oxide (iNO), typically in the treatment of diseases marked by acute pulmonary hypertension, were met by great enthusiasm regarding the purported specificity of iNO: vasodilation by iNO was specific to the lung (without a change in systemic vascular resistance), and within the lung, NO activity was said to be confined spatially and temporally by Hb within the vascular lumen. Underlying these claims were classical views of NO as a short-lived paracrine hormone that acts largely through the heme groups of soluble guanylate cyclase, and whose potential activity is terminated on encountering the hemes of red blood cell (RBC) Hb. These classical views are yielding to a broader paradigm, in which NO-related signaling is achieved through redox-related NO adducts that endow NO synthase products with the ability to act at a distance in space and time from NO synthase itself. Evidence supporting the biological importance of such stable NO adducts is probably strongest for S-nitrosothiols (SNOs), in which NO binds to critical cysteine residues in proteins or peptides. The circulating RBC is a major SNO reservoir, and RBC Hb releases SNO-related bioactivity peripherally on O2 desaturation. These new paradigms describing NO transport also provide a plausible mechanistic understanding of the increasingly recognized peripheral effects of inhaled NO. An explanation for the peripheral actions of inhaled NO is discussed here, and the rationale and results of attempts to exploit the "NO delivery" function of the RBC are reviewed.

  16. Inhaled nitric oxide in preterm infants with prolonged preterm rupture of the membranes: a case series.

    PubMed

    Semberova, J; O'Donnell, S M; Franta, J; Miletin, J

    2015-04-01

    The available evidence does not support the routine use of inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) in the care of premature infants. We present a case series of 22 preterm infants born after prolonged preterm premature rupture of membranes and oligohydramnios with respiratory failure. Oxygenation index decreased significantly after commencement of iNO.

  17. Comparison of inhaled milrinone, nitric oxide and prostacyclin in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Martin; Corsilli, Daniel; Williamson, David R; Brosseau, Marc; Bellemare, Patrick; Delisle, Stéphane; Nguyen, Anne QN; Varin, France

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the safety and efficacy of inhaled milrinone in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). METHODS Open-label prospective cross-over pilot study where fifteen adult patients with hypoxemic failure meeting standard ARDS criteria and monitored with a pulmonary artery catheter were recruited in an academic 24-bed medico-surgical intensive care unit. Random sequential administration of iNO (20 ppm) or nebulized epoprostenol (10 μg/mL) was done in all patients. Thereafter, inhaled milrinone (1 mg/mL) alone followed by inhaled milrinone in association with inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) was administered. A jet nebulization device synchronized with the mechanical ventilation was use to administrate the epoprostenol and the milrinone. Hemodynamic measurements and partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2) were recorded before and after each inhaled therapy administration. RESULTS The majority of ARDS were of pulmonary cause (n = 13) and pneumonia (n = 7) was the leading underlying initial disease. Other pulmonary causes of ARDS were: Post cardiopulmonary bypass (n = 2), smoke inhalation injury (n = 1), thoracic trauma and pulmonary contusions (n = 2) and aspiration (n = 1). Two patients had an extra pulmonary cause of ARDS: A polytrauma patient and an intra-abdominal abscess Inhaled nitric oxide, epoprostenol, inhaled milrinone and the combination of inhaled milrinone and iNO had no impact on systemic hemodynamics. No significant adverse events related to study medications were observed. The median increase of PaO2 from baseline was 8.8 mmHg [interquartile range (IQR) = 16.3], 6.0 mmHg (IQR = 18.4), 6 mmHg (IQR = 15.8) and 9.2 mmHg (IQR = 20.2) respectively with iNO, epoprostenol, inhaled milrinone, and iNO added to milrinone. Only iNO and the combination of inhaled milrinone and iNO had a statistically significant effect on PaO2. CONCLUSION When comparing the effects of inhaled NO, milrinone and epoprostenol, only NO significantly improved oxygenation

  18. Effect of inhaled nitric oxide on pulmonary hemodynamics after acute lung injury in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Romand, J.A.; Pinsky, M.R.; Firestone, L.; Zar, H.A.; Lancaster, J.R. Jr. )

    1994-03-01

    Increased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and mismatch in ventilation-to-perfusion ratio characterize acute lung injury (ALI). Pulmonary arterial pressure (Ppa) decreases when nitric oxide (NO) is inhaled during hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV); thus NO inhalation may reduce PVR and improve gas exchange in ALI. The authors studied the hemodynamic and gas exchange effects of NO inhalation during HPV and then ALI in eight anesthetized open-chest mechanically ventilated dogs. Right atrial pressure, Ppa, and left ventricular and arterial pressures were measured, and cardiac output was estimated by an aortic flow probe. Shunt and dead space were also estimated. The effect of 5-min exposures to 0, 17, 28, 47, and 0 ppm inhaled NO was recorded during hyperoxia, hypoxia, and oleic acid-induced ALI. During ALI, partial [beta]-adrenergic blockage (propanolol, 0.15 mg/kg iv) was induced and 74 ppm NO was inhaled. Nitrosylhemoglobin (NO-Hb) and methemoglobin (MetHb) levels were measured. During hyperoxia, NO inhalation had no measurable effects. Hypoxia increased Ppa and calculated PVR, both of which decreased with 17 ppm NO. ALI decreased arterial Po[sub 2] and increased airway pressure, shunt, and dead space ventilation. Ppa and PVR were greater during ALI than during hyperoxia. NO inhalation had no measurable effect during ALI before or after [beta]-adrenergic blockage. MetHb remained low, and NO-Hb was unmeasurable. Bolus infusion of nitroglycerin (15 [mu]g) induced an immediate decrease in Ppa and PVR during ALI. Short-term NO inhalation does not affect PVR or gas exchange in dogs with oleic acid-induced ALI, nor does it increase NO-Hb or MetHb. In contrast, NO can diminish hypoxia-induced elevations in pulmonary vascular tone. These data suggest that NO inhalation selectively dilates the pulmonary circulation and specifically reduces HPV but not oleic acid-induced increases in pulmonary vasomotor tone. 28 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Automated Inhaled Nitric Oxide Alerts for Adult Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Patient Identification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Automated inhaled nitric oxide alerts for adult extracorporeal membrane oxygenation patient identification Slava M. Belenkiy, MD, Andriy I...Josè Salinas, PhD, and Jeremy W. Cannon, MD, San Antonio, Texas BACKGROUND: Recently, automated alerts have been used to identify patients with...initiating ECMO. This case series summarizes our experience with using automated electronic alerts for ECMO team activation focused particularly on an

  20. Evaluation of nitrogen dioxide scavengers during delivery of inhaled nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, L; Rydgren, G

    1998-09-01

    We have analysed the ability of three nitrogen dioxide absorbing materials (soda lime, noXon and zeolite) to act as nitrogen dioxide scavengers during delivery of inhaled nitric oxide. Different mixtures of gas were produced in a ventilator (Servo Ventilator 300) and passed through an inspiratory tube. Concentrations of nitrogen dioxide and nitric oxide were measured in the distal part of the tube, with and without the gas having passed through a canister containing the different filter materials. Our findings indicated that nitrogen dioxide was absorbed effectively by all filter materials but that there was re-formation of nitrogen dioxide from nitric oxide and oxygen in or immediately after the canister. This initial production of nitrogen dioxide was very rapid and could not be prevented by the use of scavengers. Thus soda lime and zeolite had no practical effect as scavengers in this delivery system, and the effect of noXon was very slight.

  1. The Biological Chemistry of Nitric Oxide as It Pertains to the Extrapulmonary Effects of Inhaled Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Gow, Andrew J.

    2006-01-01

    The chemical properties of nitric oxide (NO) have been studied for over 200 years. However, it is only within the last 20 years that the biological implications of this chemistry have been considered. The classical model of NO action within the vasculature centers on production in the endothelium, diffusion to the smooth muscle, and subsequent activation of guanylate cyclase via binding to its heme iron. In the context of this model, it is difficult to conceptualize extrapulmonary effects of inhaled NO. However, NO possesses complex redox chemistry and is capable of forming a range of nitrogen oxide species and is therefore capable of interacting with a variety of biomolecules. Of particular interest is its reaction with reduced cysteine to form an S-nitrosothiol (SNO). SNOs are formed throughout NO biology and are a post-translational modification that has been shown to regulate many proteins under physiologic conditions. Hemoglobin, which was considered to be solely a consumer of NO, can form SNO in a conformationally dependent manner, which allows for the transport of inhaled NO beyond the realm of the lung. Higher oxides of nitrogen are capable of modifying proteins via nitration of tyrosines, which has been shown to occur under pathologic conditions. By virtue of its redox reactivity, one can appreciate that inhaled NO has a variety of routes by which it can act and that these routes may lead to extrapulmonary effects. PMID:16565423

  2. The biological chemistry of nitric oxide as it pertains to the extrapulmonary effects of inhaled nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Gow, Andrew J

    2006-04-01

    The chemical properties of nitric oxide (NO) have been studied for over 200 years. However, it is only within the last 20 years that the biological implications of this chemistry have been considered. The classical model of NO action within the vasculature centers on production in the endothelium, diffusion to the smooth muscle, and subsequent activation of guanylate cyclase via binding to its heme iron. In the context of this model, it is difficult to conceptualize extrapulmonary effects of inhaled NO. However, NO possesses complex redox chemistry and is capable of forming a range of nitrogen oxide species and is therefore capable of interacting with a variety of biomolecules. Of particular interest is its reaction with reduced cysteine to form an S-nitrosothiol (SNO). SNOs are formed throughout NO biology and are a post-translational modification that has been shown to regulate many proteins under physiologic conditions. Hemoglobin, which was considered to be solely a consumer of NO, can form SNO in a conformationally dependent manner, which allows for the transport of inhaled NO beyond the realm of the lung. Higher oxides of nitrogen are capable of modifying proteins via nitration of tyrosines, which has been shown to occur under pathologic conditions. By virtue of its redox reactivity, one can appreciate that inhaled NO has a variety of routes by which it can act and that these routes may lead to extrapulmonary effects.

  3. Effect of Inhaled β2-Agonist on Exhaled Nitric Oxide in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Amer, Mostafa; Cowan, Jan; Gray, Andrew; Brockway, Ben

    2016-01-01

    The fractional exhaled nitric oxide measured at an expiratory flow of 50mL/s (FENO50) is a marker of airway inflammation, and high levels are associated with greater response to steroid treatment. In asthma, FENO50 increases with bronchodilation and decreases with bronchoconstriction, the latter potentially causing an underestimate of the degree of airway inflammation when asthma worsens. It is unknown whether the same effect occurs in chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD). Likewise, it is not known whether changes in airway calibre in COPD patients alter flow-independent parameters describing pulmonary nitric oxide exchange, such as the maximal flux of nitric oxide (NO) from the proximal airway compartment (J’awNO) and the distal airway/alveolar concentration of NO (CANO). We recruited 24 patients with COPD and performed FENO analysis at multiple expiratory flows before and after treatment with inhaled β2-agonist bronchodilator therapy. For the 21 patients analysed, FENO50 rose from 17.1 (1.4) ppb (geometric mean (geometric SD)) at baseline, to 19.3 (1.3) ppb after bronchodilator therapy, an increase of 2.2 ppb (95% CI, 0.7–3.6; P = 0.005). There were non-significant changes in flow-independent NO parameters. The change in FENO50 correlated positively with the change in J’awNO (rs = 0.67, P < 0.001; rs = 0.62, P = 0.002 before and after correction for axial back-diffusion respectively) following bronchodilation. Inhaled bronchodilator therapy can increase exhaled nitric oxide measurements in COPD. The standardisation of inhaled bronchodilator therapy before FENO analysis in COPD patients should therefore be considered in both research and clinical settings. PMID:27258087

  4. The Effect of Inhaled Nitric Oxide on Smoke Inhalation Injury in an Ovine Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-01

    maceuticals, West Orange, NJ), and bronchoalveolar lavage (1.5 mL/kg/ h ). (BAL) was performed under mechanical ventilation. Twenty milliliters of 0.9...carboxyhemoglobin levels, and platelet counts. Methe- moglobin in group 2 was significantly higher than in 10 group 1 at 3 hours and for the duration of the study...decreases free cytosolic calcium lev- moglobin with production of nitrite and nitrate, which es.4 - 6’ 27 Nitric oxide also appears to inhibit the are then

  5. Inhaled Nitric Oxide in preterm infants: a systematic review and individual patient data meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Preterm infants requiring assisted ventilation are at significant risk of both pulmonary and cerebral injury. Inhaled Nitric Oxide, an effective therapy for pulmonary hypertension and hypoxic respiratory failure in the full term infant, has also been studied in preterm infants. The most recent Cochrane review of preterm infants includes 11 studies and 3,370 participants. The results show a statistically significant reduction in the combined outcome of death or chronic lung disease (CLD) in two studies with routine use of iNO in intubated preterm infants. However, uncertainty remains as a larger study (Kinsella 2006) showed no significant benefit for iNO for this combined outcome. Also, trials that included very ill infants do not demonstrate significant benefit. One trial of iNO treatment at a later postnatal age reported a decrease in the incidence of CLD. The aim of this individual patient meta-analysis is to confirm or refute these potentially conflicting results and to determine the extent to which patient or treatment characteristics may explain the results and/or may predict benefit from inhaled Nitric Oxide in preterm infants. Methods/Design The Meta-Analysis of Preterm Patients on inhaled Nitric Oxide (MAPPiNO) Collaboration will perform an individual patient data meta-analysis to answer these important clinical questions. Studies will be included if preterm infants receiving assisted ventilation are randomized to receive inhaled Nitric Oxide or to a control group. The individual patient data provided by the Collaborators will be analyzed on an intention-to-treat basis where possible. Binary outcomes will be analyzed using log-binomial regression models and continuous outcomes will be analyzed using linear fixed effects models. Adjustments for trial differences will be made by including the trial variable in the model specification. Discussion Thirteen (13) trials, with a total of 3567 infants are eligible for inclusion in the MAPPiNO systematic

  6. Inhalant Use in Latina Early Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzmán, Bianca L.; Kouyoumdjian, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine how lifetime use and extent of use of inhalants by Latina girls is impacted by age, acculturation, grades, ditching, sexual behaviors (light petting, heavy petting, and going all the way) and sexual agency. A total of 273 females who self-identified as being Latina whose mean age was 13.94 completed…

  7. Inhaled nitric oxide for the adjunctive therapy of severe malaria: Protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Severe malaria remains a major cause of global morbidity and mortality. Despite the use of potent anti-parasitic agents, the mortality rate in severe malaria remains high. Adjunctive therapies that target the underlying pathophysiology of severe malaria may further reduce morbidity and mortality. Endothelial activation plays a central role in the pathogenesis of severe malaria, of which angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) has recently been shown to function as a key regulator. Nitric oxide (NO) is a major inhibitor of Ang-2 release from endothelium and has been shown to decrease endothelial inflammation and reduce the adhesion of parasitized erythrocytes. Low-flow inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) gas is a US FDA-approved treatment for hypoxic respiratory failure in neonates. Methods/Design This prospective, parallel arm, randomized, placebo-controlled, blinded clinical trial compares adjunctive continuous inhaled nitric oxide at 80 ppm to placebo (both arms receiving standard anti-malarial therapy), among Ugandan children aged 1-10 years of age with severe malaria. The primary endpoint is the longitudinal change in Ang-2, an objective and quantitative biomarker of malaria severity, which will be analysed using a mixed-effects linear model. Secondary endpoints include mortality, recovery time, parasite clearance and neurocognitive sequelae. Discussion Noteworthy aspects of this trial design include its efficient sample size supported by a computer simulation study to evaluate statistical power, meticulous attention to complex ethical issues in a cross-cultural setting, and innovative strategies for safety monitoring and blinding to treatment allocation in a resource-constrained setting in sub-Saharan Africa. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01255215 PMID:21752262

  8. Inhaled Nitric Oxide Improves Outcomes After Successful Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Minamishima, Shizuka; Kida, Kotaro; Tokuda, Kentaro; Wang, Huifang; Sips, Patrick Y.; Kosugi, Shizuko; Mandeville, Joseph B.; Buys, Emmanuel S.; Brouckaert, Peter; Liu, Philip K.; Liu, Christina H.; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Ichinose, Fumito

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Sudden cardiac arrest (CA) is a leading cause of death worldwide. Breathing nitric oxide (NO) reduces ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury in animal models and in patients. The objective of this study was to learn whether inhaled NO improves outcomes after CA and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Methods and Results Adult male mice were subjected to potassium-induced CA for 7.5 min whereupon CPR was performed with chest compression and mechanical ventilation. One hour after CPR, mice were extubated and breathed air alone or air supplemented with 40 parts per million (ppm) NO for 23h. Mice that were subjected to CA/CPR and breathed air exhibited a poor 10-day survival rate (4/13), depressed neurological and left ventricular (LV) function, and increased caspase-3 activation and inflammatory cytokine induction in the brain. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed brain regions with marked water diffusion abnormality 24h after CA/CPR in mice that breathed air. Breathing air supplemented with NO for 23h starting 1h after CPR attenuated neurological and LV dysfunction 4 days after CA/CPR and markedly improved 10-day survival rate (11/13, P=0.003 vs Air). The protective effects of inhaled NO on the outcome after CA/CPR were associated with reduced water diffusion abnormality, caspase-3 activation, and cytokine induction in the brain and increased serum NOx levels. Deficiency of the α1 subunit of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), a primary target of NO, abrogated the ability of inhaled NO to improve outcomes after CA/CPR. Conclusions These results suggest that NO inhalation after CA and successful CPR improves outcome via sGC-dependent mechanisms. PMID:21931083

  9. Inhaled nitric oxide for preterm premature rupture of membranes, oligohydramnios, and pulmonary hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Chock, Valerie Y; Van Meurs, Krisa P; Hintz, Susan R; Ehrenkranz, Richard A; Lemons, James A; Kendrick, Douglas E; Stevenson, David K

    2009-04-01

    We sought to determine if inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) administered to preterm infants with premature rupture of membranes (PPROM), oligohydramnios, and pulmonary hypoplasia improved oxygenation, survival, or other clinical outcomes. Data were analyzed from infants with suspected pulmonary hypoplasia, oligohydramnios, and PPROM enrolled in the National Institute of Child Health and Development Neonatal Research Network Preemie Inhaled Nitric Oxide (PiNO) trial, where patients were randomized to receive placebo (oxygen) or iNO at 5 to 10 ppm. Outcome variables assessed were PaO (2) response, mortality, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), and severe intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) or periventricular leukomalacia (PVL). Twelve of 449 infants in the PiNO trial met criteria. Six infants received iNO and six received placebo. The iNO group had a mean increase in PaO (2) of 39 +/- 50 mm Hg versus a mean decrease of 11 +/- 15 mm Hg in the control group. Mortality was 33% versus 67%, BPD (2/5) 40% versus (2/2) 100%, and severe IVH or PVL (1/5) 20% versus (1/2) 50% in the iNO and control groups, respectively. None of these changes were statistically significant. Review of a limited number of cases from a large multicenter trial suggests that iNO use in the setting of PPROM, oligohydramnios, and suspected pulmonary hypoplasia improves oxygenation and may decrease the rate of BPD and death without increasing severe IVH or PVL. However, the small sample size precludes definitive conclusions. Further studies are required to determine if iNO is of benefit in this specific patient population.

  10. Pulmonary vascular effects of pulsed inhaled nitric oxide in COPD patients with pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hajian, Bita; De Backer, Jan; Vos, Wim; Van Holsbeke, Cedric; Ferreira, Francisca; Quinn, Deborah A; Hufkens, Annemie; Claes, Rita; De Backer, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is often associated with secondary pulmonary hypertension (PH), which worsens prognosis. PH can be lowered by oxygen, but also by inhaled nitric oxide (NO), which has the potential to improve the health status of these patients. NO is an important mediator in vascular reactions in the pulmonary circulation. Oral compounds can act through NO-mediated pathways, but delivering pulsed inhaled NO (iNO) directly to the airways and pulmonary vasculature could equally benefit patients. Therefore, a proof-of-concept study was performed to quantify pulmonary blood vessel caliber changes after iNO administration using computed tomography (CT)-based functional respiratory imaging (FRI). Methods Six patients with secondary PH due to COPD received “pulsed” iNO in combination with oxygen for 20 minutes via a nasal cannula. Patients underwent a high-resolution CT scan with contrast before and after iNO. Using FRI, changes in volumes of blood vessels and associated lobes were quantified. Oxygen saturation and blood pressure were monitored and patients were asked about their subjective feelings. Results Pulmonary blood vessel volume increased by 7.06%±5.37% after iNO. A strong correlation (Ω20=0.32, P=0.002) was obtained between ventilation and observed vasodilation, suggesting that using the pulsed system, iNO is directed toward the ventilated zones, which consequently experience more vasodilation. Patients did not develop oxygen desaturation, remained normotensive, and perceived an improvement in their dyspnea sensation. Conclusion Inhalation of pulsed NO with oxygen causes vasodilation in the pulmonary circulation of COPD patients, mainly in the well-ventilated areas. A high degree of heterogeneity was found in the level of vasodilation. Patients tend to feel better after the treatment. Chronic use trials are warranted. PMID:27462149

  11. [Inhaled nitric oxide: a physiologic treatment of persistent pulmonary arterial hypertension in the newborn].

    PubMed

    Thébaud, B; Mercier, J C

    1997-10-01

    Fetal pulmonary circulation is characterized by high resistance and low pulmonary blood flow. Right-to-left shunting through the foramen ovale and/or patent ductus arteriosus is necessary to perfuse the placenta and insure fetal life. At birth, pulmonary arterial blood flow increases immediately by 8- to 10-fold, and allows pulmonary gas exchange and postnatal life. In some circumstances, this adaptation to extra-uterine life is inadequate, because of persistent high pulmonary resistance (PPHN). Due to the lack of a selective pulmonary vasodilator, the treatment of this syndrome remained purely symptomatic using high oxygen levels and barotraumatic mechanical hyperventilation. When this medical treatment failed, the only alternative was extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). The discovery of the major role of various endothelium-derived factors including nitric oxide (NO) in the control of vascular reactivity led to dramatic switches in the concepts of severe neonatal respiratory failure and the therapeutic approach of PPHN. It was shown, first in experimental animals then in a few infants with hypoxemic respiratory failure, that NO inhalation selectively vasodilated the vasoconstricted pulmonary vessels, and reversed right-to-left shunting and refractory hypoxemia. Whether inhaled NO also reduces mortality and/or morbidity in hypoxic infants remains to be proven by appropriate randomized clinical trials. However, not only PPHN is associated with pulmonary diseases of various etiologies and underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms, but also inhaled NO is used in conjunction with other validated therapeutic strategies including ante- or postnatal steroids, exogenous surfactants, and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation. Thus, the relevant primary endpoint might be not only crude survival but the most physiological and economical way of obtaining it.

  12. Pulmonary expression of nitric oxide synthase isoforms in sheep with smoke inhalation and burn injury.

    PubMed

    Cox, Robert A; Jacob, Sam; Oliveras, Gloria; Murakami, Kazunori; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Traber, Lillian; Schmalstieg, Frank C; Herndon, David N; Traber, Daniel L; Hawkins, Hal K

    2009-03-01

    Previous studies have indicated increased plasma levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase in lung. This study further examines the pulmonary expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms in an ovine model of acute lung injury induced by smoke inhalation and burn injury (S+B injury). Female range bred sheep (4 per group) were sacrificed at 4, 8, 12, 24, and 48 hours after injury and immunohistochemistry was performed in tissues for various NOS isoforms. The study indicates that in uninjured sheep lung, endothelial (eNOS) is constitutively expressed in the endothelial cells associated with the airways and parenchyma, and in macrophages. Similarly, neuronal (nNOS) is constitutively present in the mucous cells of the epithelium and in neurons of airway ganglia. In uninjured lung, inducible (iNOS) was present in bronchial secretory cells and macrophages. In tissue after S+B injury, new expression of iNOS was evident in bronchial ciliated cells, basal cells, and mucus gland cells. In the parenchyma, a slight increase in iNOS immunostaining was seen in type I cells at 12 and 24 hours after injury only. Virtually no change in eNOS or nNOS was seen after injury.

  13. Inhaled nitric oxide and arterial oxygen tension in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and severe pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Y.; Higenbottam, T. W.; d Diaz; Cremona, G.; Akamine, S.; Barbera, J. A.; Rodriguez-Roisin, R.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inhaled nitric oxide (NO) is a selective pulmonary vasodilator which can improve gas exchange in acute lung injury. However, it is uncertain that this effect on arterial oxygenation can be generalised to all lung diseases. METHODS: The effects of inhaled NO on gas exchange were studied in nine patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), 11 patients with severe pulmonary hypertension, and 14 healthy volunteers. A randomized sequence of 40 ppm of NO or air was inhaled for 20 minutes through an orofacial mask. RESULTS: Inhaled NO reduced mean (SE) transcutaneous arterial oxygen tension (TcPO2) from 9.6 (0.3) to 8.9 (0.4) kPa in healthy volunteers and from 7.4 (0.6) to 7.0 (0.5) kPa in patients with COPD. There was no change in TcPO2 in patients with severe pulmonary hypertension. During inhalation of NO and air no change occurred in transcutaneous arterial carbon dioxide tension (TcPCO2), arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) measured by pulse oximeter, or cardiac output determined by the transthoracic impedance method. CONCLUSIONS: Inhaled NO does not improve TcPO2 nor increase cardiac output in normal subjects and patients with COPD, suggesting that inhaled NO worsens gas exchange. This could represent inhaled NO overriding hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in COPD. The finding that TcPO2 also fell when normal subjects inhaled NO suggests that a similar mechanism normally contributes to optimal gas exchange. Whilst inhaled NO can improve oxygenation, this effect should not be considered to be a general response but is dependent on the type of lung disease. 


 PMID:9059470

  14. Inhalants

    MedlinePlus

    ... place a chemical- soaked rag in their mouth. Abusers may also inhale fumes from a balloon or ... by inhalants usually lasts just a few minutes, abusers often try to prolong it by continuing to ...

  15. Inhalants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drug Facts Chat Day: Inhalants Drug Facts Chat Day: Inhalants Print Can you get high off of ... Cool Order Free Materials National Drugs & Alcohol Chat Day Newsletter Sign up to receive National Drug & Alcohol ...

  16. Inflammatory Mediators in Tracheal Aspirates of Preterm Infants Participating in a Randomized Trial of Inhaled Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Amann, Elena; Uhlig, Ulrike; Yang, Yang; Fuchs, Hans W.; Zemlin, Michael; Mercier, Jean-Christophe; Maier, Rolf F.; Hummler, Helmut D.; Uhlig, Stefan; Thome, Ulrich H.

    2017-01-01

    Background Ventilated preterm infants frequently develop bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) which is associated with elevated inflammatory mediators in their tracheal aspirates (TA). In animal models of BPD, inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) has been shown to reduce lung inflammation, but data for human preterm infants is missing. Methods Within a European multicenter trial of NO inhalation for preterm infants to prevent BPD (EUNO), TA was collected to determine the effects of iNO on pulmonary inflammation. TA was collected from 43 premature infants randomly assigned to receive either iNO or placebo gas (birth weight 530–1230 g, median 800 g, gestational age 24 to 28 2/7 weeks, median 26 weeks). Interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, interferon γ-induced protein 10 (IP-10), macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α, acid sphingomyelinase (ASM), neuropeptide Y and leukotriene B4 were measured in serial TA samples from postnatal day 2 to 14. Furthermore, TA levels of nitrotyrosine and nitrite were determined under iNO therapy. Results The TA levels of IP-10, IL-6, IL-8, MIP-1α, IL-1β, ASM and albumin increased with advancing postnatal age in critically ill preterm infants, whereas nitrotyrosine TA levels declined in both, iNO-treated and placebo-treated infants. The iNO treatment generally increased nitrite TA levels, whereas nitrotyrosine TA levels were not affected by iNO treatment. Furthermore, iNO treatment transiently reduced early inflammatory and fibrotic markers associated with BPD development including TGF-β1, IP-10 and IL-8, but induced a delayed increase of ASM TA levels. Conclusion Treatment with iNO may have played a role in reducing several inflammatory and fibrotic mediators in TA of preterm infants compared to placebo-treated infants. However, survival without BPD was not affected in the main EUNO trial. Trial registration NCT00551642 PMID:28046032

  17. [Cost effectiveness and budget impact analysis of inhaled nitric oxide in a neonatal unit from the perspective of the public health system].

    PubMed

    Kilchemmann Fuentes, Carlos; Vallejos Vallejos, Carlos; Román Navarro, Andrés

    Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) is currently the first-line therapy in severe hypoxaemic respiratory failure of the newborn. Most of regional neonatal centres in Chile do not have this therapeutic alternative.

  18. One-Year Respiratory Outcomes of Preterm Infants Enrolled in the Nitric Oxide[H1] (to Prevent) Chronic Lung Disease Trial of Inhaled Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Hibbs, Anna Maria; Walsh, Michele C.; Martin, Richard J.; Truog, William E.; Lorch, Scott A.; Alessandrini, Evaline; Cnaan, Avital; Palermo, Lisa; Wadlinger, Sandra R.; Coburn, Christine E.; Ballard, Philip L.; Ballard, Roberta A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To identify whether inhaled nitric oxide treatment decreased indicators of long-term pulmonary morbidities after discharge from the NICU. Study design The NO CLD trial enrolled preterm infants (<1250g) between 7–21 days of age who were ventilated and at high risk for BPD. Follow-up occurred at 12 ± 3 months of age adjusted for prematurity; long-term pulmonary morbidities and other outcomes were reported by parents during structured blinded interviews. Results 456 infants (85%) were seen at 1 yr. Compared with control infants, infants randomized to inhaled nitric oxide received significantly less bronchodilators [odds ratio (OR) 0.53 (95% confidence interval 0.36–0.78)], inhaled steroids [OR 0.50 (0.32–0.77)], systemic steroids [OR 0.56 (0.32–0.97)], diuretics [OR 0.54 (0.34–0.85)], and supplemental oxygen [OR 0.65 (0.44–0.95)] after discharge from neonatal intensive care. There were no significant differences between parental report of re-hospitalizations [OR 0.83 (0.57–1.21)] or wheezing or whistling in the chest [OR 0.70 (0.48–1.03)]. Conclusions Infants treated with inhaled nitric oxide received fewer outpatient respiratory medications than the control group. However, any decision to institute routine use of this dosing regimen should also take into account the results of the 24 month neurodevelopmental assessment. PMID:18534620

  19. Producing nitric oxide by pulsed electrical discharge in air for portable inhalation therapy.

    PubMed

    Yu, Binglan; Muenster, Stefan; Blaesi, Aron H; Bloch, Donald B; Zapol, Warren M

    2015-07-01

    Inhalation of nitric oxide (NO) produces selective pulmonary vasodilation and is an effective therapy for treating pulmonary hypertension in adults and children. In the United States, the average cost of 5 days of inhaled NO for persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn is about $14,000. NO therapy involves gas cylinders and distribution, a complex delivery device, gas monitoring and calibration equipment, and a trained respiratory therapy staff. The objective of this study was to develop a lightweight, portable device to serve as a simple and economical method of producing pure NO from air for bedside or portable use. Two NO generators were designed and tested: an offline NO generator and an inline NO generator placed directly within the inspiratory line. Both generators use pulsed electrical discharges to produce therapeutic range NO (5 to 80 parts per million) at gas flow rates of 0.5 to 5 liters/min. NO was produced from air, as well as gas mixtures containing up to 90% O2 and 10% N2. Potentially toxic gases produced in the plasma, including nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3), were removed using a calcium hydroxide scavenger. An iridium spark electrode produced the lowest ratio of NO2/NO. In lambs with acute pulmonary hypertension, breathing electrically generated NO produced pulmonary vasodilation and reduced pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance index. In conclusion, electrical plasma NO generation produces therapeutic levels of NO from air. After scavenging to remove NO2 and O3 and filtration to remove particles, electrically produced NO can provide safe and effective treatment of pulmonary hypertension.

  20. Inhaled nitric oxide in adult patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Monsalve-Naharro, José Ángel; Domingo-Chiva, Esther; García Castillo, Sergio; Cuesta-Montero, Pablo; Jiménez-Vizuete, José María

    2017-03-01

    In some patients, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) leads to life-threatening refractory hypoxemia developing. Physicians may consider hypoxemic rescue therapies in an attempt to improve oxygenation in these patients while on conventional mechanical ventilation support. Use of inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) in ARDS is one of the most widely-studied pharmacological interventions over the past two decades. Its efficacy was examined in several randomized clinical trials and has undergone meta-analyses. Although iNO treatment was associated with improved oxygenation, researchers unfortunately never demonstrated a concomitant decrease in mortality or any improved outcome. Hence the current evidence suggests that iNO should not be routinely used in patients with ARDS however may be considered as adjunct therapy to tentatively improve oxygenation while other therapies are being considered in patients with severely hypoxemic ARDS.This review focuses on the therapeutic use of iNO in adult ARDS patients. We set out some recommendations for its use as rescue therapy against refractory hypoxemia.

  1. Inhaled Nitric Oxide Use in Preterm Infants in California Neonatal Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Handley, Sara C.; Steinhorn, Robin H.; Hopper, Andrew O.; Govindaswami, Balaji; Bhatt, Dilip R.; Van Meurs, Krisa P.; Ariagno, Ronald L.; Gould, Jeffrey B.; Lee, Henry C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) exposure in preterm infants and variation in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) use. Study Design This was a retrospective cohort study of infants, 22–33+6/7 weeks gestational age (GA), during 2005–2013. Analyses were stratified by GA and included population characteristics, iNO use over time and hospital variation. Result Of 65 824 infants, 1 718 (2.61%) received iNO. Infants, 22–24+6/7 weeks GA, had the highest incidence of iNO exposure (6.54%). Community NICUs (n = 77, median hospital use rate 0.7%) used less iNO than regional NICUs (n = 23, median hospital use rate 5.8%). In 22–24+6/7 week GA infants the median rate in regional centers was 10.6% (hospital IQR 3.8%–22.6%). Conclusion iNO exposure varied with GA and hospital level, with the most use in extremely premature infants and regional centers. Variation reflects a lack of consensus regarding the appropriate use of iNO for preterm infants. PMID:27031320

  2. Effect of inhaled nitric oxide on cerebrospinal fluid and blood nitrite concentrations in newborn lambs

    PubMed Central

    Conahey, George R.; Power, Gordon G.; Hopper, Andrew O.; Terry, Michael H.; Kirby, Laura S.; Blood, Arlin B.

    2009-01-01

    Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) has many extrapulmonary effects. As the half-life of NO in blood is orders of magnitude less than the circulation time from lungs to the brain, the mediator of systemic effects of iNO is unknown. We hypothesized that concentrations of nitrite, a circulating byproduct of NO with demonstrated NO bioactivity, would increase in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) during iNO therapy. iNO (80ppm) was given to six newborn lambs and results compared to six control lambs. Blood and CSF nitrite concentrations increased two-fold in response to iNO. cGMP increased in blood but not CSF suggesting brain guanylate cyclase activity was not increased. When sodium nitrite was infused intravenously blood and CSF nitrite levels increased within 10 min and reached similar levels of 14.6±1.5 µM after 40 min. The reactivity of nitrite in hemoglobin-free brain homogenates was investigated, with the findings that nitrite did not disappear nor did measurable amounts of s-nitroso, n-nitroso, or iron-nitrosyl-species appear. We conclude that although nitrite diffuses freely between blood and CSF, due to its lack of reactivity in the brain, nitrite’s putative role as the mediator of the systemic effects of iNO is limited to intravascular reactions. PMID:18535482

  3. Beneficial Effects of Concomitant Neuronal and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition in Ovine Burn and Inhalation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Matthias; Hamahata, Atsumori; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Cox, Robert A.; Nakano, Yoshimitsu; Westphal, Martin; Traber, Lillian D.; Herndon, David N.; Traber, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    Different isoforms of nitric oxide synthase are critically involved in the development of pulmonary failure secondary to acute lung injury. Here we tested the hypothesis that simultaneous blockade of inducible and neuronal nitric oxide synthase effectively prevents the pulmonary lesions in an ovine model of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) induced by combined burn and smoke inhalation injury. Chronically instrumented sheep were allocated to a sham-injured group (n = 6), an injured and untreated group (n = 6), or an injured group treated with simultaneous infusion of selective inducible and neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors (n = 5). The injury was induced by 48 breath of cotton smoke and a 3rd degree burn of 40% total body surface area. All sheep were mechanically ventilated and fluid resuscitated. The injury induced severe pulmonary dysfunction as indicated by decreases in PaO2/FiO2 ratio and increases in pulmonary shunt fraction, ventilatory pressures, lung lymph flow, and lung wet/dry weight ratio. The treatment fully prevented the elevations in lymph and plasma nitrate/nitrite levels, pulmonary shunting, ventilatory pressures, lung lymph flow, and wet/dry weight ratio and significantly attenuated the decline in PaO2/FiO2 ratio. In conclusion, simultaneous blockade of inducible and neuronal nitric oxide synthase exerts beneficial pulmonary effects in an ovine model of ARDS secondary to combined burn and smoke inhalation injury. This novel treatment strategy may represent a useful therapeutic adjunct for patients with these injuries. PMID:21263377

  4. Transpulmonary flux of S-nitrosothiols and pulmonary vasodilation during nitric oxide inhalation: role of transport.

    PubMed

    Torok, Jordan A; Brahmajothi, Mulugu V; Zhu, Hongmei; Tinch, Brian T; Auten, Richard L; McMahon, Timothy J

    2012-07-01

    Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) is used to treat pulmonary hypertension and is being investigated for prevention of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in neonates. Extrapulmonary effects of iNO are widely recognized, but the underlying chemistry and pharmacology are poorly understood. Growing evidence suggests that, in addition to acting via diffusion, NO can be converted into nitrosants capable of reacting with endogenous L-cysteine (L-Cys) in the alveolar lining fluid, forming S-nitrosothiol (SNO)-L-cysteine (CSNO). CSNO can then enter cells via the type L amino acid transporter (LAT). To determine the influence of LAT and supplemental L-Cys on the functional activity of iNO and transpulmonary movement of SNOs or other related species, we exposed C57Bl6 mice to nebulized L-Cys or D-cysteine (D-Cys) and/or LAT competitors. Isolated lungs were then perfused with physiologic buffer while effluent was collected to assay perfusate SNOs. Nebulized L-Cys, but not D-Cys, augmented the iNO-induced increase in circulating SNOs in the effluent without altering iNO-induced pulmonary vasodilation. Addition to the perfusate of either L-leucine (L-Leu) or 2-amino-2-norborane carboxylic acid, two distinct LAT competitors, inhibited appearance in the perfusate of SNOs in L-Cys-exposed lungs; a higher concentration of L-Leu significantly inhibited the iNO-induced pulmonary vasodilation as well as SNO accumulation. We conclude that iNO-induced pulmonary vasodilation and the transpulmonary movement of iNO-derived SNOs are mediated in part by formation of extracellular CSNO, uptake by alveolar epithelial LAT, and/or export by LAT from the pulmonary endothelium into the circulation. Therapies that exploit and optimize LAT-dependent SNO transport might improve the efficacy of and clinical outcomes with NO-based therapy by improving systemic SNO delivery.

  5. Inhalants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Prescription Drugs & Cold ... Notes Articles Adolescent Cigarette, Alcohol Use Declines as Marijuana Use Rises ( February 2013 ) Program Helps Troubled Boys ...

  6. Inhaled nitric oxide for the brain dead donor with neurogenic pulmonary edema during anesthesia for organ donation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun Sun; Lee, A-Ran; Lee, Sang Hyun; Kim, An Suk; Park, Soon Eun; Cho, Young Woo

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) in brain dead organ donors occurring after an acute central nervous system insult threatens organ preservation of potential organ donors and the outcome of organ donation. Hence the active and immediate management of NPE is critical. In this case, a 50-year-old male was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) for organ donation. He was hypoxic due to NPE induced by spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage and intraventricular hemorrhage. Protective ventilatory management, intermittent recruitment maneuvers, and supportive treatment were maintained in the ICU and the operating room (OR). Despite this management, the hypoxemia worsened after the OR admission. So inhaled nitric oxide (NO) therapy was performed during the operation, and the hypoxic phenomena showed remarkable improvement. The organ retrieval was successfully completed. Therefore, NO inhalation can be helpful in the improvement of hypoxemia caused by NPE in brain dead organ donors during anesthesia for the organ donation. PMID:25237451

  7. [The effect of subchronic inhalations of nitric oxide on metabolic processes in blood of experimental animals].

    PubMed

    Soloveva, A G; Peretyagin, S P

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic processes were investigated in plasma and erythrocytes of Wistar rats exposed to daily 10-min sessions of NO inhalation for 30 days. These included determination of glucose and lactate, catalase activity, and activities of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and catalase. NO inhalation in a concentration of 20 ppm, 50 ppm and 100 ppm caused an increase in glucose and lactate. Inhalation of 100 ppm NO also increased catalase activity. Inhalation of all NO concentrations resulted in a decrease of ALDH activity, while the decrease in LDH activity was observed at NO concentrations of 50-100 ppm.

  8. Role of Inhaled Nitric Oxide in the Management of Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Juliette Lucinda; Bronicki, Ronald A.; Anas, Nick

    2016-01-01

    To date, there have been several systematic reviews with meta-analysis that have shown no reduction in mortality with the use of inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Importantly, these reports fail to make a distinction between the pediatric and adult patient. The number of adult patients in these reviews are far greater than the number of pediatric patients, which makes it difficult to interpret the data regarding the role of iNO on the pediatric population. Extrapolating data from the adult population to the pediatric population is complicated as we know that physiology and the body’s response to disease can be different between adult and pediatric patients. iNO has been demonstrated to improve outcomes in term and near-term infants with hypoxic respiratory failure associated with pulmonary hypertension. Recently, Bronicki et al. published a prospective randomized control trial investigating the impact of iNO on the pediatric patient population with acute respiratory failure. In this study, a benefit of decreased duration of mechanical ventilation and an increased rate of ECMO-free survival was demonstrated in patients who were randomized to receiving iNO, suggesting that there may be benefit to the use of iNO in pediatric ARDS (PARDS) that has not been demonstrated in adults. iNO has repeatedly been shown to transiently improve oxygenation in all age groups, and yet neonates and pediatric patients have shown improvement in other outcomes that have not been seen in adults. The mechanism that explains improvement with the use of iNO in these patient populations are not well understood but does not appear to be solely a result of sustained improvement in oxygenation. There are physiologic studies that suggest alternative mechanisms for explaining the positive effects of iNO, such as platelet aggregation inhibition and reduction in systemic inflammation. Hence, the role of iNO by various mechanisms and in various

  9. Fluorescence imaging microscopy of leukocytes-endothelium interaction in rat mesenteric microcirculation after endotoxin injection: role of inhaled nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordon, Serge R.; Neviere, Remi; Marechal, Xavier-Marie; Buys, Bruno; Dhelin, Guy; Lesage, Jean C.; Mathieu, D.; Guery, Benoit; Chopin, Claude

    1999-02-01

    The adhesion of leukocytes to microvascular endothelium has been recognized as an important factor in the development of multiple organ dysfunction after a septic insult. We tested the hypothesis whether inhaled NO would reduce leukocyte rolling and / or leukocyte adhesion in the mesenteric venule preparation in endotoxemic rats. This study was performed with fluorescence imaging microscopy using a closed chamber for in vivo mesentery visualization. Leukocytes were selectively stained with acridine red. Compared to saline, endotoxemia was associated with increases in the flux of rolling leukocytes and in adherent and emigrated leukocytes. Inhaled nitric oxide treatment had no effects on leukocyte behavior in saline treated rats, whereas it reduced adherent and emigrated leukocytes in endotoxin-treated rats. In conclusion, we demonstrated that endotoxemia-induced leukocyte infiltration was related to an increase in the number of rolling leukocytes and subsequent adhesion and emigration in the mesenteric venule. Our results clearly showed that inhaled NO reduces leukocyte adhesion and transmigration in mesenteric venule of endotoxemic rats presumably by interfering with specific cell adhesion molecules.

  10. Effects of early intervention with inhaled sodium cromoglycate in childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, S; Kanno, N; Yamada, Y; Ono, M; Fukuda, N; Numata, M; Abe, T; Arisaka, O

    2006-01-01

    International and Japanese guidelines classify childhood asthma as mild, moderate, or severe, and recommend treatment with "as needed" bronchodilators, inhaled sodium cromoglycate, and inhaled corticosteroids, respectively. Alternatively, some investigators proposed inhaled corticosteroids as first-line therapy to prevent airway inflammatory obstruction. This article describes a clinical study assessing the effect of early intervention with inhaled sodium cromoglycate in childhood asthma. This was a retrospective study of 189 asthmatic children treated with inhaled sodium cromoglycate for five years and whose age of onset of asthma was six year of age or younger. An end-of-study questionnaire completed the examination. Children administered oral or inhaled corticosteroids simultaneously with sodium cromoglycate, were excluded. Asthma scores as defined by the Japanese Pediatric Allergic Committee, were reduced continuously during the five years after the start of sodium cromoglycate treatment. The frequency of emergency department visits and hospitalizations also decreased. Significant between-period intervention differences showed improvement of clinical outcomes for children with severe asthma during the five years of sodium cromoglycate inhalation. The early intervention regime of starting sodium cromoglycate inhalation within two years of the onset of asthma shows a large improvement in the long-term prognosis of childhood asthma, especially for children with severe asthma. It is possible that starting inhaled sodium cromoglycate earlier than the present recommendation of corticosteroids could further improve clinical outcomes, but a prospective study should be performed to verify our results.

  11. Nitric oxide (NO) and phytohormones crosstalk during early plant development.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Luis; Albertos, Pablo; Mateos, Isabel; Sánchez-Vicente, Inmaculada; Lechón, Tamara; Fernández-Marcos, María; Lorenzo, Oscar

    2015-05-01

    During the past two decades, nitric oxide (NO) has evolved from a mere gaseous free radical to become a new messenger in plant biology with an important role in a plethora of physiological processes. This molecule is involved in the regulation of plant growth and development, pathogen defence and abiotic stress responses, and in most cases this is achieved through its interaction with phytohormones. Understanding the role of plant growth regulators is essential to elucidate how plants activate the appropriate set of responses to a particular developmental stage or a particular stress. The first task to achieve this goal is the identification of molecular targets, especially those involved in the regulation of the crosstalk. The nature of NO targets in these growth and development processes and stress responses remains poorly described. Currently, the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of NO in these processes and their interaction with other plant hormones are beginning to unravel. In this review, we made a compilation of the described interactions between NO and phytohormones during early plant developmental processes (i.e. seed dormancy and germination, hypocotyl elongation and root development).

  12. An evaluation of a new analyser for inhaled nitric oxide administration.

    PubMed

    Carter, B; Holt, M; Tibballs, J; Hochmann, M; Osborne, A

    1998-02-01

    We examined the ability of a new combined nitric oxide (NO)/nitrogen dioxide (NO2) electrochemical analyser (PrinterNOx, Micro Medical Limited, Chatham, Kent, England) to measure NO and NO2 concentrations. The PrinterNOx was compared to a chemiluminescence analyser (42H, Thermo Environmental Instruments Inc, Franklin MA, U.S.A.). NO and NO2 were generated in a standard ventilator circuit using a paediatric ventilator (900C, Siemens Elema, Sweden) connected to an artificial lung (260li, TTL Test Lung, Michigan Instruments, MI, U.S.A.). Forty-four paired NO measurements ranging from 2.56 ppm to 74.6 ppm and 50 paired NO2 measurements ranging from 0.0 ppm to 5.39 ppm were obtained. For the measurement of NO the PrinterNOx showed a tendency to overestimate the chemiluminescence analyser. Regression analysis showed a close relationship between the two analysers with r2 = 0.9981 and a regression equation of y = 1.1658 x +0.0197. In the more clinically important range of 0-25 ppm, r2 increased to 0.9996 with a regression equation of y = 1.1984 x -0.4657. Conversely the PrinterNOx underestimated the chemiluminescence analyser for the measurement of NO2. The regression equation describing this relationship was y = 0.879 x -0.0447 (r2 = 0.9993). We conclude that the PrinterNOx is of sufficient accuracy to be of clinical use in the administration of NO.

  13. Pulmonary vasodilator therapy in the NICU: inhaled nitric oxide, sildenafil, and other pulmonary vasodilating agents.

    PubMed

    Porta, Nicolas F M; Steinhorn, Robin H

    2012-03-01

    The perinatal transition from fetal to extrauterine life requires a dramatic change in the circulatory pattern as the organ of gas exchange switches from the placenta to the lungs. Pulmonary hypertension can occur during early newborn life, and present as early respiratory failure or as a complication of more chronic diseases, such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The most effective pharmacotherapeutic strategies for infants with persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn are directed at selective reduction of pulmonary vascular resistance. This article discusses currently available therapies for pulmonary hypertension, their biologic rationales, and evidence for their clinical effectiveness.

  14. Association between inflammatory mediators and response to inhaled nitric oxide in a model of endotoxin-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Trachsel, Sebastien; Deby-Dupont, Ginette; Maurenbrecher, Edwige; Nys, Monique; Lamy, Maurice; Hedenstierna, Göran

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Inhaled nitric oxide (INO) allows selective pulmonary vasodilation in acute respiratory distress syndrome and improves PaO2 by redistribution of pulmonary blood flow towards better ventilated parenchyma. One-third of patients are nonresponders to INO, however, and it is difficult to predict who will respond. The aim of the present study was to identify, within a panel of inflammatory mediators released during endotoxin-induced lung injury, specific mediators that are associated with a PaO2 response to INO. Methods After animal ethics committee approval, pigs were anesthetized and exposed to 2 hours of endotoxin infusion. Levels of cytokines, prostanoid, leucotriene and endothelin-1 (ET-1) were sampled prior to endotoxin exposure and hourly thereafter. All animals were exposed to 40 ppm INO: 28 animals were exposed at either 4 hours or 6 hours and a subgroup of nine animals was exposed both at 4 hours and 6 hours after onset of endotoxin infusion. Results Based on the response to INO, the animals were retrospectively placed into a responder group (increase in PaO2 ≥ 20%) or a nonresponder group. All mediators increased with endotoxin infusion although no significant differences were seen between responders and nonresponders. There was a mean difference in ET-1, however, with lower levels in the nonresponder group than in the responder group, 0.1 pg/ml versus 3.0 pg/ml. Moreover, five animals in the group exposed twice to INO switched from responder to nonresponder and had decreased ET-1 levels (3.0 (2.5 to 7.5) pg/ml versus 0.1 (0.1 to 2.1) pg/ml, P < 0.05). The pulmonary artery pressure and ET-1 level were higher in future responders to INO. Conclusions ET-1 may therefore be involved in mediating the response to INO. PMID:18954441

  15. Inhaled nitric oxide alleviates hyperoxia suppressed phosphatidylcholine synthesis in endotoxin-induced injury in mature rat lungs

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xiaohui; Guo, Chunbao; Huang, Shibing; Sun, Bo

    2006-01-01

    Background We investigated efficacy of inhaled nitric oxide (NO) in modulation of metabolism of phosphatidylcholine (PC) of pulmonary surfactant and in anti-inflammatory mechanism of mature lungs with inflammatory injury. Methods Healthy adult rats were divided into a group of lung inflammation induced by i.v. lipopolysaccharides (LPS) or a normal control (C) for 24 h, and then exposed to: room air (Air), 95% oxygen (O), NO (20 parts per million, NO), both O and NO (ONO) as subgroups, whereas [3H]-choline was injected i.v. for incorporation into PC of the lungs which were processed subsequently at 10 min, 4, 8, 12 and 24 h, respectively, for measurement of PC synthesis and proinflammatory cytokine production. Results LPS-NO subgroup had the lowest level of labeled PC in total phospholipids and disaturated PC in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue (decreased by 46–59%), along with the lowest activity of cytidine triphosphate: phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (-14–18%) in the lungs, compared to all other subgroups at 4 h (p < 0.01), but not at 8 and 12 h. After 24-h, all LPS-subgroups had lower labeled PC than the corresponding C-subgroups (p < 0.05). LPS-ONO had higher labeled PC in total phospholipids and disaturated PC, activity of cytidylyltransferase, and lower activity of nuclear transcription factor-κB and expression of proinflammatory cytokine mRNA, than that in the LPS-O subgroup (p < 0.05). Conclusion In LPS-induced lung inflammation in association with hyperoxia, depressed PC synthesis and enhanced proinflammatory cytokine production may be alleviated by iNO. NO alone only transiently suppressed the PC synthesis as a result of lower activity of cytidylyltransferase. PMID:16403237

  16. [Nitric oxide].

    PubMed

    Rovira, I

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide was identified as the relaxing factor derived from the endothelium in 1987. Nitric oxide synthesis allows the vascular system to maintain a state of vasodilation, thereby regulating arterial pressure. Nitric oxide is also found in platelets, where it inhibits adhesion and aggregation; in the immune system, where it is responsible for the cytotoxic action of macrophages; and in the nervous system, where it acts as neurotransmitter. A deficit in endogenous synthesis of nitric oxide contributes to such conditions as essential arterial hypertension, pulmonary hypertension and heart disease. An excess of nitrous oxide induced by endotoxins and cytokinins, meanwhile, is believed to be responsible for hypotension in septic shock and for hyperdynamic circulatory state in cirrhosis of the liver. Nitric oxide has also been implicated in the rejection of transplanted organs and in cell damage after reperfusion. Inhaled nitrous oxide gas reduces pulmonary hypertension without triggering systemic hypotension in both experimental and clinical conditions. It also produces selective vasodilation when used to ventilate specific pulmonary areas, thereby improving the ventilation/perfusion ratio and, hence, oxygenation. Nitric oxide inhalation is effective in pulmonary hypertension-coincident with chronic obstructive lung disease, in persistent neonatal pulmonary hypertension and in pulmonary hypertension with congenital or acquired heart disease. Likewise, it reduces intrapulmonary shunt in acute respiratory failure and improves gas exchange. Under experimental conditions nitric oxide acts as a bronchodilator, although it seems to be less effective for this purpose in clinical use.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Relationship between the Use of Inhaled Steroids for Chronic Respiratory Diseases and Early Outcomes in Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Almirall, Jordi; Bolíbar, Ignasi; Serra-Prat, Mateu; Palomera, Elisabet; Roig, Jordi; Hospital, Imma; Carandell, Eugenia; Agustí, Mercè; Ayuso, Pilar; Estela, Andreu; Torres, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Background The role of inhaled steroids in patients with chronic respiratory diseases is a matter of debate due to the potential effect on the development and prognosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). We assessed whether treatment with inhaled steroids in patients with chronic bronchitis, COPD or asthma and CAP may affect early outcome of the acute pneumonic episode. Methods Over 1-year period, all population-based cases of CAP in patients with chronic bronchitis, COPD or asthma were registered. Use of inhaled steroids were registered and patients were followed up to 30 days after diagnosis to assess severity of CAP and clinical course (hospital admission, ICU admission and mortality). Results Of 473 patients who fulfilled the selection criteria, inhaled steroids were regularly used by 109 (23%). In the overall sample, inhaled steroids were associated with a higher risk of hospitalization (OR=1.96, p = 0.002) in the bivariate analysis, but this effect disappeared after adjusting by other severity-related factors (adjusted OR=1.08, p=0.787). This effect on hospitalization also disappeared when considering only patients with asthma (OR=1.38, p=0.542), with COPD alone (OR=4.68, p=0.194), but a protective effect was observed in CB patients (OR=0.15, p=0.027). Inhaled steroids showed no association with ICU admission, days to clinical recovery and mortality in the overall sample and in any disease subgroup. Conclusions Treatment with inhaled steroids is not a prognostic factor in COPD and asthmatic patients with CAP, but could prevent hospitalization for CAP in patients with clinical criteria of chronic bronchitis. PMID:24039899

  18. Inhaled nitric oxide in acute respiratory distress syndrome with and without septic shock requiring norepinephrine administration: a dose–response study

    PubMed Central

    Mourgeon, Eric; Puybasset, Louis; Law-Koune, Jean-Dominique; Lu, Qin; Abdennour, Lamine; Gallart, Lluis; Malassine, Patrick; Rao, GS Umamaheswara; Cluzel, Philippe; Bennani, Abdelhai; Coriat, Pierre; Rouby, Jean-Jacques

    1997-01-01

    Background: The aim of this prospective study was to assess whether the presence of septic shock could influence the dose response to inhaled nitric oxide (NO) in NO-responding patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Results: Eight patients with ARDS and without septic shock (PaO2 = 95 ± 16 mmHg, PEEP = 0, FiO2 = 1.0), and eight patients with ARDS and septic shock (PaO2 = 88 ± 11 mmHg, PEEP = 0, FiO2 = 1.0) receiving exclusively norepinephrine were studied. All responded to 15 ppm inhaled NO with an increase in PaO2 of at least 40 mmHg, at FiO2 1.0 and PEEP 10 cmH2O. Inspiratory intratracheal NO concentrations were recorded continuously using a fast response time chemiluminescence apparatus. Seven inspiratory NO concentrations were randomly administered: 0.15, 0.45, 1.5, 4.5, 15, 45 and 150 ppm. In both groups, NO induced a dose-dependent decrease in mean pulmonary artery pressure (MPAP), pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI), and venous admixture (QVA/QT), and a dose-dependent increase in PaO2/FiO2 (P ≤ 0.012). Dose-response of MPAP and PVRI were similar in both groups with a plateau effect at 4.5 ppm. Dose-response of PaO2/FiO2 was influenced by the presence of septic shock. No plateau effect was observed in patients with septic shock and PaO2/FiO2 increased by 173 ± 37% at 150 ppm. In patients without septic shock, an 82 ± 26% increase in PaO2/FiO2 was observed with a plateau effect obtained at 15 ppm. In both groups, dose-response curves demonstrated a marked interindividual variability and in five patients pulmonary vascular effect and improvement in arterial oxygenation were dissociated. Conclusion: For similar NOinduced decreases in MPAP and PVRI in both groups, the increase in arterial oxygenation was more marked in patients with septic shock. PMID:11056694

  19. Relationship between Fractional Exhaled Nitric Oxide Level and Efficacy of Inhaled Corticosteroid in Asthma-COPD Overlap Syndrome Patients with Different Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between the fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) level and the efficacy of inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) in asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) overlap syndrome (ACOS) patients with different disease severity. A total of 127 ACOS patients with ACOS (case group) and 131 healthy people (control group) were enrolled in this study. Based on the severity of COPD, the ACOS patients were divided into: mild ACOS; moderate ACOS; severe ACOS; and extremely severe ACOS groups. We compared FeNO levels, pulmonary function parameters including percentage of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) to predicted value (FEV1%pred), ratio of FEV1 to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC), inspiratory capacity to total lung capacity (IC/TLC) and residual volume to total lung capacity (RV/TLC), arterial blood gas parameters, including PH, arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) and arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2), total serum immunoglobulin E (IgE), induced sputum eosinophil (EOS), plasma surfactant protein A (SP-A), plasma soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE), sputum myeloperoxidase (MPO), sputum neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) and Asthma Control Test (ACT) scores, and COPD Assessment Test (CAT) scores. Compared with pre-treatment parameters, the FeNO levels, RV/TLC, PaCO2, total serum IgE, induced sputum EOS, plasma SP-A, sputum MPO, sputum NGAL, and CAT scores were significantly decreased after 6 months of ICS treatment, while FEV1%pred, FEV1/FVC, IC/TLC, PH, PaO2, plasma sRAGE, and ACT scores were significantly increased in ACOS patients with different disease severity after 6 months of ICS treatment. This finding suggests that the FeNO level may accurately predict the efficacy of ICS in the treatment of ACOS patients. PMID:28145647

  20. A pilot study to assess effects of long-term inhalation of airborne particulate matter on early Alzheimer-like changes in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Dhaval P; Puig, Kendra L; Gorr, Matthew W; Wold, Loren E; Combs, Colin K

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to air pollutants, including particulate matter, results in activation of the brain inflammatory response and Alzheimer disease (AD)-like pathology in dogs and humans. However, the length of time required for inhalation of ambient particulate matter to influence brain inflammation and AD pathology is less clear. Here, we studied the effect of 3 and 9 months of air particulate matter (<2.5 μm diameter, PM2.5) exposure on brain inflammatory phenotype and pathological hallmarks of AD in C57BL/6 mice. Using western blot, ELISA, and cytokine array analysis we quantified brain APP, beta-site APP cleaving enzyme (BACE), oligomeric protein, total Aβ 1-40 and Aβ 1-42 levels, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), nitrotyrosine-modified proteins, HNE-Michael adducts, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), glial markers (GFAP, Iba-1), pre- and post- synaptic markers (synaptophysin and PSD-95), cyclooxygenase (COX-1, COX-2) levels, and the cytokine profile in PM2.5 exposed and filtered air control mice. Only 9 month PM2.5 exposure increased BACE protein levels, APP processing, and Aβ 1-40 levels. This correlated with a concomitant increase in COX-1 and COX-2 protein levels and a modest alteration in the cytokine profile. These data support the hypothesis that prolonged exposure to airborne particulate matter has the potential to alter brain inflammatory phenotype and promote development of early AD-like pathology.

  1. Lung [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake and ventilation-perfusion mismatch in the early stage of experimental acute smoke inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Musch, Guido; Winkler, Tilo; Harris, R. Scott; Vidal Melo, Marcos F.; Wellman, Tyler J.; de Prost, Nicolas; Kradin, Richard L.; Venegas, Jose G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute lung injury (ALI) occurs in a third of patients with smoke inhalation injury. Its clinical manifestations usually do not appear until 48 to 72 h after inhalation. Identifying inflammatory changes that occur in pulmonary parenchyma earlier than that could provide insight into the pathogenesis of smoke-induced ALI. Furthermore, noninvasive measurement of such changes might lead to earlier diagnosis and treatment. Because glucose is the main source of energy for pulmonary inflammatory cells, we hypothesized that its pulmonary metabolism is increased shortly after smoke inhalation, when classic manifestations of ALI are not yet expected. Methods In five sheep we induced unilateral injury with 48 breaths of cotton smoke while the contralateral lung served as control. We used positron emission tomography with: 1) [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose to measure pulmonary inflammatory cell metabolic activity; and 2) [13N]nitrogen in saline to measure shunt and ventilation-perfusion distributions separately in the smoke-exposed and control lungs. Results The pulmonary [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake rate was increased at 4 h after smoke inhalation (mean ± SD: 0.0031 ± 0.0013 vs. 0.0026 ± 0.0010 min−1, P < 0.05) mainly as a result of increased glucose phosphorylation. At this stage there was no worsening in lung aeration or shunt. However, there was a shift of perfusion toward units with lower ventilation-to-perfusion ratio (mean ratio ± SD: 0.82 ± 0.10 vs. 1.12 ± 0.02, P < 0.05) and increased heterogeneity of the ventilation-perfusion distribution (mean ± SD: 0.21 ± 0.07 vs. 0.13 ± 0.01, P < 0.05). Conclusion Using noninvasive imaging we demonstrated that increased pulmonary [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake and ventilation-perfusion mismatch occur early after smoke inhalation. PMID:24051392

  2. Clinical Utility of Fractional exhaled Nitric Oxide (FeNO) as a Biomarker to Predict Severity of Disease and Response to Inhaled Corticosteroid (ICS) in Asthma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Saka, Vinodkumar; Tamilarasu, Kadhiravan; Rajaram, Manju; Selvarajan, Sandhiya; Chandrasekaran, Adithan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bronchial asthma is a common chronic inflammatory airway disease diagnosed and is based on symptomatic history and Pulmonary Function Tests (PFT). Fractional exhaled Nitric Oxide (FeNO) is exclusively a non-invasive biomarker of on-going eosinophilic airway inflammation which remains unpredictable only with PFTs. FeNO measurement is recommended in predicting asthma severity and Inhaled Corticosteroid (ICS) response but further research is required to understand its clinical utility and agreement with current recommendations in a specific population. Aim To estimate FeNO levels in Tamilian patients with mild-to-moderate persistent asthma and to correlate with disease severity and ICS response. Materials and Methods The study was a prospective cohort with a single group of 102 persistent asthma patients under standard ICS regimen for 8 weeks (follow-up period). PFT and FeNO were measured using portable spirometry and chemiluminescence based exhaled breath analyser, at baseline and during follow-up visits. Based on PFT and FeNO parameters, the study population was sub-grouped with respect to asthma severity (as mild, moderate and moderately severe), FeNO cut-off (> or < 50ppb) and ICS response classification (good vs poor ICS responders). Results Significant decrease in mean FeNO levels were found in mild, moderate and moderately severe asthmatic groups following ICS treatment (90.15±27.36, 75.74±31.98 and 77.18±32.79 ppb) compared to similar baseline FeNO levels (103.03±34.08, 91.38±37.60 and 97.90±43.84 ppb) in all the above groups. Similarly, significant decrease in mean FeNO levels was found - FeNO>50ppb, good and poor ICS responders groups, in post- ICS treatment (89.63±24.04, 77.90±31.12 and 86.49±32.57 ppb) compared to baseline levels (110.183±1.23, 97.12±42.04 and 99.68±34.71 ppb). Conclusion The observed baseline FeNO values in all groups as stated above did not show significant difference to differentiate asthma severity or ICS

  3. Inhaled Steroids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medications Long-Term Control Medications Inhaled Steroids Inhaled Steroids Make an Appointment Ask a Question Refer Patient ... more about steroids? What are some common inhaled steroids? Common inhaled steroids include: Asmanex ® (mometasone) Alvesco ® (ciclesonide) ...

  4. Role of Heat Shock Protein 90 and Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase during Early Anesthetic and Ischemic Preconditioning

    PubMed Central

    Amour, Julien; Brzezinska, Anna K.; Weihrauch, Dorothee; Billstrom, Amie R.; Zielonka, Jacek; Krolikowski, John G.; Bienengraeber, Martin W.; Warltier, David C.; Pratt, Philip F.; Kersten, Judy R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Nitric oxide is known to be essential for early anesthetic (APC) and ischemic (IPC) preconditioning of myocardium. Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) regulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that Hsp90-eNOS interactions modulate APC and IPC. Methods Myocardial infarct size was measured in rabbits after coronary occlusion and reperfusion in the absence or presence of preconditioning with 30 min of isoflurane (APC) or 5 min of coronary artery occlusion (IPC), and with or without pre-treatment with geldanamycin or radicicol, two chemically distinct Hsp90 inhibitors, or NG-nitro-L-arginine methylester, a non-specific NOS inhibitor. Isoflurane-dependent nitric oxide production was measured (ozone chemiluminescence) in human coronary artery endothelial cells or mouse cardiomyocytes, in the absence or presence of Hsp90 inhibitors or NG-nitro-L-arginine methylester. Interactions between Hsp90 and eNOS, and eNOS activation were assessed with immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting, and confocal microscopy. Results APC and IPC decreased infarct size (50% and 59%, respectively) and this action was abolished by Hsp90 inhibitors. NG-nitro-L-arginine methylester blocked APC but not IPC. Isoflurane increased nitric oxide production in human coronary artery endothelial cells, concomitantly with an increase in Hsp90-eNOS interaction (immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry). Pretreatment with Hsp90 inhibitors abolished isoflurane-dependent nitric oxide production and decreased Hsp90-eNOS interactions. Isoflurane did not increase nitric oxide production in mouse cardiomyocytes and eNOS was below the level of detection. Conclusion The results indicate that Hsp90 plays a critical role in mediating APC and IPC through protein-protein interactions, and suggest that endothelial cells are important contributors to nitric oxide-mediated signalling during APC. PMID:19194158

  5. Comparison of early mortality in baboons and dogs after inhalation of /sup 239/PuO/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Bair, W.J.; Metivier, H.; Park, J.F.; Masse, R.; Stevens, D.L.; Lafuma, J.; Watson, C.R.; Nolibe, D.

    1980-06-01

    Results from experiments with baboons were compared with those from experiments with dogs to determine the relative sensitivity of the two species to early mortality from inhaled /sup 239/PuO/sub 2/. To ensure a valid comparison of data developed at two laboratories, methodology differences were minimized by establishing a common pool of raw data, using the same computer programs to analyze the data, and standardizing assumptions regarding the calculation of plutonium concentration in lungs. Several comparison methods were used involving variations in estimating different parameters used in these calculations. Although nearly all comparisons suggested baboons were slightly more sensitive, none of the methods for comparing the relationship between dose and survival time showed consistently significant differences between baboons and dogs. Although the baboons were physiologically and morphologically immature when exposed to plutonium, whereas the dogs were mature, we concluded that adult baboons and dogs are similarly sensitive to the early effects of inhaled /sup 239/PuO/sub 2/. Since only early mortality was considered in this comparison, the results do not apply to possible late effects caused by much lower levels of plutonium than were used in these experiments.

  6. Treatment satisfaction in cystic fibrosis: early patient experience with tobramycin inhalation powder

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Jonathan; Palmer, Jacqueline B; Chan, Wing W; Correia, Catherine E; Whalley, Diane; Shannon, Paul; Sawicki, Gregory S

    2016-01-01

    Background This study assessed treatment satisfaction of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients in a routine clinical setting for tobramycin inhalation powder (TIP), the first dry powder–inhaled antibiotic for Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Methods CF patients aged 6 years or older treated with at least one cycle of TIP completed a web survey on experience with TIP, including the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication (TSQM). Regression analysis determined the factors associated with TSQM global satisfaction. Results Eighty patients (mean age ± standard deviation: 24.4±9.4 years; 57.5% female; mean forced expiratory volume in 1 second ± standard deviation: 67.1%±27.3% predicted) completed the survey. The majority expressed satisfaction with TIP’s administration time (100%), time to clean (97.1%), portability (97.1%), and ease of use (94.3%). Effectiveness was significantly associated with TSQM global satisfaction (regression R-squared: 0.54). Conclusion Patient preferences for TIP were based on administration time and ease of use. Global satisfaction was related to greater patient-perceived effectiveness. PMID:27822017

  7. Exogenous nitric oxide (NO) generated by NO-plasma treatment modulates osteoprogenitor cells early differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsaadany, Mostafa; Subramanian, Gayathri; Ayan, Halim; Yildirim-Ayan, Eda

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we investigated whether nitric oxide (NO) generated using a non-thermal plasma system can mediate osteoblastic differentiation of osteoprogenitor cells without creating toxicity. Our objective was to create an NO delivery mechanism using NO-dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma that can generate and transport NO with controlled concentration to the area of interest to regulate osteoprogenitor cell activity. We built a non-thermal atmospheric pressure DBD plasma nozzle system based on our previously published design and similar designs in the literature. The electrical and spectral analyses demonstrated that N2 dissociated into NO under typical DBD voltage-current characteristics. We treated osteoprogenitor cells (MC3T3-E1) using NO-plasma treatment system. Our results demonstrated that we could control NO concentration within cell culture media and could introduce NO into the intracellular space using NO-plasma treatment with various treatment times. We confirmed that NO-plasma treatment maintained cell viability and did not create any toxicity even with prolonged treatment durations. Finally, we demonstrated that NO-plasma treatment induced early osteogenic differentiation in the absence of pro-osteogenic growth factors/proteins. These findings suggest that through the NO-plasma treatment system we are able to generate and transport tissue-specific amounts of NO to an area of interest to mediate osteoprogenitor cell activity without subsequent toxicity. This opens up the possibility to develop DBD plasma-assisted tissue-specific NO delivery strategies for therapeutic intervention in the prevention and treatment of bone diseases.

  8. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity in ependymal cells during early postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Soygüder, Zafer; Karadağ, Hüseyin; Nazli, Mümtaz

    2004-03-01

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) immunoreactivity was observed in ependymal cell layer of the central canal of spinal cord of neonatal rats (2-20 days old). Neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity was present in postnatal day 2 and this immunoreactivity gradually disappeared by postnatal day 16. The progressive decrease in nNOS staining with the increasing postnatal age may suggest that nNOS staining paralleled the maturation of the central canal and may also suggest that nNOS activity plays a role in the development of the ependymal cells.

  9. [Asthma therapy by the general practitioner--new approaches and progress. Why inhaled steroids and delayed action beta-2 adrenergic drugs should be combined early on].

    PubMed

    Petro, W

    1999-08-26

    Early treatment with high-dose inhaled steroids can significantly improve the prognosis of asthma. Inhaled steroids used to treat inflammation of the mucosa, and hyperreactivity may be reduced only under careful surveillance. Hig-dose initial treatment must be followed by low-dose maintenance therapy. The best therapeutic results are obtained with a combination of inhaled steroids and long-acting beta-2-adrenergic agents. Careful titration of the dose and therapeutic effects is a major task for the family doctor. Bronchial inflammation and reactivity are dependent on external factors, and are rarely stable. The most important therapeutic basis is, therefore, continuous management involving both the patient and the family doctor. The patient should be provided with relevant information on his/her disease and its treatment. A prerequisite for the effective management of asthma is the provision of individual peak-flow-adjusted and emergency plans.

  10. Glutathione improves early somatic embryogenesis in Araucaria angustifolia (Bert) O. Kuntze by alteration in nitric oxide emission.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Leila do Nascimento; Santa-Catarina, Claudete; de Freitas Fraga, Hugo Pacheco; Dos Santos, André Luis Wendt; Steinmacher, Douglas André; Schlogl, Paulo Sérgio; Silveira, Vanildo; Steiner, Neusa; Floh, Eny Iochevet Segal; Guerra, Miguel Pedro

    2012-10-01

    In this work, it was observed a straight relationship between the manipulation of the reduced glutathione (GSH)/glutathione disulfide (GSSG) ratio, nitric oxide emission and quality and number of early somatic embryos in Araucaria angustifolia, a Brazilian endangered native conifer. In low concentrations GSH (0.01 and 0.1mM) is a potential NO scavenger in the culture medium. Furthermore, it can increase the number of early SE formed in cell suspension culture media in a few days. However, the maintenance in this low redox state lead to a loss of early somatic embryos polarization. In gelled culture medium, high levels of GSH (5mM) allows the development of globular embryos presenting a high NO emission on embryo apex, stressing its importance in the differentiation and cell division. Taken together these results indicate that the modification of the embryogenic cultures redox state might be an effective strategy to develop more efficient embryogenic systems in A. angustifolia.

  11. Inhalation Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... you can inhale that can cause acute internal injuries. Particles in the air from fires and toxic ... and lung diseases worse. Symptoms of acute inhalation injuries may include Coughing and phlegm A scratchy throat ...

  12. Asthma Inhalers

    MedlinePlus

    ... an inhaler into the lungs. But CFCs are ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) that hurt the environment. Manufacturers ... inhalers, that do not rob the atmosphere of ozone. “The FDA [Food and Drug Administration] and various ...

  13. Inhalant Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Who may be abusing inhalants?The most common abusers of inhalants are teenagers, especially those who are ... to your child about the dangers of trying drugs can help him or her make the right ...

  14. Lifetime use of cigarettes, alcohol, marijuana and inhalants in Latino early adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kouyoumdjian, Claudia; Guzmán, Bianca L; Leon, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    A growing population in the US is Latinos, an ethnic group defined by people of origin from Latin America. By 2050, Hispanics will be at least one quarter of the United States population (U.S. Census Bureau, 2006 ) with a substantial proportion under the age of 25 (Vaughan, Kratz, & D'argent, 2011 ). Yet, the literature on substance use among Latino adolescents is not advancing parallel to the growth of the population (Szapocznik, Lopez, Prado, Schwartz, & Pantin, 2006 ). Health concerns during early adolescence can have a lasting impact on the Latino community and society at large, as early substance initiation can lead to addiction during adulthood (Behrendt, Wittchen, Höfler, Lieb, & Beesdo, 2009 ). Therefore, research that aims to identify psychosocial determinants that serve as risk and protective factors specific to Latino early adolescents is needed as a critical first step in the development of culturally specific prevention initiatives (Vaughan et al., 2011 ).

  15. Uncertainties in doses calculated according to ICRP recommendations after inhalation of 239PUO2 and early chest monitoring.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, P

    2007-01-01

    This study estimates uncertainties in Pu biokinetics and effective doses calculated after an acute inhalation exposure to 239PuO2 according to ICRP recommendations (default values for aerosols size and PuO2 dissolution parameters). This was performed using the most recently reported variations in model parameters and simulations after a Monte Carlo approach. Without chest monitoring, uncertainties in thoracic retention and plutonium excretion was 8-10 (95% confidence interval as the ratio between 97.5 and 2.5 percentiles of the lognormal distributions) up to 900 d after exposure. Early chest monitoring reduces significantly the uncertainties in plutonium biokinetics and doses which remain within a 95% confidence interval of 2.3 as compared with 6.6, without monitoring. Analysis of bioassay data previously reported shows that the dose delivered to some individuals can be out of the confidence interval, which was mostly due to an inhibition of the late mechanical clearance of the alveolar interstitium.

  16. Increase in non-specific bronchial hyperresponsiveness as an early marker of bronchial response to occupational agents during specific inhalation challenges.

    PubMed Central

    Vandenplas, O.; Delwiche, J. P.; Jamart, J.; Van de Weyer, R.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Specific bronchial reactivity to occupational agents may decline after exposure in the workplace ceases leading to falsely negative specific inhalation challenges. A study was carried out to assess prospectively whether increases in nonspecific bronchial hyperresponsiveness could be useful in detecting the bronchial response to occupational agents during specific inhalation challenges. METHODS: Specific inhalation challenges were performed in 66 subjects with possible occupational asthma due to various agents. After a control day the subjects were challenged with the suspected agent for up to two hours on the first test day. Those subjects who did not show an asthmatic reaction were rechallenged on the next day for 2-3 hours. The provocative concentration of histamine causing a 20% fall (PC20) in the forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) was assessed at the end of the control day as well as six hours after each challenge that did not cause a > or = 20% fall in FEV1. The subjects who had a significant (> or = 3.1-fold) reduction in PC20 value at the end of the second challenge day were requested to perform additional specific inhalation challenges. RESULTS: The first test day elicited an asthmatic reaction in 25 subjects. Of the other 41 subjects five (12%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 4% to 26%) exhibited a > or = 3.1-fold fall in the PC20 value after the inhalation challenge and developed an asthmatic reaction during the second (n = 3) or third (n = 2) challenge exposure. The offending agents included persulphate (n = 1), wood dust (n = 2), isocyanate (n = 1), or amoxycillin (n = 1). These five subjects had left their workplace for a longer period (mean (SD) 21 (14) months) than those who reacted after the first specific inhalation challenge (8 (11) months). CONCLUSIONS: The increase in non-specific bronchial hyperresponsiveness after a specific inhalation challenge can be an early and sensitive marker of bronchial response to occupational

  17. Effects of helium and air inhalation on the innate and early adaptive immune system in healthy volunteers ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Helium inhalation protects myocardium, brain and endothelium against ischemia/reperfusion injury in animals and humans, when applied according to specific “conditioning” protocols. Before widespread use of this “conditioning” agent in clinical practice, negative side effects have to be ruled out. We investigated the effect of prolonged helium inhalation on the responsiveness of the human immune response in whole blood ex vivo. Methods Male healthy volunteers inhaled 30 minutes heliox (79%He/21%O2) or air in a cross over design, with two weeks between measurements. Blood was withdrawn at T0 (baseline), T1 (25 min inhalation) and T2-T5 (1, 2, 6, 24 h after inhalation) and incubated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), T-cell stimuli anti-CD3/ anti-CD28 (TCS) or RPMI (as control) for 2, 4 and 24 hours or not incubated (0 h). An additional group of six volunteers inhaled 60 minutes of heliox or air, followed by blood incubation with LPS and RPMI. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-2 (IL-2) was analyzed by cytometric bead array. Statistical analysis was performed by the Wilcoxon test for matched samples. Results Incubation with LPS, LTA or TCS significantly increased TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IFN-γ and IL-2 in comparison to incubation with RPMI alone. Thirty min of helium inhalation did not influence the amounts of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IFN-γ and IL-2 in comparison to air. Sixty min of helium inhalation did not affect cytokine production after LPS stimulation. Conclusions We conclude that 79% helium inhalation does not affect the responsiveness of the human immune system in healthy volunteers. Trial registration Dutch Trial Register: http://www.trialregister.nl/ NTR2152 PMID:23006534

  18. Substance use - inhalants

    MedlinePlus

    Substance abuse - inhalants; Drug abuse - inhalants; Drug use - inhalants; Glue - inhalants ... symptoms and may include: Strong cravings for the drug Having mood swings from feeling depressed to agitated ...

  19. Combined effect of low-dose nitric oxide gas inhalation with partial liquid ventilation on hemodynamics, pulmonary function, and gas exchange in acute lung injury of newborn piglets.

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chang Won; Hwang, Jong Hee; Chang, Yun Sil; Park, Won Soon

    2003-01-01

    We conducted a randomized animal study to determine whether there is a cumulative effect on hemodynamics, pulmonary function, and gas exchange when low-dose nitric oxide (NO) is added to partial liquid ventilation (PLV) in acute lung injury. Eighteen newborn piglets were saline-lavaged repeatedly, and randomly divided into two groups: PLV with perfluorocarbon group (n=8) and lavage only (control) group (n=10). Perfluorodecalin (30 mL/kg) was instilled into the endotracheal tube for 30 min, followed by 5-10 mL/kg/hr. Fifteen minutes after the completion of perfluorodecalin dosing, NO (10 ppm) was added to the inspiratory gas in an "on/off" manner. Perfluorodecalin instillation produced a significant improvement in gas exchange, pulmonary mechanics, shunt, and pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP). The addition of NO produced a further significant improvement in PaO2 and PAP. The "on/off" response to NO was seen apparently in PAP, PaO2, dynamic compliance, and shunt. All the variables in control group were remained at near the after-lavage levels without significant improvements until the end of the experiment. We concluded that NO might have a cumulative effect on gas exchange when combined with PLV, and this might be attributable to deceased PAP and V/Q mismatching. PMID:14676437

  20. Early life microbial exposure and fractional exhaled nitric oxide in school-age children: a prospective birth cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Inflammation is a key factor in the pathogenesis of respiratory diseases. Early life exposure to microbial agents may have an effect on the development of the immune system and on respiratory health later in life. In the present work we aimed to evaluate the associations between early life microbial exposures, and fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) at school age. Methods Endotoxin, extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) and β(1,3)-D-glucan were measured in living room dust collected at 2–3 months of age in homes of participants of three prospective European birth cohorts (LISA, n = 182; PIAMA, n = 244; and INMA, n = 355). Home dampness and pet ownership were periodically reported by the parents through questionnaires. FeNO was measured at age 8 for PIAMA and at age 10/11 for LISA and INMA. Cohort-specific associations between the indoor microbial exposures and FeNO were evaluated using multivariable regression analyses. Estimates were combined using random-effects meta-analyses. Results FeNO at school age was lower in children exposed to endotoxin at age 2–3 months (β -0.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.10;-0.01) and in children with reported dog ownership during the first two years of life (GM ratio 0.82, CI 0.70-0.96). FeNO was not significantly associated with early life exposure to EPS, β(1,3)-D-glucan, indoor dampness and cat ownership. Conclusion Early life exposure to bacterial endotoxin and early life dog ownership are associated with lower FeNO at school age. Further studies are needed to confirm our results and to unravel the underlying mechanisms and possible clinical relevance of this finding. PMID:24295277

  1. Interannual variations of early winter Antarctic polar stratospheric cloud formation and nitric acid observed by CALIOP and MLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Alyn; Santee, Michelle L.; Livesey, Nathaniel J.

    2016-12-01

    We use satellite-borne measurements collected over the last decade (2006-2015) from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) to investigate the nitric acid distribution and the properties of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in the early winter Antarctic vortex. Frequently, at the very start of the winter, we find that synoptic-scale depletion of HNO3 can be detected in the inner vortex before the first lidar detection of geophysically associated PSCs. The generation of "sub-visible" PSCs can be explained as arising from the development of a solid particle population with low number densities and large particle sizes. Assumed to be composed of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT), the sub-visible PSCs form at ambient temperatures well above the ice frost point, but also above the temperature at which supercooled ternary solution (STS) grows out of the background supercooled binary solution (SBS) distribution. The temperature regime of their formation, inferred from the simultaneous uptake of ambient HNO3 into NAT and their Lagrangian temperature histories, is at a depression of a few kelvin with respect to the NAT existence threshold, TNAT. Therefore, their nucleation requires a considerable supersaturation of HNO3 over NAT, and is consistent with a recently described heterogeneous nucleation process on solid foreign nuclei immersed in liquid aerosol. We make a detailed investigation of the comparative limits of detection of PSCs and the resulting sequestration of HNO3 imposed by lidar, mid-infrared, and microwave techniques. We find that the temperature history of air parcels, in addition to the local ambient temperature, is an important factor in the relative frequency of formation of liquid/solid PSCs. We conclude that the initiation of NAT nucleation and the subsequent development of large NAT particles capable of sedimentation and denitrification in the early winter do not emanate from an ice

  2. Nitric oxide synthase during early embryonic development in silkworm Bombyx mori: Gene expression, enzyme activity, and tissue distribution.

    PubMed

    Kitta, Ryo; Kuwamoto, Marina; Yamahama, Yumi; Mase, Keisuke; Sawada, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    To elucidate the mechanism for embryonic diapause or the breakdown of diapause in Bombyx mori, we biochemically analyzed nitric oxide synthase (NOS) during the embryogenesis of B. mori. The gene expression and enzyme activity of B. mori NOS (BmNOS) were examined in diapause, non-diapause, and HCl-treated diapause eggs. In the case of HCl-treated diapause eggs, the gene expression and enzyme activity of BmNOS were induced by HCl treatment. However, in the case of diapause and non-diapause eggs during embryogenesis, changes in the BmNOS activity and gene expressions did not coincide except 48-60 h after oviposition in diapause eggs. The results imply that changes in BmNOS activity during the embryogenesis of diapause and non-diapause eggs are regulated not only at the level of transcription but also post-transcription. The distribution and localization of BmNOS were also investigated with an immunohistochemical technique using antibodies against the universal NOS; the localization of BmNOS was observed mainly in the cytoplasm of yolk cells in diapause eggs and HCl-treated diapause eggs. These data suggest that BmNOS has an important role in the early embryonic development of the B. mori.

  3. Comparison of Airway Pressure Release Ventilation to Conventional Mechanical Ventilation in the Early Management of Smoke Inhalation Injury in Swine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Measurements and Main Results: Anesthetized female Yorkshire pigs (n 33) inhaled room-temperature pine-bark smoke. Before injury, the pigs were...likely to lead to acute lung injury/ARDS in the majority of injured animals. Because COHb was not continuously measurable in real time, we used smoke...Healthcare MR850JHU humidifier (Auckland, NZ). Measurements . The following variables were measured : body weight, number of smoke breaths received, volume of

  4. Crucial Role for Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase in Early Microcirculatory Derangement and Recipient Survival following Murine Pancreas Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Cardini, Benno; Watschinger, Katrin; Hermann, Martin; Obrist, Peter; Oberhuber, Rupert; Brandacher, Gerald; Chuaiphichai, Surawee; Channon, Keith M.; Pratschke, Johann; Maglione, Manuel; Werner, Ernst R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Aim of this study was to identify the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoform involved in early microcirculatory derangements following solid organ transplantation. Background Tetrahydrobiopterin donor treatment has been shown to specifically attenuate these derangements following pancreas transplantation, and tetrahydrobiopterin-mediated protective effects to rely on its NOS-cofactor activity, rather than on its antioxidant capacity. However, the NOS-isoform mainly involved in this process has still to be defined. Methods Using a murine pancreas transplantation model, grafts lacking one of the three NOS-isoforms were compared to grafts from wild-type controls. Donors were treated with either tetrahydrobiopterin or remained untreated. All grafts were subjected to 16 h cold ischemia time and transplanted into wild-type recipients. Following 4 h graft reperfusion, microcirculation was analysed by confocal intravital fluorescence microscopy. Recipient survival was monitored for 50 days. Results Transplantation of the pancreas from untreated wild-type donor mice resulted in microcirculatory damage of the transplanted graft and no recipient survived more than 72 h. Transplanting grafts from untreated donor mice lacking either endothelial or inducible NOS led to similar outcomes. In contrast, donor treatment with tetrahydrobiopterin prevented microcirculatory breakdown enabling long-term survival. Sole exception was transplantation of grafts from untreated donor mice lacking neuronal NOS. It resulted in intact microvascular structure and long-term recipient survival, either if donor mice were untreated or treated with tetrahydrobiopterin. Conclusion We demonstrate for the first time the crucial involvement of neuronal NOS in early microcirculatory derangements following solid organ transplantation. In this model, protective effects of tetrahydrobiopterin are mediated by targeting this isoform. PMID:25389974

  5. Role of nitric oxide synthases in early blood-brain barrier disruption following transient focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zheng; Li, Chun; Arrick, Denise M; Yang, Shu; Baluna, Alexandra E; Sun, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The role of nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) in early blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption was determined using a new mouse model of transient focal cerebral ischemia. Ischemia was induced by ligating the middle cerebral artery (MCA) at its M2 segment and reperfusion was induced by releasing the ligation. The diameter alteration of the MCA, arterial anastomoses and collateral arteries were imaged and measured in real time. BBB disruption was assessed by Evans Blue (EB) and sodium fluorescein (Na-F) extravasation at 3 hours of reperfusion. The reperfusion produced an extensive vasodilation and a sustained hyperemia. Although expression of NOSs was not altered at 3 hours of reperfusion, L-NAME (a non-specific NOS inhibitor) abolished reperfusion-induced vasodilation/hyperemia and significantly reduced EB and Na-F extravasation. L-NIO (an endothelial NOS (eNOS) inhibitor) significantly attenuated cerebral vasodilation but not BBB disruption, whereas L-NPA and 7-NI (neuronal NOS (nNOS) inhibitors) significantly reduced BBB disruption but not cerebral vasodilation. In contrast, aminoguanidine (AG) (an inducible NOS (iNOS) inhibitor) had less effect on either cerebral vasodilation or BBB disruption. On the other hand, papaverine (PV) not only increased the vasodilation/hyperemia but also significantly reduced BBB disruption. Combined treatment with L-NAME and PV preserved the vasodilation/hyperemia and significantly reduced BBB disruption. Our findings suggest that nNOS may play a major role in early BBB disruption following transient focal cerebral ischemia via a hyperemia-independent mechanism.

  6. Ciclesonide Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... ciclesonide inhaler while you are near an open flame or a heat source. The inhaler may explode ... inhaler near a heat source or an open flame. Protect the inhaler from freezing and direct sunlight. ...

  7. Fluticasone Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... aerosol inhaler while you are near an open flame or a heat source. The inhaler may explode ... inhaler near a heat source or an open flame. Protect the inhaler from freezing and direct sunlight. ...

  8. Flunisolide Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... flunisolide inhaler while you are near an open flame or a heat source. The inhaler may explode ... inhaler near a heat source or an open flame. Protect the inhaler from freezing and direct sunlight. ...

  9. Perinatal Exogenous Nitric Oxide in Fawn-Hooded Hypertensive Rats Reduces Renal Ribosomal Biogenesis in Early Life

    PubMed Central

    Wesseling, Sebastiaan; Essers, Paul B.; Koeners, Maarten P.; Pereboom, Tamara C.; Braam, Branko; van Faassen, Ernst E.; MacInnes, Alyson W.; Joles, Jaap A.

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is known to depress ribosome biogenesis in vitro. In this study we analyzed the influence of exogenous NO on ribosome biogenesis in vivo using a proven antihypertensive model of perinatal NO administration in genetically hypertensive rats. Fawn-hooded hypertensive rat (FHH) dams were supplied with the NO-donor molsidomine in drinking water from 2 weeks before to 4 weeks after birth, and the kidneys were subsequently collected from 2 day, 2 week, and 9 to 10-month-old adult offspring. Although the NO-donor increased maternal NO metabolite excretion, the NO status of juvenile renal (and liver) tissue was unchanged as assayed by EPR spectroscopy of NO trapped with iron-dithiocarbamate complexes. Nevertheless, microarray analysis revealed marked differential up-regulation of renal ribosomal protein genes at 2 days and down-regulation at 2 weeks and in adult males. Such differential regulation of renal ribosomal protein genes was not observed in females. These changes were confirmed in males at 2 weeks by expression analysis of renal ribosomal protein L36a and by polysome profiling, which also revealed a down-regulation of ribosomes in females at that age. However, renal polysome profiles returned to normal in adults after early exposure to molsidomine. No direct effects of molsidomine were observed on cellular proliferation in kidneys at any age, and the changes induced by molsidomine in renal polysome profiles at 2 weeks were absent in the livers of the same rats. Our results suggest that the previously found prolonged antihypertensive effects of perinatal NO administration may be due to epigenetically programmed alterations in renal ribosome biogenesis during a critical fetal period of renal development, and provide a salient example of a drug-induced reduction of ribosome biogenesis that is accompanied by a beneficial long-term health effect in both males and females. PMID:22303348

  10. Intrauterine growth retardation in endothelial nitric oxide synthase-deficient mice is established from early stages of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Pallares, Pilar; Gonzalez-Bulnes, Antonio

    2008-06-01

    The current study aimed to determine effects of deficiencies in nitric oxide synthase (NOS) 3 on embryo and fetal development by in vivo, noninvasive, real-time ultrasonographic assessment of phenotypic changes in Nos3-knockout pregnant mice and their wild-type counterparts. From Day 4.5 of pregnancy onwards, embryonic vesicle diameters, crown-rump lengths, and trunk diameters were obtained by serial scanning of seven adult pregnant female mice, strain B6.129P2-Nos3(tm1Unc)/J, N9 generation backcrossing with C57BL/6J mice, homozygous for the disruption of the endothelial NOS gene (group Nos3(-/-)), and 12 pregnant, wild-type C57BL/6J mice (group Nos3(+/+)). All the measurements increased in both genotypes throughout gestation. However, embryo length and width were significantly larger in Nos3(+/+) than in Nos3(-/-) mice from Day 8.5, and both longitudinal and transverse diameters of the entire gestational sacs were larger in Nos3(+/+) mice from Day 10.5. Assessment of the relative growth of embryos/fetuses and gestational annexes showed different patterns among Nos3(-/-) and Nos3(+/+) mice. Throughout pregnancy, the distance between the external limit of the gestational sac and the embryo in Nos3(+/+) mice diminished in longitudinal sections, or remained unaffected in transverse sections. In Nos3(-/-) mice, there were significant increases (P < 0.005) in the differences between embryo and gestational vesicle measurements in both longitudinal and transversal curves from Days 5.5 to 14.5, but from Day 14.5 of pregnancy onward, the changes were not significant. The results demonstrate that the processes of fetal growth retardation in the Nos3(-/-) mice are established from early pregnancy stages.

  11. Early bronchodilatory effects of budesonide/formoterol pMDI compared with fluticasone/salmeterol DPI and albuterol pMDI: 2 randomized controlled trials in adults with persistent asthma previously treated with inhaled corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Hampel, Frank C; Martin, Paula; Mezzanotte, William S

    2008-05-01

    Two identically designed, randomized, multicenter, single-dose, crossover studies were conducted in patients aged > or = 18 years with mild to moderate asthma previously treated with inhaled corticosteroids. After 2 weeks on twice-daily budesonide pressurized metered-dose inhaler (pMDI) 160 microg, patients received a randomized sequence of budesonide/formoterol pMDI 80/4.5 microg x 2 inhalations (160/9 microg), fluticasone/salmeterol dry powder inhaler (DPI) 250/50 microg x 1 inhalation, albuterol pMDI 90 microg x 2 inhalations (180 microg), and placebo pMDI (3-to 14-day washout periods). Improvements in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV(1)) at 3 minutes were significantly (p < 0.001) greater after treatment with budesonide/formoterol pMDI compared with fluticasone/salmeterol DPI and similar to that of albuterol pMDI. In addition, significantly (p < 0.001) more patients treated with budesonide/formoterol pMDI achieved a 15% improvement in FEV(1) within 15 minutes compared with patients treated with fluticasone/salmeterol DPI and placebo. Thus, the early bronchodilatory effects of budesonide/formoterol pMDI were greater than with fluticasone/salmeterol DPI.

  12. Inhaled /sup 147/Pm and/or total-body gamma radiation: Early mortality and morbidity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Filipy, R.E.; Lauhala, K.E.; McGee, D.R.; Cannon, W.C.; Buschbom, R.L.; Decker, J.R.; Kuffel, E.G.; Park, J.F.; Ragan, H.A.; Yaniv, S.S.; Scott, B.R.

    1989-05-01

    Rats were given doses of /sup 60/Co gamma radiation and/or lung burdens of /sup 147/Pm (in fused aluminosilicate particles) within lethal ranges in an experiment to determine and compare morbidity and mortality responses for the radiation insults within 1 year after exposure. Radiation-induced morbidity was assessed by measuring changes in body weights, hematologic parameters, and pulmonary-function parameters. Acute mortality and morbidity from inhaled promethium were caused primarily by radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis that occurred more than 53 days after exposure. Acute mortality and morbidity from total-body gamma irradiation occurred within 30 days of exposure and resulted from the bone-marrow radiation syndrome. Gamma radiation caused transient morbidity, reflected by immediately depressed blood cell levels and by reduced body weight gain in animals that survived the acute gamma radiation syndrome. Inhaled promethium caused a loss of body weight and diminished pulmonary function, but its only effect on blood cell levels was lymphocytopenia. Combined gamma irradiation and promethium lung burdens were synergistic, in that animals receiving both radiation insults had higher morbidity and mortality rates than would be predicted based on the effect of either kind of radiation alone. Promethium lung burdens enhanced the effect of gamma radiation in rats within the first 30 days of exposure, and gamma radiation enhanced the later effect of promethium lung burdens. 70 refs., 68 figs., 21 tabs.

  13. Inhalation Injury.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    alpha,-antitrypsin resulting cur most often as the result of tracheal in prolonged action of proteases such as or laryngeal damage from the endotra... curs is determined by physicochemical Turbulent airflow, such as at bifurca- properties of the inhaled substance, its tions of the airway, separates

  14. Nitric oxide: a key mediator in the early and late phase of carrageenan-induced rat paw inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    Salvemini, D.; Wang, Z. Q.; Wyatt, P. S.; Bourdon, D. M.; Marino, M. H.; Manning, P. T.; Currie, M. G.

    1996-01-01

    1 The role of nitric oxide (NO) derived from constitutive and inducible nitric oxide synthase (cNOS and iNOS) and its relationship to oxygen-derived free radicals and prostaglandins (PG) was investigated in a carrageenan-induced model of acute hindpaw inflammation. 2 The intraplantar injection of carrageenan elicited an inflammatory response that was characterized by a time-dependent increase in paw oedema, neutrophil infiltration, and increased levels of nitrite/nitrate (NO2-/NO3-) and prostaglandin E2(PGE2) in the paw exudate. 3 Paw oedema was maximal by 6 h and remained elevated for 10 h following carrageenan administration. The non-selective cNOS/iNOS inhibitors, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) and NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) given intravenously (30-300 mg kg-1) 1 h before or after carrageenan administration, inhibited paw oedema at all time points. 4 The selective iNOS inhibitors, N-iminoethyl-L-lysine (L-NIL) or aminoguanidine (AG), failed to inhibit carrageenan-induced paw oedema during the first 4 h following carrageenan administration, but inhibited paw oedema at subsequent time points (from 5-10 h). iNOS mRNA was detected between 3 to 10 h following carrageenan administration using ribonuclease protection assays. iNOS protein was first detected 6 h and was maximal 10 h following carrageenan administration as shown by Western blot analysis. Administration of the iNOS inhibitors 5 h after carrageenan (a time point where iNOS was expressed) inhibited paw oedema at all subsequent time points. Infiltrating neutrophils were not the source of iNOS since pretreatment with colchicine (2 mg kg-1) suppressed neutrophil infiltration, but did not inhibit the iNOS mRNA expression or the elevated NO2-/NO3- levels in the paw exudate. 5 Inhibition of paw oedema by the NOS inhibitors was associated with attenuation of both the NO2-/NO3- and PGE2 levels in the paw exudate. These inhibitors also reduced the neutrophil infiltration at the site of inflammation

  15. Experimental studies of the early effects of inhaled beta-emitting radionuclides for nuclear accident risk assessment: Phase 2 report

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, B.R.; Hahn, F.F.; Newton, G.J.; Snipes, M.B.; Damon, E.G.; Mauderly, J.L.; Boecker, B.B.; Gray, D.H.

    1987-11-01

    This report summarizes a series of experiments concerning the effect of linear energy transfer and temporal radiation dose pattern to the lung from inhaled beta-emitting radionuclides. The results were used to test the validity of a hazard-function mathematical model for predicting death from radiation pneumonitis. Both morbidity and mortality within 18 months after exposure were examined in rats exposed to beta-emitting radionuclides, giving brief or protracted irradiation of the lung or having weak or strong beta emissions. Protraction of the radiation dose to the lung from a half-time in the lung of less than three days to a half-time with a long-term component of about 150 days has a sparing effect. The median lethal dose for the protracted irradiation is about 1.7 times the median lethal dose for the brief irradiation. Low energy beta emissions from /sup 147/Pm have a similar effectiveness in producing lethal injury as high energy beta emissions from /sup 90/Sr. Changes in three parameters of morbidity were measured: body weight, hematology and pulmonary function; only changes in pulmonary function correlated well with pulmonary radiation injury. The doses of radiation required to produce impaired function, however, were not significantly different from those that produced death. The hazard-function model for predicting death from radiation pneumonitis, which was developed from previously obtained data for inhalation exposures of dogs to beta-emitting radionuclides, adequately predicted the median lethal doses for rats receiving one of several different beta dose rate patterns to the lung, thus strengthening the validity of the mathematical model. 23 refs., 41 figs., 12 tabs.

  16. Levalbuterol Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    Levalbuterol comes as a solution (liquid) to inhale by mouth using a nebulizer (machine that turns medication into a mist that can be inhaled), a concentrated solution to be mixed with normal saline and inhaled ...

  17. Host-Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis interactome reveals a novel iron assimilation mechanism linked to nitric oxide stress during early infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The initial interaction between host cell and pathogen sets the stage for the ensuing infection and ultimately determine the course of disease. However, there is limited knowledge of the transcripts utilized by host and pathogen and how they may impact one another during this critical step. The purpose of this study was to create a host-Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) interactome for early infection in an epithelium-macrophage co-culture system using RNA-seq. Results Establishment of the host-MAP interactome revealed a novel iron assimilation system for carboxymycobactin. Iron assimilation is linked to nitric oxide synthase-2 production by the host and subsequent nitric oxide buildup. Iron limitation as well as nitric oxide is a prompt for MAP to enter into an iron sequestration program. This new iron sequestration program provides an explanation for mycobactin independence in some MAP strains grown in vitro as well as during infection within the host cell. Utilization of such a pathway is likely to aid MAP establishment and long-term survival within the host. Conclusions The host-MAP interactome identified a number of metabolic, DNA repair and virulence genes worthy for consideration as novel drug targets as well as future pathogenesis studies. Reported interactome data may also be utilized to conduct focused, hypothesis-driven research. Co-culture of uninfected bovine epithelial cells (MAC-T) and primary bovine macrophages creates a tolerant genotype as demonstrated by downregulation of inflammatory pathways. This co-culture system may serve as a model to investigate other bovine enteric pathogens. PMID:24112552

  18. Theoretical evaluation of burns to the human respiratory tract due to inhalation of hot gas in the early stage of fires.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yong-Gang; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Jun

    2006-06-01

    A transient two-dimensional mathematical model for heat and water vapor transport across the respiratory tract of human body was established and applied to predict the thermal impact of inhaled hot gas to the nasal tissues during the early stage of fires. Influences of individual's physiological status and environment variables were comprehensively investigated through numerical calculations. Burn evaluation was performed using the classical Henriques model to predict the time for thermal injury to occur. It was shown that decreasing the air velocity and increasing the respiratory rate is helpful to minimize the burn over the respiratory tract. The effect of relative humidity of surrounding dry hot air could be ignored in predicting burns for short duration exposures. Due to evaporation cooling on the mucousal membrane, the burn often occurs at certain positions underneath the skin of the tract near the inlet of the respiratory tract. Most of the tissues near the surface suffer injury immediately after exposure to fire, while in the deeper tissues, serious damage occurs after a relatively longer time period. The method presented in this paper may suggest a valuable approach to theoretically evaluate the injury of hot air to the human respiratory tract under various fire situations.

  19. Nitrate reductase-mediated early nitric oxide burst alleviates oxidative damage induced by aluminum through enhancement of antioxidant defenses in roots of wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    PubMed

    Sun, Chengliang; Lu, Lingli; Liu, Lijuan; Liu, Wenjing; Yu, Yan; Liu, Xiaoxia; Hu, Yan; Jin, Chongwei; Lin, Xianyong

    2014-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signaling molecule involved in the physiological processes of plants. The role of NO release in the tolerance strategies of roots of wheat (Triticum aestivum) under aluminum (Al) stress was investigated using two genotypes with different Al resistances. • An early NO burst at 3 h was observed in the root tips of the Al-tolerant genotype Jian-864, whereas the Al-sensitive genotype Yang-5 showed no NO accumulation at 3 h but an extremely high NO concentration after 12 h. Stimulating NO production at 3 h in the root tips of Yang-5 with the NO donor relieved Al-induced root inhibition and callose production, as well as oxidative damage and ROS accumulation, while elimination of the early NO burst by NO scavenger aggravated root inhibition in Jian-864. • Synthesis of early NO in roots of Jian-864 was mediated through nitrate reductase (NR) but not through NO synthase. Elevated antioxidant enzyme activities were induced by Al stress in both wheat genotypes and significantly enhanced by NO donor, but suppressed by NO scavenger or NR inhibitor. • These results suggest that an NR-mediated early NO burst plays an important role in Al resistance of wheat through modulating enhanced antioxidant defense to adapt to Al stress.

  20. The effect of exposure to sulphuric acid on the early asthmatic response to inhaled grass pollen allergen.

    PubMed

    Tunnicliffe, W S; Evans, D E; Mark, D; Harrison, R M; Ayres, J G

    2001-10-01

    Particulate sulphates, including sulphuric acid (H2SO4), are important components of the ambient aerosol in some areas and are regarded as air pollutants with potentially important human health effects. Challenge studies suggest little or no effect of H2SO4 exposure on lung function in asthmatic adults, although some epidemiological studies demonstrate an effect of acid species on symptoms in subjects with asthma. To date, the effect of H2SO4 on allergen responsiveness has not been studied. The effect of exposure to particulate H2SO4 on the early asthmatic response to grass pollen allergen has been investigated in 13 adults with mild asthma. After establishment of the provocative dose of allergen producing a 15% fall in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEVI) (PD15) for each subject, they were exposed to air, 100 microg m(-3) or 1,000 g x m(-3) H2SO4 for 1 h, double-blind in random order > or =2 weeks apart, through a head dome delivery system 14 h after each exposure subject underwent a fixed-dose allergen challenge (PD15). Ten subjects completed the study. The mean early asthmatic responses (maximum percentage change in FEV1 during the first 2 h after challenge) following air, 100 microg x m(-3) H2SO4, and 1,000 microg m(-3) H2SO4, were -14.1%, -16.7%, and -18.4%, respectively. The difference between 1,000 microg x m(-3) H2SO4 and air was significant (mean difference: -4.3%, 95% confidence interval (CI: -1.2-7.4%, p=0.013). The difference between air and 100 microg m(-3) H2SO4 approached significance (mean difference: -2.6%, 95% CI: 0.0-5.3%, p = 0.051). These results suggest that, at least at high mass concentration, sulphuric acid can potentiate the early asthmatic response of mild asthmatic subjects to grass pollen allergen, although the effect is limited.

  1. Inhaled Therapies for Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hill, Nicholas S; Preston, Ioana R; Roberts, Kari E

    2015-06-01

    The inhaled route has a number of attractive features for treatment of pulmonary hypertension, including delivery of drug directly to the target organ, thus enhancing pulmonary specificity and reducing systemic adverse effects. It can also improve ventilation/perfusion matching by dilating vessels supplying ventilated regions, thus improving gas exchange. Furthermore, it can achieve higher local drug concentrations at a lower overall dose, potentially reducing drug cost. Accordingly, a number of inhaled agents have been developed to treat pulmonary hypertension. Most in current use are prostacyclins, including epoprostenol, which has been cleared for intravenous applications but is used off-label in acute care settings as a continuously nebulized medication. Aerosolized iloprost and treprostinil are both prostacyclins that have been cleared by the FDA to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Both require frequent administration (6 and 4 times daily, respectively), and both have a tendency to cause airway symptoms, including cough and wheeze, which can lead to intolerance. These agents cannot be used to substitute for the infused routes of prostacyclin because they do not permit delivery of medication at high doses. Inhaled nitric oxide (INO) is cleared for the treatment of primary pulmonary hypertension in newborns. It is also used off-label to test acute vasoreactivity in PAH during right-heart catheterization and to treat acute right-heart failure in hospitalized patients. In addition, some studies on long-term application of INO either have been recently completed with results pending or are under consideration. In the future, because of its inherent advantages in targeting the lung, the inhaled route is likely to be tested using a variety of small molecules that show promise as PAH therapies.

  2. Inhalation Therapy in Horses.

    PubMed

    Cha, Mandy L; Costa, Lais R R

    2017-04-01

    This article discusses the benefits and limitations of inhalation therapy in horses. Inhalation drug therapy delivers the drug directly to the airways, thereby achieving maximal drug concentrations at the target site. Inhalation therapy has the additional advantage of decreasing systemic side effects. Inhalation therapy in horses is delivered by the use of nebulizers or pressured metered dose inhalers. It also requires the use of a muzzle or nasal mask in horses. Drugs most commonly delivered through inhalation drug therapy in horses include bronchodilators, antiinflammatories, and antimicrobials.

  3. A novel lignan composition from Cedrus deodara induces apoptosis and early nitric oxide generation in human leukemia Molt-4 and HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Shashi, Bhushan; Jaswant, Singh; Madhusudana, Rao J; Kumar, Saxena A; Nabi, Qazi G

    2006-02-01

    AP9-cd, a standardized lignan composition from Cedrus deodara consisting of (-)-wikstromal, (-)-matairesinol, and dibenzyl butyrolactol, showed cytotoxicity in several human cancer cell lines reported earlier. An attempt was made in this study to investigate the mechanism of cell death in human leukemia Molt-4 and HL-60 cells. It inhibited Molt-4 cell proliferation with 48-h IC(50) of approximately 15 microg/ml, increased sub-G0 cell fraction with no mitotic block, produced apoptotic bodies and induced DNA ladder formation. Flow cytometric analysis of annexinV-FITC/PI-stained cells showed time-related increase in apoptosis and post-apoptotic necrosis. All these biological end-points indicated cell death by apoptosis. Further, initial events involved massive nitric oxide (NO) formation within 4 h with subsequent late appearance of peroxides in cells; measured by flow cytometry using specific fluorescent probes. Persistently high levels of NO and peroxide appeared to decrease mitochondrial membrane potential (Psi(mt)) which was recovered by cyclosporin A in Molt-4 cells. AP9-cd caused 2-fold activation of caspase-3 in Molt-4 and 5-fold activation in HL-60 cells. Also caspases-8 and -9 were activated in HL-60 cells. Ascorbate suppressed the enhanced caspases activities indicating a pro-oxidant effect of AP9-cd. Further, caspase-3 activation correlated with NO generation that was partially impaired by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors and ascorbate suggesting a role of pro-oxidant species in caspase-3 activation. AP9-cd produced no cytotoxicity in primary rat hepatocyte culture at the concentrations used. The studies indicated that AP9-cd mediated early NO formation leads to caspases activation, peroxide generation, and mitochondrial depolarization which may be responsible for mitochondrial-dependent and -independent apoptotic pathways involved in the killing of leukemia cells by AP9-cd.

  4. Nitric oxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitric oxide ; CASRN 10102 - 43 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  5. Formoterol Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... until you are ready to inhale your dose. Pull off the inhaler cover and twist the mouthpiece open in the direction shown by the arrow on the mouthpiece. Push the buttons on each side to be sure ...

  6. Albuterol Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    Albuterol is used to prevent and treat difficulty breathing, wheezing, shortness of breath, coughing, and chest tightness ... for oral inhalation is also used to prevent breathing difficulties during exercise. Albuterol inhalation aerosol (Proair HFA, ...

  7. Early inflammatory response to asbestos exposure in rat and hamster lungs: role of inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Dörger, Martina; Allmeling, Anne-Marie; Kiefmann, Rainer; Münzing, Silvia; Messmer, Konrad; Krombach, Fritz

    2002-06-01

    Recent studies have suggested that inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) plays a role in the development of asbestos-related pulmonary disorders. The pulmonary reactions of rats and hamsters upon exposure to asbestos fibers are well known to be disparate. In addition, in vitro experiments have indicated that mononuclear phagocytes from hamsters, in contrast to those from rats, lack the iNOS pathway. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether rats and hamsters differ in lung iNOS expression in vivo upon exposure to asbestos fibers and whether differences in iNOS induction are associated with differences in the acute pulmonary inflammatory reaction. Body weight, alveolar-arterial oxygen difference, differential cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, total protein leakage, lung myeloperoxidase activity and lipidperoxidation, wet/dry ratio, iNOS mRNA and protein expression, and nitrotyrosine staining of lung tissue were determined 1 and 7 days after intratracheal instillation of asbestos fibers in CD rats and Syrian golden hamsters. Exposure of rats to asbestos fibers resulted in enhanced pulmonary iNOS expression and nitrotyrosine staining together with an acute inflammation that was characterized by an influx of neutrophils, enhanced myeloperoxidase activity and lipid peroxidation, damage of the alveolar-capillary membrane, edema formation, and impairment of gas exchange. In comparison, instillation of asbestos fibers in hamsters resulted in a significantly milder inflammatory reaction of the lung with no induction of iNOS in pulmonary cells. The data obtained provide important information to understand the underlying mechanisms of species differences in the pulmonary response upon exposure to asbestos fibers.

  8. Smoke inhalation injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birky, M.

    The cause of death by fires was studied. The present results and information are, however, not enough to reduce loss of life or inhalation injury. The magnitude and type of inhalation injury for civilians and firefighters represents the most inadequately defined human element of accidental fires. Little information is available on compounds other than carbon monoxide, which are responsible for respiration injury or toxicological syndrome. Effective treatment methods for inhalation victims and studies on fatalities, inhalation injury and animals are suggested.

  9. Focus on Inhalants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Challenge: Safe, Disciplines, and Drug-Free Schools, 1994

    1994-01-01

    The use of inhalants is a major health concern among the school-age population. Information presented in this publication dispels the myths about inhalant use and presents common warning signs that alert teachers to a student's use. The short- and long-term effects of inhalant use are described to shed light on the health risks involved. Lesson…

  10. Interplay between GST and nitric oxide in the early response of soybean (Glycine max L.) plants to salinity stress.

    PubMed

    Dinler, Burcu Seckin; Antoniou, Chrystalla; Fotopoulos, Vasileios

    2014-11-15

    Glutathione-s-transferases (GSTs) and nitric oxide (NO) have both been implicated in the response of plants to salinity stress. However, their interplay and underlying mechanisms are relatively unknown. The present study attempts to provide new insight into the time course effects of NO application on GST biosynthesis regulation in Glycine max L. leaves under salt stress. A 150μM concentration of sodium nitroprusside (SNP), a widely used NO donor, was sprayed on soybean seedlings for two days at 24h intervals, followed by application of 200mM NaCl. The relative water content (RWC), total chlorophyll content (CHL), stomatal conductance (gs), ABA content, malondialdehyde (MDA), hydrogen peroxide content (H2O2), along with GST enzyme and isoenzyme activities and GST1 and GST4 transcript levels were determined at 0h, 6h and 12h after stress imposition. The results indicated that salt treatment alone did not alter MDA, H2O2 or ABA content and stomatal conductance in soybean leaves, most likely due to short-term (6h and 12h) application, although lower RWC and CHL were recorded. SNP treatment alone increased ABA content and reduced stomatal conductance, but did not change RWC, CHL, MDA (except at 12h) and H2O2. However, exogenous SNP application protected soybean leaves from salt stress by increasing RWC, CHL and ABA content, as well as by lowering stomatal conductance in order to maintain water balance. A significant increase in GST activity was recorded under salt stress alone at 6h. Conversely, SNP application lowered GST activity in soybean leaves at 0h and 12h, while it increased at 6h, supported by GST isoenzyme activities. Thus, it could be suggested that exogenous NO application induced GST activity in an ABA-dependent manner, while GST activity could also be induced by salt stress independent of ABA. In addition, SNP pre-treatment in salt-stressed seedlings lowered GST activity at 6h and 12h, in line with the GST isoenzyme expression profile. Finally, GST1 and

  11. Inhalant Use and Delinquent Behaviors among Young Adolescents. The NSDUH Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Health and Human Services, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This report presents the prevalence of inhalant use among young adolescents aged 12 or 13, the association between inhalant use and delinquent behaviors within this age group, and the association between early onset of inhalant use and problems later in life. Early onset of substance use has been linked to substance use disorders, delinquent…

  12. Early systemic inflammatory response in mice after a single oral gavage with live Escherichia coli is evidenced by increased TNF-alpha and nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Nemec, Ana; Jerin, Aleš; Zdovc, Irena; Budefeld, Tomaž; Verstraete, Frank J M; Eržen, Damijan; Sentjurc, Marjeta; Petelin, Milan; Hitti, Tina; Pavlica, Zlatko

    2012-06-01

    Twenty-four female BALB/c mice were orally inoculated with 10(8) CFU Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and euthanized 2.5, 7, 13 and 25 h post-inoculation. The levels of organ nitric oxide (NO) and plasma endotoxin, TNF-alpha and nitrite/nitrate (NO(x)) were compared to those found in sham-inoculated mice, to evaluate systemic host-response to a low-level oral exposure to Gram-negative bacteria. Organ bacterial culture and immunohistochemistry for iNOS were performed on lungs, liver, kidneys and brain from all mice. Organ NO and plasma TNF-alpha levels were higher in E. coli-inoculated animals, but no differences were detected in plasma endotoxin levels, NO(x) or iNOS immunostaining for any of the animal groups. Single oral gavage with live E. coli stimulates an early systemic immune response in clinically healthy mice as evidenced by increased plasma TNF-alpha and organ NO levels, but bacteremia and endotoxemia are not related to this inflammatory response.

  13. Inhaled therapy for the management of perioperative pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Thunberg, C. A.; Morozowich, S. T.; Ramakrishna, Harish

    2015-01-01

    Patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) are at high risk for complications in the perioperative setting and often receive vasodilators to control elevated pulmonary artery pressure (PAP). Administration of vasodilators via inhalation is an effective strategy for reducing PAP while avoiding systemic side effects, chiefly hypotension. The prototypical inhaled pulmonary-specific vasodilator, nitric oxide (NO), has a proven track record but is expensive and cumbersome to implement. Alternatives to NO, including prostanoids (such as epoprostenol, iloprost, and treprostinil), NO-donating drugs (sodium nitroprusside, nitroglycerin, and nitrite), and phosphodiesterase inhibitors (milrinone, sildenafil) may be given via inhalation for the purpose of treating elevated PAP. This review will focus on the perioperative therapy of PH using inhaled vasodilators. PMID:26139748

  14. [Inhaled therapy in asthma].

    PubMed

    Plaza Moral, Vicente; Giner Donaire, Jordi

    2016-04-01

    Because of its advantages, inhaled administration of aerosolized drugs is the administration route of choice for the treatment of asthma and COPD. Numerous technological advances in the devices used in inhaled therapy in recent decades have boosted the appearance of multiple inhalers and aerosolized drugs. However, this variety also requires that the prescribing physician is aware of their characteristics. The main objective of the present review is to summarize the current state of knowledge on inhalers and inhaled drugs commonly used in the treatment of asthma. The review ranges from theoretical aspects (fundamentals and available devices and drugs) to practical and relevant aspects for asthma care in the clinical setting (therapeutic strategies, education, and adherence to inhalers).

  15. Angiotensin II type 2 receptors and nitric oxide sustain oxygenation in the clipped kidney of early Goldblatt hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Palm, Fredrik; Connors, Stephanie G; Mendonca, Margarida; Welch, William J; Wilcox, Christopher S

    2008-02-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) decrease the glomerular filtration rate and renal blood flow in the clipped kidneys of early 2-kidney, 1-clip Goldblatt hypertensive rats, but the consequences for oxygenation are unclear. We investigated the hypothesis that angiotensin II type 1 or angiotensin II type 2 receptors or NO synthase mediate renal oxygenation responses to ACEI. Three weeks after left renal artery clipping, kidney function, oxygen (O(2)) use, renal blood flow, renal cortical blood flow, and renal cortical oxygen tension (Po(2)) were measured after acute administration of an ACEI (enalaprilat) and after acute administration of ACEI following acute administration of an angiotensin II type 1 or angiotensin II type 2 receptor blocker (candesartan or PD-123,319) or an NO synthase blocker (N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester with control of renal perfusion pressure) and compared with mechanical reduction in renal perfusion pressure to the levels after ACEI. The basal renal cortical Po(2) of clipped kidneys was significantly lower than contralateral kidneys (35+/-1 versus 51+/-1 mm Hg; n=40 each). ACEI lowered renal venous Po(2), cortical Po(2), renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, and cortical blood flow and increased the renal vascular resistance in the clipped kidney, whereas mechanical reduction in renal perfusion pressure was ineffective. PD-123,319 and N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, but not candesartan, reduced the Po(2) of clipped kidneys and blocked the fall in Po(2) with acute ACEI administration. In conclusion, oxygen availability in the clipped kidney is maintained by angiotensin II generation, angiotensin II type 2 receptors, and NO synthase. This discloses a novel mechanism whereby angiotensin can prevent hypoxia in a kidney challenged with a reduced perfusion pressure.

  16. Neptunium-237 inhalation in rats.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, M F; Ruemmler, P S; Buschbom, R L

    1986-12-01

    Groups of rats were exposed to aerosols of 237Np nitrate to determine clearance rates, retention and distribution at various intervals after inhalation. Initial lung burdens (ILB) after 237Np inhalation by three treatment groups were 0.12, 0.19 and 0.37 mu Ci/kg, respectively. Radiochemical analyses of animals killed at 4, 8, 14, 28 and 90 d, as well as data for others maintained until they became moribund, showed that their lung clearance followed a three-compartment model, clearance half-times for which were 1, 35, and 10,000 d, respectively. Only 3% of the ILB was retained after 90 d; 12% of that burden had translocated to the skeleton at 750 d; the half-time for skeletal retention was 2500 d. A single tumor was the only malignancy detected in the lungs of the 35 animals allowed to survive the early phase of the study.

  17. Inhalant allergies in children.

    PubMed

    Mims, James W; Veling, Maria C

    2011-06-01

    Children with chronic or recurrent upper respiratory inflammatory disease (rhinitis) should be considered for inhalant allergies. Risk factors for inhalant allergies in children include a first-degree relative with allergies, food allergy in infancy, and atopic dermatitis. Although inhalant allergies are rare in infancy, inhalant allergies are common in older children and impair quality of life and productivity. Differentiating between viral and allergic rhinitis can be challenging in children, but the child's age, history, and risk factors can provide helpful information. Allergic rhinitis is a risk factor for asthma, and if one is present, medical consideration of the other is warranted.

  18. Inhalant Abuse and Dextromethorphan.

    PubMed

    Storck, Michael; Black, Laura; Liddell, Morgan

    2016-07-01

    Inhalant abuse is the intentional inhalation of a volatile substance for the purpose of achieving an altered mental state. As an important, yet underrecognized form of substance abuse, inhalant abuse crosses all demographic, ethnic, and socioeconomic boundaries, causing significant morbidity and mortality in school-aged and older children. This review presents current perspectives on epidemiology, detection, and clinical challenges of inhalant abuse and offers advice regarding the medical and mental health providers' roles in the prevention and management of this substance abuse problem. Also discussed is the misuse of a specific "over-the-counter" dissociative, dextromethorphan.

  19. Protective effects of hydrogen sulfide inhalation on oxidative stress in rats with cotton smoke inhalation-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    HAN, ZHI-HAI; JIANG, YI; DUAN, YUN-YOU; WANG, XIAO-YANG; HUANG, YAN; FANG, TING-ZHENG

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanism by which hydrogen sulfide (H2S) inhalation protects against oxidative stress in rats with cotton smoke inhalation-induced lung injury. A total of 24 male Sprague-Dawley rats were separated randomly into four groups, which included the control, H2S, smoke and smoke + H2S groups. A rat model of cotton smoke inhalation-induced lung injury was established following inhalation of 30% oxygen for 6 h. In addition, H2S (80 ppm) was inhaled by the rats in the H2S and smoke + H2S groups for 6 h following smoke or sham-smoke inhalation. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were performed to measure various indices in the rat lung homogenate, while the levels of nuclear factor (NF)-κBp65 in the lung tissue of the rats were determined and semiquantitatively analyzed using immunohistochemistry. In addition, quantitative fluorescence polymerase chain reaction was employed to detect the mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the rat lung tissue. The concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO), inducible iNOS and NF-κBp65, as well as the sum-integrated optical density of NF-κBp65 and the relative mRNA expression of iNOS, in the rat lung tissue from the smoke + H2S group were significantly lower when compared with the smoke group. The concentrations of MDA, NO, iNOS and NF-κBp65 in the H2S group were comparable to that of the control group. Therefore, inhalation of 80 ppm H2S may reduce iNOS mRNA transcription and the production of iNOS and NO in rats by inhibiting NF-κBp65 activation, subsequently decreasing oxidative stress and cotton smoke inhalation-induced lung injury. PMID:26170929

  20. Modeling Deposition of Inhaled Particles

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mathematical modeling of the deposition and distribution of inhaled aerosols within human lungs is an invaluable tool in predicting both the health risks associated with inhaled environmental aerosols and the therapeutic dose delivered by inhaled pharmacological drugs. Howeve...

  1. Nonthermal Inhalation Injury.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    understand the effects of the various byproducts of combustion on the human body. A thorough knowledge of the physiological mechanisms , relevant...as soon as possible. Overview of Smoke Inhalation Physiology The physiologic mechanisms of injury from smoke inhalation are multiple and complex...to breathe Lower airway obstruction Dyspnea, tachypnea, wheezing, rhonchi, carbonaceous sputum Parenchymal injury Dyspnea, tachypnea, rales Table 1

  2. Inhalants in Peru.

    PubMed

    Lerner, R; Ferrando, D

    1995-01-01

    In Peru, the prevalence and consequences of inhalant abuse appear to be low in the general population and high among marginalized children. Inhalant use ranks third in lifetime prevalence after alcohol and tobacco. Most of the use appears to be infrequent. Among marginalized children, that is, children working in the streets but living at home or children living in the street, the problem of inhalant abuse is a serious problem. Among children working in the streets but living at home, the lifetime prevalence rate for inhalant abuse is high, ranging from 15 to 45 percent depending on the study being cited. For children living in the streets, the use of inhalant is even more severe. As mentioned earlier in this chapter, most of these street children use inhalants on a daily basis. The lack of research on the problem of inhalant abuse is a serious impediment to development of intervention programs and strategies to address this problem in Peru. Epidemiologic and ethnographic research on the nature and extent of inhalant abuse are obvious prerequisites to targeted treatment and preventive intervention programs. The urgent need for current and valid data is underscored by the unique vulnerability of the youthful population at risk and the undisputed harm that results from chronic abuse of inhalants. Nonetheless, it is important to mention several programs that work with street children. Some, such as the Information and Education Center for the Prevention of Drug Abuse, Generation, and Centro Integracion de Menores en Abandono have shelters where street children are offered transition to a less marginal lifestyle. Teams of street educators provide the children with practical solutions and gain their confidence, as well as offer them alternative socialization experiences to help them survive the streets and avoid the often repressive and counterproductive environments typical of many institutions. Most of the children who go through these programs tend to abandon

  3. Extracellular killing of inhaled pneumococci in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Coonrod, J.D.; Marple, S.; Holmes, G.P.; Rehm, S.R.

    1987-12-01

    Early clearance of inhaled Staphylococcus aureus is believed to be caused by phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages. In murine models inhaled pneumococci are cleared even more rapidly than S. aureus. Conventional opsonins appear to play no role in this clearance, and recently it has been shown that murine alveolar lining material contains free fatty acids and other soluble factors that are directly bactericidal for pneumococci. To determine whether non-phagocytic factors are involved in pneumococcal clearance, we compared the site of killing of inhaled pneumococci and S. aureus in rats using histologic methods and bronchoalveolar lavage. Spontaneous lysis of pneumococci was prevented by use of autolysin-defective pneumococci or by substitution of ethanolamine for choline in the cell wall. Histologic studies showed that the percent of inhaled staphylococci associated with alveolar macrophages always exceeded the percent of staphylococci cleared, whereas there was little association of pneumococci with macrophages during clearance. Analysis of the intracellular or extracellular location of iron 59 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of rats that had inhaled aerosols of /sup 59/Fe-labeled bacteria suggested that staphylococci were killed predominantly in macrophages and pneumococci in the extracellular space. When /sup 59/Fe-labeled pneumococci or staphylococci were ingested and killed by macrophages in vitro, the /sup 59/Fe remained with the macrophages, suggesting that the extracellular location of /sup 59/Fe during pneumococcal killing in vivo was not caused by rapid turnover of /sup 59/Fe in macrophages. Studies of the site of killing of inhaled type 25 pneumococci labeled exclusively in the cell wall with carbon 14-ethanolamine confirmed the results obtained with /sup 59/Fe-labeled pneumococci. Thus, early killing of inhaled pneumococci, unlike staphylococci, appears to take place outside of macrophages.

  4. Budesonide Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    Budesonide is used to prevent difficulty breathing, chest tightness, wheezing, and coughing caused by asthma. Budesonide powder for oral inhalation (Pulmicort Flexhaler) is used in adults and children 6 ...

  5. Acetylcysteine Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    Acetylcysteine inhalation is used along with other treatments to relieve chest congestion due to thick or abnormal ... that causes problems with breathing, digestion, and reproduction). Acetylcysteine is in a class of medications called mucolytic ...

  6. Zanamivir Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... you use an inhaled medication to treat asthma, emphysema, or other breathing problems and you are scheduled ... the air passages that lead to the lungs); emphysema (damage to air sacs in the lungs); or ...

  7. Ipratropium Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    Ipratropium oral inhalation is used to prevent wheezing, shortness of breath, coughing, and chest tightness in people ... damage to the air sacs in the lungs). Ipratropium is in a class of medications called bronchodilators. ...

  8. Pirbuterol Acetate Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... mouth or throat irritation, rinse your mouth with water, chew gum, or suck sugarless hard candy after using pirbuterol.Inhalation devices require regular cleaning. Once a week, remove the mouthpiece cover, turn ...

  9. Umeclidinium Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest tightness caused by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; a group of diseases that affect the lungs ... Do not use umeclidinium inhalation during a sudden COPD attack. Your doctor will prescribe a short-acting ( ...

  10. Olodaterol Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest tightness caused by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; a group of diseases that affect the lungs ... Do not use olodaterol inhalation during a sudden COPD attack. Your doctor will prescribe a short-acting ( ...

  11. Nitric oxide and hyperoxic acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-wu; Han, Cui-hong; Zhang, Pei-xi; Zheng, Juan; Liu, Kan; Sun, Xue-jun

    2016-01-01

    Hyperoxic acute lung injury (HALI) refers to the damage to the lungs secondary to exposure to elevated oxygen partial pressure. HALI has been a concern in clinical practice with the development of deep diving and the use of normobaric as well as hyperbaric oxygen in clinical practice. Although the pathogenesis of HALI has been extensively studied, the findings are still controversial. Nitric oxide (NO) is an intercellular messenger and has been considered as a signaling molecule involved in many physiological and pathological processes. Although the role of NO in the occurrence and development of pulmonary diseases including HALI has been extensively studied, the findings on the role of NO in HALI are conflicting. Moreover, inhalation of NO has been approved as a therapeutic strategy for several diseases. In this paper, we briefly summarize the role of NO in the pathogenesis of HALI and the therapeutic potential of inhaled NO in HALI. PMID:27867474

  12. Inhaled human insulin.

    PubMed

    Strack, Thomas R

    2006-04-01

    The benefit of subcutaneous insulin therapy in patients with diabetes is frequently limited due to difficulty in convincing patients of the importance of multiple daily insulin injections to cope effectively with meal-associated glycemic changes. Thus, the aim of achieving tight glycemic control, which is critical for reducing the risk of long-term diabetes-related complications, frequently remains elusive. The successful development of an inhalable insulin as a noninvasive alternative promises to change the management of diabetes. The first product to become available to patients is inhaled human insulin, a dry-powder formulation packaged into discrete blisters containing 1 or 3 mg of dry-powder human insulin and administered via a unique pulmonary inhaler device. It has recently been approved in both the United States and the European Union for the control of hyperglycemia in adult patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The pharmacokinetic profile of inhaled human insulin closely mimics the natural pattern of insulin secretion, and resembles that of rapid-acting subcutaneous analogs. Similarly to rapid-acting subcutaneous analogs, inhaled human insulin has a more rapid onset of glucose-lowering activity compared to subcutaneous regular insulin, allowing it to be administered shortly before meals. It has a duration of glucose-lowering activity comparable to subcutaneous regular insulin and longer than rapid-acting insulin analogs. Inhaled human insulin effectively controls postprandial glucose concentrations in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes without increasing the risk of hypoglycemia, and even improves fasting glucose levels compared to subcutaneous insulin. Inhaled human insulin has an overall favorable safety profile. There are small reductions in lung function (1-1.5% of total lung forced expiratory volume in the first second [FEV1] capacity) after onset of treatment that are reversible in most patients if treatment is discontinued. Inhaled human

  13. Inhaled /sup 239/PuO/sub 2/ and/or total-body gamma radiation: Early mortality and morbidity in rats and dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Filipy, R.E.; Decker, J.R.; Lai, Y.L.; Lauhala, K.E.; Buschbom, R.L.; Hiastala, M.P.; McGee, D.R.; Park, J.F.; Kuffel, E.G.; Ragan, H.A.; Cannon, W.C.; Yaniv, S.S.; Scott, B.R.

    1988-08-01

    Rats and beagle dogs were given doses of /sup 60/Co gamma radiation and/or body burdens of /sup 239/PuO/sub 2/ within lethal ranges in an experiment to determine and compare morbidity and mortality responses of both species within 1 year after exposure. Radiation-induced morbidity was assessed by measuring changes in body weights, hematologic parameters, and pulmonary-function parameters. Gamma radiation caused transient morbidity, reflected by immediately depressed blood cell concentrations and by long-term loss of body weight and diminished pulmonary function in animals of both species that survived the acute gamma radiation syndrome. Inhaled plutonium caused a loss of body weight and diminished pulmonary function in both species, but its only effect on blood cell concentrations was lymphocytopenia in dogs. Combined gamma irradiation and plutonium lung burdens were synergistic, in that animals receiving both radiation insults had higher morbidity and mortality rates than would be predicted based on the effect of either kind of radiation alone. Plutonium lung burdens enhanced the effect of gamma radiation in rats within the first 30 days of exposure, and gamma radiation enhanced the long-term effect of plutonium lung burdens in both species. Rats were less sensitive to both kinds of radiation, whether administered alone or in combination. 71 refs., 105 figs., 48 tabs.

  14. Treatment of ovalbumin-induced experimental allergic bronchitis in rats by inhaled inhibitor of secretory phospholipase A2

    PubMed Central

    Shoseyov, D; Bibi, H; Offer, S; Schwob, O; Krimsky, M; Kleiman, M; Yedgar, S

    2005-01-01

    Background: The pathophysiology of asthma involves the action of inflammatory/allergic lipid mediators formed following membrane phospholipid hydrolysis by phospholipase A2 (PLA2). Cysteinyl leukotrienes are considered potent inducers of bronchoconstriction and airway remodelling. Ovalbumin (OVA) induced bronchoconstriction in rats is associated with increased secretory PLA2 (sPLA2) activation and cysteinyl leukotriene production, together with suppression of cytosolic PLA2 and prostaglandin E2. These processes are reversed when the animals are pretreated systemically with an extracellular cell impermeable sPLA2 inhibitor which also suppresses the early allergic reaction to OVA challenge. In this study we examine the capacity of the sPLA2 inhibitor to ameliorate inflammatory and allergic manifestations (early and late bronchoconstriction) of OVA induced allergic bronchitis in rats when the inhibitor was administered by inhalation to confine it to the airways. Methods: Rats sensitised with OVA were treated with the sPLA2 inhibitor hyaluronic acid-linked phosphatidyl ethanolamine (HyPE). The rats were divided into four groups (n = 10 per group): (1) naïve controls (no sensitisation/no treatment); (2) positive controls (sensitisation + challenge with OVA inhalation and subcutaneous injection of 1 ml saline before each challenge; (3) sensitisation + challenge with OVA and HyPE inhalation before every challenge; and (4) sensitisation + challenge with OVA and treatment with subcutaneous dexamethasone (300 µg) before each challenge as a conventional reference. Another group received no treatment with HyPE during the sensitisation process but only before or after challenge of already sensitised rats. Pulmonary function was assessed and changes in the histology of the airways, levels of cysteinyl leukotrienes in BAL fluid, and the production of nitric oxide (No) and tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) by BAL macrophages were determined. Results: Inhalation of HyPE markedly

  15. Acute Inhalation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gorguner, Metin; Akgun, Metin

    2010-01-01

    Inhaled substances may cause injury in pulmonary epithelium at various levels of respiratory tract, leading from simple symptoms to severe disease. Acute inhalation injury (AII) is not uncommon condition. There are certain high risk groups but AII may occur at various places including home or workplace. Environmental exposure is also possible. In addition to individual susceptibility, the characteristics of inhaled substances such as water solubility, size of substances and chemical properties may affect disease severity as well as its location. Although AII cases may recover in a few days but AII may cause long-term complications, even death. We aimed to discuss the effects of short-term exposures (minutes to hours) to toxic substances on the lungs. PMID:25610115

  16. Inhalation exposure methodology.

    PubMed Central

    Phalen, R F; Mannix, R C; Drew, R T

    1984-01-01

    Modern man is being confronted with an ever-increasing inventory of potentially toxic airborne substances. Exposures to these atmospheric contaminants occur in residential and commercial settings, as well as in the workplace. In order to study the toxicity of such materials, a special technology relating to inhalation exposure systems has evolved. The purpose of this paper is to provide a description of the techniques which are used in exposing laboratory subjects to airborne particles and gases. The various modes of inhalation exposure (whole body, head only, nose or mouth only, etc.) are described at length, including the advantages and disadvantages inherent to each mode. Numerous literature citations are included for further reading. Among the topics briefly discussed are the selection of appropriate animal species for toxicological testing, and the types of inhalation studies performed (acute, chronic, etc.). PMID:6383799

  17. MODELING DEPOSITION OF INHALED PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling Deposition of Inhaled Particles: ABSTRACT

    The mathematical modeling of the deposition and distribution of inhaled aerosols within human lungs is an invaluable tool in predicting both the health risks associated with inhaled environmental aerosols and the therapeut...

  18. Nitrite inhalants: history, epidemiology, and possible links to AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Haverkos, H W; Kopstein, A N; Wilson, H; Drotman, P

    1994-01-01

    Nitrite inhalants have been commonly abused substances in the United States. Nitrite inhalants and AIDS was a popular topic in the early 1980s, when the cause of AIDS was not known. With the discovery of HIV, concern about nitrite use in the USA waned. However, nitrite inhalant use is associated with behavioral relapse and HIV transmission among gay men, with decreased lymphocyte counts and natural killer cell activity in a few laboratory studies, and it remains a candidate cofactor in the pathogenesis of AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma. Discouraging nitrite use continues to be a worthwhile public health goal. PMID:9644194

  19. Inhalants. Specialized Information Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Do It Now Foundation, Phoenix, AZ.

    The document presents a collection of articles about inhalant abuse. Article 1 presents findings on the psychophysiological effects related to the use of amyl or butyl nitrate as a "recreational drug." Article 2 suggests a strong association between chronic sniffing of the solvent toulene and irreversible brain damage. Article 3 warns…

  20. Two-week inhalation toxicity of polymeric diphenylmethane-4, 4'-diisocyanate (PMDI) in rats: analysis of biochemical and morphological markers of early pulmonary response.

    PubMed

    Pauluhn, J; Emura, M; Mohr, U; Popp, A; Rosenbruch, M

    1999-12-01

    The pulmonary response of Wistar rats to respirable polymeric diphenylmethane-4,4'-diisocyanate (PMDI) aerosol was examined in a 2-wk repeated nose-only inhalation exposure study. Exposure concentrations were 1.1, 3.3, and 13.7 mg PMDI/m(3) (6 h/day, 15 exposures). The level of 13.7 mg/m(3) was actually a combination of an initial target concentration of 10 mg/m(3) in wk 1, which was raised to 16 mg/m(3) in wk 2, due to a lack of signs suggestive of pulmonary irritation. An acute sensory irritation study on rats served as basis for selection of these concentrations. Shortly after the 2-wk exposure period, rats were subjected to pulmonary function and arterial blood gas measurements. Lungs were examined by light and transmission electron microscopy, and labeling indices in terminal bronchioles were measured. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed to assess various indicators of pulmonary inflammation, including neutrophil and macrophage numbers, protein, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase (gamma-GT), alkaline phosphatase (APh), acid phosphatase (ACPh), and beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase (beta-NAG). Phosphatidylcholine in BAL fluid and BAL cells was determined as aggregated endpoint suggestive of changes in pulmonary surfactant. Rats exposed to 3.3 and 13.7 mg/m(3) experienced concentration-dependent signs of respiratory tract irritation. Determination of arterial blood gases, lung mechanics, and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity did not demonstrate specific effects. Analysis of BAL fluid and BAL cells revealed changes indicative of marked inflammatory response and/or cytotoxicity in rats exposed to 13.7 mg/m(3), and the changes were characterized by statistically significantly increased activities of LDH, beta-NAG, and protein. Phospholipid concentrations were increased in rats exposed to 1.1 mg/m(3) and above (elevated levels of lipid material in alveolar macrophages demonstrated by polychrome stain) and 3.3 mg/m(3) and above (increased

  1. [Ventricular fibrillation following deodorant spray inhalation].

    PubMed

    Girard, F; Le Tacon, S; Maria, M; Pierrard, O; Monin, P

    2008-01-01

    We report one case of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with ventricular fibrillation following butane poisoning after inhalation of antiperspiration aerosol. An early management using semi-automatic defibrillator explained the success of the resuscitation. The mechanism of butane toxicity could be an increased sensitivity of cardiac receptors to circulating catecholamines, responsible for cardiac arrest during exercise and for resuscitation difficulties. The indication of epinephrine is discussed.

  2. Food hypersensitivity by inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Daniel A; Bahna, Sami L

    2009-01-01

    Though not widely recognized, food hypersensitivity by inhalation can cause major morbidity in affected individuals. The exposure is usually more obvious and often substantial in occupational environments but frequently occurs in non-occupational settings, such as homes, schools, restaurants, grocery stores, and commercial flights. The exposure can be trivial, as in mere smelling or being in the vicinity of the food. The clinical manifestations can vary from a benign respiratory or cutaneous reaction to a systemic one that can be life-threatening. In addition to strict avoidance, such highly-sensitive subjects should carry self-injectable epinephrine and wear MedicAlert® identification. Asthma is a strong predisposing factor and should be well-controlled. It is of great significance that food inhalation can cause de novo sensitization. PMID:19232116

  3. Treatment of Inhalation Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-21

    injuries not visible with endoscopy. . Thermal and especially chemical inhalation injuries. Direct damage to the surfactant is probably implicated. o...exists a set of indirect alveolar lesions, subordinated to the skin burn itself, which is common in patients with extensive burns. This we call the...normo or hypocapnia. Very likely, a 5th lesional level exists which is the capillary itself(Venus et al). By primary or secondary damage , it affects the

  4. How to match the optimal currently available inhaler device to an individual child with asthma or recurrent wheeze

    PubMed Central

    van Aalderen, Wim M; Garcia-Marcos, Luis; Gappa, Monika; Lenney, Warren; Pedersen, Søren; Dekhuijzen, Richard; Price, David

    2015-01-01

    Inhaled medications are the cornerstone of treatment in early childhood wheezing and paediatric asthma. A match between patient and device and a correct inhalation technique are crucial for good asthma control. The aim of this paper is to propose an inhaler strategy that will facilitate an inhaler choice most likely to benefit different groups of children. The main focus will be on pressurised metered dose inhalers and dry powder inhalers. In this paper we will discuss (1) practical difficulties with the devices and with inhaled therapy and (2) the optimal location for deposition of medicines in the lungs, and (3) we will propose a practical and easy way to make the best match between the inhaler device and the individual patient. We hope that this paper will contribute to an increased likelihood of treatment success and improved adherence to therapy. PMID:25568979

  5. Inhalant abuse among adolescents: neurobiological considerations

    PubMed Central

    Lubman, D I; Yücel, M; Lawrence, A J

    2008-01-01

    Experimentation with volatile substances (inhalants) is common during early adolescence, yet limited work has been conducted examining the neurobiological impact of regular binge use during this key stage of development. Human studies consistently demonstrate that chronic use is associated with significant toxic effects, including neurological and neuropsychological impairment, as well as diffuse and subtle changes in white matter. However, most preclinical research has tended to focus on acute exposure, with limited work examining the neuropharmacological or toxicological mechanisms underpinning these changes or their potential reversibility with abstinence. Nevertheless, there is growing evidence that commonly abused inhalants share common cellular mechanisms, and have similar actions to other drugs of abuse. Indeed, the majority of acute behavioural effects appear to be underpinned by changes in receptor and/or ion channel activity (for example, GABAA, glycine and 5HT3 receptor activation, NMDA receptor inhibition), although nonspecific interactions can also arise at high concentrations. Recent studies examining the effects of toluene exposure during the early postnatal period are suggestive of long-term alterations in the function of NMDA and GABAA receptors, although limited work has been conducted investigating exposure during adolescence. Given the critical role of neurotransmitter systems in cognitive, emotional and brain development, future studies will need to take account of the substantial neuromaturational changes that are known to occur in the brain during childhood and adolescence, and to specifically investigate the neuropharmacological and toxicological profile of inhalant exposure during this period of development. PMID:18332858

  6. [Acute respiratory insufficiency in burn patients from smoke inhalation].

    PubMed

    Gartner, R; Griffe, O; Captier, G; Selloumi, D; Otman, S; Brabet, M; Baro, B

    2002-03-01

    Respiratory injuries by smoke inhalation are one of the most frequent reasons for acute respiratory failure in burn victims. They are most often of chemical origin and are responsible of a 20 to 70% increase of the mortality compared to the mortality of patients with similar burn injuries, but without inhalation lesions. They are often associated to a certain degree to other factors of acute respiratory failure: superior air way obstruction by oedema in face and neck burns, thoracic expansion hindrance due to thoracic burns, lung trauma lesions by blast injury. The generalized inflammatory reaction due to the extent of burns and an initial inadequate resuscitation are worsening factors. The inflammatory process may be responsible of lung injuries similar to those induced by smoke inhalation, even when there is no inhalation. The treatment remains symptomatic and based on the oxygen therapy, mechanical ventilation, prevention of infections and maintain of homeostasis by hydroelectrolytic adequate resuscitation. The nitric oxyde associated to the almitrin allows in a certain number of cases to minimize intra pulmonary shunting and to normalize the VA/O ratio. The development of treatments allowing to modulate inflammatory mediators may lead to news therapies in the future.

  7. Molecular steps in the immune signaling pathway evoked by plant elicitor peptides: Ca2+-dependent protein kinases, nitric oxide, and reactive oxygen species are downstream from the early Ca2+ signal.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yi; Zhao, Yichen; Walker, Robin K; Berkowitz, Gerald A

    2013-11-01

    Endogenous plant elicitor peptides (Peps) can act to facilitate immune signaling and pathogen defense responses. Binding of these peptides to the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plasma membrane-localized Pep receptors (PEPRs) leads to cytosolic Ca(2+) elevation, an early event in a signaling cascade that activates immune responses. This immune response includes the amplification of signaling evoked by direct perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns by plant cells under assault. Work included in this report further characterizes the Pep immune response and identifies new molecular steps in the signal transduction cascade. The PEPR coreceptor BRASSINOSTEROID-INSENSITIVE1 Associated Kinase1 contributes to generation of the Pep-activated Ca(2+) signal and leads to increased defense gene expression and resistance to a virulent bacterial pathogen. Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases (CPKs) decode the Ca(2+) signal, also facilitating defense gene expression and enhanced resistance to the pathogen. Nitric oxide and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase-dependent reactive oxygen species generation (due to the function of Respiratory Burst Oxidase Homolog proteins D and F) are also involved downstream from the Ca(2+) signal in the Pep immune defense signal transduction cascade, as is the case with BRASSINOSTEROID-INSENSITIVE1 Associated Kinase1 and CPK5, CPK6, and CPK11. These steps of the pathogen defense response are required for maximal Pep immune activation that limits growth of a virulent bacterial pathogen in the plant. We find a synergism between function of the PEPR and Flagellin Sensing2 receptors in terms of both nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species generation. Presented results are also consistent with the involvement of the secondary messenger cyclic GMP and a cyclic GMP-activated Ca(2+)-conducting channel in the Pep immune signaling pathway.

  8. Blood Gases as an Indicator of Inhalation Injury and Prognosis in Burn Patients

    PubMed Central

    Megahed, M.A.; Ghareeb, F.; Kishk, T.; El-Barah, A.; Abou-Gereda, H.; El-Fol, H.; El-Sisy, A.; Omran, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Inhalation injury greatly increases the incidence of respiratory failure and the acute respiratory distress syndrome. It is also the cause of most early deaths in burn victims. The aim of our research was to study the incidence, early diagnosis, complications, and management of inhalation injury and to discuss the relation between inhalation injury and death in burn patients.This study included 130 burn patients with inhalation injury admitted to Menoufiya University Hospital Burn Center, Egypt, from January 2004 to April 2008 (61 males and 69 females). We found that the presence of inhalation injury, increasing burn size, and advancing age were all associated with increased mortality (p < 0.01). The incidence of inhalation injury in our study was 46.3% (130 patients were identified as having inhalation injury out of 281). The overall mortality for patients with inhalation injury was 41.5% (54 patients out of 130) compared with 7.2% (11 patients out of 151) for patients without inhalation injury. These statistical data make it clear that inhalation injury is an important factor for the prediction of mortality in burn patients. Approximately 80% of fire-related deaths are due not to the burn injury to the airway but to the inhalation of toxic products, especially carbon monoxide and hydrogen cyanide gases. Inhalation injury is generally caused by thermal burns, mostly confined to the upper airways.Major airway, pulmonary, and systemic complications may occur in cases of inhalation injury and thus increase the incidence of burn patient mortality PMID:21991136

  9. Observational Evidence Against Mountain-Wave Generation of Ice Nuclei as a Prerequisite for the Formation of Three Solid Nitric Acid Polar Stratospheric Clouds Observed in the Arctic in Early December 1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagan, Kathy L.; Tabazadeh, Azadeh; Drdla, Katja; Hervig, Mark E.; Eckermann, Stephen D.; Browell, Edward V.; Legg, Marion J.; Foschi, Patricia G.

    2004-01-01

    A number of recently published papers suggest that mountain-wave activity in the stratosphere, producing ice particles when temperatures drop below the ice frost point, may be the primary source of large NAT particles. In this paper we use measurements from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instruments on board the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) polar-orbiting satellites to map out regions of ice clouds produced by stratospheric mountain-wave activity inside the Arctic vortex. Lidar observations from three DC-8 flights in early December 1999 show the presence of solid nitric acid (Type Ia or NAT) polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs). By using back trajectories and superimposing the position maps on the AVHRR cloud imagery products, we show that these observed NAT clouds could not have originated at locations of high-amplitude mountain-wave activity. We also show that mountain-wave PSC climatology data and Mountain Wave Forecast Model 2.0 (MWFM-2) raw hemispheric ray and grid box averaged hemispheric wave temperature amplitude hindcast data from the same time period are in agreement with the AVHRR data. Our results show that ice cloud formation in mountain waves cannot explain how at least three large scale NAT clouds were formed in the stratosphere in early December 1999.

  10. Effects of nitric acid on carbachol reactivity of the airways in normal and allergic sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, W.M.; Kim, C.S.; King, M.M.; Oliver, W. Jr.; Yerger, L.

    1982-01-01

    The airway effects of a 4-hr exposure (via a Plexiglas hood) to 1.6 ppm nitric acid vapor were evaluated in seven normal and seven allergic sheep, i.e., animals that have a history of reacting with bronchospasm to inhalation challenge with Ascaris suum antigen. The nitric acid vapor was generated by ultrasonic nebulization of a 2% nitric acid solution. Airway effects were assessed by measuring the change in specific pulmonary flow resistance before and after a standard inhalation challenge with 2.5% carbachol aerosol. Nitric acid exposure did not produce bronchoconstriction in either group. Pre-exposure increases in specific pulmonary flow resistance after carbachol inhalation were 68% (SD+/- 13%) and 82% (SD+/- 35%) for the normal and allergic sheep, respectively. Within 24 hr, the largest post-exposure increases in specific pulmonary flow resistance for the normal and allergic sheep were 108% (SD+/- 51%(P<.06)) and 175% (SD+/- 87% (p<.02)), respectively. We conclude that a short-term exposure to nitric acid vapor at levels below the industrial threshold limit (2 ppm), produces airway hyperreactivity to aerosolized carbachol in allergic sheep.

  11. An interesting case of characteristic methanol toxicity through inhalational exposure

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pratyush; Gogia, Atul; Kakar, Atul; Miglani, Pratyush

    2015-01-01

    Methanol poisoning is rare but carries high risk of morbidity and mortality. Most of the cases witnessed in emergency are due to consumption of adulterated alcohol. Here we are reporting a very rare case of methanol poisoning through inhalational exposure leading to putamen necrosis and decreased visual acuity. He had dyselectrolytemia and metabolic acidosis which was successfully managed with early intervention. Its importance lies in the fact that inhalational methanol poisoning is an entity which if picked up early can prevent long-term neurological sequelae. PMID:26285665

  12. How to Use Metered-Dose Inhalers

    MedlinePlus

    ... inhaler the right way so that the full dose of medication reaches your lungs. You can use ... inhaler.These directions explain how to use metered-dose inhalers. If you are using a different type ...

  13. Rethinking the paradigm for the development of inhaled drugs.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, John N

    2015-12-30

    Nebulized treatment is an important delivery option for the young, elderly, and those with severe chronic respiratory disease, but there is a lack of new nebulized drug products being produced for these patients, leading to the potential for under-treatment. This communication describes a new drug development paradigm as a timely solution to this issue. Often, drug development is initiated with nebulizers in the early stages, to provide cheaper and faster drug development, and then switched to inhaler devices in later clinical trials to address the majority of patients. However, the waste of resource on parallel development of the inhaler can be large due to the high early attrition rate of new drug development. The new paradigm uses the nebulizer to continue drug development through to market, and initiates inhaler development after completion of the riskier early phase studies. New drug safety and efficacy can be assessed faster and more efficiently by using a nebulized formulation rather than developing an inhaler. The results of calculations of expected net present value showed that the new paradigm produced higher expected net present values than the conventional model over a range of economic scenarios. This new paradigm could therefore provide improved returns on investments, as well as more modern drugs in nebulized form for those patients unable to use inhalers.

  14. Inhalation exposure of animals.

    PubMed Central

    Phalen, R F

    1976-01-01

    Relative advantages and disadvantages and important design criteria for various exposure methods are presented. Five types of exposures are discussed: whole-body chambers, head-only exposures, nose or mouth-only methods, lung-only exposures, and partial-lung exposures. Design considerations covered include: air cleaning and conditioning; construction materials; losses of exposure materials; evenness of exposure; sampling biases; animal observation and care; noise and vibration control, safe exhausts, chamber loading, reliability, pressure fluctuations; neck seals, masks, animal restraint methods; and animal comfort. Ethical considerations in use of animals in inhalation experiments are also discussed. PMID:1017420

  15. Inhaled insulin--does it become reality?

    PubMed

    Siekmeier, R; Scheuch, G

    2008-12-01

    After more than 80 years of history the American and European Drug Agencies (FDA and EMEA) approved the first pulmonary delivered version of insulin (Exubera) from Pfizer/Nektar early 2006. However, in October 2007, Pfizer announced it would be taking Exubera off the market, citing that the drug had failed to gain market acceptance. Since 1924 various attempts have been made to get away from injectable insulin. Three alternative delivery methods where always discussed: Delivery to the upper nasal airways or the deep lungs, and through the stomach. From these, the delivery through the deep lungs is the most promising, because the physiological barriers for the uptake are the smallest, the inspired aerosol is deposited on a large area and the absorption into the blood happens through the extremely thin alveolar membrane. However, there is concern about the long-term effects of inhaling a growth protein into the lungs. It was assumed that the large surface area over which the insulin is spread out would minimize negative effects. But recent news indicates that, at least in smokers, the bronchial tumour rate under inhaled insulin seems to be increased. These findings, despite the fact that they are not yet statistical significant and in no case found in a non-smoker, give additional arguments to stop marketing this approach. Several companies worked on providing inhalable insulin and the insulin powder inhalation system Exubera was the most advanced technology. Treatment has been approved for adults only and patients with pulmonary diseases (e.g., asthma, emphysema, COPD) and smokers (current smokers and individuals who recently quitted smoking) were excluded from this therapy. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of Exubera are similar to those found with short-acting subcutaneous human insulin or insulin analogs. It is thus possible to use Exubera as a substitute for short-acting human insulin or insulin analogs. Typical side effects of inhaled insulin were coughing

  16. Inhalation delivery of protein therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Kane, Colleen; O'Neil, Karyn; Conk, Michelle; Picha, Kristen

    2013-04-01

    Inhaled therapeutics are used routinely to treat a variety of pulmonary diseases including asthma, COPD and cystic fibrosis. In addition, biological therapies represent the fastest growing segment of approved pharmaceuticals. However, despite the increased availability of biological therapies, nearly all inhaled therapeutics are small molecule drugs with only a single inhaled protein therapeutic approved. There remains a significant unmet need for therapeutics in pulmonary diseases, and biological therapies with potential to alter disease progression represent a significant opportunity to treat these challenging diseases. This review provides a background into efforts to develop inhaled biological therapies and highlights some of the associated challenges. In addition, we speculate on the ideal properties of a biologic therapy for inhaled delivery.

  17. Deposition and clearance of inhaled particles.

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, B O

    1984-01-01

    Theoretical models of respiratory tract deposition of inhaled particles are compared to experimental studies of deposition patterns in humans and animals, as governed principally by particle size, density, respiratory rate and flow parameters. Various models of inhaled particle deposition make use of approximations of the respiratory tract to predict fractional deposition caused by fundamental physical processes of particle impaction, sedimentation, and diffusion. These models for both total deposition and regional (nasopharyngeal, tracheobronchial, and pulmonary) deposition are compared with early and recent experimental studies. Reasonable correlation has been obtained between theoretical and experimental studies, but the behavior in the respiratory tract of very fine (less than 0.1 micron) particles requires further investigation. Properties of particle shape, charge and hygroscopicity as well as the degree of respiratory tract pathology also influence deposition patterns; definitive experimental work is needed in these areas. The influence upon deposition patterns of dynamic alterations in inspiratory flow profiles caused by a variety of breathing patterns also requires further study, and the use of differing ventilation techniques with selected inhaled particle sizes holds promise in diagnosis of respiratory tract diseases. Mechanisms of conducting airway and alveolar clearance processes involving the pulmonary macrophage, mucociliary clearance, dissolution, transport to systemic circulation, and translocation via regional lymphatic vessels are discussed. PMID:6376108

  18. Smoke Inhalation Lung Injury: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Demling, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study is to present a multifaceted, definitive review of the past and current status of smoke inhalation injury. History along with current understanding of anatomical, physiology, and biologic components will be discussed. Methods: The literature has been reviewed from the early onset of the concept of smoke inhalation in the 1920s to our current understanding as of 2007. Results: The results indicate that the current pathophysiologic concept is of a disease process that leads to immediate and delayed pulmonary injury best managed by aggressive physiologic support. Management approaches for the biochemical changes have not kept up with current knowledge. The lung injury process is activated by toxins in the smoke's gas and particle components and perpetuated by a resulting lung inflammation. This inflammatory process becomes self-perpetuating through the activation of a large number of inflammatory cascades. In addition, smoke injury leads to significant systemic abnormalities injuring other organs and accentuating the burn injury process and subsequently leading to mediator-induced cellular injury leading potentially to multisystem organ failure. Conclusions: Smoke inhalation injury results in the anatomic finding of denuded and sometimes sloughed airways mucosa. Physiologic findings include small airways containing fibrin casts of mucosa and neutrophils. Airway hyper-reactivity results as well, leading to further decreased collapse, causing obstruction. PMID:18552974

  19. Exubera. Inhale therapeutic systems.

    PubMed

    Bindra, Sanjit; Cefalu, William T

    2002-05-01

    Inhale, in colaboration with Pfizer and Aventis Pharma (formerly Hoechst Marion Roussel; HMR), is developing an insulin formulation utilizing its pulmonary delivery technology for macromolecules for the potential treatment of type I and II diabetes. By July 2001, the phase III program had been completed and the companies had begun to assemble data for MAA and NDA filings; however, it was already clear at this time that additional data might be required for filing. By December 2001, it had been decided that the NDA should include an increased level of controlled, long-term pulmonary safety data in diabetic patients and a major study was planned to be completed in 2002, with the NDA filed thereafter (during 2002). US-05997848 was issued to Inhale Therapeutic Systems in December 1999, and corresponds to WO-09524183, filed in February 1995. Equivalent applications have appeared to date in Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Czech Republic, Europe, Finland, Hungary, Japan, Norway, New Zealand, Poland and South Africa. This family of applications is specific to pulmonary delivery of insulin. In February 1999, Lehman Brothers gave this inhaled insulin a 60% probability of reaching market, with a possible launch date of 2001. The analysts estimated peak sales at $3 billion in 2011. In May 2000, Aventis predicted that estimated peak sales would be in excess of $1 billion. In February 2000, Merrill Lynch expected product launch in 2002 and predicted that it would be a multibillion-dollar product. Analysts Merril Lynch predicted, in September and November 2000, that the product would be launched by 2002, with sales in that year of e75 million, rising to euro 500 million in 2004. In April 2001, Merrill Lynch predicted that filing for this drug would occur in 2001. Following the report of the potential delay in regulatory filing, issued in July 2001, Deutsche Banc Alex Brown predicted a filing would take place in the fourth quarter of 2002 and launch would take place in the first

  20. Inhaled matters of the heart

    PubMed Central

    Zaky, Ahmed; Ahmad, Aftab; Dell’Italia, Louis J; Jahromi, Leila; Reisenberg, Lee Ann; Matalon, Sadis; Ahmad, Shama

    2015-01-01

    Inhalations of atmospheric pollutants, especially particulate matters, are known to cause severe cardiac effects and to exacerbate preexisting heart disease. Heart failure is an important sequellae of gaseous inhalation such as that of carbon monoxide. Similarly, other gases such as sulphur dioxide are known to cause detrimental cardiovascular events. However, mechanisms of these cardiac toxicities are so far unknown. Increased susceptibility of the heart to oxidative stress may play a role. Low levels of antioxidants in the heart as compared to other organs and high levels of reactive oxygen species produced due to the high energetic demand and metabolic rate in cardiac muscle are important in rendering this susceptibility. Acute inhalation of high concentrations of halogen gases is often fatal. Severe respiratory injury and distress occurs upon inhalation of halogens gases, such as chlorine and bromine; however, studies on their cardiac effects are scant. We have demonstrated that inhalation of high concentrations of halogen gases cause significant cardiac injury, dysfunction, and failure that can be critical in causing mortalities following exposures. Our studies also demonstrated that cardiac dysfunction occurs as a result of a direct insult independent of coexisting hypoxia, since it is not fully reversed by oxygen supplementation. Therefore, studies on offsite organ effects of inhaled toxic gases can impact development of treatment strategies upon accidental or deliberate exposures to these agents. Here we summarize the knowledge of cardiovascular effects of common inhaled toxic gases with the intent to highlight the importance of consideration of cardiac symptoms while treating the victims. PMID:26665179

  1. Infant with Altered Consciousness after Cannabis Passive Inhalation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarfin, Yehoshua; Yefet, Enav; Abozaid, Said; Nasser, Wael; Mor, Tamer; Finkelstein, Yoram

    2012-01-01

    We report on an infant who was admitted to hospital with severe neurological symptoms following passive inhalation of cannabis. To date, cannabis abuse has been described almost entirely in adolescents and adults. In early childhood, however, cannabis effects were almost exclusively discussed in the context of maternal prenatal exposure, and the…

  2. Beneficial effects of nitric oxide breathing in adult patients with sickle cell crisis.

    PubMed

    Head, C Alvin; Swerdlow, Paul; McDade, William A; Joshi, Ratan Mani; Ikuta, Tohru; Cooper, Melanie L; Eckman, James R

    2010-10-01

    Pain from vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) is the major cause of hospitalization in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). The beneficial therapeutic effects of inhaled nitric oxide (NO) on the pathophysiology of SCD have been reported. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted to determine whether NO breathing reduces acute VOC pain in adult patients and to study the safety of inhaled NO. Twenty-three patients experiencing acute VOC were enrolled. After randomization but before treatment, five were found to not meet final eligibility criteria. Nine patients were assigned to inhaled NO (80 ppm) and nine to placebo (21% O2). Primary outcome was the mean change in pain scores after 4 hr of inhalation, measured on a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS). Both groups had similar baseline VAS pain scores but inhaled NO significantly reduced pain scores compared with placebo (P 5 0.02) at the end of NO inhalation. Secondary outcome was parenteral morphine use at baseline, 4, and 6 hr. Parenteral morphine use was lower in the inhaled NO group, but the difference was not statistically significant.Safety assessments included systolic blood pressure measurements,pulse oximetry readings, concentration of delivered nitrogen dioxide, and concentration of methemoglobin (metHb). None of these NO toxicities was observed.

  3. Pharmacologic strategies in neonatal pulmonary hypertension other than nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Lakshminrusimha, Satyan; Mathew, Bobby; Leach, Corinne L

    2016-04-01

    Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) is approved for use in persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN) but does not lead to sustained improvement in oxygenation in one-third of patients with PPHN. Inhaled NO is less effective in the management of PPHN secondary to congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), extreme prematurity, and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Intravenous pulmonary vasodilators such as prostacyclin, alprostadil, sildenafil, and milrinone have been successfully used in PPHN resistant to iNO. Oral pulmonary vasodilators such as endothelin receptor antagonist bosentan and phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors such as sildenafil and tadalafil are used both during acute and chronic phases of PPHN. In the absence of infection, glucocorticoids may also be effective in PPHN. Many of these pharmacologic agents are not approved for use in PPHN and our knowledge is based on case reports and small trials. Large multicenter randomized controlled trials with long-term follow-up are required to evaluate alternate pharmacologic strategies in PPHN.

  4. Umeclidinium and Vilanterol Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest tightness caused by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; a group of diseases that affect the lungs ... use umeclidinium and vilanterol inhalation during a sudden COPD attack. Your doctor will prescribe a short-acting ( ...

  5. Fluticasone and Vilanterol Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... and chest tightness caused by chronic obstructive pulmonary (COPD; a group of diseases that affect the lungs ... use fluticasone and vilanterol inhalation during a sudden COPD attack. Your doctor will prescribe a short acting ( ...

  6. Fluticasone and Salmeterol Oral Inhalation

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; a group of lung diseases that includes chronic ... and salmeterol during an attack of asthma or COPD. Your doctor will prescribe a short-acting inhaler ...

  7. Potent Inhalational Anesthetics for Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Satuito, Mary; Tom, James

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide and the volatile inhalational anesthetics have defined anxiety and pain control in both dentistry and medicine for over a century. From curious experimentation to spectacular public demonstrations, the initial work of 2 dentists, Horace Wells and William T. G. Morton, persists to this day in modern surgery and anesthesia. This article reviews the history, similarities, differences, and clinical applications of the most popular inhalational agents used in contemporary dental surgical settings. PMID:26866411

  8. A mathematical model for predicting the probability of acute mortality in a human population exposed to accidentally released airborne radionuclides. Final report for Phase I of the project: early effects of inhaled radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Filipy, R.E.; Borst, F.J.; Cross, F.T.; Park, J.F.; Moss, O.R.

    1980-06-01

    The report presents a mathematical model for the purpose of predicting the fraction of human population which would die within 1 year of an accidental exposure to airborne radionuclides. The model is based on data from laboratory experiments with rats, dogs and baboons, and from human epidemiological data. Doses from external, whole-body irradiation and from inhaled, alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides are calculated for several organs. The probabilities of death from radiation pneumonitis and from bone marrow irradiation are predicted from doses accumulated within 30 days of exposure to the radioactive aerosol. The model is compared with existing similar models under hypothetical exposure conditions. Suggestions for further experiments with inhaled radionuclides are included.

  9. Nitric oxide-sensitive pulmonary hypertension in congenital rubella syndrome.

    PubMed

    Raimondi, Francesco; Migliaro, Fiorella; Di Pietro, Elisa; Borgia, Francesco; Rapacciuolo, Antonio; Capasso, Letizia

    2015-01-01

    Persistent pulmonary hypertension is a very rare presentation of congenital virus infection. We discuss the case of complete congenital rubella syndrome presenting at echocardiography with pulmonary hypertension that worsened after ductus ligation. Cardiac catheterization showed a normal pulmonary valve and vascular tree but a PAP = 40 mmHg. The infant promptly responded to inhaled nitric oxide while on mechanical ventilation and was later shifted to oral sildenafil. It is not clear whether our observation may be due to direct viral damage to the endothelium or to the rubella virus increasing the vascular tone via a metabolic derangement.

  10. Inhaled chemotherapy in lung cancer: future concept of nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Zarogoulidis, Paul; Chatzaki, Ekaterini; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Domvri, Kalliopi; Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Goldberg, Eugene P; Karamanos, Nikos; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    Regional chemotherapy was first used for lung cancer 30 years ago. Since then, new methods of drug delivery and pharmaceuticals have been investigated in vitro, and in animals and humans. An extensive review of drug delivery systems, pharmaceuticals, patient monitoring, methods of enhancing inhaled drug deposition, safety and efficacy, and also additional applications of inhaled chemotherapy and its advantages and disadvantages are presented. Regional chemotherapy to the lung parenchyma for lung cancer is feasible and efficient. Safety depends on the chemotherapy agent delivered to the lungs and is dose-dependent and time-dependent. Further evaluation is needed to provide data regarding early lung cancer stages, and whether regional chemotherapy can be used as neoadjuvant or adjuvant treatment. Finally, inhaled chemotherapy could one day be administered at home with fewer systemic adverse effects. PMID:22619512

  11. Inhaled chemotherapy in lung cancer: future concept of nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Zarogoulidis, Paul; Chatzaki, Ekaterini; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Domvri, Kalliopi; Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Goldberg, Eugene P; Karamanos, Nikos; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    Regional chemotherapy was first used for lung cancer 30 years ago. Since then, new methods of drug delivery and pharmaceuticals have been investigated in vitro, and in animals and humans. An extensive review of drug delivery systems, pharmaceuticals, patient monitoring, methods of enhancing inhaled drug deposition, safety and efficacy, and also additional applications of inhaled chemotherapy and its advantages and disadvantages are presented. Regional chemotherapy to the lung parenchyma for lung cancer is feasible and efficient. Safety depends on the chemotherapy agent delivered to the lungs and is dose-dependent and time-dependent. Further evaluation is needed to provide data regarding early lung cancer stages, and whether regional chemotherapy can be used as neoadjuvant or adjuvant treatment. Finally, inhaled chemotherapy could one day be administered at home with fewer systemic adverse effects.

  12. Inhaler Technique in Asthma: How Does It Relate to Patients' Preferences and Attitudes Toward Their Inhalers?

    PubMed Central

    Jahedi, Lia; Downie, Sue R.; Saini, Bandana; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Correct inhaler technique can increase medication efficacy, reducing both dose and side effects. Patient preference for inhaler device has not been fully explored, and we hypothesized that if patients have a preference and can choose their inhaler, they might be more likely to use it correctly. Our aim was to determine the preferences, attitudes, and perceptions of patients with asthma toward their inhalers, and to evaluate whether any of these factors were related to inhalation technique. Methods: Twenty-five patients with asthma (mean age 43.1 years) participated. Qualitative semi-structured interviews and quantitative patient satisfaction and preference questionnaires (PASAPQ) were used to explore patients' preferences, attitudes, and perceptions about their inhalers. Objective inhalation technique assessment was performed. Data were triangulated to identify characteristics that could indicate a relationship between inhaler technique, satisfaction, preference, and decision making. Results: Themes from qualitative interviews were as follows: asthma inhalers and expectations; inhaler preference; characteristics of an ideal inhaler; perceived effectiveness of inhalers; and inhalers and patient decision making. PASAPQ scores indicated that all patients were at least “somewhat satisfied” with their inhalers, regardless of technique. Only 12% of inhalers were used correctly, despite pilot PASAPQ data suggesting that most patients were confident with their technique. The inhaler technique was unlikely to be related to satisfaction, perception of inhaler devices, or choice in device selection. Patients with correct inhaler technique were more aware of their asthma and expressed motivation to achieve optimal asthma control. Conclusions: The majority of the asthmatic patients did not use their inhaler(s) correctly, despite most having confidence in their technique. Patients attributed confidence in their inhaler technique to their belief that

  13. [New inhalation anesthetics].

    PubMed

    Conzen, P; Nuscheler, M

    1996-08-01

    Recently, two new halogenated volatile anaesthetics, sevoflurane and desflurane, have been approved for clinical use in Germany. Their low solubility in blood is the most important common property, and this represents the most obvious difference from the inhalational anaesthetics currently used. Extensive clinical and experimental evaluations have confirmed the superior pharmacokinetic properties predicted. Both sevoflurane and desflurane provide more rapid emergence from anaesthesia, permit easier titration of the anaesthetic dose during maintenance and offer more rapid recovery from anaesthesia. For sevoflurane, there are additional advantages: a pleasant odor, negligible airway irritation, and excellent pharmacodynamic characteristics that even provide cardiovascular stability comparable to isoflurane. A certain disadvantage and source of potential nephrotoxicity result from the metabolism of sevoflurane (2-5%) to anorganic fluoride and degradation to compound A in carbon dioxide absorbents. The extensive clinical data reported to date have revealed no evidence that sevoflurane has adverse renal effects. New insight into the pathomechanism of nephrotoxicity associated with either production of fluoride or compound A may well support clinical experience. Desflurane strongly resists in vivo metabolism and because of this it appears to be devoid of toxicity. Nevertheless, potential side-effects may result from degradation in dry absorbents and subsequent release of CO, from its extreme pungency and irritating airway effects. Thus, desflurane is not recommended for induction of anaesthesia, especially in children. The tendency for desflurane transiently to stimulate sympathetic activity, especially at concentrations above 1.0 MAC, limits its application in patients with cardiac disease.

  14. Evaluation of serum concentrations of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-2, IL-10, and nitric oxide (NO) during the estrous cycle, early pregnancy and abortion in goats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Youwang; Lv, Wenting; Jia, Jingliang; Wang, Jiantao; Yang, Jianhui

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the serum concentrations, ranges, and trends of Th1 type cytokine (tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-2), Th2 type cytokine (IL-10), and nitric oxide (NO) during the estrous cycle, early pregnancy and abortion in goats. Boer goats (n=25) having symptoms of normal estrous cycles were selected, 20 were mated and 15 conceived a pregnancy, and the remaining five were not mated and served as estrous controls. On the Day 60 of pregnancy, all 15 pregnant goats were induced to abort the pregnancy by intramuscular injection of prostaglandin (PG). Serum samples were collected on Days 1, 7, 14, and 19 of the estrous cycle, at Days 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 of pregnancy, and at Days 1, 3, 8, 10 over the period when abortion were occurring. Results of the present study indicated that during the estrous cycle the balance between Th1 and Th2 cytokines slightly shifted toward Th1 cytokine production (TNF-α and IL-2). The NO may have a direct positive role in inducing a Th1 response. During early pregnancy, TNF-α and IL-2 serum concentrations markedly increased from Days 0 to 10, and gradually decreased from Days 10 to 60, while IL-10 and NO serum concentrations remained elevated from Days 0 to 60. The increased concentrations of IL-10 and decreased concentrations of TNF-α and IL-2 are characteristic of a Th2-enhanced response, which may be related to increased concentrations of NO. These changes may be essential to maintain a normal pregnancy. In addition, the serum concentrations of TNF-α, IL-2 and NO at Days 1, 3, 8 and 10 of the period of induced abortion were markedly greater than that on Day 60 of pregnancy. Conversely, IL-10 concentrations at these four time points of abortion were markedly less than that on Day 60 of pregnancy. After abortion, the Th2 response shifted to a Th1-enhanced response. Thus, NO concentrations increase and the Th1-enhanced response may function synergistically to be involved in

  15. Pneumoconiosis after sericite inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Algranti, E; Handar, A; Dumortier, P; Mendonca, E; Rodrigues, G; Santos, A; Mauad, T; Dolhnikoff, M; De Vuyst, P; Saldiva, P; Bussacos, M

    2005-01-01

    Aims: To investigate and describe the radiological, clinical, and pathological changes in miners and millers exposed to sericite dust with mineralogical characteristics of inhaled dust. Methods: The working premises were visited to examine the sericite processing and to classify the jobs according to make qualitative evaluation. Respirable dust was collected and the amount of crystalline silica and particle size distribution were measured. Forty four workers were examined by a standard questionnaire for respiratory symptoms, spirometry, and chest x ray. Material from an open lung biopsy was reviewed for histopathological and mineralogical analysis, together with sericite samples from the work site to compare the mineral characteristics in lung lesions and work area. Results: Respirable dust contained 4.5–10.0% crystalline silica. Particle size distribution showed a heavy burden of very fine particles (23–55%) with a mean diameter of <0.5 µm. Mean age of sericite miners was 41.0 (11.9) and mean number of years of exposure was 13.5 (10.1). In 52.3% of workers (23/44), chest radiographs presented a median category of 1/0 or above, and 18.2% (8/44) had a reduced FEV1. There was a significant association between exposure indices and x ray category. Histological studies of the lung biopsy showed lesions compatible with mixed dust fibrosis with no silicotic nodules. x Ray diffraction analysis of the lung dust residue and the bulk samples collected from work area showed similar mineralogical characteristics. Muscovite and kaolinite were the major mineral particle inclusions in the lung. Conclusion: Exposure to fine sericite particles is associated with the development of functional and radiological changes in workers inducing mixed dust lesions, which are distinct histologically from silicosis. PMID:15723874

  16. Reduced upper airway nitric oxide in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Balfour-Lynn, I M; Laverty, A; Dinwiddie, R

    1996-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced within the respiratory tract is detectable in exhaled and nasal air. Its synthesis may be induced by inflammatory cytokines and reduced by glucocorticoids. Increased concentrations have been found in asthma and bronchiectasis. In this study, NO concentrations were determined in 63 children with cystic fibrosis, of whom 13 were on inhaled steroids (mean age 13.3 years) and 50 were not (mean age 12.3 years); 57 normal children (mean age 12.2 years) were also studied. NO was measured by chemiluminescence analyser, exhaled NO following a relaxed vital capacity manoeuvre, and nasal NO with the breath held following a full inspiration. Mean concentration of exhaled NO in cystic fibrosis patients (no steroids) was 4.7 parts per billion (ppb) (95% confidence interval (CI) 4.0 to 5.3); this did not differ from values in normal children (mean 4.8 ppb, 95% CI 3.8 to 5.8) or in cystic fibrosis patients on inhaled steroids (mean 3.6 ppb, 95% CI 2.5 to 4.8). Nasal concentrations were significantly lower in cystic fibrosis patients, with or without inhaled steroids, than in normal children (cystic fibrosis, no inhaled steroids: 460 ppb, 95% CI 399 to 520; cystic fibrosis, inhaled steroids: 522 ppb, 95% CI 313 to 730, v normal children: 1024 ppb, 95% CI 896 to 1152, p < 0.0001). Considering the inflammatory nature of cystic fibrosis, it is surprising exhaled NO levels were not increased, but this may have been due to alteration in NO diffusion through thick mucus. The low nasal NO concentrations, which are probably the result of impaired flow from the paranasal sinuses, may contribute to the recurrent respiratory infections typical of cystic fibrosis. PMID:8984918

  17. Air contamination with nitric oxide: effect on exhaled nitric oxide response.

    PubMed

    Therminarias, A; Flore, P; Favre-Juvin, A; Oddou, M F; Delaire, M; Grimbert, F

    1998-03-01

    This study examines the response of exhaled nitric oxide (NO) concentration (ECNO) and quantity of exhaled NO over time (EVNO) in 10 healthy subjects breathing into five polyethylene bags, one in which synthetic air was free of NO and four in which NO was diluted to concentrations of 20 +/- 0.6, 49 +/- 0.8, 98 +/- 2, and 148 +/- 2 ppb, respectively. Each subject was connected to each bag for 10 min at random. Minute ventilation and ECNO were measured continuously, and EVNO was calculated continuously. ECNO and EVNO values were significantly higher for an inhaled NO concentration of 20 ppb than for NO-free air. Above 20 ppb, ECNO and EVNO increased linearly with inhaled NO concentration. It is reasonable to assume that a share of the quantity of inspired NO over time (InspVNO) because of air contamination by pollution is rejected by the ventilatory pathway. Insofar as InspVNO does not affect endogenous production or the metabolic fate of NO in the airway, this share may be estimated as being approximately one third of InspVNO, the remainder being taken by the endogenous pathway. Thus, air contamination by the NO resulting from pollution greatly increases the NO response in exhaled air.

  18. Acute Lung Injury Following Smoke Inhalation: Predictive Value of Sputum Biomarkers and Time Course of Lung Inflammation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome ( ARDS ). Criteria for diagnosing ALI and predicting...Rationale: Smoke inhalation victims are at high risk of developing acute respiratory distress syndrome ( ARDS ). Given the delay of 12 or more hours...Background: Although smoke inhalation injury victims frequently develop acute respiratory distress syndrome ( ARDS ), no early prognostic

  19. Aloe vera affects changes induced in pulmonary tissue of mice caused by cigarette smoke inhalation.

    PubMed

    Koul, Ashwani; Bala, Shashi; Yasmeen; Arora, Neha

    2015-09-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the influence of Aloe vera (AV) on changes induced in pulmonary tissue of cigarette smoke (CS) inhaling mice. CS inhalation for 4 weeks caused pulmonary damage as evident by histoarchitectural alterations and enhanced serum and tissue lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities. CS inhalation also led to increased mucin production as revealed by mucicarmine and Alcian Blue-Periodic Acid Schiff (AB-PAS) staining. Studies on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (balf) of CS exposed animals revealed structural changes in phospholipids and increase in surface tension when compared with control counterparts. These changes were accompanied by enhanced nitric oxide (NO) levels, citrulline levels, peroxidative damage, and differential modulation of antioxidant defense system. AV administration (seven weeks, 500 mg/kg b.w. daily) to CS inhaling mice led to modulation of CS induced pulmonary changes as revealed by lesser degree of histoarchitectural alterations, lesser mucin production, decreased NO levels, citrulline levels, peroxidative damage, and serum LDH activity. AV treatment to CS inhaling mice was associated with varying response to antioxidant defense system, however balf of CS + AV treated animals did not exhibit appreciable changes when compared with that of CS exposed animals. These observations suggest that AV has the potential to modulate CS induced changes in the pulmonary tissue which could have implications in management of CS associated pulmonary diseases, however, further investigations are required to explore its complete mechanism of action.

  20. Beneficial effects of nitric oxide on outcomes after cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation in hypothermia-treated mice

    PubMed Central

    Kida, Kotaro; Shirozu, Kazuhiro; Yu, Binglan; Mandeville, Joseph B.; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Ichinose, Fumito

    2015-01-01

    Background Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) improves neurological outcomes after cardiac arrest (CA) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Although nitric oxide prevents organ injury induced by ischemia and reperfusion, role of nitric oxide during TH after CPR remains unclear. Here, we examined the impact of endogenous nitric oxide synthesis on the beneficial effects of hypothermia after CA/CPR. We also examined whether or not inhaled nitric oxide during hypothermia further improves outcomes after CA/CPR in mice treated with TH. Methods Wild-type (WT) mice and mice deficient for nitric oxide synthase 3 (NOS3−/−) were subjected to CA at 37°C and then resuscitated with chest compression. Body temperature was maintained at 37°C (normothermia) or reduced to 33°C (TH) for 24 hours after resuscitation. Mice breathed air or air mixed with nitric oxide at 10, 20, 40, 60, or 80 ppm during hypothermia. To evaluate brain injury and cerebral blood flow, magnetic resonance imaging was performed in WT mice after CA/CPR. Results Hypothermia up-regulated the NOS3-dependent signaling in the brain (n=6–7). Deficiency of NOS3 abolished the beneficial effects of hypothermia after CA/CPR (n=5–6). Breathing nitric oxide at 40 ppm improved survival rate in hypothermia-treated NOS3−/− mice (n=6) after CA/CPR compared to NOS3−/− mice that were treated with hypothermia alone (n=6, P<0.05). Breathing nitric oxide at 40 (n=9) or 60 (n=9) ppm markedly improved survival rates in TH-treated WT mice (n=51) (both P<0.05 vs TH-treated WT mice). Inhaled nitric oxide during TH (n=7) prevented brain injury compared to TH alone (n=7) without affecting cerebral blood flow after CA/CPR (n=6). Conclusions NOS3 is required for the beneficial effects of TH. Inhaled nitric oxide during TH remains beneficial and further improves outcomes after CA/CPR. Nitric oxide breathing exerts protective effects after CA/CPR even when TH is ineffective due to impaired endogenous nitric oxide production

  1. Comparison of Physician-, Biomarker-, and Symptom-Based Strategies for Adjustment of Inhaled Corticosteroid Therapy in Adults With Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Calhoun, William J.; Ameredes, Bill T.; King, Tonya S.; Icitovic, Nikolina; Bleecker, Eugene R.; Castro, Mario; Cherniack, Reuben M.; Chinchilli, Vernon M.; Craig, Timothy; Denlinger, Loren; DiMango, Emily A.; Engle, Linda L.; Fahy, John V.; Grant, J. Andrew; Israel, Elliot; Jarjour, Nizar; Kazani, Shamsah D.; Kraft, Monica; Kunselman, Susan J.; Lazarus, Stephen C.; Lemanske, Robert F.; Lugogo, Njira; Martin, Richard J.; Meyers, Deborah A.; Moore, Wendy C.; Pascual, Rodolfo; Peters, Stephen P.; Ramsdell, Joe; Sorkness, Christine A.; Sutherland, E. Rand; Szefler, Stanley J.; Wasserman, Stephen I.; Walter, Michael J.; Wechsler, Michael E.; Boushey, Homer A.

    2013-01-01

    Context No consensus exists for adjusting inhaled corticosteroid therapy in patients with asthma. Approaches include adjustment at outpatient visits guided by physician assessment of asthma control (symptoms, rescue therapy, pulmonary function), based on exhaled nitric oxide, or on a day-to-day basis guided by symptoms. Objective To determine if adjustment of inhaled corticosteroid therapy based on exhaled nitric oxide or day-to-day symptoms is superior to guideline-informed, physician assessment–based adjustment in preventing treatment failure in adults with mild to moderate asthma. Design, Setting, and Participants A randomized, parallel, 3-group, placebo-controlled, multiply-blinded trial of 342 adults with mild to moderate asthma controlled by low-dose inhaled corticosteroid therapy (n=114 assigned to physician assessment–based adjustment [101 completed], n=115 to biomarker-based [exhaled nitric oxide] adjustment [92 completed], and n=113 to symptom-based adjustment [97 completed]), the Best Adjustment Strategy for Asthma in the Long Term (BASALT) trial was conducted by the Asthma Clinical Research Network at 10 academic medical centers in the United States for 9 months between June 2007 and July 2010. Interventions For physician assessment–based adjustment and biomarker-based (exhaled nitric oxide) adjustment, the dose of inhaled corticosteroids was adjusted every 6 weeks; for symptom-based adjustment, inhaled corticosteroids were taken with each albuterol rescue use. Main Outcome Measure The primary outcome was time to treatment failure. Results There were no significant differences in time to treatment failure. The 9-month Kaplan-Meier failure rates were 22% (97.5% CI, 14%-33%; 24 events) for physician assessment–based adjustment, 20% (97.5% CI, 13%-30%; 21 events) for biomarker-based adjustment, and 15% (97.5% CI, 9%-25%; 16 events) for symptom-based adjustment. The hazard ratio for physician assessment–based adjustment vs biomarker

  2. INHALATION EXPOSURE-RESPONSE METHODOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Inhalation Exposure-Response Analysis Methodology Document is expected to provide guidance on the development of the basic toxicological foundations for deriving reference values for human health effects, focusing on the hazard identification and dose-response aspects of the ...

  3. Parental Influence on Inhalant Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltazar, Alina; Hopkins, Gary; McBride, Duane; Vanderwaal, Curt; Pepper, Sara; Mackey, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine the dynamics of the relationship between parents and their adolescent children and their association with lifetime and past-month inhalant usage. The population studied was seventh- through ninth-grade students in rural Idaho (N = 570). The authors found a small, but consistent, significant inverse…

  4. TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PROTEINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ETD-02-047 (Martonen) GPRA # 10108

    TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PROTEINS
    T. B. Martonen1, J. Schroeter2, Z. Zhang3, D. Hwang4, and J. S. Fleming5
    1Experimental Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park...

  5. Inhalant Use in Florida Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siqueira, Lorena; Crandall, Lee A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To determine (1) the prevalence of use, (2) risk and protective factors for use of inhalants in Florida youth. Methods: The Florida Youth Substance Abuse Survey 2004 is a comprehensive assessment of youth substance abuse attitudes and practices obtained by sampling youth from sixty-five counties. Results: The sample consisted of 60,345…

  6. Inhalational Anesthetics as Preconditioning Agents in Ischemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lan; Traystman, Richard J.; Murphy, Stephanie J.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY While many pharmacological agents have been shown to protect the brain from cerebral ischemia in animal models, none have translated successfully to human patients. One potential clinical neuroprotective strategy in humans may involve increasing the brain’s tolerance to ischemia by pre-ischemic conditioning (preconditioning). There are many methods to induce tolerance via preconditioning such as: ischemia itself, pharmacological, hypoxia, endotoxin, and others. Inhalational anesthetic agents have also been shown to result in brain preconditioning. Mechanisms responsible for brain preconditioning are many, complex, and unclear and may involve Akt activation, ATP-sensitive potassium channels, and nitric oxide, amongst many others. Anesthetics, however, may play an important and unique role as preconditioning agents, particularly during the perioperative period. PMID:17962069

  7. A nebulizer chronolog to monitor compliance with inhaler use.

    PubMed

    Tashkin, D P; Rand, C; Nides, M; Simmons, M; Wise, R; Coulson, A H; Li, V; Gong, H

    1991-10-21

    The Lung Health Study is a 10-center 5-year clinical trial sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute to evaluate the effectiveness of early intervention in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The specific objectives of the trial are to determine whether the accelerated decline in lung function characteristic of COPD and morbidity due to COPD can be reduced by special intervention at a relatively early stage in the evolution of the disease. Special intervention consists of a smoking-cessation program and the use of an inhaled bronchodilator to suppress airway hyperreactivity. The use of the inhaler canister is monitored every 4 months by canister weighing and, at two of the 10 centers, by an electronic recording device, the Nebulizer Chronolog. Among trial participants assigned the latter device, results from the first 4 months of the study indicate that only 52% of trial participants who were uninformed as to the nature of the chronolog used their inhaler at least twice daily as measured by the chronolog, compared with 87% as determined by self-report. Satisfactory or good compliance was achieved by 52% of these subjects as measured by the chronolog compared with 85% as assessed by canister weighing. Eighteen percent of uninformed participants "dumped" their inhalers within a 3-hour time period, contributing to the inaccuracy of canister weights as an indicator of compliance. Feedback of information to the participants from the chronolog improved the level of compliance and eliminated the "dumping" phenomenon. We conclude that, when accurate determinations of compliance are important, as in a drug trial, objective medication monitors should be considered. Electronic monitoring of inhaler use can provide valuable feedback, which encourages improved compliance.

  8. Energy Efficient Monitoring of Metered Dose Inhaler Usage.

    PubMed

    Lalos, Aris S; Lakoumentas, John; Dimas, Anastasios; Moustakas, Konstantinos

    2016-12-01

    Life-long chronic inflammatory diseases of the airways, such as asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, are very common worldwide, affecting people of all ages, race and gender. One of the most important aspects for the effective management of asthma is medication adherence which is defined as the extent to which patients follow their prescribed action plan and use their inhaler correctly. Wireless telemonitoring of the medication adherence can facilitate early diagnosis and management of these diseases through the use of an accurate and energy efficient mHealth system. Therefore, low complexity audio compression schemes need to be integrated with high accuracy classification approaches for the assessment of adherence of patients that use of pressurized Metered Dose Inhalers (pMDIs). To this end, we propose a novel solution that enables the energy efficient monitoring of metered dose inhaler usage, by exploiting the specific characteristics of the reconstructed audio features at the receiver. Simulation studies, carried out with a large dataset of indoor & outdoor measurements have led to high levels of accuracy (98 %) utilizing only 2 % of the recorded audio samples at the receiver, demonstrating the potential of this method for the development of novel energy efficient inhalers and medical devices in the area of respiratory medicine.

  9. [Effects of Instruction on Inhalation Techniques Using iPads - Web Application "Inhalation Lessons"].

    PubMed

    Kogawa, Noriko; Ito, Reiko; Gon, Yasuhiro; Maruoka, Shuichiro; Hashimoto, Shu

    2015-12-01

    Instruction on inhalation techniques for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease(COPD)and asthma patients being treated with inhalants have sufficient therapeutic effects and are important to maintain adherence. However, problems continue to exist, including time constraints of medical staff that have a large number of patients and a lack of knowledge on inhalation instruction methods. A web application,"Inhalation Lessons,'for the iPad has been developed. It explains inhalation methods, and consists of videos and review tests. Instruction on inhalation techniques was performed using this application for patients that use Diskus, and the effects were examined. As a result, there are significant improvements in the inhalation techniques of patients after viewing the"Inhalation Lessons'application. Uniform instruction on inhalation techniques can be performed even in the field of homecare.

  10. Detection of nitric oxide pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chackerian, C., Jr.; Weisbach, M. F.

    1973-01-01

    Studies of absorption spectra enhancement of certain atomic and molecular species inserter in dye-laser cavities have indicated that nitric oxide can be determined at low concentrations. Absorption coefficient of small amounts of nitric oxide in intra-laser-cavity absorption cell containing helium is enhanced by more than two orders of magnitude.

  11. Bacterial nitric oxide synthases.

    PubMed

    Crane, Brian R; Sudhamsu, Jawahar; Patel, Bhumit A

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) are multidomain metalloproteins first identified in mammals as being responsible for the synthesis of the wide-spread signaling and protective agent nitric oxide (NO). Over the past 10 years, prokaryotic proteins that are homologous to animal NOSs have been identified and characterized, both in terms of enzymology and biological function. Despite some interesting differences in cofactor utilization and redox partners, the bacterial enzymes are in many ways similar to their mammalian NOS (mNOS) counterparts and, as such, have provided insight into the structural and catalytic properties of the NOS family. In particular, spectroscopic studies of thermostable bacterial NOSs have revealed key oxyheme intermediates involved in the oxidation of substrate L-arginine (Arg) to product NO. The biological functions of some bacterial NOSs have only more recently come to light. These studies disclose new roles for NO in biology, such as taking part in toxin biosynthesis, protection against oxidative stress, and regulation of recovery from radiation damage.

  12. Nitric oxide neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Dawson, V L; Dawson, T M

    1996-06-01

    Derangements in glutamate neurotransmission have been implicated in several neurodegenerative disorders including, stroke, epilepsy, Huntington's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Activation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subtype of glutamate receptors results in the influx of calcium which binds calmodulin and activates neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), to convent L-arginine to citrulline and nitric oxide (NO). NO has many roles in the central nervous system as a messenger molecule, however, when generated in excess NO can be neurotoxic. Excess NO is in part responsible for glutamate neurotoxicity in primary neuronal cell culture and in animal models of stroke. It is likely that most of the neurotoxic actions of NO are mediated by peroxynitrite (ONOO-), the reaction product from NO and superoxide anion. In pathologic conditions, peroxynitrite and oxygen free radicals can be generated in excess of a cell antioxidant capacity resulting in severe damage to cellular constituents including proteins, DNA and lipids. The inherent biochemical and physiological characteristics of the brain, including high lipid concentrations and energy requirements, make it particularly susceptible to free radical and oxidant mediated insult. Increasing evidence indicates that many neurologic disorders may have components of free radical and oxidative stress induced injury.

  13. [Inhalant abusers and psychiatric symptoms].

    PubMed

    Okudaira, K; Yabana, T; Takahashi, H; Iizuka, H; Nakajima, K; Saito, A

    1996-01-01

    There are different opinions about the cause of chronic psychiatric symptoms observed in drug abusers between Japanese and foreign psychiatrists. The Japanese seem to recognize the chronic psychosis as the result of drug abuse. In the other hand, foreigners diagnose these cases as dual diagnosis of drug abuse and psychosis. Authors studied the problem in this research. One of the authors has examined 120 inhalant abusers of all, in- and out-patients in Kanagawa Prefectural Center of Psychiatry, Serigaya Hospital from 1991 to 1995. These patients were classified into three groups: psychosis group (23 patients), dependence group (51 patients) and abuse group (46 patients) according to their clinical courses and psychiatric symptoms. The psychosis group consists of patients who showed psychiatric symptoms such as hallucination, delusion and thought disturbance for long time after detoxification. The dependence group contains patients whose inhalant dependence was severe and met DSM-4 Diagnostic Criteria for Substance Dependence, but manifested no chronic psychiatric symptoms after detoxification. The patients belonging to abuse group were at the earlier stages of inhalant abuse and had no chronic psychiatric symptoms. The average age of the first inhalant abuse was 14.7 years old in the psychosis group, 14.8 years in the dependence group and 14.7 years in the abuse group. The average years of abuse was 9.0 years in the psychosis group, and 8.5 years in the dependence group. There was little difference between these two groups. The psychosis patients manifested chronic symptoms 5.7 years on average after the first abuse of inhalants. About one forth (26.1%) of the psychosis patients and only 5.9% of the dependence patients had family history of schizophrenia. The difference was statistically significant. These results suggest that chronic psychiatric symptoms are caused not only by inhalant abuse, but also by the genetic factors of psychosis of each patient. There have

  14. Hazard identification of inhaled nanomaterials: making use of short-term inhalation studies.

    PubMed

    Klein, Christoph L; Wiench, Karin; Wiemann, Martin; Ma-Hock, Lan; van Ravenzwaay, Ben; Landsiedel, Robert

    2012-07-01

    A major health concern for nanomaterials is their potential toxic effect after inhalation of dusts. Correspondingly, the core element of tier 1 in the currently proposed integrated testing strategy (ITS) is a short-term rat inhalation study (STIS) for this route of exposure. STIS comprises a comprehensive scheme of biological effects and marker determination in order to generate appropriate information on early key elements of pathogenesis, such as inflammatory reactions in the lung and indications of effects in other organs. Within the STIS information on the persistence, progression and/or regression of effects is obtained. The STIS also addresses organ burden in the lung and potential translocation to other tissues. Up to now, STIS was performed in research projects and routine testing of nanomaterials. Meanwhile, rat STIS results for more than 20 nanomaterials are available including the representative nanomaterials listed by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) working party on manufactured nanomaterials (WPMN), which has endorsed a list of representative manufactured nanomaterials (MN) as well as a set of relevant endpoints to be addressed. Here, results of STIS carried out with different nanomaterials are discussed as case studies. The ranking of different nanomaterials potential to induce adverse effects and the ranking of the respective NOAEC are the same among the STIS and the corresponding subchronic and chronic studies. In another case study, a translocation of a coated silica nanomaterial was judged critical for its safety assessment. Thus, STIS enables application of the proposed ITS, as long as reliable and relevant in vitro methods for the tier 1 testing are still missing. Compared to traditional subacute and subchronic inhalation testing (according to OECD test guidelines 412 and 413), STIS uses less animals and resources and offers additional information on organ burden and progression or regression of potential effects.

  15. Inhalation therapy in mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Maccari, Juçara Gasparetto; Teixeira, Cassiano; Gazzana, Marcelo Basso; Savi, Augusto; Dexheimer-Neto, Felippe Leopoldo; Knorst, Marli Maria

    2015-01-01

    Patients with obstructive lung disease often require ventilatory support via invasive or noninvasive mechanical ventilation, depending on the severity of the exacerbation. The use of inhaled bronchodilators can significantly reduce airway resistance, contributing to the improvement of respiratory mechanics and patient-ventilator synchrony. Although various studies have been published on this topic, little is known about the effectiveness of the bronchodilators routinely prescribed for patients on mechanical ventilation or about the deposition of those drugs throughout the lungs. The inhaled bronchodilators most commonly used in ICUs are beta adrenergic agonists and anticholinergics. Various factors might influence the effect of bronchodilators, including ventilation mode, position of the spacer in the circuit, tube size, formulation, drug dose, severity of the disease, and patient-ventilator synchrony. Knowledge of the pharmacological properties of bronchodilators and the appropriate techniques for their administration is fundamental to optimizing the treatment of these patients. PMID:26578139

  16. Inhaled anesthetics: an historical overview.

    PubMed

    Whalen, Francis X; Bacon, Douglas R; Smith, Hugh M

    2005-09-01

    Inhalational agents have played a pivotal role in anesthesia history. The first publicly demonstrated anesthetic of the modern era, diethyl ether, was an inhalational anesthetic. The attributes of a good agent, ability to rapidly induce anesthesia, with limited side effects has led research efforts for over a hundred and fifty years. The explosion hazard was largely conquered with the development of the halogenated agents in the 1950s. Rapid emergence, with limited nausea and vomiting continue to drive discovery efforts, yet the 'modern' agents continue to improve upon those in the past. The future holds promise, but perhaps the most interesting contrast over time is the ability to rapidly introduce new agents into practice. From James Young Simpson's dinner table one evening to the operating suite the next day, modern agents take decades from first synthesis to clinical introduction.

  17. Brain permeability of inhaled corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Arya, Vikram; Issar, Manish; Wang, Yaning; Talton, James D; Hochhaus, Guenther

    2005-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if the permeability of inhaled corticosteroids entering the brain is reduced and if P-glycoprotein (P-gp) transporters are involved. Currently employed inhaled corticosteroids were given intravenously and intratracheally to rats at a dose of 100 microg kg-1. An ex-vivo receptor binding assay was used to monitor over 12 h the glucocorticoid receptor occupancy in the brain and a systemic reference organ (kidney). The involvement of P-gp in the brain permeability of triamcinolone acetonide was assessed in wild-type mice and mdr1a(-/-) knockout mice (mice lacking the gene for expressing P-gp). After both forms of administration, the average brain receptor occupancies were 20-56% of those of the reference organ, with the more lipophilic drugs showing a more pronounced receptor occupation. While the receptor occupancies in the liver of wild-type and mdr1a(-/-) mice were similar after administration of triamcinolone acetonide, brain receptor occupancies in mdr1a(-/-) mice were significantly greater (mdr1a(-/-): 47.6%, 40.2-55.0%, n=14; 2; wild-type: 11.5+/-33.0%, n=14; 3). Penetration into the brain for inhaled corticosteroids (especially those of lower lipophilicity) is reduced. Experiments in mdr1a(-/-) mice confirmed the involvement of P-gp transporters. Further studies are needed to assess whether potential drug interactions at the transporter level are of pharmacological significance.

  18. Smoke inhalation increases intensive care requirements and morbidity in paediatric burns.

    PubMed

    Tan, Alethea; Smailes, Sarah; Friebel, Thessa; Magdum, Ashish; Frew, Quentin; El-Muttardi, Naguib; Dziewulski, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Burn survival has improved with advancements in fluid resuscitation, surgical wound management, wound dressings, access to antibiotics and nutritional support for burn patients. Despite these advancements, the presence of smoke inhalation injury in addition to a cutaneous burn still significantly increases morbidity and mortality. The pathophysiology of smoke inhalation has been well studied in animal models. Translation of this knowledge into effectiveness of clinical management and correlation with patient outcomes including the paediatric population, is still limited. We retrospectively reviewed our experience of 13 years of paediatric burns admitted to a regional burn's intensive care unit. We compared critical care requirements and patient outcomes between those with cutaneous burns only and those with concurrent smoke inhalation injury. Smoke inhalation increases critical care requirements and mortality in the paediatric burn population. Therefore, early critical care input in the management of these patients is advised.

  19. Synthetic vitreous fibers--inhalation studies.

    PubMed

    McConnell, E E

    1994-12-01

    Synthetic vitreous fibers (SVFs), often referred to as "man-made vitreous fibers," are a class of materials that have their major uses for insulation against heat and sound. The original fibers are produced by melting various types of rock, clay, etc. and then blowing or extruding them into fibers of particular properties. During production and use small fractions of airborne fibers can be generated. Because of this a series of state-of-the-art inhalation studies was initiated to study the possible health hazards presented by the four major types of vitreous materials [two types of insulation glass wool, rock wool, slag wool, and four types of refractory ceramic fibers (RCF)] found in the workplace or to which the general public may be exposed. Rats and hamsters (30 mg/m3 kaolin-based RCF only) were exposed by nose-only inhalation to 3, 16, or 30 mg/m3 for 6 hr/day, 5 days/week, for 18 (hamsters) or 24 (rats) months and were held for lifetime observation (until approximately 20% survival) to study the chronic toxicity and potential carcinogenic activity of these classes of SVFs. Chrysotile or crocidolite asbestos served as positive controls. All of the fibers stimulated an inflammatory response characterized by an increase in the number of pulmonary macrophages at the level of the terminal bronchioles and proximal alveoli. RCF produced interstitial fibrosis in the walls of the proximal alveoli as early as 3 months and rock wool by 12 months. The only fiber which showed carcinogenic activity was RCF which produced a dose-related increase in both primary lung neoplasms (rats only) and mesotheliomas (rats and hamsters).

  20. Tobramycin inhalation powder for P. aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis: the EVOLVE trial

    PubMed Central

    Konstan, Michael W; Geller, David E; Minić, Predrag; Brockhaus, Florian; Zhang, Jie; Angyalosi, Gerhild

    2014-01-01

    Tobramycin inhalation solution is used to treat chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in cystic fibrosis patients. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of a novel, light-porous-particle, dry-powder formulation of tobramycin, which was developed to improve delivery efficiency to the airways and substantially reduce the delivery time. In this randomized, double-blind study, patients with cystic fibrosis (age 6–21 years) received tobramycin inhalation powder (112 mg tobramycin) twice daily (n = 46) or placebo (n = 49) via the T-326 Inhaler for one cycle, followed by two open-label cycles (all patients). Cycles were 28 days on, 28 days off treatment. The primary endpoint was change in FEV1 % predicted from baseline to Day 28 of Cycle 1. The study was terminated early based on positive results in the interim analysis. Tobramycin inhalation powder significantly improved FEV1 % predicted versus placebo at Day 28 (difference 13.3, 95% CI 5.31, 21.28; P = 0.0016). Similar changes in FEV1 were seen in patients switching from placebo to tobramycin inhalation powder in Cycle 2; improvements were maintained over time. Tobramycin inhalation powder also reduced sputum Pseudomonas aeruginosa density, respiratory-related hospitalization and antipseudomonal antibiotic use versus placebo. The most common adverse event was cough; the frequency of cough was higher in patients receiving placebo (26.5%) versus tobramycin inhalation powder (13.0%) in Cycle 1. Tobramycin inhalation powder was not associated with ototoxicity or nephrotoxicity. Administration time was between 4 and 6 minutes. In conclusion, tobramycin inhalation powder was effective and well tolerated in cystic fibrosis patients, and may offer an important treatment option to decrease the treatment burden of cystic fibrosis pseudomonas lung infections. PMID:20963831

  1. Nitric oxide signaling in plants.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Allan D

    2005-01-01

    Plants have four nitric oxide synthase (NOS) enzymes. NOS1 appears mitochondrial, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) chloroplastic. Distinct peroxisomal and apoplastic NOS enzymes are predicted. Nitrite-dependent NO synthesis is catalyzed by cytoplasmic nitrate reductase or a root plasma membrane enzyme, or occurs nonenzymatically. Nitric oxide undergoes both catalyzed and uncatalyzed oxidation. However, there is no evidence of reaction with superoxide, and S-nitrosylation reactions are unlikely except during hypoxia. The only proven direct targets of NO in plants are metalloenzymes and one metal complex. Nitric oxide inhibits apoplastic catalases/ascorbate peroxidases in some species but may stimulate these enzymes in others. Plants also have the NO response pathway involving cGMP, cADPR, and release of calcium from internal stores. Other known targets include chloroplast and mitochondrial electron transport. Nitric oxide suppresses Fenton chemistry by interacting with ferryl ion, preventing generation of hydroxyl radicals. Functions of NO in plant development, response to biotic and abiotic stressors, iron homeostasis, and regulation of respiration and photosynthesis may all be ascribed to interaction with one of these targets. Nitric oxide function in drought/abscisic acid (ABA)-induction of stomatal closure requires nitrate reductase and NOS1. Nitric oxide synthasel likely functions to produce sufficient NO to inhibit photosynthetic electron transport, allowing nitrite accumulation. Nitric oxide is produced during the hypersensitive response outside cells undergoing programmed cell death immediately prior to loss of plasma membrane integrity. A plasma membrane lipid-derived signal likely activates apoplastic NOS. Nitric oxide diffuses within the apoplast and signals neighboring cells via hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-dependent induction of salicylic acid biosynthesis. Response to wounding appears to involve the same NOS and direct targets.

  2. [Inhalation therapy: inhaled generics, inhaled antidotes, the future of anti-infectives and the indications of inhaled pentamidine. GAT aerosolstorming, Paris 2012].

    PubMed

    Peron, N; Le Guen, P; Andrieu, V; Bardot, S; Ravilly, S; Oudyi, M; Dubus, J-C

    2013-12-01

    The working group on aerosol therapy (GAT) of the Société de pneumologie de langue française (SPLF) organized its third "Aerosolstorming" in 2012. During the course of one day, different aspects of inhaled therapy were discussed, and these will be treated separately in two articles, this one being the first. Inhaled products represent a large volume of prescriptions both in the community and in hospital settings and they involve various specialties particularly ENT and respiratory care. Technical aspects of the development of these products, their mode of administration and compliance with their indications are key elements for the effective therapeutic use of inhaled treatments. In this first article, we will review issues concerning generic inhaled products, the existence of inhaled antidotes, new anti-infective agents and indications for inhaled pentamidine.

  3. Methods for Derivation of Inhalation Reference Concentrations and Application of Inhalation Dosimetry

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's methodology for estimation of inhalation reference concentrations (RfCs) as benchmark estimates of the quantitative dose-response assessment of chronic noncancer toxicity for individual inhaled chemicals.

  4. Nitric oxide and cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Cengel, Atiye; Sahinarslan, Asife

    2006-12-01

    Endothelium has many important functions including the control of blood-tissue permeability and vascular tonus, regulation of vascular surface properties for homeostasis and inflammation. Nitric oxide is the chief molecule in regulation of endothelial functions. Nitric oxide deficiency, which is also known as endothelial dysfunction, is the first step for the occurrence of many disease states in cardiovascular system including heart failure, hypertension, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus, hyperhomocysteinemia and smoking. This review deals with the importance of nitric oxide for cardiovascular system. It also includes the latest improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of endothelial dysfunction.

  5. 49 CFR 173.337 - Nitric oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nitric oxide. 173.337 Section 173.337... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.337 Nitric oxide. (a) Nitric oxide must be... valve and valve seat that will not deteriorate in contact with nitric oxide. Cylinders or valves may...

  6. 49 CFR 173.337 - Nitric oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Nitric oxide. 173.337 Section 173.337... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.337 Nitric oxide. (a) Nitric oxide must be... valve and valve seat that will not deteriorate in contact with nitric oxide. Cylinders or valves may...

  7. 49 CFR 173.337 - Nitric oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nitric oxide. 173.337 Section 173.337... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.337 Nitric oxide. (a) Nitric oxide must be... valve and valve seat that will not deteriorate in contact with nitric oxide. Cylinders or valves may...

  8. 49 CFR 173.337 - Nitric oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Nitric oxide. 173.337 Section 173.337... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.337 Nitric oxide. (a) Nitric oxide must be... valve and valve seat that will not deteriorate in contact with nitric oxide. Cylinders or valves may...

  9. 49 CFR 173.158 - Nitric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Nitric acid. 173.158 Section 173.158... Nitric acid. (a) Nitric acid exceeding 40 percent concentration may not be packaged with any other material. (b) Nitric acid in any concentration which does not contain sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid...

  10. 49 CFR 173.158 - Nitric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Nitric acid. 173.158 Section 173.158... Nitric acid. (a) Nitric acid exceeding 40 percent concentration may not be packaged with any other material. (b) Nitric acid in any concentration which does not contain sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid...

  11. 49 CFR 173.158 - Nitric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nitric acid. 173.158 Section 173.158... Nitric acid. (a) Nitric acid exceeding 40 percent concentration may not be packaged with any other material. (b) Nitric acid in any concentration which does not contain sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid...

  12. 49 CFR 173.158 - Nitric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nitric acid. 173.158 Section 173.158... Nitric acid. (a) Nitric acid exceeding 40 percent concentration may not be packaged with any other material. (b) Nitric acid in any concentration which does not contain sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid...

  13. 49 CFR 173.158 - Nitric acid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nitric acid. 173.158 Section 173.158... Nitric acid. (a) Nitric acid exceeding 40 percent concentration may not be packaged with any other material. (b) Nitric acid in any concentration which does not contain sulfuric acid or hydrochloric acid...

  14. The Toxicity of Inhaled Sulphur Mustard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    acetyl -L- cysteine (Mucomyst™; NAC ), in ameliorating inhaled HD-induced lung injury was then assessed in the established model. This work was conducted...J and Sciuto AM. N- acetyl -L- cysteine ( NAC ) Protects Against Inhaled Sulfur Mustard (HD) Poisoning in the Large Swine. Clinical Toxicology, 2012...2012. N- acetyl -L- cysteine ( NAC ) Protects against inhaled sulfur mustard (HD) poisoning in the large swine. Clinical Toxicology; in preparation

  15. Apoptotic Cell Death in Rat Lung Following Mustard Gas Inhalation.

    PubMed

    Andres, Devon Katherine; Keyser, Brian M; Melber, Ashley A; Benton, Betty Jean; Hamilton, Tracey A; Kniffin, Denise M; Martens, Magaret E; Ray, Radharaman

    2017-03-30

    To investigate apoptosis as a mechanism of sulfur mustard (SM) inhalation injury in animals, we studied different caspases (caspase-8, -9, -3 and -6) in the lungs from a ventilated rat SM aerosol inhalation model. SM activated all four caspases in cells obtained from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) as early as 6 hr after exposure. Caspase-8, which is known to initiate the extrinsic Fas-mediated pathway of apoptosis, was increased 5-fold between 6 to 24 hr, decreasing to the unexposed-control level at 48 hr. The initiator, caspase-9, in the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis as well as the executioner caspases, caspase-3 and -6, all peaked (p<0.01) at 24 hr; caspase-3 and -6 remained elevated, but caspase-9 decreased to unexposed-control level at 48 hr. To study further the Fas pathway, we examined soluble as well as membrane-bound Fas ligand (sFas-L, mFas-L, respectively) and Fas receptor (Fas-R) in both BALF cells and BALF. SFas-L increased significantly at 24 hr after SM exposure in both BALF cells (p<0.01) and BALF (p<0.05). However, mFas-L increased only in BALF cells between 24 to 48 hr (p<0.1, <0.001, respectively). Fas-R increased only in BALF cells by 6 hr (p<0.01) after SM exposure. Apoptosis in SM-inhaled rat lung specimens was also confirmed by both immunohistochemical staining using cleaved caspse-3 and -9 antibodies and TUNEL staining as early as 6 hr in the proximal trachea and bronchi, but not before 48 hr in distal airways. These findings suggest pathogenic mechanisms at the cellular and molecular levels and logical therapeutic target(s) for SM inhalation injury in animals.

  16. Chemiluminescence of nitric oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, W. E.; Rusch, D. W.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of the intensities of the delta and gamma bands of nitric oxide in the nighttime terrestrial thermosphere are presented and used to infer the rate coefficient for the transition from the C 2 Pi to the A 2 Sigma + states. The nightglow spectrum was observed between 1900 and 2300 A at a resolution of 15 A by a rocket-borne scanning 1/4-m spectrometer pointing north at an apogee of 150 km. Progressions of the delta, gamma and epsilon bands are identified on the spectra by the construction of synthetic spectra, and the contributions of resonance fluorescence to the total band intensities are calculated. Finally, the ratio of the sum of the gamma bands for v-prime = 0 to the sum of the delta bands for v-prime = 0 is used to derive a branching ratio of 0.21 + or - 0.04 to the A 2 Sigma + state, which yields a probability for the C-A transition of 5.6 + or - 1.5 x to the 6th/sec.

  17. Nitric oxide enhancement strategies

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Nathan S

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that many diseases are characterized or associated with perturbations in nitric oxide (NO) production/signaling. Therapeutics or strategies designed to restore normal NO homeostasis will likely have broad application and utility. This highly complex and multistep pathway for NO production and subsequent target activation provides many steps in the endogenous pathway that may be useful targets for drug development for cardiovascular disease, antimicrobial, cancer, wound healing, etc. This article will summarize known strategies that are currently available or in development for enhancing NO production or availability in the human body. Each strategy will be discussed including exogenous sources of NO, use of precursors to promote NO production and downstream pathways affected by NO production with advantages and disadvantages highlighted for each. Development of NO-based therapeutics is and will continue to be a major focus of biotech, academia as well as pharmaceutical companies. Application of safe and effective strategies will certainly transform health and disease. PMID:28031863

  18. Peri-operative trans-oesophageal echocardiography and nitric oxide during general anaesthesia in a patient with Eisenmenger's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bouch, D C; Allsager, C M; Moore, N

    2006-10-01

    We describe the peri-operative care of a patient with Eisenmenger's syndrome presenting for laparotomy. These patients require techniques to prevent the potential increase in intracardiac shunt caused by anaesthesia, by minimising increases in pulmonary artery pressure and reductions in systemic vascular resistance. The successful use of combined epidural and general anaesthesia with elective use of inhaled nitric oxide as a pulmonary vasodilator, and intra-operative trans-oesophageal echocardiography is described.

  19. Inhalant initiation and the relationship of inhalant use to the use of other substances.

    PubMed

    Shamblen, Stephen R; Miller, Ted

    2012-01-01

    Conventional wisdom suggests that inhalant use is primarily isolated to youthful experimentation; however, a growing body of evidence suggests that inhalant use (a) occurs after use of common substances of experimentation (e.g., alcohol, marijuana), (b) can persist into later life, and (c) is associated with severe consequences. The current study examined the sequencing of substances relative to inhalants and the post-initiation correlates of inhalant use between youth and young adulthood in nationally representative Add Health data. Analyses examined the relationship of substance of initiation to use of other substances, as well as an examination of the relationship between substance use and consequences. The analyses suggest that (a) those initiating their substance use careers with inhalants often go on to use hard drugs, (b) inhalant use likely occurs after alcohol and marijuana use, and (c) inhalant use during adolescence was associated with health and criminal consequences in both adolescence and young adulthood.

  20. How to use an inhaler - with spacer

    MedlinePlus

    ... After using your inhaler, rinse your mouth with water, gargle, and spit. This helps reduce side effects from your medicine. ... If you see powder in or around the hole, clean your inhaler. ... cap in warm water. Let them air dry overnight. In the morning, ...

  1. How to use an inhaler - no spacer

    MedlinePlus

    ... After using your inhaler, rinse your mouth with water, gargle, and spit. This helps reduce side effects from your medicine. ... If you see powder in or around the hole, clean your inhaler. ... cap in warm water. Let them air dry overnight. In the morning, ...

  2. Investigation of Inhalation Anthrax Case, United States

    PubMed Central

    Blaney, David; Shadomy, Sean; Lehman, Mark; Pesik, Nicki; Tostenson, Samantha; Delaney, Lisa; Tiller, Rebekah; DeVries, Aaron; Gomez, Thomas; Sullivan, Maureen; Blackmore, Carina; Stanek, Danielle; Lynfield, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Inhalation anthrax occurred in a man who vacationed in 4 US states where anthrax is enzootic. Despite an extensive multi-agency investigation, the specific source was not detected, and no additional related human or animal cases were found. Although rare, inhalation anthrax can occur naturally in the United States. PMID:24447835

  3. Investigation of inhalation anthrax case, United States.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Jayne; Blaney, David; Shadomy, Sean; Lehman, Mark; Pesik, Nicki; Tostenson, Samantha; Delaney, Lisa; Tiller, Rebekah; DeVries, Aaron; Gomez, Thomas; Sullivan, Maureen; Blackmore, Carina; Stanek, Danielle; Lynfield, Ruth

    2014-02-01

    Inhalation anthrax occurred in a man who vacationed in 4 US states where anthrax is enzootic. Despite an extensive multi-agency investigation, the specific source was not detected, and no additional related human or animal cases were found. Although rare, inhalation anthrax can occur naturally in the United States.

  4. Parent's Guide to Preventing Inhalant Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... child or someone you know is an inhalant abuser, what can you do to help? Be alert for symptoms of inhalant abuse. If you suspect there's a problem, you should consider seeking professional help. Contact a local drug rehabilitation center or other services available in your ...

  5. The sepsis model: an emerging hypothesis for the lethality of inhalation anthrax.

    PubMed

    Coggeshall, Kenneth Mark; Lupu, Florea; Ballard, Jimmy; Metcalf, Jordan P; James, Judith A; Farris, Darise; Kurosawa, Shinichiro

    2013-07-01

    Inhalation anthrax is often described as a toxin-mediated disease. However, the toxaemia model does not account for the high mortality of inhalation anthrax relative to other forms of the disease or for the pathology present in inhalation anthrax. Patients with inhalation anthrax consistently show extreme bacteraemia and, in contrast to animals challenged with toxin, signs of sepsis. Rather than toxaemia, we propose that death in inhalation anthrax results from an overwhelming bacteraemia that leads to severe sepsis. According to our model, the central role of anthrax toxin is to permit the vegetative bacteria to escape immune detection. Other forms of B. anthracis infection have lower mortality because their overt symptoms early in the course of disease cause patients to seek medical care at a time when the infection and its sequelae can still be reversed by antibiotics. Thus, the sepsis model explains key features of inhalation anthrax and may offer a more complete understanding of disease pathology for researchers as well as those involved in the care of patients.

  6. Experimental inhalation injury in the goat.

    PubMed

    Walker, H L; McLeod, C G; McManus, W F

    1981-11-01

    Inhalation injuries are usually produced by inhalation of gaseous or particulate products of incomplete combustion and are rarely due to heat per se unless steam is inhaled. The clinical and anatomic characteristics of an appropriate animal model should mimic the disease encountered clinically. A model of inhalation injury has been produced in anesthetized goats through the use of a modified bee smoker. The smoke is delivered at a low temperature and contains byproducts of incomplete combustion. This reproducible injury produces necrotic tracheobronchitis and bronchiolitis with pseudomembrane and cast formation in association with mild multifocal atelectasis and bronchopneumonia. These lesions spontaneously resolve within 3 weeks without supportive therapy. The upper trachea, protected from smoke injury by the inflated cuff of the endotracheal tube, showed no evidence of injury. This nonlethal injury is proposed as an appropriate model for evaluation of the pathophysiology and treatment of inhalation injury.

  7. Inhalants

    MedlinePlus

    ... area of the brain that gets damaged. The hippocampus, for example, is responsible for memory, so someone ... stimulants like cocaine and narcotics like heroin or morphine can kill you immediately. The old standbys like ...

  8. Inhalants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Naloxone Pain Prevention Treatment Trends & Statistics Women and Drugs Publications Funding Funding Opportunities Clinical Research Post-Award Concerns General Information Grant & Contract Application ...

  9. Inhalation of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCB) Produces Hyperactivity in Rats.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, John P; Berger, David F; Hunt, Anne; Carpenter, David O

    2015-01-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a serious behavioral syndrome seen in children, and more common in males than females. There is increasing evidence that prenatal and/or early life exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POP) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) is associated with increased risk of ADHD occurrence. While PCB exposure is usually attributed to ingestion of contaminated food, recent reports of elevated PCB concentrations in indoor air, especially in schools, raised concern regarding inhalation as an important route of exposure to PCB with consequent effects on neurobehavior. The effects of exposure to air contaminated with Aroclor 1248 or contaminated sediment (SED) from the St. Lawrence River were examined on operant behavior of male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. Data showed that relative to controls, vapor-phase inhalation of PCB, whether from blowing air over Aroclor 1248 or from blowing air over sediment contaminated with PCB, resulted in hyperactivity and impatience in rats, more pronounced in males than females. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that inhalation of PCB may contribute to behavioral abnormalities in children.

  10. Inhalation injury: epidemiology, pathology, treatment strategies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Lung injury resulting from inhalation of smoke or chemical products of combustion continues to be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Combined with cutaneous burns, inhalation injury increases fluid resuscitation requirements, incidence of pulmonary complications and overall mortality of thermal injury. While many products and techniques have been developed to manage cutaneous thermal trauma, relatively few diagnosis-specific therapeutic options have been identified for patients with inhalation injury. Several factors explain slower progress for improvement in management of patients with inhalation injury. Inhalation injury is a more complex clinical problem. Burned cutaneous tissue may be excised and replaced with skin grafts. Injured pulmonary tissue must be protected from secondary injury due to resuscitation, mechanical ventilation and infection while host repair mechanisms receive appropriate support. Many of the consequences of smoke inhalation result from an inflammatory response involving mediators whose number and role remain incompletely understood despite improved tools for processing of clinical material. Improvements in mortality from inhalation injury are mostly due to widespread improvements in critical care rather than focused interventions for smoke inhalation. Morbidity associated with inhalation injury is produced by heat exposure and inhaled toxins. Management of toxin exposure in smoke inhalation remains controversial, particularly as related to carbon monoxide and cyanide. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment has been evaluated in multiple trials to manage neurologic sequelae of carbon monoxide exposure. Unfortunately, data to date do not support application of hyperbaric oxygen in this population outside the context of clinical trials. Cyanide is another toxin produced by combustion of natural or synthetic materials. A number of antidote strategies have been evaluated to address tissue hypoxia associated with cyanide exposure. Data

  11. Stimulation of Oxytocin Receptor during Early Reperfusion Period Protects the Heart against Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury: the Role of Mitochondrial ATP-Sensitive Potassium Channel, Nitric Oxide, and Prostaglandins.

    PubMed

    Imani, Alireza; Khansari, Maryam; Azizi, Yaser; Rakhshan, Kamran; Faghihi, Mahdieh

    2015-08-01

    Postconditioning is a simple and safe strategy for cardioprotection and infarct size limitation. Our previous study showed that oxytocin (OT) exerts postconditioning effect on ischemic/reperfused isolated rat heart. The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of OT receptor, mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channel (mKATP), nitric oxide (NO) and cyclooxygenase (COX) pathways in OT postconditioning. Isolated rat hearts were divided into10 groups and underwent 30 min of regional ischemia followed by 120 min of reperfusion (n =6). In I/R (ischemia/reperfusion) group, ischemia and reperfusion were induced without any treatment. In OT group, oxytocin was perfused 5 min prior to beginning of reperfusion for 25 min. In groups 3-6, atosiban (oxytocin receptor blocker), L-NAME (N-Nitro-L-Arginine Methyl Ester, non-specific nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), 5-HD (5-hydroxydecanoate, mKATP inhibitor) and indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) were infused prior to oxytocin administration. In others, the mentioned inhibitors were perfused prior to ischemia without oxytocin infusion. Infarct size, ventricular hemodynamic, coronary effluent, malondialdehyde (MDA) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were measured at the end of reperfusion. OT perfusion significantly reduced infarct size, MDA and LDH in comparison with IR group. Atosiban, 5HD, L-NAME and indomethacin abolished the postconditioning effect of OT. Perfusion of the inhibitors alone prior to ischemia had no effect on infarct size, hemodynamic parameters, coronary effluent and biochemical markers as compared with I/R group. In conclusion, this study indicates that postconditioning effects of OT are mediated by activation of mKATP and production of NO and Prostaglandins (PGs).

  12. Inflammatory effects of inhaled sulfur mustard in rat lung

    SciTech Connect

    Malaviya, Rama; Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Cervelli, Jessica; Anderson, Dana R.; Holmes, Wesley W.; Conti, Michele L.; Gordon, Ronald E.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2010-10-15

    Inhalation of sulfur mustard (SM), a bifunctional alkylating agent that causes severe lung damage, is a significant threat to both military and civilian populations. The mechanisms mediating its cytotoxic effects are unknown and were investigated in the present studies. Male rats Crl:CD(SD) were anesthetized, and then intratracheally intubated and exposed to 0.7-1.4 mg/kg SM by vapor inhalation. Animals were euthanized 6, 24, 48 h or 7 days post-exposure and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) and lung tissue collected. Exposure of rats to SM resulted in rapid pulmonary toxicity, including focal ulceration and detachment of the trachea and bronchial epithelia from underlying mucosa, thickening of alveolar septal walls and increased numbers of inflammatory cells in the tissue. There was also evidence of autophagy and apoptosis in the tissue. This was correlated with increased BAL protein content, a marker of injury to the alveolar epithelial lining. SM exposure also resulted in increased expression of markers of inflammation including cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF{alpha}), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), each of which has been implicated in pulmonary toxicity. Whereas COX-2, TNF{alpha} and iNOS were mainly localized in alveolar regions, MMP-9 was prominent in bronchial epithelium. In contrast, expression of the anti-oxidant hemeoxygenase, and the anti-inflammatory collectin, surfactant protein-D, decreased in the lung after SM exposure. These data demonstrate that SM-induced oxidative stress and injury are associated with the generation of cytotoxic inflammatory proteins which may contribute to the pathogenic response to this vesicant.

  13. Particle inhalability at low wind speeds.

    PubMed

    Brown, James S

    2005-12-15

    Accurate quantification of the dose delivered by aerosol exposures is essential for estimating the risk of potential adverse health effects. The fraction of airborne particles that can enter the nose or mouth during inhalation is referred to as the inspirable particulate mass fraction. This inhalable fraction is equivalent to delivered dose for particles greater than approximately 25 microm (aerodynamic particle diameter, d(ae)), which deposit completely and almost exclusively in the extrathoracic airways. Particle inhalability at high wind speeds (1-9 m/s) has been well characterized. However, there is a paucity of data describing the inhalability of particles at low wind speeds (< or =0.3 m/s), which are typical of indoor environments. High-wind-speed criteria poorly describe inhalability at low wind speeds. Based on the aspiration efficiencies of blunt and sharp-edged inlets, a function was developed for oral inhalability, P(I(O)), of particles at low wind speeds. This function predicts a slow decline in P(I(O)) from 0.95 at d(ae)= 8 microm, to 0.5 at d(ae) = 74 microm, and 0.1 at d(ae)= 175 microm. Data available from the literature for inhalability at relatively low wind speeds during oral breathing are well described by this logistic function (r(2)= 0.69).

  14. Dynamics of airflow in a short inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Bates, A. J.; Doorly, D. J.; Cetto, R.; Calmet, H.; Gambaruto, A. M.; Tolley, N. S.; Houzeaux, G.; Schroter, R. C.

    2015-01-01

    During a rapid inhalation, such as a sniff, the flow in the airways accelerates and decays quickly. The consequences for flow development and convective transport of an inhaled gas were investigated in a subject geometry extending from the nose to the bronchi. The progress of flow transition and the advance of an inhaled non-absorbed gas were determined using highly resolved simulations of a sniff 0.5 s long, 1 l s−1 peak flow, 364 ml inhaled volume. In the nose, the distribution of airflow evolved through three phases: (i) an initial transient of about 50 ms, roughly the filling time for a nasal volume, (ii) quasi-equilibrium over the majority of the inhalation, and (iii) a terminating phase. Flow transition commenced in the supraglottic region within 20 ms, resulting in large-amplitude fluctuations persisting throughout the inhalation; in the nose, fluctuations that arose nearer peak flow were of much reduced intensity and diminished in the flow decay phase. Measures of gas concentration showed non-uniform build-up and wash-out of the inhaled gas in the nose. At the carina, the form of the temporal concentration profile reflected both shear dispersion and airway filling defects owing to recirculation regions. PMID:25551147

  15. Inhalation challenge in humidifier fever.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J H; Cockcroft, A

    1981-05-01

    When exposed to an amount of contaminated humidifier water roughly equivalent to that inhaled over an 8-hour period at their work place, four out of six subjects developed symptoms of humidifier fever. Two non-exposed subjects failed to react to the same challenge. Characteristic lung function, temperature and leucocyte changes were recorded; however, a fall in gas transfer previously reported was not seen. That the reaction was immunologically mediated and not due to endotoxin activity was shown by a negative pyrogen response in rabbits inoculated intravenously with concentrated humidifier water. The nature of the immune response has not as yet been evaluated but it does not reside with the ability of humidifier fever antigens to activate complement. Skin testing produced an immediate weal and flare in the four subjects with precipitins and may reflect the presence of short-term anaphylactic IgG antibody.

  16. Inhaled Corticosteroids and Bone Health

    PubMed Central

    Chee, Carolyn; Sellahewa, Luckni; Pappachan, Joseph M

    2014-01-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are the cornerstones in the management of bronchial asthma and some cases of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Although ICS are claimed to have low side effect profiles, at high doses they can cause systemic adverse effects including bone diseases such as osteopenia, osteoporosis and osteonecrosis. Corticosteroids have detrimental effects on function and survival of osteoblasts and osteocytes, and with the prolongation of osteoclast survival, induce metabolic bone disease. Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIO) can be associated with major complications such as vertebral and neck of femur fractures. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) published criteria in 2010 for the management of GIO. ACR recommends bisphosphonates along with calcium and vitamin D supplements as the first-line agents for GIO management. ACR recommendations can be applied to manage patients on ICS with a high risk of developing metabolic bone disease. This review outlines the mechanisms and management of ICS-induced bone disease. PMID:25674178

  17. [Evaluation of a new nitric oxide delivery system during mechanical ventilation].

    PubMed

    Noguchi, T; Miyakawa, H; Mori, M; Kitano, T; Iwasaka, H; Oda, S; Taniguchi, K; Honda, N

    1994-07-01

    A new nitric oxide delivery and continuous monitoring system is described. During mechanical ventilation, this new system connected with Siemens Servo 900C ventilator was shown to be able to provide a constant inspired NO concentration (10-100 ppm) using chemiluminescence technique for NO analysis. Gas was analysed at the mixing chamber in front of the ventilator inlet and inspiratory tube connected with the soda-lime carbon-dioxide absorber. Both NO concentrations showed a good correlation (r = 0.99). The actual NO concentration from the NO supply cylinder was 1154 ppm and NO2 concentration was 14 ppm. In mongrel dogs, after 20 minutes of NO inhalation (10-100 ppm), the blood methemoglobin level reached a peak value of 2.2% starting from the pre-inhalation level of 0%. To optimize the safety of the clinical application of NO, its concentration should be measured continuously with chemiluminescence technique.

  18. A Community Prevention Model to Prevent Children from Inhaling and Ingesting Harmful Legal Products

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, K. W.; Grube, J. W.; Ogilvie, K. A.; Collins, D.; Courser, M.; Dirks, L. G.; Ogilvie, D.; Driscoll, D.

    2012-01-01

    Children's misuse of harmful legal products (HLPs), including inhaling or ingesting everyday household products, prescription drugs, and over-the-counter drugs, constitutes a serious health problem for American society. This article presents a community prevention model (CPM) focusing on this problem among pre and early adolescents. The model,…

  19. 42 CFR 84.90 - Breathing resistance test; inhalation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Breathing resistance test; inhalation. 84.90...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.90 Breathing resistance test; inhalation. (a) Resistance to inhalation... machine as described in § 84.88. (b) The inhalation resistance of open-circuit apparatus shall not...

  20. 42 CFR 84.90 - Breathing resistance test; inhalation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing resistance test; inhalation. 84.90...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.90 Breathing resistance test; inhalation. (a) Resistance to inhalation... machine as described in § 84.88. (b) The inhalation resistance of open-circuit apparatus shall not...

  1. Animal model of sensitization by inhalation.

    PubMed Central

    Barboriak, J J; Knoblock, H W; Hensley, G T; Gombas, O F; Fink, J N

    1976-01-01

    Groups of rats exposed to daily inhalation challenge with aerosolized pigeon serum developed precipitating antibody within 2 weeks and definitive granulomatous inflammatory changes in the lung after 7 weeks of exposure. The dissociation of the two responses to an inhalation challenge indicate that the rat model may serve for screening of the various inhalant antigens for their sensitizing potential, and for investigation of the contributory role of some of the factors involved in the pathogenesis of hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:939055

  2. Nitric oxide generating/releasing materials

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hongying; Nacharaju, Parimala; Friedman, Adam; Friedman, Joel M

    2015-01-01

    Harnessing the impressive therapeutic potential of Nitric oxide (NO) remains an ongoing challenge. This paper describes several of the current strategies both with respect to the underlying chemistry and physics and to the applications where they have shown promise. Included in this overview are molecular systems such as NONOates that release NO through chemical reactions and delivery vehicles such as nanoparticles that can generate, store, transport and deliver NO and related bioactive forms of NO such as nitrosothiols. Although there has been much positive movement, it is clear that we are only at the early stages of knowing how to precisely produce, transport and deliver to targeted sites therapeutic levels of NO and related molecules. PMID:26855790

  3. Analysis of uncertainties in CRAC2 calculations: the inhalation pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Killough, G.G.; Dunning, D.E. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    CRAC2 is a computer code for estimating the health effects and economic costs that might result from a release of radioactivity from a nuclear reactor to the environment. This paper describes tests of sensitivity of the predicted health effects to uncertainties in parameters associated with inhalation of the released radionuclides. These parameters are the particle size of the carrier aerosol and, for each element in the release, the clearance parameters for the lung model on which the code's dose conversion factors for inhalation are based. CRAC2 uses hourly meteorological data and a straight-line Gaussian plume model to predict the transport of airborne radioactivity; it includes models for plume depletion and population evacuation, and data for the distributions of population and land use. The code can compute results for single weather sequences, or it can perform random sampling of weather sequences from the meteorological data file and compute results for each weather sequence in the sample. For the work described in this paper, we concentrated on three fixed weather sequences that represent a range of conditions. For each fixed weather sequence, we applied random sampling to joint distributions of the inhalation parameters in order to estimate the sensitivity of the predicted health effects. All sampling runs produced coefficients of variation that were less than 50%, but some differences of means between weather sequences were substantial, as were some differences between means and the corresponding CRAC2 results without random sampling. Early injuries showed differences of as much as 1 to 2 orders of magnitude, while the differences in early fatalities were less than a factor of 2. Latent cancer fatalities varied by less than 10%. 19 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  4. Myocardial damage after inhalation of chloramines.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Castro, Alejandro; Holanda, Maria Soledad; Canas, Borja S; Morlote, Jesús G; Minambres, Eduardo; Prieto Solis, José A

    2006-04-01

    The objective of this case report was to document a rare case of myocardial damage, in the context of an accidental inhalation of chloramines, demonstrated by electrocardiogram and myocardium-specific enzymes.

  5. Asthma Inhalers: Which One's Right for You?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the medication is released by breathing in a deep, fast breath. Available types include a dry powder ... and convenient to carry. Doesn't require a deep, fast inhaled breath. Doesn't require a deep, ...

  6. ARDS following inhalation of hydrochloric acid.

    PubMed

    Bansal, D P; Ambegaonkar, Rahul; Radhika, P; Sharma, Manish

    2011-02-01

    The clinical spectrum of Inhalation injury can range from mild cough to a devastating ARDS. We herewith present a patient who is a goldsmith by occupation and his work consists of dissolving gold in Hydrochloric acid. He had accidentally inhaled fumes of Hydrochloric acid and presented with cough and breathlessness, later on required mechanical ventilation for ARDS and improved. This highlights the importance of not to neglect mild symptoms like cough and dyspnea in such a scenario which may have some hidden catastrophe.

  7. Predictive value of bronchoscopy in assessing the severity of inhalation injury.

    PubMed

    Mosier, Michael J; Pham, Tam N; Park, David R; Simmons, Jill; Klein, Matthew B; Gibran, Nicole S

    2012-01-01

    Inhalation injury is associated with severe pulmonary complications as inhaled products of combustion cause lung inflammation and loss of natural defenses. A bronchoscopic grading for inhalation injury has been proposed but has not yet been validated in burn patients. In this study, the authors evaluated whether bronchoscopic grading of injury clinically correlated with indices of gas exchange over the first 72 hours or predicted differences in hospitalization outcomes. They conducted a single-center retrospective review of all mechanically ventilated adults with suspected inhalation injury and thermal injury over an 18-month period. All recorded bronchoscopy examinations were reviewed and categorized injury according to the published abbreviated injury score (AIS 0: no injury, 1: mild, 2: moderate, 3: severe, and 4: massive injury). They also compared changes in oxygenation, airway pressures, chest radiograph findings, fluid administration, and early development of pneumonia and organ failure, by severity of inhalation injury according to the AIS. Thirty-two adult patients met inclusion criteria over the study period. This cohort was 69% male with a mean age of 44.5 ± 14 years and a mean % TBSA burn of 33.9 ± 17%. Of these 32 patients, 11 patients (34%) were classified as grade 0, 9 patients (28%) were classified as grade 1, 7 patients (22%) were classified as grade 2, and 5 patients (16%) were classified as grade 3. Measured carboxyhemoglobin levels increased significantly with higher AIS grade. Oxygenation indices were worse as grade worsened by 24, 48, and 72 hours. The incidence of acute respiratory distress syndrome increased by grade of injury: 0, 22, 57, and 80%, respectively, at 24 hours (P < .01), and remained statistically different at 48 and 72 hours. After adjustment for age, % TBSA burn, and full-thickness component, severe inhalation injury (grades 2 and 3) was associated with an increased risk of acute respiratory distress syndrome at 24 and 72

  8. Use of ultra pure nitric oxide generated by the reduction of nitrogen dioxide to reverse pulmonary hypertension in hypoxemic swine.

    PubMed

    Lovich, Mark A; Bruno, Natalie K; Plant, Charles P; Wei, Abraham E; Vasquez, Gregory B; Johnson, Bryan J; Fine, David H; Gilbert, Richard J

    2011-05-31

    Inhaled nitric oxide (NO) has the capacity to selectively dilate pulmonary blood vessels, and thus enhance the matching of ventilation and perfusion, improve oxygenation and decrease pulmonary hypertension. However, existing approaches for the administration of inhaled NO are associated with the co-delivery of potentially toxic concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) due to the oxidation of NO in oxygen rich environments. We tested the ability of a novel methodology for generating highly purified NO through the reduction of NO2 by ascorbic acid to reverse pulmonary hypertension. In vitro testing demonstrated that the NO output of the novel device is ultrapure and free of NO2. An in vivo hypoxemic swine model of pulmonary hypertension was used to examine the dose response to NO in terms of pulmonary pressures and pulmonary vascular resistance. Pulmonary hypertension was induced by lowering inspired oxygen to 15% prior to treatment with inhaled ultra purified NO (1, 5, 20, and 80PPM). Hypoxemia increased mean pulmonary artery pressures and pulmonary vascular resistance. Inhaled ultra purified NO doses (down to 1PPM) show a marked reduction of hypoxemia-induced pulmonary vascular resistance. These experiments demonstrate a simple and robust method to generate purified inhaled NO that is devoid of NO2 and capable of reversing hypoxemia induced pulmonary hypertension.

  9. Assessing inhalation injury in the emergency room

    PubMed Central

    Tanizaki, Shinsuke

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory tract injuries caused by inhalation of smoke or chemical products are related to significant morbidity and mortality. While many strategies have been built up to manage cutaneous burn injuries, few logical diagnostic strategies for patients with inhalation injuries exist and almost all treatment is supportive. The goals of initial management are to ensure that the airway allows adequate oxygenation and ventilation and to avoid ventilator-induced lung injury and substances that may complicate subsequent care. Intubation should be considered if any of the following signs exist: respiratory distress, stridor, hypoventilation, use of accessory respiratory muscles, blistering or edema of the oropharynx, or deep burns to the face or neck. Any patients suspected to have inhalation injuries should receive a high concentration of supplemental oxygen to quickly reverse hypoxia and to displace carbon monoxide from protein binding sites. Management of carbon monoxide and cyanide exposure in smoke inhalation patients remains controversial. Absolute indications for hyperbaric oxygen therapy do not exist because there is a low correlation between carboxyhemoglobin levels and the severity of the clinical state. A cyanide antidote should be administered when cyanide poisoning is clinically suspected. Although an ideal approach for respiratory support of patients with inhalation injuries do not exist, it is important that they are supported using techniques that do not further exacerbate respiratory failure. A well-organized strategy for patients with inhalation injury is critical to reduce morbidity and mortality. PMID:27147888

  10. Intestinal circulation during inhalation anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Tverskoy, M.; Gelman, S.; Fowler, K.C.; Bradley, E.L.

    1985-04-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the influence of inhalational agents on the intestinal circulation in an isolated loop preparation. Sixty dogs were studied, using three intestinal segments from each dog. Selected intestinal segments were pumped with aortic blood at a constant pressure of 100 mmHg. A mixture of /sub 86/Rb and 9-microns spheres labeled with /sup 141/Ce was injected into the arterial cannula supplying the intestinal loop, while mesenteric venous blood was collected for activity counting. A very strong and significant correlation was found between rubidium clearance and microsphere entrapment (r = 0.97, P less than 0.0001). Nitrous oxide anesthesia was accompanied by a higher vascular resistance (VR), lower flow (F), rubidium clearance (Cl-Rb), and microspheres entrapment (Cl-Sph) than pentobarbital anesthesia, indicating that the vascular bed in the intestinal segment was constricted and flow (total and nutritive) decreased. Halothane, enflurane, and isoflurane anesthesia were accompanied by a much lower arteriovenous oxygen content difference (AVDO/sub 2/) and oxygen uptake than pentobarbital or nitrous oxide. Compared with pentobarbital, enflurane anesthesia was not accompanied by marked differences in VR, F, Cl-Rb, and Cl-Sph; halothane at 2 MAC decreased VR and increased F and Cl-Rb while isoflurane increased VR and decreased F. alpha-Adrenoceptor blockade with phentolamine (1 mg . kg-1) abolished isoflurane-induced vasoconstriction, suggesting that the increase in VR was mediated via circulating catecholamines.

  11. Systems Pharmacology Approach Toward the Design of Inhaled Formulations of Rifampicin and Isoniazid for Treatment of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Cilfone, NA; Pienaar, E; Thurber, GM; Kirschner, DE; Linderman, JJ

    2015-01-01

    Conventional oral therapies for the treatment of tuberculosis are limited by poor antibiotic distribution in granulomas, which contributes to lengthy treatment regimens and inadequate bacterial sterilization. Inhaled formulations are a promising strategy to increase antibiotic efficacy and reduce dose frequency. We develop a multiscale computational approach that accounts for simultaneous dynamics of a lung granuloma, carrier release kinetics, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics. Using this computational platform, we predict that a rationally designed inhaled formulation of isoniazid given at a significantly reduced dose frequency has better sterilizing capabilities and reduced toxicity than the current oral regimen. Furthermore, we predict that inhaled formulations of rifampicin require unrealistic carrier antibiotic loadings that lead to early toxicity concerns. Lastly, we predict that targeting carriers to macrophages has limited effects on treatment efficacy. Our platform can be extended to account for additional antibiotics and provides a new tool for rapidly prototyping the efficacy of inhaled formulations. PMID:26225241

  12. Effect of Inhaled Nitric Oxide on Pulmonary Function After Sepsis in a Swine Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-01

    exact mechanism by which sepsis affects the pul- disease, adult respiratory distress syndrome ( ARDS ), monary system is unknown. Activation of both lcuko...the areas to normal V.\\/Q areas. These changes attenuated adult respiratory distress syndrome . (tin Infect l)is 1992;14: 1213-28.the incrcase in V/Q...in patients with does not improve Vx/Q mismatching to the same degree adult respiratory distress syndrome . Anesthesiology 1989:70: when low V.\\/Q

  13. Systemic disposition of inhaled nitric oxide, a significant somponent of vehicular emissions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies have associated airborne pollution with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Furthermore, air pollution-associated gases, primarily from mobile source emissions (e.g. NOx), have been linked to increased cardiovascular death. A mechanism for these effects has...

  14. Nanoparticle Inhalation Increases Microvascular Oxidative Stress and Compromises Nitric Oxide Bioavailability

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have shown that pulmonary nanoparticle exposure impairs endothelium dependent dilation in systemic arterioles. However, the mechanism(s) through which this effect occurs are unclear. The purpose of this study was to identify alterations in the production of oxidative stress an...

  15. 75 FR 43535 - NIH Consensus Development Conference on Inhaled Nitric Oxide Therapy for Premature Infants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-26

    ... charged with reviewing the available published literature in advance of the conference, including a systematic literature review commissioned through the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. The...

  16. [Inhalation therapy by dose-inhalers: analysis of patients performance and possibilities for improvement].

    PubMed

    Petro, W; Schuppenies, A

    2005-05-01

    Inhalation therapy in chronic obstructive airways disease requires an efficient inhalation technique. This study analyses step by step the mistakes made in the usage of different MDIs, relates these to patient information prior to the testing and examines several teaching procedures for improvement of knowledge and performance of the inhalation technique. 125 patients suffering from COPD were assigned to six different groups according to their background knowledge in the inhalation technique. The performance was assessed in standardized single steps and as overall performance. Furthermore the efficacy of an interactive pc-based-training program was evaluated. The worst performance was seen in patients who only used the suppliers medication leaflet as a guide. Patients trained in outpatient clinics as well as patients trained in small groups during an inpatient stay showed a better performance. A high improvement rate was seen in prior MDI naive patients after they had undergone the interactive pc-based training program. Most problems were detected in the application step "exhalation before inhalation" and in the actuation-inhalation step. Besides the classical and the pc-based training the use of MDI phantoms showed very good results. The practical conclusion of this study is that the ability of patients to use inhalation pharmacotherapy efficiently needs improvement. Training programs of different intensity lead to a different outcome in performance and knowledge depending on prior knowledge. Inhalation pharmacotherapy without adequate training is insufficient.

  17. Automatic identification and accurate temporal detection of inhalations in asthma inhaler recordings.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Martin S; Le Menn, Marine; D'Arcy, Shona; Rapcan, Viliam; MacHale, Elaine; Costello, Richard W; Reilly, Richard B

    2012-01-01

    Asthma is chronic airways disease characterized by recurrent attacks of breathlessness and wheezing. Adherence to medication regimes is a common failing for asthmatic patients and there exists a requirement to monitor such patients' adherence. The detection of inhalations from recordings of inhaler use can provide empirical evidence about patients' adherence to their asthma medication regime. Manually listening to recordings of inhaler use is a tedious and time consuming process and thus an algorithm which can automatically and accurately carry out this task would be of great value. This study employs a recording device attached to a commonly used dry powder inhaler to record the acoustic signals of patients taking their prescribed medication. An algorithm was developed to automatically detect and accurately demarcate inhalations from the acoustic signals. This algorithm was tested on a dataset of 255 separate recordings of inhaler use in real world environments. The dataset was obtained from 12 asthma outpatients who attended a respiratory clinic over a three month period. Evaluation of the algorithm on this dataset achieved sensitivity of 95%, specificity of 94% and an accuracy of 89% in detecting inhalations compared to manual inhalation detection.

  18. Inhalant Initiation and the Relationship of Inhalant Use to the Use of Other Substances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shamblen, Stephen R.; Miller, Ted

    2012-01-01

    Conventional wisdom suggests that inhalant use is primarily isolated to youthful experimentation; however, a growing body of evidence suggests that inhalant use (a) occurs after use of common substances of experimentation (e.g., alcohol, marijuana), (b) can persist into later life, and (c) is associated with severe consequences. The current study…

  19. Checklists for the Assessment of Correct Inhalation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Knipel, V; Schwarz, S; Magnet, F S; Storre, J H; Criée, C P; Windisch, W

    2017-02-01

    Introduction For the long-term treatment of obstructive lung diseases inhalation therapy with drugs being delivered directly to the lungs as an aerosol has become the method of choice. However, patient-related mistakes in inhalation techniques are frequent and recognized to be associated with reduced disease control. Since the assessment of patient-mistakes in inhalation has yet not been standardized, the present study was aimed at developing checklists for the assessment of correct inhalation. Methods Checklists were developed in German by an expert panel of pneumologists and professionally translated into English following back-translation procedures. The checklists comparably assessed three major steps of inhalation: 1) inhalation preparation, 2) inhalation routine, and 3) closure of inhalation. Results Checklists for eight frequently used inhalers were developed: Aerolizer, Breezhaler, Diskus (Accuhaler), metered-dose inhaler, Handihaler, Novolizer, Respimat, Turbohaler. Each checklist consists of ten items: three for inhalation preparation, six for inhalation routine, and one for closure of inhalation. Discussion Standardized checklists for frequently used inhalers are available in German and English. These checklists can be used for clinical routines or for clinical trials. All checklists can be downloaded free of charge for non-profit application from the homepage of the German Airway League (Deutsche Atemwegsliga e. V.): www.atemwegsliga.de.

  20. Effect of Disease Severity in Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease on Inhaler-Specific Inhalation Profiles Through the ELLIPTA® Dry Powder Inhaler

    PubMed Central

    de Backer, Wilfried; Hamilton, Melanie; Cahn, Anthony; Preece, Andrew; Kelleher, Dennis; Baines, Amanda; Moore, Alison; Brealey, Noushin; Moynihan, Jackie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Two studies were undertaken to characterize the maximal effort inhalation profiles of healthy subjects and patients with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) through a moderate-resistance dry powder inhaler (DPI). Correlations between inhaler-specific inhalation characteristics and inhaler-independent lung function parameters were investigated. Methods: Healthy subjects (n = 15), patients with mild, moderate, or severe asthma (n = 45), and patients with mild, moderate, severe, or very-severe COPD (n = 60) were included in the studies. Inhalation pressure drop versus time profiles were recorded using an instrumented ELLIPTA® DPI or bespoke resistor component with equivalent resistivity. Inhaler-independent lung function assessments included pharyngometry, spirometry, plethysmography, and diffusion. Results: For the inhaler-specific inhalation profiles, the mean maximal effort peak inspiratory flow rates (PIFRs) varied across the subgroups from 65.8–110.6 L/min (range: 41.6–142.9). Peak pressure drop, PIFR, inhaled volume, and average inhalation flow rate (primary endpoints) did not differ markedly between healthy subjects and patients with asthma or mild COPD. Moderate, severe, and very-severe COPD patients demonstrated lower mean peak pressure drops, PIFRs and inhaled volumes, which tended to decrease with increasing COPD severity. Severe and very-severe COPD patients demonstrated shorter mean inhalation times compared with all other participants. Inhaler-independent lung function parameters were consistent with disease severity, and statistically significant (p < 0.05) strong correlations (R > 0.7) with components of the inhaler-specific inhalation profiles were observed in the COPD cohort; correlations in the asthma cohort tended to be weaker. Conclusions: All participants achieved a maximal effort PIFR ≥ 41.6 L/min through the moderate resistance of the ELLIPTA inhaler. Patients with asthma

  1. Olfactory deposition of inhaled nanoparticles in humans

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Guilherme J. M.; Schroeter, Jeffry D.; Kimbell, Julia S.

    2016-01-01

    Context Inhaled nanoparticles can migrate to the brain via the olfactory bulb, as demonstrated in experiments in several animal species. This route of exposure may be the mechanism behind the correlation between air pollution and human neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. Objectives This manuscript aims to (1) estimate the dose of inhaled nanoparticles that deposit in the human olfactory epithelium during nasal breathing at rest and (2) compare the olfactory dose in humans with our earlier dose estimates for rats. Materials and methods An anatomically-accurate model of the human nasal cavity was developed based on computed tomography scans. The deposition of 1–100 nm particles in the whole nasal cavity and its olfactory region were estimated via computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Our CFD methods were validated by comparing our numerical predictions for whole-nose deposition with experimental data and previous CFD studies in the literature. Results In humans, olfactory dose of inhaled nanoparticles is highest for 1–2 nm particles with approximately 1% of inhaled particles depositing in the olfactory region. As particle size grows to 100 nm, olfactory deposition decreases to 0.01% of inhaled particles. Discussion and conclusion Our results suggest that the percentage of inhaled particles that deposit in the olfactory region is lower in humans than in rats. However, olfactory dose per unit surface area is estimated to be higher in humans due to their larger minute volume. These dose estimates are important for risk assessment and dose-response studies investigating the neurotoxicity of inhaled nanoparticles. PMID:26194036

  2. [Nitric oxide production in plants].

    PubMed

    Małolepsza, Urszula

    2007-01-01

    There are still many controversial observations and opinions on the cellular/subcellular localization and sources of endogenous nitric oxide synthesis in plant cells. NO can be produced in plants by non-enzymatic and enzymatic systems depending on plant species, organ or tissue as well as on physiological state of the plant and changing environmental conditions. The best documented reactions in plant that contribute to NO production are NO production from nitrite as a substrate by cytosolic (cNR) and membrane bound (PM-NR) nitrate reductases (NR), and NO production by several arginine-dependent nitric oxide synthase-like activities (NOS). The latest papers indicate that mitochondria are an important source of arginine- and nitrite-dependent NO production in plants. There are other potential enzymatic sources of NO in plants including xanthine oxidoreductase, peroxidase, cytochrome P450.

  3. Nitric Oxide Production in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Planchet, Elisabeth

    2006-01-01

    There is now general agreement that nitric oxide (NO) is an important and almost universal signal in plants. Nevertheless, there are still many controversial observations and opinions on the importance and function of NO in plants. Partly, this may be due to the difficulties in detecting and even more in quantifying NO. Here, we summarize major pathways of NO production in plants, and briefly discuss some methodical problems. PMID:19521475

  4. Nitric oxide reburning with methane

    SciTech Connect

    Kumpaty, S.K.; Subramanian, K.

    1996-12-31

    This paper deals with initial findings from the ongoing, three-year DOE program that began on 02/01/1995. The program involves computer simulation studies to aid in planning and conducting a series of experiments that will extend the knowledge of reburning process. The objective of this work is to find nitric oxide reduction effectiveness for various reburning fuels and identify both homogeneous and heterogeneous reaction mechanisms characterizing NO reduction.

  5. Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2016-01-01

    Corrosion is an extensive problem that affects the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and European Space Agency (ESA). The deleterious effects of corrosion result in steep costs, asset downtime affecting mission readiness, and safety risks to personnel. It is vital to reduce corrosion costs and risks in a sustainable manner. The primary objective of this effort is to qualify citric acid as an environmentally-preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys.

  6. [Health significance of inhaled particles].

    PubMed

    Gillissen, A; Gessner, C; Hammerschmidt, S; Hoheisel, G; Wirtz, H

    2006-03-24

    Particulates refer to particles, dust, dirt, soot and aerosol mists that has suspended in the surrounding air. They may consist of solids of various forms including fibres or liquids. Long term exposure to silicon dioxide containing dusts (crystalline silica: quartz, tridymite, cristobalite, coesite, stishovite) may cause pneumoconiosis in the form of acute or/either chronic silicosis. Asbestos refers to a divers family of crystalline hydrated fibrous siliates typically exhibiting a greater tha 3:1 length ot diameter ratio. It is subdivided into serpentine (Chrysotile) and amphibole (crocidolite, amosite, anthophyllite, tremolite, actinolite). Exposure to asbestos fibres may cause lung fibrosis and promote cancer of the lung or the pleura. Besides the induction of malignant diseases dust exposure may result in obstructive as well as restrictive lung diseases which may be compensate in case of the recognition as a occupational diseases. Other occupational exposures leading to pneumoconiosis are caused be talc, or metals including aluminium containing dusts. Also the group of man-made mineral (MMMFs) or vitreous fibres (MMVFs), including glass wool, rock wool, slag wool, glass filaments, microfibres, refractory ceramic fibres are bioactive under certain experimental conditions. Although it has been shown that MMMFs may cause malignancies when injected intraperitoneally in high quantities in rodents, inhalation trials and human studies could not reproduce these results in the same precision. Fine particles (particulate matter = PM) comprise one of the most widespread and harmful air pollutants in the industrialized world. PM may cause worsening of asthma and other respiratory diseases, reduce lung function development in children, potentially increased the risk of premature death in the elderly and enhance mortality from cardiac diseases. Because of the small size PM2.5 is seen to be even more hazardous than PM10.

  7. Antitubercular inhaled therapy: opportunities, progress and challenges.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Rajesh; Khuller, G K

    2005-04-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis remains the commonest form of this disease and the development of methods for delivering antitubercular drugs directly to the lungs via the respiratory route is a rational therapeutic goal. The obvious advantages of inhaled therapy include direct drug delivery to the diseased organ, targeting to alveolar macrophages harbouring the mycobacteria, reduced risk of systemic toxicity and improved patient compliance. Research efforts have demonstrated the feasibility of various drug delivery systems employing liposomes, polymeric microparticles and nanoparticles to serve as inhalable antitubercular drug carriers. In particular, nanoparticles have emerged as a remarkably useful tool for this purpose. While some researchers have preferred dry powder inhalers, others have emphasized nebulization. Beginning with the respiratory delivery of a single antitubercular drug, it is now possible to deliver multiple drugs simultaneously with a greater therapeutic efficacy. More experience and expertise have been observed with synthetic polymers, nevertheless, the possibility of using natural polymers for inhaled therapy has yet to be explored. Several key issues such as patient education, cost of treatment, stability and large scale production of drug formulations, etc. need to be addressed before antitubercular inhaled therapy finds its way from theory to clinical reality.

  8. Inhaled linalool-induced sedation in mice.

    PubMed

    Linck, Viviane Moura; da Silva, Adriana Lourenço; Figueiró, Micheli; Piato, Angelo Luis; Herrmann, Ana Paula; Dupont Birck, Franciele; Caramão, Elina Bastos; Nunes, Domingos Sávio; Moreno, Paulo Roberto H; Elisabetsky, Elaine

    2009-04-01

    Linalool is a monoterpene often found as a major component of essential oils obtained from aromatic plant species, many of which are used in traditional medical systems as hypno-sedatives. Psychopharmacological evaluations of linalool (i.p. and i.c.v.) revealed marked sedative and anticonvulsant central effects in various mouse models. Considering this profile and alleged effects of inhaled lavender essential oil, the purpose of this study was to examine the sedative effects of inhaled linalool in mice. Mice were placed in an inhalation chamber during 60 min, in an atmosphere saturated with 1% or 3% linalool. Immediately after inhalation, animals were evaluated regarding locomotion, barbiturate-induced sleeping time, body temperature and motor coordination (rota-rod test). The 1% and 3% linalool increased (p<0.01) pentobarbital sleeping time and reduced (p<0.01) body temperature. The 3% linalool decreased (p<0.01) locomotion. Motor coordination was not affected. Hence, linalool inhaled for 1h seems to induce sedation without significant impairment in motor abilities, a side effect shared by most psycholeptic drugs.

  9. IRIS Toxicological Review of Formaldehyde (Inhalation) ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    UPDATE EPA is currently revising its Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) assessment of formaldehyde to address the 2011 NAS peer review recommendations. This assessment addresses both noncancer and cancer human health effects that are relevant to assessing the risks from chronic inhalation exposure to formaldehyde. To facilitate discussion of several scientific issues pertinent to the assessment, EPA convened a state-of-the-science workshop on April 30 and May 1, 2014. This workshop focused on the following three themes: Evidence pertaining to the influence of formaldehyde that is produced endogenously (by the body during normal biological processes) on the toxicity of inhaled formaldehyde, and implications for the health assessment; Mechanistic evidence relevant to formaldehyde inhalation exposure and lymphohematopoietic cancers (leukemia and lymphomas); and Epidemiological research examining the potential association between formaldehyde exposure and lymphohematopoietic cancers (leukemia and lymphomas). June 2010: EPA is conducting an independent expert peer review by the National Academy of Sciences and public comment of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of Formaldehyde-Inhalation that when finalized will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database. This draft IRIS health assessment addresses both noncancer and cancer human health effects that may result from chronic inhal

  10. Deposition and biokinetics of inhaled nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Particle biokinetics is important in hazard identification and characterization of inhaled particles. Such studies intend to convert external to internal exposure or biologically effective dose, and may help to set limits in that way. Here we focus on the biokinetics of inhaled nanometer sized particles in comparison to micrometer sized ones. The presented approach ranges from inhaled particle deposition probability and retention in the respiratory tract to biokinetics and clearance of particles out of the respiratory tract. Particle transport into the blood circulation (translocation), towards secondary target organs and tissues (accumulation), and out of the body (clearance) is considered. The macroscopically assessed amount of particles in the respiratory tract and secondary target organs provides dose estimates for toxicological studies on the level of the whole organism. Complementary, microscopic analyses at the individual particle level provide detailed information about which cells and subcellular components are the target of inhaled particles. These studies contribute to shed light on mechanisms and modes of action eventually leading to adverse health effects by inhaled nanoparticles. We review current methods for macroscopic and microscopic analyses of particle deposition, retention and clearance. Existing macroscopic knowledge on particle biokinetics and microscopic views on particle organ interactions are discussed comparing nanometer and micrometer sized particles. We emphasize the importance for quantitative analyses and the use of particle doses derived from real world exposures. PMID:20205860

  11. Temperature and Nitric Oxide Generation in a Pulsed Arc Discharge Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namihira, T.; Sakai, S.; Matsuda, M.; D., Wang; Kiyan, T.; Akiyama, H.; Okamoto, K.; Toda, K.

    2007-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is increasingly being used in medical treatments of high blood pressure, acute respiratory distress syndrome and other illnesses related to the lungs. Currently a NO inhalation system consists of a gas cylinder of N2 mixed with a high concentration of NO. This arrangement is potentially risky due to the possibility of an accidental leak of NO from the cylinder. The presence of NO in the air leads to the formation of nitric dioxide (NO2), which is toxic to the lungs. Therefore, an on-site generator of NO would be highly desirable for medical doctors to use with patients with lung disease. To develop the NO inhalation system without a gas cylinder, which would include a high concentration of NO, NAMIHIRA et al have recently reported on the production of NO from room air using a pulsed arc discharge. In the present work, the temperature of the pulsed arc discharge plasma used to generate NO was measured to optimize the discharge condition. The results of the temperature measurements showed the temperature of the pulsed arc discharge plasma reached about 10,000 K immediately after discharge initiation and gradually decreased over tens of microseconds. In addition, it was found that NO was formed in a discharge plasma having temperatures higher than 9,000 K and a smaller input energy into the discharge plasma generates NO more efficiently than a larger one.

  12. Acute anti-inflammatory effects of inhaled budesonide in asthma: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Gibson, P G; Saltos, N; Fakes, K

    2001-01-01

    Corticosteroids can have acute effects on airway function and methacholine airway responsiveness in asthma as early as 6 h after dosing, suggesting there may be an acute anti-inflammatory effect of inhaled corticosteroid in asthma. This study aimed to determine the effects of a single dose of inhaled budesonide on sputum eosinophils and mast cells in adults with asthma, and to examine whether the mechanism of clearance of eosinophils was by apoptosis. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study was conducted. At the screening visit, adults with stable asthma (n = 41) ceased inhaled corticosteroid therapy for 4 d and those with significant sputum eosinophilia (> or = 7%) were randomized (n = 26) to a single dose of budesonide 2,400 microg or placebo via Turbuhaler, on two separate study days. Symptoms and lung function were followed for 6 h, then sputum was induced and airway responsiveness to hypertonic saline determined. Sputum eosinophils (mean, SE) were significantly lower 6 h after budesonide (25%, 4.5), compared with placebo (37%, 6.2, p < 0.05). There was a 2.2-fold (95% CI 1.45 to 3.33) improvement in airway responsiveness with budesonide. No significant difference was seen on mast cells, apoptotic eosinophils, symptoms, or lung function. In conclusion, a single dose of inhaled corticosteroids has beneficial effects on airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness as early as 6 h after dosing. This may be clinically useful as therapy during mild exacerbations of asthma.

  13. Nitric oxide: a challenge to chiropractic

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Lon

    2000-01-01

    The 1998 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine recognized the biological significance of nitric oxide. Nitric oxide is derived from the amino acid arginine. It is intimately involved with circulatory vessel dilation where, for example, it protects against heart attacks, and is the basis for new medications such as Sildenafil (Viagra). Nitric oxide acts as a neurotransmitter and can modulate many neurological reactions. The immune system uses nitric oxide to destroy pathogens by interfering with key enzymes. Nitric oxide is responsible for both osteoclastic and osteoblastic responses in bone and is a key player in the degenerative aspects of arthritis. The process of apoptosis employs nitric oxide in the orderly removal of unneeded cells. There is clear evidence that major signaling and control mechanisms exist in the body apart from the nervous system. Chiropractic is thus faced with the challenge of how to incorporate this new knowledge which conflicts with traditional chiropractic concepts.

  14. A novel sulfur mustard (HD) vapor inhalation exposure system for accurate inhaled dose delivery

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Mark R.; Benson, Eric M.; Kohne, Jonathon W.; Plahovinsak, Jennifer L.; Babin, Michael C.; Platoff, Gennady E.; Yeung, David T.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A custom designed HD exposure system was used to deliver controlled inhaled doses to an animal model through an endotracheal tube. Methods Target HD vapor challenges were generated by a temperature controlled bubbler/aerosol trap, while concentration was monitored near real-time by gas chromatography. Animal breathing parameters were monitored real-time by an in-line pneumotach, pressure transducer, and Buxco pulmonary analysis computer/software. For each exposure, the challenge atmosphere was allowed to stabilize at the desired concentration while the anesthetized animal was provided humidity controlled clean air. Once the target concentration was achieved and stable, a portion of the challenge atmosphere was drawn past the endotracheal tube, where the animal inhaled the exposure ad libitum. During the exposure, HD vapor concentration and animal weight were used to calculate the needed inhaled volume to achieve the target inhaled dose (μg/kg). The exposures were halted when the inhaled volume was achieved. Results The exposure system successfully controlled HD concentrations from 22.2 to 278 mg/m3 and accurately delivered inhaled doses between 49.3 and 1120 μg/kg with actual administered doses being within 4% of the target level. Discussion This exposure system administers specific HD inhaled doses to evaluate physiological effects and for evaluation of potential medical countermeasure treatments. PMID:25291290

  15. Vapor inhalation of alcohol in rats.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, Nicholas W; Richardson, Heather N; Cole, Maury; Koob, George F

    2008-07-01

    Alcohol dependence constitutes a neuroadaptive state critical for understanding alcoholism, and various methods have been utilized to induce alcohol dependence in animals, one of which is alcohol vapor exposure. Alcohol vapor inhalation provides certain advantages over other chronic alcohol exposure procedures that share the ultimate goal of producing alcohol dependence in rats. Chronic alcohol vapor inhalation allows the experimenter to control the dose, duration, and pattern of alcohol exposure. Also, this procedure facilitates testing of somatic and motivational aspects of alcohol dependence. Chronic exposure to alcohol vapor produces increases in alcohol-drinking behavior, increases in anxiety-like behavior, and reward deficits in rats. Alcohol vapor inhalation as a laboratory protocol is flexible, and the parameters of this procedure can be adjusted to accommodate the specific aims of different experiments. This unit describes the options available to investigators using this procedure for dependence induction, when different options are more or less appropriate, and the implications of each.

  16. NITRIC ACID RECPVERY FROM WASTE COLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, A.S.

    1959-04-14

    The recovery of nitric acid from aqueous nitrate solutions containing fission products as impurities is described. It is desirable to subject such solutions to concentration by evaporation since nitric acid is regenerated thereby. A difficulty, however, is that the highly radioactive fission product ruthenium is volatilized together with the nitric acid. It has been found that by adding nitrous acids ruthenium volatilization is suppressed and reduced to a negligible degree so that the distillate obtained is practically free of rutheniuim.

  17. Nitric acid recovery from waste solutions

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, A. S.

    1959-04-14

    The recovery of nitric acid from aqueous nitrate solutions containing fission products as impurities is described. It is desirable to subject such solutions to concentration by evaporation since nitric acid is regenerated thereby. A difficulty, however, is that the highly radioactive fission product ruthenium is volatilized together with the nitric acid. It has been found that by adding nitrous acid, ruthenium volatilization is suppressed and reduced to a negligible degree so that the distillate obtained is practically free of ruthenium.

  18. Nitric oxide in marine photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Castellano, Immacolata; Patti, Francesco Paolo; Palumbo, Anna; Buia, Maria Cristina

    2015-05-01

    Nitric oxide is a versatile and powerful signaling molecule in plants. However, most of our understanding stems from studies on terrestrial plants and very little is known about marine autotrophs. This review summarizes current knowledge about the source of nitric oxide synthesis in marine photosynthetic organisms and its role in various physiological processes under normal and stress conditions. The interactions of nitric oxide with other stress signals and cross talk among secondary messengers are also highlighted.

  19. The Oxidation of Hydrazine by Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Karraker, D.G.

    2001-07-02

    Hydrazine nitrate-nitric acid solutions are used in the ion exchange process for separating Pu-238 and Np-237 and have been found to dissolve plutonium metal in a manner advantageous to SRP metal recovery operations. Laboratory tests on the stability of hydrazine in nitric acid solutions were performed to obtain accurate data, and the results of these tests are reported here. These tests provide sufficient information to specify temperature control for hydrazine-nitric acid solutions in plant processes.

  20. Inhaled Antibiotics for Lower Airway Infections

    PubMed Central

    Quon, Bradley S.; Goss, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    Inhaled antibiotics have been used to treat chronic airway infections since the 1940s. The earliest experience with inhaled antibiotics involved aerosolizing antibiotics designed for parenteral administration. These formulations caused significant bronchial irritation due to added preservatives and nonphysiologic chemical composition. A major therapeutic advance took place in 1997, when tobramycin designed for inhalation was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Attracted by the clinical benefits observed in CF and the availability of dry powder antibiotic formulations, there has been a growing interest in the use of inhaled antibiotics in other lower respiratory tract infections, such as non-CF bronchiectasis, ventilator-associated pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, mycobacterial disease, and in the post–lung transplant setting over the past decade. Antibiotics currently marketed for inhalation include nebulized and dry powder forms of tobramycin and colistin and nebulized aztreonam. Although both the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency have approved their use in CF, they have not been approved in other disease areas due to lack of supportive clinical trial evidence. Injectable formulations of gentamicin, tobramycin, amikacin, ceftazidime, and amphotericin are currently nebulized “off-label” to manage non-CF bronchiectasis, drug-resistant nontuberculous mycobacterial infections, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and post-transplant airway infections. Future inhaled antibiotic trials must focus on disease areas outside of CF with sample sizes large enough to evaluate clinically important endpoints such as exacerbations. Extrapolating from CF, the impact of eradicating organisms such as P. aeruginosa in non-CF bronchiectasis should also be evaluated. PMID:24673698

  1. Cow Dung Ingestion and Inhalation Dependence: A Case Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khairkar, Praveen; Tiple, Prashant; Bang, Govind

    2009-01-01

    Although abuse of several unusual inhalants had been documented, addiction to cow dung fumes or their ashes has not been reported in medical literature as yet. We are reporting a case of cow dung dependence in ingestion and inhalational form.

  2. INHALATION EXPOSURE-RESPONSE ASSESSMENTS FOR FIVE CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inhalation exposure-response assessments for five chemicals (acrolein, ethylene oxide, hexachlorocyclopentadiene, hydrogen sulfide, and phosgene) for less-than-lifetime durations are being developed to inform the development of the Inhalation Exposure-Response Analysis Methodolog...

  3. Ozone Inhalation Impairs Coronary Artery Dilation via Intracellular Oxidative Stress: Evidence for Serum-Borne Factors as Drivers of Systemic Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Paffett, Michael L.; Zychowski, Katherine E.; Sheppard, Lianne; Robertson, Sarah; Weaver, John M.; Lucas, Selita N.; Campen, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Ambient ozone (O3) levels are associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, but the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms driving extrapulmonary toxicity remain unclear. This study examined the coronary vascular bed of rats in terms of constrictive and dilatory responses to known agonists following a single O3 inhalation exposure. In addition, serum from exposed rats was used in ex vivo preparations to examine whether bioactivity and toxic effects of inhaled O3 could be conveyed to extrapulmonary systems via the circulation. We found that 24 h following inhalation of 1 ppm O3, isolated coronary vessels exhibited greater basal tone and constricted to a greater degree to serotonin stimulation. Vasodilation to acetylcholine (ACh) was markedly diminished in coronary arteries from O3-exposed rats, compared with filtered air-exposed controls. Dilation to ACh was restored by combined superoxide dismutase and catalase treatment, and also by NADPH oxidase inhibition. When dilute (10%) serum from exposed rats was perfused into the lumen of coronary arteries from unexposed, naïve rats, the O3-induced reduction in vasodilatory response to ACh was partially recapitulated. Furthermore, following O3 inhalation, serum exhibited a nitric oxide scavenging capacity, which may partially explain blunted ACh-mediated vasodilatory responses. Thus, bioactivity from inhalation exposures may be due to compositional changes of the circulation. These studies shed light on possible mechanisms of action that may explain O3-associated cardiac morbidity and mortality in humans. PMID:25962394

  4. A Common variant in RAB27A gene is associated with fractional exhaled nitric oxide levels in adults

    PubMed Central

    Bouzigon, Emmanuelle; Nadif, Rachel; Thompson, Emma E.; Concas, Maria Pina; Kuldanek, Susan; Du, Gaixin; Brossard, Myriam; Lavielle, Nolwenn; Sarnowski, Chloé; Vaysse, Amaury; Dessen, Philippe; van der Valk, Ralf JP; Duijts, Liesbeth; Henderson, A John; Jaddoe, Vincent WV; de Jongste, Johan C; Dizier, Marie-Hélène; Pin, Isabelle; Matran, Régis; Lathrop, Mark; Pirastu, Mario; Demenais, Florence; Ober, Carole

    2015-01-01

    Background Exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) is a biomarker for eosinophilic inflammation in the airways and for responsiveness to corticosteroids in asthmatics. Objective We sought to identify in adults the genetic determinants of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) levels and to assess whether environmental and disease-related factors influence these associations. Methods We performed a genome-wide association study of FeNO through meta-analysis of two independent discovery samples of European ancestry: the outbred EGEA study (French Epidemiological study on the Genetics and Environment of Asthma, N=610 adults) and the Hutterites (N=601 adults), a founder population living on communal farms. Replication of main findings was assessed in adults from an isolated village in Sardinia (Talana study, N=450). We then investigated the influence of asthma, atopy and tobacco smoke exposure on these genetic associations and whether they were also associated with FeNO values in children of the EAGLE (EArly Genetics & Lifecourse Epidemiology, N=8,858) consortium. Results We detected a common variant in RAB27A (rs2444043) associated with FeNO that reached the genome-wide significant level (P=1.6×10−7) in the combined discovery and replication adult datasets. This SNP belongs to member of RAS oncogene family (RAB27A) and was associated with an expression quantitative trait locus for RAB27A in lymphoblastoid cell lines from asthmatics. A second suggestive locus (rs2194437, P=8.9×10−7) located nearby the sodium/calcium exchanger 1 (SLC8A1) was mainly detected in atopic subjects and influenced by inhaled corticosteroid use. These two loci were not associated with childhood FeNO values. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance This study identified a common variant located in RAB27A gene influencing FeNO levels specifically in adults and with a biological relevance to the regulation of FeNO levels. This study provides new insight into the biological mechanisms underlying FeNO levels in

  5. Early intrauterine exposure to tobacco-inhaled products and obesity.

    PubMed

    Toschke, A M; Montgomery, S M; Pfeiffer, U; von Kries, R

    2003-12-01

    An association between maternal smoking during pregnancy and offspring obesity has been reported. This study assessed the impact of maternal smoking during the first trimester. Data on 4,974 German children aged 5-6 years were obtained at school entry health examinations in 2001-2002 in Bavaria. Obesity was defined by body mass index using International Obesity Task Force cutpoints. Prevalence of obesity was 1.9% (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.5, 2.4) in offspring of never smokers, 4.5% (95% CI: 2.9, 6.7) for maternal smoking during the first trimester only, and 5.9% (95% CI: 3.8, 8.7) for maternal smoking throughout pregnancy. Unadjusted odds ratios were higher for maternal smoking throughout pregnancy (odds ratio = 3.23, 95% CI: 2.00, 5.21) compared with the first trimester only (odds ratio = 2.41, 95% CI: 1.49, 3.91). Adjusted odds ratios were similar: 1.70 (95% CI: 1.02, 2.87) for maternal smoking throughout pregnancy and 2.22 (95% CI: 1.33, 3.69) for maternal smoking in the first trimester only. When modeled together, no statistically significant difference in obesity risk was found between maternal smoking in the first trimester compared with throughout pregnancy. The effect of intrauterine tobacco exposure on childhood obesity may depend largely on cigarette smoking during the first trimester, whereas the additional impact of smoking throughout pregnancy might be due to confounding by sociodemographics. Women should be encouraged to quit smoking prior to conception.

  6. 49 CFR 172.429 - POISON INHALATION HAZARD label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false POISON INHALATION HAZARD label. 172.429 Section... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.429 POISON INHALATION HAZARD label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON INHALATION HAZARD label must be as follows: ER22JY97.023 (b) In addition to...

  7. 49 CFR 172.555 - POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard. 172.555 Section... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Placarding § 172.555 POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard must be as follows: ER22JY97.025 (b) In addition...

  8. 49 CFR 172.555 - POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard. 172.555 Section... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Placarding § 172.555 POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard must be as follows: ER22JY97.025 (b) In addition...

  9. 49 CFR 172.429 - POISON INHALATION HAZARD label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false POISON INHALATION HAZARD label. 172.429 Section... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.429 POISON INHALATION HAZARD label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON INHALATION HAZARD label must be as follows: ER22JY97.023 (b) In addition to...

  10. 49 CFR 172.555 - POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard. 172.555 Section... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Placarding § 172.555 POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard must be as follows: ER22JY97.025 (b) In addition...

  11. 49 CFR 172.555 - POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard. 172.555 Section... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Placarding § 172.555 POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard must be as follows: ER22JY97.025 (b) In addition...

  12. 49 CFR 172.429 - POISON INHALATION HAZARD label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false POISON INHALATION HAZARD label. 172.429 Section... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.429 POISON INHALATION HAZARD label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON INHALATION HAZARD label must be as follows: ER22JY97.023 (b) In addition to...

  13. 49 CFR 172.429 - POISON INHALATION HAZARD label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false POISON INHALATION HAZARD label. 172.429 Section... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.429 POISON INHALATION HAZARD label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON INHALATION HAZARD label must be as follows: ER22JY97.023 (b) In addition to...

  14. 49 CFR 172.555 - POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard. 172.555 Section... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Placarding § 172.555 POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON INHALATION HAZARD placard must be as follows: ER22JY97.025 (b) In addition...

  15. 49 CFR 172.429 - POISON INHALATION HAZARD label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false POISON INHALATION HAZARD label. 172.429 Section... REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.429 POISON INHALATION HAZARD label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON INHALATION HAZARD label must be as follows: ER22JY97.023 (b) In addition to...

  16. 42 CFR 84.90 - Breathing resistance test; inhalation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Breathing resistance test; inhalation. 84.90...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.90 Breathing resistance test; inhalation. (a) Resistance to inhalation airflow will be measured in the facepiece or mouthpiece while the apparatus is operated by a...

  17. 42 CFR 84.90 - Breathing resistance test; inhalation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Breathing resistance test; inhalation. 84.90...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.90 Breathing resistance test; inhalation. (a) Resistance to inhalation airflow will be measured in the facepiece or mouthpiece while the apparatus is operated by a...

  18. 42 CFR 84.90 - Breathing resistance test; inhalation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Breathing resistance test; inhalation. 84.90...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.90 Breathing resistance test; inhalation. (a) Resistance to inhalation airflow will be measured in the facepiece or mouthpiece while the apparatus is operated by a...

  19. 40 CFR 79.61 - Vehicle emissions inhalation exposure guideline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., densities and shapes, and to predict where in the respiratory tract such particles may be deposited. It... to particles which are capable of being inhaled and may be deposited anywhere within the respiratory...) Principles and design criteria of inhalation exposure systems. Proper conduct of inhalation toxicity...

  20. Physical Symptoms and Psychological Distress among Inhalant Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joe, George W.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Among 110 Mexican-American adolescents with varying drug use histories, self-reported physical health problems were not related to inhalant use history, but blood analyses indicated a relationship between extensive inhalant use and liver problems. Psychological distress symptoms were related to inhalant use and physical symptoms. Contains 23…

  1. Randomised trial of an inhaled β2 agonist, inhaled corticosteroid and their combination in the treatment of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Hancox, R; Cowan, J; Flannery, E; Herbison, G; McLachlan, C; Wong, C; Taylor, D

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Although many asthmatic patients are treated with a combination of β2 agonist and corticosteroid inhalers, the clinical effects of combining the drugs are unknown. Studies on the early asthmatic response to allergen suggest that β2 agonists may reduce the benefit of inhaled corticosteroids. A study of the effects of combining the drugs on asthma control was undertaken.
METHODS—Sixty one subjects with mild to moderate asthma were randomised to a double blind crossover comparison of inhaled budesonide (200-400 µg twice daily), terbutaline (500-1000 µg four times daily), combined treatment, and placebo. Each treatment was given for six weeks following a four week washout period. Ipratropium was used for symptom relief. Treatments were ranked from worst (1) to best (4) based on need for oral steroid, mean morning peak flow, nocturnal awakening, ipratropium use, and asthma symptoms. Lung function and bronchial hyperresponsiveness were measured before and after each treatment.
RESULTS—Evaluable data for all four treatments were obtained from 47 subjects. The mean rank of each treatment was: placebo = 2.05; terbutaline = 2.13; budesonide = 2.48; combined treatment = 3.34.Combined treatment was ranked significantly better than any other treatment (p<0.01). Mean (95% CI) morning and evening peak flows were 14 (5 to 23) and 24 (15 to 34) l/min higher, respectively, during combined treatment than during budesonide, and 27 (17 to 37) and 15 (7 to 23) l/min higher than during terbutaline. Asthma symptoms tended to be least frequent during combined treatment but were not significantly different from budesonide alone. There was no significant difference between combined treatment and budesonide alone for lung function and bronchial hyperresponsiveness.
CONCLUSIONS—In this group of mild to moderate asthmatic subjects the combination of β2 agonist and corticosteroid gave better asthma control than either treatment alone. There was no evidence that

  2. Study of Atmospheric Nitric Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalgarno, A.

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the contribution of energetic nitrogen atoms to the production of nitric oxide in the thermosphere and their influence on the infrared emission spectrum. The nitric oxide molecules are important contributors to the cooling of the atmosphere. We first pointed out that in determining the energy distribution of the nitrogen atoms, it is important to take into account the thermal motion of the atmospheric gases. It had been ignored in all earlier studies. The source spectra are broadened considerably by the center of mass motion of the reactants. We worked out the consequences for the production of nitric oxide at night, using as sources of energetic N atoms, NO(+) + e yield N + O, N(D-2) + O yield N + O. The high energy tail is enhanced by orders of magnitude. We had earlier suggested (Sharma et al. 1993) that the reaction of energetic nitrogen atoms with O2 was responsible for the rotationally enhanced NO identified in the infrared spectrum. Our calculations provided quantitative confirmation of the suggestion. We proceeded to explore the validity of another approximation used in earlier analyses, the hard sphere approximation for the energy loss in elastic collisions. We carried out precise quantum mechanical calculations of the elastic 2 differential scattering of nitrogen atoms in collisions with oxygen atoms and showed that although the hard sphere approximation was nowhere of high precision, reasonable results could be obtained with an effective cross section of 6 x 10(exp 15)sq cm. We also initiated a program to include inelastic energy loss processes in the determination of the energy distribution function. We began a calculation of the rotation and vibrational excitation cross sections of molecular nitrogen and nitrogen atoms and developed a method for including inelastic energy loss as a function of scattering angle in the Boltzmann equation. A procedure for obtaining the solution of the Boltzman equation was worked out.

  3. Hexanitrostilbene Recrystallized from Nitric Acid

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-19

    process. The author wishes to acknowledge Mr. Daniel Polansky for the X-Ray/N-Ray, Ms. Eleonore Kayser for the chemical analyses and nitric acid...recrystallized HNS-II using a pH meter and a solvent mixture consisting of 90% H2 0 and 10% DMSO by volume. The method was developed by Eleonore Kayser...65-142, 26 Aug 1965. 4. Syrop, Leroy J., "Process for Recrystallizing Hexanitrostilbene," U. S. Patent 3,699,176, 17 Oct 1972. 5. Kayser, Eleonore G

  4. Novel effects of nitric oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, K. L.; Martin, E.; Turko, I. V.; Murad, F.

    2001-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), a simple free radical gas, elicits a surprisingly wide range of physiological and pathophysiological effects. NO interacts with soluble guanylate cyclase to evoke many of these effects. However, NO can also interact with molecular oxygen and superoxide radicals to produce reactive nitrogen species that can modify a number of macromolecules including proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. NO can also interact directly with transition metals. Here, we have reviewed the non--3',5'-cyclic-guanosine-monophosphate-mediated effects of NO including modifications of proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids.

  5. Acute hemodynamic effects of inhaled sodium nitrite in pulmonary hypertension associated with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Marc A.; Vanderpool, Rebecca R.; Nouraie, Mehdi; Bachman, Timothy N.; White, Pamela M.; Sugahara, Masataka; Gorcsan, John; Parsley, Ed L.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is associated with poor outcomes, yet specific treatments only exist for a small subset of patients. The most common form of PH is that associated with left heart disease (Group 2), for which there is no approved therapy. Nitrite has shown efficacy in preclinical animal models of Group 1 and 2 PH, as well as in patients with left heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). We evaluated the safety and efficacy of a potentially novel inhaled formulation of nitrite in PH-HFpEF patients as compared with Group 1 and 3 PH. METHODS. Cardiopulmonary hemodynamics were recorded after acute administration of inhaled nitrite at 2 doses, 45 and 90 mg. Safety endpoints included change in systemic blood pressure and methemoglobin levels. Responses were also compared with those administered inhaled nitric oxide. RESULTS. Thirty-six patients were enrolled (10 PH-HFpEF, 20 Group 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension patients on background PH-specific therapy, and 6 Group 3 PH). Drug administration was well tolerated. Nitrite inhalation significantly lowered pulmonary, right atrial, and pulmonary capillary wedge pressures, most pronounced in patients with PH-HFpEF. There was a modest decrease in cardiac output and systemic blood pressure. Pulmonary vascular resistance decreased only in Group 3 PH patients. There was substantial increase in pulmonary artery compliance, most pronounced in patients with PH-HFpEF. CONCLUSIONS. Inhaled nitrite is safe in PH patients and may be efficacious in PH-HFpEF and Group 3 PH primarily via improvements in left and right ventricular filling pressures and pulmonary artery compliance. The lack of change in pulmonary vascular resistance likely may limit efficacy for Group 1 patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01431313 FUNDING. This work was supported in part by the NIH grants P01HL103455 (to MAS and MTG), R01HL098032 (to MTG), and R01HL096973 (to MTG), and Mast Therapeutics, Inc. PMID

  6. Transrepression and transactivation potencies of inhaled glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Dirks, N L; Li, S; Huth, B; Hochhaus, G; Yates, C R; Meibohm, B

    2008-12-01

    The anti-inflammatory activity of inhaled glucocorticoids is primarily mediated through transrepression of pro-inflammatory transcription factors such as AP-1 and NF-kappaB, while systemic side effects are largely attributed to transactivation via glucocorticoid response elements (GRE) in the promoter region of responsive genes. The objective of this study is to investigate whether inhaled corticosteroids exhibit differences in their transactivation and transrepression potencies. A549 human alveolar epithelial type II like cells, stably transfected with a reporter plasmid containing an AP-1, NF-kappaB or GRE induced secreted alkaline phosphatase reporter gene (SEAP), were exposed to a panel of concentrations of the six inhaled and three systemic glucocorticoids. Glucocorticoid-induced changes in SEAP expression were quantified by chemiluminescence. For eight glucocorticoids (budesonide, desisobutyryl-cicle-sonide, dexamethasone, flunisolide, fluocortolone, fluticasone propionate, mometasone furoate, prednisolone) the EC50 for NF-kappaB mediated transrepression was significantly larger than that for both transactivation and transrepression via AP-1. For the remaining glucocorticoid (triamcinolone acetonide), it was greater than that for transactivation. It is concluded that, within the studied cell system, inhaled corticosteroids did not exhibit preferential transrepression, but had higher potencies for transactivation than for transrepression via NF-kappaB and had differential potencies for the two transrepression pathways.

  7. Patterns of Inhalant Use among Incarcerated Youth

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Susan M.; Howard, Matthew O.

    2015-01-01

    Inhalant use is especially prevalent among antisocial youth and can have serious health consequences. However, the extant literature has not investigated how use of various inhalants may co-occur among incarcerated youth. This study begins to address this gap in the literature by using latent class analyses to form distinct typologies of inhalant use. Study participants were residents (N = 723) of 27 Missouri Division of Youth Services facilities. Interviews assessed psychiatric symptoms, antisocial traits, delinquency, trauma, suicidality, and substance use behaviors. The mean age of the mostly male, ethnically diverse sample was 15.5 (S.D. = 1.2) years old. The study revealed the following classes of inhalant use: (1) severe polyinhalant use; (2) moderate polyinhalant use; (3) gas and permanent marker use; and (4) low-use. Compared to the low-use class, members of the severe polyinhalant use class had experienced more than double the rate of head injuries, the highest rates of traumatic experiences, and the highest rates of mental illness diagnoses. The gas and markers class had the highest rate of reporting hearing voices, followed by the severe polyinhalant use class, and the moderate polyinhalant use class. Results of this study underscore the need to address the high rate of head injuries and mental health diagnoses that contribute to severe polyinhalant use. PMID:26333159

  8. 40 CFR 798.2450 - Inhalation toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... respiratory tract such particles may be deposited. This term is used in contrast to measured or geometric... within the respiratory tract. (3) The geometric mean diameter or the median diameter is the calculated... respiratory tract from the trachea to the alveoli. For man, inhalable diameter is considered as 15...

  9. 40 CFR 798.2450 - Inhalation toxicity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... respiratory tract such particles may be deposited. This term is used in contrast to measured or geometric... within the respiratory tract. (3) The geometric mean diameter or the median diameter is the calculated... respiratory tract from the trachea to the alveoli. For man, inhalable diameter is considered as 15...

  10. Manganese Inhalation as a Parkinson Disease Model

    PubMed Central

    Ordoñez-Librado, José Luis; Anaya-Martínez, Verónica; Gutierrez-Valdez, Ana Luisa; Colín-Barenque, Laura; Montiel-Flores, Enrique; Avila-Costa, Maria Rosa

    2011-01-01

    The present study examines the effects of divalent and trivalent Manganese (Mn2+/Mn3+) mixture inhalation on mice to obtain a novel animal model of Parkinson disease (PD) inducing bilateral and progressive dopaminergic cell death, correlate those alterations with motor disturbances, and determine whether L-DOPA treatment improves the behavior, to ensure that the alterations are of dopaminergic origin. CD-1 male mice inhaled a mixture of Manganese chloride and Manganese acetate, one hour twice a week for five months. Before Mn exposure, animals were trained to perform motor function tests and were evaluated each week after the exposure. By the end of Mn exposure, 10 mice were orally treated with 7.5 mg/kg L-DOPA. After 5 months of Mn mixture inhalation, striatal dopamine content decreased 71%, the SNc showed important reduction in the number of TH-immunopositive neurons, mice developed akinesia, postural instability, and action tremor; these motor alterations were reverted with L-DOPA treatment. Our data provide evidence that Mn2+/Mn3+ mixture inhalation produces similar morphological, neurochemical, and behavioral alterations to those observed in PD providing a useful experimental model for the study of this neurodegenerative disease. PMID:21209715

  11. Systemic Effects of Inhaled Corticosteroids: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Dhruti; Puttanna, Amar; Balagopal, Viswanatha

    2014-01-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are common medications, used in respiratory medicine for controlling conditions such as asthma and other obstructive airway diseases. The systemic effects of oral corticosteroids are well known and established; inhaled steroids have been known to cause relatively minor and localized adverse effects such as oral candidiasis. However, less attention has been paid to their systemic effects. Although currently there is a paucity of prospective studies demonstrating the systemic effects of inhaled corticosteroids, there are numerous retrospective studies adding evidence to this link. Inhaled corticosteroids can affect the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis, bone density and growth, eyes, skin and immunity including an increased risk of pneumonia. Clinicians are recommended to aim for the lowest possible dose to avoid these systemic side effects. Fluticasone is more likely to cause systemic effects compared to budesonide. Newer ICS molecules such as ciclesonide may be more beneficial in reducing such systemic complications on prolonged use. This paper provides an updated overview of the common systemic effects encountered with ICS treatment. PMID:25674175

  12. Subacute Inhalation Toxicity of 3-Methylpentane

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Yong Hyun; Shin, Seo-Ho; Han, Jeong Hee; Lee, Yong-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    3-Methylpentane (C6H14, CAS No. 96-14-0), isomer of hexane, is a colorless liquid originating naturally from petroleum or natural gas liquids. 3-Methylpentane has been used as a solvent in organic synthesis, as a lubricant, and as a raw material for producing carbon black. There is limited information available on the inhalation toxicity of 3-methylpentane, and the aim of this study was to determine its subacute inhalation toxicity. According to OECD Test Guideline 412 (subacute inhalation toxicity: 28-day study), Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to 0, 284, 1,135, and 4,540 ppm of 3-methylpentane for 6 hr/day, 5 days/week for 4 weeks via whole-body inhalation. Mortality, clinical signs, body weights, food consumption, hematology, serum chemistry, organ weights, and gross and histopathological findings were compared between control and all exposure groups. No mortality or remarkable clinical signs were observed during the study. No gross or histopathological lesions, or adverse effects on body weight, food consumption, hematology, serum chemistry, and organ weights were observed in any male or female rats in all exposure groups, although some statistically significant changes were observed in food consumption, serum chemistry, and organ weights. In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that no observable adverse effect level (NOAEL) for 3-methylpentane above 4,540 ppm/6 hr/day, 5 days/week for rats. PMID:27437092

  13. Patient preferences for inhaler devices in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: experience with Respimat Soft Mist inhaler.

    PubMed

    Hodder, Richard; Price, David

    2009-01-01

    Current guidelines for the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) recommend the regular use of inhaled bronchodilator therapy in order to relieve symptoms and prevent exacerbations. A variety of inhaler devices are currently available to COPD patients, and the choice of device is an important consideration because it can influence patients' adherence to treatment, and thus potentially affect the long-term outcome. The Respimat((R)) Soft Mist Inhaler (SMI) generates a slow-moving aerosol with a high fine particle fraction, resulting in deposition of a higher proportion of the dose in the lungs than pressurized metered-dose inhalers (pMDIs) or some dry powder inhalers (DPIs). We review clinical studies of inhaler satisfaction and preference comparing Respimat((R)) SMI against other inhalers in COPD patients. Using objective and validated patient satisfaction instruments, Respimat((R)) SMI was consistently shown to be well accepted by COPD patients, largely due to its inhalation and handling characteristics. In comparative studies with pMDIs, the patient total satisfaction score with Respimat((R)) SMI was statistically and clinically significantly higher than with the pMDI. In comparative studies with DPIs, the total satisfaction score was statistically significantly higher than for the Turbuhaler((R)) DPI, but only the performance domain of satisfaction was clinically significantly higher for Respimat((R)) SMI. Whether the observed higher levels of patient satisfaction reported with Respimat((R)) SMI might be expected to result in improved adherence to therapy and thus provide benefits consistent with those recently shown to be associated with sustained bronchodilator treatment in patients with COPD remains to be proven.

  14. [Inhalation therapy with Respimat soft inhaler in patients with COPD and asthma].

    PubMed

    Voshaar, T; Hausen, T; Kardos, P; Köhler, D; Schultze-Werninghaus, G; Schürmann, W; Vogelmeier, C

    2005-01-01

    Developing more effective and convenient inhalation devices for the treatment of obstructive pulmonary diseases is at least as important as designing new drugs. In recent years, existing inhalation systems have undergone many technical modifications and there have also been many new developments. All of these systems have their own particular attributes and characteristics. Two fundamentally different modes of operation are represented by propellant-driven metered-dose inhalers (pMDI) on the one hand and dry powder inhalers (DPI) on the other. However, none of the systems developed so far can be considered ideal. The Respimat Soft Inhaler (Respimat SI) was developed in the light of experience with previous systems and was launched in Germany at the beginning of 2004. The aim in developing this new type of inhaler was to avoid the well-known drawbacks typically associated with pMDI and DPI. The Respimat SI requires neither a chemical propellant nor batteries. The active ingredients are dissolved in water and the solution is atomised using mechanical energy only imparted by a spring which, when released, provides the power to force the solution through an extremely fine nozzle system. Two fine jets of liquid are produced. They converge at an optimised angle and the resulting impact generates a fine mist which is slow-moving and lasts for about 1.5 seconds; moreover, a high proportion of the droplets fall into the fine particle fraction. All of these features allow excellent lung deposition and reduced oropharyngeal deposition. Coordination between actuation and inhalation is less critical as compared with pMDI due to the fact that the mist is both slow-moving and long-lasting. A further advantage is that the mist is generated independently of the patient's inspiratory flow. The Respimat SI meets the requirements for an ideal inhaler better than any other previous device and must therefore be regarded as a significant new development.

  15. Decreased response to inhaled steroids in overweight and obese asthmatic children

    PubMed Central

    Forno, Erick; Lescher, Rachel; Strunk, Robert; Weiss, Scott; Fuhlbrigge, Anne; Celedón, Juan C.

    2011-01-01

    Background The mechanisms and consequences of the observed association between obesity and childhood asthma are unclear. Objectives To determine the effect of obesity on treatment responses to inhaled corticosteroids in asthmatic children. Methods We performed a post hoc analysis to evaluate the interaction between body mass index (BMI) and treatment with inhaled budesonide on lung function in the Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP) trial. Participants were then stratified into overweight/obese and non-overweight, and their response to inhaled budesonide was analyzed longitudinally over the 4 years of the trial. Results There was a significant interaction between BMI and budesonide for pre-BD FEV1/FVC (P=0.0007) and bronchodilator response (BDR) (P=0.049), and a non-significant trend for an interaction between BMI and budesonide on pre-BD FEV1 (P=0.15). Non-overweight children showed significant improvement with inhaled budesonide in lung function (FEV1, FEV1/FVC, and BDR) during the early (years 1–2) and late stages (years 3–4) of the trial. Overweight/obese children had improved FEV1 and BDR during the early but not the late stage of the trial, and showed no improvement in FEV1/FVC. When comparing time points where both groups showed significant response, the degree of improvement among non-overweight children was significantly greater than in overweight/obese children at most visits. Non-overweight children had a 44% reduction in the risk of ER visits or hospitalizations throughout the trial (P=0.001); there was no reduction in risk among overweight/obese (P=0.97). Conclusions Compared to children of normal weight, overweight/obese children in CAMP showed a decreased response to inhaled budesonide on measures of lung function and ER visits/hospitalizations for asthma. PMID:21377042

  16. Perinatal Factors Associated with Poor Neurocognitive Outcome in Early School Age Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, Jennifer R.; Gustafson, Kathryn E.; Smith, P. Brian; Ellingsen, Kirsten M.; Tompkins, K. Brooke; Goldberg, Ronald N.; Cotten, C. Michael; Goldstein, Ricki F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Determine predictors of neurocognitive outcome in early school age congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) survivors. Study design Prospective study of infants with CDH at Duke University Medical Center. Neurocognitive delay (NCD) at school age (4 to 7 years) was defined as a score < 80 in any of the following areas: Verbal Scale IQ, Performance Scale IQ, Expressive Language, or Receptive Language. Logistic regression, Fisher’s exact, and the Wilcoxon rank sum test were used to examine the relationship between NCD at early school age and 6 demographic and 18 medical variables. Results Of 43 infants with CDH, twenty seven (63%) survived to hospital discharge, and 16 (59%) returned for school age testing at a median age of 4.9 years. Seven (44%) of the children evaluated had NCD. Patch repair (p=0.01), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO; p=0.02), days on ECMO (p=0.01), days of mechanical ventilation (p=0.049), and post-operative use of inhaled nitric oxide (p=0.02) were found to be associated with NCD at early school age. Conclusions CDH survivors are at risk for neurocognitive delay persisting into school age. Perinatal factors such as patch repair and ECMO treatment may aid in identifying CDH survivors at high risk for continued learning difficulties throughout childhood. PMID:23583126

  17. The nitric oxide producing reactions of hydroxyurea.

    PubMed

    King, S Bruce

    2003-03-01

    Hydroxyurea is used to treat a variety of cancers and sickle cell disease. Despite this widespread use, a complete mechanistic understanding of the beneficial actions of this compound remains to be understood. Hydroxyurea inhibits ribonucleotide reductase and increases the levels of fetal hemoglobin, which explains a portion of the effects of this drug. Administration of hydroxyurea to patients results in a significant increase in levels of iron nitrosyl hemoglobin, nitrite and nitrate suggesting the in vivo metabolism of hydroxyurea to nitric oxide. Formation of nitric oxide from hydroxyurea may explain a portion of the observed effects of hydroxyurea treatment. At the present, the mechanism or mechanisms of nitric oxide release, the identity of the in vivo oxidant and the site of metabolism remain to be identified. Chemical oxidation of hydroxyurea produces nitric oxide and nitroxyl, the one-electron reduced form of nitric oxide. These oxidative pathways generally proceed through the nitroxide radical (2) or C-nitrosoformamide (3). Biological oxidants, including both iron and copper containing enzymes and proteins, also convert hydroxyurea to nitric oxide or its decomposition products in vitro and these reactions also occur through these intermediates. A number of other reactions of hydroxyurea including the reaction with ribonucleotide reductase and irradiation demonstrate the potential to release nitric oxide and should be further investigated. Gaining an understanding of the metabolism of hydroxyurea to nitric oxide will provide valuable information towards the treatment of these disorders and may lead to the development of better therapeutic agents.

  18. Nitric oxide fumigation for postharvest pest control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitric oxide fumigation is effective against all arthropod pests at various life stages tested. Nine insect pests at various life stages and bulb mites were subjected to nitric oxide fumigation treatments under ultralow oxygen conditions of =50 ppm O2 in 1.9L glass jars as fumigation chambers. The ...

  19. Nitric oxide and oxidative stress in placental explant cultures.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Juvic M; Casart, Ysabel C; Camejo, María I

    2016-01-01

    Placental explant culture, and cellular cytolysis and cellular differentiation have been previously studied. However, oxidative stress and nitric oxide profiles have not been evaluated in these systems. The aim of this study was to determine the release of lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide from placental explants cultured over a seven day period. Placental explants were maintained for seven days in culture and the medium was changed every 24 hours. The response was assessed in terms of syncytiotrophoblast differentiation (human chorionic gonadotropin, hCG), cellular cytolysis (lactate dehydrogenase, LDH), oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, TBARS), and nitric oxide (NO). Levels of hCG increased progressively from day two to attain its highest level on days four and five after which it decreased gradually. In contrast, the levels of LDH, TBARS, and NO were elevated in the early days of placental culture when new syncytiotrophoblast from cytotrophoblast were forming and also in the last days of culture when tissue was declining. In conclusion, the levels of NO and lipid peroxidation follow a pattern similar to LDH and contrary to hCG. Future placental explant studies to evaluate oxidative stress and NO should consider the physiological changes inherent during the time of culture.

  20. Two Dimensional Polymer That Generates Nitric Oxide.

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, William F.; Koren, Amy B.

    2005-10-04

    A polymeric composition that generates nitric oxide and a process for rendering the surface of a substrate nonthrombogenic by applying a coating of the polymeric composition to the substrate are disclosed. The composition comprises: (1) a crosslinked chemical combination of (i) a polymer having amino group-containing side chains along a backbone forming the polymer, and (ii) a crosslinking agent containing functional groups capable of reacting with the amino groups; and (2) a plurality of nitric oxide generating functional groups associated with the crosslinked chemical combination. Once exposed to a physiological environment, the coating generates nitric oxide thereby inhibiting platelet aggregation. In one embodiment, the nitric oxide generating functional groups are provided by a nitrated compound (e.g., nitrocellulose) imbedded in the polymeric composition. In another embodiment, the nitric oxide generating functional groups comprise N2O2- groups covalently bonded to amino groups on the polymer.

  1. Asbestos inhalation induces reactive nitrogen species and nitrotyrosine formation in the lungs and pleura of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, S; Choe, N; Hemenway, D R; Zhu, S; Matalon, S; Kagan, E

    1998-01-01

    To determine whether asbestos inhalation induces the formation of reactive nitrogen species, three groups of rats were exposed intermittently over 2 wk to either filtered room air (sham-exposed) or to chrysotile or crocidolite asbestos fibers. The rats were killed at 1 or 6 wk after exposure. At 1 wk, significantly greater numbers of alveolar and pleural macrophages from asbestos-exposed rats than from sham-exposed rats demonstrated inducible nitric oxide synthase protein immunoreactivity. Alveolar macrophages from asbestos-exposed rats also generated significantly greater nitrite formation than did macrophages from sham-exposed rats. Strong immunoreactivity for nitrotyrosine, a marker of peroxynitrite formation, was evident in lungs from chrysotile- and crocidolite-exposed rats at 1 and 6 wk. Staining was most evident at alveolar duct bifurcations and within bronchiolar epithelium, alveolar macrophages, and the visceral and parietal pleural mesothelium. Lungs from sham-exposed rats demonstrated minimal immunoreactivity for nitrotyrosine. Significantly greater quantities of nitrotyrosine were detected by ELISA in lung extracts from asbestos-exposed rats than from sham-exposed rats. These findings suggest that asbestos inhalation can induce inducible nitric oxide synthase activation and peroxynitrite formation in vivo, and provide evidence of a possible alternative mechanism of asbestos-induced injury to that thought to be induced by Fenton reactions. PMID:9664087

  2. Exhaled nitric oxide in childhood asthma: a review.

    PubMed

    Pijnenburg, M W H; De Jongste, J C

    2008-02-01

    As an 'inflammometer', the fraction of nitric oxide in exhaled air (Fe(NO)) is increasingly used in the management of paediatric asthma. Fe(NO) provides us with valuable, additional information regarding the nature of underlying airway inflammation, and complements lung function testing and measurement of airway hyper-reactivity. This review focuses on clinical applications of Fe(NO) in paediatric asthma. First, Fe(NO) provides us with a practical tool to aid in the diagnosis of asthma and distinguish patients who will benefit from inhaled corticosteroids from those who will not. Second, Fe(NO) is helpful in predicting exacerbations, and predicting successful steroid reduction or withdrawal. In atopic asthmatic children Fe(NO) is beneficial in adjusting steroid doses, discerning those patients who require additional therapy from those whose medication dose could feasibly be reduced. In pre-school children Fe(NO) may be of help in the differential diagnosis of respiratory symptoms, and may potentially allow for better targeting and monitoring of anti-inflammatory treatment.

  3. Barriers to inhaled gene therapy of obstructive lung diseases: A review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Namho; Duncan, Gregg A; Hanes, Justin; Suk, Jung Soo

    2016-10-28

    Knowledge of genetic origins of obstructive lung diseases has made inhaled gene therapy an attractive alternative to the current standards of care that are limited to managing disease symptoms. Initial lung gene therapy clinical trials occurred in the early 1990s following the discovery of the genetic defect responsible for cystic fibrosis (CF), a monogenic disorder. However, despite over two decades of intensive effort, gene therapy has yet to help patients with CF or any other obstructive lung disease. The slow progress is due in part to poor understanding of the biological barriers to inhaled gene therapy. Encouragingly, clinical trials have shown that inhaled gene therapy with various viral vectors and non-viral gene vectors is well tolerated by patients, and continued research has provided valuable lessons and resources that may lead to future success of this therapeutic strategy. In this review, we first introduce representative obstructive lung diseases and examine limitations of currently available therapeutic options. We then review key components for successful execution of inhaled gene therapy, including gene delivery systems, primary physiological barriers and strategies to overcome them, and advances in preclinical disease models with which the most promising systems may be identified for human clinical trials.

  4. Nitric oxide and teratogenesis: an update.

    PubMed

    Tiboni, Gian Mario; Ponzano, Adalisa

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), generated by NO synthase (NOS) enzymes, is an important bioactive molecule involved in the regulation of several biological phenomena that are crucial for organogenesis, including gene expression, cell growth, matrix remolding, proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. The expression of NOS isoforms in embryonic tissues is temporally and spatially regulated, and disruption of endogenous NO can lead to developmental defects. Maternal treatment with pan NOS inhibitors during early organogenesis caused severe malformations of the axial skeleton. In utero exposure during the fetal period induced limb reduction defects of vascular origin. Knock-out mice have been used to define the role of the various NOS isoforms on the origin of the abnormal development. Cardiovascular malformations, limb reduction defects, reduced growth and reduced survival have been observed in knock-out mice with targeted disruption of endothelial NOS (eNOS). Limited morphological changes were observed in mice lacking inducible NOS (iNOS) or neuronal NOS n(NOS). Results obtained with in vitro studies suggest that optimal levels of NO are required for neural tube closure. Disregulation of NO production was also recently proposed as a contributing mechanism in the origin of malformations associated with exposure to known environmental teratogens, such as valproic acid, thalidomide, copper deficiency, and diabetes.

  5. [Inhalation therapy: inhaled corticosteroids in ENT, development and technical challenges of powder inhalers, nebulisers synchronized with breathing and aerosol size distribution. GAT aerosolstorming, Paris 2012].

    PubMed

    Le Guen, P; Peron, N; Durand, M; Pourchez, J; Cavaillon, P; Reychler, G; Vecellio, L; Dubus, J-C

    2013-10-01

    The working group on aerosol therapy (GAT) of the Société de Pneumologie de Langue Française (SPLF) has organized its third Aerosolstorming in 2012. During one single day, different aspects of inhaled therapies have been treated and are detailed in two articles, this one being the second. This text deals with the indications of inhaled corticosteroids in ENT, the development and technical challenges of powder inhalers, the advantages and disadvantages of each type of technologies to measure the particle sizes of inhaled treatments.

  6. Deposition of corticosteroid aerosol in the human lung by Respimat Soft Mist inhaler compared to deposition by metered dose inhaler or by Turbuhaler dry powder inhaler.

    PubMed

    Pitcairn, Gary; Reader, Sandie; Pavia, Demetri; Newman, Steve

    2005-01-01

    Fourteen mild-to-moderate asthmatic patients completed a randomized four-way crossover scintigraphic study to determine the lung deposition of 200 microg budesonide inhaled from a Respimat Soft Mist Inhaler (Respimat SMI), 200 microg budesonide inhaled from a Turbuhaler dry powder inhaler (Turbuhaler DPI, used with fast and slow peak inhaled flow rates), and 250 microg beclomethasone dipropionate inhaled from a pressurized metered dose inhaler (Becloforte pMDI). Mean (range) whole lung deposition of drug from the Respimat SMI (51.6 [46-57]% of the metered dose) was significantly (p < 0.001) greater than that from the Turbuhaler DPI used with both fast and slow inhaled flow rates (28.5 [24-33]% and 17.8 [14-22]%, respectively) or from the Becloforte pMDI (8.9 [6-12]%). The deposition pattern within the lungs was more peripheral for Respimat SMI than for Turbuhaler DPI. The results of this study showed that Respimat SMI deposited corticosteroid more efficiently in the lungs than either of two widely used inhaler devices, Turbuhaler DPI or Becloforte pMDI.

  7. Pulmonary and heart diseases with inhalation of atmospheric pressure plasma flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Takamichi; Murata, Shigeru; Kishimoto, Takumi; Tsutsui, Chihiro; Kondo, Akane; Mori, Akira

    2012-10-01

    We examined blood pressure in the abdominal aorta of mini pig under plasma inhalation of atmospheric pressure plasma flow. The coaxial atmospheric pressure plasma source has a tungsten wire inside a glass capillary, that is surrounded by a grounded tubular electrode. Plasma was generated under the following conditions; applied voltage: 8 kVpp, frequency: 3 kHz, and helium (He) gas flow rate: 1 L/min. On the other hand, sphygmomanometry of a blood vessel proceeded using a device comprising a disposable force transducer, and a bedside monitor for simultaneous electrocardiography and signal pressure measurements. We directly measured Nitric oxide (NO) using a catheter-type NO sensor placed in the coronary sinus through an angiography catheter from the abdomen. Blood pressure decreased from 110/65 to 90/40 mm Hg in the animals in vivo under plasma inhalation. The NO concentration in the abdominal aorta like the blood pressure, reached a maximum value at about 40 s and then gradually decreased.

  8. Role of nitric oxide and prostaglandins in the bone formation response to mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Chow, J W

    2000-10-01

    Nitric oxide and prostaglandins are crucial early mediators in mechanically induced bone formation. They are also responsible for the associated induction of gene expression of c-fos and IGF-1 in osteocytes, key mechanosensory cells in bone. Insight into the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying bone formation has important implications for the maintenance of structural competence of bone.

  9. The ADMIT series - Issues in inhalation therapy. 4) How to choose inhaler devices for the treatment of COPD.

    PubMed

    Vincken, Walter; Dekhuijzen, Pn Richard; Barnes, Peter

    2010-03-01

    For patients with COPD, inhalation is the preferred route of administration of respiratory drugs for both maintenance and acute treatment. Numerous inhaler types and devices have been developed, each with their own particularities, advantages and disadvantages. Nevertheless, published COPD management guidelines pay little attention to the optimal choice of inhaler devices for COPD patients. Although efficacy and safety are the primary factors determining the choice of an inhaler device, randomised controlled trials (RCTs) directly comparing the efficacy and safety of different inhalers in COPD patients are scarce. Systematic reviews on this subject failed to find significant differences between devices for any of the clinical outcomes studied. When selecting a device for the delivery of inhaled drugs in 'real life' patients with COPD, other factors should be considered. These include availability and affordability of the inhaled drugs and inhaler devices, the uniformity of inhaler devices when several drugs are to be inhaled, the ability of patients to handle correctly the selected device - in particular taking into account the advanced age of the average COPD patient, and finally the patient's preference. The prescribing clinician's task is to provide comprehensive instructions for correct handling of the device and to review regularly the patient's inhalation technique.

  10. Impaired mitochondrial respiration and protein nitration in the rat hippocampus after acute inhalation of combustion smoke.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heung M; Reed, Jason; Greeley, George H; Englander, Ella W

    2009-03-01

    Survivors of massive inhalation of combustion smoke endure critical injuries, including lasting neurological complications. We have previously reported that acute inhalation of combustion smoke disrupts the nitric oxide homeostasis in the rat brain. In this study, we extend our findings and report that a 30-minute exposure of awake rats to ambient wood combustion smoke induces protein nitration in the rat hippocampus and that mitochondrial proteins are a sensitive nitration target in this setting. Mitochondria are central to energy metabolism and cellular signaling and are critical to proper cell function. Here, analyses of the mitochondrial proteome showed elevated protein nitration in the course of a 24-hour recovery following exposure to smoke. Mass spectrometry identification of several significantly nitrated mitochondrial proteins revealed diverse functions and involvement in central aspects of mitochondrial physiology. The nitrated proteins include the ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase, F1-ATP synthase alpha subunit, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3), succinate dehydrogenase Fp subunit, and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC1) protein. Furthermore, acute exposure to combustion smoke significantly compromised the respiratory capacity of hippocampal mitochondria. Importantly, elevated protein nitration and reduced mitochondrial respiration in the hippocampus persisted beyond the time required for restoration of normal oxygen and carboxyhemoglobin blood levels after the cessation of exposure to smoke. Thus, the time frame for intensification of the various smoke-induced effects differs between blood and brain tissues. Taken together, our findings suggest that nitration of essential mitochondrial proteins may contribute to the reduction in mitochondrial respiratory capacity and underlie, in part, the brain pathophysiology after acute inhalation of combustion smoke.

  11. Impaired mitochondrial respiration and protein nitration in the rat hippocampus after acute inhalation of combustion smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Heung M.; Reed, Jason; Greeley, George H.; Englander, Ella W.

    2009-03-01

    Survivors of massive inhalation of combustion smoke endure critical injuries, including lasting neurological complications. We have previously reported that acute inhalation of combustion smoke disrupts the nitric oxide homeostasis in the rat brain. In this study, we extend our findings and report that a 30-minute exposure of awake rats to ambient wood combustion smoke induces protein nitration in the rat hippocampus and that mitochondrial proteins are a sensitive nitration target in this setting. Mitochondria are central to energy metabolism and cellular signaling and are critical to proper cell function. Here, analyses of the mitochondrial proteome showed elevated protein nitration in the course of a 24-hour recovery following exposure to smoke. Mass spectrometry identification of several significantly nitrated mitochondrial proteins revealed diverse functions and involvement in central aspects of mitochondrial physiology. The nitrated proteins include the ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase, F1-ATP synthase {alpha} subunit, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3), succinate dehydrogenase Fp subunit, and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC1) protein. Furthermore, acute exposure to combustion smoke significantly compromised the respiratory capacity of hippocampal mitochondria. Importantly, elevated protein nitration and reduced mitochondrial respiration in the hippocampus persisted beyond the time required for restoration of normal oxygen and carboxyhemoglobin blood levels after the cessation of exposure to smoke. Thus, the time frame for intensification of the various smoke-induced effects differs between blood and brain tissues. Taken together, our findings suggest that nitration of essential mitochondrial proteins may contribute to the reduction in mitochondrial respiratory capacity and underlie, in part, the brain pathophysiology after acute inhalation of combustion smoke.

  12. Rapid Transition from Inhaled Iloprost to Inhaled Treprostinil in Patients with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Bourge, Robert C; Tapson, Victor F; Safdar, Zeenat; Benza, Raymond L; Channick, Richard N; Rosenzweig, Erika B; Shapiro, Shelley; White, Richard James; McSwain, Christopher Shane; Gotzkowsky, Stephen Karl; Nelsen, Andrew C; Rubin, Lewis J

    2013-01-01

    Background Inhaled treprostinil is a prostacyclin analog approved for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) that may provide a more convenient treatment option for patients receiving inhaled iloprost while maintaining the clinical benefit of inhaled prostacyclin therapy. Aims In this open-label safety study, 73 PAH patients were enrolled with primarily World Health Organization Class II (56%) or III (42%) symptoms. At baseline, most patients (93%) were receiving 5 μg of iloprost per dose but 38% of patients reported a dosing frequency below the labeled rate of 6–9 times daily. Patients initiated inhaled treprostinil at 3 breaths four times daily (qid) at the immediate next scheduled iloprost dose. The primary objective was to assess the safety of rapid transition from iloprost to inhaled treprostinil; clinical status and quality of life were also assessed. Results Most patients (84%) achieved the target treprostinil dose of 9 breaths qid and remained on study until transition to commercial therapy (89%). The most frequent adverse events (AEs) were cough (74%), headache (44%), and nausea (30%), and five patients prematurely discontinued study drug due to AE (n = 3), disease progression (n = 1), or death (n = 1). At week 12, the time spent on daily treatment activities was reduced compared to baseline, with a mean total savings of 1.4 h per day. Improvements were also observed at week 12 for 6-min walk distance (+16.0; P < 0.001), N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (−74 pg/mL; P = 0.001), and the Cambridge Pulmonary Hypertension Outcome Review (all domains P < 0.001). Conclusions Pulmonary arterial hypertension patients can be safely transitioned from inhaled iloprost to inhaled treprostinil while maintaining clinical status. PMID:22970909

  13. Effect of inhaler design variables on paediatric use of dry powder inhalers.

    PubMed

    Lexmond, Anne J; Kruizinga, Tonnis J; Hagedoorn, Paul; Rottier, Bart L; Frijlink, Henderik W; de Boer, Anne H

    2014-01-01

    Age appropriateness is a major concern of pulmonary delivery devices, in particular of dry powder inhalers (DPIs), since their performance strongly depends on the inspiratory flow manoeuvre of the patient. Previous research on the use of DPIs by children focused mostly on specific DPIs or single inspiratory parameters. In this study, we investigated the requirements for a paediatric DPI more broadly using an instrumented test inhaler. Our primary aim was to assess the impact of airflow resistance on children's inspiratory flow profiles. Additionally, we investigated children's preferences for airflow resistance and mouthpiece design and how these relate to what may be most suitable for them. We tested 98 children (aged 4.7-12.6 years), of whom 91 were able to perform one or more correct inhalations through the test inhaler. We recorded flow profiles at five airflow resistances ranging from 0.025 to 0.055 kPa0.5.min.L-1 and computed various inspiratory flow parameters from these recordings. A sinuscope was used to observe any obstructions in the oral cavity during inhalation. 256 flow profiles were included for analysis. We found that both airflow resistance and the children's characteristics affect the inspiratory parameters. Our data suggest that a medium-high resistance is both suitable for and well appreciated by children aged 5-12 years. High incidences (up to 90%) of obstructions were found, which may restrict the use of DPIs by children. However, an oblong mouthpiece that was preferred the most appeared to positively affect the passageway through the oral cavity. To accommodate children from the age of 5 years onwards, a DPI should deliver a sufficiently high fine particle dose within an inhaled volume of 0.5 L and at a peak inspiratory flow rate of 25-40 L.min-1. We recommend taking these requirements into account for future paediatric inhaler development.

  14. Analytical Chemistry of Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Hetrick, Evan M.

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is the focus of intense research, owing primarily to its wide-ranging biological and physiological actions. A requirement for understanding its origin, activity, and regulation is the need for accurate and precise measurement techniques. Unfortunately, analytical assays for monitoring NO are challenged by NO’s unique chemical and physical properties, including its reactivity, rapid diffusion, and short half-life. Moreover, NO concentrations may span pM to µM in physiological milieu, requiring techniques with wide dynamic response ranges. Despite such challenges, many analytical techniques have emerged for the detection of NO. Herein, we review the most common spectroscopic and electrochemical methods, with special focus on the fundamentals behind each technique and approaches that have been coupled with modern analytical measurement tools or exploited to create novel NO sensors. PMID:20636069

  15. Nanocarriers for Nitric Oxide Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Saraiva, Juliana; Marotta-Oliveira, Samantha S.; Cicillini, Simone Aparecida; Eloy, Josimar de Oliveira; Marchetti, Juliana Maldonado

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a promising pharmaceutical agent that has vasodilative, antibacterial, and tumoricidal effects. To study the complex and wide-ranging roles of NO and to facilitate its therapeutic use, a great number of synthetic compounds (e.g., nitrosothiols, nitrosohydroxyamines, N-diazeniumdiolates, and nitrosyl metal complexes) have been developed to chemically stabilize and release NO in a controlled manner. Although NO is currently being exploited in many biomedical applications, its use is limited by several factors, including a short half-life, instability during storage, and potential toxicity. Additionally, efficient methods of both localized and systemic in vivo delivery and dose control are needed. One strategy for addressing these limitations and thus increasing the utility of NO donors is based on nanotechnology. PMID:21869934

  16. Analytical chemistry of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Hetrick, Evan M; Schoenfisch, Mark H

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is the focus of intense research primarily because of its wide-ranging biological and physiological actions. To understand its origin, activity, and regulation, accurate and precise measurement techniques are needed. Unfortunately, analytical assays for monitoring NO are challenged by NO's unique chemical and physical properties, including its reactivity, rapid diffusion, and short half-life. Moreover, NO concentrations may span the picomolar-to-micromolar range in physiological milieus, requiring techniques with wide dynamic response ranges. Despite such challenges, many analytical techniques have emerged for the detection of NO. Herein, we review the most common spectroscopic and electrochemical methods, with a focus on the underlying mechanism of each technique and on approaches that have been coupled with modern analytical measurement tools to create novel NO sensors.

  17. Fiber inhalability and head deposition in rats and humans. ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Due to their dimensions and long durability, inhaled asbestos fibers clear slowly from lung airways. Retained fibers may injure the epithelium, interact with macrophages, or translocate to the interstitium to result in various respiratory diseases. Therefore, calculations of fiber inhalability, deposition, and retention in respiratory tract regions of both rats and humans are crucial, both to assess the health risk of fiber exposures and to facilitate inferences from rat inhalation studies. Rat inhalation experiments are underway at the EPA and NIEHS. A model of fiber inhalability and initial deposition in the human and rat nasal cavity was developed. Existing models for particles were extended to fibers by replacing particle diameter with an equivalent fiber diameter. Since fiber inhalability into the respiratory tract and deposition in the extra thoracic airways depended mainly on its inertia, equivalent impaction diameters were derived and substituted in expressions for spherical particle diameter to determine fiber inhalability and nasal losses. Fiber impaction diameter depended strongly on its orientation in the air. Highest inhalability was obtained when fibers were aligned perpendicular to the flow streamlines in the inhaled air. However, detailed calculations of fiber transport in slow moving air such as that in the atmosphere and in lung airways showed that fibers stayed primarily aligned (parallel) to the flow. Therefore, for inhalability calculations,

  18. Inhalation risk in low-gravity spacecraft.

    PubMed

    Todd, P; Sklar, V; Ramirez, W F; Smith, G J; Morgenthaler, G W; McKinnon, J T; Oberdorster, G; Schulz, J

    1994-07-01

    Inhalation risks on long-duration manned spaced flight include gasses chronically released by outgassing of materials, gasses released during spills, thermodegradation events (including fires) with their attendant particulates, and fire extinguishment. As an example, an event in which electronic insulation consisting of polytetrafluoroethylene undergoes thermodegradation on the Space Station Freedom was modeled experimentally and theoretically from the initial chemistry and convective transport through pulmonary deposition in humans. The low-gravity environment was found to impact various stages of event simulation. Critical unknowns were identified, and these include the extent of production of ultrafine particles and polymeric products at the source in low gravity, the transport of ultrafine particles in the spacecraft air quality control system, and the biological response of the lung, including alveolar macrophages, to this inhalation risk in low gravity.

  19. Floating patterns of metered dose inhalers.

    PubMed

    Wolf, B L; Cochran, K R

    1997-01-01

    As long as metered dose inhalers have existed, patients have sought a reliable method to determine if a given canister was still potent. Concerning beta agonists, the answer to this question may be lifesaving. Issues of compliance have made dating canisters or counting doses impractical. Likewise, previous claims of floating characteristics are unreliable. In tap water, we float-tested 13 commonly used inhalers three times each, observing variations as they were incrementally actuated, emptying their contents. One essential pattern was observed. Almost all prescription-size canisters sink when full; all float by the time one-third of their contents is gone. Orientation of prescription-size canisters changes in a distinct pattern especially near 90% depletion. Sample-size canisters showed some variance. Results suggest that the pharmaceutical industry should include individual floating characteristics as part of the package insert as they provide a reproducible means of gauging contents.

  20. ASSESSMENT OF DIOXIN INHALATION EXPOSURES AND ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In the days following the September 11, 2001, terrorist attack on New York City's World Trade Center (WTC) towers, EPA, other federal agencies, and New York City and New York State public health and environmental authorities initiated numerous air monitoring activities to better understand the ongoing impact of emissions from that disaster. Using these data, EPA conducted an inhalation exposure and human health risk assessment. The overall evaluation focused on particulate matter, metals, polychlorinated biphenyls, dioxin-like compounds, asbestos, and volatile organic compounds. This paper reports on the analysis of dioxin-like compounds only.Lorber, M. 2003. Assessment of Dioxin Inhalation Exposures and Potential Health Impacts Following the Collapse of the World Trade Center Towers. Organohalogen Compounds 63 (no page numbers). journal article

  1. IRIS Toxicological Review of Ammonia Noncancer Inhalation ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has finalized the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) Assessment of Ammonia (Noncancer Inhalation). This assessment addresses the potential noncancer human health effects from long-term inhalation exposure to ammonia. Now final, this assessment will update the current toxicological information on ammonia posted in 1991. EPA’s program and regional offices may use this assessment to inform decisions to protect human health. EPA completed the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) health assessment for ammonia. IRIS is an EPA database containing Agency scientific positions on potential adverse human health effects that may result from chronic (or lifetime) exposure to chemicals in the environment. IRIS contains chemical-specific summaries of qualitative and quantitative health information in support of two steps of the risk assessment paradigm, i.e., hazard identification and dose-response evaluation. IRIS assessments are used in combination with specific situational exposure assessment information to evaluate potential public health risk associated with environmental contaminants.

  2. Inhalation drug delivery devices: technology update

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Mariam; Verma, Rahul; Garcia-Contreras, Lucila

    2015-01-01

    The pulmonary route of administration has proven to be effective in local and systemic delivery of miscellaneous drugs and biopharmaceuticals to treat pulmonary and non-pulmonary diseases. A successful pulmonary administration requires a harmonic interaction between the drug formulation, the inhaler device, and the patient. However, the biggest single problem that accounts for the lack of desired effect or adverse outcomes is the incorrect use of the device due to lack of training in how to use the device or how to coordinate actuation and aerosol inhalation. This review summarizes the structural and mechanical features of aerosol delivery devices with respect to mechanisms of aerosol generation, their use with different formulations, and their advantages and limitations. A technological update of the current state-of-the-art designs proposed to overcome current challenges of existing devices is also provided. PMID:25709510

  3. The role of first use of inhalants within sequencing pattern of first use of drugs among Brazilian university students

    PubMed Central

    Castaldelli-Maia, João Maurício; Martins, Silvia S.; de Oliveira, Lúcio Garcia; de Andrade, Arthur Guerra; Nicastri, Sérgio

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the role of first use of inhalants within a first drug sequencing pattern. In a representative sample of university students from 27 Brazilian capitals (n=12,711), we analyzed the patterns of transition from/to first use of inhalants to/from the first use of alcohol, tobacco, cannabis, cocaine, hallucinogens, ecstasy, amphetamines, prescription opioids, and tranquilizers. Cox proportional hazards models were used to analyze data. Drugs that were not specified as the pair of drugs tested in each model were included as time-varying covariates in all models. In this sample, first use of inhalants was preceded only by the first use of alcohol and tobacco. However, first use of inhalants preceded first use of cannabis, amphetamines, cocaine, and tranquilizers. First use of inhalants preceded the first use of prescription opioids, and vice versa. This study highlights the need to intervene early with youths who are at risk of or just beginning to use inhalants, since this class of drugs seems to be the first illegal drug in Brazil to be experimented by respondents in our sample. There is also a call for attention to individuals who have already first used inhalants because of their higher chance to experiment with other drugs such as cannabis, cocaine, and prescription drugs. All these findings show an in-transition culture of drug use, which should be tracked through the time, since some classical models (i.e., gateway model) might be outdated and might also not fit within different settings. PMID:25150538

  4. Distribution of nitric oxide in cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Mesáros, S; Grunfeld, S

    1997-01-01

    We report here the in vitro measurements of nitric oxide in the cardiovascular system using a porphyrinic sensor specific for NO. Nitric oxide concentrations were measured directly in different parts of the heart and also in different arteries and veins, ranging from 100 microm to 5 mm in diameter. Highest NO. concentrations were found in the heart and particularly in the areas of aortic and pulmonary valves. The NO. concentration in the arteries was higher than in the veins. A clearcut positive correlation was obtained by plotting the vessel diameter and production of nitric oxide.

  5. Sampling nitric oxide from combustion gases.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, C.; Houseman, J.; Teixeira, D. P.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental study of several sampling tube and probe material compositions and designs aimed at preventing nitric oxide reduction when sampling nitric oxide from combustion gases. A 250,000 Btu/h furnace fired with technical grade methane was used for testing the sampling probes over a wide range of air-fuel mixtures. The results obtained include the finding that the use of stainless steel in probes creates inaccuracies in near-stoichiometric and fuel-rich sampling in hydrocarbon flames. For very fuel-rich flames, water cooling is needed even in quartz probes to prevent significant reduction of nitric oxide.-

  6. Revised reference model for nitric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gille, J. C.; Bailey, P. L.; Craig, C. A.

    1989-01-01

    A nearly global set of data on the nitric acid distribution was obtained for seven months by the Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) experiment on the Nimbus 7 spacecraft. The evaluation of the accuracy, precision, and resolution of these data is described, and a description of the major features of the nitric acid distributions is presented. The zonal mean for nitric acid is distributed in a stratospheric layer that peaks near 30 mb, with the largest mixing ratios occurring in polar regions, especially in winter.

  7. Proposed reference model for nitric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gille, John C.; Bailey, Paul L.; Craig, Cheril A.

    A nearly global set of data on the nitric acid distribution was obtained for seven months by the Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) experiment on the Nimbus 7 spacecraft. The evaluation of the accuracy, precision and resolution of these data is described, and a description of the major features of the nitric acid distributions is presented. The zonal mean for nitric acid is distributed in a stratospheric layer that peaks near 30 mb, with the largest mixing ratios occurring in polar regions, especially in winter.

  8. Revised reference model for nitric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gille, J. C.; Bailey, P. L.; Craig, C. A.

    A nearly global set of data on the nitric acid distribution was obtained for seven months by the Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) experiment on the Nimbus 7 spacecraft. The evaluation of the accuracy, precision and resolution of these data is described, and a description of the major features of the nitric acid distributions is presented. The zonal mean for nitric acid is distributed in a stratospheric layer that peaks near 30 mb, with the largest mixing ratios occurring in polar regions, especially in winter.

  9. Revised reference model for nitric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gille, J. C.; Bailey, P. L.; Craig, C. A.

    1993-01-01

    A nearly global set of data on the nitric acid distribution was obtained for seven months by the Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS) experiment on the Nimbus 7 spacecraft. The evaluation of the accuracy, precision, and resolution of these data is described, and a description of the major features of the nitric acid distributions is presented. The zonal mean for nitric acid is distributed in a stratospheric layer that peaks near 30 mb, with the largest mixing ratios occurring in polar regions, especially in winter.

  10. Deposition and clearance of inhaled particles.

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, B O

    1976-01-01

    Theoretical models of respiratory tract deposition of inhaled particles are compared to experimental studies of deposition patterns in humans and animals, as determined principally by particle size, density, respiratory rate and flow parameters. Various models of inhaled particle deposition make use of convenient approximations of the respiratory tract to predict tractional deposition according to fundamental physical processes of impaction, sedimentation, and diffusion. These theoretical models for both total deposition and regional (nasopharyngeal, tracheobronchial, and pulmonary) deposition are compared with experimental studies of inhaled dusts in humans or experimental animals that have been performed in many laboratories over several decades. Reasonable correlation has been obtained between theoretical and experimental studies, but the behavior of very fine (less than 0.01 mum) particles requires further refinement.Properties of particle shape, charge, and hygroscopicity as well as the degree of respiratory tract pathology also influence deposition patterns and further experimental work is urgently needed in these areas. The influence upon deposition patterns of dynamic alterations in inspiratory flow profiles caused by a variety of breathing patterns also requires further study, and the use of such techniques with selected inhaled particle size holds promise in possible diagnostic aid in diagnosis of normal versus disease conditions. Mechanisms of conducting airway and alveolar clearance processes involving mucociliary clearance, dissolution, transport to systemic circulation, and translocation via regional lymphatic clearance are discussed. The roles of the pulmonary macrophage in airway and alveolar clearance are described, and the applicability of recent solubility models for translocation or deposited materials to liver, skeleton, or other systemic organs is discussed. PMID:797567

  11. Iodine Inhalation Study for Project Sedan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1964-05-20

    was essential to prevent inhalation of resuspended material and in- gestion of material deposited on the nose and fur. Therefore, four animals at each...one dog from the 31 -mile station. -Z8- I 1 P J 7 ř-- COUNTED 1235 PDT JULY 8 w 1 w87 4_ COUTE 13235PTJL COUE.. 00187+ 1PJ2 I I z 132 II\\"\\/ I, w1. 7

  12. Inhaled histamine increases human lung mucociliary transport

    SciTech Connect

    Mussatto, D.J.; Garrard, C.S.; Trumbull, J.J.; Bowers, M.W.; Sanders, C.J.; Yeates, D.B.; Lourenco, R.V.

    1986-03-01

    Histamine, a mediator of airways constriction, alters ciliary beat frequency, bronchial mucus production, and epithelial ion transport; and in dogs, increases mucociliary transport. To evaluate the effect of inhaled histamine on human tracheobronchial mucociliary clearance, the authors measured lung mucociliary clearance (LMC) and tracheal mucociliary transport rate (TMTR) in 5 healthy, nonsmoking subjects in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over study. The concentration of inhaled histamine which produced a 20% fall in FEV/sub 1/ was established for each subject. On a separate day the subjects inhaled a 9 ..mu..m MMAD /sup 99m/Tc-Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ aerosol. LMC and TMTR were then measured for 2.5h using a gamma camera and a tracheal multidetector probe. Simultaneously, the subjects were challenged every 26 +/- 4 min with either PBS or histamine in PBS. The Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ retained after 24h for histamine (14.4 +/- 7.6%) and PBS studies (13.1 +/- 8.6%) indicated no difference in deposition of Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ (ANOVA). Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ clearance at 30 min was increased in the histamine studies (61 +/- 21% compared to the PBS studies (44 +/- 29%; p < 0.02, ANOVA)). TMTR was also increased with histamine (7.6 +/- 3.4 mm/min) compared to PBS (4.6 +/- 1.7 mm/min; p < 0.001, ANOVA). Results indicate an acute stimulatory effect of inhaled histamine on mucous transport in humans.

  13. 21 CFR 868.5165 - Nitric oxide administration apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nitric oxide administration apparatus. 868.5165... apparatus. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide administration apparatus is a device used to add nitric oxide to gases that are to be breathed by a patient. The nitric oxide administration apparatus is to...

  14. 21 CFR 868.5165 - Nitric oxide administration apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nitric oxide administration apparatus. 868.5165... apparatus. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide administration apparatus is a device used to add nitric oxide to gases that are to be breathed by a patient. The nitric oxide administration apparatus is to...

  15. 21 CFR 868.2380 - Nitric oxide analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nitric oxide analyzer. 868.2380 Section 868.2380...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2380 Nitric oxide analyzer. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of nitric oxide...

  16. 21 CFR 868.2380 - Nitric oxide analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nitric oxide analyzer. 868.2380 Section 868.2380...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2380 Nitric oxide analyzer. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of nitric oxide...

  17. 21 CFR 868.2380 - Nitric oxide analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nitric oxide analyzer. 868.2380 Section 868.2380...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2380 Nitric oxide analyzer. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of nitric oxide...

  18. 21 CFR 868.2380 - Nitric oxide analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nitric oxide analyzer. 868.2380 Section 868.2380...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2380 Nitric oxide analyzer. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of nitric oxide...

  19. Assistance of inhalation injury victims caused by fire in confined spaces: what we learned from the tragedy at Santa Maria.

    PubMed

    Bassi, Estevão; Miranda, Leandro Costa; Tierno, Paulo Fernando Guimarães Morando Marzocchi; Ferreira, César Biselli; Cadamuro, Filipe Matheus; Figueiredo, Viviane Rossi; Damasceno, Maria Cecilia de Toledo; Malbouisson, Luiz Marcelo Sá

    2014-01-01

    On January 2013, a disaster at Santa Maria (RS) due to a fire in a confined space caused 242 deaths, most of them by inhalation injury. On November 2013, four individuals required intensive care following smoke inhalation from a fire at the Memorial da América Latina in São Paulo (SP). The present article reports the clinical progression and management of disaster victims presenting with inhalation injury. Patients ERL and OC exhibited early respiratory failure, bronchial aspiration of carbonaceous material, and carbon monoxide poisoning. Ventilation support was performed with 100% oxygen, the aspirated material was removed by bronchoscopy, and cyanide poisoning was empirically treated with sodium nitrite and sodium thiosulfate. Patient RP initially exhibited cough and retrosternal burning and subsequently progressed to respiratory failure due to upper airway swelling and early-onset pulmonary infection, which were treated with protective ventilation and antimicrobial agents. This patient was extubated following improvement of edema on bronchoscopy. Patient MA, an asthmatic, exhibited carbon monoxide poisoning and bronchospasm and was treated with normobaric hyperoxia,bronchodilators, and corticosteroids. The length of stay in the intensive care unit varied from four to 10 days, and all four patients exhibited satisfactory functional recovery. To conclude, inhalation injury has a preponderant role in fires in confined spaces. Invasive ventilation should not be delayed in cases with significant airway swelling. Hyperoxia should be induced early asa therapeutic means against carbon monoxide poisoning, in addition to empiric pharmacological treatment in suspected cases of cyanide poisoning.

  20. Inhalation cancer risk assessment of cobalt metal.

    PubMed

    Suh, Mina; Thompson, Chad M; Brorby, Gregory P; Mittal, Liz; Proctor, Deborah M

    2016-08-01

    Cobalt compounds (metal, salts, hard metals, oxides, and alloys) are used widely in various industrial, medical and military applications. Chronic inhalation exposure to cobalt metal and cobalt sulfate has caused lung cancer in rats and mice, as well as systemic tumors in rats. Cobalt compounds are listed as probable or possible human carcinogens by some agencies, and there is a need for quantitative cancer toxicity criteria. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has derived a provisional inhalation unit risk (IUR) of 0.009 per μg/m(3) based on a chronic inhalation study of soluble cobalt sulfate heptahydrate; however, a recent 2-year cancer bioassay affords the opportunity to derive IURs specifically for cobalt metal. The mechanistic data support that the carcinogenic mode of action (MOA) is likely to involve oxidative stress, and thus, non-linear/threshold mechanisms. However, the lack of a detailed MOA and use of high, toxic exposure concentrations in the bioassay (≥1.25 mg/m(3)) preclude derivation of a reference concentration (RfC) protective of cancer. Several analyses resulted in an IUR of 0.003 per μg/m(3) for cobalt metal, which is ∼3-fold less potent than the provisional IUR. Future research should focus on establishing the exposure-response for key precursor events to improve cobalt metal risk assessment.

  1. A novel inhalable form of rifapentine.

    PubMed

    Chan, John G Y; Duke, Colin C; Ong, Hui Xin; Chan, Joseph C Y; Tyne, Anneliese S; Chan, Hak-Kim; Britton, Warwick J; Young, Paul M; Traini, Daniela

    2014-05-01

    Recent murine studies found that rifapentine, dosed daily, at least halved tuberculosis treatment times compared with standard rifampicin and isoniazid-containing regimens. However, in humans, an inhalable form of rifapentine may be necessary to considerably shorten treatment duration because of the physiological barriers associated with oral therapy. The current study compares two inhalable rifapentine dry powders-a novel pure crystalline form and an amorphous form-by a series of in vitro tests. The crystalline and amorphous powders had a mass median aerodynamic size of 1.68 ± 0.03 and 1.92 ± 0.01 μm, respectively, associated with a fine particle fraction of 83.2 ± 1.2% and 68.8 ± 2.1%, respectively. A quinone degradation product was identified in the amorphous powder stored for 1 month, whereas the crystalline form remained chemically stable after storage at both 0% and 60% relative humidity, 25°C, for at least 3 months. Solubilized rifapentine was well tolerated by pulmonary tissue and macrophage cells up to approximately 50 μM. The accumulation of rifapentine within alveolar macrophage cells was significantly higher than for rifampicin, indicating enhanced delivery to infected macrophages. The novel inhalable crystalline form of rifapentine is suitable for targeted treatment of tuberculosis infection and may radically shorten treatment duration.

  2. The pharmacology of chymotrypsin administered by inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Golberg, L.; Martin, L. E.; Sheard, P.; Harrison, C.

    1960-01-01

    The ability of chymotrypsin to reach the limits of the bronchial tree has been studied in cats receiving the enzyme by inhalation as a very fine powder. For this purpose derivatives of chymotrypsin were used which had been labelled with a fluorescent molecule or with [131I]. Quantitative measurements of the absorption and distribution of inhaled chymotrypsin- [131I] revealed a rapid removal of radioactivity from the lungs over the first 24 hr. and corresponding excretion of labelled inorganic iodide in the urine. High levels of activity were not attained in the blood or thyroid. Subcutaneous administration of labelled enzyme led to more rapid accumulation of radioactivity in the blood and thyroid. Consideration of these and other results leads to the conclusion that, while some enzyme ascends the respiratory tract by ciliary movement of mucus, a substantial part is absorbed into the lungs and the [131I] subsequently detached from it. The changes in tidal air accompanying inhalation of labelled trypsin and chymotrypsin were followed in anaesthetized cats. Trypsin brings about a decrease in tidal air in distinctly lower doses than does chymotrypsin. Prior administration of mepyramine had an antagonistic effect, and it is suggested that the change in tidal air is essentially the result of bronchial spasm. ImagesFIG. 2FIG. 3 PMID:13850540

  3. Therapy and prophylaxis of inhaled biological toxins.

    PubMed

    Paddle, Brian M

    2003-01-01

    This review highlights the current lack of therapeutic and prophylactic treatments for use against inhaled biological toxins, especially those considered as potential biological warfare (BW) or terrorist threats. Although vaccine development remains a priority, the use of rapidly deployable adjunctive therapeutic or prophylactic drugs could be life-saving in severe cases of intoxication or where vaccination has not been possible or immunity not established. The current lack of such drugs is due to many factors. Thus, methods involving molecular modelling are limited by the extent to which the cellular receptor sites and mode of action and structure of a toxin need to be known. There is also our general lack of knowledge of what effect individual toxins will have when inhaled into the lungs - whether and to what extent the action will be cell specific and cytotoxic or rather an acute inflammatory response requiring the use of immunomodulators. Possible sources of specific high-affinity toxin antagonists being investigated include monoclonal antibodies, selected oligonucleotides (aptamers) and derivatized dendritic polymers (dendrimers). The initial selection of suitable agents of these kinds can be made using cytotoxicity assays involving cultured normal human lung cells and a range of suitable indicators. The possibility that a mixture of selected antibody, aptamer or dendrimer-based materials for one or more toxins could be delivered simultaneously as injections or as inhaled aerosol sprays should be investigated.

  4. Novel cosuspension metered-dose inhalers for the combination therapy of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma.

    PubMed

    Lechuga-Ballesteros, David; Noga, Brian; Vehring, Reinhard; Cummings, R Harris; Dwivedi, Sarvajna K

    2011-10-01

    Pressurized metered dose inhaler is the most common inhaled dosage form, ideally suited for delivering the highly potent compounds that medicinal chemists typically discover for respiratory therapeutic targets. The clinical benefit of combination therapy for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has been well established, and many of the new discovery candidates are likely to be studied in the clinic as combination drugs even at early stages of development. We present a novel pressurized metered dose inhaler formulation approach to enable consistent aerosol performance of a respiratory therapeutic whether it is emitted from a single-, double- or triple-therapy product. This should enable rapid nonclinical and clinical assessment whether alone or in combination with other drugs, without the challenge of in vitro performance dissimilarity across product types.

  5. [Protection of long-term ischemic kidneys from the damages of reoxygenation by using the temporary inhalation of a gas hypoxic mixture].

    PubMed

    Bilenko, M V; Volkova, I A; Danilova, S P

    1985-08-01

    Experiments were carried out on 240 August and Wistar rats. It was shown that renal reperfusion after 2 h of ischemia, performed following 24-hour inhalation by the animals of a gas hypoxic mixture (GHM) with 10 to 12% O2, increased the survival rate of the rats and accelerated the resynthesis of adenine nucleotides by the kidneys as compared with analogous characteristics during reperfusion paralleled by inhalation of air or oxygen. The protective effect of GHM inhalation on renal function and metabolism was approximately the same as the protective action of high doses (240 mg/kg) of the antioxidant ionol. The experiments confirm the role of lipid peroxidation in the pathogenesis of reoxygenation injuries and the protective effect of GHM inhalation in the early period of reperfusion.

  6. Pathophysiology of the Rhesus Macaque Model for Inhalational Brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Stephen M.; Pak, Dennis H.; Lindsay, Amber; Fisher, David A.; Barnewall, Roy E.; Briscoe, Crystal M.; Anderson, Michael S.; Warren, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the rhesus macaque (RM) as a model for inhalational brucellosis in support of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Animal Rule. The pathophysiology of chronic Brucella melitensis aerosol infection was monitored in two phases that each occurred over an 8-week time period; dose escalation (8 RMs; targeted doses of 5.0E+03, 5.0E+04, or 5.0E+05 CFU/animal or the unchallenged control) and natural history (12 RMs; targeted dose of 2.50E+05 CFU/animal or the unchallenged control). RMs given an aerosol challenge with B. melitensis developed undulating fevers (6/6 phase I; 8/9 phase II), positive enriched blood cultures (5/10; phase II), and bacterial burdens in tissues starting 14 to 21 days postchallenge (6/6 phase I; 10/10 phase II). In addition, 80% (8/10; phase II) of infected RMs seroconverted 14 to 21 days postchallenge. RMs developed elevations in certain liver enzymes and had an increased inflammatory response by 3 weeks postchallenge as shown by increases in C-reactive protein (6/8) and neopterin (4/8), which correlated with the onset of a fever. As early as 14 days postchallenge, positive liver biopsy specimens were detected (2/8), and ultrasound imaging showed the development of splenomegaly. Finally, histopathologic examination found lesions attributed to Brucella infection in the liver, kidney, lung, and/or spleen of all animals. The disease progression observed with the RMs in this study is analogous to human brucellosis pathophysiology. Thus, the results from this study support the use of the RM as an animal model for inhalational brucellosis to evaluate the efficacy of novel vaccines and therapeutics against B. melitensis. PMID:22064715

  7. Distribution of 125Iricin in mice following aerosol inhalation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Doebler, J.A.; Wiltshire, N.D.; Mayer, T.W.; Estep, J.E.; Moeller, R.B.

    1995-12-31

    Studies were conducted to examine the uptake and redistribution of 251Iricin from the lungs of mice following nose-only aerosol inhalation exposure. Radiolabelled contents were measured in lung and various extra-pulmonary tissues 15 min through 30 h following 10 min aerosol exposures. Pharmacokinetic analyses were performed on whole organ data obtained for lungs, stomach, liver and spleen. Radioactivity within the lungs, maximal at 15 min post-exposure, was eliminated in a biexponential fashion with a long Beta half-life (approx. 40 h). Large amounts of radiolabel were also found within the gastrointestinal tract. Radiolabel within the stomach exhibited an absorption phase and two-compartment elimination. Radiolabel content of many other tissues, including known accumulation sites for intravenously administered toxin, was significantly (p < 0,05) increased (relative to 15 min post-exposure) in association with the early elimination of radiolabel from the lungs, but levels in these tissues were very low and did not increase after 4 h post-exposure. The only exception was our sample of trachea, which showed delayed elevations in radiolabel (peak at 24 h); this pattern was attributable to the contained thyroid (not removed at necropsy) and its trapping of free (125I released) upon tissue 125Iricin degradation. The overall data indicate that ricin administered by aerosol inhalation is delivered to both respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts; however, it is not extensively transported from either tract to other potential target sites. Ricin delivered to the lungs is primarily sequestered within the lungs until degradation. Only small amounts of ricin delivered to the gastrointestinal tract are absorbed into the circulation.

  8. Pulmonary neutrophil recruitment and bronchial reactivity in formaldehyde-exposed rats are modulated by mast cells and differentially by neuropeptides and nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Lino dos Santos Franco, Adriana; Damazo, Amilcar Sabino; Beraldo de Souza, Hyula Regines; Domingos, Helory Vanni; Oliveira-Filho, Ricardo Martins; Oliani, Sonia Maria; Costa, Soraia Katia Pereira; Tavares de Lima, Wothan . E-mail: wtdelima@icb.usp.br

    2006-07-01

    We have used a pharmacological approach to study the mechanisms underlying the rat lung injury and the airway reactivity changes induced by inhalation of formaldehyde (FA) (1% formalin solution, 90 min once a day, 4 days). The reactivity of isolated tracheae and intrapulmonary bronchi were assessed in dose-response curves to methacholine (MCh). Local and systemic inflammatory phenomena were evaluated in terms of leukocyte countings in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, blood, bone marrow lavage and spleen. Whereas the tracheal reactivity to MCh did not change, a significant bronchial hyporesponsiveness (BHR) was found after FA inhalation as compared with naive rats. Also, FA exposure significantly increased the total cell numbers in BAL, in peripheral blood and in the spleen, but did not modify the counts in bone marrow. Capsaicin hindered the increase of leukocyte number recovered in BAL fluid after FA exposure. Both compound 48/80 and indomethacin were able to prevent the lung neutrophil influx after FA, but indomethacin had no effect on that of mononuclear cells. Following FA inhalation, the treatment with sodium cromoglycate (SCG), but not with the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor L-NAME, significantly reduced the total cell number in BAL. Compound 48/80, L-NAME and SCG significantly prevented BHR to MCh after FA inhalation, whereas capsaicin was inactive in this regard. On the other hand, indomethacin exacerbated BHR. These data suggest that after FA inhalation, the resulting lung leukocyte influx and BHR may involve nitric oxide, airway sensory fibers and mast cell-derived mediators. The effect of NO seemed to be largely restricted to the bronchial tonus, whereas neuropeptides appeared to be linked to the inflammatory response, therefore indicating that the mechanisms responsible for the changes of airway responsiveness caused by FA may be separate from those underlying its inflammatory lung effects.

  9. Effects of Inhalation Aromatherapy on Symptoms of Sleep Disturbance in the Elderly with Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Watanuki, Emiko

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of inhalation aromatherapy on sleep disturbance in elderly individuals with dementia. In 19 subjects, normal sleep was observed for a 20-day control period, inhalation aromatherapy was then applied for a 20-day intervention period, and the control and intervention periods were compared. During the intervention period, essential oils were placed nightly on towels around the subjects' pillows. The measured sleep conditions were sleep latency, total sleep time, sleep efficacy, duration of the longest sustained sleep period, wake time after sleep onset, early morning awakening, total daytime sleep, and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. Total sleep time was significantly longer in the intervention period than in the control period (p < 0.05). The duration of the longest sustained sleep period was significantly longer in the intervention period than in the control period (p < 0.05). Early morning awakening in the intervention period was significantly less compared to that in the control period (p < 0.05). Total daytime sleep could not be adequately measured and was omitted from the analysis. No significant differences in other sleep conditions were observed. These results indicated positive effects of inhalation aromatherapy on symptoms of sleep disturbance in elderly individuals with dementia.

  10. Relative lung and systemic bioavailability of sodium cromoglycate inhaled products using urinary drug excretion post inhalation.

    PubMed

    Aswania, Osama; Chrystyn, Henry

    2002-05-01

    The relative lung and systemic bioavailability of sodium cromoglycate following inhalation by different methods have been determined using a urinary excretion pharmacokinetic method. On three separate randomised study days, 7 days apart, subjects inhaled (i) 4x5 mg from an Intal metered dose inhaler (MDI), (ii) 4x5 mg from an MDI attached to a large volume spacer (MDI+SP) and (iii) 20 mg from an Intal Spinhaler (DPI). Urine samples were provided at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 5 and 24 h post dose. The mean (S.D.) amount of sodium cromoglycate excreted in the urine during the first 30 min post inhalation was 38.1 (27.5), 222.3 (120.3) and 133.1 (92.2) microg following MDI, MDI+SP and DPI, respectively. The mean ratio (90% confidence interval) of these amounts excreted in the urine over the first 30 min for MDI+SP vs. MDI, DPI vs. MDI and MDI+SP vs. DPI was 801.0 (358.0, 1244; p<0.002)%, 457.0 (244.0, 670.0; p<0.02)% and 262.4 (110.2, 414.5)%, respectively. Similarly for the 24 h cumulative amount of sodium cromoglycate excreted over the 24 h post inhalation the ratios were 375.4 (232.9, 517.9; p<0.005)%, 287.5 (183.4, 391.6; p<0.02)% and 211.4 (88.3, 334.5)%, respectively. The results highlight better lung deposition of sodium cromoglycate from a metered dose inhaler attached to a large volume spacer.

  11. Investigation of Appropriate Inhalation Technique for Mometasone Furoate Dry Powder Inhaler.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Haruko; Ito, Kanako; Mihashi, Hirokazu; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Takayanagi, Risa; Yamada, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish an appropriate inhalation method with a mometasone furoate dry powder inhaler (MF-DPI). Utilizing a tone-based inhalation training device, we investigated the maximum peak inspiratory flow rate time (Tmax PIFR) and peak inspiratory flow rate (PIFR) to determine whether either had an influence on lung deposition with use of an MF-DPI. A low tone indicated a PIFR of 28 L/min and a high tone that of 40 L/min, while 60 L/min was considered to be the standard. We established an inhalation profile in consideration of a human inhalation pattern, in which Tmax PIFR was set at 0.5 s (Tmax PIFR 0.5 s) and 2.5 s (Tmax PIFR 2.5 s). The reference cut-off value derived with a cascade impactor test was used for evaluation of the rate of delivered dose in the lung, which was the amount of drug from stage 3 to 7 at all PIFRs. We then investigated the relationship of the fine particle fraction (FPF) with the claimed dose at Tmax PIFR of 0.5 s and PIFR. There were no differences among the Tmax PIFR values for the doses emitted from the device or for the rate of delivered doses in stages 3-7. However, FPF for the claimed dose at 40 L/min was significantly lower than that at 60 L/min, which was dependent on PIFR. Our results showed that PIFR but not Tmax PIFR has an effect on lung deposition after inhalation with an MF-DPI.

  12. Nitric oxide production by Tunguska meteor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, C.

    1978-01-01

    The nonequilibrium chemical processes of nitric oxide formation are computed for the wake of the Tunguska meteor of 1908. The wake characteristics are derived by carrying out an optically-thick radiation field analysis for ablation of the meteoroid. The wake flow field is approximated by a one-dimensional, well-stirred reactor model. Known characteristics of the Tunguska event are imposed as constraints, and three controlling parameters - chemical composition, density, and velocity - are varied over a range around the values derived by Korobeinikov et al. (1976) and Petrov and Stulov (1975). The calculation shows that at least 19 million tons of nitric oxide is produced between the altitudes of 10 and 50 km. The anomalous atmospheric phenomena following the event are attributed to the reactions involving nitric oxide thus produced and atmospheric ozone. It is speculated that the nitric oxide produced by the event fertilized the area near the fall, causing the observed rapid plant growth.

  13. ELECTROLYTIC REDUCTION OF NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Alter, H.W.; Barney, D.L.

    1958-09-30

    A process is presented for the treatment of radioactivc waste nitric acid solutions. The nitric acid solution is neutralized with an alkali metal hydroxide in an amount sufficient to precipitate insoluble hydroxides, and after separation of the precipitate the solution is electrolyzed to convert the alkali nitrate formed, to alkali hydroxide, gaseous ammonla and oxygen. The solution is then reusable after reducing the volume by evaporating the water and dissolved ammonia.

  14. Induction of Food Allergy in Mice by Allergen Inhalation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    14. ABSTRACT The purpose of this project is to test the hypothesis that food allergy may develop in response to antigen inhalation. Studies in a...relative timing of antigen ingestion vs. antigen inhalation to lead to food allergy development. We are also testing whether exposure to aerosolized...antigen will reverse or exacerbate established food allergy to that antigen. Studies in year 1 of this project demonstrate that: 1) initial inhalation

  15. Budesonide inhalation suspension: a nebulized corticosteroid for persistent asthma.

    PubMed

    Szefler, Stanley J; Eigen, Howard

    2002-04-01

    Guidelines for managing asthma in pediatric patients published by the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology and the American Academy of Pediatrics recommend the use of inhaled corticosteroids for the management of persistent asthma in infants and young children. When these guidelines were published, pressurized metered-dose inhalers and dry-powder inhalers were the only delivery devices available for inhaled corticosteroids in the United States. These devices can be difficult for young children to use correctly. Furthermore, no inhaled corticosteroid was approved in the United States for the treatment of children younger than 4 years. Budesonide inhalation suspension (Pulmicort Respules; AstraZeneca LP, Wilmington, Del) was developed to meet the medication delivery needs of infants and young children with persistent asthma. Pulmicort Respules is the first inhaled corticosteroid approved for administration by means of a nebulizer and the only inhaled corticosteroid approved in the United States for infants as young as 12 months. Budesonide has been studied extensively worldwide. In the United States the tolerability and efficacy of budesonide inhalation suspension were confirmed in 3 placebo-controlled multicenter trials. These studies demonstrated that both once- and twice-daily dosing of budesonide inhalation suspension (0.25-1 mg) improved pulmonary function and ameliorated asthma symptoms in infants and young children with persistent asthma. Budesonide inhalation suspension was well tolerated, and the incidences of reported adverse events were similar among patients in the budesonide, placebo, and conventional asthma therapy groups. This article reviews the results of these studies, as well as the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and clinical use of budesonide inhalation suspension.

  16. Understanding the Latitude Structure of Nitric Oxide in the Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller-Rowell, T.J.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of the proposed work was to understand the latitude structure of nitric oxide in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. The problem was portrayed by a clear difference between predictions of the nitric oxide distribution from chemical/dynamical models and data from observations made by the Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SMEE) in the early to mid eighties. The data exhibits a flat latitude structure of NO, the models tend to produce at equatorial maximum. The first task was to use the UARS-HALOE data to confirm the SME observations. The purpose of this first phase was to verify the UARS-NO structure is consistent with the SME data. The next task was to determine the cause of the discrepancy between modeled and observed nitric oxide latitude structure. The result from the final phase indicated that the latitude structure in the Photo-Electron (PE) production rate was the most important.

  17. Moderate dose inhaled corticosteroid-induced symptomatic adrenal suppression: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Richard H; Neacsu, Otilia; Ascher, David P; Alpan, Oral

    2012-12-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are drugs of choice for persistent asthma. Less than 500 µg/d of fluticasone are believed to be safe. We found 92 cases of adrenal suppression in PubMed; among these cases there were 13 children who took 500 µg/d or less of fluticasone. Adrenal insufficiency was diagnosed in a 7-year-old boy on 460 µg ICS for 16 months, with a diagnosis of chronic persistent asthma. A random cortisol was nondetectable as was an early morning cortisol. ICS have greatly improved the day-to-day lives of children with chronic persistent asthma. Parents of children younger than 12 years, who use at least 400 µg of inhaled fluticasone (or bioequivalent), must be given oral and written instructions about warning symptoms of hypocortisolism. Major stress such as surgery, gastrointestinal, bronchopulmonary, or other systemic infections, and heat stress may mandate a written plan of action for use by hospital physicians.

  18. New Developments in the Pathogenesis of Smoke Inhalation-Induced Pulmonary Edema

    PubMed Central

    Witten, Mark L.; Quan, Stuart F.; Sobonya, Richard E.; Lemen, Richard J.

    1988-01-01

    Smoke inhalation causes most of the deaths in fire-related injuries, with pulmonary edema as a major determinant in the outcome of smoke-inhalation injury. The pathophysiology of pulmonary edema is thought to be related to the products of incomplete combustion. Damage to the integrity of the alveolar epithelium is one of the determinants of the development of smoke-induced pulmonary edema. In recent studies using lung clearance of aerosolized pentetic acid (DTPA [diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid]) labeled with technetium Tc 99m to assess the permeability of the alveolar epithelium, several factors were identified that may increase a person's susceptibility to smoke-induced acute lung injury. These are increased initial alveolar permeability and alterations in the number and activity of alveolar macrophages. Clinical measurement of 99mTcDTPA clearance may provide a sensitive and convenient method for the early detection and serial assessment of smoke-induced alveolar epithelial permeability changes. Images PMID:3277334

  19. Use of Respimat Soft Mist inhaler in COPD patients.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Paula

    2006-01-01

    Events of the past decade have stimulated development of new drug formulations and delivery devices that have improved the efficiency, ease of use, and environmental impact of inhaled drug therapy. Respimat Soft Mist Inhaler is a novel, multidose, propellant-free, hand-held, liquid inhaler that represents a new category of inhaler devices. The aerosol cloud generated by Respimat contains a higher fraction of fine particles than most pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs) and dry powder inhalers (DPIs), and the aerosol spray exits the inhaler more slowly and for a longer duration than with pMDIs. This translates into higher lung drug deposition and lower oropharyngeal deposition, making it possible to give lower nominal doses of delivered drugs without lowering efficacy. In clinical trials in patients with COPD, bronchodilator drugs delivered from Respimat were equally effective at half of the dose delivered from a pMDI. In one study of inhaler preference, Respimat was preferred over the pMDI by patients with COPD and other obstructive lung diseases. Respimat is a valuable addition to the range of inhaler devices available to the patient with COPD.

  20. The role of nitric oxide signaling in food intake; insights from the inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase 2 mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Changjie; Zhao, Qingguo; Lu, Baisong

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species have been implicated in feeding control through involvement in brain lipid sensing, and regulating NPY/AgRP and pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons, although the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Nitric oxide is a signaling molecule in neurons and it stimulates feeding in many species. Whether reactive oxygen species affect feeding through interaction with nitric oxide is unclear. We previously reported that Immp2l mutation in mice causes excessive mitochondrial superoxide generation, which causes infertility and early signs of aging. In our present study, reduced food intake in mutant mice resulted in significantly reduced body weight and fat composition while energy expenditure remained unchanged. Lysate from mutant brain showed a significant decrease in cGMP levels, suggesting insufficient nitric oxide signaling. Thus, our data suggests that reactive oxygen species may regulate food intake through modulating the bioavailability of nitric oxide.

  1. The monocyte locomotion inhibitory factor produced by Entamoeba histolytica inhibits induced nitric oxide production in human leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Rico, G; Leandro, E; Rojas, S; Giménez, J A; Kretschmer, R R

    2003-07-01

    The monocyte locomotion inhibitory factor, an anti-inflammatory pentapeptide produced by Entamoeba histolytica, inhibits the in vitro production of nitric oxide induced by cytokines (INF-gamma, TNF-alpha) or PMA in human leukocytes. This can be added to the other previously reported functional effects of this factor, such as the inhibition of monocyte locomotion and the synthesis of reactive oxygen intermediates in both monocytes and neutrophils. The decreased nitric oxide production may interfere with the killing of amebas by neutrophils in the early invasive stages of amebiasis, when oxidative mechanisms are used [reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates either individually or synergistically via peroxynitrite (ONOO(-))], and in the advanced stages, when both non-oxidative and oxidative (including nitric oxide) mechanisms are employed by macrophages. Diminished nitric oxide production by leukocytes may also contribute to the paucity of late inflammatory components in amebic abscess of the liver and other amebic lesions.

  2. Nitric oxide signaling in yeast.

    PubMed

    Astuti, Rika Indri; Nasuno, Ryo; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    As a cellular signaling molecule, nitric oxide (NO) is widely conserved from microorganisms, such as bacteria, yeasts, and fungi, to higher eukaryotes including plants and mammals. NO is mainly produced by NO synthase (NOS) or nitrite reductase (NIR) activity. There are several NO detoxification systems, including NO dioxygenase (NOD) and S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR). NO homeostasis based on the balance between NO synthesis and degradation is important for the regulation of its physiological functions because an excess level of NO causes nitrosative stress due to the high reactivity of NO and NO-derived compounds. In yeast, NO may be involved in stress responses, but NO and its signaling have been poorly understood due to the lack of mammalian NOS orthologs in the genome. Even though the activities of NOS and NIR have been observed in yeast cells, the gene encoding NOS and the NO production mechanism catalyzed by NIR remain unclear. On the other hand, yeast cells employ NOD and GSNOR to maintain an intracellular redox balance following endogenous NO production, exogenous NO treatment, or environmental stresses. This article reviews NO metabolism (synthesis, degradation) and its regulation in yeast. The physiological roles of NO in yeast, including the oxidative stress response, are also discussed here. Such investigations into NO signaling are essential for understanding the NO-dependent genetic and physiological modulations. In addition to being responsible for the pathology and pharmacology of various degenerative diseases, NO signaling may be a potential target for the construction and engineering of industrial yeast strains.

  3. Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    The Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) Program at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida, has the primary objective of modernizing and transforming the launch and range complex at KSC to benefit current and future NASA programs along with other emerging users. Described as the launch support and infrastructure modernization program in the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, the GSDO Program will develop and implement shared infrastructure and process improvements to provide more flexible, affordable, and responsive capabilities to a multi-user community. In support of NASA and the GSDO Program, the objective of this project is to qualify citric acid as an environmentally-preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys. This project is a direct follow-on to United Space Alliance (USA) work at KSC to optimize the parameters for the use of citric acid and verify effectiveness. This project will build off of the USA study to further evaluate citric acids effectiveness and suitability for corrosion protection of a number of stainless steels alloys used by NASA, the Department of Defense (DoD), and the European Space Agency (ESA).

  4. The use of fraction of exhaled nitric oxide in pulmonary practice.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kaiser G; Mottram, Carl

    2008-05-01

    The measurement of the fractional concentration of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) is a convenient, noninvasive, point-of-service office test for airway inflammation. The first half of this practice management review presents the methodological, interpretative, and clinical applications of FeNO. The second half discusses practical management issues, including current and future technology, equipment specifications, US Food and Drug Administration regulations, cost, current procedural terminology coding, and reimbursement. The measurement of FeNO is helpful in the diagnosis of asthma. It is predictive of a response to inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs). Monitoring FeNO is useful in maintaining asthma control by allowing the assessment of adherence to medication and dose titration of ICSs. An elevated level of FeNO is predictive of asthma relapse following corticosteroid withdrawal especially in children. The advances in technology, ease of use, and clinical utility will lead to greater availability, acceptance, and routine application in the care of asthma.

  5. Inhalation dosimetry modeling provides insights into regional respiratory tract toxicity of inhaled diacetyl.

    PubMed

    Cichocki, Joseph A; Morris, John B

    2016-11-13

    Vapor dosimetry models provide a means of assessing the role of delivered dose in determining the regional airway response to inspired vapors. A validated hybrid computational fluid dynamics physiologically based pharmacokinetic model for inhaled diacetyl has been developed to describe inhaled diacetyl dosimetry in both the rat and human respiratory tracts. Comparison of the distribution of respiratory tract injury with dosimetry estimates provides strong evidence that regional delivered dose rather than regional airway tissue sensitivity to diacetyl-induced injury is the critical determinant of the regional respiratory tract response to this water soluble reactive vapor. In the rat, inhalation exposure to diacetyl causes much lesser injury in the distal bronchiolar airways compared to nose and large tracheobronchial airways. The degree of injury correlates very strongly to model based estimates of local airway diacetyl concentrations. According to the model, regional dosimetry patterns of diacetyl in the human differ greatly from those in the rat with much greater penetration of diacetyl to the bronchiolar airways in the lightly exercising mouth breathing human compared to the rat, providing evidence that rat inhalation toxicity studies underpredict the risk of bronchiolar injury in the human. For example, repeated exposure of the rat to 200ppm diacetyl results in bronchiolar injury; the estimated bronchiolar tissue concentration in rats exposed to 200ppm diacetyl would occur in lightly exercising mouth breathing humans exposed to 12ppm. Consideration of airway dosimetry patterns of inspired diacetyl is critical to the proper evaluation of rodent toxicity data and its relevance for predicting human risk.

  6. Neural mechanisms in nitric-oxide-deficient hypertension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sander, M.; Victor, R. G.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Nitric oxide is hypothesized to be an inhibitory modulator of central sympathetic nervous outflow, and deficient neuronal nitric oxide production to cause sympathetic overactivity, which then contributes to nitric-oxide-deficient hypertension. The biochemical and neuroanatomical basis for this concept revolves around nitric oxide modulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission within brainstem vasomotor centers. The functional consequence of neuronal nitric oxide in blood pressure regulation is, however, marked by an apparent conflict in the literature. On one hand, conscious animal studies using sympathetic blockade suggest a significant role for neuronal nitric oxide deficiency in the development of nitric-oxide-deficient hypertension, and on the other hand, there is evidence against such a role derived from 'knock-out' mice lacking nitric-oxide synthase 1, the major source of neuronal nitric oxide.

  7. Health effects of inhaled gasoline engine emissions.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Jacob D; Reed, Matthew D; Campen, Matthew J; Barrett, Edward G; Seagrave, JeanClare; Mauderly, Joe L

    2007-01-01

    Despite their prevalence in the environment, and the myriad studies that have shown associations between morbidity or mortality with proximity to roadways (proxy for motor vehicle exposures), relatively little is known about the toxicity of gasoline engine emissions (GEE). We review the studies conducted on GEE to date, and summarize the findings from each of these studies. While there have been several studies, most of the studies were conducted prior to 1980 and thus were not conducted with contemporary engines, fuels, and driving cycles. In addition, many of the biological assays conducted during those studies did not include many of the assays that are conducted on contemporary inhalation exposures to air pollutants, including cardiovascular responses and others. None of the exposures from these earlier studies were characterized at the level of detail that would be considered adequate today. A recent GEE study was conducted as part of the National Environmental Respiratory Center (www.nercenter.org). In this study several in-use mid-mileage General Motors (Chevrolet S-10) vehicles were purchased and utilized for inhalation exposures. An exposure protocol was developed where engines were operated with a repeating California Unified Driving Cycle with one cold start per day. Two separate engines were used to provide two cold starts over a 6-h inhalation period. The exposure atmospheres were characterized in detail, including detailed chemical and physical analysis of the gas, vapor, and particle phase. Multiple rodent biological models were studied, including general toxicity and inflammation (e.g., serum chemistry, lung lavage cell counts/differentials, cytokine/chemokine analysis, histopathology), asthma (adult and in utero exposures with pulmonary function and biochemical analysis), cardiovascular effects (biochemical and electrocardiograph changes in susceptible rodent models), and susceptibility to infection (Pseudomonas bacteria challenge). GEE resulted in

  8. Cardiomyopathy from 1,1-Difluoroethane Inhalation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Suwen; Joginpally, Tejaswini; Kim, David; Yadava, Mrinal; Norgais, Konchok; Laird-Fick, Heather S

    2016-10-01

    Consumer aerosol products can be inhaled for their psychoactive effects, but with attendant adverse health effects including "sudden sniffing death." Cardiomyopathy has rarely been described in association with 1,1-difluoroethane (DFE), a common aerosol propellant. We report a 33-year-old male who developed acute myocardial injury and global hypokinesis along with rhabdomyolysis, acute kidney injury, and fulminant hepatitis after 2 days' nearly continuous huffing. Workup for other causes, including underlying coronary artery disease, was negative. His cardiac function improved over time. The exact mechanism of DFE's effects is uncertain but may include catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy, coronary vasospasm, or direct cellular toxicity.

  9. Assessing inhalation exposure from airborne soil contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Shinn, J.H.

    1998-04-01

    A method of estimation of inhalation exposure to airborne soil contaminants is presented. this method is derived from studies of airborne soil particles with radioactive tags. The concentration of contaminants in air (g/m{sup 3}) can be derived from the product of M, the suspended respirable dust mass concentration (g/m{sup 3}), S, the concentration of contaminant in the soil (g/g), and E{sub f}, an enhancement factor. Typical measurement methods and values of M, and E{sub f} are given along with highlights of experiences with this method.

  10. Nitric oxide and virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Akaike, T; Maeda, H

    2000-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has complex and diverse functions in physiological and pathophysiological phenomena. The mechanisms of many events induced by NO are now well defined, so that a fundamental understanding of NO biology is almost established. Accumulated evidence suggests that NO and oxygen radicals such as superoxide are key molecules in the pathogenesis of various infectious diseases. NO biosynthesis, particularly through expression of an inducible NO synthase (iNOS), occurs in a variety of microbial infections. Although antimicrobial activity of NO is appreciated for bacteria and protozoa, NO has opposing effects in virus infections such as influenza virus pneumonia and certain other neurotropic virus infections. iNOS produces an excessive amount of NO for long periods, which allows generation of a highly reactive nitrogen oxide species, peroxynitrite, via a radical coupling reaction of NO with superoxide. Thus, peroxynitrite causes oxidative tissue injury through potent oxidation and nitration reactions of various biomolecules. NO also appears to affect a host's immune response, with immunopathological consequences. For example, overproduction of NO in virus infections in mice is reported to suppress type 1 helper T-cell-dependent immune responses, leading to type 2 helper T-cell-biased immunological host responses. Thus, NO may be a host response modulator rather than a simple antiviral agent. The unique biological properties of NO are further illustrated by our recent data suggesting that viral mutation and evolution may be accelerated by NO-induced oxidative stress. Here, we discuss these multiple roles of NO in pathogenesis of virus infections as related to both non-specific inflammatory responses and immunological host reactions modulated by NO during infections in vivo. PMID:11106932

  11. [Retinal ischemia and nitric oxide].

    PubMed

    Neroev, V V; Arkhipova, M M

    2003-01-01

    Retinal ischemia is the main chain in the pathogenesis of vascular diseases of the eye. It was established that nitric oxide (NO) plays the key role in the development of ischemia. Recent understanding of the NO role, as a universal regulator of the cellular and tissue metabolism, is presented. The authors' and published data were used to design a scheme of pathogenesis of retinal ischemia with regard for the NO role. NO can produce both positive and negative effects depending on a stage of the process, NO concentration and on a number of other factors if they are present. Initial stages of hypoxia/ischemia are accompanied by an activation of all forms of NO-synthases (NOS) caused by the influence of biologically active substances (cytokines, prostaglandins, serotonin, bradykinin, glycolisis suboxide products etc.). The activation of inducible NOS, which synthesize a bigger quantity of NO possessing a direct cytotoxic action and contributing to the production of highly toxic radical of peroxinitrit, is in the focus of attention. The damage of cellular structures due to free-radical processes leads to the development of endothelial, macrophage and thrombocyte malfunctions, which manifest itself through a reduced activity of endothelial NOS and through disruption of NO-dependent processes (vasospasm, an increased aggregation of platelets and a reduced fibrinolytic activity). A sharp reduction of NO synthesis substrate (L-arginine) is observed in patients with retinal ischemia. The aggravation of ischemia causes a decrease of NO synthesis due to an exhaustion of L-arginine and its intensified consumption in the course of free-radical processes. The use of NO-inhibitors and of NO-donors at different stages of retinal ischemia prevents the development of neovascularization and proliferation.

  12. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide for the management of asthma in adults: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Harnan, Sue; Gomersall, Tim; Tappenden, Paul; Wong, Ruth; Pavord, Ian; Lawson, Rod; Everard, Mark L.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) measured in a clinical setting for the management of asthma in adults. 13 electronic databases were searched and studies were selected against predefined inclusion criteria. Quality assessment was conducted using QUADAS-2. Class effect meta-analyses were performed. Six studies were included. Despite high levels of heterogeneity in multiple study characteristics, exploratory class effect meta-analyses were conducted. Four studies reported a wider definition of exacerbation rates (major or severe exacerbation) with a pooled rate ratio of 0.80 (95% CI 0.63–1.02). Two studies reported rates of severe exacerbations (requiring oral corticosteroid use) with a pooled rate ratio of 0.89 (95% CI 0.43–1.72). Inhaled corticosteroid use was reported by four studies, with a pooled standardised mean difference of −0.24 (95% CI −0.56–0.07). No statistically significant differences for health-related quality of life or asthma control were found. FeNO guided management showed no statistically significant benefit in terms of severe exacerbations or inhaled corticosteroid use, but showed a statistically significant reduction in exacerbations of any severity. However, further research is warranted to clearly define which management protocols (including cut-off points) offer best efficacy and which patient groups would benefit the most. PMID:26846832

  13. Relationship between serum arginase I and l-arginine or exhaled nitric oxide in asthma.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Keiki; Obase, Yasushi; Ito, Tatsuo; Fujimura, Masaki; Eguchi, Eri; Kubo, Masayuki; Nagaoka, Kenjiro; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between serum arginase I and serum l-arginine or fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) was evaluated cross-sectionally in asthmatic patients. No sex difference was observed in the serum mean levels of arginase I and l-arginine or FENO. Arginase I and FENO were higher in patients 60 or younger years than in those over 60 years. Asthmatic patients were divided into three groups: no steroid therapy, inhalation steroid therapy, and oral steroid therapy. Arginase I, FENO and high-sensitivity-C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) were significantly lower in the inhalation steroid therapy group than in the no steroid therapy group. Correlations were observed between arginase I and FENO, l-arginine, hs-CRP, WBC, and age, and also between FENO and IgE, WBC, and age. A logistic regression analysis revealed the positive association of arginase I with FENO, and the negative association of l-arginine. FENO was positively associated with arginase I and IgE. These results indicated that serum arginase I might influence serum levels of l-arginine and FENO, and that IgE might influence FENO in asthmatic patients.

  14. Inhalation toxicity of methyl difluoromalonyl fluoride in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, G.L. Jr.; Burgess, B.A.; Chen, H.C.

    1988-06-01

    Methyl 2,2-difluoromalonyl fluoride (MMF) is highly toxic by inhalation producing mortality in rats exposed for 4 hours to 0.55 mg/L. Repeated inhalation exposures of rats to 0.009 mg/L produced irritation but no other signs of a toxic response. Mortality was encountered following repeated exposures to 0.066 mg/L.

  15. 49 CFR 179.102-3 - Materials poisonous by inhalation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Materials poisonous by inhalation. 179.102-3... HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK... Materials poisonous by inhalation. (a) Each tank car built after March 16, 2009 for the transportation of...

  16. Evaluation of the Inhalation Carcinogenicity of Ethylene Oxide (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has finalized its Evaluation of the Inhalation Carcinogenicity of Ethylene Oxide. This assessment addresses the potential carcinogenicity from long-term inhalation exposure to ethylene oxide. Now final, this assessment updates the carcinogenicity information in EPA’s 1985 Hea...

  17. [The choice of inhalation device: A medical act].

    PubMed

    Devillier, P; Salvator, H; Roche, N

    2015-06-01

    Inhaled treatments are essential for respiratory diseases management, including COPD and asthma. Optimal control of the disease largely depends on patient's compliance and proper use of these treatments. Different types of ready-to-use inhaler devices are available: metered dose inhaler, dry powder inhaler or soft mist inhaler. Each of these devices presents specific characteristics and constraints that have to be evaluated and taken into account before prescription. In order to optimize adherence and treatment efficacy, the choice of inhaler device should depend on the specific needs, abilities and preferences of each patient and a specific education to treatment should be provided. Inhaled treatments, even containing the same drug, have different technical constraints and are thus not easily interchangeable. Their substitution without prior medical consent and without proper training can lead to errors in taking treatment, treatment failures and increased health care consumption. In France, substitution by the pharmacist is not authorized. While patient education must be carried out in collaboration with all health professionals, it is preferable that the choice of inhaler device remains the responsibility of the physician.

  18. 49 CFR 179.102-3 - Materials poisonous by inhalation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Materials poisonous by inhalation. (a) Each tank car built after March 16, 2009 for the transportation of a... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Materials poisonous by inhalation. 179.102-3 Section 179.102-3 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE...

  19. 49 CFR 179.102-3 - Materials poisonous by inhalation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Materials poisonous by inhalation. (a) Each tank car built after March 16, 2009 for the transportation of a... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Materials poisonous by inhalation. 179.102-3 Section 179.102-3 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE...

  20. 49 CFR 179.102-3 - Materials poisonous by inhalation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Materials poisonous by inhalation. (a) Each tank car built after March 16, 2009 for the transportation of a... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Materials poisonous by inhalation. 179.102-3 Section 179.102-3 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE...

  1. Purpura and dermal thinning associated with high dose inhaled corticosteroids.

    PubMed Central

    Capewell, S; Reynolds, S; Shuttleworth, D; Edwards, C; Finlay, A Y

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the effect of high dose inhaled corticosteroids on skin. DESIGN--Cross sectional study of patients receiving treatment for chest diseases. SETTING--Outpatient chest clinic in a teaching hospital. PATIENTS--68 Patients divided into four groups of similar age--namely, 15 receiving long term oral prednisolone, 21 receiving high dose inhaled corticosteroids, 15 receiving low dose inhaled corticosteroids, and 17 controls. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Skin thickness at three sites measured by A scan ultrasound and clinical assessment of purpura. RESULTS--Compared with controls patients in both the oral prednisolone treated group and the high dose inhaled corticosteroid treated group had significantly thinner skin at all three sites (group median thicknesses: prednisolone treated group 28-33% less than controls; high dose inhaled corticosteroid treated group 15-19% less than controls). Differences in skin thicknesses between the low dose inhaled corticosteroid treated group and the controls were trivial. The prevalence of purpura was significantly greater in patients receiving oral prednisolone (12/15 patients) and high dose inhaled corticosteroids (10/21) than in controls (2/17). CONCLUSION--Skin thinning and purpura represent further evidence of systemic effects of high dose inhaled corticosteroids. PMID:2372620

  2. IRIS Toxicological Review of Ammonia Noncancer Inhalation (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has finalized the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) Assessment of Ammonia (Noncancer Inhalation). This assessment addresses the potential noncancer human health effects from long-term inhalation exposure to ammonia. Now final, this assessment will update the ...

  3. The Deliberate Inhalation of Volatile Substances. Series 30, No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamage, James R.; Zerkin, E. Lief

    This report, prepared by the National Clearinghouse for Drug Abuse Information, presents information on the deliberate inhalation of volatile substances--the treatment modalities, the pharmacology and chemistry of this drug abuse, and the opinions and practices of recognized authorities in the field. Substances which are currently being inhaled to…

  4. Inhaled corticosteroids in COPD: a controversy.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Peter J

    2010-01-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are now very widely used in high doses in the management of COPD patients. In sharp contrast to the situation in asthma, ICS provide little or no benefit in COPD patients and may have long-term detrimental effects. High doses of ICS fail to reduce disease progression or mortality, even when combined with a long-acting beta(2)-agonist (LABA). Several trials have demonstrated that ICS reduce exacerbations by 20-25%, particularly in patients with more severe disease, but these studies are confounded by poor trial design and more appropriate analysis shows no benefit. Indeed, the benefit of combination inhalers seems to be largely due to the effect of the LABA, and long-acting bronchodilators--including tiotropium--provide similar benefits in reducing exacerbations. However, there may be some COPD patients, for example those with concomitant asthma, who benefit from ICS. Yet it has not been possible to identify any clinical factors that predict corticosteroid responsiveness in COPD patients in the large clinical trials. There is increasing evidence that high doses of ICS may have detrimental effects on bones and may increase the risk of pneumonia. ICS fail to suppress inflammation in COPD patients because there is a marked reduction in histone deacetylase-2, the nuclear enzyme that corticosteroids require to switch off activated inflammatory genes. In the future, alternative anti-inflammatory treatments will be needed for COPD or therapeutic strategies which reverse the molecular pathways that causes corticosteroid resistance.

  5. IRIS Toxicological Review of Ammonia Noncancer Inhalation ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In September 2016, EPA finalized the IRIS assessment of Ammonia (Noncancer Inhalation). The Toxicological Review was reviewed internally by EPA and by other federal agencies and White House Offices before public release in June 2016. Consistent with the May 2009 IRIS assessment development process, all written comments on IRIS assessments submitted by other federal agencies and White House Offices are made publicly available. Accordingly, interagency comments and the interagency science discussion materials provided to other agencies, including interagency review drafts of the IRIS Toxicological Review of Ammonia (Noncancer Inhalation) are posted on this site. Note: No major science comments were received on the Interagency Science Discussion Draft. EPA is undertaking an Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) health assessment for ammonia. IRIS is an EPA database containing Agency scientific positions on potential adverse human health effects that may result from chronic (or lifetime) exposure to chemicals in the environment. IRIS contains chemical-specific summaries of qualitative and quantitative health information in support of two steps of the risk assessment paradigm, i.e., hazard identification and dose-response evaluation. IRIS assessments are used in combination with specific situational exposure assessment information to evaluate potential public health risk associated with environmental contaminants.

  6. [Inhaled antibiotic therapy in cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Girón Moreno, Rosa M; Salcedo Posadas, Antonio; Mar Gómez-Punter, Rosa

    2011-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most frequent fatal genetically-transmitted disease among Caucasians. Chronic bronchial infection, especially by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in this disease. Aerosolized antibiotic therapy achieves high drug concentrations in the airway with low toxicity, allowing chronic use. Currently, two antibiotics have been approved for inhalation therapy, tobramycin inhalation solution and colistimethate sodium aerosol. There is less evidence from clinical trials for the latter. The main indication for these drugs is chronic bronchial colonization by P. aeruginosa, although there is increasing evidence of the importance of the primary infection by this bacterium, whether treated by oral or intravenous antibiotics or not. More controversial is the use of aerosolized antibiotic therapy in bacterial prophylaxis or respiratory exacerbations. For many years, intravenous formulations of distinct antibiotics for aerosolized use have been employed, which are in distinct phases of research for use in nebulizer therapy. In addition to being used to treat P. aeruginosa infection, aerosolized antibiotics have been used to treat other pathogens such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococus aureus, Mycobacterium abscessus and Aspergillus fumigatus.

  7. Lethal methemoglobinemia and automobile exhaust inhalation.

    PubMed

    Vevelstad, Merete; Morild, Inge

    2009-05-30

    Inhalation of automobile exhaust gas often leads to death by CO intoxication. In some cases the measured carbon monoxide hemoglobin saturation level (COHb) is considerably below what is considered to be lethal. The death in such cases has been attributed to a combination of a high CO2 and a low O2 tension. In a recent case the deceased was found dead in a car equipped with a catalytic converter, with a hose leading exhaust from the engine to the interior of the car. Analysis revealed a moderately elevated COHb and a high methemoglobin saturation level (MetHb) in peripheral blood. No ethanol, narcotics or drugs were detected. Reports mentioning MetHb or methemoglobinemia in post-mortem cases are surprisingly scarce, and very few have related exhaust gas deaths to methemoglobinemia. High-degree methemoglobinemia causes serious tissue hypoxia leading to unconsciousness, arrhythmia and death. The existing literature in this field and the knowledge that exhaust fumes contain nitrogen oxide gases (NOx) that by inhalation and absorption can result in severe methemoglobinemia, led us to postulate that this death could possibly be attributed to a combination of methemoglobinemia and a moderately high COHb concentration.

  8. The role of Bradyrhizobium japonicum nitric oxide reductase in nitric oxide detoxification in soya bean root nodules.

    PubMed

    Meakin, G E; Jepson, B J N; Richardson, D J; Bedmar, E J; Delgado, M J

    2006-02-01

    The identification of nitric oxide-bound leghaemoglobin within soya bean nodules has led to the question of how Bradyrhizobium japonicum bacteroids overcome the toxicity of this nitric oxide. It has previously been shown that one candidate for nitric oxide detoxification, the respiratory nitric oxide reductase, is expressed in soya bean nodules from plants supplied with nitrate. In this paper, the role of this enzyme in nitric oxide detoxification is assessed and discussion is provided on other possible B. japonicum nitric oxide detoxification systems.

  9. Nitric Oxide Synthases and Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Bonilla, Ingrid M.; Sridhar, Arun; Györke, Sandor; Cardounel, Arturo J.; Carnes, Cynthia A.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation. There are multiple systems in the myocardium which contribute to redox homeostasis, and loss of homeostasis can result in oxidative stress. Potential sources of oxidants include nitric oxide synthases (NOS), which normally produce nitric oxide in the heart. Two NOS isoforms (1 and 3) are normally expressed in the heart. During pathologies such as heart failure, there is induction of NOS 2 in multiple cell types in the myocardium. In certain conditions, the NOS enzymes may become uncoupled, shifting from production of nitric oxide to superoxide anion, a potent free radical and oxidant. Multiple lines of evidence suggest a role for NOS in the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation. Therapeutic approaches to reduce atrial fibrillation by modulation of NOS activity may be beneficial, although further investigation of this strategy is needed. PMID:22536189

  10. [Nitric oxide and lipid peroxidation].

    PubMed

    Cristol, J P; Maggi, M F; Guérin, M C; Torreilles, J; Descomps, B

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical produced enzymatically in biological systems from the guanidino group of L-arginine. Its large spectrum of biological effects is achieved through chemical interactions with different targets including oxygen (O2), superoxide (O2o-) and other oxygen reactive species (ROS), transition metals and thiols. Superoxide anions and other ROS have been reported to react with NO to produce peroxynitrite anions that can decompose to form nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and hydroxyl radial (OHo). Thus, NO has been reported to have a dual effect on lipid peroxidation (prooxidant via the peroxynitrite or antioxydant via the chelation of ROS). In the present study we have investigated in different models the in vitro and in vivo action of NO on lipid peroxidation. Copper-induced LDL oxidation were used as an in vitro model. Human LDL (100 micrograms ApoB/ml) were incubated in oxygene-saturated PBS buffer in presence or absence of Cu2+ (2.5 microM) with increasing concentrations of NO donnors (sodium nitroprussiate or nitroso-glutathione). LDL oxidation was monitored continuously for conjugated diene formation (234 nm) and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) accumulation. Exogenous NO prevents in a dose dependent manner the progress of copper-induced oxidation. Ischaemia-reperfusion injury (I/R), characterized by an overproduction of ROS, is used as an in vivo model. Anaesthetized rats were submitted to 1 hour renal ischaemia following by 2 hours of reperfusion. Sham-operated rats (SOP) were used as control. Lipid peroxidation was evaluated by measuring the HNE accumulated in rats kidneys in presence or absence of L-arginine or D-arginine infusion. L-arginine, but not D-arginine, enhances HNE accumulation in I/R but not in SOP (< 0.050 pmol/g tissue in SOP versus 0.6 nmol/g tissue in I/R), showing that, in this experimental conditions, NO produced from L-arginine, enhances the toxicity of ROS. This study shows that the pro- or antioxydant effects of NO are different

  11. Improvement of drug delivery with a breath actuated pressurised aerosol for patients with poor inhaler technique.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, S P; Weisz, A W; Talaee, N; Clarke, S W

    1991-01-01

    BACKGROUND The metered dose inhaler is difficult to use correctly, synchronising actuation with inhalation being the most important problem. A breath actuated pressurised inhaler, designed to help patients with poor inhaler technique, was compared with a conventional metered dose inhaler in terms of aerosol deposition and bronchodilator response. METHODS Radioaerosol deposition and bronchodilator response to 100 micrograms salbutamol were measured in 18 asthmatic patients, who inhaled from a conventional metered dose inhaler by their own chosen metered dose inhaler technique, from a conventional metered dose inhaler by a taught metered dose inhaler technique, and from a breath actuated pressured inhaler (Autohaler). RESULTS In the 10 patients who could coordinate actuation and inhalation of the inhaler on their own deposition of aerosol in the lungs and bronchodilator response were equivalent on the three study days. By contrast, in the eight patients who could not coordinate the mean (SEM) percentage of the dose deposited in the lungs with their own inhaler technique (7.2% (3.4%] was substantial lower than those attained by the taught metered dose inhaler technique (22.8% (2.5%] and by Autohaler (20.8% (1.7%]. CONCLUSION Although of little additional benefit to asthmatic patients with good coordination, the Autohaler is potentially a valuable aid to those with poor coordination, and should be considered in preference to a conventional metered dose inhaler in any patient whose inhaler technique is not known to be satisfactory. Images PMID:1750017

  12. Glutathione (GSH) and the GSH synthesis gene Gclm modulate plasma redox and vascular responses to acute diesel exhaust inhalation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Weldy, Chad S.; Luttrell, Ian P.; White, Collin C.; Morgan-Stevenson, Vicki; Cox, David P.; Carosino, Christopher M.; Larson, Timothy V.; Stewart, James A.; Kaufman, Joel D.; Kim, Francis; Chitaley, Kanchan; Kavanagh, Terrance J.

    2013-01-01

    Context Inhalation of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is associated with acute pulmonary inflammation and impairments in cardiovascular function. In many regions, PM2.5 is largely derived from diesel exhaust (DE), and these pathophysiological effects may be due in part to oxidative stress resulting from DE inhalation. The antioxidant glutathione (GSH) is important in limiting oxidative stress-induced vascular dysfunction. The rate-limiting enzyme in GSH synthesis is glutamate cysteine ligase and polymorphisms in its catalytic and modifier subunits (GCLC and GCLM) have been shown to influence vascular function and risk of myocardial infarction in humans. Objective We hypothesized that compromised de novo synthesis of GSH in Gclm−/+ mice would result in increased sensitivity to DE-induced lung inflammation and vascular effects. Materials and methods WT and Gclm−/+ mice were exposed to DE via inhalation (300 µg/m3) for 6 h. Neutrophil influx into the lungs, plasma GSH redox potential, vascular reactivity of aortic rings and aortic nitric oxide (NO•) were measured. Results DE inhalation resulted in mild bronchoalveolar neutrophil influx in both genotypes. DE-induced effects on plasma GSH oxidation and acetylcholine (ACh)-relaxation of aortic rings were only observed in Gclm−/+ mice. Contrary to our hypothesis, DE exposure enhanced ACh-induced relaxation of aortic rings in Gclm−/+ mice. Discussion and conclusion These data support the hypothesis that genetic determinants of antioxidant capacity influence the biological effects of acute inhalation of DE. However, the acute effects of DE on the vasculature may be dependent on the location and types of vessels involved. Polymorphisms in GSH synthesis genes are common in humans and further investigations into these potential gene-environment interactions are warranted. PMID:23808636

  13. Effects of intraoperative inhaled iloprost on primary graft dysfunction after lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Su Hyun; Lee, Jin Gu; Lee, Chang Yeong; Kim, Namo; Chang, Min-Yung; You, Young-Chul; Kim, Hyun Joo; Paik, Hyo Chae; Oh, Young Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Design: Inhaled iloprost was known to alleviate ischemic-reperfusion lung injury. We investigated whether intraoperative inhaled iloprost can prevent the development of primary graft dysfunction after lung transplantation. Data for a consecutive series of patients who underwent lung transplantation with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation were retrieved. By propensity score matching, 2 comparable groups of 30 patients were obtained: patients who inhaled iloprost immediately after reperfusion of the grafted lung (ILO group); patients who did not receive iloprost (non-ILO group). Results: The severity of pulmonary infiltration on postoperative days (PODs) 1 to 3 was significantly lower in the ILO group compared to the non-ILO group. The PaO2/FiO2 ratio was significantly higher in the ILO group compared to the non-ILO group (318.2 ± 74.2 vs 275.9 ± 65.3 mm Hg, P = 0.022 on POD 1; 351.4 ± 58.2 vs 295.8 ± 53.7 mm Hg, P = 0.017 on POD 2; and 378.8 ± 51.9 vs 320.2 ± 66.2 mm Hg, P = 0.013 on POD 3, respectively). The prevalence of the primary graft dysfunction grade 3 was lower in the ILO group compared to the non-ILO group (P = 0.042 on POD 1; P = 0.026 on POD 2; P = 0.024 on POD 3, respectively). The duration of ventilator use and intensive care unit were significantly reduced in the ILO group (P = 0.041 and 0.038). Conclusions: Intraoperative inhaled iloprost could prevent primary graft dysfunction and preserve allograft function, thus reducing the length of ventilator care and intensive care unit stay, and improving the overall early post-transplant morbidity in patients undergoing lung transplantation. PMID:27399072

  14. Remedial investigation report on the abandoned nitric acid pipeline at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    Upper East Fork Poplar Creek OU-2 consists of the Abandoned Nitric Acid Pipeline. This pipeline was installed in 1951 to transport liquid wastes {approximately} 4,800 ft from Buildings 9212, 9215, and 9206 to the S-3 Ponds. Materials known to have been discharged through the pipeline include nitric acid, depleted and enriched uranium, various metal nitrates, salts, and lead skimmings. A total of nineteen locations were chosen to be investigated along the pipeline for the first phase of this Remedial Investigation. Sampling consisted of drilling down to obtain a soil sample at a depth immediately below the pipeline. Additional samples were obtained deeper in the subsurface depending upon the depth of the pipeline, the depth of the water table, and the point of auger refusal. The nineteen samples collected below the pipeline were analyzed by the Y-12 Plant laboratory for metals, nitrate/nitrite, and isotopic uranium. Samples collected from three boreholes were also analyzed for volatile organic compounds because these samples produced a response with organic vapor monitoring equipment. The results of the baseline human health risk assessment for the Abandoned Nitric Acid Pipeline contaminants of potential concern show no unacceptable risks to human health via incidental ingestion of soil, inhalation of dust, dermal contact with the soil, or external exposure to radionuclides in the ANAP soils, under the construction worker and/or the residential land-use scenarios.

  15. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure HF plasma source: generation of nitric oxide and ozone for bio-medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühn, S.; Bibinov, N.; Gesche, R.; Awakowicz, P.

    2010-01-01

    A new miniature high-frequency (HF) plasma source intended for bio-medical applications is studied using nitrogen/oxygen mixture at atmospheric pressure. This plasma source can be used as an element of a plasma source array for applications in dermatology and surgery. Nitric oxide and ozone which are produced in this plasma source are well-known agents for proliferation of the cells, inhalation therapy for newborn infants, disinfection of wounds and blood ozonation. Using optical emission spectroscopy, microphotography and numerical simulation, the gas temperature in the active plasma region and plasma parameters (electron density and electron distribution function) are determined for varied nitrogen/oxygen flows. The influence of the gas flows on the plasma conditions is studied. Ozone and nitric oxide concentrations in the effluent of the plasma source are measured using absorption spectroscopy and electro-chemical NO-detector at variable gas flows. Correlations between plasma parameters and concentrations of the particles in the effluent of the plasma source are discussed. By varying the gas flows, the HF plasma source can be optimized for nitric oxide or ozone production. Maximum concentrations of 2750 ppm and 400 ppm of NO and O3, correspondingly, are generated.

  16. Deposition, retention, and clearance of inhaled particles.

    PubMed Central

    Lippmann, M; Yeates, D B; Albert, R E

    1980-01-01

    The relation between the concentrations and characteristics of air contaminants in the work place and the resultant toxic doses and potential hazards after their inhalation depends greatly on their patterns of deposition and the rates and pathways for their clearance from the deposition sites. The distribution of the deposition sites of inhaled particles is strongly dependent on their aerodynamic diameters. For normal man, inhaled non-hygroscopic particles greater than or equal to 2 micrometers that deposit in the conducting airways by impaction are concentrated on to a small fraction of the surface. Cigarette smoking and bronchitis produce a proximal shift in the deposition pattern. The major factor affecting the deposition of smaller particles is their transfer from tidal to reserve air. For particles soluble in respiratory tract fluid, systemic uptake may be relatively complete for all deposition patterns, and there may be local toxic or irritant effects or both. On the other hand, slowly soluble particles depositing in the conducting airways are carried on the surface to the glottis and are swallowed within one day. Mucociliary transport rates are highly variable, both along the ciliated airways of a given individual and between individuals. The changes in clearance rates produced by drugs, cigarette smoke, and other environmental pollutants can greatly increase or decrease these rates. Particles deposited in non-ciliated airways have large surface-to-volume ratios, and clearance by dissolution can occur for materials generally considered insoluble. They may also be cleared as free particles either by passive transport along surface liquids or, after phagocytosis, by transport within alveolar macrophages. If the particles penetrate the epithelium, either bare or within macrophages, they may be sequestered within cells or enter the lymphatic circulation and be carried to pleural, hilar, and more distant lymph nodes. Non-toxic insoluble particles are cleared from

  17. Nanoparticle Inhalation Impairs Coronary Microvascular Reactivity via a Local Reactive Oxygen Species-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, A. J.; Moseley, A. M.; Chen, B. T.; Frazer, D.; Castranova, V.

    2010-01-01

    We have shown that nanoparticle inhalation impairs endothelium-dependent vasodilation in coronary arterioles. It is unknown whether local reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to this effect. Rats were exposed to TiO2 nanoparticles via inhalation to produce a pulmonary deposition of 10 µg. Coronary arterioles were isolated from the left anterior descending artery distribution, and responses to acetylcholine, arachidonic acid, and U46619 were assessed. Contributions of nitric oxide synthase and prostaglandin were assessed via competitive inhibition with NG-Monomethyl-L-Arginine (L-NMMA) and indomethacin. Microvascular wall ROS were quantified via dihydroethidium (DHE) fluorescence. Coronary arterioles from rats exposed to nano-TiO2 exhibited an attenuated vasodilator response to ACh, and this coincided with a 45% increase in DHE fluorescence. Coincubation with 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl and catalase ameliorated impairments in ACh-induced vasodilation from nanoparticle exposed rats. Incubation with either L-NMMA or indomethacin significantly attenuated Ach-induced vasodilation in sham-control rats, but had no effect in rats exposed to nano-TiO2. Arachidonic acid induced vasoconstriction in coronary arterioles from rats exposed to nano-TiO2, but dilated arterioles from sham-control rats. These results suggest that nanoparticle exposure significantly impairs endothelium-dependent vasoreactivity in coronary arterioles, and this may be due in large part to increases in microvascular ROS. Furthermore, altered prostanoid formation may also contribute to this dysfunction. Such disturbances in coronary microvascular function may contribute to the cardiac events associated with exposure to particles in this size range. PMID:20033351

  18. The role of inhaled prostacyclin in treating acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Searcy, Randi J; Morales, James R; Ferreira, Jason A; Johnson, Donald W

    2015-12-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a syndrome of acute lung injury that is characterized by noncardiogenic pulmonary edema and severe hypoxemia second to a pathogenic impairment of gas exchange. Despite significant advances in the area, mortality remains high among ARDS patients. High mortality and a limited spectrum of therapeutic options have left clinicians searching for alternatives, spiking interest in selective pulmonary vasodilators (SPVs). Despite the lack of robust evidence, SPVs are commonly employed for their therapeutic role in improving oxygenation in patients who have developed refractory hypoxemia in ARDS. While inhaled epoprostenol (iEPO) also impacts arterial oxygenation by decreasing ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) mismatching and pulmonary shunt flow, this effect is not different from inhaled nitric oxide (iNO). The most effective and safest dose for yielding a clinically significant increase in PaO2 and reduction in pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) appears to be 20-30 ng/kg/min in adults and 30 ng/kg/min in pediatric patients. iEPO appears to have a ceiling effect above these doses in which no additional benefit may be derived. iNO and iEPO have shown similar efficacy profiles; however, they differ with respect to cost and ease of therapeutic administration. The most beneficial effects of iEPO have been seen in adult patients with secondary ARDS as compared with primary ARDS, most likely due to the difference in etiology of the two disease states, and in patients suffering from baseline right ventricular heart failure. Although iEPO has demonstrated improvements in hemodynamic parameters and oxygenation in ARDS patients, due to the limited number of randomized clinical trials and the lack of studies investigating mortality, the use of iEPO cannot be recommended as standard of care in ARDS. iEPO should be reserved for those refractory to traditional therapies.

  19. The Respimat Soft Mist Inhaler, a Novel Inhaled Drug Delivery Device.

    PubMed

    Perriello, Emily A; Sobieraj, Diana M

    2016-01-01

    Summary The Respimat SMI offers a novel delivery mechanism for the management of primarily COPD, but asthma as well. Presently, four different medications, as monotherapy or a combination of two active ingredients, are available using the Respimat SMI technology. Multiple studies have demonstrated safety and efficacy of these drugs when delivered via Respimat SMI. Patients tend to prefer the Respimat SMI over traditional inhaler devices, as it overcomes some of the disadvantages posed by traditional delivery devices.

  20. Eradication of Burkholderia cepacia Using Inhaled Aztreonam Lysine in Two Patients with Bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias, A.; Artiles, I.; Cabanillas, J. J.; Álvarez-Sala, R.; Prados, C.

    2014-01-01

    There are not many articles about the chronic bronchial infection/colonization in patients with underlying lung disease other than cystic fibrosis (CF), especially with non-CF bronchiectasis (NCFBQ). The prevalence of B. cepacia complex is not well known in NCFBQ. The vast majority of published clinical data on Burkholderia infection in individuals with CF is comprised of uncontrolled, anecdotal, and/or single center experiences, and no consensus has emerged regarding treatment. We present two cases diagnosed with bronchiectasis (BQ) of different etiology, with early pulmonary infection by B. cepacia complex, which was eradicated with inhaled aztreonam lysine. PMID:25295210

  1. 21 CFR 868.5165 - Nitric oxide administration apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nitric oxide administration apparatus. 868.5165... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5165 Nitric oxide administration apparatus. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide administration apparatus is a device used to add...

  2. 21 CFR 868.5165 - Nitric oxide administration apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nitric oxide administration apparatus. 868.5165... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5165 Nitric oxide administration apparatus. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide administration apparatus is a device used to add...

  3. 21 CFR 868.5165 - Nitric oxide administration apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nitric oxide administration apparatus. 868.5165... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5165 Nitric oxide administration apparatus. (a) Identification. The nitric oxide administration apparatus is a device used to add...

  4. Nitrous Oxide Inhalation Among Adolescents: Prevalence, Correlates, and Co-Occurrence with Volatile Solvent Inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Garland, Eric L.; Howard, Matthew O.; Perron, Brian E.

    2010-01-01

    Few studies have examined the prevalence of nitrous oxide (NO) inhalation or co-occurrence of NO and volatile solvent (VS) use in adolescents. Study aims were to (1) describe the independent and conjoint prevalence of NO and VS use in incarcerated youth, (2) compare adolescent users of both NO and VS inhalants (NO+VS) to users of NO-only, VS-only, and nonusers of NO and VS (NO/VS nonusers) with regard to demographic, psychological, and behavioral characteristics, and (3) conduct logistic regression analyses identifying correlates of NO use. Residents (N = 723) of Missouri Division of Youth Services were assessed with standardized psychosocial measures. Participants averaged 15.5 (SD = 1.2) years of age, were ethnically diverse and predominantly male. Lifetime prevalence of NO use was 15.8%. NO+VS users evidenced greater impairments compared to NO+VS nonusers. VS-only users evidenced impairments that were similar in kind but at lower prevalences compared to those displayed by NO+VS users, whereas NO-only youth had profiles that were similar to those of NO/VS nonusers. Psychiatric disorders, polydrug use, and temperamental fearlessness were correlates of NO use. NO+VS users were at high risk for behavioral and emotional problems. Screening and interventions for NO and VS inhalant use should be implemented in juvenile justice facilities. PMID:20235440

  5. Cost Reduction of Inhaled Tobramycin by Use of Preservative-Free Intravenous Tobramycin Given via Inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Timothy P.; Wasko, Justin; Unger, Nathan R.; Abbo, Lilian M.; Fernandez, Margaret; Aragon, Laura

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates drug cost outcomes related to automatic therapeutic substitution of branded tobramycin solution for inhalation (TOBI®) with inhaled generic preservative-free intravenous tobramycin (PFIT). A retrospective single-center evaluation of inhaled tobramycin use from 2008 through 2012 was performed. Number of doses dispensed and acquisition costs were obtained. Hourly wage data was acquired, pharmacy production costs were estimated and total cost-savings calculated. Days of therapy (DOTs) were determined for each year. Quality assurance and safety data was collected. In 2008, TOBI® drug costs and doses dispensed were $118,665 and 1769, respectively. Following implementation of the interchange in May 2009, TOBI® utilization ceased. PFIT costs in 2010 through 2012 averaged $34,775 annually and TOBI® cost-avoidance exceeded $94,000 annually when accounting for pharmacy production costs, which were determined to be at most $5.28 per dose. The maximum estimated pharmacy production cost ranged from $8812 to $11,299 annually. PFIT doses dispensed exceeded 1650 each year and annual DOTs ranged from 815 to 1069. The 40-month savings were calculated to be $374,706. Quality assurance and safety data identified one patient who refused PFIT due to odor complaints and one patient who was inappropriately administered a dose orally. Therapeutic substitution of TOBI® with PFIT can produce immediate and sustained savings with an acceptable safety profile. PMID:27025517

  6. NITRIC OXIDE, MITOCHONDRIAL HYPERPOLARIZATION AND T-CELL ACTIVATION

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Gyorgy; Koncz, Agnes; Fernandez, David; Perl, Andras

    2007-01-01

    T lymphocyte activation is associated with nitric oxide (NO) production that plays an essential role in multiple T cell functions. NO acts as a messenger, activating soluble guanyl cyclase and participating in the transduction signaling pathways involving cyclic GMP. NO modulates mitochondrial events that are involved in apoptosis and regulates mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial biogenesis in many cell types, including lymphocytes. Mitochondrial hyperpolarization (MHP), an early and reversible event during both T lymphocyte activation and apoptosis, is regulated by NO. Here, we discuss recent evidence that NO-induced MHP represents a molecular switch in multiple T cell signaling pathways. Overproduction of NO in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) induces mitochondrial biogenesis and alters Ca2+ signaling. Thus, while NO plays a physiological role in lymphocyte cell signaling, its overproduction may disturb normal T cell function, contributing to the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. PMID:17462531

  7. Inhaled Formulation Design for the Treatment of Lung Infections.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Contreras, Lucila; Yadav, Khushwant S

    2015-01-01

    Lung infections may be bacterial, viral or fungal and they are typically treated with oral or parenteral antibiotics. Inhaled dry powder formulations offer unique opportunities for treating lung infections with enhanced effectiveness and stability. Since drug delivery to the lungs requires chronic and repeated administration of larger amounts of therapeutics, dry powder formulations are attractive alternatives to deliver drugs directly to the lungs as they are not limited by solubility issues and they are regarded as being more stable than liquid dosage forms. This state-of-the-art review presents the use of inhaled formulations for tuberculosis as a main focus, but also for other diseases such as bronchiectasis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pneumonia and respiratory infections occurring as complications during lung transplants. Opportunities for the use of inhaled therapies and other respiratory diseases or as prevention or antidotes against warfare agents are offered. Typical and novel inhaled formulations that have been used as well as preclinical and clinical studies and evaluation of these inhaled therapies are discussed for each disease state. Lastly, the use of inhaled therapies as an alternative to end the emergence of drug resistant strains is discussed along with the risks of increasing these resistant strains if the inhaled therapy is not designed based on dosing regimens established by wellplanned pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies.

  8. Disinfection of nitrous oxide inhalation equipment.

    PubMed

    Yagiela, J A; Hunt, L M; Hunt, D E

    1979-02-01

    Cross-infection by contaminated equipment is a potential hazard associated with conscious sedation with nitrous oxide and oxygen . Nosocomial infections have occasionally been linked wih the use of unsterile inhalation devices; microbial contamination of sterile nasal hoods routinely occurs during administration of nitrous oxide; and in vitro experiments indicate that subsequent use of contaminated nasal masks may lead to aspiration of microorganisms. Although the incidence of respiratory disease after such contamination is unknown, it is clear that disinfection of the nitrous oxide apparatus between patients is desirable. A simple cleaning method involving alkaline glutaraldehyde is described that provides adequate disinfection of the rubber goods used in the administration of gas. Superiority of this technique over previously recommended cleaning methods is shown.

  9. [Wood dust as inhalative noxious agent].

    PubMed

    Kirsten, D; Liebetrau, G; Meister, W

    1985-01-01

    Wood dust is known as a cause of asthma and chronic bronchitis. From 1979 to 1983 we observed 115 patients with chronic lung diseases, who were exposed to wood dust during many years. We found an irritative pathogenesis in 101 patients with asthma or bronchitis. Twenty nine patients had got a positive skin test, especially with makoré, beech, koto, ash, pine. The inhalation test was positive in 7 of them. The occupational etiology was verified in 5 patients. Besides wood dust itself chemicals for wood protection or wood adhesives can have importance in the pathogenesis of these diseases. Fourteen patients had got alveolitis or lung fibrosis after wood-dust exposition. In each case we found precipitating antibodies against moulds, which could be cultivated from wood dust to which the patients were exposed.

  10. Rapid transepithelial transport of prions following inhalation.

    PubMed

    Kincaid, Anthony E; Hudson, Kathryn F; Richey, Matthew W; Bartz, Jason C

    2012-12-01

    Prion infection and pathogenesis are dependent on the agent crossing an epithelial barrier to gain access to the recipient nervous system. Several routes of infection have been identified, but the mechanism(s) and timing of in vivo prion transport across an epithelium have not been determined. The hamster model of nasal cavity infection was used to determine the temporal and spatial parameters of prion-infected brain homogenate uptake following inhalation and to test the hypothesis that prions cross the nasal mucosa via M cells. A small drop of infected or uninfected brain homogenate was placed below each nostril, where it was immediately inhaled into the nasal cavity. Regularly spaced tissue sections through the entire extent of the nasal cavity were processed immunohistochemically to identify brain homogenate and the disease-associated isoform of the prion protein (PrP(d)). Infected or uninfected brain homogenate was identified adhering to M cells, passing between cells of the nasal mucosa, and within lymphatic vessels of the nasal cavity at all time points examined. PrP(d) was identified within a limited number of M cells 15 to 180 min following inoculation, but not in the adjacent nasal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT). While these results support M cell transport of prions, larger amounts of infected brain homogenate were transported paracellularly across the respiratory, olfactory, and follicle-associated epithelia of the nasal cavity. These results indicate that prions can immediately cross the nasal mucosa via multiple routes and quickly enter lymphatics, where they can spread systemically via lymph draining the nasal cavity.

  11. [New technical developments for inhaled sedation].

    PubMed

    Meiser, A; Bomberg, H; Volk, T; Groesdonk, H V

    2017-01-31

    The circle system has been in use for more than 100 years, whereas the first clinical application of an anaesthetic reflector was reported just 15 years ago. In the circle system, all breathing gas is rebreathed after carbon dioxide absorption. A reflector, on the other hand, with the breathing gas flowing to and fro, specifically retains the anaesthetic during expiration and resupplies it during the next inspiration. A high reflection efficiency (number of molecules resupplied/number of molecules exhaled, RE 80-90%) decreases consumption. In analogy to the fresh gas flow of a circle system, pulmonary clearance ((1-RE) × minute ventilation) defines the opposition between consumption and control of the concentration.It was not until reflection systems became available that volatile anaesthetics were used routinely in some intensive care units. Their advantages, such as easy handling, and better ventilatory capabilities of intensive care versus anaesthesia ventilators, were basic preconditions for this. Apart from AnaConDa™ (Sedana Medical, Uppsala, Sweden), the new MIRUS™ system (Pall Medical, Dreieich, Germany) represents a second, more sophisticated commercially available system.Organ protective effects, excellent control of sedation, and dose-dependent deep sedation while preserving spontaneous breathing with hardly any accumulation or induction of tolerance, make volatile anaesthetics an interesting alternative, especially for patients needing deep sedation or when intravenous drugs are no longer efficacious.But obviously, the outcome is most important. We know that deep intravenous sedation increases mortality, whereas inhalational sedation could prove beneficial. We now need prospective clinical trials examining mortality, but also the psychological outcome of those most critically ill patients sedated by inhalation or intravenously.

  12. Formation of vascular S-nitrosothiols and plasma nitrates/nitrites following inhalation of diesel emissions.

    PubMed

    Knuckles, Travis L; Buntz, Jennifer G; Paffett, Michael; Channell, Meghan; Harmon, Molly; Cherng, Tom; Lucas, Selita N; McDonald, Jacob D; Kanagy, Nancy L; Campen, Matthew J

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have associated traffic-related airborne pollution with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Nitric oxide (NO) is a common component of fresh diesel and gasoline engine emissions that rapidly transforms both in the atmosphere and once inhaled. Because of this rapid transformation, limited information is available in terms of potential human exposures and adverse health effects. Young rats were exposed to whole diesel emissions (DE) adjusted to 300 μg/m(3) of particulate matter (containing 3.5 ppm NO) or 0, 3, or 10 ppm NO as a positive control. Animals were also pre-injected (ip) with either saline or N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a precursor of glutathione. Predictably, pure NO exposures led to a concentration-dependent increase in plasma nitrates compared to controls, which lasted for roughly 4 h postexposure. Whole DE exposure for 1 h also led to a doubling of plasma NOx. NAC injection increased the levels of plasma nitrates and nitrites (NOx) in the DE exposure group. Inhibition of nitric oxide symthase (NOS) by N(G)-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA) did not block the rise in plasma NOx, demonstrating that the increase was entirely due to exogenous sources. Both DE and pure NO exposures paradoxically led to elevated eNOS expression in aortic tissue. Furthermore, coronary arterioles from NO-exposed animals exhibited greater constriction to endothelin-1 compared to controls, consistent with a derangement of the NOS system. Thus, NO may be an important contributor to traffic-related cardiovascular morbidity, although further research is necessary for proper hazard identification.

  13. Nitric acid in polar stratospheric clouds - Similar temperature of nitric acid condensation and cloud formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, Rudolf F.; Snetsinger, Kenneth G.; Hamill, Patrick; Goodman, Jindra K.; Mccormick, M. Patrick

    1990-01-01

    As shown independently by two different techniques, nitric acid aerosols and polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) both form below similar threshold temperatures. This supports the idea that the PSC particles involved in chlorine activation and ozone depletion in the winter polar stratosphere are composed of nitric acid. One technique used to show this is the inertial impaction of nitric acid aerosols using an Er-2 aircraft; the other method is remote sensing of PSCs by the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM II) satellite borne optical sensor. Both procedures were in operation during the Arctic Airborne Stratospheric Expedition in 1989, and the Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment in 1987. Analysis of Arctic particles gathered in situ indicates the presence of nitric acid below a 'first appearance' temperature Tfa = 202 K. This is the same highest temperature at which PSCs are seen by the SAM II satellite. In comparison, a 'first appearance' temperature Tfa = 198 K as found for the Antarctic samples.

  14. Infrared optical constants of H2O ice, amorphous nitric acid solutions, and nitric acid hydrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, Owen B.; Koehler, Birgit G.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Tolbert, Margaret A.; Jordon, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    We determined the infrared optical constants of nitric acid trihydrate, nitric acid dihydrate, nitric acid monohydrate, and solid amorphous nitric acid solutions which crystallize to form these hydrates. We have also found the infrared optical constants of H2O ice. We measured the transmission of infrared light throught thin films of varying thickness over the frequency range from about 7000 to 500/cm at temperatures below 200 K. We developed a theory for the transmission of light through a substrate that has thin films on both sides. We used an iterative Kramers-Kronig technique to determine the optical constants which gave the best match between measured transmission spectra and those calculated for a variety of films of different thickness. These optical constants should be useful for calculations of the infrared spectrum of polar stratospheric clouds.

  15. Trends in Adolescent Inhalant Use: 2002 to 2007. The NSDUH Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Preventing and treating inhalant use problems, as well as raising awareness about the dangers of inhalant use, are important ongoing goals of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). Monitoring trends in inhalant use is vital to assessing policies intended to reduce inhalant use. This issue of "The NSDUH Report"…

  16. Understanding Inhalant Users: An Overview for Parents, Educators, and Clinicians. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas State Commission on Alcohol and Drug Abuse, Austin.

    Various areas of research related to inhalants are summarized and general guidance in dealing with this complex and urgent problem is provided. Topics include (1) "Characteristics of Inhalants," which reviews chemicals found in inhalants and common modes of administration; (2) "Defining Inhalant Use and Abuse," which includes…

  17. Inhalant Use, Abuse, and Dependence among Adolescent Patients: Commonly Comorbid Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakai, Joseph T.; Hall, Shannon K.; Mikulich-Gilbertson, Susan K.; Crowley, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about adolescents with DSM-IV-defined inhalant abuse and dependence. The aim of this study was to compare comorbidity among (1) adolescents with inhalant use disorders, (2) adolescents who reported using inhalants without inhalant use disorder, and (3) other adolescent patients drawn from an adolescent drug and alcohol…

  18. Age of Inhalant First Time Use and Its Association to the Use of Other Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Kele; Chang, G. Andy; Southerland, Ron

    2009-01-01

    Inhalants are the 4th most commonly abused drugs after alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana. Although inhalants are often referred as Gateway Drugs this hypothesis is less examined. Using the 2003 National Survey on Drug Use and Health data, age of first time inhalant use was compared with the age of onset of other drugs among 6466 inhalant users who…

  19. Arginine metabolism: nitric oxide and beyond.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, G; Morris, S M

    1998-01-01

    Arginine is one of the most versatile amino acids in animal cells, serving as a precursor for the synthesis not only of proteins but also of nitric oxide, urea, polyamines, proline, glutamate, creatine and agmatine. Of the enzymes that catalyse rate-controlling steps in arginine synthesis and catabolism, argininosuccinate synthase, the two arginase isoenzymes, the three nitric oxide synthase isoenzymes and arginine decarboxylase have been recognized in recent years as key factors in regulating newly identified aspects of arginine metabolism. In particular, changes in the activities of argininosuccinate synthase, the arginases, the inducible isoenzyme of nitric oxide synthase and also cationic amino acid transporters play major roles in determining the metabolic fates of arginine in health and disease, and recent studies have identified complex patterns of interaction among these enzymes. There is growing interest in the potential roles of the arginase isoenzymes as regulators of the synthesis of nitric oxide, polyamines, proline and glutamate. Physiological roles and relationships between the pathways of arginine synthesis and catabolism in vivo are complex and difficult to analyse, owing to compartmentalized expression of various enzymes at both organ (e.g. liver, small intestine and kidney) and subcellular (cytosol and mitochondria) levels, as well as to changes in expression during development and in response to diet, hormones and cytokines. The ongoing development of new cell lines and animal models using cDNA clones and genes for key arginine metabolic enzymes will provide new approaches more clearly elucidating the physiological roles of these enzymes. PMID:9806879

  20. Nitric oxide-releasing ruthenium nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chi-Ming; Liao, Kai-Jun; Lok, Chun-Nam; Che, Chi-Ming

    2011-10-14

    Nitric oxide-releasing ruthenium nanoparticles were synthesized by the reaction of alkanethiolate-protected ruthenium nanoparticles with tert-butyl nitrite ((t)BuONO), and their water-soluble derivatives are able to deliver NO to proteins such as reduced myoglobin upon light irradiation in aqueous media.

  1. Chemical of the Month: Nitric Acid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pannu, Sardul S.

    1984-01-01

    Presents background information on nitric acid including old names, history, occurrence, methods of preparation, uses, production, and price. Includes such chemical properties as decomposition; acidity, oxidation of metals and nonmetals; reactions with organic and inorganic compounds; gaseous fluorine; and nitrating properties. Also discusses bond…

  2. BIOGENIC NITRIC OXIDE EMISSIONS FROM CROPLAND SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emissions of nitric oxide (NO) were determined during late spring and summer 1995 and the spring of 1996 from four agricultural soils on which four different crops were grown. These agricultural soils were located at four different sites throughout North Carolina. Emission rates ...

  3. Nitric oxide. Novel biology with clinical relevance.

    PubMed Central

    Billiar, T R

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The author provides the reader with a view of the regulation and function of nitric oxide (NO), based on the three distinct enzyme isoforms that synthesize NO. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Nitric oxide is a short-lived molecule exhibiting functions as diverse as neurotransmission and microbial killing. Recent advances in the characterization of the enzymes responsible for NO synthesis and in the understanding of how NO interacts with targets have led to new insights into the many facets of this diverse molecule. METHODS: Nitric oxide is produced by one of three enzyme isoforms of NO synthesis. These enzymes vary considerably in their distribution, regulation, and function. Accordingly, the NO synthesis or lack of NO production will have consequences unique to that isoform. Therefore, this review summarizes the regulation and function of NO generated by each of the three isoforms. RESULTS: Nitric oxide exhibits many unique characteristics that allow this molecule to perform so many functions. The amount, duration, and location of the NO synthesis will depend on the isoform of NO synthase expressed. For each isoform, there probably are disease processes in which deficiency states exist. For induced NO synthesis, states of overexpression exist. CONCLUSIONS: Understanding the regulation and function of the enzymes that produce NO and the unique characteristics of each enzyme isoform is likely to lead to therapeutic approaches to prevent or treat a number of diseases. PMID:7537035

  4. Enhanced colonic nitric oxide generation and nitric oxide synthase activity in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Rachmilewitz, D; Stamler, J S; Bachwich, D; Karmeli, F; Ackerman, Z; Podolsky, D K

    1995-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that nitric oxide (NO.), the product of nitric oxide synthase in inflammatory cells, may play a part in tissue injury and inflammation through its oxidative metabolism. In this study the colonic generation of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and nitric oxide synthase activity was determined in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Colonic biopsy specimens were obtained from inflammatory bowel disease patients and from normal controls. Mucosal explants were cultured in vitro for 24 hours and NOx generation was determined. Nitric oxide synthase activity was monitored by the conversion of [3H]-L-arginine to citrulline. Median NOx generation by inflamed colonic mucosa of patients with active ulcerative colitis and Crohn's colitis was 4.2- and 8.1-fold respectively higher than that by normal human colonic mucosa. In ulcerative colitis and Crohn's colitis nitric oxide synthase activity was 10.0- and 3.8-fold respectively higher than in normal subjects. Colonic NOx generation is significantly decreased by methylprednisolone and ketotifen. The decrease in NOx generation by cultured colonic mucosa induced by methylprednisolone suggests that NO synthase activity is induced during the culture and the steroid effect may contribute to its therapeutic effect. Enhanced colonic NOx generation by stimulated nitric oxide synthase activity in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease may contribute to tissue injury. PMID:7541008

  5. Altered Nitric Oxide Bioavailability Contributes to Diesel Exhaust Inhalation‐Induced Cardiovascular Dysfunction in Man

    PubMed Central

    Langrish, Jeremy P.; Unosson, Jon; Bosson, Jenny; Barath, Stefan; Muala, Ala; Blackwell, Scott; Söderberg, Stefan; Pourazar, Jamshid; Megson, Ian L.; Treweeke, Andrew; Sandström, Thomas; Newby, David E.; Blomberg, Anders; Mills, Nicholas L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Diesel exhaust inhalation causes cardiovascular dysfunction including impaired vascular reactivity, increased blood pressure, and arterial stiffness. We investigated the role of nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability in mediating these effects. Methods and Results In 2 randomized double‐blind crossover studies, healthy nonsmokers were exposed to diesel exhaust or filtered air. Study 1: Bilateral forearm blood flow was measured during intrabrachial infusions of acetylcholine (ACh; 5 to 20 μg/min) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 2 to 8 μg/min) in the presence of the NO clamp (NO synthase inhibitor NG‐monomethyl‐l‐arginine (l‐NMMA) 8 μg/min coinfused with the NO donor SNP at 90 to 540 ng/min to restore basal blood flow). Study 2: Blood pressure, arterial stiffness, and cardiac output were measured during systemic NO synthase inhibition with intravenous l‐NMMA (3 mg/kg). Following diesel exhaust inhalation, plasma nitrite concentrations were increased (68±48 versus 41±32 nmol/L; P=0.006) despite similar l‐NMMA–induced reductions in basal blood flow (−20.6±14.7% versus −21.1±14.6%; P=0.559) compared to air. In the presence of the NO clamp, ACh and SNP caused dose‐dependent vasodilatation that was not affected by diesel exhaust inhalation (P>0.05 for both). Following exposure to diesel exhaust, l‐NMMA caused a greater increase in blood pressure (P=0.048) and central arterial stiffness (P=0.007), but reductions in cardiac output and increases in systemic vascular resistance (P>0.05 for both) were similar to those seen with filtered air. Conclusions Diesel exhaust inhalation disturbs normal vascular homeostasis with enhanced NO generation unable to compensate for excess consumption. We suggest the adverse cardiovascular effects of air pollution are, in part, mediated through reduced NO bioavailability. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.ClinicalTrials.gov. Unique identifiers: NCT00845767 and NCT01060930. PMID:23525434

  6. Role of exhaled nitric oxide in asthma.

    PubMed

    Yates, D H

    2001-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), an evanescent atmospheric gas, has recently been discovered to be an important biological mediator in animals and humans. Nitric oxide plays a key role within the lung in the modulation of a wide variety of functions including pulmonary vascular tone, nonadrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) transmission and modification of the inflammatory response. Asthma is characterized by chronic airway inflammation and increased synthesis of NO and other highly reactive and toxic substances (reactive oxygen species). Pro- inflammatory cytokines such as TNFalpha and IL-1beta are secreted in asthma and result in inflammatory cell recruitment, but also induce calcium- and calmodulin-independent nitric oxide synthases (iNOS) and perpetuate the inflammatory response within the airways. Nitric oxide is released by several pulmonary cells including epithelial cells, eosinophils and macrophages, and NO has been shown to be increased in conditions associated with airway inflammation, such as asthma and viral infections. Nitric oxide can be measured in the expired air of several species, and exhaled NO can now be rapidly and easily measured by the use of chemiluminescence analysers in humans. Exhaled NO is increased in steroid-naive asthmatic subjects and during an asthma exacerbation, although it returns to baseline levels with appropriate anti-inflammatory treatment, and such measurements have been proposed as a simple non-invasive method of measuring airway inflammation in asthma. Here the chemical and biological properties of NO are briefly discussed, followed by a summary of the methodological considerations relevant to the measurement of exhaled NO and its role in lung diseases including asthma. The origin of exhaled NO is considered, and brief mention made of other potential markers of airway inflammation or oxidant stress in exhaled breath.

  7. Accuracy of inhaler use in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Haejung; Boo, Sunjoo; Lim, Yeonjung; Kim, Sungmin; Kim, In-Ah

    2014-10-01

    Inaccurate use of medication inhalers can reduce effectiveness, patient adherence, and disease stability. Therefore, the accurate use of inhalers in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is crucial. This cross-sectional study evaluated 196 Korean patients with COPD for step-by-step accuracy of inhaler use with four different types of inhalers (metered-dose inhaler [MDI], Turbuhaler, Diskus, and HandiHaler); differences in accuracy levels by sociodemographic or clinical characteristics were evaluated. Descriptive statistics and t tests were used for data analysis. The proportion of patients with completely accurate inhaler use was low, ranging from 21.9% (Turbuhaler) to 46.2% (MDI). Errors with all types of inhalers were most commonly seen in the "breathing out" steps, before and after medication inhalation. Personalized nursing educational programs, correcting errors individually for each patient, could dramatically increase the accuracy of inhaler use and the effectiveness of the inhaled medications in patients with COPD.

  8. Comparison of the aerosol velocity and spray duration of Respimat Soft Mist inhaler and pressurized metered dose inhalers.

    PubMed

    Hochrainer, Dieter; Hölz, Hubert; Kreher, Christoph; Scaffidi, Luigi; Spallek, Michael; Wachtel, Herbert

    2005-01-01

    Apart from particle size distribution, spray velocity is one of the most important aerosol characteristics that influence lung deposition of inhaled drugs. The time period over which the aerosol is released (spray duration) is also important for coordination of inhalation. Respimat Soft Mist Inhaler (SMI) is a new generation, propellant-free inhaler that delivers drug to the lung much more efficiently than pressurised metered dose inhalers (pMDIs). The objective of this study was to compare the velocity and spray duration of aerosol clouds produced by Respimat SMI with those from a variety of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and hydrofluoroalkane (HFA) pMDIs. All inhalers contained solutions or suspensions of bronchodilators. A videorecording method was used to determine the aerosol velocity. For spray duration, the time for generation of the Soft Mist by Respimat SMI was initially determined using three different methods (videorecording [techniques A and B], laser light diffraction and rotating disc). Videorecording was then used to compare the spray duration of Respimat SMI with those from the other inhalers. The Soft Mist produced by Respimat SMI moved much more slowly and had a more prolonged duration than aerosol clouds from pMDIs (mean velocity at a 10-cm distance from the nozzle: Respimat SMI, 0.8 m/sec; pMDIs, 2.0-8.4 m/sec; mean duration: Respimat SMI, 1.5 sec; pMDIs, 0.15-0.36 sec). These characteristics should result in improved lung and reduced oropharyngeal deposition, and are likely to simplify coordination of inhaler actuation and inhalation compared with pMDIs.

  9. Nitric Oxide Donor Molsidomine Positively Modulates Myogenic Differentiation of Embryonic Endothelial Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Tirone, Mario; Conti, Valentina; Manenti, Fabio; Nicolosi, Pier Andrea; D’Orlando, Cristina; Azzoni, Emanuele

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic VE-Cadherin-expressing progenitors (eVE-Cad+), including hemogenic endothelium, have been shown to generate hematopoietic stem cells and a variety of other progenitors, including mesoangioblasts, or MABs. MABs are vessel-associated progenitors with multilineage mesodermal differentiation potential that can physiologically contribute to skeletal muscle development and regeneration, and have been used in an ex vivo cell therapy setting for the treatment of muscular dystrophy. There is currently a therapeutic need for molecules that could improve the efficacy of cell therapy protocols; one such good candidate is nitric oxide. Several studies in animal models of muscle dystrophy have demonstrated that nitric oxide donors provide several beneficial effects, including modulation of the activity of endogenous cell populations involved in muscle repair and the delay of muscle degeneration. Here we used a genetic lineage tracing approach to investigate whether the therapeutic effect of nitric oxide in muscle repair could derive from an improvement in the myogenic differentiation of eVE-Cad+ progenitors during embryogenesis. We show that early in vivo treatment with the nitric oxide donor molsidomine enhances eVE-Cad+ contribution to embryonic and fetal myogenesis, and that this effect could originate from a modulation of the properties of yolk sac hemogenic endothelium. PMID:27760216

  10. Neurovascular protection by ischaemic tolerance: role of nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Iadecola, Costantino; Kahles, Timo; Gallo, Eduardo F; Anrather, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Nitric oxide (NO) has emerged as a key mediator in the mechanisms of ischaemic tolerance induced by a wide variety of preconditioning stimuli. NO is involved in the brain protection that develops either early (minutes–hours) or late (days–weeks) after the preconditioning stimulus. However, the sources of NO and the mechanisms underlying the protective effects differ substantially. While in early preconditioning NO is produced by the endothelial and neuronal isoform of NO synthase, in delayed preconditioning NO is synthesized by the inducible or ‘immunological’ isoform of NO synthase. Furthermore, in early preconditioning, NO acts through the canonical cGMP pathway, possibly through protein kinase G and opening of mitochondrial KATP channels. In late preconditioning, the protection is mediated by peroxynitrite formed by the reaction of NO with superoxide derived from the enzyme NADPH oxidase. The mechanisms by which peroxynitrite exerts its protective effect may include improvement of post-ischaemic cerebrovascular function, leading to enhancement of blood flow to the ischaemic territory, and expression of prosurvival genes resulting in cytoprotection. The evidence suggests that NO can engage highly effective and multifunctional prosurvival pathways, which could be exploited for the prevention and treatment of cerebrovascular pathologies. PMID:21746790

  11. Characterization of a nose-only inhaled phosgene acute lung injury mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Plahovinsak, Jennifer L.; Perry, Mark R.; Knostman, Katherine A.; Segal, Robert; Babin, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Context Phosgene’s primary mode of action is as a pulmonary irritant characterized by its early latent phase where life-threatening, non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema is typically observed 6–24 h post-exposure. Objective To develop an inhaled phosgene acute lung injury (ALI) model in C57BL/6 mice that can be used to screen potential medical countermeasures. Methods A Cannon style nose-only inhalation exposure tower was used to expose mice to phosgene (8 ppm) or air (sham). An inhalation lethality study was conducted to determine the 8 ppm median lethal exposure (LCt50) at 24 and 48 h post-exposure. The model was then developed at 1.2 times the 24 h LCt50. At predetermined serial sacrifice time points, survivors were euthanized, body and lung weights collected, and lung tissues processed for histopathology. Additionally, post-exposure clinical observations were used to assess quality of life. Results and discussion The 24-hour LCt50 was 226ppm*min (8 ppm for 28.2 min) and the 48-hour LCt50 was 215ppm*min (8 ppm for 26.9 min). The phosgene exposed animals had a distinct progression of clinical signs, histopathological changes and increased lung/body weight ratios. Early indicators of a 1.2 times the 24-hour LCt50 phosgene exposure were significant changes in the lung-to-body weight ratios by 4 h post-exposure. The progression of clinical signs and histopathological changes were important endpoints for characterizing phosgene-induced ALI for future countermeasure studies. Conclusion An 8 ppm phosgene exposure for 34 min (1.2 × LCt50) is the minimum challenge recommended for evaluating therapeutic interventions. The predicted higher mortality in the phosgene-only controls will help demonstrate efficacy of candidate treatments and increase the probability that a change in survival rate is statistically significant PMID:26671199

  12. Fiber inhalability and head deposition in rats and humans.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to their dimensions and long durability, inhaled asbestos fibers clear slowly from lung airways. Retained fibers may injure the epithelium, interact with macrophages, or translocate to the interstitium to result in various respiratory diseases. Therefore, calculations of fibe...

  13. Photochemical Reaction Altered Cardiac Toxicity of Diesel Exhaust Inhalation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Epidemiological studies have indicated an association between urban air pollution exposure and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The present study was designed to evaluate the cardiac effects of inhaled diesel exhaust and compared with photochemically altered d...

  14. Inhalation of Simulated Smog Affects Cardiac Function in Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: The health effects of individual criteria air pollutants have been well investigated. Little is known about health effects of inhaled multi-pollutant mixtures that more realistically represent environmental exposures. The present study was designed to evaluate the card...

  15. Interactions between diltiazem and inhalation anaesthetics in the isolated heart.

    PubMed

    Carceles, M D; Miralles, F S; Laorden, M L; Hernandez, J

    1989-09-01

    It has been postulated that inhalation anaesthetics may interfere with calcium movement across cell membranes. We have evaluated the interaction between diltiazem and the inhalation anaesthetics halothane and isoflurane on sinus automaticity in the isolated right atrium (SAIRA). Isoflurane significantly reduced atrial rate at all concentrations tested. However, halothane produced only a small but significant decrease at the higher concentrations used (1-2 v/v%). Diltiazem modified the maximal negative chronotropic response to inhalation anaesthetics. Maximum depression of SAIRA was significantly greater in the presence of two different doses of diltiazem compared with exposure to halothane and isoflurane alone. These results suggest that inhalation anaesthetics may block the influx of extracellular calcium through voltage-dependent calcium channels inhibited by diltiazem.

  16. Pathophysiology, management and treatment of smoke inhalation injury

    PubMed Central

    Rehberg, Sebastian; Maybauer, Marc O; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Maybauer, Dirk M; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Traber, Daniel L

    2009-01-01

    Smoke inhalation injury continues to increase morbidity and mortality in burn patients in both the third world and industrialized countries. The lack of uniform criteria for the diagnosis and definition of smoke inhalation injury contributes to the fact that, despite extensive research, mortality rates have changed little in recent decades. The formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, as well as the procoagulant and antifibrinolytic imbalance of alveolar homeostasis, all play a central role in the pathogenesis of smoke inhalation injury. Further hallmarks include massive airway obstruction owing to cast formation, bronchospasm, the increase in bronchial circulation and transvascular fluid flux. Therefore, anticoagulants, antioxidants and bronchodilators, especially when administered as an aerosol, represent the most promising treatment strategies. The purpose of this review article is to provide an overview of the pathophysiological changes, management and treatment options of smoke inhalation injury based on the current literature. PMID:20161170

  17. FACTORS AFFECTING THE DEPOSITION OF INHALED POROUS DRUG PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    Recent findings indicate that the inhalation of large manufactured porous particles may be particularly effective for drug delivery. In this study, a mathematical model was employed to systematically investigate the effects of particle size, particle density, aerosol ...

  18. Behavorial effects of subchronic inhalation of toluene in adult rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Whereas the acute neurobehavioral effects oftoluene are robust and well characterized, evidence for persistent effects ofrepeated exposure to this industrial solvent is less compelling. The present studies sought to determine whether repeated inhalation oftoluene caused persist...

  19. Mexican-American Adolescent Inhalant Abuse: A Proposed Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dworkin, A. Gary; Stephens, Richard C.

    1980-01-01

    Drawing from literature on differences between the Mexican American experience and that of other groups, offers a model to explain the higher rates of inhalant abuse among Mexican American youth. Considers cultural, ecological, structural, and economic factors. (Author/GC)

  20. Typewriter correction fluid inhalation: a new substance of abuse.

    PubMed

    Pointer, J

    1982-07-01

    The first known case of inhalation of liquid typewriter correction fluid (TCF) is reported. Respiratory exposure to TCF can produce coma and death. Treatment is mainly supportive. Clinicians should be alerted to this new form of substance abuse.

  1. Triple inhaled therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Montuschi, Paolo; Malerba, Mario; Macis, Giuseppe; Mores, Nadia; Santini, Giuseppe

    2016-11-01

    Combining individual drugs in a single inhaler is the most convenient way to deliver triple therapy. A long-acting muscarinic receptor antagonist (LAMA) added to an inhaled corticosteroid (ICS)/long-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonist (LABA) fixed-dose combination (FDC) can improve efficacy of pharmacological treatment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). New inhaled ICS/LABA/LAMA FDCs, including fluticasone furoate/vilanterol/umeclidinium, budesonide/formoterol/glycopyrronium and beclometasone/formoterol/glycopyrronium, are in Phase III of clinical development for COPD. Triple inhaled therapy might be particularly useful in patients with severe to very severe COPD, above all in those with peripheral blood or sputum eosinophilia, asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS) or frequent exacerbators. Future prospective studies should assess efficacy and safety of triple ICS/LABA/LAMA therapy in selected COPD phenotypes.

  2. Inhaler Reminders Significantly Improve Asthma Patients' Use of Controller Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... of controller medications Share | Inhaler reminders significantly improve asthma patients’ use of controller medications Published Online: July ... effective in reducing the burden and risk of asthma, but many patients do not use them regularly. ...

  3. Aerosol deposition in the human lung following administration from a microprocessor controlled pressurised metered dose inhaler.

    PubMed Central

    Farr, S. J.; Rowe, A. M.; Rubsamen, R.; Taylor, G.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Gamma scintigraphy was employed to assess the deposition of aerosols emitted from a pressurised metered dose inhaler (MDI) contained in a microprocessor controlled device (SmartMist), a system which analyses an inspiratory flow profile and automatically actuates the MDI when predefined conditions of flow rate and cumulative inspired volume coincide. METHODS--Micronised salbutamol particles contained in a commercial MDI (Ventolin) were labelled with 99m-technetium using a method validated by the determination of (1) aerosol size characteristics of the drug and radiotracer following actuation into an eight stage cascade impactor and (2) shot potencies of these non-volatile components as a function of actuation number. Using nine healthy volunteers in a randomised factorial interaction design the effect of inspiratory flow rate (slow, 30 l/min; medium, 90 l/min; fast, 270 l/min) combined with cumulative inspired volume (early, 300 ml; late, 3000 ml) was determined on total and regional aerosol lung deposition using the technique of gamma scintigraphy. RESULTS--The SmartMist firing at the medium/early setting (medium flow and early in the cumulative inspired volume) resulted in the highest lung deposition at 18.6 (1.42)%. The slow/early setting gave the second highest deposition at 14.1 (2.06)% with the fast/late setting resulting in the lowest (7.6 (1.15)%). Peripheral lung deposition obtained for the medium/early (9.1 (0.9)%) and slow/early (7.5 (1.06)%) settings were equivalent but higher than those obtained with the other treatments. This reflected the lower total lung deposition at these other settings as no difference in regional deposition, expressed as a volume corrected central zone:peripheral zone ratio, was apparent for all modes of inhalation studied. CONCLUSIONS--The SmartMist device allowed reproducible actuation of an MDI at a preprogrammed point during inspiration. The extent of aerosol deposition in the lung is affected by a change in

  4. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN THE INTRODUCTION OF A NEW CYSTIC FIBROSIS INHALED ANTIBIOTIC CLASS AND CHANGE IN PREVALENCE OF PATIENTS RECEIVING MULTIPLE INHALED ANTIBIOTIC CLASSES

    PubMed Central

    Dasenbrook, Elliott C.; Konstan, Michael W.; VanDevanter, Donald R.

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2010, aztreonam for inhalation solution joined aminoglycosides and colistimethate as a new cystic fibrosis (CF) chronic inhaled antimicrobial therapy. We studied how introduction of this new inhaled antibiotic class changed management of US CF patients. Methods Use of inhaled aminoglycosides, colistimethate, and aztreonam among patients followed in the CF Foundation Patient Registry was analyzed by age group, lung disease stage, and microbiologic status both annually, and at individual visits between 2009 and 2012. Results The overall prevalence of inhaled antibiotic use did not change during the period, but the prevalence of annual and any visit treatment with >1 inhaled antibiotic class more than doubled. Adults, those with advanced lung disease, and those with >1 Pseudomonas aeruginosa respiratory culture were more likely to receive >1 antibiotic class. Conclusions Inhaled antibiotic management of US CF patients has dramatically changed in association with the introduction of a third inhaled antibiotic class. PMID:25496726

  5. Methods to Develop Inhalation Cancer Risk Estimates for ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document summarizes the approaches and rationale for the technical and scientific considerations used to derive inhalation cancer risks for emissions of chromium and nickel compounds from electric utility steam generating units. The purpose of this document is to discuss the methods used to develop inhalation cancer risk estimates associated with emissions of chromium and nickel compounds from coal- and oil-fired electric utility steam generating units (EGUs) in support of EPA's recently proposed Air Toxics Rule.

  6. Myocardial injury following the intentional inhalation of typewriter correction fluid.

    PubMed

    Wodka, R M; Jeong, E W

    1991-04-01

    The first known case of myocardial injury, as documented by evolutionary electrocardiographic changes and echocardiographic septal wall motion abnormality associated with the voluntary inhalation of typewriter correction fluid, is reported. Typewriter correction fluid, which contains a combination of chlorinated hydrocarbons, is rapidly becoming a substance of abuse. Therefore, primary care practitioners should be alerted to specific organ system damages that may arise from the voluntary inhalation of this substance.

  7. Laboratory study of selected personal inhalable aerosol samplers.

    PubMed

    Görner, Peter; Simon, Xavier; Wrobel, Richard; Kauffer, Edmond; Witschger, Olivier

    2010-03-01

    Assessment of inhalable dust exposure requires reliable sampling methods in order to measure airborne inhalable particles' concentrations. Many inhalable aerosol samplers can be used but their performances widely vary and remain unknown in some cases. The sampling performance of inhalable samplers is strongly dependent on particle size and ambient air velocity. Five inhalable aerosol samplers have been studied in two laboratory wind tunnels using polydisperse glass-beads' test aerosol. Samplers tested were IOM sampler (UK), two versions of CIP 10-I sampler, v1 and v2 (F), 37-mm closed face cassette sampler (USA), 37-mm cassette fitted up with an ACCU-CAP insert (USA), and Button sampler (USA). Particle size-dependent sampling efficiencies were measured in a horizontal wind tunnel under a 1 m s(-1) wind velocity and in a vertical tunnel under calm air, using a specific method with Coulter(R) counter particle size number distribution determinations. Compared with CEN-ISO-ACGIH sampling criteria for inhalable dust, the experimental results show fairly high sampling efficiency for the IOM and CIP 10-I v2 samplers and slightly lower efficiencies for the Button and CIP 10-I v1 samplers. The closed face cassette (4-mm orifice) produced the poorest performances of all the tested samplers. This can be improved by using the ACCU-CAP internal capsule, which prevents inner wall losses inside the cassette. Significant differences between moving air and calm air sampling efficiency were observed for all the studied samplers.

  8. An acoustic method of automatically evaluating patient inhaler technique.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Martin S; D'Arcy, Shona; Costello, Richard W; Reilly, Richard B

    2013-01-01

    Chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) affect millions of people worldwide. Inhalers are devices utilized to deliver medication in small doses directly to the airways in the treatment of asthma and COPD. Despite the proven effectiveness of inhaler medication in controlling symptoms, many patients suffer from technique errors leading to decreased levels of medication efficacy. This study employs a recording device attached to a commonly used dry powder inhaler (DPI) to obtain the acoustic signals of patients taking their inhaler medication. The audio files provide information on how a patient uses their inhaler over a period of one month. Manually listening to such a large quantity of audio files would be a time consuming and monotonous process and therefore an algorithm that could automatically carry out this task would be of great benefit. An algorithm was thus designed and developed to detect inhalation, exhalation and blister events in the audio signals, analyze the quantity of each event, the order in which the events took place and finally provide a score on the overall performance. The algorithm was tested on a dataset of 185 audio files obtained from five community dwelling asthmatic patients in real world environments. Evaluation of the algorithm on this dataset revealed that it had an accuracy of 92.8% in deciding the correct technique score compared to manual detection methods.

  9. Experimental investigation of design parameters on dry powder inhaler performance.

    PubMed

    Ngoc, Nguyen Thi Quynh; Chang, Lusi; Jia, Xinli; Lau, Raymond

    2013-11-30

    The study aims to investigate the impact of various design parameters of a dry powder inhaler on the turbulence intensities generated and the performance of the dry powder inhaler. The flow fields and turbulence intensities in the dry powder inhaler are measured using particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques. In vitro aerosolization and deposition a blend of budesonide and lactose are measured using an Andersen Cascade Impactor. Design parameters such as inhaler grid hole diameter, grid voidage and chamber length are considered. The experimental results reveal that the hole diameter on the grid has negligible impact on the turbulence intensity generated in the chamber. On the other hand, hole diameters smaller than a critical size can lead to performance degradation due to excessive particle-grid collisions. An increase in grid voidage can improve the inhaler performance but the effect diminishes at high grid voidage. An increase in the chamber length can enhance the turbulence intensity generated but also increases the powder adhesion on the inhaler wall.

  10. Intrapulmonary distribution of inhaled chrysotile and crocidolite asbestos: ultrastructural features.

    PubMed Central

    Oghiso, Y.; Kagan, E.; Brody, A. R.

    1984-01-01

    Although all commercial types of asbestos can cause pulmonary fibrosis, little is known about ultrastructural differences in the evolution of pulmonary lesions induced by amphiboles and serpentines. The present study was designed to compare the histological and ultrastructural effects produced by chronic inhalation of either crocidolite (amphibole) or chrysotile (serpentine) asbestos in the rat. Animals, exposed by intermittent inhalation for 3 months, were killed after 2 to 16 months. When inhaled, both types of asbestos caused thickened alveolar duct bifurcations associated with macrophage aggregates. Crocidolite inhalation also produced subpleural collections of alveolar macrophages and lymphocytes. Electron microscopy revealed some similarities, but also distinct differences, in the pulmonary distribution of inhaled chrysotile and crocidolite. Whereas both asbestos varieties were identified within the pulmonary interstitium, only crocidolite was detected inside alveolar macrophages. Chrysotile fibres were seen infrequently within the vascular compartment. Microcalcifications were noted after chrysotile inhalation, but were never observed following crocidolite exposure. Both asbestos types induced slight pulmonary fibrosis. These findings indicate that crocidolite and chrysotile produce different pathogenetic features, although both are fibrogenic. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 5 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 6 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 PMID:6087872

  11. Inhalation of two putative Gulf War toxins by mice.

    PubMed

    Repine, John E; Wilson, Paul; Elkins, Nancy; Klawitter, Jelena; Christians, Uwe; Peters, Ben; Smith, Dwight M

    2016-01-01

    We employed our inhalation methodology to examine whether biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress would be produced in mice following inhalation of aerosols containing carbonaceous particles or the vapor of pesticides prevalent during the first Gulf War. Exposure to two putative Gulf War Illness toxins, fine airborne particles and the pesticide malathion, increased biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress in Friend virus B (FVB) female mice. Mice inhaling particles 24 h before had increased lung lavage and plasma Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) (a biomarker of inflammation) and PGF2α (a biomarker of oxidative stress) levels, lung lavage protein and lung lavage lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) levels. These changes were a function of particle density and exposure time. Compared to particle inhalation, mice inhaling malathion 24 h before had small increase in plasma LTB4 and PGF2α levels but no increase in lung lavage LTB4, lung lavage protein, lung lavage LDH, and lung lavage alveolar macrophage (AM) levels compared to unexposed control mice. AM from particle-exposed mice contained phagocytosed particles, while AM from malathion-exposed mice showed no abnormalities. Our results indicate that inhaling particles or malathion can alter inflammatory and oxidative biomarkers in mice and raise the possibility that these toxins may have altered inflammation and oxidative stress biomarkers in Gulf War-exposed individuals.

  12. Comparison of high dose inhaled steroids, low dose inhaled steroids plus low dose theophylline, and low dose inhaled steroids alone in chronic asthma in general practice

    PubMed Central

    Lim, S.; Jatakanon, A.; Gordon, D.; Macdonald, C.; Chung, K. F.; Barnes, P.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Theophylline is widely used in the treatment of asthma, and there is evidence that theophylline has anti-inflammatory or immunomodulatory effects. A study was undertaken to determine whether theophylline added to low dose inhaled steroids would be as efficacious as high dose inhaled steroids in asthma.
METHODS—In a study in general practice of 155 recruited asthmatic patients with continuing symptomatic asthma while on 400 µg beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP) daily and inhaled β2 agonist as required, the effect of (1) continuing low dose inhaled steroids alone (LDS, 200 µg BDP twice daily), (2) low dose inhaled steroids plus low dose theophylline (LDT, 400 mg daily), or (3) high dose inhaled steroids (HDS, 500 µg BDP) over a six month period was examined.
RESULTS—One hundred and thirty patients completed the study. Between group comparison using analysis of variance showed no overall differences in peak flow measurements, diurnal variation, and symptom scores. Changes in evening peak flows approached significance at the 5% level (p=0.077). The mean improvement in evening peak flow in the LDT compared with the LDS group was 20.6 l/min (95% confidence interval (CI) -2.5 to 38.8). In the LDT group there was an increase in evening peak flows at the end of the study compared with entry values (22.5 l/min), while in the LDS and HDS groups evening peak flows increased by 1.9 and 8.3 l/min, respectively. There was no significant difference in exacerbations or in side effects.
CONCLUSION—There were no overall significant differences between the low dose steroid, low dose steroid with theophylline, and the high dose steroid groups. The greatest within-group improvement in evening peak flows was found after theophylline. A larger study may be necessary to show significant effects.

 PMID:10992535

  13. TPI 1020, a novel anti-inflammatory, nitric oxide donating compound, potentiates the bronchodilator effects of salbutamol in conscious guinea-pigs.

    PubMed

    Turner, Dawn L; Ferrari, Nicolay; Ford, William R; Kidd, Emma J; Paquet, Luc; Renzi, Paulo; Broadley, Kenneth J

    2010-09-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids are regularly co-administered with beta(2)-adrenoceptor agonists. This study evaluates in conscious guinea-pigs the bronchodilator effect, alone or combined with salbutamol, of TPI 1020, a novel anti-inflammatory corticosteroid and nitric oxide (NO) donor derived from budesonide. Guinea-pigs received inhaled histamine (3 mM) and specific airway conductance (sG(aw)) measured. Responses to histamine were measured before and on the next day 15 min after a 15 min inhalation of vehicle, salbutamol, TPI 1020, budesonide, the NO-donor, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP), or combinations of these drugs. Salbutamol and TPI 1020 caused concentration-dependent bronchodilatation measured as inhibition of histamine-induced bronchoconstriction. TPI 1020-induced bronchodilatation was blocked by the guanylyl cyclise inhibitor, ODQ, indicating cGMP-dependence through released NO. While salbutamol at 80 microM did not exert significant bronchodilatation, significant inhibitions were observed when co-administered with TPI 1020, 0.11 and 0.33 mM. The combined effects of TPI 1020 and salbutamol lasted significantly longer than either drug alone. Inhaled budesonide was a weak bronchodilator and when co-administered with salbutamol there was enhanced bronchodilatation. Addition of the NO-donor, SNAP (0.1 mM), to the budesonide/salbutamol combination, also improved the inhibition of histamine-induced bronchoconstriction. This study has shown that TPI 1020 potentiates the bronchodilator activity of salbutamol, and their combination lasted longer than either drug administered individually. Both the corticosteroid and NO-releasing activities of TPI 1020 appear to be required for the potentiation of salbutamol. Combination of TPI 1020 with a beta(2)-adrenoceptor agonist may therefore be useful against acute bronchoconstriction episodes in asthma, and may offer an opportunity for reducing doses of inhaled beta(2)-adrenoceptor agonists.

  14. Evaluation of dry powder inhalers with a focus on ease of use and user preference in inhaler-naïve individuals.

    PubMed

    von Schantz, Sofia; Katajavuori, Nina; Antikainen, Osmo; Juppo, Anne

    2016-07-25

    Inhaler errors are common amongst inhaler users. Therefore, in the development work of new inhalation devices, it is important to characterize the ease of use of the inhalers. In this study four dry powder inhalers, Diskus, Easyhaler, Ellipta and Turbuhaler, were evaluated, focusing on ease of use and patient preference. The study used a triangular methodology. The sample consisted of 31 inhaler naïve individuals. Educational videos for all inhalers were watched, and afterwards, the use of all four inhalers was demonstrated in a random order. The demonstrations were videotaped. Thereafter they were checked against a predefined checklist and all mistakes were recorded. Only 33% of inhaler demonstrations were completed without the participants making any mistakes. The proportions of subjects who used the devices correctly were as follows: Diskus 48%, Easyhaler 19%, Ellipta 55% and Turbuhaler 16%. When comparing correct and incorrect inhaler technique for each inhaler pair the following differences were statistically significant: Diskus vs. Easyhaler (p<0.05), Ellipta vs. Easyhaler (p<0.01), Diskus vs. Turbuhaler (p<0.01), Ellipta vs. Turbuhaler (p<0.01). In the participants' ranking, the inhalers Ellipta, followed by Turbuhaler, were most often ranked as most preferred. Participants' preference of Ellipta over Easyhaler (p<0.01) and over Diskus (p<0.001) were statistically significant.

  15. Introduction: Aerosol Delivery of Orally Inhaled Agents

    PubMed Central

    Devadason, Sunalene G.; Kuehl, Philip J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Deposition scintigraphy methods have been used extensively to provide qualitative and quantitative data on aerosol drug deposition in the lungs. However, differences in methodology among the different centers performing these studies have limited the application of these techniques, especially in regulatory roles. As an introduction to the standardized techniques developed by the International Society for Aerosols in Medicine (ISAM) Regulatory Affairs Networking Group, we present potential advantages of the use of standard techniques for deposition scintigraphy. Specifically, we propose that standardized techniques would allow for better comparisons between labs and would facilitate multicenter studies. They would allow for improved methods of establishing equivalence and could be better utilized to establish dosing for new medications. They would allow for the performance of more accurate dose ranging or multidose studies and complement pharmacokinetic studies of new inhaled medications. Standardized techniques could help to establish the relationship between the deposition of drug in the lungs and clinical effect, and may also facilitate clinical measurements of deposited dose for medications with narrow therapeutic indices. In the sections that follow, we discuss the best techniques used to perform deposition scintigraphy through planar, single-photon emission computed tomography, and positron emission tomography modalities and propose a detailed set of standardized methods for each. These include methods for radiolabel validation, radiolabel accountability and mass balance, and imaging acquisition and analysis. PMID:23215846

  16. Traumatic Inhalation due to Merapi Volcanic Ash.

    PubMed

    Trisnawati, Ika; Budiono, Eko; Sumardi; Setiadi, Andang

    2015-07-01

    Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis is fibrotic lung diseases of the pulmonary parenchyma following chronic inhalation of inorganic dusts containing crystalline silicon dioxide. The acute manifestations observed after heavy ashfalls include attacks of asthma and bronchitis, with an increased reporting of cough, breathlessness, chest tightness, and wheezing due to irritation of the lining of the airways. The chronic health condition of most concern is silicosis, a diffuse nodular fibrosis of the lungs, develops slowly, usually appearing 10 to 30 years after first exposure. A 35 years old male was admitted to Sardjito Hospital, Yogyakarta with complaints of progressive dyspnoea, right side chest pain since last 3 month and periodic episodes of dry cough. He had history of exposure to volcanic ash at the location around volcano eruption for about 10 month. Examination revealed hyperresonant note, diminished vesicular breath sounds in lower right side of the chest. The chest X-ray presence leads to bleb. Based on the clinical and radiological suspicion of pneumoconiosis the patient was submitted to computed tomography of the chest and revealed bilateral multiple bullae mainly at the right lung field. The biopsy specimen verified the diagnosis of anthrocosilicosis. There is no proven specific therapy for any form of silicosis. Symptomatic therapy should include treatment of airflow limitation with bronchodilators, aggressive management of respiratory tract infection with antibiotics, and use of supplemental oxygen (if indicated) to prevent complications of chronic hypoxemia.

  17. Inhaled treprostinil and pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Nadler, Samuel T; Edelman, Jeffrey D

    2010-01-01

    Multiple conditions result in development of pulmonary hypertension. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is the subclassification of pulmonary hypertension, in which known or unknown underlying conditions lead to similar intrinsic alterations in the pulmonary vasculature. PAH is a progressive condition characterized by restricted blood flow through the pulmonary circulation leading to poor survival in the absence of effective therapy. Over the last two decades, new therapeutic agents have substantially improved the course and prognosis for PAH patients. Three available classes of drugs, ie, prostacyclins, endothelin receptor antagonists, and phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors provide multiple options for treatment of PAH. Endothelin receptor antagonists and phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors are administered orally, whereas prostacyclin therapies are delivered by continuous intravenous or subcutaneous infusion, or as aerosols by nebulization. Because of the risks and inconveniences associated with administration, prostacyclins are typically reserved for patients with more advanced disease or progression despite oral therapy. Inhaled administration may be a safer and easier route for prostacyclin administration. Treprostinil is a prostacyclin analog that has been demonstrated to be effective when administered by continuous subcutaneous or intravenous infusion, and more recently by nebulization. PMID:21191432

  18. Incinerator air emissions: Inhalation exposure perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, H.W.

    1995-12-01

    Incineration is often proposed as the treatment of choice for processing diverse wastes, particularly hazardous wastes. Where such treatment is proposed, people are often fearful that it will adversely affect their health. Unfortunately, information presented to the public about incinerators often does not include any criteria or benchmarks for evaluating such facilities. This article describes a review of air emission data from regulatory trial burns in a large prototype incinerator, operated at design capacity by the US Army to destroy chemical warfare materials. It uses several sets of criteria to gauge the threat that these emissions pose to public health. Incinerator air emission levels are evaluated with respect to various toxicity screening levels and ambient air levels of the same pollutants. Also, emission levels of chlorinated dioxins and furans are compared with emission levels of two common combustion sources. Such comparisons can add to a community`s understanding of health risks associated with an incinerator. This article focuses only on the air exposure/inhalation pathway as related to human health. It does not address other potential human exposure pathways or the possible effects of emissions on the local ecology, both of which should also be examined during a complete analysis of any major new facility.

  19. Biliary Cast Syndrome in an Opium Inhaler

    PubMed Central

    Dabiri, Reza; Aghdae, Hamid Asadzadeh; Rajabalinia, Hasan; Mohammad Alizadeh, Amir Houshang

    2013-01-01

    Biliary cast syndrome (BCS) is an uncommon complication which is mostly described in orthotopic liver transplantation. However, BCS has also been reported rarely in non-liver transplant patients. We describe a male long-term opium inhaler with BCS who underwent successful endoscopic cast removal by balloon enteroscopy-guided endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. A 52-year-old man, who was a known case of opium addiction, presented with the chief complaint of epigastric pain for 1 week prior to admission. Routine laboratory evaluation revealed cholestatic liver enzyme elevation. A cholestatic pattern was seen in radiographic modalities. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography showed a linear filling defect in the intra- and extrahepatic duct. A long biliary cast was successfully removed using an extractor balloon. After removal of the biliary cast the patient is receiving ursodeoxycholic acid and does not report any problem 4 months after treatment. It seems that biliary dyskinesia due to long-term opium use can be a predisposing factor for biliary cast formation. PMID:24163648

  20. Metastable Nitric Acid Trihydrate in Ice Clouds.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Fabian; Kubel, Frank; Gálvez, Óscar; Hoelzel, Markus; Parker, Stewart F; Baloh, Philipp; Iannarelli, Riccardo; Rossi, Michel J; Grothe, Hinrich

    2016-03-01

    The composition of high-altitude ice clouds is still a matter of intense discussion. The constituents in question are ice and nitric acid hydrates, but the exact phase composition of clouds and its formation mechanisms are still unknown. In this work, conclusive evidence for a long-predicted phase, alpha-nitric acid trihydrate (alpha-NAT), is presented. This phase was characterized by a combination of X-ray and neutron diffraction experiments, allowing a convincing structure solution. Furthermore, vibrational spectra (infrared and inelastic neutron scattering) were recorded and compared with theoretical calculations. A strong interaction between water ice and alpha-NAT was found, which explains the experimental spectra and the phase-transition kinetics. On the basis of these results, we propose a new three-step mechanism for NAT formation in high-altitude ice clouds.

  1. Speciation in aqueous solutions of nitric acid.

    PubMed

    Hlushak, S; Simonin, J P; De Sio, S; Bernard, O; Ruas, A; Pochon, P; Jan, S; Moisy, P

    2013-02-28

    In this study, speciation in aqueous solutions of nitric acid at 25 °C was assessed in two independent ways. First, Raman experiments were carried out and interpreted in terms of free nitrate ions, ion pairs and neutral HNO(3) molecules. In parallel, a model was developed to account for the formation of these two kinds of pairs. It was based on an extension of the binding mean spherical approximation (BiMSA), or associative MSA (AMSA), in which the size and the charge of the ions in the chemical pair may differ from those of the free ions. A simultaneous fit of the osmotic coefficient and of the proportion of free ions (obtained from Raman spectroscopy experiments) led to an estimation of the speciation in nitric acid solutions. The result obtained using this procedure was compared with the estimation obtained from the Raman experiments.

  2. Metastable Nitric Acid Trihydrate in Ice Clouds

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Fabian; Kubel, Frank; Gálvez, Óscar; Hoelzel, Markus; Parker, Stewart F.; Baloh, Philipp; Iannarelli, Riccardo; Rossi, Michel J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The composition of high‐altitude ice clouds is still a matter of intense discussion. The constituents in question are ice and nitric acid hydrates, but the exact phase composition of clouds and its formation mechanisms are still unknown. In this work, conclusive evidence for a long‐predicted phase, alpha‐nitric acid trihydrate (alpha‐NAT), is presented. This phase was characterized by a combination of X‐ray and neutron diffraction experiments, allowing a convincing structure solution. Furthermore, vibrational spectra (infrared and inelastic neutron scattering) were recorded and compared with theoretical calculations. A strong interaction between water ice and alpha‐NAT was found, which explains the experimental spectra and the phase‐transition kinetics. On the basis of these results, we propose a new three‐step mechanism for NAT formation in high‐altitude ice clouds. PMID:26879259

  3. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase in the microcirculation

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Xiaohong; Keller, T.C. Stevenson; Begandt, Daniela; Butcher, Joshua T.; Biwer, Lauren; Keller, Alexander S.; Columbus, Linda; Isakson, Brant E.

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, NOS3) is responsible for producing nitric oxide (NO) - a key molecule that can directly (or indirectly) act as a vasodilator and anti-inflammatory mediator. In this review, we examine the structural effects of regulation of the eNOS enzyme, including post-translational modifications and subcellular localization. After production, NO diffuses to surrounding cells with a variety of effects. We focus on the physiological role of NO and NO-derived molecules, including microvascular effects on vessel tone and immune response. Regulation of eNOS and NO action is complicated; we address endogenous and exogenous mechanisms of NO regulation with a discussion of pharmacological agents used in clinical and laboratory settings and a proposed role for eNOS in circulating red blood cells. PMID:26390975

  4. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase in the microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Shu, Xiaohong; Keller, T C Stevenson; Begandt, Daniela; Butcher, Joshua T; Biwer, Lauren; Keller, Alexander S; Columbus, Linda; Isakson, Brant E

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, NOS3) is responsible for producing nitric oxide (NO)--a key molecule that can directly (or indirectly) act as a vasodilator and anti-inflammatory mediator. In this review, we examine the structural effects of regulation of the eNOS enzyme, including post-translational modifications and subcellular localization. After production, NO diffuses to surrounding cells with a variety of effects. We focus on the physiological role of NO and NO-derived molecules, including microvascular effects on vessel tone and immune response. Regulation of eNOS and NO action is complicated; we address endogenous and exogenous mechanisms of NO regulation with a discussion of pharmacological agents used in clinical and laboratory settings and a proposed role for eNOS in circulating red blood cells.

  5. Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation Project Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie L.

    2013-01-01

    The standard practice for protection of stainless steel is a process called passivation. This procedure results in the formation of a metal oxide layer to prevent corrosion. Typical passivation procedures call for the use of nitric acid which exhibits excellent corrosion performance; however, there are a number of environmental, worker safety, and operational issues associated with its use. The longtime military specification for the passivation of stainless steel was cancelled in favor of newer specifications which allow for the use of citric acid in place of nitric acid. Citric acid offers a variety of benefits that include increased safety for personnel, reduced environmental impact, and reduced operational costs. There have been few studies, however, to determine whether citric acid is an acceptable alternative for NASA and DoD. This paper details activities to date including development of the joint test plan, on-going and planned testing, and preliminary results.

  6. [Examination of the oral cavities of patients with cancer: clinical evaluation and indirect measurement of the nitric oxide level].

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Emilia Campos; Cárnio, Evelin Capellari; Khouri, Vivian Youssef; Guilherme, Caroline; dos Santos, Claudia Benedita; Pace, Mariangela Aparecida

    2013-02-01

    This observational study aimed to verify the association between the clinical state of the oral cavity (based on the Index of Decayed, Missing, and Filled Teeth and the Simplified Oral Hygiene Index) and the indirectly determined nitric oxide level in patients with oncologic and hematologic diseases. This study included 20 hospitalized patients who were in the evaluation phase prior to starting chemotherapy and who had been diagnosed with leukemia (35%), lymphoma (50%) or myeloma (15%). Fifty percent of these patients had normal oral health (no injury or trauma), and most had satisfactory (35%) or typical (35%) hygiene, but 30% had poor or very poor hygiene. The indirectly measured levels of nitric oxide ranged from 13.34 to 257. The nitric oxide level was not associated with other parameters, and there was great variability in its level. Further studies are necessary given the potential of using this indicator in the early detection of oral diseases.

  7. Nitric oxide, malnutrition and chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Brunini, Tatiana M C; Moss, Monique B; Siqueira, Mariana A S; Santos, Sérgio F F; Lugon, Jocemir R; Mendes-Ribeiro, Antônio C

    2007-04-01

    The conditionally essential amino acid L-arginine is the substrate for nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, a key second messenger involved in physiological functions including endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation and inhibition of platelet adhesion and aggregation. Extracellular L-arginine transport seems to be essential for the production of NO by the action of NO synthases (NOS), even when the intracellular levels of L-arginine are available in excess (L-arginine paradox). Chronic renal failure (CRF) is a complex clinical condition associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and thrombosis leading to cardiovascular events. Various studies document that markers of malnutrition and inflammation, such as low body mass index (BMI), C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), are strong independent predictors of cardiovascular mortality in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). There is considerable literature demonstrating that a disturbance in the nitric oxide control mechanism plays a role in mediating the haemodynamic and haemostatic disorders present in CRF. Endogenous analogues of L-arginine, ADMA and L-NMMA, which can inhibit NO synthesis and L-arginine transport, are increased whilst L-arginine is reduced in plasma from all stages of CRF patients. In this context, the uptake of L-arginine in blood cells is increased in undialysed CRF patients and in patients treated by CAPD and haemodialysis. In platelets obtained from haemodialysis patients, the activation of L-arginine transport and NO production was limited to well-nourished patients. Impairment in nitric oxide bioactivity, coupled with malnutrition and inflammation, may contribute to increased incidence of atherothrombotic events in CRF. This article summarizes the current knowledge of L-arginine-nitric oxide pathway and malnutrition in CRF and briefly describes possible therapeutic interventions.

  8. Correct usage, ease of use, and preference of two dry powder inhalers in patients with COPD: analysis of five phase III, randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    Riley, John H; Tabberer, Maggie; Richard, Nathalie; Donald, Alison; Church, Alison; Harris, Stephanie S

    2016-01-01

    Background Handheld inhalers are used to deliver treatment for COPD. Incorrect usage leads to suboptimal disease control. Complex treatment regimens and use of multiple inhalers may reduce patient compliance. The Anoro Ellipta™ dry powder inhaler (DPI) simultaneously delivers umeclidinium bromide (UMEC) and vilanterol (VI) without coformulation being required. Aim To assess the correct usage and ease of use of the Ellipta™ DPI administering UMEC/VI and to compare patient preference for Ellipta™ with the HandiHaler® through exploratory analyses of patient and observer questionnaires in five Phase III studies. Methods Two Phase III, 3-month double-blind, placebo-controlled studies assessed the correct usage of the Ellipta™ DPI at Day 1 and after 6 weeks, and ease of use of the Ellipta™ DPI using a nonvalidated patient questionnaire after 6 weeks or early withdrawal. In three 6-month, blinded double-dummy, active comparator studies (two Phase IIIa and one Phase IIIb), patients completed a COPD device preference questionnaire between the Ellipta™ DPI and the Handi-Haler® at Day 168 (Week 24) or early withdrawal. Results In the 3-month placebo-controlled studies, ≥98% of patients used the Ellipta™ DPI correctly and 99% of patients found the inhaler easy/very easy-to-use and the dose counter easy/very easy to read. Across the two Phase IIIa active comparator studies, patients consistently stated a preference for the Ellipta™ DPI over HandiHaler® regarding the number of steps to use (59% vs 17%), time taken to use (62% vs 14%), and ease of use (63% vs 15%) regardless of which inhaler contained active drug. Results were consistent in the Phase IIIb active comparator study. Conclusion Delivery of UMEC/VI via the Ellipta™ DPI was considered easy-to-use, and patients with COPD demonstrated clear preference for this inhaler compared with HandiHaler®. PMID:27578968

  9. Antitoxin Treatment of Inhalation Anthrax: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Huang, Eileen; Pillai, Satish K; Bower, William A; Hendricks, Katherine A; Guarnizo, Julie T; Hoyle, Jamechia D; Gorman, Susan E; Boyer, Anne E; Quinn, Conrad P; Meaney-Delman, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Concern about use of anthrax as a bioweapon prompted development of novel anthrax antitoxins for treatment. Clinical guidelines for the treatment of anthrax recommend antitoxin therapy in combination with intravenous antimicrobials; however, a large-scale or mass anthrax incident may exceed antitoxin availability and create a need for judicious antitoxin use. We conducted a systematic review of antitoxin treatment of inhalation anthrax in humans and experimental animals to inform antitoxin recommendations during a large-scale or mass anthrax incident. A comprehensive search of 11 databases and the FDA website was conducted to identify relevant animal studies and human reports: 28 animal studies and 3 human cases were identified. Antitoxin monotherapy at or shortly after symptom onset demonstrates increased survival compared to no treatment in animals. With early treatment, survival did not differ between antimicrobial monotherapy and antimicrobial-antitoxin therapy in nonhuman primates and rabbits. With delayed treatment, antitoxin-antimicrobial treatment increased rabbit survival. Among human cases, addition of antitoxin to combination antimicrobial treatment was associated with survival in 2 of the 3 cases treated. Despite the paucity of human data, limited animal data suggest that adjunctive antitoxin therapy may improve survival. Delayed treatment studies suggest improved survival with combined antitoxin-antimicrobial therapy, although a survival difference compared with antimicrobial therapy alone was not demonstrated statistically. In a mass anthrax incident with limited antitoxin supplies, antitoxin treatment of individuals who have not demonstrated a clinical benefit from antimicrobials, or those who present with more severe illness, may be warranted. Additional pathophysiology studies are needed, and a point-of-care assay correlating toxin levels with clinical status may provide important information to guide antitoxin use during a large-scale anthrax

  10. Antitoxin Treatment of Inhalation Anthrax: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Eileen; Pillai, Satish K.; Bower, William A.; Hendricks, Katherine A.; Guarnizo, Julie T.; Hoyle, Jamechia D.; Gorman, Susan E.; Boyer, Anne E.; Quinn, Conrad P.; Meaney-Delman, Dana

    2016-01-01

    Concern about use of anthrax as a bioweapon prompted development of novel anthrax antitoxins for treatment. Clinical guidelines for the treatment of anthrax recommend antitoxin therapy in combination with intravenous antimicrobials; however, a large-scale or mass anthrax incident may exceed antitoxin availability and create a need for judicious antitoxin use. We conducted a systematic review of antitoxin treatment of inhalation anthrax in humans and experimental animals to inform antitoxin recommendations during a large-scale or mass anthrax incident. A comprehensive search of 11 databases and the FDA website was conducted to identify relevant animal studies and human reports: 28 animal studies and 3 human cases were identified. Antitoxin monotherapy at or shortly after symptom onset demonstrates increased survival compared to no treatment in animals. With early treatment, survival did not differ between antimicrobial monotherapy and antimicrobial-antitoxin therapy in nonhuman primates and rabbits. With delayed treatment, antitoxin-antimicrobial treatment increased rabbit survival. Among human cases, addition of antitoxin to combination antimicrobial treatment was associated with survival in 2 of the 3 cases treated. Despite the paucity of human data, limited animal data suggest that adjunctive antitoxin therapy may improve survival. Delayed treatment studies suggest improved survival with combined antitoxin-antimicrobial therapy, although a survival difference compared with antimicrobial therapy alone was not demonstrated statistically. In a mass anthrax incident with limited antitoxin supplies, antitoxin treatment of individuals who have not demonstrated a clinical benefit from antimicrobials, or those who present with more severe illness, may be warranted. Additional pathophysiology studies are needed, and a point-of-care assay correlating toxin levels with clinical status may provide important information to guide antitoxin use during a large-scale anthrax

  11. INHALATION TOXICOLOGY METHODS: The Generation and Characterization of Exposure Atmospheres and Inhalational Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lung-Chi; Lippmann, Morton

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we outline the need for laboratory-based inhalation toxicology studies, the historical background on adverse health effects of airborne toxicants, and the benefits of advance planning for the building of analytic options into the study design to maximize the scientific gains to be derived from the investments in the study. We then discuss methods for: 1) the generation and characterization of exposure atmospheres for inhalation exposures in humans and laboratory animals; 2) their delivery and distribution into and within whole-body exposure chambers, head-only exposure chambers, face-masks, and mouthpieces or nasal catheters; 3) options for on-line functional assays during and between exposures; and 4) options for serial non-invasive assays of response. In doing so, we go beyond exposures to single agents and simple mixtures, and include methods for evaluating biological responses to complex environmental mixtures. We also emphasize that great care should be taken in the design and execution of such studies so that the scientific returns can be maximized both initially, and in follow-up utilization of archived samples of the exposure atmospheres, excreta, and tissues collected for histology. PMID:25645246

  12. Towards the optimisation and adaptation of dry powder inhalers.

    PubMed

    Cui, Y; Schmalfuß, S; Zellnitz, S; Sommerfeld, M; Urbanetz, N

    2014-08-15

    Pulmonary drug delivery by dry powder inhalers is becoming more and more popular. Such an inhalation device must insure that during the inhalation process the drug powder is detached from the carrier due to fluid flow stresses. The goal of the project is the development of a drug powder detachment model to be used in numerical computations (CFD, computational fluid dynamics) of fluid flow and carrier particle motion through the inhaler and the resulting efficiency of drug delivery. This programme will be the basis for the optimisation of inhaler geometry and dry powder inhaler formulation. For this purpose a multi-scale approach is adopted. First the flow field through the inhaler is numerically calculated with OpenFOAM(®) and the flow stresses experienced by the carrier particles are recorded. This information is used for micro-scale simulations using the Lattice-Boltzmann method where only one carrier particle covered with drug powder is placed in cubic flow domain and exposed to the relevant flow situations, e.g. plug and shear flow with different Reynolds numbers. Therefrom the fluid forces on the drug particles are obtained. In order to allow the determination of the drug particle detachment possibility by lift-off, sliding or rolling, also measurements by AFM (atomic force microscope) were conducted for different carrier particle surface structures. The contact properties, such as van der Waals force, friction coefficient and adhesion surface energy were used to determine, from a force or moment balance (fluid forces versus contact forces), the detachment probability by the three mechanisms as a function of carrier particle Reynolds number. These results will be used for deriving the drug powder detachment model.

  13. Combustion smoke exposure induces up-regulated expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, aquaporin 4, nitric oxide synthases and vascular permeability in the retina of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Zou, Y Y; Lu, J; Poon, D J F; Kaur, C; Cao, Q; Teo, A L; Ling, E A

    2009-05-19

    Retinal cells respond to various experimental stimuli including hypoxia, yet it remains to be investigated whether they react to smoke inhalation. We show here that retinal cells in rats, notably the ganglion cells, Müller cells, astrocytes and blood vessels responded vigorously to a smoke challenge. The major changes included up-regulated expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), aquaporin 4 (AQP4) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS). VEGF expression was localized in the ganglion cells, Müller cells, astrocytes and associated blood vessels. AQP4 was markedly enhanced in both astrocytes and Müller cells. Increase in vascular permeability after smoke exposure was evidenced by extravasation of serum derived rhodamine isothiocyanate which was internalized by Müller cells and ganglion cells. The tracer leakage was attenuated by aminoguanidine and N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) treatment which suppressed retinal tissue NOS and nitric oxide (NO) levels concomitantly. It is suggested that VEGF, AQP4 and NO are involved in increased vascular permeability following acute smoke exposure in which hypoxia was ultimately implicated as shown by blood gases analysis. NOS inhibitors effectively reduced the vascular leakage and hence may ameliorate possible retinal edema in smoke inhalation.

  14. Inelastic Neutron Scattering of Nitric Acid Hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baloh, P.; Grothe, H.; Martín-Llorente, B.; Parker, S.

    2009-04-01

    The IPCC report 2007 underlines the particular importance of aerosol particles for the water cycle and the radiation balance, and thus for the global climate.[1] The contribution of aerosols and clouds to radiative forcing might be comparable to the most important greenhouse gases like CO2 but is comparatively less understood. Nitric acid hydrates are important constituents of solid cloud particles in the lower polar Stratosphere (Polar Stratospheric Clouds) and the upper Troposphere (Cirrus clouds). The exact phase composition of these particles is still a matter of controversial discussion.[2] Especially, metastable modifications have, as recent measurements show, a particular relevance for the atmosphere, which has been ignored up to now.[3] Spectroscopic data for their detection are urgently needed and can be gathered with laboratory models. Only recently we have recorded the FTIR and Raman spectra of all nitric acid hydrates, stable and metastable.[4,5] These data have been corroborated by X-ray diffraction measurements.[6] However, when interpreting the spectroscopic data it became evident that not all bands could be explained reasonably. Here, DFT calculations were extremely helpful,[7] but still the translational and librational bands were not fully understood. Hence, inelastic neutron scattering was employed in order to investigate this region. The INS measurements were carried out with the instrument TOSCA at the ISIS of the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK. The samples were prepared ex-situ in an amorphous state and were transferred into a helium-bath-cryostat, where the sample has been annealed between 20 K and 220 K. Characteristic changes of translational and librational modes have been observed and have been correlated with phase transitions. [1] Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 4th Assessment Report "Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis, Summary for Policymakers", Geneva, 2007; www.ipcc.ch [2] H. Grothe, H. Tizek and I. K

  15. Updated role of nitric oxide in disorders of erythrocyte function.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Marc J; Maley, Jason H; Lasker, George F; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2013-03-01

    Nitric oxide is a potent vasodilator that plays a critical role in disorders of erythrocyte function. Sickle cell disease, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and banked blood preservation are three conditions where nitric oxide is intimately related to dysfunctional erythrocytes. These conditions are accompanied by hemolysis, thrombosis and vasoocclusion. Our understanding of the interaction between nitric oxide, hemoglobin, and the vasculature is constantly evolving, and by defining this role we can better direct trials aimed at improving the treatments of disorders of erythrocyte function. Here we briefly discuss nitric oxide's interaction with hemoglobin through the hypothesis regarding Snitrosohemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and myoglobin as nitrite reductases. We then review the current understanding of the role of nitric oxide in sickle cell disease, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, and banked blood, and discuss therapeutics in development to target nitric oxide in the treatment of some of these disorders.

  16. Reduction of nitric oxide emissions from a combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, R.A.; Pritchard, H.O.

    1980-05-27

    A turbojet combustor and method for controlling nitric oxide emissions is provided by employing successive combustion zones wherein after combustion of an initial portion of the fuel in a primary combustion zone, the combustion products of the primary zone are combined with the remaining portion of fuel and additional plenum air and burned in a secondary combustion zone under conditions that result in low nitric oxide emissions. Low nitric oxide emissions are achieved by a novel turbojet combustor arrangement which provides flame stability by allowing stable combustion, which usually result in large emissions of nitric oxide in a primary combustion zone, to be accompanied by low nitric oxide emissions resulting from controlled fuel-lean combustion, ignited by the emission products from the primary zone, in a secondary combustion zone at a lower combustion temperature resulting in low emissions of nitric oxide.

  17. 77 FR 48433 - New Source Performance Standards Review for Nitric Acid Plants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-14

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 60 RIN 2060-AQ10 New Source Performance Standards Review for Nitric Acid Plants AGENCY... performance standards (NSPS) for nitric acid plants. Nitric acid plants include one or more nitric acid... standards for nitric acid plants, contact Mr. Nathan Topham, Sector Policies and Program Division, Office...

  18. Uncertainties on lung doses from inhaled plutonium.

    PubMed

    Puncher, Matthew; Birchall, Alan; Bull, Richard K

    2011-10-01

    In a recent epidemiological study, Bayesian uncertainties on lung doses have been calculated to determine lung cancer risk from occupational exposures to plutonium. These calculations used a revised version of the Human Respiratory Tract Model (HRTM) published by the ICRP. In addition to the Bayesian analyses, which give probability distributions of doses, point estimates of doses (single estimates without uncertainty) were also provided for that study using the existing HRTM as it is described in ICRP Publication 66; these are to be used in a preliminary analysis of risk. To infer the differences between the point estimates and Bayesian uncertainty analyses, this paper applies the methodology to former workers of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA), who constituted a subset of the study cohort. The resulting probability distributions of lung doses are compared with the point estimates obtained for each worker. It is shown that mean posterior lung doses are around two- to fourfold higher than point estimates and that uncertainties on doses vary over a wide range, greater than two orders of magnitude for some lung tissues. In addition, we demonstrate that uncertainties on the parameter values, rather than the model structure, are largely responsible for these effects. Of these it appears to be the parameters describing absorption from the lungs to blood that have the greatest impact on estimates of lung doses from urine bioassay. Therefore, accurate determination of the chemical form of inhaled plutonium and the absorption parameter values for these materials is important for obtaining reliable estimates of lung doses and hence risk from occupational exposures to plutonium.

  19. [Physio-pathological impacts of inhaled nanoparticles].

    PubMed

    Baeza-Squiban, Armelle

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials are defined as materials with any external dimension in the nanoscale or having an internal structure or surface structure in the nanoscale, approximately 1 nm to 100 nm. They exhibit new or reinforced properties as compared to the same material at the micrometric scale, providing a benefit in numerous technological applications. However, their specific surface properties in addition to their shape, composition, size are suspected to elicit adverse responses from biological systems, underlining the need for a thorough hazard assessment. Increasing use of nanomaterials in industrial as well as consumer products extends the possibilities of environmental and occupational human exposures. During all their life cycle, from their production to their destruction through their use, engineered nanoparticles can be released and the respiratory route is one of the main unintentional routes of exposure. Although the respiratory tract is equipped with efficient clearance mechanisms, there is increasing evidence that nanoparticles exhibit an ability to cross biological barriers, getting access to the bloodstream and secondary target organs. Different features of nanomaterials (size, form, surface reactivity...) contribute to their internalization and translocation through the respiratory barrier. Short term inhalation exposure to nanoparticles induces pulmonary inflammation the extent of which is dependent on the type of nanoparticles according to shape, size, solubility...Oxidative stress is considered as a major toxicity pathway triggered by nanomaterials as they can intrinsically produce reactive oxygen species or induced the intracellular production of reactive oxygen species or anti-oxidant depletion upon interaction with cells. Alternative mechanisms are suspected, related to the ability of nanoparticles to interact with proteins. As they get in contact with biological fluids, nanoparticles are covered by a protein corona that modifies their interactions

  20. Plume temperature emitted from metered dose inhalers.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, G; Church, T; Lewis, D; Meakin, B

    2011-02-28

    The temperature of the drug cloud emitted from a pressurised metered dose inhaler (pMDI) may result in patient discomfort and inconsistent or non-existent dose delivery to the lungs. The effects of variations in formulation (drug, propellant, co-solvent content) and device hardware (metering volume, actuator orifice diameter, add-on devices) upon the temperature of pMDI plumes, expressed as replicate mean minimum values (MMPT), collected into a pharmacopoeial dose unit sampling apparatus (DUSA), have been investigated. Ten commercially available and two development products, including chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) suspensions and hydrofluoroalkane (HFA) solutions or suspensions, were examined together with a number of drug products in late stage development and a variety of HFA 134a placebo pMDIs. Plume temperatures were observed to be lowest in the proximity of the product's actuator mouthpiece where rapid flashing and evaporation of the formulation's propellant and volatile excipients cause cooling. The ability to control plume temperature by judicious choice of formulation co-solvent content, metering volume and the actuator orifice diameter is identified. An ethanol based HFA 134a formulation delivered through a fine orifice is inherently warmer than one with 100% HFA 134a vehicle delivered through a coarse actuator orifice. Of the 10 commercial products evaluated, MMPTs ranged from -54 to +4°C and followed the formulation class rank order, HFA suspensions