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Sample records for early mesozoic newark

  1. Sedimentary facies and depositional environments of early Mesozoic Newark Supergroup basins, eastern North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smoot, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    The early Mesozoic Newark Supergroup consists of continental sedimentary rocks and basalt flows that occupy a NE-trending belt of elongate basins exposed in eastern North America. The basins were filled over a period of 30-40 m.y. spanning the Late Triassic to Early Jurassic, prior to the opening of the north Atlantic Ocean. The sedimentary rocks are here divided into four principal lithofacies. The alluvial-fan facies includes deposits dominated by: (1) debris flows; (2) shallow braided streams; (3) deeper braided streams (with trough crossbeds); or (4) intense bioturbation or hyperconcentrated flows (tabular, unstratified muddy sandstone). The fluvial facies include deposits of: (1) shallow, ephemeral braided streams; (2) deeper, flashflooding, braided streams (with poor sorting and crossbeds); (3) perennial braided rivers; (4) meandering rivers; (5) meandering streams (with high suspended loads); (6) overbank areas or local flood-plain lakes; or (7) local streams and/or colluvium. The lacustrine facies includes deposits of: (1) deep perennial lakes; (2) shallow perennial lakes; (3) shallow ephemeral lakes; (4) playa dry mudflats; (5) salt-encrusted saline mudflats; or (6) vegetated mudflats. The lake margin clastic facies includes deposits of: (1) birdfoot deltas; (2) stacked Gilbert-type deltas; (3) sheet deltas; (4) wave-reworked alluvial fans; or (5) wave-sorted sand sheets. Coal deposits are present in the lake margin clastic and the lacustrine facies of Carnian age (Late Triassic) only in basins of south-central Virginia and North and South Carolina. Eolian deposits are known only from the basins in Nova Scotia and Connecticut. Evaporites (and their pseudomorphs) occur mainly in the northern basins as deposits of saline soils and less commonly of saline lakes, and some evaporite and alkaline minerals present in the Mesozoic rocks may be a result of later diagenesis. These relationships suggest climatic variations across paleolatitudes, more humid to the

  2. Chaotic evolution of the long-period Milankovitch cycle during the early Mesozoic: independent evidences from the Newark lacustrine sequence (North America) and the pelagic bedded chert sequence (Japan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, M.; Olsen, P. E.; Tada, R.

    2012-12-01

    The correlation of Earth's orbital parameters with climatic variations has been used to generate astronomically calibrated geologic time scales of high accuracy. However, because of the chaotic behavior of the solar planets, the orbital models have a large uncertainty beyond several tens of million years in the past. This chaotic behavior also causes the long-period astronomical cycles (> 0.5 Myr periodicity) to modulate their frequency and amplitude. In other words, their modulation patterns could be potential constraints for the orbital models. Here we report the first geologic constraints on the timing of frequency transition and amplitude modulation of the ~ 2 Myr long eccentricity cycles during the early Mesozoic. We examined the lake level records of the early Mesozoic Newark lacustrine sequence in North America and the biogenic silica burial rate of the pelagic bedded chert sequence in the Inuyama area, Japan, which are proven to be reflect the astronomical cycle (Olsen, 1986; Olsen and Kent, 1996; Ikeda et al., 2010). The time scales of the two sequences were orbitally calibrated with the end-Triassic mass extinction interval as the age anchor, covering ~ 30 Myr and ~ 65 Myr, respectively (Olsen et al., 2011; Ikeda et al., 2010, in prep). We find that the frequency modulation of ~ 2 Myr cycle between 2.4 Myr to 1.6 Myr cycle have occurred at least the Middle to Late Triassic. In addition, the ~ 2 Myr cycle modulate its amplitude with ~ 10 Myr periodicity with in-phase relation between the two. Similar modulation patterns of ~ 2 Myr cycles from the two independent geologic records indicate convincing evidences for the chaotic behavior of the Solar planets. Because these modulation patterns are different from the results of the orbital models by Laskar et al. (2004, 2011), our records will provide the new and challenging constraints for the orbital models in terms of chaotic behavior of Solar planets.

  3. Early Mesozoic Coexistence of Amniotes and Hepadnaviridae

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Alexander; Weber, Claudia C.; Kehlmaier, Christian; Braun, Edward L.; Green, Richard E.; Fritz, Uwe; Ray, David A.; Ellegren, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Hepadnaviridae are double-stranded DNA viruses that infect some species of birds and mammals. This includes humans, where hepatitis B viruses (HBVs) are prevalent pathogens in considerable parts of the global population. Recently, endogenized sequences of HBVs (eHBVs) have been discovered in bird genomes where they constitute direct evidence for the coexistence of these viruses and their hosts from the late Mesozoic until present. Nevertheless, virtually nothing is known about the ancient host range of this virus family in other animals. Here we report the first eHBVs from crocodilian, snake, and turtle genomes, including a turtle eHBV that endogenized >207 million years ago. This genomic “fossil” is >125 million years older than the oldest avian eHBV and provides the first direct evidence that Hepadnaviridae already existed during the Early Mesozoic. This implies that the Mesozoic fossil record of HBV infection spans three of the five major groups of land vertebrates, namely birds, crocodilians, and turtles. We show that the deep phylogenetic relationships of HBVs are largely congruent with the deep phylogeny of their amniote hosts, which suggests an ancient amniote–HBV coexistence and codivergence, at least since the Early Mesozoic. Notably, the organization of overlapping genes as well as the structure of elements involved in viral replication has remained highly conserved among HBVs along that time span, except for the presence of the X gene. We provide multiple lines of evidence that the tumor-promoting X protein of mammalian HBVs lacks a homolog in all other hepadnaviruses and propose a novel scenario for the emergence of X via segmental duplication and overprinting of pre-existing reading frames in the ancestor of mammalian HBVs. Our study reveals an unforeseen host range of prehistoric HBVs and provides novel insights into the genome evolution of hepadnaviruses throughout their long-lasting association with amniote hosts. PMID:25501991

  4. Showing up Matters: Newark Chronic Absenteeism in the Early Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Peter; Rice, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Based on a 180-day school year, any student who misses 18 days or more per year--or about two days per month--is considered chronically absent. An alarming 4,328 Newark students in grades kindergarten through 3rd grade were chronically absent during the 2013-14 school year. When young students miss too much school, they will likely struggle…

  5. Synthesis and revision of groups within the Newark Supergroup, eastern North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weems, R.E.; Olsen, P.E.

    1997-01-01

    The Newark Supergroup currently includes nine stratigraphic groups, each of which applies to part or all of the rock column of only one or a few basins. Because the group nomenclature within the Newark Supergroup is neither inclusive nor parallel in its concepts, nearly half of the strata within the Newark Supergroup lacks any group placement. A new system is proposed herein that (1) establishes unambiguous group boundaries, (2) places all Newark Supergroup strata into groups, (3) reduces the number of group names from nine to three, (4) creates parallelism between groups and three major successive tectonic events that created the rift basins containing the Newark Supergroup, and (5) coincidentally provides isochronous or nearly isochronous group boundaries. These proposed groups are (1) the Chatham Group (Middle Triassic to basal Lower Jurassic sedimentary rocks), (2) the Meriden Group (Lower Jurassic extrusive volcanic and sedimentary rocks), and (3) the Agawam Group (new name) (Lower Jurassic sedimentary rocks above all early Mesozoic igneous intrusive and extrusive rocks). This new rock classification system makes use of the fact that a discrete interval of synchronous or nearly synchronous volcanism and plutonism occurred throughout the early Mesozoic rift system of eastern North America. The presence or absence of volcanic rocks provides a powerful stratigraphic tool for establishing regional groups and group boundaries. The presence of sedimentary rocks injected by diabase dikes and sills, in the absence of extrusive volcanic rocks, places Newark Supergroup rocks in the Chatham Group. The presence of extrusive volcanic rocks, interbedded with sedimentary rocks injected by diabase dikes and sills, places Newark Supergroup rocks in the Meriden Group. The presence of sedimentary rocks lacking both extrusive volcanic rocks and diabase dikes and sills, places Newark Supergroup rocks in the Agawam Group. Application of this new regional group stratigraphy to the

  6. Early Mesozoic rift basin architecture and sediment routing system in the Moroccan High Atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, N.; Teixell, A.; Gomez, D.

    2016-12-01

    Late Permian to Triassic extensional systems associated with Pangea breakup governed the structural framework and rift basin architecture that was inherited by Cenozoic High Atlas Mountains in Morocco. U-Pb detrital zircon geochronologic and mapping results from Permo-Triassic deposits now incorporated into the High Atlas Mountains provide new constraints on the geometry and interconnectivity among synextensional depocenters. U-Pb detrital zircon data provide provenance constraints of Permo-Triassic deposits, highlighting temporal changes in sediment sources and revealing the spatial pattern of sediment routing along the rift. We also characterize the U-Pb detrital zircon geochronologic signature of distinctive interfingering fluvial, tidal, and aeolian facies that are preferentially preserved near the controlling normal faults. These results highlight complex local sediment mixing patterns potentially linked to the interplay between fault motion, eustatic, and erosion/transport processes. We compare our U-Pb geochronologic results with existing studies of Gondwanan and Laurentian cratonic blocks to investigate continent scale sediment routing pathways, and with analogous early Mesozoic extensional systems situated in South America (Mitu basin, Peru) and North America (Newark Basin) to assess sediment mixing patterns in rift basins.

  7. Paleomagnetism of baked sedimentary rocks in the Newark and Culpeper basins: Evidence for the J1 cusp and significant Late Triassic apparent polar wander from the Mesozoic basins of North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Kenneth P.; Cioppa, Maria T.; Sherwood, Elizabeth; Warnock, Andrew C.

    1994-08-01

    and sills. In this comparison the in situ Culpeper poles agreed with the prefolding Newark poles significantly better than the prefolding Culpeper poles. This result indicates that Culpeper intrusives erupted into already tilted sedimentary rocks. The paleomagnetic pole determined from the combined Culpeper baked sediments, dikes, and sills (in situ coordinates) and the Newark basin baked sediments (tilt-corrected coordinates) lies at 60°N, 69°E and is of 201 Ma age. This latest Triassic/earliest Jurassic pole, when combined with the Newark basin Carnian results (Witte and Kent, 1989) and Norian results (Witte et al., 1991) corrected for a counterclockwise block rotation (Kodama et al., 1994), provides a record of significant polar wander from eastern North America's Mesozoic basins for the Late Triassic. This is consistent with observations made for a similar time period from rocks on the Colorado Plateau (Bazard and Butler, 1991). Comparison of the Newark/Culpeper pole to similar age poles from the Kayenta (Bazard and Butler, 1991) and Moenave Formations (Ekstrand and Butler, 1989) only requires small amounts (5°) of Colorado Plateau rotation. The pole also provides the first well-dated evidence of the Jl cusp in North American apparent polar wander from rocks not located on the Colorado Plateau, thus giving strong support for the usefulness of paleomagnetic Euler pole analysis of apparent polar wander.

  8. Corrected Paleolatitudes for Pangea in the Early Mesozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, D.; Tauxe, L.

    2004-12-01

    A series of continental basins that developed during rifting of the Pangea supercontinent in the early Mesozoic are now distributed along the margins of the North Atlantic and their preserved contents (mainly redbeds and CAMP basalts) have often been targets of paleomagnetic studies. A continuous record of paleolatitudinal drift and a geomagnetic polarity time scale for ~35 Myr of the Late Triassic and earliest Jurassic have been derived from several of the basins in eastern North America and provide a precise spatio-temporal framework for detailed paleogeographic analysis. However, reported paleomagnetic directions from Jameson Land in East Greenland are anomalously shallow with respect to coeval sections in North America, a discrepancy that is too large to be explained by uncertainties in the reconstruction of Greenland to North America. Therefore, either the magnetizations of the Jameson Land (and perhaps other early Mesozoic rift basin) sediments are biased by inclination error or the Late Triassic time-averaged field included significant nondipole (axial octupole) contributions. According to a new statistical geomagnetic field model (Tauxe and Kent, 2004) constrained by paleomagnetic data from young lava flows, these two phenomena result in very different distributions of paleomagnetic directions, providing a basis to diagnose and correct for inclination error in sufficiently large paleomagnetic datasets. The resulting congruence of independent data from sedimentary and igneous rocks ranging over thousands of kilometers and 10s of millions of years can be taken as strong support that a geocentric axial dipole field similar to the last 5 Myr was operative more than 200 Myr ago. The corrected paleolatitudes indicate a faster rate of poleward motion of this sector of Pangea and broader continental climate belts in the Late Triassic and earliest Jurassic.

  9. Lithostratigraphic and biostratigraphic evidence for brief and synchronous Early Mesozoic basalt eruption over the Maghreb (Northwest Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Et-Touhami, M.; Et-Touhami, M.; Olsen, P. E.; Puffer, J.

    2001-05-01

    Previously very sparse biostratigraphic data suggested that the Early Mesozoic tholeiitic effusive and intrusive magmatism in the various basins of the Maghreb occurred over a long time (Ladinian-Hettangian). However, a detailed comparison of the stratigraphy underlying, interbedded with, and overlying the basalts in these basins shows not only remarkable similarities with each other, but also with sequences in the latest Triassic and earliest Jurassic of eastern North America. There, the sequences have been shown to be cyclical, controlled by Milankovitch-type climate cycles; the same seems to be true in at least part of the Maghreb. Thus, the Moroccan basins have cyclical sequences surrounding and interbedded with one or two basaltic units. In the Argana and Khemisset basins the Tr-J boundary is identified by palynology to be below the lowest basalt, and the remarkably close lithological similarity between the pre-basalt sequence in the other Moroccan basins and to the North American basins - especially the Fundy basin - suggests a tight correlation in time. Likewise, the strata above the lowest basalt in Morocco show a similar pattern to what is seen above the lowest basalt formation in eastern North America, as do the overlying sequences. Furthermore, geochemistry on basalts in the Argana, Bou Fekrane, Khemisset, and Iouawen basins indicate they are high-Ti quartz-normative tholeiites as are the Orange Mountain Basalt (Fundy basin) and the North Mountain Basalt (Newark basin). The remarkable lithostratigraphic similarity across the Maghreb of these strata suggest contemporaneous and synchronous eruption over a time span of less than 200 ky, based on Milankovitch calibration, and within a ~20 ky interval after the Triassic-Jurassic boundary. Differences with previous interpretations of the biostratigraphy can be rationalized as a result of: 1, an over-reliance on comparisons with northern European palynology; 2, over-interpretation of poorly preserved fossils

  10. Pelvis morphology suggests that early Mesozoic birds were too heavy to contact incubate their eggs.

    PubMed

    Charles Deeming, D; Mayr, Gerald

    2018-05-01

    Numerous new fossils have driven an interest in reproduction of early birds, but direct evidence remains elusive. No Mesozoic avian eggs can be unambiguously assigned to a species, which hampers our understanding of the evolution of contact incubation, which is a defining feature of extant birds. Compared to living species, eggs of Mesozoic birds are relatively small, but whether the eggs of Mesozoic birds could actually have borne the weight of a breeding adult has not yet been investigated. We estimated maximal egg breadth for a range of Mesozoic avian taxa from the width of the pelvic canal defined by the pubic symphysis. Known elongation ratios of Mesozoic bird eggs allowed us to predict egg mass and hence the load mass an egg could endure before cracking. These values were compared to the predicted body masses of the adult birds based on skeletal remains. Based on 21 fossil species, we show that for nonornithothoracine birds body mass was 187% of the load mass of the eggs. For Enantiornithes, body mass was 127% greater than the egg load mass, but some early Cretaceous ornithuromorphs were 179% heavier than their eggs could support. Our indirect approach provides the best evidence yet that early birds could not have sat on their eggs without running the risk of causing damage. We suggest that contact incubation evolved comparatively late in birds. © 2018 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2018 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  11. Development of a high resolution chemostratigraphy for the Late Triassic-Early Jurassic Newark Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinney, S.; Olsen, P. E.; Chang, C.

    2017-12-01

    The 6.7 km of continuous core recovered from the paleo-tropical Triassic-Jurassic Newark rift basin during the Newark Basin Coring Project (NBCP) has provided a wealth of data since the conclusion of drilling 25 years ago. These cores comprise the longest ( 30 Myr) continuously-cored record of orbitally-paced environmental change and have informed our understanding in several different areas including tropical climate change, history of CO­2, mass extinctions, the geological time scale, and solar system dynamics. Despite the utility of NBCP cores for these endeavors, a critical missing dataset is a comprehensive characterization of their geochemical variations relevant to paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic interests, largely a consequence of the cost of analyses at an appropriate resolution using conventional techniques. With the advent of new technology permitting the rapid acquisition of reliable geochemical data, such limitations may no longer be an obstacle for constructing a high-resolution chemostratigraphic record for the NBCP. We present the results of a proof-of-concept study using both ICP-MS-calibrated scanning ITRAX XRF and handheld Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) using the SciAps Z-300. We will show elemental abundances at resolutions as high as 500 mm obtained using these methods from correlative sections of the Titusville and Nursery cores (Lockatong Fm.). These sections are sufficiently long to capture orbital variations and include the range of lithologies present throughout the entire section. Our preliminary results are consistent with previous, semi-quantitative means (e.g., depth ranks) of assessing Milankovitch-scale orbital variations and are also consistent with core and hole geophysical data, demonstrating that these methods can acquire meaningful geochemical data from the entire NBCP. With continued work, we aim to provide an objective characterization of orbitally-paced lake level cyclicity using geochemical proxy

  12. The Colorado Plateau Coring Project: A Continuous Cored Non-Marine Record of Early Mesozoic Environmental and Biotic Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irmis, Randall; Olsen, Paul; Geissman, John; Gehrels, George; Kent, Dennis; Mundil, Roland; Rasmussen, Cornelia; Giesler, Dominique; Schaller, Morgan; Kürschner, Wolfram; Parker, William; Buhedma, Hesham

    2017-04-01

    approximation of their host rock's depositional age, along with significant populations of early Paleozoic and Proterozoic zircons which will be used to identify provenance. Thermal demagnetization of paleomagnetic samples show that most Moenkopi and some fine-grained Chinle lithologies preserve a primary magnetization, and thus will allow the construction of a robust magnetostratigraphy for portions of the Triassic section. Soil carbonates are abundant throughout the cored section. All data will be integrated to construct an exportable chronostratigraphic framework that will allow us to test a number of major questions with global implications for understanding the early Mesozoic world, including: 1) do independent U-Pb ages support the accuracy of the Newark astronomically-calibrated geomagnetic polarity timescale? 2) is the mid-Late Triassic biotic turnover observable in the western US coincident with the Manicouagan bolide impact? and 3) are cyclical climate variations apparent in the cored record, and do they reflect variations in atmospheric CO2?

  13. Terrestrial origin of viviparity in mesozoic marine reptiles indicated by early triassic embryonic fossils.

    PubMed

    Motani, Ryosuke; Jiang, Da-yong; Tintori, Andrea; Rieppel, Olivier; Chen, Guan-bao

    2014-01-01

    Viviparity in Mesozoic marine reptiles has traditionally been considered an aquatic adaptation. We report a new fossil specimen that strongly contradicts this traditional interpretation. The new specimen contains the oldest fossil embryos of Mesozoic marine reptile that are about 10 million years older than previous such records. The fossil belongs to Chaohusaurus (Reptilia, Ichthyopterygia), which is the oldest of Mesozoic marine reptiles (ca. 248 million years ago, Early Triassic). This exceptional specimen captures an articulated embryo in birth position, with its skull just emerged from the maternal pelvis. Its headfirst birth posture, which is unlikely to be a breech condition, strongly indicates a terrestrial origin of viviparity, in contrast to the traditional view. The tail-first birth posture in derived ichthyopterygians, convergent with the conditions in whales and sea cows, therefore is a secondary feature. The unequivocally marine origin of viviparity is so far not known among amniotes, a subset of vertebrate animals comprising mammals and reptiles, including birds. Therefore, obligate marine amniotes appear to have evolved almost exclusively from viviparous land ancestors. Viviparous land reptiles most likely appeared much earlier than currently thought, at least as early as the recovery phase from the end-Permian mass extinction.

  14. Terrestrial Origin of Viviparity in Mesozoic Marine Reptiles Indicated by Early Triassic Embryonic Fossils

    PubMed Central

    Motani, Ryosuke; Jiang, Da-yong; Tintori, Andrea; Rieppel, Olivier; Chen, Guan-bao

    2014-01-01

    Viviparity in Mesozoic marine reptiles has traditionally been considered an aquatic adaptation. We report a new fossil specimen that strongly contradicts this traditional interpretation. The new specimen contains the oldest fossil embryos of Mesozoic marine reptile that are about 10 million years older than previous such records. The fossil belongs to Chaohusaurus (Reptilia, Ichthyopterygia), which is the oldest of Mesozoic marine reptiles (ca. 248 million years ago, Early Triassic). This exceptional specimen captures an articulated embryo in birth position, with its skull just emerged from the maternal pelvis. Its headfirst birth posture, which is unlikely to be a breech condition, strongly indicates a terrestrial origin of viviparity, in contrast to the traditional view. The tail-first birth posture in derived ichthyopterygians, convergent with the conditions in whales and sea cows, therefore is a secondary feature. The unequivocally marine origin of viviparity is so far not known among amniotes, a subset of vertebrate animals comprising mammals and reptiles, including birds. Therefore, obligate marine amniotes appear to have evolved almost exclusively from viviparous land ancestors. Viviparous land reptiles most likely appeared much earlier than currently thought, at least as early as the recovery phase from the end-Permian mass extinction. PMID:24533127

  15. Early Mesozoic history and petroleum potential of formations in Wyoming and northern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Picard, M.D.

    1993-08-01

    During the Triassic and Jurassic, over what is now Wyoming and northern Utah, roughly equal amounts of sediment were being deposited in continental settings-lake, stream, and eolian-and in shallow-marine or deltaic-plain settings-delta, beach, marsh, tidal flat, and shallow shelf. Clastic rocks dominate. In order of decreasing abundance, the rocks are fine-grained clastics (siltstone, claystone, mudstone), sandstone, carbonates, evaporites, and claystone- and carbonate-pebble conglomerate. Approximately four-fifths of the succession contains red beds or variegated layers-purple, maroon, lavender, olive, green. Unconformities bound Jurassic formations in Wyoming-Nugget, Gypsum Spring, Sundance, and Morrison. Unconformities also bound the continental Upper Triassic section-unnamed red bed unit,more » Jelm, Popo Agie-separating it from the underlying shallow-marine formations-Dinwoody, Red Peak, Alcova, Crow Mountain. Within the marine sequence, an unconformity occurs at the top of the Alcova and, quite likely, shorter periods of erosion took place at the top and below the base of the sandy faces that underlies the Alcova. The postulate duration of the principal unconformities totals about 18 m.y., at least one-sixth of early Mesozoic time. The bulk of the remaining 80-100 m.y. may be represented by a large number of smaller unconformities. For the lower Mesozoic, as for most stratigraphic intervals, a few beds contain the story of what has taken place during the abyss of geologic time. Like other places in the world where evaporites occur in the Triassic, the Wyoming section produces little crude oil. No significant sequence in the early Mesozoic shows source-bed characteristics. The Crow Mountain Sandstone contains the best reservoirs. The Lower( ) Jurassic Nugget Sandstone produces the most oil and gas in the thrust belt of southwestern Wyoming and northern Utah. Cretaceous claystones below the thrusts contain the source beds.« less

  16. A total petroleum system of the Browse Basin, Australia; Late Jurassic, Early Cretaceous-Mesozoic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bishop, M.G.

    1999-01-01

    The Browse Basin Province 3913, offshore northern Australia, contains one important petroleum system, Late Jurassic, Early Cretaceous-Mesozoic. It is comprised of Late Jurassic through Early Cretaceous source rocks deposited in restricted marine environments and various Mesozoic reservoir rocks deposited in deep-water fan to fluvial settings. Jurassic age intraformational shales and claystones and Cretaceous regional claystones seal the reservoirs. Since 1967, when exploration began in this 105,000 km2 area, fewer than 40 wells have been drilled and only one recent oil discovery is considered potentially commercial. Prior to the most recent oil discovery, on the eastern side of the basin, a giant gas field was discovered in 1971, under a modern reef on the west side of the basin. Several additional oil and gas discoveries and shows were made elsewhere. A portion of the Vulcan sub-basin lies within Province 3913 where a small field, confirmed in 1987, produced 18.8 million barrels of oil (MMBO) up to 1995 and has since been shut in.

  17. Early Mesozoic cooling from low temperature thermochronology in N Spain and N Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grobe, R.; Alvarez-Marrón, J.; Glasmacher, U. A.; Menéndez-Duarte, R.

    2009-04-01

    In the western prolongation of the Pyrenees, the substratum of the Cantabrian Mountains consists of an E-W crustal section of the Gondwana continental margin involved in the Variscan collision. In Mesozoic times, the region was modified by rifting and the opening of the Atlantic and the Bay of Biscay, while in Paleogene-Neogene times it was affected by the convergence of the Iberian Plate with the Eurasian Plate resulting in the present mountains. Our thermochronological data and modelled time-temperature histories suggest an earlier, relative fast cooling period during Early Triassic to Early Jurassic. This cooling event coincides temporally with the process of rifting that caused Pangaea continental break-up and the opening of the North Atlantic. Other authors report similar cooling histories from Early Triassic to Middle Jurassic from other parts of the Iberian Peninsula (Juez-Larré, 2003; Barbero et al., 2005) as well as from the Moroccan Meseta, in N Africa (Ghorbal et al., 2008). Furthermore, the time span of this cooling event includes the period of main activity of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP) magmatism at around 200 Ma (Marzoli et al., 1999). Wilson (1997) postulates a relationship between this magmatic activity and upwelling of a large-scale mantle plume (super-plume) beneath the West African craton. Correlatives of this province have been identified as far as the southern Iberian Peninsula, Newfoundland, and possibly in Brittany, among other European areas (Pe-Piper et al., 1992; Jourdan et al., 2003). The current presentation aims to discuss possible African far-field effects on thermochronological data in the Cantabrian Mountains of NW Spain. References: Barbero, L.; Glasmacher, U. A.; Villaseca, C.; López García, J. A.; Martín-Romera, C. (2005). Long-term thermo-tectonic evolution of the Montes de Toledo area (Central Hercynian Belt, Spain): constraints from apatite fission-track analysis. International Journal of Earth Sciences

  18. The Completeness of the Fossil Record of Mesozoic Birds: Implications for Early Avian Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Brocklehurst, Neil; Upchurch, Paul; Mannion, Philip D.; O'Connor, Jingmai

    2012-01-01

    Many palaeobiological analyses have concluded that modern birds (Neornithes) radiated no earlier than the Maastrichtian, whereas molecular clock studies have argued for a much earlier origination. Here, we assess the quality of the fossil record of Mesozoic avian species, using a recently proposed character completeness metric which calculates the percentage of phylogenetic characters that can be scored for each taxon. Estimates of fossil record quality are plotted against geological time and compared to estimates of species level diversity, sea level, and depositional environment. Geographical controls on the avian fossil record are investigated by comparing the completeness scores of species in different continental regions and latitudinal bins. Avian fossil record quality varies greatly with peaks during the Tithonian-early Berriasian, Aptian, and Coniacian–Santonian, and troughs during the Albian-Turonian and the Maastrichtian. The completeness metric correlates more strongly with a ‘sampling corrected’ residual diversity curve of avian species than with the raw taxic diversity curve, suggesting that the abundance and diversity of birds might influence the probability of high quality specimens being preserved. There is no correlation between avian completeness and sea level, the number of fluviolacustrine localities or a recently constructed character completeness metric of sauropodomorph dinosaurs. Comparisons between the completeness of Mesozoic birds and sauropodomorphs suggest that small delicate vertebrate skeletons are more easily destroyed by taphonomic processes, but more easily preserved whole. Lagerstätten deposits might therefore have a stronger impact on reconstructions of diversity of smaller organisms relative to more robust forms. The relatively poor quality of the avian fossil record in the Late Cretaceous combined with very patchy regional sampling means that it is possible neornithine lineages were present throughout this interval but

  19. Paleozoic–early Mesozoic gold deposits of the Xinjiang Autonomous Region, northwestern China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rui, Zongyao; Goldfarb, Richard J.; Qiu, Yumin; Zhou, T.; Chen, R.; Pirajno, Franco; Yun, Grace

    2002-01-01

    The late Paleozoic–early Mesozoic tectonic evolution of Xinjiang Autonomous Region, northwestern China provided a favorable geological setting for the formation of lode gold deposits along the sutures between a number of the major Eastern Asia cratonic blocks. These sutures are now represented by the Altay Shan, Tian Shan, and Kunlun Shan ranges, with the former two separated by the Junggar basin and the latter two by the immense Tarim basin. In northernmost Xinjiang, final growth of the Altaid orogen, southward from the Angara craton, is now recorded in the remote mid- to late Paleozoic Altay Shan. Accreted Early to Middle Devonian oceanic rock sequences contain typically small, precious-metal bearing Fe–Cu–Zn VMS deposits (e.g. Ashele). Orogenic gold deposits are widespread along the major Irtysh (e.g. Duyolanasayi, Saidi, Taerde, Kabenbulake, Akexike, Shaerbulake) and Tuergen–Hongshanzui (e.g. Hongshanzui) fault systems, as well as in structurally displaced terrane slivers of the western Junggar (e.g. Hatu) and eastern Junggar areas. Geological and geochronological constraints indicate a generally Late Carboniferous to Early Permian episode of gold deposition, which was coeval with the final stages of Altaid magmatism and large-scale, right-lateral translation along older terrane-bounding faults. The Tian Shan, an exceptionally gold-rich mountain range to the west in the Central Asian republics, is only beginning to be recognized for its gold potential in Xinjiang. In this easternmost part to the range, northerly- and southerly-directed subduction/accretion of early to mid-Paleozoic and mid- to late Paleozoic oceanic terranes, respectively, to the Precambrian Yili block (central Tian Shan) was associated with 400 to 250 Ma arc magmatism and Carboniferous through Early Permian gold-forming hydrothermal events. The more significant resulting deposits in the terranes of the southern Tian Shan include the Sawayaerdun orogenic deposit along the Kyrgyzstan

  20. A comparative study of diversification events: the early Paleozoic versus the Mesozoic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erwin, D. H.; Valentine, J. W.; Sepkoski, J. J. Jr; Sepkoski JJ, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1987-01-01

    We compare two major long-term diversifications of marine animal families that began during periods of low diversity but produced strikingly different numbers of phyla, classes, and orders. The first is the early-Paleozoic diversification (late Vendian-Ordovician; 182 MY duration) and the other the Mesozoic phase of the post-Paleozoic diversification (183 MY duration). The earlier diversification was associated with a great burst of morphological invention producing many phyla, classes, and orders and displaying high per taxon rates of family origination. The later diversification lacked novel morphologies recognized as phyla and classes, produced fewer orders, and displayed lower per taxon rates of family appearances. The chief difference between the diversifications appears to be that the earlier one proceeded from relatively narrow portions of adaptive space, whereas the latter proceeded from species widely scattered among adaptive zones and representing a variety of body plans. This difference is believed to explain the major differences in the products of these great radiations. Our data support those models that hold that evolutionary opportunity is a major factor in the outcome of evolutionary processes.

  1. Geophysical and topographic expression of early Mesozoic grand cycles of the Milankovitch band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, P. E.; Reynolds, D. J.; Goldberg, D.; Kent, D. V.; Whiteside, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    Grand cycles are orbitally controlled insolation cycles that have frequencies significantly lower than the precession-related ~1/100ky "eccentricity" cycles (1). We have previously shown that variations in sedimentary facies and δ13C interpreted in terms of lake level changes in Triassic-Jurassic cores of the Newark Basin Coring Project (NBCP) of eastern North America track predicted orbital cycles related to precession (2,3). In addition to the usual ~1/20ky and "spilt" ~1/100ky cycles, Grand Cycles with frequencies of 1/405ky (g2-g5) are very prominent and cycles with much lower frequency of ~1/1.8m.y. representing the g4-g3 frequency are present. The latter differs from the present frequency of ~1/2.4m.y. because of the chaotic diffusion of planetary orbits (4). Wavelet analysis of borehole geophysical logs from the NBCP show the same basic frequencies as do sedimentary facies. The high-frequency precession-related cycles as seen in natural gamma and sonic velocity logs are strikingly complimentary to visually identified sedimentary facies patterns because the former tend to show the most striking cyclicity where the sedimentary facies pattern are the most muted. The 1/405ky cycles are also very prominent; but other grand cycles, while detectable, are distorted by the necessary detrending of each of the seven borehole records that comprise the NBCP composite (cf. 5,6). Simple detrending procedures leave a low-frequency residue and more complex models prejudge the low frequencies we are trying to detect. This emphasizes the importance of the facies interpretations that requires no detrending, and clear understanding of the meaning of the geophysical environmental proxies. As might be expected from the seismic velocity logs, synthetic seismic traces generated from the borehole data of the NBCP show the grand cycles. When tied to very long industry exploratory borehole records from the Newark basin, themselves tied to seismic lies, both the 1/405ky (g2-g5) and ~1

  2. A Temnospondyl Trackway from the Early Mesozoic of Western Gondwana and Its Implications for Basal Tetrapod Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Marsicano, Claudia A.; Wilson, Jeffrey A.; Smith, Roger M. H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Temnospondyls are one of the earliest radiations of limbed vertebrates. Skeletal remains of more than 190 genera have been identified from late Paleozoic and early Mesozoic rocks. Paleozoic temnospondyls comprise mainly small to medium sized forms of diverse habits ranging from fully aquatic to fully terrestrial. Accordingly, their ichnological record includes tracks described from many Laurasian localities. Mesozoic temnospondyls, in contrast, include mostly medium to large aquatic or semi-aquatic forms. Exceedingly few fossil tracks or trackways have been attributed to Mesozoic temnospondyls, and as a consequence very little is known of their locomotor capabilities on land. Methodology/Principal Findings We report a ca. 200 Ma trackway, Episcopopus ventrosus, from Lesotho, southern Africa that was made by a 3.5 m-long animal. This relatively long trackway records the trackmaker dragging its body along a wet substrate using only the tips of its digits, which in the manus left characteristic drag marks. Based on detailed mapping, casting, and laser scanning of the best-preserved part of the trackway, we identified synapomorphies (e.g., tetradactyl manus, pentadactyl pes) and symplesiomorphies (e.g., absence of claws) in the Episcopopus trackway that indicate a temnospondyl trackmaker. Conclusions/Significance Our analysis shows that the Episcopopus trackmaker progressed with a sprawling posture, using a lateral-sequence walk. Its forelimbs were the major propulsive elements and there was little lateral bending of the trunk. We suggest this locomotor style, which differs dramatically from the hindlimb-driven locomotion of salamanders and other extant terrestrial tetrapods can be explained by the forwardly shifted center of mass resulting from the relatively large heads and heavily pectoral girdles of temnospondyls. PMID:25099971

  3. Riftogenic magmatism of western part of the Early Mesozoic Mongolian-Transbaikalian igneous province: Results of geochronological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarmolyuk, V. V.; Kozlovsky, A. M.; Salnikova, E. B.; Travin, A. V.; Kudryashova, E. A.

    2017-08-01

    Geochronological studies of rocks from a bimodal high-alkali volcanic-plutonic complex collected in the area of Kharkhorin zone of the Early Mesozoic Mongolian-Transbaikalian igneous province (MTIP) are made. The age of alkali granites from Olziit sum is 211 ± 1 Ma (U-Pb ID-TIMS on zircon) to 209 ± 2 and 217 ± 4 Ma (40Ar/39Ar on alkali amphibole); the age of alkali granite-porphyries from the area of Sant sum is 206 ± 1 Ma (U-Pb ID-TIMS on zircon). These rock series formed syncronously to the analogous magmatism episode in the Northern Gobi and Western Transbaikalian rift zones of the MTIP. The similarity of the age and composition of igneous associations of the MTIP suggests a common mechanism of its formation related to the effect of a mantle plume on the continental lithosphere at the base of the entire igneous zone having a zonal structure.

  4. Mesozoic-Early Cenozoic Retroarc Basin Evolution in Response to Changing Tectonic Regimes, Southern Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackaman-Lofland, C.; Horton, B. K.; Fuentes, F.; Constenius, K. N.; Stockli, D. F.

    2017-12-01

    Spatial and temporal variations in pre-Andean deformation, inherited lithospheric discontinuities, and subduction geometry have been documented for the southern Central Andes (27-40°S). However, the influence of inherited crustal structures and changing subduction zone dynamics on along-strike (N-S) and across-strike (E-W) variations in upper-plate deformation and basin evolution remains poorly understood. The La Ramada Basin in the High Andes at 32°S preserves the northernmost succession correlated with the well-studied Neuquen Basin to the south. New maximum depositional ages and provenance information provided by detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology refine the chronostratigraphic and provenance framework of La Ramada Basin deposits and improve reconstructions of structural activity and subsidence mechanisms during polyphase basin evolution. Updated along- and across-strike comparisons with Neuquen and intraplate depocenters provide an unparalleled opportunity to examine long-term fluctuations in stress regime, modes of variable plate coupling, structural reactivation, and basin evolution. Zircon U-Pb age distributions constrain Mesozoic-Cenozoic ages of La Ramada clastic units and identify a previously unrecognized period of Paleogene nonmarine deposition. Late Triassic-Jurassic synrift and post-rift deposits record sediment derivation from the eastern half-graben footwall and western Andean volcanic arc during periods of slab rollback and thermal subsidence. Uplift of the Coastal Cordillera and introduction of Coastal Cordillera sediment at 107 Ma represents the first signature of initial Andean uplift associated with accumulation in the La Ramada Basin. Finally, newly identified Paleogene extensional structures and intra-arc deposits in the western La Ramada Basin are correlated with the extensional Abanico Basin system ( 28°S-44°S) to the west in Chile. Development and inversion of this system of intra-arc depocenters suggests that shortening and uplift in

  5. New Fossil Evidence on the Sister-Group of Mammals and Early Mesozoic Faunal Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubin, Neil H.; Crompton, A. W.; Sues, Hans-Dieter; Olsen, Paul E.

    1991-03-01

    Newly discovered remains of highly advanced mammal-like reptiles (Cynodontia: Tritheledontidae) from the Early Jurassic of Nova Scotia, Canada, have revealed that aspects of the characteristic mammalian occlusal pattern are primitive. Mammals and tritheledontids share an homologous pattern of occlusion that is not seen in other cynodonts. The new tritheledontids represent the first definite record of this family from North America. The extreme similarity of North American and African tritheledontids supports the hypothesis that the global distribution of terrestrial tetrapods was homogeneous in the Early Jurassic. This Early Jurassic cosmopolitanism represents the continuation of a trend toward increased global homogeneity among terrestrial tetrapod communities that began in the late Paleozoic.

  6. Steeply-dipping extension fractures in the Newark basin, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, G.C.

    2009-01-01

    Late Triassic and Early Jurassic bedrock in the Newark basin is pervasively fractured as a result of Mesozoic rifting of the east-central North American continental margin. Tectonic rifting imparted systematic sets of steeply-dipping, en ??chelon, Mode I, extension fractures in basin strata including ordinary joints and veins. These fractures are arranged in transitional-tensional arrays resembling normal dip-slip shear zones. They contributed to crustal stretching, sagging, and eventual faulting of basin rift deposits. Extension fractures display progressive linkage and spatial clustering that probably controlled incipient fault growth. They cluster into three prominent strike groups correlated to early, intermediate, and late-stage tectonic events reflecting about 50- 60?? of counterclockwise rotation of incremental stretching directions. Finite strain analyses show that extension fractures allowed the stretching of basin strata by a few percent, and these fractures impart stratigraphic dips up to a few degrees in directions opposing fracture dips. Fracture groups display three-dimensional spatial variability but consistent geometric relations. Younger fractures locally cut across and terminate against older fractures having more complex vein-cement morphologies and bed-normal folds from stratigraphic compaction. A fourth, youngest group of extension fractures occur sporadically and strike about E-W in obliquely inverted crustal blocks. A geometric analysis of overlapping fracture sets shows how fracture groups result from incremental rotation of an extending tectonic plate, and that old fractures can reactivate with oblique slip components in the contemporary, compressive stress regime. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Putting the Children First: The Changing Face of Newark's Public Schools. The Teaching for Social Justice Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silin, Jonathan G., Ed.; Lippman, Carol, Ed.

    This book chronicles the educational struggle that took place in the city of Newark, New Jersey amidst years of political upheaval and economic neglect, focusing on Project New Beginnings, a 7-year collaboration between the Newark Public Schools and Bank Street College to restructure early childhood education. Organized in three parts, the book…

  8. Photocopy of aerial photograph taken in 1959, showing Newark Airport. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of aerial photograph taken in 1959, showing Newark Airport. Photographer unknown. Original photograph property of Continental Airlines, Houston, Texas - Newark International Airport, Between New Jersey Turnpike, U.S. Routes 1 & 9, & Interstate 78, Newark, Essex County, NJ

  9. Preliminary palynological zonation of the Chinle formation, southwestern U.S.A., and its correlation to the Newark supergroup (eastern U.S.A.)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Litwin, R.J.; Traverse, A.; Ash, S.R.

    1991-01-01

    Three informal palynological assemblage zones can be distinguished in samples from Chinle Formation outcrops in Utah, Arizona and New Mexico. The oldest zone (zone I) is in the Temple Mountain Member in southeastern Utah; the middle zone (zone II) is in the Shinarump, Moss Back, Monitor Butte and (lower part of the) Petrified Forest Members (Utah, Arizona and New Mexico); the youngest zone (zone III) is in the upper Petrified Forest Member and silstone member in Arizona and Utah and the silstone member in northcentral New Mexico. Present palynological evidence suggests that Chinle deposition on the Colorado Plateau began locally in late Carnian time and continued at least into the early part of Norian time of the Late Triassic period. Because the upper boundary of the Chinle Formation is an unconformity and the overlying formations are palynologically barren, the length of time represented by this stratigraphic hiatus is not known with certainty. Current palynological evidence suggests, however, that the unconformity at the top of the Chinle cannot be older than early Norian nor younger than Hettangian. Zones I, II and III can now be recognized in the palynomorph assemblage sequences from the Eastern Mesozoic basins, which modifies earlier palynological zonations for the lower portions of the Newark Supergroup. This is based on our identification of palynomorphs not previously known from portions of the Newark Supergroup and the discovery that specific biomarker taxa combinations are the same for both the western and eastern palynomorph sequences. At present palynomorph assemblages from the Chinle Formation and Newark Supergroup compare more closely for zones II and III than they do for zone I, but research is still in progress. ?? 1991.

  10. The Early Mesozoic volcanic arc of western North America in northeastern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barboza-Gudiño, José Rafael; Orozco-Esquivel, María Teresa; Gómez-Anguiano, Martín; Zavala-Monsiváis, Aurora

    2008-02-01

    Volcanic successions underlying clastic and carbonate marine rocks of the Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian Zuloaga Group in northeastern Mexico have been attributed to magmatic arcs of Permo-Triassic and Early Jurassic ages. This work provides stratigraphic, petrographic geochronological, and geochemical data to characterize pre-Oxfordian volcanic rocks outcropping in seven localities in northeastern Mexico. Field observations show that the volcanic units overlie Paleozoic metamorphic rocks (Granjeno schist) or Triassic marine strata (Zacatecas Formation) and intrude Triassic redbeds or are partly interbedded with Lower Jurassic redbeds (Huizachal Group). The volcanic rocks include rhyolitic and rhyodacitic domes and dikes, basaltic to andesitic lava flows and breccias, and andesitic to rhyolitic pyroclastic rocks, including breccias, lapilli, and ashflow tuffs that range from welded to unwelded. Lower-Middle Jurassic ages (U/Pb in zircon) have been reported from only two studied localities (Huizachal Valley, Sierra de Catorce), and other reported ages (Ar/Ar and K-Ar in whole-rock or feldspar) are often reset. This work reports a new U/Pb age in zircon that confirms a Lower Jurassic (193 Ma) age for volcanic rocks exposed in the Aramberri area. The major and trace element contents of samples from the seven localities are typical of calc-alkaline, subduction-related rocks. The new geochronological and geochemical data, coupled with the lithological features and stratigraphic positions, indicate volcanic rocks are part of a continental arc, similar to that represented by the Lower-Middle Jurassic Nazas Formation of Durango and northern Zacatecas. On that basis, the studied volcanic sequences are assigned to the Early Jurassic volcanic arc of western North America.

  11. Facebook-Driven Newark Overhaul Lurches Forward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gewertz, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    What began as a swashbuckling move by the mayor of Newark, New Jersey, the state's governor, and a newly minted billionaire to reshape the beleaguered Newark school system has turned into a tangle of blowback and counterpunches as skeptics contend the plan would violate state law. At issue is the power-sharing arrangement proposed by the three…

  12. Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources of the East Coast Mesozoic basins of the Piedmont, Blue Ridge Thrust Belt, Atlantic Coastal Plain, and New England Provinces, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milici, Robert C.; Coleman, James L.; Rowan, Elisabeth L.; Cook, Troy A.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Kirschbaum, Mark A.; Klett, Timothy R.; Pollastro, Richard M.; Schenk, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    During the early opening of the Atlantic Ocean in the Mesozoic Era, numerous extensional basins formed along the eastern margin of the North American continent from Florida northward to New England and parts of adjacent Canada. The basins extend generally from the offshore Atlantic continental margin westward beneath the Atlantic Coastal Plain to the Appalachian Mountains. Using a geology-based assessment method, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated a mean undiscovered natural gas resource of 3,860 billion cubic feet and a mean undiscovered natural gas liquids resource of 135 million barrels in continuous accumulations within five of the East Coast Mesozoic basins: the Deep River, Dan River-Danville, and Richmond basins, which are within the Piedmont Province of North Carolina and Virginia; the Taylorsville basin, which is almost entirely within the Atlantic Coastal Plain Province of Virginia and Maryland; and the southern part of the Newark basin (herein referred to as the South Newark basin), which is within the Blue Ridge Thrust Belt Province of New Jersey. The provinces, which contain these extensional basins, extend across parts of Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, and Massachusetts.

  13. Geomechanical Characterization and Modeling of the Newark Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Daniel; Goldberg, Dave; Zakharova, Natalia

    Many effective techniques for evaluation if in-situ stress and geomechanical formation properties have been developed over the years but detailed understanding of these parameters in-situ, and standard characterization and monitoring protocols for carbon dioxide storage sites are lacking. A case study is performed in the northern Newark Basin, a candidate carbon dioxide-storage site located near the New York Metropolitan area. Possible impacts of seismic hazard and carbon dioxide leakage are particularly important due to a high population density across the basin. As one of the best-studied Mesozoic rift basins, the Newark Basin represents a great type locality for similar basinsmore » along the east coast and the results established in this project provide a robust tool for comparison to other Mesozoic basin data sets and locations (e.g., Georgia Rift Basin), where similar comprehensive core data sets and well testing results are not available. The project leveraged existing core samples to characterize and measure the strength of a series of differing lithologies and formations in the basin, with 28 samples fully tested. The orientation and magnitude of in-situ stresses were measured in an existing test well using a novel wireline tool set-up. This new methodology employed a “pre-stress” packer module to attempt to create an initial formation break using the force of the packer itself against the borehole wall. This enhancement in the testing methodology can be used in places where traditional methods are insufficient to break down a formation. Following the pre-stress packer sets, the improved Schlumberger Modular Formation Dynamics Tester tool-string was then used to perform traditional straddled formation breakdown testing of selected intervals. Testing indicated that formation breakdown was successfully achieved at two of the six test intervals, with an additional two tests sets indicating re-opening and propagation of pre-existing breaks out into the

  14. Late Mesozoic and possible early Tertiary accretion in western Washington State: the Helena-Haystack melange and the Darrington- Devils Mountain fault zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tabor, R.W.

    1994-01-01

    The Helena-Haystack melange (HH melange) and coincident Darrington-Devils Mountain fault zone (DDMFZ) in northwestern Washington separate two terranes, the northwest Cascade System (NWCS) and the western and eastern melange belts (WEMB). The two terranes of Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks superficially resemble each other but record considerable differences in structural and metamorphic history. The HH melange is a serpentinite-matrix melange containing blocks of adjacent terranes but also exotic blocks. The HH melange must have formed between early Cretaceous and late middle Eocene time, because it contains tectonic clasts of early Cretaceous Shuksan Greenschist and is overlain by late middle Eocene sedimentary and volcanic rocks. The possible continuation of the DDMFZ to the northwest as the San Juan and the West Coast faults on Vancouver Island suggests that the structure has had a major role in the emplacement of all the westernmost terranes in the Pacific Northwest. -from Author

  15. Early Mesozoic paleogeography and tectonic evolution of the western United States: Insights from detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology, Blue Mountains Province, northeastern Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaMaskin, Todd A.; Vervoort, J.D.; Dorsey, R.J.; Wright, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    This study assesses early Mesozoic provenance linkages and paleogeographic-tectonic models for the western United States based on new petrographic and detrital zircon data from Triassic and Jurassic sandstones of the "Izee" and Olds Ferry terranes of the Blue Mountains Province, northeastern Oregon. Triassic sediments were likely derived from the Baker terrane offshore accretionary subduction complex and are dominated by Late Archean (ca. 2.7-2.5 Ga), Late Paleoproterozoic (ca. 2.2-1.6 Ga), and Paleozoic (ca. 380-255 Ma) detrital zircon grains. These detrital ages suggest that portions of the Baker terrane have a genetic affinity with other Cordilleran accretionary subduction complexes of the western United States, including those in the Northern Sierra and Eastern Klamath terranes. The abundance of Precambrian grains in detritus derived from an offshore complex highlights the importance of sediment reworking. Jurassic sediments are dominated by Mesozoic detrital ages (ca. 230-160 Ma), contain significant amounts of Paleozoic (ca. 290, 380-350, 480-415 Ma), Neoproterozoic (ca. 675-575 Ma), and Mesoproterozoic grains (ca. 1.4-1.0 Ga), and have lesser quantities of Late Paleoproterozoic grains (ca. 2.1-1.7 Ga). Detrital zircon ages in Jurassic sediments closely resemble well-documented age distributions in transcontinental sands of Ouachita-Appalachian provenance that were transported across the southwestern United States and modified by input from cratonal, miogeoclinal, and Cordilleran-arc sources during Triassic and Jurassic time. Jurassic sediments likely were derived from the Cordilleran arc and an orogenic highland in Nevada that yielded recycled sand from uplifted Triassic backarc basin deposits. Our data suggest that numerous Jurassic Cordilleran basins formed close to the Cordilleran margin and support a model for moderate post-Jurassic translation (~400 km) of the Blue Mountains Province. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  16. Mesozoic units in SE Rhodope (Bulgaria): new structural and petrologic data and geodynamic implications for the Early Jurassic to Mid-Cretaceous evolution of the Vardar ocean basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonev, N.; Stampfli, G.

    2003-04-01

    . Immobile trace element discrimination of both rock types constrains the volcanic (oceanic)-arc origin. They generally show low total REE concentrations (LREE>HREE) with enrichment of LIL elements relative to the HFS elements, and also very low Nb and relatively high Ce content consistent with an island-arc tectonic setting. We consider that the Meliata-Maliac ocean northern passive margin could be the source provenance for the Upper Permian clastics and Middle-Upper Triassic limestone blocks within the olistostromic melange-like unit, whereas turbidites and magmatic blocks may originate in an island arc-accretionary complex that relates to the southward subduction of the Maliac ocean under the supra-subduction back-arc Vardar ocean/island arc system. These new structural and petrologic data allow to precise the tectonic setting of the Mesozoic units and their geodynamic context in the frame of the Early Jurassic to Late Cretaceous evolution of the Vardar ocean.

  17. Naturally occurring contaminants in the Piedmont and Blue Ridge crystalline-rock aquifers and Piedmont Early Mesozoic basin siliciclastic-rock aquifers, eastern United States, 1994–2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapman, Melinda J.; Cravotta, Charles A.; Szabo, Zoltan; Lindsay, Bruce D.

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater quality and aquifer lithologies in the Piedmont and Blue Ridge Physiographic Provinces in the eastern United States vary widely as a result of complex geologic history. Bedrock composition (mineralogy) and geochemical conditions in the aquifer directly affect the occurrence (presence in rock and groundwater) and distribution (concentration and mobility) of potential naturally occurring contaminants, such as arsenic and radionuclides, in drinking water. To evaluate potential relations between aquifer lithology and the spatial distribution of naturally occurring contaminants, the crystalline-rock aquifers of the Piedmont and Blue Ridge Physiographic Provinces and the siliciclastic-rock aquifers of the Early Mesozoic basin of the Piedmont Physiographic Province were divided into 14 lithologic groups, each having from 1 to 16 lithochemical subgroups, based on primary rock type, mineralogy, and weathering potential. Groundwater-quality data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program from 1994 through 2008 from 346 wells and springs in various hydrogeologic and land-use settings from Georgia through New Jersey were compiled and analyzed for this study. Analyses for most constituents were for filtered samples, and, thus, the compiled data consist largely of dissolved concentrations. Concentrations were compared to criteria for protection of human health, such as U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) drinking water maximum contaminant levels and secondary maximum contaminant levels or health-based screening levels developed by the USGS NAWQA Program in cooperation with the USEPA, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, and Oregon Health & Science University. Correlations among constituent concentrations, pH, and oxidation-reduction (redox) conditions were used to infer geochemical controls on constituent mobility within the aquifers. Of the 23 trace-element constituents evaluated

  18. Evolution of Northeastern Mexico during the early Mesozoic: potential areas for research and exploration José Rafael Barboza-Gudiño

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barboza-Gudiño, R.

    2013-05-01

    The lower Mesozoic succession of central and northeastern Mexico was deposited in a late Paleozoic-early Mesozoic remnant basin, formed at the westernmost culmination of the Ouachita-Marathon geosuture, after closure of the Rheic Ocean. Triassic fluvial deposits of El Alamar Formation (El Alamar River) are distributed in Tamaulipas and Nuevo Leon as remnants of a continental succession deposited close to the western margin of equatorial Pangea, such fluvial systems flowed to the ocean, located to the west and contributed to construction of the so-called Potosí submarine fan (Zacatecas Formation). Petrographic, geochemical, and detrital zircon geochronology studies indicate that both, marine and continental Triassic successions, come from a continental block and partially from a recycled orogen, showing grenvillian (900-1300 Ma) and Pan-African (500-700 Ma) zircon age populations, typical for peri-gondwanan blocks, in addition to zircons from the Permo-Triassic East Mexico arc (240-280 Ma). The absence of detrital zircons from the southwestern North American craton, represent a strong argument against left lateral displacement of Mexico to the southwest during the Jurassic up to their actual position, as proposed by the Mojave-Sonora megashear hypothesis. Towards the end of the Triassic or in earliest Jurassic time, began the subduction along the western margin of Pangea, which causes deformation of the Late Triassic Zacatecas Formation and subsequent magmatism in the continental Jurassic arc known as "Nazas Arc ", whose remnants are now exposed in central- to northeastern Mexico. Wide distributed in northern Mexico occurred also deposition of a red bed succession, overlying or partially interstratified with the Early to Middle Jurassic volcanic rocks of the Nazas Formation. To the west and southwest, such redbeds change transitionally to marine and marginal sedimentary facies which record sedimentation at the ancient paleo-pacific margin of Mexico (La Boca and

  19. Digital surfaces and hydrogeologic data for the Mesozoic through early Tertiary rocks in the Southeastern Coastal Plain in parts of Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, and Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, Debra M.; Bellino, Jason C.; Williams, Lester J.

    2012-01-01

    A digital dataset of hydrogeologic data for Mesozoic through early Tertiary rocks in the Southeastern Coastal Plain was developed using data from five U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) reports published between 1951 and 1996. These reports contain maps and data depicting the extent and elevation of the Southeast Coastal Plain stratigraphic and hydrogeologic units in Florida and parts of Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and South Carolina. The reports are: Professional Paper 1410-B (Renken, 1996), Professional Paper 1088 (Brown and others, 1979), Professional Paper 524-G (Applin and Applin, 1967), Professional Paper 447 (Applin and Applin, 1965), and Circular 91 (Applin, 1951). The digital dataset provides hydrogeologic data for the USGS Energy Resources Program assessment of potential reservoirs for carbon sequestration and for the USGS Groundwater Resource Program assessment of saline aquifers in the southeastern United States. A Geographic Information System (ArcGIS 9.3.1) was used to construct 33 digital (raster) surfaces representing the top or base of key stratigraphic and hydrogeologic units. In addition, the Geographic Information System was used to generate 102 geo-referenced scanned maps from the five reports and a geo-database containing structural and thickness contours, faults, extent polygons, and common features. The dataset also includes point data of well construction and stratigraphic elevations and scanned images of two geologic cross sections and a nomenclature chart.

  20. Origin and geodynamic significance of the early Mesozoic Weiya LP and HT granulites from the Chinese Eastern Tianshan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Ling-Juan; He, Zhen-Yu; Zhang, Ze-Ming; Klemd, Reiner; Xiang, Hua; Tian, Zuo-Lin; Zong, Ke-Qing

    2015-12-01

    The Chinese Tianshan in the southwestern part of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) is characterized by a variety of high-grade metamorphic rocks, which provide critical constraints for understanding the geodynamic evolution of the CAOB. In this paper, we present detailed petrological and zircon U-Pb geochronological studies of the Weiya low-pressure and high-temperature (LP-HT) granulites of the Chinese Eastern Tianshan. These granulites were previously considered to be a product of a regional metamorphic orogenic event. Due to different bulk-rock chemistries the Weiya granulites, which occur as lenses within the contact metamorphic aureole of the Weiya granitic ring complex, have a variety of felsic-pelitic and mafic granulites with different textural equilibrium mineral assemblages including garnet-cordierite-sillimanite-bearing granulites, cordierite-sillimanite-bearing granulites, cordierite-orthopyroxene-bearing granulites, and orthopyroxene-clinopyroxene-bearing granulites. Average P-T thermobarometric calculations and conventional geothermobarometry indicates that the Weiya granulites underwent early prograde metamorphism under conditions of 600-650 °C at 3.2-4.2 kbar and peak metamorphism of 750-840 °C at 2.9-6.3 kbar, indicating a rather high geothermal gradient of ca. 60 °C/km. Zircon U-Pb LA-ICP-MS dating revealed metamorphic ages between 244 ± 1 to 237 ± 3 Ma, which are in accordance with the crystallization age of the Weiya granitic ring complex. We suggest that the formation of the Weiya granulites was related to contemporaneous granitic magmatism instead of a regional metamorphic orogenic event. In addition, a Late Devonian metamorphic age of ca. 380 Ma was recorded in zircon mantle domains from two pelitic samples which is consistent with the metamorphic age of the Xingxingxia metamorphic complex in the Chinese Eastern Tianshan. This suggests that the mantle domains of the zircon grains of the Weiya granulites probably formed during the

  1. An alternative plate tectonic model for the Palaeozoic Early Mesozoic Palaeotethyan evolution of Southeast Asia (Northern Thailand Burma)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, O. M.; Hochard, C.; Stampfli, G. M.

    2008-04-01

    An alternative model for the geodynamic evolution of Southeast Asia is proposed and inserted in a modern plate tectonic model. The reconstruction methodology is based on dynamic plate boundaries, constrained by data such as spreading rates and subduction velocities; in this way it differs from classical continental drift models proposed so far. The different interpretations about the location of the Palaeotethys suture in Thailand are revised, the Tertiary Mae Yuam fault is seen as the emplacement of the suture. East of the suture we identify an Indochina derived terrane for which we keep the name Shan-Thai, formerly used to identify the Cimmerian block present in Southeast Asia, now called Sibumasu. This nomenclatural choice was made on the basis of the geographic location of the terrane (Eastern Shan States in Burma and Central Thailand) and in order not to introduce new confusing terminology. The closure of the Eastern Palaeotethys is related to a southward subduction of the ocean, that triggered the Eastern Neotethys to open as a back-arc, due to the presence of Late Carboniferous-Early Permian arc magmatism in Mergui (Burma) and in the Lhasa block (South Tibet), and to the absence of arc magmatism of the same age East of the suture. In order to explain the presence of Carboniferous-Early Permian and Permo-Triassic volcanic arcs in Cambodia, Upper Triassic magmatism in Eastern Vietnam and Lower Permian-Middle Permian arc volcanites in Western Sumatra, we introduce the Orang Laut terranes concept. These terranes were detached from Indochina and South China during back-arc opening of the Poko-Song Ma system, due to the westward subduction of the Palaeopacific. This also explains the location of the Cathaysian West Sumatra block to the West of the Cimmerian Sibumasu block.

  2. Unravelling the nature of Waiparaconus, a pennatulacean (Cnidaria: Octocorallia) from the Late Mesozoic-Early Cainozoic of the Southern Hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Buckeridge, John S; Campbell, Hamish J; Maurizot, Pierre

    2014-03-01

    Enigmatic calcareous conical fossils have been known from marine Paleocene-Eocene sequences of New Zealand since the early 1870s. More recently, similar fossils have been recorded from both Late Cretaceous marine sequences of Western Australia, New Caledonia and Antarctica, and possibly from the Eocene of South America. The present paper extends the record to the late Cretaceous of New Caledonia. These remains are unlike any living taxa, and have been variously interpreted as molluscs (rudistid bivalves), cirripedes (stalked barnacles), annelids and inorganic structures. Assignation to the Cirripedia has been refuted by Buckeridge (1983, 1993), who proposed that the material would be better placed within the Cnidaria. We investigate this hypothesis in light of the New Caledonian material and by comparison with living gorgonians and pennatulaceans, and demonstrate that Waiparaconus is best placed within the Pennatulacea. Waiparaconus zelandicus varies in form somewhat, with 3 morphotypes defined and reinforced by geography. Comment is provided on the imperative to fit organic remains into known groups, with reflection on what may happen if taxa are left in insertae sedis. © 2013 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Late Pan-African and early Mesozoic brittle compressions in East and Central Africa: lithospheric deformation within the Congo-Tanzania Cratonic area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delvaux, D.; Kipata, M. L.; Macheyeki, A. S.

    2012-04-01

    Tectonic reconstructions leading to the formation of the Central-African part of Gondwana have so far not much taken into account constraints provided by the evolution of brittle structures and related stress field. This is largely because little is known on continental brittle deformation in Equatorial Africa before the onset of the Mesozoic Central-African and Late Cenozoic East-African rifts. We present a synthesis of fault-kinematic data and paleostress inversion results from field surveys covering parts of Tanzania, Zambia and the Democratic Republic of Congo. It is based on investigations along the eastern margin of the Tanzanian craton, in the Ubendian belt between the Tanzanian craton and Bangweulu block, in the Lufilian Arc between the Kalahari and Congo cratons and along the Congo intracratonic basin. Paleostress tensors were computed for a substantial database by interactive stress tensor inversion and data subset separation, and the relative succession of major brittle events established. Two of them appear to be of regional importance and could be traced from one region to the other. The oldest one is the first brittle event recorded after the paroxysm of the Terminal Pan-African event that led to the amalgamation Gondwana at the Precambrian-Cambrian transition. It is related to compressional deformation with horizontal stress trajectories fluctuating from an E-W compression in Central Tanzania to NE-SW in the Ubende belt and Lufilian Arc. The second event is a transpressional inversion with a consistent NW-SE compression that we relate to the far-field effects of the active margin south of Gondwana during the late Triassic - early Jurassic.

  4. Hazardous Waste Cleanup: Federated Metals Corporation in Newark, New Jersey

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Federated Metals Corporation is located at 150 Saint Charles Street in Newark, New Jersey. The site operated on a 13.2-acre in the Ironbound section of Newark and began operations in 1943 as the American Smelting and Refining Corporation/Federated Metal

  5. New evidence for late mesozoic-early Cenozoic evolution of the Chilean Andes in the upper Tinguiririca valley (35 °S), central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charrier, Reynaldo; Wyss, AndréR.; Flynn, John J.; Swisher, Carl C.; Norell, Mark A.; Zapatta, Franyo; McKenna, Malcolm C.; Novacek, Michael J.

    1996-11-01

    New geologic, paleontologic and isotopic geochronometric results from the Termas del Flaco region in the upper Tinguiririca River valley in central Chile demand considerable revision of the accepted geotectonic history of the Andean Main Range in this region. A diverse, transitional Eocene-Oligocene aged, land-mammal fauna was recovered from several sites in volcaniclastic sediments of the Coya-Machalí (=Abanico) Formation. Major results of our study include: 1) The 1000 + m thick studied deposits, previously attributed to the Cretaceous Colimapu Formation, belong to the Coya-Machalí (=Abanico) Formation. Radioisotopic data from levels immediately above (31.5 Ma) and below (37.S Ma) the fossiliferous horizon indicate a latest Eocene to early Oligocene age for the basal part of the formation and the fauna contained in it. 2) The fossiliferous unit rests with slight angular offset on different Mesozoic units: "Brownish-red Clastic Unit" (BRCU) and Baños del Flaco Formation; in a limited area it also overlies a white tuff dated at 104 Ma. 3) The contacts just discussed (none of which is attributable to faulting), demonstrate the existence of two, or possibly three, unconformities in the region. 4) Sedimentological criteria argue against reference of the BRCU to the Colimapu Formation, and imply correlation of the former unit to basal levels with in the late Cretaceous Neuquén Group of western Argentina. 5) The Coya-Machalí Formation, previously viewed as representing the western volcanic equivalent of Riográndico Supercycle deposits of western Argentino, is likely coeval to much younger units in that region such as the Agua de la Piedra Formation. 6) Paleomagnetic results from the fossil producing horizon indicate about 20 ° of post-early Oligocene, counterclockwise rotation. 7) Fossil mammals from the Coya-Machalí Formation near Termas del Flaco represent a distinct biochronologic interval not heretofore clearly recognized from elsewhere on the continent

  6. Blueschist metamorphism and its tectonic implication of Late Paleozoic-Early Mesozoic metabasites in the mélange zones, central Inner Mongolia, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinrui; Wei, Chunjing; Chu, Hang

    2015-01-01

    Blueschists in central Inner Mongolia are distributed as layers and blocks in mélanges including the southern zone in Ondor Sum area and the northern zone in Manghete and Naomuhunni areas. They have been attributed to the subduction of Early Paleozoic oceanic crust. Blueschists from Ondor Sum and Naomuhunni are characterized by occurrence of sodic amphibole coexisting with epidote, albite, chlorite, calcic amphibole (in Ondor Sum) and muscovite (in Naomuhunni). Blueschists in Manghete contain porphyroblastic albite with inclusions of garnet and epidote in a matrix dominated by calcic-sodic amphibole, epidote, chlorite, albite and muscovite. Phase equilibria modeling for three blueschist samples using pseudosection suggest that the AlM2 contents in sodic amphibole can be used as a good barometer in the limited assemblage involving sodic amphibole + actinolite + epidote + chlorite + albite + quartz under pressures <4-6 kbar, while this barometer is largely influenced by temperature and bulk Fe2O3 contents in the actinolite-absent assemblage sodic amphibole + epidote + chlorite + albite + quartz of higher pressure and the AlM2 contents are not pressure-controlled in the albite-absent assemblage sodic amphibole + epidote + chlorite + quartz under pressures > 7-10 kbar. In the sodic amphibole-bearing assemblages, the NaM4 contents in sodic amphibole mainly decrease as temperature rises, being a potential thermometry. The calculated pseudosections constrain the P-T conditions of blueschists to be 3.2-4.2 kbar/355-415 °C in Ondor Sum, 8.2-9.0 kbar/455 °C-495 °C in Manghete and 6.6-8.1 kbar/420-470 °C in Naomuhunni. These P-T estimates indicate a rather high geothermal gradient of 18-25 °C/km for the blueschist metamorphism, being of intermediate P/T facies series. Available zircon U-Pb age data suggests that the protoliths of blueschists were formed later than Late Paleozoic-Early Mesozoic and metamorphosed soon afterwards. An alternative interpretation for the

  7. Experiments in water spreading at Newark, Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boggess, Durward Haye; Rima, Donald Robert

    1962-01-01

    Two experiments in water spreading were made at Newark, Del., to evaluate the prospects of using excess storm runoff to recharge the shallow water-table aquifer which serves the community. Water was diverted from 1 of the city's 3 production wells and released into an infiltration ditch near the municipal well field. Although slightly more than 65,000 cubic feet of water (nearly 500,000 gallons ) was spread in the infiltration ditch and allowed to seep into the subsurface, there was no indication that any appreciable amount of water reached the producing aquifer. Instead, a perched zone of saturation was created by the presence of an impermeable or slightly permeable bed above the water table. So effective is this barrier to the downward movement of water that within a period of less than 1 day, the apex of the perched zone rose about 10 feet to the level of the bottom of the infiltration ditch. As more water was added, the mound of saturation spread laterally. On the basis of these experiments, it appears that the principal aquifer at Newark, Del., would not be benefited by spreading water in shallow infiltration ditches or basins. However, the absorptive capacity of the unsaturated materials which occur at a shallow depth, is sufficient to permit the disposal of large volumes of storm runoff.

  8. Newark Kids Count 2010: A City Profile of Child Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Advocates for Children of New Jersey, 2010

    2010-01-01

    For 15 years, "Newark Kids Count" has provided insight into the challenges facing Newark's children and families. This report presents the portrait of Newark children in 2010. A special section on Newark charter schools is also presented. Advocates for Children of New Jersey's (ACNJ's) goal in choosing this topic was to inform the…

  9. A Glimpse at Late Mesozoic to Early Tertiary Offshore Stratigraphy from Wilkes Land, East Antarctica: Results of Strategic Dredging of the Mertz-Ninnis Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrum, H.; Domack, E.; Desantis, L.; Leventer, A.; McMullen, K.; Escutia, C.

    2004-12-01

    infilling a rifted basin of late Cretaceous age. Seaward dipping reflectors above the syn-rift strata represent post-rift deposits ranging from Paleogene to Quaternary. Included within this stratigraphy are lithified diamictites containing Mesozoic palynomorphs in addition to palynomorphs of Early Tertiary age (including dinoflagellates). Seaward dipping reflectors in the deep axis of the Mertz-Ninnis Trough were not sampled directly by our dredges, but are believed to be Lower Cretaceous siltstones by extrapolation to core DF-79-38, 100 km along strike to the southeast (Domack et al., 1980). Furthermore, the thermal maturity of the lignite samples recovered in our collections suggests that the coal is of Early Tertiary age, as are numerous organic-rich mudstones, which contain Paleogene palynomorphs. These results indicate that sedimentary strata in this portion of the Wilkes Land Margin contain significantly thick (greater than 2.7 km) post-rift (drift phase) marine sequences of both pre- and synglacial character. Strategic dredging is a promising methodology by which to sample stratigraphic succession in a cost effective manner along the East Antarctic margin in the absence of, or preparation for, International Ocean Drilling Projects on the shelf. Domack, E. W., Fairchild, W. W., and Anderson, J. B. (1980) Lower Cretaceous sediment from the East Antarctic continental shelf, Nature, 287, 625-626.

  10. Hazardous Waste Cleanup: Beazer Incorporated in Port Newark, New Jersey

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Beazer East, Inc. site consists of approximately eight acres, located on Maritime and Tyler Streets, between the Elizabeth and Port Newark shipping channels, in Essex County, New Jersey. Several wood-treating facilities were located at the site from

  11. Total petroleum systems of the Bonaparte Gulf Basin area, Australia; Jurassic, Early Cretaceous-Mesozoic; Keyling, Hyland Bay-Permian; Milligans-Carboniferous, Permian

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bishop, M.G.

    1999-01-01

    The Bonaparte Gulf Basin Province (USGS #3910) of northern Australia contains three important hydrocarbon source-rock intervals. The oldest source-rock interval and associated reservoir rocks is the Milligans-Carboniferous, Permian petroleum system. This petroleum system is located at the southern end of Joseph Bonaparte Gulf and includes both onshore and offshore areas within a northwest to southeast trending Paleozoic rift that was initiated in the Devonian. The Milligans Formation is a Carboniferous marine shale that sources accumulations of both oil and gas in Carboniferous and Permian deltaic, marine shelf carbonate, and shallow to deep marine sandstones. The second petroleum system in the Paleozoic rift is the Keyling, Hyland Bay-Permian. Source rocks include Lower Permian Keyling Formation delta-plain coals and marginal marine shales combined with Upper Permian Hyland Bay Formation prodelta shales. These source-rock intervals provide gas and condensate for fluvial, deltaic, and shallow marine sandstone reservoirs primarily within several members of the Hyland Bay Formation. The Keyling, Hyland Bay-Permian petroleum system is located in the Joseph Bonaparte Gulf, north of the Milligans-Carboniferous, Permian petroleum system, and may extend northwest under the Vulcan graben sub-basin. The third and youngest petroleum system is the Jurassic, Early Cretaceous-Mesozoic system that is located seaward of Joseph Bonaparte Gulf on the Australian continental shelf, and trends southwest-northeast. Source-rock intervals in the Vulcan graben sub-basin include deltaic mudstones of the Middle Jurassic Plover Formation and organic-rich marine shales of the Upper Jurassic Vulcan Formation and Lower Cretaceous Echuca Shoals Formation. These intervals produce gas, oil, and condensate that accumulates in, shallow- to deep-marine sandstone reservoirs of the Challis and Vulcan Formations of Jurassic to Cretaceous age. Organic-rich, marginal marine claystones and coals of the

  12. Possible Mesozoic age of Ellenville Zn-Pb-Cu(Ag) deposit, Shawangunk Mountains, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, J.D.; Conrad, J.E.; McKee, E.H.; Mutschler, F.E.; Zartman, R.E.

    1994-01-01

    Ore textures, epithermal open-space filling of Permian structures of the Alleghanian orogeny, and largely postorogenic mineralization of the Ellenville, New York, composite Zn-Pb-Cu(Ag) vein system, provide permissive evidence for post-Permian mineralization. Isochron ages determined by 40Ar/39Ar laser-fusion techniques for K-bearing liquid inclusions in main-stage quartz from the Ellenville deposit additionally suggest a Mesozoic time of mineralization, associated with extensional formation of the Newark basin. The best 40Ar/39Ar total-fusion age range is 165 ?? 30 to 193 ?? 35 Ma. The Mesozoic 40Ar/39Ar age agrees with that of many other dated northern Appalachian Zn-Pb-Cu(Ag) deposits with near-matching lead isotope ratios, and adds new evidence of Jurassic tectonism and mineralization as an overprint to Late Paleozoic tectonism at least as far north as Ellenville (lat. 41??43???N). ?? 1994 Springer-Verlag.

  13. Geochronology and geochemistry of late Paleozoic-early Mesozoic igneous rocks of the Erguna Massif, NE China: Implications for the early evolution of the Mongol-Okhotsk tectonic regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu; Xu, Wen-Liang; Wang, Feng; Tang, Jie; Zhao, Shuo; Guo, Peng

    2017-08-01

    We undertook geochemical and geochronological studies on late Paleozoic-early Mesozoic igneous rocks from the Erguna Massif with the aim of constraining the early evolution of the Mongol-Okhotsk tectonic regime. Zircon crystals from nine representative samples are euhedral-subhedral, display oscillatory growth zoning, and have Th/U values of 0.14-6.48, indicating a magmatic origin. U-Pb dating of zircon using SIMS and LA-ICP-MS indicates that these igneous rocks formed during the Late Devonian (∼365 Ma), late Carboniferous (∼303 Ma), late Permian (∼256 Ma), and Early-Middle Triassic (246-238 Ma). The Late Devonian rhyolites, together with coeval A-type granites, formed in an extensional environment related to the northwestwards subduction of the Heihe-Nenjiang oceanic plate. Their positive εHf(t) values (+8.4 to +14.4) and Hf two-stage model ages (TDM2 = 444-827 Ma) indicate they were derived from a newly accreted continental crustal source. The late Carboniferous granodiorites are geochemically similar to adakites, and their εHf(t) values (+10.4 to +12.3) and Hf two-stage model ages (TDM2 = 500-607 Ma) suggest they were sourced from thickened juvenile lower crustal material, this thickening may be related to the amalgamation of the Erguna-Xing'an and Songnen-Zhangguangcai Range massifs. Rocks of the late Permian to Middle Triassic suite comprise high-K calc-alkaline monzonites, quartz monzonites, granodiorites, and monzogranites. These rocks are relatively enriched in light rare earth elements and large ion lithophile elements, and depleted in heavy rare earth elements and high field strength elements. They were emplaced, together with coeval porphyry-type ore deposits, along an active continental margin where the Mongol-Okhotsk oceanic plate was subducting beneath the Erguna Massif.

  14. A Mesozoic gliding mammal from northeastern China.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jin; Hu, Yaoming; Wang, Yuanqing; Wang, Xiaolin; Li, Chuankui

    2006-12-14

    Gliding flight has independently evolved many times in vertebrates. Direct evidence of gliding is rare in fossil records and is unknown in mammals from the Mesozoic era. Here we report a new Mesozoic mammal from Inner Mongolia, China, that represents a previously unknown group characterized by a highly specialized insectivorous dentition and a sizable patagium (flying membrane) for gliding flight. The patagium is covered with dense hair and supported by an elongated tail and limbs; the latter also bear many features adapted for arboreal life. This discovery extends the earliest record of gliding flight for mammals to at least 70 million years earlier in geological history, and demonstrates that early mammals were diverse in their locomotor strategies and lifestyles; they had experimented with an aerial habit at about the same time as, if not earlier than, when birds endeavoured to exploit the sky.

  15. Start with the Faculty. The Newark Faculty Alliance for Education and Systemic Educational Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Dennis; Van Buskirk, William

    The Faculty Alliance for Education in Newark (New Jersey) is a network of faculty from local universities, a community college, and two high schools, all in the city of Newark, dedicated to improving the opportunities for at-risk youth to achieve a college education and an improved quality of life. It is an initiative of the Newark Educational…

  16. Tracking Progress, Engaging Communities: Abbott Indicators Summary Report-- Newark, New Jersey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Lesley; Applewhite-Coney, Erain

    2005-01-01

    Newark is one of 31 urban school districts in New Jersey known as Abbott districts. As an Abbott district, Newark receives funding to equalize its per student general education budget with the most successful suburban districts in the state. Through a series of indicators, the Newark Abbott Indicators Report presents the status of educational…

  17. Tracking Progress, Engaging Communities: Abbott Indicators Technical Report-- Newark, New Jersey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Lesley; Applewhite-Coney, Erain

    2005-01-01

    Newark is one of 31 urban school districts in New Jersey known as Abbott districts. As an Abbott district, Newark receives funding to equalize its per student general education budget with the most successful suburban districts in the state. Through a series of indicators, the Newark Abbott Indicators Report presents the status of educational…

  18. Newark Kids Count 2007: A City Profile of Child Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Children of New Jersey, 2007

    2007-01-01

    For at least 40 years, Newark's name has been practically synonymous with poverty and crime. Its troubled image had roots in reality. For too many families, Newark has been a hard place to raise children. For too many children, it has been a rough place to grow up. But there are signs of change, as found in "Newark Kids Count 2007," an…

  19. 78 FR 28280 - Operating Limitations at Newark Liberty International Airport

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ... Limitations at Newark Liberty International Airport AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... duration of the Order. The reasons for issuing the Order have not changed appreciably since it was implemented. Without the operational limitations imposed by this Order, the FAA expects severe congestion...

  20. Living Together in Newark. A Curriculum for the Study of the City of Newark, New Jersey, in Third Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newark Board of Education, NJ. Dept. of Curriculum Services.

    This is a curriculum guide for the study of the city of Newark, New Jersey, in grade 3 social studies classes. Included are suggested lessons plans, curriculum resources, and instructional activities designed to provide information on the city's growth and development and to increase children's understanding of people's relation to their…

  1. Installation Restoration Program. Records Search, Newark AFS, Ohio

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-01

    APPENDIX J - Aerial Photograph Newark Air Force Station . . . J-i i I I 1 I ! I iv I LIST OF TABLES No. Page 1 Potential Risk Ranking Based on Final HARM...accuracies of standards used at base level are directly traceable to the 3 Air Force Measurement Standards Laboratory at AGMC. The primary standards from...Approximately eight years ago the Base Exchange released it to the motor pool. Service is provided for all Air Force vehicles and equipment on the

  2. Gravity Data from Newark Valley, White Pine County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mankinen, Edward A.; McKee, Edwin H.

    2007-01-01

    The Newark Valley area, eastern Nevada is one of thirteen major ground-water basins investigated by the BARCAS (Basin and Range Carbonate Aquifer Study) Project. Gravity data are being used to help characterize the geophysical framework of the region. Although gravity coverage was extensive over parts of the BARCAS study area, data were sparse for a number of the valleys, including the northern part of Newark Valley. We addressed this lack of data by establishing seventy new gravity stations in and around Newark Valley. All available gravity data were then evaluated to determine their reliability, prior to calculating an isostatic residual gravity map to be used for subsequent analyses. A gravity inversion method was used to calculate depths to pre-Cenozoic basement rock and estimates of maximum alluvial/volcanic fill. The enhanced gravity coverage and the incorporation of lithologic information from several deep oil and gas wells yields a view of subsurface shape of the basin and will provide information useful for the development of hydrogeologic models for the region.

  3. Jurassic cooling ages in Paleozoic to early Mesozoic granitoids of northeastern Patagonia: 40Ar/39Ar, 40K-40Ar mica and U-Pb zircon evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez Dopico, Carmen I.; Tohver, Eric; López de Luchi, Mónica G.; Wemmer, Klaus; Rapalini, Augusto E.; Cawood, Peter A.

    2017-10-01

    U-Pb SHRIMP zircon crystallization ages and Ar-Ar and K-Ar mica cooling ages for basement rocks of the Yaminué and Nahuel Niyeu areas in northeastern Patagonia are presented. Granitoids that cover the time span from Ordovician to Early Triassic constitute the main outcrops of the western sector of the Yaminué block. The southern Yaminué Metaigneous Complex comprises highly deformed Ordovician and Permian granitoids crosscut by undeformed leucogranite dikes (U-Pb SHRIMP zircon age of 254 ± 2 Ma). Mica separates from highly deformed granitoids from the southern sector yielded an Ar-Ar muscovite age of 182 ± 3 Ma and a K-Ar biotite age of 186 ± 2 Ma. Moderately to highly deformed Permian to Early Triassic granitoids made up the northern Yaminué Complex. The Late Permian to Early Triassic (U-Pb SHRIMP zircon age of 252 ± 6 Ma) Cabeza de Vaca Granite of the Yaminué block yielded Jurassic mica K-Ar cooling ages (198 ± 2, 191 ± 1, and 190 ± 2 Ma). At the boundary between the Yaminué and Nahuel Niyeu blocks, K-Ar muscovite ages of 188 ± 3 and 193 ± 5 Ma were calculated for the Flores Granite, whereas the Early Permian Navarrete granodiorite, located in the Nahuel Niyeu block, yielded a K-Ar biotite age of 274 ± 4 Ma. The Jurassic thermal history is not regionally uniform. In the supracrustal exposures of the Nahuel Niyeu block, the Early Permian granitoids of its western sector as well as other Permian plutons and Ordovician leucogranites located further east show no evidence of cooling age reset since mica ages suggest cooling in the wake of crystallization of these intrusive rocks. In contrast, deeper crustal levels are inferred for Permian-Early Triassic granitoids in the Yaminué block since cooling ages for these rocks are of Jurassic age (198-182 Ma). Jurassic resetting is contemporaneous with the massive Lower Jurassic Flores Granite, and the Marifil and Chon Aike volcanic provinces. This intraplate deformational pulse that affected northeastern

  4. A low-angle normal fault and basement structures within the Enping Sag, Pearl River Mouth Basin: Insights into late Mesozoic to early Cenozoic tectonic evolution of the South China Sea area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Qing; Mei, Lianfu; Shi, Hesheng; Shu, Yu; Camanni, Giovanni; Wu, Jing

    2018-04-01

    The basement structure of the Cenozoic Enping Sag, within the Pearl River Mouth Basin on the northern margin of South China Sea, is revealed by borehole-constrained high-quality 3D seismic reflection data. Such data suggest that the Enping Sag is bounded in the north by a low-angle normal fault. We interpret this low-angle normal fault to have developed as the result of the reactivation of a pre-existing thrust fault part of a pre-Cenozoic thrust system. This is demonstrated by the selective reactivation of the pre-existing thrust and by diffuse contractional deformation recognized from the accurate analysis of basement reflections. Another significant result of this study is the finding of some residual rift basins within the basement of the Enping Sag. Both the thrust system and the residual basins are interpreted to have developed after the emplacement of continental margin arc-related granitoids (J3-K1) that define the basement within the study area. Furthermore, seismic sections show that the pre-existing residual rift basins are offset by the main thrust fault and they are both truncated by the Tg unconformity. These structural relationships, interpreted in the frame of previous studies, help us to reconstruct a six-event structural evolution model for the Enping Sag from the late Mesozoic to the early Cenozoic. In particular, we interpret the residual rift basins to have formed as the result of back-arc extension due to the slab roll-back of the Paleo-Pacific Plate subduction in the early K2. The thrust system has recorded a compressional event in the late K2 that followed the back-arc extension in the SCS area. The mechanism of this compressional event is still to be clarified, and might be related to continuous subduction of the Paleo-Pacific Plate or to the continent-continent collision between a micro-continental block and the South China margin.

  5. Building Model Preschools: The Newark Lighthouse Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blagman, Amanda; Rice, Cynthia; Seplocha, Holly

    2006-01-01

    More states are recognizing that preschool is a vital first step toward helping children succeed in school. Ensuring that preschoolers have a high quality early learning experience provides them with the skills they need for later school success. In New Jersey, the poorest school districts have been collaborating with community-based child care…

  6. Petrogenesis of early Jurassic basalts in southern Jiangxi Province, South China: Implications for the thermal state of the Mesozoic mantle beneath South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cen, Tao; Li, Wu-xian; Wang, Xuan-ce; Pang, Chong-jin; Li, Zheng-xiang; Xing, Guang-fu; Zhao, Xi-lin; Tao, Jihua

    2016-07-01

    Early Jurassic bimodal volcanic and intrusive rocks in southern South China show distinct associations and distribution patterns in comparison with those of the Middle Jurassic and Cretaceous rocks in the area. It is widely accepted that these rocks formed in an extensional setting, although the timing of the onset and the tectonic driver for extension are debated. Here, we present systematic LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb ages, whole-rock geochemistry and Sr-Nd isotope data for bimodal volcanic rocks from the Changpu Formation in the Changpu-Baimianshi and Dongkeng-Linjiang basins in southern Jiangxi Province, South China. Zircon U-Pb ages indicate that the bimodal volcanic rocks erupted at ca. 190 Ma, contemporaneous with the Fankeng basalts ( 183 Ma). A compilation of geochronological results demonstrates that basin-scale basaltic eruptions occurred during the Early Jurassic within a relatively short interval (< 5 Ma). These Early Jurassic basalts have tholeiitic compositions and OIB-like trace element distribution patterns. Geochemical analyses show that the basalts were derived from depleted asthenospheric mantle, dominated by a volatile-free peridotite source. The calculated primary melt compositions suggest that the basalts formed at 1.9-2.1 GPa, with melting temperatures of 1378 °C-1405 °C and a mantle potential temperature (TP) ranging from 1383 °C to 1407 °C. The temperature range is somewhat hotter than normal mid-ocean-basalt (MORB) mantle but similar to an intra-plate continental mantle setting, such as the Basin and Range Province in western North America. This study provides an important constraint on the Early Jurassic mantle thermal state beneath South China. Reference: Raczek, I., Stoll, B., Hofmann, A.W., Jochum, K.P. 2001. High-precision trace element data for the USGS reference materials BCR-1, BCR-2, BHVO-1, BHVO-2, AGV-1, AGV-2, DTS-1, DTS-2, GSP-1 and GSP-2 by ID-TIMS and MIC-SSMS. Geostandards Newsletter 25(1), 77-86.

  7. A source-depleted Early Jurassic granitic pluton from South China: Implication to the Mesozoic juvenile accretion of the South China crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zuo-Min; Ma, Chang-Qian; Wang, Lian-Xun; Chen, Shu-Guang; Xie, Cai-Fu; Li, Yong; Liu, Wei

    2018-02-01

    Source-depleted granites were rarely reported in South China. Hereby we identified such a granitic pluton, the Tiandong pluton, at Northeastern Guangdong province in Southeastern (SE) China. Whole-rock Sr-Nd and zircon Hf isotopes of the Tiandong granites both revealed obviously depleted source signatures, with initial isotopic values of initial 87Sr/86Sr = 0.7032-0.7040, εNd(t) = 1.1-1.5, and εHf(t) = 6-13, respectively. Zircon U-Pb dating implied the granite was intruded in Early Jurassic (188 Ma). The dominant minerals of the Tiandong granite consist of K-feldspar, plagioclase, quartz and biotite, with accessory mineral assemblage of apatite + zircon + magnetite. Based on the mineralogy and the depleted isotopic signature, the granites chemically show I-type affinity such as low Zr + Nb + Ce + Y (131.6 to 212.2), 104 × Ga/Al (2.12-2.27), A/CNK values < 1.1 (0.97-1.03), corundum molecule < 1 (0-0.55) and extremely low P2O5 contents (0.05 wt%). The one-stage and two-stage depleted mantle Nd model ages (TDM = 0.89 to 0.84 Ga, T2DM = 0.88 to 0.85 Ga) are consistent. TDM(Hf) values of 0.31-0.63 Ga are also indistinguishable from T2DM(Hf) values of 0.35-0.75 Ga. The Nd and Hf isotopic compositions confirm that the Tiandong granites are juvenile crustal accretion but decoupled Nd-Hf isotopic systems. The juvenile crust is likely to originate from a mixed source of the primary asthenospheric mantle and the subordinate EMII. Combined with early studies of adjacent rocks, we propose that the early Jurassic ( 200-175 Ma) magmatism as evidenced by the Tiandong granites might be driven by upwelling of asthenosphere and subsequent underplating of mafic melts in an intra-plate extensional setting as a response to far-field stress during early stage subduction of the paleo-pacific plate.

  8. Hazardous Waste Cleanup: Safety-Kleen Envirosystems Company in Newark, New Jersey

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Safety-Kleen Envirosystems Company site is located on approximately 9.5 acres in a heavily industrialized area in Newark, New Jersey. The site is bounded on the west by Doremus Avenue and on the east by the confluence of the Passaic River and Newark

  9. Newark Kids Count 2009: A City Profile of Child Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Children of New Jersey, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The 2009 Newark Kids Count Report provides the first data on how the economic downturn in New Jersey and the nation is impacting the lives of children and families in Newark. It is no surprise that child poverty is on the rise again, after several years of progress in reducing the child poverty rate. Rising unemployment has impacted Newark…

  10. Charter Schools and Urban Education Improvement: A Comparison of Newark's District and Charter Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Jason M.; Sadovnik, Alan R.; Visconti, Louisa

    2006-01-01

    This article compares student achievement of fourth graders in charter schools and district public schools in Newark, New Jersey. We find that Newark and New Jersey's charter schools mirror the educational inequalities of the state as a whole, as well as its Abbott Districts. The data indicate that charter schools are similar to district urban…

  11. Newark Kids Count 2006: A City Profile of Child Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Traini, Cecilia

    2006-01-01

    Over the past five years, Newark has seen creeping gains in several indicators of child and family well-being, particularly economics, education and health. Even though there is some good news to report, the fact remains that Newark children still suffer disproportionately compared to children growing up in other parts of Essex County, New Jersey…

  12. Newark Kids Count 2004: A City Profile of Child Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Children of New Jersey, 2004

    2004-01-01

    "Newark Kids Count 2004" presents a statistical snapshot of child well-being that can be used to inform those efforts to create a strong community safety net for Newark's youngest citizens. Following is a look at some of the major trends documented in this year's report: (1) Poverty persists; (2) Nutritional supports lag; (3) Unmarried…

  13. Hazardous Waste Cleanup: Chemical Waste Management of NJ in Newark, New Jersey

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Chemical Waste Management of NJ is located at 100 Lister Avenue in Newark, New Jersey. This section of Newark has been industrial since the late 1800s when the marshlands of the Passaic River were filled in with a mixture of coal ash, construction debris

  14. Late Paleozoic-Early Mesozoic tectonic evolution of the Paleo-Asian Ocean: geochronological and geochemical evidence from granitoids in the northern margin of Alxa, Western China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Xin; Wang, Jinrong; Chen, Wanfeng; Liu, Zheng; Zhai, Xinwei; Ma, Jinlong; Wang, Shuhua

    2018-03-01

    The Paleo-Asian Ocean (Southern Mongolian Ocean) ophiolitic belts and massive granitoids are exposed in the Alxa block, in response to oceanic subduction processes. In this work, we report petrographic, geochemical, and zircon U-Pb age data of some granitoid intrusions from the northern Alxa. Zircon U-Pb dating for the quartz diorite, tonalite, monzogranite, and biotite granite yielded weighted mean 206Pb/238U ages of 302±9.2 Ma, 246.5±4.6 Ma, 235±4.4 Ma, and 229.5±5.6 Ma, respectively. The quartz diorites ( 302 Ma) exhibit geochemical similarities to adakites, likely derived from partial melting of the initially subducted Chaganchulu back-arc oceanic slab. The tonalites ( 246.5 Ma) display geochemical affinities of I-type granites. They were probably derived by fractional crystallization of the modified lithospheric mantle-derived basaltic magmas in a volcanic arc setting. The monzogranites ( 235 Ma) are characterized by low Al2O3, but high Y and Yb with notably negative Eu anomalies. In contrast, the biotite granites ( 229.5 Ma) show high Al2O3 but low Y and Yb with steep HREE patterns and the absence of negative Eu anomalies. Elemental data suggested that the biotite granites were likely derived from a thickened lower crust, but the monzogranites originated from a thin crust. Our data suggested that the initial subduction of the Chaganchulu oceanic slab towards the Alxa block occurred at 302 Ma. This subduction process continued to the Early Triassic ( 246 Ma) and the basin was finally closed before the Middle Triassic ( 235 Ma). Subsequently, the break-off of the subducted slab triggered asthenosphere upwelling (240-230 Ma).

  15. Early Cretaceous wedge extrusion in the Indo-Burma Range accretionary complex: implications for the Mesozoic subduction of Neotethys in SE Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ji'en; Xiao, Wenjiao; Windley, Brian F.; Cai, Fulong; Sein, Kyaing; Naing, Soe

    2017-06-01

    ± 3 Ma and 115 Ma, which are close to the zircon ages of nearby calc-alkaline granite and diorite, which belong to an active continental margin arc that extends along the western side of the Shan-Thai block. The IBR accretionary complex and the active continental margin arc were generated during Early Cretaceous (115-128 Ma) subduction of the Neotethys Ocean.

  16. Arsenic, Boron, and Fluoride Concentrations in Ground Water in and Near Diabase Intrusions, Newark Basin, Southeastern Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senior, Lisa A.; Sloto, Ronald A.

    2006-01-01

    During an investigation in 2000 by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) of possible contaminant releases from an industrial facility on Congo Road near Gilbertsville in Berks and Montgomery Counties, southeastern Pennsylvania, concentrations of arsenic and fluoride above USEPA drinking-water standards of 10 ?g/L and 4 mg/L, respectively, and of boron above the USEPA health advisory level of 600 ?g/L were measured in ground water in an area along the northwestern edge of the Newark Basin. In 2003, the USEPA requested technical assistance from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to help identify sources of arsenic, boron, and fluoride in the ground water in the Congo Road area, which included possible anthropogenic releases and naturally occurring mineralization in the local bedrock aquifer, and to identify other areas in the Newark Basin of southeastern Pennsylvania with similarly elevated concentrations of these constituents. The USGS reviewed available data and collected additional ground-water samples in the Congo Road area and four similar hydrogeologic settings. The Newark Basin is the largest of the 13 major exposed Mesozoic rift basins that stretch from Nova Scotia to South Carolina. Rocks in the Newark Basin include Triassic through Jurassic-age sedimentary sequences of sandstones and shales that were intruded by diabase. Mineral deposits of hydrothermal origin are associated with alteration zones bordering intrusions of diabase and also occur as strata-bound replacement deposits of copper and zinc in sedimentary rocks. The USGS review of data available in 2003 showed that water from about 10 percent of wells throughout the Newark Basin of southeastern Pennsylvania had concentrations of arsenic greater than the USEPA maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 ?g/L; the highest reported arsenic concentration was at about 70 ?g/L. Few data on boron were available, and the highest reported boron concentration in well-water samples was 60 ?g/L in contrast

  17. Hydrogeologic framework of fractured sedimentary rock, Newark Basin, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lacombe, Pierre J.; Burton, William C.

    2010-01-01

    The hydrogeologic framework of fractured sedimentary bedrock at the former Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), Trenton, New Jersey, a trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated site in the Newark Basin, is developed using an understanding of the geologic history of the strata, gamma-ray logs, and rock cores. NAWC is the newest field research site established as part of the U.S. Geological Survey Toxic Substances Hydrology Program, Department of Defense (DoD) Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, and DoD Environmental Security Technology Certification Program to investigate contaminant remediation in fractured rock. Sedimentary bedrock at the NAWC research site comprises the Skunk Hollow, Byram, and Ewing Creek Members of the Lockatong Formation and Raven Rock Member of the Stockton Formation. Muds of the Lockatong Formation that were deposited in Van Houten cycles during the Triassic have lithified to form the bedrock that is typical of much of the Newark Basin. Four lithotypes formed from the sediments include black, carbon-rich laminated mudstone, dark-gray laminated mudstone, light-gray massive mudstone, and red massive mudstone. Diagenesis, tectonic compression, off-loading, and weathering have altered the rocks to give some strata greater hydraulic conductivity than other strata. Each stratum in the Lockatong Formation is 0.3 to 8 m thick, strikes N65 degrees E, and dips 25 degrees to 70 degrees NW. The black, carbon-rich laminated mudstone tends to fracture easily, has a relatively high hydraulic conductivity and is associated with high natural gamma-ray count rates. The dark-gray laminated mudstone is less fractured and has a lower hydraulic conductivity than the black carbon-rich laminated mudstone. The light-gray and the red massive mudstones are highly indurated and tend to have the least fractures and a low hydraulic conductivity. The differences in gamma-ray count rates for different mudstones allow gamma-ray logs to be used to correlate and

  18. The occurrence and dominant controls on arsenic in the Newark and Gettysburg Basins.

    PubMed

    Blake, Johanna M; Peters, Stephen C

    2015-02-01

    Elevated arsenic (As) concentrations in groundwater and rocks have been found in crystalline and sedimentary aquifers from New England to Pennsylvania, USA. The arsenic geochemistry and water-rock interactions of the Northern Appalachian Mountains and the Newark Basin have been researched at length, however, little is known about arsenic in the Gettysburg Basin. Both the Newark and Gettysburg Basins were formed during the breakup of Pangea, sediment deposition occurred during the Triassic and lithologies are of similar depositional environment. We compile and review the work done in the Newark Basin and collect new samples in the Gettysburg Basin for comparison. The Gettysburg Basin has 18%-39% of rock samples with arsenic concentrations greater than the crustal average of 2 mg/kg, while the Newark Basin has 73% to 95% of rock samples above the crustal average. The strongest controls on arsenic in rocks of the Gettysburg Basin are the relationship between arsenic and iron and silicon concentrations while the strongest controls in the Newark Basin are the relationship between arsenic and iron and organic carbon concentrations. The groundwater arsenic concentrations follow similarly with 8-39% of water samples from the Gettysburg Basin above 10 μg/L and 24-54% of water samples from the Newark Basin above 10 μg/L. The strongest controls on arsenic in water of the Gettysburg Basin are pH, alkalinity and silicon, while the strongest controls in the Newark Basin are pH and alkalinity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. National uranium resource evaluation: Newark Quadrangle, Pennsylvania and New Jersey

    SciTech Connect

    Popper, G.H.P.; Martin, T.S.

    1982-04-01

    The Newark Quadrangle, Pennsylvania and New Jersey, was evaluated to a depth of 1500 m to identify geologic environments and delineate areas favorable for uranium deposits. Criteria used were those developed for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. Results of the investigation indicate that the Precambrian Reading Prong contains environments favorable for anatectic and allogenic uranium deposits. Two suites of rocks are favorable for anatectic-type concentrations: An alaskite-magnetite-gneiss association, and red granite and quartz monzonite. Allogenic uranium concentrations occur in rocks of the marble-skarn-serpentinite association. Environments favorable for peneconcordant sandstone-type uranium deposits occur in the upper one-third of the Catskillmore » Formation, the Mississippian-Pennsylvanian Mauch Chunk-Pottsville transition beds, and the upper half of the Triassic Stockton Formation. The Triassic Lockatong Formation contains environments favorable for carbonaceous shale-type uranium concentrations. The Ordovician Epler Formation and the Cretaceous-Tertiary strata of the Coastal Plain were not evaluated due to time restrictions and lack of outcroup. All other geologic environments are considered unfavorable for uranium deposits.« less

  20. Hydrogeology and simulation of groundwater flow in fractured rock in the Newark basin, Rockland County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Richard M.; Ratcliffe, Nicholas M.

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater in the Newark basin aquifer flows primarily through discrete water-bearing zones parallel to the strike and dip of bedding, whereas flow perpendicular to the strike is restricted, thereby imparting anisotropy to the groundwater flow field. The finite-element model SUTRA was used to represent bedrock structure in the aquifer by spatially varying the orientation of the hydraulic conductivity tensor to reflect variations in the strike and dip of the bedding. Directions of maximum and medium hydraulic conductivity were oriented parallel to the bedding, and the direction of minimum hydraulic conductivity was oriented perpendicular to the bedding. Groundwater flow models were prepared to simulate local flow in the vicinity of the Spring Valley well field and regional flow through the Newark basin aquifer. The Newark basin contains sedimentary rocks deposited as alluvium during the Late Triassic and is one of a series of basins that developed when Mesozoic rifting of the super continent Pangea created the Atlantic Ocean. The westward-dipping basin is filled with interbedded facies of coarse-grained to fine-grained rocks that were intruded by diabase associated with Jurassic volcanism. The Newark basin aquifer is bounded to the north and east by the Palisades sill and to the west by the Ramapo Fault. Although the general dip of bedding is toward the fault, mapping of conglomerate beds indicates the rocks are folded into broad anticlines and synclines. An alternative, more uniform pattern of regional structure, based on interpolated strike and dip measurements from a number of sources, has also been proposed. Two groundwater flow models (A for the former type of bedrock structure and B for the latter type) were developed to represent these alternative depictions of bedrock structure. Transient simulations were calibrated to reproduce measured water-level recoveries in a 9.3 mi² area surrounding the Spring Valley well field during a 5-day aquifer test in 1992

  1. Inspection report of unauthorized possession and use of unsealed americium-241 and subsequent confiscation, J. C. Haynes Company, Newark, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-11-01

    This US Nuclear Regulatory Commission report documents the circumstances surrounding the March 26, 1985, confiscation and subsequent decontamination activities related to the use of unauthorized quantities of americium-241 at the John C. Haynes Company (licensee) of Newark, Ohio. It focuses on the period from early February to July 26, 1985. The incident started when NRC Region III recieved information that John C. Haynes possessed unauthorized quantities of americium-241 and was conducting unauthorized activities (diamond irradiation). By July 26, 1985, the decontamination activities at the licensee's laboratory were concluded. The licensee's actions with diamond irradiation resulted in contamination in restricted andmore » unrestricted areas of the facility. The confiscation and decontamination activities required the combined efforts of NRC, Federal Bureau of Investigation, US Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Associated Universities, the State of Ohio, and the US Environmental Protection Agency. The report describes the factual information and significant findings associated with the confiscation and decontamination activities.« less

  2. Analyzing Double Delays at Newark Liberty International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Antony D.; Lee, Paul

    2016-01-01

    When weather or congestion impacts the National Airspace System, multiple different Traffic Management Initiatives can be implemented, sometimes with unintended consequences. One particular inefficiency that is commonly identified is in the interaction between Ground Delay Programs (GDPs) and time based metering of internal departures, or TMA scheduling. Internal departures under TMA scheduling can take large GDP delays, followed by large TMA scheduling delays, because they cannot be easily fitted into the overhead stream. In this paper we examine the causes of these double delays through an analysis of arrival operations at Newark Liberty International Airport (EWR) from June to August 2010. Depending on how the double delay is defined between 0.3 percent and 0.8 percent of arrivals at EWR experienced double delays in this period. However, this represents between 21 percent and 62 percent of all internal departures in GDP and TMA scheduling. A deep dive into the data reveals that two causes of high internal departure scheduling delays are upstream flights making up time between their estimated departure clearance times (EDCTs) and entry into time based metering, which undermines the sequencing and spacing underlying the flight EDCTs, and high demand on TMA, when TMA airborne metering delays are high. Data mining methods (currently) including logistic regression, support vector machines and K-nearest neighbors are used to predict the occurrence of double delays and high internal departure scheduling delays with accuracies up to 0.68. So far, key indicators of double delay and high internal departure scheduling delay are TMA virtual runway queue size, and the degree to which estimated runway demand based on TMA estimated times of arrival has changed relative to the estimated runway demand based on EDCTs. However, more analysis is needed to confirm this.

  3. Mesozoic evolution of northeast African shelf margin, Libya and Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Aadland, R.K.; Schamel, S.

    1989-03-01

    The present tectonic features of the northeast African shelf margin between the Nile delta and the Gulf of Sirte are products of (1) precursory late Paleozoic basement arches, (2) early Mesozoic rifting and plate separation, and (3) Late Cretaceous structural inversion. The 250 km-wide and highly differentiated Mesozoic passive margin in the Western Desert region of Egypt is developed above a broad northwest-trending Late Carboniferous basement arch. In northeastern Libya, in contrast, the passive margin is restricted to just the northernmost Cyrenaica platform, where subsidence was extremely rapid in the Jurassic and Early Cretaceous. The boundary between the Western Desertmore » basin and the Cyrenaica platform is controlled by the western flank of the basement arch. In the middle Cretaceous (100-90 Ma), subsidence accelerated over large areas of the Western desert, further enhancing a pattern of east-west-trending subbasins. This phase of rapid subsidence was abruptly ended about 80 Ma by the onset of structural inversion that uplifted the northern Cyrenaica shelf margin and further differentiated the Western Desert subbasin along a northeasterly trend.« less

  4. A bottom-up perspective on ecosystem change in Mesozoic oceans

    PubMed Central

    Follows, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Mesozoic and Early Cenozoic marine animals across multiple phyla record secular trends in morphology, environmental distribution, and inferred behaviour that are parsimoniously explained in terms of increased selection pressure from durophagous predators. Another systemic change in Mesozoic marine ecosystems, less widely appreciated than the first, may help to explain the observed animal record. Fossils, biomarker molecules, and molecular clocks indicate a major shift in phytoplankton composition, as mixotrophic dinoflagellates, coccolithophorids and, later, diatoms radiated across shelves. Models originally developed to probe the ecology and biogeography of modern phytoplankton enable us to evaluate the ecosystem consequences of these phytoplankton radiations. In particular, our models suggest that the radiation of mixotrophic dinoflagellates and the subsequent diversification of marine diatoms would have accelerated the transfer of primary production upward into larger size classes and higher trophic levels. Thus, phytoplankton evolution provides a mechanism capable of facilitating the observed evolutionary shift in Mesozoic marine animals. PMID:27798303

  5. A bottom-up perspective on ecosystem change in Mesozoic oceans.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Andrew H; Follows, Michael J

    2016-10-26

    Mesozoic and Early Cenozoic marine animals across multiple phyla record secular trends in morphology, environmental distribution, and inferred behaviour that are parsimoniously explained in terms of increased selection pressure from durophagous predators. Another systemic change in Mesozoic marine ecosystems, less widely appreciated than the first, may help to explain the observed animal record. Fossils, biomarker molecules, and molecular clocks indicate a major shift in phytoplankton composition, as mixotrophic dinoflagellates, coccolithophorids and, later, diatoms radiated across shelves. Models originally developed to probe the ecology and biogeography of modern phytoplankton enable us to evaluate the ecosystem consequences of these phytoplankton radiations. In particular, our models suggest that the radiation of mixotrophic dinoflagellates and the subsequent diversification of marine diatoms would have accelerated the transfer of primary production upward into larger size classes and higher trophic levels. Thus, phytoplankton evolution provides a mechanism capable of facilitating the observed evolutionary shift in Mesozoic marine animals. © 2016 The Authors.

  6. Diverse transitional giant fleas from the Mesozoic era of China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Diying; Engel, Michael S; Cai, Chenyang; Wu, Hao; Nel, André

    2012-02-29

    Fleas are one of the major lineages of ectoparasitic insects and are now highly specialized for feeding on the blood of birds or mammals. This has isolated them among holometabolan insect orders, although they derive from the Antliophora (scorpionflies and true flies). Like most ectoparasitic lineages, their fossil record is meagre and confined to Cenozoic-era representatives of modern families, so that we lack evidence of the origins of fleas in the Mesozoic era. The origins of the first recognized Cretaceous stem-group flea, Tarwinia, remains highly controversial. Here we report fossils of the oldest definitive fleas--giant forms from the Middle Jurassic and Early Cretaceous periods of China. They exhibit many defining features of fleas but retain primitive traits such as non-jumping hindlegs. More importantly, all have stout and elongate sucking siphons for piercing the hides of their hosts, implying that these fleas may be rooted among the pollinating 'long siphonate' scorpionflies of the Mesozoic. Their special morphology suggests that their earliest hosts were hairy or feathered 'reptilians', and that they radiated to mammalian and bird hosts later in the Cenozoic.

  7. Hotspots, polar wander, Mesozoic convection and the geoid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    The geoid bears little relation to present tectonic features of the earth other than trenches. The Mesozoic supercontinent of Pangea, however, apparently occupied a central position in the Atlantic-African geoid high. This and the equatorial Pacific geoid high contain most of the world's hotspots. The plateaus and rises in the western Pacific formed in the Pacific geoid high and this may have been the early Mesozoic position of Pacifica, the fragments of which are now the Pacific rim portions of the continents. Geoid highs which are unrelated to present subduction zones may be the former sites of continental aggregations and mantle insulation and, therefore, hotter than normal mantle. The pent-up heat causes rifts and hotspots and results in extensive uplift, magmatism, fragmentation and dispersal of the continents and the subsequent formation of plateaus, aseismic ridges and seamount chains. Convection in the uppermantle would then be due to lateral temperature gradients as well as heating from below and would be intrinsically episodic.

  8. Hotspots, polar wander, Mesozoic convection and the geoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, D. L.

    1981-11-01

    The geoid bears little relation to present tectonic features of the earth other than trenches. The Mesozoic supercontinent of Pangea, however, apparently occupied a central position in the Atlantic-African geoid high. This and the equatorial Pacific geoid high contain most of the world's hotspots. The plateaus and rises in the western Pacific formed in the Pacific geoid high and this may have been the early Mesozoic position of Pacifica, the fragments of which are now the Pacific rim portions of the continents. Geoid highs which are unrelated to present subduction zones may be the former sites of continental aggregations and mantle insulation and, therefore, hotter than normal mantle. The pent-up heat causes rifts and hotspots and results in extensive uplift, magmatism, fragmentation and dispersal of the continents and the subsequent formation of plateaus, aseismic ridges and seamount chains. Convection in the uppermantle would then be due to lateral temperature gradients as well as heating from below and would be intrinsically episodic.

  9. Mesozoic dinosaurs from Brazil and their biogeographic implications.

    PubMed

    Bittencourt, Jonathas S; Langer, Max C

    2011-03-01

    The record of dinosaur body-fossils in the Brazilian Mesozoic is restricted to the Triassic of Rio Grande do Sul and Cretaceous of various parts of the country. This includes 21 named species, two of which were regarded as nomina dubia, and 19 consensually assigned to Dinosauria. Additional eight supraspecific taxa have been identified based on fragmentary specimens and numerous dinosaur footprints known in Brazil. In fact, most Brazilian specimens related to dinosaurs are composed of isolated teeth and vertebrae. Despite the increase of fieldwork during the last decade, there are still no dinosaur body-fossils of Jurassic age and the evidence of ornithischians in Brazil is very limited. Dinosaur faunas from this country are generally correlated with those from other parts of Gondwana throughout the Mesozoic. During the Late Triassic, there is a close correspondence to Argentina and other south-Pangaea areas. Mid-Cretaceous faunas of northeastern Brazil resemble those of coeval deposits of North Africa and Argentina. Southern hemisphere spinosaurids are restricted to Africa and Brazil, whereas abelisaurids are still unknown in the Early Cretaceous of the latter. Late Cretaceous dinosaur assemblages of south-central Brazil are endemic only to genus or, more conspicuously, to species level, sharing closely related taxa with Argentina, Madagascar, Indo-Pakistan and, to a lesser degree, continental Africa.

  10. Challenge for Mesozoic hydrocarbon exploration in the Eastern Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, S.; Rukmiati, M.G.; Sitompul, N.

    1996-12-31

    The eastern part of Indonesia covers approximately 3 million square kilometers, 35 percent being landmass and 65 percent covered by ocean. Only three of 38 sedimentary basins are producing hydrocarbon (Salawati, Bintuni, and Seram Basins). Oil and gas have discovered in the Lariang, Bone, Timor, Banggai, Sula and Biak Basins, however the discoveries have not developed yet. Hydrocarbon systems in Northern Australia and Papua New Guinea give the major contributions to the geological idea of Pre-Tertiary section in the less explored area in the Eastern Indonesia. The Triassic-Middle Jurassic marine carbonaceous shale sequences are the main hydrocarbon source rock inmore » the Irian Jaya and surrounding area (Buton, gula and Seram basins). The main Mesozoic reservoir are the Kembelangan Formation in the Bintuni Basin of Irian Jaya and Bobong Formation in the North Sula Region. Exploration play types in the Eastern Indonesia can be divided into five types: 1 - Peri Cratonic, 2 - Marginal Rift Graben, 3 - Thrust Fold Belt Island Arc, 4 - Early Collision and 5 -Microcontinental Block - Advanced Collision. Recent discoveries through Mesozoic section in Eastern Indonesia are: Roabiba-1 (1990) in Bintuni Basin-Irian Jaya (Kambelangan Formation); Loku- 1 (1990) in North Sula region (Pre-Tertiary sediments); Oseil-1 (1993/94) in Bula-Seram Basin (Jurassic Manusela Formation); Elang-1 (1 994); Kakaktua-1 (1994) and Laminaria-1 in North Bonaparte Basin (Upper Jurassic Sands).« less

  11. The first iguanian lizard from the Mesozoic of Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apesteguía, Sebastián; Daza, Juan D.; Simões, Tiago R.; Rage, Jean Claude

    2016-09-01

    The fossil record shows that iguanian lizards were widely distributed during the Late Cretaceous. However, the biogeographic history and early evolution of one of its most diverse and peculiar clades (acrodontans) remain poorly known. Here, we present the first Mesozoic acrodontan from Africa, which also represents the oldest iguanian lizard from that continent. The new taxon comes from the Kem Kem Beds in Morocco (Cenomanian, Late Cretaceous) and is based on a partial lower jaw. The new taxon presents a number of features that are found only among acrodontan lizards and shares greatest similarities with uromastycines, specifically. In a combined evidence phylogenetic dataset comprehensive of all major acrodontan lineages using multiple tree inference methods (traditional and implied weighting maximum-parsimony, and Bayesian inference), we found support for the placement of the new species within uromastycines, along with Gueragama sulamericana (Late Cretaceous of Brazil). The new fossil supports the previously hypothesized widespread geographical distribution of acrodontans in Gondwana during the Mesozoic. Additionally, it provides the first fossil evidence of uromastycines in the Cretaceous, and the ancestry of acrodontan iguanians in Africa.

  12. Atlas of Mesozoic and Cenozoic Coastlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. G.; Smith, D. G.; Funnell, B. M.

    2004-03-01

    The inferred positions of global paleoshorelines through the 240 million years of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic are presented within this atlas. Thirty-one maps, generally corresponding to stratigraphic stages, provide a snapshot of the continents and their shorelines at approximately 8 million year intervals. The maps provide a representation of the gross changes in the distribution of land and sea throughout the Mesozoic and Cenozoic plotted on Mollweide projections of paleocontinental reconstruction. They do not distinguish between well and poorly defined shorelines, but the information sources are set out in a bibliography numbering more than 2000 primary paleographic references. This is a global compilation that presents the first attempt at delineating global shorelines at stage level, and which represents many years of work sponsored by British Petroleum International (BPI), and work by BPI themselves between 1981 and 1987.

  13. Thrips pollination of Mesozoic gymnosperms.

    PubMed

    Peñalver, Enrique; Labandeira, Conrad C; Barrón, Eduardo; Delclòs, Xavier; Nel, Patricia; Nel, André; Tafforeau, Paul; Soriano, Carmen

    2012-05-29

    Within modern gymnosperms, conifers and Ginkgo are exclusively wind pollinated whereas many gnetaleans and cycads are insect pollinated. For cycads, thrips are specialized pollinators. We report such a specialized pollination mode from Early Cretaceous amber of Spain, wherein four female thrips representing a genus and two species in the family Melanthripidae were covered by abundant Cycadopites pollen grains. These females bear unique ring setae interpreted as specialized structures for pollen grain collection, functionally equivalent to the hook-tipped sensilla and plumose setae on the bodies of bees. The most parsimonious explanation for this structure is parental food provisioning for larvae, indicating subsociality. This association provides direct evidence of specialized collection and transportation of pollen grains and likely gymnosperm pollination by 110-105 million years ago, possibly considerably earlier.

  14. Thrips pollination of Mesozoic gymnosperms

    PubMed Central

    Peñalver, Enrique; Labandeira, Conrad C.; Barrón, Eduardo; Delclòs, Xavier; Nel, Patricia; Nel, André; Tafforeau, Paul; Soriano, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Within modern gymnosperms, conifers and Ginkgo are exclusively wind pollinated whereas many gnetaleans and cycads are insect pollinated. For cycads, thrips are specialized pollinators. We report such a specialized pollination mode from Early Cretaceous amber of Spain, wherein four female thrips representing a genus and two species in the family Melanthripidae were covered by abundant Cycadopites pollen grains. These females bear unique ring setae interpreted as specialized structures for pollen grain collection, functionally equivalent to the hook-tipped sensilla and plumose setae on the bodies of bees. The most parsimonious explanation for this structure is parental food provisioning for larvae, indicating subsociality. This association provides direct evidence of specialized collection and transportation of pollen grains and likely gymnosperm pollination by 110–105 million years ago, possibly considerably earlier. PMID:22615414

  15. The Newark Fairmount Promise Neighborhood: A Collaborative University-Community Partnership Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Diane; Herts, Rolando; Devance, Donita

    2014-01-01

    The recent awarding of a Promise Neighborhood Planning Grant to Rutgers University-Newark demonstrates how the institution's leadership has promoted a vision and mission that fosters an institutional climate supportive of community engagement. This paper discusses how Gray's (1989) partnership development framework and Kania and Kramer's (2011)…

  16. Newark Kids Count 1998: A Profile of Child Well-Being.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Gina; Hernandez, Eloisa; Cheslow, Becky

    This Kids Count report provides statistical data on several indicators of child well-being in Newark, New Jersey. Indicators are grouped into six categories: (1) Demographics (including population, number of registered voters, income level, people living below poverty level); (2) Family Well-Being (including average number of children receiving…

  17. School Staffing and Performance Management in Newark Public Schools. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Teacher Project, 2009

    2009-01-01

    In the winter and spring of 2009, The New Teacher Project (TNTP) partnered with Newark Public Schools (NPS) to investigate the impact of the school district's policies and practices on the ability of schools to build and maintain strong instructional teams. TNTP's analysis of policy and practice in NPS, funded by The Prudential Foundation, reveals…

  18. Newark Kids Count 2000: A Profile of Child Well-Being.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheslow, Becky

    This Kids Count report provides statistical data on several indicators of child well-being in Newark, New Jersey. Indicators were grouped into seven categories: (1) Demographics (including population, number of registered voters, income levels, and persons living below poverty level); (2) Family Well-Being (including average number of children in…

  19. Newark Kids Count 2001: A Profile of Child Well-Being.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romanoff, Becky

    This Kids Count report provides statistical data on several indicators of child well-being in Newark, New Jersey. Indicators were grouped into seven categories: (1) Demographics (including population, registered voters, and income levels); (2) Family Well-Being (including residents serviced by Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), children in…

  20. Science Instruction in Newark Public Schools. CPRE Research Report # RR-71

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcoran, Thomas B.; Gerry, Gail B.

    2011-01-01

    The Consortium for Policy Research in Education (CPRE) has prepared this report on the Newark Public Schools (NPS) for the Merck Institute for Science Education (MISE) to assist them with the development of a strategic plan for improving science education in the district. The data used in the report have been gathered and analyzed through the…

  1. Chemical composition of core samples from Newark Basin, a potential carbon sequestration site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seltzer, A. M.; Yang, Q.; Goldberg, D.

    2012-12-01

    Injection of carbon dioxide into deep saline aquifers has been identified as a promising mitigation option of greenhouse gases, the successful management of which is considered to be one of the most urgent and important challenges. Given the high energy production in the New York metropolitan area, the Newark Basin region is considered to be a potential future sequestration site. However, the risk of an upward leak of sequestered CO2, especially to a shallow drinking water aquifer, is a key concern facing geological sequestration as a safe and viable mitigation option. In this study, we measured the chemical composition of 25 cores from various depths throughout Newark Basin as a precursor for an ex situ incubation experiment using these rock samples and aquifer water to simulate a leak event. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis of microwave-assisted digested rock powders and X-ray fluorescence analysis of the rock powders were conducted to obtain the concentrations of major and trace elements. Most of the major and trace elements show wide concentration ranges at one to two orders of magnitude. Understanding the chemical composition of these Newark Basin core samples is important not only for characterizing materials used for the later lab incubation, but also for gaining a broader understanding of the chemistry of the Newark Basin and profiling the region according to the varying risks associated with a leak of sequestered CO2 to a drinking water aquifer.

  2. Newark Kids Count 2005: A City Profile of Child Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Children of New Jersey, 2005

    2005-01-01

    For the 8th year, "Newark Kids Count 2005" paints a statistical portrait of city children, who are born with so much promise and given so few chances to fulfill that promise. As the city, and indeed the state, labor to build a child welfare system that keeps children safe and families together, everyone must remember that real children…

  3. Hazardous Waste Cleanup: Nu-Soils Incorporated in Newark, New Jersey

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Nu-Soils, Inc. site is located at 55 Virginia Street, Newark, Essex County, New Jersey. The site is situated in an urban, mixed industrial, commercial and residential area. The site occupies Block 3773, Lot Nos. 15, 41, 43 and 53. The site is bound to

  4. 76 FR 47540 - Voluntary Termination of Subzone Status; Chrysler Group, LLC, Newark, DE

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board [Order No. 1775] Voluntary Termination of Subzone Status; Chrysler Group, LLC, Newark, DE Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade Zones Act of June 18, 1934, as amended (19 U.S.C. 81a-81u), the Foreign-Trade Zones Board (the Board) adopts the...

  5. Politics, Police Accountability, and Public Health: Civilian Review in Newark, New Jersey.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Alecia

    2016-04-01

    Police brutality, a longstanding civil rights issue, has returned to the forefront of American public debate. A growing body of public health research shows that excessive use of force by police and racial profiling have adverse effects on health for African Americans and other marginalized groups. Yet, interventions to monitor unlawful policing have been met with fierce opposition at the federal, state, and local levels. On April 30, 2015, the mayor of Newark, New Jersey signed an executive order establishing a Civilian Complaint Review Board (CCRB) to monitor the Newark Police Department (NPD). Using a mixed-methods approach, this study examined how advocates and government actors accomplished this recent policy change in the face of police opposition and after a 50-year history of unsuccessful attempts in Newark. Drawing on official public documents, news media, and interviews conducted in April and May 2015, I propose that: (1) a Department of Justice investigation of the NPD, (2) the activist background of the Mayor and his relationships with community organizations, and (3) the momentum provided by the national Black Lives Matter movement were pivotal in overcoming political obstacles to reform. Examining the history of CCRB adoption in Newark suggests when and where advocates may intervene to promote policing reforms in other US cities.

  6. Continuing Change in Newark: To Protect Reform, Chris Cerf Builds Collaborative Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colvin, Richard Lee

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on the efforts of Christopher Cerf, the state-appointed superintendent of Newark Public Schools (New Jersey), to protect reform and build collaborative relationships. His tenure followed the controversial leadership of the former superintendent that had enacted a series of unpopular initiatives, including a new citywide…

  7. Home Is Where the Heart Is: Can Cory Booker Save Newark's Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, David

    2006-01-01

    Newark, New Jersey, once called "The Worst American City," is a city that has lost 36 percent of its population since 1930 (from 442,000 to 280,000) and is now more than half black and nearly 40 percent poor. It is a city, reported the "New York Times," where "budgeting is a Rube Goldberg morass with a deficit…

  8. Newark Kids Count 2008: A City Profile of Child Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Children of New Jersey, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Newark's image has begun to change in recent years. High-profile construction projects downtown and a boom in new housing have been among the visible signs of change. Improvements on measures of child and family well-being have added to the impression of the city moving in a positive direction. Child poverty rates fell in recent years. Incomes…

  9. The Oil Game: Generating Enthusiasm for Geosciences in Urban Youth in Newark, NJ

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gates, Alexander E.; Kalczynski, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    A hands-on game based upon principles of oil accumulation and drilling was highly effective at generating enthusiasm toward the geosciences in urban youth from underrepresented minority groups in Newark, NJ. Participating 9th-grade high school students showed little interest in the geosciences prior to participating in the oil game, even if they…

  10. Restructuring Kindergarten in an Urban School District: The Case of Newark, New Jersey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopacsi, Rosemarie; Hochwald, Eve

    A collaborative project of Bank Street College and the Newark Public Schools, the New Beginnings initiative was designed to bring about progressive restructuring of kindergarten classrooms. This study used a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods to examine the impact of the initiative on curriculum, professional development, and…

  11. Newark Public Schools: Budget Impacts of Underfunding and Rapid Charter Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrie, Danielle; Johnson, Monete

    2015-01-01

    The budget of the State-operated Newark Public Schools (NPS) is now in its fourth year of crisis. The district is currently struggling to close a $13 million budget hole almost halfway into the school year. Most importantly, the ongoing budget crisis has eroded essential resources in district schools, depriving students of the opportunity for a…

  12. Preliminary report on the geology and ground-water supply of the Newark, New Jersey, area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herpers, Henry; Barksdale, Henry C.

    1951-01-01

    In the Newark area, ground water is used chiefly for industrial cooling, air-conditioning, general processing, and for sanitary purposes. A small amount is used in the manufacture of beverages. Total ground-water pumpage in Newark is estimated at not less than 20,000,000 gallons daily. The Newark area is underlain by formations of Recent, Pleistocene and Triassic age, and the geology and hydrologic properties of these formations are discussed. Attention is called to the important influence of a buried valley in the rock floor beneath the Newark area on the yield of wells located within it. Data on the fluctuation of the water levels and the variation in pumpage are presented, and their significance discussed. The results of a pumping test made during the investigation were inconclusive. The beneficial results of artificially recharging the aquifers in one part of the area are described. The intrusion of salt water into certain parts of the ground-water body is described and graphically portrayed by a map showing the chloride concentration of the ground water in various parts of the City. Insofar as available data permit, the chemical quality of the ground water is discussed and records are given of the ground-water temperatures in various parts of the City. There has been marked lowering of the water table in the eastern part of the area, accompanied by salt water intrusion, indicating that the safe yield of the formations in this part of Newark has probably been exceeded. It is recommended that the study of the ground-water resources of this area be continued, and that artificial recharging of the aquifers be increased over as wide an area as possible.

  13. An early extensional event of the South China Block during the Late Mesozoic recorded by the emplacement of the Late Jurassic syntectonic Hengshan Composite Granitic Massif (Hunan, SE China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Chen, Yan; Faure, Michel; Martelet, Guillaume; Lin, Wei; Wang, Qingchen; Yan, Quanren; Hou, Quanlin

    2016-03-01

    Continental scaled extension is the major Late Mesozoic (Jurassic and Cretaceous) tectonic event in East Asia, characterized by faulting, magmatic intrusions and half-grabens in an area with a length of > 5000 km and a width of > 1000 km. Numerous studies have been conducted on this topic in the South China Block (SCB), However, the space and time ranges of the compressional or extensional regimes of the SCB during the Jurassic are still unclear, partly due to the lack of structural data. The emplacement fabrics of granitic plutons can help determine the regional tectonic background. In this study, a multidisciplinary approach, including Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS), macro and microstructural analyses, quartz c-axis preferred orientation, gravity modeling and monazite EPMA dating, was conducted on the Hengshan composite granitic massif in SCB that consists of the Triassic Nanyue biotite granitic pluton and the Late Jurassic Baishifeng two-mica granitic pluton. The magnetic fabrics are characterized by a consistent NW-SE oriented lineation and weakly inclined foliation. A dominant high temperature deformation with a top-to-the-NW shear sense is identified for both plutons. The deformation increasing from the center of the Baishifeng pluton to its western border is associated to the development of the West Hengshan Boundary Fault (WHBF). The gravity modeling shows a ;saw tooth-shaped; NE-SW oriented structure of the Baishifeng pluton, which may be considered as NE-SW oriented tension-gashes formed due to the NW-SE extension. All results show that the Triassic Nanyue pluton was deformed under post-solidus conditions by the WHBF coeval with the emplacement of the Late Jurassic Baishifeng pluton. All these observations comply with the NW-SE extensional tectonics coeval with the emplacement of the Baishifeng pluton, which argues that the NW-SE crustal stretching started since the Late Jurassic, at least in this part of the SCB.

  14. Ophiolites of Iran: Keys to understanding the tectonic evolution of SW Asia: (II) Mesozoic ophiolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Hadi Shafaii; Stern, Robert J.

    2015-03-01

    Iran is a mosaic of continental terranes of Cadomian (520-600 Ma) age, stitched together along sutures decorated by Paleozoic and Mesozoic ophiolites. Here we present the current understanding of the Mesozoic (and rare Cenozoic) ophiolites of Iran for the international geoscientific audience. We summarize field, chemical and geochronological data from the literature and our own unpublished data. Mesozoic ophiolites of Iran are mostly Cretaceous in age and are related to the Neotethys and associated backarc basins on the S flank of Eurasia. These ophiolites can be subdivided into five belts: 1. Late Cretaceous Zagros outer belt ophiolites (ZOB) along the Main Zagros Thrust including Late Cretaceous-Early Paleocene Maku-Khoy-Salmas ophiolites in NW Iran as well as Kermanshah-Kurdistan, Neyriz and Esfandagheh (Haji Abad) ophiolites, also Late Cretaceous-Eocene ophiolites along the Iraq-Iran border; 2. Late Cretaceous Zagros inner belt ophiolites (ZIB) including Nain, Dehshir, Shahr-e-Babak and Balvard-Baft ophiolites along the southern periphery of the Central Iranian block and bending north into it; 3. Late Cretaceous-Early Paleocene Sabzevar-Torbat-e-Heydarieh ophiolites of NE Iran; 4. Early to Late Cretaceous Birjand-Nehbandan-Tchehel-Kureh ophiolites in eastern Iran between the Lut and Afghan blocks; and 5. Late Jurassic-Cretaceous Makran ophiolites of SE Iran including Kahnuj ophiolites. Most Mesozoic ophiolites of Iran show supra-subduction zone (SSZ) geochemical signatures, indicating that SW Asia was a site of plate convergence during Late Mesozoic time, but also include a significant proportion showing ocean-island basalt affinities, perhaps indicating the involvement of subcontinental lithospheric mantle.

  15. Air Traffic Control Response to Delays: A System Study of Newark International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Antony D.; Clarke, John-Paul

    2002-01-01

    Airport delays are a significant problem in the United States air transportation system. Between 1999 and 2000 the number of flights delayed increased by 20 percent despite only a 0.4% increase in total operations. Newark International Airport (EWR), one of New York City's primary airports, is one of the airports in the United States most impacted by delays. Newark had the highest percentage of operations delayed in 1999, and was second only to LaGuardia Airport in 2000. Nearly 85% of delays at Newark are caused by adverse weather impacting an airport that may be characterized as having limited capacity and a very full schedule. Although Newark is heavily impacted by weather, delays have not increased significantly since 1998. This indicates that the airlines, air traffic control (ATC), and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey have successfully adapted. On June 29, 2000, a research team from MIT visited Newark airport to assess the effectiveness of any adaptations made, and to collect data on airline and ATC departure operations, and of the national and local weather affecting the airport. Airline and ATC personnel were also interviewed. Results of this study indicate that airspace capacity limitations downstream of the airport are a primary flow constraint at the airport, and that these constraints are the source of most surface delays. A number of tactical ATC responses to delays were examined, including the application of restrictions, re-routing with the help of the National Playbook, and the use of decision-aiding tools such as the Dynamic Spacing Program (DSP) and the Integrated Terminal Weather System (ITWS). Improved interfacility communications and further utilization of runway 11-29 were identified as other tactical responses to delays, whilst the formation of the Air Traffic Control System Command Center and the New York Airspace redesign were identified as thekey strategic ATC responses to delays. Particularly the New York airspace redesign has

  16. Age and tectonic setting of Mesozoic metavolcanic and metasedimentary rocks, northern White Mountains, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, R. Brooks; Saleeby, Jason B.; Fates, D. Gilbert

    1987-11-01

    Mesozoic metavolcanic and metasedimentary rocks in the northern White Mountains, eastern California and western Nevada, are separated from lower Paleozoic and Precambrian rocks by Jurassic and Cretaceous plutons. The large stratigraphic hiatus across the plutons is called the Barcroft structural break. Recent mapping and new U/Pb zircon ages of 154 +3/-1 Ma and 137 ±1 Ma. from an ash-flow tuff and a hypabyssal intrusion, respectively, indicate that part of the Mesozoic section and the Barcroft structural break are younger than the 160 165 Ma Barcroft Granodiorite, in contrast to previous interpretations. The Barcroft Granodiorite has been thrust westward over most of the Mesozoic section. It is everywhere in fault contact with overturned metasedimentary rocks on the west side of the range, rocks which were previously thought to be upright and the oldest part of the Mesozoic section. The McAfee Creek Granite, which has a 100 ±1 Ma U/Pb zircon age, postdates thrusting; therefore, the Barcroft structural break is primarily Early Cretaceous in age. *Present addresses: Hanson—Department of Mineral Sciences, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. 20560; Fates—Dames & Moore, 455 S. Figueroa Street, Suite 3504, Los Angeles, California 90074

  17. Paleozoic and Mesozoic deformations in the central Sierra Nevada, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nokleberg, Warren J.; Kistler, Ronald Wayne

    1980-01-01

    Analysis of structural and stratigraphic data indicates that several periods of regional deformation, consisting of combined folding, faulting, cataclasis, and regional metamorphism, occurred throughout the central Sierra Nevada during Paleozoic and Mesozoic time. The oldest regional deformation occurred alono northward trends during the Devonian and Mississippian periods in most roof pendants containing lower Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks at the center and along the crest of the range. This deformation is expressed in some roof pendants by an angular unconformity separating older thrice-deformed from younger twice-deformed Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks. The first Mesozoic deformation, which consisted of uplift and erosion and was accompanied by the onset of Andean-type volcanism during the Permian and Triassic, is expressed by an angular unconformity in several roof pendants from the Saddlebag Lake to the Mount Morrison areas. This unconformity is defined by Permian and Triassic andesitic to rhyolitic metavolcanic rocks unconformably overlying more intensely deformed Pennsylvanian, Permian(?), and older metasedimentary rocks. A later regional deformation occurred during the Triassic along N. 20?_30? W. trends in Permian and Triassic metavolcanic rocks of the Saddlebag Lake and Mount Dana roof pendants, in upper Paleozoic rocks of the Pine Creek roof pendant, and in the Calaveras Formation of the western metamorphic belt; the roof pendants are crosscut by Upper Triassic granitic rocks of the Lee Vining intrusive epoch. A still later period of Early and Middle Jurassic regional deformation occurred along N. 30?-60? E. trends in upper Paleozoic rocks of the Calaveras Formation of the western metamorphic belt. A further period of deformation was the Late Jurassic Nevadan orogeny, which occurred along N. 20?_40? W. trends in Upper Jurassic rocks of the western metamorphic belt that are crosscut by Upper Jurassic granitic rocks of the Yosemite intrusive epoch

  18. Astronomical pacing of the global silica cycle recorded in Mesozoic bedded cherts

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Masayuki; Tada, Ryuji; Ozaki, Kazumi

    2017-01-01

    The global silica cycle is an important component of the long-term climate system, yet its controlling factors are largely uncertain due to poorly constrained proxy records. Here we present a ∼70 Myr-long record of early Mesozoic biogenic silica (BSi) flux from radiolarian chert in Japan. Average low-mid-latitude BSi burial flux in the superocean Panthalassa is ∼90% of that of the modern global ocean and relative amplitude varied by ∼20–50% over the 100 kyr to 30 Myr orbital cycles during the early Mesozoic. We hypothesize that BSi in chert was a major sink for oceanic dissolved silica (DSi), with fluctuations proportional to DSi input from chemical weathering on timescales longer than the residence time of DSi (<∼100 Kyr). Chemical weathering rates estimated by the GEOCARBSULFvolc model support these hypotheses, excluding the volcanism-driven oceanic anoxic events of the Early-Middle Triassic and Toarcian that exceed model limits. We propose that the Mega monsoon of the supercontinent Pangea nonlinearly amplified the orbitally paced chemical weathering that drove BSi burial during the early Mesozoic greenhouse world. PMID:28589958

  19. Astronomical pacing of the global silica cycle recorded in Mesozoic bedded cherts.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Masayuki; Tada, Ryuji; Ozaki, Kazumi

    2017-06-07

    The global silica cycle is an important component of the long-term climate system, yet its controlling factors are largely uncertain due to poorly constrained proxy records. Here we present a ∼70 Myr-long record of early Mesozoic biogenic silica (BSi) flux from radiolarian chert in Japan. Average low-mid-latitude BSi burial flux in the superocean Panthalassa is ∼90% of that of the modern global ocean and relative amplitude varied by ∼20-50% over the 100 kyr to 30 Myr orbital cycles during the early Mesozoic. We hypothesize that BSi in chert was a major sink for oceanic dissolved silica (DSi), with fluctuations proportional to DSi input from chemical weathering on timescales longer than the residence time of DSi (<∼100 Kyr). Chemical weathering rates estimated by the GEOCARBSULFvolc model support these hypotheses, excluding the volcanism-driven oceanic anoxic events of the Early-Middle Triassic and Toarcian that exceed model limits. We propose that the Mega monsoon of the supercontinent Pangea nonlinearly amplified the orbitally paced chemical weathering that drove BSi burial during the early Mesozoic greenhouse world.

  20. Astronomical pacing of the global silica cycle recorded in Mesozoic bedded cherts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Masayuki; Tada, Ryuji; Ozaki, Kazumi

    2017-06-01

    The global silica cycle is an important component of the long-term climate system, yet its controlling factors are largely uncertain due to poorly constrained proxy records. Here we present a ~70 Myr-long record of early Mesozoic biogenic silica (BSi) flux from radiolarian chert in Japan. Average low-mid-latitude BSi burial flux in the superocean Panthalassa is ~90% of that of the modern global ocean and relative amplitude varied by ~20-50% over the 100 kyr to 30 Myr orbital cycles during the early Mesozoic. We hypothesize that BSi in chert was a major sink for oceanic dissolved silica (DSi), with fluctuations proportional to DSi input from chemical weathering on timescales longer than the residence time of DSi (<~100 Kyr). Chemical weathering rates estimated by the GEOCARBSULFvolc model support these hypotheses, excluding the volcanism-driven oceanic anoxic events of the Early-Middle Triassic and Toarcian that exceed model limits. We propose that the Mega monsoon of the supercontinent Pangea nonlinearly amplified the orbitally paced chemical weathering that drove BSi burial during the early Mesozoic greenhouse world.

  1. Paleozoic and mesozoic evolution of East-Central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stevens, C.H.; Stone, P.; Dunne, G.C.; Greene, D.C.; Walker, J.D.; Swanson, B.J.

    1997-01-01

    East-central California, which encompasses an area located on the westernmost part of sialic North America, contains a well-preserved record of Paleozoic and Mesozoic tectonic events that reflect the evolving nature of the Cordilleran plate margin to the west. After the plate margin was formed by continental rifting in the Neoproterozoic, sediments comprising the Cordilleran miogeocline began to accumulate on the subsiding passive margin. In east-central California, sedimentation did not keep pace with subsidence, resulting in backstepping of a series of successive carbonate platforms throughout the early and middle Paleozoic. This phase of miogeoclinal development was brought to a close by the Late Devonian-Early Mississippian Antler orogeny, during the final phase of which oceanic rocks were emplaced onto the continental margin. Subsequent Late Mississippian-Pennsylvanian faulting and apparent reorientation of the carbonate platform margin are interpreted to have been associated with truncation of the continental plate on a sinistral transform fault zone. In the Early Permian, contractional deformation in east-central California led to the development of a narrow, uplifted thrust belt flanked by marine basins in which thick sequences of deep-water strata accumulated. A second episode of contractional deformation in late Early Permian to earliest Triassic time widened and further uplifted the thrust belt and produced the recently identified Inyo Crest thrust, which here is correlated with the regionally significant Last Chance thrust. In the Late Permian, about the time of the second contractional episode, extensional faulting created shallow sedimentary basins in the southern Inyo Mountains. In the El Paso Mountains to the south, deformation and plutonism record the onset of subduction and arc magmatism in late Early Permian to earliest Triassic time along this part of the margin. Tectonism had ceased in most of east-central California by middle to late Early

  2. Modeling the Impact of Interventions Along the HIV Continuum of Care in Newark, New Jersey

    PubMed Central

    Birger, Ruthie B.; Hallett, Timothy B.; Sinha, Anushua; Grenfell, Bryan T.; Hodder, Sally L.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic in Newark, New Jersey, is among the most severe in the United States. Prevalence ranges up to 3.3% in some groups. The aim of this study is to use a mathematical model of the epidemic in Newark to assess the impact of interventions along the continuum of care, leading to virologic suppression. Methods. A model was constructed of HIV infection including specific care-continuum steps. The model was calibrated to HIV/AIDS cases in Newark among different populations over a 10-year period. Interventions applied to model fits were increasing proportions tested, linked and retained in care, linked and adherent to treatment, and increasing testing frequency, high-risk-group testing, and adherence. Impacts were assessed by measuring incidence and death reductions 10 years postintervention. Results. The most effective interventions for reducing incidence were improving treatment adherence and increasing testing frequency and coverage. No single intervention reduced incidence in 2023 by >5%, and the most effective combination of interventions reduced incidence by approximately 16% (2%–24%). The most efficacious interventions for reducing deaths were increasing retention, linkage to care, testing coverage, and adherence. Increasing retention reduced deaths by approximately 27% (24%–29%); the most efficacious combination of interventions reduced deaths in 2023 by approximately 52% (46%–57%). Conclusions. Reducing HIV deaths in Newark over a 10-year period may be a realizable goal, but reducing incidence is less likely. Our results highlight the importance of addressing leaks across the entire continuum of care and reinforcing efforts to prevention new HIV infections with additional interventions. PMID:24140971

  3. Mesozoic evolution of the northeast African shelf margin, Libya and Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Aadland, R.K.; Schamel, S.

    1988-08-01

    The present tectonic features of the northeast African shelf margin between the Nile delta and the Gulf of Sirte are products of (1) precursory late Paleozoic basement arches, (2) early Mesozoic rifting and plate separation, and (3) Late Cretaceous structural inversion. Isopach and structural maps, cross sections, and sediment accumulation (geohistory) curves constructed from 89 wells in the Western Desert and 27 wells in northeastern Libya depict the structural and stratigraphic development of the northeast African shelf margin.

  4. Geochronologic and geochemical data from Mesozoic rocks in the Black Mountain area northeast of Victorville, San Bernardino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, Paul; Barth, Andrew P.; Wooden, Joseph L.; Fohey-Breting, Nicole K.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Priest, Susan S.

    2013-01-01

    We present geochronologic and geochemical data for Mesozoic rocks in the Black Mountain area northeast of Victorville, California, to supplement previous geologic mapping. These data, together with previously published results, limit the depositional age of the sedimentary Fairview Valley Formation to Early Jurassic, refine the ages and chemical compositions of selected units in the overlying Jurassic Sidewinder Volcanics and of related intrusive units, and limit the age of some post-Sidewinder faulting in the Black Mountain area to a brief interval in the Late Jurassic. The new information contributes to a more complete understanding of the Mesozoic magmatic and tectonic evolution of the western Mojave Desert and surrounding regions.

  5. Brewing Bachelors: The History of the University of Newark

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wechsler, Harold S.

    2010-01-01

    Locating denominational colleges and state and land grant universities away from major American cities created a growing need for urban higher education institutions in the early twentieth century. Religious denominations, municipal authorities, and entrepreneurs opened colleges and professional schools in many US cities to meet the demand. The…

  6. Chapter 1: Creating Opportunities for Success through Replacement Services. Chapter 1 Replacement Class Collaborative Teaming and Intensive Teaching Time. A Model for Student Success in Newark City Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Kathleen

    This collection of documents describes the Chapter 1 programs of the Newark (Ohio) City Schools and presents a model for programs to increase student success. Newark is a midsized city district with 1 high school, 3 middle schools, and 12 elementary schools, 7 of which receive Chapter 1 services. Collaborative efforts include replacement classes.…

  7. Attracting Urban Minority Students to Geosciences through Exposure to Careers and Applied Aspects in Newark, NJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, A. E.; Kalczynski, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    A solid pipeline of URM students into the Geosciences has been established in Newark, NJ by introducing them to applied opportunities. Prior to an OEDG program designed to engage URM students, there were no students from or near Newark interested in pursuing geosciences at Rutgers-Newark or Essex Community College, the two local urban campuses. By infusing activities that showed the applied aspects of geoscience and opportunities for careers into regular high school lesson plans, a significant number of students became interested. These students were recruited into a 4-week modular summer institute that focused on energy, mining resources, environment and surface processes. About 90 students per year attended the institute which included 2 local field trips per week, presentations by industry professionals, activities that placed academic subjects into career perspective and a research project that directly affected the well-being of the students and their families. The most interested dozen of the 90 students were invited to participate in a high profile applied project that received significant media coverage, further enhancing their impression of the importance of geosciences. Previous graduates of the program were employed as assistants in subsequent programs to recycle the experience and enthusiasm. This had a positive effect on the persistence of the assistants who viewed themselves as role models to the younger students. The results are burgeoning numbers of URM geoscience majors at Rutgers, offering of geoscience for the first time in 30 years at Essex Community College as well as a new 2+2 geoscience track and several dual-credit courses at local high schools. An important aspect of this pathway or pipeline is that students must be able to clearly see the next step and their role in it. They are very tentative in this essentially pioneering pursuit. If they don't get a sense of a welcoming community and an ultimate career outcome, they quickly lose

  8. Role Models and Mentors in Mid-Pipeline Retention of Geoscience Students, Newark, NJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, A. E.; Kalczynski, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    Undergraduate minority students retained enthusiasm for majoring in the geosciences by a combination of working with advanced minority mentors and role models as well as serving as role models for middle and high school students in Geoscience Education programs in Newark, NJ. An academic year program to interest 8-10th grade students from the Newark Public schools in the Geosciences employs minority undergraduate students from Rutgers University and Essex Community College as assistants. There is an academic year program (Geoexplorers) and a science festival (Dinosaur Day) at the Newark Museum that employs Rutgers University students and a summer program that employs Rutgers and Essex Community College students. All students are members of the Garden State LSAMP and receive any needed academic support from that program. The students receive mentoring from minority graduate students, project personnel and participating Newark Public School teachers, many of whom are from minority groups. The main factor in success and retention, however, is their role as authorities and role models for the K-12 students. The assistants are respected and consulted by the K-12 students for their knowledge and authority in the geosciences. This positive feedback shows them that they can be regarded as geoscientists and reinforces their self-image and enthusiasm. It further reinforces their knowledge of Geoscience concepts. It also binds the assistants together into a self-supporting community that even extends to the non-participating minority students in the Rutgers program. Although the drop-out rate among minority Geoscience majors was high (up to 100%) prior to the initiation of the program, it has dropped to 0% over the past 3 years with 2 participants now in PhD programs and 2 others completing MS degrees this year. Current students are seriously considering graduate education. Prior to this program, only one minority graduate from the program continued to graduate school in the

  9. Mid-Mesozoic (Mid-Jurassic to Early Cretaceous) evolution of the Georges Bank Basin, U.S. North Atlantic outer continental shelf: Sedimentology of the Conoco 145-1 well

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, L.J.; Poag, C.W.; Stanton, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    The Conoco 145-1 exploratory well, located in the southeastern portion of the Georges Bank Basin, was drilled to a total depth of 4303 m below the sea floor. The oldest sedimentary rocks sampled are of Middle Jurassic age (Late Bathonian-Callovian). A dolomite-limestone-evaporite sequence dominates the section below 3917 m; limestone is the predominant lithology in the intervals of 3271-3774 m, 2274-3158 m, and 1548-1981 m. Siliciclastics dominate the remainder of the drilled section. Calcite tightly cements most of the rocks below 1548 m; dolomite, silica, siderite, and diagenetic clay cements are locally important. Restricted inner marine environments, representing lagoonal and tidal flat conditions, prevailed at the wellsite during much of the deposition recorded by the Callovian-Bathonian age Iroquois Formation. These environments gave way to a carbonate platform, which formed part of the > 5,000 km long Bahama-Grand Banks gigaplatform that lasted through the end of the Late Jurassic (encompassing the uppermost portion of the Iroquois Formation and the Scatarie Limestone and Bacarro Limestone Members of the Abenaki Formation). The absence of a skeletal-reef association and the dominance of muddy limestone fabrics are evidence that the 145-1 wellsite was located on the platform interior. Major periods of siticiclastic deposition interrupted carbonate deposition, and they are recorded by stratigraphic equivalents of the Mohican Formation, Misaine Shale Member of the Abenaki Formation, and the Mohawk and Mic Mac Formations. A series of sustained prograding delta systems, the earliest of which is preserved as the Missisauga Formation, buried the carbonate platform following its drowning in the Early Cretaceous (Berriasian-Valanginian). The sparser, primarily allochthonous lignite content and better-sorted, glauconite-bearing sands of the Missisauga strata at the 145-1 wellsite suggest that shallow marine or barrier-bar environments were more prevalent than the low

  10. Buried Mesozoic rift basins of Moroccan Atlantic continental margin

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, N.; Jabour, H.; El Mostaine, M.

    1995-08-01

    The Atlantic continental margin is the largest frontier area for oil and gas exploration in Morocco. Most of the activity has been concentrated where Upper Jurassic carbonate rocks have been the drilling objectives, with only one significant but non commercial oil discovery. Recent exploration activities have focused on early Mesozoic Rift basins buried beneath the post-rift sediments of the Middle Atlantic coastal plain. Many of these basins are of interest because they contain fine-grained lacustrine rocks that have sufficient organic richness to be classified as efficient oil prone source rock. Location of inferred rift basins beneath the Atlantic coastal plainmore » were determined by analysis of drilled-hole data in combination with gravity anomaly and aeromagnetic maps. These rift basins are characterized by several half graben filled by synrift sediments of Triassic age probably deposited in lacustrine environment. Coeval rift basins are known to be present in the U.S. Atlantic continental margin. Basin modeling suggested that many of the less deeply bored rift basins beneath the coastal plain are still within the oil window and present the most attractive exploration targets in the area.« less

  11. Near-Stasis in the Long-Term Diversification of Mesozoic Tetrapods

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Roger B. J.; Butler, Richard J.; Alroy, John; Mannion, Philip D.; Carrano, Matthew T.; Lloyd, Graeme T.

    2016-01-01

    How did evolution generate the extraordinary diversity of vertebrates on land? Zero species are known prior to ~380 million years ago, and more than 30,000 are present today. An expansionist model suggests this was achieved by large and unbounded increases, leading to substantially greater diversity in the present than at any time in the geological past. This model contrasts starkly with empirical support for constrained diversification in marine animals, suggesting different macroevolutionary processes on land and in the sea. We quantify patterns of vertebrate standing diversity on land during the Mesozoic–early Paleogene interval, applying sample-standardization to a global fossil dataset containing 27,260 occurrences of 4,898 non-marine tetrapod species. Our results show a highly stable pattern of Mesozoic tetrapod diversity at regional and local levels, underpinned by a weakly positive, but near-zero, long-term net diversification rate over 190 million years. Species diversity of non-flying terrestrial tetrapods less than doubled over this interval, despite the origins of exceptionally diverse extant groups within mammals, squamates, amphibians, and dinosaurs. Therefore, although speciose groups of modern tetrapods have Mesozoic origins, rates of Mesozoic diversification inferred from the fossil record are slow compared to those inferred from molecular phylogenies. If high speciation rates did occur in the Mesozoic, then they seem to have been balanced by extinctions among older clades. An apparent 4-fold expansion of species richness after the Cretaceous/Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary deserves further examination in light of potential taxonomic biases, but is consistent with the hypothesis that global environmental disturbances such as mass extinction events can rapidly adjust limits to diversity by restructuring ecosystems, and suggests that the gradualistic evolutionary diversification of tetrapods was punctuated by brief but dramatic episodes of radiation

  12. Mongolian Oil Shale, hosted in Mesozoic Sedimentary Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bat-Orshikh, E.; Lee, I.; Norov, B.; Batsaikhan, M.

    2016-12-01

    Mongolia contains several Mesozoic sedimentary basins, which filled >2000 m thick non-marine successions. Late Triassic-Middle Jurassic foreland basins were formed under compression tectonic conditions, whereas Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous rift valleys were formed through extension tectonics. Also, large areas of China were affected by these tectonic events. The sedimentary basins in China host prolific petroleum and oil shale resources. Similarly, Mongolian basins contain hundreds meter thick oil shale as well as oil fields. However, petroleum system and oil shale geology of Mongolia remain not well known due to lack of survey. Mongolian oil shale deposits and occurrences, hosted in Middle Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous units, are classified into thirteen oil shale-bearing basins, of which oil shale resources were estimated to be 787 Bt. Jurassic oil shale has been identified in central Mongolia, while Lower Cretaceous oil shale is distributed in eastern Mongolia. Lithologically, Jurassic and Cretaceous oil shale-bearing units (up to 700 m thick) are similar, composed mainly of alternating beds of oil shale, dolomotic marl, siltstone and sandstone, representing lacustrine facies. Both Jurassic and Cretaceous oil shales are characterized by Type I kerogen with high TOC contents, up to 35.6% and low sulfur contents ranging from 0.1% to 1.5%. Moreover, S2 values of oil shales are up to 146 kg/t. The numbers indicate that the oil shales are high quality, oil prone source rocks. The Tmax values of samples range from 410 to 447, suggesting immature to early oil window maturity levels. PI values are consistent with this interpretation, ranging from 0.01 to 0.03. According to bulk geochemistry data, Jurassic and Cretaceous oil shales are identical, high quality petroleum source rocks. However, previous studies indicate that known oil fields in Eastern Mongolia were originated from Lower Cretaceous oil shales. Thus, further detailed studies on Jurassic oil shale and its

  13. First early Mesozoic amber in the Western Hemisphere

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Litwin, R.J.; Ash, S.R.

    1991-01-01

    Detrital amber pebbles and granules have been discovered in Upper Triassic strata on the Colorado Plateau. Although amber previously has been reported from Pennsylvanian, Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Tertiary strata, we know of no other reported Triassic occurrence in North America or the Western Hemisphere. The new discovered occurrences of amber are at two localities in the lower part of the Petrified Forest Member of the Upper Triassic Chinle Formation in Petrified Forest National Park, Arizona. The paper coals and carbonaceous paper shales containing the amber also contain fossil palynomorph assemblages that indicate a late Carnian age for these occurrences. -Authors

  14. The Partnership for Family Reading: A Collaboration of Montclair State and Newark Public Schools. Guide to Replication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handel, Ruth D.

    This manual reflects the experiences of participants in the Partnership for Family Reading a collaborative project between Montclair State College (New Jersey) and a group of Newark, New Jersey public schools, and is designed to serve as a guide to those who wish to start Family Reading Projects. In 1988, the Partnership for Family Reading began…

  15. Benefits of a STEAM Collaboration in Newark, New Jersey: Volcano Simulation through a Glass-Making Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gates, Alexander E.

    2017-01-01

    A simulated physical model of volcanic processes using a glass art studio greatly enhanced enthusiasm and learning among urban, middle- to high-school aged, largely underrepresented minority students in Newark, New Jersey. The collaboration of a geoscience department with a glass art studio to create a science, technology, engineering, arts, and…

  16. Participation of the Black Community in Selected Aspects of the Educational Institution of Newark, 1958-1972. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, W. M., Jr.; And Others

    This document is the final report of a two-year study of the interdependency of race and education in Newark, New Jersey. The report is organized into sections describing how the research was performed and presents the results on a set of topics defined as central for providing a useful understanding of the complex interrelationships of race and…

  17. Pre-mesozoic palinspastic reconstruction of the eastern great basin (Western United States).

    PubMed

    Levy, M; Christie-Blick, N

    1989-09-29

    The Great Basin of the western United States has proven important for studies of Proterozoic and Paleozoic geology [2500 to 245 million years ago (Ma)] and has been central to the development of ideas about the mechanics of crustal shortening and extension. An understanding of the deformational history of this region during Mesozoic and Cenozoic time (245 Ma to the present) is required for palinspastic reconstruction of now isolated exposures of older geology in order to place these in an appropriate regional geographic context. Considerable advances in unraveling both the crustal shortening that took place during Mesozoic to early Cenozoic time (especially from about 150 to 50 Ma) and the extension of the past 37 million years have shown that earlier reconstructions need to be revised significantly. A new reconstruction is developed for rocks of middle Proterozoic to Early Cambrian age based on evidence that total shortening by generally east-vergent thrusts and folds was at least 104 to 135 kilometers and that the Great Basin as a whole accommodated approximately 250 kilometers of extension in the direction 287 degrees +/- 12 degrees between the Colorado Plateau and the Sierra Nevada. Extension is assumed to be equivalent at all latitudes because available paleomagnetic evidence suggests that the Sierra Nevada experienced little or no rotation with respect to the extension direction since the late Mesozoic. An estimate of the uncertainty in the amount of extension obtained from geological and paleomagnetic uncertainties increases northward from +/-56 kilometers at 36 degrees 30N to (-87)(+108) kilometers at 40 degrees N. On the basis of the reconstruction, the original width of the preserved part of the late Proterozoic and Early Cambrian basin was about 150 to 300 kilometers, about 60 percent of the present width, and the basin was oriented slightly more north-south with respect to present-day coordinates.

  18. A Mesozoic orogenic cycle from post-collision to subduction in the southwestern Korean Peninsula: New structural, geochemical, and chronological evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seung-Ik; Kwon, Sanghoon; Kim, Sung Won; Hong, Paul S.; Santosh, M.

    2018-05-01

    The Early to Middle Mesozoic basins, distributed sporadically over the Korean Peninsula, preserve important records of the tectonic history of some of the major orogenic belts in East Asia. Here we present a comprehensive study of the structural, geochemical, geochronological, and paleontological features of a volcano-sedimentary package, belonging to the Oseosan Volcanic Complex of the Early to Middle Mesozoic Chungnam Basin, within the Mesozoic subduction-collision orogen in the southwestern Korean Peninsula. The zircon U-Pb data from rhyolitic volcanic rocks of the complex suggest Early to Middle Jurassic emplacement age of ca. 178-172 Ma, harmonious with plant fossil taxa found from the overlying tuffaceous sedimentary rock. The geochemical data for the rhyolitic volcanic rocks are indicative of volcanic arc setting, implying that the Chungnam Basin has experienced an intra-arc subsidence during the basin-expanding stage by subduction of the Paleo-Pacific (Izanagi) Plate. The Jurassic arc-related Oseosan Volcanic Complex was structurally stacked by the older Late Triassic to Early Jurassic post-collisional basin-fill of the Nampo Group by the Jangsan fault during basin inversion. The Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous K-feldspar and illite K-Ar ages marked the timing of inversion tectonics, contemporaneous with the magmatic quiescence in the southern Korean Peninsula, likely due to flat-lying or low-angle subduction. The basin evolution history preserved in the Mesozoic Chungnam Basin reflects a Mesozoic orogenic cycle from post-collision to subduction in the southwestern Korean Peninsula. This, in turn, provides a better understanding of the spatial and temporal changes in Mesozoic tectonic environments along the East Asian continental margin.

  19. Search for clues to Mesozoic graben on Long Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rogers, W.B.; Aparisi, M.; Sirkin, L.

    1989-01-01

    The position of Long Island between the Hartford Basin of Connecticut and graben structures reported from seismic reflection studies offshore to the south of the island suggests the possibility that other grabens associated with the early Mesozoic rifting might be buried beneath central Long Island. The hypothesis that post-rift tectonic activity would be related to the rift grabens and that such activity would be expressed in the post-rift sedimentary deposits led to a study of the Cretaceous and Pleistocene section to seek clues for buried grabens on Long Island. The Pleistocene glacial deposits in central and eastern Long Island have been mapped and a pollen zonation in the Upper Cretaceous section in the central part established. This work, combined with literature research, suggests the following: 1. (1) In central Long Island, the spacing of wells which reach basement enables a NE- striking zone free of basement samples to be defined where a buried graben could occur. This zone is referred to as the "permissible zone" because within it the data permit the existence of a hidden graben. 2. (2) The abrupt changes in the thickness of some pollen zones in the Upper Cretaceous deposits of central Long Island may be related to Cretaceous faulting. 3. (3) Buried preglacial valleys, the confluence of glacial lobes and major glacial outwash channels seem concentrated in west central and central Long Island. The loci of these drainage features may reflect structural control by a basement depression. 4. (4) The "permissible zone" is aligned with the zone of structures in an offshore zone south of central Long Island and with the Hartford Basin in Connecticut. Geophysical anomalies also fit into this pattern. 5. (5) A definitive answer to the question of a buried graben on Long Island will require a seismic line across the "permissible zone", or further drilling. ?? 1989.

  20. First identifiable Mesozoic harvestman (Opiliones: Dyspnoi) from Cretaceous Burmese amber

    PubMed Central

    Giribet, Gonzalo; Dunlop, Jason A

    2005-01-01

    Two inclusions in a piece of Upper Cretaceous (Albian) Burmese amber from Myanmar are described as a harvestman (Arachnida: Opiliones), Halitherses grimaldii new genus and species. The first Mesozoic harvestman to be named can be referred to the suborder Dyspnoi for the following reasons: prosoma divided into two regions, the posterior formed by the fusion of the meso- and metapeltidium; palp lacking a terminal claw, with clavate setae, and tarsus considerably shorter than the tibia. The bilobed, anteriorly projecting ocular tubercle is reminiscent of that of ortholasmatine nemastomatids. The status of other Mesozoic fossils referred to Opiliones is briefly reviewed. PMID:16024358

  1. Late Mesozoic tectonics of the Southern-Thai Peninsula: from transpression to basins opening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sautter, Benjamin; Pubellier, Manuel; Menier, David

    2015-04-01

    The petroleum basins of the Southern Thailand Peninsula are poorly known and their final geometry is controlled by the Tertiary stress variations applied on pre-existing Paleozoic and Mesozoic basement structures. From the end of Mesozoic times, the arrival of Indian plate was accomodated by transpressionnal deformation along the Western Margin of Sunda Plate. Evidences of this strain are the motions along several regional strike Slip Faults (Sagaing, Three Pagodas, Mae Ping, Red River, Ranong and Klong Marui Faults) as well as compressional features (folds and thrusts) evidenced onshore. Due to changes in the boundary forces, these structures were reactivated during the Tertiary, leading to the opening of basins in this part of Sundaland. We present a structural analysis based on geomorphology, fieldwork and seismic interpretation of the Southern Thai Peninsula with emphasis on the deformation's style onshore from Ranong to Satun and offshore from Eastern Mergui to Songhkla. By analyzing morphostructures and drainage anomalies from Digital Elevation Model (SRTM and ASTER), we highlight a predominance of N-S structures in the Southern Thai Peninsula: both in the granitic belt and in the sedimentary cover. The Triassic-Jurassic (Indosinian) post-collision granitic belt is intensely fractured, with 2 penetrative directions: N140 and N50. On both sides, the sedimentary units appear folded at a large wavelength (~20km). On most of the studied outcrops, Triassic to Early Cretaceous series are gently tilted and weakly fractured whereas the Paleozoic ones shows intense fracturation and steep dipping beds. Moreover, all the Paleozoic stratas display a constant N-S S1 which does not appear in the Mezosoic sediments. Althought most of the post-Mesozoic sediments do not crop out due to thick vegetal cover, several Tertiary basins can be easily seen from seismic data both onshore and offshore. These data suggest that rifting started in the Eocene and was accommodated by large

  2. Mesozoic lacewings from China provide phylogenetic insight into evolution of the Kalligrammatidae (Neuroptera)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Kalligrammatidae are distinctive, large, conspicuous, lacewings found in Eurasia from the Middle Jurassic to mid Early Cretaceous. Because of incomplete and often inadequate fossil preservation, an absence of detailed morphology, unclear relationships, and unknown evolutionary trends, the Kalligrammatidae are poorly understood. Results We describe three new subfamilies, four new genera, twelve new species and four unassigned species from the late Middle Jurassic Jiulongshan and mid Early Cretaceous Yixian Formations of China. These kalligrammatid taxa exhibit diverse morphological characters, such as mandibulate mouthparts in one major clade and siphonate mouthparts in the remaining four major clades, the presence or absence of a variety of distinctive wing markings such as stripes, wing spots and eyespots, as well as multiple major wing shapes. Based on phylogenetic analyses, the Kalligrammatidae are divided into five principal clades: Kalligrammatinae Handlirsch, 1906, Kallihemerobiinae Ren & Engel, 2008, Meioneurinae subfam. nov., Oregrammatinae subfam. nov. and Sophogrammatinae subfam. nov., each of which is accorded subfamily-level status. Our results show significant morphological and evolutionary differentiation of the Kalligrammatidae family during a 40 million-year-interval of the mid Mesozoic. Conclusion A new phylogeny and classification of five subfamilies and their constituent genera is proposed for the Kalligrammatidae. These diverse, yet highly specialized taxa from northeastern China suggest that eastern Eurasia likely was an important diversification center for the Kalligrammatidae. Kalligrammatids possess an extraordinary morphological breadth and panoply of adaptations during the mid-Mesozoic that highlight our conclusion that their evolutionary biology is much more complex than heretofore realized. PMID:24912379

  3. Mesozoic lacewings from China provide phylogenetic insight into evolution of the Kalligrammatidae (Neuroptera).

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiang; Wang, Yongjie; Labandeira, Conrad C; Shih, Chungkun; Ren, Dong

    2014-06-09

    The Kalligrammatidae are distinctive, large, conspicuous, lacewings found in Eurasia from the Middle Jurassic to mid Early Cretaceous. Because of incomplete and often inadequate fossil preservation, an absence of detailed morphology, unclear relationships, and unknown evolutionary trends, the Kalligrammatidae are poorly understood. We describe three new subfamilies, four new genera, twelve new species and four unassigned species from the late Middle Jurassic Jiulongshan and mid Early Cretaceous Yixian Formations of China. These kalligrammatid taxa exhibit diverse morphological characters, such as mandibulate mouthparts in one major clade and siphonate mouthparts in the remaining four major clades, the presence or absence of a variety of distinctive wing markings such as stripes, wing spots and eyespots, as well as multiple major wing shapes. Based on phylogenetic analyses, the Kalligrammatidae are divided into five principal clades: Kalligrammatinae Handlirsch, 1906, Kallihemerobiinae Ren & Engel, 2008, Meioneurinae subfam. nov., Oregrammatinae subfam. nov. and Sophogrammatinae subfam. nov., each of which is accorded subfamily-level status. Our results show significant morphological and evolutionary differentiation of the Kalligrammatidae family during a 40 million-year-interval of the mid Mesozoic. A new phylogeny and classification of five subfamilies and their constituent genera is proposed for the Kalligrammatidae. These diverse, yet highly specialized taxa from northeastern China suggest that eastern Eurasia likely was an important diversification center for the Kalligrammatidae. Kalligrammatids possess an extraordinary morphological breadth and panoply of adaptations during the mid-Mesozoic that highlight our conclusion that their evolutionary biology is much more complex than heretofore realized.

  4. The fragmentation of Pangaea and Mesozoic terrestrial vertebrate biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Vavrek, Matthew J

    2016-09-01

    During the Mesozoic (242-66 million years ago), terrestrial regions underwent a massive shift in their size, position and connectivity. At the beginning of the era, the land masses were joined into a single supercontinent called Pangaea. However, by the end of the Mesozoic, terrestrial regions had become highly fragmented, both owing to the drifting apart of the continental plates and the extremely high sea levels that flooded and divided many regions. How terrestrial biodiversity was affected by this fragmentation and large-scale flooding of the Earth's landmasses is uncertain. Based on a model using the species-area relationship (SAR), terrestrial vertebrate biodiversity would be expected to nearly double through the Mesozoic owing to continental fragmentation, despite a decrease of 24% in total terrestrial area. Previous studies of Mesozoic vertebrates have generally found increases in terrestrial diversity towards the end of the era, although these increases are often attributed to intrinsic or climatic factors. Instead, continental fragmentation over this time may largely explain any observed increase in terrestrial biodiversity. This study demonstrates the importance that non-intrinsic effects can have on the taxonomic success of a group, and the importance of geography to understanding past biodiversity. © 2016 The Author(s).

  5. The fragmentation of Pangaea and Mesozoic terrestrial vertebrate biodiversity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    During the Mesozoic (242–66 million years ago), terrestrial regions underwent a massive shift in their size, position and connectivity. At the beginning of the era, the land masses were joined into a single supercontinent called Pangaea. However, by the end of the Mesozoic, terrestrial regions had become highly fragmented, both owing to the drifting apart of the continental plates and the extremely high sea levels that flooded and divided many regions. How terrestrial biodiversity was affected by this fragmentation and large-scale flooding of the Earth's landmasses is uncertain. Based on a model using the species–area relationship (SAR), terrestrial vertebrate biodiversity would be expected to nearly double through the Mesozoic owing to continental fragmentation, despite a decrease of 24% in total terrestrial area. Previous studies of Mesozoic vertebrates have generally found increases in terrestrial diversity towards the end of the era, although these increases are often attributed to intrinsic or climatic factors. Instead, continental fragmentation over this time may largely explain any observed increase in terrestrial biodiversity. This study demonstrates the importance that non-intrinsic effects can have on the taxonomic success of a group, and the importance of geography to understanding past biodiversity. PMID:27651536

  6. Palaeozoic and Mesozoic tectonic implications of Central Afghanistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliaupa, Saulius; Motuza, Gediminas

    2017-04-01

    The field and laboratory studies were carried out in Ghor Province situated in the central part of Afghanistan. It straddles juxtaposition of the Tajik (alternatively, North Afghanistan) and Farah Rod blocks separated by Band-e-Bayan zone. The recent studies indicate that Band-e-Bayan zone represents highly tectonised margin of the Tajik block (Motuza, Sliaupa, 2016). The Band-e-Bayan zone is the most representative in terms of sedimentary record. The subsidence trends and sediment lithologies suggest the passive margin setting during (Cambrian?) Ordovician to earliest Carboniferous times. A change to the foredeep setting is implied in middle Carboniferous through Early Permian; the large-thickness flysh-type sediments were derived from continental island arc provenance, as suggested by chemical composition of mudtstones. This stage can be correlated to the amalgamation of the Gondwana supercontinent. The new passive-margin stage can be inferred in the Band-e-Bayan zone and Tajik blocks in the Late Permian throughout the early Late Triassic that is likely related to breaking apart of Gondwana continent. A collisional event is suggested in latest Triassic, as seen in high-rate subsidence associating with dramatic change in litholgies, occurrence of volcanic rocks and granidoid intrusions. The continental volcanic island arc derived (based on geochemical indices) terrigens prevail at the base of Jurassic that were gradually replaced by carbonate platform in the Middle Jurassic pointing to cessation of the tectonic activity. A new tectonic episode (no deposition; and folding?) took place in the Tajik and Band-e-Bayan zone in Late Jurassic. The geological section of the Farah Rod block, situated to the south, is represented by Jurassic and Cretaceous sediments overlain by sporadic Cenozoic volcanic-sedimentary succession. The lower part of the Mesozoic succession is composed of terrigenic sediments giving way to upper Lower Cretaceous shallow water carbonates implying

  7. Mesozoic carbonate-siliciclastic platform to basin systems of a South Tethyan margin (Egypt, East Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassy, Aurélie; Crouzy, Emmanuel; Gorini, Christian; Rubino, Jean-Loup

    2015-04-01

    The Mesozoïc Egyptian margin is the south margin of a remnant of the Neo-Tethys Ocean, at the African northern plate boundary. East Mediterranean basin developed during the late Triassic-Early Jurassic rifting with a NW-SE opening direction (Frizon de Lamotte et al., 2011). During Mesozoïc, Egypt margin was a transform margin with a NW-SE orientation of transform faults. In the Eastern Mediterranean basin, Mesozoïc margins are characterized by mixed carbonate-siliciclastics platforms where subsidence and eustacy are the main parameters controlling the facies distribution and geometries of the platform-to-basin transition. Geometries and facies on the platform-slope-basin system, today well constrained on the Levant area, where still poorly known on the Egyptian margin. Geometries and stratigraphic architecture of the Egyptian margin are revealed, thanks to a regional seismic and well data-base provided by an industrial-academic group (GRI, Total). The objective is to understand the sismostratigraphic architecture of the platform-slope-basin system in a key area from Western Desert to Nile delta and Levant margin. Mapping of the top Jurassic and top Cretaceous show seismic geomorphology of the margin, with the cartography of the hinge line from Western Desert to Sinaï. During the Jurassic, carbonate platform show a prograding profile and a distally thickening of the external platform, non-abrupt slope profiles, and palaeovalleys incisions. Since the Cretaceous, the aggrading and retrograding mixed carbonate-siliciclastic platform show an alternation of steep NW-SE oblique segments and distally steepened segments. These structures of the platform edge are strongly controlled by the inherited tethyan transform directions. Along the hinge line, embayments are interpreted as megaslides. The basin infilling is characterised by an alternation of chaotic seismic facies and high amplitude reflectors onlaping the paleoslopes. MTC deposits can mobilize thick sedimentary

  8. Molecular clocks indicate turnover and diversification of modern coleoid cephalopods during the Mesozoic Marine Revolution

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Dirk; Winkelmann, Inger E.; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Pankey, M. Sabrina; Ribeiro, Ângela M.; Kocot, Kevin M.; Halanych, Kenneth M.; Oakley, Todd H.; da Fonseca, Rute R.

    2017-01-01

    Coleoid cephalopod molluscs comprise squid, cuttlefish and octopuses, and represent nearly the entire diversity of modern cephalopods. Sophisticated adaptations such as the use of colour for camouflage and communication, jet propulsion and the ink sac highlight the unique nature of the group. Despite these striking adaptations, there are clear parallels in ecology between coleoids and bony fishes. The coleoid fossil record is limited, however, hindering confident analysis of the tempo and pattern of their evolution. Here we use a molecular dataset (180 genes, approx. 36 000 amino acids) of 26 cephalopod species to explore the phylogeny and timing of cephalopod evolution. We show that crown cephalopods diverged in the Silurian–Devonian, while crown coleoids had origins in the latest Palaeozoic. While the deep-sea vampire squid and dumbo octopuses have ancient origins extending to the Early Mesozoic Era, 242 ± 38 Ma, incirrate octopuses and the decabrachian coleoids (10-armed squid) diversified in the Jurassic Period. These divergence estimates highlight the modern diversity of coleoid cephalopods emerging in the Mesozoic Marine Revolution, a period that also witnessed the radiation of most ray-finned fish groups in addition to several other marine vertebrates. This suggests that that the origin of modern cephalopod biodiversity was contingent on ecological competition with marine vertebrates. PMID:28250188

  9. Bone-eating Osedax worms lived on Mesozoic marine reptile deadfalls.

    PubMed

    Danise, Silvia; Higgs, Nicholas D

    2015-04-01

    We report fossil traces of Osedax, a genus of siboglinid annelids that consume the skeletons of sunken vertebrates on the ocean floor, from early-Late Cretaceous (approx. 100 Myr) plesiosaur and sea turtle bones. Although plesiosaurs went extinct at the end-Cretaceous mass extinction (66 Myr), chelonioids survived the event and diversified, and thus provided sustenance for Osedax in the 20 Myr gap preceding the radiation of cetaceans, their main modern food source. This finding shows that marine reptile carcasses, before whales, played a key role in the evolution and dispersal of Osedax and confirms that its generalist ability of colonizing different vertebrate substrates, like fishes and marine birds, besides whale bones, is an ancestral trait. A Cretaceous age for unequivocal Osedax trace fossils also dates back to the Mesozoic the origin of the entire siboglinid family, which includes chemosynthetic tubeworms living at hydrothermal vents and seeps, contrary to phylogenetic estimations of a Late Mesozoic-Cenozoic origin (approx. 50-100 Myr). © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  10. Birds of a Feather: Social Bases of Neighborhood Formation in Newark, New Jersey, 1880.

    PubMed

    Logan, John R; Shin, Hyoung-Jin

    2016-08-01

    This study examines the bases of residential segregation in a late nineteenth century American city, recognizing the strong tendency toward homophily within neighborhoods. Our primary question is how ethnicity, social class, nativity, and family composition affect where people live. Segregation is usually studied one dimension at a time, but these social differences are interrelated, and thus a multivariate approach is needed to understand their effects. We find that ethnicity is the main basis of local residential sorting, while occupational standing and, to a lesser degree, family life cycle and nativity also are significant. A second concern is the geographic scale of neighborhoods: in this study, the geographic area within which the characteristics of potential neighbors matter in locational outcomes of individuals. Studies of segregation typically use a single spatial scale, often one determined by the availability of administrative data. We take advantage of a unique data set containing the address and geo-referenced location of every resident. We conclude that it is the most local scale that offers the best prediction of people's similarity to their neighbors. Adding information at larger scales minimally improves prediction of the person's location. The 1880 neighborhoods of Newark, New Jersey, were formed as individuals located themselves among similar neighbors on a single street segment.

  11. Mesozoic black shales, source mixing and carbon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suan, Guillaume

    2016-04-01

    Over the last decades, considerable attention has been devoted to the paleoenvironmental and biogeochemical significance of Mesozoic black shales. Black shale-bearing successions indeed often display marked changes in the organic carbon isotope composition (δ13Corg), which have been commonly interpreted as evidence for dramatic perturbations of global carbon budgets and CO2 levels. Arguably the majority of these studies have discarded some more "local" explanations when interpreting δ13Corg profiles, most often because comparable profiles occur on geographically large and distant areas. Based on newly acquired data and selected examples from the literature, I will show that the changing contribution of organic components with distinct δ13C signatures exerts a major but overlooked influence of Mesozoic δ13Corg profiles. Such a bias occurs across a wide spectrum of sedimentological settings and ages, as shown by the good correlation between δ13Corg values and proxies of kerogen proportions (such as rock-eval, biomarker, palynofacies and palynological data) recorded in Mesozoic marginal to deep marine successions of Triassic, Jurassic and Cretaceous age. In most of these successions, labile, 12C-enriched amorphous organic matter of marine origin dominates strata deposited under anoxic conditions, while oxidation-resistant, 13C-rich terrestrial particles dominate strata deposited under well-oxygenated conditions. This influence is further illustrated by weathering profiles of Toarcian (Lower Jurassic) black shales from France, where weathered areas dominated by refractory organic matter show dramatic 13C-enrichment (and decreased total organic carbon and pyrite contents) compared to non-weathered portions of the same horizon. The implications of these results for chemostratigraphic correlations and pCO2 reconstructions of Mesozoic will be discussed, as well as strategies to overcome this major bias.

  12. The inheritance of a Mesozoic landscape in western Scandinavia

    PubMed Central

    Fredin, Ola; Viola, Giulio; Zwingmann, Horst; Sørlie, Ronald; Brönner, Marco; Lie, Jan-Erik; Grandal, Else Margrethe; Müller, Axel; Margreth, Annina; Vogt, Christoph; Knies, Jochen

    2017-01-01

    In-situ weathered bedrock, saprolite, is locally found in Scandinavia, where it is commonly thought to represent pre-Pleistocene weathering possibly associated with landscape formation. The age of weathering, however, remains loosely constrained, which has an impact on existing geological and landscape evolution models and morphotectonic correlations. Here we provide new geochronological evidence that some of the low-altitude basement landforms on- and offshore southwestern Scandinavia are a rejuvenated geomorphological relic from Mesozoic times. K-Ar dating of authigenic, syn-weathering illite from saprolitic remnants constrains original basement exposure in the Late Triassic (221.3±7.0–206.2±4.2 Ma) through deep weathering in a warm climate and subsequent partial mobilization of the saprolitic mantle into the overlying sediment cascade system. The data support the bulk geomorphological development of west Scandinavia coastal basement rocks during the Mesozoic and later, long-lasting relative tectonic stability. Pleistocene glaciations played an additional geomorphological role, selectively stripping the landscape from the Mesozoic overburden and carving glacial landforms down to Plio–Pleistocene times. Saprolite K-Ar dating offers unprecedented possibilities to study past weathering and landscape evolution processes. PMID:28452366

  13. Predator-induced macroevolutionary trends in Mesozoic crinoids

    PubMed Central

    Gorzelak, Przemysław; Salamon, Mariusz A.; Baumiller, Tomasz K.

    2012-01-01

    Sea urchins are a major component of recent marine communities where they exert a key role as grazers and benthic predators. However, their impact on past marine organisms, such as crinoids, is hard to infer in the fossil record. Analysis of bite mark frequencies on crinoid columnals and comprehensive genus-level diversity data provide unique insights into the importance of sea urchin predation through geologic time. These data show that over the Mesozoic, predation intensity on crinoids, as measured by bite mark frequencies on columnals, changed in step with diversity of sea urchins. Moreover, Mesozoic diversity changes in the predatory sea urchins show a positive correlation with diversity of motile crinoids and a negative correlation with diversity of sessile crinoids, consistent with a crinoid motility representing an effective escape strategy. We contend that the Mesozoic diversity history of crinoids likely represents a macroevolutionary response to changes in sea urchin predation pressure and that it may have set the stage for the recent pattern of crinoid diversity in which motile forms greatly predominate and sessile forms are restricted to deep-water refugia. PMID:22509040

  14. Deformation style of the Mesozoic sedimentary rocks in southern Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanjanapayont, Pitsanupong

    2014-10-01

    Mesozoic sedimentary rocks in southern Thailand are widespread from NNE-SSW and N-S in Chumphon and Trang provinces. The Mesozoic stratigraphic units are the marine Triassic Sai Bon Formation and the non-marine Jurassic-Cretaceous Thung Yai Group, the latter subdivided into Khlong Min, Lam Thap, Sam Chom, and Phun Phin Formations. These units overlie Permian carbonate rocks with an angular unconformity, and are overlain unconformably by Cenozoic units and the Quaternary sediments. The Mesozoic rocks have been folded to form two huge first-ordered syncline or synclinoria, the Chumphon and Surat Thani-Krabi-Trang synclinoria. These synclinoria are elongated in NNE-SSW to N-S direction, and incorporate asymmetric lower-order parasitic folds. The folds have moderately to steeply dipping eastward limbs and more gently dipping westward limbs. These folds were transected by brittle fractures in four major directions. These geologic structures indicate WNW-ESE to E-W contraction with top-to-the-east simple shear at some time before the deposition of the Cenozoic sedimentary units. No major deformation has affected the rocks subsequently, apart from the formation of the fault-controlled Cenozoic basins.

  15. Mesozoic evolution of the Amu Darya basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunet, Marie-Françoise; Ershov, Andrey; Korotaev, Maxim; Mordvintsev, Dmitriy; Barrier, Eric; Sidorova, Irina

    2014-05-01

    This study, granted by the Darius Programme, aims at proposing a model of tectono-stratigraphic evolution of the Amu Darya basin since the Late Palaeozoic and to understand the relationship with the nearby basins. The Amu Darya basin, as its close eastern neighbour, the Afghan-Tajik basin, lies on the Turan platform, after the closure of the Turkestan Ocean during the Late Paleozoic. These two basins, spread on mainly lowlands of Turkmenistan, southwest Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, and northern Afghanistan, are separated from one another by the South-Western Gissar meganticline, where series of the northern Amu Darya margin are outcropping. The evolution is closely controlled by several periods of crustal thinning (post-collision rifting and back-arc extension), with some marine incursions, coming in between accretions of continental blocks and collisions that succeeded from the Late Triassic-Early Jurassic (Eo-Cimmerian orogeny) to the Cenozoic times. These orogenies controlled the deposition of thick clastics sequences, and the collision of the Indian Plate with Eurasia strongly deformed the sedimentary cover of the Afghan-Tajik basin. The more than 7 km thick Meso-Cenozoic sedimentary succession of the Amu Darya basin, lies on a complex system of rifts and blocks. Their orientation and age (late Permian, Triassic?) are not well known because of deep burial. The north-eastern margin, with the Bukhara (upper margin) and Chardzhou steps, is NW oriented, parallel to the Paleozoic Turkestan suture. The orientation bends to W-E, in the part of the Gissar situated to the North of the Afghan-Tajik basin. This EW trending orientation prevails also in the south(-eastern) margin of the basin (series of North Afghanistan highs) and in the Murgab depression, the south-eastern deepest portion of the Amu Darya basin. It is in this area and in the eastern part of the Amu Darya basin that the Jurassic as well as the lower Cretaceous sediments are the thickest. The south-western part

  16. The Miocene mammal Necrolestes demonstrates the survival of a Mesozoic nontherian lineage into the late Cenozoic of South America

    PubMed Central

    Rougier, Guillermo W.; Wible, John R.; Beck, Robin M. D.; Apesteguía, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    The early Miocene mammal Necrolestes patagonensis from Patagonia, Argentina, was described in 1891 as the only known extinct placental “insectivore” from South America (SA). Since then, and despite the discovery of additional well-preserved material, the systematic status of Necrolestes has remained in flux, with earlier studies leaning toward placental affinities and more recent ones endorsing either therian or specifically metatherian relationships. We have further prepared the best-preserved specimens of Necrolestes and compared them with newly discovered nontribosphenic Mesozoic mammals from Argentina; based on this, we conclude that Necrolestes is related neither to marsupials nor placentals but is a late-surviving member of the recently recognized nontherian clade Meridiolestida, which is currently known only from SA. This conclusion is supported by a morphological phylogenetic analysis that includes a broad sampling of therian and nontherian taxa and that places Necrolestes within Meridiolestida. Thus, Necrolestes is a remnant of the highly endemic Mesozoic fauna of nontribosphenic mammals in SA and extends the known record of meridiolestidans by almost 45 million years. Together with other likely relictual mammals from earlier in the Cenozoic of SA and Antarctica, Necrolestes demonstrates the ecological diversity of mammals and the mosaic pattern of fauna replacement in SA during the Cenozoic. In contrast to northern continents, the Cenozoic faunal history of SA was characterized by a long period of interaction between endemic mammalian lineages of Mesozoic origin and metatherian and eutherian lineages that probably dispersed to SA during the latest Cretaceous or earliest Paleocene. PMID:23169652

  17. Extreme Mesozoic crustal thinning in the Eastern Iberia margin: The example of the Columbrets Basin (Valencia Trough)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohn, G.; Etheve, N.; Frizon de Lamotte, D.; Roca, E.; Tugend, J.; Gómez-Romeu, J.

    2017-12-01

    Eastern Iberia preserves a complex succession of Mesozoic rifts partly or completely inverted during the Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic in relation with Africa-Eurasia convergence. Notably, the Valencia Trough, classically viewed as part of the Cenozoic West Mediterranean basins, preserves in its southwestern part a thick Mesozoic succession (locally »10km thick) over a highly thinned continental basement (locally only »3,5km thick). This sub-basin referred to as the Columbrets Basin, represents a Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous hyper-extended rift basin weakly overprinted by subsequent events. Its initial configuration is well preserved allowing us to unravel its 3D architecture and tectono-stratigraphic evolution in the frame of the Mesozoic evolution of eastern Iberia. The Columbrets Basin benefits from an extensive dataset combining high resolution reflection seismic profiles, drill holes, refraction seismic data and Expanding Spread Profiles. Its Mesozoic architecture is controlled by interactions between extensional deformation and halokinesis involving the Upper Triassic salt. The thick uppermost Triassic to Cretaceous succession describes a general synclinal shape, progressively stretched and dismembered towards the basin borders. The SE-border of the basin is characterized by a large extensional detachment fault acting at crustal scale and interacting locally with the Upper Triassic décollement. This extensional structure accommodates the exhumation of the continental basement and part of the crustal thinning. Eventually our results highlight the complex interaction between extreme crustal thinning and occurrence of a pre-rift salt level for the deformation style and tectono-stratigraphic evolution of hyper-extended rift basins.

  18. Mesozoic to Cenozoic magmatic history of the Pamir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, James B.; Scoggin, Shane H.; Kapp, Paul; Carrapa, Barbara; Ducea, Mihai N.; Worthington, James; Oimahmadov, Ilhomjon; Gadoev, Mustafo

    2018-01-01

    New geochronologic, geochemical, and isotopic data for Mesozoic to Cenozoic igneous rocks and detrital minerals from the Pamir Mountains help to distinguish major regional magmatic episodes and constrain the tectonic evolution of the Pamir orogenic system. After final accretion of the Central and South Pamir terranes during the Late Triassic to Early Jurassic, the Pamir was largely amagmatic until the emplacement of the intermediate (SiO2 > 60 wt.%), calc-alkaline, and isotopically evolved (-13 to -5 zircon εHf(t)) South Pamir batholith between 120-100 Ma, which is the most volumetrically significant magmatic complex in the Pamir and includes a high flux magmatic event at ∼105 Ma. The South Pamir batholith is interpreted as the northern (inboard) equivalent of the Cretaceous Karakoram batholith and the along-strike equivalent of an Early Cretaceous magmatic belt in the northern Lhasa terrane in Tibet. The northern Lhasa terrane is characterized by a similar high-flux event at ∼110 Ma. Migration of continental arc magmatism into the South Pamir terrane during the mid-Cretaceous is interpreted to reflect northward directed, low-angle to flat-slab subduction of the Neo-Tethyan oceanic lithosphere. Late Cretaceous magmatism (80-70 Ma) in the Pamir is scarce, but concentrated in the Central and northern South Pamir terranes where it is comparatively more mafic (SiO2 < 60 wt.%), alkaline, and isotopically juvenile (-2 to +2 zircon εHf(t)) than the South Pamir batholith. Late Cretaceous magmatism in the Pamir is interpreted here to be the result of extension associated with roll-back of the Neotethyan oceanic slab, which is consistent with similarly aged extension-related magmatism in the Karakoram terrane and Kohistan. There is an additional pulse of magmatism in the Pamir at 42-36 Ma that is geographically restricted (∼150 km diameter ellipsoidal area) and referred to as the Vanj magmatic complex. The Vanj complex comprises metaluminous, high-K calc-alkaline to

  19. Mesozoic and Cenozoic exhumation history of the SW Iberian Variscides inferred from low-temperature thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Vílchez, Mercedes; Jabaloy-Sánchez, Antonio; Azor, Antonio; Stuart, Finlay; Persano, Cristina; Alonso-Chaves, Francisco M.; Martín-Parra, Luis Miguel; Matas, Jerónimo; García-Navarro, Encarnación

    2015-11-01

    The post-Paleozoic tectonothermal evolution of the SW Iberian Variscides is poorly known mainly due to the scarce low-temperature geochronological data available. We have obtained new apatite fission-tracks and apatite (U-Th)/He ages to constrain the Mesozoic and Cenozoic tectonic evolution of this portion of the Iberian Massif located just north of the Betic-Rif Alpine orogen. We have obtained nine apatite fission-track ages on samples from Variscan and pre-Variscan granitoids. These ages range from 174.4 (± 10.8) to 54.1 (± 4.9) Ma, with mean track lengths between 10.3 and 13.9 μm. We have also performed 5 (U-Th)/He datings on some of the same samples, obtaining ages between 74.6 (± 1.6) and 18.5 (± 1.4) Ma. Time-temperature path modeling of these low-temperature geochronological data leads us to envisage four post-Paleozoic tectonically controlled exhumation episodes in the SW Iberian Variscides. Three of these episodes occurred in Mesozoic times (Middle Triassic to Early Jurassic, Early Cretaceous, and Late Cretaceous) at rates of ≈ 1.1 to 2.5 °C Ma- 1, separated by periods with almost no cooling. We relate these Mesozoic cooling events to the formation of important marginal reliefs during the rifting and opening of the central and northern Atlantic realm. The fourth exhumation episode occurred in Cenozoic times at rates of ≈ 3.2 to 3.6 °C Ma- 1, being only recorded in samples next to faults with topographic escarpments. These samples cooled below 80 °C at ≈ 20 Ma at rates of 3-13 °C Ma- 1 due to roughly N-S oriented compressional stresses affecting the whole Iberian plate, which, in the particular case of SW Iberia, reactivated some of the previous Late Paleozoic thrusts.

  20. Paleozoic and Lower Mesozoic magmas from the eastern Klamath Mountains (North California) and the geodynamic evolution of northwestern America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapierre, H.; Brouxel, M.; Albarede, F.; Coulin, C.; Lecuyer, C.; Martin, P.; Mascle, G.; Rouer, O.

    1987-09-01

    The Paleozoic to Early Mesozoic geology of the eastern Klamath Mountains (N California) is characterized by three major magmatic events of Ordovician, Late Ordovician to Early Devonian, and Permo-Triassic ages. The Ordovician event is represented by a calc-alkalic island-arc sequence (Lovers Leap Butte sequence) developed in the vicinity of a continental margin. The Late Ordovician to Early Devonian event consists of the 430-480 Ma old Trinity ophiolite formed during the early development of a marginal basin, and a series of low-K tholeiitic volcanic suites (Lovers Leap Basalt—Keratophyre unit, Copley and Balaklala Formations) belonging to intraoceanic island-arcs. Finally, the Permo-Triassic event gave rise to three successives phases of volcanic activity (Nosoni, Dekkas and Bully Hill) represented by the highly differentiated basalt-to-rhyolite low-K tholeiitic series of mature island-arcs. The Permo-Triassic sediments are indicative of shallow to moderate depth in an open, warm sea. The geodynamic evolution of the eastern Klamath Mountains during Paleozoic to Early Mesozoic times is therefore constrained by the geological, petrological and geochemical features of its island-arcs and related marginal basin. A consistent plate-tectonic model is proposed for the area, consisting of six main stages: (1) development during Ordovician times of a calc-alkalic island-arc in the vicinity of a continental margin; (2) extrusion during Late Ordovician to Silurian times of a primitive basalt-andesite intraoceanic island-arc suite, which terminated with boninites, the latter suggest rifting in the fore-arc, followed by the breakup of the arc; (3) opening and development of the Trinity back-arc basin around 430-480 Ma ago; (4) eruption of the Balaklala Rhyolite either in the arc or in the fore-arc, ending in Early Devonian time with intrusion of the 400 Ma Mule Mountain stock; (5) break in volcanic activity from the Early Devonian to the Early Permian; and (6) development of

  1. Functional Morphometric Analysis of the Furcula in Mesozoic Birds

    PubMed Central

    Close, Roger A.; Rayfield, Emily J.

    2012-01-01

    The furcula displays enormous morphological and structural diversity. Acting as an important origin for flight muscles involved in the downstroke, the form of this element has been shown to vary with flight mode. This study seeks to clarify the strength of this form-function relationship through the use of eigenshape morphometric analysis coupled with recently developed phylogenetic comparative methods (PCMs), including phylogenetic Flexible Discriminant Analysis (pFDA). Additionally, the morphospace derived from the furculae of extant birds is used to shed light on possible flight adaptations of Mesozoic fossil taxa. While broad conclusions of earlier work are supported (U-shaped furculae are associated with soaring, strong anteroposterior curvature with wing-propelled diving), correlations between form and function do not appear to be so clear-cut, likely due to the significantly larger dataset and wider spectrum of flight modes sampled here. Interclavicular angle is an even more powerful discriminator of flight mode than curvature, and is positively correlated with body size. With the exception of the close relatives of modern birds, the ornithuromorphs, Mesozoic taxa tend to occupy unique regions of morphospace, and thus may have either evolved unfamiliar flight styles or have arrived at similar styles through divergent musculoskeletal configurations. PMID:22666324

  2. Paleomagnetic Constraints on the Tectonic History of the Mesozoic Ophiolite and Arc Terranes of Western Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschman, L.; Van Hinsbergen, D. J. J.; Langereis, C. G.; Molina-Garza, R. S.; Kimbrough, D. L.

    2017-12-01

    The North American Cordillera has been shaped by a long history of accretion of arcs and other buoyant crustal fragments to the western margin of the North American Plate since the Early Mesozoic. Accretion of these terranes resulted from a complex tectonic history interpreted to include episodes of both intra-oceanic subduction within the Panthalassa/Pacific Ocean, as well as continental margin subduction along the western margin of North America. Western Mexico, at the southern end of the Cordillera, contains a Late Cretaceous-present day long-lived continental margin arc, as well as Mesozoic arc and SSZ ophiolite assemblages of which the origin is under debate. Interpretations of the origin of these subduction-related rock assemblages vary from far-travelled exotic intra-oceanic island arc character to autochthonous or parautochthonous extended continental margin origin. We present new paleomagnetic data from four localities: (1) the Norian SSZ Vizcaíno peninsula Ophiolite; (2) its Lower Jurassic sedimentary cover; and (3) Barremian and (4) Aptian sediments derived from the Guerrero arc. The data show that the Mexican ophiolite and arc terranes have a paleolatitudinal plate motion history that is equal to that of the North American continent. This suggests that these rock assemblages were part of the overriding plate and were perhaps only separated from the North American continent by temporal fore- or back-arc spreading. These spreading phases resulted in the temporal existence of tectonic plates between the North American and Farallon Plates, and upon closure of the basins, in the growth of the North American continent without addition of any far-travelled exotic terranes.

  3. Mesozoic contractile and extensional structures in the Boyer Gap area, northern Dome Rock Mountains, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Boettcher, S.S.

    1993-04-01

    Mesozoic polyphase contractile and superposed ductile extensional structures affect Proterozoic augen gneiss, Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks, and Jurassic granitoids in the Boyer Gap area of the northern Dome Rock Mtns, W-central Arizona. The nappe-style contractile structures are preserved in the footwall of the Tyson Thrust shear zone, which is one of the structurally lowest thrust faults in the E-trending Jurassic and Cretaceous Maria fold and thrust belt. Contractile deformation preceded emplacement of Late Cretaceous granite (ca 80 Ma, U-Pb zircon) and some may be older than variably deformed Late Jurassic leucogranite. Specifically, detailed structural mapping reveals the presence of a km-scalemore » antiformal syncline that apparently formed as a result of superposition of tight to isoclinal, south-facing folds on an earlier, north-facing recumbent fold. The stratigraphic sequence of metamorphosed Paleozoic cratonal strata is largely intact in the northern Dome Rock Mtns, such that overturned and upright stratigraphic units can be distinguished. A third phase of folding in the Boyer Gap area is distinguished by intersection lineations that are folded obliquely across the hinges of open to tight, sheath folds. The axial planes of the sheet folds are subparallel to the mylonitic foliation in top-to-the-northeast extensional shear zones. The timing of ductile extensional structures in the northern Dome Rock is constrained by [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar isochron ages of 56 Ma and 48 Ma on biotite from mylonitic rocks in both the hanging wall and footwall of the Tyson Thrust shear zone. The two early phases of folding are the dominant mechanism by which shortening was accommodated in the Boyer Gap area, as opposed to deformation along discrete thrust faults with large offset. All of the ductile extensional structures are spectacularly displayed at an outcrop scale but are not of sufficient magnitude to obliterate the km-scale Mesozoic polyphase contractile

  4. A Hydraulic Tomography Experiment in Fractured Sedimentary Rocks, Newark Basin, New Jersey, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiedeman, C. R.; Barrash, W.; Thrash, C. J.; Johnson, C. D.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic tomography was performed in July 2015 in contaminated fractured mudstone beds at the former Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) in the Newark Basin near Trenton, NJ using seven existing wells. The spatial arrangement of wells (in a circle of 9 m radius with one central well), the use of packers to divide the wells into multiple monitoring intervals, and the deployment of fiber optic pressure transducers enabled collection of a hydraulic tomography dataset comprising high-resolution drawdown observations at an unprecedented level of spatial detail for fractured rocks. The experiment involved 45-minute cross-hole aquifer tests, conducted by pumping from a given packer-isolated well interval and continuously monitoring drawdowns in all other well intervals. The collective set of drawdown data from all tests and intervals displays a wide range of behavior suggestive of highly heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity (K) within the tested volume, such as: drawdown curves for different well intervals crossing one another on drawdown-time plots; variable drawdown curve shapes, including linear segments on log-log plots; variable order and magnitude of time-lag and/or drawdown for intervals of a given well in response to pumping from similar fractures or stratigraphic units in different wells; and variable groupings of wells and intervals showing similar responses for different pumping tests. The observed behavior is consistent with previous testing at the NAWC indicating that K within and across individual mudstone beds can vary by orders of magnitude over scales of meters. Preliminary assessment of the drawdown data together with a rich set of geophysical logs suggests an initial conceptual model that includes densely distributed fractures of moderate K at the shallowest depths of the tested volume, connected high-K bedding-plane-parting fractures at intermediate depths, and sparse low-K fractures in the deeper rocks. Future work will involve tomographic inversion of

  5. Localized Stress Perturbations in the Northern Newark Basin: Implications for Induced Seismicity and Carbon Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharova, N. V.; Goldberg, D.

    2013-12-01

    Induced seismicity has emerged as one of the primary concerns for large-volume underground injections, such as wastewater disposal and carbon sequestration. In order to mitigate potential seismic risks, detailed knowledge of reservoir geometry, occurrence of faults and fractures, and the distribution of in situ stresses is required to predict the effect of pore pressure increase on formation stability. We present a detailed analysis of in situ stress distribution at a potential carbon sequestration site in the northern Newark basin, and then consider fault and fracture stability under injection conditions taking into account the effects of localized stress perturbations, formation anisotropy and poroelasticity. The study utilizes borehole geophysical data obtained in a 2-km-deep well drilled into Triassic lacustrine sediments in Rockland County, NY. A complex pattern of local variations in the stress field with depth and at multiple scales is revealed by borehole breakouts, including: (i) gradual counter-clockwise rotation of horizontal stress orientation and decrease in relative magnitude with depth, (ii) pronounced rotations of the principal horizontal stresses at two depths, ~800 m and ~1200 m, and (iii) small-scale departures from mean orientation at the scale of meters to tens of meters. Localized stress drop near active faults may explain these observations. Seismic profiling in the vicinity of the borehole and along dip and strike of basin sediments suggests the presence of crosscutting, and potentially active, fault zones but their geometry cannot be accurately resolved. Borehole image data from the site indicates the presence of numerous fractures with increasing density over depth that roughly form two sets: high-angle fractures striking NE-SW and sub-horizontal fractures dipping NW. We perform iterative dislocation modeling for various fault orientations and slip distances to match the observed stress distribution in the borehole. Both intersecting and

  6. Palinspastic reconstruction of Lower Mesozoic stratigraphic sequences near the latitude of Las Vegas: Implications for the entire Great Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Marzolf, J.E.

    1993-04-01

    On the Colorado Plateau, lower Mesozoic stratigraphy is subdivided by regional unconformities into the Lower Triassic Moenkopi, Upper Triassic Chinle, Lower and Middle( ) Jurassic Glen Canyon, and Middle Jurassic lower San Rafael tectonosequences. Palinspastic reconstruction for Cenozoic extensional and mesozoic compressional deformations near the latitude of Las Vegas indicates the Moenkopi tectono-sequence constructed a passive-margin-like architecture of modest width overlapping folded. Thrust-faulted, and intruded Permian strata, with state boundaries fixed relative to the Colorado Plateau, comparison of the location of the Early Triassic shelf-slope break near latitude 36[degree] with the palinspastically restored location of the shelf-slope break in southeasternmore » Idaho implies strata of the Moenkopi tectonosequence in the Mesozoic marine province of northwest NV lay in western utah in the Early Triassic. This reconstruction: suggests that the Galconda and Last Chance faults are part of the same thrust system; aligns late Carnian paleovalleys of the chinle tectonosequence on the Colorado Plateau with a coeval northwest-trending paleovalley cut across the Star Pea, and the Norian Cottonwood paleovalley with the coeval Grass Valley delta; defines a narrow, northward deepening back-arc basin in which the Glen Canyon tectonosequence was deposited; aligns east-facing half grabens along the back side of the arc from the Cowhole Mountains to the Clan Alpine Range; projects the volcan-arc/back-arc transition from northwest Arizona to the east side of the Idaho batholith; and predicts the abrupt facies change from silicic volcanics to marine strata of the lower San Rafael sequence lay in western Utah. The paleogeographic was altered in the late Bathonian to Callovian by back-arc extension north of a line extending from Cedar City, UT to Mina, NV. The palinspastic reconstruction implies the Paleozoic was tectonically stacked at the close of the Paleozoic.« less

  7. Water resources of Rockland County, New York, 2005-07, with emphasis on the Newark Basin Bedrock Aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heisig, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Concerns over the state of water resources in Rockland County, NY, prompted an assessment of current (2005-07) conditions. The investigation included a review of all water resources but centered on the Newark basin aquifer, a fractured-bedrock aquifer over which nearly 300,000 people reside. Most concern has been focused on this aquifer because of (1) high summer pumping rates, with occasional entrained-air problems and an unexplained water-level decline at a monitoring well, (2) annual withdrawals that have approached or even exceeded previous estimates of aquifer recharge, and (3) numerous contamination problems that have caused temporary or long-term shutdown of production wells. Public water supply in Rockland County uses three sources of water in roughly equal parts: (1) the Newark basin sedimentary bedrock aquifer, (2) alluvial aquifers along the Ramapo and Mahwah Rivers, and (3) surface waters from Lake DeForest Reservoir and a smaller, new reservoir supply in the Highlands part of the county. Water withdrawals from the alluvial aquifer in the Ramapo River valley and the Lake DeForest Reservoir are subject to water-supply application permits that stipulate minimum flows that must be maintained downstream into New Jersey. There is a need, therefore, at a minimum, to prevent any loss of the bedrock-aquifer resource--to maintain it in terms of both sustainable use and water-quality protection. The framework of the Newark basin bedrock aquifer included characterization of (1) the structure and fracture occurrence associated with the Newark basin strata, (2) the texture and thickness of overlying glacial and alluvial deposits, (3) the presence of the Palisades sill and associated basaltic units on or within the Newark basin strata, and (4) the streams that drain the aquifer system. The greatest concern regarding sustainability of groundwater resources is the aquifer response to the seasonal increase in pumping rates from May through October (an average increase

  8. The Mesozoic palaeo-relief and immature front belt of northern Tianshan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, K.; Gumiaux, C.; Augier, R.; Chen, Y.; Wang, Q.

    2012-04-01

    The modern Tianshan (central Asia) extends east-west on about 2500 km long with an average of more than 2000 m in altitude. At first order, the finite structure of this range obviously displays a crust-scale 'pop-up' of Palaeozoic rocks surrounded by two Cenozoic foreland basins. Up to now, this range is regarded as a direct consequence of the Neogene to recent reactivation of a Palaeozoic belt due to the India - Asia collision. This study focuses on the structure of the northern front area of Tianshan and is mainly based on field structural works. In particular, relationships in between sedimentary cover and basement units allow discussing the tectonic and morphological evolution of the northern Tianshan during Mesozoic and Cenozoic times. The study area is about 250 km long, from Wusu to Urumqi, along the northern piedmont of the Tianshan. Continental sedimentary series of the basin as well as structure of the cover/basement interface can well be observed along several incised valleys. Sedimentological observations argue for a limited transport distance for Lower and Uppermost Jurassic deposits that are preserved within intra-mountainous basins or within the foreland basin, along the range front. Moreover, some of the studied geological sections show that Triassic to Jurassic sedimentary series can be continuously followed from the basin to the range where they unconformably overlie the Carboniferous basement. Such onlap type structures of the Jurassic series, on top of the Palaeozoic rock units, can also be observed at more local-scale (~a few 100 m). At different scales, our observations thus clearly evidence i) the existence of a substantial relief during Mesozoic times and ii) very limited deformation, after Mesozoic, along some segments of the northern range front. Yet, thrusting of the Palaeozoic basement on the Mesozoic or Cenozoic sedimentary series of the basin is also well exposed along some other river valleys. As a consequence, the northern front of

  9. Rapid middle Miocene collapse of the Mesozoic orogenic plateau in north-central Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colgan, Joseph P.; Henry, Christopher D.

    2009-01-01

    The modern Sierra Nevada and Great Basin were likely the site of a high-elevation orogenic plateau well into Cenozoic time, supported by crust thickened during Mesozoic shortening. Although crustal thickening at this scale can lead to extension, the relationship between Mesozoic shortening and subsequent formation of the Basin and Range is difficult to unravel because it is unclear which of the many documented or interpreted extensional episodes was the most significant for net widening and crustal thinning. To address this problem, we integrate geologic and geochronologic data that bear on the timing and magnitude of Cenozoic extension along an ???200km east-west transect south of Winnemucca, Battle Mountain, and Elko, Nevada. Pre-Cenozoic rocks in this region record east-west Palaeozoic and Mesozoic compression that continued into the Cretaceous. Little to no tectonism and no deposition followed until intense magmatism began in the Eocene. Eocene and Oligocene ash-flow tuffs flowed as much as 200km down palaeovalleys cut as deeply as 1.5km into underlying Palaeozoic and Mesozoic rocks in a low-relief landscape. Eocene sedimentation was otherwise limited to shallow lacustrine basins in the Elko area; extensive, thick clastic deposits are absent. Minor surface extension related to magmatism locally accompanied intense Eocene magmatism, but external drainage and little or no surface deformation apparently persisted regionally until about 16-17Ma. Major upper crustal extension began across the region ca. 16-17Ma, as determined by cross-cutting relationships, low-temperature thermochronology, and widespread deposition of clastic basin fill. Middle Miocene extension was partitioned into high-strain (50-100%) domains separated by largely unextended crustal blocks, and ended by 10-12Ma. Bimodal volcanic rocks that erupted during middle Miocene extension are present across most of the study area, but are volumetrically minor outside the northern Nevada rift. The modern

  10. Astrochronology and magnetostratigraphy of the Xujiahe Formation of South China and Newark Supergroup of North America: implications for the Late Triassic time scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Zhang, Y.; Huang, C.; Ogg, J. G.; Hinnov, L.; Wang, Y.; Zou, Z.; Li, L.; Grasby, S. E.; Zhong, Y.; Huang, K.

    2017-12-01

    The astrochronology derived from lacustrine clastic successions tied to the geomagnetic polarity time scale of the Newark Supergroup of eastern North America, known as the Newark APTS provides a basis for the Late Triassic time scale. However, the Newark APTS has been challenged regarding its age scale and completeness; therefore an independent astronomically tuned magnetic polarity zonation is required to verify the upper Newark APTS reference scale. We have compiled a 6.5 million year (myr) APTS with magnetic stratigraphy from four sections of the lacustrine-fluvial, dinosaur-track-bearing Xujiahe Formation in the Sichuan Basin of South China that has dating from detrital zircons and regional biostratigraphy. Variations in natural gamma-ray and magnetic susceptibility that reflect variable continental weathering in the source regions of the Xujiahe Formation are paced by Milankovitch cycles, especially the 100-kyr short eccentricity and 405-kyr long eccentricity. The cycle-tuned magnetostratigraphy of the Xujiahe Formation is compared directly via the magnetic-polarity zones to the depth ranks of the Newark Supergroup that are indicative of relative depositional depths of lacustrine facies. The Sichuan APTS indicates that there is no significant hiatus between the sedimentary succession and the basalt flows at the top of the Newark Supergroup. The Sichuan APTS is compatible with the magnetostratigraphy from the candidate Global Boundary Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP) for the Norian-Rhaetian boundary interval at the Pignola-Abriola section of South Italy, but does not extend downward to the proposed GSSP in Austria associated with the longer Rhaetian option. The earliest dinosaur tracks in China are from the middle of the Xujiahe Formation, therefore are implied to be middle Rhaetian in age. The Sichuan APTS helps to resolve the controversy about the completeness and reliability of the Newark APTS, and can be used in the future to verify if isotopic

  11. Brittle Deformation in the Ordos Basin in response to the Mesozoic destruction of the North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q.; Jiang, L.

    2012-12-01

    strata were developed in the beginning of Cretaceous. It seems that the western NCC experienced only uplift that recorded a weak N-S extension and E-W compression during the Early Cretaceous when the NCC experienced destruction. Conclusions: 1. The Cretaceous uplift ceased the "natural test of mechanical property" of the strata in the Ordos Basin. The difference in burying depth of the strata caused the vertical difference in joints development. 2. Joints in the interior of the Ordos Basin indicate a N-S extension and E-W compression with the sigma 1 vertical in the Early Cretaceous, as implying a regional uplift in the western NCC during its Mesozoic destruction.

  12. Regulation of body temperature by some Mesozoic marine reptiles.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Aurélien; Lécuyer, Christophe; Vincent, Peggy; Amiot, Romain; Bardet, Nathalie; Buffetaut, Eric; Cuny, Gilles; Fourel, François; Martineau, François; Mazin, Jean-Michel; Prieur, Abel

    2010-06-11

    What the body temperature and thermoregulation processes of extinct vertebrates were are central questions for understanding their ecology and evolution. The thermophysiologic status of the great marine reptiles is still unknown, even though some studies have suggested that thermoregulation may have contributed to their exceptional evolutionary success as apex predators of Mesozoic aquatic ecosystems. We tested the thermal status of ichthyosaurs, plesiosaurs, and mosasaurs by comparing the oxygen isotope compositions of their tooth phosphate to those of coexisting fish. Data distribution reveals that these large marine reptiles were able to maintain a constant and high body temperature in oceanic environments ranging from tropical to cold temperate. Their estimated body temperatures, in the range from 35 degrees +/- 2 degrees C to 39 degrees +/- 2 degrees C, suggest high metabolic rates required for predation and fast swimming over large distances offshore.

  13. Neoproterozoic, Paleozoic, and Mesozoic granitoid magmatism in the Qinling Orogen, China: Constraints on orogenic process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoxia; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Chengli

    2013-08-01

    The Qinling Orogen is one of the main orogenic belts in Asia and is characterized by multi-stage orogenic processes and the development of voluminous magmatic intrusions. The results of zircon U-Pb dating indicate that granitoid magmatism in the Qinling Orogen mainly occurred in four distinct periods: the Neoproterozoic (979-711 Ma), Paleozoic (507-400 Ma), and Early (252-185 Ma) and Late (158-100 Ma) Mesozoic. The Neoproterozoic granitic magmatism in the Qinling Orogen is represented by strongly deformed S-type granites emplaced at 979-911 Ma, weakly deformed I-type granites at 894-815 Ma, and A-type granites at 759-711 Ma. They can be interpreted as the products of respectively syn-collisional, post-collisional and extensional setting, in response to the assembly and breakup of the Rodinia supercontinent. The Paleozoic magmatism can be temporally classified into three stages of 507-470 Ma, 460-422 Ma and ˜415-400 Ma. They were genetically related to the subduction of the Shangdan Ocean and subsequent collision of the southern North China Block and the South Qinling Belt. The 507-470 Ma magmatism is spatially and temporally related to ultrahigh-pressure metamorphism in the studied area. The 460-422 Ma magmatism with an extensive development in the North Qinling Belt is characterized by I-type granitoids and originated from the lower crust with the involvement of mantle-derived magma in a collisional setting. The magmatism with the formation age of ˜415-400 Ma only occurred in the middle part of the North Qinling Belt and is dominated by I-type granitoid intrusions, and probably formed in the late-stage of a collisional setting. Early Mesozoic magmatism in the study area occurred between 252 and 185 Ma, with the cluster in 225-200 Ma. It took place predominantly in the western part of the South Qinling Belt. The 250-240 Ma I-type granitoids are of small volume and show high Sr/Y ratios, and may have been formed in a continental arc setting related to subduction

  14. Mesozoic and Cenozoic structural evolution of North Oman: New insights from high-quality 3D seismic from the Lekhwair area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazalgette, Loïc; Salem, Hisham

    2018-06-01

    This paper highlights the role of Triassic-Jurassic extension and late Cretaceous compression in the Mesozoic-Cenozoic (Alpine) structuring of North Oman. The syn/post-Mesozoic regional structural evolution is usually documented as a succession of two stages of deformation. The Alpine 1 phase, late Cretaceous in age, occurred in association with two ophiolite obduction stages (Semail and Masirah ophiolites). It was characterised by strike slip to extensional deformation in the North Oman foreland basin sub-surface. The Alpine 2 phase, Miocene in age, was related to the continental collision responsible for both the Zagros orogen and the uplift of the Oman Mountains. The Alpine 2 deformation was transpressional to compressional. Observation and interpretation of good quality 3D seismic in the Lekhwair High area enabled the distinction of two earlier phases. Early Mesozoic extension occurred concomitantly with the regional Triassic to Jurassic rifting, developing Jurassic-age normal faults. Late Cretaceous compression occurred prior to the main Alpine 1 phase and triggered the inversion of Jurassic-seated normal faults as well as the initiation of compressional folds in the Cretaceous overburden. These early phases have been ignored or overlooked as part of the North Oman history although they are at the origin of structures hosting major local and regional hydrocarbon accumulations.

  15. Microbial Stimulation and Succession following a Test Well Injection Simulating CO₂ Leakage into a Shallow Newark Basin Aquifer

    PubMed Central

    O’Mullan, Gregory; Dueker, M. Elias; Clauson, Kale; Yang, Qiang; Umemoto, Kelsey; Zakharova, Natalia; Matter, Juerg; Stute, Martin; Takahashi, Taro; Goldberg, David

    2015-01-01

    In addition to efforts aimed at reducing anthropogenic production of greenhouse gases, geological storage of CO2 is being explored as a strategy to reduce atmospheric greenhouse gas emission and mitigate climate change. Previous studies of the deep subsurface in North America have not fully considered the potential negative effects of CO2 leakage into shallow drinking water aquifers, especially from a microbiological perspective. A test well in the Newark Rift Basin was utilized in two field experiments to investigate patterns of microbial succession following injection of CO2-saturated water into an isolated aquifer interval, simulating a CO2 leakage scenario. A decrease in pH following injection of CO2 saturated aquifer water was accompanied by mobilization of trace elements (e.g. Fe and Mn), and increased bacterial cell concentrations in the recovered water. 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequence libraries from samples collected before and after the test well injection were compared to link variability in geochemistry to changes in aquifer microbiology. Significant changes in microbial composition, compared to background conditions, were found following the test well injections, including a decrease in Proteobacteria, and an increased presence of Firmicutes, Verrucomicrobia and microbial taxa often noted to be associated with iron and sulfate reduction. The concurrence of increased microbial cell concentrations and rapid microbial community succession indicate significant changes in aquifer microbial communities immediately following the experimental CO2 leakage event. Samples collected one year post-injection were similar in cell number to the original background condition and community composition, although not identical, began to revert toward the pre-injection condition, indicating microbial resilience following a leakage disturbance. This study provides a first glimpse into the in situ successional response of microbial communities to CO2 leakage after subsurface

  16. Strontium and oxygen isotopic variations in Mesozoic and Tertiary plutons of central Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleck, R.J.; Criss, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    Regional variations in initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (ri) of Mesozoic plutons in central Idaho locate the edge of Precambrian continental crust at the boundary between the late Paleozoic-Mesozoic accreted terranes and Precambrian sialic crust in western Idaho. The ri values increase abruptly but continuously from less than 0.704 in the accreted terranes to greater than 0.708 across a narrow, 5 to 15 km zone, characterized by elongate, lens-shaped, highly deformed plutons and schistose metasedimentary and metavolcanic units. The chemical and petrologic character of the plutons changes concomitantly from ocean-arc-type, diorite-tonalite-trondhjemite units to a weakly peraluminous, calcic to calcalkalic tonalite-granodiorite-granite suite (the Idaho batholith). Plutons in both suites yield Late Cretaceous ages, but Permian through Early Cretaceous bodies are confined to the accreted terranes and early Tertiary intrusions are restricted to areas underlain by Precambrian crust. The two major terranes were juxtaposed between 75 and 130 m.y. ago, probably between 80 and 95 m.y. Oxygen and strontium isotopic ratios and Rb and Sr concentrations of the plutonic rocks document a significant upper-crustal contribution to the magmas that intrude Precambrian crust. Magmas intruding the arc terranes were derived from the upper mantle/subducted oceanic lithosphere and may have been modified by anatexis of earlier island-arc volcanic and sedimentary units. Plutons near the edge of Precambrian sialic crust represent simple mixtures of the Precambrian wall-rocks with melts derived from the upper mantle or subducted oceanic lithosphere with ri of 0.7035. Rb/Sr varies linearly with ri, producing "pseudoisochrons" with apparent "ages" close to the age of the wall rocks. Measured ??18O values of the wall rocks are less than those required for the assimilated end-member by Sr-O covariation in the plutons, however, indicating that wall-rock ??18O was reduced significantly by exchange with

  17. Mesozoic to Cenozoic tectonic transition process in Zhanhua Sag, Bohai Bay Basin, East China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yanjun; Wu, Zhiping; Lu, Shunan; Li, Xu; Lin, Chengyan; Huang, Zheng; Su, Wen; Jiang, Chao; Wang, Shouye

    2018-04-01

    The Zhanhua sag is part of the Bohai Bay intracontinental basin system that has developed since the Mesozoic in East China. The timing of this basin system coincides with the final assembly of East Asia and the development of Western Pacific-type plate margin. Here we use 3-D seismic and core log data to investigate the evolution of this basin and discuss its broad tectonic settings. Our new structural study of Zhanhua sag suggests that there are four major tectonic transitions occurred in the Bohai Bay Basin during Mesozoic and Cenozoic: (1) The first tectonic transition was from stable Craton to thrusting during the Triassic, mainly caused by the South China Block's subduction northward beneath the North China Block, which induced the formation of the NW-striking thrust faults. (2) The second tectonic transition was mainly characterized by a change from compression to extension, which can be further divided into two-stages. At the first stage, two episodes of NW-SE shortening occurred in East Asia during Early-Middle Jurassic and Late Jurassic-earliest Cretaceous, respectively. At the second stage, the extension and left-lateral shearing took place during Early Cretaceous while compression occurred during Late Cretaceous. The NW-striking thrust faults changed to normal faults and the NNE-striking left-lateral strike-slip faults started to influence the eastern part of the basin. (3) The third transition occurred when the NW-SE extension and NNE-striking right-lateral shearing started to form during Paleogene, and the peak deformation happen around 40 Ma due to the change of the subduction direction of Pacific Plate relative to Eurasia Plate. The NE-striking normal faults are the main structure, and the pre-existing NNE-striking strike-slip faults changed from left-lateral to right-lateral. (4) The fourth transition saw the regional subsidence during Neogene, which was probably caused by the India-Asia "Hard collision" between 25 and 20 Ma.

  18. Revisiting Mesozoic felsic intrusions in eastern South China: spatial and temporal variations and tectonic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Kong-Yang; Li, Zheng-Xiang; Xia, Qun-Ke; Xu, Xi-Sheng; Wilde, Simon A.; Chen, Han-Lin

    2017-12-01

    Whole-rock and mineral geochemical data are used to place new constraints on the petrogenesis and tectonic setting of Mesozoic granitoids (including syenites) in eastern South China. In the Early Mesozoic, granitoids of variable compositions were intruded in the Cathaysia Block which by this time had developed a thickened and highly differentiated Paleoproterozoic crust through the influence of subduction. Late Triassic ( 225 Ma) syenites are significantly different from Jurassic-Cretaceous syenites in South China and from most trachytes (GEOROC database) in terms of their high Th/U, La/Nb and Gd/Yb ratios. Their low Rb contents, coupled with their high K/Rb and Nb/Ta, and low 87Sr/86Sr and 206Pb/204Pb ratios suggest a source that had undergone granulite-facies metamorphism at the base of thickened (> 45 km thick) continental crust where garnet and rutile are stable. The Late Triassic alkaline intrusions thus appear not to be related to continental rifting. Compared with the Late Triassic syenites, contemporaneous syenogranites have higher Ga/Al and Rb/K ratios and ISr values. Their Ga/Al ratios are positively correlated with ISr values, and their higher Ga/Al ratios likewise do not appear to be related to a rift setting but reflect the composition of the source. New Pb isotopic data from Cretaceous magmatic rocks reveal that 120-100 Ma I-type granitoids in Zhejiang Province were likely derived from mixing of three components: contemporaneous basaltic magma, an enriched crustal component and a depleted crustal component. Pb isotopes of both the I-type granitoids and the basalts become more radiogenic towards the coast, where the ca. 100 Ma intrusions dominate. Furthermore, zircon-melt partition of Ce and hornblende oxygen barometries indicate that the Early Cretaceous intrusions also became more oxidized towards the coast. In addition, the ca. 100 Ma granitoids have higher Gd/Yb and lower Fe/Mg ratios than those of the 120-110 Ma suite, implying crustal thickening

  19. Astronomical tuning and magnetostratigraphy of the Upper Triassic Xujiahe Formation of South China and Newark Supergroup of North America: Implications for the Late Triassic time scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingsong; Zhang, Yang; Huang, Chunju; Ogg, James; Hinnov, Linda; Wang, Yongdong; Zou, Zhuoyan; Li, Liqin

    2017-10-01

    The time scale of the Late Triassic Epoch has a divergence of age models, especially for the durations of competing definitions for its Rhaetian Stage (uppermost Triassic). The astrochronology derived from relative depth of lacustrine-bearing clastic successions and astronomically tuned geomagnetic polarity time scale (APTS) of the Newark Supergroup of eastern North America provides a basis for the Late Triassic time scale. However, the Newark APTS has been challenged regarding its age scale and completeness; therefore an independent astronomical-tuned magnetic polarity zonation is required to verify the upper Newark APTS reference scale. We compiled a 6.5 million year (myr) APTS with magnetic stratigraphy from four sections of the lacustrine-fluvial, dinosaur-track-bearing Xujiahe Formation in the Sichuan Basin of South China that also has dating from detrital zircons and regional biostratigraphy. Variations in natural gamma-ray and magnetic susceptibility that reflect variable continental weathering in the source regions of the Xujiahe Formation are paced by Milankovitch cycles, especially the 100-kyr short eccentricity and 405-kyr long eccentricity. The cycle-tuned magnetostratigraphy of the Xujiahe Formation is compared directly via the magnetic-polarity zones to the depth ranks of the Newark Supergroup that are indicative of relative depths of lacustrine facies. The Sichuan APTS indicates that there is no significant hiatus between the sedimentary succession and the basalt flows at the top of the Newark Supergroup. The Sichuan APTS is compatible with the magnetostratigraphy from the candidate Global Boundary Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP) for the Norian-Rhaetian boundary interval at the Pignola-Abriola of South Italy, but does not extend downward to the proposed GSSP in Austria associated with the longer Rhaetian option. The earliest dinosaur tracks in China are from the middle of this Xujiahe Formation, therefore are implied to be middle Rhaetian in age

  20. Paleozoic subduction complex and Paleozoic-Mesozoic island-arc volcano-plutonic assemblages in the northern Sierra terrane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, Richard E.; Girty, Gary H.; Harwood, David S.; Schweickert, Richard A.

    2000-01-01

    This field trip provides an overview of the stratigraphic and structural evolution of the northern Sierra terrane, which forms a significant part of the wall rocks on the western side of the later Mesozoic Sierra Nevada batholith in California. The terrane consists of a pre-Late Devonian subduction complex (Shoo Fly Complex) overlain by submarine arc-related deposits that record the evolution of three separate island-arc systems in the Late Sevonian-Early Mississippian, Permian, and Late Triassic-Jurassic. The two Paleozoic are packages and the underlying Shoo Fly Complex have an important bearing on plate-tectonic processes affecting the convergent margin outboard of the Paleozoic Cordilleran miogeocline, although their original paleogeographic relations to North America are controversial. The third arc package represents an overlap assemblage that ties the terrane to North America by the Late Triassic and helps constrain the nature and timing of Mesozoic orogenesis. Several of the field-trip stops examine the record of pre-Late Devonian subduction contained in the Shoo Fly Complex, as well as the paleovolcanology of the overlying Devonian to Jurassic arc rocks. Excellent glaciated exposures provide the opportunity to study a cross section through a tilted Devonian volcano-plutonic association. Additional stops focus on plutonic rocks emplaced during the Middle Jurassic arc magmatism in the terrane, and during the main pulse of Cretaceous magmatism in the Sierra Nevada batholith to the east.

  1. Evidence for rapid climate change in the Mesozoic-Palaeogene greenhouse world.

    PubMed

    Jenkyns, Hugh C

    2003-09-15

    The best-documented example of rapid climate change that characterized the so-called 'greenhouse world' took place at the time of the Palaeocene-Eocene boundary: introduction of isotopically light carbon into the ocean-atmosphere system, accompanied by global warming of 5-8 degrees C across a range of latitudes, took place over a few thousand years. Dissociation, release and oxidation of gas hydrates from continental-margin sites and the consequent rapid global warming from the input of greenhouses gases are generally credited with causing the abrupt negative excursions in carbon- and oxygen-isotope ratios. The isotopic anomalies, as recorded in foraminifera, propagated downwards from the shallowest levels of the ocean, implying that considerable quantities of methane survived upward transit through the water column to oxidize in the atmosphere. In the Mesozoic Era, a number of similar events have been recognized, of which those at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary, in the early Toarcian (Jurassic) and in the early Aptian (Cretaceous) currently carry the best documentation for dramatic rises in temperature. In these three examples, and in other less well-documented cases, the lack of a definitive time-scale for the intervals in question hinders calculation of the rate of environmental change. However, comparison with the Palaeocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) suggests that these older examples could have been similarly rapid. In both the early Toarcian and early Aptian cases, the negative carbon-isotope excursion precedes global excess carbon burial across a range of marine environments, a phenomenon that defines these intervals as oceanic anoxic events (OAEs). Osmium-isotope ratios ((187)Os/(188)Os) for both the early Toarcian OAE and the PETM show an excursion to more radiogenic values, demonstrating an increase in weathering and erosion of continental crust consonant with elevated temperatures. The more highly buffered strontium-isotope system ((87)Sr/(86)Sr

  2. Meteoritic trace element toxification and the terminal Mesozoic mass extinction

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, S.M.; Erickson, D.J. III

    1985-01-01

    Calculations of trace element fluxes to the earth associated with 5 and 10 kilometer diameter Cl chondrites and iron meteorites are presented. The data indicate that the masses of certain trace elements contained in the bolide, such as Fe, Co, Ni, Cr, Pb, and Cu, are as large as or larger than the world ocean burden. The authors believe that this pulse of trace elements was of sufficient magnitude to perturb the biogeochemical cycles operative 65 million years ago, a probably time of meteorite impact. Geochemical anomalies in Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary sediments suggest that elevated concentrations of trace elements may havemore » persisted for thousands of years in the ocean. Through direct exposure and bioaccumulation, many trophic levels of the global food chain, including that of the dinosaurs, would have been adversely affected by these meteoritic trace elements. The trace element toxification hypothesis may account for the selective extinction of both marine and terrestrial species in the enigmatic terminal Mesozoic event.« less

  3. Latitudinal diversity gradients in Mesozoic non-marine turtles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, David B.; Holroyd, Patricia A.; Valdes, Paul; Barrett, Paul M.

    2016-11-01

    The latitudinal biodiversity gradient (LBG)-the pattern of increasing taxonomic richness with decreasing latitude-is prevalent in the structure of the modern biota. However, some freshwater taxa show peak richness at mid-latitudes; for example, extant Testudines (turtles, terrapins and tortoises) exhibit their greatest diversity at 25° N, a pattern sometimes attributed to recent bursts of climatically mediated species diversification. Here, we test whether this pattern also characterizes the Mesozoic distribution of turtles, to determine whether it was established during either their initial diversification or as a more modern phenomenon. Using global occurrence data for non-marine testudinate genera, we find that subsampled richness peaks at palaeolatitudes of 15-30° N in the Jurassic, 30-45° N through the Cretaceous to the Campanian, and from 30° to 60° N in the Maastrichtian. The absence of a significant diversity peak in southern latitudes is consistent with results from climatic models and turtle niche modelling that demonstrate a dearth of suitable turtle habitat in Gondwana during the Jurassic and Late Cretaceous. Our analyses confirm that the modern testudinate LBG has a deep-time origin and further demonstrate that LBGs are not always expressed as a smooth, equator-to-pole distribution.

  4. The newfoundland basin - Ocean-continent boundary and Mesozoic seafloor spreading history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, K. D.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that over the past 15 years there has been considerable progress in the refinement of predrift fits and seafloor spreading models of the North Atlantic. With the widespread acceptance of these basic models has come increasing interest in resolution of specific paleogeographic and kinematic problems. Two such problems are the initial position of Iberia with respect to North America and the geometry and chronology of early (pre-80 m.y.) relative motions between these two plates. The present investigation is concerned with geophysical data from numerous Bedford Institute/Dalhousie University cruises to the Newfoundland Basin which were undrtaken to determine the location of the ocean-continent boundary (OCB) and the Mesozoic spreading history on the western side. From the examination of magnetic data in the Newfoundland Basin, the OCB east of the Grand Banks is defined as the seaward limit of the 'smooth' magnetic domain which characterizes the surrounding continental shelves. A substantial improvement in Iberia-North America paleographic reconstructions is achieved.

  5. Orbital pacing of carbon fluxes by a ∼9-My eccentricity cycle during the Mesozoic.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Mathieu; Dera, Guillaume

    2015-10-13

    Eccentricity, obliquity, and precession are cyclic parameters of the Earth's orbit whose climatic implications have been widely demonstrated on recent and short time intervals. Amplitude modulations of these parameters on million-year time scales induce "grand orbital cycles," but the behavior and the paleoenvironmental consequences of these cycles remain debated for the Mesozoic owing to the chaotic diffusion of the solar system in the past. Here, we test for these cycles from the Jurassic to the Early Cretaceous by analyzing new stable isotope datasets reflecting fluctuations in the carbon cycle and seawater temperatures. Our results document a prominent cyclicity of ∼9 My in the carbon cycle paced by changes in the seasonal dynamics of hydrological processes and long-term sea level fluctuations. These paleoenvironmental changes are linked to a great eccentricity cycle consistent with astronomical solutions. The orbital forcing signal was mainly amplified by cumulative sequestration of organic matter in the boreal wetlands under greenhouse conditions. Finally, we show that the ∼9-My cycle faded during the Pliensbachian, which could either reflect major paleoenvironmental disturbances or a chaotic transition affecting this cycle.

  6. Orbital pacing of carbon fluxes by a ∼9-My eccentricity cycle during the Mesozoic

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Mathieu; Dera, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    Eccentricity, obliquity, and precession are cyclic parameters of the Earth’s orbit whose climatic implications have been widely demonstrated on recent and short time intervals. Amplitude modulations of these parameters on million-year time scales induce ‟grand orbital cycles,” but the behavior and the paleoenvironmental consequences of these cycles remain debated for the Mesozoic owing to the chaotic diffusion of the solar system in the past. Here, we test for these cycles from the Jurassic to the Early Cretaceous by analyzing new stable isotope datasets reflecting fluctuations in the carbon cycle and seawater temperatures. Our results document a prominent cyclicity of ∼9 My in the carbon cycle paced by changes in the seasonal dynamics of hydrological processes and long-term sea level fluctuations. These paleoenvironmental changes are linked to a great eccentricity cycle consistent with astronomical solutions. The orbital forcing signal was mainly amplified by cumulative sequestration of organic matter in the boreal wetlands under greenhouse conditions. Finally, we show that the ∼9-My cycle faded during the Pliensbachian, which could either reflect major paleoenvironmental disturbances or a chaotic transition affecting this cycle. PMID:26417080

  7. Distribution and character of upper mesozoic subduction complexes along the west coast of North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, D.L.; Blake, M.C.; Bailey, E.H.; McLaughlin, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    Structurally complex sequences of sedimentary, volcanic, and intrusive igneous rocks characterize a nearly continuous narrow band along the Pacific coast of North America from Baja California, Mexico to southern Alaska. They occur in two modes: (1) as complexly folded but coherent sequences of graywacke and argillite that locally exhibit blueschist-grade metamorphism, and (2) as melanges containing large blocks of graywacke, chert, volcanic and plutonic rocks, high-grade schist, and limestone in a highly sheared pelitic, cherty, or sandstone matrix. Fossils from the coherent graywacke sequences range in age from late Jurassic to Eocene; fossils from limestone blocks in the melanges range in age from mid-Paleozoic to middle Cretaceous. Fossils from the matrix surrounding the blocks, however, are of Jurassic, Cretaceous, and rarely, Tertiary age, indicating that fossils from the blocks cannot be used to date the time of formation of the melanges. Both the deformation of the graywacke, with accompanying blueschist metamorphism, as well as the formation of the melanges, are believed to be the result of late Mesozoic and early Tertiary subduction. The origin of the melanges, particularly the emplacement of exotic tectonic blocks, is not understood. ?? 1978.

  8. Indo-Burma Range: a belt of accreted microcontinents, ophiolites and Mesozoic-Paleogene flyschoid sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharyya, S. K.

    2015-07-01

    This study provides an insight into the lithotectonic evolution of the N-S trending Indo-Burma Range (IBR), constituting the southern flank of the Himalayan syntaxis. Paleogene flyschoid sediments (Disang-Barail) that represent a shallow marine to deltaic environment mainly comprise the west-central sector of IBR, possibly resting upon a continental base. On the east, these sequences are tectonically flanked by the Eocene olistostromal facies of the Disang, which developed through accretion of trench sediments during the subduction. The shelf and trench facies sequences of the Disang underwent overthrusting from the east, giving rise to two ophiolite suites ( Naga Hills Lower Ophiolite ( NHLO) and Victoria Hills Upper Ophiolite ( VHUO), but with different accretion history. The ophiolite and ophiolite cover rock package were subsequently overthrusted by the Proterozoic metamorphic sequence, originated from the Burmese continent. The NHLO suite of Late Jurassic to Early Eocene age is unconformably overlain by mid-Eocene shallow marine ophiolite-derived clastics. On the south, the VHUO of Mesozoic age is structurally underlain by continental metamorphic rocks. The entire package in Victoria Hills is unconformably overlain by shallow marine Late Albian sediments. Both the ophiolite suites and the sandwiched continental metamorphic rocks are thrust westward over the Paleogene shelf sediments. These dismembered ophiolites and continental metamorphic rocks suggest thin-skinned tectonic detachment processes in IBR, as reflected from the presence of klippe of continental metamorphic rocks over the NHLO and the flyschoid Disang floor sediments and half windows exposing the Disang beneath the NHLO.

  9. The geology and Mesozoic collisional history of the Cordillera Real, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspden, John A.; Litherland, Martin

    1992-04-01

    The geology of the metamorphic rocks of the Cordillera Real of Ecuador is described in terms of five informal lithotectonic divisions. We deduce that during the Mesozoic repeated accretionary events occurred and that dextral transpression has been of fundamental importance in determining the tectonic evolution of this part of the Northern Andes. The oldest event recognised, of probable Late Triassic age, may be related to the break-up of western Gondwana and generated a regional belt of 'S-type' plutons. During the Jurassic, major calc-alkaline batholiths were intruded. Following this, in latest Jurassic to Early Cretaceous time, a volcano-sedimentary terrane, of possible oceanic or marginal basin origin (the Alao division), and the most westerly, gneissic Chaucha-Arenillas terrane, were accreted to continental South America. The accretion of the oceanic Western Cordillera took place in latest Cretaceous to earliest Tertiary time. This latter event coincided with widespread thermal disturbance, as evidenced by the large number of young K-Ar mineral ages recorded from the Cordillera Real.

  10. Hydrocarbons in New Guinea, controlled by basement fabric, Mesozoic extension and Tertiary convergent margin tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K.C.; Kendrick, R.D.; Crowhurst, P.V.

    1996-01-01

    Most models for the tectonic evolution of New Guinea involve Early and Late Miocene arc-continent collisions, creating an orogenic belt. Structural trends and prospectivity are then analyzed in terms of belts across the country; the Fold Belt (with the discovered oil and gas fields), the Mobile Belt and the accreted arcs. This model inhibits realistic assessment of prospectivity. It now appears the Mobile Belt formed by Oligocene compression then by Early Miocene extension, related to slab-rollback, that unroofed metamorphic core complexes adjacent to starved half-grabens. The grabens filled in the Middle Miocene and were largely transported intact during the Pliocenemore » arc-collision. Early Miocene reefs and hypothesized starved basin source rocks create a viable play throughout northern New Guinea as in the Salawati Basin. The Pliocene clastic section is locally prospective due to overthrusting and deep burial. Within the Fold Belt, the site and types of oil and gas fields are largely controlled by the basement architecture. This controlled the transfer zones and depocentres during Mesozoic extension and the location of major basement uplifts during compression. In PNG, the Bosavi lineament separates an oil province from a gas province. In Irian Jaya the transition from a relatively competent sequence to a rifted sequence west of [approx]139[degrees]E may also be a gas-oil province boundary. Understanding, in detail, the compartmentalization of inverted blocks and areas of thin-skinned thrusting, controlled by the basement architecture, will help constrain hydrocarbon prospectivity.« less

  11. Hydrocarbons in New Guinea, controlled by basement fabric, Mesozoic extension and Tertiary convergent margin tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K.C.; Kendrick, R.D.; Crowhurst, P.V.

    1996-12-31

    Most models for the tectonic evolution of New Guinea involve Early and Late Miocene arc-continent collisions, creating an orogenic belt. Structural trends and prospectivity are then analyzed in terms of belts across the country; the Fold Belt (with the discovered oil and gas fields), the Mobile Belt and the accreted arcs. This model inhibits realistic assessment of prospectivity. It now appears the Mobile Belt formed by Oligocene compression then by Early Miocene extension, related to slab-rollback, that unroofed metamorphic core complexes adjacent to starved half-grabens. The grabens filled in the Middle Miocene and were largely transported intact during the Pliocenemore » arc-collision. Early Miocene reefs and hypothesized starved basin source rocks create a viable play throughout northern New Guinea as in the Salawati Basin. The Pliocene clastic section is locally prospective due to overthrusting and deep burial. Within the Fold Belt, the site and types of oil and gas fields are largely controlled by the basement architecture. This controlled the transfer zones and depocentres during Mesozoic extension and the location of major basement uplifts during compression. In PNG, the Bosavi lineament separates an oil province from a gas province. In Irian Jaya the transition from a relatively competent sequence to a rifted sequence west of {approx}139{degrees}E may also be a gas-oil province boundary. Understanding, in detail, the compartmentalization of inverted blocks and areas of thin-skinned thrusting, controlled by the basement architecture, will help constrain hydrocarbon prospectivity.« less

  12. Constraints from Mesozoic siliciclastic cover rocks and satellite image analysis on the slip history of regional E-W faults in the southeast Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tewksbury, Barbara J.; Mehrtens, Charlotte J.; Gohlke, Steven A.; Tarabees, Elhamy A.; Hogan, John P.

    2017-12-01

    In the southeast Western Desert of Egypt, a prominent set of E-W faults and co-located domes and basins involve sedimentary cover rock as young as the early Eocene. Although earlier Mesozoic slip on faults in southern Egypt has been widely mentioned in the literature and attributed to repeated reactivation of basement faults, evidence is indirect and based on the idea that regional stresses associated with tectonic events in the Syrian Arc would likely have reactivated basement faults in south Egypt in dextral strike slip during the Mesozoic as well as the Cenozoic. Here, we present direct evidence from the rock record for the sequence of development of features along these faults. Southwest of Aswan, a small structural dome in Mesozoic Nubia facies rocks occurs where the Seiyal Fault bends northward from west to east. The dome is cut by strands of the Seiyal Fault and a related set of cataclastic deformation bands showing dominantly right lateral strike slip, as well as by younger calcite veins with related patchy poikilotopic cement. High resolution satellite image analysis of the remote southwest Kharga Valley shows a similar sequence of events: older structural domes and basins located where E-W faults bend northward from west to east, right lateral offset of domes and basins along the E-W faults, and two sets of deformation band faults that lack co-located domes and basins. We suggest that field data, image analysis, and burial depth estimates are best explained by diachronous development of features along the E-W fault system. We propose that Late Mesozoic right lateral strike slip produced domes and basins in Nubia facies rocks in stepover regions above reactivated basement faults. We further suggest that the extensively linked segments of the E-W fault system in Nubia facies rocks, plus the deformation band systems, formed during the late Eocene when basement faults were again reactivated in dominantly right lateral strike slip.

  13. Late Mesozoic deformations of the Verkhoyansk-Kolyma orogenic belt, Northeast Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridovsky, Valery

    2016-04-01

    The Verkhoyansk-Kolyma orogenic belt marks the boundary between the Kolyma-Omolon superterrane (microcontinent) and the submerged eastern margin of the North Asian craton. The orogenic system is remark able for its large number of economically viable gold deposits (Natalka, Pavlik, Rodionovskoe, Drazhnoe, Bazovskoe, Badran, Malo-Tarynskoe, etc.). The Verkhoyansk - Kolyma orogenic belt is subdivided into Kular-Nera and the Polousny-Debin terranes. The Kular-Nera terrane is mainly composed of the Upper Permian, Triassic, and Lower Jurassic black shales that are metamorphosed at lower greenschist facies conditions. The Charky-Indigirka and the Chai-Yureya faults separate the Kular-Nera from the Polousny-Debin terrane that is predominantly composed of the Jurassic flyschoi dturbidites. The deformation structure of the region evolved in association with several late Mesozoic tectonic events that took place in the north-eastern part ofthe Paleo-Pacific. In Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous several generations of fold and thrust systems were formed due to frontal accretion of the Kolyma-Omolon superterrane to the eastern margin of the North Asian craton.Thrusting and folding was accompanied by granitic magmatism, metamorphic reworking of the Late Paleozoic and the Early Mesozoic sedimentary rocks, and formation of Au-Sn-W mineralization. Three stages of deformation related to frontal accretion can be distinguished. First stage D1 has developed in the north-eastern part of the Verkhoyansk - Kolyma orogenic belt. Early tight and isoclinal folds F1 and assosiated thrusts are characteristic of D1. Major thrusts, linear concentric folds F2 and cleavage were formed during D2. The main ore-controlling structures are thrust faults forming imbricate fan systems. Frontal and oblique ramps and systems of bedding and cross thrusts forming duplexes are common. It is notable that mineralized tectonized zones commonly develop along thrusts at the contacts of rocks of contrasting competence

  14. Palaeointensity determinations and rock magnetic properties on basalts from Shatsky Rise: new evidence for a Mesozoic dipole low

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvallo, C.; Camps, P.; Ooga, M.; Fanjat, G.; Sager, W. W.

    2013-03-01

    IODP Expedition 324 cored igneous rocks from Shatsky Rise, an oceanic plateau in the northwest Pacific Ocean that formed mainly during late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous times. We selected 60 samples from 3 different holes for Thellier-Thellier palaeointensity determinations. Induced and remanent magnetization curves measured at low- and high-temperature suggest a diverse and complex magnetic mineralogy, with large variations in Ti content and oxidation state. Hysteresis and FORC measurements show that most samples contain single-domain magnetic grains. After carrying out the palaeointensity determinations, only 9 samples satisfied all reliability criteria. These gave palaeointensity values between 16.5 and 21.5 μT, which correspond to average VDM values of (4.9 ± 0.2) × 1022 Am2 for an estimated age of 140-142 Ma. This value is lower than that for the recent field, which agrees with the hypothesis of a Mesozoic Dipole Low.

  15. High-pressure amphibolite facies dynamic metamorphism and the Mesozoic tectonic evolution of an ancient continental margin, east- central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dusel-Bacon, C.; Hansen, V.L.; Scala, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    Ductilely deformed amphibolite facies tectonites comprise two adjacent terranes in east-central Alaska: the northern, structurally higher Taylor Mountain terrane and the southern, structurally lower Lake George subterrane of the Yukon-Tanana terrane. The pressure, temperature, kinematic and age data are interpreted to indicate that the metamorphism of the Taylor Mountain terrane and Lake George subterrane took place during different phases of a latest Palaeozoic through early Mesozoic shortening episode resulting from closure of an ocean basin now represented by klippen of the Seventymile-Slide Mountain terrane. High- to intermediate-pressure metamorphism of the Taylor Mountain terrane took place within a SW-dipping (present-day coordinates) subduction system. High- to intermediate-pressure metamorphism of the Lake George subterrane and the structural contact zone occurred during NW-directed overthrusting of the Taylor Mountain, Seventymile-Slide Mountain and Nisutlin terranes, and imbrication of the continental margin in Jurassic time. -from Authors

  16. Isotopic and paleomagnetic constraints on the Mesozoic tectonic evolution of south China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilder, Stuart A.; Gill, James; Coe, Robert S.; Zhao, Xixi; Liu, Zhongwei; Wang, Genxian; Yuan, Kuirong; Liu, Wenlong; Kuang, Guodun; Wu, Haoruo

    1996-07-01

    In order to better constrain the paleogeographic evolution of south China we measured Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isotopic compositions for 23 Mesozoic granites that crop out throughout the area. Tightly grouped neodymium depleted mantle model ages (1.4 ± 0.3 Ga) suggest the region is underlain by relatively homogeneous Proterozoic crust and fail to define crustal provinces. Neither the isotopic nor geologic data suggest that a Mesozoic suture exists. However, granites possessing anomalously high Sm (>8 ppm) and Nd (>45 ppm) concentrations, relatively high initial epsilon neodymium (-4 to -8), and high but variable initial 87Sr/86Sr (0.759 to 0.713) form a northeast trending zone that coincides with two prominent Mesozoic basins. Southeast of the zone lie the majority of Mesozoic intrusives and Upper Triassic to Lower Cretaceous extensional basins found in south China. Mesozoic paleomagnetic poles are well clustered northwest of the zone. Pre-Cretaceous poles southeast of it are discordant with respect to those from the northwest. The only recognized tectonostratigraphic terrane in south China lies southeast of the zone. The terrane is bordered by a northeast trending sinistral fault that was active in the Mesozoic. Other faults in south China have similar attitudes, ages, and sense of shear. Together, the observations suggest that the Mesozoic tectonic regime in south China consisted of strike-slip activity plus concomitant rifting as terranes or fragments of similar crust were transported north along sinistral faults. The zone, defined by the granites enriched in Nd and Sm, demarcates displaced terranes to the southeast from relatively stable land to the northwest.

  17. Long lasting paleolandscapes stability of the French Massif Central during the Mesozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricordel-Prognon, C.; Thiry, M.; Theveniaut, H.; Lagroix, F.

    2009-04-01

    Cretaceous) in the northern parts of the massif (Ricordel et al., 2005; Ricordel, 2007;). These new ages, fairly older than the expected ones, bring considerable changes in the palaeogeographic evolution of the Massif Central during Mesozoic and Cenozoic. Basement rocks (granites, gneiss, rhyolites and even Permo-Carboniferous sediments) show often pinkish facies throughout the Massif Central. It has been shown that these pink facies are albitised (mainly pseudomorphic replacement of the primary plagioclases into albite and alteration of the biotite into chlorite) (Schmitt, 1992; Parcerisa et al., 2009). These albitised facies are arranged in a clear succession against (?) the Triassic unconformity that gives significant constraints about their development in relation with the Triassic palaeosurface. Secondary albite and chlorite contain minute hematite inclusions, which have been dated, using paleomagnetism, to be Triassic in age (245 Ma) (Ricordel et al., 2007). Given that the alterations are of the same age as the unconformity, it then follows that the albitised facies be related to the Triassic palaeosurface and be used to track back the Triassic palaeosurface through wide crystalline areas, even far away from the Mesozoic cover. Palaeomagnetic analyses allowed dating a large range of paleoweathering features for which no objective datings were previously available. Spatial and temporal distributions of the paleoweathering features and related unconformities provide key arguments to unravel the geodynamic evolution of the Massif Central. Triassic, Late Jurassic and Tertiary unconformities are superimposed on large areas of the Massif Centrall. This implies very little erosion of the crystalline basement since Triassic time, as shown by the widespread preservation of the Triassic albitized facies. Since the red kaolinitic paleosols of Late Jurassic/Early Cretaceous age rest directly on the basement rocks, large areas of the Massif Central were uncovered at this period

  18. Characterization of the Triassic Newark Basin of New York and New Jersey for geologic storage of carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Daniel J.

    The Newark Basin is a Triassic-aged rift basin underlying densely populated, industrialized sections of New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. The Basin is an elongate half-graben encompassing an area of more than 7,510 square-kilometers (2,900 square-miles), and could represent a key storage component for commercial scale management of carbon dioxide emissions via geologic sequestration. The project team first acquired published reports, surface and subsurface maps, and seismic data, which formed the basis for a three-dimensional model framework for the northern end of the Basin incorporating stratigraphic, hydrologic, and water quality data. Field investigations included drilling, coring, and logging of two stratigraphic test borings in Clarkstown, NY (Exit 14 Tandem Lot Well No. 1), drilled to a depth of 2,099 meters (6,885 feet); and Palisades, NY (Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory Test Well No. 4) drilled to a depth of 549 meters (1,802 feet). Two two-dimensional seismic reflection data lines arrayed perpendicularly were acquired by Schlumberger/WesternGeco to help characterize the structure and stratigraphy and as part of pre-drilling field screening activities for the deep stratigraphic borehole. A total of 47 meters (155 feet) of continuous whole core was recovered from the Tandem Lot boring from depths of 1,393 meters (4,570 feet) to 1,486 meters (4,877 feet). Twenty-five horizontal rotary cores were collected in mudstones and sandstones in the surface casing hole and fifty-two cores were taken in various lithologies in the deep borehole. Rotary core plugs were analyzed by Weatherford Laboratories for routine and advanced testing. Rotary core plug trim end thin sections were evaluated by the New York State Museum for mineralogical analysis and porosity estimation. Using core samples, Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory designed and completed laboratory experiments and numerical modeling analyses to characterize the dissolution and reaction of carbon

  19. Integrating Space with Place in Health Research: A Multilevel Spatial Investigation Using Child Mortality in 1880 Newark, New Jersey

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hongwei; Logan, John R.; Short, Susan E.

    2014-01-01

    Research on neighborhoods and health increasingly acknowledges the need to conceptualize, measure, and model spatial features of social and physical environments. In ignoring underlying spatial dynamics, we run the risk of biased statistical inference and misleading results. In this paper, we propose an integrated multilevel-spatial approach for Poisson models of discrete responses. In an empirical example of child mortality in 1880 Newark, New Jersey, we compare this multilevel-spatial approach with the more typical aspatial multilevel approach. Results indicate that spatially-defined egocentric neighborhoods, or distance-based measures, outperform administrative areal units, such as census units. In addition, although results did not vary by specific definitions of egocentric neighborhoods, they were sensitive to geographic scale and modeling strategy. Overall, our findings confirm that adopting a spatial-multilevel approach enhances our ability to disentangle the effect of space from that of place, and point to the need for more careful spatial thinking in population research on neighborhoods and health. PMID:24763980

  20. Late Mesozoic-Cenozoic intraplate magmatism in Central Asia and its relation with mantle diapirism: Evidence from the South Khangai volcanic region, Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarmolyuk, Vladimir V.; Kudryashova, Ekaterina A.; Kozlovsky, Alexander M.; Lebedev, Vladimir A.; Savatenkov, Valery M.

    2015-11-01

    The South Khangai volcanic region (SKVR) comprises fields of Late Mesozoic-Cenozoic volcanic rocks scattered over southern and central Mongolia. Evolution of the region from the Late Jurassic to the Late Cenozoic includes 13 successive igneous episodes that are more or less evenly distributed in time. Major patterns in the distribution of different-aged volcanic complexes were controlled by a systematic temporal migration of volcanic centers over the region. The total length of their trajectory exceeds 1600 km. Principle characteristics of local magmatism are determined. The composition of igneous rocks varies from basanites to rhyolites (predominantly, high-K rocks), with geochemistry close to that of OIB. The rock composition, however, underwent transformations in the Mesozoic-Cenozoic. Rejuvenation of mafic rocks is accompanied by decrease in the contents of HREE and increase of Nb and Ta. According to isotope data, the SKVR magmatic melts were derived from three isotope sources that differed in the Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions and successively alternated in time. In the Early Cretaceous, the predominant source composition was controlled by interaction of the EMII- and PREMA-type mantle materials. The PREMA-type mantle material dominated quantitatively in the Late Cretaceous and initial Early Cenozoic. From the latest Early Cenozoic to Late Cenozoic, the magma source also contained the EMI-type material along with the PREMA-type. The structural fabric, rock composition, major evolutionary pattern, and inner structure of SKVR generally comply with the criteria used to distinguish the mantle plume-related regions. Analogous features can be seen in other regions of recent volcanism in Central Asia (South Baikal, Udokan, Vitim, and Tok Stanovik). The structural autonomy of these regions suggests that distribution of the Late Mesozoic-Cenozoic volcanism in Central Asia was controlled by a group of relatively small hot finger-type mantle plumes associated with

  1. Pollen and spores date origin of rift basins from Texas to nova scotia as early late triassic.

    PubMed

    Traverse, A

    1987-06-12

    Palynological studies of the nonmarine Newark Supergroup of eastern North America and of rift basins in the northern Gulf of Mexico facilitate correlation with well-dated marine sections of Europe. New information emphasizes the chronological link between the Newark basins and a Gulf of Mexico basin and their common history in the rifting of North America from Pangea. Shales from the subsurface South Georgia Basin are shown to be of late Karnian age (early Late Triassic). The known time of earliest sedimentation in the Culpeper Basin is extended from Norian (late Late Triassic) to mid-Karnian, and the date of earliest sedimentation in the Richmond and Deep River basins is moved to at least earliest Karnian, perhaps Ladinian. The subsurface Eagle Mills Formation in Texas and Arkansas has been dated palynologically as mid- to late Karnian. The oldest parts of the Newark Supergroup, and the Eagle Mills Formation, mostly began deposition in precursor rift basins that formed in Ladinian to early Karnian time. In the southern Newark basins, sedimentation apparently ceased in late Karnian but continued in the northern basins well into the Jurassic, until genesis of the Atlantic ended basin sedimentation.

  2. Testing the age calibration of the Newark-Hartford APTS by magnetostratigraphic correlation of U-Pb zircon-dated tuffaceous beds in the Late Traissic Chinle Formation in core PFNP-1A from the Petrified Forest National Park (Arizona, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, D. V.; Olsen, P. E.; Mundil, R.; Lepre, C. J.

    2017-12-01

    The Newark-Hartford APTS extends over 27 Myr according to cycle stratigraphy of the Norian and Rhaetian of the Late Triassic and Hettangian and Sinemurian of the Early Jurassic and an additional 6 Myr by extrapolation into the Carnian; the entire sequence is anchored by U-Pb zircon dating of CAMP activity that provides a calibration date of 201.6 Ma for Chron E23r just below the end-Triassic extinction and the earliest CAMP basalts in the Newark basin (Blackburn+2013 Science; Kent+2017 ESR). The developing APTS has been successfully used for global correlations in marine and non-marine facies but there have been ongoing suggestions that millions of years of Rhaetian time are missing in a cryptic unconformity that supposedly occurs just above E23r in the Newark Supergroup basins. Testing the continuity of the APTS by magnetostratigraphic correlation of U-Pb zircon-dated tuffaceous beds in the Chinle Formation was a prime scientific objective for core PFNP-1A. Paleomagnetic results were obtained using stepwise thermal demagnetization to 680°C from >150 samples of finer-grained red lithologies from the upper 250 m of the cored section of the Chinle (upper Sonsela, Petrified Forest including the Black Forest Bed, and lower Owl Rock Members). Characteristic directions isolated in 2/3 of the samples showed antipodal directions that were shallow with respect to reference directions (flattening factor 0.5), consistent with early acquisition of remanence. Seven polarity magnetozones produce a distinctive pattern correlated to Chrons E17r to E14r of the APTS. The Black Forest Bed at 209.93±0.26 Ma (Ramezani+2011 GSAB), confirmed by our new U-Pb dates from core PFNP-1A, occurs in a reverse polarity magnetozone correlated to E16r (209.95-210.25 Ma), which puts the U-Pb zircon date(s) in excellent agreement with the inferred APTS age. Rather than a 'missing Rhaetian', the apparent regional differences in appearances and disappearances of palynoflora, conchostracans, and other

  3. Paleozoic-Mesozoic boundary in the Berry Creek Quadrangle, northwestern Sierra Nevada, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hietanen, Anna Martta

    1977-01-01

    Structural and petrologic studies in the Berry Creek quadrangle at the north end of the western metamorphic belt of the Sierra Nevada have yielded new information that helps in distinguishing between the chemically similar Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks. The distinguishing features are structural and textural and result from different degrees of deformation. Most Paleozoic rocks are strongly deformed and thoroughly recrystallized. Phenocrysts in meta volcanic rocks are granulated and drawn out into lenses that have sutured outlines. In contrast, the phenocrysts in the Mesozoic metavolcanic rocks show well-preserved straight crystal faces, are only slightly or not at all granulated, and contain fewer mineral inclusions than do those in the Paleozoic rocks. The groundmass in the Paleozoic rocks is recrystallized to a fairly coarse grained albite-epidote-amphibole-chlorite rock, whereas in the Mesozoic rocks the groundmass is a very fine grained feltlike mesh with only spotty occurrence of well-recrystallized finegrained albite-epidote-chlorite-actinolite rock. Primary minerals, such as augite, are locally preserved in the Mesozoic rocks but are altered to a mixture of amphibole, chlorite, and epidote in the Paleozoic rocks. In the contact aureoles of the plutons, and within the Big Bend fault zone, which crosses the area parallel to the structural trends, all rocks are thoroughly recrystallized and strongly deformed. Identification of the Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks in these parts of the area was based on the continuity of the rock units in the field and on gradual changes in microscopic textures toward the plutons.

  4. Mesozoic tectonic history and geochronology of the Kular Dome, Russia and Bendeleben Mountains, Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Daniel B.

    sandstones and Jurassic greywackes near the Kular Dome and compared to results from previously studied surrounding regions in Russia and the Arctic Alaska-Chukotka microplate in order to better define the relationship between the Arctic Alaska-Chukotka microplate and northern Russia during the Mesozoic. Results suggest that though the Chukotkan portion of the Arctic Alaska-Chukotka microplate was separated from the Kular Dome area during the Triassic, by the Tithonian it shared similar source regions for detrital zircon populations. Based on detrital zircon data from Chukotka, the Kular Dome, and the In’Yali Debin area, a new tectonic model for the formation of the Amerasian Basin and structures within is proposed. In this new model, Chukotka separated from and moved independently of the North Slope of Alaska during the Late Triassic-Early Jurassic, experiencing strike-slip emplacement along the northern coast of paleo-Russia and closed the South Anyui Ocean via transpression to form the South Anyui suture. Geochronologic and geochemical results from the Bendeleben and Windy Creek plutons of the southeastern Seward Peninsula were also studied to better describe Arctic tectonic conditions during the Late Mesozoic. In this area, six samples were collected from the multiple lithologies seen within the Bendeleben and Windy Creek plutons and were also dated by zircon U-Pb geochronology and analyzed for their major and trace element geochemistry. Results suggest that the Bendeleben and Windy Creek plutons were emplaced during multiple extensionally driven pulses of magmatism above a southward-retreating, northward-subducting slab causing extension in the overlying crust from about 104 Ma to 83 Ma. The magma chamber at depth was experiencing continuous replenishment and liquid segregation causing stratification of the Bendeleben pluton. Magmas of the felsic cap, which now form the outer region of the Bendeleben pluton, were emplaced first, followed by subsequent intrusion of

  5. Testing the inhibitory cascade model in Mesozoic and Cenozoic mammaliaforms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Much of the current research in the growing field of evolutionary development concerns relating developmental pathways to large-scale patterns of morphological evolution, with developmental constraints on variation, and hence diversity, a field of particular interest. Tooth morphology offers an excellent model system for such ‘evo-devo’ studies, because teeth are well preserved in the fossil record, and are commonly used in phylogenetic analyses and as ecological proxies. Moreover, tooth development is relatively well studied, and has provided several testable hypotheses of developmental influences on macroevolutionary patterns. The recently-described Inhibitory Cascade (IC) Model provides just such a hypothesis for mammalian lower molar evolution. Derived from experimental data, the IC Model suggests that a balance between mesenchymal activators and molar-derived inhibitors determines the size of the immediately posterior molar, predicting firstly that molars either decrease in size along the tooth row, or increase in size, or are all of equal size, and secondly that the second lower molar should occupy one third of lower molar area. Here, we tested the IC Model in a large selection of taxa from diverse extant and fossil mammalian groups, ranging from the Middle Jurassic (~176 to 161 Ma) to the Recent. Results Results show that most taxa (~65%) fell within the predicted areas of the Inhibitory Cascade Model. However, members of several extinct groups fell into the regions where m2 was largest, or rarely, smallest, including the majority of the polyphyletic “condylarths”. Most Mesozoic mammals fell near the centre of the space with equality of size in all three molars. The distribution of taxa was significantly clustered by diet and by phylogenetic group. Conclusions Overall, the IC Model was supported as a plesiomorphic developmental system for Mammalia, suggesting that mammal tooth size has been subjected to this developmental constraint at

  6. Accretion of a Small Continental Fragment to a Larger Continental Plate: Mesozoic Ecuador as a Case-Study Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massonne, H.

    2013-05-01

    Only a few regions on Earth are appropriate to study processes that have happened in deeper crustal levels during the accretion of a microplate to a larger continental plate. Ecuador is one of these regions where in middle Mesozoic times a small continental fragment collided with the South-American plate. Along the suture between both plates, which occurs close to the present volcanic belt of Ecuador, high-pressure (HP) metamorphic rocks developed. These rocks, which are metapelites, metabasites, and metagranitoids, record processes during the microcontinent-continent collision (Massonne and Toulkeridis, 2012, Int. Geol. Rev. 54). The pressures, determined for the HP rocks, were as high as 14 kbar at temperatures somewhat above 500°C. The HP stage was followed by slight heating at the early exhumation. Peak temperatures up to 560°C were reached at pressures ≥10 kbar. This HP metamorphism was caused by the collision of the microplate with the South-American plate resulting in crustal thickening. The ascent of the HP rocks occurred in an exhumation channel. Before the collision, an oceanic basin existed between these plates. Probably, it was narrow as eclogite bodies are lacking in the N-S trending HP belt of Ecuador. Such bodies, especially if the eclogites had experienced pressures in excess of 20 kbar, are markers of a collision of major continental plates in Phanerozoic times with originally extended oceanic basins between these plates. In a more global context, the narrow ocean between the microplate and the South American continent is assumed to have been the westernmost portion of the Neo-Tethys which had extended to completely separate the two major fragments of former Pangaea before the opening of the southern Atlantic Ocean. This opening caused the closure of the narrow Neo-Tethys segment between the colliding microplate and the South American plate. This segment was bordered by E-W trending transform faults. A fault system (La Palma - El Guayabo fault

  7. An integrated geophysical study on the Mesozoic strata distribution and hydrocarbon potential in the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Weijian; Hao, Tianyao; Jiang, Weiwei; Xu, Ya; Zhao, Baimin; Jiang, Didi

    2015-11-01

    A series of drilling, dredge, and seismic investigations indicate that Mesozoic sediments exist in the South China Sea (SCS) which shows a bright prospect for oil and gas exploration. In order to study the distribution of Mesozoic strata and their residual thicknesses in the SCS, we carried out an integrated geophysical study based mainly on gravity data, gravity basement depth and distribution of residual Mesozoic thickness in the SCS were obtained using gravity inversion constrained with high-precision drilling and seismic data. In addition, the fine deep crustal structures and distribution characteristics of Mesozoic thicknesses of three typical profiles were obtained by gravity fitting inversion. Mesozoic strata in the SCS are mainly distributed in the south and north continental margins, and have been reformed by the later tectonic activities. They extend in NE-trending stripes are macro-controlled by the deep and large NE-trending faults, and cut by the NW-trending faults which were active in later times. The offset in NW direction of Mesozoic strata in Nansha area of the southern margin are more obvious as compared to the north margin. In the Pearl River Mouth Basin and Southwest Taiwan Basin of the north continental margin the Mesozoic sediments are continuously distributed with a relatively large thickness. In the Nansha area of the south margin the Mesozoic strata are discontinuous and their thicknesses vary considerably. According to the characteristics of Mesozoic thickness distribution and hydrocarbon potential analyses from drilling and other data, Dongsha Uplift-Chaoshan Depression, Southwest Taiwan Basin-Peikang Uplift and Liyue Bank have large thickness of the Mesozoic residual strata, have good hydrocarbon genesis capability and complete source-reservoir-cap combinations, show a bright prospect of Mesozoic oil/gas resources.

  8. Extensive crustal melting during craton destruction: Evidence from the Mesozoic magmatic suite of Junan, eastern North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Santosh, M.; Tang, Li

    2018-05-01

    The cratonic destruction associated with the Pacific plate subduction beneath the eastern North China Craton (NCC) shows a close relationship with the widespread magmatism during the Late Mesozoic. Here we investigate a suite of intrusive and extrusive magmatic rocks from the Junan region of the eastern NCC in order to evaluate the role of extensive crustal melting related to decratonization. We present petrological, geochemical, zircon U-Pb geochronological and Lu-Hf isotopic data to evaluate the petrogenesis, timing and tectonic significance of the Early Cretaceous magmatism. Zircon grains in the basalt from the extrusive suite of Junan show multiple populations with Neoproterozoic and Early Paleozoic xenocrystic grains ranging in age from 764 Ma to 495 Ma as well as Jurassic grains with an age range of 189-165 Ma. The dominant population of magmatic zircon grains in the syenite defines three major age peaks of 772 Ma, 132 Ma and 126 Ma. Zircons in the granitoids including alkali syenite, monzonite and granodiorite yield a tightly restricted age range of 124-130 Ma representing their emplacement ages. The Neoproterozoic (841-547 Ma) zircon grains from the basalt and the syenite possess εHf(t) values of -22.9 to -8.4 and from -18.8 to -17.3, respectively. The Early Paleozoic (523-494 Ma) zircons from the basalt and the syenite also show markedly negative εHf(t) values of -22.7 to -18.0. The dominant population of Early Cretaceous (134-121 Ma) zircon grains presented in all the samples also displays negative εHf(t) values range from -31.7 to -21.1, with TDM of 1653-2017 Ma and TDMC in the range of 2193-3187 Ma. Accordingly, the Lu-Hf data suggest that the parent magma was sourced through melting of Mesoarchean to Paleoproterozoic basement rocks. Geochemical data on the Junan magmatic suite display features similar to those associated with the arc magmatic rocks involving subduction-related components, with interaction of fluids and melts in the suprasubduction

  9. Comparison of unitary associations and probabilistic ranking and scaling as applied to mesozoic radiolarians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Peter O.

    A database on Middle Jurassic-Early Cretaceous radiolarians consisting of first and final occurrences of 110 species in 226 samples from 43 localities was used to compute Unitary Associations and probabilistic ranking and scaling (RASC), in order to test deterministic versus probabilistic quantitative biostratigraphic methods. Because the Mesozoic radiolarian fossil record is mainly dissolution-controlled, the sequence of events differs greatly from section to section. The scatter of local first and final appearances along a time scale is large compared to the species range; it is asymmetrical, with a maximum near the ends of the range and it is non-random. Thus, these data do not satisfy the statistical assumptions made in ranking and scaling. Unitary Associations produce maximum ranges of the species relative to each other by stacking cooccurrence data from all sections and therefore compensate for the local dissolution effects. Ranking and scaling, based on the assumption of a normal random distribution of the events, produces average ranges which are for most species much shorter than the maximum UA-ranges. There are, however, a number of species with similar ranges in both solutions. These species are believed to be the most dissolution-resistant and, therefore, the most reliable ones for the definition of biochronozones. The comparison of maximum and average ranges may be a powerful tool to test reliability of species for biochronology. Dissolution-controlled fossil data yield high crossover frequencies and therefore small, statistically insignificant interfossil distances. Scaling has not produced a useful sequence for this type of data.

  10. Extension style in the Orphan Basin during the Mesozoic North Atlantic rifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouiza, Mohamed; Hall, Jeremy

    2013-04-01

    The Orphan Basin, lying along the Newfoundland passive continental margin, has formed in Mesozoic time during the opening of the North Atlantic Ocean and the breakup of Iberia/Eurasia from North America. Regional deep seismic reflection profiles across the basin indicate that the Neoproterozoic basement has been affected by repeated extensional episodes between the Late Triassic/Jurassic and the Early Cretaceous. Deformation initiated in the eastern part of the Orphan basin in the Jurassic and migrated toward the west in the Early Cretaceous, resulting in numerous rift structures filled with Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous syn-rift successions and sealed by thick Upper Cretaceous-Cenozoic post-rift sediments. The seismic data show an extremely attenuated crust underneath the eastern and western part of the deep basin, forming two sub-basins associated with the development of rifting. The two sub-basins are separated by a wide structural high with a relatively thick crust and are bounded to the west by the continental shelf domain. Restoration of the Orphan Basin along a 2D crustal section (520 km long), yields a total amount of stretching of about 144 km, while the total crustal thinning indicates an extension of around 250 km, assuming mass conservation along the section and an initial crustal thickness of 28 km. Brittle deformation accommodated by normal faults is documented in the seismic profiles and affected essentially the present-day upper portion of the crust, and represents only 60% of the total extension which thinned the Orphan crust. The remaining crustal thinning must involve other deformation processes which are not (easily) recognizable in the seismic data. We propose two models that could explain discrepancies between brittle deformation and total crustal thinning during lithospheric extension. The first model assumes the reactivation of pre-rift inherited structures, which act as crustal-scale detachments during the early stages of rifting. The second

  11. Detrital zircons from the Tananao metamorphic complex of Taiwan: Implications for sediment provenance and Mesozoic tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yui, T. F.; Maki, K.; Lan, C. Y.; Hirata, T.; Chu, H. T.; Kon, Y.; Yokoyama, T. D.; Jahn, B. M.; Ernst, W. G.

    2012-05-01

    Taiwan formed during the Plio-Pleistocene collision of Eurasia with the outboard Luzon arc. Its pre-Tertiary basement, the Tananao metamorphic complex, consists of the western Tailuko belt and the eastern Yuli belt. These circum-Pacific belts have been correlated with the high-temperature/low-pressure (HT/LP) Ryoke belt and the high-pressure/low-temperature (HP/LT) Sanbagawa belt of Japan, respectively. To test this correlation and to reveal the architecture and plate-tectonic history of the Tananao metamorphic basement, detrital zircons were separated from 7 metasedimentary rock samples for U-Pb dating by LA-ICPMS techniques. Results of the present study, coupled with previous data, show that (1) the Tailuko belt consists of a Late Jurassic to earliest Cretaceous accretionary complex sutured against a Permian-Early Jurassic marble ± metabasaltic terrane, invaded in the north by scattered Late Cretaceous granitic plutons; the latter as well as minor Upper Cretaceous cover strata probably formed in a circum-Pacific forearc; (2) the Yuli belt is a mid- to Late Cretaceous accretionary complex containing HP thrust sheets that were emplaced attending the Late Cenozoic Eurasian plate-Luzon arc collision; (3) these two Late Mesozoic belts are not coeval, and in part were overprinted by low-grade metamorphism during the Plio-Pleistocene collision; (4) accreted clastic sediments of the Tailuko belt contain mainly Phanerozoic detrital zircons, indicating that terrigenous sediments were mainly sourced from western Cathaysia, whereas in contrast, clastic rocks of the Yuli accretionary complex contain a significant amount of Paleoproterozoic and distinctive Neoproterozoic zircons, probably derived from the North China craton and the Yangtze block ± eastern Cathaysia, as a result of continent uplift/exhumation after the Permo-Triassic South China-North China collision; and (5) the Late Jurassic-Late Cretaceous formation of the Tananao basement complex precludes the possibility

  12. Microbial succession and stimulation following a test well injection simulating CO2 leakage into shallow Newark Basin aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dueker, M.; Clauson, K.; Yang, Q.; Umemoto, K.; Seltzer, A. M.; Zakharova, N. V.; Matter, J. M.; Stute, M.; Takahashi, T.; Goldberg, D.; O'Mullan, G. D.

    2012-12-01

    Despite growing appreciation for the importance of microbes in altering geochemical reactions in the subsurface, the microbial response to geological carbon sequestration injections and the role of microbes in altering metal mobilization following leakage scenarios in shallow aquifers remain poorly constrained. A Newark Basin test well was utilized in field experiments to investigate patterns of microbial succession following injection of CO2 saturated water into isolated aquifer intervals. Additionally, laboratory mesocosm experiments, including microbially-active and inactive (autoclave sterilized) treatments, were used to constrain the microbial role in mineral dissolution, trace metal release, and gas production (e.g. hydrogen and methane). Hydrogen production was detected in both sterilized and unsterilized laboratory mesocosm treatments, indicating abiotic hydrogen production may occur following CO2 leakage, and methane production was detected in unsterilized, microbially active mesocosms. In field experiments, a decrease in pH following injection of CO2 saturated aquifer water was accompanied by mobilization of trace elements (e.g. Fe and Mn), the production of hydrogen gas, and increased bacterial cell concentrations. 16S ribosomal RNA clone libraries, from samples collected before and after the test well injection, were compared in an attempt to link variability in geochemistry to changes in aquifer microbiology. Significant changes in microbial composition, compared to background conditions, were found following the test well injection, including a decrease in Proteobacteria, and an increased presence of Firmicutes, Verrucomicrobia, Acidobacteria and other microbes associated with iron reducing and syntrophic metabolism. The concurrence of increased microbial cell concentration, and rapid microbial community succession, with increased concentrations of hydrogen gas suggests that abiotically produced hydrogen may serve as an ecologically-relevant energy

  13. Concentrations and Size Distributions of Trace Metals in Particulate Matter in Urban New Jersey: Preliminary Results from the Newly Established Rutgers Newark Urban Air Quality Observatory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, O.; Gao, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Particulate air pollution has been associated with health issues in general and respiratory diseases in particular. Some research has shown that higher concentration of fine particulate matter (PM) is found in lungs. However, why and what kind of PM plays the roles affecting the human health still need more investigations, and most of previous and current studies were limited to those focusing on PM2.5 or larger particles. The city of Newark in New Jersey is the largest metropolitan center in the state with dense population; it is a commerce and transportation hub surrounded by many highways and busy airports, in addition to numerous power plants, waste combustion treatment facilities, etc. in the area. Thus, the city is impacted by air pollution emissions In some areas of the city, the elevated records of respiratory illness were reported. Although some PM2.5 concentration studies were done in the past, the enrichment of toxic metals in PM with respect to their sizes have not been fully addressed. The Rutgers Newark Air Quality Observatory (RNAQO) was recently established to address urban air pollution and its impact on human health. During this study, both size-segregated PM and PM2.5 are collected in RNAQO, Newark, New Jersey. The samples are analyzed to evaluate the enrichment of trace metals focusing on Pb, Cd, Cu, and Zn in different sizes of PM that will be discussed in this presentation. Such data will be valuable to further investigations into the health effects of fine mode PM. Particularly, this data will be helpful in exploring the relationships between respiratory sickness and fine mode toxic metals' concentrations.

  14. Distribution and Origin of Iridium in Upper Triassic-Lower Jurassic Continental Strata of the Fundy, Deerfield and Hartford Basins, Newark Supergroup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, L. H.; Kyte, F. T.

    2015-12-01

    To date, elevated Ir levels in continental sediments proximal to the Triassic-Jurassic boundary (TJB) have been reported only from Upper Triassic strata of the Newark and Fundy basins, below the basal extrusive units of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province. We report here the first occurrence of elevated Ir above the oldest volcanic units, as well as additional horizons of Ir enrichment from other basins of the Newark Supergroup. In the Fundy Basin (Nova Scotia, Canada), lacustrine sediments of the Scots Bay Member of the McCoy Brook Formation that directly overlie the North Mountain Basalt contain Ir up to 413 pg/g in fish-bearing strata very close to the palynological TJB. Higher in the formation the strata lack significant Ir enrichment. Similarly, sedimentary strata from between flows of North Mount Basalt show no Ir appreciable enrichment. The Deerfield Basin (Massachusetts) extension of the Hartford Basin contains only one CAMP extrusive unit, the Lower Jurassic Deerfield Basalt. Very modest Ir enrichment, up to 90 pg/g, occurs in the Fall River Beds of the Sugarloaf Formation, several meters below the basalt, and up to 70 pg/g in the Turners Falls Formation less than 2 meters above the basalt. The uppermost New Haven Formation (Upper Triassic) at the Silver Ridge locality (Guilford, CT) in the Hartford Basin contains abundant plant debris, but no evidence of elevated Ir. At the Clathopteris locality to the north (Holyoke, MA), potentially correlative strata that are fine grained and rich in plant remains have Ir enriched to 542 pg/g, an order of magnitude higher than in the coarser-grained strata in direct stratigraphic contact. The high-Ir beds also have elevated REEs relative to other Hartford Basin samples, although there is no evidence of HREE enrichment. We consider the basalts of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province, widely accepted as the driver of Late Triassic extinctions, as the origin of the elevated Ir levels in the Newark Supergroup.

  15. Synthesis and revision of the lithostratigraphic groups and formations in the Upper Permian?–Lower Jurassic Newark Supergroup of eastern North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weems, Robert E.; Tanner, Lawrence H.; Lucas, Spencer G.

    2016-01-01

    The Upper Permian? - Lower Jurassic Newark Supergroup of eastern North America has a strikingly uniform succession of lithologic units. This uniformity is seen regardless of whether these units are characterized on the basis of their lithostratigraphy, allostratigraphy, biostratigraphy, or chemostratigraphy. After deposition, these units were broken up tectonically and attacked erosionally; parts of them survive today only within localized, down-faulted areas. Many lines of evidence compellingly demonstrate that most or all of these remnant units once were physically continuous between remaining outcrops. It is needlessly confusing to give every remnant of each unit a different name in each area where it persists simply because it is now physically isolated by erosion from other portions of the same unit. Instead, these units should be defined within a regional lithostratigraphic framework that emphasizes their common origins and original stratigraphic continuity. To this end, the formation-level stratigraphy of the Newark Supergroup is reduced from 58 locally applied and locally defined formations to a succession of only 16 uniformly defined and regionally recognizable formations. In all cases the oldest name validly applied to each formation is given priority over more recently erected synonymous names, which are either abandoned or, in a few cases, changed in rank to a member of one of the formations recognized here. The Newark Supergroup is here organized into four regionally recognizable groups, each subdivided into regionally recognizable formations. In ascending order, the Upper Permian?-Middle Triassic Acadia Group (new name) includes the Honeycomb Point Formation, Chedabucto Formation, Economy Formation, and Evangeline Formation. This group is preserved only in the Canadian Fundy and Chedabucto basins. The Upper Triassic (Carnian-Norian) Chatham Group includes the Doswell Formation, Stockton Formation, Lockatong Formation, and Passaic Formation. The Upper

  16. Mesozoic mammals from Arizona: new evidence on Mammalian evolution.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, F A; Crompton, A W; Downs, W R

    1983-12-16

    Knowledge of early mammalian evolution has been based on Old World Late Triassic-Early Jurassic faunas. The discovery of mammalian fossils of approximately equivalent age in the Kayenta Formation of northeastern Arizona gives evidence of greater diversity than known previously. A new taxon documents the development of an angular region of the jaw as a neomorphic process, and represents an intermediate stage in the origin of mammalian jaw musculature.

  17. Mesozoic Deformation and Its Geological Significance in the Southern Margin of the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Rongwei; Liu, Hailing; Yao, Yongjian; Wang, Yin

    2018-05-01

    The pre-Eocene history of the region around the present South China Sea is not well known. New multi-channel seismic profiles provide valuable insights into the probable Mesozoic history of this region. Detailed structural and stratigraphic interpretations of the multi-channel seismic profiles, calibrated with relevant drilling and dredging data, show major Mesozoic structural features. A structural restoration was done to remove the Cenozoic tectonic influence and calculate the Mesozoic tectonic compression ratios. The results indicate that two groups of compressive stress with diametrically opposite orientations, S(S)E-N(N)W and N(N)W-S(S)E, were active during the Mesozoic. The compression ratio values gradually decrease from north to south and from west to east in each stress orientation. The phenomena may be related to the opening of the proto-South China Sea (then located in south of the Nansha block) and the rate at which the Nansha block drifted northward in the late Jurassic to late Cretaceous. The Nansha block drifted northward until it collided and sutured with the southern China margin. The opening of the present South China Sea may be related to this suture zone, which was a tectonic zone of weakness.

  18. Mesozoic cyclostratigraphy, the 405-kyr orbital eccentricity metronome, and the Astronomical Time Scale (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinnov, L.; Ogg, J. G.

    2009-12-01

    Mesozoic cyclostratigraphy from around the world is being assessed to construct a continuous Astronomical Time Scale (ATS) based on Earth’s cyclic orbital parameters. The recognition of a prevalent sedimentary cycling with a ~400-kyr period associated with forcing by the stable 405-kyr orbital eccentricity variation is an important development. Numerous formations spanning 10 to 20 myr (and longer) intervals in the Cretaceous, Jurassic and Triassic clearly express this dominant cycle and provide a robust basis for 405-kyr-scale calibration of the ATS. This 405-kyr metronome will enable extension of the well-defined Cenozoic ATS for scaling of the past quarter-billion years of Earth history. This astronomical calibration has a resolution comparable to the 1% to 0.1% precision for radioisotope dating of Mesozoic ash beds, with the added benefit of providing continuous stratigraphic coverage between dated beds. Extended portions of the Mesozoic ATS have already provided new insights into long-standing geologic problems of seafloor spreading, tectonics, eustasy, and paleoclimate change. Ongoing work is focused on closing gaps in coverage and on collecting duplicate cyclostratigraphic records for the entire Mesozoic Era.

  19. Toward a continuous 405-kyr-calibrated Astronomical Time Scale for the Mesozoic Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinnov, Linda; Ogg, James; Huang, Chunju

    2010-05-01

    Mesozoic cyclostratigraphy is being assembled into a continuous Astronomical Time Scale (ATS) tied to the Earth's cyclic orbital parameters. Recognition of a nearly ubiquitous, dominant ~400-kyr cycling in formations throughout the era has been particularly striking. Composite formations spanning contiguous intervals up to 50 myr clearly express these long-eccentricity cycles, and in some cases, this cycling is defined by third- or fourth-order sea-level sequences. This frequency is associated with the 405-kyr orbital eccentricity cycle, which provides a basic metronome and enables the extension of the well-defined Cenozoic ATS to scale the majority of the Mesozoic Era. This astronomical calibration has a resolution comparable to the 1% to 0.1% precision for radioisotope dating of Mesozoic ash beds, but with the added benefit of providing continuous stratigraphic coverage between dated beds. Extended portions of the Mesozoic ATS provide solutions to long-standing geologic problems of tectonics, eustasy, paleoclimate change, and rates of seafloor spreading.

  20. A tribosphenic mammal from the Mesozoic of Australia.

    PubMed

    Rich, T H; Vickers-Rich, P; Constantine, A; Flannery, T F; Kool, L; van Klaveren, N

    1997-11-21

    A small, well-preserved dentary of a tribosphenic mammal with the most posterior premolar and all three molars in place has been found in Aptian (Early Cretaceous) rocks of southeastern Australia. In most respects, dental and mandibular anatomy of the specimen is similar to that of primitive placental mammals. With the possible exception of a single tooth reported as Eocene in age, terrestrial placentals are otherwise unknown in Australia until the Pliocene. This possible Australian placental is similar in age to Prokennalestes from the late Aptian/early Albian Khoboor Beds of Mongolia, the oldest currently accepted member of the infraclass Placentalia.

  1. Spatial and temporal distribution of Mesozoic adakitic rocks along the Tan-Lu fault, Eastern China: Constraints on the initiation of lithospheric thinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Hai-Ou; Xiao, Yilin; Santosh, M.; Li, Wang-Ye; Yang, Xiaoyong; Pack, Andreas; Hou, Zhenhui

    2013-09-01

    The Mesozoic tectonics in East China is characterized by significant lithospheric thinning of the North China Craton, large-scale strike-slip movement along the Tan-Lu fault, and regional magmatism with associated metallogeny. Here we address the possible connections between these three events through a systematic investigation of the geochemistry, zircon geochronology and whole rock oxygen isotopes of the Mesozoic magmatic rocks distributed along the Tan-Lu fault in the Shandong province. The characteristic spatial and temporal distributions of high-Mg adakitic rocks along the Tan-Lu fault with emplacement ages of 134-128 Ma suggest a strong structural control for the emplacement of these intrusions, with magma generation possibly associated with the subduction of the Pacific plate in the early Cretaceous. The low-Mg adakitic rocks (127-120 Ma) in the Su-Lu orogenic belt were formed later than the high-Mg adakitic rocks, whereas in the Dabie orogenic belt, most of the low-Mg adakitic rocks (143-129 Ma) were generated earlier than the high-Mg adakitic rocks. Based on available data, we suggest that the large scale strike-slip tectonics of the Tan-Lu fault in the Mesozoic initiated cratonic destruction at the south-eastern margin of the North China Craton, significantly affecting the lower continental crust within areas near the fault. This process resulted in crustal fragments sinking into the asthenosphere and reacting with peridotites, which increased the Mg# of the adakitic melts, generating the high-Mg adakitic rocks. The gravitationally unstable lower continental crust below the Tan-Lu fault in the Su-Lu orogenic belt triggered larger volume delamination of the lower continental crust or foundering of the root.

  2. The pre-Mesozoic tectonic unit division of the Xing-Meng orogenic belt (XMOB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bei; Zhao, Pan

    2014-05-01

    According to the viewpoint that the paleo-Asian ocean closed by the end of early Paleozoic and extended during the late Paleozoic, a pre-Mesozoic tectonic unit division has been suggested. Five blocks and four sutures have been recognized in the pre-Devonia stage, the five blocks are called Erguna (EB), Xing'an (XB), Airgin Sum-Xilinhot (AXB), Songliao-Hunshandak (SHB) and Jiamusi (JB) blocks and four sutures, Xinlin-Xiguitu (XXS), Airgin Sum-Xilinhot-Heihe (AXHS), Ondor Sum-Jizhong-Yanji (OJYS) and Mudanjiang (MS) sutures. The EB contains the Precambrian base with the ages of 720-850Ma and ɛHf(T)=+2.5to +8.1. The XB is characterized by the Paleoproterozoic granitic gneiss with ɛHf(T)=-3.9 to -8.9. Several ages from 1150 to 1500 Ma bave been acquired in the AXB, proving presence of old block that links with Hutag Uul block in Mongolia to the west. The Paleoproterozoic (1.8-1.9Ga) and Neoproterozoic (750-850Ma) ages have been reported from southern and eastern parts of the SHB, respectively. As a small block in east margin of the XMOB, the JB outcrops magmatite and granitic gneiss bases with ages of 800-1000Ma. The XXS is marked by blueschists with zircon ages of 490-500Ma in Toudaoqiao village, ophiolites in Xiguitu County and granite with ages of about 500Ma along the northern segment of XXS. The AXHS is characterized by the early Paleozoic arc magmatic rocks with ages from 430Ma to 490Ma, mélange and the late Devonia molass basins, which indicates a northward subduction of the SHB beneath the AXB during the early-middle Paleozoic. The OJYS is composed of the early Paleozoic volcanic rocks, diorites and granites with ages of 425-475Ma, blueschists, ophiolitic mélange, the late Silurian flysch and Early-Middle Devonian molasses in western segment, granites (420-450Ma) in middle segment, and plagiogranites (443Ma) and the late Silurian molasses in eastern segment. This suture was caused by a southward subduction of the SHB beneath the North China block. The MS

  3. Thermal maturity of Jurassic shales from the Newark Basin, U.S.A.: influence of hydrothermal fluids and implications to basin modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, C.C.; Kotra, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    Organic geochemical investigations were conducted on a series of cores that systematically sampled the uppermost Jurassic strata from the northern Newark Basin. Each sedimentary unit consists of fluvial red sandstones and siltstones with cyclic deposits of interbedded black lacustrine shales and gray deltaic siltstones. In a suite of organic-rich shales from the Boonton, Towaco and Feltville Formations, organic maturation parameters were used to determine aspects of the thermal history of the Newark Basin. Comparisons of model calculations and measured maturities support39 Ar/40 Ar-geochronometer studies that indicate a hydrothermal event occurred ???175 Ma ago. An increase in the regional geothermal gradient to ???7.5??C/100 m for ???5 Ma best conforms to the organic geochemical observations. Biomarker compounds in Boonton and Towaco strata should have been relatively unaltered by this regional event, but anomalous molecular distributions in the organic-rich rocks may have resulted from localized heating by hydrothermal fluids. The effects of this interaction would be very subtle and may be indistinguishable from variations caused by differences in organic facies. Within this uncertainty, sterane and hopane isomerization and steroid aromatization reactions advanced in the Boonton and Towaco Formation strata primarily because of burial and normal geothermal heating that followed the hydrothermal event. Biomarker kinetic models indicate that ???2400 m of Boonton and post-Boonton strata were eroded after basinal uplift commenced ???50 Ma ago. ?? 1990.

  4. Mesozoic Calcareous Nannofossil Evolution: Relation to Paleoceanographic Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Peter H.

    1987-12-01

    The taxonomic evolution of Jurassic and Cretaceous calcareous nannofossil species is described using the following indices: species diversity, rate of speciation, rate of extinction, rate of diversification, rate of turnover, survivorship, and species accretion. The Jurassic prior to the late Oxfordian is characterized by positive diversification rates, that is, rates of speciation exceeded rates of extinction. Highest rates of diversification occurred in the late Lias and early Oxfordian. During the generally regressive latest Jurassic, diversification rates remained low and rates of extinctions exceed rates of speciation. In the early Cretaceous, rates of diversification are positive and peak in the early Valanginian, early Aptian, and middle Albian, after which time rates of extinction generally exceed rates of speciation. Such peaks in rate of evolution coincide with times of increased accumulation of organic carbon in the ocean ("anoxic events"). Peaks in rates of extinction result in very high rates of turnover during times of major regressions, in particular, in the Tithonian and Maastrichtian. Survivorship analyses for three datum planes (74.5, 144, and 160 Ma) show relatively constant extinction rates with some stepping in the older part; they are best explained by a temporally fluctuating abiotic environment causing changes in the probability of extinction. Species accretion curves are also relatively linear with some indication of changing rates of speciation. The coincidences of major changes in evolutionary rates with major paleoceanographic events are indicative of a predominantly abiotic control of nannoplankton evolution. Relationships of evolutionary rates of calcareous nannoplankton with deep ocean ventilation, sea level, and ocean fertility indicates that global tectonic processes are the ultimate causes of evolutionary change.

  5. Testing co-evolutionary hypotheses over geological timescales: interactions between Mesozoic non-avian dinosaurs and cycads.

    PubMed

    Butler, Richard J; Barrett, Paul M; Kenrick, Paul; Penn, Malcolm G

    2009-02-01

    The significance of co-evolution over ecological timescales is well established, yet it remains unclear to what extent co-evolutionary processes contribute to driving large-scale evolutionary and ecological changes over geological timescales. Some of the most intriguing and pervasive long-term co-evolutionary hypotheses relate to proposed interactions between herbivorous non-avian dinosaurs and Mesozoic plants, including cycads. Dinosaurs have been proposed as key dispersers of cycad seeds during the Mesozoic, and temporal variation in cycad diversity and abundance has been linked to dinosaur faunal changes. Here we assess the evidence for proposed hypotheses of trophic and evolutionary interactions between these two groups using diversity analyses, a new database of Cretaceous dinosaur and plant co-occurrence data, and a geographical information system (GIS) as a visualisation tool. Phylogenetic evidence suggests that the origins of several key biological properties of cycads (e.g. toxins, bright-coloured seeds) likely predated the origin of dinosaurs. Direct evidence of dinosaur-cycad interactions is lacking, but evidence from extant ecosystems suggests that dinosaurs may plausibly have acted as seed dispersers for cycads, although it is likely that other vertebrate groups (e.g. birds, early mammals) also played a role. Although the Late Triassic radiations of dinosaurs and cycads appear to have been approximately contemporaneous, few significant changes in dinosaur faunas coincide with the late Early Cretaceous cycad decline. No significant spatiotemporal associations between particular dinosaur groups and cycads can be identified - GIS visualisation reveals disparities between the spatiotemporal distributions of some dinosaur groups (e.g. sauropodomorphs) and cycads that are inconsistent with co-evolutionary hypotheses. The available data provide no unequivocal support for any of the proposed co-evolutionary interactions between cycads and herbivorous dinosaurs

  6. Mesozoic to Recent, regional tectonic controls on subsidence patterns in the Gulf of Mexico basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almatrood, M.; Mann, P.; Bugti, M. N.

    2016-12-01

    We have produced subsidence plots for 26 deep wells into the deeper-water areas of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) in order to identify regional tectonic controls and propose tectonic phases. Our results show three sub-regions of the GOM basin that have distinctive and correlative subsidence patterns: 1) Northern GOM from offshore Texas to central Florida (9 wells) - this area is characterized by a deeply buried, Triassic-early Jurassic rift event that is not represented by our wells that penetrate only the post-rift Cretaceous to recent passive margin phase. The sole complexity in the passive margin phase of this sub-region is the acceleration of prograding clastic margins including the Mississippi fan in Miocene time; 2) Southeastern GOM in the Straits of Florida and Cuba area (5 wells) - this area shows that the Cretaceous passive margin overlying the rift phase is abruptly drowned in late Cretaceous as this part of the passive margin of North America that is flexed and partially subducted beneath the Caribbean arc as it encroaches from the southwest to eventually collide with the North American passive margin in the Paleogene; 3) Western GOM along the length of the eastern continental margin of Mexico (12 wells) - this is the most complex of the three areas in that shares the Mesozic rifting and passive margin phase but is unique with a slightly younger collisional event and foreland basin phase associated with the Laramide orogeny in Mexico extending from the KT boundary to the Oligocene. Following this orogenic event there is a re-emergence of the passive margin phase during the Neogene along locally affected by extensional and convergent deformation associated with passive margin fold belts. In summary, the GOM basin exhibits evidence for widespread rifting and passive margin formation associated with the breakup of Pangea in Mesozoic times that was locally superimposed and deformed during the late Cretaceous-Paleogene period by: 1) Caribbean subduction and

  7. Concentrations and Loads of Organic Compounds and Trace Elements in Tributaries to Newark and Raritan Bays, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Timothy P.; Bonin, Jennifer L.

    2007-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine the concentrations and loads of sediment and chemicals delivered to Newark and Raritan Bays by five major tributaries: the Raritan, Passaic, Rahway, Elizabeth, and Hackensack Rivers. This study was initiated by the State of New Jersey as Study I-C of the New Jersey Toxics Reduction Workplan for the New York-New Jersey Harbor, working under the NY-NJ Harbor Estuary Program (HEP) Contaminant Assessment and Reduction Program (CARP). The CARP is a comprehensive effort to evaluate the levels and sources of toxic contaminants to the tributaries and estuarine areas of the NY-NJ Harbor, including Newark and Raritan Bays. The Raritan and Passaic Rivers are large rivers (mean daily discharges of 1,189 and 1,132 cubic feet per second (ft3/s), respectively), that drain large, mixed rural/urban basins. The Elizabeth and Rahway Rivers are small rivers (mean daily discharges of 25.9 and 49.1 ft3/s, respectively) that drain small, highly urbanized and industrialized basins. The Hackensack River drains a small, mixed rural/urban basin, and its flow is highly controlled by an upstream reservoir (mean daily discharge of 90.4 ft3/s). These rivers flow into urbanized estuaries and ultimately, to the Atlantic Ocean. Each of these tributaries were sampled during two to four storm events, and twice each during low-flow discharge conditions. Samples were collected using automated equipment installed at stations adjacent to U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations near the heads-of-tide of these rivers. Large-volume (greater than 50 liters of water and a target of 1 gram of sediment), flow-weighted composite samples were collected for chemical analysis using filtration to collect suspended particulates and exchange resin (XAD-2) to sequester dissolved contaminants. Composite whole-water samples were collected for dissolved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and for trace element analysis. Additional discrete grab samples were collected

  8. Sedimentary facies analysis of the Mesozoic clastic rocks in Southern Peru (Tacna, 18°S): Towards a paleoenvironmental Redefinition and stratigraphic Reorganization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alván, Aldo; Jacay, Javier; Caracciolo, Luca; Sánchez, Elvis; Trinidad, Inés

    2018-07-01

    The Mesozoic rocks of southern Peru comprise a Middle Jurassic to Early Cretaceous sedimentary sequence deposited during a time interval of approximately 34 Myr. In Tacna, these rocks are detrital and constitute the Yura Group (Callovian to Tithonian) and the Hualhuani Formation (Berriasian). Basing on robust interpretation of facies and petrographic analysis, we reconstruct the depositional settings of such units and provide a refined stratigraphic framework. Accordingly, nine types of sedimentary facies and six architectural elements are defined. They preserve the record of a progradational fluvial system, in which two styless regulated the dispersion of sediments: (i) a high-to moderate-sinuosity meandering setting (Yura Group), and a later (ii) incipient braided setting (Hualhuani Formation). The Yura Group (Callovian-Tithonian) represents the onset of floodplain deposits and lateral accretion of point-bar deposits sited on a semi-flat topography. Nonetheless, the progradational sequence was affected by at least two rapid marine ingressions occurred during Middle Callovian and Tithonian times. Such marine ingressions reveal the proximity of a shallow marine setting and incipient carbonate deposition. In response to increase in topographic gradient, the Hualhuani Formation (Berriasian) deposited as extensive multistory sandy channels. The mineralogy of the Mesozoic sediments suggests sediment supplies and intense recycling from a craton interior (i.e. Amazon Craton and/or plutonic sources) located eastward of the study area.

  9. Paleoclimatic and paleolatitude settings of accumulation of radiolarian siliceous-volcanogenic sequences in the middle Mesozoic Pacific: Evidence from allochthons of East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnevskaya, V. S.; Filatova, N. I.

    2017-09-01

    Jurassic-Cretaceous siliceous-volcanogenic rocks from nappes of tectonostratigraphic sequences of the East Asia Middle Cretaceous Okhotsk-Koryak orogenic belt are represented by a wide range of geodynamic sedimentation settings: oceanic (near-spreading zones, seamounts, and deep-water basins), marginal seas, and island arcs. The taxonomic compositions of radiolarian communities are used as paleolatitude indicators in the Northern Pacific. In addition, a tendency toward climate change in the Mesozoic is revealed based on these communities: from the warm Triassic to the cold Jurassic with intense warming from the Late Jurassic to the Early Cretaceous. Cretaceous warming led to heating of ocean waters even at moderately high latitudes and to the development of Tethyan radiolarians there. These data are confirmed by a global Cretaceous temperature peak coinciding with a high-activity pulse of the planetary mantle superplume system, which created thermal anomalies and the greenhouse effect. In addition, the Pacific superplume attributed to this system caused accelerated movement of oceanic plates, which resulted in a compression setting on the periphery of the Pacific and the formation of the Okhotsk-Koryak orogenic belt on its northwestern framing in the Middle Cretaceous, where Mesozoic rocks of different geodynamic and latitudinal-climate settings were juxtaposed into allochthonous units.

  10. The role of Mesozoic sedimentary basin tapers on the formation of Cenozoic crustal shortening structures and foredeep in the western Sichuan Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, M.

    2017-12-01

    The foreland basin records important clues of tectonic and sedimentary process of mountain-building, thus to explore its dynamic mechanism on the formation is an important issue of the mountain-basin interaction. The Longmen Shan fold-and-thrust belt and its adjacent Sichuan basin located in the eastern margin of Tibetan Plateau, are one of the most-concerned regions of studying modern mountain-building and seismic process, and are also a natural laboratory of studying the dynamics of the formation and development of foreland basin. However, it still need further explore on the mechanics of the development of the Cenozoic foreland basin and thrust-belts in the western Sichuan Basin. The Longmen Shan thrust belt has experienced multi-stages of tectonics evolution, foreland basin formation and topography growth since Late Triassic, and whether the early formed basin architecture and large Mesozoic sedimentary basin taper can influence the formation and development of the Cenozoic foreland basin and thrust belts? To solve these issues, this project aim to focus on the Cenozoic foreland basin and internal crustal shortening structures in the western Sichuan basin, on the basis of growth critical wedge taper theory. We will reconstruct the shape of multi-phases of sedimentary basin tapers, the temporal-spatial distribution of crustal shortening and thrusting sequences, and analyze the control mechanism of Mesozoic sedimentary basin taper on the formation of Cenozoic foreland basins, and final explore the interaction between the tectonics geomorphology, stress field and dynamic propagation of foreland basin.

  11. Tectono-sedimentary events and geodynamic evolution of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic basins of the Alpine Margin, Gulf of Tunis, north-eastern Tunisia offshore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melki, Fetheddine; Zouaghi, Taher; Chelbi, Mohamed Ben; Bédir, Mourad; Zargouni, Fouad

    2010-09-01

    The structural pattern, tectono-sedimentary framework and geodynamic evolution for Mesozoic and Cenozoic deep structures of the Gulf of Tunis (north-eastern Tunisia) are proposed using petroleum well data and a 2-D seismic interpretation. The structural system of the study area is marked by two sets of faults that control the Mesozoic subsidence and inversions during the Paleogene and Neogene times: (i) a NE-SW striking set associated with folds and faults, which have a reverse component; and (ii) a NW-SE striking set active during the Tertiary extension episodes and delineating grabens and subsiding synclines. In order to better characterize the tectono-sedimentary evolution of the Gulf of Tunis structures, seismic data interpretations are compared to stratigraphic and structural data from wells and neighbouring outcrops. The Atlas and external Tell belonged to the southernmost Tethyan margin record a geodynamic evolution including: (i) rifting periods of subsidence and Tethyan oceanic accretions from Triassic until Early Cretaceous: we recognized high subsiding zones (Raja and Carthage domains), less subsiding zones (Gamart domain) and a completely emerged area (Raouad domain); (ii) compressive events during the Cenozoic with relaxation periods of the Oligocene-Aquitanian and Messinian-Early Pliocene. The NW-SE Late Eocene and Tortonian compressive events caused local inversions with sealed and eroded folded structures. During Middle to Late Miocene and Early Pliocene, we have identified depocentre structures corresponding to half-grabens and synclines in the Carthage and Karkouane domains. The north-south contractional events at the end of Early Pliocene and Late Pliocene periods are associated with significant inversion of subsidence and synsedimentary folded structures. Structuring and major tectonic events, recognized in the Gulf of Tunis, are linked to the common geodynamic evolution of the north African and western Mediterranean basins.

  12. Depositional systems and stratigraphy of Paleozoic and Lower Mesozoic rocks in outcrop, Tassili region, southwest Algeria

    SciTech Connect

    Hertig, S.P.; Tye, R.S.; Coffield, D.Q.

    1991-08-01

    Paleozoic to Lower Mesozoic strata of the southeastern Algerian Tassili are traditionally subdivided by regionally extensive unconformities such as the Pan African, Taconic, Caledonian, and Hercynian. Using outcrop data from southeastern Algeria, this classic approach is modified by reinterpreting the genesis of these unconformities and rock sequences. Five prominent sequences, defined within the Paleozoic and lower Mesozoic section, usually consist of a succession of lowstand, transgressive, and highstand system tracts separated by sequence boundaries or transgressive surfaces. The Pan-African, Taconic, Caledonian, and Hercynian unconformities are sequence boundaries. Important sequence boundaries also occur within the Ordovician and Silurian sections. These sequencesmore » correlate with subsurface data in the Illizi basin and provide a framework for renewed exploration in the subsurface of the Algerian Sahara, where more than 30 billion bbl of recoverable oil and oil equivalent have been generated and trapped.« less

  13. 100-million-year dynasty of giant planktivorous bony fishes in the Mesozoic seas.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Matt; Shimada, Kenshu; Martin, Larry D; Everhart, Michael J; Liston, Jeff; Maltese, Anthony; Triebold, Michael

    2010-02-19

    Large-bodied suspension feeders (planktivores), which include the most massive animals to have ever lived, are conspicuously absent from Mesozoic marine environments. The only clear representatives of this trophic guild in the Mesozoic have been an enigmatic and apparently short-lived Jurassic group of extinct pachycormid fishes. Here, we report several new examples of these giant bony fishes from Asia, Europe, and North America. These fossils provide the first detailed anatomical information on this poorly understood clade and extend its range from the lower Middle Jurassic to the end of the Cretaceous, showing that this group persisted for more than 100 million years. Modern large-bodied, planktivorous vertebrates diversified after the extinction of pachycormids at the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary, which is consistent with an opportunistic refilling of vacated ecospace.

  14. Field guide to the Mesozoic arc and accretionary complex of South-Central Alaska, Indian to Hatcher Pass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karl, Susan M.; Oswald, P.J.; Hults, Chad P.

    2015-01-01

    This field trip traverses exposures of a multi-generation Mesozoic magmatic arc and subduction-accretion complex that had a complicated history of magmatic activity and experienced variations in composition and deformational style in response to changes in the tectonic environment. This Mesozoic arc formed at an unknown latitude to the south, was accreted to North America, and was subsequently transported along faults to its present location (Plafker and others, 1989; Hillhouse and Coe, 1994). Some of these faults are still active. Similar tectonic, igneous, and sedimentary processes to those that formed the Mesozoic arc complex persist today in southern Alaska, building on, and deforming the Mesozoic arc. The rocks we will see on this field trip provide insights on the three-dimensional composition of the modern arc, and the processes involved in the evolution of an arc and its companion accretionary complex.

  15. Final report. [Mesozoic tectonic history of the northeastern Great Basin (Nevada)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zamudio, Joe

    1993-01-01

    In eastern Nevada and western Utah is an extensive terrane that has experienced a complex tectonic history of Mesozoic deformation and superposed Tertiary extension. The Mesozoic tectonic history of this area has been the subject of controversy for the past twenty or more years. The debate has centered on whether major Mesozoic geologic structures were due to compressional or extensional tectonic regimes. The goal of our research was to decipher the deformational history of the area by combining detailed geologic mapping, remote sensing data analysis, and U-Pb and K-Ar geochronology. This study area includes the Dolly Varden Mountains and adjacent Currie Hills, located in the semi-arid environment of the northeastern Great Basin in Nevada. Vegetation cover in the Dolly Varden Mountains typically ranges from about 10 percent to 50 percent, with some places along drainages and on high, north-facing slopes where vegetation cover approaches 100 percent. Sagebrush is found at less vegetated lower elevations, whereas pinon pine and juniper are prevalent above 2,000 meters. A variety of geologic materials is exposed in the study area. A sequence of Late Paleozoic and Triassic sedimentary rocks includes limestone, dolomite, chert, sandstone, siltstone and shale. A two-phase granitic stock, called the Melrose, intruded these rocks, resulting in metamorphism along the intrusive contact. Tertiary volcanic rocks cover most of the eastern part of the Dolly Varden Mountains and low-lying areas in the Currie Hills.

  16. Reinterpretation of Mesozoic and Cenozoic tectonic events, Mountain Pass area, northeastern San Bernardino County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Nance, M.A.

    1993-04-01

    Detailed mapping, stratigraphic structural analysis in the Mountain Pass area has resulted in a reinterpretation of Mesozoic and Cenozoic tectonic events in the area. Mesozoic events are characterized by north vergent folds and thrust faults followed by east vergent thrusting. Folding created two synclines and an anticline which were than cut at different stratigraphic levels by subsequent thrust faults. Thrusting created composite tectono-stratigraphic sections containing autochthonous, para-autothonous, and allochthonous sections. Normal faults cutting these composite sections including North, Kokoweef, White Line, and Piute fault must be post-thrusting, not pre-thrusting as in previous interpretations. Detailed study of these faults results inmore » differentiation of at least three orders of faults and suggest they represent Cenozoic extension correlated with regional extensional events between 11 and 19 my. Mesozoic stratigraphy reflects regional orogenic uplift, magmatic activity, and thrusting. Inclusion of Kaibab clasts in the Chinle, Kaibab and Chinle clasts in the Aztec, and Chinle, Aztec, and previously deposited Delfonte Volcanics clasts in the younger members of the Delfonte Volcanics suggest regional uplift prior to the thrusting of Cambrian Bonanza King over Delfonte Volcanics by the Mescal Thrust fault. The absence of clasts younger than Kaibab argues against pre-thrusting activity for the Kokoweef fault.« less

  17. Mesozoic rift basins in western desert of Egypt, their southern extension and impact on future exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Taha, M.A.

    1988-08-01

    Rift basins are a primary target of exploration in east, central, and west Africa. These intracratonic rift basins range in age from the Triassic to the Neogene and are filled with lagoonal-lacustrine sand-shale sequences. Several rift basins may be present in the Western Desert of Egypt. In the northeastern African platform, the Mesozoic Tethyan strand lines were previously interpreted to have limited southern extension onto the continent. This concept, based upon a relatively limited amount of subsurface data, has directed and focused the exploration for oil and gas to the northernmost 120 km of the Western Desert of Egypt. Recentmore » well and geophysical data indicate a southerly extension of mesozoic rift basins several hundred kilometers inland from the Mediterranean Sea. Shushan/Faghur and Abu Gharadig/Bahrein basins may represent subparallel Mesozoic basins, trending northeast-southwest. Marine Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian sediments were recently reported from wells drilled approximately 500 km south of the present-day Mediterranean shoreline. The link of these basins with the Sirte basin to the southwest in Libya is not well understood. Exploration is needed to evaluate the hydrocarbon potential of such basins.« less

  18. Comparison of clay mineral stratigraphy to other proxy palaeoclimate indicators in the Mesozoic of NW Europe.

    PubMed

    Ruffell, Alastair; McKinley, Jennifer M; Worden, Richard H

    2002-04-15

    This paper reviews the opportunities and pitfalls associated with using clay mineralogical analysis in palaeoclimatic reconstructions. Following this, conjunctive methods of improving the reliability of clay mineralogical analysis are reviewed. The Mesozoic succession of NW Europe is employed as a case study. This demonstrates the relationship between clay mineralogy and palaeoclimate. Proxy analyses may be integrated with clay mineralogical analysis to provide an assessment of aridity-humidity contrasts in the hinterland climate. As an example, the abundance of kaolinite through the Mesozoic shows that, while interpretations may be difficult, the Mesozoic climate of NW Europe was subject to great changes in rates of continental precipitation. We may compare sedimentological (facies, mineralogy, geochemistry) indicators of palaeoprecipitation with palaeotemperature estimates. The integration of clay mineralogical analyses with other sedimentological proxy indicators of palaeoclimate allows differentiation of palaeoclimatic effects from those of sea-level and tectonic change. We may also observe how widespread palaeoclimate changes were; whether they were diachronous or synchronous; how climate, sea level and tectonics interact to control sedimentary facies and what palaeoclimate indicators are reliable.

  19. Accessory Mineral Depth-Profiling Applied to the Corsican Lower Crust: A Continuous Thermal History of Mesozoic Continental Rifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seymour, N. M.; Stockli, D. F.; Beltrando, M.; Smye, A.

    2015-12-01

    Despite advances in understanding the structural development of hyperextended magma-poor rift margins, the temporal and thermal evolution of lithospheric hyperextension during rifting remains only poorly understood. In contrast to classic pure-shear models, multi-stage rift models that include depth-dependent thinning predict significant lower-crustal reheating during the necking phase due to buoyant rise of the asthenosphere. The Santa Lucia nappe of NE Corsica is an ideal laboratory to test for lower-crustal reheating as it preserves Permian lower crust exhumed from granulitic conditions during Mesozoic Tethyan rifting. This study presents the first use of apatite U-Pb depth-profile thermochronology in conjunction with novel rutile U-Pb and zircon U-Pb thermo- and geochronology to reconstruct a continuous t-T path to constrain the syn-rift thermal evolution of this exposed lower-crustal section. LASS-ICP-MS depth-profile analyses of zircon reveal thin (<10 μm) ~210-180 Ma overgrowths on 300-270 Ma cores in lower-crustal lithologies, indicative of renewed thermal activity during Mesozoic rifting. Cooling due to rapid rift margin exhumation is recorded by the topology of rutile and apatite depth profiles caused by thermally-activated volume diffusion at T >400°C. Lower-crustal rutile reveal a rounded progression from core plateaus at ~170 Ma to 150-145 Ma at the outer 8-10 μm of grains while middle-crustal apatite records 170 Ma cores grading to 140-135 Ma rims. Inverse modeling of rutile profiles suggests the lower crust cooled from 700°C at 200 Ma to 425°C at 140 Ma. Middle-crustal apatite yield a two-stage history, with rapid cooling from 500°C at 200 Ma to 420°C at ~180 Ma followed by slow cooling to 400°C by 160 Ma. Combined with zircon overgrowth ages, these data indicate the Santa Lucia nappe underwent a thermal pulse in the late Triassic-early Jurassic associated with depth-dependent thinning and hyperextension of the Corsican margin.

  20. Pre- versus post-mass extinction divergence of Mesozoic marine reptiles dictated by time-scale dependence of evolutionary rates.

    PubMed

    Motani, Ryosuke; Jiang, Da-Yong; Tintori, Andrea; Ji, Cheng; Huang, Jian-Dong

    2017-05-17

    The fossil record of a major clade often starts after a mass extinction even though evolutionary rates, molecular or morphological, suggest its pre-extinction emergence (e.g. squamates, placentals and teleosts). The discrepancy is larger for older clades, and the presence of a time-scale-dependent methodological bias has been suggested, yet it has been difficult to avoid the bias using Bayesian phylogenetic methods. This paradox raises the question of whether ecological vacancies, such as those after mass extinctions, prompt the radiations. We addressed this problem by using a unique temporal characteristic of the morphological data and a high-resolution stratigraphic record, for the oldest clade of Mesozoic marine reptiles, Ichthyosauromorpha. The evolutionary rate was fastest during the first few million years of ichthyosauromorph evolution and became progressively slower over time, eventually becoming six times slower. Using the later slower rates, estimates of divergence time become excessively older. The fast, initial rate suggests the emergence of ichthyosauromorphs after the end-Permian mass extinction, matching an independent result from high-resolution stratigraphic confidence intervals. These reptiles probably invaded the sea as a new ecosystem was formed after the end-Permian mass extinction. Lack of information on early evolution biased Bayesian clock rates. © 2017 The Author(s).

  1. Pre- versus post-mass extinction divergence of Mesozoic marine reptiles dictated by time-scale dependence of evolutionary rates

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Cheng; Huang, Jian-dong

    2017-01-01

    The fossil record of a major clade often starts after a mass extinction even though evolutionary rates, molecular or morphological, suggest its pre-extinction emergence (e.g. squamates, placentals and teleosts). The discrepancy is larger for older clades, and the presence of a time-scale-dependent methodological bias has been suggested, yet it has been difficult to avoid the bias using Bayesian phylogenetic methods. This paradox raises the question of whether ecological vacancies, such as those after mass extinctions, prompt the radiations. We addressed this problem by using a unique temporal characteristic of the morphological data and a high-resolution stratigraphic record, for the oldest clade of Mesozoic marine reptiles, Ichthyosauromorpha. The evolutionary rate was fastest during the first few million years of ichthyosauromorph evolution and became progressively slower over time, eventually becoming six times slower. Using the later slower rates, estimates of divergence time become excessively older. The fast, initial rate suggests the emergence of ichthyosauromorphs after the end-Permian mass extinction, matching an independent result from high-resolution stratigraphic confidence intervals. These reptiles probably invaded the sea as a new ecosystem was formed after the end-Permian mass extinction. Lack of information on early evolution biased Bayesian clock rates. PMID:28515201

  2. Testing the Mojave-Sonora megashear hypothesis: Evidence from Paleoproterozoic igneous rocks and deformed Mesozoic strata in Sonora, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amato, J.M.; Lawton, T.F.; Mauel, D.J.; Leggett, W.J.; Gonzalez-Leon, C. M.; Farmer, G.L.; Wooden, J.L.

    2009-01-01

    U-Pb ages and Nd isotope values of Proterozoic rocks in Sonora, Mexico, indicate the presence of Caborca-type basement, predicted to lie only south of the Mojave-Sonora mega-shear, 40 km north of the postulated megashear. Granitoids have U-Pb zircon ages of 1763-1737 Ma and 1076 Ma, with ??Nd(t) values from +1.4 to -4.3, typical of the Caborca block. Lower Jurassic strata near the Proterozoic rocks contain large granitic clasts with U-Pb ages and ??Nd(t) values indistinguishable from those of Caborcan basement. Caborca-type basement was thus present at this location north of the megashear by 190 Ma, the depositional age of the Jurassic strata. The Proterozoic rocks are interpreted as parautochthonous, exhumed and juxtaposed against the Mesozoic section by a reverse fault that formed a footwall shortcut across a Jurassic normal fault. Geochronology, isotope geochemistry, and structural geology are therefore inconsistent with Late Jurassic megashear displacement and require either that no major transcurrent structure is present in Sonora or that strike-slip displacement occurred prior to Early Jurassic time. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  3. Melting of subducted continental crust: Geochemical evidence from Mesozoic granitoids in the Dabie-Sulu orogenic belt, east-central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zi-Fu; Liu, Zhi-Bin; Chen, Qi

    2017-09-01

    Syn-collisional and postcollisional granitoids are common in collisional orogens, and they were primarily produced by partial melting of subducted continental crust. This is exemplified by Mesozoic granitoids from the Dabie-Sulu orogenic belt in east-central China. These granitoids were emplaced in small volumes in the Late Triassic (200-206 Ma) and the Late Jurassic (146-167 Ma) but massively in the Early Cretaceous (111-143 Ma). Nevertheless, all of them exhibit arc-like trace element distribution patterns and are enriched in Sr-Nd-Hf isotope compositions, indicating their origination from the ancient continental crust. They commonly contain relict zircons with Neoproterozoic and Triassic U-Pb ages, respectively, consistent with the protolith and metamorphic ages for ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metaigneous rocks in the Dabie-Sulu orogenic belt. Some granitoids show low zircon δ18O values, and SIMS in-situ O isotope analysis reveals that the relict zircons with Neoproterozoic and Triassic U-Pb ages also commonly exhibit low δ18O values. Neoproterozoic U-Pb ages and low δ18O values are the two diagnostic features that distinguish the subducted South China Block from the obducted North China Block. Thus, the magma source of these Mesozoic granitoids has a genetic link to the subducted continental crust of the South China Block. On the other hand, these granitoids contain relict zircons with Paleoproterozoic and Archean U-Pb ages, which are present in both the South and North China Blocks. Taken together, the Mesozoic granitoids in the Dabie-Sulu orogenic belt and its hanging wall have their magma sources that are predominated by the continental crust of the South China Block with minor contributions from the continental crust of the North China Block. The Triassic continental collision between the South and North China Blocks brought the continental crust into the thickened orogen, where they underwent the three episodes of partial melting in the Late Triassic, Late

  4. Deformations and Structural Evolution of Mesozoic Complexes in Western Chukotka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golionko, B. G.; Vatrushkina, E. V.; Verzhbitskii, V. E.; Sokolov, S. D.; Tuchkova, M. I.

    2018-01-01

    Detailed structural investigations have been carried out in the Pevek district to specify tectonic evolution of the Chukotka mesozoids. The earliest south-verging folds F1 formed in Triassic rocks at the first deformation stage DI. These structures are overlapped by the northern-verging folds F2 and overthrusts pertain to the second deformation stage DII. Folding structures F1 and F2 were deformed by shear folds F3, completing stage DII. The DI and DII structures are complicated by roughly NS-trending normal faults marking deformation stage DIII. It has been established that DI is related to the onset of opening of the Amerasian Basin in the Early Jurassic, or, alternatively, to the later accretion of the Kulpolnei ensimatic arc toward the Chukotka microcontinent. DII marks the collision of Siberia and the Chukotka microcontinent in the Late Neocomian. Normal faulting under the roughly E-W-trending extension during DIII is likely related to rift opening of the Podvodnikov and Makarov-Toll basins in the deep Amerasian Basin. Formation of the Okhotsk-Chukotka volcanoplutonic belt completed the structural evolution of the studied region.

  5. Multiple Emplacement and Exhumation History of the Late Mesozoic Dayunshan-Mufushan Batholith in Southeast China and Its Tectonic Significance: 2. Magnetic Fabrics and Gravity Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wenbin; Chen, Yan; Chen, Ke; Wei, Wei; Faure, Michel; Lin, Wei

    2018-01-01

    The Late Mesozoic magmatic province is a prominent feature of the South China Block (SCB). However, the tectonic regimes associated with the magmatism are still elusive. A combined anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility and gravity study has been carried out to determine the fabric patterns and shape at depth of the Dayunshan-Mufushan composite batholith in the north-central SCB. This is a companion paper to Part 1 that presented the structural and geochronological data of this batholith. The magnetic fabrics in the batholith interior predominantly reflect magma flow structures. Two distinct patterns of the magnetic lineations are defined, around NNE-SSW and WNW-ESE trends for the early-stage and late-stage intrusions of the batholith, respectively. The gravity survey reveals that the early-stage intrusion has a main feeder zone located below its northern part, while several linear feeder zones trending NNE-SSW are inferred for the late-stage intrusion. Integrating all results, a two-stage construction of the batholith with distinct tectonic regimes has been established. It is concluded that the early-stage intrusion experienced a southward magma transport during its emplacement, partially assisted by far-field compression from the north at ca. 150 Ma. Conversely, the emplacement and exhumation of the late-stage intrusion was accommodated by a NW-SE crustal stretching involving a lateral magma expansion above the multiple feeder zones (likely corresponding to extensional fractures) and ductile shearing during 132-95 Ma localized mainly along the Dayunshan detachment fault. Finally, we discuss the geodynamic linkage between the paleo-Pacific subduction and the Late Mesozoic tectonomagmatism in the SCB.

  6. Preliminary Depositional and Provenance Records of Mesozoic Basin Evolution and Cenozoic Shortening in the High Andes, La Ramada Fold-Thrust Belt, Southern-Central Andes (32-33°S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackaman-Lofland, C.; Horton, B. K.; Fuentes, F.; Constenius, K. N.; McKenzie, R.; Alvarado, P. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Argentinian Andes define key examples of retroarc shortening and basin evolution above a zone of active subduction. The La Ramada fold-thrust belt (RFTB) in the High Andes provides insights into the relative influence and temporal records of diverse convergent margin processes (e.g. flat-slab subduction, convergent wedge dynamics, structural inversion). The RFTB contains Mesozoic extensional basin strata deformed by later Andean shortening. New detrital zircon U-Pb analyses of Mesozoic rift sediments reveal: (1) a dominant Permo-Triassic age signature (220-280 Ma) associated with proximal sources of effective basement (Choiyoi Group) during Triassic synrift deposition; (2) upsection younging of maximum depositional ages from Late Triassic through Early Cretaceous (230 to 100 Ma) with the increasing influence of western Andean arc sources; and (3) a significant Late Cretaceous influx of Paleozoic (~350-550 Ma) and Proterozoic (~650-1300 Ma) populations during the earliest shift from back-arc post-extensional subsidence to upper-plate shortening. The Cenozoic detrital record of the Manantiales foreland basin (between the Frontal Cordillera and Precordillera) records RFTB deformation prior to flat-slab subduction. A Permo-Triassic Choiyoi age signature dominates the Miocene succession, consistent with sources in the proximal Espinacito range. Subordinate Mesozoic (~80-250 Ma) to Proterozoic (~850-1800 Ma) U-Pb populations record exhumation of the Andean magmatic arc and recycling of different structural levels in the RFTB during thrusting/inversion of Mesozoic rift basin strata and subjacent Paleozoic units. Whereas maximum depositional ages of sampled Manantiales units cluster at 18-20 Ma, the Estancia Uspallata basin (~50 km to the south) shows consistent upsection younging of Cenozoic populations attributed to proximal volcanic centers. Ongoing work will apply low-temperature thermochronology to pinpoint basin accumulation histories and thrust timing.

  7. Associations of daily pediatric asthma emergency department visits with air pollution in Newark, NJ: utilizing time-series and case-crossover study designs.

    PubMed

    Gleason, Jessie A; Fagliano, Jerald A

    2015-10-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases affecting children. This study assesses the associations of ozone and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) with pediatric emergency department visits in the urban environment of Newark, NJ. Two study designs were utilized and evaluated for usability. We obtained daily emergency department visits among children aged 3-17 years with a primary diagnosis of asthma during April to September for 2004-2007. Both a time-stratified case-crossover study design with bi-directional control sampling and a time-series study design were utilized. Lagged effects (1-d through 5-d lag, 3-d average, and 5-d average) of ozone and PM2.5 were explored and a dose-response analysis comparing the bottom 5th percentile of 3-d average lag ozone with each 5 percentile increase was performed. Associations of interquartile range increase in same-day ozone were similar between the time-series and case-crossover study designs (RR = 1.08, 95% CI 1.04-1.12) and (OR = 1.10, 95% CI 1.06-1.14), respectively. Similar associations were seen for 1-day lag and 3-day average lag ozone levels. PM2.5 was not associated with the outcome in either study design. Dose-response assessment indicated a statistically significant and increasing association around 50-55 ppb consistent for both study designs. Ozone was statistically positively associated with pediatric asthma ED visits in Newark, NJ. Our results were generally comparable across the time-series and case-crossover study designs, indicating both are useful to assess local air pollution impacts.

  8. Revisiting the Mesozoic opening of the Southeastern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marton, G.; Pascoe, R. P.

    2016-12-01

    The Southeastern Gulf of Mexico (SEGOM) is defined here as the seaway between Yucatan and Florida, south of the Tampa Embayment. This area is regarded as a southward propagating rift in the Gulf of Mexico. There is an overwhelming amount of previous evidence that the Yucatan block rotated counterclockwise about 42 degrees around a pole located just north of present-day Cuba (23oN, 84oW) during the Late Jurassic to Earliest Cretaceous oceanic spreading phase. North of the pole in the SEGOM the rotational movement of Yucatan was accommodated by a uniformly increasing amount of SW-NE extension. The degree of extension north of 25oN was large enough to result in rifting and oceanic spreading. Lack of salt in the area south of the Tampa embayment indicates that the SEGOM was not affected by the large amount of NW-SE continental extension as observed in the rest of the Gulf of Mexico. Thus, the area between Yucatan and the Sarasota arch remained a land bridge between the proto- GOM and the Proto-Caribbean and formed a barrier to salt deposition. During the period of late Jurassic oceanic crust formation (and Yucatan rotation), the southern tip of the oceanic spreading center propagated south from 27oN to 25oN, or about 220 km. In the 220 km long zone from 25oN to the pole (23oN) the rotation of Yucatan was accommodated by continental rifting only. The validity of the above outlined propagating rift model in the SEGOM is also supported by the age differences in the observed post-rift unconformities along its margins. At the edge of the salt basin to the north, the post-rift unconformity in the upper crust occurs at the base of the Louann salt and thus is Callovian in age. In the southern continental rift segment of the SEGOM, a seismic to well tie at the DSDP Site 535 shows that the post-rift unconformity is no younger than Late Berriasian to Early Valanginian. This latter age bracket constrains a) the cessation of continental rifting in the SEGOM, b) the time when the

  9. A diminutive perinate European Enantiornithes reveals an asynchronous ossification pattern in early birds

    DOE PAGES

    Knoll, Fabien; Chiappe, Luis M.; Sanchez, Sophie; ...

    2018-03-05

    Fossils of juvenile Mesozoic birds provide insight into the early evolution of avian development, however such fossils are rare. The analysis of the ossification sequence in these early-branching birds has the potential to address important questions about their comparative developmental biology and to help understand their morphological evolution and ecological differentiation. Here we report on an early juvenile enantiornithine specimen from the Early Cretaceous of Europe, which sheds new light on the osteogenesis in this most species-rich clade of Mesozoic birds. Consisting of a nearly complete skeleton, it is amongst the smallest known Mesozoic avian fossils representing post-hatching stages ofmore » development. Finally, comparisons between this new specimen and other known early juvenile enantiornithines support a clade-wide asynchronous pattern of osteogenesis in the sternum and the vertebral column, and strongly indicate that the hatchlings of these phylogenetically basal birds varied greatly in size and tempo of skeletal maturation.« less

  10. A diminutive perinate European Enantiornithes reveals an asynchronous ossification pattern in early birds

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, Fabien; Chiappe, Luis M.; Sanchez, Sophie

    Fossils of juvenile Mesozoic birds provide insight into the early evolution of avian development, however such fossils are rare. The analysis of the ossification sequence in these early-branching birds has the potential to address important questions about their comparative developmental biology and to help understand their morphological evolution and ecological differentiation. Here we report on an early juvenile enantiornithine specimen from the Early Cretaceous of Europe, which sheds new light on the osteogenesis in this most species-rich clade of Mesozoic birds. Consisting of a nearly complete skeleton, it is amongst the smallest known Mesozoic avian fossils representing post-hatching stages ofmore » development. Finally, comparisons between this new specimen and other known early juvenile enantiornithines support a clade-wide asynchronous pattern of osteogenesis in the sternum and the vertebral column, and strongly indicate that the hatchlings of these phylogenetically basal birds varied greatly in size and tempo of skeletal maturation.« less

  11. A diminutive perinate European Enantiornithes reveals an asynchronous ossification pattern in early birds.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Fabien; Chiappe, Luis M; Sanchez, Sophie; Garwood, Russell J; Edwards, Nicholas P; Wogelius, Roy A; Sellers, William I; Manning, Phillip L; Ortega, Francisco; Serrano, Francisco J; Marugán-Lobón, Jesús; Cuesta, Elena; Escaso, Fernando; Sanz, Jose Luis

    2018-03-05

    Fossils of juvenile Mesozoic birds provide insight into the early evolution of avian development, however such fossils are rare. The analysis of the ossification sequence in these early-branching birds has the potential to address important questions about their comparative developmental biology and to help understand their morphological evolution and ecological differentiation. Here we report on an early juvenile enantiornithine specimen from the Early Cretaceous of Europe, which sheds new light on the osteogenesis in this most species-rich clade of Mesozoic birds. Consisting of a nearly complete skeleton, it is amongst the smallest known Mesozoic avian fossils representing post-hatching stages of development. Comparisons between this new specimen and other known early juvenile enantiornithines support a clade-wide asynchronous pattern of osteogenesis in the sternum and the vertebral column, and strongly indicate that the hatchlings of these phylogenetically basal birds varied greatly in size and tempo of skeletal maturation.

  12. Mesozoic Magmatism and Base-Metal Mineralization in the Fortymile Mining District, Eastern Alaska - Initial Results of Petrographic, Geochemical, and Isotopic Studies in the Mount Veta Area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dusel-Bacon, Cynthia; Slack, John F.; Aleinikoff, John N.; Mortensen, James K.

    2009-01-01

    We present here the initial results of a petrographic, geochemical, and isotopic study of Mesozoic intrusive rocks and spatially associated Zn-Pb-Ag-Cu-Au prospects in the Fortymile mining district in the southern Eagle quadrangle, Alaska. Analyzed samples include mineralized and unmineralized drill core from 2006 and 2007 exploration by Full Metal Minerals, USA, Inc., at the Little Whiteman (LWM) and Fish prospects, and other mineralized and plutonic samples collected within the mining district is part of the USGS study. Three new ion microprobe U-Pb zircon ages are: 210 +- 3 Ma for quartz diorite from LWM, 187 +- 3 Ma for quartz monzonite from Fish, and 70.5 +- 1.1 Ma for altered rhyolite porphyry from Fish. We also present 11 published and unpublished Mesozoic thermal ionization mass spectrometric U-Pb zircon and titanite ages and whole-rock geochemical data for the Mesozoic plutonic rocks. Late Triassic and Early Jurassic plutons generally have intermediate compositions and are slightly foliated, consistent with synkinematic intrusion. Several Early Jurassic plutons contain magmatic epidote, indicating emplacement of the host plutons at mesozonal crustal depths of greater than 15 km. Trace-element geochemical data indicate an arc origin for the granitoids, with an increase in the crustal component with time. Preliminary study of drill core from the LWM Zn-Pb-Cu-Ag prospect supports a carbonate-replacement model of mineralization. LWM massive sulfides consist of sphalerite, galena, and minor pyrite and chalcopyrite, in a gangue of calcite and lesser quartz; silver resides in Sb-As-Ag sulfosalts and pyrargyrite, and probably in submicroscopic inclusions within galena. Whole-rock analyses of LWM drill cores also show elevated In, an important metal in high-technology products. Hypogene mineralized rocks at Fish, below the secondary Zn-rich zone, are associated with a carbonate host and also may be of replacement origin, or alternatively, may be a magnetite

  13. Mesozoic Compressional Folds of the Nansha Waters, Southern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, R.; Liu, H.; Yao, Y.; Wang, Y.

    2017-12-01

    As an important part of the South China Sea, the southern margin of the South China Sea is fundamental to understand the interaction of the Eurasian, Pacific and Indian-Australian plates and the evolution of the South China Sea. Some multi-channel seismic profiles of the Nansha waters together with published drillings and dredge data were correlated for interpretation. The strata of the study region can be divided into the upper, middle and lower structural layers. The upper and middle structural layers with extensional tectonics are Cenozoic; the lower structural layer suffered compression is Mesozoic. Further structural restoration was done to remove the Cenozoic tectonic influence and to calculate the Mesozoic tectonic compression ratios. The results indicate that two diametrically opposite orientations of compressive stress, S(S)E towards N(N)W orientation and N(N)W towards S(S)E orientation respectively, once existed in the lower structural layer of the study area and shared the same variation trend. The compression ratio values gradually decrease both from the north to the south and from the west to the east in each stress orientation. The phenomena may be related to the opening of the proto-South China Sea (then located in south of the Nansha block) and the rate of the Nansha block drifted northward in Late Jurassic to Late Cretaceous, which had pushed the Nansha block drifted northward until it collided and sutured with the Southern China Margin. Thus the opening of the present-day South China Sea may be related to this suture zone, which was tectonically weakness zone.Key words: Mesozoic compression; structural restoration; proto-South China Sea; Nansha waters; Southern South China Sea; Acknowledgements: The work was granted by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 41476039, 91328205, 41576068 and 41606080).

  14. Correspondence of Mesozoic Eustatic Sea-Level Change with Palaeoclimate Proxies: Evidence for Glacio-Eustasy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, M.; Davies, A.; Gréselle, B.

    2011-12-01

    Large-scale changes in stratigraphic architecture and facies that are brought about by changes in relative sea-level have been the focus of much academic and industry study over the last few decades. The authors, plus numerous colleagues, have studied over 11,000 stratigraphic sections worldwide. By applying biostratigraphic and chemostratigraphic calibration in suitable locations from this dataset it is possible to demonstrate over 250 synchronous global sequence stratigraphic events in the Phanerozoic including over 100 in the Mesozoic. This then raises the question - what causes globally synchronous eustatic sea-level change? To answer this question requires an understanding of both the pace and amplitude of the observed eustatic sea-level change. In successions where duration can be deduced from orbital forcing cycles, our observed sea-level changes appear to be relatively rapid - less than 500,000 years, for example, for sea-level rises in the Late Jurassic. The amplitude of such rises is in the order of tens of metres. Such rates and amplitudes as inferred from our global model preclude tectonism as a primary driver and implicate glacio-eustacy as a key driving mechanism, even in supposed "greenhouse times". Given the clear economic importance of understanding the underlying mechanisms driving this eustatic change we have compiled records of key isotopic proxies through the entire Mesozoic in an effort to explore the relationship between global sea-level and palaeoclimate. Our research reveals a clear link between many large-scale maximum flooding events with known episodes of palaeoclimatic warming and between climatic cooling events and lowstand intervals, further implicating glacio-eustacy. In addition to the isotopic proxy evidence we have also compiled direct indicators for the occurrence of cold polar conditions, including the presence of ice sheets, in the Mesozoic (e.g. tillites, glendonites). This has been incorporated into plate tectonic

  15. Mesozoic invasion of crust by MORB-source asthenospheric magmas, U.S. Cordilleran interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leventhal, Janet A.; Reid, Mary R.; Montana, Art; Holden, Peter

    1995-05-01

    Mafic and ultramafic xenoliths entrained in lavas of the Cima volcanic field have Nd and Sr isotopic ratios indicative of a source similar to that of mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB). Nd and Sr internal isochrons demonstrate a Late Cretaceous intrusion age. These results, combined with evidence for emplacement in the lower crust and upper mantle, indicate invasion of the lower crust by asthenospheric magmas in the Late Cretaceous. Constituting the first prima facie evidence for depleted-mantle magmatism in the Basin and Range province prior to late Cenozoic volcanism, these results lend key support to models suggesting crustal heating by ascent of asthenosphere in the Mesozoic Cordilleran interior.

  16. Mesozoic intracontinental underthrust in the SE margin of the North China Block: Insights from the Xu-Huai thrust-and-fold belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Liangshu; Yin, Hongwei; Faure, Michel; Chen, Yan

    2017-06-01

    The Xu-Huai thrust-and-fold belt, located in the southeastern margin of the North China Block, consists mainly of thrust and folded pre-Mesozoic strata. Its geodynamic evolution and tectonic setting are topics of long debate. This paper provides new evidence from geological mapping, structural analysis, and making balance cross-sections, with restoration of cross-sections. Results suggest that this belt was subjected to two-phase deformation, including an early-phase regional-scale NW-ward thrust and fold, and a late-phase extension followed by the emplacement of dioritic, monzodioritic porphyrites dated at 131-135 Ma and locally strike-slip shearing. According to the mapping, field observations and drill-hole data, three structural units were distinguished, namely, (1) the pre-Neoproterozoic crystalline basement in the eastern segment, (2) the nappe unit or the thrust-and-fold zone in the central segment, which is composed of Neoproterozoic to Ordovician carbonate rocks and Carboniferous-Permian coal-bearing rocks, about 2600 m thick, and (3) the western frontal zone. A major decollement fault has also been identified in the base of the nappe unit, on which dozen-meter to km-scale thrust-and-fold bodies were commonly developed. All pre-Mesozoic depositional sequences were involved into a widespread thrust and fold event. Six uncompetent-rock layers with biostratigraphic ages (Nanjing University, 1996) have been recognized, and each uncompetent-rock layer occurred mainly in the top of the footwall, playing an important role in the development of the Xu-Huai thrust-and-fold belt. Geometry of the major decollement fault suggests that the nappe unit of this belt was rooted in its eastern side, near the Tan-Lu Fault Zone. Two geological cross-sections were chosen for structural balancing and restoration. From the balanced cross-sections, ramp-flat and imbricated faults as well as fault-related folds were identified. A shortening of 20.6-29.6 km was obtained from

  17. New insights into Mesozoic cycad evolution: an exploration of anatomically preserved Cycadaceae seeds from the Jurassic Oxford Clay biota

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Andrew R.; Raine, Robert J.; Rothwell, Gar W.; Hollingworth, Neville T.J.

    2017-01-01

    Most knowledge concerning Mesozoic Era floras has come from compression fossils. This has been augmented in the last 20 years by rarer permineralized material showing cellular preservation. Here, we describe a new genus of anatomically preserved gymnosperm seed from the Callovian–Oxfordian (Jurassic) Oxford Clay Formation (UK), using a combination of traditional sectioning and synchrotron radiation X-ray micro-tomography (SRXMT). Oxfordiana motturii gen. et sp. nov. is large and bilaterally symmetrical. It has prominent external ribs, and has a three-layered integument comprising: a narrow outer layer of thick walled cells; a thick middle parenchymatous layer; and innermost a thin fleshy layer. The integument has a longitudinal interior groove and micropyle, enveloping a nucellus with a small pollen chamber. The large size, bilateral symmetry and integumentary groove demonstrate an affinity for the new species within the cycads. Moreover, the internal groove in extant taxa is an autapomorphy of the genus Cycas, where it facilitates seed germination. Based upon the unique seed germination mechanism shared with living species of the Cycadaceae, we conclude that O. motturii is a member of the stem-group lineage leading to Cycas after the Jurassic divergence of the Cycadaceae from other extant cycads. SRXMT—for the first time successfully applied to fossils already prepared as slides—reveals the distribution of different mineral phases within the fossil, and allows us to evaluate the taphonomy of Oxfordiana. An early pyrite phase replicates the external surfaces of individual cells, a later carbonate component infilling void spaces. The resulting taphonomic model suggests that the relatively small size of the fossils was key to their exceptional preservation, concentrating sulfate-reducing bacteria in a locally closed microenvironment and thus facilitating soft-tissue permineralization. PMID:28875075

  18. Largest known Mesozoic multituberculate from Eurasia and implications for multituberculate evolution and biology.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; Zhang, Xingliao; Pu, Hanyong; Jia, Songhai; Zhang, Jiming; Lü, Junchang; Meng, Jin

    2015-10-22

    A new multituberculate, Yubaartar zhongyuanensis gen. and sp. nov., is reported from the Upper Cretaceous of Luanchuan County, Henan Province, China. The holotype of the new taxon is a partial skeleton with nearly complete cranium and associated lower jaws with in situ dentitions. The new species is the southern-most record of a Late Cretaceous multituberculate from outside of the Mongolian Plateau in Asia and represents the largest known Mesozoic multituberculate from Eurasia. The new specimen displays some intriguing features previously unknown in multituberculates, such as the first evidence of replacement of the ultimate upper premolar and a unique paleopathological case in Mesozoic mammals in which the animal with a severely broken right tibia could heal and survive in natural condition. The phylogenetic analysis based on craniodental characters places Yubaartar as the immediate outgroup of Taeniolabidoidea, a group consisting of a North American clade and an Asian clade. This relationship indicates at least a faunal interchange of multituberculates before the K-Pg transition. The new evidence further supports the hypothesis that disparity in dental complexity, which relates to animal diets, increased with generic richness and disparity in body size, and that an adaptive shift towards increased herbivory across the K-Pg transitional interval.

  19. Mesozoic to Eocene ductile deformation of western Central Iran: From Cimmerian collisional orogeny to Eocene exhumation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargaranbafghi, Fariba; Neubauer, Franz; Genser, Johann; Faghih, Ali; Kusky, Timothy

    2012-09-01

    To advance our understanding of the Mesozoic to Eocene tectonics and kinematics of basement units exposed in the south-western Central Iran plateau, this paper presents new structural and thermochronological data from the Chapedony metamorphic core complex and hangingwall units, particularly from the Posht-e-Badam complex. The overall Paleogene structural characteristics of the area are related to an oblique convergent zone. The Saghand area represents part of a deformation zone between the Arabian and Eurasian plates, and can be interpreted to result from the Central Iran intracontinental deformation acting as a weak zone during Mesozoic to Paleogene times. Field and microstructural evidence reveal that the metamorphic and igneous rocks suffered a ductile shear deformation including mylonitization at the hangingwall boundary of the Eocene Chapedony metamorphic core complex. Comparison of deformation features in the mylonites and other structural features within the footwall unit leads to the conclusion that the mylonites were formed in a subhorizontal shear zone by NE-SW stretching during Middle to Late Eocene extensional tectonics. The Chapedony metamorphic core complex is characterized by amphibolite-facies metamorphism and development of S and S-L tectonic fabrics. The Posht-e-Badam complex was deformed by two stages during Cimmerian tectonic processes forming the Paleo-Tethyan suture.

  20. Organic geochemistry, lithology, and paleontology of Tertiary and Mesozoic rocks from wells on the Alaska Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLean, Hugh James

    1977-01-01

    Core chips and drill cuttings from eight of the nine wells drilled along the Bering Sea lowlands of the Alaska Peninsula were subjected to lithologic and paleontologic analyses. Results suggest that at least locally, sedimentary rocks of Tertiary age contain oil and gas source and reservoir rocks capable of generating and accumulating liquid and gas hydrocarbons. Paleogene strata rich in organic carbon are immature. However, strata in offshore basins to the north and south may have been subjected to a more productive thermal environment. Total organic carbon content of fine grained Neogene strata appears to be significantly lower than in Paleogene rocks, possibly reflecting nonmarine or brackish water environments of deposition. Neogene sandstone beds locally yield high values of porosity and permeability to depths of about 8,000 feet (2,439 m). Below this depth, reservoir potential rapidly declines. The General Petroleum, Great Basins No. 1 well drilled along the shore of Bristol Bay reached granitic rocks. Other wells drilled closer to the axis of the present volcanic arc indicate that both Tertiary and Mesozoic sedimentary rocks have been intruded by dikes and sills of andesite and basalt. Although the Alaska Peninsula has been the locus of igneous activity throughout much of Mesozoic and Tertiary time, thermal maturity indicators such as vitrinite reflectance and coal rank suggest, that on a regional scale, sedimentary rocks have not been subjected to abnormally high geothermal gradients.

  1. A drowned Mesozoic bird breeding colony from the Late Cretaceous of Transylvania.

    PubMed

    Dyke, Gareth; Vremir, Mátyás; Kaiser, Gary; Naish, Darren

    2012-06-01

    Despite a rapidly improving fossil record, the reproductive biology of Mesozoic birds remains poorly known: only a handful of undisputed, isolated Cretaceous eggs (some containing embryonic remains) are known. We report here the first fossil evidence for a breeding colony of Mesozoic birds, preserved at the Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Oarda de Jos (Od) site in the Sebeş area of Transylvania, Romania. A lens of calcareous mudstone with minimum dimensions of 80 cm length, 50 cm width and 20 cm depth contains thousands of tightly packed, morphologically homogenous eggshell fragments, seven near-complete eggs and neonatal and adult avialan skeletal elements. Eggshell forms 70-80 % of the matrix, and other fossils are entirely absent. The bones exhibit clear characters of the Cretaceous avialan clade Enantiornithes, and the eggshell morphology is also consistent with this identification. Both taphonomy and lithology show that the components of this lens were deposited in a single flood event, and we conclude that it represents the drowned remains of a larger enantiornithine breeding colony, swamped by rising water, washed a short distance and deposited in a shallow, low-energy pond. The same fate often befalls modern bird colonies. Such a large concentration of breeding birds suggests aquatic feeding in this species, augments our understanding of enantiornithine biology and shows that colonial nesting was not unique to crown birds.

  2. Evolution of mantis shrimps (Stomatopoda, Malacostraca) in the light of new Mesozoic fossils

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background We describe new specimens of Mesozoic mantis shrimps (Stomatopoda, Malacostraca) that exhibit morphological and developmental information previously unknown. Results Specimens assigned to the taxon Sculda exhibit preserved pleopods, thoracopods including all four raptorial limbs as well as details of antennae and antennulae. The pleopods and the antennulae resemble those of the modern mantis shrimps, but the raptorial limbs are not as differentiated as in the modern species. In some specimens, the first raptorial limb (second thoracopod) is not significantly larger than the similar-sized posterior three pairs (as in extant species), but instead these appendages become progressively smaller along the series. In this respect they resemble certain Palaeozoic stomatopods. Another specimen, most likely belonging to another species, has one pair of large anterior raptorial thoracopods, a median-sized pair and two more pairs of small-sized raptorial appendages and, thus, shows a new, previously unknown type of morphology. A single specimen of Pseudosculda laevis also exhibits the size of the raptorial limbs; they are differentiated as in modern species, one large pair and three small pairs. Furthermore, we report additional larval specimens and show also post-larval changes, e.g., of the tail fan. Conclusions These new data are used to reconsider the phylogeny of Stomatopoda. We still need a strict taxonomical revision of the Mesozoic mantis shrimps, but this first examination already demonstrates the importance of these fossils for understanding mantis shrimp evolution and the interpretation of evolutionary pathways of particular features. PMID:20858249

  3. Changing sources of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans in sediments and ecological risk for nekton in the lower Passaic River and Newark Bay, New Jersey, USA.

    PubMed

    Khairy, Mohammed; Barrett, Kirk; Lohmann, Rainer

    2016-03-01

    Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) were measured in sediments (surface and deeper sediments) and porewater of the lower Passaic River and Newark Bay (New Jersey, USA) to apportion their sources and conduct an ecological risk assessment. Positive matrix factorization was applied to identify sources of PCDD/Fs. Five source profiles were extracted from the positive matrix factorization model applied to the sediment samples including chloranil, combustion, polychlorinated biphenyl impurities, mixed urban sources, and the historical contamination from the former Diamond Alkali plant. The ecological risk assessment was estimated using several lines of evidence depending on site-specific data (blue crab and fish samples representing different feeding habits and positions in the trophic wood web of the river). Porewater concentrations gave the best estimates of lipid concentrations especially in the blue crab samples (with an average factor difference of 3.8). Calculated hazard quotients (HQs) for the fish samples and blue crab were >1 based on the no-effect concentration and tissue screening concentration approaches. At the same time, calculated porewater toxic units were >1. Sediment concentrations exceeded the published sediment quality guidelines for the protection of fish and benthic species, indicating the existence of significant risk to the aquatic life in the Passaic River. Accordingly, further actions and control measures are needed to reduce the emission of PCDD/Fs from ongoing sources. © 2015 SETAC.

  4. Beliefs Regarding Asthma Management Relating to Asthma Action Plans (AAPs) of African American Caregivers Residing in Newark, New Jersey Public Housing Communities.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Frank; Steefel, Lorraine

    The purpose of this study was to explore the beliefs regarding asthma management and Asthma Action Plans (AAPs) of African American caregivers residing in three New Jersey public housing communities in Newark, New Jersey. A qualitative methods design was accomplished using semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of nine African American caregivers of children with asthma. Information was coded using N'VIVO™; the textual analysis combined codes into categories, which were then assembled into themes. Self-determination was found to be a fundamental goal of asthma management; however, three themes emerged as barriers and facilitators to this goal: challenges in the urban environment, preference of familial methods, and access to medical care. Findings from this study regarding minority caregivers' beliefs regarding difficulty navigating the health care system coupled with insurance instability, leading to use of Emergency Departments, are consistent with past research. Although caregivers expressed belief in use of prescribed medications as indicated on AAPs, familial methods, found to provide a sense of control over asthma, were preferred. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Contact zone permeability at intrusion boundaries: New results from hydraulic testing and geophysical logging in the Newark Rift Basin, New York, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matter, J.M.; Goldberg, D.S.; Morin, R.H.; Stute, M.

    2006-01-01

    Hydraulic tests and geophysical logging performed in the Palisades sill and the underlying sedimentary rocks in the NE part of the Newark Rift Basin, New York, USA, confirm that the particular transmissive zones are localized within the dolerite-sedimentary rock contact zone and within a narrow interval below this contact zone that is characterized by the occurrence of small layers of chilled dolerite. Transmissivity values determined from fluid injection, aquifer testing, and flowmeter measurements generally fall in the range of 8.1E-08 to 9.95E-06 m2/s and correspond to various scales of investigation. The analysis of acoustic and optical BHTV images reveals two primary fracture sets within the dolerite and the sedimentary rocks - subhorizontal fractures, intersected by subvertical ones. Despite being highly fractured either with subhorizontal, subvertical or both fracture populations, the dolerite above and the sedimentary rocks below the contact zone and the zone with the layers of chilled dolerite are significantly less conductive. The distribution of the particular conductive intervals is not a function of the two dominant fracture populations or their density but rather of the intrusion path of the sill. The intrusion caused thermal fracturing and cracking of both formations, resulting in higher permeability along the contact zone. ?? Springer-Verlag 2005.

  6. Role of black carbon in the sorption of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans at the Diamond Alkali superfund site, Newark Bay, New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Matthew K; Friedman, Carey; Luey, Pamela; Lohmann, Rainer

    2011-05-15

    The sorption of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) to organic carbon (OC) and black carbon (BC) was measured in two sediment cores taken near the Diamond Alkali superfund site (DA) in the Passaic River and Newark Bay, New Jersey (U.S.A.). An OC partitioning model and a BC-inclusive, Freundlich distribution model were used to interpret measurements of freely dissolved PCDD/Fs using passive samplers in sediment incubations, together with measured sedimentary concentrations of OC, BC, and PCDD/Fs. Samples were also analyzed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as controls on the two distribution models. The OC partitioning model underpredicted the distribution of PAHs and PCDD/Fs by 10-100-fold. The Freundlich model predicted the distribution of PAHs at the DA to within a factor of 2-3 of observations. Black carbon-water partition coefficients (K(iBC)) for PCDD/Fs, derived from literature results of both field and laboratory studies differed up to 1000-fold from values derived from this study. Contrary to expectations, PCDDs displayed stronger sorption than either PCDFs or PAHs relative to their subcooled liquid aqueous solubilities. Even though the presence of BC in the sediments reduced the overall bioavailability of PCDD/Fs by >90%, the sediments at 2 m depth continue to display the highest pore water activities of PCDD/Fs.

  7. Geochemical and Nd-Sr isotopic constraints on the genesis of Mesozoic alkaline magmatism in Tu Le basin, Northern Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, T. A.; Tran, T. H.; Lan, C. Y.; Chung, S. L.; Lo, C. H.; Wang, P. L.; Lee, T. Y.; Merztman, S. A.

    2003-04-01

    China, we propose an intraplate lithospheric extension setting to account for the Jurassic-Cretaceous magmatism whose generation postdated the continental collision between the Indochina and South China blocks in the early Triassic. Formed originally in the western margin of the South China block, SW China, the Tu Le basin and associated Mesozoic magmatic rocks were transported southeastward to the present location by the mid-Tertiary sinistral displacement of the Ailao Shan-Red River shear zone, related to the India-Asia collision.

  8. Reconstruction of crustal blocks of California on the basis of initial strontium isotopic compositions of Mesozoic granitic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kistler, Ronald Wayne; Peterman, Zell E.

    1978-01-01

    Initial 87Sr/ 86 Sr was determined for samples of Mesozoic granitic rocks in the vicinity of the Garlock fault zone in California. These data along with similar data from the Sierra Nevada and along the San Andreas fault system permit a reconstruction of basement rocks offset by the Cenozoic lateral faulting along both the San Andreas and Garlock fault systems. The location of the line of initial 87Sr/ 86 Sr = 0.7060 can be related to the edge of the Precambrian continental crust in the western United States. Our model explains the present configuration of the edge of Precambrian continental crust as the result of two stages of rifting that occurred about 1,250 to 800 m.y. ago, during Belt sedimentation, and about 600 to 350 m.y. ago, prior to and during the development of the Cordilleran geosyncline and to left-lateral translation along a locus of disturbance identified in the central Mojave Desert. The variations in Rb, Sr, and initial 87Sr/ 86 Sr of the Mesozoic granitic rocks are interpreted as due to variations in composition and age of the source materials of the granitic rocks. The variations of Rb, Sr, and initial 87Sr/ 86 Sr in Mesozoic granitic rocks, the sedimentation history during the late Precambrian and Paleozoic, and the geographic position of loci of Mesozoic magmatism in the western United States are related to the development of the continental margin and different types of lithosphere during rifting.

  9. Mesozoic paleogeography and paleoclimates - A discussion of the diverse greenhouse and hothouse conditions of an alien world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holz, Michael

    2015-08-01

    The Mesozoic was the time of the break-up of Pangaea, with profound consequences not only for the paleocontinental configuration, but also for paleoclimates and for the evolution of life. Cool greenhouse conditions alternated with warm greenhouse and even hothouse conditions, with global average temperatures around 6-9 °C warmer than the present ones. There are only sparse and controversial evidence for polar ice; meanwhile, extensive evaporitic and desertic deposits are well described. Global sea levels were mainly high, and the content of atmospheric O2 was varying between 15 and 25%. These conditions make the Mesozoic Earth an alien world compared to present-day conditions. Degassing from volcanism linked to the rifting process of Pangaea and methane emissions from reptilian biotas were climate-controlling factors because they enhanced atmospheric CO2 concentrations up to 16 times compared to present-day levels. The continental break-up modified paleopositions and shoreline configurations of the landmasses, generating huge epicontinental seas and altering profoundly the oceanic circulation. The Mesozoic was also a time of important impact events as probable triggers for "impact winters"; and for the Era at least nine huge (diameter > 20 km) impact structures are known. This paper presents an abridged but updated overview of the Mesozoic paleogeographic and paleoclimatic variations, characterizing each period and sub-period in terms of paleoclimatic state and main tectonic and climatic events, and provides a brief geologic, stratigraphic, paleoclimatic and taphonomic characterization of dinosaur occurrences as recorded in the Brazilian continental basins.

  10. Sedimentation History and Provenance Analysis of a Late Mesozoic Rifting Event at Tavan Har, East Gobi, Mongolia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Sarah Cain

    2005-01-01

    The East Gobi Basin (EGB), which covers over 1.5 million square kilometers in southeastern Mongolia, is one of several basins in eastern China and Mongolia that was formed by extension and intracontinental rifting during the late Mesozoic. For reasons that are poorly understood, the continental lithosphere covering areas that are now known as…

  11. Evolutionary history of Otophysi (Teleostei), a major clade of the modern freshwater fishes: Pangaean origin and Mesozoic radiation.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Masanori; Miya, Masaki; Mabuchi, Kohji; Saitoh, Kenji; Nishida, Mutsumi

    2011-06-22

    Freshwater harbors approximately 12,000 fish species accounting for 43% of the diversity of all modern fish. A single ancestral lineage evolved into about two-thirds of this enormous biodiversity (≈ 7900 spp.) and is currently distributed throughout the world's continents except Antarctica. Despite such remarkable species diversity and ubiquity, the evolutionary history of this major freshwater fish clade, Otophysi, remains largely unexplored. To gain insight into the history of otophysan diversification, we constructed a timetree based on whole mitogenome sequences across 110 species representing 55 of the 64 families. Partitioned maximum likelihood analysis based on unambiguously aligned sequences (9923 bp) confidently recovered the monophyly of Otophysi and the two constituent subgroups (Cypriniformes and Characiphysi). The latter clade comprised three orders (Gymnotiformes, Characiformes, Siluriformes), and Gymnotiformes was sister to the latter two groups. One of the two suborders in Characiformes (Characoidei) was more closely related to Siluriformes than to its own suborder (Citharinoidei), rendering the characiforms paraphyletic. Although this novel relationship did not receive strong statistical support, it was supported by analyzing independent nuclear markers. A relaxed molecular clock Bayesian analysis of the divergence times and reconstruction of ancestral habitats on the timetree suggest a Pangaean origin and Mesozoic radiation of otophysans. The present timetree demonstrates that survival of the ancestral lineages through the two consecutive mass extinctions on Pangaea, and subsequent radiations during the Jurassic through early Cretaceous shaped the modern familial diversity of otophysans. This evolutionary scenario is consistent with recent arguments based on biogeographic inferences and molecular divergence time estimates. No fossil otophysan, however, has been recorded before the Albian, the early Cretaceous 100-112 Ma, creating an over 100

  12. Evolutionary history of Otophysi (Teleostei), a major clade of the modern freshwater fishes: Pangaean origin and Mesozoic radiation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Freshwater harbors approximately 12,000 fish species accounting for 43% of the diversity of all modern fish. A single ancestral lineage evolved into about two-thirds of this enormous biodiversity (≈ 7900 spp.) and is currently distributed throughout the world's continents except Antarctica. Despite such remarkable species diversity and ubiquity, the evolutionary history of this major freshwater fish clade, Otophysi, remains largely unexplored. To gain insight into the history of otophysan diversification, we constructed a timetree based on whole mitogenome sequences across 110 species representing 55 of the 64 families. Results Partitioned maximum likelihood analysis based on unambiguously aligned sequences (9923 bp) confidently recovered the monophyly of Otophysi and the two constituent subgroups (Cypriniformes and Characiphysi). The latter clade comprised three orders (Gymnotiformes, Characiformes, Siluriformes), and Gymnotiformes was sister to the latter two groups. One of the two suborders in Characiformes (Characoidei) was more closely related to Siluriformes than to its own suborder (Citharinoidei), rendering the characiforms paraphyletic. Although this novel relationship did not receive strong statistical support, it was supported by analyzing independent nuclear markers. A relaxed molecular clock Bayesian analysis of the divergence times and reconstruction of ancestral habitats on the timetree suggest a Pangaean origin and Mesozoic radiation of otophysans. Conclusions The present timetree demonstrates that survival of the ancestral lineages through the two consecutive mass extinctions on Pangaea, and subsequent radiations during the Jurassic through early Cretaceous shaped the modern familial diversity of otophysans. This evolutionary scenario is consistent with recent arguments based on biogeographic inferences and molecular divergence time estimates. No fossil otophysan, however, has been recorded before the Albian, the early Cretaceous 100

  13. Late Cretaceous tectonothermal evolution of the southern Lhasa terrane, South Tibet: Consequence of a Mesozoic Andean-type orogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xin; Zhang, Ze-ming; Klemd, Reiner; He, Zhen-yu; Tian, Zuo-lin

    2018-04-01

    The Lhasa terrane of the southern Tibetan Plateau participated in a Mesozoic Andean-type orogeny caused by the northward subduction of the Neo-Tethyan oceanic lithosphere. However, metamorphic rocks, which can unravel details of the geodynamic evolution, are rare and only exposed in the south-eastern part of the Lhasa terrane. Therefore, we conducted a detailed petrological, geochemical and U-Pb zircon geochronological study of the late Cretaceous metamorphic rocks and associated gabbros from the Nyemo inlier of the southern Lhasa terrane. The Nyemo metamorphic rocks including gneisses, schists, marbles and calc-silicate rocks, experienced peak amphibolite-facies contact metamorphism under P-T conditions of 3.5-4.0 kbar and 642-657 °C with a very high geothermal gradient of 45-50 °C/km, revealing a distinct deflection from the steady-state geotherm during low-pressure metamorphism. Inherited magmatic zircon cores from the metamorphic rocks yielded protolith ages of 197-194 Ma, while overgrowth zircon rims yielded metamorphic ages of ca. 86 Ma. Whole-rock chemistry and zircon Hf isotopes suggest that the protoliths of the gneisses and schists are andesites and tuffs of the early Jurassic Sangri Group, which were derived from a depleted mantle source of a continental arc affinity. The coeval intimately-associated gabbro (ca. 86 Ma) crystallized under P-T conditions of 3.5-5.3 kbar and 914-970 °C, supplying the heat flux high enough to cause the contact metamorphism of the Sangri Group rock types. We propose that the intrusion of the gabbro and a simultaneous pressure increase of up to 4.0 kbar, which is related to crustal thickening due to crustal overthrusting and the intrusion of mafic material, resulted in the late Cretaceous metamorphism of the early Jurassic Sangri Group during an Andean-type orogeny. Furthermore the Nyemo metamorphic rocks, which have previously been considered to represent slivers of the Precambrian metamorphic basement of the Lhasa terrane

  14. Field evidences for a Mesozoic palaeo-relief through the northern Tianshan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumiaux, Charles; Chen, Ke; Augier, Romain; Chen, Yan; Wang, Qingchen

    2010-05-01

    The modern Tianshan mountain belt, located in Central Asia, offers a natural laboratory to study orogenic processes linked with convergent geodynamical settings. Most of the previous studies either focused on the Paleozoic evolution of the range - subductions, arc accretions and continental collision - or on its Cenozoic intra-continental evolution linked with the India-Asia collision. At first order, the finite structure of this range obviously displays a remarkable uprising of Paleozoic "basement" rocks - as a crustal-scale ‘pop-up' - surrounded by two Cenozoic foreland basins. The present-day topography of the Tianshan is traditionally related to the latest intra-continental reactivation of the range. In contrast, the present field study of the northern Tianshan brings new and clear evidences for the existence of a significant relief, in this area, during Mesozoic times. The investigation zone is about 250 km long, from Wusu to Urumqi, along the northern flank of the Tianshan where the rivers deeply incised the topography. In such valleys, lithologies and structural relationships between Paleozoic basement rocks, Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary series are particularly well exposed along several sections. Jurassic series are mostly characterized by coal-bearing, coarse-grained continental deposits. Within intra-mountain basins, sedimentary breccias, with clasts of Carboniferous basement rocks, have been locally found at the base of the series. This argues for the presence of a rather proximal palaeo-relief of basement rocks along the range front and the occurrence of proximal intra-mountain basins, during the Jurassic. Moreover, while a major thrust is mostly evoked between Jurassic deposits and the Paleozoic units, some of the studied sections show that the Triassic to Jurassic sedimentary series can be followed from the basin to the range. In these cases, the unconformity of the Mesozoic series on top of the Carboniferous basement has been locally clearly

  15. Diets of giants: the nutritional value of herbivorous dinosaur diet during the Mesozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Fiona; Hummel, Juergen; Sharifi, Reza; Lee, Alexandra; Lomax, Barry

    2017-04-01

    A major uncertainty in estimating energy budgets and population densities of extinct animals is the carrying capacity of their ecosystems, constrained by net primary productivity (NPP) and digestible energy content of that NPP. The hypothesis that increases in NPP of land plants due to elevated atmospheric CO2 contributed to the unparalleled size of the sauropods, the largest ever land animals, has recently been rejected, based on modern studies on herbivorous insects. However, the nutritional value of plants grown under elevated CO2 levels might be very different for vertebrate megaherbivores with more complex digestive systems and different protein:energy requirements than insects. Here we show that the metabolisable energy (ME) value of five species of potential dinosaur food plants does not decline consistently with increasing CO2 growth concentrations, with maxima observed at 1200 ppm CO2. Our data potentially rebut the hypothesis of constraints on herbivore diet quality in the Mesozoic due to CO2 levels.

  16. Asthenospheric and lithospheric sources for Mesozoic dolerites from Liberia (Africa): trace element and isotopic evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuy, C.; Marsh, J.; Dostal, J.; Michard, A.; Testa, S.

    1988-01-01

    Combined elemental, and Sr and Nd isotopic data are presented for Mesozoic dolerite dikes of Liberia (Africa) which are related to the initial stage of opening of the Atlantic Ocean. The large scatter of both trace element and isotopic data allows the identification of five groups of dolerites which cannot be related to each other by simple processes of mineral fractionation from a common source. On the contrary, the observed chemical and isotopic variation within some dolerites (Groups I and II) may result either from variable degrees of melting of an isotopically heterogeneous source or mixing between enriched and depleted oceanic type mantle. For the other dolerites (Groups III-V) mixing with a third mantle source with more radiogenic Sr and with element ratios characteristic of subduction environments is suggested. This third source is probably the subcontinental lithospheric mantle. Finally, no significant modification by interaction with continental crust is apparent in most of the analyzed samples.

  17. Tertiary or Mesozoic komatiites from Gorgona Island, Colombia: Field relations and geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echeverría, Lina M.

    1980-08-01

    An exceptional occurrence of ultramafic lavas within the volcanic member of the Mesozoic (or younger) Gorgona Igneous Complex represents the first known komatiites of post-Precambrian age. Gorgona komatiites are virtually unaltered and display typical spinifex textures, with 7 10 cm long plates of olivine (Fo 88 to 91) surrounded by acicular aluminous augite, subordinate plagioclase (An 56 to 78), basaltic glass, and two spinel phases. The MgO contents of the komatiites range from 15 to 22 wt.%. Sr and Nd isotopic compositions are indicative of depletion of incompatible elements in the mantle source region, as is the case for “normal” mid-ocean ridge basalts. The komatiites are low in total REE abundances and extremely depleted in LREE. They represent primary melts generated by high degree of partial melting of the mantle. Eruption temperatures are estimated at 1,450° to 1,500° C.

  18. A transitional alkalic dolerite dike suite of Mesozoic age in Southeastern New England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermes, O. Don; Rao, J. M.; Dickenson, M. P.; Pierce, T. A.

    1984-12-01

    Dike rocks from the New England platform of Rhode Island and adjacent Massachusetts consist of premetamorphic and post-metamorphic suites. The older group includes metamorphosed dolerite, minette, and schistose dioritic rocks. Post-metamorphic dikes consist of dolerite and sparse monchiquite. The post-metamorphic dolerites are of comparable age to the Eastern North American dolerite suite associated with the Mesozoic basins along the eastern seaboard of North America. However, the southeastern New England dolerites exhibit mineralogy and chemistry more typical of a transitional alkalic suite compared to the more subalkalic tholeiitic dolerites of the Eastern North American suite. Both suites are compatible with a rift tectonic setting, but the more alkalic dolerites may represent a deeper source of small volume melts compared to the Eastern North American dolerites. These more alkaline melts may have concentrated at local centers, or they may be typical of flank dolerites as opposed to the less alkalic varieties that occur within the central axial rift.

  19. Viviparity and K-selected life history in a Mesozoic marine plesiosaur (Reptilia, Sauropterygia).

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, F R; Chiappe, L M

    2011-08-12

    Viviparity is known in several clades of Mesozoic aquatic reptiles, but evidence for it is lacking in the Plesiosauria. Here, we report a Late Cretaceous plesiosaur fossil consisting of a fetus preserved within an adult of the same taxon. We interpret this occurrence as a gravid female and unborn young and hence as definitive evidence for plesiosaur viviparity. Quantitative analysis indicates that plesiosaurs gave birth to large, probably single progeny. The combination of viviparity, large offspring size, and small brood number differs markedly from the pattern seen in other marine reptiles but does resemble the K-selected strategy of all extant marine mammals and a few extant lizards. Plesiosaurs may have shared other life history traits with these clades, such as sociality and maternal care.

  20. Sub-basaltic Imaging of Ethiopian Mesozoic Sediments Using Surface Wave Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mammo, T.; Maguire, P.; Denton, P.; Cornwell, D.

    2003-12-01

    The Ethiopia Afar Geoscientific Lithospheric Experiment (EAGLE) involved the deployment of a 400km NW-SE cross-rift profile across the Main Ethiopian Rift. The profile extended to about 150km on either side of the rift over the uplifted Ethiopian plateau characterized by voluminous Tertiary flood basalts covering a thick sequence of Mesozoic sediments. These consist of three major stratigraphic units, the Cretaceous Upper Sandstone (medium grained, friable and moderately to well-sorted) overlying the Jurassic Antalo limestone (with intercalations of marl, shale, mudstone and gypsum) above the Triassic Adigrat sandstone. These sediments are suggested to be approximately 1.5km thick at the north-western end of the profile, thickening to the south-east. They are considered a possible hydrocarbon reservoir and therefore crucial to the economy of Ethiopia. The EAGLE cross-rift profile included the deployment of 97 Guralp 6TD seismometers (30sec - 80Hz bandwidth) at a nominal 5km spacing. A 5.75 tonne explosion from the Muger quarry detonated specifically for the EAGLE project generated the surface waves used in this study. Preliminary processing involving the multiple filter technique has enabled the production of group velocity dispersion curves. These curves have been inverted to provide 1-D shear wave models, with the intention of providing an in-line cross-rift profile of Mesozoic sediment thickness. Preliminary results suggest that the sediments can be distinguished from both overlying plateau basalt and underlying basement, with their internal S-wave velocity structure possibly indicating that the three sediment units described above can be separately identified.

  1. Diversity of developmental patterns in achelate lobsters-today and in the Mesozoic.

    PubMed

    Haug, Joachim T; Audo, Denis; Charbonnier, Sylvain; Haug, Carolin

    2013-11-01

    Modern achelate lobsters, slipper and spiny lobsters, have a specific post-embryonic developmental pattern with the following phases: phyllosoma, nisto (slipper lobsters) or puerulus (spiny lobsters), juvenile and adult. The phyllosoma is a peculiar larva, which transforms through a metamorphic moult into another larval form, the nisto or puerulus which largely resembles the juvenile. Unlike the nisto and puerulus, the phyllosoma is characterised by numerous morphological differences to the adult, e.g. a thin head shield, elongate appendages, exopods on these appendages and a special claw. Our reinvestigation of the 85 million years old fossil "Eryoneicus sahelalmae" demonstrates that it represents an unusual type of achelatan lobster larva, characterised by a mixture of phyllosoma and post-phyllosoma characters. We ascribe it to its own genus: Polzicaris nov. gen. We study its significance by comparisons with other cases of Mesozoic fossil larvae also characterised by a mixture of characters. Accordingly, all these larvae are interpreted as ontogenetic intermediates between phyllosoma and post-phyllosoma morphology. Remarkably, most of the larvae show a unique mixture of retained larval and already developed post-larval features. Considering the different-and incompatible-mixture of characters of each of these larvae and their wide geographical and temporal distribution, we interpret all these larvae as belonging to distinct species. The particular character combinations in the different larvae make it currently difficult to reconstruct an evolutionary scenario with a stepwise character acquisition. Yet, it can be concluded that a larger diversity of larval forms and developmental patterns occurred in Mesozoic than in modern faunas.

  2. Mesozoic (Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous) deep gas reservoir play, central and eastern Gulf coastal plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mancini, E.A.; Li, P.; Goddard, D.A.; Ramirez, V.O.; Talukdar, S.C.

    2008-01-01

    The Mesozoic (Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous) deeply buried gas reservoir play in the central and eastern Gulf coastal plain of the United States has high potential for significant gas resources. Sequence-stratigraphic study, petroleum system analysis, and resource assessment were used to characterize this developing play and to identify areas in the North Louisiana and Mississippi Interior salt basins with potential for deeply buried gas reservoirs. These reservoir facies accumulated in Upper Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous Norphlet, Haynesville, Cotton Valley, and Hosston continental, coastal, and marine siliciclastic environments and Smackover and Sligo nearshore marine shelf, ramp, and reef carbonate environments. These Mesozoic strata are associated with transgressive and regressive systems tracts. In the North Louisiana salt basin, the estimate of secondary, nonassociated thermogenic gas generated from thermal cracking of oil to gas in the Upper Jurassic Smackover source rocks from depths below 3658 m (12,000 ft) is 4800 tcf of gas as determined using software applications. Assuming a gas expulsion, migration, and trapping efficiency of 2-3%, 96-144 tcf of gas is potentially available in this basin. With some 29 tcf of gas being produced from the North Louisiana salt basin, 67-115 tcf of in-place gas remains. Assuming a gas recovery factor of 65%, 44-75 tcf of gas is potentially recoverable. The expelled thermogenic gas migrated laterally and vertically from the southern part of this basin to the updip northern part into shallower reservoirs to depths of up to 610 m (2000 ft). Copyright ?? 2008. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists. All rights reserved.

  3. What can we tell from particle morphology in Mesozoic charcoal assemblages?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Alastair; Belcher, Claire

    2015-04-01

    Sedimentary charcoal particles provide a valuable record of palaeofire activity on both human and geological timescales. Charcoal is both an unambiguous indicator of wildfire, and a means of preservation of plant material in an inert form; thus it records not only the occurrence and extent of wildfire, but also the species affected. While scanning electron microscopy can be usefully employed for precise taxonomic identification of charcoals, the time and cost associated with this limit the extent to which the technique is employed. Morphometric analysis of mesocharcoal particles (c. 125-1000 µm) potentially provides a simple method for obtaining useful information from optical microscopy images. Grass fires have been shown to produce mesocharcoal particles with a higher length-to-width ratio than woodland fuel sources. In Holocene archives, aspect ratio measurements are thus used to infer the broad taxonomic affinity of the burned vegetation. Since Mesozoic charcoals display similarly heterogeneous morphologies, we investigate whether there is a similar potential to infer the broad botanical affinities of Mesozoic charcoal assemblages from simple morphological metrics. We have used image analysis to analyse a range of Jurassic and Cretaceous sedimentary rocks representing different vegetation communities and depositional environments, and also to determine the range of charcoal particle morphologies which can be produced from different modern taxa under laboratory conditions. We find that modern charcoals break down into mesocharcoal particles of very variable aspect ratio, and this appears to be dependent on taxonomic position. Our analysis of fragmented laboratory-produced charcoals indicates that pteridophytes produce much more elongate particles than either conifers or non-grass angiosperms. We suggest that for charcoal assemblages that predate the evolution of grasses, high average aspect ratios may be a useful indicator of the burning of a pteridophyte

  4. The Mesozoic and Palaeozoic granitoids of north-western New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jost, Benjamin M.; Webb, Max; White, Lloyd T.

    2018-07-01

    A large portion of the Bird's Head Peninsula of NW New Guinea is an inlier that reveals the pre-Cenozoic geological history of the northern margin of eastern Gondwana. The peninsula is dominated by a regional basement high exposing Gondwanan ('Australian') Palaeozoic metasediments intruded by Palaeozoic and Mesozoic granitoids. Here, we present the first comprehensive study of these granitoids, including field and petrographic descriptions, bulk rock geochemistry, and U-Pb zircon age data. We further revise and update previous subdivisions of granitoids in the area. Most granitoids were emplaced as small to medium-scale intrusions during two episodes in the Devonian-Carboniferous and the Late Permian-Triassic, separated by a period of apparent magmatic quiescence. The oldest rocks went unrecognised until this study, likely due to the younger intrusive events resetting the K-Ar isotopic system used in previous studies. Most of the Palaeozoic and Mesozoic granitoids are peraluminous and in large parts derived from partial melts of the country rock. This is corroborated by local migmatites and country rock xenoliths. Although rare, metaluminous and mafic rocks show that partial melts of mantle-derived material played a minor role in granitoid petrogenesis, especially during the Permian-Triassic. The Devonian-Carboniferous granitoids and associated volcanics are locally restricted, whereas the Permian-Triassic intrusions are found across NW New Guinea and further afield. The latter were likely part of an extensive active continental margin above a subduction system spanning the length of what is now New Guinea and potentially extending southward through eastern Australia and Antarctica.

  5. Paleomagnetic data from Sarawak, Malaysia (Borneo) and the late Mesozoic and Cenozoic tectonics of Sundaland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidtke, Eric A.; Fuller, Michael D.; Haston, Roger B.

    1990-02-01

    Paleomagnetic data from 231 samples from 31 sites in rocks of Upper Jurassic to Miocene age in Sarawak (Malaysian Borneo) reveal a trend of increasing counterclockwise (CCW) declination deflection with age. Six sites in Tertiary hypabyssal intrusions show 8° to 52° of CCW deflection. The intrusion deflected 52° CCW was K-Ar dated at 26 m.y. (Upper Oligocene), while one deflected 22° CCW gives a 17 m. y. age (Lower Miocene). Three sites in the Upper Eocene to Miocene(?) Silantek Formation show an average 40° of CCW deflection. Prefolding directions, showing 90° of CCW deflection, are isolated in 4 sites (including two positive fold tests) in Upper Jurassic and Cretaceous rocks of the Bau Limestone and Pedawan Formations. A postfolding, Cenozoic remagnetization with an average of 60° of CCW deflection is found in five Bau Limestone sites. Three sites in the Upper Jurassic Kedadom Formation show an average of 50° of CCW deflection. CCW declination deflections found in Mesozoic and Cenozoic rocks as far as 400 km east and 150 km south of Sarawak, in Kalimantan (Indonesian Borneo), also fit the trend of deflection versus age. On the basis of the regional consistency of declination deflection versus age, along with geologic evidence the data are considered to be evidence of a regional (rather than a local block or distributed shear) rotation. The domain of CCW rotation extends into West Malaysia, suggesting that West Borneo and the Malay Peninsula may have been a stable block during the latest Cretaceous and Cenozoic. West Malaysia and Borneo may have had different histories in the rest of the Mesozoic. The data imply up to 108° CCW rotation of Borneo with respect to stable Eurasia, sometime during the Cretaceous and Cenozoic. Cenozoic rotation may also have occurred between Indochina and Borneo. The sense of rotation shown by the data does not support the "propagating extrusion tectonics" model for Cenozoic Southeast Asia.

  6. Subduction history of the Paleo-Pacific plate beneath the Eurasian continent: Evidence from Mesozoic igneous rocks and accretionary complex in NE Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.

    2015-12-01

    Mesozoic magmatisms in NE China can be subdivided into seven stages, i.e., Late Triassic, Early Jurassic, Middle Jurassic, Late Jurassic, early Early Cretaceous, late Early Cretaceous, and Late Cretaceous. Late Triassic magmatisms consist of calc-alkaline igneous rocks in the Erguna Massif, and bimodal igneous rocks in eastern margin of Eurasian continent. The former reveals southward subduction of the Mongol-Okhotsk oceanic plate, the latter reveals an extensional environment (Xu et al., 2013). Early Jurassic magmatisms are composed of calc-alkaline igneous rocks in the eastern margin of the Eurasian continent and the Erguna Massif, revealing westward subduction of the Paleo-pacific plate and southward subduction of the Mongol-Okhotsk oceanic plate (Tang et al., 2015), respectively. Middle Jurassic magmatism only occur in the Great Xing'an Range and the northern margin of the NCC, and consists of adakitic rocks that formed in crustal thickening, reflecting the closure of the Mongol-Okhotsk ocean (Li et al., 2015). Late Jurassic and early Early Cretaceous magmatisms only occur to the west of the Songliao Basin, and consist of trackyandesite and A-type of rhyolites, revealing an extensional environment related to delamination of thickened crust. The late Early Cretaceous magmatisms are widespread in NE China, and consist of calc-alkaline volcanics in eastern margin and bimodal volcanics in intracontinent, revealing westward subduction of the Paleo-pacific plate. Late Cretaceous magmatisms mainly occur to the east of the Songliao Basin, and consist of calc-alkaline volcanics in eastern margin and alkaline basalts in intracontinent (Xu et al., 2013), revealing westward subduction of the Paleo-pacific plate. The Heilongjiang complex with Early Jurassic deformation, together with Jurassic Khabarovsk complex in Russia Far East and Mino-Tamba complex in Japan, reveal Early Jurassic accretionary history. Additionally, the Raohe complex with the age of ca. 169 Ma was

  7. Tectonics, basin analysis and organic geochemical attributes of Permian through Mesozoic deposits and their derivative oils of the Turpan-Hami basin, northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Todd Jeremy

    The Turpan-Hami basin is a major physiographic and geologic feature of northwest China, yet considerable uncertainty exists as to the timing of its inception, its late Paleozoic and Mesozoic tectonic history, and the relationship of its petroleum systems to those of the nearby Junggar basin. Mesozoic sedimentary fades, regional unconformities, sediment dispersal patterns, and sediment compositions within the Turpan-Hami and southern Junggar basins suggest that these basins were initially separated between Early Triassic and Early Jurassic time. Prior to separation, Upper Permian profundal lacustrine and fan-delta fades and Triassic coarse-grained braided-fluvial/alluvial fades were deposited across a contiguous Junggar-Turpan-Hami basin. Permian through Triassic fades were derived mainly from the Tian Shan to the south as indicated by northward-directed paleocurrent directions and geochemical provenance of granitoid cobbles. Lower through Middle Jurassic strata begin to reflect ponded coal-forming, lake-plain environments within the Turpan-Hami basin. A sharp change in sedimentary-lithic-rich Lower Jurassic sandstone followed by a return to lithic volcanic-rich Middle Jurassic sandstone points to the initial uplift and unroofing of the largely andesitic Bogda Shan range, which first shed its sedimentary cover as it emerged to become the partition between the Turpan-Hami and southern Junggar basins. In Turpan-Hami, source rock age is one of three major statistically significant discriminators of effective source rocks in the basin. A newly developed biomarker parameter appears to track conifer evolution and can distinguish Permian rocks and their correlative oils from Jurassic coals and mudrocks, and their derivative oils. Source fades is a second key control on petroleum occurrence and character. By erecting rock-to-oil correlation models, the biomarker parameters separate oil families into end-member groups: Group 1 oils---Lower/Middle Jurassic peatland

  8. A multi-scale ensemble-based framework for forecasting compound coastal-riverine flooding: The Hackensack-Passaic watershed and Newark Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, F.; Ramaswamy, V.; Wang, Y.; Georgas, N.; Blumberg, A.; Pullen, J.

    2017-12-01

    Estuarine regions can experience compound impacts from coastal storm surge and riverine flooding. The challenges in forecasting flooding in such areas are multi-faceted due to uncertainties associated with meteorological drivers and interactions between hydrological and coastal processes. The objective of this work is to evaluate how uncertainties from meteorological predictions propagate through an ensemble-based flood prediction framework and translate into uncertainties in simulated inundation extents. A multi-scale framework, consisting of hydrologic, coastal and hydrodynamic models, was used to simulate two extreme flood events at the confluence of the Passaic and Hackensack rivers and Newark Bay. The events were Hurricane Irene (2011), a combination of inland flooding and coastal storm surge, and Hurricane Sandy (2012) where coastal storm surge was the dominant component. The hydrodynamic component of the framework was first forced with measured streamflow and ocean water level data to establish baseline inundation extents with the best available forcing data. The coastal and hydrologic models were then forced with meteorological predictions from 21 ensemble members of the Global Ensemble Forecast System (GEFS) to retrospectively represent potential future conditions up to 96 hours prior to the events. Inundation extents produced by the hydrodynamic model, forced with the 95th percentile of the ensemble-based coastal and hydrologic boundary conditions, were in good agreement with baseline conditions for both events. The USGS reanalysis of Hurricane Sandy inundation extents was encapsulated between the 50th and 95th percentile of the forecasted inundation extents, and that of Hurricane Irene was similar but with caveats associated with data availability and reliability. This work highlights the importance of accounting for meteorological uncertainty to represent a range of possible future inundation extents at high resolution (∼m).

  9. A longitudinal study of occlusal caries in Newark New Jersey school children: relationship between initial dental finding and the development of new lesions

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, Kenneth; Fairlie, Karen; Ferrandiz, Javier; Nasri-Heir, Cibele

    2012-01-01

    Objective Dental caries is a significant public health problem especially amongst children from low-income backgrounds. This longitudinal study examined the development of new occlusal caries in 227 Newark, NJ children ages 10–18. The role of previous caries experience and the presence of occlusal white and dark lesions in predicting the development of new lesions were examined. Design At each visit, the patient’s teeth were given a visual-tactile examination and the subject’s decayed; missing and filled (DMFS) score was determined. Next, molars lacking probeable caries or restorations were examined using transillumination for occlusal white and dark spots. This examination was repeated periodically. A Cox proportional hazard was used to analyze data concerning the development of new occusal caries in molars. Results The longitudinal data indicates that patients who were caries free at visit-1 developed significantly fewer occlusal caries during the longitudinal study. The hazard ratio for subjects who had first-visit caries was 2.27 compared to caries free subjects. Intact molars with occlusal white or dark lesions had caries hazard ratios of 0.78 and 1.49 respectively, compared to molars lacking initial color changes. Conclusion Having a prior caries history places the subject at increased risk of developing future caries. Teeth with dark lesions but not white lesions are at significantly increased risk for developing decay. White lesions may represent remineralizing or slowly progressing lesions. The results of this study can help identify patients and tooth surfaces at risk for future occlusal decay. PMID:22841633

  10. Gold deposits of the northern margin of the North China craton: Multiple late Paleozoic-Mesozoic mineralizing events

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, C.J.R.; Goldfarb, R.J.; Qiu, Yumin; Snee, L.; Miller, L.D.; Miller, M.L.

    2002-01-01

    The northern margin of the North China craton is well-endowed with lode gold deposits hosting a resource of approximately 900 tonnes (t) of gold. The ???1,500-km-long region is characterized by east-trending blocks of metamorphosed Archean and Proterozoic strata that were episodically uplifted during Variscan, Indosinian, and Yanshanian deformational and magmatic events. At least 12 gold deposits from the Daqinshan, Yan-Liao (includes the Zhangjiakou, Yanshan, and Chifeng gold districts), and Changbaishan gold provinces contain resources of 20-100 t Au each. Most deposits are hosted in uplifted blocks of Precambrian metamorphic rocks, although felsic Paleozoic and Mesozoic plutons are typically proximal and host ???30% of the deposits. The lodes are characterized by sulfide-poor quartz veins in brittle structures with low base metal values and high Au:Ag ratios. Although phyllic alteration is most common, intensive alkali feldspar metasomatism characterizes the Wulashan, Dongping, and Zhongshangou deposits, but is apparently coeval with Variscan alkalic magmatism only at Wulashan. Stepwise 40Ar-39Ar geochronology on 16 samples from gangue and alteration phases, combined with unpublished SHRIMP U-Pb dates on associated granitoids, suggest that gold mineralizing events occured during Variscan, Indosinian, and Yanshanian orogenies at circa 350, 250, 200, 180, 150, and 129 Ma. However, widespread Permo-Triassic (???250 Ma) and Early Jurassic (???180 Ma) thermal events caused variable resetting of most of the white mica and K-feldspar argon spectra, as well as previously reported K-Ar determinations. Compiled and new stable isotope and fluid inclusion data show that most ??18O values for ore-stage veins range from 8 to 14???, indicating a fluid in equilibrium with the Precambrian metamorphic basement rocks; ??D values from fluid inclysions range widely from -64 to -154???, which is indicative of a local meteoric component in some veins; and highly variable ??34S data

  11. Field guide to the Mesozoic accretionary complex along Turnagain Arm and Kachemak Bay, south-central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Dwight C.; Kusky, Timothy M.; Karl, Susan M.; Haeussler, Peter J.

    1997-01-01

    Turnagain Arm, just east of Anchorage, provides a readily accessible, world-class cross section through a Mesozoic accretionary wedge. Nearly continuous exposures along the Seward Highway, the Alaska Railroad, and the shoreline of Turnagain Arm display the two main constituent units of the Chugach terrane: the McHugh Complex and Valdez Group. In this paper we describe seven bedrock geology stops along Turnagain Arm, and two others in the Chugach Mountains just to the north (Stops 1-7 and 9), which will be visited as part of the May, 1997 field trip of the Alaska Geological Society. Outcrops along Turnagain Arm have already been described in two excellent guidebook articles (Clark, 1981; Winkler and others 1984), both of which remain as useful and valid today as when first published. Since the early 1980's, studies along Turnagain Arm have addressed radiolarian ages of chert and conodont ages of limestone in the McHugh Complex (Nelson and others, 1986, 1987); geochemistry of basalt in the McHugh Complex (Nelson and Blome, 1991); post-accretion brittle faulting (Bradley and Kusky, 1990; Kusky and others, 1997); and the age and tectonic setting of gold mineralization (Haeussler and others, 1995). Highlights of these newer findings will described both in the text below, and in the stop descriptions.Superb exposures along the southeastern shore of Kachemak Bay show several other features of the McHugh Complex that are either absent or less convincing along Turnagain Arm. While none of these outcrops can be reached via the main road network, they are still reasonably accessible - all are within an hour by motorboat from Homer, seas permitting. Here, we describe seven outcrops along the shore of Kachemak Bay that we studied between 1989 and 1993 during geologic mapping of the Seldovia 1:250,000- scale quadrangle. These outcrops (Stops 61-67) will not be part of the 1997 itinerary, but are included here tor the benefit of those who may wish to visit them later.

  12. Structural framework and Mesozoic Cenozoic evolution of Ponta Grossa Arch, Paraná Basin, southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strugale, Michael; Rostirolla, Sidnei Pires; Mancini, Fernando; Portela Filho, Carlos Vieira; Ferreira, Francisco José Fonseca; de Freitas, Rafael Corrêa

    2007-09-01

    The integration of structural analyses of outcrops, aerial photographs, satellite images, aeromagnetometric data, and digital terrain models can establish the structural framework and paleostress trends related to the evolution of Ponta Grossa Arch, one of the most important structures of the Paraná Basin in southern Brazil. In the study area, the central-northern region of Paraná State, Brazil, the arch crosses outcropping areas of the Pirambóia, Botucatu, and Serra Geral Formations (São Bento Group, Mesozoic). The Pirambóia and Botucatu Formations are composed of quartz sandstones and subordinated siltstones. The Serra Geral Formation comprises tholeiitic basalt lava flows and associated intrusive rocks. Descriptive and kinematic structural analyses reveal the imprint of two brittle deformation phases: D1, controlled by the activation of an extensional system of regional faults that represent a progressive deformation that generated discontinuous brittle structures and dike swarm emplacement along a NW-SE trend, and D2, which was controlled by a strike-slip (transtensional) deformation system, probably of Late Cretaceous-Tertiary age, responsible for important fault reactivation along dykes and deformation bands in sandstones.

  13. Mass extinction of ocean organisms at the Paleozoic-Mesozoic boundary: Effects and causes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barash, M. S.

    2012-04-01

    At the end of the Permian, at the boundary between the Paleozoic and Mesozoic (251.0 ± 0.4 Ma), the largest mass extinction of organisms on the Earth occurred. Up to 96% of the species of marine invertebrates and ˜70% of the terrestrial vertebrates died off. A lot of factors were suggested and substantiated to explain this mass mortality, such as the disappearance of environmental niches in the course of the amalgamation of the continental plates into Pangea, sea level fluctuations, anoxia, an elevated CO2 content, H2S intoxication, volcanism, methane discharge from gas-hydrates, climate changes, impact events (collisions with large asteroids), or combinations of many of these reasons. Some of these factors are in subordination to others, while others are independent. Almost all of these factors developed relatively slowly and could not cause the sudden mass mortality of organisms globally. It could have happened when large asteroids, whose craters have been discovered lately, fell to the Earth. It is suggested that the impact events "finished off" the already suppressed biota. A simultaneous change in many of the factors responsible for the biodiversity, including those not connected in a cause-and-effect relationship, proves the existence of a common extrater-restrial cause that affected both the changes in the internal and external geospheres and the activation of asteroid attacks (the Sun's transit of spiral arms of our galaxy, the Sun's oscillations perpendicularly to the galactic plane, etc).

  14. Paleogeographic atlas project-Mesozoic-Cenozoic tectonic map of the world

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, D.B.; Ziegler, A.M.; Hulver, M.

    1985-01-01

    A Mesozoic-Cenozoic tectonic map of the world has been compiled in order to provide the basis for detailed paleogeographic, first-order palin-spastic and paleo-tectonic reconstructions. The map is plotted from a digital database on two polar stereographic projections that depict both time and type of tectonic activity. Time of activity is shown using six colors, with each color representing approximately 40 m.y. intervals. The time divisions correspond with, and are defined on the basis of times of major changes in plate motions. Tectonic activity is divided into 7 major types: (1) Platformal regions unaffected by major tectonism; (2) Region as underlainmore » by oceanic lithosphere; (3) Regions affected by extensional tectonism-characterized by thinning and stretching of the crust, including Atlantic-type margins, Basin and Range, back-arc and pull-apart basin development; (4) Regions of crustal shortening and thickening, as in collisional orogens and Andean-type foreland-fold systems; (5) Strike-slip systems associated with little or no change in crustal thickness; (6) Subduction accretion prisms, associated with tectonic outbuilding of continental crust, and marking sutures within continents; and (7) Large scale oceanic volcanic/magmatic arcs and plateaus characterized by increased crustal thickness and buoyancy of the lithosphere. The map provides a basis for understanding the assembly of Asia, the Circum-Pacific, and the disaggregation of Pangea.« less

  15. Block volume estimation from the discontinuity spacing measurements of mesozoic limestone quarries, Karaburun Peninsula, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Elci, Hakan; Turk, Necdet

    2014-01-01

    Block volumes are generally estimated by analyzing the discontinuity spacing measurements obtained either from the scan lines placed over the rock exposures or the borehole cores. Discontinuity spacing measurements made at the Mesozoic limestone quarries in Karaburun Peninsula were used to estimate the average block volumes that could be produced from them using the suggested methods in the literature. The Block Quality Designation (BQD) ratio method proposed by the authors has been found to have given in the same order of the rock block volume to the volumetric joint count (J(v)) method. Moreover, dimensions of the 2378 blocks produced between the years of 2009 and 2011 in the working quarries have been recorded. Assuming, that each block surfaces is a discontinuity, the mean block volume (V(b)), the mean volumetric joint count (J(vb)) and the mean block shape factor of the blocks are determined and compared with the estimated mean in situ block volumes (V(in)) and volumetric joint count (J(vi)) values estimated from the in situ discontinuity measurements. The established relations are presented as a chart to be used in practice for estimating the mean volume of blocks that can be obtained from a quarry site by analyzing the rock mass discontinuity spacing measurements.

  16. New species of Mesozoic benthic foraminifera from the former British Petroleum micropalaeontology collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Lyndsey R.; Stukins, Stephen; Hill, Tom; Bailey, Haydon W.

    2018-05-01

    This paper describes five new Mesozoic, deep-water benthic foraminifera from the former British Petroleum microfossil reference collections at the Natural History Museum, London. The focus is on selected calcareous and agglutinating taxa that are of stratigraphical and/or palaeoecological significance for academic and industrial related activities. Ophthalmidium dracomaris (urn:lsid:zoobank.org:act:CCE951DF-0446-416B-AC2D-C5322CD335D2), Trochammina fordonensis (urn:lsid:zoobank.org:act:4F00A270-F9B2-46D4-8587-C7ADCC191D13), Eobigenerina calloviensis (urn:lsid:zoobank.org:act:B8443AA5-CFE4-44C0-A5A2-65EA97BF7EFA), Arenoturrispirillina swiecickii (urn:lsid:zoobank.org:act:06A35E03-5AA4-4363-B471-4E1A0091F62E) and Ataxophragmium mariae (urn:lsid:zoobank.org:act:B8443AA5-CFE4-44C0-A5A2-65EA97BF7EFA) are described with new illustrations. Their biostratigraphic and palaeoecological significance are briefly discussed.

  17. New Mesozoic and Cenozoic fossils from Ecuador: Invertebrates, vertebrates, plants, and microfossils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadena, Edwin A.; Mejia-Molina, Alejandra; Brito, Carla M.; Peñafiel, Sofia; Sanmartin, Kleber J.; Sarmiento, Luis B.

    2018-04-01

    Ecuador is well known for its extensive extant biodiversity, however, its paleobiodiversity is still poorly explored. Here we report seven new Mesozoic and Cenozoic fossil localities from the Pacific coast, inter-Andean depression and Napo basin of Ecuador, including vertebrates, invertebrates, plants, and microfossils. The first of these localities is called El Refugio, located near the small town of Chota, Imbabura Province, from where we report several morphotypes of fossil leaves and a mycetopodid freshwater mussel of the Upper Miocene Chota Formation. A second site is also located near the town of Chota, corresponding to potentially Pleistocene to Holocene lake deposits from which we report the occurrence of leaves and fossil diatoms. A third locality is at the Pacific coast of the country, near Rocafuerte, a town in Esmeraldas Province, from which we report a late Miocene palm leaf. We also report the first partially articulated skull with teeth from a Miocene scombridid (Mackerels) fish from El Cruce locality, and completely preserved seeds from La Pila locality, both sites from Manabí Province. Two late Cretaceous fossil sites from the Napo Province, one near Puerto Napo showing a good record of fossil shrimps and a second near the town of Loreto shows the occurrence of granular amber and small gymnosperms seeds and cuticles. All these new sites and fossils show the high potential of the sedimentary sequences and basins of Ecuador for paleontological studies and for a better understanding of the fossil record of the country and northern South America.

  18. Seismic study of the Mesozoic carbonate basement around Mt. Somma Vesuvius, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, Pier Paolo G.; Cippitelli, Giuseppe; Rapolla, Antonio

    1998-09-01

    Fifteen seismic reflection lines from AGIP surveys, in and around the Campanian Plain and Mt. Somma-Vesuvius (south Italy) have been interpreted. The attention has been focused to the horizon pertinent to the top of the Mesozoic carbonate sequence and the Quaternary faults dissecting it. As a matter of fact, both are very important elements for understanding the origin of the volcanic activity in the area, that often in the past, has been the topic of debates not supported by reliable data. In the study area, referring to the depth of the carbonate basement, comparison between the result achieved by the seismic prospecting and previous gravity studies has been made. It shows coherence in some areas but large discrepancy within others. Near the town of S. Anastasia, the gravity and seismic depth estimates differ as much as 1000 m or more. Furthermore, the seismic data show that the source of the greatest volcanic eruption in the area (the so-called `Campanian Ignimbrite') is probably not located in the Acerra depression, as suggested by other authors. A main NE-SW fault directed toward Vesuvius, considered as playing a primary role on volcanogenetic processes and previously recognised only offshore by marine seismic survey, has been now identified also inland using this new seismic information. The results presented here strengthen the hypothesis that Mt. Vesuvius is located at the crossing point of two regional Quaternary sets of fault heading NW-SE and NE-SW.

  19. The structure of a Mesozoic basin beneath the Lake Tana area, Ethiopia, revealed by magnetotelluric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hautot, Sophie; Whaler, Kathryn; Gebru, Workneh; Desissa, Mohammednur

    2006-03-01

    The northwestern Plateau of Ethiopia is almost entirely covered with extensive Tertiary continental flood basalts that mask the underlying formations. Mesozoic and Tertiary sediments are exposed in a few locations surrounding the Lake Tana area suggesting that the Tana depression is an extensional basin buried by the 1-2 km thick Eocene-Oligocene flood basalt sequences in this region. A magnetotelluric survey has been carried out to investigate the deep structure of the Tana area. The objectives were to estimate the thickness of the volcanics and anticipated underlying sedimentary basin. We have collected 27 magnetotelluric soundings south and east of Lake Tana. Two-dimensional inversion of the data along a 160 km long profile gives a model consistent with a NW-SE trending sedimentary basin beneath the lava flows. The thickness of sediments overlying the Precambrian basement averages 1.5-2 km, which is comparable to the Blue Nile stratigraphic section, south of the area. A 1 km thickening of sediments over a 30-40 km wide section suggests that the form of the basin is a half-graben. It is suggested that electrically resistive features in the model are related to volcanic materials intruded within the rift basin sediments through normal faults. The results illustrate the strong control of the Precambrian fracture zones on the feeding of the Tertiary Trap series.

  20. Block Volume Estimation from the Discontinuity Spacing Measurements of Mesozoic Limestone Quarries, Karaburun Peninsula, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Elci, Hakan; Turk, Necdet

    2014-01-01

    Block volumes are generally estimated by analyzing the discontinuity spacing measurements obtained either from the scan lines placed over the rock exposures or the borehole cores. Discontinuity spacing measurements made at the Mesozoic limestone quarries in Karaburun Peninsula were used to estimate the average block volumes that could be produced from them using the suggested methods in the literature. The Block Quality Designation (BQD) ratio method proposed by the authors has been found to have given in the same order of the rock block volume to the volumetric joint count (J v) method. Moreover, dimensions of the 2378 blocks produced between the years of 2009 and 2011 in the working quarries have been recorded. Assuming, that each block surfaces is a discontinuity, the mean block volume (V b), the mean volumetric joint count (J vb) and the mean block shape factor of the blocks are determined and compared with the estimated mean in situ block volumes (V in) and volumetric joint count (J vi) values estimated from the in situ discontinuity measurements. The established relations are presented as a chart to be used in practice for estimating the mean volume of blocks that can be obtained from a quarry site by analyzing the rock mass discontinuity spacing measurements. PMID:24696642

  1. Diagenetic contrast of sandstones in hydrocarbon prospective Mesozoic rift basins (Ethiopia, UK, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolela, A.

    2014-11-01

    Diagenetic studied in hydrocarbon-prospective Mesozoic rift basins were carried out in the Blue Nile Basin (Ethiopia), Ulster Basin (United Kingdom) and Hartford Basin (United States of America). Alluvial fan, single and amalgamated multistorey meandering and braided river, deep and shallow perennial lake, shallow ephemeral lake, aeolian and playa mud-flat are the prominent depositional environments. The studied sandstones exhibit red bed diagenesis. Source area geology, depositional environments, pore-water chemistry and circulation, tectonic setting and burial history controlled the diagenetic evolution. The diagenetic minerals include: facies-related minerals (calcrete and dolocrete), grain-coating clay minerals and/or hematite, quartz and feldspar overgrowths, carbonate cements, hematite, kaolinite, illite-smectite, smectite, illite, chlorite, actinolite, laumontite, pyrite and apatite. Diversity of diagenetic minerals and sequence of diagenetic alteration can be directly related to depositional environment and burial history of the basins. Variation in infiltrated clays, carbonate cements and clay minerals observed in the studied sandstones. The alluvial fan and fluviatile sandstones are dominated by kaolinite, illite calcite and ferroan calcite, whereas the playa and lacustrine sandstones are dominated by illite-smectite, smectite-chlorite, smectite, chlorite, dolomite ferroan dolomite and ankerite. Albite, pyrite and apatite are predominantly precipitated in lacustrine sandstones. Basaltic eruption in the basins modified mechanically infiltrated clays to authigenic clays. In all the studied sandstones, secondary porosity predominates over primary porosity. The oil emplacement inhabited clay authigenesis and generation of secondary porosity, whereas authigenesis of quartz, pyrite and apatite continued after oil emplacement.

  2. Geophysical survey within the Mesozoic magnetic anomaly sequence south of Bermuda

    SciTech Connect

    Purdy, G.M.; Rohr, K.

    1979-09-10

    This geophysical survey of an approximate 1/sup 0/ square covers Mesozoic magnetic anomalies M0, M2, and M4 south of Bermuda. Bathymetry, magnetics seismic reflection profiling, and seismic refraction data are presented. The isochron trend within the survey area at magnetic anomaly M4 times is 025/sup 0/. Two left lateral fracture zones exist: the southern fracture zone has an offset of <10 km at M4 time and 33 km at M0 time. The northern fracture zone has an offset of 37 km at M4 time and 26 km at M0 time. These changes in ofsett are accounted for by asymmetric spreading,more » an 11/sup 0/ change in trend of anomaly M0 relative to M4, and by M0 time, growth of a small right lateral fracture zone. Seismic refraction data provide poor control on the shallow crustal structure but suggest the presence of significant lateral inhomogeneities with layer 2.« less

  3. A new, well-preserved genus and species of fossil Glaphyridae (Coleoptera, Scarabaeoidea) from the Mesozoic Yixian Formation of Inner Mongolia, China

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zhuo; Nikolajev, Georgiy V.; Ren, Dong

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A new genus and species of fossil Glaphyridae, Cretohypna cristata gen. et sp. n., is described and illustrated from the Mesozoic Yixian Formation. This new genus is characterized by the large body; large and strong mandibles; short labrum; elytra without longitudinal carina; and male meso- and possible metatibia apically modified. A list of described fossil glaphyrids of the world is provided. This significant finding broadens the known diversity of Glaphyridae in the Mesozoic China. PMID:23372414

  4. Geochemistry of Mesozoic plutons, southern Death Valley region, California: Insights into the origin of Cordilleran interior magmatism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramo, O.T.; Calzia, J.P.; Kosunen, P.J.

    2002-01-01

    Mesozoic granitoid plutons in the southern Death Valley region of southeastern California reveal substantial compositional and isotopic diversity for Mesozoic magmatism in the southwestern US Cordillera. Jurassic plutons of the region are mainly calc-alkaline mafic granodiorites with ??Ndi of -5 to -16, 87Sr/86Sri of 0.707-0.726, and 206Pb/204Pbi of 17.5-20.0. Cretaceous granitoids of the region are mainly monzogranites with ??Ndi of -6 to -19, 87Sr/86Sri of 0.707-0.723, and 206Pb/204Pbi of 17.4-18.6. The granitoids were generated by mixing of mantle-derived mafic melts and pre-existing crust - some of the Cretaceous plutons represent melting of Paleoproterozoic crust that, in the southern Death Valley region, is exceptionally heterogeneous. A Cretaceous gabbro on the southern flank of the region has an unuasually juvenile composition (??Ndi -3.2, 87Sr/86Sri 0.7060). Geographic position of the Mesozoic plutons and comparison with Cordillera plutonism in the Mojave Desert show that the Precambrian lithosphere (craton margin) in the eastern Mojave Desert region may consists of two crustal blocks separated by a more juvenile terrane.

  5. Synthesis of late Paleozoic and Mesozoic eolian deposits of the Western Interior of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blakey, R.C.; Peterson, F.; Kocurek, G.

    1988-01-01

    Late Paleozoic and Mesozoic eolian deposits include rock units that were deposited in ergs (eolian sand seas), erg margins and dune fields. They form an important part of Middle Pennsylvanian through Upper Jurassic sedimentary rocks across the Western Interior of the United States. These sedimentary rock units comprise approximately three dozen major eolian-bearing sequences and several smaller ones. Isopach and facies maps and accompanying cross sections indicate that most eolian units display varied geometry and complex facies relations to adjacent non-eolian rocks. Paleozoic erg deposits are widespread from Montana to Arizona and include Pennsylvanian formations (Weber, Tensleep, Casper and Quadrant Sandstones) chiefly in the Northern and Central Rocky Mountains with some deposits (Hermosa and Supai Groups) on the Colorado Plateau. Lower Permian (Wolfcampian) erg deposits (Weber, Tensleep, Casper, Minnelusa, Ingleside, Cedar Mesa, Elephant Canyon, Queantoweap and Esplanade Formations) are more widespread and thicken into the central Colorado Plateau. Middle Permian (Leonardian I) erg deposits (De Chelly and Schnebly Hill Formations) are distributed across the southern Colorado Plateau on the north edge of the Holbrook basin. Leonardian II erg deposits (Coconino and Glorieta Sandstones) are slightly more widespread on the southern Colorado Plateau. Leonardian III erg deposits formed adjacent to the Toroweap-Kaibab sea in Utah and Arizona (Coconino and White Rim Sandstones) and in north-central Colorado (Lyons Sandstone). Recognized Triassic eolian deposits include major erg deposits in the Jelm Formation of central Colorado-Wyoming and smaller eolian deposits in the Rock Point Member of the Wingate Sandstone and upper Dolores Formation, both of the Four Corners region. None of these have as yet received a modern or thorough study. Jurassic deposits of eolian origin extend from the Black Hills to the southern Cordilleran arc terrain. Lower Jurassic intervals

  6. Vertical slab sinking and westward subduction offshore of Mesozoic North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigloch, Karin; Mihalynuk, Mitchell G.

    2013-04-01

    Subducted slabs in the mantle, as imaged by seismic tomography, preserve a record of ancient subduction zones. Ongoing debate concerns how direct this link is. How long ago did each parcel of slab subduct, and where was the trench located relative to the imaged slab position? Resolving these questions will benefit paleogeographic reconstructions, and restrict the range of plausible rheologies for mantle convection simulations. We investigate one of the largest and best-constrained Mesozoic slab complexes, the "Farallon" in the transition zone and lower mantle beneath North America. We quantitatively integrate observations from whole-mantle P-wave tomography, global plate reconstructions, and land geological evidence from the North American Cordillera. These three data sets permit us to test the simplest conceivable hypothesis for linking slabs to paleo-trenches: that each parcel of slab sank only vertically shortly after entering the trench That is, we test whether within the limits of tomographic resolution, all slab material lies directly below the location where it subducted beneath its corresponding arc. Crucially and in contrast to previous studies, we do not accept or impose an Andean-style west coast trench (Farallon-beneath-continent subduction) since Jurassic times, as this scenario is inconsistent with many geological observations. Slab geometry alone suggests that trenches started out as intra-oceanic because tomography images massive, linear slab "walls" in the lower mantle, extending almost vertically from about 800 km to 2000+ km depth. Such steep geometries would be expected from slabs sinking vertically beneath trenches that were quasi-stationary over many tens of millions of years. Intra-oceanic trenches west of Mesozoic North America could have been stationary, whereas a coastal Farallon trench could not, because the continent moved westward continuously as the Atlantic opened. Overlap of North American west-coast positions, as reconstructed in a

  7. Petrologic Aspects of Seamount and Guyot Volcanism on the Ancestral Mesozoic Pacific Plate: a Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natland, J. H.

    2007-12-01

    Hundreds of large seamounts and guyots are widely scattered almost in a "shotgun-blast" arrangement in an area about the size of the United States west of the Mississippi River on the Mesozoic Pacific plate between the Mariana Trench and the Gilbert Islands. Most of these formed between ~160-100 Ma while the Pacific plate was surrounded by spreading ridges and growing outward in all directions. There is little to no indication that the seamounts and guyots formed along linear seamount chains; existing radiometric-age data show no age progressions. The volcanoes appear to have formed in response to a uniform stress configuration across the plate, which was either not moving or moving very slowly at the time (1, 2), much like the modern Antarctic plate. When the growing plate started to encounter subduction systems in the western Pacific at ~90 Ma, consistent stress patterns began to develop, and the broad linear Gilbert and Line volcanic ridge systems began to form. Even then, however, considerable overlapping of volcanism occurred, and only the most general age progressions are evident in existing data. Petrologic data from samples obtained from dozens of volcanic summits by dredging and beneath several carbonate platforms by drilling reveal considerable diversity in development of differentiated alkalic magmatic lineages rooted in diverse parental basaltic rocks. These include transitional, alkalic and basanitic compositions, with differentiates of hawaiite, mugearite, trachyte and one phonolite. Many of the basaltic rocks are partly to significantly transformed by alteration under oxidative conditions (dredged rocks) and both oxidative and non-oxidative conditions (drilled rocks). This can make estimations of mantle geochemical provenance difficult. Nevertheless, the province has been linked by backtracking techniques to the modern SOPITA region of the South Pacific (3), and its rocks show enrichments in trace elements and isotopic characteristics similar to

  8. Lithospheric Expressions of the Precambrian Shield, Mesozoic Rifting, and Cenozoic Subduction and Mountain Building in Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levander, A.; Masy, J.; Niu, F.

    2013-05-01

    reflecting the signatures of the Precambrian craton in the south, Mesozoic rifting in central Venezuela, and Neogene subduction and orogenesis in both the northeast and northwest. Specifically, LAB depth varies from 110-130 km beneath the Guayana Shield, in agreement with finite-frequency body wave tomography (Bezada et al., 2010b). To the north beneath the Serrania del Interior and Maturin Basin the Rayleigh waves image two high velocity features to depths of 200 km. The northernmost, beneath the Serrania, corresponds to the top of the subducting Atlantic plate, in agreement with P-wave tomography that images the Atlantic plate to transition zone depths. Another localized high velocity feature extending to ~200 km depth lies to the south. We speculate that this is a lithospheric drip caused by destabilization of the SA lithospheric caused by Atlantic subduction. Immediately to the west beneath the Cariaco basin the LAB is at ~50 km, marking the top of a pronounced low velocity zone. The thin lithosphere extends southwestward from the Cariaco Basin beneath the Mesozoic Espino Graben to the craton. To the west the LAB deepens to ~80 km beneath the Barinas Apure Basin and then to ~90 km beneath the Neogene Merida Andes and Maracaibo block.

  9. Record of Cyclical Massive Upwellings from the Pacific Large Low Shear Velocity Province in the Mesozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazel, E.; Madrigal, P.; Flores, K. E.; Bizimis, M.; Jicha, B. R.

    2016-12-01

    Global tomography and numerical models suggest that mantle plume occurrences are closely linked to the margins of the large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs). In these locations the ascent of material from the core-mantle boundary connects the deep Earth with surface processes through mantle plume activity, forming large igneous provinces (LIPs) and some of the modern hotspot volcanoes. Petrological and geodynamic evidence suggest a link between the formation of oceanic plateaus and the interactions of mantle plumes and mid-ocean ridges (MOR). Therefore, it is possible to trace the potential interactions between MORs and deep mantle plume upwellings by referencing the tectonic and magmatic evolution of the Pacific Plate in time to the current location of the LLSVP, considering the long-lived ( 500 Ma) existence of these thermochemical anomalies. We identified episodic upwellings of the Pacific LLSVP during the Mesozoic separated by 10 to 20 Ma, by reconstructing the kinematic evolution of the Pacific Plate in the last 170 Ma. The fact that the bulk emplacement of LIPs ( 120-80 Ma) in the Pacific coincides with the timing of the Cretaceous Normal Superchron, that can be related to fluctuations of mantle-core heat fluxes further supports the hypothesis of deep mantle origin for LIPs. The potential cyclicity of LIP emplacement could be tied to core heat fluctuations interacting with the lower mantle, the rheology contrast of material crossing the transition zone (either upwelling hot material or downgoing dense slabs as mantle avalanches), the rate of entrainment of recycled materials, or a combination of the processes mentioned. Recognizing patterns and possible cycles is crucial to the link between deep processes and life as these pulses impacted the marine biota resulting in episodes of anoxia and mass extinctions shortly after their eruption.

  10. Physiological Ecology of Mesozoic Polar Forests in a High CO2 Environment

    PubMed Central

    BEERLING, D. J.; OSBORNE, C. P.

    2002-01-01

    Fossils show that coniferous forests extended into polar regions during the Mesozoic, a time when models and independent palaeo‐CO2 indicators suggest that the atmospheric CO2 concentration was at least double that of the present day. Consequently, such polar forests would have experienced high CO2 interacting with an extreme variation in light. Here we describe an experiment investigating this plant–environment interaction for extant tree species that were important components of polar forests, and give results from the first year of treatment. Specifically, we tested the hypotheses that growth in elevated CO2 (1) stimulates photosynthesis; (2) reduces photoinhibition during the polar summer; and (3) reduces respiration of above‐ and below‐ground plant organs. Our results indicate that CO2 fertilization generally does not affect photosynthesis under continuous daylight characteristic of the polar summer but does increase it when the period of illumination is shorter. Growth in elevated CO2 did not alter the potential for photoinhibition. CO2 enrichment significantly reduced leaf and root respiration rates by 50 and 25 %, respectively, in a range of evergreen taxa. Incorporating these observed CO2 effects into numerical simulations using a process‐based model of coniferous forest growth indicates that a high palaeo‐CO2 concentration would have increased the productivity of Cretaceous conifer forests in northern Alaska. This results from decreased respiratory costs that more than compensate for the absence of high CO2–high temperature interactions during the polar summer. The longer‐term effects of CO2 enrichment on seasonal changes in the above‐ and below‐ground carbon balance of trees are discussed. PMID:12096745

  11. Controls of late Palaeozoic and Mesozoic extension in the British Isles: evidence from seismic reflection data in the Central North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, K.; Cameron, T. D. J.

    2009-04-01

    Controls of late Palaeozoic and Mesozoic extension in the British Isles: evidence from seismic reflection data in the Central North Sea. Kevin Smith (1) and Don Cameron (2) (1) British Geological Survey, Murchison House, West Mains Road, Edinburgh, EH9 3LA. (ksm@bgs.ac.uk). (2) British Geological Survey, 376 Gilmerton Road, Edinburgh, EH17 7QS. In the area of the British Isles during the late Devonian and early Carboniferous, the oblique convergence of Laurentia and Gondwana imposed a torque on the adjoining terranes of Baltica and Avalonia. Their resulting clockwise rotation was accommodated by widely distributed N-S extension in the intervening zones previously formed by Caledonian and Acadian convergence. South of Laurentia and Baltica, late Palaeozoic extension was focused (1) at terrane margins, (2) in areas of limited Caledonian-Acadian plutonism, and (3) in places where the western (Iapetus) and eastern (Tornquist) convergence zones intersect at a high angle. One of these latter areas lies in Central England immediately north of the Midland Microcraton (part of Eastern Avalonia), where thermal subsidence associated with early Carboniferous extension gave rise to the late Carboniferous Pennine Basin. Interpretation of an extensive set of 3D and 2D long-offset seismic reflection data suggests that a similar area of enhanced extension at a fold belt intersection lies to north of the Mid North Sea High in the middle of the Central North Sea. Variscan uplift and inversion of the late Palaeozoic basins began to predominate in mid-Carboniferous times as final amalgamation of all the different terranes to form Pangaea curtailed the initial episode of extension and thermal subsidence. This change in the tectonic regime was associated with the onset of tholeiitic volcanism within the convergence zones, and was followed by localised extension during the earliest Permian. Evidence obtained from seismic interpretation of the deep structure of the UK sector of the Central

  12. From Tethyan Oceans to the Western Mediterranean I - Plate reconstructions from the Present back to the Early Mesozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Stefan; Handy, Mark; Bousquet, Romain; Kissling, Eduard; Bernoulli, Daniel

    2010-05-01

    A new reconstruction of the branches of Alpine Tethys combines available plate kinematic models of Africa-Europe motion with a wealth of new geological and geophysical data (seismic tomography and paleomagnetics) to shed light the evolution of the Western Mediterranean-Alps system, from sea-floor spreading through subduction to collision. Unlike previous models which relate the fate of Alpine Tethys solely to relative motions of the African plate with respect to Europe during opening of the Atlantic, our reconstruction invokes motions and rotations of four additional and temporarily independent microplates: Adria, Iberia, Alcapia and Alkapecia. Translations and rotations of these microplates with respect to Europe are constrained in the following way: (1) The retro-translations of Adria back to 94 Ma are obtained from shortening estimates in the Alps along geological-geophysical transects of the Alpine orogen and from geobarometric estimates of subduction depth in tectonic units that underwent high-pressure and ultrahigh-pressure metamorphism. Rotations are based on paleomagnetic data of Márton et al. (in press); (2) Iberia follows the motion paths of Savostin et al. (1986), based on magnetic anomalies in the Central and Northern Atlantic; the Corsica-Sardinia block later rifted from Iberia leading to Burdigalian opening of the Liguria-Provençal basin (Serranne 1999). (3) The Alcapia microplate, whose name is derived from the acronym ALCAPA (Alps-Carpathians-Pannonian Basin), separated from Adria in Cretaceous times. Its movement with respect to Adria was absorbed by Cretaceous orogeny in the Eastern Alps, constrained by the Adria-Europe displacement and rotation path; later, during Cenozoic orogeny in the Alps, associated with the closing of the Alpine Tethys, it became part of the Adria microplate again. (4) The introduction of an independent Alkapekia continental fragment and independent microplate during the Late Cenozoic only (Alboran-Kabylia-Peloritani-Calabria; Michard et al. 2002) is rendered necessary for two principal reasons: (a) the contrasting tectonometamorphic evolution of the West Ligurian Ocean (future Alps-Corsica-Betics) and the East Ligurian Ocean (future Apennine) make it necessary to kinematically decouple the fate of these two branches of Alpine Tethys located on opposite sides of the Alkapekia continental block; (b) Alkapecia that was formerly part of the African and/or Adriatic plate overrode parts of the Iberian, African and Adria plates as an independent continental microplate during Late Cenozoic rollback subduction leading to the present-day Betic-Rif arc and the Calabrian Trench-Arc system. Our complex five-plate model provides an explanation of the equally complex evolution of the Western Mediterranean-Alps system, as discussed in part II of this contribution (Handy et al.). Márton, E., Zampieri, D., Grandesso, P., Ćosović, V., Moro, A., submitted to Tectonophysics. New Cretaceous paleomagnetic results from the foreland of the Southern Alps and the refined apparent polar wander path for stable Adria. Savostin, L.A., Sibuet, J.-C., Zonenshain, L.P., Le Pichon, X., Roulet, M.-J., 1986. Kinematic evolution of the Tethys belt from the Atlantic ocean to the Pamire since the Triassic. Tectonophysics 123: 1-35. Séranne, M., 1999. The Gulf of Lion continental margin (NW Mediterranean) revisited by IBS: an overview. In: B. Durand, L. Jolivet, F. Horvath, M. Séranne (Editors), The Mediterranean Basins: Tertiary Extension within the Alpine Orogen. Geological Society, London, Special Publications 156: 15-36. Michard, A., Chalouan, A., Feinberg, H., Goffé, B., Montigny, R., 2002. How does the Alpine belt end between Spain and Morocco? Bullétin Societé géologique de France 173: 3-15.

  13. Multiple Emplacement and Exhumation History of the Late Mesozoic Dayunshan-Mufushan Batholith in Southeast China and Its Tectonic Significance: 1. Structural Analysis and Geochronological Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wenbin; Faure, Michel; Lin, Wei; Chen, Yan; Chu, Yang; Xue, Zhenhua

    2018-01-01

    The South China Block (SCB) experienced a polyphase reworking by the Phanerozoic tectonothermal events. To better understand its Late Mesozoic tectonics, an integrated multidisciplinary investigation has been conducted on the Dayunshan-Mufushan composite batholith in the north-central SCB. This batholith consists of two major intrusions that recorded distinct emplacement features. According to our structural analysis, two deformation events in relation to batholith emplacement and subsequent exhumation are identified. The early one (D1) was observed mostly at the southern border of the batholith, characterized by a top-to-the-SW ductile shearing in the early-stage intrusion and along its contact zone. This deformation, chiefly associated with the pluton emplacement at ca. 150 Ma, was probably assisted by farfield compression from the northern Yangtze foreland belt. The second but main event (D2) involved two phases: (1) ductile shearing (D2a) prominently expressed along the Dayunshan detachment fault at the western border of the batholith where the syntectonic late-stage intrusion and minor metasedimentary basement in the footwall suffered mylonitization with top-to-the-NW kinematics; and (2) subsequent brittle faulting (D2b) further exhumed the entire batholith that behaved as rift shoulder with half-graben basins developed on its both sides. Geochronological constraints show that the crustal ductile extension occurred during 132-95 Ma. Such a Cretaceous NW-SE extensional tectonic regime, as indicated by the D2 event, has been recognized in a vast area of East Asia. This tectonism was responsible not only for the destruction of the North China craton but also for the formation of the so-called "southeast China basin and range tectonics."

  14. Evolution of the stress field in the southern Scotia Arc from the late Mesozoic to the present-day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maestro, Adolfo; López-Martínez, Jerónimo; Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Bohoyo, Fernando; Mink, Sandra

    2014-12-01

    The geological evolution of the Scotia Arc, which developed between Antarctica and South America, has facilitated the connection between the Pacific and Atlantic oceans and, has important global implications. To improve the knowledge of the late Mesozoic evolution of the southern Scotia Arc, over 6000 brittle mesostructures were measured over the last 20 years at different outcrops from the northern Antarctic Peninsula and the South Shetland Islands as well as the James Ross and South Orkney archipelagos. This dataset covers a length of more than 1000 km of the arc. Fault data were analysed using the Etchecopar, y-R, Right Dihedra, Stress Inversion and Search Grid Inversion Palaeostress Determination methods. A total of 275 stress tensors were obtained. The results showed that the maximum horizontal stress was in the ENE-WSW and the NW-SE orientations and that the horizontal extension tensors were oriented NE-SW and NW-SE. In addition, seismic activity and focal mechanism solutions were analysed using the Gephart method to establish the present-day stress field and characterise the active tectonics. The results obtained suggest that there is a regional NE-SW compression and a NW-SE extension regime at the present day. The Southern Scotia Arc has a complex geological history due to the different tectonic settings (transform, convergent and divergent) that have affected this sector during its geological evolution from the late Mesozoic until the present day. Six stress fields were obtained from the brittle mesostructure population analysis in the region. The NW-SE and N-S maximum horizontal stresses were related to a combination of Mesozoic oceanic subduction of the former Phoenix Plate under the Pacific margin of the Antarctic Plate, Mesozoic-Cenozoic subduction of the northern Weddell Sea and the Oligocene to the Middle Miocene dextral strike-slip movement between the Scotia and Antarctic plates along the South Scotia Ridge. The NE-SW compression was related to

  15. The first Mesozoic microwhip scorpion (Palpigradi): a new genus and species in mid-Cretaceous amber from Myanmar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Michael S.; Breitkreuz, Laura C. V.; Cai, Chenyang; Alvarado, Mabel; Azar, Dany; Huang, Diying

    2016-04-01

    A fossil palpigrade is described and figured from mid-Cretaceous (Cenomanian) amber from northern Myanmar. Electrokoenenia yaksha Engel and Huang, gen. n. et sp. n., is the first Mesozoic fossil of its order and the only one known as an inclusion in amber, the only other fossil being a series of individuals encased in Pliocene onyx marble and 94-97 million years younger than E. yaksha. The genus is distinguished from other members of the order but is remarkably consistent in observable morphological details when compared to extant relatives, likely reflecting a consistent microhabitat and biological preferences over the last 100 million years.

  16. Clade perseverance from Mesozoic to present: a multidisciplinary approach to interpretation of pattern and process.

    PubMed

    Barnes, David K A

    2002-10-01

    Two clades of marine bryozoans, cyclostomes and cheilostomes, exemplify the benefits of applying a multidisciplinary approach to the interpretation of long-term evolutionary patterns. The cyclostome bryozoans were dominant in the Mesozoic; since that era, they have decreased in absolute terms and the cheilostomes have come to exceed them in both abundance and diversity. Many studies of living assemblages of the encrusting members of these two clades indicate that cheilostomes are superior space competitors, but paleontological studies suggest that competition between the two taxa has not been escalating over geological time. Both clades occur throughout the world's oceans and seas, and recent work in the geographical extremes has shown that the relative success of the clades varies markedly from place to place. In this study, the importance of differential patterns of recruitment and cumulative space occupation in the two clades was evaluated over four years and in two environments, one temperate and one polar. In both of these environments, peaks of recruitment and space occupation by the two clades were out of phase. The different strategies and outcomes of spatial competition are examined, largely using data from the literature. Only recently has it been realized that tied outcomes of competition are stable alternative results and not simply transitory phases. Many competitive encounters involving cyclostomes result in ties, implying that their strategy is based on persistence rather than dominance. When different indices and models are used to analyze competition data from the two clades, the interpretation varies markedly with methodology. The differences in patterns of recruitment, space occupation, and spatial competition have influenced both our understanding of how the two clades have persisted alongside each other and our perception of cheilostome superiority. Analysis of fluid dynamics has shown that small differences in the mechanical structure of

  17. Counter-Rotating Magellan and Trinidad Microplates at the Mesozoic Pacific-Phoenix-Farallon Triple Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schouten, H.; Smith, D. K.

    2005-12-01

    Magellan and Trinidad microplates developed at the Mesozoic triple junction between the Pacific, Phoenix and Farallon plates; the microplates were instrumental in the transition from a transform-ridge-transform to a ridge-ridge-ridge triple junction, which took several tens of millions of years. Contrasting qualitative models for the evolution of these microplates [e.g., Tamaki and Larson, 1988; Nakanishi et al., 1992] provide meager insight in the mechanics of microplate evolution and triple junction transformation. We propose a quantitative model for the evolution of Magellan and Trinidad microplates based on the edge-driven microplate kinematic principles [Schouten et al., 1993] that have provided successful quantitative solutions for the motions of Easter, Juan Fernandez, and Galapagos microplates. In these edge-driven solutions, two angular velocity vectors (describing motion between microplate and driving plates) are located on the microplate boundaries at the tip of rifts that propagate between microplate and driving plates. The rift propagation leaves pseudofaults on microplate and driving plates; the pseudofaults, which can be recognized in the seafloor topography, then become proxies for the trajectories of the angular velocity vectors from which a quantitative solution of microplate motion is derived. Using the estimated seafloor topography of the region and published marine magnetic anomaly lineations we propose the following scenario. The Magellan microplate rotated counterclockwise as evidenced by the fanning of magnetic lineations about the Magellan Trough and the rotation of the older Mid-Pac Mountains lineation set. The Trinidad microplate rotated clockwise relative to the Pacific plate to judge from the wedge-shaped region about the Trinidad trough that has its narrow tip on the Victoria fracture zone (recognized in the estimated seafloor topograpy). The clockwise motion of the Trinidad microplate was driven by Pacific-Phoenix motion; the

  18. Mesozoic intra-arc tectonics in the NE Mojave Desert, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, K.A.; Schermer, E.R.; Walker, J.D.

    1993-04-01

    Field and U-Pb zircon geochronological data from the Tiefort Mts. (TM) and surrounding areas in the NE Mojave Desert provide new constraints on Precambrian to Paleozoic paleogeography and Mesozoic intra-arc tectonics. Amphibolite facies metasediments appear to correlate with lower Paleozoic miogeoclinal sequences. Coarse-grained K-feldspar augen gneiss occurs in sharp contact with the metasedimentary rocks; U-Pb dating yields a 1393[+-]12 Ma age. This gneiss is interpreted to represent cratonal basement of North America. A texturally and compositionally heterogeneous amphibolite-facies monzonitic complex which intrudes the basement and metasediments yields a mid-Jurassic age. Felsite and biotite granite that intrude the foliated monzonitic complexmore » locally contain the mylonitic fabric and appear to be syn-late kinematic. Undeformed pegmatite, granite, and microdiorite appear as dikes throughout the region. Vertical silicic dikes at southern TM trend N5-25E and are dated at 148[+-]14 Ma, coeval with the Independence dike swarm (IDS). Similar dikes that occur at TM trend N60-80E. Undeformed granite cross-cuts the foliated monzonite; some granitic rocks cut dikes of the IDs and are likely to be Cretaceous in age. The E- to SE-vergence and mid-late Jurassic age of ductile shear zones in the TM region are similar to that in nearby parts of the East Sierra Thrust System (ESTS). If NE and NNE dikes are IDS-equivalent, this implies clockwise, vertical-axis rotation of 30[degree]--90[degree] by younger structures. The authors interpret this to be related to late Cenozoic strike-slip faults. Restoration of folds and the IDS to the regional NW trend results in top to the E to NE sense of shear during Jurassic deformation. Deformation in the TM and areas to the north connects the ESTS from the Garlock fault to the central Mojave region indicating a region in which mid-crustal levels of the arc and cratonal basement experienced contractional tectonism during mid

  19. A new kinematic model for the Mesozoic evolution of the Iberia plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirrengarten, Michael; Manatschal, Gianreto; Tugend, Julie; Kusznir, Nick; Sauter, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    During the Mesozoic Iberia was progressively surrounded by rift systems leading to its transient individualization as a tectonic plate. The kinematic evolution of Iberia prior to oceanic magnetic anomaly C34 ( 83 Ma) is controversial. To date, no kinematic models accounts for the Late Aptian to Albian hyper-extended rift phase observed in the Pyrenees. Consistent isochronal features, such as oceanic magnetic anomalies, representing the backbones of oceanic plate reconstructions are lacking. The only potential candidate, the J-anomaly, located offshore Iberia and Newfoundland has recently been re-interpreted as resulting from polyphased and polygenic magmatic events and does not provide a useful constraint. We use a new reconstruction approach that integrates the spatio-temporal evolution of adjacent hyper-extended rift domains systems to investigate Iberia plate motion during the separation of the super-continent Pangea. The plate modeling is based on careful mapping and restoration of the rift domains with key rift events dated within the study area. The main outcomes of this new model are as follows: 1) A full-fit of the southern North Atlantic 2) Extension on the southern and eastern boundary of Iberia related to the opening of the Central Atlantic 3) Segmentation of the Iberia-Newfoundland rift system by fracture zones prior to a V-shape propagation of mantle exhumation and seafloor spreading 4) No Aptian subduction in the Pyrenean domain and a limited rotation of the Iberia plate 5) The partitioning of deformation between different micro-blocks along the Iberian-Eurasian boundary enabling Late Aptian to Albian extension in the Pyrenees The resulting plate kinematic model for Iberia differs from previous ones on three main points: it does not make use of the J magnetic anomaly because the J anomlay is neither an isochron or a COB marker; the deformation along the Iberian-Eurasian boundary is partitioned between distinct rift systems; and it incorporates

  20. Crystal chemistry of pyrochlore from the Mesozoic Panda Hill carbonatite deposit, western Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boniface, Nelson

    2017-02-01

    The Mesozoic Panda Hill carbonatite deposit in western Tanzania hosts pyrochlore, an ore and source of niobium. This study was conducted to establish the contents of radioactive elements (uranium and thorium) in pyrochlore along with the concentration of niobium in the ore. The pyrochlore is mainly hosted in sövite and is structurally controlled by NW-SE (SW dipping) or NE-SW (NW dipping) magmatic flow bands with dip angles of between 60° and 90°. Higher concentrations of pyrochlore are associated with magnetite, apatite and/or phlogopite rich flow bands. Electron microprobe analyses on single crystals of pyrochlore yield very low UO2 concentrations that range between 0 and 0.09 wt% (equivalent to 0 atoms per formula unit: a.p.f.u.) and ThO2 between 0.55 and 1.05 wt% (equivalent to 0.1 a.p.f.u.). The analyses reveal high concentrations of Nb2O5 (ranging between 57.13 and 65.50 wt%, equivalent to a.p.f.u. ranging between 1.33 and 1.43) and therefore the Panda Hill Nb-oxide is classified as pyrochlore sensu stricto. These data point to a non radioactive pyrochlore and a deposit rich in Nb at Panda Hill. The Panda Hill pyrochlore has low concentrations of REEs as displayed by La2O3 that range between 0.10 and 0.49 wt% (equivalent to a.p.f.u. ranging between 0 and 0.01) and Ce2O3 ranging between 0.86 and 1.80 wt% (equivalent to a.p.f.u. ranging between 0.02 and 0.03), Pr2O3 concentrations range between 0 and 0.23 wt% (equivalent to 0 a.p.f.u.), and Y2O3 is 0 wt% (equivalent to 0 a.p.f.u.). The abundance of the REEs in pyroclore at the Panda Hill Carbonatite deposit is of no economic significance.

  1. Age and tectonic setting of the Mesozoic McCoy Mountains Formation in western Arizona, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spencer, J.E.; Richard, S.M.; Gehrels, G.E.; Gleason, J.D.; Dickinson, W.R.

    2011-01-01

    The McCoy Mountains Formation consists of Upper Jurassic to Upper Cretaceous siltstone, sandstone, and conglomerate exposed in an east-west-trending belt in southwestern Arizona and southeastern California. At least three different tectonic settings have been proposed for McCoy deposition, and multiple tectonic settings are likely over the ~80 m.y. age range of deposition. U-Pb isotopic analysis of 396 zircon sand grains from at or near the top of McCoy sections in the southern Little Harquahala, Granite Wash, New Water, and southern Plomosa Mountains, all in western Arizona, identifi ed only Jurassic or older zircons. A basaltic lava fl ow near the top of the section in the New Water Mountains yielded a U-Pb zircon date of 154.4 ?? 2.1 Ma. Geochemically similar lava fl ows and sills in the Granite Wash and southern Plomosa Mountains are inferred to be approximately the same age. We interpret these new analyses to indicate that Mesozoic clastic strata in these areas are Upper Jurassic and are broadly correlative with the lowermost McCoy Mountains Formation in the Dome Rock, McCoy, and Palen Mountains farther west. Six samples of numerous Upper Jurassic basaltic sills and lava fl ows in the McCoy Mountains Formation in the Granite Wash, New Water, and southern Plomosa Mountains yielded initial ??Nd values (at t = 150 Ma) of between +4 and +6. The geochemistry and geochronology of this igneous suite, and detrital-zircon geochronology of the sandstones, support the interpretation that the lower McCoy Mountains Formation was deposited during rifting within the western extension of the Sabinas-Chihuahua-Bisbee rift belt. Abundant 190-240 Ma zircon sand grains were derived from nearby, unidentifi ed Triassic magmatic-arc rocks in areas that were unaffected by younger Jurassic magmatism. A sandstone from the upper McCoy Mountains Formation in the Dome Rock Mountains (Arizona) yielded numerous 80-108 Ma zircon grains and almost no 190-240 Ma grains, revealing a major

  2. pre-Mesozoic evolution of the basement of the Catalan Coastal Ranges: implications from geochemical and Sm-Nd isotope data of the Palaeozoic succession of the Collserola Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilà, Miquel; Pin, Christian

    2016-04-01

    In the whole of the Western Europe and neighbouring areas numerous studies have addressed the provenance of pre-Mesozoic sedimentary rocks and the Palaeozoic geodynamic evolution using the Sm-Nd systematics. However, at present, there are still large areas of the Variscan mountain chain without systematic determinations of their whole - rock Sm-Nd isotope signatures. This is the case of the Palaeozoic blocks of the Catalan Coastal Ranges (NE Iberia). In the context of the Variscan belt many authors interpret the Palaeozoic basement of the Catalan Coastal Ranges as part of the southern foreland basin of the mountain belt. The pre-Mesozoic rocks in the Catalan Coastal Ranges exhibit important stratigraphical affinities with those outcropping in the Eastern Pyrenees, Montagne Noire, Sardinia and Iberian Range. Paleogeographic reconstructions predict that the Catalan Coastal Ranges were located in a transitional area between the northern branch of the Ibero-Armorican arc and the core of the arc. The Collserola Range, located in the metropolitan area of Barcelona, includes a representative Palaeozoic stratigraphic section, from Cambro-Ordovician to Carboniferous, of the central part of the Catalan Coastal Ranges. In this presentation we present an up-to-date review of the stratigraphy and structure of the Palaeozoic of the Collserola Range, and provide geochemical and Sm-Nd isotope data to constrain the Pre-Mesozoic crustal evolution of this sector of the Variscan belt. Geochemical compositions indicate that the Palaeozoic siliciclastic rocks of the Collserola Range were fed by a relative mature heterogeneous source of sediment, comprising from quartz-rich sediments to intermediate igneous rocks. The siliciclastic rocks of the Collserola Range show great geochemical affinity with the turbidites of passive margins. The Sm-Nd signature of the siliciclastic rocks is compatible with those of the Palaeozoic and Late Proterozoic fine grained siliciclastic rocks of the

  3. The subduction-accretion history of the Bangong-Nujiang Ocean: Constraints from provenance and geochronology of the Mesozoic strata near Gaize, central Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shun; Ding, Lin; Guilmette, Carl; Fu, Jiajun; Xu, Qiang; Yue, Yahui; Henrique-Pinto, Renato

    2017-04-01

    The Mesozoic strata, within the Bangong-Nujiang suture zone in central Tibet, recorded critical information about the subduction-accretion processes of the Bangong-Nujiang Ocean prior to the Lhasa-Qiangtang collision. This paper reports detailed field observations, petrographic descriptions, sandstone detrital zircon U-Pb ages and Hf isotopic analyses from an accretionary complex (preserved as Mugagangri Group) and the unconformably overlying Shamuluo Formation near Gaize. The youngest detrital zircon ages, together with other age constraints from literature, suggest that the Mugagangri Group was deposited during late Triassic-early Jurassic, while the Shamuluo Formation was deposited during late Jurassic-early Cretaceous. Based on the differences in lithology, age and provenance, the Mugagangri Group is subdivided into the upper, middle and lower subunits. These units are younging structurally downward/southward, consistent with models of progressive off-scrapping and accretion in a southward-facing subduction complex. The upper subunit, comprising mainly quartz-sandstone and siliceous mud/shale, was deposited in abyssal plain environment close to the Qiangtang passive margin during late Triassic, with sediments derived from the southern Qiangtang block. The middle and lower subunits comprise mainly lithic-quartz-sandstone and mud/shale, containing abundant ultramafic/ophiolitic fragments. The middle subunit, of late Triassic-early Jurassic age, records a transition in tectono-depositional setting from abyssal plain to trench-wedge basin, with sudden influx of sediments sourced from the central Qiangtang metamorphic belt and northern Qiangtang magmatic belt. The appearance of ultramafic/ophiolitic fragments in the middle subunit reflects the subduction initiation. The lower subunit was deposited in a trench-wedge basin during early Jurassic, with influx of Jurassic-aged zircons originating from the newly active southern Qiangtang magmatic arc. The lower subunit

  4. Mesozoic Crustal Thickening of the Longmenshan Belt (NE Tibet, China) by Imbrication of Basement Slices: Insights From Structural Analysis, Petrofabric and Magnetic Fabric Studies, and Gravity Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Zhenhua; Martelet, Guillaume; Lin, Wei; Faure, Michel; Chen, Yan; Wei, Wei; Li, Shuangjian; Wang, Qingchen

    2017-12-01

    This work first presents field structural analysis, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) measurements, and kinematic and microstructural studies on the Neoproterozoic Pengguan complex located in the middle segment of the Longmenshan thrust belt (LMTB), NE Tibet. These investigations indicate that the Pengguan complex is a heterogeneous unit with a ductilely deformed NW domain and an undeformed SE domain, rather than a single homogeneous body as previously thought. The NW part of the Pengguan complex is constrained by top-to-the-NW shearing along its NW boundary and top-to-the-SE shearing along its SE boundary, where it imbricates and overrides the SE domain. Two orogen-perpendicular gravity models not only support the imbricated shape of the Pengguan complex but also reveal an imbrication of high-density material hidden below the Paleozoic rocks on the west of the LMTB. Regionally, this suggests a basement-slice-imbricated structure that developed along the margin of the Yangtze Block, as shown by the regional gravity anomaly map, together with the published nearby seismic profile and the distribution of orogen-parallel Neoproterozoic complexes. Integrating the previously published ages of the NW normal faulting and of the SE directed thrusting, the locally fast exhumation rate, and the lithological characteristics of the sediments in the LMTB front, we interpret the basement-slice-imbricated structure as the result of southeastward thrusting of the basement slices during the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous. This architecture makes a significant contribution to the crustal thickening of the LMTB during the Mesozoic, and therefore, the Cenozoic thickening of the Longmenshan belt might be less important than often suggested.

  5. A new xinjiangchelyid turtle from the Middle Jurassic of Xinjiang, China and the evolution of the basipterygoid process in Mesozoic turtles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most turtles from the Middle and Late Jurassic of Asia are referred to the newly defined clade Xinjiangchelyidae, a group of mostly shell-based, generalized, small to mid-sized aquatic froms that are widely considered to represent the stem lineage of Cryptodira. Xinjiangchelyids provide us with great insights into the plesiomorphic anatomy of crown-cryptodires, the most diverse group of living turtles, and they are particularly relevant for understanding the origin and early divergence of the primary clades of extant turtles. Results Exceptionally complete new xinjiangchelyid material from the ?Qigu Formation of the Turpan Basin (Xinjiang Autonomous Province, China) provides new insights into the anatomy of this group and is assigned to Xinjiangchelys wusu n. sp. A phylogenetic analysis places Xinjiangchelys wusu n. sp. in a monophyletic polytomy with other xinjiangchelyids, including Xinjiangchelys junggarensis, X. radiplicatoides, X. levensis and X. latiens. However, the analysis supports the unorthodox, though tentative placement of xinjiangchelyids and sinemydids outside of crown-group Testudines. A particularly interesting new observation is that the skull of this xinjiangchelyid retains such primitive features as a reduced interpterygoid vacuity and basipterygoid processes. Conclusions The homology of basipterygoid processes is confidently demonstrated based on a comprehensive review of the basicranial anatomy of Mesozoic turtles and a new nomenclatural system is introduced for the carotid canal system of turtles. The loss of the basipterygoid process and the bony enclosure of the carotid circulation system occurred a number of times independently during turtle evolution suggesting that the reinforcement of the basicranial region was essential for developing a rigid skull, thus paralleling the evolution of other amniote groups with massive skulls. PMID:24053145

  6. A new xinjiangchelyid turtle from the Middle Jurassic of Xinjiang, China and the evolution of the basipterygoid process in Mesozoic turtles.

    PubMed

    Rabi, Márton; Zhou, Chang-Fu; Wings, Oliver; Ge, Sun; Joyce, Walter G

    2013-09-22

    Most turtles from the Middle and Late Jurassic of Asia are referred to the newly defined clade Xinjiangchelyidae, a group of mostly shell-based, generalized, small to mid-sized aquatic froms that are widely considered to represent the stem lineage of Cryptodira. Xinjiangchelyids provide us with great insights into the plesiomorphic anatomy of crown-cryptodires, the most diverse group of living turtles, and they are particularly relevant for understanding the origin and early divergence of the primary clades of extant turtles. Exceptionally complete new xinjiangchelyid material from the ?Qigu Formation of the Turpan Basin (Xinjiang Autonomous Province, China) provides new insights into the anatomy of this group and is assigned to Xinjiangchelys wusu n. sp. A phylogenetic analysis places Xinjiangchelys wusu n. sp. in a monophyletic polytomy with other xinjiangchelyids, including Xinjiangchelys junggarensis, X. radiplicatoides, X. levensis and X. latiens. However, the analysis supports the unorthodox, though tentative placement of xinjiangchelyids and sinemydids outside of crown-group Testudines. A particularly interesting new observation is that the skull of this xinjiangchelyid retains such primitive features as a reduced interpterygoid vacuity and basipterygoid processes. The homology of basipterygoid processes is confidently demonstrated based on a comprehensive review of the basicranial anatomy of Mesozoic turtles and a new nomenclatural system is introduced for the carotid canal system of turtles. The loss of the basipterygoid process and the bony enclosure of the carotid circulation system occurred a number of times independently during turtle evolution suggesting that the reinforcement of the basicranial region was essential for developing a rigid skull, thus paralleling the evolution of other amniote groups with massive skulls.

  7. Compression-extension transition of continental crust in a subduction zone: A parametric numerical modeling study with implications on Mesozoic-Cenozoic tectonic evolution of the Cathaysia Block

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Lung Sang; Gao, Jian-Feng

    2017-01-01

    The Cathaysia Block is located in southeastern part of South China, which situates in the west Pacific subduction zone. It is thought to have undergone a compression-extension transition of the continental crust during Mesozoic-Cenozoic during the subduction of Pacific Plate beneath Eurasia-Pacific Plate, resulting in extensive magmatism, extensional basins and reactivation of fault systems. Although some mechanisms such as the trench roll-back have been generally proposed for the compression-extension transition, the timing and progress of the transition under a convergence setting remain ambiguous due to lack of suitable geological records and overprinting by later tectonic events. In this study, a numerical thermo-dynamical program was employed to evaluate how variable slab angles, thermal gradients of the lithospheres and convergence velocities would give rise to the change of crustal stress in a convergent subduction zone. Model results show that higher slab dip angle, lower convergence velocity and higher lithospheric thermal gradient facilitate the subduction process. The modeling results reveal the continental crust stress is dominated by horizontal compression during the early stage of the subduction, which could revert to a horizontal extension in the back-arc region, combing with the roll-back of the subducting slab and development of mantle upwelling. The parameters facilitating the subduction process also favor the compression-extension transition in the upper plate of the subduction zone. Such results corroborate the geology of the Cathaysia Block: the initiation of the extensional regime in the Cathaysia Block occurring was probably triggered by roll-back of the slowly subducting slab. PMID:28182640

  8. Re-Os isotope evidence from Mesozoic and Cenozoic basalts for secular evolution of the mantle beneath the North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Feng; Xu, Ji-Feng; Liu, Yong-Sheng; Li, Jie; Chen, Jian-Lin; Li, Xi-Yao

    2017-05-01

    The mechanism and process of lithospheric thinning beneath the North China Craton (NCC) are still debated. A key criterion in distinguishing among the proposed mechanisms is whether associated continental basalts were derived from the thinning lithospheric mantle or upwelling asthenosphere. Herein, we investigate the possible mechanisms of lithospheric thinning based on a systematic Re-Os isotopic study of Mesozoic to Cenozoic basalts from the NCC. Our whole-rock Re-Os isotopic results indicate that the Mesozoic basalts generally have high Re and Os concentrations that vary widely from 97.2 to 839.4 ppt and 74.4 to 519.6 ppt, respectively. They have high initial 187Os/188Os ratios ranging from 0.1513 to 0.3805, with corresponding variable γOs(t) values (+20 to +202). In contrast, the Re-Os concentrations and radiogenic Os isotope compositions of the Cenozoic basalts are typically lower than those of the Mesozoic basalts. The lowest initial 187Os/188Os ratios of the Cenozoic basalts are 0.1465 and 0.1479, with corresponding γOs(t) values of +15 and +16, which are within the range of ocean island basalts. These new Re-Os isotopic results, combined with the findings of previous studies, indicate that the Mesozoic basalts were a hybrid product of the melting of pyroxenite and peridotite in ancient lithospheric mantle beneath the NCC. The Cenozoic basalts were derived mainly from upwelling asthenosphere mixed with small amounts of lithospheric materials. The marked differences in geochemistry between the Mesozoic and Cenozoic basalts suggest a greatly reduced involvement of lithospheric mantle as the magma source from the Mesozoic to the Cenozoic. The subsequent lithospheric thinning of the NCC and replacement by upwelling asthenospheric mantle resulted in a change to asthenosphere-derived Cenozoic basalts.

  9. Late-Paleozoic-Mesozoic deformational and deformation related metamorphic structures of Kuznetsk-Altai region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinoviev, Sergei

    2014-05-01

    Kuznetsk-Altai region is a part of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt. The nature and formation mechanisms of the observed structure of Kuznetsk-Altai region are interpreted by the author as the consequence of convergence of Tuva-Mongolian and Junggar lithospheric block structures and energy of collision interaction between the blocks of crust in Late-Paleozoic-Mesozoic period. Tectonic zoning of Kuznetsk-Altai region is based on the principle of adequate description of geological medium (without methods of 'primary' state recovery). The initial indication of this convergence is the crust thickening in the zone of collision. On the surface the mechanisms of lateral compression form a regional elevation; with this elevation growth the 'mountain roots' start growing. With an approach of blocks an interblock elevation is divided into various fragments, and these fragments interact in the manner of collision. The physical expression of collision mechanisms are periodic pulses of seismic activity. The main tectonic consequence of the block convergence and collision of interblock units is formation of an ensemble of regional structures of the deformation type on the basis of previous 'pre-collision' geological substratum [Chikov et al., 2012]. This ensemble includes: 1) allochthonous and autochthonous blocks of weakly deformed substratum; 2) folded (folded-thrust) systems; 3) dynamic metamorphism zones of regional shears and main faults. Characteristic of the main structures includes: the position of sedimentary, magmatic and PT-metamorphic rocks, the degree of rock dynamometamorphism and variety rock body deformation, as well as the styles and concentrations of mechanic deformations. 1) block terranes have weakly elongated or isometric shape in plane, and they are the systems of block structures of pre-collision substratum separated by the younger zones of interblock deformations. They stand out among the main deformation systems, and the smallest are included into the

  10. Timing of Exhumation of the Mesozoic Blue Nile Rift, Ethiopia: A New Study from Apatite Fission Track Thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gani, N. D.; Bowden, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    At present, tectonic features of Ethiopia are dominated by the 2.5 km high Ethiopian Plateau, and the NE-SW striking continental rift, the East African Rift System (EARS) that dissected the plateau into the northwest and southeast plateaus. The stress direction of the EARS is nearly perpendicular to the stress direction of the Mesozoic rifts of the Central African Rift System (CARS), located mostly in Sudan, Ethiopia and Kenya. During the Gondwana splitting in Mesozoic, active lithospheric extension within the CARS resulted in several NW-SE striking continental rifts including the Blue Nile, Muglad, Melut and Anza that are well documented in Sudan and Kenya, from a combination of geophysical and drill core analysis and field investigations. However, the timing and evolution of the poorly documented Blue Nile Rift in Ethiopia, now hidden in the subsurface of the Ethiopian Plateau and the EARS, is largely unknown. This study investigates, for the first time, the timing of tectono-thermal evolution of the Blue Nile Rift from cooling ages deduced from apatite fission track (AFT) thermochronology to understand the rift flank exhumation. Here, we report the AFT results from basement samples collected in a vertical transect from the Ethiopian Plateau. The fission track ages of the samples show a general trend of increasing cooling ages with elevations. The time-temperature simulations of the fission track ages illustrate that the cooling started at least 80 Ma ago with a significant amount of rapid cooling between 80 and 70 Ma, followed by a slow cooling after 70 Ma and then another accelerated cooling starting around 10 Ma. The Cretaceous rapid cooling event likely related to the flank uplift of the Blue Nile Rift and associated faulting, during which much of the exhumation occurred. Today, the Blue Nile Rift is buried under the thick cover of Mesozoic sedimentary rocks and Cenozoic volcanics. The late Neogene rapid cooling agrees well with our previous thermal model

  11. Anatexis, hybridization and the modification of ancient crust: Mesozoic plutonism in the Old Woman Mountains area, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, C.F.; Wooden, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    A compositionally expanded array of granitic (s.l.) magmas intruded the > 2 Ga crust of the Old Woman Mountains area between 160 and 70 Ma. These magmas were emplaced near the eastern (inland) edge of the Jurassic/Cretaceous arcs of western North America, in an area where magma flux, especially during the Jurassic, was considerably lower than to the west. The Jurassic intrusives and over half of the Cretaceous intrusives are predominantly metaluminous and variable in composition; a major Cretaceous suite comprises only peraluminous monzogranite. Only the Jurassic intrusions show clear evidence for the presence of mafic liquids. All units, including the most mafic rocks, reveal isotopic evidence for a significant crustal component. However, none of the Mesozoic intrusives matches in isotopic composition either average pre-intrusion crust or any major unit of the exposed crust. Elemental inconsistencies also preclude closed system derivation from exposed crust. Emplacement of these magmas, which doubled the volume of the mid- to upper crust, did not dramatically change its elemental composition. It did, however, affect its Nd and especially Sr isotopic composition and modify some of the distinctive aspects of the elemental chemistry. We propose that Jurassic magmatism was open-system, with a major influx of mantle-derived mafic magma interacting strongly with the ancient crust. Mesozoic crustal thickening may have led to closed-system crustal melting by the Late Cretaceous, but the deep crust had been profoundly modified by earlier Mesozoic hybridization so that crustal melts did not simply reflect the original crustal composition. The clear evidence for a crustal component in magmas of the Old Woman Mountains area may not indicate any fundamental differences from the processes at work elsewhere in this or other magmatic arcs where the role of pre-existing crust is less certain. Rather, a compositionally distinctive, very old crust may simply have yielded a more

  12. Cierco Pb-Zn-Ag vein deposits: Isotopic and fluid inclusion evidence for formation during the mesozoic extension in the pyrenees of Spain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.A.; Cardellach, E.; Tritlla, J.; Hanan, B.B.

    1996-01-01

    The Cierco Pb-Zn-Ag vein deposits, located in the central Pyrenees of Spain, crosscut Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks and are in close proximity to Hercynian granodiorite dikes and plutons. Galena and sphalerite in the deposits have average ??34S values of -4.3 and -0.8 per mil (CDT), respectively. Coexisting mineral pairs give an isotopic equilibration temperature range of 89?? to 163??C which overlaps with the 112?? to 198??C range obtained from primary fluid inclusions. Coexisting quartz has a ??18O value of 19 ?? 1 per mil (VSMOW). The fluid which deposited these minerals is inferred to have had ??18OH2o and ??34SH2s values of 5 ?? 1 and -1 ?? 1 per mil, respectively. Chemical and microthermometric analyses of fluid inclusions in quartz and sphalerite indicate salinities of 3 to 29 wt percent NaCl equiv with Na+ and Ca2+ as the dominant cations in solution. The Br/Cl and I/Cl ratios differ from those characteristic of magmatic waters and pristine seawater, but show some similarity to those observed in deep ground waters in crystalline terranes, basinal brines, and evaporated seawater, Barite, which postdates the sulfides, spans isotopic ranges of 13 to 21 per mil, 10 to 15 per mil, and 0.7109 to 0.7123 for ??34S, ??18O, and 87Sr/86Sr, respectively. The three parameters are correlated providing strong evidence that the barites are products of fluid mixing. We propose that the Cierco deposits formed along an extensional fault system at the margin of a marine basin during the breakup of Pangea at some time between the Early Triassic and Early Cretaceous. Sulfide deposition corresponded to an upwelling of hydrothermal fluid from the Paleozoic basement and was limited by the amount of metals carried by the fluid. Barite deposition corresponded to the waning of upward flow and the collapse of sulfate-rich surface waters onto the retreating hydrothermal plume. Calcite precipitated late in the paragenesis as meteoric or marine waters descended into the fault system

  13. A Cretaceous eutriconodont and integument evolution in early mammals.

    PubMed

    Martin, Thomas; Marugán-Lobón, Jesús; Vullo, Romain; Martín-Abad, Hugo; Luo, Zhe-Xi; Buscalioni, Angela D

    2015-10-15

    The Mesozoic era (252-66 million years ago), known as the domain of dinosaurs, witnessed a remarkable ecomorphological diversity of early mammals. The key mammalian characteristics originated during this period and were prerequisite for their evolutionary success after extinction of the non-avian dinosaurs 66 million years ago. Many ecomorphotypes familiar to modern mammal fauna evolved independently early in mammalian evolutionary history. Here we report a 125-million-year-old eutriconodontan mammal from Spain with extraordinary preservation of skin and pelage that extends the record of key mammalian integumentary features into the Mesozoic era. The new mammalian specimen exhibits such typical mammalian features as pelage, mane, pinna, and a variety of skin structures: keratinous dermal scutes, protospines composed of hair-like tubules, and compound follicles with primary and secondary hairs. The skin structures of this new Mesozoic mammal encompass the same combination of integumentary features as those evolved independently in other crown Mammalia, with similarly broad structural variations as in extant mammals. Soft tissues in the thorax and abdomen (alveolar lungs and liver) suggest the presence of a muscular diaphragm. The eutriconodont has molariform tooth replacement, ossified Meckel's cartilage of the middle ear, and specialized xenarthrous articulations of posterior dorsal vertebrae, convergent with extant xenarthran mammals, which strengthened the vertebral column for locomotion.

  14. Mesozoic fossils (>145 Mya) suggest the antiquity of the subgenera of Daphnia and their coevolution with chaoborid predators.

    PubMed

    Kotov, Alexey A; Taylor, Derek J

    2011-05-19

    The timescale of the origins of Daphnia O. F. Mueller (Crustacea: Cladocera) remains controversial. The origin of the two main subgenera has been associated with the breakup of the supercontinent Pangaea. This vicariance hypothesis is supported by reciprocal monophyly, present day associations with the former Gondwanaland and Laurasia regions, and mitochondrial DNA divergence estimates. However, previous multilocus nuclear DNA sequence divergence estimates at < 10 Million years are inconsistent with the breakup of Pangaea. We examined new and existing cladoceran fossils from a Mesozoic Mongolian site, in hopes of gaining insights into the timescale of the evolution of Daphnia. We describe new fossils of ephippia from the Khotont site in Mongolia associated with the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary (about 145 MYA) that are morphologically similar to several modern genera of the family Daphniidae, including the two major subgenera of Daphnia, i.e., Daphnia s. str. and Ctenodaphnia. The daphniid fossils co-occurred with fossils of the predaceous phantom midge (Chaoboridae). Our findings indicate that the main subgenera of Daphnia are likely much older than previously known from fossils (at least 100 MY older) or from nuclear DNA estimates of divergence. The results showing co-occurrence of the main subgenera far from the presumed Laurasia/Gondwanaland dispersal barrier shortly after formation suggests that vicariance from the breakup of Pangaea is an unlikely explanation for the origin of the main subgenera. The fossil impressions also reveal that the coevolution of a dipteran predator (Chaoboridae) with the subgenus Daphnia is much older than previously known -- since the Mesozoic.

  15. Anomalous isotopic compositions of Sr, Ar and O in the Mesozoic diabase dikes of Liberia, West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauche, Renée; Faure, Gunter; Jones, Lois M.; Hoefs, Jochen

    1989-01-01

    The Mesozoic diabase dikes of Liberia are tholeiites whose 87Sr/86Sr and 87Rb/86Sr ratios scatter widely on the Rb-Sr isochron diagram. The problem is attributed to differences in the initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios of these rocks which range from 0.70311 to 0.70792, assuming a uniform age of 186 Ma for the dikes and using λ(87Rb)=1.42 × 10-11y-1. The range of values is similar to that observed in the Mesozoic basalt flows and dikes of other Gondwana continents. New whole-rock K-Ar dates confirm previous conclusions that the diabase dikes in the Liberian and Pan-African age provinces of Liberia absorbed extraneous 40Ar after intrusion. Only the dikes in the Paynesville Sandstone have K-Ar dates that range from 117 Ma to 201 Ma and may not contain extraneous 40Ar. However, dikes from all three age provinces of Liberia have elevated initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios. These results indicate that contamination with radiogenic 87Sr occurred primarily before intrusion of the magma whereas the addition of extraneous 40Ar occurred after emplacement and reflects the age and mineral composition of the country rock. The δ 18O values of the Liberian diabase range from +5.6/% to +9.10/% and correlate positively with initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios. The data can be modeled by fractional crystallization and simultaneous assimilation of crustal rocks by the magma. However, samples containing amphibole and biotite replacing pyroxene deviate from the Sr-O isotope trajectories of the model and appear to have been depleted in 18O and enriched in 87Sr by interactions with groundwater at high temperature.

  16. The structural evolution of the Ghadames and Illizi basins during the Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic: Petroleum implications

    SciTech Connect

    Gauthier, F.J.; Boudjema, A.; Lounis, R.

    1995-08-01

    The Ghadames and Illizi basins cover the majority of the eastern Sahara of Algeria. Geologicaly, this part of the Central Saharan platform has been influenced by a series of structural arches and {open_quotes}moles{close_quotes} (continental highs) which controlled sedimentation and structure through geologic time. These features, resulting from and having been affected by nine major tectonic phases ranging from pre-Cambrian to Tertiary, completely bound the Ghadames and Illizi Basins. During the Paleozoic both basins formed one continuous depositional entity with the Ghadames basin being the distal portion of the continental sag basin where facies and thickness variations are observed over largemore » distances. It is during the Mesozoic-Cenozoic that the Ghadames basin starts to evolve differently from the Illizi Basin. Eustatic low-stand periods resulted in continental deposition yielding the major petroleum-bearing reservoir horizons (Cambrian, Ordovician, Siluro-Devonian and Carboniferous). High-stand periods corresponds to the major marine transgressions covering the majority of the Saharan platform. These transgressions deposited the principal source rock intervals of the Silurian and Middle to Upper Devonian. The main reservoirs of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic are Triassic sandstone sequences which are covered by a thick evaporite succession forming a super-seal. Structurally, the principal phases affecting this sequence are the extensional events related to the breakup of Pangea and the Alpine compressional events. The Ghadames and Illizi basins, therefore, have been controlled by a polphase tectonic history influenced by Pan African brittle basement fracturing which resulted in complex structures localized along the major basin bounding trends as well as several subsidiary trends within the basin. These trends, as demonstrated with key seismic data, have been found to contain the majority of hydrocarbons trapped.« less

  17. Geochronology and geochemistry of Mesozoic intrusive rocks in the Xing'an Massif of NE China: Implications for the evolution and spatial extent of the Mongol-Okhotsk tectonic regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu; Xu, Wen-Liang; Tang, Jie; Pei, Fu-Ping; Wang, Feng; Sun, Chen-Yang

    2018-04-01

    This study presents new zircon U-Pb-Hf and whole-rock geochemical data for intrusive rocks in the Xing'an Massif of NE China, with the aim of furthering our understanding of the evolution and spatial influence of the Mongol-Okhotsk tectonic regime. Zircon U-Pb dating indicates that five stages of Mesozoic magmatism are recorded in the Xing'an Massif, namely during the Middle Triassic ( 237 Ma), the Late Triassic ( 225 Ma), the Early Jurassic ( 178 Ma), the Middle Jurassic ( 168 Ma), and the late Early Cretaceous ( 130 Ma). The Middle Triassic-Early Jurassic intrusive rocks in the Xing'an Massif are dominantly granodiorites, monzogranites, and syenogranites that formed from magma generated by partial melting of newly accreted continental crust. Geochemistry of the Middle Triassic-Early Jurassic granitoid suites of the Xing'an Massif indicates their formation at an active continental margin setting, related to the southwards subduction of the Mongol-Okhotsk oceanic plate. The Middle Jurassic monzogranites in the Xing'an Massif are geochemically similar to adakites and have εHf(t) values (+3.8 to +5.8) and Hf two-stage model ages (TDM2; 979-850 Ma) that are indicative of derivation from magma generated by partial melting of thickened juvenile lower crust. The Middle Jurassic monzogranites formed in a compressional setting related to the closure of the Mongol-Okhotsk Ocean. The late Early Cretaceous intrusive rocks in the Xing'an Massif are dominated by A-type granitoids that are associated with bimodal volcanic rocks, suggesting their formation in an extensional environment related to either (i) delamination of a previously thickened region of the crust, associated with the Mongol-Okhotsk tectonic regime; (ii) the subduction of the Paleo-Pacific Plate; or (iii) the combined influence of these two tectonic regimes.

  18. Triassic–Jurassic mass extinction as trigger for the Mesozoic radiation of crocodylomorphs

    PubMed Central

    Toljagić, Olja; Butler, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudosuchia, one of the two main clades of Archosauria (Reptilia: Diapsida), suffered a major decline in lineage diversity during the Triassic–Jurassic (TJ) mass extinction (approx. 201 Ma). Crocodylomorpha, including living crocodilians and their extinct relatives, is the only group of pseudosuchians that survived into the Jurassic. We reassess changes in pseudosuchian morphological diversity (disparity) across this time interval, using considerably larger sample sizes than in previous analyses. Our results show that metrics of pseudosuchian disparity did not change significantly across the TJ boundary, contrasting with previous work suggesting low pseudosuchian disparity in the Early Jurassic following the TJ mass extinction. However, a significant shift in morphospace occupation between Late Triassic and Early Jurassic taxa is recognized, suggesting that the TJ extinction of many pseudosuchian lineages was followed by a major and geologically rapid adaptive radiation of crocodylomorphs. This marks the onset of the spectacularly successful evolutionary history of crocodylomorphs in Jurassic and Cretaceous ecosystems. PMID:23536443

  19. An evolving magmatic-hydrothermal system in the formation of the Mesozoic Meishan magnetite-apatite deposit in the Ningwu volcanic basin, eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen-Hao; Jiang, Man-Rong; Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Xia, Yan; Algeo, Thomas J.; Li, Huan

    2018-06-01

    The Meishan iron deposit contains 338 Mt of iron-ore reserves at 39% Fe and represents the largest magnetite-apatite deposit in the Ningwu Basin of eastern China. Controversy has long existed about whether this deposit had a hydrothermal or iron-oxide melt origin. Iron mineralization is genetically related to plutons that are composed of gabbro-diorite, which were emplaced at 130 ± 1 Ma. These rocks have SiO2 contents of 51.72-54.60 wt%, Na2O contents of 3.47-4.04 wt%, K2O contents of 2.02-2.69 wt%, and K2O/Na2O ratios of 0.51-0.73. These rocks are enriched in LILEs and LREEs and depleted in Nb, Ta, and Ti, which indicates that the magma originated through partial melting of an enriched lithospheric mantle source in a subduction environment. A pattern of decreasing initial Sr isotopic ratios and increasing εNd(t) values with time in Early Cretaceous magmatic rocks of the Ningwu Basin may indicate incorporation of increasing proportions of asthenospheric mantle material into the source magma, which is consistent with the processes of lithospheric thinning and asthenospheric upwelling in eastern China related to Mesozoic subduction of the Paleo-Pacific Plate. Two stages of magnetite are found in the gabbro-diorite: (1) early-crystallized magnetite as euhedral-subhedral crystals in larger clinopyroxene crystals, and (2) later-crystallized magnetite and accompanying ilmenite grains in the voids between plagioclase and clinopyroxene crystals. The formation of magnetite before clinopyroxene, combined with the results of Fe-Ti oxide geothermometry and analysis of magnetite V content, indicates that the oxygen fugacity of the source magma was greater than ΔFMQ +2.2 at an early stage (>640 °C) but decreased to ΔFMQ -2.66 as abundant magnetite crystallized at a later stage (∼489 °C). The early crystallization of magnetite at a high oxygen fugacity does not support a Fenner evolution trend for the primitive magma and diminishes the likelihood of liquid immiscibility

  20. Dissolution of Permian salt and Mesozoic depositional trends, Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, D.L.; Bean, D.W.

    1983-08-01

    Salt deposits in the Powder River basin of Wyoming occur in the Late Permian Ervay Member of the Goose Egg Formation which was deposited in a redbed-evaporite trend extending from the Williston basin of North Dakota to the Alliance basin of Nebraska and Wyoming. However, only remnants of the once extensive Ervay salt remain in the Powder River basin, with major salt dissolution events occurring during Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous. Subsidence and deposition at the surface were contemporaneous with subsurface salt dissolution except in areas where uplift and erosion were occurring. Earliest dissolution of the Ervay salt occurred inmore » the Jurassic, during regional uplift and erosion of the overlying Triassic Chugwater Formation in the present Hartville uplift and southeastern Powder River basin areas. Thickness variations of the Canyon Springs and Stockade Beaver members of the early Late Jurassic Sundance Formation, which unconformably overlie the deeply eroded Chugwater Formation, may be related in part to dissolution of the Ervay salt. Extensive salt dissolution, synsubsidence, and syndeposition occurred throughout most of the Powder River basin during the latest Jurassic and Early Cretaceous. Many producing fields from the Mowry, Muddy, and Dakota formations exhibit either rapid stratigraphic changes syndepositional to salt collapse or fracture-enhanced reservoir quality due to postdepositional salt collapse. Major Muddy accumulations occurring in areas of local Ervay salt collapse include Kitty, Hilight, Fiddler Creek, and Clareton which have produced jointly over 172 million bbl of oil. The relationship of Ervay salt dissolution to Lower Cretaceous deposition can be exploited as an effective exploration tool.« less

  1. Mesozoic basin development beneath the southeastern US coastal plain: evidence from new COCORP profiling

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, J.H.; Nelson, K.D.; Arnow, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    New COCORP profiling on the Georgia coastal plain indicates that the Triassic/Early Jurassic South Georgia basin is a composite feature, which includes several large half-grabens separated by intervening regions where the Triassic/Early Jurassic section is much thinner. Two half-grabens imaged on the profiles have apparent widths of 125 and 40 km, and at their deepest points contain about 5 km of basin fill. Both basins are bounded on their south flanks by major normal faults that dip moderately steeply toward the north, and are disrupted internally by subsidiary normal faults within the basin fill sequences. The orientation of the mainmore » basin-bounding faults suggests that they might have reactivated Paleozoic south-vergent structures formed on the south side of the Alleghenian suture. Evolution of the South Georgia basin appears to follow a model of initial, rapid rifting followed by flexural subsidence. The major episode of normal faulting, and hence extension, within the South Georgia basin occurred prior to extrusion of an areally extensive sequence of Early Jurassic basalt flows. This sequence is traceable across most of the width of the South Georgia basin in western Georgia, and may extend as far east as offshore South Carolina. Jurassic strata above the basalt horizon are notably less faulted and accumulated within a broadly subsiding basin that thins both to the north and south. The occurrence of the basalt relatively late in the rift sequence supports the hypothesis that the southeastern US may have been a major area of incipient spreading after Pangea had begun to separate.« less

  2. Paleozoic and Mesozoic silica-rich seawater: Evidence from hematitic chert (jasper) deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grenne, Tor; Slack, J.F.

    2003-01-01

    Laterally extensive beds of highly siliceous, hematitic chert (jasper) are associated with many volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) deposits of Late Cambrian to Early Cretaceous age, yet are unknown in analogous younger (including modern) settings. Textural studies suggest that VMS-related jaspers in the Ordovician Løkken ophiolite of Norway were originally deposited as Si- and Fe-rich gels that precipitated from hydrothermal plumes as colloidal silica and iron-oxyhydroxide particles. Rare earth element patterns and Ge/Si ratios of the jaspers reflect precipitation from plumes having seawater dilution factors of 103 to 104, similar to modern examples. We propose that silica in the ancient jaspers is not derived from submarine hydrothermal fluids-as suggested by previous workers-but instead was deposited from silic-rich sea-water. Flocculation and precipitation of the silica were triggered inorganically by the bridging effect of positively charged iron oxyhydroxides in the hydrothermal plume. A model involving amorphous silica (opal-A) precursors to the jaspers suggests that silica contents of Cambrian-Early Cretaceous oceans were at least 110 mg/L SiO2, compared to values of 40-60 mg/L SiO2 estimated in other studies. The evolution of ancient silica-rich to modern Fe-rich precipitates in submarine-hydrothermal plumes reflects a changeover from silica-saturated to silica-depleted seawater through Phanerozoic time, due mainly to ocean-wide emergence of diatoms in the Cretaceous.

  3. Mesozoic Alpine facies deposition as a result of past latitudinal plate motion.

    PubMed

    Muttoni, Giovanni; Erba, Elisabetta; Kent, Dennis V; Bachtadse, Valerian

    2005-03-03

    The fragmentation of Pangaea as a consequence of the opening of the Atlantic Ocean is documented in the Alpine-Mediterranean region by the onset of widespread pelagic sedimentation. Shallow-water sediments were replaced by mainly pelagic limestones in the Early Jurassic period, radiolarian cherts in the Middle-Late Jurassic period, and again pelagic limestones in the Late Jurassic-Cretaceous period. During initial extension, basin subsidence below the carbonate compensation depth (CCD) is thought to have triggered the transition from Early Jurassic limestones to Middle-Late Jurassic radiolarites. It has been proposed that the transition from radiolarites to limestones in the Late Jurassic period was due to an increase in calcareous nannoplankton abundance when the CCD was depressed below the ocean floor. But in modern oceans, sediments below the CCD are not necessarily radiolaritic. Here we present palaeomagnetic samples from the Jurassic-Cretaceous pelagic succession exposed in the Lombardian basin, Italy. On the basis of an analysis of our palaeolatitudinal data in a broader palaeogeographic context, we propose an alternative explanation for the above facies tripartition. We suggest that the Lombardian basin drifted initially towards, and subsequently away from, a near-equatorial upwelling zone of high biosiliceous productivity. Our tectonic model for the genesis of radiolarites adds an essential horizontal plate motion component to explanations involving only vertical variations of CCD relative to the ocean floor. It may explain the deposition of radiolarites throughout the Mediterranean and Middle Eastern region during the Jurassic period.

  4. Stress field sensitivity analysis within Mesozoic successions in the Swiss Alpine foreland using 3-D-geomechanical-numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Karsten; Hergert, Tobias; Heidbach, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    The in situ stress conditions are of key importance for the evaluation of radioactive waste repositories. In stage two of the Swiss site selection program, the three siting areas of high-level radioactive waste are located in the Alpine foreland in northern Switzerland. The sedimentary succession overlays the basement, consisting of variscan crystalline rocks as well as partly preserved Permo-Carboniferous deposits in graben structures. The Mesozoic sequence represents nearly the complete era and is covered by Cenozoic Molasse deposits as well as Quaternary sediments, mainly in the valleys. The target horizon (designated host rock) is an >100 m thick argillaceous Jurassic deposit (Opalinus Clay). To enlighten the impact of site-specific features on the state of stress within the sedimentary succession, 3-D-geomechanical-numerical models with elasto-plastic rock properties are set up for three potential siting areas. The lateral extent of the models ranges between 12 and 20 km, the vertical extent is up to a depth of 2.5 or 5 km below sea level. The sedimentary sequence plus the basement are separated into 10 to 14 rock mechanical units. The Mesozoic succession is intersected by regional fault zones; two or three of them are present in each model. The numerical problem is solved with the finite element method with a resolution of 100-150 m laterally and 10-30 m vertically. An initial stress state is established for all models taking into account the depth-dependent overconsolidation ratio in Opalinus Clay in northern Switzerland. The influence of topography, rock properties, friction on the faults as well as the impact of tectonic shortening on the state of stress is investigated. The tectonic stress is implemented with lateral displacement boundary conditions, calibrated on stress data that are compiled in Northern Switzerland. The model results indicate that the stress perturbation by the topography is significant to depths greater than the relief contrast. The

  5. Petrogenesis of Mesozoic granites in the Xitian, South China: Evidence from whole-rock geochemistry and zircon isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q.; Sun, J.; He, M.; Hou, Q.; Niu, R.

    2017-12-01

    Mesozoic granitoids are widespread in southeastern China, which accompanied with lots of world-famous polymetallic deposits. The mineralization is believed to be related to the Mesozoic granitic magmatism. However, the petrogenesis of these granites and their relation to the mineralization are still debated. As a typical granitic pluton, Xitian granites from the eastern Hunan Province are formed during this period and associated with tungsten-tin deposit. Whole-rock geochemical, SIMS zircon geochronology and oxygen isotopes, as well as LA-ICPMS zircon Lu-Hf isotopic analyses, were carried out on a suite of rocks from Xitian granitic pluton to constrain their magmatic sources and petrogenesis. Xitian granitic pluton is mainly composed of biotite adamellite, biotite granite, fine-grained granite. SIMS and LA-ICPMS U-Pb dating of zircons indicate that there are two episodes of these rocks, i.e., Late Triassic granites (227-233Ma) and Late Jurassic granites (150-154Ma). The Xitian granites are silica-rich, potassic and weakly peraluminous. Petrographic and geochemical features show that they are highly fractionated I-type granites. The combined elemental and isotopic results indicated that the Late Triassic granite in Xitian area experienced a process of crystal fractionation of crustal-derived magmas coupled with strong assimilation of the surrounding rocks. The occurrence of Jurassic granitoids in Xitian area is attributed to ascending of mantle-derived magmas, which provide heat for partial melting of crustal materials. The Late Jurassic granite may be derived from juvenile crust or partial melting of ancient crustal rocks, whereas high degrees of crystal fractionation further enriched tungsten-tin in the evolved granitic rocks. This work was financially supported by the Research Cooperation between Institute and University of Chinese Academy of Sciences grant (Y552012Y00), Public Welfare Project of the Ministry of land and Resources of China (201211024

  6. Using Classroom Management to Improve Preschoolers' Social and Emotional Skills: Final Impact and Implementation Findings from the Foundations of Learning Demonstration in Newark and Chicago

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Pamela; Lloyd, Chrishana M.; Millenky, Megan; Leacock, Nicole; Raver, C. Cybele; Bangser, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Investments in early childhood programs are widely viewed as a promising strategy to improve the future educational achievement of disadvantaged young children. However, it can be difficult for teachers to maintain program quality if children in the classroom display challenging behaviors. For example, when some children act out aggressively or…

  7. Mesozoic Bivalvia from Clerke and Mermaid Canyons, northwest Australian continental slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant-Mackie, J. A.

    Four sets of rock samples from two sites off the northwest Australian shelf in 3625-4480 m of water contain macrofaunas, mainly bivalves, of warm shallow-water origin. Mermaid Canyon (16 deg 19 min S, 118 deg 23 min E) provided many samples of oolitic calcarenite containing Pseudopecten (Pseudopecten) dugong n.sp., indicating an Early Jurassic age and Tethyan relationship. Three hand-specimens from the ridge forming the western edge of Clerke Canyon (16 deg 29 min S, 118 deg 30 min E) yielded a Norian coral-?Lima-oyster assemblage and the Norian-Rhaetian bivalve Palaeocardita aff. globiformis (Boettger). The latter shows relationship with south-east Asian (Indonesia-Vietnam-south China) forms.

  8. Plate tectonic evolution of the southern margin of Eurasia in the Mesozoic and Cenozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golonka, J.

    2004-03-01

    Thirteen time interval maps were constructed, which depict the Triassic to Neogene plate tectonic configuration, paleogeography and general lithofacies of the southern margin of Eurasia. The aim of this paper is to provide an outline of the geodynamic evolution and position of the major tectonic elements of the area within a global framework. The Hercynian Orogeny was completed by the collision of Gondwana and Laurussia, whereas the Tethys Ocean formed the embayment between the Eurasian and Gondwanian branches of Pangea. During Late Triassic-Early Jurassic times, several microplates were sutured to the Eurasian margin, closing the Paleotethys Ocean. A Jurassic-Cretaceous north-dipping subduction boundary was developed along this new continental margin south of the Pontides, Transcaucasus and Iranian plates. The subduction zone trench-pulling effect caused rifting, creating the back-arc basin of the Greater Caucasus-proto South Caspian Sea, which achieved its maximum width during the Late Cretaceous. In the western Tethys, separation of Eurasia from Gondwana resulted in the formation of the Ligurian-Penninic-Pieniny-Magura Ocean (Alpine Tethys) as an extension of Middle Atlantic system and a part of the Pangean breakup tectonic system. During Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous times, the Outer Carpathian rift developed. The opening of the western Black Sea occurred by rifting and drifting of the western-central Pontides away from the Moesian and Scythian platforms of Eurasia during the Early Cretaceous-Cenomanian. The latest Cretaceous-Paleogene was the time of the closure of the Ligurian-Pieniny Ocean. Adria-Alcapa terranes continued their northward movement during Eocene-Early Miocene times. Their oblique collision with the North European plate led to the development of the accretionary wedge of the Outer Carpathians and its foreland basin. The formation of the West Carpathian thrusts was completed by the Miocene. The thrust front was still propagating eastwards in

  9. Massive sulfide metallogenesis at a late Mesozoic sediment-covered spreading axis: Evidence from the Franciscan complex and contemporary analogues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koski, Randolph A.; Lamons, Roberta C.; Dumoulin, Julie A.; Bouse, Robin M.

    1993-01-01

    The Island Mountain deposit, an anomalous massive sulfide in the Central belt of the Franciscan subduction complex, northern California Coast Ranges, formed during hydrothermal activity in a sediment-dominated paleo-sea-floor environment. Although the base of the massive sulfide is juxtaposed against a 500-m-wide melange band, its gradational upper contact within a coherent sequence of sandstone, siltstone, and mudstone indicates that hydrothermal activity was concurrent with turbidite deposition. Accumulations of sulfide breccia and clastic sulfide were produced by mass wasting of the sulfide mound prior to burial by turbidites. The bulk composition of sulfide samples (pyrrhotite rich; high Cu, As, and Au contents; radiogenic Pb isotope ratios) is consistent with a hydrothermal system dominated by fluid-sediment interaction. On the basis of a comparison with possible contemporary tectonic analogues at the southern Gorda Ridge and the Chile margin triple junction, we propose that massive sulfide mineralization in the Central belt of the Franciscan complex resulted from hydrothermal activity at a late Mesozoic sediment-covered ridge axis prior to collision with the North American plate.

  10. Massive sulfide metallogenesis at a late Mesozoic sediment-covered spreading axis: Evidence from the Franciscan complex and contemporary analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koski, Randolph A.; Lamons, Roberta C.; Dumoulin, Julie A.; Bouse, Robin M.

    1993-02-01

    The Island Mountain deposit, an anomalous massive sulfide in the Central belt of the Franciscan subduction complex, northern California Coast Ranges, formed during hydrothermal activity in a sediment-dominated paleo-sea-floor environment. Although the base of the massive sulfide is juxtaposed against a 500-m-wide melange band, its gradational upper contact within a coherent sequence of sandstone, siltstone, and mudstone indicates that hydrothermal activity was concurrent with turbidite deposition. Accumulations of sulfide breccia and clastic sulfide were produced by mass wasting of the sulfide mound prior to burial by turbidites. The bulk composition of sulfide samples (pyrrhotite rich; high Cu, As, and Au contents; radiogenic Pb isotope ratios) is consistent with a hydrothermal system dominated by fluid-sediment interaction. On the basis of a comparison with possible contemporary tectonic analogues at the southern Gorda Ridge and the Chile margin triple junction, we propose that massive sulfide mineralization in the Central belt of the Franciscan complex resulted from hydrothermal activity at a late Mesozoic sediment-covered ridge axis prior to collision with the North American plate.

  11. Selective extinction of marine plankton at the end of the Mesozoic era: The fossil and stable isotope record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Y.; Bhattacharya, S. K.

    1988-01-01

    Floral, faunal and stable isotope evidence in a continuous sequence of latest Cretaceous and earliest Tertiary shallow water marine deposits in the Mangyshlak Peninsula, USSR suggest severe environmental changes at the Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T) boundary. Time frame is provided by nanno, micro and macrofossils as well as by magnetic stratigraphy and an iridium spike. Oxygen isotopic analyses of the bulk sediments, composed of nanno and microplankton skeletal remains, show a sharp positive spike at the K/T boundary. This shift is primarily attributed to severe cooling possibly accompanied by increased salinities of the surface mixed layer. Floral and faunal extinctions were selective, affecting approximately 90 percent of the warm water calcareous phyto and zooplankton genera in the Tethyan-Paratethyan regions. These highly diverse taxa with many endemic representatives were at the peak of their evolutionary development. Geologic evidence indicates that the terminal Cretaceous temperature decline was coeval with widespread and intense volcanic activity which reached a peak at the close of the Mesozoic Era. Increased acidity temporarily prohibited calcite nucleation of the surface dwelling warm-water plankton. Superimposed upon decreased alkalinity, severe and rapid climatic changes caused the extinction of calcareous phyto and zooplankton.

  12. A new, exceptionally preserved juvenile specimen of Eusaurosphargis dalsassoi (Diapsida) and implications for Mesozoic marine diapsid phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Scheyer, Torsten M; Neenan, James M; Bodogan, Timea; Furrer, Heinz; Obrist, Christian; Plamondon, Mathieu

    2017-06-30

    Recently it was suggested that the phylogenetic clustering of Mesozoic marine reptile lineages, such as thalattosaurs, the very successful fish-shaped ichthyosaurs and sauropterygians (including plesiosaurs), among others, in a so-called 'superclade' is an artefact linked to convergent evolution of morphological characters associated with a shared marine lifestyle. Accordingly, partial 'un-scoring' of the problematic phylogenetic characters was proposed. Here we report a new, exceptionally preserved and mostly articulated juvenile skeleton of the diapsid reptile, Eusaurosphargis dalsassoi, a species previously recovered within the marine reptile 'superclade', for which we now provide a revised diagnosis. Using micro-computed tomography, we show that besides having a deep skull with a short and broad rostrum, the most outstanding feature of the new specimen is extensive, complex body armour, mostly preserved in situ, along its vertebrae, ribs, and forelimbs, as well as a row of flat, keeled ventrolateral osteoderms associated with the gastralia. As a whole, the anatomical features support an essentially terrestrial lifestyle of the animal. A review of the proposed partial character 'un-scoring' using three published data matrices indicate that this approach is flawed and should be avoided, and that within the marine reptile 'superclade' E. dalsassoi potentially is the sister taxon of Sauropterygia.

  13. Mesozoic Continental Sediment-dispersal Systems of Mexico Linked to Development of the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawton, T. F.; Molina-Garza, R. S.; Barboza-Gudiño, R.; Rogers, R. D.

    2013-05-01

    Major sediment dispersal systems on western Pangea evolved in concert with thermal uplift, rift and drift phases of the Gulf of Mexico Basin, and were influenced by development of a continental arc on Pangea's western margin. Existing literature and preliminary data from fieldwork, sandstone petrology and detrital zircon analysis reveal how major drainages in Mexico changed from Late Triassic through Late Jurassic time and offer predictions for the ultimate destinations of sand-rich detritus along the Gulf and paleo-Pacific margins. Late Triassic rivers drained away from and across the present site of the Gulf of Mexico, which was then the location of a major thermal dome, the Texas uplift of recent literature. These high-discharge rivers with relatively mature sediment composition fed a large-volume submarine fan system on the paleo-Pacific continental margin of Mexico. Predictably, detrital zircon age populations are diverse and record sources as far away as the Amazonian craton. This enormous fluvial system was cut off abruptly near the Triassic-Jurassic boundary by extensive reorganization of continental drainages. Early and Middle Jurassic drainage systems had local headwaters and deposited sediment in extensional basins associated with arc magmatism. Redbeds accumulated across northern and eastern Mexico and Chiapas in long, narrow basins whose locations and dimensions are recorded primarily by inverted antiformal massifs. The Jurassic continental successions overlie Upper Triassic strata and local subvolcanic plutons; they contain interbedded volcanic rocks and thus have been interpreted as part of the Nazas continental-margin arc. The detritus of these fluvial systems is volcanic-lithic; syndepositional grain ages are common in the detrital zircon populations, which are mixed with Oaxaquia-derived Permo-Triassic and Grenville age populations. By this time, interior Pangea no longer supplied sediment to the paleo-Pacific margin, possibly because the

  14. Mesozoic crustal thickening of the eastern North China craton: Evidence from eclogite xenoliths and petrologic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenliang; Gao, Shan; Wang, Qinghai; Wang, Dongyan; Liu, Yongsheng

    2006-09-01

    A suite of xenoliths of eclogite, garnet clinopyroxenite, and felsic gneiss is found in Early Cretaceous high-Mg [Mg# >45, where Mg# = molar 100 × Mg/(Mg + Fetotal)] adakitic intrusions from the Xuzhou-Huaibei (Xu-Huai) region along the southeastern margin of the North China craton. The primary mineral assemblage of garnet + omphacite/augite + quartz + rutile ± pargasite of the eclogite and garnet clinopyroxenite xenoliths defines a minimum pressure of >1.5 GPa, while the estimated peak metamorphic temperatures range from 800 to 1060 °C. An Sm-Nd whole-rock garnet isochron and zircon U-Pb dates show that timing of the eclogite facies metamorphism took place ca. 220 Ma. This Triassic age agrees with the age of eclogites from the Dabie-Sulu ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic (UHPM) belt. The ages of abundant Late Archean to early Paleoproterozoic (2.3 2.6Ga) inherited zircons correspond to the most prominent crustal growth event in the North China craton. In addition, these xenoliths and their host high-Mg adakitic intrusions have complementary major and trace element compositions, suggesting that the adakites formed by partial melting of Archean metabasalts that were the protoliths of the Xu-Huai eclogite and garnet clinopyroxenite xenoliths. Trace element and Sr-Nd isotopic modeling shows that the high-Mg adakitic intrusions can be modeled as melts from ˜40% partial melting of the metabasalts in the eclogite facies, followed by interaction with the convecting mantle and variable degrees of crustal assimilation. Together with the similar zircon age populations between the xenoliths and the host rocks, these lines of evidence strongly suggest their genetic link via thickening, foundering, and partial melting of the Archean North China craton mafic lower crust, followed by adakitic melt-mantle interaction. The crustal thickening resulted from Triassic collision between the Yangtze craton and the North China craton, which produced the Dabie-Sulu UHPM belt in the

  15. Mesozoic authigenic carbonate deposition in the Arctic: Do glendonites record gas hydrate destabilization during the Jurassic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Chloe; Suan, Guillaume; Wierzbowski, Hubert; Rogov, Mikhail; Teichert, Barbara; Kienhuis, Michiel V. M.; Polerecky, Lubos; Middelburg, Jack B. M.; Reichart, Gert-Jan; van de Schootbrugge, Bas

    2015-04-01

    Glendonites are calcite pseudomorphs after ikaite, an unstable hydrated calcium carbonate mineral. Because present-day ikaite occurs predominantly in sub-polar environments and is unstable at warm temperatures, glendonites have been used as an indicator of near-freezing conditions throughout Earth history. Ikaite has also been observed in cold deep-sea environments like the Gulf of Mexico, the Japan Trench, and the Zaire Fan where their formation is possibly governed by other parameters. The description of glendonites in Paleocene-Eocene sediments of Svalbard, and Early Jurassic (Pliensbachian) deposits of northern Germany, however questions the role of temperature on ikaite precipitation (Spielhagen and Tripati, 2009; Teichert and Luppold, 2013). Anomalously low carbon isotope values of Jurassic glendonites point to the involvement of methane as a possible carbon source for ikaite/glendonite formation. Terrestrial organic matter degradation is also frequently evoked as a potential source of carbon. The involved bio- and geochemical processes remains thus not well constrained. Here we present new geochemical data of a large number of glendonites specimens from the Lower and Middle Jurassic of northern Siberia and the Lena river middle flows (Bajocian, Bathonian, Pliensbachian). Carbon and oxygen isotopic values show comparable trends between the different sections. Bulk glendonites δ13C and δ18O values vary from 0.0 to -44.5o and -15.0 to -0.8 respectively and show a negative correlation. Some samples display similar low δ13C values as the Pliensbachian glendonites of Germany (Teichert and Luppold, 2013), suggesting thermogenic and/or biogenic methane sources. The range of carbon isotope values is comparable to those observed at other methane seeps deposits. Further investigations are needed to better constrain the carbon cycle in these particular environmental conditions. The role of microbial communities into ikaite/glendonite formation equally needs to be

  16. Forest refugia in Western and Central Africa as 'museums' of Mesozoic biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Murienne, Jérôme; Benavides, Ligia R; Prendini, Lorenzo; Hormiga, Gustavo; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2013-02-23

    The refugial speciation model, or 'species pump', is widely accepted in the context of tropical biogeography and has been advocated as an explanation for present species distributions in tropical Western and Central Africa. In order to test this hypothesis, a phylogeny of the cryptic arachnid order Ricinulei, based on four nuclear and mitochondrial DNA markers, was inferred. This ancient clade of litter-dwelling arthropods, endemic to the primary forests of Western and Central Africa and the Neotropics, might provide insights into the mode and tempo of evolution in Africa. Twenty-six African ricinuleid specimens were sampled from eight countries spanning the distribution of Ricinulei on the continent, and analysed together with Neotropical samples plus other arachnid outgroups. The phylogenetic and molecular dating results suggest that Ricinulei diversified in association with the fragmentation of Gondwana. The early diversification of Ricinoides in Western and Central Africa around 88 (±33) Ma fits old palaeogeographical events better than recent climatic fluctuations. Unlike most recent molecular studies, these results agree with fossil evidence, suggesting that refugia may have acted as 'museums' conserving ancient diversity rather than as engines generating diversity during successive episodes of climatic fluctuation in Africa.

  17. Mesozoic arc magmatism along the southern Peruvian margin during Gondwana breakup and dispersal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boekhout, Flora; Spikings, Richard; Sempere, Thierry; Chiaradia, Massimo; Ulianov, Alexey; Schaltegger, Urs

    2012-08-01

    A high-resolution U-Pb zircon geochronological study of plutonic units along the south Peruvian margin between 17° and 18°S allows the integration of the geochemical, geodynamic and tectonic evolution of this part of the Andean margin. This study focuses on the composite Jurassic-early Cretaceous Ilo Batholith that was emplaced along the southern Peruvian coast during two episodes of intrusive magmatism; a first period between 173 and 152 Ma (with a peak in magmatic activity between roughly 168 and 162 Ma) and a second period between 110 and 106 Ma. Emplacement of the Jurassic part of the composite Ilo Batholith shortly post-dated the accumulation of the volcanosedimentary succession it intruded (Chocolate formation), which allows to estimate a subsidence rate for this unit of ~ 3.5 km/Ma. The emplacement of the main peak of Jurassic plutonism of the Ilo Batholith was also closely coeval with widespread and repeated slumping (during deposition of the Cachíos Formation) in the back-arc region, suggesting a common causal link between these phenomena, which is discussed in the context of an observed 100 km trenchward arc migration at ~ 175 Ma, and the relation with extensional tectonics that prevailed along the Central Andean margin during Pangaea break-up.

  18. An early Cambrian greenhouse climate.

    PubMed

    Hearing, Thomas W; Harvey, Thomas H P; Williams, Mark; Leng, Melanie J; Lamb, Angela L; Wilby, Philip R; Gabbott, Sarah E; Pohl, Alexandre; Donnadieu, Yannick

    2018-05-01

    The oceans of the early Cambrian (~541 to 509 million years ago) were the setting for a marked diversification of animal life. However, sea temperatures-a key component of the early Cambrian marine environment-remain unconstrained, in part because of a substantial time gap in the stable oxygen isotope (δ 18 O) record before the evolution of euconodonts. We show that previously overlooked sources of fossil biogenic phosphate have the potential to fill this gap. Pristine phosphatic microfossils from the Comley Limestones, UK, yield a robust δ 18 O signature, suggesting sea surface temperatures of 20° to 25°C at high southern paleolatitudes (~65°S to 70°S) between ~514 and 509 million years ago. These sea temperatures are consistent with the distribution of coeval evaporite and calcrete deposits, peak continental weathering rates, and also our climate model simulations for this interval. Our results support an early Cambrian greenhouse climate comparable to those of the late Mesozoic and early Cenozoic, offering a framework for exploring the interplay between biotic and environmental controls on Cambrian animal diversification.

  19. Mesozoic stratigraphy and paleoenvironments of the Georges Bank Basin: A correlation of exploratory and cost wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, L.J.; Poag, C.W.

    1993-01-01

    The Exxon 975-1, Conoco 145-1, and Mobil 312-1 hydrocarbon exploratory wells and the Continental Offshore Stratigraphic Test (COST) G-1 and G-2 wells were drilled in the southeastern part of the Georges Bank Basin. We used drill cuttings and logs from these wells to describe and correlate the dominant lithostratigraphic units and to document lateral changes in the depositional environments. The strata penetrated by the Exxon 975-1 and COST G-1 wells are much more terrestrial than at the seaward (downdip) COST G-2, Conoco 145-1, and Mobil 312-1 wellsites. Oldest rocks penetrated by the exploratory wells represent a Middle Jurassic carbonate-evaporite sequence that correlates to the Iroquois Formation. The Iroquois records nonmarine to marginal-marine sabkha, tidal-flat, and restricted lagoonal paleoenvironments in the Exxon 975-1 and COST G-1 wells, but progressively changes to inner neritic, littoral, and lagoonal paleoenvironments at the Mobil 312-1 wellsite. The nonmarine deltaic siliciclastics of the overlying Mohican Formation, Misaine Shale, and Mic Mac-Mohawk Formations are thicker and the marine carbonates of the Scatarie and Bacarro Limestones are usually thinner in the Jurassic strata of the Exxon 975-1 and COST G-1 wells than at the other wellsites. Similarly, lower delta-plain and delta-front facies of the Early Cretaceous Missisuaga and Logan Canyon Formations at the Exxon 975-1 and COST G-1 wellsites reflect a greater terrestrial influence than the laterally-equivalent shallow marine to delta-front facies present at the downdip wellsites. ?? 1993.

  20. Late cretaceous extensional tectonics and associated igneous activity on the northern margin of the Gulf of Mexico Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, R. L.; Sundeen, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Major, dominantly compressional, orogenic episodes (Taconic, Acadian, Alleghenian) affected eastern North America during the Paleozoic. During the Mesozoic, in contrast, this same region was principally affected by epeirogenic and extensional tectonism; one episode of comparatively more intense tectonic activity involving extensive faulting, uplift, sedimentation, intrusion and effusion produced the Newark Series of eposits and fault block phenomena. This event, termed the Palisades Disturbance, took place during the Late Triassic - Earliest Jurassic. The authors document a comparable extensional tectonic-igneous event occurring during the Late Cretaceous (Early Gulfian; Cenomanian-Santonian) along the southern margin of the cratonic platform from Arkansas to Georgia.

  1. Extending Molecular Signatures of Climatic and Environmental Change to the Mesozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brassell, S. C.

    2007-12-01

    The distributions, abundances and isotopic compositions of molecular constituents in sediments depend on their source organisms and the combination of environmental and climatic parameters that constrain or control their biosynthesis. Many such relationships are well documented and understood, thereby providing proxies of proven utility in paleoclimatic reconstructions. Thus, the temperature dependence in the extent of unsaturation in alkenones derived from prymnesiophyte algae, and in the proportion of ring structures in glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) synthesized by crenarchaeota enables determination of sea surface paleotemperatures from sedimentary records. This molecular approach presumes temporal uniformity in the controlling factors on biosynthesis of these lipids, and their survival in the geological record, notwithstanding the challenge of establishing ancient calibrations for such proxies. Thus, alkenone records from marine sediments document cooling at the Eocene/Oligocene boundary but cannot assess changes in ocean temperatures during the Cretaceous, unlike GDGTs, which record fluctuations in ocean temperatures during the Early Cretaceous, and even survive in Jurassic strata. Other molecular measures offer less precise, yet informative, indications of climate. For example, the occurrence of sterol ethers in Valanginian sediments from the mid-Pacific suggests some cooling at that time, since these compounds are only known to occur elsewhere in cold waters or upwelling systems. Molecular compositions can also attest to levels of oxygenation in marine systems. In particular, the occurrence of 13C-depleted isorenieratane indicates the presence of photosynthetic green sulfur bacteria, and therefore anoxic conditions, albeit perhaps short-lived. Intermittent occurrences of isorenieratane often alternate with the appearance of 2-methylhopanoids, which provide separate distinct evidence for variations in oxygenation, linked to circumstances

  2. Cenozoic Tectonic Activity of the "Passive" North America Margin: Evidence for Cenozoic Activity on Mesozoic or Paleozoic Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedorub, O. I.; Knapp, C. C.

    2012-12-01

    The tectonic history of the Eastern North American Margin (ENAM) incorporates two cycles of continental assembly, multiple pulses of orogeny, rifting, and post-rift geodynamic evolution. This is reflected in the heterogeneous lithosphere of the ENAM which contains fault structures originated in Paleozoic to Mesozoic eras. The South Georgia Rift basin is probably the largest Mesozoic graben within its boundaries that is associated with the breakup of Pangea. It is composed of smaller sub-basins which appear to be bounded by high-angle normal faults, some of which may have been inverted in late Cretaceous and Cenozoic eras. Paleozoic structures may have been reactivated in Cenozoic time as well. The ENAM is characterized by N-NE maximum horizontal compressive stress direction. This maximum compressional stress field is sub-parallel to the strike of the Atlantic Coast province fault systems. Camden, Augusta, Allendale, and Pen Branch faults are four of the many such reactivated faults along the southern part of ENAM. These faults are now buried under the 0-400 m of loosely consolidated Cretaceous and Cenozoic age sediments and thus are either only partially mapped or currently not recognized. Some of the objectives of this study are to map the subsurface expression and geometry of these faults and to investigate the post Cretaceous deformation and possible causes of fault reactivation on a passive margin. This study employs an integrated geophysical approach to investigate the upper 200 m of identified locations of the above mentioned faults. 2-D high-resolution shallow seismic reflection and refraction methods, gravity surveys, GPR, 2-D electrical resistivity and well data are used for analyses and interpretation. Preliminary results suggest that Camden fault shows signs of Cenozoic reactivation through an approximately 30 m offset NW side up mainly along a steeply dipping fault zone in the basal contact of Coastal Plain sediments with the Carolina Piedmont. Drill

  3. Adaptation to the sky: Defining the feather with integument fossils from mesozoic China and experimental evidence from molecular laboratories.

    PubMed

    Chuong, Cheng-Ming; Wu, Ping; Zhang, Fu-Cheng; Xu, Xing; Yu, Minke; Widelitz, Randall B; Jiang, Ting-Xin; Hou, Lianhai

    2003-08-15

    In this special issue on the Evo-Devo of amniote integuments, Alibardi has discussed the adaptation of the integument to the land. Here we will discuss the adaptation to the sky. We first review a series of fossil discoveries representing intermediate forms of feathers or feather-like appendages from dinosaurs and Mesozoic birds from the Jehol Biota of China. We then discuss the molecular and developmental biological experiments using chicken integuments as the model. Feather forms can be modulated using retrovirus mediated gene mis-expression that mimics those found in nature today and in the evolutionary past. The molecular conversions among different types of integument appendages (feather, scale, tooth) are discussed. From this evidence, we recognize that not all organisms with feathers are birds, and that not all skin appendages with hierarchical branches are feathers. We develop a set of criteria for true avian feathers: 1) possessing actively proliferating cells in the proximal follicle for proximo-distal growth mode; 2) forming hierarchical branches of rachis, barbs, and barbules, with barbs formed by differential cell death and bilaterally or radially symmetric; 3) having a follicle structure, with mesenchyme core during development; 4) when mature, consisting of epithelia without mesenchyme core and with two sides of the vane facing the previous basal and supra-basal layers, respectively; and 5) having stem cells and dermal papilla in the follicle and hence the ability to molt and regenerate. A model of feather evolution from feather bud --> barbs --> barbules --> rachis is presented, which is opposite to the old view of scale plate --> rachis --> barbs --> barbules (Regal, '75; Q Rev Biol 50:35). Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Tectonic Evolution of the Central Andes during Mesozoic-Cenozoic times: Insights from the Salar de Atacama Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña Gomez, M. A.; Bascunan, S. A.; Becerra, J.; Rubilar, J. F.; Gómez, I.; Narea, K.; Martínez, F.; Arriagada, C.; Le Roux, J.; Deckart, K.

    2015-12-01

    The classic Salar de Atacama Basin, located in the Central Andes of northern Chile, holds a remarkable yet not fully understood record of tectonic events since mid-Cretaceous times. Based on the growing amount of data collected over the last years, such as high-detail maps and U-Pb geochronology, we present an updated model for the development of this area after the Triassic. A major compressional event is recorded around the mid-Late Cretaceous (ca. 107 Ma) with the deposition of synorogenic continental successions reflecting the uplift of the Coastal Cordillera area farther to the west, and effectively initiating the foreland basin. The deformation front migrated eastwards during the Late Campanian (ca. 79 Ma), where it exhumed and deformed the Late Cretaceous magmatic arc and the crystalline basement of Cordillera de Domeyko. The K-T Event (ca. 65 Ma), recently identified in the basin, involved the same source areas, though the facies indicate a closer proximity to the source. The compressional record of the basin is continued by the Eocene Incaic Event (ca. 45 Ma), with deep exhumation of the Cordillera de Domeyko and the cannibalization of previous deposits. A change to an extensional regime during the Oligocene (ca. 28 Ma) is shown by the deposition of more than 4 km of evaporitic and clastic successions. A partial inversion of the basin occurred during the Miocene (ca.10 Ma-present), as shown by the deformation seen in the Cordillera de la Sal. As such, the basin shows that the uplift of the Cordillera de Domeyko was not one isolated episode, but a prolonged and complex event, punctuated by episodes of major deformation. It also highlights the need to take into account the Mesozoic-Cenozoic deformation events for any model trying to explain the building of the modern-day Andes.

  5. Mesozoic non-marine petroleum source rocks determined by palynomorphs in the Tarim Basin, Xinjiang, northwestern China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jiang, D.-X.; Wang, Y.-D.; Robbins, E.I.; Wei, J.; Tian, N.

    2008-01-01

    The Tarim Basin in Northwest China hosts petroleum reservoirs of Cambrian, Ordovician, Carboniferous, Triassic, Jurassic, Cretaceous and Tertiary ages. The sedimentary thickness in the basin reaches about 15 km and with an area of 560000 km2, the basin is expected to contain giant oil and gas fields. It is therefore important to determine the ages and depositional environments of the petroleum source rocks. For prospective evaluation and exploration of petroleum, palynological investigations were carried out on 38 crude oil samples collected from 22 petroleum reservoirs in the Tarim Basin and on additionally 56 potential source rock samples from the same basin. In total, 173 species of spores and pollen referred to 80 genera, and 27 species of algae and fungi referred to 16 genera were identified from the non-marine Mesozoic sources. By correlating the palynormorph assemblages in the crude oil samples with those in the potential source rocks, the Triassic and Jurassic petroleum source rocks were identified. Furthermore, the palynofloras in the petroleum provide evidence for interpretation of the depositional environments of the petroleum source rocks. The affinity of the miospores indicates that the petroleum source rocks were formed in swamps in brackish to lacustrine depositional environments under warm and humid climatic conditions. The palynomorphs in the crude oils provide further information about passage and route of petroleum migration, which is significant for interpreting petroleum migration mechanisms. Additionally, the thermal alternation index (TAI) based on miospores indicates that the Triassic and Jurassic deposits in the Tarim Basin are mature petroleum source rocks. ?? Cambridge University Press 2008.

  6. Magma mixing in granite petrogenesis: Insights from biotite inclusions in quartz and feldspar of Mesozoic granites from South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng; Zhao, Zi-Fu; Zheng, Yong-Fei

    2016-06-01

    Magma mixing is a common process in granite petrogenesis. The major element composition of biotites in granites is primarily controlled by the composition of magmas from which they crystallized. Biotite grains enclosed in quartz and feldspars of granites are naturally protected by their host minerals, so that their compositions are likely original and can potentially be used to track the magma mixing. This is illustrated by a combined study of matrix and inclusion biotites from Mesozoic granites in the Nanling Range, South China. Three granite samples have been used in this study: one two-mica granite and two biotite granites. The biotites of different occurrences in the two-mica granite have no compositional distinctions. Biotites in the two-mica granite have higher Al2O3 and lower MgO than those in the biotite granites. The former is consistent with biotites from typical S-type granites of metasedimentary origin. In contrast, biotites from the biotite granites can be categorized into different groups based on their paragenetic minerals and geochemical compositions. They have relatively low aluminous saturation indices but higher Mg numbers, falling in the transitional field between typical S- and I-type granites. In addition, there are two contrasting zircon populations with nearly identical U-Pb ages in the biotite granites. One shows clearly oscillatory zonings in CL images, whereas the other is totally dark and often overgrew on the former one. The zircons with oscillatory zonings have higher δ18O values than the dark ones, indicating their growth from two compositionally different magmas, respectively, with different sources. An integrated interpretation of all these data indicates that mixing of two different magmas was responsible for the petrogenesis of biotite granites. Therefore, the study of biotite inclusions provides insights into the magma mixing in granite petrogenesis.

  7. Origin and tectonic significance of a Mesozoic multi-layer over-thrust system within the Yangtze Block (South China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Dan-Ping; Zhou, Mei-Fu; Song, Hong-Lin; Wang, Xin-Wen; Malpas, John

    2003-01-01

    In the Yangtze Block (South China), a well-developed Mesozoic thrust system extends through the Xuefeng and Wuling mountains in the southeast to the Sichuan basin in the northwest. The system comprises both thin- and thick-skinned thrust units separated by a boundary detachment fault, the Dayin fault. To the northwest, the thin-skinned belt is characterized by either chevron anticlines and box synclines to the northwest or chevron synclines to the southeast. The former structural style displays narrow exposures for the cores of anticlines and wider exposures for the cores of synclines. Thrust detachments occur along Silurian (Fs) and Lower Cambrian (Fc) strata and are dominantly associated with the anticlines. To the southeast, this style of deformation passes gradually into one characterized by chevron synclines with associated principal detachment faults along Silurian (Fs), Cambrian (Fc) and Lower Sinian (Fz) strata. There are, however, numerous secondary back thrusts. Therefore, the thin-skinned belt is like the Valley and Ridge Province of the North American Applachian Mountains. The thick-skinned belt structurally overlies the thin-skinned belt and is characterized by a number of klippen including the Xuefeng and Wuling nappes. It is thus comparable to the Blue Ridge Province of Appalachia. The structural pattern of this thrust system in South China can be explained by a model involving detachment faulting along various stratigraphic layers at different stages of its evolution. The system was developed through a northwest stepwise progression of deformation with the earliest delamination along Lower Sinian strata (Fz). Analyses of balanced geological cross-sections yield about 18.1-21% (total 88 km) shortening for the thin-skinned unit and at least this amount of shortening for the thick-skinned unit. The compressional deformation from southeast to northwest during Late Jurassic to Cretaceous time occurred after the westward progressive collision of the

  8. Detection and cultivation of indigenous microorganisms in Mesozoic claystone core samples from the Opalinus Clay Formation (Mont Terri Rock Laboratory)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauclaire, L.; McKenzie, J. A.; Schwyn, B.; Bossart, P.

    Although microorganisms have been isolated from various deep-subsurface environments, the persistence of microbial activity in claystones buried to great depths and on geological time scales has been poorly studied. The presence of in-situ microbial life in the Opalinus Clay Formation (Mesozoic claystone, 170 million years old) at the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory, Canton Jura, Switzerland was investigated. Opalinus Clay is a host rock candidate for a radioactive waste repository. Particle tracer tests demonstrated the uncontaminated nature of the cored samples, showing their suitability for microbiological investigations. To determine whether microorganisms are a consistent and characteristic component of the Opalinus Clay Formation, two approaches were used: (i) the cultivation of indigenous micoorganisms focusing mainly on the cultivation of sulfate-reducing bacteria, and (ii) the direct detection of molecular biomarkers of bacteria. The goal of the first set of experiments was to assess the presence of cultivable microorganisms within the Opalinus Clay Formation. After few months of incubation, the number of cell ranged from 0.1 to 2 × 10 3 cells ml -1 media. The microorganisms were actively growing as confirmed by the observation of dividing cells, and detection of traces of sulfide. To avoid cultivation bias, quantification of molecular biomarkers (phospholipid fatty acids) was used to assess the presence of autochthonous microorganisms. These molecules are good indicators of the presence of living cells. The Opalinus Clay contained on average 64 ng of PLFA g -1 dry claystone. The detected microbial community comprises mainly Gram-negative anaerobic bacteria as indicated by the ratio of iso/anteiso phospholipids (about 2) and the detection of large amount of β-hydroxy substituted fatty acids. The PLFA composition reveals the presence of specific functional groups of microorganisms in particular sulfate-reducing bacteria ( Desulfovibrio, Desulfobulbus, and

  9. Age and geochemistry of western Hoh-Xil-Songpan-Ganzi granitoids, northern Tibet: Implications for the Mesozoic closure of the Paleo-Tethys ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li-Yun; Ding, Lin; Pullen, Alex; Xu, Qiang; Liu, De-Liang; Cai, Fu-Long; Yue, Ya-Hui; Lai, Qing-Zhou; Shi, Ren-Deng; Ducea, Mihai N.; Kapp, Paul; Chapman, Alan

    2014-03-01

    A geologic investigation was undertaken in the Hoh-Xil-Songpan-Ganzi (HXSG) complex, northern Tibet in order to better understand magma genesis and evolution during the late stages of Paleo-Tethys ocean closure. The HXSG complex is composed of vast accumulations of Middle-Upper Triassic marine gravity flow deposits that were extensively intruded by igneous rocks. These early Mesozoic rocks exposed in this area record a rich history of accretionary tectonics during the amalgamation of the Tibetan Plateau terranes. Eight plutons sampled from the western HXSG complex yield zircon U-Pb ages that range from 225 to 193 Ma. Muscovite 40Ar/39Ar ages for the Hudongliang and Zhuonai Lake plutons yield ages of 210.7 ± 2.5 Ma and 212.7 ± 2.5 Ma, respectively. These plutonic rocks can be subdivided into two geochemically distinct groups. Group 1 (221-212 Ma: Dapeng Lake, Changhong Lake and Heishibei Lake plutons) is composed of high-K calc-alkaline rocks that have strongly fractionated REE patterns with high (La/Yb)N ratios (91-18) and generally lack Eu anomalies (Eu*/Eu = 1.02-0.68). Rocks in Group 1 display pronounced negative Nb-Ta and Ti anomalies on primitive mantle-normalized spidergrams. Group 1 rocks exhibit high Sr (782-240 ppm) and low Y (6.3-16.0 ppm) contents with high Sr/Y ratios (84-20). Based on Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic data (87Sr/86Sri = 0.7079-0.7090, ɛNd(t) = - 7.7-- 4.7, ɛHf(t) = - 5.7-- 0.8) and low MgO contents (MgO = 1.10-2.18%), Group 1 rocks are geochemically similar to adakitic rocks and were probably derived from partial melting of the downgoing Paleo-Tethys oceanic slab and overlying marine sediments. Group 2 plutons (225-193 Ma: Daheishan, Yunwuling, Zhuonai Lake, Malanshan and Hudongliang plutons) display lower P2O5 with increasing SiO2 and are medium-K to high-K I-type calc-alkaline bodies with low Sr (14-549 ppm) and high Y (22.3-10.5 ppm) contents. Group 2 rocks have variable fractionated REE patterns ((La/Yb)N = 3-38) and negative Eu anomalies (Eu

  10. Structures in the transition zone of the northeast South China Sea: serpentinite dome vs mantle exhumation, or evidence of Mesozoic active subduction transferring to Cenozoic passive extension?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Z.; Zhou, D.

    2013-12-01

    Complete sedimentary sequences and weak erosion make the transition zone of the South China Sea the optimal place to study the entire evolution history of marginal sea basins, as well as the transition mechanism from active subduction to passive extension. 2D long cable seismic profiles revealed that both Baiyun and Liwan sag in the northeast South China Sea margin were lack of large controlling faults, especially in Liwan sag, syn-rift sequences waved above the basement. Dome-like uplifts(serpetinite uplifts?) or diapirs(?) came from below the basement, caused the syn-rift sequences pushed up around 36Ma(T80). Gravity inversion based on seismic reflection indicated that the dome has a lower density and a lower layer velocity than normal crust. Also around the Continent-Ocean Boundary (COB), a small segment similar to the lower crust was exposed. Between this exposed segment and the Cenozoic oceanic crust, mantle seems to be exhumed along the breakup point. Between the COB and roughly the shelf break, high velocity lower crust was discriminated in the northeast continental margin. Structures in northeast South China Sea seems having many similarities with Newfoundland-Iberia margin, by serpentinite(?) dome and exhumed mantle, although spreading rate here is intermediate. In fact, regional background suggests that there might be another interpretation: transition from Mesozoic subduction to Cenozoic extension occurred through paleo oceanic crust breakup in the northeast, which in turn retained Mesozoic subduction system beneath the northeast continental margin. Confined with magnetic anomaly, Bouguer gravity gradient anomaly, and well drilling lithological evidences, Cenozoic Baiyun sag developed upon Mesozoic fore-arc, while Cenozoic Liwan sag developed upon Mesozoic accretionary prism. The high velocity lower crust was caused by both remnant subducted slab and by Oceanic-Continent interaction due to subduction. There might also be serpentinite dome and exhumed

  11. Zircon Hf-O isotopic constraints on the origin of Late Mesozoic felsic volcanic rocks from the Great Xing'an Range, NE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Mingyue; Tian, Wei; Fu, Bin; Wang, Shuangyue; Dong, Jinlong

    2018-05-01

    The voluminous Late Mesozoic magmatism was related to extensive re-melting of juvenile materials that were added to the Central East Asia continent in Phanerozoic time. The most favoured magma generation mechanism of Late Mesozoic magmas is partial melting of underplated lower crust that had radiogenic Hf-Nd isotopic characteristics, but this mechanism faces difficulties when interpreting other isotopic data. The tectonic environment controlling the generation of the Late Mesozoic felsic magmas is also in dispute. In this study, we obtained new U-Pb ages, and geochemical and isotopic data of representative Jurassic (154.4 ± 1.5 Ma) and Cretaceous (140.2 ± 1.5 Ma) felsic volcanic samples. The Jurassic sample has inherited zircon cores of Permian age, with depleted mantle-like εHf(t) of +7.4 - +8.5, which is in contrast with those of the magmatic zircons (εHf(t) = +2.4 ± 0.7). Whereas the inherited cores and the magmatic zircons have identical mantle-like δ18O composition ranges (4.25-5.29‰ and 4.69-5.54‰, respectively). These Hf-O isotopic characteristics suggest a mixed source of enriched mantle materials rather than ancient crustal components and a depleted mantle source represented by the inherited Permian zircon core. This mechanism is manifested by the eruption of Jurassic alkaline basalts originated from an enriched mantle source. The Cretaceous sample has high εHf(t) of +7.0 - +10.5, suggesting re-melting of a mafic magma derived from a depleted mantle-source. However, the sub-mantle zircon δ18O values (3.70-4.58‰) suggest the depleted mantle-derived mafic source rocks had experienced high temperature hydrothermal alteration at upper crustal level. Therefore, the Cretaceous felsic magma, if not all, could be generated by re-melting of down-dropped supracrustal volcanic rocks that experienced high temperature oxygen isotope alteration. The two processes, enriched mantle-contribution and supracrustal juvenile material re-melting, are new

  12. Types and Mechanisms of Alterations on the Mesozoic Ophiolites (Lake Van Region-Turkey): Petrographical and Geochemical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazıcı, Ömer; Üner, Tijen; Mutlu, Sacit; Depçi, Tolga

    2017-04-01

    Mesozoic ophiolites are widely located in the eastern part of Lake Van Basin. The ophiolitic rocks deformed during the rifting and/or closure period of the Neo-Tethyan Ocean are observed as tectonic slices in the region. These ophiolites are represented by volcano-sedimentary units, isolated dikes, and mafic-ultramafic rocks. The formation, emplacement and post-emplacement processes of these ophiolitic rocks can be understood owing to alterations as rodingitization, serpentinization, and listwaenitization. Three stages of sequent mineralization are detected in the ophiolitic rocks. First stage is pyrometasomatization, represented by metamorphic minerals (garnet, chlorite etc.), observed in intruded dikes. Second stage is hydrothermal alteration of mafic-ultramafic rocks namely serpentinization. Listwaenite alteration is the last stage of mineralization. According to petrographical investigations, garnet+chlorite+diopsite minerals are detected in rodengites. The conversion of the plagioclase minerals to the calcsilicatic minerals in rodengites suggests that these rocks are metasomatic rocks produced by Ca-rich fluids derived from serpentinization of the ultramafic rocks. The serpentine minerals (chrysotile-lizardite) can be distinguished from each other by their morphology as being platy or fibrous. Listwaenite alteration is followed by the formation of carbonate, silica, oxides and hydroxides. Chemical analysis of these rocks show that the listwaenites have an enrichment in Ni and Co contents while the rodingites have low SiO2 and high CaO and MgO values (SiO2 28,50 - 36,67%, CaO 11,99 - 20,88%, and MgO 7,99 - 17,73%). Alteration types observed on the ophiolitic rocks demonstrate that these rocks are metamorphised by low pressure and low to middle temperature conditions (greenshist facies). Serpentinization is pointing out an alteration which occurred during the emplacement of the ophiolites or the latter period. This study has been supported by Project number 2013

  13. Development of continental lithospheric mantle as reflected in the chemistry of the Mesozoic Appalachian Tholeiites, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pegram, William J.

    1990-03-01

    Geochemical analyses of dikes, sills, and volcanic rocks of the Mesozoic Appalachian Tholeiite (MAT) Province of the easternmost United States provide evidence that continental tholeiites are derived from continental lithospheric mantle sources that are genetically and geochronologically related to the overlying continental crust. Nineteen olivine tholeiites and sixteen quartz tholeiites from the length of this province, associated in space and time with the last opening of the Atlantic, display significant isotopic heterogeneity: initial ɛ Nd = +3.8 to -5.7; initial 87Sr/ 86Sr= 0.7044-0.7072; 206Pb/ 204Pb= 17.49-19.14; 207Pb/ 204Pb= 15.55-15.65; 208Pb/ 204Pb= 37.24-39.11. In Pb sbnd Pb space, the MAT define a linear array displaced above the field for MORB and thus resemble oceanic basalts with DUPAL Pb isotopic traits. A regression of this array yields a secondary Pb sbnd Pb isochron age of ≈ 1000 Ma (μ 1 = 8.26), similar to Sm/Nd isochrons from the southern half of the province and to the radiometric age of the Grenville crust underlying easternmost North America. The MAT exhibit significant trace element ratio heterogeneity (e.g., Sm/Nd= 0.226-0.327) and have trace element traits similar to convergent margin magmas [e.g., depletions of Nb and Ti relative to the rare earth elements on normalized trace element incompatibility diagrams, Ba/Nb ratios (19-75) that are significantly greater than those of MORB, and low TiO 2 (0.39-0.69%)]. Geochemical and geological considerations very strongly suggest that the MAT were not significantly contaminated during ascent through the continental crust. Further, isotope and trace element variations are not consistent with the involvement of contemporaneous MORB or OIB components. Rather, the materials that control the MAT incompatible element chemistry were derived from subcontinental lithospheric mantle. Thus: (1) the MAT/arc magma trace element similarities; (2) the Pb sbnd Pb and Sm/Nd isochron ages; and (3) the need

  14. A Large Accumulation of Avian Eggs from the Late Cretaceous of Patagonia (Argentina) Reveals a Novel Nesting Strategy in Mesozoic Birds

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Mariela S.; García, Rodolfo A.; Fiorelli, Lucas; Scolaro, Alejandro; Salvador, Rodrigo B.; Cotaro, Carlos N.; Kaiser, Gary W.; Dyke, Gareth J.

    2013-01-01

    We report the first evidence for a nesting colony of Mesozoic birds on Gondwana: a fossil accumulation in Late Cretaceous rocks mapped and collected from within the campus of the National University of Comahue, Neuquén City, Patagonia (Argentina). Here, Cretaceous ornithothoracine birds, almost certainly Enanthiornithes, nested in an arid, shallow basinal environment among sand dunes close to an ephemeral water-course. We mapped and collected 65 complete, near-complete, and broken eggs across an area of more than 55 m2. These eggs were laid either singly, or occasionally in pairs, onto a sandy substrate. All eggs were found apparently in, or close to, their original nest site; they all occur within the same bedding plane and may represent the product of a single nesting season or a short series of nesting attempts. Although there is no evidence for nesting structures, all but one of the Comahue eggs were half-buried upright in the sand with their pointed end downwards, a position that would have exposed the pole containing the air cell and precluded egg turning. This egg position is not seen in living birds, with the exception of the basal galliform megapodes who place their eggs within mounds of vegetation or burrows. This accumulation reveals a novel nesting behaviour in Mesozoic Aves that was perhaps shared with the non-avian and phylogenetically more basal troodontid theropods. PMID:23613776

  15. A large accumulation of avian eggs from the late cretaceous of patagonia (Argentina) reveals a novel nesting strategy in mesozoic birds.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Mariela S; García, Rodolfo A; Fiorelli, Lucas; Scolaro, Alejandro; Salvador, Rodrigo B; Cotaro, Carlos N; Kaiser, Gary W; Dyke, Gareth J

    2013-01-01

    We report the first evidence for a nesting colony of mesozoic birds on Gondwana: a fossil accumulation in Late Cretaceous rocks mapped and collected from within the campus of the National University of Comahue, Neuquén City, Patagonia (Argentina). Here, Cretaceous ornithothoracine birds, almost certainly Enanthiornithes, nested in an arid, shallow basinal environment among sand dunes close to an ephemeral water-course. We mapped and collected 65 complete, near-complete, and broken eggs across an area of more than 55 m(2). These eggs were laid either singly, or occasionally in pairs, onto a sandy substrate. All eggs were found apparently in, or close to, their original nest site; they all occur within the same bedding plane and may represent the product of a single nesting season or a short series of nesting attempts. Although there is no evidence for nesting structures, all but one of the Comahue eggs were half-buried upright in the sand with their pointed end downwards, a position that would have exposed the pole containing the air cell and precluded egg turning. This egg position is not seen in living birds, with the exception of the basal galliform megapodes who place their eggs within mounds of vegetation or burrows. This accumulation reveals a novel nesting behaviour in Mesozoic Aves that was perhaps shared with the non-avian and phylogenetically more basal troodontid theropods.

  16. Compression-cuticle relationship of seed ferns: Insights from liquid-solid states FTIR (Late Palaeozoic-Early Mesozoic, Canada-Spain-Argentina)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zodrow, E.L.; D'Angelo, J. A.; Mastalerz, Maria; Keefe, D.

    2009-01-01

    Cuticles have been macerated from suitably preserved compressed fossil foliage by Schulze's process for the past 150 years, whereas the physical-biochemical relationship between the "coalified layer" with preserved cuticle as a unit has hardly been investigated, although they provide complementary information. This relationship is conceptualized by an analogue model of the anatomy of an extant leaf: "vitrinite (mesophyll) + cuticle (biomacropolymer) = compression". Alkaline solutions from Schulze's process as a proxy for the vitrinite, are studied by means of liquid-solid states Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). In addition, cuticle-free coalified layers and fossilized cuticles of seed ferns mainly from Canada, Spain and Argentina of Late Pennsylvanian-Late Triassic age are included in the study sample. Infrared data of cuticle and alkaline solutions differ which is primarily contingent on the mesophyll +biomacropolymer characteristics. The compression records two pathways of organic matter transformation. One is the vitrinized component that reflects the diagenetic-post-diagenetic coalification history parallel with the evolution of the associated coal seam. The other is the cuticle that reflects the sum-total of evolutionary pathway of the biomacropolymer, its monomeric, or polymeric fragmentation, though factors promoting preservation include entombing clay minerals and lower pH conditions. Caution is advised when interpreting liquid-state-based FTIR data, as some IR signals may have resulted from the interaction of Schulze's process with the cuticular biochemistry. A biochemical-study course for taphonomy is suggested, as fossilized cuticles, cuticle-free coalified layers, and compressions are responses to shared physicogeochemical factors. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Analysis of the Toxic Element Concentrations in the Mesozoic Siliceous Rocks in Terms of the Raw Material Importance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pękala, Agnieszka

    2017-10-01

    As part of an integrated system of environmental protection at every stage of the product life cycle such as: raw material extraction, its transportation and processing as well the subsequent use and development is required to carry out actions towards reducing or completely eliminating products that contain harmful substances to the environment. The purpose of the presented paper is an analysis of the toxic element concentrations in the extracted siliceous minerals at the initial stage of the raw material recognition. The research material is constituted by rocks collected from the Mesozoic bedrock from the Bełchatów lignite deposit. A group of the studied rocks is represented by diatomites, gaizes, opoka-rocks and light opoka-rocks, enriched with minerals from the group of SiO2. Most of the recognized petrographic sediments have a real possibility of potential applications in the building material industry, but it needs to carry out a detailed and thorough research. The studies of the chemical composition were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) using Philips PU 9100Xi Camera SX-100 spectrometer and an atomic emission spectroscopy with inductively coupled plasma (ICP AES) using PLASMA 40 spectrometer. There were carried out a chemical analyses and determined the content of some toxic elements: Pb, Cr, Cd, Ni, Zn, Cu, Co, As, Sr, Ba, Zr. in the studied sedimentary rocks. The analysis of the results draws attention to the high content of cadmium in the case of the studied sediments. The concentration of this element in the described rocks is an average of 0.22 mg/kg -the diatomites, 0.05 mg/kg -the gaizes, 0.4 mg/kg -the opoka-rocks, 2.23 mg/kg -the light opoka-rocks. It was moreover registered varied concentration of arsenic in diatomites, that is formed in the range of 0.05 - 9.6 mg/kg, an average of 6.3 mg/kg. The content of the other designated elements with toxic properties in the analysed groups of rocks does not exceed the limit values. An

  18. Justice for the Newark College Students Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Dent, Charles W. [R-PA-15

    2009-03-23

    House - 04/27/2009 Referred to the Subcommittee on Immigration, Citizenship, Refugees, Border Security, and International Law. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  19. The Late Oligocene to Early Miocene early evolution of rifting in the southwestern part of the Roer Valley Graben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deckers, Jef

    2016-06-01

    The Roer Valley Graben is a Mesozoic continental rift basin that was reactivated during the Late Oligocene. The study area is located in the graben area of the southwestern part of the Roer Valley Graben. Rifting initiated in the study area with the development of a large number of faults in the prerift strata. Some of these faults were rooted in preexisting zones of weakness in the Mesozoic strata. Early in the Late Oligocene, several faults died out in the study area as strain became focused upon others, some of which were able to link into several-kilometer-long systems. Within the Late Oligocene to Early Miocene northwestward prograding shallow marine syn-rift deposits, the number of active faults further decreased with time. A relatively strong decrease was observed around the Oligocene/Miocene boundary and represents a further focus of strain onto the long fault systems. Miocene extensional strain was not accommodated by further growth, but predominantly by displacements along the long fault systems. Since the Oligocene/Miocene boundary coincides with a radical change in the European intraplate stress field, the latter might have contributed significantly to the simultaneous change of fault kinematics in the study area.

  20. Fossil evidence of avian crops from the Early Cretaceous of China

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaoting; Martin, Larry D.; Zhou, Zhonghe; Burnham, David A.; Zhang, Fucheng; Miao, Desui

    2011-01-01

    The crop is characteristic of seed-eating birds today, yet little is known about its early history despite remarkable discoveries of many Mesozoic seed-eating birds in the past decade. Here we report the discovery of some early fossil evidence for the presence of a crop in birds. Two Early Cretaceous birds, the basal ornithurine Hongshanornis and a basal avian Sapeornis, demonstrate that an essentially modern avian digestive system formed early in avian evolution. The discovery of a crop in two phylogenetically remote lineages of Early Cretaceous birds and its absence in most intervening forms indicates that it was independently acquired as a specialized seed-eating adaptation. Finally, the reduction or loss of teeth in the forms showing seed-filled crops suggests that granivory was possibly one of the factors that resulted in the reduction of teeth in early birds. PMID:21896733

  1. Location of deeply buried, offshore Mesozoic transform fault along the western margin of the Gulf of Mexico inferred from gravity and magnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, L. C.; Mann, P.; Bird, D. E.

    2013-12-01

    Several workers have proposed that a Jurassic age, 500-km-long, right-lateral transform fault along the western margin of the Gulf of Mexico, possibly extending southward and onshore for another 500 km onto the isthmus area of southern Mexico, was formed as the ocean basin opened. This proposed transform fault plays a critical role in the most widely accepted tectonic model for the Mesozoic opening of the Gulf of Mexico by a ~40 degree, CCW rotation of the Yucatan block about a pole near southern Florida. Previously proposed names for the fault include the Tamaulipas-Chiapas transform fault and the Western Main transform fault for the offshore fault and the Orizaba transform fault for the southern, onland continuation of the fault into southern Mexico. There are few direct geologic or geophysical observations on the location or characteristics of the proposed offshore transform because it is buried beneath an over 10-km-thick sedimentary wedge along the continental margin of eastern Mexico. To better define this offshore fault, we identify a 500-km-long, 40-km-wide gravity anomaly, concentric with, and located about 60-70 km off the eastern coast of Mexico. Two east-west 200/1200-km-long gravity models constructed to cross the anomaly at right angles are parallel to existing multi-channel seismic lines with age-correlated stratigraphy. Both gravity models reveal an abrupt crustal thickness change beneath the gravity anomaly: from 27 km to 12 km over a distance of 65 km in the southern profile, and from 23 km to 16 km over a distance of 30 km in northern profile. The linearity of the anomaly in map view combined with the abrupt change in thickness inferred from gravity modeling is consistent with the tectonic origin of a right-lateral transform fault separating continental rocks of Mexico from Mesozoic seafloor produced by the opening of the Gulf of Mexico. Magnetic profiles were analyzed using a Werner depth-to-magnetic source technique, coincident with the gravity

  2. Criteria for the recognition and correlation of sandstone units in the Precambrian and Paleozoic-Mesozoic clastic sequence in the near east

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissbrod, T.; Perath, I.

    A systematic study of the Precambrian and Paleozoic-Mesozoic clastic sequences (Nubian Sandstone) in Israel and Sinai, and a comparative analysis of its stratigraphy in neighbouring countries, has shown that besides the conventional criteria of subdivision (lithology, field appearance, photogeological features, fossil content), additional criteria can be applied, which singly or in mutual conjuction enable the recognition of widespread units and boundaries. These criteria show lateral constancy, and recurrence of a similar vertical sequence over great distances, and are therefore acceptable for the identification of synchronous, region-wide sedimentary units (and consequently, major unconformities). They also enable, once the units are established, to identify detached (not in situ) samples, samples from isolated or discontinous outcrops, borehole material or archive material. The following rock properties were tested and found to be usefuls in stratigraphic interpretation, throughout large distribution areas of the clastic sequence: Landscape, which is basically the response of a particular textural-chemic al aggregate to atmospheric weathering. Characteristic outcrop feature — styles of roundness or massivity, fissuring or fliatin, slope profile, bedding — express a basic uniformity of these platform-type clastics. Colors are often stratigraphically constant over hundreds of kilometers, through various climates and topographies, and express some intrinsic unity of the rock bodies. Grain size and sorting, when cross-plotted, enable to differentiate existing unit. The method requires the analysis of representative numbers of samples. Vertical trends of median grain size and sorting show reversals, typically across unconformities. Feldstar content diminishes from 15-50% in Precambrian-Paleozoic rocks to a mere 5% or less in Mesozoic sandstones — a distinctive regionwide time trend. Dominance of certain feldstar types characterizes Precambrian and Paleozoic

  3. Mesozoic-Cenozoic evolution of the Zoige depression in the Songpan-Ganzi flysch basin, eastern Tibetan Plateau: Constraints from detrital zircon U-Pb ages and fission-track ages of the Triassic sedimentary sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yan; Zhang, Yunpeng; Tong, Lili

    2018-01-01

    The Zoige depression is an important depocenter within the northeast Songpan-Ganzi flysch basin, which is bounded by the South China, North China and Qiangtang Blocks and forms the northeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau. This paper discusses the sediment provenance and Mesozoic-Cenozoic evolution of the Zoige depression in the Songpan-Ganzi flysch basin, eastern Tibetan Plateau, using the detrital zircon U-Pb ages and apatite fission-track data from the Middle to Late Triassic sedimentary rocks in the area. The U-Pb ages of the Middle to Late Triassic zircons range from 260-280 Ma, 429-480 Ma, 792-974 Ma and 1800-2500 Ma and represent distinct source region. Our new results demonstrate that the detritus deposited during the Middle Triassic (Ladinian, T2zg) primarily originated from the Eastern Kunlun and North Qinling Orogens, with lesser contributions from the North China Block. By the Late Triassic (early Carnian, T3z), the materials at the southern margin of the North China Block were generally transported westward to the basin along a river network that flowed through the Qinling region between the North China and South China Blocks: this interpretation is supported by the predominance of the bimodal distribution of 1.8 Ga and 2.5 Ga age peaks and a lack of significant Neoproterozoic zircon. Since the Late Triassic (middle Carnian, T3zh), considerable changes have occurred in the source terranes, such as the cessation of the Eastern Kunlun Orogen and North China Block sources and the rise of the northwestern margin of the Yangtze Block and South Qinling Orogen. These drastic changes are compatible with a model of a sustained westward collision between the South China and North China Blocks during the late Triassic and the clockwise rotation of the South China Block progressively closed the basin. Subsequently, orogeny-associated folds have formed in the basin since the Late Triassic (late Carnian), and the study area was generally subjected to uplifting and

  4. Selected chemical analyses of water from formations of Mesozoic and Paleozoic age in parts of Oklahoma, northern Texas, and Union County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parkhurst, R.S.; Christenson, S.C.

    1987-01-01

    Hydrochemical data were compiled into a data base as part of the Central Midwest Regional Aquifer System Analysis project. The data consist of chemical analyses of water samples collected from wells that are completed in formations of Mesozoic and Paleozoic age. The data base includes data from the National Water Data Storage and Retrieval System, the Petroleum Data System, the National Uranium Resource Evaluation, and selected publications. Chemical analyses were selected for inclusion within the hydrochemical data base if the total concentration of the cations differed from the total 10 percent or less of the total concentration of all ions. Those analyses which lacked the necessary data for an ionic balance were included if the ratios of dissolved-solids concentration to specific conductance were between 0.55 and 0.75. The tabulated chemical analyses, grouped by county, and a statistical summary of the analyses, listed by geologic unit, are presented.

  5. A Reply to the Comment on "Assessing Discrepancies Between Previous Plate Kinematic Models of Mesozoic Iberia and Their Constraints" by Barnett-Moore Et Al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett-Moore, N.; Font, E.; Neres, M.

    2017-12-01

    We welcome the comments of van Hinsbergen et al. (2017) on the recent efforts of Barnett-Moore et al. (2016). Specifically, van Hinsbergen et al. (2017) raise concerns about two of the major conclusions made by Barnett-Moore et al. (2016). First, Barnett-Moore et al. (2016) choose to negate the Cretaceous Iberian paleomagnetic database as a viable plate kinematic constraint on the plate motions of Mesozoic Iberia. This conclusion, criticized by van Hinsbergen et al. (2017), was based on citing the previous efforts of Neres et al. (2012, 2013), which exposed several shortcomings, elaborated on below, within this data set. Second, van Hinsbergen et al. (2017) criticize Barnett-Moore et al. (2016) for dismissing mantle tomographic interpretations in support of a preserved Cretaceous Pyrenean "subducted slab" beneath northern Africa. Below, we have addressed each of these major criticisms from van Hinsbergen et al. (2017) in a two-section layout, similar to their comment above.

  6. Reconstruction of an early Paleozoic continental margin based on the nature of protoliths in the Nome Complex, Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Till, Alison B.; Dumoulin, Julie A.; Ayuso, Robert A.; Aleinikoff, John N.; Amato, Jeffrey M.; Slack, John F.; Shanks, W.C. Pat

    2014-01-01

    The Nome Complex is a large metamorphic unit that sits along the southern boundary of the Arctic Alaska–Chukotka terrane, the largest of several micro continental fragments of uncertain origin located between the Siberian and Laurentian cratons. The Arctic Alaska–Chukotka terrane moved into its present position during the Mesozoic; its Mesozoic and older movements are central to reconstruction of Arctic tectonic history. Accurate representation of the Arctic Alaska–Chukotka terrane in reconstructions of Late Proterozoic and early Paleozoic paleogeography is hampered by the paucity of information available. Most of the Late Proterozoic to Paleozoic rocks in the Alaska–Chukotka terrane were penetratively deformed and recrystallized during the Mesozoic deformational events; primary features and relationships have been obliterated, and age control is sparse. We use a variety of geochemical, geochronologic, paleontologic, and geologic tools to read through penetrative deformation and reconstruct the protolith sequence of part of the Arctic Alaska–Chukotka terrane, the Nome Complex. We confirm that the protoliths of the Nome Complex were part of the same Late Proterozoic to Devonian continental margin as weakly deformed rocks in the southern and central part of the terrane, the Brooks Range. We show that the protoliths of the Nome Complex represent a carbonate platform (and related rocks) that underwent incipient rifting, probably during the Ordovician, and that the carbonate platform was overrun by an influx of siliciclastic detritus during the Devonian. During early phases of the transition to siliciclastic deposition, restricted basins formed that were the site of sedimentary exhalative base-metal sulfide deposition. Finally, we propose that most of the basement on which the largely Paleozoic sedimentary protolith was deposited was subducted during the Mesozoic.

  7. U-Pb zircon geochronology of the Paleogene - Neogene volcanism in the NW Anatolia: Its implications for the Late Mesozoic-Cenozoic geodynamic evolution of the Aegean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ersoy, E. Yalçın; Akal, Cüneyt; Genç, Ş. Can; Candan, Osman; Palmer, Martin R.; Prelević, Dejan; Uysal, İbrahim; Mertz-Kraus, Regina

    2017-10-01

    The northern Aegean region was shaped by subduction, obduction, collision, and post-collisional extension processes. Two areas in this region, the Rhodope-Thrace-Biga Peninsula to the west and Armutlu-Almacık-Nallıhan (the Central Sakarya) to the east, are characterized by extensive Eocene to Miocene post-collisional magmatic associations. We suggest that comparison of the Cenozoic magmatic events of these two regions may provide insights into the Late Mesozoic to Cenozoic tectonic evolution of the Aegean. With this aim, we present an improved Cenozoic stratigraphy of the Biga Peninsula derived from a new comprehensive set of U-Pb zircon age data obtained from the Eocene to Miocene volcanic units in the region. The compiled radiometric age data show that calc-alkaline volcanic activity occurred at 43-15 Ma in the Biga Peninsula, 43-17 Ma in the Rhodope and Thrace regions, and 53-38 Ma in the Armutlu-Almacık-Nallıhan region, which are slightly overlapping. We discuss the possible cause for the distinct Cenozoic geodynamic evolution of the eastern and western parts of the region, and propose that the Rhodope, Thrace and Biga regions in the north Aegean share the same Late Mesozoic to Cenozoic geodynamic evolution, which is consistent with continuous subduction, crustal accretion, southwestward trench migration and accompanying extension; all preceded by the Late Cretaceous - Paleocene collision along the Vardar suture zone. In contrast, the Armutlu-Almacık-Nallıhan region was shaped by slab break-off and related processes following the Late Cretaceous - Paleocene collision along the İzmir-Ankara suture zone. The eastern and western parts of the region are presently separated by a northeast-southwest trending transfer zone that was likely originally present as a transform fault in the subducted Tethys oceanic crust, and demonstrates that the regional geodynamic evolution can be strongly influenced by the geographical distribution of geologic features on the

  8. To Plume or Not To Plume: SC Mesozoic Diabase Dike Orientations, Stress Fields During the Break-up of Pangea, and the Feasibility of a Causal Plume.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beutel, E. K.; Alexander, M.; Kotecha, A.; Edwards, D.

    2002-12-01

    New compilations of Mesozoic diabase dikes in South Carolina suggest that previously unrecognized N-S and NE-SW dike orientations exist throughout the western Charlotte belt, into the Carolina belt and possible into the Laurens Thrust Stack. Previous studies indicated that the majority of dikes in South Carolina were solely NW trending. While we found that the majority of dikes did trend NW-SE, the number and size of the NE-SW and N-S trending dikes indicate that these are not mere fingers off the main NW trending dikes and are likely true swarms. Previous studies of Mesozoic diabase dikes further north along the Atlantic coast have found evidence that suggests that NW-SE trending dikes are the oldest set, the N-S trending set followed, and the NE-SW trending dikes were injected last. Based on this relationship, and the stress field that most likely existed in the crust during the injection of each dike set, we have constructed a series of evolutionary models for the break-up of Pangea. Our models are based on the assumption that the multiple overlapping swarms negate the possibility of a plume being solely responsible for the break-up or for the dikes. These models suggest a complicated history of relative motion between Africa, North America, and South America. Finite element models were run to test the feasibility of these models. Preliminary model results suggest that the extensional stresses necessary for the major dike patterns seen in northwestern Africa, northern South America, and the southeastern United States may have occurred when the relative motion of Africa was northeast of North America. Initial model runs suggest that multiple dike orientations are best accounted for by a strongly nonlinear rift trend, a temporary aulacogen in Georgia, and/or rift propagation. The affect of events in the Gulf of Mexico is strongly dependent on the location and trend of the rifts and micro-continents modeled.

  9. Touchstone Education: New Charter with Experienced Leader Learns from Extending Teachers' Reach. An Opportunity Culture Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Sharon Kebschull; Han, Jiye Grace

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, Touchstone Education opened its first school, Merit Preparatory Charter School of Newark ("Merit Prep Newark"), in New Jersey, with 84 sixth-graders, 90 percent of whom are low-income, with most entering Merit Prep several years behind grade level. In reading and science, Merit Prep Newark has shown strong early results in its…

  10. U-Pb and Hf isotope analysis of detrital zircons from Mesozoic strata of the Gravina belt, southeast Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokelson, Intan; Gehrels, George E.; Pecha, Mark; Giesler, Dominique; White, Chelsi; McClelland, William C.

    2015-10-01

    The Gravina belt consists of Upper Jurassic through Lower Cretaceous marine clastic strata and mafic-intermediate volcanic rocks that occur along the western flank of the Coast Mountains in southeast Alaska and coastal British Columbia. This report presents U-Pb ages and Hf isotope determinations of detrital zircons that have been recovered from samples collected from various stratigraphic levels and from along the length of the belt. The results support previous interpretations that strata in the western portion of the Gravina belt accumulated along the inboard margin of the Alexander-Wrangellia terrane and in a back-arc position with respect to the western Coast Mountains batholith. Our results are also consistent with previous suggestions that eastern strata accumulated along the western margin of the inboard Stikine, Yukon-Tanana, and Taku terranes and in a fore-arc position with respect to the eastern Coast Mountains batholith. The history of juxtaposition of western and eastern assemblages is obscured by subsequent plutonism, deformation, and metamorphism within the Coast Mountains orogen, but may have occurred along an Early Cretaceous sinistral transform system. Our results are inconsistent with models in which an east-facing subduction zone existed along the inboard margin of the Alexander-Wrangellia terrane during Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous time.

  11. Comment on "Assessing Discrepancies Between Previous Plate Kinematic Models of Mesozoic Iberia and Their Constraints" by Barnett-Moore Et Al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.; Spakman, Wim; Vissers, Reinoud L. M.; van der Meer, Douwe G.

    2017-12-01

    In their recent paper, Barnett-Moore et al. (2016) reflect on current models of Iberian plate motion in the Jurassic and Cretaceous as well as ongoing debates on the reliability of the various types of kinematic data that form independent constraints on Iberia's motion relative to Eurasia. They question the validity of various marine geophysical, seismic, tomographic, geological, and paleomagnetic data sets from the Bay of Biscay, Central Atlantic Ocean, and Iberia for kinematic reconstruction of Iberia and conclude that neither models invoking Aptian-Albian transtension, nor compression, are consistent with currently available data. An important element in their analysis is that they discard the large paleomagnetic data set from the Jurassic and Cretaceous from Iberia based on perceived limitations of that data set. In addition, they argue that seismic tomographic images exclude a scenario of subduction in the Aptian-Albian in the Pyrenees, and based on this "question the validity of current plate reconstructions, their constraints, and geodynamic scenarios, which are in support of this scenario [e.g., Vissers et al., 2016]." We welcome the discussion raised by Barnett-Moore et al. (2016) on the reliability and usefulness of paleomagnetic data as independent constraint for Iberia's plate motion in the Mesozoic. Taking these paleomagnetic data at face value, Vissers et al. (2016) recently showed that these are consistent with an 40° counterclockwise rotation of Iberia in the Aptian, requiring up to 500 km of Aptian convergence across the Pyrenees, that is, through subduction. In this comment, we aim to critically assess whether and how the concerns on the quality of paleomagnetic data raised by Barnett-Moore et al. (2016) may allow for an alternative explanation, particularly one with a Mesozoic rotation of Iberia that is small enough so as to not requiring subduction. We also reassess whether seismic tomographic images indeed refute subduction scenarios, using 8

  12. Paleomagnetism and magnetic fabric of the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia: Evidence for oblique convergence and non-rotational reactivation of a Mesozoic intra-continental rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez Díaz, G.; Speranza, F.; Faccenna, C.; Bayona, G.; Mora, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Eastern Cordillera of Colombia (EC) is a double-verging mountain system inverting a Mesozoic rift, and bounded by major reverse faults that locally involve crystalline and metamorphic Precambrian-Lower Paleozoic basement rocks, as well as Upper Paleozoic-Cenozoic sedimentary and volcanic sequences. In map view the EC is a curved mountain belt with a regional structural strike that ranges from NNE in the southern part to NNW in the northern part. The origin of its curvature has not been studied or discussed so far. We report on an extensive paleomagnetic and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) investigation of the EC, in order to address to test its non-rotational vs. oroclinal nature. Fifty-eight sites were gathered from Cretaceous to Miocene marine and continental strata, both from the southern and northern parts of the EC; additionally, we examined the southern Maracaibo plate, at the junction between the Santander Massif and the Merida Andes of Colombia (Cucuta zone). Twenty-three sites reveal no rotation of the EC range with respect to stable South America. In contrast, a 35°±9° clockwise rotation is documented in four post-Miocene magnetically overprinted sites from the Cucuta zone. Magnetic lineations from AMS analysis do not trend parallel to the chain, but are oblique to the main strike of the orogenic belt. By also considering GPS evidence of a ~1 cm/yr ENE displacement of central-western Colombia accommodated by the EC, we suggest that the late Miocene-recent deformation occurred by a ENE oblique convergence reactivating a NNE rift zone. Our data show that the EC is a non-rotational chain, and that the locations of the Mesozoic rift and the mountain chain roughly correspond. One possible solution is that the oblique shortening is partitioned in pure dip-slip shear characterizing thick-skinned frontal thrust sheets (well-known along both chain fronts), and by range-parallel right-lateral strike-slip fault(s), which have not been identified

  13. Mesozoic lacustrine system in the Parnaíba Basin, northeastern Brazil: Paleogeographic implications for west Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, Alexandre Ribeiro; Nogueira, Afonso César Rodrigues; Abrantes, Francisco Romério; Rabelo, Cleber Eduardo Neri

    2017-03-01

    The fragmentation of the West Gondwana during Early Triassic to Cretaceous was marked by intense climatic changes, concomitant with the establishment of extensive desertic/lacustrine systems. These deposits succeeded the emplacement and extrusion of lava flows, related to the pre-rift phase and initial opening of the Equatorial Atlantic Ocean. The thermal phase is recorded in the Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous Pastos Bons Formation, exposed mainly in southeast parts of the Parnaíba Basin, Northeastern Brazil. The sedimentary facies of this unit were grouped in two facies associations (FA), representative of a shallow lacustrine system, influenced by episodic hyperpycnal and oscillatory flows. Central lake facies association (FA1) is composed by laminated mudstone (Ml), sandstone/mudstone rhythmite (S/Mr) and sandstone with even-parallel lamination (Sel). Flysch-like delta front (FA2) consists in sandstones with wave structures (Sw), sandstones with even-parallel stratification (Ses), massive sandstones (Sm), sandstones with soft-sediment deformation structures (Sd) and laminated mudstones (Ml). FA1 was deposited in the deepest portions of the lake, characterized by low energy, episodically disturbed by siliciclastic influx. FA2 presents sandy deposits generated by unconfined flow, probably fed by ephemeral stream flows that generated thickening upward of tabular sandstone beds. The progressive filling of the lake resulted in recurrent shoaling up of the water level and reworking by wave action. The installation of Pastos Bons lakes was controlled by thermal subsidence, mainly in restricted depocenters. The siliciclastic fluvial inflow can be related to the adjacent humid desertic facies, formed under climatic attenuation, typical of post-Triassic period, with reduced biological activity. Smectite and abundant feldspars, in lacustrine facies, corroborate an arid climate, with incipient chemical weathering. The new facies and stratigraphic data present in this

  14. Early to Middle Jurassic tectonic evolution of the Bogda Mountains, Northwest China: Evidence from sedimentology and detrital zircon geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Hongjie; Tao, Huifei; Wang, Qi; Qiu, Zhen; Ma, Dongxu; Qiu, Junli; Liao, Peng

    2018-03-01

    The Bogda Mountains, as an important intracontinental orogenic belt, are situated in the southern part of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), and are a key area for understanding the Mesozoic evolution of the CAOB. However, the tectonic evolution of the Bogda Mountains remains controversial during the Mesozoic Era, especially the Early to Middle Jurassic Periods. The successive Lower to Middle Jurassic strata are well preserved and exposed along the northern flank of the Western Bogda Mountains and record the uplift processes of the Bogda Mountains. In this study, we analysed sedimentary facies combined with detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology at five sections of Lower to Middle Jurassic strata to detect the tectonic evolution and changes of provenance in the Bogda area. During Early to Middle Jurassic times, the fluvial, deltaic and lacustrine environments dominated in the western section of the Bogda area. The existence of Early Triassic peak age indicates that the Bogda Mountains did not experience uplift during the period of early Badaowan Formation deposition. The Early Triassic to Late Permian granitoid plutons and Carboniferous volcanic rocks from the Barkol and Santanghu areas were the main provenances. The significant change in the U-Pb age spectrum implies that the Eastern Bogda Mountains initiated uplift in the period of late Badaowan Formation deposition, and the Eastern Junggar Basin and the Turpan-Hami Basin were partially partitioned. The Eastern Bogda Mountains gradually became the major provenance. From the period of early Sangonghe to early Toutunhe Formations deposition, the provenance of the sediments and basin-range frame were similar to that of late Badaowan. However, the Eastern Bogda Mountains suffered intermittent uplift three times, and successive denudation. The uplifts respectively happened in early Sangonghe, late Sangonghe to early Xishanyao, and late Xishanyao to early Toutunhe. During the deposition stage of Toutunhe Formation, a

  15. The Mesozoic-Cenozoic igneous intrusions and related sediment-dominated hydrothermal activities in the South Yellow Sea Basin, the Western Pacific continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumao, Pang; Xunhua, Zhang; Guolin, Xiao; Luning, Shang; Xingwei, Guo; Zhenhe, Wen

    2018-04-01

    Various igneous complexes were identified in multi-channel seismic reflection profiles from the South Yellow Sea Basin. It is not rare that magmatic intrusions in sedimentary basins cause strong thermal perturbations and hydrothermal activities. Some intrusion-related hydrothermal vent complexes have been identified and they are considered to originate from the deep sedimentary contact aureole around igneous intrusions and terminate in upper vents structures, and are linked by a vertical conduit system. The upper vent complexes are usually eye-shaped, dome-shaped, fault-related, crater-shaped or pock-shaped in seismic profiles. A schematic model was proposed to illustrate the structures of different types of hydrothermal vent complexes. A conceptual conduit model composed of an upper pipe-like part and a lower branching part was also derived. Hydrothermal vent complexes mainly developed during the Middle-Late Cretaceous, which is coeval with, or shortly after the intrusion. The back-arc basin evolution of the area which is related to the subduction of the Paleo-Pacific plate during the Mesozoic-Cenozoic may be the principal factor for voluminous igneous complexes and vent complexes in this area. It is significant to study the characteristics of igneous complexes and related hydrothermal vent complexes, which will have implications for the future study of this area.

  16. Simulation analysis of the ground-water system in Mesozoic rocks in the Four Corners area, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, B.E.

    1989-01-01

    The steady-state groundwater system in Mesozoic rocks in the Four Corners area, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico, was simulated with a finite-difference digital-computer model to improve the understanding of the system. The simulated area is 4 ,100 sq mi, and it includes three aquifers. The Entrada-Navajo aquifer includes the Wingate, Navajo, and Entrada Sandstones. The Morrison aquifer includes the sandstone units of the Morrison Formation. The Dakota aquifer includes the Burro Canyon Formation and Dakota Sandstone. The simulation of the groundwater system had a mean error (error is absolute value of residual) of 70 ft for the Entrada-Navajo aquifer, 67 ft for the Morrison aquifer and 79 ft for the Dakota aquifer. The hydraulic conductivity used in the simulation ranged from 0.38 to 0.47 ft/day. Simulated inflow to the groundwater system was 30,000 acre-ft/yr. 48% of the inflow is from infiltration of precipitation within the simulated area, and 42% is from infiltration in 145 sq mi of mountain areas adjacent to the simulated area. Simulations indicated that some vertical inflow of water is needed between the Entrada-Navajo and Morrison aquifers to develop a reasonable representation of the system. (USGS)

  17. Oil/source rock correlations in the Polish Flysch Carpathians and Mesozoic basement and organic facies of the Oligocene Menilite Shales: Insights from hydrous pyrolysis experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curtis, John B.; Kotarba, M.J.; Lewan, M.D.; Wieclaw, D.

    2004-01-01

    The Oligocene Menilite Shales in the study area in the Polish Flysch Carpathians are organic-rich and contain varying mixtures of Type-II, Type-IIS and Type-III kerogen. The kerogens are thermally immature to marginally mature based on atomic H/C ratios and Rock-Eval data. This study defined three organic facies, i.e., sedimentary strata with differing hydrocarbon-generation potentials due to varying types and concentrations of organic matter. These facies correspond to the Silesian Unit and the eastern and western portions of the Skole Unit. Analysis of oils generated by hydrous pyrolysis of outcrop samples of Menilite Shales demonstrates that natural crude oils reservoired in the flysch sediments appear to have been generated from the Menilite Shales. Natural oils reservoired in the Mesozoic basement of the Carpathian Foredeep appear to be predominantly derived and migrated from Menilite Shales, with a minor contribution from at least one other source rock most probably within Middle Jurassic strata. Definition of organic facies may have been influenced by the heterogeneous distribution of suitable Menilite Shales outcrops and producing wells, and subsequent sample selection during the analytical phases of the study. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A practical assessment of aquifer discharge for regional groundwater demand by characterizing leaky confined aquifer overlain on a Mesozoic granitic gneiss basement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, David Ching-Fang

    2018-04-01

    Due to increasing population worldwide, there is an urgent need to manage these important but diminishing groundwater resources efficiently to ensure their continued availability. The major innovative design of this study is to provide a practical assessment process for groundwater discharge under a regional demand by characterizing the nature of leaky confined aquifers overlain on a Mesozoic granitic gneiss basement which involves the important groundwater system in the Kinmen region (Taiwan, ROC) and the assessment of adoptable groundwater discharge in aquifer is needed. The storage coefficient presents an order of one in a thousand and hydraulic conductivity is approximately at the order of 1-8 m/d and 0.4-0.9 m/d for aquifer and aquitard respectively. Groundwater discharge and admissible number of pumping well is suggested considering scheduled maximum groundwater volume and head decline change for eastern and western studied area respectively. The safety subjected to the conservative issue is then addressed by the use of scheduled maximum groundwater volume. It reveals that the safety can be ensured using the indicator as scheduled maximum groundwater volume with predefined scenarios. The result can be utilized practically for developing management strategy of groundwater resources due to the applicability and novel of method.

  19. Spatial variations in effective elastic thickness in the Western Pacific Ocean and their implications for Mesozoic volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalnins, L. M.; Watts, A. B.

    2009-08-01

    We have used free-air gravity anomaly and bathymetric data, together with a moving window admittance technique, to determine the spatial variation in oceanic elastic thickness, Te, in the Western Pacific ocean. Synthetic tests using representative seamounts show that Te can be recovered to an accuracy of ± 5 km for plates up to 30 km thick, with increased accuracy of ± 3 km for Te ≤ 20 km. The Western Pacific has a T e range of 0-50 km, with a mean of 9.4 km and a standard deviation of 6.8 km. The T e structure of the region is dominated by relatively high Te over the Hawaiian-Emperor Seamount Chain, intermediate values over the Marshall Islands, Gilbert Ridge, and Marcus-Wake Guyots, and low values over the Line Islands, Mid-Pacific Mountains, Caroline Islands, Shatsky Rise, Hess Rise, and Musician Seamounts. Plots of Te at sites with radiometric ages suggest that Te is to first order controlled by the age of the lithosphere at the time of loading. In areas that backtrack into the South Pacific Isotopic and Thermal Anomaly (SOPITA), Te may be as low as the depth to the 180 ± 120 °C isotherm at least locally. In the northern part of the study area including the Hawaiian-Emperor Seamount Chain, Te correlates with the depth to 310 ± 120 °C. These best-fitting isotherms imply peak rates of volcanism during 100-120 Ma (Early Cretaceous) and 140-150 Ma (Late Jurassic). The corresponding addition of 8 × 10 6 km 3 and 4 × 10 6 km 3 of volcanic material to the surface of the oceanic crust would result in long-term sea-level rises of 20 m and 10 m respectively. The Late Jurassic volcanic event, like the later Early Cretaceous event, appears to have influenced the tectonic evolution of the Pacific plate convergent boundaries, resulting in increased volcanism and orogenesis.

  20. Geochemistry and geochronology of the Mesozoic Lanong ophiolitic mélange, northern Tibet: Implications for petrogenesis and tectonic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yun; Liu, Wei-Liang; Xia, Bin; Liu, Jing-Nan; Guan, Yao; Yin, Zhen-Xing; Huang, Qiang-Tai

    2017-11-01

    Bangong-Nujiang Tethys Ocean beneath the Lhasa terrane during the Middle Triassic-Early Cretaceous. Namely, the OIB-like dolerites likely reflect an extensional rift setting featuring thin continental crust in the Middle Triassic, and the gabbros, gabbro-dolerites and basalts represent a later stage of a fore-arc basin during the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous.

  1. Mesozoic (Lower Jurassic) red stromatactis limestones from the Southern Alps (Arzo, Switzerland): calcite mineral authigenesis and syneresis-type deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuweiler, Fritz; Bernoulli, Daniel

    2005-02-01

    The Broccatello lithological unit (Lower Jurassic, Hettangian to lower parts of Upper Sinemurian) near the village of Arzo (southern Alps, southern Switzerland) is a mound-shaped carbonate deposit that contains patches of red stromatactis limestone. Within the largely bioclastic Broccatello unit, the stromatactis limestone is distinguished by its early-diagenetic cavity system, a relatively fine-grained texture, and an in-situ assemblage of calcified siliceous sponges (various demosponges and hexactinellids). A complex shallow subsurface diagenetic pathway can be reconstructed from sediment petrography in combination with comparative geochemical analysis (carbon and oxygen isotopes; trace and rare earth elements, REE + Y). This pathway includes organic matter transformation, aragonite and skeletal opal dissolution, patchy calcification and lithification, sediment shrinkage, sagging and collapse, partial REE remobilization, and multiple sediment infiltration. These processes occurred under normal-marine, essentially oxic conditions and were independent from local, recurring syn-sedimentary faulting. It is concluded that the stromatactis results from a combination of calcite mineral authigenesis and syneresis-type deformation. The natural stromatactis phenomenon may thus be best explained by maturation processes of particulate polymer gels expected to form in fine-grained carbonate sediments in the shallow subsurface. Conditions favorable for the evolution of stromatactis appear to be particularly frequent during drowning of tropical or subtropical carbonate platforms.

  2. Early Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This theme issue focuses on early intervention. The four articles presented on this theme are: (1) "Deaf Infants, Hearing Mothers: A Research Report" (Kathryn P. Meadow-Orlans, and others), reporting findings on effects of auditory loss on early development; (2) "Maintaining Involvement of Inner City Families in Early Intervention Programs through…

  3. Mesozoic fault reactivation along the St. Lawrence Rift System as constrained by (U-Th/He) thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvier, L.; Pinti, D. L.; Tremblay, A.; Minarik, W. G.; Roden-Tice, M. K.; Pik, R.

    2011-12-01

    The Saint Lawrence Rift System (SLRS) is a half-graben, extending for 1000 km along St. Lawrence River valley. Late Proterozoic-Early Paleozoic faults of the graben form the contact with the metamorphic Grenvillian basement to the northwest and extend under the Paleozoic sedimentary sequences of the St. Lawrence Lowlands to the southeast. The SLRS is the second most seismically active area in Canada, but the causes of this activity remain unclear. Reactivation of the SLRS is believed to have occurred along Late Proterozoic to Early Paleozoic normal faults related to the opening of the Iapetus Ocean. The absence of strata younger than the Ordovician makes difficult to determine when the faults reactivated after the Ordovician. Field relations between the normal faults bordering the SLRS and those produced by the Charlevoix impact crater suggest a reactivation of the rift younger than the Devonian, the estimated age of the impact. Apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronology is an adequate tool to recognize thermal events related to fault movements. A thermochronology study was then started along three transects across the SLRS, from Québec up to Charlevoix. Apatites were extracted and separated from five granitic to charnockitic gneisses and an amphibolite of Grenvillian age. The samples were exposed on hanging wall and footwall of the Montmorency and Saint-Laurent faults at three different locations along the SLRS. For precision and accuracy, each of the six samples was analyzed for radiogenic 4He and U-Th contents at least twice. Apatite grains were isolated by heavy liquids and magnetic separation. For each sample, ten apatite grains were selected under optical microscope and inserted into Pt capsules. Particular care was taken to isolate apatite free of mineral and fluid inclusions. Indeed, SEM investigations showed that some inclusions are U-rich monazite, which is a supplementary source of 4He to be avoided. The 4He content was determined by using a static noble gas

  4. Hoplitolyda duolunica gen. et sp. nov. (Insecta, Hymenoptera, Praesiricidae), the Hitherto Largest Sawfly from the Mesozoic of China

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Taiping; Shih, Chungkun; Rasnitsyn, Alexandr P.; Ren, Dong

    2013-01-01

    Background Large body size of an insect, in general, enhances its capability of predation, competition, and defense, resulting in better survivability and reproduction. Hymenopterans, most being phytophagous or parasitic, have a relatively small to medium body size, typically under 50.0 mm in body length. Principal Findings Herein, we describe Hoplitolyda duolunica gen. et sp. nov., assigned to Praesiricidae, from the Early Cretaceous Yixian Formation of China. This new species is the largest fossil hymenopteran hitherto with body estimated >55.0 mm long and wing span >92.0 mm. H. duolunica is, to our knowledge, the only sawfly with Sc present in the hind wing but not in the forewing. Its Rs1 and M1 meeting each other at 145° angle represents an intermediate in the transition from “Y” to “T” shapes. Even though Hoplitolyda differs significantly from all previously described genera in two subfamilies of Praesricidae, we leave the new genus unplaced in existing subfamilies, pending discovery of material with more taxonomic structure. Conclusions/Significance Hoplitolyda has many unique and interesting characters which might have benefitted its competition, survival, and reproduction: large body size and head with robust and strong mandibles for defense and/or sexual selection, unique wing venation and setal arrangements for flight capability and mobility, dense hairs on body and legs for sensing and protection, etc. Considering the reported ferocious predators of feathered dinosaurs, pterosaurs, birds, and mammals coexisting in the same eco-system, Hoplitolyda is an interesting case of “survival of the fittest” in facing its evolutionary challenges. PMID:23671596

  5. The historical biogeography of the freshwater knifefishes using mitogenomic approaches: a mesozoic origin of the Asian notopterids (Actinopterygii: Osteoglossomorpha).

    PubMed

    Inoue, Jun G; Kumazawa, Yoshinori; Miya, Masaki; Nishida, Mutsumi

    2009-06-01

    The continental distributions of freshwater fishes in the family Notopteridae (Osteoglossomorpha) across Africa, India, and Southeast Asia constitute a long standing and enigmatic problem of freshwater biogeography. The migrational pathway of the Asian notopterids has been discussed in light of two competing schemes: the first posits recent transcontinental dispersal while the second relies on distributions being shaped by ancient vicariance associated with plate-tectonic events. In this study, we determined complete mitochondrial DNA sequences from 10 osteoglossomorph fishes to estimate phylogenetic relationships using partitioned Bayesian and maximum likelihood methods and divergence dates of the family Notopteridae with a partitioned Bayesian approach. We used six species representing the major lineages of the Notopteridae and seven species from the remaining osteoglossomorph families. Fourteen more-derived teleosts, nine basal actinopterygians, two coelacanths, and one shark were used as outgroups. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that the African and Asian notopterids formed a sister group to each other and that these notopterids were a sister to a clade comprising two African families (Mormyridae and Gymnarchidae). Estimated divergence time between the African and Asian notopterids dated back to the early Cretaceous when India-Madagascar separated from the African part of Gondwanaland. Thus, estimated time of divergence based on the molecular evidence is at odds with the recent dispersal model. It can be reconciled with the geological and paleontological evidence to support the vicariance model in which the Asian notopterids diverged from the African notopterids in Gondwanaland and migrated into Eurasia on the Indian subcontinent from the Cretaceous to the Tertiary. However, we could not exclude an alternative explanation that the African and Asian notopterids diverged in Pangea before its complete separation into Laurasia and Gondwanaland, to which these two

  6. Zircon U-Pb geochronology and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopic constraints on the timing and origin of Mesozoic granitoids hosting the Mo deposits in northern Xilamulun district, NE China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Qihai; Lai, Yong; Zhou, Yitao; Xu, Jiajia; Wu, Huaying

    2015-12-01

    Located in the east section of the Central Asian orogen in northeastern China, the Xilamulun district comprises several newly discovered molybdenum deposits, primarily of porphyry type and Mesozoic ages. This district is divided by the Xilamulun fault into the southern and the northern parts. In this paper, we present new zircon U-Pb dating, trace elements and Hf isotope, and/or whole rock Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic results for the host granitoids from three Mo deposits (Yangchang, Haisugou and Shabutai) in northern Xilamulun. Our aim is to constrain the age and petrogenesis of these intrusions and their implications for Mo mineralization. Zircon U-Pb LA-ICP-MS dating shows that the monzogranites from the Shabutai and Yangchang deposits formed at 138.4 ± 1.5 and 137.4 ± 2.1 Ma, respectively, which is identical to the molybdenite Re-Os ages and coeval well with the other Mo deposits in this region, thereby indicating an Early Cretaceous magmatism and Mo mineralization event. Zircon Ce/Nd ratios from the mineralized intrusions are significantly higher than the barren granites, implying that the mineralization-related magmas are characterized by higher oxygen fugacity. These mineralized intrusions share similar zircon in-situ Hf and whole rock Sr-Nd isotopic compositions, with slightly negative to positive εHf(t) ranging from - 0.8 to + 10.0, restricted εNd(t) values from - 3.7 to + 1.6 but a little variable (87Sr/86Sr)i ratios between 0.7021 and 0.7074, indicative of formation from primary magmas generated from a dominantly juvenile lower crust source derived from depleted mantle, despite diverse consequent processes (e.g., magma mixing, fractional crystallization and crustal contamination) during their evolution. The Pb isotopes (whole rock) also show a narrow range of initial compositions, with (206Pb/204Pb)i = 18.03-18.88, (207Pb/204Pb)i = 15.48-15.58 and (208Pb/204Pb)i = 37.72-38.28, in agreement with Sr-Nd-Hf isotopes reflecting the dominance of a mantle component

  7. Transformation and diversification in early mammal evolution.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhe-Xi

    2007-12-13

    Evolution of the earliest mammals shows successive episodes of diversification. Lineage-splitting in Mesozoic mammals is coupled with many independent evolutionary experiments and ecological specializations. Classic scenarios of mammalian morphological evolution tend to posit an orderly acquisition of key evolutionary innovations leading to adaptive diversification, but newly discovered fossils show that evolution of such key characters as the middle ear and the tribosphenic teeth is far more labile among Mesozoic mammals. Successive diversifications of Mesozoic mammal groups multiplied the opportunities for many dead-end lineages to iteratively evolve developmental homoplasies and convergent ecological specializations, parallel to those in modern mammal groups.

  8. Influence of Large Igneous Provinces on Svalbard tectonics and sedimentation from the Late Mesozoic through Cenozoic: Insight from (U-Th)/He zircon and apatite thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Christopher; Schneider, David; Majka, Jaroslaw

    2016-04-01

    Svalbard, the northwestern sub-aerial exposure of the Barents Shelf, offers significant insight into the geodynamics of the High Arctic. The tectonics and sedimentation on Svalbard from the Late Mesozoic through Cenozoic can be attributed to two Large Igneous Provinces: the High Arctic Large Igneous Province (HALIP; 130-90 Ma) and the North Atlantic Large Igneous Province (NAIP; 62-55 Ma). The relationship between the HALIP and the tectonics of the High Arctic remains somewhat unclear, whereas the NAIP is directly linked to opening of the North Atlantic Ocean. This study attempts to establish links between the HALIP and geodynamics of the High Arctic, and reveals the far-field tectonic consequences of the NAIP on Svalbard and the High Arctic. We focus on the Southwestern Caledonian Basement Terrane of Svalbard, characterized by the West Spitsbergen Fold and Thrust Belt, formed during the Eurekan Orogeny (c. 55-33 Ma). Crystalline basement was sampled from four regions (Prins Karls Forland, Oscar II Land, Wedel Jarlsberg Land, and Sørkapp Land) for the purpose of zircon and apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronometry which allows for resolution of thermal events below 200°C. We forward model our datasets using HeFTy software to produce temperature-time histories for each of these regions, and compare these thermal models with Svalbard stratigraphy to resolve the geodynamics of Svalbard from the Late Mesozoic through Cenozoic. The Cretaceous stratigraphy of Svalbard is characterized by a short-lived Mid-Cretaceous sub-aerial unconformity (c. 129 Ma) and a significant Late Cretaceous unconformity (c. 105-65 Ma). Our thermal models reveal a Mid-Cretaceous heating event, suggesting an increasing geothermal gradient coeval with development of the first unconformity. This may indicate that short-lived domal-uplift, related to the arrival of the HALIP plume, was a primary control on Svalbard tectonics and sedimentary deposition throughout the Mid-Cretaceous. Late Cretaceous

  9. Integrated elemental and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopic studies of Mesozoic mafic dykes from the eastern North China Craton: implications for the dramatic transformation of lithospheric mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shen; Feng, Caixia; Santosh, M.; Feng, Guangying; Coulson, Ian M.; Xu, Mengjing; Guo, Zhuang; Guo, Xiaolei; Peng, Hao; Feng, Qiang

    2018-02-01

    Evolution of the lithospheric mantle beneath the North China Craton (NCC) from its Precambrian cratonic architecture until Paleozoic, and the transformation to an oceanic realm during Mesozoic, with implications on the destruction of cratonic root have attracted global attention. Here we present geochemical and isotopic data on a suite of newly identified Mesozoic mafic dyke swarms from the Longwangmiao, Weijiazhuang, Mengjiazhuang, Jiayou, Huangmi, and Xiahonghe areas (Qianhuai Block) along the eastern NCC with an attempt to gain further insights on the lithospheric evolution of the region. The Longwangmiao dykes are alkaline with LILE (Ba and K)- and LREE-enrichment ((La/Yb) N > 4.3) and EM1-like Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopic signature ((87Sr/86Sr) i > 0.706; ε Nd (t) < -6.3, (206Pb/204Pb) i > 16.6, (207Pb/204Pb) i > 15.4, (208Pb/204Pb) i > 36.8, ε Hf (t) < -22.4). The Weijiazhuang dykes are sub-alkaline with LILE (Ba and K)- and LREE-enrichment ((La/Yb) N > 3.7), and display similar EM1-like isotopic features ((87Sr/86Sr) i > 0.706; ε Nd (t) < -7.0, (206Pb/204Pb) i > 16.7, (207Pb/204Pb) i > 15.4, (208Pb/204Pb) i > 36.9, ε Hf (t) < -23.3). The Mengjiazhuang dykes are also sub-alkaline with LILE (Ba and K)- and LREE-enrichment ((La/Yb) N > 2.4) and EM1-like isotopic features((87Sr/86Sr) i > 0.706; ε Nd (t) < -18.4, (206Pb/204Pb) i > 16.7, (207Pb/204Pb) i > 15.4, (208Pb/204Pb) i > 36.9, ε Hf (t) < -8.6). The Jiayou dykes also display sub-alkaline affinity with LILE (Ba and K)- and LREE-enrichment ((La/Yb) N > 3.7) and EM1-like Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopic features ((87Sr/86Sr) i > 0.706; ε Nd(t) < -15.3, (206Pb/204Pb) i > 16.7, (207Pb/204Pb) i > 15.4, (208Pb/204Pb) i > 36.9, ε Hf (t) < -18.4). The Huangmi dykes are alkaline (with Na2O + K2O ranging to more than 5.9 wt.%)) with LILE (Ba and K)- and LREE-enrichment ((La/Yb) N > 9.3) and EM1-like isotopic composition ((87Sr/86Sr) i > 0.705; ε Nd (t) < -15.1, (206Pb/204Pb) i > 16.9, (207Pb/204Pb) i > 15.5, (208Pb/204Pb) i > 36

  10. Geochronology and Structural Studies in the Northern Ritter Range: Implications for the Tectonic History of Mesozoic Sierra Nevada Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, C. J.; Whitesides, A. S.; Anderson, J. L.; Culbert, K. N.; Vandeveer, M.; Cox, I. V.; Cardamone, J.; Torrez, G.; Quirk, M.; Memeti, V.; Cao, W.; Paterson, S. R.

    2010-12-01

    along the SW margin of the KC lobe. Within the nearby WL Granodiorite, hundreds of andesitic host rock blocks, some up to hundred meter lengths suggest that stoping was an important emplacement process. Migmatitic zones occur along several pluton margins. Our observations are consistent with aspects of the Tobisch et al. (2000) paper suggesting early brittle thrusting led to rotation of beds to steep dips. However our results indicate that beds were already at near vertical dips prior to ductile shortening and well before pluton emplacement. And although regional downward flow of extrusive volcanics has certainly occurred we see evidence against previous suggestions that this downward flow was localized in pluton aureoles as plutons typically cut discordantly across already steeply dipping beds and in turn are deformed by the younger ductile deformation. Although ductile shortening may play a minor role in rotation of beds, much of the ductile deformation had to occur after beds were steeply dipping as the 100-93.5 m.y. plutons have fabrics that are continuous with ductile deformation in the host rocks.

  11. New 40Ar-39Ar dating of Lower Cretaceous basalts at the southern front of the Central High Atlas, Morocco: insights on late Mesozoic tectonics, sedimentation and magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moratti, G.; Benvenuti, M.; Santo, A. P.; Laurenzi, M. A.; Braschi, E.; Tommasini, S.

    2018-04-01

    This study is based upon a stratigraphic and structural revision of a Middle Jurassic-Upper Cretaceous mostly continental succession exposed between Boumalne Dades and Tinghir (Southern Morocco), and aims at reconstructing the relation among sedimentary, tectonic and magmatic processes that affected a portion of the Central High Atlas domains. Basalts interbedded in the continental deposits have been sampled in the two studied sites for petrographic, geochemical and radiogenic isotope analyses. The results of this study provide: (1) a robust support to the local stratigraphic revision and to a regional lithostratigraphic correlation based on new 40Ar-39Ar ages (ca. 120 Ma) of the intervening basalts; (2) clues for reconstructing the relation between magma emplacement in a structural setting characterized by syn-depositional crustal shortening pre-dating the convergent tectonic inversion of the Atlasic rifted basins; (3) a new and intriguing scenario indicating that the Middle Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous basalts of the Central High Atlas could represent the first signal of the present-day Canary Islands mantle plume impinging, flattening, and delaminating the base of the Moroccan continental lithosphere since the Jurassic, and successively dragged passively by the Africa plate motion to NE. The tectono-sedimentary and magmatic events discussed in this paper are preliminarily extended from their local scale into a peculiar geodynamic setting of a continental plate margin flanked by the opening and spreading Central Atlantic and NW Tethys oceans. It is suggested that during the late Mesozoic this setting created an unprecedented condition of intraplate stress for concurrent crustal shortening, related mountain uplift, and thinning of continental lithosphere.

  12. Fractional crystallization, impregnation and sulphide saturation recorded in Mesozoic arc-related cumulates at King Mountain, Cache Creek Ophiolite, Northern British Columbia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedard, J. H. J.; Zagorevski, A.; Corriveau, A. S.

    2016-12-01

    The Cache creek terrane extends from southern B.C. to the Yukon. It accreted to North America at 175Ma and is composed of Paleozoic seamounts, Mesozoic oceanic arcs and mantle rocks. Mantle harzburgite massifs represent intra-oceanic core-complexes. Mantle rocks are cut by gabbroic dykes and overlain by chert, lava, dismembered hypabyssal complexes and rare cumulates. At King Mountain, gabbronorites are in tectonic contact with subjacent peridotite. Other crustal relics exposed nearby include sheeted hypabyssal intrusions and volcanics that range from depleted arc tholeiites to boninites. The King Mountain cumulates are rhythmically layered, foliated gabbronorites with 5% oxides and minor interstitial hornblende that yields temperatures of 652-759oC. Cumulates may show evidence of compaction-related flattening and intra-cumulate shear (boudins, fold noses). A 300m thick continuous section records two fractional crystallization cycles, whole rock mg# varying from 60 to 35 in the 1st cycle and from 52 to 30 in the 2nd. Cumulates formed during passage of evolved multiply-saturated magmas derived from a deeper chamber towards the surface. Inverse trace element models show that the gabbronorite cumulates are compositionally akin to boninites. The lowest-mg# rocks in the differentiation cycles are rusty 10cm-1m interbeds with abundant magnetite+ ilmenite ( 10-15%), high sulphide contents ( 5-10%, pyrrhotite and chalcopyrite) and high V contents (<1200ppm). These are interpreted to record episodic co-accumulation of Fe-Ti-oxides, with the decrease in melt FeO-content triggering sulphide immiscibility. Hornblendite and hornblende tonalite veins are locally transposed into the layered cumulates, forming flaser gabbros with 5-50% cm-scale lensoid hornblendite that impregnates and replaces the foliated gabbro-norite; greatly increasing REE contents. Amphibole oikocrysts show evidence of internal deformation and record temperatures of 753-804 oC.

  13. Provenance of Mesozoic clastic rocks within the Bangong-Nujiang suture zone, central Tibet: Implications for the age of the initial Lhasa-Qiangtang collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shun; Guilmette, Carl; Ding, Lin; Xu, Qiang; Fu, Jia-Jun; Yue, Ya-Hui

    2017-10-01

    The Bangong-Nujiang suture zone, separating the Lhasa and Qiangtang blocks of the Tibetan Plateau, is marked by remnants of the Bangong-Nujiang oceanic basin. In the Gaize area of central Tibet, Mesozoic sedimentary strata recording the evolution of the basin and subsequent collision between these two blocks include the Upper Triassic-Lower Jurassic turbidites of the Mugagangri Group, the Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous sandstone-dominated Wuga and Shamuluo formations, and the Upper Cretaceous molasse deposits of the Jingzhushan Formation. The Shamuluo and Jingzhushan formations rest unconformably on the underlying Mugagangri Group and Wuga Formation, respectively. In this contribution, we analyze petrographic components of sandstones and U-Pb-Hf isotopic compositions of detrital zircons from the Wuga and Jingzhushan formations for the first time. Based on the youngest detrital zircon ages, the maximum depositional ages of the Wuga and Jingzhushan formations are suggested to be ∼147-150 Ma and ∼79-91 Ma, respectively. Petrographic and isotopic results indicate that sediments in the Wuga Formation were mainly sourced from the accretionary complex (preserved as the Mugagangri Group) in the north, while sediments in the Jingzhushan Formation have mixed sources from the Lhasa block, the Qiangtang block and the intervening suture zone. Provenance analysis, together with regional data, suggests that the Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous Wuga and Shamuluo formations were deposited in a peripheral foreland basin and a residual-sea basin, respectively, in response to the Lhasa-Qiangtang collision, whereas the Upper Cretaceous Jingzhushan Formation reflects continental molasse deposition during the post-collisional stage. The development of the peripheral foreland basin evidenced by deposition of the Wuga Formation reveals that the age of the initial Lhasa-Qiangtang collision might be the latest Jurassic (∼150 Ma).

  14. Unexpected Early Triassic marine ecosystem and the rise of the Modern evolutionary fauna

    PubMed Central

    Brayard, Arnaud; Krumenacker, L. J.; Botting, Joseph P.; Jenks, James F.; Bylund, Kevin G.; Fara, Emmanuel; Vennin, Emmanuelle; Olivier, Nicolas; Goudemand, Nicolas; Saucède, Thomas; Charbonnier, Sylvain; Romano, Carlo; Doguzhaeva, Larisa; Thuy, Ben; Hautmann, Michael; Stephen, Daniel A.; Thomazo, Christophe; Escarguel, Gilles

    2017-01-01

    In the wake of the end-Permian mass extinction, the Early Triassic (~251.9 to 247 million years ago) is portrayed as an environmentally unstable interval characterized by several biotic crises and heavily depauperate marine benthic ecosystems. We describe a new fossil assemblage—the Paris Biota—from the earliest Spathian (middle Olenekian, ~250.6 million years ago) of the Bear Lake area, southeastern Idaho, USA. This highly diversified assemblage documents a remarkably complex marine ecosystem including at least seven phyla and 20 distinct metazoan orders, along with algae. Most unexpectedly, it combines early Paleozoic and middle Mesozoic taxa previously unknown from the Triassic strata, among which are primitive Cambrian-Ordovician leptomitid sponges (a 200–million year Lazarus taxon) and gladius-bearing coleoid cephalopods, a poorly documented group before the Jurassic (~50 million years after the Early Triassic). Additionally, the crinoid and ophiuroid specimens show derived anatomical characters that were thought to have evolved much later. Unlike previous works that suggested a sluggish postcrisis recovery and a low diversity for the Early Triassic benthic organisms, the unexpected composition of this exceptional assemblage points toward an early and rapid post-Permian diversification for these clades. Overall, it illustrates a phylogenetically diverse, functionally complex, and trophically multileveled marine ecosystem, from primary producers up to top predators and potential scavengers. Hence, the Paris Biota highlights the key evolutionary position of Early Triassic fossil ecosystems in the transition from the Paleozoic to the Modern marine evolutionary fauna at the dawn of the Mesozoic era. PMID:28246643

  15. Unexpected Early Triassic marine ecosystem and the rise of the Modern evolutionary fauna.

    PubMed

    Brayard, Arnaud; Krumenacker, L J; Botting, Joseph P; Jenks, James F; Bylund, Kevin G; Fara, Emmanuel; Vennin, Emmanuelle; Olivier, Nicolas; Goudemand, Nicolas; Saucède, Thomas; Charbonnier, Sylvain; Romano, Carlo; Doguzhaeva, Larisa; Thuy, Ben; Hautmann, Michael; Stephen, Daniel A; Thomazo, Christophe; Escarguel, Gilles

    2017-02-01

    In the wake of the end-Permian mass extinction, the Early Triassic (~251.9 to 247 million years ago) is portrayed as an environmentally unstable interval characterized by several biotic crises and heavily depauperate marine benthic ecosystems. We describe a new fossil assemblage-the Paris Biota-from the earliest Spathian (middle Olenekian, ~250.6 million years ago) of the Bear Lake area, southeastern Idaho, USA. This highly diversified assemblage documents a remarkably complex marine ecosystem including at least seven phyla and 20 distinct metazoan orders, along with algae. Most unexpectedly, it combines early Paleozoic and middle Mesozoic taxa previously unknown from the Triassic strata, among which are primitive Cambrian-Ordovician leptomitid sponges (a 200-million year Lazarus taxon) and gladius-bearing coleoid cephalopods, a poorly documented group before the Jurassic (~50 million years after the Early Triassic). Additionally, the crinoid and ophiuroid specimens show derived anatomical characters that were thought to have evolved much later. Unlike previous works that suggested a sluggish postcrisis recovery and a low diversity for the Early Triassic benthic organisms, the unexpected composition of this exceptional assemblage points toward an early and rapid post-Permian diversification for these clades. Overall, it illustrates a phylogenetically diverse, functionally complex, and trophically multileveled marine ecosystem, from primary producers up to top predators and potential scavengers. Hence, the Paris Biota highlights the key evolutionary position of Early Triassic fossil ecosystems in the transition from the Paleozoic to the Modern marine evolutionary fauna at the dawn of the Mesozoic era.

  16. New Early Jurassic Tetrapod Assemblages Constrain Triassic-Jurassic Tetrapod Extinction Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, P. E.; Shubin, N. H.; Anders, M. H.

    1987-08-01

    The discovery of the first definitively correlated earliest Jurassic (200 million years before present) tetrapod assemblage (Fundy basin, Newark Supergroup, Nova Scotia) allows reevaluation of the duration of the Triassic-Jurassic tetrapod extinction event. Present are tritheledont and mammal-like reptiles, prosauropod, theropod, and ornithischian dinosaurs, protosuchian and sphenosuchian crocodylomorphs, sphenodontids, and hybodont, semionotid, and palaeonisciform fishes. All of the families are known from Late Triassic and Jurassic strata from elsewhere; however, pollen and spore, radiometric, and geochemical correlation indicate an early Hettangian age for these assemblages. Because all ``typical Triassic'' forms are absent from these assemblages, most Triassic-Jurassic tetrapod extinctions occurred before this time and without the introduction of new families. As was previously suggested by studies of marine invertebrates, this pattern is consistent with a global extinction event at the Triassic-Jurassic boundary. The Manicouagan impact structure of Quebec provides dates broadly compatible with the Triassic-Jurassic boundary and, following the impact theory of mass extinctions, may be implicated in the cause.

  17. Low ecological disparity in Early Cretaceous birds

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Jonathan S.; Makovicky, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Ecological divergence is thought to be coupled with evolutionary radiations, yet the strength of this coupling is unclear. When birds diversified ecologically has received much less attention than their hotly debated crown divergence time. Here, we quantify how accurately skeletal morphology can predict ecology in living and extinct birds, and show that the earliest known assemblage of birds (= pygostylians) from the Jehol Biota (≈ 125 Ma) was substantially impoverished ecologically. The Jehol avifauna has few representatives of highly preservable ecomorphs (e.g. aquatic forms) and a notable lack of ecomorphological overlap with the pterosaur assemblage (e.g. no large or aerially foraging pygostylians). Comparisons of the Jehol functional diversity with modern and subfossil avian assemblages show that taphonomic bias alone cannot explain the ecomorphological impoverishment. However, evolutionary simulations suggest that the constrained ecological diversity of the Early Cretaceous pygostylians is consistent with what is expected from a relatively young radiation. Regardless of the proximate biological explanation, the anomalously low functional diversity of the Jehol birds is evidence both for ecological vacancies in Cretaceous ecosystems, which were subsequently filled by the radiation of crown Aves, and for discordance between taxonomic richness and ecological diversity in the best-known Mesozoic ecosystem. PMID:24870044

  18. Dolomitization and over-dolomitization in the Vajont limestone (Dolomiti Bellunesi, Italy) controlled by Mesozoic normal faults: a microstructural and diagenesis study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortinovis, Silvia; Swennen, Rudy; Bistacchi, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The Vajont Gorge (Dolomiti Bellunesi, Italy) provides spectacular outcrops of Jurassic limestones (Vajont Limestone Formation) in which Mesozoic faults and fracture corridors are continuously exposed. Some of these faults acted as conduits for Mg-enriched hydrothermal fluids resulting in structurally-controlled dolomitization of the limestone. The dolomitization resulted in several dolomite bodies (100-200 m thick and several hundreds of meters along fault strike) that are particularly interesting as reservoir analogues for hydrocarbon, CO2, or water-bearing systems. The dolomitization process occurred after deposition and compaction of the oolitic limestone (dolomitization post-dates a dissolution event that affected the internal parts of the oolites), but before the Alpine contractional deformation. In fact, the meso-structural data collected in the Vajont Gorge allowed the reconstruction of a 3D model showing that the circulation of the dolomitizing fluids into the limestone host rock, but also the late stage of porosity reduction (strong pore filling due to over-dolomitization) were controlled by normal faults and fracture corridors interpreted as Pre-Alpine (Jurassic or Cretaceous). Later on, the influence of Alpine (Tertiary) deformation have been very limited in the studied volume. For instance dolomite veins are sometimes overprinted by bed-inclined stylolites consistent with Alpine shortening axes, but no large Alpine fault is present in the studied outcrops. Cathodoluminescence microscopy allowed recognizing different growth stages saddle dolomite crystals, which point to varying precipitation conditions during three main stages of dolomitization. Dolomite and calcite crystal twinning suggests deformation under increasing temperature conditions, consistent with intracrystalline plasticity deformation mechanisms. The presence of cataclasites composed of hydrothermal dolostone clasts, in turn cemented by dolomite, or of dolomite veins and compaction

  19. CHRONOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS ON FLUID CIRCULATION IN MESOZOIC FORMATIONS OF THE EASTERN PART OF THE PARIS BASIN INFERRED FROM U-Pb DATING OF SECONDARY INFILLING CARBONATES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisapia, C.; Deschamps, P.; Hamelin, B.; Buschaert, S.

    2009-12-01

    The French agency for nuclear waste management (ANDRA) developed an Underground Research Laboratory in the Mesozoic formations of Eastern part of the Paris Basin (France) to assess the feasibility of a high-level radioactive wastes repository in sedimentary formations. The target host formation is a low-porosity detrital argillite (Callovo-Oxfordian) embedded between two shelf limestones formations (of Bajocian-Bathonian and Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian ages). These formations are affected by fracture networks, likely inherited mainly from the Eocene-Oligocene extension tectonics, also responsible of the Rhine graben formation in the same region. The limestones have very low permeability, the primary and secondary porosity being infilled by secondary carbonated minerals. The inter-particle porosity is filled with euhedral calcite spar cements. Similarly, macro-cavities and connected micro-fractures are almost sealed by euhedral calcite. Geochemical evidences (δ18O) suggest that the secondary carbonates likely derived from a common parent fluid (Buschaert et al., 2004, Appl. Geochem. (19) 1201-1215p). This late carbonated precipitation phase is responsible for the intense cementation of the limestone formations and bears witness of a major phase of fluids circulation that marked the late diagenetic evolution of the system. Knowledge of the chronology of the different precipitation phases of secondary minerals is thus of critical importance in order to determine the past hydrological conditions of the geological site. The aim of this study is to provide chronological constraints on the secondary carbonate mineral precipitation using U/Th and U/Pb methods. Analyses are performed on millimeter to centimeter scale secondary calcites collected within fractures outcropping in the regional fault zone of Gondrecourt and in cores from the ANDRA exploration-drilling program. Preliminary U-Th analyses obtained on secondary carbonates from surface fractures infillings yield secular

  20. Generation of Late Mesozoic Qianlishan A2-type granite in Nanling Range, South China: Implications for Shizhuyuan W-Sn mineralization and tectonic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuxiao; Li, He; Sun, Weidong; Ireland, Trevor; Tian, Xufeng; Hu, Yongbin; Yang, Wubin; Chen, Chen; Xu, Deru

    2016-12-01

    The Late Mesozoic Qianlishan granitic complex in the western Nanling Range, South China is associated with the Shizhuyuan giant W-Sn-Mo-Bi polymetallic deposit. It mainly consists of three phases of intrusions, P-1 porphyritic biotite granite, P-2 equigranular biotite granite and P-3 granite porphyry. All three phases of granite contain quartz, plagioclase, K-feldspar and Fe-rich biotite. They have geochemical affinities of A-type granites, e.g., high FeOT/(FeOT + MgO) ratios (0.84-0.99), total alkali (Na2O + K2O, 7.50-9.04 wt.%), high Ga/Al ratios (10,000*Ga/Al > 2.6) and high Zr + Nb + Y + Ce concentrations (> 350 ppm). High Y/Nb ratios (> 1.2) suggest that the Qianlishan complex belongs to A2-type granite. Zircon U-Pb ages indicate a short age interval decreasing from 158-157 Ma, to 158-155 Ma and to 154 Ma for the P-1, P-2 and P-3 granites, respectively. These ages are similar to the mineralization age of the Shizhuyuan tungsten polymetallic deposit, within error. The Qianlishan granites were generated at low oxygen fugacity conditions based on the low values of zircon Ce4 +/Ce3 + ratios (1.53-198) and significantly negative Eu anomalies (EuN/EuN*, 0.03-0.13) in apatite. New zircon εHf(t) values for the P-3 granite range from - 13.0 to - 4.4, similar to those previously obtained for the P-1 and P-2 granites. Both the granite and apatite grains therein are characterized by high F but low Cl concentrations, suggesting the influx of a high F/Cl component. The P-2 granites especially contain higher F contents (1840-8690 ppm) and W (7-158 ppm) and Sn (6-51 ppm) concentrations and with stronger evolution features. Positive trends between F and W and Sn of Qianlishan complex indicate that high F source is crucial for mineralization of W and Sn. We consider that the lithospheric mantle source may have been metasomatized by subduction fluids in the far end of subduction zones to produce the A2 feature of the Qianlishan granite and the fluorine was introduced through

  1. Multi-proxy study of Ocean Anoxic Event 2 (Cenomanian-Turonian) yields new perspective on the drivers for Mesozoic anoxic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sageman, B. B.; Hurtgen, M.; Jacobson, A. D.; Selby, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    Mesozoic ocean anoxic events have long been a focus of intense study because they appear to reflect a large-scale oscillation of the marine redox state from oxic to anoxic, and at least locally sulfidic. The consensus view on the cause of these events has changed over the past 39 years, since they were first defined. A global net increase in primary production is now widely accepted as the key driver, and the evidence for a volcanic trigger of this process is strong. However, the exact pathway from volcanism to OAE is less certain. Some authors favor the direct role of a massive load of reduced compounds in LIP hydrothermal fluxes for consuming available marine oxygen. Others prefer the indirect pathway of oxygen consumption by enhanced organic matter flux, which requires a major increase in nutrient budgets. Metallic micronutrients in the hydrothermal fluxes have been hypothesized, as have increases in riverine phosphorus fluxes due to enhanced weathering that would result from volcanic CO2 driven warming. Our recent work on the OAE2 interval has led to some new ideas about these hypothesized drivers. In particular, refinement of the Late Cenomanian time scale, and comparison of the geochemical records of d13C, d34S, Osi, P phases, and d44Ca between selected sections in North America and Europe has suggested the following sequence of events: 1) Osi data indicate that the onset of a major volcanic event precedes the positive shift in C-isotopes by at least 40 to possibly 180 kyr; 2) a positive shift in d44Ca data interpreted to indicate ocean acidification is coincident with the volcanic event; 3) the positive shift in C-isotopes is interpreted to reflect the accumulated burial of marine organic matter sufficient to shift the C-reservoir to heavier values; thus, our data suggest that up to 180 kyr was required for the shift in nutrient supply, productivity increase, and organic matter burial. Two mechanisms that conceivably match the lagged character of the event

  2. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    In addition to Dr. Robert Goddard's pioneering work, American experimentation in rocketry prior to World War II grew, primarily in technical societies. This is an early rocket motor designed and developed by the American Rocket Society in 1932.

  3. New aragonite 87Sr/86Sr records of Mesozoic ammonoids and approach to the problem of N, O, C and Sr isotope cycles in the evolution of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, Yuri D.; Dril, Sergei I.; Shigeta, Yasunari; Popov, Alexander M.; Baraboshkin, Eugenij Y.; Michailova, Irina A.; Safronov, Peter P.

    2018-02-01

    New Sr isotope data from well-preserved aragonite ammonoid shell material from the Mesozoic are compared with that from a living Nautilus shell. The prominent negative Sr isotope excursions known from the Middle Permian, Jurassic and Cretaceous probably have their origins in intensive plate tectonic activity, followed by enhanced hydrothermal activity at the mid-ocean ridges (mantle volcanism) which supplied low radiogenic Sr to seawater. The maximum positive (radiogenic) shift in the lower Mesozoic Sr isotope curve (Lower Triassic peak) was likely caused by a significant expansion of dry land surfaces (Dabie-Sulu Triassic orogeny) and their intensive silicate weathering in conditions of extreme warming and aridity in the very end of the Smithian, followed by warm and humid conditions in the late Spathian, which apparently resulted in a significant oceanic input of radiogenic Sr through riverine flux. The comparatively high 87Sr/86Sr ratio obtained from the living Nautilus shell is probably a function of both the Alpine orogeny, which was accompanied by significant continental weathering and input of radiogenic Sr to the oceans, and the weakening of mantle volcanism.

  4. Geochemistry, 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, and geodynamic implications of Early Cretaceous basalts from the western Qinling orogenic belt, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Feifei; Wang, Yuejun; Cawood, Peter A.; Dong, Yunpeng

    2018-01-01

    The Qinling-Dabie orogenic belt was formed by the collision of the North and South China Cratons during the Early Mesozoic and subsequently developed into an intracontinental tectonic process during late Mesozoic. Field investigations identified the presence of late Mesozoic basalts in the Duofutun and Hongqiang areas in the western Qinling orogenic belt. The petrogenesis of these basalts provides an important constraint on the late Mesozoic geodynamics of the orogen. The representative basaltic samples yield the 40Ar/39Ar plateau age of about 112 Ma. These samples belong to the alkaline series and have SiO2 ranging from 44.98 wt.% to 48.19 wt.%, Na2O + K2O from 3.44 wt% to 5.44 wt%, and MgO from 7.25 wt.% to 12.19 wt.%. They demonstrate the right-sloping chondrite-normalized REE patterns with negligible Eu anomalies (1.00-1.10) and PM-normalized patterns enriched in light rare earth element, large ion lithophile element and high field strength element, similar to those of OIB rocks. These samples additionally show an OIB-like Sr-Nd isotopic signature with εNd(t) values ranging from +6.13 to +10.15 and initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios from 0.7028 to 0.7039, respectively. These samples are geochemically subdivided into two groups. Group 1 is characterized by low Al2O3 and high TiO2 and P2O5 contents, as well as high La/Yb ratios (>20), being the product of the high-pressure garnet fractionation from the OIB-derived magma. Group 2 shows higher Al2O3 but lower P2O5 contents and La/Yb ratios (<20) than Group 1, originating from asthenospheric mantle with input of delaminated lithospheric component. In combination with available data, it is proposed for the petrogenetic model of the Early Cretaceous thickened lithospheric delamination in response to the asthenospheric upwelling along the western Qinling orogenic belt.

  5. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    During the 19th century, rocket enthusiasts and inventors began to appear in almost every country. Some people thought these early rocket pioneers were geniuses, and others thought they were crazy. Claude Ruggieri, an Italian living in Paris, apparently rocketed small animals into space as early as 1806. The payloads were recovered by parachute. As depicted here by artist Larry Toschik, French authorities were not always impressed with rocket research. They halted Ruggieri's plans to launch a small boy using a rocket cluster. (Reproduced from a drawing by Larry Toschik and presented here courtesy of the artist and Motorola Inc.)

  6. The Mesozoic Caosiyao giant porphyry Mo deposit in Inner Mongolia, North China and Paleo-Pacific subduction-related magmatism in the northern North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huaying; Zhang, Lianchang; Pirajno, Franco; Shu, Qihai; Zhang, Min; Zhu, Mingtian; Xiang, Peng

    2016-09-01

    The Caosiyao giant porphyry Mo deposit is located in the Wulanchabu area of Inner Mongolia, within the northern North China Craton (NCC). It contains more than 2385 Mt of ore with an average grade of 0.075% Mo. In the Caosiyao mining district, Mo mineralization occurs mainly in a Mesozoic granite porphyry as disseminations and stockworks, with some Mo distributed in Archean metamorphic rocks and diabase as stockworks and veins. The host granite porphyry is composed of two different phases that can be distinguished based on mineral assemblages and textures: one phase contains large and abundant phenocrysts (coarse-grained), while the other phase is characterized by fewer and smaller phenocrysts (medium-grained). Zircon U-Pb-Hf analyses of the former phase yielded a concordant 206Pb/238U age of 149.8 ± 2.4 Ma with a 206Pb/238U weighted mean age of 149.9 ± 2.4 Ma and εHf(t) values ranging from -12.2 to 18.3, while the latter phase gave a concordant 206Pb/238U age of 149.0 ± 2.2 Ma with a 206Pb/238U weighted mean age of 149.0 ± 2.1 Ma and εHf(t) values ranging from -13.1 to 17.7. Five samples of disseminated molybdenite have a 187Re-187Os isochron age of 149.5 ± 5.3 Ma with a weighted average age of 149.0 ± 1.8 Ma, whereas six veinlet-type molybdenite samples have a well-constrained 187Re-187Os isochron age of 146.9 ± 3.1 Ma and a weighted average age of 146.5 ± 0.8 Ma. Thus, it is suggested that the Mo mineralization of the Caosiyao deposit occurred during the Late Jurassic (ca. 147-149 Ma), almost coeval with the emplacement of the host granite porphyry (ca. 149-150 Ma). The host granite porphyry is characterized by high silica (SiO2 = 71.52-74.10 wt%), relatively high levels of oxidation (Fe2O3/FeO = 0.32-0.94 wt%) and high alkali element concentrations (Na2O + K2O = 8.21-8.76 wt%). The host granite porphyry also shows enrichments in U and K, and depletion in Ba, Sr, P, Eu, and Ti, suggesting strong fractional crystallization of plagioclase, biotite, and

  7. Understanding the Tectonic Deformation of Turkish Blocks since Mesozoic; A Paleomagnetic study on the Nigde-Kirsehir Massif and the Taurides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mualla, Cinku; Mumtaz, Hisarli; Ulker, Beyza; Kaya, Nurcan; Oksum, Erdinc; Yilmaz, Yucel; Orbay, Naci

    2015-04-01

    It is reported that the Nigde-Kirsehir massif which constitutes the main fragment of Anatolia is rifted from the Taurides-Anatolides in Mesozoic and that the Intra-Tauride ocean exist between these blocks. Another group of researchers believed that the Intra Tauride ocean did not exist. They assumed that the Nigde-Kirsehir massif existed as a promotory of the Taurides. In this sense, both the Nigde-Kirsehir massif and the Taurides experienced several deformation phases due to the consumption of the oceanic strand (s) and the amalgamation of the Anatolian blocks after collision in the end of the paleotectonic time, whereas in the neotectonic time the traces of the westwards excursion of Anatolia was effective. Previous paleomagnetic studies showed that the Nigde-Kirsehir massif rotated 90° anticlockwise during Jurassic to Eocene time and other studies showed that the collision between the Nigde-Kirsehir massif and the Pontides resulted by deformation which was accomodated by regional faults. In the south of the Nigde-Kirsehir massif, it was proposed that all the rocks in Carboniferous to Eosen were remagnetized due to nap emplacement in Eocene. Because of several alternative interpretations about the tectonic deformation of the Nigde-Kirsehir massif in relation between the Taurides and the Pontides, we report new paleomagnetic results from Late Jurassic to Miocene rocks in the Nigde-Kirsehir massif and its surrounding. A total of 138 different sites were sampled from Jurassic to Miocene rocks in the south of the Nigde-Kirsehir massif around Ki ri kkale, Tuzgölü, Uluki şla and Kayseri, whereas in the Central Taurides Late Jurassic- Lower Cretaceous platform type carbonates and ophiolitic rocks from Mersin and Pozanti were collected. Paleomagnetic results evaluated together with previous paleomagnetic data indicate that all the studied rocks carry a magnetization before folding according to positive incremental fold tests. It has been shown that in the SE/E (SE

  8. Form, function and environments of the early angiosperms: merging extant phylogeny and ecophysiology with fossils.

    PubMed

    Feild, Taylor S; Arens, Nan Crystal

    2005-05-01

    The flowering plants--angiosperms--appeared during the Early Cretaceous period and within 10-30 Myr dominated the species composition of many floras worldwide. Emerging insights into the phylogenetics of development and discoveries of early angiosperm fossils are shedding increased light on the patterns and processes of early angiosperm evolution. However, we also need to integrate ecology, in particular how early angiosperms established a roothold in pre-existing Mesozoic plant communities. These events were critical in guiding subsequent waves of angiosperm diversification during the Aptian-Albian. Previous pictures of the early flowering plant ecology have been diverse, ranging from large tropical rainforest trees, weedy drought-adapted and colonizing shrubs, disturbance- and sun-loving rhizomatous herbs, and, more recently, aquatic herbs; however, none of these images were tethered to a robust hypothesis of angiosperm phylogeny. Here, we synthesize our current understanding of early angiosperm ecology, focusing on patterns of functional ecology, by merging recent molecular phylogenetic studies and functional studies on extant 'basal angiosperms' with the picture of early angiosperm evolution drawn by the fossil record.

  9. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1950-01-01

    Test firing of a Redstone Missile at Redstone Test Stand in the early 1950's. The Redstone was a high-accuracy, liquid-propelled, surface-to-surface missile developed by the von Braun Team under the management of the U.S. Army. The Redstone was the first major rocket development program in the United States.

  10. Early Math.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Nuys, Ute Elisabeth

    1986-01-01

    Presents reviews of the following mathematics software designed to teach young children counting, number recognition, visual discrimination, matching, addition, and subtraction skills; Stickybear Numbers, Learning with Leeper, Getting Ready to Read and Add, Counting Parade, Early Games for Young Children, Charlie Brown's 1,2,3's, Let's Go Fishing,…

  11. Early Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Donald L.; Willis, Sherry L.

    This book summarizes theory and discusses major issues pertaining to child development in the early childhood years. Chapter I provides an introduction to the conceptual framework and major theories of child development. Chapter II deals with motor, sensory, and perceptual development. Chapter III focuses on the cognitive-developmental theory of…

  12. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    During the early introduction of rockets to Europe, they were used only as weapons. Enemy troops in India repulsed the British with rockets. Later, in Britain, Sir William Congreve developed a rocket that could fire to about 9,000 feet. The British fired Congreve rockets against the United States in the War of 1812.

  13. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    In the 19th Century, experiments in America, Europe, and elsewhere attempted to build postal rockets to deliver mail from one location to another. The idea was more novel than successful. Many stamps used in these early postal rockets have become collector's items.

  14. Timing and implications for the late Mesozoic geodynamic settings of eastern North China Craton: Evidences from K-Ar dating age and sedimentary-structural characteristics records of Lingshan Island, Shandong Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Jin, Aiwen; Hou, Guiting

    2017-12-01

    The Lingshan Island in Shandong Province in the eastern North China Craton, well known for the Late Mesozoic multi-scale slide-slump structures is related to paleo-earthquake. Terrigenous clastic rocks, volcanic clastic rocks and volcanic lavas are extensively exposed in the Lingshan Island and its adjacent regions of the Shandong Province, which led to fierce debates on their ages, sedimentary characteristics and tectono-sedimentary evolution. In this contribution, we present the characteristics of the Late Mesozoic stratigraphy in the Lingshan Island. Whole-rock K-Ar dating of dyke at Beilaishi and rhyolites at Laohuzui of the Lingshan Island yielded ages of 159 Ma and 106-92 Ma which coincides with the Laiyang Period rifting and the Qingshan Period rifting in the Jiaolai Basin, respectively. On the basis of the analysis to the Late Mesozoic sedimentary environment of `flysch' and `molasse'-like formations as well as tectonic stress fields reconstruction, four episodes of the tectono-sedimentary evolution were established in the Lingshan Island and its adjacent regions in the eastern North China Craton. They consist of two episodes of extensional events for the syn-rift, and two episodes of compression events for the inversion of the post-rift. The entire episodes can be summarized as follows: (1) the first syn-rift NW-SE extension in Laiyang Period can be identified by the `flysch' formation (Unit 1) and by emplacement of the NE-trending dyke in the Laiyang Group. This syn-rift episode can be related to the NW-SE post-orogenic extension resulted from the gravity collapse of the thickened lithosphere along the Sulu Orogen. (2) The first post-rift NW-SE inversion, which was caused by the NW-directed subduction of Izanaqi Plate, can be well documented by the `X' type conjugate joints as well as slide slump folds in Unit 1. (3) The second syn-rift NW-SE extension in Qingshan Period is characterized by rhyolite rocks (Unit 2). This syn-rift episode can be considered

  15. Early Risers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asquith, Chistina

    2002-01-01

    In this article, the author features Bard High School Early College, the first public school in the country to offer a free, full-time college curriculum--and all the credits that go with it--to high schoolers. In Bard's four-year program, students race through high school requirements in 9th and 10th grades, then take college courses in 11th and…

  16. Larval cases of caddisfly (Insecta: Trichoptera) affinity in Early Permian marine environments of Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouro, Lucas D.; Zatoń, Michał; Fernandes, Antonio C. S.; Waichel, Breno L.

    2016-01-01

    Caddisflies (Trichoptera) are small, cosmopolitan insects closely related to the Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies). Most caddisflies construct protective cases during their larval development. Although the earliest recognisable caddisflies date back to the early Mesozoic (Early and Middle Triassic), being particularly numerous and diverse during the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous, the first records of their larval case constructions are known exclusively from much younger, Early to Middle Jurassic non-marine deposits in the northern hemisphere. Here we present fossils from the Early Permian (Asselian-Sakmarian) marine deposits of Brazil which have strong morphological and compositional similarity to larval cases of caddisflies. If they are, which is very probable, these finds not only push back the fossil record of true caddisflies, but also indicate that their larvae constructed cases at the very beginning of their evolution in marine environments. Since modern caddisflies that construct larval cases in marine environments are only known from eastern Australia and New Zealand, we suggest that this marine ecology may have first evolved in western Gondwana during the Early Permian and later spread across southern Pangea.

  17. Larval cases of caddisfly (Insecta: Trichoptera) affinity in Early Permian marine environments of Gondwana

    PubMed Central

    Mouro, Lucas D.; Zatoń, Michał; Fernandes, Antonio C.S.; Waichel, Breno L.

    2016-01-01

    Caddisflies (Trichoptera) are small, cosmopolitan insects closely related to the Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies). Most caddisflies construct protective cases during their larval development. Although the earliest recognisable caddisflies date back to the early Mesozoic (Early and Middle Triassic), being particularly numerous and diverse during the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous, the first records of their larval case constructions are known exclusively from much younger, Early to Middle Jurassic non-marine deposits in the northern hemisphere. Here we present fossils from the Early Permian (Asselian–Sakmarian) marine deposits of Brazil which have strong morphological and compositional similarity to larval cases of caddisflies. If they are, which is very probable, these finds not only push back the fossil record of true caddisflies, but also indicate that their larvae constructed cases at the very beginning of their evolution in marine environments. Since modern caddisflies that construct larval cases in marine environments are only known from eastern Australia and New Zealand, we suggest that this marine ecology may have first evolved in western Gondwana during the Early Permian and later spread across southern Pangea. PMID:26765261

  18. Larval cases of caddisfly (Insecta: Trichoptera) affinity in Early Permian marine environments of Gondwana.

    PubMed

    Mouro, Lucas D; Zatoń, Michał; Fernandes, Antonio C S; Waichel, Breno L

    2016-01-14

    Caddisflies (Trichoptera) are small, cosmopolitan insects closely related to the Lepidoptera (moths and butterflies). Most caddisflies construct protective cases during their larval development. Although the earliest recognisable caddisflies date back to the early Mesozoic (Early and Middle Triassic), being particularly numerous and diverse during the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous, the first records of their larval case constructions are known exclusively from much younger, Early to Middle Jurassic non-marine deposits in the northern hemisphere. Here we present fossils from the Early Permian (Asselian-Sakmarian) marine deposits of Brazil which have strong morphological and compositional similarity to larval cases of caddisflies. If they are, which is very probable, these finds not only push back the fossil record of true caddisflies, but also indicate that their larvae constructed cases at the very beginning of their evolution in marine environments. Since modern caddisflies that construct larval cases in marine environments are only known from eastern Australia and New Zealand, we suggest that this marine ecology may have first evolved in western Gondwana during the Early Permian and later spread across southern Pangea.

  19. Sub-basalt Imaging of Hydrocarbon-Bearing Mesozoic Sediments Using Ray-Trace Inversion of First-Arrival Seismic Data and Elastic Finite-Difference Full-Wave Modeling Along Sinor-Valod Profile of Deccan Syneclise, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talukdar, Karabi; Behera, Laxmidhar

    2018-03-01

    Imaging below the basalt for hydrocarbon exploration is a global problem because of poor penetration and significant loss of seismic energy due to scattering, attenuation, absorption and mode-conversion when the seismic waves encounter a highly heterogeneous and rugose basalt layer. The conventional (short offset) seismic data acquisition, processing and modeling techniques adopted by the oil industry generally fails to image hydrocarbon-bearing sub-trappean Mesozoic sediments hidden below the basalt and is considered as a serious problem for hydrocarbon exploration in the world. To overcome this difficulty of sub-basalt imaging, we have generated dense synthetic seismic data with the help of elastic finite-difference full-wave modeling using staggered-grid scheme for the model derived from ray-trace inversion using sparse wide-angle seismic data acquired along Sinor-Valod profile in the Deccan Volcanic Province of India. The full-wave synthetic seismic data generated have been processed and imaged using conventional seismic data processing technique with Kirchhoff pre-stack time and depth migrations. The seismic image obtained correlates with all the structural features of the model obtained through ray-trace inversion of wide-angle seismic data, validating the effectiveness of robust elastic finite-difference full-wave modeling approach for imaging below thick basalts. Using the full-wave modeling also allows us to decipher small-scale heterogeneities imposed in the model as a measure of the rugose basalt interfaces, which could not be dealt with ray-trace inversion. Furthermore, we were able to accurately image thin low-velocity hydrocarbon-bearing Mesozoic sediments sandwiched between and hidden below two thick sequences of high-velocity basalt layers lying above the basement.

  20. Mesozoic thermal history and timing of structural events for the Yukon-Tanana Upland, east-central Alaska: 40Ar/39Ar data from metamorphic and plutonic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dusel-Bacon, C.; Lanphere, M.A.; Sharp, W.D.; Layer, P.W.; Hansen, V.L.

    2002-01-01

    We present new 40Ar/39Ar ages for hornblende, muscovite, and biotite from metamorphic and plutonic rocks from the Yukon-Tanana Upland, Alaska. Integration of our data with published 40Ar/39Ar, kinematic, and metamorphic pressure (P) and temperature (T) data confirms and refines the complex interaction of metamorphism and tectonism proposed for the region. The oldest metamorphic episode(s) postdates Middle Permian magmatism and predates the intrusion of Late Triassic (215-212 Ma) granitoids into the Fortymile River assemblage (Taylor Mountain assemblage of previous papers). In the eastern Eagle quadrangle, rapid and widespread Early Jurassic cooling is indicated by ???188-186 Ma 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages for hornblende from plutons that intrude the Fortymile River assemblage, and for metamorphic minerals from the Fortymile River assemblage and the structurally underlying Nasina assemblage. We interpret these Early Jurassic ages to represent cooling resulting from northwest-directed contraction that emplaced the Fortymile River assemblage onto the Nasina assemblage to the north as well as the Lake George assemblage to the south. This cooling was the final stage of a continuum of subduction-related contraction that produced crustal thickening, intermediate- to high-P metamorphism within both the Fortymile River assemblage and the structurally underlying Lake George assemblage, and Late Triassic and Early Jurassic plutonism in the Fortymile River and Nasina assemblages. Although a few metamorphic samples from the Lake George assemblage yield Jurassic 40Ar/39Ar cooling ages, most yield Early Cretaceous 40Ar/39Ar ages: hornblende ???135-115 Ma, and muscovite and biotite ???110-108 Ma. We interpret the Early Cretaceous metamorphic cooling, in most areas, to have resulted from regional extension and exhumation of the lower plate, previously tectonically thickened during Early Jurassic and older convergence.

  1. Geologic and Geochronologic Studies of the Early Proterozoic Kanektok Metamorphic Complex of Southwestern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turner, Donald L.; Forbes, Robert B.; Aleinikoff, John N.; McDougall, Ian; Hedge, Carl E.; Wilson, Frederic H.; Layer, Paul W.; Hults, Chad P.

    2009-01-01

    The Kanektok complex of southwestern Alaska appears to be a rootless terrane of early Proterozoic sedimentary, volcanic, and intrusive rocks which were metamorphosed to amphibolite and granulite facies and later underwent a pervasive late Mesozoic thermal event accompanied by granitic plutonism and greenschist facies metamorphism of overlying sediments. The terrane is structurally complex and exhibits characteristics generally attributed to mantled gneiss domes. U-Th-Pb analyses of zircon and sphene from a core zone granitic orthogneiss indicate that the orthogneiss protolith crystallized about 2.05 b.y. ago and that the protolithic sedimentary, volcanic and granitic intrusive rocks of the core zone were metamorphosed to granulite and amphibolite facies about 1.77 b.y. ago. A Rb-Sr study of 13 whole-rock samples also suggests metamorphism of an early Proterozoic [Paleoproterozoic] protolith at 1.77 Ga, although the data are scattered and difficult to interpret. Seventy-seven conventional 40K/40Ar mineral ages were determined for 58 rocks distributed throughout the outcrop area of the complex. Analysis of the K-Ar data indicate that nearly all of these ages have been totally or partially reset by a pervasive late Mesozoic thermal event accompanied by granitic plutonism and greenschist facies metamorphism. Several biotites gave apparent K-Ar ages over 2 Ga. These ages appear to be controlled by excess radiogenic 40Ar produced by the degassing protolith during the 1.77 Ga metamorphism and incorporated by the biotites when they were at temperatures at which Ar could diffuse through the lattice. Five amphibolites yielded apparent Precambrian 40K/40Ar hornblende ages. There is no evidence that these hornblende ages have been increased by excess argon. The oldest 40K/40Ar hornblende age of 1.77 Ga is identical to the sphene 207Pb/206Pb orthogneiss age and to the Rb-Sr 'isochron' age for six of the 13 whole-rock samples. The younger hornblende ages are interpreted as

  2. Early Jurassic extensional inheritance in the Lurestan region of the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt, Iran.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavani, Stefano; Parente, Mariano; Vitale, Stefano; Puzone, Francesco; Erba, Elisabetta; Bottini, Cinzia; Morsalnejad, Davoud; Mazzoli, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    It has long been recognized that the tectonic architecture of the Zagros mountain belt was strongly controlled by inherited structures previously formed within the Arabian plate. These preexisting features span in age from the pre-Cambrian to the Mesozoic, showing different trends and deformation styles. Yet, these structures are currently not fully understood. This uncertainty is partly related with the paucity of exposures, which rarely allows a direct observation of these important deformation features. The Lurestan Province of Iran provides a remarkable exception, since it is one of the few places of the Zagros mountain belt where exposures of Triassic and Jurassic rocks are widespread. In this area we carried out structural observations on Mesozoic extensional structures developed at the southern margin of the Neo-Tethyan basin. Syn-sedimentary extensional faults are hosted within the Triassic-Cretaceous succession, being particularly abundant in the Jurassic portion of the stratigraphy. Early to Middle Jurassic syn-sedimentary faults are observed in different paleogeographic domains of the area, and their occurrence is coherent with the subsequent transition from shallow-water to deep-sea basin environments, observed in a wide portion of the area. Most of the thrusts exposed in the area may indeed be interpreted as reactivated Jurassic extensional faults, or as reverse faults whose nucleation was controlled by the location of preexisting normal faults, as a result of positive inversion during crustal shortening and mountain building.

  3. A synthesis of mineralization styles and geodynamic settings of the Paleozoic and Mesozoic metallic ore deposits in the Altay Mountains, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fuquan; Geng, Xinxia; Wang, Rui; Zhang, Zhixin; Guo, Xuji

    2018-06-01

    The Altay Mountains within the Xinjiang region of northwestern China hosts major metallic ore deposits. Here we review the geological characteristics, metallogenic features and tectonic settings of these deposits. The metallic ore deposits in the Altay Mountains occur mainly within four regions: North Altay, Central Altay, South Altay and Erqis. We recognize seven types of metallic ore deposits in the Altay Mountains: VMS, submarine volcanogenic iron, magmatic, skarn, pegmatite, hydrothermal vein (Cu-Zn, Fe) and orogenic gold. Among these types, the VMS, pegmatite, orogenic gold and skarn deposits are the most common. Most of the rare metal pegmatite deposits are distributed in Central Altay, with only a few in South Altay. The VMS, submarine volcanogenic type iron and skarn-type deposits are distributed in South Altay, whereas the orogenic-type gold deposits are distributed in the Erqis Fault belt. The hydrothermal vein-type deposits occur in the Erqis Fault belt and Chonghu'er Basin in South Altay. Magmatic-type deposits are mostly in the Erqis Fault belt and Central Altay. Based on isotopic age data, the VMS, submarine volcanogenic-type Fe and skarn-type Cu, Pb, Zn, Fe mineralization occurred during Early-Middle Devonian (∼410-377 Ma), orogenic-type Au, magmatic-type Cu-Ni, and a small number of skarn-type Fe, hydrothermal vein-type Cu-Zn, pegmatite-type rare-metal deposits in Early-Middle Permian (293-261 Ma), pegmatite-type rare-metal deposits, few skarn-type Fe deposit in Early-Middle Triassic (248-232 Ma), and dominantly represented by pegmatite-type rare-metal deposits in Late Triassic-Early Jurassic (223-180 Ma). The metallic ore deposits in the Altay Mountains formed in various tectonic settings, such as the Early-Middle Devonian continental arc and oceanic island arc, Early-Middle Permian post-collisional extensional setting, and Triassic-Early Jurassic intracontinental setting.

  4. Early paleozoic gabbro-amphibolites in the structure of the Bureya Terrane (eastern part of the Central Asian Fold Belt): First geochronological data and tectonic position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Yu. V.; Sorokin, A. A.; Kudryashov, N. M.

    2012-07-01

    Resulting from U-Pb geochronological study, it has been found that the gabbro-amphibolites composing the Bureya (Turan) Terrane in the eastern part of the Central Asian Fold Belt are Early Paleozoic (Early Ordovician; 455 ± 1.5 Ma) in age rather than Late Proterozoic as was believed earlier. The gabbro-amphibolites and associated metabasalts are close to tholeiites of the intraoceanic island arcs in terms of the geochemical properties. It is suggested that the tectonic block composed of these rocks was initially a seafloor fragment that divided the Bureya and Argun terranes in the Early Paleozoic and was later tectonically incorporated into the modern structure of the Bureya Terrane as a result of Late Paleozoic and Mesozoic events.

  5. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    This photograph is of the engine for the Redstone rocket. The Redstone ballistic missile was a high-accuracy, liquid-propelled, surface-to-surface missile developed by the Army Ballistic Missile Agency, Redstone Arsenal, in Huntsville, Alabama, under the direction of Dr. von Braun. The Redstone engine was a modified and improved version of the Air Force's Navaho cruise missile engine of the late forties. The A-series, as this would be known, utilized a cylindrical combustion chamber as compared with the bulky, spherical V-2 chamber. By 1951, the Army was moving rapidly toward the design of the Redstone missile, and the production was begun in 1952. Redstone rockets became the "reliable workhorse" for America's early space program. As an example of its versatility, the Redstone was utilized in the booster for Explorer 1, the first American satellite, with no major changes to the engine or missile.

  6. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    The image depicts Redstone missile being erected. The Redstone ballistic missile was a high-accuracy, liquid-propelled, surface-to-surface missile developed by Army Ballistic Missile Agency, Redstone Arsenal, in Huntsville, Alabama, under the direction of Dr. von Braun. The Redstone engine was a modified and improved version of the Air Force's Navaho cruise missile engine of the late forties. The A-series, as this would be known, utilized a cylindrical combustion chamber as compared with the bulky, spherical V-2 chamber. By 1951, the Army was moving rapidly toward the design of the Redstone missile, and the production was begun in 1952. Redstone rockets became the "reliable workhorse" for America's early space program. As an example of the versatility, Redstone was utilized in the booster for Explorer 1, the first American satellite, with no major changes to the engine or missile

  7. Early Rockets

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1958-05-15

    Redstone missile No. 1002 on the launch pad at Cape Canaveral, Florida, on May 16, 1958. The Redstone ballistic missile was a high-accuracy, liquid-propelled, surface-to-surface missile developed by the Army Ballistic Missile Agency, Redstone Arsenal, in Huntsville, Alabama, under the direction of Dr. von Braun. The Redstone engine was a modified and improved version of the Air Force's Navaho cruise missile engine of the late forties. The A-series, as this would be known, utilized a cylindrical combustion chamber as compared with the bulky, spherical V-2 chamber. By 1951, the Army was moving rapidly toward the design of the Redstone missile, and production was begun in 1952. Redstone rockets became the "reliable workhorse" for America's early space program. As an example of the versatility, Redstone was utilized in the booster for Explorer 1, the first American satellite, with no major changes to the engine or missile

  8. Reconnaissance Borehole Geophysical, Geological, and Hydrological Data from the Proposed Hydrodynamic Compartments of the Culpeper Basin in Loudoun, Prince William, Culpeper, Orange, and Fairfax Counties, Virginia (Version 1.0)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryan, Michael P.; Pierce, Herbert A.; Johnson, Carole D.; Sutphin, David M.; Daniels, David L.; Smoot, Joseph P.; Costain, John K.; Coruh, Cahit; Harlow, George E.

    2006-01-01

    The Culpeper basin is part of a much larger system of ancient depressions or troughs, that lie inboard of the Atlantic Coastal Plain, and largely within the Applachian Piedmont Geologic Province of eastern North America, and the transition region with the neighboring Blue Ridge Geologic Province. This basin system formed during an abortive attempt to make a great ocean basin during the Late Triassic and Early Jurassic, and the eroded remnants of the basins record major episodes of sedimentation, igneous intrusion and eruption, and pervasive contact metamorphism. Altogether, some twenty nine basins formed between what is now Nova Scotia and Georgia. Many of these basins are discontinuous along their strike, and have therefore recorded isolated environments for fluvial and lacustrine sedimentation. Several basins (including the Culpeper, Gettysburg, and Newark basins) are fault-bounded on the west, and Mesozoic crustal stretching has produced assymetrical patterns of basin subsidence resulting in a progressive basin deepening to the west, and a virtual onlap relationship with the pre-basin Proterozoic rocks to the east. A result of such a pattern of basin deepening is the development of sequences of sandstones and siltstones that systemmatically increase in dip towards the accomodating western border faults. A second major structural theme in several of the major Mesozoic basins (including the Culpeper) concerns the geometry of igneous intrusion, as discussed below. Froelich (1982, 1985) and Lee and Froelich (1989) discuss the general geology of the Culpeper basin, and Smoot (1989) discusses the sedimentation environments and sedimentary facies of the Mesozoic with respect to fluvial and shallow lacustrine deposition in the Culpeper basin. Ryan and others, 2007a, b, discuss the role of diabase-induced compartmentalization in the Culpeper basin (and other Mesozoic basins), and illustrate (using alteration mineral suites within the diabase and adjacent hornfels, among