Science.gov

Sample records for early natural history

  1. Byler disease: early natural history.

    PubMed

    Morris, Amy L; Bukauskas, Kathryn; Sada, Rachel E; Shneider, Benjamin L

    2015-04-01

    Byler disease, originally described in Amish kindred, results from mutations in ATPase Class I Type 8b Member 1 (ATP8b1). Specific clinical reports of Amish Byler disease were last published 40 years ago. These investigations were directed at the present detailed clinical understanding of the early course of hepatic manifestations of Byler disease. This study analyzed routine clinical practice and outcomes of children with Byler disease (defined by homozygous c.923G>T mutation in ATP8b1), who initially presented to Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC between January 2007 and October 2014. Data were analyzed to the earlier of 24 months of age or partial external biliary diversion. Six children presented between 1 and 135 days of life: 2 presented with newborn direct hyperbilirubinemia, 2 had complications of coagulopathy, 1 had failure to thrive and rickets, and 1 sibling was identified by newborn genetic testing. Intensive fat-soluble vitamin supplementation was required to prevent insufficiencies in vitamins D, E, and K. Hyperbilirubinemia was variable both over time and between children. Serum bile acid levels were elevated, whereas γ-glutamyltranspeptidase levels were low normal. Scratching behavior (pruritus) was intractable in 4 of 6 children with onset between 6 and 12 months of age. Features of portal hypertension were not observed. Partial external biliary diversion was used during the second year of life in 4 children. Detailed analysis of Byler disease revealed varied disease presentation and course. Nutritional issues and pruritus dominated the clinical picture in the first 2 years of life.

  2. Assembling the dodo in early modern natural history.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Natalie

    2015-09-01

    This paper explores the assimilation of the flightless dodo into early modern natural history. The dodo was first described by Dutch sailors landing on Mauritius in 1598, and became extinct in the 1680s or 1690s. Despite this brief period of encounter, the bird was a popular subject in natural-history works and a range of other genres. The dodo will be used here as a counterexample to the historical narratives of taxonomic crisis and abrupt shifts in natural history caused by exotic creatures coming to Europe. Though this bird had a bizarre form, early modern naturalists integrated the dodo and other flightless birds through several levels of conceptual categorization, including the geographical, morphological and symbolic. Naturalists such as Charles L'Ecluse produced a set of typical descriptive tropes that helped make up the European dodo. These long-lived images were used for a variety of symbolic purposes, demonstrated by the depiction of the Dutch East India enterprise in Willem Piso's 1658 publication. The case of the dodo shows that, far from there being a dramatic shift away from emblematics in the seventeenth century, the implicit symbolic roles attributed to exotic beasts by naturalists constructing them from scant information and specimens remained integral to natural history.

  3. Francis Bacon's natural history and the Senecan natural histories of early modern Europe.

    PubMed

    Jalobeanu, Dana

    2012-01-01

    At various stages in his career, Francis Bacon claimed to have reformed and changed traditional natural history in such a way that his new "natural and experimental history" was unlike any of its ancient or humanist predecessors. Surprisingly, such claims have gone largely unquestioned in Baconian scholarship. Contextual readings of Bacon's natural history have compared it, so far, only with Plinian or humanist natural history. This paper investigates a different form of natural history, very popular among Bacon's contemporaries, but yet unexplored by contemporary students of Bacon's works. I have provisionally called this form of natural history'Senecan' natural history, partly because it took shape in the Neo-Stoic revival of the sixteenth-century, partly because it originates in a particular cosmographical reading of Seneca's Naturales quaestiones. I discuss in this paper two examples of Senecan natural history: the encyclopedic and cosmographical projects of Pierre de la Primaudaye (1546-1619) and Samuel Purchas (1577-1626). I highlight a number of similarities between these two projects and Francis Bacon's natural history, and argue that Senecan natural history forms an important aspect in the historical and philosophical background that needs to be taken into consideration if we want to understand the extent to which Bacon's project to reform natural history can be said to be new.

  4. (See symbol in text) in early modern discussions of the passions: Stoicism, Christianity and natural history.

    PubMed

    Kraye, Jill

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the reception of the Stoic theory of the passions in the early modern period, highlighting various differences between the way notions such as (see symbol in text) (complete freedom from passions) and(see symbol in text) (pre-passions) were handled and interpreted by Continental and English authors. Both groups were concerned about the compatibility of Stoicism with Christianity, but came to opposing conclusions; and while the Continental scholars drew primarily on ancient philosophical texts, the English ones relied, in addition, on experience and observation, developing a natural history of the passions.

  5. Early life history and survival of natural subyearling fall chinook salmon in the Snake and Clearwater rivers in 1995

    Connor, William P.; Bjornn, Theodore C.; Burge, Howard L.; Garcia, Aaron P.; Rondorf, Dennis W.

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of this segment of our study were to (1) describe the early life history characteristics of naturally produced subyearling fall chinook salmon in the Snake and Clearwater rivers, and (2) estimate survival for juvenile fall chinook salmon emigrating from the Snake and Clearwater rivers to the tail race of Lower Granite Dam.

  6. Prospective study of natural history of deep vein thrombosis: early predictors of poor late outcomes.

    PubMed

    van Rij, André M; Hill, Gerry; Krysa, Jo; Dutton, Samantha; Dickson, Riordon; Christie, Ross; Smillie, Judi; Jiang, Ping; Solomon, Clive

    2013-10-01

    A proportion of patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) will develop postthrombotic syndrome (PTS). Currently, the only clearly identified risk factors for developing PTS are recurrent ipsilateral DVT and extensive proximal disease. The aim of the study was to assess the natural history of DVT and identify early predictors of poor clinical outcome at 5 years. Patients with suspected acute DVT in the lower limb were assessed prospectively. All patients with a confirmed DVT were asked to participate in this study. Within 7-10 days after diagnosis of DVT, patients underwent a further review, involving clinical, ultrasound, and air plethysmography assessment of both lower limbs. Patients were reassessed at regular intervals for 5 years. One hundred twenty-two limbs in 114 patients were included in this study. Thrombus regression occurred in two phases, with a rapid regression between 10 days and 3 months, and a more gradual regression thereafter. Reflux developed as thrombus regression occurred. Segmental reflux progressed to axial deep reflux and continued to deteriorate in a significant proportion of patients with iliofemoral-popliteal-calf DVT throughout the 5-year study period. Similarly, venous filling index became progressively more abnormal, in this group, over the course of the study. Four risk factors for PTS were identified as best predictors: extensive clot load on presentation; <50% clot regression at 6 months; venous filling index >2.5 mL/sec; and abnormal outflow rate (<0.6). Patients with three or more of these risk factors had a significant risk of developing PTS with sensitivity 100%, specificity 83%, and positive predictive value 67%. Patients scoring 2 or less did not have PTS at 5 years with a negative predictive value of 100%. This is the first study to show that venous assessment at 6 months post-DVT can predict PTS at 5 years. Those who will not develop PTS can be reassured of this at 6 months. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [The art cabinet and its current significance. Museum establishment of natural history in early modern times].

    PubMed

    Felfe, Robert

    2008-01-01

    For some time a hightened interest in so-called "curiosity cabinets" of the 16th to 18th century has surfaced in the historical sciences as well as in exhibitions with popular appeal, the arts and literature. Johann Laurentius Bausch was among those who assembled such a collection of natural history objects and artefacts. His curiosity cabinet was closely connected to his far more famous library and in his last will Bausch attempted to safeguard the coherence of the two. Against this background the article accentuates some of the aspects of his work from a perspective of a history of collections. One focus will thereby be on the practice of collecting as seemingly contradictory, being characterised on the one hand by the preservation of ancient knowledge as well as by scientific research based on specific objects. Another focus will be on curiosity cabinets as important platforms of exchange and means of social advancement. For the Academia Naturae Curiosorum exhibition objects and their publication were an important device of achieving recognition and protection from the Emperor's Court.

  8. Mercury's Early Geologic History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denevi, B. W.; Ernst, C. M.; Klima, R. L.; Robinson, M. S.

    2018-05-01

    A combination of geologic mapping, compositional information, and geochemical models are providing a better understanding of Mercury's early geologic history, and allow us to place it in the context of the Moon and the terrestrial planets.

  9. Early asthma prophylaxis, natural history, skeletal development and economy (EASE): a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Baxter-Jones, A D; Helms, P J; Russell, G; Grant, A; Ross, S; Cairns, J A; Ritchie, L; Taylor, R; Reid, D M; Osman, L M; Robins, S; Fletcher, M E

    2000-01-01

    (1) To establish recruitment rates of newly presenting asthmatic children. (2) To establish acceptability of study protocols. (3) To pilot age-specific quality of life (QoL) assessment. (4) To assess short-term (6 months) outcomes of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) treatment. (5) To refine sample size calculations for a definitive study. A randomised pragmatic longitudinal trial design was used, with no blinding or placebo, to examine early ICS introduction similar to its use in practice. Subjects were assessed at entry, 3 and 6 months. Subjects were recruited from six general practices. Children under 6 years were assessed at the Craig Research and Investigation Unit, Royal Aberdeen Children's Hospital, or their family home, and subjects 6 years and over were assessed at their general practice. Children (aged 6 months-16 years) with symptoms suggestive of asthma/wheeze that had commenced no longer than 12 months before were identified retrospectively and prospectively from general practices. Subjects were also required to be naïve to prophylactic therapy with no other lung disease/concomitant illness. Subjects were randomised to ss2-agonist (ss2-only group) or ss2-agonist and ICS (ICS group) for 6 months. Physicians could later prescribe ICS in controls if needed. (1) Pulmonary function. (2) Asthma symptom diary. (3) Symptomatic health status questionnaire. (4) Caregiver's and child's QoL. (5) Growth. (6) Bone mass. (7) Bone turnover. (8) Economic issues. Of over 15,000 children yielded from general practice records, 11% had symptoms suggestive of asthma/wheeze, and two-thirds of these already used ICS. Of the remaining, 141 subjects met the criterion of early asthma, and 86 were randomised. Two-thirds of those randomised were < 6 years old, the males:females ratio was 2:1, and 67% had a family history of atopy. RESULTS - PHYSIOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT: Pulmonary function did not significantly improve in the older children. Although tidal breathing measures in the pre

  10. An organismal concept for Sengelia radicans gen. et sp. nov. - morphology and natural history of an Early Devonian lycophyte.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Kelly K S; Tomescu, Alexandru M F

    2017-05-01

    Fossil plants are found as fragmentary remains and understanding them as natural species requires assembly of whole-organism concepts that integrate different plant parts. Such concepts are essential for incorporating fossils in hypotheses of plant evolution and phylogeny. Plants of the Early Devonian are crucial to reconstructing the initial radiation of tracheophytes, yet few are understood as whole organisms. This study assembles a whole-plant concept for the Early Devonian lycophyte Sengelia radicans gen. et sp. nov., based on morphometric data and taphonomic observations from >1000 specimens collected in the Beartooth Butte Formation (Wyoming, USA). Sengelia radicans occupies a key position between stem-group and derived lycophyte lineages. Sengelia had a rooting system of downward-growing root-bearing stems, formed dense monotypic mats of prostrate shoots in areas that experienced periodic flooding, and was characterized by a life-history strategy adapted for survival after floods, dominated by clonality, and featuring infrequent sexual reproduction. Sengelia radicans is the oldest among the very few early tracheophytes for which a detailed, rigorous whole-plant concept integrates morphology, growth habit, life history and growth environment. This plant adds to the diversity of body plans documented among lycophytes and may help elucidate patterns of morphological evolution in the clade. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  11. An organismal concept for Sengelia radicans gen. et sp. nov. – morphology and natural history of an Early Devonian lycophyte

    PubMed Central

    Tomescu, Alexandru M. F.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background and Aims Fossil plants are found as fragmentary remains and understanding them as natural species requires assembly of whole-organism concepts that integrate different plant parts. Such concepts are essential for incorporating fossils in hypotheses of plant evolution and phylogeny. Plants of the Early Devonian are crucial to reconstructing the initial radiation of tracheophytes, yet few are understood as whole organisms. Methods This study assembles a whole-plant concept for the Early Devonian lycophyte Sengelia radicans gen. et sp. nov., based on morphometric data and taphonomic observations from >1000 specimens collected in the Beartooth Butte Formation (Wyoming, USA). Key Results Sengelia radicans occupies a key position between stem-group and derived lycophyte lineages. Sengelia had a rooting system of downward-growing root-bearing stems, formed dense monotypic mats of prostrate shoots in areas that experienced periodic flooding, and was characterized by a life-history strategy adapted for survival after floods, dominated by clonality, and featuring infrequent sexual reproduction. Conclusions Sengelia radicans is the oldest among the very few early tracheophytes for which a detailed, rigorous whole-plant concept integrates morphology, growth habit, life history and growth environment. This plant adds to the diversity of body plans documented among lycophytes and may help elucidate patterns of morphological evolution in the clade. PMID:28334100

  12. Prader-Willi syndrome and early-onset morbid obesity NIH rare disease consortium: A review of natural history study.

    PubMed

    Butler, Merlin G; Kimonis, Virginia; Dykens, Elisabeth; Gold, June A; Miller, Jennifer; Tamura, Roy; Driscoll, Daniel J

    2018-02-01

    We describe the National Institutes of Health rare disease consortium for Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) developed to address concerns regarding medical care, diagnosis, growth and development, awareness, and natural history. PWS results from errors in genomic imprinting leading to loss of paternally expressed genes due to 15q11-q13 deletion, maternal disomy 15 or imprinting defects. The 8 year study was conducted at four national sites on individuals with genetically confirmed PWS and early-onset morbid obesity (EMO) with data accumulated to gain a better understanding of the natural history, cause and treatment of PWS. Enrollment of 355 subjects with PWS and 36 subjects with EMO began in September 2006 with study completion in July 2014. Clinical, genetic, cognitive, behavior, and natural history data were systematically collected along with PWS genetic subtypes, pregnancy and birth history, mortality, obesity, and cognitive status with study details as important endpoints in both subject groups. Of the 355 individuals with PWS, 217 (61%) had the 15q11-q13 deletion, 127 (36%) had maternal disomy 15, and 11 (3%) had imprinting defects. Six deaths were reported in our PWS cohort with 598 cumulative years of study exposure and one death in the EMO group with 42 years of exposure. To our knowledge, this description of a longitudinal study in PWS represents the largest and most comprehensive cohort useful for investigators in planning comparable studies in other rare disorders. Ongoing studies utilizing this database should have a direct impact on care and services, diagnosis, treatment, genotype-phenotype correlations, and clinical outcomes in PWS. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Cystic fibrosis identified by neonatal screening: incidence, genotype, and early natural history.

    PubMed

    Green, M R; Weaver, L T; Heeley, A F; Nicholson, K; Kuzemko, J A; Barton, D E; McMahon, R; Payne, S J; Austin, S; Yates, J R

    1993-04-01

    The incidence of cystic fibrosis over the last 10 years in East Anglia (a region of the United Kingdom with a population of 2.1 million) has halved. This has happened during the establishment of a neonatal screening programme, which has enabled early diagnosis, genetic counselling, and lately the option of prenatal diagnosis in subsequent pregnancies. One hundred and seven children were born with cystic fibrosis between 1981 and 1990, eight of whom were siblings. The Guthrie blood spots of 82 infants detected by neonatal immunoreactive trypsin screening between 1981 and 1990 were examined for the presence of the most common cystic fibrosis gene mutation (delta F508). It was present in 135 (82%) of the 164 cystic fibrosis genes analysed with 54 (66%) cases being homozygous and 27 (33%) heterozygous. Sixty nine per cent of infants were symptomatic at the time of diagnosis regardless of genotype. No association was found between the early clinical or biochemical features of the disease and homozygosity or heterozygosity for this mutation. Screening for cystic fibrosis using the blood immunoreactive trypsin assay alone remains an effective method of identifying infants with the disease soon after birth, thereby allowing early therapeutic intervention. Genetic counselling and prenatal diagnosis have contributed to a reduction in the number of children born with cystic fibrosis, but may not entirely explain the decreasing incidence of the disease.

  14. Natural history of allergic sensitization in infants with early-onset atopic dermatitis: results from ORCA Study.

    PubMed

    Just, Jocelyne; Deslandes-Boutmy, Emmanuelle; Amat, Flore; Desseaux, Kristell; Nemni, Ariane; Bourrat, Emmanuelle; Sahraoui, Fatia; Pansé, Isabelle; Bagot, Martine; Fouéré, Sébastien

    2014-11-01

    Early-onset atopic dermatitis (AD) is a particular phenotype that may convey a risk of developing multiple sensitizations to allergens but little is known about the pathway of sensitization. The aims of this study were to describe the natural history of sensitization to allergens for this phenotype and to identify the most predictive marker associated with the risk of developing sensitization to inhaled allergens in a well-selected cohort of infants with AD. Infants with active AD were enrolled and prospectively explored for biological markers of atopy every year until the age of 6 yr. Allergic sensitization was defined as the presence of positive specific IgEs to allergens and multiple sensitizations as being sensitized to ≥2 allergens. Elevated blood eosinophilia was defined as an eosinophil blood count ≥470 eosinophils/mm(3) and elevated total IgE as a serum IgE level ≥45 kU/l. Two hundred and twenty-nine infants were included. Elevated blood eosinophilia was observed at baseline in 60 children (26.2%) and elevated total IgE in 85 (37.1%). When elevated at baseline, eosinophilia and IgE levels remained significantly higher during the follow-up period. Sensitization to food allergens decreased from 58% to 34%, whereas sensitization to inhaled allergens increased over time from 17% to 67%. Initial multiple sensitizations to food allergens were the most predictive factor for the risk of developing sensitization to inhaled allergens at 6 yr (OR 3.72 [1.68-8.30] p < 0.001). In the early-onset AD phenotype, multiple sensitization to food allergens conveys a higher risk of sensitization to inhaled allergens than single sensitization. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The Case for Natural History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Heather; Achiam, Marianne

    2017-03-01

    Fundamental knowledge of natural history is lacking in many western societies, as demonstrated by its absence in school science curricula. And yet, to meet local and global challenges such as environmental degradation, biodiversity loss and climate change, we need to better understand the living and non-living parts of the natural world. Many have argued passionately for an increased understanding of natural history; others have developed successful pedagogical programmes for applying knowledge of natural history in environmental initiatives. In joining wider calls, we choose here to focus on the educational value afforded by understanding the epistemological bases of natural history and its particular forms of reasoning. We also briefly discuss the ways in which an education in natural history provides the foundation for environmental and social justice efforts that directly affect the lives of young people and their communities. We end by highlighting the ease by which natural history may be incorporated in learning opportunities both in and outside of the classroom.

  16. Does early use of enzyme replacement therapy alter the natural history of mucopolysaccharidosis I? Experience in three siblings.

    PubMed

    Laraway, Sarah; Breen, Catherine; Mercer, Jean; Jones, Simon; Wraith, James E

    2013-07-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy is widely used as treatment for mucopolysaccharidosis I (MPS I), and there is evidence that this produces improvement in certain clinical domains. There does appear to be variation in the response of clinical features to treatment once these are established. In a reported sibling pair, when enzyme replacement therapy was commenced pre-symptomatically in the younger child, the natural history of the condition appeared to be affected. We present data from three siblings treated with enzyme replacement therapy at different ages which supports this finding. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Case for Natural History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Heather; Achiam, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    Fundamental knowledge of natural history is lacking in many western societies, as demonstrated by its absence in school science curricula. And yet, to meet local and global challenges such as environmental degradation, biodiversity loss and climate change, we need to better understand the living and non-living parts of the natural world. Many have…

  18. Natural history of Homo erectus.

    PubMed

    Antón, Susan C

    2003-01-01

    Our view of H. erectus is vastly different today than when Pithecanthropus erectus was described in 1894. Since its synonimization into Homo, views of the species and its distribution have varied from a single, widely dispersed, polytypic species ultimately ancestral to all later Homo, to a derived, regional isolate ultimately marginal to later hominin evolution. A revised chronostratigraphic framework and recent work bearing either directly or indirectly on reconstructions of life-history patterns are reviewed here and, together with a review of the cranial and postcranial anatomy of H. erectus, are used to generate a natural history of the species. Here I argue that H. erectus is a hominin, notable for its increased body size, that originates in the latest Pliocene/earliest Pleistocene of Africa and quickly disperses into Western and Eastern Asia. It is also an increasingly derived hominin with several regional morphs sustained by intermittent isolation, particularly in Southeast Asia. This view differs from several current views, most especially that which recognizes only a single hominin species in the Pleistocene, H. sapiens, and those which would atomize H. erectus into a multiplicity of taxa. Following Jolly ([2001] Yrbk Phys Anthropol 44:177-204), the regional morphs of H. erectus may be productively viewed as geographically replacing allotaxa, rather than as the focus of unresolvable species debates. Such a view allows us to focus on the adaptations and biology of local groups, including questions of biogeographic isolation and local adaptation. A number of issues remain unresolved, including the significance of diversity in size and shape in the early African and Georgian records. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. The natural history of severe asthma and influences of early risk factors: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenjia; Marra, Carlo A; Lynd, Larry D; FitzGerald, J Mark; Zafari, Zafar; Sadatsafavi, Mohsen

    2016-03-01

    Severe asthma is associated with disproportionately high morbidity, but little is known about its natural history and how risk factors at first year of diagnosis modify its subsequent development. Using administrative health data, we retrospectively followed patients 14-55 years of age with newly diagnosed severe asthma in British Columbia, Canada. Based on intensity of resource use (drug therapy) and occurrence of exacerbations, each patient-year was classified into mild, moderate, or severe asthma. We estimated the probability of transition between severity levels or to death over the study period using a four-state Markov model, and used this to assess the 10-year trajectory of severe asthma and the influence of baseline risk factors. We followed 13,467 patients. Ten years after incident severe asthma, 83% had transitioned to a less severe level (mild: 43%, moderate: 40%). Low socioeconomic status, high comorbidity burden, and high adherence (proportion of days covered (PDC) by asthma controller therapy) in the first year were independently associated with, respectively, 10%, 24% and 35% more time in severe asthma over the next 10 years. Sex was not associated with the clinical course. Most patients with incident severe asthma used fewer resources over time, indicating a long-term transition to milder asthma. Potentially modifiable risk factors for poor prognosis of severe asthma include low socioeconomic status and high comorbidity burden. The association between PDC and future asthma severity is likely due to residual confounding by disease severity. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  20. Natural history museums and cyberspace

    Wemmer, C.; Erixon-Stanford, M.; Gardner, A.L.

    1996-01-01

    Natural history museums are entering the electronic age as they increasingly use computers to build accessible and shareable databases that support research and education on a world-wide basis. Museums are exploring the Internet and other shared uses of electronic media to enhance their traditional roles in education, training, identifications, technical assistance, and collections management.

  1. Francis Bacon and the classification of natural history.

    PubMed

    Anstey, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses the place of natural history within Bacon's divisions of the sciences in The Advancement of Learning (1605) and the later De dignitate et augmentis scientiarum (1623). It is shown that at various points in Bacon's divisions, natural history converges or overlaps with natural philosophy, and that, for Bacon, natural history and natural philosophy are not discrete disciplines. Furthermore, it is argued that Bacon's distinction between operative and speculative natural philosophy and the place of natural history within this distinction, are discontinuous with the later distinction between experimental and speculative philosophy that emerged in the methodology of the Fellows of the early Royal Society.

  2. Incubation Period and Early Natural History Events of the Acute Form of Paracoccidioidomycosis: Lessons from Patients with a Single Paracoccidioides spp. Exposure.

    PubMed

    Buccheri, Renata; Khoury, Zarifa; Barata, Luis Carlos Barradas; Benard, Gil

    2016-06-01

    Several aspects of the natural history of paracoccidioidomycosis are still poorly understood. Different from the most prevalent, chronic form of the disease, the acute form represents a continuum from the initial respiratory infection to the full-blown disease, thus providing an opportunity to elucidate the pathogenesis of the early phase of this mycosis. We describe, for the first time, two patients with a single time point exposure to Paracoccidioides spp., for whom we were able to determine the time lapsed between exposure to the fungus Paracoccidioides spp. and the onset of signs and symptoms. In case 1, the pulmonary infection was unapparent, and the first manifestations of the acute/subacute form of the disease presented 4 months after Paracoccidioides spp. In case 2, self-limited, non-specific respiratory and systemic symptoms presented 45 days after infection. Thus, our patients confirm that, within a few weeks of infection, Paracoccidioides spp. affects the pulmonary lymphatic system and initially causes no or mild-to-moderate self-limited symptoms, eventually causing abnormalities on a chest X-ray, all of which spontaneously subside. These cases provide some insight into the natural history of this mycosis, the extent of the host exposure to the fungus, and the determination of its incubation period.

  3. Systemic lupus erythematosus in three ethnic groups: III. A comparison of characteristics early in the natural history of the LUMINA cohort. LUpus in MInority populations: NAture vs. Nurture.

    PubMed

    Alarcón, G S; Friedman, A W; Straaton, K V; Moulds, J M; Lisse, J; Bastian, H M; McGwin, G; Bartolucci, A A; Roseman, J M; Reveille, J D

    1999-01-01

    To determine and contrast the socioeconomic-demographic and clinical features of patients with recent onset (< or =5 y) systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) from three ethnic groups, Hispanic, African-American and Caucasian (H, AA, C). SLE cases (American College of Rheumatology criteria) (incident (n = 56), prevalent (n = 173)), were enrolled in a longitudinal study at The University of Alabama at Birmingham, The University of Texas-Houston Health Science Center and The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. Socioeconomic-demographic, clinical, immunological, behavioral and psychological data were obtained using validated instruments and standard laboratory techniques, and compared. 70 H, 88 AA and 71 C SLE patients constitute this cohort. H and AA patients were younger and of lower socioeconomic-demographic status. They also had evidence of more frequent organ system involvement (renal, cardiovascular), more auto-antibodies, more active disease (after adjusting for discrepant socioeconomic-demographic features), lower levels of social support and more abnormal illness-related behaviors (more in H than in AA). H also were more likely to have an abrupt disease onset; C were more likely to be on antimalarials but less likely to be on corticosteroids. H, AA, and C used health care resources comparably. They had similar levels of pain and physical and mental functioning after adjusting for age, disease duration, income, education, social support, illness-related behaviors, and Systemic Lupus Activity Measure or SLAM scores. H and AA patients have more active SLE, at an earlier age of onset, and a less favorable socioeconomic-demographic structure (worse among the H than AA) which predispose them to a less favorable natural history.

  4. A natural history of hygiene

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Valerie A

    2007-01-01

    In unpacking the Pandora's box of hygiene, the author looks into its ancient evolutionary history and its more recent human history. Within the box, she finds animal behaviour, dirt, disgust and many diseases, as well as illumination concerning how hygiene can be improved. It is suggested that hygiene is the set of behaviours that animals, including humans, use to avoid harmful agents. The author argues that hygiene has an ancient evolutionary history, and that most animals exhibit such behaviours because they are adaptive. In humans, responses to most infectious threats are accompanied by sensations of disgust. In historical times, religions, social codes and the sciences have all provided rationales for hygiene behaviour. However, the author argues that disgust and hygiene behaviour came first, and that the rationales came later. The implications for the modern-day practice of hygiene are profound. The natural history of hygiene needs to be better understood if we are to promote safe hygiene and, hence, win our evolutionary war against the agents of infectious disease. PMID:18923689

  5. [The early history of "Ecstasy"].

    PubMed

    Benzenhöfer, U; Passie, T

    2006-01-01

    There is no consensus in the literature regarding the early history of MDMA (Methylendioxymethamphetamine, so-called "Ecstasy"). Various authors credit the first synthesis of MDMA to the German chemist Fritz Haber, but it appears neither in his doctoral thesis (Berlin 1891) nor in his accompanying articles. The man who first synthesized MDMA was the chemist Dr. Anton Köllisch, who worked for the German pharmaceutical company Merck. He created MDMA as a by-product while trying to synthesize hydrastinin, a styptic substance. In 1912, Merck filed to patent the applied method of preparation. The patent was issued in 1914, yet no pharmaceutical testing followed at that time.

  6. Early history of scapular fractures.

    PubMed

    Bartoníček, Jan; Kozánek, Michal; Jupiter, Jesse B

    2016-01-01

    The first to use the term Scapula was Vesalius (1514-1564) and thus it has remained ever since. Probably the oldest injured scapula, from 250 million years ago, was described by Chinese authors of a skeletal examination of a fossilised remains of a dinosaur Yangchuanosaurus hepingensis. In humans, the oldest known scapular fractures date back to the prehistoric and early historic times. In ancient times, a fracture of acromion was described in the treatises of Hippocrates. Early modern history of the treatment of scapular fractures is closely interlinked with the history of the French surgery. The first to point out the existence of these fractures were Petit, Du Verney and Desault in the 18th century. The first study devoted solely to scapular fractures was published by Traugott Karl August Vogt in 1799. Thomas Callaway published in 1849 an extensive dissertation on injuries to the shoulder girdle, in which he discussed a number of cases known at that time. The first radiograph of a scapular fracture was published by Petty in 1907. Mayo Robson (1884), Lambotte (1913) and Lane (1914) were pioneers in the surgical treatment of these fractures, followed in 1923 by the French surgeons Lenormat, Dujarrier and Basset. The first internal fixation of the glenoid fossa, including a radiograph, was published by Fischer in 1939.

  7. Teaching Health in a Natural History Museum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Ian M.

    The opportunities offered by a natural history museum to enhance and expand classroom instruction in health are discussed. A basic constellation of typical natural history museum exhibit concepts and an array of health-related opportunities that are easily developed around these displays is outlined. The natural history concept provides an…

  8. The Natural History of Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Pitot, Henry C.

    1977-01-01

    The stages of initiation and promotion in the natural history of epidermal carcinogenesis have been known for many years. Recently, experimental systems other than skin have been shown to exhibit similar, if not completely analogous, stages in the natural history of neoplasia. In particular, the demonstration by Peraino and his associates that phenobarbital may enhance the production of hepatomas by a relatively subcarcinogenic dose of acetylaminofluorene was one of the first demonstrations of stages occurring in an extraepidermal neoplasm. Studies reported in this paper have demonstrated that administration of phenobarbital (0.05% in the diet) for 6 months following a single dose of diethylnitrosamine (5 to 10 mg/kg) given within 24 hours after partial hepatectomy resulted in a marked increase in the number of enzyme-altered foci in the liver as well as in the production of hepatocellular carcinomas. This was compared to animals receiving only a single dose of diethylnitrosamine following partial hepatectomy with no further treatment, in which only a relatively small number of foci were evident in the absence of phenobarbital feeding. Using three different enzyme markers, a distinct degree of phenotypic heterogeneity of the enzyme-altered foci in liver was demonstrated. These studies have shown that liver carcinogensis can be readily divided into two stages: a) initiation by a single dose of diethylnitrosamine following partial hepatectomy and b) promotion by the continuous feeding of phenobarbital. Furthermore, the immediate progeny of the initiated cells, the enzyme-altered focus, may be recognized by suitable microscopic means prior to the formation of gross lesions as required in the skin system. These initiated cell populations exhibit a degree of biochemical heterogeneity which reflects that seen in fully developed hepatic neoplasms, suggesting that promotion and progression in this system does not significantly alter the basic biochemical characteristics of

  9. Natural history of Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Milind, Rao; Attwood, Stephen E

    2012-07-21

    The natural history of Barrett's esophagus (BE) is difficult to quantify because, by definition, it should describe the course of the condition if left untreated. Pragmatically, we assume that patients with BE will receive symptomatic treatment with acid suppression, usually a proton pump inhibitor, to treat their heartburn. This paper describes the development of complications of stricture, ulcer, dysplasia and adenocarcinoma from this standpoint. Controversies over the definition of BE and its implications in clinical practice are presented. The presence of intestinal metaplasia and its relevance to cancer risk is discussed, and the need to measure the extent of the Barrett's epithelium (long and short segments) using the Prague guidelines is emphasized. Guidelines and international consensus over the diagnosis and management of BE are being regularly updated. The need for expert consensus is important due to the lack of randomized trials in this area. After searching the literature, we have tried to collate the important studies regarding progression of Barrett's to dysplasia and adenocarcinoma. No therapeutic studies yet reported show a clear reduction in the development of cancer in BE. The effect of pharmacological and surgical intervention on the natural history of Barrett's is a subject of ongoing research, including the Barrett's Oesophagus Surveillance Study and the aspirin and esomeprazole cancer chemoprevention trial with interesting results. The geographical variation and the wide range of outcomes highlight the difficulty of providing an individualized risk profile to patients with BE. Future studies on the interaction of genome wide abnormalities in Barrett's and their interaction with environmental factors may allow individualization of the risk of cancer developing in BE.

  10. Natural history of Barrett's esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Milind, Rao; Attwood, Stephen E

    2012-01-01

    The natural history of Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is difficult to quantify because, by definition, it should describe the course of the condition if left untreated. Pragmatically, we assume that patients with BE will receive symptomatic treatment with acid suppression, usually a proton pump inhibitor, to treat their heartburn. This paper describes the development of complications of stricture, ulcer, dysplasia and adenocarcinoma from this standpoint. Controversies over the definition of BE and its implications in clinical practice are presented. The presence of intestinal metaplasia and its relevance to cancer risk is discussed, and the need to measure the extent of the Barrett’s epithelium (long and short segments) using the Prague guidelines is emphasized. Guidelines and international consensus over the diagnosis and management of BE are being regularly updated. The need for expert consensus is important due to the lack of randomized trials in this area. After searching the literature, we have tried to collate the important studies regarding progression of Barrett’s to dysplasia and adenocarcinoma. No therapeutic studies yet reported show a clear reduction in the development of cancer in BE. The effect of pharmacological and surgical intervention on the natural history of Barrett’s is a subject of ongoing research, including the Barrett’s Oesophagus Surveillance Study and the aspirin and esomeprazole cancer chemoprevention trial with interesting results. The geographical variation and the wide range of outcomes highlight the difficulty of providing an individualized risk profile to patients with BE. Future studies on the interaction of genome wide abnormalities in Barrett’s and their interaction with environmental factors may allow individualization of the risk of cancer developing in BE. PMID:22826612

  11. Natural history of Ashkenazi intelligence.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Gregory; Hardy, Jason; Harpending, Henry

    2006-09-01

    This paper elaborates the hypothesis that the unique demography and sociology of Ashkenazim in medieval Europe selected for intelligence. Ashkenazi literacy, economic specialization, and closure to inward gene flow led to a social environment in which there was high fitness payoff to intelligence, specifically verbal and mathematical intelligence but not spatial ability. As with any regime of strong directional selection on a quantitative trait, genetic variants that were otherwise fitness reducing rose in frequency. In particular we propose that the well-known clusters of Ashkenazi genetic diseases, the sphingolipid cluster and the DNA repair cluster in particular, increase intelligence in heterozygotes. Other Ashkenazi disorders are known to increase intelligence. Although these disorders have been attributed to a bottleneck in Ashkenazi history and consequent genetic drift, there is no evidence of any bottleneck. Gene frequencies at a large number of autosomal loci show that if there was a bottleneck then subsequent gene flow from Europeans must have been very large, obliterating the effects of any bottleneck. The clustering of the disorders in only a few pathways and the presence at elevated frequency of more than one deleterious allele at many of them could not have been produced by drift. Instead these are signatures of strong and recent natural selection.

  12. The natural history of violence.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, C; Russell, W M

    1979-01-01

    In the past, human violence was associated with food shortage, but recently it has increased even in relatively well-fed societies. The reason appears from studies of monkeys under relaxed, spacious conditions and under crowding stress. Uncrowded monkeys have unaggressive leaders, rarely quarrel, and protect females and young. Crowded monkeys (even well-fed) have brutal bosses, often quarrel, and wound and kill each other, including females and young. Crowding has similar behaviour effects on other mammals, with physiological disturbances including greater susceptibility to infections. All this appears to be a regular response to overpopulation, reducing the population before it has depleted its natural resources. Human beings, like monkeys and other mammals, need ample space, and become more violent when crowded. Human history is marked by population cycles: population outgrows resources, the resulting violence, stress and disease mortality cuts down the population, leading to a relief period of social and cultural progress, till renewed population growth produces the next crisis. The modern population crisis is world-wide, and explains the increase of violence even in well-fed societies. The solution to the problem of violence is to substitute voluntary birth control for involuntary death control, and bring about relaxed conditions for a reduced world population. PMID:114662

  13. The natural history of substance use disorders.

    PubMed

    Sarvet, Aaron L; Hasin, Deborah

    2016-07-01

    Illicit drugs, alcohol, and tobacco use disorders contribute substantially to the global burden of disease. Knowledge about the major elements of the natural history of substance use disorders (incidence, remission, persistence, and relapse) is crucial to a broader understanding of the course and outcomes of substance use disorders. Prospective cohort studies in nonclinical samples indicate that externalizing psychopathology in earlier life, including early disordered substance use, delinquency, and personality disorders, are related to substance use disorders later in life and chronic course. Externalizing psychopathology may be initiated by early adverse experiences, for example, childhood maltreatment and stressful life events. After controlling for confounders, 'age at first use' as a causal factor for alcohol use disorder later in life and the 'drug substitution' hypothesis are not supported in general population data. Future research should focus on elaborating the causal framework that leads to the development and persistence of severe substance use disorders, with an emphasis on identifying modifiable factors for intervention by policy makers or health professionals. More research is needed on the natural history of substance use disorders in low-income and middle-income countries.

  14. Francis Bacon's natural history and civil history: a comparative survey.

    PubMed

    Manzo, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to offer a comparative survey of Bacon's theory and practice of natural history and of civil history, particularly centered on their relationship to natural philosophy and human philosophy. I will try to show that the obvious differences concerning their subject matter encompass a number of less obvious methodological and philosophical assumptions which reveal a significant practical and conceptual convergence of the two fields. Causes or axioms are prescribed as the theoretical end-products of natural history, whereas precepts are envisaged as the speculative outcomes derived from perfect civil history. In spite of this difference, causes and precepts are thought to enable effective action in order to change the state of nature and of man, respectively. For that reason a number of common patterns are to be found in Bacon's theory and practice of natural and civil history.

  15. The natural history of fibroids.

    PubMed

    Mavrelos, D; Ben-Nagi, J; Holland, T; Hoo, W; Naftalin, J; Jurkovic, D

    2010-02-01

    Fibroids are common, hormone-dependent, benign uterine tumors. They can cause significant morbidity and the symptoms depend largely on their size. The aim of this study was to describe the natural history of fibroids and identify factors that may influence their growth. This was a retrospective longitudinal study of premenopausal women who were diagnosed with uterine fibroids on ultrasound examination. All women underwent at least two transvaginal ultrasound scans, which were all performed by a single operator. Fibroids were measured in three perpendicular planes and the mean diameter was calculated. The size and position of every individual fibroid was assessed and recorded on a computerized database. The volume of each fibroid was calculated using the formula for a sphere. A total of 122 women were included in the study. Their median age at the initial examination was 40 (range, 27-45) years. Seventy-two (59.0%) were nulliparous and 74 (60.7%) had multiple fibroids. The median interval between the initial and final examination was 21.5 (range, 8-90) months. The median fibroid volume increased by 35.2% per year. Small fibroids (< 20 mm mean diameter) grew significantly faster than larger fibroids (P = 0.007). The median increase in size was significantly higher in cases of intramural fibroids (53.2 (interquartile range (IQR), 11.2-217)%) than in subserous fibroids (25.1 (IQR, 1.1-87.1)%) and submucous fibroids (22.8 (IQR, - 11.7 to 48.3)%) (P = 0.012). Multivariate analysis retained only fibroid size at presentation as an independent predictor of fibroid growth. The growth of fibroids in premenopausal women is influenced by the tumor's size at presentation.

  16. History in the Early Nineteenth Century.

    PubMed

    Ratcliff, Jessica

    2016-09-01

    At the turn of the nineteenth century, at its headquarters in the City of London, the Honourable East India Company established a new museum and library. By midcentury this museum would contain one of Europe’s most extensive collections of the natural history, arts, and sciences of Asia. This essay uses the early history of the company’s museum, focusing in particular on its natural history collections, to explore the material relationship between scientific practice and the imperial political economy. Much of the collections had been gathered in the wake of military campaigns, trade missions, or administrative surveys. Once specimens and reports arrived in Leadenhall Street and passed through the museum storage areas, this plunder would become the stuff of science, going on to feed the growth of disciplines, societies, and projects in Britain and beyond. In this way, the East India Company was integral to the information and communication infrastructures within which many sciences then operated. Collections-based disciplines and societies flourished in this period; their growth, it is argued, was coextensive with administrative and political economic change at institutions like the East India Company. The essay first explores the company’s practices and patterns of collecting and then considers the consequences of this accumulation for aspects of scientific practice—particularly the growth of scientific societies—in both London and Calcutta.

  17. Natural history of hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, Rachel H; Dusheiko, Geoffrey

    2014-11-01

    There has long been evidence that hepatitis C can lead to persistent infection in a high proportion of infected individuals, and can progress to chronic liver disease, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The transition from acute to chronic hepatitis C is usually sub-clinical. Accurate studies of the time course for clearance of acute hepatitis C are difficult to carry out because of the silent onset of the acute disease. The likelihood of spontaneous HCV resolution is associated with several genetic factors, including IL28B inheritance and the DQB1*0301 allele of the major histocompatibility complex class II. Most data suggest that resolution in the acute phase without progression to chronic disease is not accompanied by significant disease, but minor histological lesions have been observed in anti-HCV positive, HCV RNA negative individuals. The risk of reinfection remains a possibility after clearance of acute hepatitis C. High rates of sexually-transmitted infection are being reported in HIV positive men who have sex with men (MSM). Chronic infection with HCV is the leading cause of end-stage liver disease, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and liver related death in the Western world. The natural history of the chronic disease remains incompletely defined. It is generally a slowly progressive disease characterized by persistent hepatic inflammation, leading to the development of cirrhosis in approximately 10-20% of patients over 20-30 years of HCV infection. However, the published data indicate varying progression rates to cirrhosis. Overall, once cirrhosis has developed there is a 1-5% annual risk of HCC and a 3-6% annual risk of hepatic decompensation. Following an episode of decompensation the risk of death in the following year is between 15% and 20%. The high number of chronically infected individuals, the burden of disease, and the absence of a vaccine indicates that treatment will form part of the disease control but the impact, effectiveness and

  18. The Early History of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisbet, E. G.; Fowler, C. M. R.

    2003-12-01

    ago, for the most part the planet was peaceful. Even the most active volcanoes are mostly quiet; meteorites large enough to extinguish all dinosaurs may have hit as often as every few thousand years, but this is not enough to be a nuisance to a bacterium (except when the impact boiled the ocean); while to the photosynthesizer long-term shifts in the solar spectrum may be less of a problem than cloudy hazy days. Though, admittedly, green is junk light to biology, the excretion from the photosynthetic antennae, nevertheless even a green sky would have had other wavelengths also in its spectrum.Most important of all, like all good houses, this planet had location: Earth was just in the right spot. Not too far from the faint young Sun (Sagan and Chyba, 1997), it was also far enough away still to be in the comfort zone ( Kasting et al., 1993) when the mature Sun brightened. As many have pointed out, when Goldilocks arrived, she found everything just right. But what is less obvious is that as she grew and changed, and the room changed too, she commenced to rearrange the furniture to make it ever righter for her. Thus far, the bears have not arrived, though they may have reclaimed Mars from Goldilocks's sister see ( Figure 1). (3K)Figure 1. The habitable zone (Kasting et al., 1993). Too close to the Sun, a planet's surface is too hot to be habitable; too far, it is too cold. Early in the history of the solar system, the Sun was faint and the habitable zone was relatively close; 4.5 Ga later, with a brighter Sun, planets formerly habitable are now too hot, and the habitable zone has shifted out. Note that boundaries can shift. By changing its albedo and by altering the greenhouse gas content of the air, the planet can significantly widen the bounds of the habitable zone (Lovelock, 1979, 1988).

  19. Natural history of thyroid cancer [Review].

    PubMed

    Takano, Toru

    2017-03-31

    Thyroid cancers have long been considered to arise in middle age and, after their repeated proliferation, resulting in further damage to the genome, they progress to more aggressive and lethal cancers. However, in 2014, some studies were reported that might lead to a marked change in our understanding of the natural history of thyroid cancer. A high prevalence of papillary carcinoma in the young suggested that the first initiation of thyroid cancer is likely to occur in the infantile period. Such a conclusion was also supported by a very slow growth rate of papillary microcarcinomas (PMCs) in an observation trial. The proliferation rate of PMCs was negatively correlated with the age, and surgery to remove PMCs did not contribute to reduce mortality from thyroid cancer. These findings strongly suggested the existence of self-limiting cancers, which are truly malignant but do not progress to lethal cancers, for the first time in human history. The early detection of self-limiting cancers results in overdiagnosis. Ultrasonographic screening of the thyroid in the young should be avoided. Lethal thyroid cancers, whose origin is still unknown, appear suddenly after middle age. In the elderly, thyroid cancers are a mixture of self-limiting and lethal cancers; thus, when thyroid cancer is detected, careful follow-up with examination of its growth rate is required.

  20. Alchemy--A History of Early Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollard, A. M.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the history of alchemy including personalities and methods. Discusses the philosophy associated with various early chemists and alchemists. Attempts to show that it was not unreasonable for ancient alchemists to believe in the possibility of transmutation. (CW)

  1. History without time: Buffon's natural history as a nonmathematical physique.

    PubMed

    Hoquet, Thierry

    2010-03-01

    While "natural history" is practically synonymous with the name of Buffon, the term itself has been otherwise overlooked by historians of science. This essay attempts to address this omission by investigating the meanings of "physique," "natural philosophy," and "history," among other terms, with the purpose of understanding Buffon's actual objectives. It also shows that Buffon never claimed to be a Newtonian and should not be considered as such; the goal is to provide a historical analysis that resituates Buffon's thought within his own era. This is done, primarily, by eschewing the often-studied question of time in Buffon. Instead, this study examines the nontemporal meanings of the word "history" within the naturalist's theory and method. The title of his Natural History is examined both as an indicator of the kind of science that Buffon was hoping to achieve and as a source of great misinterpretation among his peers. Unlike Buffon, many of his contemporaries actually envisioned the study of nature from a Baconian perspective where history was restricted to the mere collection of facts and where philosophy, which was the implicit and ultimate goal of studying nature, was seen, at least for the present, as unrealizable. Buffon confronts this tendency insofar as his Histoire naturelle claims to be the real physique that, along with describing nature, also sought to identify general laws and provide clear insight into what true knowledge of nature is or should be. According to Buffon, history (both natural and civil) is not analogous to mathematics; it is a nonmathematical method whose scope encompasses both nature and society. This methodological stance gives rise to the "physicization" of certain moral concepts--a gesture that was interpreted by his contemporaries as Epicurean and atheist. In addition, Buffon reduces a number of metaphysically tainted historical concepts (e.g., antediluvian monuments) to objects of physical analysis, thereby confronting the very

  2. A natural history of Cronartium ribicola

    Brian W. Geils; Detlev R. Vogler

    2011-01-01

    Cronartium ribicola is a fungal pathogen that causes a blister rust disease of white pines, Ribes, and other hosts in the genera Castilleja and Pedicularis. Although blister rust can damage white pine trees and stands, the severity and significance of these impacts vary with time, place, and management. We use a natural history approach to describe the history, biology...

  3. Early Childhood Education: History, Theory, and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Harry

    2006-01-01

    In this book, the author covers the history, theory, and practices that influence early childhood education along with an emphasis on infant and toddler care and education. He also presents a comparison of the conflict between education planners who support early childhood studies and state school systems whose cost-saving measures are dismantling…

  4. Natural course of early COPD.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Chin Kook; Kim, Kyungjoo; Yoon, Hyoung Kyu; Kim, Jee-Ae; Kim, Sang Hyun; Lee, Sang Haak; Park, Yong Bum; Jung, Ki-Suck; Yoo, Kwang Ha; Hwang, Yong Il

    2017-01-01

    Few studies have examined the natural course of early COPD. The aim of this study was to observe the natural course of early COPD patients. We also aimed to analyze medical utilization and costs for early COPD during a 6-year period. Patients with early COPD were selected from Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) data. We linked the KNHANES data of patients with early COPD to National Health Insurance data. A total of 2,397 patients were enrolled between 2007 and 2012. The mean forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV 1 ) was 78.6%, and the EuroQol five dimensions questionnaire (EQ-5D) index value was 0.9. In total, 110 patients utilized health care for COPD in 2007, and this number increased to 179 in 2012. The total mean number of days used per person increased from 4.9 in 2007 to 7.8 in 2012. The total medical cost per person also increased from 248.8 US dollar (USD) in 2007 to 780.6 USD in 2013. A multiple linear regression revealed that age, lower body mass index, lower FEV 1 (%), and lower EQ-5D score were significantly associated with medical costs. Even in early COPD patients, some of them eventually progressed and utilized health care for COPD.

  5. Investigations into the Early Life-history of Naturally Produced Spring Chinook Salmon and Summer Steelhead in the Grande Ronde River Basin, Annual Report 2001.

    SciT

    Reischauer, Alyssa; Monzyk, Frederick; Van Dyke, Erick

    2003-06-01

    We determined migration timing and abundance of juvenile spring chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and juvenile steelhead/rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss using rotary screw traps on four streams in the Grande Ronde River basin during the 2001 migratory year (MY 2001) from 1 July 2000 through 30 June 2001. Based on migration timing and abundance, two distinct life-history strategies of juvenile spring chinook and O. mykiss could be distinguished. An 'early' migrant group left upper rearing areas from 1 July 2000 through 29 January 2001 with a peak in the fall. A 'late' migrant group descended from upper rearing areas from 30more » January 2001 through 30 June 2001 with a peak in the spring. The migrant population of juvenile spring chinook salmon in the upper Grande Ronde River in MY 2001 was very low in comparison to previous migratory years. We estimated 51 juvenile spring chinook migrated out of upper rearing areas with approximately 12% of the migrant population leaving as early migrants to overwinter downstream. In the same migratory year, we estimated 16,067 O. mykiss migrants left upper rearing areas with approximately 4% of these fish descending the upper Grande Ronde River as early migrants. At the Catherine Creek trap, we estimated 21,937 juvenile spring chinook migrants in MY 2001. Of these migrants, 87% left upper rearing areas early to overwinter downstream. We also estimated 20,586 O. mykiss migrants in Catherine Creek with 44% leaving upper rearing areas early to overwinter downstream. At the Lostine River trap, we estimated 13,610 juvenile spring chinook migrated out of upper rearing areas with approximately 77% migrating early. We estimated 16,690 O. mykiss migrated out of the Lostine River with approximately 46% descending the river as early migrants. At the Minam River trap, we estimated 28,209 juvenile spring chinook migrated out of the river with 36% migrating early. During the same period, we estimated 28,113 O. mykiss with

  6. The Early History of Bioenergy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radu, Popa

    Energy is most commonly defined as the potential to do work. The maintenance of the living state requires a constant flow of energy through the system. The concept of energy is not easily implemented in computational models of life and is therefore often ignored in artificial life models. Some models even regard as irrelevant the energetic problematic (dissipation, irreversibility, couplings, energy currencies), in the physical realization of a biological system" (Ruiz-Mirazo et al. 1998). Examples of such models are Rosen's (M,R)-system, Varela's autopoietic models, Kauffman's autocatalytic set, and Fontana's algorithmic chemistry (see Appendix A). However, many origin-of-life theories maintain the primordial importance of energy for early life. Although everyone accepts that energetic constraints are important when describing material-based living systems, a problem arises when we have to consider whether or not they affect the very logic of the organization (Morán et al. 1999). It is argued here that energy considerations are not only primordial, but intimately related to the essence of life as well.

  7. Kant on the history of nature: the ambiguous heritage of the critical philosophy for natural history.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Phillip R

    2006-12-01

    This paper seeks to show Kant's importance for the formal distinction between descriptive natural history and a developmental history of nature that entered natural history discussions in the late eighteenth century. It is argued that he developed this distinction initially upon Buffon's distinctions of 'abstract' and 'physical' truths, and applied these initially in his distinction of 'varieties' from 'races' in anthropology. In the 1770s, Kant appears to have given theoretical preference to the 'history' of nature [Naturgeschichte] over 'description' of nature [Naturbeschreibung]. Following Kant's confrontations with Johann Herder and Georg Forster in the late 1780s, Kant weakened the epistemic status of the 'history of nature' and gave theoretical preference to 'description of nature'. As a result, Kant's successors, such as Goethe, could draw from Kant either a justification for a developmental history of nature, or, as this paper argues, a warrant from the critical philosophy for denying the validity of the developmental history of nature as anything more than a 'regulative' idea of reason.

  8. Field Museum of Natural History Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Benjamin W.; Fawcett, W. Peyton

    1986-01-01

    Founded in 1894 to support museum research, the Field Museum of Natural History Library specializes in fields of anthropology, archaeology, botany, geology, palaeontology, and zoology. A rich serials collection and numerous special collections serve both the scientific community and wider public as noncirculating reference collection and through…

  9. Teaching Natural History in a Wilderness Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vause, Mikel

    A college honors course called "A Field Study in American Literature and Philosophy" helps students develop foundations for an environmental philosophy, by introducing them to the literature of natural history and exploration, and more importantly, through actual participation in outdoor activities. The class spends at least four days…

  10. Learning and Engagement through Natural History Museums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mujtaba, Tamjid; Lawrence, Martin; Oliver, Mary; Reiss, Michael J.

    2018-01-01

    This review examines how natural history museums (NHMs) can enhance learning and engagement in science, particularly for school-age students. First, we describe the learning potential of informal science learning institutions in general, then we focus on NHMs. We review the possible benefits of interactions between schools and NHMs, and the…

  11. Peripheral natural killer cytotoxicity and CD56(pos)CD16(pos) cells increase during early pregnancy in women with a history of recurrent spontaneous abortion.

    PubMed

    Emmer, P M; Nelen, W L; Steegers, E A; Hendriks, J C; Veerhoek, M; Joosten, I

    2000-05-01

    For diagnostic purposes we assessed peripheral natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity and NK and T cell numbers to assess their putative predictive value in recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA). A total of 43 women with subsequent pregnancy, 37 healthy controls and 39 women successfully partaking in an in-vitro fertilization (IVF) procedure, were included in the study. We show that before pregnancy, levels of NK cytotoxicity and numbers of both single CD56(pos) and double CD56(pos)CD16(pos) cells were similar between RSA women and controls. But notably, within the RSA group, NK cell numbers of <12% were strongly associated with a subsequent pregnancy carried to term. Supplementation of folic acid led to an increase of single CD56(pos) cells, but cytotoxic function appeared unaffected. The expression pattern of killer inhibitory receptors on CD56(pos) cells was not different between patients and controls. A longitudinal study revealed that, compared with controls, in RSA women higher numbers of double CD56(pos)CD16(pos) cells were present during early pregnancy, paralleled by an increase in cytotoxic NK cell reactivity. The single CD56(pos) population decreased in number. In conclusion, the analysis of peripheral NK cell characteristics appears a suitable diagnostic tool in RSA. Immunomodulation aimed at NK cell function appears a promising therapeutic measure.

  12. Natural history of JSRV in sheep.

    PubMed

    Sharp, J M; DeMartini, J C

    2003-01-01

    Ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma (OPA) is a contagious lung tumour of sheep and, rarely, goats that arises from two types of secretory epithelial cell that retain their luxury function of surfactant synthesis and secretion. It is classified as a low-grade adenocarcinoma and is viewed as a good model for epithelial neoplasia because of its morphological resemblance to the human lung tumour, bronchioloalveolar adenocarcinoma. OPA is present in most of the sheep rearing areas of the globe and, in affected flocks, tumours are present in a high proportion of sheep. OPA is associated with the ovine retrovirus, jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV), and is transmissible only with inocula that contain JSRV. All sheep contain JSRV-related endogenous viruses, but JSRV is an exogenous virus that is associated exclusively with OPA. JSRV is detected consistently in the lung fluid, tumour and lymphoid tissues of sheep affected by both natural and experimental OPA or unaffected in-contact flockmates and never in sheep from unaffected flocks with no history of the tumour. JSRV replicates principally in the epithelial tumour cells, but also establishes a disseminated infection of several lymphoid cell types, including peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs). Longitudinal studies in flocks with endemic OPA have revealed JSRV in PBLs before the onset of clinical OPA and even in the absence of discernible lung tumour. The prevalence of JSRV infection is 40%-80%, although only 30% of sheep appear to develop OPA lesions. A unique feature of OPA is the absence of a specific humoral immune response to JSRV, despite the highly productive infection in the lungs and the disseminated lymphoid infection. This feature is associated with reduced responsiveness to some mitogens, although the phenotypic profile of the peripheral blood remains unaltered. The reduced response is an early and sustained event during infection and may indicate that the failure of infected sheep to produce specific antibodies to

  13. Natural history of Sanfilippo syndrome type A.

    PubMed

    Buhrman, Dakota; Thakkar, Kavita; Poe, Michele; Escolar, Maria L

    2014-05-01

    To describe the natural history of Sanfilippo syndrome type A. We performed a retrospective review of 46 children (21 boys, 25 girls) with Sanfilippo syndrome type A evaluated between January 2000 and April 2013. Assessments included neurodevelopmental evaluations, audiologic testing, and assessment of growth, adaptive behavior, cognitive behavior, motor function, and speech/language skills. Only the baseline evaluation was included for patients who received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Median age at diagnosis was 35 months, with a median delay between initial symptoms to diagnosis of 24 months. The most common initial symptoms were speech/language delay (48%), dysmorphology (22%), and hearing loss (20%). Early behavioral problems included perseverative chewing and difficulty with toilet training. All children developed sleep difficulties and behavioral changes (e.g., hyperactivity, aggression). More than 93% of the children experienced somatic symptoms such as hepatomegaly (67%), abnormal dentition (39%), enlarged tongue (37%), coarse facial features (76%), and protuberant abdomen (43%). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a 60% probability of surviving past 17 years of age. Sanfilippo type A is characterized by severe hearing loss and speech delay, followed by a rapid decline in cognitive skills by 3 years of age. Significant somatic disease occurs in more than half of patients. Behavioral difficulties presented between 2 and 4 years of age during a rapid period of cognitive decline. Gross motor abilities are maintained during this period, which results in an active child with impaired cognition. Sleep difficulties are concurrent with the period of cognitive degeneration. There is currently an unacceptable delay in diagnosis, highlighting the need to increase awareness of this disease among clinicians.

  14. The Interaction of Risk Network Structures and Virus Natural History in the Non-spreading of HIV Among People Who Inject Drugs in the Early Stages of the Epidemic.

    PubMed

    Dombrowski, Kirk; Khan, Bilal; Habecker, Patrick; Hagan, Holly; Friedman, Samuel R; Saad, Mohamed

    2017-04-01

    This article explores how social network dynamics may have reduced the spread of HIV-1 infection among people who inject drugs during the early years of the epidemic. Stochastic, discrete event, agent-based simulations are used to test whether a "firewall effect" can arise out of self-organizing processes at the actor level, and whether such an effect can account for stable HIV prevalence rates below population saturation. Repeated simulation experiments show that, in the presence of recurring, acute, and highly infectious outbreaks, micro-network structures combine with the HIV virus's natural history to reduce the spread of the disease. These results indicate that network factors likely played a significant role in the prevention of HIV infection within injection risk networks during periods of peak prevalence. They also suggest that social forces that disturb network connections may diminish the natural firewall effect and result in higher rates of HIV.

  15. The Interaction of Risk Network Structures and Virus Natural History in the non-Spreading of HIV among People Who Inject Drugs in the Early Stages of the Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Dombrowski, Kirk; Khan, Bilal; Habecker, Patrick; Hagan, Holly; Friedman, Samuel R.; Saad, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    This article explores how social network dynamics may have reduced the spread of HIV-1 infection among people who inject drugs during the early years of the epidemic. Stochastic, discrete event, agent-based simulations are used to test whether a “firewall effect” can arise out of self-organizing processes at the actor level, and whether such an effect can account for stable HIV prevalence rates below population saturation. Repeated simulation experiments show that, in the presence of recurring, acute, and highly infectious outbreaks, micro-network structures combine with the HIV virus’s natural history to reduce the spread of the disease. These results indicate that network factors likely played a significant role in the prevention of HIV infection within injection risk networks during periods of peak prevalence. They also suggest that social forces that disturb network connections may diminish the natural firewall effect and result in higher rates of HIV. PMID:27699596

  16. Natural history collections: A scientific treasure trove

    ,

    2006-01-01

    Natural history collections play an indispensable and often overlooked role in the conservation and management of our Nation’s flora and fauna. Scientific specimens housed in museum collections not only open an important window into the current and past diversity of life on Earth, but also play a vital role in fueling cutting-edge scientific research in many disciplines. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Fort Collins Science Center (FORT) curates a collection of vertebrates from the Intermountain and Southwestern United States that is used by researchers from around the globe. As one of the largest Federal natural history collections in the western United States, the USGS specimen holdings offer unique opportunities to study the fauna of this incredibly diverse and unique region.

  17. Natural history of rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata.

    PubMed

    White, Amy L; Modaff, Peggy; Holland-Morris, Francesca; Pauli, Richard M

    2003-05-01

    Rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata (RCP) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder with many associated medical complications. Prior to this study, natural history information about RCP was limited and based on experiences with small populations of affected individuals. We delineate the natural history of RCP through systematic analysis of 35 previously unreported individuals (as well as review of 62 literature cases with respect to survival and cause of death). Survival, growth, and developmental expectations and medical needs are summarized based upon experience with this population. Survival is greater among this population than previously reported, with 90% surviving up to 1 year and 50% surviving up to 6 years. Cause of death is most often respiratory problem. All infants with RCP have joint contractures, bilateral cataracts, and severe growth and psychomotor delays. Recommendations for health supervision of children with RCP and for parental counseling are presented. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. The "History" of Victorian Scientific Naturalism: Huxley, Spencer and the "End" of natural history.

    PubMed

    Lightman, Bernard

    2016-08-01

    As part of their defence of evolutionary theory, T. H. Huxley and Herbert Spencer argued that natural history was no longer a legitimate scientific discipline. They outlined a secularized concept of life from biology to argue for the validity of naturalism. Despite their support for naturalism, they offered two different responses to the decline of natural history. Whereas Huxley emphasized the creation of a biological discipline, and all that that entailed, Spencer was more concerned with constructing an entire intellectual system based on the idea of evolution. In effect, Spencer wanted to create a new scientific worldview based on evolutionary theory. This had consequences for their understanding of human history, especially of how science had evolved through the ages. It affected their conceptions of human agency, contingency, and directionality in history. Examining Huxley's and Spencer's responses to the "end" of natural history reveals some of the deep divisions within scientific naturalism and the inherent problems of naturalism in general. Whereas Huxley chose to separate the natural and the historical, Spencer opted to fuse them into a single system. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Music as therapy in early history.

    PubMed

    Thaut, Michael H

    2015-01-01

    The notion of music as therapy is based on ancient cross-cultural beliefs that music can have a "healing" effect on mind and body. Explanations for the therapeutic mechanisms in music have almost always included cultural and social science-based causalities about the uses and functions of music in society. However, it is also important to note that the view of music as "therapy" was also always strongly influenced by the view and understanding of the concepts and causes of disease. Magical/mystical concepts of illness and "rational" medicine probably lived side by side for thousands of years. Not until the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries were the scientific foundations of medicine established, which allowed the foundations of music in therapy to progress from no science to soft science and most recently to actual brain science. Evidence for "early music therapy" will be discussed in four broad historical-cultural divisions: preliterate cultures; early civilizations in Mesopotamia, Egypt, Israel; Greek Antiquity; Middle Ages, Renaissance, and Baroque. In reviewing "early music therapy" practice, from mostly unknown periods of early history (using preliterate cultures as a window) to increasingly better documented times, including preserved notation samples of actual "healing" music, five theories and applications of early music therapy can be differentiated. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. History of natural flows--Kansas River

    Leeson, Elwood R.

    1958-01-01

    Through its Water Resources Division, the United States Geological Survey has become the major water-resources historian for the nation. The Geological Survey's collection of streamflow records in Kansas began on a very small scale in 1895 in response to some early irrigation interest, Since that time the program has grown, and we now have about 21 350 station-years of record accumulated. A station-year of record is defined as a continuous record of flow collected at a fixed point for a period of one year. Volume of data at hand, however, is not in itself an, adequate measure of its usefullness. An important element in historical streamflow data which enhances its value as a tool for the prediction of the future is the length of continuous records available in the area being studied. The records should be of sufficient length that they may be regarded as a reasonable sample of what has gone before and may be expected in the future. Table 1 gives a graphical inventory of the available streamflow records in Kansas. It shows that, in general, there is a fair coverage of stations with records of about thirty-seven years in length, This is not a long period as history goes but it does include considerable experience with floods and droughts.Although a large quantity of data on Kansas streamflow has been accumulated, hydrologists and planning engineers find that stream flow information for many areas of the State is considerably less than adequate. The problem of obtaining adequate coverage has been given careful study by the Kansas Water Resources Board in cooperation with the U. S. Geological Survey and a report entitled "Development of A Balanced Stream-Gaging Program For Kansas", has been published by the Board as Bulletin No. 4, That report presents an analysis of the existing stream-gaging program and recommendations for a program to meet the rapidly expanding needs for more comprehensive basic data.The Kansas River is formed near Junction City, Kansas, by the

  1. Natural History of Innate Host Defense Peptides.

    PubMed

    Linde, A; Wachter, B; Höner, O P; Dib, L; Ross, C; Tamayo, A R; Blecha, F; Melgarejo, T

    2009-12-01

    Host defense peptides act on the forefront of innate immunity, thus playing a central role in the survival of animals and plants. Despite vast morphological changes in species through evolutionary history, all animals examined to date share common features in their innate immune defense strategies, hereunder expression of host defense peptides (HDPs). Most studies on HDPs have focused on humans, domestic and laboratory animals. More than a thousand different sequences have been identified, yet data on HDPs in wild-living animals are sparse. The biological functions of HDPs include broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and immunomodulation. Natural selection and coevolutionary host-pathogen arms race theory suggest that the extent and specificity of the microbial load influences the spectrum and potency of HDPs in different species. Individuals of extant species-that have lived for an extended period in evolutionary history amid populations with intact processes of natural selection-likely possess the most powerful and well-adapted "natural antibiotics". Research on the evolutionary history of the innate defense system and the host in context of the consequences of challenges as well as the efficacy of the innate immune system under natural conditions is therefore of immediate interest. This review focuses on evolutionary aspects of immunophysiology, with emphasis on innate effector molecules. Studies on host defense in wild-living animals may significantly enhance our understanding of inborn immune mechanisms, and help identify molecules that may assist us to cope better with the increasing microbial challenges that likely follow from the continuous amplification of biodiversity levels on Earth.

  2. The natural science underlying big history.

    PubMed

    Chaisson, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    Nature's many varied complex systems-including galaxies, stars, planets, life, and society-are islands of order within the increasingly disordered Universe. All organized systems are subject to physical, biological, or cultural evolution, which together comprise the grander interdisciplinary subject of cosmic evolution. A wealth of observational data supports the hypothesis that increasingly complex systems evolve unceasingly, uncaringly, and unpredictably from big bang to humankind. These are global history greatly extended, big history with a scientific basis, and natural history broadly portrayed across ∼14 billion years of time. Human beings and our cultural inventions are not special, unique, or apart from Nature; rather, we are an integral part of a universal evolutionary process connecting all such complex systems throughout space and time. Such evolution writ large has significant potential to unify the natural sciences into a holistic understanding of who we are and whence we came. No new science (beyond frontier, nonequilibrium thermodynamics) is needed to describe cosmic evolution's major milestones at a deep and empirical level. Quantitative models and experimental tests imply that a remarkable simplicity underlies the emergence and growth of complexity for a wide spectrum of known and diverse systems. Energy is a principal facilitator of the rising complexity of ordered systems within the expanding Universe; energy flows are as central to life and society as they are to stars and galaxies. In particular, energy rate density-contrasting with information content or entropy production-is an objective metric suitable to gauge relative degrees of complexity among a hierarchy of widely assorted systems observed throughout the material Universe. Operationally, those systems capable of utilizing optimum amounts of energy tend to survive, and those that cannot are nonrandomly eliminated.

  3. The Natural Science Underlying Big History

    PubMed Central

    Chaisson, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    Nature's many varied complex systems—including galaxies, stars, planets, life, and society—are islands of order within the increasingly disordered Universe. All organized systems are subject to physical, biological, or cultural evolution, which together comprise the grander interdisciplinary subject of cosmic evolution. A wealth of observational data supports the hypothesis that increasingly complex systems evolve unceasingly, uncaringly, and unpredictably from big bang to humankind. These are global history greatly extended, big history with a scientific basis, and natural history broadly portrayed across ∼14 billion years of time. Human beings and our cultural inventions are not special, unique, or apart from Nature; rather, we are an integral part of a universal evolutionary process connecting all such complex systems throughout space and time. Such evolution writ large has significant potential to unify the natural sciences into a holistic understanding of who we are and whence we came. No new science (beyond frontier, nonequilibrium thermodynamics) is needed to describe cosmic evolution's major milestones at a deep and empirical level. Quantitative models and experimental tests imply that a remarkable simplicity underlies the emergence and growth of complexity for a wide spectrum of known and diverse systems. Energy is a principal facilitator of the rising complexity of ordered systems within the expanding Universe; energy flows are as central to life and society as they are to stars and galaxies. In particular, energy rate density—contrasting with information content or entropy production—is an objective metric suitable to gauge relative degrees of complexity among a hierarchy of widely assorted systems observed throughout the material Universe. Operationally, those systems capable of utilizing optimum amounts of energy tend to survive, and those that cannot are nonrandomly eliminated. PMID:25032228

  4. An Impaired View of Earth's Early History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vervoort, J. D.; Kemp, A. I.; Bauer, A.; Bowring, S. A.; Fisher, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Hf and Nd isotope records of Earth's early history are sparse, difficult to interpret, and controversial, much like the few remnants of crust older than 4 Ga. New analytical techniques have been brought to bear on this problem but despite this recent work­-or, perhaps, because of it-the record is no clearer than it was 15 years ago. Several studies, based on highly variable calculated initial isotopic compositions, have argued for highly heterogeneous crust and mantle reservoirs in the early Earth1,2 and an ultra-depleted Eoarchean mantle3. These data come mostly from two sources: Hf-Nd isotope analyses of ultramafic rocks and Hf isotope analyses of zircons by solution or laser ablation. An important question for understanding the chemical evolution of the early Earth is: Do these data offer a unique window into the early Earth or are they artefacts not representative of crust/mantle evolution, giving an impaired view of the Earth's early history? In complex samples, measured isotopic compositions can result from open-system behavior in easily altered ultramafic compositions, in multicomponent, polymetamorphic gneisses, or in zircons with multiple generations of growth. Perhaps most importantly, accurate age assignment is often lacking, compromised, or impossible in these rocks, making calculation of initial epsilon Hf and Nd values ambiguous at best. In order to gain insight into crust mantle evolution in the early Earth we need, above all, a robust and unambiguous isotopic record to work with. This can be achieved by integrating zircon U-Pb and Hf and whole-rock Hf and Nd isotope compositions in relatively undisturbed igneous rocks with well-constrained ages. When this approach is used apparent isotopic heterogeneity decreases and a simpler model for crust-mantle evolution in the early Earth emerges. Careful screening of geological relationships, petrology, and geochemistry of samples from the early Earth should be done before interpreting isotopic data

  5. Early history of Neanderthals and Denisovans

    PubMed Central

    Bohlender, Ryan J.; Huff, Chad D.

    2017-01-01

    Extensive DNA sequence data have made it possible to reconstruct human evolutionary history in unprecedented detail. We introduce a method to study the past several hundred thousand years. Our results show that (i) the Neanderthal–Denisovan lineage declined to a small size just after separating from the modern lineage, (ii) Neanderthals and Denisovans separated soon thereafter, and (iii) the subsequent Neanderthal population was large and deeply subdivided. They also (iv) support previous estimates of gene flow from Neanderthals into modern Eurasians. These results suggest an archaic human diaspora early in the Middle Pleistocene. PMID:28784789

  6. Natural history and information overload: The case of Linnaeus

    PubMed Central

    Müller-Wille, Staffan; Charmantier, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Natural History can be seen as a discipline paradigmatically engaged in ‘data-driven research.’ Historians of early modern science have begun to emphasize its crucial role in the Scientific Revolution, and some observers of present day genomics see it as engaged in a return to natural history practices. A key concept that was developed to understand the dynamics of early modern natural history is that of ‘information overload.’ Taxonomic systems, rules of nomenclature, and technical terminologies were developed in botany and zoology to catch up with the ever increasing amount of information on hitherto unknown plant and animal species. In our contribution, we want to expand on this concept. After all, the same people who complain about information overload are usually the ones who contribute to it most significantly. In order to understand this complex relationship, we will turn to the annotation practices of the Swedish naturalist Carl Linnaeus (1707–1778). The very tools that Linnaeus developed to contain and reduce information overload, as we aim to demonstrate, facilitated a veritable information explosion that led to the emergence of a new research object in botany: the so-called ‘natural’ system. PMID:22326068

  7. North American box turtles: A natural history

    Dodd, C. Kenneth

    2002-01-01

    Once a familiar backyard visitor in many parts of the United States and Mexico, the box turtle is losing the battle against extinction. In North American Box Turtles, C. Kenneth Dodd, Jr., has written the first book-length natural history of the twelve species and subspecies of this endangered animal. This volume includes comprehensive information on the species’ evolution, behavior, courtship and reproduction, habitat use, diet, population structure, systematics, and disease. Special features include color photos of all species, subspecies, and their habitats; a simple identification guide to both living and fossil species; and a summary of information on fossil Terrapene and Native uses of box turtles. End-of-chapter sections highlight future research directions, including the need for long-term monitoring and observation of box turtles within their natural habitat and conservation applications. A glossary and a bibliography of literature on box turtles accompany the text.

  8. The Natural History of Antisocial Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Black, Donald W

    2015-01-01

    Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) is characterized by a pattern of socially irresponsible, exploitative, and guiltless behaviour. ASPD is associated with co-occurring mental health and addictive disorders and medical comorbidity. Rates of natural and unnatural death (suicide, homicide, and accidents) are excessive. ASPD is a predictor of poor treatment response. ASPD begins early in life, usually by age 8 years. Diagnosed as conduct disorder in childhood, the diagnosis converts to ASPD at age 18 if antisocial behaviours have persisted. While chronic and lifelong for most people with ASPD, the disorder tends to improve with advancing age. Earlier onset is associated with a poorer prognosis. Other moderating factors include marriage, employment, early incarceration (or adjudication during childhood), and degree of socialization. PMID:26175389

  9. The Natural History of Antisocial Personality Disorder.

    PubMed

    Black, Donald W

    2015-07-01

    Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) is characterized by a pattern of socially irresponsible, exploitative, and guiltless behaviour. ASPD is associated with co-occurring mental health and addictive disorders and medical comorbidity. Rates of natural and unnatural death (suicide, homicide, and accidents) are excessive. ASPD is a predictor of poor treatment response. ASPD begins early in life, usually by age 8 years. Diagnosed as conduct disorder in childhood, the diagnosis converts to ASPD at age 18 if antisocial behaviours have persisted. While chronic and lifelong for most people with ASPD, the disorder tends to improve with advancing age. Earlier onset is associated with a poorer prognosis. Other moderating factors include marriage, employment, early incarceration (or adjudication during childhood), and degree of socialization.

  10. Food allergy: epidemiology and natural history.

    PubMed

    Savage, Jessica; Johns, Christina B

    2015-02-01

    The prevalence of food allergy is rising for unclear reasons, with prevalence estimates in the developed world approaching 10%. Knowledge regarding the natural course of food allergies is important because it can aid the clinician in diagnosing food allergies and in determining when to consider evaluation for food allergy resolution. Many food allergies with onset in early childhood are outgrown later in childhood, although a minority of food allergy persists into adolescence and even adulthood. More research is needed to improve food allergy diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Fermilab History and Archives Project | Golden Books - The Early History of

    Fermilab History and Archives Project Home About the Archives History and Archives Online Request Contact ; - The Early History of URA and Fermilab Fermilab Golden Book Collection main page Click on Image for Larger View The Early History of URA and Fermilab Viewpoint of a URA President (1966-1981) Norman F

  12. A brief history of early neuroanesthesia.

    PubMed

    Chivukula, Srinivas; Grandhi, Ramesh; Friedlander, Robert M

    2014-04-01

    Two key discoveries in the 19th century--infection control and the development of general anesthesia--provided an impetus for the rapid advancement of surgery, especially within the field of neurosurgery. Improvements in anesthesia and perioperative care, in particular, fostered the development of meticulous surgical technique conducive to the refinement of neuroanatomical understanding and optimization of neurosurgical procedures and outcomes. Yet, even dating back to the earliest times, some form of anesthesia or perioperative pain management was used during neurosurgical procedures. Despite a few reports on anesthesia published around the time of William Morton's now-famous public demonstration of ether anesthesia in 1846, relatively little is known or written of early anesthetics in neurosurgery. In the present article the authors discuss the history of anesthesia pertaining to neurosurgical procedures and draw parallels between the refinements and developments in anesthesia care over time with some of the concomitant advances in neurosurgery.

  13. The natural history of Perthes' disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The prognosis in Perthes' disease varies considerably according to certain risk factors, but there is no concensus regarding the relative importance of these factors. We assessed the natural history of the disease and defined prognostic factors of value in deciding the proper treatment. Patients and methods During the 5-year period 1996–2000, a nationwide study on Perthes' disease was performed in Norway. 425 patients were registered. The present study involved the 212 children (mean age 5.1 years, 77% boys) who were affected unilaterally and who had been treated with physiotherapy only (which is considered not to change the natural history). They were followed by taking radiographs at the time of diagnosis and after 1, 3, and 5 years. At the 5-year follow-up, the outcome was evaluated according to a modification of the Stulberg classification: good (spherical femoral head), fair (ovoid femoral head), and poor (flat femoral head). Results The 5-year radiographic results were strongly dependent on 4 risk factors: age 6 years or more at diagnosis, total femoral head necrosis, height of the lateral pillar of the epiphysis less than 50% of normal height, and femoral head cover less than 80%. As the number of risk factors increased from 0 to 4, the proportion of patients with good radiographic 5-year outcome decreased from 79% to 0% and the proportion with poor outcome increased from 3% to 91%. Interpretation Most children under 6 years of age do not need any special treatment. In older children, no special treatment is indicated if the whole femoral head is not necrotic and the femoral head cover is > 80%. In the most severe forms of the disease (i.e. more than 2 risk factors), surgical containment treatment seems advisable. PMID:21067434

  14. The natural history of Perthes' disease.

    PubMed

    Terjesen, Terje; Wiig, Ola; Svenningsen, Svein

    2010-12-01

    The prognosis in Perthes' disease varies considerably according to certain risk factors, but there is no concensus regarding the relative importance of these factors. We assessed the natural history of the disease and defined prognostic factors of value in deciding the proper treatment. During the 5-year period 1996-2000, a nationwide study on Perthes' disease was performed in Norway. 425 patients were registered. The present study involved the 212 children (mean age 5.1 years, 77% boys) who were affected unilaterally and who had been treated with physiotherapy only (which is considered not to change the natural history). They were followed by taking radiographs at the time of diagnosis and after 1, 3, and 5 years. At the 5-year follow-up, the outcome was evaluated according to a modification of the Stulberg classification: good (spherical femoral head), fair (ovoid femoral head), and poor (flat femoral head). The 5-year radiographic results were strongly dependent on 4 risk factors: age 6 years or more at diagnosis, total femoral head necrosis, height of the lateral pillar of the epiphysis less than 50% of normal height, and femoral head cover less than 80%. As the number of risk factors increased from 0 to 4, the proportion of patients with good radiographic 5-year outcome decreased from 79% to 0% and the proportion with poor outcome increased from 3% to 91%. Most children under 6 years of age do not need any special treatment. In older children, no special treatment is indicated if the whole femoral head is not necrotic and the femoral head cover is > 80%. In the most severe forms of the disease (i.e. more than 2 risk factors), surgical containment treatment seems advisable.

  15. Hereditary Parkinson s Disease Natural History Protocol

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-03-27

    Parkinson Disease 6, Early-Onset; Parkinson Disease (Autosomal Recessive, Early Onset) 7, Human; Parkinson Disease Autosomal Recessive, Early Onset; Parkinson Disease, Autosomal Recessive Early-Onset, Digenic, Pink1/Dj1

  16. The Natural History of Food Allergy.

    PubMed

    Savage, Jessica; Sicherer, Scott; Wood, Robert

    2016-01-01

    On a population level, it is well recognized that some IgE-mediated childhood food allergies, such as milk and egg allergies, are more likely to resolve than others, such as peanut and tree nuts allergies. Unfortunately, some studies suggest that resolution rates may have slowed compared with impressions from past decades. The clinician can apply the knowledge of the epidemiology of these allergies to describe likely patient outcomes, and direct management in a general manner. However, the ability to evaluate and predict the natural course of specific food allergies for individual patients is essential to inform personalized patient care. Data are accumulating to assist in identifying whether a child's allergy has likely resolved, informing the timing of oral food challenges or subsequent testing. Exciting recent studies are increasingly identifying early prognostic markers as well. Emerging food allergy therapies carry risks and costs. Identifying which egg-allergic patient has likely persistent allergy, and which patient with peanut allergy may experience natural resolution, is becoming an important goal to identify the best candidates for these therapies. Although more work needs to be done to identify reliable predictive markers and validate them, there is already much known about the natural course of food allergies that can be applied by the clinician to improve patient care. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. History and early development of INCAP.

    PubMed

    Scrimshaw, Nevin S

    2010-02-01

    Nevin Scrimshaw was the founding Director of the Institute of Nutrition of Central America and Panama (INCAP), serving as Director from 1949 to 1961. In this article, he reviews the history of the founding of INCAP, including the role of the Rockefeller and Kellogg Foundations, the Central American governments, and the Pan American Health Organization. The objectives pursued by INCAP in its early years were to assess the nutrition and related health problems of Central America, to carry out research to find practical solutions to these problems, and to provide technical assistance to its member countries to implement solutions. INCAP pursued a strategy of selecting promising Central Americans for advanced education and training in the US who assumed positions of leadership on their return. After this early phase, talented non-Central Americans of diverse origins were brought to INCAP, as well as additional researchers from the region. Growth of INCAP, as reflected in its annual budget and in the physical plant, was rapid and this was accompanied by high scientific productivity. Several field studies were launched that contributed impetus and design elements for the Oriente Longitudinal Study, which is the focus of this supplement.

  18. Natural History of Anterior Shoulder Instability.

    PubMed

    Carpinteiro, Eduardo Palma; Barros, Andre Aires

    2017-01-01

    The shoulder is the most complex joint in the body. The large freedom of motion in this joint is the main cause of instability. Instability varies in its degree, direction, etiology and volition and there is a large spectrum of conditions. Based on literature research and also in our own experience, we propose to elucidate the reader about the natural history of instability and its importance for the appropriate management of this pathology, by answering the following questions: What happens in the shoulder after the first dislocation? Which structures suffer damage? Who are the patients at higher risk of recurrence? How does the disease evolve without treatment? Will surgical treatment avoid future negative outcomes and prevent degenerative joint disease? Who should we treat and when? 80% of anterior-inferior dislocations occur in young patients. Recurrent instability is common and multiple dislocations are the rule. Instability is influenced by a large number of variables, including age of onset, activity profile, number of episodes,delay between first episode and surgical treatment. Understanding the disease and its natural evolution is determinant to decide the treatment in order to obtain the best outcome. It is crucial to identify the risk factors for recurrence. Delay in surgical treatment, when indicated, leads to worse results. Surgical technique should address the type and severity of both soft tissue and bone lesions, when present.

  19. Learning History in Early Childhood: Teaching Methods and Children's Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skjaeveland, Yngve

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses the teaching of history in early childhood education and care centres and children's understanding of history. Based on interviews with eight Norwegian early childhood education and care teachers and on interpretative phenomenological analysis, the article shows how the early childhood education and care centres teach…

  20. Perrault, Buffon and the natural history of animals

    PubMed Central

    Guerrini, Anita

    2012-01-01

    In 1733, as part of a programme to publish its early works in a uniform format, the Paris Academy of Sciences reprinted Mémoires pour servir à l'histoire naturelle des animaux (Histoire des animaux), last published in 1676, a work of both natural history and mechanistic anatomy. However, unlike the other works in this enterprise, Histoire des animaux was extensively edited and updated. In 1749 Georges-Louis Leclerc de Buffon published the first volume of Histoire naturelle. Its volumes on quadrupeds, written with Louis-Jean-Marie Daubenton, held significant similarities to Histoire des animaux. The relationship between these works has not hitherto been examined. Buffon's early ideas on species, in particular, resemble the emphasis on particulars of Histoire des animaux.

  1. Learning and engagement through natural history museums*

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Martin; Oliver, Mary; Reiss, Michael J.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract This review examines how natural history museums (NHMs) can enhance learning and engagement in science, particularly for school-age students. First, we describe the learning potential of informal science learning institutions in general, then we focus on NHMs. We review the possible benefits of interactions between schools and NHMs, and the potential for NHMs to teach about challenging issues such as evolution and climate change and to use digital technologies to augment more traditional artefacts. We conclude that NHMs can provide students with new knowledge and perspectives, with impacts that can last for years. Through visits and their on-line presence, NHMs can help students see science in ways that the school classroom rarely can, with opportunities to meet scientists, explore whole topic exhibitions, engage with interactive displays and employ digital technologies both in situ and to support learning in the school science classroom. Although these interactions have the potential to foster positive cognitive, affective and social outcomes for students, there is a lack of reliable measures of the impact of NHM experiences for students. Opportunities to foster relationships between NHM staff and teachers through professional development can help articulate shared goals to support students’ learning and engagement.

  2. Natural history of idiopathic diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Richards, Gail E; Thomsett, Michael J; Boston, Bruce A; DiMeglio, Linda A; Shulman, Dorothy I; Draznin, Martin

    2011-10-01

    To determine what percentage of diabetes insipidus (DI) in childhood is idiopathic and to assess the natural history of idiopathic DI. We conducted a retrospective chart review of 105 patients with DI who were born or had DI diagnosed between 1980-1989 at 3 medical centers. A second cohort of 30 patients from 6 medical centers in whom idiopathic DI was diagnosed after 1990 was evaluated retrospectively for subsequent etiologic diagnoses and additional hypothalamic/pituitary deficiencies and prospectively for quality of life. In the first cohort, 11% of patients had idiopathic DI. In the second cohort, additional hypothalamic/pituitary hormone deficiencies developed in 33%, and 37% received an etiologic diagnosis for DI. Health-related quality of life for all the patients with idiopathic DI was comparable with the healthy reference population. Only a small percentage of patients with DI will remain idiopathic after first examination. Other hormone deficiencies will develop later in one-third of those patients, and slightly more than one-third of those patients will have an etiology for the DI diagnosed. Long-term surveillance is important because tumors have been diagnosed as long as 21 years after the onset of DI. Quality of life for these patients is as good as the reference population. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Learning and engagement through natural history museums.

    PubMed

    Mujtaba, Tamjid; Lawrence, Martin; Oliver, Mary; Reiss, Michael J

    2018-01-01

    This review examines how natural history museums (NHMs) can enhance learning and engagement in science, particularly for school-age students. First, we describe the learning potential of informal science learning institutions in general, then we focus on NHMs. We review the possible benefits of interactions between schools and NHMs, and the potential for NHMs to teach about challenging issues such as evolution and climate change and to use digital technologies to augment more traditional artefacts. We conclude that NHMs can provide students with new knowledge and perspectives, with impacts that can last for years. Through visits and their on-line presence, NHMs can help students see science in ways that the school classroom rarely can, with opportunities to meet scientists, explore whole topic exhibitions, engage with interactive displays and employ digital technologies both in situ and to support learning in the school science classroom. Although these interactions have the potential to foster positive cognitive, affective and social outcomes for students, there is a lack of reliable measures of the impact of NHM experiences for students. Opportunities to foster relationships between NHM staff and teachers through professional development can help articulate shared goals to support students' learning and engagement.

  4. We Can Change the Natural History of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ratner, Robert E.; Buse, John B.; Kahn, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    As diabetes develops, we currently waste the first ∼10 years of the natural history. If we found prediabetes and early diabetes when they first presented and treated them more effectively, we could prevent or delay the progression of hyperglycemia and the development of complications. Evidence for this comes from trials where lifestyle change and/or glucose-lowering medications decreased progression from prediabetes to diabetes. After withdrawal of these interventions, there was no “catch-up”—cumulative development of diabetes in the previously treated groups remained less than in control subjects. Moreover, achieving normal glucose levels even transiently during the trials was associated with a substantial reduction in subsequent development of diabetes. These findings indicate that we can change the natural history through routine screening to find prediabetes and early diabetes, combined with management aimed to keep glucose levels as close to normal as possible, without hypoglycemia. We should also test the hypothesis with a randomized controlled trial. PMID:25249668

  5. Impact melting early in lunar history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, M. A.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1979-01-01

    The total amount of impact melt produced during early lunar history is examined in light of theoretically and experimentally determined relations between crater diameter (D) and impact melt volume. The time dependence of the melt production is given by the time dependent impact rate as derived from cratering statistics for two different crater-size classes. Results show that small scale cratering (D less than or equal to 30 km) leads to melt volumes which fit selected observations specifying the amount of impact melt contained in the lunar regolith and in craters with diameters less than 10 km. Larger craters (D greater than 30 km) are capable of forming the abundant impact melt breccias found on the lunar surface. The group of large craters (D greater than 30 km) produces nearly 10 times as much impact melt as all the smaller craters, and thus, the large impacts dominate the modification of the lunar surface. A contradiction between the distribution of radiometric rock ages and a model of exponentially decreasing cratering rate going back to 4.5 b.y. is reflected in uncertainty in the distribution of impact melt as a function of time on the moon.

  6. Geodiversity and the natural history of landforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusti, Christian

    2014-05-01

    possible for a geomorphologist to travel back in the past, a delicate and speculative succession of operations: as noted by Schumm (1979, 485), "The extrapolation of measured average rates of erosion and deposition to longer periods of time is misleading, in the sense that they do not reveal the natural complexity of landform development or the variability of existing landforms". Any extrapolation in the past or future implies true actualiste approach verifying only methodological uniformitarianism (i.e. spatial and temporal invariance of natural laws) as well as quantitative models purged of any hint of gradualism and which takes into account variations of timing, frequency and intensity in the action of morphogenetic forcings. In continuation of Hack's work, the concepts of landscape sensitivity developed by Brunsden and Thornes (1979) explain that some landforms are particularly well fitted to the present conditions of endogenetic and exogenetic forcings (characteristic landforms) while others not at all (transient landforms). This highly effective approach within the Holocene and the Pleistocene marks the beginning of a return to the investigation of the past in geomorphology, given that for the Neogene or even older times, the ancient concept of "héritage" (Birot, 1958) seems more relevant than the concepts of transient or characteristic landforms. We propose here as an illustration to describe the sequence of landforms defined in the Southern Massif Central (France). The full sequence is to be observed between the Languedoc Lowlands and the Monts de Lacaune Highlands, while an elision of the lower terms of the sequence towards the Aquitaine Basin allow to highlight a highly significant limit between two modes of landform development at regional level. In short, the natural history of landforms deserve a high status in the Earth sciences: geomorphology not only needs mechanics and chemistry (i.e. the changing ratio of tectonic-driven to climatic-driven processes

  7. Maria Sibylla Merian and the metamorphosis of natural history.

    PubMed

    Etheridge, Kay

    2011-03-01

    Known primarily for creating beautiful images of butterflies and flowers, Maria Sibylla Merian (German, 1647-1717) has remained largely unappreciated for her seminal contribution to early modern natural history. Merian was indeed a talented artist, but she clearly thought of herself as a naturalist, and employed both text and images to depict lepidopteran metamorphosis and behavior with unprecedented accuracy and detail. Merian documented larvae and adult insects feeding not only on plants, but also on other animals, and she depicted other creatures preying on insects. An image of battling spiders and ants and the accompanying text in her 1705 Metamorphosis insectorum surinamensium illuminated the world of tropical arthropods in a way that was groundbreaking, and set the stage for a new way to envision nature. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The natural history of endometrial polyps.

    PubMed

    Wong, M; Crnobrnja, B; Liberale, V; Dharmarajah, K; Widschwendter, M; Jurkovic, D

    2017-02-01

    What is the natural history of endometrial polyps in women who are managed expectantly? The growth rates of expectantly managed polyps vary considerably and cannot be accurately predicted. The majority of polyps detected on ultrasound are treated surgically, and therefore little is known about their natural history. Some polyps have been reported to regress spontaneously without the need for treatment; however, the factors predictive of regression are unknown. This was a retrospective cohort study conducted at the Department of Gynaecology, University College London Hospitals. We searched our ultrasound clinic database between July 1997 and September 2015, to identify women aged 18 years or older with endometrial polyps that were managed expectantly for ≥6 months. All women attended for a minimum of two ultrasound scans. A single expert operator performed all ultrasound scans. Those with <6-month follow-up and those who were taking hormonal contraception, HRT or tamoxifen were excluded from the study. The mean diameter of each polyp was calculated from the measurements in three perpendicular planes. The polyp growth rate was expressed as annual percentage change in the mean diameter. Non-parametric tests and the Fisher's exact test were used to compare differences in polyp mean diameters and growth rates between women of different demographic characteristics. To correct for multiple significance testing, we used the Bonferroni method, giving the level of probability at which findings were considered significant as P < 0.0029 (as 17 tests were undertaken). We included 112 women with endometrial polyps, which were expectantly managed over a median period of 22.5 months (range, 6-136). The annual endometrial polyp growth rate varied with a median of 1.0% (interquartile range, -6.5 to 14.3). There was no association between women's demographic characteristics or polyps' morphology and their growth rates. Eleven out of 75 (15% (95% CI, 6.9%-23.1%)) women who initially

  9. Early volcanic history of the Rabaul area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, Chris O.; Duncan, Robert A.

    2016-04-01

    We conducted an extensive program of 40Ar-39Ar age determinations on a suite of 27 volcanic rock samples from key stratigraphic units at Rabaul, Papua New Guinea in order to improve understanding of the early eruption history of the multiple volcanic systems present in the area. Analyses of whole rock, plagioclase and groundmass separates yielded statistically significant ages for 24 samples. Replicate analyses (groundmass, plagioclase) for 17 of the samples provided concordant ages. The oldest systems in the Rabaul area (>1 Ma to ≈300 ka) are in the south, associated with the caldera-like Varzin Depression, and in the north, at the stratovolcanoes Watom and Tovanumbatir. The earliest known activity of the Rabaul system occurred between about 330 and 200 ka and involved emplacement of lava flows and scoria deposits. Major explosive activity at the Rabaul system commenced at about 200 ka and produced a sequence of dacitic ignimbrites that culminated with the emplacement of the large-volume Malaguna Pyroclastics at about 160 ka. Calderas may have been formed as a consequence of the large volumes of tephra produced during some of these eruptions. Products of the early activity are found in the northern and northeastern walls of Rabaul Caldera and on the northeastern flank of Tovanumbatir. This leads to the conclusion that the source of the early activity at Rabaul probably was located in the northern part of the present caldera complex. A shift in the focus of activity at the Rabaul system took place between about 160 and 125 ka. All of the younger (<125 ka) major pyroclastic formations, including the Karavia Welded Tuff, the Barge Tunnel Ignimbrite and the Latlat Pyroclastics, which make up the bulk of the exposure in the southern and western walls of Rabaul Caldera, were erupted from a source or sources in the south-central part of the complex. The stratovolcanoes Palangiangia and Kabiu, which flank the northeastern part of the complex, had commenced activity by

  10. Hyperactivity: nature of the syndrome and its natural history.

    PubMed

    Aman, M G

    1984-03-01

    The composition of hyperactivity as a syndrome is discussed from a historical perspective, and the principal events leading to the recent emphasis on attentional characteristics of hyperactive children are summarized. Some of the major challenges to the legitimacy of hyperactivity as a valid syndrome are set forth, and after critical examination of the most influential work, it is concluded that hyperactivity has not been disproved. This is followed by a survey of the large follow-up literature dealing with the natural history of children diagnosed as hyperactive. It is noted that the manifestations of the syndrome appear to change with age but there is little indication that problems simply remit with maturity. The evidence indicates that hyperactivity, as diagnosed in the past, is often a serious disorder with long-term and far-reaching consequences for the children and their families. Multivariate studies are also discussed, as they have important implications for differential outcome. Different symptoms such as aggression, overactivity, and learning disability appear to contain unique information about current and future status, and therefore it appears useful to retain these distinctions rather than view such children as part of an undifferentiated group. It is unknown whether the recent guidelines for diagnosing Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity will alter or refine the outlook for children so identified, but this is an active area of research at present.

  11. Natural history of medial clavicle fractures.

    PubMed

    Salipas, Andrew; Kimmel, Lara A; Edwards, Elton R; Rakhra, Sandeep; Moaveni, Afshin Kamali

    2016-10-01

    Fractures of the medial third of the clavicle comprise less than 3% of all clavicle fractures. The natural history and optimal management of these rare injuries are unknown. The aim of our study is to describe the demographics, management and outcomes of patients with medial clavicle fractures treated at a Level 1 Trauma Centre. A retrospective review was conducted of patients presenting to our institution between January 2008 and March 2013 with a medial third clavicle fracture. Clinical and radiographic data were recorded including mechanism of injury, fracture pattern and displacement, associated injuries, management and complications. Functional outcomes were assessed using the Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended (GOS-E) scores from the Victorian Orthopaedic Trauma Outcomes Registry (VOTOR). Shoulder outcomes were assessed using two patient reported outcomes scores, the American Shoulder and Elbow Society Score (ASES) and the Subjective Shoulder Value (SSV). Sixty eight medial clavicle fractures in 68 patients were evaluated. The majority of patients were male (n=53), with a median age of 53.5 years (interquartile range (IQR) 37.5-74.5 years). The most common mechanism of injury was motor vehicle accident (n=28). The in-hospital mortality rate was 4.4%. The fracture pattern was almost equally distributed between extra articular (n=35) and intra-articular (n=33). Fifty-five fractures (80.9%) had minimal or no displacement. Associated injuries were predominantly thoracic (n=31). All fractures were initially managed non-operatively, with a broad arm sling. Delayed operative fixation was performed for painful atrophic delayed union in two patients (2.9%). Both patients were under 65 years of age and had a severely displaced fracture of the medial clavicle. One intra-operative vascular complication was seen, with no adverse long-term outcome. Follow-up was obtained in 85.0% of the surviving cohort at an average of three years post injury (range 1-6 years). The mean ASES

  12. The Natural Link between Teaching History and Computer Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farnworth, George M.

    1992-01-01

    Suggests that, because both history and computers are information based, there is an natural link between the two. Argues that history teachers should exploit the technology to help students to understand history while they become computer literate. Points out uses for databases, word processing, desktop publishing, and telecommunications in…

  13. Early History of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease 1808-1980.

    PubMed

    Watson, R Ann; Pride, Neil B

    2016-01-01

    COPD has become a more popular research area in the last 3 decades, yet the first clear descriptions of acute and chronic bronchitis were in 1808. This brief history, comprehensively referenced, leads us through the early developments in respiratory physiology and their applications. It emphasises the early history of chronic bronchitis and emphysema in the 19(th) and early 20(th) centuries, long before the dominant effects of cigarette smoking emerged. This remains relevant to developing countries today.

  14. Strategies to alter the natural history of childhood asthma

    PubMed Central

    Lee-Sarwar, K; Bacharier, L; Litonjua, A

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review Asthma exhibits significant heterogeneity in occurrence and severity over the lifespan. Our goal is to discuss recent evidence regarding determinants of the natural history of asthma during childhood, and review the rationale behind and status of major efforts to alter its course. Recent findings Variations in microbial exposures are associated with risk of allergic disease, and the use of bacterial lysates may be a promising preventive strategy. Exposure to air pollution appears to be particularly damaging in prenatal and early life, and interventions to reduce pollution are feasible and result in clinical benefit. E-cigarette use may have a role in harm reduction for conventional cigarette smokers with asthma, but has undefined short- and long-term effects that must be clarified. Vitamin D insufficiency over the first several years of life is associated with risk of asthma, and vitamin D supplementation reduces the risk of severe exacerbations. Summary The identification of risk factors for asthma occurrence, persistence and severity will continue to guide efforts to alter the natural history of the disease. We have reviewed several promising strategies that are currently under investigation. Vitamin D supplementation and air pollution reduction have been shown to be effective strategies and warrant increased investigation and implementation. PMID:28079559

  15. The Transuranium Elements: Early History (Nobel Lecture)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    McMillan, E. M.

    1951-12-12

    In this talk the author tells of the circumstances that led to the discovery of neptunium, the first element beyond uranium, and the partial identification of plutonium, the next one beyond that. The part of the story that lies before 1939 has already been recounted here in the Nobel lectures of Fermi and Hahn. Rather the author starts with the discovery of fission by Hahn and Strassmann. News of this momentous discovery reached Berkeley early in 1939. The staff of the Radiation Laboratory was put into a state of great excitement and several experiments of a nature designed to check and extend the announced results were started, using ionization chambers and pulse amplifiers, cloud chambers, chemical methods, and so forth. The author decided to do an experiment of a very simple kind. When a nucleus of uranium absorbs a neutron and fission takes place, the two resulting fragments fly apart with great violence, sufficient to propel them through air or other matter for some distance. This distance, called the "range", is quantity of some interest, and the author undertook to measure it by observing the depth of penetration of the fission fragments in a stack of thin aluminum foils. The fission fragments came from a thin layer of uranium oxide spread on a sheet of paper, and exposed to neutrons from a beryllium target bombarded by 8 Mev deuterons in the 37-inch cyclotron. The aluminum foils, each with a thickness of about half a milligram per square centimeter, were stacked like the pages of a book in immediate contact with the layer of uranium oxide. After exposure to the neutrons, the sheets of aluminum were separated and examined for radioactivity by means of an ionization chamber. The fission fragments of course are radioactive atoms, and their activity is found where they stop.

  16. Preclinical Alzheimer's disease: Definition, natural history, and diagnostic criteria.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Bruno; Hampel, Harald; Feldman, Howard H; Scheltens, Philip; Aisen, Paul; Andrieu, Sandrine; Bakardjian, Hovagim; Benali, Habib; Bertram, Lars; Blennow, Kaj; Broich, Karl; Cavedo, Enrica; Crutch, Sebastian; Dartigues, Jean-François; Duyckaerts, Charles; Epelbaum, Stéphane; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Gauthier, Serge; Genthon, Remy; Gouw, Alida A; Habert, Marie-Odile; Holtzman, David M; Kivipelto, Miia; Lista, Simone; Molinuevo, José-Luis; O'Bryant, Sid E; Rabinovici, Gil D; Rowe, Christopher; Salloway, Stephen; Schneider, Lon S; Sperling, Reisa; Teichmann, Marc; Carrillo, Maria C; Cummings, Jeffrey; Jack, Cliff R

    2016-03-01

    During the past decade, a conceptual shift occurred in the field of Alzheimer's disease (AD) considering the disease as a continuum. Thanks to evolving biomarker research and substantial discoveries, it is now possible to identify the disease even at the preclinical stage before the occurrence of the first clinical symptoms. This preclinical stage of AD has become a major research focus as the field postulates that early intervention may offer the best chance of therapeutic success. To date, very little evidence is established on this "silent" stage of the disease. A clarification is needed about the definitions and lexicon, the limits, the natural history, the markers of progression, and the ethical consequence of detecting the disease at this asymptomatic stage. This article is aimed at addressing all the different issues by providing for each of them an updated review of the literature and evidence, with practical recommendations. Copyright © 2016 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Natural history of idiopathic normal-pressure hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Toma, Ahmed K; Stapleton, Simon; Papadopoulos, Marios C; Kitchen, Neil D; Watkins, Laurence D

    2011-10-01

    Natural history of idiopathic normal-pressure hydrocephalus (INPH) is not clear. We performed a literature search for studies that looked into the outcome of unshunted INPH patients trying to answer the following questions: Do all INPH patients deteriorate without shunt? If yes, at what rate? Do some NPH patients improve without shunt? If yes, to what extent? Six studies objectively described the outcome of 102 INPH patients. Result shows that without surgery, most INPH patients had measurable deterioration as early as 3 months following initial assessment. A small number of patients might improve without shunt, however the extent of improvement is not clear. The homogeneity of the findings of the cohort studies provided high evidence supporting the rule of shunt surgery in INPH patients.

  18. Natural History of Oregon Coast Mammals

    Chris Maser; Bruce R. Mate; Jerry F. Franklin; C.T. Dyrness

    1981-01-01

    The book presents detailed information on the biology, habitats, and life histories of the 96 species of mammals of the Oregon coast. Soils, geology, and vegetation are described and related to wildlife habitats for the 65 terrestrial and 31 marine species. The book is not simply an identification guide to the Oregon coast mammals but is a dynamic portrayal of their...

  19. Exploring life history characteristics of naturalized versus stocked chinook

    Rogers, Mark W.; Kerns, Janice A; Bunnell, David B.; Claramunt, Randall M.; Collingsworth, Paris D.

    2011-01-01

    Naturalization of stocked populations can result in divergence of life-history traits from domestic stocks. Lake Michigan supports popular Chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Salmon fisheries that have been sustained by stocking since the late 1960s. Natural recruitment of Chinook Salmon in Lake Michigan has increased in the last few decades and currently contributes over 50% of Chinook Salmon recruits. Samples collected as part of a lakewide mass-marking of Lake Michigan Chinook Salmon, starting with the 2006 year class, indicated hatchery fish average 30-mm longer and 130 grams heavier than naturalized fish at age-1. We hypothesized that selective forces differ for naturalized and hatchery populations resulting in divergent life-history characteristics with implications for Chinook Salmon population production and the Lake Michigan fishery. Specific life-history metrics of interest include: age- and size- at maturity, spawning run timing, fecundity, and sex ratio. Objectives: We evaluated life history characteristics between naturally recruited and stocked Chinook Salmon in Lake Michigan to help discern potential changes resulting from naturalization and implications for fisheries. A. Conduct an analysis of historical data to determine if life-history parameters changed through time as the Chinook Salmon population became increasingly naturalized. B. Conduct a two-year field study of naturalized and hatchery stocked Chinook Salmon spawning populations to quantify differences in life-history metrics of adults. C. Determine if reproductive potential differs between naturalized and hatchery stocked Chinook salmon by measuring egg thiamine levels.

  20. Early fire history near Seguin Falls, Ontario

    Daniel C. Dey; Richard P. Guyette

    1996-01-01

    This report is one of a series of site-specfic fire histories being developed for red oak (Quercus rubra L.)-pine ecosystems in central Ontario. Collectively, these studies documents the role of fire in upland oak forests. this information also provides an ecological basis for developing silviculture prescriptions that use prescribed burning to...

  1. Early fire history near Papineau lake, Ontario

    Daniel C. Dey; Richard P. Guyette

    1996-01-01

    Research that defines the role of fire in upland red oak-pine ecosystems in central Ontario is being conducted by the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Silviculture program. Site-specific fire histories are being developed that document fire frequency, fire behavior, fire effects on forest regeneration and grwoth, and the influnce of human activites on fire disturbances. This...

  2. Los Angeles-Long Beach Harbor Areas Prehistory and Early History, Los Angeles County, California,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-04-01

    H - R136 656 LOS ANGELES-LONG BEACH HARBOR ARE AS PREHISTORY AND I/i EARLY HISTORY LO S ANGELES COUNTY CALIFORNIA(U) ARMY ENGINEER DISTRICT LOS...world. The The Early Systems Period (50,000? to 7,000 creation of this megalopolis, unfortunately, years ago) had severe impacts on the natural...called amino acid dating. Using this of early occupation. There is data which system , archeologists determined that human suggests that some of the

  3. [Contribution to the history of pharmacology (the early Roman empire)].

    PubMed

    Tesařová, Drahomíra

    2014-01-01

    This article is a contribution to the history of pharmacology in the early Roman empire. It contains texts mainly written in Latin: the works of Aulus Cornelius Celsus, Scribonius Largus and Plinius Maior (Pliny the Elder). It describes their structure and contributions to the history of medicine and gives examples of some prescriptions and drugs in the original language and in Czech.

  4. Dinetah: An Early History of the Navajo People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundberg, Lawrence D.

    Originally written for Navajo elementary school students, this book chronicles the history of the Navajo people from prehistory to 1868. The book presents a sympathetic history of a people who depended on their tenacity and creative adaptability to survive troubled times. Chapters examine how Navajo culture changed from that of an early hunting…

  5. Francis Bacon: constructing natural histories of the invisible.

    PubMed

    Rusu, Doina-Cristina

    2012-01-01

    The natural histories contained in Francis Bacon's Historia naturalis et experimentalis seem to differ from the model presented in De augmentis scientiarum and the Descriptio globi intellectualis in that they are focused on the defining properties of matter, its primary schematisms and the spirits. In this respect, they are highly speculative. In this paper I aim to describe the Historia naturalis et experimentalis as a text about matter theory, the histories of which are ascending from what is most evident to the senses to what is least accessible to them. Moreover, the Latin natural histories are parts of a methodological procedure in which the provisional rules and axioms obtained in one history can be used as theoretical assumptions for another history, thereby permitting one to delve ever more profoundly into the structure of nature.

  6. The Natural History of Biocatalytic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Neetika; Mitchell, John B. O.; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Phylogenomic analysis of the occurrence and abundance of protein domains in proteomes has recently showed that the α/β architecture is probably the oldest fold design. This holds important implications for the origins of biochemistry. Here we explore structure-function relationships addressing the use of chemical mechanisms by ancestral enzymes. We test the hypothesis that the oldest folds used the most mechanisms. We start by tracing biocatalytic mechanisms operating in metabolic enzymes along a phylogenetic timeline of the first appearance of homologous superfamilies of protein domain structures from CATH. A total of 335 enzyme reactions were retrieved from MACiE and were mapped over fold age. We define a mechanistic step type as one of the 51 mechanistic annotations given in MACiE, and each step of each of the 335 mechanisms was described using one or more of these annotations. We find that the first two folds, the P-loop containing nucleotide triphosphate hydrolase and the NAD(P)-binding Rossmann-like homologous superfamilies, were α/β architectures responsible for introducing 35% (18/51) of the known mechanistic step types. We find that these two oldest structures in the phylogenomic analysis of protein domains introduced many mechanistic step types that were later combinatorially spread in catalytic history. The most common mechanistic step types included fundamental building blocks of enzyme chemistry: “Proton transfer,” “Bimolecular nucleophilic addition,” “Bimolecular nucleophilic substitution,” and “Unimolecular elimination by the conjugate base.” They were associated with the most ancestral fold structure typical of P-loop containing nucleotide triphosphate hydrolases. Over half of the mechanistic step types were introduced in the evolutionary timeline before the appearance of structures specific to diversified organisms, during a period of architectural diversification. The other half unfolded gradually after organismal

  7. The natural history of biocatalytic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Nath, Neetika; Mitchell, John B O; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2014-05-01

    Phylogenomic analysis of the occurrence and abundance of protein domains in proteomes has recently showed that the α/β architecture is probably the oldest fold design. This holds important implications for the origins of biochemistry. Here we explore structure-function relationships addressing the use of chemical mechanisms by ancestral enzymes. We test the hypothesis that the oldest folds used the most mechanisms. We start by tracing biocatalytic mechanisms operating in metabolic enzymes along a phylogenetic timeline of the first appearance of homologous superfamilies of protein domain structures from CATH. A total of 335 enzyme reactions were retrieved from MACiE and were mapped over fold age. We define a mechanistic step type as one of the 51 mechanistic annotations given in MACiE, and each step of each of the 335 mechanisms was described using one or more of these annotations. We find that the first two folds, the P-loop containing nucleotide triphosphate hydrolase and the NAD(P)-binding Rossmann-like homologous superfamilies, were α/β architectures responsible for introducing 35% (18/51) of the known mechanistic step types. We find that these two oldest structures in the phylogenomic analysis of protein domains introduced many mechanistic step types that were later combinatorially spread in catalytic history. The most common mechanistic step types included fundamental building blocks of enzyme chemistry: "Proton transfer," "Bimolecular nucleophilic addition," "Bimolecular nucleophilic substitution," and "Unimolecular elimination by the conjugate base." They were associated with the most ancestral fold structure typical of P-loop containing nucleotide triphosphate hydrolases. Over half of the mechanistic step types were introduced in the evolutionary timeline before the appearance of structures specific to diversified organisms, during a period of architectural diversification. The other half unfolded gradually after organismal diversification and during a

  8. Natural history of echocardiographic abnormalities in mucopolysaccharidosis III.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Carolyn M; Truxal, Kristen V; McBride, Kim L; Kovalchin, John P; Flanigan, Kevin M

    2018-06-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type III, Sanfilippo Syndrome, is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder. MPS I and II patients often develop cardiac involvement leading to early mortality, however there are limited data in MPS III. The objective of this study is to describe cardiac abnormalities in a large group of MPS III patients followed in a longitudinal natural history study designed to determine outcome measures for gene transfer trials. A single center study of MPS III patients who were enrolled in the Nationwide Children's Hospital natural history study in 2014. Two cardiologists reviewed all patient echocardiograms for anatomic, valvular, and functional abnormalities. Valve abnormalities were defined as abnormal morphology, trivial mitral regurgitation (MR) with abnormal morphology or at least mild MR, and any aortic regurgitation (AR). Abnormal left ventricular (LV) function was defined as ejection fraction < 50%. Group comparisons were assessed using two-sample t-tests or Wilcoxon rank sum tests for continuous variables and chi-square or Fisher's exact tests for categorical variables. Twenty-five patients, 15 Type A and 10 Type B MPS III, underwent 45 echocardiograms. Fifteen patients (60%) demonstrated an abnormal echocardiographic finding with age at first abnormal echocardiogram within the study being 6.8 ± 2.8 years. Left-sided valve abnormalities were common over time: 7 mitral valve thickening, 2 mitral valve prolapse, 16 MR (8 mild, 8 trivial), 3 aortic valve thickening, and 9 AR (7 mild, 2 trivial). Two patients had asymmetric LV septal hypertrophy. No valvular stenosis or ventricular function abnormalities were noted. Incidental findings included: mild aortic root dilation (2), bicommissural aortic valve (1), and mild tricuspid regurgitation (3). Individuals with Sanfilippo A and B demonstrate a natural history of cardiac involvement with valvular abnormalities most common. In short-term follow up, patients demonstrated only

  9. Phenomenology of tics and natural history of tic disorders.

    PubMed

    Leckman, James F

    2003-12-01

    Tic symptoms, the hallmark of Tourette's syndrome (TS), may simply be fragments of innate behavior. As such, the sensory urges that precede tics may illuminate some of the normal internal cues that are intimately involved in the assembly of behavioral sequences. The occurrence of tics in time appears to have fractal characteristics that may help to explain the waxing and waning course of tic disorders. Longitudinal studies are currently underway that should permit a close examination of the natural fluctuations in tic severity using valid and reliable clinician-rated scales of tic severity. The natural history of tics typically shows a marked decline during the course of adolescence. However, TS can also be associated with social, emotional, and academic difficulties in early adulthood. Comorbid attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder are likely to influence the long-term adaptive outcomes of individuals with TS. Future progress may also be expected as endophenotypes, and possibly genetic markers, are identified that are associated with specific comorbid conditions and etiologically distinct forms of TS.

  10. Astrobiology in Brazil: early history and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Fabio; Galante, Douglas; Paulino-Lima, Ivan G.; Duarte, Rubens T. D.; Friaça, Amancio C. S.; Lage, Claudia; Janot-Pacheco, Eduardo; Teixeira, Ramachrisna; Horvath, Jorge E.

    2012-10-01

    This review reports the Brazilian history in astrobiology, as well as the first delineation of a vision of the future development of the field in the country, exploring its abundant biodiversity, highly capable human resources and state-of-the-art facilities, reflecting the last few years of stable governmental investments in science, technology and education, all conditions providing good perspectives on continued and steadily growing funding for astrobiology-related research. Brazil is growing steadily and fast in terms of its worldwide economic power, an effect being reflected in different areas of the Brazilian society, including industry, technology, education, social care and scientific production. In the field of astrobiology, the country has had some important landmarks, more intensely after the First Brazilian Workshop on Astrobiology in 2006. The history of astrobiology in Brazil, however, is not so recent and had its first occurrence in 1958. Since then, researchers carried out many individual initiatives across the country in astrobiology-related fields, resulting in an ever growing and expressive scientific production. The number of publications, including articles and theses, has particularly increased in the last decade, but still counting with the effort of researchers working individually. That scenario started to change in 2009, when a formal group of Brazilian researchers working with astrobiology was organized, aiming at congregating the scientific community interested in the subject and to promote the necessary interactions to achieve a multidisciplinary work, receiving facilities and funding from the University de Sao Paulo and other funding agencies.

  11. Early Childhood Education: History, Theory, and Practice. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Harry

    2010-01-01

    Harry Morgan lays the foundations of what early childhood education is by integrating the history of the field with the philosophy and theories behind this discipline. From birth to age eight, when children become integrated into society through their education at school and at home, "Early Childhood Education" examines the education of this age…

  12. The Littlest Historians: Early Years Programming in History Museums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leftwich, Mariruth; Haywood, Clare

    2016-01-01

    Working with children under five years old and the adults that accompany them is a rapidly growing area within the museum and wider cultural sector, with important emphasis being placed on early learning in both the United Kingdom and United States. For history museums in particular, early learning offers a unique set of questions and challenges,…

  13. A natural history of botanical therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Barbara; Ribnicky, David M.; Poulev, Alexander; Logendra, Sithes; Cefalu, William T.; Raskin, Ilya

    2010-01-01

    Plants have been used as a source of medicine throughout history and continue to serve as the basis for many pharmaceuticals used today. Although the modern pharmaceutical industry was born from botanical medicine, synthetic approaches to drug discovery have become standard. However, this modern approach has led to a decline in new drug development in recent years and a growing market for botanical therapeutics that are currently available as dietary supplements, drugs, or botanical drugs. Most botanical therapeutics are derived from medicinal plants that have been cultivated for increased yields of bioactive components. The phytochemical composition of many plants has changed over time, with domestication of agricultural crops resulting in the enhanced content of some bioactive compounds and diminished content of others. Plants continue to serve as a valuable source of therapeutic compounds because of their vast biosynthetic capacity. A primary advantage of botanicals is their complex composition consisting of collections of related compounds having multiple activities that interact for a greater total activity. PMID:18555851

  14. The Natural History of Nonobstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hebl, Virginia B; Miranda, William R; Ong, Kevin C; Hodge, David O; Bos, J Martijn; Gentile, Federico; Klarich, Kyle W; Nishimura, Rick A; Ackerman, Michael J; Gersh, Bernard J; Ommen, Steve R; Geske, Jeffrey B

    2016-03-01

    To describe the survival of a large nonobstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (NO-HCM) cohort and to identify risk factors for increased mortality in this population. Patients were identified from the Mayo Clinic HCM database from January 1, 1975, through November 30, 2006, for this retrospective observational study. Patients with resting or provocable left ventricular outflow tract gradients were excluded. Echocardiographic, clinical, and genetic data were compared between subgroups, and survival data were compared with expected population rates. A total of 706 patients with NO-HCM were identified. During median follow-up of 5 years (mean, 7 years), there were 208 deaths. Overall survival was no different than expected compared with age- and sex-matched white US population mortality rates (P=.77). Independent predictors of death were age at diagnosis, "burned out" HCM, and history of transient ischemic attack or stroke; use of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) was inversely related to death. After exclusion of patients with an ICD, there was no difference in survival compared with age- and sex- matched individuals (P=.39); age, previous transient ischemic attack/stroke, and burned out HCM were predictors of death. In this cohort, patients with NO-HCM had similar survival rates as age- and sex-matched white US population mortality rates. Although use of an ICD was inversely related to death, no differences in overall survival were seen after those patients were excluded. Burned out HCM was independently associated with an increased risk of death, identifying a subset of patients who may benefit from more aggressive therapies. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The natural history of Halley's comet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, W. I.

    1981-07-01

    The 1986 apparition of Halley's comet will be the subject of numerous space probes, planned to determine the chemical nature and physical structure of comet nuclei, atmospheres, and ionospheres, as well as comet tails. The problems of cometary origin remain inconclusive, with theories ranging from a purely interstellar origin to their being ejecta from the Galilean satellites of Jupiter. Comets can be grouped into one of two classes, depending on their periodicity, and statistical mechanics of the entire Jovian family of comets can be examined under the equilibrium hypothesis. Comet anatomy estimations have been determined, and there is speculation that comet chemistry may have been a factor in the origin of life on earth. Halley's comet was first noted using Newton's dynamical methods, and Brady (1972) attempted to use the comet as a gravitational probe in search of a trans-Plutonian planet. Halley's orbit is calculated by combination of ancient observations and modern scientific methods.

  16. [Membranous nephropathy: Pathophysiology and natural history].

    PubMed

    Seitz-Polski, Barbara; Lambeau, Gérard; Esnault, Vincent

    2017-04-01

    Membranous nephropathy is a major cause of nephrotic syndrome in adults, with various etiologies and outcomes. One third of patients enter spontaneous remission with blockade of the renin-angiotensin system, one third develop a persistent nephrotic syndrome, while another third of patients develop end-stage kidney disease and 40% of them relapse after kidney transplantation. Treatment of membranous nephropathy remains controversial. Immunosuppressive therapy is only recommended in case of renal function deterioration or persistent nephrotic syndrome after 6months of renin-angiotensin system blockade. Therefore, delayed immunosuppressive treatments may lead to significant and potentially irreversible complications. For long, no biological markers could predict clinical outcome and guide therapy. The discovery of autoantibodies to the phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R1) in 2009, and to the thrombospondin type 1 domain containing 7A (THSD7A) in 2014 in respectively 70 and 5% of patients with membranous nephropathy were major breakthroughs. The passive infusion of human anti-THSD7A antibodies in mouse induces proteinuria and membranous nephropathy. The identification of these antigens has allowed developing diagnostic and prognostic tests. High anti-PLA2R1 titers at time of diagnosis predict a poor renal outcome. Anti-PLA2R1 antibodies can bind at least three different domains of PLA2R1. Epitope spreading with binding of two or three of these antigenic domains is associated with active membranous nephropathy and poor renal survival. These new tools could help us to monitor disease severity and to predict renal prognosis for a better selection of patients that should benefit of early immunosuppressive therapy. Copyright © 2017 Société francophone de néphrologie, dialyse et transplantation. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Natural history of very severe aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Rosenhek, Raphael; Zilberszac, Robert; Schemper, Michael; Czerny, Martin; Mundigler, Gerald; Graf, Senta; Bergler-Klein, Jutta; Grimm, Michael; Gabriel, Harald; Maurer, Gerald

    2010-01-05

    We sought to assess the outcome of asymptomatic patients with very severe aortic stenosis. We prospectively followed 116 consecutive asymptomatic patients (57 women; age, 67 + or - 16 years) with very severe isolated aortic stenosis defined by a peak aortic jet velocity (AV-Vel) > or = 5.0 m/s (average AV-Vel, 5.37 + or - 0.35 m/s; valve area, 0.63 + or - 0.12 cm(2)). During a median follow-up of 41 months (interquartile range, 26 to 63 months), 96 events occurred (indication for aortic valve replacement, 90; cardiac deaths, 6). Event-free survival was 64%, 36%, 25%, 12%, and 3% at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 years, respectively. AV-Vel but not aortic valve area was shown to independently affect event-free survival. Patients with an AV-Vel > or = 5.5 m/s had an event-free survival of 44%, 25%, 11%, and 4% at 1, 2, 3, and 4 years, respectively, compared with 76%, 43%, 33%, and 17% for patients with an AV-Vel between 5.0 and 5.5 m/s (P<0.0001). Six cardiac deaths occurred in previously asymptomatic patients (sudden death, 1; congestive heart failure, 4; myocardial infarction, 1). Patients with an initial AV-Vel > or = 5.5 m/s had a higher likelihood (52%) of severe symptom onset (New York Heart Association or Canadian Cardiovascular Society class >II) than those with an AV-Vel between 5.0 and 5.5 m/s (27%; P=0.03). Despite being asymptomatic, patients with very severe aortic stenosis have a poor prognosis with a high event rate and a risk of rapid functional deterioration. Early elective valve replacement surgery should therefore be considered in these patients.

  18. Rotation histories of the natural satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peale, S. J.

    1977-01-01

    Recent advances in the theory of rotation are combined with traditional approaches to study the rotational evolution of the 33 known natural satellites. A calculation similar to that reported by Burns and Safronov (1973) is applied to each satellite to obtain the characteristic time of decay of any wobble motion to smooth rotation about the principal axis of maximum moment of inertia. Stability criteria and capture probabilities are calculated for the 3/2 spin resonance. Results show that only the regular satellites and Iapetus, Hyperion, Triton, and the moon are tidally evolved. Of these, 13 have confirmed synchronous rotation periods; capture probabilities into the 3/2 resonance indicate that none of the remaining 10 should be captured in nonsynchronous, commensurate spin states. For the most part, the irregular satellites retain their original spins except for a relaxation to principal axis rotation. Tidal evolution of the obliquities of the satellites is evaluated in the framework of the generalization of Cassini's laws for the moon. Nearly resonant, forced librations in longitude of 4.8 and 0.5 deg are calculated on the basis of the observed shapes of Phobos and Deimos, respectively.

  19. The Natural History of IBD: Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Weimers, Petra; Munkholm, Pia

    2018-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), which include Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), are chronic, relapsing diseases with unknown etiologies. The purpose of this review is to present the natural disease course evidenced in the latest epidemiology data. The prevalence of IBD is rapidly increasing, affecting five million patients worldwide with the highest incidence observed in Northern Europe and Northern America. It has been shown that both CD and UC patients are at an increased risk for developing cancer of the gastrointestinal tract compared to the general population. Though the disease course of IBD is unpredictable, the rate of surgical treatment has declined potentially as a consequence of the introduction of immunomodulators and new biologic treatment options. Treatments with biological agents and/or immunosuppressive drugs as well as disease monitoring with eHealth devices seem to have a positive impact on the disease course. However, long-term follow-up studies are still lacking and therefore no reliable conclusions can be drawn as of yet. Medical compliance is paramount in the treatment of IBD, and continuous research focusing on approaches that increase compliance is also necessary.

  20. Early History of the Moon: Zircon Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grange, M.L.; Nemchin, A.A.; Pidgeon, R.T.; Meyer, C.

    2009-01-01

    The Moon is believed to have formed from debris produced by a giant impact of a Mars sized body with the Earth (at around 4.51 Ga), forming a primitive body with a thick global layer of melt referred to as the Lunar Magma Ocean (LMO). The crystallization of LMO created internal stratification of the Moon forming main geochemical reservoirs. The surface features on the Moon were shaped by the subsequent collision with several large impactors during a short period of time (3.9-4.0 Ga). This process known as the Late Heavy Bombardment is supported by models of planetary motion, suggesting that rapid migration of giant planets could have triggered a massive delivery of planetesimals from the asteroid belt into the inner Solar System at about 3.9 Ga. Although, general chronology of LMO and LHB is well established using both long lived (U-Pb, Rb-Sr, Sm-147-Nd-143 and Ar-Ar) and extinct (Hf-182-W-182 and 146Sm-142Nd) isotope systems, some of these systems such as Ar-Ar are known to reset easily during secondary thermal overprints. As a result important details in the timing of LMO and LHB remain unresolved. In addition, the relative weakness of these systems under high T conditions can potentially bias the chronological information towards later events in the history of the Moon.

  1. Early history of the concept of autogynephilia.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Ray

    2005-08-01

    Since the beginning of the last century, clinical observers have described the propensity of certain males to be erotically aroused by the thought or image of themselves as women. Because there was no specific term to denote this phenomenon, clinicians' references to it were generally oblique or periphrastic. The closest available word was transvestism. The definition of transvestism accepted by the end of the twentieth century, however, did not just fail to capture the wide range of erotically arousing cross-gender behaviors and fantasies in which women's garments per seplay a small role or none at all; it actually directed attention away from them. The absence of an adequate terminology became acute in the writer's research on the taxonomy of gender identity disorders in biological males. This had suggested that heterosexual, asexual, and bisexual transsexuals are more similar to each other-and to transvestites-than any of them is to the homosexual type, and that the common feature in transvestites and the three types of non-homosexual transsexuals is a history of erotic arousal in association with the thought or image of themselves as women. At the same time, the writer was becoming aware of male patients who are sexually aroused only by the idea of having a woman's body and not at all by the idea of wearing women's clothes. To fill this terminological and conceptual gap, the writer introduced the term autogynephilia(love of oneself as a woman).

  2. Ocular vascular occlusive disorders: Natural history of visual outcome☆

    PubMed Central

    Hayreh, Sohan Singh

    2014-01-01

    Ocular vascular occlusive disorders collectively constitute the most common cause of visual disability. Before a disease can be managed, it is essential to understand its natural history, so as to be able to assess the likely effectiveness of any intervention. I investigated natural history of visual outcome in prospective studies of 386 eyes with non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NA-AION), 16 eyes with non-arteritic posterior ischemic optic neuropathy, 697 eyes with central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO), 67 eyes with hemi-CRVO (HCRVO), 216 eyes with branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO), 260 eyes with central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO), 151 eyes with branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO) and 61 eyes with cilioretinal artery occlusion (CLRAO). My studies have shown that every one of these disorders consists of multiple distinct clinical sub-categories with different visual findings. When an ocular vascular occlusive disorder is caused by giant cell arteritis, which is an ophthalmic emergency, it would be unethical to do a natural history study of visual outcome in them, because in this case early diagnosis and immediate, intensive high-dose steroid therapy is essential to prevent any further visual loss, not only in the involved eye but also in the fellow, normal eye. In NA-AION in eyes seen ≤2 weeks after the onset, visual acuity (VA) improved in 41% of those with VA 20/70 or worse, and visual field (VF) improved in 26% of those with moderate to severe VF defect. In non-ischemic CRVO eyes with VA 20/70 or worse, VA improved in 47% and in ischemic CRVO in 23%; moderate to severe VF defect improved in 79% in non-ischemic CRVO and in 27% in ischemic CRVO. In HCRVO, overall findings demonstrated that initial VA and VF defect and the final visual outcome were different in non-ischemic from ischemic HCRVO – much better in the former than the latter. In major BRVO, in eyes with initial VA of 20/70 or worse, VA improved in 69%, and moderate to

  3. A natural history of mathematics: George Peacock and the making of English algebra.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Kevin

    2013-06-01

    In a series of papers read to the Cambridge Philosophical Society through the 1820s, the Cambridge mathematician George Peacock laid the foundation for a natural history of arithmetic that would tell a story of human progress from counting to modern arithmetic. The trajectory of that history, Peacock argued, established algebraic analysis as a form of universal reasoning that used empirically warranted operations of mind to think with symbols on paper. The science of counting would suggest arithmetic, arithmetic would suggest arithmetical algebra, and, finally, arithmetical algebra would suggest symbolic algebra. This philosophy of suggestion provided the foundation for Peacock's "principle of equivalent forms," which justified the practice of nineteenth-century English symbolic algebra. Peacock's philosophy of suggestion owed a considerable debt to the early Cambridge Philosophical Society culture of natural history. The aim of this essay is to show how that culture of natural history was constitutively significant to the practice of nineteenth-century English algebra.

  4. Episodes from the Early History of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaboe, Asger

    The author does not attempt to give a general survey of early astronomy; rather, he chooses to present a few "episodes" and treats them in detail. However, first he provides the necessary astronomical background in his descriptive account of what you can see when you look at the sky with the naked eye, unblinkered by received knowledge, but with curiosity and wit. Chapter 1 deals with the arithmetical astronomy of ancient Mesopotamia where astronomy first was made an exact science. Next are treated Greek geometrical models for planetary motion, culminating in Ptolemy's equant models in his Almagest. Ptolemy does not assign them absolute size in this work, but, as is shown here, if we scale the models properly, they will yield good values, not only of the directions to the planets, but of the distances to them, as well. Thus one can immediately find the dimensions of the Copernican System from parameters in the Almagest - we have evidence that Copernicus did just that. Further, Islamic astronomers' modifications of Ptolemy's models by devices using only uniform circular motion are discussed, as are Copernicus's adoption of some of them. finally, it is made precise which bothersome problem was resolved by the heliocentric hypothesis, as it was by the Tychonic arrangement. Next, the Ptolemaic System, the first cosmological scheme to incorporate quantitative models, is described as Ptolemy himself did it in a recenlty recovered passage from his Planetary Hypotheses. Here he does assign absolute size to his models in order to fit them into the snugly nested spherical shells that made up his universe. This much maligned system was, in fact, a harmonious construct that remained the basis for how educated people thought of their world for a millennium and a half. Finally, after a brief review of the geometry of the ellipse, the author gives an elementary derivation of Kepler's equation, and shows how Kepler solved it, and further proves that a planet moves very nearly

  5. The early history of the placebo.

    PubMed

    Jütte, Robert

    2013-04-01

    In the late 18th century the term "placebo" became part of medical jargon. In contrast to the prevailing opinion that it was the Scottish physician and pharmacologist William Cullen (1710-1790) who introduced this expression into medical language in 1772, the credit must be given to another English physician, Alexander Sutherland (born before 1730 - died after 1773). The main reason for administering placebos in late 18th-century medical practice was to satisfy the patient's demand and his expectations. Another reason was obstinancy of the patient: the motivation behind such prescriptions may be summarized as prescribing inert drugs for the satisfaction of the patient's mind, and not with the view of producing any direct remedial effect. In most cases these 18th century physicians did not administer "pure" placebos but resorted to any kind of medicine which they thought simple, feeble, or altogether powerless, non-perturbing medicines. Today we make the distinction between pure placebos (substances with no pharmacological effect, e.g. sugar pills) and impure placebos (substances with pharmacological effect but not on the condition being treated). In the 18th century those physicians who prescribed placebo usually thought of drugs which were considered not very effective in the particular case, e.g. a mild ointment. At the same time, only very few brilliant minds came up with the ingenious idea of using inert substances as placebo. An alternative to milk sugar used as placebo in homeopathy was breadpills. Recent research suggests that expectancy is an integral part of the placebo effect. As early as 1775 the English bishop John Douglas (1721-1807) anticipated the findings of modern research on the placebo effect. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Asperger's syndrome and autism: comparison of early history and outcome.

    PubMed

    Szatmari, P; Bartolucci, G; Bremner, R

    1989-12-01

    The authors compared children with Asperger syndrome (AS) with high-functioning autistic children and psychiatric outpatient controls on measures of early history and outcome. In terms of their early history, the autistic probands showed more social impairment, a higher frequency of echolalia and pronoun reversal, and a more restricted range of activities than the AS group. Cluster analysis suggested refinements to the diagnostic criteria, which resulted in larger differences between the groups on these early history measures. In terms of their outcome, the autistic probands spent more time in special education classes but developed fewer accessory psychiatric symptoms than the AS children. It was clear, however, that there were no substantive, qualitative differences between the AS and autistic groups, indicating that AS should be considered a mild form of high-functioning autism. The inclusion of AS among the autistic spectrum of disorders has implications both for aetiological studies and for prevalence estimates of the pervasive developmental disorders.

  7. The Early History of Psychoanalysis in San Francisco.

    PubMed

    Benveniste, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    The early history of psychoanalysis in San Francisco begins in 1918 and ends in 1953. During those 35 years the San Francisco Bay Area witnessed the awakening of interest in psychoanalysis, the arrival of the European émigré analysts and the emergence of individuals and groups engaging in extraordinarily creative work and doing so in an ecumenical spirit and with a social commitment. This article provides an overview of this illustrious history and the people who participated in it.

  8. Aphasia after stroke: natural history and associated deficits.

    PubMed

    Wade, D T; Hewer, R L; David, R M; Enderby, P M

    1986-01-01

    Data relating to 976 patients registered as suffering an acute stroke has been analysed to determine the natural history of speech disturbance: these patients came from a community survey of 215,000 people over a 28 month period. Of the 545 patients assessed within 7 days of stroke, 24% were aphasic and 28% unassessable. At 3 weeks, when over 90% of survivors were tested, 20% of those tested had aphasia. At 6 months only 12% of survivors had significant aphasia, but 44% of patients and 57% of carers thought speech was abnormal. Of those aphasic within 7 days, 40% remained so at 6 months; 60% of those aphasic at 3 weeks remained so. There was a high correlation between early and late aphasia scores. Aphasia was associated with more severe disability (degree of limb weakness, loss of function, loss of IQ), and with a less good recovery of social activities, but did not cause any measurable increase in stress upon carers. In a Health District of 250,000 people, about 60 patients each year may be referred for speech therapy after an acute stroke.

  9. The history of natural progesterone, the never-ending story.

    PubMed

    Piette, P

    2018-05-28

    The term progesterone should only be used for the natural hormone produced by the ovaries or included in a registered drug. The modern history of progesterone begins with the first book-length description of the female reproductive system including the corpus luteum and later with the Nobel Prize winner, Adolf Butenandt who took a crucial step when he succeeded in converting pregnanediol into a chemically pure form of progesterone, the corpus luteum hormone. The deficient production of progesterone was shown first to be the cause of the luteal-phase deficiency responsible for infertility and early pregnancy loss due to inadequate secretory transformation of the endometrium. Later, progesterone was confirmed to be the best and safest method of providing luteal-phase support in assisted reproductive technology. Progesterone provides adequate endometrial protection and is suggested to be the optimal progestagen in menopausal hormone therapy in terms of cardiovascular effects, venous thromboembolism, probably stroke and even breast cancer risk. Neuroprotective effects of progesterone have also been demonstrated in several of experimental models including cerebral ischemic stroke and Alzheimer's disease. Vaginal progesterone was shown to decrease the risk of preterm birth in women with a mid-trimester sonographic short cervix and to improve perinatal outcomes in singleton and twin gestations.

  10. Ray Owen and the history of naturally acquired chimerism

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Aryn

    2015-01-01

    abstract This article interweaves a history of Ray Owen's early work with a broader account of the conceptual landscape of immunology in the mid 1950's. In particular, Owen's openness to the very possibility of chimeric phenomena is recognized. PMID:27093621

  11. The Royal Society, natural history and the peoples of the 'New World(s)', 1660-1800.

    PubMed

    Gascoigne, John

    2009-12-01

    This paper focuses on the response of the Royal Society to the increasing contact with parts of the globe beyond Europe. Such contact was in accord with the programme of Baconian natural history that the early Royal Society espoused, but it also raised basic questions about the extent and nature of the pursuit of natural history. In particular, the paper is concerned with the attention paid to one particular branch of natural history, the study of other peoples and their customs. Such scrutiny of other peoples in distant lands raised basic questions about what methods natural history should employ and the extent to which it could serve as a foundation for more general and theoretical claims. By taking a wide sweep from the beginnings of the Royal Society until the end of the eighteenth century it is hoped light will be shed on the changing understanding of natural history over this period.

  12. Book review: A natural history of the Sonoran Desert

    Brooks, Matthew L.

    2000-01-01

    Review info: A Natural History of the Sonoran Desert. Edited by S. J. Phillips and P. W. Comus. 2000. Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum Press, Tucson AZ, and University of California Press, Berkeley CA. 628 pp. Cloth ISBN 0-520-22029-3 Paper ISBN 0-520-21980-5.

  13. New England wildlife: habitat, natural history, and distribution

    Richard M. DeGraaf; Deborah D. Rudis

    1986-01-01

    Describes natural history profiles of New England wildlife species and their associations with forested and nonforested habitats. Provides a database that will enable forest managers or wildlife biologists to describe the species or groups to be found in a given habitat.

  14. A Game Demonstrating Aspects of Bumblebee Natural History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westgarth-Smith, Angus R.

    2004-01-01

    The Bumblebee Game is an exciting outdoor game, which demonstrates aspects of bumblebee natural history including food chains, food webs and competition for food, predation by crab spiders, parasitism by "Conopidae" ("Diptera") and brood parasitism by cuckoo bees. It has been played successfully with groups of 10-25 people. Although most suitable…

  15. Modernizing Natural History: Berkeley's Museum of Vertebrate Zoology in Transition.

    PubMed

    Sunderland, Mary E

    2013-01-01

    Throughout the twentieth century calls to modernize natural history motivated a range of responses. It was unclear how research in natural history museums would participate in the significant technological and conceptual changes that were occurring in the life sciences. By the 1960s, the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology at the University of California, Berkeley, was among the few university-based natural history museums that were able to maintain their specimen collections and support active research. The MVZ therefore provides a window to the modernization of natural history. This paper concentrates on the directorial transitions that occurred at the MVZ between 1965 and 1971. During this period, the MVZ had four directors: Alden H. Miller (Director 1940-1965), an ornithologist; Aldo Starker Leopold (Acting Director 1965-1966), a conservationist and wildlife biologist; Oliver P. Pearson (Director 1966-1971), a physiologist and mammalogist; and David B. Wake (Director 1971-1998), a morphologist, developmental biologist, and herpetologist. The paper explores how a diversity of overlapping modernization strategies, including hiring new faculty, building infrastructure to study live animals, establishing new kinds of collections, and building modern laboratories combined to maintain collections at the MVZ's core. The paper examines the tensions between the different modernization strategies to inform an analysis of how and why some changes were institutionalized while others were short-lived. By exploring the modernization of collections-based research, this paper emphasizes the importance of collections in the transformation of the life sciences.

  16. 19th Century American Journals of Natural History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dexter, Ralph W.

    1976-01-01

    This article presents a brief list of journals containing information for historians and naturalists. The journals are presented in two lists from 1810-1875 and from 1876-1900. Each list is further classified into general natural history, microscopy, botany, entomology, conchology, ornithology, and geology and paleontology. (MR)

  17. The Mushroom Curriculum: Using Natural History to Teach Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommer, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Describes the development and content of a freshman seminar titled "The Psychology of Mushrooms," which teaches psychology as natural history. This approach allowed the course to proceed from concrete experience to general principals of perception, learning, social, and abnormal psychology. (Author/LS)

  18. Michigan Natural History. A Spring Activity Packet for Fourth Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson Community Coll., MI. Dahlem Environmental Education Center.

    This instructional packet is one of 14 school environmental education programs developed for use in the classroom and at the Dahlem Environmental Education Center (DEEC) of the Jackson Community College (Michigan). Provided in the packet are pre-trip activities, field trip activities, and post-trip activities which focus on the natural history of…

  19. Revolutionizing the Use of Natural History Collections in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Karen E.; Prather, L. Alan; Cook, Joseph A.; Woolley, James; Bart, Henry L., Jr.; Monfils, Anna K.; Sierwald, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Natural history collections are an irreplaceable and extensive record of life, and form the basis of our understanding of biodiversity on our planet. Broad-scale educational accessibility to these vast specimen collections, specimen images, and their associated data is currently severely hampered. With emerging technologies and massive efforts…

  20. Retrospective natural history of thymidine kinase 2 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Garone, Caterina; Taylor, Robert W; Nascimento, Andrés; Poulton, Joanna; Fratter, Carl; Domínguez-González, Cristina; Evans, Julie C; Loos, Mariana; Isohanni, Pirjo; Suomalainen, Anu; Ram, Dipak; Hughes, M Imelda; McFarland, Robert; Barca, Emanuele; Lopez Gomez, Carlos; Jayawant, Sandeep; Thomas, Neil D; Manzur, Adnan Y; Kleinsteuber, Karin; Martin, Miguel A; Kerr, Timothy; Gorman, Grainne S; Sommerville, Ewen W; Chinnery, Patrick F; Hofer, Monika; Karch, Christoph; Ralph, Jeffrey; Cámara, Yolanda; Madruga-Garrido, Marcos; Domínguez-Carral, Jana; Ortez, Carlos; Emperador, Sonia; Montoya, Julio; Chakrapani, Anupam; Kriger, Joshua F; Schoenaker, Robert; Levin, Bruce; Thompson, John L P; Long, Yuelin; Rahman, Shamima; Donati, Maria Alice; DiMauro, Salvatore; Hirano, Michio

    2018-03-30

    Thymine kinase 2 (TK2) is a mitochondrial matrix protein encoded in nuclear DNA and phosphorylates the pyrimidine nucleosides: thymidine and deoxycytidine. Autosomal recessive TK2 mutations cause a spectrum of disease from infantile onset to adult onset manifesting primarily as myopathy. To perform a retrospective natural history study of a large cohort of patients with TK2 deficiency. The study was conducted by 42 investigators across 31 academic medical centres. We identified 92 patients with genetically confirmed diagnoses of TK2 deficiency: 67 from literature review and 25 unreported cases. Based on clinical and molecular genetics findings, we recognised three phenotypes with divergent survival: (1) infantile-onset myopathy (42.4%) with severe mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion, frequent neurological involvement and rapid progression to early mortality (median post-onset survival (POS) 1.00, CI 0.58 to 2.33 years); (2) childhood-onset myopathy (40.2%) with mtDNA depletion, moderate-to-severe progression of generalised weakness and median POS at least 13 years; and (3) late-onset myopathy (17.4%) with mild limb weakness at onset and slow progression to respiratory insufficiency with median POS of 23 years. Ophthalmoparesis and facial weakness are frequent in adults. Muscle biopsies show multiple mtDNA deletions often with mtDNA depletion. In TK2 deficiency, age at onset, rate of weakness progression and POS are important variables that define three clinical subtypes. Nervous system involvement often complicates the clinical course of the infantile-onset form while extraocular muscle and facial involvement are characteristic of the late-onset form. Our observations provide essential information for planning future clinical trials in this disorder. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. A natural history study of X-linked myotubular myopathy.

    PubMed

    Amburgey, Kimberly; Tsuchiya, Etsuko; de Chastonay, Sabine; Glueck, Michael; Alverez, Rachel; Nguyen, Cam-Tu; Rutkowski, Anne; Hornyak, Joseph; Beggs, Alan H; Dowling, James J

    2017-09-26

    To define the natural history of X-linked myotubular myopathy (MTM). We performed a cross-sectional study that included an online survey (n = 35) and a prospective, 1-year longitudinal investigation using a phone survey (n = 33). We ascertained data from 50 male patients with MTM and performed longitudinal assessments on 33 affected individuals. Consistent with existing knowledge, we found that MTM is a disorder associated with extensive morbidities, including wheelchair (86.7% nonambulant) and ventilator (75% requiring >16 hours of support) dependence. However, unlike previous reports and despite the high burden of disease, mortality was lower than anticipated (approximate rate 10%/y). Seventy-six percent of patients with MTM enrolled (mean age 10 years 11 months) were alive at the end of the study. Nearly all deaths in the study were associated with respiratory failure. In addition, the disease course was more stable than expected, with few adverse events reported during the prospective survey. Few non-muscle-related morbidities were identified, although an unexpectedly high incidence of learning disability (43%) was noted. Conversely, MTM was associated with substantial burdens on patient and caregiver daily living, reflected by missed days of school and lost workdays. MTM is one of the most severe neuromuscular disorders, with affected individuals requiring extensive mechanical interventions for survival. However, among study participants, the disease course was more stable than predicted, with more individuals surviving infancy and early childhood. These data reflect the disease burden of MTM but offer hope in terms of future therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  2. A natural history study of X-linked myotubular myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Amburgey, Kimberly; Tsuchiya, Etsuko; de Chastonay, Sabine; Glueck, Michael; Alverez, Rachel; Nguyen, Cam-Tu; Rutkowski, Anne; Hornyak, Joseph; Beggs, Alan H.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To define the natural history of X-linked myotubular myopathy (MTM). Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study that included an online survey (n = 35) and a prospective, 1-year longitudinal investigation using a phone survey (n = 33). Results: We ascertained data from 50 male patients with MTM and performed longitudinal assessments on 33 affected individuals. Consistent with existing knowledge, we found that MTM is a disorder associated with extensive morbidities, including wheelchair (86.7% nonambulant) and ventilator (75% requiring >16 hours of support) dependence. However, unlike previous reports and despite the high burden of disease, mortality was lower than anticipated (approximate rate 10%/y). Seventy-six percent of patients with MTM enrolled (mean age 10 years 11 months) were alive at the end of the study. Nearly all deaths in the study were associated with respiratory failure. In addition, the disease course was more stable than expected, with few adverse events reported during the prospective survey. Few non–muscle-related morbidities were identified, although an unexpectedly high incidence of learning disability (43%) was noted. Conversely, MTM was associated with substantial burdens on patient and caregiver daily living, reflected by missed days of school and lost workdays. Conclusions: MTM is one of the most severe neuromuscular disorders, with affected individuals requiring extensive mechanical interventions for survival. However, among study participants, the disease course was more stable than predicted, with more individuals surviving infancy and early childhood. These data reflect the disease burden of MTM but offer hope in terms of future therapeutic intervention. PMID:28842446

  3. The diagnosis and natural history of false preterm labor.

    PubMed

    Chao, Tamara T; Bloom, Steven L; Mitchell, Judith S; McIntire, Donald D; Leveno, Kenneth J

    2011-12-01

    To estimate the natural history of pregnancies in women who present with preterm labor symptoms and who are sent home with a diagnosis of false labor. A prospective observational study of women with singletons and intact membranes who presented to triage between 24 0/7 and 33 6/7 weeks of gestation with preterm labor symptoms and cervical dilation less than 2 cm was conducted. Women sent home with a diagnosis of false preterm labor were analyzed against a comparable general obstetric population delivered during the same time period. The primary outcome was delivery before 37 weeks of gestation. Secondary outcomes included the interval between presentation and delivery, as well as maternal and neonatal outcomes. Of the 843 women who met inclusion criteria, 690 (82%) were sent home with a diagnosis of false preterm labor and 153 (18%) were admitted to labor and delivery. When analyzed compared with a comparable general obstetric population, women sent home had a similar rate of birth before 34 weeks of gestation (2% compared with 1%, P=.28) but a higher rate of birth between 34 and 36 weeks of gestation (5% compared with 2%, P<.001). There was no difference in neonatal mortality (0% compared with 0.3%, P=.18). Women with cervical dilation of 1 cm at discharge were more likely to deliver before 34 weeks of gestation compared with nondilated women (5% compared with 1%, P=.02); however, 89% of the 1-cm group delivered more than 21 days after presentation. Women sent home with a diagnosis of false preterm labor are not at increased risk for early preterm birth or neonatal mortality; however, they are at increased risk for late preterm birth. II.

  4. Natural History of Aging in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    KLINE, ANTONIE D.; GRADOS, MARCO; SPONSELLER, PAUL; LEVY, HOWARD P.; BLAGOWIDOW, NATALIE; SCHOEDEL, CHRISTIANNE; RAMPOLLA, JONI; CLEMENS, DOUGLAS K.; KRANTZ, IAN; KIMBALL, AMY; PICHARD, CARMEN; TUCHMAN, DAVID

    2016-01-01

    Observations about the natural history of aging in Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) are made, based on 49 patients from a multidisciplinary clinic for adolescents and adults. The mean age was 17 years. Although most patients remain small, obesity may develop. Gastroesophageal reflux persists or worsens, and there are early long-term sequelae, including Barrett esophagus in 10%; other gastrointestinal findings include risk for volvulus, rumination, and chronic constipation. Submucous cleft palate was found in 14%, most undetected before our evaluation. Chronic sinusitis was noted in 39%, often with nasal polyps. Blepharitis improves with age; cataracts and detached retina may occur. Decreased bone density is observed, with occasional fractures. One quarter have leg length discrepancy and 39% scoliosis. Most females have delayed or irregular menses but normal gynecologic exams and pap smears. Benign prostatic hypertrophy occurred in one male prior to 40 years. The phenotype is variable, but there is a distinct pattern of facial changes with aging. Premature gray hair is frequent; two patients had cutis verticis gyrata. Behavioral issues and specific psychiatric diagnoses, including self-injury, anxiety, attention-deficit disorder, autistic features, depression, and obsessive-compulsive behavior, often worsen with age. This work presents some evidence for accelerated aging in CdLS. Of 53% with mutation analysis, 55% demonstrate a detectable mutation in NIPBL or SMC1A. Although no specific genotype–phenotype correlations have been firmly established, individuals with missense mutations in NIPBL and SMC1A appear milder than those with other mutations. Based on these observations, recommendations for clinical management of adults with CdLS are made. PMID:17640042

  5. Narrative and natural history in the eighteenth century.

    PubMed

    Terrall, Mary

    2017-04-01

    In the eighteenth century, natural histories of animals incorporated narratives about animal behaviour and narratives of discovery and experimentation. Naturalists used first-person accounts to link the stories of their scientific investigations to the stories of the animal lives they were studying. Understanding nature depended on narratives that shifted back and forth in any given text between animal and human, and between individual cases and generalizations about species. This paper explores the uses of narrative through examples from the work of René-Antoine Ferchault de Réaumur and Abraham Trembley. In all cases, narrative took the genre of natural history well beyond straightforward description and classification. Prose accounts of insect actions and mechanisms worked in tandem with visual narratives embedded in the accompanying illustrations, where artists developed strategies for representing sequences of minute changes over time. By throwing into relief the narrative sections of natural histories, the examples considered here expose the role played by these tales of encounters with the insect world in the making of natural historical knowledge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Natural history collections as windows on evolutionary processes.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Michael W; Hammond, Talisin T; Wogan, Guinevere O U; Walsh, Rachel E; LaBarbera, Katie; Wommack, Elizabeth A; Martins, Felipe M; Crawford, Jeremy C; Mack, Katya L; Bloch, Luke M; Nachman, Michael W

    2016-02-01

    Natural history collections provide an immense record of biodiversity on Earth. These repositories have traditionally been used to address fundamental questions in biogeography, systematics and conservation. However, they also hold the potential for studying evolution directly. While some of the best direct observations of evolution have come from long-term field studies or from experimental studies in the laboratory, natural history collections are providing new insights into evolutionary change in natural populations. By comparing phenotypic and genotypic changes in populations through time, natural history collections provide a window into evolutionary processes. Recent studies utilizing this approach have revealed some dramatic instances of phenotypic change over short timescales in response to presumably strong selective pressures. In some instances, evolutionary change can be paired with environmental change, providing a context for potential selective forces. Moreover, in a few cases, the genetic basis of phenotypic change is well understood, allowing for insight into adaptive change at multiple levels. These kinds of studies open the door to a wide range of previously intractable questions by enabling the study of evolution through time, analogous to experimental studies in the laboratory, but amenable to a diversity of species over longer timescales in natural populations. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Natural history collections as windows on evolutionary processes

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Michael W.; Hammond, Talisin T.; Wogan, Guinevere O.U.; Walsh, Rachel E.; LaBarbera, Katie; Wommack, Elizabeth A.; Martins, Felipe M.; Crawford, Jeremy C.; Mack, Katya L.; Bloch, Luke M.; Nachman, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    Natural history collections provide an immense record of biodiversity on Earth. These repositories have traditionally been used to address fundamental questions in biogeography, systematics, and conservation. However, they also hold the potential for studying evolution directly. While some of the best direct observations of evolution have come from long-term field studies or from experimental studies in the lab, natural history collections are providing new insights into evolutionary change in natural populations. By comparing phenotypic and genotypic changes in populations through time, natural history collections provide a window into evolutionary processes. Recent studies utilizing this approach have revealed some dramatic instances of phenotypic change over short time scales in response to presumably strong selective pressures. In some instances evolutionary change can be paired with environmental change, providing a context for potential selective forces. Moreover, in a few cases, the genetic basis of phenotypic change is well understood, allowing for insight into adaptive change at multiple levels. These kinds of studies open the door to a wide range of previously intractable questions by enabling the study of evolution through time, analogous to experimental studies in the laboratory, but amenable to a diversity of species over longer timescales in natural populations. PMID:26757135

  8. Impact Constraints on Major Events in Early Mars History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, H. V.

    2004-01-01

    MOLA data have revealed a large population of "Quasi-Circular Depressions" (QCDs) with little or no visible expression in image data. These likely buried impact basins have important implications for the age of the lowland crust, how that compares with original highland crust, and when and how the crustal dichotomy may have formed. The buried lowlands are of Early Noachian age, likely slightly younger than the buried highlands but older than the exposed (visible) highland surface. A depopulation of large visible basins at diameters 800 to 1300 km suggests some global scale event early in martian history, maybe related to the formation of the lowlands and/or the development of Tharsis. A suggested early disappearance of the global magnetic field can be placed within a temporal sequence of formation of the very largest impact basins. The global field appears to have disappeared at about the time the lowlands formed. It seems likely the topographic crustal dichotomy was produced very early in martian history by processes which operated very quickly. Thus there appears to have been a northern lowland throughout nearly all of martian history, predating the last of the really large impacts (Hellas, Argyre and Isidis) and their likely very significant environmental consequences.

  9. 75 FR 45658 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Cultural and Natural History, Central Michigan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... Cultural and Natural History, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI; Correction AGENCY: National... Natural History, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI. The human remains and associated funerary... History professional staff and physical anthropologists from Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI...

  10. Inselect: Automating the Digitization of Natural History Collections

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Lawrence N.; Blagoderov, Vladimir; Heaton, Alice; Holtzhausen, Pieter; Livermore, Laurence; Price, Benjamin W.; van der Walt, Stéfan; Smith, Vincent S.

    2015-01-01

    The world’s natural history collections constitute an enormous evidence base for scientific research on the natural world. To facilitate these studies and improve access to collections, many organisations are embarking on major programmes of digitization. This requires automated approaches to mass-digitization that support rapid imaging of specimens and associated data capture, in order to process the tens of millions of specimens common to most natural history collections. In this paper we present Inselect—a modular, easy-to-use, cross-platform suite of open-source software tools that supports the semi-automated processing of specimen images generated by natural history digitization programmes. The software is made up of a Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux desktop application, together with command-line tools that are designed for unattended operation on batches of images. Blending image visualisation algorithms that automatically recognise specimens together with workflows to support post-processing tasks such as barcode reading, label transcription and metadata capture, Inselect fills a critical gap to increase the rate of specimen digitization. PMID:26599208

  11. Inselect: Automating the Digitization of Natural History Collections.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Lawrence N; Blagoderov, Vladimir; Heaton, Alice; Holtzhausen, Pieter; Livermore, Laurence; Price, Benjamin W; van der Walt, Stéfan; Smith, Vincent S

    2015-01-01

    The world's natural history collections constitute an enormous evidence base for scientific research on the natural world. To facilitate these studies and improve access to collections, many organisations are embarking on major programmes of digitization. This requires automated approaches to mass-digitization that support rapid imaging of specimens and associated data capture, in order to process the tens of millions of specimens common to most natural history collections. In this paper we present Inselect-a modular, easy-to-use, cross-platform suite of open-source software tools that supports the semi-automated processing of specimen images generated by natural history digitization programmes. The software is made up of a Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux desktop application, together with command-line tools that are designed for unattended operation on batches of images. Blending image visualisation algorithms that automatically recognise specimens together with workflows to support post-processing tasks such as barcode reading, label transcription and metadata capture, Inselect fills a critical gap to increase the rate of specimen digitization.

  12. Conversational Language Use as a Predictor of Early Reading Development: Language History as a Moderating Variable

    PubMed Central

    DeThorne, Laura Segebart; Petrill, Stephen A.; Schatschneider, Chris; Cutting, Laurie

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The present study examined the nature of concurrent and predictive associations between conversational language use and reading development during early school-age years. Method Language and reading data from 380 twins in the Western Reserve Reading Project were examined via phenotypic correlations and multilevel modeling on exploratory latent factors. Results In the concurrent prediction of children’s early reading abilities, a significant interaction emerged between children’s conversational language abilities and their history of reported language difficulties. Specifically, conversational language concurrently predicted reading development above and beyond variance accounted for by formal vocabulary scores, but only in children with a history of reported language difficulties. A similar trend was noted in predicting reading skills 1 year later, but the interaction was not statistically significant. Conclusions Findings suggest a more nuanced view of the association between spoken language and early reading than is commonly proposed. One possibility is that children with and without a history of reported language difficulties rely on different skills, or the same skills to differing degrees, when completing early reading-related tasks. Future studies should examine the causal link between conversational language and early reading specifically in children with a history of reported language difficulties. PMID:20150410

  13. Online Astronomy Resources from the American Museum of Natural History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, Robert

    2010-02-01

    The American Museum of Natural History, one of the world's largest natural history museums, is the locus of a rich array of scientific research, exhibition and educational resources through its Department of Astrophysics, its Rose Center for Earth and Space and its Hall of Meteorites. For the past decade, the Museum's National Center for Science Literacy, Education and Technology has leveraged these assets to create a panoply of web-based resources for students, teachers and the general public. This session will review several of these resources, including the Digital Universe (a three-dimensional mapping of the Universe); The Solar System (an online graduate course for K-12 teachers); multimedia highlighting searches for exoplanets and ultra-high-energy cosmic rays; Journey to the Stars (a DVD version of the current planetarium show); and the astronomy section of Ology (a website for children ages 7 and up). A copy of the Journey to the Stars DVD will be provided to all attendees. )

  14. Italian natural history museums on the verge of collapse?

    PubMed

    Andreone, Franco; Bartolozzi, Luca; Boano, Giovanni; Boero, Ferdinando; Bologna, Marco A; Bon, Mauro; Bressi, Nicola; Capula, Massimo; Casale, Achille; Casiraghi, Maurizio; Chiozzi, Giorgio; Delfino, Massimo; Doria, Giuliano; Durante, Antonio; Ferrari, Marco; Gippoliti, Spartaco; Lanzinger, Michele; Latella, Leonardo; Maio, Nicola; Marangoni, Carla; Mazzotti, Stefano; Minelli, Alessandro; Muscio, Giuseppe; Nicolosi, Paola; Pievani, Telmo; Razzetti, Edoardo; Sabella, Giorgio; Valle, Marco; Vomero, Vincenzo; Zilli, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The Italian natural history museums are facing a critical situation, due to the progressive loss of scientific relevance, decreasing economic investments, and scarcity of personnel. This is extremely alarming, especially for ensuring the long-term preservation of the precious collections they host. Moreover, a commitment in fieldwork to increase scientific collections and concurrent taxonomic research are rarely considered priorities, while most of the activities are addressed to public events with political payoffs, such as exhibits, didactic meetings, expositions, and talks. This is possibly due to the absence of a national museum that would have better steered research activities and overall concepts for collection management. We here propose that Italian natural history museums collaborate to instate a "metamuseum", by establishing a reciprocal interaction network aimed at sharing budgetary and technical resources, which would assure better coordination of common long-term goals and scientific activities.

  15. [Natural history, complications, safety and pregnancy in inflammatory bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Chaparro, María

    2015-09-01

    Numerous studies were presented in Digestive Disease Week 2015 (DDW 2015) on the natural history, complications, and safety of treatments in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), as well as novel findings on fertility, pregnancy, and breastfeeding. The present article reviews presentations on the natural history of IBD, the risk of complications and their prevention, treatment safety, aspects related to fertility, pregnancy, and breastfeeding, as well as the risk of cancer and its association with IBD and with drugs used in its treatment. In the next few years, more data will become available on treatment safety and the possible complications that can develop in IBD patients due to the disease itself and the drugs employed in its treatment, which will allow measures to be adopted to improve prognosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Italian natural history museums on the verge of collapse?

    PubMed Central

    Andreone, Franco; Bartolozzi, Luca; Boano, Giovanni; Boero, Ferdinando; Bologna, Marco A.; Bon, Mauro; Bressi, Nicola; Capula, Massimo; Casale, Achille; Casiraghi, Maurizio; Chiozzi, Giorgio; Delfino, Massimo; Doria, Giuliano; Durante, Antonio; Ferrari, Marco; Gippoliti, Spartaco; Lanzinger, Michele; Latella, Leonardo; Maio, Nicola; Marangoni, Carla; Mazzotti, Stefano; Minelli, Alessandro; Muscio, Giuseppe; Nicolosi, Paola; Pievani, Telmo; Razzetti, Edoardo; Sabella, Giorgio; Valle, Marco; Vomero, Vincenzo; Zilli, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The Italian natural history museums are facing a critical situation, due to the progressive loss of scientific relevance, decreasing economic investments, and scarcity of personnel. This is extremely alarming, especially for ensuring the long-term preservation of the precious collections they host. Moreover, a commitment in fieldwork to increase scientific collections and concurrent taxonomic research are rarely considered priorities, while most of the activities are addressed to public events with political payoffs, such as exhibits, didactic meetings, expositions, and talks. This is possibly due to the absence of a national museum that would have better steered research activities and overall concepts for collection management. We here propose that Italian natural history museums collaborate to instate a “metamuseum”, by establishing a reciprocal interaction network aimed at sharing budgetary and technical resources, which would assure better coordination of common long-term goals and scientific activities. PMID:25709525

  17. Natural selection. VII. History and interpretation of kin selection theory.

    PubMed

    Frank, S A

    2013-06-01

    Kin selection theory is a kind of causal analysis. The initial form of kin selection ascribed cause to costs, benefits and genetic relatedness. The theory then slowly developed a deeper and more sophisticated approach to partitioning the causes of social evolution. Controversy followed because causal analysis inevitably attracts opposing views. It is always possible to separate total effects into different component causes. Alternative causal schemes emphasize different aspects of a problem, reflecting the distinct goals, interests and biases of different perspectives. For example, group selection is a particular causal scheme with certain advantages and significant limitations. Ultimately, to use kin selection theory to analyse natural patterns and to understand the history of debates over different approaches, one must follow the underlying history of causal analysis. This article describes the history of kin selection theory, with emphasis on how the causal perspective improved through the study of key patterns of natural history, such as dispersal and sex ratio, and through a unified approach to demographic and social processes. Independent historical developments in the multivariate analysis of quantitative traits merged with the causal analysis of social evolution by kin selection. © 2013 The Author. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2013 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  18. Natural History of Rotator Cuff Disease and Implications on Management

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative rotator cuff disease is commonly associated with ageing and is often asymptomatic. The factors related to tear progression and pain development are just now being defined through longitudinal natural history studies. The majority of studies that follow conservatively treated painful cuff tears or asymptomatic tears that are monitored at regular intervals show slow progression of tear enlargement and muscle degeneration over time. These studies have highlighted greater risks for disease progression for certain variables, such as the presence of a full-thickness tear and involvement of the anterior aspect supraspinatus tendon. Coupling the knowledge of the natural history of degenerative cuff tear progression with variables associated with greater likelihood of successful tendon healing following surgery will allow better refinement of surgical indications for rotator cuff disease. In addition, natural history studies may better define the risks of nonoperative treatment over time. This article will review pertinent literature regarding degenerative rotator cuff disease with emphasis on variables important to defining appropriate initial treatments and refining surgical indications. PMID:26726288

  19. The eutrophication history of a naturally eutrophic watercourse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammelin, Mira; Kauppila, Tommi

    2015-04-01

    For efficient inland water protection, it is essential to know the natural states of lakes or, at least, the reference conditions before intensive human impact. The estimation of the natural state is particularly difficult for geologically anomalous areas, where naturally eutrophic lakes are located within nutrient-poorer regions. This is because of the lack of monitoring data and pristine reference lakes and the poor functioning of regional paleoecological nutrient models in such anomalous areas. A paleoecological model that is specifically targeted to the anomalously eutrophic area, however, could be used to interpret the eutrophication histories and natural states of the naturally eutrophic lakes in that area. We applied a targeted paleoecological diatom-total phosphorus transfer function to examine the natural eutrophy and eutrophication history of a central basin and two upstream lakes of the anomalously nutrient-rich Iisalmi watercourse in Eastern Finland. In addition to the nutrient reconstruction based on stratigraphic diatom samples, we studied chrysophyte cyst to diatom ratio, taxonomic diversity and the magnetic susceptibility of the sediment core to find further evidence for possible changes in the lakes and their catchments. The results show that the three lakes are naturally eutrophic with average background total phosphorus levels between 40 μg/l - 60 μg/l. However, human-induced eutrophication has also affected the lakes, which can be seen as rapid changes in the diatom assemblages and magnetic susceptibility between the sediment depths of 40 cm and 90 cm. The modeled lake water total phosphorus concentration has increased less abruptly, approximately 20 μg/l altogether, and the reconstructions of the top sediments mainly correspond well with the water quality observations of the last few decades. The results of this study indicate that a targeted paleoecological nutrient model can be used to interpret the natural state and the eutrophication

  20. The natural history of autoimmune hepatitis presenting with jaundice.

    PubMed

    Panayi, Vasilis; Froud, Oliver J; Vine, Louisa; Laurent, Paul; Woolson, Kathy L; Hunter, Jeremy G; Madden, Richard G; Miller, Catherine; Palmer, Jo; Harris, Nicola; Mathew, Joe; Stableforth, Bill; Murray, Iain A; Dalton, Harry R

    2014-06-01

    Forty percent of patients with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) present with acute jaundice/hepatitis. Such patients, when treated promptly, are thought to have a good prognosis. The objective of this study was to describe the natural history of AIH in patients presenting with jaundice/hepatitis and to determine whether the diagnosis could have been made earlier, before presentation. This study is a retrospective review of 2249 consecutive patients who presented with jaundice to the Jaundice Hotline clinic, Truro, Cornwall, UK, over 15 years (1998-2013) and includes a review of the laboratory data over a 23-year period (1990-2013). Of the 955 patients with hepatocellular jaundice, 47 (5%) had criterion-referenced AIH: 35 female and 12 male, the median age was 65 years (range 15-91 years); the bilirubin concentration was 139 μmol/l (range 23-634 μmol/l) and the alanine transaminase level was 687 IU/l (range 22-2519 IU/l). Among the patients, 23/46 (50%) were cirrhotic on biopsy; 11/47 (23%) died: median time from diagnosis to death, 5 months (range 1-59); median age, 72 years (range 59-91 years). All 8/11 patients who died of liver-related causes were cirrhotic. Weight loss (P=0.04) and presence of cirrhosis (P=0.004) and varices (P=0.015) were more common among those who died. Among patients who died from liver-related causes, 6/8 (75%) died less than 6 months from diagnosis. Cirrhosis at presentation and oesophageal varices were associated with early liver-related deaths (P=0.011, 0.002 respectively). Liver function test results were available in 33/47 (70%) patients before presentation. Among these patients, 16 (49%) had abnormal alanine transaminase levels previously, and eight (50%) were cirrhotic at presentation. AIH presenting as jaundice/hepatitis was mainly observed in older women: 50% of the patients were cirrhotic, and liver-related mortality was high. Some of these deaths were potentially preventable by earlier diagnosis, as the patients had abnormal liver

  1. Connecting health and natural history: a failed initiative at the American Museum of Natural History, 1909-1922.

    PubMed

    Brown, Julie K

    2014-10-01

    In 1909, curator Charles-Edward Winslow established a department of public health in New York City's American Museum of Natural History (AMNH). Winslow introduced public health as a biological science that connected human health-the modern sciences of physiology, hygiene, and urban sanitation-to the natural history of plants and animals. This was the only time an American museum created a curatorial department devoted to public health. The AMNH's Department of Public Health comprised a unique collection of live bacterial cultures-a "Living Museum"-and an innovative plan for 15 exhibits on various aspects of health. I show how Winslow, facing opposition from AMNH colleagues, gathered scientific experts and financial support, and explain the factors that made these developments seem desirable and possible. I finish with a discussion of how the Department of Public Health met an abrupt and "inglorious end" in 1922 despite the success of its collections and exhibitions.

  2. ["Artificial animals etc." Popular natural history and bourgeois curiosity around 1900].

    PubMed

    Wessely, Christina

    2008-01-01

    During the 19th and early 20th century zoological gardens ranged among the most prominent places of popular natural history While aristocratic owners of earlier menageries installed animal collections mostly to symbolize their power over nature as well as to display their extensive diplomatic relations, the zoological gardens founded from the 1830s onwards all over Europe by members of the local bourgeois elites were supposed to mediate their social and political values by "enjoyably educating" a broader public. The new zoos were introduced as places at the antipodes of the frenzy, noise and motion of modern urban life, as spaces of pure, authentic nature whose observation would teach people a reasonable and responsible way of life in a civilised bourgeois community. Taking the Berlin Zoo as an example this paper questions these programmatic imaginations by showing how popular Naturkunde (natural history) was informed by cultures of urban entertainment and spectacle. It discusses the numerous relations and productive tensions that evolved out of the establishment of a "realm of nature" in the middle of the ever growing modern metropolis and investigates the consequences the zoo's rise as "the city's most important attraction" around the turn of the century had for the public perception of natural history as well as for the institution's scientific program.

  3. Pre-mare cratering and early solar system history

    SciT

    Wetherill, G.W.

    1974-01-01

    An evaluation of the application of the high extra-lunar flux in pre- mare times to more general problems of early solar system history is attempted by combining the results of dynamic studies with lunar chronological data. Dynamical studies permit separate evaluation of the possible sources for both the normal flux during the first 600 m.y. years of lunar history as well as the peak which apparently occurred 4.0 b.y. ago. Dynamical studies have been carried out in order to determine the extent to which a heliocentric flux could be confined to the Moon (and Earth). A Monte Carlo method hasmore » been used to calculate the relative impact rates of planet-crossing bodies with the moon and the terrestrial planets. It is concluded that the time-variation of the flux on these planets is closely related to that on the moon. (STAR)« less

  4. Natural history of incidental World Health Organization grade II gliomas.

    PubMed

    Pallud, Johan; Fontaine, Denys; Duffau, Hugues; Mandonnet, Emmanuel; Sanai, Nader; Taillandier, Luc; Peruzzi, Philippe; Guillevin, Rémy; Bauchet, Luc; Bernier, Valérie; Baron, Marie-Hélène; Guyotat, Jacques; Capelle, Laurent

    2010-11-01

    Seizure is the presenting symptom in most of World Health Organization grade II gliomas (GIIGs). Rarely, a GIIG is discovered incidentally on imaging. Little is known about the natural course and prognosis of incidental GIIGs. The aim of the present study is to characterize their natural history and to investigate whether their clinical and radiological behaviors differ from those of symptomatic GIIGs. The clinical and radiological findings, treatments, and outcomes of 47 histologically-proven incidental GIIGs were compared with those of 1249 symptomatic GIIGs. Incidental GIIGs differ significantly from symptomatic GIIGs: they have a female predominance (p = 0.05), smaller initial tumor volumes (p < 0.001), lower incidence of contrast enhancement (p = 0.009), and are more likely to undergo gross total surgical removal (p < 0.001). Proliferation rates were similar to that observed among symptomatic GIIGs. Younger age at the time of discovery, frontal lobes, and noneloquent brain regions were associated with incidental GIIGs, as compared to their symptomatic counterparts. When not treated, incidental GIIGs demonstrated radiological growth (median velocity of diametric expansion at 3.5 mm/year), and became symptomatic at a median interval of 48 months after radiological discovery. Overall, incidental discovery was associated with a significant survival benefit (p = 0.04). Incidental GIIGs are progressive tumors leading to clinical transformation toward symptomatic GIIGs. They may represent an earlier step in the natural history of a glioma than the symptomatic GIIGs.

  5. Genetics instruction with history of science: Nature of science learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sun Young

    2007-12-01

    This study explored the effect of history of genetics in teaching genetics and learning the nature of science (NOS). A quasi-experimental control group research design with pretests, posttests, and delayed posttests was used, combining qualitative data and quantitative data. Two classes which consisted of tenth grade biology students participated in this study. The present study involved two instructional interventions, Best Practice Instruction with History of Genetics (BPIw/HG) and Best Practice Instruction (BPI). The experimental group received BPIw/HG utilizing various historical materials from the history of genetics, while the control group was not introduced to historical materials. Scientific Attitude Inventory II, Genetics Terms' Definitions with Concept Mapping (GTDCM), NOS Terms' Definitions with Concept Mapping (NTDCM), and View of Nature of Science (VNOS-C) were used to investigate students' scientific attitude inventory, and their understanding of genetics as well as the NOS. The results showed that students' scientific attitude inventory, and their understanding of genetics and the NOS were not statistically significantly different in the pretest (p>.05). After the intervention, the experimental group of students who received BPIw/HG demonstrated better understanding of the NOS. NTDCM results showed that the experimental group was better in defining the NOS terms and constructing a concept map ( p<.01). In addition, the experimental group retained their understanding of the NOS two-months after the completion of the intervention, showing no statistically significant difference between the posttest and the delayed posttest of NTDCM (p>.05). Further, VNOS-C data indicated that a greater percentage of the experimental group than the control group improved their understanding of the NOS. However, the two groups' understanding of genetics concepts did not show any statistically significant difference in the pretest, the posttest, and the delayed posttest

  6. Notes on the Early History of Technical Higher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorescu, Horia Nicolai

    We perform a brief analysis of the economical and political context of establishing the first technical higher school in Romania. We urge for a revision of the current point of view on the educational level in Yashi (Iaši) and Bucharest at the epoch, highlighting that these were, at the time, important academic centers we may not recognize or may not be aware of today. We also plead for a long due serious approach about the history of early modern education in Romania.

  7. Telomere biology in aging and cancer: early history and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Makoto T

    2018-01-20

    The ends of eukaryotic linear chromosomes are protected from undesired enzymatic activities by a nucleoprotein complex called the telomere. Expanding evidence indicates that telomeres have central functions in human aging and tumorigenesis. While it is undoubtedly important to follow current advances in telomere biology, it is also fruitful to be well informed in seminal historical studies for a comprehensive understanding of telomere biology, and for the anticipation of future directions. With this in mind, I here summarize the early history of telomere biology and current advances in the field, mostly focusing on mammalian studies relevant to aging and cancer.

  8. Tidal friction and the early history of the moon's orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, D. P.

    1975-01-01

    The present work investigates the consequences implied by various rheological models of the early earth for the orbital history of the moon subsequent to its formation. Models of the earth that yield small tidal angles, such as low-viscosity models, imply that the moon never orbited in the earth's equatorial plane, thereby ruling out an equatorial origin for the moon. A high-viscosity model is shown to permit the moon to originate in the equatorial plane and still account for the present-day characteristics of the moon's orbit.

  9. Natural history of experimental intestinal atresia: morphologic and ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Baglaj, S M; Czernik, J; Kuryszko, J; Kuropka, P

    2001-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a natural history of congenital intestinal atresia (IA) in the chick embryo and to assess the type and nature of changes in the intestine at various developmental stages. Chick embryos underwent operative induction of IA on the 12th day of incubation. The procedure consisted of electrocoagulation of the mesenteric vessels supplying a 7- to 8-mm intestinal segment. The embryos were subjected to macroscopic examination, histologic and ultrastructural studies of the preatretic and postatretic bowel using the light microscope, scanning, and transmission electron microscopes. All investigations were performed in an experimental group (operated embryos), in a control group, and in a sham-operated group on the 15th, 17th, 19th, and 21st day of incubation. The original technique of an iatrogenic "vascular event" proved to be effective because IA developed in 96% of embryos surviving the procedure. The affected portion of the bowel underwent progressive necrosis, and signs of bowel obstruction could be observed 48 hours after operation. Cord atresia (type II) developed in 81% of embryos. Histologic investigations showed progressive thinning of mucosa, flattening of mucosal folds, and epithelial detachment within the intestine proximal to atresia. There was only mild hypertrophy of the muscular layers. All these pathomorphologic changes were of rapidly progressive nature until the 17th day of incubation. Later, the rate of distension of preatretic bowel and histologic changes were less. Ultrastructural investigation of the proximal bowel showed progressive flattening of the enterocytes associated with their apical bulging, widening of the intercellular spaces, and microvilli atrophy. Surprisingly, at days 19 and 21 of incubation, signs of induction of adaptive mechanisms with partial restoration of near-normal microvilli pattern were observed. Study of natural history of experimental IA indicates that histologic and ultrastructural

  10. Initiating and continuing participation in citizen science for natural history.

    PubMed

    Everett, Glyn; Geoghegan, Hilary

    2016-07-22

    Natural history has a long tradition in the UK, dating back to before Charles Darwin. Developing from a principally amateur pursuit, natural history continues to attract both amateur and professional involvement. Within the context of citizen science and public engagement, we examine the motivations behind citizen participation in the national survey activities of the Open Air Laboratories (OPAL) programme, looking at: people's experiences of the surveys as 'project-based leisure'; their motivations for taking part and barriers to continued participation; where they feature on our continuum of engagement; and whether participation in an OPAL survey facilitated their movement between categories along this continuum. The paper focuses on a less-expected but very significant outcome regarding the participation of already-engaged amateur naturalists in citizen science. Our main findings relate to: first, how committed amateur naturalists (already-engaged) have also enjoyed contributing to OPAL and the need to respect and work with their interest to encourage broader and deeper involvement; and second, how new (previously-unengaged) and relatively new participants (casually-engaged) have gained confidence, renewed their interests, refocussed their activities and/or gained validation from participation in OPAL. Overall, we argue that engagement with and enthusiasm for the scientific process is a motivation shared by citizens who, prior to participating in the OPAL surveys, were previously-unengaged, casually-engaged or already-engaged in natural history activities. Citizen science has largely been written about by professional scientists for professional scientists interested in developing a project of their own. This study offers a qualitative example of how citizen science can be meaningful to participants beyond what might appear to be a public engagement data collection exercise.

  11. An early history of human breast cancer: West meets East.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shou-He

    2013-09-01

    Cancer has been increasingly recognized as a global issue. This is especially true in countries like China, where cancer incidence has increased likely because of changes in environment and lifestyle. However, cancer is not a modern disease; early cases have been recorded in ancient medical books in the West and in China. Here, we provide a brief history of cancer, focusing on cancer of the breast, and review the etymology of ai, the Chinese character for cancer. Notable findings from both Western and Chinese traditional medicine are presented to give an overview of the most important, early contributors to our evolving understanding of human breast cancer. We also discuss the earliest historical documents to record patients with breast cancer.

  12. Early history of the pre-excitation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hanon, Sam; Shapiro, Michael; Schweitzer, Paul

    2005-01-01

    This brief review discusses the interesting early history of the pre-excitation syndrome. In 1913 Cohn and Fraser published the first patient with a short P-R interval, wide QRS complexes, and paroxysmal tachycardia. This was followed by other cases of pre-excitation syndrome, all of which were considered to be due to bundle branch blocks. In 1930 Wolff, Parkinson, and White reported 11 patients with the syndrome, which came to bear their name. Two years later, Holzmann and Scherf suggested bypass tracts as the most likely mechanism of pre-excitation syndrome. In 1942, Wood et al. documented the first accessory connection at autopsy. Despite these early studies supporting the bypass theory, the quest for alternative mechanisms continued until the 1970s when electrophysiological studies and surgical therapy confirmed accessory connections as the mechanism of pre-excitation syndrome.

  13. An early history of T cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Golstein, Pierre; Griffiths, Gillian M

    2018-04-16

    After 60 years of intense fundamental research into T cell-mediated cytotoxicity, we have gained a detailed knowledge of the cells involved, specific recognition mechanisms and post-recognition perforin-granzyme-based and FAS-based molecular mechanisms. What could not be anticipated at the outset was how discovery of the mechanisms regulating the activation and function of cytotoxic T cells would lead to new developments in cancer immunotherapy. Given the profound recent interest in therapeutic manipulation of cytotoxic T cell responses, it is an opportune time to look back on the early history of the field. This Timeline describes how the early findings occurred and eventually led to current therapeutic applications.

  14. [Spleen autotransplant. Natural history and description of a case].

    PubMed

    Ceccherini, E; Sereni, P; Ferrari, F; Fagioli Zucchi, A; Croce, F; Di Maggio, G; Vattimo, A; Mancini, S

    1989-09-30

    After considering the natural history of spleen auto-transplant, a clinical case followed up for seven months with instrumental (echography, scintigraphy) and humoral (Jolly bodies, Heinz bodies, reticulocytes, platelets, complement, immune globulin) examinations has been considered so as to verify "take" and function. One months after reimplantation the patient was again operated on for the onset of an intestinal occlusion due to adherences. On that occasion it was possible to control that the implant had taken. It is concluded that personally used parameters proved to be well correlated and that scintigraphy and echography are two complementary, effective techniques for monitoring auto-transplants.

  15. Rett syndrome diagnostic criteria: lessons from the Natural History Study.

    PubMed

    Percy, Alan K; Neul, Jeffrey L; Glaze, Daniel G; Motil, Kathleen J; Skinner, Steven A; Khwaja, Omar; Lee, Hye-Seung; Lane, Jane B; Barrish, Judy O; Annese, Fran; McNair, Lauren; Graham, Joy; Barnes, Katherine

    2010-12-01

    Analysis of 819 participants enrolled in the Rett syndrome (RTT) Natural History Study validates recently revised diagnostic criteria. 765 females fulfilled 2002 consensus criteria for classic (653/85.4%) or variant (112/14.6%) RTT. All participants classified as classic RTT fulfilled each revised main criterion; supportive criteria were not uniformly present. All variant RTT participants met at least 3 of 6 main criteria in the 2002, 2 of 4 main criteria in the current format, and 5 of 11 supportive criteria in both. This analysis underscores the critical role of main criteria for classic RTT; variant RTT requires both main and supportive criteria.

  16. Natural history of severe thrombocytopenia in infectious mononucleosis

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Su Yong; Bennett, Bruce

    1982-01-01

    The natural history of severe thrombocytopenia in two patients with infectious mononucleosis (minimum platelet counts under 10 × 109 and 17 × 109/l respectively) is described. In both, the platelet count rose rapidly and spontaneously, reaching approximately 100 × 109/l on the seventh day. Bleeding symptoms were also transient and never life-threatening. The possibility of very rapid spontaneous recovery from severe thrombocytopenia must be borne in mind in assessing the effect of any drug in the management of this complication of infectious mononucleosis. PMID:7111109

  17. Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, and Natural History of Pulmonary Embolism.

    PubMed

    Turetz, Meredith; Sideris, Andrew T; Friedman, Oren A; Triphathi, Nidhi; Horowitz, James M

    2018-06-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common and potentially deadly form of venous thromboembolic disease. It is the third most common cause of cardiovascular death and is associated with multiple inherited and acquired risk factors as well as advanced age. The prognosis from PE depends on the degree of obstruction and hemodynamic effects of PE and understanding the pathophysiology helps in risk-stratifying patients and determining treatment. Though the natural history of thrombus is resolution, a subset of patients have chronic residual thrombus, contributing to the post-PE syndrome.

  18. Natural knowledge as a propaedeutic to self-betterment: Francis Bacon and the transformation of natural history.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, James A T

    2012-01-01

    This paper establishes the 'emblematic' use of natural history as a propaedeutic to self-betterment in the Renaissance; in particular, in the natural histories of Gessner and Topsell, but also in the works of Erasmus and Rabelais. Subsequently, it investigates how Francis Bacon's conception of natural history is envisaged in relation to them. The paper contends that, where humanist natural historians understood the use of natural knowledge as a preliminary to individual improvement, Bacon conceived self-betterment foremost as a means to Christian charity, or social-betterment. It thus examines the transformation of the moralizing aspect of Renaissance natural history in Bacon's conception of his Great Instauration.

  19. The "Starch Wars" and the Early History of DNA Profiling.

    PubMed

    Aronson, J D

    2006-01-01

    Just as the movie Star Wars had a prequel, so did the "DNA Wars"-the series of legal, scientific, and personal battles that took place over the admissibility of forensic DNA evidence from 1989 to 1994. Between the late 1970s and the mid-1980s, another forensic identification technique became mired in controversy: electrophoresis-based blood protein analysis. Although the debates over blood analysis were every bit as rancorous and frustrating to almost everybody involved - so much so that they became known as the "Starch Wars" - their importance has not been adequately appreciated in the recent history of forensic science. After reviewing the early history of blood typing, I will describe the development of the Multi-System approach to blood protein analysis that took place in California from 1977 to 1978. I will then elucidate the history of the Starch Wars, and demonstrate the ways that they shaped subsequent disputes over DNA evidence, especially in California. I will show that: (a) many of the forensic scientists, law enforcement officials, and lawyers who became prominent players in the DNA Wars were deeply involved in the court cases involving protein electrophoresis; and (b) many of the issues that became controversial in the disputes over DNA evidence first emerged in the Starch Wars. In the conclusion, I will suggest various ways to improve the quality of forensic science based on my analysis of the Starch Wars. Copyright © 2006 Central Police University.

  20. Pre-mare cratering and early solar system history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherill, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    An evaluation of the application of the high extralunar flux in pre-mare times to more general problems of early solar system history is attempted by combining the results of dynamic studies with lunar chronological data. There is a twofold to fourfold contrast in the integral impact flux between the Apollo 14 and 16 sites and the older mare surfaces. This is judged insufficient to account for the contrasting lithology between these two sites: basalts and soil breccias in the maria, annealed breccias and impact melts in the highlands. Therefore, these rocks and their ages (3.9-4.0 b.y.) are thought to predate the surfaces in which they are found. Estimation of the flux needed to produce these lithologies, and difficulties associated with extrapolating this further back in lunar history give support to the "cataclysm" hypothesis of Tera, Papanastassiou, and Wasserburg. Dynamical studies permit separate evaluation of the possible sources for both the "normal" flux during the first 600 million years of lunar history and the "peak" that apparently occurred 4.0 billion years ago. The most likely sources for the normal flux are comets from the vicinity of Uranus and Neptune. The most promising source for the peak is tidal disruption by Earth or Venus of a Ceres-size asteroid initially in a Mars-crossing orbit. Alternative possibilities are suggested.

  1. The physics and early history of the intergalactic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkana, Rennan; Loeb, Abraham

    2007-04-01

    The intergalactic medium—the cosmic gas that fills the great spaces between the galaxies—is affected by processes ranging from quantum fluctuations in the very early Universe to radiative emission from newly formed stars. This gives the intergalactic medium a dual role as a powerful probe both of fundamental physics and of astrophysics. The heading of fundamental physics includes conditions in the very early Universe and cosmological parameters that determine the age of the Universe and its matter content. The astrophysics refers to chapters of the long cosmic history of stars and galaxies that are being revealed through the effects of stellar feedback on the cosmic gas. This review describes the physics of the intergalactic medium, focusing on recent theoretical and observational developments in understanding early cosmic history. In particular, the earliest generation of stars is thought to have transformed the Universe from darkness to light and to have had an enormous impact on the intergalactic medium. Half a million years after the Big Bang the Universe was filled with atomic hydrogen. As gravity pulled gas clouds together, the first stars ignited and their radiation turned the surrounding atoms back into free electrons and ions. From the observed spectral absorption signatures of the gas between us and distant sources, we know that the process of reionization pervaded most of space a billion years after the Big Bang, so that only a small fraction of the primordial hydrogen atoms remained between galaxies. Knowing exactly when and how the reionization process happened is a primary goal of cosmologists, because this would tell us when the early stars and black holes formed and in what kinds of galaxies. The distribution and clustering of these galaxies is particularly interesting since it is driven by primordial density fluctuations in the dark matter. Cosmic reionization is beginning to be understood with the help of theoretical models and computer

  2. Using genetics to predict the natural history of asthma?

    PubMed

    Holloway, John W; Arshad, Syed H; Holgate, Stephen T

    2010-08-01

    Clinical practice reminds us that there is considerable variability in the course of asthma over time. Treatment of patients with asthma would be considerably improved if one could accurately predict the likely course of disease over the life course. Recently, with the advent of the era of genome-wide association studies, there has been a monumental shift in our understanding of the genetic factors that underlie inherited susceptibility to asthma. Genes have been identified that modulate many aspects of the natural history of asthma, such as susceptibility to atopy, altered lung development, and susceptibility to more severe disease. Heritability studies have even suggested a role for genetic factors in remission of asthma. However, although the discovery of novel genetic factors underlying disease susceptibility has undoubtedly improved our understanding of disease pathogenesis, whether these advances have improved the ability to predict the natural history in individual patients is questionable, and the application of genetic testing to clinical practice remains some way off. Copyright 2010 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cerebral cavernous malformations: natural history and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Gross, Bradley A; Du, Rose

    2015-01-01

    Cavernous malformations (CMs) are angiographically-occult clusters of dilated sinusoidal channels that may present clinically with seizures, focal neurological deficits and/or hemorrhage. Across natural history studies, the annual hemorrhage rate ranged from 1.6-3.1% per patient-year, decreasing to 0.08-0.2% per patient-year for incidental CMs and to 0.3-0.6% for the collective group of unruptured CMs. Prior hemorrhage is a significant risk factor for subsequent CM hemorrhage. Hemorrhage clustering, particularly within the first 2 years, is an established phenomenon that may confound results of natural history studies evaluating the rate of rehemorrhage. Indeed, rehemorrhage rates for hemorrhagic CMs range from 4.5-22.9% in the literature. Surgical resection is the gold standard treatment for surgically-accessible, symptomatic CMs. Incidental CMs or minimally symptomatic, surgically inaccessible eloquent lesions may be considered for observation. Stereotactic radiosurgery is a controversial treatment approach of consideration only for cases of highly aggressive, surgically inaccessible CMs.

  4. Novel insight into the natural history of short QT syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mazzanti, Andrea; Kanthan, Ajita; Monteforte, Nicola; Memmi, Mirella; Bloise, Raffaella; Novelli, Valeria; Miceli, Carlotta; O'Rourke, Sean; Borio, Gianluca; Zienciuk-Krajka, Agnieszka; Curcio, Antonio; Surducan, Andreea Elena; Colombo, Mario; Napolitano, Carlo; Priori, Silvia G

    2014-04-08

    This study intends to gain further insights into the natural history, the yield of familial and genetic screening, and the arrhythmogenic mechanisms in the largest cohort of short QT syndrome (SQTS) patients described so far. SQTS is a rare genetic disorder associated with life-threatening arrhythmias, and its natural history is incompletely ascertained. Seventy-three SQTS patients (84% male; age, 26 ± 15 years; corrected QT interval, 329 ± 22 ms) were studied, and 62 were followed for 60 ± 41 months (median, 56 months). Cardiac arrest (CA) was the most frequent presenting symptom (40% of probands; range, <1 month to 41 years). The rate of CA was 4% in the first year of life and 1.3% per year between 20 and 40 years; the probability of a first occurrence of CA by 40 years of age was 41%. Despite the male predominance, female patients had a risk profile superimposable to that of men (p = 0.49). The yield of genetic screening was low (14%), despite familial disease being present in 44% of kindreds. A history of CA was the only predictor of recurrences at follow-up (p < 0.0000001). Two patterns of onset of ventricular fibrillation were observed and were reproducible in patients with multiple occurrences of CA. Arrhythmias occurred mainly at rest. SQTS is highly lethal; CA is often the first manifestation of the disease with a peak incidence in the first year of life. Survivors of CA have a high CA recurrence rate; therefore, implantation of a defibrillator is strongly recommended in this group of patients. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The fractured carpal scaphoid. Natural history and factors influencing outcome.

    PubMed

    Leslie, I J; Dickson, R A

    1981-08-01

    The scaphoid fracture is commonest in young men in the age group 15 to 29 years, who have the highest incidence of non-union, take the longest time to unite, lose more time from work, and spend the longest time as outpatients. A union rate of 95 per cent can be achieved using standard simple treatment. All but a few fractures are visible on the first radiograph, and failure of visualisation at this stage is not associated with a bad outcome. The postero-anterior and semipronated views are the most important to scrutinise. Crank-handle injuries have a particularly bad prognosis when they produce a transverse fracture of the waist of the scaphoid. Poor prognostic factors are displacement during treatment, the fracture line becoming increasingly more obvious, and the presence of early cystic change. The severity of trauma is an important factor to elicit from the history.

  6. The dynamic natural history of cerebral aneurysms from cardiac myxomas: A review of the natural history of myxomatous aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Flores, Paloma Largo; Haglund, Felix; Bhogal, Pervinder; Yeo Leong Litt, Leonard; Södermann, Michael

    2018-06-01

    We describe two contrasting patients with multiple cerebral aneurysms and a previous history of resected cardiac myxomas with no cardiac recurrence on follow-up echocardiography. Both patients presented with stroke- like symptoms; one with a left visual defect and the other with right hemiplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain of both patients showed the presence of multiple cerebral aneurysms that was later confirmed on conventional angiography. Both patients' aneurysms were managed conservatively. Serial angiograms were performed during their follow-up, which spanned several years. One patient's aneurysms remained static while the evolution of the other patient's aneurysms displayed a dynamic quality with some increasing in size while others diminished. This is the first description in which some aneurysms progressed while others regressed simultaneously in the same patient. Aneurysms in patients with a history of cardiac myxoma can be active years after primary tumor resection and it is difficult to predict how they will develop. We reviewed the literature of all patients with multiple myxomatous aneurysms who were treated conservatively to better understand the natural history of this rare disease. Long-term follow-up of these patients may be necessary.

  7. Connecting Health and Natural History: A Failed Initiative at the American Museum of Natural History, 1909–1922

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In 1909, curator Charles-Edward Winslow established a department of public health in New York City’s American Museum of Natural History (AMNH). Winslow introduced public health as a biological science that connected human health—the modern sciences of physiology, hygiene, and urban sanitation—to the natural history of plants and animals. This was the only time an American museum created a curatorial department devoted to public health. The AMNH’s Department of Public Health comprised a unique collection of live bacterial cultures—a “Living Museum”—and an innovative plan for 15 exhibits on various aspects of health. I show how Winslow, facing opposition from AMNH colleagues, gathered scientific experts and financial support, and explain the factors that made these developments seem desirable and possible. I finish with a discussion of how the Department of Public Health met an abrupt and “inglorious end” in 1922 despite the success of its collections and exhibitions. PMID:24205997

  8. 75 FR 435 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ... Natural History, Chicago, IL AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice is here given... Natural History, Chicago, IL. The human remains were removed from the Channel Islands in Santa Barbara and.... A detailed assessment of the human remains was made by Field Museum of Natural History professional...

  9. 76 FR 43710 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ... Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound has completed an... contact the Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound. Disposition of the human remains...

  10. 78 FR 2434 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Natural History Museum of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-11

    ... Inventory Completion: Natural History Museum of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Natural History Museum of Utah has completed an inventory of human... culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects may contact the Natural History...

  11. 76 FR 36146 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-21

    ...: University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History, Eugene, OR AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History has... contact the University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History. Repatriation of the human remains...

  12. 75 FR 45659 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... Natural History, Chicago, IL AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice is here given... possession of the Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL. The human remains and associated funerary... assessment of the human remains was made by the Field Museum of Natural History professional staff in...

  13. 78 FR 2430 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Natural History Museum of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-11

    ... Inventory Completion: Natural History Museum of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Natural History Museum of Utah has completed an inventory of human... culturally affiliated with the human remains and associated funerary objects may contact the Natural History...

  14. 75 FR 438 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ... Natural History, Chicago, IL AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice is here given... Natural History, Chicago, IL. The human remains were removed from Howkan, AK. This notice is published as... Field Museum of Natural History professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Hydaburg...

  15. 75 FR 52022 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-24

    ... Natural History, Chicago, IL AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice is here given... possession of the Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL. The human remains and associated funerary... made by Field Museum of Natural History professional staff in consultation with representatives of the...

  16. 50 CFR 16.33 - Importation of natural-history specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Importation of natural-history specimens... WILDLIFE AND PLANTS INJURIOUS WILDLIFE Additional Exemptions § 16.33 Importation of natural-history... natural-history specimens of wildlife or their eggs for museum or scientific collection purposes: Provided...

  17. 78 FR 22285 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Pittsburgh, PA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ....R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Pittsburgh, PA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Carnegie Museum of Natural History has... associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the Carnegie Museum of Natural History. If no...

  18. 77 FR 74872 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Beneski Museum of Natural History, Amherst College, Amherst, MA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-18

    ... and museum staff of the Beneski Museum of Natural History, Amherst College, and their agents, in... Inventory Completion: Beneski Museum of Natural History, Amherst College, Amherst, MA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Beneski Museum of Natural History, Amherst College...

  19. 78 FR 19302 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, New Haven, CT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ...-PPWOCRADN0] Notice of Inventory Completion: Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, New Haven, CT AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History has... may contact the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History. Repatriation of the human remains to the...

  20. Investigations into the Early Life History of Naturally Produced Spring Chinook Salmon and Summer Steelhead in the Grande Ronde River Subbasin, Annual Report 2008 : Project Period 1 February 2008 to 31 January 2009.

    SciT

    Yanke, Jeffrey A.; Alfonse, Brian M.; Bratcher, Kyle W.

    2009-07-31

    This study was designed to document and describe the status and life history strategies of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead in the Grande Ronde River Subbasin. We determined migration timing, abundance, and life-stage survival rates for juvenile spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and summer steelhead O. mykiss in four streams during migratory year 2008 from 1 July 2007 through 30 June 2008. As observed in previous years of this study, spring Chinook salmon and steelhead exhibited fall and spring movements out of natal rearing areas, but did not begin their smolt migration through the Snake and lower Columbia Rivermore » hydrosystem until spring. In this report we provide estimates of migrant abundance and migration timing for each study stream, and their survival and timing to Lower Granite Dam. We also document aquatic habitat conditions using water temperature and stream flow in four study streams in the subbasin.« less

  1. The quantum defect: Early history and recent developments

    SciT

    Rau, A.R.; Inokuti, M.

    1997-03-01

    The notion of the quantum defect is important in atomic and molecular spectroscopy and also in unifying spectroscopy with collision theory. In the latter context, the quantum defect may be viewed as an ancestor of the phase shift. However, the origin of the term {open_quotes}quantum defect{close_quotes} does not seem to be explained in standard textbooks. It occurred in a 1921 paper by Schr{umlt o}dinger, preceding quantum mechanics, yet giving the correct meaning as an index of the short-range interactions with the core of an atom. We present the early history of the quantum-defect idea, and sketch its recent developments. {copyright}more » {ital 1997 American Association of Physics Teachers.}« less

  2. An early history of the Gestalt factors of organisation.

    PubMed

    Vezzani, Stefano; Marino, Barbara F M; Giora, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Wertheimer's (1923, Psychologische Forschung 4 301 - 350) idea that the perceptual world is articulated according to factors of organisation is widely acknowledged as one of the most original contributions of Gestalt psychology and stands as a milestone in the history of vision research. An inquiry focused on the forerunners of some of Wertheimer's factors of perceptual organisation is documented here. In fact, in 1900 Schumann described grouping by proximity and by vertical symmetry, and in 1903 G E Müller identified the factors of sameness/similarity and contour. Other authors contributed to the early description of these factors, such as Rubin, who in 1922 originally illustrated grouping by similarity. Even though Wertheimer himself granted these authors due recognition, later psychologists have paid little attention to their contributions. Some possible reasons for this negligence are briefly discussed.

  3. Differentiation of Diabetes by Pathophysiology, Natural History, and Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Skyler, Jay S; Bakris, George L; Bonifacio, Ezio; Darsow, Tamara; Eckel, Robert H; Groop, Leif; Groop, Per-Henrik; Handelsman, Yehuda; Insel, Richard A; Mathieu, Chantal; McElvaine, Allison T; Palmer, Jerry P; Pugliese, Alberto; Schatz, Desmond A; Sosenko, Jay M; Wilding, John P H; Ratner, Robert E

    2017-02-01

    The American Diabetes Association, JDRF, the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists convened a research symposium, "The Differentiation of Diabetes by Pathophysiology, Natural History and Prognosis" on 10-12 October 2015. International experts in genetics, immunology, metabolism, endocrinology, and systems biology discussed genetic and environmental determinants of type 1 and type 2 diabetes risk and progression, as well as complications. The participants debated how to determine appropriate therapeutic approaches based on disease pathophysiology and stage and defined remaining research gaps hindering a personalized medical approach for diabetes to drive the field to address these gaps. The authors recommend a structure for data stratification to define the phenotypes and genotypes of subtypes of diabetes that will facilitate individualized treatment. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  4. Differentiation of Diabetes by Pathophysiology, Natural History, and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Bakris, George L.; Groop, Per-Henrik; Handelsman, Yehuda; Insel, Richard A.; Mathieu, Chantal; Palmer, Jerry P.; Pugliese, Alberto; Sosenko, Jay M.; Ratner, Robert E.

    2017-01-01

    The American Diabetes Association, JDRF, the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists convened a research symposium, “The Differentiation of Diabetes by Pathophysiology, Natural History and Prognosis” on 10–12 October 2015. International experts in genetics, immunology, metabolism, endocrinology, and systems biology discussed genetic and environmental determinants of type 1 and type 2 diabetes risk and progression, as well as complications. The participants debated how to determine appropriate therapeutic approaches based on disease pathophysiology and stage and defined remaining research gaps hindering a personalized medical approach for diabetes to drive the field to address these gaps. The authors recommend a structure for data stratification to define the phenotypes and genotypes of subtypes of diabetes that will facilitate individualized treatment. PMID:27980006

  5. Natural History of the Post-ablation Esophagus.

    PubMed

    Reed, Craig C; Shaheen, Nicholas J

    2018-04-18

    Endoscopic ablative therapy including radiofrequency ablation (RFA) represents the preferred management strategy for dysplastic Barrett's esophagus (BE) and appears to diminish the risk of developing esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Limited data describe the natural history of the post-ablation esophagus. Recent findings demonstrate that recurrent intestinal metaplasia (IM) following RFA is relatively frequent. However, dysplastic BE and EAC subsequent to the complete eradication of intestinal metaplasia (CEIM) are uncommon. Moreover, data suggest that the risk of recurrent disease is probably highest in the first year following CEIM. Recurrent IM and dysplasia are usually successfully eradicated with repeat RFA. Future studies may refine surveillance intervals and inform the length of time surveillance should be conducted following RFA with CEIM. Further data will also be necessary to understand the utility of chemopreventive strategies, including NSAIDs, in reducing the risk of recurrent disease.

  6. Natural history of the ERVWE1 endogenous retroviral locus

    PubMed Central

    Bonnaud, Bertrand; Beliaeff, Jean; Bouton, Olivier; Oriol, Guy; Duret, Laurent; Mallet, François

    2005-01-01

    Background The human HERV-W multicopy family includes a unique proviral locus, termed ERVWE1, whose full-length envelope ORF was preserved through evolution by the action of a selective pressure. The encoded Env protein (Syncytin) is involved in hominoid placental physiology. Results In order to infer the natural history of this domestication process, a comparative genomic analysis of the human 7q21.2 syntenic regions in eutherians was performed. In primates, this region was progressively colonized by LTR-elements, leading to two different evolutionary pathways in Cercopithecidae and Hominidae, a genetic drift versus a domestication, respectively. Conclusion The preservation in Hominoids of a genomic structure consisting in the juxtaposition of a retrotransposon-derived MaLR LTR and the ERVWE1 provirus suggests a functional link between both elements. PMID:16176588

  7. Natural history of acute and chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Maasoumy, Benjamin; Wedemeyer, Heiner

    2012-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection remains a major global health burden. Hepatitis C causes significant liver-related morbidity and mortality due to hepatic decompensation and development of hepatocellular carcinoma. In addition, extra-hepatic manifestations of hepatitis C are frequent. There is a very large interindividual variability in the natural history of both acute and chronic hepatitis C which can be explained in part by a combination of various host, viral and environmental factors. Successful antiviral treatment can prevent short- and long-term complications of HCV infection in many patients. Still, the relative contribution of distinct risk factors for disease progression in different phases of HCV infection needs to be better defined. Personalized treatment approaches for HCV infection should consider individual risk profiles to avoid both under- and over-treatment - which will remain important also in upcoming era of interferon-free treatment of hepatitis C. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. STRAWBERRY HEMANGIOMAS—The Natural History of the Untreated Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Alvin H.

    1957-01-01

    A review of the literature on the natural history of strawberry hemangiomas revealed over-whelming evidence of the satisfactory spontaneous involution of over 95 per cent of these lesions without the scarring and danger of other sequelae inherent in the various forms of treatment. In a study of 105 strawberry nevi observed for more than one year, 97 per cent of the lesions had either completely disappeared or were regressing satisfactorily. A cross-section study of 1,735 consecutively examined children in routine pediatric practice showed hemangiomas to be present in 10.1 per cent of all infants from birth to one year of age but that this incidence drops to 1.5 per cent in children over five years of age, confirming the fact of spontaneous involution. PMID:13383382

  9. Natural history's hypothetical moments: narratives of contingency in Victorian culture.

    PubMed

    Choi, Tina Young

    2009-01-01

    This essay focuses on the ways in which works by Robert Chambers, Charles Darwin, and George Eliot encouraged readers to imagine the future as contingent. But where Chambers alludes to Charles Babbage's computational engine and the period's life insurance industry to hint at the role of contingency in natural history, Darwin insists on the importance of contingently determined outcomes to speciation. The "Origin" consistently exercises the reader's speculative energies by generating conditional statements, causal hypotheses, adn diverging alternatives. "Adam Bede" constitutes its characters' interior lives around the proliferation of such contingent narratives. To reflect on the future or on the past, these works suggest, demands a temporal, moral, and narrative complexity in one's thinking.

  10. Natural history of chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Busch, Katrin; Thimme, Robert

    2015-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus infection represents a major global health problem. Currently, there are more than 240 million chronically infected people worldwide. The development of chronic hepatitis B virus-mediated liver disease may lead to liver fibrosis, cirrhosis and eventually hepatocellular carcinoma. Recently, the discovery of the viral entry receptor sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide has facilitated new approaches for a better understanding of viral physiopathology. Hopefully, these novel insights may give rise to the development of more effective antiviral therapy concepts during the next years. In this review, we will discuss the natural history of hepatitis B virus infection including the viral biology, the clinical course of infection and the role of the immune response.

  11. Cutaneous skeletal hypophosphatemia syndrome: clinical spectrum, natural history, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Ovejero, D; Lim, Y H; Boyce, A M; Gafni, R I; McCarthy, E; Nguyen, T A; Eichenfield, L F; DeKlotz, C M C; Guthrie, L C; Tosi, L L; Thornton, P S; Choate, K A; Collins, M T

    2016-12-01

    Cutaneous skeletal hypophosphatemia syndrome (CSHS), caused by somatic RAS mutations, features excess fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23) and skeletal dysplasia. Records from 56 individuals were reviewed and demonstrated fractures, scoliosis, and non-congenital hypophosphatemia that in some cases were resolved. Phosphate and calcitriol, but not skin lesion removal, were effective at controlling hypophosphatemia. No skeletal malignancies were found. CSHS is a disorder defined by the association of epidermal and/or melanocytic nevi, a mosaic skeletal dysplasia, and an FGF23-mediated hypophosphatemia. To date, somatic RAS mutations have been identified in all patients whose affected tissue has undergone DNA sequencing. However, the clinical spectrum and treatment are poorly defined in CSHS. The purpose of this study is to determine the spectrum of the phenotype, natural history of the disease, and response to treatment of hypophosphatemia. Five CSHS subjects underwent prospective data collection at clinical research centers. A review of the literature identified 45 reports that included a total of 51 additional patients, in whom the findings were compatible with CSHS. Data on nevi subtypes, bone histology, mineral and skeletal disorders, abnormalities in other tissues, and response to treatment of hypophosphatemia were analyzed. Fractures, limb deformities, and scoliosis affected most CSHS subjects. Hypophosphatemia was not present at birth. Histology revealed severe osteomalacia but no other abnormalities. Skeletal dysplasia was reported in all anatomical compartments, though less frequently in the spine; there was no clear correlation between the location of nevi and the skeletal lesions. Phosphate and calcitriol supplementation was the most effective therapy for rickets. Convincing data that nevi removal improved blood phosphate levels was lacking. An age-dependent improvement in mineral abnormalities was observed. A spectrum of extra

  12. Massive plexiform neurofibromas in childhood: natural history and management issues.

    PubMed

    Serletis, Demitre; Parkin, Patricia; Bouffet, Eric; Shroff, Manohar; Drake, James M; Rutka, James T

    2007-05-01

    The authors review their experience with massive plexiform neurofibromas (PNs) in patients with pediatric neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1) to better characterize the natural history and management of these complex lesions. The authors performed a retrospective review of data obtained in seven patients with NF1 in whom massive PNs were diagnosed at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. These patients attended routine follow-up examinations conducted by a number of specialists, and serial neuroimaging studies were obtained to monitor disease progression. The most common presenting feature of PN was that of a painful, expanding lesion. Furthermore, two patients harbored multiple, distinct PNs affecting different body sites. With respect to management, two patients were simply observed, undergoing serial neuroimaging studies; two patients underwent biopsy sampling of their plexiform lesions; two patients underwent attempted medical treatment (farnesyl transferase inhibitor, R11577, and cyclophosphamide chemotherapy); and three patients required surgical debulking of their PNs because the massive growth of these tumors caused functional compromise. Ultimately, one patient died of respiratory complications due to progressive growth of the massive PN lesion. In this review of their experience, the authors found certain features that underscore the presentation and natural history of PNs. The management of these complex lesions, however, remains unclear. Slow-growing PNs may be observed conservatively, but the authors' experience suggests that resection should be considered in selected cases involving significant deterioration or functional compromise. Nevertheless, patients with massive PNs will benefit from close surveillance by a team of specialists to monitor for ongoing disease progression.

  13. TNNT1 nemaline myopathy: Natural history and therapeutic frontier.

    PubMed

    Fox, Michael D; Carson, Vincent J; Feng, Han-Zhong; Lawlor, Michael W; Gray, John T; Brigatti, Karlla W; Jin, J-P; Strauss, Kevin A

    2018-06-20

    We describe the natural history of 'Amish' nemaline myopathy (ANM), an infantile-onset, lethal disease linked to a pathogenic c.505G>T nonsense mutation of TNNT1, which encodes the slow fiber isoform of troponin T (TNNT1; a.k.a TnT). The TNNT1 c.505G>T allele has a carrier frequency of 6.5% within Old Order Amish settlements of North America. We collected natural history data for 106 ANM patients born between 1923 and 2017. Over the last two decades, mean age of molecular diagnosis was 16 ± 27 days. TNNT1 c.505G>T homozygotes were normal weight at birth but failed to thrive by age 9 months. Presenting neonatal signs were axial hypotonia, hip and shoulder stiffness, and tremors, followed by progressive muscle weakness, atrophy, and contractures. Affected children developed thoracic rigidity, pectus carinatum, and restrictive lung disease during infancy, and all succumbed to respiratory failure by 6 years of age (median survival 18 months, range 0.2-66 months). Muscle histology from two affected children showed marked fiber size variation due to both type 1 myofiber smallness (hypotrophy) and type 2 fiber hypertrophy, with evidence of nemaline rods, myofibrillar disarray, and vacuolar pathology in both fiber types. The truncated slow TNNT1 (TnT) fragment (p.Glu180Ter) was undetectable in ANM muscle, reflecting its rapid proteolysis and clearance from sarcoplasm. Similar functional and histological phenotypes were observed in other human cohorts and two transgenic murine models (Tnnt1-/- and Tnnt1 c.505G>T). These findings have implications for emerging molecular therapies, including the suitably of TNNT1 gene replacement for newborns with ANM or other TNNT1-associated myopathies.

  14. Initial report of the osteogenesis imperfecta adult natural history initiative.

    PubMed

    Tosi, Laura L; Oetgen, Matthew E; Floor, Marianne K; Huber, Mary Beth; Kennelly, Ann M; McCarter, Robert J; Rak, Melanie F; Simmonds, Barbara J; Simpson, Melissa D; Tucker, Carole A; McKiernan, Fergus E

    2015-11-14

    A better understanding of the natural history of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) in adulthood should improve health care for patients with this rare condition. The Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation established the Adult Natural History Initiative (ANHI) in 2010 to give voice to the health concerns of the adult OI community and to begin to address existing knowledge gaps for this condition. Using a web-based platform, 959 adults with self-reported OI, representing a wide range of self-reported disease severity, reported symptoms and health conditions, estimated the impact of these concerns on present and future health-related quality of life (QoL) and completed a Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®) survey of health issues. Adults with OI report lower general physical health status (p < .0001), exhibit a higher prevalence of auditory (58% of sample versus 2-16% of normalized population) and musculoskeletal (64% of sample versus 1-3% of normalized population) concerns than the general population, but report generally similar mental health status. Musculoskeletal, auditory, pulmonary, endocrine, and gastrointestinal issues are particular future health-related QoL concerns for these adults. Numerous other statistically significant differences exist among adults with OI as well as between adults with OI and the referent PROMIS® population, but the clinical significance of these differences is uncertain. Adults with OI report lower general health status but are otherwise more similar to the general population than might have been expected. While reassuring, further analysis of the extensive OI-ANHI databank should help identify areas of unique clinical concern and for future research. The OI-ANHI survey experience supports an internet-based strategy for successful patient-centered outcomes research in rare disease populations.

  15. The early history of the synapse: from Plato to Sherrington.

    PubMed

    Bennett, M R

    1999-09-15

    One hundred years ago, in 1897, Sherrington adopted the name synapse. However, the concept of the synapse emerged from considerations of how muscles are contracted and so locomotion affected over a period of 2400 years, from the time of Plato and Aristotle in the 4th century BC to the early part of the 20th century. This early history is considered in the present review. In terms of duration of influence, the early history was dominated by Aristotle's concept of vital pneuma. This was derived from the ether which filled all space, taken in by the lungs, transformed to vital pneuma in the heart, and then conducted in the blood stream to be transmitted to muscles. The vital pneuma then initiated the final phase of the muscle's psyche, that is, its contraction leading to locomotion. Aristotle's ideas had to be modified with the discovery by Galen and his students in the 2nd and 3rd centuries AD that nerves arising from the brain and spinal cord are necessary for the initiation of muscle contraction. They modified the Aristotlean account so that the vital pneuma delivered by blood vessels to the brain was converted there to psychic pneuma, from whence it was conducted along nerves to be transmitted to muscle, so allowing the muscle to contract. There matters rested for about 1300 years until Descartes. Descartes rejected the idea of organs and muscles possessing a psyche with a final cause that was released by the conduction and transmission of psychic pneuma in nerves, emphasising that mechanical explanations must be sought when determining the function of an organ or muscle. He argued in his corpuscular theory that fine particles derived from the blood in the brain, which he gave the unfortunate name of animal spirits, were conducted and transmitted along nerves to enter muscle during transmission, so leading to the increase in width of the muscle fibres, their shortening and contraction. This description was elaborated on in great detail by Descartes, and by his

  16. On the early history of the Finnish Meteorological Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevanlinna, H.

    2014-03-01

    This article is a review of the foundation (in 1838) and later developments of the Helsinki (Finland) magnetic and meteorological observatory, today the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI). The main focus of the study is in the early history of the FMI up to the beginning of the 20th century. The first director of the observatory was Physics Professor Johan Jakob Nervander (1805-1848). He was a famous person of the Finnish scientific, academic and cultural community in the early decades of the 19th century. Finland was an autonomously part of the Russian Empire from 1809 to 1917, but the observatory remained organizationally under the University of Helsinki, independent of Russian scientific institutions, and funded by the Finnish Government. Throughout the late-19th century the Meteorological Institute was responsible of nationwide meteorological, hydrological and marine observations and research. The observatory was transferred to the Finnish Society of Sciences and Letters under the name the Central Meteorological Institute in 1881. The focus of the work carried out in the Institute was changed gradually towards meteorology. Magnetic measurements were still continued but in a lower level of importance. The culmination of Finnish geophysical achievements in the 19th century was the participation to the International Polar Year programme in 1882-1883 by setting up a full-scale meteorological and magnetic observatory in Sodankylä, Lapland.

  17. From Darwin's Origin of Species toward a theory of natural history.

    PubMed

    Boero, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    Darwin is the father of evolutionary theory because he identified evolutionary patterns and, with Natural Selection, he ascertained the exquisitely ecological ultimate processes that lead to evolution. The proximate processes of evolution he proposed, however, predated the discovery of genetics, the backbone of modern evolutionary theory. The later discovery of the laws of inheritance by Mendel and the rediscovery of Mendel in the early 20th century led to two reforms of Darwinism: Neo-Darwinism and the Modern Synthesis (and subsequent refinements). If Darwin's evolutionary thought required much refinement, his ecological insight is still very modern. In the first edition of The Origin of Species, Darwin did not use either the word "evolution" or the word "ecology". "Ecology" was not coined until after the publication of the Origin. Evolution, for him, was the origin of varieties, then species, which he referred to as well-marked varieties, whereas, instead of using ecology, he used "the economy of nature". The Origin contains a high proportion of currently accepted ecological principles. Darwin labelled himself a naturalist. His discipline (natural history) was a blend of ecology and evolution in which he investigated both the patterns and the processes that determine the organization of life. Reductionist approaches, however, often keep the two disciplines separated from each other, undermining a full understanding of natural phenomena that might be favored by blending ecology and evolution through the development of a modern Theory of Natural History based on Darwin's vision of the study of life.

  18. The habitat and nature of early life.

    PubMed

    Nisbet, E G; Sleep, N H

    2001-02-22

    Earth is over 4,500 million years old. Massive bombardment of the planet took place for the first 500-700 million years, and the largest impacts would have been capable of sterilizing the planet. Probably until 4,000 million years ago or later, occasional impacts might have heated the ocean over 100 degrees C. Life on Earth dates from before about 3,800 million years ago, and is likely to have gone through one or more hot-ocean 'bottlenecks'. Only hyperthermophiles (organisms optimally living in water at 80-110 degrees C) would have survived. It is possible that early life diversified near hydrothermal vents, but hypotheses that life first occupied other pre-bottleneck habitats are tenable (including transfer from Mars on ejecta from impacts there). Early hyperthermophile life, probably near hydrothermal systems, may have been non-photosynthetic, and many housekeeping proteins and biochemical processes may have an original hydrothermal heritage. The development of anoxygenic and then oxygenic photosynthesis would have allowed life to escape the hydrothermal setting. By about 3,500 million years ago, most of the principal biochemical pathways that sustain the modern biosphere had evolved, and were global in scope.

  19. The early history of ideas on brief interventions for alcohol.

    PubMed

    McCambridge, Jim; Cunningham, John A

    2014-04-01

    This study explores the early development of brief interventions for alcohol using a history of ideas approach with a particular focus on intervention content. The source publications of the key primary studies published from approximately 1962 to 1992 were examined, followed by a brief review of the earliest reviews in this field. These studies were placed in the context of developments in alcohol research and in public health. After early pioneering work on brief interventions, further advances were not made until thinking about alcohol problems and their treatment, most notably on controlled drinking, along with wider changes in public health, created new conditions for progress. There was then a golden era of rapid advance in the late 1980s and early 1990s, when preventing the development of problem drinking became important for public health reasons, in addition to helping already problematic drinkers. Many research challenges identified at that time remain to be met. The content of brief interventions changed over the period of study, although not in ways well informed by research advances, and there were also obvious continuities, with a renewed emphasis on the facilitation of self-change being one important consequence of the development of internet applications. Ideas about brief interventions have changed in important ways. Brief interventions have been studied with different populations of drinkers, with aims embracing both individual and population-level perspectives, and without well-specified contents. The brief intervention field is an appropriate target for further historical investigations, which may help thinking about addressing alcohol and other problems. © 2013 The Authors. Addiction published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society for the Study of Addiction.

  20. The early history of ideas on brief interventions for alcohol

    PubMed Central

    McCambridge, Jim; Cunningham, John A

    2014-01-01

    Aims This study explores the early development of brief interventions for alcohol using a history of ideas approach with a particular focus on intervention content. Methods The source publications of the key primary studies published from approximately 1962 to 1992 were examined, followed by a brief review of the earliest reviews in this field. These studies were placed in the context of developments in alcohol research and in public health. Results After early pioneering work on brief interventions, further advances were not made until thinking about alcohol problems and their treatment, most notably on controlled drinking, along with wider changes in public health, created new conditions for progress. There was then a golden era of rapid advance in the late 1980s and early 1990s, when preventing the development of problem drinking became important for public health reasons, in addition to helping already problematic drinkers. Many research challenges identified at that time remain to be met. The content of brief interventions changed over the period of study, although not in ways well informed by research advances, and there were also obvious continuities, with a renewed emphasis on the facilitation of self-change being one important consequence of the development of internet applications. Conclusions Ideas about brief interventions have changed in important ways. Brief interventions have been studied with different populations of drinkers, with aims embracing both individual and population-level perspectives, and without well-specified contents. The brief intervention field is an appropriate target for further historical investigations, which may help thinking about addressing alcohol and other problems. PMID:24354855

  1. Investigations into the Early Life History of Naturally Produced Spring Chinook Salmon in the Grande Ronde Riiver Basin : Fish Research Project Oregon : Annual Progress Report 1 September 1995 to 1 August 1996.

    SciT

    Jonasson, Brian C.; Carmichael, Richard W.; Keefe, MaryLouise

    1997-09-01

    Historically, the Grande Ronde River produced an abundance of salmonids including stocks of spring, summer and fall chinook salmon, sockeye salmon, coho salmon, and summer steelhead. During the past century, numerous factors have caused the reduction of salmon stocks such that only sustainable stocks of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead remain. The sizes of spring chinook salmon populations in the Grande Ronde River basin also have been declining steadily and are substantially depressed from estimates of historic levels. In addition to a decline in population abundance, a reduction of spring chinook salmon spawning distribution is evident in the Grandemore » Ronde River basin. Numerous factors are thought to contribute to the decline of spring chinook salmon in the Snake River and its tributaries. These factors include passage problems and increased mortality of juvenile and adult migrants at mainstem Columbia and Snake river dams, overharvest, and habitat degradation associated with timber, agricultural, and land development practices. This study was designed to describe aspects of the life history strategies exhibited by spring chinook salmon in the Grande Ronde River basin. During the past year the focus was on rearing and migration patterns of juveniles in the upper Grande Ronde River and Catherine Creek. The study design included three objectives: (1) document the annual in-basin migration patterns for spring chinook salmon juveniles in the upper Grande Ronde River and Catherine Creek, including the abundance of migrants, migration timing and duration; (2) estimate and compare smolt survival indices to mainstem Columbia and Snake river dams for fall and spring migrating spring chinook salmon; and (3) determine summer and winter habitat utilization and preference of juvenile spring chinook salmon in the upper Grande Ronde River and Catherine Creek.« less

  2. Investigations into the Early History of Naturally Produced Spring Chinook Salmon in the Grand Ronde Basin : Fish Research Project Oregon : Annual Progress Report Project Period September 1, 1996 to August 31, 1997.

    SciT

    Johasson, Brian C.; Tranquilli, J. Vincent; Keefe, MaryLouise

    1998-10-28

    We have documented two general life history strategies utilized by juvenile spring chinook salmon in the Grande Ronde River basin: (1) juveniles migrate downstream out of summer rearing areas in the fall, overwinter in river valley habitats, and begin their seaward migration in the spring, and (2) juveniles remain in summer rearing areas through the winter and begin seaward migration in the spring. In migration year 96-97, the patterns evident from migrant trap data were similar for the three Grande Ronde River populations studied, with 42% of the Lostine River migrants and 76% of the Catherine Creek migrants leaving uppermore » rearing areas in the fall. Contrary to past years, the majority (98%) of upper Grande Ronde River migrants moved out in the fall. Total trap catch for the upper Grande Ronde River was exceedingly low (29 salmon), indicating that patterns seen this year may be equivocal. As in previous years, approximately 99% of chinook salmon juveniles moved past our trap at the lower end of the Grande Ronde River valley in the spring, reiterating that juvenile chinook salmon overwinter within the Grande Ronde valley section of the river. PIT-tagged fish were recaptured at Grande Ronde River traps and mainstem dams. Recapture data showed that fish that overwintered in valley habitats left as smolts and arrived at Lower Granite Dam earlier than fish that overwintered in upstream rearing areas. Fish from Catherine Creek that overwintered in valley habitats were recaptured at the dams at a higher rate than fish that overwintered upstream. In this first year of data for the Lostine River, fish tagged during the fall migration were detected at a similar rate to fish that overwintered upstream. Abundance estimates for migration year 96-97 were 70 for the upper Grande Ronde River, 4,316 for the Catherine Creek, and 4,323 for the Lostine River populations. Although present in most habitats, juvenile spring chinook salmon were found in the greatest abundance in

  3. Nature versus nurture? Consequences of short captivity in early stages.

    PubMed

    Horreo, Jose L; Valiente, America G; Ardura, Alba; Blanco, Aida; Garcia-Gonzalez, Claudia; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva

    2018-01-01

    Biological changes occurring as a consequence of domestication and/or captivity are not still deeply known. In Atlantic salmon (S almo salar ), endangered (Southern Europe) populations are enhanced by supportive breeding, which involves only 6 months of captive rearing following artificial spawning of wild-collected adults. In this work, we assess whether several fitness-correlated life-history traits (migratory behavior, straying rate, age at maturity, and growth) are affected by early exposure to the captive environment within a generation, before reproduction thus before genetic selection. Results showed significant differences in growth and migratory behavior (including straying), associated with this very short period of captivity in natural fish populations, changing even genetic variability (decreased in hatchery-reared adults) and the native population structure within and between rivers of the species. These changes appeared within a single generation, suggesting very short time of captivity is enough for initiating changes normally attributed to domestication. These results may have potential implications for the long-term population stability/viability of species subjected to restoration and enhancement processes and could be also considered for the management of zoo populations.

  4. Nature and Nurture in Early Feeding Behavior.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Lucy; Llewellyn, Clare

    2016-01-01

    Obesity has reached epidemic proportions and research into its prevention is increasingly focusing on the earliest stages of life. Avidity of appetite has been linked to a higher risk of obesity, but studies in infancy were scarce. The Gemini twin cohort was established to investigate genetic and environmental determinants of weight trajectories in early childhood with a focus on appetite and the home environment. Gemini families have been supplying questionnaire data at regular intervals, starting when the twins were 8 months old. Analyses of data on infant appetite and weight have provided a number of important findings. Firstly, a prospective study found that appetite in infancy drives weight gain more strongly than weight drives appetite, although the two processes do coexist. A further study using a subsample of twins discordant for appetite ruled out the possibility of familial confounding, suggesting a causal role for appetite in weight. Heritability estimates for appetitive traits were moderate to high (53-84%). Finally, multivariate analyses indicated that roughly one third of the genes related to weight are also related to appetite and vice versa. Environmental factors affecting appetite in infancy are understudied, but some potential strategies for minimizing over- or underconsumption by at-risk individuals are suggested. © 2016 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Natural history and prognostic factors in alcoholic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Guzzo-Merello, Gonzalo; Segovia, Javier; Dominguez, Fernando; Cobo-Marcos, Marta; Gomez-Bueno, Manuel; Avellana, Patricia; Millan, Isabel; Alonso-Pulpon, Luis; Garcia-Pavia, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to determine the natural history of contemporary alcoholic cardiomyopathy (ACM), to compare it with that of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDCM), and to identify risk factors for poor outcome. ACM is a common cause of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), but little is known about its natural history or the effect of reducing alcohol intake on disease progression. We studied the clinical characteristics and outcomes of 94 consecutive patients with ACM and 188 with IDCM, evaluated over the period between 1993 and 2011. After a median follow-up of 59 months (interquartile range: 25 to 107 months), 14 ACM patients (15%) had died from cardiovascular causes (6 from heart failure and 8 from sudden cardiac death), 14 (15%) underwent heart transplantation, 35 (37%) experienced recovery in left ventricular function, and 31 (33%) remained clinically stable without improvement in systolic function. Transplantation-free survival was higher in ACM patients than in IDCM patients (p = 0.002), and ACM was associated with a favorable outcome on multiple analysis of the entire cohort (odds ratio [OR]: 0.4; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.2 to 0.8; p = 0.01). Independent predictors of death or heart transplantation in ACM identified by multiple logistic regression analysis were atrial fibrillation (OR: 9.7; 95% CI: 2.56 to 36.79; p = 0.001); QRS duration >120 ms (OR: 7.2; 95% CI: 2.02 to 26; p = 0.002), and lack of beta-blocker therapy (OR: 4.4; 95% CI: 1.35 to 14.49; p = 0.014). ACM patients who reduced their alcohol intake to moderate levels exhibited similar survival (p = 0.22) and cardiac function recovery (p = 0.8) as abstainers. ACM has a better prognosis than IDCM. Atrial fibrillation, QRS width >120 ms, and the absence of beta-blocker therapy identify patients with a poor outcome. Alcohol abstainers and those who reduce intake to a moderate degree show similar clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier

  6. 77 FR 25740 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, New Haven, CT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-01

    ... Peabody Museum of Natural History, New Haven, CT AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History has completed an inventory of human remains in... History. Repatriation of the human remains to the Indian tribes stated below may occur if no additional...

  7. 76 FR 43712 - Notice of Inventory Completion: American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ...: American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The American Museum of Natural History has completed an inventory of human remains, in... History. Repatriation of the human remains to the Indian tribe stated below may occur if no additional...

  8. 76 FR 43720 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Homer Society of Natural History, Pratt Museum, Homer, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ... Society of Natural History, Pratt Museum, Homer, AK AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Homer Society of Natural History, Pratt Museum has completed an inventory of human... History, Pratt Museum. Repatriation of the human remains to the Indian tribe stated below may occur if no...

  9. American History in the Schools: Its Nature, Functions and Prospect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danzer, Gerald A.

    The teaching of history is part of the continuous process of redefining American civilization that lies at the center of what it means to be an American. A major challenge facing teachers of U.S. history is how to strike an appropriate balance between the forces of continuity and change. Much of the concern over history standards and the choice of…

  10. Supporting Early Childhood Environmental Education through the Natural Start Alliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrick, Christy; Braus, Judy

    2013-01-01

    The Natural Start Alliance is a new initiative of the North American Association for Environmental Education. Natural Start was created to support and expand early childhood environmental education (ECEE) by creating a network of organizations, educators, parents, and others who care about using environmental education to support young children's…

  11. Impacts of natural history and exhibit factors on carnivore welfare.

    PubMed

    Miller, Lance J; Ivy, Jamie A; Vicino, Greg A; Schork, Ivana G

    2018-04-06

    To improve the welfare of nonhuman animals under professional care, zoological institutions are continuously utilizing new methods to identify factors that lead to optimal welfare. Comparative methods have historically been used in the field of evolutionary biology but are increasingly being applied in the field of animal welfare. In the current study, data were obtained from direct behavioral observation and institutional records representing 80 individual animals from 34 different species of the order Carnivora. Data were examined to determine if a variety of natural history and animal management factors impacted the welfare of animals in zoological institutions. Output variables indicating welfare status included behavioral diversity, pacing, offspring production, and infant mortality. Results suggested that generalist species have higher behavioral diversity and offspring production in zoos compared with their specialist counterparts. In addition, increased minimum distance from the public decreased pacing and increased offspring production, while increased maximum distance from the public and large enclosure size decreased infant mortality. These results have implications for future exhibit design or renovation, as well as management practices and priorities for future research.

  12. The natural history and management of brachial plexus birth palsy.

    PubMed

    Buterbaugh, Kristin L; Shah, Apurva S

    2016-12-01

    Brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) is an upper extremity paralysis that occurs due to traction injury of the brachial plexus during childbirth. Approximately 20 % of children with brachial plexus birth palsy will have residual neurologic deficits. These permanent and significant impacts on upper limb function continue to spur interest in optimizing the management of a problem with a highly variable natural history. BPBP is generally diagnosed on clinical examination and does not typically require cross-sectional imaging. Physical examination is also the best modality to determine candidates for microsurgical reconstruction of the brachial plexus. The key finding on physical examination that determines need for microsurgery is recovery of antigravity elbow flexion by 3-6 months of age. When indicated, both microsurgery and secondary shoulder and elbow procedures are effective and can substantially improve functional outcomes. These procedures include nerve transfers and nerve grafting in infants and secondary procedures in children, such as botulinum toxin injection, shoulder tendon transfers, and humeral derotational osteotomy.

  13. Natural history of alkaptonuria revisited: analyses based on scoring systems.

    PubMed

    Ranganath, Lakshminarayan R; Cox, Trevor F

    2011-12-01

    Increased circulating homogentisic acid in body fluids occurs in alkaptonuria (AKU) due to lack of enzyme homogentisate dioxygenase leading in turn to conversion of HGA to a pigmented melanin-like polymer, known as ochronosis. The tissue damage in AKU is due to ochronosis. A potential treatment, a drug called nitisinone, to decrease formation of HGA is available. However, deploying nitisinone effectively requires its administration at the most optimal time in the natural history. AKU has a long apparent latent period before overt ochronosis develops. The rate of change of ochronosis and its consequences over time following its recognition has not been fully described in any quantitative manner. Two potential tools are described that were used to quantitate disease burden in AKU. One tool describes scoring the clinical features that includes clinical assessments, investigations and questionnaires in 15 patients with AKU. The second tool describes a scoring system that only includes items obtained from questionnaires in 44 people with AKU. Analysis of the data reveals distinct phases of the disease, a pre-ochronotic phase and an ochronotic phase. The ochronotic phase appears to demonstrate an earlier slower progression followed by a rapidly progressive phase. The rate of change of the disease will have implications for monitoring the course of the disease as well as decide on the most appropriate time that treatment should be started for it to be effective either in prevention or arrest of the disease.

  14. Reflexivity, the role of history, and the case of mesmerism in early Victorian Britain.

    PubMed

    Lamont, Peter

    2010-11-01

    As part of a wider argument that history is essential to psychological understanding because of the reflexive nature of psychological knowledge, this article examines the case of mesmerism in early Victorian Britain as an example of how psychological knowledge is both constructive and constructed. It is argued that the shift from "mesmerism" to "hypnotism" was a change in understanding that created a new kind of psychological experience. It is also argued that demonstrations of mesmerism, far from being self-evident facts, could be framed as evidence either for or against the central claims of mesmerism. It is concluded that the case of mesmerism in early Victorian Britain provides a further example of the need for historical understanding within Psychology.

  15. 78 FR 19299 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ... made by the Slater Museum of Natural History and Burke Museum professional staff in consultation with....R50000] Notice of Inventory Completion: Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound, Tacoma, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Slater Museum of Natural...

  16. Modeling the natural history of Pelizaeus–Merzbacher disease

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Joshua A.; Griffiths, Ian R.; Goldman, James E.; Smith, Chelsey M.; Cooksey, Elizabeth; Radcliff, Abigail B.; Duncan, Ian D.

    2015-01-01

    Major gaps in our understanding of the leukodystrophies result from their rarity and the lack of tissue for the interdisciplinary studies required to extend our knowledge of the pathophysiology of the diseases. This study details the natural evolution of changes in the CNS of the shaking pup (shp), a model of the classical form of the X-linked disorder Pelizaeus–Merzbacher disease, in particular in glia, myelin, and axons, which is likely representative of what occurs over time in the human disease. The mutation in the proteolipid protein gene, PLP1, leads to a delay in differentiation, increased cell death, and a marked distension of the rough endoplasmic reticulum in oligodendrocytes. However, over time, more oligodendrocytes differentiate and survive in the spinal cord leading to an almost total recovery of myelination, In contrast, the brain remains persistently hypomyelinated. These data suggest that shp oligodendrocytes may be more functional than previously realized and that their early recruitment could have therapeutic value. PMID:25562656

  17. Coastal Staphylinidae (Coleoptera): A worldwide checklist, biogeography and natural history.

    PubMed

    Frank, J H; Ahn, Kee-Jeong

    2011-01-01

    We provide a list of the 392 described species of Staphylinidae confined to coastal habitats worldwide. The list is in taxonomic sequence by subfamily, tribe, and genus and includes 91 genera. We provide the page reference of the original description of every species and genus listed and of many synonyms. We note the existence of recent reviews, phylogenies and keys of each of the tribes and genera included. Coastal Staphylinidae contain eight subfamilies: Microsilphinae, Omaliinae, Pselaphinae, Aleocharinae, Oxytelinae, Scydmaeninae, Paederinae, and Staphylininae.By 'coastal habitats' we mean habitats existing on the sea coast and subject to inundation or at least splashing by the very highest tides. This includes rocky, boulder, coral, sandy, and muddy seashores, and at least portions of salt-marshes, estuaries, and mangrove swamps. We exclude the sand dune habitat and higher parts of sea-cliffs.The list notes distribution of all the species, first according to the ocean or sea on whose shores it has been recorded, and second by country (and for the larger countries by province or state). Although this distribution is undoubtedly incomplete, it provides a basis for future development of a dedicated database.The 'Habitats, Habits, and Classificatory Notes' section is designed to provide ecologists with further taxonomic and ecological information. It includes references to descriptions of the immature stages, behavior of adults and immatures, their food, natural enemies, and habitat. We would have preferred to separate these entities, but current knowledge of ecology is developed in few instances beyond natural history.The Pacific Ocean basin was the origin and contributed to the dispersal of the majority of specialist coastal Staphylinidae at the level of genus. However, at the level of species, species belonging to non-coastal-specialist genera are about as likely to occur on the shores of other oceans as on the shores of the Pacific. This difference is a

  18. Coastal Staphylinidae (Coleoptera): A worldwide checklist, biogeography and natural history

    PubMed Central

    Frank, J. H.; Ahn, Kee-Jeong

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We provide a list of the 392 described species of Staphylinidae confined to coastal habitats worldwide. The list is in taxonomic sequence by subfamily, tribe, and genus and includes 91 genera. We provide the page reference of the original description of every species and genus listed and of many synonyms. We note the existence of recent reviews, phylogenies and keys of each of the tribes and genera included. Coastal Staphylinidae contain eight subfamilies: Microsilphinae, Omaliinae, Pselaphinae, Aleocharinae, Oxytelinae, Scydmaeninae, Paederinae, and Staphylininae. By ‘coastal habitats’ we mean habitats existing on the sea coast and subject to inundation or at least splashing by the very highest tides. This includes rocky, boulder, coral, sandy, and muddy seashores, and at least portions of salt-marshes, estuaries, and mangrove swamps. We exclude the sand dune habitat and higher parts of sea-cliffs. The list notes distribution of all the species, first according to the ocean or sea on whose shores it has been recorded, and second by country (and for the larger countries by province or state). Although this distribution is undoubtedly incomplete, it provides a basis for future development of a dedicated database. The ‘Habitats, Habits, and Classificatory Notes’ section is designed to provide ecologists with further taxonomic and ecological information. It includes references to descriptions of the immature stages, behavior of adults and immatures, their food, natural enemies, and habitat. We would have preferred to separate these entities, but current knowledge of ecology is developed in few instances beyond natural history. The Pacific Ocean basin was the origin and contributed to the dispersal of the majority of specialist coastal Staphylinidae at the level of genus. However, at the level of species, species belonging to non-coastal-specialist genera are about as likely to occur on the shores of other oceans as on the shores of the Pacific. This

  19. Contemporary Natural History and Management of Nonobstructive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Maron, Martin S; Rowin, Ethan J; Olivotto, Iacopo; Casey, Susan A; Arretini, Anna; Tomberli, Benedetta; Garberich, Ross F; Link, Mark S; Chan, Raymond H M; Lesser, John R; Maron, Barry J

    2016-03-29

    Left ventricular outflow tract gradients are absent in an important proportion of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). However, the natural course of this important patient subgroup remains largely unresolved. The authors systematically employed exercise (stress) echocardiography to define those patients without obstruction to left ventricular outflow at rest and/or under physiological exercise and to examine their natural history and clinical course to create a more robust understanding of this complex disease. We prospectively studied 573 consecutive HCM patients in 3 centers (44 ± 17 years; 66% male) with New York Heart Association functional class I/II symptoms at study entry, including 249 in whom left ventricular outflow tract obstruction was absent both at rest and following physiological exercise (<30 mm Hg; nonobstructive HCM) and retrospectively assembled clinical follow-up data. Over a median follow-up of 6.5 years, 225 of 249 nonobstructive patients (90%) remained in classes I/II, whereas 24 (10%) developed progressive heart failure to New York Heart Association functional classes III/IV. Nonobstructive HCM patients were less likely to experience advanced limiting class III/IV symptoms than the 324 patients with outflow obstruction (1.6%/year vs. 7.4%/year rest obstruction vs. 3.2%/year provocable obstruction; p < 0.001). However, 7 nonobstructive patients (2.8%) did require heart transplantation for progression to end stage versus none of the obstructive patients. HCM-related mortality among nonobstructive patients was low (n = 8; 0.5%/year), with 5- and 10-year survival rates of 99% and 97%, respectively, which is not different from expected all-cause mortality in an age- and sex-matched U.S. population (p = 0.15). HCM patients with nonobstructive disease appear to experience a relatively benign clinical course, associated with a low risk for advanced heart failure symptoms, other disease complications, and HCM-related mortality, and

  20. Natural history of deep vein thrombosis in children.

    PubMed

    Spentzouris, G; Gasparis, A; Scriven, R J; Lee, T K; Labropoulos, N

    2015-07-01

    To determine the natural history of deep vein thrombosis in children presented with a first episode in the lower extremity veins. Children with objective diagnosis of acute deep vein thrombosis were followed up with ultrasound and clinical examination. Risk factors and clinical presentation were prospectively collected. The prevalence of recurrent deep vein thrombosis and the development of signs and symptoms of chronic venous disease were recorded. There were 27 children, 15 males and 12 females, with acute deep vein thrombosis, with a mean age of 4 years, range 0.1-16 years. The median follow-up was 23 months, range 8-62 months. The location of thrombosis involved the iliac and common femoral vein in 18 patients and the femoral and popliteal veins in 9. Only one vein was affected in 7 children, two veins in 14 and more than two veins in 6. Recurrent deep vein thrombosis occurred in two patients, while no patient had a clinically significant pulmonary embolism. Signs and symptoms of chronic venous disease were present at last follow-up in 11 patients. There were nine patients with vein collaterals, but no patient developed varicose veins. Reflux was found in 18 veins of 11 patients. Failure of recanalization was seen in 7 patients and partial recanalization in 11. Iliofemoral thrombosis (p = 0.012) and failure to recanalize (p = 0.036) increased significantly the risk for developing signs and symptoms. Children with acute proximal deep vein thrombosis develop mild chronic venous disease signs and symptoms at mid-term follow-up and are closely related with iliofemoral thrombosis and failure to recanalization. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Natural history of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia treated with hypomethylating agents.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Ana; Montalban-Bravo, Guillermo; Takahashi, Koichi; Jabbour, Elias J; Kadia, Tapan; Ravandi, Farhad; Cortes, Jorge; Estrov, Zeev; Borthakur, Gautam; Pemmaraju, Naveen; Konopleva, Marina; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos; Pierce, Sherry; Kantarjian, Hagop; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo

    2017-07-01

    Hypomethylating agents (HMA) are the most commonly used therapeutic intervention in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). Due to the lack of CMML-specific clinical trials, the impact of these agents in the natural history of CMML is not fully understood. We present the largest retrospective series of CMML (n = 151) treated with HMA. Mean age at diagnosis was 69 years (range 50-88). According to the CMML-specific prognostic scoring system (CPSS): 17 (15%) were low-risk, 45 (39%) intermediate-1 risk, 42 (36%) intermediate-2, and 12 (10%) high-risk. 35 (23%) patients received single agent azacitidine, 73 (48%) single agent decitabine, and 43 (29%) combinations. With a median follow-up of 17 months, overall response rate (ORR) was 75%, with 41% achieving complete response (CR). Median overall survival (OS) was 24 months (95%CI: 20-28) and event-free survival 14 months (95%CI: 11-17). By multivariate analysis, age < 70 years, higher levels of hemoglobin, absence of blast in peripheral blood and lower CPSS cytogenetic risk predicted for better OS. CR was significantly higher in those patients treated with decitabine (58.3%) when compared with azacitidine (20.6%) (P < .001). 13 patients (9%) received allo-SCT after a median of 4 cycles of HMA. 66 patients (50%) had HMA failure: 26 primary (34%) and 50 secondary (66%), including 35 (46%) that transformed to AML. Outcomes after HMA failure were poor with OS of 7 months (95%CI: 3-12). In conclusion, HMA are effective in CMML but new agents and combinations are needed. This data could be a benchmark for further drug development in CMML. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Natural History and Treatment Outcomes of Severe Autoimmune Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Sonthalia, Nikhil; Rathi, Pravin M; Jain, Samit S; Surude, Ravindra G; Mohite, Ashok R; Pawar, Sunil V; Contractor, Qais

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the natural history and treatment outcomes of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) variants presenting with severe-AIH. Severe acute presentation is an uncommon manifestation of AIH, and it remains poorly characterized. We included 101 patients with AIH from January 2011 to December 2015. Patients were classified as seropositive-AIH and seronegative-AIH. Patients with acute liver failure, acute-on-chronic liver failure, and severe acute hepatitis were defined as severe-AIH patients. Patient characteristics and treatment outcomes with follow-up until 12 months were analyzed between the different groups. Out of 101 cases, 24 (23.76%) had severe AIH. Of them 9 (37.5%) had severe acute hepatitis, 3 (12.5%) had acute liver failure, and 12 (50%) had acute-on-chronic liver failure. Seronegative-AIH patients presented with severe-AIH significantly more frequently compared with seropositive-AIH patients (50% vs. 20.27%, P=0.022). Severe-AIH had 50% complete responders, 25% partial responders, and 25% treatment failures. Jaundice (88.88% vs. 68.7%, P=0.048), encephalopathy (55.55% vs. 6.66%, P=0.014), and higher international normalized ratio values (2.17±0.60 vs. 1.82±0.14, P=0.038) were factors associated with nonresponse rather than the presence or absence of autoantibodies in severe-AIH. The hazard ratio for predicting remission in the non-severe AIH group as compared with the severe-AIH group was 1.502, which was statistically not significant (95% CI, 0.799-2.827; P=0.205). Approximately 24% of patients with AIH have severe-AIH. Conventional autoantibodies are often absent in severe-AIH; however, it does not alter the outcome. Immunosuppressants should be given expediently in patients with severe-AIH.

  3. Genome sequencing highlights the dynamic early history of dogs.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Adam H; Gronau, Ilan; Schweizer, Rena M; Ortega-Del Vecchyo, Diego; Han, Eunjung; Silva, Pedro M; Galaverni, Marco; Fan, Zhenxin; Marx, Peter; Lorente-Galdos, Belen; Beale, Holly; Ramirez, Oscar; Hormozdiari, Farhad; Alkan, Can; Vilà, Carles; Squire, Kevin; Geffen, Eli; Kusak, Josip; Boyko, Adam R; Parker, Heidi G; Lee, Clarence; Tadigotla, Vasisht; Wilton, Alan; Siepel, Adam; Bustamante, Carlos D; Harkins, Timothy T; Nelson, Stanley F; Ostrander, Elaine A; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Wayne, Robert K; Novembre, John

    2014-01-01

    To identify genetic changes underlying dog domestication and reconstruct their early evolutionary history, we generated high-quality genome sequences from three gray wolves, one from each of the three putative centers of dog domestication, two basal dog lineages (Basenji and Dingo) and a golden jackal as an outgroup. Analysis of these sequences supports a demographic model in which dogs and wolves diverged through a dynamic process involving population bottlenecks in both lineages and post-divergence gene flow. In dogs, the domestication bottleneck involved at least a 16-fold reduction in population size, a much more severe bottleneck than estimated previously. A sharp bottleneck in wolves occurred soon after their divergence from dogs, implying that the pool of diversity from which dogs arose was substantially larger than represented by modern wolf populations. We narrow the plausible range for the date of initial dog domestication to an interval spanning 11-16 thousand years ago, predating the rise of agriculture. In light of this finding, we expand upon previous work regarding the increase in copy number of the amylase gene (AMY2B) in dogs, which is believed to have aided digestion of starch in agricultural refuse. We find standing variation for amylase copy number variation in wolves and little or no copy number increase in the Dingo and Husky lineages. In conjunction with the estimated timing of dog origins, these results provide additional support to archaeological finds, suggesting the earliest dogs arose alongside hunter-gathers rather than agriculturists. Regarding the geographic origin of dogs, we find that, surprisingly, none of the extant wolf lineages from putative domestication centers is more closely related to dogs, and, instead, the sampled wolves form a sister monophyletic clade. This result, in combination with dog-wolf admixture during the process of domestication, suggests that a re-evaluation of past hypotheses regarding dog origins is

  4. Genome Sequencing Highlights the Dynamic Early History of Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Adam H.; Gronau, Ilan; Schweizer, Rena M.; Ortega-Del Vecchyo, Diego; Han, Eunjung; Silva, Pedro M.; Galaverni, Marco; Fan, Zhenxin; Marx, Peter; Lorente-Galdos, Belen; Beale, Holly; Ramirez, Oscar; Hormozdiari, Farhad; Alkan, Can; Vilà, Carles; Squire, Kevin; Geffen, Eli; Kusak, Josip; Boyko, Adam R.; Parker, Heidi G.; Lee, Clarence; Tadigotla, Vasisht; Siepel, Adam; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Harkins, Timothy T.; Nelson, Stanley F.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Wayne, Robert K.; Novembre, John

    2014-01-01

    To identify genetic changes underlying dog domestication and reconstruct their early evolutionary history, we generated high-quality genome sequences from three gray wolves, one from each of the three putative centers of dog domestication, two basal dog lineages (Basenji and Dingo) and a golden jackal as an outgroup. Analysis of these sequences supports a demographic model in which dogs and wolves diverged through a dynamic process involving population bottlenecks in both lineages and post-divergence gene flow. In dogs, the domestication bottleneck involved at least a 16-fold reduction in population size, a much more severe bottleneck than estimated previously. A sharp bottleneck in wolves occurred soon after their divergence from dogs, implying that the pool of diversity from which dogs arose was substantially larger than represented by modern wolf populations. We narrow the plausible range for the date of initial dog domestication to an interval spanning 11–16 thousand years ago, predating the rise of agriculture. In light of this finding, we expand upon previous work regarding the increase in copy number of the amylase gene (AMY2B) in dogs, which is believed to have aided digestion of starch in agricultural refuse. We find standing variation for amylase copy number variation in wolves and little or no copy number increase in the Dingo and Husky lineages. In conjunction with the estimated timing of dog origins, these results provide additional support to archaeological finds, suggesting the earliest dogs arose alongside hunter-gathers rather than agriculturists. Regarding the geographic origin of dogs, we find that, surprisingly, none of the extant wolf lineages from putative domestication centers is more closely related to dogs, and, instead, the sampled wolves form a sister monophyletic clade. This result, in combination with dog-wolf admixture during the process of domestication, suggests that a re-evaluation of past hypotheses regarding dog origins is

  5. Application of Diversity Indices to Quantify Early Life-History Diversity for Chinook Salmon

    SciT

    Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Skalski, John R.

    2014-03-01

    We developed an index of early life history diversity (ELHD) for Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) Early life history diversity is the variation in morphological and behavioral traits expressed within and among populations by individual juvenile salmon during their downstream migration. A standard quantitative method does not exist for this prominent concept in salmon biology.

  6. The Invention and Early History of the N-Localizer for Stereotactic Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, James A

    2016-01-01

    Nearly four decades after the invention of the N-localizer, its origin and history remain misunderstood. Some are unaware that a third-year medical student invented this technology. The following conspectus accurately chronicles the origin of the N-localizer, presents recently discovered evidence that documents its history, and corrects misconceptions related to its origin and early history. PMID:27462476

  7. Natural History of Gutter-Related Type Ia Endoleaks after Snorkel/Chimney EVAR

    PubMed Central

    Ullery, Brant W.; Tran, Kenneth; Itoga, Nathan K.; Dalman, Ronald L.; Lee, Jason T.

    2018-01-01

    Objective Alternative endovascular strategies utilizing parallel or snorkel/chimney (ch-EVAR) techniques have been developed to address the lack of widespread availability and manufacturing limitations with branched/fenestrated aortic devices for the treatment of complex abdominal aortic aneurysms. Despite high technical success and mid-term patency of snorkel stent configurations, concerns remain regarding the perceived increased incidence of early gutter-related type Ia endoleaks. We aimed to evaluate the incidence and natural history of gutter-related type Ia endoleaks following ch-EVAR. Methods Review of medical records and available imaging studies, including completion angiography and serial computed tomographic angiography, was performed for all patients undergoing ch-EVAR at our institution between September 2009 and January 2015. Only procedures involving ≥1 renal artery with or without visceral snorkel stents were included. Primary outcomes of the study were presence and persistence or resolution of early gutter-related type Ia endoleak. Secondary outcomes included aneurysm sac shrinkage and need for secondary intervention related to the presence of type Ia gutter endoleak. Results Sixty patients (mean age, 75.8 ± 7.6 years; male, 70.0%) underwent ch-EVAR with a total of 111 snorkel stents (97 renal [33 bilateral renal], 12 SMA, 2 celiac). A median of 2 (range, 1-4) snorkel stents were placed per patient. Early gutter-related type Ia endoleaks were noted on 30.0% (n=18) of initial postoperative imaging studies. Follow-up imaging revealed spontaneous resolution of these gutter endoleaks in 47.3% and 71.8% of patients at 6- and 12 months post-procedure, respectively. Long-term anticoagulation, degree of oversizing, stent type and diameter, and other clinical/anatomic variables were not significantly associated with presence of gutter endoleaks. Two patients (3.3%) required secondary intervention related to persistent gutter endoleak. At a mean radiologic

  8. Mapping Early American History: Beyond What Happened Where

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milson, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    American history demands to be mapped. The stories of exploration, the colonies, the Louisiana Purchase, and so on are incomplete without maps to locate historical places, events, and conflicts. Yet maps can do more for the history teacher than simply illustrating what happened where or what territory was acquired when. Maps also provide clues…

  9. Early-Type Galaxy Star Formation Histories in Different Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, Patrick; Graves, G.

    2014-01-01

    We use very high-S/N stacked spectra of ˜29,000 nearby quiescent early-type galaxies (ETGs) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to investigate variations in their star formation histories (SFHs) with environment at fixed position along and perpendicular to the Fundamental Plane (FP). We separate galaxies in the three-dimensional FP space defined by galaxy effective radius Re, central stellar velocity dispersion σ, and surface brightness residual from the FP, ΔIe. We use the SDSS group catalogue of Yang et al. to further separate galaxies into three categories by their “identities” within their respective dark matter halos: central “Brightest Group Galaxies” (BGGs); Satellites; and Isolateds (those which are “most massive” in a dark matter halo with no Satellites). Within each category, we construct high-S/N mean stacked spectra to determine mean singleburst ages, [Fe/H], and [Mg/Fe] based on the stellar population synthesis models of R. Schiavon. This allows us to study variations in the stellar population properties (SPPs) with local group environment at fixed structure (i.e., fixed position in FP-space). We find that the SFHs of quiescent ETGs are almost entirely determined by their structural parameters σ and ΔIe. Any variation with local group environment at fixed structure is only slight: Satellites have the oldest stellar populations, 0.02 dex older than BGGs and 0.04 dex older than Isolateds; BGGs have the highest Fe-enrichments, 0.01 dex higher than Isolateds and 0.02 dex higher than Satellites; there are no differences in Mg-enhancement between BGGs, Isolateds, and Satellites. Our observation that, to zeroth-order, the SFHs of quiescent ETGs are fully captured by their structures places important qualitative constraints on the degree to which late-time evolutionary processes (those which occur after a galaxy’s initial formation and main star-forming lifetime) can alter their SFHs/structures.

  10. The natural history of multiple sclerosis: a geographically based study. 5. The clinical features and natural history of primary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cottrell, D A; Kremenchutzky, M; Rice, G P; Koopman, W J; Hader, W; Baskerville, J; Ebers, G C

    1999-04-01

    We report a natural history study of 216 patients with primary progressive (PP)- multiple sclerosis defined by at least 1 year of exacerbation-free progression at onset. This represents 19.8% of a largely population-based patient cohort having a mean longitudinal follow-up of 23 years. This subgroup of PP-multiple sclerosis patients had a mean age of onset of 38.5 years, with females predominating by a ratio of 1.3:1.0. The rate of deterioration from disease onset was substantially more rapid than for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, with a median time to disability status score (DSS) 6 and DSS 8 of 8 and 18 years, respectively. Forty-nine percent of patients were followed through to death. Examination of the early disease course revealed two groups with adverse prognostic profiles. Firstly, a shorter time to reach DSS 3 from onset of PP-multiple sclerosis significantly adversely influenced time to DSS 8. Second, involvement of three or more neurological systems at onset resulted in a median time to DSS 10 of 13.5 years in contrast to PP-multiple sclerosis patients with one system involved at onset where median time to death from multiple sclerosis was 33.2 years. However, age, gender and type of neurological system involved at onset appeared to have little influence on prognosis. Life expectancy, cause of mortality and familial history profile were similar in PP-multiple sclerosis and non-PP-multiple sclerosis (all other multiple sclerosis patients from the total population). From clinical onset, rate of progression was faster in the PP-multiple sclerosis group than in the secondary progressive (SP)-multiple sclerosis group. When the rates of progression from onset of the progressive phase to DSS 6, 8 and 10 were compared, SP-multiple sclerosis had a more rapid progressive phase. A substantial minority (28%) of the PP-multiple sclerosis cohort had a distinct relapse even decades after onset of progressive deterioration. These studies establish natural

  11. Learning with Nature and Learning from Others: Nature as Setting and Resource for Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacQuarrie, Sarah; Nugent, Clare; Warden, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Nature-based learning is an increasingly popular type of early childhood education. Despite this, children's experiences--in particular, their form and function within different settings and how they are viewed by practitioners--are relatively unknown. Accordingly, the use of nature as a setting and a resource for learning was researched. A…

  12. Effectiveness of traveller screening for emerging pathogens is shaped by epidemiology and natural history of infection

    PubMed Central

    Gostic, Katelyn M; Kucharski, Adam J; Lloyd-Smith, James O

    2015-01-01

    During outbreaks of high-consequence pathogens, airport screening programs have been deployed to curtail geographic spread of infection. The effectiveness of screening depends on several factors, including pathogen natural history and epidemiology, human behavior, and characteristics of the source epidemic. We developed a mathematical model to understand how these factors combine to influence screening outcomes. We analyzed screening programs for six emerging pathogens in the early and late stages of an epidemic. We show that the effectiveness of different screening tools depends strongly on pathogen natural history and epidemiological features, as well as human factors in implementation and compliance. For pathogens with longer incubation periods, exposure risk detection dominates in growing epidemics, while fever becomes a better target in stable or declining epidemics. For pathogens with short incubation, fever screening drives detection in any epidemic stage. However, even in the most optimistic scenario arrival screening will miss the majority of cases. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05564.001 PMID:25695520

  13. Shrub-Steppe Seasons A Natural History of the Mid-Columbia Basin

    SciT

    LE Rogers

    1995-08-01

    This book collects and updates a series of articles about the natural history of the Mid-Columbia region. The articles first appeared as a monthly column titled ''Natural History'' in the Tri-City Herald, beginning in May 1991. My approach has been to condense the best of what is known about the ecology of the region to a manageable length with little in the way of technical language and terms. Admittedly, there is a bias toward those topics and species on which I have either been personally involved or observed as part of the ecology research programs conducted on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Aridmore » Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve. The ALE Reserve is situated on the northeast-facing flank of the Rattlesnake Hills. Rattlesnake Mountain with a crest of over 3,600 feet is visible throughout much of the Mid-Columbia. Shrub-steppe grasslands once covered a large part of the western United States but most have been converted to other uses. The ALE site is the only remaining sizeable acreage (120 square miles) that is in near pristine condition and provides the only clear indication as to what the early trappers, traders, pioneers, and tribal members may have encountered in their day-to-day activities. In this respect, ALE provides a visible touchstone linking the past with the present for all of us.« less

  14. Autophagy in Natural History and After ERT in Glycogenosis Type II.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Corrado; Nascimbeni, Anna C; Fanin, Marina

    2015-01-01

    We studied the role of autophagy in a series of 10 infantile-, juvenile-, and adult-onset GSDII patients and investigated autophagy blockade in successive biopsies of adult cases during disease natural history. We also correlated the autophagosome accumulation and efficiency of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) in four treated cases (two infantile and two juvenile-adult onsets).The autophagic flux was monitored by measuring the amount of p62-positive protein aggregates and compared, together with fibre vacuolisation, to fibre atrophy.A blocked autophagic flux resulted in p62 accumulation, increased vacuolisation, and progressive atrophy of muscle fibres in biopsies collected from patients during natural history. On the contrary, in the GSDII cases early treated with ERT, the autophagic flux improved and muscle fibre atrophy, fibre vacuolisation, and acid phosphatase activity decreased.The functionality of the autophagy-lysosome system is essential in GSDII muscle, which is characterised by the presence of swollen glycogen-filled lysosomes and autophagic build-up. Defining the role of autophagy and its relationship with muscle loss is critical for understanding the disease pathogenesis, for developing new therapies, and for improving ERT efficacy in GSDII.

  15. 75 FR 52368 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Homer Society of Natural History, Pratt Museum, Homer, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Homer Society of Natural History, Pratt Museum, Homer, AK AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice... Society of Natural History, Pratt Museum, Homer, AK. The human remains were removed from Kachemak Bay, AK...

  16. More than a Museum: Natural History is Relevant in 21st Century Environmental Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, R. R.; Murphy-Mariscal, M. L.; Barrows, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    In the Anthropocene, the relevancy of natural history in environmental science is challenged and marginalized today more than ever. We tested the hypothesis that natural history is relevant to the fields of environmental science and ecology by assessing the values, needs, and decisions related to natural history of graduate students and environmental science professionals across 31 universities and various employers, respectively, in California. Graduate students surveyed (93.3%) agreed that natural history was relevant to science, approximately 70% believed it "essential" for conducting field-based research; however, 54.2% felt inadequately trained to teach a natural history course and would benefit from additional training in natural history (> 80%). Of the 185 professionals surveyed, all felt that natural history was relevant to science and "essential" or "desirable" in their vocation (93%). Our results indicate a disconnect between the value and relevancy of natural history in 21st century ecological science and opportunities for gaining those skills and knowledge through education and training.

  17. 43 CFR 9268.2 - Natural history resource management procedures. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Natural history resource management procedures. [Reserved] 9268.2 Section 9268.2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands...-CRIMINAL Recreation Programs § 9268.2 Natural history resource management procedures. [Reserved] ...

  18. 43 CFR 9268.2 - Natural history resource management procedures. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Natural history resource management procedures. [Reserved] 9268.2 Section 9268.2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands...-CRIMINAL Recreation Programs § 9268.2 Natural history resource management procedures. [Reserved] ...

  19. 43 CFR 9268.2 - Natural history resource management procedures. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Natural history resource management procedures. [Reserved] 9268.2 Section 9268.2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands...-CRIMINAL Recreation Programs § 9268.2 Natural history resource management procedures. [Reserved] ...

  20. 43 CFR 9268.2 - Natural history resource management procedures. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Natural history resource management procedures. [Reserved] 9268.2 Section 9268.2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands...-CRIMINAL Recreation Programs § 9268.2 Natural history resource management procedures. [Reserved] ...

  1. 76 FR 28074 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Utah Museum of Natural History, Salt Lake City, UT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... Museum of Natural History, Salt Lake City, UT AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice... of the Utah Museum of Natural History, Salt Lake City, UT. The human remains were removed from Snow... sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native...

  2. 75 FR 14461 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-25

    ... Museum of Anthropology professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Confederated Tribes... Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History/Oregon State Museum of Anthropology, Eugene, OR AGENCY... Museum of Natural and Cultural History/Oregon State Museum of Anthropology, Eugene, OR. The human remains...

  3. 75 FR 57288 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Utah Museum of Natural History, Salt Lake City, UT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-20

    ... the human remains was made by the Utah Museum of Natural History professional staff and a report sent... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Utah Museum of... possession and control of the Utah Museum of Natural History, Salt Lake City, UT. The human remains and...

  4. A Perspective on Natural History and Survival in Nonoperated Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Mohamad; Fok, Matthew; Hammoud, Ibrahim; Rimmer, Lara; Shaw, Matthew; Field, Mark; Harrington, Debbie; Kuduvalli, Manoj; Oo, Aung

    2013-01-01

    There are many questions that remain unanswered in the understanding of the natural history of thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA). This review will critically appraise the current published evidence on the natural history of TAA in nonoperated patients and their present rates of survival. PMID:26798691

  5. Dirt, disgust and disease: a natural history of hygiene

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Valerie A

    2007-01-01

    Hygiene has been studied from multiple perspectives, including that of history. I define hygiene as the set of behaviours that animals, including humans, use to avoid infection. I argue that it has an ancient evolutionary history, and that most animals exhibit such behaviours because they were adaptive. In humans, the avoidance of infectious threats is motivated by the emotion of disgust. Intuition about hygiene, dirt and disease can be found underlying belief about health and disease throughout history. Purification ritual, miasma, contagion, zymotic and germ theories of disease are ideas that spread through society because they are intuitively attractive, because they are supported by evidence either from direct experience or from authoritative report and because they are consistent with existing beliefs. In contrast to much historical and anthropological assertion, I argue that hygiene behaviour and disgust predate culture and so cannot fully be explained as its product. The history of ideas about disease thus is neither entirely socially constructed nor an “heroic progress” of scientists leading the ignorant into the light. As an animal behaviour the proper domain of hygiene is biology, and without this perspective attempts at explanation are incomplete. The approaches of biological anthropology have much to offer the practice of cultural history. PMID:17630362

  6. Dirt, disgust and disease: a natural history of hygiene.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Valerie A

    2007-08-01

    Hygiene has been studied from multiple perspectives, including that of history. I define hygiene as the set of behaviours that animals, including humans, use to avoid infection. I argue that it has an ancient evolutionary history, and that most animals exhibit such behaviours because they were adaptive. In humans, the avoidance of infectious threats is motivated by the emotion of disgust. Intuition about hygiene, dirt and disease can be found underlying belief about health and disease throughout history. Purification ritual, miasma, contagion, zymotic and germ theories of disease are ideas that spread through society because they are intuitively attractive, because they are supported by evidence either from direct experience or from authoritative report and because they are consistent with existing beliefs. In contrast to much historical and anthropological assertion, I argue that hygiene behaviour and disgust predate culture and so cannot fully be explained as its product. The history of ideas about disease thus is neither entirely socially constructed nor an "heroic progress" of scientists leading the ignorant into the light. As an animal behaviour the proper domain of hygiene is biology, and without this perspective attempts at explanation are incomplete. The approaches of biological anthropology have much to offer the practice of cultural history.

  7. From Darwin's Origin of Species toward a theory of natural history

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Darwin is the father of evolutionary theory because he identified evolutionary patterns and, with Natural Selection, he ascertained the exquisitely ecological ultimate processes that lead to evolution. The proximate processes of evolution he proposed, however, predated the discovery of genetics, the backbone of modern evolutionary theory. The later discovery of the laws of inheritance by Mendel and the rediscovery of Mendel in the early 20th century led to two reforms of Darwinism: Neo-Darwinism and the Modern Synthesis (and subsequent refinements). If Darwin's evolutionary thought required much refinement, his ecological insight is still very modern. In the first edition of The Origin of Species, Darwin did not use either the word “evolution” or the word “ecology”. “Ecology” was not coined until after the publication of the Origin. Evolution, for him, was the origin of varieties, then species, which he referred to as well-marked varieties, whereas, instead of using ecology, he used “the economy of nature”. The Origin contains a high proportion of currently accepted ecological principles. Darwin labelled himself a naturalist. His discipline (natural history) was a blend of ecology and evolution in which he investigated both the patterns and the processes that determine the organization of life. Reductionist approaches, however, often keep the two disciplines separated from each other, undermining a full understanding of natural phenomena that might be favored by blending ecology and evolution through the development of a modern Theory of Natural History based on Darwin's vision of the study of life. PMID:26097722

  8. 'An aid to mental health': natural history, alienists and therapeutics in Victorian Scotland.

    PubMed

    Finnegan, Diarmid A

    2008-09-01

    In the nineteenth century natural history was widely regarded as a rational and 'distracting' pursuit that countered the ill-effects, physical and mental, of urban life. This familiar argument was not only made by members of naturalists' societies but was also borrowed and adapted by alienists concerned with the moral treatment of the insane. This paper examines the work of five long-serving superintendents in Victorian Scotland and uncovers the connections made between an interest in natural history and the management of mental disease. In addition to recovering a significant influence on the conduct of several alienists the paper explores arguments made outside the asylum walls in favour of natural history as an aid to mental health. Investigating the promotion of natural history as a therapeutic recreation in Scotland and elsewhere reveals more fully the moral and cultural significance attached to natural history pursuits in the nineteenth century.

  9. A natural history of behavioral health program evaluation in Arizona.

    PubMed

    Braun, S H; Irving, D

    1984-01-01

    This article examines the history of behavioral health program evaluation efforts in the state of Arizona during the years 1974-1982. Program Evaluation in Arizona has been carried out in an environment where planning, monitoring, contracting, appropriations, and evaluation have been inter-related--sometimes loosely, sometimes closely. Here we trace the year-by-year evolution of the evaluation system and its connections with the other parts of the environment. This history illustrates the gradual development of an evaluation system in an organizational context, including the sidetracks and setbacks .

  10. The reconsideration of natural history of echinococcosis at Rebun Island.

    PubMed

    Minagawa, T

    1999-03-01

    It has been believed that the outbreak of echinococcosis at Rebun Island had ceased by 1970. The first patient was diagnosed in 1936 and 131 patients have been authorized as echinococcosis so far. The conference of measures against the outbreak had been organized in 1948 and started to eradicate Echinococcus multilocularis from the Island. Medical examination to detect the patients and the capture and autopsy of dogs and cats had been carried out hard till 1970. At that time, foxes imported from Simusiru Island in the middle Kuriles during the years 1924 to 1926 had already disappeared and it has seemed to be sure that stray dogs and cats might carry E. multilocularis and excrete infectious eggs in stead of foxes. Since we have had no real data concerning the natural history of patients with echinococcosis without any treatments, it can not be recognized the time of infection and the role of dogs or cats on the spread of echinococcosis at Rebun Island. From the new data, it is concluded that the active life cycle of E. multilocularis between foxes and vole might be closed by 1940, since the last patient infected with E. multilocularis was born in 1940 and died in 1945. Furthermore, it is estimated that more than 200 patients (3 to 4% of people at the island) might die from echinococcosis, because of the fact of the unusual increase of mortality of liver disorders and oldness observed during the years of 1940 to 1960. 81 patients with the high possibility of echinococcosis detected from 1937 to 1963 can be added to 131 authorized patients. Surprisingly, it is noticed that the standard deviations of ages of death of 94 patients born in Meiji era (1880-1912) and 59 in Taisho and Showa eras (1912-1940) are 63.16 +/- 11.68, and 34.32 +/- 11.87, respectively. It means that both old and young people might be infected simultaneously but for the long period. There was no difference between the susceptibility of young and old men to E. multilocularis. The numbers of male

  11. The Natural History and Treatment Outcomes of Perineural Spread of Malignancy within the Head and Neck.

    PubMed

    Warren, Timothy A; Nagle, Christina M; Bowman, James; Panizza, Benedict J

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the natural history of diseases enables the clinician to better diagnose and treat their patients. Perineural spread of head and neck cancers are poorly understood and often diagnosis is delayed resulting in poorer outcomes and more debilitating treatments. This article reviews a large personal series of head and neck malignancy presenting with perineural spread along almost exclusively the trigeminal and/or facial nerves. A detailed analysis of squamous cell carcinoma of cutaneous origin is presented including an analysis of likely primaries, which most often have occurred months to years prior. The importance of early detection is reinforced by the highly significant (p < 0.0001) differences in disease specific survival, which occur, depending on how far along a cranial nerve the disease has been allowed to spread.

  12. The Natural History and Treatment Outcomes of Perineural Spread of Malignancy within the Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Timothy A.; Nagle, Christina M.; Bowman, James; Panizza, Benedict J.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the natural history of diseases enables the clinician to better diagnose and treat their patients. Perineural spread of head and neck cancers are poorly understood and often diagnosis is delayed resulting in poorer outcomes and more debilitating treatments. This article reviews a large personal series of head and neck malignancy presenting with perineural spread along almost exclusively the trigeminal and/or facial nerves. A detailed analysis of squamous cell carcinoma of cutaneous origin is presented including an analysis of likely primaries, which most often have occurred months to years prior. The importance of early detection is reinforced by the highly significant (p < 0.0001) differences in disease specific survival, which occur, depending on how far along a cranial nerve the disease has been allowed to spread. PMID:27123386

  13. New concept in natural history and management of diabetes mellitus in thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Ratna; Bajoria, Rekha

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is a major endocrinopathy, which occurs due transfusional haemosiderosis and is found in 20-30% of adult patients with beta-thalassaemia worldwide, accounting for significant morbidity. It is multifactorial with iron loading being the dominant cause and its management poses a clinical challenge. Diabetes in thalassaemia patients is distinct from type 2 diabetes. It is peculiar in many aspects including its pathophysiology and occurs due to insulin resistance as well as islet cell insufficiency. This article reviews the natural history of diabetes in this presentation with emphasis on prevention monitoring and management. Use of MRI techniques may be useful for future monitoring as well as biochemical monitoring to prevent complications of diabetes. Early intervention with intensified chelation may reverse pancreatic function and structural changes as evident from MRI.

  14. [A brief history of the natural causes of human disease].

    PubMed

    Lips-Castro, Walter

    2015-01-01

    In the study of the causes of disease that have arisen during the development of humankind, one can distinguish three major perspectives: the natural, the supernatural, and the artificial. In this paper we distinguish the rational natural causes of disease from the irrational natural causes. Within the natural and rational causal approaches of disease, we can highlight the Egyptian theory of putrid intestinal materials called "wechdu", the humoral theory, the atomistic theory, the contagious theory, the cellular theory, the molecular (genetic) theory, and the ecogenetic theory. Regarding the irrational, esoteric, and mystic causal approaches to disease, we highlight the astrological, the alchemical, the iatrochemical, the iatromechanical, and others (irritability, solidism, brownism, and mesmerism).

  15. Sherborn's foraminiferal studies and their influence on the collections at the Natural History Museum, London.

    PubMed

    Miller, C Giles

    2016-01-01

    Sherborn's work on the Foraminifera clearly provided the initial spark to compile the major indexes for which he is famous. Contact and help from famous early micropalaeontologists such as T. Rupert Jones and Fortescue William Millett led Sherborn to produce his Bibliography of Foraminifera and subsequently a two-part Index of Foraminiferal Genera and Species. Edward Heron-Allen, whose mentor was Millett, was subsequently inspired by the bibliography to attempt to acquire every publication listed. This remarkable collection of literature was donated to the British Museum (Natural History) in 1926 along with the foraminiferal collections Heron-Allen had mainly purchased from early micropalaeontologists. This donation forms the backbone of the current NHM micropalaeontological collections. The NHM collections contain a relatively small amount of foraminiferal material published by Sherborn from the London Clay, Kimmeridge Clay and Speeton Clay. Another smaller collection reflects his longer-term interest in the British Chalk following regular fieldwork with A. W. Rowe. Other collections relating to Sherborn's early published work, particularly with T. R. Jones, are not present in the collections but these collections may have been sold or deposited elsewhere by his co-workers.

  16. Natural history of frozen shoulder: fact or fiction? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wong, C K; Levine, W N; Deo, K; Kesting, R S; Mercer, E A; Schram, G A; Strang, B L

    2017-03-01

    In 1940s, it was proposed that frozen shoulder progresses through a self-limiting natural history of painful, stiff and recovery phases, leading to full recovery without treatment. However, clinical evidence of persistent limitations lasting for years contradicts this assumption. To assess evidence for the natural history theory of frozen shoulder by examining: (1) progression through recovery phases, and (2) full resolution without treatment. MEDLINE, PubMed, EBSCO CINAHL and PEDro database searches augmented by hand searching. Cohort or randomised controlled trials with no-treatment comparison groups including adults with frozen shoulder who received no treatment and reporting range of motion, pain or function for ≥6 months. Reviewers assessed study eligibility and quality, and extracted data before reaching consensus. Limited early range-of-motion improvements and greater late improvements defined progression through recovery phases. Restoration of normal range of motion and previous function defined full resolution. Of 508 citations, 13 articles were reviewed and seven were included in this review. Low-quality evidence suggested that no treatment yielded some, but not complete, improvement in range of motion after 1 to 4 years of follow-up. No evidence supported the theory of progression through recovery phases to full resolution without treatment. On the contrary, moderate-quality evidence from three randomised controlled trials with longitudinal data demonstrated that most improvement occurred early, not late. Low-quality evidence revealed the weakness of longstanding assumptions about frozen shoulder. Contradictory evidence and a lack of supporting evidence shows that the theory of recovery phases leading to complete resolution without treatment for frozen shoulder is unfounded. Copyright © 2016 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Reprint Series: Nature and History of Pi. RS-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaaf, William L., Ed.

    This is one in a series of SMSG supplementary and enrichment pamphlets for high school students. This series makes available expository articles which appeared in a variety of mathematical periodicals. Topics covered include: (1) the history of the number pi; (2) what's new about pi; (3) the number pi; (4) pi and probability; and (5) from the…

  18. Still Missing? History Chapters in Introductory Early Childhood Education Textbooks From the 1990s to the 2010s

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prochner, Larry; Woitte, Sherry

    2013-01-01

    This article compares history chapters in recent introductory early childhood education textbooks with those from an earlier study, reviewing history chapters on four dimensions: the rationale for the study of history, the dominant story of the history, the facts of the history, and the image of the history. Ten textbooks are reviewed, including…

  19. The Prevalence and Natural History of Food Allergy.

    PubMed

    Kattan, Jacob

    2016-07-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that the prevalence of food allergy is increasing. Not only are more children being diagnosed with food allergies, but studies suggest that when people outgrow their food allergies, it is taking longer than was previously thought. Studies in recent years have noted factors that may lead to a lower likelihood of developing a food allergy, including the early introduction of common food allergens, having a sufficient vitamin D level, or having a higher maternal intake of peanut early in pregnancy. Given a recent report that sensitization to common food allergens did not increase from the late 1980s/early 1990s to the mid-2000s, further studies will need to examine if the rise in food allergy prevalence is due to a change in the relationship between sensitization and clinical allergy or changes in the recognition and diagnosis of food allergy.

  20. The Effect of Project-Based History and Nature of Science Practices on the Change of Nature of Scientific Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çibik, Ayse Sert

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the change of pre-service science teachers' views about the nature of scientific knowledge through Project-Based History and Nature of Science training and Conventional Method. The sample of the study consists of two groups of 3rd grade undergraduate students attending teacher preparation program of science…

  1. What History Tells Us about the Distinct Nature of Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hasok

    2017-11-01

    Attention to the history of chemistry can help us recognise the characteristics of chemistry that have helped to maintain it as a separate scientific discipline with a unique identity. Three such features are highlighted in this paper. First, chemistry has maintained a distinct type of theoretical thinking, independent from that of physics even in the era of quantum chemistry. Second, chemical research has always been shaped by its ineliminable practical relevance and usefulness. Third, the lived experience of chemistry, spanning the laboratory, the classroom and everyday life, is distinctive in its multidimensional sensuousness. Furthermore, I argue that the combination of these three features makes chemistry an exemplary science.

  2. Will novel agents for ALL finally change the natural history?

    PubMed

    Douer, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cure rates have markedly improved over the past years to approximately 85%, but remain at 40%-50% in adults. Redefining current adult chemotherapy regimens is likely to improve the natural course of the disease, but new agents are needed. Immunotherapy approaches for pre-B ALL are in the forefront of research on novel agents; in particular, advances are being made in manipulating autologous T cells either by infusion of a bifunctional antibody (eg, blinatumomab) or by ex vivo genetic modification of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). The natural course of Philadelphia positive ALL has already improved by targeting ABL/BCR1. Other mutated genes are being discovered and novel small molecules that target their products are being studied in clinical trials. Finally, ALL is a heterogeneous disease and novel agents are likely to impact the natural course of smaller populations of biologically defined ALL subtypes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical Monitoring of Chronic Hepatitis C Based on its Natural History and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Douglas L; Hu, Ke-Qin

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major public health problem and a leading cause of chronic liver disease. Chronic HCV infection often follows a progressive course over years and can result in cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and need for liver transplantation. In the United States alone, the estimated prevalence of HCV infection is up to 5.1 million persons. The optimal approach to detecting HCV infection is to screen persons for possible history of risks of exposure to virus and to test those selected individuals with risk factors. Both host and viral factors may be important contributors to the natural history of HCV. Currently, effective pharmacologic therapy are available to induce sustained virologic response (SVR) or virologic "cure," which results in improved morbidity and mortality. Patient education before treatment is essential and should include a full discussion of potential side effects. It is important to work collaboratively and closely with patients to ensure early recognition of adverse events and to effectively manage them in order to ensure treatment compliance. This paper provides a thorough overview on screening for the diagnosis, clinical management, and treatment indications and contraindications for chronic hepatitis C.

  4. Learning Early Twentieth-Century History through First-Person Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lark, Lisa A.

    2007-01-01

    For many of the students in the author's American history class, early twentieth-century American history seems far removed from their daily lives. Being first and second-generation American citizens, many of the students do not have the luxury of hearing grandparents and great-grandparents telling stories about FDR and Henry Ford. More…

  5. North American freshwater mussels: natural history, ecology, and conservation

    Wendell R. Haag

    2012-01-01

    Interest in freshwater mussels is growing for two important reasons. First, freshwater mussels are among the most endangered organisms on Earth, and many species are already extinct or face imminent extinction. Their desperate conservation plight has gained intense interest from natural resource agencies, nongovernmental conservation organizations, academia, and...

  6. Sports, Physical Activity and Recreation in Early American History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballou, Ralph B.

    Sports and physical recreation activities have been part of American life since the days of the early settlers. Although the settlers were faced with problems of survival, accounts of life in the colonies in the 1600's carry mention of bowling in the streets, play with bows and arrows, and ice skating. Other activities to gain popularity before…

  7. Zircons as a Probe of Early Luanr History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crow, C. A.; McKeegan, K. D.; Gilmour, J. D.; Crowther, S. A.; Talor, D. J.

    2013-09-01

    Zircons are ideal for investigating the early lunar bombardment because we can measure both U-Pb crystallization ages and fissiongenic Xe degassing ages for the same crystal. We report U-Pb, Pb-Pb and U-Xe ages for three lunar zircons.

  8. Zircons as a Probe of Early Lunar Impact History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crow, C. A.; McKeegan, K. D.; Gilmour, J. D.; Crowther, S. A.; Taylor, D. J.

    2013-08-01

    Zircons are ideal for investigating the early lunar bombardment because we can measure both U-Pb crystallization ages and fissiongenic Xe degassing ages for the same crystal. We report U-Pb, Pb-Pb and U-Xe ages for two lunar zircons.

  9. Early history of tree seedling nurseries in the South

    James P. Barnett

    2013-01-01

    The forests in the South were devastated by aggressive harvesting that began following the Civil War. By the early in the 20th century, many millions of acres of land needed reforestation. Foresighted individuals began a committed effort to restore this land to a productive condition. This effort required dedication, innovation, cooperation, and leadership. The...

  10. Contemporary divergence in early life history in grayling (Thymallus thymallus).

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Gaute; Barson, Nicola J; Haugen, Thrond O; Vøllestad, L Asbjørn

    2011-12-13

    Following colonization of new habitats and subsequent selection, adaptation to environmental conditions might be expected to be rapid. In a mountain lake in Norway, Lesjaskogsvatnet, more than 20 distinct spawning demes of grayling have been established since the lake was colonized, some 20-25 generations ago. The demes spawn in tributaries consistently exhibiting either colder or warmer temperature conditions during spawning in spring and subsequent early development during early summer. In order to explore the degree of temperature-related divergence in early development, a multi-temperature common-garden experiment was performed on embryos from four different demes experiencing different spring temperatures. Early developmental characters were measured to test if individuals from the four demes respond differently to the treatment temperatures. There was clear evidence of among-deme differences (genotype - environment interactions) in larval growth and yolk-to-body-size conversion efficiency. Under the cold treatment regime, larval growth rates were highest for individuals belonging to cold streams. Individuals from warm streams had the highest yolk-consumption rate under cold conditions. As a consequence, yolk-to-body-mass conversion efficiency was highest for cold-deme individuals under cold conditions. As we observed response parallelism between individuals from demes belonging to similar thermal groups for these traits, some of the differentiation seems likely to result from local adaptation The observed differences in length at age during early larval development most likely have a genetic component, even though both directional and random processes are likely to have influenced evolutionary change in the demes under study.

  11. Crayfishes (Decapoda : Cambaridae) of Oklahoma: identification, distributions, and natural history.

    PubMed

    Morehouse, Reid L; Tobler, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We furnish an updated crayfish species list for the state of Oklahoma (United States of America), including an updated and illustrated dichotomous key. In addition, we include species accounts that summarize general characteristics, life coloration, similar species, distribution and habitat, life history, and syntopic species. Current and potential distributions were analyzed using ecological niche models to provide a critical resource for the identification of areas with conservation priorities and potential susceptibility to invasive species. Currently, Oklahoma harbors 30 species of crayfish, two of which were recently discovered. Eastern Oklahoma has the highest species diversity, as this area represents the western distribution extent for several species. The work herein provides baseline data for future work on crayfish biology and conservation in Oklahoma and surrounding states.

  12. Autosomal dominant cyclic hematopoiesis: Genetics, phenotype, and natural history

    SciT

    Palmer, S.E.; Stephens, K.; Dale, D.C.

    Autosomal dominant cyclic hematopoiesis (ADCH; cyclic neutropenia) is a rare disorder manifested by transient neutropenia that recurs every three weeks. To facilitate mapping the ADCH gene by genetic linkage analysis, we studied 9 ADCH families with 42 affected individuals. Pedigrees revealed AD inheritance with no evidence for decreased penetrance. Similar intra- and interfamilial variable expression was observed, with no evidence to support heterogeneity. At least 3 families displayed apparent new mutations. Many adults developed chronic neutropenia, while offspring always cycled during childhood. Children displayed recurrent oral ulcers, gingivitis, lymphadenopathy, fever, and skin and other infections with additional symptoms. Interestingly, theremore » were no cases of neonatal infection. Some children required multiple hospitalizations for treatment. Four males under age 18 died of Clostridium sepsis following necrotizing enterocolitis; all had affected mothers. No other deaths due to ADCH were found; most had improvement of symptoms and infections as adults. Adults experienced increased tooth loss prior to age 30 (16 out of 27 adults, with 9 edentulous). No increase in myelodysplasia, malignancy, or congenital anomalies was observed. Recombinant G-CSF treatment resulted in dramatic improvement of symptoms and infections. The results suggest that ADCH is not a benign disorder, especially in childhood, and abdominal pain requires immediate evaluation. Diagnosis of ADCH requires serial blood counts in the proband and at least one CBC in relatives to exclude similar disorders. Genetic counseling requires specific histories as well as CBCs of each family member at risk to determine status regardless of symptom history, especially to assess apparent new mutations.« less

  13. Epidemiology, prevalence, and natural history of compulsive sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Kuzma, John M; Black, Donald W

    2008-12-01

    Research into CSB is hindered by the lack of a generally accepted definition and reliable and valid assessment tools. Despite these limitations, evidence indicates that CSB is relatively common in the general adult population, causes substantial personal distress, and is a source of significant psychosocial disability. CSB appears to begin early in life, to have a male preponderance, and to run a chronic or episodic course. It is also commonly associated with psychiatric comorbidity, typically mood, anxiety, substance use, and personality disorders. Further research is needed to better our understanding of the disorder and improve our ability to develop specific interventions.

  14. Clinical Presentation and Natural History of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in RASopathies.

    PubMed

    Calcagni, Giulio; Adorisio, Rachele; Martinelli, Simone; Grutter, Giorgia; Baban, Anwar; Versacci, Paolo; Digilio, Maria Cristina; Drago, Fabrizio; Gelb, Bruce D; Tartaglia, Marco; Marino, Bruno

    2018-04-01

    RASopathies are a heterogeneous group of genetic syndromes characterized by mutations in genes that regulate cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, survival, migration, and metabolism. Excluding congenital heart defects, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most frequent cardiovascular defect in patients affected by RASopathies. A worse outcome (in terms of surgical risk and/or mortality) has been described in a specific subset of Rasopathy patients with early onset, severe hypertrophic cardiomyopathy presenting with heart failure. New short-term therapy with a mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor has recently been used to prevent heart failure in these patients with a severe form of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Nature or Artifice? Grafting in Early Modern Surgery and Agronomy.

    PubMed

    Savoia, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    In 1597, Gaspare Tagliacozzi published a famous two-volume book on “plastic surgery.” The reconstructive technique he described was based on grafting skin taken from the arm onto the mutilated parts of the patient's damaged face – especially noses. This paper focuses on techniques of grafting, the “culture of grafting,” and the relationships between surgery and plant sciences in the sixteenth century. By describing the fascination with grafting in surgery, natural history, gardening, and agronomy the paper argues that grafting techniques were subject to delicate issues: to what extent it was morally acceptable to deceive the eye with artificial entities? and what was the status of the product of a surgical procedure that challenged the traditional natural/artificial distinction? Finally, this paper shows how in the seventeenth century grafting survived the crisis of Galenism by discussing the role it played in teratology and in controversies on the uses the new mechanistic anatomy.

  16. Natural Inhibitors of Snake Venom Metalloendopeptidases: History and Current Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Viviane A.; Gomes-Neto, Francisco; Perales, Jonas; Neves-Ferreira, Ana Gisele C.; Valente, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    The research on natural snake venom metalloendopeptidase inhibitors (SVMPIs) began in the 18th century with the pioneering work of Fontana on the resistance that vipers exhibited to their own venom. During the past 40 years, SVMPIs have been isolated mainly from the sera of resistant animals, and characterized to different extents. They are acidic oligomeric glycoproteins that remain biologically active over a wide range of pH and temperature values. Based on primary structure determination, mammalian plasmatic SVMPIs are classified as members of the immunoglobulin (Ig) supergene protein family, while the one isolated from muscle belongs to the ficolin/opsonin P35 family. On the other hand, SVMPIs from snake plasma have been placed in the cystatin superfamily. These natural antitoxins constitute the first line of defense against snake venoms, inhibiting the catalytic activities of snake venom metalloendopeptidases through the establishment of high-affinity, non-covalent interactions. This review presents a historical account of the field of natural resistance, summarizing its main discoveries and current challenges, which are mostly related to the limitations that preclude three-dimensional structural determinations of these inhibitors using “gold-standard” methods; perspectives on how to circumvent such limitations are presented. Potential applications of these SVMPIs in medicine are also highlighted. PMID:27571103

  17. A pervasive denigration of natural history misconstrues how biodiversity inventories and taxonomy underpin scientific knowledge

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Embracing comparative biology, natural history encompasses those sciences that discover, decipher and classify unique (idiographic) details of landscapes, and extinct and extant biodiversity. Intrinsic to these multifarious roles in expanding and consolidating research and knowledge, natural history endows keystone support to the veracity of law-like (nomothetic) generalizations in science. What science knows about the natural world is governed by an inherent function of idiographic discovery; characteristic of natural history, this relationship is exemplified wherever an idiographic discovery overturns established wisdom. This nature of natural history explicates why inventories are of such epistemological importance. Unfortunately, a Denigration of Natural History weakens contemporary science from within. It expresses in the prevalent, pervasive failure to appreciate this pivotal role of idiographic research: a widespread disrespect for how natural history undergirds scientific knowledge. Symptoms of this Denigration of Natural History present in negative impacts on scientific research and knowledge. One symptom is the failure to appreciate and support the inventory and monitoring of biodiversity. Another resides in failures of scientiometrics to quantify how taxonomic publications sustain and improve knowledge. Their relevance in contemporary science characteristically persists and grows; so the temporal eminence of these idiographic publications extends over decades. This is because they propagate a succession of derived scientific statements, findings and/or conclusions - inherently shorter-lived, nomothetic publications. Widespread neglect of natural science collections is equally pernicious, allied with disregard for epistemological functions of specimens, whose preservation maintains the veracity of knowledge. Last, but not least, the decline in taxonomic expertise weakens research capacity; there are insufficient skills to study organismal diversity in all

  18. Oral history of Florence Downs; the early years.

    PubMed

    Fairman, J; Mahon, M M

    2001-01-01

    Florence Downs is a well-recognized nursing leader, educator, editor, and scholar who helped shape nursing as an intellectual discipline, and wrote extensively about the importance of links between research and practice. Through the use of oral history data garnered over 15 hours of interviews, we constructed a narrative that describes some of Downs' formative experiences. Oral history is used to place the "stories" of an individual into a social and cultural context, in this case, the development of the profession of nursing. From the interviews, several strands emerged that defined Downs' extended career, including the importance of developing a community of scholars both in and outside of nursing, the dangers of parochialism, and the necessity of a perspective on life that melded a keen sense of humor. Factors that affected Downs' style and choice, especially her mother, and her educational experiences, were revealed. From the interviews we gained a sense of how Downs constructed her conceptual universe of nursing, as well as the language and political effectiveness to overcome barriers confronting the intellectual growth of nursing mounted by other nursing leaders as well as traditional academic disciplines.

  19. Social Confidence in Early Adulthood among Young People with and without a History of Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durkin, Kevin; Toseeb, Umar; Botting, Nicola; Pickles, Andrew; Conti-Ramsden, Gina

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purposes of this study were to test the predictions that lower self-esteem and higher shyness in individuals with a history of language impairment (LI) would continue from adolescence into early adulthood and that those with LI would have lower social self-efficacy in early adulthood. Method: Participants were young people with a…

  20. Early Childhood Education and Care for Native Hawaiian Children in Hawai'i: A Brief History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grace, Donna J.; Ku'ulei Serna, Alethea

    2013-01-01

    This study provides a brief overview of the history of early childhood education and care for Native Hawaiian children in Hawai'i. Data sources include a literature review, examination of archival documents, and interviews with a sample of Native Hawaiian parents and community members. We trace the emergence of outside-the-home early childhood…

  1. History of Science as an Instructional Context: Student Learning in Genetics and Nature of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sun Young; Irving, Karen E.

    2010-01-01

    This study (1) explores the effectiveness of the contextualized history of science on student learning of nature of science (NOS) and genetics content knowledge (GCK), especially interrelationships among various genetics concepts, in high school biology classrooms; (2) provides an exemplar for teachers on how to utilize history of science in…

  2. Wildlife of southern forests habitat & management (Chapter 2): Early History

    James G. Dickson

    2003-01-01

    According to fossil records from coal beds, primeval forests of the South eons ago were complex forests of club moss trees and ferns (Burdette 1995). Since that time forest composition and distribution have changed in response to natural phenomena and later, to the influences of man. Over a long period of time primeval forests evolved from club mosses and ferns...

  3. A history of nuclear transmutations by natural alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, Matteo

    2005-11-01

    A systematic account of the use of alpha particles up to the 1930s for promoting the disintegration of atoms is here provided. As will be shown, a number of different radium family alpha sources were used in the experiments that led to the discoveries of the proton (Rutherford E 1919 Phil. Mag. 37 581-7) and neutron (Chadwick J 1932 Nature 129 312). The reasons leading to the employment of a particular alpha particle source, as well as the relationship between these sources and the available methods of recording, will be closely addressed.

  4. Time: The Biggest Pattern in Natural History Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gontier, Nathalie

    2016-10-01

    We distinguish between four cosmological transitions in the history of Western intellectual thought, and focus on how these cosmologies differentially define matter, space and time. We demonstrate that how time is conceptualized significantly impacts a cosmology's notion on causality, and hone in on how time is conceptualized differentially in modern physics and evolutionary biology. The former conflates time with space into a single space-time continuum and focuses instead on the movement of matter, while the evolutionary sciences have a tradition to understand time as a given when they cartography how organisms change across generations over or in time, thereby proving the phenomenon of evolution. The gap becomes more fundamental when we take into account that phenomena studied by chrono-biologists demonstrate that numerous organisms, including humans, have evolved a "sense" of time. And micro-evolutionary/genetic, meso-evolutionary/developmental and macro-evolutionary phenomena including speciation and extinction not only occur by different evolutionary modes and at different rates, they are also timely phenomena that follow different periodicities. This article focusses on delineating the problem by finding its historical roots. We conclude that though time might be an obsolete concept for the physical sciences, it is crucial for the evolutionary sciences where evolution is defined as the change that biological individuals undergo in/over or through time.

  5. Natural history of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Katz, Yitzhak; Goldberg, Michael R

    2014-06-01

    Because of the paucity of reports and variability in the diagnostic criteria utilized, little is known regarding the natural outcome of patients with food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES). Data extracted from referenced manuscripts, as well as allergists' unpublished observations from across the globe, were used to form a cohesive opinion regarding its natural outcome. All authors concur that there is a generally high rate of recovery for FPIES. The most common foods causing FPIES are milk and soy. Depending upon which study is analyzed, by the age of 3-5 years, approximately 90% of patients recover from their disease. Recovery from FPIES to solid foods, occurs at a later age, but may reflect a later stage of introduction of the food into the diet. An important clinical outcome, although not common, is a shift from FPIES food hypersensitivity to an IgE-mediated food allergy. This necessitates a change in the oral food challenge protocol, if IgE-mediated sensitization is detected. Over the past several years, there has been an increasing awareness of FPIES. This knowledge should lead to a more timely diagnosis and should reassure parents and practitioners alike regarding its favorable course.

  6. Order from Force; A natural history of the vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jeffrey H.

    2015-11-01

    The laws of physics govern our lives, and the fundamental constants of Nature (for example, the mass and charge of the electron) define our very morphology. If a human body were totally dehydrated there would only remain about thirty kilograms of crystals and powder, after having removed about fifty litres of water. Yet the amazing machine that is our body functions because of the forces of interaction (attraction and repulsion) that exist between the molecules in that powder when fully hydrated. These forces of interaction are mediated and directed by the vast amount of water that is present. It is the precise orientation of one hydrated molecule with respect to another hydrated molecule, at a well-defined separation, in our central nervous systems that allows a nerve impulse to tunnel quantum-mechanically through the intermediate space between two nerve cells at a synapse. Thereby allowing us to observe our environment, and contemplate our existence. It is the arrangement of the water molecules along molecules of muscle proteins that allows one protein molecule to slide over neighbouring protein molecules, thereby allowing us to do exercise and work, or to hunt and to gather. The precise distances and orientations between the molecules of which our bodies are composed are determined by subtle intermolecular electrostatic forces, whose magnitude is determined by the various constants of Nature, and whose operation is dictated by the laws of physics. We are merely living representations of these immutable physical laws.

  7. Early History of BELL'S Theorem Theory and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauser, John F.

    Before 1980 it was unfashionable for a physicist to admit that he either did not understand and/or doubted the Truth and/or Orthodoxy of Quantum Mechanics (QM). Contemporary wisdom deemed it impossible that it may lead to incorrect predictions. Thus, it was foolish to suggest that it warranted further testing. Said wisdom proclaimed that nothing would ever be gained by any such pursuit. Bohr had won his debates with Einstein. Von Neumann had proven all other interpretations wrong. That was the end to it! Only an iconoclast dared think otherwise. Here I provide a brief history of some of my encounters with a few fellow iconoclasts, past denizens of a QM doubter's subculture.

  8. Natural history of gutter-related type Ia endoleaks after snorkel/chimney endovascular aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Ullery, Brant W; Tran, Kenneth; Itoga, Nathan K; Dalman, Ronald L; Lee, Jason T

    2017-04-01

    Alternative endovascular strategies using parallel or snorkel/chimney (chimney endovascular aneurysm repair [ch-EVAR]) techniques have been developed to address the lack of widespread availability and manufacturing limitations with branched/fenestrated aortic devices for the treatment of complex abdominal aortic aneurysms. Despite high technical success and midterm patency of snorkel stent configurations, concerns remain regarding the perceived increased incidence of early gutter-related type Ia endoleaks. We aimed to evaluate the incidence and natural history of gutter-related type Ia endoleaks following ch-EVAR. Review of medical records and available imaging studies, including completion angiography and serial computed tomographic angiography, was performed for all patients undergoing ch-EVAR at our institution between September 2009 and January 2015. Only procedures involving ≥1 renal artery with or without visceral snorkel stents were included. Primary outcomes of the study were presence and persistence or resolution of early gutter-related type Ia endoleak. Secondary outcomes included aneurysm sac shrinkage and need for secondary intervention related to the presence of type Ia gutter endoleak. Sixty patients (mean age, 75.8 ± 7.6 years; male, 70.0%) underwent ch-EVAR with a total of 111 snorkel stents (97 renal [33 bilateral renal], 12 superior mesenteric artery, 2 celiac). A mean of 1.9 ± 0.6 snorkel stents were placed per patient. Early gutter-related type Ia endoleaks were noted on 30.0% (n = 18) of initial postoperative imaging studies. Follow-up imaging revealed spontaneous resolution of these gutter endoleaks in 44.3%, 65.2%, and 88.4% of patients at 6, 12, and 18 months postprocedure, respectively. Long-term anticoagulation, degree of oversizing, stent type and diameter, and other clinical/anatomic variables were not significantly associated with presence of gutter endoleaks. Two patients (3.3%) required secondary intervention related to

  9. Early history of neutron scattering at oak ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, M. K.

    1986-03-01

    Most of the early development of neutron scattering techniques utilizing reactor neutrons occurred at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the years immediately following World War II. C.G. Shull, E.O. Wollan, and their associates systematically established neutron diffraction as a quantitative research tool and then applied this technique to important problems in nuclear physics, chemical crystallography, and magnetism. This article briefly summarizes the very important research at ORNL during this period, which laid the foundation for the establishment of neutron scattering programs throughout the world.

  10. Genetics, phenotype, and natural history of autosomal dominant cyclic hematopoiesis

    SciT

    Palmer, S.E.; Dale, D.C.

    Cyclic hematopoiesis (CH, or cyclic neutropenia) is a rare disease manifested by transient severe neutropenia that recurs approximately every 21 days. The hematologic profile of families with the autosomal dominant form (ADCH) has not been well characterized, and it is unknown if the phenotype is distinct from the more common sporadic congenital or acquired forms of CH. We studied nine ADCH families whose children displayed typical CH blood patterns. Pedigrees confirmed dominant inheritance without evidence of heterogeneity or decreased penetrance; three pedigrees suggested new mutations. Families were Caucasian with exception of one with a Cherokee Native American founder. A widemore » spectrum of symptom severity, ranging from asymptomatic to life-threatening illness, was observed within families. The phenotype changed with age. Children displayed typical neutrophil cycles with symptoms of mucosal ulceration, lymphadenopathy, and infections. Adults often had fewer and milder symptoms, sometimes accompanied by mild chronic neutropenia without distinct cycles. While CH is commonly described as {open_quotes}benign{close_quotes}, four children in three of the nine families died of Clostridium or E. coli colitis, documenting the need for urgent evaluation of abdominal pain. Misdiagnosis with other neutropenias was common but can be avoided by serial blood counts in index cases. Genetic counseling requires specific histories and complete blood counts in relatives at risk to assess status regardless of symptoms, especially to determine individuals with new mutations. We propose diagnostic criteria for ADCH in affected children and adults. Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment resulted in dramatic improvement of neutropenia and morbidity. The differential diagnosis from other forms of familial neutropenia is reviewed. 45 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.« less

  11. Lunar and Planetary Surface Dynamics and Early History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This document, submitted as part of this proposal renewal represents the Final Report required by NASA for Grant NAGS-9442. It should be emphasized that, while this work statement in the original proposal outlined anticipated directions of our research, the specific activities we carried out during this period differed slightly from those proposed, capitalizing on new unexpected results and new advances in analytical capability. The thrust of all the work we completed were completely within the stated research goals of the proposal and significantly advanced our knowledge of planetary processes and our understanding of the early solar system. The following summary outlines our achievements in the different areas of research. These include: A) Early solar system processes and time scales using I-Xe chronometry; B) The Active Capture of Volatiles: A new mechanism for the capture of heavy noble gases, possible implications for phase Q and planetary heavy noble gases; C) Separation of Xe-L from Xe-H: Physically selective experiments; D) Abundances of Presolar grains; E) Studies of Neon and Helium from single interstellar SiC and graphite grains; F) Pre-compaction exposure of meteoritic grains and chondrules; G) Geochemically Measured Half-Lives: Double beta-decay of Te and Ba isotopes; H) Noble gases in stratospheric interplanetary dust particles; I) New Analytical Instrument.

  12. Alwyne (Wyn) Cooper Wheeler (1929-2005) and the libraries of the Natural History Museum, London.

    PubMed

    Datta, Ann

    2009-01-01

    As a senior scientist working in the Fish Section of the Department of Zoology at the Natural History Museum, Alwyne (Wyn) Wheeler was a regular library user and well-known to library staff. Always amiable and helpful, and possessing a broad general knowledge of natural history as well as expertise on fishes, Wyn interacted with library staff at all levels. A close working relationship developed where he contributed to section library management and collection building. He also published catalogues of some of the library's most important art collections. This paper celebrates the collaboration between Museum scientist Wyn Wheeler and librarians at the National History Museum.

  13. The Sydney System: epidemiology and natural history of chronic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Sipponen, P; Kekki, M; Siurala, M

    1991-01-01

    Chronic gastritis is a common disease which forms an important background to the pathogenesis of several gastric diseases. In most instances, gastritis seems to be a bacterial (microbial) disease. It begins as long-lasting, chronic inflammatory reaction directed against Helicobacter pylori (HP), or occasionally against other spiral bacteria, which colonize in the space between the surface epithelium and the mucous layer. Gastritis may, irrespectively of the HP-related or HP-independent origin, progress to an atrophy (chronic gastritis with atrophy) in the underlying mucosa. Prevalence of gastritis increases with increase in age, but great variations exist in the age-specific prevalence and in mean age of onset of the gastritis in different populations. A high rate and an early onset of the HP-related gastritis associates with low socio-economic status. Chronic gastritis, and the gastritis with atrophy in particular, may interfere with the function of the affected gastric mucosa, and may subsequently increase or decrease the risk of some gastric diseases, such as cancer and peptic ulcer. Both antral and corpus gastritis with coexistent severe atrophic changes have been shown to be associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer. In addition, gastritis seems to also play an important role in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer. Virtually all patients with DU and GU have coexisting and preceding gastritis. The cumulative risk of ulcer has been estimated to be high in subjects with gastritis, but, in contrast, to be low in subjects who have normal gastric mucosa.

  14. 78 FR 50094 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-16

    ....R50000] Notice of Intent to Repatriate a Cultural Item: Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL... Natural History has corrected a Notice of Intent to Repatriate published in the Federal Register on March... Natural History. If no additional claimants come forward, transfer of control of the cultural items to the...

  15. 76 FR 28067 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... Cultural Items: Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior... Field Museum of Natural History (Field Museum), Chicago, IL, that meet the definition of unassociated... Wyman sold the items to the Field Museum of Natural History. The items were accessioned into the...

  16. 76 FR 28067 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... Cultural Items: Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior... Field Museum of Natural History (Field Museum), Chicago, IL, that meet the definition of unassociated..., Kalamazoo, MI. In 1999, the Field Museum of Natural History acquired the cultural items as a gift from the...

  17. 75 FR 58425 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ...: American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice... Museum of Natural History, New York, NY, that meets the definition of unassociated funerary objects under... American Museum of Natural History. No known individual was identified. This individual has been identified...

  18. 78 FR 19305 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, New Haven, CT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ...-PPWOCRADN0] Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, New Haven... Natural History, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined that the cultural... Natural History. DATES: Representatives of any Indian tribe that believes it has a cultural affiliation...

  19. 75 FR 52013 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-24

    ...: Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice... of Natural History (Field Museum), Chicago, IL, that meet the definition of unassociated funerary..., for the Field Museum of Natural History. The items were accessioned into the collections of the Field...

  20. History as narrative: the nature and quality of historical understanding for students with LD.

    PubMed

    Espin, Christine A; Cevasco, Jazmin; van den Broek, Paul; Baker, Scott; Gersten, Russell

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we examine the nature and quality of students' comprehension of history. Specifically, we explore whether cognitive-psychological theories developed to capture the comprehension of narrative text can be used to capture the comprehension of history. Participants were 36 students with learning disabilities who had taken part in an earlier study designed to investigate the effects of an interactive instructional intervention in history. The results of the original study supported the effectiveness of the intervention in terms of amount recalled. The results of the present study reveal that historical understanding can be characterized as the construction of meaning through the creation of a causal network of events. The study of history within a causal network framework has implications for understanding the nature and quality of students' learning of history, and for potentially identifying sources of failure in learning.

  1. History of pancreaticoduodenectomy: early misconceptions, initial milestones and the pioneers.

    PubMed

    Are, Chandrakanth; Dhir, Mashaal; Ravipati, Lavanya

    2011-06-01

    Pancreaticoduodenectomy is one of the most challenging surgical procedures which requires the highest level of surgical expertise. This procedure has constantly evolved over the years through the meticulous efforts of a number of surgeons before reaching its current state. This review navigates through some of the early limitations and misconceptions and highlights the initial milestones which laid the foundation of this procedure. The current review also provides a few excerpts from the lives and illuminates on some of the seminal contributions of the three great surgeons: William Stewart Halsted, Walther Carl Eduard Kausch and Allen Oldfather Whipple. These surgeons pioneered the nascent stages of this procedure and paved the way for the modern day pancreaticoduodenectomy. © 2011 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association.

  2. The origins and early history of the National Chiropractic Association

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Joseph C; Rehm, William S

    1993-01-01

    Early organization in chiropractic was prompted by the profession’s need to promote itself and to defend against the onslaught of political medicine and organized osteopathy. The first priorities were legal defense against prosecution for unlicensed practice and malpractice insurance. The Universal Chiropractors’ Association (UCA), organized at the Palmer School of Chiropractic (PSC) in 1906, sought to meet these needs by insuring its members and by developing a legal department under the supervision of attorney Tom Morris, one time lieutenant governor of Wisconsin. The public relations and marketing needs of chiropractors were largely served by the PSC and its legendary leader. However, as chiropractors increasingly sought to avoid prosecution by passage of chiropractic laws, Palmer’s efforts to direct this legislation so as to limit chiropractors’ scope of practice increasingly alienated many in the profession. The American Chiropractic Association (ACA) was founded in 1922 to provide a broadscope alternative to BJ’s UCA. With Palmer’s departure from the UCA following the neurocalometer debacle, ACA and UCA sought amalgamation. Simultaneously, organized medicine renewed its attack on the profession by introducing basic science legislation, which prompted chiropractors to try to upgrade and standardize chiropractic education. Early efforts to bring about the needed consensus were centered in the International Chiropractic Congress (ICC), particularly its division of state examining boards. In 1930 the ACA and UCA combined to form the National Chiropractic Association (NCA), and by 1934 the ICC had merged with the NCA to form part of its council structure. With this modicum of solidarity the NCA began the process of educational boot-strapping at its 1935 convention in Los Angeles, when its Committee on Education, a forerunner of today’s Council on Chiropractic Education, was proposed by C.O. Watkins of Montana. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5

  3. The natural history of thyroid autonomy and hot nodules.

    PubMed

    Corvilain, B

    2003-02-01

    Solitary hyperfunctioning thyroid adenomas are benign monoclonal tumors characterized by their capacity to grow and produce thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) autonomously, i.e. in the absence of thyrotropin (TSH). Mutations of the TSH receptor (TSH-R) have been found in the majority of solitary hyperfunctioning thyroid adenomas. On radioisotope scanning they generally appear as hot nodules because they concentrate radioiodide or 99mTc pertechnate, whereas the normal surrounding and contralateral tissue concentrate little isotopes. A toxic adenoma probably evolves gradually from a small autonomously hyperfunctioning adenoma that initially is only slightly more active than the extranodular tissue. This has been referred to as a "warm" nodule or a "compensated" adenoma. The diagnostic criterion for this designation is the persistence of detectable serum TSH maintaining some radioiodine uptake by the extranodular tissue. This "compensated" adenoma persists as long as the autonomous hormone output is not sufficient to suppress thyrotropin, i.e. to cause hyperthyroidism. The rate of development of thyrotoxicosis in patients with hyperfunctioning adenomas who are euthyroid initially is about 4% per year and depends on the size of the adenoma, iodine intake and age of the patient. No clear relationship can be establish between the nature of the TSH receptor mutations and the phenotype of the tumor.

  4. Historia and materia: the philosophical implications of Francis Bacon's natural history.

    PubMed

    Giglioni, Guido

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the philosophical implications underlying Bacon's views on historical knowledge, paying special attention to that variety of historical knowledge described by Bacon as "natural." More specifically, this article explores the interplay of history (historia) and fable (fabula). In the sphere of thought, fabula is the equivalent to materia in nature. Both are described by Bacon as being "versatile" and "pliant." In Bacon's system of knowledge, philosophy, as the domain of reason, starts from historiae and fabulae, once memory and the imagination have fulfilled their cognitive tasks. This means that, for Bacon, there is no such thing as a pure use of reason. He advocates a kind of reason that, precisely because it is involved with matter's inner motions (its "appetites," in Bacon's characteristic language), is constitutively 'impure'. The article shows how the terms historia and fabula cover key semantic areas in defining Bacon's philosophy: historia may mean "history" as well as "story,"fabula "myth" as well "story". In both cases, we can see significant oscillations from a stronger meaning (close to those of matter and nature) to a weaker one (connected to wit and imagination), as if the power of nature decreases moving from histories and myths to stories. On the other hand, there are cases in which Bacon seems to stick to a diachronic view of the meaning of fables and histories, such that the transition from myths to history, especially natural history, is described as a collective effort towards reality and enlightenment.

  5. John Tyndall and the Early History of Diamagnetism.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Roland

    2015-01-01

    John Tyndall, Irish-born natural philosopher, completed his PhD at the University of Marburg in 1850 while starting his first substantial period of research into the phenomenon of diamagnetism. This paper provides a detailed analysis and evaluation of his contribution to the understanding of magnetism and of the impact of this work on establishing his own career and reputation; it was instrumental in his election as a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1852 and as Professor of Natural Philosophy at the Royal Institution in 1853. Tyndall's interactions and relationships with Michael Faraday, William Thomson, Julius Plücker and others are explored, alongside his contributions to experimental practice and to emerging theory. Tyndall's approach, challenging Faraday's developing field theory with a model of diamagnetic polarity and the effect of magnetic forces acting in couples, was based on his belief in the importance of underlying molecular structure, an idea which suffused his later work, for example in relation to the study of glaciers and to the interaction of substances with radiant heat.

  6. John Tyndall and the Early History of Diamagnetism

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Summary John Tyndall, Irish-born natural philosopher, completed his PhD at the University of Marburg in 1850 while starting his first substantial period of research into the phenomenon of diamagnetism. This paper provides a detailed analysis and evaluation of his contribution to the understanding of magnetism and of the impact of this work on establishing his own career and reputation; it was instrumental in his election as a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1852 and as Professor of Natural Philosophy at the Royal Institution in 1853. Tyndall's interactions and relationships with Michael Faraday, William Thomson, Julius Plücker and others are explored, alongside his contributions to experimental practice and to emerging theory. Tyndall's approach, challenging Faraday's developing field theory with a model of diamagnetic polarity and the effect of magnetic forces acting in couples, was based on his belief in the importance of underlying molecular structure, an idea which suffused his later work, for example in relation to the study of glaciers and to the interaction of substances with radiant heat. PMID:26221835

  7. Human History and Environmental Geology: A Match Made in Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvans, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    I draw on my dual educational background in the geological sciences (PhD) and sociology (BA), with an emphasis on environmental justice, for the inspiration to approach issues in my geology courses that are directly connected to modern policy decisions with the goal of increasing students' self-awareness. I believe that giving students the opportunity for increased understanding of their own beliefs and values with respect to the environment will allow them to be more engaged in discussions and debates about environmental policies at the local, national, and global scales. I designed Environmental Geology of Prince William Forest Park (VA), a one-day Field Studies course offered through Northern Virginia Community College, to motivate students to articulate personal convictions about land use. To provide a social context for discussion of environmental issues, students first gave presentations on the demographics, economics, and methods of land use of the people that used the park over the last 400 years. At locations along Quantico Creek, students presented topics that covered geologic processes at work on the landscape, progressive farming methods promoted by some early Virginians, and agricultural methods to stabilize soil and its nutrients. Finally, at the Cabin Branch Pyrite Mine (active 1889-1920) we discussed laborer work conditions and the environmental impact of tailings, as well as the process and effects of remediation. Students tested pH levels in the creek upstream and downstream of the mine as one concrete way to personally observe the results of recent remediation (since 1994), with neutral pH in both locations indicating success. Students wrapped up the course with written reflections, from their own perspectives with respect to socially and environmentally responsible land use, on the geologic processes and human impacts that shaped the park. Social justice and environmental stewardship are two lenses that allow students to find personal meaning

  8. Natural History of Pulmonary Subsolid Nodules: A Prospective Multicenter Study.

    PubMed

    Kakinuma, Ryutaro; Noguchi, Masayuki; Ashizawa, Kazuto; Kuriyama, Keiko; Maeshima, Akiko Miyagi; Koizumi, Naoya; Kondo, Tetsuro; Matsuguma, Haruhisa; Nitta, Norihisa; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Okami, Jiro; Suehisa, Hiroshi; Yamaji, Taiki; Kodama, Ken; Mori, Kiyoshi; Yamada, Kouzo; Matsuno, Yoshihiro; Murayama, Sadayuki; Murata, Kiyoshi

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the natural course of the progression of pulmonary subsolid nodules (SSNs). Eight facilities participated in this study. A total of 795 patients with 1229 SSNs were assessed for the frequency of invasive adenocarcinomas. SSNs were classified into three categories: pure ground-glass nodules (PGGNs), heterogeneous GGNs (HGGNs) (solid component detected only in lung windows), and part-solid nodules. The mean prospective follow-up period was 4.3 ± 2.5 years. SSNs were classified at baseline as follows: 1046 PGGNs, 81 HGGNs, and 102 part-solid nodules. Among the 1046 PGGNs, 13 (1.2%) developed into HGGNs and 56 (5.4%) developed into part-solid nodules. Among the 81 HGGNs, 16 (19.8%) developed into part-solid nodules. Thus, the SSNs at the final follow-up were classified as follows: 977 PGGNs, 78 HGGNs, and 174 part-solid nodules. Of the 977 PGGNs, 35 were resected (nine minimally invasive adenocarcinomas [MIAs], 21 adenocarcinomas in situ [AIS], and five atypical adenomatous hyperplasias). Of the 78 HGGNs, seven were resected (five MIAs and two AIS). Of the 174 part-solid nodules, 49 were resected (12 invasive adenocarcinomas, 26 MIAs, 10 AIS, and one adenomatous hyperplasia). For the PGGNs, the mean period until their development into part-solid nodules was 3.8 ± 2.0 years, whereas the mean period for the HGGNs was 2.1 ± 2.3 years (p = 0.0004). This study revealed the frequencies and periods of development from PGGNs and HGGNs into part-solid nodules. Invasive adenocarcinomas were diagnosed only among the part-solid nodules, corresponding to 1% of all 1229 SSNs. Copyright © 2016 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Grapple with a Giant Squid at the Natural History Museum's Darwin Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinkler, Abigail; Collins, Sally

    2009-01-01

    The Natural History Museum's new Darwin Centre fulfils three main roles. It is a state-of-the-art scientific research and collections facility, but it is also an awe-inspiring new public space that allows visitors to explore the natural world in an exciting and innovative way. With its opening, students can experience the relevance of the science…

  10. Comparing life history characteristics of Lake Michigan’s naturalized and stocked Chinook Salmon

    Kerns, Janice A; Rogers, Mark W.; Bunnell, David B.; Claramunt, Randall M.; Collingsworth, Paris D.

    2016-01-01

    Lake Michigan supports popular fisheries for Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that have been sustained by stocking since the late 1960s. Natural recruitment of Chinook Salmon in Lake Michigan has increased in the past few decades and currently contributes more than 50% of Chinook Salmon recruits. We hypothesized that selective forces differ for naturalized populations born in the wild and hatchery populations, resulting in divergent life history characteristics with implications for Chinook Salmon population production and the Lake Michigan fishery. First, we conducted a historical analysis to determine if life history characteristics changed through time as the Chinook Salmon population became increasingly naturalized. Next, we conducted a 2-year field study of naturalized and hatchery stocked Chinook Salmon spawning populations to quantify differences in fecundity, egg size, timing of spawning, and size at maturity. In general, our results did not indicate significant life history divergence between naturalized and hatchery-stocked Chinook Salmon populations in Lake Michigan. Although historical changes in adult sex ratio were correlated with the proportion of naturalized individuals, changes in weight at maturity were better explained by density-dependent factors. The field study revealed no divergence in fecundity, timing of spawning, or size at maturity, and only small differences in egg size (hatchery > naturalized). For the near future, our results suggest that the limited life history differences observed between Chinook Salmon of naturalized and hatchery origin will not lead to large differences in characteristics important to the dynamics of the population or fishery.

  11. The Early Geological History of Long Island Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varekamp, J. C.; Thomas, E.

    2005-12-01

    Long Island Sound (LIS), an urban estuary on the east coast of the USA, formed when terminal moraines created Long Island (NY) during the last glaciation. During early deglaciation, a periglacial lake developed behind this moraine (Glacial Lake Connecticut), which was rapidly filled with red, varved lake clays. Glacial Lake Connecticut drained when a barrier at its eastern end towards the Atlantic Ocean failed, at about 18 (calibrated) ka. The LIS basin then dried out, and a fluvial drainage pattern was carved into the lake beds (Lewis and Stone, 1991). With ongoing rise in global sea level, the sea entered LIS from the east and a marine-estuarine sediment sequence was deposited on the partially eroded varved clays. Lake Hitchcock formed behind the rapidly retreating Laurentide ice sheet in eastern New England, drained (possibly catastrophically) around 14 (calibrated) ka (Brigham-Grette, 2001), and created a coarse deltaic structure in LIS. Radiocarbon dates on bulk organic matter from the varved lake clays and marine silts indicate a time frame for Glacial Lake Connecticut between 18 and 16 ka, with the marine transgression possibly occurring around 15 ka (Lewis and DiGiacomo-Cohen, 2000). We dated organic carbon (hand picked terrestrial plant fragments) and mollusk fragments from core samples. Calibrated radiocarbon ages from organic material (ours and existing dates) do not show a clear relationship between age and depth-in-core. Radiocarbon dates show consistently older dates of organic matter than mollusk fragments from the same samples, with differences of up to 3000 years. We infer that the plant remains were stored on land for extensive periods of time before being deposited in LIS. The radiocarbon ages from mollusks show a curvi-linear relationship with depth, and suggest an age of about 10 (calibrated) ka for the marine transgression at the location of core LISAT 12 (in eastern LIS off the coast near Orient Point, Long Island). This new time frame

  12. Using the history of research on sickle-cell anemia to affect preservice teachers' conceptions of the nature of science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, Eric M.

    Preservice elementary teachers enrolled in an elective biology course participated in an eight-class unit of instruction based on the history of research in understanding the disease sickle-cell anemia. Students were introduced to the disease as a "mystery" for them to solve, and subsequently developed an understanding of the disease from several disciplines in biology (e.g., genetics, ecology, evolution, molecular biology). The unit involved open-ended problems in which students examined evidence and developed explanations in a manner analogous to the reasoning used by Anthony C. Allison and his colleagues during the early to middle part of the twentieth century. Throughout the unit, students were challenged to explicitly and reflectively connect their work with the historical material to more general conclusions about aspects of the nature of science. These aspects included (a) the nature of scientific theories, (b) the tentative nature of science, (c) the difference between scientific theories and laws, (d) the validity of observational methods in science, and (e) the subjective (theory-laden) nature of science. The research measured students' pre- and post-instruction views by using both an open-ended survey (VNOS) and follow-up, semi-structured interviews. The results indicated that an appreciable number of students underwent a change or enrichment in their views for some of the nature of science aspects. Moreover, change or enrichment in students' views was directly attributable to their work in the sickle-cell unit as evidenced from the specific examples students articulated in their post-instruction responses in support of their more informed views. In general, the findings of this research lend empirical support to the value of having students actively recapitulate the history of science to improve their nature of science conceptions. This is facilitated when the lessons challenge students to explicitly and reflectively develop views of the nature of

  13. Natural history of untreatable hepatocellular carcinoma: A retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Cabibbo, Giuseppe; Maida, Marcello; Genco, Chiara; Parisi, Pietro; Peralta, Marco; Antonucci, Michela; Brancatelli, Giuseppe; Cammà, Calogero; Craxì, Antonio; Di Marco, Vito

    2012-09-27

    To investigate the clinical course of untreatable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) identified at any stage and to identify factors associated with mortality. From January 1999 to December 2010, 320 out of 825 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of HCC and not appropriate for curative or palliative treatments were followed and managed with supportive therapy. Cirrhosis was diagnosed by histological or clinical features and liver function was evaluated according to Child-Pugh score. The diagnosis of HCC was performed by Ultra-Sound guided biopsy or by multiphasic contrast-enhanced computed tomography or gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Data were collected for each patient including all clinical, laboratory and imaging variables necessary for the outcome prediction staging systems considered. HCC staging was performed according Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) and Cancer of the Liver Italian Program scores. Follow-up time was defined as the number of months from the diagnosis of HCC to death. Prognostic baseline variables were analyzed by multivariate Cox analysis to identify the independent predictors of survival. Seventy-five per cent of patients had hepatitis C. Ascites was present in 169 patients (53%), while hepatic encephalopathy was present in 49 patients (15%). The Child-Pugh score was class A in 105 patients (33%), class B in 142 patients (44%), and class C in 73 patients (23%). One hundred patients (31%) had macroscopic vascular invasion and/or extra-hepatic spread of the tumor. A single lesion > 10 cm was observed in 34 patients (11%), while multinodular HCC was present in 189 patients (59%). Thirty nine patients (12%) were BCLC early (A) stage, 55 (17%) were BCLC intermediate (B) stage, 124 (39%) were BCLC advanced (C) stage, and 102 (32%) were end-stage BCLC (D). At the time of this analysis (July 2011), 28 (9%) patients were still alive. Six (2%) patients who were lost during follow-up were censored at the last visit. The overall

  14. On the nature and consequences of early loss.

    PubMed

    Hofer, M A

    1996-01-01

    To describe how an animal model system can be used to explore basic questions about the nature of loss and the effects of early loss on later vulnerability to disease. The physiological and behavioral responses of infant rats to separation from their mothers are first described and then analyzed experimentally into component mechanisms. These studies have revealed an extensive layer of processes underlying the psychological constructs generally used to understand the response to loss. Hidden within the observable interactions of parent and offspring, we found a number of discrete sensorimotor, thermal, and nutrient-based events that have unexpected long-term regulatory effects on specific components of infant physiology and behavior. Release from all of these inhibitory and excitatory regulators together during maternal separation constitutes a novel mechanism by which the experience of loss can be translated into a complex patterned response. Evidence for early regulatory processes has also been found in monkey and human mother-infant interactions. Here they may well constitute the building blocks from which attachment and object representations develop. We and others have found long-term effects of loss, and of selective replacement of regulators, on behavioral development and on later vulnerability to disease. The results give us a new understanding of early attachment as a developmental force and of human grief as a risk to health.

  15. Evaluation of the natural history of patients who aspirate.

    PubMed

    Bock, Jonathan M; Varadarajan, Varun; Brawley, Mary C; Blumin, Joel H

    2017-12-01

    The natural clinical progression of aspiration to eventual pulmonary compromise is not well understood. We hypothesized that dietary modification recommendations, Penetration-Aspiration Scale (PAS) score, and dysphagia etiology would be associated with changes in time to first pulmonary event and overall survival for patients with documented aspiration on radiologic testing. This study identified a cohort of patients with detectable unsensed penetration or aspiration on videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS), and followed this cohort over time for development of pulmonary events and death. We then evaluated the association of aspiration severity and dietary modification recommendations on incidence of these endpoints. Retrospective chart review. A total of 2,616 VFSS exam reports were reviewed from our institution performed between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2010. Aspiration or unsensed penetration (PAS of 5 or greater) was detected in 564 (21.5%) of these patients, who were then included in the study cohort. Medical records were reviewed retrospectively for development of pulmonary events (pneumonia, pneumonitis, or other life-threatening pulmonary illness) and all-cause mortality for up to 54 months after initial VFSS. Univariate Kaplan-Meier analysis and multivariate Cox regression were performed for time to first pulmonary event and survival predicted by recommended diet, PAS score, and dysphagia etiology. Dysphagia etiology was highly associated with increased development of pulmonary events for some patients, especially those with generalized nonspecific dysphagia due to deconditioning or frailty (hazard ratio [HZ] vs. stroke 2.95, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.53-5.69, P = .001) and esophageal dysphagia (HZ: 2.66, 95% CI: 1.17-6.02, P = .019). Dysphagia etiology was also associated with increased mortality for patients with generalized nonspecific dysphagia due to deconditioning or frailty (HZ: 3.32, 95% CI: 2.0-5.52, P < .001), postsurgical

  16. Paul Ehrlich and the Early History of Granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Kay, A Barry

    2016-08-01

    Paul Ehrlich's techniques, published between 1879 and 1880, for staining blood films using coal tar dyes, and his method of differential blood cell counting, ended years of speculation regarding the classification of white cells. Acidic and basic dyes had allowed him to recognize eosinophil and basophil granules, respectively, work that was a direct continuation of his discovery of the tissue mast cell described in his doctoral thesis. Ehrlich went on to develop neutral dyes that identified epsilon granules in neutrophils ("cells with polymorphous nuclei"). He also speculated, for the most part correctly, on the formation, function, and fate of blood neutrophils and eosinophils. Before Ehrlich, a number of important observations had been made on white cells and their role in health and disease. Among the most notable were William Hewson's studies of blood and lymph; the early descriptions of leukemia by Alfred Donné, John Hughes Bennett, Rudolf Virchow, and others; as well as seminal observations on inflammation by William Addison, Friedrich von Recklinghausen, and Julius Cohnheim. Eosinophils were almost certainly recognized previously by others. In 1846, Thomas Wharton Jones (1808-1891) described "granule blood-cells" in several species including humans. The term "granule cell" had also been used by Julius Vogel (1814-1880), who had previously observed similar cells in inflammatory exudates. Vogel, in turn, was aware of the work of Gottlieb Gluge (1812-1898), who had observed "compound inflammatory globules" in pus and serum that resembled eosinophils. Almost 20 years before Ehrlich developed his staining methods, Max Johann Schultze (1825-1874) performed functional experiments on fine and coarse granular cells using a warm stage microscopic technique and showed they had amoeboid movement and phagocytic abilities. Despite these earlier observations, it was Ehrlich's use of stains that heralded the modern era of studies of leukocyte biology and pathology.

  17. Early history and reactivation of the rand thrust, southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postlethwaite, Clay E.; Jacobson, Carl E.

    The Rand thrust of the Rand Mountains in the northwestern Mojave Desert separates an upper plate of quartz monzonite and quartzofeldspathic to amphibolitic gneiss from a lower plate of metagraywacke and mafic schist (Rand Schist). The Rand thrust is considered part of the regionally extensive Vincent/Chocolate Mountain thrust system, which is commonly believed to represent a Late Cretaceous subduction zone. The initial direction of dip and sense of movement along the Vincent/Chocolate Mountain thrust are controversial. Microfabrics of mylonites and quartzites from the Rand Mountains were analyzed in an attempt to determine transport direction for this region, but the results are ambiguous. In addition, the southwestern portion of the Rand thrust was found to have been reactivated as a low-angle normal fault after subduction. Reactivation might have occurred shortly after subduction, in which case it could account for the preservation of high-pressure mineral assemblages in the Rand Schist, or it could be related to mid-Tertiary extension in the western United States. In either event, the reactivation might be responsible for the complicated nature of the microfabrics. The Rand Schist exhibits an inverted metamorphic zonation. Isograds in the schist are not significantly truncated by the reactivated segment of the Rand thrust. This indicates that other segments of the Vincent/Chocolate Mountain thrust should be re-evaluated for the possibility of late movement, even if they show an apparently undisturbed inverted metamorphic zonation.

  18. Overview: early history of crop growth and photosynthesis modeling.

    PubMed

    El-Sharkawy, Mabrouk A

    2011-02-01

    As in industrial and engineering systems, there is a need to quantitatively study and analyze the many constituents of complex natural biological systems as well as agro-ecosystems via research-based mechanistic modeling. This objective is normally addressed by developing mathematically built descriptions of multilevel biological processes to provide biologists a means to integrate quantitatively experimental research findings that might lead to a better understanding of the whole systems and their interactions with surrounding environments. Aided with the power of computational capacities associated with computer technology then available, pioneering cropping systems simulations took place in the second half of the 20th century by several research groups across continents. This overview summarizes that initial pioneering effort made to simulate plant growth and photosynthesis of crop canopies, focusing on the discovery of gaps that exist in the current scientific knowledge. Examples are given for those gaps where experimental research was needed to improve the validity and application of the constructed models, so that their benefit to mankind was enhanced. Such research necessitates close collaboration among experimentalists and model builders while adopting a multidisciplinary/inter-institutional approach. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Natural history of asymptomatic renal stones and prediction of stone related events.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ho Won; Lee, Sang Keun; Kim, Won Tae; Kim, Yong-June; Yun, Seok-Joong; Lee, Sang-Cheol; Kim, Wun-Jae

    2013-05-01

    The appropriate management for asymptomatic renal stones remains unclear. We assessed the natural history and progression rate of such stones and identified clinical factors associated with an increased risk of stone related events. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 201 male and 146 female patients with asymptomatic renal stones. It was recommended that patients be followed every 6 months. Mean followup was 31 months (range 6 to 180). Patients were divided into 2 groups by stone related events, including spontaneous stone passage, flank pain, stone growth or the need for intervention during followup. Spontaneous passage occurred in 101 patients (29.1%). Of the patients 186 (53.6%) and 161 (46.4%) did and did not have stone related events, respectively. Of the whole cohort 85 patients (24.5%) required intervention but only 4.6% needed surgery. At 19 months after diagnosis 50% of the patients had a symptom. Those with stone related events were more likely to be younger (mean ± SD age 46.6 ± 12.7 vs 49.3 ± 12.6 years) and male, and have a stone history (p = 0.047, 0.017 and 0.014, respectively). Male gender significantly decreased the probability of freedom from stone related events (log rank test p = 0.0135) and it was an independent predictor of stone related events (HR 1.521, p = 0.009). Younger patients, and those with smaller stones and no stone growth were more likely to experience spontaneous passage and less likely to undergo intervention (each p <0.05). Asymptomatic renal stones can be followed safely but long-term followup is necessary. Periodic followup and early intervention should be recommended in patients with risk factors. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. From Appearance of Adrenal Autoantibodies to Clinical Symptoms of Addison's Disease: Natural History.

    PubMed

    Betterle, Corrado; Garelli, Silvia; Presotto, Fabio; Furmaniak, Jadwiga

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in the immunopathology field has greatly improved our understanding of the natural history of autoimmune diseases, particularly of Addison's disease. Addison's disease is known to be a chronic illness characterized by adrenocortical gland insufficiency that develops following a long and mainly asymptomatic period, characterized by the presence of circulating autoantibodies directed to adrenal cortex antigens. In this chapter we describe the groups of subjects at risk of developing Addison's disease, together with the diagnostic tests considered the most appropriate for evaluating adrenal function: determination of basal plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels, plasma renin activity, plasma aldosterone and cortisol levels, and cortisol levels after intravenous stimulation with ACTH (ACTH test). The employment of specific clinical, immunological and functional criteria in the subjects with autoantibodies to the adrenal cortex allows identifying those at risk of developing overt disease. The independent risk factors for the progression to adrenal failure have also been identified and they contribute to different risks of developing clinical Addison's disease. Based on the risk level, the subjects should be monitored over time to observe early signs of adrenal dysfunction, and start substitutive treatment as soon as possible. For patients presenting with high risk, prevention strategies and trials might be available. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Interrupting the natural history of diabetes mellitus: lifestyle, pharmacological and surgical strategies targeting disease progression.

    PubMed

    Khavandi, Kaivan; Brownrigg, Jack; Hankir, Mohammed; Sood, Harpreet; Younis, Naveed; Worth, Joy; Greenstein, Adam; Soran, Handrean; Wierzbicki, Anthony; Goldsmith, David J

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades we have seen a surge in the incidence of diabetes in industrialized nations; a threat which has now extended to the developing world. Type 2 diabetes is associated with significant microvascular and macrovascular disease, with considerable impact on morbidity and mortality. Recent evidence has cast uncertainty on the benefits of very tight glycaemic goals in these individuals. The natural history of disease follows an insidious course from disordered glucose metabolism in a pre-diabetic state, often with metabolic syndrome and obesity, before proceeding to diabetes mellitus. In the research setting, lifestyle, pharmacological and surgical intervention targeted against obesity and glycaemia has shown that metabolic disturbances can be halted and indeed regressed if introduced at an early stage of disease. In addition to traditional anti-diabetic medications such as the glinides, sulphonylureas and the glitazones, novel therapies manipulating the endocannabinoid system, neurotransmitters, intestinal absorption and gut hormones have shown dual benefit in weight loss and glycaemic control normalisation. Whilst these treatments will not and should not replace lifestyle change, they will act as invaluable adjuncts for weight loss and aid in normalising the metabolic profile of individuals at risk of diabetes. Utilizing novel therapies to prevent diabetes should be the focus of future research, with the aim of preventing the challenging microvascular and macrovascular complications, and ultimately cardiovascular death.

  2. The rapid formation of Sputnik Planitia early in Pluto's history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.; Stern, S. A.; Moore, J. M.; Young, L. A.; Binzel, R. P.; Buie, M. W.; Buratti, B. J.; Cheng, A. F.; Ennico, K.; Grundy, W. M.; Linscott, I. R.; McKinnon, W. B.; Olkin, C. B.; Reitsema, H. J.; Reuter, D. C.; Schenk, P.; Showalter, M. R.; Spencer, J. R.; Tyler, G. L.; Weaver, H. A.

    2016-12-01

    Pluto's Sputnik Planitia is a bright, roughly circular feature that resembles a polar ice cap. It is approximately 1,000 kilometres across and is centred on a latitude of 25 degrees north and a longitude of 175 degrees, almost directly opposite the side of Pluto that always faces Charon as a result of tidal locking. One explanation for its location includes the formation of a basin in a giant impact, with subsequent upwelling of a dense interior ocean. Once the basin was established, ice would naturally have accumulated there. Then, provided that the basin was a positive gravity anomaly (with or without the ocean), true polar wander could have moved the feature towards the Pluto-Charon tidal axis, on the far side of Pluto from Charon. Here we report modelling that shows that ice quickly accumulates on Pluto near latitudes of 30 degrees north and south, even in the absence of a basin, because, averaged over its orbital period, those are Pluto's coldest regions. Within a million years of Charon's formation, ice deposits on Pluto concentrate into a single cap centred near a latitude of 30 degrees, owing to the runaway albedo effect. This accumulation of ice causes a positive gravity signature that locks, as Pluto's rotation slows, to a longitude directly opposite Charon. Once locked, Charon raises a permanent tidal bulge on Pluto, which greatly enhances the gravity signature of the ice cap. Meanwhile, the weight of the ice in Sputnik Planitia causes the crust under it to slump, creating its own basin (as has happened on Earth in Greenland). Even if the feature is now a modest negative gravity anomaly, it remains locked in place because of the permanent tidal bulge raised by Charon. Any movement of the feature away from 30 degrees latitude is countered by the preferential recondensation of ices near the coldest extremities of the cap. Therefore, our modelling suggests that Sputnik Planitia formed shortly after Charon did and has been stable, albeit gradually losing

  3. The rapid formation of Sputnik Planitia early in Pluto's history.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Douglas P; Stern, S A; Moore, J M; Young, L A

    2016-11-30

    Pluto's Sputnik Planitia is a bright, roughly circular feature that resembles a polar ice cap. It is approximately 1,000 kilometres across and is centred on a latitude of 25 degrees north and a longitude of 175 degrees, almost directly opposite the side of Pluto that always faces Charon as a result of tidal locking. One explanation for its location includes the formation of a basin in a giant impact, with subsequent upwelling of a dense interior ocean. Once the basin was established, ice would naturally have accumulated there. Then, provided that the basin was a positive gravity anomaly (with or without the ocean), true polar wander could have moved the feature towards the Pluto-Charon tidal axis, on the far side of Pluto from Charon. Here we report modelling that shows that ice quickly accumulates on Pluto near latitudes of 30 degrees north and south, even in the absence of a basin, because, averaged over its orbital period, those are Pluto's coldest regions. Within a million years of Charon's formation, ice deposits on Pluto concentrate into a single cap centred near a latitude of 30 degrees, owing to the runaway albedo effect. This accumulation of ice causes a positive gravity signature that locks, as Pluto's rotation slows, to a longitude directly opposite Charon. Once locked, Charon raises a permanent tidal bulge on Pluto, which greatly enhances the gravity signature of the ice cap. Meanwhile, the weight of the ice in Sputnik Planitia causes the crust under it to slump, creating its own basin (as has happened on Earth in Greenland). Even if the feature is now a modest negative gravity anomaly, it remains locked in place because of the permanent tidal bulge raised by Charon. Any movement of the feature away from 30 degrees latitude is countered by the preferential recondensation of ices near the coldest extremities of the cap. Therefore, our modelling suggests that Sputnik Planitia formed shortly after Charon did and has been stable, albeit gradually losing

  4. Early menarche, nulliparity and the risk for premature and early natural menopause.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Gita D; Pandeya, Nirmala; Dobson, Annette J; Chung, Hsin-Fang; Anderson, Debra; Kuh, Diana; Sandin, Sven; Giles, Graham G; Bruinsma, Fiona; Hayashi, Kunihiko; Lee, Jung Su; Mizunuma, Hideki; Cade, Janet E; Burley, Victoria; Greenwood, Darren C; Goodman, Alissa; Simonsen, Mette Kildevæld; Adami, Hans-Olov; Demakakos, Panayotes; Weiderpass, Elisabete

    2017-03-01

    Are parity and the timing of menarche associated with premature and early natural menopause? Early menarche (≤11 years) is a risk factor for both premature menopause (final menstrual period, FMP <40 years) and early menopause (FMP 40-44 years), a risk that is amplified for nulliparous women. Women with either premature or early menopause face an increased risk of chronic conditions in later life and of early death. Findings from some studies suggest that early menarche and nulliparity are associated with early menopause, however overall the evidence is mixed. Much of the evidence for a direct relationship is hampered by a lack of comparability across studies, failure to adjust for confounding factors and inadequate statistical power. This pooled study comprises 51 450 postmenopausal women from nine observational studies in the UK, Scandinavia, Australia and Japan that contribute to the International collaboration for a Life course Approach to reproductive health and Chronic disease Events (InterLACE). Age at menarche (categorized as ≤11, 12, 13, 14 and 15 or more years) and parity (categorized as no children, one child and two or more children) were exposures of interest. Age at FMP was confirmed by at least 12 months of cessation of menses where this was not the result of an intervention (such as surgical menopause due to bilateral oophorectomy or hysterectomy) and categorized as premature menopause (FMP before age 40), early menopause (FMP 40-44 years), 45-49 years, 50-51 years, 52-53 years and 54 or more years. We used multivariate multinomial logistic regression models to estimate relative risk ratio (RRR) and 95% CI for associations between menarche, parity and age at FMP adjusting for within-study correlation. The median age at FMP was 50 years (interquartile range 48-53 years), with 2% of the women experiencing premature menopause and 7.6% early menopause. Women with early menarche (≤11 years, compared with 12-13 years) were at higher risk of premature

  5. Evolution of CO2 and H2O on Mars: A cold Early History?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niles, P. B.; Michalski, J.

    2011-01-01

    The martian climate has long been thought to have evolved substantially through history from a warm and wet period to the current cold and dry conditions on the martian surface. This view has been challenged based primarily on evidence that the early Sun had a substantially reduced luminosity and that a greenhouse atmosphere would be difficult to sustain on Mars for long periods of time. In addition, the evidence for a warm, wet period of martian history is far from conclusive with many of the salient features capable of being explained by an early cold climate. An important test of the warm, wet early Mars hypothesis is the abundance of carbonates in the crust [1]. Recent high precision isotopic measurements of the martian atmosphere and discoveries of carbonates on the martian surface provide new constraints on the evolution of the martian atmosphere. This work seeks to apply these constraints to test the feasibility of the cold early scenario

  6. Understanding the Nature of Scientific Enterprise (NOSE) through a Discourse with Its History: The Influence of an Undergraduate "History of Science" Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dass, Pradeep M.

    2005-01-01

    An appropriate understanding of the nature of the scientific enterprise (NOSE) is a key element of scientific literacy and can arguably be influenced through an exploration of the history of science. An elective, undergraduate History of Science course was organized in the form of small-group discussion-based inquiries into the history of science…

  7. Natural history of de novo High Grade Glioma: first description of growth parabola.

    PubMed

    Altieri, Roberto; Hirono, Seiichiro; Duffau, Hugues; Ducati, Alessandro; Fontanella, Marco; LA Rocca, Giuseppe; Melcarne, Antonio; Panciani, Pier P; Spena, Giannantonio; Garbossa, Diego

    2017-07-26

    Etiopathogenesis and physiopathology of gliomas are largely unknown. Recently, many authors have proved a strict correlation between the velocity of diametric expansion (VDE) on the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and the biological behavior of these tumors, especially in Low Grade Gliomas (LGGs). Unfortunately, natural history of High Grade Gliomas (HGGs) has not been well clarified because of its fast progression, late diagnoses and early surgical intervention. We describe, for the first time to our knowledge, the case of asymptomatic patient with an incidentally discovered de novo HGG with a total of 17 months of follow-up. A male patient was referred to our consultation for routinely follow-up after meningioma resection 5 years before. He underwent MRI every year without any neuroradiological alterations. A new MRI image presented a non-enhancing lesion in the right temporal lobe with 3.55 cm of Mean Tumor Diameter (MTD) and 35.6 mm/year of VDE. After two months interval, the lesion had 3.97 cm of MTD and 27.8 mm/year of VDE. Although we have strongly suggested surgical resection, patient have delayed the operation for personal issues. After other 3 months, the tumor showed enhancement with 4.5 of MTD and 17.4 mm/year of VDE. We speculate that the descending parabola is due to initial mass effect and hypoxia of the tumor core. We also underline the crucial role of the VDE determining, in order to predict the nature of the lesion and address the most effective treatment for each patient.

  8. The ancient history of the structure of ribonuclease P and the early origins of Archaea

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Ribonuclease P is an ancient endonuclease that cleaves precursor tRNA and generally consists of a catalytic RNA subunit (RPR) and one or more proteins (RPPs). It represents an important macromolecular complex and model system that is universally distributed in life. Its putative origins have inspired fundamental hypotheses, including the proposal of an ancient RNA world. Results To study the evolution of this complex, we constructed rooted phylogenetic trees of RPR molecules and substructures and estimated RPP age using a cladistic method that embeds structure directly into phylogenetic analysis. The general approach was used previously to study the evolution of tRNA, SINE RNA and 5S rRNA, the origins of metabolism, and the evolution and complexity of the protein world, and revealed here remarkable evolutionary patterns. Trees of molecules uncovered the tripartite nature of life and the early origin of archaeal RPRs. Trees of substructures showed molecules originated in stem P12 and were accessorized with a catalytic P1-P4 core structure before the first substructure was lost in Archaea. This core currently interacts with RPPs and ancient segments of the tRNA molecule. Finally, a census of protein domain structure in hundreds of genomes established RPPs appeared after the rise of metabolic enzymes at the onset of the protein world. Conclusions The study provides a detailed account of the history and early diversification of a fundamental ribonucleoprotein and offers further evidence in support of the existence of a tripartite organismal world that originated by the segregation of archaeal lineages from an ancient community of primordial organisms. PMID:20334683

  9. The Natural History of Epilepsy in 163 Untreated Patients: Looking for “Oligoepilepsy”

    PubMed Central

    Gasparini, Sara; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Leonardi, Cinzia Grazia; Cianci, Vittoria; Mumoli, Laura; Sueri, Chiara; Labate, Angelo; Gambardella, Antonio; Aguglia, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    The clinical evolution of untreated epilepsy has been rarely studied in developed countries, and the existence of a distinct syndrome characterized by rarely repeated seizures (oligoepilepsy) is debated. The aim of this study is to assess the natural history of 163 untreated patients with epilepsy in order to evaluate whether oligoepilepsy retains specific features. We retrospectively evaluated 7344 patients with ≥2 unprovoked seizures. Inclusion criteria: sufficient anamnestic/EEG data, disease duration ≥10 years, follow-up ≥3 years. Exclusion criteria: psychogenic seizures, natural history of disease <5 years. The 163 included subjects were divided into 2 groups according to seizure frequency: oligoepilepsy (≤1/year; 47 subjects) and controls (>1/year; 116 subjects). We also evaluated seizure frequency during the natural history. There were no differences between groups regarding duration of natural history, family history of epilepsy/febrile seizures, interictal EEG. Subjects with oligoepilepsy differed from controls in terms of sex (females 38% vs. 58%, p = 0.03) and drug resistance (6% vs 28%; p = 0.003). Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy was more frequent in controls (9.5% vs 0%, p = 0.04). Patients with oligoepilepsy, differently from controls, had stable seizure frequency. Oligoepilepsy represents a favourable evolution of different epileptic syndromes and keeps a stable seizure frequency over time. PMID:27657542

  10. The prevalence and natural history of urinary symptoms among recreational ketamine users.

    PubMed

    Winstock, Adam R; Mitcheson, Luke; Gillatt, David A; Cottrell, Angela M

    2012-12-01

    Study Type--Symptom prevalence (prospective cohort) Level of Evidence 1b. What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Case series have described lower urinary tract symptoms associated with ketamine use including severe pain, frequency, haematuria and dysuria. Little is known regarding the frequency of symptoms, relationship of symptoms with dose and frequency of use and natural history of symptoms once the ketamine user has stopped. This study describes the prevalence of ketamine use in a population of recreational drug users in a dance music setting. It shows a dose-frequency relationship with ketamine use. It shows that urinary symptoms associated with recreational ketamine use may lead to a considerable demand on health resources in the primary-, secondary- and emergency-care settings. It shows that symptoms may improve once ketamine use is decreased. • To investigate the prevalence and natural history of urinary symptoms in a cohort of recreational ketamine users. • A purposeful sampling technique was used. • Between November 2009 and January 2010 participants were invited to undertake an on-line questionnaire promoted by a national dance music magazine and website. • Data regarding demographics and illicit drug-use were collected. • Among respondents reporting recent ketamine use, additional information detailing their ketamine use, experience of urinary symptoms and use of related healthcare services was obtained. • In all, 3806 surveys were completed, of which 1285 (33.8%) participants reported ketamine use within the last year. • Of the ketamine users, 17% were found to be dependent on the drug; 26.6% (340) of recent ketamine users reported experiencing urinary symptoms. • Urinary symptoms were significantly related to both dose of ketamine used and frequency of ketamine use. • Of 251 users reporting their experience of symptoms over time in relationship to their use of ketamine, 51% reported improvement in urinary symptoms

  11. 77 FR 65015 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-24

    ... Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY; Correction AGENCY... repatriate cultural items in the possession of the American Museum of Natural History that meet the... History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024, telephone (212) 769-5837, before November...

  12. Reemergence of the Natural History of Otolaryngologic Infections: Lessons Learned from 2 American Presidents.

    PubMed

    Naples, James; Schwartz, Marissa; Eisen, Marc

    2017-09-01

    Presidents George Washington and Theodore Roosevelt suffered complications of epiglottitis and otomastoiditis, respectively. The introduction of antibiotics and vaccinations against Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae has significantly reduced the incidence of these otolaryngologic infections, such that the natural history of the disease is rarely encountered. However, antibiotic resistance and pathogenic evolution has raised concern about increased virulence of these common organisms. A retrospective evaluation of the complications suffered by Washington and Roosevelt provides valuable insight to the natural history of common otolaryngologic infections that may reemerge as a result of organism evolution in response to antibiotics and vaccines.

  13. Effects of early age at natural menopause on coronary heart disease and stroke in Chinese women.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lijun; Song, Lulu; Liu, Bingqing; Li, Hui; Zheng, Xiaoxuan; Zhang, Lina; Yuan, Jing; Liang, Yuan; Wang, Youjie

    2017-08-15

    Menopause is identified as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease because of the change of estrogen. The objective of the study was to explore the associations between early age at natural menopause (menopause at an age≤45years) and the presence of CHD and stroke. The study subjects were from the first follow-up survey of the Dongfeng-Tongji cohort study. A total of 16,515 postmenopausal women were included for the analysis. Logistic regression models were used to examine the associations between age at natural menopause (≤45, 45-52, >52years) and the presence of CHD and stroke adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics, lifestyle, reproductive history and metabolic factors. In the fully adjusted model, for each 1-year delay in menopausal age, the prevalence of CHD and stroke was reduced by 3% (OR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.95-0.98) and 5% (OR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.92-0.98), respectively. Women with early menopause (≤45years) had a higher prevalence of CHD (OR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.13-1.57) compared with those with menopause at ages 45-52years. Similarly, women with early menopause (≤45years) was associated with higher prevalence of stroke (OR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.25-2.30) compared with those with menopause at ages 45-52years. Early age at natural menopause is significantly associated with the presence of CHD and stroke among Chinese women. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Building an Evidence-Based Mental Health Program for Children with History of Early Adversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroupina, Maria; Vermeulen, Marlous; Moberg, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Adoption is a major intervention in a child's life, however internationally adopted (IA) children remain at risk for long-term neurodevelopmental and mental health issues due to the fact that most of them have a history of early adversity prior to their adoption. In the last 20 years, extensive research with this population has increased the…

  15. History Of Self-Disclosure In Females And Early Defection From Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilbrun, Alfred B., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Late adolescent girls who would more likely defect from psychotherapy early had a self-rated history of greater self-disclosure than did girls who would more likely continue. This difference was especially clear with male targets. The second experimental study revealed a similar finding; terminators are higher self-disclosers to males whereas…

  16. Tensions in Constructions of Quality in Australian Early Childhood Education and Care Policy History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Helen

    2017-01-01

    In pronouncements of early childhood education and care (ECEC) policy the importance of quality appears as a seemingly irrefutable concept. Yet, attention to ECEC policy history reveals tensions between discourses that construct quality in ways that endure whereas other ways are ostensibly forgotten. Drawing on a Foucauldian-influenced…

  17. Workshop on Pristine Highlands Rocks and the early History of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longhi, J. (Editor); Ryder, G. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    Oxide composition of the Moon, evidence for an initially totally molten Moon, geophysical contraints on lunar composition, random sampling of a layered intrusion, lunar highland rocks, early evolution of the Moon, mineralogy and petrology of the pristine rocks, relationship of the pristine nonmore rocks to the highlands soils and breccias, ferroan anorthositic norite, early lunar igneous history, compositional variation in ferroan anosthosites, a lunar magma ocean, deposits of lunar pristine rocks, lunar and planetary compositions and early fractionation in the solar nebula, Moon composition models, petrogenesis in a Moon with a chondritic refractory lithophile pattern, a terrestrial analog of lunar ilmenite bearing camulates, and the lunar magma ocean are summarized.

  18. A history of early geologic research in the Deep River Triassic Basin, North Carolina

    Clark, T.W.

    1998-01-01

    The Deep River Triassic basin has one of the longest recorded histories of geologic research in North Carolina. A quick perusal of nineteenth century geologic literature in North Carolina reveals the Deep River basin has received a tremendous amount of attention, second only, perhaps, to the gold deposits of the Carolina slate belt. While these early researchers' primary interests were coal deposits, many other important discoveries, observations, and hypotheses resulted from their investigations. This article highlights many of the important advances made by these early geo-explorers by trying to include information from every major geologic investigation made in the Deep River basin from 1820 to 1955. This article also provides as thorough a consolidated history as is possible to preserve the exploration history of the Deep River basin for future investigators.

  19. The natural history of adult pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis: a prospective multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Tazi, Abdellatif; de Margerie, Constance; Naccache, Jean Marc; Fry, Stéphanie; Dominique, Stéphane; Jouneau, Stéphane; Lorillon, Gwenaël; Bugnet, Emmanuelle; Chiron, Raphael; Wallaert, Benoit; Valeyre, Dominique; Chevret, Sylvie

    2015-03-14

    The natural history of pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH) has been unclear due to the absence of prospective studies. The rate of patients who experience an early progression of their disease is unknown. Additionally, conflicting effects of smoking cessation on the outcome of PLCH have been reported. In this prospective, multicentre study, 58 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed PLCH were comprehensively evaluated over a two-year period. Our objectives were to estimate the incidence of early progression of the disease and to evaluate the impact of smoking status on lung function outcomes. Lung function deterioration was defined as a decrease of at least 15% in FEV1 and/or FVC and/or DLCO, compared with baseline values. At each visit, smoking status was recorded based on the patients' self-reports and urinary cotinine measurements that were blinded for the patients. The cumulative incidence of lung function outcomes over time was estimated using the non-parametric Kaplan-Meier method. Multivariate Cox models with time-dependent covariates were used to calculate the hazards ratios of the lung function deterioration associated with smoking status with adjustment for potential confounders. The cumulative incidence of lung function deterioration at 24 months was 38% (22% for FEV1 and DLCO, and 9% for FVC). In the multivariate analysis, smoking status and PaO2 at inclusion were the only factors associated with the risk of lung function deterioration. The patients' smoking statuses markedly changed over time. Only 20% of the patients quit using tobacco for the entire study period. Nevertheless, being a non-smoker was associated with a decreased risk of subsequent lung function deterioration, even after adjustment for baseline predictive factors. By serial lung computed tomography, the extent of cystic lesions increased in only 11% of patients. Serial lung function evaluation on a three- to six-month basis is essential for the follow-up of patients with

  20. A qualitative study of early family histories and transitions of homeless youth.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Kimberly A

    2006-10-01

    Using intensive qualitative interviews with 40 homeless youth, this study examined their early family histories for abuse, neglect, and other family problems and the number and types of transitions that youth experienced. Multiple forms of child maltreatment, family alcoholism, drug use, and criminal activity characterized early family histories of many youth. Leaving home because of either running away or being removed by child protective services often resulted in multiple transitions, which regularly included moving from foster care homes to a group home, back to their parents, and then again returning to the streets. Although having experienced family disorganization set youth on trajectories for early independence, there were many unique paths that youth traveled prior to ending up on the streets.

  1. Fossil Platygastroidea in the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution

    Platygastroid wasps preserved in Dominican amber and oil shale from the Kishenehn formation (Montana, USA) in the National Museum of Natural History are catalogued. Compression fossils in Kishenehn oil shale yield a specimen of Fidiobia, a specimen of Telenominae, and a specimen with a Scelio-type o...

  2. A photographic catalog of Platygastroidea (Hymenoptera) in the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution

    A photographic catalog of all determined species of Platygastroidea, including primary types, in the National Insect Collection, National Museum of Natural History, is here made available online. Following examination of this collection we make the following taxonomic acts: Leptacis piniellaMacGown ...

  3. Natural history of vestibular schwannomas and hearing loss in NF2 patients.

    PubMed

    Peyre, M; Bernardeschi, D; Sterkers, O; Kalamarides, M

    2015-07-13

    Bilateral vestibular schwannomas are the hallmark of neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2), occurring in 95% of patients. These tumors are associated with significant morbidity due to hearing loss, tinnitus, imbalance and facial weakness. As radiosurgery and chemotherapy have been recently introduced in the treatment armamentarium in addition to surgery, a thorough evaluation of vestibular schwannoma natural history is mandatory to determine the role and timing of each treatment modality. An exhaustive review of the literature was performed using the PubMed database concerning the natural history of tumor growth and hearing loss in NF2 patients with vestibular schwannomas. Although some aspects of vestibular schwannoma natural history remain uncertain (pattern of tumor growth, mean tumor growth rate), factors influencing growth such as age at presentation and paracrine factors are well established. Studies focusing on the natural history of hearing have highlighted different patterns of hearing loss and the possible role of intralabyrinthine tumors. The polyclonality of vestibular schwannomas in NF2 was recently unveiled, giving a new perspective to their growth mechanisms. An uniform evaluation of tumor growth using volumetric evaluation and hearing with standard classifications will ensure the use of common endpoints and should improve the quality of clinical trials as well as foster comparison among studies while ensuring more consistency in decision-making. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Cooperative Learning about Nature of Science with a Case from the History of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfensberger, Balz; Canella, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports a predominantly qualitative classroom study on cooperative learning about nature of science (NOS) using a case from the history of science. The purpose of the research was to gain insight into how students worked with the historical case study during cooperative group work, how students and teachers assessed the teaching unit,…

  5. Teaching Science Rhetorically: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Natural History, 1948-1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePaolo, Charles

    1987-01-01

    Considers the different analogies used by James Rettie, Teilhard de Chardin, Robert Ardrey, Jacob Bronowski, Richard Leakey, Steven Weinberg, Heinz Pagels, and Carl Sagan to make concepts related to time and natural history accessible to the layperson. Suggests that these analogies be used at the undergraduate level in both humanities and science…

  6. The value of the study of natural history in genetic disorders and congenital anomaly syndromes.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, J G

    1988-01-01

    The study of the natural history of genetic disorders and syndromes with congenital anomalies and dysmorphic features is a challenging and often neglected area. There are many reasons to pursue this type of research but it requires special clinical skills and a considerable amount of hard work. Setting up protocols and collecting data is complex and time consuming. Frequently, helpful clues for a particular disorder come from the study of the natural history of other disorders. Older affected subjects and unique cases with unusual features are often most important in unravelling the 'normal' course of a disease or recognising the basic defect. The study of natural history from individual patients and their records is complementary to population or registry based studies because it identifies individual variations and clinical heterogeneity. The understanding of the natural history of a particular disorder is of importance both to the affected person and their family and to the physicians caring for them. It is also useful to the basic researcher trying to determine the pathogenetic mechanism causing the disorder. In many ways, clinical geneticists have learned the art of caring for patients, as well as the challenges of clinical genetics, by becoming apprentices to and studying in depth specific disease entities. PMID:3050091

  7. How In-Service Science Teachers Integrate History and Nature of Science in Elementary Science Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hacieminoglu, Esme

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate how the in-service science teachers' (IST) perceptions and practices about curriculum and integration of the history of science (HOS) and the nature of science (NOS) affect their science courses. For this aim, how ISTs integrated the NOS and HOS in their elementary science courses for understanding of…

  8. From Pythagoras to Sauveur: Tracing the History of Ideas about the Nature of Sound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caleon, Imelda S.; Subramaniam, R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper aims to supplement the scant literature on the history of ideas about the nature of sound. It presents how notions about the production and propagation of sound developed from antiquity up to the 17th century, i.e. from the time of Pythagoras to the time of Sauveur. It will highlight and examine the principles of sound that were…

  9. Changes and Stability in Reasoning after a Field Trip to a Natural History Museum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenenbaum, Harriet R.; To, Cheryl; Wormald, Daniel; Pegram, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Darwinian evolution is difficult to understand because of conceptual barriers stemming from intuitive ideas. This study examined understanding of evolution in 52 students (M = 14.48 years, SD = 0.89) before and after a guided field trip to a natural history museum and in a comparison group of 18 students (M = 14.17 years, SD = 0.79) who did not…

  10. Chapter 1: The cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl: Taxonomy, distribution, and natural history

    Jean-Luc E. Cartron; W. Scott Richardson; Glenn A. Proudfoot

    2000-01-01

    The cactus ferruginous pygmy-owl (Glaucidium brasilianum cactorum) is a small, cryptic owl that is often difficult to observe. Its natural history and conservation needs are poorly understood. Despite ongoing research in Texas and Arizona, the available information remains limited. In addition, factors influencing demographics (e.g., habitat...

  11. Middle Level Preservice Teachers Experience a Natural History Arts-Integrated Interdisciplinary Thematic Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Carolyn A.; Rule, Audrey C.

    2017-01-01

    Curricular demands and best practices for middle school require interdisciplinary units. Arts integration can provide motivation and a new pathway to learning. This unit focused on inquiry into the natural history of artifacts and rocks recovered from the exposed subsoil of an area near Cedar Falls, Iowa that had been bulldozed as part of…

  12. Natural History of Thyroid Function in Adults with Down Syndrome--10-Year Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasher, V.; Gomez, G.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The natural history of thyroid function in adults with Down syndrome (DS) is unknown. Method: This study investigated annual thyroid function tests in 200 adults with DS over a 10-year period. Results: Transient and persistent thyroid dysfunction was common. The 5- and 10-year incidence of definite hypothyroidism was 0.9%-1.64% and…

  13. Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the cervical spine: etiology and natural history.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Shunji; Sakou, Takashi

    2012-03-01

    Review article. To review the etiology, natural history, measurement tools, and image diagnosis of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) of the cervical spine. OPLL is a well-known disease that causes myelopathy. Genetic factors are very important for development of OPLL. However, the pathogenetic gene and natural history of OPLL have not been clarified. The authors reviewed studies about the etiology, natural history, measurement tools, and diagnosis of OPLL, which had been performed by the members of the Investigation Committee on the Ossification of the Spinal Ligaments of the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare. The prevalence of OPLL in the general Japanese population was reported to be 1.9% to 4.3% among people older than 30 years. Genetic factors are important for development of OPLL, and some candidate genes have been reported. Clinical course of OPLL has been clarified by a prospective long-term follow-up study. Some radiographic predictors for development of myelopathy were introduced. Image diagnosis of OPLL is easy by plain radiographs, but magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography are useful to determine cord compression by OPLL. OPLL should be managed on the basis of the consideration of its natural history. Elucidation of pathogenetic genes of OPLL will introduce a new approach for management of OPLL.

  14. Spinal tuberculosis, natural history of disease, classifications and principles of management with historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kush

    2016-08-01

    To describe the natural history spinal tuberculosis, classifications and principles of management based upon the grading of the neurological deficit. Review of literature was conducted with the aim to provide the clinico-radiological correlation of the natural history of spinal tuberculosis in different stages. Management strategy is developed based upon the severity of the neurological deficit. A five stage natural history of spinal tuberculosis is described. Stage of neurological involvement is further divided into 4 grades, predominantly on the basis of progressively increasing motor deficits as negligible, mild, moderate and severe with sensory and autonomic dysfunctions. Suitable principles of management with role of rest, braces, chemotherapy and surgery are discussed. Neurological deficit grading based management is developed. Grade 1 and 2, conservative treatment, grade 3, gray zone and grade 4, operative treatment is emphasized. The five stages of natural history of tuberculosis of spine have been developed from the clinician's point of view. Management of tuberculosis of spine, in general, it is no different than management of soft tissue tuberculosis, in HIV negative or positive patients. Role of surgery is very limited. Management of tubercular paraplegia, based upon the grading of paraplegia is simple, logical, efficient and easy to understand and remember by any orthopedic surgeon.

  15. Natural Reforestation Reclaims a Watershed: A Case History from West Virginia

    W.P. Lima; J.H. Patric; N. Holowaychuk

    1978-01-01

    Thirteen years of hydrologic data from two contiguous small watersheds in West Virginia were analyzed to determine the effects on streamflow of natural reforestation on abandoned farmlands. During the study period (1958-1970), streamflow on the watersheds was unchanged. The history of land use on the study area helps explain the apparent lack of hydrologic effects of...

  16. Using History of Science to Teach Nature of Science to Elementary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fouad, Khadija E.; Masters, Heidi; Akerson, Valarie L.

    2015-01-01

    Science lessons using inquiry only or history of science with inquiry were used for explicit reflective nature of science (NOS) instruction for second-, third-, and fourth-grade students randomly assigned to receive one of the treatments. Students in both groups improved in their understanding of creative NOS, tentative NOS, empirical NOS, and…

  17. Neutral Theory: From Complex Population History to Natural Selection and Sociocultural Phenomena in Human Populations.

    PubMed

    Austerlitz, Frédéric; Heyer, Evelyne

    2018-06-01

    Here, we present a synthetic view on how Kimura's Neutral theory has helped us gaining insight on the different evolutionary forces that shape human evolution. We put this perspective in the frame of recent emerging challenges: the use of whole genome data for reconstructing population histories, natural selection on complex polygenic traits, and integrating cultural processes in human evolution.

  18. An Amphibious Being: How Maritime Surveying Reshaped Darwin's Approach to Natural History.

    PubMed

    Sponsel, Alistair

    2016-06-01

    This essay argues that Charles Darwin's distinctive approach to studying distribution and diversity was shaped by his face-to-face interactions with maritime surveyors during the voyage of H.M.S. Beagle (1831-1836). Introducing their hydrographic surveying methods into natural history enabled him to compare fossil and living marine organisms, to compare sedimentary rocks to present-day marine sediments, and to compare landscapes to submarine topology, thereby realizing Charles Lyell's fanciful ambition for a superior form of geology that might be practiced by an "amphibious being." Darwin's theories of continental uplift, coral reef formation, and the origin of species all depended on his amphibious natural history. This essay contributes to our understanding of theorizing in nineteenth-century natural history by illustrating that specific techniques of observing and collecting could themselves help to generate a particular theoretical orientation and, indeed, that such practical experiences were a more proximate source of Darwin's "Humboldtian" interest in distribution and diversity than Alexander von Humboldt's writings themselves. Darwin's debt to the hydrographers became obscured in two ways: through the "funneling" of credit produced by single-authorship publication in natural history and the "telescoping" of memory by which Darwin's new theories made him recall his former researches as though he had originally undertaken them for the very purpose of producing the later theory.

  19. DinoViz: Exploring the History and Nature of Science through the Progression of Dinosaur Visualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2011-01-01

    Dinosaurs in the middle school classroom can be exciting. These extinct reptiles are both an exotic subject and familiar to our students. Because students are inherently interested, dinosaurs can serve as an effective portal for the integration of biology, geology, ecology, and the history and nature of science. The field of dinosaur study is…

  20. 76 FR 48179 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-08

    ... Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound professional staff in consultation with... museum staff that it does not exhibit the darker coloration usually found on remains removed from burials... period, museum staff consider the coloration of the remain to suggest an origin east of the Cascades...

  1. Exploring Research Themes in Public Engagement within a Natural History Museum: A Modified Delphi Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seakins, Amy; Dillon, Justin

    2013-01-01

    The primacy of the research question in designing studies affords an opportunity for enhancing collaborations between researchers and "practitioners". This paper describes the use of a modified Delphi technique to co-generate research questions for a collaborative research study co-funded by a university and a natural history museum.…

  2. 75 FR 16175 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of Cultural and Natural History, Central Michigan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Museum of... funerary objects in the possession of the Museum of Cultural and Natural History, Central Michigan... sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has control of the Native...

  3. A Conceptual Guide to Natural History Museum Visitors' Understanding of Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, E. Margaret; Spiegel, Amy N.; Gram, Wendy; Frazier, Brandy N.; Tare, Medha; Thompson, Sarah; Diamond, Judy

    2010-01-01

    Museum visitors are an ideal population for assessing the persistence of the conceptual barriers that make it difficult to grasp Darwinian evolutionary theory. In comparison with other members of the public, they are more likely to be interested in natural history, have higher education levels, and be exposed to the relevant content. If museum…

  4. Guided School Visits to Natural History Museums in Israel: Teachers' Roles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tal, Revital; Bamberger, Yael; Morag, Orly

    2005-01-01

    Museums are favorite and respected resources for learning worldwide. In Israel, there are two relatively large science centers and a number of small natural history museums that are visited by thousands of students. Unlike other countries, studying museum visits in Israel only emerges in the last few years. The study focused on the roles and…

  5. Natural History of Cryptosporidiosis in a Birth Cohort in Southern India.

    PubMed

    Kattula, Deepthi; Jeyavelu, Nithya; Prabhakaran, Ashok D; Premkumar, Prasanna S; Velusamy, Vasanthakumar; Venugopal, Srinivasan; Geetha, Jayanthi C; Lazarus, Robin P; Das, Princey; Nithyanandhan, Karthick; Gunasekaran, Chandrabose; Muliyil, Jayaprakash; Sarkar, Rajiv; Wanke, Christine; Ajjampur, Sitara Swarna Rao; Babji, Sudhir; Naumova, Elena N; Ward, Honorine D; Kang, Gagandeep

    2017-02-01

    Cryptosporidium is a leading cause of moderate to severe childhood diarrhea in resource-poor settings. Understanding the natural history of cryptosporidiosis and the correlates of protection are essential to develop effective and sustainable approaches to disease control and prevention. Children (N = 497) were recruited at birth in semiurban slums in Vellore, India, and followed for 3 years with twice-weekly home visits. Stool samples were collected every 2 weeks and during diarrheal episodes were tested for Cryptosporidium species by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Serum samples obtained every 6 months were evaluated for seroconversion, defined as a 4-fold increase in immunoglobulin G directed against Cryptosporidium gp15 and/or Cp23 antigens between consecutive sera. Of 410 children completing follow-up, 397 (97%) acquired cryptosporidiosis by 3 years of age. PCR identified 1053 episodes of cryptosporidiosis, with an overall incidence of 0.86 infections per child-year by stool and serology. The median age for the first infection was 9 (interquartile range, 4-17) months, indicating early exposure. Although infections were mainly asymptomatic (693 [66%]), Cryptosporidium was identified in 9.4% of diarrheal episodes. The proportion of reinfected children was high (81%) and there was clustering of asymptomatic and symptomatic infections (P < .0001 for both). Protection against infection increased with the order of infection but was only 69% after 4 infections. Cryptosporidium hominis (73.3%) was the predominant Cryptosporidium species, and there was no species-specific protection. There is a high burden of endemic cryptosporidiosis in southern India. Clustering of infection is suggestive of host susceptibility. Multiple reinfections conferred some protection against subsequent infection. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  6. Natural history of bacterial vaginosis and intermediate flora in pregnancy and effect of oral clindamycin.

    PubMed

    Ugwumadu, Austin; Reid, Fiona; Hay, Phillip; Manyonda, Isaac

    2004-07-01

    We sought to describe the natural history of abnormal vaginal flora in pregnancy and estimate the efficacy of oral clindamycin in eradicating it and preventing relapse. This was a subanalysis of a randomized trial of oral clindamycin for abnormal vaginal flora in pregnancy. All 494 enrolled women were asked to provide a vaginal smear 2 weeks after treatment and every second participant to provide further smears at 20, 24, 28, 32, and 36 weeks of gestation. We used Nugent score of Gram-stained smears to assess the cure rate among the clindamycin group and the rate of spontaneous resolution among the placebo group. Posttreatment smears were available for 462 women (231 in each of the clindamycin and placebo arms). The prevalence of abnormal flora posttreatment was 10% (22 of 231) in the clindamycin group compared with 93% (214 of 231) in the placebo group (P <.001). Two hundred nineteen women obtained 4 weekly smears; slides for 84 women were lost, and results were available for 135 women (69 clindamycin, 66 placebo). In the clindamycin group, the prevalence of abnormal flora was 15% at 20 weeks of gestation and 17% at 36 weeks of gestation compared with 69% at 20 weeks of gestation and 43% at 36 weeks of gestation in the placebo group. Oral clindamycin eradicated abnormal flora in 90% of treated pregnant women and maintained a normal flora in two thirds of women throughout pregnancy. Almost one third of untreated women in our study had spontaneous resolution of abnormal flora by 20 weeks of gestation. Because previous research has shown that spontaneous resolution does not modify the risk of preterm birth, early screening is essential.

  7. Natural and molecular history of prolactinoma: insights from a Prlr-/- mouse model.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Valérie; Villa, Chiara; Auguste, Aurélie; Lamothe, Sophie; Guillou, Anne; Martin, Agnès; Caburet, Sandrine; Young, Jacques; Veitia, Reiner A; Binart, Nadine

    2018-01-19

    Lactotroph adenoma, also called prolactinoma, is the most common pituitary tumor but little is known about its pathogenesis. Mouse models of prolactinoma can be useful to better understand molecular mechanisms involved in abnormal lactotroph cell proliferation and secretion. We have previously developed a prolactin receptor deficient ( Prlr -/- ) mouse, which develops prolactinoma. The present study aims to explore the natural history of prolactinoma formation in Prlr -/- mice, using hormonal, radiological, histological and molecular analyses to uncover mechanisms involved in lactotroph adenoma development. Prlr -/- females develop large secreting prolactinomas from 12 months of age, with a penetrance of 100%, mimicking human aggressive densely granulated macroprolactinoma, which is a highly secreting subtype. Mean blood PRL measurements reach 14 902 ng/mL at 24 months in Prlr -/- females while PRL levels were below 15 ng/mL in control mice ( p < 0.01). By comparing pituitary microarray data of Prlr -/- mice and an estrogen-induced prolactinoma model in ACI rats, we pinpointed 218 concordantly differentially expressed (DE) genes involved in cell cycle, mitosis, cell adhesion molecules, dopaminergic synapse and estrogen signaling. Pathway/gene-set enrichment analyses suggest that the transcriptomic dysregulation in both models of prolactinoma might be mediated by a limited set of transcription factors (i.e., STAT5, STAT3, AhR, ESR1, BRD4, CEBPD, YAP, FOXO1) and kinases (i.e., JAK2, AKT1, BRAF, BMPR1A, CDK8, HUNK, ALK, FGFR1, ILK). Our experimental results and their bioinformatic analysis provide insights into early genomic changes in murine models of the most frequent human pituitary tumor.

  8. The natural history of molecular functions inferred from an extensive phylogenomic analysis of gene ontology data

    PubMed Central

    Koç, Ibrahim; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    The origin and natural history of molecular functions hold the key to the emergence of cellular organization and modern biochemistry. Here we use a genomic census of Gene Ontology (GO) terms to reconstruct phylogenies at the three highest (1, 2 and 3) and the lowest (terminal) levels of the hierarchy of molecular functions, which reflect the broadest and the most specific GO definitions, respectively. These phylogenies define evolutionary timelines of functional innovation. We analyzed 249 free-living organisms comprising the three superkingdoms of life, Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya. Phylogenies indicate catalytic, binding and transport functions were the oldest, suggesting a ‘metabolism-first’ origin scenario for biochemistry. Metabolism made use of increasingly complicated organic chemistry. Primordial features of ancient molecular functions and functional recruitments were further distilled by studying the oldest child terms of the oldest level 1 GO definitions. Network analyses showed the existence of an hourglass pattern of enzyme recruitment in the molecular functions of the directed acyclic graph of molecular functions. Older high-level molecular functions were thoroughly recruited at younger lower levels, while very young high-level functions were used throughout the timeline. This pattern repeated in every one of the three mappings, which gave a criss-cross pattern. The timelines and their mappings were remarkable. They revealed the progressive evolutionary development of functional toolkits, starting with the early rise of metabolic activities, followed chronologically by the rise of macromolecular biosynthesis, the establishment of controlled interactions with the environment and self, adaptation to oxygen, and enzyme coordinated regulation, and ending with the rise of structural and cellular complexity. This historical account holds important clues for dissection of the emergence of biomcomplexity and life. PMID:28467492

  9. A review on the clinical spectrum and natural history of human influenza.

    PubMed

    Punpanich, Warunee; Chotpitayasunondh, Tawee

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this review is to provide updated information on the clinical spectrum and natural history of human influenza, including risk factors for severe disease, and to identify the knowledge gap in this area. We searched the MEDLINE database of the recent literature for the period January 2009 to August 17, 2011 with regard to the abovementioned aspects of human influenza, focusing on A(H1N1)pdm09 and seasonal influenza. The clinical spectrum and outcomes of cases of A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza have been mild and rather indistinguishable from those of seasonal influenza. Sporadic cases covering a wide range of neurological complications have been reported. Underlying predisposing conditions considered to be high-risk for A(H1N1)pdm09 infections are generally similar to those of seasonal influenza, but with two additional risk groups: pregnant women and the morbidly obese. Co-infections with bacteria and D222/N variants or 225G substitution of the viral genome have also been reported to be significant factors associated with the severity of disease. The current knowledge gap includes: (1) a lack of clarification regarding the relatively greater severity of the Mexican A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza outbreak in the early phase of the pandemic; (2) insufficient data on the clinical impact, risk factors, and outcomes of human infections caused by resistant strains of influenza; and (3) insufficient data from less developed countries that would enable them to prioritize strategies for influenza prevention and control. Clinical features and risk factors of A(H1N1)pdm09 are comparable to those of seasonal influenza. Emerging risk factors for severe disease with A(H1N1)pdm09 include morbid obesity, pregnancy, bacterial co-infections, and D222/N variants or 225G substitution of the viral genome. Copyright © 2012 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Natural history of splenic vascular abnormalities after blunt injury: A Western Trauma Association multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    Zarzaur, Ben L; Dunn, Julie A; Leininger, Brian; Lauerman, Margaret; Shanmuganathan, Kathirkamanthan; Kaups, Krista; Zamary, Kirellos; Hartwell, Jennifer L; Bhakta, Ankur; Myers, John; Gordy, Stephanie; Todd, Samuel R; Claridge, Jeffrey A; Teicher, Erik; Sperry, Jason; Privette, Alicia; Allawi, Ahmed; Burlew, Clay Cothren; Maung, Adrian A; Davis, Kimberly A; Cogbill, Thomas; Bonne, Stephanie; Livingston, David H; Coimbra, Raul; Kozar, Rosemary A

    2017-12-01

    Following blunt splenic injury, there is conflicting evidence regarding the natural history and appropriate management of patients with vascular injuries of the spleen such as pseudoaneurysms or blushes. The purpose of this study was to describe the current management and outcomes of patients with pseudoaneurysm or blush. Data were collected on adult (aged ≥18 years) patients with blunt splenic injury and a splenic vascular injury from 17 trauma centers. Demographic, physiologic, radiographic, and injury characteristics were gathered. Management and outcomes were collected. Univariate and multivariable analyses were used to determine factors associated with splenectomy. Two hundred patients with a vascular abnormality on computed tomography scan were enrolled. Of those, 14.5% were managed with early splenectomy. Of the remaining patients, 59% underwent angiography and embolization (ANGIO), and 26.5% were observed. Of those who underwent ANGIO, 5.9% had a repeat ANGIO, and 6.8% had splenectomy. Of those observed, 9.4% had a delayed ANGIO, and 7.6% underwent splenectomy. There were no statistically significant differences between those observed and those who underwent ANGIO. There were 111 computed tomography scans with splenic vascular injuries available for review by an expert trauma radiologist. The concordance between the original classification of the type of vascular abnormality and the expert radiologist's interpretation was 56.3%. Based on expert review, the presence of an actively bleeding vascular injury was associated with a 40.9% risk of splenectomy. This was significantly higher than those with a nonbleeding vascular injury. In this series, the vast majority of patients are managed with ANGIO and usually embolization, whereas splenectomy remains a rare event. However, patients with a bleeding vascular injury of the spleen are at high risk of nonoperative failure, no matter the strategy used for management. This group may warrant closer observation or

  11. How robust are the natural history parameters used in chlamydia transmission dynamic models? A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Davies, Bethan; Anderson, Sarah-Jane; Turner, Katy M E; Ward, Helen

    2014-01-30

    Transmission dynamic models linked to economic analyses often form part of the decision making process when introducing new chlamydia screening interventions. Outputs from these transmission dynamic models can vary depending on the values of the parameters used to describe the infection. Therefore these values can have an important influence on policy and resource allocation. The risk of progression from infection to pelvic inflammatory disease has been extensively studied but the parameters which govern the transmission dynamics are frequently neglected. We conducted a systematic review of transmission dynamic models linked to economic analyses of chlamydia screening interventions to critically assess the source and variability of the proportion of infections that are asymptomatic, the duration of infection and the transmission probability. We identified nine relevant studies in Pubmed, Embase and the Cochrane database. We found that there is a wide variation in their natural history parameters, including an absolute difference in the proportion of asymptomatic infections of 25% in women and 75% in men, a six-fold difference in the duration of asymptomatic infection and a four-fold difference in the per act transmission probability. We consider that much of this variation can be explained by a lack of consensus in the literature. We found that a significant proportion of parameter values were referenced back to the early chlamydia literature, before the introduction of nucleic acid modes of diagnosis and the widespread testing of asymptomatic individuals. In conclusion, authors should use high quality contemporary evidence to inform their parameter values, clearly document their assumptions and make appropriate use of sensitivity analysis. This will help to make models more transparent and increase their utility to policy makers.

  12. 34 CFR 303.126 - Early intervention services in natural environments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Early intervention services in natural environments...) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION... Statewide System Minimum Components of A Statewide System § 303.126 Early intervention services in natural...

  13. 34 CFR 303.126 - Early intervention services in natural environments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Early intervention services in natural environments. 303...) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION... Statewide System Minimum Components of A Statewide System § 303.126 Early intervention services in natural...

  14. 34 CFR 303.126 - Early intervention services in natural environments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Early intervention services in natural environments...) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EARLY INTERVENTION... Statewide System Minimum Components of A Statewide System § 303.126 Early intervention services in natural...

  15. [Science and nation: romanticism and natural history in the works of E. J. da Silva Maia].

    PubMed

    Kury, L

    1998-01-01

    The works of physician and naturalist Emílio Joaquim da Silva Maia (1808-59) can be viewed as a scientific project that discovers Brazil and its inhabitants. Maia's nationalism and his romantic view of nature formed the underpinnings of his scientific theories, especially his studies on zoological geography. He subordinated the issue of the biological specificity of different regions of the world to his era's debates on the construction of Brazil as an independent nation. In his interpretations of European natural history, Maia endeavored to understand Brazilian nature as a specific achievement of the Cosmos, in keeping with Alexander von Humboldt's approach.

  16. "A Scientific Library of Some Value": An Early History of the Australian Museum Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Matthew

    2007-01-01

    The Australian Museum, Sydney, is Australia's oldest museum, internationally recognised for its longstanding scientific contributions. Less well-known is the Museum's fine collection of monographs and journals relating to natural history and anthropology, which has been used to support the work of Museum staff and external enquirers since the late…

  17. Suppressing Synonymy with a Homonym: The Emergence of the Nomenclatural Type Concept in Nineteenth Century Natural History.

    PubMed

    Witteveen, Joeri

    2016-02-01

    'Type' in biology is a polysemous term. In a landmark article, Paul Farber (Journal of the History of Biology 9(1): 93-119, 1976) argued that this deceptively plain term had acquired three different meanings in early nineteenth century natural history alone. 'Type' was used in relation to three distinct type concepts, each of them associated with a different set of practices. Important as Farber's analysis has been for the historiography of natural history, his account conceals an important dimension of early nineteenth century 'type talk.' Farber's taxonomy of type concepts passes over the fact that certain uses of 'type' began to take on a new meaning in this period. At the closing of the eighteenth century, terms like 'type specimen,' 'type species,' and 'type genus' were universally recognized as referring to typical, model members of their encompassing taxa. But in the course of the nineteenth century, the same terms were co-opted for a different purpose. As part of an effort to drive out nomenclatural synonymy - the confusing state of a taxon being known to different people by different names - these terms started to signify the fixed and potentially atypical name-bearing elements of taxa. A new type concept was born: the nomenclatural type. In this article, I retrace this perplexing nineteenth century shift in meaning of 'type.' I uncover the nomenclatural disorder that the new nomenclatural type concept dissolved, and expose the conceptual confusion it left in its tracks. What emerges is an account of how synonymy was suppressed through the coinage of a homonym.

  18. Taming the Wild: Approaches to Nature in Japanese Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Rachael S.

    2014-01-01

    The Japanese early childhood curriculum provides ample opportunities for children to interact with nature and to learn about natural phenomena. However, using Kalland (1995) and Martinez's (2008) theories about Japanese constructions of nature, this paper argues that most Japanese early childhood experiences do not constitute direct contact with…

  19. Surgical management of early pregnancy failure: history, politics, and safe, cost-effective care.

    PubMed

    Harris, Lisa H; Dalton, Vanessa K; Johnson, Timothy R B

    2007-05-01

    Early pregnancy failure and induced abortion are often managed differently, even though safe uterine evacuation is the goal in both. Early pregnancy failure is commonly treated by curettage in operating room settings in anesthetized patients. Induced abortion is most commonly managed by office vacuum aspiration in awake or sedated patients. Medical evidence does not support routine operating room management of early pregnancy failure. This commentary reviews historical origins of these different care standards, explores political factors responsible for their perpetuation, and uses experience at University of Michigan to dramatize the ways in which history, politics, and biomedicine intersect to produce patient care. The University of Michigan initiated office uterine evacuations for early pregnancy failure treatment. Patients previously went to the operating room. These changes required faculty, staff, and resident education. Our efforts blurred the lines between spontaneous and induced abortion management, improved patient care and better utilized hospital resources.

  20. A Third Note: Helmholtz, Palestrina, and the Early History of Musicology.

    PubMed

    Kursell, Julia

    2015-06-01

    This contribution focuses on Hermann von Helmholtz's work on Renaissance composer Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina. Helmholtz used his scientific concept of distortion to analyze this music and, reversely, to find corroboration for the concept in his musical analyses. In this, his work interlocked with nineteenth-century aesthetic and scholarly ideals. His eagerness to use the latest products of historical scholarship in early music reveals a specific view of music history. Historical documents of music provide the opportunity for the discovery of new experimental research topics and thereby also reveal insights into hearing under different conditions. The essay argues that this work occupies a peculiar position in the history of musicology; it falls under the header of "systematic musicology," which eventually emerged as a discipline of musicology at the end of the nineteenth century. That this discipline has a history at all is easily overlooked, as many of its contributors were scientists with an interest in music. A history of musicology therefore must consider at least the following two caveats: parts of it take place outside the institutionalized field of musicology, and any history of musicology must, in the last instance, be embedded in a history of music.

  1. Constraints on early events in Martian history as derived from the cratering record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, Nadine G.

    1990-01-01

    Constrains on early events in Martian history are derived using the planet's cratering record. Variations in the shapes of the crater size-frequency distribution curves are interpreted as indicative of the size-frequency distribution of the production populations, thus providing information about the age of the unit relative to the end of the heavy bombardment period. Results from the analysis of craters superposed on heavily cratered units across the Martian surface provide constraints on the hemispheric dichotomy and the early erosional conditions on Mars.

  2. Approaches to the History of Patients: From the Ancient World to Early Modern Europe.

    PubMed

    Stolberg, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This chapter looks from an early modernist's perspective at some of the major questions and methodological issues that writing the history of patients in the ancient world shares with similar work on Patientengeschichte in medieval and early modern Europe. It addresses, in particular, the problem of finding adequate sources that give access to the patients' experience of illness and medicine and highlights the potential as well as the limitations of using physicians' case histories for that purpose. It discusses the doctor-patient relationship as it emerges from these sources, and the impact of the patient's point of view on learned medical theory and practice. In conclusion, it pleads for a cautious and nuanced approach to the controversial issue of retrospective diagnosis, recommending that historians consistently ask in which contexts and in what way the application of modern diagnostic labels to pre-modern accounts of illness can truly contribute to a better historical understanding rather than distort it.

  3. Natural History of Vertebrobasilar Dolichoectatic and Fusiform Aneurysms: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Deena M; Flemming, Kelly D; Lanzino, Giuseppe; Cloft, Harry J; Kallmes, David F; Murad, Mohammad Hassan; Brinjikji, Waleed

    2018-01-01

    Vertebrobasilar non-saccular and dolichoectatic aneurysms (VBDA) are a rare type of aneurysm and are generally associated with poor prognosis. In order to better characterize the natural history of VBDAs, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature to determine rates of mortality, growth, rupture, ischemia, and intraparenchymal hemorrhage. We searched the literature for longitudinal natural history studies of VBDA patients reporting clinical and imaging outcomes. Studied outcomes included annualized rates of growth, rupture, ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), and mortality. We also studied the association between aneurysm morphology (dolichoectatic versus fusiform) and natural history. Meta-analysis was performed using a random-effects model using summary statistics from included studies. Fifteen studies with 827 patients and 5,093 patient-years were included. The overall annual mortality rate among patients with VBDAs was 13%/year (95% CI 8-19). Patients with fusiform aneurysms had a higher mortality rate than those with dolichoectatic aneurysms, but this did not reach statistical significance (12 vs. 8%, p = 0.11). The overall growth rate was 6%/year (95% CI 4-13). Patients with fusiform aneurysms had higher growth rates than those with dolichoectatic aneurysms (12 vs. 3%, p < 0.0001). The overall rupture rate was 3%/year (95% CI 1-5). Patients with fusiform aneurysms had higher rupture rates than those with dolichoectatic aneurysms (3 vs. 0%, p < 0.0001). The overall rate of ischemic stroke was 6%/year (95% CI 4-9). Patients with dolichoectatic aneurysms had higher ischemic stroke rates than those with fusiform aneurysms, but this did not reach statistical significance (8 vs. 4%, p = 0.13). The overall rate of ICH was 2%/year (95% CI 0-8) with no difference in rates between dolichoectatic and fusiform aneurysms (2 vs. 2%, p = 0.65). In general, the natural history of -VBDAs is poor. However, dolichoectatic and fusiform

  4. The role of images in the development of Renaissance natural history.

    PubMed

    Kusukawa, Sachiko

    2011-01-01

    This review surveys recent scholarship on the history of natural history with special attention to the role of images in the Renaissance. It discusses how classicism, collecting and printing were important catalysts for the Renaissance study of nature. Classicism provided inspiration of how to study and what kind of object to examine in nature, and several images from the period can be shown to reflect these classical values. The development of the passion for collecting and the rise of commerce in nature's commodities led to the circulation of a large number of exotic flora and fauna. Pictures enabled scholars to access unobtainable objects, build up knowledge of rare objects over time, and study them long after the live specimens had died away. Printing replicated pictures alongside texts and enabled scholars to share and accumulate knowledge. Images, alongside objects and text, were an important means of studying nature. Naturalists' images, in turn, became part of a larger visual culture in which nature was regarded as a beautiful and fascinating object of admiration.

  5. Geology of the Greenwater Range, and the dawn of Death Valley, California—Field guide for the Death Valley Natural History Conference, 2013

    Calzia, J.P.; Rämö, O.T.; Jachens, Robert; Smith, Eugene; Knott, Jeffrey

    2016-05-02

    Much has been written about the age and formation of Death Valley, but that is one—if not the last—chapter in the fascinating geologic history of this area. Igneous and sedimentary rocks in the Greenwater Range, one mountain range east of Death Valley, tell an earlier story that overlaps with the formation of Death Valley proper. This early story has been told by scientists who have studied these rocks for many years and continue to do so. This field guide was prepared for the first Death Valley Natural History Conference and provides an overview of the geology of the Greenwater Range and the early history (10–0 Ma) of Death Valley.

  6. Broodstock History Strongly Influences Natural Spawning Success in Hatchery Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Ford, Michael J; Murdoch, Andrew R; Hughes, Michael S; Seamons, Todd R; LaHood, Eric S

    2016-01-01

    We used genetic parentage analysis of 6200 potential parents and 5497 juvenile offspring to evaluate the relative reproductive success of hatchery and natural steelhead (Onchorhynchus mykiss) when spawning in the wild between 2008 and 2011 in the Wenatchee River, Washington. Hatchery fish originating from two prior generation hatchery parents had <20% of the reproductive success of natural origin spawners. In contrast, hatchery females originating from a cross between two natural origin parents of the prior generation had equivalent or better reproductive success than natural origin females. Males originating from such a cross had reproductive success of 26-93% that of natural males. The reproductive success of hatchery females and males from crosses consisting of one natural origin fish and one hatchery origin fish was 24-54% that of natural fish. The strong influence of hatchery broodstock origin on reproductive success confirms similar results from a previous study of a different population of the same species and suggests a genetic basis for the low reproductive success of hatchery steelhead, although environmental factors cannot be entirely ruled out. In addition to broodstock origin, fish size, return time, age, and spawning location were significant predictors of reproductive success. Our results indicate that incorporating natural fish into hatchery broodstock is clearly beneficial for improving subsequent natural spawning success, even in a population that has a decades-long history of hatchery releases, as is the case in the Wenatchee River.

  7. Broodstock History Strongly Influences Natural Spawning Success in Hatchery Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    PubMed Central

    Murdoch, Andrew R.; Hughes, Michael S.; Seamons, Todd R.; LaHood, Eric S.

    2016-01-01

    We used genetic parentage analysis of 6200 potential parents and 5497 juvenile offspring to evaluate the relative reproductive success of hatchery and natural steelhead (Onchorhynchus mykiss) when spawning in the wild between 2008 and 2011 in the Wenatchee River, Washington. Hatchery fish originating from two prior generation hatchery parents had <20% of the reproductive success of natural origin spawners. In contrast, hatchery females originating from a cross between two natural origin parents of the prior generation had equivalent or better reproductive success than natural origin females. Males originating from such a cross had reproductive success of 26–93% that of natural males. The reproductive success of hatchery females and males from crosses consisting of one natural origin fish and one hatchery origin fish was 24–54% that of natural fish. The strong influence of hatchery broodstock origin on reproductive success confirms similar results from a previous study of a different population of the same species and suggests a genetic basis for the low reproductive success of hatchery steelhead, although environmental factors cannot be entirely ruled out. In addition to broodstock origin, fish size, return time, age, and spawning location were significant predictors of reproductive success. Our results indicate that incorporating natural fish into hatchery broodstock is clearly beneficial for improving subsequent natural spawning success, even in a population that has a decades-long history of hatchery releases, as is the case in the Wenatchee River. PMID:27737000

  8. Composition and natural history notes of the coastal snake assemblage from Northern Bahia, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Marques, Ricardo; Mebert, Konrad; Fonseca, Érica; Rödder, Dennis; Solé, Mirco; Tinôco, Moacir Santos

    2016-01-01

    Information about the snake diversity and their natural history from the Atlantic forest domain in Brazil refer mostly to inland forests than to coastal region. Within the state of Bahia, this knowledge is concentrated to the southeastern coastal stretch. Herein we report on the diversity of snakes from the restinga, ombrophilous forest and anthropogenic environment from the northern Atlantic coast of Bahia. We sampled nine sites for three years and visited four museum collections. Furthermore, we provide anecdotal natural history information, voucher analyses, literature complements, and a key to fascilitate species identification. We report a total of 774 snakes belonging to 50 species and 23 new distribution records for northeastern coast of Bahia, supplemented by new data on feeding and reproduction. The number of detected species is similar to numbers obtained in comparable studies from other Brazilian ecoregions. This study reports and focuses for the first time on all known species of snakes from the northeastern coast of Bahia.

  9. The importance of scientific collecting and natural history museums for comparative neuroanatomy.

    PubMed

    Iwaniuk, Andrew N

    2011-05-01

    The comparative study of vertebrate brains is inherently dependent upon access to a sufficient number of species and specimens to perform meaningful comparisons. Although many studies rely on compiling published information, continued specimen collection, in addition to more extensive use of existing brain collections and natural history museums, are crucial for detailed neuroanatomical comparisons across species. This review highlights the importance of collecting species through a variety of means, details a marsupial brain collection, and stresses the potential of natural history museums as a resource for comparative neuroanatomy. By taking advantage of as many of these resources as possible, researchers can rapidly increase species coverage and generate a better understanding of how the brain evolves. © 2011 New York Academy of Sciences.

  10. Composition and natural history notes of the coastal snake assemblage from Northern Bahia, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Ricardo; Mebert, Konrad; Fonseca, Érica; Rödder, Dennis; Solé, Mirco; Tinôco, Moacir Santos

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Information about the snake diversity and their natural history from the Atlantic forest domain in Brazil refer mostly to inland forests than to coastal region. Within the state of Bahia, this knowledge is concentrated to the southeastern coastal stretch. Herein we report on the diversity of snakes from the restinga, ombrophilous forest and anthropogenic environment from the northern Atlantic coast of Bahia. We sampled nine sites for three years and visited four museum collections. Furthermore, we provide anecdotal natural history information, voucher analyses, literature complements, and a key to fascilitate species identification. We report a total of 774 snakes belonging to 50 species and 23 new distribution records for northeastern coast of Bahia, supplemented by new data on feeding and reproduction. The number of detected species is similar to numbers obtained in comparable studies from other Brazilian ecoregions. This study reports and focuses for the first time on all known species of snakes from the northeastern coast of Bahia. PMID:27594800

  11. The development of a digitising service centre for natural history collections

    PubMed Central

    Tegelberg, Riitta; Haapala, Jaana; Mononen, Tero; Pajari, Mika; Saarenmaa, Hannu

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Digitarium is a joint initiative of the Finnish Museum of Natural History and the University of Eastern Finland. It was established in 2010 as a dedicated shop for the large-scale digitisation of natural history collections. Digitarium offers service packages based on the digitisation process, including tagging, imaging, data entry, georeferencing, filtering, and validation. During the process, all specimens are imaged, and distance workers take care of the data entry from the images. The customer receives the data in Darwin Core Archive format, as well as images of the specimens and their labels. Digitarium also offers the option of publishing images through Morphbank, sharing data through GBIF, and archiving data for long-term storage. Service packages can also be designed on demand to respond to the specific needs of the customer. The paper also discusses logistics, costs, and intellectual property rights (IPR) issues related to the work that Digitarium undertakes. PMID:22859879

  12. [Impact of antiviral therapy on the natural history of hepatitis C virus].

    PubMed

    Fernández Rodriguez, Conrado M; Gutierrez Garcia, Maria Luisa

    2014-12-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus infection affects around 150 million persons, and 350,000 persons worldwide die of this disease each year. Although the data on its natural history are incomplete, after the acute infection, most patients develop chronic forms of hepatitis C with variable stages of fibrosis. In these patients, continual inflammatory activity can cause significant fibrosis, cirrhosis, decompensation of the liver disease, or hepatocarcinoma. In the next few years, it is expected that hepatitis C virus infection and its complications will significantly increase, as will the incidence of hepatocarcinoma in Spain. This review presents the data on the natural history of hepatitis C virus infection and discusses the potential impact of antiviral therapy on the distinct stages of the disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  13. [Natural history and eighteenth-century ideas regarding generation and heredity: Buffon and Bonnet].

    PubMed

    Castañeda, L A

    1995-01-01

    The intellectual course of natural history reveals three conceptual approaches. The first was the taxonomic point of view, where naturalists worked to name and classify the living beings created by God. The second approach was provided by the eighteenth century's philosophical doctrine of mechanism, which lent natural history its method of endeavoring to comprehend the workings of organisms, inasmuch as the world "ran". Calling into question the adequacy of prior message, the third approach argued that living things display characteristics quite distinct from those of non-living matter, making it necessary to understand processes rather than simply decompose phenomena to then analyze them. This inadequacy became apparent at the moment when ideas of generation and heredity ascribed a reproductive history to living things, a history where the act of one fellow creature being formed by another plays an important role in coming to understand the workings of life. The paper analyzes these conceptual approaches from the perspective of Buffon's and Bonnet's ideas on reproduction and heredity, which represented opposite schools of thought: epigenesis and preformation.

  14. Natural history of idiopathic abducens nerve paresis in a young adult.

    PubMed

    Hussaindeen, Jameel Rizwana; Mani, Revathy; Rakshit, Archayeeta; Ramasubramanian, Srikanth; Vittal Praveen, Smitha

    2016-01-01

    The natural history of idiopathic abducens nerve paresis and the role of conservative management such as vision training during the recovery process is not well documented in the literature to the best of our knowledge. This case report presents the natural recovery process of idiopathic abducens nerve paresis in a young adult and the role of vision therapy in the recovery process. Copyright © 2016 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Type catalogue of Terebridae (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Conoidea) in the Natural History Museum, London, U.K.

    PubMed

    Salvador, Andreia; Pickering, Joan

    2017-04-04

    The type collection of Terebridae in the Natural History Museum consists of 248 lots. In order to clarify the type status of this material, an annotated alphabetic list by species is provided. The format includes the original citation for each species, type locality, collector, label data, registration number, number of specimens, type status and remarks. Due to the actions of previous workers, fixation of lectotype by inference of holotype is given for 168 species. A bibliography of relevant publications is also provided.

  16. "What if I do nothing?" The natural history of operable cancer of the alimentary tract.

    PubMed

    Keshava, H B; Rosen, J E; DeLuzio, M R; Kim, A W; Detterbeck, F C; Boffa, D J

    2017-04-01

    "Natural history", or anticipated survival without treatment, is critical for patients weighing risks and benefits of cancer surgery. Current estimates concerning the natural history of cancer includes patients whose poor health precludes treatment; a cohort whose fate is likely distinctly worse than those eligible for surgery ("operable"). The study objective was to evaluate survival among patients recommended for cancer surgery but went untreated, to determine the natural history of "operable" alimentary tract cancer. The NCDB was queried for untreated patients with clinical stage I-III esophageal, gastric, colon, and rectal cancer diagnosed between 2003 and 2009. Untreated patients who were recommended for surgery were considered "operable," while patients coded as surgically ineligible for health reasons were "inoperable." 5-year survival of untreated, "operable" alimentary tract cancers varied by clinical stage: esophageal cI = 10.0%, cII = 9.8%, cIII = 4.6%; gastric cI = 9.2%, cII = 5.8%, cIII = 4.3%; colon cI = 18.4%, cII = 5.0%, cIII = 10.4; and rectal cI = 17.1%, cII = 14.0%, cIII = 19.9%. At every timepoint, stage-specific survival of "operable" patients was superior to inoperable patients (p < 0.05). Additionally, median survival among "operable" patients at least doubled "inoperable" patients for each tumor. Natural history of patients with "operable" alimentary tract cancer is superior to that of "inoperable" patients. Preoperative counseling should be refined to reflect this distinction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  17. Ecology and natural history of the green rat snake at Leslie Canyon National Wildlife Refuge, Cochise County, Arizona

    William R. Radke; Jacob W. Malcom

    2005-01-01

    Green rat snakes (Senticolis triaspis) appear to be rare throughout their range, and little is known about their ecology and life history. Using opportunistically captured S. triaspis coupled with captive observations, natural observations, and radio telemetry, we document several natural history and ecological aspects of the...

  18. ‘Vividness’ in english natural history and anatomy, 1650–1700

    PubMed Central

    Wragge-Morley, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    This article concerns the use of rhetorical strategies in the natural historical and anatomical works of the seventeenth-century Royal Society. Choosing representative works, it argues that naturalists such as Nehemiah Grew, John Ray and the neuroanatomist Thomas Willis used the rhetorical device known as ‘comparison’ to make their descriptions of natural things vivid. By turning to contemporary works of neurology such as Willis's Cerebri Anatome and contemporary rhetorical works inspired by other such descriptions of the brain and nerves, it is argued that the effects of these strategies were taken to be wide-ranging. Contemporaries understood the effects of rhetoric in terms inflected by anatomical and medical discourse—the brain was physically altered by powerful sense impressions such as those of rhetoric. I suggest that the rhetoric of natural history could have been understood in the same way and that natural history and anatomy might therefore have been understood to cultivate the mind, improving its capacity for moral judgements as well as giving it knowledge of nature.

  19. Early parental loss and depression history: associations with recent life stress in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Slavich, George M; Monroe, Scott M; Gotlib, Ian H

    2011-09-01

    Although exposure to early adversity and prior experiences with depression have both been associated with lower levels of precipitating life stress in depression, it is unclear whether these stress sensitization effects are similar for all types of stress or whether they are specific to stressors that may be particularly depressogenic, such as those involving interpersonal loss. To investigate this issue, we administered structured, interview-based measures of early adversity, depression history, and recent life stress to one hundred adults who were diagnosed with major depressive disorder. As predicted, individuals who experienced early parental loss or prolonged separation (i.e., lasting one year or longer) and persons with more lifetime episodes of depression became depressed following lower levels of life stress occurring in the etiologically-central time period of three months prior to onset of depression. Importantly, however, additional analyses revealed that these effects were unique to stressors involving interpersonal loss. These data highlight potential stressor-specific effects in stress sensitization and demonstrate for the first time that individuals exposed to early parental loss or separation, and persons with greater histories of MDD, may be selectively sensitized to stressors involving interpersonal loss. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. What was historical about natural history? Contingency and explanation in the science of living things.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Peter

    2016-08-01

    There is a long-standing distinction in Western thought between scientific and historical modes of explanation. According to Aristotle's influential account of scientific knowledge there cannot be an explanatory science of what is contingent and accidental, such things being the purview of a descriptive history. This distinction between scientia and historia continued to inform assumptions about scientific explanation into the nineteenth century and is particularly significant when considering the emergence of biology and its displacement of the more traditional discipline of natural history. One of the consequences of this nineteenth-century transition was that while modern evolutionary theory retained significant, if often implicit, historical components, these were often overlooked as evolutionary biology sought to accommodate itself to a model of scientific explanation that involved appeals to laws of nature. These scientific aspirations of evolutionary biology sometimes sit uncomfortably with its historical dimension. This tension lies beneath recent philosophical critiques of evolutionary theory and its modes of explanation. Such critiques, however, overlook the fact that there are legitimate modes of historical explanation that do not require recourse to laws of nature. But responding to these criticisms calls for a more explicit recognition of the affinities between evolutionary biology and history. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Citizen science networks in natural history and the collective validation of biodiversity data.

    PubMed

    Turnhout, Esther; Lawrence, Anna; Turnhout, Sander

    2016-06-01

    Biodiversity data are in increasing demand to inform policy and management. A substantial portion of these data is generated in citizen science networks. To ensure the quality of biodiversity data, standards and criteria for validation have been put in place. We used interviews and document analysis from the United Kingdom and The Netherlands to examine how data validation serves as a point of connection between the diverse people and practices in natural history citizen science networks. We found that rather than a unidirectional imposition of standards, validation was performed collectively. Specifically, it was enacted in ongoing circulations of biodiversity records between recorders and validators as they jointly negotiated the biodiversity that was observed and the validity of the records. These collective validation practices contributed to the citizen science character or natural history networks and tied these networks together. However, when biodiversity records were included in biodiversity-information initiatives on different policy levels and scales, the circulation of records diminished. These initiatives took on a more extractive mode of data use. Validation ceased to be collective with important consequences for the natural history networks involved and citizen science more generally. © 2016 The Authors. Conservation Biology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society for Conservation Biology.

  2. Lifestyles in transition: evolution and natural history of the genus Lactobacillus.

    PubMed

    Duar, Rebbeca M; Lin, Xiaoxi B; Zheng, Jinshui; Martino, Maria Elena; Grenier, Théodore; Pérez-Muñoz, María Elisa; Leulier, François; Gänzle, Michael; Walter, Jens

    2017-08-01

    Lactobacillus species are found in nutrient-rich habitats associated with food, feed, plants, animals and humans. Due to their economic importance, the metabolism, genetics and phylogeny of lactobacilli have been extensively studied. However, past research primarily examined lactobacilli in experimental settings abstracted from any natural history, and the ecological context in which these bacteria exist and evolve has received less attention. In this review, we synthesize phylogenetic, genomic and metabolic metadata of the Lactobacillus genus with findings from fine-scale phylogenetic and functional analyses of representative species to elucidate the evolution and natural history of its members. The available evidence indicates a high level of niche conservatism within the well-supported phylogenetic groups within the genus, with lifestyles ranging from free-living to strictly symbiotic. The findings are consistent with a model in which host-adapted Lactobacillus lineages evolved from free-living ancestors, with present-day species displaying substantial variations in terms of the reliance on environmental niches and the degree of host specificity. This model can provide a framework for the elucidation of the natural and evolutionary history of Lactobacillus species and valuable information to improve the use of this important genus in industrial and therapeutic applications. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. The natural history of Leydig cell testicular tumours: an analysis of the National Cancer Registry.

    PubMed

    Nason, G J; Redmond, E J; Considine, S W; Omer, S I; Power, D; Sweeney, P

    2018-05-01

    Leydig cell tumour (LCT) of the testis is a rare histological subtype of stromal tumours, accounting for 1 to 3% of testicular neoplasms. The natural history of LCT is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence and natural history of Leydig cell tumours (LCT) of the testes. A search of the National Cancer Registry of Ireland database was performed regarding Leydig cell testicular tumours. Recurrence free survival (RFS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) were analysed. Between 1994 and 2013, 2755 new cases of testicular cancer were diagnosed in Ireland. Of these, 22 (0.79%) were Leydig cell tumours. Nineteen were invasive (stage T1) and three were in situ (stage Tis). One patient developed a local recurrence following an organ preserving procedure and underwent a completion orchidectomy 107 days after initial diagnosis. No further treatment was required. There have been no disease-specific deaths. The 1-, 3- and 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 95.5, 88.2 and 73.3%, respectively. The 5-year disease-specific survival (DSS) was 100% and the 5-year recurrence free survival (RFS) was 93.3%. From the National Cancer Registry, LCT has been shown to be a rare subtype of testicular tumour. Due to the relatively favourable natural history, it may be possible to tailor less aggressive surveillance regimens in these patients.

  4. The fascinating early history of optics! Archaeological optics 2009: our knowledge of the early history of lenses, mirrors, and artificial eyes!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enoch, Jay M.

    2009-08-01

    The early history of optics and vision science (older term: physiological optics) is indeed fascinating. The earliest known true lenses have been found in "eyes" of Egyptian statues which contain superb, complex, and well-polished eye-lens units. The oldest ones known are dated circa 2575 BCE = BC, Dynasty IV, Old Kingdom. These eye-lens units induce a fascinating and powerful visual illusion, but they are just too good to have been the first lenses, or even the first lenses of this design! So saying, no earlier dateable lenses have been found in Egypt or elsewhere. Recently, at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, the writer noted a previously undetected lens in this series (a first in the Western Hemisphere). Oddly, dateable simpler magnifying lenses and burning glasses seem to have appeared later in time (?)! Manufactured mirrors are quite a bit older, dating from circa 6000 BCE in atal Hyk, located in south-central modern-day Turkey. Using these ancient mirrors, the image quality obtained is remarkable! Recently discovered ancient artificial eyes, located, in situ, in exhumed corpses, have been dated circa 3000 BCE (one discovered in Iran) 5000 BCE (one found in Spain). On the 3000 BCE artificial eye, there are drawn light rays (the writer believes these to be the oldest known depiction of light rays!) spreading out from (or passing into) the iris/ pupil border! Added interesting aspects associated with the early development of light-rays are considered. Thus, early optics can be readily traced back to the Neolithic era (the new stone age), and in some cases before that time period. We have deep roots indeed!

  5. Increased Pre- and Early-Adolescent Stress in Youth with a Family History of Substance Use Disorder and Early Substance Use Initiation.

    PubMed

    Charles, Nora E; Mathias, Charles W; Acheson, Ashley; Bray, Bethany C; Ryan, Stacy R; Lake, Sarah L; Liang, Yuanyuan; Dougherty, Donald M

    2015-10-01

    Individuals with a family history of substance use disorders (Family History Positive) are more likely to have early-onset substance use (i.e., prior to age 15), which may contribute to their higher rates of substance use disorders. One factor that may differentiate Family History Positive youth who engage in early-onset substance use from other Family History Positive youth is exposure to stressors. The aim of this study was to quantify how exposure to stressors from age 11-15 varies as a function of family history of substance use disorders and early-onset substance use. Self-reported stressors were prospectively compared in a sample of predominately (78.9%) Hispanic youth that included 68 Family History Positive youth (50% female) who initiated substance use by age 15 and demographically matched non-users with (n = 136; 52.9% female) and without (n = 75; 54.7% female) family histories of substance use disorders. Stressors were assessed at 6-month intervals for up to 4 years. Both the severity of stressors and the degree to which stressors were caused by an individual's own behavior were evaluated. All three groups differed from one another in overall exposure to stressors and rates of increase in stressors over time, with Family History Positive youth who engaged in early-onset substance use reporting the greatest exposure to stressors. Group differences were more pronounced for stressors caused by the participants' behavior. Family History Positive users had higher cumulative severity of stressors of this type, both overall and across time. These results indicate greater exposure to stressors among Family History Positive youth with early-onset substance use, and suggest that higher rates of behavior-dependent stressors may be particularly related to early-onset use.

  6. Increased Pre- and Early-Adolescent Stress in Youth with a Family History of Substance Use Disorder and Early Substance Use Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Nora E.; Mathias, Charles W.; Acheson, Ashley; Bray, Bethany C.; Ryan, Stacy R.; Lake, Sarah L.; Liang, Yuanyuan; Dougherty, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with a family history of substance use disorders (Family History Positive) are more likely to have early-onset substance use (i.e., prior to age 15), which may contribute to their higher rates of substance use disorders. One factor that may differentiate Family History Positive youth who engage in early-onset substance use from other Family History Positive youth is exposure to stressors. The aim of this study was to quantify how exposure to stressors from age 11 to 15 varies as a function of family history of substance use disorders and early-onset substance use. Self-reported stressors were prospectively compared in a sample of predominately (78.9%) Hispanic youth that included 68 Family History Positive youth (50% female) who initiated substance use by age 15 and demographically matched non-users with (n=136; 52.9% female) and without (n=75; 54.7% female) family histories of substance use disorders. Stressors were assessed at 6-month intervals for up to 4 years. Both the severity of stressors and the degree to which stressors were caused by an individual’s own behavior were evaluated. All three groups differed from one another in overall exposure to stressors and rates of increase in stressors over time, with Family History Positive youth who engaged in early-onset substance use reporting the greatest exposure to stressors. Group differences were more pronounced for stressors caused by the participants’ behavior. Family History Positive users had higher cumulative severity of stressors of this type, both overall and across time. These results indicate greater exposure to stressors among Family History Positive youth with early-onset substance use, and suggest that higher rates of behavior-dependent stressors may be particularly related to early-onset use. PMID:25788123

  7. Patterns and natural history of radiographically defined osteoarthritis in a registry of women

    SciT

    Cerhan, J.R.

    The authors studied the natural history of osteoarthritis (OA) in a registry of female radium dial painters who had longitudinal radiographic examinations. Radiographs of the hands, spine, pelvis, knees and feet were graded for OA using the method of Kellgren and Lawrence. The prevalence of OA in this study was consistent with other population-based studies of OA in white women. A full body OA score was defined as the summation of the number of joints with OA. Higher full body OA score was associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality, after controlling for age and year of birth. Variables cross-sectionallymore » associated with the full body OA score included increasing age; later year of birth; increasing systolic and diastolic blood pressure; increasing uric acid level; a history of diabetes, cholecystectomy, or cardiovascular disease; and being a current drinker of alcohol or being a current smoker. The authors described that natural history of OA for individual joints, joint groups, and the full body. The authors found that progression of OA was common, but not universal. Every joint group studied also displayed some amount of regression, although the authors could not conclude how much of the regression was real versus measurement error. The authors found that, in general, joints with a baseline OA grade of one to four were more likely to progress to a higher grade compared to joints with a grade of zero at baseline. Finally, the authors described predictors of followup OA status and predictors of change from baseline to followup for the full body. Predictors of greater change (to more OA) included increasing age, a history of cholecystectomy, having ever drank alcohol, and not having ever smoked. Predictors of a higher followup OA status included increasing age, increasing baseline full body OA score, a history of cholecystectomy, being a current drinker, and having never smoked.« less

  8. Acts of God - The Unnatural History of Natural Disaster in America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, Ted

    2003-05-01

    With the exception of the 9/11 disaster, the top ten most costly catastrophes in U.S. history have all been natural disasters--five of them hurricanes--and all have occurred since 1989. Why this tremendous plague on our homes? In Acts of God , environmental historian Ted Steinberg explains that much of the death and destruction has been well within the realm of human control. Steinberg exposes the fallacy of seeing such calamities as simply random events. Beginning with the 1886 Charleston and 1906 San Francisco earthquakes, and continuing to the present, Steinberg explores the unnatural history of natural calamity, the decisions of business leaders and government officials that have paved the way for the greater losses of life and property, especially among those least able to withstand such blows--America's poor, elderly, and minorities. Seeing nature or God as the primary culprit, Steinberg argues, has helped to hide the fact that some Americans are better protected from the violence of nature than their counterparts lower down the socioeconomic ladder. Sure to provoke discussion, Acts of God is a call to action that must be heard. "A sobering lesson in humanity's vulnerability to extreme climatic events, especially the impoverished farmer and the urban poor."--The Los Angeles Times Book Review

  9. Social Confidence in Early Adulthood Among Young People With and Without a History of Language Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Durkin, Kevin; Toseeb, Umar; Botting, Nicola; Pickles, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purposes of this study were to test the predictions that lower self-esteem and higher shyness in individuals with a history of language impairment (LI) would continue from adolescence into early adulthood and that those with LI would have lower social self-efficacy in early adulthood. Method Participants were young people with a history of LI and a comparison group of age-matched peers. Both groups were tested at ages 17 and 24 years. Participants completed measures of language ability, nonverbal IQ, shyness, global self-esteem, and (at age 24 years only) social self-efficacy. Results Young adults with LI scored lower than age-matched peers on self-esteem, higher on shyness, and lower on social self-efficacy (medium to large effect sizes). In line with expectations, in the group with LI, language ability in adolescence predicted shyness in young adulthood, which, in turn, was negatively associated with self-esteem. There was also a direct association between language ability in adolescence and self-esteem in young adulthood. Conclusions Young people with a history of LI are likely to be entering adulthood less socially confident than their peers. Interventions may be desirable for young adults with LI, and the present findings indicate social self-efficacy as a key area of social confidence that calls for practitioners' attention. PMID:28586830

  10. Nature by Default in Early Childhood Education for Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Sue; Young, Tracy

    2016-01-01

    This essay critiques the relevance of historical antecedents about children's play in nature and how these historical and political mechanisms create cultural rovoked by Taylor's (2013) exploration of the pervasive influence of romanticised images of innocent children in nature and our own experiences of never-ending "nice" stories about…

  11. Natural History of Ground-Glass Lesions Among Patients With Previous Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shewale, Jitesh B; Nelson, David B; Rice, David C; Sepesi, Boris; Hofstetter, Wayne L; Mehran, Reza J; Vaporciyan, Ara A; Walsh, Garrett L; Swisher, Stephen G; Roth, Jack A; Antonoff, Mara B

    2018-06-01

    Among patients with previous lung cancer, the malignant potential of subsequent ground-glass opacities (GGOs) on computed tomography remains unknown, with a lack of consensus regarding surveillance and intervention. This study sought to describe the natural history of GGO in patients with a history of lung cancer. A retrospective review was performed of 210 patients with a history of lung cancer and ensuing computed tomography evidence of pure or mixed GGOs between 2007 and 2013. Computed tomography reports were reviewed to determine the fate of the GGOs, by classifying all lesions as stable, resolved, or progressive over the course of the study. Multivariable analysis was performed to identify predictors of GGO progression and resolution. The mean follow-up time was 13 months. During this period, 55 (26%) patients' GGOs were stable, 131 (62%) resolved, and 24 (11%) progressed. Of the 24 GGOs that progressed, three were subsequently diagnosed as adenocarcinoma. Patients of black race (odds ratio [OR], 0.26) and other races besides white (OR, 0.89) had smaller odds of GGO resolution (p = 0.033), whereas patients with previous lung squamous cell carcinoma (OR, 5.16) or small cell carcinoma (OR, 5.36) were more likely to experience GGO resolution (p < 0.001). On multivariable analysis, only a history of adenocarcinoma was an independent predictor of GGO progression (OR, 6.9; p = 0.011). Among patients with a history of lung cancer, prior adenocarcinoma emerged as a predictor of GGO progression, whereas a history of squamous cell carcinoma or small cell carcinoma and white race were identified as predictors of GGO resolution. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [The natural history of ankylosing spondylitis in the 21st century].

    PubMed

    Frallonardo, P; Ramonda, R; Lo Nigro, A; Modesti, V; Campana, C; Punzi, L

    2011-03-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects the axial skeleton and evolves in stiffness followed by ankylosis and disability. However, it may be difficult to exactly establish the natural history of the disease and the influence of risk factors of progression, since most patients are treated with various pharmacologic or non-pharmacologic agents, which may potentially influence the natural progression of the disease. In this context, we report here a very interesting case of a 40 year old man, presented to our outpatient clinic, 28 years after the onset of AS. Previously for personal reasons, did not choose not to undergo any treatment. This case allows us to evaluate the natural radiological progression of the disease and the influence of predictive risk factors.

  13. Genomic evidence for rod monochromacy in sloths and armadillos suggests early subterranean history for Xenarthra

    PubMed Central

    Emerling, Christopher A.; Springer, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Rod monochromacy is a rare condition in vertebrates characterized by the absence of cone photoreceptor cells. The resulting phenotype is colourblindness and low acuity vision in dim-light and blindness in bright-light conditions. Early reports of xenarthrans (armadillos, sloths and anteaters) suggest that they are rod monochromats, but this has not been tested with genomic data. We searched the genomes of Dasypus novemcinctus (nine-banded armadillo), Choloepus hoffmanni (Hoffmann's two-toed sloth) and Mylodon darwinii (extinct ground sloth) for retinal photoreceptor genes and examined them for inactivating mutations. We performed PCR and Sanger sequencing on cone phototransduction genes of 10 additional xenarthrans to test for shared inactivating mutations and estimated the timing of inactivation for photoreceptor pseudogenes. We concluded that a stem xenarthran became an long-wavelength sensitive-cone monochromat following a missense mutation at a critical residue in SWS1, and a stem cingulate (armadillos, glyptodonts and pampatheres) and stem pilosan (sloths and anteaters) independently acquired rod monochromacy early in their evolutionary history following the inactivation of LWS and PDE6C, respectively. We hypothesize that rod monochromacy in armadillos and pilosans evolved as an adaptation to a subterranean habitat in the early history of Xenarthra. The presence of rod monochromacy has major implications for understanding xenarthran behavioural ecology and evolution. PMID:25540280

  14. A review of noble gas geochemistry in relation to early Earth history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurz, M. D.

    1985-01-01

    One of the most fundamental noble gas constraints on early Earth history is derived from isotopic differences in (129)Xe/(130)Xe between various terrestrial materials. The short half life (17 m.y.) of extinct (129I, parent of (129)Xe, means that these differences must have been produced within the first 100 m.y. after terrestrial accretion. The identification of large anomalies in (129)Xe/(130)Xe in mid ocean ridge basalts (MORB), with respect to atmospheric xenon, suggests that the atmosphere and upper mantle have remained separate since that time. This alone is a very strong argument for early catastrophic degassing, which would be consistent with an early fractionation resulting in core formation. However, noble gas isotopic systematics of oceanic basalts show that the mantle cannot necessarily be regarded as a homogeneous system, since there are significant variations in (3)He/(4)He, (40)Ar/(36)Ar, and (129)Xe/(130)Xe. Therefore, the early degassing cannot be considered to have acted on the whole mantle. The specific mechanisms of degassing, in particular the thickness and growth of the early crust, is an important variable in understanding present day noble gas inventories. Another constraint can be obtained from rocks that are thought to be derived from near the lithosphere asthenosphere boundary: ultramafic xenoliths.

  15. Reporting success rates in the treatment of vestibular schwannomas: are we accounting for the natural history?

    PubMed

    Miller, Timothy; Lau, Tsz; Vasan, Rohit; Danner, Christopher; Youssef, A Samy; van Loveren, Harry; Agazzi, Siviero

    2014-06-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is generally accepted as one of the best treatment options for vestibular schwannomas. We question whether growth control is an accurate measure of success in vestibular schwannoma treatment. We aim to clarify the success rate of stereotactic radiosurgery and adjust the reported results to the benign natural history of untreated tumors. All articles were taken from a PubMed search of the English literature from the years 2000-2011. Inclusion criteria were articles containing the number of patients treated, radiation technique, average tumor size, follow-up time, and percentage of tumors growing during follow-up. Data were extracted from 19 articles. Success rates were adjusted using published data that 17% to 30% of vestibular schwannomas grow. The average reported success rate for stereotactic radiosurgery across all articles was 95.5%. When considering 17% or 30% natural growth without intervention, the adjusted success rates became 78.2% and 86.9% respectively. These rates were obtained by applying the natural history growth percentages to any tumors not reported to be growing before radiosurgical intervention. Success in the treatment of vestibular schwannomas with stereotactic radiosurgery is often defined as lack of further growth. Recent data on the natural growth history of vestibular schwannomas raise the question of whether this is the best definition of success. We have identified a lack of continuity regarding the reporting of success and emphasize the importance of the clarification of the success of radiosurgery to make informed decisions regarding the best treatment options for vestibular schwannoma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Fostering Connections to Nature -- Strategies for Community College Early Childhood Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Debra

    2017-01-01

    How can early childhood teacher educators at the community college level create opportunities for their students to explore and relate to the natural world? This article discusses three learning opportunities in an early childhood associate-degree program that foster connections between preservice and inservice early childhood teachers and nature…

  17. Outcomes of patients with a pretransplant history of early-stage melanoma.

    PubMed

    Puza, Charles J; Barbas, Andrew S; Mosca, Paul J

    2018-06-25

    A history of melanoma within the preceding 5 years is commonly considered a contraindication to solid organ transplantation. We investigated how a pretransplant history of melanoma impacts patient survival and melanoma recurrence. Institutional Review Board approval was obtained, and Duke's retrospective database was used to identify 4552 patients who underwent a solid organ transplant at Duke University from 1 January 2001 to 31 December 2016. Data with regard to the transplant, melanoma characteristics, rejection episodes, and survival were recorded. Of 4552 patients who underwent a solid organ transplant, 12 (0.3%) had a history of melanoma before transplant (six with melanoma in situ and six with stage I disease). The median time between melanoma diagnosis and transplant was 4.13 years (range: 1.1-13.3 years). The study cohort consisted of four liver transplants, four lung transplants, one kidney transplant, one heart transplant, one small bowel transplant, and one multivisceral transplant. At the median follow-up time of 2.8 years, 10 (83.3%) patients were alive. In nonmelanoma cohorts, the 3-year survival is 70% for thoracic transplants, 78% for liver transplants, and 88% for kidney transplants. In well-selected patients with a history of early-stage melanoma and an appropriate time interval between melanoma treatment and transplant, post-transplant outcomes are favorable.

  18. Bringing dinosaurs back to life: exhibiting prehistory at the American Museum of Natural History.

    PubMed

    Rieppel, Lukas

    2012-09-01

    This essay examines the exhibition of dinosaurs at the American Museum of Natural History during the first two decades of the twentieth century. Dinosaurs provide an especially illuminating lens through which to view the history of museum display practices for two reasons: they made for remarkably spectacular exhibits; and they rested on contested theories about the anatomy, life history, and behavior of long-extinct animals to which curators had no direct observational access. The American Museum sought to capitalize on the popularity of dinosaurs while mitigating the risks of mounting an overtly speculative display by fashioning them into a kind of mixed-media installation made of several elements, including fossilized bone, shellac, iron, and plaster. The resulting sculptures provided visitors with a vivid and lifelike imaginative experience. At the same time, curators, who were anxious to downplay the speculative nature of mounted dinosaurs, drew systematic attention to the material connection that tied individual pieces of fossilized bone to the actual past. Freestanding dinosaurs can therefore be read to have functioned as iconic sculptures that self-consciously advertised their indexical content.

  19. Between the national and the universal: natural history networks in Latin America in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Regina Horta

    2013-12-01

    This essay examines contemporary Latin American historical writing about natural history from the nineteenth through the twentieth centuries. Natural history is a "network science," woven out of connections and communications between diverse people and centers of scholarship, all against a backdrop of complex political and economic changes. Latin American naturalists navigated a tension between promoting national science and participating in "universal" science. These tensions between the national and the universal have also been reflected in historical writing on Latin America. Since the 1980s, narratives that recognize Latin Americans' active role have become more notable within the renewal of the history of Latin American science. However, the nationalist slant of these approaches has kept Latin American historiography on the margins. The networked nature of natural history and Latin America's active role in it afford an opportunity to end the historiographic isolation of Latin America and situate it within world history.

  20. [Evaluation of quality of life in school children with a history of early severe malnutrition].

    PubMed

    De Grandis, E S; Armelini, P A; Cuestas, E

    2014-12-01

    Severe malnutrition in young children may lead to long-term complications, in particular learning and psychosocial disorders linked to health related quality of life (HRQOL). The aim of this study was to evaluate HRQOL in children whit a history of severe malnutrition before 2 years of life, expecting to find lower scores in these patients. A comparative study was performed on schoolchildren between 5 and 12 years with a history of early severe malnutrition, excluding those with chronic diseases. The Controls were healthy siblings of patients. The sample size was estimated as 26 subjects per group (Total=52). Sociodemographic variables were recorded and the HRQOL was assessed with PedsQL4.0. Chi square and Student t test were applied. Significance level: P<.05. A total of 25 patients and 28 controls were studied. The HRQOL scores obtained from PedsQL for children with history of malnutrition, compared with their healthy siblings, were: Total: 80.82±1.94 vs 89.18±1.84 P<.0001), physical health/dimension: 87.75±3.37 vs 94.75±1.87 (P<.0001), psychosocial health: 77.77±2.90 vs 86.57±1.42 (P<.0001), emotional dimension: 67.80±4.40 vs 78.75±2.96 (P<.0001), social dimension: 88.80±3.05 vs 95.71±1.52 (P<.0001), and school dimension: 74.58±3.80 vs 85.00±3.51 (P<.0001). Patients with a history of early severe malnutrition, showed significantly lower HRQOL scores compared with controls. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Early type galaxies: Mapping out the two-dimensional space of galaxy star formation histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, Genevieve J.

    Early type galaxies form a multi-parameter family, as evidenced by the two- dimensional (2-D) Fundamental Plane relationship. However, their star formation histories are often treated as a one-dimensional mass sequence. This dissertation presents a systematic study of the relationship between the multi- parameter structural properties of early type galaxies and their star formation histoires. We demonstrate that the stellar populations of early type galaxies span a 2-D space, which means that their star formation histories form a two- parameter family. This 2-D family is then mapped onto several familiar early type galaxy scaling relations, including the color-magnitude relation, the Fundamental Plane, and a cross-section through the Fundamental Plane. We find that the stellar population properties, and therefore the star formation histories of early type galaxies depend most strongly on galaxy velocity dispersion (s), rather than on luminosity ( L ), stellar mass ( M [low *] ), or dynamical mass ( M dyn ). Interestingly, stellar populations are independent of the radius ( R e ) of the galaxies. At fixed s, they show correlated residuals through the thickness of the Fundamental Plane (FP) in the surface-brightness ( I e ) dimension, such that low-surface-brightness galaxies are older, less metal-enriched, and more enhanced in Mg relative to Fe than their counterparts at the same s and R e on the FP midplane. Similarly, high- surface-brightness galaxies are younger, more metal-rich, and less Mg-enhanced than their counterparts on the FP midplane. These differences suggest that the duration of star formation varies through the thickness of the FP. If the dynamical mass-to-light ratios of early type galaxies ( M dyn /L ) were constant for all such galaxies, the FP would be equivalent to the plane predicted by the virial relation. However, the observed FP does not exactly match the virial plane. The FP is tilted from the virial plane, indicating that M dyn /L varies

  2. The known knowns, the known unknowns, and beyond: early life history perspective for the Laurentian Great Lakes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Early life history research has been crucial for understanding and managing fisheries in the Laurentian Great Lakes and beyond. Much is known about spawning sites, temperatures at spawning, incubation periods, spawning substrates, and other factors surrounding reproduction for ma...

  3. West Virginia crayfishes (Decapoda: Cambaridae): observations on distribution, natural history, and conservation

    Loughman, Zachary J.; Simon, Thomas P.; Welsh, Stuart A.

    2009-01-01

    West Virginia's crayfishes have received moderate attention since publication of Jezerinac et al.'s (1995) monograph of the state fauna. Survey efforts were initiated over the summers of 2006 and 2007 to gather voucher material for the Indiana Biological Survey's Crustacean Collection. These collections have provided new information regarding the distribution, natural history, life history, taxonomy, and conservation status of Cambarus (Cambarus) carinirostris, C. (C.) bartonii cavatus, C. (C.) sciotensis, C. (Hiaticambarus) chasmodactylus, C. (H.) elkensis, C. (H.) longulus, C. (Jugicambarus) dubius, C. (Puncticambarus) robustus, Orconectes (Procericambarus) cristavarius, and O. (P.) rusticus. Orconectes (Faxonius) limosus has apparently been extirpated from West Virginia and should be removed from the state's list of extant crayfishes.

  4. West Virginia crayfishes (Decapoda: Cambaridae): observations on distribution, natural history, and conservation

    Loughman, Zachary J.; Simon, Thomas P.; Welsh, Stuart A.

    2009-01-01

    West Virginia's crayfishes have received moderate attention since publication of Jezerinac et al.'s (1995) monograph of the state fauna. Survey efforts were initiated over the summers of 2006 and 2007 to gather voucher material for the Indiana Biological Survey's Crustacean Collection. These collections have provided new information regarding the distribution, natural history, life history, taxonomy, and conservation status of Cambarus (Cambarus) carinirostris, C. (C.) bartonii cavatus, C. (C.) sciotensis, C. (Hiaticambarus) chasmodactylus, C. (H.) elkensis, C. (H.) longulus, C. (Jugicambarus) dubius, C. (Puncticambarus) robustus, Orconectes (Procericambarus) cristavarius, and O. (P.) rusticus. Orconectes (Faxonius) limosus has apparently been extirpated from West Virginia and should be removed from the state's list of extant crayfishes.

  5. The natural history and incidence of Yersinia pestis and prospects for vaccination.

    PubMed

    Williamson, E D; Oyston, P C F

    2012-07-01

    Plague is an ancient, serious, infectious disease which is still endemic in regions of the modern world and is a potential biothreat agent. This paper discusses the natural history of the bacterium and its evolution into a flea-vectored bacterium able to transmit bubonic plague. It reviews the incidence of plague in the modern world and charts the history of vaccines which have been used to protect against the flea-vectored disease, which erupts as bubonic plague. Current approaches to vaccine development to protect against pneumonic, as well as bubonic, plague are also reviewed. The considerable challenges in achieving a vaccine which is licensed for human use and which will comprehensively protect against this serious human pathogen are assessed.

  6. History of Science as an Instructional Context: Student Learning in Genetics and Nature of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sun Young; Irving, Karen E.

    2010-02-01

    This study (1) explores the effectiveness of the contextualized history of science on student learning of nature of science (NOS) and genetics content knowledge (GCK), especially interrelationships among various genetics concepts, in high school biology classrooms; (2) provides an exemplar for teachers on how to utilize history of science in genetics instruction; and (3) suggests a modified concept mapping assessment tool for both NOS and GCK. A quasi-experimental control group research design was utilized with pretests, posttests, and delayed posttests, combining qualitative data and quantitative data. The experimental group was taught with historical curricular lessons, while the control group was taught with non-historical curricular lessons. The results indicated that students in the experimental group developed better understanding in targeted aspects of NOS immediately after the intervention and retained their learning 2 months after the intervention. Both groups developed similar genetics knowledge in the posttest, and revealed a slight decay in their understanding in the delayed posttest.

  7. Annotated type catalogue of the Amphibulimidae (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Orthalicoidea) in the Natural History Museum, London

    PubMed Central

    Breure, Abraham S.H.; Ablett, Jonathan D.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The type status is described of 39 taxa classified within the family Amphibulimidae (superfamily Orthalicoidea) and kept in the London museum. One taxon, Bulimus elaeodes Pfeiffer, 1853, is removed to the Strophocheilidae. Lectotypes are designated for Bulimus adoptus Reeve, 1849; Bulimus (Eurytus) eros Angas, 1878; Helix onca d'Orbigny, 1835; Amphibulima pardalina Guppy, 1868. The type status of the following taxon is changed to lectotype in accordance with Art. 74.6 ICZN: Strophocheilus (Dryptus) jubeus Fulton, 1908. As general introduction to this and following papers on Orthalicoid types in the Natural History Museum, a brief history of the London collection is given and several examples of handwriting from different authors are presented. PMID:22144852

  8. Bichordites from the early Eocene of Cuba: significance in the evolutionary history of the spatangoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villegas-Martín, Jorge; Netto, Renata Guimarães

    2017-12-01

    The trace fossil Bichordites monastiriensis is found in early Eocene turbiditic sandstones of the upper-slope deposits from the Capdevila Formation in Los Palacios Basin, Pinar del Río region, western Cuba. The potential tracemakers of B. monastiriensis include fossil spatangoids from the family Eupatagidae. The record of Bichordites in the deposits from Cuba allows to suppose that Eupatagidae echinoids were the oldest potential tracemakers of Bichordites isp. and reinforce the hypothesis that the ichnological record are relevant in envisaging the evolutionary history of the spatangoids.

  9. Rethinking the early history of post-Vygotskian psychology: the case of the Kharkov school.

    PubMed

    Yasnitsky, Anton; Ferrari, Michel

    2008-05-01

    Between the death of Vygotsky in 1934 and the discovery of Vygotsky's work in the West in 1962, Vygotskian psychology was developed through research done by the first generation of Vygotsky's students and their followers, primarily associated with the Kharkov School. Surprisingly, these studies carried out in the 1930s, of great importance for the development of virtually all subsequent Vygotskian psychology, still remain largely unknown; this represents a significant gap in understanding the history of Vygotskian psychology as an empirical study of consciousness. This paper provides a systematic overview of the research agenda of the Kharkov group between 1931 and 1941 and provides new insights into the early development of Vygotskian psychology.

  10. [An early history of Japanese amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-related diseases and the current development].

    PubMed

    Abe, Koji

    2018-03-28

    The present review focuses an early history of Japanese amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-related diseases and the current development. In relation to foreign previous reports, five topics are introduced and discussed on ALS with dementia, ALS/Parkinsonism dementia complex (ALS/PDC), familial ALS (FALS), spinal bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), and multisystem involvement especially in cerebellar system of ALS including ALS/SCA (spinocerebellar ataxia) crossroad mutation Asidan. This review found the great contribution of Japanese reports on the above five topics, and confirmed the great development of ALS-related diseases over the past 120 years.

  11. The Classification, Natural History and Treatment of the Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Alexander Peter; Straub, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Over sixty years ago John Walton and Frederick Nattrass defined limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) as a separate entity from the X-linked dystrophinopathies such as Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies. LGMD is a highly heterogeneous group of very rare neuromuscular disorders whose common factor is their autosomal inheritance. Sixty years later, with the development of increasingly advanced molecular genetic investigations, a more precise classification and understanding of the pathogenesis is possible. To date, over 30 distinct subtypes of LGMD have been identified, most of them inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion. There are significant differences in the frequency of subtypes of LGMD between different ethnic populations, providing evidence of founder mutations. Clinically there is phenotypic heterogeneity between subtypes of LGMD with varying severity and age of onset of symptoms. The first natural history studies into subtypes of LGMD are in process, but large scale longitudinal data have been lacking due to the rare nature of these diseases. Following natural history data collection, the next challenge is to develop more effective, disease specific treatments. Current management is focussed on symptomatic and supportive treatments. Advances in the application of new omics technologies and the generation of large-scale biomedical data will help to better understand disease mechanisms in LGMD and should ultimately help to accelerate the development of novel and more effective therapeutic approaches. PMID:27858764

  12. The Classification, Natural History and Treatment of the Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Alexander Peter; Straub, Volker

    2015-07-22

    Over sixty years ago John Walton and Frederick Nattrass defined limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) as a separate entity from the X-linked dystrophinopathies such as Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies. LGMD is a highly heterogeneous group of very rare neuromuscular disorders whose common factor is their autosomal inheritance. Sixty years later, with the development of increasingly advanced molecular genetic investigations, a more precise classification and understanding of the pathogenesis is possible.To date, over 30 distinct subtypes of LGMD have been identified, most of them inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion. There are significant differences in the frequency of subtypes of LGMD between different ethnic populations, providing evidence of founder mutations. Clinically there is phenotypic heterogeneity between subtypes of LGMD with varying severity and age of onset of symptoms. The first natural history studies into subtypes of LGMD are in process, but large scale longitudinal data have been lacking due to the rare nature of these diseases. Following natural history data collection, the next challenge is to develop more effective, disease specific treatments. Current management is focussed on symptomatic and supportive treatments. Advances in the application of new omics technologies and the generation of large-scale biomedical data will help to better understand disease mechanisms in LGMD and should ultimately help to accelerate the development of novel and more effective therapeutic approaches.

  13. Climate and history in the late 18th and early 19th centuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Theodore S.

    As in many areas of human knowledge, the notion of climate acquired a deeper historical content around the turn of the 19th century. Natural philosophers, geographers, and others became increasingly aware of climate's own history and its relation to human, plant and animal, and Earth history. This article examines several aspects of this “historicization” of climate.The lively 18th century discussion of the influence of climate on society is well known. Montesquieu is its most famous representative, but Voltaire, Hume, Kant, and others also participated. Their debate was literary more than scientific, their goal the understanding of man, not climate. Partly for this reason and partly because of the lack of good information on climates, they made no attempt to gather substantial climatic data. In fact, the importance of systematically collecting reliable data was scarcely understood in any area of natural philosophy before the last decades of the century [Cf. Frängsmyr et al., 1990; Feldman, 1990]. Instead, participants in the debate repeated commonplaces dating from Aristotle and Hippocrates and based their conclusions on unreliable reports from travelers. As Glacken wrote of Montesquieu, “his dishes are from old and well-tested recipes” [Glacken, 1967, chapter 12]. This is not to say that the debate over climatic influence was not significant—only that its significance lay more in the history of man than in the atmospheric sciences.

  14. Natural history of small gallbladder polyps is benign: evidence from a clinical and pathogenetic study.

    PubMed

    Colecchia, Antonio; Larocca, Anna; Scaioli, Eleonora; Bacchi-Reggiani, Maria Letizia; Di Biase, Anna Rita; Azzaroli, Francesco; Gualandi, Roberta; Simoni, Patrizia; Vestito, Amanda; Festi, Davide

    2009-03-01

    Little is known about the natural history and pathogenesis of small gallbladder polyps (<10 mm, usually of the cholesterol type), particularly in Western populations. It is unclear if these polyps and gallstones represent different aspects of the same disease. The aim of this study was to characterize the natural history and pathogenesis of small gallbladder polyps. Fifty-six Caucasian patients with small gallbladder polyps, 30 matched gallstone patients, and 30 controls were enrolled in this 5-year prospective study. Patients underwent a symptomatic questionnaire, abdominal ultrasonography, and ultrasonographic evaluation of gallbladder motility at baseline and yearly intervals for 5 years. Cholesterol saturation index, cholesterol crystals in bile, and apolipoprotein E genotype were also determined. Most patients with polyps (mean size: 5.3 mm) were men (61%), asymptomatic, and had multiple polyps (57%). Polyps did not change in 91% of patients during follow-up. No subject experienced biliary pain or underwent cholecystectomy; four developed gallstones. Cholesterol saturation index was higher in patients with polyps or gallstones than in controls (P<0.05). Cholesterol crystals were more frequent in patients with polyps than in controls (P<0.0001) but less common than in gallstone patients (P<0.0001). Polyps and gallstones were associated with nonapolipoprotein E4 phenotypes. The natural history of small gallbladder polyps was benign, as no patient developed specific symptoms and/or morphological changes in polyps. Consequently, a "wait and see" policy is advisable in these patients. Polyps have some pathogenetic mechanisms in common with gallstones, but few patients developed gallstones.

  15. Natural History of Conservatively Managed Ureteral Stones: Analysis of 6600 Patients.

    PubMed

    Yallappa, Sachin; Amer, Tarik; Jones, Patrick; Greco, Francesco; Tailly, Thomas; Somani, Bhaskar K; Umez-Eronini, Nkem; Aboumarzouk, Omar M

    2018-05-01

    Ureteral colic has a lifetime prevalence of 10%-15% and is one of the most common emergency urologic presentations. Current European Association of Urology recommends conservative management for "small" (<6 mm) ureteral stones if active removal is not indicated. It is important to understand the natural history of ureteral stone disease to help counsel patients with regard to their likelihood of stone passage and anticipated time frame with which they could be safely observed. We aimed to conduct a systematic review to better establish the natural history of stone expulsion. Literature search was performed using Cochrane and PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses) guidelines. Outcome measures were patient and stone demographics, expulsion rates, expulsion times, and side effect of the medication. A cumulative analysis, with subgroup analysis, was performed on stone location and size. The results were depicted as percentages and an intention-to-treat basis was used. The literature search identified 70 studies and a total of 6642 patients, with a median age of 46 and range of 18-74 years. Overall, 64% of patients successfully passed their stones spontaneously. About 49% of upper ureteral stones, 58% of midureteral stones, and 68% of distal ureteral stones passed spontaneously. Almost 75% of stones <5 mm and 62% of stones ≥5 mm passed spontaneously. The average time to stone expulsion was about 17 days (range 6-29 days). Nearly 5% of participants required rehospitalization due to a deterioration of their condition and only about 1% of patients experienced side effects from analgesia provided. We believe this current review is the largest study for the evaluation of natural history of ureteral stones. The evidence suggests that ureteral stones will pass without intervention in 64% of patients, however, this varies from nearly 50%-75% depending on the size and location, in the span of 1-4 weeks.

  16. Natural history of diminutive colorectal polyps: long-term prospective observation by colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Ken-Ichi; Suzuki, Yutaka; Takeuchi, Manabu; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Aoyagi, Yutaka

    2014-04-01

    Endoscopic removal of colorectal adenomatous polyps effectively prevents cancer. However, the treatment strategy for diminutive polyps (diameter ≤ 5 mm) remains controversial. Understanding the natural history of diminutive polyps is a prerequisite to their effective management. We prospectively examined the natural history of diminutive polyps by long-term surveillance colonoscopy. A total of 207 polyps detected in 112 patients from December 1991 through March 2002 were studied. To avoid potential effects on size and morphological characteristics, all polyps were selected randomly and were followed without biopsy. Polyp size was estimated by comparing the lesion with the diameter of a biopsy forceps. Mean follow up was 7.8 years (SD, 4.8; range, 1.0-18.6; median, 7.5; interquartile range 3.4-11.2). Twenty-four polyps were resected endoscopically, and the histopathological diagnosis was mucosal high-grade neoplasia (Category 4) for one polyp, and mucosal low-grade neoplasia (Category 3) for 23 polyps. Mean linear size of the polyps was 3.2 mm (SD, 1.0; range, 1.3-5.0) at initial colonoscopy and 3.8 mm (SD 1.6; range 1.3-10.0) at final colonoscopy (P<0.01). Left-sided polyps showed a higher growth rate than right-sided polyps, and a type IIIL2 pit pattern was associated with a lower growth rate than a type IIIL1 pattern. We clarified the natural history of diminutive polyps by long-term follow-up colonoscopy. The benign course of diminutive polyps should be considered in the design of treatment strategies. © 2014 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2014 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  17. The Natural History and Rehabilitative Outcomes of Hearing Loss in Congenital Cytomegalovirus: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Kyle T; Horrell, Erin M Wolf; Ayugi, John; Irungu, Catherine; Muthoka, Maria; Creel, Liza M; Lester, Cathy; Bush, Matthew L

    2018-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine the literature regarding the natural history and rehabilitative outcomes of sensorineural hearing loss from congenital cytomegalovirus infections. A systematic search was performed in PubMed, PsychINFO, CINAHL, and Web of Science to identify peer-reviewed research. Eligible studies were those containing original peer-reviewed research in English addressing either the natural history or rehabilitative outcomes of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV). Two investigators independently reviewed all articles and extracted data. Bias was assessed using the Cochrane Collaboration's tool and the Newcastle-Ottawa Assessment Scale. Thirty-six articles were reviewed. Universal screening identifies 0.2 to 1% of newborns with cCMV infection. SNHL ranged from 8 to 32% of infants and was more prevalent in symptomatic versus asymptomatic cases. Nine to 68% of hearing loss occurs in a late or delayed fashion. In 7 to 71% of cases hearing loss is progressive. Cochlear implantation (CI) is a viable option for patients with cCMV associated hearing loss and leads to improvements in hearing and language. There is limited literature comparing rehabilitation outcomes in cCMV and non-cCMV CI recipients. Late onset and progressive hearing loss is seen in children who develop hearing loss from cCMV. Frequent audiologic follow-up is necessary considering the natural history of cCMV hearing loss. Universal screening should be pursued due to the number of asymptomatic children, at birth, who develop late onset/delayed hearing loss. CI is an effective means of improving speech and language in this population.

  18. Natural History of Excessive Daytime Sleepiness: Role of Obesity, Weight Loss, Depression, and Sleep Propensity

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Mendoza, Julio; Vgontzas, Alexandros N.; Kritikou, Ilia; Calhoun, Susan L.; Liao, Duanping; Bixler, Edward O.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is highly prevalent in the general population and is associated with occupational and public safety hazards. However, no study has examined the clinical and polysomnographic (PSG) predictors of the natural history of EDS. Design: Representative longitudinal study. Setting: Sleep laboratory. Participants: From a random, general population sample of 1,741 individuals of the Penn State Adult Cohort, 1,395 were followed up after 7.5 years. Measurements and Results: Full medical evaluation and 1-night PSG at baseline and standardized telephone interview at follow-up. The incidence of EDS was 8.2%, while its persistence and remission were 38% and 62%, respectively. Obesity and weight gain were associated with the incidence and persistence of EDS, while weight loss was associated with its remission. Significant interactions between depression and PSG parameters on incident EDS showed that, in depressed individuals, incident EDS was associated with sleep disturbances, while in non-depressed individuals, incident EDS was associated with increased physiologic sleep propensity. Diabetes, allergy/asthma, anemia, and sleep complaints also predicted the natural history of EDS. Conclusions: Obesity, a disorder of epidemic proportions, is a major risk factor for the incidence and chronicity of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), while weight loss is associated with its remission. Interestingly, objective sleep disturbances predict incident EDS in depressed individuals, whereas physiologic sleep propensity predicts incident EDS in those without depression. Weight management and treatment of depression and sleep disorders should be part of public health policies. Citation: Fernandez-Mendoza J, Vgontzas AN, Kritikou I, Calhoun SL, Liao D, Bixler EO. Natural history of excessive daytime sleepiness: role of obesity, weight loss, depression, and sleep propensity. SLEEP 2015;38(3):351–360. PMID:25581913

  19. Chiari Malformation Type 1: A Systematic Review of Natural History and Conservative Management.

    PubMed

    Langridge, Benjamin; Phillips, Edward; Choi, David

    2017-08-01

    Chiari malformation type 1 (CM-1) is a variation of hindbrain development that can sometimes occur in asymptomatic individuals. Conventional treatment is surgical decompression, but little is known about the natural history of patients who do not undergo surgical management. This information is critical to determine how these patients should be managed. We conducted a systematic literature review to determine the natural history of CM-1, particularly in patients who did not undergo surgery and in asymptomatic individuals, to help patients and physicians determine when surgery is likely to be beneficial. The literature search was performed following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines using the electronic databases PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were predefined. In symptomatic patients who did not undergo surgery, headaches and nausea often improved, whereas ataxia and sensory disturbance tended not to improve spontaneously. Of patients, 27%-47% had an improvement in symptoms after 15 months, and 37%-40% with cough headache and 89% with nausea who were managed nonoperatively improved at follow-up. Most asymptomatic individuals with CM-1 remained asymptomatic (93.3%) even in the presence of syringomyelia. The natural history of mild symptomatic and asymptomatic CM-1 in adults is relatively benign and nonprogressive; the decision to perform surgical decompression should be based on severity and duration of a patient's symptoms at presentation. It is reasonable to observe a patient with mild or asymptomatic symptoms even in the presence of significant tonsillar descent or syringomyelia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Natural history and magnetic resonance imaging follow-up in 9 Sturge-Weber Syndrome patients and clinical correlation.

    PubMed

    Udani, Vrajesh; Pujar, Suresh; Munot, Pinki; Maheshwari, Shailendra; Mehta, Nirad

    2007-04-01

    The natural history of Sturge-Weber Syndrome is variable where some patients have refractory epilepsy and persistent neurologic deficits while others do well. Also, evolution of MRI abnormalities is largely unknown. This long-term follow-up study tries to address these two issues. This retrospective and later prospective study followed 9 children with confirmed SWS. Clinical details of seizures, stroke-like episodes, neurologic and developmental deficits were ascertained specifically. Patients were divided into those with onset below or after 6 months of age for analysis. Disease was classified as active or inactive and correlations were made with the use of aspirin. All past, as well as prospectively acquired imaging was reviewed by two independent blinded neuroradiologists and the images were analysed as ictal (temporally related to seizure/stroke-like event) or interictal. Degree and extent of leptomeningeal enhancement was specifically looked for. Four boys and five girls were followed up for a mean of 6.1 years. Disease activity subsided in 8/9. Early-onset patients had a severe early course with significant residual deficits while late-onset patients did uniformly well. In 6 patients where aspirin was used, a stable course ensued. There was a significant increase in degree/extent of leptomeningeal enhancement during an ictus which returned to the baseline in the interictal state in all 7 patients where both images were available. Focal cerebral atrophy worsened in early-onset cases. In conclusion, SWS patients with onset of seizures/stroke-like events before 6 months of age seem to do worse with a severe early course and persistent neurologic deficits. However the course stabilizes after 5 years of age in most. Late-onset SWS patients have a benign course. Aspirin use is associated with a stable course though further studies are needed. The leptomeningeal enhancement appears to increase during acute events before returning to baseline suggesting that extent

  1. Leukocytes and the natural history of deep vein thrombosis: current concepts and future directions

    PubMed Central

    P, Saha; J, Humphries; B, Modarai; K, Mattock; M, Waltham; C, Evans; A, Ahmad; A, Patel; S, Premaratne; OTA, Lyons; A, Smith

    2011-01-01

    Observational studies have shown that inflammatory cells accumulate within the thrombus and surrounding vein wall during the natural history of venous thrombosis. More recent studies have begun to unravel the mechanisms that regulate this interaction and have confirmed that thrombosis and inflammation are intimately linked. This review outlines our current knowledge of the complex relationship between inflammatory cell activity and venous thrombosis and highlights new areas of research in this field. A better understanding of this relationship could lead to the development of novel therapeutic targets that inhibit thrombus formation or promote its resolution. PMID:21325673

  2. A review of the natural history of adult Cetoniinae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) from Argentina and adjacent countries.

    PubMed

    Di Iorio, Osvaldo

    2014-04-17

    A compilation of the known natural history of adult Cetoniinae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) from Argentina and adjacent countries is provided. Food items of adult Cetoniinae include pollen and/or nectar (flower visitors), sap and/or slime flux, ripened fruits on plants, green tissues and leaves, and honey. Of the 36 species of Cetoniinae from Argentina, food items are known only for 11 species (30.5%). Attraction to light and bait-traps, adult activity periods, vertebrate predators, and the occurrence in bird nests are presented and discussed. Other insects that share the same food sources and bait-traps with Cetoniinae are mentioned.

  3. Congenital neutropenia in the era of genomics: classification, diagnosis, and natural history.

    PubMed

    Donadieu, Jean; Beaupain, Blandine; Fenneteau, Odile; Bellanné-Chantelot, Christine

    2017-11-01

    This review focuses on the classification, diagnosis and natural history of congenital neutropenia (CN). CN encompasses a number of genetic disorders with chronic neutropenia and, for some, affecting other organ systems, such as the pancreas, central nervous system, heart, bone and skin. To date, 24 distinct genes have been associated with CN. The number of genes involved makes gene screening difficult. This can be solved by next-generation sequencing (NGS) of targeted gene panels. One of the major complications of CN is spontaneous leukaemia, which is preceded by clonal somatic evolution, and can be screened by a targeted NGS panel focused on somatic events. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The natural history of congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries.

    PubMed

    Huhta, James

    2011-01-01

    The natural history of congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries is of clinical/surgical importance once the fetus is born without heart block or signs of heart failure. Without significant tricuspid valve malformation, associated defects such as ventricular septal defect and left ventricular outflow obstruction can be repaired surgically. The mortality and long-term outcome appear to be linked strongly with the severity of tricuspid valve regurgitation. Some patients with an intact ventricular septum and no right ventricular dysfunction will live long lives without detection, and some women will successfully complete pregnancy.

  5. Distribution of early life history stages of fishes in selected pools of the upper Mississippi River

    Holland, L.E.

    1986-01-01

    Effective management of the fishery resources of the Upper Mississippi River and successful mitigation of the loss of critical habitat depend in part on an understanding of the reproductive and early life history requirements of the affected fishes. However, little is known about the use of nursery areas by fishes in the river. Of the nearly 130 species identified in the adult ichthyofauna, only a few are represented proportionally in the available data on early life stages because study designs have not included consideration of the early stages, collection gears have not adequately sampled the young, and eggs and larvae of some species are difficult to sample by conventional approaches. For the species collected, information is available on seasonal variations in total densities, composition, and catch among different habitat types. However, the data are most accurate for species with buoyant early life stages, such as freshwater drum (Aplodinotus grunniens) and gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum). Eggs and larvae of freshwater drum dominate collections made in the main channel, whereas other larval fishes are usually most abundant in backwater habitats. The species found there usually deposit eggs on the substrate or on vegetation. Habitat preferences (as indicated by relative abundance) often shift as development proceeds and physical and behavioral changes occur in the larvae. Only limited information is available on the distribution of larvae within habitats, but it is clear that variations within habitats are significant.

  6. Density-dependent coral recruitment displays divergent responses during distinct early life-history stages

    PubMed Central

    Evensen, Nicolas R.; Gómez-Lemos, Luis A.; Babcock, Russell C.

    2017-01-01

    Population growth involves demographic bottlenecks that regulate recruitment success during various early life-history stages. The success of each early life-history stage can vary in response to population density, interacting with intrinsic (e.g. behavioural) and environmental (e.g. competition, predation) factors. Here, we used the common reef-building coral Acropora millepora to investigate how density-dependence influences larval survival and settlement in laboratory experiments that isolated intrinsic effects, and post-settlement survival in a field experiment that examined interactions with environmental factors. Larval survival was exceptionally high (greater than 80%) and density-independent from 2.5 to 12 days following spawning. By contrast, there was a weak positive effect of larval density on settlement, driven by gregarious behaviour at the highest density. When larval supply was saturated, settlement was three times higher in crevices compared with exposed microhabitats, but a negative relationship between settler density and post-settlement survival in crevices and density-independent survival on exposed surfaces resulted in similar recruit densities just one month following settlement. Moreover, a negative relationship was found between turf algae and settler survival in crevices, whereas gregarious settlement improved settler survival on exposed surfaces. Overall, our findings reveal divergent responses by coral larvae and newly settled recruits to density-dependent regulation, mediated by intrinsic and environmental interactions. PMID:28573015

  7. First description of the breeding biology and natural history of the ochre-breasted brush finch atlapetes semirufus in venezuela

    Biancucci, L.; Martin, T.E.

    2008-01-01

    We provide the first description of the eggs, breeding biology, and natural history of the Ochre-breasted Brush Finch (Atlapetes semirufus). We found 37 nests over four breeding seasons (2004-2007) in Yacamb?? National Park, Venezuela. Nesting activity started in late April and continued until early June suggesting single-brooded behavior despite a typical tropical clutch size of two eggs (x?? = 1.89) that were laid on consecutive days. Egg mass averaged 3.38 g and 11.6% of adult female mass. The incubation and nestling periods averaged 14.9 and 10.5 days, respectively. Only females incubated and the percent time they spent incubating did not change between early and late incubation. Females brooded 42.7% of the time when nestlings were 2 days of age and 20.5% when 9 days of age. Both parents provisioned young at a low rate (3.9 trips/hr) and nestling growth rate (k = 0.45) was also slow. Nest predation rates were relatively high with daily mortality rates of 0.058 and 0.067 during incubation and nestling stages, respectively.

  8. Development and Early Usage Patterns of a Consumer-Facing Family Health History Tool

    PubMed Central

    Hulse, Nathan C.; Ranade-Kharkar, Pallavi; Post, Herman; Wood, Grant M.; Williams, Marc S.; Haug, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Personalized medicine will require detailed clinical patient profiles, and a particular focus on capturing data that is useful in forecasting risk. A detailed family health history is considered a critical component of these profiles, insomuch that it has been coined as ‘the best genetic test available’. Despite this, tools aimed at capturing this information for use in electronic health records have been characterized as inadequate. In this manuscript we detail the creation of a patient-facing family health history tool known as OurFamilyHealth, whose long-term emphasis is to facilitate risk assessment and clinical decision support. We present the rationale for such a tool, describe its development and release as a component of Intermountain Healthcare’s patient portal, and detail early usage statistics surrounding the application. Data derived from the tool since its release are also compared against family history charting patterns in Intermountain’s electronic health records, revealing differences in data availability. PMID:22195113

  9. Exploring the Phenotypic Space and the Evolutionary History of a Natural Mutation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Ullastres, Anna; Petit, Natalia; González, Josefa

    2015-07-01

    A major challenge of modern Biology is elucidating the functional consequences of natural mutations. Although we have a good understanding of the effects of laboratory-induced mutations on the molecular- and organismal-level phenotypes, the study of natural mutations has lagged behind. In this work, we explore the phenotypic space and the evolutionary history of a previously identified adaptive transposable element insertion. We first combined several tests that capture different signatures of selection to show that there is evidence of positive selection in the regions flanking FBti0019386 insertion. We then explored several phenotypes related to known phenotypic effects of nearby genes, and having plausible connections to fitness variation in nature. We found that flies with FBti0019386 insertion had a shorter developmental time and were more sensitive to stress, which are likely to be the adaptive effect and the cost of selection of this mutation, respectively. Interestingly, these phenotypic effects are not consistent with a role of FBti0019386 in temperate adaptation as has been previously suggested. Indeed, a global analysis of the population frequency of FBti0019386 showed that climatic variables explain well the FBti0019386 frequency patterns only in Australia. Finally, although FBti0019386 insertion could be inducing the formation of heterochromatin by recruiting HP1a (Heterochromatin Protein 1a) protein, the insertion is associated with upregulation of sra in adult females. Overall, our integrative approach allowed us to shed light on the evolutionary history, the relevant fitness effects, and the likely molecular mechanisms of an adaptive mutation and highlights the complexity of natural genetic variants. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  10. Contribution of natural history collection data to biodiversity assessment in national parks

    O'Connell, A.F.; Gilbert, A.T.; Hatfield, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    There has been mounting interest in the use of museum and herbaria collections to assess biodiversity; information is often difficult to locate and access, however, and few recommendations are available for effectively using natural history collections. As part of an effort to inventory vertebrates and vascular plants in U.S. national parks, we searched manually and by computer for specimens originating within or adjacent to 14 parks throughout the northeastern United States. We compared the number of specimens located to collection size to determine whether there was any effect on detection rate of specimens. We evaluated the importance of park characteristics (e.g., age since establishment, size, theme [natural vs. cultural]) for influencing the number of specimens found in a collection. We located >31,000 specimens and compiled associated records (hereafter referred to as specimens) from 78 collections; >9000 specimens were park-significant, originating either within park boundaries or in the local township where the park was located. We found >2000 specimens by means of manual searches, which cost $0.001?0.15 per specimen searched and $0.81?151.95 per specimen found. Collection effort appeared relatively uniform between 1890 and 1980, with low periods corresponding to significant sociopolitical events. Detection rates for specimens were inversely related to collection size. Although specimens were most often located in collections within the region of interest, specimens can be found anywhere, particularly in large collections international in scope, suggesting that global searches will be necessary to evaluate historical biodiversity. Park characteristics indicated that more collecting effort occurred within or adjacent to larger parks established for natural resources than in smaller historical sites. Because many institutions have not yet established electronic databases for collections, manual searches can be useful for retrieving specimens. Our results

  11. Educating Human Nature: "Nature" and "Nurture" in Early Confucian Moral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Judson B.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines early Chinese moral education--its curriculum, objectives and the philosophical assumptions underlying them--in its classical Confucian expression. It analyzes early Confucian debates on moral psychology, the Confucian moral curriculum consisting of model emulation, cultural practices and canonical instruction, and the methods…

  12. Sahagún's "Florentine codex," a little known Aztecan natural history of the Valley of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Henry M

    2006-01-01

    Franciscan missionary Fray Bernardino de Sahagún arrived in New Spain (Mexico) in 1529 to proselytize Aztecs surviving the Conquest, begun by Hernán Cortés in 1519. About 1558 he commenced his huge opus "Historia general de las cosas de Nueva España" completed in Latin-Nahuatl manuscript in 1569. The best surviving version, the "Florentine Codex," 1579 in Spanish-Nahuatl, is the basis for the editions published since 1829. The first English translation was issued in 13 volumes between 1950 and 1982, and the first facsimile was published in 1979. Book 11, "Earthly things," is a comprehensive natural history of the Valley of Mexico based on pre-Cortésian Aztec knowledge. Sahagún's work, largely unknown among English-speaking biologists, is an untapped treasury of information about Aztecan natural history. It also establishes the Aztecs as the preeminent pioneering naturalists of North American, and Sahagún and his colleagues as their documentarians.

  13. Lessons from the life history of natural fertility societies on child growth and maturation.

    PubMed

    Gawlik, Aneta; Hochberg, Ze'ev

    2012-06-19

    During the evolution of hominids, childhood and adolescence have been added as new life-history phases. The transition from infancy to childhood (ICT) confers a predictive adaptive response to energetic cues that strongly influence adult height, whereas the transition from juvenility to adolescence establishes longevity and the age of fertility. Evolutionary short-term adaptations to energy crises apparently use epigenetic mechanisms that defer the ICT, culminating in short stature. The study of hunter-gatherers gives us an indication of pre-demographic transition populations and their life style that prevailed for 99% of homo's evolution. The secular trend for receding age of pubertal development has been an adaptive response to positive environmental cues in terms of energy balance. In natural fertility preindustrial societies with limited access to modern contraception and health care, and whose economies are primarily subsistence-based, most resources are invested as somatic capital in human body size and fertility. Here we review results from databases for natural fertility societies, with the information on life history, population density, height and body mass, indices of adolescence and fertility. By using them it was possible to verify the ICT model as well as to explore pubertal parameters that are related to evolutionary fitness. They confirmed that body size was adaptively smaller in hostile environments, and was tightly associated with reproductive fitness.

  14. Longitudinal timed function tests in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: ImagingDMD cohort natural history.

    PubMed

    Arora, Harneet; Willcocks, Rebecca J; Lott, Donovan J; Harrington, Ann T; Senesac, Claudia R; Zilke, Kirsten L; Daniels, Michael J; Xu, Dandan; Tennekoon, Gihan I; Finanger, Erika L; Russman, Barry S; Finkel, Richard S; Triplett, William T; Byrne, Barry J; Walter, Glenn A; Sweeney, H Lee; Vandenborne, Krista

    2018-05-09

    Tests of ambulatory function are common clinical trial endpoints in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The ImagingDMD study has generated a large data set using these tests, which can describe the contemporary natural history of DMD in 5-12.9 year olds. 92 corticosteroid treated boys with DMD and 45 controls participated in this longitudinal study. Subjects performed the 6 minute walk test (6MWT) and timed function tests (TFTs: 10m walk/run, 4 stairs, supine to stand). Boys with DMD had impaired functional performance even at 5-6.9 years. Boys older than 7 had significant declines in function over 1 year for 10m walk/run and 6MWT. 80% of subjects could perform all functional tests at 9 years old. TFTs appear to be slightly more responsive and predictive of disease progression than 6MWT in 7-12.9 year olds. This study provides insight into the contemporary natural history of key functional endpoints in DMD. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Is prostate cancer different in black men? Answers from three natural history models

    PubMed Central

    Tsodikov, Alex; Gulati, Roman; de Carvalho, Tiago M.; Heijnsdijk, Eveline A. M.; Hunter-Merrill, Rachel A.; Mariotto, Angela B.; de Koning, Harry J.; Etzioni, Ruth

    2017-01-01

    Background Black men in the US have substantially higher prostate cancer incidence rates than the general population. The extent to which the incidence disparity is due to prostate cancer being more prevalent, more aggressive, and/or more frequently diagnosed in black men is unknown. Methods We estimated three independently developed models of prostate cancer natural history in black men and in the general population using an updated reconstruction of PSA screening, based on the National Health Interview Survey in 2005, and prostate cancer incidence from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program in 1975–2000. Using the estimated models, we compared prostate cancer natural history in black men and in the general population. Results The models projected that 30–43% (range across models) of black men develop preclinical prostate cancer by age 85 years, a risk that is (relatively) 28–56% higher than in the general population. Among men who have had preclinical disease onset, black men have a similar risk of diagnosis (35–49%) compared with the general population (32–44%), but their risk of progression to metastatic disease by the time of diagnosis is 44–75% higher than in the general population. Conclusions Prostate cancer incidence patterns implicate higher incidence of preclinical disease and higher risk of metastatic progression among black men. The findings suggest screening black men earlier than white men and support further research into the benefit-harm tradeoffs of more aggressive screening policies for black men. PMID:28436011

  16. On the Natural and Unnatural History of the Voltage-Gated Na(+) Channel.

    PubMed

    Moczydlowski, E G

    2016-01-01

    This review glances at the voltage-gated sodium (Na(+)) channel (NaV) from the skewed perspective of natural history and the history of ideas. Beginning with the earliest natural philosophers, the objective of biological science and physiology was to understand the basis of life and discover its intimate secrets. The idea that the living state of matter differs from inanimate matter by an incorporeal spirit or mystical force was central to vitalism, a doctrine based on ancient beliefs that persisted until the last century. Experimental electrophysiology played a major role in the abandonment of vitalism by elucidating physiochemical mechanisms that explained the electrical excitability of muscle and nerve. Indeed, as a principal biomolecule underlying membrane excitability, the NaV channel may be considered as the physical analog or surrogate for the vital spirit once presumed to animate higher forms of life. NaV also epitomizes the "other secret of life" and functions as a quantal transistor element of biological intelligence. Subplots of this incredible but true story run the gamut from electric fish to electromagnetism, invention of the battery, venomous animals, neurotoxins, channelopathies, arrhythmia, anesthesia, astrobiology, etc. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Natural History and Ecology of Soldier Beetles (Coleoptera: Cantharidae) in the Mexican Tropical Dry Forests.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Hernández, Cisteil X

    2018-06-06

    Until today, most information about the natural history and ecology of soldier beetles came from temperate zones, mainly from Holarctic areas, while tropical regions have been poorly studied. The aim of this contribution is to compile and synthesize information concerning the natural history and ecology of Cantharidae (Coleoptera) from the Mexican tropical dry forest (TDF), to serve as a starting point for more in-depth study of the group in one of the Mexico's most endangered ecosystems. All compiled data on the family have been organized into the following topics: distributional patterns and habitat preferences, feeding behavior and host plants, and daily and seasonal activity cycles. For the first time, it was provided a list of host plants for TDF Cantharidae genera and species, and it was also observed a high ecological diversity in the phenology and behavior of TDF Cantharidae assemblages. Further research concerning cantharids and other TDF insects needs to have a more comprehensive and integrated approach toward understanding the patterns of distribution and diversity, and elucidating the role that cantharids play in ecosystems, especially in TDF, which is one of the most endangered ecosystem in the world.

  18. The natural history of cystic echinococcosis in untreated and albendazole-treated patients.

    PubMed

    Solomon, N; Kachani, M; Zeyhle, E; Macpherson, C N L

    2017-07-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) treatment protocols for cystic echinococcosis (CE) are based on the standardized ultrasound (US) classification. This study examined whether the classification reflected the natural history of CE in untreated and albendazole-treated patients. Data were collected during mass US screenings in CE endemic regions among transhumant populations, the Turkana and Berber peoples of Kenya and Morocco. Cysts were classified using the WHO classification. Patient records occurring prior to treatment, and after albendazole administration, were selected. 852 paired before/after observations of 360 cysts from 257 patients were analyzed. A McNemar-Bowker χ 2 test for symmetry was significant (p<0.0001). 744 observations (87.3%) maintained the same class, and 101 (11.9%) progressed, consistent with the classification. Regression to CE3B occurred in seven of 116 CE4 cyst observations (6.0%). A McNemar-Bowker χ 2 test of 1414 paired before/after observations of 288 cysts from 157 albendazole-treated patients was significant (p<0.0001). 1236 observations (87.4%) maintained the same class, and 149 (10.5%) progressed, consistent with the classification. Regression to CE3B occurred in 29 of 206 CE4 observations (14.1%). Significant asymmetry confirms the WHO classification's applicability to the natural history of CE and albendazole-induced changes. Regressions may reflect the stability of CE3B cysts. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Natural history and the formation of the human being: Kant on active forces.

    PubMed

    Waldow, Anik

    2016-08-01

    In his 1785-review of the Ideen zur Philosophie der Geschichte der Menschheit, Kant objects to Herder's conception of nature as being imbued with active forces. This attack is usually evaluated against the background of Kant's critical project and his epistemological concern to caution against the "metaphysical excess" of attributing immanent properties to matter. In this paper I explore a slightly different reading by investigating Kant's pre-critical account of creation and generation. The aim of this is to show that Kant's struggle with the forces of matter has a long history and revolves around one central problem: that of how to distinguish between the non-purposive forces of nature and the intentional powers of the mind. Given this history, the epistemic stricture that Kant's critical project imposes on him no longer appears to be the primary reason for his attack on Herder. It merely aggravates a problem that Kant has been battling with since his earliest writings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Impact of chronic kidney disease on the natural history of alkaptonuria

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Bernardo; Vidinha, Joana; Pêgo, Cátia; Correia, Hugo; Sousa, Tânia

    2012-01-01

    In alkaptonuria, deficiency of homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase leads to the accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA) and its metabolites in the body, resulting in ochronosis. Reports of patients with alkaptonuria who have decreased kidney function are rare, but this seems to play an important role in the natural history of the disease. We describe a 68-year-old female with chronic kidney disease (CKD) of unknown etiology who started peritoneal dialysis (PD) after 5 years of follow-up and who was diagnosed with alkaptonuria at this time. Progressive exacerbation of ochronotic manifestations had been noted during these last few years, as kidney function worsened. After PD initiation, the disease continued to progress, and death occurred after one year and a half, due to severe aortic stenosis-related complications. Her 70-year-old sister was evaluated and also diagnosed with alkaptonuria. She had no renal dysfunction. Higher HGA excretion and significantly milder ochronosis than that of her sister were found. We present two alkaptonuric sisters with similar comorbidities except for the presence of CKD, who turned out to have totally different evolutions of their disease. This report confirms that kidney dysfunction may be an important factor in determining the natural history of alkaptonuria. PMID:25874097

  1. The Natural History of Oral Human Papillomavirus in Young Costa Rican Women.

    PubMed

    Beachler, Daniel C; Lang Kuhs, Krystle A; Struijk, Linda; Schussler, John; Herrero, Rolando; Porras, Carolina; Hildesheim, Allan; Cortes, Bernal; Sampson, Joshua; Quint, Wim; Gonzalez, Paula; Kreimer, Aimée R

    2017-07-01

    Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and related oropharyngeal cancer are uncommon in lower-income countries, particularly compared to HPV-associated cervical cancer. However, little is known about the natural history of oral HPV in less-developed settings and how it compares to the natural history of cervical HPV. Three hundred fifty women aged 22 to 33 years from the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial provided exfoliated cells from the cervical and oral regions at 2 visits 2 years apart. Samples from both visits were tested for 25 characterized α HPV types by the SPF10 PCR-DNA enzyme immunoassay-LiPA25 version 1 system. Risk factors for oral HPV persistence were calculated utilizing generalized estimating equations with a logistic link. Among the 82 women with characterized α oral HPV DNA detected at baseline, 14 persisted and were detected 2 years later (17.6%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 10.9-28.5%) and was similar to the persistence of α cervical HPV (40/223; 17.7%; 95% CI, 13.1-23.9%; P = 0.86). Acquisition of new α oral HPV type was low; incident infection (1.7%; 95% CI, 0.6-3.7%). Oral HPV DNA is uncommon in young women in Latin America, and often appears to clear within a few years at similar rates to cervical HPV.

  2. Natural history of excessive daytime sleepiness: role of obesity, weight loss, depression, and sleep propensity.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Mendoza, Julio; Vgontzas, Alexandros N; Kritikou, Ilia; Calhoun, Susan L; Liao, Duanping; Bixler, Edward O

    2015-03-01

    Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is highly prevalent in the general population and is associated with occupational and public safety hazards. However, no study has examined the clinical and polysomnographic (PSG) predictors of the natural history of EDS. Representative longitudinal study. Sleep laboratory. From a random, general population sample of 1,741 individuals of the Penn State Adult Cohort, 1,395 were followed up after 7.5 years. Full medical evaluation and 1-night PSG at baseline and standardized telephone interview at follow-up. The incidence of EDS was 8.2%, while its persistence and remission were 38% and 62%, respectively. Obesity and weight gain were associated with the incidence and persistence of EDS, while weight loss was associated with its remission. Significant interactions between depression and PSG parameters on incident EDS showed that, in depressed individuals, incident EDS was associated with sleep disturbances, while in non-depressed individuals, incident EDS was associated with increased physiologic sleep propensity. Diabetes, allergy/ asthma, anemia, and sleep complaints also predicted the natural history of EDS. Obesity, a disorder of epidemic proportions, is a major risk factor for the incidence and chronicity of EDS, while weight loss is associated with its remission. Interestingly, objective sleep disturbances predict incident EDS in depressed individuals, whereas physiologic sleep propensity predicts incident EDS in those without depression. Weight management and treatment of depression and sleep disorders should be part of our public health policies. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  3. Cryopreservation of Fish Spermatogonial Cells: The Future of Natural History Collections.

    PubMed

    Hagedorn, Mary M; Daly, Jonathan P; Carter, Virginia L; Cole, Kathleen S; Jaafar, Zeehan; Lager, Claire V A; Parenti, Lynne R

    2018-04-18

    As global biodiversity declines, the value of biological collections increases. Cryopreserved diploid spermatogonial cells meet two goals: to yield high-quality molecular sequence data; and to regenerate new individuals, hence potentially countering species extinction. Cryopreserved spermatogonial cells that allow for such mitigative measures are not currently in natural history museum collections because there are no standard protocols to collect them. Vertebrate specimens, especially fishes, are traditionally formalin-fixed and alcohol-preserved which makes them ideal for morphological studies and as museum vouchers, but inadequate for molecular sequence data. Molecular studies of fishes routinely use tissues preserved in ethanol; yet tissues preserved in this way may yield degraded sequences over time. As an alternative to tissue fixation methods, we assessed and compared previously published cryopreservation methods by gating and counting fish testicular cells with flow cytometry to identify presumptive spermatogonia A-type cells. Here we describe a protocol to cryopreserve tissues that yields a high percentage of viable spermatogonial cells from the testes of Asterropteryx semipunctata, a marine goby. Material cryopreserved using this protocol represents the first frozen and post-thaw viable spermatogonial cells of fishes archived in a natural history museum to provide better quality material for re-derivation of species and DNA preservation and analysis.

  4. Taking Spectacle Seriously: Wildlife Film and the Legacy of Natural History Display.

    PubMed

    Louson, Eleanor

    2018-03-01

    Argument I argue through an analysis of spectacle that the relationship between wildlife documentary films' entertainment and educational mandates is complex and co-constitutive. Accuracy-based criticism of wildlife films reveals assumptions of a deficit model of science communication and positions spectacle as an external commercial pressure influencing the genre. Using the Planet Earth (2006) series as a case study, I describe spectacle's prominence within the recent blue-chip renaissance in wildlife film, resulting from technological innovations and twenty-first-century consumer and broadcast market contexts. I connect spectacle in contemporary wildlife films to its relevant precursors within natural history, situating spectacle as a central feature of natural history display designed to inspire awe and wonder in audiences. I show that contemporary documentary spectacle is best understood as an opportunity for affective knowing rather than a constraint on accuracy; as a result, spectacle contributes to the virtuous inter-reinforcement of entertainment and education at work in blue-chip wildlife films.

  5. Natural history of chronic hepatitis B: phases in a complex relationship.

    PubMed

    Croagh, Catherine M N; Lubel, John S

    2014-08-14

    Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) is a condition of global prevalence and its sequelae include cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The natural history of CHB is a complex interplay of virological, environmental and host factors. The dynamic relationship between the virus and host evolves over the duration of the infection and different phases of the disease have been observed and described. These have been conceptualized in terms of the state of balance between the host immune system and the hepatitis B virus and have been given the labels immune tolerant, immune clearance, immune control and immune escape although other nomenclature is also used. Host factors, such as age at infection, determine progression to chronicity. Virological factors including hepatitis B viral load, mutations and genotype also have an impact on the adverse outcomes of the infection, as do hepatotoxic cofactors such as alcohol. Our understanding of the natural history of CHB has evolved significantly over the past few decades and characterizing the phase of disease of CHB remains an integral part of managing this virus in the clinic.

  6. Stereotactic Radiosurgery versus Natural History in Patients with Growing Vestibular Schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Tu, Albert; Gooderham, Peter; Mick, Paul; Westerberg, Brian; Toyota, Brian; Akagami, Ryojo

    2015-08-01

    Objective To describe our experience with stereotactic radiosurgery and its efficacy on growing tumors, and then to compare this result with the natural history of a similar cohort of non-radiation-treated lesions. Study Design A retrospective chart review and cohort comparison. Methods The long-term control rates of patients having undergone radiosurgery were collected and calculated, and this population was then compared with a group of untreated patients from the same period of time with growing lesions. Results A total of 61 patients with growing vestibular schwannomas treated with radiosurgery were included. After a mean of 160 months, we observed a control rate of 85.2%. When compared with a group of 36 patients with growing tumors who were yet to receive treatment (previously published), we found a corrected control rate or relative risk reduction of only 76.8%. Conclusion Radiosurgery for growing vestibular schwannomas is less effective than previously reported in unselected series. Although radiosurgery still has a role in managing this disease, consideration should be given to the actual efficacy that may be calculated when the natural history is known. We hope other centers will similarly report their experience on this cohort of patients.

  7. Stereotactic Radiosurgery versus Natural History in Patients with Growing Vestibular Schwannomas

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Albert; Gooderham, Peter; Mick, Paul; Westerberg, Brian; Toyota, Brian; Akagami, Ryojo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe our experience with stereotactic radiosurgery and its efficacy on growing tumors, and then to compare this result with the natural history of a similar cohort of non-radiation–treated lesions. Study Design A retrospective chart review and cohort comparison. Methods The long-term control rates of patients having undergone radiosurgery were collected and calculated, and this population was then compared with a group of untreated patients from the same period of time with growing lesions. Results A total of 61 patients with growing vestibular schwannomas treated with radiosurgery were included. After a mean of 160 months, we observed a control rate of 85.2%. When compared with a group of 36 patients with growing tumors who were yet to receive treatment (previously published), we found a corrected control rate or relative risk reduction of only 76.8%. Conclusion Radiosurgery for growing vestibular schwannomas is less effective than previously reported in unselected series. Although radiosurgery still has a role in managing this disease, consideration should be given to the actual efficacy that may be calculated when the natural history is known. We hope other centers will similarly report their experience on this cohort of patients. PMID:26225318

  8. Guided school visits to natural history museums in Israel: Teachers' roles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tal, Revital; Bamberger, Yael; Morag, Orly

    2005-11-01

    Museums are favorite and respected resources for learning worldwide. In Israel, there are two relatively large science centers and a number of small natural history museums that are visited by thousands of students. Unlike other countries, studying museum visits in Israel only emerges in the last few years. The study focused on the roles and perceptions of teachers, who visited four natural history museums with their classes. The study followed previous studies that aimed at understanding the role teachers play in class visits to museums (Griffin & Symington, 1997, Science Education, 81, 763-779; Cox-Petersen et al., 2003, Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 40, 200-218; Olsen, Cox-Petersen, & McComas, 2001, Journal of Science Teacher Education, 12, 155-173) and emphasized unique phenomena related to the Israeli system. None of the teachers interviewed for this study was an active facilitator, and in many cases the teachers had no idea regarding the field trip program and rationale. Our main findings support previous studies that indicated that teachers are hardly involved in planning and enacting the museum visit. An issue of concern, which came up in this study, is the tendency of Israeli schools to use subcontractor companies that plan and make all the museum arrangements. Unlike the common patterns described in the paper, a case study of unique teacher's function is presented as well.

  9. Using the History of Research on Sickle Cell Anemia to Affect Preservice Teachers' Conceptions of the Nature of Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Eric M.

    This paper examines how using a series of lessons developed from the history of research on sickle cell anemia affects preservice teacher conceptions of the nature of science (NOS). The importance of a pedagogy that has students do science through an integral use of the history of science is effective at enriching students' NOS views is presented.…

  10. History and Nature of Science in High School: Building up Parameters to Guide Educational Materials and Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forato, Thais Cyrino de Mello; Martins, Roberto de Andrade; Pietrocola, Mauricio

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the main results of a research examining the didactic transposition of history and philosophy of science in high school level. The adaptation of history of science to this particular level, addressing some aspects of the nature of science aiming at the students' critical engagement, was analyzed by examining both the…

  11. Addressing Nature of Science Core Tenets with the History of Science: An Example with Sickle-Cell Anemia & Malaria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Erica M.

    2007-01-01

    The history of science (HOS) has proven to be a useful pedagogical tool to help students learn about what has come to be regarded as an agreed upon set of core nature of science (NOS) tenets. The following article illustrates an example of how teachers can instrumentally use the history of research on heterozygote protection in sickle-cell anemia…

  12. Discriminating between natural versus induced seismicity from long-term deformation history of intraplate faults.

    PubMed

    Magnani, Maria Beatrice; Blanpied, Michael L; DeShon, Heather R; Hornbach, Matthew J

    2017-11-01

    To assess whether recent seismicity is induced by human activity or is of natural origin, we analyze fault displacements on high-resolution seismic reflection profiles for two regions in the central United States (CUS): the Fort Worth Basin (FWB) of Texas and the northern Mississippi embayment (NME). Since 2009, earthquake activity in the CUS has increased markedly, and numerous publications suggest that this increase is primarily due to induced earthquakes caused by deep-well injection of wastewater, both flowback water from hydrofracturing operations and produced water accompanying hydrocarbon production. Alternatively, some argue that these earthquakes are natural and that the seismicity increase is a normal variation that occurs over millions of years. Our analysis shows that within the NME, faults deform both Quaternary alluvium and underlying sediments dating from Paleozoic through Tertiary, with displacement increasing with geologic unit age, documenting a long history of natural activity. In the FWB, a region of ongoing wastewater injection, basement faults show deformation of the Proterozoic and Paleozoic units, but little or no deformation of younger strata. Specifically, vertical displacements in the post-Pennsylvanian formations, if any, are below the resolution (~15 m) of the seismic data, far less than expected had these faults accumulated deformation over millions of years. Our results support the assertion that recent FWB earthquakes are of induced origin; this conclusion is entirely independent of analyses correlating seismicity and wastewater injection practices. To our knowledge, this is the first study to discriminate natural and induced seismicity using classical structural geology analysis techniques.

  13. Clinical and Polysomnographic Predictors of the Natural History of Poor Sleep in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Mendoza, Julio; Vgontzas, Alexandros N.; Bixler, Edward O.; Singareddy, Ravi; Shaffer, Michele L.; Calhoun, Susan L.; Karataraki, Maria; Vela-Bueno, Antonio; Liao, Duanping

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: Approximately 8-10% of the general population suffers from chronic insomnia, whereas another 20-30% of the population has insomnia symptoms at any given time (i.e., poor sleep). However, few longitudinal studies have examined risk factors of the natural history of poor sleep, and none have examined the role of polysomnographic (PSG) variables. Design: Representative longitudinal study. Setting: Sleep laboratory. Participants: From a random, general population sample of 1,741 individuals of the adult Penn State Cohort, 1,395 were followed up after 7.5 yr. Measurements: Full medical evaluation and 1-night PSG at baseline and telephone interview at follow-up. Results: The rate of incident poor sleep was 18.4%. Physical (e.g., obesity, sleep apnea, and ulcer) and mental (e.g., depression) health conditions and behavioral factors (e.g., smoking and alcohol consumption) increased the odds of incident poor sleep as compared to normal sleep. The rates of persistent, remitted, and poor sleepers who developed chronic insomnia were 39%, 44%, and 17%, respectively. Risk factors for persistent poor sleep were physical health conditions combined with psychologic distress. Shorter objective sleep duration and a family history of sleep problems were risk factors for poor sleep evolving into chronic insomnia. Conclusions: Poor sleep appears to be primarily a symptom of physical and mental health conditions, whereas the persistence of poor sleep is associated with psychologic distress. Importantly, sleep apnea appears to be associated with incident poor sleep but not with chronic insomnia. Finally, this study suggests that objective short sleep duration in poor sleepers is a biologic marker of genetic predisposition to chronic insomnia. Citation: Fernandez-Mendoza J; Vgontzas AN; Bixler EO; Singareddy R; Shaffer ML; Calhoun SL; Karataraki M; Vela-Bueno A; Liao D. Clinical and polysomnographic predictors of the natural history of poor sleep in the general population

  14. The biology and natural history of prostate cancer: a short introduction.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, Lars; Van Hemelrijck, Mieke

    2014-01-01

    This chapter aims to serve as a quick glance outlining an overall picture of mainstream thoughts, and to serve as a point of departure for more thorough discussions. The introduction of PSA testing has immensely complicated research in prostate cancer epidemiology and biology and added new clinical and biological domains. As for many cancers, age and ethnic origin are the strongest known risk factors. While migrant studies imply that environment and/or personal life style is important, epidemiological studies have failed to establish any strong leads. Despite the known androgen dependence of prostate cancer, there is little to support that circulating levels of androgens, estrogens or 5-alpha-reductase are associated with risk of developing the disease. However, a consistent finding is a positive association with levels of Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1). Prostate cancer is one of the cancers most strongly related to inherited susceptibility, even when taking into account that family history of prostate cancer triggers PSA testing among relatives. A number of somatic genetic alterations (amplifications, deletions, point mutations, translocations) are associated with prostate cancer risk. Findings for alterations in FASN, HPN, AMACR and MYC have been fairly consistent. Recent research shows that the notion of "hormone-independent prostate cancer" has to be revised: most prostate cancers remain dependent on androgen receptor signalling also after progression despite traditional androgen deprivation therapy. Traditional markers of stage and type of disease still play a major role for prognostication and treatment decisions. Prostate cancer is one of the few cancers where patients have been recommended watchful waiting or active surveillance. This provides opportunities for studies of natural history of the disease. The understanding of prostate cancer aetiology and natural history has progressed slowly. However, the current situation is positively challenging and

  15. Oxygenation history of the Neoproterozoic to early Phanerozoic and the rise of land plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Malcolm W.; Hood, Ashleigh vS.; Shuster, Alice; Greig, Alan; Planavsky, Noah J.; Reed, Christopher P.

    2017-05-01

    There has been extensive debate about the history of Earth's oxygenation and the role that land plant evolution played in shaping Earth's ocean-atmosphere system. Here we use the rare earth element patterns in marine carbonates to monitor the structure of the marine redox landscape through the rise and diversification of animals and early land plants. In particular, we use the relative abundance of cerium (Ceanom), the only redox-sensitive rare earth element, in well-preserved marine cements and other marine precipitates to track seawater oxygen levels. Our results indicate that there was only a moderate increase in oceanic oxygenation during the Ediacaran (average Cryogenian Ceanom = 1.1, average Ediacaran Ceanom = 0.62), followed by a decrease in oxygen levels during the early Cambrian (average Cryogenian Ceanom = 0.90), with significant ocean anoxia persisting through the early and mid Paleozoic (average Early Cambrian-Early Devonian Ceanom = 0.84). It was not until the Late Devonian that oxygenation levels are comparable to the modern (average of all post-middle Devonian Ceanom = 0.55). Therefore, this work confirms growing evidence that the oxygenation of the Earth was neither unidirectional nor a simple two-stage process. Further, we provide evidence that it was not until the Late Devonian, when large land plants and forests first evolved, that oxygen levels reached those comparable to the modern world. This is recorded with the first modern-like negative Ceanom (values <0.6) occurring at around 380 Ma (Frasnian). This suggests that land plants, rather than animals, are the 'engineers' responsible for the modern fully oxygenated Earth system.

  16. Natural history of severe atheromatous disease of the thoracic aorta: a transesophageal echocardiographic study.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, D H; Ververis, J J; McGorisk, G; Frohwein, S; Martin, R P; Taylor, W R

    1996-01-01

    This study sought to prospectively observe the morphologic and clinical natural history of severe atherosclerotic disease of the thoracic aorta as defined by transesophageal echocardiography. Atherosclerosis of the thoracic aorta has been shown to be highly associated with risk for embolic events in transesophageal studies, but the natural history of the disease under clinical conditions has not been reported. During a 20-month period, 191 of 264 patients undergoing transesophageal echocardiography had adequate visualization of the aorta to allow atherosclerotic severity to be graded as follows: grade I = normal (44 patients); grade II = intimal thickening (52 patients); grade III = atheroma < 5 mm (62 patients); grade IV = atheroma > or = 5 mm (19 patients); grade V = mobile lesion (14 patients). All available patients with grades IV (8 patients) and V (10 patients) disease as well as a subgroup of 12 patients with grade III disease had follow-up transesophageal echocardiographic studies (mean [+/- SD] 11.7 +/- 0.9 months, range 6 to 22). Of 30 patients undergoing follow-up transesophageal echocardiographic studies, 20 (66%) had no change in atherosclerotic severity grade. Of the remaining 10 patients, atherosclerotic severity progressed one grade in 7 and decreased in 3 with resolved mobile lesions. Of 18 patients with grade IV or V disease of the aorta who underwent a follow-up study, 11 (61%) demonstrated formation of new mobile lesions. Of 10 patients with grade V disease on initial study who underwent follow-up study, 7 (70%) demonstrated resolution of a specific previously documented mobile lesion. However, seven patients (70%) with grade V disease also demonstrated development of a new mobile lesion. Of 33 patients with grade IV or V disease, 8 (24%) died during the study period, and 1 (3%) had a clinical embolic event. The presence of severe atherosclerotic disease of the thoracic aorta as defined by transesophageal echocardiography is associated with a

  17. Natural history of chronic hepatitis B in Euro-Mediterranean and African countries.

    PubMed

    Hadziyannis, Stephanos J

    2011-07-01

    Data derived from population, case-control, and cohort studies conducted in several Euro-Mediterranean and African countries disclose impressive similarities in the age and modes of hepatitis B virus (HBV) transmission and in the prevalence, duration, and outcome of the four phases of the natural history of chronic infection. Perinatal HBV infection is rare while the vast majority of chronic infections originate from horizontal HBV transmission to infants and children. HBeAg loss and seroconversion to anti-HBe occur in a few years time, usually during the second decade of life. HBeAg-negative/anti-HBe-positive chronic hepatitis B (CHB), predominates in these countries being 7-9 times more frequent than HBeAg-positive CHB. The predominance of HBeAg-negative CHB is largely linked to the molecular characteristics of HBV genotype D prevailing in European and African countries of the Mediterranean basin and of genotype E and subgenotype A1 that prevail in the other parts of Africa. The molecular characteristics of the African subgenotype A1 differ from those of European subgenotype A2 explaining the fact that patients infected subgenotype A1 demonstrate an earlier loss of HBeAg and seroconversion to anti-HBe during the natural course of HBV infection compared to those infected with subgenotype A2. It is proposed that the molecular characteristics of HBV genotypes and subgenotypes prevailing in Euro-Mediterranean and African countries acting in concert with host and environmental factors largely determine the natural history of chronic HBV infection and its significant differences from countries of HBV genotype C and B and of subgenotype Ae predominance. The knowledge of the natural history of chronic HBV infection in Euro-Mediterranean and African countries combined with wide screening programs for prompt recognition and treatment of chronic HBV infection both in its HBeAg-positive and -negative immune reactive phases can be expected to increase the efficacy of current

  18. Variations in early life history traits of Japanese anchovy Engraulis japonicus in the Yangtze River Estuary.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunlong; Xian, Weiwei; Liu, Shude; Chen, Yifeng

    2018-01-01

    Resources of Japanese anchovy ( Engraulis japonicus Temminck & Schlegel, 1846) are undergoing dramatic recessions in China as the consequence of intensifying anthropogenic activities. Elucidating the influences of local-scale environmental factors on early life history traits is of great importance to design strategies conserving and restoring the declining anchovy resources. In this research, we studied hatching date and early growth of anchovy in the Yangtze River Estuary (YRE) using information obtained from otolith microstructure. Onset of hatching season and growth rates of anchovy was compared to populations in Japan and Taiwan. In YRE, the hatching date of anchovy ranged from February 26th to April 6th and mean growth rate ranged from 0.27 to 0.77 mm/d. Anchovies hatching later had higher growth rates than individuals hatching earlier before the 25th day. Among populations, hatching onsets of anchovy from the higher latitude were later than populations in the lower latitude, and growth rates of anchovy in YRE were much lower than populations in Japan and Taiwan. Variations in hatching onsets and early growth patterns of anchovy thus provide important knowledge on understanding the adaptation of anchovy in YRE and designing management strategies on conserving China's anchovy resources.

  19. Effects of predispersal insect seed predation on the early life history stages of a rare cold sand-desert legume.

    PubMed

    Han, Yi J; Baskin, Jerry M; Tan, Dun Y; Baskin, Carol C; Wu, Ming Y

    2018-02-19

    Seed predation by insects is common in seeds of Fabaceae (legume) species with physical dormancy (PY). However, the consequences of insect seed predation on the life history of legumes with PY have been little studied. In the largest genus of seed plants, Astragalus (Fabaceae), only one study has tested the effects of insect predation on germination, and none has tested it directly on seedling survival. Thus, we tested the effects of insect predation on seed germination and seedling growth and survival of Astragalus lehmannianus, a central Asian sand-desert endemic. Under laboratory conditions, seeds lightly predated in the natural habitat of this perennial legume germinated to a much higher percentage than intact seeds, and seedlings from predated and nonpredated seeds survived and grew about equally well. Further, in contrast to our prediction seedlings from predated seeds that germinated "out-of-season" under near-natural conditions in NW China survived over winter. The implication of our results is that individual plants from predated seeds that germinate early (in our case autumn) potentially have a fitness advantage over those from nonpredated seeds, which delay germination until spring of a subsequent year.

  20. An investigation of Taiwanese early adolescents' views about the nature of science.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao-Ming; Tsai, Chin-Chung; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2005-01-01

    This study developed a Pupils' Nature of Science Scale, including the subscales of the invented and changing nature of science, the role of social negotiation on science, and cultural context on science, to assess early adolescents' views about the nature of science. More than 6,000 fifth and sixth graders in Taiwan responded to the Scale. The study revealed that the adolescents had quite different perspectives toward different subscales of the nature of science. Moreover, male adolescents tended to express more constructivist-oriented views toward the nature of science than did their female counterparts. The adolescents of different grades and races also displayed varying views toward the nature of science.