Science.gov

Sample records for early learning curves

  1. The sales learning curve.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Mark; Holloway, Charles A

    2006-01-01

    When a company launches a new product into a new market, the temptation is to immediately ramp up sales force capacity to gain customers as quickly as possible. But hiring a full sales force too early just causes the firm to burn through cash and fail to meet revenue expectations. Before it can sell an innovative product efficiently, the entire organization needs to learn how customers will acquire and use it, a process the authors call the sales learning curve. The concept of a learning curve is well understood in manufacturing. Employees transfer knowledge and experience back and forth between the production line and purchasing, manufacturing, engineering, planning, and operations. The sales learning curve unfolds similarly through the give-and-take between the company--marketing, sales, product support, and product development--and its customers. As customers adopt the product, the firm modifies both the offering and the processes associated with making and selling it. Progress along the manufacturing curve is measured by tracking cost per unit: The more a firm learns about the manufacturing process, the more efficient it becomes, and the lower the unit cost goes. Progress along the sales learning curve is measured in an analogous way: The more a company learns about the sales process, the more efficient it becomes at selling, and the higher the sales yield. As the sales yield increases, the sales learning process unfolds in three distinct phases--initiation, transition, and execution. Each phase requires a different size--and kind--of sales force and represents a different stage in a company's production, marketing, and sales strategies. Adjusting those strategies as the firm progresses along the sales learning curve allows managers to plan resource allocation more accurately, set appropriate expectations, avoid disastrous cash shortfalls, and reduce both the time and money required to turn a profit.

  2. Learning curve and early clinical outcomes for a robotic surgery novice performing robotic single site cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Angus, Andrew A; Sahi, Saad L; McIntosh, Bruce B

    2014-06-01

    A rapid training protocol has been developed for robotic surgery novices to learn robotic single-incision techniques. This study assesses the learning curve and early clinical results for a robotic surgery novice starting single-site cholecystectomy. A chart review was performed on the surgeon's first 55 patients to undergo this procedure. Average patient age was 46.01 ± 4.25 (range 21-86) years and BMI was 26.57 ± 4.25 (range 19.4-36.6) kg/m(2) . The mean port placement with docking time was 11.34 ± 3.74 (range 7-23) min. Mean console time was 28.74 ± 11.04 (range 15-66) min. Average total OR time was 61.84 ± 14.66 (range 40-105) min. All procedures were successfully completed without conversion or added ports. Complications included several minor procedural gall bladder perforations and miscellaneous postoperative symptomatic complaints. Robotic single site cholecystectomy can be safely performed by a robotic novice within a minimal learning curve and have early clinical results that are comparable to the published data of robotic experts. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Impact of the Learning Curve for Endoscopic Vein Harvest on Conduit Quality and Early Graft Patency

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Pranjal; Kiani, Soroosh; Thiruvanthan, Nannan; Henkin, Stanislav; Kurian, Dinesh; Ziu, Pluen; Brown, Alex; Patel, Nisarg; Poston, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent studies have suggested that endoscopic vein harvest (EVH) compromises graft patency. To test whether the learning curve for EVH alters conduit integrity owing to increased trauma compared with an open harvest, we analyzed the quality and early patency of conduits procured by technicians with varying EVH experience. Methods During coronary artery bypass grafting, veins were harvested open (n = 10) or by EVH (n = 85) performed by experienced (>900 cases, >30/month) versus novice <100 cases, <3/month) technicians. Harvested conduits were imaged intraoperatively using optical coherence tomography and on day 5 to assess graft patency using computed tomographic angiography. Results Conduits from experienced (n = 55) versus novice (n = 30) harvesters had similar lengths (33 versus 34 cm) and harvest times (32.4 versus 31.8 minutes). Conduit injury was noted in both EVH groups with similar distribution among disruption of the adventitia (62%), intimal tears at branch points (23%), and intimal or medial dissections (15%), but the incidence of these injuries was less with experienced harvesters and rare in veins procured with an open technique. Overall, the rate of graft attrition was similar between the two EVH groups (6.45% versus 4.34% of grafts; p = 0.552). However, vein grafts with at least 4 intimal or medial dissections showed significantly worse patency (67% versus 96% patency; p = 0.05). Conclusions High-resolution imaging confirmed that technicians inexperienced with EVH are more likely to cause intimal and deep vessel injury to the saphenous vein graft, which increases graft failure risk. Endoscopic vein harvest remains the most common technique for conduit harvest, making efforts to better monitor the learning curve an important public health issue. PMID:21524447

  4. Early results after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: effect of the learning curve

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Christopher G.; Hanna, Wael; Look, Didier; McLean, Alexander P.H.; Christou, Nicolas V.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction This study was performed to evaluate the safety and short-term efficacy of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) for morbid obesity and to describe the relation between learning curve and short-term outcomes. Methods We collected a prospective database on the first 201 consecutive patients who underwent LRYGB by a single university-based, experienced bariatric surgeon over 24 months. We divided patients into 3 consecutive groups of 67 patients for analysis (Group 1, Group 2 and Group 3). Results The mean patient age was 37 (standard deviation [SD] 9) years; mean body mass index (BMI) was 49.2 (SD 8.3) kg/m2. BMI was similar in Groups 1 and 2 (mean 47.1, SD 5.9 and mean 48.7, SD 8.9 kg/m2) but increased in Group 3 (mean 52, SD 9.7 kg/m2, p < 0.01). Operative time decreased from 145 (SD 30) minutes in Group 1 to 114 (SD 24) minutes in Group 2 (p < 0.01) and was maintained at 119 (SD 23) minutes in Group 3. Early and late complication rates were 14.9% and 12.4%, respectively. Leak rates decreased from 6.0% in the first group to 1.5% in Groups 2 and 3, but they did not reach statistical significance. Anastomotic stricture rates decreased from 11.9% in Group 1 to 3.0% in Group 2 (p < 0.01). Overall excess weight loss for the entire series was 31.5% (SD 11.9%), 54.5% (SD 14.1%), 77.1% (SD 18.5%) and 82.1% (SD 17.5%) at 3, 6, 12 and 18 months, respectively. Conclusion LRYGB can be performed with acceptable morbidity and short-term results during the learning curve. In our series, operative time and anastomotic stricture rates decreased with experience, despite an increase in mean BMI. PMID:17234071

  5. Mild decentration measured by a Scheimpflug camera and its impact on visual quality following SMILE in the early learning curve.

    PubMed

    Li, Meiyan; Zhao, Jing; Miao, Huamao; Shen, Yang; Sun, Ling; Tian, Mi; Wadium, Elizabeth; Zhou, Xingtao

    2014-05-20

    To measure decentration following femtosecond laser small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) for the correction of myopia and myopic astigmatism in the early learning curve, and to investigate its impact on visual quality. A total of 55 consecutive patients (100 eyes) who underwent the SMILE procedure were included. Decentration was measured using a Scheimpflug camera 6 months after surgery. Uncorrected and corrected distance visual acuity (UDVA, CDVA), manifest refraction, and wavefront errors were also measured. Associations between decentration and the preoperative spherical equivalent were analyzed, as well as the associations between decentration and wavefront aberrations. Regarding efficacy and safety, 40 eyes (40%) had an unchanged CDVA; 32 eyes (32%) gained one line; and 11 eyes (11%) gained two lines. Fifteen eyes (15%) lost one line of CDVA, and two eyes (2%) lost two lines. Ninety-nine of the treated eyes (99%) had a postoperative UDVA better than 1.0, and 100 eyes (100%) had a UDVA better than 0.8. The mean decentered displacement was 0.17 ± 0.09 mm. The decentered displacement of all treated eyes (100%) was within 0.50 mm; 70 eyes (70%) were within 0.20 mm; and 90 eyes (90%) were within 0.30 mm. The vertical coma showed the greatest increase in magnitude. The magnitude of horizontal decentration was found to be associated with an induced horizontal coma. This study suggests that, although mild decentration occurred in the early learning curve, good visual outcomes were achieved after the SMILE surgery. Special efforts to minimize induced vertical coma are necessary. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  6. Learning curves in health care.

    PubMed

    Waldman, J Deane; Yourstone, Steven A; Smith, Howard L

    2003-01-01

    This article explores the uses of learning curve theory in medicine. Though effective application of learning curve theory in health care can result in higher quality and lower cost, it is seldom methodically applied in clinical practice. Fundamental changes are necessary in the corporate culture of medicine in order to capitalize maximally on the benefits of learning.

  7. Mentorship, learning curves, and balance.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Meryl S; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Quintessenza, James A; Chai, Paul J; Lindberg, Harald L; Dickey, Jamie; Ungerleider, Ross M

    2007-09-01

    Professionals working in the arena of health care face a variety of challenges as their careers evolve and develop. In this review, we analyze the role of mentorship, learning curves, and balance in overcoming challenges that all such professionals are likely to encounter. These challenges can exist both in professional and personal life. As any professional involved in health care matures, complex professional skills must be mastered, and new professional skills must be acquired. These skills are both technical and judgmental. In most circumstances, these skills must be learned. In 2007, despite the continued need for obtaining new knowledge and learning new skills, the professional and public tolerance for a "learning curve" is much less than in previous decades. Mentorship is the key to success in these endeavours. The success of mentorship is two-sided, with responsibilities for both the mentor and the mentee. The benefits of this relationship must be bidirectional. It is the responsibility of both the student and the mentor to assure this bidirectional exchange of benefit. This relationship requires time, patience, dedication, and to some degree selflessness. This mentorship will ultimately be the best tool for mastering complex professional skills and maturing through various learning curves. Professional mentorship also requires that mentors identify and explicitly teach their mentees the relational skills and abilities inherent in learning the management of the triad of self, relationships with others, and professional responsibilities.Up to two decades ago, a learning curve was tolerated, and even expected, while professionals involved in healthcare developed the techniques that allowed for the treatment of previously untreatable diseases. Outcomes have now improved to the point that this type of learning curve is no longer acceptable to the public. Still, professionals must learn to perform and develop independence and confidence. The responsibility to

  8. Robotic Mitral Valve Repair: The Learning Curve.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Avi; Koprivanac, Marijan; Kelava, Marta; Mick, Stephanie L; Gillinov, A Marc; Rajeswaran, Jeevanantham; Brzezinski, Anna; Blackstone, Eugene H; Mihaljevic, Tomislav

    Adoption of robotic mitral valve surgery has been slow, likely in part because of its perceived technical complexity and a poorly understood learning curve. We sought to correlate changes in technical performance and outcome with surgeon experience in the "learning curve" part of our series. From 2006 to 2011, two surgeons undertook robotically assisted mitral valve repair in 458 patients (intent-to-treat); 404 procedures were completed entirely robotically (as-treated). Learning curves were constructed by modeling surgical sequence number semiparametrically with flexible penalized spline smoothing best-fit curves. Operative efficiency, reflecting technical performance, improved for (1) operating room time for case 1 to cases 200 (early experience) and 400 (later experience), from 414 to 364 to 321 minutes (12% and 22% decrease, respectively), (2) cardiopulmonary bypass time, from 148 to 102 to 91 minutes (31% and 39% decrease), and (3) myocardial ischemic time, from 119 to 75 to 68 minutes (37% and 43% decrease). Composite postoperative complications, reflecting safety, decreased from 17% to 6% to 2% (63% and 85% decrease). Intensive care unit stay decreased from 32 to 28 to 24 hours (13% and 25% decrease). Postoperative stay fell from 5.2 to 4.5 to 3.8 days (13% and 27% decrease). There were no in-hospital deaths. Predischarge mitral regurgitation of less than 2+, reflecting effectiveness, was achieved in 395 (97.8%), without correlation to experience; return-to-work times did not change substantially with experience. Technical efficiency of robotic mitral valve repair improves with experience and permits its safe and effective conduct.

  9. Learning curve of speech recognition.

    PubMed

    Kauppinen, Tomi A; Kaipio, Johanna; Koivikko, Mika P

    2013-12-01

    Speech recognition (SR) speeds patient care processes by reducing report turnaround times. However, concerns have emerged about prolonged training and an added secretarial burden for radiologists. We assessed how much proofing radiologists who have years of experience with SR and radiologists new to SR must perform, and estimated how quickly the new users become as skilled as the experienced users. We studied SR log entries for 0.25 million reports from 154 radiologists and after careful exclusions, defined a group of 11 experienced radiologists and 71 radiologists new to SR (24,833 and 122,093 reports, respectively). Data were analyzed for sound file and report lengths, character-based error rates, and words unknown to the SR's dictionary. Experienced radiologists corrected 6 characters for each report and for new users, 11. Some users presented a very unfavorable learning curve, with error rates not declining as expected. New users' reports were longer, and data for the experienced users indicates that their reports, initially equally lengthy, shortened over a period of several years. For most radiologists, only minor corrections of dictated reports were necessary. While new users adopted SR quickly, with a subset outperforming experienced users from the start, identification of users struggling with SR will help facilitate troubleshooting and support.

  10. Learning curves in health professions education.

    PubMed

    Pusic, Martin V; Boutis, Kathy; Hatala, Rose; Cook, David A

    2015-08-01

    Learning curves, which graphically show the relationship between learning effort and achievement, are common in published education research but are not often used in day-to-day educational activities. The purpose of this article is to describe the generation and analysis of learning curves and their applicability to health professions education. The authors argue that the time is right for a closer look at using learning curves-given their desirable properties-to inform both self-directed instruction by individuals and education management by instructors.A typical learning curve is made up of a measure of learning (y-axis), a measure of effort (x-axis), and a mathematical linking function. At the individual level, learning curves make manifest a single person's progress towards competence including his/her rate of learning, the inflection point where learning becomes more effortful, and the remaining distance to mastery attainment. At the group level, overlaid learning curves show the full variation of a group of learners' paths through a given learning domain. Specifically, they make overt the difference between time-based and competency-based approaches to instruction. Additionally, instructors can use learning curve information to more accurately target educational resources to those who most require them.The learning curve approach requires a fine-grained collection of data that will not be possible in all educational settings; however, the increased use of an assessment paradigm that explicitly includes effort and its link to individual achievement could result in increased learner engagement and more effective instructional design.

  11. Aspherical Supernovae: Effects on Early Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afsariardchi, Niloufar; Matzner, Christopher D.

    2018-04-01

    Early light from core-collapse supernovae, now detectable in high-cadence surveys, holds clues to a star and its environment just before it explodes. However, effects that alter the early light have not been fully explored. We highlight the possibility of nonradial flows at the time of shock breakout. These develop in sufficiently nonspherical explosions if the progenitor is not too diffuse. When they do develop, nonradial flows limit ejecta speeds and cause ejecta–ejecta collisions. We explore these phenomena and their observational implications using global, axisymmetric, nonrelativistic FLASH simulations of simplified polytropic progenitors, which we scale to representative stars. We develop a method to track photon production within the ejecta, enabling us to estimate band-dependent light curves from adiabatic simulations. Immediate breakout emission becomes hidden as an oblique flow develops. Nonspherical effects lead the shock-heated ejecta to release a more constant luminosity at a higher, evolving color temperature at early times, effectively mixing breakout light with the early light curve. Collisions between nonradial ejecta thermalize a small fraction of the explosion energy; we will address emission from these collisions in a subsequent paper.

  12. Microvascular Anastomosis: Proposition of a Learning Curve.

    PubMed

    Mokhtari, Pooneh; Tayebi Meybodi, Ali; Benet, Arnau; Lawton, Michael T

    2018-04-14

    Learning to perform a microvascular anastomosis is one of the most difficult tasks in cerebrovascular surgery. Previous studies offer little regarding the optimal protocols to maximize learning efficiency. This failure stems mainly from lack of knowledge about the learning curve of this task. To delineate this learning curve and provide information about its various features including acquisition, improvement, consistency, stability, and recall. Five neurosurgeons with an average surgical experience history of 5 yr and without any experience in bypass surgery performed microscopic anastomosis on progressively smaller-caliber silastic tubes (Biomet, Palm Beach Gardens, Florida) during 24 consecutive sessions. After a 1-, 2-, and 8-wk retention interval, they performed recall test on 0.7-mm silastic tubes. The anastomoses were rated based on anastomosis patency and presence of any leaks. Improvement rate was faster during initial sessions compared to the final practice sessions. Performance decline was observed in the first session of working on a smaller-caliber tube. However, this rapidly improved during the following sessions of practice. Temporary plateaus were seen in certain segments of the curve. The retention interval between the acquisition and recall phase did not cause a regression to the prepractice performance level. Learning the fine motor task of microvascular anastomosis adapts to the basic rules of learning such as the "power law of practice." Our results also support the improvement of performance during consecutive sessions of practice. The objective evidence provided may help in developing optimized learning protocols for microvascular anastomosis.

  13. The learning curve in robotic distal pancreatectomy.

    PubMed

    Napoli, Niccolò; Kauffmann, Emanuele F; Perrone, Vittorio Grazio; Miccoli, Mario; Brozzetti, Stefania; Boggi, Ugo

    2015-09-01

    No data are available on the learning curve in robotic distal pancreatectomy (RADP). The learning curve in RADP was assessed in 55 consecutive patients using the cumulative sum method, based on operative time. Data were extracted from a prospectively maintained database and analyzed retrospectively considering all events occurring within 90 days of surgery. No operation was converted to laparoscopic or open surgery and no patient died. Post-operative complications occurred in 34 patients (61.8%), being of Clavien-Dindo grade I-II in 32 patients (58.1%), including pancreatic fistula in 29 patients (52.7%). No grade C pancreatic fistula occurred. Four patients received blood transfusions (7.2%), three were readmitted (5.4%) and one required repeat surgery (1.8%). Based on the reduction of operative times (421.1 ± 20.5 vs 248.9 ± 9.3 min; p < 0.0001), completion of the learning curve was achieved after ten operations. Operative time of the first 10 operations was associated with a positive slope (0.47 + 1.78* case number; R (2) 0.97; p < 0.0001*), while that of the following 45 procedures showed a negative slope (23.52 - 0.39* case number; R (2) 0.97; p < 0.0001*). After completion of the learning curve, more patients had a malignant histology (0 vs 35.6%; p = 0.002), accounting for both higher lymph node yields (11.1 ± 12.2 vs 20.9 ± 18.5) (p = 0.04) and lower rate of spleen preservation (90 vs 55.6%) (p = 0.04). RADP was safely feasible in selected patients and the learning curve was completed after ten operations. Improvement in clinical outcome was not demonstrated, probably because of the limited occurrence of outcome comparators.

  14. Learning micro incision surgery without the learning curve

    PubMed Central

    Navin, Shoba; Parikh, Rajul

    2008-01-01

    We describe a method of learning micro incision cataract surgery painlessly with the minimum of learning curves. A large-bore or standard anterior chamber maintainer (ACM) facilitates learning without change of machine or preferred surgical technique. Experience with the use of an ACM during phacoemulsification is desirable. PMID:18292624

  15. A learning curve for solar thermal power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platzer, Werner J.; Dinter, Frank

    2016-05-01

    Photovoltaics started its success story by predicting the cost degression depending on cumulated installed capacity. This so-called learning curve was published and used for predictions for PV modules first, then predictions of system cost decrease also were developed. This approach is less sensitive to political decisions and changing market situations than predictions on the time axis. Cost degression due to innovation, use of scaling effects, improved project management, standardised procedures including the search for better sites and optimization of project size are learning effects which can only be utilised when projects are developed. Therefore a presentation of CAPEX versus cumulated installed capacity is proposed in order to show the possible future advancement of the technology to politics and market. However from a wide range of publications on cost for CSP it is difficult to derive a learning curve. A logical cost structure for direct and indirect capital expenditure is needed as the basis for further analysis. Using derived reference cost for typical power plant configurations predictions of future cost have been derived. Only on the basis of that cost structure and the learning curve levelised cost of electricity for solar thermal power plants should be calculated for individual projects with different capacity factors in various locations.

  16. Taking the brakes off the learning curve.

    PubMed

    Gheysen, Freja; Lasne, Gabriel; Pélégrini-Issac, Mélanie; Albouy, Genevieve; Meunier, Sabine; Benali, Habib; Doyon, Julien; Popa, Traian

    2017-03-01

    Motor learning is characterized by patterns of cerebello-striato-cortical activations shifting in time, yet the early dynamic and function of these activations remains unclear. Five groups of subjects underwent either continuous or intermittent theta-burst stimulation of one cerebellar hemisphere, or no stimulation just before learning a new motor sequence during fMRI scanning. We identified three phases during initial learning: one rapid, one slow, and one quasi-asymptotic performance phase. These phases were not changed by left cerebellar stimulation. Right cerebellar inhibition, however, accelerated learning and enhanced brain activation in critical motor learning-related areas during the first phase, continuing with reduced brain activation but high-performance in late phase. Right cerebellar excitation did not affect the early learning process, but slowed learning significantly in late phase, along with increased brain activation. We conclude that the right cerebellum is a key factor coordinating other neuronal loops in the early acquisition of an explicit motor sequential skill. Hum Brain Mapp 38:1676-1691, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty: the learning curve.

    PubMed

    Hill, Christine; El Zein, Mohamad; Agnihotri, Abhishek; Dunlap, Margo; Chang, Angela; Agrawal, Alison; Barola, Sindhu; Ngamruengphong, Saowanee; Chen, Yen-I; Kalloo, Anthony N; Khashab, Mouen A; Kumbhari, Vivek

    2017-09-01

     Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty (ESG) is gaining traction as a minimally invasive bariatric treatment. Concern that the learning curve may be slow, even among those proficient in endoscopic suturing, is a barrier to widespread implementation of the procedure. Therefore, we aimed to define the learning curve for ESG in a single endoscopist experienced in endoscopic suturing who participated in a 1-day ESG training program.  Consecutive patients who underwent ESG between February 2016 and November 2016 were included. The performing endoscopist, who is proficient in endoscopic suturing for non-ESG procedures, participated in a 1-day ESG training session before offering ESG to patients. The outcome measurements were length of procedure (LOP) and number of plications per procedure. Nonlinear regression was used to determine the learning plateau and calculate the learning rate.  Twenty-one consecutive patients (8 males), with mean age 47.7 ± 11.2 years and mean body mass index 41.8 ± 8.5 kg/m 2 underwent ESG. LOP decreased significantly across consecutive procedures, with a learning plateau at 101.5 minutes and a learning rate of 7 cases ( P  = 0.04). The number of plications per procedure also decreased significantly across consecutive procedures, with a plateau at 8 sutures and a learning rate of 9 cases ( P  < 0.001). Further, the average time per plication decreased significantly with consecutive procedures, reaching a plateau at 9 procedures ( P  < 0.001).  Endoscopists experienced in endoscopic suturing are expected to achieve a reduction in LOP and number of plications per procedure in successive cases, with progress plateauing at 7 and 9 cases, respectively.

  18. Analysis of the vitreoretinal surgery learning curve.

    PubMed

    Martín-Avià, J; Romero-Aroca, P

    2017-06-01

    To describe intra- and post-operative complications, as well as the evolution of the surgical technique in first 4years of work of a novice retina surgeon, and evaluate minimal learning time required to reduce its complications, deciding which pathologies should still be referred to higher level hospitals, until further experience may be achieved. A study was conducted on patients that had undergone vitreoretinal surgery by a novice surgeon in Tarragona between 23rd October 2007 and 31st December 2011. The primary diagnosis, surgeon learning time, surgical technique, intra-operative and post-operative complications were recorded. A total of 247 surgeries were studied. The percentage of use of 20G and 23G calibres during the time, marks a change towards trans-conjunctival surgery from the ninth trimester (98 surgeries). Surgical complications decreased towards twelfth trimester (130 surgeries) with an increase in the previous months. The shift towards 23G technique around 100 surgeries is interpreted as greater comfort and safety by the surgeon. Increased surgical complications during the following months until its decline around 130 surgeries can be interpreted as an 'overconfidence'. It is arguable that the learning curve is slower than what the surgeon believes. An individual analysis of the complications and surgical outcomes is recommended to ascertain the status of the learning curve. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Medical learning curves and the Kantian ideal

    PubMed Central

    Le Morvan, P; Stock, B

    2005-01-01

    A hitherto unexamined problem for the "Kantian ideal" that one should always treat patients as ends in themselves, and never only as a means to other ends, is explored in this paper. The problem consists of a prima facie conflict between this Kantian ideal and the reality of medical practice. This conflict arises because, at least presently, medical practitioners can only acquire certain skills and abilities by practising on live, human patients, and given the inevitability and ubiquity of learning curves, this learning requires some patients to be treated only as a means to this end. A number of ways of attempting to establish the compatibility of the Kantian Ideal with the reality of medical practice are considered. Each attempt is found to be unsuccessful. Accordingly, until a way is found to reconcile them, we conclude that the Kantian ideal is inconsistent with the reality of medical practice. PMID:16131552

  20. Medical learning curves and the Kantian ideal.

    PubMed

    Le Morvan, P; Stock, B

    2005-09-01

    A hitherto unexamined problem for the "Kantian ideal" that one should always treat patients as ends in themselves, and never only as a means to other ends, is explored in this paper. The problem consists of a prima facie conflict between this Kantian ideal and the reality of medical practice. This conflict arises because, at least presently, medical practitioners can only acquire certain skills and abilities by practising on live, human patients, and given the inevitability and ubiquity of learning curves, this learning requires some patients to be treated only as a means to this end. A number of ways of attempting to establish the compatibility of the Kantian Ideal with the reality of medical practice are considered. Each attempt is found to be unsuccessful. Accordingly, until a way is found to reconcile them, we conclude that the Kantian ideal is inconsistent with the reality of medical practice.

  1. Learning curve for peroral endoscopic myotomy

    PubMed Central

    El Zein, Mohamad; Kumbhari, Vivek; Ngamruengphong, Saowanee; Carson, Kathryn A.; Stein, Ellen; Tieu, Alan; Chaveze, Yamile; Ismail, Amr; Dhalla, Sameer; Clarke, John; Kalloo, Anthony; Canto, Marcia Irene; Khashab, Mouen A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Although peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is being performed more frequently, the learning curve for gastroenterologists performing the procedure has not been well studied. The aims of this study were to define the learning curve for POEM and determine which preoperative and intraoperative factors predict the time that will be taken to complete the procedure and its different steps. Patients and methods: Consecutive patients who underwent POEM performed by a single expert gastroenterologist for the treatment of achalasia or spastic esophageal disorders were included. The POEM procedure was divided into four steps: mucosal entry, submucosal tunneling, myotomy, and closure. Nonlinear regression was used to determine the POEM learning plateau and calculate the learning rate. Results: A total of 60 consecutive patients underwent POEM in an endoscopy suite. The median length of procedure (LOP) was 88 minutes (range 36 – 210), and the mean (± standard deviation [SD]) LOP per centimeter of myotomy was 9 ± 5 minutes. The total operative time decreased significantly as experience increased (P < 0.001), with a “learning plateau” at 102 minutes and a “learning rate” of 13 cases. The mucosal entry, tunneling, and closure times decreased significantly with experience (P < 0.001). The myotomy time showed no significant decrease with experience (P = 0.35). When the mean (± SD) total procedure times for the learning phase and the corresponding comparator groups were compared, a statistically significant difference was observed between procedures 11 – 15 and procedures 16 – 20 (15.5 ± 2.4 min/cm and 10.1 ± 2.7 min/cm, P = 0.01) but not thereafter. A higher case number was significantly associated with a decreased LOP (P < 0.001). Conclusion: In this single-center retrospective study, the minimum threshold number of cases required for an expert interventional endoscopist performing POEM to reach a

  2. Preventing Early Learning Failure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sornson, Bob, Ed.

    Noting that thousands of young children with the capacity to experience school success do not because they are unprepared for school learning activities, have experienced physical or emotional setbacks that cause them to be at risk for early learning failure, have never experienced limits on their behavior, or have mild sensory or motor deficits,…

  3. Guidelines for application of learning/cost improvement curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delionback, L. M.

    1975-01-01

    The differences between the terms learning curve and improvement curve are noted, as well as the differences between the Wright system and the Crawford system. Learning curve computational techniques were reviewed along with a method to arrive at a composite learning curve for a system given detail curves either by the functional techniques classification or simply categorized by subsystem. Techniques are discussed for determination of the theoretical first unit (TFU) cost using several of the currently accepted methods. Sometimes TFU cost is referred to as simply number one cost. A tabular presentation of the various learning curve slope values is given. A discussion of the various trends in the application of learning/improvement curves and an outlook for the future are presented.

  4. Understanding and Taking Control of Surgical Learning Curves.

    PubMed

    Gofton, Wade T; Papp, Steven R; Gofton, Tyson; Beaulé, Paul E

    2016-01-01

    As surgical techniques continue to evolve, surgeons will have to integrate new skills into their practice. A learning curve is associated with the integration of any new procedure; therefore, it is important for surgeons who are incorporating a new technique into their practice to understand what the reported learning curve might mean for them and their patients. A learning curve should not be perceived as negative because it can indicate progress; however, surgeons need to understand how to optimize the learning curve to ensure progress with minimal patient risk. It is essential for surgeons who are implementing new procedures or skills to define potential learning curves, examine how a reported learning curve may relate to an individual surgeon's in-practice learning and performance, and suggest methods in which an individual surgeon can modify his or her specific learning curve in order to optimize surgical outcomes and patient safety. A defined personal learning contract may be a practical method for surgeons to proactively manage their individual learning curve and provide evidence of their efforts to safely improve surgical practice.

  5. Automated Blazar Light Curves Using Machine Learning

    SciT

    Johnson, Spencer James

    2017-07-27

    This presentation describes a problem and methodology pertaining to automated blazar light curves. Namely, optical variability patterns for blazars require the construction of light curves and in order to generate the light curves, data must be filtered before processing to ensure quality.

  6. Learning curves for urological procedures: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Abboudi, Hamid; Khan, Mohammed Shamim; Guru, Khurshid A; Froghi, Saied; de Win, Gunter; Van Poppel, Hendrik; Dasgupta, Prokar; Ahmed, Kamran

    2014-10-01

    To determine the number of cases a urological surgeon must complete to achieve proficiency for various urological procedures. The MEDLINE, EMBASE and PsycINFO databases were systematically searched for studies published up to December 2011. Studies pertaining to learning curves of urological procedures were included. Two reviewers independently identified potentially relevant articles. Procedure name, statistical analysis, procedure setting, number of participants, outcomes and learning curves were analysed. Forty-four studies described the learning curve for different urological procedures. The learning curve for open radical prostatectomy ranged from 250 to 1000 cases and for laparoscopic radical prostatectomy from 200 to 750 cases. The learning curve for robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP) has been reported to be 40 procedures as a minimum number. Robot-assisted radical cystectomy has a documented learning curve of 16-30 cases, depending on which outcome variable is measured. Irrespective of previous laparoscopic experience, there is a significant reduction in operating time (P = 0.008), estimated blood loss (P = 0.008) and complication rates (P = 0.042) after 100 RALPs. The available literature can act as a guide to the learning curves of trainee urologists. Although the learning curve may vary among individual surgeons, a consensus should exist for the minimum number of cases to achieve proficiency. The complexities associated with defining procedural competence are vast. The majority of learning curve trials have focused on the latest surgical techniques and there is a paucity of data pertaining to basic urological procedures. © 2013 The Authors. BJU International © 2013 BJU International.

  7. Implementation Learning and Forgetting Curve to Scheduling in Garment Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhamad Badri, Huda; Deros, Baba Md; Syahri, M.; Saleh, Chairul; Fitria, Aninda

    2016-02-01

    The learning curve shows the relationship between time and the cumulative number of units produced which using the mathematical description on the performance of workers in performing repetitive works. The problems of this study is level differences in the labors performance before and after the break which affects the company's production scheduling. The study was conducted in the garment industry, which the aims is to predict the company production scheduling using the learning curve and forgetting curve. By implementing the learning curve and forgetting curve, this paper contributes in improving the labors performance that is in line with the increase in maximum output 3 hours productive before the break are 15 unit product with learning curve percentage in the company is 93.24%. Meanwhile, the forgetting curve improving maximum output 3 hours productive after the break are 11 unit product with the percentage of forgetting curve in the company is 92.96%. Then, the obtained 26 units product on the productive hours one working day is used as the basic for production scheduling.

  8. Early vertical correction of the deep curve of Spee.

    PubMed

    Martins, Renato Parsekian

    2017-01-01

    Even though few technological advancements have occurred in Orthodontics recently, the search for more efficient treatments continues. This paper analyses how to accelerate and improve one of the most arduous phases of orthodontic treatment, i.e., correction of the curve of Spee. The leveling of a deep curve of Spee can happen simultaneously with the alignment phase through a method called Early Vertical Correction (EVC). This technique uses two cantilevers affixed to the initial flexible archwire. This paper describes the force system produced by EVC and how to control its side effects. The EVC can reduce treatment time in malocclusions with deep curves of Spee, by combining two phases of the therapy, which clinicians ordinarily pursue sequentially.

  9. Early vertical correction of the deep curve of Spee

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Renato Parsekian

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Even though few technological advancements have occurred in Orthodontics recently, the search for more efficient treatments continues. This paper analyses how to accelerate and improve one of the most arduous phases of orthodontic treatment, i.e., correction of the curve of Spee. The leveling of a deep curve of Spee can happen simultaneously with the alignment phase through a method called Early Vertical Correction (EVC). This technique uses two cantilevers affixed to the initial flexible archwire. This paper describes the force system produced by EVC and how to control its side effects. The EVC can reduce treatment time in malocclusions with deep curves of Spee, by combining two phases of the therapy, which clinicians ordinarily pursue sequentially. PMID:28658363

  10. An appraisal of the learning curve in robotic general surgery.

    PubMed

    Pernar, Luise I M; Robertson, Faith C; Tavakkoli, Ali; Sheu, Eric G; Brooks, David C; Smink, Douglas S

    2017-11-01

    Robotic-assisted surgery is used with increasing frequency in general surgery for a variety of applications. In spite of this increase in usage, the learning curve is not yet defined. This study reviews the literature on the learning curve in robotic general surgery to inform adopters of the technology. PubMed and EMBASE searches yielded 3690 abstracts published between July 1986 and March 2016. The abstracts were evaluated based on the following inclusion criteria: written in English, reporting original work, focus on general surgery operations, and with explicit statistical methods. Twenty-six full-length articles were included in final analysis. The articles described the learning curves in colorectal (9 articles, 35%), foregut/bariatric (8, 31%), biliary (5, 19%), and solid organ (4, 15%) surgery. Eighteen of 26 (69%) articles report single-surgeon experiences. Time was used as a measure of the learning curve in all studies (100%); outcomes were examined in 10 (38%). In 12 studies (46%), the authors identified three phases of the learning curve. Numbers of cases needed to achieve plateau performance were wide-ranging but overlapping for different kinds of operations: 19-128 cases for colorectal, 8-95 for foregut/bariatric, 20-48 for biliary, and 10-80 for solid organ surgery. Although robotic surgery is increasingly utilized in general surgery, the literature provides few guidelines on the learning curve for adoption. In this heterogeneous sample of reviewed articles, the number of cases needed to achieve plateau performance varies by case type and the learning curve may have multiple phases as surgeons add more complex cases to their case mix with growing experience. Time is the most common determinant for the learning curve. The literature lacks a uniform assessment of outcomes and complications, which would arguably reflect expertise in a more meaningful way than time to perform the operation alone.

  11. Analysis of Learning Curve Fitting Techniques.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    1986. 15. Neter, John and others. Applied Linear Regression Models. Homewood IL: Irwin, 19-33. 16. SAS User’s Guide: Basics, Version 5 Edition. SAS... Linear Regression Techniques (15:23-52). Random errors are assumed to be normally distributed when using -# ordinary least-squares, according to Johnston...lot estimated by the improvement curve formula. For a more detailed explanation of the ordinary least-squares technique, see Neter, et. al., Applied

  12. Learning curve for intracranial angioplasty and stenting in single center.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qiankun; Li, Yongkun; Xu, Gelin; Sun, Wen; Xiong, Yunyun; Sun, Wenshan; Bao, Yuanfei; Huang, Xianjun; Zhang, Yao; Zhou, Lulu; Zhu, Wusheng; Liu, Xinfeng

    2014-01-01

    To identify the specific caseload to overcome learning curve effect based on data from consecutive patients treated with Intracranial Angioplasty and Stenting (IAS) in our center. The Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke and Intracranial Stenosis trial was prematurely terminated owing to the high rate of periprocedural complications in the endovascular arm. To date, there are no data available for determining the essential caseload sufficient to overcome the learning effect and perform IAS with an acceptable level of complications. Between March 2004 and May 2012, 188 consecutive patients with 194 lesions who underwent IAS were analyzed retrospectively. The outcome variables used to assess the learning curve were periprocedural complications (included transient ischemic attack, ischemic stroke, vessel rupture, cerebral hyperperfusion syndrome, and vessel perforation). Multivariable logistic regression analysis was employed to illustrate the existence of learning curve effect on IAS. A risk-adjusted cumulative sum chart was performed to identify the specific caseload to overcome learning curve effect. The overall rate of 30-days periprocedural complications was 12.4% (24/194). After adjusting for case-mix, multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that operator experience was an independent predictor for periprocedural complications. The learning curve of IAS to overcome complications in a risk-adjusted manner was 21 cases. Operator's level of experience significantly affected the outcome of IAS. Moreover, we observed that the amount of experience sufficient for performing IAS in our center was 21 cases. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Laparoscopic varicocelectomy: virtual reality training and learning curve.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Ni, Yuhua; Zhang, Yinan; Jin, Xunbo; Xia, Qinghua; Wang, Hanbo

    2014-01-01

    To explore the role that virtual reality training might play in the learning curve of laparoscopic varicocelectomy. A total of 1326 laparoscopic varicocelectomy cases performed by 16 participants from July 2005 to June 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. The participants were divided into 2 groups: group A was trained by laparoscopic trainer boxes; group B was trained by a virtual reality training course preoperatively. The operation time curves were drafted, and the learning, improving, and platform stages were divided and statistically confirmed. The operation time and number of cases in the learning and improving stages of both groups were compared. Testicular artery sparing failure and postoperative hydroceles rate were statistically analyzed for the confirmation of the learning curve. The learning curve of laparoscopic varicocelectomy was 15 cases, and with 14 cases more, it came into the platform stage. The number of cases for the learning stages of both groups showed no statistical difference (P=.49), but the operation time of group B for the learning stage was less than that of group A (P<.00001). The number of cases of group B for the improving stage was significantly less than that of group A (P=.005), but the operation time of both groups in the improving stage showed no difference (P=.30). The difference of testicular artery sparing failure rates among these 3 stages was proved significant (P<.0001), the postoperative hydroceles rate showed no statistical difference (P=.60). The virtual reality training shortened the operation time in the learning stage and hastened the trainees' steps in the improving stage, but did not shorten the learning curve as expected to.

  14. 75 FR 20830 - Early Learning

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-21

    ... meetings and written submissions, is seeking input from State agencies responsible for early learning and... intervention service providers and other providers of services to young children), students, technical... receive all written submissions of comments on the four early learning topics on or before 5 p.m...

  15. Value-Added Early Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dichter, Harriet

    2011-01-01

    Elected state leaders often prioritize economic prosperity and competitiveness, which provides an important opportunity too rarely taken for investing in early education. In 2003, Pennsylvania recognized the connection between early education and the economy, and smartly embraced early learning as part of its economic prosperity and…

  16. Learning Factors Transfer Analysis: Using Learning Curve Analysis to Automatically Generate Domain Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlik, Philip I. Jr.; Cen, Hao; Koedinger, Kenneth R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a novel method to create a quantitative model of an educational content domain of related practice item-types using learning curves. By using a pairwise test to search for the relationships between learning curves for these item-types, we show how the test results in a set of pairwise transfer relationships that can be…

  17. Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgical Lobectomy for Lung Cancer: Description of a Learning Curve.

    PubMed

    Yao, Fei; Wang, Jian; Yao, Ju; Hang, Fangrong; Cao, Shiqi; Cao, Yongke

    2017-07-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgical (VATS) lobectomy is gaining popularity in the treatment of lung cancer. The aim of this study is to investigate the learning curve of VATS lobectomy by using multidimensional methods and to compare the learning curve groups with respect to perioperative clinical outcomes. We retrospectively reviewed a prospective database to identify 67 consecutive patients who underwent VATS lobectomy for lung cancer by a single surgeon. The learning curve was analyzed by using moving average and the cumulative sum (CUSUM) method. With the moving average and CUSUM analyses for the operation time, patients were stratified into two groups, with chronological order defining early and late experiences. Perioperative clinical outcomes were compared between the two learning curve groups. According to the moving average method, the peak point for operation time occurred at the 26th case. The CUSUM method also showed the operation time peak point at the 26th case. When results were compared between early- and late-experience periods, the operation time, duration of chest drainage, and postoperative hospital stay were significantly longer in the early-experience group (cases 1 to 26). The intraoperative estimated blood loss was significantly less in the late-experience group (cases 27 to 67). CUSUM charts showed a decreasing duration of chest drainage after the 36th case and shortening postoperative hospital stay after the 37th case. Multidimensional statistical analyses suggested that the learning curve for VATS lobectomy for lung cancer required ∼26 cases. Favorable intraoperative and postoperative care parameters for VATS lobectomy were observed in the late-experience group.

  18. Identifying Learning Preferences Early.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reiff, Judith C.

    The Picture Learning Style Inventory was administered to 42 first graders and 46 second graders attending two public schools in a Southern university community. The inventory consists of 13 individual picture booklets, each illustrating a different element of learning style (environmental, emotional, sociological, and physical). The inventory is…

  19. The learning curve: Implications of a quantitative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gallistel, Charles R.; Fairhurst, Stephen; Balsam, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The negatively accelerated, gradually increasing learning curve is an artifact of group averaging in several commonly used basic learning paradigms (pigeon autoshaping, delay- and trace-eye-blink conditioning in the rabbit and rat, autoshaped hopper entry in the rat, plus maze performance in the rat, and water maze performance in the mouse). The learning curves for individual subjects show an abrupt, often step-like increase from the untrained level of responding to the level seen in the well trained subject. The rise is at least as abrupt as that commonly seen in psychometric functions in stimulus detection experiments. It may indicate that the appearance of conditioned behavior is mediated by an evidence-based decision process, as in stimulus detection experiments. If the appearance of conditioned behavior is taken instead to reflect the increase in an underlying associative strength, then a negligible portion of the function relating associative strength to amount of experience is behaviorally visible. Consequently, rate of learning cannot be estimated from the group-average curve; the best measure is latency to the onset of responding, determined for each subject individually. PMID:15331782

  20. The learning curve: implications of a quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Gallistel, Charles R; Fairhurst, Stephen; Balsam, Peter

    2004-09-07

    The negatively accelerated, gradually increasing learning curve is an artifact of group averaging in several commonly used basic learning paradigms (pigeon autoshaping, delay- and trace-eye-blink conditioning in the rabbit and rat, autoshaped hopper entry in the rat, plus maze performance in the rat, and water maze performance in the mouse). The learning curves for individual subjects show an abrupt, often step-like increase from the untrained level of responding to the level seen in the well trained subject. The rise is at least as abrupt as that commonly seen in psychometric functions in stimulus detection experiments. It may indicate that the appearance of conditioned behavior is mediated by an evidence-based decision process, as in stimulus detection experiments. If the appearance of conditioned behavior is taken instead to reflect the increase in an underlying associative strength, then a negligible portion of the function relating associative strength to amount of experience is behaviorally visible. Consequently, rate of learning cannot be estimated from the group-average curve; the best measure is latency to the onset of responding, determined for each subject individually.

  1. Learning curves for single incision and conventional laparoscopic right hemicolectomy: a multidimensional analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoonah; Yong, Yuen Geng; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Jung, Kyung Uk; Huh, Jung Wook; Cho, Yong Beom; Kim, Hee Cheol; Lee, Woo Yong; Chun, Ho-Kyung

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to compare the learning curves and early postoperative outcomes for conventional laparoscopic (CL) and single incision laparoscopic (SIL) right hemicolectomy (RHC). This retrospective study included the initial 35 cases in each group. Learning curves were evaluated by the moving average of operative time, mean operative time of every five consecutive cases, and cumulative sum (CUSUM) analysis. The learning phase was considered overcome when the moving average of operative times reached a plateau, and when the mean operative time of every five consecutive cases reached a low point and subsequently did not vary by more than 30 minutes. Six patients with missing data in the CL RHC group were excluded from the analyses. According to the mean operative time of every five consecutive cases, learning phase of SIL and CL RHC was completed between 26 and 30 cases, and 16 and 20 cases, respectively. Moving average analysis revealed that approximately 31 (SIL) and 25 (CL) cases were needed to complete the learning phase, respectively. CUSUM analysis demonstrated that 10 (SIL) and two (CL) cases were required to reach a steady state of complication-free performance, respectively. Postoperative complications rate was higher in SIL than in CL group, but the difference was not statistically significant (17.1% vs. 3.4%). The learning phase of SIL RHC is longer than that of CL RHC. Early oncological outcomes of both techniques were comparable. However, SIL RHC had a statistically insignificant higher complication rate than CL RHC during the learning phase.

  2. Concentrated photovoltaics system costs and learning curve analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haysom, Joan E.; Jafarieh, Omid; Anis, Hanan; Hinzer, Karin

    2013-09-01

    An extensive set of costs in /W for the installed costs of CPV systems has been amassed from a range of public sources, including both individual company prices and market reports. Cost reductions over time are very evident, with current prices for 2012 in the range of 3.0 ± 0.7 /W and a predicted cost of 1.5 /W for 2020. Cost data is combined with deployment volumes in a learning curve analysis, providing a fitted learning rate of either 18.5% or 22.3% depending on the methodology. This learning rate is compared to that of PV modules and PV installed systems, and the influence of soft costs is discussed. Finally, if an annual growth rate of 39% is assumed for deployed volumes, then, using the learning rate of 20%, this would predict the achievement of a cost point of 1.5 /W by 2016.

  3. Supporting Early Learning Act

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Himes, James A. [D-CT-4

    2014-02-03

    House - 06/13/2014 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  4. Early Learning Innovation Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Himes, James A. [D-CT-4

    2009-10-29

    House - 12/08/2009 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  5. Early Learning Alignment Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Altmire, Jason [D-PA-4

    2010-09-29

    House - 11/18/2010 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  6. Machine Learning Techniques for Stellar Light Curve Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinners, Trisha A.; Tat, Kevin; Thorp, Rachel

    2018-07-01

    We apply machine learning techniques in an attempt to predict and classify stellar properties from noisy and sparse time-series data. We preprocessed over 94 GB of Kepler light curves from the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST) to classify according to 10 distinct physical properties using both representation learning and feature engineering approaches. Studies using machine learning in the field have been primarily done on simulated data, making our study one of the first to use real light-curve data for machine learning approaches. We tuned our data using previous work with simulated data as a template and achieved mixed results between the two approaches. Representation learning using a long short-term memory recurrent neural network produced no successful predictions, but our work with feature engineering was successful for both classification and regression. In particular, we were able to achieve values for stellar density, stellar radius, and effective temperature with low error (∼2%–4%) and good accuracy (∼75%) for classifying the number of transits for a given star. The results show promise for improvement for both approaches upon using larger data sets with a larger minority class. This work has the potential to provide a foundation for future tools and techniques to aid in the analysis of astrophysical data.

  7. [Pancreatoduodenectomy: learning curve within single multi-field center].

    PubMed

    Kaprin, A D; Kostin, A A; Nikiforov, P V; Egorov, V I; Grishin, N A; Lozhkin, M V; Petrov, L O; Bykasov, S A; Sidorov, D V

    2018-01-01

    To analyze learning curve by using of immediate results of pancreatoduodenectomy at multi-field oncology institute. For the period 2010-2016 at Abdominal Oncology Department of Herzen Moscow Oncology Research Institute 120 pancreatoduodenal resections were consistently performed. All patients were divided into two groups: the first 60 procedures (group A) and subsequent 60 operations (group B). Herewith, first 60 operations were performed within the first 4.5 years of study period, the next 60 operations - within remaining 2.5 years. Learning curves showed significantly variable intraoperative blood loss (1100 ml and 725 ml), surgery time (589 min and 513 min) and postoperative hospital-stay (15 days and 13 days) in group A followed by gradual improvement of these values in group B. Incidence of negative resection margin (R0) was also significantly improved in the last 60 operations (70 and 92%, respectively). Despite pancreatoduodenectomy is one of the most difficult surgical interventions in abdominal surgery learning curve will differ from one surgeon to another.

  8. Defining the learning curve in laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair: a CUSUM analysis.

    PubMed

    Okrainec, Allan; Ferri, Lorenzo E; Feldman, Liane S; Fried, Gerald M

    2011-04-01

    There are numerous reports in the literature documenting high recurrence rates after laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair. The purpose of this study was to determine the learning curve for this procedure using the Cumulative Summation (CUSUM) technique. Forty-six consecutive patients with paraesophageal hernia were evaluated prospectively after laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair. Upper GI series was performed 3 months postoperatively to look for recurrence. Patients were stratified based on the surgeon's early (first 20 cases) and late experience (>20 cases). The CUSUM method was then used to further analyze the learning curve. Nine patients (21%) had anatomic recurrence. There was a trend toward a higher recurrence rate during the first 20 cases, although this did not achieve statistical significance (33% vs. 13%, p = 0.10). However, using a CUSUM analysis to plot the learning curve, we found that the recurrence rate diminishes after 18 cases and reaches an acceptable rate after 26 cases. Surgeon experience is an important predictor of recurrence after laparoscopic paraesophageal hernia repair. CUSUM analysis revealed there is a significant learning curve to become proficient at this procedure, with approximately 20 cases required before a consistent decrease in hernia recurrence rate is observed.

  9. Statistical assessment of the learning curves of health technologies.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, C R; Grant, A M; Wallace, S A; Garthwaite, P H; Monk, A F; Russell, I T

    2001-01-01

    (1) To describe systematically studies that directly assessed the learning curve effect of health technologies. (2) Systematically to identify 'novel' statistical techniques applied to learning curve data in other fields, such as psychology and manufacturing. (3) To test these statistical techniques in data sets from studies of varying designs to assess health technologies in which learning curve effects are known to exist. METHODS - STUDY SELECTION (HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT LITERATURE REVIEW): For a study to be included, it had to include a formal analysis of the learning curve of a health technology using a graphical, tabular or statistical technique. METHODS - STUDY SELECTION (NON-HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT LITERATURE SEARCH): For a study to be included, it had to include a formal assessment of a learning curve using a statistical technique that had not been identified in the previous search. METHODS - DATA SOURCES: Six clinical and 16 non-clinical biomedical databases were searched. A limited amount of handsearching and scanning of reference lists was also undertaken. METHODS - DATA EXTRACTION (HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT LITERATURE REVIEW): A number of study characteristics were abstracted from the papers such as study design, study size, number of operators and the statistical method used. METHODS - DATA EXTRACTION (NON-HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT LITERATURE SEARCH): The new statistical techniques identified were categorised into four subgroups of increasing complexity: exploratory data analysis; simple series data analysis; complex data structure analysis, generic techniques. METHODS - TESTING OF STATISTICAL METHODS: Some of the statistical methods identified in the systematic searches for single (simple) operator series data and for multiple (complex) operator series data were illustrated and explored using three data sets. The first was a case series of 190 consecutive laparoscopic fundoplication procedures performed by a single surgeon; the second

  10. Learning curve for robotic-assisted laparoscopic rectal cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Rodríguez, Rosa M; Díaz-Pavón, José Manuel; de la Portilla de Juan, Fernando; Prendes-Sillero, Emilio; Dussort, Hisnard Cadet; Padillo, Javier

    2013-06-01

    One of the main uses of robotic assisted abdominal surgery is the mesorectal excision in patients with rectal cancer. The aim of the present study is to analyse the learning curve for robotic assisted laparoscopic resection of rectal cancer. We included in our study 43 consecutive rectal cancer resections (16 females and 27 males) performed from January 2008 through December 2010. Mean age of patients was 66 ± 9.0 years. Surgical procedures included both abdomino-perineal and anterior resections. We analysed the following parameters: demographic data of the patients included in the study, intra- and postoperative data, time taking to set up the robot for operations (set-up or docking time), operative time, intra- and postoperative complications, conversion rates and pathological specimen features. The learning curve was analysed using cumulative sum (CUSUM) methodology. The procedures understudied included seven abdomino-perineal resections and 36 anterior resections. In our series of patients, mean robotic set-up time was 62.9 ± 24.6 min, and the mean operative time was 197.4 ± 44.3 min. Once we applied CUSUM methodology, we obtained two graphs for CUSUM values (operating time and success), both of them showing three well-differentiated phases: phase 1 (the initial 9-11 cases), phase 2 (the middle 12 cases) and phase 3 (the remaining 20-22 cases). Phase 1 represents initial learning; phase 2 plateau represents increased competence in the use of the robotic system, and finally, phase 3 represents the period of highest skill or mastery with a reduction in docking time (p = 0.000), but a slight increase in operative time (p = 0.007). The CUSUM curve shows three phases in the learning and use of robotic assisted rectal cancer surgery which correspond to the phases of initial learning of the technique, consolidation and higher expertise or mastery. The data obtained suggest that the estimated learning curve for robotic assisted rectal cancer

  11. Perceptual learning as improved probabilistic inference in early sensory areas.

    PubMed

    Bejjanki, Vikranth R; Beck, Jeffrey M; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Pouget, Alexandre

    2011-05-01

    Extensive training on simple tasks such as fine orientation discrimination results in large improvements in performance, a form of learning known as perceptual learning. Previous models have argued that perceptual learning is due to either sharpening and amplification of tuning curves in early visual areas or to improved probabilistic inference in later visual areas (at the decision stage). However, early theories are inconsistent with the conclusions of psychophysical experiments manipulating external noise, whereas late theories cannot explain the changes in neural responses that have been reported in cortical areas V1 and V4. Here we show that we can capture both the neurophysiological and behavioral aspects of perceptual learning by altering only the feedforward connectivity in a recurrent network of spiking neurons so as to improve probabilistic inference in early visual areas. The resulting network shows modest changes in tuning curves, in line with neurophysiological reports, along with a marked reduction in the amplitude of pairwise noise correlations.

  12. Measuring the surgical 'learning curve': methods, variables and competency.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nuzhath; Abboudi, Hamid; Khan, Mohammed Shamim; Dasgupta, Prokar; Ahmed, Kamran

    2014-03-01

    To describe how learning curves are measured and what procedural variables are used to establish a 'learning curve' (LC). To assess whether LCs are a valuable measure of competency. A review of the surgical literature pertaining to LCs was conducted using the Medline and OVID databases. Variables should be fully defined and when possible, patient-specific variables should be used. Trainee's prior experience and level of supervision should be quantified; the case mix and complexity should ideally be constant. Logistic regression may be used to control for confounding variables. Ideally, a learning plateau should reach a predefined/expert-derived competency level, which should be fully defined. When the group splitting method is used, smaller cohorts should be used in order to narrow the range of the LC. Simulation technology and competence-based objective assessments may be used in training and assessment in LC studies. Measuring the surgical LC has potential benefits for patient safety and surgical education. However, standardisation in the methods and variables used to measure LCs is required. Confounding variables, such as participant's prior experience, case mix, difficulty of procedures and level of supervision, should be controlled. Competency and expert performance should be fully defined. © 2013 The Authors. BJU International © 2013 BJU International.

  13. Learning curve for new technology?: a nationwide register-based study of 46,363 total knee arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Peltola, Mikko; Malmivaara, Antti; Paavola, Mika

    2013-12-04

    The risk of early revision is increased for the first patients operatively treated with a newly introduced knee prosthesis. In this study, we explored the learning curves associated with ten knee implant models to determine their effect on early revision risk. We studied register data from all seventy-five surgical units that performed knee arthroplasty in Finland from 1998 to 2007. Of 54,925 patients (66,098 knees), 39,528 patients (46,363 knees) underwent arthroplasty for osteoarthritis of the knee with the ten most common total knee implants and were followed with complete data until December 31, 2010, or the time of death. We used a Cox proportional-hazards regression model for calculating the hazard ratios for early revision for the first fifteen arthroplasties and subsequent increments of numbers of arthroplasties. We found large differences among knee implants at the introduction with regard to the risk of early revision, as well as for the overall risk of early revision. A learning curve was found for four implant models, while six models did not show a learning effect on the risk of early revision. The survivorship of the studied prostheses showed substantial differences. Knee implants have model-specific learning curves and early revision risks. Some models are more difficult to implement than others. The manufacturers should consider the learning effect when designing implants and instrumentation. The surgeons should thoroughly familiarize themselves with the new knee implants before use.

  14. Learning curve analysis of mitral valve repair using telemanipulative technology.

    PubMed

    Charland, Patrick J; Robbins, Tom; Rodriguez, Evilio; Nifong, Wiley L; Chitwood, Randolph W

    2011-08-01

    To determine if the time required to perform mitral valve repairs using telemanipulation technology decreases with experience and how that decrease is influenced by patient and procedure variables. A single-center retrospective review was conducted using perioperative and outcomes data collected contemporaneously on 458 mitral valve repair surgeries using telemanipulative technology. A regression model was constructed to assess learning with this technology and predict total robot time using multiple predictive variables. Statistical analysis was used to determine if models were significantly useful, to rule out correlation between predictor variables, and to identify terms that did not contribute to the prediction of total robot time. We found a statistically significant learning curve (P < .01). The institutional learning percentage∗ derived from total robot times† for the first 458 recorded cases of mitral valve repair using telemanipulative technology is 95% (R(2) = .40). More than one third of the variability in total robot time can be explained through our model using the following variables: type of repair (chordal procedures, ablations, and leaflet resections), band size, use of clips alone in band implantation, and the presence of a fellow at bedside (P < .01). Learning in mitral valve repair surgery using telemanipulative technology occurs at the East Carolina Heart Institute according to a logarithmic curve, with a learning percentage of 95%. From our regression output, we can make an approximate prediction of total robot time using an additive model. These metrics can be used by programs for benchmarking to manage the implementation of this new technology, as well as for capacity planning, scheduling, and capital budget analysis. Copyright © 2011 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  15. Learning Curves of Virtual Mastoidectomy in Distributed and Massed Practice.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Steven Arild Wuyts; Konge, Lars; Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Sørensen, Mads Sølvsten

    2015-10-01

    Repeated and deliberate practice is crucial in surgical skills training, and virtual reality (VR) simulation can provide self-directed training of basic surgical skills to meet the individual needs of the trainee. Assessment of the learning curves of surgical procedures is pivotal in understanding skills acquisition and best-practice implementation and organization of training. To explore the learning curves of VR simulation training of mastoidectomy and the effects of different practice sequences with the aim of proposing the optimal organization of training. A prospective trial with a 2 × 2 design was conducted at an academic teaching hospital. Participants included 43 novice medical students. Of these, 21 students completed time-distributed practice from October 14 to November 29, 2013, and a separate group of 19 students completed massed practice on May 16, 17, or 18, 2014. Data analysis was performed from June 6, 2014, to March 3, 2015. Participants performed 12 repeated virtual mastoidectomies using a temporal bone surgical simulator in either a distributed (practice blocks spaced in time) or massed (all practice in 1 day) training program with randomization for simulator-integrated tutoring during the first 5 sessions. Performance was assessed using a modified Welling Scale for final product analysis by 2 blinded senior otologists. Compared with the 19 students in the massed practice group, the 21 students in the distributed practice group were older (mean age, 25.1 years), more often male (15 [62%]), and had slightly higher mean gaming frequency (2.3 on a 1-5 Likert scale). Learning curves were established and distributed practice was found to be superior to massed practice, reported as mean end score (95% CI) of 15.7 (14.4-17.0) in distributed practice vs. 13.0 (11.9-14.1) with massed practice (P = .002). Simulator-integrated tutoring accelerated the initial performance, with mean score for tutored sessions of 14.6 (13.9-15.2) vs. 13.4 (12.8-14.0) for

  16. Early Learning Theories Made Visible

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beloglovsky, Miriam; Daly, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Go beyond reading about early learning theories and see what they look like in action in modern programs and teacher practices. With classroom vignettes and colorful photographs, this book makes the works of Jean Piaget, Erik Erikson, Lev Vygotsky, Abraham Maslow, John Dewey, Howard Gardner, and Louise Derman-Sparks visible, accessible, and easier…

  17. Early Career Teacher Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormack, Ann; Gore, Jennifer; Thomas, Kaye

    2006-01-01

    Becoming a teacher requires not only the development of a professional identity but the construction of professional knowledge and practice through continued professional learning. This study tracked a sample group of 16 early career teachers through their first year of teaching. The participants were encouraged to write about their experiences in…

  18. Novel Uses of Video to Accelerate the Surgical Learning Curve.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Andrew M; Varban, Oliver A; Dimick, Justin B

    2016-04-01

    Surgeons are under enormous pressure to continually improve and learn new surgical skills. Novel uses of surgical video in the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative setting are emerging to accelerate the learning curve of surgical skill and minimize harm to patients. In the preoperative setting, social media outlets provide a valuable platform for surgeons to collaborate and plan for difficult operative cases. Live streaming of video has allowed for intraoperative telementoring. Finally, postoperative use of video has provided structure for peer coaching to evaluate and improve surgical skill. Applying these approaches into practice is becoming easier as most of our surgical platforms (e.g., laparoscopic, and endoscopy) now have video recording technology built in and video editing software has become more user friendly. Future applications of video technology are being developed, including possible integration into accreditation and board certification.

  19. Learning curve of thyroid fine-needle aspiration biopsy.

    PubMed

    Penín, Manuel; Martín, M Ángeles; San Millán, Beatriz; García, Juana

    2017-12-01

    Fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) is the reference procedure for thyroid nodule evaluation. Its main limitation are inadequate samples, which should be less than 20%. To analyze the learning curve of the procedure by comparing the results of a non-experienced endocrinologist (endocrinologist 2) to those of an experienced one (endocrinologist 1). Sixty FNABs were analyzed from February to June 2016. Each endocrinologist made 2punctures of every nodule in a random order. This order and the professional making every puncture were unknown to the pathologist who examined the samples. Endocrinologist 1 had a higher percentage of diagnoses than endocrinologist 2 (82% vs. 72%, P=.015). In the first 20 FNABs, the difference between both physicians was remarkable and statistically significant (80% vs. 50%, P=.047). In the following 20 FNABs, the difference narrowed and was not statistically significant (90% vs. 65%, P=.058). In the final 20 FNABs, the difference was minimal and not statistically significant (75% vs. 70%, P=.723). The learning curve of ultrasound-guided FNAB may be completed in a suitable environment by performing it at least 60 times. Although the guidelines recommend at least 3punctures per nodule, 2are enough to achieve an accurate percentage of diagnoses. Copyright © 2017 SEEN y SED. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Cumulative sum analysis score and phacoemulsification competency learning curve.

    PubMed

    Vedana, Gustavo; Cardoso, Filipe G; Marcon, Alexandre S; Araújo, Licio E K; Zanon, Matheus; Birriel, Daniella C; Watte, Guilherme; Jun, Albert S

    2017-01-01

    To use the cumulative sum analysis score (CUSUM) to construct objectively the learning curve of phacoemulsification competency. Three second-year residents and an experienced consultant were monitored for a series of 70 phacoemulsification cases each and had their series analysed by CUSUM regarding posterior capsule rupture (PCR) and best-corrected visual acuity. The acceptable rate for PCR was <5% (lower limit h) and the unacceptable rate was >10% (upper limit h). The acceptable rate for best-corrected visual acuity worse than 20/40 was <10% (lower limit h) and the unacceptable rate was >20% (upper limit h). The area between lower limit h and upper limit h is called the decision interval. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean age, sex or cataract grades between groups. The first trainee achieved PCR CUSUM competency at his 22 nd case. His best-corrected visual acuity CUSUM was in the decision interval from his third case and stayed there until the end, never reaching competency. The second trainee achieved PCR CUSUM competency at his 39 th case. He could reach best-corrected visual acuity CUSUM competency at his 22 nd case. The third trainee achieved PCR CUSUM competency at his 41 st case. He reached best-corrected visual acuity CUSUM competency at his 14 th case. The learning curve of competency in phacoemulsification is constructed by CUSUM and in average took 38 cases for each trainee to achieve it.

  1. Evaluating the learning curve for robot-assisted laparoscopic radical cystectomy.

    PubMed

    Pruthi, Raj S; Smith, Angela; Wallen, Eric M

    2008-11-01

    We seek to describe the learning curve of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical cystectomy by evaluating some of the surgical, oncologic, and clinical outcomes in our initial experience with 50 consecutive patients undergoing this novel procedure. Fifty consecutive patients (representing our initial experience with robot-assisted cystectomy) underwent radical cystectomy and urinary diversion from January 2006 to December 2007. Several different metrics were used to evaluate the learning curve of this procedure, including estimated blood loss (EBL), operative (OR) time, pathologic outcomes, and complication rate. We evaluated patients as a continuous variable, divided into five distinct time periods (quintiles), and stratified by first half and second half of robotic experience. EBL was not significantly lower until the third quintile (patients 21-30), after which further significant reductions were not observed. Mean OR time declined between each quintile for the first 30 patients (1-10 v 11-20 v 21-30). No significant declines occurred after the third quintile (21-30). When evaluated as a continuous variable, the statistical cut point at which no further significant reductions were observed was after patient 20 for OR time. No differences were observed with regard to time to flatus, bowel movement, or hospital discharge. Furthermore, complications were not different between the initial 25 patients and the most recent patients. There has been no case of a positive margin, and there was only one inadvertent bladder entry. Lymph node yield has also not significantly changed over time. This report helps to define the learning curve associated with robot-assisted laparoscopic radical cystectomy for bladder cancer. Despite the higher OR times and blood loss that is observed early in the learning curve, no such compromises are observed with regard to these oncologic parameters even early in the experience.

  2. Learning curves for single incision and conventional laparoscopic right hemicolectomy: a multidimensional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoonah; Yong, Yuen Geng; Jung, Kyung Uk; Huh, Jung Wook; Cho, Yong Beom; Kim, Hee Cheol; Lee, Woo Yong; Chun, Ho-Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to compare the learning curves and early postoperative outcomes for conventional laparoscopic (CL) and single incision laparoscopic (SIL) right hemicolectomy (RHC). Methods This retrospective study included the initial 35 cases in each group. Learning curves were evaluated by the moving average of operative time, mean operative time of every five consecutive cases, and cumulative sum (CUSUM) analysis. The learning phase was considered overcome when the moving average of operative times reached a plateau, and when the mean operative time of every five consecutive cases reached a low point and subsequently did not vary by more than 30 minutes. Results Six patients with missing data in the CL RHC group were excluded from the analyses. According to the mean operative time of every five consecutive cases, learning phase of SIL and CL RHC was completed between 26 and 30 cases, and 16 and 20 cases, respectively. Moving average analysis revealed that approximately 31 (SIL) and 25 (CL) cases were needed to complete the learning phase, respectively. CUSUM analysis demonstrated that 10 (SIL) and two (CL) cases were required to reach a steady state of complication-free performance, respectively. Postoperative complications rate was higher in SIL than in CL group, but the difference was not statistically significant (17.1% vs. 3.4%). Conclusion The learning phase of SIL RHC is longer than that of CL RHC. Early oncological outcomes of both techniques were comparable. However, SIL RHC had a statistically insignificant higher complication rate than CL RHC during the learning phase. PMID:25960990

  3. Learning curve with minimally invasive unicompartmental knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, William G; Ammeen, Deborah; Engh, C Anderson; Engh, Gerard A

    2010-08-01

    This study examined 445 consecutive minimally invasive unicompartmental knee arthroplasties (UKAs) from one institution to determine whether revision and reoperation rates would decrease as the number of cases performed increased, indicating the presence of a learning curve with this procedure. At a mean of 3.25 years, 26 knees required revision yielding an overall revision rate of 5.8%; survivorship at 2 years with revision as an end point was 96% +/- 1.7%. Both revisions and reoperations decreased over time but not significantly. For the first half of UKA cases performed vs the second half, revision rates fell from 5.0% to 2.5%, and reoperation rates fell from 8.1% to 5.4%. These data demonstrate that despite modifications made to improve surgical technique across time, a substantial complication rate with this procedure persists. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Minimally invasive video-assisted thyroidectomy: Ascending the learning curve

    PubMed Central

    Capponi, Michela Giulii; Bellotti, Carlo; Lotti, Marco; Ansaloni, Luca

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Minimally invasive video-assisted thyroidectomy (MIVAT) is a technically demanding procedure and requires a surgical team skilled in both endocrine and endoscopic surgery. The aim of this report is to point out some aspects of the learning curve of the video-assisted thyroid surgery, through the analysis of our preliminary series of procedures. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Over a period of 8 months, we selected 36 patients for minimally invasive video-assisted surgery of the thyroid. The patients were considered eligible if they presented with a nodule not exceeding 35 mm and total thyroid volume <20 ml; presence of biochemical and ultrasound signs of thyroiditis and pre-operative diagnosis of cancer were exclusion criteria. We analysed surgical results, conversion rate, operating time, post-operative complications, hospital stay and cosmetic outcomes of the series. RESULTS: We performed 36 total thyroidectomy and in one case we performed a consensual parathyroidectomy. The procedure was successfully carried out in 33 out of 36 cases (conversion rate 8.3%). The mean operating time was 109 min (range: 80-241 min) and reached a plateau after 29 MIVAT. Post-operative complications included three transient recurrent nerve palsies and two transient hypocalcemias; no definitive hypoparathyroidism was registered. The cosmetic result was considered excellent by most patients. CONCLUSIONS: Advances in skills and technology allow surgeons to easily reproduce the standard open total thyroidectomy with video-assistance. Although the learning curve represents a time-consuming step, training remains a crucial point in gaining a reasonable confidence with video-assisted surgical technique. PMID:25883451

  5. Virtual reality cataract surgery training: learning curves and concurrent validity.

    PubMed

    Selvander, Madeleine; Åsman, Peter

    2012-08-01

    To investigate initial learning curves on a virtual reality (VR) eye surgery simulator and whether achieved skills are transferable between tasks. Thirty-five medical students were randomized to complete ten iterations on either the VR Caspulorhexis module (group A) or the Cataract navigation training module (group B) and then two iterations on the other module. Learning curves were compared between groups. The second Capsulorhexis video was saved and evaluated with the performance rating tool Objective Structured Assessment of Cataract Surgical Skill (OSACSS). The students' stereoacuity was examined. Both groups demonstrated significant improvements in performance over the 10 iterations: group A for all parameters analysed including score (p < 0.0001), time (p < 0.0001) and corneal damage (p = 0.0003), group B for time (p < 0.0001), corneal damage (p < 0.0001) but not for score (p = 0.752). Training on one module did not improve performance on the other. Capsulorhexis score correlated significantly with evaluation of the videos using the OSACSS performance rating tool. For stereoacuity < and ≥120 seconds of arc, sum of both modules' second iteration score was 73.5 and 41.0, respectively (p = 0.062). An initial rapid improvement in performance on a simulator with repeated practice was shown. For capsulorhexis, 10 iterations with only simulator feedback are not enough to reach a plateau for overall score. Skills transfer between modules was not found suggesting benefits from training on both modules. Stereoacuity may be of importance in the recruitment and training of new cataract surgeons. Additional studies are needed to investigate this further. Concurrent validity was found for Capsulorhexis module. © 2010 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica © 2010 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  6. Venous Grafts Procured During the Learning Curve for Endoscopic Veins Harvesting Show Compromised Vascular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Kiani, Soroosh; Desai, Pranjal H.; Thirumvalavan, Nannan; Kurian, Dinesh John; Flynn, Mary Margaret; Zhao, XiaoQing

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Endoscopic vein harvest (EVH) is the US standard of care for CABG but recent comparisons to open harvest suggest that conduit quality and outcomes may be compromised. To test the hypothesis that problems with EVH may relate to its learning curve and conduit quality, we analyzed the quality and early function of conduits procured by technicians with varying EVH experience. METHODS EVH was performed during CABG by “experienced” (>900 cases, n=55 patients) vs. “novice” (<100 cases, n=30 patients) technicians. Afterwards, conduits were and examined for vascular injury using optical coherence tomography (OCT), with segments identified as injured further examined for gene expression using a tissue injury array. Conduit diameter was measured intra- and postoperatively (day 5 and 6 months) using OCT and Computed-Tomography angiography. RESULTS EVH performed by novice harvesters resulted in increased number of discrete graft injuries and higher expression of tissue injury genes. Regression analysis revealed an association between shear stress and early dilation (positive remodeling) (R2 =0.48, p <0.01). Injured veins showed blunted positive remodeling at 5 days and a greater degree of late lumen loss at 6 months. CONCLUSION Under normal conditions, intraluminal shear stress leads vein grafts to develop positive remodeling over the first postoperative week. Injury to conduits, a frequent sequela of the learning curve for EVH, was a predictor of early graft failure, blunted positive remodeling and greater negative remodeling. Given the ongoing annual volume of EVH cases, rigorous monitoring of the learning curve represents an important and unrecognized public health issue. PMID:21996436

  7. Early Learning and Educational Technology Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Recognizing the growth of technology use in early learning settings, the U.S. Department of Education and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services collaborated in the development of the "Early Learning and Educational Technology Policy Brief" to promote developmentally appropriate use of technology in homes and early learning…

  8. Using Dragon Curves To Learn about Length and Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Lyle R.

    1999-01-01

    Utilizes dragon curves which are made with three tiles and can be used to create fascinating patterns to help students understand the concepts of length, area, and perimeter of regions as defined by dragon curves. (ASK)

  9. The learning curve of robot-assisted laparoscopic aortofemoral bypass grafting for aortoiliac occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Novotný, Tomáš; Dvorák, Martin; Staffa, Robert

    2011-02-01

    Since the end of the 20th century, robot-assisted surgery has been finding its role among other minimally invasive methods. Vascular surgery seems to be another specialty in which the benefits of this technology can be expected. Our objective was to assess the learning curve of robot-assisted laparoscopic aortofemoral bypass grafting for aortoiliac occlusive disease in a group of 40 patients. Between May 2006 and January 2010, 40 patients (32 men, 8 women), who were a median age of 58 years (range, 48-75 years), underwent 40 robot-assisted laparoscopic aortofemoral reconstructions. Learning curve estimations were used for anastomosis, clamping, and operative time assessment. For conversion rate evaluation, the cumulative summation (CUSUM) technique was used. Statistical analysis comparing the first and second half of our group, and unilateral-to-bilateral reconstructions were performed. We created 21 aortofemoral and 19 aortobifemoral bypasses. The median proximal anastomosis time was 23 minutes (range, 18-50 minutes), median clamping time was 60 minutes (range, 40-95 minutes), and median operative time was 295 minutes (range, 180-475 minutes). The 30-day mortality rate was 0%, and no graft or wound infection or cardiopulmonary or hepatorenal complications were observed. During the median 18-month follow-up (range, 2-48 months), three early graft occlusions occurred (7%). After reoperations, the secondary patency of reconstructions was 100%. Data showed a typical short learning curve for robotic proximal anastomosis creation with anastomosis and clamping time reduction. The operative time learning curve was flat, confirming the procedure's complexity. There were two conversions to open surgery. CUSUM analysis confirmed that an acceptable conversion rate set at 5% was achieved. Comparing the first and second half of our group, all recorded times showed statistically significant improvements. Differences between unilateral and bilateral reconstructions were not

  10. [Learning curve of vacuum extraction in residency: a preliminary study].

    PubMed

    Velemir, L; Vendittelli, F; Bonnefoy, C; Accoceberry, M; Savary, D; Gallot, D

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the lurning curve of young residents for vacuum extraction. All vacuum extractions performed in our department by five residents (< or =5th semester) during a study period of nine months were systematically supervised by a senior who fulfilled an assessment questionnaire from which was calculated a score reflecting the quality of the extraction. Fifty-four vacuum extractions were assessed with a mean of 10.8+/-2.9 (range, 10-13) procedures by resident. We compared the group including the six first procedures performed by each resident (group 1, n = 30) with the group including the following procedures (group 2, n = 24). We observed in the group 2 compared to the group 1, a significant improvement of the scores mean (12.3+/-5.4 vs 8.4+/-6.2, p = 0.016) and a significant reduction of the need for manual assistance by the senior (12.5% vs 40%, p = 0.034). We report a method for the learning and assessment of vacuum extraction feasible at "the bed" of the patient. This approach allows to observe a significant progression of the resident for the technique of vacuum extraction on a dozen of procedures.

  11. Early Childhood Systems: Transforming Early Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagan, Sharon Lynn, Ed.; Kauertz, Kristie, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    In this seminal volume, leading authorities strategize about how to create early childhood systems that transcend politics and economics to serve the needs of all young children. The authors offer different interpretations of the nature of early childhood systems, discuss the elements necessary to support their development, and examine how…

  12. The learning curve of robot-assisted laparoscopic fundoplication in children: a prospective evaluation and CUSUM analysis.

    PubMed

    Cundy, Thomas P; Rowland, Simon P; Gattas, Nicholas E; White, Alan D; Najmaldin, Azad S

    2015-06-01

    Fundoplication is a leading application of robotic surgery in children, yet the learning curve for this procedure (RF) remains ill-defined. This study aims to identify various learning curve transition points, using cumulative summation (CUSUM) analysis. A prospective database was examined to identify RF cases undertaken during 2006-2014. Time-based surgical process outcomes were evaluated, as well as clinical outcomes. A total of 57 RF cases were included. Statistically significant transitions beyond the learning phase were observed at cases 42, 34 and 37 for docking, console and total operating room times, respectively. A steep early learning phase for docking time was overcome after 12 cases. There were three Clavien-Dindo grade ≥ 3 complications, with two patients requiring redo fundoplication. We identified numerous well-defined learning curve trends to affirm that experience confers significant temporal improvements. Our findings highlight the value of the CUSUM method for learning curve evaluation. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Learning Curve for Teaching Constellations in a Planetarium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintz, Eric G.; Smith, N.; Moody, J. W.; Stephens, D. C.; Joner, M. D.; Hintz, M.; Lawler, J.; Jones, M.; Bench, N.

    2014-01-01

    As part of a larger project we have examined how students learn constellations in a planetarium environment. Students in our introductory descriptive astronomy class were given a 50 object quiz before any instruction. This quiz includes 30 constellations, 17 bright stars, two star clusters, and the Orion Nebula. In addition we gathered a small set of demographic information. After the initial quiz we tracked student scores through the semester to see how long it took for them to learn all 50 objects. We also plan to give a follow-up constellation quiz to students who have previously taken the quiz to test for retention. This will cover a time line for 6 months up to 4 years. We will present our early results from this study. This data will also be used as a baseline for a study of Head Mounted Displays to teach a deaf audience in a planetarium. This work is partially supported by funding from the National Science Foundation grant IIS-1124548 and the Sorenson Foundation.

  14. What is the learning curve for robotic-assisted pedicle screw placement in spine surgery?

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaobang; Lieberman, Isador H

    2014-06-01

    Some early studies with robotic-assisted pedicle screw implantation have suggested these systems increase accuracy of screw placement. However, the relationship between the success rate of screw placement and the learning curve of this new technique has not been evaluated. We determined whether, as a function of surgeon experience, (1) the success rate of robotic-assisted pedicle screw placement improved, (2) the frequency of conversion from robotic to manual screw placement decreased, and (3) the frequency of malpositioned screws decreased. Between June 2010 and August 2012, the senior surgeon (IHL) performed 174 posterior spinal procedures using pedicle screws, 162 of which were attempted with robotic assistance. The use of the robotic system was aborted in 12 of the 162 procedures due to technical issues (registration failure, software crash, etc). The robotic system was successfully used in the remaining 150 procedures. These were the first procedures performed with the robot by the senior surgeon, and in this study, we divided the early learning curve into five groups: Group 1 (Patients 1-30), Group 2 (Patients 31-60), Group 3 (Patients 61-90), Group 4 (Patients 91-120), and Group 5 (Patients 121-150). One hundred twelve patients (75%) had spinal deformity and 80 patients (53%) had previous spine surgery. The accuracy of screw placement in the groups was assessed based on intraoperative biplanar fluoroscopy and postoperative radiographs. The results from these five groups were compared to determine the effect on the learning curve. The numbers of attempted pedicle screw placements were 359, 312, 349, 359, and 320 in Groups 1 to 5, respectively. The rates of successfully placed screws using robotic guidance were 82%, 93%, 91%, 95%, and 93% in Groups 1 to 5. The rates of screws converted to manual placement were 17%, 7%, 8%, 4%, and 7%. Of the robotically placed screws, the screw malposition rates were 0.8%, 0.3%, 1.4%, 0.8%, and 0%. The rate of successfully

  15. Teaching Learning Curves in an Undergraduate Economics or Operations Management Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naidu, Jaideep T.; Sanford, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Learning Curves has its roots in economics and behavioral psychology. Learning Curves theory has several business applications and is widely used in the industry. As faculty of Operations Management courses, we cover this topic in some depth in the classroom. In this paper, we present some of our teaching methods and material that have helped us…

  16. [HoLEP learning curve: Toward a standardised formation and a team strategy].

    PubMed

    Baron, M; Nouhaud, F-X; Delcourt, C; Grise, P; Pfister, C; Cornu, J-N; Sibert, L

    2016-09-01

    Holmium laser enucleation of prostate (HoLEP) is renowned for the difficulty of its learning curve. Our aim was to evaluate the interest of a three-step tutorial in the HoLEP learning curve, in a university center. It is a retrospective, monocentric study of the 82 first procedures done consecutively by the same operator with a proctoring in early experience and after 40 procedures. For all patients were noted: enucleation efficiency (g/min), morcellation efficiency (g/min), percentage of enucleated tissue (enucleated tissue/adenome weigth evaluated by ultrasonography. g/g), perioperative morbidity (Clavien), length of hospital stay, length of urinary drainage, functional outcomes at short and middle term (Qmax, post-void residual volume [PVR], QOL scores and IPSS at 3 and 6months). Enucleation and morcellation efficiency were significantly higher after the second proctoring (0.87 vs 0.44g/min; P<0.0001 and 4.2 vs 3.37g/min, P=0.038, respectively) so as the prostatic volume (43.5 vs 68.1mL, P=0.0001). Percentage of enucleated tissue was higher in the second group, however, the difference was not significant (69.5% vs 80.4%, P=0.03). Per- and postoperative complications, hospital length of stay, urinary drainage length and functional results at 3 and 6months were not significantly different. The learning curve did not interfere with functional results. The second proctoring was essential to us in order to grasp the technique. These data underlined the necessity of a pedagogic reflexion in order to built a standardized formation technique to the HoLEP. 4. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Defining the learning curve of laparoendoscopic single-site Heller myotomy.

    PubMed

    Ross, Sharona B; Luberice, Kenneth; Kurian, Tony J; Paul, Harold; Rosemurgy, Alexander S

    2013-08-01

    Initial outcomes suggest laparoendoscopic single-site (LESS) Heller myotomy with anterior fundoplication provides safe, efficacious, and cosmetically superior outcomes relative to conventional laparoscopy. This study was undertaken to define the learning curve of LESS Heller myotomy with anterior fundoplication. One hundred patients underwent LESS Heller myotomy with anterior fundoplication. Symptom frequency and severity were scored using a Likert scale (0 = never/not bothersome to 10 = always/very bothersome). Symptom resolution, additional trocars, and complications were compared among patient quartiles. Median data are presented. Preoperative frequency/severity scores were: dysphagia = 10/8 and regurgitation = 8/7. Additional trocars were placed in 12 patients (10%), of whom all were in the first two quartiles. Esophagotomy/gastrotomy occurred in three patients. Postoperative complications occurred in 9 per cent. No conversions to "open" operations occurred. Length of stay was 1 day. Postoperative frequency/severity scores were: dysphagia = 2/0 and regurgitation = 0/0; scores were less than before myotomy (P < 0.001). There were no apparent scars, except where additional trocars were placed. LESS Heller myotomy with anterior fundoplication well palliates symptoms of achalasia with no apparent scar. Placement of additional trocars only occurred early in the experience. For surgeons proficient with the conventional laparoscopic approach, the learning curve of LESS Heller myotomy with anterior fundoplication is short and safe, because proficiency is quickly attained.

  18. Learning curve for laparoscopic Heller myotomy and Dor fundoplication for achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Omura, Nobuo; Tsuboi, Kazuto; Hoshino, Masato; Yamamoto, Seryung; Akimoto, Shunsuke; Masuda, Takahiro; Kashiwagi, Hideyuki; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Although laparoscopic Heller myotomy and Dor fundoplication (LHD) is widely performed to address achalasia, little is known about the learning curve for this technique. We assessed the learning curve for performing LHD. Methods Of the 514 cases with LHD performed between August 1994 and March 2016, the surgical outcomes of 463 cases were evaluated after excluding 50 cases with reduced port surgery and one case with the simultaneous performance of laparoscopic distal partial gastrectomy. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to identify the cut-off value for the number of surgical experiences necessary to become proficient with LHD, which was defined as the completion of the learning curve. Results We defined the completion of the learning curve when the following 3 conditions were satisfied. 1) The operation time was less than 165 minutes. 2) There was no blood loss. 3) There was no intraoperative complication. In order to establish the appropriate number of surgical experiences required to complete the learning curve, the cut-off value was evaluated by using a ROC curve (AUC 0.717, p < 0.001). Finally, we identified the cut-off value as 16 surgical cases (sensitivity 0.706, specificity 0.646). Conclusion Learning curve seems to complete after performing 16 cases. PMID:28686640

  19. Learning curve for laparoscopic Heller myotomy and Dor fundoplication for achalasia.

    PubMed

    Yano, Fumiaki; Omura, Nobuo; Tsuboi, Kazuto; Hoshino, Masato; Yamamoto, Seryung; Akimoto, Shunsuke; Masuda, Takahiro; Kashiwagi, Hideyuki; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Although laparoscopic Heller myotomy and Dor fundoplication (LHD) is widely performed to address achalasia, little is known about the learning curve for this technique. We assessed the learning curve for performing LHD. Of the 514 cases with LHD performed between August 1994 and March 2016, the surgical outcomes of 463 cases were evaluated after excluding 50 cases with reduced port surgery and one case with the simultaneous performance of laparoscopic distal partial gastrectomy. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to identify the cut-off value for the number of surgical experiences necessary to become proficient with LHD, which was defined as the completion of the learning curve. We defined the completion of the learning curve when the following 3 conditions were satisfied. 1) The operation time was less than 165 minutes. 2) There was no blood loss. 3) There was no intraoperative complication. In order to establish the appropriate number of surgical experiences required to complete the learning curve, the cut-off value was evaluated by using a ROC curve (AUC 0.717, p < 0.001). Finally, we identified the cut-off value as 16 surgical cases (sensitivity 0.706, specificity 0.646). Learning curve seems to complete after performing 16 cases.

  20. Close Early Learning Gaps with Rigorous DAP

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Christopher P.; Mowry, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Rigorous DAP (developmentally appropriate practices) is a set of 11 principles of instruction intended to help close early childhood learning gaps. Academically rigorous learning environments create the conditions for children to learn at high levels. While academic rigor focuses on one dimension of education--academic--DAP considers the whole…

  1. Acquisition Challenge: The Importance of Incompressibility in Comparing Learning Curve Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    parameters for all four learning mod- els used in the study . The learning rate factor, b, is the slope of the linear regression line, which in this case is...incorporated within the DoD acquisition environment. This study tested three alternative learning models (the Stanford-B model, DeJong’s learning formula...appropriate tools to calculate accurate and reliable predictions. However, conventional learning curve methodology has been in practice since the pre

  2. A Primer on the Statistical Modelling of Learning Curves in Health Professions Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pusic, Martin V.; Boutis, Kathy; Pecaric, Martin R.; Savenkov, Oleksander; Beckstead, Jason W.; Jaber, Mohamad Y.

    2017-01-01

    Learning curves are a useful way of representing the rate of learning over time. Features include an index of baseline performance (y-intercept), the efficiency of learning over time (slope parameter) and the maximal theoretical performance achievable (upper asymptote). Each of these parameters can be statistically modelled on an individual and…

  3. Is the learning curve endless? One surgeon's experience with robotic prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Vipul; Thaly, Rahul; Shah, Ketul

    2007-02-01

    Introduction: After performing 1,000 robotic prostatectomies we reflected back on our experience to determine what defined the learning curve and the essential elements that were the keys to surmounting it. Method: We retrospectively assessed our experience to attempt to define the learning curve(s), key elements of the procedure, technical refinements and changes in technology that facilitated our progress. Result: The initial learning curve to achieve basic competence and the ability to smoothly perform the procedure in less than 4 hours with acceptable outcomes was approximately 25 cases. A second learning curve was present between 75-100 cases as we approached more complicated patients. At 200 cases we were comfortably able to complete the procedure routinely in less than 2.5 hours with no specific step of the procedure hindering our progression. At 500 cases we had the introduction of new instrumentation (4th arm, biopolar Maryland, monopolar scissors) that changed our approach to the bladder neck and neurovascular bundle dissection. The most challenging part of the procedure was the bladder neck dissection. Conclusion: There is no single parameter that can be used to assess or define the learning curve. We used a combination of factors to make our subjective definition this included: operative time, smoothness of technical progression during the case along with clinical outcomes. The further our case experience progressed the more we expected of our outcomes, thus we continually modified our technique and hence embarked upon yet a new learning curve.

  4. Intensive Monitoring Survey of Nearby Galaxies (IMSNG): Catching Early Light Curves of Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Myungshin; IMSNG Team

    2018-01-01

    SNe light curves have been used to study the expansion history of the universe, and a lot of efforts have gone into understanding the overall shape of the radioactively powered light curve. However, we still have little direct observational evidence for the theorized SN progenitor systems. Recent studies suggest that the light curve of a supernova shortly after its explosion (< 1 day) contains valuable information about its progenitor system and can be used to set a limit on the progenitor size, R*. In order to catch the early light curve of SNe explosion and understand SNe progenitors, we are performing a ~8hr interval monitoring survey of nearby galaxies (d < 50 Mpc) with 1-m class telescopes around the world. Through this survey, we expect to catch the very early precursor emission as faint as R=21 mag (~0.1 Rsun for the progenitor). This poster outlines this project, and present a few scientific highlights, such as the early light curve of SN 2015F in NGC 2442.

  5. Learner Characteristic Based Learning Effort Curve Mode: The Core Mechanism on Developing Personalized Adaptive E-Learning Platform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Pi-Shan

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to develop the core mechanism for realizing the development of personalized adaptive e-learning platform, which is based on the previous learning effort curve research and takes into account the learner characteristics of learning style and self-efficacy. 125 university students from Taiwan are classified into 16 groups according…

  6. Curved Saccade Trajectories Reveal Conflicting Predictions in Associative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koenig, Stephan; Lachnit, Harald

    2011-01-01

    We report how the trajectories of saccadic eye movements are affected by memory interference acquired during associative learning. Human participants learned to perform saccadic choice responses based on the presentation of arbitrary central cues A, B, AC, BC, AX, BY, X, and Y that were trained to predict the appearance of a peripheral target…

  7. Tactile perceptual learning: learning curves and transfer to the contralateral finger.

    PubMed

    Kaas, Amanda L; van de Ven, Vincent; Reithler, Joel; Goebel, Rainer

    2013-02-01

    Tactile perceptual learning has been shown to improve performance on tactile tasks, but there is no agreement about the extent of transfer to untrained skin locations. The lack of such transfer is often seen as a behavioral index of the contribution of early somatosensory brain regions. Moreover, the time course of improvements has never been described explicitly. Sixteen subjects were trained on the Ludvigh task (a tactile vernier task) on four subsequent days. On the fifth day, transfer of learning to the non-trained contralateral hand was tested. In five subjects, we explored to what extent training effects were retained approximately 1.5 years after the final training session, expecting to find long-term retention of learning effects after training. Results showed that tactile perceptual learning mainly occurred offline, between sessions. Training effects did not transfer initially, but became fully available to the untrained contralateral hand after a few additional training runs. After 1.5 years, training effects were not fully washed out and could be recuperated within a single training session. Interpreted in the light of theories of visual perceptual learning, these results suggest that tactile perceptual learning is not fundamentally different from visual perceptual learning, but might proceed at a slower pace due to procedural and task differences, thus explaining the apparent divergence in the amount of transfer and long-term retention.

  8. Anterior minimally invasive approach for total hip replacement: five-year survivorship and learning curve.

    PubMed

    Müller, Daniel A; Zingg, Patrick O; Dora, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Opponents associate minimally invasive total hip replacement (THR) with additional risks, potentially resulting in increased implant failure rates. The purpose was to document complications, quality of implant positioning and five-year survivorship of THR using the AMIS approach and to test the hypothesis that eventual high complication and revision rates would be limited to an early series and be avoided by junior surgeons who get trained by a senior surgeon. A consecutive series of 150 primary THR implanted during the introduction of the AMIS technique in the department was retrospectively analysed for complications, implant positioning and implant survival after a minimum of five years. Survivorship curves of implants were compared between different surgeons and time periods. Due to implant revision for any reason the five-year survival rate was 94.6%, 78.9% for the first 20 and 96.8% for the following 130 AMIS procedures (p = 0.001). The hazard ratio for implant failure was 0.979 indicating a risk reduction of 2% every further case. The five-year implant survivorship of those procedures performed by two junior surgeons was 97.7%. We conclude that adoption of AMIS temporarily exposed patients to a higher risk of implant revisions, which normalised after the first 20 cases and that experience from a single surgeon's learning curve could effectively be taught to junior surgeons.

  9. Predictable Locations Aid Early Object Name Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benitez, Viridiana L.; Smith, Linda B.

    2012-01-01

    Expectancy-based localized attention has been shown to promote the formation and retrieval of multisensory memories in adults. Three experiments show that these processes also characterize attention and learning in 16- to 18-month old infants and, moreover, that these processes may play a critical role in supporting early object name learning. The…

  10. Mobile Learning and Early Age Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peled, Shir; Schocken, Shimon

    2014-01-01

    The ability to develop engaging simulations and constructive learning experiences using mobile devices is unprecedented, presenting a disruption in educational practices of historical proportions. In this paper we describe some of the unique virtues that mobile learning hold for early age mathematics education. In particular, we describe how…

  11. Early Foreign Language Learning: The Biological Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peltzer-Karpf, Annemarie

    A discussion of the biological and developmental issues in early second language learning first looks at psycholinguistic research on brain growth patterns and the relationship of first and second language learning. Focus is on three phenomena observed in the self-organization of living systems: selection of input data; organization of specialized…

  12. Early Identification of Ineffective Cooperative Learning Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsiung, C .M.; Luo, L. F.; Chung, H. C.

    2014-01-01

    Cooperative learning has many pedagogical benefits. However, if the cooperative learning teams become ineffective, these benefits are lost. Accordingly, this study developed a computer-aided assessment method for identifying ineffective teams at their early stage of dysfunction by using the Mahalanobis distance metric to examine the difference…

  13. Learning Partnerships in Rural Early Childhood Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coombe, Kennece; Lubawy, Joy

    A study examined six aspects of learning communities in early childhood settings in rural New South Wales (Australia). These aspects are reflection, individual development, diversity, conversation, caring, and shared responsibility. Surveys of 15 directors of early childhood programs indicated that the reflective component of the learning…

  14. Home and Preschool Learning Environments and Their Relations to the Development of Early Numeracy Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anders, Yvonne; Rossbach, Hans-Gunther; Weinert, Sabine; Ebert, Susanne; Kuger, Susanne; Lehrl, Simone; von Maurice, Jutta

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the influence of the quality of home and preschool learning environments on the development of early numeracy skills in Germany, drawing on a sample of 532 children in 97 preschools. Latent growth curve models were used to investigate early numeracy skills and their development from the first (average age: 3 years) to the third…

  15. Preliminary experience and learning curve for laparoendoscopic single-site retroperitoneal pyeloplasty.

    PubMed

    Ou, Zhenyu; Qi, Lin; Yang, Jinrui; Chen, Xiang; Cao, Zhenzhen; Zu, Xiongbing; Liu, Longfei; Wang, Long

    2013-09-01

    To report our preliminary experience and to assess the learning curve for laparoendoscopic single-site retroperitoneal pyeloplasty (LESS-RP) for ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO). From July 2010 to February 2012, LESS-RP was performed in 27 patients affected with UPJO by a single surgeon. A homemade single-access platform and both conventional and prebent instruments were applied. Patient characteristics and perioperative outcomes were analyzed. The cumulative sum (CUSUM) method was used to evaluate the learning curve. The LESS-RP was successfully accomplished in all 27 patients. The mean operative time (OT) was 175.9±22.5 minutes, and the mean estimated blood loss was 83.3±27.1 mL. We used the OT as a proxy to assess the learning curve. The CUSUM learning curve can be divided into two distinct phases: the initial 12 cases and the last 15 cases. There were significant differences in the mean OT (195.6 minutes versus 159.1 minutes, P<.001) and mean estimated blood loss (97.2 mL versus 72.2 mL, P=.014) between the two phases. The two phases did not differ in other parameters. LESS-RP is a safe and feasible procedure. The learning curve of a single surgeon suggests that the initial learning phase for LESS-RP can be completed after approximately 12 cases.

  16. Improving Accuracy and Temporal Resolution of Learning Curve Estimation for within- and across-Session Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tabelow, Karsten; König, Reinhard; Polzehl, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Estimation of learning curves is ubiquitously based on proportions of correct responses within moving trial windows. Thereby, it is tacitly assumed that learning performance is constant within the moving windows, which, however, is often not the case. In the present study we demonstrate that violations of this assumption lead to systematic errors in the analysis of learning curves, and we explored the dependency of these errors on window size, different statistical models, and learning phase. To reduce these errors in the analysis of single-subject data as well as on the population level, we propose adequate statistical methods for the estimation of learning curves and the construction of confidence intervals, trial by trial. Applied to data from an avoidance learning experiment with rodents, these methods revealed performance changes occurring at multiple time scales within and across training sessions which were otherwise obscured in the conventional analysis. Our work shows that the proper assessment of the behavioral dynamics of learning at high temporal resolution can shed new light on specific learning processes, and, thus, allows to refine existing learning concepts. It further disambiguates the interpretation of neurophysiological signal changes recorded during training in relation to learning. PMID:27303809

  17. Predictable Locations Aid Early Object Name Learning

    PubMed Central

    Benitez, Viridiana L.; Smith, Linda B.

    2012-01-01

    Expectancy-based localized attention has been shown to promote the formation and retrieval of multisensory memories in adults. Three experiments show that these processes also characterize attention and learning in 16- to 18- month old infants and, moreover, that these processes may play a critical role in supporting early object name learning. The three experiments show that infants learn names for objects when those objects have predictable rather than varied locations, that infants who anticipate the location of named objects better learn those object names, and that infants integrate experiences that are separated in time but share a common location. Taken together, these results suggest that localized attention, cued attention, and spatial indexing are an inter-related set of processes in young children that aid in the early building of coherent object representations. The relevance of the experimental results and spatial attention for everyday word learning are discussed. PMID:22989872

  18. The learning curve and the cost of heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Woods, J R; Saywell, R M; Nyhuis, A W; Jay, S J; Lohrman, R G; Halbrook, H G

    1992-06-01

    The effect of learning on hospital outcomes such as mortality or adverse events (the so-called "practice makes perfect" hypothesis) has been studied by numerous investigators. The effect of learning on hospital cost, however, has received much less attention. This article reports the results of a multiple regression model demonstrating a nonlinear, decreasing trend in operative and postoperative hospital costs over time in a consecutive series of 71 heart transplant patients, all treated in the same institution. The cost trend is shown to persist even after controlling for various preoperative demographic and clinical risk factors and the specific experience of individual surgeons. Using a reference case, the model predicts a cost of $81,297 for the first heart transplant procedure performed at the hospital. If this same patient had been the tenth case rather than the first, with the hospital having benefited from the experience gained in nine previous cases, the model predicts the cost would now be only $48,431, or approximately 60 percent of the cost of the first case. Had this patient been the twenty-fifth case, the predicted cost would be $35,352 (43 percent of the original cost), and had this been the fiftieth case, the cost would be $25,458 (31 percent of the original cost). The longitudinal study design used in this analysis greatly reduces the likelihood that the observed cost reduction is due to economies of scale rather than learning. The results have implications for a policy of regionalization as a tactic for containing hospital cost. Whereas others have pointed to a volume-cost relationship as an argument for the regionalization of expensive and complex hospital procedures, the present data isolate a learning-cost relationship as a separate argument for regionalization.

  19. Hysteroscopic sterilization using a virtual reality simulator: assessment of learning curve.

    PubMed

    Janse, Juliënne A; Goedegebuure, Ruben S A; Veersema, Sebastiaan; Broekmans, Frank J M; Schreuder, Henk W R

    2013-01-01

    To assess the learning curve using a virtual reality simulator for hysteroscopic sterilization with the Essure method. Prospective multicenter study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). University and teaching hospital in the Netherlands. Thirty novices (medical students) and five experts (gynecologists who had performed >150 Essure sterilization procedures). All participants performed nine repetitions of bilateral Essure placement on the simulator. Novices returned after 2 weeks and performed a second series of five repetitions to assess retention of skills. Structured observations on performance using the Global Rating Scale and parameters derived from the simulator provided measurements for analysis. The learning curve is represented by improvement per procedure. Two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to analyze learning curves. Effect size (ES) was calculated to express the practical significance of the results (ES ≥ 0.50 indicates a large learning effect). For all parameters, significant improvements were found in novice performance within nine repetitions. Large learning effects were established for six of eight parameters (p < .001; ES, 0.50-0.96). Novices approached expert level within 9 to 14 repetitions. The learning curve established in this study endorses future implementation of the simulator in curricula on hysteroscopic skill acquisition for clinicians who are interested in learning this sterilization technique. Copyright © 2013 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Illinois Early Learning Project Tip Sheets: Physical Development and Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2003

    The Illinois Early Learning Project (IEL) is funded by the Illinois State Board of Education to provide information resources on early learning and training related to implementing the Illinois Early Learning Standards for parents and for early childhood personnel in all settings. The IEL tip sheets offer suggestions to parents and early childhood…

  1. Illinois Early Learning Project Tip Sheets: Parenting and Family Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2003

    The Illinois Early Learning Project (IEL) is funded by the Illinois State Board of Education to provide information resources on early learning and training related to implementing the Illinois Early Learning Standards for parents and for early childhood personnel in all settings. The IEL tip sheets offer suggestions to parents and early childhood…

  2. Comparison of Learning Curves for Major and Minor Laparoscopic Liver Resection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woohyung; Woo, Jung-Woo; Lee, Jin-Kwon; Park, Ji-Ho; Kim, Ju-Yeon; Kwag, Seung-Jin; Park, Taejin; Jeong, Sang-Ho; Ju, Young-Tae; Jeong, Eun-Jung; Lee, Young-Joon; Choi, Sang-Kyung; Hong, Soon-Chan; Jeong, Chi-Young

    2016-06-01

    Because laparoscopic liver resection (LLR) has a steep learning curve, analyzing experience is important for trainees. Several authors have described the learning curve of LLR, without comparing the learning curves between major and minor LLR. Perioperative data were retrieved from the medical records of 170 consecutive patients who underwent LLR by a single surgeon at a tertiary hospital. Learning curves were generated and compared between major and minor LLR using cumulative sum control charts and the moving average. Major and minor LLR was performed in 96 and 74 patients, respectively. The learning curves showed a steady state after case 50 for major LLR. Because of discordant results in minor LLR, subgroup analyses were performed, showing competency in LLR after cases 25 and 35 for left lateral sectionectomy and tumorectomy, respectively. Transfused red blood cell volume (0.6 versus 2.2 packs, P < .001) decreased after achievement of competence in major LLR. Blood loss exceeding 500 mL (odds ratio 2.395, 95% confidence interval 1.096-5.233, P = .028) was independently associated with LLR failure. The number of cases required to accomplish LLR differed according to the extent of resection. Extensive blood loss was independently associated with LLR failure.

  3. Learning curve in robotic rectal cancer surgery: current state of affairs.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Rodríguez, Rosa M; Rubio-Dorado-Manzanares, Mercedes; Díaz-Pavón, José Manuel; Reyes-Díaz, M Luisa; Vazquez-Monchul, Jorge Manuel; Garcia-Cabrera, Ana M; Padillo, Javier; De la Portilla, Fernando

    2016-12-01

    Robotic-assisted rectal cancer surgery offers multiple advantages for surgeons, and it seems to yield the same clinical outcomes as regards the short-time follow-up of patients compared to conventional laparoscopy. This surgical approach emerges as a technique aiming at overcoming the limitations posed by rectal cancer and other surgical fields of difficult access, in order to obtain better outcomes and a shorter learning curve. A systematic review of the literature of robot-assisted rectal surgery was carried out according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. The search was conducted in October 2015 in PubMed, MEDLINE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, for articles published in the last 10 years and pertaining the learning curve of robotic surgery for colorectal cancer. It consisted of the following key words: "rectal cancer/learning curve/robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery". A total of 34 references were identified, but only 9 full texts specifically addressed the analysis of the learning curve in robot-assisted rectal cancer surgery, 7 were case series and 2 were non-randomised case-comparison series. Eight papers used the cumulative sum (CUSUM) method, and only one author divided the series into two groups to compare both. The mean number of cases for phase I of the learning curve was calculated to be 29.7 patients; phase II corresponds to a mean number 37.4 patients. The mean number of cases required for the surgeon to be classed as an expert in robotic surgery was calculated to be 39 patients. Robotic advantages could have an impact on learning curve for rectal cancer and lower the number of cases that are necessary for rectal resections.

  4. Endotracheal nitinol stents: lessons from the learning curve.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Bianca; Bent, John P; Ward, Robert F

    2013-04-01

    To reflect on lessons learned placing endotracheal nitinol stents in children. Case series with chart review. Tertiary care children's hospital. All children who underwent nitinol cervical tracheal stenting were included. Records were carefully reviewed for intraoperative and postoperative complications, management choices, outcomes, and factors that influenced results. Between 1999 and 2011, 7 children underwent 13 stent placements. Median follow-up was 5 years (range, 1-12 years). Six patients underwent stenting as a salvage procedure following open attempts at airway reconstruction. Four patients remain decannulated with their stent in place (median follow-up 7 years). The fifth patient had his stent removed endoscopically after 50 days because it became apparent that his obstruction was primarily laryngeal. The sixth child had his stent removed via a tracheal fissure after 14 months because of recalcitrant subglottic inflammation at the superior stent border. The seventh patient was decannulated for over 2 years but ultimately required tracheotomy replacement because of stenosis with the stent lumen. Complications included stent migration (23%), restenosis (29%), edema (29%), and granulation (57%). Endotracheal nitinol stents provide a realistic opportunity for decannulation in children for whom other options have failed but should be reserved only as a salvage procedure in severely complicated airways. Our experience has taught valuable lessons about stent indications, sizing, characteristics, and deployment, as well as means to avoid and manage their complications.

  5. Learning curve for robotic-assisted surgery for rectal cancer: use of the cumulative sum method.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Kinugasa, Yusuke; Shiomi, Akio; Sato, Sumito; Yamakawa, Yushi; Kagawa, Hiroyasu; Tomioka, Hiroyuki; Mori, Keita

    2015-07-01

    Few data are available to assess the learning curve for robotic-assisted surgery for rectal cancer. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the learning curve for robotic-assisted surgery for rectal cancer by a surgeon at a single institute. From December 2011 to August 2013, a total of 80 consecutive patients who underwent robotic-assisted surgery for rectal cancer performed by the same surgeon were included in this study. The learning curve was analyzed using the cumulative sum method. This method was used for all 80 cases, taking into account operative time. Operative procedures included anterior resections in 6 patients, low anterior resections in 46 patients, intersphincteric resections in 22 patients, and abdominoperineal resections in 6 patients. Lateral lymph node dissection was performed in 28 patients. Median operative time was 280 min (range 135-683 min), and median blood loss was 17 mL (range 0-690 mL). No postoperative complications of Clavien-Dindo classification Grade III or IV were encountered. We arranged operative times and calculated cumulative sum values, allowing differentiation of three phases: phase I, Cases 1-25; phase II, Cases 26-50; and phase III, Cases 51-80. Our data suggested three phases of the learning curve in robotic-assisted surgery for rectal cancer. The first 25 cases formed the learning phase.

  6. Comparison of the Operative Outcomes and Learning Curves between Laparoscopic and Robotic Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kuo-Hung; Lan, Yuan-Tzu; Fang, Wen-Liang; Chen, Jen-Hao; Lo, Su-Shun; Li, Anna Fen-Yau; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Wu, Chew-Wun; Shyr, Yi-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Background Minimally invasive surgery, including laparoscopic and robotic gastrectomy, has become more popular in the treatment of gastric cancer. However, few studies have compared the learning curves between laparoscopic and robotic gastrectomy for gastric cancer. Methods Data were prospectively collected between July 2008 and Aug 2014. A total of 145 patients underwent minimally invasive gastrectomy for gastric cancer by a single surgeon, including 73 laparoscopic and 72 robotic gastrectomies. The clinicopathologic characteristics, operative outcomes and learning curves were compared between the two groups. Results Compared with the laparoscopic group, the robotic group was associated with less blood loss and longer operative time. After the surgeon learning curves were overcome for each technique, the operative outcomes became similar between the two groups except longer operative time in the robotic group. After accumulating more cases of robotic gastrectomy, the operative time in the laparoscopic group decreased dramatically. Conclusions After overcoming the learning curves, the operative outcomes became similar between laparoscopic and robotic gastrectomy. The experience of robotic gastrectomy could affect the learning process of laparoscopic gastrectomy. PMID:25360767

  7. Tissue adhesive skills study: the physician learning curve.

    PubMed

    Lin, Michelle; Coates, Wendy C; Lewis, Roger J

    2004-04-01

    To compare 2 educational approaches (structured group session vs. individual instruction) of learning application techniques of 2-octylcyanoacrylate (OCA) on wounds repaired in the emergency department. This prospective, nonrandomized, observational study was conducted in an urban hospital emergency department. Medical students, residents, and faculty were trained in the use of OCA either in a standardized group session or individually, based on their availability to attend the group session. Physicians completed a data collection form that included wound characteristics, type of instruction, and number of lacerations previously repaired with OCA. Impressions of time required, difficulty, and postrepair cosmesis were each recorded on a 5-point Likert scale. The 3 scales were totaled to yield a 15-point summary outcome measure. Univariate nonparametric comparisons of measures were performed between physicians with and without group instruction and between those with and without prior OCA experience. Using 35 subjects in each group, this study had a power of 0.95 to detect a difference of 1.5 points in the 15-point summary score, using alpha = 0.05. Eighty-one subjects were enrolled; the median summary score was 13 (IQR 12 to 15). There was no statistically significant difference in the summary score, nor any of its 3 components (time saved, difficulty, cosmesis), when comparing physicians with and without group instruction, nor when comparing first-time users to those with prior experience. OCA application is an easily acquired skill. Physicians were satisfied with their proficiency in OCA application, regardless of type of instruction received or number of previous lacerations repaired with OCA.

  8. Assessment of Surgical Learning Curves in Transoral Robotic Surgery for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx

    PubMed Central

    Albergotti, William G.; Gooding, William E.; Kubik, Mark W.; Geltzeiler, Mathew; Kim, Seungwon; Duvvuri, Umamaheswar; Ferris, Robert L.

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) is increasingly employed as a treatment option for squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx (OPSCC). Measures of surgical learning curves are needed particularly as clinical trials using this technology continue to evolve. OBJECTIVE To assess learning curves for the oncologic TORS surgeon and to identify the number of cases needed to identify the learning phase. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A retrospective review of all patients who underwent TORS for OPSCC at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center between March 2010 and March 2016. Cases were excluded for involvement of a subsite outside of the oropharynx, for nonmalignant abnormality or nonsquamous histology, unknown primary, no tumor in the main specimen, free flap reconstruction, and for an inability to define margin status. EXPOSURES Transoral robotic surgery for OPSCC. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Primary learning measures defined by the authors include the initial and final margin status and time to resection of main surgical specimen. A cumulative sum learning curve was developed for each surgeon for each of the study variables. The inflection point of each surgeon’s curve was considered to be the point signaling the completion of the learning phase. RESULTS There were 382 transoral robotic procedures identified. Of 382 cases, 160 met our inclusion criteria: 68 for surgeon A, 37 for surgeon B, and 55 for surgeon C. Of the 160 included patients, 125 were men and 35 were women. The mean (SD) age of participants was 59.4 (9.5) years. Mean (SD) time to resection including robot set-up was 79 (36) minutes. The inflection points for the final margin status learning curves were 27 cases (surgeon A) and 25 cases (surgeon C). There was no inflection point for surgeon B for final margin status. Inflection points for mean time to resection were: 39 cases (surgeon A), 30 cases (surgeon B), and 27 cases (surgeon C). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Using metrics of

  9. Unskilled unawareness and the learning curve in robotic spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Schatlo, Bawarjan; Martinez, Ramon; Alaid, Awad; von Eckardstein, Kajetan; Akhavan-Sigari, Reza; Hahn, Anina; Stockhammer, Florian; Rohde, Veit

    2015-10-01

    Robotic assistance for the placement of pedicle screws has been established as a safe technique. Nonetheless rare instances of screw misplacement have been reported.The aim of the present retrospective study is to assess whether experience and time affect the accuracy of screws placed with the help of the SpineAssist™ robot system. Postoperative computed tomography (CT) scans of 258 patients requiring thoracolumbar pedicle screw instrumentation from 2008 to 2013 were reviewed. Overall, 13 surgeons performed the surgeries. A pedicle breach of >3 mm was graded as a misplacement. Surgeons were dichotomised into an early and experienced period in increments of five surgeries. In 258 surgeries, 1,265 pedicle screws were placed with the aid of the robot system. Overall, 1,217 screws (96.2 %) were graded as acceptable. When displayed by surgeon, the development of percent misplacement rates peaked between 5 and 25 surgeries in 12 of 13 surgeons. The overall misplacement rate in the first five surgeries was 2.4 % (6/245). The misplacement rate rose to 6.3 % between 11 and 15 surgeries (10/158; p = 0.20), and reached a significant peak between 16 and 20 surgeries with a rate of 7.1 % (8/112; p = 0.03). Afterwards, misplacement rates declined. A major peak in screw inaccuracies occurred between cases 10 and 20, and a second, smaller one at about 40 surgeries. One potential explanation could be a transition from decreased supervision (unskilled but aware) to increased confidence of a surgeon (unskilled but unaware) who adopts this new technique prior to mastering it (skilled). We therefore advocate ensuring competent supervision for new surgeons at least during the first 25 procedures of robotic spine surgery to optimise the accuracy of robot-assisted pedicle screws.

  10. The Early Years: Development, Learning and Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boulton-Lewis, Gillian, Ed.; Catherwood, Di, Ed.

    Designed for teachers, students, caregivers, and health professionals who work with children from birth to age 8, this book provides a review of recent research and theories of development and learning in the early childhood years, with an emphasis on implications for effective teaching. Where appropriate, the book takes an Australian perspective,…

  11. Assessing Vocabulary Learning in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Jessica L.; Teale, William H.; Paciga, Kathleen A.

    2014-01-01

    There is widespread agreement with in the field of early childhood education that vocabulary is important to literacy achievement and that reading aloud can support vocabulary growth. However, there are unexplored and significant problems with the ways we assess young children's vocabulary learning from read-alouds. This paper critically reviews…

  12. Technical Report: Kindergarten Early Learning Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley-Ayers, Shannon; Jung, Kwanghee; Quinn, Jorie

    2014-01-01

    The Kindergarten Early Learning Scale (KELS) was developed as a concise observational assessment for young children. It examines three domains including (1) Math/Science, (2) Social Emotional/Social Studies, and (3) Language and Literacy, with a total of 10 items across the domains. Scores reported for each of the 10 items are based upon…

  13. Establishing the Learning Curve of Robotic Sacral Colpopexy in a Start-up Robotics Program.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shefali; Calixte, Rose; Finamore, Peter S

    2016-01-01

    To determine the learning curve of the following segments of a robotic sacral colpopexy: preoperative setup, operative time, postoperative transition, and room turnover. A retrospective cohort study to determine the number of cases needed to reach points of efficiency in the various segments of a robotic sacral colpopexy (Canadian Task Force II-2). A university-affiliated community hospital. Women who underwent robotic sacral colpopexy at our institution from 2009 to 2013 comprise the study population. Patient characteristics and operative reports were extracted from a patient database that has been maintained since the inception of the robotics program at Winthrop University Hospital and electronic medical records. Based on additional procedures performed, 4 groups of patients were created (A-D). Learning curves for each of the segment times of interest were created using penalized basis spline (B-spline) regression. Operative time was further analyzed using an inverse curve and sequential grouping. A total of 176 patients were eligible. Nonparametric tests detected no difference in procedure times between the 4 groups (A-D) of patients. The preoperative and postoperative points of efficiency were 108 and 118 cases, respectively. The operative points of proficiency and efficiency were 25 and 36 cases, respectively. Operative time was further analyzed using an inverse curve that revealed that after 11 cases the surgeon had reached 90% of the learning plateau. Sequential grouping revealed no significant improvement in operative time after 60 cases. Turnover time could not be assessed because of incomplete data. There is a difference in the operative time learning curve for robotic sacral colpopexy depending on the statistical analysis used. The learning curve of the operative segment showed an improvement in operative time between 25 and 36 cases when using B-spline regression. When the data for operative time was fit to an inverse curve, a learning rate of 11 cases

  14. An exploratory analysis of personality, attitudes, and study skills on the learning curve within a team-based learning environment.

    PubMed

    Persky, Adam M; Henry, Teague; Campbell, Ashley

    2015-03-25

    To examine factors that determine the interindividual variability of learning within a team-based learning environment. Students in a pharmacokinetics course were given 4 interim, low-stakes cumulative assessments throughout the semester and a cumulative final examination. Students' Myers-Briggs personality type was assessed, as well as their study skills, motivations, and attitudes towards team-learning. A latent curve model (LCM) was applied and various covariates were assessed to improve the regression model. A quadratic LCM was applied for the first 4 assessments to predict final examination performance. None of the covariates examined significantly impacted the regression model fit except metacognitive self-regulation, which explained some of the variability in the rate of learning. There were some correlations between personality type and attitudes towards team learning, with introverts having a lower opinion of team-learning than extroverts. The LCM could readily describe the learning curve. Extroverted and introverted personality types had the same learning performance even though preference for team-learning was lower in introverts. Other personality traits, study skills, or practice did not significantly contribute to the learning variability in this course.

  15. An Exploratory Analysis of Personality, Attitudes, and Study Skills on the Learning Curve within a Team-based Learning Environment

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Teague; Campbell, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To examine factors that determine the interindividual variability of learning within a team-based learning environment. Methods. Students in a pharmacokinetics course were given 4 interim, low-stakes cumulative assessments throughout the semester and a cumulative final examination. Students’ Myers-Briggs personality type was assessed, as well as their study skills, motivations, and attitudes towards team-learning. A latent curve model (LCM) was applied and various covariates were assessed to improve the regression model. Results. A quadratic LCM was applied for the first 4 assessments to predict final examination performance. None of the covariates examined significantly impacted the regression model fit except metacognitive self-regulation, which explained some of the variability in the rate of learning. There were some correlations between personality type and attitudes towards team learning, with introverts having a lower opinion of team-learning than extroverts. Conclusion. The LCM could readily describe the learning curve. Extroverted and introverted personality types had the same learning performance even though preference for team-learning was lower in introverts. Other personality traits, study skills, or practice did not significantly contribute to the learning variability in this course. PMID:25861101

  16. Diffusion of robotics into clinical practice in the United States: process, patient safety, learning curves, and the public health.

    PubMed

    Mirheydar, Hossein S; Parsons, J Kellogg

    2013-06-01

    Robotic technology disseminated into urological practice without robust comparative effectiveness data. To review the diffusion of robotic surgery into urological practice. We performed a comprehensive literature review focusing on diffusion patterns, patient safety, learning curves, and comparative costs for robotic radical prostatectomy, partial nephrectomy, and radical cystectomy. Robotic urologic surgery diffused in patterns typical of novel technology spreading among practicing surgeons. Robust evidence-based data comparing outcomes of robotic to open surgery were sparse. Although initial Level 3 evidence for robotic prostatectomy observed complication outcomes similar to open prostatectomy, subsequent population-based Level 2 evidence noted an increased prevalence of adverse patient safety events and genitourinary complications among robotic patients during the early years of diffusion. Level 2 evidence indicated comparable to improved patient safety outcomes for robotic compared to open partial nephrectomy and cystectomy. Learning curve recommendations for robotic urologic surgery have drawn exclusively on Level 4 evidence and subjective, non-validated metrics. The minimum number of cases required to achieve competency for robotic prostatectomy has increased to unrealistically high levels. Most comparative cost-analyses have demonstrated that robotic surgery is significantly more expensive than open or laparoscopic surgery. Evidence-based data are limited but suggest an increased prevalence of adverse patient safety events for robotic prostatectomy early in the national diffusion period. Learning curves for robotic urologic surgery are subjective and based on non-validated metrics. The urological community should develop rigorous, evidence-based processes by which future technological innovations may diffuse in an organized and safe manner.

  17. The SOURCE Registry: what is the learning curve in trans-apical aortic valve implantation?

    PubMed

    Wendler, Olaf; Walther, Thomas; Schroefel, Holger; Lange, Rüdiger; Treede, Hendrik; Fusari, Melissa; Rubino, Paolo; Thomas, Martyn

    2011-06-01

    Trans-apical aortic valve implantation (TA-AVI) has been shown to be a reproducible technique. Early results from the SAPIEN Aortic Bioprosthesis European Outcome (SOURCE) Registry identified major access complications associated with high 30-day mortality. Using the SOURCE Registry, we analyze the learning curve for TA-AVI over the first 2 years after commercialization. The SOURCE Registry gathered data for 2 consecutive years at European centers following commercialization of the Edwards SAPIEN bioprosthesis, totaling 2339 patients (1038 in COHORT 1 and 1301 in COHORT 2). Only data from centers that provided all of their consecutively treated patients were included in this study. We compared the 30-day results of TA-AVI from COHORT 1 (C-1: January/2008-January/2009) with the 30-day results of COHORT 2 (C-2: February/2009-January/2010). This analysis is based on a total number of 575 TA-AVIs in C-1 and 819 TA-AVIs in C-2. Mean age (C-1: 80.7 years, C-2: 80.5 years) and logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE) (C-1: 29.1%, C-2 27.3%) were not significantly different. Valve malposition (C-1: 1.6%, C-2: 1.2%), valve migration/embolization (C-1: 0.5%, C-2: 1.0%), and major access complications (C-1: 2.1%, C-2: 1.8%) were in total less frequent, but not statistically significant lower in C-2. However, the reduction of aortic regurgitation >2+ immediately following the procedure (C-1: 4.52%, C-2: 2.1%, p=0.011) and conversion rate to open surgery (C-1: 3.7%, C-2: 1.5%, p=0.0315) reached statistical significance. Postoperative complications included dialysis (C-1: 7.0%, C-2: 5.7%, p=ns), pacemaker implantation (C-2: 7.7%, C-2: 6.7%, p=ns), stroke (C-1: 2.4%, C-2: 2.6%, p=ns), and myocardial infarct (C-1: 0.7%, C-2: 0.4%, p=ns). The total 30-day mortality was 10.8% and not significantly different between the two groups (C-1: 10.8%, C-2: 10.7%, p=ns). Although the incidence of technical intra procedural complications has trended downward

  18. Why the Kantian ideal survives medical learning curves, and why it matters.

    PubMed

    Brecher, B

    2006-09-01

    The "Kantian ideal" is often misunderstood as invoking individual autonomy rather than rational self legislation. Le Morvan and Stock's otherwise insightful discussion of "Medical learning curves and the Kantian ideal"--for example--draws the mistaken inference that that ideal is inconsistent with the realities of medical practice. But it is not. Rationally to be a patient entails accepting its necessary conditions.

  19. Using Technology in Teacher Preparation: Two Mature Teacher Educators Negotiate the Steep Learning Curve

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe, Eula; Tolman, Marvin

    2004-01-01

    This paper chronicles the ventures of two mature faculty members who continue to negotiate their own steep learning curves in helping teacher education students use current technology. It describes the scaffolding provided within the university setting for the faculty members' growth. Included are elements supported by a PT3 grant that have…

  20. Using Machine Learning To Predict Which Light Curves Will Yield Stellar Rotation Periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agüeros, Marcel; Teachey, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    Using time-domain photometry to reliably measure a solar-type star's rotation period requires that its light curve have a number of favorable characteristics. The probability of recovering a period will be a non-linear function of these light curve features, which are either astrophysical in nature or set by the observations. We employ standard machine learning algorithms (artificial neural networks and random forests) to predict whether a given light curve will produce a robust rotation period measurement from its Lomb-Scargle periodogram. The algorithms are trained and validated using salient statistics extracted from both simulated light curves and their corresponding periodograms, and we apply these classifiers to the most recent Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) data release. With this pipeline, we anticipate measuring rotation periods for a significant fraction of the ∼4x108 stars in the iPTF footprint.

  1. Assessing the Classification Accuracy of Early Numeracy Curriculum-Based Measures Using Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laracy, Seth D.; Hojnoski, Robin L.; Dever, Bridget V.

    2016-01-01

    Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis was used to investigate the ability of early numeracy curriculum-based measures (EN-CBM) administered in preschool to predict performance below the 25th and 40th percentiles on a quantity discrimination measure in kindergarten. Areas under the curve derived from a sample of 279 students ranged…

  2. Robotic radical prostatectomy learning curve of a fellowship-trained laparoscopic surgeon.

    PubMed

    Zorn, Kevin C; Orvieto, Marcelo A; Gong, Edward M; Mikhail, Albert A; Gofrit, Ofer N; Zagaja, Gregory P; Shalhav, Arieh L

    2007-04-01

    Several experienced practitioners of open surgery with limited or no laparoscopic background have adopted robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RLRP) as an alternative to open radical prostatectomy (RRP), demonstrating outcomes comparable to those in large RRP and laparoscopic prostatectomy series. Thus, the significance of prior laparoscopic skills seems unclear. The learning curve, with respect to operative time and complications, in the hands of a devoted laparoscopic surgeon has not been critically assessed. We evaluated the learning curve of a highly experienced laparoscopic surgeon in achieving expertise with RLRP. We prospectively evaluated 150 consecutive patients undergoing RLRP by a single surgeon between March 2003 and September 2005. The first 25 cases were performed with the assistance of a surgeon experienced in open RRP. Data were compared for the first, second, and third groups of 50 cases. Demographic data were similar for the three groups. Urinary and sexual function data were evaluated subjectively and objectively using the RAND-36v2 Survey and the UCLA PCI preoperatively and at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. The mean operative time, blood loss, and conversion rate decreased significantly with increasing experience. All open conversions occurred during the first 25 cases. Intraoperative and postoperative complication rates were similar among groups. Although the differences were not significant, urinary and sexual function recovery improved with experience. The RLRP learning curve for a fellowship-trained laparoscopic surgeon seems to be similar to that of laparoscopically naive yet experienced practitioners of open RRP. The RLRP is safe and reproducible and even during the learning curve can produce results similar to those reported in large RRP series. The importance of assistance by an experienced open RRP surgeon during the learning curve cannot be overemphasized.

  3. Robotic partial nephrectomy - Evaluation of the impact of case mix on the procedural learning curve.

    PubMed

    Roman, A; Ahmed, K; Challacombe, B

    2016-05-01

    Although Robotic partial nephrectomy (RPN) is an emerging technique for the management of small renal masses, this approach is technically demanding. To date, there is limited data on the nature and progression of the learning curve in RPN. To analyse the impact of case mix on the RPN LC and to model the learning curve. The records of the first 100 RPN performed, were analysed at our institution that were carried out by a single surgeon (B.C) (June 2010-December 2013). Cases were split based on their Preoperative Aspects and Dimensions Used for an Anatomical (PADUA) score into the following groups: 6-7, 8-9 and >10. Using a split group (20 patients in each group) and incremental analysis, the mean, the curve of best fit and R(2) values were calculated for each group. Of 100 patients (F:28, M:72), the mean age was 56.4 ± 11.9 years. The number of patients in each PADUA score groups: 6-7, 8-9 and >10 were 61, 32 and 7 respectively. An increase in incidence of more complex cases throughout the cohort was evident within the 8-9 group (2010: 1 case, 2013: 16 cases). The learning process did not significantly affect the proxies used to assess surgical proficiency in this study (operative time and warm ischaemia time). Case difficulty is an important parameter that should be considered when evaluating procedural learning curves. There is not one well fitting model that can be used to model the learning curve. With increasing experience, clinicians tend to operate on more difficult cases. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Early Learning Foundations. Indiana's Early Learning Development Framework Aligned to the Indiana Academic Standards, 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The "Foundations" (English/language arts, mathematics, social emotional skills, approaches to play and learning, science, social studies, creative arts, and physical health and growth) are Indiana's early learning development framework and are aligned to the 2014 Indiana Academic Standards. This framework provides core elements that…

  5. The learning curves in living donor hemiliver graft procurement using small upper midline incision.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Toru; Harimoto, Norifumi; Shimokawa, Masahiro; Yoshizumi, Tomoharu; Uchiyama, Hideaki; Itoh, Shinji; Okabe, Norihisa; Sakata, Kazuhito; Nagatsu, Akihisa; Soejima, Yuji; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2016-12-01

    The learning curve for performing living donor hemiliver procurement (LDHP) via small upper midline incision (UMI) has not been determined. Living donors (n=101) who underwent LDHP via UMI were included to investigate the learning curve using cumulative sum analysis. The cumulative sum analysis showed that nine cases for right lobe (case #23) and 19 cases for left lobe (case #32 in the whole series) are needed for stable and acceptable surgical outcomes in LDHP via UMI. The established phase (n=69, since case #33) had a significantly shorter operative time, a smaller incision size, and less blood loss than the previous learning phase (n=32, serial case number up to the last 19th left lobe case). Multivariate analysis showed that the learning phase, high body mass index ≥25 kg/m 2 , and left lobe graft procurement are the factors associated with surgical events including operative blood loss ≥400 mL, operative time ≥300 minutes, or surgical complications ≥Clavien-Dindo grade II. There is an obvious learning curve in performing LDHP via UMI, and 32 cases including both 19 cases for left lobe and nine cases for right lobe are needed for having stable and acceptable surgical outcomes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Autoshaped head poking in the mouse: a quantitative analysis of the learning curve.

    PubMed

    Papachristos, Efstathios B; Gallistel, C R

    2006-05-01

    In autoshaping experiments, we quantified the acquisition of anticipatory head poking in individual mice, using an algorithm that finds changes in the slope of a cumulative record. In most mice, upward changes in the amount of anticipatory poking per trial were abrupt, and tended to occur at session boundaries, suggesting that the session is as significant a unit of experience as the trial. There were large individual differences in the latency to the onset of vigorous responding. "Asymptotic" performance was unstable; large, bidirectional, and relatively enduring changes were common. Given the characteristics of the individual learning curves, it is unlikely that physiologically meaningful estimates of rate of learning can be extracted from group-average learning curves.

  7. Autoshaped Head Poking in the Mouse: A Quantitative Analysis of the Learning Curve

    PubMed Central

    Papachristos, Efstathios B; Gallistel, C.R

    2006-01-01

    In autoshaping experiments, we quantified the acquisition of anticipatory head poking in individual mice, using an algorithm that finds changes in the slope of a cumulative record. In most mice, upward changes in the amount of anticipatory poking per trial were abrupt, and tended to occur at session boundaries, suggesting that the session is as significant a unit of experience as the trial. There were large individual differences in the latency to the onset of vigorous responding. “Asymptotic” performance was unstable; large, bidirectional, and relatively enduring changes were common. Given the characteristics of the individual learning curves, it is unlikely that physiologically meaningful estimates of rate of learning can be extracted from group-average learning curves. PMID:16776053

  8. Predicting Robust Learning with the Visual Form of the Moment-by-Moment Learning Curve

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Ryan S.; Hershkovitz, Arnon; Rossi, Lisa M.; Goldstein, Adam B.; Gowda, Sujith M.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new method for analyzing a student's learning over time for a specific skill: analysis of the graph of the student's moment-by-moment learning over time. Moment-by-moment learning is calculated using a data-mined model that assesses the probability that a student learned a skill or concept at a specific time during learning (Baker,…

  9. Training, Simulation, the Learning Curve, and How to Reduce Complications in Urology.

    PubMed

    Brunckhorst, Oliver; Volpe, Alessandro; van der Poel, Henk; Mottrie, Alexander; Ahmed, Kamran

    2016-04-01

    Urology is at the forefront of minimally invasive surgery to a great extent. These procedures produce additional learning challenges and possess a steep initial learning curve. Training and assessment methods in surgical specialties such as urology are known to lack clear structure and often rely on differing operative flow experienced by individuals and institutions. This article aims to assess current urology training modalities, to identify the role of simulation within urology, to define and identify the learning curves for various urologic procedures, and to discuss ways to decrease complications in the context of training. A narrative review of the literature was conducted through December 2015 using the PubMed/Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases. Evidence of the validity of training methods in urology includes observation of a procedure, mentorship and fellowship, e-learning, and simulation-based training. Learning curves for various urologic procedures have been recommended based on the available literature. The importance of structured training pathways is highlighted, with integration of modular training to ensure patient safety. Valid training pathways are available in urology. The aim in urology training should be to combine all of the available evidence to produce procedure-specific curricula that utilise the vast array of training methods available to ensure that we continue to improve patient outcomes and reduce complications. The current evidence for different training methods available in urology, including simulation-based training, was reviewed, and the learning curves for various urologic procedures were critically analysed. Based on the evidence, future pathways for urology curricula have been suggested to ensure that patient safety is improved. Copyright © 2016 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Robotic thyroidectomy learning curve for beginning surgeons with little or no experience of endoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Hyun; Lee, Jandee; Hakim, Nor Azham; Kim, Ha Yan; Kang, Sang-Wook; Jeong, Jong Ju; Nam, Kee-Hyun; Bae, Keum-Seok; Kang, Seong Joon; Chung, Woong Youn

    2015-12-01

    This study assessed the results of robotic thyroidectomy by fellowship-trained surgeons in their initial independent practice, and whether standard fellowship training for robotic surgery shortens the learning curve. This prospective cohort study evaluated outcomes in 125 patients who underwent robotic thyroidectomy using gasless transaxillary single-incision technique by 2 recently graduated fellowship-trained surgeons. Learning curves were analyzed by operation time, with proficiency defined as the point at which the slope of the time curve became less steep. Of the 125 patients, 113 underwent robotic less-than-total thyroidectomy, 9 underwent robotic total thyroidectomy and 3 underwent robotic total thyroidectomy with modified radical neck dissection. Mean total times for these 3 operations were 100.8 ± 20.6 minutes, 134.2 ± 38.7 minutes, and 284.7 ± 60.4 minutes, respectively. For both surgeons, the operation times gradually decreased, reaching a plateau after 20 robotic less-than-total thyroidectomies. The surgical learning curve for robotic thyroidectomy performed by recently graduated fellowship-trained surgeons with little or no experience in endoscopic surgery showed excellent results compared with those in a large series of more experienced surgeons. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Laparoscopic recurrent inguinal hernia repair during the learning curve: it can be done?

    PubMed

    Bracale, Umberto; Sciuto, Antonio; Andreuccetti, Jacopo; Merola, Giovanni; Pecchia, Leandro; Melillo, Paolo; Pignata, Giusto

    2017-01-01

    Trans-Abdominal Preperitoneal Patch (TAPP) repairs for Recurrent Hernia (RH) is a technically demanding procedure. It has to be performed only by surgeons with extensive experience in the laparoscopic approach. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the surgical safety and the efficacy of TAPP for RH performed in a tutoring program by surgeons in practice (SP). All TAPP repairs for RH performed by the same surgical team have been included in the study. We have evaluated the results of three SP during their learning curve in a tutoring program. Then these results have been compared to those of a highly experienced laparoscopic surgeon (Benchmark). A total of 530 TAPP repairs have been performed. Among these, 83 TAPP have been executed for RH, of which 43 by the Benchmark and 40 by the SP. When we have compared the outcomes of the Benchmark with those of SP, no significant difference has been observed about morbidity and recurrence while the operative time has been significantly longer for the SP. No intraoperative complications have occurred. International guidelines urge that TAPP repair for RH has to be performed only by surgeons with extensive experience in the laparoscopic approach. The results of the present study demonstrate that TAPP for RH could be performed also by surgeons in training during a learning program. We retain that an adequate tutoring program could lead a surgeon in practice to perform more complex hernia procedures without jeopardizing patient safety throughout the learning curve period. Laparoscopy, Learning Curve, Recurrent Hernia.

  12. Non-Constant Learning Rates in Retrospective Experience Curve Analyses and their Correlation to Deployment Programs

    SciT

    Wei, Max; Smith, Sarah J.; Sohn, Michael D.

    2015-07-16

    A key challenge for policy-makers and technology market forecasters is to estimate future technology costs and in particular the rate of cost reduction versus production volume. A related, critical question is what role should state and federal governments have in advancing energy efficient and renewable energy technologies? This work provides retrospective experience curves and learning rates for several energy-related technologies, each of which have a known history of federal and state deployment programs. We derive learning rates for eight technologies including energy efficient lighting technologies, stationary fuel cell systems, and residential solar photovoltaics, and provide an overview and timeline ofmore » historical deployment programs such as state and federal standards and state and national incentive programs for each technology. Piecewise linear regimes are observed in a range of technology experience curves, and public investments or deployment programs are found to be strongly correlated to an increase in learning rate across multiple technologies. A downward bend in the experience curve is found in 5 out of the 8 energy-related technologies presented here (electronic ballasts, magnetic ballasts, compact fluorescent lighting, general service fluorescent lighting, and the installed cost of solar PV). In each of the five downward-bending experience curves, we believe that an increase in the learning rate can be linked to deployment programs to some degree. This work sheds light on the endogenous versus exogenous contributions to technological innovation and highlights the impact of exogenous government sponsored deployment programs. This work can inform future policy investment direction and can shed light on market transformation and technology learning behavior.« less

  13. Does my high blood pressure improve your survival? Overall and subgroup learning curves in health.

    PubMed

    Van Gestel, Raf; Müller, Tobias; Bosmans, Johan

    2017-09-01

    Learning curves in health are of interest for a wide range of medical disciplines, healthcare providers, and policy makers. In this paper, we distinguish between three types of learning when identifying overall learning curves: economies of scale, learning from cumulative experience, and human capital depreciation. In addition, we approach the question of how treating more patients with specific characteristics predicts provider performance. To soften collinearity problems, we explore the use of least absolute shrinkage and selection operator regression as a variable selection method and Theil-Goldberger mixed estimation to augment the available information. We use data from the Belgian Transcatheter Aorta Valve Implantation (TAVI) registry, containing information on the first 860 TAVI procedures in Belgium. We find that treating an additional TAVI patient is associated with an increase in the probability of 2-year survival by about 0.16%-points. For adverse events like renal failure and stroke, we find that an extra day between procedures is associated with an increase in the probability for these events by 0.12%-points and 0.07%-points, respectively. Furthermore, we find evidence for positive learning effects from physicians' experience with defibrillation, treating patients with hypertension, and the use of certain types of replacement valves during the TAVI procedure. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Evaluation of the learning curve for external cephalic version using cumulative sum analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, So Yun; Chang, Eun Hye; Kwak, Dong Wook; Ahn, Hyun Kyung; Ryu, Hyun Mi; Kim, Moon Young

    2017-01-01

    Objective We evaluated the learning curve for external cephalic version (ECV) using learning curve-cumulative sum (LC-CUSUM) analysis. Methods This was a retrospective study involving 290 consecutive cases between October 2013 and March 2017. We evaluated the learning curve for ECV on nulli and over para 1 group using LC-CUSUM analysis on the assumption that 50% and 70% of ECV procedures succeeded by description a trend-line of quadratic function with reliable R2 values. Results The overall success rate for ECV was 64.8% (188/290), while the success rate for nullipara and over para 1 groups was 56.2% (100/178) and 78.6% (88/112), respectively. ‘H’ value, that the actual failure rate does not differ from the acceptable failure rate, was −3.27 and −1.635 when considering ECV success rates of 50% and 70%, respectively. Consequently, in order to obtain a consistent 50% success rate, we would require 57 nullipara cases, and in order to obtain a consistent 70% success rate, we would require 130 nullipara cases. In contrast, 8 to 10 over para 1 cases would be required for an expected success rate of 50% and 70% on over para 1 group. Conclusion Even a relatively inexperienced physician can experience success with multipara and after accumulating experience, they will manage nullipara cases. Further research is required for LC-CUSUM involving several practitioners instead of a single practitioner. This will lead to the gradual implementation of standard learning curve guidelines for ECV. PMID:28791265

  15. The Predictive Value of Ultrasound Learning Curves Across Simulated and Clinical Settings.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Mette E; Nørgaard, Lone N; Tabor, Ann; Konge, Lars; Ringsted, Charlotte; Tolsgaard, Martin G

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore whether learning curves on a virtual-reality (VR) sonographic simulator can be used to predict subsequent learning curves on a physical mannequin and learning curves during clinical training. Twenty midwives completed a simulation-based training program in transvaginal sonography. The training was conducted on a VR simulator as well as on a physical mannequin. A subgroup of 6 participants underwent subsequent clinical training. During each of the 3 steps, the participants' performance was assessed using instruments with established validity evidence, and they advanced to the next level only after attaining predefined levels of performance. The number of repetitions and time needed to achieve predefined performance levels were recorded along with the performance scores in each setting. Finally, the outcomes were correlated across settings. A good correlation was found between time needed to achieve predefined performance levels on the VR simulator and the physical mannequin (Pearson correlation coefficient .78; P < .001). Performance scores on the VR simulator correlated well to the clinical performance scores (Pearson correlation coefficient .81; P = .049). No significant correlations were found between numbers of attempts needed to reach proficiency across the 3 different settings. A post hoc analysis found that the 50% fastest trainees at reaching proficiency during simulation-based training received higher clinical performance scores compared to trainees with scores placing them among the 50% slowest (P = .025). Performances during simulation-based sonography training may predict performance in related tasks and subsequent clinical learning curves. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  16. Evaluation of the learning curve for external cephalic version using cumulative sum analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, So Yun; Han, Jung Yeol; Chang, Eun Hye; Kwak, Dong Wook; Ahn, Hyun Kyung; Ryu, Hyun Mi; Kim, Moon Young

    2017-07-01

    We evaluated the learning curve for external cephalic version (ECV) using learning curve-cumulative sum (LC-CUSUM) analysis. This was a retrospective study involving 290 consecutive cases between October 2013 and March 2017. We evaluated the learning curve for ECV on nulli and over para 1 group using LC-CUSUM analysis on the assumption that 50% and 70% of ECV procedures succeeded by description a trend-line of quadratic function with reliable R 2 values. The overall success rate for ECV was 64.8% (188/290), while the success rate for nullipara and over para 1 groups was 56.2% (100/178) and 78.6% (88/112), respectively. 'H' value, that the actual failure rate does not differ from the acceptable failure rate, was -3.27 and -1.635 when considering ECV success rates of 50% and 70%, respectively. Consequently, in order to obtain a consistent 50% success rate, we would require 57 nullipara cases, and in order to obtain a consistent 70% success rate, we would require 130 nullipara cases. In contrast, 8 to 10 over para 1 cases would be required for an expected success rate of 50% and 70% on over para 1 group. Even a relatively inexperienced physician can experience success with multipara and after accumulating experience, they will manage nullipara cases. Further research is required for LC-CUSUM involving several practitioners instead of a single practitioner. This will lead to the gradual implementation of standard learning curve guidelines for ECV.

  17. Urgent and Elective Robotic Single-Site Cholecystectomy: Analysis and Learning Curve of 150 Consecutive Cases.

    PubMed

    Kubat, Eric; Hansen, Nathan; Nguyen, Huy; Wren, Sherry M; Eisenberg, Dan

    2016-03-01

    The use of robotic single-site cholecystectomy has increased exponentially. There are few reports describing the safety, efficacy, and operative learning curve of robotic single-site cholecystectomy either in the community setting or with nonelective surgery. We performed a retrospective review of a prospective database of our initial experience with robotic single-site cholecystectomy. Demographics and perioperative outcomes were evaluated for both urgent and elective cholecystectomy. Cumulative sum analysis was performed to determine the surgeon's learning curve. One hundred fifty patients underwent robotic single-site cholecystectomy. Seventy-four (49.3%) patients underwent urgent robotic single-site cholecystectomy, and 76 (50.7%) underwent elective robotic single-site cholecystectomy. Mean total operative time for robotic single-site cholecystectomy was 83.3 ± 2.7 minutes. Mean operative time for the urgent cohort was significantly longer than for the elective cohort (95.0 ± 4.4 versus 71.9 ± 2.6 minutes; P < .001). There was one conversion in the urgent cohort and none in the elective cohort. There was one bile duct injury (0.7%) in the urgent cohort. Perioperative complications occurred in 8.7% of patients, and most consisted of superficial surgical-site infections. There were no incisional hernias detected. The surgeon's learning curve, inclusive of urgent and elective cases, was 48 operations. Robotic single-site cholecystectomy can be performed safely and effectively in both elective and urgent cholecystectomy with a reasonable learning curve and acceptable perioperative outcomes.

  18. Why the Kantian ideal survives medical learning curves, and why it matters

    PubMed Central

    Brecher, B

    2006-01-01

    The “Kantian ideal” is often misunderstood as invoking individual autonomy rather than rational self legislation. Le Morvan and Stock's otherwise insightful discussion of “Medical learning curves and the Kantian ideal”—for example—draws the mistaken inference that that ideal is inconsistent with the realities of medical practice. But it is not. Rationally to be a patient entails accepting its necessary conditions. PMID:16943330

  19. Displays mounted on cutting blocks reduce the learning curve in navigated total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Schnurr, Christoph; Eysel, Peer; König, Dietmar Pierre

    2011-01-01

    The use of computer navigation in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) improves the implant alignment but increases the operation time. Studies have shown that the operation time is further prolonged due to the surgeon's learning curve, and longer operation times have been associated with higher morbidity risks. It has been our hypothesis that an improvement in the human-machine interface might reduce the time required during the learning curve. Accordingly, we asked whether the use of navigation devices with a display fixed on the surgical instruments would reduce the operation time in navigated TKAs performed by navigation beginners. Thirty medical students were randomized and used two navigation devices in rotation: these were the Kolibri® device with an external display and the Dash® device with a display that was fixed on the cutting blocks. The time for adjustment of the tibial and femoral cutting blocks on knee models while using these devices was measured. A significant time reduction was demonstration when the Dash® device was used: The time reduction was 21% for the tibial block (p = 0.007), 40% for the femoral block (p < 0.001), and 32% for the whole procedure (p < 0.001). The integrated display, fixed on surgical instruments in a manner similar to a spirit level, seems to be more user-friendly for navigation beginners. Hence, unproductive time losses during the learning curve may be diminished.

  20. The learning curve of laparoendoscopic single-Site (LESS) fundoplication: definable, short, and safe.

    PubMed

    Ross, Sharona B; Choung, Edward; Teta, Anthony F; Colibao, Lotiffa; Luberice, Kenneth; Paul, Harold; Rosemurgy, Alexander S

    2013-01-01

    This study of laparoendoscopic single-site (LESS) fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux disease was undertaken to determine the "learning curve" for implementing LESS fundoplication. One hundred patients, 38% men, with a median age of 61 years and median body mass index of 26 kg/m(2) , underwent LESS fundoplications. The operative times, placement of additional trocars, conversions to "open" operations, and complications were compared among patient quartiles to establish a learning curve. Median data are reported. The median operative times and complications did not differ among 25-patient cohorts. Additional trocars were placed in 27% of patients, 67% of whom were in the first 25-patient cohort. Patients undergoing LESS fundoplication had a dramatic relief in the frequency and severity of all symptoms of reflux across all cohorts equally (P < .05), particularly for heartburn and regurgitation, without causing dysphagia. LESS fundoplication ameliorates symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease without apparent scarring. Notably, few operations required additional trocars after the first 25-patient cohort. Patient selection became more inclusive (eg, more "redo" fundoplications) with increasing experience, whereas operative times and complications remained relatively unchanged. The learning curve of LESS fundoplication is definable, short, and safe. We believe that patients will seek LESS fundoplication because of the efficacy and superior cosmetic outcomes; surgeons will need to meet this demand.

  1. Experience and learning curve of retroperitoneal laparoscopic ureterolithotomy for upper ureteral calculi.

    PubMed

    Fan, Tianyong; Xian, Peng; Yang, Lu; Liu, Yong; Wei, Qiang; Li, Hong

    2009-11-01

    To summarize our experience and evaluate the learning curve of retroperitoneal laparoscopic ureterolithotomy of the upper ureter. Between May 2004 and May 2007, 40 patients underwent retroperitoneal laparoscopic ureterolithotomy of the upper ureter. We divided the first and last 20 patients into group I and group II. There was no statistical difference in stone size between groups. Operative time and complications were measured as a basis for the assessment of the learning curve. In group I, the complication rate was 15% (3/20), including two patients whose procedure was converted to open surgery because of intraoperative bleeding, and one patient who experienced urine leakage because of a displaced Double-J ureteral stent. In group II, no postoperative complications occurred, while the mean operative time was significantly shorter compared with the earlier operations (65 vs 120 min). Retroperitoneal laparoscopic ureterolithotomy is safe and effective for large or impacted stones of the upper ureter. It is associated with a short learning curve in the setting of an active laparoscopic practice for selected patients.

  2. The learning curve of laparoendoscopic single-site (LESS) cholecystectomy: definable, short, and safe.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Jonathan; Ross, Sharona; Morton, Connor; McFarlin, Kellie; Dahal, Sujat; Golkar, Farhaad; Albrink, Michael; Rosemurgy, Alexander

    2010-11-01

    The applications of laparoendoscopic single-site (LESS) surgery, including cholecystectomy, are occurring quickly, although little is generally known about issues associated with the learning curve of this new technique including operative time, conversion rates, and safety. We prospectively followed all patients undergoing LESS cholecystectomy, and compared operations undertaken at our institutions in cohorts of 25 patients with respect to operative times, conversion rates, and complications. One-hundred fifty patients of mean age 46 years underwent LESS cholecystectomy. No significant differences in operative times were demonstrable between any of the 25-patient cohorts operated on at our institution. A significant reduction in operative times (p < 0.001) after completion of 75 LESS procedures was, however, identified with the experience of a single surgeon. No significant reduction in the number of procedures requiring an additional trocar(s) or conversion to open operations was observed after completion of 25 LESS cholecystectomies. Complication rates were low, and not significantly different between any 25-patient cohorts. For surgeons proficient with multi-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy, the learning curve for LESS cholecystectomy begins near proficiency. Operative complications and conversions were infrequent and unchanged across successive 25-patient cohorts, and were similar to those reported for multi-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy after the learning curve. Copyright © 2010 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Prognostication of Learning Curve on Surgical Management of Vasculobiliary Injuries after Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Faisal Saud; Zia, Haseeb; Rafique, Muhammad Salman; Khan, Nusrat Yar; Salih, Mohammad; Hassan Shah, Najmul

    2016-01-01

    Background. Concomitant vascular injury might adversely impact outcomes after iatrogenic bile duct injury (IBDI). Whether a new HPB center should embark upon repair of complex biliary injuries with associated vascular injuries during learning curve is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine outcome of surgical management of IBDI with and without vascular injuries in a new HPB center during its learning curve. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed patients who underwent surgical management of IBDI at our center. A total of 39 patients were included. Patients without (Group 1) and with vascular injuries (Group 2) were compared. Outcome was defined as 90-day morbidity and mortality. Results. Median age was 39 (20–80) years. There were 10 (25.6%) vascular injuries. E2 injuries were associated significantly with high frequency of vascular injuries (66% versus 15.1%) (P = 0.01). Right hepatectomy was performed in three patients. Out of these, two had a right hepatic duct stricture and one patient had combined right arterial and portal venous injury. The number of patients who developed postoperative complications was not significantly different between the two groups (11.1% versus 23.4%) (P = 0.6). Conclusion. Learning curve is not a negative prognostic variable in the surgical management of iatrogenic vasculobiliary injuries after cholecystectomy. PMID:27525124

  4. Learning curve of hysteroscopic placement of tubal sterilization microinserts in 15 gynecologists in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Janse, Juliënne A; Pattij, Thyrza O S; Eijkemans, Marinus J C; Broekmans, Frank J; Veersema, Sebastiaan; Schreuder, Henk W R

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate the learning curve of hysteroscopic placement of tubal sterilization microinserts by gynecologists in the Netherlands. Prospective multicenter study (Canadian Task Force II-2). Ten community (teaching) hospitals in the Netherlands. A total of 631 women who underwent permanent sterilization by tubal microinserts. Hysteroscopic placement of tubal sterilization microinserts performed by 15 gynecologists experienced in performing operative hysteroscopy, starting from their very first placement. Effect of increasing experience in time on procedure time, pain score, successful bilateral placement, and complications. Bilateral successful placement with confirmation of adequate positioning at follow-up evaluation was achieved in 480 (76.1%) patients at first attempt and in 44 (7.0%) at second attempt. Median procedure time was 8.0 minutes (range: 3-40), and 31 (4.9%) patients were lost to follow-up evaluation. Gravidity showed to be a confounding factor and was consequently adjusted for. A learning curve was seen in a statistically significant decrease of procedure time with increasing experience. The decrease in procedure time extended to 11 to 15 cases and was followed by a plateau phase of the subsequent 60 cases. In contrast, pain scores, successful placement, and complication rate appeared not to improve with increasing experience. A learning curve for hysteroscopic tubal sterilization was seen for procedure time, but successful placement, pain score, and complication rate were not clearly influenced by increasing experience. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Evidence for Cocoon Emission from the Early Light Curve of SSS17a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piro, Anthony L.; Kollmeier, Juna A.

    2018-03-01

    Swope Supernova Survey 2017a (SSS17a) was discovered as the first optical counterpart to the gravitational wave event GW170817. Although its light curve on the timescale of weeks roughly matches the expected luminosity and red color of an r-process powered transient, the explanation for the blue emission from high velocity material over the first few days is not as clear. Here we show that the power-law evolution of the luminosity, temperature, and photospheric radius during these early times can be explained by cooling of shock-heated material around the neutron star merger. This heating is likely from the interaction of the gamma-ray burst jet with merger debris, the so-called cocoon emission. We summarize the properties of this emission and provide formulae that can be used to study future detections of shock cooling from merging neutron stars. This argues that optical transient surveys should search for such early, blue light if they wish to find off-axis gamma-ray bursts and double neutron star gravitational wave events as soon as possible after the merger.

  6. Can the learning curve of totally endoscopic robotic mitral valve repair be short-circuited?

    PubMed

    Yaffee, David W; Loulmet, Didier F; Kelly, Lauren A; Ward, Alison F; Ursomanno, Patricia A; Rabinovich, Annette E; Neuburger, Peter J; Krishnan, Sandeep; Hill, Frederick T; Grossi, Eugene A

    2014-01-01

    A concern with the initiation of totally endoscopic robotic mitral valve repair (TERMR) programs has been the risk for the learning curve. To minimize this risk, we initiated a TERMR program with a defined team and structured learning approach before clinical implementation. A dedicated team (two surgeons, one cardiac anesthesiologist, one perfusionist, and two nurses) was trained with clinical scenarios, simulations, wet laboratories, and "expert" observation for 3 months. This team then performed a series of TERMRs of varying complexity. Thirty-two isolated TERMRs were performed during the first programmatic year. All operations included mitral valve repair, left atrial appendage exclusion, and annuloplasty device implantation. Additional procedures included leaflet resection, neochordae insertion, atrial ablation, and papillary muscle shortening. Longer clamp times were associated with number of neochordae (P < 0.01), papillary muscle procedures (P < 0.01), and leaflet resection (P = 0.06). Sequential case number had no impact on cross-clamp time (P = 0.3). Analysis of nonclamp time demonstrated a 71.3% learning percentage (P < 0.01; ie, 28.7% reduction in nonclamp time with each doubling of case number). There were no hospital deaths or incidences of stroke, myocardial infarction, unplanned reoperation, respiratory failure, or renal failure. Median length of stay was 4 days. All patients were discharged home. Totally endoscopic robotic mitral valve repair can be safely performed after a pretraining regimen with emphasis on experts' current practice and team training. After a pretraining regimen, cross-clamp times were not subject to learning curve phenomena but were dependent on procedural complexity. Nonclamp times were associated with a short learning curve.

  7. Emerging Early Actions to Bend the Curve in Sub-Saharan Africa's Nutrition Transition.

    PubMed

    Haggblade, Steven; Duodu, Kwaku G; Kabasa, John D; Minnaar, Amanda; Ojijo, Nelson K O; Taylor, John R N

    2016-06-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa is the last region to undergo a nutrition transition and can still avoid its adverse health outcomes. The article explores emerging responses to "bend the curve" in sub-Saharan Africa's nutrition transition to steer public health outcomes onto a healthier trajectory. Early responses in 3 countries at different stages of food system transformation are examined: South Africa-advanced, Ghana-intermediate, and Uganda-early. By comparing these with international experience, actions are proposed to influence nutrition and public health trajectories as Africa's food systems undergo rapid structural change. Arising from rapid urbanization and diet change, major public health problems associated with overweight are taking place, particularly in South Africa and among adult women. However, public health responses are generally tepid in sub-Saharan Africa. Only in South Africa have policy makers instituted extensive actions to combat overweight and associated noncommunicable diseases through regulation, education, and public health programs. Elsewhere, in countries in the early and middle stages of transition, public health systems continue to focus their limited resources primarily on undernutrition. Related pressures on the supply side of Africa's food systems are emerging that also need to be addressed. Three types of intervention appear most feasible: maternal and child health programs to simultaneously address short-term undernutrition problems while at the same time helping to reduce future tendencies toward overweigh; regulatory and fiscal actions to limit access to unhealthy foods; and modernization of Africa's agrifood food system through job skills training, marketing reforms, and food industry entrepreneurship. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. [Evaluation of the learning curve of residents in localizing a phantom target with ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Dessieux, T; Estebe, J-P; Bloc, S; Mercadal, L; Ecoffey, C

    2008-10-01

    Few information are available regarding the learning curve in ultrasonography and even less for ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia. This study aimed to evaluate in a training program the learning curve on a phantom of 12 residents novice in ultrasonography. Twelve trainees inexperienced in ultrasonography were given introductory training consisting of didactic formation on the various components of the portable ultrasound machine (i.e. on/off button, gain, depth, resolution, and image storage). Then, students performed three trials, in two sets of increased difficulty, at executing these predefined tasks: adjustments of the machine, then localization of a small plastic piece introduced into roasting pork (3 cm below the surface). At the end of the evaluation, the residents were asked to insert a 22 G needle into an exact predetermined target (i.e. point of fascia intersection). The progression of the needle was continuously controlled by ultrasound visualization using injection of a small volume of water (needle perpendicular to the longitudinal plane of the ultrasound beam). Two groups of two different examiners evaluated for each three trials the skill of the residents (quality, time to perform the machine adjustments, to localize the plastic target, and to hydrolocalize, and volume used for hydrolocalization). After each trial, residents evaluated their performance using a difficulty scale (0: easy to 10: difficult). All residents performed the adjustments from the last trial of each set, with a learning curve observed in terms of duration. Localization of the plastic piece was achieved by all residents at the 6th trial, with a shorter duration of localization. Hydrolocalization was achieved after the 4th trial by all subjects. Difficulty scale was correlated to the number of trials. All these results were independent of the experience of residents in regional anesthesia. Four trials were necessary to adjust correctly the machine, to localize a target, and to

  9. Subjective Estimates of Job Performance after Job Preview: Determinants of Anticipated Learning Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, Phillip L.; Shapiro, Stacey; Beier, Margaret E.

    2011-01-01

    When people choose a particular occupation, they presumably make an implicit judgment that they will perform well on a job at some point in the future, typically after extensive education and/or on-the-job experience. Research on learning and skill acquisition has pointed to a power law of practice, where large gains in performance come early in…

  10. How to Avoid a Learning Curve in Stapedotomy: A Standardized Surgical Technique.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Pingling; Gleich, Otto; Dalles, Katharina; Mayr, Elisabeth; Jacob, Peter; Strutz, Jürgen

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate, whether a learning curve for beginners in stapedotomy can be avoided by using a prosthesis with thermal memory-shape attachment in combination with a standardized laser-assisted surgical technique. Retrospective case review. Tertiary referral center. Fifty-eight ears were operated by three experienced surgeons and compared with a group of 12 cases operated by a beginner in stapedotomy. Stapedotomy. Difference of pure-tone audiometry thresholds measured before and after surgery. The average postoperative gain for air conduction in the frequencies below 2 kHz was 20 to 25 dB and decreased for the higher frequencies. Using the Mann-Whitney-U test for comparing mean gain between experienced and inexperienced surgeons showed no significant difference (p = 0.281 at 4 kHz and p > 0.7 for the other frequencies). A Spearman rank correlation of the postoperative gain for air- and bone-conduction thresholds was obtained at each test frequency for the first 12 patients consecutively treated with a thermal memory-shape attachment prosthesis by two experienced and one inexperienced surgeon. This analysis does not support the hypothesis of a "learning effect" that should be associated with an improved outcome for successively treated patients. It is possible to avoid a learning curve in stapes surgery by applying a thermal memory-shape prosthesis in a standardized laser-assisted surgical procedure.

  11. Visits to Cultural Learning Places in the Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mudiappa, Michael; Kluczniok, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Studies show the important role of the home learning environment in early childhood for later school success. This article focuses on a particular aspect of the home learning environment: visits to cultural learning places (e.g. museums) as a component of the quality of the home learning environment. Therefore the educational concept of…

  12. Learning Curves for Ultrasound Assessment of Lumbar Puncture Insertion Sites: When is Competency Established?

    PubMed

    Rankin, Jessica H; Elkhunovich, Marsha A; Rangarajan, Vijayeta; Chilstrom, Mikaela; Mailhot, Tom

    2016-07-01

    Ultrasound (US) can be used to improve lumbar puncture (LP) success. How to achieve competency in LP US has not been defined. Cumulative sum statistics (CUSUM) characterized competency acquisition in other skills. Identify the learning curve for 80% success rate in LP US insertion site (IS) identification among pediatric emergency medicine fellows. This prospective study took place in a single pediatric emergency department. Fellows with limited ultrasound experience received didactics, training, and three proctored examinations. Skills were evaluated in three 2-h sessions: using US, subjects identified LP ISs on a convenience sample of patients ages 0-20 years old. Subjects' IS markings were compared to markings by an expert, an emergency US fellowship-trained attending. Successful IS identification was defined as markings within 2 mm or 5 mm of the expert mark in infants and older children, respectively. A second expert marked 17 cases for interrater agreement. CUSUM was used to analyze individual learning curves. Five fellows evaluated 72 patients (mean age 11.4 years [SD = 4, range 3-20], mean body mass index 20.5 [SD = 4.4, range 13.1-37.7]) over a 3-month period. Mean number of attempts per fellow was 14.4 ± 3.1 (R 11-19); mean time to landmark identification was 72 ± 46 s (R 27-240). The two experts demonstrated 100% observed agreement. Aggregate success rate for all fellows was 75% (54/72). Four fellows showed learning curves that trended toward, but did not achieve, the acceptable success rate of 80%. Nineteen attempts are insufficient among fellows to achieve competency in US-guided LP IS identification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Preliminary Results and Learning Curve of the Minimally Invasive Chevron Akin Operation for Hallux Valgus.

    PubMed

    Jowett, Charlie R J; Bedi, Harvinder S

    Minimally invasive surgery is increasing in popularity. It is relevant in hallux valgus surgery owing to the potential for reduced disruption of the soft tissues and improved wound healing. We present our results and assess the learning curve of the minimally invasive Chevron Akin operation for hallux valgus. A total of 120 consecutive feet underwent minimally invasive Chevron Akin for symptomatic hallux valgus, of which 14 were excluded. They were followed up for a mean of 25 (range 18 to 38) months. The patients were clinically assessed using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score. Complications and patient satisfaction were recorded. The radiographs were analyzed and measurements recorded for hallux valgus and intermetatarsal angle correction. The mean age of the patients undergoing surgery was 55 (range 25 to 81) years. Of the 78 patients, 76 (97.4%) were female and 2 (2.6%) were male; 28 (35.9%) cases were bilateral. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score improved from 56 (range 23 to 76) preoperatively to 87 (range 50 to 100) postoperatively (p < .001). The mean hallux valgus and intermetatarsal angles preoperatively were 29.7° (range 12° to 46°) and 14.0° (range 8° to 20°). The corresponding postoperative angles were 10.3° (range 0° to 25°) and 7.6° (range 3° to 15°; p < .001). The patients were satisfied with the results of surgery in 87% of cases (92 of 106). The incidence of reoperation was 14% (15 of 106). These are the only reported results for this technique. They display a steep associated learning curve. However, the results are promising, and the learning curve is comparable to that for open hallux valgus surgery. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Transanal total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer: evaluation of the learning curve.

    PubMed

    Koedam, T W A; Veltcamp Helbach, M; van de Ven, P M; Kruyt, Ph M; van Heek, N T; Bonjer, H J; Tuynman, J B; Sietses, C

    2018-04-01

    Transanal total mesorectal excision (TaTME) provides an excellent view of the resection margins for rectal cancer from below, but is challenging due to few anatomical landmarks. During implementation of this technique, patient safety and optimal outcomes need to be ensured. The aim of this study was to evaluate the learning curve of TaTME in patients with rectal cancer in order to optimize future training programs. All consecutive patients after TaTME for rectal cancer between February 2012 and January 2017 were included in a single-center database. Influence of surgical experience on major postoperative complications, leakage rate and operating time was evaluated using cumulative sum charts and the splitting model. Correction for potential case-mix differences was performed. Over a period of 60 months, a total of 138 patients were included in this study. Adjusted for case-mix, improvement in postoperative outcomes was clearly seen after the first 40 patients, showing a decrease in major postoperative complications from 47.5 to 17.5% and leakage rate from 27.5 to 5%. Mean operating time (42 min) and conversion rate (from 10% to zero) was lower after transition to a two-team approach, but neither endpoint decreased with experience. Readmission and reoperation rates were not influenced by surgical experience. The learning curve of TaTME affected major (surgical) postoperative complications for the first 40 patients. A two-team approach decreased operative time and conversion rate. When implementing this new technique, a thorough teaching and supervisory program is recommended to shorten the learning curve and improve the clinical outcomes of the first patients.

  15. Learning Curve Analysis and Surgical Outcomes of Single-port Laparoscopic Myomectomy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee Jun; Kim, Ju Yeong; Kim, Seul Ki; Lee, Jung Ryeol; Suh, Chang Suk; Kim, Seok Hyun

    2015-01-01

    To identify learning curves for single-port laparoscopic myomectomy (SPLM) and evaluate surgical outcomes according to the sequence of operation. A retrospective study. A university-based hospital (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). The medical records from 205 patients who had undergone SPLM from October 2009 to May 2013 were reviewed. Because the myomectomy time was significantly affected by the size and number of myomas removed by SPLM, cases in which 2 or more of the myomas removed were >7 cm in diameter were excluded. Furthermore, cases involving additional operations performed simultaneously (e.g., ovarian or hysteroscopic surgery) were also excluded. A total of 161 cases of SPLM were included. None. We assessed the SPLM learning curve via a graph based on operation time versus sequence of cases. Patients were chronologically arranged according to their surgery dates and were then placed into 1 of 4 groups according to their operation sequence. SPLM was completed successfully in 160 of 161 cases (99.4%). One case was converted to multiport surgery. Basal characteristics of the patients between the 4 groups did not differ. The median operation times for the 4 groups were 112.0, 92.8, 83.7, and 90.0 minutes, respectively. Operation time decreased significantly in the second, third, and fourth groups compared with that in the first group (p < .001). Proficiency, which is the point at which the slope of the learning curve became less steep, was evident after about 45 operations. Results from the current study suggested that proficiency for SPLM was achieved after about 45 operations. Additionally, operation time decreased with experience without an increase in complication rate. Copyright © 2015 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. What is the learning curve for the anterior approach for total hip arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    de Steiger, Richard Noel; Lorimer, Michelle; Solomon, Michael

    2015-12-01

    There are many factors that may affect the learning curve for total hip arthroplasty (THA) and surgical approach is one of these. There has been renewed interest in the direct anterior approach for THA with variable outcomes reported, but few studies have documented a surgeon's individual learning curve when using this approach. (1) What was the revision rate for all surgeons adopting the anterior approach for placement of a particular implant? (2) What was the revision rate for surgeons who performed > 100 cases in this fashion? (3) Is there a minimum number of cases required to complete a learning curve for this procedure? The Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry prospectively collects data on all primary and revision joint arthroplasty surgery. We analyzed all conventional THAs performed up to December 31, 2013, with a primary diagnosis of osteoarthritis using a specific implant combination and secondarily those associated with surgeons performing more than 100 procedures. Ninety-five percent of these procedures were performed through the direct anterior approach. Procedures using this combination were ordered from earliest (first procedure date) to latest (last procedure date) for each individual surgeon. Using the order number for each surgeon, five operation groups were defined: one to 15 operations, 16 to 30 operations, 31 to 50 operations, 51 to 100 operations, and > 100 operations. The primary outcome measure was time to first revision using Kaplan-Meier estimates of survivorship. Sixty-eight surgeons performed 5499 THAs using the specified implant combination. The cumulative percent revision at 4 years for all 68 surgeons was 3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.5-3.8). For surgeons who had performed over 100 operations, the cumulative revision rate was 3% (95% CI, 2.0-3.5). It was not until surgeons had performed over 50 operations that there was no difference in the cumulative percent revision compared with over 100

  17. Impact of Witnessing Violence on Growth Curves for Problem Behaviors among Early Adolescents in Urban and Rural Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Albert D.; Sullivan, Terri N.

    2004-01-01

    Two studies used latent growth-curve analysis to examine the relation between witnessing violence and changes in problem behaviors (drug use, aggression, and delinquency) and attitudes during early adolescence. In Study 1, six waves of data covering 6th to 8th grades were collected from 731 students in urban schools serving mostly African-American…

  18. Learning curves of theta/beta neurofeedback in children with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Tieme W P; Bink, Marleen; Weeda, Wouter D; Geladé, Katleen; van Mourik, Rosa; Maras, Athanasios; Oosterlaan, Jaap

    2017-05-01

    Neurofeedback is widely applied as non-pharmacological intervention aimed at reducing symptoms of ADHD, even though efficacy has not been unequivocally established. Neuronal changes during the neurofeedback intervention that resemble learning can provide crucial evidence for the feasibility and specificity of this intervention. A total of 38 children (aged between 7 and 13 years) with a DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of ADHD, completed on average 29 sessions of theta (4-8 Hz)/beta (13-20 Hz) neurofeedback training. Dependent variables included training-related measures as well as theta and beta power during baseline and training runs for each session. Learning effects were analyzed both within and between sessions. To further specify findings, individual learning curves were explored and correlated with behavioral changes in ADHD symptoms. Over the course of the training, there was a linear increase in participants' mean training level, highest obtained training level and the number of earned credits (range b = 0.059, -0.750, p < 0.001). Theta remained unchanged over the course of the training, while beta activity increased linearly within training sessions (b = 0.004, 95% CI = [0.0013-0.0067], p = 0.005) and over the course of the intervention (b = 0.0052, 95% CI = [0.0039-0.0065], p < 0.001). In contrast to the group analyses, significant individual learning curves were found for both theta and beta over the course of the intervention in 39 and 53%, respectively. Individual learning curves were not significantly correlated with behavioral changes. This study shows that children with ADHD can gain control over EEG states during neurofeedback, although a lack of behavioral correlates may indicate insufficient transfer to daily functioning, or to confounding reinforcement of electromyographic activity. This trial is registered at the US National Institutes of Health (ClinicalTrials.gov, ref. no: NCT01363544); https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01363544 .

  19. Microinvasive Glaucoma Stent (MIGS) Surgery With Concomitant Phakoemulsification Cataract Extraction: Outcomes and the Learning Curve.

    PubMed

    Al-Mugheiry, Toby S; Cate, Heidi; Clark, Allan; Broadway, David C

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate learning effects with respect to outcomes of a microinvasive glaucoma stent (MIGS) inserted during cataract surgery in glaucoma patients. Single surgeon, observational cohort study of 25 consecutive Ivantis Hydrus microstent insertions, with a minimum follow-up of 12 months. A learning curve analysis was performed by assessing hypotensive effect, adverse effects, and surgical procedure duration, with respect to consecutive case number. Success was defined with respect to various intraocular pressure (IOP) targets (21, 18, 15 mm Hg) and reduction in required antiglaucoma medications. Complete success was defined as achieving target IOP without antiglaucoma therapy. No clinically significant adverse events or learning effects were identified, although surgical time reduced with consecutive case number. Mean follow-up was 16.8 months. At final follow-up the mean IOP for all eyes was reduced from 18.1 (±3.6) mm Hg [and a simulated untreated value of 25.9 (±5.2) mm Hg] to 15.3 (±2.2) mm Hg (P=0.007; <0.0001) and the mean number of topical antiglaucoma medications was reduced from 1.96 (±0.96) to 0.04 (±0.20) (P<0.0001). Complete success (IOP<21 mm Hg, no medications) was 96% at final follow-up. Complete success (IOP<18 mm Hg, no medications) was 80% at final follow-up, but only 32% with a target IOP of <15 mm Hg (no medications). No significant learning curve effects were observed for a trained surgeon with respect to MIGS microstent insertion performed at the time of cataract surgery. Adjunctive MIGS surgery was successful in lowering IOP to <18 mm Hg and reducing/abolishing the requirement for antiglaucoma medication in eyes with open-angle glaucoma, but less successful at achieving low IOP levels (<15 mm Hg).

  20. Analysis of Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy Learning Curve and Its Influence on Procedure Safety and Perioperative Complications.

    PubMed

    Major, Piotr; Wysocki, Michał; Dworak, Jadwiga; Pędziwiatr, Michał; Pisarska, Magdalena; Wierdak, Mateusz; Zub-Pokrowiecka, Anna; Natkaniec, Michał; Małczak, Piotr; Nowakowski, Michał; Budzyński, Andrzej

    2018-06-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) has become an attractive bariatric procedure with promising treatment effects yet amount of data regarding institutional learning process is limited. Retrospective study included patients submitted to LSG at academic teaching hospital. Patients were divided into groups every 100 consecutive patients. LSG introduction was structured along with Enhanced Recovery after Surgery (ERAS) treatment protocol. Primary endpoint was determining the LSG learning curve's stabilization point, using operative time, intraoperative difficulties, intraoperative adverse events (IAE), and number of stapler firings. Secondary endpoints: influence on perioperative complications and reoperations. Five hundred patients were included (330 females, median age of 40 (33-49) years). Operative time in G1-G2 differed significantly from G3-G5. Stabilization point was the 200th procedure using operative time. Intraoperative difficulties of G1 differed significantly from G2-G5, with stabilization after the 100th procedure. IAE and number of stapler firings could not be used as predictor. Based on perioperative morbidity, the learning curve was stabilized at the 100th procedure. The morbidity rates in the groups were G1, 13%; G2, 4%; G3, 5%; G4, 5%; and G5, 2%. The reoperation rate in G1 was 3%; G2, 2%; G3, 2%; G4, 1%; and G5, 0%. The institutional learning process stabilization point for LSG in a newly established bariatric center is between the 100th and 200th operation. Initially, the morbidity rate is high, which should concern surgeons who are willing to perform bariatric surgery.

  1. Structure in the early afterglow light curve of the gamma-ray burst of 29 March 2003.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Makoto; Kato, Taichi; Ishioka, Ryoko; Yamaoka, Hitoshi; Monard, Berto; Nogami, Daisaku; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Sugie, Atsushi; Takahashi, Susumu

    2003-06-19

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are energetic explosions that for 0.01-100 s are the brightest gamma-ray sources in the sky. Observations of the early evolution of afterglows are expected to provide clues about the nature of the bursts, but their rapid fading has hampered such studies; some recent rapid localizations of bursts have improved the situation. Here we report an early detection of the very bright afterglow of the burst of 29 March 2003 (GRB030329). Our data show that, even early in the afterglow phase, the light curve shows unexpectedly complicated structures superimposed on the fading background.

  2. Anesthesiologists' learning curves for bedside qualitative ultrasound assessment of gastric content: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Arzola, Cristian; Carvalho, Jose C A; Cubillos, Javier; Ye, Xiang Y; Perlas, Anahi

    2013-08-01

    Focused assessment of the gastric antrum by ultrasound is a feasible tool to evaluate the quality of the stomach content. We aimed to determine the amount of training an anesthesiologist would need to achieve competence in the bedside ultrasound technique for qualitative assessment of gastric content. Six anesthesiologists underwent a teaching intervention followed by a formative assessment; then learning curves were constructed. Participants received didactic teaching (reading material, picture library, and lecture) and an interactive hands-on workshop on live models directed by an expert sonographer. The participants were instructed on how to perform a systematic qualitative assessment to diagnose one of three distinct categories of gastric content (empty, clear fluid, solid) in healthy volunteers. Individual learning curves were constructed using the cumulative sum method, and competence was defined as a 90% success rate in a series of ultrasound examinations. A predictive model was further developed based on the entire cohort performance to determine the number of cases required to achieve a 95% success rate. Each anesthesiologist performed 30 ultrasound examinations (a total of 180 assessments), and three of the six participants achieved competence. The average number of cases required to achieve 90% and 95% success rates was estimated to be 24 and 33, respectively. With appropriate training and supervision, it is estimated that anesthesiologists will achieve a 95% success rate in bedside qualitative ultrasound assessment after performing approximately 33 examinations.

  3. MILS in a general surgery unit: learning curve, indications, and limitations.

    PubMed

    Patriti, Alberto; Marano, Luigi; Casciola, Luciano

    2015-06-01

    Minimally invasive liver surgery (MILS) is going to be a method with a wide diffusion even in general surgery units. Organization, learning curve effect, and the environment are crucial issues to evaluate before starting a program of minimally invasive liver resections. Analysis of a consecutive series of 70 patients has been used to define advantages and limits of starting a program of MILS in a general surgery unit. Seventeen MILS have been calculated with the cumulative sum method as the number of cases to complete the learning curve. Operative times [270 (60-480) vs. 180 (15-550) min; p 0.01] and rate of conversion (6/17 vs. 5/53; p 0.018) decrease after this number of cases. More complex cases can be managed after a proper optimization of all steps of liver resection. When a high confidence of the medical and nurse staff with MILS is reached, economical and strategic issues should be evaluated in order to establish a multidisciplinary hepatobiliary unit independent from the general surgery unit to manage more complex cases.

  4. What can we Learn from the Rising Light Curves of Radioactively Powered Supernovae?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piro, Anthony L.; Nakar, Ehud

    2013-05-01

    The light curve of the explosion of a star with a radius <~ 10-100 R ⊙ is powered mostly by radioactive decay. Observationally, such events are dominated by hydrogen-deficient progenitors and classified as Type I supernovae (SNe I), i.e., white dwarf thermonuclear explosions (Type Ia), and core collapses of hydrogen-stripped massive stars (Type Ib/c). Current transient surveys are finding SNe I in increasing numbers and at earlier times, allowing their early emission to be studied in unprecedented detail. Motivated by these developments, we summarize the physics that produces their rising light curves and discuss ways in which observations can be utilized to study these exploding stars. The early radioactive-powered light curves probe the shallowest deposits of 56Ni. If the amount of 56Ni mixing in the outermost layers of the star can be deduced, then it places important constraints on the progenitor and properties of the explosive burning. In practice, we find that it is difficult to determine the level of mixing because it is hard to disentangle whether the explosion occurred recently and one is seeing radioactive heating near the surface or whether the explosion began in the past and the radioactive heating is deeper in the ejecta. In the latter case, there is a "dark phase" between the moment of explosion and the first observed light emitted once the shallowest layers of 56Ni are exposed. Because of this, simply extrapolating a light curve from radioactive heating back in time is not a reliable method for estimating the explosion time. The best solution is to directly identify the moment of explosion, either through observing shock breakout (in X-ray/UV) or the cooling of the shock-heated surface (in UV/optical), so that the depth being probed by the rising light curve is known. However, since this is typically not available, we identify and discuss a number of other diagnostics that are helpful for deciphering how recently an explosion occurred. As an

  5. Learning curve evaluation using cumulative summation analysis-a clinical example of pediatric robot-assisted laparoscopic pyeloplasty.

    PubMed

    Cundy, Thomas P; Gattas, Nicholas E; White, Alan D; Najmaldin, Azad S

    2015-08-01

    The cumulative summation (CUSUM) method for learning curve analysis remains under-utilized in the surgical literature in general, and is described in only a small number of publications within the field of pediatric surgery. This study introduces the CUSUM analysis technique and applies it to evaluate the learning curve for pediatric robot-assisted laparoscopic pyeloplasty (RP). Clinical data were prospectively recorded for consecutive pediatric RP cases performed by a single-surgeon. CUSUM charts and tests were generated for set-up time, docking time, console time, operating time, total operating room time, and postoperative complications. Conversions and avoidable operating room delay were separately evaluated with respect to case experience. Comparisons between case experience and time-based outcomes were assessed using the Student's t-test and ANOVA for bi-phasic and multi-phasic learning curves respectively. Comparison between case experience and complication frequency was assessed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. A total of 90 RP cases were evaluated. The learning curve transitioned beyond the learning phase at cases 10, 15, 42, 57, and 58 for set-up time, docking time, console time, operating time, and total operating room time respectively. All comparisons of mean operating times between the learning phase and subsequent phases were statistically significant (P=<0.001-0.01). No significant difference was observed between case experience and frequency of post-operative complications (P=0.125), although the CUSUM chart demonstrated a directional change in slope for the last 12 cases in which there were high proportions of re-do cases and patients <6 months of age. The CUSUM method has a valuable role for learning curve evaluation and outcome quality monitoring. In applying this statistical technique to the largest reported single surgeon series of pediatric RP, we demonstrate numerous distinctly shaped learning curves and well-defined learning phase transition

  6. Using learning curves on energy-efficient technologies to estimate future energy savings and emission reduction potentials in the U.S. iron and steel industry

    SciT

    Karali, Nihan; Park, Won Young; McNeil, Michael A.

    Increasing concerns on non-sustainable energy use and climate change spur a growing research interest in energy efficiency potentials in various critical areas such as industrial production. This paper focuses on learning curve aspects of energy efficiency measures in the U.S iron and steel sector. A number of early-stage efficient technologies (i.e., emerging or demonstration technologies) are technically feasible and have the potential to make a significant contribution to energy saving and CO 2 emissions reduction, but fall short economically to be included. However, they may also have the cost effective potential for significant cost reduction and/or performance improvement in themore » future under learning effects such as ‘learning-by-doing’. The investigation is carried out using ISEEM, a technology oriented, linear optimization model. We investigated how steel demand is balanced with/without the availability learning curve, compared to a Reference scenario. The retrofit (or investment in some cases) costs of energy efficient technologies decline in the scenario where learning curve is applied. The analysis also addresses market penetration of energy efficient technologies, energy saving, and CO 2 emissions in the U.S. iron and steel sector with/without learning impact. Accordingly, the study helps those who use energy models better manage the price barriers preventing unrealistic diffusion of energy-efficiency technologies, better understand the market and learning system involved, predict future achievable learning rates more accurately, and project future savings via energy-efficiency technologies with presence of learning. We conclude from our analysis that, most of the existing energy efficiency technologies that are currently used in the U.S. iron and steel sector are cost effective. Penetration levels increases through the years, even though there is no price reduction. However, demonstration technologies are not economically feasible in the U

  7. Alberta Learning: Early Development Instrument Pilot Project Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meaney, Wanda; Harris-Lorenze, Elayne

    The Early Development Instrument (EDI) was designed by McMaster University to measure the outcomes of childrens early years as they influence their readiness to learn at school. The EDI was piloted in several Canadian cities in recent years through two national initiatives. Building on these initiatives, Alberta Learning piloted the EDI as a…

  8. Traces of an Early Learned Second Language in Discontinued Bilingualism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadat, Jasmin; Pureza, Rita; Alario, F.-Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Can an early learned second language influence speech production after living many years in an exclusively monolingual environment? To address this issue, we investigated the consequences of discontinued early bilingualism in heritage speakers who moved abroad and switched language dominance from the second to the primary learned language. We used…

  9. English Learners (ELs) and Early Learning. Fast Facts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of English Language Acquisition, US Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The Office of English Language Acquisition (OELA) and Office of Early Learning (OEL) has synthesized key data on English learners (ELs) and early learning into two-page PDF sheets, by topic, with graphics, plus key contacts. The topics for this report include: (1) State-funded preschool programs with highest percentage of ELs: Fall 2013; (2)…

  10. Meeting the Early Learning Challenge: Supporting English Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Hannah

    2011-01-01

    The Race to The Top-Early Learning Challenge (RTT-ELC) is designed to improve the quality of early learning and development and close the achievement gap for children with high needs. The Departments of Education and Health and Human Services define high needs to include children who are English learners, often referred to as English Language…

  11. Early Learning Canada: Workshop Leader Guide [and] Participant Resource [and] Trainer Manual. Learning & Reading Partners Adult Learning System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estey, Nancy; MacIsaac, Maitland; Rendell, Sandra

    Based on the understanding that the capacity to learn is optimized in the early years, Early Learning Canada (ELC) is a community workshop program for parents and adults who work with children from birth to age 6 and their families to facilitate life-long learning. This workshop leader guide explains the ELC principles, examines learning styles…

  12. Learning curves for transapical transcatheter aortic valve replacement in the PARTNER-I trial: Technical performance, success, and safety.

    PubMed

    Suri, Rakesh M; Minha, Sa'ar; Alli, Oluseun; Waksman, Ron; Rihal, Charanjit S; Satler, Lowell P; Greason, Kevin L; Torguson, Rebecca; Pichard, Augusto D; Mack, Michael; Svensson, Lars G; Rajeswaran, Jeevanantham; Lowry, Ashley M; Ehrlinger, John; Mick, Stephanie L; Tuzcu, E Murat; Thourani, Vinod H; Makkar, Raj; Holmes, David; Leon, Martin B; Blackstone, Eugene H

    2016-09-01

    Introduction of hybrid techniques, such as transapical transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TA-TAVR), requires skills that a heart team must master to achieve technical efficiency: the technical performance learning curve. To date, the learning curve for TA-TAVR remains unknown. We therefore evaluated the rate at which technical performance improved, assessed change in occurrence of adverse events in relation to technical performance, and determined whether adverse events after TA-TAVR were linked to acquiring technical performance efficiency (the learning curve). From April 2007 to February 2012, 1100 patients, average age 85.0 ± 6.4 years, underwent TA-TAVR in the PARTNER-I trial. Learning curves were defined by institution-specific patient sequence number using nonlinear mixed modeling. Mean procedure time decreased from 131 to 116 minutes within 30 cases (P = .06) and device success increased to 90% by case 45 (P = .0007). Within 30 days, 354 patients experienced a major adverse event (stroke in 29, death in 96), with possibly decreased complications over time (P ∼ .08). Although longer procedure time was associated with more adverse events (P < .0001), these events were associated with change in patient risk profile, not the technical performance learning curve (P = .8). The learning curve for TA-TAVR was 30 to 45 procedures performed, and technical efficiency was achieved without compromising patient safety. Although fewer patients are now undergoing TAVR via nontransfemoral access, understanding TA-TAVR learning curves and their relationship with outcomes is important as the field moves toward next-generation devices, such as those to replace the mitral valve, delivered via the left ventricular apex. Copyright © 2016 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Laparoscopy Instructional Videos: The Effect of Preoperative Compared With Intraoperative Use on Learning Curves.

    PubMed

    Broekema, Theo H; Talsma, Aaldert K; Wevers, Kevin P; Pierie, Jean-Pierre E N

    Previous studies have shown that the use of intraoperative instructional videos has a positive effect on learning laparoscopic procedures. This study investigated the effect of the timing of the instructional videos on learning curves in laparoscopic skills training. After completing a basic skills course on a virtual reality simulator, medical students and residents with less than 1 hour experience using laparoscopic instruments were randomized into 2 groups. Using an instructional video either preoperatively or intraoperatively, both groups then performed 4 repetitions of a standardized task on the TrEndo augmented reality. With the TrEndo, 9 motion analysis parameters (MAPs) were recorded for each session (4 MAPs for each hand and time). These were the primary outcome measurements for performance. The time spent watching the instructional video was also recorded. Improvement in performance was studied within and between groups. Medical Center Leeuwarden, a secondary care hospital located in Leeuwarden, The Netherlands. Right-hand dominant medical student and residents with more than 1 hour experience operating any kind of laparoscopic instruments were participated. A total of 23 persons entered the study, of which 21 completed the study course. In both groups, at least 5 of 9 MAPs showed significant improvements between repetition 1 and 4. When both groups were compared after completion of repetition 4, no significant differences in improvement were detected. The intraoperative group showed significant improvement in 3 MAPs of the left-nondominant-hand, compared with one MAP for the preoperative group. No significant differences in learning curves could be detected between the subjects who used intraoperative instructional videos and those who used preoperative instructional videos. Intraoperative video instruction may result in improved dexterity of the nondominant hand. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc

  14. Impact of a learning curve on the survivorship of 4802 cementless total hip arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Magill, P; Blaney, J; Hill, J C; Bonnin, M P; Beverland, D E

    2016-12-01

    Our aim was to report survivorship data and lessons learned with the Corail/Pinnacle cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA) system. Between August 2005 and March 2015, a total of 4802 primary cementless Corail/Pinnacle THAs were performed in 4309 patients. In March 2016, we reviewed these hips from a prospectively maintained database. A total of 80 hips (1.67%) have been revised which is equivalent to a cumulative risk of revision of 2.5% at ten years. The rate of revision was not significantly higher in patients aged ≥ 70 years (p = 0.93). The leading indications for revision were instability (n = 22, 0.46%), infection (n = 20, 0.42%), aseptic femoral loosening (n = 15, 0.31%) and femoral fracture (n = 6, 0.12%). There were changes in the surgical technique with respect to the Corail femoral component during the ten-year period involving a change to collared components and a trend towards larger size. These resulted in a decrease in the rate of iatrogenic femoral fracture and a decrease in the rate of aseptic loosening. The rate of revision in this series is comparable with the best performing THAs in registry data. Most revisions were not directly related to the implants. Despite extensive previous experience with cemented femoral components, the senior author noted a learning curve requiring increased focus on primary stability. The number of revisions related to the femoral component is reducing. Any new technology has a learning curve that may be independent of surgical experience. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:1589-96. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  15. The learning curve associated with the introduction of the subcutaneous implantable defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Knops, Reinoud E; Brouwer, Tom F; Barr, Craig S; Theuns, Dominic A; Boersma, Lucas; Weiss, Raul; Neuzil, Petr; Scholten, Marcoen; Lambiase, Pier D; Leon, Angel R; Hood, Margaret; Jones, Paul W; Wold, Nicholas; Grace, Andrew A; Olde Nordkamp, Louise R A; Burke, Martin C

    2016-07-01

    The subcutaneous implantable cardioverter defibrillator (S-ICD) was introduced to overcome complications related to transvenous leads. Adoption of the S-ICD requires implanters to learn a new implantation technique. The aim of this study was to assess the learning curve for S-ICD implanters with respect to implant-related complications, procedure time, and inappropriate shocks (IASs). In a pooled cohort from two clinical S-ICD databases, the IDE Trial and the EFFORTLESS Registry, complications, IASs at 180 days follow-up and implant procedure duration were assessed. Patients were grouped in quartiles based on experience of the implanter and Kaplan-Meier estimates of complication and IAS rates were calculated. A total of 882 patients implanted in 61 centres by 107 implanters with a median of 4 implants (IQR 1,8) were analysed. There were a total of 59 patients with complications and 48 patients with IAS. The complication rate decreased significantly from 9.8% in Quartile 1 (least experience) to 5.4% in Quartile 4 (most experience) (P = 0.02) and non-significantly for IAS from 7.9 to 4.8% (P = 0.10). Multivariable analysis demonstrated a hazard ratio of 0.78 (P = 0.045) for complications and 1.01 (P = 0.958) for IAS. Dual-zone programming increased with experience of the individual implanter (P < 0.001), which reduced IAS significantly in the multivariable model (HR 0.44, P = 0.01). Procedure time decreased from 75 to 65 min (P < 0.001). The complication rate and procedure time stabilized after Quartile 2 (>13 implants). There is a short and significant learning curve associated with physicians adopting the S-ICD. Performance stabilizes after 13 implants. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  16. Development Process and Technical Aspects of Laparoscopic Hepatectomy: Learning Curve Based on 15 Years of Experience.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Shohei; Scatton, Olivier; Goumard, Claire; Sepulveda, Ailton; Brustia, Raffaele; Perdigao, Fabiano; Soubrane, Olivier

    2017-05-01

    Laparoscopic hepatectomy continues to be a challenging operation associated with a steep learning curve. This study aimed to evaluate the learning process during 15 years of experience with laparoscopic hepatectomy and to identify approaches to standardization of this procedure. Prospectively collected data of 317 consecutive laparoscopic hepatectomies performed from January 2000 to December 2014 were reviewed retrospectively. The operative procedures were classified into 4 categories (minor hepatectomy, left lateral sectionectomy [LLS], left hepatectomy, and right hepatectomy), and indications were classified into 5 categories (benign-borderline tumor, living donor, metastatic liver tumor, biliary malignancy, and hepatocellular carcinoma). During the first 10 years, the procedures were limited mainly to minor hepatectomy and LLS, and the indications were limited to benign-borderline tumor and living donor. Implementation of major hepatectomy rapidly increased the proportion of malignant tumors, especially hepatocellular carcinoma, starting from 2011. Conversion rates decreased with experience for LLS (13.3% vs 3.4%; p = 0.054) and left hepatectomy (50.0% vs 15.0%; p = 0.012), but not for right hepatectomy (41.4% vs 35.7%; p = 0.661). Our 15-year experience clearly demonstrates the stepwise procedural evolution from LLS through left hepatectomy to right hepatectomy, as well as the trend in indications from benign-borderline tumor/living donor to malignant tumors. In contrast to LLS and left hepatectomy, a learning curve was not observed for right hepatectomy. The ongoing development process can contribute to faster standardization necessary for future advances in laparoscopic hepatectomy. Copyright © 2017 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Optimizing area under the ROC curve using semi-supervised learning

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shijun; Li, Diana; Petrick, Nicholas; Sahiner, Berkman; Linguraru, Marius George; Summers, Ronald M.

    2014-01-01

    Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis is a standard methodology to evaluate the performance of a binary classification system. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) is a performance metric that summarizes how well a classifier separates two classes. Traditional AUC optimization techniques are supervised learning methods that utilize only labeled data (i.e., the true class is known for all data) to train the classifiers. In this work, inspired by semi-supervised and transductive learning, we propose two new AUC optimization algorithms hereby referred to as semi-supervised learning receiver operating characteristic (SSLROC) algorithms, which utilize unlabeled test samples in classifier training to maximize AUC. Unlabeled samples are incorporated into the AUC optimization process, and their ranking relationships to labeled positive and negative training samples are considered as optimization constraints. The introduced test samples will cause the learned decision boundary in a multidimensional feature space to adapt not only to the distribution of labeled training data, but also to the distribution of unlabeled test data. We formulate the semi-supervised AUC optimization problem as a semi-definite programming problem based on the margin maximization theory. The proposed methods SSLROC1 (1-norm) and SSLROC2 (2-norm) were evaluated using 34 (determined by power analysis) randomly selected datasets from the University of California, Irvine machine learning repository. Wilcoxon signed rank tests showed that the proposed methods achieved significant improvement compared with state-of-the-art methods. The proposed methods were also applied to a CT colonography dataset for colonic polyp classification and showed promising results.1 PMID:25395692

  18. Optimizing area under the ROC curve using semi-supervised learning.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shijun; Li, Diana; Petrick, Nicholas; Sahiner, Berkman; Linguraru, Marius George; Summers, Ronald M

    2015-01-01

    Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis is a standard methodology to evaluate the performance of a binary classification system. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) is a performance metric that summarizes how well a classifier separates two classes. Traditional AUC optimization techniques are supervised learning methods that utilize only labeled data (i.e., the true class is known for all data) to train the classifiers. In this work, inspired by semi-supervised and transductive learning, we propose two new AUC optimization algorithms hereby referred to as semi-supervised learning receiver operating characteristic (SSLROC) algorithms, which utilize unlabeled test samples in classifier training to maximize AUC. Unlabeled samples are incorporated into the AUC optimization process, and their ranking relationships to labeled positive and negative training samples are considered as optimization constraints. The introduced test samples will cause the learned decision boundary in a multidimensional feature space to adapt not only to the distribution of labeled training data, but also to the distribution of unlabeled test data. We formulate the semi-supervised AUC optimization problem as a semi-definite programming problem based on the margin maximization theory. The proposed methods SSLROC1 (1-norm) and SSLROC2 (2-norm) were evaluated using 34 (determined by power analysis) randomly selected datasets from the University of California, Irvine machine learning repository. Wilcoxon signed rank tests showed that the proposed methods achieved significant improvement compared with state-of-the-art methods. The proposed methods were also applied to a CT colonography dataset for colonic polyp classification and showed promising results.

  19. Highlighting in Early Childhood: Learning Biases through Attentional Shifting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burling, Joseph M.; Yoshida, Hanako

    2017-01-01

    The literature on human and animal learning suggests that individuals attend to and act on cues differently based on the order in which they were learned. Recent studies have proposed that one specific type of learning outcome, the highlighting effect, can serve as a framework for understanding a number of early cognitive milestones. However,…

  20. A Learning Progressions Approach to Early Algebra Research and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fonger, Nicole L.; Stephens, Ana; Blanton, Maria; Knuth, Eric

    2015-01-01

    We detail a learning progressions approach to early algebra research and how existing work around learning progressions and trajectories in mathematics and science education has informed our development of a four-component theoretical framework consisting of: a curricular progression of learning goals across big algebraic ideas; an instructional…

  1. The learning curve of laparoscopic treatment of rectal cancer does not increase morbidity.

    PubMed

    Luján, Juan; Gonzalez, Antonio; Abrisqueta, Jesús; Hernandez, Quiteria; Valero, Graciela; Abellán, Israel; Frutos, María Dolores; Parrilla, Pascual

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of rectal cancer via laparoscopy is controversial due to its technical complexity. Several randomized prospective studies have demonstrated clear advantages for the patient with similar oncological results to those of open surgery, although during the learning of this surgical technique there may be an increase in complications and a worse prognosis. Our aim is to analyze how the learning curve for rectal cancer via laparoscopy influences intra- and postoperative results and oncological markers. A retrospective review was conducted of the first 120 patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery for rectal neoplasia. The operations were performed by the same surgical team with a wide experience in the treatment of open colorectal cancer and qualified to perform advanced laparoscopic surgery. We analyzed sex, ASA, tumour location, neoadjuvant treatment, surgical technique, operating time, conversion, postoperative complications, length of hospital stay, number of lymph nodes, stage and involvement of margins. Significant differences were observed with regard to surgical time (224 min in the first group, 204 min in the second group), with a higher rate of conversion in the first group (22.5%) than in the second (11.3%). No significant differences were noted for rate of conservative sphincter surgery, length of hospital stay, post-surgical complications, number of affected/isolated lymph nodes or affected circumferential and distal margins. It is possible to learn this complex surgical technique without compromising the patient's safety and oncological outcome. Copyright © 2013 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of the Mathematics of Learning Curve Models for Evaluating Small Modular Reactor Economics

    SciT

    Harrison, T. J.

    2014-02-01

    The cost of nuclear power is a straightforward yet complicated topic. It is straightforward in that the cost of nuclear power is a function of the cost to build the nuclear power plant, the cost to operate and maintain it, and the cost to provide fuel for it. It is complicated in that some of those costs are not necessarily known, introducing uncertainty into the analysis. For large light water reactor (LWR)-based nuclear power plants, the uncertainty is mainly contained within the cost of construction. The typical costs of operations and maintenance (O&M), as well as fuel, are well knownmore » based on the current fleet of LWRs. However, the last currently operating reactor to come online was Watts Bar 1 in May 1996; thus, the expected construction costs for gigawatt (GW)-class reactors in the United States are based on information nearly two decades old. Extrapolating construction, O&M, and fuel costs from GW-class LWRs to LWR-based small modular reactors (SMRs) introduces even more complication. The per-installed-kilowatt construction costs for SMRs are likely to be higher than those for the GW-class reactors based on the property of the economy of scale. Generally speaking, the economy of scale is the tendency for overall costs to increase slower than the overall production capacity. For power plants, this means that doubling the power production capacity would be expected to cost less than twice as much. Applying this property in the opposite direction, halving the power production capacity would be expected to cost more than half as much. This can potentially make the SMRs less competitive in the electricity market against the GW-class reactors, as well as against other power sources such as natural gas and subsidized renewables. One factor that can potentially aid the SMRs in achieving economic competitiveness is an economy of numbers, as opposed to the economy of scale, associated with learning curves. The basic concept of the learning curve is that the

  3. Assessment of quality outcomes for robotic pancreaticoduodenectomy: identification of the learning curve.

    PubMed

    Boone, Brian A; Zenati, Mazen; Hogg, Melissa E; Steve, Jennifer; Moser, Arthur James; Bartlett, David L; Zeh, Herbert J; Zureikat, Amer H

    2015-05-01

    Quality assessment is an important instrument to ensure optimal surgical outcomes, particularly during the adoption of new surgical technology. The use of the robotic platform for complex pancreatic resections, such as the pancreaticoduodenectomy, requires close monitoring of outcomes during its implementation phase to ensure patient safety is maintained and the learning curve identified. To report the results of a quality analysis and learning curve during the implementation of robotic pancreaticoduodenectomy (RPD). A retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database of 200 consecutive patients who underwent RPD in a large academic center from October 3, 2008, through March 1, 2014, was evaluated for important metrics of quality. Patients were analyzed in groups of 20 to minimize demographic differences and optimize the ability to detect statistically meaningful changes in performance. Robotic pancreaticoduodenectomy. Optimization of perioperative outcome parameters. No statistical differences in mortality rates or major morbidity were noted during the study. Statistical improvements in estimated blood loss and conversions to open surgery occurred after 20 cases (600 mL vs 250 mL [P = .002] and 35.0% vs 3.3% [P < .001], respectively), incidence of pancreatic fistula after 40 cases (27.5% vs 14.4%; P = .04), and operative time after 80 cases (581 minutes vs 417 minutes [P < .001]). Complication rates, lengths of stay, and readmission rates showed continuous improvement that did not reach statistical significance. Outcomes for the last 120 cases (representing optimized metrics beyond the learning curve) included a mean operative time of 417 minutes, median estimated blood loss of 250 mL, a conversion rate of 3.3%, 90-day mortality of 3.3%, a clinically significant (grade B/C) pancreatic fistula rate of 6.9%, and a median length of stay of 9 days. Continuous assessment of quality metrics allows for safe implementation of RPD. We identified

  4. Learning curve for gastric cancer patients with laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lin-Yong; Zhang, Wei-Han; Sun, Yan; Chen, Xin-Zu; Yang, Kun; Liu, Kai; Chen, Xiao-Long; Wang, Yi-Gao; Song, Xiao-Hai; Xue, Lian; Zhou, Zong-Guang; Hu, Jian-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Laparoscopy-assisted distal gastrectomy (LADG) is widely used for gastric cancer (GC) patients nowadays. This study aimed to investigate the time trend of outcomes so as to describe the learning curve for GC patients with LADG at a single medical institution in western China over a 6-year period. A total of 246 consecutive GC patients with LADG were divided into 5 groups (group A: 46 patients from 2006 to 2007; group B: 47 patients in 2008; group C: 49 patients in 2009; group D: 73 patients in 2010; and group E: 31 patients in 2011). All surgeries were conducted by the same surgeon. Comparative analyses were successively performed by Mann–Whitney U test or Student t test among the 5 different groups for the clinical data, including clinicopathologic characteristics, surgical parameters, postoperative course, and survival outcomes, through which the learning curve was described. There were no differences in the baseline information among the 5 groups (P > 0.05), and the proportion of advanced GC patients with LADG slightly increased from 58.7% to 77.4% during the 6 years. Besides, the proportion of D2/D2+ lymphadenectomy and the number of retrieved lymph nodes gradually grew from 60.9% to 80.6% and from 20.0 to 28.8, respectively. In addition, the operation time decreased from 299.2 to 267.8 minutes, while the estimated blood loss dropped from 175.2 to 146.8 mL. Furthermore, some surgical parameters (surgical duration and blood loss) and postoperative course (such as postoperative complications, the time to ambulation, to first flatus, and to first liquid intake as well as the length of hospital stay) were all observed to be significantly different between group A and other groups (P < 0.05), illustrating a similar downward trend and remaining stable to form a plateau after 46 cases in group A. However, no difference on overall survival was found among these 5 groups, and multivariate analysis indicated that factors, such as age, tumor

  5. Learning curves in abdominal wall reconstruction with components separation: one step closer toward improving outcomes and reducing complications.

    PubMed

    Hultman, Charles Scott; Clayton, John L; Kittinger, Benjamin J; Tong, Winnie M

    2014-01-01

    Learning curves are characterized by incremental improvement of a process, through repetition and reduction in variability, but can be disrupted with the emergence of new techniques and technologies. Abdominal wall reconstruction continues to evolve, with the introduction of components separation in the 1990s and biologic mesh in the 2000s. As such, attempts at innovation may impact the success of reconstructive outcomes and yield a changing set of complications. The purpose of this project was to describe the paradigm shift that has occurred in abdominal wall reconstruction during the past 10 years, focusing on the incorporation of new materials and methods. We reviewed 150 consecutive patients who underwent abdominal wall reconstruction of midline defects with components separation, from 2000 to 2010. Both univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify risk factors for complications. Patients were stratified into the following periods: early (2000-2003), middle (2004-2006), and late (2007-2010). From 2000 to 2010, we performed 150 abdominal wall reconstructions with components separation [mean age, 50.2 years; body mass index (BMI), 30.4; size of defect, 357 cm; length of stay, 9.6 days; follow-up, 4.4 years]. Primary fascial closure was performed in 120 patients. Mesh was used in 114 patients in the following locations: overlay (n = 28), inlay (n = 30), underlay (n = 54), and unknown (n = 2). Complications occurred in a bimodal distribution, highest in 2001 (introduction of biologic mesh) and 2008 (conversion from underlay to overlay location). Age, sex, history of smoking, defect size, and length of stay were not associated with incidence of complications. Unadjusted risk factors for seroma (16.8%) were elevated BMI, of previous hernia repairs, use of overlay mesh, and late portion of the learning curve, with logistic regression supporting only late portion of the learning curve [odds ratio (OR), 4.3; 95% confidence interval

  6. Gender and Early Learning Environments. Research on Women and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irby, Beverly, Ed.; Brown, Genevieve H., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The Research on Women and Education SIG of the American Educational Research Association presents the third book in its series, Gender and Early Learning Environments. Finding after the publication of Gender and Schooling in the Early Years, the second book in the series, that there was and is a paucity of published literature on early childhood…

  7. Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Surgery by a Neurosurgeon: Learning Curve for Neurosurgeons.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Seung-Jae; Han, Sanghyun; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Yongjung J; Rhim, Seung-Chul; Kim, Hyun-Jib

    2018-02-01

    To determine a neurosurgeon's learning curve of surgical treatment for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients. This study is a retrospective analysis. Forty-six patients were treated by a single neurosurgeon between 2011 and 2017 using posterior segmental instrumentation and fusion. According to the time period, the former and latter 23 patients were divided into group 1 and group 2, respectively. Patients' demographic data, curve magnitude, number of levels treated, amount of correction achieved, radiographic/clinical outcomes, and complications were compared between the groups. The majority were females (34 vs. 12) with average ages of 15.0 versus 15.6, respectively. The mean follow-up period was 24.6 months. The average number of fusion levels was similar with 10.3 and 11.5 vertebral bodies in groups 1 and 2, respectively. The average Cobb angle of major curvature was 59.8° and 58.5° in groups 1 and 2, respectively. There observed significant reductions of operative time (324.4 vs. 224.7 minutes, P = 0.007) and estimated blood loss (648.3 vs. 438.0 mL, P = 0.027) in group 2. The correction rate of the major structural curve was greater in group 2 (70.7% vs. 81.0%, P = 0.001). There was no case of neurologic deficit, infection, and revision for screw malposition. One patient of group 1 underwent fusion extension surgery for shoulder asymmetry. Radiographic and clinical outcomes of AIS patients treated by a neurosurgeon were acceptable. AIS surgery may be performed with an acceptable rate of complications after about 20 surgeries. With acquisition of surgical experiences, neurosurgeons could perform deformity surgery for AIS effectively and safely. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Digital tomosynthesis for evaluating metastatic lung nodules: nodule visibility, learning curves, and reading times.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Hee; Goo, Jin Mo; Lee, Sang Min; Park, Chang Min; Bahn, Young Eun; Kim, Hyungjin; Song, Yong Sub; Hwang, Eui Jin

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate nodule visibility, learning curves, and reading times for digital tomosynthesis (DT). We included 80 patients who underwent computed tomography (CT) and DT before pulmonary metastasectomy. One experienced chest radiologist annotated all visible nodules on thin-section CT scans using computer-aided detection software. Two radiologists used CT as the reference standard and retrospectively graded the visibility of nodules on DT. Nodule detection performance was evaluated in four sessions of 20 cases each by six readers. After each session, readers were unblinded to the DT images by revealing the true-positive markings and were instructed to self-analyze their own misreads. Receiver-operating-characteristic curves were determined. Among 414 nodules on CT, 53.3% (221/414) were visible on DT. The main reason for not seeing a nodule on DT was small size (93.3%, ≤ 5 mm). DT revealed a substantial number of malignant nodules (84.1%, 143/170). The proportion of malignant nodules among visible nodules on DT was significantly higher (64.7%, 143/221) than that on CT (41.1%, 170/414) (p < 0.001). Area under the curve (AUC) values at the initial session were > 0.8, and the average detection rate for malignant nodules was 85% (210/246). The inter-session analysis of the AUC showed no significant differences among the readers, and the detection rate for malignant nodules did not differ across sessions. A slight improvement in reading times was observed. Most malignant nodules > 5 mm were visible on DT. As nodule detection performance was high from the initial session, DT may be readily applicable for radiology residents and board-certified radiologists.

  9. Kant, curves and medical learning practice: a reply to Le Morvan and Stock.

    PubMed

    Ives, J

    2007-02-01

    In a recent paper published in the Journal of Medical Ethics, Le Morvan and Stock claim that the kantian ideal of treating people always as ends in themselves and never merely as a means is in direct and insurmountable conflict with the current medical practice of allowing practitioners at the bottom of their "learning curve" to "practise their skills" on patients. In this response, I take up the challenge they issue [corrected] and try to reconcile this conflict. The kantian ideal offered in the paper is an incomplete characterisation of Kant's moral philosophy, and the formula of humanity is considered in isolation without taking into account other salient kantian principles. I also suggest that their argument based on "necessary for the patient" assumes too narrow a reading of "necessary". This reply is intended as an extension to, rather than a criticism of, their work.

  10. The Learning Curve in neurofeedback of Peter Van Deusen: A review article

    PubMed Central

    Ribas, Valdenilson Ribeiro; Ribas, Renata de Melo Guerra; Martins, Hugo André de Lima

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Learning Curve (TLC) in neurofeedback concept emerged after Peter Van Deusen compiled the results of articles on the expected electrical activity of the brain. This concept was subsequently tested on patients at four clinics in Atlanta between 1994 and 2001. The aim of this paper was to report the historical aspects of TLC. Articles published on the electronic databases MEDLINE/PubMed and Web of Science were reviewed. During patient evaluation, TLC investigates categories called disconnected, hot temporal lobes, reversal of alpha and beta waves, blocking, locking, and filtering or processing. This enables neuroscientists to use their training designs and, by means of behavioral psychology, to work on neuroregulation, as self-regulation for patients. TLC shows the relationships between electrical, mental and behavioral activity in patients. It also identifies details of patterns that can assist physicians in their choice of treatment. PMID:29213440

  11. Carotid Artery Stenting – Strategies to Improve Procedural Performance and Reduce the Learning Curve

    PubMed Central

    Van Herzeele, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Carotid artery stenting (CAS) remains an appealing intervention to reduce the stroke risk because of its minimal invasive nature. Nevertheless, landmark randomised controlled trials have not been able to resolve the controversies surrounding this complex procedure as the peri-operative stroke risk in a non-selected patient population still seems to be higher after CAS in comparison to carotid endarterectomy. What is more, these trials have highlighted that patient outcome after CAS is influenced by patient- and operator-dependant factors. The CAS procedure exhibits a definitive learning curve resulting in higher complication rates if the procedure is performed by inexperienced interventionists or in low-volume centres. This article will outline strategies to improve the performance of physicians carrying out the CAS procedure by means of proficiency-based training, credentialing, virtual reality rehearsal and optimal patient selection. PMID:29588751

  12. Use of the cumulative sum method (CUSUM) to assess the learning curves of ultrasound-guided continuous femoral nerve block.

    PubMed

    Kollmann-Camaiora, A; Brogly, N; Alsina, E; Gilsanz, F

    2017-10-01

    Although ultrasound is a basic competence for anaesthesia residents (AR) there is few data available on the learning process. This prospective observational study aims to assess the learning process of ultrasound-guided continuous femoral nerve block and to determine the number of procedures that a resident would need to perform in order to reach proficiency using the cumulative sum (CUSUM) method. We recruited 19 AR without previous experience. Learning curves were constructed using the CUSUM method for ultrasound-guided continuous femoral nerve block considering 2 success criteria: a decrease of pain score>2 in a [0-10] scale after 15minutes, and time required to perform it. We analyse data from 17 AR for a total of 237 ultrasound-guided continuous femoral nerve blocks. 8/17 AR became proficient for pain relief, however all the AR who did more than 12 blocks (8/8) became proficient. As for time of performance 5/17 of AR achieved the objective of 12minutes, however all the AR who did more than 20 blocks (4/4) achieved it. The number of procedures needed to achieve proficiency seems to be 12, however it takes more procedures to reduce performance time. The CUSUM methodology could be useful in training programs to allow early interventions in case of repeated failures, and develop competence-based curriculum. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. CUSUM method for construction of trainee spinal ultrasound learning curves following standardised teaching.

    PubMed

    Deacon, A J; Melhuishi, N S; Terblanche, N C S

    2014-07-01

    Spinal ultrasonography is a promising aid for epidural insertion. We aimed to determine the learning curve of spinal ultrasonography tasks and the number of training scans required to reach competency after undergoing standardised step-wise teaching. Trainees were required to complete a minimum of 60 assessed scans on selected non-pregnant models following attendance at two training sessions, with feedback from an expert after each scan. Learning curves were plotted using the non-risk cumulative summation technique and an acceptable failure rate of 20%. Five trainees completed between 65 and 75 scans each. All trainees were competent at identifying a randomly assigned intervertebral space after a median of five scans (range one to nine) and at measuring the depth from skin to the posterior complex after a median of 10 scans (range 1 to 42). Two trainees were competent at marking an ideal needle insertion point after 55 scans, while three trainees did not attain competency. All trainees were competent after 60 scans if the tolerance was changed from five to eight millimetre for marking the needle insertion point. The average time taken to complete a scan was 163 seconds. Our study showed that after a standardised educational intervention, anaesthetic trainees are able to identify a lumbar interlaminar space easily and can measure the depth to the posterior complex after a reasonable number of additional practice scans, but experienced difficulty accurately marking the needle insertion point whilst using spinal ultrasonography. We confirmed that it was hard to achieve competency in all aspects of spinal ultrasonography, based on assessment using our predefined competency criteria.

  14. Safety, efficiency and learning curves in robotic surgery: a human factors analysis.

    PubMed

    Catchpole, Ken; Perkins, Colby; Bresee, Catherine; Solnik, M Jonathon; Sherman, Benjamin; Fritch, John; Gross, Bruno; Jagannathan, Samantha; Hakami-Majd, Niv; Avenido, Raymund; Anger, Jennifer T

    2016-09-01

    Expense, efficiency of use, learning curves, workflow integration and an increased prevalence of serious incidents can all be barriers to adoption. We explored an observational approach and initial diagnostics to enhance total system performance in robotic surgery. Eighty-nine robotic surgical cases were observed in multiple operating rooms using two different surgical robots (the S and Si), across several specialties (Urology, Gynecology, and Cardiac Surgery). The main measures were operative duration and rate of flow disruptions-described as 'deviations from the natural progression of an operation thereby potentially compromising safety or efficiency.' Contextual parameters collected were surgeon experience level and training, type of surgery, the model of robot and patient factors. Observations were conducted across four operative phases (operating room pre-incision; robot docking; main surgical intervention; post-console). A mean of 9.62 flow disruptions per hour (95 % CI 8.78-10.46) were predominantly caused by coordination, communication, equipment and training problems. Operative duration and flow disruption rate varied with surgeon experience (p = 0.039; p < 0.001, respectively), training cases (p = 0.012; p = 0.007) and surgical type (both p < 0.001). Flow disruption rates in some phases were also sensitive to the robot model and patient characteristics. Flow disruption rate is sensitive to system context and generates improvement diagnostics. Complex surgical robotic equipment increases opportunities for technological failures, increases communication requirements for the whole team, and can reduce the ability to maintain vision in the operative field. These data suggest specific opportunities to reduce the training costs and the learning curve.

  15. [Video-assisted thoracic surgery to treat spinal deformities: climbing the learning curve].

    PubMed

    Rivo Vázquez, José Eduardo; Cañizares Carretero, Miguel Angel; García Fontán, Eva; Blanco Ramos, Montserrat; Varela Ares, Ermitas; Justo Tarrazo, César

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of the learning curve on the preliminary results of video-assisted thoracic surgery for spinal deformities in a general hospital setting. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 15 patients who underwent video-assisted thoracic surgery performed by a multidisciplinary team comprising orthopedic and thoracic surgeons. Endoscopic anterior release and fusion were followed by posterior instrumentation in a single procedure. Demographic, orthopedic, morbidity, and mortality statistics were compiled for the 15 patients and compared to results reported for similar series. Endoscopic surgery was indicated for 15 patients: 11 women (73.3%) and 4 men (26.7%). The median age was 15 years (interquartile range [IQR], 14-19 years). Three patients (20%) required conversion to thoracotomy. There were 2 serious (13.3%) and 3 minor complications (20%). They all resolved satisfactorily and there was no perioperative mortality. The median Cobb angle was 71 degrees (IQR, 63.75 degrees -75.25 degrees ) before surgery and 41 degrees (IQR, 30 degrees -50 degrees ) after surgery. Median duration of surgery was 360 minutes (IQR, 300-360 minutes), duration of postoperative recovery unit stay was 1.5 days (IQR, 1-2.75 days), and total hospital stay was 11.5 days (IQR, 8.25-14 days). Despite the complexity of video-assisted thoracic surgical procedures, we believe they will become the standard approach to treating spinal deformities in the near future. By working together in general hospital settings, orthopedic and thoracic surgeons can help to overcome the steep yet manageable learning curve.

  16. Endoscopic Evacuation of Basal Ganglia Hematoma: Surgical Technique, Outcome, and Learning Curve.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lichao; Hou, Yuanzheng; Zhu, Ruyuan; Chen, Xiaolei

    2017-05-01

    Minimally invasive endoscopic hematoma evacuation is a promising treatment option for intracerebral hemorrhage. However, the technique still needs improvement. We report our clinical experience of using this technique to evacuate deep-seated basal ganglia hematomas. The frontal approach was used in most patients. The preoperative and postoperative hematoma volumes, Glasgow Coma Scale, hematoma evacuation rate, 30-day mortality, and long-term outcome defined by the modified Rankin Scale were analyzed retrospectively. The surgical duration per milliliter of clot (DPM) was calculated. The learning curve for this technique was determined based on the relation between the DPM and evacuation rate per the number of cases experienced. A total of 24 patients were enrolled. The evacuation rate was 87% ± 10%. The average Glasgow Coma Scale score recovered from 8 to 13 after surgery. Twenty-one patients had follow-up data. The follow-up time was 13 ± 6 months. The 30-day mortality after surgery was zero. Forty-eight percent of patients (10/21) achieved a favorable outcome. The DPM (P = 0.92) and evacuation rate (P = 0.64) did not change substantially with the number of cases experienced. Endoscopic port surgery for hematoma evacuation via the frontal approach is a safe surgical option for deep-seated basal ganglia hematomas. This technique is minimally invasive and may be helpful to provide better long-term outcomes for selected patients. For neurosurgeons, the learning curve for this technique is steep, which implies that the skills needed for our technique can be easily acquired. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The learning curve of robot-assisted radical cystectomy: results from the International Robotic Cystectomy Consortium.

    PubMed

    Hayn, Matthew H; Hussain, Abid; Mansour, Ahmed M; Andrews, Paul E; Carpentier, Paul; Castle, Erik; Dasgupta, Prokar; Rimington, Peter; Thomas, Raju; Khan, Shamim; Kibel, Adam; Kim, Hyung; Manoharan, Murugesan; Menon, Mani; Mottrie, Alex; Ornstein, David; Peabody, James; Pruthi, Raj; Palou Redorta, Joan; Richstone, Lee; Schanne, Francis; Stricker, Hans; Wiklund, Peter; Chandrasekhar, Rameela; Wilding, Greg E; Guru, Khurshid A

    2010-08-01

    Robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) has evolved as a minimally invasive alternative to open radical cystectomy for patients with invasive bladder cancer. We sought to define the learning curve for RARC by evaluating results from a multicenter, contemporary, consecutive series of patients who underwent this procedure. Utilizing the International Robotic Cystectomy Consortium database, a prospectively maintained and institutional review board-approved database, we identified 496 patients who underwent RARC by 21 surgeons at 14 institutions from 2003 to 2009. Cut-off points for operative time, lymph node yield (LNY), estimated blood loss (EBL), and margin positivity were identified. Using specifically designed statistical mixed models, we were able to inversely predict the number of patients required for an institution to reach the predetermined cut-off points. Mean operative time was 386 min, mean EBL was 408 ml, and mean LNY was 18. Overall, 34 of 482 patients (7%) had a positive surgical margin (PSM). Using statistical models, it was estimated that 21 patients were required for operative time to reach 6.5h and 8, 20, and 30 patients were required to reach an LNY of 12, 16, and 20, respectively. For all patients, PSM rates of <5% were achieved after 30 patients. For patients with pathologic stage higher than T2, PSM rates of <15% were achieved after 24 patients. RARC is a challenging procedure but is a technique that is reproducible throughout multiple centers. This report helps to define the learning curve for RARC and demonstrates an acceptable level of proficiency by the 30th case for proxy measures of RARC quality. Copyright (c) 2010 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Quantitative analysis of a spinal surgeon's learning curve for scoliosis surgery.

    PubMed

    Ryu, K J; Suh, S W; Kim, H W; Lee, D H; Yoon, Y; Hwang, J H

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was a quantitative analysis of a surgeon's learning curve for scoliosis surgery and the relationship between the surgeon's experience and post-operative outcomes, which has not been previously well described. We have investigated the operating time as a function of the number of patients to determine a specific pattern; we analysed factors affecting the operating time and compared intra- and post-operative outcomes. We analysed 47 consecutive patients undergoing scoliosis surgery performed by a single, non-trained scoliosis surgeon. Operating time was recorded for each of the four parts of the procedures: dissection, placement of pedicle screws, reduction of the deformity and wound closure. The median operating time was 310 minutes (interquartile range 277.5 to 432.5). The pattern showed a continuous decreasing trend in operating time until the patient number reached 23 to 25, after which it stabilised with fewer patient-dependent changes. The operating time was more affected by the patient number (r =- 0.75) than the number of levels fused (r = 0.59). Blood loss (p = 0.016) and length of stay in hospital (p = 0.012) were significantly less after the operating time stabilised. Post-operative functional outcome scores and the rate of complications showed no significant differences. We describe a detailed learning curve for scoliosis surgery based on a single surgeon's practise, providing useful information for novice scoliosis surgeons and for those responsible for training in spinal surgery. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:679-85. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  19. Early clinical experience: do students learn what we expect?

    PubMed

    Helmich, Esther; Bolhuis, Sanneke; Laan, Roland; Koopmans, Raymond

    2011-07-01

    Early clinical experience is thought to contribute to the professional development of medical students, but little is known about the kind of learning processes that actually take place. Learning in practice is highly informal and may be difficult to direct by predefined learning outcomes. Learning in medical practice includes a socialisation process in which some learning outcomes may be valued, but others neglected or discouraged. This study describes students' learning goals (prior to a Year 1 nursing attachment) and learning outcomes (after the attachment) in relation to institutional educational goals, and evaluates associations between learning outcomes, student characteristics and place of attachment. A questionnaire containing open-ended questions about learning goals and learning outcomes was administered to all Year 1 medical students (n = 347) before and directly after a 4-week nursing attachment in either a hospital or a nursing home. Two confirmatory focus group interviews were conducted and data were analysed using qualitative and quantitative content analyses. Students' learning goals corresponded with educational goals with a main emphasis on communication and empathy. Other learning goals included gaining insight into the organisation of health care and learning to deal with emotions. Self-reported learning outcomes were the same, but students additionally mentioned reflection on professional behaviour and their own future development. Women and younger students mentioned communication and empathy more often than men and older students. Individual learning goals, with the exception of communicating and empathising with patients, did not predict learning outcomes. Students' learning goals closely match educational goals, which are adequately met in early nursing attachments in both hospitals and nursing homes. Learning to deal with emotions was under-represented as a learning goal and learning outcome, which may indicate that emotional aspects

  20. Minimally invasive video-assisted thyroid surgery: how can we improve the learning curve?

    PubMed

    Castagnola, G; Giulii Cappone, M; Tierno, S M; Mezzetti, G; Centanini, F; Vetrone, I; Bellotti, C

    2012-10-01

    Minimally invasive video-assisted thyroidectomy (MIVAT) is a technically demanding procedure and requires a surgical team skilled in both endocrine and endoscopic surgery. A time consuming learning and training period is mandatory at the beginning of the experience. The aim of our report is to focus some aspects of the learning curve of the surgeon who practices video-assisted thyroid procedures for the first time, through the analysis of our preliminary series of 36 cases. From September 2004 to April 2005 we selected 36 patients for minimally invasive video-assisted surgery of the thyroid. The patients were considered eligible if they presented with a nodule not exceeding 35 mm in maximum diameter; total thyroid volume within normal range; absence of biochemical and echographic signs of thyroiditis. We analyzed surgical results, conversion rate, operating time, post-operative complications, hospital stay, cosmetic outcome of the series. We performed 36 total thyroidectomy. The procedure was successfully carried out in 33/36 cases. Post-operative complications included 3 transient recurrent nerve palsies and 2 transient hypocalcemias; no definitive hypoparathyroidism was registered. All patients were discharged 2 days after operation. The cosmetic result was considered excellent by most patients. Advances in skills and technology have enabled surgeons to reproduce most open surgical techniques with video-assistance or laparoscopically. Training is essential to acquire any new surgical technique and it should be organized in detail to exploit it completely.

  1. Rapid learning curve assessment in an ex vivo training system for microincisional glaucoma surgery.

    PubMed

    Dang, Yalong; Waxman, Susannah; Wang, Chao; Parikh, Hardik A; Bussel, Igor I; Loewen, Ralitsa T; Xia, Xiaobo; Lathrop, Kira L; Bilonick, Richard A; Loewen, Nils A

    2017-05-09

    Increasing prevalence and cost of glaucoma have increased the demand for surgeons well trained in newer, microincisional surgery. These procedures occur in a highly confined space, making them difficult to learn by observation or assistance alone as is currently done. We hypothesized that our ex vivo outflow model is sensitive enough to allow computing individual learning curves to quantify progress and refine techniques. Seven trainees performed nine trabectome-mediated ab interno trabeculectomies in pig eyes (n = 63). An expert surgeon rated the procedure using an Operating Room Score (ORS). The extent of outflow beds accessed was measured with canalograms. Data was fitted using mixed effect models. ORS reached a half-maximum on an asymptote after only 2.5 eyes. Surgical time decreased by 1.4 minutes per eye in a linear fashion. The ablation arc followed an asymptotic function with a half-maximum inflection point after 5.3 eyes. Canalograms revealed that this progress did not correlate well with improvement in outflow, suggesting instead that about 30 eyes are needed for true mastery. This inexpensive pig eye model provides a safe and effective microsurgical training model and allows objective quantification of outcomes for the first time.

  2. A learning curve-based method to implement multifunctional work teams in the Brazilian footwear sector.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, L B de M; Anzanello, M J; Renner, J S

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents a method for implementing multifunctional work teams in a footwear company that followed the Taylor/Ford system for decades. The suggested framework first applies a Learning Curve (LC) modeling to assess whether rotation between tasks of different complexities affects workers' learning rate and performance. Next, the Macroergonomic Work Analysis (MA) method (Guimarães, 1999, 2009) introduces multifunctional principles in work teams towards workers' training and resources improvement. When applied to a pilot line consisting of 100 workers, the intervention-reduced work related accidents in 80%, absenteeism in 45.65%, and eliminated work related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD), medical consultations, and turnover. Further, the output rate of the multifunctional team increased average 3% compared to the production rate of the regular lines following the Taylor/Ford system (with the same shoe model being manufactured), while the rework and spoilage rates were reduced 85% and 69%, respectively. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterizing the Learning Curve of the VBLaST-PT© (Virtual Basic Laparoscopic Skill Trainer)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Likun; Sankaranarayanan, Ganesh; Arikatla, Venkata Sreekanth; Ahn, Woojin; Grosdemouge, Cristol; Rideout, Jesse M.; Epstein, Scott K.; De, Suvranu; Schwaitzberg, Steven D.; Jones, Daniel B.; Cao, Caroline G.L.

    2013-01-01

    Background and study aim Mastering laparoscopic surgical skills requires considerable time and effort. The Virtual Basic Laparoscopic Skill Trainer (VBLaST-PT©) is being developed as a computerized version of the peg transfer task of the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS) system using virtual reality technology. We assessed the learning curve of trainees on the VBLaST-PT© using the cumulative summation (CUSUM) method and compared them with those on the FLS to establish convergent validity for the VBLaST-PT©. Methods Eighteen medical students from were assigned randomly to one of three groups: control, VBLaST-training and FLS-training. The VBLaST and the FLS groups performed a total of 150 trials of the peg-transfer task over a three week period, five days a week. Their CUSUM scores were computed based on pre-defined performance criteria (junior, intermediate and senior levels). Results Of the six subjects in the VBLaST-training group, five achieved at least the “junior” level, three achieved the “intermediate” level and one achieved the “senior” level of performance criterion by the end of the 150 trials. In comparison, for the FLS group, three students achieved the “senior” criterion and all six students achieved the “intermediate” and “junior” criteria by the 150th trials. Both the VBLaST-PT© and the FLS systems showed significant skill improvement and retention, albeit with system specificity as measured by transfer of learning in the retention test: The VBLaST-trained group performed better on the VBLaST-PT© than on FLS (p=0.003), while the FLS-trained group performed better on the FLS than on VBLaST-PT© (p=0.002). Conclusion We characterized the learning curve for a virtual peg transfer task on the VBLaST-PT© and compared it with the FLS using CUSUM analysis. Subjects in both training groups showed significant improvement in skill performance, but the transfer of training between systems was not significant. PMID:23572217

  4. Learning Curve and Clinical Outcomes of Performing Surgery with the InterTan Intramedullary Nail in Treating Femoral Intertrochanteric Fractures

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the learning curve of performing surgery with the InterTan intramedullary nail in treating femoral intertrochanteric fractures, to provide valuable information and experience for surgeons who decide to learn a new procedure. Methods. We retrospectively analyzed data from 53 patients who underwent surgery using an InterTan intramedullary nail at our hospital between July 2012 and September 2015. The negative exponential curve-fit regression analysis was used to evaluate the learning curve. According to 90% learning milestone, patients were divided into two group, and the outcomes were compared. Results. The mean operative time was 69.28 (95% CI 64.57 to 74.00) minutes; with the accumulation of surgical experience, the operation time was gradually decreased. 90% of the potential improvement was expected after 18 cases. In terms of operative time, intraoperative blood loss, hospital stay, and Harris hip score significant differences were found between two groups (p = 0.009, p = 0.000, p = 0.030, and p = 0.002, resp.). Partial weight bearing time, fracture union time, tip apex distance, and the number of blood transfusions and complications were similar between two groups (p > 0.5). Conclusion. This study demonstrated that the learning curve of performing surgery with the InterTan intramedullary nail is acceptable and 90% of the expert's proficiency level is achieved at around 18 cases. PMID:28503572

  5. Learning Curve for Seawater Reverse Osmosis Desalination Plants: Capital Cost Trend of the Past, Present, and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldera, Upeksha; Breyer, Christian

    2017-12-01

    Seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) desalination is expected to play a pivotal role in helping to secure future global water supply. While the global reliance on SWRO plants for water security increases, there is no consensus on how the capital costs of SWRO plants will vary in the future. The aim of this paper is to analyze the past trends of the SWRO capital expenditures (capex) as the historic global cumulative online SWRO capacity increases, based on the learning curve concept. The SWRO capex learning curve is found based on 4,237 plants that came online from 1977 to 2015. A learning rate of 15% is determined, implying that the SWRO capex reduced by 15% when the cumulative capacity was doubled. Based on SWRO capacity annual growth rates of 10% and 20%, by 2030, the global average capex of SWRO plants is found to fall to 1,580 USD/(m3/d) and 1,340 USD/(m3/d), respectively. A learning curve for SWRO capital costs has not been presented previously. This research highlights the potential for decrease in SWRO capex with the increase in installation of SWRO plants and the value of the learning curve approach to estimate future SWRO capex.

  6. CUSUM analysis of learning curves for the head-mounted microscope in phonomicrosurgery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Vamos, Andrew C; Dailey, Seth H; Jiang, Jack J

    2016-10-01

    To observe the learning curve of the head-mounted microscope in a phonomicrosurgery simulator using cumulative summation (CUSUM) analysis, which incorporates a magnetic phonomicrosurgery instrument tracking system (MPTS). Retrospective case series. Eight subjects (6 medical students and 2 surgeons inexperienced in phonomicrosurgery) operated on phonomicrosurgical simulation cutting tasks while using the head-mounted microscope for 400 minutes total. Two 20-minute sessions occurred each day for 10 total days, with operation quality (Qs ) and completion time (T) being recorded after each session. Cumulative summation analysis of Qs and T was performed by using subjects' performance data from trials completed using a traditional standing microscope as success criteria. The motion parameters from the head-mounted microscope were significantly better than the standing microscope (P < 0.01), but T was longer than that from the standing microscope (P < 0.01). No subject successfully adapted to the head-mounted microscope, as assessed by CUSUM analysis. Cumulative summation analysis can objectively monitor the learning process associated with a phonomicrosurgical simulator system, ultimately providing a tool to assess learning status. Also, motion parameters determined by our MPTS showed that, although the head-mounted microscope provides better motion control, worse Qs and longer T resulted. This decrease in Qs is likely a result of the relatively unstable visual environment that it provides. Overall, the inexperienced surgeons participating in this study failed to adapt to the head-mounted microscope in our simulated phonomicrosurgery environment. 4 Laryngoscope, 126:2295-2300, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  7. Is there a new learning curve with transition to a new resurfacing system?

    PubMed

    Johnson, Aaron J; Costa, Christopher R; Naziri, Qais; Mont, Michael A

    2011-01-01

    Metal-on-metal hip resurfacing has been proven to be a successful option for treating hip osteoarthritis in young, active patients. However, compared to a standard primary hip arthroplasty, hip resurfacing has a higher degree of technical difficulty. While all resurfacing systems utilize similar principles, there can be some variation in surgical technique. The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a second learning curve when a surgeon transitioned from one hip resurfacing system to another. In 2007, the senior investigator (MAM) transitioned from using one resurfacing system for a majority of his patients to a different system. The records of 200 resurfacings were reviewed, including the last 150 patients who underwent this procedure prior to the switch, and who were then compared with the first 50 patients using a newer system. The mean age and mean body mass index (BMI) of the patients in the prior 150-patient group was 53 years and 28 kg/m2, respectively, compared to a mean age of 51 years and a mean BMI of 29 kg/m2 in the newer system group. The mean follow-up for the prior 150 patients was 45 months (range, 40 to 50 months), compared to 31 months (range, 25 to 37 months) for the first 50 receiving the new system. Clinical survivorship and complications were monitored, and clinical outcomes were evaluated using Harris hip scores. The implant survival rate of the last 150 patients regarding the first resurfacing system was 97.3 (146/150), compared to 100% survival with the second system. The mean Harris hip score improved from 61 points (range, 40 to 76 points) to 93 points (range, 50 to 100 points) in the first group and from 52 points (range, 31 to 83 points) to 97 points (range, 86 to 100 points) in the latter group. There were four revisions: three for femoral neck fractures and one for unexplained groin pain; two revisions were in the postoperative period, and one was 1-year postoperative and the other 2-years postoperative. Of these four

  8. Learning Partnerships in Rural Early Childhood Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coombe, Kennece; Lubawy, Joy

    2002-01-01

    A study examined the value of six theoretical aspects of learning communities in rural New South Wales (Australia) preschools. Surveys of nine preschool directors indicated that they recognized the value of shared decision making, reflection, and delegating power, and that open communication was necessary for developing a learning environment…

  9. Femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery with bimanual technique: learning curve for an experienced cataract surgeon.

    PubMed

    Cavallini, Gian Maria; Verdina, Tommaso; De Maria, Michele; Fornasari, Elisa; Volpini, Elisa; Campi, Luca

    2017-11-29

    To describe the intraoperative complications and the learning curve of microincision cataract surgery assisted by femtosecond laser (FLACS) with bimanual technique performed by an experienced surgeon. It is a prospective, observational, comparative case series. A total of 120 eyes which underwent bimanual FLACS by the same experienced surgeon during his first experience were included in the study; we considered the first 60 cases as Group A and the second 60 cases as Group B. In both groups, only nuclear sclerosis of grade 2 or 3 was included; an intraocular lens was implanted through a 1.4-mm incision. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), surgically induced astigmatism (SIA), central corneal thickness and endothelial cell loss (ECL) were evaluated before and at 1 and 3 months after surgery. Intraoperative parameters, and intra- and post-operative complications were recorded. In Group A, we had femtosecond laser-related minor complications in 11 cases (18.3%) and post-operative complications in 2 cases (3.3%); in Group B, we recorded 2 cases (3.3%) of femtosecond laser-related minor complications with no post-operative complications. Mean effective phaco time (EPT) was 5.32 ± 3.68 s in Group A and 4.34 ± 2.39 s in Group B with a significant difference (p = 0.046). We recorded a significant mean BCVA improvement at 3 months in both groups (p < 0.05) and no significant SIA nor corneal pachymetry changes in the two groups during the follow-up (p > 0.05). Finally, we found significant ECL in both groups with a significant difference between the two groups (p = 0.042). FLACS with bimanual technique and low-energy LDV Z8 is associated with a necessary initial learning curve. After the first adjustments in the surgical technique, this technology seems to be safe and effective with rapid visual recovery and it helps surgeons to standardize the crucial steps of cataract surgery.

  10. Early Learning and Development: Cultural-Historical Concepts in Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleer, Marilyn

    2010-01-01

    "Early Learning and Development" provides a unique synthesis of cultural-historical theory from Vygotsky, Elkonin and Leontiev in the 20th century to the ground-breaking research of scholars such as Siraj-Blatchford, Kratsova and Hedegaard today. It demonstrates how development and learning are culturally embedded and institutionally defined, and…

  11. iPads: Improving Numeracy Learning in the Early Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Peta

    2013-01-01

    The concept of mobile technologies is now an emergency theme in educational research, yet the playing of these edutainment applications and their impact on early childhood learning needs to be fully explored. This study highlights current research and explores how iPads improve student learning. It also examines how the introduction of iPads,…

  12. A New Tool to Facilitate Learning Reading for Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puspitasari, Cita; Subiyanto

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a new android application for early childhood learning reading. The description includes a design, development, and an evaluation experiment of an educational game for learning reading on android. Before developing the game, Unified Modeling Language (UML) diagrams, interfaces, animation, narrative or audio were designed.…

  13. Formula for Success: Engaging Families in Early Math Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Global Family Research Project, 2017

    2017-01-01

    Early math ability is one of the best predictors of children's later success in school. Because children's learning begins in the home, families are fundamental in shaping children's interest and skills in math. The experience of learning and doing math, however, looks different from the instruction that was offered when most adults were in…

  14. Early Education of the Language-Learning Handicapped Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easter Seal Treatment Center of Montgomery County, Rockville, MD.

    The brochure descrbies a demonstration program on the early education of the language learning handicapped preschool child. Discussed are symptoms of the language learning problem (such as misunderstanding what is said), a remedial approach based on specific disability intervention, the Easter Seal Treatment Center, project objectives (such as the…

  15. Digital Discourses in Early Childhood Educator Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Emily Brown

    2017-01-01

    Active, dialogic participation is a necessary component of high quality teacher professional learning (Dunst, Bruder, & Hamby, 2015). However, logistical problems arise when implementing cooperative learning opportunities for early childhood educators, as preschool teachers are habitually separated from peers both institutionally and…

  16. Factors predicting early postpartum glucose intolerance in Japanese women with gestational diabetes mellitus: decision-curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Kondo, M; Nagao, Y; Mahbub, M H; Tanabe, T; Tanizawa, Y

    2018-04-29

    To identify factors predicting early postpartum glucose intolerance in Japanese women with gestational diabetes mellitus, using decision-curve analysis. A retrospective cohort study was performed. The participants were 123 Japanese women with gestational diabetes who underwent 75-g oral glucose tolerance tests at 8-12 weeks after delivery. They were divided into a glucose intolerance and a normal glucose tolerance group based on postpartum oral glucose tolerance test results. Analysis of the pregnancy oral glucose tolerance test results showed predictive factors for postpartum glucose intolerance. We also evaluated the clinical usefulness of the prediction model based on decision-curve analysis. Of 123 women, 78 (63.4%) had normoglycaemia and 45 (36.6%) had glucose intolerance. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed insulinogenic index/fasting immunoreactive insulin and summation of glucose levels, assessed during pregnancy oral glucose tolerance tests (total glucose), to be independent risk factors for postpartum glucose intolerance. Evaluating the regression models, the best discrimination (area under the curve 0.725) was obtained using the basic model (i.e. age, family history of diabetes, BMI ≥25 kg/m 2 and use of insulin during pregnancy) plus insulinogenic index/fasting immunoreactive insulin <1.1. Decision-curve analysis showed that combining insulinogenic index/fasting immunoreactive insulin <1.1 with basic clinical information resulted in superior net benefits for prediction of postpartum glucose intolerance. Insulinogenic index/fasting immunoreactive insulin calculated using oral glucose tolerance test results during pregnancy is potentially useful for predicting early postpartum glucose intolerance in Japanese women with gestational diabetes. © 2018 Diabetes UK.

  17. Evaluation of the learning curve of laparoscopic choledochal cyst excision and Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy in children: CUSUM analysis of a single surgeon's experience.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zhe; Liang, Huiying; Liang, Jiankun; Liang, Qifeng; Xia, Huimin

    2017-02-01

    Laparoscopic cyst excision and Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy is gaining popularity as a treatment for choledochal cyst (CDC) in children. However, the learning curve for this challenging laparoscopic procedure has not been addressed. The aim of this study is to determine the characteristics of the learning curve of this procedure. This may guide the training in institutions currently not using this technique. A prospectively collected database comprising all medical records of the first 104 consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic CDC excision and Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy performed by one surgeon was studied. Multifactorial linear/logistic regression analysis was performed to identify patient-, surgeon-, and procedure-related factors associated with operating times, rates of adverse event, and length of postoperative stay. Cumulative sum analysis demonstrated a learning curve for laparoscopic choledochal cyst excision of 37 cases. Comparing the early with the late experiences (37 vs. 67 cases), the surgeon-specific outcomes significantly improved in terms of operating times (352 vs. 240 min; P < 0.001), postoperative complication rate (13.5 vs. 1.5 %; P = 0.02), and the length of hospital stay (9.4 vs. 7.8 days; P = 0.01). After multivariate analyses, independent predictors of operating times included the completion of the learning curve (CLC) (OR 0.68, 95 % CI 0.63-0.73) and adhesion score (OR middle 1.25, 95 % CI 1.08-1.45; OR high 1.40, 95 % CI 1.20-1.62; compared with the low score); significant predictors of perioperative adverse outcomes were CLC (OR 0.07, 95 % CI 0.02-0.34) and comorbidities prior to the surgery (OR 30.65, 95 % CI 1.71-549.63). The independent predictors of length of postoperative stay included CLC, preoperative comorbidities, and perioperative adverse events. CLC for laparoscopic choledochal cyst excision is 37 cases. After CLC, not only the operative time is reduced, the complications, adverse results, and the length

  18. Overview: Measuring Early Learning Quality and Outcomes (MELQO)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookings Institution, 2017

    2017-01-01

    The Measuring Early Learning Quality and Outcomes (MELQO) initiative began in 2014 in anticipation of a new global emphasis on early childhood development (ECD). Led by UNESCO, the World Bank, the Center for Universal Education at the Brookings Institution, and UNICEF, the initiative aims to promote feasible, accurate and useful measurement of…

  19. Learning with Technology for Pre-Service Early Childhood Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Anne; Scotellaro, Grazia

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes an innovative pilot project at the University of Canberra aimed at providing pre-service early childhood teachers with the skills, confidence and ideological change required to include technology-enhanced learning as part of the early childhood curriculum. The impact of the project was evaluated through participant…

  20. Beyond Subprime Learning: Accelerating Progress in Early Education. Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornfreund, Laura; McCann, Clare; Williams, Conor; Guernsey, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Earlier this year, in "Subprime Learning: Early Education in America since the Great Recession," the current state of early education in the U.S. was surveyed by examining progress over the last five years . It was found that while the public, political, and research consensus is stronger than ever, the field remains in dire need of…

  1. Learning to Teach in the Early Years Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaise, Mindy; Nuttal, Joce

    2011-01-01

    "Learning to Teach in the Early Years Classroom" helps teacher education students understand the complexities of teaching in early years' classrooms. It integrates research and theory with practice through vignettes, based on authentic classroom case studies, in order to show students how educators make decisions and achieve expected outcomes.…

  2. Building a Community of Learning through Early Residential Fieldwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Cathy; Larsen, Carl; Parry, Damian

    2014-01-01

    The positioning of residential fieldwork early in students' higher education is an established way of attempting to build and engage them in a community of learning. In the study reported here, the benefits of such early residential fieldwork were investigated using Krausse and Coates's seven scales of engagement. These scales consider a number of…

  3. Early Boost and Slow Consolidation in Motor Skill Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hotermans, Christophe; Peigneux, Philippe; de Noordhout, Alain Maertens; Moonen, Gustave; Maquet, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Motor skill learning is a dynamic process that continues covertly after training has ended and eventually leads to delayed increments in performance. Current theories suggest that this off-line improvement takes time and appears only after several hours. Here we show an early transient and short-lived boost in performance, emerging as early as…

  4. Changing the Learning Curve in Novice Laparoscopists: Incorporating Direct Visualization into the Simulation Training Program.

    PubMed

    Dawidek, Mark T; Roach, Victoria A; Ott, Michael C; Wilson, Timothy D

    A major challenge in laparoscopic surgery is the lack of depth perception. With the development and continued improvement of 3D video technology, the potential benefit of restoring 3D vision to laparoscopy has received substantial attention from the surgical community. Despite this, procedures conducted under 2D vision remain the standard of care, and trainees must become proficient in 2D laparoscopy. This study aims to determine whether incorporating 3D vision into a 2D laparoscopic simulation curriculum accelerates skill acquisition in novices. Postgraduate year-1 surgical specialty residents (n = 15) at the Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, at Western University were randomized into 1 of 2 groups. The control group practiced the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery peg-transfer task to proficiency exclusively under standard 2D laparoscopy conditions. The experimental group first practiced peg transfer under 3D direct visualization, with direct visualization of the working field. Upon reaching proficiency, this group underwent a perceptual switch, changing to standard 2D laparoscopy conditions, and once again trained to proficiency. Incorporating 3D direct visualization before training under standard 2D conditions significantly (p < 0.0.5) reduced the total training time to proficiency by 10.9 minutes or 32.4%. There was no difference in total number of repetitions to proficiency. Data were also used to generate learning curves for each respective training protocol. An adaptive learning approach, which incorporates 3D direct visualization into a 2D laparoscopic simulation curriculum, accelerates skill acquisition. This is in contrast to previous work, possibly owing to the proficiency-based methodology employed, and has implications for resource savings in surgical training. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Self-organizing adaptive map: autonomous learning of curves and surfaces from point samples.

    PubMed

    Piastra, Marco

    2013-05-01

    Competitive Hebbian Learning (CHL) (Martinetz, 1993) is a simple and elegant method for estimating the topology of a manifold from point samples. The method has been adopted in a number of self-organizing networks described in the literature and has given rise to related studies in the fields of geometry and computational topology. Recent results from these fields have shown that a faithful reconstruction can be obtained using the CHL method only for curves and surfaces. Within these limitations, these findings constitute a basis for defining a CHL-based, growing self-organizing network that produces a faithful reconstruction of an input manifold. The SOAM (Self-Organizing Adaptive Map) algorithm adapts its local structure autonomously in such a way that it can match the features of the manifold being learned. The adaptation process is driven by the defects arising when the network structure is inadequate, which cause a growth in the density of units. Regions of the network undergo a phase transition and change their behavior whenever a simple, local condition of topological regularity is met. The phase transition is eventually completed across the entire structure and the adaptation process terminates. In specific conditions, the structure thus obtained is homeomorphic to the input manifold. During the adaptation process, the network also has the capability to focus on the acquisition of input point samples in critical regions, with a substantial increase in efficiency. The behavior of the network has been assessed experimentally with typical data sets for surface reconstruction, including suboptimal conditions, e.g. with undersampling and noise. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Growth curve analyses of the relationship between early maternal age and children's mathematics and reading performance.

    PubMed

    Torres, D Diego

    2015-03-01

    Regarding the methods used to examine the early maternal age-child academic outcomes relationship, the extant literature has tended to examine change using statistical analyses that fail to appreciate that individuals vary in their rates of growth. Of the one study I have been able to find that employs a true growth model to estimate this relationship, the authors only controlled for characteristics of the maternal household after family formation; confounding background factors of mothers that might select them into early childbearing, a possible source of bias, were ignored. The authors' findings nonetheless suggested an inverse relationship between early maternal age, i.e., a first birth between the ages of 13 and 17, and Canadian adolescents' mean math performance at age 10. Early maternal age was not related to the linear slope of age. To elucidate whether the early maternal age-child academic outcomes association, treated in a growth context, is consistent with this finding, the present study built on it using US data and explored children's mathematics and reading trajectories from age 5 on. Its unique contribution is that it further explicitly controlled for maternal background factors and employed a three-level growth model with repeated measures of children nested within their mothers. Though the strength of the relationship varied between mean initial academic performance and mean academic growth, results confirmed that early maternal age was negatively related to children's mathematics and reading achievement, net of post-teen first birth child-specific and maternal household factors. Once maternal background factors were included, there was no statistically significant relationship between early maternal age and either children's mean initial mathematics and reading scores or their mean mathematics and reading growth. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Learning a Music Instrument in Early Childhood: What Can We Learn from Professional Musicians' Childhood Memories?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Wyverne

    2008-01-01

    Professional early childhood educators are often asked for advice about whether or when a young child should learn to play a music instrument. Many educators who do not have a background in music education may not be confident in providing such advice. A range of overseas research has supported learning a music instrument in the early childhood…

  8. Leadership of Learning in Early Years Practice: A Professional Learning Resource [Includes DVD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallet, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses upon effective pedagogical leadership and practice in the leadership of learning within early years settings and children's centres. The book and accompanying DVD, containing real-life examples of early years leaders, provides a framework for reflective thinking and learning for those leading practice and working with children,…

  9. Evaluating the Learning Curve for Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy under Total Ultrasound Guidance.

    PubMed

    Song, Yan; Ma, YaNan; Song, YongSheng; Fei, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the learning curve of percutaneous nephrolithotomy under total ultrasound guidance. One hundred and twenty consecutive PCNL operations under total ultrasound guidance performed by a novice surgeon in a tertiary referral center were studied. Operations were analyzed in cohorts of 15 to determine when a plateau was reached for the variables such as operation duration, ultrasound screening time, tract dilation time, stone-free rate and complication rate. Comparison was made with the results of a surgeon who had performed more than 1000 PCNLs. Fluoroscopy was not used at all during procedure. The mean operation time dropped from 82.5 min for the first 15 patients to a mean of 64.7 min for cases 46 through 60(P = 0.047). The ultrasound screening time was a peak of 6.4 min in the first 15 cases, whereas it dropped to a mean of 3.9 min for cases 46 through 60(P = 0.01). The tract dilation time dropped from 4.9 min for the first 15 patients to a mean of 3.8 min for cases 46 through 60(P = 0.036). The senior surgeon had a mean operating time, screening time and tract dilation time equivalent to those of the novice surgeon after 60 cases. There was no significant difference in stone free rate and complication rate. The competence of ultrasound guided PCNL is reached after 60 cases with good stone free rate and without major complications.

  10. "Alarm-corrected" ergonomic armrest use could improve learning curves of novices on robotic simulator.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kun; Perez, Manuela; Hossu, Gabriela; Hubert, Nicolas; Perrenot, Cyril; Hubert, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    In robotic surgery, the professional ergonomic habit of using an armrest reduces operator fatigue and increases the precision of motion. We designed and validated a pressure surveillance system (PSS) based on force sensors to investigate armrest use. The objective was to evaluate whether adding an alarm to the PSS system could shorten ergonomic training and improve performance. Twenty robot and simulator-naïve participants were recruited and randomized in two groups (A and B). The PSS was installed on a robotic simulator, the dV-Trainer, to detect contact with the armrest. The Group A members completed three tasks on the dV-Trainer without the alarm, making 15 attempts at each task. The Group B members practiced the first two tasks with the alarm and then completed the final tasks without the alarm. The simulator provided an overall score reflecting the trainees' performance. We used the new concept of an "armrest load" score to describe the ergonomic habit of using the armrest. Group B had a significantly higher performance score (p < 0.001) and armrest load score (p < 0.001) than Group A from the fifth attempt of the first task to the end of the experiment. Based on the conditioned reflex effect, the alarm associated with the PSS rectified ergonomic errors and accelerated professional ergonomic habit acquisition. The combination of the PSS and alarm is effective in significantly shortening the learning curve in the robotic training process.

  11. Assessing the learning curve for the acquisition of laparoscopic skills on a virtual reality simulator.

    PubMed

    Sherman, V; Feldman, L S; Stanbridge, D; Kazmi, R; Fried, G M

    2005-05-01

    The aim of this study was to develop summary metrics and assess the construct validity for a virtual reality laparoscopic simulator (LapSim) by comparing the learning curves of three groups with different levels of laparoscopic expertise. Three groups of subjects ('expert', 'junior', and 'naïve') underwent repeated trials on three LapSim tasks. Formulas were developed to calculate scores for efficiency ('time-error') and economy of 'motion' ('motion') using metrics generated by the software after each drill. Data (mean +/- SD) were evaluated by analysis of variance (ANOVA). Significance was set at p < 0.05. All three groups improved significantly from baseline to final for both 'time-error' and 'motion' scores. There were significant differences between groups in time error performances at baseline and final, due to higher scores in the 'expert' group. A significant difference in 'motion' scores was seen only at baseline. We have developed summary metrics for the LapSim that differentiate among levels of laparoscopic experience. This study also provides evidence of construct validity for the LapSim.

  12. Implementing clinical protocols in oncology: quality gaps and the learning curve phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Kedikoglou, Simos; Syrigos, Konstantinos; Skalkidis, Yannis; Ploiarchopoulou, Fani; Dessypris, Nick; Petridou, Eleni

    2005-08-01

    The quality improvement effort in clinical practice has focused mostly on 'performance quality', i.e. on the development of comprehensive, evidence-based guidelines. This study aimed to assess the 'conformance quality', i.e. the extent to which guidelines once developed are correctly and consistently applied. It also aimed to assess the existence of quality gaps in the treatment of certain patient segments as defined by age or gender and to investigate methods to improve overall conformance quality. A retrospective audit of clinical practice in a well-defined oncology setting was undertaken and the results compared to those obtained from prospectively applying an internally developed clinical protocol in the same setting and using specific tools to increase conformance quality. All indicators showed improvement after the implementation of the protocol that in many cases reached statistical significance, while in the entire cohort advanced age was associated (although not significantly) with sub-optimal delivery of care. A 'learning curve' phenomenon in the implementation of quality initiatives was detected, with all indicators improving substantially in the second part of the prospective study. Clinicians should pay separate attention to the implementation of chosen protocols and employ specific tools to increase conformance quality in patient care.

  13. Retroperitoneal laparoscopic nephrectomy: the effect of the learning curve, and concentrating expertise, on operating times.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Adrian; Maoate, Kiki; Beasley, Spencer

    2010-05-01

    Laparoscopic nephrectomy is an accepted alternative to open nephrectomy. We analyzed our first 80 procedures of laparoscopic nephrectomy to evaluate the effect of experience and configuration of service on operative times. A retrospective review of 80 consecutive children who underwent retroperitoneal laparoscopic nephrectomy or heminephrectomy during an 11-year period from 1997 at Christchurch Hospital (Christchurch, New Zealand) was conducted. Operative times, in relation to the experience of the surgeon for this procedure, were analyzed. Four surgeons, assisted by an annually rotating trainee registrar, performed the procedure in 26 girls and 54 boys (range, 8 months to 15 years). Operating times ranged from 38 to 225 minutes (mean, 104). The average operative time fell from 105 to 90 minutes. One surgeon performed 40% of the procedures and assisted with a further 55%. The operative times for all surgeons showed a tendency to reduce, but this was not marked. Most procedures were performed by two surgeons working together, although one surgeon was involved in the majority of cases. The lead surgeon is often assisted by a fellow consultant colleague. Operative times were influenced by experience, but not markedly so. The shorter operative times and minimal "learning curve," compared with other reported series, may, in part, be due to the involvement of two surgeons experienced in laparoscopy for the majority of cases.

  14. Variation in learning curves and competence for ERCP among advanced endoscopy trainees by using cumulative sum analysis.

    PubMed

    Wani, Sachin; Hall, Matthew; Wang, Andrew Y; DiMaio, Christopher J; Muthusamy, V Raman; Keswani, Rajesh N; Brauer, Brian C; Easler, Jeffrey J; Yen, Roy D; El Hajj, Ihab; Fukami, Norio; Ghassemi, Kourosh F; Gonzalez, Susana; Hosford, Lindsay; Hollander, Thomas G; Wilson, Robert; Kushnir, Vladimir M; Ahmad, Jawad; Murad, Faris; Prabhu, Anoop; Watson, Rabindra R; Strand, Daniel S; Amateau, Stuart K; Attwell, Augustin; Shah, Raj J; Early, Dayna; Edmundowicz, Steven A; Mullady, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    There are limited data on learning curves and competence in ERCP. By using a standardized data collection tool, we aimed to prospectively define learning curves and measure competence among advanced endoscopy trainees (AETs) by using cumulative sum (CUSUM) analysis. AETs were evaluated by attending endoscopists starting with the 26th hands-on ERCP examination and then every ERCP examination during the 12-month training period. A standardized ERCP competency assessment tool (using a 4-point scoring system) was used to grade the examination. CUSUM analysis was applied to produce learning curves for individual technical and cognitive components of ERCP performance (success defined as a score of 1, acceptable and unacceptable failures [p1] of 10% and 20%, respectively). Sensitivity analyses varying p1 and by using a less-stringent definition of success were performed. Five AETs were included with a total of 1049 graded ERCPs (mean ± SD, 209.8 ± 91.6/AET). The majority of cases were performed for a biliary indication (80%). The overall and native papilla allowed cannulation times were 3.1 ± 3.6 and 5.7 ± 4, respectively. Overall learning curves demonstrated substantial variability for individual technical and cognitive endpoints. Although nearly all AETs achieved competence in overall cannulation, none achieved competence for cannulation in cases with a native papilla. Sensitivity analyses increased the proportion of AETs who achieved competence. This study demonstrates that there is substantial variability in ERCP learning curves among AETs. A specific case volume does not ensure competence, especially for native papilla cannulation. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Two Processes in Early Bimanual Motor Skill Learning

    PubMed Central

    Yeganeh Doost, Maral; Orban de Xivry, Jean-Jacques; Bihin, Benoît; Vandermeeren, Yves

    2017-01-01

    Most daily activities are bimanual and their efficient performance requires learning and retention of bimanual coordination. Despite in-depth knowledge of the various stages of motor skill learning in general, how new bimanual coordination control policies are established is still unclear. We designed a new cooperative bimanual task in which subjects had to move a cursor across a complex path (a circuit) as fast and as accurately as possible through coordinated bimanual movements. By looking at the transfer of the skill between different circuits and by looking at training with varying circuits, we identified two processes in early bimanual motor learning. Loss of performance due to the switch in circuit after 15 min of training amounted to 20%, which suggests that a significant portion of improvements in bimanual performance is specific to the used circuit (circuit-specific skill). In contrast, the loss of performance due to the switch in circuit was 5% after 4 min of training. This suggests that learning the new bimanual coordination control policy dominates early in the training and is independent of the used circuit. Finally, switching between two circuits throughout training did not affect the early stage of learning (i.e., the first few minutes), but did affect the later stage. Together, these results suggest that early bimanual motor skill learning includes two different processes. Learning the new bimanual coordination control policy predominates in the first minutes whereas circuit-specific skill improvements unfold later in parallel with further improvements in the bimanual coordination control policy. PMID:29326573

  16. Learning in Early Childhood: Experiences, Relationships and "Learning to Be"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tayler, Collette

    2015-01-01

    Learning in the earliest stage of life--the infancy, toddlerhood and preschool period--is relational and rapid. Child-initiated and adult-mediated conversations, playful interactions and learning through active involvement are integral to young children making sense of their environments and to their development over time. The child's experience…

  17. Using a high-fidelity patient simulator with first-year medical students to facilitate learning of cardiovascular function curves.

    PubMed

    Harris, David M; Ryan, Kathleen; Rabuck, Cynthia

    2012-09-01

    Students are relying on technology for learning more than ever, and educators need to adapt to facilitate student learning. High-fidelity patient simulators (HFPS) are usually reserved for the clinical years of medical education and are geared to improve clinical decision skills, teamwork, and patient safety. Finding ways to incorporate HFPS into preclinical medical education represents more of a challenge, and there is limited literature regarding its implementation. The main objective of this study was to implement a HFPS activity into a problem-based curriculum to enhance the learning of basic sciences. More specifically, the focus was to aid in student learning of cardiovascular function curves and help students develop heart failure treatment strategies based on basic cardiovascular physiology concepts. Pretests and posttests, along with student surveys, were used to determine student knowledge and perception of learning in two first-year medical school classes. There was an increase of 21% and 22% in the percentage of students achieving correct answers on a posttest compared with their pretest score. The median number of correct questions increased from pretest scores of 2 and 2.5 to posttest scores of 4 and 5 of a possible total of 6 in each respective year. Student survey data showed agreement that the activity aided in learning. This study suggests that a HFPS activity can be implemented during the preclinical years of medical education to address basic science concepts. Additionally, it suggests that student learning of cardiovascular function curves and heart failure strategies are facilitated.

  18. Supporting State Systems of Early Learning Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Himes, James A. [D-CT-4

    2011-11-02

    House - 11/18/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  19. Early onset marijuana use is associated with learning inefficiencies.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Randi Melissa; Hoeppner, Susanne S; Evins, A Eden; Gilman, Jodi M

    2016-05-01

    Verbal memory difficulties are the most widely reported and persistent cognitive deficit associated with early onset marijuana use. Yet, it is not known what memory stages are most impaired in those with early marijuana use. Forty-eight young adults, aged 18-25, who used marijuana at least once per week and 48 matched nonusing controls (CON) completed the California Verbal Learning Test, Second Edition (CVLT-II). Marijuana users were stratified by age of initial use: early onset users (EMJ), who started using marijuana at or before age 16 (n = 27), and late onset marijuana user group (LMJ), who started using marijuana after age 16 (n = 21). Outcome variables included trial immediate recall, total learning, clustering strategies (semantic clustering, serial clustering, ratio of semantic to serial clustering, and total number of strategies used), delayed recall, and percent retention. Learning improved with repetition, with no group effect on the learning slope. EMJ learned fewer words overall than LMJ or CON. There was no difference between LMJ and CON in total number of words learned. Reduced overall learning mediated the effect on reduced delayed recall among EMJ, but not CON or LMJ. Learning improved with greater use of semantic versus serial encoding, but this did not vary between groups. EMJ was not related to delayed recall after adjusting for encoding. Young adults reporting early onset marijuana use had learning weaknesses, which accounted for the association between early onset marijuana use and delayed recall. No amnestic effect of marijuana use was observed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Early Onset Marijuana Use Is Associated with Learning Inefficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Randi Melissa; Hoeppner, Susanne S.; Evins, A. Eden; Gilman, Jodi M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Verbal memory difficulties are the most widely reported and persistent cognitive deficit associated with early-onset marijuana use. Yet, it is not known what memory stages are most impaired in those with early marijuana use. Method Forty-eight young adults, aged 18–25, who used marijuana at least once per week and 48 matched non-using controls (CON) completed the California Verbal Learning Test, Second Edition (CVLT-II). Marijuana users were stratified by age of initial use: ‘early onset’ users (EMJ), who started using marijuana at or before age 16 (n = 27), and ‘late onset’ marijuana user group (LMJ), who started using marijuana after age 16 (n = 21). Outcome variables included trial immediate recall, total learning, clustering strategies (semantic clustering, serial clustering, ratio of semantic to serial clustering, and total number of strategies used), delayed recall, and percent retention. Results Learning improved with repetition, with no group effect on the learning slope. EMJ learned fewer words overall than LMJ or CON. There was no difference between LMJ and CON in total number of words learned. Reduced overall learning mediated the effect on reduced delayed recall among EMJ, but not CON or LMJ. Learning improved with greater use of semantic versus serial encoding, but this did not vary between groups. EMJ was not related to delayed recall after adjusting for encoding. Conclusions Young adults reporting early onset marijuana use had learning weaknesses, which accounted for the association between early onset marijuana use and delayed recall. No amnestic effect of marijuana use was observed. PMID:26986749

  1. Joy in Learning: Making It Happen in Early Childhood Classes. NEA Early Childhood Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Leon H.

    A premise of this book for teachers of young children is that all learning should be challenging, interesting, and enjoyable. Chapters include: (1) A Philosophy for Early Education (concerning the nature of young children, learning contexts, societal expectations); (2) Child Development (concerning independence, self-esteem, cooperative…

  2. Start Early to Build a Healthy Future: The Research Linking Early Learning and Health. Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Brooke; Hanson, Ann; Raden, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Every child deserves a fair chance. A chance to learn, grow, explore possibilities, persevere and achieve his or her potential. The Ounce of Prevention Fund believes that no child's potential should be limited by poor health. Good health in early childhood is an essential component of school readiness. The benefits of health and learning are…

  3. Lifewide Learning for Early Reading Development.

    PubMed

    Dowd, Amy Jo; Friedlander, Elliott; Jonason, Christine; Leer, Jane; Sorensen, Lisa Zook; Guajardo, Jarrett; D'Sa, Nikhit; Pava, Clara; Pisani, Lauren

    2017-03-01

    The authors examine the relationships between children's reading abilities and the enabling environment for learning in the context of Save the Children's Literacy Boost program. They conceptualize the enabling environment at a micro level, with two components: the home literacy environment, represented by reading materials/habits at home, and the community learning environment (community reading activities). Using longitudinal reading scores of 6,874 students in 424 schools in 12 sites across Africa and Asia, there was 1) a modest but consistent relationship between students' home literacy environments and reading scores, and 2) a strong relationship between reading gains and participation in community reading activities, suggesting that interventions should consider both home and community learning environments and their differential influences on interventions across different low-resource settings. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Huang's three-step maneuver shortens the learning curve of laparoscopic spleen-preserving splenic hilar lymphadenectomy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chang-Ming; Huang, Ze-Ning; Zheng, Chao-Hui; Li, Ping; Xie, Jian-Wei; Wang, Jia-Bin; Lin, Jian-Xian; Jun, Lu; Chen, Qi-Yue; Cao, Long-Long; Lin, Mi; Tu, Ru-Hong

    2017-12-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the difference between the learning curves of different maneuvers in laparoscopic spleen-preserving splenic hilar lymphadenectomy for advanced upper gastric cancer. From January 2010 to April 2014, 53 consecutive patients who underwent laparoscopic spleen-preserving splenic hilar lymphadenectomy via the traditional-step maneuver (group A) and 53 consecutive patients via Huang's three-step maneuver (group B) were retrospectively analyzed. No significant difference in patient characteristics were found between the two groups. The learning curves of groups A and B were divided into phase 1 (1-43 cases and 1-30 cases, respectively) and phase 2 (44-53 cases and 31-53 cases, respectively). Compared with group A, the dissection time, bleeding loss and vascular injury were significantly decreased in group B. No significant differences in short-term outcomes were found between the two maneuvers. The multivariate analysis indicated that the body mass index, short gastric vessels, splenic artery type and maneuver were significantly associated with the dissection time in group B. No significant difference in the survival curve was found between the maneuvers. The learning curve of Huang's three-step maneuver was shorter than that of the traditional-step maneuver, and the former represents an ideal maneuver for laparoscopic spleen-preserving splenic hilar lymphadenectomy.To shorten the learning curve at the beginning of laparoscopic spleen-preserving splenic hilar lymphadenectomy, beginners should beneficially use Huang's three-step maneuver and select patients with advanced upper gastric cancer with a body mass index of less than 25 kg/m 2 and the concentrated type of splenic artery. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Systematic review of learning curves for minimally invasive abdominal surgery: a review of the methodology of data collection, depiction of outcomes, and statistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Harrysson, Iliana J; Cook, Jonathan; Sirimanna, Pramudith; Feldman, Liane S; Darzi, Ara; Aggarwal, Rajesh

    2014-07-01

    To determine how minimally invasive surgical learning curves are assessed and define an ideal framework for this assessment. Learning curves have implications for training and adoption of new procedures and devices. In 2000, a review of the learning curve literature was done by Ramsay et al and it called for improved reporting and statistical evaluation of learning curves. Since then, a body of literature is emerging on learning curves but the presentation and analysis vary. A systematic search was performed of MEDLINE, EMBASE, ISI Web of Science, ERIC, and the Cochrane Library from 1985 to August 2012. The inclusion criteria are minimally invasive abdominal surgery formally analyzing the learning curve and English language. 592 (11.1%) of the identified studies met the selection criteria. Time is the most commonly used proxy for the learning curve (508, 86%). Intraoperative outcomes were used in 316 (53%) of the articles, postoperative outcomes in 306 (52%), technical skills in 102 (17%), and patient-oriented outcomes in 38 (6%) articles. Over time, there was evidence of an increase in the relative amount of laparoscopic and robotic studies (P < 0.001) without statistical evidence of a change in the complexity of analysis (P = 0.121). Assessment of learning curves is needed to inform surgical training and evaluate new clinical procedures. An ideal analysis would account for the degree of complexity of individual cases and the inherent differences between surgeons. There is no single proxy that best represents the success of surgery, and hence multiple outcomes should be collected.

  6. Water: The Ideal Early Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Susan J.

    2008-01-01

    Bathtubs and swimming pools provide the ideal learning environment for people with special needs. For young preschool children, the activities that take place through water can help them develop physical fitness, facilitate motor development, reinforce perceptual-motor ability, encourage social development, and enhance self-esteem and confidence.…

  7. Visual variability affects early verb learning.

    PubMed

    Twomey, Katherine E; Lush, Lauren; Pearce, Ruth; Horst, Jessica S

    2014-09-01

    Research demonstrates that within-category visual variability facilitates noun learning; however, the effect of visual variability on verb learning is unknown. We habituated 24-month-old children to a novel verb paired with an animated star-shaped actor. Across multiple trials, children saw either a single action from an action category (identical actions condition, for example, travelling while repeatedly changing into a circle shape) or multiple actions from that action category (variable actions condition, for example, travelling while changing into a circle shape, then a square shape, then a triangle shape). Four test trials followed habituation. One paired the habituated verb with a new action from the habituated category (e.g., 'dacking' + pentagon shape) and one with a completely novel action (e.g., 'dacking' + leg movement). The others paired a new verb with a new same-category action (e.g., 'keefing' + pentagon shape), or a completely novel category action (e.g., 'keefing' + leg movement). Although all children discriminated novel verb/action pairs, children in the identical actions condition discriminated trials that included the completely novel verb, while children in the variable actions condition discriminated the out-of-category action. These data suggest that - as in noun learning - visual variability affects verb learning and children's ability to form action categories. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  8. Early Language Learning: Complexity and Mixed Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enever, Janet, Ed.; Lindgren, Eva, Ed.

    2017-01-01

    This is the first collection of research studies to explore the potential for mixed methods to shed light on foreign or second language learning by young learners in instructed contexts. It brings together recent studies undertaken in Cameroon, China, Croatia, Ethiopia, France, Germany, Italy, Kenya, Mexico, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Tanzania and…

  9. Parents Resourcing Children's Early Development and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Sue; Nixon, Helen; Pudney, Valerie; Jurvansuu, Sari

    2009-01-01

    Parents deal with a complex web of choices when seeking and using knowledge and resources related to their young children's literacy development. Information concerning children's learning and development comes in many forms and is produced by an increasingly diverse range of players including governments, non-government organizations and…

  10. [Associative Learning between Orientation and Color in Early Visual Areas].

    PubMed

    Amano, Kaoru; Shibata, Kazuhisa; Kawato, Mitsuo; Sasaki, Yuka; Watanabe, Takeo

    2017-08-01

    Associative learning is an essential neural phenomenon where the contingency of different items increases after training. Although associative learning has been found to occur in many brain regions, there is no clear evidence that associative learning of visual features occurs in early visual areas. Here, we developed an associative decoded functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) neurofeedback (A-DecNef) to determine whether associative learning of color and orientation can be induced in early visual areas. During the three days' training, A-DecNef induced fMRI signal patterns that corresponded to a specific target color (red) mostly in early visual areas while a vertical achromatic grating was simultaneously, physically presented to participants. Consequently, participants' perception of "red" was significantly more frequently than that of "green" in an achromatic vertical grating. This effect was also observed 3 to 5 months after training. These results suggest that long-term associative learning of two different visual features such as color and orientation, was induced most likely in early visual areas. This newly extended technique that induces associative learning may be used as an important tool for understanding and modifying brain function, since associations are fundamental and ubiquitous with respect to brain function.

  11. The learning curve of an academic cardiac surgeon: use of the CUSUM method.

    PubMed

    Novick, R J; Stitt, L W

    1999-01-01

    Despite the sizeable volume of research on the determinants of outcome after cardiac operations, few articles have analyzed the learning curves of individual cardiac surgeons over time. The objective of our study was to analyze statistically the learning curve of an academic cardiac surgeon in reducing operative morbidity and mortality during a 10-year interval. The study cohort of 1347 consecutive and unselected patients undergoing cardiac surgical operations from October 1988 to September 1998 were grouped into five 2-year blocks (periods 1 to 5) according to the date of operation. The main outcome measures were operative mortality rate and standardized definitions of perioperative myocardial infarction, intra-aortic balloon pump use, reoperation for bleeding, stroke, sternal wound complications, sepsis, and respiratory insufficiency. Preoperative risk factors and operative results in periods 1 to 5 were compared statistically using a chi-square test for linear trend (categorical variables) or analysis of variance with linear contrast and lack of fit tests (continuous variables). In addition, the cumulative sum (CUSUM) method was used to determine the association among operative morbidity, mortality, and prespecified 80% alert and 95% alarm boundary lines in practice years 1, 5, and 9. Of the preoperative risk factors, only patient age showed an important change during the 10 years of the study (61.3+/-0.7 to 64.3+/-0.6, p = 0.001). There were no statistically significant changes from periods 1 to 5 in overall operative mortality (4.0% to 2.2%, p = 0.56) or in the rates of perioperative stroke (1.8% to 3.8%, p = 0.33), sternal wound complications (0.4% to 0.8%, p = 0.97), sepsis (0.9% to 0.8%, p = 0.63), or respiratory failure (4.4% to 2.8%, p = 0.21). Decreases occurred in a linear fashion during periods 1 to 5 in mortality after coronary artery bypass grafting (5.1% to 1.3%, p = 0.012) and in the rates of perioperative myocardial infarction (7.0% to 2.2%, p = 0

  12. Overall Memory Impairment Identification with Mathematical Modeling of the CVLT-II Learning Curve in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Stepanov, Igor I.; Abramson, Charles I.; Hoogs, Marietta; Benedict, Ralph H. B.

    2012-01-01

    The CVLT-II provides standardized scores for each of the List A five learning trials, so that the clinician can compare the patient's raw trials 1–5 scores with standardized ones. However, frequently, a patient's raw scores fluctuate making a proper interpretation difficult. The CVLT-II does not offer any other methods for classifying a patient's learning and memory status on the background of the learning curve. The main objective of this research is to illustrate that discriminant analysis provides an accurate assessment of the learning curve, if suitable predictor variables are selected. Normal controls were ninety-eight healthy volunteers (78 females and 20 males). A group of MS patients included 365 patients (266 females and 99 males) with clinically defined multiple sclerosis. We show that the best predictor variables are coefficients B3 and B4 of our mathematical model B3 ∗ exp(−B2  ∗  (X − 1)) + B4  ∗  (1 − exp(−B2  ∗  (X − 1))) because discriminant functions, calculated separately for B3 and B4, allow nearly 100% correct classification. These predictors allow identification of separate impairment of readiness to learn or ability to learn, or both. PMID:22745911

  13. Overall Memory Impairment Identification with Mathematical Modeling of the CVLT-II Learning Curve in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Stepanov, Igor I; Abramson, Charles I; Hoogs, Marietta; Benedict, Ralph H B

    2012-01-01

    The CVLT-II provides standardized scores for each of the List A five learning trials, so that the clinician can compare the patient's raw trials 1-5 scores with standardized ones. However, frequently, a patient's raw scores fluctuate making a proper interpretation difficult. The CVLT-II does not offer any other methods for classifying a patient's learning and memory status on the background of the learning curve. The main objective of this research is to illustrate that discriminant analysis provides an accurate assessment of the learning curve, if suitable predictor variables are selected. Normal controls were ninety-eight healthy volunteers (78 females and 20 males). A group of MS patients included 365 patients (266 females and 99 males) with clinically defined multiple sclerosis. We show that the best predictor variables are coefficients B3 and B4 of our mathematical model B3 ∗ exp(-B2  ∗  (X - 1)) + B4  ∗  (1 - exp(-B2  ∗  (X - 1))) because discriminant functions, calculated separately for B3 and B4, allow nearly 100% correct classification. These predictors allow identification of separate impairment of readiness to learn or ability to learn, or both.

  14. Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion with Rigid Interspinous Process Fixation: A Learning Curve Analysis of a Surgeon Team's First 74 Cases.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Patrick; Welch, Arthur; Tharpe, Jason; Moore, Camille; Ferry, Chris

    2017-05-30

    Studies have shown that a significant learning curve may be associated with adopting minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS TLIF) with bilateral pedicle screw fixation (BPSF). Accordingly, several hybrid TLIF techniques have been proposed as surrogates to the accepted BPSF technique, asserting that less/fewer fixation(s) or less disruptive fixation may decrease the learning curve while still maintaining the minimally disruptive benefits. TLIF with interspinous process fixation (ISPF) is one such surrogate procedure. However, despite perceived ease of adaptability given the favorable proximity of the spinous processes, no evidence exists demonstrating whether or not the technique may possess its own inherent learning curve. The purpose of this study was to determine whether an intraoperative learning curve for one- and two-level TLIF + ISPF may exist for a single lead surgeon. Seventy-four consecutive patients who received one- or two-Level TLIF with rigid ISPF by a single lead surgeon were retrospectively reviewed. It was the first TLIF + ISPF case series for the lead surgeon. Intraoperative blood loss (EBL), hospitalization length-of-stay (LOS), fluoroscopy time, and postoperative complications were collected. EBL, LOS, and fluoroscopy time were modeled as a function of case number using multiple linear regression methods. A change point was included in each model to allow the trajectory of the outcomes to change during the duration of the case series. These change points were determined using profile likelihood methods. Models were fit using the maximum likelihood estimates for the change points. Age, sex, body mass index (BMI), and the number of treated levels were included as covariates. EBL, LOS, and fluoroscopy time did not significantly differ by age, sex, or BMI (p ≥ 0.12). Only EBL differed significantly by the number of levels (p = 0.026). The case number was not a significant predictor of EBL, LOS, or fluoroscopy time (p ≥ 0

  15. Comparison of the learning curves of digital examination and transabdominal sonography for the determination of fetal head position during labor.

    PubMed

    Rozenberg, P; Porcher, R; Salomon, L J; Boirot, F; Morin, C; Ville, Y

    2008-03-01

    To evaluate the learning curve of transabdominal sonography for the determination of fetal head position in labor and to compare it with that of digital vaginal examination. A student midwife who had never performed digital vaginal examination or ultrasound examination was recruited for this study. Instructions on how to perform digital vaginal examination and ultrasound examination were given before and after completing the first vaginal and ultrasound examinations, and repeated for each subsequent examination for as long as necessary. Digital and ultrasound diagnoses of the fetal head position were always performed first by the student midwife, and repeated by an experienced midwife or physician. The learning curve for identification of the fetal head position by either one of the two methods was analyzed using the cumulative sums (CUSUM) method for measurement errors. One hundred patients underwent digital vaginal examination and 99 had transabdominal sonography for the determination of fetal head position. An error rate of around 50% for vaginal examination was nearly constant during the first 50 examinations. It decreased subsequently, to stabilize at a low level from the 82(nd) patient. Errors of +/- 180 degrees were the most frequent. The learning curve for ultrasound imaging stabilized earlier than that of vaginal examination, after the 32(nd) patient. The most frequent errors with ultrasound examination were the inability to conclude on a diagnosis, particularly at the beginning of training, followed by errors of +/- 45 degrees. Based on our findings for the student tested, learning and accuracy of the determination of fetal head position in labor were easier and higher, respectively, with transabdominal sonography than with digital examination. This should encourage physicians to introduce clinical ultrasound examination into their practice. CUSUM charts provide a reliable representation of the learning curve, by accumulating evidence of performance

  16. Learning Curves Among All Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation in Germany: A Retrospective Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Kaier, Klaus; Reinecke, Holger; Schmoor, Claudia; Frankenstein, Lutz; Vach, Werner; Hehn, Philip; Zirlik, Andreas; Bode, Christoph; Zehender, Manfred; Reinöhl, Jochen

    2017-05-15

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a rapidly evolving technique for therapy of aortic stenosis. Previous studies report learning curves with respect to in-hospital mortality and clinical complications. We aim to determine whether observed improvements of in-hospital outcomes after TAVI are the result of improvements in procedures or due to a change in the patient population, and whether improvements differ between the transfemoral (TF) and the transapical (TA) approach. Data was analyzed using risk-adjusted regression analyses in order to track the development of clinical outcomes of all isolated TAVI procedures performed in Germany from 2008 to 2013 (N=32.436) in all German hospitals performing TAVI. Measurements include in-hospital mortality, stroke, bleeding, and mechanical ventilation. Unadjusted mortality rates decrease over time for both TA-TAVI and TF-TAVI. Reductions in mortality were smaller for TA-TAVI than for TF-TAVI. These trends could also be observed for risk-adjusted (standardized) mortality rates, indicating that time trends and differences between TA-TAVI (around 7% in 2013) and TF-TAVI (around 4% in 2013) cannot be explained by changes in the risk factor composition of the patient populations. Bleeding complications decreased for both access routes. Both unadjusted and standardized bleeding rates were substantially higher for TA-TAVI. In addition, TA-TAVI procedures were associated with an increased likelihood of requiring >48h of mechanical ventilation. Observed improvements in TAVI-related in-hospital mortality are not due to a change in patient population. The results indicate the superiority of a TF-first approach. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Institutional learning curve of cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemoperfusion for peritoneal malignancies.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Patricio M; Ding, Ying; Knox, Jordan M; Ramalingam, Lekshmi; Jones, Heather; Hogg, Melissa E; Zureikat, Amer H; Holtzman, Matthew P; Pingpank, James; Ahrendt, Steven; Zeh, Herbert J; Bartlett, David L; Choudry, Haroon A

    2015-05-01

    Cytoreductive surgery (CRS) with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemoperfusion (HIPEC) is routinely used to treat certain peritoneal carcinomatoses (PC), but it can be associated with relatively high complication rates, prolonged hospital length of stay, and potential mortality. Our objective was to determine the learning curve (LC) of CRS/HIPEC in our high-volume institution. A total of 370 patients with PC from mucinous appendiceal neoplasms (MAN = 282), malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (MPM = 60), and gastric cancer (GC = 24) were studied. Outcomes analyzed included incomplete cytoreduction (IC), severe morbidity (SM), 60-day mortality, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Risk-adjusted sequential probability ratio test (RA-SPRT) was employed to assess the LC of CRS/HIPEC for IC and SM using prespecified odds ratio (OR) boundaries derived from previously published data. Risk adjusted-cumulative average probability (RA-CAP) was used to analyze 1-year PFS and 2-year OS. Complete cytoreduction, severe morbidity, and 60-day mortality were 84.2, 30, and 1.9 % respectively. Higher simplified peritoneal cancer index was the major independent risk factor for IC, whereas high-grade histology, IC, and diagnosis of MPM and GC (compared with MAN) were predictors of SM after CRS/HIPEC (p < 0.05). RA-SPRT showed that approximately 180 cases are needed to achieve the lowest risk of IC and SM. Ninety cases were needed to achieve a steady 1-year PFS and 2-year OS in RA-CAP plots. The completeness of cytoreduction, morbidity, and mortality rates for CRS/HIPEC at our institution are comparable to previously reported data. Approximately 180 and 90 procedures are required to improve operative and oncologic outcomes respectively.

  18. Evaluation of the learning curve of non-penetrating glaucoma surgery.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Fatih; Yuce, Berna; Oztas, Zafer; Ates, Halil

    2017-08-11

    To evaluate the learning curve of non-penetrating glaucoma surgery (NPGS). The study included 32 eyes of 27 patients' (20 male and 7 female) with medically uncontrolled glaucoma. Non-penetrating glaucoma surgeries performed by trainees under control of an experienced surgeon between 2005 and 2007 at our tertiary referral hospital were evaluated. Residents were separated into two groups. Humanistic training model applied to the one in the first group, he studied with experimental models before performing NPGS. Two residents in the second group performed NPGS after a conventional training model. Surgeries of the residents were recorded on video and intraoperative parameters were scored by the experienced surgeon at the end of the study. Postoperative intraocular pressure, absolute and total success rates were analyzed. In the first group 19 eyes of 16 patients and in the second group 13 eyes of 11 patients had been operated by residents. Intraoperative parameters and complication rates were not statistically significant between groups (p > 0.05, Chi-square). The duration of surgery was 32.7 ± 5.6 min in the first group and 45 ± 3.8 min in the second group. The difference was statistically significant (p < 0.001, Student's t test). Absolute and total success was 68.8 and 93.8% in the first group and 62.5 and 87.5% in the second group, respectively. The difference was not statistically significant. Humanistic and conventional training models under control of an experienced surgeon are safe and effective for senior residents who manage phacoemulsification surgery in routine cataract cases. Senior residents can practice these surgical techniques with reasonable complication rates.

  19. Impact of Three-Dimensional Laparoscopy in a Bariatric Surgery Program: Influence in the Learning Curve.

    PubMed

    Padin, Esther Mariño; Santos, Raquel Sánchez; Fernández, Sonia González; Jimenez, Antonia Brox; Fernández, Sergio Estevez; Dacosta, Ester Carrera; Duran, Agata Rial; Artime Rial, Maria; Dominguez Sanchez, Ivan

    2017-10-01

    3D laparoscopy allows the surgeon to regain the sense of depth and improve accuracy. The aim of the study was to assess the impact of 3D in bariatric surgery. A retrospective cohort study was conducted. All our patients who underwent bariatric surgery (sleeve gastrectomy (SG) or gastric bypass (GB)) between 2013 and 2016 were included. We compared 3D laparoscopy cohort and 2D laparoscopy cohort. Variables are as follows: age, sex, DM, hypertension, surgeon experience, and type of intervention. Comparisons of operative time, hospital stay, conversion, complications, reoperation, and exitus are completed. Three hundred twelve consecutive patients were included. 56.9% of patients underwent GB and 43.1% SG. Global complications were 3.2% (fistula 2.5%, hemoperitoneum 0.3%, others 0.4%). One hundred four procedures were performed in the 3D cohort and 208 in the 2D cohort. The 2D cohort and 3D cohort were similar regarding the following: percentage of GB vs SG, age, gender, learning curve, diabetes mellitus 2, hypertension, and sleep apnea. The operating time and hospital stay were significantly reduced in the 3D cohort (144.07 ± 58.07 vs 172.11 ± 76.11 min and 5.12 ± 9.6 vs 7.7 ± 13.2 days. It was the same when we stratified the sample by type of surgery or experience of the surgeon. Complications were reduced in the 3D cohort in the surgeries performed by novice surgeons (10.2 vs 1.8%, p = 0.034). The use of 3D laparoscopy in bariatric surgery in our center has helped reducing the operating time and hospital stay, and improving the safety of the surgery, either in GB or SG, being equally favorable in novice or more experienced surgeons.

  20. The learning curve of resident physicians using emergency ultrasonography for cholelithiasis and cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Jang, Timothy B; Ruggeri, Wendy; Dyne, Pamela; Kaji, Amy H

    2010-11-01

    Emergency department bedside ultrasonography (EUS) can expedite treatment for patients. However, it is unknown how much experience is required for competency in the sonographic diagnosis of cholelithiasis and cholecystitis. The objective was to assess the learning curve of physicians training in right upper quadrant (RUQ) EUS. This was a prospective study at an urban, academic emergency department from August 1999 to July 2006. Patients with suspected biliary tract disease underwent RUQ EUS followed by abdominal ultra sonography (AUS) by the Department of Radiology. Results of EUS were compared to AUS using a predesigned, standardized data sheet. A total of 1,837 patients underwent EUS by 127 physicians. The overall sensitivity and specificity of EUS for cholelithiasis were 84% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 81% to 86%) and 86% (95% CI = 83% to 88%), respectively. The overall sensitivity of EUS for ductal dilation, gallbladder wall thickening, pericholecystic fluid, and sludge were each < 60%. When analyzing the EUS test characteristics, for every increase in 10 examinations up to 50 examinations, there was no significant improvement in the sensitivity or specificity for any of these sonographic findings. Moreover, on probit regression analysis, accounting for clustering or correlation among the examinations performed by each of the operators, there was no improvement for detecting any of the sonographic findings except for pericholecystic fluid for every 10 additional examinations performed. When adjusting for operator dependence, performing up to 50 EUS examinations appears to have little effect on the accuracy of RUQ EUS. Rather than simply requiring an arbitrary number of examinations, another method of competency assessment may be necessary. © 2010 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  1. Adopting Ultrasound Guidance for Prone Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy: Evaluating the Learning Curve for the Experienced Surgeon

    PubMed Central

    Usawachintachit, Manint; Masic, Selma; Allen, Isabel E.; Li, Jianxing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: To define the learning curve associated with adopting ultrasound guidance for prone percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) for the experienced surgeon. Methods: A prospective cohort study of consecutive patients undergoing PCNL with ultrasound guidance for renal tract access and dilation was performed. Clinical data reviewed included success in gaining renal access with ultrasound guidance, total fluoroscopic screening time, and radiation exposure dose. PCNL cases performed with fluoroscopic guidance matched for stone size served as control cases. Results: One hundred consecutive ultrasound-guided procedures performed by a single experienced endourologist were divided into five experience groups. Significant improvement in renal access success rate with ultrasound was seen after 20 cases (p < 0.05). Total fluoroscopic screening time, radiation exposure dose, and operative time were also statistically significantly improved over the study period. When compared with fluoroscopy-guided PCNL, significant decreases in total fluoroscopic screening time (33.4 ± 35.3 seconds vs 157.5 ± 84.9 seconds, p < 0.05) and radiation exposure (7.0 ± 8.7 mGy vs 47.8 ± 45.9 mGy, p < 0.05) were seen. No differences in complication rates were found. Conclusions: Ultrasound-guided renal access for PCNL can be performed effectively after 20 cases. Transition to the use of ultrasound will quickly reduce radiation exposure for patients and intraoperative personnel. PMID:27150671

  2. Highlighting in Early Childhood: Learning Biases Through Attentional Shifting.

    PubMed

    Burling, Joseph M; Yoshida, Hanako

    2017-02-01

    The literature on human and animal learning suggests that individuals attend to and act on cues differently based on the order in which they were learned. Recent studies have proposed that one specific type of learning outcome, the highlighting effect, can serve as a framework for understanding a number of early cognitive milestones. However, little is known how this learning effect itself emerges among children, whose memory and attention are much more limited compared to adults. Two experiments were conducted using different versions of the general highlighting paradigm: Experiment 1 tested 3 to 6 year olds with a newly developed image-based version of the paradigm, which was designed specifically to test young children. Experiment 2 tested the validity of an image-based implementation of the highlighting paradigm with adult participants. The results from Experiment 1 provide evidence for the highlighting effect among children 3-6 years old, and they suggest age-related differences in dividing attention among multiple cues during learning. Experiment 2 replicated results from previous studies by showing robust biases for both image-based and text-based versions of the highlighting task. This study suggests that sensitivity to learning order emerges early through the process of cued attention, and the role of the highlighting effect in early language learning is discussed. Copyright © 2016 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  3. Ultrasensitive prostate specific antigen assay following laparoscopic radical prostatectomy--an outcome measure for defining the learning curve.

    PubMed

    Viney, R; Gommersall, L; Zeif, J; Hayne, D; Shah, Z H; Doherty, A

    2009-07-01

    Radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP) performed laparoscopically is a popular treatment with curative intent for organ-confined prostate cancer. After surgery, prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels drop to low levels which can be measured with ultrasensitive assays. This has been described in the literature for open RRP but not for laparoscopic RRP. This paper describes PSA changes in the first 300 consecutive patients undergoing non-robotic laparoscopic RRP by a single surgeon. To use ultrasensitive PSA (uPSA) assays to measure a PSA nadir in patients having laparoscopic radical prostatectomy below levels recorded by standard assays. The aim was to use uPSA nadir at 3 months' post-prostatectomy as an early surrogate end-point of oncological outcome. In so doing, laparoscopic oncological outcomes could then be compared with published results from other open radical prostatectomy series with similar end-points. Furthermore, this end-point could be used in the assessment of the surgeon's learning curve. Prospective, comprehensive, demographic, clinical, biochemical and operative data were collected from all patients undergoing non-robotic laparoscopic RRP. We present data from the first 300 consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic RRP by a single surgeon. uPSA was measured every 3 months post surgery. Median follow-up was 29 months (minimum 3 months). The likelihood of reaching a uPSA of < or = 0.01 ng/ml at 3 months is 73% for the first 100 patients. This is statistically lower when compared with 83% (P < 0.05) for the second 100 patients and 80% for the third 100 patients (P < 0.05). Overall, 84% of patients with pT2 disease and 66% patients with pT3 disease had a uPSA of < or = 0.01 ng/ml at 3 months. Pre-operative PSA, PSA density and Gleason score were not correlated with outcome as determined by a uPSA of < or = 0.01 ng/ml at 3 months. Positive margins correlate with outcome as determined by a uPSA of < or = 0.01 ng/ml at 3 months but operative time and

  4. Per-oral Endoscopic Myotomy (POEM) After the Learning Curve: Durable Long-term Results With a Low Complication Rate.

    PubMed

    Hungness, Eric S; Sternbach, Joel M; Teitelbaum, Ezra N; Kahrilas, Peter J; Pandolfino, John E; Soper, Nathaniel J

    2016-09-01

    We aimed to report long-term outcomes for patients undergoing per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) after our initial 15-case learning curve. POEM has become an established, natural-orifice surgical approach for treating esophageal motility disorders. To date, published outcomes and comparative-effectiveness studies have included patients from the early POEM experience. Consecutive patients undergoing POEM after our initial 15 cases, with a minimum of 1-year postoperative follow-up, were included. Treatment success was defined as an Eckardt score ≤3 without reintervention. Gastroesophageal reflux was defined by abnormal pH-testing or reflux esophagitis >Los Angeles grade A. Between January 2012 and March 2015, 115 patients underwent POEM at a single, high-volume center. Operative time was 101 ± 29 minutes, with 95% (109/115) of patients discharged on postoperative day 1. Clavien-Dindo grade III complications occurred in 2.7%, one of which required diagnostic laparoscopy to rule out Veress needle injury to the gall bladder. The rate of grade I complications was 15.2%. At an average of 2.4 years post-POEM (range 12-52 months), the overall success rate was 92%. Objective evidence of reflux was present in 40% for all patients and 33% for patients with a body mass index <35 kg/m and no hiatal hernia. POEM performed by experienced surgeons provided durable symptomatic relief in 94% of patients with nonspastic achalasia and 90% of patients with type 3 achalasia/spastic esophageal motility disorders, with a low rate of complications. The rate of gastroesophageal reflux was comparable with prior studies of both POEM and laparoscopic Heller myotomy.

  5. Rapid Determination of Appropriate Source Models for Tsunami Early Warning using a Depth Dependent Rigidity Curve: Method and Numerical Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanioka, Y.; Miranda, G. J. A.; Gusman, A. R.

    2017-12-01

    Recently, tsunami early warning technique has been improved using tsunami waveforms observed at the ocean bottom pressure gauges such as NOAA DART system or DONET and S-NET systems in Japan. However, for tsunami early warning of near field tsunamis, it is essential to determine appropriate source models using seismological analysis before large tsunamis hit the coast, especially for tsunami earthquakes which generated significantly large tsunamis. In this paper, we develop a technique to determine appropriate source models from which appropriate tsunami inundation along the coast can be numerically computed The technique is tested for four large earthquakes, the 1992 Nicaragua tsunami earthquake (Mw7.7), the 2001 El Salvador earthquake (Mw7.7), the 2004 El Astillero earthquake (Mw7.0), and the 2012 El Salvador-Nicaragua earthquake (Mw7.3), which occurred off Central America. In this study, fault parameters were estimated from the W-phase inversion, then the fault length and width were determined from scaling relationships. At first, the slip amount was calculated from the seismic moment with a constant rigidity of 3.5 x 10**10N/m2. The tsunami numerical simulation was carried out and compared with the observed tsunami. For the 1992 Nicaragua tsunami earthquake, the computed tsunami was much smaller than the observed one. For the 2004 El Astillero earthquake, the computed tsunami was overestimated. In order to solve this problem, we constructed a depth dependent rigidity curve, similar to suggested by Bilek and Lay (1999). The curve with a central depth estimated by the W-phase inversion was used to calculate the slip amount of the fault model. Using those new slip amounts, tsunami numerical simulation was carried out again. Then, the observed tsunami heights, run-up heights, and inundation areas for the 1992 Nicaragua tsunami earthquake were well explained by the computed one. The other tsunamis from the other three earthquakes were also reasonably well explained

  6. Early Language Learning and Literacy: Neuroscience Implications for Education

    PubMed Central

    Kuhl, Patricia K.

    2011-01-01

    The last decade has produced an explosion in neuroscience research examining young children’s early processing of language that has implications for education. Noninvasive, safe functional brain measurements have now been proven feasible for use with children starting at birth. In the arena of language, the neural signatures of learning can be documented at a remarkably early point in development, and these early measures predict performance in children’s language and pre-reading abilities in the second, third, and fifth year of life, a finding with theoretical and educational import. There is evidence that children’s early mastery of language requires learning in a social context, and this finding also has important implications for education. Evidence relating socio-economic status (SES) to brain function for language suggests that SES should be considered a proxy for the opportunity to learn and that the complexity of language input is a significant factor in developing brain areas related to language. The data indicate that the opportunity to learn from complex stimuli and events are vital early in life, and that success in school begins in infancy. PMID:21892359

  7. Estimation of abbreviated mycophenolic acid area under the concentration-time curve during early posttransplant period by limited sampling strategy.

    PubMed

    Mohammadpour, A-H; Nazemian, F; Abtahi, B; Naghibi, M; Gholami, K; Rezaee, S; Nazari, M-R A; Rajabi, O

    2008-12-01

    Area under the concentration curve (AUC) of mycophenolic acid (MPA) could help to optimize therapeutic drug monitoring during the early post-renal transplant period. The aim of this study was to develop a limited sampling strategy to estimate an abbreviated MPA AUC within the first month after renal transplantation. In this study we selected 19 patients in the early posttransplant period with normal renal graft function (glomerular filtration rate > 70 mL/min). Plasma MPA concentrations were measured using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. MPA AUC(0-12h) was calculated using the linear trapezoidal rule. Multiple stepwise regression analysis was used to determine the minimal and convenient time points of MPA levels that could be used to derive model equations best fitted to MPA AUC(0-12h). The regression equation for AUC estimation that gave the best performance was AUC = 14.46 C(10) + 15.547 (r(2) = .882). The validation of the method was performed using the jackknife method. Mean prediction error of this model was not different from zero (P > .05) and had a high root mean square prediction error (8.06). In conclusion, this limited sampling strategy provided an effective approach for therapeutic drug monitoring during the early posttransplant period.

  8. Technical refinement and learning curve for attenuating neurapraxia during robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy to improve sexual function.

    PubMed

    Alemozaffar, Mehrdad; Duclos, Antoine; Hevelone, Nathanael D; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Borza, Tudor; Yu, Hua-Yin; Kowalczyk, Keith J; Hu, Jim C

    2012-06-01

    While radical prostatectomy surgeon learning curves have characterized less blood loss, shorter operative times, and fewer positive margins, there is a dearth of studies characterizing learning curves for improving sexual function. Additionally, while learning curve studies often define volume thresholds for improvement, few of these studies demonstrate specific technical modifications that allow reproducibility of improved outcomes. Demonstrate and quantify the learning curve for improving sexual function outcomes based on technical refinements that reduce neurovascular bundle displacement during nerve-sparing robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP). We performed a retrospective study of 400 consecutive RARPs, categorized into groups of 50, performed after elimination of continuous surgeon/assistant neurovascular bundle countertraction. Our approach to RARP has been described previously. A single-console robotic system was used for all cases. Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite sexual function was measured within 1 yr of RARP. Linear regression was performed to determine factors influencing the recovery of sexual function. Greater surgeon experience was associated with better 5-mo sexual function (p = 0.007) and a trend for better 12-mo sexual function (p = 0.061), with improvement plateauing after 250-300 cases. Additionally, younger patient age (both p<0.02) and better preoperative sexual function (<0.001) were associated with better 5- and 12-mo sexual function. Moreover, trainee robotic console time during nerve sparing was associated with worse 12-mo sexual function (p=0.021), while unilateral nerve sparing/non-nerve sparing was associated with worse 5-mo sexual function (p = 0.009). Limitations include the retrospective single-surgeon design. With greater surgeon experience, attenuating lateral displacement of the neurovascular bundle and resultant neurapraxia improve postoperative sexual function. However, to maximize outcomes, appropriate patient

  9. The learning curve of laparoscopic liver resection after the Louisville statement 2008: Will it be more effective and smooth?

    PubMed

    Lin, Chung-Wei; Tsai, Tzu-Jung; Cheng, Tsung-Yen; Wei, Hung-Kuang; Hung, Chen-Fang; Chen, Yin-Yin; Chen, Chii-Ming

    2016-07-01

    Laparoscopic liver resection (LLR) has been proven to be feasible and safe. However, it is a difficult and complex procedure with a steep learning curve. The aim of this study was to evaluate the learning curve of LLR at our institutions since 2008. One hundred and twenty-six consecutive LLRs were included from May 2008 to December 2014. Patient characteristics, operative data, and surgical outcomes were collected prospectively and analyzed. The median tumor size was 25 mm (range 5-90 mm), and 96 % of the resected tumors were malignant. 41.3 % (52/126) of patients had pathologically proven liver cirrhosis. The median operation time was 216 min (range 40-602 min) with a median blood loss of 100 ml (range 20-2300 ml). The median length of hospital stay was 4 days (range 2-10 days). Six major postoperative complications occurred in this series, and there was no 90-day postoperative mortality. Regarding the incidence of major operative events including operation time longer than 300 min, perioperative blood loss above 500 ml, and major postoperative complications, the learning curve [as evaluated by the cumulative sum (CUSUM) technique] showed its first reverse after 22 cases. The indication of laparoscopic resection in this series extended after 60 cases to include tumors located in difficult locations (segments 4a, 7, 8) and major hepatectomy. CUSUM showed that the incidence of major operative events proceeded to increase again, and the second reverse was noted after an additional 40 cases of experience. Location of the tumor in a difficult area emerged as a significant predictor of major operative events. In carefully selected patients, CUSUM analysis showed 22 cases were needed to overcome the learning curve for minor LLR.

  10. Uniportal video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery: safety, efficacy and learning curve during the first 250 cases in Quebec, Canada.

    PubMed

    Drevet, Gabrielle; Ugalde Figueroa, Paula

    2016-03-01

    Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) using a single incision (uniportal) may result in better pain control, earlier mobilization and shorter hospital stays. Here, we review the safety and efficiency of our initial experience with uniportal VATS and evaluate our learning curve. We conducted a retrospective review of uniportal VATS using a prospectively maintained departmental database and analyzed patients who had undergone a lung anatomic resection separately from patients who underwent other resections. To assess the learning curve, we compared the first 10 months of the study period with the second 10 months. From January 2014 to August 2015, 250 patients underwent intended uniportal VATS, including 180 lung anatomic resections (72%) and 70 other resections (28%). Lung anatomic resection was successfully completed using uniportal VATS in 153 patients (85%), which comprised all the anatomic segmentectomies (29 patients), 80% (4 of 5) of the pneumonectomies and 82% (120 of 146) of the lobectomies attempted. The majority of lung anatomic resections that required conversion to thoracotomy occurred in the first half of our study period. Seventy patients underwent other uniportal VATS resections. Wedge resections were the most common of these procedures (25 patients, 35.7%). Although 24 of the 70 patients (34%) required the placement of additional ports, none required conversion to thoracotomy. Uniportal VATS was safe and feasible for both standard and complex pulmonary resections. However, when used for pulmonary anatomic resections, uniportal VATS entails a steep learning curve.

  11. Learning curve of transumbilical single incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy (SILS): a preliminary study of 80 selected patients with benign gallbladder diseases.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhengjun; Sun, Jing; Pu, Ying; Jiang, Tao; Cao, Jun; Wu, Weidong

    2011-09-01

    Transumbilical single incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) is a new laparoscopic procedure in which only one transumbilical incision is made, demonstrated as a scarless procedure. Here we report a single-center preliminary experience of transumbilical single incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy (SILC) in the treatment of benign gallbladder diseases, defining a single surgeon's learning curve. A total of 80 patients underwent SILC successfully by a single experienced laparoscopic surgeon. The operation was performed following the routine LC procedure. Then the perioperative demographics were recorded and the operative time was used to define the learning curve. The study group included 27 male and 53 female patients with gallstones (56 cases), cholesterol polyps (16 cases), an adenomatous polyp (3 cases), adenomyomatosis (1 case), or complex diseases (4 cases), and all consented to undergo SILC. No patient was converted to normal LC or open surgery. There were no perioperative port-related or surgical complications. The average operative time was 46.9 ± 14.6 min. The average postoperative hospital stay was 1.8 ± 1.3 days. The learning curve of the SILC procedures for this series of selected patients confirmed that SILC is a feasible, safe, and effective approach to the treatment of benign gallbladder diseases. For experienced laparoscopic surgeons, SILC is an easy and safe procedure. Patients benefit from milder pain, a lower incidence of port-related complications, better cosmesis, and fast recovery. The SILC procedure may become another option for the treatment of benign gallbladder diseases for selected patients.

  12. [Individual learning curve for radical robot-assisted prostatectomy based on the example of three professionals working in one clinic].

    PubMed

    Rasner, P I; Pushkar', D Iu; Kolontarev, K B; Kotenkov, D V

    2014-01-01

    The appearance of new surgical technique always requires evaluation of its effectiveness and ease of acquisition. A comparative study of the results of the first three series of successive robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) performed on at time by three surgeons, was conducted. The series consisted of 40 procedures, and were divided into 4 groups of 10 operations for the analysis. When comparing data, statistically significant improvement of intra- and postoperative performance in each series was revealed, with increase in the number of operations performed, and in each subsequent series compared with the preceding one. We recommend to perform the planned conversion at the first operation. In our study, previous laparoscopic experience did not provide any significant advantages in the acquisition of robot-assisted technology. To characterize the individual learning curve, we recommend the use of the number of operations that the surgeon looked in the life-surgery regimen and/or in which he participated as an assistant before his own surgical activity, as well as the indicator "technical defect". In addition to the term "individual learning curve", we propose to introduce the terms "surgeon's individual training phase", and "clinic's learning curve".

  13. Fluoroscopy Learning Curve in Hip Arthroscopy-A Single Surgeon's Experience.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kevin M; Duplantier, Neil L; Crump, Kimbelyn H; Delgado, Domenica A; Sullivan, Stephanie L; McCulloch, Patrick C; Harris, Joshua D

    2017-10-01

    cases of a single surgeon's hip arthroscopy practice learning curve. Level IV, therapeutic, retrospective, noncomparative case series. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Robot-assisted partial nephrectomy: continued refinement of outcomes beyond the initial learning curve.

    PubMed

    Paulucci, David J; Abaza, Ronney; Eun, Daniel D; Hemal, Ashok K; Badani, Ketan K

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate trends in peri-operative outcomes of 250 consecutive cases beyond the initial learning curve (LC) of robot-assisted partial nephrectomy (RAPN) among multiple surgeons. A multi-institutional database was used to evaluate trends in patient demographics (e.g. age, gender, comorbidities), tumour characteristics (e.g. size, complexity) and peri-operative outcomes (e.g. warm ischaemia time [WIT], operating time, complications, estimated blood loss [EBL], trifecta achievement) in consecutive cases 50-300 (n = 960) from 2008 to 2016 among four experienced surgeons. Trends in outcomes were assessed using multivariable regression models adjusted for demographic and tumour-specific variables. Outcomes for cases 50-99 were compared with those for cases 250-300. In the study period RAPN was increasingly performed in patients with larger tumours (β = 0.001, P = 0.048), hypertension (odds ratio [OR] 1.003; P = 0.008) diabetes (OR 1.003; P = 0.025) and previous abdominal surgery (OR 1.003; P = 0.006). Surgeon experience was associated with more trifecta achievement (OR 1.006; P < 0.001), shorter WIT (β = -0.036, P < 0.001), less EBL (β = -0.154, P = 0.009), fewer blood transfusions (OR 0.989, P = 0.024) and a reduced length of hospital stay (β = -0.002, P = 0.002), but not with operating time (P = 0.243), complications (P = 0.587) or surgical margin status (P = 0.102). Tumour size and WIT in cases 50-99 vs 250-300 were 2.7 vs 3.2 cm (P = 0.001) and 21.4 vs 16.2 min (P < 0.001), respectively. Refinement of RAPN outcomes, concomitant with the treatment of a patient population with larger tumours and more comorbidities, occurs after the initial LC is reached. Although RAPN can consistently be performed safely with acceptable outcomes after a small number of cases, improvement in trifecta achievement, WIT, EBL, blood transfusions and a shorter hospitalization continues to occur up to 300 procedures. © 2016 The Authors BJU International © 2016 BJU International

  15. Analysis of the learning curve for peroral endoscopic myotomy for esophageal achalasia: Single-center, two-operator experience.

    PubMed

    Lv, Houning; Zhao, Ningning; Zheng, Zhongqing; Wang, Tao; Yang, Fang; Jiang, Xihui; Lin, Lin; Sun, Chao; Wang, Bangmao

    2017-05-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) has emerged as an advanced technique for the treatment of achalasia, and defining the learning curve is mandatory. From August 2011 to June 2014, two operators in our institution (A&B) carried out POEM on 35 and 33 consecutive patients, respectively. Moving average and cumulative sum (CUSUM) methods were used to analyze the POEM learning curve for corrected operative time (cOT), referring to duration of per centimeter myotomy. Additionally, perioperative outcomes were compared among distinct learning curve phases. Using the moving average method, cOT reached a plateau at the 29th case and at the 24th case for operators A and B, respectively. CUSUM analysis identified three phases: initial learning period (Phase 1), efficiency period (Phase 2) and mastery period (Phase 3). The relatively smooth state in the CUSUM graph occurred at the 26th case and at the 24th case for operators A and B, respectively. Mean cOT of distinct phases for operator A were 8.32, 5.20 and 3.97 min, whereas they were 5.99, 3.06 and 3.75 min for operator B, respectively. Eckardt score and lower esophageal sphincter pressure significantly decreased during the 1-year follow-up period. Data were comparable regarding patient characteristics and perioperative outcomes. This single-center study demonstrated that expert endoscopists with experience in esophageal endoscopic submucosal dissection reached a plateau in learning of POEM after approximately 25 cases. © 2016 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  16. Early boost and slow consolidation in motor skill learning.

    PubMed

    Hotermans, Christophe; Peigneux, Philippe; Maertens de Noordhout, Alain; Moonen, Gustave; Maquet, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Motorskill learning is a dynamic process that continues covertly after training has ended and eventually leads to delayed increments in performance. Current theories suggest that this off-line improvement takes time and appears only after several hours. Here we show an early transient and short-lived boost in performance, emerging as early as 5-30 min after training but no longer observed 4 h later. This early boost is predictive of the performance achieved 48 h later, suggesting its functional relevance for memory processes.

  17. Accounting Early for Life Long Learning: The AcE Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University Coll. Worcester (England). Centre for Research in Early Childhood Education.

    Building upon the work of the Effective Early Learning (EEL) Project in raising the quality of early learning for young children in the United Kingdom, the 3-year Accounting Early for Life Long Learning Project (AcE Project) focuses on enhancing in 3- to 6-year-olds those attitudes and dispositions that are important to life-long learning. This…

  18. A Growth Curve Analysis of Novel Word Learning by Sequential Bilingual Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kan, Pui Fong; Kohnert, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    Longitudinal word learning studies which control for experience can advance understanding of language learning and potential intra- and inter-language relationships in developing bilinguals. We examined novel word learning in both the first (L1) and the second (L2) languages of bilingual children. The rate and shape of change as well as the role…

  19. Family Concepts in Early Learning and Development Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Bridget A.; Sanchez, Claudia; Lee, Angela M.; Casillas, Nicole; Hansen, Caitlynn

    2016-01-01

    This exploratory study investigated the use of concepts related to families, parents, and the home in 51 state-level early learning and development standards documents. Guidelines from six national family involvement, engagement, and school-partnership models were used to create the Family Involvement Models Analysis Chart (FIMAC), which served as…

  20. Rethinking Early Learning and Development Standards in the Ugandan Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ejuu, Godfrey

    2013-01-01

    Concerns that the African child is being tailored to be a "global child," alongside other homogenizing and dominating projections, such as early learning and development standards (ELDS), have increased. African communities need to be assured that global standards and global indicators will not further homogenize nations and thereby risk…

  1. Workjobs: Activity-Centered Learning for Early Childhood Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorton, Mary Baratta

    Based on the idea that through active involvement with the materials the child would draw out the generalizations within the material, a teacher's method of activity-centered learning for early childhood education is presented. The first section of the book deals with the development of language through workjobs, emphasizing perception, matching,…

  2. Assessing the Quality of Early Years Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Glenda; Gardner, John

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a means of evaluating early years classrooms from the perspective of the child's experience. Nine key themes, such as motivation and independence, are identified as representing significant aspects of a high-quality environment for learning. The manner in which these manifest themselves in relation to the three elements of…

  3. Report to the Legislature: Child Welfare and Early Learning Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Department of Early Learning, 2015

    2015-01-01

    House Bill 2519, sponsored by Representative Tana Senn, was passed during the 2014 legislative session and signed into law by Governor Jay Inslee. HB 2519 directs the Department of Early Learning (DEL) and the Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) to jointly develop recommendations on methods to "better partner to ensure children…

  4. Agency in Early Childhood Learning and Development in Cameroon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nsamenang, A. Bame

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on agency, as a natural disposition in children to be active and participative. Africa's parenting attitudes and education in African family traditions encourage and foster children's responsible agency in family life, cultural and economic activities, and their own developmental learning from an early, especially within the…

  5. Assessing the Impact of Early Learning Programs in Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gove, Amber; Brunette, Tracy; Bulat, Jennae; Carrol, Bidemi; Henny, Catherine; Macon, Wykia; Nderu, Evangeline; Sitabkhan, Yasmin

    2017-01-01

    We present results from early learning programs in six African countries: Ethiopia, Kenya, Liberia, Malawi, Tanzania, and Uganda. In partnership with ministries of education, RTI International has worked within government systems to support the design and deployment of locally contextualized materials, training, and assessment tools, with the goal…

  6. Children at Play: Learning Gender in the Early Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    This captivating book illuminates our understanding of how young children develop gender identities. A two year longitudinal research project on children's own understandings of gender casts new light on how 3 and 4 year old newcomers in early years classes learn rules for gendered behaviour from older children, in their imaginative and…

  7. Promoting Meaningful Learning: Innovations in Educating Early Childhood Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yelland, Nicola J., Ed.

    Grounded in active learning, inquiry, and problem solving embedded in a social and cultural context, this book presents a collection of ideas illustrating innovative practices for educating early childhood professionals in university and other contexts. The book is presented in three parts. Part 1, "Listening to Student Voices," is…

  8. A Collaborative Inquiry into Museum and Library Early Learning Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirinides, Phil; Fink, Ryan; DuBois, Tesla

    2016-01-01

    As states, cities, and communities take a more active role in ensuring that all children have access to high quality experiences and opportunities to learn, many are looking to museums and libraries as part of the early childhood education system. Museums and libraries can play a critical role in these efforts, and there is clear momentum and…

  9. Learning in the Early Grades: Parents and Teachers Talk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leavitt, Midge, Ed.

    This booklet contains four articles, from the perspective of both parents and teachers, concerned with learning in the early grades. "From Kindergarten to Grade One: Making the Transition" (J. Ward), is a teacher's narrative on the importance of creating a child-centered classroom and an integrated, play-based curriculum. This article…

  10. A Study of Early Learning Services in Museums and Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirinides, P.; Fink, R.; DuBois, T.

    2017-01-01

    Museums and libraries can play a role in providing opportunities for early learning, and there is clear momentum and infrastructure already in place to help make this happen. Researchers conducted a mixed-methods descriptive study to generate new evidence about the availability of services for young children in museums and libraries, and the…

  11. Never Too Early to Learn: Antibias Education for Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooven, Jennifer; Runkle, Katherine; Strouse, Laurie; Woods, Misty; Frankenberg, Erica

    2018-01-01

    Four early childhood educators, along with a university researcher, describe their efforts to implement an antiracist, antibias curriculum in a daycare and preschool setting. Even very young children can learn important lessons about race, diversity, and equity, they argue, and teachers should not shy away from addressing these issues at staff…

  12. Learning with Nature and Learning from Others: Nature as Setting and Resource for Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacQuarrie, Sarah; Nugent, Clare; Warden, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Nature-based learning is an increasingly popular type of early childhood education. Despite this, children's experiences--in particular, their form and function within different settings and how they are viewed by practitioners--are relatively unknown. Accordingly, the use of nature as a setting and a resource for learning was researched. A…

  13. Informal Science Learning through Inquiry: Effects on Preschool Students' Achievement in Early Science Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samsudin, Mohd Ali; Haniza, Noor Hasyimah; Ismail, Juliah; Abd-Talib, Corrienna

    2015-01-01

    This study was undertaken to explore the effects of informal science learning outside the classroom on preschool students' achievement in the Early Science learning topic (plant-related topics that presented concepts about tree leaves, height and roots) using an inquiry method. A sample of 64 preschool students was selected using purposive…

  14. Learning Languages: The Journal of the National Network for Early Language Learning, 1998-1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbusch, Marcia H., Ed.

    1999-01-01

    These three journals include articles on issues related to language learning. The fall 1998 journal presents: "Attention! Are You Seeking a Position with Excellent Long-Term Benefits? Be an Advocate!" (Mary Lynn Redmond); "National Town Meeting Energizes Support for Early Language Learning" (Marcia Harmon Rosenbusch);…

  15. When Service Learning Meets the Project Approach: Incorporating Service Learning in an Early Childhood Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chun, Eul Jung; Hertzog, Nancy B.; Gaffney, Janet S.; Dymond, Stacy K.

    2012-01-01

    The researchers described in this case study how Service Learning was incorporated within the context of an early childhood program where the teachers used the Project Approach. The Service Learning project was embedded in an investigation about water and was designed to help tsunami victims in Asia. Participants included two teachers and 12…

  16. Training anesthesiology residents in providing anesthesia for awake craniotomy: learning curves and estimate of needed case load.

    PubMed

    Bilotta, Federico; Titi, Luca; Lanni, Fabiana; Stazi, Elisabetta; Rosa, Giovanni

    2013-08-01

    To measure the learning curves of residents in anesthesiology in providing anesthesia for awake craniotomy, and to estimate the case load needed to achieve a "good-excellent" level of competence. Prospective study. Operating room of a university hospital. 7 volunteer residents in anesthesiology. Residents underwent a dedicated training program of clinical characteristics of anesthesia for awake craniotomy. The program was divided into three tasks: local anesthesia, sedation-analgesia, and intraoperative hemodynamic management. The learning curve for each resident for each task was recorded over 10 procedures. Quantitative assessment of the individual's ability was based on the resident's self-assessment score and the attending anesthesiologist's judgment, and rated by modified 12 mm Likert scale, reported ability score visual analog scale (VAS). This ability VAS score ranged from 1 to 12 (ie, very poor, mild, moderate, sufficient, good, excellent). The number of requests for advice also was recorded (ie, resident requests for practical help and theoretical notions to accomplish the procedures). Each task had a specific learning rate; the number of procedures necessary to achieve "good-excellent" ability with confidence, as determined by the recorded results, were 10 procedures for local anesthesia, 15 to 25 procedures for sedation-analgesia, and 20 to 30 procedures for intraoperative hemodynamic management. Awake craniotomy is an approach used increasingly in neuroanesthesia. A dedicated training program based on learning specific tasks and building confidence with essential features provides "good-excellent" ability. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of Asynchronous Training on Radiology Learning Curve among Emergency Medicine Residents and Clerkship Students

    PubMed Central

    Pourmand, Ali; Woodward, Christina; Shokoohi, Hamid; King, Jordan B; Taheri, M Reza; King, Jackson; Lawrence, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    Context Web-based learning (WBL) modules are effectively used to improve medical education curriculum; however, they have not been evaluated to improve head computed tomography (CT) scan interpretation in an emergency medicine (EM) setting. Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of a WBL module to aid identification of cranial structures on CT and to improve ability to distinguish between normal and abnormal findings. Design Prospective, before-and-after trial in the Emergency Department of an academic center. Baseline head CT knowledge was assessed via a standardized test containing ten head CT scans, including normal scans and those showing hemorrhagic stroke, trauma, and infection (abscess). All trainees then participated in a WBL intervention. Three weeks later, they were given the same ten CT scans to evaluate in a standardized posttest. Main Outcome Measures Improvement in test scores. Results A total of 131 EM clerkship students and 32 EM residents were enrolled. Pretest scores correlated with stage of training, with students and first-year residents demonstrating the lowest scores. Overall, there was a significant improvement in percentage of correctly classified CT images after the training intervention from a mean pretest score of 32% ± 12% to posttest score of 67% ± 13% (mean improvement = 35% ± 13%, p < 0.001). Among subsets by training level, all subgroups except first-year residents demonstrated a statistically significant increase in scores after the training. Conclusion Incorporating asynchronous WBL modules into EM clerkship and residency curriculum provides early radiographic exposure in their clinical training and can enhance diagnostic head CT scan interpretation. PMID:29272248

  18. Learning representations for the early detection of sepsis with deep neural networks.

    PubMed

    Kam, Hye Jin; Kim, Ha Young

    2017-10-01

    Sepsis is one of the leading causes of death in intensive care unit patients. Early detection of sepsis is vital because mortality increases as the sepsis stage worsens. This study aimed to develop detection models for the early stage of sepsis using deep learning methodologies, and to compare the feasibility and performance of the new deep learning methodology with those of the regression method with conventional temporal feature extraction. Study group selection adhered to the InSight model. The results of the deep learning-based models and the InSight model were compared. With deep feedforward networks, the area under the ROC curve (AUC) of the models were 0.887 and 0.915 for the InSight and the new feature sets, respectively. For the model with the combined feature set, the AUC was the same as that of the basic feature set (0.915). For the long short-term memory model, only the basic feature set was applied and the AUC improved to 0.929 compared with the existing 0.887 of the InSight model. The contributions of this paper can be summarized in three ways: (i) improved performance without feature extraction using domain knowledge, (ii) verification of feature extraction capability of deep neural networks through comparison with reference features, and (iii) improved performance with feedforward neural networks using long short-term memory, a neural network architecture that can learn sequential patterns. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Adoption of Robotic vs Fluoroscopic Guidance in Total Hip Arthroplasty: Is Acetabular Positioning Improved in the Learning Curve?

    PubMed

    Kamara, Eli; Robinson, Jonathon; Bas, Marcel A; Rodriguez, Jose A; Hepinstall, Matthew S

    2017-01-01

    Acetabulum positioning affects dislocation rates, component impingement, bearing surface wear rates, and need for revision surgery. Novel techniques purport to improve the accuracy and precision of acetabular component position, but may have a significant learning curve. Our aim was to assess whether adopting robotic or fluoroscopic techniques improve acetabulum positioning compared to manual total hip arthroplasty (THA) during the learning curve. Three types of THAs were compared in this retrospective cohort: (1) the first 100 fluoroscopically guided direct anterior THAs (fluoroscopic anterior [FA]) done by a surgeon learning the anterior approach, (2) the first 100 robotic-assisted posterior THAs done by a surgeon learning robotic-assisted surgery (robotic posterior [RP]), and (3) the last 100 manual posterior (MP) THAs done by each surgeon (200 THAs) before adoption of novel techniques. Component position was measured on plain radiographs. Radiographic measurements were taken by 2 blinded observers. The percentage of hips within the surgeons' "target zone" (inclination, 30°-50°; anteversion, 10°-30°) was calculated, along with the percentage within the "safe zone" of Lewinnek (inclination, 30°-50°; anteversion, 5°-25°) and Callanan (inclination, 30°-45°; anteversion, 5°-25°). Relative risk (RR) and absolute risk reduction (ARR) were calculated. Variances (square of the standard deviations) were used to describe the variability of cup position. Seventy-six percentage of MP THAs were within the surgeons' target zone compared with 84% of FA THAs and 97% of RP THAs. This difference was statistically significant, associated with a RR reduction of 87% (RR, 0.13 [0.04-0.40]; P < .01; ARR, 21%; number needed to treat, 5) for RP compared to MP THAs. Compared to FA THAs, RP THAs were associated with a RR reduction of 81% (RR, 0.19 [0.06-0.62]; P < .01; ARR, 13%; number needed to treat, 8). Variances were lower for acetabulum inclination and anteversion in RP

  20. A variation reduction allocation model for quality improvement to minimize investment and quality costs by considering suppliers’ learning curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosyidi, C. N.; Jauhari, WA; Suhardi, B.; Hamada, K.

    2016-02-01

    Quality improvement must be performed in a company to maintain its product competitiveness in the market. The goal of such improvement is to increase the customer satisfaction and the profitability of the company. In current practice, a company needs several suppliers to provide the components in assembly process of a final product. Hence quality improvement of the final product must involve the suppliers. In this paper, an optimization model to allocate the variance reduction is developed. Variation reduction is an important term in quality improvement for both manufacturer and suppliers. To improve suppliers’ components quality, the manufacturer must invest an amount of their financial resources in learning process of the suppliers. The objective function of the model is to minimize the total cost consists of investment cost, and quality costs for both internal and external quality costs. The Learning curve will determine how the employee of the suppliers will respond to the learning processes in reducing the variance of the component.

  1. Race to the Top--Early Learning Challenge: An Analysis of Impact on IDEIA, Part C Early Intervention Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohjanen, Sharon L.

    2016-01-01

    Infants and toddlers who live in poverty are more likely to experience developmental delays or disabilities and less likely to access early intervention (EI) services. The federal initiative Race to the Top--Early Learning Challenge (RTT-ELC) was designed to increase access to high quality early learning programs for children at risk for…

  2. Utility of Interobserver Agreement Statistics in Establishing Radiology Resident Learning Curves During Self-directed Radiologic Anatomy Training.

    PubMed

    Tureli, Derya; Altas, Hilal; Cengic, Ismet; Ekinci, Gazanfer; Baltacioglu, Feyyaz

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to ascertain the learning curves for the radiology residents when first introduced to an anatomic structure in magnetic resonance images (MRI) to which they have not been previously exposed to. The iliolumbar ligament is a good marker for testing learning curves of radiology residents because the ligament is not part of a routine lumbar MRI reporting and has high variability in detection. Four radiologists, three residents without previous training and one mentor, studied standard axial T1- and T2-weighted images of routine lumbar MRI examinations. Radiologists had to define iliolumbar ligament while blinded to each other's findings. Interobserver agreement analyses, namely Cohen and Fleiss κ statistics, were performed for groups of 20 cases to evaluate the self-learning curve of radiology residents. Mean κ values of resident-mentor pairs were 0.431, 0.608, 0.604, 0.826, and 0.963 in the analysis of successive groups (P < .001). The results indicate that the concordance between the experienced and inexperienced radiologists started as weak (κ <0.5) and gradually became very acceptable (κ >0.8). Therefore, a junior radiology resident can obtain enough experience in identifying a rather ambiguous anatomic structure in routine MRI after a brief instruction of a few minutes by a mentor and studying approximately 80 cases by oneself. Implementing this methodology will help radiology educators obtain more concrete ideas on the optimal time and effort required for supported self-directed visual learning processes in resident education. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Learning curves and impact of previous operative experience on performance on a virtual reality simulator to test laparoscopic surgical skills.

    PubMed

    Grantcharov, Teodor P; Bardram, Linda; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2003-02-01

    The study was carried out to analyze the learning rate for laparoscopic skills on a virtual reality training system and to establish whether the simulator was able to differentiate between surgeons with different laparoscopic experience. Forty-one surgeons were divided into three groups according to their experience in laparoscopic surgery: masters (group 1, performed more than 100 cholecystectomies), intermediates (group 2, between 15 and 80 cholecystectomies), and beginners (group 3, fewer than 10 cholecystectomies) were included in the study. The participants were tested on the Minimally Invasive Surgical Trainer-Virtual Reality (MIST-VR) 10 consecutive times within a 1-month period. Assessment of laparoscopic skills included time, errors, and economy of hand movement, measured by the simulator. The learning curves regarding time reached plateau after the second repetition for group 1, the fifth repetition for group 2, and the seventh repetition for group 3 (Friedman's tests P <0.05). Experienced surgeons did not improve their error or economy of movement scores (Friedman's tests, P >0.2) indicating the absence of a learning curve for these parameters. Group 2 error scores reached plateau after the first repetition, and group 3 after the fifth repetition. Group 2 improved their economy of movement score up to the third repetition and group 3 up to the sixth repetition (Friedman's tests, P <0.05). Experienced surgeons (group 1) demonstrated best performance parameters, followed by group 2 and group 3 (Mann-Whitney test P <0.05). Different learning curves existed for surgeons with different laparoscopic background. The familiarization rate on the simulator was proportional to the operative experience of the surgeons. Experienced surgeons demonstrated best laparoscopic performance on the simulator, followed by those with intermediate experience and the beginners. These differences indicate that the scoring system of MIST-VR is sensitive and specific to measuring

  4. Speaker variability augments phonological processing in early word learning

    PubMed Central

    Rost, Gwyneth C.; McMurray, Bob

    2010-01-01

    Infants in the early stages of word learning have difficulty learning lexical neighbors (i.e., word pairs that differ by a single phoneme), despite the ability to discriminate the same contrast in a purely auditory task. While prior work has focused on top-down explanations for this failure (e.g. task demands, lexical competition), none has examined if bottom-up acoustic-phonetic factors play a role. We hypothesized that lexical neighbor learning could be improved by incorporating greater acoustic variability in the words being learned, as this may buttress still developing phonetic categories, and help infants identify the relevant contrastive dimension. Infants were exposed to pictures accompanied by labels spoken by either a single or multiple speakers. At test, infants in the single-speaker condition failed to recognize the difference between the two words, while infants who heard multiple speakers discriminated between them. PMID:19143806

  5. Simultaneous development of laparoscopy and robotics provides acceptable perioperative outcomes and shows robotics to have a faster learning curve and to be overall faster in rectal cancer surgery: analysis of novice MIS surgeon learning curves.

    PubMed

    Melich, George; Hong, Young Ki; Kim, Jieun; Hur, Hyuk; Baik, Seung Hyuk; Kim, Nam Kyu; Sender Liberman, A; Min, Byung Soh

    2015-03-01

    Laparoscopy offers some evidence of benefit compared to open rectal surgery. Robotic rectal surgery is evolving into an accepted approach. The objective was to analyze and compare laparoscopic and robotic rectal surgery learning curves with respect to operative times and perioperative outcomes for a novice minimally invasive colorectal surgeon. One hundred and six laparoscopic and 92 robotic LAR rectal surgery cases were analyzed. All surgeries were performed by a surgeon who was primarily trained in open rectal surgery. Patient characteristics and perioperative outcomes were analyzed. Operative time and CUSUM plots were used for evaluating the learning curve for laparoscopic versus robotic LAR. Laparoscopic versus robotic LAR outcomes feature initial group operative times of 308 (291-325) min versus 397 (373-420) min and last group times of 220 (212-229) min versus 204 (196-211) min-reversed in favor of robotics; major complications of 4.7 versus 6.5 % (NS), resection margin involvement of 2.8 versus 4.4 % (NS), conversion rate of 3.8 versus 1.1 (NS), lymph node harvest of 16.3 versus 17.2 (NS), and estimated blood loss of 231 versus 201 cc (NS). Due to faster learning curves for extracorporeal phase and total mesorectal excision phase, the robotic surgery was observed to be faster than laparoscopic surgery after the initial 41 cases. CUSUM plots demonstrate acceptable perioperative surgical outcomes from the beginning of the study. Initial robotic operative times improved with practice rapidly and eventually became faster than those for laparoscopy. Developing both laparoscopic and robotic skills simultaneously can provide acceptable perioperative outcomes in rectal surgery. It might be suggested that in the current milieu of clashing interests between evolving technology and economic constrains, there might be advantages in embracing both approaches.

  6. Intraoperative perception and estimates on extent of resection during awake glioma surgery: overcoming the learning curve.

    PubMed

    Lau, Darryl; Hervey-Jumper, Shawn L; Han, Seunggu J; Berger, Mitchel S

    2018-05-01

    quantitative perception (61.1% correct; p < 0.001) compared with tumors in other locations. Even after adjusting for surgeon experience, this particular trend for insular tumors remained true. The absence of 1p19q co-deletion was associated with higher quantitative perception accuracy (96.9% vs 81.5%; p = 0.051). Tumor grade, recurrence, diagnosis, and isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 (IDH-1) status were not associated with accurate perception of EOR. Overall, new neurological deficits occurred in 8.4% of cases, and 42.1% of those new neurological deficits persisted after the 3-month follow-up. Correct quantitative perception was associated with lower postoperative motor deficits (2.4%) compared with incorrect perceptions (8.0%; p = 0.029). There were no detectable differences in language outcomes based on perception of EOR. CONCLUSIONS The findings from this study suggest that there is a learning curve associated with the ability to accurately assess intraoperative EOR during glioma surgery, and it may take more than a decade to be truly proficient. Understanding the factors associated with this ability to accurately assess EOR will provide safer surgeries while maximizing tumor resection.

  7. SN 2015as: a low-luminosity Type IIb supernova without an early light-curve peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangopadhyay, Anjasha; Misra, Kuntal; Pastorello, A.; Sahu, D. K.; Tomasella, L.; Tartaglia, L.; Singh, Mridweeka; Dastidar, Raya; Srivastav, S.; Ochner, P.; Brown, Peter J.; Anupama, G. C.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Kumar, Brajesh; Kumar, Brijesh; Pandey, S. B.

    2018-05-01

    We present results of the photometric (from 3 to 509 d post-explosion) and spectroscopic (up to 230 d post-explosion) monitoring campaign of the He-rich Type IIb supernova (SN) 2015as. The (B - V) colour evolution of SN 2015as closely resemble those of SN 2008ax, suggesting that SN 2015as belongs to the SN IIb subgroup that does not show the early, short-duration photometric peak. The light curve of SN 2015as reaches the B-band maximum about 22 d after the explosion, at an absolute magnitude of -16.82 ± 0.18 mag. At ˜75 d after the explosion, its spectrum transitions from that of a SN II to a SN Ib. P Cygni features due to He I lines appear at around 30 d after explosion, indicating that the progenitor of SN 2015as was partially stripped. For SN 2015as, we estimate a 56Ni mass of ˜0.08 M⊙ and ejecta mass of 1.1-2.2 M⊙, which are similar to the values inferred for SN 2008ax. The quasi-bolometric analytical light-curve modelling suggests that the progenitor of SN 2015as has a modest mass (˜0.1 M⊙), a nearly compact (˜0.05 × 1013 cm) H envelope on top of a dense, compact (˜2 × 1011 cm) and a more massive (˜1.2 M⊙) He core. The analysis of the nebular phase spectra indicates that ˜0.44 M⊙ of O is ejected in the explosion. The intensity ratio of the [Ca II]/[O I] nebular lines favours either a main-sequence progenitor mass of ˜15 M⊙ or a Wolf-Rayet star of 20 M⊙.

  8. Narrative assessment: making mathematics learning visible in early childhood settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Glenda; McLachlan, Claire; Lim Fock Poh, Rachel

    2015-09-01

    Narratives that capture children's learning as they go about their day-to-day activities are promoted as a powerful assessment tool within early childhood settings. However, in the New Zealand context, there is increasing concern that learning stories—the preferred form of narrative assessment—currently downplay domain knowledge. In this paper, we draw on data from 13 teacher interviews and samples of 18 children's learning stories to examine how mathematics is made visible within learning stories. Despite appreciating that mathematics is embedded in a range of everyday activities within the centres, we found that the nature of a particular activity appeared to influence `how' and `what' the teachers chose to document as mathematics learning. Many of the teachers expressed a preference to document and analyse mathematics learning that occurred within explicit mathematics activities rather than within play that involves mathematics. Our concern is that this restricted documentation of mathematical activity could potentially limit opportunities for mathematics learning both in the centre and home settings.

  9. Early Foundations for Mathematics Learning and Their Relations to Learning Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Geary, David C

    2013-02-01

    Children's quantitative competencies upon entry into school can have lifelong consequences. Children who start behind generally stay behind, and mathematical skills at school completion influence employment prospects and wages in adulthood. I review the current debate over whether early quantitative learning is supported by (a) an inherent system for representing approximate magnitudes, (b) an attentional-control system that enables explicit processing of quantitative symbols, such as Arabic numerals, or (c) the logical problem-solving abilities that facilitate learning of the relations among numerals. Studies of children with mathematical learning disabilities and difficulties have suggested that each of these competencies may be involved, but to different degrees and at different points in the learning process. Clarifying how and when these competencies facilitate early quantitative learning and developing interventions to address their impact on children have the potential to yield substantial benefits for individuals and for society.

  10. Two-year Outcomes from a Single Surgeon's Learning Curve Experience of Oblique Lateral Interbody Fusion without Intraoperative Neuromonitoring

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Ahtziri; Miller, Larry E

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Oblique lumbar interbody fusion (OLIF) is a newer procedure that avoids the psoas and lumbosacral plexus due to its oblique trajectory into the retroperitoneal space. While early experience with OLIF is reassuring, the longer-term clinical efficacy has not been well established. The purpose of this study was to describe two-year clinical outcomes with OLIF performed by a single surgeon during the learning curve without the aid of the neuromonitoring. Materials and methods Chart review was performed for the consecutive patients who underwent OLIF by a single surgeon. Back pain severity on a visual analog scale (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were collected preoperatively and postoperatively at six weeks, three months, six months, one year and two years. Results A total of 21 patients (38 levels) were included in this study. The indications for surgery were degenerative disc disease (n=10, 47.6%), spondylolisthesis (n=9, 42.9%) and spinal stenosis (n=6, 28.6%). The median operating room time was 351 minutes (interquartile range (IQR): 279-406 minutes), blood loss was 40 ml (IQR: 30-150 ml), and hospital stay was 2.0 days (IQR: 1.0-3.5 days). The complication rate was 9.5%, both venous injuries. There were no other perioperative complications. Back pain severity decreased by 70%, on average, over two years (p <0.001). A total of 17 (81%) patients reported at least a two-point decrease from the baseline. The ODI scores decreased by 55%, on average, over two years (p <0.001), with 16 (76%) patients reporting at least a 15-point decrease from the baseline. Over two years, no symptomatic pseudarthrosis, hardware failure, reoperations, or additional complications were reported. Conclusions The oblique lateral interbody fusion performed without the intraoperative neuromonitoring was safe and clinically efficacious for up to two years. The complication rate in this cohort is similar to other published OLIF series and appears acceptable when

  11. Two-year Outcomes from a Single Surgeon's Learning Curve Experience of Oblique Lateral Interbody Fusion without Intraoperative Neuromonitoring.

    PubMed

    Woods, Kamal; Fonseca, Ahtziri; Miller, Larry E

    2017-12-22

    Introduction Oblique lumbar interbody fusion (OLIF) is a newer procedure that avoids the psoas and lumbosacral plexus due to its oblique trajectory into the retroperitoneal space. While early experience with OLIF is reassuring, the longer-term clinical efficacy has not been well established. The purpose of this study was to describe two-year clinical outcomes with OLIF performed by a single surgeon during the learning curve without the aid of the neuromonitoring. Materials and methods Chart review was performed for the consecutive patients who underwent OLIF by a single surgeon. Back pain severity on a visual analog scale (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were collected preoperatively and postoperatively at six weeks, three months, six months, one year and two years. Results A total of 21 patients (38 levels) were included in this study. The indications for surgery were degenerative disc disease (n=10, 47.6%), spondylolisthesis (n=9, 42.9%) and spinal stenosis (n=6, 28.6%). The median operating room time was 351 minutes (interquartile range (IQR): 279-406 minutes), blood loss was 40 ml (IQR: 30-150 ml), and hospital stay was 2.0 days (IQR: 1.0-3.5 days). The complication rate was 9.5%, both venous injuries. There were no other perioperative complications. Back pain severity decreased by 70%, on average, over two years (p <0.001). A total of 17 (81%) patients reported at least a two-point decrease from the baseline. The ODI scores decreased by 55%, on average, over two years (p <0.001), with 16 (76%) patients reporting at least a 15-point decrease from the baseline. Over two years, no symptomatic pseudarthrosis, hardware failure, reoperations, or additional complications were reported. Conclusions The oblique lateral interbody fusion performed without the intraoperative neuromonitoring was safe and clinically efficacious for up to two years. The complication rate in this cohort is similar to other published OLIF series and appears acceptable when

  12. The "U" Curve Hypothesis: A Framework for Making Sense of Learning to Teach in Diverse Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birrell, James R.; Tinney, Mari Vawn

    2008-01-01

    Experiences in this research study started in 1991 before many teacher educators were aware of the "?U"? curve hypothesis or predictable stages of culture shock and the recognizable stages used on the path to gaining intercultural competence. This study of student teachers is used here as an illustration of what happens when teachers are…

  13. Early Life Manipulations Alter Learning and Memory in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kosten, Therese A; Kim, Jeansok J; Lee, Hongjoo J.

    2012-01-01

    Much research shows early life manipulations have enduring behavioral, neural, and hormonal effects. However, findings of learning and memory performance vary widely across studies. We reviewed studies in which pre-weaning rat pups were exposed to stressors and tested on learning and memory tasks in adulthood. Tasks were classified as aversive conditioning, inhibitory learning, or spatial/relational memory. Variables of duration, type, and timing of neonatal manipulation and sex and strain of animals were examined to determine if any predict enhanced or impaired performance. Brief separations enhanced and prolonged separations impaired performance on spatial/relational tasks. Performance was impaired in aversive conditioning and enhanced in inhibitory learning tasks regardless of manipulation duration. Opposing effects on performance for spatial/relational memory also depended upon timing of manipulation. Enhanced performance was likely if the manipulation occurred during postnatal week 3 but performance was impaired if it was confined to the first two postnatal weeks. Thus, the relationship between early life experiences and adulthood learning and memory performance is multifaceted and decidedly task-dependent. PMID:22819985

  14. Learning Curve Analyses in Neurodevelopmental Disorders: Are Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Truly Visual Learners?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdodi, Laszlo; Lajiness-O'Neill, Renee; Schmitt, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Visual and auditory verbal learning using a selective reminding format was studied in a mixed clinical sample of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) (n = 42), attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (n = 83), velocardiofacial syndrome (n = 17) and neurotypicals (n = 38) using the Test of Memory and Learning to (1) more thoroughly…

  15. Balloon dilation of the eustachian tube in a cadaver model: technical considerations, learning curve, and potential barriers.

    PubMed

    McCoul, Edward D; Singh, Ameet; Anand, Vijay K; Tabaee, Abtin

    2012-04-01

    The surgical management options for eustachian tube dysfunction have historically been limited. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the technical considerations, learning curve, and potential barriers for balloon dilation of the eustachian tube (BDET) as an alternative treatment modality. Prospective preclinical trial of BDET in a cadaver model. A novel balloon catheter device was used for eustachian tube dilation. Twenty-four BDET procedures were performed by three independent rhinologists with no prior experience with the procedure (eight procedures per surgeon). The duration and number of attempts of the individual steps and overall procedure were recorded. Endoscopic examination of the eustachian tube was performed after each procedure, and the surgeon was asked to rate the subjective difficulty on a five-point scale. Successful completion of the procedure occurred in each case. The overall mean duration of the procedure was 284 seconds, and a mean number of 1.15 attempts were necessary to perform the individual steps. The mean subjective procedure difficulty was noted as somewhat easy. Statistically shorter duration and subjectively easier procedure were noted in the second compared to the first half of the series, indicating a favorable learning curve. Linear fissuring within the eustachian tube lumen without submucosal disruption (nine procedures, 37%) and with submucosal disruption (five procedures, 21%) were noted. The significance of these physical findings is unclear. Preclinical testing of BDET is associated with favorable duration, learning curve, and overall ease of completion. Clinical trials are necessary to evaluate safety and efficacy. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  16. The learning curve to achieve satisfactory completion rates in upper GI endoscopy: an analysis of a national training database.

    PubMed

    Ward, S T; Hancox, A; Mohammed, M A; Ismail, T; Griffiths, E A; Valori, R; Dunckley, P

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the number of OGDs (oesophago-gastro-duodenoscopies) trainees need to perform to acquire competency in terms of successful unassisted completion to the second part of the duodenum 95% of the time. OGD data were retrieved from the trainee e-portfolio developed by the Joint Advisory Group on GI Endoscopy (JAG) in the UK. All trainees were included unless they were known to have a baseline experience of >20 procedures or had submitted data for <20 procedures. The primary outcome measure was OGD completion, defined as passage of the endoscope to the second part of the duodenum without physical assistance. The number of OGDs required to achieve a 95% completion rate was calculated by the moving average method and learning curve cumulative summation (LC-Cusum) analysis. To determine which factors were independently associated with OGD completion, a mixed effects logistic regression model was constructed with OGD completion as the outcome variable. Data were analysed for 1255 trainees over 288 centres, representing 243 555 OGDs. By moving average method, trainees attained a 95% completion rate at 187 procedures. By LC-Cusum analysis, after 200 procedures, >90% trainees had attained a 95% completion rate. Total number of OGDs performed, trainee age and experience in lower GI endoscopy were factors independently associated with OGD completion. There are limited published data on the OGD learning curve. This is the largest study to date analysing the learning curve for competency acquisition. The JAG competency requirement for 200 procedures appears appropriate. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. da Vinci skills simulator for assessing learning curve and criterion-based training of robotic basic skills.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, Willem M; Luursema, Jan-Maarten; Kengen, Bas; Schout, Barbara M A; Witjes, J Alfred; Bekkers, Ruud L

    2013-03-01

    To answer 2 research questions: what are the learning curve patterns of novices on the da Vinci skills simulator parameters and what parameters are appropriate for criterion-based robotic training. A total of 17 novices completed 2 simulator sessions within 3 days. Each training session consisted of a warming-up exercise, followed by 5 repetitions of the "ring and rail II" task. Expert participants (n = 3) performed a warming-up exercise and 3 repetitions of the "ring and rail II" task on 1 day. We analyzed all 9 parameters of the simulator. Significant learning occurred on 5 parameters: overall score, time to complete, instrument collision, instruments out of view, and critical errors within 1-10 repetitions (P <.05). Economy of motion and excessive instrument force only showed improvement within the first 5 repetitions. No significant learning on the parameter drops and master workspace range was found. Using the expert overall performance score (n = 3) as a criterion (overall score 90%), 9 of 17 novice participants met the criterion within 10 repetitions. Most parameters showed that basic robotic skills are learned relatively quickly using the da Vinci skills simulator, but that 10 repetitions were not sufficient for most novices to reach an expert level. Some parameters seemed inappropriate for expert-based criterion training because either no learning occurred or the novice performance was equal to expert performance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Ensemble Learning Method for Outlier Detection and its Application to Astronomical Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nun, Isadora; Protopapas, Pavlos; Sim, Brandon; Chen, Wesley

    2016-09-01

    Outlier detection is necessary for automated data analysis, with specific applications spanning almost every domain from financial markets to epidemiology to fraud detection. We introduce a novel mixture of the experts outlier detection model, which uses a dynamically trained, weighted network of five distinct outlier detection methods. After dimensionality reduction, individual outlier detection methods score each data point for “outlierness” in this new feature space. Our model then uses dynamically trained parameters to weigh the scores of each method, allowing for a finalized outlier score. We find that the mixture of experts model performs, on average, better than any single expert model in identifying both artificially and manually picked outliers. This mixture model is applied to a data set of astronomical light curves, after dimensionality reduction via time series feature extraction. Our model was tested using three fields from the MACHO catalog and generated a list of anomalous candidates. We confirm that the outliers detected using this method belong to rare classes, like Novae, He-burning, and red giant stars; other outlier light curves identified have no available information associated with them. To elucidate their nature, we created a website containing the light-curve data and information about these objects. Users can attempt to classify the light curves, give conjectures about their identities, and sign up for follow up messages about the progress made on identifying these objects. This user submitted data can be used further train of our mixture of experts model. Our code is publicly available to all who are interested.

  19. Learning Curves: Making Quality Online Health Information Available at a Fitness Center

    PubMed Central

    Dobbins, Montie T.; Tarver, Talicia; Adams, Mararia; Jones, Dixie A.

    2012-01-01

    Meeting consumer health information needs can be a challenge. Research suggests that women seek health information from a variety of resources, including the Internet. In an effort to make women aware of reliable health information sources, the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center – Shreveport Medical Library engaged in a partnership with a franchise location of Curves International, Inc. This article will discuss the project, its goals and its challenges. PMID:22545020

  20. Learning Curves: Making Quality Online Health Information Available at a Fitness Center.

    PubMed

    Dobbins, Montie T; Tarver, Talicia; Adams, Mararia; Jones, Dixie A

    2012-01-01

    Meeting consumer health information needs can be a challenge. Research suggests that women seek health information from a variety of resources, including the Internet. In an effort to make women aware of reliable health information sources, the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center - Shreveport Medical Library engaged in a partnership with a franchise location of Curves International, Inc. This article will discuss the project, its goals and its challenges.

  1. An improved method of early diagnosis of smoking-induced respiratory changes using machine learning algorithms.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Jorge L M; Lopes, Agnaldo J; Jansen, José M; Faria, Alvaro C D; Melo, Pedro L

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an automatic classifier to increase the accuracy of the forced oscillation technique (FOT) for diagnosing early respiratory abnormalities in smoking patients. The data consisted of FOT parameters obtained from 56 volunteers, 28 healthy and 28 smokers with low tobacco consumption. Many supervised learning techniques were investigated, including logistic linear classifiers, k nearest neighbor (KNN), neural networks and support vector machines (SVM). To evaluate performance, the ROC curve of the most accurate parameter was established as baseline. To determine the best input features and classifier parameters, we used genetic algorithms and a 10-fold cross-validation using the average area under the ROC curve (AUC). In the first experiment, the original FOT parameters were used as input. We observed a significant improvement in accuracy (KNN=0.89 and SVM=0.87) compared with the baseline (0.77). The second experiment performed a feature selection on the original FOT parameters. This selection did not cause any significant improvement in accuracy, but it was useful in identifying more adequate FOT parameters. In the third experiment, we performed a feature selection on the cross products of the FOT parameters. This selection resulted in a further increase in AUC (KNN=SVM=0.91), which allows for high diagnostic accuracy. In conclusion, machine learning classifiers can help identify early smoking-induced respiratory alterations. The use of FOT cross products and the search for the best features and classifier parameters can markedly improve the performance of machine learning classifiers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Learning Curve of the Application of Huang Three-Step Maneuver in a Laparoscopic Spleen-Preserving Splenic Hilar Lymphadenectomy for Advanced Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ze-Ning; Huang, Chang-Ming; Zheng, Chao-Hui; Li, Ping; Xie, Jian-Wei; Wang, Jia-Bin; Lin, Jian-Xian; Lu, Jun; Chen, Qi-Yue; Cao, Long-long; Lin, Mi; Tu, Ru-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the learning curve of the application of Huang 3-step maneuver, which was summarized and proposed by our center for the treatment of advanced upper gastric cancer. From April 2012 to March 2013, 130 consecutive patients who underwent a laparoscopic spleen-preserving splenic hilar lymphadenectomy (LSPL) by a single surgeon who performed Huang 3-step maneuver were retrospectively analyzed. The learning curve was analyzed based on the moving average (MA) method and the cumulative sum method (CUSUM). Surgical outcomes, short-term outcomes, and follow-up results before and after learning curve were contrastively analyzed. A stepwise multivariate logistic regression was used for a multivariable analysis to determine the factors that affect the operative time using Huang 3-step maneuver. Based on the CUSUM, the learning curve for Huang 3-step maneuver was divided into phase 1 (cases 1–40) and phase 2 (cases 41–130). The dissection time (DT) (P < 0.001), blood loss (BL) (P < 0.001), and number of vessels injured in phase 2 were significantly less than those in phase 1. There were no significant differences in the clinicopathological characteristics, short-term outcomes, or major postoperative complications between the learning curve phases. Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed that body mass index (BMI), short gastric vessels (SGVs), splenic hilar artery (SpA) type, and learning curve phase were significantly associated with DT. In the entire group, 124 patients were followed for a median time of 23.0 months (range, 3–30 months). There was no significant difference in the survival curve between phases. AUGC patients with a BMI less than 25 kg/m2, a small number of SGVs, and a concentrated type of SpA are ideal candidates for surgeons who are in phase 1 of the learning curve. PMID:27043698

  3. Laparoscopic colorectal surgery in learning curve: Role of implementation of a standardized technique and recovery protocol. A cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Luglio, Gaetano; De Palma, Giovanni Domenico; Tarquini, Rachele; Giglio, Mariano Cesare; Sollazzo, Viviana; Esposito, Emanuela; Spadarella, Emanuela; Peltrini, Roberto; Liccardo, Filomena; Bucci, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the proven benefits, laparoscopic colorectal surgery is still under utilized among surgeons. A steep learning is one of the causes of its limited adoption. Aim of the study is to determine the feasibility and morbidity rate after laparoscopic colorectal surgery in a single institution, “learning curve” experience, implementing a well standardized operative technique and recovery protocol. Methods The first 50 patients treated laparoscopically were included. All the procedures were performed by a trainee surgeon, supervised by a consultant surgeon, according to the principle of complete mesocolic excision with central vascular ligation or TME. Patients underwent a fast track recovery programme. Recovery parameters, short-term outcomes, morbidity and mortality have been assessed. Results Type of resections: 20 left side resections, 8 right side resections, 14 low anterior resection/TME, 5 total colectomy and IRA, 3 total panproctocolectomy and pouch. Mean operative time: 227 min; mean number of lymph-nodes: 18.7. Conversion rate: 8%. Mean time to flatus: 1.3 days; Mean time to solid stool: 2.3 days. Mean length of hospital stay: 7.2 days. Overall morbidity: 24%; major morbidity (Dindo–Clavien III): 4%. No anastomotic leak, no mortality, no 30-days readmission. Conclusion Proper laparoscopic colorectal surgery is safe and leads to excellent results in terms of recovery and short term outcomes, even in a learning curve setting. Key factors for better outcomes and shortening the learning curve seem to be the adoption of a standardized technique and training model along with the strict supervision of an expert colorectal surgeon. PMID:25859386

  4. Culture and the Brain: Making the Most of Learning in the Early Childhood Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas-Fair, Ursula

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews the impetus for higher quality, culturally appropriate early learning experiences. It investigates the economic costs of low quality learning and the absence of early learning programs as well. The article identifies and explores the tenets of brain-based learning and its connection to culture. Finally, the article describes…

  5. Dorsolateral Striatum Engagement Interferes with Early Discrimination Learning.

    PubMed

    Bergstrom, Hadley C; Lipkin, Anna M; Lieberman, Abby G; Pinard, Courtney R; Gunduz-Cinar, Ozge; Brockway, Emma T; Taylor, William W; Nonaka, Mio; Bukalo, Olena; Wills, Tiffany A; Rubio, F Javier; Li, Xuan; Pickens, Charles L; Winder, Danny G; Holmes, Andrew

    2018-05-22

    In current models, learning the relationship between environmental stimuli and the outcomes of actions involves both stimulus-driven and goal-directed systems, mediated in part by the DLS and DMS, respectively. However, though these models emphasize the importance of the DLS in governing actions after extensive experience has accumulated, there is growing evidence of DLS engagement from the onset of training. Here, we used in vivo photosilencing to reveal that DLS recruitment interferes with early touchscreen discrimination learning. We also show that the direct output pathway of the DLS is preferentially recruited and causally involved in early learning and find that silencing the normal contribution of the DLS produces plasticity-related alterations in a PL-DMS circuit. These data provide further evidence suggesting that the DLS is recruited in the construction of stimulus-elicited actions that ultimately automate behavior and liberate cognitive resources for other demands, but with a cost to performance at the outset of learning. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Curve Modulation and Apex Migration Using Shilla Growth Guidance Rods for Early-onset Scoliosis at 5-Year Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, John T; Songy, Chad E; Bumpass, David B; McCullough, Francis L; McCarthy, Richard E

    2017-04-03

    The Shilla procedure was designed to correct and control early-onset spinal deformity while harnessing a child's remaining spinal growth. It allows for controlled axial skeletal growth within the construct, avoiding the need for frequent surgeries to lengthen implants. We hypothesized that curve characteristics evolve over time after initial apex fusion and placement of the Shilla implants. The purpose of this study was to identify trends in curve evolution after Shilla implantation and understand how these changes influence ultimate outcome. A single-center, retrospective review of all patients with Shilla implants in place for ≥5 years yielded 21 patients. Charts and radiographs were reviewed to compare coronal curve characteristics preoperatively, postoperatively, and at last follow-up to note changes in the apex of the primary curve. Also noted were the development of adjacent compensatory curves, the overall vertical spinal growth, and the need for definitive spinal fusion once skeletal maturity was reached. Of the 21 patients, the curve apex migrated caudally in 12 patients (57%) and cephalad in 1 patient (5%), with a mean migration of 2.7 vertebral levels. Two patients (10%) developed new, significant compensatory curves (1 caudal and 1 cephalad). All patients demonstrated spinal growth in T1-S1 length following index surgery (mean, 45 mm). At skeletal maturity, 10 patients underwent definitive posterior spinal fusion and instrumentation, and 3 underwent implant removal alone. This study constitutes the longest follow-up of Shilla patients evaluating curve and implant behavior. Results of this review suggest that the apex of the fused primary curve shifts in approximately 62% of patients, with nearly all of these (92%) involving a distal migration. Compensatory curves did develop after Shilla placement as well. Overall, these findings represent adding-on distal to the apex after Shilla instrumentation rather than a crankshaft phenomenon about the apex. A

  7. Learning curves and perioperative outcomes after endoscopic enucleation of the prostate: a comparison between GreenLight 532-nm and holmium lasers.

    PubMed

    Peyronnet, Benoit; Robert, Grégoire; Comat, Vincent; Rouprêt, Morgan; Gomez-Sancha, Fernando; Cornu, Jean-Nicolas; Misrai, Vincent

    2017-06-01

    To compare the learning curves, perioperative and early functional outcomes after HoLEP and GreenLEP. Data from the first 100 consecutive cases treated by GreenLEP and HoLEP by two surgeons were prospectively collected from dedicated databases and analysed retrospectively. En-bloc GreenLEP and two-lobar HoLEP enucleations were conducted using the GreenLight HPS™ 2090 laser and Lumenis™ holmium laser. Patients' characteristics, perioperative outcomes and functional outcomes after 1, 3 and 6 months were compared between groups. Total energy delivered and operative times were significantly shorter for GreenLEP (58 vs. 110 kJ, p < 0.0001; 60 vs. 90 min, p < 0.0001). Operative time reached a plateau after 30 procedures in each group. Length of catheterization and hospital stay were significantly shorter in the HoLEP group (2 vs. 1 day, p < 0.0001; 2 vs. 1 day, p < 0.0001). Postoperative complications were comparable between GreenLEP and HoLEP (19 vs. 25 %; p = 0.13). There was a greater increase of Q max at 3 months and a greater IPSS decrease at 1 month for GreenLEP, whereas decreases in IPSS and IPSS-Q8 at 6 months were greater for HoLEP. Transient stress urinary incontinence was comparable between both groups (6 vs. 9 % at 3 months; p = 0.42). Pentafecta was achieved in four consecutive patients after the 18th and the 40th procedure in the GreenLEP and HoLEP group, respectively. Learning curves ranged from 14 to 30 cases for GreenLEP and 22 to 40 cases for HoLEP. Learning curves of GreenLEP and HoLEP provided roughly similar peri-operative and short-term functional outcomes.

  8. Soft tissue balancing in total knee arthroplasty using sensor-guided assessment: is there a learning curve?

    PubMed

    Gharaibeh, Monther A; Chen, Darren B; MacDessi, Samuel J

    2018-05-01

    Sensor-guided assessment for soft tissue balance in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has been reported to improve patient satisfaction and self-reported outcome scores. As more surgeons adopt this technology in TKA, we performed this study to identify if there is a learning curve with its use. Analysis of a total of 90 consecutive cases was performed in this study. Initial and final intercompartmental pressure differences were recorded before and after knee ligament balancing. The first 45 patients (group 1) were compared to the last 45 patients (group 2) in terms of operative time and the final state of knee balance. A balanced knee was defined as pressure difference between medial and lateral compartments of ≤15 pounds. Group 1 had 10 unbalanced knees in the final pressure difference assessment, while all cases in group 2 were balanced (P < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in mean operative time between the two groups. A scatter plot of intercompartmental pressure difference identified that after 30 cases, the capacity to achieve knee ligament balance improved. This study suggests that there is a learning curve with the use of sensor-guided assessment in TKA in achieving knee balance; however, the differences noted between initial and final groups were small and may not be of clinical significance. © 2018 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  9. Comparison of the learning curves and frustration level in performing laparoscopic and robotic training skills by experts and novices.

    PubMed

    Passerotti, Carlo C; Franco, Felipe; Bissoli, Julio C C; Tiseo, Bruno; Oliveira, Caio M; Buchalla, Carlos A O; Inoue, Gustavo N C; Sencan, Arzu; Sencan, Aydin; do Pardo, Rogerio Ruscitto; Nguyen, Hiep T

    2015-07-01

    Robotic assistance may provide for distinct technical advantages over conventional laparoscopic technique. The goals of this study were (1) to objectively evaluate the difference in the learning curves by novice and expert surgeons in performing fundamental laparoscopic skills using conventional laparoscopic surgery (CLS) and robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery (RALS) and (2) to evaluate the surgeons' frustration level in performing these tasks. Twelve experienced and 31 novices in laparoscopy were prospectively evaluated in performing three standardized laparoscopic tasks in five consecutive, weekly training sessions. Analysis of the learning curves was based on the magnitude, rate, and quickness in performance improvement. The participant's frustration and mood were also evaluated during and after every session. For the novice participants, RALS allowed for shorter time to task completion and greater accuracy. However, significant and rapid improvement in performance as measured by magnitude, rate, and quickness at each session was also seen with CLS. For the experienced surgeons, RALS only provided a slight improvement in performance. For all participants, the use of RALS was associated with less number of sessions in which they felt frustrated, less number of frustration episodes during a session, lower frustration score during and after the session, and higher good mood score. The advantages of RALS may be of most benefit when doing more complex tasks and by less experienced surgeons. RALS should not be used as a replacement for CLS but rather in specific situations in which it has the greatest advantages.

  10. A neurocomputational theory of how explicit learning bootstraps early procedural learning.

    PubMed

    Paul, Erick J; Ashby, F Gregory

    2013-01-01

    It is widely accepted that human learning and memory is mediated by multiple memory systems that are each best suited to different requirements and demands. Within the domain of categorization, at least two systems are thought to facilitate learning: an explicit (declarative) system depending largely on the prefrontal cortex, and a procedural (non-declarative) system depending on the basal ganglia. Substantial evidence suggests that each system is optimally suited to learn particular categorization tasks. However, it remains unknown precisely how these systems interact to produce optimal learning and behavior. In order to investigate this issue, the present research evaluated the progression of learning through simulation of categorization tasks using COVIS, a well-known model of human category learning that includes both explicit and procedural learning systems. Specifically, the model's parameter space was thoroughly explored in procedurally learned categorization tasks across a variety of conditions and architectures to identify plausible interaction architectures. The simulation results support the hypothesis that one-way interaction between the systems occurs such that the explicit system "bootstraps" learning early on in the procedural system. Thus, the procedural system initially learns a suboptimal strategy employed by the explicit system and later refines its strategy. This bootstrapping could be from cortical-striatal projections that originate in premotor or motor regions of cortex, or possibly by the explicit system's control of motor responses through basal ganglia-mediated loops.

  11. The Source of Child Care Center Preschool Learning and Program Standards: Implications for Potential Early Learning Challenge Fund Grantees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, Debra J.; Sansanelli, Rachel A.

    2010-01-01

    The proposed federal Early Learning Challenge Fund (ELCF) aims to improve the quality of early care and education programs by promoting the integration of more stringent program and early learning standards than are typically found in child care centers. ELCF grantees also must outline their plans for professional development and technical…

  12. Children's Participation Rights in Early Childhood Education and Care: The Case of Early Literacy Learning and Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunphy, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    This position article argues that educators' knowledge of young children's perspectives on aspects of early learning, including literacy learning, and subsequent interpretations of the ways that these perspectives can inform and shape pedagogy are key to promoting children's participation rights in early childhood education and care. Drawing on…

  13. From Experiment to Theory: What Can We Learn from Growth Curves?

    PubMed

    Kareva, Irina; Karev, Georgy

    2018-01-01

    Finding an appropriate functional form to describe population growth based on key properties of a described system allows making justified predictions about future population development. This information can be of vital importance in all areas of research, ranging from cell growth to global demography. Here, we use this connection between theory and observation to pose the following question: what can we infer about intrinsic properties of a population (i.e., degree of heterogeneity, or dependence on external resources) based on which growth function best fits its growth dynamics? We investigate several nonstandard classes of multi-phase growth curves that capture different stages of population growth; these models include hyperbolic-exponential, exponential-linear, exponential-linear-saturation growth patterns. The constructed models account explicitly for the process of natural selection within inhomogeneous populations. Based on the underlying hypotheses for each of the models, we identify whether the population that it best fits by a particular curve is more likely to be homogeneous or heterogeneous, grow in a density-dependent or frequency-dependent manner, and whether it depends on external resources during any or all stages of its development. We apply these predictions to cancer cell growth and demographic data obtained from the literature. Our theory, if confirmed, can provide an additional biomarker and a predictive tool to complement experimental research.

  14. The equivalence of learning paths in early science instruction: effect of direct instruction and discovery learning.

    PubMed

    Klahr, David; Nigam, Milena

    2004-10-01

    In a study with 112 third- and fourth-grade children, we measured the relative effectiveness of discovery learning and direct instruction at two points in the learning process: (a) during the initial acquisition of the basic cognitive objective (a procedure for designing and interpreting simple, unconfounded experiments) and (b) during the subsequent transfer and application of this basic skill to more diffuse and authentic reasoning associated with the evaluation of science-fair posters. We found not only that many more children learned from direct instruction than from discovery learning, but also that when asked to make broader, richer scientific judgments, the many children who learned about experimental design from direct instruction performed as well as those few children who discovered the method on their own. These results challenge predictions derived from the presumed superiority of discovery approaches in teaching young children basic procedures for early scientific investigations.

  15. Descemet Membrane Endothelial Keratoplasty Learning Curve for Graft Preparation in an Eye Bank Using 645 Donor Corneas.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Mohit; Ruzza, Alessandro; Romano, Vito; Favaro, Elisa; Baruzzo, Mattia; Salvalaio, Gianni; Grassetto, Andrea; Ferrari, Stefano; Ponzin, Diego

    2018-06-01

    To investigate the learning curve of Descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty (DMEK) graft preparation in an eye bank. Four operators prepared 645 DMEK grafts using the stripping technique between 2014 and 2017 at the Veneto Eye Bank Foundation, Italy. Endothelial cell loss (ECL) and tissue wastage were recorded retrospectively after DMEK preparation and correlated with the number of tissues prepared each year by each operator. On average, our operators performed 1 donor preparation a week over the course of this study. Only donors older than 60 years were used in this study, and approximately 10% of donors had diabetes. The Wilcoxon test for paired data and 1-way ANOVA were used for checking statistical significance with the Tukey test as post hoc analysis. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. ECL did not change significantly over time from operator 1. Significant ECL drop was noted from operator 2 between years 2014-2016 (P = 0.0049) and 2017 (P = 0.0094); from operator 3 between years 2015-2016 (P = 0.0288) and 2017 (P = 0.0097); and from operator 4 between 2015-2016 (P = 0.0469) and 2017 (P = 0.0331). Operators 1 and 3 did not show a significant difference, considering every 50 grafts prepared by each operator. Operator 2 showed significant ECL drop between 1 to 50 and 51 to 100 (P = 0.0002) and 1 to 50 and 101 to 150 (P = 0.0001) grafts. Operator 4 showed significant ECL drop between 1 to 50 and 101 to 150 (P = 0.002) and 51 to 100 and 101 to 141 (P = 0.0207) grafts. No intraoperator difference was observed per 50 grafts (P > 0.05). There is a learning curve for DMEK graft preparation. ECL and tissue wastage can be reduced with practice and skills. However, each operator may be limited to his or her own learning capability.

  16. Learning to trust: trust and attachment in early psychosis.

    PubMed

    Fett, A-K J; Shergill, S S; Korver-Nieberg, N; Yakub, F; Gromann, P M; Krabbendam, L

    2016-05-01

    Distrust and social dysfunction are characteristic in psychosis and may arise from attachment insecurity, which is elevated in the disorder. The relationship between trust and attachment in the early stages of psychosis is unknown, yet could help to understand interpersonal difficulties and disease progression. This study aimed to investigate whether trust is reduced in patients with early psychosis and whether this is accounted for by attachment avoidance and attachment anxiety. We used two trust games with a cooperative and unfair partner in a sample of 39 adolescents with early psychosis and 100 healthy controls. Patients had higher levels of attachment anxiety, but the groups did not differ in attachment avoidance. Basic trust was lower in patients than controls, as indicated by lower initial investments. During cooperation patients increased their trust towards levels of controls, i.e. they were able to learn and to override initial suspiciousness. Patients decreased their trust less than controls during unfair interactions. Anxious attachment was associated with higher basic trust and higher trust during unfair interactions and predicted trust independent of group status. Discussion Patients showed decreased basic trust but were able to learn from the trustworthy behaviour of their counterpart. Worries about the acceptance by others and low self-esteem are associated with psychosis and attachment anxiety and may explain behaviour that is focused on conciliation, rather than self-protection.

  17. Half-Life Learning Curves in the Defense Acquisition Life Cycle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    International Journal of Production Economics , 83(1), 95–111. Jaber, M. Y., & Bonney, M. (2007). Economic Manufacture Quantity (EMQ) model with lot...size dependent learning and forgetting rates. International Journal of Production Economics , 108(1–2), 359–367. Jaber, M.Y., & Guiffrida, A. L. (2008...189(1), 93–104. Jaber, M. Y., Hemant, K. V., & Darwin D. J. (2003). Countering forgetting through training and deployment. International Journal of

  18. Job-Embedded Professional Learning Essential to Improving Teaching and Learning in Early Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacchiano, Debra; Klein, Rebecca; Hawley, Marsha Shigeyo

    2016-01-01

    Improving classroom teaching improves children's learning outcomes. In pursuit of those goals, the early education field has made substantial investments aimed at increasing the quality of classroom environments and teacher-child interactions. Yet, in publicly funded programs across the country, the quality of instruction remains low and…

  19. The learning curve of laparoscopic holecystectomy in general surgery resident training: old age of the patient may be a risk factor?

    PubMed

    Ferrarese, Alessia; Gentile, Valentina; Bindi, Marco; Rivelli, Matteo; Cumbo, Jacopo; Solej, Mario; Enrico, Stefano; Martino, Valter

    2016-01-01

    A well-designed learning curve is essential for the acquisition of laparoscopic skills: but, are there risk factors that can derail the surgical method? From a review of the current literature on the learning curve in laparoscopic surgery, we identified learning curve components in video laparoscopic cholecystectomy; we suggest a learning curve model that can be applied to assess the progress of general surgical residents as they learn and master the stages of video laparoscopic cholecystectomy regardless of type of patient. Electronic databases were interrogated to better define the terms "surgeon", "specialized surgeon", and "specialist surgeon"; we surveyed the literature on surgical residency programs outside Italy to identify learning curve components, influential factors, the importance of tutoring, and the role of reference centers in residency education in surgery. From the definition of acceptable error, self-efficacy, and error classification, we devised a learning curve model that may be applied to training surgical residents in video laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Based on the criteria culled from the literature, the three surgeon categories (general, specialized, and specialist) are distinguished by years of experience, case volume, and error rate; the patients were distinguished for years and characteristics. The training model was constructed as a series of key learning steps in video laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Potential errors were identified and the difficulty of each step was graded using operation-specific characteristics. On completion of each procedure, error checklist scores on procedure-specific performance are tallied to track the learning curve and obtain performance indices of measurement that chart the trainee's progress. The concept of the learning curve in general surgery is disputed. The use of learning steps may enable the resident surgical trainee to acquire video laparoscopic cholecystectomy skills proportional to the instructor

  20. Learning from Children: Learning from Caroline Pratt (1867-1954). Early Progressives in Early Years Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drummond, Mary Jane

    2014-01-01

    This review of Caroline Pratt's life and work in early years education includes an account of how a six-year-old boy taught a woman in her thirties what she needed to know in order to open a school--in 1914--that continues to this day, a school that was, in the founder's own words, fitted to the child and not the other way around. It finds a clear…

  1. Impact of cap-assisted colonoscopy on the learning curve and quality in colonoscopy: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhouwen; Zhang, Daniel S; Thrift, Aaron P; Patel, Kalpesh K

    2018-03-01

    Colonoscopy competency assessment in trainees traditionally has been informal. Comprehensive metrics such as the Assessment of Competency in Endoscopy (ACE) tool suggest that competency thresholds are higher than assumed. Cap-assisted colonoscopy (CAC) may improve competency, but data regarding novice trainees are lacking. We compared CAC versus standard colonoscopy (SC) performed by novice trainees in a randomized controlled trial. All colonoscopies performed by 3 gastroenterology fellows without prior experience were eligible for the study. Exclusion criteria included patient age <18 or >90 years, pregnancy, prior colon resection, diverticulitis, colon obstruction, severe hematochezia, referral for EMR, or a procedure done without patient sedation. Patients were randomized to either CAC or SC in a 1:1 fashion. The primary outcome was the independent cecal intubation rate (ICIR). Secondary outcomes were cecal intubation time, polyp detection rate, polyp miss rate, adenoma detection rate, ACE tool scores, and cumulative summation learning curves. A total of 203 colonoscopies were analyzed, 101 in CAC and 102 in SC. CAC resulted in a significantly higher cecal intubation rate, at 79.2% in CAC compared with 66.7% in SC (P = .04). Overall cecal intubation time was significantly shorter at 13.7 minutes for CAC versus 16.5 minutes for SC (P =.02). Cecal intubation time in the case of successful independent fellow intubation was not significantly different between CAC and SC (11.6 minutes vs 12.7 minutes; P = .29). Overall ACE tool motor and cognitive scores were higher with CAC. Learning curves for ICIR approached the competency threshold earlier with cap use but reached competency for only 1 fellow. The polyp detection rate, polyp miss rate, and adenoma detection rate were not significantly different between groups. CAC resulted in significant improvement in ICIR, overall ACE tool scores, and trend toward competency on learning curves when compared with SC in

  2. [Application of decision curve on evaluation of MRI predictive model for early assessing pathological complete response to neoadjuvant therapy in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    He, Y J; Li, X T; Fan, Z Q; Li, Y L; Cao, K; Sun, Y S; Ouyang, T

    2018-01-23

    Objective: To construct a dynamic enhanced MR based predictive model for early assessing pathological complete response (pCR) to neoadjuvant therapy in breast cancer, and to evaluate the clinical benefit of the model by using decision curve. Methods: From December 2005 to December 2007, 170 patients with breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant therapy were identified and their MR images before neoadjuvant therapy and at the end of the first cycle of neoadjuvant therapy were collected. Logistic regression model was used to detect independent factors for predicting pCR and construct the predictive model accordingly, then receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and decision curve were used to evaluate the predictive model. Results: ΔArea(max) and Δslope(max) were independent predictive factors for pCR, OR =0.942 (95% CI : 0.918-0.967) and 0.961 (95% CI : 0.940-0.987), respectively. The area under ROC curve (AUC) for the constructed model was 0.886 (95% CI : 0.820-0.951). Decision curve showed that in the range of the threshold probability above 0.4, the predictive model presented increased net benefit as the threshold probability increased. Conclusions: The constructed predictive model for pCR is of potential clinical value, with an AUC>0.85. Meanwhile, decision curve analysis indicates the constructed predictive model has net benefit from 3 to 8 percent in the likely range of probability threshold from 80% to 90%.

  3. The U-Curve of E-Learning: Course Website and Online Video Use in Blended and Distance Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geri, Nitza; Gafni, Ruti; Winer, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Procrastination is a common challenge for students. While course Websites and online video lectures enable studying anytime, anywhere, and expand learning opportunities, their availability may increase procrastination by making it easier for students to defer until tomorrow. This research used Google Analytics to examine temporal use patterns of…

  4. Differential Training Facilitates Early Consolidation in Motor Learning

    PubMed Central

    Henz, Diana; Schöllhorn, Wolfgang I.

    2016-01-01

    Current research demonstrates increased learning rates in differential learning (DL) compared to repetitive training. To date, little is known on the underlying neurophysiological processes in DL that contribute to superior performance over repetitive practice. In the present study, we measured electroencephalographic (EEG) brain activation patterns after DL and repetitive badminton serve training. Twenty-four semi-professional badminton players performed badminton serves in a DL and repetitive training schedule in a within-subjects design. EEG activity was recorded from 19 electrodes according to the 10–20 system before and immediately after each 20-min exercise. Increased theta activity was obtained in contralateral parieto-occipital regions after DL. Further, increased posterior alpha activity was obtained in DL compared to repetitive training. Results indicate different underlying neuronal processes in DL and repetitive training with a higher involvement of parieto-occipital areas in DL. We argue that DL facilitates early consolidation in motor learning indicated by post-training increases in theta and alpha activity. Further, brain activation patterns indicate somatosensory working memory processes where attentional resources are allocated in processing of somatosensory information in DL. Reinforcing a somatosensory memory trace might explain increased motor learning rates in DL. Finally, this memory trace is more stable against interference from internal and external disturbances that afford executively controlled processing such as attentional processes. PMID:27818627

  5. Lexically-based learning and early grammatical development.

    PubMed

    Lieven, E V; Pine, J M; Baldwin, G

    1997-02-01

    Pine & Lieven (1993) suggest that a lexically-based positional analysis can account for the structure of a considerable proportion of children's early multiword corpora. The present study tests this claim on a second, larger sample of eleven children aged between 1;0 and 3;0 from a different social background, and extends the analysis to later in development. Results indicate that the positional analysis can account for a mean of 60% of all the children's multiword utterances and that the great majority of all other utterances are defined as frozen by the analysis. Alternative explanations of the data based on hypothesizing underlying syntactic or semantic relations are investigated through analyses of pronoun case marking and of verbs with prototypical agent-patient roles. Neither supports the view that the children's utterances are being produced on the basis of general underlying rules and categories. The implications of widespread distributional learning in early language development are discussed.

  6. Robotic thoracic surgery: technical considerations and learning curve for pulmonary resection.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Giulia

    2014-05-01

    Retrospective series indicate that robot-assisted approaches to lung cancer resection offer comparable radicality and safety to video-assisted thoracic surgery or open surgery. More intuitive movements, greater flexibility, and high-definition three-dimensional vision overcome limitations of video-assisted thoracic surgery and may encourage wider adoption of robotic surgery for lung cancer, particularly as more early stage cases are diagnosed by screening. High capital and running costs, limited instrument availability, and long operating times are important disadvantages. Entry of competitor companies should drive down costs. Studies are required to assess quality of life, morbidity, oncologic radicality, and cost effectiveness. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Professional Development for Early Childhood Educators: Efforts to Improve Math and Science Learning Opportunities in Early Childhood Classrooms.

    PubMed

    Piasta, Shayne B; Logan, Jessica A R; Pelatti, Christina Yeager; Capps, Janet L; Petrill, Stephen A

    2015-05-01

    Because recent initiatives highlight the need to better support preschool-aged children's math and science learning, the present study investigated the impact of professional development in these domains for early childhood educators. Sixty-five educators were randomly assigned to experience 10.5 days (64 hours) of training on math and science or on an alternative topic. Educators' provision of math and science learning opportunities were documented, as were the fall-to-spring math and science learning gains of children ( n = 385) enrolled in their classrooms. Professional development significantly impacted provision of science, but not math, learning opportunities. Professional development did not directly impact children's math or science learning, although science learning was indirectly affected via the increase in science learning opportunities. Both math and science learning opportunities were positively associated with children's learning. Results suggest that substantive efforts are necessary to ensure that children have opportunities to learn math and science from a young age.

  8. Learning curve of robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy for a single experienced surgeon: comparison with simultaneous laparoscopic radical prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Ku, Ja Yoon; Ha, Hong Koo

    2015-04-01

    Despite the large number of analytical reports regarding the learning curve in the transition from open to robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP), few comparative results with laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP) have been reported. Thus, we evaluated operative and postoperative outcomes in RARP versus 100 simultaneously performed LRPs. A single surgeon had performed more than 1,000 laparoscopic operations, including 415 cases of radical nephrectomy, 85 radical cystectomies, 369 radical prostatectomies, and treatment of 212 other urological tumors, since 2009. We evaluated operative (operation time, intraoperative transfusion, complications, hospital stay, margin status, pathological stage, Gleason score) and postoperative (continence and erectile function) parameters in initial cases of RARP without tutoring compared with 100 recently performed LRPs. Mean operation time and length of hospital stay for RARP and LRP were 145.5±43.6 minutes and 118.1±39.1 minutes, and 6.4±0.9 days and 6.6±1.1 days, respectively (p=0.003 and p=0.721). After 17 cases, the mean operation time for RARP was similar to LRP (less than 2 hours). Positive surgical margins in localized cancer were seen in 11.1% and 8.9% of cases in RARP and LRP, respectively (p=0.733). At postoperative 3 months, sexual intercourse was reported in 14.0% and 12.0%, and pad-free continence in 96.0% and 81.0% in patients with RARP and LRP, respectively (p=0.796 and p=0.012). Previous large-volume experience of LRPs may shorten the learning curve for RARP in terms of oncological outcome. Additionally, previous experience with laparoscopy may improve the functional outcomes of RARP.

  9. The learning curve in short-stem THA: influence of the surgeon's experience on intraoperative adjustments due to intraoperative radiography.

    PubMed

    Loweg, Lennard; Kutzner, Karl Philipp; Trost, Matthias; Hechtner, Marlene; Drees, Philipp; Pfeil, Joachim; Schneider, Michael

    2018-02-01

    Short-stem THA has become increasingly popular over the last decade. However, implantation technique differs from conventional THA and thus possibly involves a distinct learning curve. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the value of intraoperative radiography and the influence of the surgeon's experience on intraoperative adjustments in short-stem THA. A total of 287 consecutive short-stem THAs, operated by a total of 24 senior consultants, consultants and residents in training, were prospectively included. Intraoperative radiography was performed after trial reduction. Preoperative planning and intraoperative outcome with regard to positioning, sizing of components as well as resulting offset and leg length were compared. Frequency, reason and type of intraoperative adjustments were documented in relation to the surgeon's experience. Operation time was assessed. One hundred and fifty-six (54.4%) procedures were carried out by one of three senior consultants, and a total of nine consultants and 12 residents in training performed 105 (36.6%) and 26 (9.0%) operations, respectively. In 121 cases (42.2%), intraoperative adjustments were made following intraoperative radiography. Intraoperative adjustments of one or more components were made by senior consultants in 51 cases (32.7%), by consultants in 53 cases (50.5%) and by residents in 17 cases (65.4%), respectively. The most common cause was undersizing of the stem. Operation time varied markedly between groups of surgeons. Short-stem THA involves a learning curve. Intraoperative radiography is decisive for prevention of malpositioning and undersizing of components, as well as loss of offset and leg length discrepancies. Hence, it should be considered mandatory, especially for less experienced surgeons.

  10. Initial laparoscopic basic skills training shortens the learning curve of laparoscopic suturing and is cost-effective.

    PubMed

    Stefanidis, Dimitrios; Hope, William W; Korndorffer, James R; Markley, Sarah; Scott, Daniel J

    2010-04-01

    Laparoscopic suturing is an advanced skill that is difficult to acquire. Simulator-based skills curricula have been developed that have been shown to transfer to the operating room. Currently available skills curricula need to be optimized. We hypothesized that mastering basic laparoscopic skills first would shorten the learning curve of a more complex laparoscopic task and reduce resource requirements for the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery suturing curriculum. Medical students (n = 20) with no previous simulator experience were enrolled in an IRB-approved protocol, pretested on the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery suturing model, and randomized into 2 groups. Group I (n = 10) trained (unsupervised) until proficiency levels were achieved on 5 basic tasks; Group II (n = 10) received no basic training. Both groups then trained (supervised) on the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery suturing model until previously reported proficiency levels were achieved. Two weeks later, they were retested to evaluate their retention scores, training parameters, instruction requirements, and cost between groups using t-test. Baseline characteristics and performance were similar for both groups, and 9 of 10 subjects in each group achieved the proficiency levels. The initial performance on the simulator was better for Group I after basic skills training, and their suturing learning curve was shorter compared with Group II. In addition, Group I required less active instruction. Overall time required to finish the curriculum was similar for both groups; but the Group I training strategy cost less, with a savings of $148 per trainee. Teaching novices basic laparoscopic skills before a more complex laparoscopic task produces substantial cost savings. Additional studies are needed to assess the impact of such integrated curricula on ultimate educational benefit. Copyright (c) 2010 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical Outcomes and Complications during the Learning Curve for Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty: An Analysis of the First 40 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kwang-Soon; Koo, Tae-Won

    2017-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the results and complications during the learning curve of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA) for rotator cuff deficiency. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the first 40 cases of RTSA performed by a single surgeon. The mean age of patients was 72.7 years (range, 63 to 81 years) and mean follow-up period was 26.7 months (range, 9 to 57 months). Clinical outcomes were evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) shoulder score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeon (ASES) score, subjective shoulder value (SSV), and active range of motion (ROM). Intraoperative and postoperative complications were also evaluated. Results The average VAS pain score, UCLA score, ASES score, and SSV improved from 6.9%, 12.8%, 29.0%, and 29.0% before surgery to 1.6%, 27.0%, 73.3%, and 71.5% after surgery, respectively (p < 0.001). The mean forward flexion, abduction, and external rotation improved from 68.0°, 56.9°, and 28.0° before surgery to 131.0°, 112.3°, and 38.8° after surgery, respectively (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, and p = 0.021). However, the mean internal rotation did not improve after surgery (p = 0.889). Scapular notching was observed in 33 patients (51.5%). Eight shoulders (20%) had complications, including 2 major (1 deep infection and 1 glenoid fixation failure) and 6 minor complications (3 brachial plexus injuries, 2 acromial fractures, and 1 intraoperative periprosthetic fracture). Conclusions The first 40 cases of RTSA performed by a single surgeon during the learning curve period showed satisfactory short-term follow-up results with an acceptable complication rate. PMID:28567225

  12. The learning curve, interobserver, and intraobserver agreement of endoscopic confocal laser endomicroscopy in the assessment of mucosal barrier defects.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jeff; Ip, Matthew; Yang, Michael; Wong, Brendon; Power, Theresa; Lin, Lisa; Xuan, Wei; Phan, Tri Giang; Leong, Rupert W

    2016-04-01

    Confocal laser endomicroscopy can dynamically assess intestinal mucosal barrier defects and increased intestinal permeability (IP). These are functional features that do not have corresponding appearance on histopathology. As such, previous pathology training may not be beneficial in learning these dynamic features. This study aims to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy, learning curve, inter- and intraobserver agreement for identifying features of increased IP in experienced and inexperienced analysts and pathologists. A total of 180 endoscopic confocal laser endomicroscopy (Pentax EC-3870FK; Pentax, Tokyo, Japan) images of the terminal ileum, subdivided into 6 sets of 30 were evaluated by 6 experienced analysts, 13 inexperienced analysts, and 2 pathologists, after a 30-minute teaching session. Cell-junction enhancement, fluorescein leak, and cell dropout were used to represent increased IP and were either present or absent in each image. For each image, the diagnostic accuracy, confidence, and quality were assessed. Diagnostic accuracy was significantly higher for experienced analysts compared with inexperienced analysts from the first set (96.7% vs 83.1%, P < .001) to the third set (95% vs 89.7, P = .127). No differences in accuracy were noted between inexperienced analysts and pathologists. Confidence (odds ratio, 8.71; 95% confidence interval, 5.58-13.57) and good image quality (odds ratio, 1.58; 95% confidence interval, 1.22-2.03) were associated with improved interpretation. Interobserver agreement κ values were high and improved with experience (experienced analysts, 0.83; inexperienced analysts, 0.73; and pathologists, 0.62). Intraobserver agreement was >0.86 for experienced observers. Features representative of increased IP can be rapidly learned with high inter- and intraobserver agreement. Confidence and image quality were significant predictors of accurate interpretation. Previous pathology training did not have an effect on learning. Copyright © 2016

  13. Race to the Top - Early Learning Challenge: 2014 Annual Performance Report. Wisconsin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Race to the Top - Early Learning Challenge, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This Race to the Top - Early Learning Challenge (RTT-ELC) annual performance report for the year 2014 describes Wisconsin's accomplishments, lessons learned, challenges, and strategies Wisconsin will implement to address those challenges. During the second year of the Race to the Top - Early Learning Challenge (RTT-ELC) in Wisconsin, there have…

  14. Race to the Top - Early Learning Challenge: 2014 Annual Performance Report. Delaware

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Race to the Top - Early Learning Challenge, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This Race to the Top - Early Learning Challenge (RTT-ELC) annual performance report for the year 2014 describes Delaware's accomplishments, lessons learned, challenges, and strategies Delaware will implement to address those challenges. At the end of Year Three of the Early Learning Challenge Grant, Delaware continues to make significant progress…

  15. Second-Language Learning in Early Childhood: Some Thoughts for Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Barry

    There is much that can be done in early childhood education programs to foster second language learning in young children. The research literature on early childhood bilingualism clearly indicates that children can learn two languages simultaneously without apparent effort, without cognitive strain or interference in learning either language…

  16. Kant, curves and medical learning practice: a reply to Le Morvan and Stock

    PubMed Central

    Ives, J

    2007-01-01

    In a recent paper published in the Journal of Medical Ethics, Le Morvan and Stock claim that the kantian ideal of treating people always as ends in themselves and never merely as a means is in direct and insurmountable conflict with the current medical practice of allowing practitioners at the bottom of their “learning curve” to “practise their skills” on patients. In this response, I take up the challenge they issue is and try to reconcile this conflict. The kantian ideal offered in the paper is an incomplete characterisation of Kant's moral philosophy, and the formula of humanity is considered in isolation without taking into account other salient kantian principles. I also suggest that their argument based on “necessary for the patient” assumes too narrow a reading of “necessary”. This reply is intended as an extension to, rather than a criticism of, their work. PMID:17264201

  17. SELF (Supports for Early Learning Foundations): A Non-Directed Model Demonstration Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Holly

    This final report describes achievements and activities of Project SELF (Supports for Early Learning Foundations), a federally funded project in New Mexico which developed, evaluated, and replicated an innovative model that provides strategies for early interventionists and families to support early learning foundations. The project identified…

  18. Learning abilities and disabilities: generalist genes in early adolescence.

    PubMed

    Davis, Oliver S P; Haworth, Claire M A; Plomin, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The new view of cognitive neuropsychology that considers not just case studies of rare severe disorders but also common disorders, as well as normal variation and quantitative traits, is more amenable to recent advances in molecular genetics, such as genome-wide association studies, and advances in quantitative genetics, such as multivariate genetic analysis. A surprising finding emerging from multivariate quantitative genetic studies across diverse learning abilities is that most genetic influences are shared: they are "generalist", rather than "specialist". We exploited widespread access to inexpensive and fast Internet connections in the United Kingdom to assess over 5000 pairs of 12-year-old twins from the Twins Early Development Study (TEDS) on four distinct batteries: reading, mathematics, general cognitive ability (g) and, for the first time, language. Genetic correlations remain high among all of the measured abilities, with language as highly correlated genetically with g as reading and mathematics. Despite developmental upheaval, generalist genes remain important into early adolescence, suggesting optimal strategies for molecular genetic studies seeking to identify the genes of small effect that influence learning abilities and disabilities.

  19. Learning and Teaching Early Math: The Learning Trajectories Approach, 2nd Edition. Studies in Mathematical Thinking and Learning Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clements, Douglas H.; Sarama, Julie

    2014-01-01

    In this important book for pre- and in-service teachers, early math experts Douglas Clements and Julie Sarama show how "learning trajectories" help diagnose a child's level of mathematical understanding and provide guidance for teaching. By focusing on the inherent delight and curiosity behind young children's mathematical reasoning,…

  20. Native language change during early stages of second language learning.

    PubMed

    Bice, Kinsey; Kroll, Judith F

    2015-11-11

    Research on proficient bilinguals has demonstrated that both languages are always active, even when only one is required. The coactivation of the two languages creates both competition and convergence, facilitating the processing of cognate words, but slowing lexical access when there is a requirement to engage control mechanisms to select the target language. Critically, these consequences are evident in the native language (L1) as well as in the second language (L2). The present study questioned whether L1 changes can be detected at early stages of L2 learning and how they are modulated by L2 proficiency. Native English speakers learning Spanish performed an English (L1) lexical decision task that included cognates while event-related potentials were recorded. They also performed verbal fluency, working memory, and inhibitory control tasks. A group of matched monolinguals performed the same tasks in English only. The results revealed that intermediate learners demonstrate a reduced N400 for cognates compared with noncognates in English (L1), and an emerging effect is visually present in beginning learners as well; however, no behavioral cognate effect was present for either group. In addition, slower reaction times in English (L1) are related to a larger cognate N400 magnitude in English (L1) and Spanish (L2), and to better inhibitory control for learners but not for monolinguals. The results suggest that contrary to the claim that L2 affects L1 only when L2 speakers are highly proficient, L2 learning begins to impact L1 early in the development of the L2 skill.

  1. Comparison of learning curves and skill transfer between classical and robotic laparoscopy according to the viewing conditions: implications for training.

    PubMed

    Blavier, Adélaïde; Gaudissart, Quentin; Cadière, Guy-Bernard; Nyssen, Anne-Sophie

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the perceptual (2-dimensional [2D] vs. 3-dimensional [3D] view) and instrumental (classical vs. robotic) impacts of new robotic system on learning curves. Forty medical students without any surgical experience were randomized into 4 groups (classical laparoscopy with 3D-direct view or with 2D-indirect view, robotic system in 3D or in 2D) and repeated a laparoscopic task 6 times. After these 6 repetitions, they performed 2 trials with the same technique but in the other viewing condition (perceptive switch). Finally, subjects performed the last 3 trials with the technique they never used (technical switch). Subjects evaluated their performance answering a questionnaire (impressions of mastery, familiarity, satisfaction, self-confidence, and difficulty). Our study showed better performance and improvement in 3D view than in 2D view whatever the instrumental aspect. Participants reported less mastery, familiarity, and self-confidence and more difficulty in classical laparoscopy with 2D-indirect view than in the other conditions. Robotic surgery improves surgical performance and learning, particularly by 3D view advantage. However, perceptive and technical switches emphasize the need to adapt and pursue training also with traditional technology to prevent risks in conversion procedure.

  2. Early hospital mortality prediction of intensive care unit patients using an ensemble learning approach.

    PubMed

    Awad, Aya; Bader-El-Den, Mohamed; McNicholas, James; Briggs, Jim

    2017-12-01

    Mortality prediction of hospitalized patients is an important problem. Over the past few decades, several severity scoring systems and machine learning mortality prediction models have been developed for predicting hospital mortality. By contrast, early mortality prediction for intensive care unit patients remains an open challenge. Most research has focused on severity of illness scoring systems or data mining (DM) models designed for risk estimation at least 24 or 48h after ICU admission. This study highlights the main data challenges in early mortality prediction in ICU patients and introduces a new machine learning based framework for Early Mortality Prediction for Intensive Care Unit patients (EMPICU). The proposed method is evaluated on the Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care II (MIMIC-II) database. Mortality prediction models are developed for patients at the age of 16 or above in Medical ICU (MICU), Surgical ICU (SICU) or Cardiac Surgery Recovery Unit (CSRU). We employ the ensemble learning Random Forest (RF), the predictive Decision Trees (DT), the probabilistic Naive Bayes (NB) and the rule-based Projective Adaptive Resonance Theory (PART) models. The primary outcome was hospital mortality. The explanatory variables included demographic, physiological, vital signs and laboratory test variables. Performance measures were calculated using cross-validated area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) to minimize bias. 11,722 patients with single ICU stays are considered. Only patients at the age of 16 years old and above in Medical ICU (MICU), Surgical ICU (SICU) or Cardiac Surgery Recovery Unit (CSRU) are considered in this study. The proposed EMPICU framework outperformed standard scoring systems (SOFA, SAPS-I, APACHE-II, NEWS and qSOFA) in terms of AUROC and time (i.e. at 6h compared to 48h or more after admission). The results show that although there are many values missing in the first few hour of ICU admission

  3. Program Setup Time and Learning Curves associated with "ready to fly" Drone Mapping Hardware and Software.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, T.

    2016-12-01

    How quickly can students (and educators) get started using a "ready to fly" UAS and popular publicly available photogrammetric mapping software for student research at the undergraduate level? This poster presentation focuses on the challenges of starting up your own drone-mapping program for undergraduate research in a compressed timescale of three months. Particular focus will be given to learning the operation of the platforms, hardware and software interface challenges, and using these electronic systems in real-world field settings that pose a range of physical challenges to both operators and equipment. We will be using a combination of the popular DJI Phantom UAS and Pix4D mapping software to investigate mass wasting processes and potential hazards present in public lands popular with recreational users. Projects are aimed at characterizing active geological hazards that operate on short timescales and may include gully headwall erosion in Flaming Geyser State Park and potential landslide instability within Capital State Forest, both in the Puget Sound region of Washington State.

  4. Jump-Starting Early Childhood Education at Home: Early Learning, Parent Motivation, and Public Policy.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Erin A; Converse, Benjamin A; Gibbs, Chloe R; Levine, Susan C; Beilock, Sian L

    2015-11-01

    By the time children begin formal schooling, their experiences at home have already contributed to large variations in their math and language development, and once school begins, academic achievement continues to depend strongly on influences outside of school. It is thus essential that educational reform strategies involve primary caregivers. Specifically, programs and policies should promote and support aspects of caregiver-child interaction that have been empirically demonstrated to boost early learning and should seek to impede "motivational sinkholes" that threaten to undermine caregivers' desires to engage their children effectively. This article draws on cognitive and behavioral science to detail simple, low-cost, and effective tools caregivers can employ to prepare their children for educational success and then describes conditions that can protect and facilitate caregivers' motivation to use those tools. Policy recommendations throughout focus on using existing infrastructure to more deeply engage caregivers in effective early childhood education at home. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Learning neuroendoscopy with an exoscope system (video telescopic operating monitor): Early clinical results.

    PubMed

    Parihar, Vijay; Yadav, Y R; Kher, Yatin; Ratre, Shailendra; Sethi, Ashish; Sharma, Dhananjaya

    2016-01-01

    Steep learning curve is found initially in pure endoscopic procedures. Video telescopic operating monitor (VITOM) is an advance in rigid-lens telescope systems provides an alternative method for learning basics of neuroendoscopy with the help of the familiar principle of microneurosurgery. The aim was to evaluate the clinical utility of VITOM as a learning tool for neuroendoscopy. Video telescopic operating monitor was used 39 cranial and spinal procedures and its utility as a tool for minimally invasive neurosurgery and neuroendoscopy for initial learning curve was studied. Video telescopic operating monitor was used in 25 cranial and 14 spinal procedures. Image quality is comparable to endoscope and microscope. Surgeons comfort improved with VITOM. Frequent repositioning of scope holder and lack of stereopsis is initial limiting factor was compensated for with repeated procedures. Video telescopic operating monitor is found useful to reduce initial learning curve of neuroendoscopy.

  6. Novel telementoring system for robot-assisted radical prostatectomy: impact on the learning curve.

    PubMed

    Hinata, Nobuyuki; Miyake, Hideaki; Kurahashi, Toshifumi; Ando, Makoto; Furukawa, Junya; Ishimura, Takeshi; Tanaka, Kazushi; Fujisawa, Masato

    2014-05-01

    To develop a Web-based audiovisual telementoring system for robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) and to assess the utility of this system. A telementoring system for RARP, consisting of a 3-dimensional high-definition view of the operating field, overview of the operating room, annotation function, and 2-channel audio feed with bidirectional connectivity between 2 institutions, was developed. The outcome of RARP performed for the initial 30 patients by 2 surgeons with telementoring was compared with that for 2 surgeons who received direct mentoring. This system was shown to function properly with an acceptable latency. There were no significant differences in several parameters reflecting surgical outcomes, including the operating time, complication rate, early continence status, and positive margin rate between the telementoring and direct mentoring groups. These findings suggest the usefulness of the telementoring system for promoting the spread of precise surgical techniques associated with RARP. To our knowledge, this is the first report concerning telementoring for robot-assisted surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. "A steep learning curve": junior doctor perspectives on the transition from medical student to the health-care workplace.

    PubMed

    Sturman, Nancy; Tan, Zachary; Turner, Jane

    2017-05-26

    The transition from medical student to hospital-based first year junior doctor (termed "intern" in Australia) is known to be challenging, and recent changes in clinical learning environments may reduce graduate preparedness for the intern workplace. Although manageable challenges and transitions are a stimulus to learning, levels of burnout in junior medical colleagues are concerning. In order to prepare and support medical graduates, educators need to understand contemporary junior doctor perspectives on this transition. Final-year University of Queensland medical students recruited junior doctors working in diverse hospital settings, and videorecorded individual semi-structured interviews about their transition from medical student to working as a junior doctor. Two clinical academics (NS and JT) and an intern (ZT) independently conducted a descriptive analysis of interview transcripts, and identified preliminary emerging concepts and themes, before reaching agreement by consensus on the major overarching themes. Three key themes emerged from the analysis of 15 interviews: internship as a "steep learning curve"; relationships and team; and seeking help. Participants described the intern transition as physically, mentally and emotionally exhausting. They learned to manage long days, administrative and clinical tasks, frequent interruptions and time pressures; identify priorities; deal with criticism without compromising key relationships; communicate succinctly; understand team roles (including their own status within hospital hierarchies); and negotiate conflict. Participants reported a drop in self-confidence, and difficulty maintaining self-care and social relationships. Although participants emphasised the importance of escalating concerns and seeking help to manage patients, they appeared more reluctant to seek help for personal issues and reported a number of barriers to doing so. Findings may assist educators in refining their intern preparation and intern

  8. Comparison between the story recall test and the word-list learning test in Korean patients with mild cognitive impairment and early stage of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Baek, Min Jae; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Sangyun

    2012-01-01

    Among verbal memory tests, two that are commonly used to measure the ability of verbal memory function in cognitive impairment are story recall tests and word-list learning tests. However, research is limited regarding which test might be more sensitive in discriminating between normal cognitive aging and patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the Korean population. The purpose of the current study was to compare the word-list learning test (Seoul Verbal Learning Test; SVLT) and the story recall test (Korean Story Recall Test; KSRT) to determine which test is more sensitive in discriminating between individuals with normal cognitive aging and patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and early stage of AD in Korea. A total of 53 healthy adults, 127 patients with MCI, and 72 patients with early stage of AD participated in this study. The receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve and area under the curve (AUC) were evaluated to compare these two tests. The results showed that the AUC of the SVLT was significantly larger than the AUC of the KSRT in all three groups (healthy adults vs. MCI and early stage of AD; healthy adults vs. MCI; healthy adults vs. early stage of AD). However, in comparison of patients with MCI and early stage of AD, the AUC of SVLT and the AUC of KSRT were not significant. The word-list learning test is a more useful tool for examining verbal memory function for older adults in Korea than the story recall test.

  9. Recommendations for Implementing the New Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards to Affect Classroom Practices for Social and Emotional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zinsser, Katherine M.; Dusenbury, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The state of Illinois in the central United States has long been a trendsetter both in the development of learning standards and in addressing social and emotional learning in education settings. With a recent revision to the state's early learning standards, published in 2013, the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) fully aligned its…

  10. Professional learning communities (PLCs) for early childhood science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eum, Jungwon

    beliefs toward science teaching. Face-to-face group teachers' comfort with planning and doing different science activities increased significantly after the workshop and after the combination of workshop and face-to-face PLC. This study contributes to the research about various forms of professional development and their process and outcome in early childhood science education and informs early childhood professional communities of creative ways to improve science teaching and learning.

  11. The Age-Crime Curve in Adolescence and Early Adulthood Is Not Due to Age Differences in Economic Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shulman, Elizabeth P.; Steinberg, Laurence D.; Piquero, Alex R.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most consistent findings in developmental criminology is the "age-crime curve"--the observation that criminal behavior increases in adolescence and decreases in adulthood. Recently, Brown and Males (Justice Policy J 8:1-30, 2011) conducted an analysis of aggregate arrest, poverty, and population data from California and…

  12. Machine Learning Seismic Wave Discrimination: Application to Earthquake Early Warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zefeng; Meier, Men-Andrin; Hauksson, Egill; Zhan, Zhongwen; Andrews, Jennifer

    2018-05-01

    Performance of earthquake early warning systems suffers from false alerts caused by local impulsive noise from natural or anthropogenic sources. To mitigate this problem, we train a generative adversarial network (GAN) to learn the characteristics of first-arrival earthquake P waves, using 300,000 waveforms recorded in southern California and Japan. We apply the GAN critic as an automatic feature extractor and train a Random Forest classifier with about 700,000 earthquake and noise waveforms. We show that the discriminator can recognize 99.2% of the earthquake P waves and 98.4% of the noise signals. This state-of-the-art performance is expected to reduce significantly the number of false triggers from local impulsive noise. Our study demonstrates that GANs can discover a compact and effective representation of seismic waves, which has the potential for wide applications in seismology.

  13. A Comparison of a Machine Learning Model with EuroSCORE II in Predicting Mortality after Elective Cardiac Surgery: A Decision Curve Analysis.

    PubMed

    Allyn, Jérôme; Allou, Nicolas; Augustin, Pascal; Philip, Ivan; Martinet, Olivier; Belghiti, Myriem; Provenchere, Sophie; Montravers, Philippe; Ferdynus, Cyril

    2017-01-01

    The benefits of cardiac surgery are sometimes difficult to predict and the decision to operate on a given individual is complex. Machine Learning and Decision Curve Analysis (DCA) are recent methods developed to create and evaluate prediction models. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using a prospective collected database from December 2005 to December 2012, from a cardiac surgical center at University Hospital. The different models of prediction of mortality in-hospital after elective cardiac surgery, including EuroSCORE II, a logistic regression model and a machine learning model, were compared by ROC and DCA. Of the 6,520 patients having elective cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass, 6.3% died. Mean age was 63.4 years old (standard deviation 14.4), and mean EuroSCORE II was 3.7 (4.8) %. The area under ROC curve (IC95%) for the machine learning model (0.795 (0.755-0.834)) was significantly higher than EuroSCORE II or the logistic regression model (respectively, 0.737 (0.691-0.783) and 0.742 (0.698-0.785), p < 0.0001). Decision Curve Analysis showed that the machine learning model, in this monocentric study, has a greater benefit whatever the probability threshold. According to ROC and DCA, machine learning model is more accurate in predicting mortality after elective cardiac surgery than EuroSCORE II. These results confirm the use of machine learning methods in the field of medical prediction.

  14. Invisible to Visible: Mapping the Continuum of Literacy Learning Experiences in an Early Years Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kervin, Lisa; Turbill, Jan; Harden-Thew, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    The face of early childhood education continues to change. In Australia, the national early childhood guidelines, "Early Years Learning Framework" (2009) and the "National Quality Framework" have articulated and defined the work of early years' educators in a range of areas, including literacy. Both frameworks state that their…

  15. Full Day Early Learning Kindergarten Program Team: Perspectives from the Principal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shahbazi, Sara; Salinitri, Geri

    2016-01-01

    The Full Day Early Learning Kindergarten (FDK) Program has expanded the role of the principal and has altered the teaching dynamics of the classroom with the introduction of an early years team. The early years team consists of a certified teacher with the Ontario College of Teachers and a registered early childhood educator from the College of…

  16. Analysis of the learning curve for pre-cut corneal specimens in preparation for lamellar transplantation: a prospective, single-centre, consecutive case series prepared at the Lions New South Wales Eye Bank.

    PubMed

    Martin, Aifric Isabel; Devasahayam, Rajnesh; Hodge, Christopher; Cooper, Simon; Sutton, Gerard L

    2017-09-01

    This study is the first paper to establish a learning curve by a single technician. Preparation of pre-cut corneal endothelial grafts commenced at Lions New South Wales Eye Bank in December 2014. The primary objective of this study was to review the safety and reliability of the preparation method during the first year of production. This is a hospital-based, prospective case series. There were 234 consecutive donor corneal lenticules. Donor lenticules were prepared by a single operator using a linear cutting microkeratome. Immediately prior to cutting, central corneal thickness values were recorded. Measurements of the corneal bed were taken immediately following lenticule preparation. Outcomes were separated by blade sizes, and intended thickness was compared to actual thickness for each setting. Early specimens were compared to later ones to assess for a learning curve within the technique. The main parameter measured is the mean difference from intended lamellar cut thickness. The mean final cut thickness was 122.36 ± 20.35 μm, and the mean difference from intended cut was 30.17 ± 37.45 μm. No significant difference was found between results achieved with early specimens versus those achieved with later specimens (P = 0.425). Thin, reproducible endothelial grafts can routinely be produced by trained technicians at their respective eye banks without significant concerns for an extended learning curve. This service can reduce perioperative surgical complexity, required surgical paraphernalia and theatre times. The consistent preparation of single-pass, ultrathin pre-cut corneas may have additional advantages for surgeons seeking to introduce lamellar techniques. © 2017 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  17. Score card endoscopy: a multicenter study to evaluate learning curves in 1-week courses using the Erlangen Endo-Trainer.

    PubMed

    Neumann, M; Hahn, C; Horbach, T; Schneider, I; Meining, A; Heldwein, W; Rösch, T; Hohenberger, W

    2003-06-01

    The present study was carried out in the context of current discussions concerning ways in which simulation systems can be integrated sensibly and effectively into clinical educational structures, in order to shorten the training period for assistants and reduce potential risks for the patient. In our study, a number of centers used a standardized training approach, in 1 week courses, to investigate the learning curve improvement that can be achieved with a group of beginners in upper gastroduodenal endoscopy. The multicenter study used the Erlangen Endo-Trainer, with specially prepared biological specimens from pigs. Using this, the individual steps of diagnostic upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with biopsy can be carried out following a score-card system. After a theoretical introduction and a demonstration of the examination by an experienced endoscopist, an initial evaluation score for each participant was obtained on day 1. On the following days, the program consisted of 2 hours' training by a tutor, followed by a test run for each participant. On days 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 the test run was directly followed by a self-assessment. In addition, on days 1, 3, and 5 the test run for each beginner was recorded on video, with each video assigned an encrypted code number. All the end of the study week, control assessments of these videos were carried out by an experienced endoscopist. Both the self-assessments and the control assessments showed significant improvements in the endoscopic parameters tested during the course (days 1-5; all parameters P < 0.001, Wilcoxon-test). However, it was found that the trainees tended to give themselves better marks than the marks given by experienced endoscopists. During 1 week of training, using the model and following the score card, a significant improvement in the learning curve was achieved in the beginners' group for the individual steps involved in diagnostic upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. When this approach is used with

  18. Learning Curve Assessment of Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy Compared with Open-Surgery Controls from the Premier Perspective Database

    PubMed Central

    Kreaden, Usha S.; Gabbert, Jessica; Thomas, Raju

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: The primary aims of this study were to assess the learning curve effect of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) in a large administrative database consisting of multiple U.S. hospitals and surgeons, and to compare the results of RARP with open radical prostatectomy (ORP) from the same settings. Materials and Methods: The patient population of study was from the Premier Perspective Database (Premier, Inc., Charlotte, NC) and consisted of 71,312 radical prostatectomies performed at more than 300 U.S. hospitals by up to 3739 surgeons by open or robotic techniques from 2004 to 2010. The key endpoints were surgery time, inpatient length of stay, and overall complications. We compared open versus robotic, results by year of procedures, results by case volume of specific surgeons, and results of open surgery in hospitals with and without a robotic system. Results: The mean surgery time was longer for RARP (4.4 hours, standard deviation [SD] 1.7) compared with ORP (3.4 hours, SD 1.5) in the same hospitals (p<0.0001). Inpatient stay was shorter for RARP (2.2 days, SD 1.9) compared with ORP (3.2 days, SD 2.7) in the same hospitals (p<0.0001). The overall complications were less for RARP (10.6%) compared with ORP (15.8%) in the same hospitals, as were transfusion rates. ORP results in hospitals without a robot were not better than ORP with a robot, and pretreatment co-morbidity profiles were similar in all cohorts. Trending of results by year of procedure showed no differences in the three cohorts, but trending of RARP results by surgeon experience showed improvements in surgery time, hospital stay, conversion rates, and complication rates. Conclusions: During the initial 7 years of RARP development, outcomes showed decreased hospital stay, complications, and transfusion rates. Learning curve trends for RARP were evident for these endpoints when grouped by surgeon experience, but not by year of surgery. PMID:24350787

  19. Trainees do not negatively impact the institutional learning curve for robotic prostatectomy as characterized by operative time, estimated blood loss, and positive surgical margin rate.

    PubMed

    Schroeck, Florian R; de Sousa, Chiquita A Palha; Kalman, Ross A; Kalia, Maitri S; Pierre, Sean A; Haleblian, George E; Sun, Leon; Moul, Judd W; Albala, David M

    2008-04-01

    We evaluated the learning curves and perioperative outcomes of an experienced laparoscopic surgeon and his trainees to assess our structured teaching program. We retrieved 383 patients undergoing robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP) from our database. Trainees completed a structured teaching program and were categorized as early (days 0 to 232), mid (days 566 to 797), and late (days 825 to 1218) according to the time period in which they were working with the mentor. We compared operative times, estimated blood loss (EBL), and positive surgical margin (PSM) rates between the trainees and the mentor (Mann-Whitney and Chi-square test). Association of EBL, body mass index (BMI), and prostate weight with operative time was evaluated in multivariate linear regression analysis. Median operative times of the early, mid, and late trainees (258, 220, and 200 minutes) significantly decreased and were similar to the corresponding senior surgeon's (254, 242, and 180 minutes). Operative times decreased with lower BMI, EBL, and prostate weight (P = 0.006, P <0.001, and P <0.001, respectively). Overall, EBL (150 mL vs. 150 mL, P = 0.215) and PSM rates (20% vs. 18.6%, P = 0.741) did not differ between the mentor and the trainees. A structured teaching program for RALP is effective and trainees are able to adopt the increased efficiency and skills of their mentor. Lower BMI, EBL, and prostate weight were associated with shorter operative times. Trainees performing the procedure did not negatively affect EBL and positive surgical margin rate.

  20. Napping facilitates word learning in early lexical development.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Klára; Myers, Kyle; Foster, Russell; Plunkett, Kim

    2015-10-01

    Little is known about the role that night-time sleep and daytime naps play in early cognitive development. Our aim was to investigate how napping affects word learning in 16-month-olds. Thirty-four typically developing infants were assigned randomly to nap and wake groups. After teaching two novel object-word pairs to infants, we tested their initial performance with an intermodal preferential looking task in which infants are expected to increase their target looking time compared to a distracter after hearing its auditory label. A second test session followed after approximately a 2-h delay. The delay contained sleep for the nap group or no sleep for the wake group. Looking behaviour was measured with an automatic eye-tracker. Vocabulary size was assessed using the Oxford Communicative Development Inventory. A significant interaction between group and session was found in preferential looking towards the target picture. The performance of the nap group increased after the nap, whereas that of the wake group did not change. The gain in performance correlated positively with the expressive vocabulary size in the nap group. These results indicate that daytime napping helps consolidate word learning in infancy. © 2015 European Sleep Research Society.

  1. Up, Not Down: The Age Curve in Happiness from Early Adulthood to Midlife in Two Longitudinal Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galambos, Nancy L.; Fang, Shichen; Krahn, Harvey J.; Johnson, Matthew D.; Lachman, Margie E.

    2015-01-01

    Happiness is an important indicator of well-being, and little is known about how it changes in the early adult years. We examined trajectories of happiness from early adulthood to midlife in 2 Canadian longitudinal samples: high school seniors followed from ages 18-43 and university seniors followed from ages 23-37. Happiness increased into the…

  2. An Ecological Footprint for an Early Learning Centre: Identifying Opportunities for Early Childhood Sustainability Education through Interdisciplinary Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNichol, Heidi; Davis, Julie Margaret; O'Brien, Katherine R.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, engineers and educators worked together to adapt and apply the ecological footprint (EF) methodology to an early learning centre in Brisbane, Australia. Results were analysed to determine how environmental impact can be reduced at the study site and more generally across early childhood settings. It was found that food, transport…

  3. Resources on Social and Emotional Development and Early Learning Standards. CEELO FastFacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors-Tadros, L.

    2013-01-01

    In this "FastFacts," a state's Department of Education requests information from the Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes (CEELO) on how the research defines skills in social-emotional development, approaches to learning, and executive function, to inform planned revisions to the early childhood indicators of progress for children…

  4. 78 FR 53991 - Applications for New Awards; Race to the Top-Early Learning Challenge

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-30

    ... gaps for Children with High Needs.\\1\\ This program focuses on improving early learning and development... disadvantaged children in each age group of infants, toddlers, and preschoolers who are enrolled in high-quality... implement an integrated system of high-quality Early Learning and Development Programs and services. \\1...

  5. Reflective Processes: A Qualitative Study Exploring Early Learning Student Teacher Mentoring Experiences in Student Teaching Practicums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Michelle M.

    2013-01-01

    This doctoral thesis explored mentoring in early learning teacher preparation programs. This study explored the reflective processes embedded in the work between student teachers and their mentors during early learning student teacher experiences at Washington State community and technical colleges. Schon's (1987a) concepts of…

  6. Feature Biases in Early Word Learning: Network Distinctiveness Predicts Age of Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelthaler, Tomas; Hills, Thomas T.

    2017-01-01

    Do properties of a word's features influence the order of its acquisition in early word learning? Combining the principles of mutual exclusivity and shape bias, the present work takes a network analysis approach to understanding how feature distinctiveness predicts the order of early word learning. Distance networks were built from nouns with edge…

  7. Parent Engagement in Early Learning: Strategies for Working with Families. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Julie

    2016-01-01

    This updated second edition of "Parent-Friendly Early Learning" brings to life real scenarios that care providers face in today's world. We know parent engagement is important for a child's success, but how do you turn parent-provider relationships into partnerships? "Parent Engagement in Early Learning" will help you: (1)…

  8. Parent Engagement in Early Learning: Strategies for Working with Families, Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Julie

    2016-01-01

    This updated second edition of Parent ­Friendly Early Learning brings to life real scenarios that care providers face in today's world. We know parent engagement is important for a child's success, but how do you turn parent ­provider relationships into partnerships? Parent Engagement in Early Learning will help you: (1) Improve parent-­teacher…

  9. Building Early Learning Leaders: New Jersey's PreK-3rd Leadership Training. A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Cynthia; Costanza, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    New Jersey school administrators are finding themselves in need of the supports necessary to build on the state's existing model preschools toward a broader vision of early learning, including making strong connections to the early learning system. Clearly, changing the educational mindset and building the related capacity of front-line leaders is…

  10. Classroom Challenges in Developing an Intercultural Early Learning Program for Refugee Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dachyshyn, Darcey; Kirova, Anna

    2011-01-01

    The project described here was aimed at piloting an intercultural, multilingual, early learning program that was genuinely responsive to the circumstances and early learning needs of preschool refugee children and parents from three ethnocultural communities--Somali, Sudanese, and Kurdish--in a large city in Western Canada. We discuss the unique…

  11. The Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development's International Early Learning Study: What Happened Next

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Peter; Urban, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the authors provide an update on what has happened over recent months with the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development's proposal for an International Early Learning Study, and review responses to the proposed International Early Learning Study, including the concerns that have been raised about this new venture in…

  12. Solid-State Lighting. Early Lessons Learned on the Way to Market

    SciT

    Sandahl, L. J.; Cort, K. A.; Gordon, K. L.

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of issues and lessons learned during the early stages of solid-state lighting market introduction in the U.S., which also summarizes early actions taken to avoid potential problems anticipated based on lessons learned from the market introduction of compact fluorescent lamps.

  13. Transition and protective agency of early childhood learning behaviors as portents of later school attendance and adjustment.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Paul A; Rikoon, Samuel H; Fantuzzo, John W

    2016-02-01

    This article reports on the study of differential change trajectories for early childhood learning behaviors as they relate to future classroom adjustment and school attendance. A large sample (N=2152) of Head Start children was followed through prekindergarten, kindergarten, and 1st grade. Classroom learning behaviors were assessed twice each year by teachers who observed gradual declines in Competence Motivation and Attentional Persistence as children transitioned through schooling. Cross-classified multilevel growth models revealed distinct transitional pathways for future adjustment versus maladjustment and sporadic versus chronic absenteeism. Generalized multilevel logistic modeling and receiver operating characteristic curve analyses showed that teachers' earliest assessments were substantially predictive of eventual good classroom adjustment and school attendance, with increasing accuracy for prediction of future sociobehavioral adjustment as time progressed. Copyright © 2015 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The age-crime curve in adolescence and early adulthood is not due to age differences in economic status.

    PubMed

    Shulman, Elizabeth P; Steinberg, Laurence D; Piquero, Alex R

    2013-06-01

    One of the most consistent findings in developmental criminology is the "age-crime curve"-the observation that criminal behavior increases in adolescence and decreases in adulthood. Recently, Brown and Males (Justice policy J 8:1-30, 2011) conducted an analysis of aggregate arrest, poverty, and population data from California and concluded that the widely-observed adolescent peak in rates of offending is not a consequence of developmental factors, but rather an artifact of age differences in economic status. Youngsters, they argue, offend more than adults because they are poorer than adults. The present study challenges Brown and Males' proposition by analyzing data from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth (NLSY97; N = 8,984; 51% female; 26% Black, 21% Hispanic, 52% non-Black, non-Hispanic; ages 12-18 at Wave 1), which collected measures of criminal behavior and economic status at multiple time points. Consistent with scores of other studies, we find that criminal offending peaks in adolescence, even after controlling for variation in economic status. Our findings both counter Brown and Males' claim that the age-crime curve is illusory and underscore the danger of drawing inferences about individual behavior from analysis of aggregated data.

  15. Power and Identity in Immigrant Parents' Involvement in Early Years Mathematics Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takeuchi, Miwa Aoki

    2018-01-01

    This study examined immigrant parents' involvement in early years mathematics learning, focusing on learning of multiplication in in- and out-of-school settings. Ethnographic interviews and workshops were conducted in an urban city in Japan, to examine out-of-school practices of immigrant families. Drawing from sociocultural theory of learning and…

  16. Exploring Staff Perceptions: Early Childhood Teacher Educators Examine Online Teaching and Learning Challenges and Dilemmas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Julie; Lennox, Sandra; Walker, Sue; Walsh, Kerryann

    2007-01-01

    Early Childhood teacher educators at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) have been engaging with online teaching and learning since the mid 1990s. On campus students have lectures and tutorials supported by information and communication technologies via QUT's home grown learning management system, Online Learning and Teaching (OLT). We…

  17. Predicting Cognitive-Language and Social Growth Curves from Early Maternal Behaviors in Children at Varying Degrees of Biological Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landry, Susan H.; Smith, Karen E.; Miller-Loncar, Cynthia L.; Swank, Paul R.

    1997-01-01

    Used growth modeling to examine relationship of early parenting to cognitive, language, and social development from 6 to 40 months in full-term and very low birth weight (medically low or high risk) children. Found that behaviors that were sensitive to children's focus of interest and did not highly control or restrict their behaviors predicted…

  18. Learning curves of two different techniques for the intra-articular injection of the knee joint under fluoroscopic guidance.

    PubMed

    Simoni, Paolo; Malaise, Olivier; El Hachemi, Mounia; Tromba, Angelo; Boitsios, Grammatina

    2018-05-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the learning curves of three beginner operators using two different techniques of intra-articular injection of the knee under fluoroscopic guidance with a superolateral approach. In total, 177 consecutive patients (72 females (40.7%) and 105 males (59.3%), mean age 42.2 ± 15.0 years) scheduled for a computed tomography (CT) arthrography and without joint effusion on the lateral X-rays were enrolled. They underwent an intra-articular injection of the knee under fluoroscopic guidance with a superolateral approach. Patients were randomly assigned to three different operators, including a junior supervisor and two first-year residents in radiology who never performed an intra-articular injection of the knee before the present study. Procedures in lateral or supine position were randomly assigned to three operators. There was a higher rate of successful injections with the lateral position (92.1%) than with supine position (80.2%) (odds ratio (OR) 4.52, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.46-14.0). A significant learning effect was observed for the supine position, while none was observed for the lateral position. Pain and time of fluoroscopy did not differ between the two procedures (p = 0.85 and p = 0.10, respectively). Junior supervisor had a higher rate of successful intra-articular injection compared with the other two operators (p = 0.0072). There was a statistically significant higher rate of extravasation with the supine position (66.3%) than with lateral position (19.7%) (p < 0.0001, OR 0.13, 95% CI 0.06-0.25). The intra-articular injection of the knee under fluoroscopic guidance with the patient in lateral position is an easy technique for operators in training with a low rate of extravasation. Lateral position does not require a supplementary irradiation and does not increase the procedural pain. Personal operator's skill is an independent factor in determining the success of the training.

  19. Early testimonial learning: monitoring speech acts and speakers.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Elizabeth; Suarez, Sarah; Koenig, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Testimony provides children with a rich source of knowledge about the world and the people in it. However, testimony is not guaranteed to be veridical, and speakers vary greatly in both knowledge and intent. In this chapter, we argue that children encounter two primary types of conflicts when learning from speakers: conflicts of knowledge and conflicts of interest. We review recent research on children's selective trust in testimony and propose two distinct mechanisms supporting early epistemic vigilance in response to the conflicts associated with speakers. The first section of the chapter focuses on the mechanism of coherence checking, which occurs during the process of message comprehension and facilitates children's comparison of information communicated through testimony to their prior knowledge, alerting them to inaccurate, inconsistent, irrational, and implausible messages. The second section focuses on source-monitoring processes. When children lack relevant prior knowledge with which to evaluate testimonial messages, they monitor speakers themselves for evidence of competence and morality, attending to cues such as confidence, consensus, access to information, prosocial and antisocial behavior, and group membership. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Learning from parents' stories about what works in early intervention.

    PubMed

    Pighini, Maria J; Goelman, Hillel; Buchanan, Marla; Schonert-Reichl, Kimberly; Brynelsen, Dana

    2014-08-01

    Using a multiple case study approach, this ethnography examined the experiences of parents of children deemed at risk for developmental delays or disabilities who had received early intervention (EI) services (birth to age 3 years) in a large urban location in Western Canada. Participants (11 adult parents and 7 children) were drawn from six families. Methods of data collection included focus groups (FG), face-to-face interviews and file reviews. Member check and expert reviews were conducted throughout data collection and data analyses as part of the validation process in this ethnography. Qualitative content analyses followed by thematic analyses highlighted the implementation of family-centred practices (FCP) as a main theme. Parents identified how EI professionals using FCP embraced collaborative practices. FCP resulted in parents leading the EI process for their children. More specifically, EI professionals shared strategies and information to support parents in gaining a deeper understanding of their children's individual developmental characteristics. Parents expressed how empowering this level of understanding was for them as they learned to articulate what were their children's needs for developmental, health and educational services. Recommendations for future research include inquiring about parents' experiences for families of diverse constellations and/or residing in smaller urban or rural communities. © 2013 International Union of Psychological Science.

  1. Perceptual Learning Selectively Refines Orientation Representations in Early Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Jehee, Janneke F.M.; Ling, Sam; Swisher, Jascha D.; van Bergen, Ruben S.; Tong, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Although practice has long been known to improve perceptual performance, the neural basis of this improvement in humans remains unclear. Using fMRI in conjunction with a novel signal detection-based analysis, we show that extensive practice selectively enhances the neural representation of trained orientations in the human visual cortex. Twelve observers practiced discriminating small changes in the orientation of a laterally presented grating over 20 or more daily one-hour training sessions. Training on average led to a two-fold improvement in discrimination sensitivity, specific to the trained orientation and the trained location, with minimal improvement found for untrained orthogonal orientations or for orientations presented in the untrained hemifield. We measured the strength of orientation-selective responses in individual voxels in early visual areas (V1–V4) using signal detection measures, both pre- and post-training. Although the overall amplitude of the BOLD response was no greater after training, practice nonetheless specifically enhanced the neural representation of the trained orientation at the trained location. This training-specific enhancement of orientation-selective responses was observed in the primary visual cortex (V1) as well as higher extrastriate visual areas V2–V4, and moreover, reliably predicted individual differences in the behavioral effects of perceptual learning. These results demonstrate that extensive training can lead to targeted functional reorganization of the human visual cortex, refining the cortical representation of behaviorally relevant information. PMID:23175828

  2. Perceptual learning selectively refines orientation representations in early visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Jehee, Janneke F M; Ling, Sam; Swisher, Jascha D; van Bergen, Ruben S; Tong, Frank

    2012-11-21

    Although practice has long been known to improve perceptual performance, the neural basis of this improvement in humans remains unclear. Using fMRI in conjunction with a novel signal detection-based analysis, we show that extensive practice selectively enhances the neural representation of trained orientations in the human visual cortex. Twelve observers practiced discriminating small changes in the orientation of a laterally presented grating over 20 or more daily 1 h training sessions. Training on average led to a twofold improvement in discrimination sensitivity, specific to the trained orientation and the trained location, with minimal improvement found for untrained orthogonal orientations or for orientations presented in the untrained hemifield. We measured the strength of orientation-selective responses in individual voxels in early visual areas (V1-V4) using signal detection measures, both before and after training. Although the overall amplitude of the BOLD response was no greater after training, practice nonetheless specifically enhanced the neural representation of the trained orientation at the trained location. This training-specific enhancement of orientation-selective responses was observed in the primary visual cortex (V1) as well as higher extrastriate visual areas V2-V4, and moreover, reliably predicted individual differences in the behavioral effects of perceptual learning. These results demonstrate that extensive training can lead to targeted functional reorganization of the human visual cortex, refining the cortical representation of behaviorally relevant information.

  3. [Surgical learning curve for creation of vascular accesses for haemodialysis: value of medico-radio-surgical collaboration].

    PubMed

    Van Glabeke, Emmanuel; Belenfant, Xavier; Barrou, Benoît; Adhemar, Jean-Pierre; Laedrich, Joëlle; Mavel, Marie-Christine; Challier, Emmanuel

    2005-04-01

    Creation of a vascular access (VA) for haemodialysis is a surgical procedure which comprises a failure rate related to the quality of the vessels and the operator's experience. The authors report the first 2 years of a young urologist's experience with this procedure in a local hospital in collaboration with the nephrology team. Patients undergoing creation of VA were divided into 2 chronological groups. The patient's age and gender, the cause of renal failure, the presence of diabetes, clinical examination of the upper limb, preoperative assessment of upper limb vessels, the type of anaesthesia, the operating time and the start of dialysis after the operation, as well as the functional results of the VA at 6 months were studied. Results concerning the patients of the first period were discussed by the operator and the nephrology team. During the first 9 months, 28 patients were operated, corresponding to 36 operations including 32 direct fistulas. Over the following 15 months, 61 patients were operated, with the creation of 63 VAs, including 55 direct fistulas. The failure rate (thrombosis or non-functioning VA) decreased from 32.1% to 11.1% (p=0.07), while the 2 groups were globally comparable. Evaluation of a new surgical procedure shows a number of failures, as for all learning curves. However, it helps to improve the results. Collaboration with nephrologists must comprise a discussion allowing the acceptance of certain failures, as they reflect compliance with a strategy of preservation of the vascular capital and a rational attempt to avoid a non-essential proximal access or bypass graft. The support of a motivated radiology team (preoperative assessment and management of complications) and the assistance of a more experienced operator are essential.

  4. Computational Sensing of Staphylococcus aureus on Contact Lenses Using 3D Imaging of Curved Surfaces and Machine Learning.

    PubMed

    Veli, Muhammed; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2018-03-27

    We present a cost-effective and portable platform based on contact lenses for noninvasively detecting Staphylococcus aureus, which is part of the human ocular microbiome and resides on the cornea and conjunctiva. Using S. aureus-specific antibodies and a surface chemistry protocol that is compatible with human tears, contact lenses are designed to specifically capture S. aureus. After the bacteria capture on the lens and right before its imaging, the captured bacteria are tagged with surface-functionalized polystyrene microparticles. These microbeads provide sufficient signal-to-noise ratio for the quantification of the captured bacteria on the contact lens, without any fluorescent labels, by 3D imaging of the curved surface of each lens using only one hologram taken with a lens-free on-chip microscope. After the 3D surface of the contact lens is computationally reconstructed using rotational field transformations and holographic digital focusing, a machine learning algorithm is employed to automatically count the number of beads on the lens surface, revealing the count of the captured bacteria. To demonstrate its proof-of-concept, we created a field-portable and cost-effective holographic microscope, which weighs 77 g, controlled by a laptop. Using daily contact lenses that are spiked with bacteria, we demonstrated that this computational sensing platform provides a detection limit of ∼16 bacteria/μL. This contact-lens-based wearable sensor can be broadly applicable to detect various bacteria, viruses, and analytes in tears using a cost-effective and portable computational imager that might be used even at home by consumers.

  5. The learning curve for access creation in solo ultrasonography-guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy and the associated skills.

    PubMed

    Yu, Weimin; Rao, Ting; Li, Xing; Ruan, Yuan; Yuan, Run; Li, Chenglong; Li, Haoyong; Cheng, Fan

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the current trial was to evaluate the learning curve of access creation through solo ultrasonography (US)-guided percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL), and clarify the technical details of the procedure. We evaluated the first 240 solo US-guided PCNLs performed by one surgeon at our institution. The data including the puncture procedure, access characteristics, access-related complications and stone-free rates were assessed in four sequential groups. The puncture duration and number of times decreased from a mean of 4.4 min and 2.1 times for the first 60 patients to 1.3 min and 1.2 times for the last 60 patients. There was a significant decrease from 3.7 min and 1.8 times for the 61th-120th patients to 1.5 min and 1.3 times for the 121th-180th patients. All of the access-related severe bleeding appeared in the first 120 patients, while perforations only occurred in the first 60 patients. The stone-free rates were 68.3, 83.3, 90.0, and 93.3% for the four sequential groups. The increase in experience lead to an improvement in the puncture duration and times, which accompany with better stone-free rates and lower complications. We propose that 60 operations are sufficient to gain competency, and a cutoff point of 120 operations will allow the surgeon to achieve excellence in the solo US-guided PCNL.

  6. Value of Play as An Early Learning Instrument in Bangladesh Context: A Socio-Cultural Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chowdhury, Nurun Nahar; Rivalland, Corine

    2012-01-01

    In early childhood education the dominant discourse of play-based pedagogy is greatly influenced by a western play approach. This paper examines how play is valued as early learning in Bangladesh. It reports on a qualitative study that explored the understandings of four parents and four early childhood educators in semi-rural Bangladesh. Findings…

  7. Equal Access to Early Learning. Cantigny Conference Report (Chicago, Illinois, June 5-7, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Black Child Development Inst., Inc., Washington, DC.

    Despite a growing acknowledgement that the United States needs to invest more in the early care and education needs of children, the country lacks a common vision for a comprehensive approach to an early childhood care and education system. The Equal Access to Early Learning Conference, sponsored by the National Black Child Development Institute…

  8. Making the Case for Early Identification and Intervention for Young Children at Risk for Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Marcee M.

    2004-01-01

    The early identification of children with learning disabilities (LD) is difficult but can be accomplished. Observation of key behaviors which are indicators of LD by preschool and kindergarten teachers can assist in this process. This early identification facilitates the use of intervention strategies to provide a positive early experience for…

  9. Sex differences in the prediction of the effectiveness of paroxetine for patients with major depressive disorder identified using a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis for early response.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Tetsu; Yasui-Furukori, Norio; Norio, Yasui-Furukori; Sato, Yasushi; Nakagami, Taku; Tsuchimine, Shoko; Kaneda, Ayako; Kaneko, Sunao

    2014-01-01

    We investigated cutoff values for the early response of patients with major depressive disorder to paroxetine and their sex differences by using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis to predict the effectiveness of paroxetine. In total, 120 patients with major depressive disorder were enrolled and treated with 10-40 mg/day paroxetine for 6 weeks; 89 patients completed the protocol. A clinical evaluation using the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) was performed at weeks 0, 1, 2, 4, and 6. In male subjects, the cutoff values for MADRS improvement rating in week 1, week 2, and week 4 were 20.9%, 34.9%, and 33.3%, respectively. The sensitivities and the specificities were 83.3% and 80.0%, 83.3% and 80.0%, and 100% and 90%, respectively. The areas under the curve (AUC) were 0.908, 0.821, and 0.979, respectively. In female subjects, the cutoff values for the MADRS improvement rating in week 1, week 2, and week 4 were 21.4%, 35.7%, and 32.3%, respectively. The sensitivities and the specificities were 71.4% and 84.6%, 73.8% and 76.9%, and 90.5% and 76.9%, respectively. The AUCs were 0.781, 0.735, and 0.904, respectively. Early improvement with paroxetine may predict the long-term response. The accuracy of the prediction for the response is higher in male subjects.

  10. Professional Development for Early Childhood Educators: Efforts to Improve Math and Science Learning Opportunities in Early Childhood Classrooms

    PubMed Central

    Piasta, Shayne B.; Logan, Jessica A. R.; Pelatti, Christina Yeager; Capps, Janet L.; Petrill, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Because recent initiatives highlight the need to better support preschool-aged children’s math and science learning, the present study investigated the impact of professional development in these domains for early childhood educators. Sixty-five educators were randomly assigned to experience 10.5 days (64 hours) of training on math and science or on an alternative topic. Educators’ provision of math and science learning opportunities were documented, as were the fall-to-spring math and science learning gains of children (n = 385) enrolled in their classrooms. Professional development significantly impacted provision of science, but not math, learning opportunities. Professional development did not directly impact children’s math or science learning, although science learning was indirectly affected via the increase in science learning opportunities. Both math and science learning opportunities were positively associated with children’s learning. Results suggest that substantive efforts are necessary to ensure that children have opportunities to learn math and science from a young age. PMID:26257434

  11. The learning curve for narrow-band imaging in the diagnosis of precancerous gastric lesions by using Web-based video.

    PubMed

    Dias-Silva, Diogo; Pimentel-Nunes, Pedro; Magalhães, Joana; Magalhães, Ricardo; Veloso, Nuno; Ferreira, Carlos; Figueiredo, Pedro; Moutinho, Pedro; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário

    2014-06-01

    A simplified narrow-band imaging (NBI) endoscopy classification of gastric precancerous and cancerous lesions was derived and validated in a multicenter study. This classification comes with the need for dissemination through adequate training. To address the learning curve of this classification by endoscopists with differing expertise and to assess the feasibility of a YouTube-based learning program to disseminate it. Prospective study. Five centers. Six gastroenterologists (3 trainees, 3 fully trained endoscopists [FTs]). Twenty tests provided through a Web-based program containing 10 randomly ordered NBI videos of gastric mucosa were taken. Feedback was sent 7 days after every test submission. Measures of accuracy of the NBI classification throughout the time. From the first to the last 50 videos, a learning curve was observed with a 10% increase in global accuracy, for both trainees (from 64% to 74%) and FTs (from 56% to 65%). After 200 videos, sensitivity and specificity of 80% and higher for intestinal metaplasia were observed in half the participants, and a specificity for dysplasia greater than 95%, along with a relevant likelihood ratio for a positive result of 7 to 28 and likelihood ratio for a negative result of 0.21 to 0.82, were achieved by all of the participants. No constant learning curve was observed for the identification of Helicobacter pylori gastritis and sensitivity to dysplasia. The trainees had better results in all of the parameters, except specificity for dysplasia, compared with the FTs. Globally, participants agreed that the program's structure was adequate, except on the feedback, which should have consisted of a more detailed explanation of each answer. No formal sample size estimate. A Web-based learning program could be used to teach and disseminate classifications in the endoscopy field. In this study, an NBI classification for gastric mucosal features seems to be easily learned for the identification of gastric preneoplastic

  12. A Comparison of a Machine Learning Model with EuroSCORE II in Predicting Mortality after Elective Cardiac Surgery: A Decision Curve Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Allyn, Jérôme; Allou, Nicolas; Augustin, Pascal; Philip, Ivan; Martinet, Olivier; Belghiti, Myriem; Provenchere, Sophie; Montravers, Philippe; Ferdynus, Cyril

    2017-01-01

    Background The benefits of cardiac surgery are sometimes difficult to predict and the decision to operate on a given individual is complex. Machine Learning and Decision Curve Analysis (DCA) are recent methods developed to create and evaluate prediction models. Methods and finding We conducted a retrospective cohort study using a prospective collected database from December 2005 to December 2012, from a cardiac surgical center at University Hospital. The different models of prediction of mortality in-hospital after elective cardiac surgery, including EuroSCORE II, a logistic regression model and a machine learning model, were compared by ROC and DCA. Of the 6,520 patients having elective cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass, 6.3% died. Mean age was 63.4 years old (standard deviation 14.4), and mean EuroSCORE II was 3.7 (4.8) %. The area under ROC curve (IC95%) for the machine learning model (0.795 (0.755–0.834)) was significantly higher than EuroSCORE II or the logistic regression model (respectively, 0.737 (0.691–0.783) and 0.742 (0.698–0.785), p < 0.0001). Decision Curve Analysis showed that the machine learning model, in this monocentric study, has a greater benefit whatever the probability threshold. Conclusions According to ROC and DCA, machine learning model is more accurate in predicting mortality after elective cardiac surgery than EuroSCORE II. These results confirm the use of machine learning methods in the field of medical prediction. PMID:28060903

  13. Early deprivation disruption of associative learning is a developmental pathway to depression and social problems.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Margaret A; McLaughlin, Katie A; Winter, Warren; Fox, Nathan; Zeanah, Charles; Nelson, Charles A

    2018-06-07

    Exposure to psychosocial deprivation is associated with elevations in numerous forms of impairment throughout the life-course. Disruptions in associative learning may be a key mechanism through which adversity, particularly psychosocial deprivation, increases risk for impairment. Existing data consistent with this claim come entirely from correlational studies. Here, we present the first experimental evidence relating psychosocial deprivation and disruptions in multiple forms of associative learning. Using data from the Bucharest Early Intervention Project, we demonstrate that randomized placement into a family caregiving environment during the infant/toddler period as compared to prolonged institutional care normalizes two forms of associative learning in early adolescence: reward responsivity and implicit motor learning. These forms of associative learning significantly mediate the effect of institutional rearing on depressive symptoms and peer relationships. In sum, we provide evidence for a novel pathway linking early experience to psychopathology and peer relationships through basic associative learning mechanisms.

  14. Statistical Learning Is Related to Early Literacy-Related Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Mercedes; Kaschak, Michael P.; Jones, John L.; Lonigan, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that statistical learning, or the ability to use statistical information to learn the structure of one's environment, plays a role in young children's acquisition of linguistic knowledge. Although most research on statistical learning has focused on language acquisition processes, such as the segmentation of words from…

  15. Multivariate Genetic Analysis of Learning and Early Reading Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Brian; Wadsworth, Sally; Boehme, Kristi; Talk, Andrew C.; Coventry, William L.; Olson, Richard K.; Samuelsson, Stefan; Corley, Robin

    2013-01-01

    The genetic factor structure of a range of learning measures was explored in twin children, recruited in preschool and followed to Grade 2 ("N"?=?2,084). Measures of orthographic learning and word reading were included in the analyses to determine how these patterned with the learning processes. An exploratory factor analysis of the…

  16. The Parallel Episodic Processing (PEP) model 2.0: A single computational model of stimulus-response binding, contingency learning, power curves, and mixing costs.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, James R; De Houwer, Jan; Rothermund, Klaus

    2016-12-01

    The current paper presents an extension of the Parallel Episodic Processing model. The model is developed for simulating behaviour in performance (i.e., speeded response time) tasks and learns to anticipate both how and when to respond based on retrieval of memories of previous trials. With one fixed parameter set, the model is shown to successfully simulate a wide range of different findings. These include: practice curves in the Stroop paradigm, contingency learning effects, learning acquisition curves, stimulus-response binding effects, mixing costs, and various findings from the attentional control domain. The results demonstrate several important points. First, the same retrieval mechanism parsimoniously explains stimulus-response binding, contingency learning, and practice effects. Second, as performance improves with practice, any effects will shrink with it. Third, a model of simple learning processes is sufficient to explain phenomena that are typically (but perhaps incorrectly) interpreted in terms of higher-order control processes. More generally, we argue that computational models with a fixed parameter set and wider breadth should be preferred over those that are restricted to a narrow set of phenomena. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Solid-State Lighting: Early Lessons Learned on the Way to Market

    SciT

    Sandahl, Linda J.; Cort, Katherine A.; Gordon, Kelly L.

    2013-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to document early challenges and lessons learned in the solid-state lighting (SSL) market development as part of the DOE’s SSL Program efforts to continually evaluate market progress in this area. This report summarizes early actions taken by DOE and others to avoid potential problems anticipated based on lessons learned from the market introduction of compact fluorescent lamps and identifies issues, challenges, and new lessons that have been learned in the early stages of the SSL market introduction. This study identifies and characterizes12 key lessons that have been distilled from DOE SSL program results.

  18. Up, not down: The age curve in happiness from early adulthood to midlife in two longitudinal studies.

    PubMed

    Galambos, Nancy L; Fang, Shichen; Krahn, Harvey J; Johnson, Matthew D; Lachman, Margie E

    2015-11-01

    Happiness is an important indicator of well-being, and little is known about how it changes in the early adult years. We examined trajectories of happiness from early adulthood to midlife in 2 Canadian longitudinal samples: high school seniors followed from ages 18-43 and university seniors followed from ages 23-37. Happiness increased into the 30s in both samples, with a slight downturn by age 43 in the high school sample. The rise in happiness after high school and university remained after controlling for important baseline covariates (gender, parents' education, grades, self-esteem), time-varying covariates known to be associated with happiness (marital status, unemployment, self-rated physical health), and number of waves of participation. The upward trend in happiness runs counter to some previous cross-sectional research claiming a high point in happiness in the late teens, decreasing into midlife. As cross-sectional designs do not assess within-person change, longitudinal studies are necessary for drawing accurate conclusions about patterns of change in happiness across the life span. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Using variability to guide dimensional weighting: Associative mechanisms in early word learning

    PubMed Central

    Apfelbaum, Keith S.; McMurray, Bob

    2013-01-01

    At 14 months, children appear to struggle to apply their fairly well developed speech perception abilities to learning similar sounding words (e.g. bih/dih; Stager & Werker, 1997). However, variability in non-phonetic aspects of the training stimuli seems to aid word learning at this age. Extant theories of early word learning cannot account for this benefit of variability. We offer a simple explanation for this range of effects based on associative learning. Simulations suggest that if infants encode both non-contrastive information (e.g. cues to speaker voice) and meaningful linguistic cues (e.g. place of articulation or voicing), then associative learning mechanisms predict these variability effects in early word learning. Crucially, this means that despite the importance of task variables in predicting performance, this body of work shows that phonological categories are still developing in this age, and that the structure of non-informative cues has critical influences on word learning abilities. PMID:21609356

  20. Early-Life Stress Triggers Juvenile Zebra Finches to Switch Social Learning Strategies.

    PubMed

    Farine, Damien R; Spencer, Karen A; Boogert, Neeltje J

    2015-08-17

    Stress during early life can cause disease and cognitive impairment in humans and non-humans alike. However, stress and other environmental factors can also program developmental pathways. We investigate whether differential exposure to developmental stress can drive divergent social learning strategies between siblings. In many species, juveniles acquire essential foraging skills by copying others: they can copy peers (horizontal social learning), learn from their parents (vertical social learning), or learn from other adults (oblique social learning). However, whether juveniles' learning strategies are condition dependent largely remains a mystery. We found that juvenile zebra finches living in flocks socially learned novel foraging skills exclusively from adults. By experimentally manipulating developmental stress, we further show that social learning targets are phenotypically plastic. While control juveniles learned foraging skills from their parents, their siblings, exposed as nestlings to experimentally elevated stress hormone levels, learned exclusively from unrelated adults. Thus, early-life conditions triggered individuals to switch strategies from vertical to oblique social learning. This switch could arise from stress-induced differences in developmental rate, cognitive and physical state, or the use of stress as an environmental cue. Acquisition of alternative social learning strategies may impact juveniles' fit to their environment and ultimately change their developmental trajectories. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. The Early Psychosis Screener (EPS): Quantitative validation against the SIPS using machine learning.

    PubMed

    Brodey, B B; Girgis, R R; Favorov, O V; Addington, J; Perkins, D O; Bearden, C E; Woods, S W; Walker, E F; Cornblatt, B A; Brucato, G; Walsh, B; Elkin, K A; Brodey, I S

    2018-01-18

    Machine learning techniques were used to identify highly informative early psychosis self-report items and to validate an early psychosis screener (EPS) against the Structured Interview for Psychosis-risk Syndromes (SIPS). The Prodromal Questionnaire-Brief Version (PQ-B) and 148 additional items were administered to 229 individuals being screened with the SIPS at 7 North American Prodrome Longitudinal Study sites and at Columbia University. Fifty individuals were found to have SIPS scores of 0, 1, or 2, making them clinically low risk (CLR) controls; 144 were classified as clinically high risk (CHR) (SIPS 3-5) and 35 were found to have first episode psychosis (FEP) (SIPS 6). Spectral clustering analysis, performed on 124 of the items, yielded two cohesive item groups, the first mostly related to psychosis and mania, the second mostly related to depression, anxiety, and social and general work/school functioning. Items within each group were sorted according to their usefulness in distinguishing between CLR and CHR individuals using the Minimum Redundancy Maximum Relevance procedure. A receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (AUC) analysis indicated that maximal differentiation of CLR and CHR participants was achieved with a 26-item solution (AUC=0.899±0.001). The EPS-26 outperformed the PQ-B (AUC=0.834±0.001). For screening purposes, the self-report EPS-26 appeared to differentiate individuals who are either CLR or CHR approximately as well as the clinician-administered SIPS. The EPS-26 may prove useful as a self-report screener and may lead to a decrease in the duration of untreated psychosis. A validation of the EPS-26 against actual conversion is underway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Learning History in Early Childhood: Teaching Methods and Children's Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skjaeveland, Yngve

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses the teaching of history in early childhood education and care centres and children's understanding of history. Based on interviews with eight Norwegian early childhood education and care teachers and on interpretative phenomenological analysis, the article shows how the early childhood education and care centres teach…

  3. Clinical and Radiographic Outcomes With Assessment of the Learning Curve in Arthroscopically Assisted Latissimus Dorsi Tendon Transfer for Irreparable Posterosuperior Rotator Cuff Tears.

    PubMed

    Yamakado, Kotaro

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the clinical results of an arthroscopy-assisted latissimus dorsi tendon transfer (aLD) for irreparable posterosuperior cuff tears as a primary surgery. The secondary aim of this study was to quantify the learning curve using the log-linear model. We hypothesized that aLD significantly improved shoulder function and that there was consistent reduction of the operative time in support of a learning-curve effect. After the arthroscopic partial repair was completed, the latissimus dorsi tendon was harvested via axillary mini-open incision and fixed with a knotless anchor arthroscopically. All patients were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively using a modified University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) scoring system, active range of motion, and the visual analog scale (VAS) for pain. The operative time was recorded to quantify the learning curve using a log-linear model. Thirty patients with a mean age of 67.4 years who underwent aLD were included. At a mean of 34 months after an aLD, the mean UCLA score increased from 15.7 preoperatively to 28.8 postoperatively (P < .001). The mean active forward elevation increased from 105° preoperatively to 149° postoperatively (P < .001). The mean active external rotation increased from 22° preoperatively to 32° postoperatively (P < .001). The VAS improved from 58 mm to 18 mm (P < .001). In all but 2 cases (93%), the preoperative osteoarthritis grade was maintained. The mean operative time was 145 minutes. A significant linear correlation was observed between the operative time and cumulative volume of cases after performing a logarithmic transformation. The learning rate was calculated as 84%. Arthroscopy-assisted latissimus dorsi tendon transfer is a technically demanding procedure; however, it can lead to significant improvements in overall shoulder pain and function. This study also confirmed a learning-curve effect for the aLD. The learning rate was 84%, indicating the existence of a long

  4. Assessment of Lymph Nodes and Prostate Status Using Early Dynamic Curves with (18)F-Choline PET/CT in Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Cédric; Ferrer, Ludovic; Carlier, Thomas; Colombié, Mathilde; Rusu, Daniela; Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise; Campion, Loic; Rousseau, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic image acquisition with (18)F-Choline [fluorocholine (FCH)] PET/CT in prostate cancer is mostly used to overcome the bladder repletion, which could obstruct the loco-regional analysis. The aim of our study was to analyze early dynamic FCH acquisitions to define pelvic lymph node or prostate pathological status. Retrospective analysis was performed on 39 patients for initial staging (n = 18), or after initial treatment (n = 21). Patients underwent 10-min dynamic acquisitions centered on the pelvis, after injection of 3-4 MBq/kg of FCH. Whole-body images were acquired about 1 h after injection using a PET/CT GE Discovery LS (GE-LS) or Siemens Biograph mCT (mCT). Maximum and mean SUV according to time were measured on nodal and prostatic lesions. SUVmean was corrected for partial volume effect (PVEC) with suitable recovery coefficients. The status of each lesion was based on histological results or patient follow-up (>6 months). A Mann-Whitney test and ANOVA were used to compare mean and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. The median PSA was 8.46 ng/mL and the median Gleason score was 3 + 4. Ninety-two lesions (43 lymph nodes and 49 prostate lesions) were analyzed, including 63 malignant lesions. In early dynamic acquisitions, the maximum and mean SUV were significantly higher, respectively, on mCT and GE-LS, in malignant versus benign lesions (p < 0.001, p < 0.001). Mean SUV without PVEC, allowed better discrimination of benign from malignant lesions, in comparison with maximum and mean SUV (with PVEC), for both early and late acquisitions. For patients acquired on mCT, area under the ROC curve showed a trend to better sensitivity and specificity for early acquisitions, compared with late acquisitions (SUVmax AUC 0.92 versus 0.85, respectively). Assessment of lymph nodes and prostate pathological status with early dynamic imaging using PET/CT FCH allowed prostate cancer detection in situations where proof of

  5. Instrumental learning and cognitive flexibility processes are impaired in children exposed to early life stress.

    PubMed

    Harms, Madeline B; Shannon Bowen, Katherine E; Hanson, Jamie L; Pollak, Seth D

    2017-10-19

    Children who experience severe early life stress show persistent deficits in many aspects of cognitive and social adaptation. Early stress might be associated with these broad changes in functioning because it impairs general learning mechanisms. To explore this possibility, we examined whether individuals who experienced abusive caregiving in childhood had difficulties with instrumental learning and/or cognitive flexibility as adolescents. Fifty-three 14-17-year-old adolescents (31 exposed to high levels of childhood stress, 22 control) completed an fMRI task that required them to first learn associations in the environment and then update those pairings. Adolescents with histories of early life stress eventually learned to pair stimuli with both positive and negative outcomes, but did so more slowly than their peers. Furthermore, these stress-exposed adolescents showed markedly impaired cognitive flexibility; they were less able than their peers to update those pairings when the contingencies changed. These learning problems were reflected in abnormal activity in learning- and attention-related brain circuitry. Both altered patterns of learning and neural activation were associated with the severity of lifetime stress that the adolescents had experienced. Taken together, the results of this experiment suggest that basic learning processes are impaired in adolescents exposed to early life stress. These general learning mechanisms may help explain the emergence of social problems observed in these individuals. © 2017 The Authors. Developmental Science Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Professional Development for Early Childhood Educators: Efforts to Improve Math and Science Learning Opportunities in Early Childhood Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piasta, Shayne B.; Logan, Jessica A. R.; Pelatti, Christina Yeager; Capps, Janet L.; Petrill, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Because recent initiatives highlight the need to better support preschool-aged children's math and science learning, the present study investigated the impact of professional development in these domains for early childhood educators. Sixty-five educators were randomly assigned to experience 10.5 days (64 hr) of training on math and science or on…

  7. Early Literacy and Assessment for Learning (K-3) Series: Little Book Insert: Little Honu's Journey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noto, Lee

    2005-01-01

    This illustrated children's story accompanies "Exploring Comprehension through Retelling: A Teacher's Story", part of the Early Literacy and Assessment for Learning (K-3) Series (ED490189). It describes a baby turtle's adventures on his journey to the ocean.

  8. Early adversity and learning: implications for typical and atypical behavioral development.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Jamie L; van den Bos, Wouter; Roeber, Barbara J; Rudolph, Karen D; Davidson, Richard J; Pollak, Seth D

    2017-07-01

    Children who experience early adversity often develop emotion regulatory problems, but little is known about the mechanisms that mediate this relation. We tested whether general associative learning processes contribute to associations between adversity, in the form of child maltreatment, and negative behavioral outcomes. Eighty-one participants between 12 and 17 years of age were recruited for this study and completed a probabilistic learning Task. Forty-one of these participants had been exposed to physical abuse, a form of early adversity. Forty additional participants without any known history of maltreatment served as a comparison group. All participants (and their parents) also completed portions of the Youth Life Stress Interview to understand adolescent's behavior. We calculated measures of associative learning, and also constructed mathematical models of learning. We found that adolescents exposed to high levels of adversity early in their lives had lower levels of associative learning than comparison adolescents. In addition, we found that impaired associative learning partially explained the higher levels of behavioral problems among youth who suffered early adversity. Using mathematical models, we also found that two components of learning were specifically affected in children exposed to adversity: choice variability and biases in their beliefs about the likelihood of rewards in the environment. Participants who had been exposed to early adversity were less able than their peers to correctly learn which stimuli were likely to result in reward, even after repeated feedback. These individuals also used information about known rewards in their environments less often. In addition, individuals exposed to adversity made decisions early in the learning process as if rewards were less consistent and occurred more at random. These data suggest one mechanism through which early life experience shapes behavioral development. © 2017 Association for Child and

  9. Early adversity and learning: implications for typical and atypical behavioral development

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Jamie L.; van den Bos, Wouter; Roeber, Barbara J.; Rudolph, Karen D.; Davidson, Richard J.; Pollak, Seth D.

    2017-01-01

    Background Children who experience early adversity often develop emotion regulatory problems, but little is known about the mechanisms that mediate this relation. We tested whether general associative learning processes contribute to associations between adversity, in the form of child maltreatment, and negative behavioral outcomes. Methods Eighty-one participants between 12 and 17 years of age were recruited for this study and completed a probabilistic learning Task. Forty-one of these participants had been exposed to physical abuse, a form of early adversity. Forty additional participants without any known history of maltreatment served as a comparison group. All participants (and their parents) also completed portions of the Youth Life Stress Interview to understand adolescent’s behavior. We calculated measures of associative learning, and also constructed mathematical models of learning. Results We found that adolescents exposed to high levels of adversity early in their lives had lower levels of associative learning than comparison adolescents. In addition, we found that impaired associative learning partially explained the higher levels of behavioral problems among youth who suffered early adversity. Using mathematical models, we also found that two components of learning were specifically affected in children exposed to adversity: choice variability and biases in their beliefs about the likelihood of rewards in the environment. Conclusions Participants who had been exposed to early adversity were less able than their peers to correctly learn which stimuli were likely to result in reward, even after repeated feedback. These individuals also used information about known rewards in their environments less often. In addition, individuals exposed to adversity made decisions early in the learning process as if rewards were less consistent and occurred more at random. These data suggest one mechanism through which early life experience shapes behavioral

  10. Understanding the Early Career Benefits of Learning Abroad Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potts, Davina

    2015-01-01

    European and U.S. institutions have promoted the value of a learning abroad experience for many years. As Australian higher education institutions have adopted policies and strategies to increase participation in learning abroad, with employability as a central argument, it is important to study this claim. This article examines the links between…

  11. Critical Learning Periods and Programs of Early Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magill, Richard A.

    In an effort to clarify understanding of the concept of critical learning periods, this paper discusses problems that people concerned with the motor development of children have had determining relationships between critical periods and learning, and a "readiness model" is offered as a solution that could enhance understanding of critical…

  12. The prevalence of synaesthesia depends on early language learning.

    PubMed

    Watson, Marcus R; Chromý, Jan; Crawford, Lyle; Eagleman, David M; Enns, James T; Akins, Kathleen A

    2017-02-01

    According to one theory, synaesthesia develops, or is preserved, because it helps children learn. If so, it should be more common among adults who faced greater childhood learning challenges. In the largest survey of synaesthesia to date, the incidence of synaesthesia was compared among native speakers of languages with transparent (easier) and opaque (more difficult) orthographies. Contrary to our prediction, native speakers of Czech (transparent) were more likely to be synaesthetes than native speakers of English (opaque). However, exploratory analyses suggested that this was because more Czechs learned non-native second languages, which was strongly associated with synaesthesia, consistent with the learning hypothesis. Furthermore, the incidence of synaesthesia among speakers of opaque languages was double that among speakers of transparent languages other than Czech, also consistent with the learning hypothesis. These findings contribute to an emerging understanding of synaesthetic development as a complex and lengthy process with multiple causal influences. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Establishing the minimal number of virtual reality simulator training sessions necessary to develop basic laparoscopic skills competence: evaluation of the learning curve.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Ricardo Jordão; Cury, José; Oliveira, Luis Carlos Neves; Srougi, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Medical literature is scarce on information to define a basic skills training program for laparoscopic surgery (peg and transferring, cutting, clipping). The aim of this study was to determine the minimal number of simulator sessions of basic laparoscopic tasks necessary to elaborate an optimal virtual reality training curriculum. Eleven medical students with no previous laparoscopic experience were spontaneously enrolled. They were submitted to simulator training sessions starting at level 1 (Immersion Lap VR, San Jose, CA), including sequentially camera handling, peg and transfer, clipping and cutting. Each student trained twice a week until 10 sessions were completed. The score indexes were registered and analyzed. The total of errors of the evaluation sequences (camera, peg and transfer, clipping and cutting) were computed and thereafter, they were correlated to the total of items evaluated in each step, resulting in a success percent ratio for each student for each set of each completed session. Thereafter, we computed the cumulative success rate in 10 sessions, obtaining an analysis of the learning process. By non-linear regression the learning curve was analyzed. By the non-linear regression method the learning curve was analyzed and a r2 = 0.73 (p < 0.001) was obtained, being necessary 4.26 (∼five sessions) to reach the plateau of 80% of the estimated acquired knowledge, being that 100% of the students have reached this level of skills. From the fifth session till the 10th, the gain of knowledge was not significant, although some students reached 96% of the expected improvement. This study revealed that after five simulator training sequential sessions the students' learning curve reaches a plateau. The forward sessions in the same difficult level do not promote any improvement in laparoscopic basic surgical skills, and the students should be introduced to a more difficult training tasks level.

  14. Colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) in the West - when can satisfactory results be obtained? A single-operator learning curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Spychalski, Michał; Skulimowski, Aleksander; Dziki, Adam; Saito, Yutaka

    2017-12-01

    Up to date we lack a detailed description of the colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) learning curve, that would represent the experience of the Western center. The aim of this study was to define the critical points of the learning curve and to draw up lesions qualification guidelines tailored to the endoscopists experience. We have carried out a single center prospective study. Between June 2013 and December 2016, 228 primary colorectal lesions were managed by ESD procedure. In order to create a learning curve model and to carry out the analysis the cases were divided into six periods, each consisting of 38 cases. The overall en bloc resection rate was 79.39%. The lowest en bloc resection rate (52.36%) was observed in the first period. After completing 76 procedures, the resection rate surged to 86% and it was accompanied by the significant increase in the mean procedure speed of ≥9 cm 2 /h. Lesions localization and diameter had a signification impact on the outcomes. After 76 procedures, en bloc resection rate of 90.9 and 90.67% were achieved for the left side of colon and rectum, respectively. In the right side of colon statistically significant lower resection rate of 67.57% was observed. We have proved that in the setting of the Western center, colorectal ESD can yield excellent results. It seems that the key to the success during the learning period is 'tailoring' lesions qualification guidelines to the experience of the endoscopist, as lesions diameter and localization highly influence the outcomes.

  15. Assessment and Program Accountability in Early Childhood Education: Lessons Learned in Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boat, Mary; Zorn, Debbie; Austin, James T.

    2005-01-01

    Ensuring that children, especially those from disadvantaged backgrounds, start school ready to learn is an important goal. This paper presents lessons learned from the state of Ohio's multi-year program to develop a standards-based assessment system for programs delivering state-funded early childhood education (ECE) through programs receiving…

  16. Race to the Top - Early Learning Challenge: 2014 Annual Performance Report Kentucky

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Race to the Top - Early Learning Challenge, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This Race to the Top - Early Learning Challenge (RTT-ELC) annual performance report for the year 2014 describes Kentucky's accomplishments, lessons learned, challenges, and strategies Kentucky will implement to address those challenges. In December of 2013, Kentucky received notice that they would join 19 other States as a winner of the Race to…

  17. Addressing Early Learning Standards for All Children within Blended Preschool Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grisham-Brown, Jennifer; Pretti-Frontczak, Kristie; Hawkins, Sarah R.; Winchell, Brooke N.

    2009-01-01

    Preschool teachers working in blended classrooms are faced with identifying which children need intensive instruction as well as being responsible for directly linking individualized learning outcomes with state or federal early learning standards. The series of studies presented were designed to illustrate how teachers working in blended…

  18. Race to the Top - Early Learning Challenge: 2015 Annual Performance Report. Maryland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Race to the Top - Early Learning Challenge, 2016

    2016-01-01

    This Race to the Top - Early Learning Challenge (RTT-ELC) annual performance report for the year 2015 describes Maryland's accomplishments, lessons learned, challenges, and strategies Maryland will implement to address those challenges. Maryland's remarkable progress in increasing participation in their tiered quality rating and improvement…

  19. Race to the Top - Early Learning Challenge: 2015 Annual Performance Report. New Jersey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Race to the Top - Early Learning Challenge, 2016

    2016-01-01

    This Race to the Top - Early Learning Challenge (RTT-ELC) annual performance report for the year 2015 describes New Jersey's accomplishments, lessons learned, challenges, and strategies New Jersey will implement to address those challenges. New Jersey's remarkable progress in increasing participation in their tiered quality rating and improvement…

  20. Race to the Top - Early Learning Challenge: 2015 Annual Performance Report. Vermont

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Race to the Top - Early Learning Challenge, 2016

    2016-01-01

    This Race to the Top - Early Learning Challenge (RTT-ELC) annual performance report for the year 2015 describes Vermont's accomplishments, lessons learned, challenges, and strategies Vermont will implement to address those challenges. Vermont's remarkable progress in increasing participation in their tiered quality rating and improvement system,…

  1. Race to the Top - Early Learning Challenge: 2015 Annual Performance Report. Pennsylvania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Race to the Top - Early Learning Challenge, 2016

    2016-01-01

    This Race to the Top - Early Learning Challenge (RTT-ELC) annual performance report for the year 2015 describes Pennsylvania's accomplishments, lessons learned, challenges, and strategies Pennsylvania will implement to address those challenges. Pennsylvania's remarkable progress in increasing participation in their tiered quality rating and…

  2. Race to the Top - Early Learning Challenge: 2015 Annual Performance Report. Minnesota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Race to the Top - Early Learning Challenge, 2016

    2016-01-01

    This Race to the Top - Early Learning Challenge (RTT-ELC) annual performance report for the year 2015 describes Minnesota's accomplishments, lessons learned, challenges, and strategies Minnesota will implement to address those challenges. Minnesota's remarkable progress in increasing participation in their tiered quality rating and improvement…

  3. The Nature of Professional Learning Communities in New Zealand Early Childhood Education: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherrington, Sue; Thornton, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Professional learning communities are receiving increasing attention within the schooling sector but empirical research into their development and use within early childhood education contexts is rare. This paper reports initial findings of an exploratory study into the development of professional learning communities in New Zealand's early…

  4. Learning through English Language in Early Childhood Education: A Case of English Medium Schools in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mwalongo, Leopard Jacob

    2016-01-01

    In China the English medium schools are now mushrooming and many parents send their children at very early age. These schools enroll children of pre-school to school age to learn through English as foreign language regardless of their proficiency in the first language. Therefore the study aims at examining the learning English language as a…

  5. Race to the Top - Early Learning Challenge: 2015 Annual Performance Report. New Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Race to the Top - Early Learning Challenge, 2016

    2016-01-01

    This Race to the Top - Early Learning Challenge (RTT-ELC) annual performance report for the year 2015 describes New Mexico's accomplishments, lessons learned, challenges, and strategies New Mexico will implement to address those challenges. New Mexico is pleased to report that at the end of Year Three of the RTT-ELC grant, the State continues to…

  6. Inside the Content: The Breadth and Depth of Early Learning Standards. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott-Little, Catherine; Kagan, Sharon Lynn; Frelow, Victoria Stebbins

    2005-01-01

    This executive summary describes a study that analyzes the content of early learning standards, operationally defined as documents that articulate expectations for children's development and learning during the preschool period (ages three to five years). Standards from 36 states were collected and analyzed to address the following research…

  7. Early-Career Academics' Perceptions of Teaching and Learning in Hong Kong: Implications for Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Keith; McNaught, Carmel; Wong, Kin-Chi; Li, Yi-Ching

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses early-career academics' development at a university in Hong Kong. Reflecting the impact of local context, the paper explores cultural and structural influences that can impinge on teaching and learning strategies for new academics. Barriers such as student learning behaviour and publication pressure may discourage new…

  8. Effect of Formative and Ability Test Results on Early Learning of Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadir, Abdul; Ardi, Muhammad; Nurhayati, B.; Dirawan, Gufran Darma

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship of formative tests to early learning ability of students in the science learning style. This research used an experimental method with a 2 x 2 factorial design. The participants comprised all the students in class VII of the Islamic Junior High School State of Kolaka, a total of 343…

  9. Contributions of Early Work-Based Learning: A Case Study of First Year Pharmacy Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ting, Kang Nee; Wong, Kok Thong; Thang, Siew Ming

    2009-01-01

    Generally work-based learning opportunities are only offered to students in their penultimate year of undergraduate study. Little is known about the benefits and shortcomings of such experiential learning for students in the early stages of their undergraduate education. This is a mixed method study investigating first year undergraduate pharmacy…

  10. Universal Design for Learning: Cognitive Theory into Practice for Facilitating Comprehension in Early Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Susan Trostle; Dalton, Elizabeth M.

    2012-01-01

    Addressing the unique needs of children of all ages and abilities, Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is gaining momentum in schools and preschools around the nation and the globe. This article explores Universal Design for Learning and its promising applications to a variety of reading and language arts experiences in the Early Childhood…

  11. Predictive Coding Accelerates Word Recognition and Learning in the Early Stages of Language Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ylinen, Sari; Bosseler, Alexis; Junttila, Katja; Huotilainen, Minna

    2017-01-01

    The ability to predict future events in the environment and learn from them is a fundamental component of adaptive behavior across species. Here we propose that inferring predictions facilitates speech processing and word learning in the early stages of language development. Twelve- and 24-month olds' electrophysiological brain responses to heard…

  12. Categorical Structure among Shared Features in Networks of Early-Learned Nouns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hills, Thomas T.; Maouene, Mounir; Maouene, Josita; Sheya, Adam; Smith, Linda

    2009-01-01

    The shared features that characterize the noun categories that young children learn first are a formative basis of the human category system. To investigate the potential categorical information contained in the features of early-learned nouns, we examine the graph-theoretic properties of noun-feature networks. The networks are built from the…

  13. Statistical Learning is Related to Early Literacy-Related Skills

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Mercedes; Kaschak, Michael P.; Jones, John L.; Lonigan, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that statistical learning, or the ability to use statistical information to learn the structure of one’s environment, plays a role in young children’s acquisition of linguistic knowledge. Although most research on statistical learning has focused on language acquisition processes, such as the segmentation of words from fluent speech and the learning of syntactic structure, some recent studies have explored the extent to which individual differences in statistical learning are related to literacy-relevant knowledge and skills. The present study extends on this literature by investigating the relations between two measures of statistical learning and multiple measures of skills that are critical to the development of literacy—oral language, vocabulary knowledge, and phonological processing—within a single model. Our sample included a total of 553 typically developing children from prekindergarten through second grade. Structural equation modeling revealed that statistical learning accounted for a unique portion of the variance in these literacy-related skills. Practical implications for instruction and assessment are discussed. PMID:26478658

  14. Playing off the curve - testing quantitative predictions of skill acquisition theories in development of chess performance.

    PubMed

    Gaschler, Robert; Progscha, Johanna; Smallbone, Kieran; Ram, Nilam; Bilalić, Merim

    2014-01-01

    Learning curves have been proposed as an adequate description of learning processes, no matter whether the processes manifest within minutes or across years. Different mechanisms underlying skill acquisition can lead to differences in the shape of learning curves. In the current study, we analyze the tournament performance data of 1383 chess players who begin competing at young age and play tournaments for at least 10 years. We analyze the performance development with the goal to test the adequacy of learning curves, and the skill acquisition theories they are based on, for describing and predicting expertise acquisition. On the one hand, we show that the skill acquisition theories implying a negative exponential learning curve do a better job in both describing early performance gains and predicting later trajectories of chess performance than those theories implying a power function learning curve. On the other hand, the learning curves of a large proportion of players show systematic qualitative deviations from the predictions of either type of skill acquisition theory. While skill acquisition theories predict larger performance gains in early years and smaller gains in later years, a substantial number of players begin to show substantial improvements with a delay of several years (and no improvement in the first years), deviations not fully accounted for by quantity of practice. The current work adds to the debate on how learning processes on a small time scale combine to large-scale changes.

  15. The Importance of Teaching and Learning Nature of Science in the Early Childhood Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akerson, Valarie L.; Buck, Gayle A.; Donnelly, Lisa A.; Nargund-Joshi, Vanashri; Weiland, Ingrid S.

    2011-01-01

    Though research has shown that students do not have adequate understandings of nature of science (NOS) by the time they exit high school, there is also evidence that they have not received NOS instruction that would enable them to develop such understandings. How early is "too early" to teach and learn NOS? Are students, particularly young…

  16. Children's Early Approaches to Learning and Academic Trajectories through Fifth Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li-Grining, Christine P.; Votruba-Drzal, Elizabeth; Maldonado-Carreno, Carolina; Haas, Kelly

    2010-01-01

    Children's early approaches to learning (ATL) enhance their adaptation to the demands they experience with the start of formal schooling. The current study uses individual growth modeling to investigate whether children's early ATL, which includes persistence, emotion regulation, and attentiveness, explain individual differences in their academic…

  17. Meeting Basic Learning Needs through Programmes of Early Childhood Care and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consultative Group on Early Childhood Care and Development, Haydenville, MA.

    Noting that early childhood development is the foundation for basic education across the life span, the first chapter of this report discusses the benefits of early interventions for individuals and society and justifies the basis for programs which aim at meeting the basic learning needs of young children. It also suggests several questions which…

  18. Mental Health Problems in Early Childhood Can Impair Learning and Behavior for Life. Working Paper #6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Significant mental health problems can and do occur in young children. In some cases, these problems can have serious consequences for early learning, social competence, and lifelong health. Furthermore, the foundations of many mental health problems that endure through adulthood are established early in life through the interaction of genetic…

  19. Incorporating Early Learning Strategies in the School Improvement Grants (SIG) Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors-Tadros, Lori; Dunn, Lenay; Martella, Jana; McCauley, Carlas

    2015-01-01

    The Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes (CEELO) and the Center on School Turnaround (CST) collaborated to develop case studies of three selected schools receiving SIG funds that have, with the support of their districts, promoted the use of early childhood programming (PK-3) as a key strategy in their schools' turnaround models. The goal…

  20. Our Inquiry, Our Practice: Undertaking, Supporting, and Learning from Early Childhood Teacher Research(ers)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Gail, Ed.; Henderson, Barbara, Ed.; Meier, Daniel R., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Through "teacher research", teachers engage in the systematic study of their own practice to answer questions they have about teaching and learning, and their own effectiveness. This book explores what teacher research in the early childhood setting looks like, why it is important to the field of early childhood education, and how…

  1. Interrogating "Belonging" in Belonging, Being and Becoming: The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumsion, Jennifer; Wong, Sandie

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors interrogate the use of "belonging" in "Belonging, Being and Becoming: the Early Years Learning Framework for Australia" (EYLF), Australia's first national curriculum for early childhood education and care settings and, from the authors' interrogation, possibilities are offered for thinking about and…

  2. Foregrounding Silences in the South African National Early Learning Standards for Birth to Four Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebrahim, Hasina Banu

    2014-01-01

    The development of standards in early childhood is associated with governments wanting to assert their influence on what young children should know and be able to do before they enter formal schooling. In South Africa the National Early Learning and Development Standards (NELDS), released in 2009, attempts to assert influence in the context of…

  3. A Universal Good: Expanding Voluntary, Early Learning Opportunities for Illinois' Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Sean

    This report was written to stimulate discussion about the potential and need for expanding access to voluntary, high-quality early childhood care and education programs in Illinois. The report compiles 13 short articles pertaining to early learning as follows: (1) "Ready to Succeed: Preparing Children for School, and for Life"; (2)…

  4. Education and Learning in the Early Middle Ages: New Perspectives and Old Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Contreni, John J.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses various scholarly views of education and learning in the early middle ages and identifies some problems confronting scholars investigating this period. Points out new perspectives relative to the role of education during this time. Asserts that future study of early medieval education will benefit from focusing on the minds of masters…

  5. Student Teacher Views of Text in Early Learning Environments: Images from Sweden and New Zealand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellgren, Elisabeth; Margrain, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    A total of 659 photographs of text in early childhood environments were gathered by student teachers in New Zealand and Sweden, replicating an earlier Swedish study [Gustafsson, K., & Mellgren, E. (2002)." Using text in pre-school: A Learning Environment." "Early Child Development and Care", 172(6), 603-624]. The findings…

  6. Exploring Educators' Perspectives: How Does Learning through "Happiness" Promote Quality Early Childhood Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikegami, Kiiko; Agbenyega, Joseph Seyram

    2014-01-01

    The quality of early childhood education has dominated current debates in the ways educators develop and implement learning programs for children yet conceptions of quality vary contextually and culturally. This qualitative case study explored the insider perspectives of six early childhood educators in Sapporo, Japan regarding their conceptions…

  7. Designing Informal Learning Experiences for Early Career Academics Using a Knowledge Ecosystem Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Faye; Partridge, Helen; Bruce, Christine; Hemmings, Brian

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a "knowledge ecosystem" model of how early career academics experience using information to learn while building their social networks for developmental purposes. Developed using grounded theory methodology, the model offers a way of conceptualising how to empower early career academics through (1) agency…

  8. Designs for Living and Learning: Transforming Early Childhood Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Deb; Carter, Margie

    While the early childhood field has formed standards to help in recognizing quality programs for children, practitioners seldom use values to guide in selection of materials or to help plan early childhood environments. This book draws on a variety of educational approaches, including Waldorf, Montessori, and Reggio Emilia, to outline hundreds of…

  9. Idaho's Blueprint for Early Learning: "The Essential Elements."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Myrl, Ed.

    Designed to provide information related to quality early care and education services for providers, policy makers, and clients in Idaho, This "blueprint" outlines the nine essential elements for best practices in early care and education settings. The document is presented in three parts. Part 1 delineates standards and indicators in…

  10. Early Learning: Birth to Third Grade Continuum. Annotated Bibliography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hite, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that persistent achievement gaps among children begin as early as 18 months, years before most publicly funded prekindergarten programs offer enrollment. Early childhood development necessitates more than access to pre-K at age four. Proper brain development requires adequate nutrition, access to quality healthcare, and…

  11. Preparing Students for College: Lessons Learned from the Early College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmunds, Julie A.; Arshavsky, Nina; Lewis, Karla; Thrift, Beth; Unlu, Fatih; Furey, Jane

    2017-01-01

    This article utilizes mixed methods--a lottery-based experimental design supplemented by qualitative data--to examine college readiness within an innovative high school setting: early college high schools. Early colleges are small schools that merge the high school and college experiences and are targeted at students underrepresented in college.…

  12. Early Learning and Early Identification Follow-Up Study: Transition from the Early to the Later Childhood Grades, 1990-93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcon, Rebecca A.

    As follow-up to an in-depth study of the District of Columbia's early learning programs and their impact, this study provided data on the transition of previously studied children from primary education to upper elementary grades. Academic progress of the original group of pre-kindergarten and Head Start children was studied during years 5 and 6…

  13. ERPs recorded during early second language exposure predict syntactic learning.

    PubMed

    Batterink, Laura; Neville, Helen J

    2014-09-01

    Millions of adults worldwide are faced with the task of learning a second language (L2). Understanding the neural mechanisms that support this learning process is an important area of scientific inquiry. However, most previous studies on the neural mechanisms underlying L2 acquisition have focused on characterizing the results of learning, relying upon end-state outcome measures in which learning is assessed after it has occurred, rather than on the learning process itself. In this study, we adopted a novel and more direct approach to investigate neural mechanisms engaged during L2 learning, in which we recorded ERPs from beginning adult learners as they were exposed to an unfamiliar L2 for the first time. Learners' proficiency in the L2 was then assessed behaviorally using a grammaticality judgment task, and ERP data acquired during initial L2 exposure were sorted as a function of performance on this task. High-proficiency learners showed a larger N100 effect to open-class content words compared with closed-class function words, whereas low-proficiency learners did not show a significant N100 difference between open- and closed-class words. In contrast, amplitude of the N400 word category effect correlated with learners' L2 comprehension, rather than predicting syntactic learning. Taken together, these results indicate that learners who spontaneously direct greater attention to open- rather than closed-class words when processing L2 input show better syntactic learning, suggesting a link between selective attention to open-class content words and acquisition of basic morphosyntactic rules. These findings highlight the importance of selective attention mechanisms for L2 acquisition.

  14. Quantitative forecasting of PTSD from early trauma responses: a Machine Learning application.

    PubMed

    Galatzer-Levy, Isaac R; Karstoft, Karen-Inge; Statnikov, Alexander; Shalev, Arieh Y

    2014-12-01

    There is broad interest in predicting the clinical course of mental disorders from early, multimodal clinical and biological information. Current computational models, however, constitute a significant barrier to realizing this goal. The early identification of trauma survivors at risk of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is plausible given the disorder's salient onset and the abundance of putative biological and clinical risk indicators. This work evaluates the ability of Machine Learning (ML) forecasting approaches to identify and integrate a panel of unique predictive characteristics and determine their accuracy in forecasting non-remitting PTSD from information collected within 10 days of a traumatic event. Data on event characteristics, emergency department observations, and early symptoms were collected in 957 trauma survivors, followed for fifteen months. An ML feature selection algorithm identified a set of predictors that rendered all others redundant. Support Vector Machines (SVMs) as well as other ML classification algorithms were used to evaluate the forecasting accuracy of i) ML selected features, ii) all available features without selection, and iii) Acute Stress Disorder (ASD) symptoms alone. SVM also compared the prediction of a) PTSD diagnostic status at 15 months to b) posterior probability of membership in an empirically derived non-remitting PTSD symptom trajectory. Results are expressed as mean Area Under Receiver Operating Characteristics Curve (AUC). The feature selection algorithm identified 16 predictors, present in ≥ 95% cross-validation trials. The accuracy of predicting non-remitting PTSD from that set (AUC = .77) did not differ from predicting from all available information (AUC = .78). Predicting from ASD symptoms was not better then chance (AUC = .60). The prediction of PTSD status was less accurate than that of membership in a non-remitting trajectory (AUC = .71). ML methods may fill a critical gap in forecasting PTSD. The

  15. A randomized control trial to evaluate the importance of pre-training basic laparoscopic psychomotor skills upon the learning curve of laparoscopic intra-corporeal knot tying.

    PubMed

    Molinas, Carlos Roger; Binda, Maria Mercedes; Sisa, Cesar Manuel; Campo, Rudi

    2017-01-01

    Training of basic laparoscopic psychomotor skills improves the acquisition of more advanced laparoscopic tasks, such as laparoscopic intra-corporeal knot tying (LICK). This randomized controlled trial was designed to evaluate whether pre-training of basic skills, as laparoscopic camera navigation (LCN), hand-eye coordination (HEC), and bimanual coordination (BMC), and the combination of the three of them, has any beneficial effect upon the learning curve of LICK. The study was carried out in a private center in Asunción, Paraguay, by 80 medical students without any experience in surgery. Four laparoscopic tasks were performed in the ENCILAP model (LCN, HEC, BMC, and LICK). Participants were allocated to 5 groups (G1-G5). The study was structured in 5 phases. In phase 1, they underwent a base-line test ( T 1 ) for all tasks (1 repetition of each task in consecutive order). In phase 2, participants underwent different training programs (30 consecutive repetitions) for basic tasks according to the group they belong to (G1: none; G2: LCN; G3: HEC; G4: BMC; and G5: LCN, HEC, and BMC). In phase 3, they were tested again ( T 2 ) in the same manner than at T 1 . In phase 4, they underwent a standardized training program for LICK (30 consecutive repetitions). In phase 5, they were tested again ( T 3 ) in the same manner than at T 1 and T 2 . At each repetition, scoring was based on the time taken for task completion system. The scores were plotted and non-linear regression models were used to fit the learning curves to one- and two-phase exponential decay models for each participant (individual curves) and for each group (group curves). The LICK group learning curves fitted better to the two-phase exponential decay model. From these curves, the starting points ( Y 0), the point after HEC training/before LICK training ( Y 1), the Plateau, and the rate constants ( K ) were calculated. All groups, except for G4, started from a similar point ( Y 0). At Y 1, G5 scored already

  16. Early life programming of innate fear and fear learning in adult female rats.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Carl W; Meredith, John P; Spicer, Clare H; Mason, Rob; Marsden, Charles A

    2009-03-02

    The early rearing environment can impact on emotional reactivity and learning later in life. In this study the effects of neonatal maternal separation (MS) on innate fear and fear learning were assessed in the adult female rat. Pups were subjected to MS (360 min), brief handling (H; 15 min), or animal facility rearing (AFR) on post-natal days 2-14. In the first experiment, innate fear was tested in the open field. No differences between the early rearing groups were observed in unconditioned fear. In the second experiment, separate cohorts were used in a 3-day fear learning paradigm which tested the acquisition (Day 1), expression and extinction (both Day 2) of conditioning to an auditory cue; extinction recall was determined as well (Day 3). Contextual fear conditioning was also assessed prior to cue presentations on Days 2 and 3. Whereas MS attenuated the acquisition and expression of fear conditioning to the cue, H potentiated extinction learning. Cue-induced fear was reduced on Day 3, compared to Day 2, indicating that the recall of extinction learning was evident; however, no early rearing group differences in extinction recall were observed. Similarly, while contextual fear was decreased on Day 3, compared to Day 2, there were no differences between the early rearing groups on either day tested. The present findings of altered cue-conditioned fear learning, in the absence of innate fear changes, lend further support for the important role of the early rearing environment in mediating cognition in adulthood.

  17. Using a High-Fidelity Patient Simulator with First-Year Medical Students to Facilitate Learning of Cardiovascular Function Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, David M.; Ryan, Kathleen; Rabuck, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Students are relying on technology for learning more than ever, and educators need to adapt to facilitate student learning. High-fidelity patient simulators (HFPS) are usually reserved for the clinical years of medical education and are geared to improve clinical decision skills, teamwork, and patient safety. Finding ways to incorporate HFPS into…

  18. Brief periods of NREM sleep do not promote early offline gains but subsequent on-task performance in motor skill learning.

    PubMed

    Maier, Jonathan G; Piosczyk, Hannah; Holz, Johannes; Landmann, Nina; Deschler, Christoph; Frase, Lukas; Kuhn, Marion; Klöppel, Stefan; Spiegelhalder, Kai; Sterr, Annette; Riemann, Dieter; Feige, Bernd; Voderholzer, Ulrich; Nissen, Christoph

    2017-11-01

    Sleep modulates motor learning, but its detailed impact on performance curves remains to be fully characterized. This study aimed to further determine the impact of brief daytime periods of NREM sleep on 'offline' (task discontinuation after initial training) and 'on-task' (performance within the test session) changes in motor skill performance (finger tapping task). In a mixed design (combined parallel group and repeated measures) sleep laboratory study (n=17 'active' wake vs. sleep, n=19 'passive' wake vs. sleep), performance curves were assessed prior to and after a 90min period containing either sleep, active or passive wakefulness. We observed a highly significant, but state- (that is, sleep/wake)-independent early offline gain and improved on-task performance after sleep in comparison to wakefulness. Exploratory curve fitting suggested that the observed sleep effect most likely emerged from an interaction of training-induced improvement and detrimental 'time-on-task' processes, such as fatigue. Our results indicate that brief periods of NREM sleep do not promote early offline gains but subsequent on-task performance in motor skill learning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Learning curve for the management of tyrosine kinase inhibitors as the first line of treatment for patients with metastatic renal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lendínez-Cano, G; Osman García, I; Congregado Ruiz, C B; Conde Sánchez, J M; Medina López, R A

    2018-03-07

    To analyse the learning curve for the management of tyrosine kinase inhibitors as the first line of treatment for patients with metastatic renal cancer. We evaluated 32 consecutive patients treated in our department for metastatic renal cancer with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (pazopanib or sunitinib) as first-line treatment between September 2012 and November 2015. We retrospectively analysed this sample. We measured the time to the withdrawal of the first-line treatment, the time to progression and overall survival using Kaplan-Meier curves. The learning curve was analysed with the cumulative sum (CUSUM) methodology. In our series, the median time to the withdrawal of the first-line treatment was 11 months (95% CI 4.9-17.1). The mean time to progression was 30.4 months (95% CI 22.7-38.1), and the mean overall survival was 34.9 months (95% CI 27.8-42). By applying the CUSUM methodology, we obtained a graph for the CUSUM value of the time to withdrawal of the first-line treatment (CUSUM TW), observing 3 well-differentiated phases: phase 1 or initial learning phase (1-15), phase 2 (16-26) in which the management of the drug progressively improved and phase 3 (27-32) of maximum experience or mastery of the management of these drugs. The number of treated patients needed to achieve the proper management of these patients was estimated at 15. Despite the limitations of the sample size and follow-up time, we estimated (in 15 patients) the number needed to reach the necessary experience in the management of these patients with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We observed no relationship between the time to the withdrawal of the first-line treatment for any cause and progression. Copyright © 2018 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Supporting Creativity and Imagination in the Early Years. Supporting Early Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Bernadette

    2006-01-01

    Learning through the arts has the potential to stimulate open ended activity that encourages discovery, exploration, experimentation and invention, thus contributing to children's development in all areas of learning and helping to make the curriculum meaningful to them. In this book, the author draws on her extensive experience of promoting young…

  1. Learning in Complex Environments: The Effects of Background Speech on Early Word Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, Brianna T. M.; Saffran, Jenny R.

    2016-01-01

    Although most studies of language learning take place in quiet laboratory settings, everyday language learning occurs under noisy conditions. The current research investigated the effects of background speech on word learning. Both younger (22- to 24-month-olds; n = 40) and older (28- to 30-month-olds; n = 40) toddlers successfully learned novel…

  2. Applying Learning Analytics for the Early Prediction of Students' Academic Performance in Blended Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Owen H. T.; Huang, Anna Y. Q.; Huang, Jeff C. H.; Lin, Albert J. Q.; Ogata, Hiroaki; Yang, Stephen J. H.

    2018-01-01

    Blended learning combines online digital resources with traditional classroom activities and enables students to attain higher learning performance through well-defined interactive strategies involving online and traditional learning activities. Learning analytics is a conceptual framework and is a part of our Precision education used to analyze…

  3. Association of Polar Early Career Scientists: a model for experiential learning in professional development for students and early career researchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, A. C.; Hindshaw, R. S.; Fugmann, G.; Mariash, H.

    2016-12-01

    The Association of Polar Early Career Scientists was established by early career researchers during the 2007-2008 International Polar Year as an organization for early career researchers in the polar and cryospheric sciences. APECS works to promote early career researchers through soft-skills training in both research and outreach activities, through advocating for including early career researchers in all levels of the scientific process and scientific management, and through supporting a world-wide network of researchers in varied fields. APECS is lead by early career researchers; this self-driven model has proved to be an effective means for developing the leadership, management, and communication skills that are essential in the sciences, and has shown to be sustainable even in a community where frequent turn-over is inherent to the members. Since its inception, APECS has reached over 5,500 members in more than 80 countries, and we have placed more than 50 early career researchers on working groups and steering committees with organizations around the world in the last two years alone. The close partnerships that APECS has with national and international organizations exposes members to both academic and alternative career paths, including those at the science-policy interface. This paper describes APECS's approach to experiential learning in professional development and the best practices identified over our nearly ten years as an organization.

  4. It Pays to Go Off-Track: Practicing with Error-Augmenting Haptic Feedback Facilitates Learning of a Curve-Tracing Task

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Camille K.; Tremblay, Luc; Carnahan, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Researchers in the domain of haptic training are now entering the long-standing debate regarding whether or not it is best to learn a skill by experiencing errors. Haptic training paradigms provide fertile ground for exploring how various theories about feedback, errors and physical guidance intersect during motor learning. Our objective was to determine how error minimizing, error augmenting and no haptic feedback while learning a self-paced curve-tracing task impact performance on delayed (1 day) retention and transfer tests, which indicate learning. We assessed performance using movement time and tracing error to calculate a measure of overall performance – the speed accuracy cost function. Our results showed that despite exhibiting the worst performance during skill acquisition, the error augmentation group had significantly better accuracy (but not overall performance) than the error minimization group on delayed retention and transfer tests. The control group’s performance fell between that of the two experimental groups but was not significantly different from either on the delayed retention test. We propose that the nature of the task (requiring online feedback to guide performance) coupled with the error augmentation group’s frequent off-target experience and rich experience of error-correction promoted information processing related to error-detection and error-correction that are essential for motor learning. PMID:28082937

  5. A Meta-Analysis of the Relationship between Learning Outcomes and Parental Involvement during Early Childhood Education and Early Elementary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Xin; Shen, Jianping; Krenn, Huilan Y.; Hu, Shanshan; Yuan, Jing

    2016-01-01

    This meta-analysis examined the relationship between learning outcomes of children and educational involvement of parents during a unique period of early childhood education and early elementary education based on 100 independent effect sizes from 46 studies. Learning outcomes are academic achievement, and frameworks of parental involvement…

  6. The Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development's International Early Learning Study: Opening for Debate and Contestation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Peter; Dahlberg, Gunilla; Grieshaber, Susan; Mantovani, Susanna; May, Helen; Pence, Alan; Rayna, Sylvie; Swadener, Beth Blue; Vandenbroeck, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development is initiating the International Early Learning Study, a cross-national assessment of early learning outcomes involving the testing of 5-year-old children in participating countries. The authors use this colloquium to inform members of the early childhood community about this project and to…

  7. From Early Starters to Late Finishers? A Longitudinal Study of Early Foreign Language Learning in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaekel, Nils; Schurig, Michael; Florian, Merle; Ritter, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Foreign language education has now been implemented at the elementary school level across Europe, and early foreign language education has gained traction following language policies set by the European Commission. The long-term effects of an early start, however, have not received ample scientific scrutiny. The present study assessed early…

  8. Learning curves in highly skilled chess players: a test of the generality of the power law of practice.

    PubMed

    Howard, Robert W

    2014-09-01

    The power law of practice holds that a power function best interrelates skill performance and amount of practice. However, the law's validity and generality are moot. Some researchers argue that it is an artifact of averaging individual exponential curves while others question whether the law generalizes to complex skills and to performance measures other than response time. The present study tested the power law's generality to development over many years of a very complex cognitive skill, chess playing, with 387 skilled participants, most of whom were grandmasters. A power or logarithmic function best fit grouped data but individuals showed much variability. An exponential function usually was the worst fit to individual data. Groups differing in chess talent were compared and a power function best fit the group curve for the more talented players while a quadratic function best fit that for the less talented. After extreme amounts of practice, a logarithmic function best fit grouped data but a quadratic function best fit most individual curves. Individual variability is great and the power law or an exponential law are not the best descriptions of individual chess skill development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Prevalence and influences of preschoolers' sedentary behaviors in early learning centers: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Patricia; Vanderloo, Leigh M; Burke, Shauna M; Irwin, Jennifer D; Johnson, Andrew M

    2015-09-18

    Recent research has highlighted the need for increased evidence regarding the sedentary activity levels of preschoolers. Given the large proportion of time this population spends in various early learning facilities, the exploration of sedentary behaviors within this particular environment should be a priority. The purpose of the study was two-fold: (1) to compare sedentary time of preschoolers in three different early learning environments (i.e., full-day kindergarten [FDK], center-, and home-based childcare); and (2) to assess which characteristics (i.e., staff behaviors, sedentary environment, fixed play environment, portable play environment, sedentary opportunities) of these early learning environments influence preschoolers' sedentary time. Data collection occurred between September 2011 and June 2012. Preschoolers' sedentary time was measured using Actical(™) accelerometers at a 15 s epoch. The Environment and Policy Assessment and Observation (EPAO) tool was used to assess the sedentary environment of participating early learning classrooms, and those subscales (n = 5) that were evidence-informed as potentially influencing sedentary time in early learning centers were explored in the current study. A linear mixed model ANCOVA was carried out to determine the differences in sedentary time based on type of early learning environment while direct entry regression analyses were performed to describe the relationships between sedentary time and the five sedentary-specific EPAO subscale. Preschoolers (n = 218) from 28 early learning programs (i.e., 8 FDK, 9 centre-, and 8 home-based childcare facilities) participated. Accelerometry data revealed that preschoolers attending centre-based childcare engaged in the highest rate of sedentary time (41.62 mins/hr, SD = 3.78) compared to preschoolers in home-based childcare (40.72 mins/hr, SD = 6.34) and FDK (39.68 mins/hr, SD = 3.43). The models for FDK, center-based childcare, and home-based childcare, comprised each

  10. Early Spanish Grammatical Gender Bootstrapping: Learning Nouns through Adjectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arias-Trejo, Natalia; Alva, Elda Alicia

    2013-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that children use different strategies to infer a referent. One of these strategies is to use inflectional morphology. We present evidence that toddlers learning Spanish are capable of using gender word inflections to infer word reference. Thirty-month-olds were tested in a preferential looking experiment. Participants…

  11. A Connected Space for Early Experiential Learning in Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Yong; Hunt, Jean Ann

    2016-01-01

    Carefully constructed field-based experiences in teacher education programs have been recognized as one of the essential conditions for effective teacher learning. Most college/university-based teacher education programs, however, are still dominated by the epistemology that academic knowledge is the authoritative source of knowledge about…

  12. Examining the role of social cues in early word learning.

    PubMed

    Briganti, Alicia M; Cohen, Leslie B

    2011-02-01

    Infants watched a video of an adult pointing towards two different objects while hearing novel labels. Analyses indicated that 14- and 18-month-olds looked longer at the target object, but only 18-month-olds showed word learning. The results suggest that different types of social cues are available at different ages. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Play: Ten Power Boosts for Children's Early Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice

    2007-01-01

    Play is children's work. Alice Honig enumerates from the heart 10 ways in which children learn through play, including building dexterity; social skills; cognitive and language skills; number and time concepts; spatial understanding; reasoning of cause and effect; clarification of pretend versus real; sensory and aesthetic appreciation; extended…

  14. Engaging First Graders in Transformational Early Childhood Emergent Learning Themes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pendergrass, Amanda Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to encourage learners to care for others and make a difference in the world through Reggio Emilia-inspired teaching and learning practice that promoted transformational education. Students were anticipated to take an active role in helping to develop the transformational educational curriculum.…

  15. Early School Experiences: Gender Differences in Mathematics Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leder, Gilah C.

    This study of gender differences in mathematics learning examined two 4-year-olds who attended a Melbourne, Australia preschool. The study traces the experiences of the students, one female and one male, during their first formal exposure to mathematics in kindergarten. Of particular concern was how the preschoolers interacted with their teacher,…

  16. Early Results in Capella's Prior Learning Assessment Experimental Site Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Jillian

    2017-01-01

    In July 2014, the U.S. Department of Education announced a new round of experimental sites focusing on competency-based education. Capella University was selected to participate in three of the Department of Education's competency-based education (CBE) experiments and began by implementing the prior learning assessment experiment, which allows…

  17. Think Summer: Early Planning, Teacher Support Boost Summer Learning Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental problem that continues to plague educators is the achievement gap between low-income and higher-income students. In the ongoing search for solutions, one of the more promising approaches is expanding opportunities for learning, particularly in the summer. This article describes a project funded by The Wallace Foundation that offers…

  18. Evidence of Early Strategies in Learning to Walk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snapp-Childs, Winona; Corbetta, Daniela

    2009-01-01

    Learning to walk is a dynamic process requiring the fine coordination, assembly, and balancing of many body segments at once. For the young walker, coordinating all these behavioral levels may be quite daunting. In this study, we examine the whole-body strategies to which infants resort to produce their first independent steps and progress over…

  19. Different Approaches to the Study of Early Perceptual Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatt, Ramesh S.; Quinn, Paul C.

    2011-01-01

    Bhatt and Quinn (2011) review evidence indicating that learning plays a powerful role in the development of perceptual organization, and provide a theoretical framework for studying this process. The fact that prominent researchers in diverse areas of cognitive development and adult cognition have commented on this paper (Aslin, 2011; Goldstone,…

  20. Placement of central venous port catheters and peripherally inserted central catheters in the routine clinical setting of a radiology department: analysis of costs and intervention duration learning curve.

    PubMed

    Rotzinger, Roman; Gebauer, Bernhard; Schnapauff, Dirk; Streitparth, Florian; Wieners, Gero; Grieser, Christian; Freyhardt, Patrick; Hamm, Bernd; Maurer, Martin H

    2017-12-01

    Background Placement of central venous port catheters (CVPS) and peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) is an integral component of state-of-the-art patient care. In the era of increasing cost awareness, it is desirable to have more information to comprehensively assess both procedures. Purpose To perform a retrospective analysis of interventional radiologic implantation of CVPS and PICC lines in a large patient population including a cost analysis of both methods as well as an investigation the learning curve in terms of the interventions' durations. Material and Methods All CVPS and PICC line related interventions performed in an interventional radiology department during a three-year period from January 2011 to December 2013 were examined. Documented patient data included sex, venous access site, and indication for CVPS or PICC placement. A cost analysis including intervention times was performed based on the prorated costs of equipment use, staff costs, and expenditures for disposables. The decrease in intervention duration in the course of time conformed to the learning curve. Results In total, 2987 interventions were performed by 16 radiologists: 1777 CVPS and 791 PICC lines. An average implantation took 22.5 ± 0.6 min (CVPS) and 10.1 ± 0.9 min (PICC lines). For CVPS, this average time was achieved by seven radiologists newly learning the procedures after performing 20 CVPS implantations. Total costs per implantation were €242 (CVPS) and €201 (PICC lines). Conclusion Interventional radiologic implantations of CVPS and PICC lines are well-established procedures, easy to learn by residents, and can be implanted at low costs.