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Sample records for early menarche results

  1. Factors associated with early menarche: results from the French Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Puberty is a transition period making physiological development a challenge adolescents have to face. Early pubertal development could be associated with higher risks of poor health. Our objective was to examine risk behaviours, physical and psychological determinants associated with early menarche (<11 years). Methods Early menarche was assessed in the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children French cross-sectional survey. Data were collected in 2006 by anonymous self-reported standardized questionnaire from a nationally representative sample of 1072 15 years old girls in school classrooms. Family environment, school experience, physical and psychological factors, risk behaviours (substance use and sexual initiation) were recorded. Logistic regression models were applied (analysing for crude and adjusted relationships between early menarche and risk behaviours controlled for family context). Results Median age at menarche was 13.0 years; 57 girls (5.3%) were early-matured. Controlled for familial environment, early menarche was associated with having had more than two life-drunkenness episodes (adjusted OR = 2.5 [1.3-4.6]), early sexual initiation (adjusted OR = 2.8 [1.3-6.0]) and overweight (adjusted OR = 7.3 [3.6-14.9]). Conclusion Early-maturing girls may affiliate with older adolescents, hence engage in risk behaviours linked to their appearance rather than their maturity level. Factors associated with early menarche highlight the need to focus attention on early-matured girls to prevent further health problems linked to risk behaviours. PMID:20353570

  2. Childhood Abuse and Early Menarche among Peruvian Women

    PubMed Central

    Barrios, Yasmin V.; Sanchez, Sixto E.; Nicolaidis, Christina; Garcia, Pedro J.; Gelaye, Bizu; Zhong, Qiuyue; Williams, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Childhood abuse has been associated with age of menarche in some studies, but not all, and few have assessed the independent associations of sexual and physical abuse with early menarche. We examined the association between childhood abuse and early menarche among pregnant women in Lima, Peru. Methods Multinomial logistic regression procedures were used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for early menarche (≤11 years) in relation to any physical or sexual childhood abuse, physical abuse only, sexual abuse only and both physical and sexual abuse in a cohort of 1,499 pregnant (first trimester) women. Results Approximately 69% of participants reported experiencing physical or sexual abuse in childhood. The frequencies of physical abuse only, sexual abuse only and both physical and sexual abuse were 37.4%, 7.7% and 24.5%, respectively. Compared with women who reported no childhood abuse, those who reported any childhood abuse had a 1.38-fold increased odds of early menarche (95% CI: 1.01–1.87). Compared to no abuse, the odds of early menarche was 1.60-fold among women with childhood sexual abuse only (OR=1.60; 95% CI 0.93–2.74) and 1.56-fold for those with both physical and sexual abuse (OR=1.56; 95% CI 1.07–2.25) during childhood. Isolated physical abuse was weakly associated with early menarche (OR=1.23; 95% CI 0.87–1.74). There was no clear evidence of association of childhood abuse with late menarche (≥15 years). Conclusion Childhood abuse, particularly joint physical and sexual abuse, is associated with early menarche. Our findings add to an expanding body of studies documenting the enduring adverse health consequences of childhood abuse. PMID:25620302

  3. Mendelian Randomisation Study of Childhood BMI and Early Menarche.

    PubMed

    Mumby, Hannah S; Elks, Cathy E; Li, Shengxu; Sharp, Stephen J; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Luben, Robert N; Wareham, Nicholas J; Loos, Ruth J F; Ong, Ken K

    2011-01-01

    To infer the causal association between childhood BMI and age at menarche, we performed a mendelian randomisation analysis using twelve established "BMI-increasing" genetic variants as an instrumental variable (IV) for higher BMI. In 8,156 women of European descent from the EPIC-Norfolk cohort, height was measured at age 39-77 years; age at menarche was self-recalled, as was body weight at age 20 years, and BMI at 20 was calculated as a proxy for childhood BMI. DNA was genotyped for twelve BMI-associated common variants (in/near FTO, MC4R, TMEM18, GNPDA2, KCTD15, NEGR1, BDNF, ETV5, MTCH2, SEC16B, FAIM2 and SH2B1), and for each individual a "BMI-increasing-allele-score" was calculated by summing the number of BMI-increasing alleles across all 12 loci. Using this BMI-increasing-allele-score as an instrumental variable for BMI, each 1 kg/m(2) increase in childhood BMI was predicted to result in a 6.5% (95% CI: 4.6-8.5%) higher absolute risk of early menarche (before age 12 years). While mendelian randomisation analysis is dependent on a number of assumptions, our findings support a causal effect of BMI on early menarche and suggests that increasing prevalence of childhood obesity will lead to similar trends in the prevalence of early menarche.

  4. Factors Influencing Menarcheal Age: Results From the Cohort of Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study

    PubMed Central

    Ramezani Tehrani, Fahimeh; Mirmiran, Parvin; Gholami, Roya; Moslehi, Nazanin; Azizi, Feriedon

    2014-01-01

    Background: Menarche is considered as a milestone in the women’s reproductive life. Most existing studies on factors influencing menarcheal age had cross-sectional designs and their finding were controversial. Objectives: We aimed to determine some factors affecting the age at menarche in a cohort study with an average of ten-year follow-up; the study was conducted within the framework of Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study (TLGS). Materials and Methods: For the purpose of the present study, we recruited all the females aged 12 to 18 years participated in TLGS whose menarche had not begun at the initiation of the study, but occurred during their follow-up. The effect of premenarcheal status of various factors including socioeconomic and anthropometric parameters, physical activity, energy expenditure, and exposure to tobacco smoke on menarcheal age was explored. Results: The mean of age at menarche was 13.06 ± 1.24 years. There were significant statistical associations between age of the participants’ mothers at menarche (r = 0.66, P < 0.001), maternal education (r = -0.04, P = 0.002), and body mass index (BMI) before menarcheal (r = 0.25, P = 0.027) with age at menarche. There was no significant correlation between age at menarche, with either of maternal employment, premenarcheal physical activity, energy expenditure, and passive smoking. Conclusions: Among various factor influencing menarcheal age, premenarcheal BMI is modifiable, and considering its significance, could prevent early or late menarches. PMID:25237321

  5. Early life circumstances and their impact on menarche and menopause

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Gita D; Cooper, Rachel; Tom, Sarah E; Kuh, Diana

    2012-01-01

    Ages at menarche and menopause have been shown to be associated with adverse health outcomes in later life. For example, earlier menarche and later menopause have been independently linked to higher risk of breast cancer. Earlier menarche may also be associated with an increased risk of endometrial cancer, menstrual problems and adult obesity. Given the associations of ages at menarche and menopause with future health outcomes, it is important to establish what factors across life, and generations, may influence these. This article examines the associations of early life factors, namely birthweight, bodyweight and growth during childhood, childhood socioeconomic circumstances and psychosocial factors with ages at menarche and menopause. It examines possible explanations of the associations found, including life history theory, and discusses areas for future research. PMID:19245355

  6. Consumption of caffeinated and artificially sweetened soft drinks is associated with risk of early menarche12

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Noel T; Jacobs, David R; MacLehose, Richard F; Demerath, Ellen W; Kelly, Scott P; Dreyfus, Jill G; Pereira, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Early menarche has been linked to risk of several chronic diseases. Prospective research on whether the intake of soft drinks containing caffeine, a modulator of the female reproductive axis, is associated with risk of early menarche is sparse. Objective: We examined the hypothesis that consumption of caffeinated soft drinks in childhood is associated with higher risk of early menarche. Design: The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Growth and Health Study recruited and enrolled 2379 (1213 African American, 1166 Caucasian) girls aged 9–10 y (from Richmond, CA; Cincinnati, OH; and Washington, DC) and followed them for 10 y. After exclusions were made, there were 1988 girls in whom we examined prospective associations between consumption of caffeinated and noncaffeinated sugar- and artificially sweetened soft drinks and early menarche (defined as menarche age <11 y). We also examined associations between intakes of caffeine, sucrose, fructose, and aspartame and early menarche. Results: Incident early menarche occurred in 165 (8.3%) of the girls. After adjustment for confounders and premenarcheal percentage body fat, greater consumption of caffeinated soft drinks was associated with a higher risk of early menarche (RR for 1 serving/d increment: 1.47; 95% CI: 1.22, 1.79). Consumption of artificially sweetened soft drinks was also positively associated with risk of early menarche (RR for 1 serving/d increment: 1.43; 95% CI: 1.08, 1.88). Consumption of noncaffeinated soft drinks was not significantly associated with early menarche (RR for 1 serving/d increment: 0.88; 95% CI: 0.62, 1.25); nor was consumption of sugar-sweetened soft drinks (RR for 1 serving/d increment: 1.15; 95% CI: 0.95, 1.39). Consistent with the beverage findings, intakes of caffeine (RR for 1-SD increment: 1.22; 95% CI: 1.08, 1.37) and aspartame (RR for 1-SD increment: 1.20; 95% CI: 1.10, 1.31) were positively associated with risk of early menarche. Conclusion: Consumption of

  7. A new childhood asthma phenotype: obese with early menarche.

    PubMed

    Castro-Rodriguez, Jose A

    2016-03-01

    Three concomitant phenomena occur in the later years of childhood: increases in the incidence of asthma, obesity and early menarche. This article is an overview of the current epidemiologic, basic, genetic and epigenetic evidence about this relationship. As a consequence we propose that obese girls who have an early menarche (≤ 11 years of age) constitute a new asthma phenotype in childhood. Future studies need to be carried out in order to find the best control and treatment of this new asthma phenotype. PMID:26644272

  8. Relation of Early Menarche to Depression, Eating Disorders, Substance Abuse, and Comorbid Psychopathology among Adolescent Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stice, Eric; Presnell, Katherine; Bearman, Sarah Kate

    2001-01-01

    Used interview data from a community study to test whether early menarche partially accounts for increased depression, eating pathology, substance abuse, and comorbid psychopathology among adolescent girls. Found that menarche prior to 11.6 years related to elevated depression and substance abuse. Findings support assertion that early menarche is…

  9. Age at Menarche Is Associated with Divergent Alcohol Use Patterns in Early Adolescence and Early Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Meghan A.; Oinonen, Kirsten A.

    2011-01-01

    A cross-sectional retrospective design was employed to examine the relationship between age at menarche (AAM) and alcohol use patterns from middle childhood (age 7) to early adulthood in 265 University-aged women. Earlier menarche was associated with: (a) earlier ages at first drink and first intoxication, (b) greater use between ages 9 and 14…

  10. Milk Intake and Total Dairy Consumption: Associations with Early Menarche in NHANES 1999-2004

    PubMed Central

    Wiley, Andrea S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Several components of dairy products have been linked to earlier menarche. Methods/Findings This study assessed whether positive associations exist between childhood milk consumption and age at menarche or the likelihood of early menarche (<12 yrs) in a U.S sample. Data derive from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999–2004. Two samples were utilized: 2657 women age 20–49 yrs and 1008 girls age 9–12 yrs. In regression analysis, a weak negative relationship was found between frequency of milk consumption at 5–12 yrs and age at menarche (daily milk intake β = −0.32, P<0.10; “sometimes/variable milk intake” β = −0.38, P<0.06, each compared to intake rarely/never). Cox regression yielded no greater risk of early menarche among those who drank milk “sometimes/varied” or daily vs. never/rarely (HR: 1.20, P<0.42, HR: 1.25, P<0.23, respectively). Among the 9–12 yr olds, Cox regression indicated that neither total dairy kcal, calcium and protein, nor daily milk intake in the past 30 days contributed to early menarche. Girls in the middle tertile of milk intake had a marginally lower risk of early menarche than those in the highest tertile (HR: 0.6, P<0.06). Those in the lowest tertiles of dairy fat intake had a greater risk of early menarche than those in the highest (HR: 1.5, P<0.05, HR: 1.6, P<0.07, lowest and middle tertile, respectively), while those with the lowest calcium intake had a lower risk of early menarche (HR: 0.6, P<0.05) than those in the highest tertile. These relationships remained after adjusting for overweight or overweight and height percentile; both increased the risk of earlier menarche. Blacks were more likely than Whites to reach menarche early (HR: 1.7, P<0.03), but not after controlling for overweight. Conclusions There is some evidence that greater milk intake is associated with an increased risk of early menarche, or a lower age at menarche. PMID:21347271

  11. Secure Infant-Mother Attachment Buffers the Effect of Early-Life Stress on Age of Menarche.

    PubMed

    Sung, Sooyeon; Simpson, Jeffry A; Griskevicius, Vladas; Kuo, Sally I-Chun; Schlomer, Gabriel L; Belsky, Jay

    2016-05-01

    Prior research indicates that being reared in stressful environments is associated with earlier onset of menarche in girls. In this research, we examined (a) whether these effects are driven by exposure to certain dimensions of stress (harshness or unpredictability) during the first 5 years of life and (b) whether the negative effects of stress on the timing of menarche are buffered by secure infant-mother attachment. Results revealed that (a) exposure to greater harshness (but not unpredictability) during the first 5 years of life predicted earlier menarche and (b) secure infant-mother attachment buffered girls from this effect of harsh environments. By connecting attachment research to its evolutionary foundations, these results illuminate how environmental stressors and relationships early in life jointly affect pubertal timing. PMID:26980153

  12. Effects of early menarche on physical and psychosocial health problems in adolescent girls and adult women

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The menarcheal age of Korean women has been rapidly decreasing for the last 50 years, and the average menarcheal age of women born in the 1990s is approaching 12.6 years. In addition, interest in early puberty has been increasing recently owing to the rapid increase in precocious puberty. Generally, out of concern for short stature and early menarche, idiopathic central precocious puberty in female adolescents is treated with gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs. Studies to date have described the association between early menarche and psychosocial problems such as delinquency and risky sexual behavior, as well as physical health problems such as obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and breast cancer throughout the lifespan of women. However, the pathophysiological mechanism underlying this association has not been clarified thus far. In this article, we review and discuss the existing literature to describe the current understanding of the effects of early menarche on the physical and psychosocial health of adolescent girls and adult women. PMID:27721839

  13. Weight, height, thorax and of menarche in Spanish schoolgirls.

    PubMed

    Marin, B; Simon, J

    1975-01-01

    In this paper, the authors study the correlation which exists between somatic development, represented by weight, height and thorax, and the age of onset of menarche. The results indicate that girls showing early menarche have a somatic development greater than the mean. It has also been possible to show that the greatest increase in height occurs before the menarche, while the greatest increase in weight coincides with the appearance of the menarche, or occurs shortly afterwards.

  14. Age at Menarche and Its Association with the Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components: Results from the KORA F4 Study

    PubMed Central

    Stöckl, Doris; Meisinger, Christa; Peters, Annette; Thorand, Barbara; Huth, Cornelia; Heier, Margit; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Kowall, Bernd; Stöckl, Heidi; Döring, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Objective The metabolic syndrome is a major public health challenge and identifies persons at risk for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to examine the association between age at menarche and the metabolic syndrome (IDF and NCEP ATP III classification) and its components. Design 1536 women aged 32 to 81 years of the German population based KORA F4 study were investigated. Data was collected by standardized interviews, physical examinations, and whole blood and serum measurements. Results Young age at menarche was significantly associated with elevated body mass index (BMI), greater waist circumference, higher fasting glucose levels, and 2 hour glucose (oral glucose tolerance test), even after adjusting for the difference between current BMI and BMI at age 25. The significant effect on elevated triglycerides and systolic blood pressure was attenuated after adjustment for the BMI change. Age at menarche was inversely associated with the metabolic syndrome adjusting for age (p-values: <0.001 IDF, 0.003 NCEP classification) and additional potential confounders including lifestyle and reproductive history factors (p-values: 0.001, 0.005). Associations remain significant when additionally controlling for recollected BMI at age 25 (p-values: 0.008, 0.033) or the BMI change since age 25 (p-values: 0.005, 0.022). Conclusion Young age at menarche might play a role in the development of the metabolic syndrome. This association is only partially mediated by weight gain and increased BMI. A history of early menarche may help to identify women at risk for the metabolic syndrome. PMID:22028807

  15. Trends and differentials in menarcheal age in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Duolao; Murphy, Michael

    2002-07-01

    This study examines trends in menarcheal age of women born in China between 1950 and 1973, and explores the impact of relevant social background characteristics on the timing of first menarche. Data on recalled ages of menarche collected in the 1988 Chinese Two-per-Thousand Fertility Survey are used in a linear regression model where the covariates are transformed with the help of an Alternating Conditional Expectation (ACE) algorithm. The results indicate that a trend towards early menarche has evolved in China during recent decades. The pattern of early menarche is especially pronounced among women residing in urban areas, and those who are better educated.

  16. Timing of menarche in Chinese girls with and without adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: current results and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mao, Sai-Hu; Jiang, Jun; Sun, Xu; Zhao, Qinghua; Qian, Bang-Ping; Liu, Zhen; Shu, Hao; Qiu, Yong

    2011-02-01

    Age at menarche is closely related to scoliosis progression during adolescence. Current data concerning the timing of menarche between scoliotic and non-scoliotic girls in the literature are conflicting, with inconclusive results. The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution difference of age at menarche for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) girls and normal control population and to subsequently elucidate the menarche age difference through literature reviewing. Moreover, menarche age of AIS girls with Cobb angle <40°, 40-60°, >60° were compared to estimate its association with curve severity. Menstrual status data were available for 6,376 healthy female adolescents and 2,196 AIS girls. We notice that less than 10% of healthy Chinese girls experienced onset of menses before 11.38 years, and approximately 90% of healthy Chinese girls were menstruating by 13.88 years, with a median age of 12.63 years. As for AIS girls, less than 10% started to menstruate before 11.27 years, and approximately 90% were menstruating by 14.38 years, with a median age of 12.83 years. Average menarche age in AIS (12.83 ± 1.22 years) was significantly later than that of normal control girls (12.63 ± 0.98 years) (p < 0.001). Age at menarche for AIS affected girls was significantly greater than that of normal control girls at 75%, 90% of whom had attained menarche (p = 0.001, p < 0.001). Proportion of girls starting to menstruate after 14 years was significantly higher in AIS population compared with normal controls (16.3 vs. 8.1%, p < 0.001). In addition, AIS girls with Cobb angle >60° experienced onset of menses at an average age of 13.25 years, which was significantly later than AIS girls with Cobb angle <40° (12.81 years, p < 0.05) and marginally significantly later than AIS girls with Cobb angle between 40 and 60° (12.86 years, p = 0.053). In conclusion, a tendency of delayed onset of menarche was observed in Chinese idiopathic scoliotic girls in this large

  17. Trends and correlates of age at menarche in Colombia: Results from a nationally representative survey.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Erica C; Herrán, Oscar F; Villamor, Eduardo

    2015-12-01

    Surveillance of age at menarche could provide useful information on the impact of changing environmental conditions on child health. Nevertheless, nationally representative data are exceedingly rare. The aim of this study was to examine trends and sociodemographic correlates of age at menarche of Colombian girls. The study sample included 15,441 girls born between 1992 and 2000 who participated in the Colombian National Nutrition Survey of 2010. We estimated median menarcheal age using Kaplan-Meier time-to-event analyses. Hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals were estimated with Cox regression models. The median age at menarche was 12.6 years. There was an estimated decline of 0.54 years/decade (P<0.001) over the birth years; this decline was only observed among girls from urban areas, and was more pronounced among girls from wealthier versus poorer families. Child height and BMI, maternal BMI and education, and family wealth were each inversely associated with menarcheal age whereas food insecurity and number of children in the household were positively associated with age at menarche. In conclusion, a negative trend in age at menarche is ongoing in Colombia, especially in groups most likely to benefit from socioeconomic development.

  18. Adult anthropometric measures and socio-demographic factors influencing age at menarche of university students in malaysia.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Golam; Wee, Ai-Sze; Ashaie, Maeirah; Kamarul, T

    2013-09-01

    Early onset of menarche has been shown to be associated with breast cancer and ischaemic heart disease. Studies on age at menarche of the Malaysian population are poorly documented. This study aimed to determine the influence of anthropometric and socio-demographic factors on the age at menarche of university students in Malaysia. Data were obtained in 2010-11 from 961 students between the ages of 18 and 25 years from the University of Malaya using stratified sampling, and multiple regression analysis was applied. Sixty-three per cent of students reached menarche at the age of 12 or 13 years, with the mean and median of age at menarche being 12.45 ± 1.17 and 12.01 years, respectively. Menarcheal age was positively associated with height (p<0.05) and negatively associated with BMI (p<0.001). Students from urban areas attained menarche earlier than those from rural areas (p<0.05). Students from small-sized families attained menarche earlier than those from larger families (p<0.05). First-born students experienced menarche earlier than those who were seventh-born or later. Obese and overweight students reached menarche earlier than students who were underweight or of normal weight (p<0.01). The variations in age at menarche among the Malaysian ethnic groups were statistically insignificant. The results suggest that heavier and first-born students from small families are more likely to attain menarche earlier than their counterparts.

  19. Association between age at menarche and diabetes in Korean post-menopausal women: results from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2007-2009).

    PubMed

    Hwang, Eunjung; Lee, Kyong Won; Cho, Yoonsu; Chung, Hye Kyung; Shin, Min-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Early menarche is known to be associated with diabetes, however this association remains controversial. Our study aimed to investigate the possible association between age at menarche and diabetes prevalence in post-menopausal Korean women. This study included 3,254 post-menopausal Korean women aged 50-85 years from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey IV (KNHANES 2007-2009). Logistic regression analyses were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) for diabetes prevalence. Levels of biochemical markers were compared according to groups by age at menarche. Women in the earlier menarche age group (10-12 years) showed higher levels of fasting blood glucose (FBG) and scores of homeostatic model assessment in the insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index than other groups (p <0.05). After adjusting for potential confounding factors, early age at menarche was significantly associated with a higher prevalence of diabetes (OR 1.86, 95% confidence intervals [CI] 1.07-3.23). The observed association remained significant despite additional adjustment for body mass index and waist circumference (OR 1.82, 95% CI 1.03-3.23) and despite further adjustments for FBG levels and HOMA-IR index (OR 2.25, 95% CI 1.11-4.55). Our findings strengthen the hypothesis that younger age at menarche is associated with increased diabetes prevalence in the Korean population.

  20. Age at menarche and its relationship to body mass index among adolescent girls in Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the increasing rates of childhood obesity and rapid change in socio-economic status, the mean age at menarche remains mostly unknown among contemporary girls in Kuwait and other countries in the Gulf region. This study aimed to estimate the mean age at menarche among schoolgirls in Kuwait and investigate the association between age at menarche and obesity. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted on 1,273 randomly selected female high school students from all governorates in Kuwait. Overweight was defined as higher than or equal to the 85th percentile and obesity as higher than or equal to the 95th percentile using growth charts provided by the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, 2000). Data on menarche, socio-demographic status, physical activity and diet were collected using confidential self-administered questionnaire. Results Out of 1,273 students, 23 (1.8%) were absent or refused to participate. The mean age at menarche was 12.41 years (95% CI: 12.35-12.48). The prevalence of early menarche, defined as less than 11 years of age, was 8.5% (95% CI: 7.0-10.2%). The prevalence of obesity and overweight was 18.3% (95% CI: 16.2-20.6%) and 25.8% (95% CI: 23.42-28.30%), respectively. Age at menarche was inversely and significantly associated with odds of overweight and obesity after adjusting for potential confounders, odds ratio 0.84 (0.77-0.93); (p = 0.001). Conclusion Age at menarche among contemporary girls in Kuwait is similar to that in industrialized countries. There is an inverse association between age at menarche and obesity or overweight. Trends in menarcheal age should be monitored and time of sexual maturation and its related factors should be taken into account in strategies that aim to combat obesity. PMID:23311596

  1. Leisure physical activity and age at menarche.

    PubMed

    Moisan, J; Meyer, F; Gingras, S

    1991-10-01

    Early menarche has been associated with higher risk of breast cancer. A prospective study of 2487 girls, has been conducted in Quebec City, Canada, to evaluate the relationship of exercise to menarche, taking personal and family characteristics into account. Weight, height, body mass index, and abdominal and supra-iliac skinfolds were inversely associated with age of menstruation. Mother's age at menarche was positively associated with age of menstruation. Age, mother's age at menarche, and weight-adjusted incidence density ratios (IDR) showed no association between energy expenditure and onset of menstruation. Girls who participated in dance, gymnastic figure skating, synchronized swimming, or diving competitions had a lower risk of reaching menarche at an early age (IDR = 0.71 (0.51-0.97)). PMID:1758293

  2. The influence of climate on age at menarche: Augmented with the influence of ancestry.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Kitae

    2016-08-01

    Samples representative of South Korea, Indonesia, and Peninsular Malaysia were analyzed and the influence of climate on age at menarche was investigated. The sample size was 24,651 for Korea (birth years 1941-1992), for Indonesia 8331 (birth years 1944-1988) plus 20,519 (birth years 1978-1997), and 2842 for Peninsular Malaysia (birth years 1927-1968). Respondents recalled their age at menarche. The mean age at menarche was calculated for each birth year by country, and for Malaysia, additionally by ancestry. It has been found that mean ages at menarche for the early birth years were much younger in Indonesia than in Korea despite similar levels of socioeconomic conditions (proxied by GDP per capita). For example, for the birth year 1944, the mean age at menarche was 14.45 years for Indonesia and 16.19 years for Korea-a difference of 1.74 years. It was necessary to double the Korean GDP per capita to make the Korean mean age at menarche the same as the Indonesian one. Chinese and Malay women in Peninsular Malaysia were further analyzed, and the results provided indirect evidence that the difference between Korea and Indonesia was not due to ancestry differences. Results in multivariate settings provided consistent results. It has been concluded that climate exerts a significant influence on age at menarche because the relatively easy availability of food in the tropics increases energy intake while the absence of cold weather decreases energy expenditure on maintenance and activity.

  3. Menstruation across time: menarche, menstrual attitudes, experiences, and behaviors.

    PubMed

    McPherson, Marianne E; Korfine, Lauren

    2004-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between early and current menstrual experiences. The primary hypothesis was that women who reported positive menarcheal experiences (including menstrual education and menarche) would tend to report positive current menstrual attitudes, experiences, and/or behaviors, and vice versa for women who reported negative menarcheal experiences. In this survey-based study, college-aged women (n = 327) were screened by completing a questionnaire concerning their menarcheal experiences. Women who had extremely negative ("negative group," n = 46) or extremely positive ("positive group," n = 38) early menstrual experiences returned to complete questionnaires concerning current menstrual attitudes, experiences, and behaviors. Early and current menstrual experiences were most strongly associated in the domain of menstrual attitudes. Women in the negative group reported more negative menstrual attitudes than did women in the positive group. There were additional associations between early menstrual experiences and measures of body image and health behaviors. Positive group participants reported more positive body image and better general health behaviors. Results suggest that early menstrual experiences may be related to menstrual experiences later in life. This study invites further investigation of the psychology of menstruation and suggests connecting menstruation with other women's health issues.

  4. Critical anthropometry for menarche.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, G F; Villena, A

    1996-08-01

    The objective of the study was to determine if any anthropometric measurements, including weight, height, and upper arm circumference, or the calculated body mass index observed at the time of menarche may be used as a threshold for menarche. The sample was randomly selected from 1133 girls aged 10-18 years from two groups, one residing in Lima, Peru, at 150 m above sea level, and the second in Cerro de Pasco, Peru, at 4340 m above sea level. For the purpose of this study, all girls who reached menarche at least 1 month before the study (n = 93) were considered as cases (girls at menarche); 88 girls without menarche at the time of the study were randomly matched by age and place of residence, and designated as controls. All subjects came from the same low socioeconomic status. Body weight at menarche was 44.6 +/- 5.09 kg (mean +/- SD; coefficient of variation [CV], 11.4%). Height at menarche was 151.6 +/- 5.5 cm (CV, 3.7%). Body mass index, defined as weight/height2.15, was 18.26 +/- 1.96 kg/m2.15 at menarche (CV, 10.7%). Upper arm circumference at menarche was 21.8 +/- 1.6 cm (CV, 7.3%). The logistic regression analysis showed that any of the four anthropometric measurements analyzed were critical for menarche; i.e., any of the four could be used as a threshold for menarche. Data from the present study do not support the hypothesis that there are anthropometric markers that are critical for menarche.

  5. Systematic review and meta-analysis of age at menarche and risk of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Janghorbani, Mohsen; Mansourian, Marjan; Hosseini, Elham

    2014-08-01

    The relation of early menarche with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) remains inconsistent across studies. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis of published population-based observational studies was to assess the association between age at menarche and T2DM risk. We searched online data bases through December 2013 and examined the reference lists of pertinent articles. Summary relative risks (RRs) with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated with a random-effects model. A total of 14 effect estimates from 10 eligible studies (three cross-sectional and seven cohort studies) included 315,428 participants and 22,085 cases of T2DM. Compared with the highest or middle category, women in the lowest category of age at menarche had higher risk of T2DM [summary RR (95 % CI) 1.22 (1.17, 1.28)]. These results were consistent between studies that conducted in the United States and in Europe. The association between age at menarche and T2DM was slightly stronger for cohort than for cross-sectional studies. These findings strongly support an association between younger age at menarche and increased risk of T2DM. Age at menarche may help identify women with increased risk of developing T2DM. PMID:24671509

  6. Urinary bisphenol A and age at menarche among adolescent girls: Evidence from NHANES 2003–2010

    PubMed Central

    McGuinn, Laura A.; Ghazarian, Armen A.; Su, L. Joseph; Ellison, Gary L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Bisphenol A (BPA) is an environmental estrogen used in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins used to make food and beverage packaging. Increasing evidence suggests that BPA mimics estrogens in the body and may be associated with putative markers of breast cancer risk. Objectives We analyzed the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003–2010 data to investigate the association of BPA with age at menarche in adolescent girls. We hypothesized that urinary BPA, as a surrogate biomarker for BPA exposure, is associated with earlier age at menarche, and that body mass index (BMI) may modulate this association. Methods We conducted cross-sectional analyses of urinary BPA, BMI and age of menarche in a subsample of 987 adolescent girls aged 12–19, using pooled data from the 2003–2010 NHANES. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between urinary BPA and early onset of menarche, with adjustment for sampling design. We additionally assessed interaction of BPA with BMI. Results Adolescent girls with moderate BPA levels appeared to be less likely to have early onset of menarche than those with the lowest levels (OR=0.57; 95% CI=0.30, 1.08) after adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, parental education, country of birth, NHANES cycle, BMI and creatinine. BMI appeared to modify the BPA-menarche association. Conclusions Although a non-significant trend suggests increasing urinary BPA may be associated with delayed menarche in adolescent girls, these results are based on cross-sectional data. Results should be clarified in carefully designed longitudinal cohort studies. PMID:25460659

  7. The Experience of Menarche.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruble, Diane N.; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    1982-01-01

    Examines reactions to menarche and the subsequent effects of this experience as a function of preparation for and timing of menarche. A questionnaire including measures of responses about first menstruation, current symptoms, and self-image was completed by 639 girls in fifth through twelfth grades. (Author/MP)

  8. The influence of climate on age at menarche: Augmented with the influence of ancestry.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Kitae

    2016-08-01

    Samples representative of South Korea, Indonesia, and Peninsular Malaysia were analyzed and the influence of climate on age at menarche was investigated. The sample size was 24,651 for Korea (birth years 1941-1992), for Indonesia 8331 (birth years 1944-1988) plus 20,519 (birth years 1978-1997), and 2842 for Peninsular Malaysia (birth years 1927-1968). Respondents recalled their age at menarche. The mean age at menarche was calculated for each birth year by country, and for Malaysia, additionally by ancestry. It has been found that mean ages at menarche for the early birth years were much younger in Indonesia than in Korea despite similar levels of socioeconomic conditions (proxied by GDP per capita). For example, for the birth year 1944, the mean age at menarche was 14.45 years for Indonesia and 16.19 years for Korea-a difference of 1.74 years. It was necessary to double the Korean GDP per capita to make the Korean mean age at menarche the same as the Indonesian one. Chinese and Malay women in Peninsular Malaysia were further analyzed, and the results provided indirect evidence that the difference between Korea and Indonesia was not due to ancestry differences. Results in multivariate settings provided consistent results. It has been concluded that climate exerts a significant influence on age at menarche because the relatively easy availability of food in the tropics increases energy intake while the absence of cold weather decreases energy expenditure on maintenance and activity. PMID:27369814

  9. Heterosexual Romantic Involvement and Depressive Symptoms in Black Adolescent Girls: Effects of Menarche and Perceived Social Support

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Cleopatra Howard; Matusko, Niki; Jackson, James S.

    2015-01-01

    Research has accumulated to demonstrate that depressive symptoms are associated with heterosexual romantic involvement during adolescence, but relatively little work has linked this body of literature to the existing literature on associations between early pubertal timing and adolescent depressive symptoms. This study extends prior research by examining whether early menarche and heterosexual romantic involvement interact to predict depressive symptoms in a national sample of Black adolescent girls (N = 607; M age = 15 years; 32 % Caribbean Black and 68 % African American). We further examined whether the adverse effects of heterosexual romantic involvement and early menarche would be mediated by perceived social support from mothers, fathers, and peers. Path analysis results indicated that girls who report current involvement in a heterosexual romantic relationship also reported high levels of perceived peer support than girls with no romantic involvement. High levels of perceived peer support, in turn, predicted low levels of depressive symptoms. Romantically involved girls with an early menarche also reported significantly less depressive symptoms than girls not romantically involved with an early menarche. Neither perceived maternal support nor perceived paternal support mediated associations between heterosexual romantic involvement, menarche, and depressive symptoms. The findings suggest that individual and social factors can impede heterosexual romantic involvement effects on depressive symptoms in Black adolescent girls. PMID:25678429

  10. Early physics results.

    PubMed

    Jenni, Peter

    2012-02-28

    For the past year, experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have started exploring physics at the high-energy frontier. Thanks to the superb turn-on of the LHC, a rich harvest of initial physics results have already been obtained by the two general-purpose experiments A Toroidal LHC Apparatus (ATLAS) and the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS), which are the subject of this report. The initial data have allowed a test, at the highest collision energies ever reached in a laboratory, of the Standard Model (SM) of elementary particles, and to make early searches Beyond the Standard Model (BSM). Significant results have already been obtained in the search for the Higgs boson, which would establish the postulated electro-weak symmetry breaking mechanism in the SM, as well as for BSM physics such as Supersymmetry (SUSY), heavy new particles, quark compositeness and others. The important, and successful, SM physics measurements are giving confidence that the experiments are in good shape for their journey into the uncharted territory of new physics anticipated at the LHC. PMID:22253245

  11. Menarchal Timing in Type 1 Diabetes Through the Last 4 Decades

    PubMed Central

    Schweiger, Bahareh; Klingensmith, Georgeanna J.; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We sought to examine whether age at menarche has changed over the past 4 decades by comparing age at menarche by year of diagnosis with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS This work consisted of a cross-sectional study of age at menarche in two cohorts: adolescents (ages 11–24 years, n = 228) and adults (ages 19–55 years, n = 290, enrolled in the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes study). RESULTS The adolescent cohort reported a younger age of menarche than the adult women with type 1 diabetes (12.69 ± 0.08 vs. 13.22 ± 0.12 years, mean ± SE, P < 0.001). Age at menarche was later in both adolescent girls and adult women with type 1 diabetes diagnosed before menarche (12.82 ± 1.16 and 13.7 ± 2.23 years) than for individuals diagnosed after menarche (12.12 ± 1.25 and 12.65 ± 1.38 years, P < 0.001 for both). Age at menarche was then examined by decade of type 1 diabetes diagnosis (1970–1979, 1980–1989, 1990–1999, and 2000–2009). Age at menarche significantly declined over the 4 decades (P = 0.0002). However, the delay in menarche among girls diagnosed with type 1 diabetes before menarche compared with those diagnosed after menarche was also significant across all decades (P < 0.0001) and did not change significantly over time (P = 0.41 for interaction of cohort and diagnosis premenarche). CONCLUSIONS Age at menarche has declined over the past 4 decades among girls with type 1 diabetes, but a delay in age at menarche remains among individuals diagnosed before menarche compared with individuals diagnosed after menarche. PMID:20843975

  12. Menarche delay and menstrual irregularities persist in adolescents with type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Menarche delay has been reported in adolescent females with type 1 diabetes (T1DM), perhaps due to poor glycemic control. We sought to compare age at menarche between adolescent females with T1DM and national data, and to identify factors associated with delayed menarche and menstrual irregularity in T1DM. Methods This was a cross-sectional study and females ages 12- 24 years (n = 228) with at least one menstrual period were recruited during their outpatient diabetes clinic appointment. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001-2006 data (n = 3690) for females 12-24 years were used as a control group. Results Age at menarche was later in adolescent females with T1DM diagnosed prior to menarche (12.81 +/- 0.09 years) (mean+/- SE) (n = 185) than for adolescent females diagnosed after menarche (12.17 0.19 years, p = 0.0015) (n = 43). Average age of menarche in NHANES was 12.27 +/- 0.038 years, which was significantly earlier than adolescent females with T1DM prior to menarche (p < 0.0001) and similar to adolescent females diagnosed after menarche (p = 0.77). Older age at menarche was negatively correlated with BMI z-score (r = -0.23 p = 0.0029) but not hemoglobin A1c (A1c) at menarche (r = 0.01, p = 0.91). Among 181 adolescent females who were at least 2 years post menarche, 63 (35%) reported usually or always irregular cycles. Conclusion Adolescent females with T1DM had a later onset of menarche than both adolescent females who developed T1DM after menarche and NHANES data. Menarche age was negatively associated with BMI z-score, but not A1c. Despite improved treatment in recent decades, menarche delay and high prevalence of menstrual irregularity is still observed among adolescent females with T1DM. PMID:21548955

  13. Girls' Understanding and Social Construction of Menarche.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Susan M.

    1995-01-01

    Assessed Australian girls' (n=87) beliefs and feelings about menarche and menstruation. Results revealed limited knowledge about menstruation, accompanied by incorrect and negative myths. Attitudes to menstruation were characterized by embarrassment, discomfort, and ambivalence about growing up. Themes in story completion results reflected these…

  14. Maternal Age of Menarche and Blood Pressure in Adolescence: Evidence from Hong Kong’s “Children of 1997” Birth Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Tsz Chun; Leung, Gabriel Matthew; Schooling, C. Mary

    2016-01-01

    Background Age of puberty has declined substantially in developed settings and is now declining in the rest of the world with economic development. Early age of puberty is associated with non-communicable diseases in adulthood, and may be a long-term driver of population health with effects over generations. In a non-Western setting, we examined the association of maternal age of menarche with blood pressure in late childhood/adolescence. Methods We used generalised estimating equations to estimate the adjusted association of maternal age of menarche with age-, sex- and height-adjusted blood pressure z-score from 10 to 16 years in Hong Kong’s population-representative birth cohort, “Children of 1997” (n = 8327). We also assessed whether associations were mediated by body mass index (BMI) or pubertal stage. Results Earlier maternal age of menarche was associated with higher systolic blood pressure in adolescence [-0.02 z-score per year older maternal age of menarche, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.04 to -0.003]. The association of maternal age of menarche with systolic blood pressure was mediated by adiposity and/or pubertal stage at 11 years. Maternal age of menarche was not associated with diastolic blood pressure. Conclusion Earlier maternal age of puberty was associated with higher systolic blood pressure, largely mediated by adiposity, highlighting the importance of tackling childhood obesity as a public health priority in view of the secular trend of declining age of puberty. PMID:27454175

  15. The Development of Reproductive Strategy in Females: Early Maternal Harshness [right arrow] Earlier Menarche [right arrow] Increased Sexual Risk Taking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belsky, Jay; Steinberg, Laurence; Houts, Renate M.; Halpern-Felsher, Bonnie L.

    2010-01-01

    To test a proposition central to J. Belsky, L. Steinberg, and P. Draper's (1991) evolutionary theory of socialization--that pubertal maturation plays a role in linking early rearing experience with adolescent sexual risk taking (i.e., frequency of sexual behavior) and, perhaps, other risk taking (e.g., alcohol, drugs, delinquency)--the authors…

  16. Family structure and age at menarche: a children-of-twins approach.

    PubMed

    Mendle, Jane; Turkheimer, Eric; D'Onofrio, Brian M; Lynch, Stacy K; Emery, Robert E; Slutske, Wendy S; Martin, Nicholas G

    2006-05-01

    Girls who grow up in households with an unrelated adult male reach menarche earlier than peers, a finding hypothesized to be an evolutionary strategy for families under stress. The authors tested the alternative hypothesis that nonrandom selection into stepfathering due to shared environmental and/or genetic predispositions creates a spurious relation between stepfathering and early menarche. Using the unique controls for genetic and shared environmental experiences offered by the children-of-twins design, the authors found that cousins discordant for stepfathering did not differ in age of menarche. Moreover, controlling for mother's age of menarche eliminated differences in menarcheal age associated with stepfathering in unrelated girls. These findings strongly suggest selection, and not causation, accounts for the relationship between stepfathering and early menarche.

  17. The effects of high altitude on age at menarche and menopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapoor, A. K.; Kapoor, Satwanti

    1986-03-01

    The age at menarche and menopause of three groups of Bhotia females living at high altitude, Himalayan region — Uttar Pradesh, North India, were studied. The Johari Bhotia women had earliest menarche (¯X=15.1±1.1 years) as compared to Rang Bhotias, settled (¯X=15.6±0.9 years) and Rang Bhotias, migratory (¯X=16.0±1.0 years). The differences between all these three groups for age at menarche were significant. A trend towards increase in age at menarche with an increase in altitude has been observed, but the total fertility period in the three groups remained similar as early menarche has been found to be associated with early onset of menopause and late menarche with late menopause.

  18. Changes in menarcheal age in girls exposed to war conditions.

    PubMed

    Prebeg, Zivka; Bralic, Irena

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess changes in mean menarcheal age of girls in the city of Sibenik in the period from mid-1980s to the mid-1990s. Sibenik is a Dalmatian town which was exposed to hard war conditions in 1991-1995. Menarcheal status of Sibenik girls was surveyed three times, in 1981, 1985, and 1996, and included 720, 1,207, and 1,680 girls, respectively, ages 9.5-16.5 years. Mean menarcheal age was estimated by the status quo method and application of probit analysis. Results show a slight decrease in menarcheal age from 1981 to 1985 (from 12.97 +/- 0.06 years to 12.87 +/- 0.05), and then a significant increase from 12.87 +/- 0.05 years in 1985 to 13.13 +/- 0.10 years in 1996. The increase in mean menarcheal age occurred in all socioeconomic groups based on parental occupation and number of siblings. In the group of girls whose homes were damaged during war, menarche occurred at an average of 13.53 +/- 0.14 years, while those who lost a family member experienced menarche at an older mean age, 13.76 +/- 0.27 years. However, when the girls who experienced personal tragedies were excluded the onset of menarche was still later than in girls surveyed in the earlier periods. The results suggest that the general reversal in the secular trend of menarcheal age in Sibenik girls can be attributed to persistent psychological pressures and uncertainties associated with conditions of war. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 12:503-508, 2000. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:11534042

  19. Menarche: Prior Knowledge and Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skandhan, K. P.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Recorded menstruation information among 305 young women in India, assessing the differences between those who did and did not have knowledge of menstruation prior to menarche. Those with prior knowledge considered menarche to be a normal physiological function and had a higher rate of regularity, lower rate of dysmenorrhea, and earlier onset of…

  20. Age at Menarche: 50-Year Socioeconomic Trends Among US-Born Black and White Women

    PubMed Central

    Kiang, Mathew V.; Kosheleva, Anna; Waterman, Pamela D.; Chen, Jarvis T.; Beckfield, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated 50-year US trends in age at menarche by socioeconomic position (SEP) and race/ethnicity because data are scant and contradictory. Methods. We analyzed data by income and education for US-born non-Hispanic Black and White women aged 25 to 74 years in the National Health Examination Survey (NHES) I (1959–1962), National Health Examination and Nutrition Surveys (NHANES) I–III (1971–1994), and NHANES 1999–2008. Results. In NHES I, average age at menarche among White women in the 20th (lowest) versus 80th (highest) income percentiles was 0.26 years higher (95% confidence interval [CI] = −0.09, 0.61), but by NHANES 2005–2008 it had reversed and was −0.33 years lower (95% CI = −0.54, −0.11); no socioeconomic gradients occurred among Black women. The proportion with onset at younger than 11 years increased only among women with low SEP, among Blacks and Whites (P for trend < .05), and high rates of change occurred solely among Black women (all SEP strata) and low-income White women who underwent menarche before 1960. Conclusions. Trends in US age at menarche vary by SEP and race/ethnicity in ways that pose challenges to several leading clinical, public health, and social explanations for early age at menarche and that underscore why analyses must jointly include data on race/ethnicity and socioeconomic position. Future research is needed to explain these trends. PMID:25033121

  1. Childhood Passive Smoking Exposure and Age at Menarche in Chinese Women Who Had Never Smoked: The Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    He, Yao; Jiang, Chaoqiang; Cheng, Kar Keung; Zhang, Weisen; Lam, Tai Hing

    2015-01-01

    Objective We examined the associations between childhood passive smoking exposure and age at menarche in women who had never smoked in southern China. Methods Among 30,518 participants in Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study (GBCS) from 2003-2008, 20,061 women who had never smoked and had complete outcome data were included. Childhood passive smoking exposure was defined as living with 1 or more smokers in the same household during childhood. Data on the number of smokers in the household and frequency of exposure (density and frequency) were also obtained. Age at menarche was measured as a continuous variable. Results 11,379 (56.7%) participants were exposed to passive smoking during childhood. Compared to those with no passive smoking exposure during childhood, those with exposure ≥5 days/week had menarche 0.19 year (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.13-0.25) earlier on average. Those exposed to more than two smokers had menarche 0.38 year earlier (95% CI: 0.29-0.47). Childhood exposure was associated with early age at menarche (≤13 vs. >13 years), with an adjusted odds ratio of 1.34 (95% CI: 1.21-1.48) for high density, and 1.17 (95% CI: 1.09-1.26) for high frequency of exposure. Conclusion Childhood passive smoking exposure was associated with earlier age at menarche, with a dose-response relationship in Chinese women who had never smoked. If causal, the results support the promotion of smoking cessation in families with children, particularly young girls. PMID:26186646

  2. Age of Menarche and Psychosocial Outcomes in a New Zealand Birth Cohort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boden, Joseph M.; Fergusson, David M.; Horwood, L. John

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study examined associations between age of menarche and psychosocial outcomes in early adulthood, including sexual behavior, mental health, criminal behavior, and education/employment, to identify the possible causal role of earlier age of menarche in increasing risks of adverse outcomes. Method: Data were gathered from 497 female…

  3. Brief Report: Autistic-Like Traits in Childhood Predict Later Age at Menarche in Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehouse, Andrew J. O.; Maybery, Murray T.; Hickey, Martha; Sloboda, Deborah M.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between autistic-like traits in early childhood and age at menarche in typically developing girls. Autistic-like symptoms were measured at age 2 years using the Child Behaviour Checklist, and age at menarche (AAM) was determined prospectively using self-report questionnaires at age 8, 10, 14 and 17 years. Girls…

  4. Earlier age at menarche is associated with higher diabetes risk and cardiometabolic disease risk factors in Brazilian adults: Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Early menarche has been linked to higher risk of type 2 diabetes in Western and Asian societies, yet whether age at menarche is associated with diabetes in Latin America, where puberty and diabetes may have different life courses, is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that earlier menarche is associated with higher diabetes risk in Brazilian adults. Methods We used data from 8,075 women aged 35-74 years in the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil) who had complete information on age at menarche, diabetes status, and covariates. Diabetes was defined based on self-reported physician diagnosis, medication use, and laboratory variables (fasting glucose, 2-hour glucose, and glycated hemoglobin). Poisson regression was used to generate risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Menarche onset < 11 years [vs. 13-14 years (referent)] was associated with higher risk of diabetes (RR = 1.34; 95% CI: 1.14-1.57) after adjusting for sociodemographic factors, maternal education, maternal and paternal diabetes, and birth weight. This persisted after further control for BMI at age 20 years and relative leg length. Additionally, among those not taking diabetes medications, earlier menarche [<11 years vs. 13-14 years (referent)] was associated with higher % glycated hemoglobin (p < 0.001), alanine aminotransferase (p < 0.001), triglycerides (p < 0.001), C-reactive protein (p = 0.003), waist circumference (p < 0.001), and BMI measured at baseline exam (p < 0.001). Conclusion These findings support the hypothesis that earlier menarche is associated with greater risk for adult diabetes and cardiometabolic disease in the Brazilian context. PMID:24438044

  5. [The menarche age in teenagers of the Northwest of Mexico].

    PubMed

    Méndez Estrada, Rosa Olivia; Valencia, Mauro E; Meléndez Torres, Juana María

    2006-06-01

    The beginning of sexual maturity in individuals is a measure commonly used as an indicator of a population's quality of life. Among women, one of the most frequently used indicators is the age of menarche. The objectives of this research were to obtain the age of menarche in school age girls from the Northwest of Mexico, and to establish the relationship between the latter with their socioeconomic level, body weight, and height. The sample was taken from 857 girls between 7 and 17 years old from different socioeconomic level sectors. The age of menarche of these girls was determined by the statu quo method. The value found for menarche was 12.06 +/- 0.44 years old. We also found an association of menarche to height (p < 0.01) and to socioeconomic level (p < 0.01). The value for age of menarche in this study was similar to the one reported for other Latin-American populations. Taking into consideration that approximately 70% of the Mexican population has been considered of low income level and that the environmental conditions are not entirely favorable, it is possible that this could be the result of genetic and environmental interactions.

  6. Neighborhood-Level Poverty at Menarche and Prepregnancy Obesity in African-American Women.

    PubMed

    Cassidy-Bushrow, Andrea E; Peters, Rosalind M; Burmeister, Charlotte; Bielak, Lawrence F; Johnson, Dayna A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Menarche is a critical time point in a woman's reproductive system development; exposures at menarche may influence maternal health. Living in a poorer neighborhood is associated with adult obesity; however, little is known if neighborhood factors at menarche are associated with prepregnancy obesity. Methods. We examined the association of neighborhood-level poverty at menarche with prepregnancy body mass index category in 144 pregnant African-American women. Address at menarche was geocoded to census tract (closest to year of menarche); neighborhood-level poverty was defined as the proportion of residents living under the federal poverty level. Cumulative logistic regression was used to examine the association of neighborhood-level poverty at menarche, in quartiles, with categorical prepregnancy BMI. Results. Before pregnancy, 59 (41%) women were obese. Compared to women in the lowest neighborhood-level poverty quartile, women in the highest quartile had 2.9 [1.2, 6.9] times higher odds of prepregnancy obesity; this was slightly attenuated after adjusting for age, marital status, education, and parity (odds ratio: 2.3 [0.9, 6.3]). Conclusions. Living in a higher poverty neighborhood at menarche is associated with prepregnancy obesity in African-American women. Future studies are needed to better understand the role of exposures in menarche on health in pregnancy. PMID:27418977

  7. Neighborhood-Level Poverty at Menarche and Prepregnancy Obesity in African-American Women

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Rosalind M.; Burmeister, Charlotte; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Johnson, Dayna A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Menarche is a critical time point in a woman's reproductive system development; exposures at menarche may influence maternal health. Living in a poorer neighborhood is associated with adult obesity; however, little is known if neighborhood factors at menarche are associated with prepregnancy obesity. Methods. We examined the association of neighborhood-level poverty at menarche with prepregnancy body mass index category in 144 pregnant African-American women. Address at menarche was geocoded to census tract (closest to year of menarche); neighborhood-level poverty was defined as the proportion of residents living under the federal poverty level. Cumulative logistic regression was used to examine the association of neighborhood-level poverty at menarche, in quartiles, with categorical prepregnancy BMI. Results. Before pregnancy, 59 (41%) women were obese. Compared to women in the lowest neighborhood-level poverty quartile, women in the highest quartile had 2.9 [1.2, 6.9] times higher odds of prepregnancy obesity; this was slightly attenuated after adjusting for age, marital status, education, and parity (odds ratio: 2.3 [0.9, 6.3]). Conclusions. Living in a higher poverty neighborhood at menarche is associated with prepregnancy obesity in African-American women. Future studies are needed to better understand the role of exposures in menarche on health in pregnancy. PMID:27418977

  8. Socioeconomic status and age at menarche: An examination of multiple indicators in an ethnically diverse cohort

    PubMed Central

    Deardorff, Julianna; Abrams, Barbara; Ekwaru, J. Paul; Rehkopf, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Ethnic disparities exist in US girls' ages at menarche. Overweight and low socioeconomic status (SES) may contribute to these disparities but past research has been equivocal. We sought to determine which SES indicators were associated uniquely with menarche, for which ethnic groups, and whether associations operated through overweight. Methods Using National Longitudinal Study of Youth data, we examined associations between SES indicators and age at menarche. Participants were 4851 girls and their mothers. We used survival analyses to examine whether SES, at various time points, was associated with menarche, whether body mass index (BMI) mediated associations, and whether race/ethnicity modified associations. Results Black and Hispanic girls experienced menarche earlier than whites. After adjusting for SES, there was a 50% reduction in the effect estimate for “being Hispanic” and 40% reduction for “being Black” versus “being white” on menarche. SES indicators were associated uniquely with earlier menarche, including mother's unmarried status and lower family income. Associations varied by race/ethnicity. BMI did not mediate associations. Conclusion Racial differences in menarche may in large part be due to SES differences. Future experimental or quasi-experimental studies should examine whether intervening on SES factors could have benefits for delaying menarche among Blacks and Hispanics. PMID:25108688

  9. The Planck Mission: Early Results

    SciTech Connect

    Marco Bersanelli

    2012-03-07

    The ESA Planck space mission, launched on May 14, 2009, is dedicated to high precision measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), the first light of the universe, both in temperature and polarization. The satellite observes the full sky from a far-Earth orbit with two cryogenic instruments in the 30-850 GHz range at the focal plane of a 1.5-meter telescope. The primary objective of Planck is to measure with unprecedented precision the key cosmological parameters and to provide accurate tests of physics in the early universe. Planck has recently completed the fifth full-sky survey. The data analysis is underway. The first cosmology results are expected in early 2013 while a number of astrophysical results have been recently delivered to the community, including galactic and extragalactic astrophysics and a rich catalogue of radio and infrared sources. These results demonstrate the excellent in-orbit performance of the instruments and give excellent prospects for the forthcoming cosmological results.

  10. Father Absence, Menarche and Interest in Infants among Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maestripieri, Dario; Roney, James R.; Debias, Nicole; Durante, Kristina M.; Spaepen, Geertrui M.

    2004-01-01

    In this study we examined the relationship between menarche and interest in infants among adolescent girls, and the effects of early environment, particularly of father absence from home, on both variables. Eighty-three girls ranging in age from between 11 and 14 years served as study participants. Interest in infants was assessed through their…

  11. African-American/white differences in the age of menarche: accounting for the difference.

    PubMed

    Reagan, Patricia B; Salsberry, Pamela J; Fang, Muriel Z; Gardner, William P; Pajer, Kathleen

    2012-10-01

    Lifetime health disparity between African-American and white females begins with lower birthweight and higher rates of childhood overweight. In adolescence, African-American girls experience earlier menarche. Understanding the origins of these health disparities is a national priority. There is growing literature suggesting that the life course health development model is a useful framework for studying disparities. The purpose of this study was to quantify the influence of explanatory factors from key developmental stages on the age of menarche and to determine how much of the overall race difference in age of menarche they could explain. The factors were maternal age of menarche, birthweight, poverty during early childhood (age 0 through 5 years), and child BMI z-scores at 6 years. The sample, drawn from the US National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth Child-Mother file, consisted of 2337 girls born between 1978 and 1998. Mean age of menarche in months was 144 for African-American girls and 150 for whites. An instrumental variable approach was used to estimate a causal effect of child BMI z-score on age of menarche. The instrumental variables were pre-pregnancy BMI, high gestational weight gain and smoking during pregnancy. We found strong effects of maternal age of menarche, birthweight, and child BMI z-score (-5.23, 95% CI [-7.35,-3.12]) for both African-Americans and whites. Age of menarche declined with increases in exposure to poverty during early childhood for whites. There was no effect of poverty for African-Americans. We used Oaxaca decomposition techniques to determine how much of the overall race difference in age of menarche was attributable to race differences in observable factors and how much was due to race dependent responses. The African-American/white difference in childhood BMI explained about 18% of the overall difference in age of menarche and birthweight differences explained another 11%.

  12. The influence of age at menarche on cross-sectional geometry of bone in young adulthood.

    PubMed

    Sešelj, Maja; Nahhas, Ramzi W; Sherwood, Richard J; Chumlea, Wm Cameron; Towne, Bradford; Duren, Dana L

    2012-07-01

    Elucidating the somatic and maturational influences on the biomechanical properties of bone in children is crucial for a proper understanding of bone strength and quality in childhood and later life, and has significant potential for predicting adult fracture and osteoporosis risks. The ability of a long bone to resist bending and torsion is primarily a function of its cross-sectional geometric properties, and is negatively impacted by smaller external bone diameter. In pubescent girls, elevated levels of estrogen impede subperiosteal bone growth and increase endosteal bone deposition, resulting in bones averaging a smaller external and internal diameter relative to boys. In addition, given a well-documented secular trend for an earlier menarche, the age at which the rate of subperiosteal bone deposition decreases may also be younger in more recent cohorts of girls. In this study we examined the relationship between pubertal timing and subsequent bone strength in girls. Specifically, we investigated the effects of age at menarche on bone strength indicators (polar moment of inertia and section modulus) determined from cross-sectional geometry of the second metacarpal (MC2) using data derived from serial hand-wrist radiographs of female participants (N=223) in the Fels Longitudinal Study, with repeated measures of MC2 between the ages of 7 and 35 years. Using multivariate regression models, we evaluated the effects of age at menarche on associations between measures of bone strength in early adulthood and the same measures at a prepubertal age. Results indicate that later age at menarche is associated with stronger adult bone (in torsion and bending) when controlling for prepubertal bone strength (R(2) ranged between 0.54 and 0.70, p<0.001). Since cross-sectional properties of bone in childhood may have long lasting implications, they should be considered along with pubertal timing in assessing risk for future fracture and in clinical recommendations.

  13. The influence of age at menarche on cross-sectional geometry of bone in young adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Šešelj, Maja; Nahhas, Ramzi W.; Sherwood, Richard J.; Chumlea, Wm. Cameron; Towne, Bradford; Duren, Dana L.

    2013-01-01

    Elucidating the somatic and maturational influences on the biomechanical properties of bone in children is crucial for a proper understanding of bone strength and quality in childhood and later life, and has significant potential for predicting adult fracture and osteoporosis risks. The ability of a long bone to resist bending and torsion is primarily a function of its cross-sectional geometric properties, and is negatively impacted by smaller external bone diameter. In pubescent girls, elevated levels of estrogen impede subperiosteal bone growth and increase endosteal bone deposition, resulting in bones averaging a smaller external and internal diameter relative to boys. In addition, given a well-documented secular trend for an earlier menarche, the age at which the rate of subperiosteal bone deposition decreases may also be younger in more recent cohorts of girls. In this study we examined the relationship between pubertal timing and subsequent bone strength in girls. Specifically, we investigated the effects of age at menarche on bone strength indicators (polar moment of inertia and section modulus) determined from cross-sectional geometry of the second metacarpal (MC2) using data derived from serial hand-wrist radiographs of female participants (N=223) in the Fels Longitudinal Study, with repeated measures of MC2 between the ages of 7 and 35 years. Using multivariate regression models, we evaluated the effects of age at menarche on associations between measures of bone strength in early adulthood and the same measures at a prepubertal age. Results indicate that later age at menarche is associated with stronger adult bone (in torsion and bending) when controlling for prepubertal bone strength (R2 ranged between 0.54 and 0.70, p<0.001). Since cross-sectional properties of bone in childhood may have long lasting implications, they should be considered along with pubertal timing in assessing risk for future fracture and in clinical recommendations. PMID:22513271

  14. Psychosocial and Cultural Factors Influencing Expectations of Menarche: A Study on Chinese Premenarcheal Teenage Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeung, Dannii Y. L.; Tang, Catherine So-kum; Lee, Antoinette

    2005-01-01

    This study explored how psychosocial and cultural factors influenced expectations of menarche among 476 Chinese premenarcheal teenage girls. Results showed that participants' expectations of menarche were largely negative and heavily influenced by cultural beliefs about menstruation. Findings of hierarchical regression analyses revealed that…

  15. Association Between Age at Menarche and Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Diseases in Korean Women

    PubMed Central

    Won, Jong Chul; Hong, Jae Won; Noh, Jung Hyun; Kim, Dong-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Early menarche is strongly associated with adulthood obesity; however, the relationship between age at menarche and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in Korean women remains poorly understood. Here, we investigated the association between early menarche and risk factors for developing CVD during adulthood using a nationwide population database. In total, 12,336 women (weighted n = 17,483,406; weighted age, 45.7 years) who participated in the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2010 to 2013 were included in this study. Participants were scored using the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria for metabolic syndrome. Risk of CVD was estimated using the 10-year Framingham Coronary Heart Disease Risk Point Scale (10-year FRS). Early menarche (≤11 years) was reported in 5.2% (weighted n = 917,493) of subjects. The weighted prevalences of metabolic syndrome and ≥20% 10-year FRS were 23.6% [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 22.7–24.6] and 7.7% (7.1–8.3), respectively. Women with early menarche reported a significantly higher body mass index and waist circumference, along with a higher prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome than those with later menarche (≥13 years). Furthermore, the prevalence of women with a ≥10% or ≥20% 10-year FRS was higher in those with early menarche than in other groups after adjusting for age, smoking, education level, and menstruation. Logistic regression analyses controlling for these and other confounding factors revealed odds ratios of 2.29 (95% CI = 1.25–4.19) and 1.78 (0.96–3.30) for ≥10% and ≥20% 10-year FRS in women with early menarche, respectively, compared with those in the latest menarche group (≥17 years). Taken together, this nationwide study revealed that women with early menarche are at increased risks of metabolic syndrome and CVD. Early menarche may therefore represent an important marker for early preventive

  16. Whether age of menarche is influenced by body mass index and lipoproteins profile? a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Farahmand, Maryam; Ramezani Tehrani, Fahimeh; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2012-01-01

    Background: Menarche, a milestone in the reproductive life span of a woman, is influenced by several genetics and environmental factors. There is no consensus regarding the impact of body mass index (BMI) and lipid profiles on the age of menarche, as the results of various studies demonstrate. Objective: To investigate the correlation between age of menarche and BMI/lipoprotein profile in a community sample of Iranian girls. Materials and Methods: In the study, 370 girls, aged 10-16 years, who began their menarche within six months prior to the study, were recruited from the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study (TLGS) population. Information was documented regarding their body composition, including height, weight, BMI, waist and hip circumference were collected and their lipid profiles were assessed after a 12-hour fast. Results: In this study, the mean±SD of age of menarche and BMI were 12.6±1.1 years and 21.7±3.9 kg/m2, respectively. There were statistically significant relationships between age of menarche and height, BMI, waist circumference, and the maternal educational level. The relationship between age of menarche and the weight and lipid profiles of subjects was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Age at menarche is not influenced by lipid profiles but it is influenced by BMI. PMID:25246895

  17. A meta-analysis provides evidence that prenatal smoking exposure decreases age at menarche.

    PubMed

    Yermachenko, Anna; Dvornyk, Volodymyr

    2015-12-01

    Since studies of association between prenatal tobacco exposure and age at menarche have reported inconsistent results so far, we conducted a meta-analysis to examine this association. In total 36 relevant articles (1995-2014) were identified, 17 of which satisfied the inclusion criteria and were used in the analysis. Nearly one month decrease (-0.092 [95%CI:-0.160, -0.024] year) in age at menarche was found in women who were exposed to tobacco in utero. The meta-regression analysis showed that average year of birth in the cohorts might significantly influence association between maternal smoking and daughter's age at menarche. Based on results obtained from 5 studies where age at menarche was treated as a categorical variable, maternal smoking status during pregnancy increased a risk for daughters to have menarche earlier than at 11 years old by 15%.

  18. Clarifying the Associations between Age at Menarche and Adolescent Emotional and Behavioral Problems

    PubMed Central

    Van Hulle, Carol A.; Beasley, William H.; Rodgers, Joseph L.; D’Onofrio, Brian M.

    2015-01-01

    Better understanding risk factors for the development of adolescent emotional and behavioral problems can help with intervention and prevention efforts. Previous studies have found that an early menarcheal age predicts several adolescent problems, including depressive symptoms, delinquency, and early age at first intercourse. Few studies, nevertheless, have explicitly tested (a) whether the associations with menarcheal age vary across racial/ethnic groups or (b) whether the sources of the associations are within-families (i.e., consistent with a direct, causal link) or only between-families (i.e., due to selection or confounding factors). The current study analyzed data from a nationally representative US Sample of females (N = 5,637). We examined whether race/ethnicity moderated the associations between early menarche and several adolescent problems by using multiple-group analyses and we examined the degree to which genetic and environmental factors shared by family members account for the associations by comparing sisters and cousins with differing menarcheal ages. Menarcheal age predicted subsequent depressive symptoms, delinquency, and early age at first intercourse in the population. The magnitudes of the associations were similar across all racial/ethnic groups for all outcomes. The within-family associations (i.e., when comparing siblings and cousins with different menarcheal age) were large and statistically significant when predicting early intercourse, but not the other outcomes. The findings suggest that selection or confounding factors account for the associations between menarcheal age and subsequent depressive symptoms and delinquency, whereas the independent association between menarcheal age and early age at first intercourse is consistent with a direct, causal effect. PMID:25687264

  19. Secular trends in age at menarche among Chinese girls from 24 ethnic minorities, 1985 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yi; Ma, Jun; Agardh, Anette; Lau, Patrick W.C.; Hu, Peijin; Zhang, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Background Declining age at menarche has been observed in many countries. In China, a decrease of 4.5 months per decade in the average age at menarche among the majority Han girls has recently been reported. However, the trends in age at menarche among ethnic minority girls over the past 25 years remain unknown. Objectives To compare the differences in median age at menarche among girls aged 9–18 years across 24 ethnic minorities in 2010 and to estimate the trends in age at menarche in different ethnic minorities from 1985 to 2010. Design We used data from six cross-sectional Chinese National Surveys on Students’ Constitution and Health (1985, 1991, 1995, 2000, 2005, and 2010). The median age at menarche was estimated by using probit analysis. Results In 2010, the ethnic minorities with the earliest age at menarche were the Koreans (11.79 years), Mongolians (12.44 years), and Zhuang (12.52 years). The three ethnic minorities with the latest age at menarche were the Sala (14.32 years), Yi (13.74 years), and Uighurs (13.67 years). From 1985 to 2010, the age at menarche declined in all 24 minority groups. The Lisu, Kazakh, and Korean minorities showed the largest reductions in age at menarche by 1.79 (p<0.05), 1.69 (p<0.05), and 1.57 (p<0.05) years, respectively, from 1985 to 2010. The Yi, Sala, and Li minorities showed the smallest reductions, with age at menarche declining by only 0.06 (p>0.05), 0.15 (p>0.05), and 0.15 (p>0.05) years, respectively, in the same period. Conclusion A large variation in age at menarche was observed among different ethnic minorities, with the earliest age at menarche found among Korean girls. A reduction in the average age at menarche appeared among most of the ethnic minorities over time, and the largest decrease was observed in Lisu, Kazakh, and Korean girls. Thus, health education should focus on targeting the specific needs of each ethnic minority group. PMID:26220757

  20. Malnutrition, menarche, and marriage in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, A K; Huffman, S L; Curlin, G T

    1977-01-01

    In order to assess the impact of nutritional status on the onset of menarche and the association between age at menarche and age at marriage, a survey of 1155 girls, ages 10 through 20, was conducted in a rural area of Bangladesh in March 1976. In order to obtain an estimated mean of age of menarche, probit analysis was used. The mean age of menarche using this technique is estimated at 15.65 for Muslims and 15.91 for Hindus. It was learned that in recent years the age of menarche has increased in a rural area. This increase seems to be associated with malnutrition caused by the war, postwar inflation, floods and famines during the 1971-75 period. When age is controlled for, the prominent effect of weight on menstrual status is evident. 98% of the girls whose weights were 88 pounds or greater had reached menarche compared to only 1% of those weighing less than 66 pounds. Body weight appears to be 1 of the most important factors for the determination of onset of menarche. There exists a seasonality of onset of menarche with a peak in winter. Age of marriage among this rural population has increased and may be associated with the increasing age of menarche. Since both age of menarche and age of marriage have increased, fertility among females age 15-19 may be expected to decrease in the future if this pattern continues. PMID:607404

  1. Association of Age at Menarche With Increasing Number of Fibroids in a Cohort of Women Who Underwent Standardized Ultrasound Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Velez Edwards, Digna R.; Baird, Donna D.; Hartmann, Katherine E.

    2013-01-01

    Age at menarche has been associated with several reproductive conditions, and frequencies differ by race. Racial disparities also impact fibroid risk. We comprehensively examined the relationship between age at menarche, fibroid characteristics, and race. Women were enrolled in Right From the Start (2001–2010), a multistate study that systematically screened for fibroids during very early pregnancy. Endovaginal ultrasounds were conducted, and fibroid presence, number, type, volume, and diameter were recorded according to standardized definitions. Generalized estimating equations adjusted for correlations within study site were used to estimate associations between age at menarche and fibroid status and to test for interactions with race. Of 5,023 participants, 11% had a fibroid. Seven percent underwent menarche before 11 years of age and 11% at 15 years or later. We did not observe interactions between age at menarche and race. A 1-year increase in age at menarche was inversely associated with fibroids (adjusted risk ratio = 0.87, 95% confidence interval: 0.82, 0.91). Early age at menarche had a similar positive association in individual analyses with fibroid size, type, and location but was stronger for multiple fibroids (adjusted risk ratio = 0.75, 95% confidence interval: 0.68, 0.83). Our findings confirm other reports of an association between age at menarche and fibroid development (regardless of characteristics), demonstrate no effect modification by race, and suggest a stronger association for women with multiple fibroids, possibly reflecting a stronger association for early-onset disease. PMID:23817917

  2. Association of age at menarche with increasing number of fibroids in a cohort of women who underwent standardized ultrasound assessment.

    PubMed

    Velez Edwards, Digna R; Baird, Donna D; Hartmann, Katherine E

    2013-08-01

    Age at menarche has been associated with several reproductive conditions, and frequencies differ by race. Racial disparities also impact fibroid risk. We comprehensively examined the relationship between age at menarche, fibroid characteristics, and race. Women were enrolled in Right From the Start (2001-2010), a multistate study that systematically screened for fibroids during very early pregnancy. Endovaginal ultrasounds were conducted, and fibroid presence, number, type, volume, and diameter were recorded according to standardized definitions. Generalized estimating equations adjusted for correlations within study site were used to estimate associations between age at menarche and fibroid status and to test for interactions with race. Of 5,023 participants, 11% had a fibroid. Seven percent underwent menarche before 11 years of age and 11% at 15 years or later. We did not observe interactions between age at menarche and race. A 1-year increase in age at menarche was inversely associated with fibroids (adjusted risk ratio = 0.87, 95% confidence interval: 0.82, 0.91). Early age at menarche had a similar positive association in individual analyses with fibroid size, type, and location but was stronger for multiple fibroids (adjusted risk ratio = 0.75, 95% confidence interval: 0.68, 0.83). Our findings confirm other reports of an association between age at menarche and fibroid development (regardless of characteristics), demonstrate no effect modification by race, and suggest a stronger association for women with multiple fibroids, possibly reflecting a stronger association for early-onset disease. PMID:23817917

  3. Putting menarche and girls into the global population health agenda.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Marni; Sutherland, Carla; Chandra-Mouli, Venkatraman

    2015-03-26

    Menarche, the onset of menstruation is a fundamental part of a girl's transition from childhood to adolescence. Studies show that girls in many countries experience menarche with insufficient information and support. Girls from around the world report feeling ashamed and afraid. The potential health effects of such experiences include a weakening of girls' sense of self-confidence and competence, which in turn may comprise girls' abilities to assert themselves in different situations, including in relation to their sexuality and sexual and reproductive health. There is an important need for the public health community to assure that girls receive the education and support they need about menstruation, so they are able to feel more confident about their bodies, and navigate preventable health problems - now and in the future. For too long, the global health community has overlooked the window of opportunity presented by menarche. Family planning programs have generally focused their efforts on married couples and HIV programs have focused safer sex promotion on older adolescent girls and boys. Starting the conversation at menarche with girls in early adolescence would fully use this window of opportunity. It would engage young adolescent girls and be a natural first step for later, more comprehensive conversations about sexuality, reproduction and reproductive health. There are a number of initiatives beginning to tackle the provision of puberty information to girls and boys, but the global health community is overdue to set a global standard for the provision of such guidance.

  4. Complex relation of HLA-DRB1*1501, age at menarche, and age at multiple sclerosis onset

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Alicia S.; Xia, Zongqi; Chibnik, Lori; De Jager, Philip L.; Chitnis, Tanuja

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relationship between 2 markers of early multiple sclerosis (MS) onset, 1 genetic (HLA-DRB1*1501) and 1 experiential (early menarche), in 2 cohorts. Methods: We included 540 white women with MS or clinically isolated syndrome (N = 156 with genetic data available) and 1,390 white women without MS but with a first-degree relative with MS (Genes and Environment in Multiple Sclerosis [GEMS]). Age at menarche, HLA-DRB1*1501 status, and age at MS onset were analyzed. Results: In both cohorts, participants with at least 1 HLA-DRB1*1501 allele had a later age at menarche than did participants with no risk alleles (MS: mean difference = 0.49, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [0.03–0.95], p = 0.036; GEMS: mean difference = 0.159, 95% CI = [0.012–0.305], p = 0.034). This association remained after we adjusted for body mass index at age 18 (available in GEMS) and for other MS risk alleles, as well as a single nucleotide polymorphism near the HLA-A region previously associated with age of menarche (available in MS cohort). Confirming previously reported associations, in our MS cohort, every year decrease in age at menarche was associated with a 0.65-year earlier MS onset (95% CI = [0.07–1.22], p = 0.027, N = 540). Earlier MS onset was also found in individuals with at least 1 HLA-DRB1*1501 risk allele (mean difference = −3.40 years, 95% CI = [−6.42 to −0.37], p = 0.028, N = 156). Conclusions: In 2 cohorts, a genetic marker for earlier MS onset (HLA-DRB1*1501) was inversely related to earlier menarche, an experiential marker for earlier symptom onset. This finding warrants broader investigations into the association between the HLA region and hormonal regulation in determining the onset of autoimmune disease. PMID:27504495

  5. Age of thelarche and menarche in contemporary US females: a cross-sectional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Susanne M.; Bright, George M.; Frane, James W.; Blethen, Sandra L.

    2014-01-01

    Aim A recent secular trend towards earlier thelarche has been suggested. The aim of this study is to examine normative ages of thelarche and menarche in contemporary US females. Methods Trained physicians documented Tanner breast stage by observation in a cross-sectional cohort. Age of menarche was self-reported. The subjects were healthy female children and adolescents. The mean age of thelarche was determined by probit analysis and the mean age of menarche was determined by using a normal time-to-event model. Results Mean age of thelarche was 9.7 years among 610 females aged 3.0–17.9 years (70% non-Hispanic Caucasian (NHC), 14% African-Americans, 7% Hispanic, 9% “other”). The mean age of menarche was 12.8 years for NHC, with African-Americans having menarche 0.6 years earlier. Conclusions Thelarche occurred earlier than recently reported, while age of menarche remained unchanged, this supported a persistent secular trend towards earlier thelarche but stable age of menarche. This suggests that the observed thelarche is gonadotropin-independent or the tempo of pubertal advancement has slowed. PMID:23959659

  6. FlareLab: early results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltwisch, H.; Kempkes, P.; Mackel, F.; Stein, H.; Tenfelde, J.; Arnold, L.; Dreher, J.; Grauer, R.

    2010-12-01

    The FlareLab experiment at Bochum University has been constructed to generate and investigate plasma-filled magnetic flux tubes similar to arch-shaped solar prominences, which often result in coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In its first version, the device has been used to reproduce and extend previous studies of Bellan et al (1998 Phys. Plasmas 5 1991). Here the plasma source consists of two electrodes, which can be connected to a 1.0 kJ capacitor bank, and of a horseshoe magnet, which provides an arch-shaped guiding field. The discharge is ignited in a cloud of hydrogen gas that has been puffed into the space above the electrodes. In the first few microseconds the plasma current rises at a rate of several kA µs-1, causing the plasma column to pinch along the guiding B-field and to form an expanding loop structure. The observed dynamics of the magnetic flux tubes is analysed by means of three-dimensional MHD simulations in order to determine the influence of parameters like the initial magnetic field geometry on magnetic stability. At present, FlareLab is redesigned to mimic a model that was proposed by Titov and Démoulin (1999 Astron. Astrophys. 351 707) to investigate twisted magnetic configurations in solar flares.

  7. ALOHA Cabled Observatory: Early Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, B. M.; Lukas, R.; Duennebier, F. K.

    2011-12-01

    The ALOHA Cabled Observatory (ACO) was installed 6 June 2011, extending power, network communications and timing to a seafloor node and instruments at 4726 m water depth 100 km north of Oahu. The system was installed using ROV Jason operated from the R/V Kilo Moana. Station ALOHA is the field site of the Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) program that has investigated temporal dynamics in biology, physics, and chemistry since 1988. HOT conducts near monthly ship-based sampling and makes continuous observations from moored instruments to document and study climate and ecosystem variability over semi-diurnal to decadal time scales. The cabled observatory system will provide the infrastructure for continuous, interactive ocean sampling enabling new measurements as well as a new mode of ocean observing that integrates ship and cabled observations. The ACO is a prototypical example of a deep observatory system that uses a retired first-generation fiber-optic telecommunications cable. Sensors provide live video, sound from local and distant sources, and measure currents, pressure, temperature, and salinity. Preliminary results will be presented and discussed.

  8. Genome-wide association study of age at menarche in African-American women.

    PubMed

    Demerath, Ellen W; Liu, Ching-Ti; Franceschini, Nora; Chen, Gary; Palmer, Julie R; Smith, Erin N; Chen, Christina T L; Ambrosone, Christine B; Arnold, Alice M; Bandera, Elisa V; Berenson, Gerald S; Bernstein, Leslie; Britton, Angela; Cappola, Anne R; Carlson, Christopher S; Chanock, Stephen J; Chen, Wei; Chen, Zhao; Deming, Sandra L; Elks, Cathy E; Evans, Michelle K; Gajdos, Zofia; Henderson, Brian E; Hu, Jennifer J; Ingles, Sue; John, Esther M; Kerr, Kathleen F; Kolonel, Laurence N; Le Marchand, Loic; Lu, Xiaoning; Millikan, Robert C; Musani, Solomon K; Nock, Nora L; North, Kari; Nyante, Sarah; Press, Michael F; Rodriquez-Gil, Jorge L; Ruiz-Narvaez, Edward A; Schork, Nicholas J; Srinivasan, Sathanur R; Woods, Nancy F; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Regina G; Zonderman, Alan; Heiss, Gerardo; Gwen Windham, B; Wellons, Melissa; Murray, Sarah S; Nalls, Michael; Pastinen, Tomi; Rajkovic, Aleksandar; Hirschhorn, Joel; Adrienne Cupples, L; Kooperberg, Charles; Murabito, Joanne M; Haiman, Christopher A

    2013-08-15

    African-American (AA) women have earlier menarche on average than women of European ancestry (EA), and earlier menarche is a risk factor for obesity and type 2 diabetes among other chronic diseases. Identification of common genetic variants associated with age at menarche has a potential value in pointing to the genetic pathways underlying chronic disease risk, yet comprehensive genome-wide studies of age at menarche are lacking for AA women. In this study, we tested the genome-wide association of self-reported age at menarche with common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a total of 18 089 AA women in 15 studies using an additive genetic linear regression model, adjusting for year of birth and population stratification, followed by inverse-variance weighted meta-analysis (Stage 1). Top meta-analysis results were then tested in an independent sample of 2850 women (Stage 2). First, while no SNP passed the pre-specified P < 5 × 10(-8) threshold for significance in Stage 1, suggestive associations were found for variants near FLRT2 and PIK3R1, and conditional analysis identified two independent SNPs (rs339978 and rs980000) in or near RORA, strengthening the support for this suggestive locus identified in EA women. Secondly, an investigation of SNPs in 42 previously identified menarche loci in EA women demonstrated that 25 (60%) of them contained variants significantly associated with menarche in AA women. The findings provide the first evidence of cross-ethnic generalization of menarche loci identified to date, and suggest a number of novel biological links to menarche timing in AA women.

  9. Genome-wide association study of age at menarche in African-American women

    PubMed Central

    Demerath, Ellen W.; Liu, Ching-Ti; Franceschini, Nora; Chen, Gary; Palmer, Julie R.; Smith, Erin N.; Chen, Christina T.L.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Arnold, Alice M.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Berenson, Gerald S.; Bernstein, Leslie; Britton, Angela; Cappola, Anne R.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chen, Wei; Chen, Zhao; Deming, Sandra L.; Elks, Cathy E.; Evans, Michelle K.; Gajdos, Zofia; Henderson, Brian E.; Hu, Jennifer J.; Ingles, Sue; John, Esther M.; Kerr, Kathleen F.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Le Marchand, Loic; Lu, Xiaoning; Millikan, Robert C.; Musani, Solomon K.; Nock, Nora L.; North, Kari; Nyante, Sarah; Press, Michael F.; Rodriquez-Gil, Jorge L.; Ruiz-Narvaez, Edward A.; Schork, Nicholas J.; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Woods, Nancy F.; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Regina G.; Zonderman, Alan; Heiss, Gerardo; Gwen Windham, B.; Wellons, Melissa; Murray, Sarah S.; Nalls, Michael; Pastinen, Tomi; Rajkovic, Aleksandar; Hirschhorn, Joel; Adrienne Cupples, L.; Kooperberg, Charles; Murabito, Joanne M.; Haiman, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    African-American (AA) women have earlier menarche on average than women of European ancestry (EA), and earlier menarche is a risk factor for obesity and type 2 diabetes among other chronic diseases. Identification of common genetic variants associated with age at menarche has a potential value in pointing to the genetic pathways underlying chronic disease risk, yet comprehensive genome-wide studies of age at menarche are lacking for AA women. In this study, we tested the genome-wide association of self-reported age at menarche with common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a total of 18 089 AA women in 15 studies using an additive genetic linear regression model, adjusting for year of birth and population stratification, followed by inverse-variance weighted meta-analysis (Stage 1). Top meta-analysis results were then tested in an independent sample of 2850 women (Stage 2). First, while no SNP passed the pre-specified P < 5 × 10−8 threshold for significance in Stage 1, suggestive associations were found for variants near FLRT2 and PIK3R1, and conditional analysis identified two independent SNPs (rs339978 and rs980000) in or near RORA, strengthening the support for this suggestive locus identified in EA women. Secondly, an investigation of SNPs in 42 previously identified menarche loci in EA women demonstrated that 25 (60%) of them contained variants significantly associated with menarche in AA women. The findings provide the first evidence of cross-ethnic generalization of menarche loci identified to date, and suggest a number of novel biological links to menarche timing in AA women. PMID:23599027

  10. Nongenetic Determinants of Age at Menarche: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background. The acceleration of pubertal development is an important medical and social problem, as it may result in increased morbidity and mortality in later life. This systematic review summarizes relevant data about nongenetic factors, which contribute to age at menarche (AAM), and suggests those which may be the most important. Methods. The available literature from 1980 till July 2013 was searched using PubMed and Google Scholar databases. Finally, 154 papers were selected for the analysis. Results. Environmental factors, which may affect AAM, vary in populations of different ethnicity. The prenatal, infancy, and early childhood periods are the most susceptible to these factors. Body weight, high animal protein intake, family stressors (e.g., single parenting), and physical activity seem to influence AAM in most populations. Conclusions. The data about influence of nongenetic factors on AAM are still inconsistent. The factors affecting prenatal and early childhood growth seem to have a larger effect on further sexual maturation. Further studies are needed in order to validate the association between other environmental determinants and AAM in different ethnical groups. PMID:25050345

  11. Flashbulb Memories of Menarche and Adult Menstrual Distress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillemer, David B.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Female college students (N=99) recounted memories of menarche, described menarcheal circumstances, and completed the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire (MDQ). Found inadequate emotional preparation for menstruation to be associated with negative feelings at menarche. Menarcheal circumstances were not strongly predictive of adult MDQ scores. (Author)

  12. Secular Trends in Menarcheal Age in India-Evidence from the Indian Human Development Survey

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Praveen Kumar; Tripathi, Niharika; Subramanian, S. V.

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence from a number of countries in Europe and North America point towards the secular declining trend in menarcheal age with considerable spatial variations over the past two centuries. Similar trends were reported in several developing countries from Asia, Africa and Latin America. However, data corroborating any secular trend in the menarcheal age of the Indian population remained sparse and inadequately verified. Methods We examined secular trends, regional heterogeneity and association of socioeconomic, anthropometric and contextual factors with menarcheal age among ever-married women (15–49 years) in India. Using the pseudo cohort data approach, we fit multiple linear regression models to estimate secular trends in menarcheal age of 91394 ever-married women using the Indian Human Development Survey. Results The mean age at menarche among Indian women was 13.76 years (95 % CI: 13.75, 13.77) in 2005. It declined by three months from 13.83 years (95% CI: 13.81, 13.85) among women born prior to 1955–1964, to nearly 13.62 years (95% CI: 13.58, 13.67) among women born during late 1985–1989. However, these aggregate national figures mask extensive spatial heterogeneity as mean age at menarche varied from 15.0 years in Himachal Pradesh during 1955–1964 (95% CI: 14.89–15.11) to about 12.1 years in Assam (95% CI: 11.63–12.56) during 1985–1989. Conclusion The regression analysis established a reduction of nearly one month per decade, suggesting a secular decline in age at menarche among Indian women. Notably, the menarcheal age was significantly associated with the area of residence, geographic region, linguistic groups, educational attainment, wealth status, caste and religious affiliations among Indian women. PMID:25369507

  13. Environmental and Genetic Factors Influence Age at Menarche in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Jessica; Saxena, Richa; Welt, Corrine K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We hypothesized that BMI and DNA variants would predict age at menarche in PCOS. Subjects: Subjects with PCOS defined by the NIH criteria (n=522) and controls with regular menstrual cycles and no hyperandrogenism (n=472); aged 18 to 45 years were studied. Methods Age at menarche was compared between PCOS cases and controls, and examined as a function of multiple parameters. Results There was a strong inverse relationship between BMI and age at menarche in PCOS (r=−0.32; p=5×10−11). The chromosome 6 rs7759938-T variant was associated with earlier age at menarche in women with PCOS (12.60±0.09 vs. 13.41±0.23 years; genotype TT vs. CC; p=0.006). Age at menarche was predicted by PCOS status (β=0.512; p<0.001), reported weight group at 10 to 14 years (β= −0.432; p<0.001), current BMI (β= −0.0202; p=0.01) and genotype (β=0.169; p=0.02). Conclusions Age at menarche in women with PCOS is influenced by BMI and genetic variants near LIN28B. Trial Registration NCT00166569 PMID:22876539

  14. Age at Menarche and Factors that Influence It: A Study among Female University Students in Tamale, Northern Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Ameade, Evans Paul Kwame; Garti, Helene Akpene

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Age at menarche reflects the health status of a population. This marks the beginning of sexual maturation and is affected by nutritional status and prevailing environmental conditions. This study measured the menarcheal age of female undergraduate students in northern Ghana and explored factors that could impact on the onset of menarche. Method GraphPad 5.01 was used to analyze data collected from 293 randomly selected female university students in a cross-sectional study using a semi-structured questionnaire. Association between different variables was tested using appropriate statistical tests. Results The mean recall age at menarche of participants in this study was 13.66 ±1.87 years for a female population of mean age, 23.04±5.07 years. Compared to female students who lived in rural settings, urban and suburban areas dwellers significantly recorded earlier menarche (p = 0.0006). Again, females from high income earning families experienced menarche earlier than those who were born to or lived with lower income earners (p = 0.003). Lower menarcheal age increased risk of experiencing menstrual pain prior to menses rather than during menstrual flow for dysmenorrhic females. (13.52±2.052 vrs 13.63±1.582 year; χ2 = 7.181, df = 2, p = 0.028). Conclusion Mean menarcheal age of female university students in northern Ghana was 13.66 years. Females from urban areas and high income families had earlier menarche. Compared to the very first Ghanaian study reported in 1989, the menarcheal age decline was 0.11 year per decade. PMID:27171234

  15. Functional brain asymmetry, handedness and menarcheal age.

    PubMed

    Nikolova, P; Stoyanov, Z; Negrev, N

    1994-12-01

    Functional brain asymmetry influences many functions of the organism; the neuroendocrine axis is one that has received insufficient attention. In this study we set us as the goal of studying the link between functional brain asymmetry and menarcheal age in females with left versus right manual dominance. The appearance of the first menarche was used as a natural model of functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. 1695 females, aged between 16 and 25 years, were interviewed by questionnaire about manual dominance and menarcheal age. 182 women were selected and divided into 2 groups: all left-handers (n = 91), and a control group of 91 right-handers. We found a significantly lower average age of menarcheal appearance in the left-handers' age of 12.09 +/- 0.16 years compared to the right-handers' age of 13.32 +/- 0.12 years (p < 0.001). The earliest menarcheal age in left-handers was 8 years and the peak of appearance at age 13 (in 30.76% of the cases). In right-handers these values were 10 and 14 years (in 40.60% of the cases), respectively. The data allow us to accept the existence of a link between functional brain asymmetry and menarche, which causes earlier activation of the HPG axis in left-handed females.

  16. A cross-cultural examination of the relationship between ages at menarche, marriage, and first birth.

    PubMed

    Udry, J R; Cliquet, R L

    1982-02-01

    Recent work with samples of black and white urban American women showed a clear behavioral sequence relating age at menarche to age at first intercourse to age at first birth. This paper shows that the linking of ages at menarche, intercourse, marriage, and first birth is a pattern which occurs in very diverse cultures. We present confirmatory data from the United States, Belgium, and Pakistan, and from Malay and Chinese women in Malaysia. We interpret our findings as indicating a biological process leading to (a) social interpretations of readiness for reproduction, and (b) persisting biological differences between early and late maturing women. PMID:7067870

  17. Age at menarche and risk of ovarian cancer: a meta-analysis of epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ting-Ting; Wu, Qi-Jun; Vogtmann, Emily; Lin, Bei; Wang, Yong-Lai

    2013-06-15

    Epidemiological studies have reported inconsistent associations between menarcheal age and ovarian cancer risk. To our knowledge, a meta-analysis for the association between menarcheal age and ovarian cancer has not been reported. Relevant published studies of menarcheal age and ovarian cancer were identified using MEDLINE, EMBASE and Web of Science through the end of April 2012. Two authors (T-T.G. and Q-J.W.) independently assessed eligibility and extracted data. We pooled the relative risks (RRs) from individual studies using a random-effects model and performed heterogeneity and publication bias analyses. A total of 27 observational studies consisting of 22 case-control and five cohort studies were included in our analysis. In a pooled analysis of all studies, a statistically significant inverse association was observed between menarcheal age (for the oldest compared to the youngest category) and ovarian cancer risk (RR = 0.85; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.75-0.97). The pooled RRs of ovarian cancer for the oldest versus the youngest categories of menarcheal age in prospective and case-control studies were 0.89 (95% CI = 0.76-1.03) and 0.84 (95% CI = 0.70-0.99), respectively. Inverse associations between menarcheal age and ovarian cancer risk were observed in most subgroups; however, the significant association was restricted to invasive and borderline serous ovarian cancer. In conclusion, findings from this meta-analysis support that menarcheal age was inversely associated with the risk of ovarian cancer. More large studies are warranted to stratify these results by different cancer grading and histotype of ovarian cancer.

  18. Social background and age at menarche in Portuguese university students: a note on the secular changes in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Padez, C

    2003-01-01

    Menarcheal age of a sample of Portuguese university students (n = 3366), born between 1972 and 1983, age 18-23 years, was analyzed. The influence of parents' educational level and occupation, family size, birth order, and degree of urbanization of girl's locality of residence during childhood and adolescence were analyzed as well as secular trend in the Portuguese population. Mean age at menarche for girls born in 1983 was 12.32 years. Parents' educational level and occupation did not show any significant influence on mean age at menarche. Place of residence during childhood years and adolescence showed a significant effect on mean age at menarche, with girls from rural places with a later age at menarche than those who spent their childhood or adolescence in urban areas (P menarche (12.41 years) than those who were third or later (12.58 years, P menarche in our university students. In this sample, from 1972 to 1983, mean age at menarche remained stable. When we considered published data from all the Portuguese population we found a decrease in mean age at menarche from 15 years for girls born in 1880 to 12.44 for those born in the 1980s. This decrease was the result of great improvements in the social and economic living conditions that occurred in Portugal especially after the 1970s concerning nutrition and health care, among many other environmental factors.

  19. Black adolescents' emotional response to menarche.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, C. S.; Arthur, D.; Owen, R.; Panizo, M. I.

    1989-01-01

    There has been substantial agreement in the literature that cultural attitudes influence females' reaction to menarche. Recently, growing interest has been shown in the ways cultural traditions affect the response to this event. To date, studies of the emotional impact of menarche have involved primarily white middle class populations. To determine whether the black American experience is similar to or different from that of a white American sample, the questions and measure used previously on a white sample were replicated in a group of middle class black adolescents. Although the black and white mean scores on positive feelings were similar (slightly positive), the blacks indicated somewhat greater negative feelings than did the whites. The black perception of menarche as more negative than positive is in accord with findings from other studies concerning the reaction to this event in this culture. Several explanations are suggested as possible bases for the negative feelings surrounding first menstruation in the United States. PMID:2651677

  20. The influence of age at menarche on the fertility of Chinese women.

    PubMed

    McKibben, Sherry L; Poston, Dudley L

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of age at menarche on children ever born (CEB). We use data from the 1997 Sample Survey of Population and Reproductive Health conducted by the China Population Information and Research Center and the State Family Planning Commission. Poisson regression models are estimated for 10,919 ever married Chinese Han women. The influence of a woman's age at menarche on her CEB is examined while controlling for the social effects of rural/urban residency, education, her number of fecund years, whether her first birth occurred before or after the initiation of China's one child policy, and her age at first marriage. The results support our hypothesized positive association between age at menarche and CEB. That is, the later a woman's age at menarche, the greater her number of children ever born. Holding the other five independent variables constant, we show that for every additional month in age at menarche, a Chinese Han woman's mean number of children ever born increases by 0.5 percent. Some of the implications of these results are explored.

  1. Evidence for a downward secular trend in age of menarche in a rural Gambian population

    PubMed Central

    Prentice, Sarah; Fulford, Antony J.; Jarjou, Landing M. A.; Goldberg, Gail R.; Prentice, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Menarcheal age is a key indicator of female maturity and development. Studies in many countries have reported a downward secular trend in age of menarche over the past century. This study presents data gained using the ‘status quo’ method and interval regression to estimate median menarcheal age of girls in a rural Gambian community. Cross-sectional studies carried out in 1989, 2000 and 2008 revealed a median menarcheal age of 16.06 (95% CI 15.67–16.45), 15.03 (95% CI 14.76–15.30) and 14.90 (95% CI 14.52–15.28), respectively. The average rate of decline of median age of menarche was amongst the most rapid yet reported, at 0.65 years of age per decade (p < 0.00001). There was no evidence for a change in the rate of decline over the two decades studied. These results probably reflect ongoing socio-economic development within the region. PMID:20465526

  2. Anthropometry and Menarcheal Status of Adolescent Nigerian Urban Senior Secondary School Girls

    PubMed Central

    Onyiriuka, Alphonsus Ndidi; Egbagbe, Eruke Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Background Age at menarche is a significant indicator of growth and sexual maturation in girls. During adolescence, anthropometry provides a tool for monitoring and evaluating the hormone-mediated changes in growth and reproductive maturation. Objectives We aimed to examine the anthropometric status of pre- and post-menarcheal Nigerian adolescent girls attending senior secondary schools. Materials and Methods In this school-based cross-sectional survey, a pre-tested structured self-administered questionnaire was set for obtaining the socio-demographic data (age at menarche, number of siblings, occupation and educational attainment of their parents, etc.), while the anthropometric status data was obtained by direct measurement of weight and height. The body mass index (BMI) and the ponderal index (PI) of each participant were computed from their respective weight and height values. The study was designed to include all the students in the two schools that were randomly selected. The anthropometric indices of pre- and post-menarcheal girls were compared. Results Out of a total population of 2,166 students, 2,159 (99.7%) participated but 9 questionnaires were incompletely filled and were rejected, leaving 2,150 (510 were pre-menarcheal and 1,640 were post- menarcheal) for further analysis. The mean menarcheal age was 13.44 ± 1.32 years (95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 13.38-13.5). Girls from families with high socio-economic status (SES) attained menarche 8.0 and 9.0 months earlier than their counterparts from families with middle and low SES respectively. Girls from small-size families had a significantly lower menarcheal age than their counterparts from large-size families. A comparison of the anthropometric indices of pre- and post-menarcheal girls showed: weight, 41.1 ± 6.3 kg (95% CI = 40.6-41.6) vs 47.6 ± 7.2 kg (95% CI = 47.3-47.9), P < 0.001; height, 146.2± 5.5 cm (95% CI = 145.7-146.7) vs 153.6 ± 9.9 cm (95% CI = 153.1-154.1), P < 0.001; BMI, 16.4 ± 1

  3. Association Between Age at Menarche and Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Diseases in Korean Women: The 2010 to 2013 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    PubMed

    Won, Jong Chul; Hong, Jae Won; Noh, Jung Hyun; Kim, Dong-Jun

    2016-05-01

    Early menarche is strongly associated with adulthood obesity; however, the relationship between age at menarche and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in Korean women remains poorly understood. Here, we investigated the association between early menarche and risk factors for developing CVD during adulthood using a nationwide population database.In total, 12,336 women (weighted n = 17,483,406; weighted age, 45.7 years) who participated in the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2010 to 2013 were included in this study. Participants were scored using the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria for metabolic syndrome. Risk of CVD was estimated using the 10-year Framingham Coronary Heart Disease Risk Point Scale (10-year FRS).Early menarche (≤11 years) was reported in 5.2% (weighted n = 917,493) of subjects. The weighted prevalences of metabolic syndrome and ≥20% 10-year FRS were 23.6% [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 22.7-24.6] and 7.7% (7.1-8.3), respectively. Women with early menarche reported a significantly higher body mass index and waist circumference, along with a higher prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome than those with later menarche (≥13 years). Furthermore, the prevalence of women with a ≥10% or ≥20% 10-year FRS was higher in those with early menarche than in other groups after adjusting for age, smoking, education level, and menstruation. Logistic regression analyses controlling for these and other confounding factors revealed odds ratios of 2.29 (95% CI = 1.25-4.19) and 1.78 (0.96-3.30) for ≥10% and ≥20% 10-year FRS in women with early menarche, respectively, compared with those in the latest menarche group (≥17 years).Taken together, this nationwide study revealed that women with early menarche are at increased risks of metabolic syndrome and CVD. Early menarche may therefore represent an important marker for early preventive interventions. PMID

  4. The Z CamPaign Early Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonsen, Mike

    2011-05-01

    The Z CamPaign is an observing project designed to acquire enough detailed, long-tem data to unambiguously classify dwarf novae as bona fide members of the Z Cam sub-type or not. Because the defining characteristic of all Z Cam dwarf novae are "standstills", a temporary period of relative quiet between maximum and minimum light, we are monitoring these systems for this specific activity. Amateur astronomers are gathering all the data with backyard telescopes as part of an AAVSO Cataclysmic Variable Section observing initiative. We will discuss the organization, science goals, and present early results of the Z CamPaign.

  5. The Z CamPaign Early Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonsen, M.

    2012-06-01

    (Abstract only) The Z CamPaign is an observing project designed to acquire enough detailed, long-term data to unambiguously classify dwarf novae as bona fide members of the Z Cam sub-type or not. Because the defining characteristic of all Z Cam dwarf novae are "standstills," a temporary period of relative quiet between maximum and minimum light, we are monitoring these systems for this specific activity. Amateur astronomers are gathering all the data with backyard telescopes as part of an AAVSO Cataclysmic Variable Section observing initiative. We will discuss the organization, science goals, and present early results of the Z CamPaign.

  6. Kepler Mission Development Challenges and Early Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanson, J.

    2011-01-01

    Kepler is NASA`s first mission capable of detecting Earth-size planets orbiting in the habitable zone of stars other than the sun. Kepler comprises a space telescope designed to continuously monitor the brightnesses of more than 100,000 target stars, and a ground segment to analyze the measured stellar light curves and detect the signatures of orbiting planets. In order to detect Earth-size planets orbiting Sun-like stars Kepler was designed to provide unprecedented photometric sensitivity and stability. This paper addresses some of the technical challenges encountered during the development of the Kepler mission and the measures taken to overcome them. Early scientific results are summarized.

  7. Kepler Mission Development Challenges and Early Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanson, J.; Duren, R.; Frerking, M.

    2011-01-01

    Kepler is NASA s first mission capable of detecting Earth-size planets orbiting in the habitable zone of stars other than the Sun. Kepler comprises a space telescope designed to continuously monitor the brightnesses of more than 100,000 target stars, and a ground segment to analyze the measured stellar light curves and detect the signatures of orbiting planets. In order to detect Earth-size planets orbiting Sun-like stars Kepler was designed to provide unprecedented photometric sensitivity and stability. This paper addresses some of the technical challenges encountered during the development of the Kepler mission and the measures taken to overcome them. Early scientific results are summarized.

  8. The Social and Psychological Meaning of Menarche.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Ruble, Diane N.

    In order to understand the psychological meaning of menarche it is necessary to examine cultural beliefs, socialization, and actual experience. A sample of 641 fifth to twelfth grade girls, 40% of whom were premenarcheal, completed a modified version of the Moos Menstrual Distress Questionnaire (MDQ). Half of the sample completed the MDQ according…

  9. The trend in age at menarche in Indonesia: birth cohorts 1944–1988.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Kitae

    2015-05-01

    Employing the Indonesian Family Life Survey, this paper depicts the trend in age at menarche in Indonesia for women born in 1944–1988. Mean age at menarche decreased from 14.39 years for birth year 1944 to 13.18 years for birth year 1988. Subsequently, this trend is related to the improvement in material conditions, measured by GDP per capita in childhood. The OLS results indicate that this decrease is largely explained by the improvement in material conditions. If age at menarche is considered an indicator of biological standard of living, these results suggest that the improvement in material conditions during the period converted to an improvement in biological standard of living.

  10. Association of size at birth with adolescent hormone levels, body size and age at menarche: relevance for breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Opdahl, S; Nilsen, T I L; Romundstad, P R; Vanky, E; Carlsen, S M; Vatten, L J

    2008-07-01

    Birth size has been positively associated with age at menarche and height in adolescence and adulthood, but the relevant biological mechanisms remain unclear. Among 262 Norwegian term-born singleton girls, birth size measures (weight, length, ponderal index, head circumference and subscapular skin-fold thickness) were analysed in relation to adolescent hormone levels (oestradiol, prolactin, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate, androstenedione and free testosterone index), age at menarche and adolescent (ages 12.7-15.5 years) and body size (height, weight, body mass index and waist-to-hip ratio) using survival analysis and general linear modelling. The results were adjusted for gestational age at birth, age and menarcheal status at measurement in adolescence and maternal age at menarche. Birth weight, birth length and head circumference were positively associated with adolescent weight and height, and small birth size was associated with earlier age at menarche. Subscapular skin-fold thickness at birth was not associated with adolescent body size, but low fold-thickness was associated with earlier age at menarche. Measures of birth size were inversely related to circulating levels of dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate in adolescence, but there was no clear association with other hormones. These results suggest that physical and sexual development in puberty and adolescence is influenced by prenatal factors, and in combination, these factors may influence health and disease later in life. PMID:18594544

  11. Early Results from the Long Wavelength Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Gregory B.; LWA Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The Long Wavelength Array (LWA) will be a new multi-purpose radio telescope operating in the frequency range 10-88 MHz. Scientific programs include pulsars, supernova remnants, general transient searches, radio recombination lines, solar and Jupiter bursts, investigations into the "dark ages" using redshifted hydrogen, and ionospheric phenomena. Upon completion, LWA will consist of 53 phased array "stations” distributed accross a region over 400 km in diameter. Each station consists of 256 pairs of dipole-type antennas whose signals are formed into beams, with outputs transported to a central location for high-resolution aperture synthesis imaging. The resulting image sensitivity is estimated to be a few mJy (5sigma, 8 MHz, 2 polarizations, 1 h, zenith) from 20-80 MHz; with angular resolution of a few arcseconds. Additional information is online at http://lwa.unm.edu. Partners in the LWA project include LANL, JPL, NRAO, NRL, UNM, NMT, and Virginia Tech. The first station of the LWA, called "LWA1", is located near the center of the EVLA and has recently begun scientific operations. The LWA1 images the sky in realtime using the "transient buffer - narrowband” (TBN) system which is operational with 257 dipoles, and a bandwidth of 70 kHz. The LWA1 can also form up to 4 beams on the sky simultaneously with 16 MHz bandwidth in each of two tuning and full polarization. Early results include observations of pulsars, the Sun, and Jupiter.

  12. Life-course origins of the ages at menarche and menopause

    PubMed Central

    Forman, Michele R; Mangini, Lauren D; Thelus-Jean, Rosenie; Hayward, Mark D

    2013-01-01

    A woman’s age at menarche (first menstrual period) and her age at menopause are the alpha and omega of her reproductive years. The timing of these milestones is critical for a woman’s health trajectory over her lifespan, as they are indicators of ovarian function and aging. Both early and late timing of either event are associated with risk for adverse health and psychosocial outcomes. Thus, the search for a relationship between age at menarche and menopause has consequences for chronic disease prevention and implications for public health. This article is a review of evidence from the fields of developmental biology, epidemiology, nutrition, demography, sociology, and psychology that examine the menarche–menopause connection. Trends in ages at menarche and menopause worldwide and in subpopulations are presented; however, challenges exist in constructing trends. Among 36 studies that examine the association between the two sentinel events, ten reported a significant direct association, two an inverse association, and the remainder had null findings. Multiple factors, including hormonal and environmental exposures, socioeconomic status, and stress throughout the life course are hypothesized to influence the tempo of growth, including body size and height, development, menarche, menopause, and the aging process in women. The complexity of these factors and the pathways related to their effects on each sentinel event complicate evaluation of the relationship between menarche and menopause. Limitations of past investigations are discussed, including lack of comparability of socioeconomic status indicators and biomarker use across studies, while minority group differences have received scant attention. Suggestions for future directions are proposed. As research across endocrinology, epidemiology, and the social sciences becomes more integrated, the confluence of perspectives will yield a richer understanding of the influences on the tempo of a woman

  13. LANDSAT 7: Early on-Orbit Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. L.; Irons, J. R.; Barker, J. L.; Markham, B. L.; Pedelty, J, A.

    1999-01-01

    As this article was being submitted in mid-March, 1999, Landsat 7 had been cleared for an official launch date of April, 15, 1999, approximately 4 - 5 weeks prior to the Portland ASPRS conference. Although it is hoped that the presentation in Portland will be the first public status report on the in-orbit performance of the Landsat 7 spacecraft and the ETM+ instrument, it is impossible to discuss "early on-orbit performance" prior to launch. Therefore, we have chosen to summarize the overarching salient features of the Landsat 7 program, and we will point to some web sites where additional information about the program can be found (e.g., http://geo.arc.nasa.gov/sge/landsat/landsat. html). At this time, the Landsat Project Science Office is pleased to report that the performance of the ETM+ instrument appears to be very good. In addition to excellent instrument performance, a robust data acquisition plan has been developed with the goal of acquiring a seasonally-refreshed archive of global land observations at the EROS Data Center annually. A ground processing system is being implemented at EROS that will be capable of capturing, processing and archiving 250 Landsat scenes per day, and delivering 100 scene products to users each day. The cost of a systematically-processed Level 1 product will be less than $600, and there will be no copyright protection on the data. The net result is that the use of remote sensing data in our daily lives is expected to grow dramatically. This growth is expected to benefit all facets of the land remote sensing community.

  14. Precocious puberty presenting with menarche at the age of 6 years - a case report.

    PubMed

    Banu, J; Sultana, P; Chowdhury, M A

    2014-07-01

    Precocious puberty or central precocious puberty can be very confusing and truly unexpected. After all who know children could go into puberty too early? There is treatment for this condition. Present report has stated that central precocious puberty is becoming more frequent. Many factors may contribute to children who exhibit signs of early precocious puberty. Here we are reporting a case of premature menarche of 6 years old girl who initially presented with continuous per vaginal bleeding for 3 months as a onset of menarche later on after clinical examination and investigations she was diagnosed a precocious puberty due to juvenile premature hypothyroidism. After the successful treatment with thyroxin, level of TSH gradually was decreased and subsequently normal. There after per vaginal bleeding stopped and clinically improved. PMID:25178615

  15. Important Role of Menarche in Development of Estrogen Receptor–Negative Breast Cancer in African American Women

    PubMed Central

    Zirpoli, Gary; Hong, Chi-Chen; Yao, Song; Troester, Melissa A.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Schedin, Pepper; Bethea, Traci N.; Borges, Virginia; Park, Song-Yi; Chandra, Dhyan; Rosenberg, Lynn; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Olshan, Andrew F.; Palmer, Julie R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Menarche is a critical time point for diverging fates of mammary cells of origin. African American women have young age at menarche, which could be associated with their high rates of estrogen receptor–negative (ER-) breast cancer. Methods: In the AMBER Consortium, using harmonized data from 4426 African American women with breast cancer and 17 474 controls, we used polytomous logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for ages at menarche and first live birth (FLB), and the interval between, in relation to ER+ and ER- breast cancer. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Risk of ER- breast cancer was reduced with later age at menarche among both parous and nulliparous women (≥15 vs <11 years OR = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.48 to 0.81 and OR = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.29 to 1.10, respectively), with no effect of age at FLB. For ER+ breast cancer, the inverse association was weaker among nulliparous women. While longer intervals between menarche and FLB were associated with increased risk of ER+ breast cancer in a dose-response fashion (OR for 20 year interval = 1.39, 95% CI = 1.08 to 1.79, P trend = .003), ER- risk was only increased for intervals up to 14 years and not beyond (P trend = .33). Conclusions: While ER- breast cancer risk was markedly reduced in women with a late age at menarche, there was not a clear pattern of increased risk with longer interval between menarche and FLB, as was observed for ER+ breast cancer. These findings indicate that etiologic pathways involving adolescence and pregnancy may differ for ER- and ER+ breast cancer. PMID:26085483

  16. Genome-wide association study of sexual maturation in males and females highlights a role for body mass and menarche loci in male puberty

    PubMed Central

    Cousminer, Diana L.; Stergiakouli, Evangelia; Berry, Diane J.; Ang, Wei; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria M.; Körner, Antje; Siitonen, Niina; Ntalla, Ioanna; Marinelli, Marcella; Perry, John R.B.; Kettunen, Johannes; Jansen, Rick; Surakka, Ida; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Ring, Susan; Mcmahon, George; Power, Chris; Wang, Carol; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Lehtimäki, Terho; Middeldorp, Christel M.; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.; Neef, Madlen; Weise, Sebastian; Pahkala, Katja; Niinikoski, Harri; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Bustamante, Mariona; Penninx, Brenda W.J.H.; Murabito, Joanne; Torrent, Maties; Dedoussis, George V.; Kiess, Wieland; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Pennell, Craig E.; Raitakari, Olli T.; Hyppönen, Elina; Davey Smith, George; Ripatti, Samuli; McCarthy, Mark I.; Widén, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about genes regulating male puberty. Further, while many identified pubertal timing variants associate with age at menarche, a late manifestation of puberty, and body mass, little is known about these variants' relationship to pubertal initiation or tempo. To address these questions, we performed genome-wide association meta-analysis in over 11 000 European samples with data on early pubertal traits, male genital and female breast development, measured by the Tanner scale. We report the first genome-wide significant locus for male sexual development upstream of myocardin-like 2 (MKL2) (P = 8.9 × 10−9), a menarche locus tagging a developmental pathway linking earlier puberty with reduced pubertal growth (P = 4.6 × 10−5) and short adult stature (p = 7.5 × 10−6) in both males and females. Furthermore, our results indicate that a proportion of menarche loci are important for pubertal initiation in both sexes. Consistent with epidemiological correlations between increased prepubertal body mass and earlier pubertal timing in girls, body mass index (BMI)-increasing alleles correlated with earlier breast development. In boys, some BMI-increasing alleles associated with earlier, and others with delayed, sexual development; these genetic results mimic the controversy in epidemiological studies, some of which show opposing correlations between prepubertal BMI and male puberty. Our results contribute to our understanding of the pubertal initiation program in both sexes and indicate that although mechanisms regulating pubertal onset in males and females may largely be shared, the relationship between body mass and pubertal timing in boys may be complex and requires further genetic studies. PMID:24770850

  17. Genome-wide association study of sexual maturation in males and females highlights a role for body mass and menarche loci in male puberty.

    PubMed

    Cousminer, Diana L; Stergiakouli, Evangelia; Berry, Diane J; Ang, Wei; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria M; Körner, Antje; Siitonen, Niina; Ntalla, Ioanna; Marinelli, Marcella; Perry, John R B; Kettunen, Johannes; Jansen, Rick; Surakka, Ida; Timpson, Nicholas J; Ring, Susan; Mcmahon, George; Power, Chris; Wang, Carol; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Lehtimäki, Terho; Middeldorp, Christel M; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Neef, Madlen; Weise, Sebastian; Pahkala, Katja; Niinikoski, Harri; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Bustamante, Mariona; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Murabito, Joanne; Torrent, Maties; Dedoussis, George V; Kiess, Wieland; Boomsma, Dorret I; Pennell, Craig E; Raitakari, Olli T; Hyppönen, Elina; Davey Smith, George; Ripatti, Samuli; McCarthy, Mark I; Widén, Elisabeth

    2014-08-15

    Little is known about genes regulating male puberty. Further, while many identified pubertal timing variants associate with age at menarche, a late manifestation of puberty, and body mass, little is known about these variants' relationship to pubertal initiation or tempo. To address these questions, we performed genome-wide association meta-analysis in over 11 000 European samples with data on early pubertal traits, male genital and female breast development, measured by the Tanner scale. We report the first genome-wide significant locus for male sexual development upstream of myocardin-like 2 (MKL2) (P = 8.9 × 10(-9)), a menarche locus tagging a developmental pathway linking earlier puberty with reduced pubertal growth (P = 4.6 × 10(-5)) and short adult stature (p = 7.5 × 10(-6)) in both males and females. Furthermore, our results indicate that a proportion of menarche loci are important for pubertal initiation in both sexes. Consistent with epidemiological correlations between increased prepubertal body mass and earlier pubertal timing in girls, body mass index (BMI)-increasing alleles correlated with earlier breast development. In boys, some BMI-increasing alleles associated with earlier, and others with delayed, sexual development; these genetic results mimic the controversy in epidemiological studies, some of which show opposing correlations between prepubertal BMI and male puberty. Our results contribute to our understanding of the pubertal initiation program in both sexes and indicate that although mechanisms regulating pubertal onset in males and females may largely be shared, the relationship between body mass and pubertal timing in boys may be complex and requires further genetic studies.

  18. MERIS 1st Year: early calibration results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delwart, Steven; Bourg, Ludovic; Huot, Jean-Paul

    2004-02-01

    Envisat is ESA's environmental research satellite launched on 1 March 2002. It carries a suit of sensors offering opportunities for a broad range of scientific research and applications. The calibration results from the first year of operation of the MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) will be presented, including in-flight verification and radiometric, spectral and geometric characterization of the instrument. Radiometric calibration using the on-board diffuser will be discussed and comparison with vicarious calibration results over desert sites or well-characterized marine sites will be presented. The image quality will be assessed, and improvements resulting from the in-flight characterization will be presented.

  19. The effect of menarche age, parity and lactation on bone mineral density in premenopausal ambulatory multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Sioka, Chrissa; Fotopoulos, Andreas; Papakonstantinou, Stilianos; Georgiou, Athanasia; Pelidou, Sygliti-Henrietta; Kyritsis, Athanasios P; Kalef-Ezra, John A

    2015-07-01

    Although pregnancy and breast-feeding do not have any deleterious effect on disease activity in female multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, their role on bone mineral density (BMD) and osteoporosis risk is unknown. We investigated the role of age at menarche, parity and lactation on BMD expressed as percentage of the mean BMD (%BMD) in 46 pre-menopausal ambulatory female MS patients using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans in lumbar spine (LS) and hip. MS female patients with age at menarche ≥13 years old had reduced %BMD compared to those with menarche age <13 years (95.2±10.7 vs 102.1±13.3, p=0.05 in LS; 90.5±12.6 vs 99.8±12.6, p=0.02 in hip). Parity did not result in any statistically significant changes in either LS or hip. Patients that breastfed their offspring compared to those that did not had significantly lower BMD in both LS (93.9±9.3 vs 110.7±15.6, p=0.004) and hip (91.6±10.7 vs 105.6±15.3, p=0.02). MS female patients with menarche at age≥13 years and those who breastfed their offspring may have reduced BMD. Larger studies are needed to verify these findings and establish a definite role of menarche age and breast feeding with BMD.

  20. Diabetes mellitus and its effects on menarche.

    PubMed

    Schriock, E A; Winter, R J; Traisman, H S

    1984-04-01

    In a combined mail and medical record survey of 121 non-diabetic and 90 diabetic girls greater than or equal to 9 years of age, the mean age of menarche in the control non-diabetic population was 13.0 +/- 1.2 years and 13.4 +/- 1.2 years in the diabetics. The diabetic group was divided into those whose onset was before or after age 11 years (DM less than 11, DM greater than or equal to 11). The DM greater than or equal to 11 group had a mean menarchal age of 14.0 +/- 1.2 years and the DM less than 11 group, 13.1 +/- 1.2 (p less than 0.005). The DM greater than or equal to 11 group also differed significantly from the control group. The difference between the two groups suggests that the onset of diabetes near the onset of puberty may have a more disruptive effect on hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis maturation that does the prepubertal onset of diabetes.

  1. Does handedness and altitude affect age at menarche?

    PubMed

    Orbak, Zerrin

    2005-08-01

    Although there is knowledge about earlier mean age at menopause among left-handed postmenopausal women, it is unclear from the literature whether age of menarche is influenced by the prenatal hormonal pattern and cerebral lateralization. We therefore planned to investigate the relation between age of menarche and cerebral lateralization in girls at an altitude of nearly 2000 m. Sixty-two girls, aged between 9.4 and 15.5 years, were interviewed by questionnaire about manual dominance and menarcheal age. All girls were divided into two groups: left-handers (n = 31) and right-handers (n = 31). It was shown that there was a significantly lower average age of menarcheal appearance (12.96 +/- 1.34 years) in the left-handers' compared with the right-handers' (13.72 +/- 1.41 years; p = 0.025). The earliest menarcheal age was 9.4 years in left-handers and 10.1 years in right-handers.A menarcheal age of 13.34 +/- 1.35 years was found for the whole group at an altitude of nearly 2000 m. This data leads us to believe the existence of a link between functional brain asymmetry and menarche. It would appear that the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis is earlier in left-handed females than in right-handed females.

  2. Reduction pneumonoplasty for emphysema. Early results.

    PubMed Central

    Little, A G; Swain, J A; Nino, J J; Prabhu, R D; Schlachter, M D; Barcia, T C

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors determined the role of Nd:YAG laser reduction pneumonoplasty for selected patients with diffuse emphysema. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The study is based on the concepts introduced 30 years ago by Brantigan regarding the value of lung reduction surgery in patients with emphysema. The authors used minimally invasive techniques with the hopes of providing appropriate clinical results with the least surgical morbidity. METHODS: Fifty-five patients with advanced symptomatic emphysema were treated with unilateral Nd:YAG laser reduction pneumonoplasty to achieve lung volume reduction. RESULTS: Patients experienced significant improvement in exercise capacity and relief of breathlessness. This correlated with improvement in objective measures of pulmonary function and with reduction in lung volume by radiographic and spirometric measures. Significant associated hospital morbidity and a 5.5% mortality were associated. CONCLUSIONS: These encouraging results with treatment of only one lung will be built on with both sequential lung and simultaneous, bilateral lung treatment protocols. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:7677465

  3. Landsat-7 Mission and Early Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, S. Kenneth; Sabelhaus, Phillip A.; Williams, Darrel L.; Irons, James R.; Barker, John L.; Markham, Brian L.; Bolek, Joseph T.; Scott, Steven S.; Thompson, R. J.; Rapp, Jeffrey J.

    1999-01-01

    The Landsat-7 mission has the goal of acquiring annual data sets of reflective band digital imagery of the landmass of the Earth at a spatial resolution of 30 meters for a period of five years using the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) imager on the Landsat-7 satellite. The satellite was launched on April 15, 1999. The mission builds on the 27-year continuous archive of thematic images of the Earth from previous Landsat satellites. This paper will describe the ETM+ instrument, the spacecraft, and the ground processing system in place to accomplish the mission. Results from the first few months in orbit will be given, with emphasis on performance parameters that affect image quality, quantity, and availability. There will also be a discussion of the Landsat Data Policy and the user interface designed to make contents of the archive readily available, expedite ordering, and distribute the data quickly. Landsat-7, established by a Presidential Directive and a Public Law, is a joint program of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Science Enterprise and the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observing System (EROS) Data Center.

  4. Genetics, Genome-Wide Association Studies, and Menarche.

    PubMed

    Witchel, Selma Feldman

    2016-07-01

    Puberty is characterized by maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, development of secondary sexual features, increased linear growth velocity, maturation of the epiphyses limiting additional growth, and achievement of menarche. The age at menarche appears to have a significant genetic component. With the advent of genome-wide association studies (GWASs), the genome has been interrogated to find associations between specific loci and age at menarche. It is apparent that multiple genetic loci, epigenetic mechanisms, and environmental factors modulate this biological event crucial for reproductive competence.

  5. Genetics, Genome-Wide Association Studies, and Menarche.

    PubMed

    Witchel, Selma Feldman

    2016-07-01

    Puberty is characterized by maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, development of secondary sexual features, increased linear growth velocity, maturation of the epiphyses limiting additional growth, and achievement of menarche. The age at menarche appears to have a significant genetic component. With the advent of genome-wide association studies (GWASs), the genome has been interrogated to find associations between specific loci and age at menarche. It is apparent that multiple genetic loci, epigenetic mechanisms, and environmental factors modulate this biological event crucial for reproductive competence. PMID:27513021

  6. Early results from the infrared astronomical satellite.

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, G; Beichman, C A; Soifer, B T; Aumann, H H; Chester, T J; Gautier, T N; Gillett, F C; Hauser, M G; Houck, J R; Lonsdale, C J; Low, F J; Young, E T

    1984-04-01

    For 10 months the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) provided astronomers with what might be termed their first view of the infrared sky on a clear, dark night. Without IRAS, atmospheric absorption and the thermal emission from both the atmosphere and Earthbound telescopes make the task of the infrared astronomer comparable to what an optical astronomer would face if required to work only on cloudy afternoons. IRAS observations are serving astronomers in the same manner as the photographic plates of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey; just as the optical survey has been used by all astronomers for over three decades, as a source of quantitative information about the sky and as a "roadmap" for future observations, the results of IRAS will be studied for years to come. IRAS has demonstrated the power of infrared astronomy from space. Already, from a brief look at a miniscule fraction of the data available, we have learned much about the solar system, about nearby stars, about the Galaxy as a whole and about distant extragalactic systems. Comets are much dustier than previously thought. Solid particles, presumably the remnants of the star-formation process, orbit around Vega and other stars and may provide the raw material for planetary systems. Emission from cool interstellar material has been traced throughout the Galaxy all the way to the galactic poles. Both the clumpiness and breadth of the distribution of this material were previously unsuspected. The far-infrared sky away from the galactic plane has been found to be dominated by spiral galaxies, some of which emit more than 50 percent and as much as 98 percent of their energy in the infrared-an exciting and surprising revelation. The IRAS mission is clearly the pathfinder for future missions that, to a large extent, will be devoted to the discoveries revealed by IRAS. PMID:17783499

  7. [Correlation of menarche with age and various somatometric indexes].

    PubMed

    Jacobo, M; Malacara, J

    1985-01-01

    An analysis of age at menarche in Mexico is presented. Data concern 1,500 girls in the urban population of Leon. Consideration is given to differences by socioeconomic status, height, and weight. (summary in ENG)

  8. A Longitudinal Assessment of Associations between Adolescent Environment, Adversity Perception, and Economic Status on Fertility and Age of Menarche

    PubMed Central

    Amir, Dorsa; Jordan, Matthew R.; Bribiescas, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Perceptions of environmental adversity and access to economic resources in adolescence can theoretically affect the timing of life history transitions and investment in reproductive effort. Here we present evidence of correlations between variables associated with subjective extrinsic mortality, economic status, and reproductive effort in a nationally representative American population of young adults. Methods We used a longitudinal database that sampled American participants (N ≥ 1,579) at four points during early adolescence and early adulthood to test whether perceptions of environmental adversity and early economic status were associated with reproductive effort. Results We found that subjectively high ratings of environmental danger and low access to economic resources in adolescence were significantly associated with an earlier age of menarche in girls and earlier, more robust fertility in young adulthood. Conclusion While energetics and somatic condition remain as possible sources of variation, the results of this study support the hypothesis that perceptions of adversity early in life and limited access to economic resources are associated with differences in reproductive effort and scheduling. How these factors may covary with energetics and somatic condition merits further investigation. PMID:27249338

  9. Early Childhood Teacher Research: From Questions to Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castle, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    What is early childhood teacher research and why is it important? How does a teacher researcher formulate a research question and a plan for doing research? How do teachers apply research results to effect change? "Early Childhood Teacher Research" is an exciting new resource that will address the sorts of questions and concerns that pre- and…

  10. A Turkish study on menarche and menstrual experiences and their effects on attitudes towards menopause.

    PubMed

    Erbil, Nülüfer; Boyacı, Serap; Kurt, Ipek; Akdoğan, Yasemin; Kaya, Ilknur

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate women's menarche and menstrual experiences and their effects on attitudes towards menopause. This research was planned as cross-sectional. A total of 300 women who had applied for a physical examination at the Maternity and Gynecology and Children's Hospital of Ordu province of Turkey were recruited for the study using the convenience sampling method. The study was conducted between 16 April and 28 May 2008. The research data were gathered using the Menopause Attitude Scale and a questionnaire. The average score for women on the Menopause Attitude Scale was 37.85 ± 10.34. Significant differences were found between attitudes of women towards menopause and the information they had received before menarche about menstruation (P = 0.024), the meaning of menstruation (P = 0.014), the interval time between menstrual periods (P = 0.017), problems experienced before menstruation (P = 0.035) and the desire of some women to continue menstruating and delay menopause (P = 0.005). Results of this study showed that more than half of the women had negative attitudes towards menopause. In order to help girls and women develop positive attitudes about menarche, menstruation and menopause, they need to have access to information during all phases of these important physical changes.

  11. Age of menarche in Indian female basketball and volleyball players at different competitive levels.

    PubMed

    Mokha, R; Sidhu, L S

    1989-12-01

    Data for the age of menarche have been collected on 98 female volleyball players and 75 basketball players. The players belonged to four different levels of competition: international, national, intervarsity and district. Menarche is significantly delayed in players as compared with the controls. There is a continuous trend of increase in the age of menarche with the increasing levels of competition; menarche is more delayed in players playing at a higher level than those at the lower levels of competition.

  12. UGT2B4 previously implicated in the risk of breast cancer is associated with menarche timing in Ukrainian females.

    PubMed

    Yermachenko, Anna; Dvornyk, Volodymyr

    2016-09-15

    Age at menarche (AAM) is a multifactorial trait that is regulated by dozens environmental and genetic factors. Recent meta-analysis of GWAS showed significant association of 106 loci with AAM. These polymorphisms need replicating in different ethnic populations in order to confirm their association with menarche timing. This study was aimed to replicate 53 polymorphisms that were previously associated with AAM. DNA samples were collected from 416 Ukrainian young females for further genotyping. After data quality control 47 polymorphisms remained for the association analysis using the linear regression model. SNP rs13111134 located in UGT2B4 showed the most significant association with AAM (0.431years per allele A, padj=0.044 after the Bonferroni correction). Polymorphisms rs7589318 in POMC, rs11724758 in FABP2, rs7753051 in IGF2R, rs2288696 in FGFR1 and rs12444979 in GPRC5B may also contribute to menarche timing. However, none of these associations remained significant after the Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. The obtained results provide evidence that UGT2B4, which was previously associated with predisposition to breast cancer, may play a role in the onset of menarche.

  13. Childhood Experience and the Onset of Menarche: A Test of a Sociobiological Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffitt, Terrie E.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Used data from a longitudinal study of 16-year-old girls to test predictions about psychosocial factors in the onset of menarche. Found that family conflict and father's absence in childhood predicted an earlier age of menarche, and these factors in combination with weight showed some evidence of an additive influence on menarche. (Author/GLR)

  14. Nutritional Status and Age at Menarche on Female Students of Junior High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juliyatmi, Rihul Husnul; Handayani, Lina

    2015-01-01

    Menarche is the first menstrual period as one of the sign of puberty. There are many factors may affect the age at menarche such as nutritional status, genetic, environmental conditions, socioeconomic status, and education. The purpose of this research is to determine the relationship between nutritional status and age of menarche on female…

  15. Age of menarche in various categories of Indian sportswomen.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, L S; Grewal, R

    1980-12-01

    Data on the age of menarche has been collected on 264 Indian sportswomen, and 108 girls forming the control group, all hailing from the Punjab, Haryana, chandigarh and Delhi. Outstanding athletes and players of hockey, basketball and volleyball were included. The combined mean age at menarche for sportswomen is 15.21 years and for the control sample is 14.05 years. The differences in the two series are statistically significant. The mean age at menarche in hockey, basketball, volleyball and athletes is found to be 15.15, 15.40, 15.05 and 15.27 years respectively. The differences in these groups, however, are not found to be statistically significant.

  16. Age at Menarche, Level of Education, Parity and the Risk of Hysterectomy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses of Population-Based Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Louise F.; Mishra, Gita D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although rates have declined, hysterectomy is still a frequent gynaecological procedure. To date, there has been no systematic quantification of the relationships between early/mid-life exposures and hysterectomy. We performed a systematic review and meta-analyses to quantify the associations between age at menarche, education level, parity and hysterectomy. Methods Eligible studies were identified by searches in PubMed and Embase through March 2015. Study-specific estimates were summarised using random effects meta-analysis. Heterogeneity was explored using sub-group analysis and meta-regression. Results Thirty-two study populations were identified for inclusion in at least one meta-analysis. Each year older at menarche was associated with lower risk of hysterectomy—summary hazard ratio 0.86 (95% confidence interval: 0.78, 0.95; I2 = 0%); summary odds ratio 0.88 (95% confidence interval: 0.82, 0.94; I2 = 61%). Low education levels conferred a higher risk of hysterectomy in the lowest versus highest level meta-analysis (summary hazard ratio 1.87 (95% confidence interval: 1.25, 2.80; I2 = 86%), summary odds ratio 1.51 (95% confidence interval: 1.35, 1.69; I2 = 90%)) and dose-response meta-analysis (summary odds ratio 1.17 (95% confidence interval: 1.12, 1.23; I2 = 85%) per each level lower of education). Sub-group analysis showed that the birth cohort category of study participants, the reference category used for level of education, the year the included article was published, quality of the study (as assessed by the authors) and control for the key variables accounted for the high heterogeneity between studies in the education level meta-analyses. In the meta-analyses of studies of parity and hysterectomy the results were not statistically significant. Conclusions The present meta-analyses suggest that the early life factors of age at menarche and lower education level are associated with hysterectomy, although this evidence should be interpreted with

  17. The effect of menarche age, parity and lactation on bone mineral density in premenopausal ambulatory multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Sioka, Chrissa; Fotopoulos, Andreas; Papakonstantinou, Stilianos; Georgiou, Athanasia; Pelidou, Sygliti-Henrietta; Kyritsis, Athanasios P; Kalef-Ezra, John A

    2015-07-01

    Although pregnancy and breast-feeding do not have any deleterious effect on disease activity in female multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, their role on bone mineral density (BMD) and osteoporosis risk is unknown. We investigated the role of age at menarche, parity and lactation on BMD expressed as percentage of the mean BMD (%BMD) in 46 pre-menopausal ambulatory female MS patients using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans in lumbar spine (LS) and hip. MS female patients with age at menarche ≥13 years old had reduced %BMD compared to those with menarche age <13 years (95.2±10.7 vs 102.1±13.3, p=0.05 in LS; 90.5±12.6 vs 99.8±12.6, p=0.02 in hip). Parity did not result in any statistically significant changes in either LS or hip. Patients that breastfed their offspring compared to those that did not had significantly lower BMD in both LS (93.9±9.3 vs 110.7±15.6, p=0.004) and hip (91.6±10.7 vs 105.6±15.3, p=0.02). MS female patients with menarche at age≥13 years and those who breastfed their offspring may have reduced BMD. Larger studies are needed to verify these findings and establish a definite role of menarche age and breast feeding with BMD. PMID:26195044

  18. Early results from the ultra heavy cosmic ray experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osullivan, D.; Thompson, A.; Bosch, J.; Keegan, R.; Wenzel, K.-P.; Jansen, F.; Domingo, C.

    1995-01-01

    Data extraction and analysis of the LDEF Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment is continuing. Almost twice the pre LDEF world sample has been investigated and some details of the charge spectrum in the region from Z approximately 70 up to and including the actinides are presented. The early results indicate r process enhancement over solar system source abundances.

  19. Early Scientific Results from the Rejuvenated Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedner, Malcolm

    2010-01-01

    With the complete success of Servicing Mission 4 (SM4) to the Hubble Space Telescope in May, 2009, the Observatory's capabilities are extremely broad and beyond anything it has previously been equipped with. I will present results on the important early science corning out of the telescope and discuss prospects for the future."

  20. Age at menarche: the influence of environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saar, E.; Shalev, C.; Dalal, I.; Sod-Moriah, U. A.

    1988-03-01

    Age at menarche was studied by the recollection method in two groups of Causasian Jewish high school girls, inhabitants of two towns in Israel, Safad and Elat. The two towns differ mainly in climatic conditions. The age at menarche was found to be significantly lower ( P<0.02) in the hot town of Elat than in the temperate town of Safad: 13.30±1.21 and 13.58±0.9 years, respectively (mean ±SD). A significant association was found between the age at menarche and the town in which the girls lived. Accordingly, in the hot town of Elat, the percentage of girls who had their first menstrual cycle by the age of 12 years and earlier, was more than double that of the girls in Safad (17.9% and 7.1%, respectively). It is concluded that the environmental temperature, with or without any possible interaction of humidity, is probably responsible for the tendency for an earlier onset of menarche in girls living in the hot town of Elat.

  1. "A Kotex and a Smile": Mothers and Daughters at Menarche

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Janet

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the menarche or first-period narratives of 155 young women, focusing on their relationships with their mothers at this time. It finds that maternal scripts are changing as young women of this cohort, most of whom started their periods around the new millennium, recalled supportive mothers who were emotionally engaged with…

  2. Early retinoic acid deprivation in developing zebrafish results in microphthalmia.

    PubMed

    Le, Hong-Gam T; Dowling, John E; Cameron, D Joshua

    2012-09-01

    Vitamin A deficiency causes impaired vision and blindness in millions of children around the world. Previous studies in zebrafish have demonstrated that retinoic acid (RA), the acid form of vitamin A, plays a vital role in early eye development. The objective of this study was to describe the effects of early RA deficiency by treating zebrafish with diethylaminobenzaldehyde (DEAB), a potent inhibitor of the enzyme retinaldehyde dehydrogenase (RALDH) that converts retinal to RA. Zebrafish embryos were treated for 2 h beginning at 9 h postfertilization. Gross morphology and retinal development were examined at regular intervals for 5 days after treatment. The optokinetic reflex (OKR) test, visual background adaptation (VBA) test, and the electroretinogram (ERG) were performed to assess visual function and behavior. Early treatment of zebrafish embryos with 100 μM DEAB (9 h) resulted in reduced eye size, and this microphthalmia persisted through larval development. Retinal histology revealed that DEAB eyes had significant developmental abnormalities but had relatively normal retinal lamination by 5.5 days postfertilization. However, the fish showed neither an OKR nor a VBA response. Further, the retina did not respond to light as measured by the ERG. We conclude that early deficiency of RA during eye development causes microphthalmia as well as other visual defects, and that timing of the RA deficiency is critical to the developmental outcome.

  3. [Biomechanical principles, indications and early results of bipolar hip arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Bednarek, A; Gagała, J; Blacha, J

    1998-01-01

    The authors present indications and early results of bipolar hip arthroplasty in 58 patients (46 females, 12 males) aged 38-84 (mean 65 years). Femoral neck fracture in 51 patients, femoral neck pseudoarthrosis in 3, pathological fracture of the femoral neck in 2 and early type of hip osteoarthritis constituted the indication for bipolar hip replacement. No infection or dislocation has occurred. Mean follow-up was 1.5 years (6-36 months). Revision of the replacement was necessary in one patient due to faulty size of chosen implant. Results in remaining patients were rated excellent to good (mean Harris Hip Score was 93 points) with great range of movement in the operated hip. No signs of acetabular cartilage deterioration or prosthetic protrusion was observed.

  4. [Age of menarche and menstruation characteristics of Puerto Rican women athletes].

    PubMed

    Rivera, M A; Matos, R M; Volquez, B

    1990-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine and describe the chronological age, age at menarche (AM), age at initiation of training (AIT), years dedicated to training (YDT), selected menstrual characteristics, use of oral contraceptives, family size (FZ), birth order (BO), martial status, and number of children relative to sport of Puerto Rican women athletes. Fifty five (55) women athletes (track and field n = 6, basketball n = 7, gymnastics n = 5, synchronized swimming n = 9, swimming n = 5, softball n = 14, tennis n = 4 [field tennis n = 2, table tennis n = 2], and volleyball n = 5) members of the Puerto Rico Olympic Committee delegation to the XV Central American and Caribbean Games were interview. The M +/- sd of the variables were as follows: age = 21.0 +/- 5.3 years, AIT = 11.4 +/- 4.3 years, YDT = 9.6 +/- 4.4 years, AM = 13.2 +/- 1.6 years, BO = 2.7 +/- 1.3, y FZ = 3.7 +/- 1.9. Five percent of the sample (gymnasts = 2, swimmers = 1) had not attained menarche at the time of the study. The prevalence for menstrual irregularity and dysmenorrhea was 44.2 and 40.4%, respectively. With respect to the degree of certainty in the recall of age of menarche: 61.5% were very certain, 25% certain, and 13.5% uncertain. The prevalence of the use of oral contraceptives was 7.3%. In conclusion, the results are within the range of those reported for olympic athletes.

  5. The Advanced Photon Source: Performance and results from early operation

    SciTech Connect

    Moncton, D.E.

    1997-10-01

    The Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory is now providing researchers with extreme-brilliance undulator radiation in the hard x-ray region of the spectrum. All technical facilities and components are operational and have met design specifications. Fourteen research teams, occupying 20 sectors on the APS experiment hall floor, are currently installing beamline instrumentation or actively taking data. An overview is presented for the first operational years of the Advanced Photon Source. Emphasis is on the performance of accelerators and insertion devices, as well as early scientific results and future plans.

  6. Early results from the SWECS Rotor Wake Measurement Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A. C.

    Tests were conducted to quantitatively measure the nature and extent of the far wake of a horizontal-axis wind turbine. The tests were conducted at the Department of Transportation, Transportation Test Center in Pueblo, Colorado using controlled velocity tests. Early results presented in this paper show the width and downwind extent of the mean velocity wake. The measured interdependence of the wake strength and SWECS power coefficient is also presented. It is shown that the mean velocity wake is detectable on the wake centerline 14 at rotor diameters from the rotor hub.

  7. Preface: The LAMOST Galactic surveys and early results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Wei; Zhao, Gang; Hou, Jin-Liang

    2015-08-01

    By the time of this writing, the ongoing LAMOST Galactic surveys have collected approximately 4.5 million stellar spectra with signal-to-noise ratios better than 10 per pixel. This special issue is devoted to early results from the surveys, mostly based on the LAMOST Data Release 1 (DR1; Luo et al., this volume) that contains data secured by May 2013, the end of the first year of regular surveys, although a few studies have made use of data collected in the second year of regular surveys. LAMOST DR1 was released to the Chinese astronomical community and international partners in August 2013 and made public to the whole world in March 2015. Here we briefly review the scope and motivation, data reduction and release, as well as early results of the surveys. As the project advances, one can expect that these surveys will yield an exquisite description of the distribution, kinematics and chemistry of Galactic stellar populations, especially those within a few kpc of the Sun, a robust measurement of the local dark matter density, and, consequently, shed light on how our Galaxy, and other galaxies in general, form and evolve.

  8. The age of menarche as related to physical growth of junior high school girls in Jakarta.

    PubMed

    Samsudin

    1990-01-01

    A study on the age of menarche and its relation to physical growth was conducted in 1444 junior high school girls who were selected by means of stratified random sampling from 5 districts in Jakarta. This study revealed that 1276 girls had already menarche at different ages, 56.4% of them at the age under 13 years with 1.6% at the age 9-10 years. The mean age of menarche was 13.0 +/- 1.1 years. The relationship between the age of menarche and physical growth was studied on a subsample of 301 girls consisting of 133 whose age of menarche was the same as the chronological age at the time of study, and 168 who had not yet had menarche. Comparison on physical growth was based on weight, height, MUAC, and triceps skinfold respectively. The study reveal that significant higher values on those indices were observed in girls who had already had menarche as compared to the same age girls who had not yet. The value of difference was higher in younger age group as compared to the older one. Besides that the relatively higher values of weight for height combined with higher values for triceps skinfold indicates the relative overweight in girls with younger age of menarche. This study showed that menarche may occur at less than 13 years if a girl showed faster physical growth and was relatively overweight, although many other factors of growth and development should also be considered.

  9. Young western women's experiences of menarche and menstruation.

    PubMed

    Beausang, C C; Razor, A G

    2000-09-01

    A qualitative approach was used to examine young women's experiences of menarche and menstruation that were included in personal stories of growing up sexually. The personal experiences were examined by cross-case analysis to learn more about the narrators' attitudes toward menarche and their menstrual-related education. This was a secondary analysis using data collected for a study of common themes in the stories gathered in a 1998 study by Beausang. The data came from 332 stories written by students taking a sexuality course in a Midwestern community college. Of 227 stories written by women, 85 stories included menstrual experiences. Eleven narrators described menarche as a positive experience. In 10 of these stories, the mother was the primary teacher. The two most frequently identified sources of information by narrators were mothers and schoolteachers, with most narrators having a primarily negative view of their menstrual education regardless of the source. Problems with menstrual-related education were described as perceptions of unwillingness by teachers to discuss menstruation, time limits for education, unclear instruction leading to misconceptions, and the presence of peers in group learning situations that lead to embarrassment.

  10. Early Results from the Juno Mission at Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, Scott; Juno Science Team

    2016-10-01

    The Juno mission is the second mission in NASA's New Frontiers program. Launched in August 2011, Juno arrived at Jupiter July 4, 2016. Juno science goals include the study of Jupiter's origin, interior structure, deep atmosphere, aurora and magnetosphere. Juno's orbit around Jupiter is a polar elliptical orbit with perijove approximately 5000 km above the visible cloud tops. The payload consists of a set of microwave antennas for deep sounding, magnetometers, gravity radio science, low and high energy charged particle detectors, electric and magnetic field radio and plasma wave experiment, ultraviolet imaging spectrograph, infrared imager and a visible camera. Early results from the mission will be presented as well as an overview of planned observations.

  11. DEEP-South: Network Construction, Test Runs and Early Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Hong-Kyu; Kim, Myung-Jin; Yim, Hong-Suh; Choi, Young-Jun; Bae, Young-Ho; Roh, Dong-Goo; Park, Jintae; Moon, Bora

    2016-01-01

    Korea Microlensing Telescope Network (KMTNet) which consists of three identical 1.6 m wide-field telescopes with 18k × 18k CCDs, is the first optical survey system of its kind. The combination of fast optics and the mosaic CCD delivers seeing limited images over a 4 square degrees field of view. The main science goal of KMTNet is the discovery and characterization of exoplanets, yet it also offers various other science applications including DEep Ecliptic Patrol of SOUTHern sky (DEEP-South). The aim of DEEP-South is to discover and characterize asteroids and comets, including Near Earth Objects (NEOs). We started test runs last February after commissioning, and will return to normal operations in October 2015. A summary of early results from the test runs will be presented.

  12. Early Results from the MAVEN IUVS Echelle Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, J. T.; Mayyasi, M.; Schneider, N. M.; Deighan, J.; Stewart, I. F.; McClintock, B.; Jakosky, B. M.; Bhattacharyya, D.

    2015-12-01

    The IUVS instrument on MAVEN contains the first echelle spectrograph to be sent to another planet. The system has a novel optical design to enable long-aperture measurements of emission lines in the absence of continuum, intended primarily to measure the H and D Ly αlpha emission lines and thereby the D/H ratio from the martian upper atmosphere. The system also detects the OI 1304 triplet with the three component lines well resolved. The main scientific goal of the echelle channel is to measure the H and D Ly αlpha emissions, and to discover how the H and D densities, temperatures, and escape fluxes vary with location, season, topography, etc. The global D/H ratio of the martian atmosphere is roughly 5 times higher than in the terrestrial atmosphere due to the escape of a large volume of water into space, likely early in the history of Mars. Since H atoms escape faster than D atoms, the D/H ratio increases with time as more water is lost. Recent IR observations indicate large variations in the D/H ratio in the lower atmosphere from location to location, and possibly seasonal changes [Villanueva et al. 2015]. HST and MEX measurements of the H corona of Mars show large (order of magnitude) changes in the H exosphere and escape flux with changing seasons and/or heliospheric distance [Clarke et al. 2014; Chaffin et al. 2014]. Do the same variations apply to deuterium? Are there similar variations in the D/H ratio? Early results from the echelle channel will be presented.

  13. Early results with the cementless Variall hip system.

    PubMed

    Suda, Arnold J; Knahr, Karl

    2009-01-01

    This study presents the early results of the Variall cementless hip system, a further development of the reliable Alloclassic Zweymüller system. In a prospective randomized study, 319 patients (333 hips) underwent the Variall cementless hip system with four different bearings and were scored using the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) Score and the Short Form-36 health survey form, with a follow-up period of 3 years. The patients were grouped according to age, with those in the age range 23-75 years as group one (n = 285) and those over 75 years of age as group two (n = 48). For both the Short Form-36 and WOMAC scoring, worse function was found in group two (i.e., patients >75 years). In this group, the function scores were worse in patients who received a conventional polyethylene bearing. The clinical and radiological results after 5 or more years will lead to a clearer prediction. PMID:19105776

  14. The EOLE experiment: Early results and current objectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morel, P.; Bandeen, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    The EOLE experiment with 480 constant level balloons released in the Southern Hemisphere is described. Each balloon floating freely at approximately the 200 mb level, is a precise tracer of the horizontal motion of air masses, the accuracy of which is limited only by the laminated structure of the stratospheric flow, within an RMS uncertainty of 1.5 m/sec. The balloons were found after 2 months to distribute at random over the whole hemisphere outside the tropics, irrespective of their original launching site. Early results of Eulerian and Lagrangian averages of the EOLE wind data are given for describing the mean 200 mb zonal and meridional circulations. The effect of the small scale eddies of two-dimensional turbulence has been studied with respect to the relative eddy diffusion of pairs of balloons and the relative dispersion of triangular clusters. New estimates of the RMS divergence of the 200 mb flow are given, together with their scale dependence which was found to be a logarithmic law.

  15. Robotic Esophagectomy for Cancer: Early Results and Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Cerfolio, Robert J; Wei, Benjamin; Hawn, Mary T; Minnich, Douglas J

    2016-01-01

    Minimally invasive esophagectomy with intrathoracic dissection and anastomosis is increasingly performed. Our objectives are to report our operative technique, early results and lessons learned. This is a retrospective review of 85 consecutive patients who were scheduled for minimally invasive Ivor Lewis esophagectomy (laparoscopic or robotic abdominal and robotic chest) for esophageal cancer. Between 4/2011 and 3/2015, 85 (74 men, median age: 63) patients underwent robotic Ivor Lewis esophageal resection. In all, 64 patients (75%) had preoperative chemoradiotherapy, 99% had esophageal cancer, and 99% had an R0 resection. There were no abdominal or thoracic conversions for bleeding. There was 1 abdominal conversion for the inability to completely staple the gastric conduit. The mean operative time was 6 hours, median blood loss was 35ml (no intraoperative transfusions), median number of resected lymph nodes was 22, and median length of stay was 8 days. Conduit complications (anastomotic leak or conduit ischemia) occurred in 6 patients. The 30 and 90-day mortality were 3/85 (3.5%) and 9/85 (10.6%), respectively. Initial poor results led to protocol changes via root cause analysis: longer rehabilitation before surgery, liver biopsy in patients with history of suspected cirrhosis, and refinements to conduit preparation and anastomotic technique. Robotic Ivor Lewis esophagectomy for cancer provides an R0 resection with excellent lymph node resection. Our preferred port placement and operative techniques are described. Disappointingly high thoracic conduit problems and 30 and 90-day mortality led to lessons learned and implementation of change which are shared. PMID:27568155

  16. Skeletal Benefits of Pre-Menarcheal Gymnastics Are Retained After Activity Cessation

    PubMed Central

    Scerpella, Tamara A.; Dowthwaite, Jodi N.; Gero, Nicole M.; Kanaley, Jill A.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical loading during childhood and adolescence may yield skeletal benefits that persist beyond activity cessation and menarche. At 1 year pre- and 2 years post-menarche, non-dominant forearm areal bone mineral density (aBMD), bone mineral content (BMC) and projected area (area) were compared in gymnasts (n=9), ex-gymnasts (n=8) and non-gymnasts (n=13). At both observations, gymnasts and ex-gymnasts had higher forearm aBMD, BMC and area than non-gymnasts. gymnasts had higher post-menarcheal means than ex-gymnasts for all three parameters. Childhood mechanical loading yields skeletal advantages that persist at least 24 months after loading cessation and menarche. Continued post-menarcheal loading yields additional benefit. PMID:20332537

  17. Genetic variation at CYP3A is associated with age at menarche and breast cancer risk: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We have previously shown that a tag single nucleotide polymorphism (rs10235235), which maps to the CYP3A locus (7q22.1), was associated with a reduction in premenopausal urinary estrone glucuronide levels and a modest reduction in risk of breast cancer in women age ≤50 years. Methods We further investigated the association of rs10235235 with breast cancer risk in a large case control study of 47,346 cases and 47,570 controls from 52 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Genotyping of rs10235235 was conducted using a custom Illumina Infinium array. Stratified analyses were conducted to determine whether this association was modified by age at diagnosis, ethnicity, age at menarche or tumor characteristics. Results We confirmed the association of rs10235235 with breast cancer risk for women of European ancestry but found no evidence that this association differed with age at diagnosis. Heterozygote and homozygote odds ratios (ORs) were OR = 0.98 (95% CI 0.94, 1.01; P = 0.2) and OR = 0.80 (95% CI 0.69, 0.93; P = 0.004), respectively (Ptrend = 0.02). There was no evidence of effect modification by tumor characteristics. rs10235235 was, however, associated with age at menarche in controls (Ptrend = 0.005) but not cases (Ptrend = 0.97). Consequently the association between rs10235235 and breast cancer risk differed according to age at menarche (Phet = 0.02); the rare allele of rs10235235 was associated with a reduction in breast cancer risk for women who had their menarche age ≥15 years (ORhet = 0.84, 95% CI 0.75, 0.94; ORhom = 0.81, 95% CI 0.51, 1.30; Ptrend = 0.002) but not for those who had their menarche age ≤11 years (ORhet = 1.06, 95% CI 0.95, 1.19, ORhom = 1.07, 95% CI 0.67, 1.72; Ptrend = 0.29). Conclusions To our knowledge rs10235235 is the first single nucleotide polymorphism to be associated with both breast cancer risk and age at menarche consistent with the well-documented association between later age at

  18. Epidemiology of Uterine Fibroids: From Menarche to Menopause.

    PubMed

    Wise, Lauren A; Laughlin-Tommaso, Shannon K

    2016-03-01

    Uterine leiomyomata (UL) have a substantial impact on women's health, but relatively few studies have identified opportunities for primary prevention of these neoplasms. Most established risk factors are not modifiable, including premenopausal age, African ancestry, age at menarche, and childbearing history. The main challenge in studying UL is that a large proportion of tumors are asymptomatic. Herein, we review the epidemiology of UL from published studies to date. We highlight the advantages of ultrasound screening studies and the ways in which their innovative methods have helped clarify the etiology of disease. We conclude with a discussion of promising new hypotheses. PMID:26744813

  19. Midcarpal hemiarthroplasty for wrist arthritis: rationale and early results.

    PubMed

    Vance, Michael C; Packer, Greg; Tan, David; Crisco, J J Trey; Wolfe, Scott W

    2012-08-01

    Midcarpal hemiarthroplasty is a novel motion-preserving treatment for radiocarpal arthritis and is an alternative to current procedures that provide pain relief at the expense of wrist biomechanics and natural motion. It is indicated primarily in active patients with a well-preserved distal row and debilitating arthritic symptoms. By resurfacing the proximal carpal row, midcarpal arthroplasty relieves pain while preserving the midcarpal articulation and the anatomic center of wrist rotation. This technique has theoretical advantages when compared with current treatment options (i.e., arthrodesis and total wrist arthroplasty) since it provides coupled wrist motion, preserves radial length, is technically simple, and avoids the inherent risks of nonunion and distal component failure. The KinematX midcarpal hemiarthroplasty has an anatomic design and does not disrupt the integrity of the wrist ligaments. We have implanted this prosthesis in nine patients with promising early results. The indications for surgery were as follows: scapholunate advanced collapse wrist (three), posttraumatic osteoarthritis (three), inflammatory arthritis (two), and Keinböck disease (one). Prospective data has been collected and the results are preliminary given the infancy of the procedure. The mean follow-up was 30.9 weeks (range: 16 to 56 weeks). The mean Mayo wrist score increased from 31.9 preoperatively to 58.8 (p < 0.05) and the mean DASH score improved significantly from 47.8 preoperatively to 28.7 (p < 0.05). There was a trend toward increased motion but statistical significance was not reached. Two patients required manipulation for wrist stiffness. There was no evidence of prosthetic loosening or capitolunate narrowing. The procedure is simple (average surgical time was 49 minutes) and maintains coupled wrist motion through preservation of the midcarpal articulation. The preliminary data show that it appears safe but considerably longer follow-up is required before

  20. Chinese women in Italy--menarche, pregnancy and maternity.

    PubMed

    Argnani, Lisa; Toselli, Stefania; Gualdi-Russo, Emanuela

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the well-being and health status of Chinese immigrant women in Italy. The subjects (mean 29.5 years) frequented the "Health Center for Foreign Women and their Children" in Bologna, Italy. Information on living conditions, biological characteristics and pregnancy or maternity was obtained through interviews of the women in the Center during normal medical visits. Data on menarche age were based on the retrospective method since all the women were in China at the onset of menarche. Social factors influencing the health and behavior of Chinese women in Italian society are discussed. The analysis on children sex ratio at birth indicates that the old cultural Chinese tradition of son preference still continues to exist. These women have achieved a socio-economic improvement and generally good health status in Italy. The difficult living conditions they faced in China are indirectly reflected in their delayed puberty (14.4 +/- 1.4 years). The delayed sexual development was probably due to the same situation of severe poverty that forced them to migrate.

  1. Successful Pregnancy and Delivery After Radiation With Ovarian Shielding for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Before Menarche.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Naoya; Maebayashi, Toshiya; Aizawa, Takuya; Sakaguchi, Masakuni; Abe, Osamu; Saito, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Chin, Motoaki; Mugishima, Hideo

    2015-07-01

    Total body irradiation is performed as a preconditioning regimen to inhibit graft-versus-host disease after bone marrow transplantation and to eradicate remaining tumor cells. However, these regimens result in delayed secondary sex characteristics and failure of ovarian function recovery, leading to amenorrhea and infertility. Herein, we report a case of an 11-year-old girl diagnosed with acute lymphocytic leukemia who received induction chemotherapy and prophylactic cranial irradiation. For bone marrow transplantation, she received total body irradiation of 12 Gy with uterine and ovarian shielding at 13 years of age. The patient remained in remission and menarche began at 14 years of age. At 23, she became pregnant and delivered a baby naturally with no abnormalities.

  2. Aquarius Radiometer Performance: Early On-Orbit Calibration and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; LeVine, David M.; Yueh, Simon H.; Wentz, Frank; Ruf, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The Aquarius/SAC-D observatory was launched into a 657-km altitude, 6-PM ascending node, sun-synchronous polar orbit from Vandenberg, California, USA on June 10, 2011. The Aquarius instrument was commissioned two months after launch and began operating in mission mode August 25. The Aquarius radiometer meets all engineering requirements, exhibited initial calibration biases within expected error bars, and continues to operate well. A review of the instrument design, discussion of early on-orbit performance and calibration assessment, and investigation of an on-going calibration drift are summarized in this abstract.

  3. Planck early results. V. The Low Frequency Instrument data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacchei, A.; Maino, D.; Baccigalupi, C.; Bersanelli, M.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Cuttaia, F.; de Zotti, G.; Dick, J.; Frailis, M.; Galeotta, S.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Knoche, J.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leach, S.; Leahy, J. P.; López-Caniego, M.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Matthai, F.; Meinhold, P. R.; Mennella, A.; Morgante, G.; Morisset, N.; Natoli, P.; Pasian, F.; Perrotta, F.; Polenta, G.; Poutanen, T.; Reinecke, M.; Ricciardi, S.; Rohlfs, R.; Sandri, M.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Tomasi, M.; Valiviita, J.; Villa, F.; Zonca, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Bedini, L.; Bennett, K.; Binko, P.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bremer, M.; Cabella, P.; Cappellini, B.; Chen, X.; Colombo, L.; Cruz, M.; Curto, A.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Gasperis, G.; de Rosa, A.; de Troia, G.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Donzelli, S.; Dörl, U.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falvella, M. C.; Finelli, F.; Franceschi, E.; Gaier, T. C.; Gasparo, F.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giardino, G.; Gómez, F.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Hell, R.; Herranz, D.; Hovest, W.; Huynh, M.; Jewell, J.; Juvela, M.; Kisner, T. S.; Knox, L.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Lilje, P. B.; Lubin, P. M.; Maggio, G.; Marinucci, D.; Martínez-González, E.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Meharga, M. T.; Melchiorri, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Moss, A.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Pagano, L.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pearson, D.; Pettorino, V.; Pietrobon, D.; Prézeau, G.; Procopio, P.; Puget, J.-L.; Quercellini, C.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Robbers, G.; Rocha, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Salerno, E.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Silk, J. I.; Smoot, G. F.; Sternberg, J.; Stivoli, F.; Stompor, R.; Tofani, G.; Toffolatti, L.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Vielva, P.; Vittorio, N.; Vuerli, C.; Wade, L. A.; Watson, R.; White, S. D. M.; Wilkinson, A.

    2011-12-01

    We describe the processing of data from the Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) used in production of the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC). In particular, we discuss the steps involved in reducing the data from telemetry packets to cleaned, calibrated, time-ordered data (TOD) and frequency maps. Data are continuously calibrated using the modulation of the temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation induced by the motion of the spacecraft. Noise properties are estimated from TOD from which the sky signal has been removed using a generalized least square map-making algorithm. Measured 1/f noise knee-frequencies range from ~100 mHz at 30 GHz to a few tens of mHz at 70GHz. A destriping code (Madam) is employed to combine radiometric data and pointing information into sky maps, minimizing the variance of correlated noise. Noise covariance matrices required to compute statistical uncertainties on LFI and Planck products are also produced. Main beams are estimated down to the ≈-10dB level using Jupiter transits, which are also used for geometrical calibration of the focal plane. Corresponding author: A. Zacchei, e-mail: zacchei@oats.inaf.it

  4. Crossing Healthgrid borders: early results in medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Olabarriaga, Sílvia; Glatard, Tristan; Hoheisel, Andreas; Nederveen, Aart J; Krefting, Dagmar

    2009-01-01

    Image analysis has been strongly present in several healthgrid initiatives from the start, and today we find many imaging projects with successful grid implementations and developments. An example is the analysis of functional MRI data on grids, which has been successfully realized by several projects and that could be of interest for others. However, crossing the borders of existing grids is not trivial because the infrastructures being created for these projects differ, each adopting a (slightly) different software stack. This paper describes our early attempts to cross the borders between the German and Dutch grid infrastructures for medical imaging, motivated by a true wish to share expertise about fMRI analysis on grids between these two communities. We describe how we used off-the-shelf, production-level, grid technology to implement supporting mechanisms for cooperation in fMRI at several levels (users, data, software, workflows and computing resources). This simple exercise provided us valuable insights into the problems of crossing the borders of real grids from a user's perspective. Besides technical aspects, we observed that security and usability are very important for the success of inter-operation of Healthgrid.

  5. Early Science Results from the Dark Energy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Ashley

    2015-04-01

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is a next-generation large galaxy survey designed to unravel the mystery of the nature of the dark energy that powers the current accelerated expansion of the Universe. The DES collaboration built and participated in the installation and commissioning of DECam, a 570 mega-pixel optical and near-infrared camera with a large 3 deg2 field of view, set at the prime focus of the Víctor M. Blanco 4-meter telescope in at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. Using DECam, DES will map 5000 deg2 to a depth IAB ~ 24 and observe designated supernova survey fields at high cadence. These data will allow DES to measure positions, approximate redshifts, and shapes for 300 million galaxies, the light-curves of several thousand supernovae, and the masses of tens of thousands of galaxy clusters. Using these data, DES will use four main probes to study the properties of dark energy: galaxy clustering on large scales, weak gravitational lensing, galaxy-cluster abundance, and supernova distances. I describe the early progress of the survey and provide highlights of the science analyses that have been completed so far. These include: large-scale galaxy clustering measurements; significant detection of a cross-correlation with SPT CMB lensing maps; galaxy-shear and shear-shear correlation function measurements; discoveries of super-luminous supernovae, dozens of strong lenses, and redshift > 6 quasars; and characterization of DES galaxy clusters and SNe1a light-curves.

  6. FRONTIER FIELDS: HIGH-REDSHIFT PREDICTIONS AND EARLY RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Coe, Dan; Bradley, Larry; Zitrin, Adi

    2015-02-20

    The Frontier Fields program is obtaining deep Hubble and Spitzer Space Telescope images of new ''blank'' fields and nearby fields gravitationally lensed by massive galaxy clusters. The Hubble images of the lensed fields are revealing nJy sources (AB mag > 31), the faintest galaxies yet observed. The full program will transform our understanding of galaxy evolution in the first 600 million years (z > 9). Previous programs have yielded a dozen or so z > 9 candidates, including perhaps fewer than expected in the Ultra Deep Field and more than expected in shallower Hubble images. In this paper, we present high-redshift (z > 6) number count predictions for the Frontier Fields and candidates in three of the first Hubble images. We show the full Frontier Fields program may yield up to ∼70 z > 9 candidates (∼6 per field). We base this estimate on an extrapolation of luminosity functions observed between 4 < z < 8 and gravitational lensing models submitted by the community. However, in the first two deep infrared Hubble images obtained to date, we find z ∼ 8 candidates but no strong candidates at z > 9. We defer quantitative analysis of the z > 9 deficit (including detection completeness estimates) to future work including additional data. At these redshifts, cosmic variance (field-to-field variation) is expected to be significant (greater than ±50%) and include clustering of early galaxies formed in overdensities. The full Frontier Fields program will significantly mitigate this uncertainty by observing six independent sightlines each with a lensing cluster and nearby blank field.

  7. Fiber heart valve prosthesis: Early in vitro fatigue results.

    PubMed

    Vaesken, Antoine; Khoffi, Foued; Heim, Frederic; Dieval, Florence; Chakfe, Nabil

    2016-07-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement has become today a largely considered alternative technique to surgical valve replacement in patients with high risk for open chest surgery. Biological valve tissue used in the transcatheter devices has shown success over 5 years now, but the procedure remains expensive. Moreover, different studies point out potential degradations that the tissue can undergo when folded to lower diameter and released in calcified environment with irregular geometry, which may jeopardize the durability of the device. The use of synthetic materials, like textile in particular, to replace biological valve leaflets would help reducing the procedure costs, and limit the degradations when the valve is crimped. Textile polyester material has been extensively used in the vascular surgery and is characterized by outstanding folding and strength properties combined with proven biocompatibility. However, the friction effects that occur between filaments and between yarns within a fabric under flexure loading could be critical for the resistance of the material on the long term. The purpose of this study was to assess the early fatigue performances of textile valve prototypes under accelerated cyclic loading up to 200 Mio cycles. Durability tests show that the fibrous material undergoes rearrangements between fibrous elements within the textile construction and the mechanical properties are modified on the long term. But testing is not complete with 200 Mio cycles. The material should be tested up to a higher number of cycles in future work to test the effective long-term durability. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 986-992, 2016.

  8. Menopause and menarche in patients with primary blepharospasm: an exploratory case-control study.

    PubMed

    Martino, Davide; Livrea, Paolo; Giorelli, Maurizio; Masi, Gianluca; Aniello, Maria Stella; Defazio, Giovanni

    2002-01-01

    We studied the relationships between blepharospasm (BSP) and menopause/menarche in female patients with primary BSP (n = 83) and age-matched healthy (n = 83) and disease controls (n = 83). BSP patients and matched controls had comparable age at menopause, and there was no correlation between age at menopause and age at BSP onset. Thus, menopause probably exerts no significant influence on the age-dependent development of BSP. BSP cases tended to have a later menarche than either group of controls. The association was independent of age, disease duration and education level. Because the higher the age at menarche, the higher the age at BSP onset, later menarche was unlikely to be a risk factor for BSP. Rather, the two conditions may share pathophysiologic mechanisms, for example minor abnormality of neurotransmitter systems controlling both the motor system and the maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis responsible for the onset of puberty.

  9. Menarcheal age in a sample of Basque schoolgirls: a comparative study with other Spanish populations.

    PubMed

    Rebato, E; Rosique, J; González Apraiz, A

    1994-06-01

    Reported data on age at menarche in a sample of Biscayan schoolgirls are compared with data from several Spanish populations. Though the mean age falls in the range of variation of the Spanish means, the analysis of variance shows significant differences among the series. With regard to the possible secular trend of this event in the Biscay province, both a stability of menarcheal age and a diminution of the process of variability are observed.

  10. Materials Adherence Experiment on Mars Pathfinder: Early results

    SciTech Connect

    Landis, G.A.; Jenkins, P.P.; Hunter, G.

    1997-12-31

    The Materials Adherence Experiment (MAE) on the Pathfinder Sojourner rover will measure the dust deposition rate. By August, the Sojourner Rover on Mars Pathfinder will have completed its primary mission, and the experiment will have data on dust deposition during the first three weeks of operation on Mars. This paper will present the initial data from the experiment. This will be the first presentation of the results from the Pathfinder MAE experiment.

  11. MIS unicondylar knee arthroplasty: surgical approach and early results.

    PubMed

    Gesell, Mark W; Tria, Alfred J

    2004-11-01

    Unicondylar arthroplasty of the knee has seen a resurgence of interest in the United States. The principles of unicondylar arthroplasty of the knee are different from those for total knee arthroplasty, allowing replacement of only the affected joint compartment with less bone loss. Minimally invasive surgery allows for less soft tissue dissection with the potential for less morbidity. The key question is: will the changes associated with the minimally invasive surgery procedure improve the clinical results of the standard unicondylar arthroplasty of the knee or will the changes make the procedure too difficult and lead to an increasing failure rate? This study reviews the surgical technique and presents the 2 to 4 year results of the minimally invasive unicondylar arthroplasty of the knee 47 knees in 41 patients. The average range of motion increased from 121 degrees -132 degrees . The Knee Society pain score improved from 45-80 and the function score improved from 47-78. Only one knee has been revised. With proper patient selection, minimally invasive unicondylar arthroplasty of the knee allows for results that are at least equal to those of the standard open procedure at 2 to 4 years after the surgery.

  12. Early Results from the YOHKOH Soft X-ray Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruner, M. E.; Acton, L. W.; Lemen, J.; Hirayama, T.; Tsuneta, S.

    1992-05-01

    The The Soft X-ray Telescope on the Yohkoh satellite, launched by Japan on August 30, 1992, has proved to be a resounding success. It is providing a wealth of new information and many surprises, both on flares and on the behavior of the solar corona. Performance of the telescope has met or exceed our most optimistic expectations and it appears to be in perfect focus. Unlike the Skylab instruments, the Yohkoh telescope is not limited by a finite supply of film, permitting long sequences of images to be made with relatively high time resolution. Repetition rates for a given exposure / filter combination are typically a few seconds per frame to a few minutes per frame, depending on the selected field size. Movies assembled from long exposure sequences have shown the corona to be even more dynamic than expected. Major re-structuring, involving large fractions of the visible corona, can take place in an hour or two. Smaller regions are even more dynamic, changing almost continuously. Movies, created from long exposure sequences, have demonstrated the fundamental importance of large-scale coronal loops in connecting widely separated regions such that activity in one region quickly affects the physical conditions at remote sites. The images also show that the majority of the loops have nearly constant cross sections along their lengths, rather than one that increases with height. Several X-class flares have been observed; the surprising result is that they do not appear to be very dynamic in soft X-rays. The flare kernels seem to consist of compact loop structures that brighten and then fade without changing size or shape. Bright points are not as prominent as in the Skylab images; a result of using a CCD (a linear detector) rather than film which has a logarithmic response. The other instruments on Yohkoh are producing equally exciting results; it seems clear that the Yohkoh mission will produce many major advances in our knowledge of the flare mechanism.

  13. Early Results and Spaceflight Implications of the SWAB Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, C. Mark; Pierson, Duane L.

    2007-01-01

    Microbial monitoring of spacecraft environments provides key information in the assessment of infectious disease risk to the crew. Monitoring aboard the Mir space station and International Space Station (ISS) has provided a tremendous informational baseline to aid in determining the types and concentrations of microorganisms during a mission. Still, current microbial monitoring hardware utilizes culture-based methodology which may not detect many medically significant organisms, such as Legionella pneumophila. We hypothesize that evaluation of the ISS environment using non-culture-based technologies would reveal microorganisms not previously reported in spacecraft, allowing for a more complete health assessment. To achieve this goal, a spaceflight experiment, operationally designated as SWAB, was designed to evaluate the DNA from environmental samples collected from ISS and vehicles destined for ISS. Results from initial samples indicate that the sample collection and return procedures were successful. Analysis of these samples using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and targeted PCR primers for fungal contaminants is underway. The current results of SWAB and their implication for in-flight molecular analysis of environmental samples will be discussed.

  14. CMS tracking performance results from early LHC operation

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2010-11-24

    The first LHC pp collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 0.9 and 2.36 TeV were recorded by the CMS detector in December 2009. The trajectories of charged particles produced in the collisions were reconstructed using the all-silicon Tracker and their momenta were measured in the 3.8 T axial magnetic field. Results from the Tracker commissioning are presented including studies of timing, efficiency, signal-to-noise, resolution, and ionization energy. Reconstructed tracks are used to benchmark the performance in terms of track and vertex resolutions, reconstruction of decays, estimation of ionization energy loss, as well as identification of photon conversions, nuclear interactions, and heavy-flavour decays.

  15. The Whole Heliosphere Interval: Campaign Summaries and Early Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Barbara J.; Gibson, Sarah E.; Kozyra, Janet U.

    2008-01-01

    The Whole Heliosphere Interval (WHI) is an internationally coordinated observing and modeling effort to characterize the 3-dimensional interconnected solar-heliospheric-planetary system - a.k.a. the "heliophysical" system. The heart of the WHI campaign is the study of the interconnected 3-D heliophysical domain, from the interior of the Sun, to the Earth, outer planets, and into interstellar space. WHI observing campaigns began with the 3-0 solar structure from solar Carrington Rotation 2068, which ran from March 20 - April 16, 2008. Observations and models of the outer heliosphere and planetary impacts extended beyond those dates as necessary; for example, the solar wind transit time to outer planets can take months. WHI occurs during solar minimum, which optimizes our ability to characterize the 3-D heliosphere and trace the structure to the outer limits of the heliosphere. A summary of some of the key results from the WHI first workshop in August 2008 will be given.

  16. Early Run 2 Hard QCD Results from the ATLAS Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, Nicola

    2016-07-01

    We provide an overview of hard QCD results based on data collected with the ATLAS detector in proton-proton collision at √s = 13 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider. The production of high transverse momentum jets, photons and photon-pairs were studied; the inclusive jet cross section is found to agree well with the prediction of perturbative QCD calculations performed at next-to-leading accuracy. The production cross sections for W and Z bosons in their e and μ decays was measured; in general, agreement is found with the expectation of next-to-next-to leading order QCD calculations and interesting sensitivities to the proton structure functions are already observed. The top production cross sections were measured in different top decay channels and found to agree with the state of the art QCD predictions.

  17. CMS tracking performance results from early LHC operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hänsel, S.; Hoch, M.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kasieczka, G.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Krammer, M.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Teischinger, F.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Benucci, L.; Ceard, L.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Maes, T.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; Adler, V.; Beauceron, S.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Devroede, O.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, J.; Maes, M.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; Villella, I.; Chabert, E. C.; Charaf, O.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hammad, G. H.; Marage, P. E.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wickens, J.; Costantini, S.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Marinov, A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Vanelderen, L.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, J.; de Favereau de Jeneret, J.; Delaere, C.; Demin, P.; Favart, D.; Giammanco, A.; Grégoire, G.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Militaru, O.; Ovyn, S.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Quertenmont, L.; Schul, N.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Alves, G. A.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Carvalho, W.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Santoro, A.; Silva Do Amaral, S. M.; Sznajder, A.; Torres da Silva de Araujo, F.; Dias, F. A.; Dias, M. A. F.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Marinho, F.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Darmenov, N.; Dimitrov, L.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Trayanov, R.; Vankov, I.; Dyulendarova, M.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Marinova, E.; Mateev, M.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Yang, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Ban, Y.; Guo, S.; Hu, Z.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Zhu, B.; Cabrera, A.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Lelas, K.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Dzelalija, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Fereos, R.; Galanti, M.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Hektor, A.; Kadastik, M.; Kannike, K.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Azzolini, V.; Eerola, P.; Czellar, S.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Klem, J.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Sarkar, S.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Sillou, D.; Besancon, M.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Descamps, J.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Gentit, F. X.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Marionneau, M.; Millischer, L.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Rousseau, D.; Titov, M.; Verrecchia, P.; Baffioni, S.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Dobrzynski, L.; Elgammal, S.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Kalinowski, A.; Miné, P.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Sirois, Y.; Thiebaux, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Besson, A.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Greder, S.; Juillot, P.; Karim, M.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Mikami, Y.; Speck, J.; van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Baty, C.; Beaupere, N.; Bedjidian, M.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Boumediene, D.; Brun, H.; Chanon, N.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Le Grand, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sordini, V.; Tosi, S.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Xiao, H.; Roinishvili, V.; Anagnostou, G.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.; Merz, J.; Mohr, N.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Sprenger, D.; Weber, H.; Weber, M.; Wittmer, B.; Actis, O.; Ata, M.; Bender, W.; Biallass, P.; Erdmann, M.; Frangenheim, J.; Hebbeker, T.; Hinzmann, A.; Hoepfner, K.; Hof, C.; Kirsch, M.; Klimkovich, T.; Kreuzer, P.; Lanske, D.; Magass, C.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Papacz, P.; Pieta, H.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Sowa, M.; Steggemann, J.; Teyssier, D.; Zeidler, C.; Bontenackels, M.; Davids, M.; Duda, M.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Giffels, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Heydhausen, D.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Linn, A.; Nowack, A.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Sauerland, P.; Stahl, A.; Thomas, M.; Tornier, D.; Zoeller, M. H.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bergholz, M.; Borras, K.; Campbell, A.; Castro, E.; Dammann, D.; Eckerlin, G.; Flossdorf, A.; Flucke, G.; Geiser, A.; Hauk, J.; Jung, H.; Kasemann, M.; Katkov, I.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, H.; Knutsson, A.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lange, W.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Marienfeld, M.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Olzem, J.; Parenti, A.; Raspereza, A.; Schmidt, R.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Sen, N.; Stein, M.; Tomaszewska, J.; Volyanskyy, D.; Wissing, C.; Autermann, C.; Bobrovskyi, S.; Draeger, J.; Eckstein, D.; Enderle, H.; Gebbert, U.; Kaschube, K.; Kaussen, G.; Klanner, R.; Mura, B.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nowak, F.; Pietsch, N.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schröder, M.; Schum, T.; Schwandt, J.; Srivastava, A. K.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Thomsen, J.; Wolf, R.; Bauer, J.; Buege, V.; Cakir, A.; Chwalek, T.; Daeuwel, D.; de Boer, W.; Dierlamm, A.; Dirkes, G.; Feindt, M.; Gruschke, J.; Hackstein, C.; Hartmann, F.; Heinrich, M.; Held, H.; Hoffmann, K. H.; Honc, S.; Kuhr, T.; Martschei, D.; Mueller, S.; Müller, Th.; Niegel, M.; Oberst, O.; Oehler, A.; Ott, J.; Peiffer, T.; Piparo, D.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Ratnikov, F.; Renz, M.; Sabellek, A.; Saout, C.; Scheurer, A.; Schieferdecker, P.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schott, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Troendle, D.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Zeise, M.; Zhukov, V.; Ziebarth, E. B.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Manolakos, I.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Mavrommatis, C.; Petrakou, E.; Gouskos, L.; Katsas, P.; Panagiotou, A.; Evangelou, I.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Patras, V.; Triantis, F. A.; Aranyi, A.; Bencze, G.; Boldizsar, L.; Debreczeni, G.; Hajdu, C.; Horvath, D.; Kapusi, A.; Krajczar, K.; Laszlo, A.; Sikler, F.; Vesztergombi, G.; Beni, N.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Veszpremi, V.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Jindal, M.; Kaur, M.; Kohli, J. M.; Mehta, M. Z.; Nishu, N.; Saini, L. K.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, R.; Singh, A. P.; Singh, J. B.; Singh, S. P.; Ahuja, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chauhan, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Gupta, P.; Jain, S.; Jain, S.; Kumar, A.; Ranjan, K.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Choudhury, R. K.; Dutta, D.; Kailas, S.; Kataria, S. K.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Suggisetti, P.; Aziz, T.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Maity, M.; Majumder, D.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Saha, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Banerjee, S.; Dugad, S.; Mondal, N. K.; Arfaei, H.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Fahim, A.; Hashemi, M.; Jafari, A.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Barbone, L.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Fedele, F.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Lusito, L.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Manna, N.; Marangelli, B.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pierro, G. A.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Romano, F.; Roselli, G.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Trentadue, R.; Tupputi, S.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, M.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Odorici, F.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Broccolo, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Frosali, S.; Gallo, E.; Genta, C.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Colafranceschi, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Fabbricatore, P.; Musenich, R.; Benaglia, A.; Cerati, G. B.; de Guio, F.; Di Matteo, L.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Malberti, M.; Malvezzi, S.; Martelli, A.; Massironi, A.; Menasce, D.; Miccio, V.; Moroni, L.; Negri, P.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Sala, S.; Salerno, R.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Tancini, V.; Taroni, S.; Buontempo, S.; Cimmino, A.; de Cosa, A.; de Gruttola, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Noli, P.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bellan, P.; Bisello, D.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Conti, E.; de Mattia, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Fanzago, F.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Giubilato, P.; Gresele, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Lazzizzera, I.; Margoni, M.; Mazzucato, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Perrozzi, L.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Zotto, P.; Zumerle, G.; Baesso, P.; Berzano, U.; Riccardi, C.; Torre, P.; Vitulo, P.; Viviani, C.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Caponeri, B.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Lucaroni, A.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Nappi, A.; Santocchia, A.; Servoli, L.; Valdata, M.; Volpe, R.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Castaldi, R.; Dagnolo, R. T.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Kraan, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Palmonari, F.; Segneri, G.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Del Re, D.; di Marco, E.; Diemoz, M.; Franci, D.; Grassi, M.; Longo, E.; Organtini, G.; Palma, A.; Pandolfi, F.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Biino, C.; Botta, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Castello, R.; Costa, M.; Demaria, N.; Graziano, A.; Mariotti, C.; Marone, M.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Mila, G.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Trocino, D.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ambroglini, F.; Belforte, S.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; Montanino, D.; Penzo, A.; Kim, H.; Chang, S.; Chung, J.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, J. E.; Kong, D. J.; Park, H.; Son, D.; Son, D. C.; Kim, Z.; Kim, J. Y.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Hong, B.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, T. J.; Lee, K. S.; Moon, D. H.; Park, S. K.; Rhee, H. B.; Sim, K. S.; Choi, M.; Kang, S.; Kim, H.; Park, C.; Park, I. C.; Park, S.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Lee, J.; Lee, S.; Seo, H.; Yu, I.; Janulis, M.; Martisiute, D.; Petrov, P.; Sabonis, T.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Reyes-Santos, M. A.; Allfrey, P.; Krofcheck, D.; Tam, J.; Butler, P. H.; Signal, T.; Williams, J. C.; Ahmad, M.; Ahmed, I.; Asghar, M. I.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Qazi, S.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Frueboes, T.; Gokieli, R.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Szleper, M.; Wrochna, G.; Zalewski, P.; Almeida, N.; David, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Martins, P.; Mini, G.; Musella, P.; Nayak, A.; Raposo, L.; Ribeiro, P. Q.; Seixas, J.; Silva, P.; Soares, D.; Varela, J.; Wöhri, H. K.; Belotelov, I.; Bunin, P.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Golutvin, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Kozlov, G.; Lanev, A.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Smirnov, V.; Volodko, A.; Zarubin, A.; Bondar, N.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Levchenko, P.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Andreev, Yu.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Matveev, V.; Pashenkov, A.; Toropin, A.; Troitsky, S.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Ilina, N.; Kaftanov, V.; Kossov, M.; Krokhotin, A.; Kuleshov, S.; Oulianov, A.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Shreyber, I.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Sarycheva, L.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Andreev, V.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Datsko, K.; Grishin, V.; Kachanov, V.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Slabospitsky, S.; Sobol, A.; Sytine, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Djordjevic, M.; Krpic, D.; Maletic, D.; Milosevic, J.; Puzovic, J.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Arce, P.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cepeda, M.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; de La Cruz, B.; Diez Pardos, C.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fern Ández Ramos, J. P.; Ferrando, A.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Merino, G.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Santaolalla, J.; Willmott, C.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Chuang, S. 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F.; Honma, A.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Lecoq, P.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Lourenço, C.; MacPherson, A.; Mäki, T.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moser, R.; Mozer, M. U.; Mulders, M.; Nesvold, E.; Orsini, L.; Perez, E.; Petrilli, A.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Pimiä, M.; Racz, A.; Rolandi, G.; Rovelli, C.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Segoni, I.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Spiropulu, M.; Stöckli, F.; Stoye, M.; Tropea, P.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Vichoudis, P.; Voutilainen, M.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Gabathuler, K.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; König, S.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Meier, F.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Sibille, J.; Starodumov, A.; Caminada, L.; Chen, Z.; Cittolin, S.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Eugster, J.; Freudenreich, K.; Grab, C.; Hervé, A.; Hintz, W.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Marchica, C.; Meridiani, P.; Milenovic, P.; Moortgat, F.; Nardulli, A.; Nef, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pape, L.; Pauss, F.; Punz, T.; Rizzi, A.; Ronga, F. J.; Sala, L.; Sanchez, A. K.; Sawley, M.-C.; Schinzel, D.; Stieger, B.; Tauscher, L.; Thea, A.; Theofilatos, K.; Treille, D.; Weber, M.; Wehrli, L.; Weng, J.; Aguiló, E.; Amsler, C.; Chiochia, V.; de Visscher, S.; Favaro, C.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Jaeger, A.; Millan Mejias, B.; Regenfus, C.; Robmann, P.; Rommerskirchen, T.; Schmidt, A.; Tsirigkas, D.; Wilke, L.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, K. H.; Chen, W. T.; Go, A.; Kuo, C. M.; Li, S. W.; Lin, W.; Liu, M. H.; Lu, Y. J.; Wu, J. H.; Yu, S. S.; Bartalini, P.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Kao, K. Y.; Lei, Y. J.; Lin, S. W.; Lu, R.-S.; Shiu, J. G.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Ueno, K.; Wang, C. C.; Wang, M.; Wei, J. T.; Adiguzel, A.; Ayhan, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Demir, Z.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gökbulut, G.; Güler, Y.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Karaman, T.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Nart, A.; Önengüt, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatöz, A.; Sahin, O.; Sengul, O.; Sogut, K.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Uzun, D.; Vergili, L. N.; Vergili, M.; Zorbilmez, C.; Akin, I. V.; Aliev, T.; Bilmis, S.; Deniz, M.; Gamsizkan, H.; Guler, A. M.; Ocalan, K.; Ozpineci, A.; Serin, M.; Sever, R.; Surat, U. E.; Yildirim, E.; Zeyrek, M.; Deliomeroglu, M.; Demir, D.; Gülmez, E.; Halu, A.; Isildak, B.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Özbek, M.; Ozkorucuklu, S.; Sonmez, N.; Levchuk, L.; Bell, P.; Bostock, F.; Brooke, J. J.; Cheng, T. L.; Cussans, D.; Frazier, R.; Goldstein, J.; Hansen, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Hill, C.; Huckvale, B.; Jackson, J.; Kreczko, L.; Mackay, C. K.; Metson, S.; Newbold, D. M.; Nirunpong, K.; Smith, V. J.; Ward, S.; Basso, L.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Camanzi, B.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Kennedy, B. W.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Tomalin, I. R.; Womersley, W. J.; Worm, S. D.; Bainbridge, R.; Ball, G.; Ballin, J.; Beuselinck, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Cutajar, M.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Foudas, C.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Guneratne Bryer, A.; Hall, G.; Hatherell, Z.; Hays, J.; Iles, G.; Karapostoli, G.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Marrouche, J.; Nandi, R.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Papageorgiou, A.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Pioppi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Rompotis, N.; Rose, A.; Ryan, M. J.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Sparrow, A.; Tapper, A.; Tourneur, S.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Wakefield, S.; Wardrope, D.; Whyntie, T.; Barrett, M.; Chadwick, M.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leslie, D.; Reid, I. D.; Teodorescu, L.; Bose, T.; Carrera Jarrin, E.; Clough, A.; Fantasia, C.; Heister, A.; St. John, J.; Lawson, P.; Lazic, D.; Rohlf, J.; Sulak, L.; Andrea, J.; Avetisyan, A.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chou, J. P.; Cutts, D.; Esen, S.; Ferapontov, A.; Heintz, U.; Jabeen, S.; Kukartsev, G.; Landsberg, G.; Narain, M.; Nguyen, D.; Speer, T.; Tsang, K. V.; Borgia, M. A.; Breedon, R.; Calderon de La Barca Sanchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Cox, P. T.; Dolen, J.; Erbacher, R.; Friis, E.; Ko, W.; Kopecky, A.; Lander, R.; Liu, H.; Maruyama, S.; Miceli, T.; Nikolic, M.; Pellett, D.; Robles, J.; Schwarz, T.; Searle, M.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Tripathi, M.; Vasquez Sierra, R.; Veelken, C.; Andreev, V.; Arisaka, K.; Cline, D.; Cousins, R.; Deisher, A.; Erhan, S.; Farrell, C.; Felcini, M.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Jarvis, C.; Plager, C.; Rakness, G.; Schlein, P.; Tucker, J.; Valuev, V.; Wallny, R.; Babb, J.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Giordano, F.; Hanson, G.; Jeng, G. Y.; Kao, S. C.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Luthra, A.; Nguyen, H.; Pasztor, G.; Satpathy, A.; Shen, B. C.; Stringer, R.; Sturdy, J.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wilken, R.; Wimpenny, S.; Andrews, W.; Branson, J. G.; Dusinberre, E.; Evans, D.; Golf, F.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Mangano, B.; Muelmenstaedt, J.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Petrucciani, G.; Pi, H.; Pieri, M.; Ranieri, R.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Barge, D.; Bellan, R.; Blume, M.; Campagnari, C.; D'Alfonso, M.; Danielson, T.; Garberson, J.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Kalavase, P.; Koay, S. A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krutelyov, V.; Lamb, J.; Lowette, S.; Pavlunin, V.; Rebassoo, F.; Ribnik, J.; Richman, J.; Rossin, R.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; Vlimant, J. R.; Witherell, M.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Gataullin, M.; Kcira, D.; Litvine, V.; Ma, Y.; Newman, H. B.; Rogan, C.; Shin, K.; Timciuc, V.; Traczyk, P.; Veverka, J.; Wilkinson, R.; Yang, Y.; Zhu, R. Y.; Akgun, B.; Carroll, R.; Ferguson, T.; Jang, D. W.; Jun, S. Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Terentyev, N.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Dinardo, M. E.; Drell, B. R.; Edelmaier, C. J.; Ford, W. T.; Heyburn, B.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Zang, S. L.; Agostino, L.; Alexander, J.; Blekman, F.; Chatterjee, A.; Das, S.; Eggert, N.; Fields, L. J.; Gibbons, L. K.; Heltsley, B.; Henriksson, K.; Hopkins, W.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Kreis, B.; Kuznetsov, V.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Puigh, D.; Riley, D.; Ryd, A.; Saelim, M.; Shi, X.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Vaughan, J.; Weng, Y.; Wittich, P.; Biselli, A.; Cirino, G.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Atac, M.; Bakken, J. A.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bloch, I.; Borcherding, F.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Chetluru, V.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Demarteau, M.; Eartly, D. P.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Gottschalk, E.; Green, D.; Gutsche, O.; Hahn, A.; Hanlon, J.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; James, E.; Jensen, H.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Khatiwada, R.; Kilminster, B.; Klima, B.; Kousouris, K.; Kunori, S.; Kwan, S.; Limon, P.; Lipton, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; McCauley, T.; Miao, T.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Popescu, S.; Pordes, R.; Prokofyev, O.; Saoulidou, N.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Smith, R. P.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Tan, P.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, W.; Yumiceva, F.; Yun, J. C.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Chen, M.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Dobur, D.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Fu, Y.; Furic, I. K.; Gartner, J.; Kim, B.; Klimenko, S.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotov, K.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kypreos, T.; Matchev, K.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Pakhotin, Y.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Prescott, C.; Remington, R.; Schmitt, M.; Scurlock, B.; Sellers, P.; Wang, D.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Ceron, C.; Gaultney, V.; Kramer, L.; Lebolo, L. M.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Mesa, D.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Chen, J.; Diamond, B.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Jenkins, M.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Sekmen, S.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Baarmand, M. M.; Guragain, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Mermerkaya, H.; Ralich, R.; Vodopiyanov, I.; Adams, M. R.; Anghel, I. M.; Apanasevich, L.; Bazterra, V. E.; Betts, R. R.; Callner, J.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dragoiu, C.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatian, S.; Lacroix, F.; Shabalina, E.; Smoron, A.; Strom, D.; Varelas, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Cankocak, K.; Clarida, W.; Duru, F.; Lae, C. K.; McCliment, E.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Newsom, C. R.; Norbeck, E.; Olson, J.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Sen, S.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bonato, A.; Eskew, C.; Fehling, D.; Giurgiu, G.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Hu, G.; Maksimovic, P.; Rappoccio, S.; Swartz, M.; Tran, N. V.; Whitbeck, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Grachov, O.; Murray, M.; Radicci, V.; Sanders, S.; Wood, J. S.; Zhukova, V.; Bandurin, D.; Bolton, T.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Maravin, Y.; Shrestha, S.; Svintradze, I.; Wan, Z.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Wright, D.; Baden, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Eno, S. C.; Ferencek, D.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kirn, M.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Rossato, K.; Rumerio, P.; Santanastasio, F.; Skuja, A.; Temple, J.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Twedt, E.; Alver, B.; Bauer, G.; Bendavid, J.; Busza, W.; Butz, E.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; D'Enterria, D.; Everaerts, P.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Hahn, K. A.; Harris, P.; Kim, Y.; Klute, M.; Lee, Y.-J.; Li, W.; Loizides, C.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Nahn, S.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rudolph, M.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Sung, K.; Wenger, E. A.; Wyslouch, B.; Xie, S.; Yang, M.; Yilmaz, Y.; Yoon, A. S.; Zanetti, M.; Cole, P.; Cooper, S. I.; Cushman, P.; Dahmes, B.; de Benedetti, A.; Dudero, P. R.; Franzoni, G.; Haupt, J.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Rekovic, V.; Rusack, R.; Sasseville, M.; Singovsky, A.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Perera, L.; Rahmat, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Butt, J.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Eads, M.; Keller, J.; Kelly, T.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Lundstedt, C.; Malbouisson, H.; Malik, S.; Snow, G. R.; Baur, U.; Iashvili, I.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Smith, K.; Zennamo, J.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Boeriu, O.; Chasco, M.; Reucroft, S.; Swain, J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Kubik, A.; Ofierzynski, R. A.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Antonelli, L.; Berry, D.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kolb, J.; Kolberg, T.; Lannon, K.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Morse, D. M.; Ruchti, R.; Slaunwhite, J.; Valls, N.; Warchol, J.; Wayne, M.; Ziegler, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Gu, J.; Killewald, P.; Ling, T. Y.; Rodenburg, M.; Williams, G.; Adam, N.; Berry, E.; Elmer, P.; Gerbaudo, D.; Halyo, V.; Hunt, A.; Jones, J.; Laird, E.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Acosta, J. G.; Huang, X. T.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Oliveros, S.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Zatzerklyaniy, A.; Alagoz, E.; Barnes, V. E.; Bolla, G.; Borrello, L.; Bortoletto, D.; Everett, A.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Gecse, Z.; Gutay, L.; Jones, M.; Koybasi, O.; Laasanen, A. T.; Leonardo, N.; Liu, C.; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Potamianos, K.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Jindal, P.; Parashar, N.; Cuplov, V.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Liu, J. H.; Morales, J.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Chung, Y. S.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Flacher, H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Gotra, Y.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Miner, D. C.; Orbaker, D.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Zielinski, M.; Bhatti, A.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Hatakeyama, K.; Lungu, G.; Mesropian, C.; Yan, M.; Atramentov, O.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hits, D.; Lath, A.; Rose, K.; Schnetzer, S.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Cerizza, G.; Hollingsworth, M.; Spanier, S.; Yang, Z. C.; York, A.; Asaadi, J.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Gurrola, A.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Montalvo, R.; Nguyen, C. N.; Pivarski, J.; Safonov, A.; Sengupta, S.; Toback, D.; Weinberger, M.; Akchurin, N.; Bardak, C.; Damgov, J.; Jeong, C.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Lee, S. W.; Mane, P.; Roh, Y.; Sill, A.; Volobouev, I.; Wigmans, R.; Yazgan, E.; Appelt, E.; Brownson, E.; Engh, D.; Florez, C.; Gabella, W.; Johns, W.; Kurt, P.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Sheldon, P.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Balazs, M.; Boutle, S.; Buehler, M.; Conetti, S.; Cox, B.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Neu, C.; Yohay, R.; Gollapinni, S.; Gunthoti, K.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Mattson, M.; Milstène, C.; Sakharov, A.; Anderson, M.; Bachtis, M.; Bellinger, J. N.; Carlsmith, D.; Dasu, S.; Dutta, S.; Efron, J.; Gray, L.; Grogg, K. S.; Grothe, M.; Herndon, M.; Klabbers, P.; Klukas, J.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Leonard, J.; Lomidze, D.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Polese, G.; Reeder, D.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Swanson, J.; Weinberg, M.

    2010-12-01

    The first LHC pp collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 0.9 and 2.36 TeV were recorded by the CMS detector in December 2009. The trajectories of charged particles produced in the collisions were reconstructed using the all-silicon Tracker and their momenta were measured in the 3.8 T axial magnetic field. Results from the Tracker commissioning are presented including studies of timing, efficiency, signal-to-noise, resolution, and ionization energy. Reconstructed tracks are used to benchmark the performance in terms of track and vertex resolutions, reconstruction of decays, estimation of ionization energy loss, as well as identification of photon conversions, nuclear interactions, and heavy-flavour decays.

  18. Early results from NASA's assessment of satellite servicing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Benjamin B.; Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Thronson, Harley A., Jr.; Ahmed, Mansoor; Whipple, Arthur O.; Oegerle, William R.

    2010-07-01

    Following recommendations by the NRC, NASA's FY 2008 Authorization Act and the FY 2009 and 2010 Appropriations bills directed NASA to assess the use of the human spaceflight architecture to service existing/future observatory-class scientific spacecraft. This interest in satellite servicing, with astronauts and/or with robots, reflects the success that NASA achieved with the Shuttle program and HST on behalf of the astronomical community as well as the successful construction of ISS. This study, led by NASA GSFC, will last about a year, leading to a final report to NASA and Congress in autumn 2010. We will report on its status, results from our March satellite servicing workshop, and recent concepts for serviceable scientific missions.

  19. Early MITHRAS results - The electric field response to substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Beaujardiere, O.; Holt, J.; Nielsen, E.

    1983-12-01

    The MITHRAS data base offers a unique opportunity to observe simultaneously the auroral-zone ion convection pattern with three radars, widely separated in longitude. It is attempted to separate local-time versus universal-time effects in a study of the electric field signature associated with substorms. Preliminary results indicate that this signature is similar at a given local time, regardless of the longitude of the station. In the dawn and dusk sectors the electric field is intensified, whereas around noon and midnight the electric field appears to reverse during a substorm. The potential drop across the polar cap can be estimated from the potential across the auroral oval. The radar data agree well with the relationship found by Reiff and co-workers between the solar wind energy parameter epsilon and the cross-tail potential.

  20. Early results from ISEE-A electric field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, J. P.; Maynard, N. C.; Aggson, T. L.

    1978-01-01

    In the solar wind and in middle latitude regions of the magnetosphere, spacecraft sheath fields obscure the ambient field under low plasma flux conditions such that valid measurements are confined to periods of moderately intense flux. Initial results show: (1) that the DC electric field is enhanced by roughly a factor of two in a narrow region at the front, increasing B, edge of the bow shock, (2) that scale lengths for large changes in E at the subsolar magnetopause are considerably shorter than scale lengths associated with the magnetic structure of the magnetopause, and (3) that the transverse distribution of B-aligned E-fields between the outer magnetosphere and ionospheric levels must be highly complex to account for the random turbulent appearance of the magnetospheric fields and the lack of corresponding time-space variations at ionospheric levels. Spike-like, non-oscillatory, fields lasting less than 0.2 seconds are occasionally seen at the bow shock and at the magnetopause and also intermittently appear in magnetosheath and plasma sheet regions under highly variable field conditions.

  1. Photodynamic therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer: early clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandanayake, N. S.; Huggett, M. T.; Bown, S. G.; Pogue, B. W.; Hasan, T.; Pereira, S. P.

    2010-02-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma ranks as the fourth most common cause of cancer death in the USA. Patients usually present late with advanced disease, limiting attempted curative surgery to 10% of cases. Overall prognosis is poor with one-year survival rates of less than 10% with palliative chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Given these dismal results, a minimally invasive treatment capable of local destruction of tumor tissue with low morbidity may have a place in the treatment of this disease. In this paper we review the preclinical photodynamic therapy (PDT) studies which have shown that it is possible to achieve a zone of necrosis in normal pancreas and implanted tumour tissue. Side effects of treatment and evidence of a potential survival advantage are discussed. We describe the only published clinical study of pancreatic interstitial PDT, which was carried out by our group (Bown et al Gut 2002), in 16 patients with unresectable locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. All patients had evidence of tumor necrosis on follow-up imaging, with a median survival from diagnosis of 12.5 months. Finally, we outline a phase I dose-escalation study of verteporfin single fibre PDT followed by standard gemcitabine chemotherapy which our group is currently undertaking in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Randomized controlled studies are also planned.

  2. NASA'S Coastal and Ocean Airborne Science Testbed (COAST): Early Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guild, L. S.; Dungan, J. L.; Edwards, M.; Russell, P. B.; Morrow, J. H.; Kudela, R. M.; Myers, J. S.; Livingston, J.; Lobitz, B.; Torres-Perez, J.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Coastal and Ocean Airborne Science Testbed (COAST) project advances coastal ecosystems research and ocean color calibration and validation capability by providing a unique airborne payload optimized for remote sensing in the optically complex coastal zone. The COAST instrument suite combines a customized imaging spectrometer, sunphotometer system, and a new bio-optical radiometer package to obtain ocean/coastal/atmosphere data simultaneously in flight for the first time. The imaging spectrometer (Headwall) is optimized in the blue region of the spectrum to emphasize remote sensing of marine and freshwater ecosystems. Simultaneous measurements supporting empirical atmospheric correction of image data is accomplished using the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14). Coastal Airborne In situ Radiometers (C-AIR, Biospherical Instruments, Inc.), developed for COAST for airborne campaigns from field-deployed microradiometer instrumentation, will provide measurements of apparent optical properties at the land/ocean boundary including optically shallow aquatic ecosystems. Ship-based measurements allowed validation of airborne measurements. Radiative transfer modeling on in-water measurements from the HyperPro and Compact-Optical Profiling System (C-OPS, the in-water companion to C-AIR) profiling systems allows for comparison of airborne and in-situ water leaving radiance measurements. Results of the October 2011 Monterey Bay COAST mission include preliminary data on coastal ocean color products, coincident spatial and temporal data on aerosol optical depth and water vapor column content, as well as derived exact water-leaving radiances.

  3. Early Results of Retrograde Transpopliteal Angioplasty of Iliofemoral Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Saumitra; Gibson, Matthew; Magee, Timothy R.; Galland, Robert B.; Torrie, E. Peter H.

    2001-12-15

    Purpose: To assess whether the retrograde transpopliteal approach is a safe, practical and effective alternative to femoral puncture for percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA).Methods: Forty PTAs in 38 patients were evaluated. Intentional subintimal recanalization was performed in 13 limbs. Ultrasound evaluation of the popliteal fossa was carried out 30 min and 24 hr post procedurally in the first 10 patients to exclude local complications. All patients had a follow-up of at least 6 weeks.Results: The indication for PTA was critical ischemia in seven limbs and disabling claudication in the remainder.Stenoses (single or multiple) were present in 24 and occlusion in 15.The superficial femoral artery (SFA) was the commonest segment affected(36) followed by common femoral artery (CFA) in four and iliac artery in four. Technical success was achieved in 38 of 39 limbs where angioplasty was carried out. In one limb no lesion was found.Immediate complications were distal embolization in two and thrombosis in one. None of these required immediate surgery. There were no puncture site hematomas or popliteal arteriovenous fistulae.Symptomatic patency at 6 weeks was 85%. Further reconstructive surgery was required in three limbs and amputation in two.Conclusion: The transpopliteal approach has a high technical success rate and a low complication rate with a potential to develop into an outpatient procedure. It should be considered for flush SFA occulsions or iliac disease with tandem CFA/SFA disease where the contralateral femoral approach is often technically difficult.

  4. Early Results from the Q{sub weak} Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Androic, D; Armstrong, D S; Asaturyan, A; Averett, T; Balewski, J; Beaufait, J; Beminiwattha, R S; Benesch, J; Benmokhtar, F; Birchall, J; Carlini, R D; Cates, G D; Cornejo, J C; Covrig, S; Dalton, M M; Davis, C A; Deconinck, W; Diefenbach, J; Dowd, J F; Dunne, J A; Dutta, D; Duvall, W S; Elaasar, M; Falk, W R; Finn, J M; Forest, T; Gaskel, D; Gericke, M T.W.; Grames, J; Gray, V M; Grimm, K; Guo, F; Hoskins, J R; Johnston, K; Jones, D; Jones, M; Jones, R; Kargiantoulakis, M; King, P M; Korkmaz, E; Kowalski, S; Leacock, J; Leckey, J; Lee, A R; Lee, J H; Lee, L; MacEwan, S; Mack, D; Magee, J A; Mahurin, R; Mammei, J; Martin, J; McHugh, M J; Meekins, D; Mei, J; Michaels, R; Micherdzinska, A; Mkrtchyan, A; Mkrtchyan, H; Morgan, N; Myers, K E; Narayan, A; Ndukum, L Z; Nelyubin, V; W T H, Nuruzzaman; Oers, van; Opper, A K; Page, S A; Pan, J; Paschke, K; Phillips, S K; Pitt, M L; Poelker, M; Rajotte, J F; Ramsay, W D; Roche, J; Sawatzky, B; Seva, T; Shabestari, M H; Silwal, R; Simicevic, N; Smith, G R; Solvignon, P; Spayde, D T; Subedi, A; Subedi, R; Suleiman, R; Tadevosyan, V; Tobias, W A; Tvaskis, V; Waidyawansa, B; Wang, P; Wells, S P; Wood, S A; Yang, S; Young, R D; Zhamkochyan, S

    2014-03-01

    A subset of results from the recently completed Jefferson Lab Q{sub weak} experiment are reported. This experiment, sensitive to physics beyond the Standard Model, exploits the small parity-violating asymmetry in elastic {vector e}p scattering to provide the first determination of the protons weak charge Q{sub w}{sup p}. The experiment employed a 180 {micro}A longitudinally polarized 1.16 GeV electron beam on a 35 cm long liquid hydrogen target. Scattered electrons corresponding to Q{sup 2} of 0.025 GeV{sup 2} were detected in eight Cerenkov detectors arrayed symmetrically around the beam axis. The goals of the experiment were to provide a measure of Q{sub w}{sup p} to 4.2 percent (combined statistical and systematic error), which implies a measure of sin2(thetaw) at the level of 0.3 percent, and to help constrain the vector weak quark charges C{sub 1u} and C{sub 1d}. The experimental method is described, with particular focus on the challenges associated with the worlds highest power LH{sub 2} target. The new constraints on C{sub 1u} and C{sub 1d} provided by the subset of the experiments data analyzed to date will also be shown, together with the extracted weak charge of the neutron.

  5. The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment - Early validation results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. L.; Barkstrom, B. R.; Harrison, E. F.; Huck, F. O.; Cess, R.; Coakley, J.; Duncan, C.; King, M.; Mecherikunnel, A.; Gruber, A.

    1986-01-01

    The primary techniques used to obtain and validate the data of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) are described, together with preliminary results of the validation. The ERBE consists of radiometers aboard the ERB Satellite, dedicated to a 57-deg orbit, and each of the two NOAA meteorological spacecraft (NOAA 9 and NOAA G) in near polar orbits. The radiometers include scanning narrow field-of-view (FOV) and nadir-looking wide and medium FOV radiometers, and a solar monitoring channel. Measurements of the solar constant by the solar monitors, and the wide and medium FOV radiometers of the ERB and the NOAA 9 spacecraft agree within a fraction of a percent. Comparison of the wide and medium FOV radiometers with the scanning radiometers showed an agreement of 1 to 4 percent. The multiple ERBE satellites are acquiring the first global measurements of regional scale-diurnal variations in the earth's radiation budget. These were verified by comparison with the high-temporal-resolution geostationary satellite data.

  6. The earth radiation budget experiment: Early validation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, G. Louis; Barkstrom, Bruce R.; Harrison, Edwin F.

    The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) consists of radiometers on a dedicated spacecraft in a 57° inclination orbit, which has a precessional period of 2 months, and on two NOAA operational meteorological spacecraft in near polar orbits. The radiometers include scanning narrow field-of-view (FOV) and nadir-looking wide and medium FOV radiometers covering the ranges 0.2 to 5 μm and 5 to 50 μm and a solar monitoring channel. This paper describes the validation procedures and preliminary results. Each of the radiometer channels underwent extensive ground calibration, and the instrument packages include in-flight calibration facilities which, to date, show negligible changes of the instruments in orbit, except for gradual degradation of the suprasil dome of the shortwave wide FOV (about 4% per year). Measurements of the solar constant by the solar monitors, wide FOV, and medium FOV radiometers of two spacecraft agree to a fraction of a percent. Intercomparisons of the wide and medium FOV radiometers with the scanning radiometers show agreement of 1 to 4%. The multiple ERBE satellites are acquiring the first global measurements of regional scale diurnal variations in the Earth's radiation budget. These diurnal variations are verified by comparison with high temporal resolution geostationary satellite data. Other principal investigators of the ERBE Science Team are: R. Cess, SUNY, Stoneybrook; J. Coakley, NCAR; C. Duncan, M. King and A Mecherikunnel, Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA; A. Gruber and A.J. Miller, NOAA; D. Hartmann, U. Washington; F.B. House, Drexel U.; F.O. Huck, Langley Research Center, NASA; G. Hunt, Imperial College, London U.; R. Kandel and A. Berroir, Laboratory of Dynamic Meteorology, Ecole Polytechique; V. Ramanathan, U. Chicago; E. Raschke, U. of Cologne; W.L. Smith, U. of Wisconsin and T.H. Vonder Haar, Colorado State U.

  7. Early sexual maturity among Pumé foragers of Venezuela: fitness implications of teen motherhood.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Karen L

    2008-07-01

    Because humans have slow life histories, discussions of the optimal age at first birth have stressed the benefits of delayed reproduction. However, given the diversity of ecological, fertility, and mortality environments in which humans live, reproductive maturity is expected to be highly variable. This article uses reproductive histories to examine a pattern of early menarche and first birth among the Pume, a group of South American foragers. Age at menarche and first birth are constructed using both retrospective and cross-sectional data for females over the age of 10 (n = 83). The objectives are first to define these patterns and then discuss their reproductive consequences. On average, Pume girls reach menarche at age 12.9, and give birth to their first child at age 15.3-15.5 (retrospective and cross-sectional data, respectively). This populational average falls several years prior to what often is considered the human norm. Two questions are then considered. What are the infant mortality costs across a mother's reproductive career? How does surviving fertility vary with age at first birth? Results indicate that the youngest of first-time mothers (<14) are four times more likely to loose their firstborns than older first-time mothers (> or =17). Given parity-specific mortality rates, the optimal strategy to minimize infant mortality and maximize reproductive span is to initiate childbearing in the midteens. Women gain no additional advantage in surviving fertility by delaying childbearing until their late teens. PMID:18386795

  8. Early Results from Swift AGN and Cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xinyu; Griffin, Rhiannon; Nugent, Jenna; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Bregman, Joel N.

    2016-04-01

    The Swift AGN and Cluster Survey (SACS) uses 125 deg^2 of Swift X-ray Telescope serendipitous fields with variable depths surrounding gamma-ray bursts to provide a medium depth (4 × 10^-15 erg cm^-2 s^-1) and area survey filling the gap between deep, narrow Chandra/XMM-Newton surveys and wide, shallow ROSAT surveys. Here, we present the first two papers in a series of publications for SACS. In the first paper, we introduce our method and catalog of 22,563 point sources and 442 extended sources. SACS provides excellent constraints on the AGN and cluster number counts at the bright end with negligible uncertainties due to cosmic variance, and these constraints are consistent with previous measurements. The depth and areal coverage of SACS is well suited for galaxy cluster surveys outside the local universe, reaching z > 1 for massive clusters. In the second paper, we use SDSS DR8 data to study the 203 extended SACS sources that are located within the SDSS footprint. We search for galaxy over-densities in 3-D space using SDSS galaxies and their photometric redshifts near the Swift galaxy cluster candidates. We find 103 Swift clusters with a > 3σ over-density. The remaining targets are potentially located at higher redshifts and require deeper optical follow-up observations for confirmations as galaxy clusters. We present a series of cluster properties including the redshift, BCG magnitude, BCG-to-X-ray center offset, optical richness, X-ray luminosity and red sequences. We compare the observed redshift distribution of the sample with a theoretical model, and find that our sample is complete for z ≤ 0.3 and 80% complete for z ≤ 0.4, consistent with the survey depth of SDSS. These analysis results suggest that our Swift cluster selection algorithm presented in our first paper has yielded a statistically well-defined cluster sample for further studying cluster evolution and cosmology. In the end, we will discuss our ongoing optical identification of z>0.5 cluster

  9. Body mass index and age at menarche in Peruvian children living at high altitude and at sea level.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, G F; Villena, A

    1996-04-01

    The present study was designed to determine the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and age at menarche in girls (aged 10-19 years) living in Lima (150 m) and in Cerro de Pasco (4340 m above sea level). The purpose of the study was to determine whether the relationships between BMI and both age at menarche and chronological age differ between girls living at low and at high altitude. The ratio weight/height (the Benn index) was used in the present study as a variant of BMI because the exponent minimizes the relationship with height and maximizes the relationship with weight. From 10 to 16 years of age the Benn index of highlander girls was lower than that for girls at sea level, but at 17-19 years the differences disappeared. A later age at menarche was observed at high altitude than at sea level after controlling for socioeconomic status and for the Benn index. The value of the Benn index at the time of menarche, after controlling for chronological age in the analysis, was significantly higher at high altitude than at sea level. It was also observed that the higher the chronological age, the lower the value of the Benn index at the time of menarche. Using the median ages at menarche in Lima and in Cerro de Pasco, we found that a higher Benn index at the time of menarche is still observed at high altitude compared with girls from sea level. In Lima body weight and height were directly related to age at menarche (p < 0.001 and p < 0.005, respectively), whereas in Cerro de Pasco only weight was related to age at menarche (p < 0.001). The value of body weight at the time of menarche, after controlling for height in the analysis, was significantly higher at high altitude than at sea level. The stepwise multiple regression analysis of data from 93 girls having menarche at the time of or at most one month before the study showed that weight and altitude x height are predictors of age at menarche. These data suggest that age at menarche has an effect on both age

  10. Planck early results. VIII. The all-sky early Sunyaev-Zeldovich cluster sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartelmann, M.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhatia, R.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Brown, M. L.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Cabella, P.; Cantalupo, C. M.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Carvalho, P.; Catalano, A.; Cayón, L.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Chiang, C.; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Churazov, E.; Clements, D. L.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colombi, S.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Dörl, U.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Eisenhardt, P.; Enßlin, T. A.; Feroz, F.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Fosalba, P.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Fromenteau, S.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; González-Riestra, R.; Górski, K. M.; Grainge, K. J. B.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Harrison, D.; Heinämäki, P.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hovest, W.; Hoyland, R. J.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knox, L.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leach, S.; Leonardi, R.; Li, C.; Liddle, A.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mann, R.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Mei, S.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.-B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Olamaie, M.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Piffaretti, R.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Saar, E.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Saunders, R. D. E.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B. M.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, P.; Smoot, G. F.; Stanford, A.; Starck, J.-L.; Stivoli, F.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Taburet, N.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Torre, J.-P.; Tristram, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Weller, J.; White, S. D. M.; White, M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2011-12-01

    We present the first all-sky sample of galaxy clusters detected blindly by the Planck satellite through the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect from its six highest frequencies. This early SZ (ESZ) sample is comprised of 189 candidates, which have a high signal-to-noise ratio ranging from 6 to 29. Its high reliability (purity above 95%) is further ensured by an extensive validation process based on Planck internal quality assessments and by external cross-identification and follow-up observations. Planck provides the first measured SZ signal for about 80% of the 169 previously-known ESZ clusters. Planck furthermore releases 30 new cluster candidates, amongst which 20 meet the ESZ signal-to-noise selection criterion. At the submission date, twelve of the 20 ESZ candidates were confirmed as new clusters, with eleven confirmed using XMM-Newton snapshot observations, most of them with disturbed morphologies and low luminosities. The ESZ clusters are mostly at moderate redshifts (86% with z below 0.3) and span more than a decade in mass, up to the rarest and most massive clusters with masses above 1 × 1015 M⊙. Corresponding author: M. Douspis, e-mail: marian.douspis@ias.u-psud.frAppendix is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  11. Going through the Rites of Passage: Timing and Transition of Menarche, Childhood Sexual Abuse, and Anxiety Symptoms in Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natsuaki, Misaki N.; Leve, Leslie D.; Mendle, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Menarche is a discrete, transitional event that holds considerable personal, social, biological, and developmental significance. The present longitudinal study examined both the transition and timing of menarche on the trajectory of anxiety in girls with histories of childhood maltreatment (N = 93; 63% European American, 14% multiracial, 10%…

  12. Influence of menarche on the relation between diurnal cortisol production and ventral striatum activity during reward anticipation

    PubMed Central

    LeMoult, Joelle; Colich, Natalie L.; Sherdell, Lindsey; Hamilton, J. Paul; Gotlib, Ian H.

    2015-01-01

    Adolescence is characterized by an increase in risk-taking and reward-seeking behaviors. In other populations, increased risk taking has been associated with tighter coupling between cortisol production and ventral striatum (VS) activation during reward anticipation; this relation has not yet been examined, however, as a function of adolescent development. This study examined the influence of pubertal development on the association between diurnal cortisol production and VS activity during reward anticipation. Pre- and post-menarcheal girls collected diurnal cortisol and completed an functional magnetic resonance imaging-based monetary incentive delay task, from which we extracted estimates of VS activity during the anticipation of reward, anticipation of loss and anticipation of non-incentive neutral trials. Post-menarcheal girls showed greater coupling between the cortisol awakening response and VS activation during anticipation of reward and loss than did their pre-menarcheal counterparts. Post-menarcheal girls did not differ from pre-menarcheal girls in their cortisol-VS coupling during anticipation of neutral trials, suggesting that puberty-related changes in cortisol-VS coupling are specific to affective stimuli. Interestingly, behavioral responses during the task indicate that post-menarcheal girls are faster to engage with affective stimuli than are pre-menarcheal girls. Thus, post-menarcheal girls exhibit neurobiological and behavioral patterns that have been associated with risk taking and that may underlie the dramatic increase in risk-taking behavior documented during adolescence. PMID:25678549

  13. Longitudinal Reliability of Self-Reported Age at Menarche in Adolescent Girls: Variability across Time and Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorn, Lorah D.; Sontag-Padilla, Lisa M.; Pabst, Stephanie; Tissot, Abbigail; Susman, Elizabeth J.

    2013-01-01

    Age at menarche is critical in research and clinical settings, yet there is a dearth of studies examining its reliability in adolescents. We examined age at menarche during adolescence, specifically, (a) average method reliability across 3 years, (b) test-retest reliability between time points and methods, (c) intraindividual variability of…

  14. Knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about menarche of adolescent girls in Anand district, Gujarat.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, H; Oza, U N; Tiwari, R

    2006-01-01

    A questionnaire survey of knowledge, attitudes and beliefs towards menstruation was made in 22 schools in Anand district, Gujarat state. Of 900 schoolgirls aged 11-17 years, only 38.5% felt comfortable about menarche and only 31.0% believed that menstruation was a normal physiological process. Many (37.2%) had not been informed about menarche before its onset and 48.2% felt they were not mentally prepared. The major sources of information were the mother (60.7%) or an elder sister (15.8%); teachers and others relatives played a small role. In this area of India, many families continue the custom of celebrating the first menarche and observing social restrictions.

  15. Genetic and environmental correlations between age at menarche and bone mineral density at different skeletal sites.

    PubMed

    Guo, Y; Zhao, L-J; Shen, H; Guo, Y; Deng, H-W

    2005-12-01

    Low bone mineral density (BMD) is an important risk factor for osteoporotic fractures. Though previous studies have demonstrated that age at menarche (AAM) is phenotypically associated with BMD, the contributions of genetic and environmental factors to this association remain unknown. In this study, using variance decomposition analyses, we provided an accurate estimation of the genetic and environmental correlations between AAM and BMD in 2,667 Caucasian women from 512 pedigrees. After adjustment for significant covariates, we detected significant genetic correlations between AAM and BMD at the lumbar spine, femoral neck, and ultradistal radius (rho(G) = -0.1316, -0.1417, and -0.1137, respectively; all P < 0.01). However, all environmental correlations between AAM and BMD were nonsignificant (P > 0.05). We also generated a principal component factor for BMD (PC_BMD) and evaluated the relationship between this factor and AAM. The genetic and environmental correlations between PC_BMD and AAM (rho(P) = -0.0847, P < 0.001; rho(G) = -0.1737, P < 0.01; rho(E) = -0.0348, P > 0.05) were consistent with the results of BMD at the three skeletal sites and AAM. Our results confirmed the significant phenotypic association between BMD and AAM and for the first time suggested that this association is mainly attributable to shared genetic, rather than environmental, factors.

  16. Anterior pituitary gland assessment in sickle cell anaemia patients with delayed menarche.

    PubMed

    Abbiyesuku, F M; Osotimehin, B O

    1999-01-01

    Pituitary gland dysfunction and its contribution to menarcheal delay in sickle cell anaemia patients was investigated. Ten SS patients mean age 17.5 years who had not achieved menarche were recruited and 10 each of AS and AA controls, mean ages 17.4 and 17.7 years were used as controls to study the effect of the heterozygous state. Dynamic studies with LHRH and TRH were performed for 60 minutes and LH, FSH, PRL and TSH assays were done. Median basal values were significantly lower in the SS patients compared with the AS and AA controls for LH, FSH and PRL. LH: 3.0; 7.1; 7.7 U/L, FSH: 2.1: 4.3: 5.1 U/L. PRL: 94.5; 590; 390 U/L, respectively. The median basal TSH values did not show any significant difference between the SS subjects (7.3 U/L) and the AS and AA controls (5.4 U/L) and 5.6 U/L, respectively. The readily releasable pool also showed the same pattern for LH, FSH and PRL as the basal values while the SS subjects had higher median TSH releasable pool values that were significantly different from those of the AA controls. From the prolactin responses three subjects demonstrated maturational delay in menarcheal achievement while seven demonstrated isolated gonadotrophin deficiency. It is concluded that SS patients with delayed menarche have a hypothalamopituitary axis dysfunction that gives rise to delay in menarcheal achievement and metabolic adaptations to stress of illness. The heterozygous state did not delay menarcheal onset. PMID:12953990

  17. Early palaeozoic palaeomagnetism in Australia I. Cambrian results from the Flinders Ranges, South Australia II. Late Early Cambrian results from Kangaroo Island, South Australia III. Middle to early-Late Cambrian results from the Amadeus Basin, Northern Territory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klootwijk, C. T.

    1980-04-01

    I. Cambrian results from the Flinders Ranges, South Australia A total of 460 samples from six sequences spanning the Cambrian succession of the Flinders Ranges (Adelaide "Geosyncline", South Australia) has been analyzed through thermal demagnetization studies. All samples showed a recent field component, generally constituting more than 50% of the initial intensity, which in most cases was removed by 200-400°C. Two characteristic magnetic components have been identified: (A) A secondary magnetic component of Cambro-Ordovician age (S-pole at 75.3°E 26.0°N, α95 = 7.4°, N = 5 localities) interpreted as having been induced by thermochemical activity during a period of enhanced heat flux prior to the Late Cambrian-Early Ordovician diastrophistic phases of the Delamarian Orogeny. (B) A primary magnetic component, which indicates rapid polar motion during the Early Cambrian and a much reduced polar motion during the Middle Cambrian. Representative palaeomagnetic pole positions for the primary component are: (1) Basal Hawker Group (earliest Cambrian): S-pole at 2.3°E 26.7°S, d p = 8.1°, d m = 14.3°, N = 10 (sites). (2) Billy Creek Formation— Wirrealpa Limestone— Aroona Creek Limestone (late Early Cambrian to early Middle Cambrian): S-pole at 20.1°E 37.4°S, d p = 7.2°, dm = 14.4°, N = 11(sites). (3) Basal Lake Frame Group (Middle Cambrian): S-pole at 26.1°E 29.3°S, d p = 6.6°, d m = 13.1°, N =10 (sites). (4) Pantapinna Formation (late Middle Cambrian?): S-pole at 29.2°E 36.4°S, d p = 8.4°, dm = 16.7°, N = 4 (sites). Available data suggest that deposition of the Lake Frome Group beds probably did not continue into the Late Cambrian. II. Late Early Cambrian results from Kangaroo Island, South Australia A total of 108 block samples from a late Early Cambrian red-bed sequence on Kangaroo Island (Adelaide "Geosyncline", South Australia) has been analysed through thermal demagnetization studies. All samples contained a recent field component of

  18. Early palaeozoic palaeomagnetism in Australia I. Cambrian results from the Flinders Ranges, South Australia II. Late Early Cambrian results from Kangaroo Island, South Australia III. Middle to early-Late Cambrian results from the Amadeus Basin, Northern Territory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klootwijk, C. T.

    1980-04-01

    I. Cambrian results from the Flinders Ranges, South Australia A total of 460 samples from six sequences spanning the Cambrian succession of the Flinders Ranges (Adelaide "Geosyncline", South Australia) has been analyzed through thermal demagnetization studies. All samples showed a recent field component, generally constituting more than 50% of the initial intensity, which in most cases was removed by 200-400°C. Two characteristic magnetic components have been identified: (A) A secondary magnetic component of Cambro-Ordovician age (S-pole at 75.3°E 26.0°N, α95 = 7.4°, N = 5 localities) interpreted as having been induced by thermochemical activity during a period of enhanced heat flux prior to the Late Cambrian-Early Ordovician diastrophistic phases of the Delamarian Orogeny. (B) A primary magnetic component, which indicates rapid polar motion during the Early Cambrian and a much reduced polar motion during the Middle Cambrian. Representative palaeomagnetic pole positions for the primary component are: (1) Basal Hawker Group (earliest Cambrian): S-pole at 2.3°E 26.7°S, d p = 8.1°, d m = 14.3°, N = 10 (sites). (2) Billy Creek Formation— Wirrealpa Limestone— Aroona Creek Limestone (late Early Cambrian to early Middle Cambrian): S-pole at 20.1°E 37.4°S, d p = 7.2°, dm = 14.4°, N = 11(sites). (3) Basal Lake Frame Group (Middle Cambrian): S-pole at 26.1°E 29.3°S, d p = 6.6°, d m = 13.1°, N =10 (sites). (4) Pantapinna Formation (late Middle Cambrian?): S-pole at 29.2°E 36.4°S, d p = 8.4°, dm = 16.7°, N = 4 (sites). Available data suggest that deposition of the Lake Frome Group beds probably did not continue into the Late Cambrian. II. Late Early Cambrian results from Kangaroo Island, South Australia A total of 108 block samples from a late Early Cambrian red-bed sequence on Kangaroo Island (Adelaide "Geosyncline", South Australia) has been analysed through thermal demagnetization studies. All samples contained a recent field component of

  19. Age at menarche in Peninsular Malaysia: time trends, ethnic differentials, and association with ages at marriage and at first birth.

    PubMed

    Tan Boon Ann; Othman, R; Butz, W P; Davanzo, J

    1983-12-01

    This study, based on respondent-reported data from the 1976-77 Malaysian Family Life Survey, analyzeed the association between age at menarche and several family-level factors. The data on mean age at menarche for birth cohorts of pre-1929 to post-1955, by ethnic group, indicate substantial declines for Chinese and Indians but virtually no change for Malays. Age at menarche has fallen by 3.25 months/decade for women born in 1926-61. Girls raised in households of higher socioeconomic status tend to experience earlier menarche. In fact, about half of the secular decline in age at menarche is attributable to improvements in socioeconomic level and, to a lesser extent, declines in the proportion of foreign births. In this sample, age at menarche was related to age at 1st marriage and age at 1st birth. Moreover, controlling for age at menarche affects the relationship between demographic and socioeconomic variables on the 1 hand and age at marriage and 1st birth on the other. When ethnicity is controlled, a 1 year delay in menarche is associated with a 3 month delay in age at marriage. When the socioeconomic status and childhood abroad indices are controlled, the coefficient of age at menarche increases by almost 1/3. When ethnicity, birthdate, childhood abroad, and socioeconomic status are controlled, each 1 year delay in menarche is associated, on average, with a 5 month delay in age at marriage. Even when socioeconomic variables are controlled, the relationship between age at menarche and at marriage is much smaller for Chinese women than for Indian or Malay women, perhaps because the average age between these 2 events is greater for Chinese (6.8 years, versus 3.5 years for Malays and 4.6 years for Indians). These findings suggest that studies that look only at the relationship between age at menarche and age at 1st marriage, without controlling for other factors, will underestimate the relationship. In addition, it is noted that the observed trend toward falling age

  20. Age at menarche in Peninsular Malaysia: time trends, ethnic differentials, and association with ages at marriage and at first birth.

    PubMed

    Tan Boon Ann; Othman, R; Butz, W P; Davanzo, J

    1983-12-01

    This study, based on respondent-reported data from the 1976-77 Malaysian Family Life Survey, analyzeed the association between age at menarche and several family-level factors. The data on mean age at menarche for birth cohorts of pre-1929 to post-1955, by ethnic group, indicate substantial declines for Chinese and Indians but virtually no change for Malays. Age at menarche has fallen by 3.25 months/decade for women born in 1926-61. Girls raised in households of higher socioeconomic status tend to experience earlier menarche. In fact, about half of the secular decline in age at menarche is attributable to improvements in socioeconomic level and, to a lesser extent, declines in the proportion of foreign births. In this sample, age at menarche was related to age at 1st marriage and age at 1st birth. Moreover, controlling for age at menarche affects the relationship between demographic and socioeconomic variables on the 1 hand and age at marriage and 1st birth on the other. When ethnicity is controlled, a 1 year delay in menarche is associated with a 3 month delay in age at marriage. When the socioeconomic status and childhood abroad indices are controlled, the coefficient of age at menarche increases by almost 1/3. When ethnicity, birthdate, childhood abroad, and socioeconomic status are controlled, each 1 year delay in menarche is associated, on average, with a 5 month delay in age at marriage. Even when socioeconomic variables are controlled, the relationship between age at menarche and at marriage is much smaller for Chinese women than for Indian or Malay women, perhaps because the average age between these 2 events is greater for Chinese (6.8 years, versus 3.5 years for Malays and 4.6 years for Indians). These findings suggest that studies that look only at the relationship between age at menarche and age at 1st marriage, without controlling for other factors, will underestimate the relationship. In addition, it is noted that the observed trend toward falling age

  1. Secular trend in age at menarche in China: a case study of two rural counties in Anhui Province.

    PubMed

    Graham, M J; Larsen, U; Xu, X

    1999-04-01

    There is increasing evidence that age at menarche has decreased in Europe and the United States during the last century and in Japan over the last several decades. Data from a community-based survey conducted in two rural counties of Anhui Province in China indicate a similar, downward secular trend in age at menarche for Chinese women. The present study shows the mean age at menarche decreased by 2.8 years, from 16.5 to 13.7, over an approximate 40-year time interval. This rapid decrease in age at menarche may partly be due to better nutrition and living standards reflected by the improved socioeconomic standards experienced in China over the past few decades. To test this hypothesis, a number of determinants of age at menarche were assessed; year of birth, literacy status, county of residence, amount of physical labour, general health status, pesticide exposure before age at menarche, and drinking water source were all found to be associated with age at menarche.

  2. Secular trend in age at menarche in China: a case study of two rural counties in Anhui Province.

    PubMed

    Graham, M J; Larsen, U; Xu, X

    1999-04-01

    There is increasing evidence that age at menarche has decreased in Europe and the United States during the last century and in Japan over the last several decades. Data from a community-based survey conducted in two rural counties of Anhui Province in China indicate a similar, downward secular trend in age at menarche for Chinese women. The present study shows the mean age at menarche decreased by 2.8 years, from 16.5 to 13.7, over an approximate 40-year time interval. This rapid decrease in age at menarche may partly be due to better nutrition and living standards reflected by the improved socioeconomic standards experienced in China over the past few decades. To test this hypothesis, a number of determinants of age at menarche were assessed; year of birth, literacy status, county of residence, amount of physical labour, general health status, pesticide exposure before age at menarche, and drinking water source were all found to be associated with age at menarche. PMID:10333655

  3. The LEP G-2548A gene polymorphism is associated with age at menarche and breast cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Sara; Kohan, Leila; Mohammadianpanah, Mohammad

    2015-02-25

    Leptin is an adipocytokine made by fat cells and plays a key role in proliferation, cell survival, migration and immune response. It has a powerful effect on the initiation of puberty and in determining age at menarche. The current study is the first investigation to examine the effect of G-2548A leptin gene polymorphism on the age at menarche and breast cancer susceptibility. This case-control study was performed on 203 patients with breast cancer and 171 healthy women. The leptin genotypes were determined using the PCR-RFLP method and age at menarche was obtained by questionnaires. There was a significant difference between the leptin G-2548A genotypes between case and control groups (P<0.05). AA genotype is significantly higher in patients compared to the controls. Furthermore, women carrying the AA genotype had a significantly younger age at menarche (12.47 years) than women with the AG (12.94 years) and GG (13.47 years) genotypes. Also, we found that the AA genotype frequency in women with age at menarche <13 years was higher than in women with age at menarche ≥13 years (OR: 3.4, 95% CI: 1.7-6.7, P: 0.001). In conclusion, the G-2548A leptin gene polymorphism has an important role in the onset of menarche and breast cancer susceptibility.

  4. Age at menarche and selected menstrual characteristics in athletes at different competitive levels and in different sports.

    PubMed

    Malina, R M; Spirduso, W W; Tate, C; Baylor, A M

    1978-01-01

    Ages at menarche in 110 non-athletes, 59 high school atjletes, 53 college athletes, and 18 olympic volleyball candidates were determined through interview. The athletes attained menarche significantly later than the non-athletes (p less than .001), and the olympic athletes attained menarche significantly later than the high school and college athletes (p less than .001). The high school and college athletes did not differ significantly in the mean age at menarche. When menarche in college athletes was analyzed by specific sports, the small samples of participants in golf (n = 4), volleyball (n = 7), swimming (n = 7), basketball (n = 16), and gymnastics and track (n = 6) did not differ significantly from each other in the mean age at menarche. The olympic volleyball aspirants attained menarche significantly later than all sport-specific groups (p less than .05 to p less than .001) except the gymnastics-track and tennis (n = 13) athletes. Smaller samples of non-athletes (n = 27) and college athletes (n = 21 from volleyball and basketball), plus the olympic athletes were also interviewed regarding selected menstrual characteristics. Although the athletes reported a greater incidence of dysmenorrhea and menstrual irregularity, none of the chi square values comparing the three groups was significant.

  5. An Exploration of Mothers' Attitudes towards Their Daughters' Menarche

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Clare; Harden, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Menarche is a significant milestone for young women, representing an important juncture between girlhood and maturation. The limited literature that exists suggests that a mother's reaction to her daughter's first periods can shape her experiences and perceptions of menstruation which, in turn, may impact on her self-image and,…

  6. Family Structure and Age at Menarche: A Children-of-Twins Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendle, Jane; Turkheimer, Eric; D'Onofrio, Brian M.; Lynch, Stacy K.; Emery, Robert E.; Slutske, Wendy S.; Martin, Nicholas G.

    2006-01-01

    Girls who grow up in households with an unrelated adult male reach menarche earlier than peers, a finding hypothesized to be an evolutionary strategy for families under stress. The authors tested the alternative hypothesis that nonrandom selection into stepfathering due to shared environmental and/or genetic predispositions creates a spurious…

  7. Frequencies of spontaneous breast development and spontaneous menarche in Turner syndrome in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshiaki; Igarashi, Yutaka; Ozono, Keiichi; Ohyama, Kenji; Ogawa, Masamichi; Osada, Hisao; Onigata, Kazumichi; Kanzaki, Susumu; Kohno, Hitoshi; Seino, Yoshiki; Takahashi, Hiroaki; Tajima, Toshihiro; Tachibana, Katsuhiko; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Nishi, Yoshikazu; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Fujita, Keinosuke; Yorifuji, Tohru; Horikawa, Reiko; Yokoya, Susumu

    2015-10-01

    The Growject® database on human GH treatment in Turner syndrome was analyzed in the Turner Syndrome Research Collaboration, and the relationships of the frequencies of spontaneous breast development and spontaneous menarche with karyotype and GH treatment were investigated. One hundred and three cases started GH treatment with 0.5 IU/kg/ week (0.5 IU group), and their dose was increased to 0.35 mg/kg/wk midway through the treatment course. Another 109 cases started GH at a dose of 0.35 mg/kg/wk (0.35 mg group). Spontaneous breast development was observed in 77 (36.3%) of the 212 patients, and spontaneous menarche occurred in 31 patients (14.6%). The frequency of spontaneous breast development was significantly lower in patients with the 45,X karyotype and significantly higher in patients with a structural abnormality of the second X chromosome. The frequency of spontaneous menarche was significantly higher in patients with mosaicism characterized by X monosomy and a cellular line with no structural abnormality of the X chromosome. No significant differences in frequencies of spontaneous breast development and spontaneous menarche were observed between the two dose groups, indicating that GH treatment does not increase the frequency of spontaneous puberty.

  8. Interactive Effects of Menarcheal Status and Dating on Dieting and Disordered Eating among Adolescent Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cauffman, Elizabeth; Steinberg, Laurence

    1996-01-01

    Examined effects of three different aspects of heterosocial activity--mixed-sex activities, dating, and physical involvement with boys--on the diet patterns of adolescent girls. Found interaction between dating and menarcheal status in the prediction of dieting and disordered eating, with dating more strongly linked to dieting and disordered…

  9. Frequencies of spontaneous breast development and spontaneous menarche in Turner syndrome in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshiaki; Igarashi, Yutaka; Ozono, Keiichi; Ohyama, Kenji; Ogawa, Masamichi; Osada, Hisao; Onigata, Kazumichi; Kanzaki, Susumu; Kohno, Hitoshi; Seino, Yoshiki; Takahashi, Hiroaki; Tajima, Toshihiro; Tachibana, Katsuhiko; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Nishi, Yoshikazu; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Fujita, Keinosuke; Yorifuji, Tohru; Horikawa, Reiko; Yokoya, Susumu

    2015-10-01

    The Growject® database on human GH treatment in Turner syndrome was analyzed in the Turner Syndrome Research Collaboration, and the relationships of the frequencies of spontaneous breast development and spontaneous menarche with karyotype and GH treatment were investigated. One hundred and three cases started GH treatment with 0.5 IU/kg/ week (0.5 IU group), and their dose was increased to 0.35 mg/kg/wk midway through the treatment course. Another 109 cases started GH at a dose of 0.35 mg/kg/wk (0.35 mg group). Spontaneous breast development was observed in 77 (36.3%) of the 212 patients, and spontaneous menarche occurred in 31 patients (14.6%). The frequency of spontaneous breast development was significantly lower in patients with the 45,X karyotype and significantly higher in patients with a structural abnormality of the second X chromosome. The frequency of spontaneous menarche was significantly higher in patients with mosaicism characterized by X monosomy and a cellular line with no structural abnormality of the X chromosome. No significant differences in frequencies of spontaneous breast development and spontaneous menarche were observed between the two dose groups, indicating that GH treatment does not increase the frequency of spontaneous puberty. PMID:26568657

  10. Age at Menarche and Premenstrual Syndrome in Adolescent Girls with Intellectual Disability in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibralic, Inga; Sinanovic, Osman; Memisevic, Haris

    2010-01-01

    The issues involving menstruation are the topic of many scientific inquires in the fields of medicine, psychology, sociology and anthropology. The aim of this study was to determine the age at menarche and the most common symptoms of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) in adolescent girls with intellectual disability. The main method of data collection…

  11. Frequencies of spontaneous breast development and spontaneous menarche in Turner syndrome in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Toshiaki; Igarashi, Yutaka; Ozono, Keiichi; Ohyama, Kenji; Ogawa, Masamichi; Osada, Hisao; Onigata, Kazumichi; Kanzaki, Susumu; Kohno, Hitoshi; Seino, Yoshiki; Takahashi, Hiroaki; Tajima, Toshihiro; Tachibana, Katsuhiko; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Nishi, Yoshikazu; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Fujita, Keinosuke; Yorifuji, Tohru; Horikawa, Reiko; Yokoya, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. The Growject® database on human GH treatment in Turner syndrome was analyzed in the Turner Syndrome Research Collaboration, and the relationships of the frequencies of spontaneous breast development and spontaneous menarche with karyotype and GH treatment were investigated. One hundred and three cases started GH treatment with 0.5 IU/kg/ week (0.5 IU group), and their dose was increased to 0.35 mg/kg/wk midway through the treatment course. Another 109 cases started GH at a dose of 0.35 mg/kg/wk (0.35 mg group). Spontaneous breast development was observed in 77 (36.3%) of the 212 patients, and spontaneous menarche occurred in 31 patients (14.6%). The frequency of spontaneous breast development was significantly lower in patients with the 45,X karyotype and significantly higher in patients with a structural abnormality of the second X chromosome. The frequency of spontaneous menarche was significantly higher in patients with mosaicism characterized by X monosomy and a cellular line with no structural abnormality of the X chromosome. No significant differences in frequencies of spontaneous breast development and spontaneous menarche were observed between the two dose groups, indicating that GH treatment does not increase the frequency of spontaneous puberty. PMID:26568657

  12. Final Visual Acuity Results in the Early Treatment for Retinopathy of Prematurity Study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare visual acuity at 6 years of age in eyes that received early treatment for high-risk prethreshold retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) with conventionally-managed eyes. Methods Infants with symmetrical, high-risk prethreshold ROP (N=317) had one eye randomized to earlier treatment at high-risk prethreshold disease and the other eye managed conventionally, treated if ROP progressed to threshold severity. For asymmetric cases (N=84), the high-risk prethreshold eye was randomized to either early treatment or conventional management. Main Outcome Measures ETDRS visual acuity measured at 6 years of age by masked testers. Retinal structure was assessed as a secondary outcome. Results Analysis of all subjects with high-risk prethreshold ROP showed no statistically significant benefit for early treatment (24.6% v. 29.0% unfavorable outcome, P=0.15). Analysis of 6-year visual acuity results according to the Type 1 and 2 clinical algorithm showed a benefit for Type 1 eyes (25.1% v. 32.8%, P=0.02) treated early, but not Type 2 eyes (23.6% v. 19.4%, P=0.37). Early treated eyes showed a significantly better structural outcome compared with conventionally managed eyes (8.9% v. 15.2% unfavorable outcome, P<0.001), with no greater risk of ocular complications. Conclusion Early treatment for Type 1 high-risk prethreshold eyes improved visual acuity outcomes at 6 years of age. Early treatment for Type 2 high-risk prethreshold eyes did not. Application to Clinical Practice Type 1 eyes, not Type 2 eyes should be treated early. These results are particularly important considering that 52 % of Type 2 high-risk prethreshold eyes underwent regression of ROP without requiring treatment. PMID:20385926

  13. Grating Visual Acuity Results in the Early Treatment for Retinopathy of Prematurity Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare grating (resolution) visual acuity at 6 years of age in eyes that received early treatment (ET) for high-risk prethreshold retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) versus eyes that were managed conventionally (CM). Methods In a randomized clinical trial, infants with bilateral, high-risk prethreshold ROP (N=317) had one eye treated early at high-risk prethreshold disease and the other eye managed conventionally, and treated if ROP progressed to threshold severity. For asymmetric cases (N=84), the high-risk prethreshold eye was randomized to either ET or CM. Main Outcome Measures Grating visual acuity measured at 6 years of age by masked testers using Teller acuity cards. Results Monocular grating acuity results were obtained from 317 (86%) of 370 surviving children. Analysis of grating acuity results for all subjects with high-risk prethreshold ROP showed no statistically significant overall benefit for early treatment (18.1% vs 22.8% unfavorable outcome, P=0.08). When the 6-year grating acuity results were analyzed according to a clinical algorithm (high-risk Type 1 and high-risk Type 2 prethreshold ROP), a benefit was seen in Type 1 eyes (16.4% vs 25.2%, P=0.004) that were treated early, but not in Type 2 eyes (21.3% vs 15.9%, P=0.29). Conclusion Early treatment for eyes with Type 1 ROP improved grating acuity outcomes but early treatment for eyes with Type 2 ROP did not. Application to Clinical Medicine Type I eyes should be treated early; however, based on acuity results at age 6 years, Type 2 eyes should be cautiously monitored for progression to Type 1 ROP. Trial Registration NCT00027222 PMID:21746974

  14. Early Blindness Results in Developmental Plasticity for Auditory Motion Processing within Auditory and Occipital Cortex.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fang; Stecker, G Christopher; Boynton, Geoffrey M; Fine, Ione

    2016-01-01

    Early blind subjects exhibit superior abilities for processing auditory motion, which are accompanied by enhanced BOLD responses to auditory motion within hMT+ and reduced responses within right planum temporale (rPT). Here, by comparing BOLD responses to auditory motion in hMT+ and rPT within sighted controls, early blind, late blind, and sight-recovery individuals, we were able to separately examine the effects of developmental and adult visual deprivation on cortical plasticity within these two areas. We find that both the enhanced auditory motion responses in hMT+ and the reduced functionality in rPT are driven by the absence of visual experience early in life; neither loss nor recovery of vision later in life had a discernable influence on plasticity within these areas. Cortical plasticity as a result of blindness has generally be presumed to be mediated by competition across modalities within a given cortical region. The reduced functionality within rPT as a result of early visual loss implicates an additional mechanism for cross modal plasticity as a result of early blindness-competition across different cortical areas for functional role. PMID:27458357

  15. Early Blindness Results in Developmental Plasticity for Auditory Motion Processing within Auditory and Occipital Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Fang; Stecker, G. Christopher; Boynton, Geoffrey M.; Fine, Ione

    2016-01-01

    Early blind subjects exhibit superior abilities for processing auditory motion, which are accompanied by enhanced BOLD responses to auditory motion within hMT+ and reduced responses within right planum temporale (rPT). Here, by comparing BOLD responses to auditory motion in hMT+ and rPT within sighted controls, early blind, late blind, and sight-recovery individuals, we were able to separately examine the effects of developmental and adult visual deprivation on cortical plasticity within these two areas. We find that both the enhanced auditory motion responses in hMT+ and the reduced functionality in rPT are driven by the absence of visual experience early in life; neither loss nor recovery of vision later in life had a discernable influence on plasticity within these areas. Cortical plasticity as a result of blindness has generally be presumed to be mediated by competition across modalities within a given cortical region. The reduced functionality within rPT as a result of early visual loss implicates an additional mechanism for cross modal plasticity as a result of early blindness—competition across different cortical areas for functional role. PMID:27458357

  16. The results of early physiotherapy on a child with incontinentia pigmenti with encephalocele.

    PubMed

    Kara, Ozgun Kaya; Mutlu, Akmer; Gunel, Mintaze Kerem

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to exhibit the effects of early physiotherapy and discusses post-treatment results on a patient with incontinentia pigmenti (IP) with encephalocele. Physiotherapy evaluations of the child included cognitive, fine and gross motor development assessed with the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development - Third Edition (Bayley-III), disability level with the gross motor function classification system, gross motor function with the gross motor function measurement (GMFM), and tonus evaluation with the Modified Ashworth Scale. The child was included in a physiotherapy and rehabilitation programme based on neurodevelopmental treatment three times a week. Although cognitive and motor development according to Bayley-III improved in the present case, motor and cognitive retardation became more apparent with growth. GMFM results indicated a large improvement from 5.88% to 47.73%. Presentation of this case shows the significance of early physiotherapy in this first study on physiotherapy for IP during the early rehabilitation process. PMID:22767665

  17. Search for promotion factors of ultrasound bone measurement in Japanese males and pre/post-menarcheal females aged 8-14 years.

    PubMed

    Kohri, Toshiyuki; Kaba, Naoko; Murakami, Tetsuo; Narukawa, Teruaki; Yamamoto, Shigeru; Sakai, Takeo; Sasaki, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    There is little evidence regarding the associations between bone growth and environmental factors among growing children, especially in Asians. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to search for the promotion factors of bone growth in Japanese children during growth. The study subjects were male (n=333) and pre/post-menarcheal female (n=179/n=68) school children aged 8-14 y. Bone status at the calcaneus was evaluated by quantitative ultrasound (Benus III), and the bone area ratio (BAR) was used as an evaluation index. Dietary intakes were assessed via brief self-administered diet history questionnaires. The participants were asked to record all of their activities for 3 d (2 weekdays and 1 holiday). They were also required to provide the most recent anthropometric measurement records at their schools and answer questions about the frequency of fractures and, for females, the length of time since menarche. Multiple regression analysis with dummy variables demonstrated that age, magnesium (more than the RDA), vitamin B(1) (more than the RDA), mean physical activity intensity per day (more than 1.7 METs), vitamin C (more than the RDA) and calcium (more than the RDA) were significantly positive influential factors of BAR for males. For premenarcheal females, age, vitamin A (more than the RDA), BMI, and mean physical activity intensity per day (more than 1.7 METs) were significantly positive influential factors of BAR, and for postmenarcheal females, only BMI and age were significantly positive influential factors of BAR. The results suggest that several manageable factors correlate with the bone mass, and the associations differ depending on gender and menarcheal status. PMID:23132310

  18. Early prenatal androgenization results in diminished ovarian reserve in adult female rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Dumesic, D.A.; Patankar, M.S.; Barnett, D.K.; Lesnick, T.G.; Hutcherson, B.A.; Abbott, D.H.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Early prenatal androgenization (PA) accelerates follicle differentiation and impairs embryogenesis in adult female rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) undergoing FSH therapy for IVF. To determine whether androgen excess in utero affects follicle development over time, this study examines whether PA exposure, beginning at gestational days 40–44 (early treated) or 100–115 (late treated), alters the decline in serum anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) levels with age in adult female rhesus monkeys and perturbs their ovarian response to recombinant human FSH (rhFSH) therapy for IVF. METHODS Thirteen normal (control), 11 early-treated and 6 late-treated PA adult female monkeys had serum AMH levels measured at random times of the menstrual cycle or anovulatory period. Using some of the same animals, basal serum AMH, gonadotrophins and steroids were also measured in six normal, five early-treated and three late-treated PA female monkeys undergoing FSH therapy for IVF during late-reproductive life (>17 years); serum AMH also was measured on day of HCG administration and at oocyte retrieval. RESULTS Serum AMH levels in early-treated PA females declined with age to levels that were significantly lower than those of normal (P ≤ 0.05) and late-treated PA females (P ≤ 0.025) by late-reproductive life. Serum AMH levels positively predicted numbers of total/mature oocytes retrieved, with early-treated PA females having the lowest serum AMH levels, fewest oocytes retrieved and lowest percentage of females with fertilized oocytes that cleaved. CONCLUSIONS Based on these animals, early PA appears to program an exaggerated decline in ovarian reserve with age, suggesting that epigenetically induced hormonal factors during fetal development may influence the cohort size of ovarian follicles after birth. PMID:19740899

  19. Enhancing Student Services at Owens Community College: Early Results from the Opening Doors Demonstration in Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scrivener, Susan; Pih, Michael

    2007-01-01

    MDRC launched Opening Doors in 2003 to study the effects of community college programs designed to help students persist in school and earn a credential. This report presents early results from the Opening Doors program at Owens Community College in Toledo, Ohio, which operated from 2004 through 2006. The two-semester program served students whose…

  20. Cardiovascular and selected comorbidities in early arthritis and early spondyloarthritis, a comparative study: results from the ESPOIR and DESIR cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Gherghe, Ana Maria; Dougados, Maxime; Combe, Bernard; Landewé, Robert; Mihai, Carina; Berenbaum, Francis; Mariette, Xavier; Wolterbeek, Ron; van der Heijde, Désirée

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the prevalence of comorbidities in early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA) and early axial spondyloarthritis (ESpA) versus the general population. Methods Baseline data of 689 patients with ERA from the Etude et Suivi des Polyarthrites Indifférenciées Récentes (ESPOIR) cohort (age 48.2±12.1 years, symptoms duration 14.2±14.5 weeks) and 645 patients with ESpA from Devenir des Spondylarthropathies Indifférenciées Récentes (DESIR; age 32.8±8.4 years, axial symptoms duration 79.0±45.7 weeks) were analysed. Metabolic and cardiovascular diseases (CVD), infections and neoplasia were determined in each cohort. The prevalence (95% CI) of several comorbidities was compared with that in the French general population. For patients without CVD, the 10-year risk of developing CVD was calculated using the Framingham and SCORE equations. The heart age was calculated using the 2008 Framingham points system. Results 42% of patients with ERA and 20.3% of patients with ESpA had at least 1 comorbidity; the most common were arterial hypertension (AHT) and dyslipidaemia. AHT prevalence (95% CI) in ERA (18.2% (15.5% to 21.3%)), but not in ESpA (5.08% (3.57% to 7.14%)), was significantly increased (p<0.05) compared with the general population (7.58%). Prevalence of tuberculosis history was higher in ERA (4.7% (3.3% to 6.6%)), and ESpA (0.99% (0.4% to 2.3%)) than in the general population (0.02%; both p<0.05). No differences were observed in malignancies, coronary heart disease or diabetes. In ERA, among patients without a history of CVD, an intermediate to high CVD risk was found. The heart age exceeded the real age by 4.1±9.6 years in ERA and by 2.1±7.0 years in ESpA (p<0.001). Conclusions We found an increased prevalence of AHT and tuberculosis history in ERA and ESpA, and an increased CVD risk. These results should prompt rheumatologists to check these comorbidities early in the disease. PMID:26535145

  1. Palaeomagnetic results from the southern Sierra Madre Oriental, Mexico: evidence for Early Cretaceous or Laramide remagnetization?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhnel, H.; Gose, W. A.; Testarmata, M. M.; Bocanegra Noriega, G.

    1990-12-01

    A large suite of samples from the Latest Triassic Huizachal and Early Jurassic Huayacocotla Groups and the Latest Jurassic Taman and Earliest Cretaceous Pimienta Formations was collected in the southern Sierra Madre Oriental for a palaeomagnetic study. Only the samples from three sites belonging to the Huizachal Group and the Las Juntas Formation possibly have retained their primary magnetization. If so, their pole position does not reveal any palaeomagnetically discernable motion relative to cratonic North America. All remaining sites were remagnetized as evidenced by a negative fold test at four sites and the fact that the pole positions cluster better at the 95% significance level if no structural corrections are applied. The tightness of the cluster ( α95 = 4.6 °) and the same polarity, suggest that the samples were remagnetized at some common time. These results permit two interpretations. (1) If the sampling region has not suffered any significant tectonic rotation, then the remagnetization can be dated by comparison with the polar wander path for North America as Early Cretaceous (≈ 130 Ma). This Early Cretaceous phase of deformation is not recognized in the northern Sierra Madre Oriental and clearly pre-dates the Early Tertiary Laramide orogeny. (2) If the southern Sierra Madre Oriental did rotate counterclockwise by ≈ 20 °, then the remagnetization could have originated in any Cretaceous or Early Tertiary time, and may indeed be related to the Laramide deformation. In either case, the data imply that the southern Sierra Madre Oriental constitutes an independent tectonic domain.

  2. Early results from Magsat. [studies of near-earth magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.; Estes, R. H.; Mayhew, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    Papers presented at the May 27, 1981 meeting of the American Geophysical Union concerning early results from the Magsat satellite program, which was designed to study the near-earth magnetic fields originating in the core and lithosphere, are discussed. The satellite was launched on October 30, 1979 into a sun-synchronous (twilight) orbit, and re-entered the atmosphere on June 11, 1980. Instruments carried included a cesium vapor magnetometer to measure field magnitudes, a fluxgate magnetometer to measure field components and an optical system to measure fluxgate magnetometer orientation. Early results concerned spherical harmonic models, fields due to ionospheric and magnetospheric currents, the identification and interpretation of fields from lithospheric sources. The preliminary results confirm the possibility of separating the measured field into core, crustal and external components, and represent significant developments in analytical techniques in main-field modelling and the physics of the field sources.

  3. Parent-of-origin-specific allelic associations among 106 genomic loci for age at menarche.

    PubMed

    Perry, John R B; Day, Felix; Elks, Cathy E; Sulem, Patrick; Thompson, Deborah J; Ferreira, Teresa; He, Chunyan; Chasman, Daniel I; Esko, Tõnu; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Albrecht, Eva; Ang, Wei Q; Corre, Tanguy; Cousminer, Diana L; Feenstra, Bjarke; Franceschini, Nora; Ganna, Andrea; Johnson, Andrew D; Kjellqvist, Sanela; Lunetta, Kathryn L; McMahon, George; Nolte, Ilja M; Paternoster, Lavinia; Porcu, Eleonora; Smith, Albert V; Stolk, Lisette; Teumer, Alexander; Tšernikova, Natalia; Tikkanen, Emmi; Ulivi, Sheila; Wagner, Erin K; Amin, Najaf; Bierut, Laura J; Byrne, Enda M; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Koller, Daniel L; Mangino, Massimo; Pers, Tune H; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Hua Zhao, Jing; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Atsma, Femke; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Blomqvist, Carl; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Buring, Julie E; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen; Chen, Jinhui; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Collée, J Margriet; Couch, Fergus J; Couper, David; Coviello, Andrea D; Cox, Angela; Czene, Kamila; D'adamo, Adamo Pio; Davey Smith, George; De Vivo, Immaculata; Demerath, Ellen W; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dieffenbach, Aida K; Dunning, Alison M; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Eriksson, Johan G; Fasching, Peter A; Ferrucci, Luigi; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Flyger, Henrik; Foroud, Tatiana; Franke, Lude; Garcia, Melissa E; García-Closas, Montserrat; Geller, Frank; de Geus, Eco E J; Giles, Graham G; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guénel, Pascal; Guo, Suiqun; Hall, Per; Hamann, Ute; Haring, Robin; Hartman, Catharina A; Heath, Andrew C; Hofman, Albert; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Hu, Frank B; Hunter, David J; Karasik, David; Kiel, Douglas P; Knight, Julia A; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lai, Sandra; Lambrechts, Diether; Lindblom, Annika; Mägi, Reedik; Magnusson, Patrik K; Mannermaa, Arto; Martin, Nicholas G; Masson, Gisli; McArdle, Patrick F; McArdle, Wendy L; Melbye, Mads; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Milne, Roger L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Nohr, Ellen A; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Oostra, Ben A; Palotie, Aarno; Peacock, Munro; Pedersen, Nancy L; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul D P; Postma, Dirkje S; Pouta, Anneli; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Ring, Susan; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Robino, Antonietta; Rose, Lynda M; Rudolph, Anja; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanna, Serena; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Southey, Mellissa C; Sovio, Ulla; Stampfer, Meir J; Stöckl, Doris; Storniolo, Anna M; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tyrer, Jonathan; Visser, Jenny A; Vollenweider, Peter; Völzke, Henry; Waeber, Gerard; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wang, Qin; Willemsen, Gonneke; Winqvist, Robert; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Wright, Margaret J; Boomsma, Dorret I; Econs, Michael J; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Loos, Ruth J F; McCarthy, Mark I; Montgomery, Grant W; Rice, John P; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Bergmann, Sven; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boyd, Heather A; Crisponi, Laura; Gasparini, Paolo; Gieger, Christian; Harris, Tamara B; Ingelsson, Erik; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kraft, Peter; Lawlor, Debbie; Metspalu, Andres; Pennell, Craig E; Ridker, Paul M; Snieder, Harold; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Spector, Tim D; Strachan, David P; Uitterlinden, André G; Wareham, Nicholas J; Widen, Elisabeth; Zygmunt, Marek; Murray, Anna; Easton, Douglas F; Stefansson, Kari; Murabito, Joanne M; Ong, Ken K

    2014-10-01

    Age at menarche is a marker of timing of puberty in females. It varies widely between individuals, is a heritable trait and is associated with risks for obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, breast cancer and all-cause mortality. Studies of rare human disorders of puberty and animal models point to a complex hypothalamic-pituitary-hormonal regulation, but the mechanisms that determine pubertal timing and underlie its links to disease risk remain unclear. Here, using genome-wide and custom-genotyping arrays in up to 182,416 women of European descent from 57 studies, we found robust evidence (P < 5 × 10(-8)) for 123 signals at 106 genomic loci associated with age at menarche. Many loci were associated with other pubertal traits in both sexes, and there was substantial overlap with genes implicated in body mass index and various diseases, including rare disorders of puberty. Menarche signals were enriched in imprinted regions, with three loci (DLK1-WDR25, MKRN3-MAGEL2 and KCNK9) demonstrating parent-of-origin-specific associations concordant with known parental expression patterns. Pathway analyses implicated nuclear hormone receptors, particularly retinoic acid and γ-aminobutyric acid-B2 receptor signalling, among novel mechanisms that regulate pubertal timing in humans. Our findings suggest a genetic architecture involving at least hundreds of common variants in the coordinated timing of the pubertal transition. PMID:25231870

  4. Parent-of-origin specific allelic associations among 106 genomic loci for age at menarche

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Deborah J; Ferreira, Teresa; He, Chunyan; Chasman, Daniel I; Esko, Tõnu; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Albrecht, Eva; Ang, Wei Q; Corre, Tanguy; Cousminer, Diana L; Feenstra, Bjarke; Franceschini, Nora; Ganna, Andrea; Johnson, Andrew D; Kjellqvist, Sanela; Lunetta, Kathryn L; McMahon, George; Nolte, Ilja M; Paternoster, Lavinia; Porcu, Eleonora; Smith, Albert V; Stolk, Lisette; Teumer, Alexander; Tšernikova, Natalia; Tikkanen, Emmi; Ulivi, Sheila; Wagner, Erin K; Amin, Najaf; Bierut, Laura J; Byrne, Enda M; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Koller, Daniel L; Mangino, Massimo; Pers, Tune H; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Zhao, Jing Hua; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Atsma, Femke; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Blomqvist, Carl; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Buring, Julie E; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen; Chen, Jinhui; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Collée, J. Margriet; Couch, Fergus J; Couper, David; Coveillo, Andrea D; Cox, Angela; Czene, Kamila; D’adamo, Adamo Pio; Smith, George Davey; De Vivo, Immaculata; Demerath, Ellen W; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dieffenbach, Aida K; Dunning, Alison M; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Eriksson, Johan G; Fasching, Peter A; Ferrucci, Luigi; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Flyger, Henrik; Foroud, Tatiana; Franke, Lude; Garcia, Melissa E; García-Closas, Montserrat; Geller, Frank; de Geus, Eco EJ; Giles, Graham G; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guénel, Pascal; Guo, Suiqun; Hall, Per; Hamann, Ute; Haring, Robin; Hartman, Catharina A; Heath, Andrew C; Hofman, Albert; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Hu, Frank B; Hunter, David J; Karasik, David; Kiel, Douglas P; Knight, Julia A; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lai, Sandra; Lambrechts, Diether; Lindblom, Annika; Mägi, Reedik; Magnusson, Patrik K; Mannermaa, Arto; Martin, Nicholas G; Masson, Gisli; McArdle, Patrick F; McArdle, Wendy L; Melbye, Mads; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Milne, Roger L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Nohr, Ellen A; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Oostra, Ben A; Palotie, Aarno; Peacock, Munro; Pedersen, Nancy L; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul DP; Postma, Dirkje S; Pouta, Anneli; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Ring, Susan; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Robino, Antonietta; Rose, Lynda M; Rudolph, Anja; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanna, Serena; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Southey, Mellissa C; Sovio, Ulla; Stampfer, Meir J; Stöckl, Doris; Storniolo, Anna M; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tyrer, Jonathan; Visser, Jenny A; Vollenweider, Peter; Völzke, Henry; Waeber, Gerard; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wang, Qin; Willemsen, Gonneke; Winqvist, Robert; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce HR; Wright, Margaret J; Boomsma, Dorret I; Econs, Michael J; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Loos, Ruth JF; McCarthy, Mark I; Montgomery, Grant W; Rice, John P; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Bergmann, Sven; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boyd, Heather A; Crisponi, Laura; Gasparini, Paolo; Gieger, Christian; Harris, Tamara B; Ingelsson, Erik; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kraft, Peter; Lawlor, Debbie; Metspalu, Andres; Pennell, Craig E; Ridker, Paul M; Snieder, Harold; Sørensen, Thorkild IA; Spector, Tim D; Strachan, David P; Uitterlinden, André G; Wareham, Nicholas J; Widen, Elisabeth; Zygmunt, Marek; Murray, Anna; Easton, Douglas F

    2014-01-01

    Age at menarche is a marker of timing of puberty in females. It varies widely between individuals, is a heritable trait and is associated with risks for obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, breast cancer and all-cause mortality1. Studies of rare human disorders of puberty and animal models point to a complex hypothalamic-pituitary-hormonal regulation2,3, but the mechanisms that determine pubertal timing and underlie its links to disease risk remain unclear. Here, using genome-wide and custom-genotyping arrays in up to 182,416 women of European descent from 57 studies, we found robust evidence (P<5×10−8) for 123 signals at 106 genomic loci associated with age at menarche. Many loci were associated with other pubertal traits in both sexes, and there was substantial overlap with genes implicated in body mass index and various diseases, including rare disorders of puberty. Menarche signals were enriched in imprinted regions, with three loci (DLK1/WDR25, MKRN3/MAGEL2 and KCNK9) demonstrating parent-of-origin specific associations concordant with known parental expression patterns. Pathway analyses implicated nuclear hormone receptors, particularly retinoic acid and gamma-aminobutyric acid-B2 receptor signaling, among novel mechanisms that regulate pubertal timing in humans. Our findings suggest a genetic architecture involving at least hundreds of common variants in the coordinated timing of the pubertal transition. PMID:25231870

  5. Rare coding variants and X-linked loci associated with age at menarche.

    PubMed

    Lunetta, Kathryn L; Day, Felix R; Sulem, Patrick; Ruth, Katherine S; Tung, Joyce Y; Hinds, David A; Esko, Tõnu; Elks, Cathy E; Altmaier, Elisabeth; He, Chunyan; Huffman, Jennifer E; Mihailov, Evelin; Porcu, Eleonora; Robino, Antonietta; Rose, Lynda M; Schick, Ursula M; Stolk, Lisette; Teumer, Alexander; Thompson, Deborah J; Traglia, Michela; Wang, Carol A; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Antoniou, Antonis C; Barbieri, Caterina; Coviello, Andrea D; Cucca, Francesco; Demerath, Ellen W; Dunning, Alison M; Gandin, Ilaria; Grove, Megan L; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Hocking, Lynne J; Hofman, Albert; Huang, Jinyan; Jackson, Rebecca D; Karasik, David; Kriebel, Jennifer; Lange, Ethan M; Lange, Leslie A; Langenberg, Claudia; Li, Xin; Luan, Jian'an; Mägi, Reedik; Morrison, Alanna C; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pirie, Ailith; Polasek, Ozren; Porteous, David; Reiner, Alex P; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Sala, Cinzia F; Schlessinger, David; Scott, Robert A; Stöckl, Doris; Visser, Jenny A; Völker, Uwe; Vozzi, Diego; Wilson, James G; Zygmunt, Marek; Boerwinkle, Eric; Buring, Julie E; Crisponi, Laura; Easton, Douglas F; Hayward, Caroline; Hu, Frank B; Liu, Simin; Metspalu, Andres; Pennell, Craig E; Ridker, Paul M; Strauch, Konstantin; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Toniolo, Daniela; Uitterlinden, André G; Ulivi, Sheila; Völzke, Henry; Wareham, Nicholas J; Wellons, Melissa; Franceschini, Nora; Chasman, Daniel I; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Murray, Anna; Stefansson, Kari; Murabito, Joanne M; Ong, Ken K; Perry, John R B

    2015-08-04

    More than 100 loci have been identified for age at menarche by genome-wide association studies; however, collectively these explain only ∼3% of the trait variance. Here we test two overlooked sources of variation in 192,974 European ancestry women: low-frequency protein-coding variants and X-chromosome variants. Five missense/nonsense variants (in ALMS1/LAMB2/TNRC6A/TACR3/PRKAG1) are associated with age at menarche (minor allele frequencies 0.08-4.6%; effect sizes 0.08-1.25 years per allele; P<5 × 10(-8)). In addition, we identify common X-chromosome loci at IGSF1 (rs762080, P=9.4 × 10(-13)) and FAAH2 (rs5914101, P=4.9 × 10(-10)). Highlighted genes implicate cellular energy homeostasis, post-transcriptional gene silencing and fatty-acid amide signalling. A frequently reported mutation in TACR3 for idiopathic hypogonatrophic hypogonadism (p.W275X) is associated with 1.25-year-later menarche (P=2.8 × 10(-11)), illustrating the utility of population studies to estimate the penetrance of reportedly pathogenic mutations. Collectively, these novel variants explain ∼0.5% variance, indicating that these overlooked sources of variation do not substantially explain the 'missing heritability' of this complex trait.

  6. Parent-of-origin-specific allelic associations among 106 genomic loci for age at menarche.

    PubMed

    Perry, John R B; Day, Felix; Elks, Cathy E; Sulem, Patrick; Thompson, Deborah J; Ferreira, Teresa; He, Chunyan; Chasman, Daniel I; Esko, Tõnu; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Albrecht, Eva; Ang, Wei Q; Corre, Tanguy; Cousminer, Diana L; Feenstra, Bjarke; Franceschini, Nora; Ganna, Andrea; Johnson, Andrew D; Kjellqvist, Sanela; Lunetta, Kathryn L; McMahon, George; Nolte, Ilja M; Paternoster, Lavinia; Porcu, Eleonora; Smith, Albert V; Stolk, Lisette; Teumer, Alexander; Tšernikova, Natalia; Tikkanen, Emmi; Ulivi, Sheila; Wagner, Erin K; Amin, Najaf; Bierut, Laura J; Byrne, Enda M; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Koller, Daniel L; Mangino, Massimo; Pers, Tune H; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Hua Zhao, Jing; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Atsma, Femke; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Blomqvist, Carl; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Buring, Julie E; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen; Chen, Jinhui; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Collée, J Margriet; Couch, Fergus J; Couper, David; Coviello, Andrea D; Cox, Angela; Czene, Kamila; D'adamo, Adamo Pio; Davey Smith, George; De Vivo, Immaculata; Demerath, Ellen W; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Dieffenbach, Aida K; Dunning, Alison M; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Eriksson, Johan G; Fasching, Peter A; Ferrucci, Luigi; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Flyger, Henrik; Foroud, Tatiana; Franke, Lude; Garcia, Melissa E; García-Closas, Montserrat; Geller, Frank; de Geus, Eco E J; Giles, Graham G; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guénel, Pascal; Guo, Suiqun; Hall, Per; Hamann, Ute; Haring, Robin; Hartman, Catharina A; Heath, Andrew C; Hofman, Albert; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Hu, Frank B; Hunter, David J; Karasik, David; Kiel, Douglas P; Knight, Julia A; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lai, Sandra; Lambrechts, Diether; Lindblom, Annika; Mägi, Reedik; Magnusson, Patrik K; Mannermaa, Arto; Martin, Nicholas G; Masson, Gisli; McArdle, Patrick F; McArdle, Wendy L; Melbye, Mads; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Milne, Roger L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Nohr, Ellen A; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Oostra, Ben A; Palotie, Aarno; Peacock, Munro; Pedersen, Nancy L; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul D P; Postma, Dirkje S; Pouta, Anneli; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Ring, Susan; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Robino, Antonietta; Rose, Lynda M; Rudolph, Anja; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanna, Serena; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Southey, Mellissa C; Sovio, Ulla; Stampfer, Meir J; Stöckl, Doris; Storniolo, Anna M; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tyrer, Jonathan; Visser, Jenny A; Vollenweider, Peter; Völzke, Henry; Waeber, Gerard; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wang, Qin; Willemsen, Gonneke; Winqvist, Robert; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Wright, Margaret J; Boomsma, Dorret I; Econs, Michael J; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Loos, Ruth J F; McCarthy, Mark I; Montgomery, Grant W; Rice, John P; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Bergmann, Sven; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boyd, Heather A; Crisponi, Laura; Gasparini, Paolo; Gieger, Christian; Harris, Tamara B; Ingelsson, Erik; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kraft, Peter; Lawlor, Debbie; Metspalu, Andres; Pennell, Craig E; Ridker, Paul M; Snieder, Harold; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Spector, Tim D; Strachan, David P; Uitterlinden, André G; Wareham, Nicholas J; Widen, Elisabeth; Zygmunt, Marek; Murray, Anna; Easton, Douglas F; Stefansson, Kari; Murabito, Joanne M; Ong, Ken K

    2014-10-01

    Age at menarche is a marker of timing of puberty in females. It varies widely between individuals, is a heritable trait and is associated with risks for obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, breast cancer and all-cause mortality. Studies of rare human disorders of puberty and animal models point to a complex hypothalamic-pituitary-hormonal regulation, but the mechanisms that determine pubertal timing and underlie its links to disease risk remain unclear. Here, using genome-wide and custom-genotyping arrays in up to 182,416 women of European descent from 57 studies, we found robust evidence (P < 5 × 10(-8)) for 123 signals at 106 genomic loci associated with age at menarche. Many loci were associated with other pubertal traits in both sexes, and there was substantial overlap with genes implicated in body mass index and various diseases, including rare disorders of puberty. Menarche signals were enriched in imprinted regions, with three loci (DLK1-WDR25, MKRN3-MAGEL2 and KCNK9) demonstrating parent-of-origin-specific associations concordant with known parental expression patterns. Pathway analyses implicated nuclear hormone receptors, particularly retinoic acid and γ-aminobutyric acid-B2 receptor signalling, among novel mechanisms that regulate pubertal timing in humans. Our findings suggest a genetic architecture involving at least hundreds of common variants in the coordinated timing of the pubertal transition.

  7. Rare coding variants and X-linked loci associated with age at menarche

    PubMed Central

    Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Day, Felix R.; Sulem, Patrick; Ruth, Katherine S.; Tung, Joyce Y.; Hinds, David A.; Esko, Tõnu; Elks, Cathy E.; Altmaier, Elisabeth; He, Chunyan; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Mihailov, Evelin; Porcu, Eleonora; Robino, Antonietta; Rose, Lynda M.; Schick, Ursula M.; Stolk, Lisette; Teumer, Alexander; Thompson, Deborah J.; Traglia, Michela; Wang, Carol A.; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Barbieri, Caterina; Coviello, Andrea D.; Cucca, Francesco; Demerath, Ellen W.; Dunning, Alison M.; Gandin, Ilaria; Grove, Megan L.; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Hocking, Lynne J.; Hofman, Albert; Huang, Jinyan; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Karasik, David; Kriebel, Jennifer; Lange, Ethan M.; Lange, Leslie A.; Langenberg, Claudia; Li, Xin; Luan, Jian'an; Mägi, Reedik; Morrison, Alanna C.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pirie, Ailith; Polasek, Ozren; Porteous, David; Reiner, Alex P.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Sala, Cinzia F.; Schlessinger, David; Scott, Robert A.; Stöckl, Doris; Visser, Jenny A.; Völker, Uwe; Vozzi, Diego; Wilson, James G.; Zygmunt, Marek; Forouhi, Nita G.; Kerrison, Nicola D.; Sharp, Stephen J.; Sims, Matt; Barroso, Inês; Deloukas, Panos; McCarthy, Mark I.; Arriola, Larraitz; Balkau, Beverley; Barricarte, Aurelio; Boeing, Heiner; Franks, Paul W.; Gonzalez, Carlos; Grioni, Sara; Kaaks, Rudolf; Key, Timothy J.; Navarro, Carmen; Nilsson, Peter M.; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Quirós, J Ramón; Rolandsson, Olov; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Sánchez, María-José; Slimani, Nadia; Tjonneland, Anne; Tumino, Rosario; van der A, Daphne L.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Riboli, Elio; Smith, Blair H.; Campbell, Archie; Deary, Ian J.; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Buring, Julie E.; Crisponi, Laura; Easton, Douglas F.; Hayward, Caroline; Hu, Frank B.; Liu, Simin; Metspalu, Andres; Pennell, Craig E.; Ridker, Paul M.; Strauch, Konstantin; Streeten, Elizabeth A.; Toniolo, Daniela; Uitterlinden, André G.; Ulivi, Sheila; Völzke, Henry; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Wellons, Melissa; Franceschini, Nora; Chasman, Daniel I.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Murray, Anna; Stefansson, Kari; Murabito, Joanne M.; Ong, Ken K.; Perry, John R. B.

    2015-01-01

    More than 100 loci have been identified for age at menarche by genome-wide association studies; however, collectively these explain only ∼3% of the trait variance. Here we test two overlooked sources of variation in 192,974 European ancestry women: low-frequency protein-coding variants and X-chromosome variants. Five missense/nonsense variants (in ALMS1/LAMB2/TNRC6A/TACR3/PRKAG1) are associated with age at menarche (minor allele frequencies 0.08–4.6%; effect sizes 0.08–1.25 years per allele; P<5 × 10−8). In addition, we identify common X-chromosome loci at IGSF1 (rs762080, P=9.4 × 10−13) and FAAH2 (rs5914101, P=4.9 × 10−10). Highlighted genes implicate cellular energy homeostasis, post-transcriptional gene silencing and fatty-acid amide signalling. A frequently reported mutation in TACR3 for idiopathic hypogonatrophic hypogonadism (p.W275X) is associated with 1.25-year-later menarche (P=2.8 × 10−11), illustrating the utility of population studies to estimate the penetrance of reportedly pathogenic mutations. Collectively, these novel variants explain ∼0.5% variance, indicating that these overlooked sources of variation do not substantially explain the ‘missing heritability' of this complex trait. PMID:26239645

  8. Rare coding variants and X-linked loci associated with age at menarche.

    PubMed

    Lunetta, Kathryn L; Day, Felix R; Sulem, Patrick; Ruth, Katherine S; Tung, Joyce Y; Hinds, David A; Esko, Tõnu; Elks, Cathy E; Altmaier, Elisabeth; He, Chunyan; Huffman, Jennifer E; Mihailov, Evelin; Porcu, Eleonora; Robino, Antonietta; Rose, Lynda M; Schick, Ursula M; Stolk, Lisette; Teumer, Alexander; Thompson, Deborah J; Traglia, Michela; Wang, Carol A; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Antoniou, Antonis C; Barbieri, Caterina; Coviello, Andrea D; Cucca, Francesco; Demerath, Ellen W; Dunning, Alison M; Gandin, Ilaria; Grove, Megan L; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Hocking, Lynne J; Hofman, Albert; Huang, Jinyan; Jackson, Rebecca D; Karasik, David; Kriebel, Jennifer; Lange, Ethan M; Lange, Leslie A; Langenberg, Claudia; Li, Xin; Luan, Jian'an; Mägi, Reedik; Morrison, Alanna C; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pirie, Ailith; Polasek, Ozren; Porteous, David; Reiner, Alex P; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Sala, Cinzia F; Schlessinger, David; Scott, Robert A; Stöckl, Doris; Visser, Jenny A; Völker, Uwe; Vozzi, Diego; Wilson, James G; Zygmunt, Marek; Boerwinkle, Eric; Buring, Julie E; Crisponi, Laura; Easton, Douglas F; Hayward, Caroline; Hu, Frank B; Liu, Simin; Metspalu, Andres; Pennell, Craig E; Ridker, Paul M; Strauch, Konstantin; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Toniolo, Daniela; Uitterlinden, André G; Ulivi, Sheila; Völzke, Henry; Wareham, Nicholas J; Wellons, Melissa; Franceschini, Nora; Chasman, Daniel I; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Murray, Anna; Stefansson, Kari; Murabito, Joanne M; Ong, Ken K; Perry, John R B

    2015-01-01

    More than 100 loci have been identified for age at menarche by genome-wide association studies; however, collectively these explain only ∼3% of the trait variance. Here we test two overlooked sources of variation in 192,974 European ancestry women: low-frequency protein-coding variants and X-chromosome variants. Five missense/nonsense variants (in ALMS1/LAMB2/TNRC6A/TACR3/PRKAG1) are associated with age at menarche (minor allele frequencies 0.08-4.6%; effect sizes 0.08-1.25 years per allele; P<5 × 10(-8)). In addition, we identify common X-chromosome loci at IGSF1 (rs762080, P=9.4 × 10(-13)) and FAAH2 (rs5914101, P=4.9 × 10(-10)). Highlighted genes implicate cellular energy homeostasis, post-transcriptional gene silencing and fatty-acid amide signalling. A frequently reported mutation in TACR3 for idiopathic hypogonatrophic hypogonadism (p.W275X) is associated with 1.25-year-later menarche (P=2.8 × 10(-11)), illustrating the utility of population studies to estimate the penetrance of reportedly pathogenic mutations. Collectively, these novel variants explain ∼0.5% variance, indicating that these overlooked sources of variation do not substantially explain the 'missing heritability' of this complex trait. PMID:26239645

  9. Results from conceptual design study of potential early commercial MHD/steam power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hals, F.; Kessler, R.; Swallom, D.; Westra, L.; Zar, J.; Morgan, W.; Bozzuto, C.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents conceptual design information for a potential early MHD power plant developed in the second phase of a joint study of such plants. Conceptual designs of plant components and equipment with performance, operational characteristics and costs are reported on. Plant economics and overall performance including full and part load operation are reviewed. Environmental aspects and the methods incorporated in plant design for emission control of sulfur and nitrogen oxides are reviewed. Results from reliability/availability analysis conducted are also included.

  10. Age at menarche and endometrial cancer risk: a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ting-Ting; Wang, Yong-Lai; Ma, Xiao-Xin

    2015-09-11

    Evidence between age at menarche and endometrial cancer risk have been controversial. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis of prospective studies to analyze the aforementioned association. Relevant studies were identified by searching PubMed and EMBASE databases until the end of June 2015. A random-effects model was used to estimate summary relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between menarcheal age and endometrial cancer risk. Our meta-analysis included eight prospective studies involving 4553 subjects with endometrial cancer. The summarized RRs of endometrial cancer for menarcheal age were 0.68 (95%CI = 0.58-0.81, I(2) = 41.9%, P = 0.099, n = 8) when comparing women with oldest category of menarcheal age with women with youngest category of menarcheal age. Notably, there was an 4% reduction in risk for per 2 years delay in menarcheal age (summarized RR = 0.96; 95%CI = 0.94-0.98, I(2) = 45.7%, P = 0.101, n = 6). Additionally, significant inverse associations were consistent within all stratified analyses. There was no evidence of publication bias or significant heterogeneity between subgroups detected by meta-regression analyses. Our findings support the hypothesis that late menarcheal age is inversely associated with endometrial cancer risk. Further larger prospective or pooled studies are warranted to fully adjust for potential confounders and distinguish whether the associations differ by histological subtypes of endometrial cancer.

  11. FINAL RESULTS OF THE EARLY TREATMENT FOR RETINOPATHY OF PREMATURITY (ETROP) RANDOMIZED TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Good, William V

    2004-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose To present the final results of the Early Treatment for Retinopathy of Prematurity Study. Methods Infants with bilateral high-risk prethreshold retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) (n = 317) had one eye randomized to early retinal ablative treatment and the fellow eye managed conventionally (control eye). In asymmetric cases (n = 84), the eye with high-risk prethreshold ROP was randomized to early or to conventional management. High risk was determined using a model based on the Cryotherapy for Retinopathy of Prematurity natural history cohort. The primary outcome was visual acuity assessed by masked testers using the Teller acuity card procedure. Structural examinations were performed at 6 and 9 months. Results Grating acuity results showed a reduction in unfavorable visual acuity outcomes with earlier treatment, from 19.8% to 14.3% (P < .005). Unfavorable structural outcomes were reduced from 15.6% to 9.0% (P < .001) at 9 months. Further analysis supported retinal ablative therapy for eyes with type I ROP, defined as zone I, any stage ROP with plus disease; zone I, stage 3 ROP without plus disease; or zone II, stage 2 or 3 with plus disease. The analysis supported a “wait and watch” approach to type II ROP, defined as zone I, stage 1 and 2 without plus disease, or zone II, stage 3 without plus disease. These eyes should be considered for treatment only if they progress to type I ROP or threshold. Conclusion Early treatment of high-risk prethreshold ROP significantly reduced unfavorable outcomes in both primary and secondary (structural) measures. PMID:15747762

  12. Twenty-Year Experience of Heart Transplantation: Early and Long-Term Results

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae-Hong; Yeom, Sang Yoon; Hwang, Ho Young; Choi, Jae-Woong; Cho, Hyun-Jai; Lee, Hae-Young; Huh, Jae-Hak; Kim, Ki-Bong

    2016-01-01

    Background We evaluated early and long-term results after heart transplantation (HTPL). Methods One hundred five consecutive patients (male:female=80:25) who underwent HTPL between 1994 and 2013 were enrolled. Based on the changes in immunosuppressive regimen, the study patients were divided into two groups. Early and long-term clinical outcomes were evaluated and compared between the patients who underwent HTPL before (group E, n=41) and after July 2009 (group L, n=64). The group L patients were older (p<0.001), had higher incidence of hypertension (p=0.001) and chronic kidney disease (p<0.001), and more frequently needed preoperative mechanical ventilation (p=0.027) and mechanical circulatory support (p=0.014) than the group E patients. Results Overall operative mortality was 3.8%, and postoperative morbidities included acute kidney injury (n=31), respiratory complications (n=16), reoperation for bleeding (n=15) and wound complications (n=10). There were no significant differences in early results except acute kidney injury between group E and group L patients. Overall survival rates at 1, 5, and 10 years were 83.8%, 67.7%, and 54.9%, respectively, with no significant difference between the two patient groups. Rejection-free rates at 1 and 5 years were 63.0% and 59.7%, respectively; rates were significantly higher in group L than in group E (p<0.001). Conclusion Despite increased preoperative comorbidities, group L patients showed similar early and long-term outcomes and significantly higher rejection-free rates when compared with group E patients. PMID:27525232

  13. Polymorphisms of estrogen-biosynthesis genes CYP17 and CYP19 may influence age at menarche: a genetic association study in Caucasian females.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan; Xiong, Dong-Hai; Yang, Tie-Lin; Guo, Yan-Fang; Recker, Robert R; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2006-08-15

    Variation in age at menarche (AAM) is known to be substantially influenced by genetic factors, but the true causal genes remain largely unidentified. Because the increased amplitude of estrogen exposure of tissues initiates the onset of menarche, the genes involved in estrogen biosynthesis are natural candidate genes underlying AAM. Our study aimed to identify whether the CYP17 and CYP19, the two key genes involved in the biosynthesis of estrogen, are associated with AAM variation in 1048 females from 354 Caucasian nuclear families. We genotyped 38 SNPs and established the linkage disequilibrium blocks and haplotype structures that covered the full transcript length of those two genes. Family-based and population-based statistical analyses were used to test for associations with all of the single SNPs and haplotypes. Both methods consistently detected significant associations for five SNPs of CYP19 with AAM. Haplotype analyses corroborated our single-SNP results by showing that the haplotypes in block 1 were highly significant to AAM in population-based analyses. However, we could not find any association of CYP17 with AAM. Our study is the first to suggest the important effect of CYP19 on AAM variation in Caucasian females. It will be valuable to replicate and confirm these findings in other independent studies, aiming at eventually finding the hidden genetic mechanisms underlying the variation in AAM.

  14. Premature menarche without other evidence of precocious puberty.

    PubMed Central

    Heller, M E; Dewhurst, J; Grant, D B

    1979-01-01

    We describe 4 young girls with recurrent vaginal bleeding in the absence of other signs of precocious sexual development. Investigation showed low oestrogen levels in 2 of them, and basal gonadotrophins were in the upper part of the prepubertal range. We believe that the isolated early menstruation in these patients was possibly related to increased sensitivity of the endometrium to oestrogens. PMID:475434

  15. Body size in early life and breast cancer risk in African American and European American women

    PubMed Central

    Bandera, Elisa V.; Chandran, Urmila; Zirpoli, Gary; Ciupak, Gregory; Bovbjerg, Dana H.; Jandorf, Lina; Pawlish, Karen; Freudenheim, Jo L.; Ambrosone, Christine B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose There is growing evidence that body size in early life influences lifetime breast cancer risk, but little is known for African American (AA) women. Methods We evaluated body size during childhood and young adulthood and breast cancer risk among 1,751 cases [979 AA and 772 European American (EA)] and 1,673 controls (958 AA and 715 EA) in the Women’s Circle of Health Study. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed using logistic regression models while adjusting for potential covariates. Results Among AA women, being shorter at 7–8 y compared to peers was associated with increased postmenopausal breast cancer risk (OR: 1.68, 95% CI: 1.02–2.74), and being heavier at menarche with decreased postmenopausal breast cancer risk, although of borderline significance (OR: 0.45, 95% CI: 0.20–1.02). For EA women, being shorter from childhood through adolescence, particularly at menarche, was associated with reduced premenopausal breast cancer risk (OR: 0.55, 95% CI: 0.31–0.98). After excluding hormone replacement therapy users, an inverse association with postmenopausal breast cancer was found among EA women reporting to be heavier than their peers at menarche (OR: 0.18, 95% CI: 0.04–0.79). The inverse relationship between BMI at age 20 and breast cancer risk was stronger and only statistically significant in EA women. No clear association with weight gain since age 20 was found. Conclusions Findings suggest that the impact of childhood height on breast cancer risk may differ for EA and AA women and confirm the inverse association previously reported in EA populations with adolescent body fatness, in AA women. PMID:24113797

  16. Early Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Reducing Radiotherapy Side Effects: Early Results of a Randomized Trial in Oropharyngeal and Nasopharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Teguh, David N.; Levendag, Peter C.; Noever, Inge; Voet, Peter; Est, Henrie van der; Rooij, Peter van; Dumans, Antoine G.; Boer, Maarten F. de; Huls, Michiel van der; Sterk, Wouter; Schmitz, Paul

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: Comparison of quality of life (QoL) and side effects in a randomized trial for early hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) after radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: From 2006, 19 patients with tumor originating from the tonsillar fossa and/or soft palate (15), base of tongue (1), and nasopharynx (3) were randomized to receive HBOT or not. HBOT consisted of 30 sessions at 2.5 ATA (15 msw) with oxygen breathing for 90 min daily, 5 days per week, applied shortly after the RT treatment was completed. As of 2005, all patients received validated questionnaires (i.e., the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer [EORTC] QLQ-C30, EORTC QLQ Head and Neck Cancer Module (H and N35), Performance Status Scale): before treatment; at the start of RT treatment; after 46 Gy; at the end of RT treatment; and 2, 4, and 6 weeks and 3, 6, 12, and 18 months after follow-up. Results: On all QoL items, better scores were obtained in patients treated with hyperbaric oxygen. The difference between HBOT vs. non-HBOT was significant for all parameters: EORTC H and N35 Swallowing (p = 0.011), EORTC H and N35 Dry Mouth (p = 0.009), EORTC H and N35, Sticky Saliva (p = 0.01), PSS Eating in Public (p = 0.027), and Pain in Mouth (visual analogue scale; p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Patients randomized for receiving hyperbaric oxygen after the RT had better QoL scores for swallowing, sticky saliva, xerostomia, and pain in mouth.

  17. Primary patellar tendon repair and early mobilization: results in an active-duty population.

    PubMed

    Enad, J G; Loomis, L L

    2001-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed 13 patellar tendon repairs done over 32 months at a tertiary care, military medical center. Early mobilization was initiated within 2 weeks postoperatively. Clinical and functional results were statistically examined with relation to age, timing of surgery, length of follow-up, quadriceps atrophy, extensor lag, patella position, and time to full duty. At an average of 24 months' follow-up, six patients (46%) had thigh girth atrophy, and one patient (8%) had an extensor lag >5 degrees. Mean Lysholm score was 84 (range, 57 to 100). Maximum postoperative Tegner activity scores averaged 7.1 (range, 5 to 10). Clinical results classified five cases as excellent, three good, three fair, and two poor. Functional results classified three cases as excellent, four good, two fair, and four poor. Time to return to duty averaged 13 months. Our results suggest that adequate extensor function can be restored after primary repair and immediate motion therapy.

  18. Loss of Daxx, a promiscuously interacting protein, results in extensive apoptosis in early mouse development

    PubMed Central

    Michaelson, Jennifer S.; Bader, Debra; Kuo, Frank; Kozak, Christine; Leder, Philip

    1999-01-01

    The mammalian Daxx gene has been identified in a diverse set of yeast interaction trap experiments. Although a facilitating role for Daxx in Fas-induced apoptosis has been suggested, Daxx’s physiologic function remains unknown. To elucidate the in vivo role of Daxx, we have generated Daxx-deficient mice. Surprisingly, rather than a hyperproliferative disorder expected from the loss of a pro-apoptotic gene, mutation of Daxx results in extensive apoptosis and embryonic lethality. These findings argue against a role for Daxx in promoting Fas-induced cell death and suggest that Daxx either directly or indirectly suppresses apoptosis in the early embryo. PMID:10444590

  19. GLOBULAR CLUSTER POPULATIONS: FIRST RESULTS FROM S{sup 4}G EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Zaritsky, Dennis; Aravena, Manuel; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert; Comerón, Sébastien; Laine, Jarkko; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Knapen, Johan H.; Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Muñoz-Mateos, Juan Carlos; Hinz, Joannah L.; Ho, Luis C.; Holwerda, Benne; Sheth, Kartik

    2015-02-01

    Using 3.6 μm images of 97 early-type galaxies, we develop and verify methodology to measure globular cluster populations from the S{sup 4}G survey images. We find that (1) the ratio, T {sub N}, of the number of clusters, N {sub CL}, to parent galaxy stellar mass, M {sub *}, rises weakly with M {sub *} for early-type galaxies with M {sub *} > 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉} when we calculate galaxy masses using a universal stellar initial mass function (IMF) but that the dependence of T {sub N} on M {sub *} is removed entirely once we correct for the recently uncovered systematic variation of IMF with M {sub *}; and (2) for M {sub *} < 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}, there is no trend between N {sub CL} and M {sub *}, the scatter in T {sub N} is significantly larger (approaching two orders of magnitude), and there is evidence to support a previous, independent suggestion of two families of galaxies. The behavior of N {sub CL} in the lower-mass systems is more difficult to measure because these systems are inherently cluster-poor, but our results may add to previous evidence that large variations in cluster formation and destruction efficiencies are to be found among low-mass galaxies. The average fraction of stellar mass in clusters is ∼0.0014 for M {sub *} > 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉} and can be as large as ∼0.02 for less massive galaxies. These are the first results from the S{sup 4}G sample of galaxies and will be enhanced by the sample of early-type galaxies now being added to S{sup 4}G and complemented by the study of later-type galaxies within S{sup 4}G.

  20. The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission Status and Early Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entekhabi, D.; Yueh, S. H.; O'Neill, P. E.; Entin, J. K.; Njoku, E. G.; Kellogg, K.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission was launched on January 31, 2015. SMAP provides high-resolution, frequent revisit global mapping of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state based on coincident L-band radiometer and L-band radar measurements. The primary science goal of SMAP is to provide new perspectives on how the three fundamental cycles of the Earth system, the water, energy and carbon cycles, are linked together over land. Soil moisture is the key variable that links the three cycles and makes their co-variations synchronous in time. Soil moisture products with varying resolution and coverage are produced from the radiometer alone, radar alone, radiometer-radar combination and data assimilation. In this session the status of the SMAP observatory and early results based on the science data products will be included. The science data acquisition began in May 2015 following several weeks of observatory and instrument commissioning. An intense calibration and validation period followed. Preliminary science products on instrument measurements, soil moisture, landscape frozen or thawed status, and net ecosystem exchange are available at publicly-accessible data archives. The presentation will include early and summary results on the validation of these products. The instrument measurements can also be used to map sea-ice coverage, ocean surface winds and sea surface salinity. Examples of these global retrievals are also presented.

  1. [Early rehabilitation care in the hospital--definition and indication. Results of the expert group "Early Rehabilitation Care in the Hospital"].

    PubMed

    Leistner, K; Stier-Jarmer, M; Berleth, B; Braun, J; Koenig, E; Liman, W; Lüttje, D; Meindl, R; Pientka, L; Weber, G; Stucki, G

    2005-06-01

    As a result of the continuing development in recent medicine, and improvements of emergency services, an increasing number of patients are surviving serious disease and injury. This has increased the need for rehabilitation, starting already during the acute hospital stay. Early identification and rehabilitation may reduce overall costs and help patients to regain independence earlier. Since the eighties specialized early post-acute rehabilitation units have been increasingly implemented in German hospitals. With book 9 of the German Social Code (SGB IX) coming into effect in July 2001, early post-acute rehabilitation care in hospitals became accepted as a social right. However, the specifics of early rehabilitation care have not been defined. There is a lack of generally accepted indication criteria for early rehabilitation services. Similarly, the aims, objectives and methods need to be specified. It was the objective of a group of interested experts from different fields and backgrounds to achieve an interdisciplinary consensus in terms of conceptual definitions and terminology for all early rehabilitation care services in the acute hospital. The development of the definitions and criteria was achieved by using a modified Delphi-technique. By publishing this paper the group is providing information about its activities and results. Examples of typical cases from the various fields of early rehabilitation care were identified and described. Furthermore, the report points out a number of other problems in the area of early rehabilitation care, which have yet to be solved.

  2. Early allograft dysfunction in liver transplantation with donation after cardiac death donors results in inferior survival.

    PubMed

    Lee, David D; Singh, Amandeep; Burns, Justin M; Perry, Dana K; Nguyen, Justin H; Taner, C Burcin

    2014-12-01

    Donation after cardiac death (DCD) liver allografts have been associated with increased morbidity from primary nonfunction, biliary complications, early allograft failure, cost, and mortality. Early allograft dysfunction (EAD) after liver transplantation has been found to be associated with inferior patient and graft survival. In a cohort of 205 consecutive liver-only transplant patients with allografts from DCD donors at a single center, the incidence of EAD was found to be 39.5%. The patient survival rates for those with no EAD and those with EAD at 1, 3, and 5 years were 97% and 89%, 79% and 79%, and 61% and 54%, respectively (P = 0.009). Allograft survival rates for recipients with no EAD and those with EAD at 1, 3, and 5 years were 90% and 75%, 72% and 64%, and 53% and 43%, respectively (P = 0.003). A multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant association between the development of EAD and the cold ischemia time [odds ratio (OR) = 1.26, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.01-1.56, P = 0.037] and hepatocellular cancer as a secondary diagnosis in recipients (OR = 2.26, 95% CI = 1.11-4.58, P = 0.025). There was no correlation between EAD and the development of ischemic cholangiopathy. In conclusion, EAD results in inferior patient and graft survival in recipients of DCD liver allografts. Understanding the events that cause EAD and developing preventive or early therapeutic approaches should be the focus of future investigations. PMID:25179581

  3. Regression model estimation of early season crop proportions: North Dakota, some preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, K. K. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    To estimate crop proportions early in the season, an approach is proposed based on: use of a regression-based prediction equation to obtain an a priori estimate for specific major crop groups; modification of this estimate using current-year LANDSAT and weather data; and a breakdown of the major crop groups into specific crops by regression models. Results from the development and evaluation of appropriate regression models for the first portion of the proposed approach are presented. The results show that the model predicts 1980 crop proportions very well at both county and crop reporting district levels. In terms of planted acreage, the model underpredicted 9.1 percent of the 1980 published data on planted acreage at the county level. It predicted almost exactly the 1980 published data on planted acreage at the crop reporting district level and overpredicted the planted acreage by just 0.92 percent.

  4. Socioeconomic determinants of menarche in rural Polish girls using the decision trees method.

    PubMed

    Matusik, Stanisław; Laska-Mierzejewska, Teresa; Chrzanowska, Maria

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of the decision trees method as a research method of multidimensional associations between menarche and socioeconomic variables. The article is based on data collected from the rural area of Choszczno in the West Pomerania district of Poland between 1987 and 2001. Girls were asked about the appearance of first menstruation (a yes/no method). The average menarchal age was estimated by the probit analysis method, using second grade polynomials. The socioeconomic status of the girls' families was determined using five qualitative variables: fathers' and mothers' educational level, source of income, household appliances and the number of children in a family. For classification based on five socioeconomic variables, one of the most effective algorithms CART (Classification and Regression Trees) was used. In 2001 the menarchal age in 66% of examined girls was properly classified, while a higher efficiency of 70% was obtained for girls examined in 1987. The decision trees method enabled the definition of the hierarchy of socioeconomic variables influencing girls' biological development level. The strongest discriminatory power was attributed to the number of children in a family, and the mother's and then father's educational level. Using this method it is possible to detect differences in strength of socioeconomic variables associated with girls' pubescence before 1987 and after 2001 during the transformation of the economic and political systems in Poland. However, the decision trees method is infrequently applied in social sciences and constitutes a novelty; this article proves its usefulness in examining relations between biological processes and a population's living conditions. PMID:21211091

  5. Early activation of caspases during T lymphocyte stimulation results in selective substrate cleavage in nonapoptotic cells.

    PubMed

    Alam, A; Cohen, L Y; Aouad, S; Sékaly, R P

    1999-12-20

    Apoptosis induced by T cell receptor (TCR) triggering in T lymphocytes involves activation of cysteine proteases of the caspase family through their proteolytic processing. Caspase-3 cleavage was also reported during T cell stimulation in the absence of apoptosis, although the physiological relevance of this response remains unclear. We show here that the caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl (Cbz)-Val-Ala-Asp(OMe)-fluoromethylketone (zVAD) blocks proliferation, major histocompatibility complex class II expression, and blastic transformation during stimulation of peripheral blood lymphocytes. Moreover, T cell activation triggers the selective processing and activation of downstream caspases (caspase-3, -6, and -7), but not caspase-1, -2, or -4, as demonstrated even in intact cells using a cell-permeable fluorescent substrate. Caspase-3 processing occurs in different T cell subsets (CD4(+), CD8(+), CD45RA(+), and CD45RO(+)), and in activated B lymphocytes. The pathway leading to caspase activation involves death receptors and caspase-8, which is also processed after TCR triggering, but not caspase-9, which remains as a proenzyme. Most importantly, caspase activity results in a selective substrate specificity, since poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), lamin B, and Wee1 kinase, but not DNA fragmentation factor (DFF45) or replication factor C (RFC140), are processed. Caspase and substrate processing occur in nonapoptotic lymphocytes. Thus, caspase activation is an early and physiological response in viable, stimulated lymphocytes, and appears to be involved in early steps of lymphocyte activation. PMID:10601362

  6. Post-impact climate conditions on early Mars: preliminary results from GCM simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steakley, Kathryn; Murphy, Jim; Kahre, Melinda A.; Haberle, Robert

    2016-10-01

    Observations imply that liquid water was stable on Mars' surface during the late Noachian/early Hesperian era, with valley networks forming roughly 3.5-3.75 billion years ago, possibly from precipitation and runoff (Fassett & Head 2008, Icarus 195, 61; Hynek et al., 2010, JGR Planets, 115, E09008). Climate models, however, struggle to reproduce such warm conditions (Forget et al., 2013, Icarus 21, 81). Volcanism and impacts have been suggested as mechanisms of either inducing a warm and wet environment or causing local melting in a cold and wet environment. Comets and asteroids are capable of injecting into the atmosphere both kinetic energy from the impact and water from the object itself and from vaporized surface and subsurface ice. Segura et al. (2008, JGR Planets 113, E11007) find using a 1-D atmospheric model that significant rainfall and periods of above-freezing temperatures lasting months to years can follow impacts of objects between 30 and 100 km in diameter. We revisit this work utilizing a 3-D global climate model (GCM) to consider the effects of dynamics, topography, global surface ice variations, etc. We present preliminary results from the NASA ARC Mars GCM investigating global temperature and precipitation behavior in a post-impact, early Mars environment.

  7. Intraoperative Ir-192 implantation for early breast cancer. Techniques and results

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, C.M. )

    1990-07-01

    Patients with early breast cancer (T1-2 N0-1) can be treated by lumpectomy and irradiation with a local control and survival equal to more radical surgery. Between 1982 and 1988, 323 patients with early breast cancer were treated, when possible, with Ir-192 implants at the time of lumpectomy to a local dose of 2000 cGy in 40-50 hours. Ten to 14 days later, the whole breast was treated to 4500 cGy at 180 per fraction in 5 weeks. The 6-year actuarial survival for stages I and II disease was 98% and 91%, respectively, and the recurrence-free survival was 96% and 98%, respectively. When these 323 patients were evaluated by T status, a local control of 97% was the same for T1 and T2 lesions. The cosmetic results were good to excellent in 95% of the patients. This approach has improved our ability to accurately place the boost dose in the breast.

  8. Early Clinical and Radiographic Results of Minimally Invasive Anterior Approach Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, Tamara; Ahlmann, Elke R.; Menendez, Lawrence R.

    2014-01-01

    We present a retrospective review of the early results and complications in a series of 35 consecutive patients with 43 total hip arthroplasties performed through an anterior muscle sparing minimally invasive approach. We found the early complication rates and radiographic outcomes comparable to those reported from arthroplasties performed via traditional approaches. Complications included dislocation (2%), femur fracture (2%), greater trochanteric fracture (12%), postoperative periprosthetic intertrochanteric fracture (2%), femoral nerve palsy (5%), hematoma (2%), and postoperative iliopsoas avulsion (2%). Radiographic analysis revealed average cup anteversion of 19.6° ± 6.6, average cup abduction angle of 48.4° ± 7, stem varus of 0.9° ± 2, and a mean leg length discrepancy of 0.7 mm. The anterior approach to the hip is an attractive alternative to the more traditional approaches. Acceptable component placement with comparable complication rates is possible using a muscle sparing technique which may lead to faster overall recovery. PMID:24715984

  9. Early-life seizures result in deficits in social behavior and learning.

    PubMed

    Lugo, Joaquin N; Swann, John W; Anderson, Anne E

    2014-06-01

    Children with epilepsy show a high co-morbidity with psychiatric disorders and autism. One of the critical determinants of a child's behavioral outcome with autism and cognitive dysfunction is the age of onset of seizures. In order to examine whether seizures during postnatal days 7-11 result in learning and memory deficits and behavioral features of autism we administered the inhalant flurothyl to induce seizures in C57BL/6J mice. Mice received three seizures per day for five days starting on postnatal day 7. Parallel control groups consisted of similarly handled animals that were not exposed to flurothyl and naïve mice. Subjects were then processed through a battery of behavioral tests in adulthood: elevated-plus maze, nose-poke assay, marble burying, social partition, social chamber, fear conditioning, and Morris water maze. Mice with early-life seizures had learning and memory deficits in the training portion of the Morris water maze (p<0.05) and probe trial (p<0.01). Mice with seizures showed no differences in marble burying, the nose-poke assay, or elevated plus-maze testing compared to controls. However, they showed a significant difference in the social chamber and social partition tests. Mice with seizures during postnatal days 7-11 showed a significant decrease in social interaction in the social chamber test and had a significant impairment in social behavior in the social partition test. Together, these results indicate that early life seizures result in deficits in hippocampal-dependent memory tasks and produce long-term disruptions in social behavior.

  10. Two Eyes, 3D Early Results: Stereoscopic vs 2D Representations of Highly Spatial Scientific Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Aaron

    2013-06-01

    "Two Eyes, 3D" is a 3-year NSF funded research project to study the educational impacts of using stereoscopic representations in informal settings. The first study conducted as part of the project tested children 5-12 on their ability to perceive spatial elements of slides of scientific objects shown to them in either stereoscopic or 2D format. Children were also tested for prior spatial ability. Early results suggest that stereoscopy does not have a major impact on perceiving spatial elements of an image, but it does have a more significant impact on how the children apply that knowledge when presented with a common sense situation. The project is run by the AAVSO and this study was conducted at the Boston Museum of Science.

  11. Early Scientific Results and Future Prospects for the Rejuvenated Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedner, Malcolm B.

    2010-01-01

    Following the extraordinarily successful Servicing Mission 4 (SM4) of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in May of 2009, the Observatory is now fully equipped with a broad array of powerful science instruments that put it at the pinnacle of its scientific power. Relevant to the subject matter of the Beyond 2010 Conference, HST will be well-placed over the next five-plus years to advance our knowledge of the formation of high-redshift galaxies and their growth with cosmic time; the emergence of structure in the early universe via Dark Matter-driven gravitational instability; and the universe's expansion history and any resulting implications for the temporal character of Dark Energy. These are fitting projects for the iconic facility now celebrating its 20th anniversary in orbit.

  12. Characteristics and Early Science Results of the Virgin Islands Robotic Telescope at the Etelman Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, David C.; Neff, J. E.; Hakkila, J. E.

    2014-01-01

    The Virgin Islands Robotic Telescope is an 0.5m robotic telescope located at the easternmost and southernmost optical observatory in the United States at a latitude of 18.5N and longitude of 65W. The observatory is located on the island of St Thomas in the USVI. Astronomers from the College of Charleston and the University of the Virgin Islands collaborate to maintain and operate the facility. Science goals of the facility include optical follow-up of high-energy transients, extra-solar planet observations, and near-Earth asteroid searches. The facility also supports a wide-reaching education and outreach program dedicated to raising the level of STEM engagement and enrichment in the USVI. We detail the characteristics, capabilities, and early results from the observatory. The observatory is growing its staff and science activities and potential topics for collaboration will be discussed.

  13. The Cochlear Baha 4 Attract System - design concepts, surgical technique and early clinical results.

    PubMed

    Clamp, Philip J; Briggs, Robert J S

    2015-05-01

    Bone conduction implant systems utilize osseointegrated fixtures to transmit sound through the bones of the skull. They allow patients with hearing loss to receive acoustic signals directly to the inner ear, bypassing the outer and middle ear. The new Cochlear™ Baha(®) Attract System (Cochlear Bone Anchored Solutions AB, Mölnlycke, Sweden) has been designed as a non-skin penetration hearing implant. The system uses magnetic coupling to hold the external sound processor in place and transmit acoustic energy. An implantable magnet is anchored to the skull via a single osseointegrated fixture, maximizing the efficiency of energy sound transfer. The interposed soft tissue is protected by a SoftWear pad that evenly distributes pressure in order to minimize the risk of pressure necrosis. This article summarizes the design features and early clinical results of the Baha 4 Attract System and provides context as to its place in the broader hearing aid market.

  14. Early clinical results with cortically based pedicle screw trajectory for fusion of the degenerative lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Glennie, R Andrew; Dea, Nicolas; Kwon, Brian K; Street, John T

    2015-06-01

    This study reviews the outcomes and revision rates of degenerative lumbar fusion surgery using cortical trajectory pedicle screws in lieu of traditional pedicle screw instrumentation. Pedicle screw fixation can be a challenge in patients with low bone mineral density. Wide posterior approaches to the lumbar spine exposing lateral to the facet joints and onto transverse processes causes an additional degree of muscular damage and blood loss not present with a simple laminectomy. A cortical bone trajectory pedicle screw has been proposed as an alternative to prevent screw pullout and decrease the morbidity associated with the wide posterior approach to the spine. We present a series of eight consecutive patients using a cortical bone trajectory instead of traditional pedicle screw fixation for degenerative conditions of the lumbar spine. A retrospective review of our institutional registry data identified eight patients who had cortical screws placed with the assistance of O-arm Stealth navigation (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN, USA) from 2010-2013. We analyzed the need for revision, the maintenance of reduction and the incidence of screw pullout or breakage. Our review demonstrated that two of eight patients were revised at an average of 12months. The reasons for these revisions were pseudarthrosis and caudal adjacent segment failure. All patients who were revised had frank screw loosening. We present early clinical results of a new technique that has been shown to have a better fixation profile in laboratory testing. Our less than favorable early clinical results should be interpreted with caution and highlight important technical issues which should be considered.

  15. Early- to mid-Holocene vegetation development in northern Iceland: project outline and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddudóttir, S.; Erlendsson, E.; Gísladóttir, G.

    2013-12-01

    Iceland is a key site for the study of Holocene vegetation and climate variations due to its location in the North Atlantic. The aim of the project is to reconstruct the history of Holocene vegetation development in Austur-Húnavatnssýsla, northern Iceland. Using pollen and macrofossils, patterns of vegetation change in three locations will be reconstructed, forming a transect from coastal extremes to the highland margin. The palynological and macrofossil data will be combined with a robust regional chronology, constructed by combining tephra layers with radiocarbon-dated macrofossils. Available data covering the vegetation history of Iceland are scarce. This study will improve the understanding of how environmental factors have driven vegetation development during the Holocene. Pollen analysis has been carried out on a section of a lacustrine core from the first study site of this project, a lowland site in Svínadalur valley. The analysed section of the core covers the period from Younger Dryas to the mid-Holocene. The results show a transition from pioneering vegetation during the cold period of Younger Dryas to the birch forests of the Holocene Thermal Maximum. An initial expansion of birch and gradual closing of vegetation cover was halted during early-Holocene, probably due to a period of cooling climate. An age model for the core has yet to be constructed, however this change in vegetation may be the result of cooling during the 8.2 ka event that has previously been recorded in proxies from Icelandic lakes. This cooling event has however not been seen in Icelandic terrestrial biotic palaeorecords before. The impact of this event seen in the Svínadalur core may underscore a vulnerability of the early-Holocene terrestrial ecosystem to climatic fluctuations. The study is funded by the Eimskip University fund, University of Iceland Research Fund and Landsvirkjun's Energy Research Fund, the study is also supported by the INTIMATE EU COST action in the form of a

  16. Early maternal separation, nightmares, and bad dreams: results from the Hungarostudy Epidemiological Panel.

    PubMed

    Csóka, Szilvia; Simor, Péter; Szabó, Gábor; Kopp, Mária S; Bódizs, Róbert

    2011-03-01

    Early maternal separation is a particularly stressful experience. Current models of nightmare production emphasize negative emotionality as having a central role in determining dream affect. Our aim is to test the hypothesis that persons who experienced early maternal separation (before one year of age and lasting at least one month) report more frequent nightmare experiences and bad dreams as adults. In the frame of the Hungarostudy Epidemiological Panel, 5020 subjects were interviewed. Significant associations were found between early maternal separation and both frequent nightmare experience in adulthood and increased frequency of oppressive and bad dreams. Current depression scores fully mediated the association between early separation and nightmares, but not the association between early separation and negative dream affect. We interpret these findings as a trait-like enhancement of negative emotionality in adults who experienced early maternal separation. This enhancement influences the content of dreams and, when it takes the form of depression, also influences the frequency of nightmares.

  17. Differential gene expression profile in bovine blastocysts resulting from hyperglycemia exposure during early cleavage stages.

    PubMed

    Cagnone, Gaël L M; Dufort, Isabelle; Vigneault, Christian; Sirard, Marc-André

    2012-02-01

    To understand the compromised survival of embryos derived from assisted reproductive techniques, transcriptome survey of early embryonic development has shown the impact of in vitro culture environment on gene expression in bovine or other living species. However, how the differentially expressed genes translate into developmentally compromised embryos is unresolved. We therefore aimed to characterize transcriptomic markers expressed by bovine blastocysts cultured in conditions that are known to impair embryo development. As increasing glucose concentrations has been shown to be stressful for early cleavage stages of mammalian embryos and to decrease subsequent blastocyst survival, in vitro-matured/fertilized bovine zygotes were cultured in control (0.2 mM) or high-glucose (5 mM) conditions until the 8- to 16-cell stage, and then transferred to control media until they reached the blastocyst stage. The concentration of 5 mM glucose was chosen as a stress treatment because there was a significant effect on blastocyst rate without the treatment's being lethal as with 10 mM. Microarray analysis revealed gene expression differences unrelated to embryo sex or hatching. Overrepresented processes among differentially expressed genes in treated blastocysts were extracellular matrix signalling, calcium signaling, and energy metabolism. On a pathophysiological level, higher glucose treatment impacts pathways associated with diabetes and tumorigenesis through genes controlling the Warburg effect, i.e., emphasis on use of anaerobic glycolysis rather than oxidative phosphorylation. These results allowed us to conclude that disruption of in vitro preattachment development is concomitant with gene expression modifications involved in metabolic control.

  18. Early interruption of exclusive breastfeeding: results from the eight-country MAL-ED study.

    PubMed

    Patil, Crystal L; Turab, Ali; Ambikapathi, Ramya; Nesamvuni, Cebisa; Chandyo, Ram Krishna; Bose, Anuradha; Islam, M Munirul; Ahmed, A M Shamsir; Olortegui, Maribel Paredes; de Moraes, Milena Lima; Caulfield, Laura E

    2015-01-01

    We report the infant feeding experiences in the first month of life for 2,053 infants participating in "Malnutrition and Enteric Infections: Consequences for Child Health and Development" (MAL-ED). Eight sites (in Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Brazil, Peru, South Africa, Tanzania), each followed a cohort of children from birth (by day 17), collecting detailed information on infant feeding practices, diet and illness episodes. Mothers were queried twice weekly regarding health status, breastfeeding and the introduction (or no) of non-breast milk liquids and foods. Here, our goal is to describe the early infant feeding practices in the cohort and evaluate factors associated with termination of exclusive breastfeeding in the first month of life. With data from enrollment to a visit at 28-33 days of life, we characterized exclusive, predominant or partial breastfeeding (using a median of 6-9 visits per child across the sites). Only 6 of 2,053 infants were never breastfed. By one month, the prevalences of exclusive breastfeeding were < 60% in 6 of 8 sites, and of partial breastfeeding (or no) were > 20% in 6 of 8 sites. Logistic regression revealed that prelacteal feeding (given to 4-63% of infants) increased the likelihood of partial breastfeeding (Odds Ratio (OR): 1.48 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04, 2.10), as did the withholding of colostrum (2-16% of infants) (OR: 1.63:1.01, 2.62), and being a first-time mother (OR: 1.38:1.10, 1.75). Our results reveal diversity across these sites, but an overall trend of early transition away from exclusive breastfeeding in the first month of life. Interventions which introduce or reinforce the WHO/UNICEF Ten Steps for Successful Breastfeeding are needed in these sites to improve breastfeeding initiation, to reinforce exclusive breastfeeding and delay introduction of non-breast milk foods and/or liquids. PMID:26825923

  19. Tangential Radiotherapy Without Axillary Surgery in Early-Stage Breast Cancer: Results of a Prospective Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Julia S.; Winer, Eric P.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the risk of regional-nodal recurrence in patients with early-stage, invasive breast cancer, with clinically negative axillary nodes, who were treated with breast-conserving surgery, 'high tangential' breast radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy, without axillary surgery or the use of a separate nodal radiation field. Methods and Materials: Between September 1998 and November 2003, 74 patients who were {>=}55 years of age with Stage I-II clinically node-negative, hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer underwent tumor excision to negative margins without axillary surgery as a part of a multi-institutional prospective study. Postoperatively, all underwent high-tangential, whole-breast radiotherapy with a boost to the tumor bed, followed by 5 years of hormonal therapy. Results: For the 74 patients enrolled, the median age was 74.5 years, and the median pathologic tumor size was 1.2 cm. Lymphatic vessel invasion was present in 5 patients (7%). At a median follow-up of 52 months, no regional-nodal failures or ipsilateral breast recurrences had been identified (95% confidence interval, 0-4%). Eight patients died, one of metastatic disease and seven of other causes. Conclusion: In this select group of mainly older patients with early-stage hormone-responsive breast cancer and clinically negative axillary nodes, treatment with high-tangential breast radiotherapy and hormonal therapy, without axillary surgery, yielded a low regional recurrence rate. Such patients might be spared more extensive axillary treatment (axillary surgery, including sentinel node biopsy, or a separate nodal radiation field), with its associated time, expense, and morbidity.

  20. Early result of hemiarthroplasty in elderly patients with fracture neck of femur

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Mue; Mohammed, Salihu; Francis, Awonusi; William, Yongu; Joseph, Kortor; Cornilius, Elachi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fractured neck of femur is a frequent and severe injury in elderly patients with consequent high morbidity and mortality. Hemiarthroplasty is an established treatment modality for displaced intracapsular femoral neck fractures in elderly patients above 60 years. This study analysed the early functional outcome and complications of Austin Moore endoprosthesis in elderly patients above 60 years with fractured neck of femur. Materials and Methods: Retrospective data were obtained over a 5 year period from January 2007 to December 2012. Thirty-five elderly patients of 60 years and above with displaced intracapsular fracture neck of femur treated with hemiarthroplasty using Austin Moore endoprosthesis were included. Data were analysed using SPSS version 21. Results: A total of 35 patients were involved. The age-range was 60-90 years with mean age of 69.7 ± 7 years. The predominant mechanism of injury was trivial falls in 18 (66.7%) patients. The commonest complication was pressure sore in 2 (5.7%) patients, followed by surgical site infection in 1 (2.9%) patient and periprosthetic fracture in 1 (2.9%) patients. Early post-operative mortality was 2.9%. Post-operative hip functional status according to Postel and Merle d Aubigne revealed that majority (66.6%) of patients had satisfactory hip function. Conclusion: Functional outcome of Austin Moore in elderly patients above 60 years with fracture neck of femur was satisfactory in most of the cases with minimal morbidity. Careful patient selection for hemiarthroplasty is vital and may decrease the incidence of complications and ameliorate the outcomes in the treatment of intracapsular femoral neck fractures. PMID:25657497

  1. Early results with the Mutaf technique: a novel off-midline approach in pilonidal sinus surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zorlu, Musa; Zobacı, Ethem; Kocak, Cem; Yastı, Ahmet Çınar; Dolapçı, Mete

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The objective of the present study was to compare different off-midline techniques in terms of their advantages and disadvantages. Methods A total of 81 patients were included in this prospective, controlled, randomized study. Patients in group 1 were treated with the Limberg flap, and patients in group 2 were treated with Mutaf technique. Patients were followed up for 9 months postsurgically and assessed at regular intervals. Results A total of 41 and 40 patients received surgical treatment with Limberg or Mutaf techniques, respectively. The 2 groups were similar in terms of age, gender, body mass index, and Tezel pilonidal sinus classification. Also, the 2 groups were comparable with regard to the frequency of preoperative discharge from the wound site, history of abscess formation, and the resultant antibiotic use. Early results showed similar recurrence rates and surgical-site complications between the 2 groups. Although a lower visual analogue scale score was found in group 2 at postoperative day 1, seroma persistence, time to withdrawal of surgical drains, and wound healing were more prolonged. Conclusion In this study, Mutaf technique was comparable to Limberg flap in the treatment of pilonidal sinus. Therefore, Mutaf technique may be offered as a viable surgical therapeutic option among off-midline closure approaches. PMID:27186571

  2. Early and mid-term results of minimally invasive coronary artery bypass grafting

    PubMed Central

    Pande, Shantanu; Agarwal, Surendra K.; Gupta, Devendra; Mohanty, Satayapriya; Kapoor, Aditya; Tewari, Satyendra; Bansal, Anubhav; Ambesh, Sushil P.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Minimally invasive coronary artery bypass grafting (MICABG) is a less invasive method of performing surgical revascularization. This technique coupled with use of off pump technique of surgical revascularization makes it truly less invasive. This method is highly effective even in high-risk patients. Results of this procedure are comparable to standard off pump technique and are better than percutaneous coronary intervention utilizing drug-eluting stent. We present an early and mid-term result of the use of this technique. Method We enrolled 33 patients for analysis operated between 2008 and 2012. Operation was performed utilizing off-pump technique of coronary artery bypass grafting through a minimal invasive incision. Left internal mammary artery graft was done for single vessel disease and radial artery was utilized for other grafts if required. Median follow up of 2.5 years (6 months–4 years) is available. Results Median age was 58.5 years (41–77) and all were male. Single vessel disease was present in 7, double vessel in 14 and triple vessel disease in 12 patients. All the patients had normal left ventricular size and function. There was no operative and 30-day mortality. Conversion to median sternotomy to complete the operation was done in 6.6% (2 out of 33 patients). One patient had acute myocardial infarction and there were no deaths during follow up. Conclusion MICABG is a safe and effective method of revascularization in low risk candidates for coronary artery bypass grafting. PMID:24814114

  3. Secular Changes in Education, Urban-rural Living, Menarche and Abortion Rates in Perinatal Population.

    PubMed

    Vranes, Hrvojka Soljacić; Kraljević, Zdenko; Vranes, Zoran; Gall, Vesna; Vuković, Ante; Kunal, Krunoslav; Filipcić, Igor

    2015-12-01

    Over a 25-year period we examined the anthropological characteristics of mothers and their partners, such as the place of living: urban vs. rural, the degree of education, parity, the time of menarche, and the frequency of intentional abortions. We examined 2 414 mothers and their partners in four periods of time extending from 1985 to 2009 in order to establish changes in the said anthropological characteristics over a period of 25 years. The degree of education of mothers and their partners is on the rise. In the period from 1985 to 1994, the percentage of mothers from the country was on the rise. Women with less education have on average more children, and those with better education the least children. Women from rural areas have on average more children than women from urban areas. The time of menarche dropped by 9 months over the period of 25 years. Girls from urban areas have their first menstrual cycle earlier. Women with higher professional qualifications had their first period earlier. The number of intentional abortions over the 25-year period dropped.

  4. Early Science Results From the NASA Van Allen Probes Mission RBSP-ECT Instrument Suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, Harlan; Reeves, Geoff; Rbspect Team

    2013-04-01

    The NASA Van Allen Probes mission includes an instrument suite known as the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) - Energetic Particle, Composition, and Thermal Plasma (ECT) suite. RBSP-ECT contains a well-proven complement of particle instruments to ensure the highest quality measurements ever made in the radiation belts and the inner magnetosphere. The coordinated RBSP-ECT particle measurements, analyzed in combination with fields and waves observations and state of-the-art theory and modeling, provide new understanding on the acceleration, global distribution, and variability of radiation belt electrons and ions, key science objectives of NASA's Living With a Star program and the Van Allen Probes mission. The RBSP-ECT suite consists of three highly-coordinated instruments: the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) spectrometer, the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS), and the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT). Collectively these three instrument types cover comprehensively the full electron and ion spectra from one eV to 10's of MeV with sufficient energy resolution, pitch angle coverage and resolution, and with composition measurements in the critical energy range up to 50 keV and also from a few to 50 MeV/nucleon. All three instruments are based on measurement techniques proven in the radiation belts, then optimized to provide unambiguous separation of ions and electrons and clean energy responses even in the presence of extreme penetrating background environments. In this presentation, we summarize overall ECT science goals and then show early scientific results derived from the ECT suite on the dual Van Allen Probes spacecraft. Mission operations began only in late October 2012, but we have already achieved significant early results. Results presented here will include substantial progress toward resolving primary Van Allen Probes science targets, such as: the relative role of localized acceleration versus transport-generated particle

  5. Early life environmental and pharmacological stressors result in persistent dysregulations of the serotonergic system

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Peiyan; Sze, Ying; Gray, Laura Jane; Chang, Cecilia Chin Roei; Cai, Shiwei; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulations in the brain serotonergic system and exposure to environmental stressors have been implicated in the development of major depressive disorder. Here, we investigate the interactions between the stress and serotonergic systems by characterizing the behavioral and biochemical effects of chronic stress applied during early-life or adulthood in wild type (WT) mice and mice with deficient tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2) function. We showed that chronic mild stress applied in adulthood did not affect the behaviors and serotonin levels of WT and TPH2 knock-in (KI) mice. Whereas, maternal separation (MS) stress increased anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors of WT mice, with no detectable behavioral changes in TPH2 KI mice. Biochemically, we found that MS WT mice had reduced brain serotonin levels, which was attributed to increased expression of monoamine oxidase A (MAO A). The increased MAO A expression was detected in MS WT mice at 4 weeks old and adulthood. No change in TPH2 expression was detected. To determine whether a pharmacological stressor, dexamethasone (Dex), will result in similar biochemical results obtained from MS, we used an in vitro system, SH-SY5Y cells, and found that Dex treatment resulted in increased MAO A expression levels. We then treated WT mice with Dex for 5 days, either during postnatal days 7–11 or adulthood. Both groups of Dex treated WT mice had reduced basal corticosterone and glucocorticoid receptors expression levels. However, only Dex treatment during PND7–11 resulted in reduced serotonin levels and increased MAO A expression. Just as with MS WT mice, TPH2 expression in PND7–11 Dex-treated WT mice was unaffected. Taken together, our findings suggest that both environmental and pharmacological stressors affect the expression of MAO A, and not TPH2, when applied during the critical postnatal period. This leads to long-lasting perturbations in the serotonergic system, and results in anxiety- and depressive

  6. The Field Operations and Early Results of the South China Sea Monsoon Experiment (SCSMEX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, K. M.; Ding, Yihui; Wang, Jough-Tai; Johnson, Richard; Keenan, Tom; Cifelli, Robert; Gerlach, John; Thiele, Otto; Rickenbach, Tom; Tsay, Si-Chee

    1999-01-01

    The South China Sea Monsoon Experiment (SCSMEX) is an international field experiment with the objective to better understand the key physical processes for the onset and evolution of the Asian summer monsoon in relation to fluctuation of the regional hydrologic cycle over Southeast Asian, southern East Asia, aiming at improving monsoon prediction. In this article, we present a description of the major meteorological observation platforms during the Intensive Observing Periods (IOP) of SCSMEX. We also provide highlights of early results and discussions of the role of SCSMEX in providing valuable in-situ data for calibration of satellite rainfall estimate from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). Preliminary results indicate that there are distinctive stages in the onset of the South China Sea monsoon including possibly strong influences from extratropical systems as well as from convection over the Indian Ocean and the Bay of Bengal. There are some tantalizing evidence of complex interactions between the supercloud cluster development over the Indian Ocean, advancing southwest monsoon flow over the South China Sea, midlatitude disturbances and the western Pacific subtropical high, possibly contributing to the disastrous flood over Yangtze River Basin in China during June 1998.

  7. Strength and Flexibility in Gymnasts Before and After Menarche.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haywood, Kathleen M.

    Twenty female gymnasts between the ages of twelve and fourteen were tested to determine possible difference in strength and flexibility before and after the development of an active menstrual cycle. Results indicate that females participating in gymnastics on a seriously competitive level tend to be short and light for their ages, as well as to…

  8. Early life exposure to allergen and ozone results in altered development in adolescent rhesus macaque lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Herring, M.J.; Putney, L.F.; St George, J.A.; Avdalovic, M.V.; Schelegle, E.S.; Miller, L.A.; Hyde, D.M.

    2015-02-15

    In rhesus macaques, previous studies have shown that episodic exposure to allergen alone or combined with ozone inhalation during the first 6 months of life results in a condition with many of the hallmarks of asthma. This exposure regimen results in altered development of the distal airways and parenchyma (Avdalovic et al., 2012). We hypothesized that the observed alterations in the lung parenchyma would be permanent following a long-term recovery in filtered air (FA) housing. Forty-eight infant rhesus macaques (30 days old) sensitized to house dust mite (HDM) were treated with two week cycles of FA, house dust mite allergen (HDMA), ozone (O{sub 3}) or HDMA/ozone (HDMA + O{sub 3}) for five months. At the end of the five months, six animals from each group were necropsied. The other six animals in each group were allowed to recover in FA for 30 more months at which time they were necropsied. Design-based stereology was used to estimate volumes of lung components, number of alveoli, size of alveoli, distribution of alveolar volumes, interalveolar capillary density. After 30 months of recovery, monkeys exposed to HDMA, in either group, had significantly more alveoli than filtered air. These alveoli also had higher capillary densities as compared with FA controls. These results indicate that early life exposure to HDMA alone or HDMA + O{sub 3} alters the development process in the lung alveoli. - Highlights: • Abnormal lung development after postnatal exposure to ozone and allergen • This remodeling is shown as smaller, more numerous alveoli and narrower airways. • Allergen appears to have more of an effect than ozone during recovery. • These animals also have continued airway hyperresponsiveness (Moore et al. 2014)

  9. Intraoperative Radiotherapy in Early-Stage Breast Cancer: Results of the Montpellier Phase II Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Lemanski, Claire; Azria, David; Gourgon-Bourgade, Sophie; Gutowski, Marian; Rouanet, Phillippe; Saint-Aubert, Bernard; Ailleres, Norbert; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Dubois, Jean-Bernard

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: We recently presented the intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) technique given as a reliable alternative to conventional boost radiation after breast-conserving surgery. The low crude numbers of recurrence in elderly patients led us to investigate the feasibility and the efficacy of this procedure as a sole treatment. Methods and Materials: We included 94 patients older than 65 years in this phase II trial. Among them, 42 patients presented with all the inclusion criteria, i.e., stages pT0 to pT1 and pN0, ductal invasive unifocal carcinoma, and tumor-free margin of >2 mm. IORT was delivered using a dedicated linear accelerator. One 21-Gy fraction was prescribed and specified at the 90% isodose, using electrons. In vivo dosimetry was performed for all patients. The primary endpoint was the quality index. Secondary endpoints were quality of life, local recurrences, cosmetic results, and specific and overall rates of survival. Results: The median follow-up was 30 months (range, 12-49 months), and median age was 72 years (range, 66-80 years). The median tumor diameter was 10 mm. All patients received the total prescribed dose. No acute grade 3 toxicities were observed. Endpoints for all but one patient corresponded to acceptable quality index criteria. Pretreatment quality-of-life scores were maximal, and no significant decrease was observed during follow-up. Cosmesis was good to excellent at 6 months. Two patients experienced recurrence but underwent salvage mastectomy. Conclusion: Our results confirm that exclusive partial-breast IORT is feasible for treating early-stage breast cancer in the elderly. IORT may be considered an alternative treatment for a selected population and offers a safe one-step treatment.

  10. Adaptive multi-sensor biomimetics for unsupervised submarine hunt (AMBUSH): Early results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blouin, Stéphane

    2014-10-01

    Underwater surveillance is inherently difficult because acoustic wave propagation and transmission are limited and unpredictable when targets and sensors move around in the communication-opaque undersea environment. Today's Navy underwater sensors enable the collection of a massive amount of data, often analyzed offtine. The Navy of tomorrow will dominate by making sense of that data in real-time. DRDC's AMBUSH project proposes a new undersea-surveillance network paradigm that will enable such a real-time operation. Nature abounds with examples of collaborative tasks taking place despite limited communication and computational capabilities. This publication describes a year's worth of research efforts finding inspiration in Nature's collaborative tasks such as wolves hunting in packs. This project proposes the utilization of a heterogeneous network combining both static and mobile network nodes. The military objective is to enable an unsupervised surveillance capability while maximizing target localization performance and endurance. The scientific objective is to develop the necessary technology to acoustically and passively localize a noise-source of interest in shallow waters. The project fulfills these objectives via distributed computing and adaptation to changing undersea conditions. Specific research interests discussed here relate to approaches for performing: (a) network self-discovery, (b) network connectivity self-assessment, (c) opportunistic network routing, (d) distributed data-aggregation, and (e) simulation of underwater acoustic propagation. We present early results then followed by a discussion about future work.

  11. Early results from the Northern Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem Change and Hazard Susceptibility Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, John C.; Lavoie, Dawn L.; Poore, Richard Z.

    2011-01-01

    The northern Gulf of Mexico coastal region and its diverse ecosystems are threatened by population and development pressure and by the impacts of rising sea level and severe storms such as the series of hurricanes that has impacted the northern Gulf in recent years. In response to the complex management issues facing the region, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) organized a multidisciplinary research program to coordinate the activities of USGS and other scientists working in the northern Gulf of Mexico region (fig. 1). The Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) Ecosystem Change and Hazard Susceptibility Project aims to develop a thorough understanding of the dynamic coastal ecosystems on the northern Gulf coast, the impact of human activities on these ecosystems, and the vulnerability of ecosystems and human communities to more frequent and more intense hurricanes in the future. A special issue of Geo-Marine Letters published in December 2009 is devoted to early results of studies completed as part of this project. These studies, which have been conducted at sites throughout the northern Gulf region, from the Chandeleur Islands to Apalachicola Bay, have focused on three themes: (1) The underlying geologic framework that exerts controls over coastal processes (2) The impact of human activities on nearshore water quality (3) Hurricanes and associated effects

  12. A Pilot Clinical Trial of Creatine and Minocycline in Early Parkinson Disease: 18-Month Results

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective To report an 18-month follow-up on creatine and minocycline futility study, the Neuroprotective Exploratory Trials in Parkinson Disease, Futility Study 1 (NET-PD FS-1). Background The NET-PD FS-1 futility study on creatine and minocycline found neither agent futile in slowing down the progression of disability in Parkinson disease (PD) at 12 months using the prespecified futility threshold. An additional 6 months of follow-up aimed to assess safety and potential interactions of the study interventions with anti-parkinsonian therapy. Methods Additional 6 months of follow-up in randomized, blinded phase II trial of creatine (dosage, 10 g/d) and minocycline (dosage, 200 mg/d) in subjects with early PD. Results By 18 months, symptomatic treatment of PD symptoms was required in 61% of creatine, 62% of minocycline, and 60% of placebo-treated subjects. Study treatment was prematurely discontinued in 9%, 23%, and 6% of subjects in the creatine, minocycline, and placebo arms, respectively. Creatine and minocycline did not seem to adversely influence the response to symptomatic therapy nor increase adverse events. Conclusions Data from this small, 18-month phase II trial of creatine and minocycline do not demonstrate safety concerns that would preclude a large, phase III efficacy trial, although the decreased tolerability of minocycline is a concern. PMID:18520981

  13. Early and Late Retrieval of the ALN Removable Vena Cava Filter: Results from a Multicenter Study

    SciTech Connect

    Pellerin, O.; Barral, F. G.; Lions, C.; Novelli, L.; Beregi, J. P.; Sapoval, M.

    2008-09-15

    Retrieval of removable inferior vena cava (IVC) filters in selected patients is widely practiced. The purpose of this multicenter study was to evaluate the feasibility and results of percutaneous removal of the ALN removable filter in a large patient cohort. Between November 2003 and June 2006, 123 consecutive patients were referred for percutaneous extraction of the ALN filter at three centers. The ALN filter is a removable filter that can be implanted through a femoral/jugular vein approach and extracted by the jugular vein approach. Filter removal was attempted after an implantation period of 93 {+-} 15 days (range, 6-722 days) through the right internal jugular vein approach using the dedicated extraction kit after control inferior vena cavography. Following filter removal, vena cavograms were obtained in all patients. Successful extraction was achieved in all but one case. Among these successful retrievals, additional manipulation using a femoral approach was needed when the apex of the filter was close to the IVC wall in two patients. No immediate IVC complications were observed according to the postimplantation cavography. Neither technical nor clinical differences between early and late filter retrieval were noticed. Our data confirm the safety of ALN filter retrieval up to 722 days after implantation. In infrequent cases, additional endovenous filter manipulation is needed to facilitate extraction.

  14. Overview and Early Results of the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiotani, Masato

    2010-05-01

    The Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) was developed to be aboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS) under the cooperation of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and the National Institute of Information and Communication Technology (NICT). SMILES was successfully launched by the H-IIB rocket with the H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) on September 11, 2009 and was attached to JEM on September 25. Mission objectives are: i) Space demonstration of 4-K mechanical cooler and super-conductive mixer for the submillimeter limb-emission sounding in the frequency bands of 624.32- 627.32 GHz and 649.12- 650.32 GHz, and ii) global observations of atmospheric minor constituents in the middle atmosphere (O3, HCl, ClO, HO2, HOCl, BrO, O3 isotopes, HNO3, CH3CN, etc), contributing to the atmospheric sciences. SMILES started atmospheric observations on October 12, 2009, and has been making very precise measurements on several radical species crucial to the ozone chemistry with its high-sensitivity. In this presentation, the overview of SMILES and the early results will be shown to demonstrate its high potential to observe the atmospheric minor constituents in the middle atmosphere.

  15. Early Results from the Curiosity Rover's SAM Investigation at Gale Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaffy, Paul; Webster, Chris; Cabane, Michael; Coll, Patrice

    2013-04-01

    The goals of the Mars Science Laboratory Mission (1, 2) are to explore the potential of the Gale Crater landing site to support life either in the distant past or the present. The contribution of the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite (3) in this exploration of habitability is (A) to search for organic compounds in rocks and soils, (B) to determine the composition of inorganic volatiles compounds in the atmosphere or extracted from solid materials, and (C) to measure the isotopic composition of several of these volatiles. While prime exploration targets of MSL's Curiosity Rover are the layers in the central mound (Mt. Sharp) of Gale crater the initial exploration of region near the landing point has revealed a diverse geology and the early part of the mission has been spent both commissioning the 10 Curiosity instruments and the Rover subsystems and making first time measurements of both atmospheric and solid samples. SAM is located in the interior of MSL's Curiosity rover next to the XRD/XRF CheMin instrument. A variety of imaging, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, and elemental analysis instrumentation serves to locate sampling sites and interogate candidate materials before solid sample is collected either with a drill or a scoop for delivery to SAM and CheMin. SAM's instruments are a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), a tunable laser spectrometer (TLS), and a 6-column gas chromatograph (GC). These are coupled through a solid sample transport system and a gas processing and enrichment system. The SAM suite is able to measure a suite of light isotopes and to analyze volatiles directly from the atmosphere or thermally released from solid samples. Early results from SAM atmospheric runs include a determination of: new volume mixing ratios for the 5 major isotopic constituents showing Ar approximately equal to N2; an upper limit of 3.5 ppb for the volume mixing ratio of methane; C and O isotope ratios showing both heavier than terrestrial averages

  16. Spectroscopic Analysis of Metal-poor Stars from LAMOST: Early Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai-Ning; Zhao, Gang; Christlieb, Norbert; Wang, Liang; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yonghui; Yuan, Hailong

    2015-01-01

    We report on early results from a pilot program searching for metal-poor stars with LAMOST and follow-up high-resolution observation acquired with the MIKE spectrograph attached to the Magellan II telescope. We performed detailed abundance analysis for eight objects with iron abundances [Fe/H] < -2.0, including five extremely metal-poor (EMP; [Fe/H] < -3.0) stars with two having [Fe/H] < -3.5. Among these objects, three are newly discovered EMP stars, one of which is confirmed for the first time with high-resolution spectral observations. Three program stars are regarded as carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars, including two stars with no enhancement in their neutron-capture elements, which thus possibly belong to the class of CEMP-no stars; one of these objects also exhibits significant enhancement in nitrogen, and is thus a potential carbon and nitrogen-enhanced metal-poor star. The [X/Fe] ratios of the sample stars generally agree with those reported in the literature for other metal-poor stars in the same [Fe/H] range. We also compared the abundance patterns of individual program stars with the average abundance pattern of metal-poor stars and find only one chemically peculiar object with abundances of at least two elements (other than C and N) showing deviations larger than 0.5 dex. The distribution of [Sr/Ba] versus [Ba/H] agrees that an additional nucleosynthesis mechanism is needed aside from a single r-process. Two program stars with extremely low abundances of Sr and Ba support the prospect that both main and weak r-processes may have operated during the early phase of Galactic chemical evolution. The distribution of [C/N] shows that there are two groups of carbon-normal giants with different degrees of mixing. However, it is difficult to explain the observed behavior of the [C/N] of the nitrogen-enhanced unevolved stars based on current data.

  17. SPECTROSCOPIC ANALYSIS OF METAL-POOR STARS FROM LAMOST: EARLY RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hai-Ning; Zhao, Gang; Wang, Liang; Wang, Wei; Yuan, Hailong; Christlieb, Norbert; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yonghui E-mail: gzhao@nao.cas.cn

    2015-01-10

    We report on early results from a pilot program searching for metal-poor stars with LAMOST and follow-up high-resolution observation acquired with the MIKE spectrograph attached to the Magellan II telescope. We performed detailed abundance analysis for eight objects with iron abundances [Fe/H] < -2.0, including five extremely metal-poor (EMP; [Fe/H] < -3.0) stars with two having [Fe/H] < -3.5. Among these objects, three are newly discovered EMP stars, one of which is confirmed for the first time with high-resolution spectral observations. Three program stars are regarded as carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars, including two stars with no enhancement in their neutron-capture elements, which thus possibly belong to the class of CEMP-no stars; one of these objects also exhibits significant enhancement in nitrogen, and is thus a potential carbon and nitrogen-enhanced metal-poor star. The [X/Fe] ratios of the sample stars generally agree with those reported in the literature for other metal-poor stars in the same [Fe/H] range. We also compared the abundance patterns of individual program stars with the average abundance pattern of metal-poor stars and find only one chemically peculiar object with abundances of at least two elements (other than C and N) showing deviations larger than 0.5 dex. The distribution of [Sr/Ba] versus [Ba/H] agrees that an additional nucleosynthesis mechanism is needed aside from a single r-process. Two program stars with extremely low abundances of Sr and Ba support the prospect that both main and weak r-processes may have operated during the early phase of Galactic chemical evolution. The distribution of [C/N] shows that there are two groups of carbon-normal giants with different degrees of mixing. However, it is difficult to explain the observed behavior of the [C/N] of the nitrogen-enhanced unevolved stars based on current data.

  18. The chemokine (C-C-motif) receptor 3 (CCR3) gene is linked and associated with age at menarche in Caucasian females.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fang; Xiong, Dong-hai; Guo, Yan; Shen, Hui; Xiao, Peng; Zhang, Feng; Jiang, Hui; Recker, Robert R; Deng, Hong-wen

    2007-03-01

    Chemokine (C-C-motif) receptor 3 (CCR3), playing an important role in endometrium related metabolic pathways, may influence the onset of menarche. To test linkage and/or association between CCR3 polymorphisms with the variation of age at menarche (AAM) in Caucasian females, we recruited a sample of 1,048 females from 354 Caucasian nuclear families and genotyped 16 SNPs spanning the entire CCR3 gene. Linkage disequilibrium and haplotype blocks were inferred by Haploview. Both single-SNP markers and haplotypes were tested for linkage and/or association with AAM using QTDT (quantitative transmission disequilibrium test). We also tested associations between CCR3 polymorphisms and AAM in a selected random sample of daughters using ANOVA (analysis of variance). We identified two haplotype blocks. Only block two showed significant results. After correction for multiple testing, significant total associations of SNP7, SNP9 with AAM were detected (P = 0.009 and 0.006, respectively). We also detected significant within-family association of SNP9 (P = 0.01). SNP14 was linked to AAM (P = 0.02) at the nominal level. In addition, there was evidence of significant total association and nominal significant linkage (P = 0.008 and 0.03, respectively) with AAM for the haplotype AGA reconstructed by SNP7, SNP9 and SNP13. ANOVA confirmed the results by QTDT. For the first time we reported that CCR3 is linked and associated with AAM variation in Caucasian women. However, further studies are necessary to substantiate our conclusions.

  19. ``Hit and Run Research'' with ``Hit and Miss'' Results in Early Childhood Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleer, Marilyn; Robbins, Jill

    2003-08-01

    Constructivism has provided us with a useful pedagogy and a powerful methodological framework for over twenty years. We now know a great deal about children's thinking. Can this research paradigm take us any further? Are we locked into a particular perspective about data gathering and categorising children's thinking? Have we tended to fit early childhood data into the 'accepted science education paradigm'? As early childhood researchers, we have found the wealth of research in science education research unable to provide solutions to some fundamental challenges we face when working with young children. This paper seeks to examine the established body of literature in science education research with a view to seeking out a more inclusive research approach to support early childhood science education. Examples of early childhood data within a range of contexts are presented to illustrate some of the challenges. Some of the issues that are raised may well be helpful to the field as a whole.

  20. PROBA-V Energetic Particle Telescope instrument and its early science results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyamukungu, Mathias; O'Brien, Paul; Benck, Sylvie; Evans, Hugh; Nieminen, Petteri; Mazur, Joseph; Daly, Eamonn; Borisov, Stanislav

    The Energetic Particle Telescope (EPT) is a science-class instrument designed to measure contamination-free spectra of electrons (0.5 - 10 MeV), protons (9 - 300 MeV) and He-ions (38 - 1200 MeV) within a 52 deg. Field Of View (FOV) angle and a 149 cm(2) sr aperture geometrical factor. The instrument is modular and it can be in-flight configured so as to provide up to 19 energy channels per particle type. The EPT dimensions are 210 mm x 162 mm x 128 mm, the total mass is 4.6 kgs and its power consumption amounts to 5.6 Watts. The satellite PROBA-V was launched on the 7th May 2013 onto a sun-synchronous circular Low Earth Orbit at 820 km altitude and 98.7 deg. inclination. Its local time at descending node is 10:30. The EPT has been accommodated onto the S/C so as to get its boresight oriented Eastwards during local night time and Westwards during local day time. However, the East/West orientation has been modified during the commissioning phase to allow measurements of Pitch Angle Distribution (PAD). The latters were part of a plan aimed at validating the EPT hardware and the data analysis software. The EPT is currently acquiring data that are used for (i) cross-validation of radiation monitors or spectrometers, (ii) cross-validation of space radiation models, (iii) development of steady-state electron and proton flux models and (iv) space weather studies. The EPT validation results along with early results of the ongoing science studies are presented in this paper.

  1. Titan: Preliminary results on surface properties and photometry from VIMS observations of the early flybys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buratti, B.J.; Sotin, C.; Brown, R.H.; Hicks, M.D.; Clark, R.N.; Mosher, J.A.; McCord, T.B.; Jaumann, R.; Baines, K.H.; Nicholson, P.D.; Momary, T.; Simonelli, D.P.; Sicardy, B.

    2006-01-01

    Cassini observations of the surface of Titan offer unprecedented views of its surface through atmospheric windows in the 1-5 ??m region. Images obtained in windows for which the haze opacity is low can be used to derive quantitative photometric parameters such as albedo and albedo distribution, and physical properties such as roughness and particle characteristics. Images from the early Titan flybys, particularly T0, Ta, and T5 have been analyzed to create albedo maps in the 2.01 and 2.73 ??m windows. We find the average normal reflectance at these two wavelengths to be 0.15??0.02 and 0.035??0.003, respectively. Titan's surface is bifurcated into two albedo regimes, particularly at 2.01 ??m. Analysis of these two regimes to understand the physical character of the surface was accomplished with a macroscopic roughness model. We find that the two types of surface have substantially different roughness, with the low-albedo surface exhibiting mean slope angles of ???18??, and the high-albedo terrain having a much more substantial roughness with a mean slope angle of ???34??. A single-scattering phase function approximated by a one-term Henyey-Greenstein equation was also fit to each unit. Titan's surface is back-scattering (g???0.3-0.4), and does not exhibit substantially different backscattering behavior between the two terrains. Our results suggest that two distinct geophysical domains exist on Titan: a bright region cut by deep drainage channels and a relatively smooth surface. The two terrains are covered by a film or a coating of particles perhaps precipitated from the satellite's haze layer and transported by eolian processes. Our results are preliminary: more accurate values for the surface albedo and physical parameters will be derived as more data is gathered by the Cassini spacecraft and as a more complete radiative transfer model is developed from both Cassini orbiter and Huygens Lander measurements. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Coronary Bypass Surgery in Patients with Pulmonary Hypertension: Assessment of Early and Long Term Results

    PubMed Central

    Erdil, Nevzat; Murat Disli, Olcay; Donmez, Koksal; Erdil, Feray; Cengiz Colak, Mehmet; Battaloglu, Bektas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We aimed to evaluate the effects of preoperative pulmonary hypertension (PH) on early and long term results in patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery and the effects of coronary bypass surgery on PH. Methods: Among 2325 patients who underwent elective isolated coronary artery bypass surgery between March 2003 and March 2012, 287 patients with high preoperative pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) ≥30 mmHg were examined. Patients’ data were obtained by retrospective examination of our clinic’s database. 69 patients who had complete parameters included in the study. Results: There was no increase in the New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classification 84% of cases. Preoperative and postoperative values of the mean ejection fraction and mean PAP of patients was respectively 45.28 ± 9.67 (25–65), 46.03 ±12.4 (20–65) (p = 0.447), 36.67 ± 6.81 (30–60) mmHg, 37.81 ± 10.07 (20–70) mmHg (p = 0.378). The late mortality of cases was 5.79%. In our study, during 33.9 ± 17 (9–100) months follow up period, life expectancy was calculated as 94.7 months. Conclusion: Preoperative evaluation of these patients for appropriate medical treatment at peroperative and postoperative period, coronary bypass can be performed with low morbidity and mortality rates. In the late period after surgical revascularization PH showed no significant change and had no adverse effect on quality of life. PMID:25753326

  3. Survival of Implants in Immediate Extraction Sockets of Anterior Teeth: Early Clinical Results

    PubMed Central

    Sabir, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background The aims and objectives of this study were placement of implants in freshly extracted sockets of anterior teeth and to evaluate the implant stability, peri-implant radiolucency and gingival inflammation around implant over a short period of 30 months. Materials and Methods A total of 12 patients (8 male and 4 female), ranging in the age from 20 to 50 years, from March 2007 to June 2007, were evaluated for immediate implant placement into 22 fresh extraction sockets. Only maxillary and mandibular anterior teeth/roots (central incisors, lateral incisors and canines) were considered for replacement with implants. One piece implant with integrated abutment and integrated surface, non-submerged, threaded and tapered at apical 5 mm, sand-blasted and acid etched surfaced implants (HI-TEC TRX-OP Implants of Life Care Company) were used. Results The mobility was not present in any of the implants at all the follow up visits. There were 2 implants at 6 month, 1 implant at 12 month, 1 implant at 18 month visits, showing peri-implant radiolucency at some sites at bone to implant contact site. Severe gingival inflammation was not observed in any of the implant site. At every follow-up visit, every implant met the criteria of success and none was found to be failed over a 30 months duration i.e. 100% success rate was achieved by implants in immediate extraction socket. Conclusion The success rate of implant survival in this study was found 100%. These implants have fulfilled all the criteria of implant success and based on the defined criteria, the success rate of implants placed in immediate extraction sockets of anterior teeth compared favorably with the conventional implants. The early results of the present study showed that high survival rates with the implants in immediate extraction sockets can be achieved. PMID:26266220

  4. Single-Fraction Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: Early Cosmetic Results

    SciTech Connect

    Beal, Kathryn McCormick, Beryl; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Borgen, Patrick; Fey, Jane; Goldberg, Jessica; Sacchini, Virgilio

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the cosmetic outcome of patients treated with wide local excision and intraoperative radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 50 women were treated on a pilot study to evaluate the feasibility of intraoperative radiotherapy at wide local excision. The eligibility criteria included age >60, tumor size {<=}2.0 cm, clinically negative lymph nodes, and biopsy-established diagnosis. After wide local excision, a custom breast applicator was placed in the excision cavity, and a dose of 20 Gy was prescribed to a depth of 1 cm. After 18 patients were treated, the dose was constrained laterally to 18 Gy. The cosmetic outcome was evaluated by photographs at baseline and at 6 and 12 months postoperatively. Four examiners graded the photographs for symmetry, edema, discoloration, contour, and scarring. The grades were evaluated in relationship to the volume of irradiated tissue, tumor location, and dose at the lateral aspects of the cavity. Results: The median volume of tissue receiving 100% of the prescription dose was 47 cm{sup 3} (range, 20-97 cm{sup 3}). Patients with {<=}47 cm{sup 3} of treated tissue had better cosmetic outcomes than did the women who had >47 cm{sup 3} of treated tissue. Women who had received 18 Gy at the lateral aspects of their cavities had better cosmetic outcomes than did women who had received 20 Gy at the lateral aspects. When comparing the 6- and 12-month results, the scores remained stable for 63%, improved for 17%, and worsened for 20%. Conclusion: Intraoperative radiotherapy appears feasible for selected patients. A favorable cosmetic outcome appears to be related to a smaller treatment volume. The cosmetic outcome is acceptable, although additional follow-up is necessary.

  5. Danish Prostate Cancer Registry – methodology and early results from a novel national database

    PubMed Central

    Helgstrand, JT; Klemann, N; Røder, MA; Toft, BG; Brasso, K; Vainer, B; Iversen, P

    2016-01-01

    Background Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine (SNOMED) codes are computer-processable medical terms used to describe histopathological evaluations. SNOMED codes are not readily usable for analysis. We invented an algorithm that converts prostate SNOMED codes into an analyzable format. We present the methodology and early results from a new national Danish prostate database containing clinical data from all males who had evaluation of prostate tissue from 1995 to 2011. Materials and methods SNOMED codes were retrieved from the Danish Pathology Register. A total of 26,295 combinations of SNOMED codes were identified. A computer algorithm was developed to transcode SNOMED codes into an analyzable format including procedure (eg, biopsy, transurethral resection, etc), diagnosis, and date of diagnosis. For validation, ~55,000 pathological reports were manually reviewed. Prostate-specific antigen, vital status, causes of death, and tumor-node-metastasis classification were integrated from national registries. Results Of the 161,525 specimens from 113,801 males identified, 83,379 (51.6%) were sets of prostate biopsies, 56,118 (34.7%) were transurethral/transvesical resections of the prostate (TUR-Ps), and the remaining 22,028 (13.6%) specimens were derived from radical prostatectomies, bladder interventions, etc. A total of 48,078 (42.2%) males had histopathologically verified prostate cancer, and of these, 78.8% and 16.8% were diagnosed on prostate biopsies and TUR-Ps, respectively. Future perspectives A validated algorithm was successfully developed to convert complex prostate SNOMED codes into clinical useful data. A unique database, including males with both normal and cancerous histopathological data, was created to form the most comprehensive national prostate database to date. Potentially, our algorithm can be used for conversion of other SNOMED data and is available upon request. PMID:27729813

  6. Early Results of Endovascular Treatment of the Thoracic Aorta Using the Valiant Endograft

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Matt Ivaz, Stella; Cheshire, Nicholas; Fattori, Rosella; Rousseau, Herve; Heijmen, Robin; Beregi, Jean-Paul; Thony, Frederic; Horne, Gillian; Morgan, Robert; Loftus, Ian

    2007-11-15

    Endovascular repair of the thoracic aorta has been adopted as the first-line therapy for much pathology. Initial results from the early-generation endografts have highlighted the potential of this technique. Newer-generation endografts have now been introduced into clinical practice and careful assessment of their performance should be mandatory. This study describes the initial experience with the Valiant endograft and makes comparisons with similar series documenting previous-generation endografts. Data were retrospectively collected on 180 patients treated with the Valiant endograft at seven European centers between March 2005 and October 2006. The patient cohort consisted of 66 patients with thoracic aneurysms, 22 with thoracoabdominal aneurysms, 19 with an acute aortic syndrome, 52 with aneurysmal degeneration of a chronic dissection, and 21 patients with traumatic aortic transection. The overall 30-day mortality for the series was 7.2%, with a stroke rate of 3.8% and a paraplegia rate of 3.3%. Subgroup analysis demonstrated that mortality differed significantly between different indications; thoracic aneurysms (6.1%), thoracoabdominal aneurysms (27.3%), acute aortic syndrome (10.5%), chronic dissections (1.9%), and acute transections (0%). Adjunctive surgical procedures were required in 63 patients, and 51% of patients had grafts deployed proximal to the left subclavian artery. Comparison with a series of earlier-generation grafts demonstrated a significant increase in complexity of procedure as assessed by graft implantation site, number of grafts and patient comorbidity. The data demonstrate acceptable results for a new-generation endograft in series of patients with diverse thoracic aortic pathology. Comparison of clinical outcomes between different endografts poses considerable challenges due to differing case complexity.

  7. The JCMT Plane Survey: early results from the ℓ = 30° field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T. J. T.; Plume, R.; Thompson, M. A.; Parsons, H.; Urquhart, J. S.; Eden, D. J.; Dempsey, J. T.; Morgan, L. K.; Thomas, H. S.; Buckle, J.; Brunt, C. M.; Butner, H.; Carretero, D.; Chrysostomou, A.; deVilliers, H. M.; Fich, M.; Hoare, M. G.; Manser, G.; Mottram, J. C.; Natario, C.; Olguin, F.; Peretto, N.; Polychroni, D.; Redman, R. O.; Rigby, A. J.; Salji, C.; Summers, L. J.; Berry, D.; Currie, M. J.; Jenness, T.; Pestalozzi, M.; Traficante, A.; Bastien, P.; diFrancesco, J.; Davis, C. J.; Evans, A.; Friberg, P.; Fuller, G. A.; Gibb, A. G.; Gibson, S.; Hill, T.; Johnstone, D.; Joncas, G.; Longmore, S. N.; Lumsden, S. L.; Martin, P. G.; Lu'o'ng, Q. Nguyê˜n.; Pineda, J. E.; Purcell, C.; Richer, J. S.; Schieven, G. H.; Shipman, R.; Spaans, M.; Taylor, A. R.; Viti, S.; Weferling, B.; White, G. J.; Zhu, M.

    2015-11-01

    We present early results from the JCMT (James Clerk Maxwell Telescope) Plane Survey (JPS), which has surveyed the northern inner Galactic plane between longitudes ℓ = 7° and ℓ = 63° in the 850-μm continuum with SCUBA-2 (Submm Common-User Bolometer Array 2), as part of the JCMT Legacy Survey programme. Data from the ℓ = 30° survey region, which contains the massive-star-forming regions W43 and G29.96, are analysed after approximately 40 per cent of the observations had been completed. The pixel-to-pixel noise is found to be 19 mJy beam-1 after a smooth over the beam area, and the projected equivalent noise levels in the final survey are expected to be around 10 mJy beam-1. An initial extraction of compact sources was performed using the FELLWALKER method, resulting in the detection of 1029 sources above a 5σ surface-brightness threshold. The completeness limits in these data are estimated to be around 0.2 Jy beam-1 (peak flux density) and 0.8 Jy (integrated flux density) and are therefore probably already dominated by source confusion in this relatively crowded section of the survey. The flux densities of extracted compact sources are consistent with those of matching detections in the shallower APEX (Atacama Pathfinder Experiment) Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy (ATLASGAL) survey. We analyse the virial and evolutionary state of the detected clumps in the W43 star-forming complex and find that they appear younger than the Galactic-plane average.

  8. Confocal microendoscopy: Characterization of imaging bundles, fluorescent contrast agents, and early clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udovich, Joshua Anthony

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer related deaths among women. Early detection improves the chances of survival following diagnosis, and new imaging modalities have the potential to reduce deaths due to this disease. The confocal microendoscope (CME) is a non-destructive in-vivo imaging device for visualization of the ovaries that operates in real-time. Two components of the CME system are evaluated in this paper, and initial results from an ongoing clinical trial are presented. Fiber-optic imaging bundles are used in the CME imaging catheter to relay images over distances of up to 20 feet. When detecting fluorescent signals from investigated tissue, any fluorescence in the system can potentially reduce contrast in images. The emission and transmission properties of three commercially available fiber optic imaging bundles were evaluated. Emission maps of fluorescence from bundles were generated at multiple excitation wavelengths to determine the profile and amount of fluorescence present in bundles manufactured by Sumitomo, Fujikura, and Schott. Results are also presented that show the variation of transmittance as a function of illumination angle in these bundles. Users of high-resolution fiber-optic imaging bundles should be aware of these properties and take them into account during system design. Contrast is improved in images obtained with the CME through the application of topical dyes. Acridine orange (AO) and SYTO 16 are two fluorescent stains that are used to show the size, shape, and distribution of cell nuclei. Unfortunately, little is known about the effects of these dyes on living tissues. This study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of dye treatment on peritoneal tissues in mice. Seventy-five Balb/c mice were split into five groups of fifteen and given peritoneal injections of dye or saline. The proportions of negative outcomes for the control and test groups were compared using confidence intervals and the Fisher's exact test

  9. Endurance training in early life results in long-term programming of heart mass in rats.

    PubMed

    Wadley, Glenn D; Laker, Rhianna C; McConell, Glenn K; Wlodek, Mary E

    2016-02-01

    Being born small for gestational age increases the risk of developing adult cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. This study aimed to examine if early-life exercise could increase heart mass in the adult hearts from growth restricted rats. Bilateral uterine vessel ligation to induce uteroplacental insufficiency and fetal growth restriction in the offspring (Restricted) or sham surgery (Control) was performed on day 18 of gestation in WKY rats. A separate group of sham litters had litter size reduced to five pups at birth (Reduced litter), which restricted postnatal growth. Male offspring remained sedentary or underwent treadmill running from 5 to 9 weeks (early exercise) or 20 to 24 weeks of age (later exercise). Remarkably, in Control, Restricted, and Reduced litter groups, early exercise increased (P < 0.05) absolute and relative (to body mass) heart mass in adulthood. This was despite the animals being sedentary for ~4 months after exercise. Later exercise also increased adult absolute and relative heart mass (P < 0.05). Blood pressure was not significantly altered between groups or by early or later exercise. Phosphorylation of Akt Ser(473) in adulthood was increased in the early exercise groups but not the later exercise groups. Microarray gene analysis and validation by real-time PCR did not reveal any long-term effects of early exercise on the expression of any individual genes. In summary, early exercise programs the heart for increased mass into adulthood, perhaps by an upregulation of protein synthesis based on greater phosphorylation of Akt Ser(473).

  10. Acute Vs Delayed ACL Reconstruction. Early Differences and Preliminary Two Year Results

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Karl; Barenius, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Historically acute ACL reconstruction has been avoided due to reports of early rehabilitation problems with stiffness. Are these reports still valid today with modern arthroscopic techniques? Methods: 70 patients with a high recreational activity level (Tegner ≥6) who presented with a acute ACL injury were randomized to an acute reconstruction within 8 days from the injury or delayed reconstruction after 6-10 weeks. Four surgeons performed the ACL reconstructions with quadrupled semitendinosus tendon grafts and endobutton and metallic interference screw fixation. The rehabilitation training was performed at the same physiotherapy center for all patients. The follow up at 6 and 24 months included ROM, Lachman, Rolimeter, pivot shift, one leg hop, IKDC, KOOS, Lysholm and Tegner activity level. Results: There were no differences between the groups in ROM, IKDC, activity level or laxity at 6 months. Four patients had a combined extension and flexion deficit of more than 15 degrees, two from each group. In the acute group 79% had an objective IKDC grade A or B compared with 73% in the delayed group. The one leg hop index above 90% was found in 50% in the acute group and 24% in the delayed group (p=0.04). Functional data for the 2-year follow up are not available at the time of abstract writing. The median activity level according to Tegner was restored to pre-injury levels in both groups after one year, and was stationary at 2 years. The visual analogue scale (VAS) response to the question “How is your knee working on a scale from 0-100? (100 = best)” revealed 81 in the acute and 71 in the delayed group (p=0.1). To the question “How does your knee affect your activity level on a scale from 0-100? (100 = no affection)” the mean score was 75 in the acute group and 67 in the delayed group (p=0.3). At one and two years the KOOS was statistically similar between the groups but with slightly higher subscale “Sport and recreation” scores, 85 in the

  11. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of early exposure results with the MACCS Reactor Accident Consequence Model

    SciTech Connect

    Helton, J.C.; Johnson, J.D.; McKay, M.D.; Shiver, A.W.; Sprung, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques based on Latin hypercube sampling, partial correlation analysis and stepwise regression analysis are used in an investigation with the MACCS model of the early health effects associated with a severe accident at a nuclear power station. The primary purpose of this study is to provide guidance on the variables to be considered in future review work to reduce the uncertainty in the important variables used in the calculation of reactor accident consequences. The effects of 34 imprecisely known input variables on the following reactor accident consequences are studied: number of early fatalities, number of cases of prodromal vomiting, population dose within 10 mi of the reactor, population dose within 1000 mi of the reactor, individual early fatality probability within 1 mi of the reactor, and maximum early fatality distance. When the predicted variables are considered collectively, the following input variables were found to be the dominant contributors to uncertainty: scaling factor for horizontal dispersion, dry deposition velocity, inhalation protection factor for nonevacuees, groundshine shielding factor for nonevacuees, early fatality hazard function alpha value for bone marrow exposure, and scaling factor for vertical dispersion.

  12. Neurobiological consequences of early stress and childhood maltreatment: are results from human and animal studies comparable?

    PubMed

    Teicher, Martin H; Tomoda, Akemi; Andersen, Susan L

    2006-07-01

    Recent studies have reported an association between exposure to childhood abuse or neglect and alterations in brain structure or function. One limitation of these studies is that they are correlational and do not provide evidence of a cause-effect relationship. Preclinical studies on the effects of exposure to early life stress can demonstrate causality, and can enrich our understanding of the clinical research if we hypothesize that the consequences of early abuse are predominantly mediated through the induction of stress responses. Exposure to early abuse and early stress has each been associated with the emergence of epileptiform electroencephalogram (EEG) abnormalities, alterations in corpus callosum area, and reduced volume or synaptic density of the hippocampus. Further, there is evidence that different brain regions have unique periods when they are maximally sensitive to the effects of early stress. To date, preclinical studies have guided clinical investigations and will continue to provide important insight into studies on molecular mechanisms and gene-environment interactions. PMID:16891580

  13. The Multiple Sclerosis Risk Sharing Scheme Monitoring Study – early results and lessons for the future

    PubMed Central

    Pickin, Mark; Cooper, Cindy L; Chater, Timothy; O'Hagan, Anthony; Abrams, Keith R; Cooper, Nicola J; Boggild, Mike; Palace, Jackie; Ebers, George; Chilcott, James B; Tappenden, Paul; Nicholl, Jon

    2009-01-01

    Background Risk sharing schemes represent an innovative and important approach to the problems of rationing and achieving cost-effectiveness in high cost or controversial health interventions. This study aimed to assess the feasibility of risk sharing schemes, looking at long term clinical outcomes, to determine the price at which high cost treatments would be acceptable to the NHS. Methods This case study of the first NHS risk sharing scheme, a long term prospective cohort study of beta interferon and glatiramer acetate in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients in 71 specialist MS centres in UK NHS hospitals, recruited adults with relapsing forms of MS, meeting Association of British Neurologists (ABN) criteria for disease modifying therapy. Outcome measures were: success of recruitment and follow up over the first three years, analysis of baseline and initial follow up data and the prospect of estimating the long term cost-effectiveness of these treatments. Results Centres consented 5560 patients. Of the 4240 patients who had been in the study for a least one year, annual review data were available for 3730 (88.0%). Of the patients who had been in the study for at least two years and three years, subsequent annual review data were available for 2055 (78.5%) and 265 (71.8%) patients respectively. Baseline characteristics and a small but statistically significant progression of disease were similar to those reported in previous pivotal studies. Conclusion Successful recruitment, follow up and early data analysis suggest that risk sharing schemes should be able to deliver their objectives. However, important issues of analysis, and political and commercial conflicts of interest still need to be addressed. PMID:19126193

  14. SADI-S WITH RIGHT GASTRIC ARTERY LIGATION: TECHNICAL SYSTEMATIZATION AND EARLY RESULTS

    PubMed Central

    GEBELLI, Jordi Pujol; de GORDEJUELA, Amador Garcia Ruiz; RAMOS, Almino Cardoso; NORA, Mario; PEREIRA, Ana Marta; CAMPOS, Josemberg Marins; RAMOS, Manoela Galvão; BASTOS, Eduardo Lemos de Souza; MARCHESINI, João Batista

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Bariatric surgery is performed all over the world with close to 500.000 procedures per year. The most performed techniques are Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy. Despite this data, the most effective procedure, biliopancreatic diversion with or without duodenal switch, represents only no more than 1.5% of the procedures. Technical complexity, morbidity, mortality, and severe nutritional adverse effects related to the procedure are the main fears that prevent most universal acceptance. Aim: To explain the technical aspects and the benefits of the SADI-S with right gastric artery ligation as an effective simplification from the original duodenal switch. Methods: Were included all patients undergoing this procedure from the November 2014 to May 2016, describing and analysing aspects of this technique, the systematization and early complications associated with the procedure. Results: A series of 67 patients were operated; 46 were women (68.7%); mean age of the group was 44 years old (33-56); and an average BMI of 53.5 kg/m2 (50-63.5). Surgical time was 115 min (80-180). A total of five patients (7.5%) had any complication and two (2.9%) had to be reoperated. There were two patients with leak, one at the duodenal stump and other at the esophagogastric angle. There was no mortality. Patients stayed at the hospital a median of 2.5 days (1-25). Conclusions: SADI-S with right gastric artery ligation is a safe procedure with few preliminary complications. The technical variations introduced to the classical duodenal switch are reproducible and may allow this procedure to be more popular. All the complications in this series were not related to the ligation of the right gastric artery. PMID:27683784

  15. Implementing intensity modulated radiotherapy to the prostate bed: Dosimetric study and early clinical results

    SciTech Connect

    Riou, Olivier; Laliberté, Benoit; Azria, David; Menkarios, Cathy; Llacer Moscardo, Carmen; Dubois, Jean-Bernard; Aillères, Norbert; Fenoglietto, Pascal

    2013-07-01

    Salvage intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to the prostate bed has hardly been studied so far. We present here a feasibility study and early clinical results for 10 patients. These patients were selected on the basis of having either a biochemical relapse or high risk histology after prostatectomy. They were treated using “sliding-window” IMRT to 68 Gy in 34 fractions. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plans were generated using the same planning computed tomography data set. Dose coverage of planning target volumes (PTVs) and of organs-at-risk (OAR, namely: rectum, bladder, and femoral heads) were compared. Acute toxicity and chronic toxicity were measured using the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 scale. IMRT significantly reduces the dose above the prescription dose given to the PTV1 (mean dose: IMRT 67.2 Gy vs 3D-CRT 67.7 Gy (p = 0.0137)), without altering dose coverage for PTV2 (mean dose: IMRT 68.1 Gy vs 3D-CRT 68.0 Gy (p = 0.3750)). Doses to OAR were lower with IMRT and differences were statistically significant (mean dose: IMRT 51.4 Gy vs 3D-CRT 56.6 Gy for rectum (p = 0.002), IMRT 45.1 Gy vs 3D-CRT 53.1 Gy for bladder (p = 0.002), and IMRT 26.1 Gy vs 3D-CRT 28.4 Gy for femoral heads (p = 0.0059)). There was no acute or chronic genitourinary or gastrointestinal toxicity >1 with a median follow-up of 38 months. IMRT to the prostatic fossa is feasible and reduces dose to OAR, with consequential limited toxicity.

  16. Tyrosine monitoring in children with early and continuously treated phenylketonuria: results of an international practice survey.

    PubMed

    Sharman, Rachael; Sullivan, Karen A; Young, Ross McD; McGill, James J

    2010-12-01

    Investigations into the biochemical markers associated with executive function (EF) impairment in children with early and continuously treated phenylketonuria (ECT-PKU) remain largely phenylalanine-only focused, despite experimental data showing that a high phenylalanine:tyrosine (phe:tyr) ratio is more strongly associated with EF deficit than phe alone. A high phe:tyr ratio is hypothesized to lead to a reduction in dopamine synthesis within the brain, which in turn results in the development of EF impairment. This paper provides a snapshot of current practice in the monitoring and/or treatment of tyrosine levels in children with PKU, across 12 countries from Australasia, North America and Europe. Tyrosine monitoring in this population has increased over the last 5 years, with over 80% of clinics surveyed reporting routine monitoring of tyrosine levels in infancy alongside phe levels. Twenty-five percent of clinics surveyed reported actively treating/managing tyrosine levels (with supplemental tyrosine above that contained in PKU formulas) to ensure tyrosine levels remain within normal ranges. Anecdotally, supplemental tyrosine has been reported to ameliorate symptoms of both attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and depression in this population. EF assessment of children with ECT-PKU was likewise highly variable, with 50% of clinics surveyed reporting routine assessments of intellectual function. However when function was assessed, test instruments chosen tended towards global measures of IQ prior to school entry, rather than specific assessment of EF development. Further investigation of the role of tyrosine and its relationship with phe and EF development is needed to establish whether routine tyrosine monitoring and increased supplementation is recommended. PMID:20882350

  17. Bypass surgery for unresectable oesophageal cancer: early and late results in 124 cases.

    PubMed

    Mannell, A; Becker, P J; Nissenbaum, M

    1988-03-01

    The early and late results of bypass surgery in 124 patients with unresectable oesophageal cancer are reported. Patients were grouped according to the extent of disease: group A, tumour localized to the oesophagus where severe pulmonary disease contra-indicated oesophagectomy (n = 9); group B, tumour less than or equal to 10 cm in length with mediastinal invasion (n = 81); group C, tumour greater than 10 cm in length with mediastinal invasion and/or fixed malignant lymph nodes (n = 33). Extent of disease was not recorded in one patient. The operative mortality was 4 per cent but 9 other patients died in hospital (hospital mortality, 11 per cent). Mortality was increased in patients undergoing colon bypass and in those with a large tumour load but these differences failed to reach statistical significance. The most frequent complication was neck sepsis, secondary to leakage from the proximal end of the excluded oesophagus. Eighty-nine per cent of the survivors could eat a normal, unrestricted diet on discharge and eighty-two per cent of survivors had complete and lasting relief from dysphagia. Median survival after bypass was 5 months but survival was significantly improved by radiotherapy to the tumour (P less than 0.001). Gastric bypass with radiotherapy is indicated in patients with extra-oesophageal spread of malignancy and in patients with tumours localized to the oesophagus who are unfit for resection. Bypass surgery may be contra-indicated in patients with a primary tumour greater than 10 cm in length and/or fixed lymph node metastases because mortality is increased and survival after operation is short.

  18. Early results of pulsed dye laser angioplasty with integral ball-tips in long femoral occlusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Alan; Mitchell, David C.; Wood, Richard F. M.

    1990-07-01

    A Pulsed Dye laser together with specifically designed integral ball-tipped optical fibres have been used for the primary recanalisation of femoropopliteal vascular disease in 25 limbs of 23 patients. All patients had complete occlusions of the vessels ranging from 8-49cms in length (mean 22cms), having presented with critical ischaemia (18) or severe claudication warranting operative intervention (5). Pedal ulceration was present in 8 limbs and digital gangrene in 4. The laser produced visible light at 480nm in lOOmJ/lus pulses, at a frequency of 10-20Hz. The energy delivery device comprised a smooth atraumatic ball-tip constructed from the glass of the optical fibre, which was loaded retrogradely into a standard balloon angioplasty catheter. The device was introduced through a common femoral artery cutdown. Angiographic recanalisation was achieved in 22 of the 25 limbs with a mean energy of 280J(range 68-727J) and in each case the channel created by the laser fibre was augmented by balloon angioplasty. Technical failure occurred in three cases, caused by a wall dissection, persistent side-branch entry and incomplete lesion penetration respectively. Eighteen of procedures (72%) were clinically successful with marked symptomatic improvement. Of the four angiographic successful but clinical failures, acute occlusion within 48 hours occurred in 2 diabetic patients with very poor run-off and distal gangrene. The third case failed acutely due to a technically inadequate balloon dilatation and the fourth patient failed to improve symptomatically due to widespread with segmental tibial vessel disease below a successful recanalisation. Over a mean follow-up period of 7 months, three patients died of myocardial infarction. Twelve of the 23 patients (52%) remain well with patent vessels. These early results demonstrate the efficacy of pulsed dye laser angioplasty using ball-tipped optical fibres.

  19. Results from early programmatic implementation of Xpert MTB/RIF testing in nine countries

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Xpert MTB/RIF assay has garnered significant interest as a sensitive and rapid diagnostic tool to improve detection of sensitive and drug resistant tuberculosis. However, most existing literature has described the performance of MTB/RIF testing only in study conditions; little information is available on its use in routine case finding. TB REACH is a multi-country initiative focusing on innovative ways to improve case notification. Methods We selected a convenience sample of nine TB REACH projects for inclusion to cover a range of implementers, regions and approaches. Standard quarterly reports and machine data from the first 12 months of MTB/RIF implementation in each project were utilized to analyze patient yields, rifampicin resistance, and failed tests. Data was collected from September 2011 to March 2013. A questionnaire was implemented and semi-structured interviews with project staff were conducted to gather information on user experiences and challenges. Results All projects used MTB/RIF testing for people with suspected TB, as opposed to testing for drug resistance among already diagnosed patients. The projects placed 65 machines (196 modules) in a variety of facilities and employed numerous case-finding strategies and testing algorithms. The projects consumed 47,973 MTB/RIF tests. Of valid tests, 7,195 (16.8%) were positive for MTB. A total of 982 rifampicin resistant results were found (13.6% of positive tests). Of all tests conducted, 10.6% failed. The need for continuous power supply was noted by all projects and most used locally procured solutions. There was considerable heterogeneity in how results were reported and recorded, reflecting the lack of standardized guidance in some countries. Conclusions The findings of this study begin to fill the gaps among guidelines, research findings, and real-world implementation of MTB/RIF testing. Testing with Xpert MTB/RIF detected a large number of people with TB that routine services failed to

  20. Integrating earth observations and model results provides earlier Famine Early Warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M. E.; Funk, C. C.; Galu, G.; Choularton, R.

    2007-12-01

    Remote sensing allows us to detect slowly evolving natural hazards such as agricultural drought. Famine early warning systems transform this data into actionable policy information, enabling humanitarian organizations to respond in a timely and appropriate manner. These life saving responses are increasingly important. In 2006, 1 out of 8 people did not have enough to eat, 22 million more people became undernourished, and 22 countries provided 6.5 billion dollars in food aid. The motivation is strong, therefore, to increase the effectiveness of every dollar of food aid provided, ensuring that the assistance arrives sufficiently early to ward off human and economic catastrophe. Properly interpreted remote sensing information reduces the influence of politics in determining the amount and location of aid delivered. In this talk we will review three recent contributions that earth observations have provided to famine early warning: trend identification, increasingly accurate forecasts of food security conditions, and enhanced integration of biophysical and socio-economic data.

  1. Early results on 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko observed by Rosetta/OSIRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierks, H.; Tubiana, C.; Snodgrass, C.; Agarwal, J.; Güttler, C.; Oklay, N.; Vincent, J.; Küppers, M.; Barbieri, C.; Lamy, P.; Rickman, H.; Rodrigo, R.; Koschny, D.; Hviid, S.; Mottola, S.; Osiris Team

    2014-07-01

    March/April 2014. At this time, Rosetta will be at about 4 million kilometers from the comet and 67P will still be unresolved. We present results about the early cometary activity based on OSIRIS images. Orange-filter images (central wavelength 649.2 nm) will be used to determine the dust environment of 67P, since this wavelength range is quite free from gas emission lines. Moreover, a series of lightcurves will be taken to compare with the existing ones and look for possible changes in the rotational period due to its last perihelion passage.

  2. Early and Long-Term Results of Subclavian Angioplasty in Aortoarteritis (Takayasu Disease): Comparison with Atherosclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Tyagi, Sanjay; Verma, Puneet K.; Gambhir, Daljeet S.; Kaul, Upkar A.; Saha, Renuka; Arora, Ramesh

    1998-05-15

    Purpose: To compare the early andlong-term outcomes of subclavian artery angioplasty in patients with aortoarteritis and atherosclerosis. Methods: Sixty-one subclavian artery angioplasties were performed in 55 consecutive patients with aortoarteritis (n= 32) and atherosclerosis (n= 23) between 1986 and 1995. An arch aortogram followed by a selective subclavian artery angiogram was done to profile the site and extent of the lesion, its relation to the vertebral artery, and the distal circulation. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) was performed via the femoral route for 56 stenotic lesions and 5 total occlusions. Results: PTA was successful in 52 (92.8%) stenotic lesions and 3 (60%) total occlusions. Three patients (5.4%) had complications, that could be effectively managed nonsurgically. Compared with atherosclerosis, patients with aortoarteritis were younger (27.4 {+-} 9.3 years vs 54.5 {+-} 10.5 years; p < 0.001), more often female (75% vs 17.4%; p < 0.001), gangrene was uncommon (0% vs 17.4%; p < 0.05), and diffuse involvement was seen more often (43.8% vs 4.4%; p < 0.001). The luminal diameter stenoses were similar before PTA (88.6 {+-} 9.7% vs 89.0 {+-} 9.1%; p= NS). Higher balloon inflation pressure was required to dilate the lesions of aortoarteritis (9.9 {+-} 4.6 ATM vs 5.5 {+-} 1.0 ATM; p < 0.001). This group had more residual stenosis (15.5 {+-} 12.4% vs 8.3 {+-} 9.4%; p < 0.05) after PTA. There were no neurological sequelae, even in PTA of prevertebral lesions. On 3-120 months (mean 43.3 {+-} 28.9 months) follow-up of 40 patients, restenosis was more often observed in patients with aortoarteritis, particularly in those with diffuse arterial narrowing. These lesions could be effectively redilated. Clinical symptoms showed marked improvement after successful angioplasty. Conclusion: Subclavian PTA is safe and can be performed as effectively in aortoarteritis as in atherosclerosis, with good long-term results. Long-term follow-up shows that it

  3. The Employment Retention and Advancement Project Early Results from Four Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Dan; Hendra, Richard; Martinson, Karin; Scrivener, Susan

    2005-01-01

    Millions of welfare recipients have entered the labor force in the past decade, but surveys show that many remain in unstable, low-paying jobs that offer few opportunities for advancement. This report presents early evidence on the effectiveness of four diverse programs designed to help current or former welfare recipients work more steadily and…

  4. Effect of Formative and Ability Test Results on Early Learning of Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadir, Abdul; Ardi, Muhammad; Nurhayati, B.; Dirawan, Gufran Darma

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship of formative tests to early learning ability of students in the science learning style. This research used an experimental method with a 2 x 2 factorial design. The participants comprised all the students in class VII of the Islamic Junior High School State of Kolaka, a total of 343…

  5. [Decompression sickness of the spinal cord. Results of early and of late treatment].

    PubMed

    Bühlmann, A A

    1985-06-01

    The treatment of 20 scuba divers with decompression sickness of the spinal cord between 1969 and 1984 is reported. Seven patients presented with mild sensomotor impairments, 13 patients were paraplegic and some suffered from additional impairments to the arms. In 12 of the divers the accident that occurred in a Swiss lake and recompression was initiated with a latency of a few hours. These early treatments were successful in 11 patients. The neurologic symptoms already improved during recompression even in the 7 patients who were paraplegic. In a paraplegic woman early treatment failed, but her condition improved under subsequent hyperbaric oxygen treatment. In 9 patients late treatment after an interval of 48 to 192 hours, consisting of repeated hyperbaric oxygen exposures, was performed. 3 patients with mild neurologic disturbances improved completely. 6 patients were paraplegic. In 5 of these early treatment was without success. On 3 occasions, however, early treatment was not started before 15 to 24 hours after the dive. All 6 paraplegic patients improved considerably during late treatment. 8 of the 9 patients undergoing hyperbaric oxygen treatment had been transported by air with slightly reduced cabin pressure from the foreign country to Zurich. No deterioration of neurologic symptoms was observed during air transport.

  6. Intervention with African American Premature Infants: Four-Month Results of an Early Intervention Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teti, Douglas M.; Black, Maureen M.; Viscardi, Rose; Glass, Penny; O'Connell, Melissa A.; Baker, Linda; Cusson, Regina; Reiner Hess, Christine

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluates the efficacy of an early intervention program targeting African American mothers and their premature, low birth weight infants at 3 to 4 months' corrected age from four neonatal intensive care units, 173 families are recruited (84 intervention, 89 control). The 8-session, 20-week intervention consists of a psychoeducational…

  7. Early Experience in Restructuring Schools: Voices from the Field. Results in Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmore, Richard F.

    As part of its school restructuring work with states, the National Governors' Association sponsored a March 1988 working meeting of experts to define common issues confronting educators and policymakers. Besides initiating dialogue between these groups, the meeting concentrated discussion on early state and district efforts. This essay summarizes…

  8. Ongoing Proof: Results from the Canton Early College High School Class of 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochford, Joseph A.

    2010-01-01

    In 2005, the Canton City Schools (CCS), Stark College of Technology (SSCT), Canton Professional Educators Association (CPEA) and the Stark Education Partnership (SEP) came together to found Canton's Early College High School (CECHS). The goal of CECHS is to allow students an opportunity to earn both a diploma and an Associate Degree during their…

  9. Model Registry of Early Childhood Visual Impairment: First-Year Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatton, Deborah D.

    2001-01-01

    A study obtained data on 406 children from birth to age 3 with visual impairments at the point of entry into specialized early intervention programs in nine states. The majority were legally blind and had additional disabilities. About a six-month mean lag was found between diagnosis and referral for services. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  10. Exercise Effects on Fitness and Bone Mineral Density in Early Postmenopausal Women: 1-Year EFOPS Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemmler, Wolfgang; Engelke, Klaus; Lauber, Dirk; Weineck, Juergen; Hensen, Johannes; Kalender, Willi A.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated the effect of intense exercise training on physical fitness, coronary heart disease, bone mineral density (BMD), and parameters related to quality of life in early postmenopausal women with osteopenia. Data on woman in control and exercise training groups indicated that the intense exercise training program was effective in improving…

  11. Bulimic Behaviors and Early Substance Use: Findings from a Cotwin-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Munn-Chernoff, Melissa A.; Grant, Julia D.; Bucholz, Kathleen K.; Agrawal, Arpana; Lynskey, Michael T.; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Heath, Andrew C.; Duncan, Alexis E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Bulimic behaviors (i.e., binge eating and compensatory behaviors) and substance use frequently co-occur. However, the etiology underlying this association is poorly understood. This study evaluated the association between bulimic behaviors and early substance use, controlling for genetic and shared environmental factors. Methods Participants were 3540 young adult women from the Missouri Adolescent Female Twin Study. A telephone adaptation of the Semi-Structured Assessment for the Genetics of Alcoholism interview assessed DSM-IV bulimic behaviors, substance use, and other psychological characteristics. Lifetime bulimic behaviors were examined in twin pairs concordant and discordant for early substance use. Logistic regressions were adjusted for the non-independence of twin data, zygosity, age, body mass index, early menarche (onset before age 12), and early sex (first consensual sexual intercourse before age 15). Results In the entire study population, women who reported early use of alcohol or nicotine were more likely to engage in bulimic behaviors after adjusting for covariates. In 53 pairs of monozygotic twins discordant for alcohol experimentation before age 15, the twin who reported early alcohol experimentation had 3.21 (95% confidence interval=1.54–6.67) times higher odds of reporting bulimic behaviors than the cotwin who did not report early alcohol experimentation, even after adjustment for covariates. Conclusions Findings suggest that early alcohol experimentation may contribute to the development of bulimic behaviors via mechanisms extending beyond shared vulnerability, including individual-specific environmental experiences or causal pathways. PMID:26248308

  12. Enceladus-Mimas paradox: a result of different early evolutions of satellites?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czechowski, Leszek; Witek, Piotr

    2015-04-01

    the coefficient of the heat conduction in the considered layer, i.e.: kconv =Nu k. This approach is used successfully in parameterized theory of convection for SSC in the Earth and other planets (e.g. [3], [4]). Parameterization of liquid state convection (LSC) is even simpler. Ra in molten region is very high (usually higher than 1016). The LSC could be very intensive resulting in almost adiabatic temperature gradient given by: dT-= gαmT-, dr cpm where αm and cpm are thermal expansion coefficient and specific heat in molten region, g is the local gravity. In Enceladus and Mimas the adiabatic gradient is low and therefore LSC region is almost isothermal. 2. Results: Comparison of thermal models of Mimas and Enceladus indicates that conditions favorable for starting tidal heating (interior hot enough) lasted for short time (~107yr) in Mimas and for ~108 yr in Enceladus. This could explain Mimas-Enceladus paradox. 3. Conclusions: The Mimas-Enceladus paradox is probably the result of short time when Mimas was hot enough to allow for substantial tidal heating. The Mimas-Tethys resonance formed later when Mimas was already cool. (see also [1, 4]) The full text of the paper will be published in Acta Geophysica [5]. Acknowledgements: The research is partly supported by National Science Centre (grant 2011/ 01/ B/ ST10/06653). References : [1] Czechowski, L. (2014) Some remarks on the early evolution of Enceladus. Planet. Sp. Sc. 104, 185-199. [2] Merk, R., Breuer, D., Spohn, T. (2002). Numerical modeling of 26Al induced radioactive melting of asteroids concerning accretion. Icarus 199, 183-191. [3] Sharpe, H.N., Peltier, W.R., (1978) Parameterized mantle convection and the Earth's thermal history. Geophys. Res. Lett. 5, 737-740. [4] Czechowski, L. (2006) Parameterized model of convection driven by tidal and radiogenic heating. Adv. Space Res. 38, 788-793. [5] Czechowski, L., Witek, P. (2015) Comparisons of early evolutions of Mimas and Enceladus. Submitted to Acta

  13. Lack of association between the ESR1 rs9340799 polymorphism and age at menarche: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, H Y; Xing, X K; Wang, K J; Zhang, L

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that the estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1) rs9340799 polymorphism is associated with age at menarche (AAM). However, recent investigations have generated inconsistent results. This study aimed to establish a more precise estimation of the association between this polymorphism and AAM. A meta-analysis was conducted based on an in silico literature search using PubMed. Six studies presenting continuous data, including ESR1 rs9340799 genotype frequencies, were selected. Effect size was estimated using Hedges' adjusted g with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), which were calculated based on the standardized mean difference between groups of subjects and different genotypes. No evidence of an association between the ESR1 rs9340799 polymorphism and AAM was found in the pooled continuous data under any genotype comparison (AA vs GG+AG: Hedges' g = -0.085, 95%CI = -0.202-0.032, P = 0.156; GG vs AA+AG: Hedges' g = 0.143, 95%CI = -0.041-0.327, P = 0.129; A vs G: Hedges' g = 0.187, 95%CI = -0.032-0.406, P = 0.095). Moreover, a funnel plot generated using this data was found to be symmetrical using the Egger (P = 0.797) and Begg tests (P = 0.851), indicating the absence of publication bias. In summary, our meta-analysis shows that the ESR1 rs9340799 polymorphism is not a significant, independent contributing factor to AAM. To validate this finding, further studies involving larger numbers of participants are needed. PMID:27525849

  14. Conceptual design study of potential early commercial MHD powerplant. Report of task 2 results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hals, F. A.

    1981-03-01

    The conceptual design of one of the potential early commercial MHD power plants was studied. The plant employs oxygen enrichment of the combustion air and preheating of this oxygen enriched air to an intermediate temperature of 1200 F attainable with a tubular type recuperative heat exchanger. Conceptual designs of plant componets and equipment with performance, operational characteristics, and costs are reported. Plant economics and overall performance including full and part load operation are reviewed. The projected performance and estimated cost of this early MHD plant are compared to conventional power plants, although it does not offer the same high efficiency and low costs as the mature MHD power plant. Environmental aspects and the methods incorporated in plant design for emission control of sulfur and nitrogen are reviewed.

  15. Early results of metal on metal articulation total hip arthroplasty in young patients.

    PubMed

    Mohamad, J A; Kwan, M K; Merican, A M; Abbas, A A; Kamari, Z H; Hisa, M K; Ismail, Z; Idrus, R M

    2004-12-01

    We report our early experience of 20 cases of metal on metal articulation total hip arthroplasty in 19 young patients. Avascular necrosis of the femoral head (63%) was the commonest diagnosis for patients undergoing this procedure, followed by osteoarthritis (21%). In general, most of the patients were young and physically active with an average age of 43.1 years (range, 25 to 58 years). The average follow-up period was 18 months (range, 7 to 46 months). The mean total Harris Hip Score preoperatively and at final follow-up was 31 points and 89 points respectively. The mean total Pain Score improved from an average of 11.5 to 41.1 points at final follow-up. Sixteen (84%) of the patients had a good to excellent hip score. There was one dislocation, which stabilized after reduction and conservative management. One case of early infection underwent a two-staged revision.

  16. Conceptual design study of potential early commercial MHD powerplant. Report of task 2 results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hals, F. A.

    1981-01-01

    The conceptual design of one of the potential early commercial MHD power plants was studied. The plant employs oxygen enrichment of the combustion air and preheating of this oxygen enriched air to an intermediate temperature of 1200 F attainable with a tubular type recuperative heat exchanger. Conceptual designs of plant componets and equipment with performance, operational characteristics, and costs are reported. Plant economics and overall performance including full and part load operation are reviewed. The projected performance and estimated cost of this early MHD plant are compared to conventional power plants, although it does not offer the same high efficiency and low costs as the mature MHD power plant. Environmental aspects and the methods incorporated in plant design for emission control of sulfur and nitrogen are reviewed.

  17. Radiation pneumonitis: a complication resulting from combined radiation and chemotherapy for early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gez, E.; Sulkes, A.; Isacson, R.; Catane, R.; Weshler, Z.

    1985-10-01

    Described is a patient with early breast carcinoma who developed clinical radiation pneumonitis during primary radiation therapy and concomitant chemotherapy that included prednisone. This syndrome developed three days following abrupt steroid withdrawal. Retrieval of steroids brought complete resolution of the clinical and radiological findings. Although this syndrome is rare, it is recommended that steroid therapy in a patient previously irradiated to the chest be avoided.

  18. The Coastal Area Tactical-mapping System (CATS): Early Test Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, W. E.; Shrestha, R. L.; Slatton, K. C.; Shrestha, K.; Cossio, T.

    2006-12-01

    Researchers at the University of Florida (UF) are developing a next generation airborne laser mapping instrument under a contract with the Office of Naval Research. The Coastal Area Tactical-mapping System (CATS) is based on a different paradigm than the commercially developed units currently in wide use. The commercial units achieve a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) per pulse by using a relatively long pulse (typically about 10 nanoseconds) infrared laser, illuminating a single small footprint (typically a few decimeters in diameter) with a strong signal (typically on the order of 100 microjoules per pulse). Laser pulse rates of 25 kHz to 100 kHz are common. The detector is a single avalanche photodiode, and the signal is large enough that multiple discrete returns (from vegetation) can be detected sequentially, or the unit can be equipped with a wave form digitizer. The CATS unit uses a short pulse (480 picosecond FWHM) frequency-doubled NdYAG (0.530 micrometer wavelength) micro laser, and illuminates a patch (nominally 2 meters by 2 meters) with a 10 by 10 array of laser beams, each having about 30 nanojoules of energy. The returning signals may be as low as a single photon per channel, and the sensor is a 100 channel photomultiplier tube (PMT). The range electronics have multi-stop capabilities in each channel. Each channel of the CATS instrument has a much lower SNR than the current generation of commercial units, but even operating at pulse rates as low as 8,000 pulses per second, it provides essentially contiguous coverage of the terrain in a single pass, sampling 800,000 points per second—as compared to 100,000 points per second for the leading commercial unit. And the short laser pulse length results in sub-nanosecond inter-pulse dead times. Another anticipated advantage of the CATS design is being able to penetrate water to depths of about 5 meters. The CATS unit is fully assembled and ground testing began in early 2006. Initial testing has focused on

  19. The Mars Science Laboratory Mission: Early Results from Gale Crater Landing Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flatow, I.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Blake, D.; Crisp, J. A.; Edgett, K. S.; Gellert, R.; Gomez-Elvira, J.; Hassler, D. M.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Malin, M. C.; Meyer, M. A.; Mitrofanov, I.; Vasavada, A. R.; Wiens, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity, landed at Gale Crater on August 5th (PDT) and initiated an investigation of modern and ancient environments. The 155-km diameter Gale Crater was chosen as Curiosity's field site based on several attributes: the interior Mount Sharp preserves a succession of flat-lying strata extending almost 5 km above the elevation of the landing site; the lower few hundred meters of the mound show a progression with relative age from clay-bearing to sulfate-bearing strata, separated by an unconformity from overlying likely anhydrous strata; the landing ellipse is characterized by a mixture of alluvial fan and high thermal inertia/high albedo stratified deposits; and a number of stratigraphically/geomorphically distinct fluvial features. Gale's regional context and strong evidence for a progression through multiple potentially habitable environments, represented by a stratigraphic record of extraordinary extent, ensure preservation of a rich record of the environmental history of early Mars. Curiosity has an expected lifetime of at least one Mars year (~23 months), and drive capability of at least 20 km. The MSL science payload was specifically assembled to assess habitability and includes a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer and gas analyzer that will search for organic carbon in rocks, regolith fines, and the atmosphere (SAM); an x-ray diffractometer that will determine mineralogical diversity (CheMin); focusable cameras that can image landscapes and rock/regolith textures in natural color (MAHLI, Mastcam); an alpha-particle x-ray spectrometer for in situ determination of rock and soil chemistry (APXS); a laser-induced breakdown spectrometer to remotely sense the chemical composition of rocks and minerals (ChemCam); an active/passive neutron spectrometer designed to search for water in rocks/regolith (DAN); a weather station to measure modern-day environmental variables (REMS); and a sensor designed for continuous monitoring of

  20. Lipid raft disarrangement as a result of neuropathological progresses: a novel strategy for early diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Marin, R; Rojo, J A; Fabelo, N; Fernandez, C E; Diaz, M

    2013-08-15

    Lipid rafts are the preferential site of numerous membrane signaling proteins which are involved in neuronal functioning and survival. These proteins are organized in multiprotein complexes, or signalosomes, in close contact with lipid classes particularly represented in lipid rafts (i.e. cholesterol, sphingolipids and saturated fatty acids), which may contribute to physiological responses leading to neuroprotection. Increasing evidence indicates that alteration of lipid composition in raft structures as a consequence of neuropathologies, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), causes a dramatic increase in lipid raft order. These phenomena may correlate with perturbation of signalosome activities, likely contributing to neurodegenerative progression. Interestingly, significant disruption of stable raft microenvironments has been already observed in the first stages of either AD or PD, suggesting that these alterations may represent early events in the neuropathological development. In this regard, the search for biochemical markers, such as specific metabolic products altered in the brain at the first steps of the disease, presently represents an important challenge for early diagnostic strategies. Alterations of these biomarkers may be reflected in either plasma or cerebrospinal fluid, thus representing a potential strategy to predict an accurate diagnosis. We propose that pathologically-linked lipid raft markers may be interesting candidates to be explored at this level, although it has not been studied so far to what extent alteration of different signalosome components may be reflected in peripheral fluids. In this mini-review, we will discuss on relevant aspects of lipid rafts that contribute to the modulation of neuropathological events related to AD and PD. An interesting hypothesis is that anomalies on raft biomarkers measured at peripheral fluids might mirror the lipid raft pathology observed in early stages of AD and PD.

  1. Profile Modifications Resulting from Early High-harmonic Fast Wave heating in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Mendard, J.E.; LeBlanc, Wilson, J.R.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Stutman, D.; and Swain, D.W.

    2001-05-18

    Experiments have been performed in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) to inject high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) power early during the plasma current ramp-up in an attempt to reduce the current penetration rate to raise the central safety factor during the flattop phase of the discharge. To date, up to 2 MW of HHFW power has been coupled to deuterium plasmas as early as t = 50 ms using the slowest interstrap phasing of k|| approximately equals 14 m(superscript)-1 (nf = 24). Antenna-plasma gap scans have been performed and find that for small gaps (5-8 cm), electron heating is observed with relatively small density rises and modest reductions in current penetration rate. For somewhat larger gaps (10-12 cm), weak electron heating is observed but with a spontaneous density rise at the plasma edge similar to that observed in NSTX H-modes. In the larger gap configuration, EFIT code reconstructions (without MSE [motional Stark effect]) find that resistive flux consumption is reduced as much as 30%, the internal inductance is maintained below 0.6 at 1 MA into the flattop, q(0) is increased significantly, and the MHD stability character of the discharges is strongly modified.

  2. Thirty new loci for age at menarche identified by a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    Elks, Cathy E.; Perry, John R.B.; Sulem, Patrick; Chasman, Daniel I.; Franceschini, Nora; He, Chunyan; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Visser, Jenny A.; Byrne, Enda M.; Cousminer, Diana L.; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Esko, Tõnu; Feenstra, Bjarke; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Koller, Daniel L.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Lin, Peng; Mangino, Massimo; Marongiu, Mara; McArdle, Patrick F.; Smith, Albert V.; Stolk, Lisette; van Wingerden, Sophie W.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Albrecht, Eva; Corre, Tanguy; Ingelsson, Erik; Hayward, Caroline; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Smith, Erin N.; Ulivi, Shelia; Warrington, Nicole M.; Zgaga, Lina; Alavere, Helen; Amin, Najaf; Aspelund, Thor; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barroso, Ines; Berenson, Gerald S.; Bergmann, Sven; Blackburn, Hannah; Boerwinkle, Eric; Buring, Julie E.; Busonero, Fabio; Campbell, Harry; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chen, Wei; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Couper, David; Coviello, Andrea D.; d’Adamo, Pio; de Faire, Ulf; de Geus, Eco J.C.; Deloukas, Panos; Döring, Angela; Smith, George Davey; Easton, Douglas F.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Emilsson, Valur; Eriksson, Johan; Ferrucci, Luigi; Folsom, Aaron R.; Foroud, Tatiana; Garcia, Melissa; Gasparini, Paolo; Geller, Frank; Gieger, Christian; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hall, Per; Hankinson, Susan E.; Ferreli, Liana; Heath, Andrew C.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Hofman, Albert; Hu, Frank B.; Illig, Thomas; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Johnson, Andrew D.; Karasik, David; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kiel, Douglas P.; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O.; Kolcic, Ivana; Kraft, Peter; Launer, Lenore J.; Laven, Joop S.E.; Li, Shengxu; Liu, Jianjun; Levy, Daniel; Martin, Nicholas G.; McArdle, Wendy L.; Melbye, Mads; Mooser, Vincent; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Murray, Sarah S.; Nalls, Michael A.; Navarro, Pau; Nelis, Mari; Ness, Andrew R.; Northstone, Kate; Oostra, Ben A.; Peacock, Munro; Palmer, Lyle J.; Palotie, Aarno; Paré, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Peltonen, Leena; Pennell, Craig E.; Pharoah, Paul; Polasek, Ozren; Plump, Andrew S.; Pouta, Anneli; Porcu, Eleonora; Rafnar, Thorunn; Rice, John P.; Ring, Susan M.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Sala, Cinzia; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanna, Serena; Schlessinger, David; Schork, Nicholas J.; Scuteri, Angelo; Segrè, Ayellet V.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Soranzo, Nicole; Sovio, Ulla; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Strachan, David P.; Tammesoo, Mar-Liis; Tikkanen, Emmi; Toniolo, Daniela; Tsui, Kim; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Tyrer, Jonathon; Uda, Manuela; van Dam, Rob M.; van Meurs, Joyve B.J.; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Weedon, Michael N.; Wichmann, H. Erich; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F.; Wright, Alan F.; Young, Lauren; Zhai, Guangju; Zhuang, Wei Vivian; Bierut, Laura J.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Boyd, Heather A.; Crisponi, Laura; Demerath, Ellen W.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Econs, Michael J.; Harris, Tamara B.; Hunter, David J.; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Metspalu, Andres; Montgomery, Grant W.; Ridker, Paul M.; Spector, Tim D.; Streeten, Elizabeth A.; Stefansson, Kari; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Uitterlinden, André G.; Widen, Elisabeth; Murabito, Joanne M.; Ong, Ken K.; Murray, Anna

    2011-01-01

    To identify loci for age at menarche, we performed a meta-analysis of 32 genome-wide association studies in 87,802 women of European descent, with replication in up to 14,731 women. In addition to the known loci at LIN28B (P=5.4×10−60) and 9q31.2 (P=2.2×10−33), we identified 30 novel menarche loci (all P<5×10−8) and found suggestive evidence for a further 10 loci (P<1.9×10−6). New loci included four previously associated with BMI (in/near FTO, SEC16B, TRA2B and TMEM18), three in/near other genes implicated in energy homeostasis (BSX, CRTC1, and MCHR2), and three in/near genes implicated in hormonal regulation (INHBA, PCSK2 and RXRG). Ingenuity and MAGENTA pathway analyses identified coenzyme A and fatty acid biosynthesis as biological processes related to menarche timing. PMID:21102462

  3. Combined radiation and burn injury results in exaggerated early pulmonary inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Jessica L.; Deburghgraeve, Cory R.; Bird, Melanie D.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Chen, Michael M.; Yong, Sherri; Kovacs, Elizabeth J.

    2014-01-01

    Events such as a nuclear meltdown accident or nuclear attack have potential for severe radiation injuries. Radiation injury frequently occurs in combination with other forms of trauma, most often burns. Thus far, combined injury studies have focused mainly on skin wound healing and damage to the gut. Since both radiation exposure and remote burn have pulmonary consequences, we examined the early effects of combined injury on the lung. C57BL/6 male mice were subjected to 5 Gy of total body irradiation followed by a 15% total body surface area scald burn. Lungs from surviving animals were examined for evidence of inflammation and pneumonitis. At 48 hours post-injury, pathology of the lungs from combined injury mice showed greater inflammation compared to all other treatment groups, with marked red blood cell and leukocyte congestion of the pulmonary vasculature. There was excessive leukocyte accumulation, primarily neutrophils, in the vasculature and interstitium, with occasional cells in the alveolar space. At 24 and 48 hours post-injury, myeloperoxidase levels in lungs of mice given combined injury were elevated compared to all other treatment groups (p<0.01), confirming histological evidence of neutrophil accumulation. Pulmonary levels of the neutrophil chemoattractant KC (CXCL1) were 3 times above that of either injury alone (p<0.05). Further, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1, CCL2) was increased 2-fold and 3-fold compared to burn injury or radiation injury, respectively (p<0.05). Together, these data suggest that combined radiation and burn injury augments early pulmonary congestion and inflammation.. Currently, countermeasures for this unique type of injury are extremely limited. Further research is needed to elucidate the mechanisms behind the synergistic effects of combined injury in order to develop appropriate treatments. PMID:23899376

  4. THE STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTION IN EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES FROM ABSORPTION LINE SPECTROSCOPY. II. RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, Charlie; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.

    2012-11-20

    The spectral absorption lines in early-type galaxies contain a wealth of information regarding the detailed abundance pattern, star formation history, and stellar initial mass function (IMF) of the underlying stellar population. Using our new population synthesis model that accounts for the effect of variable abundance ratios of 11 elements, we analyze very high quality absorption line spectra of 38 early-type galaxies and the nuclear bulge of M31. These data extend to 1 {mu}m and they therefore include the IMF-sensitive spectral features Na I, Ca II, and FeH at 0.82 {mu}m, 0.86 {mu}m, and 0.99 {mu}m, respectively. The models fit the data well, with typical rms residuals {approx}< 1%. Strong constraints on the IMF and therefore the stellar mass-to-light ratio, (M/L){sub stars}, are derived for individual galaxies. We find that the IMF becomes increasingly bottom-heavy with increasing velocity dispersion and [Mg/Fe]. At the lowest dispersions and [Mg/Fe] values the derived IMF is consistent with the Milky Way (MW) IMF, while at the highest dispersions and [Mg/Fe] values the derived IMF contains more low-mass stars (is more bottom-heavy) than even a Salpeter IMF. Our best-fit (M/L){sub stars} values do not exceed dynamically based M/L values. We also apply our models to stacked spectra of four metal-rich globular clusters in M31 and find an (M/L){sub stars} that implies fewer low-mass stars than a MW IMF, again agreeing with dynamical constraints. We discuss other possible explanations for the observed trends and conclude that variation in the IMF is the simplest and most plausible.

  5. Rewarding Progress, Reducing Debt: Early Results from Ohio's Performance-Based Scholarship Demonstration for Low-Income Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cha, Paulette; Patel, Reshma

    2010-01-01

    This report presents early results from a rigorous evaluation of a performance-based scholarship program that was implemented at three community colleges in Ohio during the 2008-2009 academic year. The program in Ohio that is the subject of this report is part of MDRC's national Performance-Based Scholarship (PBS) Demonstration, which was…

  6. Enhancing Student Services at Lorain County Community College: Early Results from the Opening Doors Demonstration in Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scrivener, Susan; Au, Jenny

    2007-01-01

    In 2003, MDRC and a consortium of funders launched the Opening Doors demonstration to test reforms in six community colleges aimed at helping students stay in school and earn credentials. This report presents early results from the Opening Doors program at Lorain County Community College in Elyria, Ohio. The program provided intensive advising and…

  7. Effects of Cognitive Enhancement Therapy on Employment Outcomes in Early Schizophrenia: Results From a Two-Year Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Eack, Shaun M.; Hogarty, Gerard E.; Greenwald, Deborah P.; Hogarty, Susan S.; Keshavan, Matcheri S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the effects of psychosocial cognitive rehabilitation on employment outcomes in a randomized controlled trial for individuals with early course schizophrenia. Method Early course schizophrenia outpatients (N = 58) were randomly assigned to Cognitive Enhancement Therapy (CET) or an Enriched Supportive Therapy (EST) control and treated for two years. Comprehensive data on cognition and employment were collected annually. Results Individuals treated with CET were significantly more likely to be competitively employed, had greater earnings from employment, and were more satisfied with their employment status by the end of treatment compared to EST recipients. Mediator analyses revealed that improvements in both social and non-social cognition mediated the CET effects on employment. Conclusion CET can help facilitate employment in early schizophrenia, by addressing the cognitive impairments that limit functioning in the disorder. Inclusion of cognitive rehabilitation in social work practice can support more optimal functional recovery from schizophrenia. PMID:23885163

  8. Early and Middle Miocene Antarctic Ice Sheet Behavior: results from the ANDRILL SMS Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harwood, D. M.; Florindo, F.; Levy, R. H.; SMS Project Science Team http://andrill. org/projects/sms/team. html

    2011-12-01

    A 1138-meter sediment drillcore (AND-2A) recovered by the SMS Project of the ANDRILL Program from the McMurdo Sound sector of the western Ross Sea contains a near-continuous, coastal record of Antarctic climate and ice sheet variability through the early Miocene (20.2 to ~14.5 million years ago), including an interval of global warmth known as the Mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum (MMCO). The AND-2A drillcore was deposited in the subsiding Victoria Land Basin, during a period of relatively steady thermal subsidence, on the coastal plain and continental shelf seaward of the rising Transantarctic Mountains. Analysis of this drillcore indicates prolonged periods when the ice sheet margin remained retreated from the coastline, and other periods when the ice sheet was highly dynamic, advancing and retreating on orbital timescales. It preserves a record of the pace and scale of climate and ice sheet variation, and allows for the evaluation of climate sensitivity through data and numerical modeling integration. Stratigraphic sequences and facies interpretations reveal a cyclical history of climate changes, glacial advance and retreat cycles. Under warm, equable climate conditions recorded in a variety of climate indicators, the behavior of the early Miocene Antarctic ice sheet evident in the AND-2A core was varied, ranging between two modes: (1) persistent absence/retreat of low elevation ice sheets from coastal regions, and (2) periods of dynamic but subdued fluctuations with the ice margin of larger volume ice sheets entering across the coastal zone. The glacial regime varied from sub-polar with significant meltwater through proximal and distal high-latitude temperate glacial conditions with abundant meltwater. A well-developed chronostratigraphic framework allows for the comparison of events recognized in this drillcore with events identified in distal proxy records from deep-sea stable isotope studies. This dynamic response of Antarctic climate during times when CO2 levels

  9. Planck Early Results. XV. Spectral Energy Distributions and Radio Continuum Spectra of Northern Extragalactic Radio Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aatrokoski, J.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Angelakis, E.; Amaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit, A.; Berdyugin, A.; Bernard, J. P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhatia, R.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Gehrels, N.

    2011-01-01

    Spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and radio continuum spectra are presented for a northern sample of 104 extragalactic radio sources. based on the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC) and simultaneous multi frequency data. The nine Planck frequencies, from 30 to 857 GHz, are complemented by a set of simultaneous observations ranging from radio to gamma-rays. This is the first extensive frequency coverage in the radio and millimetre domains for an essentially complete sample of extragalactic radio sources, and it shows how the individual shocks, each in their own phase of development, shape the radio spectra as they move in the relativistic jet. The SEDs presented in this paper were fitted with second and third degree polynomials to estimate the frequencies of the synchrotron and inverse Compton (IC) peaks, and the spectral indices of low and high frequency radio data, including the Planck ERCSC data, were calculated. SED modelling methods are discussed, with an emphasis on proper. physical modelling of the synchrotron bump using multiple components. Planck ERCSC data also suggest that the original accelerated electron energy spectrum could be much harder than commonly thought, with power-law index around 1.5 instead of the canonical 2.5. The implications of this are discussed for the acceleration mechanisms effective in blazar shock. Furthermore in many cases the Planck data indicate that gamma-ray emission must originate in the same shocks that produce the radio emission.

  10. Preliminary results suggesting exaggerated ovarian androgen production early in the course of polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Francis, G L; Getts, A; McPherson, J C

    1990-11-01

    Excess ovarian androgen production might be a cause of the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCO). Previous studies have evaluated adult women with long-standing abnormality of the hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal axis. Abnormal ovarian function in such patients could be a primary or even a secondary finding. For that reason, this study was designed to evaluate ovarian androgen production in symptomatic adolescent females. Simultaneous adrenal suppression, by using dexamethasone, and ovarian stimulation, by using gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), were achieved in 12 patients. Following stimulation, blood was serially obtained over 8 hr to measure gonadotropin, estrogen, and androgen responses. Based on the androgen response, patients could be divided into two groups. Group A (five) had a significant increase (p less than 0.01) in free testosterone, whereas group B (seven) had no increase in any androgen, including free testosterone (significantly different from group A, p = 0.01). All patients in group A had enlarged or cystic ovaries, whereas only one-quarter patients in group B had enlarged ovaries (significantly different from group A, p less than 0.03). The pituitary and estrogenic response was similar in both groups. These preliminary data suggest that some patients with PCO (group A) have a primary abnormality in ovarian androgen production early in the course of their disease.

  11. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy: evolution, early results, and impact on nonsurgical gallstone therapies.

    PubMed

    Brandon, J C; Velez, M A; Teplick, S K; Mueller, P R; Rattner, D W; Broadwater, J R; Lang, N P; Eidt, J F

    1991-08-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy, a surgical technique first performed in France, has gained widespread acceptance among surgeons in the United States. The abdominal cavity is inflated by carbon dioxide, a video monitor is inserted via a laparoscope placed periumbilically, and the gallbladder is freed and removed from the liver bed by using small subcostal ports for access and dissection. Intraoperative cholangiography is routinely performed, but uncertainty exists about how best to manage choledocholithiasis. Compared with traditional cholecystectomy, initial reports describing laparoscopic cholecystectomy cite shorter recovery times because no large incisions are made, thus potentially reducing the cost and morbidity of cholecystectomy. A survey of 614 early cases supports these claims, with a reported complication rate of 1.5% and quick resumption of normal activities by patients. Because of its promise for reduced morbidity, laparoscopic cholecystectomy is challenging open cholecystectomy as the therapeutic gold standard for symptomatic cholelithiasis. Thus, the standard to which the nonsurgical gallstone therapies, such as lithotripsy and contact dissolution, will be compared may shift to laparoscopic cholecystectomy. As the laparoscopic complications are similar to those of traditional cholecystectomy, such as abscesses and bile leaks, their percutaneous treatment should not change. PMID:1830188

  12. gPhoton: A Time-Tagged Database of Every GALEX Photon and Early Science Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Scott W.; Million, Chase; Shiao, Bernie; Thompson, Randy; Tseng, Shui-Ay; Rogers, Anthony; Smith, Myron; White, Richard L.; Levay, Karen

    2014-06-01

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) mission observed a large fraction of the sky in FUV and NUV at time resolutions of five thousandths of a second, spanning a decade of operation. Due to technical limitations when the data were first archived, the ability to use GALEX data at such high time resolutions was limited: the primary data products were images that were combined into several-minute integrations, along with source catalogs.MAST is pleased to introduce gPhoton, a time-tagged database of every photon event detected by GALEX during its lifetime; some 1.5 trillion events in total. This database is accompanied by both a python-based software package and a web interface. These tools allow users to create calibrated lightcurves, intensity maps, and animated movies from any set of photons selected across any tile. Users can specify custom apertures sizes, coordinates, and time steps down to the level of seconds. We present some early science cases with gPhoton, which include studies of flare stars, Be stars, and unique opportunities with objects in the Kepler field.

  13. Early Performance and Results from the Globe at Night - Sky Brightness Monitoring Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Yukiko; Cheung, Sze Leung; Pun, Jason Chun Shing; SO, Chu-wing; Walker, Constance Elaine; Agata, Hidehiko

    2015-08-01

    The Global at Night - Sky Brightness Monitoring Network (GaN-MN) is an international project for long-term monitoring of night sky conditions around the world. The GaN-MN consists of fixed monitoring stations each equipped with a Sky Quality Meter - Lensed Ethernet (SQM-LE), which is a specialized light sensor for night sky brightness (NSB) measurement. NSB data are continuously collected at high sampling frequency throughout the night, and these data will be instantly made available to the general public to provide a real-time snapshot of the global light pollution condition. The huge NSB database accumulated also provides the basis for studies of the temporal and geographical variations of light pollution and its correlation with various natural and artificial factors. In order to ensure the quality of data collected between the monitoring sites, detailed guidelines of setting and location selection are defined, and a user workshop was held in Tokyo, Japan to introduce and discuss the installation procedures and data analysis for participants. In this presentation, the user workshop and early performance of the GaN-MN will be reported. The GaN-MN project is endorsed by the IAU Executive Committee Working Group as a major Cosmic Light program in the International Year of Light.

  14. Early benefit assessment of new drugs in Germany - results from 2011 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Hörn, Helmut; Nink, Katrin; McGauran, Natalie; Wieseler, Beate

    2014-06-01

    Rising drug costs in Germany led to the Act on the Reform of the Market for Medicinal Products (AMNOG) in January 2011. For new drugs, pharmaceutical companies have to submit dossiers containing all available evidence to demonstrate an added benefit versus an appropriate comparator therapy. The Federal Joint Committee (G-BA), the main decision-making body of the statutory healthcare system, is responsible for the overall procedure of "early benefit assessment". The Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) largely conducts the dossier assessments, which inform decisions by the G-BA on added benefit and support price negotiations. Of the 25 dossiers (excluding orphan drugs) assessed until 31 December 2012, 14 contained sufficient data from randomized active-controlled trials investigating patient-relevant outcomes or at least acceptable surrogates; 11 contained insufficient data. The most common indications were oncology (6) and viral infections (4). For the 14 drugs assessed, the extent of added benefit was rated as minor, considerable, and non-quantifiable in 3, 8, and 2 cases; the remaining drug showed no added benefit. Despite some shortcomings, for the first time it has been possible in Germany to implement a systematic procedure for assessing new drugs at market entry, thus providing support for price negotiations and informed decision-making for patients, clinicians and policy makers.

  15. Emergent categorical representation of natural, complex sounds resulting from the early post-natal sound environment

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Shaowen; Chang, Edward F.; Teng, Ching-Ling; Heiser, Marc A.; Merzenich, Michael M.

    2013-01-01

    Cortical sensory representations can be reorganized by sensory exposure in an epoch of early development. The adaptive role of this type of plasticity for natural sounds in sensory development is, however, unclear. We have reared rats in a naturalistic, complex acoustic environment and examined their auditory representations. We found that cortical neurons became more selective to spectrotemporal features in the experienced sounds. At the neuronal population level, more neurons were involved in representing the whole set of complex sounds, but fewer neurons actually responded to each individual sound, but with greater magnitudes. A comparison of population-temporal responses to the experienced complex sounds revealed that cortical responses to different renderings of the same song motif were more similar, indicating that the cortical neurons became less sensitive to natural acoustic variations associated with stimulus context and sound renderings. By contrast, cortical responses to sounds of different motifs became more distinctive, suggesting that cortical neurons were tuned to the defining features of the experienced sounds. These effects lead to emergent “categorical” representations of the experienced sounds, which presumably facilitate their recognition. PMID:23747304

  16. Genome Wide Association Study of Age at Menarche in the Japanese Population

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Atsushi; Oda, Katsutoshi; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Kubo, Michiaki; Nakamura, Yusuke; Matsuda, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    Age at menarche (AAM) is a complex trait involving both genetic and environmental factors. To identify the genetic factors associated with AAM, we conducted a large-scale meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies using more than 15,000 Japanese female samples. Here, we identified an association between SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) rs364663 at the LIN28B locus and AAM, with a P-value of 5.49×10−7 and an effect size of 0.089 (year). We also evaluated 33 SNPs that were previously reported to be associated with AAM in women of European ancestry. Among them, two SNPs rs4452860 and rs7028916 in TMEM38B indicated significant association with AAM in the same directions as reported in previous studies (P = 0.0013 with an effect size of 0.051) even after Bonferroni correction for the 33 SNPs. In addition, six loci in or near CCDC85A, LOC100421670, CA10, ZNF483, ARNTL, and RXRG exhibited suggestive association with AAM (P<0.05). Our findings elucidated the impact of genetic variations on AAM in the Japanese population. PMID:23667675

  17. Study of the mesosphere using wide-field twilight polarization measurements: Early results beyond the polar circle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugolnikov, O. S.; Kozelov, B. V.

    2016-07-01

    This paper discusses the results of early measurements of temperature and dust in the mesosphere on the basis of wide-field twilight sky polarimetry, which began in 2015 in Apatity (North of Russia, 67.6° N, 33.4° E) using the original entire-sky camera. These measurements have been performed for the first time beyond the Polar Circle in the winter and early spring period. The general polarization properties of the twilight sky and the procedure for identifying single scattering are described. The key results of the study include the Boltzmann temperature values at altitudes higher than 70 km and the conclusion on a weak effect of dust on scattering properties of the mesosphere during this period.

  18. Breast cancer risk accumulation starts early – Prevention must also

    PubMed Central

    Colditz, Graham A; Bohlke, Kari; Berkey, Catherine S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Nearly 1 in 4 breast cancers is diagnosed before the age of 50, and many early-stage premalignant lesions are present but not yet diagnosed. Therefore, we review evidence to support the strategy that breast cancer prevention efforts must begin early in life. Methods Literature review Results Exposures during childhood and adolescence affect a woman’s long-term risk of breast cancer, but have received far less research attention than exposures that occur later in life. Breast tissue undergoes rapid cellular proliferation between menarche and first full-term pregnancy, and risk accumulates rapidly until the terminal differentiation that accompanies first pregnancy. Evidence on childhood diet and growth in height, and adolescent alcohol intake, among other adolescent factors are related to breast cancer risk and risk of premalignant proliferative benign lesions. Conclusion Breast cancer prevention efforts will have the greatest effect when initiated at an early age and continued over a lifetime. Gaps in knowledge are identified and deserve increase attention to inform prevention. PMID:24820413

  19. Medial column stabilization improves the early result of calcaneal lengthening in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Che-Nan; Wu, Kuan-Wen; Huang, Shier-Chieg; Kuo, Ken N; Wang, Ting-Ming

    2013-05-01

    Calcaneal lengthening is a popular surgical treatment for pronated foot deformity. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of medial column stabilization in improving the results of calcaneal lengthening for pronated foot deformity in ambulatory children with cerebral palsy. Twenty-one consecutive (37 feet) children with cerebral palsy with pronated foot deformity who received calcaneal lengthening from 2004 to 2009 were reviewed. Talonavicular stabilizations were performed by either stapling alone or fusion depending on the children's age and correctability of midfoot deformity. Satisfaction rates were assessed using Mosca's radiographic, Mosca's clinical, and Yoo's clinical criteria. Talonavicular coverage angle was also measured. Results between groups with and without stabilization of the talonavicular joint were compared. Group 1 included 11 children (19 feet) who had no talonavicular stabilization. Group 2 included 10 children (18 feet) who had talonavicular fixation. Groups were further divided into subgroups A [Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS)≤II] and B (GMFCS≥III). Factors including demography, geographical classification, functional status, and preoperative degree of deformity were similar between the two groups. After the operation, all four radiographic parameters improved significantly. The talonavicular coverage angle was better in group 2 than in group 1. Mosca's radiographic results were satisfactory in 73.68% of cases in group 1 and 100% in group 2; the difference was statistically significant (P=0.027). As for Mosca's clinical results, 63.16% in group 1 and 83.33% in group 2 achieved satisfactory results (P=0.156). On the basis of Yoo's criteria, the results were satisfactory in 57.89% of cases in group 1 and in 94.44% of cases in group 2 (P=0.012). Further analysis on the satisfaction rates between the subgroups showed similar results between the patients in subgroup 1A and 2A, and significantly better results

  20. Maternal passive smoking during pregnancy and age of menarche in daughters: a study of elementary and middle school students in Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bolin; Shi, Huijing; Wang, Qun; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Mengna

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence and determinants of passive smoking in pregnancy and to examine its association with an earlier age of menarche in offspring. This retrospective study enrolled 751 students 8 to 20 years old in Shanghai selected by stratified cluster sampling. Data were obtained through structured self-administered questionnaires and physical examinations. It was found that daughters with maternal tobacco exposure experienced relatively earlier menarche and had shorter cycle lengths, although both findings were not statistically significant. The unadjusted odds ratio for prenatal tobacco smoke exposure on the relatively earlier onset of menarche was 1.84 (95% confidence interval = 1.05-3.22) compared with no exposure, and the associations remained statistically significant after adjusting for birth weight, birth length, maternal age of menarche, and present height and weight. In conclusion, our study provides limited evidence supporting the hypothesis that maternal passive smoking during pregnancy leads to an earlier age of menarche of daughters.

  1. Maternal passive smoking during pregnancy and age of menarche in daughters: a study of elementary and middle school students in Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bolin; Shi, Huijing; Wang, Qun; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Mengna

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence and determinants of passive smoking in pregnancy and to examine its association with an earlier age of menarche in offspring. This retrospective study enrolled 751 students 8 to 20 years old in Shanghai selected by stratified cluster sampling. Data were obtained through structured self-administered questionnaires and physical examinations. It was found that daughters with maternal tobacco exposure experienced relatively earlier menarche and had shorter cycle lengths, although both findings were not statistically significant. The unadjusted odds ratio for prenatal tobacco smoke exposure on the relatively earlier onset of menarche was 1.84 (95% confidence interval = 1.05-3.22) compared with no exposure, and the associations remained statistically significant after adjusting for birth weight, birth length, maternal age of menarche, and present height and weight. In conclusion, our study provides limited evidence supporting the hypothesis that maternal passive smoking during pregnancy leads to an earlier age of menarche of daughters. PMID:25667229

  2. Microgravity Effects on the Early Events of Biological Nitrogen Fixation in Medicago Truncatula: Results from the SyNRGE Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutte, Gary W.; Roberts, Michael

    2012-01-01

    SyNRGE (Symbiotic Nodulation in a Reduced Gravity Environment) was a sortie mission on STS-135 in the Biological Research in Canisters (BRIC) hardware to study the effect of microgravity on a plant-microbe symbiosis resulting in biological nitrogen fixation. Medicago truncatula, a model species for th legume family, was inoculated with its bacterial symbiont, Sinorhizobium meliloti, to observe early biomolecular events associated with infection and nodulation in Petri Dish Fixation Units (PDFU's).

  3. Competitive Employment for Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Early Results from a Randomized Clinical Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wehman, Paul H.; Schall, Carol M.; McDonough, Jennifer; Kregel, John; Brooke, Valerie; Molinelli, Alissa; Ham, Whitney; Graham, Carolyn W.; Riehle, J. Erin; Collins, Holly T.; Thiss, Weston

    2014-01-01

    For most youth with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), employment upon graduation from high school or college is elusive. Employment rates are reported in many studies to be very low despite many years of intensive special education services. This paper presented the preliminary results of a randomized clinical trial of Project SEARCH plus ASD…

  4. Results from an Experimental Study about Reinforcements Employed in Early Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aparicio, Maria Teresa Sanz

    2004-01-01

    The Down's syndrome population presents a social quotient higher than its intelligence quotient, the main characteristic of its personality and because of the pronounced hypotony suffered by them, principally in the first years of life. This report shows the results of a study carried out about differential acquisitions of two groups of trisomy-21…

  5. Longitudinal Twin Study of Early Reading Development in Three Countries: Preliminary Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Brian; Delaland, Cara; Fielding-Barnsley, Ruth; Quain, Peter; Samuelsson, Stefan; Hoien, Torleiv; Corley, Robin; DeFries, John C.; Wadsworth, Sally; Willcutt, Erik; Olson, Richard K.

    2002-01-01

    Preliminary results from data on 146 Australian, 284 American, and 70 Norwegian preschool twins indicate reliable genetic influences on phonological awareness and memory and learning. Vocabulary, grammar, and morphology showed significant shared environment and negligible genetic effects. A print knowledge composite showed genetic and shared…

  6. Competitive employment for youth with autism spectrum disorders: early results from a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Wehman, Paul H; Schall, Carol M; McDonough, Jennifer; Kregel, John; Brooke, Valerie; Molinelli, Alissa; Ham, Whitney; Graham, Carolyn W; Erin Riehle, J; Collins, Holly T; Thiss, Weston

    2014-03-01

    For most youth with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), employment upon graduation from high school or college is elusive. Employment rates are reported in many studies to be very low despite many years of intensive special education services. This paper presented the preliminary results of a randomized clinical trial of Project SEARCH plus ASD Supports on the employment outcomes for youth with ASD between the ages of 18-21 years of age. This model provides very promising results in that the employment outcomes for youth in the treatment group were much higher in non-traditional jobs with higher than minimum wage incomes than for youth in the control condition. Specifically, 21 out of 24 (87.5 %) treatment group participants acquired employment while 1 of 16 (6.25 %) of control group participants acquired employment.

  7. [Early results of proximal femoral fractures treated with FENIX modular hemiarthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Görski, Radosław; Górecki, Andrzej; Olszewski, Paweł; Biedrzycki, Jerzy; Skowronek, Paweł

    2010-01-01

    The article discusses preliminary clinical results in patients with proximal femoral fractures treated with hemiarthroplasty using a FENIX implant. The study group comprised 41 subjects aged 69 to 97 (median age 82.3 year). The follow-up study provided data on 26 subjects (63.4%), among which 15 attended the check-up, 5 subjects refused to visit at the Department and 6 subjects were reported as deceased. Median follow-up period amounted to 6.8 month (1 to 22 months). General hospitalization-related complications occurred in 8 patients (19.5%). During hospitalization no deaths occurred, in the deceased group 3 patients died within 12 months after surgery, while another 3 died after the twelve-month postoperative period (median of 13.3%). According to Merle d'Aubigne-Postel score favorable long-term results were observed in 9 patients (59.9%), 13 patients regained the level of motor function similar to the functional ability prior to fracture. The need to postpone the surgery due to general health status and impaired pre-operative motor function are significant negative prognostic factors. The results obtained were compared with previous efficacy studies on femoral fracture treatment using an Austin-Moore implant. Functional ability and self-reliance was higher in the FENIX group. FENIX arthroplasty effectively helps patients regain self-reliance and motor function thanks to its modular characteristics and anatmoical construction. PMID:20496778

  8. Implementation and Operational Research: Expedited Results Delivery Systems Using GPRS Technology Significantly Reduce Early Infant Diagnosis Test Turnaround Times.

    PubMed

    Deo, Sarang; Crea, Lindy; Quevedo, Jorge; Lehe, Jonathan; Vojnov, Lara; Peter, Trevor; Jani, Ilesh

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the impact of a new technology to communicate the results of an infant HIV diagnostic test on test turnaround time and to quantify the association between late delivery of test results and patient loss to follow-up. We used data collected during a pilot implementation of Global Package Radio Service (GPRS) printers for communicating results in the early infant diagnosis program in Mozambique from 2008 through 2010. Our dataset comprised 1757 patient records, of which 767 were from before implementation and 990 from after implementation of expedited results delivery system. We used multivariate logistic regression model to determine the association between late result delivery (more than 30 days between sample collection and result delivery to the health facility) and the probability of result collection by the infant's caregiver. We used a sample selection model to determine the association between late result delivery to the facility and further delay in collection of results by the caregiver. The mean test turnaround time reduced from 68.13 to 41.05 days post-expedited results delivery system. Caregivers collected only 665 (37.8%) of the 1757 results. After controlling for confounders, the late delivery of results was associated with a reduction of approximately 18% (0.44 vs. 0.36; P < 0.01) in the probability of results collected by the caregivers (odds ratio = 0.67, P < 0.05). Late delivery of results was also associated with a further average increase in 20.91 days of delay in collection of results (P < 0.01). Early infant diagnosis program managers should further evaluate the cost-effectiveness of operational interventions (eg, GPRS printers) that reduce delays.

  9. Total enbloc spondylectomy for metastatic high grade spinal tumors: Early results

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Sanganagouda S; Nene, Abhay M

    2016-01-01

    Background: High grade metastatic spinal tumors are most common and are invasive. These patients can succumb to disease progression if not treated timely. Although considered as invasive and morbid, total enbloc spondylectomy (TES) in selected cases has better survival rates. The authors describe the results of TES for high grade metastatic spinal tumors. Materials and Methods: Five patients (four females and one male) underwent TES for solitary metastatic vertebral lesion between November 2012 and January 2014. These patients presented to us with spinal instability, unrelenting severe spinal pain and/or with severe progressive radiculopathy. Average age was 46.2 years (range 39–62 years). After complete investigations, computed tomography scan, magnetic resonance imaging scan and positron emission tomography (PET) scan, it was confirmed that these patients had high grade solitary vertebral metastatic tumor. Results: Average duration of followup was 18 months (range 16–20 months). The average preoperative visual analog scale score of 9.4 (range 9–10) improved to 2 (range 1–4) at last followup. Average blood loss was 1440 mL (range 1000–2000 mL). Average duration of surgery was 198 min (range 180–240 min). Significant pain relief was noticed in each patient in the immediate postoperative period and during followups. These patients attained complete functional activities of daily living with in a month. The imaging showed implants in situ, no recurrence of tumor, and no activity on PET scan at the final followup. Conclusion: The present series shows favorable short term results of TES for solitary, metastatic, high grade vertebral body tumors by a team approach. PMID:27512215

  10. Geological questions and significant results provided by early ERTS-1 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, W. D.

    1972-01-01

    There are no author-identified significant results in this report. The organization for evaluating the uses of Earth Resources Technology Satellite data of the United States and foreign areas is described. The implementation of a system to disseminate the data to the geographical areas of interest is discussed. Brief descriptions are included of data received for the following areas: (1) east coast, (2) central United States, (3) western mountain areas, (4) west coast areas, and (5) Alaska. It is concluded that the multiband approach is useful with each of the bands providing unique and useful information. The difficulties in handling the data if all seven bands are used are examined.

  11. Early results from a prototype VLBI clock monitoring system. [Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yunck, T. P.; Madrid, G. A.

    1979-01-01

    Four sets of experiments were conducted to measure the relative epoch offsets between atomic clocks in California, Australia, and Spain by means of very long baseline interferometry (VLBI). The experiments were conducted using an incomplete R & D VLBI system with a number of inherent limitations. The results indicate that the measurement objective of epoch offset to 10 nanoseconds will be met. Tables show the measured offset, the residual to fit, and the square root Allan variance. Graphs show the rate change and the rate reset.

  12. SeaWinds on QuikSCAT Mission and Early Science Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Wu-Yang; Graf, James E.

    2000-01-01

    SeaWinds on QuikSCAT (QSCAT) is a dedicated satellite remote sensing mission for measuring ocean surface wind speed and direction, using a spinning, pencil-beam Ku-band scatterometer. It is a replacement mission for NASA Scatterometer (NSCAT), which was launched on board of the Japan's Advanced Earth Observation System (ADEOS-1) in August 1996 and returned 10 months of high quality data before the mission was terminated in June, 1997 due to the failure of the ADEOS-1 spacecraft. Since the next NASA scatterometer mission, SeaWinds on ADEOS-2 (SeaWinds), will not be launched until November 2000, NASA decided to fill the data gap by launching the QSCAT mission. Furthermore, after year 2000. the potential exists for using both the QSCAT and SeaWinds to provide approximately 6 hours global coverage of the marine winds. QSCAT is currently scheduled for launch in April, 1999 from Vandenberg Air Force Base, using Titan-II launch vehicle. The purpose of this paper is to first present the mission objectives, the spacecraft and instrument design, ground receiving systems, the science data processing system, and the data products. We will then present the post-launch calibration and verification results of the QSCAT end-to-end sensor system. Finally, we present some of the key results obtained from the first two months of the mission, which include ocean surface wind measurements, ice detection and classification, global snow cover detection, and flood detection.

  13. Early results of an in vivo trial of ESS in thyroid cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Jennifer E.; Goukassian, Ilona D.; A'Amar, Ousama M.; Bigio, Irving J.; Lee, Stephanie L.

    2012-02-01

    Introduction: Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy. The current gold standard for diagnosis, fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy, yields 10-25% of indeterminate cytology results, leading to patients undergoing thyroidectomy for diagnosis. We assessed the technical potential of a miniaturized in vivo ESS (elastic light scattering spectroscopy) probe, built into an FNA needle assembly, to differentiate benign from malignant thyroid nodules. Methods: Under IRB approval, 15 patients in the endocrine clinic undergoing FNAB of a thyroid nodule had collection of ESS data using our novel miniaturized FNA probe. Using final surgical pathology as our gold standard, data post processing and visual inspection was completed. Results: 225 spectra were grouped and analyzed (120 benign, 30 malignant and 75 from indeterminate cytology). ESS probes demonstrated excellent reproducibility in use. Initial analysis of these preliminary data is promising, indicating distinction of spectral ESS features between malignant and benign conditions. Conclusion(s): An in vivo trial of an invasive miniaturized integrated ESS biopsy probe is acceptable to patients, and collection of ESS data is feasible and reliable. With development of a disease-specific algorithm, ESS could potentially be used as an in-situ real time intra-operative diagnostic tool or as a minimally invasive adjunct to conventional FNA cytology.

  14. Percutaneous Intraductal Radiofrequency Ablation is a Safe Treatment for Malignant Biliary Obstruction: Feasibility and Early Results

    SciTech Connect

    Mizandari, Malkhaz; Pai, Madhava Xi Feng; Valek, Vlastimil; Tomas, Andrasina; Quaretti, Pietro; Golfieri, Rita; Mosconi, Cristina; Ao Guokun; Kyriakides, Charis; Dickinson, Robert; Nicholls, Joanna; Habib, Nagy

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. Previous clinical studies have shown the safety and efficacy of this novel radiofrequency ablation catheter when used for endoscopic palliative procedures. We report a retrospective study with the results of first in man percutaneous intraductal radiofrequency ablation in patients with malignant biliary obstruction. Methods. Thirty-nine patients with inoperable malignant biliary obstruction were included. These patients underwent intraductal biliary radiofrequency ablation of their malignant biliary strictures following external biliary decompression with an internal-external biliary drainage. Following ablation, they had a metal stent inserted. Results. Following this intervention, there were no 30-day mortality, hemorrhage, bile duct perforation, bile leak, or pancreatitis. Of the 39 patients, 28 are alive and 10 patients are dead with a median survival of 89.5 (range 14-260) days and median stent patency of 84.5 (range 14-260) days. One patient was lost to follow-up. All but one patient had their stent patent at the time of last follow-up or death. One patient with stent blockage at 42 days postprocedure underwent percutaneous transhepatic drain insertion and restenting. Among the patients who are alive (n = 28) the median stent patency was 92 (range 14-260) days, whereas the patients who died (n = 10) had a median stent patency of 62.5 (range 38-210) days. Conclusions. In this group of patients, it appears that this new approach is feasible and safe. Efficacy remains to be proven in future, randomized, prospective studies.

  15. The effect of gender on the early results of coronary artery bypass surgery in the younger patients' group

    PubMed Central

    Uncu, Hasan; Acipayam, Mehmet; Altinay, Levent; Doğan, Pinar; Davarcı, Isil; Özsöyler, İbrahim

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In this retrospective study, we aimed to determine the risk factors for coronary artery bypass surgery in patients under 45 years of age, and evaluate the early postoperative results and the effect of gender. Methods A total of 324 patients under 45 years of age who undergone on-pump coronary artery bypass surgery between April 12, 2004 and January 10, 2012 were included to the study. Patients divided into groups as follows: Group 1 consisted of 269 males (mean age 41.3), Group 2 consisted of 55 females (mean age 41.6). Preoperative risk factors, intraoperative and postoperative data and early mortality rates of the groups were compared. Results Smoking rate was significantly higher in Group 1. Diabetes mellitus incidence and body mass index were significantly higher in Group 2 (P values P=0.01; P=0.0001; P=0.04 respectively). The aortic cross-clamping and cardiopulmonary bypass time and number of grafts per patient were significantly higher in Group 1 (P values P=0.04; P=0.04; P=0.002 respectively). There were no deaths in either group. Conclusion We found that gender has no effect on early mortality rates of the coronary bypass surgery patients under 45 years. PMID:25714211

  16. Learning neuroendoscopy with an exoscope system (video telescopic operating monitor): Early clinical results

    PubMed Central

    Parihar, Vijay; Yadav, Y. R.; Kher, Yatin; Ratre, Shailendra; Sethi, Ashish; Sharma, Dhananjaya

    2016-01-01

    Context: Steep learning curve is found initially in pure endoscopic procedures. Video telescopic operating monitor (VITOM) is an advance in rigid-lens telescope systems provides an alternative method for learning basics of neuroendoscopy with the help of the familiar principle of microneurosurgery. Aims: The aim was to evaluate the clinical utility of VITOM as a learning tool for neuroendoscopy. Materials and Methods: Video telescopic operating monitor was used 39 cranial and spinal procedures and its utility as a tool for minimally invasive neurosurgery and neuroendoscopy for initial learning curve was studied. Results: Video telescopic operating monitor was used in 25 cranial and 14 spinal procedures. Image quality is comparable to endoscope and microscope. Surgeons comfort improved with VITOM. Frequent repositioning of scope holder and lack of stereopsis is initial limiting factor was compensated for with repeated procedures. Conclusions: Video telescopic operating monitor is found useful to reduce initial learning curve of neuroendoscopy. PMID:27695549

  17. A summary of selected early results from the ERTS-1 menhaden experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, W. H. (Principal Investigator); Kemmerer, A. J.; Benigno, J. A.; Reese, G. B.; Minkler, F. C.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Imagery from ERTS-1 satellite was used in conjunction with aerial photographically-sensed menhaden distribution information, sea truth oceanographic measurements, and commercial fishing information from a 8685 square kilometer study area in the north-central portion of the Gulf of Mexico to demonstrate relationships between selected oceanographic parameters and menhaden distribution, ERTS-1 imagery and menhaden distribution, and ERTS-1 imagery and oceanographic parameters. ERTS-1, MSS band 5 imagery density levels correlated with photographically detected menhaden distribution patterns and could be explained based on sea truth Secchi disc transparency and water depth measurements. These two parameters, together with surface salinity, Forel-Ule color, and chlorophyll-a also were found to correlate significantly with menhaden distribution. Eight empirical models were developed which provided menhaden distribution predictions for the study area on combinations of Secchi disc transparency, water depth, surface salinity, and Forel-Ule color measurements.

  18. Early Results on the Saturn System from the Composite Infrared Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flasar, F. M.

    2005-01-01

    The Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) is a remote-sensing Fourier Transform Spectrometer on the Cassini orbiter that measures thermal radiation over two decades in wavenumber, from 10 to 1400 /cm (1 mm to 7 microns), with a spectral resolution that can be set from 0.5 to 15.5 /cm. The far infrared portion of the spectrum (10-600 /cm) is measured with a polarizing interferometer having thermopile detectors with a common 4-mrad field of view. The middle infrared portion is measured with a traditional Michelson interferometer having two focal planes (600-1100 /cm, 1100-1400 cm). Each focal plane is composed of a 1x10 array of HgCdTe detectors, each detector having a 0.3-mrad field of view. More complete descriptions of the instrument and investigation are given in and. A brief description of the first results from observations through the Saturn orbital insertion period can be found in.

  19. Learning neuroendoscopy with an exoscope system (video telescopic operating monitor): Early clinical results

    PubMed Central

    Parihar, Vijay; Yadav, Y. R.; Kher, Yatin; Ratre, Shailendra; Sethi, Ashish; Sharma, Dhananjaya

    2016-01-01

    Context: Steep learning curve is found initially in pure endoscopic procedures. Video telescopic operating monitor (VITOM) is an advance in rigid-lens telescope systems provides an alternative method for learning basics of neuroendoscopy with the help of the familiar principle of microneurosurgery. Aims: The aim was to evaluate the clinical utility of VITOM as a learning tool for neuroendoscopy. Materials and Methods: Video telescopic operating monitor was used 39 cranial and spinal procedures and its utility as a tool for minimally invasive neurosurgery and neuroendoscopy for initial learning curve was studied. Results: Video telescopic operating monitor was used in 25 cranial and 14 spinal procedures. Image quality is comparable to endoscope and microscope. Surgeons comfort improved with VITOM. Frequent repositioning of scope holder and lack of stereopsis is initial limiting factor was compensated for with repeated procedures. Conclusions: Video telescopic operating monitor is found useful to reduce initial learning curve of neuroendoscopy.

  20. Overview and early results of the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Ken-Ichi; Nishibori, Toshiyuki; Ochiai, Satoshi; Ozeki, Hiroyuki; Irimajiri, Yoshihisa; Kasai, Yasuko; Koike, Makoto; Manabe, Takeshi; Mizukoshi, Kazuo; Murayama, Yasuhiro; Nagahama, Tomoo; Sano, Takuki; Sato, Ryota; Seta, Masumichi; Takahashi, Chikako; Takayanagi, Masahiro; Masuko, Harunobu; Inatani, Junji; Suzuki, Makoto; Shiotani, Masato

    2010-12-01

    The Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) was successfully launched and attached to the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS) on 25 September 2009. It has been making atmospheric observations since 12 October 2009 with the aid of a 4 K mechanical cooler and superconducting mixers for submillimeter limb-emission sounding in the frequency bands of 624.32-626.32 GHz and 649.12-650.32 GHz . On the basis of the observed spectra, the data processing has been retrieving vertical profiles for the atmospheric minor constituents in the middle atmosphere, such as O3 with isotopes, HCl, ClO, HO2, BrO, and HNO3. Results from SMILES have demonstrated its high potential to observe atmospheric minor constituents in the middle atmosphere. Unfortunately, SMILES observations have been suspended since 21 April 2010 owing to the failure of a critical component.

  1. Early results using high-resolution, low-voltage, low-temperature SEM.

    PubMed

    Pawley, J B; Walther, P; Shih, S J; Malecki, M

    1991-02-01

    Recent advances in the design of the scanning electron microscope (SEM) column, such as the coupling of a field-emission gun to a low-aberration immersion lens and the availability of a high-stability cryo-transfer stage, make low-temperature, low-voltage SEM (LTLVSEM) possible at very high resolution. We have used this combination to obtain results with uncoated biological specimens. The trichocyst from a Paramecium was used as a test specimen to observe the shrinkage of this structure as the temperature is raised from 170 K to room temperature following freeze-drying. High-magnification stereo images were obtained of trichocysts that had been prepared by freezing, freeze-substitution and critical-point drying and which were subsequently viewed by LTLVSEM to reduce beam damage and contamination. PMID:2038037

  2. A Powerful New Imager for HST: Performance and Early Science Results from Wide Field Camera 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Randy

    2009-01-01

    Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) was installed into the Hubble Space Telescope during the highly successful Servicing Mission 4 in May, 2009. WFC3 offers sensitive, high resolution imaging over a broad wavelength range from the near UV through the visible to the near IR (200nm - 1700nm). Its capabilities in the near UV and near IR ends of that range represent particularly large advances vs. those of previous HST instruments. In this talk, I will review the purpose and design of the instrument, describe its performance in flight, and highlight some of the initial scientific results from the instrument, including its use in deep infrared surveys in search of galaxies at very high redshift, in investigations of the global processes of star formation in nearby galaxies, and in the study of the recent impact on Jupiter.

  3. The Early Results of a New Health Care Program Implementation in HBV Screening: an Iranian Experience.

    PubMed

    Sharifian, Afsaneh; Naderi, Nostratollah; Sanati, Azar; Mohebi, Seyed Reza; Azimzadeh, Pedram; Golmohamadi, Ali; Nori, Simin; Khanyaghma, Mahsa; Sheikhesmaeili, Farshad; Zali, Mohamad Reza

    2015-10-01

    BACKGROUND According to the reports of World Health Organization (WHO) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the prevalence of chronic hepatitis B infection in Iran has decreased from 2-7% in 2001 to 1.3-0.8% in children aged 2-14 years. In 2010 the Institute of Medicine recommended more comprehensive screening by primary care physicians (PCPs) for evaluation, vaccination, and management of infected patients for further decrease in the prevalence of chronic HBV infection. Thus, with contribution of the Health Department, we developed a practical flowchart for PCPs to start active screening of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in all visited patients and refer the positive cases for further evaluation and management to Taleghani Hospital. METHODS With collaboration of Health Department of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences), physicians of health centers were asked to screen all their patients for HBsAg. Positive cases were referred to Taleghani Hospital. They were first registered and educated about their disease, life style, and prevention methods. Their first degree families were screened for HBV infection too and were referred for vaccination if needed. According to the results of lab tests, appropriate management was done by a hepatologist. RESULTS Since implementation of this program, we have encountered a significant rise in patient detection (even in high risk groups). Many of them were not aware of their disease and most of those who were aware of their disease were not managed appropriately. Family screening and vaccination were inadequate and need more emphasis. CONCLUSION Although health system is active about screening of HBV infection in high risk populations, it is not perfect. It seems that health system needs to upgrade the screening and management programs of HBV infection.

  4. The Trans-African Hydro-Meteorological Observatory: Early results from the crowd sourcing competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Giesen, Nick; Hilkhuijsen, Tanja; Hut, Rolf; Andreini, Marc; Selker, John

    2013-04-01

    The Trans-African Hydro-Meteorological Observatory (www.tahmo.org) is an international initiative with the objective to develop, build, and operate 20,000 hydro-meteorological measurement stations in sub-Saharan Africa. TAHMO tries to integrate science with education. At the same time, we try to make the initiative financially sustainable by developing and rolling out viable business development. Estimated total costs for establishing the network will be in the order of US 20 million, whereas operational costs will be around US 2 million per year. The stations need to be designed in accordance to a set of rules that serves easy deployment and operation, such as absence of moving parts and cavities, self- and cross calibration of sensors, and low cost (€ 200-300 per station). There are some promising first results in this respect. The presentation will focus on recent activities, specifically concerning crowd sourcing activities at African universities. This competition (http://tahmo.info/sensor-design-competition) consists of two rounds. The first round is open to any academic or research group in Africa and asks for the design of an innovative robust sensor in line with the TAHMO design criteria. The top twenty teams with the best designs will receive a "Maker Package" that will allow them to build and test the sensors. The final top ten design teams will meet in Nairobi in August 2013 to tinker and collaborate for one week and to integrate the sensors into a standard weather station. The deadline for the first round is 1 March 2013 and the results from this round will be presented.

  5. [Analysis of early and late results of surgically treated Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome].

    PubMed

    Zünd, G; von Segesser, L K; Vogt, P; Candinas, R; Amann, F W; Jenni, R; Turina, M

    1996-01-01

    The results of surgical procedures for termination of Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) Syndrom were assessed in 59 patients undergoing operation between January, 1980 and December, 1993. All cases of WPW were refractory to medical treatment and 14 of 58 patients had one or several syncopes, and 4 of them had to be reanimated. The surgical treatment of these patients was a dissection of an accessory atrioventricular pathway. 15 patients required additional heart operation. A total of 60 accessory pathways were diagnosed preoperatively, 64 were located intraoperatively. The reoperation rate was 3% (2 patients) due to persistent WPW. Incidence of total AV block after the operation was 7% (4 patients). In the late postoperative stage, 12 patients developed supraventricular tachycardias, but none of these cases required a surgical treatment. The actuarial survival rate after 10 years was 100% and after 14 years 96%. We conclude that surgical dissection of accessory pathways offers a good alternative in cases of unsuccessful catheter ablative procedure or in cases of additional heart operation.

  6. Total anomalous pulmonary venous connection (surgical technique, early and late results).

    PubMed Central

    Di Eusanio, G; Sandrasagra, F A; Donnelly, R J; Hamilton, D I

    1978-01-01

    Between March 1970 and October 1977, 36 patients underwent correction of total anomalous pulmonary venous connection. The ages ranged from 5 days to 16 years; 27 (75%) were under 1 year and 19 were under 3 months of age at the time of surgery. The overall mortality was 33%. Supracardiac connection was the commonest type and was associated with the lowest hospital mortality (30%). The highest mortality occurred in the mixed and infracardiac types and was related in part to the presence of associated intracardiac anomalies. The use of hypothermia and circulatory arrest in infancy has resulted in a considerably lower hospital mortality compared with cases operated on under conventional cardiopulmonary bypass. The mortality in 23 infants (under 1 year of age) was 26% using circulatory arrest and was lowest when correction was performed within the first three months of life (18%). All four infants operated on with standard cardiopulmonary bypass died, whereas this technique was found to be safe in older children. The surgical technique using a left anterolateral thoractomy with a trans-sternal extension is described. This technique gives an excellent exposure for fashioning a long anastomosis and has been associated with a low incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications. There have been no late deaths and all survivors, who are in excellent condition up to seven years after correction, have a normal exercise tolerance. Images PMID:684663

  7. The Payment by Results (PbR) national tariff severely penalises efficiency and early hospital discharge.

    PubMed

    Alam, Syed Munawer; Brown, Alex; Moreea, Sulleman

    2009-01-01

    The system of Payment by Results (PbR) was instituted in 2005 to reimburse secondary care for its activity. One of the features of PbR is the short stay tariff (SST), in which only 20-50% of the national tariff is paid if patients have a length of stay (LoS) of less than 2 days in hospital for certain Healthcare Resource Groups (HRGs) - or conditions. We analysed the admissions under Acute Medicine at Bradford Teaching Hospitals over a period of one year and identified the HRGs to which the SST applied. We used the 2007 PbR national tariff to calculate the additional income that would have been generated if these patients were kept in hospital for at least 2 days in order to avoid SST. We calculated an extra theoretical income of approximately £5 million if all these patients had a length of stay (LoS) more than 2 days to avoid the SST. Sixteen additional beds (assuming 85% occupancy) would have been required at a cost of around £1million per year to accommodate these patients. We show that the current PbR system is flawed and penalises hospitals with a higher turnover of patients.

  8. Oral citrulline as arginine precursor may be beneficial in sickle cell disease: early phase two results.

    PubMed Central

    Waugh, W. H.; Daeschner, C. W.; Files, B. A.; McConnell, M. E.; Strandjord, S. E.

    2001-01-01

    L-Arginine may be a conditionally essential amino acid in children and adolescents with sickle cell disease, particularly as required substrate in the arginine-nitric oxide pathway for endogenous nitrovasodilation and vasoprotection. Vasoprotection by arginine is mediated partly by nitric oxide-induced inhibition of endothelial damage and inhibition of adhesion and activation of leukocytes. Activated leukocytes may trigger many of the complications, including vasoocclusive events and intimal hyperplasias. High blood leukocyte counts during steady states in the absence of infection are significant laboratory risk factors for adverse complications. L-Citrulline as precursor amino acid was given orally twice daily in daily doses of approximately 0.1 g/kg in a pilot Phase II clinical trial during steady states in four homozygous sickle cell disease subjects and one sickle cell-hemoglobin C disease patient (ages 10-18). There soon resulted dramatic improvements in symptoms of well-being, raised plasma arginine levels, and reductions in high total leukocyte and high segmented neutrophil counts toward or to within normal limits. Continued L-citrulline supplementation in compliant subjects continued to lessen symptomatology, to maintain plasma arginine concentrations greater than control levels, and to maintain nearly normal total leukocyte and neutrophil counts. Side effects or toxicity from citrulline were not experienced. Oral L-citrulline may portend very useful for palliative therapy in sickle cell disease. Placebo-controlled, long-term trials are now indicated. PMID:11688916

  9. A comparison of a printed patient summary document with its electronic equivalent: early results.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, S. M.; Overhage, J. M.; Warvel, J.; McDonald, C. J.

    2001-01-01

    Clinicians are always searching for efficient access to clinical data. The Regenstrief Medical Record System has a printed report that fills this niche: Pocket Rounds. Handheld computers may offer an alternative, but it is unclear how effectively a handheld computer can display such data. We surveyed residents and students on the general medicine services for their opinions regarding Pocket Rounds. Those with handheld computers were given access to an electronic version of Pocket Rounds-e-Rounds. We surveyed the subjects who used e-Rounds for their opinions on the electronic format and how it compared to paper. Users overall satisfaction with Pocket Rounds was 5.8 on a seven-point scale. User s overall satisfaction for e-Rounds was 5.6 on a seven-point scale. The most useful function was retrieval of lab data for both modalities. The results suggest that the electronic format is a viable alternative to paper. Further evaluation is needed, and we plan a prospective controlled trial to study this further. PMID:11825276

  10. Incorporating bortezomib into upfront treatment for multiple myeloma: early results of total therapy 3.

    PubMed

    Barlogie, Bart; Anaissie, Elias; van Rhee, Frits; Haessler, Jeffrey; Hollmig, Klaus; Pineda-Roman, Mauricio; Cottler-Fox, Michele; Mohiuddin, Abid; Alsayed, Yazan; Tricot, Guido; Bolejack, Vanessa; Zangari, Maurizio; Epstein, Joshua; Petty, Nathan; Steward, Douglas; Jenkins, Bonnie; Gurley, Jennifer; Sullivan, Ellen; Crowley, John; Shaughnessy, John D

    2007-07-01

    Total therapy 3 incorporated bortezomib into a melphalan-based tandem transplant regimen for 303 newly diagnosed patients with myeloma. Induction chemotherapy prior to and consolidation chemotherapy after transplants each consisted of two cycles of VTD-PACE (bortezomib, thalidomide, dexamethasone and 4-d continuous infusions of cis-platin, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, etoposide); 3-year maintenance comprised monthly cycles of VTD in the first and TD in the remaining years. The median age was 59 years (age >64 years, 28%). A minimum of 20 x 10(6) CD34 cells/kg was collected in 87% of patients; 83% completed both transplants, and only 5% suffered a treatment-related death. At 24 months, 83% had achieved near-complete remission, which was sustained in 88% at 2 years from its onset. With a median follow-up of 20 months, 2-year estimates of event-free and overall survival were 84% and 86% respectively. The 44 patients who experienced an event more often had a high-risk gene array profile, cytogenetic abnormalities and indicators of high lactate dehydrogenase, beta-2-microglobulin, creatinine and International Staging System stage. Toxicities of grade > 2 included thrombo-embolic events in 27% and peripheral neuropathy in 12%. Results of this phase-2 study demonstrated that bortezomib could be safely combined with multi-agent chemotherapy, effecting near-complete remission status and 2-year survival rates in more than 80% of patients. PMID:17593024

  11. Planck early results. XI. Calibration of the local galaxy cluster Sunyaev-Zeldovich scaling relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Balbi, A.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartelmann, M.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bhatia, R.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Bourdin, H.; Brown, M. L.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Cabella, P.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Cayón, L.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Chiang, C.; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Churazov, E.; Clements, D. L.; Colafrancesco, S.; Colombi, S.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cuttaia, F.; da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; de Bernardis, P.; de Gasperis, G.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Dörl, U.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Fromenteau, S.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Harrison, D.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hovest, W.; Hoyland, R. J.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knox, L.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lanoux, J.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leach, S.; Leonardi, R.; Liddle, A.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mann, R.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.-B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, A.; Naselsky, P.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Piffaretti, R.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B. M.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, P.; Smoot, G. F.; Starck, J.-L.; Stivoli, F.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Torre, J.-P.; Tristram, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; White, S. D. M.; White, M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2011-12-01

    We present precise Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect measurements in the direction of 62 nearby galaxy clusters (z < 0.5) detected at high signal-to-noise in the first Planck all-sky data set. The sample spans approximately a decade in total mass, 2 × 1014 M⊙ < M500 < 2 × 1015 M⊙, where M500 is the mass corresponding to a total density contrast of 500. Combining these high quality Planck measurements with deep XMM-Newton X-ray data, we investigate the relations between DA2 Y500, the integrated Compton parameter due to the SZ effect, and the X-ray-derived gas mass Mg,500, temperature TX, luminosity LX,500, SZ signal analogue YX,500 = Mg,500 × TX, and total mass M500. After correction for the effect of selection bias on the scaling relations, we find results that are in excellent agreement with both X-ray predictions and recently-published ground-based data derived from smaller samples. The present data yield an exceptionally robust, high-quality local reference, and illustrate Planck's unique capabilities for all-sky statistical studies of galaxy clusters. Corresponding author: G. W. Pratt, e-mail: gabriel.pratt@cea.fr

  12. Long-term results of early condylar fracture correction: case report.

    PubMed

    Farronato, Giampietro; Grillo, Maria Elena; Giannini, Lucia; Farronato, Davide; Maspero, Cinzia

    2009-06-01

    Condylar fractures in childhood occur frequently, often with minimal pain and discomfort and therefore the diagnosis is not made at the time of injury. Management may be surgical or non-surgical. Non-surgical therapy in children is the method of choice if the condyle can translate normally. In fact, there is an excellent chance of regeneration and continued normal development after fracture in growing patients. The purpose of this article is to describe the long-term clinical and radiological evaluation of a conservatively treated unilateral condylar fracture, a result of trauma, in a 6-year-old patient. In addition, she presented a congenitally missing lower incisor ipsilateral to the fracture and a class II malocclusion. She was treated with functional jaw orthopedics using a splint and an activator and subsequent orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances [J Orofac Orthop5 (2002) 429]. The remodeling process of the condylar head and neck is clearly observed in the panoramic radiographs of the 12-year follow-up records presented. PMID:19239483

  13. Status and Early Commissioning Results for the PEP-IIB-Factory High Energy Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wienands, H.-Ulrich

    1997-05-01

    The PEP-II B-Factory High Energy Ring (HER) is a 2.2 km 9 GeV electron ring for 1 A beam current, construction of which is currently being completed at SLAC. The HER beam will collide with positrons from the 3.1 GeV, 2 A Low Energy Ring which is on a one-year later schedule. The SLAC linac will serve as high-intensity, low-emittance injector for the facility. By March 1997 the HER magnet and power system will have been installed and checked out. The vacuum system---capable of absorbing 10 MW of synchrotron radiation---will be closed and evacuated. Two initial rf stations with four cavities each, sufficient to support beams up to several hundred mA, will have been installed. The beam-position monitor (BPM) system consists of about 300 button-type BPM and is capable of single-turn data acquisition. A sophisticated beam-loss monitor system using Cherenkov detectors is capable of localizing losses over a 10-6 intensity range. A phased commissioning plan has been adopted with initial beam commissioning activities scheduled to commence in spring 1997, focusing on lattice optics diagnosis and tuning. We will present our experience checking out the various accelerator systems and our beam commissioning plans. First results of beam commissioning will be presented as they are available.

  14. Early marriage, premarital fertility, and marital dissolution: results for Blacks and Whites.

    PubMed

    Teachman, J D

    1983-03-01

    Based on data from the marital histories contained in the 1973 National Survey of Family Growth, this research investigates the impact of age at 1st marriage and premarital fertility status on subsequent marital dissolution for both black women and white women 1st married between 1950 and 1970. Results, using multivariate proportional hazards models, indicate that 1) premarital births, but not premarital pregnancies, increase the risk of marital dissolution; 2) an increasing age at the 1st marriage reduces the risk of marital separation and divorce, but not monotonically; 3) blacks differ from whites in that they are less responsive to the effects of a premarital birth or a young age at 1st marriage in increasing the likelihood of marital instability; and 4) an older age at 1st marriage offsets somewhat the destabilizing effects of a premarital birth. Variables used in the analysis include husband/wife age difference at marriage, education at marriage, farm versus nonfarm background, stability of parental marriage, religion, religiosity, work before marriage, number of siblings, urban or rural residence, western versus nonwestern region, 1st marriage cohort, premarital fertility status and age at 1st marriage. Policy implications include reducing the level of premarital births, and establishing support programs for those having a premarital birth without a legitimating marriage which will delay subsequent marriage, especially if the birth occurred at a young age.

  15. Overview and early results of the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiotani, Masato; Takayanagi, Masahiro; Murayama, Yasuhiro

    The Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) was developed to be aboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on the International Space Station (ISS) under the cooperation of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and the National Institute of Information and Communication Technology (NICT). SMILES was successfully launched by the H-IIB rocket with the H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) on September 11, 2009 and was attached to JEM on September 25. Mission objectives are: i) Space demonstration of 4-K mechanical cooler and super-conductive mixer for the submillimeter limb-emission sounding in the frequency bands of 624.32-627.32 GHz and 649.12-650.32 GHz, and ii) global observations of atmospheric minor constituents in the middle atmosphere (O3, HCl, ClO, HO2, HOCl, BrO, O3 isotopes, HNO3, CH3CN, etc), contributing to the atmospheric sciences. SMILES started atmospheric observations on October 12, 2009, and has been making very precise measurements on several radical species crucial to the ozone chemistry with its high-sensitivity. In this pre-sentation, the overview of SMILES and the preliminary results will be shown to demonstrate its high potential to observe the atmospheric minor constituents in the middle atmosphere.

  16. Early diagnosis of external ventricular drainage infection: results of a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Pfisterer, W; Muhlbauer, M; Czech, T; Reinprecht, A

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of total drainage time on the risk of catheter infection, and the predictive value of standard laboratory examinations for the diagnosis of bacteriologically recorded cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) infection during external ventricular drainage. Methods: During a three year period, all patients of the neurosurgical intensive care unit (ICU), who received an external ventricular drain, were prospectivly studied. Daily CSF samples were obtained and examined for cell count, glucose and protein content. Bacteriological cultures were taken three times a week, and serum sepsis parameters were determined. Results: 130 patients received a total of 186 external ventricular drains. The ventricular catheters were in place from one to 25 days (mean 7.1 days). In 1343 days of drainage, the authors recorded 41 positive bacteriological cultures in 21 patients between the first and the 22nd drainage day (mean 6.4). No significant correlation was found between drainage time and positive CSF culture. The only parameter that significantly correlated with the occurrence of a positive CSF culture was the CSF cell count (unpaired t test, p<0.05). Conclusions: Drainage time is not a significant risk factor for catheter infection. Increasing CSF cell count should lead to the suspicion of bacteriological drainage contamination. Other standard laboratory parameters, such as peripheral leucocyte count, CSF glucose, CSF protein, or serum sepsis parameters, are not reliable predictors for incipient ventricular catheter infection. PMID:12810782

  17. Radar Rainfall Estimation with an X-Band Polarimetric Radar on Wheels: Early Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnostou, E. N.; Krajewski, W. F.; Anagnostou, M. N.; Kruger, A.; Miriovsky, B.

    2002-05-01

    The main goal of the X-Band Polarimetric Radar on Wheels (XPOW) study is aimed at exploring the advantages of dual-polarized X-band radar systems in radar rainfall estimation. Secondary goals include characterizing the reflectivity variability captured by National Weather Service WSR-88Ds and comparing different types of disdrometers. This investigation was facilitated through field experiments during which high-resolution polarimetric radar data from the National Observatory of Athens (NOA) mobile dual-polarization X-band radar were collected over well-instrumented sites. The XPOW field experiment was conducted in Iowa City, Iowa during October and November 2001. For this experiment, five disdrometers, a vertically pointing Doppler radar, and several dual-gauge tipping bucket rain gauge platforms were deployed in an area about 1.0 km by 1.5 km. These instruments were used to both augment and validate the data collected by the polarimetric radar, which was located approximately 8 km away. In the same area we collected data from some 14 rain gauges located within a high density cluster at the Iowa City Municipal Airport. The five disdrometers included two-dimensional video disdrometer, two optical disdrometers, an impact disdrometer, and a bistatic radar based disdrometer. The area in which these instruments were deployed corresponds to the size of one pixel from the Davenport, IA WSR-88D, located 80 km east of Iowa City, allowing exploration of the variability of reflectivity at scales smaller than a typical radar pixel. We will be presenting quantitative comparisons of rain rates and precipitation microphysical variables retrieved from XPOW and measured by the high-density network of gages and disdrometers. Furthermore, XPOW attenuation correction results will be compared to the un-attenuated WSR-88D reflectivity measurements providing a framework for assessing the deployed algorithm's microphysical retrievals.

  18. CyberKnife-based prostate cancer patient radioablation – early results of irradiation in 200 patients

    PubMed Central

    Napieralska, Aleksandra; Namysł-Kaletka, Agnieszka; Głowacki, Grzegorz; Grabińska, Kinga; Woźniak, Grzegorz; Stąpór-Fudzińska, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Prostrate cancer (PC) is one of the most common malignancies and is frequently treated with an 8-week course of radiotherapy. CyberKnife (CK) based radioablation enables completion of therapy within 5-9 days. The aim of this study is an evaluation of the effectiveness and tolerance of CyberKnife-based radioablation in prostate cancer patients. Material and methods 200 PC patients (94 low risk [LR], 106 intermediate risk [IR]) underwent CK irradiation every other day (fraction dose [fd] 7.25 Gy, total dose [TD] 36.25 Gy, time 9 days). PSA varied from 1.1 to 19.5 (median 7.7) and T stage from T1c to T2c. The percentage of patients with Androgen Deprivation Therapy (ADT), GI (gastrointestinal) and GU (genitourinary) toxicity (EORTC/RTOG scale), and PSA were checked at 1, 4 and 8 months, and thereafter every 6 months – up to a total of 26 months – post-treatment. Results The percentage of patients without ADT increased from 47.5% to 94.1% after 26 months. The maximum percentage of acute G3 adverse effects was 0.6% for GI, 1% for GU and G2 – 2.1% for GI and 8.5% for GU. No late G3 toxicity was observed. The maximum percentage of late G2 toxicity was 0.7% for GI and 3.4% for GU. Median PSA decreased from 7.7 to 0.1 ng/ml during FU. One patient relapsed and was treated with salvage brachytherapy. Conclusions We conclude that CK-based radioablation in low and intermediate risk PC patients is an effective treatment modality enabling OTT reduction and presents a very low percentage of adverse effects. PMID:26568868

  19. Are Early Results of Robotic Assisted Medial Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty Successful?

    PubMed Central

    Haklar, Uğur; Ulusoy, Ertuğrul; Şimşek, Tayfun; Terzi, Nuray

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Robotic surgery studies have been increasing in literature in the past years due to its operative advantages on reducing error and improving functional success in partial knee arthroplasty. Methods: Data were prospectively collected in 21 patients (31 knees) who underwent MAKOplasty, robotic assisted unicondylar medial knee arthroplasty, between June 2013 – January 2014 in our clinic with an average follow-up time of 5.5 months. Clinical outcomes were evaluated with American Knee Society Scoring System. Additionally, intra-operative digitally planned implant positions on the robot’s software were compared with post-operative radiographic component alignment. In the radiographic evaluation; anatomic axis of the tibia was observed in the coronal plane. Tibial posterior slope and flexion angle of the femoral component were observed in the sagittal plane. Results: Pre-operatively 1 patient was scored fair (60 points) and 20 patients were scored poor (mean, 46.6 points) on American Knee Society Scoring System. Post-operatively all 21 patients had excellent knee scores (mean, 99.67 points). Function-wise 7 patients were scored fair (mean, 60 points) and 14 patients were scored poor (mean, 30.7 points) again on American Knee Society Functional Scoring System. Post-operatively all 21 patients exhibited excellent function scores (mean, 99.04 points). In the radiological evaluation, intra-operative robotic analyses were compared with post-operative radiographic alignment. No significant difference was observed statistically (paired t-test, p < 0.05). This comparison is valuable as Lonner, Hernigou, Collier report that mal-alignment by as little as 2° may predispose to implant failures. Conclusion: Robotic assistance greatly improves clinical and functional outcomes and may help prevent implant failures due to surgical error and mal-alignment in partial knee arthroplasty.

  20. Pro-/Antiinflammatory Dysregulation in Early Psychosis: Results from a 1-Year Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    García-Bueno, Borja; Bioque, Miquel; MacDowell, Karina S.; Santabárbara, Javier; Martínez-Cengotitabengoa, Mónica; Moreno, Carmen; Sáiz, Pilar A.; Berrocoso, Esther; Gassó, Patricia; Fe Barcones, M.; González-Pinto, Ana; Parellada, Mara; Bobes, Julio; Micó, Juan A.; Bernardo, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous studies indicated a systemic deregulation of the pro-/antiinflammatory balance in subjects after 6 months of a first psychotic episode. This disruption was reexamined 12 months after diagnosis to identify potential risk/protective factors and associations with symptom severity. Methods: Eighty-five subjects were followed during 12 months and the determination of the same pro-/antiinflammatory mediators was carried out in plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to identify risk/protective factors. Multiple linear regression models were performed to detect the change of each biological marker during follow-up in relation to clinical characteristics and confounding factors. Results: This study suggests a more severe systemic pro-/antiinflammatory deregulation than in earlier pathological stages in first psychotic episode, because not only were intracellular components of the inflammatory response increased but also the majority of soluble elements. Nitrite plasma levels and cyclooxygenase-2 expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells are reliable potential risk factors and 15d-prostaglandin-J2 plasma levels a protection biomarker. An interesting relationship exists between antipsychotic dose and the levels of prostaglandin-E2 (inverse) and 15d-prostaglandin-J2 (direct). An inverse relationship between the Global Assessment of Functioning scale and lipid peroxidation is also present. Conclusions: Summing up, pro-/antiinflammatory mediators can be used as risk/protection biomarkers. The inverse association between oxidative/nitrosative damage and the Global Assessment of Functioning scale, and the possibility that one of the targets of antipsychotics could be the restoration of the pro-/antiinflammatory balance support the use of antiinflammatory drugs as coadjuvant to antipsychotics. PMID:25577666

  1. Development and preliminary results of an in vivo Raman probe for early lung cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, Michael A.; Lam, Stephen; McWilliams, Annette; Zhao, Jianhua; Lui, Harvey; Zeng, Haishan

    2008-02-01

    Our previous results from Raman spectroscopy studies on ex vivo lung tissue showed the technique had great potential to differentiate between samples with different pathologies. In this work, a fast dispersive-type near-infrared (NIR) Raman spectroscopy system was developed to collect real-time, noninvasive, in vivo human lung spectra. The 785 nm excitation, and the collection of tissue emission were accomplished by using a reusable fiber optic catheter which passed down the instrument channel of a bronchoscope. Filters in two stages blocked laser emission other than 785 nm from reaching the tissue surface, and reduced fiber fluorescence and elastically scattered excitation light from being passed to the spectrometer. The spectrometer itself consisted of one of two holographic gratings with usable frequency ranges of: 700 to 2000 cm -1 and 1500 to 3400 cm -1. The dispersed light was detected by a cooled CCD array consisting of 400 by 1340 pixels. To increase the resolution of the system, while maximizing the throughput, a second fiber bundle, consisting of 54×100 μm diameter fibers connected the catheter to the spectrometer. The fibers in this second bundle were spread out to form a parabolic arc which replaced the conventional entrance slit. This geometry corrected for image aberrations, permitting complete CCD vertical binning, thereby yielding up to a 20-fold improvement in signal-to-noise ratio. The estimated spectral resolution of the system was 9 cm -1 for both gratings. So far we have measured spectra from 20 patients and have seen clear differences between spectra from tumor and normal tissue.

  2. Results of a multicenter study of the retrievable Tulip vena cava filter: Early clinical experience

    SciTech Connect

    Neuerburg, Joerg M.; Guenther, Rolf W.; Vorwerk, Dierk; Dondelinger, Robert F.; Jaeger, Horst; Lackner, Klaus J.; Schild, Hans H.; Plant, Graham R.; Joffre, Francis G.; Schneider, Pierre A.; Janssen, Johan H. A.

    1997-01-15

    Purpose. To evaluate clinically a new, retrievable vena caval filter in a multicenter study. Methods. The Tulip filter is a stainless steel half-basket that is suitable for antegrade or retrograde insertion via an 8.5 Fr introducer sheath. The filter can be retrieved via the jugular approach using an 11 Fr coaxial retrieval system. Forty-eight filters were implanted via the femoral approach and 38 via the jugular approach in 83 patients. Follow-up examinations (plain films, colorcoded duplex sonography) were performed up to 3 years after filter insertion (mean 136 days) in 75 patients. Twenty-seven patients were screened by colorcoded duplex sonography for insertion site thrombosis. Results. An appropriate filter position was achieved in all cases. Insertion problems occurred in 3 cases; these were not due to the filter design but to an imperfect prototype insertion mechanism that has now been modified (n=2) or a manipulation error (n=1). In 2 of these cases the filters were replaced percutaneously; 1 patient required venotomy for filter removal. No further complications due to filter insertion occurred. Two filters were used as temporary devices and were successfully removed after 6 and 11 days, respectively. There was 1 fatal recurrent pulmonary embolism (PE) and 2 non-fatal PE, 5 complete and 3 partial caval occlusions, and 3 caudal migrations of the filter. Insertion site venous thrombosis was not seen in the 27 patients monitored for this complication. Conclusion. Precise placement of the Tulip filter is feasible by either access route and the device appears mechanically stable. Further observations are needed to confirm that safe filter removal is practical up to 10 days after its insertion.

  3. Complete loss of Ndel1 results in neuronal migration defects and early embryonic lethality.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Shinji; Mori, Daisuke; Toyo-oka, Kazuhito; Chen, Amy; Garrett-Beal, Lisa; Muramatsu, Masami; Miyagawa, Shuji; Hiraiwa, Noriko; Yoshiki, Atsushi; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Hirotsune, Shinji

    2005-09-01

    Regulation of cytoplasmic dynein and microtubule dynamics is crucial for both mitotic cell division and neuronal migration. NDEL1 was identified as a protein interacting with LIS1, the protein product of a gene mutated in the lissencephaly. To elucidate NDEL1 function in vivo, we generated null and hypomorphic alleles of Ndel1 in mice by targeted gene disruption. Ndel1(-/-) mice were embryonic lethal at the peri-implantation stage like null mutants of Lis1 and cytoplasmic dynein heavy chain. In addition, Ndel1(-/-) blastocysts failed to grow in culture and exhibited a cell proliferation defect in inner cell mass. Although Ndel1(+/-) mice displayed no obvious phenotypes, further reduction of NDEL1 by making null/hypomorph compound heterozygotes (Ndel1(cko/-)) resulted in histological defects consistent with mild neuronal migration defects. Double Lis1(cko/+)-Ndel1(+/-) mice or Lis1(+/-)-Ndel1(+/-) mice displayed more severe neuronal migration defects than Lis1(cko/+)-Ndel1(+/)(+) mice or Lis1(+/-)-Ndel1(+/+) mice, respectively. We demonstrated distinct abnormalities in microtubule organization and similar defects in the distribution of beta-COP-positive vesicles (to assess dynein function) between Ndel1 or Lis1-null MEFs, as well as similar neuronal migration defects in Ndel1- or Lis1-null granule cells. Rescue of these defects in mouse embryonic fibroblasts and granule cells by overexpressing LIS1, NDEL1, or NDE1 suggest that NDEL1, LIS1, and NDE1 act in a common pathway to regulate dynein but each has distinct roles in the regulation of microtubule organization and neuronal migration. PMID:16107726

  4. Early Evolved Gas Results from the Curiosity Rover’s SAM Investigation at Gale Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaffy, Paul R.; Franz, H.; McAdam, A.; Brunner, A.; Eigenbrode, J.; Stern, J.; SAM Science Team; MSL Science Team

    2013-10-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory Mission is designed to explore the habitability of the selected landing site at Gale crater. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite contributes to this study with a search for organic compounds, an analysis of the composition of inorganic volatiles, and measurements of the isotopic composition light elements. Both atmospheric and solid samples are analyzed. The layers in the central mound (Mt. Sharp) of Gale crater are important targets for the MSL mission. However, in situ measurements made during the past year of interesting regions close to the Bradbury landing site have revealed a diverse geology and several primary mission objectives have already been realized. SAM is located in the interior of the Curiosity rover. The MSL cameras, a laser induced breakdown spectrometer, and elemental analysis instrumentation serves to locate sampling sites and interogate candidate materials before solid sample is collected either with a drill or a scoop for delivery to SAM and the XRD instrument CheMin. SAM integrates a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), a tunable laser spectrometer (TLS), and a 6-column gas chromatograph (GC) with a solid sample transport system and a gas processing and enrichment system. Results of SAM atmospheric composition analyses have already been reported (1,2). To date, multiple SAM evolved gas experiments have examined samples from fines scooped from an aeolian drift and from two drilled samples of a mudstone. Major evolved gases are H2O, CO2, O2, SO2, H2S, H2, and a number of minor species. These data help confirm the likely presence of perchlorates, the presence of phylosillicates, and both reduced and oxidized compounds evolved from the same sample. 1) P.R. Mahaffy et al., Abundance and Isotopic Composition of Gases in the Martian Atmosphere from the Curiosity Rover, Science 343, (2013). 2) C.R. Webster et al., Isotope Ratios of H, C and O in Martian Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Water Measured by the

  5. Quantification of anthropogenic emissions from an urban region: Early results from the Indianapolis Flux Project (INFLUX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, J. C.; Sweeney, C.; Guenther, D.; Karion, A.; Davis, K. J.; Miles, N. L.; Richardson, S.; Lauvaux, T.; Shepson, P. B.; Cambaliza, M. L.; Gurney, K. R.; Song, Y.; Razlivanov, I.; Lehman, S. J.; Tans, P. P.

    2011-12-01

    The Indianapolis Flux Project (INFLUX) is a NIST funded project with the goal of developing and assessing methods to quantify greenhouse gas emissions at the urban scale from top-down and bottom-up approaches. Indianapolis was chosen as an ideal test case, since it has relatively straightforward meteorology; a contained, isolated, urban region; and substantial and well-known fossil fuel CO2 emissions. INFLUX incorporates atmospheric measurements of greenhouse and other trace gases from light aircraft (providing high spatial resolution) and from a network of cell phone towers (providing high temporal coverage) surrounding the Indianapolis urban area. Both platforms make in situ measurements of CO2, CH4 and CO are made using cavity ring down spectrometers, and flasks are collected and analyzed for ~55 trace gases and isotopes including CO2, CH4, CO, and 14CO2 (as a proxy for fossil fuel CO2). Bottom-up inventory estimates from Vulcan and Hestia provide perhaps the best-known fossil fuel CO2 emissions of any urban region. Modeling efforts span the range of simple plume models to a high-resolution regional inversion using the WRF and LPDM models. The observations and models are used to estimate the urban greenhouse gas emissions, primarily fossil fuel CO2 and CH4. The top-down results are compared with the bottom-up inventory data, allowing realistic estimates of overall uncertainties in the top-down approach, as well as improvements in the bottom-up inventory data and methods. The latter part of this presentation will focus on experimental design and flask measurements from the towers. The towers were selected to obtain samples both upwind and downwind of the urban region, so that background mixing ratios can be accurately quantified. A newly developed time-integrated flask sampling system is used to provide hourly averaged flask samples, taken in mid-afternoon only on days when the appropriate wind conditions occur. Trace species associated with urban emissions are

  6. The Design of a Remote Sensing Data Acquisition Campaign for Precision Agriculture and Some Early Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickmanl, D.; Luvall, J. C.; Wersinger, J. M.; Mask, P.; Kissel, D. E.

    1999-01-01

    harvest! Soil images show significant within field variation in clay, soil brightness and emissivity. Light wind has been found to effect the reflectance and temperature of broad leaf crops, including soybeans, cotton and peanuts. Clearly, this work has already demonstrated some very important results. With continued development of the remote sensing technology there is good reason to believe this research will soon be able to help the individual farmer.

  7. The dementia and disability project in Thai elderly: rational, design, methodology and early results

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A strong inverse relationship of functional limitation and socioeconomic status has been established in western ageing society. Functional limitation can be related to chronic diseases, disuse, cognitive decline, and ageing. Among chronic diseases in the Thai population, cerebrovascular diseases, diabetes, and arthritis are common. These factors are known to contribute to disability and poor quality of life in the elder population. Neuropsychiatric problems, cognitive decline, dementia, and cultural issues in elderly people also can alter the quality of life of the elderly. Methods The Dementia and Disability Project in Thai Elderly (DDP) aims at comprehensively assessing community dwelling Thai elderly to understand the relationship between disability and motor function, neuropsychiatric symptoms, cognitive function, and chronic diseases. The DDP is the first study to look at the prevalence and etiology of dementia and of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in Thai elders and to explore the relationship of cognition, disability, small vessel diseases and cortical degeneration with neuroimaging in Thai elderly people. 1998 Thai elders were screened in 2004–2006 and diagnosed as having MCI or dementia. 223 elders with MCI or dementia and cognitively normal elderly had brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or at baseline. 319 elders from the 3 groups had blood tests to investigate the risks and possible etiologies of dementia including genotyping at baseline. Results The mean age of elders in this study is 69.51(SD=6.71, min=60, max=95) years. 689(34.9%) are men and 1284(65.1%) are women. Mean body weight was 58.36(SD=11.20) kgs. The regression model reveals that performance on gait and balance and serum triglyceride predicts activity of daily living performance (adjusted r2 = 0.280, f=2.644, p=0.003). The majority of abnormal gait in Thai elders was lower level gait disturbance. Only 1.5% (29/1952) had highest level gait disorders. 39.5% of 1964 subjects

  8. Chronic pelvic pain, psychiatric disorders and early emotional traumas: Results of a cross sectional case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Osório, Flávia L; Carvalho, Ana Carolina F; Donadon, Mariana F; Moreno, André L; Polli-Neto, Omero

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare the prevalence of psychiatric disorders and early emotional traumas between women with chronic pelvic pain (CPP) and healthy women. METHODS One hundred women in reproductive age, 50 of them had CPP (according to the criteria set by the International Association for Study of Pain), and 50 were considered healthy after the gynecological evaluation. The eligibility criteria were defined as follows: chronic or persistent pain perceived in the pelvis-related structures (digestive, urinary, genital, myofascial or neurological systems). Only women in reproductive age with acyclic pain for 6 mo, or more, were included in the present study. Menopause was the exclusion criterion. The participants were grouped according to age, school level and socio-economic status and were individually assessed through DSM-IV Structured Clinical Interview (SCID-I) and Early Trauma Inventory Self-report - short form (ETISR-SF Brazilian version). Descriptive statistics, group comparison tests and multivariate logistics regression were used in the data analysis. RESULTS The early emotional traumas are highly prevalent, but their prevalence did not differ between the two groups. The current Major Depressive Disorder was more prevalent in women with CPP. The CPP was associated with endometriosis in 48% of the women. There was no difference in the prevalence of disorders when endometriosis was taken into account (endometriosis vs other diseases: P > 0.29). The current Major Depressive Disorder and the Bipolar Disorder had greater occurrence likelihood in the group of women with CPP (ODDS = 5.25 and 9.0). CONCLUSION The data reinforce the link between mood disorders and CPP. The preview evidences about the association between CPP and early traumas tended not to be significant after a stronger methodological control was implemented.

  9. Chronic pelvic pain, psychiatric disorders and early emotional traumas: Results of a cross sectional case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Osório, Flávia L; Carvalho, Ana Carolina F; Donadon, Mariana F; Moreno, André L; Polli-Neto, Omero

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare the prevalence of psychiatric disorders and early emotional traumas between women with chronic pelvic pain (CPP) and healthy women. METHODS One hundred women in reproductive age, 50 of them had CPP (according to the criteria set by the International Association for Study of Pain), and 50 were considered healthy after the gynecological evaluation. The eligibility criteria were defined as follows: chronic or persistent pain perceived in the pelvis-related structures (digestive, urinary, genital, myofascial or neurological systems). Only women in reproductive age with acyclic pain for 6 mo, or more, were included in the present study. Menopause was the exclusion criterion. The participants were grouped according to age, school level and socio-economic status and were individually assessed through DSM-IV Structured Clinical Interview (SCID-I) and Early Trauma Inventory Self-report - short form (ETISR-SF Brazilian version). Descriptive statistics, group comparison tests and multivariate logistics regression were used in the data analysis. RESULTS The early emotional traumas are highly prevalent, but their prevalence did not differ between the two groups. The current Major Depressive Disorder was more prevalent in women with CPP. The CPP was associated with endometriosis in 48% of the women. There was no difference in the prevalence of disorders when endometriosis was taken into account (endometriosis vs other diseases: P > 0.29). The current Major Depressive Disorder and the Bipolar Disorder had greater occurrence likelihood in the group of women with CPP (ODDS = 5.25 and 9.0). CONCLUSION The data reinforce the link between mood disorders and CPP. The preview evidences about the association between CPP and early traumas tended not to be significant after a stronger methodological control was implemented. PMID:27679773

  10. Secular trend of the age at menarche of Japanese girls with special regard to the secular acceleration of the age at peak height velocity.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, H; Kouchi, M

    1981-12-01

    An attempt is made to clarify the special characteristics of the secular trend of the menarchial age in Japan. The relationships with the precocious appearance of the age at peak high velocity, another exemplification of the maturity acceleration, is also reviewed. This research on menarche was conducted in 1979-1980 on 284 school girls born between 1961 and 1966. The girls were healthy, of middle socioeconomic class, and grew up and lived in Tokyo and its outskirts. A questionnaire was given to each subject who was requested to answer after referring to her diary, mother's or sister's records, or any other writing about her menarche. If none of these was available, they were asked to provide an event which occurred soon before or after the menarche. The arithmetic mean of the age at menarche was 12.40 years with a range of 9.63 to 15.44 years. In 1958 research was conducted on the menarche of 309 girls in the same school, and the mean menarchial age was reported to be 13.27 years with a range of 10.83 to 16.92 years. The rate of acceleration during these 21 years was 4.4 months/decade. Mean menarchial ages obtained in 157 studies ever reported in Japan were plotted against the year of publication. No definite tendency was apparent until a gradual change toward earlier menstruation began in about 1920. In the next 20 years the average decreased from 15.0 to 14.2 years of age. The rate of decrease during the 1920-1940 period was about 4 months/decade. Due to World War 2, a retardation of menarche began in 1941 and reached a peak of about 15.0 years of age in 1950-1952, after which the trend changed into one of rapid acceleration. It is believed that the age at peak height velocity (PHV) is highly correlated with menarche age. The correlation coefficient is reported to be 0.71 by Nicholson and Hanly (1953), 0.93 by Deming (1957) and 0.77 by the author's of this study based on the present subjects. Thus it can be reasonably assumed that the secular trend of menarche

  11. Early Child Care and Adolescent Functioning at the End of High School: Results from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandell, Deborah Lowe; Burchinal, Margaret; Pierce, Kim M.

    2016-01-01

    Relations between early child care and adolescent functioning at the end of high school (EOHS; M age = 18.3 years) were examined in a prospective longitudinal study of 1,214 children. Controlling for extensive measures of family background, early child care was associated with academic standing and behavioral adjustment at the EOHS. More…

  12. Randomized Controlled Trial of Forward-Planned Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy for Early Breast Cancer: Interim Results at 2 Years

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, Gillian C.; Wilkinson, Jennifer S.; Moody, Anne M.; Wilson, Charles B.; Twyman, Nicola; Wishart, Gordon C.; Burnet, Neil G.; Coles, Charlotte E.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: This single-center randomized trial was designed to investigate whether intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) reduces late toxicity in patients with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: The standard tangential plans of 1,145 nonselected patients were analyzed. The patients with inhomogeneous plans were randomized to a simple method of forward-planned IMRT or standard radiotherapy (RT). The primary endpoint was serial photographic assessment of breast shrinkage. Results: At 2 years, no significant difference was found in the development of any photographically assessed breast shrinkage between the patients randomized to the interventional or control group (odds ratio, 1.51; 95% confidence interval, 0.83-1.58; p = .41). The patients in the control group were more likely to develop telangiectasia than those in the IMRT group (odds ratio, 1.68; 95% confidence interval 1.13-2.40; p = .009). Poor baseline surgical cosmesis resulted in poor overall cosmesis at 2 years after RT. In patients who had good surgical cosmesis, those randomized to IMRT were less likely to deteriorate to a moderate or poor overall cosmesis than those in the control group (odds ratio, 0.63; 95% confidence interval, 0.39-1.03, p = .061). Conclusions: IMRT can lead to a significant reduction in telangiectasia at comparatively early follow-up of only 2 years after RT completion. An important component of breast induration and shrinkage will actually result from the surgery and not from the RT. Surgical cosmesis is an important determinant of overall cosmesis and could partially mask the longer term benefits of IMRT at this early stage.

  13. Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemsky, Robert; Shaman, Susan; Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Collegiate Results Instrument (CRI), which measures a range of collegiate outcomes for alumni 6 years after graduation. The CRI was designed to target alumni from institutions across market segments and assess their values, abilities, work skills, occupations, and pursuit of lifelong learning. (EV)

  14. Maternal Early Life Factors Associated with Hormone Levels and the Risk of Having a Child with an Autism Spectrum Disorder in the Nurses Health Study II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyall, Kristen; Pauls, David L.; Santangelo, Susan; Spiegelman, Donna; Ascherio, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    It is not known whether reproductive factors early in the mother's life influence risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We assessed maternal age at menarche, menstrual cycle characteristics during adolescence, oral contraceptive use prior to first birth, body shape, and body mass index (BMI) in association with ASD using binomial regression in…

  15. The impact of emotional stress early in life on adult voluntary ethanol intake-results of maternal separation in rats.

    PubMed

    Roman, Erika; Nylander, Ingrid

    2005-09-01

    The combination of genetic and environmental factors determines the individual vulnerability for excessive ethanol intake, possibly leading to dependence. The environmental influences early in life represent examples of determinant factors for adult behaviour and can be protective as well as risk factors. Maternal separation is one model to examine the long-term consequences of early environmental experiences on neurochemistry and behaviour, including drug-taking behaviour in experimental animals. In the present review, findings from studies using repeated short and prolonged periods of maternal separation, with emphasis on effects on voluntary ethanol intake in rats with or without a genetic predisposition for high voluntary ethanol intake, are summarized. Despite some contradictory results, the general picture emerging shows that short periods of maternal separation during the postnatal period result in a lower adult voluntary ethanol intake in male rats. Prolonged periods of maternal separation were found to induce a high voluntary ethanol intake in male rats, including rats with a genetic predisposition for high ethanol intake. Results from the literature also show that changes were not just related to time of separation but were also related to the degree of handling. Interestingly, in terms of voluntary ethanol intake, female rats were generally not affected by postnatal maternal separation. The reasons for these sex differences need further investigation. In terms of neurobiological consequences of maternal separation, conclusive data are sparse and one of the future challenges will, therefore, be to identify and characterize underlying neurobiological mechanisms, especially in the individual animal.

  16. A Multi-Institutional Study of Feasibility, Implementation, and Early Clinical Results With Noninvasive Breast Brachytherapy for Tumor Bed Boost

    SciTech Connect

    Hamid, Subarna; Rocchio, Kathy; Arthur, Douglas; Vera, Robyn; Sha, Sandra; Jolly, Michele; Cavanaugh, Sean; Wooten, Eric; Benda, Rashmi; Greenfield, Brad; Prestidge, Bradley; Ackerman, Scot; Kuske, Robert; Quiet, Coral; Snyder, Margaret; Wazer, David E.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility, implementation, and early results of noninvasive breast brachytherapy (NIBB) for tumor bed boost with whole breast radiation therapy (WBRT). Methods and Materials: NIBB is a commercially available (AccuBoost, Billerica, MA) mammography-based, brachytherapy system in which the treatment applicators are centered on the planning target volume (PTV) to direct {sup 192}Ir emissions along orthogonal axes. A privacy-encrypted online data registry collected information from 8 independent academic and community-based institutions. Data were from 146 consecutive women with early-stage breast cancer after lumpectomy and WBRT receiving boost with NIBB between July 2007 and March 2010. Toxicity and cosmesis were graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria (v. 3.0) and the Harvard scale. Median follow-up was 6 months (1-39 months). Results: Grade 1-2 skin toxicity was observed in 64%, 48%, and 21% during the acute (1-3 weeks), intermediate (4-26 weeks), and late-intermediate (>26 weeks) periods. There was no Grade 4 toxicity. At 6 months, for the entire cohort, cosmesis was excellent/good in 62%/38%. The subset receiving NIBB before WBRT had cosmetic scores of 32% and 63%, whereas during WBRT, 58% and 37% were rated as excellent and good, respectively. Breast compression was scored as 'uncomfortable' in 12%, 29%, and 59% when NIBB was delivered before, during, or after WBRT. For each patient, the fraction-to-fraction variability in PTV was low. Skin flash was associated with a higher proportion of excellent cosmesis (58% vs. 42%) relative to having the applicator all within breast tissue. Conclusions: These data indicate that NIBB is feasible and can be consistently implemented in a broad array of practice settings. Preliminary evaluation suggests that NIBB is associated with acceptably mild normal tissue toxicity and favorable early cosmesis. The application of NIBB before WBRT may be associated with better patient tolerance at the

  17. ICESat Laser Altimeter Pointing, Ranging and Timing Calibration from Integrated Residual Analysis: A Summary of Early Mission Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutchke, Scott B.; Rowlands, David D.; Harding, David J.; Bufton, Jack L.; Carabajal, Claudia C.; Williams, Teresa A.

    2003-01-01

    On January 12, 2003 the Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) was successfUlly placed into orbit. The ICESat mission carries the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), which consists of three near-infrared lasers that operate at 40 short pulses per second. The instrument has collected precise elevation measurements of the ice sheets, sea ice roughness and thickness, ocean and land surface elevations and surface reflectivity. The accurate geolocation of GLAS's surface returns, the spots from which the laser energy reflects on the Earth's surface, is a critical issue in the scientific application of these data Pointing, ranging, timing and orbit errors must be compensated to accurately geolocate the laser altimeter surface returns. Towards this end, the laser range observations can be fully exploited in an integrated residual analysis to accurately calibrate these geolocation/instrument parameters. Early mission ICESat data have been simultaneously processed as direct altimetry from ocean sweeps along with dynamic crossovers resulting in a preliminary calibration of laser pointing, ranging and timing. The calibration methodology and early mission analysis results are summarized in this paper along with future calibration activities

  18. An Early Carboniferous paleomagnetic pole for Gondwanaland: New results from the Mount Eclipse Sandstone in the Ngalia Basin, central Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhong; Li, Zheng-Xiang; Powell, Christopher M.; Balme, Basil E.

    1994-02-01

    Paleomagnetism of fourteen diamond-drill cores from the uppermost Devonian-Lower Carboniferous Mount Eclipse Sandstone in the Ngalia Basin, central Australia, has been studied. The samples were oriented using the borehole directions, bedding planes identified in the drill cores, and regional bedding attitudes. Three magnetic remanent components have been revealed: (1) a drilling-induced, low- to moderate-temperature remanence (C1) from all the drill cores, which is oriented parallel to the drill cores and is most likely a combination of isothermal remanent magnetization and piezoremanent magnetization; (2) a moderate- to high-temperature, syn-deformational overprint (C2: D = 226.7 deg, I = 82.3 deg, alpha(sub 95) = 6.2 deg, k = 68.9) in 65 samples from nine drill cores, which was probably acquired during the mid- to Late Carboniferous Mount Eclipse movement; and (3) a moderate- to high-temperature, likely primary remanence (C3: D = 057.1 deg, I = -36.9 deg, alpha(sub 95) = 9.6 deg, K = 29.6) from 64 samples in nine drill cores, which exhibits a positive fold test. C2 and C3 are found only in reddish siltstones and sandstones, whereas C1 is best developed in grey reduced sandstones and siltstones. A palynological examination gives an early to mid-Visean (Early Carboniferous) age of deposition for samples carrying the interpreted primary component. C2 gives a mid- to Late Carboniferous pole at 32.1 deg S, 119.5 deg E with A(sub 95) = 11.9 deg, which is in agreement with results of a previous study on surface outcrops. C3, when combined with results from one drill core in a previous study, gives a Visean pole at 37.6 deg S, 52.6 deg E with A(sub 95) = 8.7 deg. This pole suggests a south polar position for central Africa during the Early Carboniferous and therefore indicates the existence of a large ocean between Gondwanaland and Laurussia at that time. The paleo-south pole shifted from central Africa in the Early Carboniferous (approximately 340 +/-5 Ma) to East

  19. Lava heating and loading of ice sheets on early Mars: Predictions for meltwater generation, groundwater recharge, and resulting landforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassanelli, James P.; Head, James W.

    2016-06-01

    Recent modeling studies of the early Mars climate predict a predominantly cold climate, characterized by the formation of regional ice sheets across the highland areas of Mars. Formation of the predicted "icy highlands" ice sheets is coincident with a peak in the volcanic flux of Mars involving the emplacement of the Late Noachian - Early Hesperian ridged plains unit. We explore the relationship between the predicted early Mars "icy highlands" ice sheets, and the extensive early flood volcanism to gain insight into the surface conditions prevalent during the Late Noachian to Early Hesperian transition period. Using Hesperia Planum as a type area, we develop an ice sheet lava heating and loading model. We quantitatively assess the thermal and melting processes involved in the lava heating and loading process following the chronological sequence of lava emplacement. We test a broad range of parameters to thoroughly constrain the lava heating and loading process and outline predictions for the formation of resulting geological features. We apply the theoretical model to a study area within the Hesperia Planum region and assess the observed geology against predictions derived from the ice sheet lava heating and loading model. Due to the highly cratered nature of the Noachian highlands terrain onto which the volcanic plains were emplaced, we predict highly asymmetrical lava loading conditions. Crater interiors are predicted to accumulate greater thicknesses of lava over more rapid timescales, while in the intercrater plains, lava accumulation occurs over longer timescales and does not reach great thicknesses. We find that top-down melting due to conductive heat transfer from supraglacial lava flows is generally limited when the emplaced lava flows are less than ∼10 m thick, but is very significant at lava flow thicknesses of ∼100 m or greater. We find that bottom-up cryosphere and ice sheet melting is most likely to occur within crater interiors where lavas

  20. I-FABP as Biomarker for the Early Diagnosis of Acute Mesenteric Ischemia and Resultant Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Khadaroo, Rachel G.; Fortis, Spyridon; Salim, Saad Y.; Streutker, Catherine; Churchill, Thomas A.; Zhang, Haibo

    2014-01-01

    Acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI) is a life-threatening condition that can result in multiple organ injury and death. A timely diagnosis and treatment would have a significant impact on the morbidity and mortality in high-risk patient population. The purpose of this study was to investigate if intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) and α-defensins can be used as biomarkers for early AMI and resultant lung injury. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to intestinal ischemia by occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery. A time course of intestinal ischemia from 0.5 to 3 h was performed and followed by reperfusion for 2 h. Additional mice were treated with N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) at 300 mg/kg given intraperitoneally prior to reperfusion. AMI resulted in severe intestinal injury characterized by neutrophil infiltrate, myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels, cytokine/chemokine levels, and tissue histopathology. Pathologic signs of ischemia were evident at 1 h, and by 3 h of ischemia, the full thickness of the intestine mucosa had areas of coagulative necrosis. It was noted that the levels of α-defensins in intestinal tissue peaked at 1 h and I-FABP in plasma peaked at 3 h after AMI. Intestinal ischemia also resulted in lung injury in a time-dependent manner. Pretreatment with NAC decreased the levels of intestinal α-defensins and plasma I-FABP, as well as lung MPO and cytokines. In summary, the concentrations of intestinal α-defensins and plasma I-FABP predicted intestinal ischemia prior to pathological evidence of ischemia and I-FABP directly correlated with resultant lung injury. The antioxidant NAC reduced intestinal and lung injury induced by AMI, suggesting a role for oxidants in the mechanism for distant organ injury. I-FABP and α-defensins are promising biomarkers, and may guide the treatment with antioxidant in early intestinal and distal organ injury. PMID:25541714

  1. Early articular cartilage degeneration in a developmental dislocation of the hip model results from activation of β-catenin.

    PubMed

    Ning, Bo; Sun, Jun; Yuan, Yi; Yao, Jie; Wang, Peng; Ma, Ruixue

    2014-01-01

    Developmental dislocation or dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is one of the most common deformities in children. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most frequent long-term complication. The molecular mechanism of early articular cartilage degeneration in DDH is still unclear. It is well known that β-catenin plays a crucial role in articular cartilage degeneration. The objective of this study was to verify the relationship between β-catenin and DDH cartilage degeneration. We used a DDH model that was established by modification of swaddling position in newborn Wistar rats. The hips were isolated from the DDH model rats and untreated control group at the age of 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks. β-Catenin gene and protein were investigated by quantitative (q)RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Collagen X and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, markers of early cartilage degeneration, were assessed by qRT-PCR. Primary chondrocytes were cultured from cartilage of two groups at the age of 8 weeks. Expression of β-catenin, collagen X and MMP-13 was detected. Continued high expression of β-catenin was observed in cartilage from DDH model rats. mRNA and protein expression of β-catenin was significantly increased in primary chondrocytes of the DDH model compared with the control group. Collagen X and MMP-13 expression was higher in the cartilage and chondrocytes from DDH model rats than the control group. Our findings suggest that early cartilage degeneration in DDH may result from activation of β-catenin signaling. PMID:24817933

  2. Early-onset glaucoma in Axenfeld-Rieger anomaly: long-term surgical results and visual outcome.

    PubMed

    Mandal, A K; Pehere, N

    2016-07-01

    PurposeTo determine the long-term surgical and visual outcomes in Indian children with early-onset glaucoma associated with Axenfeld-Rieger anomaly (ARA).MethodsThis is a retrospective analysis of 44 eyes of 24 consecutive children with early-onset glaucoma (within 3 years of age) and ARA who underwent glaucoma surgery over a 20-year period (1991-2010) by a single surgeon. Main outcome measures were pre- and postoperative intraocular pressures (IOPs), corneal clarity, visual acuities (VAs), refractive errors, success rate, time of surgical failure, and complications.ResultsThe series consisted of 38 primary combined trabeculotomy-trabeculectomy (CTT) and 6 primary trabeculectomy procedures (Schlemm's canal could not be identified in these eyes). There was a statistically significant reduction in IOP postoperatively (27.07±4.88 vs 14.88±3.62 mm Hg; P<0.0001) with a mean reduction of 45.14%. Success probability by Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was 93% till 5 years, and then 88.1%, 82.3%, 70.5%, 56.4%, and 42.3% at year 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10, respectively. Preoperative corneal edema was present in 43/44 eyes (97.72%) and cleared in 42 eyes (97.67%). There was one case each with intraoperative hyphema and with shallow chamber postoperatively and both were successfully managed successfully. There was no incidence of endophthalmitis or any other sight-threatening complication. Data on VA were available in 34 eyes (77.3%). At final follow-up visit, 15 (44.1%) eyes had best corrected VA ⩾6/18.ConclusionsPrimary CTT is safe and effective for early-onset glaucoma associated with ARA. It leads to excellent IOP control and satisfactory visual outcome.

  3. Pre-menarche pubertal development following unique form of immigration: the case of girls adopted from China.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tony Xing; Camras, Linda A

    2015-02-01

    Our study tested the hypothesis that drastic social-cultural change has an impact on girls' pre-menarche pubertal development. We focused on a unique group of Chinese immigrants who migrated out of China in infancy through international adoption. Our sample included 298 Chinese girls who were 7.3-11.1 years in 2011 (Mean = 8.8, SD = 0.9) and were adopted at 7-24 months (Mean = 12.6, SD = 3.4). We found that 34% showed at least one of four signs of pubertal development: Growth spurt, body fat increase, breast development, and body hair. Logistic regression analyses showed that the odds of growth spurt was raised by the girls' age in 2011, behavior problems in 2005, but lowered by the adoptive families' household income; the odds of body fat increase in 2011 was raised by the adopted Chinese girls' weight in 2007 and behavior problems in 2005, but was lowered by the adoptive mother's education level; the odds for breast development in 2011 was raised by the girls' age in 2011, weight in 2007, and behavior problems in 2009. For body hair, none of the factors predicted the odds. Prevalence of precocious puberty, based on the criterion of breast development before 8 years, was 3.5%. Overall, our study suggests that the pre-menarche pubertal development of adopted Chinese girls may be slightly advanced but also is affected by factors that affect non-adopted girls' pubertal development.

  4. Early Childhood Teachers' Perceived Competence during Transition from Teacher Education to Work: Results from a Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mischo, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The transition from education to work is a challenge for early childhood teachers. In this study, competence self-ratings of 348 German early childhood teachers were investigated one year before, at the end of and four months after early childhood teacher education at universities and vocational schools. Perceived competence was assessed by means…

  5. A collaborative accountable care model in three practices showed promising early results on costs and quality of care.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Richard B; Sanderson, Mark I; Walters, Barbara A; Kennedy, Karen; Flores, Robert C; Muney, Alan M

    2012-11-01

    Cigna's Collaborative Accountable Care initiative provides financial incentives to physician groups and integrated delivery systems to improve the quality and efficiency of care for patients in commercial open-access benefit plans. Registered nurses who serve as care coordinators employed by participating practices are a central feature of the initiative. They use patient-specific reports and practice performance reports provided by Cigna to improve care coordination, identify and close care gaps, and address other opportunities for quality improvement. We report interim quality and cost results for three geographically and structurally diverse provider practices in Arizona, New Hampshire, and Texas. Although not statistically significant, these early results revealed favorable trends in total medical costs and quality of care, suggesting that a shared-savings accountable care model and collaborative support from the payer can enable practices to take meaningful steps toward full accountability for care quality and efficiency.

  6. Accelerated Hypofractionated Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Long-Term Results

    SciTech Connect

    Soliman, Hany; Cheung, Patrick; Yeung, Latifa; Poon, Ian; Balogh, Judith; Barbera, Lisa; Spayne, Jacqueline; Danjoux, Cyril; Dahele, Max; Ung, Yee

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively review the results of a single-institution series of accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients who are medically inoperable or who refuse surgery. Methods and Materials: Peripherally located T1 to T3 N0 M0 tumors were treated with 48 to 60 Gy in 12 to 15 fractions between 1996 and 2007. No elective nodal irradiation was delivered. Patient, tumor, and treatment information was abstracted from the medical records. Results: A total of 124 tumors were treated in 118 patients (56 male and 62 female). Median age at diagnosis was 76.3 years (range, 49-90 years). In all, 113 patients (95.8%) were not surgical candidates because of medical comorbidities. The 2- and 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 51.0% and 23.3%, respectively, and the 2- and 5-year cause-specific survival (CSS) rates were 67.6% and 59.8%, respectively. The 2- and 5-year actuarial local control (LC) rates were 76.2% and 70.1%, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed that tumor size less than 3cm compared with greater than 3 cm resulted in significantly improved OS (40.0% vs. 5.0% at 5 years; p = 0.0002), CSS (69.7% vs. 45.1% at 5 years; p = 0.0461), and a trend toward better LC (82.5% vs. 66.9% at 2 years, 76.6% vs. 60.8% at 5 years; p = 0.0685). Treatment was well tolerated and there were no treatment delays because of acute toxicity. Conclusions: Accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy with 48 to 60 Gy using fractions of 4 Gy per day provides very good results for small tumors in medically inoperable patients with early-stage NSCLC.

  7. Early life exposure to PCB126 results in delayed mortality and growth impairment in the zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Di Paolo, Carolina; Groh, Ksenia J; Zennegg, Markus; Vermeirssen, Etiënne L M; Murk, Albertinka J; Eggen, Rik I L; Hollert, Henner; Werner, Inge; Schirmer, Kristin

    2015-12-01

    The occurrence of chronic or delayed toxicity resulting from the exposure to sublethal chemical concentrations is an increasing concern in environmental risk assessment. The Fish Embryo Toxicity (FET) test with zebrafish provides a reliable prediction of acute toxicity in adult fish, but it cannot yet be applied to predict the occurrence of chronic or delayed toxicity. Identification of sublethal FET endpoints that can assist in predicting the occurrence of chronic or delayed toxicity would be advantageous. The present study characterized the occurrence of delayed toxicity in zebrafish larvae following early exposure to PCB126, previously described to cause delayed effects in the common sole. The first aim was to investigate the occurrence and temporal profiles of delayed toxicity during zebrafish larval development and compare them to those previously described for sole to evaluate the suitability of zebrafish as a model fish species for delayed toxicity assessment. The second aim was to examine the correlation between the sublethal endpoints assessed during embryonal and early larval development and the delayed effects observed during later larval development. After exposure to PCB126 (3-3000ng/L) until 5 days post fertilization (dpf), larvae were reared in clean water until 14 or 28 dpf. Mortality and sublethal morphological and behavioural endpoints were recorded daily, and growth was assessed at 28 dpf. Early life exposure to PCB126 caused delayed mortality (300 ng/L and 3000 ng/L) as well as growth impairment and delayed development (100 ng/L) during the clean water period. Effects on swim bladder inflation and cartilaginous tissues within 5 dpf were the most promising for predicting delayed mortality and sublethal effects, such as decreased standard length, delayed metamorphosis, reduced inflation of swim bladder and column malformations. The EC50 value for swim bladder inflation at 5 dpf (169 ng/L) was similar to the LC50 value at 8 dpf (188 and 202 ng/L in

  8. Do Diagnosis Delays Impact Receipt of Test Results? Evidence from the HIV Early Infant Diagnosis Program in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Mugambi, Melissa Latigo; Deo, Sarang; Kekitiinwa, Adeodata; Kiyaga, Charles; Singer, Mendel E.

    2013-01-01

    Background There is scant evidence on the association between diagnosis delays and the receipt of test results in HIV Early Infant Diagnosis (EID) programs. We determine the association between diagnosis delays and other health care system and patient factors on result receipt. Methods We reviewed 703 infant HIV test records for tests performed between January 2008 and February 2009 at a regional referral hospital and level four health center in Uganda. The main outcome was caregiver receipt of the test result. The primary study variable was turnaround time (time between sample collection and result availability at the health facility). Additional variables included clinic entry point, infant age at sample collection, reported HIV status and receipt of antiretroviral prophylaxis for prevention of mother-to-child transmission. We conducted a pooled analysis in addition to separate analyses for each facility. We estimated the relative risk of result receipt using modified Poisson regression with robust standard errors. Results Overall, the median result turnaround time, was 38 days. 59% of caregivers received infant test results. Caregivers were less likely to receive results at turnaround times greater than 49 days compared to 28 days or fewer (ARR = 0.83; 95% CI = 0.70–0.98). Caregivers were more likely to receive results at the PMTCT clinic (ARR = 1.81; 95% CI = 1.40–2.33) and less likely at the pediatric ward (ARR = 0.54; 95% CI = 0.37–0.81) compared to the immunization clinic. At the level four health center, result receipt was half as likely among infants older than 9 months compared to 3 months and younger (ARR= 0.47; 95% CI = 0.25–0.93). Conclusion In this study setting, we find evidence that longer turnaround times, clinic entry point and age at sample collection may be associated with receipt of infant HIV test results. PMID:24282502

  9. Feasibility and Acceptability of an Early Childhood Obesity Prevention Intervention: Results from the Healthy Homes, Healthy Families Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Gorham, Gemma

    2014-01-01

    Background. This study examined the feasibility and acceptability of a home-based early childhood obesity prevention intervention designed to empower low-income racially/ethnically diverse parents to modify their children's health behaviors. Methods. We used a prospective design with pre-/posttest evaluation of 50 parent-child pairs (children aged 2 to 5 years) to examine potential changes in dietary, physical activity, and sedentary behaviors among children at baseline and four-month follow-up. Results. 39 (78%) parent-child pairs completed evaluation data at 4-month follow-up. Vegetable intake among children significantly increased at follow-up (0.54 cups at 4 months compared to 0.28 cups at baseline, P = 0.001) and ounces of fruit juice decreased at follow-up (11.9 ounces at 4 months compared to 16.0 ounces at baseline, P = 0.036). Sedentary behaviors also improved. Children significantly decreased time spent watching TV on weekdays (P < 0.01) and also reduced weekend TV time. In addition, the number of homes with TV sets in the child's bedroom also decreased (P < 0.0013). Conclusions. The findings indicate that a home-based early childhood obesity prevention intervention is feasible, acceptable and demonstrates short-term effects on dietary and sedentary behaviors of low-income racially/ethnically diverse children. PMID:25405026

  10. Biallelic Variants in UBA5 Reveal that Disruption of the UFM1 Cascade Can Result in Early-Onset Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Colin, Estelle; Daniel, Jens; Ziegler, Alban; Wakim, Jamal; Scrivo, Aurora; Haack, Tobias B; Khiati, Salim; Denommé, Anne-Sophie; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Charif, Majida; Procaccio, Vincent; Reynier, Pascal; Aleck, Kyrieckos A; Botto, Lorenzo D; Herper, Claudia Lena; Kaiser, Charlotte Sophia; Nabbout, Rima; N'Guyen, Sylvie; Mora-Lorca, José Antonio; Assmann, Birgit; Christ, Stine; Meitinger, Thomas; Strom, Tim M; Prokisch, Holger; Miranda-Vizuete, Antonio; Hoffmann, Georg F; Lenaers, Guy; Bomont, Pascale; Liebau, Eva; Bonneau, Dominique

    2016-09-01

    Via whole-exome sequencing, we identified rare autosomal-recessive variants in UBA5 in five children from four unrelated families affected with a similar pattern of severe intellectual deficiency, microcephaly, movement disorders, and/or early-onset intractable epilepsy. UBA5 encodes the E1-activating enzyme of ubiquitin-fold modifier 1 (UFM1), a recently identified ubiquitin-like protein. Biochemical studies of mutant UBA5 proteins and studies in fibroblasts from affected individuals revealed that UBA5 mutations impair the process of ufmylation, resulting in an abnormal endoplasmic reticulum structure. In Caenorhabditis elegans, knockout of uba-5 and of human orthologous genes in the UFM1 cascade alter cholinergic, but not glutamatergic, neurotransmission. In addition, uba5 silencing in zebrafish decreased motility while inducing abnormal movements suggestive of seizures. These clinical, biochemical, and experimental findings support our finding of UBA5 mutations as a pathophysiological cause for early-onset encephalopathies due to abnormal protein ufmylation. PMID:27545681

  11. Preliminary results of an Earthquake Early Warning System for South Portugal and Southwest of Spain based on Earthworm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeu, Núria; Jara, Jose Antonio; Colom, Yolanda; Goula, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    The areas of Cape San Vicente (SV) and Gulf of Cádiz (GC), in the SW Iberian Peninsula, are characterized by a significant seismic activity being a source of destructive earthquakes, such as the 1755 Lisbon (Mw=8.5) and the 1969 Cape San Vicente (Mw=7.8). This study presents the development and results of a prototype of an Earthquake Early Warning System (EEWS) applied to South Portugal and Southwest of Spain within the framework of the Alertes-Rim Spanish project. This EEWS, based on the Earthworm (USGS) tools, was implemented to automatically produce location scenarios with an optimized location and estimated magnitude that minimize the warning time. Main functionalities of the system are: real-time data acquisition from broadband stations existing on the area of study, data processing (involving P-waves picking, Pd and τc proxies computation, hypocentral location and magnitude estimation) and data archiving. The last upgrade of the system also incorporates an algorithm to select the suitable proxies to estimate the magnitude and a specific configuration to avoid the detection of events coming from the surround of the study area. Finally, the system has been completed with a "monitoring module" that enables to visualize in real time the evolution of the Early Warning from the detection until the arrival of possible damaging waves. The prototype has been in operation for a stable period launched in November 14, 2014. Since then, only one earthquake of interest (those with moment magnitude above 4) occurred. Location and magnitude results are favorable, comparing to Instituto Geográfico Nacional (IGN) catalog. Coherent results are also obtained for lead times, which are on the order of tens of seconds for most of targets, allowing the feasibility of a regional EEWS in the SW Iberia.

  12. Early results of experimental 222Rn flux campaign carried out at a mountain Spanish region and comparison with available radon flux inventories results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nofuentes, Manel; Grossi, Claudia; Morguí, Josep Anton; Curcoll, Roger; Cañas, Lidia; Occhipinti, Paola; Borràs, Silvia; Vazquez, Eusebi; Rodó, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    The atmospheric concentrations of components impacting the greenhouse effect (CO2, CH4, N2O, O3, and aerosols) have increased significantly in the last two centuries, leading to a direct impact on our climate. These climatic changes deeply affect the geochemistry and the dynamics of the main reservoirs such as the atmosphere, the ocean, and the biosphere. Therefore, reductions of the emissions are needed for all four of the most important anthropogenic GHGs: CO2, CH4, N2O and SF6. Particularly, the relative contribution of human induced CH4 in the atmosphere to the total human direct greenhouse effect is about 25%. Furthermore, the CH4 has the shortest lifetime in the atmosphere (about 9 years), so that emissions reduction measures for CH4 will lead to changes in concentration growth rates, or even a concentration decline, at relatively shor time scales. All these reasons make the CH4 an attractive compound to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions. Nowadays, the study and attribution of categories for GHGs sources is carried out by using bottom-up inventories and top-down techniques. The atmospheric concentrations and the fluxes of the noble and radioactive 222Rn gas are widely used for retriving indirectly GHGs fluxes, improving top-down techniques and analysing different type of sources. In the frame of the "Methane exchange between soil and atmosphere over the Iberian Peninsula" (MIP) project (Reference: CGL2013-46186-R, Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness) four experimental radon flux campaigns are carried out at mountain as well as at coastal Spanish regions using integrated and continuous monitors. The early results of first radon flux campaign carried out at the Gredos and Iruelas climate station (GIC3) of the Catalan Institute of Climate Science (IC3) are presented and compared with available radon flux inventories maps.

  13. Is the Prediction of Adolescent Outcomes from Early Child Care Moderated by Later Maternal Sensitivity? Results from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burchinal, Margaret R.; Lowe Vandell, Deborah; Belsky, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Longitudinal data are used to examine whether effects of early child care are amplified and/or attenuated by later parenting. Analyses tested these interactions using parenting as both a categorical and continuous variable to balance power and flexibility in testing moderation. The most consistent finding was that maternal sensitivity during…

  14. Early Child Care and Children's Development in the Primary Grades: Follow-Up Results from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Educational Research Journal, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Associations between early child care and children's functioning though the end of third grade were examined. Some of the relations that had been detected before children's school entry were maintained. Higher-quality child care continued to be linked to higher scores in math, reading, and memory. More time spent in center care was associated with…

  15. Clinical and MRI responses to etanercept in early non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis: 48-week results from the EMBARK study

    PubMed Central

    Maksymowych, Walter P; Dougados, Maxime; Sieper, Joachim; Braun, Jürgen; Citera, Gustavo; Van den Bosch, Filip; Logeart, Isabelle; Wajdula, Joseph; Jones, Heather; Marshall, Lisa; Bonin, Randi; Pedersen, Ron; Vlahos, Bonnie; Kotak, Sameer; Bukowski, Jack F

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of etanercept (ETN) after 48 weeks in patients with early active non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (nr-axSpA). Methods Patients meeting Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS) classification criteria for axSpA, but not modified New York radiographic criteria, received double-blind ETN 50 mg/week or placebo (PBO) for 12 weeks, then open-label ETN (ETN/ETN or PBO/ETN). Clinical, health, productivity, MRI and safety outcomes were assessed and the 48-week data are presented here. Results 208/225 patients (92%) entered the open-label phase at week 12 (ETN, n=102; PBO, n=106). The percentage of patients achieving ASAS40 increased from 33% to 52% between weeks 12 and 48 for ETN/ETN and from 15% to 53% for PBO/ETN (within-group p value <0.001 for both). For ETN/ETN and PBO/ETN, the EuroQol 5 Dimensions utility score improved by 0.14 and 0.08, respectively, between baseline and week 12 and by 0.23 and 0.22 between baseline and week 48. Between weeks 12 and 48, MRI Spondyloarthritis Research Consortium of Canada sacroiliac joint (SIJ) scores decreased by −1.1 for ETN/ETN and by −3.0 for PBO/ETN, p<0.001 for both. Decreases in MRI SIJ inflammation and C-reactive protein correlated with several clinical outcomes at weeks 12 and 48. Conclusions Patients with early active nr-axSpA demonstrated improvement from week 12 in clinical, health, productivity and MRI outcomes that was sustained to 48 weeks. Trial registration number NCT01258738. PMID:26269397

  16. Management of Symphysis and Parasymphysis Mandibular Fractures in Children Treated with MacLennan Splint: Stability and Early Results

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Manohar; Sharma, Anupama; Sharma, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the safety and efficiency of MacLennan splint in symphysis and parasymphysis mandibular fractures in children. Study design: Six patients (four boys and two girls, mean age 3 years, range between 2 and 5 years) were operated on parasymphysis fractures of children. The mean follow-up time was 12 months. MacLennan splint was applied in these case upto 3 weeks. Results: Primary healing of the fractured mandible was observed in all patients. Postoperative complications were minor and transient. The outcome of the operation was not endangered. Adverse tissue reaction like infection, malocclusion, swelling and growth restrictions did not occur during observation period. Conclusion: MacLennan splint is having various advantages like faster mobilization and the avoidance of secondary removal operations. Based on this preliminary results MacLennan splints are safe and efficient in the treatment of pediatric mandible fracture. How to cite this article: Khairwa A, Bhat M, Sharma A, Sharma R. Management of Symphysis and Parasymphysis Mandibular Fractures in Children Treated with MacLennan Splint: Stability and Early Results. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(2):127-132. PMID:26379381

  17. Intraoperative radiotherapy given as a boost for early breast cancer: Long-term clinical and cosmetic results

    SciTech Connect

    Lemanski, Claire; Azria, David . E-mail: azria@valdorel.fnclcc.fr; Thezenas, Simon; Gutowski, Marian; Saint-Aubert, Bernard; Rouanet, Philippe; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Ailleres, Norbert; Dubois, Jean-Bernard

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: The standard radiotherapy (RT) of breast cancer consists of 50 Gy external beam RT (EBRT) to the whole breast followed by an electron boost of 10-16 Gy to the tumor bed, but this has several cosmetic disadvantages. Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) could be an alternative to overcome these. Methods and Materials: We evaluated 50 women with early breast cancer operated on in a dedicated IORT facility. Median dose of 10 Gy was delivered using 9-MeV electron beams. All patients received postoperative EBRT (50 Gy in 2 Gy fractions). Late toxicity and cosmetic results were assessed independently by two physicians according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Event v3.0 grading system and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer questionnaires. Results: After a median follow-up of 9.1 years (range, 5-15 years), two local recurrences were observed within the primary tumor bed. At the time of analysis, 45 patients are alive with (n = 1) or without disease. Among the 42 disease-free remaining patients, 6 experienced Grade 2 late subcutaneous fibrosis within the boost area. Overall, the scores indicated a very good quality of life and cosmesis was good to excellent in the evaluated patients. Conclusion: Our results confirm that IORT given as a boost after breast-conserving surgery is a reliable alternative to conventional postoperative fractionated boost radiation.

  18. Effects of Cognitive Enhancement Therapy on Employment Outcomes in Early Schizophrenia: Results from a 2-Year Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eack, Shaun M.; Hogarty, Gerard E.; Greenwald, Deborah P.; Hogarty, Susan S.; Keshavan, Matcheri S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effects of psychosocial cognitive rehabilitation on employment outcomes in a randomized controlled trial for individuals with early course schizophrenia. Method: Early course schizophrenia outpatients (N = 58) were randomly assigned to cognitive enhancement therapy (CET) or an enriched supportive therapy (EST) control and…

  19. Early Results of Three-Year Monitoring of Red Wood Ants’ Behavioral Changes and Their Possible Correlation with Earthquake Events

    PubMed Central

    Berberich, Gabriele; Berberich, Martin; Grumpe, Arne; Wöhler, Christian; Schreiber, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Simple Summary For three years (2009–2012), two red wood ant mounds (Formica rufa-group), located at the seismically active Neuwied Basin (Eifel, Germany), have been monitored 24/7 by high-resolution cameras. Early results show that ants have a well-identifiable standard daily routine. Correlation with local seismic events suggests changes in the ants’ behavior hours before the earthquake: the nocturnal rest phase and daily activity are suppressed, and standard daily routine does not resume until the next day. At present, an automated image evaluation routine is being applied to the video streams. Based on this automated approach, a statistical analysis of the ant behavior will be carried out. Abstract Short-term earthquake predictions with an advance warning of several hours or days are currently not possible due to both incomplete understanding of the complex tectonic processes and inadequate observations. Abnormal animal behaviors before earthquakes have been reported previously, but create problems in monitoring and reliability. The situation is different with red wood ants (RWA; Formica rufa-group (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)). They have stationary mounds on tectonically active, gas-bearing fault systems. These faults may be potential earthquake areas. For three years (2009–2012), two red wood ant mounds (Formica rufa-group), located at the seismically active Neuwied Basin (Eifel, Germany), have been monitored 24/7 by high-resolution cameras with both a color and an infrared sensor. Early results show that ants have a well-identifiable standard daily routine. Correlation with local seismic events suggests changes in the ants’ behavior hours before the earthquake: the nocturnal rest phase and daily activity are suppressed, and standard daily routine does not resume until the next day. At present, an automated image evaluation routine is being applied to the more than 45,000 hours of video streams. Based on this automated approach, a statistical analysis of

  20. Past and recent abuse is associated with early cessation of breast feeding: results from a large prospective cohort in Norway

    PubMed Central

    Sørbø, Marie Flem; Brantsæter, Anne-Lise; Grimstad, Hilde

    2015-01-01

    Objective Breast feeding provides a wide range of health benefits for both infants and mothers. Few studies have examined the impact of past and recent abuse of women on breastfeeding behaviour. The aims of our study were to examine whether exposure to past and recent emotional, sexual or physical abuse was associated with early breastfeeding cessation, and to assess whether a potential association differed for known and unknown perpetrators. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Norway, years 1999–2006. Participants 53 934 mothers participated in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. We included mothers with singleton pregnancy who had responded to three questionnaires (weeks 18 and 30 in pregnancy, and 6 months postpartum) and had answered minimum one of the abuse questions in week 30. Main outcome measure ORs were estimated by binary logistic regression with cessation of any (all) breast feeding before 4 months as the outcome, and abuse including subcategories of abuse, as the exposure. Results Nearly all women initiated breast feeding, but 12.1% ceased any breast feeding before 4 months and 38.9% ceased full breast feeding before 4 months, but continued partial breast feeding. Overall, 19% of the women reported any adult abuse and 18% reported any child abuse. The highest risk of any breast feeding cessation before 4 months was seen in women exposed to three types of adult abuse (emotional, sexual or physical), with adjusted OR being 1.47 (95% CI 1.23 to 1.76) compared with no abuse. Recent abuse and exposure from known perpetrator resulted in nearly 40% and 30% increased risk, respectively. The OR of any breast feeding cessation for women exposed to any child abuse was 1.41 (95% CI 1.32 to 1.50) compared with no abuse in childhood. Conclusions Past and recent abuse of women is strongly associated with early cessation of breast feeding. Abused mothers comprise a key group to target for extra support and breastfeeding assistance. PMID

  1. Initiation rites at menarche and self-reported dysmenorrhoea among indigenous women of the Colombian Amazon: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Zuluaga, Germán; Andersson, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the association between self-reported dysmenorrhoea and patterns of female initiation rites at menarche among Amazonian indigenous peoples of Vaupés in Colombia. Design A cross-sectional study of all women in seven indigenous communities. Questionnaire administered in local language documented female initiation rites and experience of dysmenorrhoea. Analysis examined 10 initiation components separately, then together, comparing women who underwent all rites, some rites and no rites. Settings Seven indigenous communities belonging to the Tukano language group in the Great Eastern Reservation of Vaupés (Colombia) in 2008. Participants All women over the age of 13 years living in the seven communities in Vaupés, who had experienced at least two menstruations (n=185), aged 13–88 years (mean 32.5; SD 15.6). Primary and secondary outcome measures The analysis rested on pelvic pain to define dysmenorrhoea as the main outcome. Women were also asked about other disorders present during menstruation or the precedent days, and about the interval between two menstruations and duration of each one. Results Only 17.3% (32/185) completed all initiation rites and 52.4% (97/185) reported dysmenorrhoea. Women not completing the rites were more likely to report dysmenorrhoea than those who did so (p=0.01 Fisher exact), taking into account age, education, community, parity and use of family planning. Women who completed less than the full complement of rites had higher risk than those who completed all rites. Those who did not complete all rites reported increased severity of dysmenorrhoea (p=0.00014). Conclusions Our results are compatible with an association between traditional practices and women's health. We could exclude indirect associations with age, education, parity and use of family planning as explanations for the association. The study indicates feasibility, possible utility and limits of intercultural epidemiology in small groups. PMID

  2. Early Results of Clinical Application of Autologous Whole Bone Marrow Stem Cell Transplantation for Critical Limb Ischemia with Buerger's Disease.

    PubMed

    Heo, Seon-Hee; Park, Yoong-Seok; Kang, Eun-Suk; Park, Kwang-Bo; Do, Young-Soo; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Kim, Dong-Ik

    2016-01-01

    Our goal was to evaluate early results of the clinical application of autologous whole bone marrow stem cell transplantation (AWBMSCT) for critical limb ischemia (CLI) in patients with Buerger's disease. We retrospectively analyzed the data of 58 limbs of 37 patients (mean age, 43.0 years; range, 28-63 years; male, 91.9%) with Buerger's disease with CLI who were treated with AWBMSCT from March 2013 to December 2014. We analyzed Rutherford category, pain score, pain-free walking time (PFWT), total walking time (TWT), ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI), and toe brachial pressure index (TBPI), and investigated wound healing and occurrence of unplanned amputations. The mean follow-up duration was 11.9 ± 7.2 months (range, 0.9-23.9 months) and 100%, 72.4%, and 74.1% of patients were available to follow-up 1, 3 and 6 months after AWBMST, respectively. At 6 months, patients demonstrated significant improvements in Rutherford category (P < 0.0001), pain score (P < 0.0001), PFWT (P < 0.0001) and TBPI (P < 0.0001). ABPI was increased compared to baseline, but the difference was not significant. A total of 76.5% ischemic wounds achieved complete or improved healing. AWBMSCT is a safe and effective alternative or adjunctive treatment modality to achieve clinical improvement in patients with CLI. PMID:26791280

  3. Early Cretaceous rifting and exposure of periodotite on the Galicia continental margin: preliminary results of ocean drilling program Leg 103

    SciTech Connect

    Winterer, E.; Boillot, G.; Meyer, A.; Applegate, J.; Baltuck, M.; Bergen, J.; Comas, M.; Davies, T.; Dunham, K.; Evans, C.; Girardeau, J.

    1985-01-01

    Results of drilling near the ocean-continent boundary on the Galicia margin of Iberia shed new light on the timing of rifting and demonstrate the presence at the foot of the margin of a ridge of foliated, lineated, sheared and serpentinized harzburgite, probably representing oceanic mantle. Fifty km east of the periodotite ridge, on a continental fault block, the stratigraphic section sampled during Leg 103 above Hercynian basement comprises: (1) at least 250m of Upper Jurassic and possibly lowest Cretaceous limestone, dolomite and minor sandstone and claystone deposited in relatively shallow water before rifting began; (2) about 20m of Valanginian calpionellid marlstone, probably deposited in moderate depths at the onset of rifting; (3) from about 500 to 1500m of Valanginian and Hauterivian turbidite sandstone rich in terrestrial plant debris, and Barremian and Aptian( ) claystone and marlstone deposited in deeper water during rifting; and (4) about 700m of sediments deposited after Aptian time, when rifting ceased and oceanic spreading between Iberia and Newfoundland began. The lithology and seismic stratigraphy of the wedges of clastic sediments laid down during rifting show the progressive filling of basins that formed by episodic listric faulting that began very early in the Cretaceous and continued for about 25 my. The Lower Cretaceous turbidite sandstone cored on the Galicia margin correlates with thick Lower Cretaceous turbidites cored off Morocco during DSDP Leg 50, and with Wealden deltaic and fluviatile deposits on both sides of the Atlantic.

  4. Egestion of asbestos fibers in Tetrahymena results in early morphological abnormalities. A step in the induction of heterogeneous cell lines?

    PubMed

    Hjelm, K K

    1989-01-01

    In Tetrahymena populations exposed to crocidolite asbestos fibers, many cells develop morphological abnormalities within 1-2 hours. The abnormalities are mainly large or small protrusions or indentations, or flattened parts of the cell surface and most often located in the posterior part of the cell. They are formed repeatedly in all cells but are also continuously repaired so that the fraction of cells affected represents an equilibrium between these two processes. Their formation is connected with egestion of the large bundles of fibers formed by phagocytosis. Such effects of egestion of fibers do not seem to have been reported previously. Egestion of a bundle of fibers is much slower than for other types of undigestible residues. In contrast to normal exocytosis occurring invariably at the cytoproct, egestion of asbestos often occurs in the posterior part of the cell outside the cytoproct. To my knowledge this is the first reported case of either very slow or extra-cytoproctal egestion in Tetrahymena. Cells with large abnormalities have a greater tendency to develop into "early heterogeneous" cells than the average abnormal cell. Some of these give rise to hereditarily stable heterogeneous cell lines of Tetrahymena. The morphological abnormalities are probably caused by mechanical action of the crocidolite fibers resulting in local damage of the cytoskeletal elements responsible for normal cell shape. The heterogenous cell lines may arise when cellular structures carrying non-genic cytotactically inherited information are modified. The relevance of these ideas to the induction of cancer by asbestos is briefly discussed.

  5. Early Blood Pressure Lowering Does Not Reduce Growth of Intraventricular Hemorrhage following Acute Intracerebral Hemorrhage: Results of the INTERACT Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Edward; Anderson, Craig S.; Wang, Xia; Arima, Hisatomi; Saxena, Anubhav; Moullaali, Tom J.; Delcourt, Candice; Wu, Guojun; Wang, Jinchao; Chen, Guofang; Lavados, Pablo M.; Stapf, Christian; Robinson, Thompson; Chalmers, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) extension is common following acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and is associated with poor prognosis. Aim To determine whether intensive blood pressure (BP)-lowering therapy reduces IVH growth. Methods Pooled analyses of the Intensive Blood Pressure Reduction in Acute Cerebral Hemorrhage Trials (INTERACT1 and INTERACT2) computed tomography (CT) substudies; multicenter, open, controlled, randomized trials of patients with acute spontaneous ICH and elevated systolic BP, randomly assigned to intensive (<140 mm Hg) or guideline-based (<180 mm Hg) BP management. Participants had blinded central analyses of baseline and 24-hour CT. Association of BP lowering to IVH growth was assessed in analysis of covariance. Results There was no significant difference in adjusted mean IVH growth following intensive (n = 228) compared to guideline-recommended (n = 228) BP treatment (1.6 versus 2.2 ml, respectively; p = 0.56). Adjusted mean IVH growth was nonsignificantly greater in patients with a mean achieved systolic BP ≥160 mm Hg over 24 h (3.94 ml; p trend = 0.26). Conclusions Early intensive BP-lowering treatment had no clear effect on IVH in acute ICH. PMID:27603933

  6. Uptake of platinum by zebrafish (Danio rerio) and ramshorn snail (Marisa cornuarietis) and resulting effects on early embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Osterauer, Raphaela; Haus, Nadine; Sures, Bernd; Köhler, Heinz-R

    2009-11-01

    Platinum group elements (PGEs), platinum, palladium and rhodium are widely used in automobile catalytic converters. PGEs are emitted into the environment and enter the aquatic ecosystem via runoff rainwater. The present study investigated the bioavailability of platinum chloride for the zebrafish (Danio rerio) and the ramshorn snail (Marisa cornuarietis) and determined the bioaccumulation rate of platinum. Applying the fish early life stage assay for D. rerio (DarT) and the Marisa embryo toxicity test ("Mariett") for M. cornuarietis, effects of platinum chloride on the embryonic development were investigated. Platinum concentrations tested in this study ranged from environmentally relevant concentrations of 38 ng L(-1) up to a concentration of 74.2 microg L(-1) for D. rerio and of 200 ngL(-1) up to 98.7 microg L(-1) for M. cornuarietis. Platinum was found to be accumulated in both organisms. Bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) were in the range of 5-55 for D. rerio and of 218.4-723.9 for M. cornuarietis, depending on the tested Pt concentrations. During the embryonic development, platinum was shown to alter the heart rate of both organisms already at the lowest tested concentration. At higher concentrations, platinum decelerated the hatching rate of the embryos of both species. Additionally, a retardation of the general development and a loss of weight due to platinum exposure was observed in M. cornuarietis. Results of this study contribute important data on the ecotoxicity of a rarely studied element.

  7. Efficacy of adjuvant CYVADIC chemotherapy in early-stage uterine sarcomas: results of long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Odunsi, K; Moneke, V; Tammela, J; Ghamande, S; Seago, P; Driscoll, D; Marchetti, D; Baker, T; Lele, S

    2004-01-01

    Data on adjuvant chemotherapy in early-stage uterine sarcomas are conflicting and most often based on small patient groups with relatively short duration of follow-up. Approximately 60% of patients present with stage I disease with an overall 5-year survival of 30-50% when treated with surgery alone. This study examines the efficacy and results of long-term follow-up of a multiagent chemotherapy regimen of cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, and dacarbazine (CYVADIC) as adjuvant treatment for patients with stage I uterine sarcoma. Between 1982 and 1999, 24 evaluable patients with completely staged uterine sarcomas received adjuvant multiagent chemotherapy with vincristine sulfate (1mg /m(2)) on days 1 and 4, doxorubicin (40 mg /m(2)) and cyclophosphamide (400 mg /m(2)) on day 2, and dacarbazine (200 mg /m(2)) on days 1 through 4 for a total of nine monthly cycles or until recurrence of disease was documented. Survival distributions were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and statistical significance was determined with the log-rank test. Factors significant on univariate analysis were analyzed in a multivariate fashion using Cox proportional hazards model. The histologic distribution of patients was 46% leiomyosarcoma, 33% mixed mullerian tumors, 13% stromal sarcomas, 4% adenosarcomas, and 4% hemangiosarcoma. The patients received 206 of a planned 216 cycles of chemotherapy. The median follow-up of the patient population was 93 months (range 11-213 months). Eight patients (33%) developed recurrent disease. The median time to recurrence was 19 months (range 7-184 months). The estimated survival for the entire group was 88, 75, and 69% at 2, 5, and 15 years, respectively. Factors that did not affect survival included age, histology, and tumor grade. Four patients required dose reductions secondary to grade 2-3 toxicities (hematologic). Grade 1 neurotoxicity was observed in six patients (25%) and grade 2 neurotoxicity in one patient (4%). Adjuvant CYVADIC

  8. Computerized detection of vertebral compression fractures on lateral chest radiographs: Preliminary results with a tool for early detection of osteoporosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kasai, Satoshi; Li Feng; Shiraishi, Junji; Li Qiang; Doi, Kunio

    2006-12-15

    Vertebral fracture (or vertebral deformity) is a very common outcome of osteoporosis, which is one of the major public health concerns in the world. Early detection of vertebral fractures is important because timely pharmacologic intervention can reduce the risk of subsequent additional fractures. Chest radiographs are used routinely for detection of lung and heart diseases, and vertebral fractures can be visible on lateral chest radiographs. However, investigators noted that about 50% of vertebral fractures visible on lateral chest radiographs were underdiagnosed or under-reported, even when the fractures were severe. Therefore, our goal was to develop a computerized method for detection of vertebral fractures on lateral chest radiographs in order to assist radiologists' image interpretation and thus allow the early diagnosis of osteoporosis. The cases used in this study were 20 patients with severe vertebral fractures and 118 patients without fractures, as confirmed by the consensus of two radiologists. Radiologists identified the locations of fractured vertebrae, and they provided morphometric data on the vertebral shape for evaluation of the accuracy of detecting vertebral end plates by computer. In our computerized method, a curved search area, which included a number of vertebral end plates, was first extracted automatically, and was straightened so that vertebral end plates became oriented horizontally. Edge candidates were enhanced by use of a horizontal line-enhancement filter in the straightened image, and a multiple thresholding technique, followed by feature analysis, was used for identification of the vertebral end plates. The height of each vertebra was determined from locations of identified vertebral end plates, and fractured vertebrae were detected by comparison of the measured vertebral height with the expected height. The sensitivity of our computerized method for detection of fracture cases was 95% (19/20), with 1.03 (139/135) false

  9. Age-Adjusted PSA Levels in Prostate Cancer Prediction: Updated Results of the Tyrol Prostate Cancer Early Detection Program

    PubMed Central

    Heidegger, Isabel; Fritz, Josef; Klocker, Helmut; Pichler, Renate

    2015-01-01

    Objective To reduce the number of unnecessary biopsies in patients with benign prostatic disease, however, without missing significant PCa the present study re-evaluates the age-dependent PSA cut-offs in the Tyrol Prostate Cancer (PCa) early detection program. Patients and Methods The study population included 2225 patients who underwent prostate biopsy due to elevated PSA levels at our department. We divided our patient collective into four age groups: ≤49 years (n = 178), 50-59 years (n = 597), 60-69 years (n = 962) and ≥70 years (n = 488). We simulated different scenarios for PSA cut-off values between 1.25 and 6 ng/mL and fPSA% between 15 and 21% for all four age groups and calculated sensitivity, specificity, confidence intervals and predictive values. Results PCa was detected in 1218 men (54.7%). We found that in combination with free PSA ≤21% the following PSA cut-offs had the best cancer specificity: 1.75 ng/ml for men ≤49 years and 50-59 years, 2.25 ng/ml for men aged 60-69 years and 3.25 ng/ml for men ≥70 years. Using these adjusted PSA cut-off values all significant tumors are recognized in all age groups, yet the number of biopsies is reduced. Overall, one biopsy is avoided in 13 to 14 men (number needed to screen = 13.3, reduction of biopsies = 7.5%) when decision regarding biopsy is done according to the “new” cut-off values instead of the “old” ones. For the different age groups the number needed to screen to avoid one biopsy varied between 9.2 (≤49 years) and 17.4 (50-59 years). Conclusion With “new”, fine-tuned PSA cut-offs we detect all relevant PCa with a significant reduction of biopsies compared to the “old” cut-off values. Optimization of age-specific PSA cut-offs is one step towards a smarter strategy in the Tyrol PCa Early Detection Program. PMID:26218594

  10. The VLA Low Band Project: Early Commissioning Results and Vision for a Primary Focus-based Commensal Observing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassim, Namir E.; Clarke, T. E.; Hicks, B.; Peters, W. M.; Wilson, T. L.; Cutchin, S.; Owen, F. N.; Perley, R. A.; Durand, S.; Kutz, C.; Harden, P.; Intema, H.; Brisken, W.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Taylor, G. B.; Lazio, T. J.

    2013-01-01

    We present an update on the Jansky Very Large Array Low Band (VLA-LB) project, currently undergoing scientific commissioning and expected to be fully available in 2013. VLA-LB is a joint NRL and NRAO initiative to equip the VLA with broadband low frequency receivers that cover the spectrum between 66 and 470 MHz. The current system can already access the 66 to 86 MHz and 230 to 436 MHz sub-bands by working with existing 74 and 330 MHz feeds, respectively. The bandwidth at 74 MHz will increase by more than an order of magnitude while the 330 MHz bandwidth increases by approximately a factor of 6. The improved bandwidth and system temperature, coupled with the power of the WIDAR correlator, promise significantly enhanced performance compared to past VLA capabilities. Early commissioning results at “P band” (330 MHz) with a handful of antennas accessing the larger bandwidth indicate sensitivity rivaling that of the legacy 27-antenna, narrow-band old VLA capability. New feeds that can exploit a larger fraction of the available receiver bandwidth are being explored. While VLA-LB is useful as a conventional system, we are looking to enhance its power by leveraging the VLA’s capability to detect radiation at its prime and Cassegrain foci simultaneously. The ability to observe with more than one band in parallel is a powerful multiplier of a telescope’s function, and many instruments (e.g. the GMRT, WSRT and VLA) offer this. A variant is being explored for VLA-LB: observing from the prime focus during all normal Cassegrain observations. This proposed VLA-LB commensal system would piggyback normal VLA observing time to survey at low frequencies with relatively large field of views. Shared fields with other multi-beaming, dipole-based arrays that view the same sky with the VLA, e.g. the first station of the Long Wavelength Array (LWA1), would be possible. The collected data will be assembled into a database of spectra and wide-field images, suitable for studies of

  11. Is the Prediction of Adolescent Outcomes From Early Child Care Moderated by Later Maternal Sensitivity? Results From the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development

    PubMed Central

    Burchinal, Margaret R.; Vandell, Deborah Lowe; Belsky, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Longitudinal data are used to examine whether effects of early child care are amplified and/or attenuated by later parenting. Analyses tested these interactions using parenting as both a categorical and continuous variable to balance power and flexibility in testing moderation. The most consistent finding was that maternal sensitivity during adolescence accentuated the association between child care quality and adolescent academic-cognitive skills at age 15 years when maternal sensitivity during adolescence was high. This interaction was obtained in analyses with maternal sensitivity as both a categorical and continuous variable. Relations between early child care hours and adolescent behavioral outcomes also were moderated by maternal sensitivity, with longer child care hours predicting more impulsivity and externalizing at age 15 when maternal sensitivity during middle childhood, scored as a categorical variable, was low to moderate and when maternal sensitivity during adolescence, scored as a continuous variable, was lower. These findings suggest that some child care effects are moderated by subsequent parenting and that this moderation may take both linear and nonlinear forms. PMID:23937381

  12. Early Significant Tumor Volume Reduction After Radiosurgery in Brain Metastases From Renal Cell Carcinoma Results in Long-Term Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Wook Ha; Kim, Dong Gyu; Han, Jung Ho; Paek, Sun Ha; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Park, Chul-Kee; Kim, Chae-Yong; Kim, Yong Hwy; Kim, Jin Wook; Jung, Hee-Won

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate survival of patients with brain metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC) after radiosurgery. Patients and Methods: Between 1998 and 2010, 46 patients were treated with radiosurgery, and the total number of lesions was 99. The mean age was 58.9 years (range, 33-78 years). Twenty-six patients (56.5%) had a single brain metastasis. The mean tumor volume was 3.0 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.01-35.1 cm{sup 3}), and the mean marginal dose prescribed was 20.8 Gy (range, 12-25 Gy) at the 50% isodose line. A patient was classified into the good-response group when the sum of the volume of the brain metastases decreased to less than 75% of the original volume at a 1-month follow-up evaluation using MRI. Results: As of December 28, 2010, 39 patients (84.8%) had died, and 7 (15.2%) survived. The overall median survival time was 10.0 {+-} 0.4 months (95% confidence interval, 9.1-10.8). After treatment, local tumor control was achieved in 72 (84.7%) of the 85 tumors assessed using MRI after radiosurgery. The good-response group survived significantly longer than the poor-response group (median survival times of 18.0 and 9.0 months, respectively; p = 0.025). In a multivariate analysis, classification in the good-response group was the only independent prognostic factor for longer survival (p = 0.037; hazard ratio = 0.447; 95% confidence interval, 0.209-0.953). Conclusions: Radiosurgery seems to be an effective treatment modality for patients with brain metastases from RCC. The early significant tumor volume reduction observed after radiosurgery seems to result in long-term survival in RCC patients with brain metastases.

  13. Early Life Ozone Exposure Results in Dysregulated Innate Immune Function and Altered microRNA Expression in Airway Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Gerriets, Joan E.; Wang, Theodore T.; Postlethwait, Edward M.; Evans, Michael J.; Fontaine, Justin H.; Miller, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to ozone has been associated with increased incidence of respiratory morbidity in humans; however the mechanism(s) behind the enhancement of susceptibility are unclear. We have previously reported that exposure to episodic ozone during postnatal development results in an attenuated peripheral blood cytokine response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) that persists with maturity. As the lung is closely interfaced with the external environment, we hypothesized that the conducting airway epithelium of neonates may also be a target of immunomodulation by ozone. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated primary airway epithelial cell cultures derived from juvenile rhesus macaque monkeys with a prior history of episodic postnatal ozone exposure. Innate immune function was measured by expression of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8 in primary cultures established following in vivo LPS challenge or, in response to in vitro LPS treatment. Postnatal ozone exposure resulted in significantly attenuated IL-6 mRNA and protein expression in primary cultures from juvenile animals; IL-8 mRNA was also significantly reduced. The effect of antecedent ozone exposure was modulated by in vivo LPS challenge, as primary cultures exhibited enhanced cytokine expression upon secondary in vitro LPS treatment. Assessment of potential IL-6-targeting microRNAs miR-149, miR-202, and miR-410 showed differential expression in primary cultures based upon animal exposure history. Functional assays revealed that miR-149 is capable of binding to the IL-6 3′ UTR and decreasing IL-6 protein synthesis in airway epithelial cell lines. Cumulatively, our findings suggest that episodic ozone during early life contributes to the molecular programming of airway epithelium, such that memory from prior exposures is retained in the form of a dysregulated IL-6 and IL-8 response to LPS; differentially expressed microRNAs such as miR-149 may play a role in the persistent modulation of the epithelial innate

  14. A new early life-stage toxicity test using the California grunion (Leuresthes tenuis) and results with chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed

    Goodman, L R; Hansen, D J; Cripe, G M; Middaugh, D P; Moore, J C

    1985-08-01

    California grunion were continuously exposed as embryos and fry to technical chlorpyrifos in two toxicity tests conducted in the same exposure apparatus. The first test, a 35-day early life-stage (ELS) test, began with approximately 2.5-day-old embryos that were exposed in flow-through aquaria in darkness until hatching was stimulated on Day 9 of exposure. The second toxicity test, a fry test, began with newly hatched fry and lasted 26 days. Test water temperature ranged from 23 to 26 degrees C and salinity from 24.5 to 34.0%. Results of the two tests were similar, indicating that exposure of embryos added little to the overall toxicity of chlorpyrifos to grunions. Percentage hatch of embryos was unaffected by the chlorpyrifos concentrations tested. Fry survival was apparently reduced in nominal concentrations greater than or equal to 1.0 micrograms/liter in both tests, but significantly so in concentrations greater than or equal to 1.0 micrograms/liter in the ELS test and greater than or equal to 2.0 micrograms/liter in the fry test. When compared with carrier controls, mean fish weights were significantly reduced in nominal chlorpyrifos concentrations greater than or equal to 0.5 micrograms/liter in the ELS test and greater than or equal to 1.0 micrograms/liter in the fry exposure. Mean bioconcentration factors were 770X for fish that survived the ELS test and 190X for those that survived the fry test. Results demonstrate the practicality of conducting ELS tests for the first time with a marine fish from the Pacific coastal waters of the United States. PMID:2411496

  15. Early Vertebroplasty versus Delayed Vertebroplasty for Acute Osteoporotic Compression Fracture : Are the Results of the Two Surgical Strategies the Same?

    PubMed Central

    Son, Seong; Kim, Woo-Kyung; Park, Chan-Woo; Yoo, Chan-Jong

    2014-01-01

    Objective In Korea, early vertebroplasty (EVP) or delayed vertebroplasty (DVP, which is performed at least 2 weeks after diagnosis) were performed for the treatment of acute osteoporotic compression fracture (OCF) of the spine. The present study compared the outcomes of two surgical strategies for the treatment of single-level acute OCF in the thoracolumbar junction (T12-L2). Methods From 2004 to 2010, 23 patients were allocated to the EVP group (EVPG) and 27 patients to the DVP group (DVPG). Overall mean age was 68.3±7.9 and minimum follow-up period was 1.0 year. Retrospective study of clinical and radiological results was conducted. Results No significant differences in baseline characteristics were observed between the two groups. As expected, mean duration from onset to vertebroplasty and mean duration of hospital stay were significantly longer in the DVPG (17.1±2.1 and 17.5±4.2) than in the EVPG (3.8±3.3 and 10.8±5.1, p=0.001). Final clinical outcome including visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index, and Odom's criteria did not differ between the two groups. However, immediate improvement of the VAS after vertebroplasty was greater in the EVPG (5.1±1.3) than in the DVPG (4.0±1.0, p=0.002). The proportion of cement leakage was lower in the EVPG (30.4%) than in the DVPG (59.3%, p=0.039). In addition, semiquantitative grade of cement interdigitation was significantly more favorable in the EVPG than in the DVPG (p=0.003). Final vertebral body collapse and segmental kyphosis did not differ significantly between the two groups. Conclusion Our findings suggest that EVP achieves a better immediate surgical effect with more favorable cost-effectiveness. PMID:25368763

  16. Burden and predictors of hypertension in India: results of SEEK (Screening and Early Evaluation of Kidney Disease) study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypertension (HTN) is one of the major causes of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The objective of the study was to investigate the burden and predictors of HTN in India. Methods 6120 subjects participated in the Screening and Early Evaluation of Kidney disease (SEEK), a community-based screening program in 53 camps in 13 representative geographic locations in India. Of these, 5929 had recorded blood pressure (BP) measurements. Potential predictors of HTN were collected using a structured questionnaire for SEEK study. Results HTN was observed in 43.5% of our cohort. After adjusting for center variation (p < 0.0001), predictors of a higher prevalence of HTN were older age ≥40 years (p < 0.0001), BMI of ≥ 23 Kg/M2 (p < 0.0004), larger waist circumference (p < 0.0001), working in sedentary occupation (p < 0.0001), having diabetes mellitus (p < 0.0001), having proteinuria (p < 0.0016), and increased serum creatinine (p < 0.0001). High school/some college education (p = 0.0016), versus less than 9th grade education, was related with lower prevalence of HTN. Of note, proteinuria and CKD were observed in 19% and 23.5% of HTN subjects. About half (54%) of the hypertensive subjects were aware of their hypertension status. Conclusions HTN was common in this cohort from India. Older age, BMI ≥ 23 Kg/M2, waist circumference, sedentary occupation, education less, diabetes mellitus, presence of proteinuria, and raised serum creatinine were significant predictors of hypertension. Our data suggest that HTN is a major public health problem in India with low awareness, and requires aggressive community-based screening and education to improve health. PMID:24602391

  17. Early Mission Orbit Determination Error Analysis Results for Low-Earth Orbiting Missions using TDRSS Differenced One-way Doppler Tracking Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marr, Greg C.

    2003-01-01

    Differencing multiple, simultaneous Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) one-way Doppler passes can yield metric tracking data usable for orbit determination for (low-cost) spacecraft which do not have TDRSS transponders or local oscillators stable enough to allow the one-way TDRSS Doppler tracking data to be used for early mission orbit determination. Orbit determination error analysis results are provided for low Earth orbiting spacecraft for various early mission tracking scenarios.

  18. Reengaging High School Dropouts: Early Results of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program Evaluation. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Dan; Gardenhire-Crooks, Alissa; Mandsager, Conrad

    2009-01-01

    The ChalleNGe model grew out of a project by the Center for Strategic and International Studies in the late 1980s and early 1990s that sought to develop new approaches for out-of-school youth. The project's final report concluded that aspects of the military structure could be beneficial for disadvantaged youth. The report also concluded that the…

  19. The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS): An Overview and Early Results from the 1994 Field Year.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellers, Piers; Hall, Forrest; Ranson, K. Jon; Margolis, Hank; Kelly, Bob; Baldocchi, Dennis; den Hartog, Gerry; Cihlar, Josef; Ryan, Michael G.; Goodison, Barry; Crill, Patrick; Lettenmaier, Dennis; Wickland, Diane E.

    1995-09-01

    area). The strong sensible fluxes generated as a result of this often lead to the development of a deep dry planetary boundary layer over the forest, particularly during the spring and early summer. The effects of frozen soils and the strong physiological control of evapotranspiration in the biome do not seem to be well represented in most operational general circulation models of the atmosphere.Analyses of the data will continue through 1995 and 1996. Some limited revisits to the field are anticipated.

  20. The Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment SALTRACE 2013 - Overview and Early Results (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinzierl, B.; Ansmann, A.; Reitebuch, O.; Freudenthaler, V.; Müller, T.; Kandler, K.; Althausen, D.; Busen, R.; Dollner, M.; Dörnbrack, A.; Farrell, D. A.; Gross, S.; Heimerl, K.; Klepel, A.; Kristensen, T. B.; Mayol-Bracero, O. L.; Minikin, A.; Prescod, D.; Prospero, J. M.; Rahm, S.; Rapp, M.; Sauer, D. N.; Schaefler, A.; Toledano, C.; Vaughan, M.; Wiegner, M.

    2013-12-01

    Chantal in the dusty environment. We give an overview of the SALTRACE measurements and show early results covering profiles of dust size distributions, dust optical properties and the investigation of the impact of dust aging processes between the Cape Verde region and Florida.

  1. Survival and success rates of immediately and early loaded implants: 12-month results from a multicentric randomized clinical study.

    PubMed

    Grandi, Tommaso; Garuti, Giovanna; Guazzi, Paolo; Tarabini, Luciano; Forabosco, Andrea

    2012-06-01

    Our objective was to compare survival and peri-implant bone levels of immediately nonocclusally vs early loaded implants in partially edentulous patients up to 12 months after implant placement. Eighty patients (inclusion criteria: general good health, good oral hygiene, 30-65 years old; exclusion criteria: head and neck irradiation/cancer, pregnancy, uncontrolled diabetes, substance abuse, bruxism, lack of opposing occluding dentition, smokers >10 cigarettes/day, need for bone augmentation procedures) were selected in 5 Italian study centers and randomized into 2 groups: 40 patients in the immediately loaded group (minimal insertion torque 30 Ncm) and 40 patients in the early loaded group. Immediately loaded implants were provided with nonoccluding temporary restorations. Final restorations were provided 2 months later. Early loaded implants were provided with a definitive restoration after 2 months. Peri-implant bone resorption was evaluated radiographically with software (ImageJ 1.42). No dropout occurred. Both groups gradually lost peri-implant bone. After 12 months, patients of both groups lost an average of 0.4 mm of peri-implant bone. There were no statistically significant differences (evaluated with t test) between the 2 loading strategies for peri-implant bone level changes at 2 (P = .6730), 6 (P = .6613) and 12 (P = .5957) months or for survival rates (100% in both groups). If adequate primary stability is achieved, immediate loading of dental implants can provide similar success rates, survival rates, and peri-implant bone resorption as compared with early loading, as evaluated in the present study. PMID:21480777

  2. Rapid and reliable seismic source characterization in earthquake early warning systems: current methodologies, results, and new perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombelli, Simona; Zollo, Aldo

    2016-04-01

    In the present paper, we provided a review of the main principles and methodologies on which the current earthquake early warning systems are grounded and will also provide a perspective view for next future developments and improvements. First, we introduce the standard methodologies for the source characterization in earthquake early warning, with a special focus on the real-time earthquake magnitude determination. We discuss the suitability of existent methodologies and empirical regression laws for very large events. We then present the different approaches for the rapid prediction of the ground shaking and of the potential damaged zone, both based on traditional seismic data and on the use of continuous GPS data. Finally, the last part of the paper provides the perspective view toward a next generation of early warning systems, linking new research achievements about the earthquake rupture nucleation and the development of new methods/technologies aimed at a fast and high-resolution, real-time modeling of the ongoing source process and accurate prediction of the quake shaking at the regional and local scale.

  3. Early active extension after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction does not result in increased laxity of the knee.

    PubMed

    Isberg, Jonas; Faxén, Eva; Brandsson, Sveinbjörn; Eriksson, Bengt I; Kärrholm, Johan; Karlsson, Jon

    2006-11-01

    If permission of full active and passive extension immediately after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction will increase the post-operative laxity of the knee has been a subject of discussion. We investigated whether a post-operative rehabilitation protocol including active and passive extension without any restrictions in extension immediately after an ACL reconstruction would increase the post-operative anterior-posterior knee laxity (A-P laxity). Our hypothesis was that full active and passive extension immediately after an ACL reconstruction would have no effect on the A-P laxity and clinical results up to 2 years after the operation. Twenty-two consecutive patients (14 men, 8 women, median age 21 years, range 17-41) were included. All the patients had a unilateral ACL rupture and no other ligament injuries or any other history of previous knee injuries. The surgical procedure was identical in all patients and one experienced surgeon operated on all the patients, using the bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft. The post-operative rehabilitation programme was identical in both groups, except for extension training during the first 4 weeks post-operatively. The patients were randomly allocated to post-operative rehabilitation programmes either allowing (Group A, n=11) or not allowing [Group B (30 to -10 degrees ), n=11] full active and passive extension immediately after the operation. They were evaluated pre-operatively and at 6 months and 2 years after the reconstruction. To evaluate the A-P knee laxity, radiostereometric analysis (RSA) and KT-1000 arthrometer (KT-1000) measurements were used, range of motion, Lysholm score, Tegner activity level, the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) evaluation system and one-leg-hop test quotient were used. Pre-operatively, the RSA measurements revealed side-to-side differences in Group A of 8.6 mm (2.3-15.4), median (range) and in Group B of 7.2 mm (2.2-17.4) (n.s.). The corresponding KT-1000

  4. Bivariate genome-wide association analyses identified genes with pleiotropic effects for femoral neck bone geometry and age at menarche.

    PubMed

    Ran, Shu; Pei, Yu-Fang; Liu, Yong-Jun; Zhang, Lei; Han, Ying-Ying; Hai, Rong; Tian, Qing; Lin, Yong; Yang, Tie-Lin; Guo, Yan-Fang; Shen, Hui; Thethi, Inderpal S; Zhu, Xue-Zhen; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Femoral neck geometric parameters (FNGPs), which include cortical thickness (CT), periosteal diameter (W), buckling ratio (BR), cross-sectional area (CSA), and section modulus (Z), contribute to bone strength and may predict hip fracture risk. Age at menarche (AAM) is an important risk factor for osteoporosis and bone fractures in women. Some FNGPs are genetically correlated with AAM. In this study, we performed a bivariate genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify new candidate genes responsible for both FNGPs and AAM. In the discovery stage, we tested 760,794 SNPs in 1,728 unrelated Caucasian subject, followed by replication analyses in independent samples of US Caucasians (with 501 subjects) and Chinese (with 826 subjects). We found six SNPs that were associated with FNGPs and AAM. These SNPs are located in three genes (i.e. NRCAM, IDS and LOC148145), suggesting these three genes may co-regulate FNGPs and AAM. Our findings may help improve the understanding of genetic architecture and pathophysiological mechanisms underlying both osteoporosis and AAM.

  5. Bivariate genome-wide association study suggests that the DARC gene influences lean body mass and age at menarche.

    PubMed

    Hai, Rong; Zhang, Lei; Pei, Yufang; Zhao, Lanjuan; Ran, Shu; Han, Yingying; Zhu, Xuezhen; Shen, Hui; Tian, Qing; Deng, Hongwen

    2012-06-01

    Lean body mass (LBM) and age at menarche (AAM) are two important complex traits for human health. The aim of this study was to identify pleiotropic genes for both traits using a powerful bivariate genome-wide association study (GWAS). Two studies, a discovery study and a replication study, were performed. In the discovery study, 909622 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in 801 unrelated female Han Chinese subjects using the Affymetrix human genome-wide SNP array 6.0 platform. Then, a bivariate GWAS was performed to identify the SNPs that may be important for LBM and AAM. In the replication study, significant findings from the discovery study were validated in 1692 unrelated Caucasian female subjects. One SNP rs3027009 that was bivariately associated with left arm lean mass and AAM in the discovery samples (P=7.26×10(-6)) and in the replication samples (P=0.005) was identified. The SNP is located at the upstream of DARC (Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines) gene, suggesting that DARC may play an important role in regulating the metabolisms of both LBM and AAM.

  6. BioSense/SR-BioSpectra demonstrations of wide area/early warning for bioaerosol threats: program description and early test and evaluation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simard, Jean-Robert; Buteau, Sylvie; Lahaie, Pierre; Mathieu, Pierre; Roy, Gilles; Nadeau, Denis; McFee, John; Ho, Jim; Rowsell, Susan; Ho, Nicolas; Babin, François; Cantin, Daniel; Healey, Dave; Robinson, Jennifer; Wood, Scott; Hsu, Jack

    2011-11-01

    Threats associated with bioaerosol weapons have been around for several decades and have been mostly associated with terrorist activities or rogue nations. Up to the turn of the millennium, defence concepts against such menaces relied mainly on point or in-situ detection technologies. Over the last 10 years, significant efforts have been deployed by multiple countries to supplement the limited spatial coverage of a network of one or more point bio-detectors using lidar technology. The addition of such technology makes it possible to detect within seconds suspect aerosol clouds over area of several tens of square kilometers and track their trajectories. These additional capabilities are paramount in directing presumptive ID missions, mapping hazardous areas, establishing efficient counter-measures and supporting subsequent forensic investigations. In order to develop such capabilities, Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC) and the Chemical, Biological, Radiological-Nuclear, and Explosives Research and Technology Initiative (CRTI) have supported two major demonstrations based on spectrally resolved Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) lidar: BioSense, aimed at defence military missions in wide open spaces, and SR-BioSpectra, aimed at surveillance of enclosed or semienclosed wide spaces common to defence and public security missions. This article first reviews briefly the modeling behind these demonstration concepts. Second, the lidar-adapted and the benchtop bioaerosol LIF chambers (BSL1), developed to challenge the constructed detection systems and to accelerate the population of the library of spectral LIF properties of bioaerosols and interferents of interest, will be described. Next, the most recent test and evaluation (T&E) results obtained with SR-BioSpectra and BioSense are reported. Finally, a brief discussion stating the way ahead for a complete defence suite is provided.

  7. Documenting the conversion from traditional to Studio Physics formats at the Colorado School of Mines: Process and early results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, Patrick B.; Kuo, H. Vincent; Ruskell, Todd G.

    2008-10-01

    The Colorado School of Mines (CSM) has taught its first-semester introductory physics course using a hybrid lecture/Studio Physics format for several years. Over the past year we have converted the second semester of our calculus-based introductory physics course (Physics II) to a Studio Physics format, starting from a traditional lecture-based format. In this paper, we document the early stages of this conversion in order to better understand which features succeed and which do not, and in order to develop a model for switching to Studio that keeps the time and resource investment manageable. We describe the recent history of the Physics II course and of Studio at Mines, discuss the PER-based improvements that we are implementing, and characterize our progress via several metrics, including pre/post Conceptual Survey of Electricity and Magnetism (CSEM) scores, Colorado Learning About Science Survey scores (CLASS), solicited student comments, failure rates, and exam scores.

  8. A late eocene-early Oligocene transgressive event in the Golfo San Jorge basin: Palynological results and stratigraphic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes, José M.; Foix, Nicolás; Guerstein, G. Raquel; Guler, María V.; Irigoyen, Martín; Moscoso, Pablo; Giordano, Sergio

    2015-11-01

    A new Cenozoic dataset in the subsurface of the South Flank of the Golfo San Jorge Basin (Santa Cruz province) allowed to identify a non-previously recognized transgressive event of late Eocene to early Oligocene age. Below of a marine succession containing a dinoflagellate cyst assemblage that characterizes the C/G palynological zone of the Chenque Formation (early Miocene), a 80-110 m thick marine succession contains a palynological assemblage integrated by Gelatia inflata, Diphyes colligerum and Reticulatosphaera actinocoronata supporting the occurrence of a marine incursion in the basin during the Eocene-Oligocene transition (EOT). The new lithostratigraphic unit - here defined as El Huemul Formation - covers in sharp contact to the Sarmiento Formation, and become thinner from East to West; the unit has been identified in about 1800 well logs covering up to 3500 km2, and its subsurface distribution exceed the boundaries of the study area. The El Huemul Formation consists of a thin lag of glauconitic sandstones with fining-upward log motif, followed by a mudstone-dominated succession that coarsening-upward to sandstones, evidencing a full T-R cycle. Preservation of the El Huemul Formation in the subsurface of the South Flank has been favored by the reactivation of WNW-ESE late Cretaceous normal faults, and by the generation of N-S striking normal faults of Paleocene-Eocene age. Flexural loading associated to igneous intrusions of Paleocene?- middle Eocene age also promoted the increase of subsidence in the South Flank of the basin prior to the transgression.

  9. LANDSAT-4 Science Characterization Early Results. Volume 4: Applications. [agriculture, soils land use, geology, hydrology, wetlands, water quality, biomass identification, and snow mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, J. L. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The excellent quality of TM data allows researchers to proceed directly with applications analyses, without spending a significant amount of time applying various corrections to the data. The early results derived of TM data are discussed for the following applications: agriculture, land cover/land use, soils, geology, hydrology, wetlands biomass, water quality, and snow.

  10. [Access to high-risk families through selected actors of the health care system. Results of an explorative questioning of early childhood intervention pilot projects].

    PubMed

    Renner, I

    2010-10-01

    A requirement for preventive child protection is an early and systematic access to high-risk families. Actors of the health care system, in particular doctors in private practice and midwives, are highly accepted within the population and therefore offer perfect requirements to provide this access. For this reason the aim in the context of early childhood intervention is a close cooperation of the Child and Youth Services with doctors and midwives. To what extent can these service providers of the health care system fulfill these expectations? The National Centre on Early Prevention tried to find an answer to this question with the support of 10 pilot projects which were set up within the framework of the action program "Early Prevention and Intervention for Parents and Children and Social Warning Systems". The comprehensive project presentation of selected results, insights and experiences concerning cooperation between agents of the Child and Youth Services and doctors in private practice and midwives is based on explorative written questioning of the 10 projects. The study shows from the point of view of the pilot projects that the cooperation with freelance midwives is promising. In contrast, the cooperation with doctors in private practice does not yet meet the hopes and expectations. To achieve an improvement of this situation, conditions have to be supported which promote a stronger commitment of the medical profession to early childhood intervention.

  11. Results of U-Pb LA-ICP-MS dating of detrital zircons from Ediacaran-Early Cambrian deposits of the eastern part of the Baltic monoclise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivleva, A. S.; Podkovyrov, V. N.; Ershova, V. B.; Anfinson, O. A.; Khudoley, A. K.; Fedorov, P. V.; Maslov, A. V.; Zdobin, D. Yu.

    2016-06-01

    Here we present the results of U-Pb LA-ICP-MS dating of detrital zircons from the Ediacaran-Early Cambrian deposits of the eastern part of the Baltic monoclise (Leningrad Region). The obtained age spectra of the detrital zircons suggest that, in the Ediacaran-Early Cambrian, the main clastic material source to the northwest of the Russian Platform was the Baltic Shield. Then in the Early Cambrian along with the Baltic Shield provenance, a clastic source from the Timanian margin of Baltica (northeast in modern coordinates) contributed to the deposits. The obtained data either somewhat set limits of the Timanian orogen formation as older than the previously suggested Middle Cambrian (about 510 Ma), based on the "absence of a Proto-Uralian-Timanian provenance signal" in the Sablino Formation rocks in the south Ladoga, or suggest another rearrangement of detritus transportation paths at the end of Stage 3 (Atdabanian).

  12. Mitochondrial Carbonic Anhydrase VA Deficiency Resulting from CA5A Alterations Presents with Hyperammonemia in Early Childhood

    PubMed Central

    van Karnebeek, Clara D.; Sly, William S.; Ross, Colin J.; Salvarinova, Ramona; Yaplito-Lee, Joy; Santra, Saikat; Shyr, Casper; Horvath, Gabriella A.; Eydoux, Patrice; Lehman, Anna M.; Bernard, Virginie; Newlove, Theresa; Ukpeh, Henry; Chakrapani, Anupam; Preece, Mary Anne; Ball, Sarah; Pitt, James; Vallance, Hilary D.; Coulter-Mackie, Marion; Nguyen, Hien; Zhang, Lin-Hua; Bhavsar, Amit P.; Sinclair, Graham; Waheed, Abdul; Wasserman, Wyeth W.; Stockler-Ipsiroglu, Sylvia

    2014-01-01

    Four children in three unrelated families (one consanguineous) presented with lethargy, hyperlactatemia, and hyperammonemia of unexplained origin during the neonatal period and early childhood. We identified and validated three different CA5A alterations, including a homozygous missense mutation (c.697T>C) in two siblings, a homozygous splice site mutation (c.555G>A) leading to skipping of exon 4, and a homozygous 4 kb deletion of exon 6. The deleterious nature of the homozygous mutation c.697T>C (p.Ser233Pro) was demonstrated by reduced enzymatic activity and increased temperature sensitivity. Carbonic anhydrase VA (CA-VA) was absent in liver in the child with the homozygous exon 6 deletion. The metabolite profiles in the affected individuals fit CA-VA deficiency, showing evidence of impaired provision of bicarbonate to the four enzymes that participate in key pathways in intermediary metabolism: carbamoylphosphate synthetase 1 (urea cycle), pyruvate carboxylase (anaplerosis, gluconeogenesis), propionyl-CoA carboxylase, and 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (branched chain amino acids catabolism). In the three children who were administered carglumic acid, hyperammonemia resolved. CA-VA deficiency should therefore be added to urea cycle defects, organic acidurias, and pyruvate carboxylase deficiency as a treatable condition in the differential diagnosis of hyperammonemia in the neonate and young child. PMID:24530203

  13. Urinary Microbiota Associated with Preterm Birth: Results from the Conditions Affecting Neurocognitive Development and Learning in Early Childhood (CANDLE) Study.

    PubMed

    Ollberding, Nicholas J; Völgyi, Eszter; Macaluso, Maurizio; Kumar, Ranjit; Morrow, Casey; Tylavsky, Frances A; Piyathilake, Chandrika J

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth (PTB) is the leading cause of infant morbidity and mortality. Genitourinary infection is implicated in the initiation of spontaneous PTB; however, examination of the urinary microbiota in relation to preterm delivery using next-generation sequencing technologies is lacking. In a case-control study nested within the Conditions Affecting Neurocognitive Development and Learning in Early Childhood (CANDLE) study, we examined associations between the urinary microbiota and PTB. A total of 49 cases (delivery < 37 weeks gestation) and 48 controls (delivery ≥ 37 weeks gestation) balanced on health insurance type were included in the present analysis. Illumina sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene V4 region was performed on urine samples collected during the second trimester. We observed no difference in taxa richness, evenness, or community composition between cases and controls or for gestational age modeled as a continuous variable. Operational taxonomic units (OTUs) classified to Prevotella, Sutterella, L. iners, Blautia, Kocuria, Lachnospiraceae, and S.marcescens were enriched among cases (FDR corrected p≤ 0.05). A urinary microbiota clustering partition dominated by S. marcescens was also associated with PTB (OR = 3.97, 95% CI: 1.19-13.24). These data suggest a limited role for the urinary microbiota in PTB when measured during the second trimester by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The enrichment among cases in several organisms previously reported to be associated with genitourinary pathology requires confirmation in future studies to rule out the potential for false positive findings. PMID:27611781

  14. Determination of inflammation of reflex sympathetic dystrophy at early stages with Tc-99m HIG scintigraphy: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Okudan, Berna; Celik, Canan

    2006-03-01

    The pathogenesis of reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) is not completely understood. However, an excessive regional inflammation, sensitization of primary somatosensory afferents, and sensitization of spinal neurons are considered to have a role in the pathogenesis of RSD. The underlying pathophysiology relating the clinical picture may help to determine the pharmacotherapeutic approach for an individual patient. Scintigraphy using radiolabelled human polyclonal non-specific immunoglobulin (HIG) has been recognized as a useful tool for the localization of inflammatory disorders. Thirty-six consecutive RSD patients associated with hemiplegia were included in this study. All the patients in this study had three phases bone scan and Tc-99m HIG scintigraphy. On admission, of 36 patients with positive bone scan, 30 had positive Tc-99m HIG scan. All the patients were symptomatic at the time of bone scanning. On the contrary, 24 out of 36 patients subsequently became asymptomatic at an 8-month re-evaluation period. Tc-99m HIG scintigraphy is a non-invasive complementary method for the determination of ongoing inflammatory reactions which also aids the clinicians to predict the response to anti-inflammatory therapy at the very early phase of RSD associated with hemiplegia. This preliminary study may be a source of inspiration for further studies with larger series and longer follow-up .

  15. Endoscopic Plantar Fasciotomy Improves Early Postoperative Results: A Retrospective Comparison of Outcomes After Endoscopic Versus Open Plantar Fasciotomy.

    PubMed

    Chou, Andrew Chia Chen; Ng, Sean Yung Chuan; Koo, Kevin Oon Thien

    2016-01-01

    Plantar fasciotomy is offered to patients with recalcitrant plantar fasciitis. Few studies have characterized the functional outcomes over time for the endoscopic approach compared with the open approach. We hypothesized that patients undergoing endoscopic surgery will have better postoperative functional outcomes early in the postoperative period but equivalent long-term outcomes compared with patients undergoing open surgery. We analyzed the prospectively collected data of all patients undergoing plantar fasciotomy at our institution from December 2007 to August 2014. A total of 42 feet of 38 patients were included in the analysis. The clinical data were collected preoperatively and at 3 and 6 months and 1 year. The functional outcomes analyzed included the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Ankle-Hindfoot scale, the Medical Outcomes Study, Short-Form, 36-item Health Survey, and patient satisfaction and expectations. Patients undergoing endoscopic surgery had significantly greater American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Ankle-Hindfoot and SF-36 Health Survey scores and lower pain scores at the 3-month period. They were also significantly more likely to be satisfied with and have had their expectations met by surgery. Compared with the open approach, the patients who had undergone endoscopic plantar fasciotomy experienced significantly greater improvements in the subjective and objective functional outcomes, with less pain and greater satisfaction, and had had their expectations met earlier in the recovery period, with equivalent long-term outcomes, compared with the patients who had undergone open plantar fasciotomy.

  16. Mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase VA deficiency resulting from CA5A alterations presents with hyperammonemia in early childhood.

    PubMed

    van Karnebeek, Clara D; Sly, William S; Ross, Colin J; Salvarinova, Ramona; Yaplito-Lee, Joy; Santra, Saikat; Shyr, Casper; Horvath, Gabriella A; Eydoux, Patrice; Lehman, Anna M; Bernard, Virginie; Newlove, Theresa; Ukpeh, Henry; Chakrapani, Anupam; Preece, Mary Anne; Ball, Sarah; Pitt, James; Vallance, Hilary D; Coulter-Mackie, Marion; Nguyen, Hien; Zhang, Lin-Hua; Bhavsar, Amit P; Sinclair, Graham; Waheed, Abdul; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Stockler-Ipsiroglu, Sylvia

    2014-03-01

    Four children in three unrelated families (one consanguineous) presented with lethargy, hyperlactatemia, and hyperammonemia of unexplained origin during the neonatal period and early childhood. We identified and validated three different CA5A alterations, including a homozygous missense mutation (c.697T>C) in two siblings, a homozygous splice site mutation (c.555G>A) leading to skipping of exon 4, and a homozygous 4 kb deletion of exon 6. The deleterious nature of the homozygous mutation c.697T>C (p.Ser233Pro) was demonstrated by reduced enzymatic activity and increased temperature sensitivity. Carbonic anhydrase VA (CA-VA) was absent in liver in the child with the homozygous exon 6 deletion. The metabolite profiles in the affected individuals fit CA-VA deficiency, showing evidence of impaired provision of bicarbonate to the four enzymes that participate in key pathways in intermediary metabolism: carbamoylphosphate synthetase 1 (urea cycle), pyruvate carboxylase (anaplerosis, gluconeogenesis), propionyl-CoA carboxylase, and 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (branched chain amino acids catabolism). In the three children who were administered carglumic acid, hyperammonemia resolved. CA-VA deficiency should therefore be added to urea cycle defects, organic acidurias, and pyruvate carboxylase deficiency as a treatable condition in the differential diagnosis of hyperammonemia in the neonate and young child. PMID:24530203

  17. Elemental abundance analysis of the early-type members of the open cluster M6: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kııçoǧlu, T.; Monier, R.; Fossati, L.

    2014-11-01

    Differences in chemical composition among main sequence stars within a given cluster are probably due to differences in their masses and other effects such as radiative diffusion, magnetic field, rotation, mixing mechanisms, mass loss, accretion and multiplicity. The early type main-sequence members of open clusters of different ages support studies of the competition between radiative diffusion and mixing mechanisms. We have analysed low- and high-resolution spectra covering the spectral range λ 4500-5840 Å of late B-, A- and F-type members of the open cluster M6 (age ˜100 Myr). The spectra were obtained with the FLAMES/GIRAFFE spectrograph mounted at UT2, the 8-m VLT telescope. The effective temperatures, surface gravities and microturbulent velocities of the stars were derived from both photometric and spectral methods. We have also performed a chemical abundance analysis using synthetic spectra. Abundances were determined for the elements C, O, Mg, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Y and Ba. The star-to-star variations in element abundances among the members of M6 are discussed.

  18. Mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase VA deficiency resulting from CA5A alterations presents with hyperammonemia in early childhood.

    PubMed

    van Karnebeek, Clara D; Sly, William S; Ross, Colin J; Salvarinova, Ramona; Yaplito-Lee, Joy; Santra, Saikat; Shyr, Casper; Horvath, Gabriella A; Eydoux, Patrice; Lehman, Anna M; Bernard, Virginie; Newlove, Theresa; Ukpeh, Henry; Chakrapani, Anupam; Preece, Mary Anne; Ball, Sarah; Pitt, James; Vallance, Hilary D; Coulter-Mackie, Marion; Nguyen, Hien; Zhang, Lin-Hua; Bhavsar, Amit P; Sinclair, Graham; Waheed, Abdul; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Stockler-Ipsiroglu, Sylvia

    2014-03-01

    Four children in three unrelated families (one consanguineous) presented with lethargy, hyperlactatemia, and hyperammonemia of unexplained origin during the neonatal period and early childhood. We identified and validated three different CA5A alterations, including a homozygous missense mutation (c.697T>C) in two siblings, a homozygous splice site mutation (c.555G>A) leading to skipping of exon 4, and a homozygous 4 kb deletion of exon 6. The deleterious nature of the homozygous mutation c.697T>C (p.Ser233Pro) was demonstrated by reduced enzymatic activity and increased temperature sensitivity. Carbonic anhydrase VA (CA-VA) was absent in liver in the child with the homozygous exon 6 deletion. The metabolite profiles in the affected individuals fit CA-VA deficiency, showing evidence of impaired provision of bicarbonate to the four enzymes that participate in key pathways in intermediary metabolism: carbamoylphosphate synthetase 1 (urea cycle), pyruvate carboxylase (anaplerosis, gluconeogenesis), propionyl-CoA carboxylase, and 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase (branched chain amino acids catabolism). In the three children who were administered carglumic acid, hyperammonemia resolved. CA-VA deficiency should therefore be added to urea cycle defects, organic acidurias, and pyruvate carboxylase deficiency as a treatable condition in the differential diagnosis of hyperammonemia in the neonate and young child.

  19. Early E-modulus of healing Achilles tendons correlates with late function: similar results with or without surgery.

    PubMed

    Schepull, T; Kvist, J; Aspenberg, P

    2012-02-01

    Non-operative treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures is associated with an increased risk of rerupture. We hypothesized that this is due to inferior mechanical properties during an early phase of healing, and performed a randomized trial, using a new method to measure the mechanical properties. Tantalum markers were inserted in the tendon stumps, and tendon strain at different loadings was measured by stereo-radiography (Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis) at 3, 7 and 19 weeks and 18 months after injury. Thirty patients were randomized to operative or non-operative treatment. The primary out-come variable was an estimate for the modulus of elasticity at 7 weeks. Strain per force, cross-sectional area and tendon elongation were also measured. The functional outcome variable was the heel-raise index after 18 months. There was no difference in the mean modulus of elasticity or other mechanical or functional variables between operative and non-operative treatments at any time-point, but strain per force at 7 and 19 weeks had a significantly larger variation in the non-operative group. This group, therefore, might contain more outliers with poor healing. The modulus of elasticity at 7 weeks correlated with the heel-raise index after 18 months in both treatment groups (r(2) =0.75; P=0.0001). This correlation is an intriguing finding.

  20. A Candida albicans Strain Expressing Mammalian Interleukin-17A Results in Early Control of Fungal Growth during Disseminated Infection

    PubMed Central

    Huppler, Anna R.; Whibley, Natasha; Woolford, Carol A.; Childs, Erin E.; He, Jie; Biswas, Partha S.; McGeachy, Mandy J.; Mitchell, Aaron P.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is normally a commensal fungus of the human mucosae and skin, but it causes life-threatening systemic infections in hospital settings in the face of predisposing conditions, such as indwelling catheters, abdominal surgery, or antibiotic use. Immunity to C. albicans involves various immune parameters, but the cytokine interleukin-17A (IL-17A) (also known as IL-17) has emerged as a centrally important mediator of immune defense against both mucosal and systemic candidiasis. Conversely, IL-17A has been suggested to enhance the virulence of C. albicans, indicating that it may exert detrimental effects on pathogenesis. In this study, we hypothesized that a C. albicans strain expressing IL-17A would exhibit reduced virulence in vivo. To that end, we created a Candida-optimized expression cassette encoding murine IL-17A, which was transformed into the DAY286 strain of C. albicans. Candida-derived IL-17A was indistinguishable from murine IL-17A in terms of biological activity and detection in standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Expression of IL-17A did not negatively impact the growth of these strains in vitro. Moreover, the IL-17A-expressing C. albicans strains showed significantly reduced pathogenicity in a systemic model of Candida infection, mainly evident during the early stages of disease. Collectively, these findings suggest that IL-17A mitigates the virulence of C. albicans. PMID:26150537

  1. Urinary Microbiota Associated with Preterm Birth: Results from the Conditions Affecting Neurocognitive Development and Learning in Early Childhood (CANDLE) Study

    PubMed Central

    Ollberding, Nicholas J.; Völgyi, Eszter; Macaluso, Maurizio; Kumar, Ranjit; Morrow, Casey; Tylavsky, Frances A.; Piyathilake, Chandrika J.

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth (PTB) is the leading cause of infant morbidity and mortality. Genitourinary infection is implicated in the initiation of spontaneous PTB; however, examination of the urinary microbiota in relation to preterm delivery using next-generation sequencing technologies is lacking. In a case-control study nested within the Conditions Affecting Neurocognitive Development and Learning in Early Childhood (CANDLE) study, we examined associations between the urinary microbiota and PTB. A total of 49 cases (delivery < 37 weeks gestation) and 48 controls (delivery ≥ 37 weeks gestation) balanced on health insurance type were included in the present analysis. Illumina sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene V4 region was performed on urine samples collected during the second trimester. We observed no difference in taxa richness, evenness, or community composition between cases and controls or for gestational age modeled as a continuous variable. Operational taxonomic units (OTUs) classified to Prevotella, Sutterella, L. iners, Blautia, Kocuria, Lachnospiraceae, and S.marcescens were enriched among cases (FDR corrected p≤ 0.05). A urinary microbiota clustering partition dominated by S. marcescens was also associated with PTB (OR = 3.97, 95% CI: 1.19–13.24). These data suggest a limited role for the urinary microbiota in PTB when measured during the second trimester by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The enrichment among cases in several organisms previously reported to be associated with genitourinary pathology requires confirmation in future studies to rule out the potential for false positive findings. PMID:27611781

  2. Early results for treatment of three- and four-part fractures of the proximal humerus using the PHILOS plate system.

    PubMed

    Moonot, P; Ashwood, N; Hamlet, M

    2007-09-01

    Secure fixation of displaced proximal fractures of the humerus is a challenging problem. A total of 32 patients with acutely displaced three- or four-part proximal fractures of the humerus were treated by open reduction and internal fixation using the proximal humeral internal locking system (PHILOS) plate. There were 23 women and nine men with a mean age of 59.9 years (18 to 87). Data were collected prospectively and the outcomes were assessed using the Constant score. The mean follow-up was for 11 months (3 to 24). In 31 patients (97%) the fracture united clinically and radiologically at a mean of 10 weeks (8 to 24). The mean Constant score at final review was 66.5 (30 to 92). There was no significant difference in outcome when comparing patients aged more than 60 years (18 patients) with those aged less than 60 years (14 patients) (t-test, p = 0.8443). There was one case each of nonunion, malunion and a broken screw in the elderly population. This plate provides an alternative method of fixation for fractures of the proximal humerus. It provides a stable fixation in young patients with good-quality bone sufficient to permit early mobilisation. Failure of the screws to maintain fixation in the elderly remains a problem.

  3. Effects of Low-Dose Estrogen Replacement During Childhood on Pubertal Development and Gonadotropin Concentrations in Patients With Turner Syndrome: Results of a Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xiaohai; Garg, Sipi; Kowal, Karen; Cutler, Gordon B.; Ross, Judith L.

    2014-01-01

    Context: The optimal approach to estrogen replacement in girls with Turner syndrome has not been determined. Objective: The aim of the study was to assess the effects of an individualized regimen of low-dose ethinyl estradiol (EE2) during childhood from as early as age 5, followed by a pubertal induction regimen starting after age 12 and escalating to full replacement over 4 years. Design: This study was a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Setting: The study was conducted at two US pediatric endocrine centers. Subjects: Girls with Turner syndrome (n = 149), aged 5.0–12.5 years, were enrolled; data from 123 girls were analyzable for pubertal onset. Intervention(s): Interventions comprised placebo or recombinant GH injections three times a week, with daily oral placebo or oral EE2 during childhood (25 ng/kg/d, ages 5–8 y; 50 ng/kg/d, ages >8–12 y); after age 12, all patients received escalating EE2 starting at a nominal dosage of 100 ng/kg/d. Placebo/EE2 dosages were reduced by 50% for breast development before age 12 years, vaginal bleeding before age 14 years, or undue advance in bone age. Main Outcome Measures: The main outcome measures for this report were median ages at Tanner breast stage ≥2, median age at menarche, and tempo of puberty (Tanner 2 to menarche). Patterns of gonadotropin secretion and impact of childhood EE2 on gonadotropins also were assessed. Results: Compared with recipients of oral placebo (n = 62), girls who received childhood low-dose EE2 (n = 61) had significantly earlier thelarche (median, 11.6 vs 12.6 y, P < 0.001) and slower tempo of puberty (median, 3.3 vs 2.2 y, P = 0.003); both groups had delayed menarche (median, 15.0 y). Among childhood placebo recipients, girls who had spontaneous breast development before estrogen exposure had significantly lower median FSH values than girls who did not. Conclusions: In addition to previously reported effects on cognitive measures and GH

  4. Early versus delayed minimal enteral feeding and risk for necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm growth-restricted infants with abnormal antenatal Doppler results.

    PubMed

    Karagianni, Paraskevi; Briana, Despina D; Mitsiakos, George; Elias, Anestis; Theodoridis, Theodoros; Chatziioannidis, Elias; Kyriakidou, Maria; Nikolaidis, Nikolaos

    2010-05-01

    We studied the effect of early (< or = 5 days) versus delayed (> or = 6 days) initiation of minimal enteral feeding (MEF) on the incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and feeding intolerance in preterm infants with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and abnormal antenatal Doppler results. We performed a randomized, nonblinded pilot trial of infants receiving early or delayed MEF in addition to parenteral feeding within 48 hours of life. Demographic data, maternal preeclampsia, antenatal steroid exposure, Doppler studies, as well as cases of NEC and feeding intolerance were all recorded. Of the 84 infants enrolled, 81 completed the study: 40 received early (median age: 2 days, range: 1 to 5 days) and 41 delayed (median age: 7 days, range: 6 to 14 days) MEF. The incidence of NEC and feeding intolerance was not significantly different between groups (p = 0.353 and p = 0.533, respectively). Birth weight was an independent risk factor for NEC in both groups. Early MEF of preterm infants with IUGR and abnormal antenatal Doppler results may not have a significant effect on the incidence of NEC or feeding intolerance. Furthermore, birth weight seems to be an independent risk factor for the development of NEC, irrespectively of the timing of MEF introduction.

  5. Impact of Early Life Adversity on Reward Processing in Young Adults: EEG-fMRI Results from a Prospective Study over 25 Years

    PubMed Central

    Boecker, Regina; Holz, Nathalie E.; Buchmann, Arlette F.; Blomeyer, Dorothea; Plichta, Michael M.; Wolf, Isabella; Baumeister, Sarah; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Banaschewski, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Several lines of evidence have implicated the mesolimbic dopamine reward pathway in altered brain function resulting from exposure to early adversity. The present study examined the impact of early life adversity on different stages of neuronal reward processing later in life and their association with a related behavioral phenotype, i.e. attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). 162 healthy young adults (mean age = 24.4 years; 58% female) from an epidemiological cohort study followed since birth participated in a simultaneous EEG-fMRI study using a monetary incentive delay task. Early life adversity according to an early family adversity index (EFA) and lifetime ADHD symptoms were assessed using standardized parent interviews conducted at the offspring's age of 3 months and between 2 and 15 years, respectively. fMRI region-of-interest analysis revealed a significant effect of EFA during reward anticipation in reward-related areas (i.e. ventral striatum, putamen, thalamus), indicating decreased activation when EFA increased. EEG analysis demonstrated a similar effect for the contingent negative variation (CNV), with the CNV decreasing with the level of EFA. In contrast, during reward delivery, activation of the bilateral insula, right pallidum and bilateral putamen increased with EFA. There was a significant association of lifetime ADHD symptoms with lower activation in the left ventral striatum during reward anticipation and higher activation in the right insula during reward delivery. The present findings indicate a differential long-term impact of early life adversity on reward processing, implicating hyporesponsiveness during reward anticipation and hyperresponsiveness when receiving a reward. Moreover, a similar activation pattern related to lifetime ADHD suggests that the impact of early life stress on ADHD may possibly be mediated by a dysfunctional reward pathway. PMID:25118701

  6. Early Neurological Outcome of Young Infants Exposed to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors during Pregnancy: Results from the Observational SMOK Study

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Nathalie K. S.; van der Veere, Christine N.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.; Bos, Arend F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) during pregnancy is common while the effect on the infant’s neurological outcome is unknown. Our objective was to determine the effects of prenatal SSRI-exposure on the infants’ neurological functioning, adjusted for maternal mental health. Methods A prospective observational study from May 2007 to April 2010. The study groups comprised 63 SSRI-exposed infants (SSRI group) and 44 non-exposed infants (non-SSRI group). Maternal depression and anxiety were measured using questionnaires. The main outcome measures during the first week after birth and at three to four months were the quality of the infants’ general movements (GMs) according to Prechtl and a detailed motor optimality score. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for abnormal GM quality in the SSRI and non-SSRI groups, and adjusted for maternal depression, anxiety, and other confounders. The study was registered under 53506435 in the ISRCTN. Findings All infants were born around term. During the first week, abnormal GMs occurred more frequently in the SSRI group than in the non-SSRI group (59% versus 33%) and the median MOS was lower (13 versus 18). The OR for abnormal GMs in the SSRI versus the non-SSRI group was 3·0 (95% CI, 1.3 to 6.9) and increased after adjustment for confounders. At three to four months, more SSRI-exposed infants had monotonous movements (48% versus 20%) with lower median MOSs (26 versus 28). The OR for monotonous movements was 3·5 (95% CI, 1.5 to 8.6) and increased after adjusting for confounders. Interpretation Prenatal exposure to SSRI had an adverse effect on early neurological functioning as reflected by GM quality, irrespective of maternal depression and anxiety, and other confounders. Physicians should take this into account in consultation with parents. PMID:23785389

  7. Characterization of early pathogenesis in the SOD1G93A mouse model of ALS: part II, results and discussion

    PubMed Central

    Vinsant, Sharon; Mansfield, Carol; Jimenez-Moreno, Ramon; Del Gaizo Moore, Victoria; Yoshikawa, Masaaki; Hampton, Thomas G; Prevette, David; Caress, James; Oppenheim, Ronald W; Milligan, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Pathological events are well characterized in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) mouse models, but review of the literature fails to identify a specific initiating event that precipitates disease pathology. There is now growing consensus in the field that axon and synapses are first cellular sites of degeneration, but controversy exists over whether axon and synapse loss is initiated autonomously at those sites or by pathology in the cell body, in nonneuronal cells or even in nonmotoneurons (MNs). Previous studies have identified pathological events in the mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) models involving spinal cord, peripheral axons, neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), or muscle; however, few studies have systematically examined pathogenesis at multiple sites in the same study. We have performed ultrastructural examination of both central and peripheral components of the neuromuscular system in the SOD1G93A mouse model of ALS. Twenty percent of MNs undergo degeneration by P60, but NMJ innervation in fast fatigable muscles is reduced by 40% by P30. Gait alterations and muscle weakness were also found at P30. There was no change in axonal transport prior to initial NMJ denervation. Mitochondrial morphological changes are observed at P7 and become more prominent with disease progression. At P30 there was a significant decrease in excitatory axo-dendritic and axo-somatic synapses with an increase in C-type axo-somatic synapses. Our study examined early pathology in both peripheral and central neuromuscular system. The muscle denervation is associated with functional motor deficits and begins during the first postnatal month in SOD1G93A mice. Physiological dysfunction and pathology in the mitochondria of synapses and MN soma and dendrites occur, and disease onset in these animals begins more than 2 months earlier than originally thought. This information may be valuable for designing preclinical trials that are more likely to impact disease onset and progression

  8. Early Maternal Withdrawal and Nonverbal Childhood IQ as Precursors for Substance Use Disorder in Young Adulthood: Results of a 20-Year Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Pechtel, Pia; Woodman, Ashley; Lyons-Ruth, Karlen

    2012-01-01

    The relation between early mother-infant interaction and later socio-emotional development has been well established. The present study addresses the more recent interest in the impact of maternal caregiving on cognitive development and their role in decision-making in young adulthood. Using data from a prospective longitudinal study on attachment, prediction from early mother-infant interactions at age 18 months and from verbal and nonverbal cognitive skill at age 5 were examined as predictors of a substance use disorder (abuse/dependence) in young adulthood (age 20) on the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID). Results reveal that the mother's withdrawal from interaction with the infant at age 18 months, coded using the AMBIANCE coding system (Atypical Maternal Behavior Instrument for Assessment and Classification), was associated with the child's lower nonverbal cognitive scores but not verbal cognitive scores at age 5. In addition, maternal withdrawal at 18 months predicted a clinical diagnosis of substance use disorder (alcohol/cannabis) at age 20. Finally, nonverbal reasoning at age 5 mediated the relationship between early maternal withdrawal and substance use disorder (alcohol/cannabis) in young adulthood. Findings indicate the need for further work examining how early maternal withdrawal affects nonverbal cognitive development by school entry, and how these nonverbal deficits further contribute to maladaptive coping strategies such as substance use by young adulthood. PMID:25473440

  9. Early Maternal Withdrawal and Nonverbal Childhood IQ as Precursors for Substance Use Disorder in Young Adulthood: Results of a 20-Year Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Pechtel, Pia; Woodman, Ashley; Lyons-Ruth, Karlen

    2014-01-01

    The relation between early mother–infant interaction and later socio-emotional development has been well established. The present study addresses the more recent interest in the impact of maternal caregiving on cognitive development and their role in decision-making in young adulthood. Using data from a prospective longitudinal study on attachment, prediction from early mother–infant interactions at age 18 months and from verbal and nonverbal cognitive skill at age 5 were examined as predictors of a substance use disorder (abuse/dependence) in young adulthood (age 20) on the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID). Results reveal that the mother’s withdrawal from interaction with the infant at age 18 months, coded using the AMBIANCE coding system (Atypical Maternal Behavior Instrument for Assessment and Classification), was associated with the child’s lower nonverbal cognitive scores but not verbal cognitive scores at age 5. In addition, maternal withdrawal at 18 months predicted a clinical diagnosis of substance use disorder (alcohol/cannabis) at age 20. Finally, nonverbal reasoning at age 5 mediated the relationship between early maternal withdrawal and substance use disorder (alcohol/cannabis) in young adulthood. Findings indicate the need for further work examining how early maternal withdrawal affects nonverbal cognitive development by school entry, and how these nonverbal deficits further contribute to maladaptive coping strategies such as substance use by young adulthood. PMID:25473440

  10. The prognostic significance of early treatment response in pediatric relapsed acute myeloid leukemia: results of the international study Relapsed AML 2001/01

    PubMed Central

    Creutzig, Ursula; Zimmermann, Martin; Dworzak, Michael N.; Gibson, Brenda; Tamminga, Rienk; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Ha, Shau-Yin; Hasle, Henrik; Maschan, Alexey; Bertrand, Yves; Leverger, Guy; von Neuhoff, Christine; Razzouk, Bassem; Rizzari, Carmelo; Smisek, Petr; Smith, Owen P.; Stark, Batia; Reinhardt, Dirk; Kaspers, Gertjan L.

    2014-01-01

    The prognostic significance of early response to treatment has not been reported in relapsed pediatric acute myeloid leukemia. In order to identify an early and easily applicable prognostic factor allowing subsequent treatment modifications, we assessed leukemic blast counts in the bone marrow by morphology on days 15 and 28 after first reinduction in 338 patients of the international Relapsed-AML2001/01 trial. Both day 15 and day 28 status was classified as good (≤20% leukemic blasts) in 77% of patients. The correlation between day 15 and 28 blast percentages was significant, but not strong (Spearman correlation coefficient = 0.49, P<0.001). Survival probability decreased in a stepwise fashion along with rising blast counts at day 28. Patients with bone marrow blast counts at this time-point of ≤5%, 6–10%, 11–20% and >20% had 4-year probabilities of survival of 52%±3% versus 36%±10% versus 21%±9% versus 14%±4%, respectively, P<0.0001; this trend was not seen for day 15 results. Multivariate analysis showed that early treatment response at day 28 had the strongest prognostic significance, superseding even time to relapse (< or ≥12 months). In conclusion, an early response to treatment, measured on day 28, is a strong and independent prognostic factor potentially useful for treatment stratification in pediatric relapsed acute myeloid leukemia. This study was registered with ISRCTN code: 94206677. PMID:24763401

  11. Prophylactic volume expansion therapy for the prevention of delayed cerebral ischemia after early aneurysm surgery. Results of a preliminary trial.

    PubMed

    Solomon, R A; Fink, M E; Lennihan, L

    1988-03-01

    From June 1986 to June 1987, 47 consecutive patients with ruptured intracranial aneurysms were treated with immediate aneurysm surgery and prophylactic volume expansion therapy for ten to 14 days after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Twenty-four patients were admitted within three days of SAH. Twenty-three of these patients had an excellent result, and one patient died. There were no cases of delayed cerebral infarction. In 18 of 23 patients admitted more than three days after SAH, there was an excellent result. The other five patients had permanent morbidity related to the original SAH. These preliminary data suggest that immediate aneurysm surgery and aggressive postoperative prophylactic volume expansion in all patients can substantially reduce rebleeding and delayed cerebral ischemia, potential causes of morbidity, after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. A more extensive prospective trial of this approach will be required to test this hypothesis. PMID:3277601

  12. The Martian Soil as a Geochemical Sink for Hydrothermally Altered Crustal Rocks and Mobile Elements: Implications of Early MER Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, H. E.; Nelson, M. J.; Shearer, C. K.; Draper, D. S.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrothermal and aqueous alteration can explain some of the exciting results from the MER team s analyses of the martian soil, including the major elements, mobile elements, and the nickel enrichment. Published results from the five lander missions lead to the following conclusions: 1) The soil appears to be globally mixed and basaltic with only small local variations in chemistry. Relative to martian basaltic meteorites and Gusev rocks the soils are depleted in the fluid-mobile element calcium, but only slightly enriched to somewhat depleted in iron oxide. 2) The presence of olivine in the soils based on M ssbauer data argues that the soil is only partly weathered and is more akin to a lunar regolith than a terrestrial soil. 3) The presence of bromine along with sulfur and chlorine in the soils is consistent with addition of a mobile element component to the soil.

  13. Evaluation of Early Performance Results for Massachusetts Homes in the National Grid Pilot Deep Energy Retrofit Program

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, C.; Neuhauser, K.

    2013-11-01

    This research project evaluates post-retrofit performance measurements, energy use data and construction costs for 13 projects that participated in the National Grid Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot program. The projects implemented a package of measures defined by performance targets for building enclosure components and building enclosure air tightness. Nearly all of the homes reached a post-retrofit air tightness result of 1.5 ACH 50. Homes that used the chainsaw retrofit technique along with roof insulation, and wall insulation applied to the exterior had the best air tightness results and the lowest heating and cooling source energy use. Analysis of measure costs and project objectives yielded a categorization of costs relative to energy performance objectives. On average about 1/2 of the energy-related measure costs correspond primarily to energy-related objectives, and 20% of energy-related measure costs relate primarily to non-energy objectives.

  14. Evaluation of Early Performance Results for Massachusetts Homes in the National Grid Pilot Deep Energy Retrofit Program

    SciTech Connect

    Neuhauser, K.; Gates, C.

    2013-11-01

    This research project evaluates post-retrofit performance measurements, energy use data and construction costs for 13 projects that participated in the National Grid Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot program. The projects implemented a package of measures defined by performance targets for building enclosure components and building enclosure air tightness. Nearly all of the homes reached a post-retrofit air tightness result of 1.5 ACH 50. Homes that used the chainsaw retrofit technique along with roof insulation, and wall insulation applied to the exterior had the best air tightness results and the lowest heating and cooling source energy use. Analysis of measure costs and project objectives yielded a categorization of costs relative to energy performance objectives. On average about ½ of the energy-related measure costs correspond primarily to energy-related objectives, and 20% of energy-related measure costs relate primarily to non-energy objectives.

  15. Biological effects of anti-CD34-coated ePTFE vascular grafts. Early in vivo experimental results

    PubMed Central

    Rungatscher, Alessio; Buchegger, Franz; Tille, Jean-Christophe; Namy, Sophie; Ratib, Osman; Kutryk, Michael; Walpoth, Beat Hans

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the study To assess the biological activity of anti-CD34 antibody-coated ePTFE vascular prostheses. Material and methods Indium111-labeled autologous thrombocytes were administered to 5 anesthetized pigs after the placement of femoral arterial and venous catheters. An arterio-venous fistula, created by the random interposition of 4 different ePTFE grafts (A = dry control, B = dry anti-CD34, C = wet control, D = wet anti-CD34), was blood perfused for 0, 10, 30, 60 and 120 minutes. Radioactivity of each graft was measured and expressed in cpm/mg. Morphological studies were performed to assess intraluminal deposition. Results The median radioactivity of graft B was significantly higher than that of graft A after 60 min (1074 vs. 18; p = 0.021) and 120 min (1990 vs. 25; p = 0.043) of perfusion. Similarly, graft D was significantly more active than graft C (60 min: 1388 vs. 26; p = 0.021 and 120 min: 2780 vs. 23; p = 0.021). Histological and SEM results confirmed the radio-labeling in-vivo studies by showing significantly more protein/cell and platelet depositions (p = 0.012). Conclusions Anti-CD34-coated ePTFE grafts bound significantly more platelets/cells and proteins than their uncoated counterparts, confirming the bioactivity of the antibody. This process is time-dependent and matches the morphological results. The anti-CD34 coating may enhance temporal and spatial endothelialization of vascular grafts and, thus, possibly improve clinical results by providing direct endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) adhesion/entrapment or by creating a biocompatible protein-thrombocyte/cell layer that indirectly enhances migration and further proliferation of EPCs. PMID:26335112

  16. Percutaneous Intraductal Radiofrequency Ablation for Clearance of Occluded Metal Stent in Malignant Biliary Obstruction: Feasibility and Early Results

    SciTech Connect

    Pai, Madhava; Valek, Vlastimil; Tomas, Andrasina; Doros, Attila; Quaretti, Pietro; Golfieri, Rita; Mosconi, Cristina; Habib, Nagy

    2013-07-11

    PurposeThe major complication occurring with biliary stents is stent occlusion, frequently seen because of tumour in-growth, epithelial hyperplasia, and sludge deposits, resulting in recurrent jaundice and cholangitis. We report a prospective study with the results of first in man percutaneous intraductal radiofrequency (RF) ablation to clear the blocked metal stents in patients with malignant biliary obstruction using a novel bipolar RF catheter.MethodsNine patients with malignant biliary obstruction and blocked metal stents were included. These patients underwent intraductal biliary RF ablation through the blocked metal stent following external biliary decompression with an internal–external biliary drainage.ResultsAll nine patients had their stent patency restored successfully without the use of secondary stents. Following this intervention, there was no 30-day mortality, haemorrhage, bile duct perforation, bile leak, or pancreatitis. Of the nine patients, six are alive and three patients are dead with a median follow-up of 122 (range 50–488) days and a median stent patency of 102.5 (range 50–321) days. Six patients had their stent patent at the time of last follow-up or death. Three patients with stent blockage at 321, 290, and 65 days postprocedure underwent percutaneous transhepatic drain insertion and repeat ablation.ConclusionsIn this selective group of patients, it appears that this new approach is safe and feasible. Efficacy remains to be proven in future, randomized, prospective studies.

  17. Cosmetic results in early breast cancer treated with lumpectomy, peri-operative interstitial irradiation, and external beam radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, L.; Jewell, W.R.; Mansfield, C.M.; Reddy, E.K.; Thomas, J.H.; Krishnan, E.C.; Gerald, K.

    1988-07-01

    Patients with operable breast cancer were treated at the University of Kansas Medical Center with lumpectomy, peri-operative interstitial Iridium, and external beam radiotherapy, and concomitant adjuvant chemotherapy in a majority of node positive cases. Examination of the cosmetic results in 85 breasts followed for at least 2 years, at a median of 41 months revealed 20% to be excellent, 44% to be very good, 24% good, 9% fair, and 4% to have poor results. In this paper cosmesis is analyzed with reference to the size of the primary, its location, age of the patient, whether the patient received adjuvant chemotherapy, and whether the regional nodes were treated. In this group of patients, the size and the site of the primary, patient's age, and whether adjuvant chemotherapy was administered or not, did not adversely affect the aesthetic outcome. Treatment of the regional nodes gave a worse mean cosmetic score compared to the group in whom only the breast was treated (37.51 vs. 58.98 respectively, p less than 0.001). Among the 11 patients with fair/poor cosmesis, all had regional nodal treatment, 7/11 had inner quadrant lesions, and 7/11 had lesions greater than T1. Further follow-up and accrual would be needed to confirm our results and affirm if other factors would change.

  18. Effects of 60 Hz electromagnetic fields on early growth in three plant species and a replication of previous results

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.S.

    1996-05-01

    In an attempt to replicate the findings of Smith et al., seeds of Raphanus sativus L. (radish), Sinapsis alba L. (mustard), and Hordeum vulgare L. (barley) were grown for between 9 and 21 days in continuous electromagnetic fields (EMFs) at ion-cyclotron resonance conditions for stimulation of Ca{sup 2+} (B{sub H} = 78.3 {micro}T, B{sub HAC} = 40 {micro}T peak-peak at 60 Hz, B{sub v} = 0). On harvesting, radish showed results similar to those of Smith et al. Dry stem weight and plant height were both significantly greater (Mann-Whitney tests, Ps < 0.05) in EMF-exposed plants than in control plants in each EMF experiment. Wet root weight was significantly greater in EMF-exposed plants in two out of three experiments, as were dry leaf weight, dry whole weight, and stem diameter. Dry root weight, wet leaf weight, and wet whole weight were significantly greater in EMF-exposed plants in one of three experiments. All significant differences indicated an increase in weight or size in the EMF-exposed plants. In each of the sham experiments, no differences between exposed and control plants were evident. Mustard plants failed to respond to the EMFs in any of the plant parameters measured. In one experiment, barley similarly failed to respond; but in another showed significantly greater wet root weight and significantly smaller stem diameter and dry seed weight at the end of the experiment in exposed plants compared to control plants. Although these results give no clue about the underlying bioelectromagnetic mechanism, they demonstrate that, at least for one EMF-sensitive biosystem, results can be independently replicated in another laboratory. Such replication is crucial in establishing the validity of bioelectromagnetic science.

  19. Impact of etanercept tapering on work productivity in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: results from the PRIZE study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Bansback, Nick; Sun, Huiying; Pedersen, Ronald; Kotak, Sameer; Anis, Aslam H

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess changes in work productivity in patients who have achieved response using etanercept (ETN) 50 mg+methotrexate (MTX) (phase I) are randomised to ETN 25 mg+MTX versus MTX versus placebo (phase II) and then withdrawn from treatment (phase III). Methods Patients included in the analysis were in employment entering phase II of the PRIZE trial and had one or more follow-ups. Phase II was a 39-week, randomised and double-blind comparison of the 3 dose-reduction treatments. Phase III was a 26-week observational study where treatment was withdrawn. The Valuation of Lost Productivity was completed approximately every 13 weeks to estimate productivity impacts from a societal perspective. Results A total of 120 participants were included in our analyses. During phase II, ETN25+MTX or MTX improved paid work productivity by over 100 hours compared with placebo, amounting to a gain of €1752 or €1503, respectively. ETN25+MTX compared with placebo gains €1862 in total paid/unpaid productivity. At week 52, the 3-month paid work productivity loss was 21.8, 12.8 and 14.0 hours, respectively. The productivity loss increased at week 64 from week 52, dropped at week 76 for all treatment groups and then continued rising after week 76 for the placebo group (71.9 hours at week 91) but not for the other 2 groups (21.9 hours for ETX25+MTX and 27.6 hours for MTX). Conclusions The work productivity gain in phase I as a result of ETN50+MTX was marginally lost in the dose-reduction treatment groups, ETN25+MTX and MTX, but substantially lost in the placebo group during phase II. Trial registration number NCT00913458; Results. PMID:27486524

  20. Remote sensing studies of lunar dark-halo impact craters - Preliminary results and implications for early volcanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawke, B. R.; Bell, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    A summary of the nature and origin of lunar dark-h