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Sample records for early mysticete hearing

  1. A bizarre new toothed mysticete (Cetacea) from Australia and the early evolution of baleen whales.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Erich M G

    2006-12-07

    Extant baleen whales (Cetacea, Mysticeti) are all large filter-feeding marine mammals that lack teeth as adults, instead possessing baleen, and feed on small marine animals in bulk. The early evolution of these superlative mammals, and their unique feeding method, has hitherto remained enigmatic. Here, I report a new toothed mysticete from the Late Oligocene of Australia that is more archaic than any previously described. Unlike all other mysticetes, this new whale was small, had enormous eyes and lacked derived adaptations for bulk filter-feeding. Several morphological features suggest that this mysticete was a macrophagous predator, being convergent on some Mesozoic marine reptiles and the extant leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx). It thus refutes the notions that all stem mysticetes were filter-feeders, and that the origins and initial radiation of mysticetes was linked to the evolution of filter-feeding. Mysticetes evidently radiated into a variety of disparate forms and feeding ecologies before the evolution of baleen or filter-feeding. The phylogenetic context of the new whale indicates that basal mysticetes were macrophagous predators that did not employ filter-feeding or echolocation, and that the evolution of characters associated with bulk filter-feeding was gradual.

  2. A bizarre new toothed mysticete (Cetacea) from Australia and the early evolution of baleen whales

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Erich M.G

    2006-01-01

    Extant baleen whales (Cetacea, Mysticeti) are all large filter-feeding marine mammals that lack teeth as adults, instead possessing baleen, and feed on small marine animals in bulk. The early evolution of these superlative mammals, and their unique feeding method, has hitherto remained enigmatic. Here, I report a new toothed mysticete from the Late Oligocene of Australia that is more archaic than any previously described. Unlike all other mysticetes, this new whale was small, had enormous eyes and lacked derived adaptations for bulk filter-feeding. Several morphological features suggest that this mysticete was a macrophagous predator, being convergent on some Mesozoic marine reptiles and the extant leopard seal (Hydrurga leptonyx). It thus refutes the notions that all stem mysticetes were filter-feeders, and that the origins and initial radiation of mysticetes was linked to the evolution of filter-feeding. Mysticetes evidently radiated into a variety of disparate forms and feeding ecologies before the evolution of baleen or filter-feeding. The phylogenetic context of the new whale indicates that basal mysticetes were macrophagous predators that did not employ filter-feeding or echolocation, and that the evolution of characters associated with bulk filter-feeding was gradual. PMID:17015308

  3. Tracking the Development of Muscular Myoglobin Stores in Mysticete Calves

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, Rachel; Newton, Cori; West, Kristi M.; Rice, Jim; Niemeyer, Misty; Burek, Kathryn; Wilson, Andrew; Wall, Alison N.; Remonida-Bennett, Jean; Tejeda, Areli; Messi, Sarah; Marcial-Hernandez, Lila

    2016-01-01

    For marine mammals, the ability to tolerate apnea and make extended dives is a defining adaptive trait, facilitating the exploitation of marine food resources. Elevated levels of myoglobin within the muscles are a consistent hallmark of this trait, allowing oxygen collected at the surface to be stored in the muscles and subsequently used to support extended dives. In mysticetes, the largest of marine predators, details on muscular myoglobin levels are limited. The developmental trajectory of muscular myoglobin stores has yet to be documented and any physiological links between early behavior and the development of muscular myoglobin stores remain unknown. In this study, we used muscle tissue samples from stranded mysticetes to investigate these issues. Samples from three different age cohorts and three species of mysticetes were included (total sample size = 18). Results indicate that in mysticete calves, muscle myoglobin stores comprise only a small percentage (17–23%) of conspecific adult myoglobin complements. Development of elevated myoglobin levels is protracted over the course of extended maturation in mysticetes. Additionally, comparisons of myoglobin levels between and within muscles, along with details of interspecific differences in rates of accumulation of myoglobin in very young mysticetes, suggest that levels of exercise may influence the rate of development of myoglobin stores in young mysticetes. This new information infers a close interplay between the physiology, ontogeny and early life history of young mysticetes and provides new insight into the pressures that may shape adaptive strategies in migratory mysticetes. Furthermore, the study highlights the vulnerability of specific age cohorts to impending changes in the availability of foraging habitat and marine resources. PMID:26788728

  4. Salishicetus meadi, a new aetiocetid from the late Oligocene of Washington State and implications for feeding transitions in early mysticete evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peredo, Carlos Mauricio; Pyenson, Nicholas D.

    2018-04-01

    Living baleen whales, or Mysticeti, lack teeth and instead feed using keratinous baleen plates to sieve prey-laden water. This feeding strategy is profoundly different from that of their toothed ancestors, which processed prey using the differentiated dentition characteristic of mammals. The fossil record of mysticetes reveals stem members that include extinct taxa with dentition, illuminating the morphological states that preceded the loss of teeth and the subsequent origin of baleen. The relationships among stem mysticetes, including putative clades such as Mammalodontidae and Aetiocetidae, remain debatable. Aetiocetids are among the more species-rich clade of stem mysticetes, and known only from fossil localities along the North Pacific coastline. Here, we report a new aetiocetid, Salishicetus meadi gen. et sp. nov, from the late Oligocene of Washington State, USA. Salishicetus preserves a near-complete lower dentition with extensive occlusal wear, indicating that it processed prey using shearing cheek teeth in the same way as its stem cetacean ancestors. Using a matrix with all known species of aetiocetids, we recover a monophyletic Aetiocetidae, crownward of a basal clade of Mammalodontidae. The description of Salishicetus resolves phylogenetic relationships among aetiocetids, which provides a basis for reconstructing ancestral feeding morphology along the stem leading to crown Mysticeti.

  5. Earliest Mysticete from the Late Eocene of Peru Sheds New Light on the Origin of Baleen Whales.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Olivier; Martínez-Cáceres, Manuel; Bianucci, Giovanni; Di Celma, Claudio; Salas-Gismondi, Rodolfo; Steurbaut, Etienne; Urbina, Mario; de Muizon, Christian

    2017-05-22

    Although combined molecular and morphological analyses point to a late middle Eocene (38-39 million years ago) origin for the clade Neoceti (Odontoceti, echolocating toothed whales plus Mysticeti, baleen whales, and relatives), the oldest known mysticete fossil dates from the latest Eocene (about 34 million years ago) of Antarctica [1, 2]. Considering that the latter is not the most stemward mysticete in recent phylogenies and that Oligocene toothed mysticetes display a broad morphological disparity most likely corresponding to contrasted ecological niches, the origin of mysticetes from a basilosaurid ancestor and its drivers are currently poorly understood [1, 3-8]. Based on an articulated cetacean skeleton from the early late Eocene (Priabonian, around 36.4 million years ago) of the Pisco Basin, Peru, we describe a new archaic tooth-bearing mysticete, Mystacodon selenensis gen. et sp. nov. Being the geologically oldest neocete (crown group cetacean) and the earliest mysticete to branch off described so far, the new taxon is interpreted as morphologically intermediate between basilosaurids and later toothed mysticetes, providing thus crucial information about the anatomy of the skull, forelimb, and innominate at these critical initial stages of mysticete evolution. Major changes in the morphology of the oral apparatus (including tooth wear) and flipper compared to basilosaurids suggest that suction and possibly benthic feeding represented key, early ecological traits accompanying the emergence of modern filter-feeding baleen whales' ancestors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Morphological and molecular evidence for a stepwise evolutionary transition from teeth to baleen in mysticete whales.

    PubMed

    Deméré, Thomas A; McGowen, Michael R; Berta, Annalisa; Gatesy, John

    2008-02-01

    The origin of baleen in mysticete whales represents a major transition in the phylogenetic history of Cetacea. This key specialization, a keratinous sieve that enables filter-feeding, permitted exploitation of a new ecological niche and heralded the evolution of modern baleen-bearing whales, the largest animals on Earth. To date, all formally described mysticete fossils conform to two types: toothed species from Oligocene-age rocks ( approximately 24 to 34 million years old) and toothless species that presumably utilized baleen to feed (Recent to approximately 30 million years old). Here, we show that several Oligocene toothed mysticetes have nutrient foramina and associated sulci on the lateral portions of their palates, homologous structures in extant mysticetes house vessels that nourish baleen. The simultaneous occurrence of teeth and nutrient foramina implies that both teeth and baleen were present in these early mysticetes. Phylogenetic analyses of a supermatrix that includes extinct taxa and new data for 11 nuclear genes consistently resolve relationships at the base of Mysticeti. The combined data set of 27,340 characters supports a stepwise transition from a toothed ancestor, to a mosaic intermediate with both teeth and baleen, to modern baleen whales that lack an adult dentition but retain developmental and genetic evidence of their ancestral toothed heritage. Comparative sequence data for ENAM (enamelin) and AMBN (ameloblastin) indicate that enamel-specific loci are present in Mysticeti but have degraded to pseudogenes in this group. The dramatic transformation in mysticete feeding anatomy documents an apparently rare, stepwise mode of evolution in which a composite phenotype bridged the gap between primitive and derived morphologies; a combination of fossil and molecular evidence provides a multifaceted record of this macroevolutionary pattern.

  7. Results of an early hearing detection program.

    PubMed

    Borkoski Barreiro, Silvia A; Falcón González, Juan C; Bueno Yanes, Jorge; Pérez Bermúdez, José L; López Cano, Zoraida; Ramos Macías, Ángel

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal hearing loss is a public health problem that meets the requirements for submission to universal screening. Our objective was to analyse the results of the early hearing detection and intervention program implemented at our centre between January 2007 and December 2010. We studied 26,717 newborns during the period mentioned, using transient otoacoustic emissions (TOAEs) for the screening. The diagnostic phase was carried out at the hearing loss department. In our area, there were 27,935 births between January 2007 and December 2010. The screening was performed on 26,717 children. Of these, 24,173 had positive TOAEs, 1,040 had no TOAEs and 1,504 presented TOAEs in 1 ear with absence of TOAEs in the contralateral ear. Risk factors associated with hearing loss were found in 4,674 infants. In a second phase of the program, TOAEs were given to 5,156 children, of whom 4,626 had positive otoacoustic emissions in both ears, 323 had no TOAEs in 1 ear and 207 failed this second phase. Of all children studied, 3.8% were referred to auditory brainstem response (ABR) testing and 26 children entered the cochlear implant program. The program reached coverage of 95.64%. The early hearing detection and intervention program at our hospital is suitable for our environment, reaching 95.64% of coverage. We consider the relationship between effectiveness and efficiency to be positive. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. Identification of impaired hearing in early childhood.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, D; Shah, C P

    1979-01-01

    Although the incidence of congenital deafness is high, routine neonatal screening for this problem is not practised, and early identification of congenital or early acquired deafness is relatively rare. Delaying therapy until a child is 3 or more years old severely limits speech development, language acquisition and learning. The commonest causes of delay in diagnosis are the refusal of physicians to listen to the parents' observations, their failure to screen children for hearing and speech problems, and their reluctance to arrange prompt referral for audiologic assessment. Diagnostic delay occurs even though half the children who have impaired hearing are known to be at increased risk. A plea is made for the setting up of a register of infants known to be at risk for impaired hearing. First-contact physicians should be alert to the possibility of hearing problems, particularly in children at high risk. Screening methods for use by nonspecialist practitioners are outlined. Images p535-a p536-a p540-a PMID:387194

  9. Periodic Early Childhood Hearing Screening: The EHDI Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Jeff; Houston, K. Todd; Munoz, Karen F.; Bradham, Tamala S.

    2011-01-01

    State coordinators of early hearing detection and intervention (EHDI) programs completed a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats, or SWOT, analysis that examined 12 areas within state EHDI programs. Concerning periodic early childhood hearing screening, 47 coordinators listed 241 items and themes were identified within each SWOT…

  10. Low-residue euthanasia of stranded mysticetes.

    PubMed

    Harms, Craig A; McLellan, William A; Moore, Michael J; Barco, Susan G; Clarke, Elsburgh O; Thayer, Victoria G; Rowles, Teresa K

    2014-01-01

    Euthanasia of stranded large whales poses logistic, safety, pharmaceutical, delivery, public relations, and disposal challenges. Reasonable arguments may be made for allowing a stranded whale to expire naturally. However, slow cardiovascular collapse from gravitational effects outside of neutral buoyancy, often combined with severely debilitating conditions, motivate humane efforts to end the animal's suffering. The size of the animal and prevailing environmental conditions often pose safety concerns for stranding personnel, which take priority over other considerations. When considering chemical euthanasia, the size of the animal also necessitates large quantities of euthanasia agents. Drug residues are a concern for relay toxicity to scavengers, particularly for pentobarbital-containing euthanasia solutions. Pentobarbital is also an environmental concern because of its stability and long persistence in aquatic environments. We describe a euthanasia technique for stranded mysticetes using readily available, relatively inexpensive, preanesthetic and anesthetic drugs (midazolam, acepromazine, xylazine) followed by saturated KCl delivered via custom-made needles and a low-cost, basic, pressurized canister. This method provides effective euthanasia while moderating personnel exposure to hazardous situations and minimizing drug residues of concern for relay toxicity.

  11. Hearing loss and risk of early retirement. The HUNT study

    PubMed Central

    Krokstad, Steinar; Tambs, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Background: We explore the possible consequences of measured hearing impairment (HI) and perceived hearing difficulties for early retirement in a large population-based study. Furthermore, we study whether having a part-time position was associated with measured HI and perceived hearing difficulties in the same population. Methods: This study included 25 740 persons from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT) aged 20–54 years at baseline in HUNT1 (1984–1986) who also participated in the follow up, HUNT2, including a hearing examination 11 years later. Logistic regression analysis was conducted for men and women separately and in two age strata. Effects of low-, middle- and high-frequency hearing levels were explored, adjusting for each other. Further adjustment was made for socio-economic class and general health in HUNT1. Results: The risk of early retirement increased with degree of loss of low-frequency hearing in young and middle-aged men and middle-aged women. The middle-aged men and women experiencing hearing disability had an increased risk of early retirement. Degree of hearing level was not associated with part-time work, but in middle-aged men, awareness of having a hearing loss was associated with part-time employment. Conclusions: Degree of low-frequency hearing loss was associated with early retirement but not with part-time work. Perceived hearing disability increased the risk of early retirement in middle-aged men and women and also the risk of part-time work in middle-aged men. PMID:22930741

  12. Hearing loss and risk of early retirement. The HUNT study.

    PubMed

    Helvik, Anne-Sofie; Krokstad, Steinar; Tambs, Kristian

    2013-08-01

    We explore the possible consequences of measured hearing impairment (HI) and perceived hearing difficulties for early retirement in a large population-based study. Furthermore, we study whether having a part-time position was associated with measured HI and perceived hearing difficulties in the same population. This study included 25,740 persons from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study (HUNT) aged 20-54 years at baseline in HUNT1 (1984-1986) who also participated in the follow up, HUNT2, including a hearing examination 11 years later. Logistic regression analysis was conducted for men and women separately and in two age strata. Effects of low-, middle- and high-frequency hearing levels were explored, adjusting for each other. Further adjustment was made for socio-economic class and general health in HUNT1. The risk of early retirement increased with degree of loss of low-frequency hearing in young and middle-aged men and middle-aged women. The middle-aged men and women experiencing hearing disability had an increased risk of early retirement. Degree of hearing level was not associated with part-time work, but in middle-aged men, awareness of having a hearing loss was associated with part-time employment. Degree of low-frequency hearing loss was associated with early retirement but not with part-time work. Perceived hearing disability increased the risk of early retirement in middle-aged men and women and also the risk of part-time work in middle-aged men.

  13. Mild and Unilateral Hearing Loss: Implications for Early Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holstrum, W. June; Biernath, Krista; McKay, Sarah; Ross, Danielle S.

    2009-01-01

    Newborn hearing screening has become a standard practice in most birthing hospitals in the United States. Historically, the primary target for the identification of hearing loss has been infants with permanent bilateral loss of moderate degree or greater (i.e., greater than 40 dB). However, research indicates that without early identification and…

  14. Early hearing detection and intervention: 2010 CODEPEH recommendation.

    PubMed

    Trinidad-Ramos, Germán; de Aguilar, Valentín Alzina; Jaudenes-Casaubón, Carmen; Núñez-Batalla, Faustino; Sequí-Canet, José Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Newborn hearing screening is currently performed routinely in many regional health-care systems in Spain. Despite the remarkable expansion in newborn hearing screening since 2000, its feasibility and the benefits of early identification and intervention, many major challenges still remain. In this article, the Committee for the Early Detection of Hearing Loss (Comisión para la Detección Precoz de la Hipoacusia, CODEPEH) updates the recommendations that are considered important for the future development of early hearing detection and intervention (EDHI) systems in the following points: 1. Screening protocols: Separate protocols are recommended for NICU (Neonatal Intensive Care Units) and well-infant nurseries. 2. Diagnostic audiology evaluation. Professionals with skills and expertise in evaluating newborn and young infants should provide diagnosis, selection and fitting of amplification devices. 3. Medical evaluation. Risk factors for congenital and acquired hearing loss have been combined in a single list rather than grouped by time of onset. A stepwise diagnostic paradigm is diagnostically more efficient and cost-effective than a simultaneous testing approach. 4. Early intervention and surveillance. All individuals providing services to infants with hearing loss should have specialized training and expertise in the development of audition, speech and language. Regular surveillance should be performed on developmental milestones, auditory skills, parental concerns, and middle ear status. 5. Quality control. Data management as part of an integrated system is important to monitor and improve the quality of EDHI services. 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. From Teeth to Baleen and Raptorial to Bulk Filter Feeding in Mysticete Cetaceans: The Role of Paleontological, Genetic, and Geochemical Data in Feeding Evolution and Ecology.

    PubMed

    Berta, Annalisa; Lanzetti, Agnese; Ekdale, Eric G; Deméré, Thomas A

    2016-12-01

    The origin of baleen and filter feeding in mysticete cetaceans occurred sometime between approximately 34 and 24 million years ago and represents a major macroevolutionary shift in cetacean morphology (teeth to baleen) and ecology (raptorial to filter feeding). We explore this dramatic change in feeding strategy by employing a diversity of tools and approaches: morphology, molecules, development, and stable isotopes from the geological record. Adaptations for raptorial feeding in extinct toothed mysticetes provide the phylogenetic context for evaluating morphological apomorphies preserved in the skeletons of stem and crown edentulous mysticetes. In this light, the presence of novel vascular structures on the palates of certain Oligocene toothed mysticetes is interpreted as the earliest evidence of baleen and points to an intermediate condition between an ancestral condition with teeth only and a derived condition with baleen only. Supporting this step-wise evolutionary hypothesis, evidence from stable isotopes show how changes in dental chemistry in early toothed mysticetes tracked the changes in diet and environment. Recent discoveries also demonstrate how this transition was made possible by radical changes in cranial ontogeny. In addition, genetic mutations and the possession of dental pseudogenes in extant baleen whales support a toothed ancestry for mysticetes. Molecular and morphological data also document the dramatic developmental shifts that take place in extant fetal baleen whales, in skull development, resorption of a fetal dentition and growth of baleen. The mechanisms involved in this complex evolutionary transition that entails multiple, integrated aspects of anatomy and ecology are only beginning to be understood, and future work will further clarify the processes underlying this macroevolutionary pattern. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved

  16. Infant vocalizations and the early diagnosis of severe hearing impairment.

    PubMed

    Eilers, R E; Oller, D K

    1994-02-01

    To determine whether late onset of canonical babbling could be used as a criterion to determine risk of hearing impairment, we obtained vocalization samples longitudinally from 94 infants with normal hearing and 37 infants with severe to profound hearing impairment. Parents were instructed to report the onset of canonical babbling (the production of well-formed syllables such as "da," "na," "bee," "yaya"). Verification that the infants were producing canonical syllables was collected in laboratory audio recordings. Infants with normal hearing produced canonical vocalizations before 11 months of age (range, 3 to 10 months; mode, 7 months); infants who were deaf failed to produce canonical syllables until 11 months of age or older, often well into the third year of life (range, 11 to 49 months; mode, 24 months). The correlation between age at onset of the canonical stage and age at auditory amplification was 0.68, indicating that early identification and fitting of hearing aids is of significant benefit to infants learning language. The fact that there is no overlap in the distribution of the onset of canonical babbling between infants with normal hearing and infants with hearing impairment means that the failure of otherwise healthy infants to produce canonical syllables before 11 months of age should be considered a serious risk factor for hearing impairment and, when observed, should result in immediate referral for audiologic evaluation.

  17. The importance of retesting the hearing screening as an indicator of the real early hearing disorder.

    PubMed

    Silva, Daniela Polo Camargo da; Lopez, Priscila Suman; Ribeiro, Georgea Espíndola; Luna, Marcos Otávio de Mesquita; Lyra, João César; Montovani, Jair Cortez

    2015-01-01

    Early diagnosis of hearing loss minimizes its impact on child development. We studied factors that influence the effectiveness of screening programs. To investigate the relationship between gender, weight at birth, gestational age, risk factors for hearing loss, venue for newborn hearing screening and "pass" and "fail" results in the retest. Prospective cohort study was carried out in a tertiary referral hospital. The screening was performed in 565 newborns through transient evoked otoacoustic emissions in three admission units before hospital discharge and retest in the outpatient clinic. Gender, weight at birth, gestational age, presence of risk indicators for hearing loss and venue for newborn hearing screening were considered. Full-term infants comprised 86% of the cases, preterm 14%, and risk factors for hearing loss were identified in 11%. Considering the 165 newborns retested, only the venue for screening, Intermediate Care Unit, was related to "fail" result in the retest. Gender, weight at birth, gestational age and presence of risk factors for hearing loss were not related to "pass" and/or "fail" results in the retest. The screening performed in intermediate care units increases the chance of continued "fail" result in the Transient Otoacoustic Evoked Emissions test. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Baleen boom and bust: a synthesis of mysticete phylogeny, diversity and disparity

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Felix G.; Fordyce, R. Ewan

    2015-01-01

    A new, fully dated total-evidence phylogeny of baleen whales (Mysticeti) shows that evolutionary phases correlate strongly with Caenozoic modernization of the oceans and climates, implying a major role for bottom-up physical drivers. The phylogeny of 90 modern and dated fossil species suggests three major phases in baleen whale history: an early adaptive radiation (36–30 Ma), a shift towards bulk filter-feeding (30–23 Ma) and a climate-driven diversity loss around 3 Ma. Evolutionary rates and disparity were high following the origin of mysticetes around 38 Ma, coincident with global cooling, abrupt Southern Ocean eutrophication and the development of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). Subsequently, evolutionary rates and disparity fell, becoming nearly constant after approximately 23 Ma as the ACC reached its full strength. By contrast, species diversity rose until 15 Ma and then remained stable, before dropping sharply with the onset of Northern Hemisphere glaciation. This decline coincided with the final establishment of modern mysticete gigantism and may be linked to glacially driven variability in the distribution of shallow habitats or an increased need for long-distance migration related to iron-mediated changes in glacial marine productivity. PMID:26064636

  19. Baleen boom and bust: a synthesis of mysticete phylogeny, diversity and disparity.

    PubMed

    Marx, Felix G; Fordyce, R Ewan

    2015-04-01

    A new, fully dated total-evidence phylogeny of baleen whales (Mysticeti) shows that evolutionary phases correlate strongly with Caenozoic modernization of the oceans and climates, implying a major role for bottom-up physical drivers. The phylogeny of 90 modern and dated fossil species suggests three major phases in baleen whale history: an early adaptive radiation (36-30 Ma), a shift towards bulk filter-feeding (30-23 Ma) and a climate-driven diversity loss around 3 Ma. Evolutionary rates and disparity were high following the origin of mysticetes around 38 Ma, coincident with global cooling, abrupt Southern Ocean eutrophication and the development of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). Subsequently, evolutionary rates and disparity fell, becoming nearly constant after approximately 23 Ma as the ACC reached its full strength. By contrast, species diversity rose until 15 Ma and then remained stable, before dropping sharply with the onset of Northern Hemisphere glaciation. This decline coincided with the final establishment of modern mysticete gigantism and may be linked to glacially driven variability in the distribution of shallow habitats or an increased need for long-distance migration related to iron-mediated changes in glacial marine productivity.

  20. Sensory Temporal Processing in Adults with Early Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heming, Joanne E.; Brown, Lenora N.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined tactile and visual temporal processing in adults with early loss of hearing. The tactile task consisted of punctate stimulations that were delivered to one or both hands by a mechanical tactile stimulator. Pairs of light emitting diodes were presented on a display for visual stimulation. Responses consisted of YES or NO…

  1. Auditory Deprivation and Early Conductive Hearing Loss from Otitis Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunnarson, Adele D.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This article reviews auditory deprivation effects on anatomy, physiology, and behavior in animals and discusses the sequelae of otitis media with effusion (OME) in children. Focused on are central auditory processing disorders associated with early fluctuating hearing loss from OME. (DB)

  2. Infant hearing loss: the necessity for early identification.

    PubMed

    Harney, C L

    2000-01-01

    There has been controversy in the health professions about the necessity for newborn infant hearing screening. It is well accepted that patient history or a birth that places the infant in the high-risk registry (HHR) can identify 50% of all infants born with permanent bilateral hearing loss. Two major factors which have been cited as reasons for not screening the well-baby nursery have been poor cost effectiveness and the lack of documentation as to the benefits derived from early identification and intervention. Recent technological developments and published data are presented which indicate that economical well-baby hearing screening can be done in any setting, and that the language acquisition of the infant is permanently affected if the intervention is not done in the first six months after birth.

  3. Anatomy of infrasonic communication in baleen whales: Divergent mechanisms of sound generation in mysticetes and odontocetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reidenberg, Joy S.; Laitman, Jeffrey T.

    2004-05-01

    Cetaceans produce sounds at opposite ends of the frequency spectrum. The laryngeal role in odontocete sound production (echolocation, communication) remains unclear. Mysticete infrasonics are presumed to be laryngeal in origin, but production mechanisms are unknown. To address this, we examined postmortem larynges in 6 mysticete species (3 genera) and compared them to our odontocete collection (20 species/15 genera). Results indicate that the rostral portion of the odontocete larynx is elongated, narrow, rigid, and normally positioned intranarially. This portion of the mysticete larynx is comparatively shortened, open, pliable, and in Megaptera may be retracted from its intranarial position. Internally, mysticete vocal folds are thick, paired, and oriented horizontally, compared with the thin, usually unpaired, and vertically oriented odontocete fold. Mysticetes may generate low frequency sounds via pneumatically driven fold vibrations, which then pass to attached laryngeal sac walls, through overlying throat pleats, to water. Rorqual mysticetes may also vibrate paired corniculate flaps while regulating airflow into the nasal region. Infrasonic pulses may pass through adjacent soft palate, skull, or nasal cartilages to water. Laryngeal anatomy in mysticetes and odontocetes appears highly divergent. These morphological differences may correlate to adaptations for producing infrasonic (mysticete) or ultrasonic (odontocete) communication. [Work supported by ONR:N00014-96-1-0764, ONR:N00014-99-1-0815, and AMNHSOF.

  4. Early investigational drugs for hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjea, Debashree; Ghosh, Sumana; Bhatta, Puspanjali; Sheth, Sandeep; Tupal, Srinivasan; Borse, Vikrant; Brozoski, Thomas; Sheehan, Kelly E; Rybak, Leonard P; Ramkumar, Vickram

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Sensorineural hearing loss (HL) is becoming a global phenomenon at an alarming rate. Nearly 600 million people have been estimated to have significant HL in at least one ear. There are several different causes of sensorineural HL included in this review of new investigational drugs for HL. They are noise-induced, drug-induced, sudden sensorineural HL, presbycusis and HL due to cytomegalovirus infections. Areas covered This review presents trends in research for new investigational drugs encompassing a variety of causes of HL. The studies presented here are the latest developments either in the research laboratories or in preclinical, Phase 0, Phase I or Phase II clinical trials for drugs targeting HL. Expert opinion While it is important that prophylactic measures are developed, it is extremely crucial that rescue strategies for unexpected or unavoidable cochlear insult be established. To achieve this goal for the development of drugs for HL, innovative strategies and extensive testing are required for progress from the bench to bedside. However, although a great deal of research needs to be done to achieve the ultimate goal of protecting the ear against acquired sensorineural HL, we are likely to see exciting breakthroughs in the near future. PMID:25243609

  5. Low-frequency hearing preceded the evolution of giant body size and filter feeding in baleen whales.

    PubMed

    Park, Travis; Evans, Alistair R; Gallagher, Stephen J; Fitzgerald, Erich M G

    2017-02-08

    Living baleen whales (mysticetes) produce and hear the lowest-frequency (infrasonic) sounds among mammals. There is currently debate over whether the ancestor of crown cetaceans (Neoceti) was able to detect low frequencies. However, the lack of information on the most archaic fossil mysticetes has prevented us from determining the earliest evolution of their extreme acoustic biology. Here, we report the first anatomical analyses and frequency range estimation of the inner ear in Oligocene (34-23 Ma) fossils of archaic toothed mysticetes from Australia and the USA. The cochlear anatomy of these small fossil mysticetes resembles basilosaurid archaeocetes, but is also similar to that of today's baleen whales, indicating that even the earliest mysticetes detected low-frequency sounds, and lacked ultrasonic hearing and echolocation. This suggests that, in contrast to recent research, the plesiomorphic hearing condition for Neoceti was low frequency, which was retained by toothed mysticetes, and the high-frequency hearing of odontocetes is derived. Therefore, the low-frequency hearing of baleen whales has remained relatively unchanged over the last approximately 34 Myr, being present before the evolution of other signature mysticete traits, including filter feeding, baleen and giant body size. © 2017 The Author(s).

  6. Low-frequency hearing preceded the evolution of giant body size and filter feeding in baleen whales

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Alistair R.; Fitzgerald, Erich M. G.

    2017-01-01

    Living baleen whales (mysticetes) produce and hear the lowest-frequency (infrasonic) sounds among mammals. There is currently debate over whether the ancestor of crown cetaceans (Neoceti) was able to detect low frequencies. However, the lack of information on the most archaic fossil mysticetes has prevented us from determining the earliest evolution of their extreme acoustic biology. Here, we report the first anatomical analyses and frequency range estimation of the inner ear in Oligocene (34–23 Ma) fossils of archaic toothed mysticetes from Australia and the USA. The cochlear anatomy of these small fossil mysticetes resembles basilosaurid archaeocetes, but is also similar to that of today's baleen whales, indicating that even the earliest mysticetes detected low-frequency sounds, and lacked ultrasonic hearing and echolocation. This suggests that, in contrast to recent research, the plesiomorphic hearing condition for Neoceti was low frequency, which was retained by toothed mysticetes, and the high-frequency hearing of odontocetes is derived. Therefore, the low-frequency hearing of baleen whales has remained relatively unchanged over the last approximately 34 Myr, being present before the evolution of other signature mysticete traits, including filter feeding, baleen and giant body size. PMID:28179519

  7. Early Radiosurgery Improves Hearing Preservation in Vestibular Schwannoma Patients With Normal Hearing at the Time of Diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Akpinar, Berkcan; Mousavi, Seyed H., E-mail: mousavish@upmc.edu; McDowell, Michael M.

    Purpose: Vestibular schwannomas (VS) are increasingly diagnosed in patients with normal hearing because of advances in magnetic resonance imaging. We sought to evaluate whether stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) performed earlier after diagnosis improved long-term hearing preservation in this population. Methods and Materials: We queried our quality assessment registry and found the records of 1134 acoustic neuroma patients who underwent SRS during a 15-year period (1997-2011). We identified 88 patients who had VS but normal hearing with no subjective hearing loss at the time of diagnosis. All patients were Gardner-Robertson (GR) class I at the time of SRS. Fifty-seven patients underwent earlymore » (≤2 years from diagnosis) SRS and 31 patients underwent late (>2 years after diagnosis) SRS. At a median follow-up time of 75 months, we evaluated patient outcomes. Results: Tumor control rates (decreased or stable in size) were similar in the early (95%) and late (90%) treatment groups (P=.73). Patients in the early treatment group retained serviceable (GR class I/II) hearing and normal (GR class I) hearing longer than did patients in the late treatment group (serviceable hearing, P=.006; normal hearing, P<.0001, respectively). At 5 years after SRS, an estimated 88% of the early treatment group retained serviceable hearing and 77% retained normal hearing, compared with 55% with serviceable hearing and 33% with normal hearing in the late treatment group. Conclusions: SRS within 2 years after diagnosis of VS in normal hearing patients resulted in improved retention of all hearing measures compared with later SRS.« less

  8. The cochlea of the enigmatic pygmy right whale Caperea marginata informs mysticete phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Park, Travis; Marx, Felix G; Fitzgerald, Erich M G; Evans, Alistair R

    2017-06-01

    The pygmy right whale, Caperea marginata, is the least understood extant baleen whale (Cetacea, Mysticeti). Knowledge on its basic anatomy, ecology, and fossil record is limited, even though its singular position outside both balaenids (right whales) and balaenopteroids (rorquals + grey whales) gives Caperea a pivotal role in mysticete evolution. Recent investigations of the cetacean cochlea have provided new insights into sensory capabilities and phylogeny. Here, we extend this advance to Caperea by describing, for the first time, the inner ear of this enigmatic species. The cochlea is large and appears to be sensitive to low-frequency sounds, but its hearing limit is relatively high. The presence of a well-developed tympanal recess links Caperea with cetotheriids and balaenopteroids, rather than balaenids, contrary to the traditional morphological view of a close Caperea-balaenid relationship. Nevertheless, a broader sample of the cetotheriid Herpetocetus demonstrates that the presence of a tympanal recess can be variable at the specific and possibly even the intraspecific level. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Early intervention in South Africa: moving beyond hearing screening.

    PubMed

    Storbeck, Claudine; Pittman, Paula

    2008-01-01

    Since little information is available on the outcome of early hearing intervention programs in South Africa, this article examines data on infants and families registered with a family-centred, home-based intervention program (HI HOPES) over a 12-month period in order to track the effectiveness of the holistic unbiased support to families of infants and toddlers with a hearing-loss. The aim of HI HOPES, which is based on the SKI-HI model of early intervention in the USA, is to ensure that families are enabled to make informed choices for their unique infant. Data were gathered on 32 infants ages birth to three years and their families using both qualitative and quantitative measures which included analysis of demographic data, quarterly language assessments, and parent satisfaction surveys. The report on the pilot year of this early intervention program shows that, though the sample is small, there is significant improvement in infant receptive and expressive language for infants identified before seven months of age, as well as a high level of satisfaction from families who have received services.

  10. Obtaining Acoustic Cue Rate Estimates for Some Mysticete Species Using Existing Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    several species of endangered mysticete whales on and near U.S. Navy ranges, using existing recordings from both the SCORE and PMRF hydrophone...Mysticete Species using Existing Data Tyler A. Helble Marine Mammals and Autonomous Underwater Vehicles, Code 56440 Space and Naval Warfare Systems...acoustics, one must know the species -specific average cue rate, which is the average number of calls produced per animal per time. The cue rate can

  11. Current Trends in Early Hearing Diagnosis and Intervention in North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pretto, Aneesha Patrice

    2010-01-01

    In North Carolina, the eligibility criteria for enrollment in Part C early intervention services do not exclude infants and toddlers based on the severity or laterality of hearing loss. As such, the state's early intervention population represents a widely diverse array of children ranging from those with minimal to profound hearing losses. While…

  12. Early Hearing Detection and Intervention in Developing Countries: Current Status and Prospects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olusanya, Bolajoko O.

    2006-01-01

    Infant hearing screening is emerging rapidly as a silent global revolution for the early detection of children with congenital or early onset hearing loss to ensure timely enrollment in family-oriented intervention programs for the development of spoken language. This article examines the overriding and interrelated scientific, ethical and…

  13. Early ERP Signature of Hearing Impairment in Visual Rhyme Judgment

    PubMed Central

    Classon, Elisabet; Rudner, Mary; Johansson, Mikael; Rönnberg, Jerker

    2013-01-01

    Postlingually acquired hearing impairment (HI) is associated with changes in the representation of sound in semantic long-term memory. An indication of this is the lower performance on visual rhyme judgment tasks in conditions where phonological and orthographic cues mismatch, requiring high reliance on phonological representations. In this study, event-related potentials (ERPs) were used for the first time to investigate the neural correlates of phonological processing in visual rhyme judgments in participants with acquired HI and normal hearing (NH). Rhyme task word pairs rhymed or not and had matching or mismatching orthography. In addition, the inter-stimulus interval (ISI) was manipulated to be either long (800 ms) or short (50 ms). Long ISIs allow for engagement of explicit, top-down processes, while short ISIs limit the involvement of such mechanisms. We hypothesized lower behavioral performance and N400 and N2 deviations in HI in the mismatching rhyme judgment conditions, particularly in short ISI. However, the results showed a different pattern. As expected, behavioral performance in the mismatch conditions was lower in HI than in NH in short ISI, but ERPs did not differ across groups. In contrast, HI performed on a par with NH in long ISI. Further, HI, but not NH, showed an amplified N2-like response in the non-rhyming, orthographically mismatching condition in long ISI. This was also the rhyme condition in which participants in both groups benefited the most from the possibility to engage top-down processes afforded with the longer ISI. Taken together, these results indicate an early ERP signature of HI in this challenging phonological task, likely reflecting use of a compensatory strategy. This strategy is suggested to involve increased reliance on explicit mechanisms such as articulatory recoding and grapheme-to-phoneme conversion. PMID:23653613

  14. Early hearing loss and language abilities in children with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Laws, Glynis; Hall, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    Although many children with Down syndrome experience hearing loss, there has been little research to investigate its impact on speech and language development. Studies that have investigated the association give inconsistent results. These have often been based on samples where children with the most severe hearing impairments have been excluded and so results do not generalize to the wider population with Down syndrome. Also, measuring children's hearing at the time of a language assessment does not take into account the fluctuating nature of hearing loss in children with Down syndrome or possible effects of losses in their early years. To investigate the impact of early hearing loss on language outcomes for children with Down syndrome. Retrospective audiology clinic records and parent report for 41 children were used to categorize them as either having had hearing difficulties from 2 to 4 years or more normal hearing. Differences between the groups on measures of language expression and comprehension, receptive vocabulary, a narrative task and speech accuracy were investigated. After accounting for the contributions of chronological age and nonverbal mental age to children's scores, there were significant differences between the groups on all measures. Early hearing loss has a significant impact on the speech and language development of children with Down syndrome. Results suggest that speech and language therapy should be provided when children are found to have ongoing hearing difficulties and that joint audiology and speech and language therapy clinics could be considered for preschool children. © 2014 Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists.

  15. The Effect of Early Confirmation of Hearing Loss on the Behaviour in Middle Childhood of Children with Bilateral Hearing Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Jim; McCann, Donna C.; Law, Catherine M.; Mullee, Mark; Petrou, Stavros; Worsfold, Sarah; Yuen, Ho M.; Kennedy, Colin R.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To determine if the benefit of early confirmation of permanent childhood hearing impairment (PCHI) on children's receptive language development is associated with fewer behavioural problems. Method: Follow-up of a total population cohort of 120 children with PCHI of moderate or greater severity (greater than or equal to 40 decibels relative…

  16. "Foundations for Literacy": An Early Literacy Intervention for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lederberg, Amy R.; Miller, Elizabeth M.; Easterbrooks, Susan R.; Connor, Carol McDonald

    2014-01-01

    The present study evaluated the efficacy of a new preschool early literacy intervention created specifically for deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) children with functional hearing. Teachers implemented "Foundations for Literacy" with 25 DHH children in 2 schools (intervention group). One school used only spoken language, and the other used…

  17. Anxious Mothers and At-Risk Infants: The Influence of Mild Hearing Impairment on Early Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Pat Spencer; Prezioso, Carlene

    To examine the influence of imperfect audition in otherwise intact infants on early mother-infant interaction, three hard of hearing and three normally hearing infants were videotaped in interaction with their mothers. Interaction was coded, a narrative record of the mothers' nonverbal behavior was made, and transcripts of interviews with the…

  18. The Emergence of Early Intervention for Children with Hearing Loss in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shenglin, Liu; Raver, Sharon A.

    2011-01-01

    In the last decade, China began developing early intervention services for very young children with hearing loss, and their families. This article presents a broad description of some of these programs, including the national rehabilitation networks for speech and hearing training, increased attention on the development of professionals, the…

  19. Hearing of the African lungfish (Protopterus annectens) suggests underwater pressure detection and rudimentary aerial hearing in early tetrapods.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Christian Bech; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Madsen, Peter Teglberg

    2015-02-01

    In the transition from an aquatic to a terrestrial lifestyle, vertebrate auditory systems have undergone major changes while adapting to aerial hearing. Lungfish are the closest living relatives of tetrapods and their auditory system may therefore be a suitable model of the auditory systems of early tetrapods such as Acanthostega. Therefore, experimental studies on the hearing capabilities of lungfish may shed light on the possible hearing capabilities of early tetrapods and broaden our understanding of hearing across the water-to-land transition. Here, we tested the hypotheses that (i) lungfish are sensitive to underwater pressure using their lungs as pressure-to-particle motion transducers and (ii) lungfish can detect airborne sound. To do so, we used neurophysiological recordings to estimate the vibration and pressure sensitivity of African lungfish (Protopterus annectens) in both water and air. We show that lungfish detect underwater sound pressure via pressure-to-particle motion transduction by air volumes in their lungs. The morphology of lungfish shows no specialized connection between these air volumes and the inner ears, and so our results imply that air breathing may have enabled rudimentary pressure detection as early as the Devonian era. Additionally, we demonstrate that lungfish in spite of their atympanic middle ear can detect airborne sound through detection of sound-induced head vibrations. This strongly suggests that even vertebrates with no middle ear adaptations for aerial hearing, such as the first tetrapods, had rudimentary aerial hearing that may have led to the evolution of tympanic middle ears in recent tetrapods. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Alveoli, teeth, and tooth loss: Understanding the homology of internal mandibular structures in mysticete cetaceans

    PubMed Central

    Pyenson, Nicholas D.; Uhen, Mark D.; Marshall, Christopher D.

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of filter feeding in baleen whales (Mysticeti) facilitated a wide range of ecological diversity and extreme gigantism. The innovation of filter feeding evolved in a shift from a mineralized upper and lower dentition in stem mysticetes to keratinous baleen plates that hang only from the roof of the mouth in extant species, which are all edentulous as adults. While all extant mysticetes are born with a mandible lacking a specialized feeding structure (i.e., baleen), the bony surface retains small foramina with elongated sulci that often merge together in what has been termed the alveolar gutter. Because mysticete embryos develop tooth buds that resorb in utero, these foramina have been interpreted as homologous to tooth alveoli in other mammals. Here, we test this homology by creating 3D models of the internal mandibular morphology from terrestrial artiodactyls and fossil and extant cetaceans, including stem cetaceans, odontocetes and mysticetes. We demonstrate that dorsal foramina on the mandible communicate with the mandibular canal via smaller canals, which we explain within the context of known mechanical models of bone resorption. We suggest that these dorsal foramina represent distinct branches of the inferior alveolar nerve (or artery), rather than alveoli homologous with those of other mammals. As a functional explanation, we propose that these branches provide sensation to the dorsal margin of the mandible to facilitate placement and occlusion of the baleen plates during filer feeding. PMID:28542468

  1. Exploring reasons for late identification of children with early-onset hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Elizabeth M; Dos Santos, Johnny Cesconetto; Grandpierre, Viviane; Whittingham, JoAnne

    2017-09-01

    Several studies have shown that early identification of childhood hearing loss leads to better language outcomes. However, delays in the confirmation of hearing loss persist even in the presence of well-established universal newborn hearing screening programs (UNHS). The objective of this population-based study was to document the proportion of children who experienced delayed confirmation of congenital and early onset hearing loss in a UNHS program in one region of Canada. The study also sought to determine the reasons for delayed confirmation of hearing loss in children. Population level data related to age of first assessment, age of identification and clinical characteristics were collected prospectively for all children identified through the UNHS program. We documented the number of children who experienced delay (defined as more than 3 months) from initial audiologic assessment to confirmation of hearing loss. A detailed chart review was subsequently performed to examine the reasons for delay to confirmation. Of 418 children identified from 2003 to 2013, 182 (43.5%) presented with congenital or early onset hearing loss, of whom 30 (16.5%) experienced more than 3 months delay from initial audiologic assessment to confirmation of their hearing disorder. The median age of first assessment and confirmation of hearing loss for these 30 children was 3.7 months (IQR: 2.0, 7.6) and 13.8 months (IQR: 9.7, 26.1) respectively. Close examination of the factors related to delay to confirmation revealed that for the overwhelming majority of children, a constellation of factors contributed to late diagnosis. Several children (n = 22; 73.3%) presented with developmental/medical issues, 15 of whom also had middle ear dysfunction at assessment, and 9 of whom had documented family follow-up concerns. For the remaining eight children, additional reasons included ongoing middle ear dysfunction for five children, complicated by family follow-up concerns (n = 3) and mild

  2. Hearing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koehlinger, Keegan M.; Van Horne, Amanda J. Owen; Moeller, Mary Pat

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Spoken language skills of 3- and 6-year-old children who are hard of hearing (HH) were compared with those of children with normal hearing (NH). Method: Language skills were measured via mean length of utterance in words (MLUw) and percent correct use of finite verb morphology in obligatory contexts based on spontaneous conversational…

  3. Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... loud noise is a regular part of the working environment, such as farming, construction or factory work, can ... hearing tested. Consider regular hearing tests if you work in a noisy environment. Regular testing of your hearing can provide early ...

  4. Early identification: Language skills and social functioning in deaf and hard of hearing preschool children.

    PubMed

    Netten, Anouk P; Rieffe, Carolien; Theunissen, Stephanie C P M; Soede, Wim; Dirks, Evelien; Korver, Anna M H; Konings, Saskia; Oudesluys-Murphy, Anne Marie; Dekker, Friedo W; Frijns, Johan H M

    2015-12-01

    Permanent childhood hearing impairment often results in speech and language problems that are already apparent in early childhood. Past studies show a clear link between language skills and the child's social-emotional functioning. The aim of this study was to examine the level of language and communication skills after the introduction of early identification services and their relation with social functioning and behavioral problems in deaf and hard of hearing children. Nationwide cross-sectional observation of a cohort of 85 early identified deaf and hard of hearing preschool children (aged 30-66 months). Parents reported on their child's communicative abilities (MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventory III), social functioning and appearance of behavioral problems (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire). Receptive and expressive language skills were measured using the Reynell Developmental Language Scale and the Schlichting Expressive Language Test, derived from the child's medical records. Language and communicative abilities of early identified deaf and hard of hearing children are not on a par with hearing peers. Compared to normative scores from hearing children, parents of deaf and hard of hearing children reported lower social functioning and more behavioral problems. Higher communicative abilities were related to better social functioning and less behavioral problems. No relation was found between the degree of hearing loss, age at amplification, uni- or bilateral amplification, mode of communication and social functioning and behavioral problems. These results suggest that improving the communicative abilities of deaf and hard of hearing children could improve their social-emotional functioning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Newborn Hearing Screening and Early Diagnostic in the NICU

    PubMed Central

    Colella-Santos, Maria Francisca; Hein, Thaís Antonelli Diniz; de Souza, Gabriele Libano; do Amaral, Maria Isabel Ramos; Casali, Raquel Leme

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to describe the outcome of neonatal hearing screening (NHS) and audiological diagnosis in neonates in the NICU. The sample was divided into Group I: neonates who underwent NHS in one step and Group II: neonates who underwent a test and retest NHS. NHS procedure was automated auditory brainstem response. NHS was performed in 82.1% of surviving neonates. For GI, referral rate was 18.6% and false-positive was 62.2% (normal hearing in the diagnostic stage). In GII, with retest, referral rate dropped to 4.1% and false-positive to 12.5%. Sensorineural hearing loss was found in 13.2% of infants and conductive in 26.4% of cases. There was one case of auditory neuropathy spectrum (1.9%). Dropout rate in whole process was 21.7% for GI and 24.03% for GII. We concluded that it was not possible to perform universal NHS in the studied sample or, in many cases, to apply it within the first month of life. Retest reduced failure and false-positive rate and did not increase evasion, indicating that it is a recommendable step in NHS programs in the NICU. The incidence of hearing loss was 2.9%, considering sensorineural hearing loss (0.91%), conductive (1.83%) and auditory neuropathy spectrum (0.19%). PMID:24999481

  6. Consequences of Early Conductive Hearing Loss on Long-Term Binaural Processing.

    PubMed

    Graydon, Kelley; Rance, Gary; Dowell, Richard; Van Dun, Bram

    The aim of the study was to investigate the long-term effects of early conductive hearing loss on binaural processing in school-age children. One hundred and eighteen children participated in the study, 82 children with a documented history of conductive hearing loss associated with otitis media and 36 controls who had documented histories showing no evidence of otitis media or conductive hearing loss. All children were demonstrated to have normal-hearing acuity and middle ear function at the time of assessment. The Listening in Spatialized Noise Sentence (LiSN-S) task and the masking level difference (MLD) task were used as the two different measures of binaural interaction ability. Children with a history of conductive hearing loss performed significantly poorer than controls on all LiSN-S conditions relying on binaural cues (DV90, p = <0.001 and SV90, p = 0.003). No significant difference was found between the groups in listening conditions without binaural cues. Fifteen children with a conductive hearing loss history (18%) showed results consistent with a spatial processing disorder. No significant difference was observed between the conductive hearing loss group and the controls on the MLD task. Furthermore, no correlations were found between LiSN-S and MLD. Results show a relationship between early conductive hearing loss and listening deficits that persist once hearing has returned to normal. Results also suggest that the two binaural interaction tasks (LiSN-S and MLD) may be measuring binaural processing at different levels. Findings highlight the need for a screening measure of functional listening ability in children with a history of early otitis media.

  7. 10 CFR 2.604 - Notice of hearing on application for early review of site suitability issues in construction...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Notice of hearing on application for early review of site... AGENCY RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Additional Procedures Applicable to Early Partial Decisions on... Early Partial Decisions on Site Suitability-Construction Permit § 2.604 Notice of hearing on application...

  8. 10 CFR 2.604 - Notice of hearing on application for early review of site suitability issues in construction...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Notice of hearing on application for early review of site... AGENCY RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Additional Procedures Applicable to Early Partial Decisions on... Early Partial Decisions on Site Suitability-Construction Permit § 2.604 Notice of hearing on application...

  9. Effective Partnering of State Agencies to Achieve Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Benchmarks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corwin, Joanne

    2011-01-01

    Relative to Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI), New Mexico struggles with multiple points of referral into early intervention in the same way most states do. Referrals are not systematized through a single point of entry. The Step*Hi (statewide Parent-Infant) Program of the New Mexico School for the Deaf (NMSD) receives referrals from…

  10. Predictors of Early-Onset Permanent Hearing Loss in Malnourished Infants in Sub-Saharan Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olusanya, Bolajoko O.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the predictors of early-onset permanent hearing loss (EPHL) among undernourished infants in a low-income country where routine screening for developmental disabilities in early childhood is currently unattainable. All infants attending four community-based clinics for routine immunization who met the…

  11. Relationships between Early Child Factors and School Readiness Skills in Young Children with Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Marjorie; DesJardin, Jean L.; Shea, Lynn C.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this longitudinal study is to examine the relationships between early child factors (i.e., age at identification, enrollment in early intervention, oral language skills) and school readiness skills (i.e., conceptual knowledge) in a group of young children with hearing loss (HL). Standardized language, cognition, and conceptual…

  12. Early Intervention Practices for Children with Hearing Loss: Impact of Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin-Prudent, Angi; Lartz, Maribeth; Borders, Christina; Meehan, Tracy

    2016-01-01

    Early identification and appropriate intervention services for children who are deaf or hard of hearing significantly increase the likelihood of better language, speech, and social-emotional development. However, current research suggests that there is a critical shortage of professionals trained to provide early intervention services to deaf and…

  13. Language ability in children with permanent hearing impairment: the influence of early management and family participation.

    PubMed

    Watkin, Peter; McCann, Donna; Law, Catherine; Mullee, Mark; Petrou, Stavros; Stevenson, Jim; Worsfold, Sarah; Yuen, Ho Ming; Kennedy, Colin

    2007-09-01

    The goal was to examine the relationships between management after confirmation, family participation, and speech and language outcomes in the same group of children with permanent childhood hearing impairment. Speech, oral language, and nonverbal abilities, expressed as z scores and adjusted in a regression model, and Family Participation Rating Scale scores were assessed at a mean age of 7.9 years for 120 children with bilateral permanent childhood hearing impairment from a 1992-1997 United Kingdom birth cohort. Ages at institution of management and hearing aid fitting were obtained retrospectively from case notes. Compared with children managed later (> 9 months), those managed early (< or = 9 months) had higher adjusted mean z scores for both receptive and expressive language, relative to nonverbal ability, but not for speech. Compared with children aided later, a smaller group of more-impaired children aided early did not have significantly higher scores for these outcomes. Family Participation Rating Scale scores showed significant positive correlations with language and speech intelligibility scores only for those with confirmation after 9 months and were highest for those with late confirmed, severe/profound, permanent childhood hearing impairment. Early management of permanent childhood hearing impairment results in improved language. Family participation is also an important factor in cases that are confirmed late, especially for children with severe or profound permanent childhood hearing impairment.

  14. Obtaining Cue Rate Estimates for Some Mysticete Species using Existing Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    primary focus is to obtain cue rates for humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) off the California coast and on the PMRF range. To our knowledge, no... humpback whale cue rates have been calculated for these populations. Once a cue rate is estimated for the populations of humpback whales off the...rates for humpback whales on breeding grounds, in addition to average cue rates for other species of mysticete whales . Cue rates of several other

  15. Evaluating the Structure of Early English Literacy Skills in Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children.

    PubMed

    Webb, Mi-Young; Lederberg, Amy R; Branum-Martin, Lee; McDonald Connor, Carol

    2015-10-01

    Better understanding the mechanisms underlying developing literacy has promoted the development of more effective reading interventions for typically developing children. Such knowledge may facilitate effective instruction of deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) children. Hence, the current study examined the multivariate associations among phonological awareness, alphabetic knowledge, word reading, and vocabulary skills in DHH children who have auditory access to speech. One hundred and sixty-seven DHH children (M age = 60.43 months) were assessed with a battery of early literacy measures. Forty-six percent used at least 1 cochlear implant; 54% were fitted with hearing aids. About a fourth of the sample was acquiring both spoken English and sign. Scores on standardized tests of phonological awareness and vocabulary averaged at least 1 standard deviation (SD) below the mean of the hearing norming sample. Confirmatory factor analyses showed that DHH children's early literacy skills were best characterized by a complex 3-factor model in which phonological awareness, alphabetic knowledge, and vocabulary formed 3 separate, but highly correlated constructs, with letter-sound knowledge and word reading skills relating to both phonological awareness and alphabetic knowledge. This supports the hypothesis that early reading of DHH children with functional hearing is qualitatively similar to that of hearing children. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Early Intervention with Young Hearing-Impaired Children. Occasional Paper Number Three.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, D. J., Ed.; And Others

    Five papers focus on issues of early intervention with young hearing impaired children. The papers were presented at a seminar in 1981 in Queensland, Australia. A. Hayes begins with "The Emergence of Interest in Social Interaction in Infancy," in which he considers the role of metaphors in influencing intervention research. D. Power and G. Elias…

  17. An Early Natural Auditory-Oral Intervention Approach for Children with Hearing Loss: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turan, Zerrin

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to examine the session goals and their realization during the session flow for a child with a hearing loss and his mother in an early intervention program. The study was designed as a case study. Video recordings of the intervention sessions, reflective journals, session plans, and the plan evaluations were used to collect and…

  18. A Model of Early Intervention for Children with Hearing Loss Provided through Telepractice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston, K. Todd; Stredler-Brown, Arlene

    2012-01-01

    Children who are deaf and hard of hearing and their families need access to appropriate early intervention services that are delivered by professionals who are well trained and experienced using their chosen communication approach. Unfortunately, a lack of qualified practitioners, especially in remote and rural communities, and limited funding can…

  19. Factors Affecting Early Services for Children Who Are Hard of Hearing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Melody; Page, Thomas A.; Oleson, Jacob; Spratford, Meredith; Berry, Lauren Unflat; Peterson, Barbara; Welhaven, Anne; Arenas, Richard M.; Moeller, Mary Pat

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To describe factors affecting early intervention (EI) for children who are hard of hearing, we analyzed (a) service setting(s) and the relationship of setting to families' frequency of participation, and (b) provider preparation, caseload composition, and experience in relation to comfort with skills that support spoken language for…

  20. Early Intervention for Children with Hearing Loss: Information Parents Receive about Supporting Children's Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Kalli B.; Vallotton, Claire D.

    2016-01-01

    Family-centered early intervention for children with hearing loss is intended to strengthen families' interactions with their children to support children's language development, and should include providing parents with information they can use as part of their everyday routines. However, little is known about the information received by families…

  1. Early Intervention: A Multicultural Perspective on d/Deaf and Hard of Hearing Multilingual Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, Sandy K.

    2016-01-01

    Today's pluralistic society is characterized by families from many linguistic and cultural backgrounds, including families with infants and toddlers who are deaf or hard of hearing (d/Dhh). Taking a multicultural perspective, the author examines family-centered early intervention (FCEI) and the transition to school services for children who are…

  2. Early Reading Development in Chinese-Speaking Children with Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Yi-Chih; Yang, You-Jhen

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to explore early reading comprehension in Chinese-speaking children with hearing loss (HL) by examining character recognition and linguistic comprehension. Twenty-five children with HL received three measures relevant to character reading: phonological awareness (PA), morphological awareness (MA), and character recognition; two…

  3. Foundations for Literacy: An Early Literacy Intervention for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children

    PubMed Central

    Lederberg, Amy R.; Miller, Elizabeth M.; Easterbrooks, Susan R.; Connor, Carol McDonald

    2014-01-01

    The present study evaluated the efficacy of a new preschool early literacy intervention created specifically for deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) children with functional hearing. Teachers implemented Foundations for Literacy with 25 DHH children in 2 schools (intervention group). One school used only spoken language, and the other used sign with and without spoken language. A “business as usual” comparison group included 33 DHH children who were matched on key characteristics with the intervention children but attended schools that did not implement Foundations for Literacy. Children’s hearing losses ranged from moderate to profound. Approximately half of the children had cochlear implants. All children had sufficient speech perception skills to identify referents of spoken words from closed sets of items. Teachers taught small groups of intervention children an hour a day, 4 days a week for the school year. From fall to spring, intervention children made significantly greater gains on tests of phonological awareness, letter–sound knowledge, and expressive vocabulary than did comparison children. In addition, intervention children showed significant increases in standard scores (based on hearing norms) on phonological awareness and vocabulary tests. This quasi-experimental study suggests that the intervention shows promise for improving early literacy skills of DHH children with functional hearing. PMID:25125456

  4. Sensorineural hearing loss--a common finding in early-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lerman-Garber, Israel; Cuevas-Ramos, Daniel; Valdés, Samantha; Enríquez, Lorena; Lobato, Marlette; Osornio, Melannie; Escobedo, Ana Rosa; Pascual-Ramos, Virginia; Mehta, Roopa; Ramírez-Anguiano, Jacqueline; Gómez-Pérez, Francisco J

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence and potential associations of hearing impairment in patients 30 to 50 years old with diabetes diagnosed before age 40 years-early-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The study cohorts consisted of 46 consecutive patients with early-onset T2DM and 47 age-matched control subjects with rheumatoid arthritis. All study subjects completed clinical, serologic, and auditory assessments. The patients with T2DM had a mean age of 42 ± 6 years and a mean disease duration of 11 ± 6 years. Microalbuminuria was present in 26.1%, proliferative retinopathy in 26.1%, and symptomatic peripheral neuropathy in 23.9%. The prevalence of unilateral or bilateral hearing loss was significantly higher in the patients with T2DM than in the patients with rheumatoid arthritis (21.7% versus 6.4%, respectively; P = .01). Most cases of hearing loss were mild and involved high or acute tones. After multivariate analysis with adjustment for age, there was a significant association between hearing loss and hemoglobin A1c (odds ratio, 1.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.02 to 1.81; P = .035). In the patients with T2DM, the lengthening of the brainstem response was not significantly increased; however, the wave morphologic features were abnormal and the reproducibility was poor in both ears in 11 patients (24%). Patients with early-onset T2DM and poor glycemic control have an increased prevalence of subclinical hearing loss and impaired auditory brainstem responses. Hearing impairment may be an underrecognized complication of diabetes.

  5. Progress towards early detection services for infants with hearing loss in developing countries

    PubMed Central

    Olusanya, Bolajoko O; Swanepoel, De Wet; Chapchap, Mônica J; Castillo, Salvador; Habib, Hamed; Mukari, Siti Z; Martinez, Norberto V; Lin, Hung-Ching; McPherson, Bradley

    2007-01-01

    Background Early detection of infants with permanent hearing loss through infant hearing screening is recognised and routinely offered as a vital component of early childhood care in developed countries. This article investigates the initiatives and progress towards early detection of infants with hearing loss in developing countries against the backdrop of the dearth of epidemiological data from this region. Methods A cross-sectional, descriptive study based on responses to a structured questionnaire eliciting information on the nature and scope of early hearing detection services; strategies for financing services; parental and professional attitudes towards screening; and the performance of screening programmes. Responses were complemented with relevant data from the internet and PubMed/Medline. Results Pilot projects using objective screening tests are on-going in a growing number of countries. Screening services are provided at public/private hospitals and/or community health centres and at no charge only in a few countries. Attitudes amongst parents and health care workers are typically positive towards such programmes. Screening efficiency, as measured by referral rate at discharge, was generally found to be lower than desired but several programmes achieved other international benchmarks. Coverage is generally above 90% but poor follow-up rates remain a challenge in some countries. The mean age of diagnosis is usually less than six months, even for community-based programmes. Conclusion Lack of adequate resources by many governments may limit rapid nationwide introduction of services for early hearing detection and intervention, but may not deter such services altogether. Parents may be required to pay for services in some settings in line with the existing practice where healthcare services are predominantly financed by out-of-pocket spending rather than public funding. However, governments and their international development partners need to complement

  6. Changing Trends within the Population of Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing in Flanders (Belgium): Effects of 12 Years of Universal Newborn Hearing Screening, Early Intervention, and Early Cochlear Implantation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Raeve, Leo; Lichtert, Guido

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to show the changing trends within the population of children who are deaf and hard of hearing in Belgium over the last 12 years. The combination of Universal Newborn Hearing Screening programs, early intervention, and cochlear implants have tremendously influenced the education and support of children who are deaf or…

  7. Measures of follow-up in early hearing detection and intervention programs: a need for standardization.

    PubMed

    Mason, Craig A; Gaffney, Marcus; Green, Denise R; Grosse, Scott D

    2008-06-01

    To demonstrate the need for standardized data definitions and reporting for early hearing detection and intervention (EHDI) programs collecting information on newborn hearing screening and follow-up, and types of information best collected in a standardized manner. A hypothetical birth cohort was used to show the potential effects of nonstandardized definitions and data classifications on rates of hearing screening, audiologic follow-up, and hearing loss. The true screening rate in this cohort was 92.4%. The calculated rate was between 90.0% and 96.5%, depending on the measure used. Among children documented as screened and referred for follow-up, 61.0% received this testing. Only 49.0% were documented to have been tested. Despite a true prevalence of 3.7 per 1,000 births, only 1.5 per 1,000 children were documented with a hearing loss. Ensuring that children receive recommended follow-up is challenging. Without complete reporting by audiologists to EHDI programs, accurate calculation of performance measures is impossible. Lack of documentation can lead to the overstatement of "loss to follow-up." Also, standardization of measures is essential for programs to evaluate how many children receive recommended services and assess progress toward national goals. A new survey has been implemented to collect more detailed and standardized information about recommended services.

  8. Early Development and Orientation of the Acoustic Funnel Provides Insight into the Evolution of Sound Reception Pathways in Cetaceans

    PubMed Central

    Yamato, Maya; Pyenson, Nicholas D.

    2015-01-01

    Whales receive underwater sounds through a fundamentally different mechanism than their close terrestrial relatives. Instead of hearing through the ear canal, cetaceans hear through specialized fatty tissues leading to an evolutionarily novel feature: an acoustic funnel located anterior to the tympanic aperture. We traced the ontogenetic development of this feature in 56 fetal specimens from 10 different families of toothed (odontocete) and baleen (mysticete) whales, using X-ray computed tomography. We also charted ear ossification patterns through ontogeny to understand the impact of heterochronic developmental processes. We determined that the acoustic funnel arises from a prominent V-shaped structure established early in ontogeny, formed by the malleus and the goniale. In odontocetes, this V-formation develops into a cone-shaped funnel facing anteriorly, directly into intramandibular acoustic fats, which is likely functionally linked to the anterior orientation of sound reception in echolocation. In contrast, the acoustic funnel in balaenopterids rotates laterally, later in fetal development, consistent with a lateral sound reception pathway. Balaenids and several fossil mysticetes retain a somewhat anteriorly oriented acoustic funnel in the mature condition, indicating that a lateral sound reception pathway in balaenopterids may be a recent evolutionary innovation linked to specialized feeding modes, such as lunge-feeding. PMID:25760328

  9. Impact of early hearing screening and treatment on language development and education level: evaluation of 6 years of universal newborn hearing screening (ALGO) in Flanders, Belgium.

    PubMed

    Verhaert, N; Willems, M; Van Kerschaver, E; Desloovere, C

    2008-05-01

    Early intervention in hearing-impaired children may improve language outcomes and subsequent school and occupational performance. The objective of this study was to retrospectively analyze over 6 years the educational outcome and language development of a first cohort of children, detected by the Flemish universal newborn hearing screening (UNHS) program based on automated auditory brainstem response (AABR), with the oldest children being in primary school. We studied 229 hearing-impaired children from 1998 till 2003. The following variables were considered: the age during the school year 2005-2006, the degree of hearing loss, additional impairments including presence of intellectual disability, school placement and early intervention. Analysis showed that 85.4% of the children with moderate, severe or profound hearing loss and no additional disability, older than 5.5 years, reach mainstream education. Further detailed description was provided for the outcomes of children with uni- and bilateral cochlear implants. Overall results stress that 46% of all children with a cochlear implant obtain mainstream education. Of all cochlear implant (CI) children above 5.5 years, without additional handicaps, 78.9% of children attend primary mainstream school. Data on language development show that up to 45% of the children with unilateral cochlear implant and no additional disabilities had normal to slight delay on language development. These data are fulfilling the goals stated by the JCIH and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) in 2000. The role and impact of additional handicaps is discussed. The importance of early hearing loss identification and hearing therapy for appropriate language development is highlighted. Finally our preliminary results on children with bilateral cochlear implants without additional handicaps present an improved language development in comparison to unilateral CI-children. A vast majority of the children detected by the UNHS program, with

  10. Parental Level of Satisfaction Regarding Early Intervention Services for Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ealy, Barbara Smith

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study explores the level of satisfaction of parents regarding early identification/intervention services for children who are deaf or hard of hearing (D/HH). The purpose of this study is to compare the progress of children who are D/HH with their hearing peers on elements used to measure the readiness of students to enter the…

  11. Predicting Acceptance and Popularity in Early Adolescence as a Function of Hearing Status, Gender, and Educational Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolters, Nina; Knoors, Harry E. T.; Cillessen, Antonius H. N.; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2011-01-01

    This study examined associations of communicative skills, social behavior, and personality with acceptance and popularity as a function of hearing status, gender, and educational setting. Participants were 87 deaf and 672 hearing early adolescents of 52 6th grade classrooms in mainstream and special education. Acceptance varied as a function of…

  12. Towards integrated practices in early detection of and intervention for deaf and hard of hearing children.

    PubMed

    Storbeck, Claudine; Calvert-Evers, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    It is well documented that undetected hearing loss can have a profound effect on a child's holistic development, including communicative, language and cognitive development. It is crucial therefore that deaf and hard of hearing infants are detected as early as possible so that appropriate intervention services and support can be initiated. To assist parents in enabling their child's optimal growth and development, HI HOPES-the first South African home-based early intervention project-was launched in August 2006, offering families weekly home-based support that is both child-centred and family-directed. A critical overview of the pilot implementation of HI HOPES is presented, from inception to implementation, focusing on its innovative services and practices, and issues that influence the intervention process including a reflection on the challenges and areas for development.

  13. Delayed diagnosis of childhood deafness: the value of false negatives in the Programme for Early Detection of Neonatal Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pacheco, María C; Ferrán de la Cierva, Luis; García-Purriños, Francisco J

    Despite its importance, the existence of false negatives (patients who are told they hear well, but they have some degree of hipacusia) is rarely evaluated in programs for early detection of hearing loss. The aim of this study is to determine the variables that can lead to a delayed diagnosis, especially the existence of false negatives and the lack of registration of risk factors. A retrospective study of prevalence has been carried out, in which the medical records of children diagnosed with sensorineural hearing loss born within 2005 and 2012 in the health centers of study have been analyzed. Of the 32 children with sensorineural hearing loss, 16 passed the OAE, 12 did not passed the OAE, and in four they were not carried out. Of the children who passed the OAE, 57% have severe hearing loss. 66% of children with hearing loss presented a risk factor for hearing loss at birth, being the most frecuent family history of hearing loss, but only 7% of those with family history of hearing loss were included in the risk group. The results of the study indicate that the late diagnosis of hearing loss is related to the presence of false negatives to the OAE and the non-registration of risk factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  14. Long-term hearing outcomes after recurrent acute otitis media during early childhood.

    PubMed

    Krakau, Mattias; Dagöö, Britta Rynnel; Hellström, Sten; Granath, Anna

    2017-12-01

    To survey long-term hearing outcomes and middle ear pathology in a 30-year follow-up in individuals with onset of recurrent acute otitis media (rAOM) before three years of age. 28 adults, aged 30.1-31.8 years, who originally - at the age of 12-32 months - participated in a study on rAOM between 1979 and 1983, were re-examined regarding self-reported ear problems, current tympanic membrane changes and audiology. Thirteen subjects had suffered from rAOM during early childhood and 15 subjects served as a control group. Recurrent acute otitis media subjects reported hearing problems comparable to those of the controls. Pure tone audiometry, at 125-8000 Hz, did not differ between groups. The rAOM group had a trend for impaired high-frequency (9000-14,000 Hz) threshold levels (9000-14,000 Hz); implying that their cochlear function seemed to have deteriorated. Adults, who suffered from recurrent acute otitis media as infants, did not show any clinically significant hearing loss for pure tone audiometry when compared to controls, but there was a trend for impaired results regarding extended high frequency audiometry (9-14 kHz). Children suffering from rAOM will be at low risk of developing hearing loss and severe middle ear disease.

  15. Early Intervention: A Multicultural Perspective on d/Deaf and Hard of Hearing Multilingual Learners.

    PubMed

    Sandy, K Bowen

    2016-01-01

    Today's pluralistic society is characterized by families from many linguistic and cultural backgrounds, including families with infants and toddlers who are deaf or hard of hearing (d/Dhh). Taking a multicultural perspective, the author examines family-centered early intervention (FCEI) and the transition to school services for children who are d/Dhh. Working with d/Dhh Multilingual Learners (DMLs) and their families presents a unique challenge to early intervention professionals: ensuring that families have adequate information and resources to make informed choices, particularly regarding communication. The author presents information and research related to (a) family and professional partnerships, (b) cultural contexts for early intervention, (c) family communication decisions and linguistic diversity, (d) emerging research on DMLs, (e) considerations for early intervention providers and interpreters who work with culturally and linguistically diverse d/Dhh infants and toddlers, and (f) cultural reflections on ensuring smooth transitions from early intervention into preschool programs.

  16. 10 CFR 2.623 - Notice of hearing on application for early review of site suitability issues in combined license...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Notice of hearing on application for early review of site... Applicable to Early Partial Decisions on Site Suitability Issues in Connection With an Application for a... Limited Work Authorizations Early Partial Decisions on Site Suitability-Combined License Under 10 Cfr Part...

  17. 10 CFR 2.623 - Notice of hearing on application for early review of site suitability issues in combined license...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Notice of hearing on application for early review of site... AGENCY RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Additional Procedures Applicable to Early Partial Decisions on... Early Partial Decisions on Site Suitability-Combined License Under 10 Cfr Part 52 § 2.623 Notice of...

  18. 10 CFR 2.604 - Notice of hearing on application for early review of site suitability issues in construction...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Notice of hearing on application for early review of site... Applicable to Early Partial Decisions on Site Suitability Issues in Connection With an Application for a... Limited Work Authorizations Early Partial Decisions on Site Suitability-Construction Permit § 2.604 Notice...

  19. 10 CFR 2.623 - Notice of hearing on application for early review of site suitability issues in combined license...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Notice of hearing on application for early review of site... AGENCY RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Additional Procedures Applicable to Early Partial Decisions on... Early Partial Decisions on Site Suitability-Combined License Under 10 Cfr Part 52 § 2.623 Notice of...

  20. 10 CFR 2.623 - Notice of hearing on application for early review of site suitability issues in combined license...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Notice of hearing on application for early review of site... Applicable to Early Partial Decisions on Site Suitability Issues in Connection With an Application for a... Limited Work Authorizations Early Partial Decisions on Site Suitability-Combined License Under 10 Cfr Part...

  1. 10 CFR 2.623 - Notice of hearing on application for early review of site suitability issues in combined license...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Notice of hearing on application for early review of site... Applicable to Early Partial Decisions on Site Suitability Issues in Connection With an Application for a... Limited Work Authorizations Early Partial Decisions on Site Suitability-Combined License Under 10 Cfr Part...

  2. 10 CFR 2.604 - Notice of hearing on application for early review of site suitability issues in construction...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Notice of hearing on application for early review of site... Applicable to Early Partial Decisions on Site Suitability Issues in Connection With an Application for a... Limited Work Authorizations Early Partial Decisions on Site Suitability-Construction Permit § 2.604 Notice...

  3. 10 CFR 2.604 - Notice of hearing on application for early review of site suitability issues in construction...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Notice of hearing on application for early review of site... Applicable to Early Partial Decisions on Site Suitability Issues in Connection With an Application for a... Limited Work Authorizations Early Partial Decisions on Site Suitability-Construction Permit § 2.604 Notice...

  4. [CODEPEH 2014 recommendations for the early detection of delayed hearing loss].

    PubMed

    Núñez-Batalla, Faustino; Jáudenes-Casaubón, Carmen; Sequí-Canet, José Miguel; Vivanco-Allende, Ana; Zubicaray-Ugarteche, José

    2016-10-01

    The latest scientific literature considers early diagnosis of deafness as key element to define the educational prognosis and inclusion of the deaf child, as advantage can be taken in the critical period of development (0-4 years). Highly significant differences exist between those deaf persons who have been stimulated early and those who have received late or inappropriate intervention. Early identification of late-onset disorders requires special attention and knowledge of all childcare professionals. Programs and additional actions beyond neonatal screening should be designed and planned in order to ensure that every child with a significant hearing loss is detected early. For this purpose, the Committee for the Early Detection of Deafness (CODEPEH) would like to highlight the need for continuous monitoring on the hearing health of children. And, for this reason, CODEPEH drafts the recommendations included in the present document. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. First-hand sensory experience plays a limited role in children's early understanding of seeing and hearing as sources of knowledge: evidence from typically hearing and deaf children.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Ellyn; Pyers, Jennie

    2014-11-01

    One early-developing component of theory of mind is an understanding of the link between sensory perception and knowledge formation. We know little about the extent to which children's first-hand sensory experiences drive the development of this understanding, as most tasks capturing this early understanding target vision, with less attention paid to the other senses. In this study, 64 typically hearing children (Mage  = 4.0 years) and 21 orally educated deaf children (Mage  = 5.44 years) were asked to identify which of two informants knew the identity of a toy animal when each had differing perceptual access to the animal. In the 'seeing' condition, one informant saw the animal and the other did not; in the 'hearing' condition, one informant heard the animal and the other did not. For both hearing and deaf children, there was no difference between performance on hearing and seeing trials, but deaf children were delayed in both conditions. Further, within both the hearing and deaf groups, older children outperformed younger children on these tasks, indicating that there is a developmental progression. Taken together, the pattern of results suggests that experiences other than first-hand sensory experiences drive children's developing understanding that sensory perception is associated with knowledge. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  6. Early definition of type, degree and audiogram shape in childhood hearing impairment.

    PubMed

    Conti, G; Gallus, R; Fetoni, A R; Martina, B M; Muzzi, E; Orzan, E; Bastanza, G

    2016-02-01

    In the context of permanent childhood hearing loss, early audiological diagnosis is a prerequisite for activation of an adequate rehabilitation program to prevent or limit the known effects that auditory deprivation determines on language development and cognitive skills in neonates. Audiological diagnosis consists schematically of three phases: identification of subjects at risk, definition of hearing loss and/or children features, verification of appropriateness of diagnosis itself and a rehabilitation programme. Strategies and methods of audiological diagnosis are well defined and include an integration of data coming from objective methods with clinical and behavioural data. Although the substantial effectiveness of procedures and a general consensus on their use and interpretation have been defined, there are several critical issues concerning the achievement of this objective, which will be discussed in this paper. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale.

  7. Cost-benefit analysis of targeted hearing directed early testing for congenital cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Bergevin, Anna; Zick, Cathleen D; McVicar, Stephanie Browning; Park, Albert H

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we estimate an ex ante cost-benefit analysis of a Utah law directed at improving early cytomegalovirus (CMV) detection. We use a differential cost of treatment analysis for publicly insured CMV-infected infants detected by a statewide hearing-directed CMV screening program. Utah government administrative data and multi-hospital accounting data are used to estimate and compare costs and benefits for the Utah infant population. If antiviral treatment succeeds in mitigating hearing loss for one infant per year, the public savings will offset the public costs incurred by screening and treatment. If antiviral treatment is not successful, the program represents a net cost, but may still have non-monetary benefits such as accelerated achievement of diagnostic milestones. The CMV education and treatment program costs are modest and show potential for significant cost savings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Compliance with current standards for the early detection of neonatal hearing loss].

    PubMed

    Rojas-Godoy, Andrea L; Gómez-Gómez, Olga; Rivas-Muñoz, Fabio A

    2014-01-01

    Assessing compliance with the section "Assessment of hearing" stipulated in the Technical Standard to Detect Alteration in children aged less than 10 years-old in Bogota. This was a cross-sectional study which involved reviewing the medical records of all children born between July 1st and December 31st 2010 in two healthcare institutions in Bogota. Records were selected in which any of the following risk factors appeared: neonatal hyperbilirubinaemia involving phototherapy, neonatal exposure to ototoxic substances and/or <1.500 gr low birth weight. It was also ascertained whether children had been referred to an auditory evoked potential test as the prescribed screening test for neonatal hearing, as stipulated in mandatory Colombian technical standards for detecting abnormal growth and developmental in children aged less than ten years-old. Neither of the two institutions was making the aforementioned referral test. The results indicated significant difficulties in adherence to the protocol for the early detection of hearing loss regarding pertinent/current neonatal Colombian regulations.

  9. Timing Discrepancies of Early Intervention Hearing Services in Urban and Rural Cochlear Implant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Matthew L.; Burton, Mary; Loan, Ashley; Shinn, Jennifer B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the timing of early intervention diagnostic and therapeutic services in cochlear implant recipients from rural and urban areas. Study design Retrospective case series review Setting Tertiary referral center Patients Cochlear implant recipients from a single comprehensive hearing institute born with severe congenital sensorineural hearing loss were examined. Timing of diagnostic and therapeutic services was examined. Intervention(s) Diagnosis, amplification, and eventual cochlear implantation for all patients in the study Main outcome measure(s) Time points of definitive diagnosis, amplification, and cochlear implantation for children from urban and rural regions were examined. Correlation analysis of distance to testing center and timing of services was also assessed. Results 40 children born with congenital hearing loss were included in the study and were diagnosed at a median age of 13 weeks after birth. Children from rural regions obtained amplification at a median age of 47.7 weeks after birth, while urban children were amplified at 26 weeks after birth. Cochlear implantation was performed at a median age of 182 weeks after birth in those from rural areas and at 104 weeks after birth in urban-dwelling patients. A linear relationship was identified between distance to the implant center and timing of hearing aid amplification (r=0.5, p=0.033) and cochlear implantation (r=0.5, p=0.016). Conclusions Children residing outside of metro areas may be at higher risk of delayed rehabilitative services and cochlear implantation than those residing in urban areas that may be closer in proximity to tertiary care centers. PMID:24136305

  10. Effectiveness and efficacy of early detection of hearing impairment in children.

    PubMed

    Ruben, R J

    1991-01-01

    Throughout the industrial world, technology and techniques are now available so that any child, no matter how young or how impaired, can have an accurate and precise assessment of middle ear function, auditory reactivity, and physiological processing of auditory stimuli. Yet, a major problem exists in the lack of timely identification of many children with hearing impairments. Presently, identification systems are primarily proactive and are based on technology. These consist of testing of infants with biological risk factors and the use of hearing screening programs at various times during the first decade of life. The reactive sources of referral appear to be inadequate, an impression that is supported by the data on the delay of diagnosis. These inadequacies appear to be due to a lack of awareness on the part of health providers as to the potential hearing losses; ignorance concerning the ability to diagnose them; and a lack of awareness of the potential of effective intervention. Two additional approaches are suggested which would be added to those already existing for improving the number of children who will have their diagnoses made in a timely fashion. The first of these is educational: health providers should have required and continuing education concerning the effects of hearing loss, the ability to diagnose, and to intervene effectively. A parallel educational program should be provided for the public. The second is the periodic assessment of speech and language from early infancy through the first few years of life for all children. This would enable children with suspected impairments to be referred for definitive testing.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Testimony of Gina Adams, Senior Fellow, Urban Institute. Before the Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education Subcommittee Hearing on "Improving Early Childhood Development Policies and Practices"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Gina

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the testimony of Gina Adams before the Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education Subcommittee Hearing on "Improving Early Childhood Development Policies and Practices." This testimony was presented to the House Committee on Education and Labor, U.S. House of Representatives last March 19, 2009. She talks about how…

  12. Priorities for early hearing detection and intervention in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Olusanya, Bolajoko O

    2008-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa not only has the highest rates of neonatal, infant, and child mortality worldwide but also accounts for a significant proportion of the global burden of permanent congenital and early-onset hearing loss (PCEHL). This article explores the diverse psychosocial, educational, and economic consequences of PCEHL in the region and highlights the interrelationships between this condition and the crucial domains of early childhood development. It also examines relevant levels of prevention and current practices within the context of the birthing patterns and routine immunization schedules in the first three months of life. It presents practical options for addressing the needs of children with PCEHL and their parents against the backdrop of the prevailing health and socioeconomic conditions. It concludes by underscoring the crucial dimensions of culturally-sensitive interventions as well as the need for ear-care professionals in each country to take advantage of the growing global initiatives for hearing impairment prevention within a multidisciplinary framework to advance the best interests of the affected children and their families.

  13. Predictors of early-onset permanent hearing loss in malnourished infants in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Olusanya, Bolajoko O

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the predictors of early-onset permanent hearing loss (EPHL) among undernourished infants in a low-income country where routine screening for developmental disabilities in early childhood is currently unattainable. All infants attending four community-based clinics for routine immunization who met the criteria for undernutrition by the Growth Standards of the World Health Organization (WHO) based on weight-for-age, weight-for-length and body-mass-index-for-age were enlisted. EPHL was determined after two-stage screening with transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions, automated auditory brainstem response and diagnostic evaluation. Factors predictive of EPHL were explored with multivariable logistic regression analysis. Some 39 (1.7%) infants from 2254 undernourished infants were confirmed with hearing loss (>30 dB HL). Bilateral EPHL was mild in 7 (17.9%) and moderate-to-profound in 26 (66.7%). EPHL was unilateral in 6 (15.4%). Multiparity, chronological age of more than 30 days, the absence of skilled attendant at birth and severe neonatal jaundice were associated with an increased risk of EPHL while having a Christian mother and exclusive breast feeding had protective effect against EPHL. EPHL is highly prevalent among undernourished infants and associated with modifiable risk factors that can be addressed at the community-level and used as a basis for targeted intervention in resource-poor countries. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Temporary conductive hearing loss in early life impairs spatial memory of rats in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Han; Wang, Li; Chen, Liang; Zhang, Jinsheng; Sun, Wei; Salvi, Richard J; Huang, Yi-Na; Wang, Ming; Chen, Lin

    2018-05-31

    It is known that an interruption of acoustic input in early life will result in abnormal development of the auditory system. Here, we further show that this negative impact actually spans beyond the auditory system to the hippocampus, a system critical for spatial memory. We induced a temporary conductive hearing loss (TCHL) in P14 rats by perforating the eardrum and allowing it to heal. The Morris water maze and Y-maze tests were deployed to evaluate spatial memory of the rats. Electrophysiological recordings and anatomical analysis were made to evaluate functional and structural changes in the hippocampus following TCHL. The rats with the TCHL had nearly normal hearing at P42, but had a decreased performance with the Morris water maze and Y-maze tests compared with the control group. A functional deficit in the hippocampus of the rats with the TCHL was found as revealed by the depressed long-term potentiation and the reduced NMDA receptor-mediated postsynaptic current. A structural deficit in the hippocampus of those animals was also found as revealed the abnormal expression of the NMDA receptors, the decreased number of dendritic spines, the reduced postsynaptic density and the reduced level of neurogenesis. Our study demonstrates that even temporary auditory sensory deprivation in early life of rats results in abnormal development of the hippocampus and consequently impairs spatial memory in adulthood. © 2018 The Authors. Brain and Behavior published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Descending projections from the inferior colliculus to medial olivocochlear efferents: Mice with normal hearing, early onset hearing loss, and congenital deafness.

    PubMed

    Suthakar, Kirupa; Ryugo, David K

    2017-01-01

    Auditory efferent neurons reside in the brain and innervate the sensory hair cells of the cochlea to modulate incoming acoustic signals. Two groups of efferents have been described in mouse and this report will focus on the medial olivocochlear (MOC) system. Electrophysiological data suggest the MOC efferents function in selective listening by differentially attenuating auditory nerve fiber activity in quiet and noisy conditions. Because speech understanding in noise is impaired in age-related hearing loss, we asked whether pathologic changes in input to MOC neurons from higher centers could be involved. The present study investigated the anatomical nature of descending projections from the inferior colliculus (IC) to MOCs in 3-month old mice with normal hearing, and in 6-month old mice with normal hearing (CBA/CaH), early onset progressive hearing loss (DBA/2), and congenital deafness (homozygous Shaker-2). Anterograde tracers were injected into the IC and retrograde tracers into the cochlea. Electron microscopic analysis of double-labelled tissue confirmed direct synaptic contact from the IC onto MOCs in all cohorts. These labelled terminals are indicative of excitatory neurotransmission because they contain round synaptic vesicles, exhibit asymmetric membrane specializations, and are co-labelled with antibodies against VGlut2, a glutamate transporter. 3D reconstructions of the terminal fields indicate that in normal hearing mice, descending projections from the IC are arranged tonotopically with low frequencies projecting laterally and progressively higher frequencies projecting more medially. Along the mediolateral axis, the projections of DBA/2 mice with acquired high frequency hearing loss were shifted medially towards expected higher frequency projecting regions. Shaker-2 mice with congenital deafness had a much broader spatial projection, revealing abnormalities in the topography of connections. These data suggest that loss in precision of IC directed MOC

  16. Early Detection of Hearing Loss: The Case for Listening to Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchbank, Alison Margaret

    2011-01-01

    This article is drawn from a larger doctoral study that explored hearing mothers' experiences of discovering that their babies had a permanent hearing loss in Australia in 2008. The particular focus for this paper is the period in time after a concern is flagged, either by a newborn hearing screener or the mother herself, until a hearing loss is…

  17. Language Outcomes in Deaf or Hard of Hearing Teenagers Who Are Spoken Language Users: Effects of Universal Newborn Hearing Screening and Early Confirmation

    PubMed Central

    Pimperton, Hannah; Kreppner, Jana; Mahon, Merle; Stevenson, Jim; Terlektsi, Emmanouela; Worsfold, Sarah; Yuen, Ho Ming

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to examine whether (a) exposure to universal newborn hearing screening (UNHS) and b) early confirmation of hearing loss were associated with benefits to expressive and receptive language outcomes in the teenage years for a cohort of spoken language users. It also aimed to determine whether either of these two variables was associated with benefits to relative language gain from middle childhood to adolescence within this cohort. Design: The participants were drawn from a prospective cohort study of a population sample of children with bilateral permanent childhood hearing loss, who varied in their exposure to UNHS and who had previously had their language skills assessed at 6–10 years. Sixty deaf or hard of hearing teenagers who were spoken language users and a comparison group of 38 teenagers with normal hearing completed standardized measures of their receptive and expressive language ability at 13–19 years. Results: Teenagers exposed to UNHS did not show significantly better expressive (adjusted mean difference, 0.40; 95% confidence interval [CI], −0.26 to 1.05; d = 0.32) or receptive (adjusted mean difference, 0.68; 95% CI, −0.56 to 1.93; d = 0.28) language skills than those who were not. Those who had their hearing loss confirmed by 9 months of age did not show significantly better expressive (adjusted mean difference, 0.43; 95% CI, −0.20 to 1.05; d = 0.35) or receptive (adjusted mean difference, 0.95; 95% CI, −0.22 to 2.11; d = 0.42) language skills than those who had it confirmed later. In all cases, effect sizes were of small size and in favor of those exposed to UNHS or confirmed by 9 months. Subgroup analysis indicated larger beneficial effects of early confirmation for those deaf or hard of hearing teenagers without cochlear implants (N = 48; 80% of the sample), and these benefits were significant in the case of receptive language outcomes (adjusted mean difference, 1.55; 95% CI, 0.38 to 2.71; d = 0.78). Exposure

  18. Language Outcomes in Deaf or Hard of Hearing Teenagers Who Are Spoken Language Users: Effects of Universal Newborn Hearing Screening and Early Confirmation.

    PubMed

    Pimperton, Hannah; Kreppner, Jana; Mahon, Merle; Stevenson, Jim; Terlektsi, Emmanouela; Worsfold, Sarah; Yuen, Ho Ming; Kennedy, Colin R

    This study aimed to examine whether (a) exposure to universal newborn hearing screening (UNHS) and b) early confirmation of hearing loss were associated with benefits to expressive and receptive language outcomes in the teenage years for a cohort of spoken language users. It also aimed to determine whether either of these two variables was associated with benefits to relative language gain from middle childhood to adolescence within this cohort. The participants were drawn from a prospective cohort study of a population sample of children with bilateral permanent childhood hearing loss, who varied in their exposure to UNHS and who had previously had their language skills assessed at 6-10 years. Sixty deaf or hard of hearing teenagers who were spoken language users and a comparison group of 38 teenagers with normal hearing completed standardized measures of their receptive and expressive language ability at 13-19 years. Teenagers exposed to UNHS did not show significantly better expressive (adjusted mean difference, 0.40; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.26 to 1.05; d = 0.32) or receptive (adjusted mean difference, 0.68; 95% CI, -0.56 to 1.93; d = 0.28) language skills than those who were not. Those who had their hearing loss confirmed by 9 months of age did not show significantly better expressive (adjusted mean difference, 0.43; 95% CI, -0.20 to 1.05; d = 0.35) or receptive (adjusted mean difference, 0.95; 95% CI, -0.22 to 2.11; d = 0.42) language skills than those who had it confirmed later. In all cases, effect sizes were of small size and in favor of those exposed to UNHS or confirmed by 9 months. Subgroup analysis indicated larger beneficial effects of early confirmation for those deaf or hard of hearing teenagers without cochlear implants (N = 48; 80% of the sample), and these benefits were significant in the case of receptive language outcomes (adjusted mean difference, 1.55; 95% CI, 0.38 to 2.71; d = 0.78). Exposure to UNHS did not account for significant

  19. 2014 CODEPEH recommendations: Early detection of late onset deafness, audiological diagnosis, hearing aid fitting and early intervention.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Batalla, Faustino; Jáudenes-Casaubón, Carmen; Sequí-Canet, Jose Miguel; Vivanco-Allende, Ana; Zubicaray-Ugarteche, Jose

    2016-01-01

    The latest scientific literature considers early diagnosis of deafness as the key element to define the educational and inclusive prognosis of the deaf child, because it allows taking advantage of the critical period of development (0-4 years). Highly significant differences exist between deaf people who have been stimulated early and those who have received late or improper intervention. Early identification of late-onset disorders requires special attention and knowledge on the part of every childcare professional. Programs and additional actions beyond neonatal screening should be designed and planed to ensure that every child with a significant hearing loss is detected early. For this purpose, the CODEPEH would like to highlight the need for continuous monitoring of children's auditory health. Consequently, CODEPEH has drafted the recommendations included in the present document. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  20. Consensus Development Conference on Early Identification of Hearing Impairment in Infants and Young Children (Bethesda, Maryland, March 1-3, 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Child Health and Human Development (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This document compiles abstracts of papers that were presented at a 3-day conference of experts which developed a consensus statement on early identification of hearing impairment in infants and young children. Papers addressed taxonomy; epidemiology; developmental consequences of early hearing impairment; methodology, instrumentation, and…

  1. Social inclusion for children with hearing loss in listening and spoken Language early intervention: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Constantinescu-Sharpe, Gabriella; Phillips, Rebecca L; Davis, Aleisha; Dornan, Dimity; Hogan, Anthony

    2017-03-14

    Social inclusion is a common focus of listening and spoken language (LSL) early intervention for children with hearing loss. This exploratory study compared the social inclusion of young children with hearing loss educated using a listening and spoken language approach with population data. A framework for understanding the scope of social inclusion is presented in the Background. This framework guided the use of a shortened, modified version of the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC) to measure two of the five facets of social inclusion ('education' and 'interacting with society and fulfilling social goals'). The survey was completed by parents of children with hearing loss aged 4-5 years who were educated using a LSL approach (n = 78; 37% who responded). These responses were compared to those obtained for typical hearing children in the LSAC dataset (n = 3265). Analyses revealed that most children with hearing loss had comparable outcomes to those with typical hearing on the 'education' and 'interacting with society and fulfilling social roles' facets of social inclusion. These exploratory findings are positive and warrant further investigation across all five facets of the framework to identify which factors influence social inclusion.

  2. A Qualitative Study on Knowledge and Attitude towards Risk Factors, Early Identification and Intervention of Infant Hearing Loss among Puerperal Mothers- A Short Survey

    PubMed Central

    Dudda, Ravi; Muniyappa, Hanumanth Prasad; Lakshmi, M.S

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Maternal active participation and their support are critical for the success of early hearing loss detection program. Erroneous maternal decisions may have large life long consequences on the infant’s life. The mothers’ knowledge and their attitudes towards infant hearing loss is the basis for their decisions. Aim The present study was done to determine the mothers’ knowledge and their attitude towards risk factors of infant hearing loss, its early identification and intervention and also awareness of effect of consanguinity on hearing loss. Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional questionnaire survey study, a total of 100 mothers were interviewed using the questionnaire which consisted of three sections namely risk factors, early identification and early intervention of hearing loss. Chi-square test was used to establish relationship between consanguineous and non-consanguineous mother’s responses to its effect on hearing loss. A p-value < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results Mothers’ awareness was significantly high for visible causes (ear pain/discharge, head injury and slap to ear) of hearing loss. Positive attitude was seen for importance of screening programs and follow up testing. Moderate level of awareness was found on hazards of consanguinity and benefits of early identification. However, mothers were least aware of neonatal jaundice, NICU admission (>5 days), signs of late-onset and neural hearing loss, management of hearing loss, hearing aid fitting and therapy necessity, which might interfere in early detection and intervention of hearing loss. Conclusion It is crucial to educate mothers on few risk factors and management of hearing loss to reduce its consequences. PMID:28892940

  3. A Qualitative Study on Knowledge and Attitude towards Risk Factors, Early Identification and Intervention of Infant Hearing Loss among Puerperal Mothers- A Short Survey.

    PubMed

    Dudda, Ravi; Muniyappa, Hanumanth Prasad; Puttaraju, Sahana; Lakshmi, M S

    2017-07-01

    Maternal active participation and their support are critical for the success of early hearing loss detection program. Erroneous maternal decisions may have large life long consequences on the infant's life. The mothers' knowledge and their attitudes towards infant hearing loss is the basis for their decisions. The present study was done to determine the mothers' knowledge and their attitude towards risk factors of infant hearing loss, its early identification and intervention and also awareness of effect of consanguinity on hearing loss. In this cross-sectional questionnaire survey study, a total of 100 mothers were interviewed using the questionnaire which consisted of three sections namely risk factors, early identification and early intervention of hearing loss. Chi-square test was used to establish relationship between consanguineous and non-consanguineous mother's responses to its effect on hearing loss. A p-value < 0.05 was considered as significant. Mothers' awareness was significantly high for visible causes (ear pain/discharge, head injury and slap to ear) of hearing loss. Positive attitude was seen for importance of screening programs and follow up testing. Moderate level of awareness was found on hazards of consanguinity and benefits of early identification. However, mothers were least aware of neonatal jaundice, NICU admission (>5 days), signs of late-onset and neural hearing loss, management of hearing loss, hearing aid fitting and therapy necessity, which might interfere in early detection and intervention of hearing loss. It is crucial to educate mothers on few risk factors and management of hearing loss to reduce its consequences.

  4. Predicting acceptance and popularity in early adolescence as a function of hearing status, gender, and educational setting.

    PubMed

    Wolters, Nina; Knoors, Harry E T; Cillessen, Antonius H N; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2011-01-01

    This study examined associations of communicative skills, social behavior, and personality with acceptance and popularity as a function of hearing status, gender, and educational setting. Participants were 87 deaf and 672 hearing early adolescents of 52 6th grade classrooms in mainstream and special education. Acceptance varied as a function of hearing status by gender; popularity varied as a function of hearing status and educational setting. Deaf boys in mainstream education were less accepted and popular than their hearing classmates and than deaf peers in special education. Deaf girls in mainstream education were also less popular but not less accepted. Communicative skills varied as a function of hearing status, whereas social behavior varied as a function of educational setting. Deaf mainstreamed children showed less developed pragmatic and strategic communicative skills (monitoring, improvisation, initiating/maintaining) than their hearing classmates, but more social adjustment than deaf peers in special education (more prosocial behavior, less antisocial or withdrawn behavior, and more agreeableness). For acceptance, deaf girls in mainstream education compensated the lack of improvisation with higher levels of prosocial behavior, agreeableness, monitoring, and pragmatic skills, and lower levels of antisocial behavior than deaf boys. Monitoring and pragmatic skills negatively affected a deaf mainstream boy's acceptance. In special education, gender differences in prosocial behavior explained deaf boys' lower acceptance. Popularity was explained by pragmatic skills and improvisation as a function of hearing status. Voter population difference and different social behavior norms are considered as an explanation for popularity differences as a function of educational setting. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. 10 CFR 51.105 - Public hearings in proceedings for issuance of construction permits or early site permits...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... concerning the benefits assessment (e.g., need for power) or alternative energy sources if those issues were... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Public hearings in proceedings for issuance of construction permits or early site permits; limited work authorizations. 51.105 Section 51.105 Energy NUCLEAR...

  6. 10 CFR 51.105 - Public hearings in proceedings for issuance of construction permits or early site permits...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... concerning the benefits assessment (e.g., need for power) or alternative energy sources if those issues were... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Public hearings in proceedings for issuance of construction permits or early site permits; limited work authorizations. 51.105 Section 51.105 Energy NUCLEAR...

  7. 10 CFR 51.105 - Public hearings in proceedings for issuance of construction permits or early site permits...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... concerning the benefits assessment (e.g., need for power) or alternative energy sources if those issues were... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Public hearings in proceedings for issuance of construction permits or early site permits; limited work authorizations. 51.105 Section 51.105 Energy NUCLEAR...

  8. 10 CFR 51.105 - Public hearings in proceedings for issuance of construction permits or early site permits...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... concerning the benefits assessment (e.g., need for power) or alternative energy sources if those issues were... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Public hearings in proceedings for issuance of construction permits or early site permits; limited work authorizations. 51.105 Section 51.105 Energy NUCLEAR...

  9. 10 CFR 51.105 - Public hearings in proceedings for issuance of construction permits or early site permits...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... concerning the benefits assessment (e.g., need for power) or alternative energy sources if those issues were... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Public hearings in proceedings for issuance of construction permits or early site permits; limited work authorizations. 51.105 Section 51.105 Energy NUCLEAR...

  10. Technology--and Colorado Early Education Staff--Helping Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuler-Woodard, Dee

    2009-01-01

    The youngest deaf and hard of hearing children with disabilities in Colorado can now participate more fully in the world around them thanks to funding from grants solicited through the Early Education Department at the Colorado School for the Deaf and the Blind. The grants enable the children, from birth to age 3, to overcome their physical…

  11. Hear, Hear!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rittner-Heir, Robbin

    2000-01-01

    Examines the problem of acoustics in school classrooms; the problems it creates for student learning, particularly for students with hearing problems; and the impediments to achieving acceptable acoustical levels for school classrooms. Acoustic guidelines are explored and some remedies for fixing sound problems are highlighted. (GR)

  12. Coarticulation in Early Vocalizations by Children with Hearing Loss: A Locus Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Helen Mccaffrey

    2012-01-01

    Locus equations derived from productions by three children with hearing loss revealed sensory and motor influences on anticipatory coarticulation. Participants who received auditory access to speech via hearing aids and cochlear implants at different ages (5-39 months) were recorded at approximately 6 and 12 months after hearing technology…

  13. Understanding minds: early cochlear implantation and the development of theory of mind in children with profound hearing impairment.

    PubMed

    Sundqvist, Annette; Lyxell, Björn; Jönsson, Radoslava; Heimann, Mikael

    2014-03-01

    The present study investigates how auditory stimulation from cochlear implants (CI) is associated with the development of Theory of Mind (ToM) in severely and profoundly hearing impaired children with hearing parents. Previous research has shown that deaf children of hearing parents have a delayed ToM development. This is, however, not always the case with deaf children of deaf parents, who presumably are immersed in a more vivid signing environment. Sixteen children with CI (4.25 to 9.5 years of age) were tested on measures of cognitive and emotional ToM, language and cognition. Eight of the children received their first implant relatively early (before 27 months) and half of them late (after 27 months). The two groups did not differ in age, gender, language or cognition at entry of the study. ToM tests included the unexpected location task and a newly developed Swedish social-emotional ToM test. The tests aimed to test both cognitive and emotional ToM. A comparison group of typically developing hearing age matched children was also added (n=18). Compared to the comparison group, the early CI-group did not differ in emotional ToM. The late CI-group differed significantly from the comparison group on both the cognitive and emotional ToM tests. The results revealed that children with early cochlear implants solved ToM problems to a significantly higher degree than children with late implants, although the groups did not differ on language or cognitive measures at baseline. The outcome suggests that early cochlear implantation for deaf children in hearing families, in conjunction with early social and communicative stimulation in a language that is native to the parents, can provide a foundation for a more normalized ToM development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Federal privacy regulations and the provision of Early Hearing Detection and Intervention programs.

    PubMed

    Houston, K Todd; Behl, Diane D; White, Karl R; Forsman, Irene

    2010-08-01

    To be successful, Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) programs require individually identifiable information about children to be shared among people who are responsible for screening, diagnosis, early intervention, family support, and medical home services. Pediatricians and other stakeholders in the EHDI process often point to federal laws that were passed to ensure privacy and confidentiality in health care and educational programs as major obstacles to achieving efficient and effective EHDI programs. In this article we summarize the provisions of 3 federal laws (the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act [HIPAA], the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act [FERPA], and Part C privacy regulations of the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act [IDEA]) that most directly affect information-sharing in EHDI programs. We suggest strategies for sharing the information needed to operate successful EHDI programs while remaining in compliance with these laws, including obtaining signed parental consent to share information between providers, including an option on the individual family services plan for parents to permit sharing of the plan with pediatricians and other providers, and giving copies of all relevant test results to parents to share with providers as they wish.

  15. Identifying Early Onset of Hearing Loss in Young Adults With Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 Using High Frequency Audiometry.

    PubMed

    Vignesh, S S; Jaya, V; Moses, Anand; Muraleedharan, A

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disorder caused by hyperglycemia which leads to dysfunction of various organs. Hearing acuity is equally hindered by this disorder. Among individuals with DM audiological characteristics of DM type 1 are of great concern in the literature. This study aims at establishing high frequency audiometry (HFA) as a useful tool in identifying early onset of hearing loss in individuals with DM type 2. 20 non-diabetic participants and 20 individuals with DM type 2 in the age range of 20-40 years were considered for the study. Subjects in both groups underwent otoscopic examination, PTA at 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4 and 8 kHz and HFA at 9, 10, 11.2, 12.5, 14 and 16 kHz. Results revealed statistically significant difference in thresholds of both PTA and HFA at all frequencies across the group, but the mean threshold difference between the diabetic and non-diabetic group was marked in HFA than in PTA. In the diabetic subjects the thresholds of PTA was within 25 dBHL at all frequencies when compared to the thresholds of HFA. Individuals with DM type 2 showed bilateral symmetrical mild hearing loss in HFA and the hearing loss increased with ascending test frequencies from 9,000 to 16,000 Hz. Mild hearing loss in HFA is an indicator for early onset of hearing loss in DM type 2. Hence this present study emphasis the clinical utility of HFA in young adults with DM type 2.

  16. Early onset hearing loss in autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets caused by loss of function mutation in ENPP1.

    PubMed

    Steichen-Gersdorf, Elisabeth; Lorenz-Depiereux, Bettina; Strom, Tim Matthias; Shaw, Nicholas J

    2015-07-01

    Autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets 2 (ARHR2) is a rare form of renal tubular phosphate wasting disorder. Loss of function mutations of the ecto-nucleotide pyrophosphatase/pyrophosphodiesterase 1 gene (ENPP1) causes a wide spectrum of phenotypes, ranging from lethal generalized arterial calcification of infancy to hypophosphatemic rickets with hypertension. Hearing loss was not previously thought to be one of the features of the disease entities and was merely regarded as a complication rather than a part of the disease. We report two children who presented in mid to late childhood with progressive varus deformity of their legs due to hypophosphatemic rickets caused by mutations in the ENPP1 gene. Both children had evidence of progressive hearing loss requiring the use of hearing aids. This report of two unrelated infants with compound heterozygous mutations in ENPP1 and previously published cases confirms that mild to moderate hearing loss is frequently associated with ARHR2. Early onset conductive hearing loss may further distinguish the autosomal recessive ENPP1 related type from other types of hypophosphatemia.

  17. Supporting Children and Families through Investments in High-Quality Early Education. Hearing of the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions, United States Senate, One Hundred Thirteenth Congress, Second Session on Examining Supporting Children and Families through Investments in High-Quality Early Education (February 6, 2014). Senate Hearing 113-672

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Senate, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This hearing serves as a first in a set of hearings focusing on early learning. In his opening statement, Senator Tom Harkin, Chairman of the Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions, strongly encouraged members of this committee on both sides of the aisle to hold roundtables and have discussions on early learning in their local…

  18. Auditory development in early amplified children: factors influencing auditory-based communication outcomes in children with hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Sininger, Yvonne S; Grimes, Alison; Christensen, Elizabeth

    2010-04-01

    demonstrated the importance of early amplification on communication outcomes. This demonstration required a participant pool that included children who have been fit at very early ages and who represent all degrees of hearing loss. Limitations of longitudinal studies include selection biases. Families who enroll tend to have high levels of education and rate highly on cooperation and compliance measures. Although valuable information can be extracted from prospective studies, not all factors can be evaluated because of enrollment constraints.

  19. Early Hearing Loss and Language Abilities in Children with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laws, Glynis; Hall, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although many children with Down syndrome experience hearing loss, there has been little research to investigate its impact on speech and language development. Studies that have investigated the association give inconsistent results. These have often been based on samples where children with the most severe hearing impairments have…

  20. Early Detection and Diagnosis of Hearing Impairment: A United Kingdom Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bamford, John M.; McSporran, Eileen

    1993-01-01

    The incidence of congenital hearing loss in the United Kingdom is noted, and the use of a universal behavioral hearing screen at the age of seven or eight months, implemented by Health Visitors, is described. Procedures involved in identification, diagnosis, and management are discussed. (JDD)

  1. Predictors of Early Reading Skill in 5-Year-Old Children With Hearing Loss Who Use Spoken Language

    PubMed Central

    Ching, Teresa Y.C.; Crowe, Kathryn; Day, Julia; Seeto, Mark

    2013-01-01

    This research investigated the concurrent association between early reading skills and phonological awareness (PA), print knowledge, language, cognitive, and demographic variables in 101 5-year-old children with prelingual hearing losses ranging from mild to profound who communicated primarily using spoken language. All participants were fitted with hearing aids (n = 71) or cochlear implants (n = 30). They completed standardized assessments of PA, receptive vocabulary, letter knowledge, word and non-word reading, passage comprehension, math reasoning, and nonverbal cognitive ability. Multiple regressions revealed that PA (assessed using judgments of similarity based on words’ initial or final sounds) made a significant, independent contribution to children’s early reading ability (for both letters and words/non-words) after controlling for variation in receptive vocabulary, nonverbal cognitive ability, and a range of demographic variables (including gender, degree of hearing loss, communication mode, type of sensory device, age at fitting of sensory devices, and level of maternal education). Importantly, the relationship between PA and reading was specific to reading and did not generalize to another academic ability, math reasoning. Additional multiple regressions showed that letter knowledge (names or sounds) was superior in children whose mothers had undertaken post-secondary education, and that better receptive vocabulary was associated with less severe hearing loss, use of a cochlear implant, and earlier age at implant switch-on. Earlier fitting of hearing aids or cochlear implants was not, however, significantly associated with better PA or reading outcomes in this cohort of children, most of whom were fitted with sensory devices before 3 years of age. PMID:24563553

  2. Otoprotective effects of mouse nerve growth factor in DBA/2J mice with early-onset progressive hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingzhu; Zhao, Hongchun; Zheng, Tihua; Wang, Wenjun; Zhang, Xiaolin; Wang, Andi; Li, Bo; Wang, Yanfei; Zheng, Qingyin

    2017-10-01

    As it displays progressive hair-cell loss and degeneration of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) characterized by early-onset progressive hearing loss (ePHL), DBA/2J is an inbred mouse strain widely used in hearing research. Mouse nerve growth factor (mNGF), as a common exogenous nerve growth factor (NGF), has been studied extensively for its ability to promote neuronal survival and growth. To determine whether mNGF can ameliorate progressive hearing loss (PHL) in DBA/2J mice, saline or mNGF was given to DBA/2J mice of either sex by daily intramuscular injection from the 1st to the 9th week after birth. At 5, 7, and 9 weeks of age, in comparison with vehicle groups, mNGF groups experienced decreased auditory-evoked brainstem response (ABR) thresholds and increased distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) amplitudes, the prevention of hair cell loss, and the inhibition of apoptosis of SGNs. Downregulation of Bak/Bax and Caspase genes and proteins in cochleae of mice receiving the mNGF treatment was detected by real-time PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. This suggests that the Bak-dependent mitochondrial apoptosis pathway may be involved in the otoprotective mechanism of mNGF in progressive hearing loss of DBA/2J mice. Our results demonstrate that mNGF can act as an otoprotectant in the DBA/2J mice for the early intervention of PHL and, thus, could become of great value in clinical applications. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The Master Hearing Aid

    PubMed Central

    Curran, James R.

    2013-01-01

    As early as the 1930s the term Master Hearing Aid (MHA) described a device used in the fitting of hearing aids. In their original form, the MHA was a desktop system that allowed for simulated or actual adjustment of hearing aid components that resulted in a changed hearing aid response. Over the years the MHA saw many embodiments and contributed to a number of rationales for the fitting of hearing aids. During these same years, the MHA was viewed by many as an inappropriate means of demonstrating hearing aids; the audio quality of the desktop systems was often superior to the hearing aids themselves. These opinions and the evolution of the MHA have molded the modern perception of hearing aids and the techniques used in the fitting of hearing aids. This article reports on a history of the MHA and its influence on the fitting of hearing aids. PMID:23686682

  4. The utility of early developmental assessments on understanding later nonverbal IQ in children who are deaf or hard of hearing.

    PubMed

    Meinzen-Derr, Jareen; Wiley, Susan; Phillips, Jannel; Altaye, Mekibib; Choo, Daniel I

    2017-01-01

    In children who are deaf or hard of hearing (DHH), it is helpful to have meaningful early measures of development in order to provide effective interventions and offer benchmarks that help recognize varied developmental trajectories. The main objective of this study was to compare results of an early developmental assessment prior to 3 years of age to later nonverbal IQ assessed between 3 and 6 years of age in children who are DHH. This study included children 3-6 years of age with bilateral permanent hearing who were enrolled in a prospective cohort study on developmental outcomes. As part of the study, children received the Leiter International Performance Scale-Revised, which provided a nonverbal Brief IQ, as well as standardized language assessment and behavioral checklists. Children were included in this analysis if they had received an early developmental assessment with the Gesell Developmental Schedules-Revised as part of a clinical visit with a developmental pediatrician. Correlation coefficients and multiple regression analysis were used to associate the scores on the Gesell (using a developmental quotient) with scores on the Leiter-R Brief IQ. Forty-five participants who enrolled in the observational study had available evaluation results from the Gesell and complete Brief IQ results from the Leiter-R. The adaptive domain of the Gesell had good correlation (r = 0.61, p < 0.0001) with the Brief IQ on the Leiter-R. Children who had stable developmental or intelligence classifications based on scores (<70, 70 to <85, 85 to <100, ≥100) over time were older (>24 months) at the early Gesell assessment. Degree of hearing loss or maternal education did not appear to confound the relationship between the Gesell and the Leiter-R. The adaptive domain of the Gesell Developmental Schedules - Revised administered in early childhood (under 3 years of age) has good correlation with the nonverbal Brief IQ on the Leiter International Performance Scale-R. Because

  5. Evaluating the Structure of Early English Literacy Skills in Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Mi-Young; Lederberg, Amy R.; Branum-Martin, Lee; McDonald Connor, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Better understanding the mechanisms underlying developing literacy has promoted the development of more effective reading interventions for typically developing children. Such knowledge may facilitate effective instruction of deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) children. Hence, the current study examined the multivariate associations among phonological…

  6. Cranial asymmetry in Eocene archaeocete whales and the evolution of directional hearing in water

    PubMed Central

    Fahlke, Julia M.; Gingerich, Philip D.; Welsh, Robert C.; Wood, Aaron R.

    2011-01-01

    Eocene archaeocete whales gave rise to all modern toothed and baleen whales (Odontoceti and Mysticeti) during or near the Eocene-Oligocene transition. Odontocetes have asymmetrical skulls, with asymmetry linked to high-frequency sound production and echolocation. Mysticetes are generally assumed to have symmetrical skulls and lack high-frequency hearing. Here we show that protocetid and basilosaurid archaeocete skulls are distinctly and directionally asymmetrical. Archaeocete asymmetry involves curvature and axial torsion of the cranium, but no telescoping. Cranial asymmetry evolved in Eocene archaeocetes as part of a complex of traits linked to directional hearing (such as pan-bone thinning of the lower jaws, mandibular fat pads, and isolation of the ear region), probably enabling them to hear the higher sonic frequencies of sound-producing fish on which they preyed. Ultrasonic echolocation evolved in Oligocene odontocetes, enabling them to find silent prey. Asymmetry and much of the sonic-frequency range of directional hearing were lost in Oligocene mysticetes during the shift to low-frequency hearing and bulk-straining predation. PMID:21873217

  7. Promotion of early pediatric hearing detection through patient navigation: A randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Bush, Matthew L; Taylor, Zachary R; Noblitt, Bryce; Shackleford, Taylor; Gal, Thomas J; Shinn, Jennifer B; Creel, Liza M; Lester, Cathy; Westgate, Philip M; Jacobs, Julie A; Studts, Christina R

    2017-11-01

    To assess the efficacy of a patient navigator intervention to decrease nonadherence to obtain audiological testing following failed screening, compared to those receiving the standard of care. Using a randomized controlled design, guardian-infant dyads, in which the infants had abnormal newborn hearing screening, were recruited within the first week after birth. All participants were referred for definitive audiological diagnostic testing. Dyads were randomized into a patient navigator study arm or standard of care arm. The primary outcome was the percentage of patients with follow-up nonadherence to obtain diagnostic testing. Secondary outcomes were parental knowledge of infant hearing testing recommendations and barriers in obtaining follow-up testing. Sixty-one dyads were enrolled in the study (patient navigator arm = 27, standard of care arm = 34). The percentage of participants nonadherent to diagnostic follow-up during the first 6 months after birth was significantly lower in the patient navigator arm compared with the standard of care arm (7.4% vs. 38.2%) (P = .005). The timing of initial follow-up was significantly lower in the navigator arm compared with the standard of care arm (67.9 days after birth vs. 105.9 days, P = .010). Patient navigation increased baseline knowledge regarding infant hearing loss diagnosis recommendations compared with the standard of care (P = .004). Patient navigation decreases nonadherence rates following abnormal infant hearing screening and improves knowledge of follow-up recommendations. This intervention has the potential to improve the timeliness of delivery of infant hearing healthcare; future research is needed to assess the cost and feasibility of larger scale implementation. 1b. Laryngoscope, 127:S1-S13, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  8. Early predictors of autism in young children who are deaf or hard of hearing: three longitudinal case studies.

    PubMed

    Kellogg, Elizabeth Cameron; Thrasher, Amy; Yoshinaga-Itano, Christine

    2014-11-01

    Early assessment data (starting at 9 months) for three children who were deaf or hard of hearing and later diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) were analyzed. The results from the MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories (CDI) Words and Gestures and the Child Development Inventory were used to develop three profiles of children who were deaf or hard of hearing and had ASD. One child lacked expected skills and language at ages 9 and 14 months. Another child lost skills and language after 17 months. The third child had results usually within or above the average range until 3 years of age. However, his age quotient decreased for MacArthur-Bates CDI: Words and Gestures Words Expressed and the Child Development Inventory: Social to significantly below the normal range. Although it can be difficult to diagnose the co-occurrence of ASD and deafness, there were early warning signs for these children. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  9. Estimating blue whale skin isotopic incorporation rates and baleen growth rates: Implications for assessing diet and movement patterns in mysticetes

    PubMed Central

    Busquets-Vass, Geraldine; Newsome, Seth D.; Calambokidis, John; Serra-Valente, Gabriela; Jacobsen, Jeff K.; Aguíñiga-García, Sergio; Gendron, Diane

    2017-01-01

    Stable isotope analysis in mysticete skin and baleen plates has been repeatedly used to assess diet and movement patterns. Accurate interpretation of isotope data depends on understanding isotopic incorporation rates for metabolically active tissues and growth rates for metabolically inert tissues. The aim of this research was to estimate isotopic incorporation rates in blue whale skin and baleen growth rates by using natural gradients in baseline isotope values between oceanic regions. Nitrogen (δ15N) and carbon (δ13C) isotope values of blue whale skin and potential prey were analyzed from three foraging zones (Gulf of California, California Current System, and Costa Rica Dome) in the northeast Pacific from 1996–2015. We also measured δ15N and δ13C values along the lengths of baleen plates collected from six blue whales stranded in the 1980s and 2000s. Skin was separated into three strata: basale, externum, and sloughed skin. A mean (±SD) skin isotopic incorporation rate of 163±91 days was estimated by fitting a generalized additive model of the seasonal trend in δ15N values of skin strata collected in the Gulf of California and the California Current System. A mean (±SD) baleen growth rate of 15.5±2.2 cm y-1 was estimated by using seasonal oscillations in δ15N values from three whales. These oscillations also showed that individual whales have a high fidelity to distinct foraging zones in the northeast Pacific across years. The absence of oscillations in δ15N values of baleen sub-samples from three male whales suggests these individuals remained within a specific zone for several years prior to death. δ13C values of both whale tissues (skin and baleen) and potential prey were not distinct among foraging zones. Our results highlight the importance of considering tissue isotopic incorporation and growth rates when studying migratory mysticetes and provide new insights into the individual movement strategies of blue whales. PMID:28562625

  10. The Effectiveness of a Phonics-Based Early Intervention for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Preschool Children and Its Possible Impact on Reading Skills in Elementary School: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Ye; Spychala, Heather; Harris, Regina S.; Oetting, Tara L.

    2013-01-01

    The study explored the effects of a phonics-based early intervention package on the early reading skills of three preschool students who were d/Deaf or hard of hearing who differed in regard to degree of hearing loss, use of amplification, and communication mode. The 40-week intervention (50-week in one case) was delivered through individual and…

  11. Spinster Homolog 2 (Spns2) Deficiency Causes Early Onset Progressive Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Ingham, Neil; Kelly, John; Jadeja, Shalini; Goulding, David; Pass, Johanna; Mahajan, Vinit B.; Tsang, Stephen H.; Nijnik, Anastasia; Jackson, Ian J.; White, Jacqueline K.; Forge, Andrew; Jagger, Daniel; Steel, Karen P.

    2014-01-01

    Spinster homolog 2 (Spns2) acts as a Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) transporter in zebrafish and mice, regulating heart development and lymphocyte trafficking respectively. S1P is a biologically active lysophospholipid with multiple roles in signalling. The mechanism of action of Spns2 is still elusive in mammals. Here, we report that Spns2-deficient mice rapidly lost auditory sensitivity and endocochlear potential (EP) from 2 to 3 weeks old. We found progressive degeneration of sensory hair cells in the organ of Corti, but the earliest defect was a decline in the EP, suggesting that dysfunction of the lateral wall was the primary lesion. In the lateral wall of adult mutants, we observed structural changes of marginal cell boundaries and of strial capillaries, and reduced expression of several key proteins involved in the generation of the EP (Kcnj10, Kcnq1, Gjb2 and Gjb6), but these changes were likely to be secondary. Permeability of the boundaries of the stria vascularis and of the strial capillaries appeared normal. We also found focal retinal degeneration and anomalies of retinal capillaries together with anterior eye defects in Spns2 mutant mice. Targeted inactivation of Spns2 in red blood cells, platelets, or lymphatic or vascular endothelial cells did not affect hearing, but targeted ablation of Spns2 in the cochlea using a Sox10-Cre allele produced a similar auditory phenotype to the original mutation, suggesting that local Spns2 expression is critical for hearing in mammals. These findings indicate that Spns2 is required for normal maintenance of the EP and hence for normal auditory function, and support a role for S1P signalling in hearing. PMID:25356849

  12. Effects of Early Childhood Education on Children with Hearing Impairments in Special Schools in Kiambu, Murang'A and Nyeri Counties, Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loise W., Chege; Wamocho, Franciscah I.; Orodho, John Aluko

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to find out the effects of Early Childhood Education on children with hearing impairment (HI). Vigotsky's theory of cognitive development guided the study. Descriptive survey method was used. Target population included children with HI between ages 3-6 years and their parents, teachers, head teachers all from special schools in…

  13. The Impact of Early Visual Deprivation on Spatial Hearing: A Comparison between Totally and Partially Visually Deprived Children

    PubMed Central

    Cappagli, Giulia; Finocchietti, Sara; Cocchi, Elena; Gori, Monica

    2017-01-01

    The specific role of early visual deprivation on spatial hearing is still unclear, mainly due to the difficulty of comparing similar spatial skills at different ages and to the difficulty in recruiting young blind children from birth. In this study, the effects of early visual deprivation on the development of auditory spatial localization have been assessed in a group of seven 3–5 years old children with congenital blindness (n = 2; light perception or no perception of light) or low vision (n = 5; visual acuity range 1.1–1.7 LogMAR), with the main aim to understand if visual experience is fundamental to the development of specific spatial skills. Our study led to three main findings: firstly, totally blind children performed overall more poorly compared sighted and low vision children in all the spatial tasks performed; secondly, low vision children performed equally or better than sighted children in the same auditory spatial tasks; thirdly, higher residual levels of visual acuity are positively correlated with better spatial performance in the dynamic condition of the auditory localization task indicating that the more residual vision the better spatial performance. These results suggest that early visual experience has an important role in the development of spatial cognition, even when the visual input during the critical period of visual calibration is partially degraded like in the case of low vision children. Overall these results shed light on the importance of early assessment of spatial impairments in visually impaired children and early intervention to prevent the risk of isolation and social exclusion. PMID:28443040

  14. Validation of the second version of the LittlEARS® Early Speech Production Questionnaire (LEESPQ) in German-speaking children with normal hearing.

    PubMed

    Keilmann, Annerose; Friese, Barbara; Lässig, Anne; Hoffmann, Vanessa

    2018-04-01

    The introduction of neonatal hearing screening and the increasingly early age at which children can receive a cochlear implant has intensified the need for a validated questionnaire to assess the speech production of children aged 0‒18. Such a questionnaire has been created, the LittlEARS ® Early Speech Production Questionnaire (LEESPQ). This study aimed to validate a second, revised edition of the LEESPQ. Questionnaires were returned for 362 children with normal hearing. Completed questionnaires were analysed to determine if the LEESPQ is reliable, prognostically accurate, internally consistent, and if gender or multilingualism affects total scores. Total scores correlated positively with age. The LEESPQ is reliable, accurate, and consistent, and independent of gender or lingual status. A norm curve was created. This second version of the LEESPQ is a valid tool to assess the speech production development of children with normal hearing, aged 0‒18, regardless of their gender. As such, the LEESPQ may be a useful tool to monitor the development of paediatric hearing device users. The second version of the LEESPQ is a valid instrument for assessing early speech production of children aged 0‒18 months.

  15. Differences and similarities in early vocabulary development between children with hearing aids and children with cochlear implant enrolled in 3-year auditory verbal intervention.

    PubMed

    Percy-Smith, Lone; Hallstrøm, Maria; Josvassen, Jane Lignel; Mikkelsen, Jeanette Hølledig; Nissen, Lena; Dieleman, Eveline; Cayé-Thomasen, Per

    2018-05-01

    The overall objective of this study was to evaluate the implementation of a Nordic Auditory Verbal (AV) intervention for children with all degrees and types of hearing impairment (HI) using all kinds of hearing technology. A first specific objective was to identify differences and similarities in early vocabulary development between children with cochlear implant (CI) compared with children with hearing aids (HAs)/Bone anchored hearing aids (Bahs) enrolled in a 3-year AVprogram, and to compare the group of children with HI to a control group of children with normal hearing (NH). A second specific objective was to study universal neonatal hearing screening (UNHS) using the 1-3-6 Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) guidelines. Effect of AV intervention for children with HI using different hearing technology is not thoroughly studied. It is relevant to question, whether children with mild to moderate HI encounter the same intensive need for AV intervention as children with congenital deafness. A longitudinal and comparative study design was used involving two cohorts of children, i.e. 36 children with CI and 19 children with HA/Bahs. The children were the first in Denmark to receive a 3-year AV intervention by formally trained AV-practitioners. Children were tested annually with standardized speech and language tests, i.e. Peabody Picture Vocabulary test, Reynell test and a Danish test for active vocabulary, Viborgmaterialet. Categorical variables were compared using Fischer's exact test and continuous variables were compared using Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test, as data was not normally distributed. Median age of diagnosis was 6 months and median age at intervention was 13 and 12 months respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of scores according to age equivalency for the three tests. However, there was a significant difference between children with HI regardless of hearing technology and children with

  16. Non-hospital delivery and permanent congenital and early-onset hearing loss in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Olusanya, B O; Wirz, S L; Luxon, L M

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the role of non-hospital delivery and other risk factors for permanent congenital and early-onset hearing loss (PCEHL) in a developing country. Matched case-control study. Four primary healthcare centres in inner-city Lagos, Nigeria. Fifty-six infants with PCEHL and 280 normal hearing controls matched for age and sex from a population of infants not older than 3 months attending Bacille de Calmette-Guérin immunisation clinics. Conditional logistic regression analyses of infant and maternal characteristics associated with PCEHL, and the evaluation of population exposure to each risk factor. Adjusted matched odds ratios and population attributable risk percent (PAR%). Children with PCEHL were significantly more likely to be first born (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1-3.6) without skilled attendants at birth (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.3-4.5) and have a history of neonatal jaundice requiring exchange blood transfusion (NNJ/EBT) (OR 9.6, 95% CI 2.4-38.2) but less likely to be small for gestational age (SGA) (OR 0.1, 95% CI 0.0-0.5). After controlling for other covariates, the absence of skilled attendants at birth (OR 4.2, 95% CI 2.0-8.6) and NNJ/EBT (OR 19.1, 95% CI 4.3-85.5) emerged as predictors of PCEHL, while SGA (OR 0.1, 95% CI 0.0-0.2) retained its inverse relationship with PCEHL. The PAR% was 35.9% for the lack of skilled attendants at birth and 10.6% for having NNJ/EBT. About 23% of children with PCEHL did not exhibit any risk factors. NNJ/EBT and the absence of skilled attendant at birth rather than the place of delivery are significant predictors of PCEHL in this study population. Targeted hearing screening using these risk factors would facilitate the detection of about 77% of children with PCEHL.

  17. Hearing Impairment

    MedlinePlus

    ... deafness ) or loses hearing later in life (after learning to hear and speak, which is known as ... Impaired? For people who lose their hearing after learning to speak and hear, it can be difficult ...

  18. The Mass1frings mutation underlies early onset hearing impairment in BUB/BnJ mice, a model for the auditory pathology of Usher syndrome IIC

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, K.R.; Zheng, Q.Y.; Weston, M.D.; Ptacek, L.J.; Noben-Trauth, K.

    2010-01-01

    The human ortholog of the gene responsible for audiogenic seizure susceptibility in Frings and BUB/BnJ mice (mouse gene symbol Mass1) recently was shown to underlie Usher syndrome type IIC (USH2C). Here we report that the Mass1frings mutation is responsible for the early onset hearing impairment of BUB/BnJ mice. We found highly significant linkage of Mass1 with ABR threshold variation among mice from two backcrosses involving BUB/BnJ mice with mice of strains CAST/EiJ and MOLD/RkJ. We also show an additive effect of the Cdh23 locus in modulating the progression of hearing loss in backcross mice. Together, these two loci account for more than 70% of the total ABR threshold variation among the backcross mice at all ages. The modifying effect of the strain-specific Cdh23ahl variant may account for the hearing and audiogenic seizure differences observed between Frings and BUB/BnJ mice, which share the Mass1frings mutation. During postnatal cochlear development in BUB/BnJ mice, stereocilia bundles develop abnormally and remain immature and splayed into adulthood, corresponding with the early onset hearing impairment associated with Mass1frings. Progressive base–apex hair cell degeneration occurs at older ages, corresponding with the age-related hearing loss associated with Cdh23ahl. The molecular basis and pathophysiology of hearing loss suggest BUB/BnJ and Frings mice as models to study cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying USH2C auditory pathology. PMID:15820310

  19. [A case of early onset cerebellar ataxia with hearing loss, mental disturbance and primary hypogonadism].

    PubMed

    Ikezoe, K; Yamada, A; Takeuchi, H; Miki, H; Katanaka, J

    1992-09-01

    A 14-year-old girl, whose birth and developmental history were normal till the age of 7, was admitted to our hospital because of slowly progressive difficulties in walking, speaking and hearing. She also complained of absence of menstruation. She showed poor school records since the age of 7. On neurological examination, she showed limb and truncal ataxia. There was no nystagmus but slurred speech was found. Muscular power was good and her sensory system was normal. Tendon reflexes were equally present, and plantar reflexes were flexor. Bilateral moderate nerve deafness was also present. Mental deficiency was diagnosed on an intelligence test. Brain CT and MRI showed cerebellar atrophy. Gynecological examination revealed scanty pubic hair and small uterus. Karyotype was 46XX. Endocrinological studies demonstrated high level of FSH, low level of E2, and the normal response to pituitary stimulation with LHRH, indicating the existence of primary hypogonadism. Although the etiology of this multisystem disorder is unknown, it is possible that both nervous and endocrine disorders were genetically determined.

  20. Congenital hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Korver, Anna M. H.; Smith, Richard J. H.; Van Camp, Guy; Schleiss, Mark R.; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria A. K.; Lustig, Lawrence R.; Usami, Shin-ichi; Boudewyns, An N.

    2017-01-01

    Congenital hearing loss (hearing loss present at birth) is one of the most prevalent chronic conditions in children. In the majority of developed countries, neonatal hearing-screening programmes enable early detection; early intervention will prevent delays in speech and language development and have long-lasting beneficial effects on social and emotional development and quality of life. A hearing loss diagnosis is usually followed by a search for an underlying aetiology. Congenital hearing loss might be attributed to environmental and prenatal factors, which prevail in low-income settings; congenital infections, particularly cytomegalovirus, are also a common risk factor for hearing loss. Genetic causes probably account for the majority of cases in developed countries; mutations can affect any component of the hearing pathway, in particular inner ear homeostasis (endolymph production and maintenance) and mechano-electrical transduction (conversion of a mechanical stimulus into electrochemical activity). Once the underlying cause of hearing loss is established, it might direct therapeutic decision-making and guide prevention and (genetic) counseling. Management options include specific antimicrobial therapies, surgical treatment of cranio-facial abnormalities and hearing aids. An improved understanding of the pathophysiology and molecular mechanisms underlying hearing loss and increased awareness of recent advances in genetic testing will promote the development of new treatment and screening strategies. PMID:28079113

  1. Early cortical metabolic rearrangement related to clinical data in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Micarelli, Alessandro; Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Viziano, Andrea; Danieli, Roberta; Schillaci, Orazio; Alessandrini, Marco

    2017-07-01

    Results in studies concerning cortical changes in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL) are not homogeneous, in particular due to the different neuroimaging techniques implemented and the diverse stages of ISSNHL studied. Considering the recent advances in state-of-the-art positron emission tomography (PET) cameras, the aim of this study was to gain more insight into the neuroanatomical differences associated with the earliest stages of unilateral ISSNHL and clinical-perceptual performance changes. After an audiological examination including the mean auditory threshold (mean AT), mean speech discrimination score (mean SDS) and Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI), 14 right-handed ISSNHL patients underwent brain [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET within 72 h of the onset of symptoms. When compared to an homogeneous group of 35 healthy subjects by means of statistical parametric mapping, a relative increase in FDG uptake was found in the right superior and medial frontal gyrus as well as in the right anterior cingulate cortex in ISSNHL patients. Conversely, the same group showed a significant relative decrease in FDG uptake in the right middle temporal, precentral and postcentral gyrus as well as in the left posterior cingulate cortex, left lingual, superior, middle temporal and middle frontal gyrus and in the left insula. Regression analysis showed a positive correlation between mean THI and glucose consumption in the right anterior cingulate cortex and a positive correlation between mean SDS and glucose consumption in the left precentral gyrus. The relative changes in FDG uptake found in these brain regions and the positive correlation with mean SDS and THI scores in ISSNHL could possibly highlight new aspects of cerebral rearrangement, contributing to further explain changes in those functions that support speech recognition during the sudden impairment of unilateral auditory input. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Ritalin Use among Youth: Examining the Issues and Concerns. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Youth and Families of the Committee on Education and the Workforce. House of Representatives, One Hundred Sixth Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and the Workforce.

    This document contains the proceedings of a hearing held on May 16, 2000, before the U.S. House of Representatives Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Youth, and Families. The hearing addressed issues and concerns on the use of ritalin among youth with attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD). Following opening remarks of the congressmen, the…

  3. Program Monitoring Practices for Teachers of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing in Early Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Anne E.; Marvin, Christine A.

    2016-01-01

    Program monitoring is an important and necessary assessment practice within the field of early childhood deaf education. Effective program monitoring requires a focus on both the consistent implementation of intervention strategies (fidelity) and the assessment of children's ongoing progress in response to interventions (progress monitoring).…

  4. Early Childhood Special Education for the Hearing Handicapped. Occasional Paper #13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moores, Donald F.

    The author reviews studies and programs in consideration of problems and issues professionals face in the early education of aurally handicapped children. Language handicaps as an obstacle to development of the child's academic, intellectual, and social potential are examined; as is parental need for supportive guidance. Discussed are studies…

  5. Gross Motor Development of Malaysian Hearing Impaired Male Pre- and Early School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zawi, Khairi; Lian, Denise Koh Choon; Abdullah, Rozlina Tan

    2014-01-01

    Acquisition of gross motor skill is a natural developmental process for children. This aspect of human development increases with one's chronological age, irrespective of any developmental conditions. The purpose of this study was to assess the level of gross motor skill development among pre- and early school-aged children with motor disability.…

  6. Early language development in children with profound hearing loss fitted with a device at a young age: part II--content of the first lexicon.

    PubMed

    Nott, Pauline; Cowan, Robert; Brown, P Margaret; Wigglesworth, Gillian

    2009-10-01

    Lexical content is commonly understood to refer to the various categories of words that children produce and has been studied extensively in children with normal hearing. Unlike the hearing child, however, little is known about the word categories that make up the first lexicon of children with hearing loss (HL). Knowledge of the first lexicon is increasingly important, as infants with HL are now being detected through universal newborn hearing screening programs and fitted with hearing aids and cochlear implants in before 12 months of age. For these children, emergence of the first spoken words is a major milestone eagerly awaited by parents and one of the first verbal language goals of teachers and therapists working with such children. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the lexical content of the first 50 and 100 words produced by children with HL and to contrast this with that of a group of hearing children. Lexical content was compared in two groups of children: one group composed of 24 participants with severe profound or profound HL and a second group composed of 16 participants with normal hearing. Twenty-three participants in the HL group were fitted with a cochlear implant and one with bilateral hearing aids. All were "switched on" or fitted before 30 months of age. The Diary of Early Language (Di-EL) was used to collect a 100-word lexicon from each participant. All single word and frozen phrase data from each child's Di-EL were allocated to 1 of 15 word types grouped into four word categories (noun, predicate, grammatical, and paralexical), and the results were compared for both groups. The hearing and HL groups showed similar distributions of word categories, with nouns constituting the largest portion of the lexicon followed by predicates and paralexicals. Grammaticals made up the smallest portion of the lexicon. However, several significant differences were evident between the two groups. In both the 50- and 100-word lexicons, the hearing group

  7. Morphological variation among the inner ears of extinct and extant baleen whales (Cetacea: Mysticeti).

    PubMed

    Ekdale, Eric G

    2016-12-01

    Living mysticetes (baleen whales) and odontocetes (toothed whales) differ significantly in auditory function in that toothed whales are sensitive to high-frequency and ultrasonic sound vibrations and mysticetes to low-frequency and infrasonic noises. Our knowledge of the evolution and phylogeny of cetaceans, and mysticetes in particular, is at a point at which we can explore morphological and physiological changes within the baleen whale inner ear. Traditional comparative anatomy and landmark-based 3D-geometric morphometric analyses were performed to investigate the anatomical diversity of the inner ears of extinct and extant mysticetes in comparison with other cetaceans. Principal component analyses (PCAs) show that the cochlear morphospace of odontocetes is tangential to that of mysticetes, but odontocetes are completely separated from mysticetes when semicircular canal landmarks are combined with the cochlear data. The cochlea of the archaeocete Zygorhiza kochii and early diverging extinct mysticetes plot within the morphospace of crown mysticetes, suggesting that mysticetes possess ancestral cochlear morphology and physiology. The PCA results indicate variation among mysticete species, although no major patterns are recovered to suggest separate hearing or locomotor regimes. Phylogenetic signal was detected for several clades, including crown Cetacea and crown Mysticeti, with the most clades expressing phylogenetic signal in the semicircular canal dataset. Brownian motion could not be excluded as an explanation for the signal, except for analyses combining cochlea and semicircular canal datasets for Balaenopteridae. J. Morphol. 277:1599-1615, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The Transition From Early Intervention to School for Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing: Administrator Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Curle, Deirdre; Jamieson, Janet; Buchanan, Marla; Poon, Brenda T; Zaidman-Zait, Anat; Norman, Nancy

    2017-01-01

    Although the transition from early intervention (EI) to school is a significant milestone in the lives of young children, little research to date has investigated this transition among children who are deaf or hard of hearing (D/HH). The aims of this study were to investigate the organizational policies, procedures, and guidelines that facilitate or hinder the transition from the EI system to the school system for children who are D/HH from the perspective of program administrators. Using the Enhanced Critical Incident Technique methodology, 146 incidents were extracted from 10 interviews and sorted into 10 helping, 9 hindering, and 5 wish list categories. Findings are consistent with the Ecological and Dynamic Model of Transition (Rimm-Kaufman & Pianta, 2000), which conceptualizes the transition to school as being influenced by the pattern of interactions between the individuals, groups, and institutions connected to the child. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Relationship between the linguistic environments and early bilingual language development of hearing children in deaf-parented families.

    PubMed

    Kanto, Laura; Huttunen, Kerttu; Laakso, Marja-Leena

    2013-04-01

    We explored variation in the linguistic environments of hearing children of Deaf parents and how it was associated with their early bilingual language development. For that purpose we followed up the children's productive vocabulary (measured with the MCDI; MacArthur Communicative Development Inventory) and syntactic complexity (measured with the MLU10; mean length of the 10 longest utterances the child produced during videorecorded play sessions) in both Finnish Sign Language and spoken Finnish between the ages of 12 and 30 months. Additionally, we developed new methodology for describing the linguistic environments of the children (N = 10). Large variation was uncovered in both the amount and type of language input and language acquisition among the children. Language exposure and increases in productive vocabulary and syntactic complexity were interconnected. Language acquisition was found to be more dependent on the amount of exposure in sign language than in spoken language. This was judged to be related to the status of sign language as a minority language. The results are discussed in terms of parents' language choices, family dynamics in Deaf-parented families and optimal conditions for bilingual development.

  10. Functional and structural changes throughout the auditory system following congenital and early-onset deafness: implications for hearing restoration

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Blake E.; Lomber, Stephen G.

    2013-01-01

    The absence of auditory input, particularly during development, causes widespread changes in the structure and function of the auditory system, extending from peripheral structures into auditory cortex. In humans, the consequences of these changes are far-reaching and often include detriments to language acquisition, and associated psychosocial issues. Much of what is currently known about the nature of deafness-related changes to auditory structures comes from studies of congenitally deaf or early-deafened animal models. Fortunately, the mammalian auditory system shows a high degree of preservation among species, allowing for generalization from these models to the human auditory system. This review begins with a comparison of common methods used to obtain deaf animal models, highlighting the specific advantages and anatomical consequences of each. Some consideration is also given to the effectiveness of methods used to measure hearing loss during and following deafening procedures. The structural and functional consequences of congenital and early-onset deafness have been examined across a variety of mammals. This review attempts to summarize these changes, which often involve alteration of hair cells and supporting cells in the cochleae, and anatomical and physiological changes that extend through subcortical structures and into cortex. The nature of these changes is discussed, and the impacts to neural processing are addressed. Finally, long-term changes in cortical structures are discussed, with a focus on the presence or absence of cross-modal plasticity. In addition to being of interest to our understanding of multisensory processing, these changes also have important implications for the use of assistive devices such as cochlear implants. PMID:24324409

  11. Hearing in cetaceans: from natural history to experimental biology.

    PubMed

    Mooney, T Aran; Yamato, Maya; Branstetter, Brian K

    2012-01-01

    Sound is a primary sensory cue for most marine mammals, and this is especially true for cetaceans. To passively and actively acquire information about their environment, cetaceans have some of the most derived ears of all mammals, capable of sophisticated, sensitive hearing and auditory processing. These capabilities have developed for survival in an underwater world where sound travels five times faster than in air, and where light is quickly attenuated and often limited at depth, at night, and in murky waters. Cetacean auditory evolution has capitalized on the ubiquity of sound cues and the efficiency of underwater acoustic communication. The sense of hearing is central to cetacean sensory ecology, enabling vital behaviours such as locating prey, detecting predators, identifying conspecifics, and navigating. Increasing levels of anthropogenic ocean noise appears to influence many of these activities. Here, we describe the historical progress of investigations on cetacean hearing, with a particular focus on odontocetes and recent advancements. While this broad topic has been studied for several centuries, new technologies in the past two decades have been leveraged to improve our understanding of a wide range of taxa, including some of the most elusive species. This chapter addresses topics including how sounds are received, what sounds are detected, hearing mechanisms for complex acoustic scenes, recent anatomical and physiological studies, the potential impacts of noise, and mysticete hearing. We conclude by identifying emerging research topics and areas which require greater focus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Symbolic Play and Novel Noun Learning in Deaf and Hearing Children: Longitudinal Effects of Access to Sound on Early Precursors of Language.

    PubMed

    Quittner, Alexandra L; Cejas, Ivette; Wang, Nae-Yuh; Niparko, John K; Barker, David H

    2016-01-01

    In the largest, longitudinal study of young, deaf children before and three years after cochlear implantation, we compared symbolic play and novel noun learning to age-matched hearing peers. Participants were 180 children from six cochlear implant centers and 96 hearing children. Symbolic play was measured during five minutes of videotaped, structured solitary play. Play was coded as "symbolic" if the child used substitution (e.g., a wooden block as a bed). Novel noun learning was measured in 10 trials using a novel object and a distractor. Cochlear implant vs. normal hearing children were delayed in their use of symbolic play, however, those implanted before vs. after age two performed significantly better. Children with cochlear implants were also delayed in novel noun learning (median delay 1.54 years), with minimal evidence of catch-up growth. Quality of parent-child interactions was positively related to performance on the novel noun learning, but not symbolic play task. Early implantation was beneficial for both achievement of symbolic play and novel noun learning. Further, maternal sensitivity and linguistic stimulation by parents positively affected noun learning skills, although children with cochlear implants still lagged in comparison to hearing peers.

  13. Symbolic Play and Novel Noun Learning in Deaf and Hearing Children: Longitudinal Effects of Access to Sound on Early Precursors of Language

    PubMed Central

    Quittner, Alexandra L.; Cejas, Ivette; Wang, Nae-Yuh; Niparko, John K.; Barker, David H.

    2016-01-01

    In the largest, longitudinal study of young, deaf children before and three years after cochlear implantation, we compared symbolic play and novel noun learning to age-matched hearing peers. Participants were 180 children from six cochlear implant centers and 96 hearing children. Symbolic play was measured during five minutes of videotaped, structured solitary play. Play was coded as "symbolic" if the child used substitution (e.g., a wooden block as a bed). Novel noun learning was measured in 10 trials using a novel object and a distractor. Cochlear implant vs. normal hearing children were delayed in their use of symbolic play, however, those implanted before vs. after age two performed significantly better. Children with cochlear implants were also delayed in novel noun learning (median delay 1.54 years), with minimal evidence of catch-up growth. Quality of parent-child interactions was positively related to performance on the novel noun learning, but not symbolic play task. Early implantation was beneficial for both achievement of symbolic play and novel noun learning. Further, maternal sensitivity and linguistic stimulation by parents positively affected noun learning skills, although children with cochlear implants still lagged in comparison to hearing peers. PMID:27228032

  14. Help with Hearing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infections and Hearing ...................................................................................4 Tubes ............................................................................................................................4 Speech and Language Development .......................................................................6 Common Speech Disorders Related to Persistent Ear ... may be placed early to help speech and language development. If your child needs “tubes” (see below), they ...

  15. Factors influencing speech and language outcomes of children with early identified severe/profound hearing loss: Clinician-identified facilitators and barriers.

    PubMed

    Fulcher, Anne Nivelles; Purcell, Alison; Baker, Elise; Munro, Natalie

    2015-06-01

    Early identification of severe/profound childhood hearing loss (HL) gives these children access to hearing devices and early intervention to facilitate improved speech and language outcomes. Predicting which infants will go on to achieve such outcomes remains difficult. This study describes clinician identified malleable and non-malleable factors that may influence speech and language outcomes for children with severe/profound HL. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with six experienced auditory verbal clinicians. A collective case study design was implemented. The interviews were transcribed and coded into themes using constant comparative analysis. Clinicians identified that, for children with severe/profound HL, early identification, early amplification and commencing auditory-verbal intervention under 6 months of age may facilitate child progress. Possible barriers were living in rural/remote areas, the clinicians' lack of experience and confidence in providing intervention for infants under age 6-months and belonging to a family with a culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) background. The results indicate that multiple factors need to be considered by clinicians working with children with HL and their families to determine how each child functions within their own environment and personal contexts, consistent with the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) framework. Such an approach is likely to empower clinicians to carefully balance potential barriers to, and facilitators of, optimal speech and language outcomes for all children with HL.

  16. Best practices in family-centered early intervention for children who are deaf or hard of hearing: an international consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Mary Pat; Carr, Gwen; Seaver, Leeanne; Stredler-Brown, Arlene; Holzinger, Daniel

    2013-10-01

    A diverse panel of experts convened in Bad Ischl, Austria, in June of 2012 for the purpose of coming to consensus on essential principles that guide family-centered early intervention with children who are deaf or hard of hearing (D/HH). The consensus panel included parents, deaf professionals, early intervention program leaders, early intervention specialists, and researchers from 10 nations. All participants had expertise in working with families of children who are D/HH, and focus was placed on identifying family-centered practice principles that are specific to partnering with these families. Panel members reported that the implementation of family-centered principles was uneven or inconsistent in their respective nations. During the consensus meeting, they identified 10 agreed-upon foundational principles. Following the conference, they worked to refine the principles and to develop a document that described the principles themselves, related program and provider behaviors, and evidence supporting their use (drawing upon studies from multiple disciplines and nations). The goal of this effort was to promote widespread implementation of validated, evidence-based principles for family-centered early intervention with children who are deaf and hard of hearing and their families.

  17. The Auditory System of the Minke Whale (Balaenoptera Acutorostrata): A Potential Fatty Sound Reception Pathway in a Mysticete Cetacean

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    thermoregulate their acoustic fats through increased blood flow to both the melon and peri-mandibular fats (Houser et al., 2004). Cetaceans inhabiting...Fleischer G. 1976. Hearing in Extinct Cetaceans as Determined by Cochlear Structure. Journal of Paleontology 50:133-152. Fraser FC, Purves PE

  18. Hearing Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson-Curiskis, Nanette

    2012-01-01

    Hearing levels are threatened by modern life--headsets for music, rock concerts, traffic noises, etc. It is crucial we know our hearing levels so that we can draw attention to potential problems. This exercise requires that students receive a hearing screening for their benefit as well as for making the connection of hearing to listening.

  19. Hearing Aid Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Hearing aids often develop malfunctions that are not detected by the wearer. This is particularly true when the wearers are school-age children. Studies of selected groups showed that from 30 to more than 50 percent of school children were not getting adequate benefit from their hearing aids because of unrecognized malfunctions, usually low or dead batteries. This can be serious because hearing impairment retards a child's educational progress. NASA technology incorporated in the Hearing Aid Malfunction Detection Unit (HAMDU), the device pictured, is expected to provide an effective countermeasure to the childrens' hearing aid problem. A patent license has been awarded to a minority-owned firm, Hopkins International Company, a subsidiary of H. H. Aerospace Design Co., Inc., Elmford, New York. The company plans early commercial availability of its version of the device.

  20. A Pilot Study of Deaf Trauma Survivors’ Experiences: Early Traumas Unique to Being Deaf in a Hearing World

    PubMed Central

    Wolf Craig, Kelly S.; Hall, Wyatte C.; Ziedonis, Douglas M.

    2016-01-01

    Conducting semi-structured American Sign Language interviews with 17 Deaf trauma survivors, this pilot study explored Deaf individuals’ trauma experiences and whether these experiences generally align with trauma in the hearing population. Most commonly reported traumas were physical assault, sudden unexpected deaths, and “other” very stressful events. Although some “other” events overlap with traumas in the general population, many are unique to Deaf people (e.g., corporal punishment at oral/aural school if caught using sign language, utter lack of communication with hearing parents). These findings suggest that Deaf individuals may experience developmental traumas distinct to being raised in a hearing world. Such traumas are not captured by available trauma assessments, nor are they considered in evidence-based trauma treatments. PMID:28138351

  1. A Pilot Study of Deaf Trauma Survivors' Experiences: Early Traumas Unique to Being Deaf in a Hearing World.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Melissa L; Wolf Craig, Kelly S; Hall, Wyatte C; Ziedonis, Douglas M

    2016-12-01

    Conducting semi-structured American Sign Language interviews with 17 Deaf trauma survivors, this pilot study explored Deaf individuals' trauma experiences and whether these experiences generally align with trauma in the hearing population. Most commonly reported traumas were physical assault, sudden unexpected deaths, and "other" very stressful events. Although some "other" events overlap with traumas in the general population, many are unique to Deaf people (e.g., corporal punishment at oral/aural school if caught using sign language, utter lack of communication with hearing parents). These findings suggest that Deaf individuals may experience developmental traumas distinct to being raised in a hearing world. Such traumas are not captured by available trauma assessments, nor are they considered in evidence-based trauma treatments.

  2. Using structured games to teach early fraction concepts to students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

    PubMed

    Markey, Carmel; Power, Des; Booker, George

    2003-01-01

    The study focused on the development of the concept of fractions in a group of 11- and 12-year-old students who were deaf or hard of hearing. The approach implemented in the study relied extensively on the use of games with very little formal instruction. It emphasized the development of appropriate language to facilitate an understanding of the notion of fractions through the investigation of concrete materials, pictorial representations, and interactions between students and teacher. The progress achieved by means of this approach is reported, and the implications of developing an understanding of fractions (and mathematics generally) among students who are deaf or hard of hearing are noted.

  3. Early Childhood Interventions: Public-Private Partnerships. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Human Resources of the Committee on Government Reform and Oversight. House of Representatives, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Subcommittee on Human Resources.

    These hearings transcripts recount testimony before the U.S. House of Representatives concerning early childhood development programs. Testimony addressed the questions of how public and private investments in early childhood programs contribute to successful outcomes for infants and mothers, and how these successes can be measured and replicated…

  4. Hearing Mothers and Their Deaf Children: The Relationship between Early, Ongoing Mode Match and Subsequent Mental Health Functioning in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallis, Delia; Musselman, Carol; MacKay, Sherri

    2004-01-01

    In the few studies that have been conducted, researchers have typically found that deaf adolescents have more mental health difficulties than their hearing peers and that, within the deaf groups, those who use spoken language have better mental health functioning than those who use sign language. This study investigated the hypotheses that mental…

  5. Hearing and Hearing Protection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    repeated episodes of otitis media in childhood (even when no sequelae was observable during the otoscopic examination at the time of the survey...Raynal, M. and Rondet, Ph., “Hearing loss and use of personal stereos in young adults with antecedents of otitis media ”, The Lancet, 353, 1999, 35 24

  6. Emergent Literacy Skills in Preschool Children with Hearing Loss Who Use Spoken Language: Initial Findings from the Early Language and Literacy Acquisition (ELLA) Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werfel, Krystal L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare change in emergent literacy skills of preschool children with and without hearing loss over a 6-month period. Method: Participants included 19 children with hearing loss and 14 children with normal hearing. Children with hearing loss used amplification and spoken language. Participants completed…

  7. Is very early hearing assessment always reliable in selecting patients for cochlear implants? A case series study.

    PubMed

    Bovo, R; Trevisi, P; Ghiselli, S; Benatti, A; Martini, A

    2015-05-01

    This study concerns a case series of 23 infants with a diagnosis of severe-to-profound hearing loss at 3 months old, who significantly improved (even reaching a normal auditory threshold) within their first year of life. All infants were routinely followed up with audiological tests every 2 months after being fitted with hearing aids as necessary. A reliable consistency between the various test findings (DPOAE, ABR, behavioral responses, CAEP and ECoG) clearly emerged in most cases during the follow-up, albeit at different times after birth. The series of infants included 7 cases of severe prematurity, 6 of cerebral or complex syndromic malformations, 5 healthy infants, 2 with asymptomatic congenital CMV infection, and 1 case each of hyperbilirubinemia, hypoxia, and sepsis. All term-born infants showed a significant improvement over their initial hearing threshold by 6 months of age, while in most of those born prematurely the first signs of threshold amelioration occurred beyond 70 weeks of gestational age, and even beyond 85 weeks in one case. Cochlear implantation (CI) should only be considered after a period of auditory stimulation and follow-up with electrophysiological and behavioral tests, and an accurate analysis of their correlation. In our opinion, CI can be performed after a period of 8 months in all term-born infants with persistent severe-to-profound hearing loss without risk of diagnostic error, whereas the follow-up for severely preterm infants should extend to at least 80 weeks of gestational age. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Hearing in the elderly. Relation of hearing loss, loneliness, and self-esteem.

    PubMed

    Chen, H L

    1994-06-01

    1. The prevalence of hearing impairment increases with age. Hearing handicap resulting from hearing loss may lead to psychosocial problems in elders. 2. Previous studies have shown relations among hearing handicap, loneliness and low self-esteem, but those studies focused on populations other than elders. 3. Early detection of hearing handicap and appropriate interventions promote increased independence and preserve the ability of elders to interact with their environment.

  9. Hearing loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... eardrum) Ringing or buzzing sound in the ears ( tinnitus ) Causes Conductive hearing loss (CHL) occurs because of ... severe hearing loss or ringing in the ears (tinnitus). You have other symptoms, such as ear pain , ...

  10. Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... primarily useful in improving the hearing and speech comprehension of people who have hearing loss that results ... and you can change the program for different listening environments—from a small, quiet room to a ...

  11. Field Hearing on the Reauthorization of the Early Intervention and Preschool Programs under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Select Education of the Committee on Education and Labor, House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session (Brooklyn, New York).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.

    This hearing, held in Brooklyn, New York, on the reauthorization of the early intervention and preschool programs of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, addresses the at-risk factors that prevent school readiness of young children and seeks to ascertain the extent to which at-risk children have been identified and served. A statement…

  12. Field Hearing on Technology in Schools: Preparing for the 21st Century. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Youth and Families of the Committee on Education and the Workforce. House of Representatives, One Hundred Sixth Congress, First Session (Petaluma, California, August 30, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and the Workforce.

    The Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Youth and Families, Committee on Education and the Workforce, U.S. House of Representatives met, pursuant to call, on August 30, 1999 in the Petaluma Community Center, Petaluma, California, with Chairman of the Subcommittee Michael Castle presiding. This document represents the field hearing on how educational…

  13. A Fresh Start for New Orleans' Children: Improving Education after Katrina. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Education and Early Childhood Development of the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions, United States Senate. One Hundred Ninth Congress, Second Session on Examining the Education System of New Orleans (July 14, 2006, New Orleans, LA). Senate Hearing 109-626

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Senate, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine the education system of New Orleans. Statements were presented by: Honorable Lamar Alexander, Chairman, Subcommittee on Education and Early Childhood Development; Honorable Mary L. Landrieu, U.S. Senator from Louisiana; Honorable Richard Burr, U.S. Senator from North Carolina; Linda Johnson, President,…

  14. The Role of Character Education in America's Schools. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Youth and Families of the Committee on Education and the Workforce. House of Representatives, One Hundred Sixth Congress, Second Session (Washington, DC, March 1, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and the Workforce.

    This publication covers the hearing held on March 1, 2000, in Washington, DC, before the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Youth and Families of the Committee on Education and the Workforce of the House of Representatives on the role of character education in U.S. schools. The publication contains the following: "Statement of Mr. Michael N.…

  15. Educating Homeless Children. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Youth and Families of the Committee on Education and the Workforce. House of Representatives, One Hundred Sixth Congress, Second Session (Phoenix, Arizona, September 5, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and the Workforce.

    This hearing before the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Youth and Families of the Committee on Education and the Workforce, House of Representatives, which was held in Phoenix, Arizona, focused on ensuring equal educational opportunities for homeless children. After an opening statement by the Honorable Matt Solomon, Subcommittee on Early…

  16. The Role of Technology in America's Schools. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Youth and Families of the Committee on Education and the Workforce. House of Representatives, One Hundred Sixth Congress, Second Session (Washington, DC, March 8, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and the Workforce.

    The Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Youth and Families, Committee on Education and the Workforce, Washington, DC met in Washington, DC on March 8, 2000 to hear testimony on the role of technology in America's schools. Chairman of the Subcommittee Michael Castle presided. Contents include the opening statements of Chairman Michael Castle and of…

  17. Reauthorization of the Bilingual Education Act. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Youth and Families of the Committee on Education and the Workforce. House of Representatives, One Hundred Sixth Congress, First Session (McAllen, Texas, July 7, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and the Workforce.

    This Congressional hearing on the reauthorization of the Bilingual Education Act, held in McAllen Texas, focuses on issues to consider in the reauthorization of the Bilingual Education Act. After opening statements by Chairman Michael Castle and Representative Ruben Hinojosa, both of the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Youth and Families of the…

  18. [Muenster Parental Programme--Feedback from Parents: How do parents evaluate an early intervention programme for improving the communication with their baby or toddler with hearing impairment?].

    PubMed

    Glanemann, R; Reichmuth, K; am Zehnhoff-Dinnesen, A

    2016-02-01

    With the implementation of the UNHS, early educational services' existing concepts of early intervention have to be adapted to the situation and needs of families with a preverbal child who is deaf or hard of hearing. The Muenster Parental Programme (MPP), a module in early family-centered intervention, fulfils this requirement. We report feedback from participating parents regarding processes and outcomes of the MPP. The self-developed questionnaire was checked for its suitability as feedback instrument for measuring parental satisfaction with the MPP. 29 parents who participated in the MPP assessed the programme by using the standardised FBB and the self-developed questionnaire FB-MEP, which is specific to the MPP. Using the FBB, 96% of parents judged the MPP to be good or very good. With the FB-MEP, parents rated setting, contents and didactics as highly as they did using the FBB (r = 0.7, p < 0.01). In particular, parents judged both the contact and exchange with other affected parents, and the specific individual support for communicating with their child (including video feedback) as especially helpful. The results reflect parents' high level of satisfaction with the setting, content, didactics and individual benefit gained by their child and themselves from the MPP. The parents are aware of the efficacy of the MPP, which was shown in the controlled intervention study. The self-developed questionnaire FB-MEP was shown to be a suitable instrument for quality assurance measurements of the MPP.

  19. Purpose of Newborn Hearing Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... services, babies will have trouble with speech and language development. For some babies, early intervention services may include ... baby will have the best chance for normal language development if any hearing loss is discovered and treatment ...

  20. Early Indication of Noise-induced Hearing Loss from PMP Use in Adolescents: A Cross-Sectional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Colon, Diana C.; Verdugo-Raab, Ulla; Alvarez, Carmelo P.; Steffens, Thomas; Marcrum, Steven C.; Kolb, Stefanie; Herr, Caroline; Twardella, Dorothee

    2016-01-01

    Context: Distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) may indicate preclinical noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) in adolescents from unsafe personal music player (PMP) use. Aims: The objective, therefore, was to observe preclinical signs of NIHL in 9th grade adolescents with clinically normal hearing by comparing DPOAE signals between different levels of A-weighted equivalent PMP exposure. Settings and Design: Subjects were recruited from all secondary-level schools located in the city of Regensburg, Germany during two academic years 2009/2010 and 2010/2011. Subjects and Methods: A-weighted equivalent sound pressure levels (SPLs) for a 40-hour work week (LAeq,40h) were estimated from questionnaire responses on output and duration of PMP use of the previous week. Subjects were then categorized into four levels of exposure: <80, 80–85, >85 to <90, and ≥90 A-weighted Decibel [dB(A)]. DPOAE signals were collected by trained audiological staff, applying a standard optimized protocol, at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology of the University Hospital Regensburg. Statistical Analysis Used: Mean DPOAE signals were compared between levels by unpaired t test. Novel linear regression models adjusting for other leisure noise exposures and with outcome variables DPoutcome and 4 kilo Hertz (kHz) DPOAEs estimated effects between levels. Results: A total of 1468 subjects (56% female, mostly aged 15 or 16 years) were available for analysis. Comparison of DPOAE means by PMP exposure typically showed no greater than 1 dB difference between groups. In fact, comparisons between ≥90 dB(A) and <80 dB(A) presented the least differences in magnitude. Both DPoutcome and 4 kHz linear regression models presented a weak association with the 4-level PMP exposure variable. An expected dose-response to PMP exposure was not observed in any analyses. Conclusions: DPOAE signal strength alone cannot indicate preclinical NIHL in adolescents. PMID:27991459

  1. "It's Just So Lovely to Hear Him Talking": Exploring the Early-Intervention Expectations and Experiences of Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Rena; O'Malley, Mary Pat; O'Connor, Patricia; Monaghan, Una

    2010-01-01

    Little research to date explores parental experiences of early intervention. This study uses action research over a six-month period to explore the expectations and experiences of parents whose children attended an early-intervention group for speech/language impairments. This intervention programme was facilitated by a speech and language…

  2. Do Hearing Protectors Protect Hearing?

    PubMed Central

    Groenewold, Matthew R.; Masterson, Elizabeth A.; Themann, Christa L.; Davis, Rickie R.

    2015-01-01

    Background We examined the association between self-reported hearing protection use at work and incidence of hearing shifts over a 5-year period. Methods Audiometric data from 19,911 workers were analyzed. Two hearing shift measures—OSHA standard threshold shift (OSTS) and high-frequency threshold shift (HFTS)—were used to identify incident shifts in hearing between workers’ 2005 and 2009 audiograms. Adjusted odds ratios were generated using multivariable logistic regression with multi-level modeling. Results The odds ratio for hearing shift for workers who reported never versus always wearing hearing protection was nonsignificant for OSTS (OR 1.23, 95% CI 0.92–1.64) and marginally significant for HFTS (OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.00–1.59). A significant linear trend towards increased risk of HFTS with decreased use of hearing protection was observed (P = 0.02). Conclusion The study raises concern about the effectiveness of hearing protection as a substitute for noise control to prevent noise-induced hearing loss in the workplace. Am. J. Ind. Med. 57:1001–1010, 2014. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:24700499

  3. Hearing Screening Follow-Up: Completing the Process to Identify Hearing Health Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eiserman, William; Shisler, Lenore; Hoffman, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Hearing is at the heart of language development and school readiness; increasing numbers of Early Head Start programs have come to rely on otoacoustic emissions (OAE) technology to screen all infants and toddlers for hearing loss. Successful identification of hearing health needs is dependent not only on an appropriate screening method, but also…

  4. Emergent Literacy Skills in Preschool Children With Hearing Loss Who Use Spoken Language: Initial Findings From the Early Language and Literacy Acquisition (ELLA) Study.

    PubMed

    Werfel, Krystal L

    2017-10-05

    The purpose of this study was to compare change in emergent literacy skills of preschool children with and without hearing loss over a 6-month period. Participants included 19 children with hearing loss and 14 children with normal hearing. Children with hearing loss used amplification and spoken language. Participants completed measures of oral language, phonological processing, and print knowledge twice at a 6-month interval. A series of repeated-measures analyses of variance were used to compare change across groups. Main effects of time were observed for all variables except phonological recoding. Main effects of group were observed for vocabulary, morphosyntax, phonological memory, and concepts of print. Interaction effects were observed for phonological awareness and concepts of print. Children with hearing loss performed more poorly than children with normal hearing on measures of oral language, phonological memory, and conceptual print knowledge. Two interaction effects were present. For phonological awareness and concepts of print, children with hearing loss demonstrated less positive change than children with normal hearing. Although children with hearing loss generally demonstrated a positive growth in emergent literacy skills, their initial performance was lower than that of children with normal hearing, and rates of change were not sufficient to catch up to the peers over time.

  5. Senate Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-07

    Astrophysicist, American Museum of Natural History and Director, Hayden Planetarium Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson testifies during a U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation hearing on Wednesday, March 7, 2012 in Washington. NASA Administrator Charles Bolden testified at the same hearing prior to Tyson. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  6. A Mixed Methods Investigation of Caregiver Coaching in an Early Intervention Model: Differences in Providers for Children with Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Alison R.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the relationship between early intervention providers' backgrounds, and their perceptions of caregiver coaching and auditory skill development, to develop professional development programs. An explanatory sequential design was used with participants of varying backgrounds and experience. In the first…

  7. An Alternative Approach to Early Literacy: The Effects of ASL in Educational Media on Literacy Skills Acquisition for Hearing Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moses, Annie M.; Golos, Debbie B.; Bennett, Colleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Early childhood educators need access to research-based practices and materials to help all children learn to read. Some theorists have suggested that individuals learn to read through "dual coding" (i.e., a verbal code and a nonverbal code) and may benefit from more than one route to literacy (e.g., dual coding theory). Although deaf…

  8. Academic Outcomes for School-Aged Children with Severe-Profound Hearing Loss and Early Unilateral and Bilateral Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarant, Julia Z.; Harris, David C.; Bennet, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study sought to (a) determine whether academic outcomes for children who received early cochlear implants (CIs) are age appropriate, (b) determine whether bilateral CI use significantly improves academic outcomes, and (c) identify other factors that are predictive of these outcomes. Method: Forty-four 8-year-old children with…

  9. Rate of Language Growth in Children with Hearing Loss in an Auditory-Verbal Early Intervention Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Carla Wood; Schatschneider, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study explored the rate of language growth of children in an early intervention program providing auditory-verbal therapy. A retrospective investigation, the study applied a linear growth model to estimate a mean growth curve and the extent of individual variation in language performance on the Preschool Language Scale, 4th ed.…

  10. House Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-07

    Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson, D-TX, asks a question of NASA Administrator Charles Bolden during a House Science, Space and Technology Committee hearing on Wednesday, March 7, 2012 in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. Fish Hearing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaxter, J. H. S.

    1980-01-01

    Provides related information about hearing in fish, including the sensory stimulus of sound in the underwater environment, mechanoreceptors in fish, pressure perception and the swimbladder, specializations in sound conduction peculiar to certain fish families. Includes numerous figures. (CS)

  12. Senate Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-07

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden testifies during a U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation hearing on Wednesday, March 7, 2012 in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  13. Senate Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-07

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden's cowboy boots are seen as he testifies during a U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation hearing on Wednesday, March 7, 2012 in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  14. Senate Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-07

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden's hands and Naval Academy ring are seen as he testifies during a U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation hearing on Wednesday, March 7, 2012 in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  15. Senate Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-07

    U.S. Senator Bill Nelson, D-Fla., questions NASA Administrator Charles Bolden during a U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation hearing on Wednesday, March 7, 2012 in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  16. Early Education and Care: What Is the Federal Government's Role? Hearing before the Subcommittee on Education and Early Childhood Development of the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions, United States Senate, One Hundred Ninth Congress, First Session (April 20, 2005) S. Hrg. 109-116

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Senate, 2005

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this hearing was to examine the federal role in improving the effectiveness and coordination of sixty-nine Federal programs that are designed to help parents help their young children with child care and early education. Opening statements were delivered by Subcommittee Chairman Senator Lamar Alexander, Tennessee; Ranking Member…

  17. Genetics of Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hearing Loss Homepage Basics Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Genetics of Hearing Loss Screening & Diagnosis Types of Hearing Loss About Sound Treatment & Intervention Services Learning Language Bacterial Meningitis Studies Data & Statistics EHDI Annual Data 2016 2015 2014 2013 ...

  18. Hearing Loss in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hearing Loss Homepage Basics Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Genetics of Hearing Loss Screening & Diagnosis Types of Hearing Loss About Sound Treatment & Intervention Services Learning Language Bacterial Meningitis Studies Data & Statistics EHDI Annual Data 2016 2015 2014 2013 ...

  19. [Subsidized project of hearing aid purchase for mild-moderate hearing impaired children in Akita prefecture].

    PubMed

    Sato, Teruyuki; Nakazawa, Misao; Takahashi, Shin; Ishikawa, Kazuo

    2013-06-01

    The dissemination of newborn hearing screening has detected children with mild-moderate hearing impairment at an early age. However, there is no nation-wide welfare system for children with mild-moderate hearing impairment in Japan. Under these kinds of social conditions, a subsidized project of hearing aid purchase for mild-moderate hearing impaired children has come into force from April 2010 in Akita prefecture. All 18 candidates who applied for this project were subsidized in Akita prefecture. Eighteen children purchased their hearing aids using this subsidy. The feature of this project was that every child could have access to subsidies as long as their doctor recognized the effectiveness of hearing aids because children with hearing impairment need to learn language. They contacted the hospital, prefectural government and institutes related to hearing loss before this project come into force. We recognized parents who are raising a child with mild-moderate hearing impairment have high interest in this project. Hearing aids can represent a considerable expense for young parents who are raising a child. We encountered some children who had to give up the idea of hearing aids due to their parents' economic circumstances before this project become effective. These situations were completely avoided after this project came into being. This administrative purpose was of demonstrated value in children with mild-moderate hearing impairment.

  20. Hearing Loss in Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    House, John W.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses hearing loss in adults. It begins with an explanation of the anatomy of the ear and then explains the three types of hearing loss: conductive hearing loss, sensorineural hearing loss, and mixed conductive-sensorineural hearing loss. Tinnitus, hearing aids, and cochlear implants are also addressed. (CR)

  1. Does hearing aid use affect audiovisual integration in mild hearing impairment?

    PubMed

    Gieseler, Anja; Tahden, Maike A S; Thiel, Christiane M; Colonius, Hans

    2018-04-01

    There is converging evidence for altered audiovisual integration abilities in hearing-impaired individuals and those with profound hearing loss who are provided with cochlear implants, compared to normal-hearing adults. Still, little is known on the effects of hearing aid use on audiovisual integration in mild hearing loss, although this constitutes one of the most prevalent conditions in the elderly and, yet, often remains untreated in its early stages. This study investigated differences in the strength of audiovisual integration between elderly hearing aid users and those with the same degree of mild hearing loss who were not using hearing aids, the non-users, by measuring their susceptibility to the sound-induced flash illusion. We also explored the corresponding window of integration by varying the stimulus onset asynchronies. To examine general group differences that are not attributable to specific hearing aid settings but rather reflect overall changes associated with habitual hearing aid use, the group of hearing aid users was tested unaided while individually controlling for audibility. We found greater audiovisual integration together with a wider window of integration in hearing aid users compared to their age-matched untreated peers. Signal detection analyses indicate that a change in perceptual sensitivity as well as in bias may underlie the observed effects. Our results and comparisons with other studies in normal-hearing older adults suggest that both mild hearing impairment and hearing aid use seem to affect audiovisual integration, possibly in the sense that hearing aid use may reverse the effects of hearing loss on audiovisual integration. We suggest that these findings may be particularly important for auditory rehabilitation and call for a longitudinal study.

  2. House Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-28

    William Gerstenmaier, Associate Administrator, Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate, NASA Headquarters, testifies during a hearing before the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology regarding access to and sustainability of the International Space Station, Wednesday, March 28, 2012 at the Rayburn House Office Building in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  3. House Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-28

    Retired astronaut Lt. Gen. Thomas Stafford testifies during a hearing before the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology regarding access to and sustainability of the International Space Station, Wednesday, March 28, 2012 at the Rayburn House Office Building in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  4. House Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-07

    Chairman of the U.S. House Science, Space and Technology Committee Rep. Ralph Hall, R-TX, asks a question of NASA Administrator Charles Bolden during a hearing on Wednesday, March 7, 2012 in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  5. House Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-28

    U.S. Congressman Steven Palazzo (R-MS) asks a question during a hearing before the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology regarding access to and sustainability of the International Space Station, Wednesday, March 28, 2012 at the Rayburn House Office Building in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  6. House Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-28

    U.S. Congresswoman Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-TX) listens to testimony during a hearing before the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology regarding access to and sustainability of the International Space Station, Wednesday, March 28, 2012 at the Rayburn House Office Building in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  7. Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... of pulling off wearing a hearing aid (or making others forget it's there) is by acting like you don't even notice it. If you continue to be ... of them than other people are. Most people don't even notice that someone is ... about them. They'll be too busy thinking about you as a person — what you' ...

  8. House Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-28

    Cristina Chaplain, director, Acquisition and Sourcing Management, U.S. Government Accountability Office testifies during a hearing before the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology regarding access to and sustainability of the International Space Station, Wednesday, March 28, 2012 at the Rayburn House Office Building in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  9. Senate Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-07

    U.S. Senator Tom Udall, D-N.M., questions NASA Administrator Charles Bolden during a U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation hearing on Wednesday, March 7, 2012 in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. Senate Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-07

    U.S. Senator Bill Nelson, D-Fla., and U.S. Senator Kay Bailey Hutchinson, R-Texas, confer during a U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation hearing on Wednesday, March 7, 2012 in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. Senate Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-07

    U.S. Senator Kay Bailey Hutchinson, R-Texas, questions NASA Administrator Charles Bolden during a U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation hearing on Wednesday, March 7, 2012 in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. Senate Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-07

    View from the witness table in the Russell Senate Office Building prior to the start of a U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation hearing with NASA Administrator Charles Bolden as the first witness on Wednesday, March 7, 2012 in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  13. House Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-03-28

    Retired astronaut Lt. Gen. Thomas Stafford, right, and Cristina Chaplain, director, Acquisition and Sourcing Management, U.S. Government Accountability Office listen during a hearing before the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology regarding access to and sustainability of the International Space Station, Wednesday, March 28, 2012 at the Rayburn House Office Building in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  14. Conference on Newborn Hearing Screening; Proceedings Summary and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Presented in the conference proceedings are schedule and list of participants, seven major papers, and the newborn hearing screening recommendations of the interdisciplinary conference on newborn hearing and early identification of hearing impairment. Neonatal auditory testing is reviewed by Sanford E. Gerber, and Sheldon B. Korones gives a…

  15. Tactile Aid Usage with Young Hearing-Impaired Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor, Adele

    Five hearing impaired children (2 to 4 years old) were followed longitudinally while using a single channel, vibrotactile aid as a supplement to hearing aids. Standardized language tests (including the Scales of Early Communication Skills for Hearing Impaired Children, the Test for Auditory Comprehension of Language, and the Test for Auditory…

  16. Early Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This theme issue focuses on early intervention. The four articles presented on this theme are: (1) "Deaf Infants, Hearing Mothers: A Research Report" (Kathryn P. Meadow-Orlans, and others), reporting findings on effects of auditory loss on early development; (2) "Maintaining Involvement of Inner City Families in Early Intervention Programs through…

  17. [Rehabilitative measures in hearing-impaired children].

    PubMed

    von Wedel, H; von Wedel, U C; Zorowka, P

    1991-12-01

    On the basis of certain fundamental data on the maturation processes of the central auditory pathways in early childhood the importance of early intervention with hearing aids is discussed and emphasized. Pathological hearing, that is acoustical deprivation in early childhood will influence the maturation process. Very often speech development is delayed if diagnosis and therapy or rehabilitation are not early enough. Anamnesis, early diagnosis and clinical differential diagnosis are required before a hearing aid can be fitted. Selection criteria and adjustment parameters are discussed, showing that the hearing aid fitting procedure must be embedded in a complex matrix of requirements related to the development of speech as well as to the cognitive, emotional and social development of the child. As a rule, finding and preparing the "best" hearing aids (binaural fitting is obligatory) for a child is a long and often difficult process, which can only be performed by specialists who are pedo-audiologists. After the binaural fitting of hearing aids an intensive hearing and speech education in close cooperation between parents, pedo-audiologist and teacher must support the whole development of the child.

  18. Binaural pitch fusion: Comparison of normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listenersa)

    PubMed Central

    Reiss, Lina A. J.; Shayman, Corey S.; Walker, Emily P.; Bennett, Keri O.; Fowler, Jennifer R.; Hartling, Curtis L.; Glickman, Bess; Lasarev, Michael R.; Oh, Yonghee

    2017-01-01

    Binaural pitch fusion is the fusion of dichotically presented tones that evoke different pitches between the ears. In normal-hearing (NH) listeners, the frequency range over which binaural pitch fusion occurs is usually <0.2 octaves. Recently, broad fusion ranges of 1–4 octaves were demonstrated in bimodal cochlear implant users. In the current study, it was hypothesized that hearing aid (HA) users would also exhibit broad fusion. Fusion ranges were measured in both NH and hearing-impaired (HI) listeners with hearing losses ranging from mild-moderate to severe-profound, and relationships of fusion range with demographic factors and with diplacusis were examined. Fusion ranges of NH and HI listeners averaged 0.17 ± 0.13 octaves and 1.7 ± 1.5 octaves, respectively. In HI listeners, fusion ranges were positively correlated with a principal component measure of the covarying factors of young age, early age of hearing loss onset, and long durations of hearing loss and HA use, but not with hearing threshold, amplification level, or diplacusis. In NH listeners, no correlations were observed with age, hearing threshold, or diplacusis. The association of broad fusion with early onset, long duration of hearing loss suggests a possible role of long-term experience with hearing loss and amplification in the development of broad fusion. PMID:28372056

  19. Education Technology Programs Authorized under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA). Hearing before the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Youth and Families of the Committee on Education and the Workforce. House of Representatives, One Hundred Sixth Congress, First Session (Washington, DC, May 11, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and the Workforce.

    This document represents the second hearing before the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Youth and Families, held in Washington, DC on May 11, 1999 on the education technology programs authorized under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA). Michael Castle, Chairman of the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Youth and Families, Committee on…

  20. Influences of Working Memory and Audibility on Word Learning in Children with Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiles, Derek Jason

    2010-01-01

    As a group, children with hearing loss demonstrate delays in language development relative to their peers with normal hearing. Early intervention has a profound impact on language outcomes in children with hearing loss. Data examining the relationship between degree of hearing loss and language outcomes are variable. Two approaches are used in the…

  1. Smartphone-Based Hearing Screening in Noisy Environments

    PubMed Central

    Na, Youngmin; Joo, Hyo Sung; Yang, Hyejin; Kang, Soojin; Hong, Sung Hwa; Woo, Jihwan

    2014-01-01

    It is important and recommended to detect hearing loss as soon as possible. If it is found early, proper treatment may help improve hearing and reduce the negative consequences of hearing loss. In this study, we developed smartphone-based hearing screening methods that can ubiquitously test hearing. However, environmental noise generally results in the loss of ear sensitivity, which causes a hearing threshold shift (HTS). To overcome this limitation in the hearing screening location, we developed a correction algorithm to reduce the HTS effect. A built-in microphone and headphone were calibrated to provide the standard units of measure. The HTSs in the presence of either white or babble noise were systematically investigated to determine the mean HTS as a function of noise level. When the hearing screening application runs, the smartphone automatically measures the environmental noise and provides the HTS value to correct the hearing threshold. A comparison to pure tone audiometry shows that this hearing screening method in the presence of noise could closely estimate the hearing threshold. We expect that the proposed ubiquitous hearing test method could be used as a simple hearing screening tool and could alert the user if they suffer from hearing loss. PMID:24926692

  2. Hearing Problems in Children

    MedlinePlus

    Most children hear and listen from the moment they are born. They learn to talk by imitating the sounds around them ... United States are born deaf or hard-of-hearing. More lose their hearing later during childhood. Babies ...

  3. Types of Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... hearing impairment. Most hearing aids share several similar electronic components, including a microphone that picks up sound; ... the ear canal; and batteries that power the electronic parts. Hearing aids differ by: design technology used ...

  4. Buying a Hearing Aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... hearing aids? Federal regulation prohibits any hearing aid sale unless the buyer has first received a physician’s ... care of your hearing aids and other helpful strategies. How should I begin wearing the aids? Start ...

  5. Hearing Disorders and Deafness

    MedlinePlus

    ... enough to enjoy talking with friends or family. Hearing disorders make it hard, but not impossible, to ... often be helped. Deafness can keep you from hearing sound at all. What causes hearing loss? Some ...

  6. Rehabilitation for disabling hearing loss: evaluating the need relative to provision of hearing aids in the public health care system.

    PubMed

    Hlayisi, Vera-Genevey; Ramma, Lebogang

    2018-05-20

    To determine the demand relative to supply of hearing rehabilitation through hearing aids for those with disabling hearing loss in a public health care setting in South Africa. Retrospective cross-sectional survey of medical records of all patients were seen at a public hospital (Polokwane Provincial Academic) during 2012-2014, was conducted. Audiological data from 3894 medical folders were accessed and reviewed; thereafter, results were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Of the 3894 medical folders reviewed, two-third (62%, n = 2402) were diagnosed with hearing loss, mostly bilaterally (81%). More than 30% of all patients diagnosed with hearing loss were ≤10 years old. Sensorineural (permanent) hearing loss was diagnosed most often (38%, n = 913) and 74% (n = 1778) of hearing losses diagnosed were of moderate or worse severity (i.e., disabling loss). Hearing aids were fitted to only 15% (n = 272) of those diagnosed with disabling hearing loss and most hearing aid fittings were to low-income adult patients (≥25 years old) with more severe-profound hearing losses. This study showed that the need for hearing aids to provide hearing rehabilitation far exceeds the supply. Therefore, a multi-pronged approach that includes increased budget allocation and exploring low-cost interventions for developing countries to meet the demand for hearing aids. Furthermore, study highlighted a high prevalence of hearing loss in those younger than 10 years of age, and thus highlights the need for early intervention as well as intensifying efforts to reduce preventable causes of hearing loss. Implications for Rehabilitation Audiologists need to advocate for an increase in budget allocation for hearing rehabilitation devices. Study indicates need to explore low-cost hearing devices/rehabilitation interventions for developing countries. Health professionals should consider preventative measures to reduce prevalence of preventable hearing loss.

  7. Working Together: Communication between Stakeholders during the Transition from Early Intervention to School for Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curle, Deirdre; Jamieson, Janet; Poon, Brenda T.; Buchanan, Marla; Norman, Nancy; Zaidman-Zait, Anat

    2017-01-01

    The transition to school can be a complicated process for families of children with exceptionalities (Janus, Lefort, Cameron, & Kopechanski, 2007). Little is known about the transition to school specifically for children who are deaf or hard of hearing (D/HH). The aim of this study was to examine the communication that occurred among early…

  8. Can Routinely Collected Early Intervention Data for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Children Be Used for Outcome Monitoring? A Case Example from British Columbia, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poon, Brenda T.; Simmons, Noreen R.

    2016-01-01

    Population-based outcome monitoring could provide useful information about factors that differentially influence the developmental trajectories of deaf or hard-of-hearing children. A strong basis for population-based outcome monitoring is a coordinated, longitudinal data collection, and management infrastructure that includes quality local…

  9. False Belief Development in Children Who Are Hard of Hearing Compared with Peers with Normal Hearing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Elizabeth A.; Ambrose, Sophie E.; Oleson, Jacob; Moeller, Mary Pat

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates false belief (FB) understanding in children who are hard of hearing (CHH) compared with children with normal hearing (CNH) at ages 5 and 6 years and at 2nd grade. Research with this population has theoretical significance, given that the early auditory-linguistic experiences of CHH are less restricted compared with…

  10. Singing whales generate high levels of particle motion: implications for acoustic communication and hearing?

    PubMed

    Mooney, T Aran; Kaplan, Maxwell B; Lammers, Marc O

    2016-11-01

    Acoustic signals are fundamental to animal communication, and cetaceans are often considered bioacoustic specialists. Nearly all studies of their acoustic communication focus on sound pressure measurements, overlooking the particle motion components of their communication signals. Here we characterized the levels of acoustic particle velocity (and pressure) of song produced by humpback whales. We demonstrate that whales generate acoustic fields that include significant particle velocity components that are detectable over relatively long distances sufficient to play a role in acoustic communication. We show that these signals attenuate predictably in a manner similar to pressure and that direct particle velocity measurements can provide bearings to singing whales. Whales could potentially use such information to determine the distance of signalling animals. Additionally, the vibratory nature of particle velocity may stimulate bone conduction, a hearing modality found in other low-frequency specialized mammals, offering a parsimonious mechanism of acoustic energy transduction into the massive ossicles of whale ears. With substantial concerns regarding the effects of increasing anthropogenic ocean noise and major uncertainties surrounding mysticete hearing, these results highlight both an unexplored pathway that may be available for whale acoustic communication and the need to better understand the biological role of acoustic particle motion. © 2016 The Author(s).

  11. Singing whales generate high levels of particle motion: implications for acoustic communication and hearing?

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Maxwell B.; Lammers, Marc O.

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic signals are fundamental to animal communication, and cetaceans are often considered bioacoustic specialists. Nearly all studies of their acoustic communication focus on sound pressure measurements, overlooking the particle motion components of their communication signals. Here we characterized the levels of acoustic particle velocity (and pressure) of song produced by humpback whales. We demonstrate that whales generate acoustic fields that include significant particle velocity components that are detectable over relatively long distances sufficient to play a role in acoustic communication. We show that these signals attenuate predictably in a manner similar to pressure and that direct particle velocity measurements can provide bearings to singing whales. Whales could potentially use such information to determine the distance of signalling animals. Additionally, the vibratory nature of particle velocity may stimulate bone conduction, a hearing modality found in other low-frequency specialized mammals, offering a parsimonious mechanism of acoustic energy transduction into the massive ossicles of whale ears. With substantial concerns regarding the effects of increasing anthropogenic ocean noise and major uncertainties surrounding mysticete hearing, these results highlight both an unexplored pathway that may be available for whale acoustic communication and the need to better understand the biological role of acoustic particle motion. PMID:27807249

  12. Hearing and music in dementia

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Julene K; Chow, Maggie L

    2016-01-01

    Music is a complex acoustic signal that relies on a number of different brain and cognitive processes to create the sensation of hearing. Changes in hearing function are generally not a major focus of concern for persons with a majority of neurodegenerative diseases associated with dementia, such as Alzheimer disease (AD). However, changes in the processing of sounds may be an early, and possibly preclinical, feature of AD and other neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of this chapter is to review the current state of knowledge concerning hearing and music perception in persons who have a dementia as a result of a neurodegenerative disease. The review focuses on both peripheral and central auditory processing in common neurodegenerative diseases, with a particular focus on the processing of music and other non-verbal sounds. The chapter also reviews music interventions used for persons with neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25726296

  13. Sound transmission in archaic and modern whales: anatomical adaptations for underwater hearing.

    PubMed

    Nummela, Sirpa; Thewissen, J G M; Bajpai, Sunil; Hussain, Taseer; Kumar, Kishor

    2007-06-01

    The whale ear, initially designed for hearing in air, became adapted for hearing underwater in less than ten million years of evolution. This study describes the evolution of underwater hearing in cetaceans, focusing on changes in sound transmission mechanisms. Measurements were made on 60 fossils of whole or partial skulls, isolated tympanics, middle ear ossicles, and mandibles from all six archaeocete families. Fossil data were compared with data on two families of modern mysticete whales and nine families of modern odontocete cetaceans, as well as five families of noncetacean mammals. Results show that the outer ear pinna and external auditory meatus were functionally replaced by the mandible and the mandibular fat pad, which posteriorly contacts the tympanic plate, the lateral wall of the bulla. Changes in the ear include thickening of the tympanic bulla medially, isolation of the tympanoperiotic complex by means of air sinuses, functional replacement of the tympanic membrane by a bony plate, and changes in ossicle shapes and orientation. Pakicetids, the earliest archaeocetes, had a land mammal ear for hearing in air, and used bone conduction underwater, aided by the heavy tympanic bulla. Remingtonocetids and protocetids were the first to display a genuine underwater ear where sound reached the inner ear through the mandibular fat pad, the tympanic plate, and the middle ear ossicles. Basilosaurids and dorudontids showed further aquatic adaptations of the ossicular chain and the acoustic isolation of the ear complex from the skull. The land mammal ear and the generalized modern whale ear are evolutionarily stable configurations, two ends of a process where the cetacean mandible might have been a keystone character. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. A new archaic baleen whale Toipahautea waitaki (early Late Oligocene, New Zealand) and the origins of crown Mysticeti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Cheng-Hsiu; Fordyce, R. Ewan

    2018-04-01

    A new genus and species of extinct baleen whale †Toipahautea waitaki (Late Oligocene, New Zealand) is based on a skull and associated bones, from the lower Kokoamu Greensand, about 27.5 Ma (local upper Whaingaroan Stage, early Chattian). The upper jaw includes a thin, elongate and apparently toothless maxilla, with evidence of arterial supply for baleen. Open sutures with the premaxilla suggest a flexible (kinetic) upper jaw. The blowhole is well forward. The mandible is bowed laterally and slightly dorsally; unlike the Eomysticetidae, there are no mandibular alveoli, and the coronoid process is tapered and curved laterally. Jaw structure is consistent with baleen-assisted gulp-feeding. The age of early Chattian makes †Toipahautea a very early, if not the oldest named, toothless and baleen-bearing mysticete, suggesting that the full transition from toothed to baleen-bearing probably occurred in the Early Oligocene. Late Oligocene mysticetes vary considerably in jaw form and kinesis, tooth form and function, and development of baleen, implying a wide range of raptorial, suctorial and filter-feeding behaviour. More study may elucidate the function of jaws, teeth and baleen in terms of opportunist/generalist feeding, as in modern gray whales, versus specialized feeding. We here propose that early mysticetes, when transitioned from toothed to baleen-bearing, were generalists and opportunists instead of specializing in any forms of feeding strategies. In addition, two different phylogenetic analyses placed †Toipahautea either in a polytomy including crown Mysticeti, or immediately basal to the crown, and above †Eomysticetidae in both cases. Because the †Toipahautea waitaki holotype is an immature individual, it may plot more basally in phylogeny than its true position.

  15. Language Outcomes in Children Who Are Deaf and Hard of Hearing: The Role of Language Ability before Hearing Aid Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daub, Olivia; Bagatto, Marlene P.; Johnson, Andrew M.; Cardy, Janis Oram

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Early auditory experiences are fundamental in infant language acquisition. Research consistently demonstrates the benefits of early intervention (i.e., hearing aids) to language outcomes in children who are deaf and hard of hearing. The nature of these benefits and their relation with prefitting development are, however, not well…

  16. How to Get Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... batteries and hearing aids away from children and pets. We recommend visiting a hearing healthcare professional on a regular basis to have your hearing aids inspected. More in Hearing Aids Hearing Loss Types of Hearing Aids Benefits and Safety Issues Hearing Aids and Cell Phones ...

  17. Music exposure and hearing disorders: an overview.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fei; Manchaiah, Vinaya K C; French, David; Price, Sharon M

    2010-01-01

    It has been generally accepted that excessive exposure to loud music causes various hearing symptoms (e.g. tinnitus) and consequently leads to a risk of permanent hearing damage, known as noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Such potential risk of NIHL due to loud music exposure has been widely investigated in musicians and people working in music venues. With advancements in sound technology and rapid developments in the music industry, increasing numbers of people, particularly adolescents and young adults, are exposing themselves to music on a voluntary basis at potentially harmful levels, and over a substantial period of time, which can also cause NIHL. However, because of insufficient audiometric evidence of hearing loss caused purely by music exposure, there is still disagreement and speculation about the risk of hearing loss from music exposure alone. Many studies have suggested using advanced audiological measurements as more sensitive and efficient tools to monitor hearing status as early indicators of cochlear dysfunction. The purpose of this review is to provide further insight into the potential risk of hearing loss caused by exposure to loud music, and thus contribute to further raising awareness of music induced hearing loss.

  18. Hearing aids: indications, technology, adaptation, and quality control

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, Ulrich; Hesse, Gerhard

    2017-01-01

    Hearing loss can be caused by a number of different pathological conditions. Some of them can be successfully treated, mainly by surgery, depending on the individual’s disease process. However, the treatment of chronic sensorineural hearing loss with damaged cochlear structures usually needs hearing rehabilitation by means of technical amplification. During the last two decades tremendous improvements in hearing aid technology led to a higher quality of the hearing rehabilitation process. For example, due to sophisticated signal processing acoustic feedback could be reduced and hence open fitting options are available even for more subjects with higher degrees of hearing loss. In particular for high-frequency hearing loss, the use of open fitting is an option. Both the users’ acceptance and the perceived sound quality were significantly increased by open fittings. However, we are still faced with a low level of readiness in many hearing impaired subjects to accept acoustic amplification. Since ENT specialists play a key-role in hearing aid provision, they should promote early hearing aid rehabilitation and include this in the counselling even in subjects with mild and moderate hearing loss. Recent investigations demonstrated the benefit of early hearing aid use in this group of patients since this may help to reduce subsequent damages as auditory deprivation, social isolation, development of dementia, and cognitive decline. For subjects with tinnitus, hearing aids may also support masking by environmental sounds and enhance cortical inhibition. The present paper describes the latest developments of hearing aid technology and the current state of the art for amplification modalities. Implications for both hearing aid indication and provision are discussed. PMID:29279726

  19. Compound heterozygosity of the functionally null Cdh23(v-ngt) and hypomorphic Cdh23(ahl) alleles leads to early-onset progressive hearing loss in mice.

    PubMed

    Miyasaka, Yuki; Suzuki, Sari; Ohshiba, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Kei; Sagara, Yoshihiko; Yasuda, Shumpei P; Matsuoka, Kunie; Shitara, Hiroshi; Yonekawa, Hiromichi; Kominami, Ryo; Kikkawa, Yoshiaki

    2013-01-01

    The waltzer (v) mouse mutant harbors a mutation in Cadherin 23 (Cdh23) and is a model for Usher syndrome type 1D, which is characterized by congenital deafness, vestibular dysfunction, and prepubertal onset of progressive retinitis pigmentosa. In mice, functionally null Cdh23 mutations affect stereociliary morphogenesis and the polarity of both cochlear and vestibular hair cells. In contrast, the murine Cdh23(ahl) allele, which harbors a hypomorphic mutation, causes an increase in susceptibility to age-related hearing loss in many inbred strains. We produced congenic mice by crossing mice carrying the v niigata (Cdh23(v-ngt)) null allele with mice carrying the hypomorphic Cdh23(ahl) allele on the C57BL/6J background, and we then analyzed the animals' balance and hearing phenotypes. Although the Cdh23(v-ngt/ahl) compound heterozygous mice exhibited normal vestibular function, their hearing ability was abnormal: the mice exhibited higher thresholds of auditory brainstem response (ABR) and rapid age-dependent elevation of ABR thresholds compared with Cdh23(ahl/ahl) homozygous mice. We found that the stereocilia developed normally but were progressively disrupted in Cdh23(v-ngt/ahl) mice. In hair cells, CDH23 localizes to the tip links of stereocilia, which are thought to gate the mechanoelectrical transduction channels in hair cells. We hypothesize that the reduction of Cdh23 gene dosage in Cdh23(v-ngt/ahl) mice leads to the degeneration of stereocilia, which consequently reduces tip link tension. These findings indicate that CDH23 plays an important role in the maintenance of tip links during the aging process.

  20. [Sensorineural hearing loss due to neonatal hyperbilirubinemia].

    PubMed

    Clarós, P; Turcanu, D; Caballero, M; Costa, C; Clavería, M A; Clarós, A; Clarós, A

    2003-01-01

    In this article, the sensorineural hearing loss is presented as a possible sequelae of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. In our program of early hipoacusia detection, 241 babies were examined from January 1996 until November 1999; 7 cases had a history of hyperbilirubinemia in the neonatal period and 2 of them were diagnosed of sensorineural hearing loss. We discuss how the bilirubin or any other associated factor might have been the cause and this could explain the selective affectation of some children.

  1. Hearing on the Reauthorization of the Higher Education Act of 1965: Early Intervention. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Postsecondary Education of the Committee on Education and Labor. House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.

    This document presents tetimony and prepared statements concerning three pieces of legislation which seek to increase early intervention and outreach activities designed to inform students and their families about postsecondary education and student financial assistance options. The legislation provides for technical assistance to guidance…

  2. Hearing impairment and language delay in infants: Diagnostics and genetics

    PubMed Central

    Lang-Roth, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    This overview study provides information on important phoniatric and audiological aspects of early childhood hearing and language development with the aim of presenting diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. The article first addresses the universal newborn hearing screening that has been implemented in Germany for all infants since January 2009. The process of newborn hearing screening from the maternity ward to confirmation diagnostics is presented in accordance with a decision by the Federal Joint Committee (G-BA). The second topic is pediatric audiology diagnostics. Following confirmation of a permanent early childhood hearing disorder, the search for the cause plays an important role. Hereditary hearing disorders and intrauterine cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, probably the most common cause of an acquired hearing disorder, are discussed and compared with the most common temporary hearing disorder, otitis media with effusion, which in some cases is severe enough to be relevant for hearing and language development and therefore requires treatment. The third topic covered in this article is speech and language development in the first 3 years of life, which is known today to be crucial for later language development and learning to read and write. There is a short overview and introduction to modern terminology, followed by the abnormalities and diagnostics of early speech and language development. Only some aspects of early hearing and language development are addressed here. Important areas such as the indication for a cochlear implant in the first year of life or because of unilateral deafness are not included due to their complexity. PMID:25587365

  3. Noise-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Sliwinska-Kowalska, Mariola; Davis, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) still remains a problem in developed countries, despite reduced occupational noise exposure, strict standards for hearing protection and extensive public health awareness campaigns. Therefore NIHL continues to be the focus of noise research activities. This paper summarizes progress achieved recently in our knowledge of NIHL. It includes papers published between the years 2008-2011 (in English), which were identified by a literature search of accessible medical and other relevant databases. A substantial part of this research has been concerned with the risk of NIHL in the entertainment sector, particularly in professional, orchestral musicians. There are also constant concerns regarding noise exposure and hearing risk in "hard to control" occupations, such as farming and construction work. Although occupational noise has decreased since the early 1980s, the number of young people subject to social noise exposure has tripled. If the exposure limits from the Noise at Work Regulations are applied, discotheque music, rock concerts, as well as music from personal music players are associated with the risk of hearing loss in teenagers and young adults. Several recent research studies have increased the understanding of the pathomechanisms of acoustic trauma, the genetics of NIHL, as well as possible dietary and pharmacologic otoprotection in acoustic trauma. The results of these studies are very promising and offer grounds to expect that targeted therapies might help prevent the loss of sensory hair cells and protect the hearing of noise-exposed individuals. These studies emphasize the need to launch an improved noise exposure policy for hearing protection along with developing more efficient norms of NIHL risk assessment.

  4. Eocene evolution of whale hearing.

    PubMed

    Nummela, Sirpa; Thewissen, J G M; Bajpai, Sunil; Hussain, S Taseer; Kumar, Kishor

    2004-08-12

    The origin of whales (order Cetacea) is one of the best-documented examples of macroevolutionary change in vertebrates. As the earliest whales became obligately marine, all of their organ systems adapted to the new environment. The fossil record indicates that this evolutionary transition took less than 15 million years, and that different organ systems followed different evolutionary trajectories. Here we document the evolutionary changes that took place in the sound transmission mechanism of the outer and middle ear in early whales. Sound transmission mechanisms change early on in whale evolution and pass through a stage (in pakicetids) in which hearing in both air and water is unsophisticated. This intermediate stage is soon abandoned and is replaced (in remingtonocetids and protocetids) by a sound transmission mechanism similar to that in modern toothed whales. The mechanism of these fossil whales lacks sophistication, and still retains some of the key elements that land mammals use to hear airborne sound.

  5. Hearing loss and disability exit: Measurement issues and coping strategies.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Vibeke Tornhøj; Datta Gupta, Nabanita

    2017-02-01

    Hearing loss is one of the most common conditions related to aging, and previous descriptive evidence links it to early exit from the labor market. These studies are usually based on self-reported hearing difficulties, which are potentially endogenous to labor supply. We use unique representative data collected in the spring of 2005 through in-home interviews. The data contains self-reported functional and clinically-measured hearing ability for a representative sample of the Danish population aged 50-64. We estimate the causal effect of hearing loss on early retirement via disability benefits, taking into account the endogeneity of functional hearing. Our identification strategy involves the simultaneous estimation of labor supply, functional hearing, and coping strategies (i.e. accessing assistive devices at work or informing one's employer about the problem). We use hearing aids as an instrument for functional hearing. Our main empirical findings are that endogeneity bias is more severe for men than women and that functional hearing problems significantly increase the likelihood of receiving disability benefits for both men and women. However, relative to the baseline the effect is larger for men (47% vs. 20%, respectively). Availability of assistive devices in the workplace decreases the likelihood of receiving disability benefits, whereas informing an employer about hearing problems increases this likelihood. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Hearing Aid Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Progress in hearing aids has come a long way. Yet despite such progress hearing aids are not the perfect answer to many hearing problems. Some adult ears cannot accommodate tightly fitting hearing aids. Mouth movements such as chewing, talking, and athletic or other active endeavors also lead to loosely fitting ear molds. It is well accepted that loosely fitting hearing aids are the cause of feedback noise. Since feedback noise is the most common complaint of hearing aid wearers it has been the subject of various patents. Herein a hearing aid assembly is provided eliminating feedback noise. The assembly includes the combination of a hearing aid with a headset developed to constrict feedback noise.

  7. OI Issues: Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... a formal audiologic assessment regardless of age. If borderline hearing is discovered, then yearly testing with a certified audiologist is recommended. Adults with borderline hearing should have yearly testing and follow up ...

  8. Hearing and the cochlea

    MedlinePlus

    ... like structure that contains the receptor organ for hearing. The cochlea contains the spiral organ of Corti, which is the receptor organ for hearing. It consists of tiny hair cells that translate ...

  9. Office of Administrative Hearings

    Science.gov Websites

    Mandala (Anchorage) Kathryn L. Kurtz (Juneau) Lawrence A. Pederson (Anchorage) Jessica Leeah (Juneau ) Kathryn A. Swiderski (Anchorage) Karen L. Loeffler (Anchorage) Hearing Procedures for Fair Hearings and

  10. Hearing Voices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blount, Reginald

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the influence of conversations in the shaping of a person's life. He shares how some of the voices he heard early in his life, specifically those of his mother and his local pastor, had a profound impact on his life. These were conversations that taught him the value of doing the best that he could and of the…

  11. Rehabilitation of Hearing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Federation of the Deaf, Rome (Italy).

    Rehabilitation of hearing is considered in five conference papers. Two papers come from Poland: "Rehabilitation of Hearing in Children 'Deaf' in First 5 Years of Age" by D. Borkowska-Gaertig and others and "Possibilities of Hearing Improvement in Adults with Conservative Methods" by T. Bystrzanowska. Also included are…

  12. Deafness and Hearing Loss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities, Washington, DC.

    This brief overview provides information on the definition, incidence, and characteristics of children with hearing impairments and deafness. The federal definitions of hearing impairment and deafness are provided. The different types of hearing loss are noted, including: (1) conductive (caused by diseases or obstructions in the outer or middle…

  13. Hearing-aid tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessinger, R.; Polhemus, J. T.; Waring, J. G.

    1977-01-01

    Hearing aids are automatically checked by circuit that applies half-second test signal every thirty minutes. If hearing-aid output is distorted, too small, or if battery is too low, a warning lamp is activated. Test circuit is incorporated directly into hearing-aid package.

  14. Diphtheria and hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Schubert, C R; Cruickshanks, K J; Wiley, T L; Klein, R; Klein, B E; Tweed, T S

    2001-01-01

    To determine if infectious diseases usually experienced in childhood have an effect on hearing ability later in life. The Epidemiology of Hearing Loss Study (N = 3,753) is a population-based study of age-related hearing loss in adults aged 48 to 92 years in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin. As part of this study, infectious disease history was obtained and hearing was tested using pure-tone audiometry. Hearing loss was defined as a pure-tone average of thresholds at 500 Hz, 1,000 Hz, 2,000 Hz, and 4,000 Hz greater than 25 decibels hearing level in either ear. After adjusting for confounders, only a history of diphtheria (n = 37) was associated with hearing loss (odds ratio [OR] 2.79; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05, 7.36). There was no relationship between hearing loss and history of chickenpox, measles, mumps, pertussis, polio, rheumatic fever, rubella, or scarlet fever. Only two participants with a history of diphtheria and hearing loss reported having a hearing loss before age 20. Diphtheria in childhood may have consequences for hearing that do not become apparent until later in life. A possible biological mechanism for a diphtheria effect on hearing ability exists: The toxin produced by the Corynebacterium diphtheriae bacteria can cause damage to cranial nerves and therefore may affect the auditory neural pathway. These data may have important implications for areas facing a resurgence of diphtheria cases.

  15. Implementing Hearing Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cliffe, Roger

    1978-01-01

    Hearing damage from noise exposure and approaches to implementing hearing safety in school industrial laboratories through noise reduction and protective equipment are discussed. Although all states have not adopted the Occupational Safety and Health Act, teachers should be aware of noise hazards and act to protect hearing. (MF)

  16. Hearing Conservation Medical Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Background on hearing impairment is presented including causes and criteria for safe noise levels. The purpose of the Hearing Conservation Program at LeRC is outlined, and the specifics of the Medical Surveillance Program for Hearing Impairment at LeRC are discussed.

  17. Industrial hearing conservation.

    PubMed

    Glorig, A

    1979-08-01

    Hearing conservation programs, when appropriate in industry, are now a necessity. Even though one may not wish to adopt an altruistic attitude toward the conservation of hearing, one must, like it or not, initiate a hearing conservation program because of both federal and state regulations. Since industrial noise exposure produced more hearing loss in more people than all other causes of hearing loss combined, it is incumbent on all industries with noise makers to do something about protecting human hearing. The tragedy is that nearly all industrial hearing loss can be prevented with proper hearing conservation measures. The cost of hearing conservation is far less than the cost of hearing loss in terms of human suffering and dollars in the compensation courts. Proper education of both managment and labor can result in successful hearing conservation programs. The method of choice is reduction of the noise at the source, but in many cases this is infeasible both technically and economically and therefore protection at the ear must be used. Experience has shown that with proper supervision ear protection programs can prevent the majority of instances of hearing loss in the majority of individuals exposed.

  18. Identifying congenital hearing impairment. Personal experience based on selective hearing screening.

    PubMed

    Molini, E; Ricci, G; Baroni, S; Ciorba, A; Bellocci, A; Simoncelli, C

    2004-06-01

    If all degrees of permanent uni- or bilateral hypoacusis are taken into consideration, hearing impairment is the most common congenital disease. Early detection of permanent infantile hearing impairment has become extremely important in preventive medicine, since steps can be taken with hearing aids and rehabilitation to ensure better development of language and higher cognitive functions. Aim of this study is to provide a critical review of the time of diagnosis of hypoacusis at our audiology laboratory, where two methods were used to screen hearing of children with/without risk indicators. Results of approximately 10 years' work were re-examined during which time outpatient screening was conducted on children referred by colleagues in neonatology and paediatrics. All were carriers of congenital risk indicators associated with sensorineural and/or conductive hearing loss, based on the Joint Committee on Infant Hearing findings, or were suspected of being hypoacusic even if they had no known congenital risk factors. Hearing screening was conducted in hospital on newborns with no risk factors, within the first few days of birth. Results of the present study showed that when selective hearing screening was performed, the mean age of high-risk patients diagnosed with hypoacusis was slightly higher than that in international guidelines. Moreover, these patients represent approximately half the hypoacusic population identified in the study period. The other half of congenital hypoacusic subjects identified had no risk indicators and there was a significant delay in diagnosis due to later manifestation of symptoms indicating hypoacusis, and thus, in turn, delayed referral for hearing tests. In contrast, subjects without risk indicators who underwent in-hospital hearing screening and proved to be hypoacusic, were diagnosed early. In our experience, however, universal screening has considerable disadvantages, such as difficulty in covering the entire population, difficulty

  19. 10 CFR 52.21 - Administrative review of applications; hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... alternative energy sources. The presiding officer in an early site permit hearing shall not admit contentions... or reactors, or an analysis of alternative energy sources if those issues were not addressed by the... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administrative review of applications; hearings. 52.21...

  20. 10 CFR 52.21 - Administrative review of applications; hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... alternative energy sources. The presiding officer in an early site permit hearing shall not admit contentions... or reactors, or an analysis of alternative energy sources if those issues were not addressed by the... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Administrative review of applications; hearings. 52.21...

  1. 10 CFR 52.21 - Administrative review of applications; hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... alternative energy sources. The presiding officer in an early site permit hearing shall not admit contentions... or reactors, or an analysis of alternative energy sources if those issues were not addressed by the... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Administrative review of applications; hearings. 52.21...

  2. 10 CFR 52.21 - Administrative review of applications; hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... alternative energy sources. The presiding officer in an early site permit hearing shall not admit contentions... or reactors, or an analysis of alternative energy sources if those issues were not addressed by the... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Administrative review of applications; hearings. 52.21...

  3. 10 CFR 52.21 - Administrative review of applications; hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... alternative energy sources. The presiding officer in an early site permit hearing shall not admit contentions... or reactors, or an analysis of alternative energy sources if those issues were not addressed by the... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Administrative review of applications; hearings. 52.21...

  4. Newborn Hearing Screening: An Analysis of Current Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston, K. Todd; Bradham, Tamala S.; Munoz, Karen F.; Guignard, Gayla Hutsell

    2011-01-01

    State coordinators of early hearing detection and intervention (EHDI) programs completed a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats, or SWOT, analysis that consisted of 12 evaluative areas of EHDI programs. For the newborn hearing screening area, a total of 293 items were listed by 49 EHDI coordinators, and themes were identified within…

  5. Hearing loss in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckey, J. C. Jr; Musiek, F. E.; Kline-Schoder, R.; Clark, J. C.; Hart, S.; Havelka, J.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Temporary and, in some cases, permanent hearing loss has been documented after long-duration spaceflights. METHODS: We examined all existing published data on hearing loss after space missions to characterize the losses. RESULTS: Data from Russian missions suggest that the hearing loss, when it occurs, affects mainly mid to high frequencies and that using hearing protection often might prevent the loss. Several significant questions remain about hearing loss in space. While the hearing loss has been presumed to be noise-induced, no clear link has been established between noise exposure and hearing loss during spaceflight. In one documented case of temporary hearing loss from the Shuttle-Mir program, the pattern of loss was atypical for a noise-induced loss. Continuous noise levels that have been measured on the Mir and previous space stations, while above engineering standards, are not at levels usually associated with hearing loss in ground-based studies (which have usually been limited to 8-10 h exposure periods). Attempts to measure hearing in space using threshold-based audiograms have been unsuccessful in both the American and Russian programs due to noise interference with the measurements. CONCLUSIONS: The existing data highlight the need for reliable monitoring of both hearing and noise in long-duration spaceflight.

  6. Children with Mild Bilateral and Unilateral Hearing Loss: Parents' Reflections on Experiences and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzpatrick, Elizabeth; Grandpierre, Viviane; Durieux-Smith, Andrée; Gaboury, Isabelle; Coyle, Doug; Na, Eunjung; Sallam, Nusaiba

    2016-01-01

    Children with mild bilateral and unilateral hearing loss are now commonly identified early through newborn hearing screening initiatives. There remains considerable uncertainty about how to support parents and about which services to provide for children with mild bilateral and unilateral hearing loss. The goal of this study was to learn about…

  7. Facilitative Communication Strategies of Hearing Mothers with Their Children Who Are Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad, Aznan Che; Brown, P. Margaret

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated how the type and duration of early intervention (EI) experience impacts hearing parents' views of the importance of different types of facilitative communication strategies when interacting with their children who are deaf or hard of hearing (D/HH). Sixteen mothers were involved in the study. Respondents were allocated to…

  8. Sensitivity in Interactions between Hearing Mothers and their Toddlers with Hearing Loss: The Effect of Cochlear Implantation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakar, Zaharah Abu; Brown, P. Margaret; Remine, Maria D.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the potential effects of cochlear implantation and age at implantation on maternal interactional sensitivity. Three groups of dyads were studied at two points over 1 year. The hearing aid (HA) group wore hearing aids throughout the study, the early cochlear implanted (ECI) group were implanted prior to 22 months of age, and…

  9. Preliminary comparison of infants speech with and without hearing loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, Richard S.; Nittrouer, Susan; Chenausky, Karen

    2005-04-01

    The speech of ten children with hearing loss and ten children without hearing loss aged 12 months is examined. All the children with hearing loss were identified before six months of age, and all have parents who wish them to become oral communicators. The data are from twenty minute sessions with the caregiver and child, with their normal prostheses in place, in semi-structured settings. These data are part of a larger test battery applied to both caregiver and child that is part of a project comparing the development of children with hearing loss to those without hearing loss, known as the Early Development of Children with Hearing Loss. The speech comparisons are in terms of number of utterances, syllable shapes, and segment type. A subset of the data was given a detailed acoustic analysis, including formant frequencies and voice quality measures. [Work supported by NIDCD R01 006237 to Susan Nittrouer.

  10. Music and hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Sara M K; Moore, Brian C J

    2014-10-31

    The signal processing and fitting methods used for hearing aids have mainly been designed to optimize the intelligibility of speech. Little attention has been paid to the effectiveness of hearing aids for listening to music. Perhaps as a consequence, many hearing-aid users complain that they are not satisfied with their hearing aids when listening to music. This issue inspired the Internet-based survey presented here. The survey was designed to identify the nature and prevalence of problems associated with listening to live and reproduced music with hearing aids. Responses from 523 hearing-aid users to 21 multiple-choice questions are presented and analyzed, and the relationships between responses to questions regarding music and questions concerned with information about the respondents, their hearing aids, and their hearing loss are described. Large proportions of the respondents reported that they found their hearing aids to be helpful for listening to both live and reproduced music, although less so for the former. The survey also identified problems such as distortion, acoustic feedback, insufficient or excessive gain, unbalanced frequency response, and reduced tone quality. The results indicate that the enjoyment of listening to music with hearing aids could be improved by an increase of the input and output dynamic range, extension of the low-frequency response, and improvement of feedback cancellation and automatic gain control systems. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Music and Hearing Aids

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Brian C. J.

    2014-01-01

    The signal processing and fitting methods used for hearing aids have mainly been designed to optimize the intelligibility of speech. Little attention has been paid to the effectiveness of hearing aids for listening to music. Perhaps as a consequence, many hearing-aid users complain that they are not satisfied with their hearing aids when listening to music. This issue inspired the Internet-based survey presented here. The survey was designed to identify the nature and prevalence of problems associated with listening to live and reproduced music with hearing aids. Responses from 523 hearing-aid users to 21 multiple-choice questions are presented and analyzed, and the relationships between responses to questions regarding music and questions concerned with information about the respondents, their hearing aids, and their hearing loss are described. Large proportions of the respondents reported that they found their hearing aids to be helpful for listening to both live and reproduced music, although less so for the former. The survey also identified problems such as distortion, acoustic feedback, insufficient or excessive gain, unbalanced frequency response, and reduced tone quality. The results indicate that the enjoyment of listening to music with hearing aids could be improved by an increase of the input and output dynamic range, extension of the low-frequency response, and improvement of feedback cancellation and automatic gain control systems. PMID:25361601

  12. Hearing: Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... stereo headsets (at about 110 dB), attending a rock concert (at about l20 dB), or hearing a ... by listening to parents, teachers, television, and radio. Music, the sounds of nature, and the voices of ...

  13. Do You Hear What Horton Hears?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Robert; Johnson, Jordan

    2010-01-01

    "I've never heard of a small speck of dust that is able to yell" says Horton of a sound he hears well (Geisel 1954). It is always valuable to connect science to student's interests and their everyday world--so what better way to teach concepts relating to sound than to read "Horton Hears a Who" by Dr. Seuss? Here the authors present several…

  14. Binaural integration: a challenge to overcome for children with hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Karen A; Cushing, Sharon L; Easwar, Vijayalakshmi; Polonenko, Melissa J; Papsin, Blake C

    2017-12-01

    Access to bilateral hearing can be provided to children with hearing loss by fitting appropriate hearing devices to each affected ear. It is not clear, however, that bilateral input is properly integrated through hearing devices to promote binaural hearing. In the present review, we examine evidence indicating that abnormal binaural hearing continues to be a challenge for children with hearing loss despite early access to bilateral input. Behavioral responses and electrophysiological data in children, combined with data from developing animal models, reveal that deafness in early life disrupts binaural hearing and that present hearing devices are unable to reverse these changes and/or promote expected development. Possible limitations of hearing devices include mismatches in binaural place, level, and timing of stimulation. Such mismatches could be common in children with hearing loss. One potential solution is to modify present device fitting beyond providing audibility to each ear by implementing binaural fitting targets. Efforts to better integrate bilateral input could improve spatial hearing in children with hearing loss.

  15. Ensuring financial access to hearing AIDS for infants and young children.

    PubMed

    Limb, Stephanie J; McManus, Margaret A; Fox, Harriette B; White, Karl R; Forsman, Irene

    2010-08-01

    Many young children with permanent hearing loss do not receive hearing aids and related professional services, in part because of public and private financing limitations. In 2006 the Children's Audiology Financing Workgroup was convened by the National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management to evaluate and make recommendations about public and private financing of hearing aids and related professional services for 0- to 3-year-old children. The workgroup recommended 4 possible strategies for ensuring that all infants and young children with hearing loss have access to appropriate hearing aids and professional services: (1) clarify that the definition of assistive technology, which is a required service under Part C of the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), includes not only analog hearing aids but also digital hearing aids with appropriate features as needed by young children with hearing loss; (2) clarify for both state Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Programs that digital hearing aids are almost always the medically necessary type of hearing aid required for infants and young children and should be covered under the Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment (EPSDT) program; (3) encourage the passage of private health insurance legislative mandates to require coverage of appropriate digital hearing aids and related professional services for infants and young children; and (4) establish hearing-aid loaner programs in every state. The costs of providing hearing aids to all 0- to 3-year old children in the United States are estimated here.

  16. Predicting Language Performance in Hearing Impaired Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monsees, Edna K.

    The 2-year study evaluated the language performance of 69 hearing impaired, preschool children born following the rubella epidemic of the early 1960's in order to develop an instrument for objectively assessing language achievement and a predictive index of language achievement. Two language rating scales were developed which were tied to the…

  17. Hearing or speech impairment - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - hearing or speech impairment ... The following organizations are good resources for information on hearing impairment or speech impairment: Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing -- www.agbell. ...

  18. Effect of hearing aids on auditory function in infants with perinatal brain injury and severe hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Aguirre, Alma Janeth; Santiago-Rodríguez, Efraín; Harmony, Thalía; Fernández-Bouzas, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 2-4% of newborns with perinatal risk factors present with hearing loss. Our aim was to analyze the effect of hearing aid use on auditory function evaluated based on otoacoustic emissions (OAEs), auditory brain responses (ABRs) and auditory steady state responses (ASSRs) in infants with perinatal brain injury and profound hearing loss. A prospective, longitudinal study of auditory function in infants with profound hearing loss. Right side hearing before and after hearing aid use was compared with left side hearing (not stimulated and used as control). All infants were subjected to OAE, ABR and ASSR evaluations before and after hearing aid use. The average ABR threshold decreased from 90.0 to 80.0 dB (p = 0.003) after six months of hearing aid use. In the left ear, which was used as a control, the ABR threshold decreased from 94.6 to 87.6 dB, which was not significant (p>0.05). In addition, the ASSR threshold in the 4000-Hz frequency decreased from 89 dB to 72 dB (p = 0.013) after six months of right ear hearing aid use; the other frequencies in the right ear and all frequencies in the left ear did not show significant differences in any of the measured parameters (p>0.05). OAEs were absent in the baseline test and showed no changes after hearing aid use in the right ear (p>0.05). This study provides evidence that early hearing aid use decreases the hearing threshold in ABR and ASSR assessments with no functional modifications in the auditory receptor, as evaluated by OAEs.

  19. Effect of Hearing Aids on Auditory Function in Infants with Perinatal Brain Injury and Severe Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Aguirre, Alma Janeth; Santiago-Rodríguez, Efraín; Harmony, Thalía; Fernández-Bouzas, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Background Approximately 2–4% of newborns with perinatal risk factors present with hearing loss. Our aim was to analyze the effect of hearing aid use on auditory function evaluated based on otoacoustic emissions (OAEs), auditory brain responses (ABRs) and auditory steady state responses (ASSRs) in infants with perinatal brain injury and profound hearing loss. Methodology/Principal Findings A prospective, longitudinal study of auditory function in infants with profound hearing loss. Right side hearing before and after hearing aid use was compared with left side hearing (not stimulated and used as control). All infants were subjected to OAE, ABR and ASSR evaluations before and after hearing aid use. The average ABR threshold decreased from 90.0 to 80.0 dB (p = 0.003) after six months of hearing aid use. In the left ear, which was used as a control, the ABR threshold decreased from 94.6 to 87.6 dB, which was not significant (p>0.05). In addition, the ASSR threshold in the 4000-Hz frequency decreased from 89 dB to 72 dB (p = 0.013) after six months of right ear hearing aid use; the other frequencies in the right ear and all frequencies in the left ear did not show significant differences in any of the measured parameters (p>0.05). OAEs were absent in the baseline test and showed no changes after hearing aid use in the right ear (p>0.05). Conclusions/Significance This study provides evidence that early hearing aid use decreases the hearing threshold in ABR and ASSR assessments with no functional modifications in the auditory receptor, as evaluated by OAEs. PMID:22808289

  20. Hear here: children with hearing loss learn words by listening.

    PubMed

    Lew, Joyce; Purcell, Alison A; Doble, Maree; Lim, Lynne H

    2014-10-01

    Early use of hearing devices and family participation in auditory-verbal therapy has been associated with age-appropriate verbal communication outcomes for children with hearing loss. However, there continues to be great variability in outcomes across different oral intervention programmes and little consensus on how therapists should prioritise goals at each therapy session for positive clinical outcomes. This pilot intervention study aimed to determine whether therapy goals that concentrate on teaching preschool children with hearing loss how to distinguish between words in a structured listening programme is effective, and whether gains in speech perception skills impact on vocabulary and speech development without them having to be worked on directly in therapy. A multiple baseline across subjects design was used in this within-subject controlled study. 3 children aged between 2:6 and 3:1 with moderate-severe to severe-profound hearing loss were recruited for a 6-week intervention programme. Each participant commenced at different stages of the 10-staged listening programme depending on their individual listening skills at recruitment. Speech development and vocabulary assessments were conducted before and after the training programme in addition to speech perception assessments and probes conducted throughout the intervention programme. All participants made gains in speech perception skills as well as vocabulary and speech development. Speech perception skills acquired were noted to be maintained a week after intervention. In addition, all participants were able to generalise speech perception skills learnt to words that had not been used in the intervention programme. This pilot study found that therapy directed at listening alone is promising and that it may have positive impact on speech and vocabulary development without these goals having to be incorporated into a therapy programme. Although a larger study is necessary for more conclusive findings, the

  1. Hearing Conservation Live #2430

    SciTech Connect

    Chochoms, Michael

    Occupational hearing loss is one of the most common work-related illnesses in the United States (US). From 22 to 30 million US workers are exposed to hazardous noise levels at work, and 25% of these workers will develop permanent hearing loss. Hearing loss from noise is slow and painless, and you can have a disability before you notice it. This course presents the hazards associated with workplace noise, the purpose and elements of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Hearing Conservation Program (HCP), and controls that are available to reduce your exposure to hazardous levels of noise.

  2. EHDI Africa: advocating for infants with hearing loss in Africa.

    PubMed

    Swanepoel, DeWet; Störbeck, Claudine

    2008-01-01

    Children with hearing loss who happen to reside in Africa deserve the chance to develop according to their potential as much as their peers living in more affluent regions. This leaves a moral obligation to pursue ways of initiating, developing,and growing early hearing detection and intervention services in Africa. For these reasons, the first EHDI Africa international conference was held in Johannesburg, South Africa, in 2007 (13-14 August). The theme was 'Building bridges in Africa: Early childhood development for children with hearing loss'. This special issue contains several reports from the EHDI Africa conference.

  3. The influence of hearing aids on the speech and language development of children with hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Tomblin, J Bruce; Oleson, Jacob J; Ambrose, Sophie E; Walker, Elizabeth; Moeller, Mary Pat

    2014-05-01

    IMPORTANCE Hearing loss (HL) in children can be deleterious to their speech and language development. The standard of practice has been early provision of hearing aids (HAs) to moderate these effects; however, there have been few empirical studies evaluating the effectiveness of this practice on speech and language development among children with mild-to-severe HL. OBJECTIVE To investigate the contributions of aided hearing and duration of HA use to speech and language outcomes in children with mild-to-severe HL. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS An observational cross-sectional design was used to examine the association of aided hearing levels and length of HA use with levels of speech and language outcomes. One hundred eighty 3- and 5-year-old children with HL were recruited through records of Universal Newborn Hearing Screening and referrals from clinical service providers in the general community in 6 US states. INTERVENTIONS All but 4 children had been fitted with HAs, and measures of aided hearing and the duration of HA use were obtained. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Standardized measures of speech and language ability were obtained. RESULTS Measures of the gain in hearing ability for speech provided by the HA were significantly correlated with levels of speech (ρ179 = 0.20; P = .008) and language: ρ155 = 0.21; P = .01) ability. These correlations were indicative of modest levels of association between aided hearing and speech and language outcomes. These benefits were found for children with mild and moderate-to-severe HL. In addition, the amount of benefit from aided hearing interacted with the duration of HA experience (Speech: F4,161 = 4.98; P < .001; Language: F4,138 = 2.91; P < .02). Longer duration of HA experience was most beneficial for children who had the best aided hearing. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The degree of improved hearing provided by HAs was associated with better speech and language development in

  4. 10 CFR 2.104 - Notice of hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... work authorization, construction permit, early site permit, or combined license for a facility of the... work authorization, construction permit, early site permit, or combined license for a facility of the... hearing concerning an application for a limited work authorization, construction permit, early site permit...

  5. Audiology in Latin America: hearing impairment, resources and services.

    PubMed

    Madriz, J J

    2001-01-01

    Evidence is presented about the limitation of information available on prevalence/incidence of deafness and hearing impairment in the developing world; particularly in Latin America. Two questionnaires on audiological resources and services were mailed to Latin American and Caribbean countries in general and to Central American nations in particular. The information returned by Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Belize, El Salvador, Grenada, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Puerto Rico and Uruguay was analysed. Data was gathered about epidemiological studies on hearing impairment, about specific programmes, such as early identification of hearing impairment, national registers on deafness and programmes on hearing screening. Training programmes and availability of professionals in the field of hearing and deafness is also shown. Hearing services, hearing aids provision, hearing testing equipment, professional organization and legislation in audiology is also documented. It is our conclusion that hearing impairment is a low priority for health systems in the developing world, technology continues to be excessively costly and material and human resources are limited, and services are poor and restricted.

  6. The Hearing Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capewell, Carmel

    2014-01-01

    Glue ear, a condition resulting in intermittent hearing loss in young children, affects about 80% of young children under seven years old. About 60% of children will spend a third of their time unable to hear within normal thresholds. Teachers are unlikely to consider the sound quality in classrooms. In my research young people provided…

  7. School Hearing Test Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Noise Abatement and Control.

    The document offers guidelines for administration of the Hearing Test Noise Education Program, a program to teach students the harmful effects of excessive moise on their hearing and learning ability. Section 1 outlines the program strategy in terms of program initiation, suggested program coordination, suggested coordinator's responsibilities,…

  8. Molecular biology of hearing

    PubMed Central

    Stöver, Timo; Diensthuber, Marc

    2012-01-01

    The inner ear is our most sensitive sensory organ and can be subdivided into three functional units: organ of Corti, stria vascularis and spiral ganglion. The appropriate stimulus for the organ of hearing is sound, which travels through the external auditory canal to the middle ear where it is transmitted to the inner ear. The inner ear houses the hair cells, the sensory cells of hearing. The inner hair cells are capable of mechanotransduction, the transformation of mechanical force into an electrical signal, which is the basic principle of hearing. The stria vascularis generates the endocochlear potential and maintains the ionic homeostasis of the endolymph. The dendrites of the spiral ganglion form synaptic contacts with the hair cells. The spiral ganglion is composed of neurons that transmit the electrical signals from the cochlea to the central nervous system. In recent years there has been significant progress in research on the molecular basis of hearing. An increasing number of genes and proteins related to hearing are being identified and characterized. The growing knowledge of these genes contributes not only to greater appreciation of the mechanism of hearing but also to a deeper understanding of the molecular basis of hereditary hearing loss. This basic research is a prerequisite for the development of molecular diagnostics and novel therapies for hearing loss. PMID:22558056

  9. Diagnosis of Hearing Loss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Federation of the Deaf, Rome (Italy).

    Seven conference papers from the U.S.S.R., India, Poland, Czechoslovakia, and Yugoslavia consider the diagnosis of hearing loss. They are "Examination of Hearing of Children, Aged from 2 to 5, by Means of Playing Audiometry" by A. P. Kossacheva, "A Study of the Etiology and Pattern of Deafness in a School for the Deaf in Madras,…

  10. Hereditary Hearing Loss.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tran, LenhAnh P.; Grundfast, Kenneth M.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses inheritance patterns in hearing loss, epidemiology, clues to genetic causes, locating genes that cause hereditary disorders, genes related to hearing loss disorders in individuals with Usher syndrome, Waardenburg syndrome, Treacher-Collins syndrome, Branchio-oto-renal and Pendred syndromes, and the significance of finding…

  11. Devices for hearing loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIDCD). Assistive devices for people with hearing, voice, speech, or language disorders. Nidcd.nih.gov Web site. www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/assistive-devices-people-hearing-voice-speech-or-language-disorders . Updated March 6, 2017. Accessed July 5, 2017. ...

  12. Aging and Hearing Health: The Life-course Approach.

    PubMed

    Davis, Adrian; McMahon, Catherine M; Pichora-Fuller, Kathleen M; Russ, Shirley; Lin, Frank; Olusanya, Bolajoko O; Chadha, Shelly; Tremblay, Kelly L

    2016-04-01

    Sensory abilities decline with age. More than 5% of the world's population, approximately 360 million people, have disabling hearing loss. In adults, disabling hearing loss is defined by thresholds greater than 40 dBHL in the better hearing ear.Hearing disability is an important issue in geriatric medicine because it is associated with numerous health issues, including accelerated cognitive decline, depression, increased risk of dementia, poorer balance, falls, hospitalizations, and early mortality. There are also social implications, such as reduced communication function, social isolation, loss of autonomy, impaired driving ability, and financial decline. Furthermore, the onset of hearing loss is gradual and subtle, first affecting the detection of high-pitched sounds and with difficulty understanding speech in noisy but not in quiet environments. Consequently, delays in recognizing and seeking help for hearing difficulties are common. Age-related hearing loss has no known cure, and technologies (hearing aids, cochlear implants, and assistive devices) improve thresholds but do not restore hearing to normal. Therefore, health care for persons with hearing loss and people within their communication circles requires education and counseling (e.g., increasing knowledge, changing attitudes, and reducing stigma), behavior change (e.g., adapting communication strategies), and environmental modifications (e.g., reducing noise). In this article, we consider the causes, consequences, and magnitude of hearing loss from a life-course perspective. We examine the concept of "hearing health," how to achieve it, and implications for policy and practice. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. The Need for Improved Detection and Management of Adult-Onset Hearing Loss in Australia

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Catherine M.; Gopinath, Bamini; Schneider, Julie; Reath, Jennifer; Hickson, Louise; Leeder, Stephen R.; Mitchell, Paul; Cowan, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Adult-onset hearing loss is insidious and typically diagnosed and managed several years after onset. Often, this is after the loss having led to multiple negative consequences including effects on employment, depressive symptoms, and increased risk of mortality. In contrast, the use of hearing aids is associated with reduced depression, longer life expectancy, and retention in the workplace. Despite this, several studies indicate high levels of unmet need for hearing health services in older adults and poor use of prescribed hearing aids, often leading to their abandonment. In Australia, the largest component of financial cost of hearing loss (excluding the loss of well-being) is due to lost workplace productivity. Nonetheless, the Australian public health system does not have an effective and sustainable hearing screening strategy to tackle the problem of poor detection of adult-onset hearing loss. Given the increasing prevalence and disease burden of hearing impairment in adults, two key areas are not adequately met in the Australian healthcare system: (1) early identification of persons with chronic hearing impairment; (2) appropriate and targeted referral of these patients to hearing health service providers. This paper reviews the current literature, including population-based data from the Blue Mountains Hearing Study, and suggests different models for early detection of adult-onset hearing loss. PMID:23710184

  14. Cochlear implantation in adults with asymmetric hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Firszt, Jill B; Holden, Laura K; Reeder, Ruth M; Cowdrey, Lisa; King, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    listening conditions postimplant. The postlingual participants showed significant improvements in speech recognition after 6 mo cochlear implant use in the poorer ear. Five postlingual participants had a bimodal advantage over the hearing aid-alone condition on at least one test measure. On average, the postlingual participants had significantly improved localization with bimodal input compared with the hearing aid-alone. Only one pre/perilingual participant had open-set speech recognition with the cochlear implant. This participant had better hearing than the other two pre/perilingual participants in both the poorer and better ear. Localization abilities were not significantly different between the bimodal and hearing aid-alone conditions for the pre/perilingual participants. Mean hearing handicap ratings improved postimplant for all participants indicating perceived benefit in everyday life with the addition of the cochlear implant. Patients with asymmetric hearing loss who are not typical cochlear implant candidates can benefit from using a cochlear implant in the poorer ear with continued use of a hearing aid in the better ear. For this group of 10, the 7 postlingually deafened participants showed greater benefits with the cochlear implant than the pre/perilingual participants; however, further study is needed to determine maximum benefit for those with early onset of hearing loss.

  15. Cochlear Implantation in Adults with Asymmetric Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Firszt, Jill B.; Holden, Laura K.; Reeder, Ruth M.; Cowdrey, Lisa; King, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    aid-alone and bimodal listening conditions post-implant. Results The postlingual participants showed significant improvements in speech recognition after six months cochlear implant use in the poorer ear. Five postlingual participants had a bimodal advantage over the hearing aid-alone condition on at least one test measure. On average, the postlingual participants had significantly improved localization with bimodal input compared to the hearing aid-alone. Only one pre/perilingual participant had open-set speech recognition with the cochlear implant. This participant had better hearing than the other two pre/perilingual participants in both the poorer and better ear. Localization abilities were not significantly different between the bimodal and hearing aid-alone conditions for the pre/perilingual participants. Mean hearing handicap ratings improved post-implant for all participants indicating perceived benefit in everyday life with the addition of the cochlear implant. Conclusions Patients with asymmetric hearing loss who are not typical cochlear implant candidates can benefit from using a cochlear implant in the poorer ear with continued use of a hearing aid in the better ear. For this group of ten, the seven postlingually deafened participants showed greater benefits with the cochlear implant than the pre/perilingual participants; however, further study is needed to determine maximum benefit for those with early onset of hearing loss. PMID:22441359

  16. Better than fish on land? Hearing across metamorphosis in salamanders.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Christian Bech; Lauridsen, Henrik; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Pedersen, Michael; Madsen, Peter Teglberg

    2015-03-07

    Early tetrapods faced an auditory challenge from the impedance mismatch between air and tissue in the transition from aquatic to terrestrial lifestyles during the Early Carboniferous (350 Ma). Consequently, tetrapods may have been deaf to airborne sounds for up to 100 Myr until tympanic middle ears evolved during the Triassic. The middle ear morphology of recent urodeles is similar to that of early 'lepospondyl' microsaur tetrapods, and experimental studies on their hearing capabilities are therefore useful to understand the evolutionary and functional drivers behind the shift from aquatic to aerial hearing in early tetrapods. Here, we combine imaging techniques with neurophysiological measurements to resolve how the change from aquatic larvae to terrestrial adult affects the ear morphology and sensory capabilities of salamanders. We show that air-induced pressure detection enhances underwater hearing sensitivity of salamanders at frequencies above 120 Hz, and that both terrestrial adults and fully aquatic juvenile salamanders can detect airborne sound. Collectively, these findings suggest that early atympanic tetrapods may have been pre-equipped to aerial hearing and are able to hear airborne sound better than fish on land. When selected for, this rudimentary hearing could have led to the evolution of tympanic middle ears. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  17. [Fully implantable hearing systems].

    PubMed

    Maurer, J

    2009-03-01

    As yet comparatively little experience has been gained with fully implantable hearing systems, as the two systems available at present have only recently received CE permission for Europe and the FDA permissions are still pending in the USA. Additionally the technology is expensive and usually not covered by insurance companies. However, it could be shown that by careful patient selection and very careful surgical techniques, good results can be achieved with this highly sensitive technology, often with better patient satisfaction and hearing quality than with conventional hearing aids. To spread the technology further, the systems must also show reliable results on a broad application. Further surgery to change the batteries should not be necessary more frequently than with cardiac pacemakers. Not all technical problems are finally solved. However, it is to be foreseen that fully implantable hearing systems will be a good long-term alternative to conventional hearing aids for some patients.

  18. Hearing in Insects.

    PubMed

    Göpfert, Martin C; Hennig, R Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Insect hearing has independently evolved multiple times in the context of intraspecific communication and predator detection by transforming proprioceptive organs into ears. Research over the past decade, ranging from the biophysics of sound reception to molecular aspects of auditory transduction to the neuronal mechanisms of auditory signal processing, has greatly advanced our understanding of how insects hear. Apart from evolutionary innovations that seem unique to insect hearing, parallels between insect and vertebrate auditory systems have been uncovered, and the auditory sensory cells of insects and vertebrates turned out to be evolutionarily related. This review summarizes our current understanding of insect hearing. It also discusses recent advances in insect auditory research, which have put forward insect auditory systems for studying biological aspects that extend beyond hearing, such as cilium function, neuronal signal computation, and sensory system evolution.

  19. Hearing Aids and Hearing Impaired Students in Rural Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodford, Charles

    This paper describes functions of the components of hearing aids and provides a detailed procedure to detect hearing aid dysfunctions. The most common type of hearing aids for school children are the behind the ear type. Various hearing aid components change sound into an electrical signal, which is amplified and adjusted by a volume control. The…

  20. The Future of Telepractice for Children Who Are Deaf and Hard of Hearing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stredler-Brown, Arlene

    2012-01-01

    Telepractice can be used to deliver early intervention, therapeutic, and educational services to children who are deaf and hard of hearing (DHH). For infants and toddlers, telepractice can provide early access to family-centered services that are delivered by experts in hearing loss, irrespective of where either party lives. For school-age…

  1. A Team Approach to Quality Programming for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutierrez, Priscilla Shannon

    2011-01-01

    In this issue of "Odyssey," Joanne Corwin describes New Mexico's statewide partnership among several agencies for the provision of early intervention services to infants and children who are deaf or hard of hearing and their families (Effective Partnering of State Agencies to Achieve Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Benchmarks,…

  2. [Early auditory training of children with auditory deficiencies].

    PubMed

    Herman, N

    1988-01-01

    The author insists on the importance of an early diagnosis and hearing training of the young deaf child. She shows some aspects of the new possibilities of technology in the approach of the deaf child by hearing- and speech training.

  3. Hearing impairment and retirement.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Mary E; Cruickshanks, Karen J; Pinto, Alex; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Dalton, Dayna S

    2014-02-01

    Many factors influence the decision to retire including age, insurance, and pension availability along with physical and mental health. Hearing impairment may be one such factor. The purpose of this study was to compare the 15 yr retirement rate among subjects with and without hearing impairment. Prospective, population-based study. Subjects were participants in the Epidemiology of Hearing Loss Study (EHLS), a longitudinal investigation of age-related hearing loss. Participants who were working full- or part-time in 1993-1995 were included (n = 1410, mean age = 57.8 yr). Data from four EHLS phases (1993-1995, 1998-2000, 2003-2005, and 2009-2010) were analyzed in 2010-2012. Hearing impairment was defined as a pure tone threshold average (at 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 kHz) greater than 25 dB HL in the worse ear. Employment status was determined at each of the four phases. Kaplan-Meier estimates of the cumulative incidence of retirement were calculated, and Cox discrete-time modeling was used to determine the effect of hearing impairment on the rate of retirement. The cumulative incidence of retirement was significantly (p < 0.02) higher in those with a hearing impairment (77%) compared to those without a hearing impairment (74%). After adjustment for age, gender, self-reported health, and history of chronic disease, there was no significant difference in the rate of retirement between those with and without a hearing impairment (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.7, 1.1). Similar results were observed when hearing aid users were excluded, when hearing impairment was based on the better ear thresholds, and when analyses were restricted to those under 65 yr of age and working full-time at baseline. Participants with a hearing impairment were less likely to state that the main reason for retirement was that the time seemed right. Hearing impairment was found to be associated with a higher rate of retirement, but the association was not independent of the

  4. Hearing Impairment and Retirement

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Mary E; Cruickshanks, Karen J; Pinto, Alex; Klein, Barbara E K; Klein, Ronald; Dalton, Dayna S

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Many factors influence the decision to retire including age, insurance and pension availability along with physical and mental health. Hearing impairment may be one such factor. PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to compare the 15 year retirement rate among subjects with and without hearing impairment. RESEARCH DESIGN Prospective, population-based study STUDY SAMPLE Subjects were participants in the Epidemiology of Hearing Loss Study (EHLS), a longitudinal investigation of age-related hearing loss. Participants who were working full- or part-time in 1993–1995 were included (n=1410, mean age=57.8 years). DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS Data from four EHLS phases (1993–1995, 1998–2000, 2003–2005, and 2009–2010) were analyzed in 2010–2012. Hearing impairment was defined as a pure tone threshold average (at 0.5,1,2 and 4 kHz) greater than 25 dB HL in the worse ear. Employment status was determined at each of the four phases. Kaplan-Meier estimates of the cumulative incidence of retirement were calculated and Cox discrete-time modeling was used to determine the effect of hearing impairment on the rate of retirement. RESULTS The cumulative incidence of retirement was significantly (p < 0.02) higher in those with a hearing impairment (77%) compared to those without a hearing impairment (74%). After adjustment for age, gender, self-reported health, and history of chronic disease, there was no significant difference in the rate of retirement between those with and without a hearing impairment (Hazard Ratio (HR) = 0.9, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 0.7, 1.1). Similar results were observed when hearing aid users were excluded, when hearing impairment was based on the better ear thresholds, and when analyses were restricted to those less than 65 years of age and working full-time at baseline. Participants with a hearing impairment were less likely to state that the main reason for retirement was that the time seemed right. CONCLUSIONS Hearing impairment

  5. 78 FR 22546 - Hearing Procedures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-16

    ... FINANCIAL STABILITY OVERSIGHT COUNCIL Hearing Procedures AGENCY: Financial Stability Oversight... Council (Council) has adopted amendments to its hearing procedures (Council Hearing Procedures) for hearings conducted by the Council under Title I and Title VIII of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and...

  6. Restoration of hearing by hearing aids: conventional hearing aids – implantable hearing aids – cochlear implants – auditory brainstem implants

    PubMed Central

    Leuwer, R.; Müller, J.

    2005-01-01

    Aim of this report is to explain the current concept of hearing restoration using hearing aids. At present the main issues of conventional hearing aids are the relative benefits of analogue versus digital devices and different strategies for the improvement of hearing in noise. Implantable hearing aids provide a better sound quality and less distortion. The lack of directional microphones is the major disadvantage of the partially implantable hearing aids commercially available. Two different clinical studies about fully implantable hearing aids have been started in 2004. One of the most-promising developments seems to be the electric-acoustic stimulation. PMID:22073051

  7. Hearing Screening of High-Risk Newborns with Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potentials: A Follow-Up Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannon, Dorothy A.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The brainstem auditory evoked potential (BAEP) was evaluated as a hearing screening test in 168 high-risk newborns. The BAEP was found to be a sensitive procedure for the early identification of hearing-impaired newborns. However, the yield of significant hearing abnormalities was less than predicted in other studies using BAEP. (Author/CL)

  8. Age-related hearing difficulties. I. Hearing impairment, disability, and handicap--a controlled study.

    PubMed

    Salomon, G; Vesterager, V; Jagd, M

    1988-01-01

    The study compares the audiological profile of a group of first-time applicants for hearing aids, a group of re-applicants and a group of non-complainers, aged 70-75 years (n = 71). In spite of overlap in range, a significant difference in thresholds and discrimination was found. The lip-reading capacity was well preserved in the elderly, but showed a significant correlation to the general health condition. The audiological benefit of hearing-aids did not increase with early fitting. General satisfaction with life was independent of satisfaction with hearing; two thirds of the patients were satisfied with their aids and used them regularly. The rest were dissatisfied and used them less than once a week. The aids were most systematically used to watch TV. Pure-tone average and handicap scaling were compared as guidelines for hearing-aid fitting. The most powerful tool to identify those in need of hearing-aids was handicap scaling based on interviews concerning self-assessed hearing difficulties.

  9. How Data Mining Threatens Student Privacy. Joint Hearing before the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Security Technologies of the Committee on Homeland Security, House of Representatives Serial No. 113-76 and the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education of the Committee on Education and the Workforce, House of Representatives Serial No. 113-61, House of Representatives, One Hundred Thirteenth Congress, Second Session (June 25, 2014)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US House of Representatives, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the first joint hearing of the Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Security Technologies of the Committee on Homeland Security and the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education of the Committee on Education and the Workforce. The subcommittees met to examine data collection…

  10. Micromechanics of hearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudspeth, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    The following summarizes the key points addressed during a tutorial session on the Micromechanics of Hearing that took place at the 12th International Workshop on the Mechanics of Hearing held at Cape Sounio, Greece, in June 2014. The tutorial was intended to present an overview of basic ideas and to address topics of current interest relevant to the Workshop. The session was recorded, and the audio file and accompanying visual content of the presentation can be found in the Mechanics of Hearing Digital Library (www.mechanicsofhearing.org).

  11. Hearing preservation cochlear implantation in children: The HEARRING Group consensus and practice guide.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Gunesh; Tavora-Vieira, Dayse; Baumgartner, Wolf-Dieter; Godey, Benoit; Müller, Joachim; O'Driscoll, Martin; Skarzynski, Henryk; Skarzynski, Piotr; Usami, Shin-Ichi; Adunka, Oliver; Agrawal, Sumit; Bruce, Iain; De Bodt, Marc; Caversaccio, Marco; Pilsbury, Harold; Gavilán, Javier; Hagen, Rudolf; Hagr, Abdulrahman; Kameswaran, Mohan; Karltorp, Eva; Kompis, Martin; Kuzovkov, Vlad; Lassaletta, Luis; Yongxin, Li; Lorens, Artur; Manoj, Manikoth; Martin, Jane; Mertens, Griet; Mlynski, Robert; Parnes, Lorne; Pulibalathingal, Sasidharan; Radeloff, Andreas; Raine, Christopher H; Rajeswaran, Ranjith; Schmutzhard, Joachim; Sprinzl, Georg; Staecker, Hinrich; Stephan, Kurt; Sugarova, Serafima; Zernotti, Mario; Zorowka, Patrick; Van de Heyning, Paul

    2018-01-01

    To provide multidisciplinary cochlear implant teams with a current consensus statement to support hearing preservation cochlear implantation (HPCI) in children, including those children with symptomatic partial deafness (PD) where the intention is to use electric-acoustic stimulation (EAS). The main objectives are to provide guidelines on who is a candidate, how to assess these children and when to implant if Med-El Flex electrode arrays are chosen for implantation. The HEARRING group reviewed the current evidence and practice regarding the management of children to be considered for HPCI surgery emphasizing the assessment needed prior to implantation in order to demonstrate the benefits in these children over time. The consensus statement addresses following three key questions: (1) Should these children be treated? (2) How to identify these children? (3) How to manage these children? The HEARRING group concludes that irrespective of the degree of residual hearing present, the concepts of hearing and structure preservation should be applied in every child undergoing cochlear implantation and that HPCI is a safe and reliable treatment option. Early detection and multidisciplinary assessment are key to the identification of children with symptomatic PD, these children should undergo HPCI as early as possible.

  12. Association between language and hearing disorders – risk identification

    PubMed Central

    Samelli, Alessandra Giannella; Rondon-Melo, Silmara; Rabelo, Camila Maia; Molini-Avejonas, Daniela Regina

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify children at risk for hearing and/or language disorders and to investigate the association between these risks by conducting pre-validated hearing and language screenings. METHODS: The study was conducted during a polio vaccination campaign in August of 2013 in basic health units in western São Paulo. Parents of children between 2 and 5 years of age were asked to complete two screening tools: a hearing questionnaire (regarding hearing development) and a language production and comprehension scale (including the major language development milestones). The screening tools were administered by different researchers. We compared the risk of having language disorders among children at risk for hearing loss versus children not at risk, as well as the attributable risk and odds ratios. Chi-squared tests and logistic regression analyses were used. RESULTS: The study included 479 children with a mean age of three and one-half years, of whom 26.9% were identified as at risk for deficits in language production, 8.6% were at risk for deficits in language comprehension and 14% were at risk for hearing disorders. The children at risk for hearing disorders were twice as likely as those not at risk to exhibit language production and comprehension deficits. CONCLUSION: The results of this study highlight the importance of establishing and adopting low-cost procedures such as screenings to identify children at risk of developing language and/or hearing disorders in early childhood. PMID:28492720

  13. An Introduction to the Outcomes of Children with Hearing Loss Study

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, Mary Pat; Tomblin, J. Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The landscape of service provision for young children with hearing loss has shifted in recent years as a result of newborn hearing screening and the early provision of interventions, including hearing technologies. It is expected that early service provision will minimize or prevent linguistic delays that typically accompany untreated permanent childhood hearing loss. The post-newborn hearing screening era has seen a resurgence of interest in empirically examining the outcomes of children with hearing loss to determine if service innovations have resulted in expected improvements in children’s functioning. The Outcomes of Children with Hearing Loss (OCHL) project was among these recent research efforts, and this introductory article provides background in the form of literature review and theoretical discussion to support the goals of the study. The OCHL project was designed to examine the language and auditory outcomes of infants and preschool-aged children with permanent, bilateral, mild-to-severe hearing loss and to identify factors that moderate the relationship between hearing loss and longitudinal outcomes. We propose that children who are hard of hearing experience limitations in access to linguistic input, which lead to a decrease in uptake of language exposure and an overall reduction in linguistic experience. We explore this hypothesis in relation to three primary factors that are proposed to influence children’s access to linguistic input: aided audibility, duration and consistency of hearing aid (HA) use, and characteristics of caregiver input. PMID:26731159

  14. Improving regional universal newborn hearing screening programmes in Italy.

    PubMed

    Molini, E; Cristi, M C; Lapenna, R; Calzolaro, L; Muzzi, E; Ciciriello, E; Della Volpe, A; Orzan, E; Ricci, G

    2016-02-01

    The Universal Newborn Hearing Screening (UNHS) programme aims at achieving early detection of hearing impairment. Subsequent diagnosis and intervention should follow promptly. Within the framework of the Ministry of Health project CCM 2013 "Preventing Communication Disorders: a Regional Program for early Identification, Intervention and Care of Hearing Impaired Children", the limitations and strengths of current UNHS programs in Italy have been analysed by a group of professionals working in tertiary centres involved in regional UNHS programmes, using SWOT analysis and a subsequent TOWS matrix. Coverage and lost-to-follow up rates are issues related to UNHS programmes. Recommendations to improve the effectiveness of the UNHS programme have been identified. The need for homogeneous policies, high-quality information and dissemination of knowledge for operators and families of hearing-impaired children emerged from the discussion. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale.

  15. Noise and Hearing Protection

    MedlinePlus

    ... my hearing? A ringing in the ears, called tinnitus, commonly occurs after noise exposure, and often becomes ... a ringing or other sound in your ear (tinnitus), which could be the result of long-term ...

  16. Occupational hearing loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... risks connected with recreation such as shooting a gun, driving snowmobiles, or other similar activities. Learn how ... hearing from recreational activities such as shooting a gun or driving snowmobiles. DO NOT listen to loud ...

  17. Human Spaceflight Safety Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-02

    Dr. Joseph R. Fragola, Vice President, Valador, Inc., testifies during a hearing before the House Subcommitte on Space and Aeronautics regarding Safety of Human Spaceflight on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2009, in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  18. Hearing regulates Drosophila aggression

    PubMed Central

    Versteven, Marijke; Vanden Broeck, Lies; Geurten, Bart; Zwarts, Liesbeth; Decraecker, Lisse; Beelen, Melissa; Göpfert, Martin C.; Heinrich, Ralf; Callaerts, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Aggression is a universal social behavior important for the acquisition of food, mates, territory, and social status. Aggression in Drosophila is context-dependent and can thus be expected to involve inputs from multiple sensory modalities. Here, we use mechanical disruption and genetic approaches in Drosophila melanogaster to identify hearing as an important sensory modality in the context of intermale aggressive behavior. We demonstrate that neuronal silencing and targeted knockdown of hearing genes in the fly’s auditory organ elicit abnormal aggression. Further, we show that exposure to courtship or aggression song has opposite effects on aggression. Our data define the importance of hearing in the control of Drosophila intermale aggression and open perspectives to decipher how hearing and other sensory modalities are integrated at the neural circuit level. PMID:28115690

  19. Living with Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Nora Woodruff and her family, including dad Bob, have ... hearing, balance, smell, taste, voice, speech, and language. Nora Woodruff, daughter of ABC newsman Bob Woodruff and ...

  20. What's Hearing Loss?

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells in the cochlea by turning sounds into electrical signals that stimulate the hearing nerve directly. Learning ... loss can read along to follow the action. Technology is changing all the time, and you will ...

  1. Can Baby Hear?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Special Section: Focus on Communication Can Baby Hear? Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table ... to the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD). Prior to this, the average age ...

  2. Implantable digital hearing aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kissiah, A. M., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Hearing aid converts analog output of microphone into digital pulses in about 10 channels of audiofrequencies. Each pulse band could be directly connected to portion of auditory nerve most sensitive to that range.

  3. Hearing regulates Drosophila aggression.

    PubMed

    Versteven, Marijke; Vanden Broeck, Lies; Geurten, Bart; Zwarts, Liesbeth; Decraecker, Lisse; Beelen, Melissa; Göpfert, Martin C; Heinrich, Ralf; Callaerts, Patrick

    2017-02-21

    Aggression is a universal social behavior important for the acquisition of food, mates, territory, and social status. Aggression in Drosophila is context-dependent and can thus be expected to involve inputs from multiple sensory modalities. Here, we use mechanical disruption and genetic approaches in Drosophila melanogaster to identify hearing as an important sensory modality in the context of intermale aggressive behavior. We demonstrate that neuronal silencing and targeted knockdown of hearing genes in the fly's auditory organ elicit abnormal aggression. Further, we show that exposure to courtship or aggression song has opposite effects on aggression. Our data define the importance of hearing in the control of Drosophila intermale aggression and open perspectives to decipher how hearing and other sensory modalities are integrated at the neural circuit level.

  4. Regional Hearing Clerk

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Regional Hearing Clerk receives filings for proceedings under the Consolidated Rules of Practice Governing the Administrative Assessment of Civil Penalties and the Revocation/Termination or Suspension of Permits, 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 22

  5. Living with hearing loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... independent Be safer wherever you are Managing the Environment Many things in your surroundings can affect how ... hearing loss . References Andrews J. Optimizing the built environment for frail older adults. In: Fillit HM, Rockwood ...

  6. Single-Stage Ear Reconstruction and Hearing Restoration Using Polyethylene Implant and Implantable Hearing Devices.

    PubMed

    Hempel, John Martin

    2015-12-01

    The use of porous polyethylene in reconstructive surgery of the auricle is becoming increasingly accepted. This is a single-stage procedure providing pleasing cosmetic rehabilitation. Further advantages are the possibility of early implantation and the lack of complications caused by harvesting costal cartilage. Additional hearing restoration using middle ear implants allows functional rehabilitation at an early stage. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  7. Hearing Aids and Music

    PubMed Central

    Chasin, Marshall; Russo, Frank A.

    2004-01-01

    Historically, the primary concern for hearing aid design and fitting is optimization for speech inputs. However, increasingly other types of inputs are being investigated and this is certainly the case for music. Whether the hearing aid wearer is a musician or merely someone who likes to listen to music, the electronic and electro-acoustic parameters described can be optimized for music as well as for speech. That is, a hearing aid optimally set for music can be optimally set for speech, even though the converse is not necessarily true. Similarities and differences between speech and music as inputs to a hearing aid are described. Many of these lead to the specification of a set of optimal electro-acoustic characteristics. Parameters such as the peak input-limiting level, compression issues—both compression ratio and knee-points—and number of channels all can deleteriously affect music perception through hearing aids. In other cases, it is not clear how to set other parameters such as noise reduction and feedback control mechanisms. Regardless of the existence of a “music program,” unless the various electro-acoustic parameters are available in a hearing aid, music fidelity will almost always be less than optimal. There are many unanswered questions and hypotheses in this area. Future research by engineers, researchers, clinicians, and musicians will aid in the clarification of these questions and their ultimate solutions. PMID:15497032

  8. Hearing AIDS and music.

    PubMed

    Chasin, Marshall; Russo, Frank A

    2004-01-01

    Historically, the primary concern for hearing aid design and fitting is optimization for speech inputs. However, increasingly other types of inputs are being investigated and this is certainly the case for music. Whether the hearing aid wearer is a musician or merely someone who likes to listen to music, the electronic and electro-acoustic parameters described can be optimized for music as well as for speech. That is, a hearing aid optimally set for music can be optimally set for speech, even though the converse is not necessarily true. Similarities and differences between speech and music as inputs to a hearing aid are described. Many of these lead to the specification of a set of optimal electro-acoustic characteristics. Parameters such as the peak input-limiting level, compression issues-both compression ratio and knee-points-and number of channels all can deleteriously affect music perception through hearing aids. In other cases, it is not clear how to set other parameters such as noise reduction and feedback control mechanisms. Regardless of the existence of a "music program,'' unless the various electro-acoustic parameters are available in a hearing aid, music fidelity will almost always be less than optimal. There are many unanswered questions and hypotheses in this area. Future research by engineers, researchers, clinicians, and musicians will aid in the clarification of these questions and their ultimate solutions.

  9. Hear ye? Hear ye! Successful auditory aging.

    PubMed Central

    Gates, G A; Rees, T S

    1997-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (presbycusis) is a multifactorial process that affects nearly all people in their senior years. Most cases are due to a loss of cochlear hair cell function and are well mediated by communication courtesy and modern amplification technology. Severe hearing loss is generally due to cochlear problems or age-related diseases and may require speech reading, assistive listening devices, and cochlear implants, depending on the degree of loss. Presbycusis may seriously impair communication and contribute to isolation, depression, and possibly dementia. Accurate diagnosis and prompt remediation are widely available but are frequently underused. Geriatric health care and well-being is enhanced by the detection and remediation of communication disorders. PMID:9348755

  10. Restaurant noise, hearing loss, and hearing aids.

    PubMed Central

    Lebo, C P; Smith, M F; Mosher, E R; Jelonek, S J; Schwind, D R; Decker, K E; Krusemark, H J; Kurz, P L

    1994-01-01

    Our multidisciplinary team obtained noise data in 27 San Francisco Bay Area restaurants. These data included typical minimum, peak, and average sound pressure levels; digital tape recordings; subjective noise ratings; and on-site unaided and aided speech discrimination tests. We report the details and implications of these noise measurements and provide basic information on selecting hearing aids and suggestions for coping with restaurant noise. Images PMID:7941506

  11. Achieving effective hearing aid fitting within one month after identification of childhood permanent hearing impairment.

    PubMed

    Bastanza, G; Gallus, R; De Carlini, M; Picciotti, P M; Muzzi, E; Ciciriello, E; Orzan, E; Conti, G

    2016-02-01

    Diagnosis of child permanent hearing impairment (PHI) can be made with extreme timeliness compared to the past thanks to improvements in PHI identification through newborn hearing screening programmes. It now becomes essential to provide an effective amplification as quickly as possible in order to restore auditory function and favour speech and language development. The early fitting of hearing aids and possible later cochlear implantation indeed prompts the development of central auditory pathways, connections with secondary sensory brain areas, as well as with motor and articulatory cortex. The aim of this paper is to report the results of a strategic analysis that involves identification of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats regarding the process of achieving early amplification in all cases of significant childhood PHI. The analysis is focused on the Italian situation and is part of the Italian Ministry of Health project CCM 2013 "Preventing Communication Disorders: a Regional Program for Early Identification, Intervention and Care of Hearing Impaired Children". © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale.

  12. Stereotype threat lowers older adults’ self-reported hearing abilities

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Sarah J.; Lee, Soohyoung Rain

    2016-01-01

    Background Although stereotype threat is a well-documented phenomenon, previous studies examining it in older adults have almost exclusively focused on objective cognitive outcomes. Considerably less attention has been paid to the impact of stereotype threat on older adults’ subjective assessments of their own abilities or to the impact of stereotype threat in non-cognitive domains. Objective Older adults are stereotyped as having experienced not only cognitive declines, but physical declines as well. The current study tested the prediction that stereotype threat can negatively influence older adult's subjective hearing abilities. Methods To test this, 115 adults (M age = 50.02, range = 41-67) read either a positive or negative description about how aging affects hearing. All participants then answered a questionnaire in which they assessed their own hearing abilities. Results The impact of stereotype threat on self-reported hearing was moderated by chronological age. Participants in their 40's and early 50's were unaffected by the stereotype threat manipulation. In contrast, participants in their late 50's and 60's rated their hearing as being subjectively worse when under stereotype threat. Conclusion The current study provides a clear demonstration that stereotype threat negatively impacts older adults’ subjective assessments of their own abilities. It is also the first study to demonstrate an effect of stereotype threat within the domain of hearing. These results have important implications for researchers investigating age-related hearing decline. Stereotype threat can lead to overestimation of the prevalence of age-related hearing decline. It can also serve as a confounding variable when examining the psychosocial correlates of hearing loss. Because of this, researchers studying age-related hearing loss should aim to provide a stereotype-threat free testing environment and also include assessments of stereotype threat within their studies. PMID:26461273

  13. Stereotype Threat Lowers Older Adults' Self-Reported Hearing Abilities.

    PubMed

    Barber, Sarah J; Lee, Soohyoung Rain

    2015-01-01

    Although stereotype threat is a well-documented phenomenon, previous studies examining it in older adults have almost exclusively focused on objective cognitive outcomes. Considerably less attention has been paid to the impact of stereotype threat on older adults' subjective assessments of their own abilities or to the impact of stereotype threat in noncognitive domains. Older adults are stereotyped as having experienced not only cognitive declines, but physical declines as well. The current study tested the prediction that stereotype threat can negatively influence older adults' subjective hearing abilities. To test this, 115 adults (mean age 50.03 years, range 41-67) read either a positive or negative description about how aging affects hearing. All participants then answered a questionnaire in which they assessed their own hearing abilities. The impact of stereotype threat on self-reported hearing was moderated by chronological age. Participants in their 40s and early 50s were unaffected by the stereotype threat manipulation. In contrast, participants in their late 50s and 60s rated their hearing as being subjectively worse when under stereotype threat. The current study provides a clear demonstration that stereotype threat negatively impacts older adults' subjective assessments of their own abilities. It is also the first study to demonstrate an effect of stereotype threat within the domain of hearing. These results have important implications for researchers investigating age-related hearing decline. Stereotype threat can lead to overestimation of the prevalence of age-related hearing decline. It can also serve as a confounding variable when examining the psychosocial correlates of hearing loss. Because of this, researchers studying age-related hearing loss should aim to provide a stereotype threat-free testing environment and also include assessments of stereotype threat within their studies. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Hearing Screening in a Tertiary Care Hospital in India

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Neha; Patel, Kalpesh B.; Vishwakarma, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: To study the incidence of hearing loss among children and to determine and confirm the distribution of common risk factors in children with hearing loss presenting at a tertiary care hospital in India. Materials and Methods: Babies underwent hearing screening using Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emission (TEOAE) and Automated Auditory Brainstem Response (AABR) from November 2009 to September 2011. It was a cross-sectional study carried out at our institute involving 500 babies (≤2 y). To identify the high risk babies, Joint Committee on Infant Hearing (2007) High risk registry was used. Results: In our study 110 (22%) babies belonged to high risk category and 11(2.2%) of total screened babies had significant hearing loss. Total number of babies who passed the initial screening with TEOAE was 284 (56.8%). On diagnostic AABR screening of TEOAE REFERRED babies, the babies with no risk factor showed normal AABR tracings whereas from among those with one or multiple risk factors (110 babies), 11(10%) showed different levels of hearing impairment. Hearing loss was highly associated with Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) admission i.e. 8/11(72.7%), followed by Low Birth Weight (LBW) and hypoxia (6/11 i.e. 54.5% each). Conclusion: Hearing loss is more common in those babies with risk factors (majority being NICU admission, LBW and hypoxia). OAE and ABR screening of infants at risk for significant hearing loss is a clinically efficient and cost effective approach for early detection of significant hearing loss. PMID:25954639

  15. 22 CFR 512.21 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ....21 Hearing. (a) Petition for hearing. (1) A hearing may be requested by filing a written petition...) was hand delivered or the date of delivery by certified mail. (4) Where petition is received after the.... (b) Type of hearing. (1) The form and content of the hearing will be determined by the hearing...

  16. 22 CFR 401.29 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Hearings. 401.29 Section 401.29 Foreign... Hearings. (a) A hearing or hearings may be held whenever in the opinion of the Commission such action would... or exceptions which may be imposed by the terms of the reference, a final hearing or hearings shall...

  17. 22 CFR 401.23 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Hearings. 401.23 Section 401.23 Foreign... Hearings. (a) The time and place of the hearing or hearings of an application shall be fixed by the... of the hearing or hearings to the applicant, the Governments and all persons who have presented...

  18. 22 CFR 401.29 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Hearings. 401.29 Section 401.29 Foreign... Hearings. (a) A hearing or hearings may be held whenever in the opinion of the Commission such action would... or exceptions which may be imposed by the terms of the reference, a final hearing or hearings shall...

  19. 18 CFR 1308.33 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hearings. 1308.33... Prehearing and Hearing Procedures § 1308.33 Hearings. (a) TVA shall arrange for the verbatim reporting of evidentiary hearings before the Hearing Officer, and shall provide the Hearing Officer with the original...

  20. 20 CFR 658.417 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hearings. 658.417 Section 658.417 Employees... Hearings. (a) Hearings shall be held by State hearing officials. A State hearing official may be any State official authorized to hold hearings under State law. They may be, for example, the same referees who hold...

  1. 22 CFR 401.23 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hearings. 401.23 Section 401.23 Foreign... Hearings. (a) The time and place of the hearing or hearings of an application shall be fixed by the... of the hearing or hearings to the applicant, the Governments and all persons who have presented...

  2. 22 CFR 401.29 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hearings. 401.29 Section 401.29 Foreign... Hearings. (a) A hearing or hearings may be held whenever in the opinion of the Commission such action would... or exceptions which may be imposed by the terms of the reference, a final hearing or hearings shall...

  3. 13 CFR 117.16 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hearings. 117.16 Section 117.16... Hearings. (a) Opportunity for hearing. Whenever an opportunity for a hearing is required by § 117.15... Hearings and Appeals (OHA) that the matter be scheduled for hearing; or (2) Advise the applicant or...

  4. 22 CFR 401.23 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Hearings. 401.23 Section 401.23 Foreign... Hearings. (a) The time and place of the hearing or hearings of an application shall be fixed by the... of the hearing or hearings to the applicant, the Governments and all persons who have presented...

  5. 20 CFR 658.417 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hearings. 658.417 Section 658.417 Employees... Hearings. (a) Hearings shall be held by State hearing officials. A State hearing official may be any State official authorized to hold hearings under State law. They may be, for example, the same referees who hold...

  6. 18 CFR 1308.33 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hearings. 1308.33... Prehearing and Hearing Procedures § 1308.33 Hearings. (a) TVA shall arrange for the verbatim reporting of evidentiary hearings before the Hearing Officer, and shall provide the Hearing Officer with the original...

  7. 18 CFR 1308.33 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hearings. 1308.33... Prehearing and Hearing Procedures § 1308.33 Hearings. (a) TVA shall arrange for the verbatim reporting of evidentiary hearings before the Hearing Officer, and shall provide the Hearing Officer with the original...

  8. 18 CFR 1308.33 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Hearings. 1308.33... Prehearing and Hearing Procedures § 1308.33 Hearings. (a) TVA shall arrange for the verbatim reporting of evidentiary hearings before the Hearing Officer, and shall provide the Hearing Officer with the original...

  9. 42 CFR 431.222 - Group hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Group hearings. 431.222 Section 431.222 Public... Beneficiaries Right to Hearing § 431.222 Group hearings. The agency— (a) May respond to a series of individual requests for hearing by conducting a single group hearing; (b) May consolidate hearings only in cases in...

  10. 42 CFR 431.222 - Group hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Group hearings. 431.222 Section 431.222 Public... Beneficiaries Right to Hearing § 431.222 Group hearings. The agency— (a) May respond to a series of individual requests for hearing by conducting a single group hearing; (b) May consolidate hearings only in cases in...

  11. 42 CFR 431.222 - Group hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Group hearings. 431.222 Section 431.222 Public... Beneficiaries Right to Hearing § 431.222 Group hearings. The agency— (a) May respond to a series of individual requests for hearing by conducting a single group hearing; (b) May consolidate hearings only in cases in...

  12. 42 CFR 431.222 - Group hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Group hearings. 431.222 Section 431.222 Public... Recipients Right to Hearing § 431.222 Group hearings. The agency— (a) May respond to a series of individual requests for hearing by conducting a single group hearing; (b) May consolidate hearings only in cases in...

  13. 18 CFR 1308.33 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hearings. 1308.33... Prehearing and Hearing Procedures § 1308.33 Hearings. (a) TVA shall arrange for the verbatim reporting of evidentiary hearings before the Hearing Officer, and shall provide the Hearing Officer with the original...

  14. 13 CFR 117.16 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hearings. 117.16 Section 117.16... Hearings. (a) Opportunity for hearing. Whenever an opportunity for a hearing is required by § 117.15... Hearings and Appeals (OHA) that the matter be scheduled for hearing; or (2) Advise the applicant or...

  15. Underwater Hearing in Turtles.

    PubMed

    Willis, Katie L

    2016-01-01

    The hearing of turtles is poorly understood compared with the other reptiles. Although the mechanism of transduction of sound into a neural signal via hair cells has been described in detail, the rest of the auditory system is largely a black box. What is known is that turtles have higher hearing thresholds than other reptiles, with best frequencies around 500 Hz. They also have lower underwater hearing thresholds than those in air, owing to resonance of the middle ear cavity. Further studies demonstrated that all families of turtles and tortoises share a common middle ear cavity morphology, with scaling best suited to underwater hearing. This supports an aquatic origin of the group. Because turtles hear best under water, it is important to examine their vulnerability to anthropogenic noise. However, the lack of basic data makes such experiments difficult because only a few species of turtles have published audiograms. There are also almost no behavioral data available (understandable due to training difficulties). Finally, few studies show what kinds of sounds are behaviorally relevant. One notable paper revealed that the Australian snake-necked turtle (Chelodina oblonga) has a vocal repertoire in air, at the interface, and under water. Findings like these suggest that there is more to the turtle aquatic auditory scene than previously thought.

  16. Hearing speech in music.

    PubMed

    Ekström, Seth-Reino; Borg, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The masking effect of a piano composition, played at different speeds and in different octaves, on speech-perception thresholds was investigated in 15 normal-hearing and 14 moderately-hearing-impaired subjects. Running speech (just follow conversation, JFC) testing and use of hearing aids increased the everyday validity of the findings. A comparison was made with standard audiometric noises [International Collegium of Rehabilitative Audiology (ICRA) noise and speech spectrum-filtered noise (SPN)]. All masking sounds, music or noise, were presented at the same equivalent sound level (50 dBA). The results showed a significant effect of piano performance speed and octave (P<.01). Low octave and fast tempo had the largest effect; and high octave and slow tempo, the smallest. Music had a lower masking effect than did ICRA noise with two or six speakers at normal vocal effort (P<.01) and SPN (P<.05). Subjects with hearing loss had higher masked thresholds than the normal-hearing subjects (P<.01), but there were smaller differences between masking conditions (P<.01). It is pointed out that music offers an interesting opportunity for studying masking under realistic conditions, where spectral and temporal features can be varied independently. The results have implications for composing music with vocal parts, designing acoustic environments and creating a balance between speech perception and privacy in social settings.

  17. Hearing is Believing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a discussion on the cochlear implant. This device was developed by Adam Kissiah, who suffers from hearing loss. Driven by his own hearing problem and three failed corrective surgeries, Kissiah started working in the mid-1970s on this surgically implantable device that provides hearing sensation to persons with severe-to-profound hearing loss who receive little or no benefit from hearing aids. Uniquely, the cochlear implant concept was not based on theories of medicine, as Kissiah had no medical background whatsoever. Instead, he utilized the technical expertise he learned while working as an electronics instrumentation engineer at NASA s Kennedy Space Center for the basis of his invention. This took place over 3 years, when Kissiah would spend his lunch breaks and evenings in Kennedy s technical library, studying the impact of engineering principles on the inner ear. In April of 2003, Kissiah was inducted into the Space Foundation's U.S. Space Technology Hall of Fame for his invention

  18. Evolutionary trends in directional hearing

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Catherine E.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Tympanic hearing is a true evolutionary novelty that arose in parallel within early tetrapods. We propose that in these tetrapods, selection for sound localization in air acted upon pre-existing directionally sensitive brainstem circuits, similar to those in fishes. Auditory circuits in birds and lizards resemble this ancestral, directionally sensitive framework. Despite this anatomically similarity, coding of sound source location differs between birds and lizards. In birds, brainstem circuits compute sound location from interaural cues. Lizards, however, have coupled ears, and do not need to compute source location in the brain. Thus their neural processing of sound direction differs, although all show mechanisms for enhancing sound source directionality. Comparisons with mammals reveal similarly complex interactions between coding strategies and evolutionary history. PMID:27448850

  19. Perception of Musical Emotion in the Students with Cognitive and Acquired Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Mazaheryazdi, Malihe; Aghasoleimani, Mina; Karimi, Maryam; Arjmand, Pirooz

    2018-01-01

    Hearing loss can affect the perception of emotional reaction to the music. The present study investigated whether the students with congenital hearing loss exposed to the deaf culture, percept the same emotion from the music as students with acquired hearing loss. Participants were divided into two groups; 30 students with bilaterally congenital moderate to severe hearing loss that were selected from deaf schools located in Tehran, Iran and 30 students with an acquired hearing loss with the same degree of hearing loss selected from Amiralam Hospital, Tehran, Iran and compared with the group of 30 age and gender-matched normal hearing subjects served our control in 2012. The musical stimuli consisted of three different sequences of music, (sadness, happiness, and fear) each with the duration of 60 sec. The students were asked to point to the lists of words that best matched with their emotions. Emotional perception of sadness, happiness, and fear in congenital hearing loss children was significantly poorly than acquired hearing loss and normal hearing group ( P <0.001). There was no significant difference in the emotional perception of sadness, happiness, and fear among the group of acquired hearing loss and normal hearing group ( P =0.75), ( P =1) and ( P =0.16) respectively. Neural plasticity induced by hearing assistant devises may be affected by the time when a hearing aid was first fitted and how the auditory system responds to the reintroduction of certain sounds via amplification. Therefore, children who experienced auditory input of different sound patterns in their early childhood will show more perceptual flexibility in different situations than the children with congenital hearing loss and Deaf culture.

  20. Age-related hearing loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... both physical (not hearing a fire alarm) and psychological (social isolation) problems. The hearing loss may lead ... accountability. A.D.A.M. is among the first to achieve this important distinction for online health ...

  1. Eldercare at Home: Hearing Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Join our e-newsletter! Resources Eldercare at Home: Hearing Problems Caregiving How Tos Understanding the Problem ... are caring for. Ways to check hearing at home include the following: Ask the older person if ...

  2. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... to noise. The NIDCD sponsors It's a Noisy Planet. Protect Their Hearing® , a national public education campaign ... induced hearing loss is 100% preventable. NIDCD's Noisy Planet website Have a question? Information specialists can answer ...

  3. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... signals Identify sources of loud sounds (such as gas-powered lawnmowers, snowmobiles, power tools, gunfire, or music) that can contribute to hearing loss and try to reduce exposure Adopt behaviors to protect their hearing: Avoid or limit exposure ...

  4. False Belief Development in Children Who Are Hard of Hearing Compared With Peers With Normal Hearing

    PubMed Central

    Ambrose, Sophie E.; Oleson, Jacob; Moeller, Mary Pat

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study investigates false belief (FB) understanding in children who are hard of hearing (CHH) compared with children with normal hearing (CNH) at ages 5 and 6 years and at 2nd grade. Research with this population has theoretical significance, given that the early auditory–linguistic experiences of CHH are less restricted compared with children who are deaf but not as complete as those of CNH. Method Participants included CHH and CNH who had completed FB tasks as part of a larger multicenter, longitudinal study on outcomes of children with mild-to-severe hearing loss. Both cross-sectional and longitudinal data were analyzed. Results At age 5 years, CHH demonstrated significant delays in FB understanding relative to CNH. Both hearing status and spoken-language abilities contributed to FB performance in 5-year-olds. A subgroup of CHH showed protracted delays at 6 years, suggesting that some CHH are at risk for longer term delays in FB understanding. By 2nd grade, performance on 1st- and 2nd-order FBs did not differ between CHH and CNH. Conclusions Preschool-age CHH are at risk for delays in understanding others' beliefs, which has consequences for their social interactions and pragmatic communication. Research related to FB in children with hearing loss has the potential to inform our understanding of mechanisms that support social–cognitive development, including the roles of language and conversational access. PMID:29209697

  5. [Hearing disorders and rock music].

    PubMed

    Lindhardt, Bjarne Orskov

    2008-12-15

    Only few studies have investigated the frequency of hearing disorders in rock musicians. Performing rock music is apparently associated with a hearing loss in a fraction of musicians. Tinnitus and hyperacusis are more common among rock musicians than among the background population. It seems as if some sort of resistance against further hearing loss is developed over time. The use of ear protection devices have not been studied systematically but appears to be associated with diminished hearing loss.

  6. Reauthorization of the National Assessment of Educational Progress and National Assessment Governing Board. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Youth and Families of the Committee on Education and the Workforce. House of Representatives, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and the Workforce.

    A hearing was held on the re-authorization of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) and the National Assessment Governing Board (NAGB). Mary R. Blanton, Vice Chair of the NAGB, spoke about its mission and plans for design changes under the re-authorization. She also outlined the role of the NAGB in overseeing the voluntary…

  7. Juvenile Crime Control and Delinquency Prevention Act. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Youth and Families of the Committee on Education and the Workforce. House of Representatives, One Hundred Sixth Congress, First Session (Washington, DC, March 25, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and the Workforce.

    This hearing on the Juvenile Crime Control and Delinquency Prevention Act (H.R. 1150) presents testimonies from individuals who administer the key federal programs that address problems of juvenile delinquency and runaway and homeless youth. As the committee looks toward reauthorizing the Juvenile Justice Act, it is suggested that the act needs a…

  8. Upcoming hearings in Congress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The following hearings and markups have been tentatively scheduled for the coming weeks by the Senate and House of Representatives. Dates and times should be verified with the committee or subcommittee holding the hearing or markup; all offices on Capitol Hill may be reached by telephoning 202-224-3121. For guidelines on contacting a member of Congress, see AGU's Guide to Legislative Information and Contacts (Eos, August 28, 1984, p. 669).October 8: A joint hearing by the Energy Research & Development Subcommittee of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee and the Nuclear Regulation Subcommittee of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee on low-level radioactive waste (S. 1517 and S. 1578). Room SD-366, Dirksen Building, 9:30 A.M.

  9. Assessment of Hearing Impaired Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Doin E., Ed.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The issue of Directions contains 11 articles on assessment of hearing impaired individuals. Entries have the following titles and authors: "Classroom Assessment Techniques for Hearing Impaired Students--A Literature Review" (B. McKee, M. Hausknecht); "Informal Assessment of Hearing Impaired Students In the Classroom" (B. Culhane, R. Hein);…

  10. Deaf/Hearing Research Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolsey, Ju-Lee A.; Misener Dunn, Kim; Gentzke, Scott W.; Joharchi, Hannah A.; Clark, M. Diane

    2017-01-01

    Deaf individuals typically are seen through the lens of the dominant hearing society's perception, i.e., that being deaf is an impairment. Today, a small but growing number of Deaf and hearing researchers are challenging this perception. The authors examined perceptions of what components are necessary for a successful Deaf/hearing research…

  11. How to quantify binaural hearing in patients with unilateral hearing using hearing implants.

    PubMed

    Snik, Ad; Agterberg, Martijn; Bosman, Arjan

    2015-01-01

    Application of bilateral hearing devices in bilateral hearing loss and unilateral application in unilateral hearing loss (second ear with normal hearing) does not a priori lead to binaural hearing. An overview is presented on several measures of binaural benefits that have been used in patients with unilateral or bilateral deafness using one or two cochlear implants, respectively, and in patients with unilateral or bilateral conductive/mixed hearing loss using one or two percutaneous bone conduction implants (BCDs), respectively. Overall, according to this overview, the most significant and sensitive measure is the benefit in directional hearing. Measures using speech (viz. binaural summation, binaural squelch or use of the head shadow effect) showed minor benefits, except for patients with bilateral conductive/mixed hearing loss using two BCDs. Although less feasible in daily practise, the binaural masking level difference test seems to be a promising option in the assessment of binaural function. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Impact of Aging and Cognition on Hearing Assistive Technology Use

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, Lindsey E.; Messersmith, Jessica J.

    2015-01-01

    Many factors go into appropriate recommendation and use of hearing assistive technology (HAT). The aging auditory system presents with its own complications and intricacies; there are many types of age-related hearing loss, and it is possible that the underlying cause of hearing loss can significantly impact the recommendations and performance with HATs. The audiologist should take into consideration peripheral and central auditory function when selecting HATs for the aging adult population as well as when selecting appropriate types of technology including personal sound amplification products, hearing aids, cochlear implants, and other assistive technology. The cognitive ability of the patient plays a central role in the recommendations of HAT. It is possible that the use of HATs could mitigate some of the effects of cognitive decline and thus should be considered as early as possible. Assessment of ability and appropriate recommendations are crucial to consistent use of HAT devices. PMID:27516716

  13. Minocycline attenuates noise-induced hearing loss in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Song, Yong-Li; Tian, Ke-Yong; Qiu, Jian-Hua

    2017-02-03

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a serious health concern and prevention of hair cell death or therapeutic intervention at the early stage of NIHL is critical to preserve hearing. Minocycline is a semi-synthetic derivative of tetracycline and has been shown to have otoprotective effects in ototoxic drug-induced hearing impairment, however, whether minocycline can protect against NIHL has not been investigated. The present study demonstrated elevated ABR (auditory brainstem response) thresholds and outer hair cell loss following traumatic noise exposure, which was mitigated by intraperitoneal administration of minocycline (45mg/kg/d) for 5 consecutive days. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that minocycline, a clinically approved drug with a good safety profile, can attenuate NIHL in rats and may potentially be used for treatment of hearing loss in clinic. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [Hearing loss and idoneity--the segnalation of noise-induced hearing loss hearing Loss].

    PubMed

    Albera, Roberto; Dagna, Federico; Cassandro, Claudia; Canale, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Work idoneity in hearing loss must be related to working ability and evolution risks. Working ability is referred to the difficulties found in speech comprehension and in signals perception. As regards hearing loss evolution it is necessary to define if the subject is affected by conductive or neurosensorial hearing loss. In conductive hearing loss it is necessary to evaluate entity and frequential distribution of the deficit. In neurosensorial hearing loss it is necessary to distinguish between noise-induced hearing loss and extraprofessional hearing loss. In noise-induced hearing loss the evolution risk is high if the noise exposure is less than 10-15 years or the actual noise exposure is louder than the former. In case of extraprofessional hearing loss the evolution risk is higher in presbycusis, endolymphatic hydrops and toxic hearing loss. The necessity to report the presence on professionale noise-induced hearing loss arises if audiometric threshold is more than 25 dB at 0.5-1-2-3-4 kHz and if it is verified the professional origine of hearing loss.

  15. Health Teachers' Perceptions and Teaching Practices Regarding Hearing Loss Conservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Amy; Pakulski, Lori; Price, James; Kleinfelder, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    Background: Limited research has examined the role of school health personnel in the prevention and early identification of hearing impairment. Purpose: This study assessed high school health teachers' perceptions and teaching practices regarding hearing loss conservation. Methods: A 26-item survey based on selected components of the health…

  16. Pediatricians' Opinions about Otitis Media and Speech-Language-Hearing Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sonnenschein, Esther; Cascella, Paul W.

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-five pediatricians responded to a confidential survey about their opinions on the relationship between otitis media and children's speech-language-hearing status. Results found that pediatricians did not necessarily agree that otitis media has an impact on speech-language-hearing development. Pediatricians reported that an early otitis…

  17. Professional Development for In-Service Practitioners Serving Children Who Are Deaf and Hard of Hearing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Kathryn; Nevins, Mary Ellen; Houston, K. Todd

    2010-01-01

    Because children who are deaf or hard of hearing are being identified at birth, fitted with advanced hearing technology, and enrolled in early intervention programs, families increasingly seek professionals who can provide services that support their choice of listening and spoken language. The increased demand for these services and shortages of…

  18. School Nurses' Role in Identifying and Referring Children at Risk of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendershot, Candace; Pakulski, Lori A.; Thompson, Amy; Dowling, Jamie; Price, James H.

    2011-01-01

    Young people are likely to experience noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), as the use of personal listening devices and other damaging factors (e.g., video games) increases. Little research has examined the role of school health personnel in the prevention and early identification of hearing impairment. A 32-item, valid and reliable survey was…

  19. Unilateral hearing during development: hemispheric specificity in plastic reorganizations

    PubMed Central

    Kral, Andrej; Heid, Silvia; Hubka, Peter; Tillein, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates the hemispheric contributions of neuronal reorganization following early single-sided hearing (unilateral deafness). The experiments were performed on ten cats from our colony of deaf white cats. Two were identified in early hearing screening as unilaterally congenitally deaf. The remaining eight were bilaterally congenitally deaf, unilaterally implanted at different ages with a cochlear implant. Implanted animals were chronically stimulated using a single-channel portable signal processor for two to five months. Microelectrode recordings were performed at the primary auditory cortex under stimulation at the hearing and deaf ear with bilateral cochlear implants. Local field potentials (LFPs) were compared at the cortex ipsilateral and contralateral to the hearing ear. The focus of the study was on the morphology and the onset latency of the LFPs. With respect to morphology of LFPs, pronounced hemisphere-specific effects were observed. Morphology of amplitude-normalized LFPs for stimulation of the deaf and the hearing ear was similar for responses recorded at the same hemisphere. However, when comparisons were performed between the hemispheres, the morphology was more dissimilar even though the same ear was stimulated. This demonstrates hemispheric specificity of some cortical adaptations irrespective of the ear stimulated. The results suggest a specific adaptation process at the hemisphere ipsilateral to the hearing ear, involving specific (down-regulated inhibitory) mechanisms not found in the contralateral hemisphere. Finally, onset latencies revealed that the sensitive period for the cortex ipsilateral to the hearing ear is shorter than that for the contralateral cortex. Unilateral hearing experience leads to a functionally-asymmetric brain with different neuronal reorganizations and different sensitive periods involved. PMID:24348345

  20. Unilateral hearing during development: hemispheric specificity in plastic reorganizations.

    PubMed

    Kral, Andrej; Heid, Silvia; Hubka, Peter; Tillein, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates the hemispheric contributions of neuronal reorganization following early single-sided hearing (unilateral deafness). The experiments were performed on ten cats from our colony of deaf white cats. Two were identified in early hearing screening as unilaterally congenitally deaf. The remaining eight were bilaterally congenitally deaf, unilaterally implanted at different ages with a cochlear implant. Implanted animals were chronically stimulated using a single-channel portable signal processor for two to five months. Microelectrode recordings were performed at the primary auditory cortex under stimulation at the hearing and deaf ear with bilateral cochlear implants. Local field potentials (LFPs) were compared at the cortex ipsilateral and contralateral to the hearing ear. The focus of the study was on the morphology and the onset latency of the LFPs. With respect to morphology of LFPs, pronounced hemisphere-specific effects were observed. Morphology of amplitude-normalized LFPs for stimulation of the deaf and the hearing ear was similar for responses recorded at the same hemisphere. However, when comparisons were performed between the hemispheres, the morphology was more dissimilar even though the same ear was stimulated. This demonstrates hemispheric specificity of some cortical adaptations irrespective of the ear stimulated. The results suggest a specific adaptation process at the hemisphere ipsilateral to the hearing ear, involving specific (down-regulated inhibitory) mechanisms not found in the contralateral hemisphere. Finally, onset latencies revealed that the sensitive period for the cortex ipsilateral to the hearing ear is shorter than that for the contralateral cortex. Unilateral hearing experience leads to a functionally-asymmetric brain with different neuronal reorganizations and different sensitive periods involved.

  1. The impact of a family history of hearing problems on those with hearing difficulties themselves: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Dafydd; Kramer, Sophia E

    2005-04-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the effects of a family history of hearing impairment on those people with the hearing impairment themselves. The subjects were 102 consecutive patients with a family history of hearing impairment, seen in an audiological rehabilitation clinic. Each was given an open-ended questionnaire asking whether such a family history had any effects on them and, if so, to list any effects. Results were qualitatively analysed. 57 subjects indicated effects. Of those listed, 57% were positive, 19% negative, and 24% neutral. The most common positive effects concerned realising the importance of hearing aids and early help-seeking. Common negative effects were concern for the future of themselves and their children. Neutral effects were a reported ignorance or denial of a family history. The results emphasize the importance of asking patients about any family history when planning their rehabilitative programme.

  2. Parent Hearing Aid Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, Karen; Roberts, Mallory; Mullings, Day; Harward, Richard

    2012-01-01

    This study addresses parent experiences in obtaining and managing hearing aids for their young child. The purpose was to identify challenges parents encounter to determine what state agencies can do to improve parent access to amplification. Data were collected July through September of 2010; 40 parents of children ages birth to 3 years old…

  3. Hearing Impaired: Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton.

    The curriculum guide is intended to assist families, school administrators, and teachers providing educational services to hearing impaired (HI) children in regular and special classes in Alberta, Canada. Explained in the introduction are such curriculum aspects as goals and purpose, population to be served, eligibility criteria, three…

  4. Hear and Now

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeon, Michael; Berry, Lincoln

    2006-01-01

    Classrooms often get the short shrift when it comes to designing a space that allows for optimum hearing conditions for students and speaking conditions for teachers. Over the last few years, increasing concern from state regulators and facility designers has focused greater attention on improving acoustics. The main acoustical issues to consider…

  5. Human Spaceflight Safety Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-02

    U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz., left, speaks with reitred astronaut Lt. Gen. Thomas Stafford prior to the start of a hearing before the House Subcommitte on Space and Aeronautics regarding Safety of Human Spaceflight on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2009, in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  6. Unmanned Aircraft House Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-02-15

    Dr. Edgar Waggoner, Director, Integrated Systems research Program Office, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), takes notes during a House Subcommittee on Oversight hearing titled "Operating Unmanned Aircraft Systems in the National Airspace System: Assessing Research and Development Efforts to Ensure Safety" on Friday, Feb. 15, 2013 at the Rayburn House Office Building in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  7. House Hearing Independent Audit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-03

    Elizabeth Robinson, NASA Chief Finiancial Officer, testifies during a Joint Hearing before the House Committee on Science and Technology, Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight, Thursday, Dec. 3, 2009, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  8. House Hearing Independent Audit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-03

    Paul Martin, Inspector General for NASA, testifies during a Joint Hearing before the House Committee on Science and Technology, Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight, Thursday, Dec. 3, 2009, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  9. Independent Audit House Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-03

    Elizabeth Robinson, NASA Chief Financial Officer, testifies during a Joint Hearing before the House Committee on Science and Technology, Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight, Thursday, Dec. 3, 2009, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. House Hearing Independent Audit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-03

    Thomas Howard, NASA Deputy Inspector General, testifies during a Joint Hearing before the House Committee on Science and Technology, Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight, Thursday, Dec. 3, 2009, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. Human Spaceflight Safety Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-02

    U.S. Rep. Pete Olson, R-Texas, speaks during a hearing before the House Subcommitte on Space and Aeronautics regarding Safety of Human Spaceflight on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2009, in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. House Hearing Independent Audit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-03

    Daniel Murrin, Partner, Assurance and Advisory Business Services, Ernst & Young LLP, testifies during a Joint Hearing before the House Committee on Science and Technology, Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight, Thursday, Dec. 3, 2009, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  13. House Hearing Independent Audit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-03

    Daniel Murrin, Partner, Assurance and Advisory Business Service, Ernst & Young LLP, testifies during a Joint Hearing before the House Committee on Science and Technology, Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight, Thursday, Dec. 3, 2009, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  14. House Hearing Independent Audit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-03

    Elizabeth Robinson, NASA Chief Financial Officer, far right, testifies during a Joint Hearing before the House Committee on Science and Technology, Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, Subcommittee on Investigations and Oversight, Thursday, Dec. 3, 2009, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  15. Hearing and Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuerele, Jane

    2000-01-01

    Appreciation of the effect of reduced access to meaningful sounds due to hearing loss can help gerontologists understand clients' response behaviors that seem off target or out of place. Gerontologists should have the ability to assess the need for changes in communication patterns in order to assist older adults with quality of life issues. (SK)

  16. Senate Confirmation Hearing CFO

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-10-14

    U.S. Sen. Jay Rockefeller, D-W.Va., Chairman of the of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation, makes a point during the nomination hearing for Dr. Elizabeth M. Robinson, nominee for Chief Financial Officer for NASA, Thursday, Oct. 15, 2009, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  17. Senate Confirmation Hearing CFO

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-10-14

    Dr. Elizabeth M. Robinson, nominee for Chief Financial Officer for NASA, answers questions during her confirmation hearing in front of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation, Thursday, Oct. 15, 2009, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  18. Senate Confirmation Hearing IG

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-10-14

    Paul K. Martin, nominee for Inspector General at NASA, right, answers questions during his confirmation hearing in front of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation, Thursday, Oct. 15, 2009, on Capitol Hill in Washington. At left is Dr. Elizabeth M. Robinson, nominee for Chief Financial Officer for NASA. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  19. Senate Confirmation Hearing CFO

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-10-14

    U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell, D-Wash., left, talks about Dr. Elizabeth M. Robinson, nominee for Chief Financial Officer for NASA, right, prior to her confirmation hearing in front of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation, Thursday, Oct. 15, 2009, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  20. Senate Confirmation Hearing IG

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-10-14

    Paul K. Martin, nominee for Inspector General for NASA, answers questions during his confirmation hearing in front of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation, Thursday, Oct. 15, 2009, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  1. Lori Garver Confirmation Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-07

    Charles Bolden, nominee for Administrator of NASA, left, and Lori Garver, Nominee for Deputy Administrator of NASA, testify at their confirmation hearing before the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee in the Russell Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, July 8, 2009. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. Michael Griffin Senate Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-05-17

    Senator Trent Lott, R-Miss., questions NASA Administrator Dr. Michael Griffin during his appearance in front of the Senate Commerce Committee Science and Space Subcommittee hearing on Human Space Flight: The Space Shuttle and Beyond, Wednesday, May 18, 2005, in the Russell Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. Michael Griffin Senate Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-05-17

    NASA Administrator Dr. Michael Griffin is seen during his appearance in front of the Senate Commerce Committee Science and Space Subcommittee hearing on Human Space Flight: The Space Shuttle and Beyond, Wednesday, May 18, 2005, in the Russell Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  4. Michael Griffin Senate Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-05-17

    NASA Administrator Dr. Michael Griffin smiles during his appearance in front of the Senate Commerce Committee Science and Space Subcommittee hearing on Human Space Flight: The Space Shuttle and Beyond, Wednesday, May 18, 2005, in the Russell Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  5. Michael Griffin Senate Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-05-17

    NASA Administrator Dr. Michael Griffin is seen prior to his appearance in front of the Senate Commerce Committee Science and Space Subcommittee hearing on Human Space Flight: The Space Shuttle and Beyond, Wednesday, May 18, 2005, in the Russell Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  6. Charles Bolden Confirmation Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-07

    Charles Bolden, nominee for Administrator of NASA, left, and Lori Garver, nominee for Deputy Administrator of NASA, listen to Senators questions at their confirmation hearing before the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee in the Russell Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, July 8, 2009. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  7. Lori Garver Confirmation Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-07

    Lori Garver, nominee for Deputy Administrator of NASA, testifies at her confirmation hearing before the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee in the Russell Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, July 8, 2009. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  8. Michael Griffin Senate Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-05-17

    NASA Administrator Dr. Michael Griffin speaks in front of the Senate Commerce Committee Science and Space Subcommittee hearing on Human Space Flight: The Space Shuttle and Beyond, Wednesday, May 18, 2005, in the Russell Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  9. Charles Bolden Confirmation Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-07

    Charles Bolden, nominee for Administrator of NASA, testifies at his confirmation hearing before the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee in the Russell Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, July 8, 2009. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. Michael Griffin Senate Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-05-17

    NASA Administrator Dr. Michael Griffin delivers a statement during testimony in front of the Senate Commerce Committee Science and Space Subcommittee hearing on Human Space Flight: The Space Shuttle and Beyond, Wednesday, May 18, 2005, in the Russell Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. Charles Bolden Confirmation Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-07

    Charles Bolden, nominee for Administrator of NASA, waits for his turn to testify at his confirmation hearing before the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee in the Russell Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, July 8, 2009. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. Michael Griffin Senate Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-05-17

    U.S. Senator Bill Nelson. R-Fla., questions NASA Administrator Dr. Michael Griffin during his appearance in front of the Senate Commerce Committee Science and Space Subcommittee hearing on Human Space Flight: The Space Shuttle and Beyond, Wednesday, May 18, 2005, in the Russell Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  13. Unmanned Aircraft House Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-02-15

    Dr. Gerald Dillingham, Director, Civil Aviation Issues, Government Accounting Office (GAO), talks during a House Subcommittee on Oversight hearing titled "Operating Unmanned Aircraft Systems in the National Airspace System: Assessing Research and Development Efforts to Ensure Safety" on Friday, Feb. 15, 2013 at the Rayburn House Office Building in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  14. [Rock music and hearing disorders].

    PubMed

    Størmer, Carl Christian Lein; Stenklev, Niels Christian

    2007-03-29

    Continued exposition to loud noise is a well-known risk factor for development of various hearing disorders; rock musicians are especially vulnerable. The aim of this paper was to get an overview of hearing loss, tinnitus and hyperacusis among rock musicians. Medline was systematically searched, using combinations of the terms "hearing", "rock music", "tinnitus" and "hyperacusis". Seven publications concerning hearing of rock musicians were identified. Permanent hearing loss occurred in 20% (mean) of the rock musicians; the prevalence varied from 5 to 41%. Tinnitus and hyperacusis appear significantly more often in rock musicians than in non-musicians. Rock musicians have increased resistance against loud music and exposure over time is protective towards hearing loss. Further research is needed to assess rock music's impact on musicians' hearing.

  15. Quality and readability of information pamphlets on hearing and paediatric hearing loss in the Gauteng Province, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Joubert, Karin; Githinji, Esther

    2014-02-01

    The implementation of early hearing detection and intervention (EHDI) programmes is necessary in order to facilitate the early identification of hearing loss. An important component of EHDI is parental education. International and national guidelines stipulating that comprehensive, unbiased and appropriate information pamphlets should be provided to parents as part of EHDI programmes, however little is known about the availability and readability of such materials in South Africa. The objectives of this study were therefore to determine the availability of information pamphlets on hearing and hearing loss in children at public hospitals in the Gauteng Province of South Africa. In addition, the quality and readability levels of these pamphlets were determined. A non-experimental, descriptive research design was employed for this study. Information on the availability of leaflets at public health hospitals was obtained through a telephonic survey. Twenty-one information pamphlets available at these hospitals were then evaluated to determine the quality and readability levels. It was found that 73% of audiology departments at public hospitals in Gauteng had information pamphlets available on hearing and hearing loss in children. Of the pamphlets evaluated, the majority were rated to 'present with serious problems' questioning the quality of the content included. In addition, it was found that on average the readability level of these pamphlets were at a sixth-grade level, much higher that the recommended fourth-grade reading level. The need for development of quality educational material focused on providing parents with unbiased, comprehensive and appropriate information on hearing and hearing loss in children has been highlighted. Proposed guidelines were recommended to assist audiologists in this endeavour. The importance of providing appropriate parental educational materials for the success of EHDI in South Africa should not be underestimated. Copyright © 2013

  16. Long-Term Asymmetric Hearing Affects Cochlear Implantation Outcomes Differently in Adults with Pre- and Postlingual Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Boisvert, Isabelle; McMahon, Catherine M.; Dowell, Richard C.; Lyxell, Björn

    2015-01-01

    In many countries, a single cochlear implant is offered as a treatment for a bilateral hearing loss. In cases where there is asymmetry in the amount of sound deprivation between the ears, there is a dilemma in choosing which ear should be implanted. In many clinics, the choice of ear has been guided by an assumption that the reorganisation of the auditory pathways caused by longer duration of deafness in one ear is associated with poorer implantation outcomes for that ear. This assumption, however, is mainly derived from studies of early childhood deafness. This study compared outcomes following implantation of the better or poorer ear in cases of long-term hearing asymmetries. Audiological records of 146 adults with bilateral hearing loss using a single hearing aid were reviewed. The unaided ear had 15 to 72 years of unaided severe to profound hearing loss before unilateral cochlear implantation. 98 received the implant in their long-term sound-deprived ear. A multiple regression analysis was conducted to assess the relative contribution of potential predictors to speech recognition performance after implantation. Duration of bilateral significant hearing loss and the presence of a prelingual hearing loss explained the majority of variance in speech recognition performance following cochlear implantation. For participants with postlingual hearing loss, similar outcomes were obtained by implanting either ear. With prelingual hearing loss, poorer outcomes were obtained when implanting the long-term sound-deprived ear, but the duration of the sound deprivation in the implanted ear did not reliably predict outcomes. Contrary to an apparent clinical consensus, duration of sound deprivation in one ear has limited value in predicting speech recognition outcomes of cochlear implantation in that ear. Outcomes of cochlear implantation are more closely related to the period of time for which the brain is deprived of auditory stimulation from both ears. PMID:26043227

  17. Genetics of Hearing Loss – Syndromic

    PubMed Central

    Koffler, Tal; Ushakov, Kathy; Avraham, Karen B.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Hearing loss (HL) is one of the most common birth defects in developed countries and is a diverse pathology with different classifications. One of these is based on the association with other clinical features, defined as syndromic hearing loss (SHL). Determining the etiology of the HL in these patients is extremely beneficial as it enables a personalized approach to caring for the individual. Early screening can further aid in optimal rehabilitation for a child’s development and growth. Pathogenic variants in forty-five genes, encoding proteins functioning as ion channels, transcription factors, molecular motors and more, are known to lead to eleven forms of SHL. The development of high-throughput sequencing technology is facilitating rapid and low-cost diagnostics for patients with SHL. PMID:26443487

  18. Targeted surveillance for postnatal hearing loss: a program evaluation.

    PubMed

    Beswick, Rachael; Driscoll, Carlie; Kei, Joseph; Glennon, Shirley

    2012-07-01

    The importance of monitoring hearing throughout early childhood cannot be understated. However, there is a lack of evidence available regarding the most effective method of monitoring hearing following the newborn screen. The goal of this study was to describe a targeted surveillance program using a risk factor registry to identify children with a postnatal hearing loss. All children who were born in Queensland, Australia between September 2004 and December 2009, received a bilateral 'pass' on newborn hearing screening, and had at least one risk factor, were referred for targeted surveillance and were included in this study. The cohort was assessed throughout early childhood in accordance with Queensland's diagnostic assessment protocols. During the study period, 7320 (2.8% of 261,328) children were referred for targeted surveillance, of which 56 were identified with a postnatal hearing loss (0.77%). Of these, half (50.0%) were identified with a mild hearing loss, and 64.3% were identified with a sensorineural hearing loss. In regards to risk factors, syndrome, craniofacial anomalies, and severe asphyxia had the highest yield of positive cases of postnatal hearing loss for children referred for targeted surveillance, whereas, low birth weight, bacterial meningitis, and professional concern had a particularly low yield. Limitations of the targeted surveillance program were noted and include: (1) a lost contact rate of 32.4%; (2) delays in first surveillance assessment; (3) a large number of children who required on-going monitoring; and (4) extensive diagnostic assessments were completed on children with normal hearing. Examination of the lost contact rate revealed indigenous children were more likely to be documented as lost contact. In addition, children with one risk factor only were significantly more likely to not attend a surveillance appointment. Positive cases of postnatal hearing loss were detected through the targeted surveillance program. However, the

  19. Unilateral and Mild Bilateral Hearing Loss in Children: Past and Current Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Tharpe, Anne Marie

    2008-01-01

    Since the early 1980s, audiologists have become increasingly aware of the potential effect of even mild degrees of hearing loss on the psychoeducational and psychosocial outcomes of children. This review describes some of the key research findings during the past several decades that have led us to our current thinking about unilateral and mild bilateral hearing loss in children. The first section addresses unilateral hearing loss. This is followed by a review of the literature on mild bilateral hearing loss. Specifically, the issues addressed include the significance of permanent mild degrees of hearing loss on children's psychoeducational and psychosocial development and the speech, language, and auditory characteristics of children with mild degrees of hearing loss. Finally, some recommendations regarding the direction of future research are offered. This review is followed by 2 articles summarizing the proceedings of a 2005 workshop convened by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) program, and the Marion Downs Hearing Center to address concerns about the underidentification of—and professionals' apparent lack of awareness of—permanent unilateral and minimal to mild hearing loss in children.56,57 PMID:18270174

  20. Hearing, speech, language, and vestibular disorders in the fetal alcohol syndrome: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Church, M W; Kaltenbach, J A

    1997-05-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is characterized in part by mental impairment, as well as craniofacial and ocular anomalies. These conditions are traditionally associated with childhood hearing disorders, because they all have a common embryonic origin in malformations of the first and second branchial arches, and have similar critical periods of vulnerability to toxic insult. A review of human and animal research indicates that there are four types of hearing disorders associated with FAS. These are: (1) a developmental delay in auditory maturation, (2) sensorineural hearing loss, (3) intermittent conductive hearing loss due to recurrent serous otitis media, and (4) central hearing loss. The auditory and vestibular systems share the same peripheral apparatuses (the inner ear and eighth cranial nerve) and are embryologically and structurally similar. Consequently, vestibular disorders in FAS children might be expected. The evidence for vestibular dysfunction in FAS is ambiguous, however. Like other syndromes associated with craniofacial anomalies, hearing disorders, and mental impairment, FAS is also characterized by a high prevalence of speech and language pathology. Hearing disorders are a form of sensory deprivation. If present during early childhood, they can result in permanent hearing, language, and mental impairment. Early identification and intervention to treat hearing, language, and speech disorders could therefore result in improved outcome for the FAS child. Specific recommendations are made for intervention and future research.

  1. Emotion Understanding in Preschool Children with Mild-to-Severe Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Laugen, Nina J.; Jacobsen, Karl H.; Rieffe, Carolien; Wichstrøm, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Deaf and hard of hearing school-aged children are at risk for delayed development of emotion understanding; however, little is known about this during the preschool years. We compared the level of emotion understanding in a group of 35 4–5-year-old children who use hearing aids to that of 130 children with typical hearing. Moreover, we investigated the parents’ perception of their child's level of emotion understanding. Children were assessed with the Test of Emotion Comprehension. Parents were presented with the same test and asked to guess what their child answered on each item. The results showed that children with hearing loss performed at the same level as typically hearing children, despite having lower vocabulary scores. Parents of children with hearing loss were more accurate in their estimations of their child's competence, and higher accuracy was associated with better emotion understanding. These findings may have implications for early intervention planning. PMID:27881481

  2. [Management of sudden neurosensory hearing loss in a Primary Care Centre].

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Proto, F; Carnevale, C; Bejarano-Panadés, N; Ferrán-de la Cierva, L; Mas-Mercant, S; Sarría-Echegaray, P

    2014-04-01

    Sudden hearing loss is a rapid loss of neurosensory hearing that may occur within hours or days in an apparently healthy patient. Its origins are variable and multifactorial. Most patients do not recover hearing if not treated, and some even develop cophosis (deafness) in the affected ear. It is an otological emergency, as early therapeutic management offers a better hearing prognosis. As there is limited knowledge on this condition, it may be underdiagnosed in Primary Health Care Centers. It should be suspected in patients with abrupt hearing loss or tinnitus. Sophisticated instruments are not required for its diagnosis, just a detailed history, basic otoscopy, and proper interpretation of the hearing test. In this way, an accurate diagnosis is achieved in most cases, which is confirmed by audiometry. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. 44 CFR 7.13 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Hearings. 7.13 Section 7.13... Programs-General § 7.13 Hearings. (a) Opportunity for hearing. Whenever an opportunity for a hearing is... may request of the responsible agency official that the matter be scheduled for hearing or (2) advise...

  4. 29 CFR 1450.22 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hearing. 1450.22 Section 1450.22 Labor Regulations Relating... STATES Salary Offset § 1450.22 Hearing. (a) Petition for hearing. (1) A hearing may be requested by..., and is not accepted pursuant to paragraph (a)(4) of this section, the employee's right to hearing will...

  5. 41 CFR 50-203.17 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Hearings. 50-203.17...-Healey Public Contracts Act § 50-203.17 Hearings. (a) Hearings held for the purpose of receiving evidence... administrative law judge. (b) Due notice of hearing shall be published in the Federal Register. (c) The hearing...

  6. 29 CFR 2700.108 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hearing. 2700.108 Section 2700.108 Labor Regulations... Proceedings § 2700.108 Hearing. (a) Procedures. As soon as practicable after the conclusion of the pre-hearing conference, the Judge will hold a hearing on any issue that remains in dispute. The hearing will be in...

  7. 36 CFR 1211.620 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hearings. 1211.620 Section... Procedures § 1211.620 Hearings. (a) Opportunity for hearing. Whenever an opportunity for a hearing is... may request of the designated agency official that the matter be scheduled for hearing; or (2) Advise...

  8. 45 CFR 1203.9 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hearings. 1203.9 Section 1203.9 Public Welfare... Hearings. (a) Opportunity for hearing. When an opportunity for a hearing is required by § 1203.8(c... matter be scheduled for hearing; or (2) Advise the applicant or recipient that the matter in question has...

  9. 22 CFR 512.21 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Hearing. 512.21 Section 512.21 Foreign Relations....21 Hearing. (a) Petition for hearing. (1) A hearing may be requested by filing a written petition... section, the employee's right to hearing will be considered waived, and salary offset will be implemented...

  10. 45 CFR 1203.9 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hearings. 1203.9 Section 1203.9 Public Welfare... Hearings. (a) Opportunity for hearing. When an opportunity for a hearing is required by § 1203.8(c... matter be scheduled for hearing; or (2) Advise the applicant or recipient that the matter in question has...

  11. 12 CFR 308.155 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hearing. 308.155 Section 308.155 Banks and... Pursuant to Section 32 of the FDIA § 308.155 Hearing. (a) Hearing dates. The Executive Secretary shall order a hearing to be commenced within 30 days after receipt of a request for a hearing filed pursuant...

  12. 10 CFR 205.172 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hearings. 205.172 Section 205.172 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES AND SANCTIONS Conferences, Hearings, and Public Hearings § 205.172 Hearings. (a) The DOE in its discretion may direct that a hearing be convened on its own initiative or upon...

  13. 29 CFR 1450.22 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hearing. 1450.22 Section 1450.22 Labor Regulations Relating... STATES Salary Offset § 1450.22 Hearing. (a) Petition for hearing. (1) A hearing may be requested by..., and is not accepted pursuant to paragraph (a)(4) of this section, the employee's right to hearing will...

  14. 10 CFR 431.426 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hearing. 431.426 Section 431.426 Energy DEPARTMENT OF... § 431.426 Hearing. The Secretary may hold a public hearing, and publish notice in the Federal Register of the date and location of the hearing, when he determines that such a hearing is necessary and...

  15. 7 CFR 400.132 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hearings. 400.132 Section 400.132 Agriculture... Years § 400.132 Hearings. (a) If an employee timely files a petition for a hearing, the FCIC Official will select the date, time, and location for the hearing. (b) The hearing shall be conducted by an...

  16. 12 CFR 308.164 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hearings. 308.164 Section 308.164 Banks and... Where a Felony ls Charged § 308.164 Hearings. (a) Hearing dates. The Executive Secretary shall order a hearing to be commenced within 30 days after receipt of a request for hearing filed pursuant to § 308.163...

  17. 28 CFR 42.109 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hearings. 42.109 Section 42.109 Judicial....109 Hearings. (a) Opportunity for hearing. Whenever an opportunity for a hearing is required by § 42... that the responsible Department official schedule the matter for hearing, or (2) advise the applicant...

  18. 12 CFR 308.164 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hearings. 308.164 Section 308.164 Banks and... Where a Felony ls Charged § 308.164 Hearings. (a) Hearing dates. The Executive Secretary shall order a hearing to be commenced within 30 days after receipt of a request for hearing filed pursuant to § 308.163...

  19. 34 CFR 668.116 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hearing. 668.116 Section 668.116 Education Regulations... Program Review Determinations § 668.116 Hearing. (a) A hearing is a process conducted by the hearing official whereby an orderly presentation of arguments and evidence is made by the parties. (b) The hearing...

  20. 18 CFR 1302.9 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hearings. 1302.9... Hearings. (a) Opportunity for hearing. Whenever an opportunity for a hearing is required by § 1302.7(b... notice within which the recipient may request of TVA that the matter be scheduled for hearing or (2...

  1. 5 CFR 1215.5 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hearing. 1215.5 Section 1215.5... § 1215.5 Hearing. (a) Request for hearing. (1) An employee must file a petition for a hearing in accordance with the instructions outlined in the agency's notice to offset. (2) A hearing may be requested by...

  2. 45 CFR 1203.9 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hearings. 1203.9 Section 1203.9 Public Welfare... Hearings. (a) Opportunity for hearing. When an opportunity for a hearing is required by § 1203.8(c... matter be scheduled for hearing; or (2) Advise the applicant or recipient that the matter in question has...

  3. 41 CFR 105-57.005 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hearing. 105-57.005...-ADMINISTRATION WAGE GARNISHMENT § 105-57.005 Hearing. (a) GSA will provide a hearing, which at the hearing... by GSA, the debtor submits a signed and dated written request for a hearing, to the official named in...

  4. 39 CFR 957.13 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hearings. 957.13 Section 957.13 Postal Service... SUSPENSION FROM CONTRACTING § 957.13 Hearings. (a) Hearings are held at 2101 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 600... than 7 days prior to the scheduled date of a hearing, file a request that such hearing be held at a...

  5. 28 CFR 42.109 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hearings. 42.109 Section 42.109 Judicial....109 Hearings. (a) Opportunity for hearing. Whenever an opportunity for a hearing is required by § 42... that the responsible Department official schedule the matter for hearing, or (2) advise the applicant...

  6. 5 CFR 1215.5 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hearing. 1215.5 Section 1215.5... § 1215.5 Hearing. (a) Request for hearing. (1) An employee must file a petition for a hearing in accordance with the instructions outlined in the agency's notice to offset. (2) A hearing may be requested by...

  7. 10 CFR 1003.62 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hearings. 1003.62 Section 1003.62 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS PROCEDURAL REGULATIONS Conferences and Hearings § 1003.62 Hearings. (a) The OHA in its discretion may direct that a hearing be convened on its own...

  8. 10 CFR 1003.62 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hearings. 1003.62 Section 1003.62 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS PROCEDURAL REGULATIONS Conferences and Hearings § 1003.62 Hearings. (a) The OHA in its discretion may direct that a hearing be convened on its own...

  9. 45 CFR 16.11 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hearing. 16.11 Section 16.11 Public Welfare... BOARD § 16.11 Hearing. (a) Electing a hearing. If the appellant believes a hearing is appropriate, the... appeal file). The Board will approve a request (and may schedule a hearing on its own or in response to a...

  10. 5 CFR 1215.5 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hearing. 1215.5 Section 1215.5... § 1215.5 Hearing. (a) Request for hearing. (1) An employee must file a petition for a hearing in accordance with the instructions outlined in the agency's notice to offset. (2) A hearing may be requested by...

  11. 17 CFR 201.300 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hearings. 201.300 Section 201... Practice Rules Regarding Hearings § 201.300 Hearings. Hearings for the purpose of taking evidence shall be held only upon order of the Commission. All hearings shall be conducted in a fair, impartial...

  12. 22 CFR 512.21 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Hearing. 512.21 Section 512.21 Foreign Relations....21 Hearing. (a) Petition for hearing. (1) A hearing may be requested by filing a written petition... section, the employee's right to hearing will be considered waived, and salary offset will be implemented...

  13. 45 CFR 73b.5 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hearings. 73b.5 Section 73b.5 Public Welfare... § 73b.5 Hearings. (a) Hearings shall be stenographically recorded and transcribed and the testimony of witnesses shall be taken under oath or affirmation. Hearings will be closed unless an open hearing is...

  14. 7 CFR 400.132 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hearings. 400.132 Section 400.132 Agriculture... Years § 400.132 Hearings. (a) If an employee timely files a petition for a hearing, the FCIC Official will select the date, time, and location for the hearing. (b) The hearing shall be conducted by an...

  15. 49 CFR 209.115 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hearing. 209.115 Section 209.115 Transportation... Hearing. (a) When a hearing is requested and scheduled under § 209.113, a hearing officer designated by the Chief Counsel convenes and presides over the hearing. If requested by respondent and if...

  16. 40 CFR 57.807 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hearing. 57.807 Section 57.807... § 57.807 Hearing. (a) Composition of hearing panel. The Presiding Officer shall preside at the hearing held under this subpart. An EPA panel shall also take part in the hearing. In general, the membership...

  17. 10 CFR 431.426 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hearing. 431.426 Section 431.426 Energy DEPARTMENT OF... § 431.426 Hearing. The Secretary may hold a public hearing, and publish notice in the Federal Register of the date and location of the hearing, when he determines that such a hearing is necessary and...

  18. 36 CFR 1211.620 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hearings. 1211.620 Section... Procedures § 1211.620 Hearings. (a) Opportunity for hearing. Whenever an opportunity for a hearing is... may request of the designated agency official that the matter be scheduled for hearing; or (2) Advise...

  19. 10 CFR 16.9 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hearing. 16.9 Section 16.9 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... § 16.9 Hearing. (a) Request for hearing. (1) An employee shall file a petition for a hearing in... creditor agency, a hearing may be requested by filing a written petition stating why the employee disputes...

  20. 14 CFR 13.79 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hearing. 13.79 Section 13.79 Aeronautics....79 Hearing. If an alleged violator requests a hearing in accordance with § 13.75, the procedure of subpart D of this part applies. At the close of the hearing, the Hearing Officer, on the record or...

  1. 41 CFR 105-57.005 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hearing. 105-57.005...-ADMINISTRATION WAGE GARNISHMENT § 105-57.005 Hearing. (a) GSA will provide a hearing, which at the hearing... by GSA, the debtor submits a signed and dated written request for a hearing, to the official named in...

  2. 37 CFR 11.44 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hearings. 11.44 Section 11.44... Proceedings; Jurisdiction, Sanctions, Investigations, and Proceedings § 11.44 Hearings. (a) The hearing officer shall preside over hearings in disciplinary proceedings. The hearing officer shall set the time...

  3. 44 CFR 7.13 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hearings. 7.13 Section 7.13... Programs-General § 7.13 Hearings. (a) Opportunity for hearing. Whenever an opportunity for a hearing is... may request of the responsible agency official that the matter be scheduled for hearing or (2) advise...

  4. 10 CFR 205.172 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hearings. 205.172 Section 205.172 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES AND SANCTIONS Conferences, Hearings, and Public Hearings § 205.172 Hearings. (a) The DOE in its discretion may direct that a hearing be convened on its own initiative or upon...

  5. 40 CFR 57.807 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hearing. 57.807 Section 57.807... § 57.807 Hearing. (a) Composition of hearing panel. The Presiding Officer shall preside at the hearing held under this subpart. An EPA panel shall also take part in the hearing. In general, the membership...

  6. 28 CFR 42.109 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hearings. 42.109 Section 42.109 Judicial....109 Hearings. (a) Opportunity for hearing. Whenever an opportunity for a hearing is required by § 42... that the responsible Department official schedule the matter for hearing, or (2) advise the applicant...

  7. 10 CFR 2.1405 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hearing. 2.1405 Section 2.1405 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION AGENCY RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Expedited Proceedings with Oral Hearings § 2.1405 Hearing... officer shall hold a hearing on any contention that remains in dispute. At the beginning of the hearing...

  8. 15 CFR 8.12 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hearings. 8.12 Section 8.12 Commerce... Compliance § 8.12 Hearings. (a) Opportunity for hearing. Whenever an opportunity for a hearing is required by... hearing, or (2) advise the recipient or other party that the matter in question has been set down for...

  9. 15 CFR 8.12 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hearings. 8.12 Section 8.12 Commerce... Compliance § 8.12 Hearings. (a) Opportunity for hearing. Whenever an opportunity for a hearing is required by... hearing, or (2) advise the recipient or other party that the matter in question has been set down for...

  10. 32 CFR 195.10 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hearings. 195.10 Section 195.10 National Defense... RIGHTS ACT OF 1964 § 195.10 Hearings. (a) Opportunity for hearing. Whenever an opportunity for a hearing... recipient may request of the responsible Department official that the matter be scheduled for hearing or (2...

  11. 41 CFR 50-203.17 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Hearings. 50-203.17...-Healey Public Contracts Act § 50-203.17 Hearings. (a) Hearings held for the purpose of receiving evidence... administrative law judge. (b) Due notice of hearing shall be published in the Federal Register. (c) The hearing...

  12. 41 CFR 105-57.005 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hearing. 105-57.005...-ADMINISTRATION WAGE GARNISHMENT § 105-57.005 Hearing. (a) GSA will provide a hearing, which at the hearing... by GSA, the debtor submits a signed and dated written request for a hearing, to the official named in...

  13. 39 CFR 957.13 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hearings. 957.13 Section 957.13 Postal Service... SUSPENSION FROM CONTRACTING § 957.13 Hearings. (a) Hearings are held at 2101 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 600... than 7 days prior to the scheduled date of a hearing, file a request that such hearing be held at a...

  14. 18 CFR 1302.9 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hearings. 1302.9... Hearings. (a) Opportunity for hearing. Whenever an opportunity for a hearing is required by § 1302.7(b... notice within which the recipient may request of TVA that the matter be scheduled for hearing or (2...

  15. 12 CFR 308.160 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hearings. 308.160 Section 308.160 Banks and... Hearings. (a) Hearing dates. The Executive Secretary shall order a hearing to be commenced within 60 days after receipt of a request for hearing on an application filed pursuant to § 308.159. Upon the request...

  16. 44 CFR 7.13 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hearings. 7.13 Section 7.13... Programs-General § 7.13 Hearings. (a) Opportunity for hearing. Whenever an opportunity for a hearing is... may request of the responsible agency official that the matter be scheduled for hearing or (2) advise...

  17. 14 CFR 13.79 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hearing. 13.79 Section 13.79 Aeronautics....79 Hearing. If an alleged violator requests a hearing in accordance with § 13.75, the procedure of subpart D of this part applies. At the close of the hearing, the Hearing Officer, on the record or...

  18. 10 CFR 1003.62 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hearings. 1003.62 Section 1003.62 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS PROCEDURAL REGULATIONS Conferences and Hearings § 1003.62 Hearings. (a) The OHA in its discretion may direct that a hearing be convened on its own...

  19. 34 CFR 668.88 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hearing. 668.88 Section 668.88 Education Regulations of... Proceedings § 668.88 Hearing. (a) A hearing is an orderly presentation of arguments and evidence conducted by a hearing official. (b) If the hearing official, the designated department official who brought a...

  20. 37 CFR 11.44 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hearings. 11.44 Section 11.44... Proceedings; Jurisdiction, Sanctions, Investigations, and Proceedings § 11.44 Hearings. (a) The hearing officer shall preside over hearings in disciplinary proceedings. The hearing officer shall set the time...

  1. 32 CFR 195.10 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hearings. 195.10 Section 195.10 National Defense... RIGHTS ACT OF 1964 § 195.10 Hearings. (a) Opportunity for hearing. Whenever an opportunity for a hearing... recipient may request of the responsible Department official that the matter be scheduled for hearing or (2...

  2. 45 CFR 16.11 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hearing. 16.11 Section 16.11 Public Welfare... BOARD § 16.11 Hearing. (a) Electing a hearing. If the appellant believes a hearing is appropriate, the... appeal file). The Board will approve a request (and may schedule a hearing on its own or in response to a...

  3. 17 CFR 204.64 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hearing. 204.64 Section 204.64... Administrative Wage Garnishment § 204.64 Hearing. (a) Request for hearing. The Commission will order a hearing... hearing concerning, for debts not previously established by judicial or administrative order, the...

  4. 12 CFR 308.160 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hearings. 308.160 Section 308.160 Banks and... Hearings. (a) Hearing dates. The Executive Secretary shall order a hearing to be commenced within 60 days after receipt of a request for hearing on an application filed pursuant to § 308.159. Upon the request...

  5. 29 CFR 2700.108 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hearing. 2700.108 Section 2700.108 Labor Regulations... Proceedings § 2700.108 Hearing. (a) Procedures. As soon as practicable after the conclusion of the pre-hearing conference, the Judge will hold a hearing on any issue that remains in dispute. The hearing will be in...

  6. 45 CFR 73b.5 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hearings. 73b.5 Section 73b.5 Public Welfare... § 73b.5 Hearings. (a) Hearings shall be stenographically recorded and transcribed and the testimony of witnesses shall be taken under oath or affirmation. Hearings will be closed unless an open hearing is...

  7. 39 CFR 957.13 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hearings. 957.13 Section 957.13 Postal Service... SUSPENSION FROM CONTRACTING § 957.13 Hearings. (a) Hearings are held at 2101 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 600... than 7 days prior to the scheduled date of a hearing, file a request that such hearing be held at a...

  8. 18 CFR 1302.9 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Hearings. 1302.9 Section... Hearings. (a) Opportunity for hearing. Whenever an opportunity for a hearing is required by § 1302.7(b... notice within which the recipient may request of TVA that the matter be scheduled for hearing or (2...

  9. 41 CFR 50-203.17 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hearings. 50-203.17...-Healey Public Contracts Act § 50-203.17 Hearings. (a) Hearings held for the purpose of receiving evidence... administrative law judge. (b) Due notice of hearing shall be published in the Federal Register. (c) The hearing...

  10. 12 CFR 308.155 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hearing. 308.155 Section 308.155 Banks and... Pursuant to Section 32 of the FDIA § 308.155 Hearing. (a) Hearing dates. The Executive Secretary shall order a hearing to be commenced within 30 days after receipt of a request for a hearing filed pursuant...

  11. 5 CFR 1215.5 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hearing. 1215.5 Section 1215.5... § 1215.5 Hearing. (a) Request for hearing. (1) An employee must file a petition for a hearing in accordance with the instructions outlined in the agency's notice to offset. (2) A hearing may be requested by...

  12. 22 CFR 512.21 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hearing. 512.21 Section 512.21 Foreign... Offset § 512.21 Hearing. (a) Petition for hearing. (1) A hearing may be requested by filing a written... section, the employee's right to hearing will be considered waived, and salary offset will be implemented...

  13. 18 CFR 1302.9 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hearings. 1302.9... Hearings. (a) Opportunity for hearing. Whenever an opportunity for a hearing is required by § 1302.7(b... notice within which the recipient may request of TVA that the matter be scheduled for hearing or (2...

  14. 45 CFR 73b.5 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hearings. 73b.5 Section 73b.5 Public Welfare... § 73b.5 Hearings. (a) Hearings shall be stenographically recorded and transcribed and the testimony of witnesses shall be taken under oath or affirmation. Hearings will be closed unless an open hearing is...

  15. 9 CFR 124.42 - Hearing procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Diligence Hearing § 124.42 Hearing procedure. (a) The presiding officer shall be appointed by the... hearing. (g) The due diligence hearing will be conducted in accordance with rules of practice adopted for... opportunity to participate as a party in the hearing. The standard of due diligence set forth in § 124.33 will...

  16. 10 CFR 110.102 - Hearing docket.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hearing docket. 110.102 Section 110.102 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) EXPORT AND IMPORT OF NUCLEAR EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL Hearings § 110.102 Hearing docket. For each hearing, the Secretary will maintain a docket which will include the hearing...

  17. 12 CFR 308.164 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hearings. 308.164 Section 308.164 Banks and... Where a Felony ls Charged § 308.164 Hearings. (a) Hearing dates. The Executive Secretary shall order a hearing to be commenced within 30 days after receipt of a request for hearing filed pursuant to § 308.163...

  18. 5 CFR 1215.5 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hearing. 1215.5 Section 1215.5... § 1215.5 Hearing. (a) Request for hearing. (1) An employee must file a petition for a hearing in accordance with the instructions outlined in the agency's notice to offset. (2) A hearing may be requested by...

  19. 38 CFR 39.12 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hearings. 39.12 Section... Requirements and Procedures § 39.12 Hearings. (a) No application for a grant to establish, expand, or improve a... hearing. (b) Whenever a hearing is requested under this section, notice of the hearing, procedure for the...

  20. 34 CFR 668.88 - Hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hearing. 668.88 Section 668.88 Education Regulations of... Proceedings § 668.88 Hearing. (a) A hearing is an orderly presentation of arguments and evidence conducted by a hearing official. (b) If the hearing official, the designated department official who brought a...