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Sample records for early orthodontic treatment

  1. [Early orthodontic treatment].

    PubMed

    Boute, S; Kleutghen, J

    1989-01-01

    Several preventive procedures are recommended for the interception of early malocclusion. Therefore some important characteristics of normal dental development are mentioned. This preventive approach is focused around selected topics as forced bite, midline diastema and retarded eruption. This influence of functional disturbances on dentofacial morphology is discussed. An overview of possible therapy by the general dentist is presented for problems, aroused by thumb- and fingersucking, agenesis of upper lateral and mandibular second premolars as well as early loss of deciduous molars. Finally, the possible indications for serial extractions are examined.

  2. "Real" early orthodontic treatment. From birth to age 8.

    PubMed

    Page, David C

    2003-01-01

    This article will introduce new concepts for earlier orthodontic (teeth) and orthopedic (jaw-bone) diagnosis and treatment from birth to age eight. While early orthodontic treatment around age 8 is getting some attention, age 8 is still too late to orthopedically guide proper jaw and airway growth in some children. By age 8, the jaws (maxilla and mandible) grow 80-90% of their adult size. Research shows that small jaws create small airways and increase the likelihood of life-threatening disorders, for life. Since the upper and lower jaw-bones form the gateway to the human airway, a new earlier orthodontic protocol and standard is warranted. Unique Functional Jaw Orthopedic concepts will help form a new early orthodontic protocol. These new concepts may very well help general dentists, pedodontists and orthodontists move dental care into a future world of medical dentistry which will include airway development, bed-wetting, ear disease, heart disease and longevity.

  3. Dentoalveolar Effects of Early Orthodontic Treatment in Patients With Cleft Lip and Palate

    PubMed Central

    Cassi, Diana; Di Blasio, Alberto; Gandolfinini, Mauro; Magnifico, Marisabel; Pellegrino, Francesca; Piancino, Maria Grazia

    2017-01-01

    Abstract No agreement exists on the most appropriate timing of orthodontic treatment in patients with cleft lip and palate. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of early orthodontic treatment on development of the dental arches and alveolar bone. A dental casts analysis was performed on 28 children with cleft lip and palate before orthodontic treatment (T0; mean age, 6.5 ± 1.7) and at the end of active treatment (T1; mean age, 9.2 ± 2.1 years). The considered variables were: intercanine and intermolar distances; dental arch relationships, evaluated according to the modified Huddart/Bodenham system. The study group was divided into 2 samples according to the age at T0: Group A (age < 6 years) and Group B (age ≥ 6 years). A statistical comparison of the treatment effects between the 2 samples was performed. Patients in Group A exhibited a greater increase of intercanine distance (8 mm versus 2.7 mm; P<0.001), intermolar distance (7.2 mm versus 5 mm; P = 0.06), and Huddart/Bodenham score (7.1 versus 3; P < 0.05) when compared with patients in Group B. Early orthodontic treatment strongly improved the dental arch relationship, since subjects starting the therapy before the age of 6 had a better response in terms of anterior maxillary expansion. PMID:28891894

  4. Oral health: orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Martonffy, Andrea Ildiko

    2015-01-01

    Improper tooth alignment due to crowding, malocclusion, and missing teeth can cause difficulties with eating and speech, and premature wear. It is estimated that more than 20% of children would benefit from orthodontic treatment to correct these conditions, many of which will persist into adulthood if not corrected. Orthodontic care is gaining popularity among adults for similar concerns, as well as for correction of cosmetic issues. The psychological effects of malocclusion should not be ignored. The American Association of Orthodontists recommends that all children undergo evaluation at the first recognition of an orthodontic condition and no later than age 7 years. Some children will need early treatment to help eliminate developing conditions and improve the foundations of the bite, which can ease later treatment in adolescence. For others, treatment in adolescence without early treatment is recommended. Standard cemented braces or clear, removable aligners may be used, depending on the patient's corrective needs. Average treatment time is approximately 2 years; this may be shortened by the use of accelerative techniques. Routine preventive dental care should be continued during the treatment period. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  5. Malocclusion and early orthodontic treatment requirements in the mixed dentitions of a population of Nigerian children.

    PubMed

    daCosta, Oluranti Olatokunbo; Aikins, Elfleda Angelina; Isiekwe, Gerald Ikenna; Adediran, Virginia Efunyemi

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to establish the prevalence of dental features that indicate a need for early intervention and to ascertain the prevalence of different methods of early treatment among a population of Nigerian children in mixed dentition. Occlusal relationships were evaluated in 101 children in mixed dentition between the ages of 6 and 12 years who presented at the Orthodontic Unit, Department of Child Dental Health, Lagos University Teaching Hospital over a 2 years period. The need for different modes of early orthodontic treatment was also recorded. Anterior tooth rotations (61.4%) and increased overjet (44.6%) were the most prevalent occlusal anomalies. Others included deep bite (31.7%), reverse overjet (13.9%), and anterior open bite (14.8%). Severe maxillary spacing and crowding were exhibited in 12.0% and 5.0%, respectively. About a third (35.7%) of the subjects presented with crossbite while lip incompetence was observed in 43.6% of the subjects. About 44% of the subjects also presented with various oral habits with digit (15.8%) and lip sucking (9.9%) being the most prevalent. Subjects were recommended for treatment with 2 by 4 fixed orthodontic appliances (22.3%), habit breakers (20.7%), removable orthodontic appliances (16.5%), and extractions (15.7%). Increased overjet and anterior tooth rotation were the majority of occlusal anomalies seen, which are not only esthetically displeasing but may also cause an increased susceptibility to trauma to these teeth. Treatment options varied from extractions only to the use of appliance therapy.

  6. Malocclusion and early orthodontic treatment requirements in the mixed dentitions of a population of Nigerian children

    PubMed Central

    daCosta, Oluranti Olatokunbo; Aikins, Elfleda Angelina; Isiekwe, Gerald Ikenna; Adediran, Virginia Efunyemi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aims of this study were to establish the prevalence of dental features that indicate a need for early intervention and to ascertain the prevalence of different methods of early treatment among a population of Nigerian children in mixed dentition. Methods: Occlusal relationships were evaluated in 101 children in mixed dentition between the ages of 6 and 12 years who presented at the Orthodontic Unit, Department of Child Dental Health, Lagos University Teaching Hospital over a 2 years period. The need for different modes of early orthodontic treatment was also recorded. Results: Anterior tooth rotations (61.4%) and increased overjet (44.6%) were the most prevalent occlusal anomalies. Others included deep bite (31.7%), reverse overjet (13.9%), and anterior open bite (14.8%). Severe maxillary spacing and crowding were exhibited in 12.0% and 5.0%, respectively. About a third (35.7%) of the subjects presented with crossbite while lip incompetence was observed in 43.6% of the subjects. About 44% of the subjects also presented with various oral habits with digit (15.8%) and lip sucking (9.9%) being the most prevalent. Subjects were recommended for treatment with 2 by 4 fixed orthodontic appliances (22.3%), habit breakers (20.7%), removable orthodontic appliances (16.5%), and extractions (15.7%). Conclusions: Increased overjet and anterior tooth rotation were the majority of occlusal anomalies seen, which are not only esthetically displeasing but may also cause an increased susceptibility to trauma to these teeth. Treatment options varied from extractions only to the use of appliance therapy. PMID:27556019

  7. Lateral incisor root resorption and active orthodontic treatment in the early mixed dentition.

    PubMed

    Amlani, M S; Inocencio, F; Hatibovic-Kofman, S

    2007-12-01

    To evaluate the presence of root resorption in the lateral incisor after active orthodontic treatment in the early mixed dentition. Twenty-six children treated at the Children's Clinic of the Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry at the University of Western Ontario were examined radiographically for lateral incisors root resorption before and after early active treatment to align upper incisors (2 x 4 appliance). In addition, canine inclinations to the midline and to the long axis of the lateral incisor as well as the most medial position of the canine crown were measured as potential risk factors for root resorption. 8% (4) of the lateral incisors exhibited root resorption and the mean crown-to-root ratio of these teeth was significantly higher than that for lateral incisors not exhibiting root resorption. Similarly, mean canine inclinations to the midline and to the long axis of the lateral incisor were also significantly higher for the root resorption group. No association could be found between the most medial position of the canine crown and root resorption in the lateral incisor. This study showed that active orthodontic treatment in the early mixed dentition does not increase the risk for root resorption in the lateral incisors as long as the clinician takes into consideration canine inclinations and their potential effect on root resorption. Limitations inherent to radiographic assessment are acknowledged.

  8. Early vs late orthodontic treatment of tooth crowding by first premolar extraction: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lopes Filho, Hibernon; Maia, Lúcio H; Lau, Thiago C L; de Souza, Margareth M G; Maia, Lucianne Cople

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the body of evidence in the literature about the most favorable time for initiating orthodontic treatment in patients with severe crowding caused by tooth size arch length deficiency (TSALD). Electronic databases (PubMed, Ovid Medline, Scopus, Virtual Health Library, and The Cochrane Library) were searched for articles published between 1900 and April 2014. Studies were included that evaluated treatment of patients with severe crowding caused TSALD, who were treated with first premolar extraction. The association between the stage of development of occlusion at which treatment was started, and the primary and/or secondary outcomes of early and late treatment were investigated. After application of the eligibility criteria and reading of the full texts, six articles were included in the final review. Of these six articles, all of which were retrospective, four showed that the primary outcome (correction of severe crowding) of the early and late groups was improved, but without statistically significant differences after treatment. Therefore, the findings of secondary outcomes in the literature (postretention crowding relapse, duration of total and active treatment [treatment with appliances], external apical root resorption, and soft tissue profile) were the target of this study. These studies presented low or moderate methodological quality and control of bias. Both early and late extraction had a similar effect on correction of crowding. Early treatment had two favorable secondary outcomes (less relapse and reduced active treatment time) vs late treatment. However, the levels of evidence were not sufficient to assert which protocol was superior.

  9. Objectively measured compliance during early orthodontic treatment: Do treatment needs have an impact?

    PubMed

    Sarul, Michał; Kawala, Beata; Kozanecka, Anna; Łyczek, Jan; Antoszewska-Smith, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Objective assessment of daily wear time of removable appliances is possible, so the next step is to ascertain whether the severity of malocclusion influences patients' compliance. This could help resolve the controversy over the question of whether removable appliance therapy truly works. The aim of the study was to investigate whether the patient's orthodontic treatment needs affect the cooperation between the patient and the doctor, and to find a correlation that could affect recommendations for orthodontic treatment. The study involved 58 patients (29 boys, 29 girls) aged 9-12 years, who qualified for treatment with removable appliances equipped with a sensor system. The patients were divided into four groups according to their Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need dental health component scores. Over a 9-month period, data stored in the sensors were compared with the recommended daily wear time (DWT) of the appliances, and a statistical analysis was conducted. DWT differed considerably in all the groups. Statistically significant differences in the mean DWT values occurred only when extreme values of the IOTN DHC were compared. The degree of patient compliance depends to a small extent on the severity of malocclusion. Patients with mild malocclusion will probably be less likely to cooperate. Among patients with severe malocclusion, compliance may be unpredictable. Patient compliance is an important background factor that can explain a lot of the controversy over the effectiveness of treatment with removable appliances.

  10. A systematic review concerning early orthodontic treatment of unilateral posterior crossbite.

    PubMed

    Petrén, Sofia; Bondemark, Lars; Söderfeldt, Björn

    2003-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the orthodontic treatment effects on unilateral posterior crossbite in the primary and early mixed dentition by systematically reviewing the literature. A literature search was performed by applying the Medline database (Entrez PubMed) and covering the period from January 1966 to October 2002. The inclusion criteria were primary and early mixed dentition with unilateral posterior crossbite, randomized controlled trials (RCT), prospective and retrospective studies with concurrent untreated as well as normal controls, and clinical trials comparing at least two treatment strategies without any untreated or normal group involved. Two reviewers extracted the data independently and also assessed the quality of the studies. The search strategy resulted in 1001 articles, and 12 met the inclusion criteria. Two RCTs of early treatment of crossbite have been performed, and these two studies support grinding as treatment in the primary dentition. There is no scientific evidence available to show which of the treatment modalities, grinding, Quad-helix, expansion plates, or rapid maxillary expansion, is the most effective. Most of the studies have serious problems of lack of power because of small sample size, bias and confounding variables, lack of method error analysis, blinding in measurements, and deficient or lack of statistical methods. To obtain reliable scientific evidence, better-controlled RCTs with sufficient sample sizes are needed to determine which treatment is the most effective for early correction of unilateral posterior crossbite. Future studies should also include assessments of long-term stability as well as analysis of costs and side effects of the interventions.

  11. Monitoring early phases of orthodontic treatment by means of Raman spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Apuzzo, Fabrizia; Perillo, Letizia; Delfino, Ines; Portaccio, Marianna; Lepore, Maria; Camerlingo, Carlo

    2017-11-01

    Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) is a site-specific exudate in the gingival sulcus. GCF composition changes in response to diseases or mechanical stimuli, such as those occurring during orthodontic treatments. Raman microspectroscopy (μ-RS) and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) were adopted for a GCF analysis during different initial phases of orthodontic force application. GCF samples were pooled from informed patients using paper cones. SERS spectra were obtained from GCF extracted from these cones, whereas μ-RS spectra were directly acquired on paper cones without any manipulation. The spectral characteristics of the main functional groups and the changes in cytochrome, amide III, and amide I contributions were highlighted in the different phases of orthodontic treatment with both SERS and μ-RS analysis. μ-RS directly performed on the paper cones together with proper statistical methods can offer an effective approach for the development of a tool for monitoring the processes occurring during orthodontic treatments, which may help the clinician in the choice of type of treatment individually for each patient and accelerate and improve the orthodontic therapy.

  12. [Early orthodontic treatment of children with dentofacial anomalies in the mixed dentition with the use of fixed appliances].

    PubMed

    Arsenina, O I; Ivanova, Yu A; Popova, N V; Popova, A V

    The article summarizes the authors experience in the treatment of patients with dentofacial anomalies in mixed dentition with fixed orthodontic appliances ("system 2×4") and combined treatment type with the use of extraoral device. Indications and contraindications, advantages and disadvantages, special conditions of the treatment, the mechanism of a face-bow action with extraoral traction, the sequence of events during the treatment are described in the article. Clinical cases of early treatment with "system 2×4" and in combination with the face-bow and extraoral traction demonstrate the effectiveness of the methods.

  13. FIXED OR REMOVABLE APPLIANCE FOR EARLY ORTHODONTIC TREATMENT OF FUNCTIONAL ANTERIOR CROSSBITE.

    PubMed

    Wiedel, Anna-Paulina

    2015-01-01

    Anterior crossbite with functional shift also called pseudo Class III is a malocclusion in which the incisal edges of one or more maxillary incisors occlude with the incisal edges of the mandibular incisors in centric relationship: the mandible and mandibular incisors are then guided anteriorly in central occlusion resulting in an anterior crossbite. Early correction, at the mixed dentition stage, is recommended, in order to avoid a compromising dentofacial condition which could result in the development of a true Class III malocclusion and temporomandibular symptoms. Various treatment options are available. The method of choice for orthodontic correction of this condition should not only be clinically effective, with long-term stability, but also cost-effective and have high patient acceptance, i.e. minimal perceived pain and discomfort. At the mixed dentition stage, the condition may be treated by fixed (FA) or removable appliance (RA). To date there is insufficient evidence to determine the preferred method. The overall aim of this thesis was therefore to compare and evaluate the use of FA and RA for correcting anterior crossbite with functional shift in the mixed dentition, with special reference to clinical effectiveness, stability, cost-effectiveness and patient perceptions. Evidence-based, randomized controlled trial (RCT) methodology was used, in order to generate a high level of evidence. The thesis is based on the following studies: The material comprised 64 patients, consecutively recruited from the Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University, Sweden and from one Public Dental Health Service Clinic in Malmö, Skane County Council, Sweden. The patients were no syndrome and no cleft patients. The following inclusion criteria were applied: early to late mixed dentition, anterior crossbite affecting one or more incisors with functional shift, moderate space deficiency in the maxilla, no inherent skeletal Class III discrepancy, ANB

  14. Orthodontic Treatment Consideration in Diabetic Patients.

    PubMed

    Almadih, Ahmed; Al-Zayer, Maryam; Dabel, Sukainh; Alkhalaf, Ahmed; Al Mayyad, Ali; Bardisi, Wajdi; Alshammari, Shouq; Alsihati, Zainab

    2018-02-01

    Although orthodontic treatment is commonly indicated for young healthy individuals, recent trends showed an increase in number of older individuals undergoing orthodontic interventions. The increased age resulted in a proportionate increase in the prevalence of systemic diseases facing dentists during orthodontic procedures, especially diabetes mellitus. This necessitates that dentists should be aware of the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and its early signs particularly in teeth and oral cavity. It is also essential for them to understand the implications of diabetes on orthodontic treatment and the measures to be considered during managing those patients. In this review, we focused on the impact of diabetes mellitus on orthodontic treatment. We also summarized the data from previous studies that had explained the measures required to be taken into consideration during managing those patients. We included both human and animal studies to review in depth the pathophysiological mechanisms by which diabetes affects orthodontic treatment outcome. In conclusion, this review emphasizes the need to carefully identify early signs and symptoms of diabetes mellitus in patients demanding orthodontic treatment and to understand the considerations to be adopted before and during treating these patients.

  15. Orthodontic Treatment Consideration in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Almadih, Ahmed; Al-Zayer, Maryam; Dabel, Sukainh; Alkhalaf, Ahmed; Al Mayyad, Ali; Bardisi, Wajdi; Alshammari, Shouq; Alsihati, Zainab

    2018-01-01

    Although orthodontic treatment is commonly indicated for young healthy individuals, recent trends showed an increase in number of older individuals undergoing orthodontic interventions. The increased age resulted in a proportionate increase in the prevalence of systemic diseases facing dentists during orthodontic procedures, especially diabetes mellitus. This necessitates that dentists should be aware of the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and its early signs particularly in teeth and oral cavity. It is also essential for them to understand the implications of diabetes on orthodontic treatment and the measures to be considered during managing those patients. In this review, we focused on the impact of diabetes mellitus on orthodontic treatment. We also summarized the data from previous studies that had explained the measures required to be taken into consideration during managing those patients. We included both human and animal studies to review in depth the pathophysiological mechanisms by which diabetes affects orthodontic treatment outcome. In conclusion, this review emphasizes the need to carefully identify early signs and symptoms of diabetes mellitus in patients demanding orthodontic treatment and to understand the considerations to be adopted before and during treating these patients. PMID:29317952

  16. Adjunctive orthodontic treatment with lingual orthodontic system.

    PubMed

    Kafle, D; Humagain, M; Upadhaya, C

    2011-01-01

    The lingual orthodontic therapy though started in 1972, could not be popular till the beginning of 1990. In Nepal it does not have a history of more than a year. It is started in Dhulikhel Hospital for the first time in Nepal. Usually orthodontic therapy is meant for putting braces on the labial surface of the teeth which is called labial orthodontic system. Lingual orthodontic system is a purely invisible kind of orthodontic therapy in which braces are placed behind the teeth. The advantages of lingual orthodontic therapy are: invisibility, better biomechanics and improved patient compliance. On the other hand it is difficult to master and costlier than labial orthodontics. We have presented six adjunctive orthodontic cases treated by lingual system with the same end result comparable to labial orthodontic system.

  17. Assessment of pain and discomfort during early orthodontic treatment of skeletal Class III malocclusion using the Removable Mandibular Retractor Appliance.

    PubMed

    Saleh, M; Hajeer, M Y; Al-Jundi, A

    2013-06-01

    To determine the degree of pain and discomfort during the orthodontic treatment of skeletal Class III malocclusion using the Removable Mandibular Retractor (RMR). The sample consisted of 33 skeletal Class III patients (17 males and 16 females; average age: 7.5 ± 1.33 years) who had been assigned to the RMR treatment group in a randomised controlled trial comparing this treatment versus a control group of no treatment at the Orthodontic Department, University of Al-Baath Dental School in Syria. Pain and discomfort were assessed using standardised questionnaires at the following assessment times: 7 days (T1), 14 days (T2), 6 weeks (T3), 3 months (T4) and 6 months (T5) after appliance insertion. Levels of pain and discomfort decreased gradually by time in general. No significant changes in the levels of pain, tooth sensitivity and soft tissues tension were detected, whereas a significant decrease in the levels of pressure, impaired speech, impaired swallowing and lack of confidence in public was observed two weeks following appliance insertion. Mandibular constraint feeling required three months to decrease significantly. No difference was found between males and females with regard to acceptance. The RMR is well accepted by Class III patients in the early mixed dentition.

  18. Clear aligners in orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Weir, T

    2017-03-01

    Since the introduction of the Tooth Positioner (TP Orthodontics) in 1944, removable appliances analogous to clear aligners have been employed for mild to moderate orthodontic tooth movements. Clear aligner therapy has been a part of orthodontic practice for decades, but has, particularly since the introduction of Invisalign appliances (Align Technology) in 1998, become an increasingly common addition to the orthodontic armamentarium. An internet search reveals at least 27 different clear aligner products currently on offer for orthodontic treatment. The present paper will highlight the increasing popularity of clear aligner appliances, as well as the clinical scope and the limitations of aligner therapy in general. Further, the paper will outline the differences between the various types of clear aligner products currently available. © 2017 Australian Dental Association.

  19. Early vs late orthodontic treatment of deepbite: a prospective clinical trial in growing subjects.

    PubMed

    Baccetti, Tiziano; Franchi, Lorenzo; Giuntini, Veronica; Masucci, Caterina; Vangelisti, Andrea; Defraia, Efisio

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this prospective clinical trial was to compare the outcomes of prepubertal vs pubertal treatment of deepbite patients with a protocol including biteplane and fixed appliances. A sample of 58 subjects with deepbite completed the study. A total of 34 subjects received treatment with removable biteplane appliances in the mixed dentition at a prepubertal stage of skeletal maturation (early treatment group), and 24 subjects were treated at a pubertal stage of skeletal maturation in the permanent dentition (late treatment group). All subjects of both groups were reevaluated after an average period of 15 months after the completion of fixed appliance therapy. Treatment outcomes were assessed statistically after a phase with removable biteplane appliances and at the posttreatment observation. Treatment duration was significantly shorter in the early treatment group than in the late treatment group. Overbite reduction was significantly greater in the late treatment group (-3.1 mm) than in the early treatment group (-1.4 mm). In the late treatment group, 92% of the patients had a corrected overbite 1 year after therapy. Treatment of deepbite at puberty in the permanent dentition leads to significantly more favorable outcomes than treatment before puberty in the mixed dentition. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Extraction treatment in lingual orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Robert B

    2013-09-01

    Contemporary lingual orthodontic appliances offer an aesthetic and accurate means of treating malocclusion. Managing extraction-based treatments with lingual appliances presents a number of challenges. This article discusses the specific biomechanical considerations associated with extraction treatment and outlines clinical techniques that can optimize treatment outcome in these cases.

  1. Corticotomy-assisted orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Ali H.; Al-Saeed, Samar H.; Al-Maghlouth, Basma A.; Bahammam, Maha A.; Linjawi, Amal I.; El-Bialy, Tarek H.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To systematically review the literature to assess the quality of evidence related to corticotomy-assisted orthodontic treatment (CAOT) as adjunctive treatment in orthodontics. Methods: The study was conducted in the Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia between 2013 and 2014. Various electronic databases were searched and abstracts were retrieved. Defined inclusion criteria were then applied to the obtained original articles for further evaluation by 2 examiners independently. The criteria of selection included human, or animal studies, which assessed some aspects of CAOT and/or the biological principles behind it. Case reports and series were excluded. The quality of the studies was evaluated by the methodological score for clinical trials developed. Results: Fourteen articles were retrieved initially, but only 12 articles were finally selected for the study. The CAOT was found to accelerate tooth movement by 2-2.5 folds when compared with conventional orthodontic tooth movement. The CAOT was found safe on periodontal health and exhibits no or little risk of root resorption. A localized turnover of alveolar spongiosa and the absence of a hyalinized zone was the acceptable biological explanation of CAOT. There is no evidence to support that CAOT enhances the movement of ankylosed teeth, closing old extraction sites, post-orthodontic stability, or transverse expansion. Conclusions: Corticotomy-assisted orthodontic treatment should be considered with caution. Long term randomized clinical trials are still needed. PMID:26108582

  2. Periodontal management in orthognathic surgery: early screening of periodontal risk and its current management for the optimization of orthodontic and surgical treatments.

    PubMed

    Straub, B; Bouletreau, P; Breton, P

    2014-09-01

    Orthodontic preparation for orthognathic surgery requires correcting mal-occlusions and coordination of arcades. In addition to improving the aesthetics, these treatments can ensure the achievement and sustainability of prosthetics and/or implants. Nevertheless, periodontal structures are easily damaged. Orthodontic displacement can only be applied in the absence of inflammation or weakened periodontal structure. An early detection of periodontal risk should be achievable by prescribers of a surgical-orthodontic treatment. Simplified periodontal examination, with easily detectable warning signs, will help to identify the periodontal risk. Although periodontal treatment follows current "non invasive" trend, some procedures remain necessary to prevent and/or remedy periodontal defects or diseases, such as mineral periodontal reinforcement corticotomy. It is essential that the patient meets all the practitioners to plan and assess the extent of the constraints necessary to optimize results, before starting orthodontic treatment combined with orthognathic surgery. Any periodontal complication (even minor) will be considered as a failure, regardless of good aesthetic and functional results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. [Iatrogenic risks in orthodontic treatment].

    PubMed

    Aiello, G; D'Andria, A

    1991-09-01

    This first task of a dentist, regardless of his speciality, is to maintain de dentoperiodontal unit in the best of conditions and prevent possible iatrogenic damage. Particularly in orthodontic treatment, a sort of scaling of the dental crown in the debanding phase is advisable.

  4. Monitoring growth during orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Ghafari, J G; Shofer, F S; Laster, L L; Markowitz, D L; Silverton, S; Katz, S H

    1995-09-01

    The relationship between somatic growth and orthodontic treatment has been limited to the evaluation of body height and skeletal age relative to craniofacial development. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation of anthropometric and biochemical measures of general growth with facial and occlusal changes during the early treatment of Class II Division 1 malocclusion. Findings are reported from 46 children, ages 7.20 to 12.85 years (skeletal ages, 5.75 to 12.75 years), who are enrolled in a prospective clinical trial. Body and knee heights were measured monthly, with a Holtain stadiometer and a Knee Height Measuring Device, respectively. Every three months, serum levels were measured of the hormone dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), an androgen associated with growth in midchildhood, and osteocalcin, an indicator of bone turnover. Significant correlations existed between knee height and various occlusal measurements, but mandibular length was not significantly correlated with knee height and DHEAS levels. Knee height correlated significantly (P < .05) with DHEAS and osteocalcin only in 46% and 37% of the children, respectively. The results indicate that the evaluated biochemical measures, at the time intervals considered, may not increase the accuracy of growth depiction by physical measures alone (height and skeletal maturation).

  5. Orthodontic treatment of a patient with hypoglossia.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Takuya; Sato, Chiemi; Kawakubo, Naomi; Moriyama, Keiji

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this case study was to provide a detailed report of the orthodontic approach used in treating a Japanese patient with congenital hypoglossia. The patient was a 6-year-old girl with hypoglossia, micrognathia, congenital absence of three incisors, and a telescopic occlusion accompanied by an extremely narrow lower arch. She had no limb anomalies, and her speech was normal. Bite opening and mandibular widening from the early mixed dentition dramatically improved the extremely constricted mandible and telescopic occlusion. Cephalometric tracings taken from the beginning to the end of active treatment revealed substantial forward and downward growth in the mandible over time, which may have contributed to correction of the intermaxillary relationship. Treatment of telescopic occlusion by bite opening and mandibular widening from the early mixed dentition may be effective in facilitating mandibular growth acceleration. An acceptable intermaxillary occlusal relationship and improvement of profile were achieved by an orthodontic approach in this case.

  6. [In the absence of early orthodontic treatment, is there a loss of chance?].

    PubMed

    Béry, A

    2006-06-01

    Chance is the probability that something will happen, and, in this sense, the absence of chance can be defined as the damage resulting from the disappearance of the probability of a favorable outcome (the contrary being the non-realization of the risk). This is autonomous damage that should be differentiated from final damage. Moral damage is a notion very close to the loss of chance even though it reposes on the indemnization of a final damage of an affection or malady. This article deals with these matters: an insufficient amount of information, the cause of final damage or the loss of chance, the loss of chance being a function of the deficit of information. In this sense, can the failure to begin early, appropriate dento-facial orthopedic treatment be considered a loss of chance for the child?

  7. Clinical and microbiological parameters in patients with self-ligating and conventional brackets during early phase of orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Pejda, Slavica; Varga, Marina Lapter; Milosevic, Sandra Anic; Mestrovic, Senka; Slaj, Martina; Repic, Dario; Bosnjak, Andrija

    2013-01-01

    To determine the effect of different bracket designs (conventional brackets and self-ligating brackets) on periodontal clinical parameters and periodontal pathogens in subgingival plaque. The following inclusion criteria were used: requirement of orthodontic treatment plan starting with alignment and leveling, good general health, healthy periodontium, no antibiotic therapy in the previous 6 months before the beginning of the study, and no smoking. The study sample totaled 38 patients (13 male, 25 female; mean age, 14.6 ± 2.0 years). Patients were divided into two groups with random distribution of brackets. Recording of clinical parameters was done before the placement of the orthodontic appliance (T0) and at 6 weeks (T1), 12 weeks (T2), and 18 weeks (T3) after full bonding of orthodontic appliances. Periodontal pathogens of subgingival microflora were detected at T3 using a commercially available polymerase chain reaction test (micro-Dent test) that contains probes for Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola. There was a statistically significant higher prevalence of A actinomycetemcomitans in patients with conventional brackets than in patients with self-ligating brackets, but there was no statistically significant difference for other putative periodontal pathogens. The two different types of brackets did not show statistically significant differences in periodontal clinical parameters. Bracket design does not seem to have a strong influence on periodontal clinical parameters and periodontal pathogens in subgingival plaque. The correlation between some periodontal pathogens and clinical periodontal parameters was weak.

  8. Comparison of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Concentrations in Gingival Crevicular Fluid between Self-Ligating and Preadjusted Edgewise Appliances in the Early Leveling Stage of Orthodontic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pramustika, Agita; Soedarsono, Nurtami; Krisnawati; Widayati, Retno

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is an important proinflammatory cytokine that regulates the early phase of inflammation reaction during orthodontic tooth movement. The aim of the present study was to compare TNF-α concentrations in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) between preadjusted edgewise appliance (PEA) and self-ligating (SL) systems during the early leveling stage of orthodontic treatment. Materials and Methods: Eighteen patients (aged 15–35 years) who participated in this study were divided into two experimental groups (PEA and SL) and control group (without orthodontic treatment). The GCF was taken at five sites in the maxilla anterior teeth from each participant just before bracket bonding and at 1, 24, and 168 h after the initiation of tooth movement. Cytokine levels were determined through ELISA. Results: The concentration of TNF-α was significantly higher in the experimental groups than in the control group at 24 h after force application. TNF-α levels were significantly decreased at 168 h after force application in the PEA group. Meanwhile, in the SL group, the level of TNF-α at 168 h was still increased, although there was no statistically significant difference. Conclusion: TNF-α concentration was increased at 1 h and 24 h after orthodontic force application in both the PEA and SL groups. In the PEA group, TNF-α concentration was significantly decreased at 168 h, meanwhile in the SL group, this value remained increased at this time point. The differences in TNF-α concentration between the PEA and SL groups may be caused by their different types of brackets, wires, and ligation methods. PMID:29599592

  9. Corticotomy-Assisted Orthodontic Treatment: Review

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Ali H; Al-Fraidi, Ahmad A; Al-Saeed, Samar H

    2010-01-01

    Corticotomy-assisted orthodontic treatment is an established and efficient orthodontic technique that has recently been studied in a number of publications. It has gradually gained popularity as an adjunct treatment option for the orthodontic treatment of adults. It involves selective alveolar decortication in the form of decortication lines and dots performed around the teeth that are to be moved. It is done to induce a state of increased tissue turnover and a transient osteopenia, which is followed by a faster rate of orthodontic tooth movement. This technique has several advantages, including faster tooth movement, shorter treatment time, safer expansion of constricted arches, enhanced post-orthodontic treatment stability and extended envelope of tooth movement. The aim of this article is to present a comprehensive review of the literature, including historical background, contemporary clinical techniques, indications, contraindications, complications and side effects. PMID:21228919

  10. Orthodontic treatment need in Asian adult males.

    PubMed

    Soh, Jen; Sandham, Andrew

    2004-12-01

    Orthodontic treatment in adults has gained social and professional acceptance in recent years. An assessment of orthodontic treatment need helps to identify individuals who will benefit from treatment and safeguard their interest. The purpose of this study was to assess the objective and subjective levels of orthodontic treatment need in a sample of orthodontically untreated adult Asian males. A sample of male army recruits (n = 339, age 17-22 years, Chinese = 258, Malay = 60, Indian = 21) with no history of orthodontic treatment or craniofacial anomalies participated in the study on a voluntary basis with informed consent. Impressions for study models were taken. Objective treatment need was assessed based on study model analysis using the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN). Questionnaires were used to assess subjective treatment need based on subjective esthetic component (EC) ratings. Fifty percentage of the sample had a definite need for orthodontic treatment (dental health component [DHC] grades 4 and 5), whereas 29.2% had a moderate need for treatment (DHC grades 3). The occlusal trait most commonly identified was dental crossbite. Malay males had the highest percentage with a definite need for treatment for both dental health and esthetic reasons in comparison with Chinese and Indian males. However, there was no difference in the level of treatment need among the ethnic groups (P > .05). No correlation between objective and subjective EC scores was found (P > .05). A high level of investigator-identified treatment need was not supported by a similar level of subject awareness among the adult sample.

  11. [Orthodontic treatment possibilities of allergic patients].

    PubMed

    Vitályos, Géza; Török, Judit; Márton, Ildikó; Szepesi, Marta; Radics, Tonde; Hegedus, Csaba

    2007-04-01

    During the past two decades the incidence of allergies against dental materials has been rising. The most common allergens are nickel, mercury, benzoxyl-peroxide, formaldehyde, MMA, HEMA, EGDMA and TEGDMA. Contact allergy develops in predisposed individuals as a consequence of environmental exposures to allergens. Although the relatively high frequency of contact allergies in children is well documented, its importance during orthodontic treatments is still often underestimated. The most common metal to cause dental allergic reactions is nickel. Nickel-containing metal alloys, such as nickel-titanium, are widely used in orthodontics because of their favorable physical properties. Coated wires (epoxi coating, teflon, etc.) are not only more aesthetic, but can play a role in the orthodontic treatment of patients with nickel allergy. In our case report we present two patients with nickel allergy, and their treatment with alternative orthodontic appliances. During the orthodontic treatment our patients did not have any objective or subjective allergy-related symptoms.

  12. Root resorption during orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Walker, Sally

    2010-01-01

    Medline, Embase, LILACS, The Cochrane Library (Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, CENTRAL, and Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register) Web of Science, EBM Reviews, Computer Retrieval of Information on Scientific Project (CRISP, www.crisp.cit.nih.gov), On-Line Computer Library Center (www.oclc.org), Google Index to Scientific and Technical Proceedings, PAHO (www.paho.org), WHOLis (www.who.int/library/databases/en), BBO (Brazilian Bibliography of Dentistry), CEPS (Chinese Electronic Periodical Services), Conference materials (www.bl.uk/services/bsds/dsc/conference.html), ProQuest Dissertation Abstracts and Thesis database, TrialCentral (www.trialscentral.org), National Research Register (www.controlled-trials.com), www.Clinicaltrials.gov and SIGLE (System for Information on Grey Literature in Europe). Randomised controlled trials including split mouth design, recording the presence or absence of external apical root resorption (EARR) by treatment group at the end of the treatment period. Data were extracted independently by two reviewers using specially designed and piloted forms. Quality was also assessed independently by the same reviewers. After evaluating titles and abstracts, 144 full articles were obtained of which 13 articles, describing 11 trials, fulfilled the criteria for inclusion. Differences in the methodological approaches and reporting results made quantitative statistical comparisons impossible. Evidence suggests that comprehensive orthodontic treatment causes increased incidence and severity of root resorption, and heavy forces might be particularly harmful. Orthodontically induced inflammatory root resorption is unaffected by archwire sequencing, bracket prescription, and self-ligation. Previous trauma and tooth morphology are unlikely causative factors. There is some evidence that a two- to three-month pause in treatment decreases total root resorption. The results were inconclusive in the clinical management of root resorption, but there

  13. Orthodontic treatment in patients with aggressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Cássio Volponi; Saraiva, Luciana; Bauer, Flávio Paim Falcão; Kimura, Rui Yoshio; Souto, Maria Luisa Silveira; Bernardo, Carlos Cheque; Pannuti, Cláudio Mendes; Romito, Giuseppe Alexandre; Pustiglioni, Francisco Emílio

    2018-04-01

    Aggressive periodontitis (AP) is a condition that promotes breakdown of the periodontal tissues in a short time. In severe cases, pathologic migration of teeth and tooth loss can occur, producing esthetic and functional problems for the patient. Orthodontic treatment may be recommended to restore esthetics and masticatory function. We assessed the effects of orthodontic movement in the periodontal tissues of treated patients with AP. Ten subjects (ages 25.0 ± 5.22 years) with AP received periodontal treatment followed by orthodontic treatment. Maintenance sessions were performed monthly under a strict dental biofilm control. They were compared with 10 periodontally healthy subjects (ages 22.9 ± 5.23 years) who received orthodontic treatment. Probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level, bleeding on probing, and dental plaque index were measured at baseline, after orthodontic treatment, and after 4 months. Statistical analysis showed improvement in all clinical parameters between baseline and 4 months after orthodontic treatment: probing pocket depth (0.29 mm), clinical attachment level (0.38 mm), bleeding on probing (4.0%), and dental plaque index (11%). The periodontal parameters of the AP patients remained stable during orthodontic treatment under strict biofilm control. Copyright © 2018 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Does orthodontic treatment contribute to oral health?].

    PubMed

    van Beek, H

    2008-09-01

    The first part of this article is an edited Dutch summary of the paper "Oral-health-related benefits of orthodontic treatment" by Donald J. Burden in the special issue''Orthodontics: quality of care, quality of life'' in Seminars in Orthodontics (June 2007). Burden carried out a systematic review of the literature on some, historically claimed, beneficial influences of orthodontic treatment, such as reduced susceptibility to dental caries, periodontal disease, temporomandibular dysfunction, and traumatic injury. Based on the results of this review, Burden concludes that the oral health benefits of orthodontic intervention have not been demonstrated. The second part is a critical and balanced commentary on the content of the paper and on Burden's conclusions.

  15. Orthodontic Treatment of a Kabuki Syndrome Patient.

    PubMed

    Cudzilo, Dorota; Czochrowska, Ewa

    2018-01-01

    Kabuki syndrome (KS) is a rare disorder characterized by somatic and psychological disturbances including special face morphology, skeletal anomalies, and other systemic disorders. Because of the diverse clinical manifestation, the management of a patient with KS may involve several medical and dental specialists, including orthodontics. The aim of the article is to present successful orthodontic treatment performed in a 14-year-old boy diagnosed with the KS. Dental relations and smile aesthetics were normalized after orthodontic treatment; however, problems with patient compliance and cooperation and an increased risk of root resorption may influence treatment outcomes. Interdisciplinary cooperation between medical and dental specialists is essential in patients with KS.

  16. Finance schemes for funding private orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Perks, S

    1997-02-01

    Over the last ten years there has been a steady increase in the volume of private dental treatment and numerous finance schemes have been developed to help both patients and dentists. Private orthodontic treatment is increasing and the purpose of this article is to summarise the main features of the schemes currently available to fund private orthodontic treatment and to provide a source of reference.

  17. Accelerated orthodontic treatment - what's the evidence?

    PubMed

    Miles, P

    2017-03-01

    The demand and accessibility of orthodontic care has increased but has also been accompanied by patient requests for shorter treatment times. Longer orthodontic treatment increases the risk of decalcification, gingival recession, and root resorption and so shorter treatment times have multiple advantages as well as appealing to patient's desires. Numerous techniques and materials have been suggested to reduce treatment times but, in most cases, are based upon selected case reports with no prospective clinical trials to validate claims. The present review examines many of the current options purported to accelerate orthodontic tooth movement and the level of evidence presently available. There is some evidence to suggest that low-level laser therapy and a corticotomy involving the raising of a muco-periosteal flap are associated with accelerated orthodontic tooth movement; however, the current level of evidence is low to moderate in quality. For this reason, further research is required before routine application could be recommended. © 2017 Australian Dental Association.

  18. Orthodontics

    PubMed Central

    Hemrend, Bernard; Altuna, Gurkan; Tompson, Bryan

    1989-01-01

    The authors of this article offer an introduction to the field of orthodontics. They present the latest advances in orthodontic appliances and some of the possible consequences of orthodontic treatment. They discuss a number of cases and offer examples of some of the more common problems that the orthodontist is asked to treat. Such cases include severe Class II, division 1 malocclusion, surgical orthodontics, “long-face” syndrome, adult orthodontics-TMJ-periodontics, late adult growth, and post-retention changes. Practical information useful to the physician who encounters patient with these disorders is balanced with good research data to support the various claims. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9 PMID:21249042

  19. In-Office Bleaching During Orthodontic Treatment.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Mauricio Neves; Dutra, Hélio; Morais, Alexandre; Sgura, Ricardo; Devito-Moraes, André Guaraci

    2017-04-01

    To demonstrate that it is possible to pursue teeth whitening treatment protocols during orthodontic treatment with no esthetic loss. Many patients undergoing orthodontic treatment desire to have a straight and well aligned dentition, but also whiter teeth. For many years, it was believed that carrying out a whitening treatment with positioned orthodontic brackets in place would result in localized spots on the enamel labial surfaces of teeth. However, a deeper understanding of the bleaching process suggests that the oxidation caused by products, which results from hydrogen peroxide decomposition, are able to diffuse peripherally into the tooth structure and reach even that under the cemented brackets. Two in-office-bleaching treatments were performed in patients using orthodontic fixed braces in two or three 40-minute sessions using a 35% hydrogen peroxide. In-office bleaching is possible and effective, even with orthodontic brackets in position. The teeth were successfully bleached despite the presence of brackets. All biological criteria have been fulfilled satisfying patients' expectations of aligned and whitened teeth in less time than if treatments had been performed separately, with satisfactory results and no esthetic loss. The whitening of teeth is possible during orthodontic treatment with fixed braces without any esthetic loss. The in-office bleaching treatment with brackets in position also may act as a motivation factor, preventing patient withdrawal or treatment interruption. Therefore, at the end of the orthodontic treatment, the patient is able to display an aligned, functional and whitened smile. (J Esthet Restor Dent 29:83-92, 2017). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Clear aligners for orthodontic treatment?

    PubMed

    Javidi, Hanieh; Graham, Elizabeth

    2015-12-01

    PubMed/Medline, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Clinical trials (CENTRAL), Web of Knowledge, SCOPUS, Google Scholar and LILACS databases. Clinical prospective and retrospective studies of orthodontic treatment with clear aligners on patients over the age of 15 that included clear descriptions of the materials and applied technique were included. Selection was undertaken independently by two reviewers. Two reviewers extracted data independently with study quality being assessed using the grading system described by the Swedish Council on Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU). A narrative summary of the findings was presented. Eleven studies involving a total of 480 patients were included consisting of two randomised controlled trials, five prospective studies and four retrospective studies. Six studies were considered to be of moderate quality, the remainder of limited quality. Most of the studies presented with methodological problems: small sample size, bias and confounding variables, lack of method error analysis, blinding in measurements, and deficient or missing statistical methods. The quality level of the studies was not sufficient to draw any evidence-based conclusions.

  1. Early orthognathic surgery with three-dimensional image simulation during presurgical orthodontics in adults.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Moon-Key; Park, Sun-Yeon; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Park, Wonse; Lee, Sang-Hwy

    2011-03-01

    To correct dentofacial deformities, three-dimensional skeletal analysis and computerized orthognathic surgery simulation are used to facilitate accurate diagnoses and surgical plans. Computed tomography imaging of dental occlusion can inform three-dimensional facial analyses and orthognathic surgical simulations. Furthermore, three-dimensional laser scans of a cast model of the predetermined postoperative dental occlusion can be used to increase the accuracy of the preoperative surgical simulation. In this study, we prepared cast models of planned postoperative dental occlusions from 12 patients diagnosed with skeletal class III malocclusions with mandibular prognathism and facial asymmetry that had planned to undergo bimaxillary orthognathic surgery during preoperative orthodontic treatment. The data from three-dimensional laser scans of the cast models were used in three-dimensional surgical simulations. Early orthognathic surgeries were performed based on three-dimensional image simulations using the cast images in several presurgical orthodontic states in which teeth alignment, leveling, and space closure were incomplete. After postoperative orthodontic treatments, intraoral examinations revealed that no patient had a posterior open bite or space. The two-dimensional and three-dimensional skeletal analyses showed that no mandibular deviations occurred between the immediate and final postoperative states of orthodontic treatment. These results showed that early orthognathic surgery with three-dimensional computerized simulations based on cast models of predetermined postoperative dental occlusions could provide early correction of facial deformities and improved efficacy of preoperative orthodontic treatment. This approach can reduce the decompensation treatment period of the presurgical orthodontics and contribute to efficient postoperative orthodontic treatments.

  2. Invasive cervical resorption following orthodontic treatment: Two cases involving the same patient.

    PubMed

    Yoshpe, Margarita; Kaufman, Arieh; Lin, Shaul; Gabay, Eran; Einy, Shmuel

    2016-01-01

    Invasive cervical resorption (ICR), a destructive form of external root resorption, is characterized by invasion of the fibrovascular tissue. This phenomenon is very rare and appears in 0.02% of the general population where the leading factors are orthodontics in addition to trauma, restorations, and bleaching. Heavy orthodontic force may increase the incidence to 1%. One of the main concerns regarding ICR is that it is often misdiagnosed with conventional diagnostic tools. In recent decades, a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging technique has become more common and can lead to a more accurate diagnosis and treatment plan. This case report describes a possible association between orthodontic treatment and ICR of a 14-year-old male, 18 months post orthodontic treatment. ICR in the mandibular right canine was diagnosed and verified by CBCT, and underwent combined endodontic-periodontal treatment. However, after orthodontic forced eruption was performed on this tooth to improve the bone defect, ICR was diagnosed on the mandibular right second premolar. The possible association between orthodontic treatment and ICR is discussed, as ICR was noted following orthodontic treatment on both occasions. This case report stresses the importance of ICR early detection by close attention to periodic radiographic checkups during orthodontic treatment. The use of modern diagnostic tools is highly recommended in suspicious cases. A case is described in which the patient underwent two types of orthodontic treatment in the mandible at different time periods and developed ICR in two different teeth.

  3. Influence of orthodontic treatment on oral streptococci.

    PubMed

    Vizitiu, Theodor-Cristian; Giuca, Mihaela Cristina; Ionescu, Ecaterina

    2011-01-01

    Objective of this study is to evaluate the changes of the oral microbial flora, concentrating on the oral streptococci, after the first 3 and 6 months of orthodontic treatment. 40 patients, aged 7-17, that presented for orthodontic treatment between April and September 2010 in the Department of Orthodontics and Dento-Facial Orthopedics of "Carol Davila" University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest have been selected. According to the protocol, coronary and subgingival plaque was collected from the dental surface before starting any orthodontic treatment (T0), 3 months after wearing orthodontic appliances (T1) and 6 months after wearing orthodontic appliances (T2). The samples were studied in Cantacuzino National Institute of Research-Development for Microbiology and Immunology [isolation on Columbia agar with 5% sheep blood, identification on morphotinctorial, growth and biochemical characteristics using API 20 STREP (BioMerieux)]. Bacterial concentration (colony-forming units/sample = CFU/sample) for the aerobic and anaerobic flora was calculated by the serial dilution method of counting bacteria. 106 strains of oral streptococci were isolated from dental plaque, belonging to 6 species (Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus sanguis and Streptococcus acidominimus), 37 strains of oral streptococci in patients from group I (T0), 40 strains from group II (T1) and 29 strains of oral streptococci from group III (T2). After 3 months (T1) the aerobic bacteria percentage, detected at a concentration between 10(5) and 10(6), increased from 30 to 38.2%. The percentage of patients with a bacterial concentration higher than 10(6) CFU/sample increased from 5% to 8.8%. The samples colected at T2 (patients examined after 6 months of orthodonic treatment) presented a lower bacterial concentration, as compared to group II (T1). The most common isolated species of streptococci were S. salivarius, S. oralis and S

  4. Orthodontic treatment attitude versus orthodontic treatment need: differences by gender, age, socioeconomical status and geographical context.

    PubMed

    Deli, Roberto; Macrì, Ludovica A; Radico, Paola; Pantanali, Francesca; Grieco, Domenico L; Gualano, Maria R; La Torre, Giuseppe

    2012-02-01

    To investigate the relationship between the attitude towards orthodontic treatment and the objective level of orthodontic need, and variables like gender, socioeconomic status and geographical context, among 6- to 16-year-old children. The attitude of 2284 Italian children towards orthodontics was assessed using the Child Orthodontic Attitude Survey (COAS) questionnaire, previously validated for Italian-speaking children. The level of orthodontic need was evaluated by using the Risk of Malocclusion Assessment (ROMA) Index while socioeconomic status (SES) was based on parental job activities. The univariate analysis was performed using chi-square tests to find differences between groups for categorical variables, while multivariate analyses were conducted using logistic regression models. Individuals with a higher SES had a statistically significant lower need of orthodontic treatment (P = 0.003). Children with a very high SES were from northern (20.8%) and central Italy (65.9%), while only 13.3% lived in southern Italy (P < 0.001). Logistic regression showed that females, older children, in-treatment subjects and children from the region of Puglia were more likely to have orthodontics (OR = 2.09; 95% CI: 1.66-2.64, OR = 1.08; 95% CI: 1.01-1.15, OR = 1.48, 95% CI: 1.11-1.97, OR = 1.43; 95% CI: 1.05-1.95, respectively). The orthodontic treatment attitude largely depends on age, gender and geographical context but is not influenced by the real level of orthodontic therapy need. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. [Preprosthetic orthodontic treatment--retrospective statistic study].

    PubMed

    Ispas, Dana Catrinel; Eftene, Oana Alexandra; Temelcea, Anca; Pădure, Hariclea

    2011-01-01

    Orthodontic treatment as a help is the teeth movement made in order to facilitate the odontal,prosthetic and periodontal proceedures which are needed in the dentomaxilar and/or facial reabilitation. The aim of the study was to follow for 5 years which is the percentage of patients who asked for orthodontic treatment in the Orthodontic and Dentofacial Orthopedie Clinic from UMF 'Carol Davila'. We also followed the frequency related to the etiology of the loss of some teeth and also the relationship between the loss of the teeth and periodontal disease. In our country, the number of patients who ask for preprosthetic orthodontic treatment is lower comparing with Western and Northtern Europe, but the percentage is increasing due to the dentists calification. We can conclude by saying that the frequency of losing teeth by cavities is increased by age because all patients from the study group aged 35 and above lost their teeth from cavity etiology and the patients aged 18 and lower had genetic etiology in losing their teeth.

  6. Prevalence of orthodontic treatment need in southern Italian schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Perillo, Letizia; Masucci, Caterina; Ferro, Fabrizia; Apicella, Davide; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2010-02-01

    The present survey was performed to determine orthodontic treatment need in a large sample (n = 703) of 12-year-old schoolchildren from the southern part of Italy. The sample comprised 331 males (47 per cent) and 372 females (53 per cent), all orthodontically untreated. Two examiners, who had been previously trained in the use of occlusal indices, screened all the schoolchildren. The prevalence rates for the Dental Health Component (DHC) of the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN) as well as for occlusal features (Angle Class, overjet, overbite, crowding, posterior crossbite) were calculated for the total sample. The IOTN grades were statistically compared in the two genders using the chi-square test. The findings indicated that this southern Italian school population showed a rather low prevalence rate for objective need for treatment (grades 4 and 5; 27.3 per cent of the total sample). This prevalence rate is generally lower than those reported in northern and central European countries (Sweden, Germany, and UK) but slightly greater than those in France. No significant differences in the DHC grades of the IOTN were found between genders. Among the occlusal features diagnosed in the subjects examined, a high prevalence rate was found for crowding (45.9 per cent). Moreover, posterior crossbites and Class III malocclusions, which would presumably have benefited from early orthodontic intervention, were still present in 14.2 and 4.3 per cent of the students, respectively.

  7. What is the value of orthodontic treatment?

    PubMed

    Benson, P E; Javidi, H; DiBiase, A T

    2015-02-16

    Orthodontic treatment is as popular as ever. Orthodontists frequently have long lists of people wanting treatment and the cost to the NHS in England was £258m in 2010-2011 (approximately 10% of the NHS annual spend on dentistry). It is important that clinicians and healthcare commissioners constantly question the contribution of interventions towards improving the health of the population. In this article, the authors outline some of the evidence for and against the claims that people with a malocclusion are at a disadvantage compared with those without a malocclusion and that orthodontic treatment has significant health benefits. The authors would like to point out that this is not a comprehensive and systematic review of the entire scientific literature. Rather the evidence is presented in order to stimulate discussion and debate.

  8. Early orthodontic treatment of skeletal open-bite malocclusion with the open-bite bionator: a cephalometric study.

    PubMed

    Defraia, Efisio; Marinelli, Andrea; Baroni, Giulia; Franchi, Lorenzo; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2007-11-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of the open-bite bionator in growing subjects with increased vertical dimensions. The records of 20 subjects with high-angle skeletal relationships (MPA > or =25 degrees) were examined. Cephalometric measurements were compared with those obtained from 23 sets of records of an untreated group matched according to age, sex, vertical skeletal relationships, and time intervals between records. Lateral cephalograms were analyzed before the start of treatment (mean age; 8.3 years) and after therapy and retention, with a mean period of observation of 2.5 years. The treated group had a significantly smaller palatal plane-mandibular plane angle (-1.9 degrees) and a greater overbite (+1.5 mm) associated with a significantly smaller overjet when compared with the control group. Based on the analysis of this sample, early treatment of skeletal open bite with the open-bite bionator appears to produce a modest effect that mainly consists of significant improvement in intermaxillary divergence. No favorable effects on the extrusion of posterior teeth were found.

  9. Patients' and parents' concerns and decisions about orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Aydoğan, Cihan; Alkan, Özer

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients' and parents' expectations are important in orthodontic treatment decision making. The literature generally demonstrates the perceived benefits of orthodontic treatment, but patients' and their parents' concerns about orthodontic treatment have not been investigated comprehensively. The aim of this study was to identify patients' and parents' concerns about orthodontic treatment and compare them according to sex, age, and treatment demand level. Methods One hundred and eighty-nine children and their parents were interviewed about concerns related to orthodontic treatment. Patients and parents were asked about orthodontic treatment decisions. Answers were recorded as "yes," "no," or "don't know." Chi-squared and Fisher's exact tests were used to compare concerns between age groups, sexes, and treatment demand levels. Kappa statistics were used to assess agreement between patients and their parents. Results Concerns about orthodontic treatment were gathered under 10 items as follows: "feeling pain," "the appearance of braces," "being teased," "avoiding smiling," "speech problems," "dietary changes," "problems with transportation," "economic problems," "long treatment duration," and "missing school." There was no statistically significant difference in concerns between the sexes or age groups. Some concern items and treatment demand were inversely related in patients. Conclusions The results of this study demonstrate patients' and parents' concerns about orthodontic treatment. Differences between the concerns of patients with different treatment demands imply that children might reject orthodontic treatment because of their concerns. Appropriate consultation of patients addressing their concerns may help reduce anxiety and improve the acceptance of treatment. PMID:26877979

  10. Patients' and parents' concerns and decisions about orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Kazancı, Fatih; Aydoğan, Cihan; Alkan, Özer

    2016-01-01

    Patients' and parents' expectations are important in orthodontic treatment decision making. The literature generally demonstrates the perceived benefits of orthodontic treatment, but patients' and their parents' concerns about orthodontic treatment have not been investigated comprehensively. The aim of this study was to identify patients' and parents' concerns about orthodontic treatment and compare them according to sex, age, and treatment demand level. One hundred and eighty-nine children and their parents were interviewed about concerns related to orthodontic treatment. Patients and parents were asked about orthodontic treatment decisions. Answers were recorded as "yes," "no," or "don't know." Chi-squared and Fisher's exact tests were used to compare concerns between age groups, sexes, and treatment demand levels. Kappa statistics were used to assess agreement between patients and their parents. Concerns about orthodontic treatment were gathered under 10 items as follows: "feeling pain," "the appearance of braces," "being teased," "avoiding smiling," "speech problems," "dietary changes," "problems with transportation," "economic problems," "long treatment duration," and "missing school." There was no statistically significant difference in concerns between the sexes or age groups. Some concern items and treatment demand were inversely related in patients. The results of this study demonstrate patients' and parents' concerns about orthodontic treatment. Differences between the concerns of patients with different treatment demands imply that children might reject orthodontic treatment because of their concerns. Appropriate consultation of patients addressing their concerns may help reduce anxiety and improve the acceptance of treatment.

  11. Indication for and frequency of early orthodontic therapy or interceptive measures.

    PubMed

    Schopf, Peter

    2003-05-01

    The early treatment of nonskeletal and skeletal orthodontic anomalies in the deciduous and early mixed dentition is intended to prevent the development of pronounced anomalies in the late mixed and permanent dentition with the ultimate aim of reducing or even eliminating the need for later orthodontic treatment. There is a general consensus in the international literature that early therapy is indicated in cases of anterior and lateral crossbite and Class III malocclusion, and possibly for extreme forms of mandibular retrognathism (overjet > or =10 mm) and of open bite. However, evidence of the efficiency of early orthodontic measures is just as rare as studies providing serviceable information on the incidence of tooth malalignments and malocclusions in the deciduous and early mixed dentition, some of whose findings are in any case highly divergent. This makes it substantially more difficult to draw conclusions on the extent to which early orthodontic therapy may be indicated. In order to obtain information on the incidence of nonskeletal and skeletal orthodontic problems constituting a treatment need, 2326 first-year schoolchildren aged between 6 and 7 years were examined in Frankfurt am Main and in the Rural District of Offenbach. In only 14.7% of the children were no relevant orthodontic findings recorded. 77.2% displayed mild to severe dysgnathic symptoms, though without early orthodontic therapy being considered indicated. Treatment with orthodontic appliances was considered urgent for 187 of the children (8.04%). With 8.3% and 7.9% respectively, lateral and anterior crossbite were top of the list of anomalies with an urgent treatment need. Among the patients with lateral crossbite, the prognostically less favorable unilateral form was recorded approximately four times more often than the bilateral form. Markedly increased sagittal overjet > or =10 mm) was registered in only 1.4% of the children, and negative overjet (Class III) (with the exception of edge

  12. Differences of protein profile before and after orthodontic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasri, Farah Amirah Mohd; Wahab, Rohaya Megat Abdul; Karsani, Saiful Anuar; Ariffin, Shahrul Hisham Zainal

    2016-11-01

    Mechanical forces in orthodontic treatment used to treat malocclusion can cause inflamed gingival tissue and the process of tooth movement may resorb dental root. Root resorption is an iatrogenic effect of orthodontic treatment but it can be monitored using protein biomarker. This study aims to investigate the differences of protein profile before and after orthodontic treatment using different staining methods. Human gingival crevicular fluid and saliva were collected from orthodontic patients before and after treatment. Protein profile were observed using SDS-PAGE. Our study shows down regulation of proteins after 3 months of treatment. Hence, there are potential values from this study to aid in investigation for specific biomarkers for root resorption.

  13. Dynamics of Alloplastic Bone Grafts on an Early Stage of Corticotomy-Facilitated Orthodontic Tooth Movement in Beagle Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyung-Joo; Kim, Tae-Woo

    2014-01-01

    Alveolar augmented corticotomy is effective in accelerating orthodontic tooth movement, but the effect only lasts for a relatively short time. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the underlying biology of the immediate periodontal response to orthodontic tooth movement after a corticotomy with alloplastic bone grafts. The results demonstrated that measurable tooth movement began as early as 3 days after the intervention in beagle dogs. Based on the results and histological findings, augmented corticotomy-facilitated orthodontic tooth movement might enhance the condition of the periodontal tissue and the stability of the outcomes of orthodontic treatment. PMID:25276787

  14. [Root resorption associated to orthodontic treatment: a clinical case].

    PubMed

    Houb-Dine, Afaf; Rerhrhaye, Mariam; Ismaili, Zouheir; Rerhrhaye, Wiam

    2011-12-01

    Root resorption associated to orthodontic treatment is of multiple etiologies and a non intentional iatrogenic side effect which exists in almost all the orthodontic treatment. This clinical case of an apparently healthy patient illustrates the occurrence during the orthodontic treatment of a root resorption interesting the left central incisor, victims of previous traumatism and presenting a moderate periodontal attachment loss. The orthodontic treatment was carried out with light and continuous forces and a per-orthodontic periodontal maintenance in respect of periodontal requirements. As soon as the root resorption on the left central incisive was diagnosed, the active orthodontic treatment was interrupted in order to stabilize the lesion and a regular clinical and radiological monitoring was established.

  15. Non-pharmacological interventions for alleviating pain during orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Padhraig S; Strydom, Hardus; Katsaros, Christos; MacDonald, Lci; Curatolo, Michele; Fudalej, Piotr; Pandis, Nikolaos

    2016-12-23

    Pain is prevalent during orthodontics, particularly during the early stages of treatment. To ensure patient comfort and compliance during treatment, the prevention or management of pain is of major importance. While pharmacological means are the first line of treatment for alleviation of orthodontic pain, a range of non-pharmacological approaches have been proposed recently as viable alternatives. To assess the effects of non-pharmacological interventions to alleviate pain associated with orthodontic treatment. Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 6 October 2016), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library, 2016, Issue 9), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 6 October 2016), Embase Ovid (1980 to 6 October 2016) and EThOS (to 6 October 2016). We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing a non-pharmacological orthodontic pain intervention to a placebo, no intervention or another non-pharmacological pain intervention were eligible for inclusion. We included any type of orthodontic treatment but excluded trials involving the use of pre-emptive analgesia or pain relief following orthognathic (jaw) surgery or dental extractions in combination with orthodontic treatment. We excluded split-mouth trials (in which each participant receives two or more treatments, each to a separate section of the mouth) and cross-over trials. At least two review authors independently assessed risk of bias and extracted data. We used the random-effects model and expressed results as mean differences (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We investigated heterogeneity with reference to both clinical and methodological factors. We included 14

  16. Influence of orthodontic treatment on temporomandibular disorders. A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Cañigral, Aránzazu; López-Caballo, José L.; Brizuela, Aritza; Moreno-Hay, Isabel; del Río-Highsmith, Jaime; Vega, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this literature systematic review was to evaluate the possible association between malocclusions, orthodontic treatment and development of temporomandibular disorders. Material and Methods: A search was carried out on PubMed-Medline database from January 2000 to August 2013 using the keywords “orthodontics and temporomandibular disorders”, “orthodontics and facial pain” and “malocclusion and temporomandibular disorders”. Human studies included in the study were those assessing signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in relation to orthodontic treatment. Material and Methods A search was carried out on PubMed-Medline database from January 2000 to August 2013 using the keywords “orthodontics and temporomandibular disorders”, “orthodontics and facial pain” and “malocclusion and temporomandibular disorders”. Human studies included in the study were those assessing signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders in relation to orthodontic treatment. Results The search strategy resulted in 61 articles. After selection according to the inclusion/exclusion criteria 9 articles qualified for the final analysis. The articles which linked orthodontics and development of temporomandibular disorders showed very discrepant results. Some indicated that orthodontic treatment could improve signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, but none of them obtained statistically significant differences. Conclusions According to the authors examined, there is no evidence for a cause-effect relationship between orthodontic treatment and temporomandibular disorders, or that such treatment might improve or prevent them. More longitudinal studies are needed to verify any possible interrelationship. Key words:Malocclusion and temporomandibular disorders, orthodontics and facial pain, orthodontics and temporomandibular disorders, temporomandibular disorders, temporomandibular dysfunction. PMID:26155354

  17. Comparison of personality traits, attitude toward orthodontic treatment, and pain perception and experience before and after orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Abu Alhaija, Elham S; Abu Nabaa, Mona A; Al Maaitah, Emad F; Al-Omairi, Mahmoud K

    2015-05-01

    To compare personality traits, attitude toward orthodontic treatment, and pain perception and experience before and after orthodontic treatment. One hundred subjects (50 male and 50 female) were included in this study. The mean (SD) age was 17.5 (2.05) years at T1 and 19.15 (2.32) years at T2. The instruments for data collection were questionnaires that included assessment of patients' personality traits, attitudes toward orthodontic treatment, and pain perception/experience. Subjects completed the questionnaires at two different times: before orthodontic treatment (T1) and after fixed orthodontic treatment (T2). Subjects were treated by fixed orthodontic appliances for an average (SD) period of 18.64 (0.35) months. Paired sample t-test and chi-square test were used to detect any differences. Significant changes in personality traits were detected after orthodontic treatment irrespective of gender. Neuroticism, openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness scores were improved (P < .001). A positive attitude toward orthodontic treatment was reported at T1 (4.31 [±1.26]) and improved at T2 (3.98 [±1.16]) irrespective of gender (P < .05). The average (SD) expected pain score (T1) was 4.73 (1.88) and the average (SD) experienced pain score (T2) was 4.63 (1.58). Significant difference in the expected and experienced pain scores was not detected (P  =  .11). Personality traits and attitude toward orthodontic treatment improved after orthodontic treatment. Reported actual pain experience during orthodontic treatment was similar to that expected before treatment.

  18. [Dental alveolar bone and dental arch remodeling in children: orthodontic diagnosis and treatments based on individual child arch development].

    PubMed

    Xiaobing, Li

    2016-12-01

    The etiology of malocclusions basically involves both congenital and environmental factors. Malocclusion is the result of the abnormal development of the orofacial complex (including tooth, dental alveolar bone, upper and lower jaws). Early orthodontic interceptive treatments involve the elimination of all congenital and environmental factors that contribute to the malformation of the orofacial complex, as well as interrupt the deviated development of the orofacial complex and the occlusion. Early orthodontic interceptive treatments mainly aim to use children's growth potential to correct abnormal developments of occlusions and orthodontically treat malocclusions more efficiently. The early orthodontic interceptive treatments include correcting the child's bad oral habits, training the abnormal functioned para-oral muscles, maintaining the normal eruptions of succeeding permanent teeth, applying interceptive treatments to the mal-developed teeth, and employing functional orthopedic treatments for abnormal growths of the upper and lower jaws. In orthodontics, correcting mal-positioned teeth is called orthodontic treatment, while rectifying the abnormal relationships of the upper and lower jaws is called functional orthopedic treatment. However, no clear definition is available as regards to the early orthodontic interceptive treatment of malocclusions caused by the deviated development of the dental alveolar bone. This new theory of "early dental alveolar bone and dental arch remodeling technique" was proposed by Professor Li Xiaobing of the Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics in West China Hospital of Stomatology through his clinical analyses and investigation of his early orthodontic interceptive treatments. He defined the early orthodontic corrections of abnormal growth of dental alveolar bone as "remodel". The "early dental alveolar bone and dental arch remodeling theory and technique" is proved useful in

  19. [Predictors for compliance in orthodontic treatment].

    PubMed

    Müssig, E; Berger, M; Komposch, G; Brunner, M

    2008-03-01

    Having established the importance of compliance as a significant factor of a successful orthodontic treatment, the aim of the present study was to evaluate intrapersonal and interpersonal factors which could help predict patient compliance. The attributional style of 58 patients was assessed by a standardised questionnaire. An individual questionnaire was designed to determine attitudes concerning orthodontic treatment, the doctor-patient relationship, the wearing behaviour and control behaviour. The questionnaire was answered by the patient and by the orthodontist. The compliance was evaluated by the orthodontist on the basis of commonly used indicators for compliance: wearing time, oral hygiene and reliability of keeping the appointments. The results showed a significant correlation between the compliance and the attributional style of the patients in positive situations, but not between the compliance and the wearing behaviour estimated by the patient. The interpersonal comparison revealed a lack of knowledge on the part of the orthodontist about the patients' daily activities and their ability to correctly wear their appliances. The questionnaire answers show compliance to be a subjective construct of the orthodontist demonstrating mostly social-emotional matters. There is no consistency with compliance and the patients' statement concerning their wearing behaviour but with a positive attitude on the part of the patients demonstrating independent responsibility.

  20. Maxillary second molar extractions in orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wilson; Wong, Ricky Wing-Kit; Ikegami, Tomio; Hägg, Urban

    2008-01-01

    This article is a review of the rationales, indications, methods, and effects of orthodontic treatment with maxillary second molar extractions. In addition to the patient's malocclusion, specific considerations about the status and position of the maxillary second and third molars should be taken into account. In recent years, the development of temporary anchorage devices, in addition to extraoral traction and intraoral distalization appliances, has become another armamentarium in the distalization of the maxillary posterior teeth, which may affect the selection of teeth to be extracted from second to third molars. In conclusion, extraction of maxillary second molars is a viable option in selected cases at present, but it is important to understand the indications and limitations of this treatment choice.

  1. Paresthesia during orthodontic treatment: case report and review.

    PubMed

    Monini, André da Costa; Martins, Renato Parsekian; Martins, Isabela Parsekian; Martins, Lídia Parsekian

    2011-10-01

    Paresthesia of the lower lip is uncommon during orthodontic treatment. In the present case, paresthesia occurred during orthodontic leveling of an extruded mandibular left second molar. It was decided to remove this tooth from the appliance and allow it to relapse. A reanatomization was then performed by grinding. The causes and treatment options of this rare disorder are reviewed and discussed. The main cause of paresthesia during orthodontic treatment may be associated with contact between the dental roots and inferior alveolar nerve, which may be well observed on tomography scans. Treatment usually involves tooth movement in the opposite direction of the cause of the disorder.

  2. [Failure in the orthodontic treatment of impacted maxillary canines].

    PubMed

    Chaushu, S; Abramovitz, I; Becker, A

    2013-04-01

    Maxillary canine impaction occurs in 1-3% of most Western populations and its orthodontic treatment is often difficult. Failure to resolve the impaction is not uncommon and may lead to malpractice lawsuits. The information in the literature about the reasons for non-resolution of this condition is sparse and unsubstantiated. This encourages the dispensing of inappropriate treatment that may result in severe tooth, soft and hard tissue damage as well as a prolonged treatment period. This review describes the epidemiology, pathogenesis and the wide range of reasons that may lead to failure to resolve the canine impaction. It shows that a lack of appreciation of anchorage demands and inaccurate positional diagnosis of the 3-D location and orientation of impacted teeth are the major reasons for failure. In addition, the review shows that invasive cervical root resorption (ICRR) is a frequently undiagnosed or unrecognized cause of failure of orthodontic resolution of impacted canines, and should be distinguished from replacement resorption (ankylosis). Corrective measures which may lead to successful treatment are further recommended. Special emphasis is placed on the crucial role of cone beam computerized tomography in the accurate radiographic diagnosis and early detection of pathology of impacted tooth and damage to adjacent anchor teeth. The importance of teamwork in achieving the best treatment outcome is stressed.

  3. Long-term remineralizing effect of MI Paste Plus on regression of early caries after orthodontic fixed appliance treatment: a 12-month follow-up randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Beerens, Moniek W; Ten Cate, Jacob M; Buijs, Mark J; van der Veen, Monique H

    2017-11-17

    Casein-phosphopeptide-amorphous-calcium-fluoride-phosphate (CPP-ACFP) can remineralize subsurface lesions. It is the active ingredient of MI-Paste-Plus® (MPP). The long-term remineralization efficacy is unknown. To evaluate the long-term effect of MPP versus a placebo paste on remineralization of enamel after fixed orthodontic treatment over a 12-month period. This trial was designed as a prospective, double-blinded, placebo-controlled RCT. Patients with subsurface lesions scheduled for removal of the appliance were included. They applied either MPP or control paste once a day at bedtime for 12 months, complementary to normal oral hygiene. Changes in enamel lesions (primary outcome) were fluorescence loss and lesion area determined by quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF). Secondary outcomes were Microbial composition, by conventional plating, and acidogenicity of plaque, by capillary ion analysis (CIA), and lesion changes scored visually on clinical photographs. Participants [age = 15.5 years (SD = 1.6)] were randomly assigned to either the MPP or the control group, as determined by a computer-randomization scheme, created and locked before the start of the study. Participants received neutral-coloured concealed toothpaste tubes marked A or B. The patients and the observers were blinded with respect to the content of tube A or B. A total of 51 patients were analysed; MPP (n = 25) versus control group (n = 26); data loss (n = 14). There was no significant difference between the groups over time for all the used outcome measures. There was a significant improvement in enamel lesions (fluorescence loss) over time in both groups (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001), with no differences between groups. Being an in vivo study, non-compliance of the subjects could have influenced the result. The additional use of MPP in patients with subsurface enamel lesions after orthodontic fixed appliance treatment did not improve these lesions during the 1 year following debonding

  4. Non-routine extractions in orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Zilberman, Y; Becker, A

    1978-10-01

    A four-unit symmetrical premolar extraction case demands meticulous levelling, overjet reduction, space closure, rotating, paralleling and torqueing to justify the gambit of having extracted the teeth at the commencement of treatment. This involves the patient in complex therapy which may, for any of several reasons, be contra-indicated for that particular patient, though a decision based on the plaster casts alone may have upheld such an approach. The purpose of this article is to discourage automatic decisions to extract first premolars in orthodontic extraction cases. The clinician is offered a classification of special cases in which an alternative should be sought, based on careful consideration of the general dental, facial, physical, psychological and economic state of the patient.

  5. [Effect of body image in adolescent orthodontic treatment].

    PubMed

    Minghui, Peng; Jing, Kang; Xiao, Deng

    2017-10-01

    This study was designed to probe the psychological factors adolescent orthodontic patients, the role of body image and self-esteem in the whole process of orthodontic treatment and the impact on the efficacy and satisfaction of orthodontic. Five hundred and twenty-eight patients were selected in this study. The Aesthetic Component of the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN-AC) , Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (SES), Negative Physical Self-General (NPS-G) and other body analysis scale study after orthodontic lasted 18-24 months were used to investigate the role of body image in adolescent orthodontic treatment. Esthetic evaluation of patients teeth after correction had been significantly improved, patient self-evaluation difference IOTN-AC doctor evaluation, Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire-tooth confidence, aesthetic concerns, psychological impact and social function were significantly improved. The improvement of the dental aesthetics component (T2 when doctors evaluate IOTN-AC) was positively correlated with the evaluation of the efficacy, and was significantly negatively correlated with the negative emotions of patients at baseline. Negative body image-dental dissatisfied-cognitive component and the affective component, the overall negative body image and negative emotions can predict patient satisfaction with treatment efficacy. Orthodontic treatment not only improves the self-aesthetic evaluation of adolescent patients, but also has a positive effect on the mental health of adolescent patients.

  6. Lingual orthodontics as an aesthetic resource in the preparation of orthodontic/surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Kairalla, Silvana Allegrini; Galiano, Aluísio; Paranhos, Luiz Renato

    2014-01-01

    The lingual technique was introduced in the late '70s and, just like orthodontics, it has developed significantly in the past few years. Adult and young adult have been attracted to such alternative aesthetic treatment. Despite their need of orthodontic treatment, they want to have an aesthetic alternative, as "invisible" as possible--something that can be achieved with the lingual technique. Nevertheless, many treatment or re-treatment cases also demand correction through orthognathic surgery, a process which is nowadays much simpler and considered an effective auxiliary method for the malocclusion correction. Having posed that, this study aims to show correction of malocclusion and discrepancy between dental arches through lingual orthodontic technique associated to orthognathic surgery. This study shows that it is possible to provide the patient who suffers frJom malocclusion with proper correction, achieving the desired aesthetics by using lingual braces and pe?forming lingual orthognathic surgery.

  7. An index of orthodontic treatment complexity.

    PubMed

    Llewellyn, Stuart K; Hamdan, Ahmad M; Rock, William P

    2007-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop an index specifically for the measurement of treatment complexity. Input factors were directly related to complexity, and the output was a score measuring the degree of treatment complexity. The sample comprised 120 sets of dental casts, 30 for each of the four main malocclusion classes. Sixteen orthodontists graded the study casts for perceived treatment complexity on a six-point scale and then listed, in order of importance, up to three occlusal features which they felt contributed to complexity from a pre-determined list. Multiple regression analysis was used to derive weightings for each occlusal feature, which would reflect the relevant treatment complexity. In order to obtain an overall treatment complexity score for each case, weightings were then multiplied by the corresponding occlusal feature scores and summed. The relationship between treatment complexity scores and perceived complexity was examined using Spearman's ranked correlation coefficient. The regression equation explained 49.5 per cent of the variance in treatment complexity of the whole sample. Regression analysis on the basis of malocclusion produced R (2) values of 90.7 per cent for Class I, 42.6 per cent for Class II division 1, 62.3 per cent for Class II division 2, and 79.5 per cent for Class III malocclusions. The index of orthodontic treatment complexity (IOTC) scores showed a moderate but highly significant association with the orthodontists' perceived complexity assessments (rho = 0.42, P = 0.000). The proposed IOTC shows sufficient promise to warrant further development.

  8. Orthodontic treatment of a mandibular incisor extraction case with invisalign.

    PubMed

    Zawawi, Khalid H

    2014-01-01

    Mandibular incisor extraction for orthodontic treatment is considered an unusual treatment option because of the limited number of patients that meet the criteria for such treatment. Accurate diagnosis and treatment planning is essential to achieve the desired results. Adult orthodontic patients are increasingly motivated by esthetic considerations and reject the idea of conventional fixed appliances. In recent years, Invisalign appliances have gained tremendous attention for orthodontic treatment of adult patients to meet their esthetic demands. In this case report, a case of Class I malocclusion was treated with mandibular incisor extraction using the Invisalign appliance system. Successful tooth alignment of both arches was achieved. The use of Invisalign appliance is an effective treatment option in adult patients with Class I malocclusion that requires incisor extraction due to moderate to severe mandibular anterior crowding.

  9. Orthodontic Treatment of a Mandibular Incisor Extraction Case with Invisalign

    PubMed Central

    Zawawi, Khalid H.

    2014-01-01

    Mandibular incisor extraction for orthodontic treatment is considered an unusual treatment option because of the limited number of patients that meet the criteria for such treatment. Accurate diagnosis and treatment planning is essential to achieve the desired results. Adult orthodontic patients are increasingly motivated by esthetic considerations and reject the idea of conventional fixed appliances. In recent years, Invisalign appliances have gained tremendous attention for orthodontic treatment of adult patients to meet their esthetic demands. In this case report, a case of Class I malocclusion was treated with mandibular incisor extraction using the Invisalign appliance system. Successful tooth alignment of both arches was achieved. The use of Invisalign appliance is an effective treatment option in adult patients with Class I malocclusion that requires incisor extraction due to moderate to severe mandibular anterior crowding. PMID:25024852

  10. Extractions prior to comprehensive orthodontic treatment in the mixed dentition.

    PubMed

    Kuthy, R A; Antkowiak, M F; Clive, J M

    1994-01-01

    Studies concerning the prevalence of extractions prior to orthodontic treatment have been limited in scope. This quasi-experimental analysis from secondary data explores patient and provider variables as they relate to extractions prior to comprehensive orthodontic therapy in the mixed dentition. This national database contains 38,529 children who had at least one comprehensive orthodontic (mixed dentition) visit within a 27-month period (January 1987-March 1989). Because of the relatively small number of Class III malocclusion cases, an equal allocation, random sample method was used in choosing children from the three Angle malocclusion classifications and the seven NIDR regions. Of those selected 24.7% had one or more extractions prior to orthodontic treatment, with 56% occurring at either 11 or 12 years of age. There were slightly more extraction cases for the Class I malocclusion children (26.7%) than either Class II (23.1%) or Class III (24.1%). Those children who had an orthodontic extraction were slightly older (P < 0.05). There were no statistically significant differences relating to orthodontic extractions for the following patient and provider variables: gender, malocclusion classification, years since dental graduation, and type of dental practice. There were regional differences among extraction rates for pediatric dentists, with those from the NIDR Midwest region more likely to have children receiving one or more extractions.

  11. Combined orthodontic - mucogingival treatment of a deep post-orthodontic gingival recession.

    PubMed

    Zucchelli, Giovanni; Parenti, Serena Incerti; Ghigi, Gino; Bonetti, Giulio Alessandri

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the interdisciplinary management of an isolated-type recession defect in a severely compromised mandibular incisor of a young post-orthodontic patient is described. The prognosis of root coverage surgery was very questionable and unpredictable due to the severe root malposition (III Miller class gingival recession). The treatment plan consisted of: (1) interproximal enamel reduction to gain space within the dental arch, (2) orthodontic repositioning of the root of the affected tooth within the alveolar bone and (3) root coverage mucogingival surgery. Clinical re-evaluation 7 months after fixed orthodontic treatment revealed major improvements in the root coverage prognosis due to the resolution of root malposition and de novo formation of keratinized tissue apical to the root exposure (I Miller class gingival recession). A subepithelial connective tissue graft was performed as a root coverage surgical procedure. Clinical examination 1 year after surgery revealed complete root coverage, good color blending with adjacent soft tissue and an increase in facial gingival thickness. Successful periodontal and esthetic outcomes can be accomplished after the combined orthodontic-periodontal treatment of a severely mucogingivally compromised tooth.

  12. Orthodontic treatment needs in Westmead Hospital Dental Clinical School.

    PubMed

    Howell, S; Morel, G

    1993-10-01

    One hundred and fifty-four adolescents, 76 female and 78 male consented to take part in this survey. The two authors examined and assessed them for dental aesthetics, malocclusion related features and TMJ related signs. The patients were also questioned about their opinion of dental aesthetics, their interest in having orthodontic treatment and their TMJ symptoms. Only 63 per cent of the adolescents who were considered suitable for orthodontic treatment expressed an interest in wanting treatment. Twenty-seven per cent of patients had signs and/or symptoms of TMJ disturbance. No association was found between individual malocclusion problems and TMJ signs and symptoms. The authors considered 56.5 per cent of the total group for orthodontic treatment, the majority for aesthetic reasons, and placed them into high, medium and low priority groups. Fixed appliance therapy for both arches was the recommended type of treatment for most patients.

  13. Invisible orthodontics part 2: lingual appliance treatment.

    PubMed

    McMullin, Ailbhe; Waring, David; Malik, Ovais

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this second article of the three part series is to sum up the current developments in lingual orthodontics. This article attempts to review the development, advantages and disadvantages, bonding techniques, bracket mechanics, patient factors and types of lingual appliance systems available. In addition, the article shows examples of treated cases with lingual appliances. Lingual appliances are a useful addition to the armamentarium of invisible orthodontic appliances, with significant developments over the last few years. Clinicians need to be aware of the advances and predictable results achievable with lingual appliances.

  14. Temporomandibular disorders and orthodontic treatment need in orthodontically untreated children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Špalj, Stjepan; Šlaj, Martina; Athanasiou, Athanasios E; Žak, Irena; Šimunović, Martina; Šlaj, Mladen

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the association between signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and orthodontic treatment need in orthodontically untreated children and adolescents. One thousand five hundred and ninety-seven subjects aged 11-19 years, without previous orthodontic history, from sixteen randomly selected public schools in Zagreb, Croatia, were examined. Malocclusion characteristics were assessed by using the criteria proposed by Bjork et al., the Dental Aesthetic Index, and the Aesthetic Component of Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need. Data on TMD signs/symptoms and parafunctional behaviour were obtained by means of questionnaire and clinical examination, respectively. Multiple logistic regression models were used for analysis. Twenty-two percent of children and young adolescents had one or more signs of TMD, ranging from 17% in age of 11 years up to 24% in age of 19. There was poor correlation between presence of TMD and orthodontic treatment need. Multiple logistic regression models showed that Class III, crowding and spacing were related to mandibular deflection on opening. Ectopic eruption was related to TMJ clicking, and severely tipped teeth with reduced mouth opening. Headaches presented a positive relationship with reverse overjet and severe rotations, and tooth wear with crowding, spacing and lateral openbite. Age, female gender and parafunctional habits were related to several TMD signs. Although logistic regression models were statistically significant (p < 0.05) malocclusions, parafunctional behaviours, age and gender accounted for less than 20% of the variability in TMD signs/symptoms. TMD signs and symptoms seemed to be poorly related to malocclusions or treatment needs.

  15. Adults seeking orthodontic treatment: expectations, periodontal and TMD issues.

    PubMed

    Christensen, L; Luther, F

    2015-02-16

    The growth in adult orthodontics presents new challenges to both the general dental practitioner and the orthodontist. Although many of the main objectives of orthodontic treatment are similar for adults, young adults and children, adult patients frequently bring significant challenges in several areas not often seen in the younger patient group. In areas such as planning realistic treatment outcomes, it is paramount that the patient's expectations are identified, respected and managed where appropriate. The adult patient's dental health often dictates deviation from the ideal treatment plan and periodontal problems are a common example. Based on current evidence, this paper presents an overview of some of the difficulties in the management of these issues, as well as highlighting developments with regard to pain conditions and their relevance to orthodontic treatment and its effects on temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) management.

  16. A novel approach for early evaluation of orthodontic process by a numerical thermomechanical analysis.

    PubMed

    Heidary, Z; Mojra, A; Shirazi, M; Bazargan, M

    2018-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to propose a novel method that provides an opportunity to evaluate an orthodontic process at early phase of the treatment. This was accomplished by finding out a correlation between the applied orthodontic force and thermal variations in the tooth structure. To this end, geometry of the human tooth surrounded by the connective soft tissue called the periodontal ligament and the bone was constructed by employing dental CT scan images of a specific case. The periodontal ligament was modeled by finite strain viscoelastic model through a nonlinear stress-strain relation (hyperelasticity) and nonlinear stress-time relation (viscoelasticity). The tooth structure was loaded by a lateral force with 15 different quantities applied to 20 different locations, along the midedge of the tooth crown. The resultant compressive stress in the periodontal ligament was considered as the cause of elevated cell activity that was modeled by a transient heat flux in the thermal analysis. The heat flux value was estimated by conducting an experiment on a pair of rats. The numerical results showed that by applying an orthodontic force to the tooth structure, a significant temperature rise was observed. By measuring the temperature rise, the orthodontic process can be evaluated. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Orthodontic treatment of a transmigrated mandibular canine: a case report.

    PubMed

    Trakyali, Göksu; Cildir, Sule Kavaloğlu; Sandalli, Nüket

    2010-11-01

    Intraosseous migration of a lower canine across the midline is a rare dental anomaly. The treatment options include: forced eruption of the unerupted tooth using orthodontic traction, autotransplantation, extraction followed by prosthetic replacement. To report the management of a transmigrated lower right canine. The treatment involved surgical, orthodontic and cosmetic dental treatment. No permanent teeth were extracted. The transmigrated canine was placed between the left central and lateral incisors and the crown recontoured to simulate a lateral incisor. An acceptable aesthetic and functional outcome was gained. Transmigration is a rare dental condition that can be treated successfully with a collaborative effort from several dental disciplines.

  18. A Systematic Review of Individual Motivational Factors in Orthodontic Treatment: Facial Attractiveness as the Main Motivational Factor in Orthodontic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Broukal, Zdenek

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Physical, mental, and social consequences of malocclusion may impact the quality of life. The aim of this review is to describe main factors motivating parents for orthodontic treatment for their children. Methods. A systematic review study design was used to identify articles analyzing different motivational factors in orthodontic treatment appearing in Medline database, EMBASE, and Google Scholar. The search terms used were teasing, motivating factors, orthodontics, malocclusion, quality of life, smile attractiveness, and perception of malocclusion. Papers selected up to May 2013 included retrospective and prospective longitudinal studies, randomized control trials, cross-sectional studies, reviews, and meta-analyses. Results. 13 articles included in this review identified aesthetics as the main motivational factor in orthodontic treatment. Children mention teeth crowding, large overbite, missing teeth, and largest maxillary anterior irregularities also as motivational factors. Parents want their children to look nice and worry of being accused of neglecting parental duties. Conclusions. Dissatisfaction with one's appearance, dentist recommendation, interest and worries of parents, and the impact of peers who wear braces rank among the main motivation factors of seeking orthodontic treatment. Understanding these factors allows better planning of resources and better assessment of the requirements and priorities of treatment. PMID:24963296

  19. Surgical Orthodontic Treatment of Severe Skeletal Class II

    PubMed Central

    Alsulaimani, Fahad F.; Al-Sebaei, Maisa O.; Afify, Ahmed R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an adult Saudi male patient who presented with a severe skeletal class II deformity. The case was managed with a combination of presurgical orthodontic treatment followed by a double jaw orthognathic surgery and then another phase of orthodontic treatment for final occlusal detailing. Extraction of the four first premolars was done during the presurgical orthodontic phase of treatment to decompensate upper and lower incisors and to give room for surgical setback of the maxillary anterior segment. Double jaw surgery was performed: bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy for 8 mm mandibular advancement combined with three-piece Le Fort I maxillary osteotomy, 6 mm setback of the anterior segment, 8 mm impaction of the maxilla, and 5 mm advancement genioplasty. Although the anteroposterior discrepancy and the facial convexity were so severe, highly acceptable results were obtained, both esthetically as well as occlusally. PMID:23573428

  20. Orthodontic treatment for oral rehabilitation after multiple maxillofacial bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yoshiki; Ogino, Tomoko Kuroiwa; Hirashita, Ayao

    2008-09-01

    We present the orthodontic treatment of a patient with occlusal dysfunction after plastic surgery for multiple maxillofacial bone fractures caused by a traffic accident. The patient had mandibular deviation to the right because of inappropriate repositioning and fixation of the fractured bone and complete avulsion of both mandibular central incisors. The bilateral mandibular incisors, canines, and premolars were also suspected of partial avulsion or alveolar bone fracture. Several tests, including percussion and dental computed tomography, were performed on these teeth to rule out ankylosis and confirm tooth movement. Camouflage orthodontic treatment was carried out with expansion of the maxillary arch, alignment of both arches, and space closure between the mandibular lateral incisors to improve the occlusion. Good occlusion and interdigitation were obtained. Orthodontic treatment is useful for the rehabilitation of occlusal dysfunction caused by multiple maxillofacial bone fractures.

  1. The effect of photobiomodulation on root resorption during orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Nimeri, Ghada; Kau, Chung H; Corona, Rachel; Shelly, Jeffery

    2014-01-01

    Photobiomodulation is used to accelerate tooth movement during orthodontic treatments. The changes in root morphology in a group of orthodontic patients who received photobiomodulation were evaluated using the cone beam computed tomography technique. The device used is called OrthoPulse, which produces low levels of light with a near infrared wavelength of 850 nm and an intensity of 60 mW/cm2 continuous wave. Twenty orthodontic patients were recruited for these experiments, all with class 1 malocclusion and with Little’s Irregularity Index (>2 mm) in either of the arches. Root resorption was detected by measuring changes in tooth length using cone beam computed tomography. These changes were measured before the orthodontic treatment and use of low-level laser therapy and after finishing the alignment level. Little’s Irregularity Index for all the patients was calculated in both the maxilla and mandible and patients were divided into three groups for further analysis, which were then compared to the root resorption measurements. Our results showed that photobiomodulation did not cause root resorption greater than the normal range that is commonly detected in orthodontic treatments. Furthermore, no correlation between Little’s Irregularity Index and root resorption was detected. PMID:24470774

  2. Adverse effects of orthodontic treatment: A clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Talic, Nabeel F.

    2011-01-01

    Orthodontic treatment is associated with a number of adverse effects, such as root resorption, pain, pulpal changes, periodontal disease, and temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD). Orthodontists should be aware of these effects and associated risk factors. Risk factors linked to root resorption include the duration of treatment, length, and shape of the root, trauma history, habits, and genetic predisposition. PMID:24151415

  3. A Multivariate Descriptive Model of Motivation for Orthodontic Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackett, Paul M. W.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Motivation for receiving orthodontic treatment was studied among 109 young adults, and a multivariate model of the process is proposed. The combination of smallest scale analysis and Partial Order Scalogram Analysis by base Coordinates (POSAC) illustrates an interesting methodology for health treatment studies and explores motivation for dental…

  4. [Research on Chinese orthodontic specialists' subjective evaluation of orthodontic treatment outcome].

    PubMed

    Song, Guang-ying; Zhao, Zhi-he; Ding, Yin; Bai, Yu-xing; Wang, Lin; He, Hong; Qian, Yu-fen; Li, Wei-ran; Xu, Tian-min

    2012-03-01

    To analyze the results of multiple Chinese orthodontic specialists' subjective evaluation of orthodontic treatment outcome, to investigate the relevance of different experiment items and to explore the weight of each monomial material. As a randomized clinical trial, with six orthodontic treatment centers and Angle's classification being regarded as two stratification factors, it contained 108 cases with integrity data, which was random extracted from 2383 cases that received orthodontic treatment in six orthodontic treatment centers during the past five years, gathering post-treatment study casts, cephalometrics and photographs of 48 cases as the research subject. Similarly taking Angle's classification as a stratification factor, 108 cases were randomly divided into 9 groups. The randomization of sampling and grouping were both generated by a pseudo-random number generator. According to the monomial and combined subjects, 69 orthodontic specialists were regarded as the raters to rank the 12 cases in each group, and to judge whether the case was qualified. Correlation analysis: the Spearman r between Post-M + C and Post-M + C + P and the Spearman r between Post-M + P and Post-M + C + P were both greater than 0.950. The Spearman r between Post-M and Post-P and the Spearman r between Post-M and Post-C were about 0.300. The Spearman r between Post-P and Post-C was 0.505. Regression analysis: the linear regression results: M + C = 0.782M + 0.308C - 0.150, M + P = 0.804M + 0.233P - 0.091, M + C + P = 0.764M + 0.243P + 0.131C - 0.291. The r(2) of above three models was greater than 0.9. It was applicable to use M + C and M + P instead of M + C + P. Study casts could not replace cephalometrics or photographs when doing subjective evaluation. Cephalometrics and photographs could not substitute for each other either. In the combined materials evaluation, model accounted for the largest percentage. Based on the regression model, for the greater part, the integration of

  5. Combined Periodontal, Orthodontic, and Prosthetic Treatment in an Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    Sabatoski, Claudio Vinicius; Bueno, Regis Claret; Pithon, Matheus Melo; Tanaka, Orlando Motohiro

    2015-01-01

    A 41-year-old man had a significant loss of bone and supporting tissues with pathologic migration of several teeth and several missing teeth. He was treated with an interdisciplinary therapeutic protocol that included nonsurgical periodontal therapy based on strict control of supragingival plaque, subgingival periodontal therapy, orthodontic and endodontic treatment, and replacement of restorations. The orthodontic therapy was performed in a severely reduced bone support and the presence of pathological tooth migration after periodontal disease control. The interdisciplinary treatment protocol was the key to achieve a significant improvement in his facial and dental esthetics, masticatory function, and quality of life. PMID:26587295

  6. [Application of three-dimensional digital technology in the diagnosis and treatment planning in orthodontics].

    PubMed

    Bai, Y X

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional(3D)digital technology has been widely used in the field of orthodontics in clinical examination, diagnosis, treatment and curative effect evaluation. 3D digital technology greatly improves the accuracy of diagnosis and treatment, and provides effective means for personalized orthodontic treatment. This review focuses on the application of 3D digital technology in the field of orthodontics.

  7. Treatment outcomes in 4 modes of orthodontic practice.

    PubMed

    Poulton, Donald; Vlaskalic, Vicki; Baumrind, Sheldon

    2005-03-01

    This study is a continuation of a previously published report on the outcome of orthodontic treatment provided in offices representing different modes of practice. The sample consisted of duplicate pretreatment (T1) and posttreatment (T2) dental casts of 348 patients from traditional private orthodontic practices (5 offices, 134 patients), company-owned practices (5 offices, 107 patients), offices associated with practice-management organizations (2 offices, 60 patients), and general dental practices (2 offices, 47 patients). Methods were used to obtain random, representative samples from each office, starting with lists of patients who were treated consecutively with full fixed orthodontic appliances. The dental casts were measured by 2 independent judges who used the unweighted PAR score. Good interjudge agreement was shown on the initial casts, but the agreement was not as strong on the final casts. The measurements showed that treatment outcomes were generally satisfactory, although some significant differences between offices and management modes were shown.

  8. Orthodontic treatment for a patient with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Bakathir, Manal A

    2017-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, autoimmune inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) that affects myelinated axons, destroying the myelin and damaging axons to varying degrees. The course of MS is highly varied and unpredictable. Metals used during orthodontic treatment can negatively affect imaging techniques used to diagnose and monitor the progression of MS, while medications used to treat MS can negatively affect orthodontic tooth movement. The present case report highlights some of the challenges encountered during orthodontic treatment of a patient with MS and how to overcome them. The patient was a 20-year-old woman with complaints of diastema and spacing in the upper arch. Although closing the spaces was challenging due to some of the MS medications, she was treated successfully, without complications, within 20 months using closing loops. PMID:28717636

  9. Treatment results in dental school orthodontic patients in 1983 and 1993.

    PubMed

    Firestone, A R; Häsler, R U; Ingervall, B

    1999-02-01

    The effect of incremental changes in materials and techniques on orthodontic treatment outcomes is difficult to evaluate objectively. Treatment results for two groups of patients whose treatments were completed approximately 10 years apart were evaluated using the peer assessment rating (PAR) index and the index of orthodontic treatment need (IOTN) using the Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank test. Patients in the later group who had been treated by postgraduate students primarily (using fixed appliances) had significantly lower IOTN and PAR scores at the end of treatment and showed a significantly greater reduction in the PAR score than a similar group of patients in the earlier group. There were no significant differences in treatment results between patients in the early and late groups who were treated with removable appliances. Differences in treatment results were most likely the result of changes in materials and techniques that had occurred in the 10 intervening years.

  10. Preventing enamel decalcification during orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Tillery, T J; Hembree, J H; Weber, F N

    1976-10-01

    One hundred thirty-two extracted premolar teeth were selected and divided into four equal groups. The first group of thirty-three teeth received a topical application of acidulated phosphate fluoride; the second group, a topical application of stannous fluoride; the third group, an application of a polymeric adhesive coating; the fourth group was left untreated to serve as a control. On each tooth a loosely fitted orthodontic band was cemented to place. After cementation, the band was broken to simulate a loose orthodontic band in vivo. The four groups of teeth were simultaneously immersed in a decalcifying gelatin and were left undisturbed for 11 weeks. The teeth were then removed and a record was made of the decalcification produced. A chi-square test was used to compare the teeth in each group to those in every other group. Compared to a control group of teeth, those teeth treated with polymeric adhesive coating, acidulated phosphate fluoride, or stannous fluoride produced a statistically significant reduction in decalcification of the tooth surfaces beneath loose orthodontic bands. For a one-application technique, the polymeric adhesive coating provided more protection against decalcification of teeth under loose orthondontic bands than did either acidulated phosphate fluoride or stannous flouride.

  11. Iatrogenic possibilities of orthodontic treatment and modalities of prevention

    PubMed Central

    Meeran, Nazeer Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    The benefits of orthodontic treatment are numerous and in most cases, the benefits outweigh the possible disadvantages. Orthodontic treatment can play an important role in enhancing esthetics, function, and self-esteem in patients. However, it carries with it the risks of enamel demineralization, tissue damage, root resorption, open gingival embrasures in the form of triangular spaces, allergic reactions to nickel, and treatment failure in the form of relapse. These potential complications are easily avoidable by undertaking certain precautions and timely interventions by both the orthodontist and the patient. The orthodontist must ensure that the patient is aware of the associated risks and stress the importance of the patient's role in preventing these untoward outcomes. The decision whether to proceed with the orthodontic treatment is essentially a risk-benefit analysis, where the perceived benefits of commencing treatment outweigh the potential risks. This article provides an overview of the iatrogenic possibilities of orthodontic treatment and the role of the patient as well as the orthodontist in preventing the associated risks. PMID:24987646

  12. Orthodontic treatment of Class II malocclusion with miniscrew implants.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Moschos A

    2008-11-01

    Orthodontic treatment of patients with Class II malocclusion who show poor compliance with conventional treatment modalities such as extraoral headgear, functional orthopedic appliances, or conventional fixed appliances with intermaxillary elastics, can be challenging. Noncompliance approaches can be used, but they often pose anchorage problems. This article describes the orthodontic treatment of a girl, aged 11.5 years, with a Class II malocclusion, a deep bite, and increased overjet. Initially, an intraoral miniscrew implant supported distalization system (MISDS) was used to distalize the maxillary first molars. Temporary stationary anchorage was provided by 2 miniscrew implants that were placed paramedian in the anterior region of the palate. After distalization, the system was modified slightly by a chair-side procedure and then used to provide the desired stationary anchorage for subsequent anterior tooth retraction in conjunction with conventional full fixed orthodontic appliances. After 18 months of treatment, a Class I molar relationship was achieved, and the deep bite, overjet, posterior intercuspation, and facial esthetics were improved. Biomechanical considerations, clinical efficacy, and the advantages and potential complications of MISDS treatment are discussed. This case report illustrates the use of MISDS to distalize the maxillary molars and retract the anterior teeth, providing noncompliance, nonextraction, and efficient approach for the orthodontic treatment of patients with Class II malocclusion, which is initially invisible.

  13. Media advertising effects on consumer perception of orthodontic treatment quality.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Daenya T; Shroff, Bhavna; Lindauer, Steven J; Fowler, Chad E; Tufekci, Eser

    2008-09-01

    To determine the effect of media advertising on consumer perception of orthodontic treatment quality. A survey instrument was designed to evaluate factors influencing consumer selection of an orthodontist and consumer perception of different forms of media advertising (radio, television, newspaper, magazine, direct mail, and billboard) by orthodontic practices. The surveys were distributed by eight orthodontic offices in and around the Richmond, Virginia area. The survey return rate was 97%. Respondents most often cited dentist and patient referrals as how they learned of the orthodontic practices they visited (50% to 57%). A caring attitude and good practitioner reputation were the top reasons influencing actual selection of an orthodontist (53% and 49%, respectively). Of respondents, 14% to 24% felt that advertising orthodontists would offer a lower quality of care than nonadvertising orthodontists. Newspaper, magazine, and direct mail advertisements were viewed more favorably than radio, television, and billboard advertisements. Chi-square analyses revealed few statistically significant differences in perception between different income and education groups. The majority of patients do not perceive advertising to reflect poorly on the quality of orthodontic care. However, patients with different income and education levels perceive media advertising differently.

  14. Some comments on clinical studies in orthodontics and their applications to orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Baumrind, S

    1999-06-01

    This article indicates the origins and background of the current series of National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research-funded, university-based clinical studies of orthodontic treatment. It suggests that future studies should be less focused on refining our estimates of mean changes during treatment and concentrate research on the systematic analysis of individual differences among patients' responses to treatment, and study how skilled clinicians make in-course corrections in response to unexpected changes in treatment conditions. Finally, some suggestions are made concerning optimization of decision making in the presence of uncertainty.

  15. Serial extraction or premolar extraction in the permanent dentition? Comparison of duration and outcome of orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Wagner, M; Berg, R

    2000-01-01

    Treatment outcome and duration of 2 different treatment approaches in 2 groups of comparable extraction cases were analyzed: Group I: serial extraction performed in the early mixed dentition followed by orthodontic treatment in the permanent dentition; group II: extractions as well as orthodontic treatment in the permanent dentition. The following conclusions were reached: 1. The treatment period with fixed appliances was highly significantly shorter in group I; however, the number of appointments was significantly higher and the total duration of treatment/observation time significantly longer. 2. In both groups the reduction in PAR score was either improved or greatly improved in all cases.

  16. Prevention and Treatment of White Spot Lesions During and After Treatment with Fixed Orthodontic Appliances: a Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Lopatiene, Kristina; Lapenaite, Egle

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The aim of the systematic literature review is to update the evidence for the prevention of white spot lesions, using materials containing fluoride and/or casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate during and after treatment with fixed orthodontic appliances. Material and Methods Information search for controlled studies on humans published between January 2008 and February 2016 was performed in PubMed, ScienceDirect, Embase, The Cochrane Library. Inclusion criteria were: the English language, study on humans, patients undergoing orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances, randomized or quasi-randomized controlled clinical studies fluoride-containing product or casein derivates used throughout the appliance therapy or straightaway after debonding. Results 326 articles were reviewed (Embase 141, PubMed 129, ScienceDirect 41, Cochrane 15). Twelve clinical studies fulfilled all inclusion criteria. Use of fluoridated toothpaste had a remineralizing effect on white spot lesions (WSLs) (P < 0.05); fluoride varnish and casein supplements were effective in prevention and early treatment of WSLs (P < 0.05). Conclusions Early detection of white spot lesions during orthodontic treatment would allow implementing preventive measures to control the demineralization process before lesions progress. The systemic review has showed that the usage of fluoride and casein supplements in ameliorating white spot lesions during and after fixed orthodontic treatment is significantly effective. However the use of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate can be more beneficial than fluoride rinse in the reduction of demineralization spots. PMID:27489605

  17. Prevention and Treatment of White Spot Lesions During and After Treatment with Fixed Orthodontic Appliances: a Systematic Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Lopatiene, Kristina; Borisovaite, Marija; Lapenaite, Egle

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the systematic literature review is to update the evidence for the prevention of white spot lesions, using materials containing fluoride and/or casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate during and after treatment with fixed orthodontic appliances. Information search for controlled studies on humans published between January 2008 and February 2016 was performed in PubMed, ScienceDirect, Embase, The Cochrane Library. Inclusion criteria were: the English language, study on humans, patients undergoing orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances, randomized or quasi-randomized controlled clinical studies fluoride-containing product or casein derivates used throughout the appliance therapy or straightaway after debonding. 326 articles were reviewed (Embase 141, PubMed 129, ScienceDirect 41, Cochrane 15). Twelve clinical studies fulfilled all inclusion criteria. Use of fluoridated toothpaste had a remineralizing effect on white spot lesions (WSLs) (P < 0.05); fluoride varnish and casein supplements were effective in prevention and early treatment of WSLs (P < 0.05). Early detection of white spot lesions during orthodontic treatment would allow implementing preventive measures to control the demineralization process before lesions progress. The systemic review has showed that the usage of fluoride and casein supplements in ameliorating white spot lesions during and after fixed orthodontic treatment is significantly effective. However the use of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate can be more beneficial than fluoride rinse in the reduction of demineralization spots.

  18. Congenitally missing mandibular second premolar: treatment outcome with orthodontic space closure.

    PubMed

    Fines, Casey D; Rebellato, Joe; Saiar, Maryam

    2003-06-01

    Orthodontic treatment for patients with congenitally missing mandibular second premolars can be challenging. Treatment options include keeping the deciduous second molar, extracting the molars and allowing the space to close spontaneously, autotransplantation, prosthetic replacement, and orthodontic space closure. Space closure with orthodontic appliances is demonstrated in this case report.

  19. Understanding the basis of space closure in Orthodontics for a more efficient orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Gerson Luiz Ulema; Jacob, Helder B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Space closure is one of the most challenging processes in Orthodontics and requires a solid comprehension of biomechanics in order to avoid undesirable side effects. Understanding the biomechanical basis of space closure better enables clinicians to determine anchorage and treatment options. In spite of the variety of appliance designs, space closure can be performed by means of friction or frictionless mechanics, and each technique has its advantages and disadvantages. Friction mechanics or sliding mechanics is attractive because of its simplicity; the space site is closed by means of elastics or coil springs to provide force, and the brackets slide on the orthodontic archwire. On the other hand, frictionless mechanics uses loop bends to generate force to close the space site, allowing differential moments in the active and reactive units, leading to a less or more anchorage control, depending on the situation. Objective: This article will discuss various theoretical aspects and methods of space closure based on biomechanical concepts. PMID:27275623

  20. Understanding the basis of space closure in Orthodontics for a more efficient orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Gerson Luiz Ulema; Jacob, Helder B

    2016-01-01

    Space closure is one of the most challenging processes in Orthodontics and requires a solid comprehension of biomechanics in order to avoid undesirable side effects. Understanding the biomechanical basis of space closure better enables clinicians to determine anchorage and treatment options. In spite of the variety of appliance designs, space closure can be performed by means of friction or frictionless mechanics, and each technique has its advantages and disadvantages. Friction mechanics or sliding mechanics is attractive because of its simplicity; the space site is closed by means of elastics or coil springs to provide force, and the brackets slide on the orthodontic archwire. On the other hand, frictionless mechanics uses loop bends to generate force to close the space site, allowing differential moments in the active and reactive units, leading to a less or more anchorage control, depending on the situation. This article will discuss various theoretical aspects and methods of space closure based on biomechanical concepts.

  1. Extractions in support of orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Russell, D M

    1994-01-01

    Extractions in support of orthodontic therapy may be done in any combination of teeth. The more common extraction patterns are: 1. Maxillary and mandibular first premolars; 2. Maxillary first and mandibular second premolars; 3. Maxillary and mandibular second premolars; 4. Maxillary first premolar; 5. Maxillary second permanent molar; 6. Maxillary first permanent molars; 7. Maxillary permanent lateral incisors; 8. Mandibular permanent incisors; or 9. Any possible combination and variation for other considerations. Extractions have been proven to support changes in the profile, helping in the alignment of teeth and in reducing lower facial height. The decision as to whether or not to extract requires a great deal of thoughtful application of diagnostic skills.

  2. Prevention and Treatment of White Spot Lesions in Orthodontic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Kachuie, Marzie

    2017-01-01

    Decalcification of enamel, appearing as white spot lesions (WSLs), around fixed orthodontic appliances is a major challenge during and after fixed orthodontic treatment by considering the fact that the goal of orthodontic treatment is to enhance facial and dental esthetic appearance. Banded or bonded teeth exhibit a significantly higher rate of WSLs compared to the controls with no braces as fixed appliances and the bonding materials promote retention of biofilms. These lesions are managed in the first step by establishing good oral hygiene habits and prophylaxis with topical fluorides, including high-fluoride toothpastes, fluoride mouthwashes, gels, varnishes, fluoride-containing bonding materials, and elastic ligatures. Recently, other materials and methods have been recommended, including the application of casein phosphopeptides-amorphous calcium phosphate, antiseptics, probiotics, polyols, sealants, laser, tooth bleaching agents, resin infiltration, and microabrasion. This article reviews the currently used methods to manage enamel demineralization during and after orthodontic treatment and the risk factors and preventive measures based on the latest evidence. PMID:28566845

  3. Orthodontic Treatment, Genetic Factors and Risk of Temporomandibular Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Gary D.; Diatchenko, Luda; Ohrbach, Richard; Maixner, William

    2008-01-01

    Traditionally, four groups of factors have been identified in the etiology of temporomandibular disorder (TMD): anatomical variation in the masticatory system; psychosocial characteristics; pain in other body regions; and demographics. Orthodontic treatment has been variously cited both as a protective and harmful factor in TMD etiology. Recently, a search has begun for a genetic influence on TMD etiology. Genetic markers can be of additional value in identifying gene-environment interactions, that is, isolating population sub-groups, defined by genotype in which environmental influences play a relatively greater or lesser etiological role. This paper reviews concepts and study design requirements for epidemiological investigations into TMD etiology. Findings are presented from a prospective cohort study of 186 females that illustrate an example of gene-environment interaction in TMD onset. Among people with a variant of the gene encoding catechol-O-methyl-transferase, an enzyme associated with pain responsiveness, risk of developing TMD was significantly greater for subjects who reported a history of orthodontic treatment compared with subjects who did not (P=0.04). While further studies are needed to investigate TMD etiology, this genetic variant potentially could help to identify patients whose risk of developing TMD is heightened following orthodontic treatment, hence serving as a risk marker useful in planning orthodontic care. PMID:18663384

  4. Apicotomy as Treatment for Failure of Orthodontic Traction

    PubMed Central

    Osório, Leandro Berni; Ferrazzo, Vilmar Antonio; Serpa, Geraldo; Ferrazzo, Kívia Linhares

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to present a case report that demonstrated primary failure in a tooth traction that was subsequently treated with apicotomy technique. Case Report. A 10-year-old girl had an impacted upper right canine with increased pericoronal space, which was apparent on a radiographic image. The right maxillary sinus showed an opacity suggesting sinusitis. The presumptive diagnosis was dentigerous cyst associated with maxillary sinus infection. The plan for treatment included treatment of the sinus infection and cystic lesion and orthodontic traction of the canine after surgical exposure and bonding of an orthodontic appliance. The surgical procedure, canine position, root dilaceration, and probably apical ankylosis acted in the primary failure of the orthodontic traction. Surgical apical cut of the displaced teeth was performed, and tooth position in the dental arch was possible, with a positive response to the pulp vitality test. Conclusion. Apicotomy is an effective technique to treat severe canine displacement and primary orthodontic traction failure of palatally displaced canines. PMID:24383010

  5. Apicotomy as treatment for failure of orthodontic traction.

    PubMed

    Osório, Leandro Berni; Ferrazzo, Vilmar Antonio; Serpa, Geraldo; Ferrazzo, Kívia Linhares

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to present a case report that demonstrated primary failure in a tooth traction that was subsequently treated with apicotomy technique. Case Report. A 10-year-old girl had an impacted upper right canine with increased pericoronal space, which was apparent on a radiographic image. The right maxillary sinus showed an opacity suggesting sinusitis. The presumptive diagnosis was dentigerous cyst associated with maxillary sinus infection. The plan for treatment included treatment of the sinus infection and cystic lesion and orthodontic traction of the canine after surgical exposure and bonding of an orthodontic appliance. The surgical procedure, canine position, root dilaceration, and probably apical ankylosis acted in the primary failure of the orthodontic traction. Surgical apical cut of the displaced teeth was performed, and tooth position in the dental arch was possible, with a positive response to the pulp vitality test. Conclusion. Apicotomy is an effective technique to treat severe canine displacement and primary orthodontic traction failure of palatally displaced canines.

  6. Immigrant background and orthodontic treatment need. Quantitative and qualitative studies in Swedish adolescents.

    PubMed

    Josefsson, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Need--Dental Health Component" (IOTN-DHC) grades 4 and 5, ranged from 30 to 40 per cent, without any inter-group differences. There were strong associations between subjects perceiving a need for orthodontic treatment and IOTN-DHC grades 4 and 5, anterior crossbite and avoiding smiling because they were self-conscious about their teeth. At the age of 18-19 years, the frequency of malocclusion was similar in all groups. Subjects of Asian origin had a higher self-perceived orthodontic treatment need than their Swedish counterparts and a higher frequency of headache than those of Eastern/Southeastern European origin. Psychological wellbeing was reduced in nearly one quarter of the sample, more frequently in girls than boys. No association was found between self-perceived orthodontic treatment need and psychological wellbeing. The theory "Being under the pressure of social norms" was generated in Paper V, and it can be applied to improve our understanding of young adults who have adjusted to living with poor dental aesthetics and also aid to identify those who are not as well-adjusted and would probably benefit from treatment. Undisclosed dental fear is an important barrier to acceptance of orthodontic treatment in early adolescence. Despite demographic changes due to immigration, no major change in the prevalence of malocclusion and normative orthodontic treatment need has been disclosed. This does not apply to adolescents and adults who immigrated at an older age.

  7. [Analysis of orthodontic treatment efficiency in children with dental crowding].

    PubMed

    Дмитренко, Марина И; Писаренко, Елена А

    2016-01-01

    Efficiency of dental treatment is necessary to provide optimal results with less outlay of clinical time and shorter duration of treatment and for stable and balanced occlusion. To compare duration of orthodontic treatment in children with dental crowding by authoring and traditional methods. Orthodontic treatment of 37 patients with dental crowding of severe degree in period of mixed dentition was carried out. The first (1) (basic) group consisted of 27 patients (mean age 11,93±0,73 years) who were treated with removable orthodontic appliances of our own design and additional application of own theoretical and practical developments. Control group (2) consisted of 10 patients (mean age 12,6±1,28 years). They were treated by traditional removable appliances with screws. Student's t-test was applied to reveal significanсe deference of the obtained results for different groups. Before treatment comparative analysis has not showed significant difference between groups depending on age, gender, sagittal, vertical and lateral malocclusion as well as localization and severity degree of dental crowding (P >0,05). It was found that treatment duration of malocclusion with dental crowding of the maxillary teeth for groups 1 and 2 was 11,95±0,85 and 18,75±2,61 months respectively (P >0,05) . Duration of treatment for groups 1 and 2 of mandibular teeth crowding was 12,47±1,09 and 17,86±1,81 months respectively (P >0,05). It was proved that the application of own theoretical and practical developments which were introduced in orthodontic treatment of malocclusion complicated by dental crowding, makes it possible to reduce period of treatment on the average in 1,45 times in comparison with conventional.

  8. Perception of orthodontic treatment need in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Spalj, Stjepan; Slaj, Martina; Varga, Suzana; Strujic, Mihovil; Slaj, Mladen

    2010-08-01

    Patients' and parents' perception of malocclusion are important in determining orthodontic treatment demand, motivation, and cooperation. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in perception of treatment need in currently orthodontically treated, previously treated, and untreated subjects. The sample comprised 3196 children and adolescents (1593 males and 1603 females) aged 8-19 years (mean age 13.0 +/- 3.6 years) from 24 randomly selected public schools in Zagreb, Croatia. Objective treatment need was assessed clinically using the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI). Subjective treatment need was estimated separately by an orthodontic resident, the child/adolescent and his/her parent using the Standardized Continuum of Aesthetic Need (SCAN) procedure. The children/adolescents completed a questionnaire that had five questions with five-point Likert-type scale answers concerning satisfaction with dental appearance, importance of teeth for facial appearance, and malocclusion-related quality of life. Spearman correlation and logistic regression were used for statistical analysis. Associations between objective and subjective orthodontic treatment need were weak but statistically significant (Rho from 0.20 to 0.50; P < 0.05). Malocclusion-related quality of life was poorly associated with treatment need. Satisfaction with tooth appearance showed the most frequent statistically significant correlation (Rho from -0.14 to -0.35; P < 0.05), while importance of aligned teeth for facial appearance and social contacts had the weakest correlation with treatment need. Perception of treatment need was greater in previously treated subjects. Parents' perception had a low predictive value. The findings of this study show that malocclusion has more impact on emotional well-being than on function or social contacts.

  9. ORTHODONTIC TREATMENT ALTERNATIVE TO A CLASS III SUBDIVISION MALOCCLUSION

    PubMed Central

    Janson, Guilherme; de Souza, José Eduardo Prado; Barros, Sérgio Estelita Cavalcante; Andrade, Pedro; Nakamura, Alexandre Yudi

    2009-01-01

    Class III malocclusions are considered one of the most complex and difficult orthodontic problems to diagnose and treat. Skeletal and/or dental asymmetries in patients presenting with Class III malocclusions can worsen the prognosis. Recognizing the dentoalveolar and skeletal characteristics of subdivision malocclusions and their treatment possibilities is essential for a favorable nonsurgical correction. Therefore, this article presents a nonsurgical asymmetric extraction approach to Class III subdivision malocclusion treatment which can significantly improve the occlusal and facial discrepancies. PMID:19668997

  10. Orthodontic treatment modalities: a qualitative assessment of Internet information.

    PubMed

    Arun, Madahar; Usman, Qureshi; Johal, Ama

    2017-06-01

    The present study aimed to determine the quality, accuracy, reliability and usability of Internet information, regarding different orthodontic treatment modalities. Google AdWords identified five popular keywords: Cosmetic braces, fixed braces, Removable braces, Quick braces and risks. These were entered in five search engines, with the resultant websites analysed using five validated assessment tools. Intra-examiner reliability was assessed, descriptive and inferential analysis of the data undertaken. Good intra-examiner reliability and consistency was observed. A total of 119 websites were included for analysis, with the keywords cosmetic and fixed braces accounting for 55% of identified websites. Invisalign was the most offered treatment (80%). Specialist orthodontists produced the highest, whilst general dentists advertising short-term options produced the lowest quality scoring websites. LIDA provided the most accurate assessment of quality (mean 62.02, SD 7.48). Regression analysis found a significant relationship between author type and a questions and answer sections with both Discern (P < 0.001) and LIDA (P = 0.002) scores, respectively. Quality of Information regarding orthodontic treatment was variable, with the highest scoring websites were produced by orthodontic specialists and Invisalign the most offered treatment. There is a clear need for valid and reliable websites to better guide patients.

  11. Evaluation of dental morphometrics during the orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diagnostic orthodontic and prosthetic procedures commence with an initial examination, during which a number of individual findings on occlusion or malocclusion are clarified. Nowadays we try to replace standard plaster casts by scanned objects and digital models. Method Geometrically calibrated images aid in the comparison of several different steps of the treatment and show the variation of selected features belonging to individual biomedical objects. The methods used are based on geometric morphometrics, making a new approach to the evaluation of the variability of features. The study presents two different methods of measurement and shows their accuracy and reliability. Results The experimental part of the present paper is devoted to the analysis of the dental arch objects of 24 patients before and after the treatment using the distances between the canines and premolars as the features important for diagnostic purposes. Our work proved the advantage of measuring digitalized orthodontic models over manual measuring of plaster casts, with statistically significant results and accuracy sufficient for dental practice. Conclusion A new method of computer imaging and measurements of a dental stone cast provides information with the precision required for orthodontic treatment. The results obtained point to the reduction in the variance of the distances between the premolars and canines during the treatment, with a regression coefficient RC=0.7 and confidence intervals close enough for dental practice. The ratio of these distances pointed to the nearly constant value of this measure close to 0.84 for the given set of 24 individuals. PMID:24893983

  12. Conservative orthodontic treatment of mandibular bilateral condyle fracture.

    PubMed

    Gašpar, Goran; Brakus, Ivan; Kovačić, Ivan

    2014-09-01

    Maxillofacial trauma is rare in children younger than the age of 5 years (range 0.6%-1.2%), and they can require different clinical treatment strategies compared with fractures in the adult population because of concerns regarding mandibular growth and development of dentition. A 5-year-old girl with a history of falling from a bicycle 7 hours earlier was referred to the department of oral and maxillofacial surgery. Multislice computed tomographic examination demonstrated a bilateral fracture of the mandibular condyle neck associated with minimal fracture of the alveolar ridge of the maxilla. The multislice computed tomographic scan also demonstrated dislocation on the right condyle neck and, on the left side, a medial inclination of approximately 45 degrees associated with greenstick fracture of the right parasymphysis region. In this particular case, orthodontic rubber elastics in combination with fixed orthodontic brackets provided good results in the treatment of bilateral condyle neck fractures associated with greenstick fracture of parasymphysis.

  13. Morphological changes in palatal rugae patterns following orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Ayman G; Allouh, Mohammed Z; Alshehab, Rawan M

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the morphometric changes that occur in palatal rugae during orthodontic treatment. The potential impact of these changes on the individuality of the palatal rugae patterns and on the use of palatal rugae patterns in human identification was also explored. Fifty pairs of pre- and post-orthodontic treatment dental casts were used. The palatal rugae patterns were compared between each pre-treatment cast and its post-treatment counterpart to reveal any morphometric changes. In addition, the individuality of the pre- and post-treatment sets of the casts was evaluated. Finally, a matching test of the palatal rugae patterns was performed in which the ability to match each post-treatment cast with its duplicate was compared with the ability to match that post-treatment cast with its pre-treatment counterpart. Statistical analysis of the results revealed the incidence of several morphometric changes, including segmentation (22%); unification (20%); changes in orientation (6%), shape (6%), and length (28%); anteroposterior displacement of the medial (54%) and lateral (60%) end of the ruga; and mediolateral displacement of the medial end of ruga (20%). The individuality of the palatal rugae patterns was confirmed in both pre- and post-treatment sets of casts. Finally, the mean percentage of correct matches was found to be significantly higher when the post-treatment casts were matched with their duplicates compared to when they were matched with their pre-treatment counterparts. The study revealed that Orthodontic treatment induces various morphometric changes in the palatal rugae patterns. These changes may potentially complicate palatal rugae-based human identification. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of surgical-orthodontic treatments on impacted mandibular canines.

    PubMed

    Aras, Mutan-Hamdi; Halicioğlu, Koray; Yavuz, Muhammed-Selim; Çağlaroğlu, Murat

    2011-11-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate patients treated for impacted mandibular canines through a combined surgical and orthodontic approach. The cases which were made button operations of impacted mandibular canines were selected from 5100 panoramic radiographs taken from patients who made use of our oral and maxillofacial surgery services between January 1998 to April 2006. All of these selected patients were assessed radiographically. Pertinent information such as sex, age at the time of surgery, site of the unerupted tooth, space availability and any other associated pathoses were also recorded. These patients were called again, and the condition of the mandibular canines was evaluated with panoramic radiographs. If the tooth erupted in the right position and it was functional and asymptomatic, we assumed the treatment to be successful clinically. In the present study, from 5100 patients, 69 patients had impacted mandibular canines and only 21 patients ' teeth (a total of 23 teeth) were treated orthodontically. Sixteen impacted mandibular canine teeth of 14 patients erupted successfully. Two impacted canine were extracted, and only one canine tooth was transplanted to the normal position. Four patients ended the treatment because of failure of eruption. If a mandibular canine tooth is impacted, not only is surgical exposure sufficient but also traction force must be applied orthodontically after the surgical exposure. In addition, age influences the success of the treatment on impacted mandibular canine teeth more than the position and impaction level of the teeth.

  15. [Sequence orthodontic treatment of impacted dilacerated maxillary central incisors].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi; Pang, Xuannai; Nan, Lan; Mo, Shuixue

    2012-06-01

    To explore an effective orthodontic method for treating impacted dilacerated maxillary central incisors. 12 impacted teeth of 11 cases were chosen. The position of the impacted teeth and the relations with neighbour tissues were assessed by X-ray images, oral examination and plaster model, etc. The impacted teeth were induced to erupt with the closed-eruption technique and fixed orthodontic appliances, root canal therapy, apicoectomy and prosthetic treatment. 12 impacted teeth were moved into arches, and the occlusal relationship was normal. There were no root resorption or conglutination in those impacted teeth. The labial impacted teeth of nine cases had bigger labial crown torsion. The root apexes of four impacted teeth were palpable under mucosa of the labial sulcus and operated by root canal therapy and apicoectomy. One of them received prosthetic treatment. Others (five cases) hadn't accepted root canal therapy, and were observed temporarily. The effects of two palatal impacted teeth was stable. It was a good method to expand indication with sequence orthodontic treatment. The impacted dilacerated maxillary central incisors could be aligned with good esthetical and functional effect.

  16. Combined orthodontic and periodontic treatment in a child with Papillon Lefèvre syndrome

    PubMed Central

    AlSarheed, Maha A.; Al-Sehaibany, Fares S.

    2015-01-01

    A 9-year-old girl with Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome (PLS) was treated orthodontically 24 months after the start of mechanical and antibiotic therapy in adjunct with periodontal treatment every 6 weeks. After achieving stable periodontal conditions, orthodontic treatment was commenced to correct the teeth position, facial profile, and maxillary protraction. Following the combination therapy and a failure to detect Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans from any site in the oral cavity, orthodontic treatment with a fixed appliance was performed aside from creating space for eruption of permanent teeth. We found that combined periodontal and orthodontic treatment of PLS may be successful with a complex interdisciplinary regimen and close follow up. This is a 2-year follow-up case report of a girl with PLS. Orthodontic and periodontic therapy were offered using combined treatments of orthodontic and periodontal with the benefit of prosthodontic consultation, resulting in a treatment plan. PMID:26219452

  17. Combined orthodontic and periodontic treatment in a child with Papillon Lefèvre syndrome.

    PubMed

    AlSarheed, Maha A; Al-Sehaibany, Fares S

    2015-08-01

    A 9-year-old girl with Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome (PLS) was treated orthodontically 24 months after the start of mechanical and antibiotic therapy in adjunct with periodontal treatment every 6 weeks. After achieving stable periodontal conditions, orthodontic treatment was commenced to correct the teeth position, facial profile, and maxillary protraction. Following the combination therapy and a failure to detect Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans from any site in the oral cavity, orthodontic treatment with a fixed appliance was performed aside from creating space for eruption of permanent teeth. We found that combined periodontal and orthodontic treatment of PLS may be successful with a complex interdisciplinary regimen and close follow up. This is a 2-year follow-up case report of a girl with PLS. Orthodontic and periodontic therapy were offered using combined treatments of orthodontic and periodontal with the benefit of prosthodontic consultation, resulting in a treatment plan.

  18. Provision of orthodontic care to adolescents in South Australia: the type, the provider, and the place of treatment.

    PubMed

    Allister, J H; Spencer, A J; Brennan, D S

    1996-12-01

    There are many pathways involving different providers and locations that individuals may take in obtaining, orthodontic services. The aim of this study was to document the provision of orthodontic services and establish the pathways taken toward fixed orthodontic treatment by adolescents in South Australia. Data were collected on the use of orthodontic services by a cohort of adolescents enrolled in the School Dental Service at age 13 years and again at age 15 years. By age 15 years, 83.2 per cent of the adolescents had received orthodontic consultations, 27.3 per cent had received fixed orthodontic treatment and 41.4 per cent had received other forms of orthodontic treatment (extractions, space retainers or removable appliances). The majority of fixed orthodontic treatment was supplied by orthodontists in the private sector, while extractions and removable appliances were provided mainly by public sector general dentists. Most individuals used services in both the public and private sectors and the most frequent pathway taken by the adolescents receiving fixed orthodontic treatment involved consultation in both the public and private sectors, non-fixed orthodontic treatment in the public sector and fixed orthodontic treatment in the private sector. The findings indicate wide access to orthodontic consultation and a high uptake of fixed orthodontic treatment once the adolescent sought private sector orthodontic consultation. Orthodontic care was seen to be an interactive process between public sector general dentists and private sector orthodontists.

  19. Healing of gingival recession following orthodontic treatment: a 30-year case report.

    PubMed

    Pini-Prato, Giovan Paolo; Cozzani, Giuseppe; Magnani, Cristina; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2012-02-01

    This case report describes the healing of gingival recessions on mandibular incisors resulting from orthodontic treatment of a deep bite malocclusion at a 30-year follow-up observation. The marked improvement in the severe recessions was a consequence of the elimination of the direct trauma, orthodontic intrusion of the affected teeth, and subsequent creeping attachment over time. No periodontal treatment was performed before or after orthodontic treatment.

  20. In-office bacteria test for a microbial monitoring during the conventional and self-ligating orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the microbial level of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus spp. during an orthodontic treatment, and compare the data with untreated control subjects. Sixty young adult subjects were selected (average 20.5, DS 1.62), among which 40 underwent an orthodontic treatment (20 were treated with self-ligating brackets and 20 with conventional brackets) and 20 were controls. Plaque Index, salivary flow and buffering capacity of saliva were assessed before the beginning of the orthodontic treatment. Then the microbial counts were obtained by using an in-office bacteria test. The plaque index (PI) increased over time in each group as well as salivary flow, mostly in subjects treated with self-ligating brackets, suggesting a difference between conventional and self-ligating brackets. S.mutans showed a different trend of colonization in the two treated groups, as for subjects treated with conventional brackets it showed the greater value at the early stage of treatment (T1), followed by a decrease at T2. Lactobacillus spp. showed significant increase over time in the two treated groups, respect to the control group. Linear regression analysis showed no significant predictor for the microbial count at T2. The assortment of the various species of bacteria change over time during the orthodontic treatment, and seems to show different trends, depending on the type of orthodontic device. Consequently a periodical microbial monitoring using in-office bacteria tests, seems indicated. PMID:23375053

  1. Pharmacological interventions for pain relief during orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Monk, Aoife B; Harrison, Jayne E; Worthington, Helen V; Teague, Annabel

    2017-11-28

    Pain is a common side effect of orthodontic treatment. It increases in proportion to the amount of force applied to the teeth, and the type of orthodontic appliance used can affect the intensity of the pain. Pain during orthodontic treatment has been shown to be the most common reason for people wanting to discontinue treatment, and has been ranked as the worst aspect of treatment. Although pharmacological methods of pain relief have been investigated, there remains some uncertainty among orthodontists about which painkillers are most suitable and whether pre-emptive analgesia is beneficial. We conducted this Cochrane Review to assess and summarize the international evidence relating to the effectiveness of analgesics for preventing this unwanted side effect associated with orthodontic treatment. The objectives of this review are to determine:- the effectiveness of drug interventions for pain relief during orthodontic treatment; and- whether there is a difference in the analgesic effect provided by different types, forms and doses of analgesia taken during orthodontic treatment. Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: the Cochrane Oral Health Trials Register (to 19 June 2017), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL;the Cochrane Library 2016, Issue 7), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 19 June 2017), Embase Ovid (1980 to 19 June 2017) and CINAHL EBSCO (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature; 1937 to 19 June 2017). The US National Institutes of Health Ongoing Trials Register (ClinicalTrials.gov) and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform were searched on the 19 June 2017 for ongoing studies. We placed no restrictions on language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) relating to pain control during orthodontic treatment. Pain could be measured on a visual analogue scale (VAS), numerical

  2. Nickel allergy: blood and periodontal evaluation after orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Pazzini, Camila A; Pereira, Luciano J; Peconick, Ana P; Marques, Leandro S; Paiva, Saul M

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess periodontal status and blood parameters in orthodontic patients with nickel allergy one month after removal of brackets. Ninety-six randomly selected patients were initially evaluated. Allergy to nickel was diagnosed using a patch test. After determining the prevalence of subjects allergic to nickel, two groups were formed: 16 allergic (experimental) and 16 non-allergic (control) patients. Their periodontal status was determined regularly by a single, blinded, duly calibrated examiner using the Löe Index (GI) and their blood was tested (complete blood test, including nickel and IgE levels) after nine months of orthodontic treatment and again one month after removing the orthodontic appliances. Statistical analyses included paired and non-paired t-tests, Mann-Whitney, Wilcoxon, McNemar and linear trend chi-square tests (p≤0.05). Comparison of the values recorded during orthodontic treatment and one month after removing the appliances showed that in the allergic group there was significant increase in eosinophils (p=0.046), basophils (p=0.001) and monocytes (p=0.002), and decrease in number of bands (p=0.000), while in the control group, there was increase in lymphocytes (p=0.039) and decrease in segmented neutrophils (p=0.030) and IgE levels (p=0.001). In both groups, plasma nickel levels increased (p=0.010; p=0.039) and GI scores decreased. One month after removing the brackets, blood and periodontal parameters from patients with and without nickel allergy were similar. Sociedad Argentina de Investigación Odontológica.

  3. Quantitative assessment of the effectiveness of phase 1 orthodontic treatment using the American Board of Orthodontics Discrepancy Index.

    PubMed

    Vasilakou, Nefeli; Araujo, Eustaquio A; Kim, Ki Beom; Oliver, Donald R

    2016-12-01

    This retrospective study included a sample of 300 randomly selected patients from the archived records of Saint Louis University's graduate orthodontic clinic, St. Louis, Mo, from 1990 to 2012. The objective of this study was to quantify the changes obtained in phase 1 of orthodontic treatment and determine how much improvement, if any, has occurred before the initiation of the second phase. For the purpose of this study, prephase 1 and prephase 2 records of 300 subjects were gathered. All were measured using the American Board of Ortodontics Discrepancy Index (DI), and a score was given for each phase. The difference of the 2 scores indicated the quantitative change of the complexity of the treatment. Paired t tests were used to compare the scores. Additionally, the sample was categorized into 3 groups according to the Angle classifications, and the same statistics were used to identify significant changes between the 2 scores. Analysis of variance was applied to compare the 3 groups and determine which had the most change. Percentages of change were calculated for the significant scores. The total DI score overall and the scores of all 3 groups were significantly reduced from before to after phase 1. Overall, 42% improvement was observed. The Class I group showed 49.3% improvement, the Class II group 34.5% and the Class III group 58.5%. Most components of the DI improved significantly, but a few showed negative changes. Significant reductions of DI scores were observed in the total sample and in all Angle classification groups. This indicates that early treatment reduces the complexity of the malocclusions. Only 2 components of the DI showed statistically significant negative changes. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Orthodontic treatment need in school-age children in the Leningrad region].

    PubMed

    Bagnenko, N M; Bagnenko, A S; Grebnev, G A; Madai, D Y

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiology of dentoalveolar anomalies is undoubtedly important, but in terms of the organization of orthodontic care, greater interest are data on the needs in this type of treatment. In a situation of limited manpower and resources for the provision of orthodontic care information about needs in orthodontic treatment allows you to define a group of patients with the primary need for orthodontic treatment, and to identify priorities to optimize the organization of orthodontic care in the region. Such data can be obtained by using the Dental Aesthetics Index (DAI) and Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN). The aim of the study was to analyze the epidemiology of various forms of dentoalveolar anomalies school-age children of Kirishi district of Leningrad region, as well as their needs in orthodontic treatment in accordance with objective evaluation indices. The study involved 734 pupils of Kirishi lyceum №1 of Leningrad region. Analysis of the prevalence of dentoalveolar anomalies, as well as needs in the orthodontic treatment was conducted in three age groups: I mixed dentition period (6-9 years), II mixed dentition period (10-13 years), and permanent dentition (14-17). To determine the needs in the orthodontic treatment were used two most common international index (DAI and IOTN). In Kirishi district of Leningrad region dentoalveolar anomalies were found in 88.8% of children of school age, which is in accordance with the indices and IOTN DAI needs in orthodontic treatment is 38.8% and 54.5%, respectively. In order to reduce unnecessarily high load volume medical institutions orthodontic profile, optimize utilization of financial resources, as well as reducing social tension it is recommended to introduce the practice of doctors-orthodontists methodology for determining the needs in orthodontic treatment by objective indices.

  5. The treatment effects of Invisalign orthodontic aligners: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lagravère, Manuel O; Flores-Mir, Carlos

    2005-12-01

    The authors conducted a systematic review of the literature to determine the treatment effects of the Invisalign orthodontic system (Align Technology), Santa Clara, Calif.). The authors reviewed clinical trials that assessed Invisalign's treatment effects in nongrowing patients. They did not consider trials involving surgical or other simultaneous fixed or removable orthodontic treatment interventions. The authors searched electronic databases (PubMed, MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, Evidence Based Medicine Reviews, EMBASE Excerpta Medica, Thomsen's ISI Web of Science and LILACS) with the help of a senior health sciences librarian. They used "Invisalign" as the sole search term, and 22 documents appeared in the combined search. Thereafter, they used "clinical trials," "humans" and "Invisalign treatment effects" as abstract selection criteria. Only two published articles met these inclusion criteria, though after reading the actual articles, the authors determined that they did not adequately evaluate Invisalign treatment effects. Both articles identified methodological issues. The inadequately designed studies the authors found represented only a lower level of evidence (level II). Therefore, the authors found that no strong conclusions could be made regarding the treatment effects of Invisalign appliances. Future prospective randomized clinical trials are required to support, with sound scientific evidence, the claims about Invisalign's treatment effects. Clinicians will have to rely on their Invisalign clinical experience, the opinions of experts and the limited published evidence when using Invisalign appliances.

  6. [Gingival health and esthetics--another aspect of objectives of orthodontic treatment].

    PubMed

    Ai, Dongqing; Xu, Hui; Bai, Ding

    2013-04-01

    Contemporary orthodontic care should be a team approach to achieve health and esthetics of soft and hard tissue. It should be given enough attention that periodontal health provides the foundation for tooth movement, and that distinct esthetic results can be achieved by subtle changes in tooth alignment and gingival contours. Orthodontic treatment planning should include evaluation of gingival health and esthetics to anticipate the need for interdisciplinary approaches. Studies on the effect of orthodontic treatment on gingiva can provides basis for maintaining gingival health and esthetic. This article will focus primarily on the gingival health and esthetic care in orthodontic treatment.

  7. The effect of orthodontic bands or tubes upon periodontal status during the initial phase of orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Al-Anezi, Saud A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Orthodontic bands cause periodontal inflammation. In theory, the use of a buccal tube (bond) instead of a band should prevent or minimize periodontal changes because the bonds are positioned away from the gingival margins. Objective The primary aim of this study was to investigate the periodontal status of orthodontic bands compared with bonds in the first three months of orthodontic treatment. Materials and methods Twenty-four orthodontic patients (mean age = 12.6 years) were enrolled in this Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT). Using the cross-mouth technique, bands and bonds were used in opposite quadrants. Periodontal parameters including the presence or absence of Bleeding On Probing (BOP) and Probing Depths (PDs) were taken at the start and three months into treatment. Results Bands caused a statistically significant change in the Bleeding On Probing (BOP) (P = 0.001 and 0.021) and bonds displayed a statistically insignificant change in the Bleeding On Probing (BOP) (P = 0.125 and 1.00) for the upper and lower arch. The difference in Probing Depths (PDs) between bands and bonds was also statistically significant (P = 0.001). Conclusion Molar bands are associated with greater periodontal inflammation compared with molar bonds in the first three months of fixed orthodontic treatment. PMID:26236124

  8. Psychosocial predictors of affect in adult patients undergoing orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Peñacoba, Cecilia; González, M José; Santos, Noelia; Romero, Martín

    2014-02-01

    In this paper we propose to study the role of psychosocial variables in affect in adult patients undergoing orthodontic treatment, considering that affect is a key variable in treatment adherence. Seventy-four patients (average age 33,24 ± 10,56) with metal multibracket-fixed orthodontic treatment were included. Patients were assessed twice. The first stage, at the beginning of treatment, included assessment of dental impact (Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire), trait anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory), self-esteem (Rosenberg's self-esteem scale), and self-efficacy (General Self-efficacy Scale). In the second stage, 6 months later, positive and negative affect towards treatment was assessed using the Positive and Negative Affect Scale. Dental social impact differentiates between patients with high and low negative affect, while self-efficacy differentiates between patients with high and low positive affect. Trait anxiety and self-esteem differentiate between both types of affect (positive and negative). Trait anxiety and self-esteem (when trait anxiety weight is controlled) are significant predictor variables of affective balance. These results have important practical implications, because it seems essential to adopt a bio-psychosocial model incorporating assessment methods focusing on day-to-day changes in mood and well-being.

  9. A Survey of Orthodontic Treatment in Team Care for Patients With Syndromic Craniosynostosis in Japan.

    PubMed

    Susami, Takafumi; Fukawa, Toshihiko; Miyazaki, Haruyo; Sakamoto, Teruo; Morishita, Tadashi; Sato, Yoshiaki; Kinno, Yoshiaki; Kurata, Kazuyuki; Watanabe, Keiichiro; Asahito, Toshikazu; Saito, Isao

    2018-04-01

    To understand the actual condition of orthodontic treatment in team care for patients with syndromic craniosynostosis (SCS) in Japan. A nationwide collaborative survey. Twenty-four orthodontic clinics in Japan. A total of 246 patients with SCS. Treatment history was examined based on orthodontic records using common survey sheets. Most patients first visited the orthodontic clinic in the deciduous or mixed dentition phase. Midface advancement was performed without visiting the orthodontic clinic in about a quarter of the patients, and more than a half of the patients underwent "surgery-first" midface advancement. First-phase orthodontic treatment was carried out in about a half of the patients, and maxillary expansion and protraction were performed. Tooth extraction was required in about two-thirds of patients, and the extraction of maxillary teeth was required in most patients. Tooth abnormalities were found in 37.8% of patients, and abnormalities of maxillary molars were frequently (58.3%) found in patients who had undergone midface surgery below the age of 6 years. Many patients underwent "surgery-first" midface advancement, and visiting the orthodontic clinic at least before advancement was considered desirable. First-phase orthodontic treatment should be performed considering the burden of care. Midface advancement below the age of 6 years had a high risk of injury to the maxillary molars. This survey is considered useful for improving orthodontic treatment in team care of patients with SCS.

  10. Guidelines for periodontal care and follow-up during orthodontic treatment in adolescents and young adults

    PubMed Central

    LEVIN, Liran; EINY, Shmuel; ZIGDON, Hadar; AIZENBUD, Dror; MACHTEI, Eli E.

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive periodontitis is characterized by non-contributory medical history, rapid attachment loss and bone destruction and familial aggregation of cases. Aggressive periodontitis (both localized and generalized) is usually diagnosed in a young population. This is frequently the age that an orthodontic care is provided to this population. The aim of the present paper is to draw guidelines for periodontal evaluation and monitoring prior to and during active orthodontic treatment. Strict adherence to these guidelines as a routine protocol for periodontal examination prior, during and following orthodontic treatment may dramatically decrease the severity and improve the prognosis of patients with aggressive periodontitis in orthodontic clinics. PMID:23032199

  11. Guidelines for periodontal care and follow-up during orthodontic treatment in adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Levin, Liran; Einy, Shmuel; Zigdon, Hadar; Aizenbud, Dror; Machtei, Eli E

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive periodontitis is characterized by non-contributory medical history, rapid attachment loss and bone destruction and familial aggregation of cases. Aggressive periodontitis (both localized and generalized) is usually diagnosed in a young population. This is frequently the age that an orthodontic care is provided to this population. The aim of the present paper is to draw guidelines for periodontal evaluation and monitoring prior to and during active orthodontic treatment. Strict adherence to these guidelines as a routine protocol for periodontal examination prior, during and following orthodontic treatment may dramatically decrease the severity and improve the prognosis of patients with aggressive periodontitis in orthodontic clinics.

  12. [Fibrous dysplasia of maxilla and the orthodontic treatment. Case report].

    PubMed

    Syryńska, Maria; Szyszka, Liliana; Kowalczyk, Robert; Wedrychowska-Szulc, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Patients who have malocclusions caused by bone diseases come to see the dentist for the orthodontic treatment. One of these diseases is fibrous dysplasia. The aim of this study was to present the patient with the active form of fibrous dysplasia who reported to the Orthodontic Department of Pomeranian Medical University in Szczecin for treatment. We used the patient's own documentation, photos, radiological view and histopathological investigations. The extraoral, clinical examination revealed the asymmetry of the face on the left side, while the intraoral examination showed the convex lesion similar to an egg on the palate which crosses the medial line and clear "distension" of the alveolar bone in the direction of the oral vestibule. The dysplastic lesions are extensive and cause numerous malocclusions and disorders of the symmetry. The radiological and histopathological examinations were added to the clinical examination. The panoramic radiographs have shown the asymmetry and heterogenic structure of the bone with areas of"ground glass". Computer tomography demonstrated bumpy thickening of the zygomatic bone, maxilla, and a great wing of the sphenoid bone and almost completely filled maxillary sinus. The histopathological examination is the confirmation of the diagnosis of fibrous dysplasia. It demonstrates immature bone. The diagnosis of fibrous dysplasia commands the periodic observation and the postponement of the orthodontic treatment in the stage of active development of lesions, but when the overgrowth impairs the function, there is the necessity to use surgical and radical excision to remove lesions. We must pay particular attention to the possibility of malignant transformation of these lesions.

  13. Multiple congenitally missing teeth: treatment outcome with autologous transplantation and orthodontic space closure.

    PubMed

    Fiorentino, Giuseppe; Vecchione, Pietro

    2007-11-01

    Treatment for patients with congenitally missing teeth can be challenging. The treatment options include retaining the deciduous teeth, extracting the deciduous teeth and allowing the space to close spontaneously, implant replacement, autotransplantation, prosthetic replacement, and orthodontic space closure. Autologous transplantation and space closure with orthodontic appliances are demonstrated in this case report.

  14. Surgical Orthodontic Treatment of an Impacted Canine in the Presence of Dens Invaginatus and Follicular Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Canevello, Carola; Laffi, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. “Dens invaginatus” is a dental anomaly which originates from the invagination of the ameloblastic epithelium into the lingual surface of the dental crown during the odontogenesis. It can cause early pulpal necrosis, abscesses, retention or dislocation of contiguous elements, cysts, and internal resorptions. It normally affects the upper lateral incisors. In the following study the authors will discuss the etiology, the physiopathology, and the surgical-orthodontic management of a rare case of impacted canine associated with dens invaginatus and follicular cyst, with the aim of highlighting the importance of taking any therapeutic decision based on the data available in the literature. Case Report. The present study describes a combined surgical-orthodontic treatment of an impacted canine associated with a lateral incisor (2.2) suffering from type III dens invaginatus with radicular cyst, in a 15-year-old patient. Discussion. When treating a dens invaginatus there are different therapeutic solutions: they depend on the gravity of the anomaly and on the association with the retention of a permanent tooth. The aesthetic and functional restoration becomes extremely important when performing a surgical-orthodontic repositioning. PMID:24963421

  15. Surgical orthodontic treatment of an impacted canine in the presence of dens invaginatus and follicular cyst.

    PubMed

    Spallarossa, Marialuce; Canevello, Carola; Silvestrini Biavati, Francesca; Laffi, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. "Dens invaginatus" is a dental anomaly which originates from the invagination of the ameloblastic epithelium into the lingual surface of the dental crown during the odontogenesis. It can cause early pulpal necrosis, abscesses, retention or dislocation of contiguous elements, cysts, and internal resorptions. It normally affects the upper lateral incisors. In the following study the authors will discuss the etiology, the physiopathology, and the surgical-orthodontic management of a rare case of impacted canine associated with dens invaginatus and follicular cyst, with the aim of highlighting the importance of taking any therapeutic decision based on the data available in the literature. Case Report. The present study describes a combined surgical-orthodontic treatment of an impacted canine associated with a lateral incisor (2.2) suffering from type III dens invaginatus with radicular cyst, in a 15-year-old patient. Discussion. When treating a dens invaginatus there are different therapeutic solutions: they depend on the gravity of the anomaly and on the association with the retention of a permanent tooth. The aesthetic and functional restoration becomes extremely important when performing a surgical-orthodontic repositioning.

  16. Orthodontic treatment need and demand among 12- and 16 year-old school children in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Zreaqat, Maen; Hassan, Rozita; Ismail, Abdul Rashid; Ismail, Noorliza Mastura; Aziz, Fadi Abdul

    2013-12-01

    Assessment of orthodontic treatment need and demand helps in planning orthodontic services and estimating the required resources and man power. The aim of this study was to assess the orthodontic treatment need and demand and to assess the association between the orthodontic treatment demand and factors such as ITON, gender, and age. Treatment need was assessed using the DHC and AC of IOTN among 12- and 16-year-old Malay school children. The treatment demand was also assessed through a modified health questionnaire and its association with IOTN, age, and gender. A total number of 837 Malay school children were randomly recruited (389 males and 448 females divided into two age groups; 12-year olds; and 16-year olds). Findings showed that 51.4% of 12-year-old school children had definite need for treatment (DHC>4) while 22% of them desired treatment. Among 16-year-old subjects, 56.4% showed definite need for treatment while 47.2% desired treatment. The 16-year-old group was more interested in orthodontic treatment than the 12-year-old group (P<0.001). Only age was associated with treatment demand while gender had no effect (P>0.05). There is a high level of need for treatment among Malay school children which was not associated with orthodontic demand. Age was associated with orthodontic demand.

  17. Psychosocial impact of dental aesthetics and desire for orthodontic treatment among Chinese undergraduate students

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Song; Zhang, Chuqin; Ni, Chulei; Qian, Ying; Zhang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study is to evaluate the psychosocial impact of dental aesthetics in undergraduate students in the People’s Republic of China and to investigate the association between normal orthodontic treatment needs, psychosocial impact of dental aesthetics, and desire for orthodontic treatment. Materials and methods A cross-sectional study was carried out in two universities in a city of the People’s Republic of China with 374 young adults aged between 19 years and 24 years. The students answered a Chinese version of the Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire (PIDAQ) and addressed their desire for orthodontic treatment. Objective malocclusion severity was assessed with the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN). Statistical analysis was performed by the SPSS software (Version 15.0). Results There was no statistical sex difference in relation to the dental health component of IOTN (P=0.893) and PIDAQ scores (P=0.06), but it was found that the desire for orthodontic treatment was significantly stronger among females. The total and subscale PIDAQ scores and malocclusion severity differed significantly among the five grades of desire (P<0.01). Significant positive correlation was found among desire for orthodontic treatment, IOTN-dental health component grades, and total or subscale PIDAQ scores (P<0.01). High correlation was found between desire and PIDAQ score (r=0.93). Conclusion The desire for orthodontic treatment is higher among female young adults who have the same orthodontic treatment needs compared to males. The desire for orthodontic treatment has high positive correlation with PIDAQ scores and increases with the increase in self-perceived psychosocial impacts of malocclusion and the needs for orthodontic treatment. PMID:27354773

  18. Treatment outcomes in 3 modes of orthodontic practice.

    PubMed

    Poulton, Donald R; Baumrind, Sheldon; Vlaskalic, Vicki

    2002-02-01

    This study examined differences in pretreatment severity and treatment outcome among orthodontic patients treated in 3 different practice-management modes. Samples of pretreatment (T1) and end of treatment (T2) study casts were selected from traditional private practices (TPP, 3 offices, 81 cases), a dental corporation (COMP, 2 offices, 53 cases), and a dental management service organization (DMSO, 1 office, 36 cases). Orthodontic specialists had treated all patients. Cases were initially selected on a consecutive start basis. From each practice, the first 30 cases satisfying the study criteria were included in the sample. The T1 and T2 study casts were evaluated with the PAR and HLD indexes. The PAR and HLD indexes showed a high level of agreement on T1 cast scores but not on the T2 casts. Mean T1 scores were highest in the COMP cases, followed by the DMSO and the TPP cases. T2 scores were lowest in the TPP cases, followed by the DMSO and the COMP cases. The percentage of PAR score reduction showed that, in all 3 modes, patients were treated to a high standard.

  19. Dental visits, oral hygiene behaviour, and orthodontic treatment in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Stadelmann, Pascale; Zemp, Elisabeth; Weiss, Carine; Weiger, Roland; Menghini, Giorgio; Zitzmann, Nicola U

    2012-01-01

    Since the first survey in 1992/93, the Swiss Health Survey (SHS) has been repeated every 5 years (1997, 2002 and 2007). In the present study, dental visits (dental care utilisation within the last 12 months), oral hygiene measures and the frequency of orthodontic treatments in the Swiss population in 2002 were examined and dental visits were compared with the years 1992/93, 1997 and 2007. Weighted data were analysed regarding different sociodemographic factors. From 1992 to 2002, dental visits among the 15-74-year-old declined continuously (1992/93: 70%, 1997: 66%, 2002: 63%), whereas in 2007 a slight increase (66%) was documented. In the survey from 2002, a large proportion (74%) of the population stated to clean their teeth or prostheses several times a day, predominantly with a manual toothbrush, whereas 28% applied an electric toothbrush and almost half of the respondents also used dental floss or toothpicks. Fewer visits and less intensive oral hygiene measures were observed among the elderly, men, weak social strata, smokers, persons with more than 8 missing teeth and in the group with removable dentures. Almost a quarter of the population had orthodontic treatment with the highest proportion among the 15-24-year-old (56%).

  20. Tooth movement after orthodontic treatment with 4 second premolar extractions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kun; Han, Xianglong; Huang, Lan; Bai, Ding

    2010-12-01

    This retrospective study was designed to investigate the position changes and movement patterns of incisors and molars after orthodontic treatment with extractions of 4 second premolars in patients with mild crowding, slight dental protrusion, and Angle Class I relationship. Pretreatment and posttreatment cephalograms of 26 subjects were chosen from patients treated by an experienced orthodontist. The movements of the incisors and the molars as well as tooth tipping were measured. Relative to the posttreatment occlusal plane, the mean incisor movements were 3.3 and 2.9 mm lingually in the maxilla and the mandible, respectively. The first molars were moved mesially an average of 3.2 and 3.4 mm in the maxilla and the mandible, respectively. The incisor inclination was under proper control. The extraction space was almost equally taken up by the anterior and posterior segments. These data can be used to estimate the expected position changes and movement patterns of the incisors and molars in patients with mild crowding and slight bialveolar dental protrusion after orthodontic treatment with 4 second premolar extractions. Copyright © 2010 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Orthodontic Camouflage: A Treatment Option – A Clinical Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mazzini, William Ubilla; Torres, Fátima Mazzini

    2017-01-01

    Orthodontic camouflage provides an alternative treatment for angle III malocclusion since patients with limited economic resources cannot opt for orthognathic surgery, it being clear that correction will be achieved at the dental level and not at the bone complex. Objective: To determine an alternative treatment for patients who do not have the possibility of having orthognathic surgery. Clinical case: A 13-year-old female patient, dolico facial biotype with slightly concave profile, with Class III Skeletal by mandibular prognathism, anterior crossbite, anterior diastema, and large mandibular body, molar class, and canine III. Alexander technique brackets were placed; premolar extraction was not planned. Once the case was completed, the correction of the anterior crossbite was achieved, thanks to the use of the spaces that existed at the beginning of the treatment and also that a correct distalization of canines and retraction of the lower anterior segment were performed. PMID:29326524

  2. Adolescent perceptions of orthodontic treatment risks and risk information: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Perry, John; Johnson, Ilona; Popat, Hashmat; Morgan, Maria Z; Gill, Paul

    2018-04-24

    For effective risk communication, clinicians must understand patients' values and beliefs in relation to the risks of treatment. This qualitative study aimed to explore adolescent perceptions of orthodontic treatment risks and risk information. Five focus groups were carried out with 32 school/college pupils aged 12-18 in Wales, UK. Participants were purposively selected and had all experienced orthodontic treatment. A thematic approach was used for analysis and data collection was completed at the point of data saturation. Four themes emerged from the data; (a) day-to-day risks of orthodontic treatment, (b) important orthodontic risk information, (c) engaging with orthodontic risk information and (d) managing the risks of orthodontic treatment. Day-to-day risks of orthodontic treatment that were affecting participants "here and now" were of most concern. Information about preventing the risks of treatment was deemed to be important. Participants did not actively seek risk information but engaged passively with information from convenient sources. Perceptions of risk susceptibility influenced participants' management of the risks of orthodontic treatment. This study demonstrates that adolescent patients can understand information about the nature and severity of orthodontic treatment risks. However, adolescent patients can have false perceptions if the risks are unfamiliar, perceived only to have a future impact or if seen as easy to control. Adolescent patients must be provided with timely and easily accessible risk information and with practical solutions to prevent the risks of treatment. The views and experiences gathered in this study can assist clinicians to better understand their young patients' beliefs about treatment risks, facilitate effective risk communication and contribute to improved patient-centred care. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Orthodontic care in suburban Cuyahoga County, Ohio: who provides treatment and whom do they treat?

    PubMed

    Hans, Mark G; Le, Nhat Minh; Armogan, Vidya; Abei, Yumi; Bernard, Lowell; Nelson, Suchitra

    2004-06-01

    It has been reported that orthodontic services are being provided to a larger segment of the population by an increasing number of providers. The present study surveyed the dental and orthodontic experiences of 10th grade students attending 16 public and two parochial high schools in suburban Cuyahoga County, Ohio, as well as two schools from the city of Cleveland. Questionnaires were distributed in the classroom and data obtained for 2808 students. Approximately 50% of the sample were girls with an average age of 15.5 +/- 0.8 years. Results of the survey revealed that 84% (2371/2808) had seen a dentist within the past year, and 37% (1047/2808) of the students had received orthodontic treatment from 171 different providers. Of those treated, 87.2% (913/1047) were treated by a specialist in orthodontics, 10.8% (114/1047) by a general dentist, and 0.7% (7/1047) by a pediatric dentist, with 1.3% missing or unknown (13/1047). Patients who had seen a dentist within the past year were more likely to have had orthodontic treatment. Only 7% of the untreated students were told by a dental professional that they needed braces compared with 71% of the treated group. Therefore, we conclude that orthodontic specialists provide most of the orthodontic services in the suburbs of Cuyahoga County, and visiting a general dentist positively influences the utilization of orthodontic services.

  4. Mathematical formulation of biomechanical parameters used in orthodontic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishna, A.; Vamsi, Ch. Raghu; Rao, V. D. Prasad; Swamy, Ch. Kishore; Kuladeep, B.

    2015-05-01

    Orthodontic Treatment is being widely practiced around the world for teeth straightening and extraction to improve alignment of remaining teeth. Here, forces are applied to correct the position of teeth. The force applied on the teeth isn't calibrated and applied arbitrarily based on the recommendations from scientific research and experience of the orthodontist. The number of settings and the total time required for the completion of treatment also remains arbitrary. So, there is a need for determining the force which is actually acting on the teeth and determining the optimal force required for the treatment of each and every individual case. In this paper a mathematical relation is derived between the force applied on the tooth and tooth displacement by considering a 2nd order non-homogeneous linear differential equation. As the tooth displacement is not a direct function of force applied, Biomechanical parameters like mass of tooth, stiffness and damping coefficient of periodontal ligament & alveolar bone are involved in the differential equation. By solving the equation, tooth displacement thereby, tooth velocity can be obtained for a particular force. On the other hand, based on the dimensions of the model, orthodontist could determine the total tooth displacement required for each setting of the treatment, so that, the total displacement is covered. The orthodontist uses the data and applies the required force on to the teeth, based on which the orthodontist can plan his treatment procedure and reduce the number of settings, total treatment time and also increases the success rate of the treatment.

  5. [Conservative treatment of upper anterior dental discrepancy during orthodontic therapy].

    PubMed

    Messina, G; Verzì, P; Pappalardo, S

    1999-06-01

    The orthodontic therapeutic sequence used in cases with dento-dental discrepancy for reduced mesiodistal size and congenital absent lateral upper incisors, is described. The importance of correct conoid tooth replacement in the programmed space between the other teeth and its restorative treatment in order to obtain the best biomechanical control is stressed. The contemporaneous presence of the form and volume anomaly of the 12th and the missing 22nd due to agenesia demanded an interdisciplinary approach. For the restoration of the conoid tooth the authors used a microhybrid composite for the alloy properties with the grain size of the inorganic particles. In fact this type of composite responds well to mechanical stress and has a high shining capacity and good aesthetical rendering. Meanwhile the temporary dental prothesis solution of the 22nd in this case has suggested the application of the artificial element on the superior Hawley holding plaque.

  6. Pain Perception and Personality Trait toward Orthodontic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jaideep; Dixit, Pankaj; Singh, Prerana; Kedia, Neal Bharat; Tiwari, Manish Kumar; Kumar, Amit

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The study was done to evaluate the pain perception, attitude, and personality trait of the patient toward orthodontic treatment. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional questionnaire survey, 100 patients were divided into Group 1, 150 (75 males and 75 females) as untreated group and Group 2, 150 as treated group (75 males and 75 females). Evaluation of the patients was done based on pain perception, attitude, and personality trait. Set of questionnaire was used to assess attitude and pain perception on visual analog scale. The data were tabulated, and statistical evaluation was done using statistical software IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, (Version 21.0. Armonk, NY: IBM Corp.) using t-test and Tukey's test. Results: The mean pain perception for Group 1 was 4.8 ± 1.30 and 4.17 ± 1.58 in Group 2; the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.26). The mean value for attitude in Group 1 was 3.57 ± 1.21, and in Group 2, it was 3.39 ± 1.60 (P = 0.09). There was statistically significant difference in pain perception between low (L) level to high level (H) neuroticism (P = 0.009). There was significant difference (P = 0.021) in pain for conscientiousness from very low to very high levels which is directly proportional. Conclusion: The present study indicated that attitude, personality traits, and pain perception have a definite role in patient cooperation and success of orthodontic treatment. PMID:29387624

  7. Lingual orthodontic treatment and absolute anchorage to correct an impacted maxillary canine in an adult.

    PubMed

    Chaushu, Stella; Becker, Adrian; Chaushu, Gavriel

    2008-12-01

    There are 2 major drawbacks to the classic orthodontic-surgical approach for resolution of impacted teeth in adults: appearance and duration of treatment. This case report illustrates the lingual orthodontic treatment of an adult with an impacted maxillary canine; absolute anchorage was achieved with a miniscrew placed in the palate. The combination of invisible appliances and a nondental anchorage system is particularly useful in adults and should make treatment available to more patients.

  8. Combined orthodontic-surgical approach in the treatment of impacted maxillary canines: three clinical cases

    PubMed Central

    SPUNTARELLI, M.; CECCHETTI, F.; ARCURI, L.; TESTI, D.; MELONE, P.; BIGELLI, E.; GERMANO, F.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Impaction of maxillary canine is a relatively frequent orthodontic anomaly which could represent fuctional and aesthetic problems for patients. Nowadays, the conventional technique to impacted canines consists of a combined orthodontic and surgical approach, aimed to guide cuspids at the center of the alveolar ridge in a stable position and surrounded by healthy hard and soft tissues. This article presents three cases studies with different combined surgical-orthodontic approaches for the treatment of infraosseous impacted canines. An impacted maxillary canine could be guided, after adequate space is created orthodontically, to the center of the ridge through an orthodontic traction directly applied to the crown of impacted cuspid. Several surgical techniques have been proposed to expose the crown of impacted tooth. Location (buccal or palatal side) of impactation and depth influence surgical approach in order to obtain best aesthetic and functional results. PMID:27555906

  9. Combined orthodontic-surgical approach in the treatment of impacted maxillary canines: three clinical cases.

    PubMed

    Spuntarelli, M; Cecchetti, F; Arcuri, L; Testi, D; Melone, P; Bigelli, E; Germano, F

    2015-01-01

    Impaction of maxillary canine is a relatively frequent orthodontic anomaly which could represent fuctional and aesthetic problems for patients. Nowadays, the conventional technique to impacted canines consists of a combined orthodontic and surgical approach, aimed to guide cuspids at the center of the alveolar ridge in a stable position and surrounded by healthy hard and soft tissues. This article presents three cases studies with different combined surgical-orthodontic approaches for the treatment of infraosseous impacted canines. An impacted maxillary canine could be guided, after adequate space is created orthodontically, to the center of the ridge through an orthodontic traction directly applied to the crown of impacted cuspid. Several surgical techniques have been proposed to expose the crown of impacted tooth. Location (buccal or palatal side) of impactation and depth influence surgical approach in order to obtain best aesthetic and functional results.

  10. The extended tentacles of laser - From diagnosis to treatment in orthodontics: An overview.

    PubMed

    Milling Tania, S D; Sathiasekar, Cynthia; Anison, Job Jacob; Samyukta Reddy, B V

    2015-08-01

    Since the introduction of lasers in dentistry in the mid-1990's, research in laser supported dental therapies is progressing at a rapid pace. Orthodontics is no exception. In orthodontics, lasers have many diagnostic, therapeutic, and biomodulating applications. To update the various applications of lasers in orthodontics. Lasers work by delivering energy in the form of light. Laser, striking the biological tissues can either get reflected, absorbed or scattered depending on several factors. Depending on the fate of the emitted laser, it can be applied for different diagnostic, therapeutic and surgical procedures. The knowledge and understanding of different types of lasers and its specific applications is a prerequisite before it can be applied beneficially. In Orthodontics, the versatility of laser has expanded into bonding, curing, debonding, imaging, growth modification, pain reduction, etc. Definitely laser has extended its tentacles from diagnosis to treatment in orthodontics.

  11. The extended tentacles of laser - From diagnosis to treatment in orthodontics: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Milling Tania, S. D.; Sathiasekar, Cynthia; Anison, Job Jacob; Samyukta Reddy, B. V.

    2015-01-01

    Since the introduction of lasers in dentistry in the mid-1990's, research in laser supported dental therapies is progressing at a rapid pace. Orthodontics is no exception. In orthodontics, lasers have many diagnostic, therapeutic, and biomodulating applications. To update the various applications of lasers in orthodontics. Lasers work by delivering energy in the form of light. Laser, striking the biological tissues can either get reflected, absorbed or scattered depending on several factors. Depending on the fate of the emitted laser, it can be applied for different diagnostic, therapeutic and surgical procedures. The knowledge and understanding of different types of lasers and its specific applications is a prerequisite before it can be applied beneficially. In Orthodontics, the versatility of laser has expanded into bonding, curing, debonding, imaging, growth modification, pain reduction, etc. Definitely laser has extended its tentacles from diagnosis to treatment in orthodontics. PMID:26538884

  12. Use of laser technology in orthodontics: hard and soft tissue laser treatments.

    PubMed

    Genovese, M D; Olivi, G

    2010-03-01

    Modern technology has perfected a new instrument that has become almost indispensable in modern dentistry, in accordance with the philosophy of minimally invasive therapy: the laser. The aim of this work is to evaluate the effectiveness and efficacy of laser technology to solve mucogingival problems associated with orthodontic treatment. Some laser wavelengths work both on hard and soft tissues (2780 nm, 2940 nm), other lasers, such as the 810 nm diode, have a very good surgical and haemostatic action on soft tissues and an important analgesic and biostimulating effect that can help the healing of both TMJ painful symptoms as well as the pain following active orthodontic treatment. Several cases connected to orthodontic therapy are presented. Different laser systems (diode laser at 810 nm; Er,Cr:YSGG laser at 2780 nm; Erbium:YAG laser at 2940 nm) were used, both for soft tissue surgery and enamel etching, and for biostimulating effect. These wavelengths were used with different parameters for each case, according to international current studies in view of minimally invasive therapy. The cases reported showed very quick and good healing of the laser treated tissues. These treatments, necessary for the orthodontic therapy or for its completion, become extremely simple, safe and rapid and the orthodontic specialist can perform them himself. The laser technique is very effective in many operative and surgical procedures during orthodontic therapy. Further studies are however necessary to set the treatment protocols in orthodontic biostimulation.

  13. Factors associated with the desire for orthodontic treatment among Brazilian adolescents and their parents

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background In the period of adolescence physical appearance takes on significant importance in the construction of personal identity, including one's relationship with one's own body. A variety of social, cultural, psychological and personal factors influences the self-perception of dental appearance and the decision to undergo orthodontic treatment. Adolescents who seek orthodontic treatment are concerned with improving their appearance and social acceptance. The aim of the present study was to determine factors associated to the desire for orthodontic treatment among Brazilian adolescents and their parents. Methods The sample consisted of 403 subjects aged 14 to 18 years, selected randomly from a population of 182,291 schoolchildren in the same age group. The outcome variable "desire for orthodontic treatment" was assessed through a questionnaire. Self-perception of dental aesthetics was assessed using the Oral Aesthetic Subjective Impact Scale (OASIS) and the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI) was used for clinical assessment. Statistical analysis involved the chi-square test as well as both simple and multiple logistic regression analyses. Results The majority (78%) of the Brazilian adolescents desired orthodontic treatment and 69% of the parents reported that their children were not in orthodontic treatment due to the high costs involved. There was significant association (p ≤ 0.05) between the desire for orthodontic treatment and most types of malocclusion. However, there was no significant association between the desire for orthodontic treatment and the variables gender and age. Conclusions The following were considered factors associated to the desire for treatment: upper anterior crowding ≥ 2 mm and parents' perception of their child's need for treatment. PMID:20021649

  14. Implementation of post treatment critical evaluation improved the quality of orthodontic care in postgraduate orthodontic clinic: A 10 years comparative study.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rashmi; Utreja, Ashok Kumar; Singh, Satinder Pal; Jena, Ashok Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of post- treatment critical evaluation on the quality of orthodontic care in a postgraduate orthodontic clinic. Orthodontic treatment outcome of 109 consecutively treated cases was evaluated in Phase-I evaluation. Following Phase-I evaluation, PTCE of each case was made mandatory. After 6-years of implementation of compulsory PTCE for each case, orthodontic treatment outcome of all consecutively treated cases (n = 126) was evaluated (Phase-II). The treatment outcome was evaluated by American Board of Orthodontics Model Grading System (ABO MGS) and Subjective evaluation (Visual Analogue Scale, VAS). Based on the ABO scores, the cases were divided into three grades, that is, Grade-I, Grade-II, and Grade-III. The mean total ABO score was improved significantly in Phase-II evaluation (P < 0.01). The total number of cases in ABO Grade-II were increased significantly (P < 0.01) whereas cases in ABO Grade-I remained comparable. The VAS score was improved from 5.66 ± 0.77 at Phase-I to 6.02 ± 0.99 at Phase-II evaluation (P < 0.01). The implementation of PTCE significantly improved the quality of orthodontic care in a postgraduate orthodontic clinic. Grading one's own treatment improves the quality of future treatment.

  15. [Arguments and counter-arguments about the orthodontic treatment of missing incisors. Literature review].

    PubMed

    Kaan, Miklós

    2010-09-01

    An article of Czochrowska, Skaare, Stenvik and Zachrisson was published about the possibilities of orthodontic treatment of missing upper central incisors, in the American Journal of Orthodontics, in July 2003. This article generated a heavy discussion among the readers of this periodical. A lot of orthodontists published their pros and cons about the advantages and disadvantages of orthodontic space closure. The purpose of this review is to collect the opinions and arguments about the topic from the orthodontic literature. There are some long-term, follow-up studies which compared the results of the orthodontic and prosthetic solutions after the treatment of missing upper incisors. The better-known studies are Nordquist and McNeil' s work published in the Journal of Periodontology (1975) and the publication of Robertsson and Mohlin published in the European Journal of Orthodontics (2000). The long-term studies argued that from the aspect of patients' satisfaction and periodontal or functional evaluation the orthodontic treatments ensured better results than either the prosthodontic or implantological approaches. These statements are contentious by a lot of experts and so it is important to review all the aspects of this topic.

  16. Orthodontic treatment with a series of removable appliances.

    PubMed

    Chenin, David A; Trosien, Andrew H; Fong, Patricia F; Miller, Robert A; Lee, Rodney S

    2003-09-01

    In the United States, the demand for straight white teeth has never been more important to patients. Crowded, poorly aligned teeth are not esthetically pleasing and are difficult to keep clean. However, until recently, the process of straightening the teeth typically has involved appliances involving bands, brackets and wires that also can be difficult to clean. The desire for a cosmetic solution to misaligned teeth has led to an increase in the number of patients seeking veneers, crowns and other laboratory-fabricated cosmetic restorations. Some clinicians are not aware that there are other ways to align teeth without either significant enamel reduction or conspicuous fixed orthodontic appliances. An alternative method of treatment, involving a series of clear removable appliances, circumvents this shortcoming and enables tooth alignment while avoiding deterioration in the cosmetics of the smile during treatment. This article describes a method of treatment, Invisalign (Align Technology, Santa Clara, Calif.), that clinicians can use in conjunction with 3-D computer models to accomplish the esthetic and oral hygiene objectives during and after treatment. The authors present three case reports, all involving a chief concern of crowding. The first case involved treatment of both arches by interproximal reduction, alignment of teeth and leveling the curve of Spee. The second case involved treatment of both arches by proclination, expansion and minor interproximal reduction. The final case shows relief of lower-arch crowding via lower-incisor extraction. In addition to satisfying the patient's chief concern of desiring straight teeth, this method of treatment satisfies additional objectives of esthetic treatment and esthetic results with significant oral hygiene benefits. Clinicians can address a patient's chief concern effectively without requiring an inventory of appliances (such as bands, brackets, wires and instruments). Furthermore, the use of 3-D computer models

  17. Impacted maxillary central incisor: surgical exposure and orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Pinho, Teresa; Neves, Manuel; Alves, Célia

    2011-08-01

    This case report describes the treatment of a patient with a horizontally impacted maxillary central incisor, a canine in the same quadrant, and an inclusion tendency. Due to severe crowing in the maxilla and the Class II molar relationship on the impaction side, a 2-stage treatment plan was developed. In the first stage, the right first premolar and deciduous canine were extracted; this allowed enough space for the eruption of the maxillary right permanent canine. The second stage included surgical exposure and traction of the impacted central incisor with a fixed orthodontic appliance. An excisional uncovering technique was needed to expose the impacted incisor. After it erupted, an apically positioned partial-thickness flap was used to add keratinized attached gingiva in the area surrounding the crown, initially located in an area of unattached gingiva. The patient finished treatment with a normal and stable occlusion between the maxillary and mandibular arches and an adequate width of attached gingiva. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Orthodontic treatment of impacted maxillary canines: an appraisal of prognostic factors.

    PubMed

    Baccetti, Tiziano; Crescini, Aldo; Nieri, Michele; Rotundo, Roberto; Pini Prato, Giovan Paolo

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of pre-treatment radiographic features (alpha-angle, d-distance and s-sector) on the duration of active orthodontic traction of impacted maxillary canines treated by a combined surgical (flap approach) and orthodontic (direct traction to the center of the ridge) treatment. A study population of 168 patients (168 canines) was evaluated. Multiple regression analysis was used. Pre-treatment radiographic variables were associated significantly with the duration of orthodontic traction. Age, gender and site of impaction did not affect the duration of traction significantly. Alpha-angle, d-distance and s-sector are valid indicators for the duration of orthodontic traction.

  19. Orthodontic treatment needs in the western region of Saudi Arabia: a research report.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Ali H

    2006-01-18

    Evaluation of self perceived and actual need for orthodontic treatment helps in planning orthodontic services and estimating the required resources and man power. In the present study, the perceptive need as evaluated by patients and the actual need to orthodontic treatment, as assessed by orthodontists, were evaluated at two types of dental practices in the city of Jeddah using the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN). A consecutive sample of 743 adults seeking orthodontic treatment at two different types of dental practices in Jeddah; King Abdulaziz University, Faculty of Dentistry (KAAU) (Free treatment) and two private dental polyclinics (PDP) (Paid treatment), was examined for orthodontic treatment need using the dental health component (DHC) of the IOTN. The self-perceived need for orthodontic treatment was also determined using the aesthetic component (AC) of the IOTN. The IOTN score and the incidence of each variable were calculated statistically. AC and DHC categories were compared using the Chi-Square and a correlation between them was assessed using Spearman's correlation test. AC and DHC were also compared between the two types of dental practices using the Chi-Square. The results revealed that among the 743 patients studied, 60.6% expressed no or slight need for treatment, 23.3% expressed moderate to borderline need and only16.1% thought they needed orthodontic treatment. Comparing these estimates to professional judgments, only 15.2% conformed to little or no need for treatment, 13.2% were assessed as in borderline need and 71.6% were assessed as in need for treatment (p < 0.001). Spearman's correlation test proved no correlation (r = -.045) between the two components. Comparing the AC and the DHC between the KAAU group and PDP group showed significant differences between the two groups (p < 0.001). Patient's perception to orthodontic treatment does not always correlate with professional assessment. The IOTN is a valid screening tool that should

  20. Orthodontic treatment needs in the western region of Saudi Arabia: a research report

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Ali H

    2006-01-01

    Background Evaluation of self perceived and actual need for orthodontic treatment helps in planning orthodontic services and estimating the required resources and man power. In the present study, the perceptive need as evaluated by patients and the actual need to orthodontic treatment, as assessed by orthodontists, were evaluated at two types of dental practices in the city of Jeddah using the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN). Methods A consecutive sample of 743 adults seeking orthodontic treatment at two different types of dental practices in Jeddah; King Abdulaziz University, Faculty of Dentistry (KAAU) (Free treatment) and two private dental polyclinics (PDP) (Paid treatment), was examined for orthodontic treatment need using the dental health component (DHC) of the IOTN. The self-perceived need for orthodontic treatment was also determined using the aesthetic component (AC) of the IOTN. The IOTN score and the incidence of each variable were calculated statistically. AC and DHC categories were compared using the Chi-Square and a correlation between them was assessed using Spearman's correlation test. AC and DHC were also compared between the two types of dental practices using the Chi-Square. Results The results revealed that among the 743 patients studied, 60.6% expressed no or slight need for treatment, 23.3% expressed moderate to borderline need and only16.1% thought they needed orthodontic treatment. Comparing these estimates to professional judgments, only 15.2% conformed to little or no need for treatment, 13.2% were assessed as in borderline need and 71.6% were assessed as in need for treatment (p < 0.001). Spearman's correlation test proved no correlation (r = -.045) between the two components. Comparing the AC and the DHC between the KAAU group and PDP group showed significant differences between the two groups (p < 0.001). Conclusion Patient's perception to orthodontic treatment does not always correlate with professional assessment. The IOTN

  1. Management of impacted all canines with surgical exposure and alignment by orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Katiyar, Radha; Tandon, Pradeep; Singh, Gyan P.; Agrawal, Akhil; Chaturvedi, T. P.

    2013-01-01

    Canine impaction is a dental problem very often encountered in orthodontic practice. After the third molar, the canine is the most frequently impacted tooth. Bringing the impacted canine into a normal position is important for functional occlusion and the final esthetics of the orthodontic treatment. This article illustrates a peculiar case, in which all four permanent canines maintained their unerupted status at age of 16 years. All four impacted canines were surgically exposed, attachment bonded, traction given with K-9 spring and ideally positioned with fixed orthodontic mechanotherapy. PMID:24124308

  2. Desire for orthodontic treatment and associated factors among adolescents in Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Feldens, Carlos Alberto; Nakamura, Eduardo Kenji; Tessarollo, Fábio Rafael; Closs, Luciane Quadrado

    2015-03-01

    To estimate the prevalence of the desire for orthodontic treatment and investigate associated factors among adolescents in southern Brazil. A cross-sectional study was carried out with 704 adolescents aged 12 and 13 years at municipal public schools in the city of Balneário Camboriú (southern Brazil). The adolescents answered a previously tested questionnaire addressing satisfaction with their dental appearance, speech function, chewing function, and the desire for orthodontic treatment. The parents/guardians answered a questionnaire addressing satisfaction with their child's dental appearance and socioeconomic variables. A trained and calibrated orthodontist collected clinical data on malocclusion using the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI). Statistical analysis was performed using multivariate Poisson regression with robust variance. The prevalence of the desire for orthodontic treatment was 69.6% (490/704). In the adjusted analysis, the outcome was significantly more prevalent among girls (P < .001), those with difficulty chewing (P  =  .026), those dissatisfied with their dental appearance (P < .001), and those with greater malocclusion severity (P < .001). The following orthodontic characteristics were associated with the desire for orthodontic treatment in the multivariate model: diastema in anterior segment (P < .001), anterior maxillary irregularity (P < .001), maxillary overjet ≥6 mm (P < .001), and mandibular overjet (P  =  .047). The desire for orthodontic treatment among 12- and 13-year-old adolescents is influenced by gender, dissatisfaction with one's dental appearance, difficulty chewing, malocclusion severity, and orthodontic characteristics. These findings should be considered together with normative indications regarding the need for orthodontic treatment in adolescents.

  3. Nickel hypersensitivity and orthodontic treatment: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Gölz, Lina; Papageorgiou, Spyridon N; Jäger, Andreas

    2015-07-01

    Nickel-containing alloys are widely used in orthodontic appliances, even though nickel is by far the most common contact allergen. However, the scientific evidence concerning allergic reactions to nickel in orthodontic patients has not been evaluated systematically. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the prevalence of nickel hypersensitivity is affected by orthodontic treatment. Unrestricted electronic and manual searches were performed until July 2013 for human clinical studies assessing orthodontic treatment and nickel hypersensitivity. Methodological limitations were evaluated with the Downs and Black tool. Crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated from random-effects meta-analyses, followed by subgroup and sensitivity analyses. Thirty studies were included in the review, and 24 datasets with 10 184 patients in the meta-analyses. Orthodontic treatment had no significant effect on nickel hypersensitivity (n = 11; crude OR 0.99; 95%CI: 0.78-1.25; p = 0.914). However, when confounding from factors such as sex and piercings was taken into account, orthodontic treatment was associated with a lower risk of hypersensitivity (n = 1; adjusted OR 0.60; 95%CI: 0.40-0.80; p < 0.001). This was even more pronounced when orthodontic treatment was performed prior to piercing (n = 7; crude OR 0.35; 95%CI: 0.24-0.50; p < 0.001). Orthodontic treatment seems to have a protective role against nickel hypersensitivity, especially when it precedes piercings. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Quality of life and psychosocial outcomes after fixed orthodontic treatment: a 17-year observational cohort study.

    PubMed

    Arrow, Peter; Brennan, David; Spencer, A John

    2011-12-01

    There is little evidence to suggest that orthodontic treatment can prevent or reduce the likelihood of dental caries or of periodontal disease or dental trauma and temporomandibular disorders, but there is a modest association between the presence of malocclusion/orthodontic treatment need and quality of life. However, little is known of the long-term outcomes of orthodontic treatment. This study reports on the longitudinal follow-up of quality of life and psychosocial outcomes of orthodontic treatment among a cohort of adults who were examined as adolescents in 1988/1989. Children who were examined in 1988/1989 were invited to a follow-up in 2005/2006. Respondents completed a questionnaire, which collected information on quality of life, receipt of orthodontic treatment and psychosocial factors, and were invited for a clinical examination. Oral health conditions including occlusal status using the Dental Aesthetic Index were recorded. Analysis of variance and multiple linear regression were used to examine the relationship between the measured factors. There was no statistically significant association between occlusal status at adolescence and quality of life at adulthood. Those individuals who had orthodontic treatment but did not need orthodontic treatment had higher self-esteem (23.1, SD 5.2) and were more satisfied with life (18.5, SD 3.7) than other treatment groups (self-esteem range, 20.0-22.7; life satisfaction range, 16.4-18.1), anovaP < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively. Occlusal status at adulthood was significantly associated with quality of life, P < 0.01. Multivariate analyses showed a statistically significant association between occlusal status at adolescence ('Desirable treatment'β = 0.70, P = 0.04) and adulthood ('Desirable treatment'β = 1.66, P < 0.01) with quality of life. Orthodontic treatment was negatively associated with psychosocial factors (life satisfaction; fixed orthodontic treatment (FOT) β = -0.91, P = 0.02 and self-esteem; FOT

  5. [Orthodontic treatment failure: the advice of a forensic expert].

    PubMed

    Tricot-Blestel, Marie-Claude

    2016-03-01

    If patients consider that their orthodontic treatment is a failure, they can claim compensation from their practitioner. Most often, discontented patients call on their third-party liability insurance when they are covered for "legal expenses protection". The patient's insurance company will then get in touch with the practitioner's insurance firm. Three-quarters of all claims are dealt with by the insurance companies. However, if an agreement cannot be reached or if the practitioner's insurance company manages to establish that he/she is not at fault, the patient can apply to the Tribunal de Grande Instance, the French Regional Court. The judge appoints a forensic expert who will examine the patient and follow a very precise procedure involving a dozen different questions. The advice of the forensic expert is therefore very valuable to orthodontists, in particular regarding their duty to inform patients and the importance of the medical file in order to avoid being held accountable following a course of treatment. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2016.

  6. Posterior crossbite and temporomandibular disorders (TMDs): need for orthodontic treatment?

    PubMed

    Thilander, Birgit; Bjerklin, Krister

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this work was to update the bibliography regarding the concept of 'temporomandibular disorder (TMD)' and 'posterior crossbite' and try to find out if there is any association between some special signs/symptoms of TMD and type of posterior crossbite. A literature search from 1970 to 2009, due to specified criterion, resulted in 14 publications that were found to be relevant for the present systematic review. An association between TMD and posterior crossbite (Yes-group) was reported as often as absence of such a relationship (No-group). The samples in the two groups showed similarities as well as differences with respect to number, gender, and age. Most articles reported only on 'presence' or 'absence' of crossbite and only few on type of crossbite opposite to a thorough account of clinical signs and symptoms of TMD. This review seems, however, to state that a functional posterior crossbite (mandibular guidance with midline deviation) is associated with headache, temporomandibular joint and muscular pain, and clicking. As evident from the discussion, such type needs orthodontic treatment to rehabilitate the asymmetric muscular activity between the crossbite and non-crossbite sides and the changed condyle/temporal relationship caused by mandibular deviation. Whether this treatment also will avoid future TMD problems can be answered only after clinical follow-up studies have been performed.

  7. Orthodontic treatment stability predictors: A retrospective longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    de Bernabé, Paloma González-Gil; Montiel-Company, José María; Paredes-Gallardo, Vanessa; Gandía-Franco, Jose Luis; Bellot-Arcís, Carlos

    2017-03-01

    To examine medium- to long-term orthodontic treatment stability and its possible association with certain variables. In a retrospective longitudinal study of 70 postretention patients, the Peer Assessment Rating (PAR) index was measured at the start (T1) and end (T2) of treatment and between 4 and 10 years afterwards (T3). The stability was considered absolute when the T2 and T3 values were identical and relative when the difference was within the ±5 range. Among the 70 patients, 65.8% were female and 34.2% were male. Their mean age was 14.5 years. The mean treatment length was 2.4 years. The mean retention phase was 3.3 years. The mean pre- and posttreatment PAR scores were 29.8 (T1) and 6.3 (T2). The mean T1-T2 difference was 23.6. The mean T2-T3 difference was -0.39. Within the study, 7.1% presented absolute stability and 68.6% presented relative stability. Lower anterior segment alignment and overbite were the most unstable occlusal features and tended to worsen. Fixed retainer (odds ratio [OR] 0.31; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.10-0.98) as a protective factor and years without retention (OR 1.32; 95% CI 1.03-1.68) as a risk factor are predictor variables of instability in the case of lower anterior segment alignment. The PAR value at the end of treatment (OR 1.29; 95% CI 1.08-1.54) and extractions (OR 4.76; 95% CI 1.05-21.6) before treatment are predictors for midline instability.

  8. [Planning of volume and terms of orthodontic treatment of patients with transversal maloclusion].

    PubMed

    Смаглюк, Любовь В; Белоус, Алевтина Н

    2016-01-01

    In planning of orthodontic treatment, as well as the alleged end of the treatment of orthodontic patients with transversal malocclusion should first pay attention to the treatment of opportunistic diseases that can affect the outcome of treatment of orthodontic patients (for example, rehabilitation of the nasopharynx, the treatment of rickets, the treatment of scoliosis posture, scoliosis ). definition of related factors affecting the volume and timing of the treatment of patients with transversal malocclusion. There were examined 32 patients with transversal malocclusion, and studied their medical history (Form 043). Patients were examined by standard algorithm survey. Two groups of patients by sex: Group 1: girls - 16 people and 2-th group: boys- 16 people. The material collected from 2010 to 2015. Patient age - 12-17 years. Subjective attitude to the disease formed on the basis of a number of factors that can be grouped into the following categories: social and constitutional and individual psychological. Since incorrect posture and malocclusion are the cause and effect of each other, in such cases should be treated at the same time and bite and pathology of the musculoskeletal system (10, 11). It is clear that in the planning of orthodontic treatment should be part and treatment of posture and a close and fruitful collaboration with the doctor traumatologist orthopaedist. The sex of the patient, especially temperament, the doctor-patient relationship, as well as the presence of somatic diseases have a significant impact on the length and complexity of the orthodontic treatment.

  9. Early biofilm formation and the effects of antimicrobial agents on orthodontic bonding materials in a parallel plate flow chamber.

    PubMed

    Chin, Mervyn Y H; Busscher, Henk J; Evans, Robert; Noar, Joseph; Pratten, Jonathan

    2006-02-01

    Decalcification is a commonly recognized complication of orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances. A technology, based on a parallel plate flow chamber, was developed to investigate early biofilm formation of a strain of Streptococcus sanguis on the surface of four orthodontic bonding materials: glass ionomer cement (Ketac Cem), resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Fuji Ortho LC), chemically-cured composite resin (Concise) and light-cured composite resin (Transbond XT). S. sanguis was used as it is one of the primary colonizers of dental hard surfaces. Artificial saliva was supplied as a source of nutrients for the biofilms. The effects of two commercially available mouthrinses (i.e. a fluoride containing rinse and chlorhexidine) were evaluated. Initial colonization of the bacterium was assessed after 6 hours of growth by the percentage surface coverage (PSC) of the biofilm on the disc surfaces. There were statistically significant differences in bacterial accumulation between different bonding materials (P < 0.05), Concise being the least colonized and Transbond XT being the most colonized by S. sanguis biofilms. All materials pre-treated with 0.05 per cent sodium fluoride mouthrinse showed more than 50 per cent reduction in biofilm formation. The 0.2 per cent chlorhexidine gluconate mouthrinse caused significant reduction of biofilm formation on all materials except Ketac Cem. This in vitro study showed that the use of a chemically-cured composite resin (Concise) reduced early S. sanguis biofilm formation. Also, fluoride had a greater effect in reducing the PSC by S. sanguis biofilms than chlorhexidine. Rinsing with 0.05 per cent sodium fluoride prior to placement of orthodontic appliances is effective in reducing early biofilm formation.

  10. Pain reduced by low-level laser therapy during use of orthodontic separators in early mixed dentition.

    PubMed

    Stein, Steffen; Korbmacher-Steiner, Heike; Popovic, Nenad; Braun, Andrea

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate whether low-level laser therapy (LLLT) applied at a defined distance from the gingiva has a pain-reducing effect in young patients undergoing orthodontic separation during the early mixed-dentition stage. A total of 40 children in early mixed dentition (mean age 8.05 years) who required separation of molars were included. The study comprised a group of 20 patients whose treatment included laser application on the day of separation and a control group of 20 patients not receiving LLLT. All patients recorded their maximum pain intensities on the day of separation (day 1) and on the following 4 days. Compared to the control group, pain perception was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) in the LLLT group on day 1 and continued to be reduced on day 2. Equivalent pain levels were recorded in both groups on days 3-5. Given our findings of a pain-reducing effect in young patients undergoing orthodontic separation during the early mixed-dentition stage, LLLT is an interesting alternative option of providing analgesia even in very young patients.

  11. Orthodontic and orthopaedic treatment for anterior open bite in children.

    PubMed

    Lentini-Oliveira, Débora A; Carvalho, Fernando R; Rodrigues, Clarissa Garcia; Ye, Qingsong; Prado, Lucila B F; Prado, Gilmar F; Hu, Rongdang

    2014-09-24

    Anterior open bite occurs when there is a lack of vertical overlap of the upper and lower incisors. The aetiology is multifactorial including: oral habits, unfavourable growth patterns, enlarged lymphatic tissue with mouth breathing. Several treatments have been proposed to correct this malocclusion, but interventions are not supported by strong scientific evidence. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate orthodontic and orthopaedic treatments to correct anterior open bite in children. The following databases were searched: the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (to 14 February 2014); the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL)(The Cochrane Library 2014, Issue 1); MEDLINE via OVID (1946 to 14 February 2014); EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 14 February 2014); LILACS via BIREME Virtual Health Library (1982 to 14 February 2014); BBO via BIREME Virtual Health Library (1980 to 14 February 2014); and SciELO (1997 to 14 February 2014). We searched for ongoing trials via ClinicalTrials.gov (to 14 February 2014). Chinese journals were handsearched and the bibliographies of papers were retrieved. All randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials of orthodontic or orthopaedic treatments or both to correct anterior open bite in children. Two review authors independently assessed the eligibility of all reports identified. Risk ratios (RRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for dichotomous data. The continuous data were expressed as described by the author. Three randomised controlled trials were included comparing: effects of Frankel's function regulator-4 (FR-4) with lip-seal training versus no treatment; repelling-magnet splints versus bite-blocks; and palatal crib associated with high-pull chincup versus no treatment.The study comparing repelling-magnet splints versus bite-blocks could not be analysed because the authors interrupted the treatment earlier than planned due to side effects in four of ten patients

  12. Need for orthodontic treatment among Brazilian adolescents: evaluation based on public health

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas, Carolina Vieira; Souza, João Gabriel Silva; Mendes, Danilo Cangussu; Pordeus, Isabela Almeida; Jones, Kimberly Marie; Martins, Andréa Maria Eleutério de Barros Lima

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the prevalence and the severity of malocclusions and to analyze factors associated with the need for orthodontic treatment of Brazilian adolescents. METHODS: This exploratory, cross-sectional study was carried out based on secondary data from the national epidemiological survey on oral health in Brazil (2002-2003). Socio-demographic conditions, self-perception, and the existence and degree of malocclusion, using the Dental Aesthetic Index, were evaluated in 16,833 adolescent Brazilians selected by probabilistic sample by conglomerates. The dependent variable need orthodontic treatment was estimated from the severity of malocclusion. The magnitude and direction of the association in bivariate and multivariate analyzes from a Robust Poisson regression was estimated. RESULTS: The majority of the adolescents needed orthodontic treatment (53.2%). In the multivariate analysis, the prevalence of the need for orthodontic treatment was larger among females, non-whites, those that perceived a need for treatment, and those that perceived their appearance as normal, bad, or very bad. The need for orthodontic treatment was smaller among those that lived in the Northeast and Central West macro-regions compared to those living in Southeast Brazil and it was also smaller among those that perceived their chewing to be normal or their oral health to be bad or very bad. CONCLUSIONS: There was a high prevalence of orthodontic treatment need among adolescents in Brazil and this need was associated with demographic and subjective issues. The high prevalence of orthodontic needs in adolescents is a challenge to the goals of Brazil's universal public health system. PMID:25769190

  13. Tooth loss caused by displaced elastic during simple preprosthetic orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Dianiskova, Simona; Calzolari, Chiara; Migliorati, Marco; Silvestrini-Biavati, Armando; Isola, Gaetano; Savoldi, Fabio; Dalessandri, Domenico; Paganelli, Corrado

    2016-09-16

    The use of elastics to close a diastema or correct tooth malpositions can create unintended consequences if not properly controlled. The American Association of Orthodontists recently issued a consumer alert, warning of "a substantial risk for irreparable damage" from a new trend called "do-it-yourself" orthodontics, consisting of patients autonomously using elastics to correct tooth position. The elastics can work their way below the gums and around the roots of the teeth, causing damage to the periodontium and even resulting in tooth loss. The cost of implants to replace these teeth would well exceed the cost of proper orthodontic care. This damage could also occur in a dental office, when a general dentist tries to perform a simplified orthodontic correction of a minor tooth malposition. The present case report describes a case of tooth loss caused by a displaced intraoral elastic, which occurred during a simple preprosthetic orthodontic treatment.

  14. [Ultrastructural changes of human dental hard tissues during orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances].

    PubMed

    Antonova, I N; Goncharov, V D; Bobrova, E A

    The aim of the study was to evaluate ultrastructural changes of dental enamel after fixation of orthodontic appliances, initial influence of orthodontic forces and removal of braces. Five intact permanent tooth extracted for orthodontic reasons were included in the experimental study. Scanning probe microscopy was conducted in 4 random enamel points in each tooth (20 points overall) in semi-contact mode with standard 10 nm probes. The study showed ultrastructural enamel changes such as nanofractures up to 1 mm along the braces locks. The changes correlated with surface morphological features and teeth anatomy and may play an important role in dental decay and non-carious lesions occurring in the course of orthodontic treatment.

  15. Tooth loss caused by displaced elastic during simple preprosthetic orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dianiskova, Simona; Calzolari, Chiara; Migliorati, Marco; Silvestrini-Biavati, Armando; Isola, Gaetano; Savoldi, Fabio; Dalessandri, Domenico; Paganelli, Corrado

    2016-01-01

    The use of elastics to close a diastema or correct tooth malpositions can create unintended consequences if not properly controlled. The American Association of Orthodontists recently issued a consumer alert, warning of “a substantial risk for irreparable damage” from a new trend called “do-it-yourself” orthodontics, consisting of patients autonomously using elastics to correct tooth position. The elastics can work their way below the gums and around the roots of the teeth, causing damage to the periodontium and even resulting in tooth loss. The cost of implants to replace these teeth would well exceed the cost of proper orthodontic care. This damage could also occur in a dental office, when a general dentist tries to perform a simplified orthodontic correction of a minor tooth malposition. The present case report describes a case of tooth loss caused by a displaced intraoral elastic, which occurred during a simple preprosthetic orthodontic treatment. PMID:27672645

  16. Treatment of Maxillary Impacted Canine using Ballista Spring and Orthodontic Wire Traction

    PubMed Central

    Raghav, Pradeep; Munish Reddy, C; Joshi, Divya; Jain, Shalu

    2017-01-01

    In orthodontic practice, impaction of maxillary permanent canines is a frequently encountered clinical problem. After the third molar, the canine is the most frequently impacted tooth. For functional occlusion, bringing the impacted canine into occlusion is important to achieve final esthetic in orthodontic practice. This article illustrates a distinct case in which the three permanent canines maintained their unerupted status till the age of 18 years. The three impacted canines were surgically exposed, attachment bonded, traction given with ballista spring for vertical and labial movement, and ideally positioned with fixed orthodontic mechanotherapy. How to cite this article Raghav P, Singh K, Reddy CM, Joshi D, Jain S. Treatment of Maxillary Impacted Canine using Ballista Spring and Orthodontic Wire Traction. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2017;10(3):313-317. PMID:29104396

  17. Treatment of Maxillary Impacted Canine using Ballista Spring and Orthodontic Wire Traction.

    PubMed

    Raghav, Pradeep; Singh, Kanika; Munish Reddy, C; Joshi, Divya; Jain, Shalu

    2017-01-01

    In orthodontic practice, impaction of maxillary permanent canines is a frequently encountered clinical problem. After the third molar, the canine is the most frequently impacted tooth. For functional occlusion, bringing the impacted canine into occlusion is important to achieve final esthetic in orthodontic practice. This article illustrates a distinct case in which the three permanent canines maintained their unerupted status till the age of 18 years. The three impacted canines were surgically exposed, attachment bonded, traction given with ballista spring for vertical and labial movement, and ideally positioned with fixed orthodontic mechanotherapy. Raghav P, Singh K, Reddy CM, Joshi D, Jain S. Treatment of Maxillary Impacted Canine using Ballista Spring and Orthodontic Wire Traction. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2017;10(3):313-317.

  18. Hawley or vacuum-formed retainers following orthodontic treatment?

    PubMed

    Kalha, Anmol S

    2014-12-01

    Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Medline, Embase, ISI Web of Science, LILACS. In addition, Pro-Quest Dissertation and Thesis database and Pro-Quest Science Journals. Hand searches were also carried out in American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Angle Orthodontist, European Journal of Orthodontics and Journal of Orthodontics. Two reviewers independently selected studies, and randomised, quasi-randomised (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) were considered. Studies with at least six months follow-up were included. Data extraction and risk of bias assessment were carried out independently by two reviewers. A narrative summary was presented as a meta-analysis could not be performed. Seven studies were included (five RCTs, two CCTs). Three were considered to be at low risk of bias, three at moderate risk and one at high risk. There was some evidence to suggest that no difference exists to distinguish between the HRs and VFRs with respect to changes in intercanine and intermolar widths after orthodontic retention. There was insufficient evidence to support the use of VFRs over HRs in relation to occlusal contacts, cost effectiveness, patient satisfaction and survival time. This systematic review suggests that further high-quality RCTs regarding the differences between HRs and VFRs during orthodontic retention are necessary to determine which retainer is the better selection for orthodontists.

  19. Comparison of two different debonding techniques in orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Piccoli, Luca; Migliau, Guido; Besharat, Laith Konstantinos; Di Carlo, Stefano; Pompa, Giorgio; Di Giorgio, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate whether and how the adhesive bond failure site varied in relation to the material used for the orthodontic bonding and debonding technique applied. Two different methods of orthodontic debonding were included in our survey; cutters for orthodontics and debonding plier. Three different materials for the adhesion of the bracket: composite light curing, self-curing composite and glass ionomer cement. The remaining amount of adhesive on the tooth surface is an important parameter that gives information on how the location of the posting site varied during the debonding. 60 dental elements, maxillary and mandibular, previously extracted for orthodontic reasons, as well as periodontal, were included in our research. We investigated a possible significant correlation between different variables (debonding technique and materials for membership) and the ARI index. The use of orthodontic cutters or debonding pliers does not affect the adhesive bond failure site and both techniques have a tendency to leave a significant amount of adhesive on the surface enamel. In the resin-reinforced glass ionomer cements, detachment occurs at the interface enamel-adhesive and this pattern of detachment increases the risk of the enamel damage during debonding. In both types of composite resins (photopolymerizable or self-curing), the detachment occurs at the interface bracketing adhesive. In this case the amount of remaining adhesive material on the tooth must be removed with further methods, which in addition, increase the risk of iatrogenic injury as well as the working hours.

  20. Invisible orthodontics part 3: aesthetic orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Waring, David; McMullin, Ailbhe; Malik, Ovais H

    2013-09-01

    In this, the third part of the series, aesthetic orthodontic treatment will be considered. The previous two articles have looked at invisible orthodontics with Invisalign and lingual brackets. This article will discuss the properties and use of aesthetic brackets, along with examples of orthodontic treatment cases using the aesthetic brackets. Increasing demand for aesthetics during orthodontic treatment has resulted in a significant increase in the use of aesthetic brackets. Clinicians need to be aware of the benefits and drawbacks of aesthetic brackets.

  1. The Need for Orthodontic Treatment among Vietnamese School Children and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Son Minh; Nguyen, Minh Khac; Saag, Mare; Jagomagi, Triin

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the need for orthodontic treatment among 12-year-old school children and 18-year-olds from Da Nang, Vietnam. Basic Research Design. A random representative sample of 200 12-year-old children from primary schools in Da Nang city was gathered. In addition, 200 18-year-old students were randomly selected from among the 4000 students studying at Da Nang University of Medical Technology and Pharmacy, Vietnam. All the subjects were evaluated according to Angle's molar relationship, the presence of malocclusion, and the components of the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (Dental Health Component, DHC, and Aesthetic Component, AC). Results. The DHC of index of orthodontic treatment need (IOTN) for 12-year-olds was in 60% of cases no or little, in 21% of cases moderate, and in 19% of cases definitive, while the prevalence of moderate and definitive need for treatment among the 18-year-olds was 24% and 30.5%, respectively. The prevalence of class III malocclusion, contact point displacement, and crossbite was higher in 18-year-olds than among the 12-year-olds, while the prevalence of increased overjet and increased overbite had decreased in 18-year-olds compared to the group of 12-year-olds. Conclusions. There is a strong need for orthodontic treatment in Vietnam's population. The need for orthodontic treatment was determined by contact point displacement, crossbite, increased overjet, and increased overbite. PMID:25136367

  2. Iatrogenic Damage to the Periodontium Caused by Orthodontic Treatment Procedures: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Rafiuddin, Syed; YG, Pradeep Kumar; Biswas, Shriparna; Prabhu, Sandeep S; BM, Chandrashekar; MP, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    In orthodontic treatment, teeth are moved in to new positions and relationships and the soft tissue and underlying bone are altered to accommodate changes in esthetics and function. Function is more important than esthetics. The speciality of orthodontics has in addition to its benefits, complications as well as risks associated with its procedures. However the benefits outweigh the risks & complications in most of the treatment cases. Few of the unwanted side effects associated with treatment are tooth discolorations, enamel decalcification, periodontal complications like open gingival embrasures, root resorption, allergic reactions to nickel & chromium as well as treatment failure in the form of relapse. PMID:26312093

  3. Comparison of combined application treatment with one-visit varnish treatments in an orthodontic population

    PubMed Central

    Tuzuner, Tamer; Ozel, Mehmet B.; Bostanoglu, Ozge

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of chlorhexidine-thymol varnish alone, its combination with chlorhexidine-fluoride containing dentifrice and fluoride varnish on oral hygiene and caries prevention in orthodontic patients. Study design: Sixty patients, aged 12-18, with orthodontic fixed appliances were randomly assigned into three groups as follows: Group 1 (n=20): 1% chlorhexidine and 1% thymol varnish (Cervitec®Plus); Group 2 (n=20): Cervitec®Plus+ 0.2% chlorhexidine and 0.2% sodium fluoride (900 ppm fluoride) (Cervitec®Gel)); and Group 3 (n=20): 0.1% fluoride varnish (Fluor Protector®). Mutans streptococci (MS), lactobacilli (LB) levels, buffering capacity (BC), visible plaque index (VPI), and gingival bleeding index (GBI) scores were evaluated at four stages: T0, before orthodontic bonding; T1, one week after orthodontic bonding; T2, one week; and T3, four weeks after the first application, respectively. Inter and intra group comparisons were made by the Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U, Friedman and Wilcoxon Signed-Rank tests with Bonferroni step-down correction (P<0.017). Results: Significantly lower MS and LB levels were found in Group 2 than Group 1 (T2) and 3 (T2, T3) (P<0.017). Groups 1-2 (T2) showed significantly higher BC (P<0.017) and lower VPI and GBI (P<0.017) scores compared with Group 3. Decreased MS levels at T2 (P<0.017) and T3 (P>0.017) were found in Group1-2 compared with T0. Significantly lower LB levels were recorded in Group 2 at T2 compared with T0 (P<0.017) while no significant differences were seen in Group 1 and 3 (P>0.017). Conclusions: Addition of Cervitec®Plus+Cervitec®Gel combination to the standard oral hygiene regimen may be beneficial for orthodontic patients for maintaining oral health by reducing bacterial colonisation and gingivitis. Key words:Chlorhexidine, flouride, mutans streptococci, lactobacilli, antibacterial effect, plaque, gingivitis, orthodontic treatment. PMID:23385499

  4. Invisalign and traditional orthodontic treatment postretention outcomes compared using the American Board of Orthodontics objective grading system.

    PubMed

    Kuncio, Daniel; Maganzini, Anthony; Shelton, Clarence; Freeman, Katherine

    2007-09-01

    To compare the postretention dental changes between patients treated with Invisalign and those treated with conventional fixed appliances. This is a comparative cohort study using patient records of one orthodontist in New York City. Two groups of patients were identified that differed only in the method of treatment (Invisalign and Braces group). Dental casts and panoramic radiographs were collected and analyzed using the objective grading system (OGS) of the American Board of Orthodontics (ABO). The cases were evaluated immediately after appliance removal (T1) and at a postretention time (T2), three years after appliance removal. All patients had completed active orthodontic treatment and had undergone at least one year of retention. A Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to evaluate differences in treatment outcomes between the groups for each of the eight categories in the OGS, including four additional subcategories in the alignment category. A Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to determine the significance of changes within each group from T1 to T2. The change in the total alignment score in the Invisalign group was significantly larger than that for the Braces group. There were significant changes in total alignment and mandibular anterior alignment in both groups. There were significant changes in maxillary anterior alignment in the Invisalign group only. In this sample for this period of observation, patients treated with Invisalign relapsed more than those treated with conventional fixed appliances.

  5. Orthodontic treatment need in Peruvian young adults evaluated through dental aesthetic index.

    PubMed

    Bernabé, Eduardo; Flores-Mir, Carlos

    2006-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the frequency and severity of the malocclusion and treatment needs in Peruvian young adults. The second aim was to compare the orthodontic treatment needs according to sex and socio-economic status (SES). This cross-sectional study was conducted at the University Dental Clinic of a private university in Lima, Peru. A total of 267 freshmen (from 16 to 25 years old) were randomly selected from a pool of 780 students. Students wearing an orthodontic appliance or reporting a history of orthodontic treatment were excluded from the study. Clinical examinations were conducted using the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI). Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to compare the DAI scores according to sex and SES, respectively. The mean DAI score was 28.87 points (IC(95%) 27.77; 29.97, where IC indicates interval of confidence). Around one-third of the sample presented severe or very severe malocclusion, which implies a highly desirable or mandatory orthodontic treatment need. No statistically significant difference was found between the DAI scores according to sex (P = .592) and SES (P = .397). Approximately one-third of the evaluated Peruvian young adults would need orthodontic treatment according to the DAI. In this population, malocclusion was characterized by a relatively high frequency of missing teeth, appreciable dental crowding, and inadequate anteroposterior relationships.

  6. Establishing the reliability of palatal rugae pattern in individual identification (following orthodontic treatment).

    PubMed

    Shukla, D; Chowdhry, A; Bablani, D; Jain, P; Thapar, R

    2011-07-01

    This study aims to determine the stability of palatal rugae before and after orthodontic treatment. 50 orthodontic cases were selected with pre- and posttreatment casts and 50 casts were randomly selected as variables. Landmarks on the palatal raphe and rugae were marked on the maxillary casts. Points were made on medial and lateral ends of first, second and third rugae. Each cast was photographed, measured and then trimmed leaving only the rugae area of the hard palate. In the pre and post-treatment group, changes in transverse measurements were significantly different for lateral points of first rugae and anteroposterior changes were significant for the distances between first and second rugae. All inter-point measurements of third rugae were stable in post-treatment casts. Thirty blinded examiners compared 50 trimmed preorthodontic casts to similarly prepared one hundred casts for possible matches based on pattern of rugae. The percentages of correct matches for examiners had a median of 90%. The matching of pre-operative and post-operative orthodontic casts demonstrated that although some changes do occur in the rugae during orthodontic treatment, the morphology of palatal rugae remains stable throughout life. Hence carefully assessed rugae pattern may have a definite role in forensic identification. Further, points associated with the third palatal ruage were the most immutable over a person's life and hence could be used as a reference to evaluate the changes in teeth positions during orthodontic treatment.

  7. Orthodontic Management in Aggressive Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Bhattarai, Bhagabat

    2017-01-01

    Aggressive periodontitis is a type of periodontitis with early onset and rapid progression and mostly affecting young adults who occupy a large percentage of orthodontic patients. The role of the orthodontist is important in screening the disease, making a provisional diagnosis, and referring it to a periodontist for immediate treatment. The orthodontist should be aware of the disease not only before starting the appliance therapy, but also during and after the active mechanotherapy. The orthodontic treatment plan, biomechanics, and appliance system may need to be modified to deal with the teeth having reduced periodontal support. With proper force application and oral hygiene maintenance, orthodontic tooth movement is possible without any deleterious effect in the tooth with reduced bone support. With proper motivation and interdisciplinary approach, orthodontic treatment is possible in patients with controlled aggressive periodontitis. PMID:28299350

  8. Gingival recession: its causes and types, and the importance of orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Jati, Ana Suzy; Furquim, Laurindo Zanco; Consolaro, Alberto

    2016-06-01

    Gingival recession has direct causes and predisposing factors. Orthodontic treatment is able to prevent recession and even contribute to its treatment, with or without periodontal approach, depending on the type and severity of gingival tissue damage. There is no evidence on the fact that orthodontic treatment alone might induce gingival recession, although it might lead the affected teeth (usually mandibular incisors or maxillary canines) to be involved in situations that act as predisposing factors, allowing direct causes to act and, therefore, trigger recession, especially when the buccal bone plate is very thin or presents with dehiscence. Several aspects regarding the relationship between orthodontic treatment and gingival recession have been addressed, and so has the importance of the periosteum to the mechanism of gingival recession formation. Clinical as well as experimental trials on the subject would help to clarify this matter, of which understanding is not very deep in the related literature.

  9. Gingival recession: its causes and types, and the importance of orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jati, Ana Suzy; Furquim, Laurindo Zanco; Consolaro, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    abstract Gingival recession has direct causes and predisposing factors. Orthodontic treatment is able to prevent recession and even contribute to its treatment, with or without periodontal approach, depending on the type and severity of gingival tissue damage. There is no evidence on the fact that orthodontic treatment alone might induce gingival recession, although it might lead the affected teeth (usually mandibular incisors or maxillary canines) to be involved in situations that act as predisposing factors, allowing direct causes to act and, therefore, trigger recession, especially when the buccal bone plate is very thin or presents with dehiscence. Several aspects regarding the relationship between orthodontic treatment and gingival recession have been addressed, and so has the importance of the periosteum to the mechanism of gingival recession formation. Clinical as well as experimental trials on the subject would help to clarify this matter, of which understanding is not very deep in the related literature. PMID:27409650

  10. [Efficiency of cephalometry in orthodontic treatment planning: cephalometric parameters and their age-related changes].

    PubMed

    Arsenina, O I; Shishkin, K M; Shishkin, M K; Popova, N V

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficiency of cephalometry in orthodontic treatment planning in patients with teeth crowding and Angle Class I molars relation. Cephalometric parameters were analyzed in 70 patients that completed orthodontic treatment in 'Orthodont' dental clinic (Samara). Cephalometric X-rays were taken at baseline examination and after treatment. In patients with crowding and Class I molars relationship treated with extraction of all four first premolars correlation between N-Se and mandibular and maxillary length was disturbed. These patients showed higher N-Se and reduced jaws length than patients with no extraction or extraction of 2 premolars. The observed increase of G angle with reduced mandibular length assumes compensatory changes of mandible position. These disproportions were aggravated by facial growth. In certain cases cephalometric assessment is inefficient for treatment strategy choice.

  11. [Cephalometry efficacy in orthodontic treatment planning: correlations of cephalometric values and their changes in the course of treatment].

    PubMed

    Shishkin, K M; Arsenina, O I; Shishkin, M K; Popova, N V

    The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy of cephalometry in planning of orthodontic patients with teeth crowding (TC) and Angle Class I molar relationship (MR). Cephalometric values of 70 patients with TC and class I MR were analyzed before and after orthodontic treatment. Cephalometric study of correlations proved to be more relevant than comparing with mean values. In patients with TC and class I MR statistically significant were correlations with: facial profile (ÐN-A-B) and jaws relationship in anterio-posterior direction (ÐA-N-B); ÐN-A-B and type of maxillary growth (ÐPn-Mp, ÐB); ÐB and maxillary incisors inclination (Ðis-SpP); ÐPn-Mp and mandibular incisors inclination (Ðii-Mp). These correlations depend on age, anomaly severity and orthodontic strategy. Cephalometry proved to be effective tool for orthodontic treatment planning, prognosis and modelling.

  12. Cancer treatment -- early menopause

    MedlinePlus

    ... if your cancer treatment may cause early menopause. Effects of Early Menopause When your ovaries are removed ... to help with dryness. These hormones come in creams, gels, tablets, and rings. You need a prescription ...

  13. Routine treatment of bilateral aplasia of upper lateral incisors by orthodontic space closure without mandibular extractions.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Bernd; Seifi-Shirvandeh, Nasrin

    2009-06-01

    This study aimed to gather statistically validated information on the changes in orthodontic variables in patients with bilateral upper lateral incisor aplasia treated with isolated orthodontic space closure. Data were collected from 25 (15 females, 10 males) consecutively treated, unselected adolescents [mean age at the end of treatment 16.4 years, standard deviation (SD) 1.3] after orthodontic space closure using push-and-pull mechanics (PPM). The changes in the relevant parameters were determined by comparing baseline and final lateral headfilms and casts. Following verification of normal distribution by means of a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, a two-tailed t-test for related data was performed. SNA, ANB, OcP-NL, OcP-ML, upper space balance, overbite, overjet, bilateral molar relationship, and L1-NB changed significantly (P < or = 0.05) during treatment. The changes in overbite, overjet, spatial conditions, and molar relationship were in line with the targeted treatment objectives and within the normal range. Although the change in L1-NB was probably due to treatment, it was not clinically relevant given that the mean final values were close to normal at 22.8 degrees (SD 5.8 degrees ) for L1-NB and 95 degrees (SD 8 degrees ) for L1-ML. Isolated orthodontic space closure for bilateral upper lateral incisor aplasia using PPM can be regarded as a valid alternative to prosthetic solutions. Long-term use of Class III elastics does not lead to significant changes in relevant orthodontic parameters.

  14. Three-dimensional evaluation of molar buccolingual inclinations after orthodontic treatment using edgewise mechanics.

    PubMed

    Billings, Branson; Helms, Lana; Kula, Katherine; Utreja, Achint; Eckert, George; Ghoneima, Ahmed

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure changes in buccolingual inclination and in thickness of maxillary and mandibular buccal and lingual bone of maxillary and mandibular molars following orthodontic treatment using edgewise mechanics. Cone-beam computed tomography scans of 48 patients taken before and after completion of comprehensive orthodontic treatment were collected for this retrospective study. Buccolingual molar inclinations were reported as angular measurements using the long axis of the teeth and inferior border of the nasal floor and inferior border of the mandible, respectively. Distances between the buccal and lingual cusps of maxillary and mandibular molars, respectively, were measured to the occlusal plane to assess the change in buccolingual inclination after orthodontic treatment. The amount of buccal and lingual bone at the level of the root apex of each molar was also evaluated before and after orthodontic treatment. Orthodontic edgewise mechanics caused significant increases in mandibular first molars' inclination angle, lingual bone, and mandibular second molars' buccal bone and inclination angle. Significant decreases were noted in mandibular first molars' buccal bone, inclination distance and mandibular second molars' lingual bone and inclination distance. Maxillary teeth had fewer significant changes than the mandibular teeth. Significant decreases were found for maxillary first molars' buccal bone, inclination distance, and maxillary second molar buccal bone. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  15. Prevalence and severity of vestibular recession in mandibular incisors after orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Gisela; Kjellsen, Kristian; Preus, Hans; Vandevska-Radunovic, Vaska; Hansen, Bjørn Frode

    2012-01-01

    To assess the prevalence and severity of vestibular gingival recession of mandibular incisors after orthodontic treatment and to evaluate possible contributing factors. From the record pool of patients who completed orthodontic treatment from 1999-2006 at the Department of Orthodontics, University of Oslo, Norway, 588 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Intraoral color slides were used for the evaluation of gingival recessions (based on Miller classification), presence of visible plaque, and gingival inflammation. Cephalometric radiographs were used to assess the sagittal intermaxillary relation, mandibular and intermaxillary angles, and the position of the lower incisors. A control group was drawn from the same pool of 588 patients. All statistical analyses were performed using SPSS. The prevalence of gingival recessions after orthodontic treatment was 10.3%. Most (8.6%) were classified as Miller Class I, and 1.7% were classified as Miller Class II. Gingival recession was predominantly found on central incisors. Reduction of the sagittal intermaxillary angle and retroclination of the lower incisors was correlated with the development of a more severe gingival recession. The present study indicates that vestibular gingival recession of mandibular incisors after orthodontic treatment is of minor prevalence and severity. The presence of gingival recession or retroclination of the incisors with mesial basal relations increases the risk of more severe gingival recession.

  16. Orthodontic treatment effects on inflammatory marker profiles in saliva before and after 2 archwire changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Zulham; Jaafar, Ikmal Mohamad; Rohaya, M. A. W.; Abidin, Intan Zarina Zainol; Senafi, Sahidan; Ariffin, Zaidah Zainal; Ariffin, Shahrul Hisham Zainal

    2013-11-01

    Periodontal tissue changes exerted by external forces in orthodontic treatment allow tooth movement. The changes in periodontal tissues i.e. inflammation can be monitored using gingival crevicular fluid (GCF). GCF is a component of saliva. Saliva could be used to monitor periodontal disease progression. The use of saliva to monitor periodontal tissues changes during orthodontic treatment is still unknown. Therefore, we observed the profiles of inflammatory markers namely creatine kinase ('CK), nitric oxide (NO), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) in saliva of orthodontic patients to evaluate their importance in orthodontic treatment. A total of 21 subjects (13 female and 8 male) participated in this study. Samples were collected from gingival crevicular fluid at three period of archwire changes: baseline (M0), 2 weeks after 0.014" NiTi archwire (M1), and 2 weeks after 0.018" NiTi archwire (M2). All enzyme activities i.e. CK, LDH and AST were measured spectrophotometrically at 340 nm. Griess assay was used to measure nitric oxide level. CK activity, NO level, LDH activity and AST activity in saliva samples did not show significant differences among period of archwire changes. The use of inflammatory marker profiles in saliva may not represent the changes in periodontal tissues during orthodontic treatment.

  17. Surface Treatment on Physical Properties and Biocompatibility of Orthodontic Power Chains

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, H. C.; Chen, M. S.; Peng, B. Y.; Lin, W. T.; Wang, Y. H.

    2017-01-01

    The conventional orthodontic power chain, often composed of polymer materials, has drawbacks such as a reduction of elasticity owing to water absorption as well as surface discoloration and staining resulting from food or beverages consumed by the patient. The goal of this study was to develop a surface treatment (nanoimprinting) for orthodontic power chains and to alleviate their shortcomings. A concave template (anodic alumina) was manufactured by anodization process using pure aluminum substrate by employing the nanoimprinting process. Convex nanopillars were fabricated on the surface of orthodontic power chains, resulting in surface treatment. Distinct parameters of the nanoimprinting process (e.g., imprinting temperature, imprinting pressure, imprinting time, and demolding temperature) were used to fabricate nanopillars on the surface of orthodontic power chains. The results of this study showed that the contact angle of the power chains became larger after surface treatment. In addition, the power chains changed from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. The power chain before surface treatment without water absorption had a water absorption rate of approximately 4%, whereas a modified chain had a water absorption rate of approximately 2%–4%. Furthermore, the color adhesion of the orthodontic power chains after surface modification was less than that before surface modification. PMID:28540299

  18. Surface Treatment on Physical Properties and Biocompatibility of Orthodontic Power Chains.

    PubMed

    Cheng, H C; Chen, M S; Peng, B Y; Lin, W T; Shen, Y K; Wang, Y H

    2017-01-01

    The conventional orthodontic power chain, often composed of polymer materials, has drawbacks such as a reduction of elasticity owing to water absorption as well as surface discoloration and staining resulting from food or beverages consumed by the patient. The goal of this study was to develop a surface treatment (nanoimprinting) for orthodontic power chains and to alleviate their shortcomings. A concave template (anodic alumina) was manufactured by anodization process using pure aluminum substrate by employing the nanoimprinting process. Convex nanopillars were fabricated on the surface of orthodontic power chains, resulting in surface treatment. Distinct parameters of the nanoimprinting process (e.g., imprinting temperature, imprinting pressure, imprinting time, and demolding temperature) were used to fabricate nanopillars on the surface of orthodontic power chains. The results of this study showed that the contact angle of the power chains became larger after surface treatment. In addition, the power chains changed from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. The power chain before surface treatment without water absorption had a water absorption rate of approximately 4%, whereas a modified chain had a water absorption rate of approximately 2%-4%. Furthermore, the color adhesion of the orthodontic power chains after surface modification was less than that before surface modification.

  19. How does orthodontic treatment affect young adults' oral health-related quality of life?

    PubMed

    Palomares, Nathália B; Celeste, Roger Keller; Oliveira, Branca Heloisa de; Miguel, José Augusto M

    2012-06-01

    Studies in the dental literature do not yet provide conclusive evidence for the functional and psychosocial benefits of orthodontic treatment. In this cross-sectional study, we aimed to assess the oral health-related quality of life of young Brazilian adults, aged 18 to 30 years, who had completed orthodontic treatment compared with untreated subjects waiting for treatment. The subjects were recruited at a state-funded university clinic. The sample comprised 100 patients in the retention phase of orthodontic treatment for more than 6 months (treated group) and 100 persons who were seeking orthodontic treatment and were still on a waiting list (nontreated group). Data were collected by using the oral health impact profile, the index of orthodontic treatment need (malocclusion severity and esthetic impairment), the Brazilian economic classification criteria (socioeconomic status), and the index of decayed, missing, and filled teeth (oral health status). Statistical analyses were performed by using chi-square and Fisher exact tests and negative binomial regression. The mean oral health impact profile scores were 3.1 (SD ± 2.99) and 15.1 (SD ± 8.02) in the treated and nontreated groups, respectively. The most frequent impacts in the treated and nontreated groups were "painful aching" and "been self-conscious," respectively. Comparisons between the groups were controlled for malocclusion severity, clinician-assessed esthetic impairment, age, sex, socioeconomic status, and oral health status. Nontreated young adults had mean oral health impact profile scores 5.3 times higher than did the treated subjects. Young Brazilian adults who received orthodontic treatment had significantly better oral health-related quality of life scores in the retention phase, after treatment completion, than did nontreated subjects. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Severe root resorption resulting from orthodontic treatment: Prevalence and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Maués, Caroline Pelagio Raick; do Nascimento, Rizomar Ramos; Vilella, Oswaldo de Vasconcellos

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of severe external root resorption and its potential risk factors resulting from orthodontic treatment. METHODS: A randomly selected sample was used. It comprised conventional periapical radiographs taken in the same radiology center for maxillary and mandibular incisors before and after active orthodontic treatment of 129 patients, males and females, treated by means of the Standard Edgewise technique. Two examiners measured and defined root resorption according to the index proposed by Levander et al. The degree of external apical root resorption was registered defining resorption in four degrees of severity. To assess intra and inter-rater reproducibility, kappa coefficient was used. Chi-square test was used to assess the relationship between the amount of root resorption and patient's sex, dental arch (maxillary or mandibular), treatment with or without extractions, treatment duration, root apex stage (open or closed), root shape, as well as overjet and overbite at treatment onset. RESULTS: Maxillary central incisors had the highest percentage of severe root resorption, followed by maxillary lateral incisors and mandibular lateral incisors. Out of 959 teeth, 28 (2.9%) presented severe root resorption. The following risk factors were observed: anterior maxillary teeth, overjet greater than or equal to 5 mm at treatment onset, treatment with extractions, prolonged therapy, and degree of apex formation at treatment onset. CONCLUSION: This study showed that care must be taken in orthodontic treatment involving extractions, great retraction of maxillary incisors, prolonged therapy, and/or completely formed apex at orthodontic treatment onset. PMID:25741825

  1. Personality traits as a potential predictor of willingness to undergo various orthodontic treatments.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Vincent; Liu, Sean Shih-Yao; Schrader, Stuart M; Dean, Jeffery A; Stewart, Kelton T

    2013-09-01

    To establish an association between patient personality traits and potential willingness to undergo various orthodontic treatments. One hundred adolescent individuals aged 12-16 years completed an anonymous electronic questionnaire via Survey Monkey. The 24-item questionnaire contained three major sections: patient demographics, a modified Big Five Inventory (BFI)-10 personality index, and a willingness to undergo treatment assessment. Multiple-variable linear regression analyses were used to determine the associations among age, gender, ethnicity, and the five personality traits simultaneously with willingness to undergo treatment. Statistical significance was set at P ≤ .05. Ninety-six of the 100 individuals were included in the statistical analysis. Age, ethnicity, and gender failed to correlate with potential willingness to undergo orthodontic treatment. Several personality dimensions within the modified BFI-10 (agreeableness, conscientiousness, and neuroticism) were significantly associated with willingness to undergo various orthodontic treatments (P ≤ .05). Agreeableness demonstrated positive correlations with five treatment modalities, while both conscientiousness and neuroticism exhibited negative associations with a single treatment modality. Openness and extraversion were the only personality dimensions that failed to associate with any of the treatment modalities. Four of the nine treatment modalities had no association with patient demographics or a patient's personality dimensions. Personality traits are useful in predicting a patient's potential willingness to participate in various orthodontic treatments. The agreeableness dimension provided the most utility in predicting patient willingness. Age, ethnicity, and gender were not significant in predicting patient willingness.

  2. Comparison of two different debonding techniques in orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Piccoli, Luca; Migliau, Guido; Besharat, Laith Konstantinos; Di Carlo, Stefano; Pompa, Giorgio; Di Giorgio, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Summary Aim The purpose of this research is to investigate whether and how the adhesive bond failure site varied in relation to the material used for the orthodontic bonding and debonding technique applied. Materials and methods Two different methods of orthodontic debonding were included in our survey; cutters for orthodontics and debonding plier. Three different materials for the adhesion of the bracket: composite light curing, self-curing composite and glass ionomer cement. The remaining amount of adhesive on the tooth surface is an important parameter that gives information on how the location of the posting site varied during the debonding. 60 dental elements, maxillary and mandibular, previously extracted for orthodontic reasons, as well as periodontal, were included in our research. We investigated a possible significant correlation between different variables (debonding technique and materials for membership) and the ARI index. Conclusions The use of orthodontic cutters or debonding pliers does not affect the adhesive bond failure site and both techniques have a tendency to leave a significant amount of adhesive on the surface enamel. In the resin-reinforced glass ionomer cements, detachment occurs at the interface enamel-adhesive and this pattern of detachment increases the risk of the enamel damage during debonding. In both types of composite resins (photopolymerizable or self-curing), the detachment occurs at the interface bracketing adhesive. In this case the amount of remaining adhesive material on the tooth must be removed with further methods, which in addition, increase the risk of iatrogenic injury as well as the working hours. PMID:29299191

  3. The theory of reasoned action and patient compliance during orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Bos, Annemieke; Hoogstraten, Johan; Prahl-Andersen, Birte

    2005-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential of the theory of reasoned action (TRA) for the prediction and understanding of patients' intention to comply during orthodontic treatment and to analyze the effect of two additional variables in the model, namely perceived behavioral control and anticipated regret. Moreover, (the determinants of) intentions of orthodontic patients to comply during treatment were compared with (the determinants of) intentions of parents to stimulate this cooperation. A questionnaire was handed out to patients and parents visiting the Department of Orthodontics of the Academic Centre of Dentistry in Amsterdam. In both the patient and parent sample, independent-sample t-tests, correlation analyses and stepwise regression analyses were conducted. Variables in both samples were compared and tested. The extended version of the TRA explained 20% of the variance in the patients' intention to comply. The patients' anticipated regret, attitude and motivation to comply were significant determinants of the patients' intention to comply. In addition, the parents' attitude toward compliance was a significant predictor. The role of parents in enhancing patients' intentions to comply cannot be neglected. Our findings suggest that patients' intentions to comply during orthodontic treatment are influenced by factors outside of the TRA. Therefore, it is recommended to develop a new model, in which factors of the TRA are included, which can be used specifically for the study of compliance in orthodontics.

  4. Does orthodontic treatment provide a real functional improvement? a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Electromyographic analysis of the masticatory muscles provides useful data on the behavior of these muscles during stomatognathic system functioning and allows a functional assessment of orthodontic treatments. This study was undertaken to verify if achieving an Angle Class I bite through orthodontic treatment can lead to neuromuscular balance. Methods This study enrolled 30 patients (20 females, 10 males, mean age: 15.78 years) with an Angle Class II, division 1 malocclusion that was orthodontically treated. A group of 30 subjects (19 females, 11 males; mean age: 16.15 years), randomly selected among subjects with an Angle Class II, division 1 malocclusion that had not been orthodontically treated served as the Control group. Both groups were subjected to electromyography to study their neuromuscular characteristics. The Shapiro-Wilk's test revealed a non normal distribution, therefore we used a Friedman two way ANOVA by ranks test to compare differences of surface electromyography values between treated and untreated subjects at closed and open eyes condition. Results A statistically significant interaction between orthodontic treatment and open eyes conditions was detected for anterior temporal muscles. A significant imbalance of the anterior temporal muscles, which is indicative of an asymmetric electromyographic pattern, was also found. Conclusions The present data indicate that achieving a correct occlusal target does not necessarily correspond to a neuromuscular balance. PMID:24152806

  5. Prevalence of malocclusion traits and orthodontic treatment in a Finnish adult population.

    PubMed

    Krooks, Laura; Pirttiniemi, Pertti; Kanavakis, Georgios; Lähdesmäki, Raija

    2016-07-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to examine the prevalence of malocclusion traits and the extent of orthodontic treatment in a Finnish adult population. Materials and methods The study population comprised subjects (n = 1964) from the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 living in the city of Oulu and within 100 km of it. A clinical oral and dental examination with registration of occlusion was carried out in 2012 in connection with a 46-year follow-up survey. Data on previous orthodontic treatment were collected based on a questionnaire. Results In the clinical examination, 39.5% of the subjects had at least one malocclusion trait. The most common malocclusion traits were lateral crossbite (17.9%), overbite ≥ 6 mm (11.7%) and overjet ≥ 6 mm (9.7%). Crossbite on the left premolars, negative overjet and increased overbite were found more frequently in men. The prevalence of malocclusion traits was at the same level in treated and untreated groups. Overall, 18.6% of the subjects had undergone orthodontic treatment. Women showed a significantly higher prevalence of orthodontic treatment. Conclusions The most common malocclusion trait in the present study was lateral crossbite. Significant male dominance in the prevalence of malocclusion was observed, which has not been reported earlier in Finland. Orthodontic treatment of malocclusion traits was more common among females in Northern Finland. This study indicates that orthodontic treatment provided in childhood was, on average, adequate in reducing malocclusion traits to the level observed in the general population.

  6. Factors influencing orthodontic treatment time for non-surgical Class III malocclusion

    PubMed Central

    Bichara, Lívia Monteiro; de Aragón, Mônica Lídia Castro; Brandão, Gustavo Antônio Martins; Normando, David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT To improve orthodontic treatment efficiency, orthodontists must know which variables could interfere with orthodontic treatment time. Objective: To identify variables and their effect size on orthodontic treatment time of Class III malocclusion. Material and Methods: Forty-five Class III malocclusion cases were selected from 2008 patients’ records. Clinical charts, cephalometric radiographs, and pre and posttreatment dental casts were evaluated. Age, sex, PAR index at T1 and T2, overjet, missing teeth, extractions, number of treatment phases, missed appointments, appliance breakages, and cephalometric variables SNA, SNB, ANB, Wits, SnGoGn, CoA, CoGn, IMPA, 1.PP were investigated by multiple linear regression analysis and stepwise method at p<0.05. The sample was also divided into two groups: Group 0-2 (patients who had missed two clinical appointments or less) and Group >2 (patients who missed more than 2 appointments), to detect the influence of this data on treatment time and the quality of the treatment (PAR T2). Results: Average treatment time was 30.27 months. Multiple regression analysis showed that missed appointment (R2=0.4345) and appliance breakages (R2=0.0596) are the only variables able to significantly predict treatment duration. Treatment time for patients who missed more than 2 appointments was nearly one year longer. However, no significant influence on PAR T2 was observed for those patients. Conclusion: Orthodontic treatment duration in Class III patients is mainly influenced by factors related to patient compliance. Patients who missed more appointments did not show worse orthodontic finishing, but longer treatment. No occlusal, cephalometric, or demographic variable obtained before treatment was able to give some significant prediction about treatment time in Class III patients. PMID:27812612

  7. Impact of self-esteem and personality traits on the association between orthodontic treatment need and oral health-related quality of life in adults seeking orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Clijmans, Maïté; Lemiere, Jurgen; Fieuws, Steffen; Willems, Guy

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether an association exists between orthodontic treatment need and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) and whether this association is moderated by self-esteem (SE) and/or personality traits. In this cross-sectional study comprising 189 adults (55 males and 134 females) aged 17 or older (mean age 31.3 years), the OHRQoL was scored by the use of the shortened version of the Oral Health Impact Profile-14 (OHIP-14). The Rosenberg self-esteem scale was used to evaluate SE, and the Dutch adaptation of the Neuroticism Extraversion Openness Five-Factor Inventory was used to assess personality profiles. Need for treatment was defined by the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need. Spearman correlations, Mann-Whitney U-tests, and regression models were used to analyse the data. There is a modest to weak association between treatment need (Dental Health Component and aesthetic component) and OHRQoL as measured by the total OHIP-14 score (ρ = 0.21, P = 0.01216; ρ = 0.18, P = 0.02960, respectively). A significant, yet modest to weak, association between SE and the total OHIP-14 score was found (ρ = -0.34, P = 0.00057). Moreover, significant associations were found for the total OHIP-14 score and neuroticism and extraversion. Significant associations can be found between SE and all personality traits. There was a significant association between orthodontic treatment need and OHRQoL. Moreover, a significant association can be found between SE and OHRQoL, as well as certain personality traits and OHRQoL. No evidence was found that SE or personality traits moderate the association between OHRQoL and treatment need. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Interventions for managing relapse of the lower front teeth after orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yongchun; Sun, Jie; Lai, Wenli; Wu, Taixiang; Koshy, Stephen; Shi, Zongdao

    2013-09-06

    Orthodontic relapse can be defined as the tendency for teeth to return to their pre-treatment position, and this occurs especially in lower front teeth (lower canines and lower incisors). Retention, to maintain the position of corrected teeth, has become one of the most important phases of orthodontic treatment. However, 10 years after the completion of orthodontic treatment, only 30% to 50% of orthodontic patients effectively retain the satisfactory alignment initially obtained. After 20 years, satisfactory alignment reduces to 10%. When relapse occurs, simple effective strategies are required to effectively manage the problem. The periodontal, physiological or psychological conditions may be different from those before orthodontic treatment, so re-treatment methods may also need to be different. To assess the effects of interventions used to manage relapse of the lower front teeth after first fixed orthodontic treatment. The following electronic databases were searched: the Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register (to 9 November 2012), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 10), MEDLINE via OVID (1950 to 9 November 2012), EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 9 November 2012). There were no restrictions regarding language or date of publication. A thorough handsearch was done in relation to the following journals: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (1970 to 9 November 2012), Angle Orthodontist (1978 to 9 November 2012), European Journal of Orthodontics (1979 to 9 November 2012), Journal of Orthodontics (1978 to 9 November 2012), Chinese Journal of Stomatology (1953 to 9 November 2012), West China Journal of Stomatology (1983 to 9 November 2012), Chinese Journal of Dental Materials and Devices (1992 to 9 November 2012) and Chinese Journal of Orthodontics (1994 to 9 November 2012). We would have included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) which compared any of the following: fixed options

  9. Factors influencing satisfaction with the process of orthodontic treatment in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Wong, Lilia; Ryan, Fiona S; Christensen, Lars R; Cunningham, Susan J

    2018-03-01

    Despite the increases in adults undergoing orthodontic treatment in both the public and private sectors, satisfaction with the treatment process has not been widely explored. In this study, we investigated factors influencing satisfaction with the process of orthodontic treatment in adult patients. This was a prospective cross-sectional qualitative study. Participants were adults who had completed orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances and were recruited from 2 sites (a National Health Service public sector teaching hospital and a private specialist practice). Data were collected using in-depth interviews, and a content thematic analysis with a framework approach was used to analyze the data. A total of 26 adults were recruited (13 at each site). Five main themes were identified relating to patient satisfaction with the process of treatment: communication, staff, physical environment, appointments, and impact of appliance treatment. Effective communication was a dominant theme, particularly relating to explanations during treatment and making patients feel involved in their own care. In general, adult orthodontic patients were satisfied with the process of treatment, and good communication played a major part in this. Despite the differences in working models in the public and private sectors, many similarities arose when comparing the factors between the 2 sites. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Aesthetic Rehabilitation of a Complicated Crown-Root Fracture of the Maxillary Incisor: Combination of Orthodontic and Implant Treatment

    PubMed Central

    de Avila, Érica Dorigatti; de Molon, Rafael Scaf; Cardoso, Mauricio de Almeida; Capelozza Filho, Leopoldino; Campos Velo, Marilia Mattar de Amoêdo; Mollo, Francisco de Assis; Borelli Barros, Luiz Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a complex rehabilitation, of fractured tooth, with implants in anterior region considering the orthodontics extrusion to clinical success. At 7 years old, the patient fractured the maxillary left central incisor and the dentist did a crown with the fragment. Twenty years later, the patient was referred to a dental clinic for orthodontic treatment, with the chief complaint related to an accentuated deep bite, and a professional started an orthodontic treatment. After sixteen months of orthodontic treatment, tooth 21 fractured. The treatment plan included an orthodontic extrusion of tooth 21 and implant placement. This case has been followed up and the clinical and radiographic examinations show excellence esthetic results and satisfaction of patient. The forced extrusion can be a viable treatment option in the management of crown root fracture of an anterior tooth to gain bone in a vertical direction. This case emphasizes that to achieve the esthetic result a multidisciplinary approach is necessary. PMID:24872900

  11. Impact of Orthodontic Treatment on Periodontal Tissues: A Narrative Review of Multidisciplinary Literature

    PubMed Central

    Gorbunkova, Angelina; Pagni, Giorgio; Brizhak, Anna; Farronato, Giampietro; Rasperini, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to describe the most commonly observed changes in periodontium caused by orthodontic treatment in order to facilitate specialists' collaboration and communication. An electronic database search was carried out using PubMed abstract and citation database and bibliographic material was then used in order to find other appropriate sources. Soft and hard periodontal tissues changes during orthodontic treatment and maintenance of the patients are discussed in order to provide an exhaustive picture of the possible interactions between these two interwoven disciplines. PMID:26904120

  12. Surgical-orthodontic treatment of Class I malocclusion with maxillary vertical excess--a case report.

    PubMed

    Kiran, Jyothi; Isaac, Anish; Shanthraj, Ravis; Madannagowda, Shivalinga

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the treatment of an adult male with vertical maxillary excess, excessive gingival display on smiling, a convex profile, proclined upper and lower incisors, and crowded lower anteriors with severe lip incompetence. The therapy included stages: (1) Pre surgical orthodontics- leveling and aligning of the maxillary and mandibular arch with closure of all extraction spaces. (2) Surgical phase-Lefort I osteotomy for superior maxillary impaction, 5 mm of anterior and 3 mm of posterior impaction ofmaxilla was done. (3) Post surgical orthodontics for finishing and detailing. The treatment lasted 16 months; improved facial esthetics significantly; and resulted in a normal occlusion, overjet, and overbite.

  13. Orthodontic treatment provision and referral preferences among New Zealand general dental practitioners.

    PubMed

    Aldawood, S; Ampuan, S N H; Medara, N; Thomson, W M

    2011-11-01

    General dental practitioners (GDPs) are key clinicians in the orthodontic referral chain as they complement (and may compete with) orthodontists in providing treatment for the public. To determine the nature and extent of GDPs' involvement in orthodontic treatment provision and to identify influences on GDPs' choice of orthodontist. An email survey was conducted of actively-practising GDPs in May-June 2010. Two timelines of contact were followed, with non-responders to the first survey re-contacted three weeks later. Just under one-fifth (19.3 per cent) reported providing forms of orthodontic treatment. This proportion was higher among males, more experienced practitioners, and dentists in rural locations. The percentage involvement ranged from 22.3 per cent in Greater Auckland to 10.5 per cent in Greater Wellington and 11.9 per cent in Christchurch. In the remainder of New Zealand, percentages ranged from 11.5 per cent in urban areas to 37.1 per cent in rural areas. Of those providing treatment, almost half had 1-10 patients under management, and just over one-third had greater numbers. Sixty-one per cent of orthodontically-involved GDPs in Auckland had more than 10 orthodontic patients. The most commonly treated condition was a simple crossbite, while the least commonly treated condition was the severe Class III malocclusion. The provision of orthodontic treatment by New Zealand GDPs has decreased in recent years to an average of about one in five, but this figure is considerably higher in rural areas and is a notable feature of the greater Auckland area. The findings suggest that the majority of the more complex cases are continuing to be referred to specialist orthodontists.

  14. The congenitally missing upper lateral incisor. A retrospective study of orthodontic space closure versus restorative treatment.

    PubMed

    Robertsson, S; Mohlin, B

    2000-12-01

    Orthodontic treatment for patients with uni- or bilateral congenitally missing lateral incisors is a challenge to effective treatment planning. The two major alternatives, orthodontic space closure or space opening for prosthetic replacements, can both compromise aesthetics, periodontal health, and function. The aim of this retrospective study was to examine treated patients who had congenitally missing lateral incisors and to compare their opinion of the aesthetic result with the dentists' opinions of occlusal function and periodontal health. In this sample, 50 patients were identified. Thirty had been treated with orthodontic space closure, and 20 by space opening and a prosthesis (porcelain bonded to gold and resin bonded bridges). The patient's opinion of the aesthetic result was evaluated using the Eastman Esthetic Index questionnaire and during a structured interview. The functional status, dental contact patterns, periodontal condition, and quality of the prosthetic replacement was evaluated. In general, subjects treated with orthodontic space closure were more satisfied with the appearance of their teeth than those who had a prosthesis. No significant differences in the prevalence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) were found. However, patients with prosthetic replacements had impaired periodontal health with accumulation of plaque and gingivitis. The conclusion of this study is that orthodontic space closure produces results that are well accepted by patients, does not impair temporomandibular joint (TMJ) function, and encourages periodontal health in comparison with prosthetic replacements.

  15. Early treatment of posterior crossbite - a randomised clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this randomised clinical trial was to assess the effect of early orthodontic treatment in contrast to normal growth effects for functional unilateral posterior crossbite in the late deciduous and early mixed dentition by means of three-dimensional digital model analysis. Methods This randomised clinical trial was assessed to analyse the orthodontic treatment effects for patients with functional unilateral posterior crossbite in the late deciduous and early mixed dentition using a two-step procedure: initial maxillary expansion followed by a U-bow activator therapy. In the treatment group 31 patients and in the control group 35 patients with a mean age of 7.3 years (SD 2.1) were monitored. The time between the initial assessment (T1) and the follow-up (T2) was one year. The orthodontic analysis was done by a three-dimensional digital model analysis. Using the ‘Digimodel’ software, the orthodontic measurements in the maxilla and mandible and for the midline deviation, the overjet and overbite were recorded. Results Significant differences between the control and the therapy group at T2 were detected for the anterior, median and posterior transversal dimensions of the maxilla, the palatal depth, the palatal base arch length, the maxillary arch length and inclination, the midline deviation, the overjet and the overbite. Conclusions Orthodontic treatment of a functional unilateral posterior crossbite with a bonded maxillary expansion device followed by U-bow activator therapy in the late deciduous and early mixed dentition is an effective therapeutic method, as evidenced by the results of this RCT. It leads to three-dimensional therapeutically induced maxillary growth effects. Dental occlusion is significantly improved, and the prognosis for normal craniofacial growth is enhanced. Trial registration Registration trial DRKS00003497 on DRKS PMID:23339736

  16. Dentoalveolar and skeletal changes associated with the pendulum appliance followed by fixed orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Angelieri, Fernanda; Almeida, Renato Rodrigues de; Almeida, Marcio Rodrigues de; Fuziy, Acácio

    2006-04-01

    This prospective clinical study analyzed the distalization of maxillary molars achieved by the pendulum appliance and its effect on the anchorage teeth during and after fixed orthodontic treatment. Lateral cephalograms of 22 adolescents (15 girls, 7 boys) taken pretreatment, after distalization, after leveling and aligning, and after fixed orthodontic treatment were evaluated. The initial mean age was 14.5 years (SD = 1.80). The mean time for distalization of the maxillary molars was 5.85 months (SD = 1.82), and the total treatment time was 3.61 years (SD = 1.83). The pendulum appliance moved the maxillary molars distally, but with significant distal inclination, protrusion of the anterior teeth, and increase in lower anterior facial height (LAFH) due to the clockwise mandibular rotation. After fixed orthodontic treatment, the maxillary incisors and the maxillary first premolars and first molars were returned to their pretreatment anteroposterior positions. Thus, at postdistalization, there was 2.1 mm of protrusion of the maxillary first molars, despite the anchorage reinforcement (Nance button and cervical headgear worn at night during fixed appliance therapy). However, at the end of treatment, all patients had Class I molar relationships. The pendulum appliance followed by fixed orthodontic treatment corrected the Class II sagittal relationship, especially due to the dentoalveolar changes secondary to the spontaneous mandibular growth in the anterior direction during fixed appliance treatment.

  17. Pain and distress induced by elastomeric and spring separators in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Al-Balbeesi, Hana O; Bin Huraib, Sahar M; AlNahas, Nadia W; AlKawari, Huda M; Abu-Amara, Abdulrahman B; Vellappally, Sajith; Anil, Sukumaran

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present investigation is to evaluate patients' pain perception and discomfort, the duration of pain and the level of self-medication over time during tooth separation, and the effectiveness of elastomeric and spring types of orthodontic separators in Saudi population. The study group consisted of 30 female adolescent patients who had elastomeric/spring separators as part of their orthodontic treatment. A self-administrated questionnaire comprising 16 multiple choice questions and another with visual analog scale were used to record the patient's pain perceptions at 4 hours, 24 hours, 3 days, 5 days, and 7 days from the time of insertion. The level of pain and discomfort during these time periods were assessed by a visual analog scale. After a separation period of 7 days, the amount of separation was measured with a leaf gauge. Type and frequency of analgesic consumption was also recorded. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20 (IBM SPSS -Chicago, IL: SPSS Inc.,) was used for statistical analysis. The data showed significant increase in the level of pain at 4 hours, 24 hours, and 3 days from separator placement. The elastomeric separators produced significantly more separation than the spring separators and also caused maximum pain during the first 3 days after insertion. However, there was no significant difference between the score of pain between two separators at all time intervals. Both elastomeric and spring separators showed comparative levels of pain and discomfort during the early phase of separation. Elastomeric separators were found to be more effective in tooth separation than spring separators. However, further studies are necessary to substantiate this preliminary observation.

  18. Evolution of treatment mechanics and contemporary appliance design in orthodontics: A 40-year perspective.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Richard P; Bennett, John C

    2015-06-01

    Until the early 1970s, successful treatment with the Begg technique and the Tweed edgewise technique required tedious wire bending. The introduction of Andrews' straight wire appliance changed that, and it was one of the most significant contributions in the history of orthodontics. The straight wire appliance significantly reduced the amount of wire bending and also brought along other options in treatment mechanics. Retraction of the canines with elastic chains and ligature wires became more common. Sliding mechanics in place of closing loops became the method of space closure for a significant number of clinicians. Edgewise force levels were initially used to close spaces; however, it was soon observed that lighter forces were more effective with sliding mechanics. Along with these changes, it became apparent that compensation in the appliance was needed, depending on the type of malocclusion and particularly with varying extraction sequences. Various appliance designs were developed to accommodate changes in mechanics and force levels. These modifications improved tooth positions at the end of treatment as long as the brackets were properly placed. These major changes in appliances, force levels, and treatment mechanics can be traced back to the work of Dr Lawrence Andrews and the straight wire appliances. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A comparative study of combined periodontal and orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances and clear aligners in patients with periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose With the increasing prevalence of orthodontic treatment in adults, clear aligner treatments are becoming more popular. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of orthodontic treatment on periodontal tissue and to compare orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances (FA) to clear aligner treatment (CAT) in periodontitis patients. Methods A total of 35 patients who underwent orthodontic treatment in the Department of Periodontology were included in this study. After periodontal treatment with meticulous oral hygiene education, patients underwent treatment with FA or CAT, and this study analyzed patient outcomes depending on the treatment strategy. Clinical parameters were assessed at baseline and after orthodontic treatment, and the duration of treatment was compared between these two groups. Results The overall plaque index, the gingival index, and probing depth improved after orthodontic treatment (P<0.01). The overall bone level also improved (P=0.045). However, the bone level changes in the FA and CAT groups were not significantly different. Significant differences were found between the FA and CAT groups in probing depth, change in probing depth, and duration of treatment (P<0.05). However, no significant differences were found between the FA and CAT groups regarding the plaque index, changes in the plaque index, the gingival index, changes in the gingival index, or changes in the alveolar bone level. The percentage of females in the CAT group (88%) was significantly greater than in the FA group (37%) (P<0.01). Conclusions After orthodontic treatment, clinical parameters were improved in the FA and CAT groups with meticulous oral hygiene education and plaque control. Regarding plaque index and gingival index, no significant differences were found between these two groups. We suggest that combined periodontal and orthodontic treatment can improve patients’ periodontal health irrespective of orthodontic techniques. PMID:26734489

  20. A comparative study of combined periodontal and orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances and clear aligners in patients with periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Han, Ji-Young

    2015-12-01

    With the increasing prevalence of orthodontic treatment in adults, clear aligner treatments are becoming more popular. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of orthodontic treatment on periodontal tissue and to compare orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances (FA) to clear aligner treatment (CAT) in periodontitis patients. A total of 35 patients who underwent orthodontic treatment in the Department of Periodontology were included in this study. After periodontal treatment with meticulous oral hygiene education, patients underwent treatment with FA or CAT, and this study analyzed patient outcomes depending on the treatment strategy. Clinical parameters were assessed at baseline and after orthodontic treatment, and the duration of treatment was compared between these two groups. The overall plaque index, the gingival index, and probing depth improved after orthodontic treatment (P<0.01). The overall bone level also improved (P=0.045). However, the bone level changes in the FA and CAT groups were not significantly different. Significant differences were found between the FA and CAT groups in probing depth, change in probing depth, and duration of treatment (P<0.05). However, no significant differences were found between the FA and CAT groups regarding the plaque index, changes in the plaque index, the gingival index, changes in the gingival index, or changes in the alveolar bone level. The percentage of females in the CAT group (88%) was significantly greater than in the FA group (37%) (P<0.01). After orthodontic treatment, clinical parameters were improved in the FA and CAT groups with meticulous oral hygiene education and plaque control. Regarding plaque index and gingival index, no significant differences were found between these two groups. We suggest that combined periodontal and orthodontic treatment can improve patients' periodontal health irrespective of orthodontic techniques.

  1. Comparing esthetic smile perceptions among laypersons with and without orthodontic treatment experience and dentists

    PubMed Central

    An, Seong-Mu; Choi, Sun-Young; Chung, Young-Wook; Jang, Tae-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine whether orthodontic treatment experience affects the individual's perception of smile esthetics and to evaluate differences among orthodontically treated laypersons, non-treated laypersons, and dentists by using computerized image alterations. Methods A photograph of a woman's smile was digitally altered using a software image editing program. The alterations involved gingival margin height, crown width and length, incisal plane canting, and dental midline of the maxillary anterior teeth. Three groups of raters (orthodontically treated laypersons, non-treated laypersons, and dentists) evaluated the original and altered images using a visual analog scale. Results The threshold for detecting changes in maxillary central incisor gingival margin height among laypersons was 1.5 mm; the threshold of dentists, who were more perceptive, was 1.0 mm. For maxillary lateral incisor crown width and height, the threshold of all three groups was 3.0 mm. Canting of the incisal plane was perceived when the canting was 3.0 mm among non-treated laypersons, 2.0 mm among treated laypersons, and 1.0 mm among dentists. Non-treated laypersons could not perceive dental midline shifts; however, treated laypersons and dentists perceived them when the shift was ≥ 3.0 mm. Conclusions Laypersons with and without orthodontic treatment experience and dentists have different perceptions of smile esthetics. Orthodontically treated laypersons were more critical than non-treated laypersons regarding incisal plane canting and dental midline shifts. Based on these findings, it is suggested that orthodontic treatment experience improved the esthetic perceptions of laypersons. PMID:25473645

  2. Association among pain, masticatory performance, and proinflammatory cytokines in crevicular fluid during orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Gameiro, Gustavo Hauber; Schultz, Christian; Trein, Marcos Porto; Mundstock, Karina Santos; Weidlich, Patrícia; Goularte, Jéferson Ferraz

    2015-12-01

    Orthodontic patients usually complain about masticatory limitations associated with the activation of fixed appliances. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate whether orthodontic pain reflects differences in the objective evaluation of mastication and in the levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the crevicular fluid of patients undergoing orthodontic treatment. Twenty patients with malocclusions requiring orthodontic treatment were included in this prospective study. Their pain experience, masticatory performance, and levels of interleukin 1-beta and prostaglandin E2 in crevicular fluid were evaluated at 3 times: before bracket placement, 24 hours after archwire placement, and 30 days after the initial appointment. All variables were compared with those of a control group of 25 subjects with normal occlusion. The masticatory performance of the patients was significantly reduced at 24 hours after bracket placement, the period in which they reported higher values of pain and had higher levels of interleukin 1-beta. The levels of prostaglandin E2 did not change in the periods evaluated, and there were no correlations between the levels of cytokines and the functional limitations observed. The only significant correlation was between pain and decreased masticatory performance. The masticatory performance of orthodontic patients is significantly reduced only during the period of greatest pain. However, these alterations did not correlate with any measurement of interleukin 1-beta or prostaglandin E2 in the crevicular fluid, suggesting that these solitary measurements are inadequate to predict the temporary pain and masticatory limitations experienced by patients undergoing orthodontic treatment. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Mechanical and Histological Effects of Resorbable Blasting Media Surface Treatment on the Initial Stability of Orthodontic Mini-Implants.

    PubMed

    Gansukh, Odontuya; Jeong, Jong-Wha; Kim, Jong-Wan; Lee, Jong-Ho; Kim, Tae-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of resorbable blasting media (RBM) treatment on early stability of orthodontic mini-implants by mechanical, histomorphometric, and histological analyses. Methods. Ninety-six (64 for mechanical study and 32 for histological study and histomorphometric analysis) titanium orthodontic mini-implants (OMIs) with machined (machined group) or RBM-treated (CaP) surface (RBM group) were implanted in the tibiae of 24 rabbits. Maximum initial torque (MIT) was measured during insertion, and maximum removal torque (MRT) and removal angular momentum (RAM) were measured at 2 and 4 weeks after implantation. Bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and bone area (BA) were analyzed at 4 weeks after implantation. Results. RBM group exhibited significantly lower MIT and significantly higher MRT and RAM at 2 weeks than machined group. No significant difference in MRT, RAM, and BIC between the two groups was noted at 4 weeks, although BA was significantly higher in RBM group than in machined group. RBM group showed little bone resorption, whereas machined group showed new bone formation after bone resorption. Conclusions. RBM surface treatment can provide early stability of OMIs around 2 weeks after insertion, whereas stability of machined surface OMIs may decrease in early stages because of bone resorption, although it can subsequently recover by new bone apposition.

  4. Mechanical and Histological Effects of Resorbable Blasting Media Surface Treatment on the Initial Stability of Orthodontic Mini-Implants

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of resorbable blasting media (RBM) treatment on early stability of orthodontic mini-implants by mechanical, histomorphometric, and histological analyses. Methods. Ninety-six (64 for mechanical study and 32 for histological study and histomorphometric analysis) titanium orthodontic mini-implants (OMIs) with machined (machined group) or RBM-treated (CaP) surface (RBM group) were implanted in the tibiae of 24 rabbits. Maximum initial torque (MIT) was measured during insertion, and maximum removal torque (MRT) and removal angular momentum (RAM) were measured at 2 and 4 weeks after implantation. Bone-to-implant contact (BIC) and bone area (BA) were analyzed at 4 weeks after implantation. Results. RBM group exhibited significantly lower MIT and significantly higher MRT and RAM at 2 weeks than machined group. No significant difference in MRT, RAM, and BIC between the two groups was noted at 4 weeks, although BA was significantly higher in RBM group than in machined group. RBM group showed little bone resorption, whereas machined group showed new bone formation after bone resorption. Conclusions. RBM surface treatment can provide early stability of OMIs around 2 weeks after insertion, whereas stability of machined surface OMIs may decrease in early stages because of bone resorption, although it can subsequently recover by new bone apposition. PMID:26942200

  5. OBJECTIVE AND SUBJECTIVE EVALUATION OF ADOLESCENT'S ORTHODONTIC TREATMENT NEEDS AND THEIR IMPACT ON SELF-ESTEEM.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anshika; Mathur, Anmol; Batra, Manu; Makkar, Diljot Kaur; Aggarwal, Vikram Pal; Goyal, Nikita; Kaur, Puneet

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the presence of association between objective and subjective evaluation of orthodontic treatment needs in adolescents and their impact on their self-esteem. Cross-sectional study with adolescents aged 10-17 years old in Sri Ganganagar city, Rajasthan, India. The objective index of orthodontic treatment need (IOTN) dental health component (DHC) and the subjective aesthetic component (AC) were used to determine the normative and the self-perception need for orthodontic treatment, respectively. The selected students were further examined for dental trauma, tooth loss, and dental caries. Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale was applied for self-esteem level determination. Linear regression analysis was executed to test the individual association of different independent clinical variables with self-esteem scores. Among 1,140 studied adolescents, the prevalence of dental normative orthodontic treatment need was in 56.9% of individuals, whereas 53.3% of individuals considered themselves as needy for the treatment. Multivariate analyses revealed that out of all dental disorders, DHC followed by AC of IOTN had maximum impact on the self-esteem of the adolescence. Dissatisfaction with dental appearance is a strong predictor for low self-esteem in adolescence.

  6. The PAR index for evaluation of treatment outcomes in orthodontics: a clinical audit of 50 cases.

    PubMed

    Fadiga, Mohamed Siddick; Diouf, Joseph Samba; Diop Ba, Khady; Gueye, Idrissa; Ngom, Papa Ibrahima; Diagne, Falou

    2014-03-01

    In the context of this study, a clinical audit of cases treated by a single orthodontist was carried out to illustrate one practical application of the PAR index. Fifty pairs of dental casts taken from the patient group before and at the end of orthodontic treatment were evaluated by an orthodontist trained in the use of the PAR index. This evaluation shows that the average overall PAR score for the subjects included in the study fell from an initial value of 25.64 ± 11.73 points to 1.78 ± 2.79 points at the end of orthodontic treatment. The average reduction attributable to orthodontic treatment was 23.86 ± 0.95 points, for an average percentage reduction of 93.36 ± 9.02%. When cases were classified according to the degree of improvement suggested by the nomogram of the PAR index, 23 (46%) were in the "Improved" category after treatment, and 27 cases (54%) in the "Greatly improved" category. This adds up to a total of 100% in these two categories, with none in the "No better" or "Worse" categories. It should be recalled that a high standard of orthodontic treatment is considered to be reached when the average percentage reduction of the PAR score exceeds 70% and when the number of cases in the "Worse or no better" category is below 5%. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  7. Normative and subjective need for orthodontic treatment within different age groups in a population in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Nur Yilmaz, R B; Oktay, I; Ilhan, D; Fişekçioğlu, E; Özdemir, Fulya

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate and compare the normative and subjective need for orthodontic treatment within different age groups in Turkey. One thousand and sixteen patients from seven different demographic regions of Turkey (Marmara, Black Sea, East Anatolia, Southeastern Anatolia, Mediterranean, Aegean, and Central Anatolia Region) (mean age ± SD: 12.80 ± 3.57 years) were randomly selected and divided into six age groups (7-8,9-10,11-12,13-14,15-16, and 17-18 year-olds) and categorized according to the dental health component (DHC) of the index for orthodontic treatment need (IOTN). Additionally, the patients were asked to indicate the photograph that was most similar to their own dentition from the 10-point scale of the aesthetic component of IOTN. The DHC of IOTN was not significantly different between the six age groups (P > 0.05). However, no/slight need (aesthetic component 1-4) for orthodontic treatment according to AC of IOTN was significantly higher in 13-14,15-16, and 17-18 age groups than 7-8, 9-10, and 11-12 age groups (P < 0.05). No sex differences were found in both DHC and aesthetic component of IOTN between age groups (P > 0.05). The normative need distribution was homogeneous within all the age groups according to DHC. However, the subjective need for orthodontic treatment was higher in the younger age groups.

  8. [Effect of dental arch length decrease during orthodontic treatment in the upper airway development. A review].

    PubMed

    Haddad, Stéphanie; Kerbrat, Jean-Baptiste; Schouman, Thomas; Goudot, Patrick

    2017-03-01

    A possible relation between an upper airway space decrease and the development of obstructive sleep apnea syndrom explains the importance to know the effect of the modification of dental arch length on the upper airway during orthodontic treatment. The aim of this article is to expose recent knowledge about upper airway development and dental arch length decrease factors, to determine the influence of this decrease on upper airway development. A review was done to determine the upper airway normal development, to define dental arch to specify if an ideal position of dental arch on apical base exists. All of the length dental arch decrease factors during orthodontic treatment (dental extraction, dental agenesis and dental malpositions) and their upper airway resounding were searched. Some authors found a diminution of upper airway space after premolars extractions while others didn't found this diminution after extractions premolars when incisor retraction is finished. A decrease of transversal maxillary diameter and nasal cavity may be due to absence of permanent teeth. The effect of dental arch length decrease during orthodontic treatment in the upper airway development was not scientifically proved. However we had to be vigilant and adapt our orthodontic treatment case by case to avoid an upper airway modification. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2017.

  9. Orthodontic treatment outcome in a First Nations population in Alberta, Canada: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Cadman, Kirby C; Glover, Kenneth E; Heo, Giseon; Warren, Sharon; Major, Paul W

    2002-04-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine whether there was a significant difference in the degree of improvement after orthodontic treatment between a sample of First Nations orthodontic patients and a control sample of non-First Nations orthodontic patients. The secondary objective was to determine whether there was a difference in the severity of malocclusions being treated in a sample of the First Nations patients compared with a control sample of the non-First Nations patients. Several factors that might affect treatment outcome, such as missed appointments, treatment duration, oral hygiene, extractions, dental classification, and geographic location, were also studied. A sample of 60 First Nations patients and a control group of 60 non-First Nations patients between the 11 and 18 years of age who had been treated with full fixed orthodontic appliances were evaluated. The weighted peer assessment rating (PAR) index was applied to pretreatment and posttreatment study models to address the study's main objectives. The results showed that the First Nations group had greater PAR scores pretreatment than did the controls, and their weighted PAR scores improved more with treatment. Posttreatment PAR scores were similar between the 2 groups. In addition to First Nations status, only extractions and geographic location affected PAR improvement scores.

  10. [Orthodontic treatment effect of on the condition of the upper airways].

    PubMed

    Куроедова, Вера Д; Чикор, Татьяна А; Макарова, Александра Н; Ким, Анна А

    during the period of child growth airways and facial skeleton are developing in close relationship. Patients with upper dental arch narrowing and high gothic palet, tend to have narrowed nasal passages and are more vulnerable to violations of breathing during sleep - so-called obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, Obstructive Sleep Apnea), the occurrence of which is explained by a decrease of anteroposterior sizes of throat. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of orthodontic treatment in the period of mixed dentition on the state of the upper respiratory tract. there were examined 64 children (7-12 years) with class I malocclusion. Clinical examination was carried out according to the protocols of providing orthodontic care with assessment of the functional state of the maxillofacial region. Orthodontic correction had been carried with apparatus of Biobloc system. Before treatment and after its completion there had been performed morphometric analysis of dentition and assess patency of the upper airway by McNamara method. prior to the beginning of orthodontic treatment in all patients had been found a significant decrease of upper and lower pharyngeal spaces 5.95±0.75mm, 8.1 8.}0.74 mm respectively (normal - 15-20mm and 11-14mm). After orthodontic treatment with Biobloc system the upper pharyngeal space increased in 2.5 times (P<0,01), lower pharyngeal space increased in 1.6 (p<0,01) times, and in average amounted to 13,3 ± 0,86 mm. thus found that after orthodontic treatment with Biobloc apparatus along with the expansion of the alveolar arches of both jaws there is a significant positive effect of increasing the volume of the upper respiratory tract. Consequently, orthodontic treatment in the period of mixed dentition, stimulates the growth not only of the dental arches, but also greatly improves the development nazomaxillary complex and prevents apnea syndrome, that increases the level patient's health and life quality.

  11. A pilot clinical study of Class III surgical patients facilitated by improved accelerated osteogenic orthodontic treatments.

    PubMed

    Wu, JiaQi; Jiang, Jiu-Hui; Xu, Li; Liang, Cheng; Bai, YunYang; Zou, Wei

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate if the improved accelerated osteogenic orthodontics (IAOO) procedure could speed Class III surgical patients' preoperative orthodontic treatment duration and, if yes, to what extent. This study was also designed to determine whether or not an IAOO procedure affects the tooth-moving pattern during extraction space closure. The samples in this study consisted of 24 Class III surgical patients. Twelve skeletal Class III surgery patients served as an experimental group (group 1) and the others as a control group (group 2). Before treatment, the maxillary first premolars were removed. For group 1, after the maxillary dental arch was aligned and leveled (T2), IAOO procedures were performed in the maxillary alveolar bone. Except for this IAOO procedure in group 1, all 24 patients experienced similar combined orthodontic and orthognathic treatment. Study casts of the maxillary dentitions were made before orthodontic treatment (T1) and after extraction space closure (T3). All of the casts were laser scanned, and the amount of movement of the maxillary central incisor, canine, and first molar, as well as arch widths, were digitally measured and analyzed by using the three-dimensional model superimposition method. The time durations T3-T2 were significantly reduced in group 1 by 8.65 ± 2.67 months and for T3-T1 were reduced by 6.39 ± 2.00 months (P < .001). Meanwhile, the tooth movement rates were all higher in group 1 (P < .05). There were no significant differences in the amount of teeth movement in the sagittal, vertical, and transverse dimensions between the two groups (P > .05). The IAOO can reduce the surgical orthodontic treatment time for the skeletal Class III surgical patient by more than half a year on average. The IAOO procedures do not save anchorage.

  12. Factors Influencing Subjective Orthodontic Treatment Need and Culture-related Differences among Chinese Natives and Foreign Inhabitants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-ting; Tang, Yin; Huang, Xue-lian; Wan, Hua; Chen, Yang-xi

    2010-01-01

    Aim The aim of this survey was to compare Chinese natives and foreign inhabitants in Chengdu, China, with respect to: (1) attitudes towards dental appearance, (2) subjective orthodontic treatment need, and (3) the main factors influencing orthodontic treatment need. Methodology A total of 522 subjects, including 227 foreign inhabitants and 295 Chinese natives in Chengdu participated in the survey. A simple random sampling method was adopted and a face-to-face interview was conducted at some public sites using a questionnaire. Data was entered by two persons synchronously using Epidata 3.0, and SPSS 13.0 was used to analyze these data. Results 89.0% of foreign inhabitants were satisfied with their teeth compared to only 46.8% of Chinese natives. Females were more dissatisfied with their teeth than males. Chinese natives put improving appearance as the top priority (55.9%) for seeking orthodontic treatment; however, in foreign inhabitants, the main reason for seeking treatment was to improve masticatory function (44.1%), followed by ”to be pretty“ (35.2%). The importance of well-aligned teeth and self-perception of psycho-social impact of malocclusion were the same two main factors influencing subjective orthodontic treatment need (P<0.05) in foreign inhabitants and Chinese natives. Subjective orthodontic treatment need between the two target groups was significantly different (P<0.05). Conclusion (1) It was very common that Chinese natives were dissatisfied with their dental appearance, and their subjective orthodontic treatment needs were high. (2) There were some differences in orthodontic treatment motives between the two target groups. (3) There were differences in subjective orthodontic treatment needs between foreign inhabitants and Chinese natives. However, the prominent influential factors were almost the same. There may be benefit to understanding subjective orthodontic needs of different races. PMID:21125793

  13. Factors influencing subjective orthodontic treatment need and culture-related differences among Chinese natives and foreign inhabitants.

    PubMed

    Xiao-Ting, Li; Tang, Yin; Huang, Xue-Lian; Wan, Hua; Chen, Yang-Xi

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this survey was to compare Chinese natives and foreign inhabitants in Chengdu, China, with respect to: (1) attitudes towards dental appearance, (2) subjective orthodontic treatment need, and (3) the main factors influencing orthodontic treatment need. A total of 522 subjects, including 227 foreign inhabitants and 295 Chinese natives in Chengdu participated in the survey. A simple random sampling method was adopted and a face-to-face interview was conducted at some public sites using a questionnaire. Data was entered by two persons synchronously using Epidata 3.0, and SPSS 13.0 was used to analyze these data. 89.0% of foreign inhabitants were satisfied with their teeth compared to only 46.8% of Chinese natives. Females were more dissatisfied with their teeth than males. Chinese natives put improving appearance as the top priority (55.9%) for seeking orthodontic treatment; however, in foreign inhabitants, the main reason for seeking treatment was to improve masticatory function (44.1%), followed by "to be pretty" (35.2%). The importance of well-aligned teeth and self-perception of psychosocial impact of malocclusion were the same two main factors influencing subjective orthodontic treatment need (P < 0.05) in foreign inhabitants and Chinese natives. Subjective orthodontic treatment need between the two target groups was significantly different (P < 0.05). (1) It was very common that Chinese natives were dissatisfied with their dental appearance, and their subjective orthodontic treatment needs were high. (2) There were some differences in orthodontic treatment motives between the two target groups. (3) There were differences in subjective orthodontic treatment needs between foreign inhabitants and Chinese natives. However, the prominent influential factors were almost the same. There may be benefit to understanding subjective orthodontic needs of different races.

  14. Outcome assessment of Invisalign and traditional orthodontic treatment compared with the American Board of Orthodontics objective grading system.

    PubMed

    Djeu, Garret; Shelton, Clarence; Maganzini, Anthony

    2005-09-01

    This treatment-outcome assessment objectively compares Invisalign (Align Technology, Santa Clara, Calif) treatment with braces. This study, a retrospective cohort analysis, was conducted in New York, NY, in 2004. Records from 2 groups of 48 patients (Invisalign and braces groups) were evaluated by using methods from the American Board of Orthodontics Phase III examination. The discrepancy index was used to analyze pretreatment records to control for initial severity of malocclusion. The objective grading system (OGS) was used to systematically grade posttreatment records. Statistical analyses evaluated treatment outcome, duration, and strengths and weaknesses of Invisalign compared with braces. The Invisalign group lost 13 OGS points more than the braces group on average, and the OGS passing rate for Invisalign was 27% lower than that for braces. Invisalign scores were consistently lower than braces scores for buccolingual inclination, occlusal contacts, occlusal relationships, and overjet. Invisalign's OGS scores were negatively correlated to initial overjet, occlusion, and buccal posterior crossibite. Invisalign patients finished 4 months sooner than those with fixed appliances on average. P < .05 was used to determine statistically significant differences. According to the OGS, Invisalign did not treat malocclusions as well as braces in this sample. Invisalign was especially deficient in its ability to correct large anteroposterior discrepancies and occlusal contacts. The strengths of Invisalign were its ability to close spaces and correct anterior rotations and marginal ridge heights. This study might help clinicians to determine which patients are best suited for Invisalign treatment.

  15. Overview of non-invasive factors (low level laser and low intensity pulsed ultrasound) accelerating tooth movement during orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Jawad, Mohammed Mahmood; Husein, Adam; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Hassan, Rozita; Shaari, Rumaizi

    2014-01-01

    The need for orthodontic treatment is increasing all the time. As the treatment is time consuming ranging from a year to several years, any method of reducing the period of treatment and increasing the quality of the tissue will be beneficial to patients. The use of non-invasive techniques such as low level laser therapy and low intensity pulsed ultasound in accelerating orthodontic tooth movement are promising. Thus, this overview study will help to generate more understanding about the background information and the possible applications of them in daily orthodontics, depending on previous literature searching for reviews and original research articles.

  16. Orthodontic treatment planning for impacted maxillary canines using conventional records versus 3D CBCT.

    PubMed

    Alqerban, Ali; Willems, Guy; Bernaerts, Christien; Vangastel, Jan; Politis, Constantinus; Jacobs, Reinhilde

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the orthodontic treatment planning for impacted maxillary canines based on conventional orthodontic treatment records versus three-dimensional (3D) information taken from single cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. This study consisted of 40 individuals with impacted maxillary canines. Patients were identified from among those referred for orthodontic treatment (26 females, 14 males) with a mean age of 12.5 years (± SD 3). In total, 64 impacted canines were identified, justifying the need for CBCT scans by the treating orthodontist. Two sets of information were obtained. The first set consisted of conventional planning records [two-dimensional (2D) panoramic, 2D lateral cephalograms, and dental casts] and the second set of 3D volumetric images obtained from a single CBCT scan (3D panoramic, 3D lateral cephalograms, 3D virtual study model). For both sets, intra- and extraoral images were included. The radiographic diagnostic features, treatment planning, orthodontists' opinions, and case classifications of both sets were produced and subsequently analysed by four orthodontists. There was no statistically significant difference in treatment planning between the use of both sets, in terms of either orthopaedic growth modification or orthodontic compensation. Also, anticipated complications during treatment and expected treatment duration did not differ significantly. Orthodontists found the conventional set to be insufficient for treatment planning in 22.5 per cent and requested additional radiographs needed in 63 per cent of cases, compared with 1.3 and 0.5 per cent, respectively (P < 0.001). The observers' confidence level was higher for therapy based on the 3D set compared with the conventional set (96.3 per cent versus 61.9 per cent, P < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in treatment planning between the use of conventional and CBCT sets. CBCT images have been shown to offer useful orthodontic

  17. From orthodontic treatment plan to ultrathin no-prep CAD/CAM temporary veneers.

    PubMed

    Patroni, Stefano; Cocconi, Renato

    Several treatment options are described in the literature to solve the microdontia-related problems of maxillary anterior teeth. These options are often focused on an orthodontic rather than a restorative approach. The case presented here started with an orthodontic phase followed by a restorative one. The aim of the orthodontic phase was to achieve the correct spacing, respecting ideal average tooth proportions. This was done using a digital setup to restore the six anterior teeth, so that an optimal esthetic and functional result was achieved by the end of the orthodontic treatment. The purpose of the restorative phase was to contribute to the esthetic outcome and occlusal stability. The 12-year-old patient was treated utilizing a CAD/CAM procedure, which took advantage of the mechanical properties and reasonable cost of the chosen resin matrix ceramic material (Vita Enamic). Once stability has been attained and proper periodontal tissue maturation has been reached at the end of the patient's growth, there will then be the option of improving the esthetics by replacing these restorations with ceramic veneers.

  18. Orthodontic treatment of a mandibular incisor fenestration resulting from a broken retainer.

    PubMed

    Farret, Marcel M; Farret, Milton M B; da Luz Vieira, Gustavo; Assaf, Jamal Hassan; de Lima, Eduardo Martinelli S

    2015-08-01

    This article describes the orthodontic relapse with mandibular incisor fenestration in a 36-year-old man who had undergone orthodontic treatment 21 years previously. The patient reported that his mandibular 3 × 3 bonded retainer had been partially debonded and broken 4 years earlier. The mandibular left lateral incisor remained bonded to the retainer and received the entire load of the incisors; consequently, there was extreme labial movement of the root, resulting in dental avulsion. As part of the treatment, the root was repositioned lingually using a titanium-molybdenum segmented archwire for 8 months, followed by endodontic treatment, an apicoectomy, and 4 months of alignment and leveling of both arches. The treatment outcomes were excellent, and the tooth remained stable, with good integrity of the mesial, distal, and lingual alveolar bones and periodontal ligament. The 1-year follow-up showed good stability of the results. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Orthodontic treatment of anterior open bite: a review article--is surgery always necessary?

    PubMed

    Reichert, Isabelle; Figel, Philipp; Winchester, Lindsay

    2014-09-01

    Anterior open bite cases are very difficult to treat satisfactorily because of their multifactorial aetiology and their very high relapse rate. Dependent on the origin of the anterior open bite malocclusion and the patient's age, there are several treatment possibilities ranging from deterrent appliances, high-pull headgear, fixed appliances with and without extractions to orthognathic surgery, and skeletal anchorage with miniplates or miniscrews. The gold standard treatment of skeletal anterior open bite cases is the combined approach of orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances and orthognathic surgery. In recent years, temporary anchorage devices (TAD) have been developed to correct anterior open bites orthodontically. With the introduction of TAD as an effective treatment modality, orthognathic surgery may be avoidable in selected anterior open bite cases. This is a relatively new technique and to date there remains a lack of evidence of long-term stability of anterior open bite closure with TAD.

  20. Advanced system for 3D dental anatomy reconstruction and 3D tooth movement simulation during orthodontic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monserrat, Carlos; Alcaniz-Raya, Mariano L.; Juan, M. Carmen; Grau Colomer, Vincente; Albalat, Salvador E.

    1997-05-01

    This paper describes a new method for 3D orthodontics treatment simulation developed for an orthodontics planning system (MAGALLANES). We develop an original system for 3D capturing and reconstruction of dental anatomy that avoid use of dental casts in orthodontic treatments. Two original techniques are presented, one direct in which data are acquired directly form patient's mouth by mean of low cost 3D digitizers, and one mixed in which data are obtained by 3D digitizing of hydrocollids molds. FOr this purpose we have designed and manufactured an optimized optical measuring system based on laser structured light. We apply these 3D dental models to simulate 3D movement of teeth, including rotations, during orthodontic treatment. The proposed algorithms enable to quantify the effect of orthodontic appliance on tooth movement. The developed techniques has been integrated in a system named MAGALLANES. This original system present several tools for 3D simulation and planning of orthodontic treatments. The prototype system has been tested in several orthodontic clinic with very good results.

  1. [Orthodontic treatment of malocclusion Class III in patients aged 6-12 by Postnikov appliance, face mask and bracket system].

    PubMed

    Postnikov, M A; Trunin, D A; Pankratova, N V; Nesterov, A M; Sadykov, M I; Ostankov, S A

    2018-01-01

    The diagnostics and treatment of malocclusion Class III in patients aged 6-12 is an vital problem in orthodontics. Method of orthodontic treatment of malocclusion Class III in patients with the help of improved and patented orthodontic construction - 'Postnikov appliance' - and face mask and bracket system is analysed in the article. Orthodontic treatment of malocclusion Class III was examined in 24 patients aged 6-12 by the suggested method. All patients were examined clinically and with the help af additional diagnostic methods: head cephalometry in lateral position with further data analysis in Dolphin Imaging (USA). The use of computer technologies in Dolphin Imaging helps to controll the process of correction of dentition correlation in different stages of treatment, to reduce the period of treatment of malocclusion Class III in patients aged 6-12 and to improve face esthetics and life quality ratio.

  2. Prevention of enamel demineralization during orthodontic treatment: an in vitro comparative study.

    PubMed

    Bichu, Yashodhan M; Kamat, Nandini; Chandra, Pavan Kumar; Kapoor, Aditi; Razmus, Thomas; Aravind, N K S

    2013-01-01

    Enamel demineralization is considered to be the most prevalent and significant iatrogenic effect associated with fixed orthodontic treatment and can seriously jeopardize both tooth longevity and dental esthetics. This in vitro study was undertaken to compare the effectiveness of four different commercially available surface treatment medicaments for the inhibition of enamel demineralization. Seventy-five intact maxillary premolars extracted from patients undergoing orthodontic treatment were divided into five equal groups and were subjected to one of the following protocols: no treatment (control group) or treatment with one of the following four medicaments: fluoride varnish (Fluor Protector [FP]), casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (GC Tooth Mousse [TM]), calcium sodium phosphosilicate (SHY-NM), and casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate with fluoride (GC Tooth Mousse Plus [TMP]). All the teeth were subjected to ten Cate demineralization solution?for 96 hours and subsequently evaluated under polarized light microscopy to obtain the mean depths of enamel demineralization. One-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni comparison tests were used to obtain statistically significant differences between the five different groups at P < .05. All four surface treatment medicaments provided statistically significant reduction in the depths of enamel demineralization as compared with the control group. FP provided the greatest protection of enamel surface in terms of reduction of lesion depth, followed by TMP, SHY-NM, and TM. The use of these commercially available medicaments could prove to be beneficial for patients undergoing orthodontic treatment and who are at a risk for developing enamel decalcification.

  3. Orthodontic treatment of fused and geminated central incisors: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hashim, Hayder A

    2004-02-15

    A 10-year old Egyptian male presented with a geminated upper right central incisor along with a fused and rotated upper left central incisor in cross bite. He also had severe crowding in the maxillary arch and a congenitally missing lower right first permanent premolar. Orthodontic treatment was carried out to align upper right and left central incisors, lateral incisors, and canines. Treatment options were discussed.

  4. Orthodontic pain: an interaction between age and sex in early and middle adolescence.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Satpal S; Sandhu, Jasleen

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the age and sex interaction effect on orthodontic pain in adolescence during the initial phase of fixed orthodontic treatment. Three hundred participants (mean age 13.85 ± 1.98 years; 152 female, 148 male) met all inclusion criteria and enrolled in the study designed as 2 × 2 factorial trial with two levels each for age (11-14 years; 14-17 years) and sex (male; female). A 0.16-inch superelastic NiTi wire was used in a 0.022-inch slot (Roth's prescription) preadjusted edgewise appliance for initial leveling and alignment of mandibular anterior dentition. The follow-up period was 7 days. Pain was assessed by using 100 mm visual analog scale for one baseline and nine follow-up repeated measurements at prespecified time points. Data were analyzed by using generalized linear mixed effect model analysis. Three participants were lost to follow-up, and 17 participants were not considered for analysis due to incomplete or improperly completed questionnaire. Therefore, 280 participants (mean age 13.96 ± 2.01 years; 138 female, 142 male) were analyzed for results. Results showed that age and sex interaction had statistically significant effect on pain (F  =  3.56; P  =  .0151; df 3/218). In the 11-14 year age group, there was no significant difference for pain between male and female. In the 14-17 year age group, girls reported significantly greater pain compared to 14- to 17 year-old boys (t  =  2.76; P  =  .0209). Pain reported by 14- to 17-year-old girls was also significantly greater compared to 11- to 14-year-old boys (t  =  2.91; P  =  .0206). Age and sex interaction has significant effect on orthodontic pain during adolescence, and 14- to 17-year-old girls experienced maximum pain.

  5. Periodontal parameters following orthodontic treatment in patients with aggressive periodontitis: A before-after clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Khorsand, Afshin; Paknejad, Mojgan; Yaghobee, Siamak; Ghahroudi, Amir Alireza Rasouli; Bashizadefakhar, Hourieh; Khatami, Masoomeh; Shirazi, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    Background: The success of combined periodontal and orthodontic approach in the treatment of aggressive periodontitis patients with the pathologic extruded anterior teeth is a main concern and stability of the treatment results is an important factor to evaluate the treatment. The present study investigated the periodontal parameters at the end of the orthodontic treatment in patients with the aggressive periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Eight patients with an aggressive periodontal disease, extruded maxillary incisors, infrabony defects and probing depth of ≥5 mm were enrolled in this clinical trial (before, after). After periodontal therapy, orthodontic treatment was carried out for intrusion and alignment of teeth. Plaque index (PI), probing pocket depth (PPD), distance between incisal edge and interdental papilla, root length (RL), and defect dimensions (depth and width) were examined at the end of treatment and three as well as 6 months afterward. The data were subjected to repeated measure ANOVA test. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: There was statistically significant decrease in PPD, PI, and depth of the defects during T0, T3 and T6 (P < 0.05). No significant differences were observed in the RL and distance between incisal edge and interdental papilla (P = 0.95). Furthermore, width of the defects demonstrated significant decrease up to T3 (P = 0.042) while no significant changes from 3 months to 6 months were noted (P = 0.59). Conclusion: The results showed that combined periodontal and orthodontic approach would be a successful treatment with acceptable stability in the case of regular follow-up visits and controlled oral hygiene habits. PMID:24379862

  6. Objective method for evaluating orthodontic treatment from the lay perspective: An eye-tracking study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi; Cai, Bin; Cao, Yang; Zhou, Chen; Yang, Le; Liu, Runzhong; Long, Xiaojing; Wang, Weicai; Gao, Dingguo; Bao, Baicheng

    2016-10-01

    Currently, few methods are available to measure orthodontic treatment need and treatment outcome from the lay perspective. The objective of this study was to explore the function of an eye-tracking method to evaluate orthodontic treatment need and treatment outcome from the lay perspective as a novel and objective way when compared with traditional assessments. The scanpaths of 88 laypersons observing the repose and smiling photographs of normal subjects and pretreatment and posttreatment malocclusion patients were recorded by an eye-tracking device. The total fixation time and the first fixation time on the areas of interest (eyes, nose, and mouth) for each group of faces were compared and analyzed using mixed-effects linear regression and a support vector machine. The aesthetic component of the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need was used to categorize treatment need and outcome levels to determine the accuracy of the support vector machine in identifying these variables. Significant deviations in the scanpaths of laypersons viewing pretreatment smiling faces were noted, with less fixation time (P <0.05) and later attention capture (P <0.05) on the eyes, and more fixation time (P <0.05) and earlier attention capture (P <0.05) on the mouth than for the scanpaths of laypersons viewing normal smiling subjects. The same results were obtained when comparing posttreatment smiling patients, with less fixation time (P <0.05) and later attention capture on the eyes (P <0.05), and more fixation time (P <0.05) and earlier attention capture on the mouth (P <0.05). The pretreatment repose faces exhibited an earlier attention capture on the mouth than did the normal subjects (P <0.05) and posttreatment patients (P <0.05). Linear support vector machine classification showed accuracies of 97.2% and 93.4% in distinguishing pretreatment patients from normal subjects (treatment need), and pretreatment patients from posttreatment patients (treatment outcome), respectively

  7. Endodontic and orthodontic treatment of fused maxillary central incisors: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ozalp, Serife Ozdemir; Tuncer, Burcu Baloş; Tulunoglu, Ozlem; Akkaya, Sevil

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this case report was to describe combined endodontic and orthodontic treatment of a patient who had permanent maxillary central incisors fused with supernumerary teeth. A severe esthetic problem and crowding in the maxillary arch were present clinically. Radiographic examination demonstrated two separate crowns, roots and pulpal canals on each side. The therapy was initiated with endodontic treatment. Six months after the completion of endodontic therapy, mesio-distal trimming was performed and the defects were restored with anterior resin composites in order to re-establish the esthetics. Orthodontic treatment was performed for the alignment of the upper arch. Follow-up at 4 years demonstrated that the teeth were asymptomatic and neither root nor alveolar bone resorption was found. In conclusion, instead of extracting the supernumerary teeth, the anomaly was treated successfully in a conservative way.

  8. Dental pulp stone formation during orthodontic treatment: A retrospective clinical follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Ertas, E Tarim; Veli, I; Akin, M; Ertas, H; Atici, M Yircali

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was two-fold: (1) To assess the incidence of dental pulp stone formation during orthodontic treatment, and (2) to determine the correlations between the presence of dental pulp stones and age, gender, and dental arches. A sample of 545 patients (334 girls and 211 boys, age range; 12-22 years) who had undergone nonextraction orthodontic treatment were included in this study. 8442 teeth (T1) and 8410 teeth (T2), including the first and second maxillary and mandibular premolars and molars were evaluated from the pre- (T1) and post-treatment (T2) panoramic radiographs of the patients. The Pearson Chi-square test was used to investigate the associations between the presence of dental pulp stone, gender, age, tooth type and arches. Dental pulp stones were detected in 3% of the teeth at pretreatment panoramic radiographs and 5.2% of the teeth at posttreatment panoramic radiographs. Pulp stone prevalence increased pointedly (2.2%) in the pre- and post-treatment radiographs (P < 0.001). Also, there was a significant difference between the age groups (P < 0.001). In the maxilla, dental pulp stones were found significantly more than that in the mandible at T1 and T2 panoramic radiographs. Maxillary first molars exhibited dental pulp stones the most frequently, followed by the maxillary second molars and mandibular first molars. Orthodontic treatment may trigger the formation of dental pulp stones. However, further studies are required to determine the relationship between the pulp stone formation and orthodontic treatment.

  9. Effect of intervention using a messaging app on compliance and duration of treatment in orthodontic patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue; Xu, Zhen-Rui; Tang, Na; Ye, Cui; Zhu, Xiao-Ling; Zhou, Ting; Zhao, Zhi-He

    2016-11-01

    This study aims to determine the effectiveness of a messaging app (WeChat) in improving patients' compliance and reducing the duration of orthodontic treatment (DOT). A randomized controlled trial was performed in a dental hospital and a clinic from August 2012 to May 2015. Orthodontic patients were included at the beginning of treatment. Patients with multiphase treatment or braceless technique were excluded. Participants were randomized to WeChat group (received regular reminders and educational messages) or control group (received conventional management) and were followed up until the treatment was completed. Primary outcome measure was DOT. Others were late and failed attendance, bracket bond failure, and oral hygiene condition. One hundred twelve patients in each group participated and completed the trial. DOT in WeChat group were 7.3 weeks shorter (P = 0.007). There were less failed attendance (3.1 vs. 10.9 %, P < 0.001), late attendance (20.1 vs. 29.9 %, P < 0.001), and bracket bond failure (11.8 vs. 16.1 %, P < 0.001) in WeChat group than control. There was no difference in orthodontic plaque index nor modified gingivitis index between the two groups before and after treatment. Number of failed attendances was identified as an independent factor affecting DOT (P = 0.004; HR = 0.89, 95 % CI 0.84 to 0.95). The intervention with WeChat is effective in reducing the treatment duration and bracket bond failure, and improving the attendance in orthodontic patients. DOT can be reduced by improving patient's compliance. The messaging app is useful for outpatient education and management.

  10. [Analysis of effect of military outpatients' psychological feelings on doctor-patient relationship in orthodontic treatment].

    PubMed

    Wan, Rong; Han, Ying-xing; Guo, Li; Guo, Jia-ping; Gao, Qun; Huang, Shi-hua

    2015-10-01

    To explore the effect of military outpatients' psychological feelings on doctor-patient relationship in orthodontic treatment. A total of 95 clinic patients who were undergoing orthodontic treatment were asked to complete the questionnaire of dental visit satisfaction scale (DVSS) and orthodontist-patient relationship scale (OPRS). The results of different groups according to identity, gender, age and treatment time were compared. The data was analyzed with SPSS 20.0 software package for correlation analysis and stepwise regression. Except 6-18 months group, psychological feelings of patients had significant impact on doctor-patient relationship (P<0.01). The correlation coefficient was 0.610 between patients' satisfaction of outpatient treatment and doctor-patient relationship (P<0.001). Among 9 psychological feelings of orthodontic treatment, five kinds had significant effect on doctor-patient relationship, including three kinds of positive correlation and two kinds of negative correlation. The patients' psychological feelings are closely related to doctor-patient relationship. Doctors should try to improve medical quality, strengthen service level and pay much attention to the patients' psychological and social needs.

  11. Outcomes of different Class II treatments : Comparisons using the American Board of Orthodontics Model Grading System.

    PubMed

    Akinci Cansunar, Hatice; Uysal, Tancan

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of three different Class II treatment modalities followed by fixed orthodontic therapy, using the American Board of Orthodontics Model Grading System (ABO-MGS). As a retrospective study, files of patients treated at postgraduate orthodontic  clinics in different cities in Turkey was randomly selected. From 1684 posttreatment records, 669 patients were divided into three groups: 269 patients treated with extraction of two upper premolars, 198 patients treated with cervical headgear, and 202 patients treated with functional appliances. All the cases were evaluated by one researcher using ABO-MGS. The χ (2), Z test, and multivariate analysis of variance were used for statistical evaluation (p < 0.05). No significant differences were found among the groups in buccolingual inclination, overjet, occlusal relationship, and root angulation. However, there were significant differences in alignment, marginal ridge height, occlusal contact, interproximal contact measurements, and overall MGS average scores. The mean treatment time between the extraction and functional appliance groups was significantly different (p = 0.017). According to total ABO-MGS scores, headgear treatment had better results than functional appliances. The headgear group had better tooth alignment than the extraction group. Headgear treatment resulted in better occlusal contacts than the functional appliances and had lower average scores for interproximal contact measurements. Functional appliances had the worst average scores for marginal ridge height. Finally, the functional appliance group had the longest treatment times.

  12. Orthodontic evolution: an update for the general dental practitioner. Part 1: recent advances, treatment need and demand, and benefits of treatment.

    PubMed

    McGuinness, Niall J P

    2008-01-01

    Like all specialties of dentistry, orthodontics has undergone considerable development and improvement in treatment techniques over the past four decades. The two articles in this series aim to inform the general dental practitioner about these developments, together with an update on orthodontics' relationship to dental health, TMJ dysfunction and other aspects.

  13. Use of Q methodology to assess the concerns of adult female individuals seeking orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Linjie; Xu, Xingqiao; Ni, Zhenyu; Zheng, Minling; Lin, Feiou

    2015-01-01

    Background Orthodontic treatment may cause functional restrictions, discomfort, and pain, which may lead to dental anxiety and noncooperation among patients. This study aimed to assess the concerns of adult female patients with respect to such treatment. Patients and methods We conducted an explorative study using Q methodology among 40 adult female patients with different educational and social backgrounds in Wenzhou, People’s Republic of China. We asked participants to rank a set of 41 statements about seeking orthodontic treatment on an 11-point scale from “agree most” to “disagree most”. The collected data were analyzed using the PQ Method 2.35 program. We extracted significant viewpoints using centroid factor extraction and varimax rotation. Results We identified major factors based on how the patients ranked statements. Patients in group 1 worried about lack of information about orthodontic treatment, and may have suffered from dental phobia; patients in group 2 were all single women, and they were worried that the braces might lower their chances of finding a partner; patients in group 3 worried about appearance and speech with braces; and patients in group 4 worried about cost, pain, and dental hygiene. The remaining participants who had other viewpoints did not load to any of these four groups. Conclusion The concerns of adult female individuals seeking orthodontic treatment are complex. A significant feature of this study was using Q methodology to analyze the psychological characteristics of the patients. This study identified four typical characterizations that are associated with each group, and our findings may aid orthodontists in improving doctor–patient relationships. PMID:25609926

  14. The effects of orthodontic movement on a subepithelial connective tissue graft in the treatment of gingival recession.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Orlando Motohiro; Avila, Ana Leticia Rocha; Silva, Gabriela Molina; Añez, Maria Cecilia Galacini; Taffarel, Ivan Pedro

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to report on the five-year follow-up of a case involving treatment of gingival recession with a subepithelial connective tissue graft prior to orthodontic tooth movement. Gingival recession has a global prevalence that varies from 3 to 100 percent depending on the population studied and the method of analysis. In addition, the frequency of recession seems to be positively correlated with age. Planned orthodontic tooth movement is not necessarily an etiological factor for gingival recession, so long as it does not move the tooth out of its alveolar process. When the tooth is shifted without adequate biomechanical control, bone dehiscence can develop, and the recession can occur as a consequence of the orthodontic treatment. A 19.6-year-old female patient was referred for orthodontic treatment due to severe anterior-inferior dental crowding and a mandibular right lateral incisor in linguoverson and 4.0 mm of gingival recession on the labial surface. Normal gingival architecture was restored with a subepithelial connective tissue graft used to cover the 4.0 mm defect, after which orthodontic treatment repositioned the malposed incisor into its correct occlusal alignment. Individualized torque was applied to the mandibular right central incisor during the orthodontic treatment. The patient was reevaluated five years after completion of the orthodontic treatment. At the five-year recall appointment, the patient exhibited normal tooth alignment and generalized normal gingival architecture; however, 2 mm of gingival recession was noted on the graft site. This case demonstrated that periodontal surgical correction of facial gingival recession with a subepithelial graft may be performed prior to initiating orthodontic treatment.

  15. [Factors influencing the changes of lower third molars' angulation and space/crown width ratio by orthodontic treatment].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-tong; Zhang, Dong-mei; Yang, Yan-qi

    2011-04-18

    To investigate the factors which influence the changes of lower third molars' angulation and space/crown width ratio by orthodontic treatment. Pretreatment and posttreatment panoramic radiographs of 120 orthodontically treated cases were taken. The lower third molars' angulation and space/crown width ratio were examined and the relative factors on changes were analyzed. (1)The changes of the lower third molars' angulation and space/crown width ratio after orthodontic treatment were quite different among the cases. (2)The factors which influenced these changes mainly included extraction, mandibular plane angle, angulation and space/crown width ratio of lower third molar before orthodontic treatment. (3) Extraction was the most significantly variable associated with lower third molars' upright (angulation <30 degree) after orthodontic treatment. Orthodontic extraction is helpful to upright the lower third molars and to increase the space for third molars; and the pre-treatment lower third molars' angulation and space/crown width ratio are important variables for the changes after treatment; cases with lower mandibular plane angle are apt to greater possibility for the lower third molars' upright.

  16. Orthodontic treatment for a mandibular prognathic girl of short stature under growth hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chin-Yun; Lan, Ting-Hung; Chou, Szu-Ting; Tseng, Yu-Chuan; Chang, Jenny Zwei-Chieng; Chang, Hong-Po

    2013-12-01

    This report presents a case of a 12-year-old girl with maxillary deficiency, mandibular prognathism, and facial asymmetry, undergoing growth hormone (GH) therapy due to idiopathic short stature. Children of short stature with or without GH deficiency have a deviating craniofacial morphology with overall smaller dimensions; facial retrognathism, especially mandibular retrognathism; and increased facial convexity. However, a complete opposite craniofacial pattern was presented in our case of a skeletal Class III girl with idiopathic short stature. The orthodontic treatment goal was to inhibit or change the direction of mandibular growth and stimulate the maxillary growth of the girl during a course of GH therapy. Maxillary protraction and mandibular retraction were achieved using occipitomental anchorage (OMA) orthopedic appliance in the first stage of treatment. In the second stage, the patient was treated with a fixed orthodontic appliance using a modified multiple-loop edgewise archwire technique of asymmetric mechanics and an active retainer of vertical chin-cup. The treatment led to an acceptable facial profile and obvious facial asymmetry improvement. Class I dental occlusion and coincident dental midline were also achieved. A 3½-year follow-up of the girl at age 18 showed a stable result of the orthodontic and dentofacial orthopedic treatment. Our case shows that the OMA orthopedic appliance of maxillary protraction combined with mandibular retraction is effective for correcting skeletal Class III malocclusion with midface deficiency and mandibular prognathism in growing children with idiopathic short stature undergoing GH therapy. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Axiographic findings in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment with and without premolar extractions.

    PubMed

    Heiser, Wolfgang; Stainer, Martin; Reichegger, Hans; Niederwanger, Andreas; Kulmer, Siegfried

    2004-08-01

    Mechanical axiography was performed on 49 (37 female, 12 male) patients prior to orthodontic treatment, after removal of the fixed appliance, and at the end of retention. Twenty-five subjects (mean age 12.8 years) underwent orthodontic treatment without premolar extractions (group 1) and 24 subjects (mean age 13.5 years) with premolar extractions (group 2). The axiographic tracings of the protrusive movements were analysed using a digitizer and specially designed software. A statistically significant increase (P < 0.05) in the values for horizontal condylar inclination (HCI) was found for both groups over the entire observation period. Group 1 showed a higher increase (P < 0.05) between the beginning of treatment and removal of the brackets, and group 2 between bracket removal and the end of retention. At the end of retention, a similar increase in HCI values was found for both groups. Over the observation period, the frequency of pathological axiographic findings decreased, which seems to be a positive effect of orthodontic treatment.

  18. Extraction of Maxillary Central Incisors: An Orthodontic-Restorative Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hedayati, Zohreh; Zare, Maryam; Bahramnia, Fateme

    2014-01-01

    Malformed central incisors with poor prognosis could be candidates for extraction especially in crowded dental arches. This case report refers to a 12-year-old boy who suffered from malformed upper central incisors associated with severe attrition. Upper lateral incisors were positioned palatally and canines were rotated and positioned in the high buccal area. The patient had class II malocclusion and space deficiency in both dental arches. Due to incisal wear and malformed short maxillary central incisors and the need for root canal therapy with a major crown build-up, these teeth were extracted. The maxillary lateral incisors were substituted. Thus the maxillary canines were substituted for lateral incisors and the first premolars were substituted for canines. In the lower dental arch the first bicuspids were extracted. Composite resin build-up was performed on the maxillary lateral incisors and canines. This allowed for the crowding and the malocclusion to be corrected. Subsequent gingivectomy improved the patient's gingival margins and smile esthetics one month after orthodontic therapy. PMID:25400954

  19. Investigation of bracket bonding for orthodontic treatments using en-face optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda L.; Hughes, Michael; Bradu, Adrian; Todea, Carmen; Rominu, Roxana; Dodenciu, Dorin; Laissue, Philippe L.; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2008-04-01

    Despite good diagnosis and treatment planning, orthodontic treatment can fail if bonding fails. It is now common practice to address the aesthetic appearance of patients using aesthetic brackets instead of metal ones. Therefore, bonding aesthetic brackets has become an issue for orthodontists today. Orthodontic bonding is mainly achieved using composite resin but can also be performed with glass ionomer or resin cements. For improving the quality of bonding, the enamel is acid etched for 30 seconds with 38% phosphoric acid and then a bonding agent is applied. In our study we investigated and compared the quality of bonding between ceramic brackets, polymeric brackets and enamel, respectively using a new investigation method-OCT. The aim of our study was to evaluate the resin layer at the bracket base-tooth interface.

  20. Corticotomies as a surgical procedure to accelerate tooth movement during orthodontic treatment: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Ferrer, Laura; Montiel-Company, José-María; Candel-Martí, Eugenia; Almerich-Silla, José-Manuel; Peñarrocha-Diago, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Background One of the main aims of orthodontists is to reduce the treatment time as much as possible, particularly in view of the rise in demand for orthodontic treatment among adult patients. The objective of this systematic review was to examine the effectiveness of corticotomy as a surgical procedure that accelerates orthodontic tooth movement, together with its possible adverse effects. Material and Methods A systematic review of articles in 4 databases, Pubmed, Cochrane, Scopus and Embase, complemented by a manual search, identified 772 articles. The duplicates were eliminated and a critical reading of titles and abstracts led to the rejection of articles that did not meet the objectives of the review, leaving 69. After reading the full text of these articles, 49 were excluded because they did not meet the inclusion criteria. On applying the CONSORT criteria as a quality filter, a further 4 were eliminated due to low quality. Finally, 16 articles (4 systematic reviews and 12 controlled trials) were reviewed. Results All the studies agree that corticotomy prior to orthodontic treatment accelerates dental movement, reducing the treatment time. With regard to side-effects, no periodontal damage was found, although this was only studied in the short term. Conclusions The evidence regarding the results of corticotomy is limited, given the small number of quality clinical studies available. Before this procedure is included as a routine practice in dental surgeries, studies of higher methodological quality are required, studying a greater number of individuals and examining the possible long-term adverse effects and the cost/benefit of the procedure. Key words:Corticotomy, orthodontics, adults, accelerated tooth movement, osteotomy. PMID:27475698

  1. [Er:YAG laser in periodontics and implication in the orthodontic treatment plan].

    PubMed

    Glez, Dominique; Hourdin, Solenn; Sorel, Olivier

    2010-03-01

    The Er:YAG laser is used in periodontal surgery to remove excess tissue formations and to clean periodontal pockets. Combined with ultrasonic procedures lasers have significantly advanced the parameters of periodontal surgery. The goal of this article is to review the working mechanisms of the Er:YAG laser in the wide variety of its applications in complex treatment situations in both periodontics and orthodontics. EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2010.

  2. Diastema closure using direct bonding restorations combined with orthodontic treatment: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Soon-Kong; Ha, Jung-Hong; Jin, Myoung-Uk; Kim, Sung-Kyo; Kim, Young-Kyung

    2012-08-01

    Closure of interdental spaces using proximal build-ups with resin composite is considered to be practical and conservative. However, a comprehensive approach combining two or more treatment modalities may be needed to improve esthetics. This case report describes the management of a patient with multiple diastemas, a peg-shaped lateral incisor and midline deviation in the maxillary anterior area. Direct resin bonding along with orthodontic movement of teeth allows space closure and midline correction, consequently, creating a better esthetic result.

  3. [Clinical outcome evaluation of midpalatal mini-implant anchorage system in orthodontic treatment].

    PubMed

    Pan, Y C; Zhao, J H

    2014-12-18

    To evaluate the effect of midpalatal mini-implant anchorage system in fixed appliance treatment. In this study, 14 adolescents who had skeletal class I or II malocclusions were involved. Maximal anchorage was required during orthodontic treatment. Maxillary first premolars of the selected individuals were extracted and the individuals were treated by fixed appliance. One mini-implant was inserted in the midpalatal suture region and a transpalatal arch (TPA) made of 0.019 inch×0.022 inch(1 inch=2.54 cm) stainless steel was adhered to the mini-implant and upper first molars. Cephalometric radiographs taken after mini-implants inserted (T0) and before mini-implants removing (T1) were traced and measured. SN-7 plane and PP plane were used as reference planes. Student's t-test was used. The successful rate of midpalatal mini-implant was 73.9%. All the items measured were found with no significant difference between the two groups. This mini-implant system as orthodontic anchorage in midpalatal region can be an alternative method of maximal anchorage during orthodontic treatment.

  4. Surgical-orthodontic treatment of Class III malocclusion with agenesis of lateral incisor and unerupted canine.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Bruno Boaventura; Sanguino, Ana Carolina Meng; Moreira, Marilia Rodrigues; Morizono, Elizabeth Norie; Matsumoto, Mírian Aiko Nakane

    2013-01-01

    Orthodontic-surgical treatment was performed in patient with skeletal Class III malocclusion due to exceeding mandibular growth. Patient also presented upper and lower dental protrusion, overjet of -3.0 mm, overbite of -1.0 mm, congenital absence of tooth #22, teeth #13 and supernumerary impaction, tooth #12 with conoid shape and partly erupted in supraversion, prolonged retention of tooth #53, tendency to vertical growth of the face and facial asymmetry. The discrepancy on the upper arch was -2.0 mm and -5.0 mm on the lower arch. The presurgical orthodontic treatment was performed with extraction of the teeth #35 and #45. On the upper arch, teeth #53, #12 and supernumerary were extracted to accomplish the traction of the impacted canine. The spaces of the lower extractions were closed with mesialization of posterior segment. After aligning and leveling the teeth, extractions spaces closure and correct positioning of teeth on the bone bases, the correct intercuspation of the dental arch, with molars and canines in Angle's Class I, coincident midline, normal overjet and overbite and ideal torques, were evaluated through study models. The patient was submitted to orthognathic surgery and then the postsurgical orthodontic treatment was finished. The Class III malocclusion was treated establishing occlusal and facial normal standards.

  5. Effects of CO-CR discrepancy in daily orthodontic treatment planning

    PubMed Central

    COSTEA, CARMEN MARIA; BADEA, MÎNDRA EUGENIA; VASILACHE, SORIN; MESAROŞ, MICHAELA

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Nowadays centric relation is defined as a musculoskeletal stable position, with the condyles forward, as far upward as possible, centered transversely and with the articular disc properly interposed. On the other hand, centric occlusion or maximum intercuspidation is a dental determined position. The purpose of this pilot study is to evaluate the direction, frequency and magnitude of the discrepancy between centric occlusion and centric relation in all three axial directions, in a muscular non-deprogrammed population, before the beginning of orthodontic treatment. Methods The study group was represented by 40 symptomatic and asymptomatic patients seeking orthodontic treatment in a private dental office in Cluj-Napoca, Romania between 2014 and 2015. All patients had full records and articulator mounted models. All measurements were analyzed three-dimensionally. Results 85% of the patients had vertical and 87.5% had horizontal CO-CR discrepancy for both condyles. 87.5% of the cases have had a significant condylar displacement in at least one of the three planes. Conclusions We should be aware of the dental occlusion determined by the dental contacts and the occlusion dictated by the musculoskeletal stable position of the condyles. The bigger the discrepancy between these two positions at the level of the condyles, the greater the chances to have either a patient who will develop a form of TMD before/during or after the orthodontic or prosthetic treatment, or a patient suffering already, but poorly diagnosed. PMID:27152081

  6. Comparison of the effects produced by headgear and pendulum appliances followed by fixed orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Angelieri, Fernanda; de Almeida, Renato Rodrigues; Janson, Guilherme; Castanha Henriques, José Fernando; Pinzan, Arnaldo

    2008-12-01

    This study compared the effects produced by two different molar distalizers, namely cervical headgear (CHG) and the intraoral pendulum appliance, associated with fixed orthodontic appliances. The headgear group comprised 30 patients (19 females, 11 males), with an initial age of 13.07 years [standard deviation (SD) = 1.3], treated with CHG and fixed orthodontic appliances for a mean period of 3.28 years, and the pendulum group 22 patients (15 females, 7 males), with initial age of 13.75 years (SD = 1.86), treated with the pendulum appliance followed by fixed orthodontic appliances for a mean period of 4.12 years. Lateral cephalograms were taken at the start (T1) and on completion (T2) of orthodontic treatment. The pendulum and CHG groups were similar as to initial age, severity of the Class II malocclusion, gender distribution, initial cephalometric characteristics, and initial and final treatment priority index (TPI). Only treatment time was not similar between the groups, with a need for annualization for data for the pendulum group. The data were compared with independent t-tests. There was significantly greater restriction of maxillary forward growth and improvement of the skeletal maxillomandibular relationship in the CHG group (P < 0.05). The maxillary molars were more mesially tipped and extruded and the mandibular molars more uprighted in the CHG group compared with the pendulum group (P < 0.05). There was more labial tipping of the mandibular incisors and greater overbite reduction in the pendulum group. The pendulum appliance produced only dentoalveolar effects, different from the CHG appliance, which restricted maxillary forward displacement, thus improving the skeletal maxillomandibular relationship.

  7. Perception of children and mothers regarding dental aesthetics and orthodontic treatment need: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Emerson Tavares; da Silva, Beatriz Feitosa; Maia, Fabiana Barros Marinho; Forte, Franklin Delano Soares; Sampaio, Fábio Correia

    2016-12-01

    The normative orthodontic treatment need, established by dental professionals during the dental appointment, becomes ineffective when it does not evaluate all the factors that influence the decision-making process, including individuals' perception and satisfaction with their dental appearance. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the perception of children and their mothers as regards orthodontic treatment need and satisfaction with dental aesthetics and test if these variables are associated with the objective orthodontic treatment needs, assessed by the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI). A cross-sectional study was conducted on 308 children aged 12 years, and their mothers were randomly selected by cluster sampling (primary schools). The variables "orthodontic treatment need," "satisfaction with chewing," and "dental appearance" were assessed by means of a questionnaire. The questions were answered individually at school or home, in cases of children or mothers, respectively. DAI was assessed to make an objective clinical assessment. The variables were dichotomized and statistically analyzed by the chi-square and Fisher's exact tests, contingency coefficient C, and logistic regression. The results of the clinical evaluation (DAI) were statistically associated with the perception of orthodontic treatment need and satisfaction with dental appearance in children (p ≤ 0.01). However, no association was observed with regard to satisfaction with chewing and DAI (p = 0.10). The children's perception of orthodontic treatment need and satisfaction with the appearance of their teeth was statistically associated (p ≤ 0.01) with their mothers' perception. Maxillary overjet, maxillary and mandibular misalignment, and dental crowding were associated with the orthodontic treatment need by children and their mothers, with p value -0.05 and 5 % level of significance. Maxillary overjet was a significant predictor for the perception of orthodontic

  8. The Cardiff dental study: a 20-year critical evaluation of the psychological health gain from orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Kenealy, Pamela M; Kingdon, Anne; Richmond, Stephen; Shaw, William C

    2007-02-01

    Despite the widespread belief that orthodontics improves psychological well-being and self-esteem, there is little objective evidence to support this (Kenealy et al., 1989a; Shaw, O'Brien, Richmond, & Brook, 1991). A 20 year follow-up study compared the dental and psychosocial status of individuals who received, or did not receive, orthodontics as teenagers. A prospective longitudinal cohort design with four studies of the effect of orthodontic treatment. Secondary analysis of outcome data incorporated orthodontic need at baseline and treatment received in a 2 x 2 factorial design. A multidisciplinary research programme studied a cohort of 1,018, 11-12 year old participants in 1981. Extensive assessment of dental health and psychosocial well-being was conducted; facial and dental photographs and plaster casts of dentition were obtained and rated for attractiveness and pre-treatment need. No recommendations about orthodontic treatment were made, and an observational approach was adopted. At the third follow-up 337 (30-31 year olds) were re-examined in 2001. Participants with a prior need for orthodontic treatment as children who obtained treatment demonstrated better tooth alignment and satisfaction. However when self-esteem at baseline was controlled for, orthodontics had little positive impact on psychological health and quality of life in adulthood. Lack of orthodontic treatment where there was a prior need did not lead to psychological difficulties in later life. Dental status alone was a weak predictor of self-esteem at outcome explaining 8% of the variance. Self-esteem in adulthood was more strongly predicted (65% of the variance) by psychological variables at outcome: perception of quality of life, life satisfaction, self-efficacy, depression, social anxiety, emotional health, and by self-perception of attractiveness. Longitudinal analysis revealed that the observed effect of orthodontic treatment on self esteem at outcome was accounted for by self esteem at

  9. Surgical orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Strohl, Alexis M; Vitkus, Lauren

    2017-08-01

    The article reviews some commonly used orthodontic treatments as well as new strategies to assist in the correction of malocclusion. Many techniques are used in conjunction with surgical intervention and are a necessary compliment to orthognathic surgery. Basic knowledge of these practices will aid in the surgeon's ability to adequately treat the patient. Many orthodontists and surgeons are eliminating presurgical orthodontics to adopt a strategy of 'surgery first' orthodontics in orthognathic surgery. This has the benefit of immediate improvement in facial aesthetics and shorter treatment times. The advent of virtual surgical planning has helped facilitate the development of this new paradigm by making surgical planning faster and easier. Furthermore, using intraoperative surgical navigation is improving overall precision and outcomes. A variety of surgical and nonsurgical treatments may be employed in the treatment of malocclusion. It is important to be familiar with all options available and tailor the patient's treatment plan accordingly. Surgery-first orthodontics, intraoperative surgical navigation, virtual surgical planning, and 3D printing are evolving new techniques that are producing shorter treatment times and subsequently improving patient satisfaction without sacrificing long-term stability.

  10. (Super)hydrophobic coating of orthodontic dental devices and reduction of early oral biofilm retention.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Adauê S; Kaizer, Marina R; Azevedo, Marina S; Ogliari, Fabrício A; Cenci, Maximiliano S; Moraes, Rafael R

    2015-11-03

    This study was designed to apply (super)hydrophobic crosslinked coatings by means of a sol-gel process on the surface of orthodontic devices and investigate the potential effect of these coatings in reducing the early retention of oral biofilm. Two organosilane-based hydrophobic solutions (HSs) were prepared containing hexadecyltrimethoxysilane diluted in ethanol (HS1) or 1H, 1H, 2H, 2H-perfluorodecyltriethoxysilane diluted in dimethyl sulfoxide (HS2). Stainless steel plates and ceramic discs were coated with HS1 or HS2 and heated at 150 °C for 2 h for condensation of a crosslinked SiO x network. Organosilane coatings were applied after previous, or no, surface sandblasting. Commercial stainless steel and ceramic brackets were used to evaluate oral biofilm retention after 12 h or 24 h of biofilm growth, using a microcosm model with human saliva as the inoculum. Surface roughness analysis (Ra, μm) indicated that sandblasting associated with organosilane coatings increased roughness for stainless steel brackets only. Analysis of the water contact angle showed that the stainless steel surface treated with HS1 was hydrophobic (~123°), while the ceramic surface treated with HS2 was superhydrophobic (~155°). Biofilm retention after 24 h was significantly lower in groups treated with hydrophobic coatings. An exponential reduction in biofilm accumulation was associated with increased water contact angle for both stainless steel and ceramic at 24 h. Application of (super)hydrophobic coatings on the surface of stainless steel and ceramic orthodontic devices might reduce the retention of oral biofilm.

  11. Orthodontic treatment with preadjusted appliances and low-friction ligatures: experimental evidence and clinical observations.

    PubMed

    Baccetti, Tiziano; Franchi, Lorenzo; Fortini, Arturo

    2008-01-01

    To describe the features of low-friction ligatures during the leveling and aligning phase of fixed appliance therapy with preadjusted brackets. Experimental in vitro and in vivo studies were carried out to test the performance of the low-friction system with regard to leveling and aligning of the dental arches, as well as to increasing the transverse dimension of the maxillary arch. The outcomes of experimental testing showed that the combination of the low-friction ligatures with the superelastic nickel-titanium wires produced a significantly smaller amount of binding at the bracket/archwire/ligature unit when compared to conventional elastomeric ligatures. The biomechanical consequences of the use of low-friction ligatures were shorter duration of orthodontic treatment during the leveling and aligning phase, concurrent dentoalveolar expansion of the dental arch, and the possibility of using biologically adequate orthodontic forces.

  12. The duration of orthodontic treatment with and without extractions: a pilot study of five selected practices.

    PubMed

    Vig, P S; Weintraub, J A; Brown, C; Kowalski, C J

    1990-01-01

    Contemporary orthodontic practice is diverse, both in the variety of clinical problems treated and in the methods used. Practices differ with respect to their patient composition as well as in many variables relative to treatment protocols. Such heterogeneity makes it difficult to make valid generalizations concerning the characteristics of orthodontic treatment procedures or outcomes; yet data and methods are required for assessment of issues of efficacy and utility. The frequency of orthodontic extractions is an objective criterion that distinguishes practices and may also be related to differences in treatment outcome variables, such as duration. Following a telephone survey to estimate extraction rates in the practices of 238 Michigan orthodontists, five practices with very high or low reported rates were chosen for this pilot study. Our primary aim was to determine whether a systematic relationship existed between the relative frequency of extraction treatments and the duration of active appliance therapy. Records of 438 patients from these practices were examined. The extraction rates of the practices ranged from a low of 25% to a high of 84%. Treatment duration was affected by several variables, such as the number of arches treated, the number of treatment phases, and the practice selected. When the data for all five practices were pooled, and all of the extraction versus nonextraction treatments were compared, the mean durations of treatment were 31.2 and 31.3 months, respectively. Data from individual practices, however, indicated that extraction treatment in each of the practices was of longer duration than nonextraction therapy. These differences in duration were 3.0, 6.6, 2.4, 3.0, and 7.3 months in the five practices.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Prospective evaluation of the psychosocial impact of the first 6 months of orthodontic treatment with fixed appliance among young adults.

    PubMed

    Prado, Renata França; Ramos-Jorge, Joana; Marques, Leandro Silva; de Paiva, Saul Martins; Melgaço, Camilo Aquino; Pazzini, Camila Alessandra

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the psychosocial impact of the first 6 months of orthodontic treatment with a fixed appliance among young adults and compare the results with those of a control group of patients awaiting treatment for malocclusion. A study was conducted with a sample of 120 patients on a waiting list for orthodontic treatment at a university. The participants were allocated to an experimental group submitted to treatment and a control group awaiting treatment. The groups were matched for sex and age. All participants were instructed to answer the Brazilian version of the Psychosocial Impact of Dental Aesthetics Questionnaire (PIDAQ) at baseline and after 6 months. Statistical analysis involved the Wilcoxon test for the total PIDAQ score and the score of each subscale. All patients participated until the end of the study. Significant differences between baseline and the 6-month evaluation were found for the total PIDAQ score as well as the dental self-confidence and social impact subscales in both groups. No differences between baseline and the 6-month evaluation were found regarding the psychological impact or esthetic concern subscales in the control group. The patients in the experimental group reported greater esthetic impact 6 months after beginning treatment (P < .001). The first 6 months of orthodontic treatment seem to improve psychosocial impact. The first 6 months of orthodontic treatment seem to improve the psychosocial impact of malocclusion. The patients analyzed in the present study reported a greater esthetic impact and less psychological impact after 6 months of using an orthodontic appliance.

  14. Insufficient Evidence Supports the Use of Low-Level Laser Therapy to Accelerate Tooth Movement, Prevent Orthodontic Relapse, and Modulate Acute Pain During Orthodontic Treatment.

    PubMed

    Farsaii, Adrian; Al-Jewair, Thikriat

    2017-09-01

    Efficacy of low-level laser therapy in accelerating tooth movement, preventing relapse and managing acute pain during orthodontic treatment in humans: A systematic review. Sonesson M, De Geer E, Subraian J, Petrén S. BMC Oral Health 2017;17:11. No funding was obtained for this study TYPE OF STUDY/DESIGN: Systematic review. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Esthetic reconstruction of the anterior teeth area following a combined periodontic-orthodontic treatment in adult periodontal patients].

    PubMed

    Lihong, Zhu; Sa, Li; Fei, He; Yong, Wu; Yan, Zhou; Nianhong, Qin; Yi, Ding

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the role of the combined periodontic-orthodontic treatment in the esthetic reconstruc- tion of the anterior teeth area following periodontitis. Thirteen adult patients with anterior teeth displacements were treated. The probing pocket depth (PD; 102 teeth, 612 sites), bleeding on probing (102 teeth, 204 sites), papilla index (PI; 128 papillae), and papillary height (PH; 128 papillae) of each patient were assessed at baseline, 3 months after the initial therapy, and the end of the orthodontic treatment. Non-parametric and paired-sample t tests were carried out for the statistical analysis of the data. Three months after initial therapy, the sites with PD ≤ 3 mm accounted for 79.58% (487/612) of the observed teeth, and 88.73% (181/204) of the buccal and lingual sites of the teeth showed negative bleeding on probing. These findings were better than those at baseline [26.31% (161/612) and 22.06% (45/204), respectively] (P < 0.05), but no sig- nificant difference was observed compared with pro-orthodontic treatment (P > 0.05). Prior to orthodontic treatment, the levels of the PI of 8 and 21 papillae were III and II, respectively, among the 128 observed papillae. After the orthodontic treatment, 51 papillae were at level III and 68 papillae were at level II. The PH of the 102 papillae was 2.84 mm ± 0.62 mm after ortho- dontic treatment. This result indicated significant difference compared with that of pre-orthodontic treatment (1.69 mm ± 0.57 mm) (P < 0.05). After initial therapy, moderate orthodontic teeth movements may reconstruct the interproximal soft tissue, with esthetic improvement of the papillary level and resolution of the periodontal defects.

  16. Force systems in the initial phase of orthodontic treatment -- a comparison of different leveling arch wires.

    PubMed

    Fuck, Lars-Michael; Drescher, Dieter

    2006-01-01

    The determination of orthodontically-effective forces and moments places great demands on the technical equipment. Many patients report severe pain after fixed appliance insertion. Since it is assumed that pain from orthodontic appliances is associated with the force and moment levels applied to the teeth and since the occurrence of root resorption is a common therapeutic side effect, it would seem important to know the actual magnitudes of the components of the active orthodontic force systems. The aim of the present study was therefore to measure initial force systems produced by different leveling arch-wires in a complete multi-bracket appliance and to assess whether force and moment levels can be regarded as biologically acceptable or not. The actual bracket position in 42 patients was transferred onto a measurement model. Forces and moments produced by a super-elastic nickel-titanium (NiTi) archwire, a 6-strand stainless steel archwire, and a 7-strand super-elastic NiTi archwire were determined experimentally on different teeth. Average forces and moments produced by the super-elastic NiTi arch wires were found to be the highest. In spite if their larger diameter, the stranded arch wires' average force and moment levels were lower, especially that of the stranded super-elastic archwire. Nevertheless, maximum force levels sometimes exceeded recommended values in the literature and must be considered as too high. The measured arch wires' initial force systems differed significantly depending on the type of archwire and its material structure. Stranded arch wires produced lower force and moment levels, and we recommend their use in the initial phase of orthodontic treatment.

  17. Motivation of adult female patients seeking orthodontic treatment: an application of Q-methodology

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xia; Cai, Jiaxin; Lin, Beibei; Yao, Linjie; Lin, Feiou

    2015-01-01

    Background Motivation is the impetus for patients to seek orthodontic treatment, affecting adherence, treatment outcomes, and satisfaction. The aim of this study was to assess the motivation of adult female patients seeking orthodontic treatment, and classify the patients according to their motivations. Methods This study used Q-methodology as the main tool. Q-samples were collected and categorized (35 items). Forty-two adult female patients were interviewed before treatment as the P-sample, and their responses were categorized into the Q-methodology grid. Participants were asked to rank-order a set of 35 statements (Q-sample) from “agree most” to “disagree most” (Q-sorting). The finished Q-grids were analyzed using PQ method 2.35. Results Four main factors were identified based on how adult female patients ranked statements: factor 1, patients who focus on their self-perception of their appearance; factor 2, patients who are concerned about the esthetics and function of their teeth; factor 3, patients who are easily influenced by others; factor 4, patients who want to improve their confidence and avoid negative thoughts caused by their teeth. The remaining patients who had other views did not match any of the above four groups. Conclusion The motivations of adult female patients seeking orthodontic treatment are complex. This study found that most adult female patients fell into one of four typical factor groups. Our findings may improve the adherence of adult female patients by developing a more ideal treatment program. PMID:25709410

  18. [Application of digital design of orthodontic-prosthodontic multidisciplinary treatment plan in esthetic rehabilitation of anterior teeth].

    PubMed

    Liu, Y S; Li, Z; Zhao, Y J; Ye, H Q; Zhou, Y Q; Hu, W J; Liu, Y S; Xun, C L; Zhou, Y S

    2018-02-18

    To develop a digital workflow of orthodontic-prosthodontic multidisciplinary treatment plan which can be applied in complicated anterior teeth esthetic rehabilitation, in order to enhance the efficiency of communication between dentists and patients, and improve the predictability of treatment outcome. Twenty patients with the potential needs of orthodontic-prosthodontic multidisciplinary treatment to solve their complicated esthetic problems in anterior teeth were recruited in this study. Digital models of patients' both dental arches and soft tissues were captured using intra oral scanner. Direct prosthodontic (DP) treatment plan and orthodontic-prosthodontic (OP) treatment plan were carried out for each patient. For DP treatment plans, digital wax-up models were directly designed on original digital models using prosthodontic design system. For OP treatment plans, virtual-setups were performed using orthodontic analyze system according to orthodontic and esthetic criteria and imported to prosthodontic design system to finalize the digital wax-up models. These two treatment plans were shown to the patients and demonstrated elaborately. Each patient rated two treatment plans using visual analogue scales and the medians of scores of two treatment plans were analyzed using signed Wilcoxon test. Having taken into consideration various related factors, including time, costs of treatment, each patient chose a specific treatment plan. For the patients chose DP treatment plans, digital wax-up models were exported and printed into resin diagnostic models which would be utilized in the prosthodontic treatment process. For the patients chose OP treatment plans, virtual-setups were used to fabricate aligners or indirect bonding templates and digital wax-up models were also exported and printed into resin diagnostic models for prosthodontic treatment after orthodontic treatment completed. The medians of scores of DP treatment plan and OP treatment plan were calculated and

  19. Tooth demineralization and associated factors in patients on fixed orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Salmerón-Valdés, Elías Nahúm; Lara-Carrillo, Edith; Medina-Solís, Carlo Eduardo; Robles-Bermeo, Norma Leticia; Scougall-Vilchis, Rogelio José; Casanova-Rosado, Juan Fernando; Pontigo-Loyola, América Patricia; Fernández Barrera, Miguel Ángel

    2016-01-01

    Dental demineralization was determined in patients at three time points during fixed orthodontic treatment. A multiple cross-sectional study included 108 patients divided into three different groups: (1) beginning of orthodontic treatment; (2) one year into treatment; and (3) two years into treatment. Demineralization was estimated using a DIAGNOdent pen. We obtained data from multiple tooth-by-tooth demineralization readings combined with salivary pH and patients’ oral hygienic and dietary behaviors. A t-test for independent samples and Spearman´s correlation were performed. No demineralizations differences were found between the initial stage and one year into treatment. Between one and two years small differences were observed, but demineralization increased between the initial stage and second treatment year, predominating in upper right central incisors (p = 0.056), upper left lateral incisors (p = 0.040), both upper canines (p = 0.055 and p = 0.040, respectively) and first left premolars (p = 0.034 and p = 0.053, respectively). We did not find associations between oral hygiene and dietary behaviours or salivary pH. In conclusion, demineralization occurred in first year of treatment and increased during second year, predominating in the upper arch and the left side mainly in upper right central incisors, upper left lateral incisors, both upper canines, and first left premolars. PMID:27805027

  20. How Do Patients and Parents Decide for Orthodontic Treatment-Effects of Malocclusion, Personal Expectations, Education and Media.

    PubMed

    Tuncer, C; Canigur Bavbek, N; Balos Tuncer, B; Ayhan Bani, A; Çelik, B

    2015-01-01

    To examine patients' and parents' perceptions and expectations from orthodontic treatment. 491 patients (274 female, 217 male) aged 14-22 years, and 399 parents (245 female, 154 male) completed a questionnaire about preferences, needs and expectations about orthodontic treatment, and scored the present problem. Continuous variables were compared by Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests, whereas Chi-square test was used for categorical variables. Patients'(77.1%) and parents'(84.6%), decision about orthodontic treatments were influenced by suggestion of dentists. Patients who decided to attend to clinic by themselves were higher than parents (p=0.006). Dental aesthetics was the determinant factor for treatment demand for patients(61.0%) and parents(57.3%). Improvement in oral functions was more important for Class III patients than Class I patients (p=0.040). Adult patients/parents with higher education gave more importance to oral functions as well as dental aesthetics (p=0.031). There was no difference among Angle classifications regarding orthodontic problem scores. Parents found media sources valuable (p=0.018) but majority expected dentists for information about orthodontic treatments. Education degree of adult patients/parents effected this decision(p=0.002). Desire to have better dental aesthetics was the primary motivating factor for all participants. Clinicians should consider concerns of Class III patients about oral functions during treatment planning.

  1. Combined surgical and orthodontic treatment of bilaterial double teeth: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pearson, A I; Willmot, D R

    1995-03-01

    A case of bilateral 'double teeth' is described. The patient, aged 8 at initial presentation, was unhappy with the appearance of his two abnormally large upper central incisor teeth. Endodontic treatment was carried out on both teeth followed by surgical splitting and the removal of half of each so as to leave two reasonably-shaped central incisors. Comprehensive orthodontic treatment was then carried out to align the teeth and reduce the overjet, following which the central incisors exhibited no increased mobility or any periodontal problems.

  2. Reliability assessment and correlation analysis of evaluating orthodontic treatment outcome in Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Song, Guang-Ying; Zhao, Zhi-He; Ding, Yin; Bai, Yu-Xing; Wang, Lin; He, Hong; Shen, Gang; Li, Wei-Ran; Baumrind, Sheldon; Geng, Zhi; Xu, Tian-Min

    2014-03-01

    This study aimed to assess the reliability of experienced Chinese orthodontists in evaluating treatment outcome and to determine the correlations between three diagnostic information sources. Sixty-nine experienced Chinese orthodontic specialists each evaluated the outcome of orthodontic treatment of 108 Chinese patients. Three different information sources: study casts (SC), lateral cephalometric X-ray images (LX) and facial photographs (PH) were generated at the end of treatment for 108 patients selected randomly from six orthodontic treatment centers throughout China. Six different assessments of treatment outcome were made by each orthodontist using data from the three information sources separately and in combination. Each assessment included both ranking and grading for each patient. The rankings of each of the 69 judges for the 108 patients were correlated with the rankings of each of the other judges yielding 13 873 Spearman rs values, ranging from -0.08 to +0.85. Of these, 90% were greater than 0.4, showing moderate-to-high consistency among the 69 orthodontists. In the combined evaluations, study casts were the most significant predictive component (R(2)=0.86, P<0.000 1), while the inclusion of lateral cephalometric films and facial photographs also contributed to a more comprehensive assessment (R(2)=0.96, P<0.000 1). Grading scores for SC+LX and SC+PH were highly significantly correlated with those for SC+LX+PH (r(SC+LX)vs.(SC+LX+PH)=0.96, r(SC+PH)vs.(SC+LX+PH)=0.97), showing that either SC+LX or SC+PH is an excellent substitute for all three combined assessment.

  3. Reliability assessment and correlation analysis of evaluating orthodontic treatment outcome in Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Song, Guang-Ying; Zhao, Zhi-He; Ding, Yin; Bai, Yu-Xing; Wang, Lin; He, Hong; Shen, Gang; Li, Wei-Ran; Baumrind, Sheldon; Geng, Zhi; Xu, Tian-Min

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the reliability of experienced Chinese orthodontists in evaluating treatment outcome and to determine the correlations between three diagnostic information sources. Sixty-nine experienced Chinese orthodontic specialists each evaluated the outcome of orthodontic treatment of 108 Chinese patients. Three different information sources: study casts (SC), lateral cephalometric X-ray images (LX) and facial photographs (PH) were generated at the end of treatment for 108 patients selected randomly from six orthodontic treatment centers throughout China. Six different assessments of treatment outcome were made by each orthodontist using data from the three information sources separately and in combination. Each assessment included both ranking and grading for each patient. The rankings of each of the 69 judges for the 108 patients were correlated with the rankings of each of the other judges yielding 13 873 Spearman rs values, ranging from –0.08 to +0.85. Of these, 90% were greater than 0.4, showing moderate-to-high consistency among the 69 orthodontists. In the combined evaluations, study casts were the most significant predictive component (R2=0.86, P<0.000 1), while the inclusion of lateral cephalometric films and facial photographs also contributed to a more comprehensive assessment (R2=0.96, P<0.000 1). Grading scores for SC+LX and SC+PH were highly significantly correlated with those for SC+LX+PH (r(SC+LX)vs.(SC+LX+PH)=0.96, r(SC+PH)vs.(SC+LX+PH)=0.97), showing that either SC+LX or SC+PH is an excellent substitute for all three combined assessment. PMID:24136673

  4. CBCT in orthodontics: assessment of treatment outcomes and indications for its use

    PubMed Central

    Nervina, J M

    2015-01-01

    Since its introduction into dentistry in 1998, CBCT has become increasingly utilized for orthodontic diagnosis, treatment planning and research. The utilization of CBCT for these purposes has been facilitated by the relative advantages of three-dimensional (3D) over two-dimensional radiography. Despite many suggested indications of CBCT, scientific evidence that its utilization improves diagnosis and treatment plans or outcomes has only recently begun to emerge for some of these applications. This article provides a comprehensive and current review of key studies on the applications of CBCT in orthodontic therapy and for research to decipher treatment outcomes and 3D craniofacial anatomy. The current diagnostic and treatment planning indications for CBCT include impacted teeth, cleft lip and palate and skeletal discrepancies requiring surgical intervention. The use of CBCT in these and other situations such as root resorption, supernumerary teeth, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pathology, asymmetries and alveolar boundary conditions should be justified on the basis of the merits relative to risks of imaging. CBCT has also been used to assess 3D craniofacial anatomy in health and disease and of treatment outcomes including that of root morphology and angulation; alveolar boundary conditions; maxillary transverse dimensions and maxillary expansion; airway morphology, vertical malocclusion and obstructive sleep apnoea; TMJ morphology and pathology contributing to malocclusion; and temporary anchorage devices. Finally, this article utilizes findings of these studies and current voids in knowledge to provide ideas for future research that could be beneficial for further optimizing the use of CBCT in research and the clinical practice of orthodontics. PMID:25358833

  5. Effects of fixed orthodontic treatment on hair nickel and chromium levels: a 6-month prospective preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Amini, Fariborz; Mollaei, Mobina; Harandi, Saghar; Rakhshan, Vahid

    2015-03-01

    Although nickel and chromium are known as allergen and cytotoxic orthodontic metals, very few and controversial studies have assessed the effect of orthodontic treatment on their systemic levels reflected by their best biomarker of exposure, hair. This prospective preliminary study was conducted to evaluate hair nickel and chromium levels in fixed orthodontic patients. Scalp hair nickel/chromium concentrations of 12 female and 12 male fixed orthodontic patients were measured before treatment and 6 months later, using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The effects of treatment, gender, and age on hair ions were analyzed statistically (α = 0.05). The patients' mean age was 18.38 ± 3.98 years. The mean nickel levels were 0.1380 ± 0.0570 and 0.6715 ± 0.1785 μg/g dry hair mass, respectively, in the baseline and sixth month of treatment. Chromium concentrations were 0.1455 ± 0.0769 and 0.1683 ± 0.0707 μg/g dry hair mass, respectively. After 6 months, nickel increased for 387 % (paired t test P = 0.0000) and chromium increased for 16 % (P = 0.0002). No significant correlations were observed between any ion levels with age or gender (Spearman P > 0.2). Within the limitations of this preliminary study, it seems that 6 months of fixed orthodontic treatment might increase levels of hair nickel and chromium. Future larger studies are necessary to validate these results.

  6. Oral hygiene compliance in orthodontic patients: a randomized controlled study on the effects of a post-treatment communication.

    PubMed

    Cozzani, Mauro; Ragazzini, Giulia; Delucchi, Alessia; Mutinelli, Sabrina; Barreca, Carlo; Rinchuse, Daniel J; Servetto, Roberto; Piras, Vincenzo

    2016-12-01

    Several studies have recently demonstrated that a post-treatment communication to explain the importance of an oral hygiene can improve the orthodontic patients' compliance over a period of 66 days. The main goal of this study is to evaluate the effects of a structured follow-up communication after orthodontic appliance application on oral hygiene compliance after 30-40 days. Eighty-four orthodontic participants enrolled from patients who were beginning fixed orthodontic treatment at the Orthodontic Department, Gaslini Hospital, Genova, between July and October 2014 were randomly assigned to one of three trial arms. Before the bonding, all patients underwent a session of oral hygiene aimed at obtaining an plaque index of "zero." At the following orthodontic appointment, the plaque index was calculated for each patient in order to assess oral hygiene compliance. The first group served as control and did not receive any post-procedure communication, the second group received a structured text message giving reassurance, and the third group received a structured telephone call. Participants were blinded to group assignment and were not made aware that the text message or the telephone call was part of the study. (The research protocol was approved by the Italian Comitato Etico Regionale della Liguria-sezione 3^ c/o IRCCS-Istituto G. Gaslini 845/2014, and it is not registered in the trial's register.) RESULTS: Thirty patients were randomly assigned to the control group, 28 participants to the text message group, and 26 to the telephone group. Participants who received a post-treatment communication reported higher level of oral hygiene compliance than participants in the control group. The plaque index was 0.3 (interquartile range (Iqr), 0.60) and 0.75 (Iqr, 1.30), respectively, with a significant difference (P = 0.0205). A follow-up procedure after orthodontic treatment may be an effective tool to increase oral hygiene compliance also over a short period.

  7. Orthodontic treatment and follow-up of a patient with cerebral palsy and spastic quadriplegia.

    PubMed

    Çifter, Muhsin; Cura, Nil

    2016-10-01

    This report describes the clinical orthodontic management of a patient with spastic quadriplegia and cerebral palsy. Guidelines to overcome difficulties encountered during the treatment period are suggested. A 13-year-old boy with cerebral palsy and spastic quadriplegia complained of an undesirable oral appearance because of his malocclusion. He had a Class II molar relationship, with severe maxillary and moderate mandibular anterior crowding. Enamel hypoplasia was apparent on all teeth. He had losses of body function and upper extremity function of 70% and 39%, respectively. His physical limitations necessitated a treatment approach that did not rely on patient-dependent appliances. The treatment plan called for maxillary first premolar extractions, mandibular incisor protrusion, and air rotor stripping. The patient's oral function and esthetic appearance were significantly improved. Aligned dental arches with good occlusion were obtained. The patient's self-confidence improved during the treatment period. Physical appearance can influence personality and social acceptability. Corrective orthodontic treatment for patients with physical handicaps can improve not only oral function, but also self-confidence and self-esteem. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The effect of drill-free and drilling methods on the stability of mini-implants under early orthodontic loading in adolescent patients.

    PubMed

    Türköz, Cagri; Ataç, Mustafa Sancar; Tuncer, Cumhur; Balos Tuncer, Burcu; Kaan, Emre

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the stability of mini-implants using drill-free and drilling methods, both before and after early force loading. Sixty-two adolescent patients (24 males and 38 females, mean age 15.7 ± 4.2 years) were randomly assigned to three groups and 112 titanium mini-implants were placed between the upper first molars and second premolars to achieve molar distalization. Groups I (n = 22) and II (n = 20) received pilot drilling with diameters of 1.1 and 0.9 mm, respectively, while the drill-free method was used in group III (n = 20). Distalization forces of up to 200 g were applied with nickel-titanium (NiTi) open coil springs. The Z-test was used for statistical analyses to compare the success rates of the groups with each other. The overall success rate was 77.7 per cent. There was no significant difference between groups I and II either before or after loading. Significant differences were found between groups I and III (P = 0.0002) and between groups II and III (P = 0.045) both before and after loading. Mini-implants using the drill-free method provided the highest success rate before orthodontic force application and also maintained their stability after early loading for 1 month during orthodontic treatment. Smaller drill diameters can contribute to clinical stability of mini-implants in the short-term, however long-term evaluations are needed to clarify the stability of temporary skeletal anchorage devices throughout orthodontic loading.

  9. Critical evaluation of incidence and prevalence of white spot lesions during fixed orthodontic appliance treatment: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sundararaj, Dhinahar; Venkatachalapathy, Sudhakar; Tandon, Akshay; Pereira, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Development of dental caries, specifically, white spot lesions (WSLs), continues to be a well-recognized and troubling side effect of orthodontic fixed appliance therapy, despite vast improvement in preventive dental techniques and procedures. The aim of this meta-analysis is to evaluate, determine, and summarize the incidence and prevalence rates of WSLs during orthodontic treatment that have been published in the literature. According to predetermined criteria, databases were searched for appropriate studies. References of the selected articles and relevant reviews were searched for any missed publications. In the 14 studies evaluated for WSLs, the incidence of new carious lesions formed during orthodontic treatment in patients was 45.8% and the prevalence of lesions in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment was 68.4%. The incidence and prevalence rates of WSLs in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment are quite high and significant. This widespread problem of WSL development is an alarming challenge and warrants significant attention from both patients and providers, which should result in greatly increased emphasis on effective caries prevention.

  10. Efficacy of 3 toothbrush treatments on plaque removal in orthodontic patients assessed with digital plaque imaging: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Erbe, Christina; Klukowska, Malgorzata; Tsaknaki, Iris; Timm, Hans; Grender, Julie; Wehrbein, Heinrich

    2013-06-01

    Good oral hygiene is a challenge for orthodontic patients because food readily becomes trapped around the brackets and under the archwires, and appliances are an obstruction to mechanical brushing. The purpose of this study was to compare plaque removal efficacy of 3 toothbrush treatments in orthodontic subjects. This was a replicate-use, single-brushing, 3-treatment, examiner-blind, randomized, 6-period crossover study with washout periods of approximately 24 hours between visits. Forty-six adolescent and young adult patients with fixed orthodontics from a university clinic in Germany were randomized, based on computer-generated randomization, to 1 of 3 treatments: (1) oscillating-rotating electric toothbrush with a specially designed orthodontic brush head (Oral-B Triumph, OD17; Procter & Gamble, Cincinnati, Ohio); (2) the same electric toothbrush handle with a regular brush head (EB25; Procter & Gamble); and (3) a regular manual toothbrush (American Dental Association, Chicago, Ill). The primary outcome was the plaque score change from baseline, which we determined using digital plaque image analysis. Forty-five subjects completed the study. The differences in mean plaque removal (95% confidence interval) between the electric toothbrush with an orthodontic brush head (6% [4.4%-7.6%]) or a regular brush head (3.8% [2.2%-5.3%]) and the manual toothbrush were significant (P <0.001). Plaque removal with the electric toothbrush with the orthodontic brush head was superior (2.2%; P = 0.007) to the regular brush head. No adverse events were seen. The electric toothbrush, with either brush head, demonstrated significantly greater plaque removal over the manual brush. The orthodontic brush head was superior to the regular head. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Orthodontic apps for smartphones.

    PubMed

    Singh, Parmjit

    2013-09-01

    The increasing use of technology is rapidly changing our personal and professional lives. Smartphones allow users to access information in ways previously not possible and our patients may be accessing apps to source information about orthodontics and help them through their treatment. To provide an overview of the orthodontic apps currently available on four of the main operating systems with emphasis on those apps targeted towards new and existing orthodontic patients as well as practising clinicians. Four mobile devices were used to search four mobile operating systems (Android, Apple, Blackberry and Windows) using the key words 'braces', 'orthodontist', 'orthodontic' and 'orthodontics'. Android and Apple operating systems derived all of the apps considered relevant to orthodontic clinicians and patients. Clinician apps (11) related to orthodontic meetings (3), publications (3), products (3) and tooth ratio calculators such as Bolton (2). Patient apps (8) related to reminding patients about elastic wear (2) and aligner wear (2), dealing with orthodontic emergencies (2), orthodontic products (1) and a progress tracker of treatment (1). Apps are available for both orthodontic clinicians and patients; however, much of the information contained within them is often not independent and even more often not validated. Patients are increasingly likely to access apps and clinicians should direct patients to those that are most appropriate and useful.

  12. [Study on application of CPP-ACP on tooth mineralization during orthodontic treatment with fixed appliance].

    PubMed

    He, Wen-dan; Liu, Ying-zhi; Xu, Yuan-yuan; Chen, Dong

    2010-04-01

    To determine the value of clinical application of CPP-ACP during orthodontic treatment with fixed appliance. Seventy-five subjects were divided randomly into three groups, the control group, experimental group A and experimental group B. The control group were emphasized on daily oral hygiene. Experimental group A used fluor protector every three months under the dentist's guidance. Experimental group B used Casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium phosphate(CCP-ACP) once a day. After finishing the orthodontic treatment, photos were taken under the same condition ,then the degree of the enamel's demineralization was examined and the enamel decalcification index(EDI) was calculated. SPSS11.0 software package was used for statistical analysis. (1)The incidence of three groups' enamel decalcification declined in sequence as the control group(60%),experimental group A (36%), experimental group B (32%).(2)The incidence of the teeth's enamel calcification of three groups declined in sequence as the control group(14.7%),experimental group A (8.46%), experimental group B (7.72%), the difference between the control group and two experimental groups was significant, while no significant difference was found between the two experimental groups.(3(EDI of the control group was 0.155+/-0.023, EDI of the experimental group A was 0.082+/-0.009,while EDI of the experimental group B was 0.078+/-0.006. The difference between the control group and two experimental groups was statistically significant, while was not statistically significant between the two experimental groups. The application of fluor protector and CPP-ACP can improve the mineralization of the teeth during orthodontic treatment with fixed appliance. CPP-ACP is more convenient for the patients to use. Supported by Research Fund of Bureau of Science and Technology of Futian District Shenzhen City(Grant No.FTWS056).

  13. Clinical, microbiologic, and immunologic factors of orthodontic treatment-induced gingival enlargement.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yiming; Lu, Jing; Ding, Xiaojun

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the microbiologic and immunologic factors related to orthodontic treatment-induced gingival enlargement (GE). Our study included 12 patients with GE undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment and 12 periodontally healthy controls. At baseline, periodontal variables, subgingival plaque samples, and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) samples were taken from 2 preselected sites in both the GE and the control groups. The levels of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Prevotella intermedia, Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. GCF interleukin (IL)-1β and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Invitrogen, Camarillo, Calif). Periodontal therapy was given to the GE group, and all parameters were reassessed after 4 weeks. At baseline, the GE group showed higher prevalences of the 5 periodontal pathogens than did the control group (P <0.05). IL-1β and TGF-β1 levels at the GE sites were also significantly higher than those at the control sites (P <0.05). Four weeks after periodontal therapy, the GE group showed significant improvements in the clinical parameters associated with significant reductions of P gingivalis, A actinomycetemcomitans, and T denticola. The levels of IL-1β decreased significantly compared with the baseline (P <0.05), whereas there was no significant change in TGF-β1 levels (P >0.05). Periodontal pathogens might have a relationship with the initiation and development of orthodontic treatment-induced GE. Inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and TGF-β1) can also be considered as contributing factors. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Root resorption during orthodontic treatment with Invisalign®: a radiometric study.

    PubMed

    Gay, Giulia; Ravera, Serena; Castroflorio, Tommaso; Garino, Francesco; Rossini, Gabriele; Parrini, Simone; Cugliari, Giovanni; Deregibus, Andrea

    2017-12-01

    Root resorption (RR) is described as a permanent loss of tooth structure from the root apex. Many reports in the literature indicate that orthodontically treated patients are more likely to have severe apical root shortening, interesting mostly maxillary, followed by mandibular incisors. The aim of the study was to investigate the incidence and severity of RR in adult patients treated with aligners. The study group consisted of 71 class I adult healthy patients (mean age 32.8 ± 12.7) treated with aligners (Invisalign®, Align Technologies, Santa Clara, CA, USA). All incisors, canines, upper first premolars, and first molars were assessed. Root and crown lengths of 1083 teeth were measured in panoramic radiographs at the beginning (T0) and at the end (T1) of clear aligner therapy. Individual root-crown ratio (RCR) of each tooth and therefore the relative changes of RCR (rRCR) were determined. A decrease of rRCR was assessed as a reduction of the root length during treatment. All patients had a minimum of one teeth affected with a reduction of root length, on average 6.38 ± 2.28 teeth per patient. Forty one, 81% of the 1083, measured teeth presented a reduction of the pre-treatment root length. A reduction in percentage of >0% up to 10% was found in 25.94% (n = 281), a distinct reduction of >10% up to 20% in 12.18% (n = 132) of the sample. 3.69% (n = 40) of the teeth were affected with a considerable reduction (>20%). Orthodontic treatment with Invisalign® aligners could lead to RR. However, its incidence resulted to be very similar to that described for orthodontic light forces, with an average percentage of RR < 10% of the original root length.

  15. Occlusal bite force change after orthodontic treatment with Andresen functional appliance.

    PubMed

    Al-Khateeb, Susan N; Abu Alhaija, Elham S; Majzoub, Sami

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the occlusal bite force (OBF) changes, at the incisal and molar regions, after orthodontic treatment with functional appliance therapy in preadolescent subjects. OBF was measured for patients (17 females and 16 males) before and after the treatment with Andresen functional appliance for an average period of 9 months (mean age was 11.8±1.1 years). Three variables were registered; maximum OBF at molar region and the average of three readings at the molar (AOBF) and incisal regions (IOBF). The same variables were measured in two occasions for a matching non-treated control group with a period of 9 months between the two measurements. No significant changes were seen in the OBF measured parameters in the control group. There was a reduction in all measured parameters. The mean reduction in maximum OBF was 76.1±12.4 N (P < 0.001), 58.5±13.0 N in AOBF (P < 0.001), and 69.3±11.6 N IOBF (P < 0.001). Treatment with functional appliance caused a significant reduction in OBF immediately after treatment. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Changes in the surface roughness and friction coefficient of orthodontic bracket slots before and after treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaomo; Lin, Jiuxiang; Ding, Peng

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we tested the surface roughness of bracket slots and the friction coefficient between the bracket and the stainless steel archwire before and after orthodontic treatment. There were four experimental groups: groups 1 and 2 were 3M new and retrieved brackets, respectively, and groups 3 and 4 were BioQuick new and retrieved brackets, respectively. All retrieved brackets were taken from patients with the first premolar extraction and using sliding mechanics to close the extraction space. The surface roughness of specimens was evaluated using an optical interferometry profilometer, which is faster and nondestructive compared with a stylus profilometer, and provided a larger field, needing no sample preparation, compared with atomic force microscopy. Orthodontic treatment resulted in significant increases in surface roughness and coefficient of friction for both brands of brackets. However, there was no significant difference by brand for new or retrieved brackets. These retrieval analysis results highlight the necessity of reevaluating the properties and clinical behavior of brackets during treatment to make appropriate treatment decisions. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Orthodontic-surgical treatment: neuromuscular evaluation in open and deep skeletal bite patients.

    PubMed

    Farronato, Giampietro; Giannini, Lucia; Galbiati, Guido; Stabilini, Santo Andrea; Maspero, Cinzia

    2013-10-29

    The aim of this study was to compare electromyographic data of two groups of patients (open and deep skeletal bite) before and after surgical orthodontic treatment. All patients who underwent orthognathic surgery at the Department of Orthodontics (University of Milan) were subjected to periodic electromyographic evaluation of the masticatory muscles (masseter and anterior temporal muscles) and to electrokinesiographic evaluation of mandibular movements. The sample comprised 72 patients (35 open skeletal bite patients and 37 deep skeletal bite patients) at the end of craniofacial growth. The electromyographic instruments used in the study included a Freely and a K6-I electromyograph. Statistical evaluation was carried out with Student's t tests for independent samples. Lots of differences between open and deep skeletal bite patients have been underlined by the analysis of the electromyographic data obtained. These results have been obtained with both electromyographic systems. Muscular activity in microvolts is higher in deep skeletal bite patients at the beginning of the treatment than in open bite ones, but during the following phases of the treatment, the two values became similar. Morphologic differences between open and deep bite patients can also be demonstrated by instrumental examinations, and their correction after surgical treatment is observable on electromyographic and electrognatographic exams.

  18. Long-term periodontal response to orthodontic treatment of palatally impacted maxillary canines.

    PubMed

    Caprioglio, Alberto; Vanni, Arianna; Bolamperti, Laura

    2013-06-01

    One of the most important aspects to take into consideration when evaluating the outcome of treatment of impacted maxillary canines is the final periodontal status. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the long-term periodontal response of palatally impacted maxillary canines aligned using a codified procedure and the 'Easy Cuspid' compared with contralateral spontaneously erupted teeth. The periodontal conditions of the adjacent teeth were also considered. From an initial sample of 124 patients, 33 patients (24 females and 9 males) were selected. All patients who had undergone surgical orthodontic treatment conducted in accordance with a standardized protocol were recalled for follow-up at an average of 4.6 years after the end of treatment. The average treatment time was 29 months and the mean eruption time of the previously impacted tooth was 3.1 months. The average probing depth values showed no significant clinical differences. Probing depths recorded at the vestibular surface of the lateral incisor (P < 0.05) and at the midpalatal/midlingual aspect of the first premolar were statistically significant in comparison with the control elements. Student's t-test was used to compare the test and control group values. Coefficient of reliability was set at P < 0.05. The use of a closed-flap surgical technique in association with a codified orthodontic traction system (Easy Cuspid) allowed alignment of palatally impacted canines without damage to the periodontium.

  19. Class II malocclusion treatment using combined Twin Block and fixed orthodontic appliances – A case report

    PubMed Central

    Al-Anezi, Saud A.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of the Twin Block functional orthodontic appliances is mostly dento-alveolar with small skeletal effect. There are certain clinical indications where functional appliances can be used successfully in class II malocclusion e.g. in a growing patient. The use of these appliances is greatly dependent on the patient’s compliance and they simplify the fixed appliance phase. In this case, a 13-year old adolescent was treated with Twin Block appliance followed by fixed appliance to detail the occlusion. The design and treatment effects were demonstrated in this case report. PMID:24151413

  20. Diastema closure using direct bonding restorations combined with orthodontic treatment: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Soon-Kong; Ha, Jung-Hong; Jin, Myoung-Uk; Kim, Sung-Kyo

    2012-01-01

    Closure of interdental spaces using proximal build-ups with resin composite is considered to be practical and conservative. However, a comprehensive approach combining two or more treatment modalities may be needed to improve esthetics. This case report describes the management of a patient with multiple diastemas, a peg-shaped lateral incisor and midline deviation in the maxillary anterior area. Direct resin bonding along with orthodontic movement of teeth allows space closure and midline correction, consequently, creating a better esthetic result. PMID:23429455

  1. Orthodontic-surgical treatment of four impacted canines in an adult patient: A case report.

    PubMed

    Pavlović, Jasna; Tabaković, Saša Z; Simić, Sanja; Vujačić, Amila; Vukićević, Vladanka

    2016-07-01

    Full impaction of canines, in both jaws, is a rare phenomenon. It is usually coupled with the persistence of deciduous canines, or any other irregularity in the dental arch. Panoramic radiograph of a 24-year-old female patient showed bilateral canine impaction in both jaws. Due to vestibular, apical and medial position of canines in the upper jaw, the surgical approach implied the apically positioned flap technique. The position of impacted mandibular canines was vertical with more coronal position relative to the upper canines, thus requiring a closed eruption technique. Inadequate position of impacted canines in the bone fully justifies the use of orthodontic-surgical treatment.

  2. Surgical Orthodontic Treatment for Open Bite in Noonan Syndrome Patient: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Masayoshi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Shimomura, Tadahiro; Kirita, Tadaaki

    2016-03-01

    Noonan syndrome, characterized by short stature, facial anomalies, and congenital heart defects, may also be associated with hematopoietic disorders. Craniofacial anomalies in affected patients include hypertelorism and severe open bite associated with masticatory dysfunction. We treated a Noonan syndrome patient with a skeletal open bite. Surgical orthodontic treatment including two-jaw surgery established a good occlusal relationship after correction of severe anemia. Both upper and lower incisors were moved to upright positions, while clockwise rotation of the palatal plane and decreased mandibular plane angle were accomplished. Lower masticatory activity may affect posttreatment occlusion in such cases.

  3. Prevalence of malocclusions and orthodontic treatment need in 8- to 12-year-old schoolchildren in Casablanca, Morocco.

    PubMed

    Bourzgui, Farid; Sebbar, Mourad; Hamza, Mouna; Lazrak, Laila; Abidine, Zouhair; El Quars, Farid

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the prevalence of malocclusions and orthodontic treatment need among schoolchildren in Casablanca, Morocco. A sample of 1000 children aged between 8 and 12 years, with no history of orthodontic treatment, was chosen at random in state schools in different administrative areas of the city of Casablanca. Data was registered using the method of Bjork et al. (1964). Orthodontic treatment need was assessed with the index used by the Swedish National Board of Health (SweNBH). We found Angle Class I malocclusions in 61.4%, Class II in 24%, Class III in 10% and an indeterminate molar class with one or more missing molars in 4.6% of the children. Overjet was 1-4mm in 63.8%, 4-6 mm in 17.2% and >6 mm in 10%. Bite was normal in 65.4%, 23.6% presented an overbite greater than 4 mm, 1.7% an anterior open bite ≤3 mm, 1.2% an anterior open bite >3 mm and 0.2% a bilateral open bite. Half of the sample presented anterior crowding, while only 2.5% presented posterior crowding. In all, 84.2% of the subjects needed some orthodontic treatment, and 15.8% needed no treatment. No statistically significant difference was found between sex or age and orthodontic treatment need (P>0.05). This study found a strong need for orthodontic treatment, confirming the utility of implementing a programme of bucco-dental prevention and screening for malocclusion. Copyright © 2012 Società Italiana di Ortodonzia SIDO. Published by Elsevier Srl. All rights reserved.

  4. Outcomes of two-phase orthodontic treatment of deepbite malocclusions.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Lorenzo; Baccetti, Tiziano; Giuntini, Veronica; Masucci, Caterina; Vangelisti, Andrea; Defraia, Efisio

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this prospective controlled study was to assess the outcomes of two-phase treatment of deepbite patients revaluated at the end of circumpubertal growth, 1 year after the end of a phase-2 treatment. A sample of 58 subjects with deepbite (mean age 9.7 years, overbite greater than 4.5 mm) was treated consecutively with a two-phase protocol. Lateral cephalograms were taken before treatment (T1), at the completion of phase 1 (T2), and 1 year after the completion of phase 2 with fixed appliances (T3, mean age 15.8 years). The T1-T2, T2-T3, and T1-T3 changes were compared with those of the 29 subjects (mean age at T1 = 9.1 years) with untreated deepbite (t-tests for independent samples). Prevalence rates for improved overbite during the T1-T3 interval and for corrected overbite at T3 were contrasted in the treated vs untreated groups (z tests on proportions). Overbite was reduced by 1.9 mm in the treated group as a result of overall treatment; this group also displayed a significant reduction in the interincisal angulation (-6.6°) due to a significant proclination of upper incisors (4.1°) and a significant increase in the projection of the lower incisors (2.0 mm). The average amount of deepbite correction 1 year into retention was modest, and it was mainly due to a significant proclination of the incisors. The prevalence rate of subjects with a corrected overbite in the treated sample at T3 (74%) was not significantly different from that of the untreated sample (52%).

  5. A posteriori registration and subtraction of periapical radiographs for the evaluation of external apical root resorption after orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chibinski, Ana Cláudia; Coelho, Ulisses; Wambier, Letícia Stadler; Zedebski, Rosário de Arruda Moura; de Moraes, Mari Eli Leonelli; de Moraes, Luiz Cesar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study employed a posteriori registration and subtraction of radiographic images to quantify the apical root resorption in maxillary permanent central incisors after orthodontic treatment, and assessed whether the external apical root resorption (EARR) was related to a range of parameters involved in the treatment. Materials and Methods A sample of 79 patients (mean age, 13.5±2.2 years) with no history of trauma or endodontic treatment of the maxillary permanent central incisors was selected. Periapical radiographs taken before and after orthodontic treatment were digitized and imported to the Regeemy software. Based on an analysis of the posttreatment radiographs, the length of the incisors was measured using Image J software. The mean EARR was described in pixels and relative root resorption (%). The patient's age and gender, tooth extraction, use of elastics, and treatment duration were evaluated to identify possible correlations with EARR. Results The mean EARR observed was 15.44±12.1 pixels (5.1% resorption). No differences in the mean EARR were observed according to patient characteristics (gender, age) or treatment parameters (use of elastics, treatment duration). The only parameter that influenced the mean EARR of a patient was the need for tooth extraction. Conclusion A posteriori registration and subtraction of periapical radiographs was a suitable method to quantify EARR after orthodontic treatment, and the need for tooth extraction increased the extent of root resorption after orthodontic treatment. PMID:27051635

  6. [Invisible orthodontics: lingual orthodontics].

    PubMed

    Fillion, D; Leclerc, J F

    1989-01-01

    After an historical, a description of the appliance and the problems met in lingual orthodontics, the authors show that it has come to maturity. Indirect bonding is one of the main elements contributing to success. A large iconography illustrates the different stages of the laboratory and presents an overview of the clinical possibilities of lingual orthodontics.

  7. Effect of rotary electric toothbrush versus manual toothbrush on periodontal status during orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Boyd, R L; Murray, P; Robertson, P B

    1989-10-01

    Adolescents with fixed orthodontic appliances frequently have increased levels of plaque accumulation and gingivitis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a rotary electric toothbrush would be more effective than conventional toothbrushing in maintaining periodontal health in these patients. Forty adolescent patients were divided into equal groups matched for sex and age. Before and during placement of orthodontic appliances, one group was instructed in use of the rotary electric toothbrush and the other in the use of a conventional toothbrush; these instructions were reinforced at monthly visits thereafter. Baseline clinical assessments of Plaque Index, Gingival Index, and bleeding tendency were made on six standard teeth before appliances were placed. assessments were repeated at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 18 months after appliances were placed. Intragroup and intergroup differences were tested by a two-way analysis of variance. At baseline there were no significant differences between the two groups for any study variable. During the 18-month study period, however, plaque accumulation and gingivitis increased significantly over baseline levels in the control group (p less than 0.01) but remained stable in the group using the rotary electric toothbrush. In addition, the control group showed significantly greater plaque (p less than 0.01), gingival inflammation (p less than 0.001), and gingival bleeding on probing (p less than 0.001) than did the treatment group from the 1- to 18-month examinations. These data suggest that the rotary electric toothbrush is more effective than conventional toothbrushes for removing plaque and controlling gingivitis in adolescents during orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances.

  8. Three questionnaires to assess the perception of fixed orthodontic therapy before, during and after treatment: validity and reliability.

    PubMed

    Yassir, Yassir A; McIntyre, Grant T; Bearn, David R

    2017-08-01

    To assess the validity and reliability of a series of three questionnaires for the quantification of patient perception of fixed appliance orthodontic treatment. The study was carried out at the University of Dundee with content and face validity being assessed using proformas. Initially ten experts (Orthodontic Specialists) assessed content validity with 11 professionals (seven Orthodontic Specialists and four Postgraduates) and 20 patients assessing face validity. Content validity was determined according to the values of item-level content validity index (I-CVI) and scale-level CVI (S-CVI/Ave), while specially designed feedback forms were used for face validation. Internal consistency determined the reliability of the questionnaires according to the value of Cronbach alpha correlation coefficient test. The three questionnaires were then modified according to the recommendations of professionals and patients with seven experts reassessing content validity and ten newly selected patients assessing face validity. The first round of content validity revealed that around half of the items in the questionnaires were not valid. Therefore, the questionnaires were not valid as a whole (S-CVI/Ave = 0.60). After modifying the questionnaires and removing the non-valid items, the new versions of the Pre-treatment, Orthodontic Experience, and Post-treatment Questionnaires showed high levels of face validity, content validity (S-CVI/Ave: 0.99, 0.97, and 0.99, respectively) and good levels of internal consistency (α = 0.86, 0.78, and 0.88, respectively). The patient sample was collected from a single university clinic and from one city within the UK and this could affect the generalizability of the results. Three content valid and reliable questionnaires have been developed and validated for the evaluation of patient perception of fixed appliance orthodontic treatment. Unlike other tools that assess oral health-related quality of life, this series of three questionnaires

  9. Changes in gingival recession related to orthodontic treatment of traumatic deep bites in adults.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Bernd; Seifi-Shirvandeh, Nasrin

    2007-05-01

    It was the aim of this investigation to establish whether orthodontic treatment of traumatic deep bites can restore trauma-related gingival recessions in adults. Forty-one incisor sites with trauma-related recession (group Tr) and 54 trauma-free sites (group NonTr) were diagnosed in the upper palatal or lower buccal regions in twelve adult patients (mean age 38.3 +/- 8.1 years). The 48 antagonistic sites on the buccal aspects of the upper incisors (Ubuc) and 47 sites on the lingual aspects of the lower incisors (L-ling) were also evaluated. Changes in clinical crown lengths achieved during treatment were measured on dental casts, and length changes in recessions were measured on screen projections of magnified intraoral photographs. The clinical crown lengths (mean: -1.13 +/- 0.97 mm) and recession depths (mean: -2.05 +/- 0.93 mm) decreased significantly (p < 0.001) in the trauma group (Tr). We also observed significant shortening (p < 0.05) of clinical crown lengths in the buccal sites of upper incisors (U-buc) (mean: -0.16 +/- 0.46 mm). All other changes were insignificant. Orthodontic treatment of traumatic deep bites involving removal of gingival trauma and intrusion of incisor teeth shows great potential in reducing the length of clinical crowns and depth of gingival recessions. In trauma-free buccal sites of upper incisors, intrusion therapy may also improve the gingival marginal contour.

  10. Volumetric pulp changes after orthodontic treatment determined by cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Shivanand; Ajmera, Shreya; Ganeshkar, Sanjay V

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe and evaluate 3-dimensional pulp cavity changes during orthodontic treatment. Eighty-seven patients formed the study sample and were divided into an experimental group (48 patients) and a control group (39 patients). Cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) records were obtained before the start of the treatment (T0) and after space closure for the experimental group, whereas for the control group CBCT images were obtained approximately 17-18 months (T1) after obtaining the first image (T0). CBCT data were reconstructed with surface and volume rendering software (Mimics; Materialise, Leuven, Belgium), and the volumetric images were modified to display the teeth from various orientations. Six anterior teeth were segmented and their pulps isolated. Paired t test was used to check for statistical significance. The difference in the pulp volume was statistically significant at P < .05 for all the anterior teeth in the experimental group and at P < .05 for the right canine, P < .05 for the right and left lateral incisors, and P < .05 for the left central in the control group. Orthodontic treatment in the experimental group produced a significant decrease in the size of the pulp, which was statistically significant. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Predicting of growth tendency with cephalometry. Cephalometric research comparing orthodontic treatment cases with four premolar extraction].

    PubMed

    Szabó, Gyula Tamás; Herényi, Gejza; Szabó, Gyula

    2007-02-01

    The Hasund cephalometry gives important information about the position of the mandible and maxilla to each other and to the cranium in horizontal and vertical plane, and about the expecting mandibular growth. The aim of the study was to examine the reliability of the Hasund growth analysis on the basis of cephalogramms. The data of eighteen children having been treated with four premolar extraction in the growing period were compared. At the start of treatments the children's average age was 10 (8.5-11.5) years. Figures from the cephalometry were analysed by an orthodontic diagnostic program. According to our results the predicted growth was justified in 14 cases and contrary mandibular development was found in 4 cases. Beyond the limits of this study we concluded that the Hasund growth analysis gives mainly a reliable prognosis on predicting mandibular development. In diagnostic procedures this analysis should be followed for a successful decision-making in treatment plan. However, during the orthodontic treatment the prognostic results have to be monitored by using further cephalometric evaluations in a time-scales of a year.

  12. Effects of orthodontic treatment and premolar extractions on the mandibular third molars.

    PubMed

    Celikoglu, Mevlut; Kamak, Hasan; Akkast, Ismail; Oktay, Hüsamettin

    2010-11-01

    The space available for an unerupted mandibular third may depend on the choice of premolar extracted. To investigate the effects of orthodontic treatment and premolar extractions on the inclinations of the mandibular third molars and the space available for their eruption, and to compare these changes with a nonextraction group. The pre- and post-treatment panoramic radiographs of 54 subjects (20 males, 34 females) were used. Eighteen of these subjects had the four first premolars extracted, 16 subjects had four second premolars extracted and 20 subjects were treated nonextraction. Changes in the inclinations and spaces available for the unerupted third molars were compared. In the nonextraction group the third molars uprighted approximately 1 degree and in the second premolar extraction group the third molars uprighted 10 degrees. The spaces available for the third molars increased significantly in the first and second premolar extraction groups as compared with the space available in the nonextraction group. Orthodontic treatment and extraction of the second premolars improved the inclinations of unerupted third molars and the space available for their eruption into the arch. The changes in inclination and eruption space were less marked following first premolar extractions.

  13. Fluoride varnish reduces white spot lesions during orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Shafi, Imran

    2008-01-01

    This was a randomised controlled trial (RCT) set in a community dental practice. The test varnish was a commercially available product, Fluor Protector (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein), containing 0.1% fluoride as difluorosilane in a polyurethane varnish base. The placebo varnish applied had an identical composition but without fluoride. The incidence and prevalence of white spot lesions (WSL) on the upper incisors, cuspids and premolars were recorded, as scored from digital photographs by two independent examiners. In the case of disagreement, cases were re-examined until a consensus was achieved. The incidence of WSL during the treatment period was 7.4% in the fluoride varnish group compared with 25.3% placebo group (P <0.001). The mean progression score was significantly lower in the fluoride varnish group than in the placebo group, (0.8 +/- 2.0 vs 2.6 +/- 2.8; P <0.001). The absolute risk reduction was 18% and the number-needed-to-treat was calculated to be 5.5 (95% confidence interval, 3.7-10.9). The results strongly suggest that regular topical fluoride varnish applications may reduce the development of WSL adjacent to the bracket base during treatment with fixed appliances.

  14. The Gingival Crevicular Fluid as a Source of Biomarkers to Enhance Efficiency of Orthodontic and Functional Treatment of Growing Patients

    PubMed Central

    Capelli, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) is a biological exudate and quantification of its constituents is a current method to identify specific biomarkers with reasonable sensitivity for several biological events. Studies are being performed to evaluate whether the GCF biomarkers in growing subjects reflect both the stages of individual skeletal maturation and the local tissue remodeling triggered by orthodontic force. Present evidence is still little regarding whether and which GCF biomarkers are correlated with the growth phase (mainly pubertal growth spurt), while huge investigations have been reported on several GCF biomarkers (for inflammation, tissue damage, bone deposition and resorption, and other biological processes) in relation to the orthodontic tooth movement. In spite of these investigations, the clinical applicability of the method is still limited with further data needed to reach a full diagnostic utility of specific GCF biomarkers in orthodontics. Future studies are warranted to elucidate the role of main GCF biomarkers and how they can be used to enhance functional treatment, optimize orthodontic force intensity, or prevent major tissue damage consequent to orthodontic treatment. PMID:28232938

  15. Non-surgical adjunctive interventions for accelerating tooth movement in patients undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    El-Angbawi, Ahmed; McIntyre, Grant T; Fleming, Padhraig S; Bearn, David R

    2015-11-18

    Accelerating the rate of tooth movement may help to reduce the duration of orthodontic treatment and associated unwanted effects including root resorption and enamel demineralisation. Several methods, including surgical and non-surgical adjuncts, have been advocated to accelerate the rate of tooth movement. Non-surgical techniques include low-intensity laser irradiation, resonance vibration, pulsed electromagnetic fields, electrical currents and pharmacological approaches. To assess the effect of non-surgical adjunctive interventions on the rate of orthodontic tooth movement and the overall duration of treatment. We searched the following databases on 25 November 2014: the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (November 2014), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; The Cochrane Library 2014, Issue 10), MEDLINE via OVID (1946 to November 2014), EMBASE via OVID (1980 to November 2014), LILACS via BIREME (1980 to November 2014), metaRegister of Controlled Trials (November 2014), the US National Institutes of Health Trials Register (ClinicalTrials.gov; November 2014) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (November 2014). We checked the reference lists of all trials identified for further studies. There were no restrictions regarding language or date of publication in the searches of the electronic databases. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of people receiving orthodontic treatment using fixed appliances along with non-surgical adjunctive interventions to accelerate tooth movement. We excluded non-parallel design studies (for example, split-mouth) as we regarded them as inappropriate for assessment of the effects of this type of intervention. Two review authors were responsible for study selection, risk of bias assessment and data extraction; they carried out these tasks independently. Any disagreements were resolved by discussion amongst the review team to reach consensus. The review authors contacted

  16. Impact of body mass index on oral health during orthodontic treatment: an explorative pilot study.

    PubMed

    von Bremen, Julia; Lorenz, Nathalie; Ruf, Sabine

    2016-08-01

    To answer the question: is there a correlation between body mass index (BMI), oral health, and patient cooperation during multibracket (MB) appliance therapy? All adolescent MB patients started and finished between 2007 and 2012 were analysed. According to their pre-treatment BMI, patients were divided into one of the following groups: normal weight, overweight, or obese. Using the patients' records, the cooperation during treatment was classified as good, bad, or poor and the treatment duration was calculated. Using pre- and post-treatment photographs, white spot lesion (WSL) formation and gingivitis before and after MB therapy were assessed. Of the 175 subjects, 138 had a normal BMI (79 per cent), 22 were overweight (12.5 per cent), and 15 obese (8.5 per cent). Whereas 42.8 per cent of the normal weight patients showed a good cooperation, only 22.7 per cent of the overweight and 20.9 per cent of the obese patients cooperated sufficiently. On average, normal weight patients were treated for 22.2 months, overweight patients for 23.0 months, and obese patients for 27.7 months. Normal weight patients developed less WSL (41.3 per cent) during MB treatment than overweight (50 per cent) or obese (66.7 per cent) patients. Furthermore, patients with a normal weight or overweight had less gingival inflammation (79.5 per cent) after treatment than obese individuals (93.3 per cent). An increased BMI appears to be a risk factor for less cooperation, a longer treatment duration, and more oral health-related problems during MB treatment, indicating that these patients require special attention during orthodontic therapy. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Apical root resorption during orthodontic treatment with aligners? A retrospective radiometric study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Objective of this study was to investigate the incidence and severity of apical root resorptions (ARR) during orthodontic treatment with aligners. Materials and methods The sample comprised 100 patients (17–75 years of age) with a class I occlusion and anterior crowding before treatment, treated exclusively with aligners (Invisalign®, Align Technologies, Santa Clara, CA, USA). The following teeth were assessed: upper and lower anterior teeth and first molars. Root and crown lengths of a total of 1600 teeth were measured twice in pre- and post-treatment panoramic radiographs. Afterwards, relative changes of the root length during treatment were calculated by a root-crown-ratio taking pre- and post-treatment root and crown lengths into consideration. A reduction of this ratio was considered as a shortening of the initial root length. Additionally, tooth movements of the front teeth were assessed by lateral cephalograms and the 3-dimensonal set up of each patient. Results All patients had a reduction of the pre-treatment root length with a minimum of two teeth. On average 7.36 teeth per patient were affected. 54% of 1600 measured teeth showed no measurable root reduction. A reduction of >0%-10% of the pre-treatment root length was found in 27.75%, a distinct reduction of >10%-20% in 11.94%. 6.31% of all teeth were affected with a considerable reduction of >20%. We found no statistically significant correlation between relative root length changes and the individual tooth, gender, age or sagittal and vertical orthodontic tooth movement; except for extrusion of upper front teeth, which was considered as not clinical relevant due to the small amount of mean 4% ARR. Conclusions The present study is the first analyzing ARR in patients with a fully implemented orthodontic treatment with aligners (i.e. resolving anterior crowding). The variety was high and no clinical relevant influence factor could be detected. A minimum of two teeth with a root length

  18. Apical root resorption during orthodontic treatment with aligners? A retrospective radiometric study.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Elena; Drechsler, Thomas; Schmidtmann, Irene; Jacobs, Collin; Haag, Simeon; Wehrbein, Heinrich

    2013-08-14

    Objective of this study was to investigate the incidence and severity of apical root resorptions (ARR) during orthodontic treatment with aligners. The sample comprised 100 patients (17-75 years of age) with a class I occlusion and anterior crowding before treatment, treated exclusively with aligners (Invisalign®, Align Technologies, Santa Clara, CA, USA). The following teeth were assessed: upper and lower anterior teeth and first molars. Root and crown lengths of a total of 1600 teeth were measured twice in pre- and post-treatment panoramic radiographs. Afterwards, relative changes of the root length during treatment were calculated by a root-crown-ratio taking pre- and post-treatment root and crown lengths into consideration. A reduction of this ratio was considered as a shortening of the initial root length. Additionally, tooth movements of the front teeth were assessed by lateral cephalograms and the 3-dimensonal set up of each patient. All patients had a reduction of the pre-treatment root length with a minimum of two teeth. On average 7.36 teeth per patient were affected. 54% of 1600 measured teeth showed no measurable root reduction. A reduction of >0%-10% of the pre-treatment root length was found in 27.75%, a distinct reduction of >10%-20% in 11.94%. 6.31% of all teeth were affected with a considerable reduction of >20%. We found no statistically significant correlation between relative root length changes and the individual tooth, gender, age or sagittal and vertical orthodontic tooth movement; except for extrusion of upper front teeth, which was considered as not clinical relevant due to the small amount of mean 4% ARR. The present study is the first analyzing ARR in patients with a fully implemented orthodontic treatment with aligners (i.e. resolving anterior crowding). The variety was high and no clinical relevant influence factor could be detected. A minimum of two teeth with a root length reduction was found in every patient. On average, 7.36 teeth

  19. An Analysis of Correlation between Demand and Need for Orthodontic Treatment among Patients in Prince Sattam Bin Abdulaziz University Dental College Clinic, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Sam, George; Seehan, Saad; Al-Shayea, Meshari

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study is to determine whether there is any correlation between demand and need for orthodontic treatment among patients in Sattam Bin Abdulaziz University (SAU) Dental College Clinic. This study also provides a baseline data on the demand and need for orthodontic treatment among a Saudi population, which is important for planning public orthodontic dental services in the Kingdom. An epidemiological descriptive survey was conducted using two sets of questionnaire in the orthodontic clinic of Prince SAU, Al-Kharj among Saudi subjects with angle's Class I, Class II, and Class III malocclusions, between the ages of 10 and 30 years for a period of 6 months with purposive sampling method. Using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient a significant correlation (0.482) was observed in male and female patients respectively with orthodontic demand (2) and treatment need (1) at 0.05 level of significance. A significant correlation (0.326) was observed for the study subjects (both males and females) with orthodontic demand (4) and treatment need (1) at 0.05 level of significance. A significant correlation (0.325) was observed in male patients with orthodontic demand (4) and treatment need (5) at 0.05 level of significance. Patients with the higher orthodontic demand required high treatment needs and vice versa.

  20. Characterizing constraining forces in the alignment phase of orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Christopher G; Lin, Feng-Chang; Phillips, Ceib; Edelman, Alex; Ko, Ching-Chang

    2018-01-01

    To describe the frictional forces (FF) that constrain wire sliding in the initial alignment phase of treatment using a new term, the "constraining force" (CF), and to hypothesize that CF is dependent on two factors: the hyperelastic behavior of archwires and the specific type of tooth geometric malalignment present. A laboratory device that simulates the four distinct malalignment types (in-out, rotation, tipping, and vertical step) was used to couple with an Instron testing apparatus. Incremental CF data for the four types of malalignment were recorded. Each type had five trials per increment of severity, from which the CF was averaged using 0.016-inch copper-nickel-titanium (CuNiTi) archwires. Two types of friction curves were obtained: a traditional step function response and a power regression response. For all malalignment types, increasing degrees of irregularity increased power regression responses and CF. A severity turning point, displayed as a sudden increase in CF, occurred for each malalignment. The rotation type of malalignment yielded the lowest CF, while the vertical step type resulted in the highest CF. The data infer a hypothesis that malrotation type having weak CF might act as a limiting factor in the alignment phase to unravel the neighboring teeth. Future investigations to compare clinical and bench data can help explain more fully the constraints impeding alignment resolution and the factors governing the ability to bring malaligned teeth into alignment.

  1. Orthodontics: computer-aided diagnosis and treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Yaxing; Li, Zhongke; Wei, Suyuan; Deng, Fanglin; Yao, Sen

    2000-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce the outline of our newly developed computer-aided 3D dental cast analyzing system with laser scanning, and its preliminary clinical applications. The system is composed of a scanning device and a personal computer as a scanning controller and post processor. The scanning device is composed of a laser beam emitter, two sets of linear CCD cameras and a table which is rotatable by two-degree-of-freedom. The rotating is controlled precisely by a personal computer. The dental cast is projected and scanned with a laser beam. Triangulation is applied to determine the location of each point. Generation of 3D graphics of the dental cast takes approximately 40 minutes. About 170,000 sets of X,Y,Z coordinates are store for one dental cast. Besides the conventional linear and angular measurements of the dental cast, we are also able to demonstrate the size of the top surface area of each molar. The advantage of this system is that it facilitates the otherwise complicated and time- consuming mock surgery necessary for treatment planning in orthognathic surgery.

  2. Expectations, acceptance, and preferences regarding microimplant treatment in orthodontic patients: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Baxmann, Martin; McDonald, Fraser; Bourauel, Christoph; Jäger, Andreas

    2010-09-01

    In this study, we evaluated the pain and discomfort experienced by orthodontic patients by comparing how they rated pain associated with had microimplant placement, tooth extraction, and gingival tissue removal in preparation for implant placement. Fifty-six microimplants were placed in 28 consecutive orthodontic patients for anchorage reinforcement in the maxilla for en-masse retraction. For all patients, extractions of maxillary, or maxillary and mandibular, premolars had been planned. The recruited patients were randomized into 2 groups according to the timing of the extractions. In group A, at least 1 extraction was performed during the evaluation period; the extractions in group B were after the evaluations. Furthermore, all patients had 2 different surgical procedures for placement. On 1 side, the gingival tissue was removed before placement. On the contralateral side, the implant was placed transgingivally. Each patient's perception of pain and discomfort was evaluated by a questionnaire before, immediately after, and 1 week after the intervention. The discomfort experienced during the extractions was described as very painful by 50% of the patients. It was significantly greater than during tissue removal and microimplant placement (P <0.05). Microimplant placement produced no pain in 30% of the patients and was described as the least painful procedure (P <0.05). Transgingival microimplant placement was significantly preferred by all patients (P <0.05). Microimplant surgery seems to be a well-accepted treatment option in orthodontic patients, with significantly lower pain levels than for tooth extractions. Furthermore, transgingival placement is clearly favored by patients who do not need tissue removed before placement. 2010 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Orthodontic-surgical treatment after posttraumatic bilateral condylectomy of the mandible in an adult patient.

    PubMed

    Belli, Evaristo; Matteini, Claudio; Incisivo, Veronica

    2003-01-01

    A posttraumatic open bite associated with a bird face is reported. Condylectomy was indicated in relation to the plurifragmentary fracture of the condyles with limitation of mandibular movement. Condylectomies were mandatory as a result of delayed maxillofacial surgical treatment, which was related to the poor general condition of the patient after trauma. Functional disorder recovery and aesthetic deformity correction were planned by a team approach between orthodontists and maxillofacial surgeons with the support of a logopedist for the postural-related muscle problems. The main practical and theoretical problems presented by the clinical case were a result of the need to restore the occlusal relations and to avoid recurrence of open bite in this patient. The patient presented a wide alteration of muscular function and a strength fibrotic retraction with alteration in the relationship between upper and lower jaws and retrusion of the mandible associated to open bite. Orthodontic treatment was carried with no impact on the upper and lower axis, avoiding orthodontic correction of the open bite. Surgery corrected both the open bite and the bird face by means of bilateral sagittal split osteotomies. Wiring of the mandibular osteotomies and intermaxillary fixation allowed positioning of the mandibular ramus bilaterally because of the fibrosis and muscular action-related forces without resulting in a similar rotation of the mandible with the risk of recurrence. Myotherapy and logopedic support minimized the risk of recurrence, improved reduction of muscular tension with the resolution of the lip incompetence, and allowed functional recovery of mandibular movements.

  4. Alveolar bone morphology of maxillary central incisors near grafted alveolar clefts after orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Yatabe, Marilia; Natsumeda, Gabriela Manami; Miranda, Felicia; Janson, Guilherme; Garib, Daniela

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the thickness and the height of the maxillary central incisors' alveolar bone near the grafted alveolar cleft area, after comprehensive orthodontic treatment. The sample comprised 30 patients with unilateral alveolar cleft with a mean age of 20.5 years (range, 17-25.8 years). High-resolution cone-beam computed tomography images of the maxilla were obtained 6 to 24 months after the comprehensive orthodontic treatment. The contralateral maxillary central incisor was used as a comparison group. Axial sections at the level of the central incisor root were used to measure the labial and lingual alveolar bone thicknesses. Cross sections were used to measure the bone crest heights using the cementoenamel junction as the reference. Paired t and Wilcoxon tests were used to compare the cleft and noncleft sides. The labial and lingual bone thicknesses of the maxillary central incisors' alveolar bone were significantly thinner (0.16 and 0.39 mm, respectively), and the labial alveolar crest height distance was significantly greater on the cleft side compared with the noncleft side (-1.2 mm). In patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate, the maxillary central incisors adjacent to the grafted alveolar cleft had thinner labial and lingual alveolar bones and an apically displaced labial alveolar crest level than the controls. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Interleukins 2, 6, and 8 levels in human gingival sulcus during orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Başaran, Güvenç; Ozer, Törün; Kaya, Filiz Acun; Hamamci, Orhan

    2006-07-01

    The aims of this study were to determine levels of interleukins 2, 6, and 8 during tooth movement, and test whether they differ from each other with leveling and distalization forces used in various treatment stages of standard orthodontic therapy. Fifteen patients (9 female, 6 male; ages, 15-19 years; mean age, 16.7 +/- 2.3 years) participated in this study. Each underwent a session of professional oral hygiene and received oral hygiene instructions. Two months later, a fixed orthodontic appliance was placed. The patients were seen at baseline, at days 7 and 21, and as the teeth were leveled. Records of the baseline scores for the distalization forces were taken at the sixth month. Scores of days 7 and 21 after 6 months of the distalization treatment were also recorded. Increases were seen in the volume of gingival crevicular fluid and the concentrations of interleukins 2, 6, and 8. Leveling and distalization of the teeth evoke increases in interleukins 2, 6, and 8 levels in the periodontal tissues that can be detected in gingival crevicular fluid.

  6. Effect of surface treatment on cell responses to grades 4 and 5 titanium for orthodontic mini-implants.

    PubMed

    Galli, Carlo; Piemontese, Marilina; Ravanetti, Francesca; Lumetti, Simone; Passeri, Giovanni; Gandolfini, Mauro; Macaluso, Guido M

    2012-06-01

    Mini-implants are used to improve orthodontic anchorage, but optimal composition and surface characteristics have yet to be determined. We investigated the behavior of osteoblast-like cells on grade 4 commercially pure titanium and grade 5 titanium alloy with different surface treatments for mini-implants. MC3T3 cells were plated on machined, acid-etched, or acid-etched grade 4 titanium enriched with calcium phosphate, or machined, anodized, or anodized and calcium phosphate-enriched grade 5 titanium disks. Surface and cell morphologies were assessed by scanning electron microscopy. Cell viability was measured by chemiluminescence, cytoskeletal organization was investigated by immunofluorescence, and real-time polymerase chain reaction for osteoblast-specific genes was performed to measure cell differentiation. Flattened shapes and strong stress fibers were observed on the machined surfaces; cells on the rough surfaces had a spindle shape, with lower cytoskeletal polarization. Cell proliferation was highest on smooth grade 4 titanium surfaces, whereas cells quickly reached a plateau on rough grade 4 titanium; no difference was observed after 72 hours in the grade 5 titanium groups. Calcium phosphate enrichment on grade 4 titanium significantly increased the messenger RNA levels for alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin. Osteoblastic markers were higher on the grade 5 titanium machined surfaces than on the rough surfaces, and comparable with acid-etched grade 4 titanium. Although the grade 4 titanium enriched with calcium phosphate had the highest level of differentiation in vitro, the grade 5 titanium machined surfaces supported cell proliferation and matrix synthesis, and induced high expression of early differentiation markers. Increased mechanical resistance of grade 5 titanium makes it a potential candidate for orthodontic mini-implants. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of combined application treatment with one-visit varnish treatments in an orthodontic population.

    PubMed

    Baygin, Ozgul; Tuzuner, Tamer; Ozel, Mehmet-Birol; Bostanoglu, Ozge

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of chlorhexidine-thymol varnish alone, its combination with chlorhexidine-fluoride containing dentifrice and fluoride varnish on oral hygiene and caries prevention in orthodontic patients. Sixty patients, aged 12-18, with orthodontic fixed appliances were randomly assigned into three groups as follows: Group 1 (n=20): 1% chlorhexidine and 1% thymol varnish (CervitecPlus); Group 2 (n=20): CervitecPlus+ 0.2% chlorhexidine and 0.2% sodium fluoride (900 ppm fluoride) (CervitecGel)); and Group 3 (n=20): 0.1% fluoride varnish (Fluor Protector). Mutans streptococci (MS), lactobacilli (LB) levels, buffering capacity (BC), visible plaque index (VPI), and gingival bleeding index (GBI) scores were evaluated at four stages: T0, before orthodontic bonding; T₁, one week after orthodontic bonding; T₂, one week; and T₃, four weeks after the first application, respectively. Inter and intra group comparisons were made by the Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U, Friedman and Wilcoxon Signed-Rank tests with Bonferroni step-down correction (P<0.017). Significantly lower MS and LB levels were found in Group 2 than Group 1 (T₂) and 3 (T₂, T₃) (P<0.017). Groups 1-2 (T₂) showed significantly higher BC (P<0.017) and lower VPI and GBI (P<0.017) scores compared with Group 3. Decreased MS levels at T₂ (P<0.017) and T₃ (P>0.017) were found in Group1-2 compared with T0. Significantly lower LB levels were recorded in Group 2 at T₂ compared with T₀ (P<0.017) while no significant differences were seen in Group 1 and 3 (P>0.017). Addition of CervitecPlus+CervitecGel combination to the standard oral hygiene regimen may be beneficial for orthodontic patients for maintaining oral health by reducing bacterial colonisation and gingivitis.

  8. Orthodontic treatment of gummy smile by maxillary total intrusion with a midpalatal absolute anchorage system

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Seung-Min; Heo, Jung-Min; Baek, Seung-Hak

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the orthodontic treatment of a 31-year-old Korean female patient with gummy smile and crowding. The patient showed excessive gingival display in both the anterior and posterior areas and a large difference in gingival heights between the anterior and posterior teeth in the maxilla. To correct the gummy smile, we elected to intrude the entire maxillary dentition instead of focusing only on the maxillary anterior teeth. Alignment and leveling were performed, and a midpalatal absolute anchorage system as well as a modified lingual arch was designed to achieve posterosuperior movement of the entire upper dentition. The active treatment period was 18 months. The gummy smile and crowding were corrected, and the results were stable at 21 months post-treatment. PMID:23814710

  9. Histomorphologic and histomophometric evaluation of immediately and early loaded mini-implants for orthodontic anchorage.

    PubMed

    Freire, José Nilo O; Silva, Nelson R F A; Gil, José N; Magini, Ricardo S; Coelho, Paulo G

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bone response to statically loaded 2.5-mm diameter mini-implants of 6 and 10 mm lengths activated after various healing periods in a dog model. Seventy-eight machined-surface Ti-6Al-4V mini-implants were bilaterally placed in the mandibular premolar and molar regions of 6 beagle dogs. The left (experimental) and the right (control) hemi-arches received 6 and 7 mini-implants, respectively. Experimental mini-implants healing periods of 0 days (immediately activated), 1 week, and 3 weeks were followed by a 12-week load activation period (250 g between parallel implant pairs). Control (nonloaded) mini-implant groups were placed for 12 weeks, 3 weeks, and 1 week before the dogs were killed they provided data concerning the experimental groups' bone to mini-implant scenarios at load activation times. The mandibles were exposed by sharp dissection, and decalcified specimens were prepared for histomorphologic and histomorphometric (bone to mini-implant contact) assessment. Survival rates were 100% and 77.78% for the control and the experimental groups, respectively. Survival rates were 88.89% for the 10-mm and 66.67% for the 6-mm experimental groups. All failed devices had tissue inflammation and were lost after spring placement. The control groups showed classic bone-healing events, and the experimental groups showed mature bone morphology after 12 weeks in vivo regardless of placement time before load activation. Bone to implant contact values were not significantly different between the experimental and the control groups that remained 12 weeks in vivo. These results showed that low-intensity immediate or early orthodontic static loads did not affect mini-implant performance.

  10. Stability of orthodontic treatment outcome in relation to retention status: An 8-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Steinnes, Jeanett; Johnsen, Gunn; Kerosuo, Heidi

    2017-06-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the stability of orthodontic treatment outcome and retention status 7 or more years after active treatment in relation to posttreatment or postretention time, type of retention appliance, and duration of retainer use. The subjects were former patients who completed orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances from 2000 to 2007. The pretreatment eligibility criteria were anterior crowding of 4 mm or more in the maxilla or the mandible and Angle Class I or Class II sagittal molar relationship. Acceptable pretreatment and posttreatment dental casts were required. A total of 67 patients participated, 24 men and 43 women, with a mean age of 24.7 years (range, 20.0-50.0 years). All participants had a follow-up clinical examination, which included impressions for follow-up casts, and each completed a questionnaire. Data were obtained from pretreatment, posttreatment, and follow-up (T2) casts as well as from the patients' dental records. Treatment stability was evaluated with the peer assessment rating (PAR) index and Little's irregularity index. The participation rate was 64%. The average posttreatment time was 8.5 years (range, 7.0-11.0). All participants had received a retainer in the mandible, maxilla, or both after active treatment. At T2, the PAR score showed a mean relapse of 14%. The majority (78%) of participants still had a fixed retainer at T2 (retainer group), and 22% had been out of retention for at least 1 year (postretention group). The relapse according to the PAR did not differ significantly between participants with and without a retainer at T2. From posttreatment to T2, the irregularity of the mandibular incisors increased almost 3 times more in participants with no retainer in the mandible compared with those with an intact retainer at T2 (P = 0.001). In the maxilla, no corresponding difference was found. Our results suggest that occlusal relapse can be expected after active orthodontic treatment irrespective of long

  11. Allergy and orthodontics

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarthi, Sunitha; Padmanabhan, Sridevi; Chitharanjan, Arun B.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the current literature on allergy in orthodontics and to identify the predisposing factors and the implications of the allergic reaction in the management of patients during orthodontic treatment. A computerized literature search was conducted in PubMed for articles published on allergy in relation to orthodontics. The MeSH term used was allergy and orthodontics. Allergic response to alloys in orthodontics, particularly nickel, has been extensively studied and several case reports of nickel-induced contact dermatitis have been documented. Current evidence suggests that the most common allergic reaction reported in orthodontics is related to nickel in orthodontic appliances and allergic response is more common in women due to a previous sensitizing exposure from nickel in jewellery. Studies have implicated allergy in the etiology of hypo-dontia. It has also been considered as a high-risk factor for development of extensive root resorption during the course of orthodontic treatment. This review discusses the relationship and implications of allergy in orthodontics. PMID:24987632

  12. Tooth model reconstruction based upon data fusion for orthodontic treatment simulation.

    PubMed

    Yau, Hong-Tzong; Yang, Tsan-Jui; Chen, Yi-Chen

    2014-05-01

    This paper proposes a full tooth reconstruction method by integrating 3D scanner data and computed tomography (CT) image sets. In traditional dental treatment, plaster models are used to record patient׳s oral information and assist dentists for diagnoses. However, plaster models only save surface information, and are therefore unable to provide further information for clinical treatment. With the rapid development of medical imaging technology, computed tomography images have become very popular in dental treatment. Computed tomography images with complete internal information can assist the clinical diagnosis for dental implants or orthodontic treatment, and a digital dental model can be used to simulate and predict results before treatment. However, a method of producing a high quality and precise dental model has yet to be developed. To this end, this paper presents a tooth reconstruction method based on the data fusion concept via integrating external scanned data and CT-based medical images. First, a plaster model is digitized with a 3D scanner. Then, each crown can be separated from the base according to the characteristics of tooth. CT images must be processed for feature enhancement and noise reduction, and to define the tooth axis direction which will be used for root slicing. The outline of each slice of dental root can then be determined by the level set algorithm, and converted to point cloud data. Finally, the crown and root data can be registered by the iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm. With this information, a complete digital dental model can be reconstructed by the Delaunay-based region-growing (DBRG) algorithm. The main contribution of this paper is to reconstruct a high quality customized dental model with root information that can offer significant help to the planning of dental implant and orthodontic treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. OBJECTIVE AND SUBJECTIVE EVALUATION OF ADOLESCENT’S ORTHODONTIC TREATMENT NEEDS AND THEIR IMPACT ON SELF-ESTEEM

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anshika; Mathur, Anmol; Batra, Manu; Makkar, Diljot Kaur; Aggarwal, Vikram Pal; Goyal, Nikita; Kaur, Puneet

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To investigate the presence of association between objective and subjective evaluation of orthodontic treatment needs in adolescents and their impact on their self-esteem. Methods: Cross-sectional study with adolescents aged 10-17 years old in Sri Ganganagar city, Rajasthan, India. The objective index of orthodontic treatment need (IOTN) dental health component (DHC) and the subjective aesthetic component (AC) were used to determine the normative and the self-perception need for orthodontic treatment, respectively. The selected students were further examined for dental trauma, tooth loss, and dental caries. Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale was applied for self-esteem level determination. Linear regression analysis was executed to test the individual association of different independent clinical variables with self-esteem scores. Results: Among 1,140 studied adolescents, the prevalence of dental normative orthodontic treatment need was in 56.9% of individuals, whereas 53.3% of individuals considered themselves as needy for the treatment. Multivariate analyses revealed that out of all dental disorders, DHC followed by AC of IOTN had maximum impact on the self-esteem of the adolescence. Conclusions: Dissatisfaction with dental appearance is a strong predictor for low self-esteem in adolescence. PMID:28977320

  14. Lip morphological changes in orthodontic treatment. Class II division 1: malocclusion and normal occlusion at rest and on smiling.

    PubMed

    Islam, Rafiqul; Kitahara, Toru; Naher, Lutfun; Hara, Atsushi; Nakasima, Akihiko

    2009-03-01

    To evaluate the morphological changes in the lips and to determine the degree of improvement in the smile after orthodontic treatment for Class II division 1 malocclusion. The sample subjects were divided into two groups: a group that consisted of 20 adult female patients with Angle Class II division 1 malocclusion and a control group that consisted of 28 adult female volunteers with normal occlusion. Frontal photographs were taken before and after orthodontic treatment, and 35 landmarks were placed on each tracing made from the photograph. Thereafter, landmarks were digitized into an x- and y-coordinate system with the subnasal point as the origin. The comparisons between pretreatment and posttreatment at rest and on smiling, and the comparisons between Class II division 1 and control group were made using Student's t-test. Both the upper and lower lips in the smile of patients in the Class II division 1 pretreatment group were positioned downward, and the upward movement of the upper lip and mouth corners was smaller in comparison with the control group. These characteristics of the Class II smile improved after orthodontic treatment, but the differences with the control group remained unchanged immediately after treatment. The soft tissue morphology shows a relative improvement after orthodontic treatment.

  15. Outcomes of comprehensive fixed appliance orthodontic treatment: A systematic review with meta-analysis and methodological overview

    PubMed Central

    Höchli, Damian; Eliades, Theodore

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this systematic review was to assess the occlusal outcome and duration of fixed orthodontic therapy from clinical trials in humans with the Objective Grading System (OGS) proposed by the American Board of Orthodontics. Methods Nine databases were searched up to October 2016 for prospective/retrospective clinical trials assessing the outcomes of orthodontic therapy with fixed appliances. After duplicate study selection, data extraction, and risk of bias assessment according to the Cochrane guidelines, random-effects meta-analyses of the mean OGS score and treatment duration were performed and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Results A total of 34 relevant clinical trials including 6,207 patients (40% male, 60% female; average age, 18.4 years) were identified. The average OGS score after treatment was 27.9 points (95% CI, 25.3–30.6 points), while the average treatment duration was 24.9 months (95% CI, 24.6–25.1 months). There was no significant association between occlusal outcome and treatment duration, while considerable heterogeneity was identified. In addition, orthodontic treatment involving extraction of four premolars appeared to have an important effect on both outcomes and duration of treatment. Finally, only 10 (39%) of the identified studies matched compared groups by initial malocclusion severity, although meta-epidemiological evidence suggested that matching may have significantly influenced their results. Conclusions The findings from this systematic review suggest that the occlusal outcomes of fixed appliance treatment vary considerably, with no significant association between treatment outcomes and duration. Prospective matched clinical studies that use the OGS tool are needed to compare the effectiveness of orthodontic appliances. PMID:29090128

  16. Outcomes of comprehensive fixed appliance orthodontic treatment: A systematic review with meta-analysis and methodological overview.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, Spyridon N; Höchli, Damian; Eliades, Theodore

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to assess the occlusal outcome and duration of fixed orthodontic therapy from clinical trials in humans with the Objective Grading System (OGS) proposed by the American Board of Orthodontics. Nine databases were searched up to October 2016 for prospective/retrospective clinical trials assessing the outcomes of orthodontic therapy with fixed appliances. After duplicate study selection, data extraction, and risk of bias assessment according to the Cochrane guidelines, random-effects meta-analyses of the mean OGS score and treatment duration were performed and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. A total of 34 relevant clinical trials including 6,207 patients (40% male, 60% female; average age, 18.4 years) were identified. The average OGS score after treatment was 27.9 points (95% CI, 25.3-30.6 points), while the average treatment duration was 24.9 months (95% CI, 24.6-25.1 months). There was no significant association between occlusal outcome and treatment duration, while considerable heterogeneity was identified. In addition, orthodontic treatment involving extraction of four premolars appeared to have an important effect on both outcomes and duration of treatment. Finally, only 10 (39%) of the identified studies matched compared groups by initial malocclusion severity, although meta-epidemiological evidence suggested that matching may have significantly influenced their results. The findings from this systematic review suggest that the occlusal outcomes of fixed appliance treatment vary considerably, with no significant association between treatment outcomes and duration. Prospective matched clinical studies that use the OGS tool are needed to compare the effectiveness of orthodontic appliances.

  17. SEM-EDS-Based Elemental Identification on the Enamel Surface after the Completion of Orthodontic Treatment: In Vitro Studies

    PubMed Central

    Seeliger, Julia; Lipski, Mariusz; Wójcicka, Anna; Gedrange, Tomasz; Woźniak, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Braces as foreign bodies in the mouth carry a risk of side effects and toxicity to the human body. This article presents the results indicating the possible toxic effects of tools used for cleaning the enamel after the completion of orthodontic treatment. The studies were carried out in vitro. The procedure of enamel etching, bonding orthodontic metal brackets, and enamel cleaning after their removal was performed under laboratory conditions. The enamel microstructure and elements present on its surface were evaluated using the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Silicon and aluminium were found in addition to the tooth building elements. PMID:27766265

  18. Effect of heat treatment on corrosion behavior of duplex stainless steel in orthodontic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabea Hammood, Ali; Faraj Noor, Ahmed; Talib Alkhafagy, Mohammed

    2017-12-01

    Heat treatment is necessary for duplex stainless steel (DSS) to remove or dissolve intermetallic phases, to remove segregation and to relieve any residual thermal stress in DSS, which may be formed during production processes. In the present study, the corrosion resistance of a DSS in artificial saliva was studied by potentiodynamic measurements. The microstructure was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM),x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Vickers hardness (HV). The properties were tested in as-received and in thermally treated conditions (800-900 °C, 2-8 min). The research aims to evaluate the capability of DSS for orthodontic applications, in order to substitute the austenitic grades. The results indicate that the corrosion resistance is mainly affected by the ferrite/austenite ratio. The best result was obtained with a treatment at 900 °C for 2 min.

  19. Prediction of Mesiodistal Width of Unerupted Lateral Incisors, Canines and Premolars in Orthodontic Patients in Early Mixed Dentition Period

    PubMed Central

    Toodehzaeim, Mohammad Hossein; Haerian, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Proper diagnosis and prevention of malocclusion are superior to treatment. Discrepancy between arch length and tooth size in mixed dentition period is a condition requiring timely diagnosis. Estimating the mesiodistal width of unerupted teeth according to the size of erupted ones can lead to earlier diagnosis of malocclusion. On the other hand, the best timing for serial extractions is before the eruption of lateral incisors. The aim of this study was to present prediction formulas for mesiodistal width of unerupted lateral incisors, canines and premolars in an Iranian population based on the width of erupted permanent mandibular central incisors and maxillary first molars. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 dental models (60 males, 60 females) of orthodontic patients between 11–25 years were evaluated in Yazd city. The measurements were made by a digital caliper on the widest mesiodistal width of teeth at the interproximal contacts. Data were analyzed to calculate the prediction equation. Results: The prediction equation in the upper jaw was y=0.57x+10.82 for males, y=0.7x+6.37 for females and y=0.64x+8.46 for both sexes. The equation for the lower jaw was y=0.76x+2.86 for males, y=0.74x+3.53 for females and y=0.77x+2.7 for both sexes. Conclusions: The prediction equations suggested in this study can predict the mesiodistal width of unerupted lateral incisors, canines and premolars in an Iranian population in early mixed dentition period without taking radiographs. PMID:28243298

  20. Prediction of Mesiodistal Width of Unerupted Lateral Incisors, Canines and Premolars in Orthodontic Patients in Early Mixed Dentition Period.

    PubMed

    Toodehzaeim, Mohammad Hossein; Haerian, Alireza; Alesaeidi, Ali

    2016-11-01

    Proper diagnosis and prevention of malocclusion are superior to treatment. Discrepancy between arch length and tooth size in mixed dentition period is a condition requiring timely diagnosis. Estimating the mesiodistal width of unerupted teeth according to the size of erupted ones can lead to earlier diagnosis of malocclusion. On the other hand, the best timing for serial extractions is before the eruption of lateral incisors. The aim of this study was to present prediction formulas for mesiodistal width of unerupted lateral incisors, canines and premolars in an Iranian population based on the width of erupted permanent mandibular central incisors and maxillary first molars. A total of 120 dental models (60 males, 60 females) of orthodontic patients between 11-25 years were evaluated in Yazd city. The measurements were made by a digital caliper on the widest mesiodistal width of teeth at the interproximal contacts. Data were analyzed to calculate the prediction equation. The prediction equation in the upper jaw was y=0.57x+10.82 for males, y=0.7x+6.37 for females and y=0.64x+8.46 for both sexes. The equation for the lower jaw was y=0.76x+2.86 for males, y=0.74x+3.53 for females and y=0.77x+2.7 for both sexes. The prediction equations suggested in this study can predict the mesiodistal width of unerupted lateral incisors, canines and premolars in an Iranian population in early mixed dentition period without taking radiographs.

  1. What Are the Histologic Effects of Surgical and Orthodontic Treatment on the Gingiva of Palatal Impacted Canines?

    PubMed

    Torres-Lagares, Daniel; Hita-Iglesias, Pilar; Azcárate-Velázquez, Francisco; Garrido-Serrano, Roberto; Ruiz-de-León-Hernández, Gonzalo; Velazquez-Cayón, Rocío; Gutiérrez-Pérez, José-Luis

    2015-12-01

    To histologically evaluate changes in the marginal gingiva of palatal impacted maxillary canines after surgical exposure and orthodontic treatment. A prospective case-and-control study was conducted of 10 patients presenting with bilateral palatal impaction of the maxillary canines. All patients underwent surgical exposure of the impacted canines with an open-window technique, which was followed by orthodontic treatment to achieve proper arch alignment. Once the treatment was finalized, 4 samples of marginal gingival tissue from each patient were taken for histologic study. The 4 samples consisted of 1 from each of the repositioned maxillary canines (case teeth) and 1 from each of their respective adjacent first premolars (control teeth). Histologic examination of the case teeth tissue samples showed microscopic changes mainly in the nonkeratinized epithelium and connective tissue, whereas changes in the keratinized epithelium remained minimal. The control teeth showed a greater inflammatory reaction in the nonkeratinized epithelium. Orthodontic treatment of impacted maxillary canines used in conjunction with an open-window surgical technique results in predictable orthodontic eruption with few periodontal discrepancies of the marginal gingiva compared with their adjacent first premolars. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Investigation of differences in subjective demand for orthodontic treatment of middle school students in zones with different economic levels].

    PubMed

    Chen, Guo; Yin, Bei; Zhao, Qing; Xu, Yichen; Huo, Jingyi; Li, Zhang'ao; Meng, Mingmei; Chen, Yafei

    2012-08-01

    To investigate the acquaintance to orthodontics and possible factors that obstruct orthodontic treatment in middle school students in zones with different economic levels in Jiangjin, Chongqing. The students were randomly divided into four groups: A class from a junior high school in town (group 1), a class from a senior high school in town (group 2), a class from a junior high school in the countryside (group 3), a class from a senior high school in the countryside (group 4). The information was collected by questionnaire, and the statistical analysis of results was carried out by SPSS 17.0 software. Sex made difference in the acquaintance to orthodontics treatment. Girls worried more about teeth extraction and pain that may occur during treatment than the boys. Students in the city had more access to related consultations compared to those in the countryside. Different economic conditions made much contribution to the proportion to go for orthodontics treatment in cities and rural areas. The evaluation from families and friends may affect patients' subjective estimation to themselves. Orthodontists should learn more about student patiens from various aspects, and make different therapies according to their sexes, economic conditions of family, education levels, etc. Only so can orthodontists get better compliance from their patients.

  3. Tooth movement in orthodontic treatment with low-level laser therapy: a systematic review of human and animal studies.

    PubMed

    Carvalho-Lobato, Patricia; Garcia, Valentin Javier; Kasem, Khaled; Ustrell-Torrent, Josep Maria; Tallón-Walton, Victòria; Manzanares-Céspedes, Maria Cristina

    2014-05-01

    This review attempts to organize the existing published literature regarding tooth movement in orthodontic treatment when low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is applied. The literature discusses different methods that have been developed to motivate the remodeling and decrease the duration of orthodontic treatment. The application of LLLT has been introduced to favor the biomechanics of tooth movements. However there is disagreement between authors as to whether LLLT reduces orthodontic treatment time, and the parameters that are used vary. Studies in humans and animals in which LLLT was applied to increase the dental movement were reviewed. Three reviewers selected the articles. The resulting studies were analyzed according to the parameters used in the application of laser and existing changes clinically and histopathologically. Out of 84 studies, 5 human studies were selected in which canine traction had been performed after removing a premolar, and 11 studies in rats were selected in which first premolar traction was realized. There were statistically significant changes in four human studies and eight animal studies. Varying the wavelength with a reasonable dose in the target zone leads to obtaining the desired biological effect and achieving a reduction of the orthodontic treatment time, although there are studies that do not demonstrate any benefit according to their values.

  4. [Computer assisted orthodontic diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Romeo García, A; González Blanco, A

    1991-03-01

    Quick Ceph is a program to help in orthodontic diagnosis, which is not limited to lateral cephalometric analysis but also allows, thanks to the Macintosh graphic interface the simulation of all orthodontic and surgical movements and so this to establish a treatment plan.

  5. Efficacy of 2 finishing protocols in the quality of orthodontic treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Stock, Gregory J; McNamara, James A; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2011-11-01

    The objectives of this prospective clinical study were to evaluate the quality of treatment outcomes achieved with a complex orthodontic finishing protocol involving serpentine wires and a tooth positioner, and to compare it with the outcomes of a standard finishing protocol involving archwire bends used to detail the occlusion near the end of active treatment. The complex finishing protocol sample consisted of 34 consecutively treated patients; 1 week before debonding, their molar bands were removed, and serpentine wires were placed; this was followed by active wear of a tooth positioner for up to 1 month after debonding. The standard finishing protocol group consisted of 34 patients; their dental arches were detailed with archwire bends and vertical elastics. The objective grading system of the American Board of Orthodontics was used to quantify the quality of the finish at each time point. The Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to compare changes in the complex finishing protocol; the Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare changes between groups. The complex finishing protocol group experienced a clinically significant improvement in objective grading system scores after treatment with the positioner. Mild improvement in posterior space closure was noted after molar band removal, but no improvement in the occlusion was observed after placement of the serpentine wires. Patients managed with the complex finishing protocol also had a lower objective grading system score (14.7) at the end of active treatment than did patients undergoing the standard finishing protocol (23.0). Tooth positioners caused a clinically significant improvement in interocclusal contacts, interproximal contacts, and net objective grading system score; mild improvement in posterior band space was noted after molar band removal 1 week before debond. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Genetic and clinical risk factors of root resorption associated with orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yujiao; He, Shushu; Gu, Tian; Liu, Yi; Chen, Song

    2016-08-01

    External apical root resorption (EARR) is a common complication in orthodontic treatment. Despite many studies on EARR, great controversies remain with regard to its risk factors. The objective of this study was to explore the relationship among sex, root movement, IL-1RN single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs419598, IL-6 SNP rs1800796, and EARR associated with orthodontic treatment. Altogether 174 patients (with 174 maxillary left central incisors) were selected for this study. Cone-beam computed tomography was performed before the start of the treatment and at the end of the treatment. Cone-beam computed tomography data were used to reconstruct a 3-dimensional image of each tooth; the volume and the root resorption volume of each tooth were calculated. Three-dimensional matching was used to measure the amount of movement of each root. Genomic DNA was extracted from buccal swabs, and genotypes of SNP rs419598 and SNP rs1800796 of each subject were determined using TaqMan polymerase chain reaction genotyping (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, Calif). The data were analyzed with multiple linear regression analysis. The statistical analysis indicated no relationship between sex, tooth movement amount, and IL-1RN SNP rs419598 with EARR. The IL-6 SNP rs1800796 GC was associated with EARR, and root resorption differed significantly between SNP rs1800796 GC and CC. IL-6 SNP rs1800796 GC is a risk factor for EARR. The amount of root movement, IL-1RN SNP rs419598, and sex as risk factors for EARR need further study. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Effect of Awareness of American Board of Orthodontics Criteria on Treatment Outcomes in a Postgraduate Dental Clinic.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Rahime Burcu Nur; Nalbantgil, Didem; Ozdemir, Fulya

    2016-09-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the posttreatment outcomes in a postgraduate orthodontic clinic following a course on American Board of Orthodontics Cast and Radiograph Evaluation (ABO-CRE); to compare the outcomes of postgraduate students who took the course before and after finishing treatment of their cases; and to assess if the need for orthodontic treatment as determined by the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN) at the beginning of treatment affected students' final scores. A course on ABO-CRE was given to second- (group A), third- (group B), and fourth- (group C) year postgraduate students at Yeditepe University, Istanbul, Turkey, in 2012. Pre- and posttreatment plaster models of 253 cases (group A) were treated by students in 2011-12. An additional 251 (group B, 2012-13) and 341 (group C, 2013-14) cases were evaluated in the first and second years after the course, respectively. The models were graded retrospectively using the ABO-CRE and IOTN. The results showed that the total mean scores on the posttreatment plaster models were significantly higher in the pre-course group than the first- and second-year post-course group (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively). The borderline cases (grade 3) received a lower score on the ABO-CRE than the cases with need (grade 4) (p<0.01) and severe need (grade 5) (p<0.01) for orthodontic treatment. Increasing awareness by giving information about the ABO-CRE significantly improved the posttreatment success of these postgraduate students. After the course, treatment outcomes in the following year were better than two years later, suggesting it may be useful to teach the course annually to refresh students' knowledge.

  8. Agreement between orthodontist and patient perception using Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Tania Arshad; Shaikh, Attiya; Fida, Mubassar

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The primary objective of the study was to assess the agreement between orthodontist and patient perception regarding the Aesthetic Component of the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN-AC) at pre-orthodontic treatment levels. The secondary objective was to determine how well the subjective assessment of malocclusion (IOTN-AC) correlated with the normative Dental Health Component of the IOTN (IOTN-DC). Materials and methods A cross-sectional analytical study was conducted on patients between the ages of 16 and 25, presenting for initiation of orthodontic treatment with no history of prior orthodontic treatment. The mean age of the total sample population was 19.50 ± 3.15 years. The mean age of the males was 19.05 ± 3.09 years and for females it was 19.75 ± 3.18 years. The sample consisted of 41 males and 80 females. Patients were shown their pretreatment monochrome intraoral frontal photographs to rate according to the IOTN-AC. Simultaneously, the orthodontist reviewed the photographs with each patient. The IOTN-DHC of pretreatment casts was also recorded by the orthodontist. The frequency of specific traits that had led to increased severity of malocclusion was also identified. All readings were recorded manually on a data collection form. The data were assessed using the chi-square test, Spearman’s correlation and Cohen’s kappa test. Intra- and inter-examiner reliability was assessed using Spearman’s correlation. Results A significant positive relationship (p < 0.05) was observed between orthodontist and patient perception (r = 0.516), orthodontist perception and the normative need (r = 0.430), and between the patient perception and the normative need (r = 0.252). A statistically significant level of agreement was observed between orthodontist and patient perception (kappa = 0.339, p ⩽ 0.001, 95% CI, 0.207–0.470) and between orthodontist perception and the normative need (kappa = 0.331, p ⩽ 0.001, 95% CI, 0

  9. Effect of honey in preventing gingivitis and dental caries in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Atwa, AL-Dany A.; AbuShahba, Ramadan Y.; Mostafa, Marwa; Hashem, Mohamed I.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to investigate the following: (1) the effects of chewing honey on plaque formation in orthodontic patients, (2) the effect of chewing honey on dental plaque bacterial counts, (3) determine if honey possesses antibacterial effects on bacteria recovered from plaques. Methods Female orthodontic patients (n = 20, 12–18 years of age) participated in this randomized controlled study. The effects of honey were compared to treatment with either 10% sucrose or 10% sorbitol that served as positive and negative controls, respectively. The pH of plaque was measured using a digital pH meter prior to baseline and at 2, 5, 10, 20, and 30 min after chewing honey or rinsing with control solutions and the numbers of Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacilli, and Prophymonas gingivalis in respective plaques were determined. The antibacterial activity of honey was tested against commonly used antibiotics using the disk diffusion method. Results Significant differences in pH were observed in the honey and sucrose groups compared to the pH observed in the sorbitol group (p ⩽ 0.001). The maximum pH drop occurred at 5 min in both the honey and sucrose groups; however the pH in the honey group rapidly recovered 10–20 min after exposure and did not drop below the critical decalcification pH of 5.5. On the other hand, the pH following sucrose exposure fell <5.5 and was associated with a 30 min recovery time. The pH observed for the sorbitol group did not change over time. Bacterial counts were significantly reduced in the honey group compared to the other treatment groups (p ⩽ 0.001) and honey significantly inhibited the growth of all studied strains compared to inhibition observed with antibiotics (p ⩽ 0.001). Conclusions Honey can be used as an alternative to traditional remedies for the prevention of dental caries and gingivitis following orthodontic treatment. PMID:25057231

  10. [Soft tissue changes of patients with skeletal class II malocclusion after orthodontic and surgical treatments].

    PubMed

    Chen, Kaiyun; Zheng, Yi; Wang, Xin

    2002-02-01

    One of the prime concerns of both the orthodontist and the oral surgeon must be the final soft tissue profile and the esthetic appearance of the patient. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the amount, direction, and predictability of the soft tissue changes associated with simultaneous skeletal changes. The authors analyzed the recent 22 cases with skeletal class II maloclusion in Orthodontic Department, College of Stomatology, West China University of Medical Sciences with 7 male and 15 female from 20 to 30 years old. Each patient was taken standardized lateral cephalograms before the treatment and 6-12 months after the treatment. A total of 16 hard and soft tissue landmarks were evaluated in both horizontal and vertical directions. In the horizontal directions, the soft tissue maxillary landmarks (superior labial sulcus, labrale superius, and upper lip stomion) moved posterior with a range of 2.17 to 2.33 mm. The strongest correlations were found between the posterior movement of the upper incisal edge and the three soft tissue parameters: superior labial sulcus r = 0.78, labrale superius r = 0.81, upper lip stomion r = 0.75. The soft/hard tissue ratios of the mandible anterior movement is 0.83:1 between inferior labial sulcus and B point, and 0.95:1 for Pog' to Pog. In the vertical directions, all the soft tissue mandible landmarks (Pog', inferior labial sulcus, labrale inferius, lower lip stomion) moved upward more than 2 mm. And the soft/hard tissue ratio is from 1.07:1 to 1.34:1. The combined orthodontic and surgical treatment is an efficient way to cure skeletal class II malocclusion. All the patients regained satisfactory face appearance and profile. Although the soft tissue movement is less than the hard tissue in both jaws in the horizontal direction, the vertical movement of the mandibular soft tissue is greater than that of the underlying hard tissue.

  11. Radiographic evaluation of orthodontic treatment by means of four different cephalometric superimposition methods.

    PubMed

    Lenza, Marcos Augusto; Carvalho, Adilson Alves de; Lenza, Eduardo Beaton; Lenza, Mauricio Guilherme; Torres, Hianne Miranda de; Souza, João Batista de

    2015-01-01

    Despite discussion on the merit of various cephalometric superimposition methods, there remains a need to assess which one can be used in daily practice with reasonably accuracy and less working time. The aim of this study was to investigate four methods of cephalometric superimposition by means of assessing the longitudinal changes in craniofacial morphology caused by growth and response of adolescents with Class I malocclusion to orthodontic treatment involving first premolar extraction. Pretreatment (T1) and post-treatment (T2) standardized lateral cephalometric radiographs of 31 adolescents (20 females and 11 males), with Angle Class I malocclusion and indication of premolar extraction, participated in this study. Radiographs were digitized, traced and had structures identified by means of a cephalometric software. Four superimposition methods were used: Björk structural method, Steiner/Tweed SN line, Ricketts N-Ba line at N-point and Ricketts N-Ba line at CC-point. Positional changes were quantified by horizontal and vertical linear changes in the following cephalometric landmarks: anterior/posterior nasal spine (ANS and PNS), gnathion (Gn), Gonion (Go), Pogonion (Pog), A-point and B-point. Differences between T1 and T2 in horizontal and vertical positional changes for all superimposition methods were assessed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Bonferroni correction (p < 0.05). There were no statistically significant differences among the cephalometric superimposition methods or when patients' sex was considered. Björk structural method, Steiner/Tweed SN line, Ricketts N-Ba line at N-point and Ricketts N-Ba line at CC-point methods were reliable and presented similar precision when the overall facial changes due to active growth and/or orthodontic treatment were examined.

  12. Radiographic evaluation of orthodontic treatment by means of four different cephalometric superimposition methods

    PubMed Central

    Lenza, Marcos Augusto; de Carvalho, Adilson Alves; Lenza, Eduardo Beaton; Lenza, Mauricio Guilherme; de Torres, Hianne Miranda; de Souza, João Batista

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Despite discussion on the merit of various cephalometric superimposition methods, there remains a need to assess which one can be used in daily practice with reasonably accuracy and less working time. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate four methods of cephalometric superimposition by means of assessing the longitudinal changes in craniofacial morphology caused by growth and response of adolescents with Class I malocclusion to orthodontic treatment involving first premolar extraction. METHODS: Pretreatment (T1) and post-treatment (T2) standardized lateral cephalometric radiographs of 31 adolescents (20 females and 11 males), with Angle Class I malocclusion and indication of premolar extraction, participated in this study. Radiographs were digitized, traced and had structures identified by means of a cephalometric software. Four superimposition methods were used: Björk structural method, Steiner/Tweed SN line, Ricketts N-Ba line at N-point and Ricketts N-Ba line at CC-point. Positional changes were quantified by horizontal and vertical linear changes in the following cephalometric landmarks: anterior/posterior nasal spine (ANS and PNS), gnathion (Gn), Gonion (Go), Pogonion (Pog), A-point and B-point. Differences between T1 and T2 in horizontal and vertical positional changes for all superimposition methods were assessed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Bonferroni correction (p < 0.05). RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences among the cephalometric superimposition methods or when patients' sex was considered. CONCLUSION: Björk structural method, Steiner/Tweed SN line, Ricketts N-Ba line at N-point and Ricketts N-Ba line at CC-point methods were reliable and presented similar precision when the overall facial changes due to active growth and/or orthodontic treatment were examined. PMID:26154453

  13. Orthodontically guided bone transport in the treatment of alveolar cleft: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Elena; Otero, Marta; Berraquero, Rosario; Wucherpfennig, Begona; Hernández-Godoy, Juan; Guiñales, Jorge; Vincent, Germán; Burgueño, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Conventional treatments are sometimes not possible in certain alveolar cleft cases due to the severity of the gap which separates the fragments. Various management strategies have been proposed, including sequential surgical interventions or delaying treatment until adulthood to then carry out maxillary osteotomies. A further alternative approach has also been proposed, involving the application of bone transport techniques to mobilise the osseous fragments and thereby reduce the gap between lateral fragments and the premaxilla. Case Report We introduce the case of a 10-year-old patient who presented with a bilateral alveolar cleft and a severe gap. Stable occlusion between the premaxilla and the mandible was achieved following orthodontic treatment, making it inadvisable to perform a retrusive osteotomy of the premaxilla in order to close the alveolar clefts. Faced with this situation, it was decided we would employ a bone transport technique under orthodontic guidance using a dental splint. This would enable an osseous disc to be displaced towards the medial area and reduce the interfragmentary distance. During a second surgical intervention, closure of the soft tissues was performed and the gap was filled in using autogenous bone. Conclusions The use of bone transport techniques in selected cases allows closure of the osseous defect, whilst also preserving soft tissues and reducing the amount of bone autograft required. In our case, we were able to respect the position of the premaxilla and, at the same time, generate new tissues at both an alveolar bone and soft tissue level with results which have remained stable over the course of time. Key words:Alveolar cleft, bone transport, graft. PMID:26855699

  14. Assessment of orthodontic treatment need among tribal children of Indore division, Central India

    PubMed Central

    MURALIDHARAN, SHRIKANTH; GOWDA, SRINIVASA; AMBEKAR, RUTUJA; RATHORE, BHUPENDRA S.; CHABRA, SAKSHI; LALANI, AFSHEEN; HARANI, HARSH

    2018-01-01

    Introduction India is home to many tribes which have an interesting and varied history of origins, customs and social practices. Oral health care in tribal areas is limited due to shortage of dental manpower, financial constraints and the lack of perceived need for dental care among tribal masses. Objective To assess orthodontic treatment need among tribal children of Indore division, Central India. Methods A cross-sectional house to house survey was carried out among 800 tribal children aged 5 to 15 years old in two major tribal districts of Indore division. Permissions and consent were obtained from local administrative authorities, ethical committee and parents respectively. A structured proforma was used to record demographic data. Examination for dentofacial anomalies was conducted according to WHO 1997 survey methods. Descriptive tables and analytical tests like ANOVA, post-hoc and chi-square test were employed. Results The mean age was 9.75(±2.43) years. The mean DAI score among 12 to 15 years old children was 23.19±5.22. Female exhibited higher (24.51±5.34) mean DAI score compared to males (22.12±4.87) (p<0.05). The Patelia tribes (24.38±5.13) reported higher mean DAI score than Bhilala (23.02±5.69) and Bhil tribe (22.73±4.79) (p<0.005). Conclusion The tribal children had minor malocclusion with no or slight treatment need. Categorization of orthodontic treatment need according to malocclusion severity is particularly important for the planning of corresponding public policies. The isolation of the villages, lack of transportation options imposes limitations on the availability of health professionals to provide dental services. PMID:29440959

  15. Assessment of orthodontic treatment need among tribal children of Indore division, Central India.

    PubMed

    Muralidharan, Shrikanth; Chauhan, Astha; Gowda, Srinivasa; Ambekar, Rutuja; Rathore, Bhupendra S; Chabra, Sakshi; Lalani, Afsheen; Harani, Harsh

    2018-01-01

    India is home to many tribes which have an interesting and varied history of origins, customs and social practices. Oral health care in tribal areas is limited due to shortage of dental manpower, financial constraints and the lack of perceived need for dental care among tribal masses. To assess orthodontic treatment need among tribal children of Indore division, Central India. A cross-sectional house to house survey was carried out among 800 tribal children aged 5 to 15 years old in two major tribal districts of Indore division. Permissions and consent were obtained from local administrative authorities, ethical committee and parents respectively. A structured proforma was used to record demographic data. Examination for dentofacial anomalies was conducted according to WHO 1997 survey methods. Descriptive tables and analytical tests like ANOVA, post-hoc and chi-square test were employed. The mean age was 9.75(±2.43) years. The mean DAI score among 12 to 15 years old children was 23.19±5.22. Female exhibited higher (24.51±5.34) mean DAI score compared to males (22.12±4.87) (p<0.05). The Patelia tribes (24.38±5.13) reported higher mean DAI score than Bhilala (23.02±5.69) and Bhil tribe (22.73±4.79) (p<0.005). The tribal children had minor malocclusion with no or slight treatment need. Categorization of orthodontic treatment need according to malocclusion severity is particularly important for the planning of corresponding public policies. The isolation of the villages, lack of transportation options imposes limitations on the availability of health professionals to provide dental services.

  16. The time-factor in orthodontics: what influences the duration of treatments in National Health Service practices?

    PubMed

    Turbill, E A; Richmond, S; Wright, J L

    2001-02-01

    This study aimed to elucidate factors associated with duration of orthodontic treatment. Retrospective analysis of a systematic 2% sample of cases completed in National Health Service practices in England and Wales. Records were collected during 1991. Characteristics of practitioners, patients, malocclusions, treatment variables and outcomes were evaluated. Data were submitted to multivariate analysis, with Log10 Time in Treatment as the dependent variable. Data were available for 1506 cases. The (geometric) mean time in treatment was 13 months. A model was found that explained 41% of the variance. Factors found to increase duration were fixed appliances, multiple stages in the treatments, premolar extractions, and correction of antero-posterior buccal occlusion. Age, buccal segment malocclusion, DHC (Dental Health Component of the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need) grade 5 and orthodontically qualified practitioners were also associated with slightly longer treatments. Whilst briefer treatments may be attractive to purchasers, providers and recipients, it should be remembered that thorough treatment, and treatment of more complex malocclusions, tends to take longer. Economic pressures on practitioners to produce high turnovers of cases may be counterproductive in the quest for better outcomes.

  17. Initial arch wires for tooth alignment during orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances.

    PubMed

    Jian, Fan; Lai, Wenli; Furness, Susan; McIntyre, Grant T; Millett, Declan T; Hickman, Joy; Wang, Yan

    2013-04-30

    Initial arch wires are the first arch wires to be inserted into the fixed appliance at the beginning of orthodontic treatment and are used mainly for the alignment of teeth by correcting crowding and rotations. With a number of different types of orthodontic arch wires available for initial tooth alignment, it is important to understand which wire is most efficient, as well as which wires cause the least amount of root resorption and pain during the initial aligning stage of treatment. This is an update of the review 'Initial arch wires for alignment of crooked teeth with fixed orthodontic braces' first published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2010, Issue 4. To assess the effects of initial arch wires for alignment of teeth with fixed orthodontic braces in relation to alignment speed, root resorption and pain intensity. We searched the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (to 2 August 2012), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 7), MEDLINE via OVID (1950 to 2 August 2012) and EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 2 August 2012). We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles. There was no restriction with regard to publication status or language of publication. We contacted all authors of included studies to identify additional studies. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of initial arch wires to align teeth with fixed orthodontic braces. Only studies involving participants with upper and/or lower full arch fixed orthodontic appliances were included. Two review authors were responsible for study selection, validity assessment and data extraction. All disagreements were resolved by discussion amongst the review team. Corresponding authors of included studies were contacted to obtain missing information. Nine RCTs with 571 participants were included in this review. All trials were at high risk of bias and a number of methodological limitations were identified. All trials had at least one

  18. Development of lingual brachet technique. (Esthetic and hygienic approach to orthodontic treatment) (Part 1) Background and design.

    PubMed

    Fujita, K

    1978-04-01

    The present study relates to a development of the new technique and the new appliances, for the treatment of malocclusion and minor tooth movement. The primary purpose of the present study consists in to reduce mental burden of the patients receiving orthodontic treatment and to improve effect of the treatment further by making the appliance invisible when mouth is opened. The second purpose of the study is in orthodontic treatment carried out from lingual side, to control all teeth movement in oral cavity in three dimensions so that the normal occlusion may be operated. The third purpose of the present study is to make the exchange of wire readily when the wire with bigger elasticity is exchanged by turns during the process of the treatment. The background and the design of appliances for the lingual-bracker technique(lingual-bracket mushroom arch wire technique) is found out in this report.

  19. Changes in the Oral Environment after Placement of Fixed Orthodontic Appliance for the Treatment of Malocclusion - a Descriptive Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Vanishree, T; Panchmal, Ganesh Shenoy; Shenoy, Rekha; Jodalli, Praveen; Sonde, Laxminarayan; Kundapur, Nagaraj

    The aim of this study was to determine the changes of salivary flow rate, pH, buffering capacity, total antioxidant capacity and changes in streptococci and lactobacilli counts at baseline, 1 month and 6 months of fixed orthodontic treatment. An unstimulated salivary sample was collected from 30 out of 43 patients who were in need of fixed orthodontic treatment (mean age 17.8 ± 5.01 years). Salivary samples were collected from the patients before the placement of fixed orthodontic appliance (Gemini MBT 0223M) at 1 month and 6 months following start of the treatment. Samples were tested for significant changes in flow rate, pH, buffering capacity, total antioxidant capacity and streptococci and lactobacilli counts. Results were compared using ANOVA. The study results showed that orthodontic appliances significantly changed the unstimulated salivary flow rate (p < 0.05) (baseline: 0.40 ± 0.11, 1 month: 0.45 ± 0.09, 6 months: 0.44 ± 0.07) and buffering capacity (p < 0.05) (baseline: 5.01 ± 0.50,1 month: 3 .98 ± 0.78, 6 months: 4.02 ± 0.78) at the end of 1 month and 6 months whereas lactobacilli count showed significant changes at the end of 6 months (p < 0.05) (baseline: 6.20 ± 2.07, 1 month: 7.09 ± 3.78, 6 months: 7.85 ± 1.88). The pH, total antioxidant capacity and streptococci counts did not show any significant changes during the study period. It appears that 6 months of treatment with fixed orthodontic appliance resulted in a significant increase in unstimulated salivary flow rate and lactobacilli counts, whereas buffering capacity decreased significantly during the study period.

  20. Orthodontic movement of a dilacerated maxillary incisor in mixed dentition treatment.

    PubMed

    Farronato, Giampietro; Maspero, Cinzia; Farronato, Davide

    2009-08-01

    Dilaceration is a dental deformity characterized by an angulation between crown and root causing non-eruption of the tooth. It generally occurs following trauma to the deciduous dentition the apices of which lie close to the permanent tooth buds. Surgical extraction used to be the first choice in treating the severely dilacerated teeth. In this case report, it is described how a dilacerated central incisor was successfully moved into alignment in a young patient with proper surgical and orthodontic management avoiding use of prosthetic/implant devices. The panoramic radiograph after the traumatic injury is compared with the one at the end of treatment. The results were sustainable over long-term in both periodontal and aesthetic terms.

  1. Orthodontic treatment need for adolescents in the Campania region: the malocclusion impact on self-concept

    PubMed Central

    Perillo, Letizia; Esposito, Maria; Caprioglio, Alberto; Attanasio, Stefania; Santini, Annamaria Chiara; Carotenuto, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Background Dental malocclusions can be considered not only as an oral health problem, because they are linked to quality of life perception. Many factors related to malocclusion have strong influences on the perception of facial esthetics (eg, anterior tooth alignment, tooth shape and position, lip thickness, symmetric gingival or tooth contour, lip profile, and overjet). Many reports have shown that the perception of facial esthetics can influence psychological development from early childhood to adulthood. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of dental malocclusion on self-esteem in a sample of adolescents. Materials and methods The study population was composed of 516 orthodontically untreated subjects (256 males) mean ages 13.75±1.977 years recruited from schools in the Campania region of Italy between January 2011 and July 2011. To evaluate the self-esteem grade in our population, all subjects filled out the Multidimensional Self Concept Scale questionnaire and attended an orthodontic clinical evaluation to estimate dental occlusal aspects. Results Pearson’s analysis shows the relationship in our sample between some occlusal characteristics (crossbite and dental crowding) and aspects of self-concept evaluation (social, competence, academic, physical, and global score) of the Multidimensional Self Concept Scale questionnaire. Moreover, logistic regression analysis shows the potential role of dental crowding (odds ratio 5.359; 95% confidence interval 3.492–8.225) and crossbite (odds ratio 6.153; 95% confidence interval 3.545–10.678) as risk factors for development of global self-concept score abnormalities. Conclusion Our findings confirm the relationship between psychosocial well-being, self-esteem, and dental malocclusion among adolescents. PMID:24672229

  2. Orthodontic treatment need for adolescents in the Campania region: the malocclusion impact on self-concept.

    PubMed

    Perillo, Letizia; Esposito, Maria; Caprioglio, Alberto; Attanasio, Stefania; Santini, Annamaria Chiara; Carotenuto, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Dental malocclusions can be considered not only as an oral health problem, because they are linked to quality of life perception. Many factors related to malocclusion have strong influences on the perception of facial esthetics (eg, anterior tooth alignment, tooth shape and position, lip thickness, symmetric gingival or tooth contour, lip profile, and overjet). Many reports have shown that the perception of facial esthetics can influence psychological development from early childhood to adulthood. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of dental malocclusion on self-esteem in a sample of adolescents. The study population was composed of 516 orthodontically untreated subjects (256 males) mean ages 13.75±1.977 years recruited from schools in the Campania region of Italy between January 2011 and July 2011. To evaluate the self-esteem grade in our population, all subjects filled out the Multidimensional Self Concept Scale questionnaire and attended an orthodontic clinical evaluation to estimate dental occlusal aspects. Pearson's analysis shows the relationship in our sample between some occlusal characteristics (crossbite and dental crowding) and aspects of self-concept evaluation (social, competence, academic, physical, and global score) of the Multidimensional Self Concept Scale questionnaire. Moreover, logistic regression analysis shows the potential role of dental crowding (odds ratio 5.359; 95% confidence interval 3.492-8.225) and crossbite (odds ratio 6.153; 95% confidence interval 3.545-10.678) as risk factors for development of global self-concept score abnormalities. Our findings confirm the relationship between psychosocial well-being, self-esteem, and dental malocclusion among adolescents.

  3. Evaluation of two protocols for low-level laser application in patients submitted to orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Marquezan, Mariana; Bolognese, Ana Maria; Araújo, Mônica Tirre de Souza

    2013-02-15

    Different low-level laser (LLL) irradiation protocols have been tested to accelerate orthodontic tooth movement (OTM). Nevertheless, divergent results have been obtained. It was suggested that the stimulatory action of low level laser irradiation occurs during the proliferation and differentiation stages of bone cellular precursors, but not during later stages. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of two protocols of LLL irradiation on experimental tooth movement: One with daily irradiations and another with irradiations during the early stages. Thirty-six rats were divided into control groups (CG1, CG2, CG3) and irradiated groups (IrG1, IrG2, IrG3) according to the presence of: experimental tooth movement, laser irradiation, type of laser irradiation protocol and date of euthanasia (3th or 8th day of experiment). At the end of experimental periods, a quantitative evaluation of the amount of OTM was made and the reactions of the periodontium were analyzed by describing cellular and tissue reactions and by counting blood vessels. The amount of OTM revealed no significant differences between groups in the same experimental period (p < 0.05). Qualitative analysis revealed the strongest resorption activity in irradiated groups after seven days, especially when using the daily irradiation protocol. There was a higher number of blood vessels in irradiated animals than in animals without orthodontic devices and without laser irradiation (p < 0.05). Moreover, angiogenesis was verified in some of the irradiated groups. The irradiation protocols tested were not able to accelerate OTM and root resorption was observed while they were applied.

  4. Effective and Efficient Herbst Appliance Therapy for Skeletal Class II Malocclusion Patient with a Low Degree of Collaboration with the Orthodontic Treatment.

    PubMed

    Souki, Bernardo Quiroga; Bastos, Barbra Duque Costa; Araujo, Luana Fialho Ferro; Moyses-Braga, Wagner Fernando; Pantuzo, Mariele Garcia; Cheib, Paula Loureiro

    2015-01-01

    The current concept for effective and efficient treatment of skeletal Class II malocclusion prescribes that interceptive approach should be delivered during the pubertal growth stage. However, psychosocial issues and a greater risk of dental trauma are also factors that should be addressed when considering early Class II therapy. This paper reports a case of a patient that sought orthodontic treatment due to aesthetic discomfort with the incisors' protrusion. Two previous treatments failed because patient's collaboration with removable appliances was inadequate. Given his history of no collaboration and because the patient was in the prepubertal stage, it was decided to try a different approach in the third attempt of treatment. Traumatic injury protective devices were used during the prepubertal stage and followed by Herbst appliance and fixed multibrackets therapy during the pubertal stage, resulting in an adequate outcome and long-term stability.

  5. Effective and Efficient Herbst Appliance Therapy for Skeletal Class II Malocclusion Patient with a Low Degree of Collaboration with the Orthodontic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Souki, Bernardo Quiroga; Bastos, Barbra Duque Costa; Araujo, Luana Fialho Ferro; Moyses-Braga, Wagner Fernando; Pantuzo, Mariele Garcia; Cheib, Paula Loureiro

    2015-01-01

    The current concept for effective and efficient treatment of skeletal Class II malocclusion prescribes that interceptive approach should be delivered during the pubertal growth stage. However, psychosocial issues and a greater risk of dental trauma are also factors that should be addressed when considering early Class II therapy. This paper reports a case of a patient that sought orthodontic treatment due to aesthetic discomfort with the incisors' protrusion. Two previous treatments failed because patient's collaboration with removable appliances was inadequate. Given his history of no collaboration and because the patient was in the prepubertal stage, it was decided to try a different approach in the third attempt of treatment. Traumatic injury protective devices were used during the prepubertal stage and followed by Herbst appliance and fixed multibrackets therapy during the pubertal stage, resulting in an adequate outcome and long-term stability. PMID:25861486

  6. Effect of Four Methods of Surface Treatment on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets to Zirconium

    PubMed Central

    Yassaei, Soghra; Aghili, Hossein Agha; Davari, Abdolrahim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Providing reliable attachment between bracket base and zirconia surface is a prerequisite for exertion of orthodontic force. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of four zirconium surface treatment methods on shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: One block of zirconium was trimmed into four zirconium surfaces, which served as our four study groups and each had 18 metal brackets bonded to them. Once the glazed layer was removed, the first group was etched with 9.6% hydrofluoric acid (HF), and the remaining three groups were prepared by means of sandblasting and 1W, and 2W Er: YAG laser, respectively. After application of silane, central incisor brackets were bonded to the zirconium surfaces. The SBS values were measured by a Dartec testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD for multiple comparisons. Results: The highest SBS was achieved in the sandblasted group (7.81±1.02 MPa) followed in a descending order by 2W laser group (6.95±0.87 MPa), 1W laser group (6.87±0.92 MPa) and HF acid etched group (5.84±0.78 MPa). The differences between the study groups were statistically significant except between the laser groups (P<0.05). Conclusion: In terms of higher bond strength and safety, sandblasting and Er: YAG laser irradiation with power output of 1W and 2W can be considered more appropriate alternatives to HF acid etching for zirconium surface treatment prior to bracket bonding. PMID:26622283

  7. Apical root resorption of incisors after orthodontic treatment of impacted maxillary canines: a radiographic study.

    PubMed

    Brusveen, Elin Marie Gravdal; Brudvik, Pongsri; Bøe, Olav Egil; Mavragani, Maria

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate impacted maxillary canines as risk factor for orthodontic apical root resorption. The sample comprised 66 patients treated with fixed appliances. Thirty-two patients with a unilateral impacted maxillary canine, which was distanced from the roots of the incisors at a preliminary phase of treatment before bonding, formed the impaction group, and 34 patients without impactions served as the controls. Root shortening was calculated by using pretreatment and posttreatment intraoral radiographs. Inclination of the eruption path of the impacted canine relative to the midline, axis of the lateral incisor, and nasal line, root development, and the medial and vertical positions of the impacted tooth were recorded on orthopantomograms and lateral cephalometric films. The follicle/tooth ratio was evaluated by using periapical radiographs. No significant difference in apical resorption of the maxillary incisors was detected between the impaction and control groups, or between the incisors of the impacted and contralateral sides in the same subject. Likewise, no difference in the severity of root resorption was found between the incisors of impacted side alone and the incisors of the control group. Mesial and vertical inclinations of the impacted canines were negatively related to a lateral incisor's root resorption. No correlations were found between resorption and medial or vertical position of the crown of the canine. The follicle/tooth ratio was significantly related to the mesial inclination of the impacted canine, but not to root resorption. An impacted maxillary canine, after being distanced from the incisor roots, does not seem to be a risk factor for apical root resorption during orthodontic treatment. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cervical vertebral bone mineral density changes in adolescents during orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Bethany; Kim, Do-Gyoon; Moon, Eun-Sang; Johnson, Elizabeth; Fields, Henry W; Palomo, J Martin; Johnston, William M

    2014-08-01

    The cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) stages have been used to estimate facial growth status. In this study, we examined whether cone-beam computed tomography images can be used to detect changes of CVM-related parameters and bone mineral density distribution in adolescents during orthodontic treatment. Eighty-two cone-beam computed tomography images were obtained from 41 patients before (14.47 ± 1.42 years) and after (16.15 ± 1.38 years) orthodontic treatment. Two cervical vertebral bodies (C2 and C3) were digitally isolated from each image, and their volumes, means, and standard deviations of gray-level histograms were measured. The CVM stages and mandibular lengths were also estimated after converting the cone-beam computed tomography images. Significant changes for the examined variables were detected during the observation period (P ≤0.018) except for C3 vertebral body volume (P = 0.210). The changes of CVM stage had significant positive correlations with those of vertebral body volume (P ≤0.021). The change of the standard deviation of bone mineral density (variability) showed significant correlations with those of vertebral body volume and mandibular length for C2 (P ≤0.029). The means and variability of the gray levels account for bone mineral density and active remodeling, respectively. Our results indicate that bone mineral density distribution and the volume of the cervical vertebral body changed because of active bone remodeling during maturation. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Differences in the gingival crevicular fluid composition between adults and adolescents undergoing orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Rody, Wellington J; Wijegunasinghe, Manjula; Wiltshire, William A; Dufault, Brenden

    2014-01-01

    To investigate differences in the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) composition between adolescent and adult patients undergoing orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances. Ten adolescents (14.4 ± 1.43) and 10 adults (28.5 ± 7.83) with Class I malocclusions and minor upper incisor crowding were allocated to two different age groups. Brackets were bonded only in the upper arch over the 20-week period of the experiment. Samples of GCF were collected from the labial sides of the upper incisors (experimental sites) and lower incisors (control sites) of each subject at five time points. Aliquots from diluted GCF were screened for the presence of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL), osteoprotegerin (OPG), interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA), and metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) using a microarray technique. The values were statistically analyzed. In adults, the ratio of IL-1 to IL-1RA decreased significantly (P  =  .033) in experimental sites 3 weeks after appliance placement and first archwire activation. In adolescents, the ratio of RANKL to OPG peaked 6 weeks after the insertion of the first rectangular archwire. This ratio peak found in adolescents was a consequence of a decrease in the mean concentration of OPG. No significant changes over time were observed in the concentration of MMP-9. This study demonstrates age trends in the GCF levels of IL-1, IL-1RA, RANKL, and OPG that may be used to track differences in tissue response between adults and adolescents undergoing orthodontic treatment.

  10. Treatment of post-orthodontic white spot lesions with casein phosphopeptide-stabilised amorphous calcium phosphate.

    PubMed

    Bröchner, Ann; Christensen, Carsten; Kristensen, Bjarne; Tranæus, Sofia; Karlsson, Lena; Sonnesen, Liselotte; Twetman, Svante

    2011-06-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of topical applications of 10% casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) on white spot lesions (WSL) detected after treatment with fixed orthodontic appliances. Sixty healthy adolescents with ≥1 clinically visible WSL at debonding were recruited and randomly allocated to a randomised controlled trial with two parallel groups. The intervention group was instructed to topically apply a CPP-ACP -containing agent (Tooth Mousse, GC Europe) once daily and the subjects of the control group brushed their teeth with standard fluoride toothpaste. The intervention period was 4 weeks and the endpoints were quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) on buccal surfaces of the upper incisors, cuspids and first premolars and visual scoring from digital photos. The attrition rate was 15%, mostly due to technical errors, and 327 lesions were included in the final evaluation. A statistically significant (p < 0.05) regression of the WSL was disclosed in both study groups compared to baseline, but there was no difference between the groups. The mean area of the lesions decreased by 58% in the CPP-ACP group and 26% in the fluoride group (p = 0.06). The QLF findings were largely reflected by the clinical scores. No side effects were reported. Topical treatment of white spot lesions after debonding of orthodontic appliances with a casein phosphopeptide-stabilised amorphous calcium phosphate agent resulted in significantly reduced fluorescence and a reduced area of the lesions after 4 weeks as assessed by QLF. The improvement was however not superior to the "natural" regression following daily use of fluoride toothpaste.

  11. Effect of rotary electric toothbrush versus manual toothbrush on decalcification during orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Boyd, R L; Rose, C M

    1994-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether daily use of a rotary electric toothbrush (Rota-dent, Prodentec Corp., Batesville, Ark.) and a 0.05% sodium fluoride (NaF) rinse would significantly reduce decalcification when compared with manual toothbrushing only (control group) or manual toothbrushing and daily use of a NaF rinse (rinse group). All three groups used a standard fluoride toothpaste. Ninety consecutive adolescent patients who were to receive orthodontic treatment were placed into one of three groups according to age and sex criteria. Decalcification was evaluated single blind by two calibrated examiners on the facial surfaces of all permanent teeth before appliances were placed (baseline) and 3 months after appliances were removed (posttreatment). Data were analyzed by analysis of covariance with the dependent variable derived by subtracting the baseline decalcification scores from the posttreatment scores and using the baseline scores as the covariate. The results showed that although there were no significant differences between the three groups at baseline, the Rota-dent group showed significantly (p < 0.05) less posttreatment decalcification than either the control or rinse groups. In a separate analysis of first molars, the Rota-dent group again showed the least decalcification and the control group showed the most. These data suggest that twice daily use of the Rota-dent electric toothbrush with a standard fluoride toothpaste and once daily use of a 0.05% NaF rinse is more effective for preventing decalcification in adolescents during orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances than either conventional toothbrushing with a fluoride toothpaste, or similar toothbrushing and toothpaste with a once daily NaF rinse.

  12. The Dental Aesthetic Index and Dental Health Component of the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need as Tools in Epidemiological Studies

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Chrystiane F.; Drummond, Alexandre F.; Lages, Elisabeth M.B.; Pretti, Henrique; Ferreira, Efigênia F.; Abreu, Mauro Henrique N.G.

    2011-01-01

    The present study assesses the validity and reproducibility of two occlusal indices for epidemiological studies—the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI) and the Dental Health Component of the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (DHC-IOTN) for the identification of orthodontic treatment needs. The total of 131 study models was examined by an examiner (orthodontic specialist) for the determination of the DAI and DHC-IOTN. Thirty days later, further assessment was performed to determine the reproducibility. The duration of each exam was measured in seconds with a stopwatch. The indices were compared by a panel of three experts in orthodontics to evaluate validity. The intra-examiner reliability evaluation resulted in an intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.89 for the DAI (95% CI = 0.64 to 1.0) and 0.87 for the DHC-IOTN (95% CI = 0.56 to 0.96). The time spent on the evaluation of the DHC-IOTN was less than the time spent on that of the DAI (P < 0.001). The accuracy of the indices, as reflected by the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve, was 61% for the DAI (95% CI = 51 to 70; p = 0.037) and 67% for the DHC-IOTN (95% CI = 58 to 77; p = 0.001). Both indices presented good reproducibility and validity. PMID:21909306

  13. Positional changes of maxillary central incisors following orthodontic treatment using single-crown implants as fixed reference markers.

    PubMed

    Brahem, E B; Holm, B; Sonnesen, L; Worsaae, N; Gotfredsen, K

    2017-12-01

    This follow-up study (1) compares tooth displacement of central incisors in patients with and without pre-implant orthodontic treatment and (2) investigates whether sex, age, or orthodontic retention have an effect on tooth displacement after the insertion of single-crown implants. Fifty-seven patients - thirty-seven with (test group) and twenty without pre-implant orthodontic treatment (control group) - were rehabilitated with 89 single-crown implants in the upper maxilla. Clinical and radiographic data, clinical photographs, and dental casts were collected during baseline examinations after prosthetic rehabilitation and at the final follow-up examination at least 5 years later. A total of 114 dental casts were digitalized and aligned using a software program to measure changes in the positions of the central incisors. After a follow-up period of at least five years, 87% of the central incisors measured in the test group were displaced >0.25 mm vertically compared with 70% in the control group. Seventy-eight percent of the test group teeth had moved >0.25 mm horizontally compared with 55% in the control group. These differences were not significant, and there were no significant correlations with patient age or sex. The majority of patients had minor vertical (60%) or horizontal (67%) tooth displacement of the central incisors (0.25-0.75 mm) after a minimum follow-up period of 5 years. This study found no significant differences in tooth displacement comparing patients with and without pre-implant orthodontic treatment. No significant effect of sex, age, orthodontic retention, or implant location was observed on tooth displacement. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Caspase-3 as an important factor in the early cytotoxic effect of nickel on oral mucosa cells in patients treated orthodontically.

    PubMed

    Buczko, Piotr; Szarmach, Izabela; Grycz, Monika; Kasacka, Irena

    2017-01-01

    The effect of fixed orthodontic appliances on biochemical changes in saliva and pathophysiological status of the oral cavity is not clear. Recent data showed that nickel (Ni) released from orthodontic appliances can decrease cellular viability, induce DNA damage and apoptosis in oral mucosa cells. Since the mechanism of these Ni effects is unknown, the aim of our study was to analyze the expression of caspase-3 in epithelial cells of oral mucosa in healthy individuals treated orthodontically. Twenty-eight volunteers participated in the study. Epithelial cells were collected from oral mucosa directly before appliance insertion, one week after the insertion, and 24 four weeks after the insertion of fixed appliances. Cellular identification and measurements were conducted by light microscopy. Caspase-3 expression was evaluated immunochemically. Nickel concentration in saliva was also determined. A significantly higher number of oral epithelial cells with caspase-3 immunoreactivity in was found one week, but not 24 weeks, after orthodontic treatment. The enhanced expression of caspase-3 was accompanied by increased nickel concentration in saliva. Our data suggests that nickel released from orthodontic appliances can activate caspase-3 and this mechanism may be partially responsible for the cytotoxic action of nickel in the oral cavity of orthodontically-treated individuals.

  15. Assessment of orthodontic treatment need in 5,112 Malaysian children using the IOTN and DAI indices.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, M S; Rock, W P

    2001-12-01

    To assess the prevalence and severity of malocclusion in a large sample of 12-13-year-old children and to compare assessments of treatment need according to three methods. A random sample of 5,112 Malaysian children was drawn according to a multi-stage technique which accounted for the ethnic composition of the population. Subjects were examined using both components of the Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN) and the Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI). The proportion of children in need of orthodontic treatment was 47.9% according to grades 4 and 5 of the dental health component (DHC) of IOTN and 22.8% according to grades 8-10 of the aesthetic component (AC). Using 32 points as the cut-off point for treatment acceptance, the DAI index indicated that 24.1% needed treatment. The IOTN index was found to be efficient and fair in identifying children who required orthodontic treatment. The best results appeared to be produced by using DHC grades 4 and 5 in association with AC photographs 6-10. This combination indicated 30% of children as being in need of treatment.

  16. Oral health-related quality of life of children seeking orthodontic treatment based on child oral health impact profile: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Thiruvenkadam, G.; Asokan, Sharath; John, J. Baby; Geetha Priya, P. R.; Prathiba, J.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to assess oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) using short form (SF) of child oral health impact profile (COHIP) in children aged 11–15 years who sought orthodontic treatment. A comparison was done between these children and age-matched peers who never had or sought orthodontic treatment. Methodology: This cross-sectional study included 227 children aged 11–15 years. A total of 110 participants had sought orthodontic treatment at KSR Institute of Dental Science and Research (orthodontic group) and 117 participants from a nearby school who had never undergone or sought orthodontic treatment (comparison group). OHRQoL was assessed with the SF of the COHIP, and malocclusion severity was assessed with the index of orthodontic treatment needs. Data presentation and statistical analysis were performed with the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences Software (Version 19, SPSS, Chicago, IL, USA). The Chi-square test and Fischer exact tests were used to analyze the qualitative data. Results: Children with little to borderline treatment needs have a better quality of life when compared to children with definitive treatment needs (P = 0.049). No statistically significant difference in COHIP-SF scores was found between boys and girls (P > 1.000). In the orthodontic group, children with little to borderline treatment needs were 4.8 times (P = 0.037) more likely to report better OHRQoL when compared to children with definitive treatment needs. Conclusion: Children who sought orthodontic treatment had lower quality of life scores than those who never had or never sought treatment. PMID:26321842

  17. Oral health-related quality of life of children seeking orthodontic treatment based on child oral health impact profile: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Thiruvenkadam, G; Asokan, Sharath; John, J Baby; Geetha Priya, P R; Prathiba, J

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) using short form (SF) of child oral health impact profile (COHIP) in children aged 11-15 years who sought orthodontic treatment. A comparison was done between these children and age-matched peers who never had or sought orthodontic treatment. This cross-sectional study included 227 children aged 11-15 years. A total of 110 participants had sought orthodontic treatment at KSR Institute of Dental Science and Research (orthodontic group) and 117 participants from a nearby school who had never undergone or sought orthodontic treatment (comparison group). OHRQoL was assessed with the SF of the COHIP, and malocclusion severity was assessed with the index of orthodontic treatment needs. Data presentation and statistical analysis were performed with the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences Software (Version 19, SPSS, Chicago, IL, USA). The Chi-square test and Fischer exact tests were used to analyze the qualitative data. Children with little to borderline treatment needs have a better quality of life when compared to children with definitive treatment needs (P = 0.049). No statistically significant difference in COHIP-SF scores was found between boys and girls (P > 1.000). In the orthodontic group, children with little to borderline treatment needs were 4.8 times (P = 0.037) more likely to report better OHRQoL when compared to children with definitive treatment needs. Children who sought orthodontic treatment had lower quality of life scores than those who never had or never sought treatment.

  18. Orthodontic, genetic, and periodontal considerations in the treatment of impacted maxillary central incisors: A study of twins.

    PubMed

    Brand, A; Akhavan, M; Tong, H; Kook, Y A; Zernik, J H

    2000-01-01

    Treatment of twins each with one impacted maxillary central incisor and a mesiodens is described. Treatment included rapid expansion, extraction of the mesiodens, surgical exposure of the impacted central incisor, and its forced eruption. The impacted incisor was brought into functional position in one patient but was lost in the other because of insufficient root length and high mobility. Orthodontic, genetic, and periodontal considerations of these 2 cases are evaluated.

  19. A Comparison of pical Root Resorption in Incisors after Fixed Orthodontic Treatment with Standard Edgewise and Straight Wire (MBT) Method.

    PubMed

    Zahed Zahedani, Sm; Oshagh, M; Momeni Danaei, Sh; Roeinpeikar, Smm

    2013-09-01

    One of the major outcomes of orthodontic treatment is the apical root resorption of teeth moved during the treatment. Identifying the possible risk factors, are necessary for every orthodontist. The aim of this study was to compare the rate of apical root resorption after fixed orthodontic treatment with standard edgewise and straight wire (MBT) method, and also to evaluate other factors effecting the rate of root resorption in orthodontic treatments. In this study, parallel periapical radiographs of 127 patients imaging a total of 737 individual teeth, were collected. A total of 76 patients were treated by standard edgewise and 51 patients by straight wire method. The periapical radiographs were scanned and then the percentage of root resorption was calculated by Photoshop software. The data were analyzed by Paired-Samples t-test and the Generalized Linear Model adopting the SPSS 15.0. In patients treated with straight wire method (MBT), mean root resorption was 18.26% compared to 14.82% in patients treated with standard edgewise technique (p< .05). Male patients had higher rate of root resorption,statistically significant (p< .05). Age at onset of treatment, duration of treatment, type of dental occlusion, premolar extractions and the use of intermaxillary elastics had no significant effect on the root resorption in this study. Having more root resorption in the straight wire method and less in the standard edgewise technique can be attributed to more root movement in pre-adjusted MBT technique due to the brackets employed in this method.

  20. Prevalence of orthodontic treatment need in permanent dentition of Iranian population: A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Eslamipour, Faezeh; Afshari, Zohreh; Najimi, Arash

    2018-01-01

    Malocclusion is a common oral health problem and can affect the psychosocial well-being in the long term. Therefore, in the recent decades, demand for orthodontic treatment to correct malocclusion has greatly increased worldwide. This systematic review and meta-analysis was undertaken to assess existing evidence on the prevalence of orthodontic treatment need in Iran. National and international databases were searched for articles on the prevalence of orthodontic treatment need using index of orthodontic treatment need (IOTN) and dental aesthetic index (DAI). The required data were completed by hand-searching. After applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria, the quality of articles was checked by a professional checklist. Data extraction and meta-analysis were performed. A random effects model was employed, and publication bias was checked. From a total of 443 articles that reported orthodontic treatment need in Iran, 24 articles were included in the meta-analysis process. Meta-analysis was performed on components of IOTN and DAI. The pooled prevalence of orthodontic treatment need based on Dental Health Component and Aesthetic Component of IOTN and DAI was 23.8% (19.5%-28.7%), 4.8% (3.3%-7%), and 16.1% (12.3%-20.8%). The results were found to be heterogeneous ( P < 0.05). The results of this study revealed that orthodontic treatment need was not high in the Iranian population. Considering the differing prevalence of orthodontic treatment need based on normative index and self-perceived index, it is essential to improve the people's awareness of malocclusion and its side effects on their oral and general health.

  1. Combined orthodontic-orthopedic treatment of an adolescent Class II Division 2 patient with extreme deepbite using the Forsus Fatigue Resistant Device.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Mehmet

    2017-09-01

    Class II Division 2 malocclusion is often characterized by severe, traumatic deepbite with lingually inclined and overerupted incisors. Combined orthodontic-orthopedic treatment of this malocclusion is a challenging issue for orthodontists. This case report describes the combined orthodontic-orthopedic treatment of an adolescent Class II Division 2 patient with an extreme deepbite and a retrognathic mandible using the Forsus Fatigue Resistant Device. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of neonatal capsaicin treatment on orthodontic tooth movement in male Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Davila, Julian E; Miller, James R; Hodges, James S; Beyer, John P; Larson, Brent E

    2011-04-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of neonatal administration of capsaicin on the magnitude of orthodontic tooth movement in rats. Twelve timed pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized between the capsaicin group and the vehicle group. The pups received treatment with either capsaicin or vehicle on day 2 of life. Capsaicin treatment has been shown to produce a selective destruction of fine myelinated and unmyelinated Aδ and C sensory nerve fibers, causing an inhibition of the effects from neurogenic inflammation. Tooth-movement experiments began at 12 weeks of age. A mesial tipping force was applied to the maxillary first molar by using a 3-mm length of Sentalloy closed-coil spring (Dentsply GAC Intl, Bohemia, NY) activated from a bonded molar cleat to the maxillary incisors; this appliance delivers a constant tipping force of 50 g. Diastema measurements between the first and second molars were made at 2 and 4 weeks after appliance placement. Measurements were made indirectly from stone models by using a charge-coupled device microscope camera and Optimas 5.2 measurement software (Media Cybernetics, Bethesda, Md). Two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to analyze the differences between the groups. The capsaicin-treated rats and the controls did not differ in the amount of tooth movement at the collected time points (P >0.05). Similarly, the magnitude of change of tooth movement from 2 to 4 weeks did not differ between the groups (P >0.05). An increase in average diastema size was observed between 2 and 4 weeks after appliance activation in both treatment groups (P <0.0001). These results suggest that neonatal capsaicin desensitization in the rat does not affect the rate of orthodontic tooth movement after the application of a 50-g tipping force to the maxillary first molar. This might be due in part to the development of compensatory mechanisms in the chronically desensitized rat. Further studies are necessary to determine the

  3. Traction of impacted canines in a skeletal Class III malocclusion: A challenging orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, José Tarcísio Lima; Romano, Fábio Lourenço; Sasso Stuani, Maria Bernadete; Assed Carneiro, Fábio Carvalho; Nakane Matsumoto, Mírian Aiko

    2017-06-01

    This case report describes the successful traction of 2 severely impacted canines. The patient, a 7-year-old girl, had good general health, nasal breathing, crossbite of the lateral incisors and canines, and a Class I molar relationship. The panoramic radiograph showed that the permanent canines were positioned above the roots of the lateral incisors, with the right canine in an accentuated inclination. The cephalometric analysis showed a skeletal Class III malocclusion with a predominance of horizontal growth. The Haas appliance associated with maxillary protraction was used during the first stage of treatment for 14 months. The second stage included the extraction of the deciduous molars, distal movement of the permanent molars to create space, and traction of the canines, and was associated with complete orthodontic treatment. The patient showed good esthetic and functional results at the end of treatment, verified by the stability over a period of 8 years after retention. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of nonextraction and extraction orthodontic treatments on smile esthetics for different malocclusions.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hsin-Chung; Wang, Yi-Chun

    2018-01-01

    Smile esthetics is a critical factor for evaluating orthodontic treatment outcomes. In this study, we evaluated the differences in esthetic perceptions and smile variables between extraction and nonextraction treatments for different malocclusions. Ninety participants were divided into 3 groups according to their pretreatment overjet (group I, 0-4 mm; group II, >4 mm; group III, <0 mm), with 15 extraction participants and 15 nonextraction participants in each group. Posttreatment frontal smiling photographs were evaluated by 30 raters (10 orthodontists, 10 general dentists, 10 laypeople), and 9 smile variables were measured. Smile perception for the group II extraction subjects was higher than for the nonextraction subjects by the orthodontists and general dentists. Regardless of the type of treatment, group III subjects were rated lower than those in groups I and II. The arch form index, maxillary incisor show, and smile arc were greater in the extraction participants. In multiple regression analysis, nonextraction and group III correlated negatively with the esthetic score. Maxillary incisor show, tooth number display, and buccal corridor ratio correlated positively with the esthetic score. Group II extraction subjects were rated higher than the nonextraction subjects by dental professionals. A smile with greater maxillary incisor show, number of displayed teeth, and buccal corridor ratio was considered more esthetic. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of the changes in facial profile after orthodontic treatment, with and without extractions.

    PubMed

    Bravo, L A; Canut, J A; Pascual, A; Bravo, B

    1997-02-01

    A study was made of 31 patients with Angle Class II malocclusion. Fifteen patients did not undergo extraction of teeth (Group A), while 16 underwent extractions of four premolars (Group B). Data was obtained from the corresponding lateral radiographs of the head taken both before and after orthodontic treatment. The main aim of the study was to compare the response of the soft and hard tissues of the facial profile in Class II malocclusion treated with the extraction of four premolars and the response of borderline cases presenting with similar malocclusions, but not subjected to extraction. In this latter group reasonable doubt existed as to whether or not to remove teeth in order to solve the occlusal and aesthetic problems. It is concluded that significant hard tissue differences between the groups at the end of treatment were limited to a more retruded position of the incisors and a reduced overbite amongst those patients subjected to extraction. The main soft tissue differences between the groups at the end of treatment were a more retruded lower lip and a more pronounced lower labial sulcus in those patients subjected to extraction.

  6. A randomized controlled trial evaluating antioxidant-essential oil gel as a treatment for gingivitis in orthodontic patients.

    PubMed

    Martin, Benjamin J; Campbell, Phillip M; Rees, Terry D; Buschang, Peter H

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the treatment effect of an antioxidant-essential oil gel on orthodontic patients with generalized gingivitis. The gel contains the essential oils menthol and thymol and the antioxidants ferulic acid and phloretin. Thirty patients from the university's orthodontic clinic were screened for gingivitis and randomly allocated into treatment and placebo-control groups. Each patient was evaluated at three orthodontic treatment visits (T1, T2, and T3). A periodontal examination, including probing depth (PD), bleeding on probing (BOP), gingival index (GI), and plaque index (PI) was performed at each visit. Between T1 and T2, patients were instructed to apply a topical gel (active or placebo) to their gingiva twice daily after brushing. From T2 to T3, patients were instructed to discontinue use of the gel. The treatment group showed statistically significant (P < .05) reductions of BOP (-13.6 percentage points) and GI (-0.14) between T1 and T2, and significant increases in BOP (13.3 percentage points) and GI (0.14) between T2 and T3. Except for an increase in the GI between T2 and T3, the control group showed no significant changes in BOP or GI over time. The only other significant changes that occurred pertained to the treatment group, which showed significant increases in PD (0.08 mm) and PI (0.18) between T2 and T3. Application of a topical antioxidant-essential oil gel is an effective means of reducing inflammation in orthodontic patients with gingivitis.

  7. Orthodontic and surgical approach to the treatment of bilaterally impacted maxillary canines: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ertan Erdinc, Aslihan M

    2008-01-01

    Impaction of maxillary canines is a common orthodontic anomaly that causes facial and dentoalveolar system problems, both functional and esthetic. A combination of surgery and orthodontics is important in bringing impacted canines to their ideal position in the dental arch. In this case report of a 14-year-old patient with impacted right and left maxillary canines, the crowns of these teeth were surgically exposed, brackets were bonded, and light orthodontic forces were delivered for 2 years to align the teeth in the dental arch.

  8. Facial and occlusal esthetic improvements of an adult skeletal Class III malocclusion using surgical, orthodontic, and implant treatment

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Cardoso, Mauricio; de Avila, Erica Dorigatti; Guedes, Fabio Pinto; Battilani Filho, Valter Antonio Ban; Capelozza Filho, Leopoldino; Correa, Marcio Aurelio; Nary Filho, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this clinical report is to describe the complex treatment of an adult Class III malocclusion patient who was disappointed with the outcome of a previous oral rehabilitation. Interdisciplinary treatment planning was performed with a primary indication for implant removal because of marginal bone loss and gingival recession, followed by orthodontic and surgical procedures to correct the esthetics and skeletal malocclusion. The comprehensive treatment approach included: (1) implant removal in the area of the central incisors; (2) combined orthodontic decompensation with mesial displacement and forced extrusion of the lateral incisors; (3) extraction of the lateral incisors and placement of new implants corresponding to the central incisors, which received provisional crowns; (4) orthognathic surgery for maxillary advancement to improve occlusal and facial relationships; and finally, (5) orthodontic refinement followed by definitive prosthetic rehabilitation of the maxillary central incisors and reshaping of the adjacent teeth. At the three-year follow-up, clinical and radiographic examinations showed successful replacement of the central incisors and improved skeletal and esthetic appearances. Moreover, a Class II molar relationship was obtained with an ideal overbite, overjet, and intercuspation. In conclusion, we report the successful esthetic anterior rehabilitation of a complex case in which interdisciplinary treatment planning improved facial harmony, provided gingival architecture with sufficient width and thickness, and improved smile esthetics, resulting in enhanced patient comfort and satisfaction. This clinical case report might be useful to improve facial esthetics and occlusion in patients with dentoalveolar and skeletal defects. PMID:26877982

  9. Impact of orthodontic treatment on self-esteem and quality of life of adult patients requiring oral rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    de Couto Nascimento, Vanessa; de Castro Ferreira Conti, Ana Cláudia; de Almeida Cardoso, Maurício; Valarelli, Danilo Pinelli; de Almeida-Pedrin, Renata Rodrigues

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate whether orthodontic treatment in adults requiring oral rehabilitation is effective for increasing patients' self-esteem and quality of life (QoL). The sample consisted of 102 adult patients (77 women and 25 men) aged between 18 and 66 years (mean, 35.1 years) requiring oral rehabilitation and orthodontic treatment simultaneously. Rosenberg's Self-Esteem (RSE) Scale and a questionnaire about QoL based on the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) were used to determine self-esteem and QoL scores retrospectively. Questionnaires were carried out in two stages, T1 (start of treatment) and T2 (6 months after). To compare score changes between T1 and T2, the data obtained from the RSE Scale were evaluated with paired t tests, and data from the quality-of-life questionnaire were assessed by applying descriptive statistics. The results showed a statistically significant increase in self-esteem (P < .001) and a great improvement on patients' QoL. Orthodontic treatment causes a significant increase in self-esteem and QoL, providing psychological benefits for adult patients in need of oral rehabilitation.

  10. Two-phase orthodontic treatment in a patient with turner syndrome: an unusual case of deep bite.

    PubMed

    Aristizábal, Juan Fernando; Smit, Rosana Martínez

    2015-05-01

    Turner syndrome is caused by complete or partial absence of one X chromosome. These patients usually have a delay in growth and altered body proportions, causing sexual infantilism, short stature, delayed bone maturation, and variations in craniofacial morphology, among other systemic complications. The skeletal features associated with this syndrome include maxillary growth reduction with midface hypoplasia; mandibular micrognathia; high, narrow palate; V-shaped maxillary arch; and open bite. This case report shows a two-phase orthodontic treatment in a patient with Turner syndrome with a Class II malocclusion and severe deep bite, which is an unusual feature in patients with this disease. A conventional orthodontic treatment was performed, and after 20 months in retention the patient remains stable.

  11. A combined prosthodontic and orthodontic treatment approach in a case of growth inhibition induced by dental implants: a case report.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Elena; Wegener, Joachim; Wagner, Wilfried; Hornikel, Sandra; Wehrbein, Heinrich

    2012-01-01

    Functional and esthetic results can improve significantly when a combined prosthodontic-orthodontic treatment approach is employed in cases requiring extensive oral rehabilitation. The patient presented in this case report was treated in his late teens with dental implants as a replacement for his maxillary incisors. Ten years later, the entire maxillary anterior segment was in infraocclusion compared to the rest of the dentition and lip line. Since prosthodontic follow-up treatment alone could not achieve an optimal functional and esthetic outcome, the patient was treated orthodontically prior to renewing the restoration. A fixed appliance was used to intrude the mandibular anterior teeth as well as vertically align the infrapositioned maxillary lateral incisors.

  12. Osteoclastogenesis in Local Alveolar Bone in Early Decortication-Facilitated Orthodontic Tooth Movement

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang; Jiang, Yu-Xi; Qu, Hong; Li, Cui-Ying; Jiang, Jiu-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Objective In the current study, we aimed to investigate the effects of alveolar decortication on local bone remodeling, and to explore the possible mechanism by which decortication facilitates tooth movement. Materials and Methods Forty rabbits were included in the experiment. The left mandible was subjected to decortication-facilitated orthodontics, and the right mandible underwent traditional orthodontics as a control. The animals were sacrificed on the days 1, 3, 5, 7 and 14, after undergoing orthodontic procedures. Tooth movement was measured by Micro-CT, and the local periodontal tissues were investigated using H&E, Masson's trichrome and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining. The mRNA levels of genes related to bone remodeling in the alveolar bone were analyzed using real-time PCR. Result On days 3, 5, 7 and 14, tooth movement was statistically accelerated by decortication (P < 0.05) and was accompanied by increased hyperemia. Despite the lack of new bone formation in both groups, more osteoclasts were noted in the decorticated group, with two peak counts (P < 0.05). The first peak count was consistent with the maximum values of ctsk and TRAP expression, and the second peak counts accompanied the maximum nfatc1 and jdp2 expression. The increased fra2 expression and the ratio of rankl/opg also accompanied the second peak counts. Conclusions Following alveolar decortication, osteoclastogenesis was initially induced to a greater degree than the new bone formation which was thought to have caused a regional acceleratory phenomenon (RAP). The amount of steoclastogenesis in the decorticated alveolar bone was found to have two peaks, perhaps due to attenuated local resistance. The first peak count in osteoclasts may have been due to previously existing osteoclast precursors, whereas the second may represent the differentiation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells which came from circulation as the result of hyperemia. PMID:27096621

  13. Reinforcement of anchorage during orthodontic brace treatment with implants or other surgical methods.

    PubMed

    Jambi, Safa; Walsh, Tanya; Sandler, Jonathan; Benson, Philip E; Skeggs, Richard M; O'Brien, Kevin D

    2014-08-19

    The term anchorage in orthodontic treatment refers to methods of controlling unwanted tooth movement. This is provided either by anchor sites within the mouth, such as the teeth and the palate, or from outside the mouth (headgear). Recently, new methods of providing anchorage have been developed using orthodontic implants which are surgically inserted into the bone in the mouth. This is termed surgical anchorage. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2007. To assess the effects of surgical anchorage techniques compared to conventional anchorage in the prevention of unwanted tooth movement in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment by evaluating the mesiodistal movement of upper first molar teeth. A secondary objective was to compare the effects of one type of surgical anchorage with another. We searched the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (to 28 October 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 9), MEDLINE via OVID (1946 to 28 October 2013) and EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 28 October 2013). We handsearched key international orthodontic and dental journals, and searched the trial database ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing and unpublished studies. Randomised controlled trials comparing surgical anchorage with conventional anchorage in orthodontic patients. Trials comparing two types of surgical anchorage were also included. At least two review authors independently and in duplicate extracted data and carried out risk of bias assessments. We contacted study authors to clarify aspects of study design and conduct, and to obtain unreported data. Fourteen new studies were added in this update resulting in a total of 15 studies reporting data from 561 randomised patients. The studies were conducted in Europe, India, China, South Korea and the USA. The age range of patients was commonly restricted to

  14. Surgical and orthodontic management of fused maxillary central and lateral incisors in early mixed dentition stage.

    PubMed

    Ramamurthy, Suresh; Satish, Ramaswamy; Priya, Kalidass

    2014-01-01

    Fusion is one of the developmental dental anomalies in which two adjacent teeth are joined at the crown level forming a single tooth with an enlarged crown. Fusion causes some clinical problems such as unaesthetic appearance, pain, caries, and malocclusion. The management of fusion often needs multidisciplinary approach to give best possible esthetic and functional outcome. This paper reports a case of 9-year-old boy with fused maxillary left central and lateral incisors who was treated with 2 × 4 fixed orthodontic appliances after surgical separation of fused teeth.

  15. Difference in the Surgical Outcome of Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate Patients with and without Pre-Alveolar Bone Graft Orthodontic Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chun-Shin; Wallace, Christopher Glenn; Hsiao, Yen-Chang; Chiu, Yu-Ting; Pai, Betty Chien-Jung; Chen, I.-Ju; Liao, Yu-Fang; Liou, Eric Jen-Wein; Chen, Philip Kuo-Ting; Chen, Jyh-Ping; Noordhoff, M. Samuel

    2016-04-01

    Presurgical orthodontic treatment before secondary alveolar bone grafting (SABG) is widely performed for cleft lip/palate patients. However, no randomized controlled trial has been published comparing SABG outcomes in patients with, and without, presurgical orthodontic treatment. This randomized, prospective, single-blinded trial was conducted between January 2012 and April 2015 to compare ABG volumes 6 months postoperatively between patients with and without presurgical orthodontic treatment. Twenty-four patients were enrolled and randomized and 22 patients completed follow-up. Patients who had presurgical orthodontics before SABG had significantly improved inclination (p < 0.001) and rotation (p < 0.001) of the central incisor adjacent to the defect, significantly improved ABG fill volume (0.81 ± 0.26 cm3 at 6 months compared to 0.59 ± 0.22 cm3 p < 0.05) and less residual alveolar bone defect (0.31 ± 0.08 cm3 at 6 months compared to s 0.55 ± 0.14 cm3 p < 0.001) compared to patients who did not have presurgical orthodontic treatment. In conclusion, orthodontic treatment combined with SABG results in superior bone volume when compared with conventional SABG alone.

  16. Effect of surface treatment of prefabricated teeth on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Cumerlato, Marina; Lima, Eduardo Martinelli de; Osorio, Leandro Berni; Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves; Menezes, Luciane Macedo de; Rizzatto, Susana Maria Deon

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the effects of grinding, drilling, sandblasting, and ageing prefabricated teeth (PfT) on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets, as well as the effects of surface treatments on the adhesive remnant index (ARI). One-hundred-ninety-two PfT were divided into four groups (n = 48): Group 1, no surface treatment was done; Group 2, grinding was performed with a cylindrical diamond bur; Group 3, two drillings were done with a spherical diamond bur; Group 4, sandblasting was performed with 50-µm aluminum oxide. Before the experiment, half of the samples stayed immersed in distilled water at 37oC for 90 days. Brackets were bonded with Transbond XT and shear strength tests were carried out using a universal testing machine. SBS were compared by surface treatment and by ageing with two-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey's test. ARI scores were compared between surface treatments with Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Dunn's test. Surface treatments on PfT enhanced SBS of brackets (p< 0.01), result not observed with ageing (p= 0.45). Groups II, III, and IV showed higher SBS and greater ARI than the Group 1 (p< 0.05). SBS was greater in the groups 3 and 4 (drilling, sandblasting) than in the Group 2 (grinding) (p< 0.05). SBS and ARI showed a positive correlation (Spearman's R2= 0.57; p< 0.05). Surface treatment on PfT enhanced SBS of brackets, however ageing did not show any relevance. Sandblasting and drilling showed greater SBS than grinding. There was a positive correlation between SBS and ARI.

  17. Effect of surface treatment of prefabricated teeth on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    PubMed Central

    Cumerlato, Marina; de Lima, Eduardo Martinelli; Osorio, Leandro Berni; Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves; de Menezes, Luciane Macedo; Rizzatto, Susana Maria Deon

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the effects of grinding, drilling, sandblasting, and ageing prefabricated teeth (PfT) on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets, as well as the effects of surface treatments on the adhesive remnant index (ARI). Methods: One-hundred-ninety-two PfT were divided into four groups (n = 48): Group 1, no surface treatment was done; Group 2, grinding was performed with a cylindrical diamond bur; Group 3, two drillings were done with a spherical diamond bur; Group 4, sandblasting was performed with 50-µm aluminum oxide. Before the experiment, half of the samples stayed immersed in distilled water at 37oC for 90 days. Brackets were bonded with Transbond XT and shear strength tests were carried out using a universal testing machine. SBS were compared by surface treatment and by ageing with two-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey’s test. ARI scores were compared between surface treatments with Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Dunn’s test. Results: Surface treatments on PfT enhanced SBS of brackets (p< 0.01), result not observed with ageing (p= 0.45). Groups II, III, and IV showed higher SBS and greater ARI than the Group 1 (p< 0.05). SBS was greater in the groups 3 and 4 (drilling, sandblasting) than in the Group 2 (grinding) (p< 0.05). SBS and ARI showed a positive correlation (Spearman’s R2= 0.57; p< 0.05). Conclusion: Surface treatment on PfT enhanced SBS of brackets, however ageing did not show any relevance. Sandblasting and drilling showed greater SBS than grinding. There was a positive correlation between SBS and ARI. PMID:28902249

  18. Lingual orthodontic appliances: invisible braces.

    PubMed

    Muir, J C

    1991-04-01

    Lingual orthodontics is a relatively new method of delivering orthodontic treatment. These appliances may be used on any patient, but they have a special application for that small group of adult patients who need orthodontic treatment but refuse to accept the appearance of conventional appliances. The technique is difficult to manage and should be used only by experienced orthodontists. Although the patients may experience difficulties, these are usually adequately compensated for by the improved aesthetics.

  19. Orthodontic treatment for disabled children: a survey of parents’ attitudes and overall satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many patients with disability require orthodontic treatment (OT) to achieve adequate oral function and aesthetic appearance. The cooperation of disabled patients and of their parents is central to the success of OT, as treatment can involve ethical dilemmas. The aim of this study was to analyze the motivation, expectations and overall satisfaction with OT among parents of patients with disabilities. Methods The parents of 60 disabled Spanish children with physical, mental and/or sensory impairment undergoing OT were surveyed on attitudes to OT and level of satisfaction with the outcomes. The survey consisted of 23 questions in 4 sections: attitude and adaptation, benefits, adverse effects, and level of satisfaction after completion of OT. A control group formed of the parents of 60 healthy children undergoing OT at the same institution were also surveyed. Results Parents of disabled children undergoing OT showed a high level of motivation and they are willing to collaborate in oral hygiene procedures. Adaptation to the removable appliances was poorer in disabled children but adaptation to fixed appliances was excellent. OT can provide a marked improvement in quality of life, social relationships and oral functionality in disabled children. Conclusions Among parents of disabled children undergoing OT, the perceived level of overall satisfaction was very high and expectations were often exceeded. PMID:25096027

  20. Orthodontic treatment for disabled children: a survey of parents' attitudes and overall satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Abeleira, María Teresa; Pazos, Elisabeth; Ramos, Isabel; Outumuro, Mercedes; Limeres, Jacobo; Seoane-Romero, Juan; Diniz, Marcio; Diz, Pedro

    2014-08-05

    Many patients with disability require orthodontic treatment (OT) to achieve adequate oral function and aesthetic appearance. The cooperation of disabled patients and of their parents is central to the success of OT, as treatment can involve ethical dilemmas. The aim of this study was to analyze the motivation, expectations and overall satisfaction with OT among parents of patients with disabilities. The parents of 60 disabled Spanish children with physical, mental and/or sensory impairment undergoing OT were surveyed on attitudes to OT and level of satisfaction with the outcomes. The survey consisted of 23 questions in 4 sections: attitude and adaptation, benefits, adverse effects, and level of satisfaction after completion of OT. A control group formed of the parents of 60 healthy children undergoing OT at the same institution were also surveyed. Parents of disabled children undergoing OT showed a high level of motivation and they are willing to collaborate in oral hygiene procedures. Adaptation to the removable appliances was poorer in disabled children but adaptation to fixed appliances was excellent. OT can provide a marked improvement in quality of life, social relationships and oral functionality in disabled children. Among parents of disabled children undergoing OT, the perceived level of overall satisfaction was very high and expectations were often exceeded.

  1. Class II Division 1 malocclusion with severe overbite: cephalometric evaluation of the effects of orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Marques, Leandro Silva; Ramos-Jorge, Maria Leticia; Araujo, Mônica Tirre de Souza; Bolognese, Ana Maria

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of orthodontic treatment among individuals with Class II Division 1 malocclusion and severe overbite. The sample was made up of 70 patients (35 males and 35 females), with an average age of 11.6 years in pretreatment and 14.9 years in posttreatment. One hundred forty lateral cephalograms were obtained and traced by a single investigator. All individuals were treated with the edgewise technique associated with the Kloehn cervical extraoral headgear during the growth spurt, and simultaneously presented ANB > or = 5 degrees and overbite > or = 4 mm. Statistical analysis involved t tests for both independent and paired samples and the Spearman correlation test. There were no significant differences between genders regarding the effects of treatment. The cases treated with extraction presented a greater reduction in the SNA angle. On average, all the variables of the study were significantly different when comparing the pretreatment and posttreatment conditions, except for the measurement of the mandibular plane angle (SNGoMe). Correction of severe overbite occurred in virtue of the intrusion of the maxillary and mandibular incisors associated to a reduction of the maxillary prognathism and differential growth of the mandible, as well as dentoalveolar growth.

  2. Hard- and soft-tissue contributions to the esthetics of the posed smile in growing patients seeking orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Laurie; McNamara, James A; Ackerman, Marc B; Baccetti, Tiziano

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to broaden the understanding of how various skeletal, dental, and soft-tissue relationships are related to the esthetics of the smile in patients with malocclusions before orthodontic treatment. Images of the posed smile were captured from digital video clips of 60 growing patients (33 girls, 27 boys) seeking orthodontic treatment; they were judged by panels of laypersons and orthodontists. Discriminant analysis identified determinants of the "pleasing smile" from the results of a visual analog scale. Quantitative measurements of the soft and hard tissues were made by using the smile images, cephalometric radiographs, and study models. The esthetics of the smile were correlated with specific skeletal, dental, and soft-tissue structures in the anteroposterior, vertical, and transverse dimensions (Pearson test on non-topographic correlations). The esthetic smile judgments of orthodontists agreed with those of laypersons (r >0.93). The vertical thicknesses of the lips were the most significant component of a pleasant smile, for both the orthodontists (upper lip) and laypersons (lower lip) (discriminant power: 75%). The vertical thickness of the upper lip had a significant positive correlation with the position of the maxillary incisor. Vertical lip thickness proved to be the most influential variable in smile esthetics. The significant relationship of incisor protrusion with the vertical thickness of the vermilion border of the upper lip must be considered when planning orthodontic treatment.

  3. [Orthodontics and cosmetic composite for treatment ending: ultra conservative approach of the smile restoring].

    PubMed

    Grossetti, François

    2013-12-01

    Thanks to alignment, bleaching and bonding, cosmetic dentistry is rising. The cases presented in this article are treated through minimal invasive dentistry linked to orthodontics. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2013.

  4. Efficacy of combined orthodontic-periodontic treatment for patients with periodontitis and its effect on inflammatory cytokines: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Ai-Min; Zhang, Zong-Mei; Jia, Jin-Lin; Sui, Xin-Xin; Yu, Lu-Rui; Liu, Hai-Tao

    2017-10-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the efficacy of combined orthodontic-periodontic treatment in the treatment of patients with periodontitis and its effects on the levels of inflammatory cytokines. A total of 117 patients with periodontitis were randomly assigned to the basic group (receiving basic periodontic treatment, n = 58) and the combined group (receiving combined orthodontic-periodontic treatment, n = 59). In addition, 52 healthy people without periodontal disease were selected as the normal group. Probing depth, tooth mobility, plaque index, clinical attachment level, and sulcus bleeding index were recorded. ELISA was applied to detect gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and serum levels of inflammatory cytokines. A 2-year clinical follow-up was conducted. Before treatment, the periodontal parameters (probing depth, tooth mobility, plaque index, clinical attachement level, and sulcus bleeding index) and GCF and serum levels of inflammatory cytokines (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, interleukin-1β, interleukin-5, interleukin-6, interleukin-8, tumor necrosis factor-α, and prostaglandin E2) in the combined and basic groups were higher than those in the normal group. After 6 and 18 months of treatment, the periodontal parameters and GCF and serum levels of inflammatory cytokines decreased in the combined and basic groups. The periodontal parameters and the GCF and serum levels of inflammatory cytokines in the combined group were significantly lower than those in the basic group after 18 months of treatment. The combined group had a lower recurrence rate compared with the basic group. Combined orthodontic-periodontic treatment had good clinical efficacy in the treatment of periodontitis and could effectively decrease the levels of inflammatory cytokines. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Alterations in plaque accumulation and gingival inflammation promoted by treatment with self-ligating and conventional orthodontic brackets

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Mauricio de Almeida; Saraiva, Patrícia Pinto; Maltagliati, Liliana Ávila; Rhoden, Fernando Kleinübing; Costa, Carla Cristina Alvarenga; Normando, David; Capelozza, Leopoldino

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to evaluate, comparatively, the periodontal response during orthodontic treatment performed with self-ligating and conventional brackets. METHODS: Sixteen Caucasian individuals of both sexes, aged between 12 and 16 years old and in permanent dentition were selected. Eight individuals were treated with conventional brackets installed on the lower dental arch and self-ligating brackets on the upper arch. Another eight individuals received self-ligating brackets in the lower arch and conventional brackets in the upper arch. The subjects received material and instructions for oral hygiene. Visible plaque index (VPI), gingival bleeding index (GBI) and clinical attachment level (CAL) were evaluated just after installation of orthodontic appliances, and 30, 60 and 180 days later. Mann-Whitney test was used to compare differences between groups (self-ligating and conventional), two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test was used to assess CAL at each site of each tooth. Significance level was set at 5%. RESULTS: No significant changes were found with regard to the assessed parameters (VPI, GBI and CAL) in either one of the systems. CONCLUSION: No significant changes were found with regard to the periodontal response to orthodontic treatment for the variables assessed and between subjects receiving passive self-ligating and conventional brackets. All individuals had received oral hygiene instructions and had their periodontal conditions monitored. PMID:25992985

  6. An orthodontic oral appliance.

    PubMed

    Marklund, Marie; Legrell, Per Erik

    2010-11-01

    This pilot study was performed to test the hypothesis that an orthodontic oral appliance (OA) that is designed to work against the backwardly directed forces on the upper incisors may counteract the reduction in overjet from these devices. Thirty patients with normal bites, good oral health, and milder sleep apnea were randomized to treatment with either OAs or orthodontic OAs. Bite changes were evaluated on plaster casts and radiographs and by questionnaires after a mean of 2.4 years in 19 frequent users. Four of nine patients in the orthodontic OA group increased their overjet by > or =0.4 mm, while none of the 10 patients in the OA group experienced that effect. Only the orthodontic OA increases the overjet; this design may therefore be beneficial to patients at risk of negative effects on their bite during OA treatment.

  7. Self-concept and the perception of facial appearance in children and adolescents seeking orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Ceib; Beal, Kimberly N Edwards

    2009-01-01

    To examine, in adolescents with mild to moderate malocclusion, the relationship between self-concept and demographic characteristics, a clinical assessment of malocclusion, self-perception of malocclusion, and self-perception of facial attractiveness. Fifty-nine consecutive patients ages 9 to 15 years scheduled for initial records in a graduate orthodontic clinic consented to participate. Each subject independently completed the Multidimensional Self-Concept Scale (MSCS), the Facial Image Scale, and the Index of Treatment Need-Aesthetic Component (IOTN-AC). Peer Assessment Rating (PAR) scores were obtained from the patients' diagnostic dental casts. Forward multiple-regression analysis with a backward overlook was used to analyze the effect of the demographic, clinical, and self-perception measures on each of the six self-concept (MSCS) domains. Self-perception of the dentofacial region was the only statistically significant predictor (P < .05) for the Global, Competence, Affect, Academic, and Physical domains of self-concept, while age, parental marital status, and the adolescent's self-perception of the dentofacial region were statistically significant predictors (P < .05) of Social Self-Concept. The self-perceived level of the attractiveness or "positive" feelings toward the dentofacial region is more strongly related to self-concept than the severity of the malocclusion as indicated by the PAR score or by the adolescent's perception of their malocclusion.

  8. Epidemiological survey on third molar agenesis and facial pattern among adolescents requiring orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gómez de Diego, Rafael; Montero, Javier; López-Valverde, Nansi; Ignacio de Nieves, José; Prados-Frutos, Juan-Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine the association between facial pattern according to Ricketts cephalometric analysis, and prevalence of third molar agenesis, taking subject age and gender as control variables. Material and Methods An epidemiological survey was conducted based on a sample of 224 candidates for orthodontic treatment aged 12 to 24 (n=224). Third molar agenesis was recorded using Ricketts cephalometric analyses of lateral teleradiographs and panoramic radiographs. The risk for agenesis was predicted considering the 5 Vert Index parameters (facial axis, facial depth, mandibular plane angle, lower facial height and mandibular arch), facial type (brachyfacial, mesofacial, dolichofacial) and sociodemographic variables (age and sex), using odds ratio (OR) calculated by logistic regression. Results Third molar agenesis was observed in 25% of the sample. Risk for agenesis is significantly determined by sociodemographic factors (age, OR: 1.2), cephalic patterns (mesofacial vs dolichofacial, OR:4.3; and brachyfacial vs dolichofacial OR: 3.2) and cephalometric patterns (facial axis, OR: 0.8; lower facial height, OR: 0.8; and mandibular plane angle, OR:0.9). Conclusions Facial parameters (facial axis, lower facial height, and mandibular plane angle) proved to be strong predictors of the risk for third molar agenesis, the prevalence of agenesis being significantly lower in dolichofacial individuals. Key words:Facial Pattern, Ricketts Analysis, Third Molar Agenesis. PMID:29075410

  9. Epidemiological survey on third molar agenesis and facial pattern among adolescents requiring orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Gómez de Diego, Rafael; Montero, Javier; López-Valverde, Nansi; Ignacio de Nieves, José; Prados-Frutos, Juan-Carlos; López-Valverde, Antonio

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between facial pattern according to Ricketts cephalometric analysis, and prevalence of third molar agenesis, taking subject age and gender as control variables. An epidemiological survey was conducted based on a sample of 224 candidates for orthodontic treatment aged 12 to 24 (n=224). Third molar agenesis was recorded using Ricketts cephalometric analyses of lateral teleradiographs and panoramic radiographs. The risk for agenesis was predicted considering the 5 Vert Index parameters (facial axis, facial depth, mandibular plane angle, lower facial height and mandibular arch), facial type (brachyfacial, mesofacial, dolichofacial) and sociodemographic variables (age and sex), using odds ratio (OR) calculated by logistic regression. Third molar agenesis was observed in 25% of the sample. Risk for agenesis is significantly determined by sociodemographic factors (age, OR: 1.2), cephalic patterns (mesofacial vs dolichofacial, OR:4.3; and brachyfacial vs dolichofacial OR: 3.2) and cephalometric patterns (facial axis, OR: 0.8; lower facial height, OR: 0.8; and mandibular plane angle, OR:0.9). Facial parameters (facial axis, lower facial height, and mandibular plane angle) proved to be strong predictors of the risk for third molar agenesis, the prevalence of agenesis being significantly lower in dolichofacial individuals. Key words: Facial Pattern, Ricketts Analysis, Third Molar Agenesis.

  10. An Assessment of Oral Hygiene in 7-14-Year-Old Children undergoing Orthodontic Treatment.

    PubMed

    Krupińska-Nanys, Magdalena; Zarzecka, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    The study is focused on increased risk of dental plaque accumulation among the children undergoing orthodontic treatment in consideration of individual hygiene and dietary habits. The study was conducted among 91 children aged 7-14 including 47 girls and 44 boys. The main objectives of the study were: API index, plaque pH, DMF index, proper hygiene and dietary habits. Statistical analysis was provided in Microsoft Office Exel spreadsheet and STATISTICA statistical software. The average API index among the children wearing removable appliance was 9 (SD = 13), and among children without appliances was 16 (SD = 21). DMF index for patients using appliances was 5 (SD = 3) and for those without appliances was 4 (SD = 2). The average plaque pH was 6 for children with appliances (SD = 0.9) and 6.2 without ones (SD = 0.3). In patients in whom there is a higher risk of dental plaque accumulating, correct oral hygiene supported with regular visits to the dentist is one of the best ways to control dental caries. In the fight against caries the most effective and only approach is to promote awareness of the problem, foster proper hygiene and nutritional habits, as well as educate children from a very young age in how to maintain proper oral hygiene.

  11. Self-Concept and the Perception of Facial Appearance in Children and Adolescents Seeking Orthodontic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Ceib; Beal, Kimberly N. Edwards

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine, in adolescents with mild to moderate malocclusion, the relationship between self-concept and demographic characteristics, a clinical assessment of malocclusion, self-perception of malocclusion, and self-perception of facial attractiveness. Methods and Materials Fifty-nine consecutive patients ages 9 to 15 years scheduled for initial records in a graduate orthodontic clinic consented to participate. Each subject independently completed the Multidimensional Self-Concept Scale (MSCS), the Facial Image Scale, and the Index of Treatment Need–Aesthetic Component (IOTN-AC). Peer Assessment Rating (PAR) scores were obtained from the patients’ diagnostic dental casts. Forward multiple-regression analysis with a backward overlook was used to analyze the effect of the demographic, clinical, and self-perception measures on each of the six self-concept (MSCS) domains. Results Self-perception of the dentofacial region was the only statistically significant predictor (P < .05) for the Global, Competence, Affect, Academic, and Physical domains of self-concept, while age, parental marital status, and the adolescent's self-perception of the dentofacial region were statistically significant predictors (P < .05) of Social Self-Concept. Conclusion The self-perceived level of the attractiveness or “positive” feelings toward the dentofacial region is more strongly related to self-concept than the severity of the malocclusion as indicated by the PAR score or by the adolescent's perception of their malocclusion. PMID:19123700

  12. Analysis of anterior dentoalveolar and perioral aesthetic characteristics and their impact on the decision to undergo a Phase II orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Flores-Mir, Carlos; Witt, Matthew M; Heo, Giseon; Major, Paul W

    2014-12-01

    Researchers have conducted extensive studies regarding dentoalveolar factors that affect anterior dental aesthetics; however, there is no consensus regarding how these factors affect orthodontic treatment decisions. Only a few studies have included multiple factors simultaneously. Therefore, the objective was to investigate if there are identifiable dentofacial and perioral aesthetic factors that bias laypeople towards discontinuing treatment after a phase I treatment with this fixed class II corrector. An analysis of photos and dental casts of 60 children (23 males, 37 females) having received phase I orthodontic treatment with the Xbow appliance was conducted. Variables considered were incisor height and width measurements, incisor proportions, incisor angulations, vertical lip thickness, gingival/incisal display, smile width per cent, diastema, midline deviation, smile arc, gender, and use of a 2×4. A principal component analysis and a logistic regression were used to determine which factors related to a patient's likelihood of receiving further orthodontic treatment. Only the angulation of the right maxillary incisors was significantly related to a patient's likelihood (odds ratio 1.886 (1.004-3.466); P = 0.049) to proceed to phase II orthodontic treatment following phase I orthodontic treatment with the Xbow appliance. The odds of proceeding to phase II treatment were 86.6% greater with a one standard deviation increase in the angulation of the right central and lateral incisors. Other factors demonstrated trends but were not statistically significant. Sample in subgroups was small, excluded smiles that did not expose the upper incisor crowns significantly, smiles in real life are observed three-dimensionally, other factors outside the aesthetic measurements were not considered in the analysis. In this sample, the angulation of the maxillary right incisors was the most significant factor influencing the decision to undergo an orthodontic phase II. © The

  13. Validation of the American Board of Orthodontics Objective Grading System for assessing the treatment outcomes of Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Song, Guang-Ying; Baumrind, Sheldon; Zhao, Zhi-He; Ding, Yin; Bai, Yu-Xing; Wang, Lin; He, Hong; Shen, Gang; Li, Wei-Ran; Wu, Wei-Zi; Ren, Chong; Weng, Xuan-Rong; Geng, Zhi; Xu, Tian-Min

    2013-09-01

    Orthodontics in China has developed rapidly, but there is no standard index of treatment outcomes. We assessed the validity of the American Board of Orthodontics Objective Grading System (ABO-OGS) for the classification of treatment outcomes in Chinese patients. We randomly selected 108 patients who completed treatment between July 2005 and September 2008 in 6 orthodontic treatment centers across China. Sixty-nine experienced Chinese orthodontists made subjective assessments of the end-of-treatment casts for each patient. Three examiners then used the ABO-OGS to measure the casts. Pearson correlation analysis and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis were conducted to evaluate the correspondence between the ABO-OGS cast measurements and the orthodontists' subjective assessments. The average subjective grading scores were highly correlated with the ABO-OGS scores (r = 0.7042). Four of the 7 study cast components of the ABO-OGS score-occlusal relationship, overjet, interproximal contact, and alignment-were statistically significantly correlated with the judges' subjective assessments. Together, these 4 accounted for 58% of the variability in the average subjective grading scores. The ABO-OGS cutoff score for cases that the judges deemed satisfactory was 16 points; the corresponding cutoff score for cases that the judges considered acceptable was 21 points. The ABO-OGS is a valid index for the assessment of treatment outcomes in Chinese patients. By comparing the objective scores on this modification of the ABO-OGS with the mean subjective assessment of a panel of highly qualified Chinese orthodontists, a cutoff point for satisfactory treatment outcome was defined as 16 points or fewer, with scores of 16 to 21 points denoting less than satisfactory but still acceptable treatment. Cases that scored greater than 21 points were considered unacceptable. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Changes in psychological health, subjective food intake ability and oral health-related quality of life during orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Choi, S-H; Cha, J-Y; Lee, K-J; Yu, H-S; Hwang, C-J

    2017-11-01

    Assessing changes in patient's psychological health and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) over time during orthodontic treatment may help clinicians to treat patients more carefully. To evaluate changes in mental health, self-reported masticatory ability and OHRQoL during orthodontic treatment in adults, this prospective study included 66 adults (30 men, 36 women; mean age, 24·2 ± 5·2 years). Each patient completed the Korean versions of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale, Rosenberg self-esteem scale, key subjective food intake ability (KFIA) test for five key foods and Oral Health Impact Profile-14 (OHIP-14K) at baseline (T0), 12 months after treatment initiation (T1) and debonding (T2). All variables changed with time. Self-esteem and the total OHIP-14K score significantly decreased and increased, respectively, at T1, with a particular increase in the psychological and social disabilities scores. There were no significant differences in any questionnaire scores before and after treatment. The total OHIP-14K score was positively correlated with trait anxiety and depression, and negatively correlated with self-esteem and KFIA at T0, regardless of the treatment duration. Older patients showed a significant increase in the total OHIP-14K score at T1 and T2. OHRQoL worsened with an increase in the treatment duration. Our results suggest that OHRQoL temporarily deteriorates, with the development of psychological and social disabilities, during orthodontic treatment. This is related to the baseline age, psychological health and self-reported masticatory function. However, patients recover once the treatment is complete. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Changes of occlusal plane inclination after orthodontic treatment in different dentoskeletal frames.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-le; Kau, Chung; Wang, Min

    2014-06-25

    The inclination of the occlusal plane (OP) is related to facial types and experiences physiological growth-related changes. The aims of this research were to determine if there were any differences in the inclination of OP in subjects with three types of skeletal malocclusion and to investigate the characteristics and differences of functional occlusal plane (FOP) compared to bisected occlusal plane (BOP). A sample of 90 Caucasians patients was skeletal-classified into three (n = 30), and pre- and post-treatment cephalograms were digitized. Six linear and 8 angular cephalometric measurements were selected. The changes of OP inclination within each group and the differences among the three groups pre- and post-treatment were compared with paired t test and ANOVA test, respectively. The comparison and correlation between BOP and FOP were analyzed with paired t test and coefficient of correlation, respectively. The BOP angle increased in all of the three groups but only had statistically significant differences in skeletal class II patients in a mean of 1.51° (p < 0.05). The FOP-SN angle showed stability (p > 0.05) in all three groups. The inclination of FOP was closely related to that of BOP (p < 0.001) but revealed discrepancies in each group. BOP and FOP were statistically significantly steeper in class II subjects compared to the other two groups both before and after treatment. The BOP angle statistically significantly increased by 1.51° in skeletal class II patients. BOP was a more reproducible reference plane compared to FOP during cephalometric tracing process, while FOP showed stability in orthodontically treated patients with all three skeletal patterns.

  16. A comparison of the periodontal health of patients during treatment with the Invisalign system and with fixed orthodontic appliances.

    PubMed

    Miethke, Rainer-Reginald; Vogt, Silke

    2005-05-01

    Evaluation of the periodontal health in patients during treatment with either fixed orthodontic appliances or the Invisalign system. The study was designed as a concomitant trial. The evaluation of the patients started in February 2002 and was completed in August 2003. Thirty consecutive patients each with fixed orthodontic appliances and with aligners were examined at three consecutive control visits for their periodontal condition. All individuals were part of the clientele of the Department of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics of the Charité Berlin. The parameters evaluated were the modified Gingival Index, modified Plaque Index, modified Papillary Bleeding Index, and sulcus probing depth. The first three indices were recorded alternatively buccally and lingually in all permanent teeth from central incisor to first molar: buccally in the maxillary right and the mandibular left quadrants, lingually in the maxillary left and mandibular right quadrants. The sulcus depth was measured in four areas: mesially and distally, lingually and buccally in the 1st molar and the 1st premolar of each quadrant. Each control visit was concluded with a detailed, individualized oral hygiene instruction. The modified Plaque Index was significantly lower in the Invisalign group overall. On the other hand, the periodontal condition of the two samples was nearly identical. Periodontal health is not jeopardized, even though the Invisalign system aligners cover all the teeth and the keratinized gingiva in part. This could be attributed to the fact that aligners are removable and thus allow unimpeded oral hygiene.

  17. [Evaluation of the knowledge, attitude and practices of orthodontists in relation to nickel allergy during orthodontic treatment].

    PubMed

    Rerhrhaye, W; Bahije, L; Zaoui, F; Merzouk, N

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) of Moroccan dentists about allergy to Nickel (Ni) during orthodontic treatment. Dentists of two Moroccan cities (n = 553) were contacted and a questionnaire was distributed to those who have certified of partial or exclusive practice of orthodontics (N = 202). They were asked to specify the adverse reactions observed and the alloys frequently used. KAP about etiology, prevention and therapeutic management of allergic patients were also addressed. Twenty-two percent of the dentists have reported at least one allergic patient reaction with more implication of fixed appliances. Eleven percent of adverse effects locations reported were mucosal area and facial skin near contact area and less than 5% was systemic eruption outside contact site. Only 34% of the respondents knew the Nickel allergy etiology. Nickel-containing orthodontic alloys are generally used even in patient with suspected nickel allergy. It is very important to minimize corrosion factors and use nickel-free appliances in clinical practice.

  18. The 808 nm Laser-Assisted Surgery as an Adjunct to Orthodontic Treatment of Delayed Tooth Eruption.

    PubMed

    Seifi, Massoud; Vahid-Dastjerdi, Elahe; Ameli, Nazila; Badiee, Mohammad-Reza; Younessian, Farnaz; Amdjadi, Parisa

    2013-01-01

    Failure of teeth to erupt from gingival tissues at usual developmental time is called delayed tooth eruption (DTE). Delayed tooth eruption lead to prolonged fixed orthodontic treatment and its eventual complications. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of laser-assisted (808 nm) surgical uncovering, on the tooth emergence and orthodontic treatment of DTE. A total of 16 orthodontic patients were included in this study and were equally assigned to an experimental and a control group. Subjects for experiment consisted of eight patients (6 girls and 2 boys) with a mean age of 14±0.9 years. All patients exhibited delayed second premolar eruption. The laser wavelength was 810 nm and it was set in a continuous wave mode at a power output of 1.6 watt with a 0.3-mm diameter fiber tip. When the target tissue was sufficiently anesthetized, the tip was directed at an angle of 10 to 20 degrees to the tissue (light contact mode); and was applied continuously for approximately 12 Seconds until an acceptable tooth exposure area was visible. The facial axis of the clinical crown (FACC) line represents the most prominent portion of the facial central lobe for premolars. All orthodontic brackets are aligned along this reference and are located on FA (Facial Axis) point. The standard for adequate tooth eruption was the accessibility of facial axis of the clinical crown (FACC) for bonding the brackets. Data gathered from the patients were statistically surveyed and compared by means of Tukey's Test and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). All patients showed good gingival status, no significant bleeding during or immediately after the surgery, and acceptable level of healing after laser surgery. The biologic width of the teeth was preserved and no violation of this important periodontal parameter was observed. The average time for accessing the FA point in experimental group was 11±1.1 weeks and the mentioned period was increased to 25±1.8 weeks in control group

  19. [Periodontal status of labially inversely impacted maxillary central incisor in mixed dentition after orthodontic treatment].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hui-Xi; Cao, Zhen-Sheng; Sun, Hao; Hu, Han; Fang, Yu; Hu, Rong-Dang

    2016-12-01

    To study the periodontal status of labially inversely impacted maxillary central incisor in mixed dentition after orthodontic treatment. Sixteen patients with labially inversely impacted maxillary central incisor in mixed dentition and treated by guided rod appliance and conventional fixed appliance were enrolled in this study. Periodontal examinations were performed and cone-beam CT (CBCT) was taken approximately 2 years post treatment. Central incisors were divided into impacted and contralateral incisor groups. Clinical examinations included plaque index (PLI), gingival index (GI), probing depth (PD), width of attached gingiva (AW) and clinical crown length (CL); Mimics 16.0 software was used to measure the length of alveolar bone around the root (ha and fc), the length from the alveolar bone crest to cemento-enamel junction(CEJ) (ab and cd) on both the labial and palatal side of the central incisors as well as the labial and palatal bone support proportion (LBP and PBP) of the root and tipping of central incisor (U1-SN). The data were analyzed using paired sample t tests with SPSS 17.0 software package. There was no significant difference in PLI, GI, PD, U1-SN; the value of AW, ha,fc, LBP, PBP was significantly smaller in impacted groups(P<0.01); the value of CL, ab and cd was significantly larger in impacted groups (P<0.01). The periodontal status of the impacted central incisor was on good condition without teeth mobility and inflammation, although a little worse than the contralateral homonymous teeth. There may be a need for periodontal bone grafting and gingival surgery in the future for the asymmetric morphology of gingiva.

  20. The effect of different surface treatments of demineralised enamel on microleakage under metal orthodontic brackets

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this investigation was to assess the effects of different treatments of demineralised enamel on microleakage under orthodontic brackets. Methods Seventy-five intact premolars were randomly assigned to five groups. The teeth in groups 2 through 5 were immersed in a demineralising solution for 16 weeks. In groups 1 (control) and 2 (demineralised/control), conventional acid etching was used. In group 3, sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) was applied on the enamel surface for 1 min after acid etching, and in group 4, Transbond Plus (3M Unitek, Monrovia, CA, USA) self-etching primer (SEP) was used. The teeth in group 5 were treated with 2% sodium fluoride (NaF) for 4 min before etching. After bracket bonding, the specimens were thermocycled, sealed with nail varnish, immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsine solution for 24 h and sectioned. Microleakage was measured under a stereomicroscope for the enamel-adhesive and adhesive-bracket interfaces of both occlusal and gingival sides. Results Demineralised teeth showed more microleakage at the enamel-adhesive interface on both occlusal and gingival sides compared to sound teeth, but the difference was not significant (P > 0.005). Treating the demineralised enamel with 5% NaOCl or Transbond Plus SEP was not effective in reducing microleakage. NaF treatment followed by acid etching of demineralised enamel resulted in significantly lower microleakage in most comparisons (P < 0.005). Conclusions The use of 2% NaF on hypomineralised enamel before the bracket bonding procedure is an effective way to decrease microleakage. PMID:24325863

  1. Conventional Vs Digital Impressions: Acceptability, Treatment Comfort and Stress Among Young Orthodontic Patients.

    PubMed

    Mangano, Alessandro; Beretta, Matteo; Luongo, Giuseppe; Mangano, Carlo; Mangano, Francesco

    2018-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare patients' acceptability, comfort and stress with conventional and digital impressions. Thirty young orthodontic patients (15 males and 15 females) who had no previous experience of impressions were enrolled in this study. Conventional impressions for orthodontic study models of the dental arches were taken using an alginate impression material (Hydrogum ® , Zhermack Spa, Badia Polesine, Rovigo, Italy). Fifteen days later, digital impressions of both arches were acquired using an intraoral scanner (CS3600 ® , Carestream Dental, Rochester, NY, USA). Immediately after impression taking, patients' acceptability, comfort and stress were measured using two questionnaires and the State anxiety scale. Data showed no difference in terms of anxiety and stress; however, patients preferred the use of digital impressions systems instead of conventional impression techniques. Alginate impressions resulted as fast as digital impressions. Digital impressions resulted the most accepted and comfortable impression technique in young orthodontic patients, when compared to conventional techniques.

  2. Impact of the first eight months of orthodontic treatment with a fixed appliance on the families of adolescent patients.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Lucas G; Melgaço, Camilo A; Abreu, Mauro H N G; Lages, Elizabeth M B; Paiva, Saul M

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the impact of the first 8 months of orthodontic treatment with a fixed appliance on the families of adolescent patients and to examine the evaluative properties of the Family Impact Scale (FIS). The study involved a sample of 94 parents/caregivers of adolescents undergoing orthodontic treatment with a fixed appliance. The participants were asked to answer the Brazilian version of the FIS before treatment (T1) and 8 months after the bonding of the fixed appliance (T2). Statistical analysis was carried out using the Wilcoxon signed rank test and the Bonferroni correction for the overall score and FIS subscales. Responsiveness of the measure and the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) were also assessed. Among the 94 participants initially admitted to the present study, two were excluded as a result of treatment dropout and failure to return the second questionnaire. Thus, a sample of 92 parents/caregivers participated (response rate: 97.8%). Among the 92 participants, 70 were the mothers of patients, 16 were fathers, and six were other family members. Statistically significant improvements were found in the overall score (P < .001) as well as in both parental activity and parental emotions subscales (P < .001). The reductions in scores were associated with effect sizes showing moderate clinically meaningful changes in the overall FIS and in the parental/family activity, parental emotions, and family conflict subscales. The MCID was 2.66 for the overall FIS. The first 8 months of orthodontic treatment with a fixed appliance had a positive impact on the families of adolescents.

  3. Orthodontic treatment need in Dubai school adolescents: a study of 20,000 school-age adolescents in 66 public and private schools comparing orthodontic treatment need by gender and ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Al Jeshi, Ameena; Al-Mulla, Anas; Ferguson, Donald J

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare and contrast the orthodontic treatment needs of Dubai school-age school age children as a function of gender and ethnicity. A total of 20,880 subjects were screened in 66 public and private school located in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. The study sample was grouped according to seven geographic regions. The total sample included 9,765 females and 11,115 males. Ages ranged from 9.08 years to 24.4 years with an overall mean age of 14.5 years. Calibrated dentists examined school age children using Peer Assessment Rating Index (PAR). PAR scores were translated to Index for Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN) scores based upon the description of each of the 31 IOTN line item descriptions that constitute IOTN grades from 1 to 5. Upon completion, statistical comparison of the study variables by gender and ethnicity was applied. Evaluation of IOTN grade by gender demonstrated significantly higher male (2.52) than female (2.47, p=0.002) grade; comparison of IOTN grade by region showed South Asia (2.58) significantly higher than Middle East (2.43). IOTN grade was highest for South Asia males (2.62) which was significantly higher than South Asia females (2.55, p=0.023) and higher than both Middle East males and females (2.45 and 2.41, p=.000). Moreover, average South Asia female IOTN grade was significantly higher (p=0.000) than for both Middle East males and females. Conclusions 1. In Dubai school-aged adolescents, 53.2% of the study sample would benefit from orthodontic treatment and 14.4% were profiled as "treatment require". 2. Within the Middle East region, UAE subjects had higher mean IOTN grade than subjects from Iran, Syria and Yemen. 3. India males had significantly higher mean IOTN grades than Middle East male and female subjects from UAE, Iran, Syria, and Yemen. 4. India females had significantly higher mean IOTN grades than Middle East female subjects from UAE, Iran, Syria, and Yemen. It may be concluded that males and females

  4. Modality and risk management for orthodontic extrusion procedures in interdisciplinary treatment for generating proper bone and tissue contours for the planned implant: a case report.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Sachiko; Sasaki, Takeshi

    2015-12-01

    In adult interdisciplinary treatments with using dental implants, limited orthodontic treatment, especially orthodontic extrusion (OE), offers many benefits by both correcting teeth alignment and by contributing to the regeneration of periodontal tissues. However, orthodontic procedures carry some risks and unpredictabilities that might compromise tooth and/or periodontal tissue health. Especially in complex cases, it is difficult to decide which orthodontic treatment modalities should be combined, in what sequences they should be applied, and what their force systems and treatment times are.To achieve optimum results, some cases require two or more OEs to the same site being carried out at different times while taking the treatment effects into consideration. Such staged OE offers minimum intervention and maximum efficiency. In this case report, OE was first applied for orthodontic extraction. After bone regeneration followed by an implant placement and another surgical operation, a second OE was applied to align the inclination of an adjacent tooth. As a result, a predictable prognosis of implants as well as greatly improved esthetics and periodontal tissue health were achieved.

  5. Effect of low-level laser therapy on dental pain induced by separator force in orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Abtahi, Seyed Mostafa; Mousavi, Seyed Amir; Shafaee, Hooman; Tanbakuchi, Behrad

    2013-09-01

    Patients undergoing orthodontic treatment experience varying degrees of pain with separator insertion. A survey of patients' attitude towards orthodontic treatment revealed that pain was the most discouraging factor related to their treatment. Moreover, it was the highest ranking reason for wanting to discontinue care. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of low-level laser irradiation on dental pain induced by forces from separators in orthodontic treatment. This study was an experimental clinical trial. Twenty-nine patients were recruited for this research. Low-level laser irradiation was applied on one half of the maxillary and mandibular arches for 5 days. The opposite half of the arches was considered the control group. Laser irradiation was applied for 30 seconds in the alveolar bone between the second premolars, first molars, and second molars. Pain perception was evaluated with a standardized questionnaire that was answered by patients before and after laser irradiation. Data was analyzed by Wilcoxon and Friedman test. P value ≤0.05 was considered significant. The highest pain level was reported at day 1 following separator placement and decreased gradually until day 5. At day 4 and 5, the pain intensity was lower in the laser group than in the control group; however, this finding was not statistically significant. At day 1 and 3, the pain intensity was higher in the laser group than in the control group; however, it was not statistically significant. At day 2, the pain intensity was lower in the laser group than in the control group and was statistically significant. Our findings suggest that there is no statistically significant difference in pain by using low-level laser irradiation.

  6. Orthodontic Class II:1 treatment-efficiency and outcome quality of Herbst-multibracket appliance therapy.

    PubMed

    Bock, N; Ruehl, J; Ruf, S

    2017-12-08

    The aim of this retrospective investigation was to assess the efficiency and outcome quality of Class II:1 treatment (Tx). The investigation is based on the evaluation of all Class II:1 patients that ever (1986-2014) started Tx with a Herbst appliance and subsequently a multibracket appliance (MBA) at the study center. Study casts from before Tx, after Herbst-MBA Tx, and (if available) after ≥ 24 months of retention were evaluated using the Peer Assessment Rating (PAR) index, the Ahlgren scale, and standard occlusal variables. In total, 526 Class II:1 patients with a mean pre-Tx age of 14.4 years (range 9.8-44.4) had received Herbst-MBA Tx; 18 patients discontinued Tx before completion. For 240 patients, data from ≥ 24 months of retention were available. The pre-Tx PAR score of 32.4 ± 8.83 was reduced to 8.0 ± 4.51 during Tx. A slight increase to 8.8 ± 5.11 occurred during retention. The percentage of patients which could be assigned to the category "greatly improved" was 62% after Tx and 57% after retention; only 2-3% had to be assigned to the category "worse/no different." The outcome ratings according to the Ahlgren scale revealed 17% excellent, 35% good, 45% satisfactory, and 3% unsuccessful results. Class II:1 Tx using Herbst-MBA is an efficient approach in orthodontic care. During a mean active Tx period of 2 years, high-quality results can be obtained in the majority of patients. The present investigation is the first to investigate a large unselected cohort of consecutive Herbst-MBA patients to determine representative data on the efficiency and the outcome quality of this Tx approach.

  7. [Optimization of diagnostics and orthodontic treatment planning in children and adolescents with multiply adentia].

    PubMed

    Gunenkova, I V; Samoylova, N V; Bondarets, A Yu

    2015-01-01

    The data of clinical examination, diagnostic models and panoramic x-rays investigation of the 332 patients at the age from 6 to 18 years with adentia were analysed. The congenital absence of more than 6 teeth was defined as oligodontia. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of missing teeth patterns and other dental abnormalities such as microdontia, persistent deciduous teeth, ankylosis, taurodontism, impaction and transposition in children and adolescents with isolated and syndromic oligodontia to optimize the diagnostic and orthodontic treatment plan. The total number of 332 patients were devided into three groups: 1-132 patients with hypodontia, 2-119 subjects with isolated oligodontia and 3 - 81 with syndromic oligodontia. The subgroup comprised of 45 children with ectodermal dysplasia (ED) syndromes and oligodontia 1,5-6 years at baseline examination was selected from the patients of group 3. The main type of inheritance was X-linked recessive and the most spread syndrome was hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia or Christ-Siemens-Touraine syndrome. The female patients were twice more than males in hypodontia and isolated oligodontia groups, but in group of 3 syndromic patients the rate of males to females was 1,56:1. The most stable to agenesis teeth were the upper central deciduous and permanent incisors. In group 2 the most often absent teeth were upper second premolars and in group 3-the upper lateral incisors. In syndromic patients with temporary dentition the upper lateral incisors and all lower incisors were always absent. It was concluded that the absence of teeth at the age of 1,5 years, male gender and absense of more than 14 teeth in the temporary dentition and 20 teeth in the permanent dentition were the signs of syndromic oligidontia. It is necessary for such patients to be examined besides dentists and pediatrician by other medical specialist such as dermatologist and geneticist.

  8. The effect of microrough surface treatment on miniscrews used as orthodontic anchors.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chin-Shan; Lee, Tzer-Min; Chang, Chih-Han; Liu, Jia-Kuang

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of two different microrough surface treatments on miniscrews with loading over different time periods in vivo. Twenty-four New Zealand white rabbits were selected. One hundred and forty-four miniscrews with a machined (MA), sandblasted and acid-etched (SLA) or sandblasted and alkaline-etched (SL/NaOH) surface were implanted into the tibia of the rabbits. Then, orthodontic forces with Ni-Ti coils were applied immediately to two of the three miniscrews in each tibia, with the center one serving as the control. After 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks, the rabbits were sacrificed. The removal torque value (RTV) was tested and bone-to-implant contact (BIC) was examined. In most groups, there were no differences between the RTV in the unloaded and loaded conditions at different time periods. In the loaded condition, the RTV of the SLA groups increased significantly after 4 weeks of healing. The RTV in the SL/NaOH groups increased after 8 weeks, and reached a significant difference with the SLA groups after 12 weeks. After 12 weeks, the BIC in the SLA and SL/NaOH groups was higher than in the MA groups. A regression test revealed a moderate correlation between the BIC and the RTV. There were no differences between the loaded and unloaded conditions in most groups. The RTV and BIC increased with time. In the loaded condition, the RTV of the SLA surface increased earlier, at 4 weeks, while the SL/NAOH group showed the highest RTV after 8 weeks.

  9. Efficacy of fluoride varnish for preventing white spot lesions and gingivitis during orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances-a prospective randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kirschneck, Christian; Christl, Jan-Joachim; Reicheneder, Claudia; Proff, Peter

    2016-12-01

    The development of white spot lesions around orthodontic brackets and gingivitis is a common problem during orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances. This prospective randomized double-blind controlled clinical trial investigated the preventive efficacy of a one-time application of two commonly used fluoride varnishes in patients with low to moderate caries risk. Ninety adolescent orthodontic patients with a low to moderate caries risk were prospectively randomized to three groups of 30 patients each: (1) standardized dental hygiene with fluoride toothpaste and one-time application of placebo varnish (control) or (2) of elmex® fluid or (3) of Fluor Protector S on all dental surfaces at the start of fixed therapy. The extent of enamel demineralization and gingivitis was determined with the ICDAS and the gingivitis index (GI) at baseline and after 4, 12, and 20 weeks. Each treatment group showed a significant increase of the ICDAS index, but not of the GI over the course of time with no significant intergroup differences detectable. A one-time application of fluoride varnish at the start of orthodontic treatment did not provide any additional preventive advantage over sufficient dental hygiene with fluoride toothpaste with regard to formation of white spots and gingivitis in patients with a low to moderate caries risk. In dental practice, patients often receive an application of fluoride varnish at the start of orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances. However, the efficacy of this procedure is still unclear.

  10. Parents' and caregivers' perceptions of the quality of life of adolescents in the first 4 months of orthodontic treatment with a fixed appliance.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Lucas G; Melgaço, Camilo A; Lages, Elizabeth M B; Abreu, Mauro H N G; Paiva, Saul M

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate adolescents oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) in the first 4 months of fixed orthodontic appliance treatment using parents and caregivers as proxies. Descriptive study. Department of Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics at Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil. A sample of parents and caregivers of 95 adolescents undergoing orthodontic treatment with a fixed appliance. Participants were required to answer the Brazilian version of the Parental-Caregivers Perceptions Questionnaire (P-CPQ) before adolescent's treatment (T1) and 4 months after bonding of the fixed appliance (T2). Statistical analysis was carried out using the Wilcoxon signed rank test and the Bonferroni correction for the domains of P-CPQ. Among the 95 participants, there were 73 mothers, 18 fathers and 4 were other relations. There was a statistically significant improvement in the overall score as well as in both emotional and social wellbeing subscales (P<0·001). Parents and caregivers report an improvement on their adolescent's OHRQoL in the first 4 months of orthodontic treatment with a fixed appliance. © 2014 British Orthodontic Society.

  11. Three case reports demonstrating treatment of relatively complex orthodontic cases using a completely customised lingual appliance.

    PubMed

    Buckley, John

    2016-01-01

    It is a commonly held misconception among Irish dentists that only minor malocclusions can be treated with lingual appliances. This article demonstrates the use of contemporary completely customised lingual orthodontic appliances to treat a diverse range of malocclusions, to a satisfactory level, and thereby may disabuse clinicians of the belief that only minor malocclusions can be treated with lingual appliances.

  12. Treatment of an impacted supernumerary tooth using limited fixed orthodontic appliances.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Hyun; Tai, Kiyoshi; Kanao, Akira

    2013-01-01

    A 42-year and 9-month-old female with an impacted supernumerary tooth was treated with limited fixed orthodontic appliances. As seen in this case, it is possible to successfully treat impacted teeth in adults even though the most common time to treat impactions is during adolescence.

  13. Orthodontics and orthognathic surgery in the combined treatment of an excessively "gummy smile".

    PubMed

    Fowler, P

    1999-06-01

    This report highlights the benefits that can be achieved with the combined orthodontic and orthognathic surgical approach where the presenting malocclusion is related primarily to an underlying skeletal malrelationship. The patient experienced a dramatic improvement in her facial form and occlusion, and a reduction of her excessively "gummy smile".

  14. University clinic and private practice treatment outcomes in Class I extraction and nonextraction patients: A comparative study with the American Board of Orthodontics Objective Grading System.

    PubMed

    Mislik, Barbara; Konstantonis, Dimitrios; Katsadouris, Alexios; Eliades, Theodore

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare treatment outcomes in university vs private practice settings with Class I patients using the American Board of Orthodontics Objective Grading System. A parent sample of 580 Class I patients treated with and without extractions of 4 first premolars was subjected to discriminant analysis to identify a borderline spectrum of 66 patients regarding the extraction modality. Of these patients, 34 were treated in private orthodontic practices, and 32 were treated in a university graduate orthodontic clinic. The treatment outcomes were evaluated using the 8 variables of the American Board of Orthodontics Objective Grading System. The total scores ranged from 10 to 47 (mean, 25.44; SD, 9.8) for the university group and from 14 to 45 (mean, 25.94; SD, 7.7) for the private practice group. The university group achieved better scores for the variables of buccolingual inclination (mean difference, 2.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.59, 3.98; P = 0.01) and marginal ridges (mean difference, 1.32; 95% CI, 0.28, 2.36; P = 0.01), and the private practice group achieved a better score for the variable of root angulation (mean difference, -0.65; 95% CI, -1.26, -0.03; P = 0.04). However, no statistically intergroup differences were found between the total American Board of Orthodontics Objective Grading System scores (mean difference, -0.5; 95% CI, -3.82, 4.82; P = 0.82). Patients can receive similar quality of orthodontic treatment in a private practice and a university clinic. The orthodontists in the private practices were more successful in angulating the roots properly, whereas the orthodontic residents accomplished better torque control of the posterior segments and better marginal ridges. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Using three-dimensional imaging to assess treatment outcomes in orthodontics: a progress report from the University of the Pacific.

    PubMed

    Baumrind, S; Carlson, S; Beers, A; Curry, S; Norris, K; Boyd, R L

    2003-01-01

    Past research in integrated three-dimensional (3D) craniofacial mapping at the Craniofacial Research Instrumentation Laboratory (CRIL) of the University of the Pacific is summarized in narrative form. The advantages and limitations of recent commercial developments in the application of cone beam geometry volumetric X-ray scanners in dentistry and surface digital mapping of study casts are discussed. The rationale for methods currently in development at CRIL for merging longitudinal information from existing 3D study casts and two-dimensional lateral X-ray cephalograms in studies of orthodontic treatment outcome is presented.

  16. Regeneration of multiple adjacent bone dehiscences with guided tissue regeneration after orthodontic proclination: a corrective treatment approach.

    PubMed

    Toygar, Hilal Uslu; Kircelli, Beyza Hancioglu

    2010-08-01

    Transverse expansion or proclination of the teeth are valid alternatives to extraction in cases of crowding, but lack of stability and development of bone dehiscences have been demonstrated as side effects subsequent to anterior displacement of the incisors. The aim of this study was to repair the osseous dehiscence associated with incisor proclination. The multiple adjacent bone dehiscences were treated with a titanium membrane and bone matrix. Exposed root surfaces were covered with newly formed tissues. The patients in this study are the first to demonstrate the treatment of bone dehiscences that may occur as a result of orthodontic proclination.

  17. Optimal management of orthodontic pain

    PubMed Central

    Topolski, Francielle; Moro, Alexandre; Correr, Gisele Maria; Schimim, Sasha Cristina

    2018-01-01

    Pain is an undesirable side effect of orthodontic tooth movement, which causes many patients to give up orthodontic treatment or avoid it altogether. The aim of this study was to investigate, through an analysis of the scientific literature, the best method for managing orthodontic pain. The methodological aspects involved careful definition of keywords and diligent search in databases of scientific articles published in the English language, without any restriction of publication date. We recovered 1281 articles. After the filtering and classification of these articles, 56 randomized clinical trials were selected. Of these, 19 evaluated the effects of different types of drugs for the control of orthodontic pain, 16 evaluated the effects of low-level laser therapy on orthodontic pain, and 21 evaluated other methods of pain control. Drugs reported as effective in orthodontic pain control included ibuprofen, paracetamol, naproxen sodium, aspirin, etoricoxib, meloxicam, piroxicam, and tenoxicam. Most studies report favorable outcomes in terms of alleviation of orthodontic pain with the use of low-level laser therapy. Nevertheless, we noticed that there is no consensus, both for the drug and for laser therapy, on the doses and clinical protocols most appropriate for orthodontic pain management. Alternative methods for orthodontic pain control can also broaden the clinician’s range of options in the search for better patient care. PMID:29588616

  18. Optimal management of orthodontic pain.

    PubMed

    Topolski, Francielle; Moro, Alexandre; Correr, Gisele Maria; Schimim, Sasha Cristina

    2018-01-01

    Pain is an undesirable side effect of orthodontic tooth movement, which causes many patients to give up orthodontic treatment or avoid it altogether. The aim of this study was to investigate, through an analysis of the scientific literature, the best method for managing orthodontic pain. The methodological aspects involved careful definition of keywords and diligent search in databases of scientific articles published in the English language, without any restriction of publication date. We recovered 1281 articles. After the filtering and classification of these articles, 56 randomized clinical trials were selected. Of these, 19 evaluated the effects of different types of drugs for the control of orthodontic pain, 16 evaluated the effects of low-level laser therapy on orthodontic pain, and 21 evaluated other methods of pain control. Drugs reported as effective in orthodontic pain control included ibuprofen, paracetamol, naproxen sodium, aspirin, etoricoxib, meloxicam, piroxicam, and tenoxicam. Most studies report favorable outcomes in terms of alleviation of orthodontic pain with the use of low-level laser therapy. Nevertheless, we noticed that there is no consensus, both for the drug and for laser therapy, on the doses and clinical protocols most appropriate for orthodontic pain management. Alternative methods for orthodontic pain control can also broaden the clinician's range of options in the search for better patient care.

  19. Prevalence of malocclusions, oral habits and orthodontic treatment need in a 7- to 15-year-old schoolchildren population in Tirana.

    PubMed

    Laganà, Giuseppina; Masucci, Caterina; Fabi, Francesco; Bollero, Patrizio; Cozza, Paola

    2013-06-14

    The aim of present study was to determine the prevalence of malocclusions, oral habits and the need for orthodontic treatment in a sample of 7- to 15-year-old Albanese schoolchildren. The final sample comprised 2,617 subjects (1,257 males and 1,360 females), all orthodontically untreated. Occlusal relationship and the functional analysis were recorded for all subjects. The prevalence rates for the dental health component of the index of orthodontic treatment need (IOTN) were calculated. Comparisons between genders were performed for the prevalence of malocclusions, oral habits and IOTN grades (chi-square tests). Class I, class II and class III malocclusions and asymmetries were observed in 40.4%, 29.2%, 3.2% and 27.1% of the sample, respectively. There were 2,108 subjects (80.6%) that showed oral habits, with females (82.1%) presenting with a greater prevalence rate than males (78.9%). The objective need for orthodontic treatment (grades 4 and 5 of IOTN) was registered in 1,077 subjects (41.2%). This prevalence rate is higher than those reported for other European countries. No significant differences between genders were found for the IOTN grades. The findings of the present study revealed the need to improve public health plans for orthodontic prevention and screening and to organise the resources in this area in Albania.

  20. Cone beam CT in orthodontics: the current picture.

    PubMed

    Makdissi, Jimmy

    2013-03-01

    The introduction of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) technology to dentistry and orthodontics revolutionized the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of orthodontic patients. This review article discusses the use of CBCT in diagnosis and treatment planning in orthodontics. The steps required to install and operate a CBCT facility within the orthodontic practice as well as the challenges are highlighted. The available guidelines in relation to the clinical applications of CBCT in orthodontics are explored. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  1. Effect of heat treatment on the tensile strength of 'Elgiloy' orthodontic wire.

    PubMed

    Philip, S M; Darvell, B W

    2016-08-01

    Elgiloy is the trade name of a cobalt-chromium-nickel superalloy that is offered for orthodontic use as wire. Despite some years of use, there is very little information in the dental literature on its mechanical properties, and especially on the effect of the hardening heat treatment (HT), that may be used after forming, on the tensile strength (TS) in relation to the four 'tempers' that are available. Straight lengths of round wire of the four available tempers, Blue, Yellow, Green and Red, were tested in direct tension at 5mm/min in air at 23°C to fracture, both as-supplied (AS) and with HT at 500°C for 5h, in air. HT was done in a high-uniformity, three-zone tube furnace in an alumina boat. The wires were then allowed to cool to room temperature in the boat, outside the furnace. The nominal (original cross-sectional area) peak stress was calculated. TS varied from 1.4 to 2.1GPa, AS, and 1.6 to 2.8GPa HT, according to temper, but with appreciable variation within tempers. Even so, the TS plot of HT vs. AS was very straight and of narrow distribution (intercept: -0.638±0.064GPa, slope: 1.575±0.036, r(2): 0.994918, n=12, F=1957.7, p∼8×10(-13)). The strengthening due to HT was highly regular and TS can be reliably predicted on the basis of the AS value, but this of course cannot be known without specific batch testing. However, the unexpectedly large variation in the AS values within tempers renders such a prediction of lower reliability and usefulness in practice. Indeed, the distinction between tempers can be negligible, making selection according to application demands problematic, and differential property expectation less than certain. No such product data are provided commercially. Quality control is not as tight as might be expected. The implications for treatment need to be explored. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Microelectronic wear-time documentation of removable orthodontic devices detects heterogeneous wear behavior and individualizes treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Schott, Timm Cornelius; Ludwig, Björn

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether microelectronic wear-time documentation can contribute to individualized orthodontic management. The wear times and behaviors of 281 patients undergoing orthodontic treatment with removable appliances were quantified and analyzed using the TheraMon microelectronic system (Sales Agency Gschladt, Hargelsberg, Austria) over a 6-month treatment period. The 281 study participants wore their removable appliances for a median of 9.0 hours per day, compared with the 12 to 15 hours per day prescribed. Wear behavior was variable and heterogeneous in patients with almost identical median wear times, with fluctuating and numerous zero wear-time periods observed. Both the duration of daily wear time and the wear behavior need to be considered to individualize the prescription for wear time; this is made possible with microelectronic wear-time documentation. Individual prescription changes based on the wear-time documentation can be arranged with patients in a shared decision-making process to achieve effective and successful treatment progress. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Efficacy of low-intensity laser therapy in reducing treatment time and orthodontic pain: a clinical investigation.

    PubMed

    Doshi-Mehta, Gauri; Bhad-Patil, Wasundhara A

    2012-03-01

    The long duration of orthodontic treatment is a major concern for patients. A noninvasive method of accelerating tooth movement in a physiologic manner is