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Sample records for early peripheral burning

  1. Burn-related peripheral neuropathy: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yiji; Lineaweaver, William C; Zheng, Xianyou; Chen, Zenggan; Mullins, Fred; Zhang, Feng

    2017-06-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is the most frequent disabling neuromuscular complication of burns. However, the insidious and progressive onset of burn neuropathy makes it often undiagnosed or overlooked. In our study, we reviewed the current studies on the burn-related peripheral neuropathy to summarize the morbidity, mechanism, detecting method and management of peripheral neuropathy in burn patients. Of the 1533 burn patients included in our study, 98 cases (6.39%) were presented with peripheral neuropathy. Thermal and electrical burns were the most common etiologies. Surgical procedures, especially nerve decompression, showed good effect on functional recovery of both acute and delayed peripheral neuropathy in burn patients. It is noteworthy that, for early detection and prevention of peripheral neuropathy, electrodiagnostic examinations should be performed on burn patients independent of symptoms. Still, the underlying mechanisms of burn-related peripheral neuropathy remain to be clarified. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  2. Peripheral Neuropathy and Nerve Compression Syndromes in Burns.

    PubMed

    Strong, Amy L; Agarwal, Shailesh; Cederna, Paul S; Levi, Benjamin

    2017-10-01

    Peripheral neuropathy and nerve compression syndromes lead to substantial morbidity following burn injury. Patients present with pain, paresthesias, or weakness along a specific nerve distribution or experience generalized peripheral neuropathy. The symptoms manifest at various times from within one week of hospitalization to many months after wound closure. Peripheral neuropathy may be caused by vascular occlusion of vasa nervorum, inflammation, neurotoxin production leading to apoptosis, and direct destruction of nerves from the burn injury. This article discusses the natural history, diagnosis, current treatments, and future directions for potential interventions for peripheral neuropathy and nerve compression syndromes related to burn injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cutaneous chemical burns: assessment and early management.

    PubMed

    Gnaneswaran, Neiraja; Perera, Eshini; Perera, Marlon; Sawhney, Raja

    2015-03-01

    Chemical burns are common and may cause significant physical, psychological, social and economic burden. Despite a wide variety of potentially harmful chemicals, important general principals may be drawn in the assessment and initial management of such injuries. Early treatment of chemical burns is crucial and may reduce the period of resulting morbidity. This article reviews the assessment and management of cutaneous chemical burns. Assessment of the patient should be rapid and occur in conjunction with early emergency management. Rapid history and pri-mary and secondary survey may be required to exclude systemic side effects of the injury. Depth of wound assessment is difficult given that necrosis caused by various chemicals can continue despite cessation of exposure. Early management should be conducted with consideration of clinician's safety, and appropriate precautions should be taken. Excluding specific situations and chemical exposure, copious irrigation with water remains the mainstay of early management. Referral to a centre of higher acuity may be required for expert evaluation.

  4. Dendritic cells modulate burn wound healing by enhancing early proliferation.

    PubMed

    Vinish, Monika; Cui, Weihua; Stafford, Eboni; Bae, Leon; Hawkins, Hal; Cox, Robert; Toliver-Kinsky, Tracy

    2016-01-01

    Adequate wound healing is vital for burn patients to reduce the risk of infections and prolonged hospitalization. Dendritic cells (DCs) are antigen presenting cells that release cytokines and are central for the activation of innate and acquired immune responses. Studies have showed their presence in human burn wounds; however, their role in burn wound healing remains to be determined. This study investigated the role of DCs in modulating healing responses within the burn wound. A murine model of full-thickness contact burns was used to study wound healing in the absence of DCs (CD11c promoter-driven diphtheria toxin receptor transgenic mice) and in a DC-rich environment (using fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 ligand, FL- a DC growth factor). Wound closure was significantly delayed in DC-deficient mice and was associated with significant suppression of early cellular proliferation, granulation tissue formation, wound levels of TGFβ1 and formation of CD31+ vessels in healing wounds. In contrast, DC enhancement significantly accelerated early wound closure, associated with increased and accelerated cellular proliferation, granulation tissue formation, and increased TGFβ1 levels and CD31+ vessels in healing wounds. We conclude that DCs play an important role in the acceleration of early wound healing events, likely by secreting factors that trigger the proliferation of cells that mediate wound healing. Therefore, pharmacological enhancement of DCs may provide a therapeutic intervention to facilitate healing of burn wounds. © 2016 by the Wound Healing Society.

  5. Exogenous peripheral blood mononuclear cells affect the healing process of deep-degree burns

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Guanying; Li, Yaonan; Ye, Lan; Wang, Xinglei; Zhang, Jixun; Dong, Zhengxue; Jiang, Duyin

    2017-01-01

    The regenerative repair of deep-degree (second degree) burned skin remains a notable challenge in the treatment of burn injury, despite improvements being made with regards to treatment modality and the emergence of novel therapies. Fetal skin constitutes an attractive target for investigating scarless healing of burned skin. To investigate the inflammatory response during scarless healing of burned fetal skin, the present study developed a nude mouse model, which was implanted with normal human fetal skin and burned fetal skin. Subsequently, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were used to treat the nude mouse model carrying the burned fetal skin. The expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP)-1 were investigated during this process. In the present study, fetal skin was subcutaneously implanted into the nude mice to establish the murine model. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was used to detect alterations in the skin during the development of fetal skin and during the healing process of deep-degree burned fetal skin. The expression levels of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 were determined using immunochemical staining, and their staining intensity was evaluated by mean optical density. The results demonstrated that fetal skin subcutaneously implanted into the dorsal skin flap of nude mice developed similarly to the normal growth process in the womb. In addition, the scarless healing process was clearly observed in the mice carrying the burned fetal skin. A total of 2 weeks was required to complete scarless healing. Following treatment with PBMCs, the burned fetal skin generated inflammatory factors and enhanced the inflammatory response, which consequently resulted in a reduction in the speed of healing and in the formation of scars. Therefore, exogenous PBMCs may alter the lowered immune response environment, which is required for scarless healing, resulting in scar formation. In conclusion, the present

  6. [Analgesic effect and related mechanism of peripheral acupoints electroacupuncture on superficial partial-thickness burn rats].

    PubMed

    Sun, X; Wei, Z R; Xiao, Z

    2017-03-20

    expression of GFAP of astrocytes in PAG area of rats in group PB was significantly lower than that in group SI ( P <0.05), but similar to that in group SE ( P >0.05). The expression of GFAP of astrocytes in PAG area of rats in group E was significantly lower than that in groups PB and SE (with P values below 0.05). Conclusions: Electroacupuncture of peripheral acupoints can release the pain followed superficial partial-thickness burn in rats at early stage, and the possible mechanism is that it reduces the activation of astrocytes in PAG area.

  7. [Assessment of local and systemic inflammatory parameters of peripheral burn in an animal model].

    PubMed

    Torres, Wilmary; Mendoza, Liseth; Vicci, Hember; Eblen-Zajjur, Antonio; Navarro, María

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the edema volume and leukocyte, platelet, and fibrinogen count of peripheral burn in an animal model. The back left leg of Rattus norvegicus (experimental group) was placed in water at 60 °C for 60 seconds or at room temperature (control group). An analysis was carried out before and after the induced burn (at 4, 8, 12, and 24 h). The edema volume was determined by an orthogonal photo, the leukocyte and platelet counts were determined using automated equipment, and the fibrinogen count was determined using the gravimetric method. The maximum value of the edema was recorded at 4 h and leukocytes at 24 h. The platelet count did not vary at different post-edema time intervals. The fibrinogen level increased at 4 h and 24 h. In this animal model we induced systemic inflammation characterized by leukocytosis and elevated fibrinogen levels, combined with edema located at the induction area.

  8. Early and Late Acute Kidney Injury in Severely Burned Patients

    PubMed Central

    Witkowski, Wojciech; Kawecki, Marek; Surowiecka-Pastewka, Agnieszka; Klimm, Wojciech; Szamotulska, Katarzyna; Niemczyk, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    Background This study evaluated factors influencing early and late occurrence of AKI in severely burned patients and assessed the relationship between time of occurrence of AKI and mortality of AKI patients. Material/Methods Renal function was evaluated at 3 time points: at admission, at the critical point or middle point of hospitalization, and at the endpoint for which death or a discharge from the center was considered. AKI criteria were: decrease in GFR of less than 60 ml/min at admission, decrease in GFR of more than 75% compared to baseline, and decrease in the daily diuresis of less than 500 ml/24 h. Results At admission, 15.1% of the patients had eGFR <60 ml/min. AKI occurred in 38.5% of cases. The occurrence of AKI was associated with: elderly age (p<0.001), female sex (p=0.017), overweight and obesity (p=0.055); extent and depth of burns, respiratory failure, low protein concentration (for all p<0.001), low blood pressure (p=0.014), and high WBC (p=0.010). Early AKI was detected in 28% of patients. Mortality was 100% with the initial GFR ≥60, 100% with the initial GFR <60 and early deterioration of renal function, 80% with the initial GFR <60 and late worsening, and 60% with the initial GFR <60 and no worsening. Late AKI was observed in 10% of patients and mortality in this group was 79.2%. Mortality in the entire group with AKI was 88.0% versus 24.5%. Conclusions The frequent occurrence of AKI, especially early, worsens the prognosis for survival. Assessment of renal function should be included in the prognostic scales for burned patients. PMID:27746455

  9. Peripheral nervous system involvement in primary burning mouth syndrome--results of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Puhakka, A; Forssell, H; Soinila, S; Virtanen, A; Röyttä, M; Laine, M; Tenovuo, O; Teerijoki-Oksa, T; Jääskeläinen, S K

    2016-05-01

    The pathophysiology of primary burning mouth syndrome (BMS) has remained enigmatic, but recent studies suggest pathology within the nervous system at multiple levels. This study aimed to investigate in detail the contribution of either focal or generalized alterations within the peripheral nervous system (PNS) in the etiopathogenesis of BMS. Intraepithelial nerve fiber density (IENFD) of tongue mucosa was assessed in 10 carefully characterized BMS, and the results were compared to 19 age- and gender-matched cadaver controls, 6 with lifetime diabetes. Extensive neurophysiologic and psychophysical examinations of the trigeminal system and distal extremities were performed to profile PNS function in BMS. Patients with BMS had significantly fewer intraepithelial nerve fibers (0,27, s.e. 0,18 mm(-1); P = 0.0253) than non-diabetic controls (0,92, s.e. 0,15 mm(-1)). In the subepithelial space, the amount of nerve fibers did not differ between the groups. The majority (9/10) of patients with BMS showed neurophysiologic or psychophysical signs of a more generalized PNS dysfunction. Our results in neurophysiologically optimally characterized BMS patients confirm that pure focal small fiber neuropathy of the oral mucosa has a role in the pathophysiology of primary BMS. Furthermore, BMS may be related to a more generalized, yet subclinical peripheral neuropathy. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Burns

    MedlinePlus

    ... doing so puts you in danger as well. Chemical and Electrical Burns For chemical and electrical burns, call 911 or your local ... the power source has been turned off. For chemical burns: Dry chemicals should be brushed off the ...

  11. The effects of electroacupuncture on analgesia and peripheral sensory thresholds in patients with burn scar pain.

    PubMed

    Cuignet, Olivier; Pirlot, A; Ortiz, S; Rose, T

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to observe if the effects of electro-acupuncture (EA) on analgesia and peripheral sensory thresholds are transposable from the model of heat pain in volunteers to the clinical setting of burn scar pain. After severe burns, pathological burn scars (PPBS) may occur with excruciating pain that respond poorly to treatment and prevent patients from wearing their pressure garments, thereby leading to unesthetic and function-limiting scars. EA might be of greater benefit in terms of analgesia and functional recovery, should it interrupt this vicious circle by counteracting the peripheral hyperalgesia characterizing PPBS. Therefore we enrolled 32 patients (22 males/10 females) aged of 46±11 years with clinical signs of PPBS and of neuropathic pain despite treatment. The study protocol consisted in 3 weekly 30-min sessions of standardized EA with extra individual needles in accordance to Traditional Chinese Medicine, in addition of previous treatments. We assessed VAS for pain and quantitative sensory testing (QST) twice: one week before and one after protocol. QST measured electrical thresholds for non-nociceptive A-beta fibers, nociceptive A-delta and C fibers in 2 dermatomes, respectively from the PPBS and from the contralateral pain-free areas. Based on heat pain studies, EA consisted in sessions at the extremity points of the main meridian flowing through PPBS (0.300s, 5Hz, sub noxious intensity, 15min) and at the bilateral paravertebral points corresponding to the same metameric level, 15min. VAS reduction of 3 points or below 3 on a 10 points scale was considered clinically relevant. Paired t-test compared thresholds (mean [SD]) and Wilcoxon test compared VAS (median [IQR]) pre and after treatment, significant p<0.05. The reduction of VAS for pain reached statistical but not clinical relevance (6.8 [3] vs. 4.5 [3.6]). This was due to a large subgroup of 14 non-responders whose VAS did not change after treatment (6.6 [2.7] vs. 7.2 [3

  12. Burns

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur by direct or indirect contact with heat, electric current, radiation, or chemical agents. Burns can lead ... is. The burn is caused by chemicals or electricity. The person shows signs of shock . The person ...

  13. Burns

    MedlinePlus

    A burn is damage to your body's tissues caused by heat, chemicals, electricity, sunlight, or radiation. Scalds from hot ... and gases are the most common causes of burns. Another kind is an inhalation injury, caused by ...

  14. Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy Suppresses the Early Proinflammatory Immune Response to a Severe Cutaneous Burn Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    Burn wound model Mice were anaesthetised using isoflurane inha- lation. After shaving the dorsum, the exposed skin was washed gently with room...Extracorporeal shock wave therapy suppresses the early proinflammatory immune response to a severe cutaneous burn injury* Thomas A Davis, Alexander...S, Peoples GE, Tadaki D, Elster EA. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy suppresses the early proinflammatory immune response to a severe cutaneous burn

  15. Paracrine Factors from Irradiated Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Improve Skin Regeneration and Angiogenesis in a Porcine Burn Model

    PubMed Central

    Hacker, Stefan; Mittermayr, Rainer; Nickl, Stefanie; Haider, Thomas; Lebherz-Eichinger, Diana; Beer, Lucian; Mitterbauer, Andreas; Leiss, Harald; Zimmermann, Matthias; Schweiger, Thomas; Keibl, Claudia; Hofbauer, Helmut; Gabriel, Christian; Pavone-Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Redl, Heinz; Tschachler, Erwin; Mildner, Michael; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2016-01-01

    Burn wounds pose a serious threat to patients and often require surgical treatment. Skin grafting aims to achieve wound closure but requires a well-vascularized wound bed. The secretome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) has been shown to improve wound healing and angiogenesis. We hypothesized that topical application of the PBMC secretome would improve the quality of regenerating skin, increase angiogenesis, and reduce scar formation after burn injury and skin grafting in a porcine model. Full-thickness burn injuries were created on the back of female pigs. Necrotic areas were excised and the wounds were covered with split-thickness mesh skin grafts. Wounds were treated repeatedly with either the secretome of cultured PBMCs (SecPBMC), apoptotic PBMCs (Apo-SecPBMC), or controls. The wounds treated with Apo-SecPBMC had an increased epidermal thickness, higher number of rete ridges, and more advanced epidermal differentiation than controls. The samples treated with Apo-SecPBMC had a two-fold increase in CD31+ cells, indicating more angiogenesis. These data suggest that the repeated application of Apo-SecPBMC significantly improves epidermal thickness, angiogenesis, and skin quality in a porcine model of burn injury and skin grafting. PMID:27125302

  16. Early anticoagulation therapy for severe burns complicated by inhalation injury in a rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Zhong-Hua; Guo, Guang-Hua; Xiong, Zhen-Fang; Liao, Xincheng; Liu, Ming-Zhuo; Luo, Jinhua

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of early anticoagulation treatment on severe burns complicated by inhalation injury in a rabbit model. Under anesthetization, an electrical burns instrument (100°C) was used to scald the backs of rabbits for 15 sec, which established a 30% III severe burns model. Treatment of the rabbits with early anticoagulation effectively improved the severe burns complicated by inhalation injury-induced lung injury, reduced PaO2, PaCO2 and SPO2 levels, suppressed the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, and increased the activity of IL-10. In addition, it was found that early anticoagulation treatment effectively suppressed the activities of caspase-3 and caspase-9, upregulated the protein expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and decreased the protein expression of protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) in the severe burns model. It was concluded that early anticoagulation treatment affected the severe burns complicated by inhalation injury in a rabbit model through the upregulation of VEGF and downregulation of PAR1 signaling pathways. Thus, early anticoagulation is a potential therapeutic option for severe burns complicated by inhalation injury. PMID:28944866

  17. Impact of Early Inpatient Rehabilitation on Adult Burn Survivors' Functional Outcomes and Resource Utilization.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Manuel; Tushinski, Morris; Jeschke, Marc G

    waiting time for rehab (0.7 ± 1.1 days vs 1.5 ± 2.3 days, P = .010) than patients transferred before the merger. Early initiation of inpatient rehabilitation, after the burn center and the inpatient rehabilitation service were located in the same hospital, improved burn survivors' resource utilization.

  18. Beneficial Effects of Hydrogen-Rich Saline on Early Burn-Wound Progression in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Song Xue; Jin, Yun Yun; Fang, Quan; You, Chuan Gang; Wang, Xin Gang; Hu, Xin Lei; Han, Chun-Mao

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Deep burn wounds undergo a dynamic process known as wound progression that results in a deepening and extension of the initial burn area. The zone of stasis is more likely to develop more severe during wound progression in the presence of hypoperfusion. Hydrogen has been reported to alleviate injury triggered by ischaemia/reperfusion and burns in various organs by selectively quenching oxygen free radicals. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible protective effects of hydrogen against early burn-wound progression. Methods Deep-burn models were established through contact with a boiled, rectangular, brass comb for 20 s. Fifty-six Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham, burn plus saline, and burn plus hydrogen-rich saline (HS) groups with sacrifice and analysis at various time windows (6 h, 24 h, 48 h) post burn. Indexes of oxidative stress, apoptosis and autophagy were measured in each group. The zone of stasis was evaluated using immunofluorescence staining, ELISA, and Western blot to explore the underlying effects and mechanisms post burn. Results The burn-induced increase in malondialdehyde was markedly reduced with HS, while the activities of endogenous antioxidant enzymes were significantly increased. Moreover, HS treatment attenuated increases in apoptosis and autophagy postburn in wounds, according to the TUNEL staining results and the expression analysis of Bax, Bcl-2, caspase-3, Beclin-1 and Atg-5 proteins. Additionally, HS lowered the level of myeloperoxidase and expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in the zone of stasis while augmenting IL-10. The elevated levels of Akt phosphorylation and NF-κB p65 expression post burn were also downregulated by HS management. Conclusion Hydrogen can attenuate early wound progression following deep burn injury. The beneficial effect of hydrogen was mediated by attenuating oxidative stress, which inhibited apoptosis and inflammation, and the Akt/NF-κB signalling pathway may be

  19. Involvement of peripheral artemin signaling in tongue pain: possible mechanism in burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Masamichi; Takeda, Mamoru; Honda, Kuniya; Maruno, Mitsuru; Katagiri, Ayano; Satoh-Kuriwada, Shizuko; Shoji, Noriaki; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Iwata, Koichi

    2015-12-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is characterized by altered sensory qualities, namely tongue pain hypersensitivity. We found that the mRNA expression of Artemin (Artn) in the tongue mucosa of patients with burning mouth syndrome was significantly higher than that of control subjects, and we developed a mouse model of burning mouth syndrome by application of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) diluted with 50% ethanol to the dorsum of the tongue. TNBS treatment to the tongue induced persistent, week-long, noninflammatory tongue pain and a significant increase in Artn expression in the tongue mucosa and marked tongue heat hyperalgesia. Following TNBS treatment, the successive administration of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) antagonist SB366791 or neutralizing anti-Artn antibody completely inhibited the heat hyperalgesia. The number of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family receptor α3 (GFRα3)-positive and TRPV1-positive trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons innervating the tongue significantly increased following TNBS treatment and was significantly reduced by successive administration of neutralizing anti-Artn antibody. The capsaicin-induced current in TG neurons innervating the tongue was enhanced following TNBS treatment and was inhibited by local administration of neutralizing anti-Artn antibody to the tongue. These results suggest that the overexpression of Artn in the TNBS-treated tongue increases the membrane excitability of TG neurons innervating the tongue by increasing TRPV1 sensitivity, which causes heat hyperalgesia. This model may be useful for the study of tongue pain hypersensitivity associated with burning mouth syndrome.

  20. Early management in children with burns: Cooling, wound care and pain management.

    PubMed

    Baartmans, M G A; de Jong, A E E; van Baar, M E; Beerthuizen, G I J M; van Loey, N E E; Tibboel, D; Nieuwenhuis, M K

    2016-06-01

    Early management in burns, i.e. prior to admission in a burn center, is essential for an optimal process and outcome of burn care. Several publications have reported suboptimal early management, including low levels of pain medication after trauma, especially in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the current practice in the Netherlands and factors related to early management in pediatric burns, i.e. cooling, wound covering and pain management. To study possible change and improvement over time, two study periods were compared. This study involved two periods; January 2002-March 2004 (period 1) and January 2007-August 2008 (period 2). All children (0-15 years of age) with acute burns admitted within 24h after burn to one of the three Dutch Burn centers with a formal referral were eligible. Data were obtained from patient records, both retrospectively and prospectively. A total of 323 and 299 children were included in periods 1 and 2, respectively. The vast majority of children in both study periods had been cooled before admission (>90%). Over time, wound covering increased significantly (from 64% to 89%) as well as pain treatment (from 68% to 79%). Predominantly paracetamol and morphine were used. Referral from ambulance services (OR=41.4, 95%CI=16.6-103.0) or general practitioners (OR=59.7, 95%CI=25.1-141.8) were strong independent predictors for not receiving pre-burn center pain medication. On the other hand, flame burns (OR=0.2, 95%CI=0.1-0.5) and more extensive burns (TBSA 5-10%: OR=0.4, 95%CI=-0.2 to 0.8; TBSA≥10%: OR=0.2, 95%CI=0.1-0.4) were independent predictors of receiving pain medication. Referring physicians of children with burns were overall well informed: they cool the wound after burns and cover it before transport to prevent hypothermia and reduce the pain. Additional studies should be conducted to clarify the duration and temperature for cooling to be effective. Furthermore, there is room and a need for improvement regarding early

  1. Early Enteral Nutrition in Burns: Compliance With Guidelines and Associated Outcomes in a Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Mosier, Michael J.; Pham, Tam N.; Klein, Matthew B.; Gibran, Nicole S.; Arnoldo, Brett D.; Gamelli, Richard L.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Herndon, David N.

    2013-01-01

    Early nutritional support is an essential component of burn care to prevent ileus, stress ulceration, and the effects of hypermetabolism. The American Burn Association practice guidelines state that enteral feedings should be initiated as soon as practical. The authors sought to evaluate compliance with early enteral nutrition (EN) guidelines, associated complications, and hospitalization outcomes in a prospective multicenter observational study. They conducted a retrospective review of mechanically ventilated burn patients enrolled in the prospective observational multicenter study “Inflammation and the Host Response to Injury.” Timing of initiation of tube feedings was recorded, with early EN defined as being started within 24 hours of admission. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to distinguish barriers to initiation of EN and the impact of early feeding on development of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, infectious complications, days on mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay, and survival. A total of 153 patients met study inclusion criteria. The cohort comprised 73% men, with a mean age of 41 ± 15 years and a mean %TBSA burn of 46 ± 18%. One hundred twenty-three patients (80%) began EN in the first 24 hours and 145 (95%) by 48 hours. Age, sex, inhalation injury, and full-thickness burn size were similar between those fed by 24 hours vs after 24 hours, except for higher mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II scores (26 vs 23, P = .03) and smaller total burn size (44 vs 54% TBSA burn, P = .01) in those fed early. There was no significant difference in rates of hyperglycemia, abdominal compartment syndrome, or gastrointestinal bleeding between groups. Patients fed early had shorter ICU length of stay (adjusted hazard ratio 0.57, P = 0.03, 95% confidence interval 0.35–0.94) and reduced wound infection risk (adjusted odds ratio 0.28, P = 0.01, 95% confidence interval 0.10–0.76). The

  2. [Inflammasome and its role in immunological and inflammatory response at early stage of burns].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Li, Jiahui; Xia, Zhaofan

    2014-06-01

    Inflammasomes are large multi-protein complexes that serve as a platform for caspase-1 activation, and this process induces subsequent maturation and secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18, as well as pyroptosis. As an important component of the innate immune system, early activation of inflammasomes in a variety of immune cell subsets can mediate inflammatory response and immunological conditions after burn injury. Here, we review the current knowledge of inflammasomes and its role in immunological and inflammatory response at the early stage of burn injury.

  3. [Effects of hydrogen on the lung damage of mice at early stage of severe burn].

    PubMed

    Qin, C; Bian, Y X; Feng, T T; Zhang, J H; Yu, Y H

    2017-11-20

    Objective: To investigate the effects of hydrogen on the lung damage of mice at early stage of severe burn. Methods: One hundred and sixty ICR mice were divided into sham injury, hydrogen, pure burn, and burn+ hydrogen groups according to the random number table, with 40 mice in each group. Mice in pure burn group and burn+ hydrogen group were inflicted with 40% total body surface area full-thickness scald (hereafter referred to as burn) on the back, while mice in sham injury group and hydrogen group were sham injured. Mice in hydrogen group and burn+ hydrogen group inhaled 2% hydrogen for 1 h at post injury hour (PIH) 1 and 6, respectively, while mice in sham injury group and pure burn group inhaled air for 1 h. At PIH 24, lung tissue of six mice in each group was harvested, and then pathological changes of lung tissue were observed by HE staining and the lung tissue injury pathological score was calculated. Inferior vena cava blood and lung tissue of other eight mice in each group were obtained, and then content of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in serum and lung tissue was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in serum and lung tissue was detected by spectrophotometry. After arterial blood of other six mice in each group was collected for detection of arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO(2)), the wet and dry weight of lung tissue were weighted to calculate lung wet to dry weight ratio. The survival rates of the other twenty mice in each group during post injury days 7 were calculated. Data were processed with one-way analysis of variance, LSD test and log-rank test. Results: (1) At PIH 24, lung tissue of mice in sham injury group and hydrogen group showed no abnormality. Mice in pure burn group were with pulmonary interstitial edema, serious rupture of alveolar capillary wall, and infiltration of a large number of inflammatory cells. Mice in burn+ hydrogen group were with mild

  4. Early-Onset Physical Frailty in Adults with Diabesity and Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Tuttle, Lori J; Bittel, Daniel C; Bittel, Adam J; Sinacore, David R

    2017-12-07

    Diabesity (obesity and diabetes mellitus) has been identified as a potential contributor to early-onset frailty. Impairments contributing to early onset of physical frailty in this population are not well understood, and there is little evidence of the impact of peripheral neuropathy on frailty. The purpose of this study was to determine impairments that contribute to early-onset physical frailty in individuals with diabesity and peripheral neuropathy. We studied 105 participants, 82 with diabesity and peripheral neuropathy (57 years of age, body mass index [BMI] 31 kg/m 2 ); 13 with diabesity only (53 years of age, BMI 34 kg/m 2 ) and 10 obese controls (67 years of age, BMI 32 kg/m 2 ). Peripheral neuropathy was determined using Semmes Weinstein monofilaments; physical frailty was classified using the 9-item, modified Physical Performance Test; and knee extension and ankle plantarflexion peak torques were measured using isokinetic dynamometry. Participants with diabesity and peripheral neuropathy were 7.4 times more likely to be classified as physically frail. Impairments in lower-extremity function were associated with classification of frailty. Individuals with diabesity and peripheral neuropathy are particularly likely to be classified as frail. Earlier identification and interventions aimed at improving lower-extremity function may be important to mitigate the early-onset functional decline. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Can we make an early 'do not resuscitate' decision in severe burn patients?

    PubMed

    Yüce, Yücel; Acar, Hakan Ahmet; Erkal, Kutlu Hakan; Tuncay, Erhan

    2017-03-01

    The present study was conducted to examine topic of issuing early do-not-resuscitate (DNR) order at first diagnosis of patients with severe burn injuries in light of current law in Turkey and the medical literature. DNR requires withholding cardiopulmonary resuscitation in event of respiratory or cardiac arrest and allowing natural death to occur. It is frequently enacted for terminal cancer patients and elderly patients with irreversible neurological disorders. Between January 2009 and December 2014, 29 patients (3.44%) with very severe burns were admitted to burn unit. Average total burn surface area (TBSA) was 94.24% (range: 85-100%), and in 10 patients, TBSA was 100%. Additional inhalation burns were present in 26 of the patients (89.65%). All of the patients died, despite every medical intervention. Mean survival was 4.75 days (range: 1-24 days). Total of 17 patients died within 72 hours. Lethal dose 50 (% TBSA at which certain group has 50% chance of survival) rate of our burn center is 62%. Baux indices were used for prognostic evaluation of the patients; mean total Baux score of the patients was 154.13 (range: 117-183). It is well known that numerous problems may be encountered during triage of severely burned patients in Turkey. These patients are referred to burn centers and are frequently transferred via air ambulance between cities, and even countries. They are intubated and mechanical ventilation is initiated at burn center. Many interventions are performed to treat these patients, such as escharotomy, fasciotomy, tangential or fascial excision, central venous catheterization and tracheostomy, or hemodialysis. Yet despite such interventions, these patients die, typically within 48 to 96 hours. Integrity of the body is often lost as result of aggressive intervention with no real benefit, and there are also economic costs to hospital related to use of materials, bed occupancy, and distribution of workforce. For these reasons, as well as patient comfort

  6. Early Detection of NSCLC Using Stromal Markers in Peripheral Blood

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-11-01

    transcriptionally altered and the alteration is tumor dependent . The specific transcriptomic signature of circulating myeloid cells may provide us unique...signature, which may be useful for early lung cancer diagnosis. The specific aims are: Aim 1. To identify a NSCLC- dependent transcriptomic signature in...circulating myeloid cells are transcriptionally altered and the alteration is tumor dependent . The specific transcriptomic signature of circulating

  7. Staphylococcus aureus carriage at admission predicts early-onset pneumonia after burn trauma.

    PubMed

    Fournier, A; Voirol, P; Krähenbühl, M; Bonnemain, C-L; Fournier, C; Dupuis-Lozeron, E; Pantet, O; Pagani, J-L; Revelly, J-P; Sadeghipour, F; Eggimann, P; Que, Y-A

    2017-03-01

    Early-onset pneumonia (EOP) is frequent after burn trauma, increasing morbidity in the critical resuscitation phase, which may preclude early aggressive management of burn wounds. Currently, however, preemptive treatment is not recommended. The aim of this study was to identify predictive factors for EOP that may justify early empirical antibiotic treatment. Data for all burn patients requiring ≥4 h mechanical ventilation (MV) who were admitted between January 2001 and October 2012 were extracted from the hospital's computerized information system. We reviewed EOP episodes (≤7 days) among patients who underwent endotracheal aspiration (ETA) within 5 days after admission. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify independent factors associated with EOP. Logistic regression was used to identify factors predicting EOP development. During the study period, 396 burn patients were admitted. ETA was performed within 5 days in 204/290 patients receiving ≥4 h MV. One hundred and eight patients developed EOP; 47 cases were caused by Staphylococcus aureus, 37 by Haemophilus influenzae, and 23 by Streptococcus pneumoniae. Among the 33 patients showing S. aureus positivity on ETA samples, 16 (48.5 %) developed S. aureus EOP. Among the 156 S. aureus non-carriers, 16 (10.2 %) developed EOP. Staphylococcus aureus carriage independently predicted EOP (p < 0.0001). We identified S. aureus carriage as an independent and strong predictor of EOP. As rapid point-of-care testing for S. aureus is readily available, we recommend testing of all patients at admission for burn trauma and the consideration of early preemptive treatment in all positive patients. Further studies are needed to evaluate this new strategy.

  8. Procalcitonin for the early diagnosis of sepsis in burn patients: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Luís; Afreixo, Vera; Santos, Filipe; Almeida, Luís; Paiva, José Artur

    2017-11-01

    The gold standard for sepsis diagnosis in burn patient still relies on microbiological cultures, which take 48-72h to provide results, delaying the start of antimicrobial therapy. Thus, biomarkers allowing an earlier sepsis diagnosis in burn patients are needed. This retrospective observational study included 150 burn patients with total burned surface area ≥15%. Clinical diagnosis of sepsis among these patients was done according to the American Burn Association criteria. Biomarker (procalcitonin, white blood cells and platelet countings, prothrombinemia, D-dimers, C-reactive protein, blood lactate and temperature) values were available for 48 patients without sepsis (2767 timepoints) and 102 patients with sepsis (652 timepoints). Quantitative variables were compared with Mann-Whitney tests and qualitative variables were compared with Pearson chi-square test. Effect size was measured by the probability of superiority. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves evaluate capacity for sepsis diagnosis. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were calculated for some cut-off values, including the best cut-off defined by the maximum of Youden index. Statistically significant differences between the groups of septic and non-septic patients, with medium to large effect size, were detected for all the biomarkers considered, except temperature. PCT was the biomarker with the largest AUC and effect size (AUC=0.71). Analysis of the PCT ROC curve showed that 0.5ng/mL cut-off presented highest sensitivity and lowest specificity, whereas 1.5ng/mL cut-off was associated with lowest sensitivity and highest specificity. Procalcitonin showed to be the best of the biomarkers studied for an early diagnosis of sepsis. Its use should be considered in antimicrobial stewardship programs in Burn Units. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  9. Optimal Timing for Early Excision in a Deep Partial Thickness Porcine Burn Model.

    PubMed

    Toussaint, Jimmy; Chung, Won Taek; Mc Clain, Steve; Raut, Vivek; Singer, Adam J

    Many deep partial thickness burns require more than 3 weeks to heal resulting in disfiguring and dysfunctional scarring. Early excision of the eschar has been shown to improve outcomes in deep burns; however, the optimal timing of the excision remains controversial. We compared wound healing and scarring of deep partial thickness burns that were excised at different time points in a porcine model. Deep partial thickness burns (2.5 by 2.5 cm each) were created on the backs of six anesthetized pigs using a previously validated model. The burns were randomly assigned to excision at days 2, 4, or 7 using an electric dermatome. Full thickness 4-mm punch biopsies were obtained at several time points for determination of re-epithelialization and at day 28 for determination of scar depth. Digital imaging was used to calculate percentage wound contraction at day 28. There were no statistically significant differences in wound re-epithelialization at any of the studied time points. Scar depth and percentage wound contraction were also similar among the wounds excised at 2, 4, and 7 days (4.4 ± 1.1 mm vs 3.9 ± 1.1 mm vs 4.1 ± 1.2 mm and 52.9 ± 17.9% vs 52.6 ± 15.6% vs 52.5 ± 13.8%, respectively). Timing of eschar excision (at 2, 4, or 7 days) does not affect the rates of re-epithelialization and scarring in a deep partial thickness porcine burn model. Timing of eschar excision may not change outcomes if performed within the first 2 to 7 days after injury.

  10. Heterogeneity in fire severity within early season and late season prescribed burns in a mixed-conifer forest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knapp, E.E.; Keeley, J.E.

    2006-01-01

    Structural heterogeneity in forests of the Sierra Nevada was historically produced through variation in fire regimes and local environmental factors. The amount of heterogeneity that prescription burning can achieve might now be more limited owing to high fuel loads and increased fuel continuity. Topography, woody fuel loading, and vegetative composition were quantified in plots within replicated early and late season burn units. Two indices of fire severity were evaluated in the same plots after the burns. Scorch height ranged from 2.8 to 25.4 m in early season plots and 3.1 to 38.5 m in late season plots, whereas percentage of ground surface burned ranged from 24 to 96% in early season plots and from 47 to 100% in late season plots. Scorch height was greatest in areas with steeper slopes, higher basal area of live trees, high percentage of basal area composed of pine, and more small woody fuel. Percentage of area burned was greatest in areas with less bare ground and rock cover (more fuel continuity), steeper slopes, and units burned in the fall (lower fuel moisture). Thus topographic and biotic factors still contribute to the abundant heterogeneity in fire severity with prescribed burning, even under the current high fuel loading conditions. Burning areas with high fuel loads in early season when fuels are moister may lead to patterns of heterogeneity in fire effects that more closely approximate the expected patchiness of historical fires.

  11. Should early amputation impact initial fluid therapy algorithms in burns resuscitation? A retrospective analysis using 3D modelling.

    PubMed

    Staruch, Robert M T; Beverly, A; Lewis, D; Wilson, Y; Martin, N

    2017-02-01

    While the epidemiology of amputations in patients with burns has been investigated previously, the effect of an amputation on burn size and its impact on fluid management have not been considered in the literature. Fluid resuscitation volumes are based on the percentage of the total body surface area (%TBSA) burned calculated during the primary survey. There is currently no consensus as to whether the fluid volumes should be recalculated after an amputation to compensate for the new body surface area. The aim of this study was to model the impact of an amputation on burn size and predicted fluid requirement. A retrospective search was performed of the database at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham Regional Burns Centre to identify all patients who had required an early amputation as a result of their burn injury. The search identified 10 patients over a 3-year period. Burn injuries were then mapped using 3D modelling software. BurnCase3D is a computer program that allows accurate plotting of burn injuries on a digital mannequin adjusted for height and weight. Theoretical fluid requirements were then calculated using the Parkland formula for the first 24 h, and Herndon formula for the second 24 h, taking into consideration the effects of the amputation on residual burn size. This study demonstrated that amputation can have an unpredictable effect on burn size that results in a significant deviation from predicted fluid resuscitation volumes. This discrepancy in fluid estimation may cause iatrogenic complications due to over-resuscitation in burn-injured casualties. Combining a more accurate estimation of postamputation burn size with goal-directed fluid therapy during the resuscitation phase should enable burn care teams to optimise patient outcomes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. Multiple Biomarker Panels for Early Detection of Breast Cancer in Peripheral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Deng, Youping; Drabier, Renee

    2013-01-01

    Detecting breast cancer at early stages can be challenging. Traditional mammography and tissue microarray that have been studied for early breast cancer detection and prediction have many drawbacks. Therefore, there is a need for more reliable diagnostic tools for early detection of breast cancer due to a number of factors and challenges. In the paper, we presented a five-marker panel approach based on SVM for early detection of breast cancer in peripheral blood and show how to use SVM to model the classification and prediction problem of early detection of breast cancer in peripheral blood. We found that the five-marker panel can improve the prediction performance (area under curve) in the testing data set from 0.5826 to 0.7879. Further pathway analysis showed that the top four five-marker panels are associated with signaling, steroid hormones, metabolism, immune system, and hemostasis, which are consistent with previous findings. Our prediction model can serve as a general model for multibiomarker panel discovery in early detection of other cancers. PMID:24371830

  13. Multiple biomarker panels for early detection of breast cancer in peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Deng, Youping; Drabier, Renee

    2013-01-01

    Detecting breast cancer at early stages can be challenging. Traditional mammography and tissue microarray that have been studied for early breast cancer detection and prediction have many drawbacks. Therefore, there is a need for more reliable diagnostic tools for early detection of breast cancer due to a number of factors and challenges. In the paper, we presented a five-marker panel approach based on SVM for early detection of breast cancer in peripheral blood and show how to use SVM to model the classification and prediction problem of early detection of breast cancer in peripheral blood. We found that the five-marker panel can improve the prediction performance (area under curve) in the testing data set from 0.5826 to 0.7879. Further pathway analysis showed that the top four five-marker panels are associated with signaling, steroid hormones, metabolism, immune system, and hemostasis, which are consistent with previous findings. Our prediction model can serve as a general model for multibiomarker panel discovery in early detection of other cancers.

  14. Identification of early B cell precursors (stage 1 and 2 hematogones) in the peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Kurzer, Jason H; Weinberg, Olga K

    2018-05-25

    Differentiating malignant B-lymphoblasts from early benign B cell precursors (hematogones) is a vital component of the diagnosis of B-lymphoblastic leukaemia. It has been previously reported that only late-stage B cell precursors circulate in the peripheral blood. Consequently, flow cytometric detection of cells with immunophenotypic findings similar to earlier stage precursors in the peripheral blood justifiably raises concern for involvement by B-lymphoblastic leukaemia. We report here, however, that benign early B cell precursors can indeed be detected in the peripheral blood, thus complicating the interpretation of flow cytometric findings derived from these sample types. A retrospective search of our collective databases identified 13 cases containing circulating early stage B cell precursors. The patients ranged in age from 15 days to 85 years old. All positive cases demonstrated that the earlier B cell precursors were associated with later stage precursors, a finding that could help differentiate these cells from B-lymphoblastic leukaemia. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Use of porcine acellular dermal matrix following early dermabrasion reduces length of stay in extensive deep dermal burns.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhi-Qian; Qiu, Le; Gao, You; Li, Jin-Hu; Zhang, Xin-He; Yang, Xin-Lei; Peszel, April; Chen, Xu-Lin

    2016-05-01

    Extensive deep partial-thickness burns still seriously challenge the surgeon's abilities. This study aimed to assess the impact of early dermabrasion combined with porcine acellular dermal matrix (ADM) in extensive deep dermal burns. From September 2009 to September 2013, a total of 60 adult patients sustained greater than 50% total body surface area (TBSA) burn by hot water or gas explosion were divided into three groups based on dermabrasion: group A (early dermabrasion and porcine ADM), group B (early dermabrasion and nano-silver dressings), and group C (conservative group). The wound healing time and length of hospital stay were analyzed. Scar assessment was performed at 3 and 12 months after the injury with a modified Vancouver Scar Scale linked with TBSA (mVSS-TBSA). No significant difference was found in mean burn size, burn depth, age, male-to-female ratio, or incidence of inhalation injury between the patients in the three groups (p>0.05). Compared with groups B and C, the patients that received early dermabrasion combined with porcine ADM had a shorter wound healing time (p<0.01). The burn patients treated with early dermabrasion and porcine ADM coverage had a mean length of hospital stay of 28.3 days (±7.2), which was significantly shorter than that of groups B and C (p<0.05-0.01). The mVSS-TBSA of patients in group A was significantly improved in comparison with groups B and C at 3 and 12 months after the injury. There was no significant difference in the mortality rate between the three groups (p>0.05). Early dermabrasion combined with porcine ADM coverage facilitates wound healing, reduces the length of hospital stay, and improves esthetic and functional results in extensive deep dermal burns with burn size over 50% TBSA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  16. Postoperative Delirium in Severely Burned Patients Undergoing Early Escharotomy: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhenggang; Liu, Jiabin; Li, Jia; Wang, Xiaoyan; Guo, Hui; Ma, Panpan; Su, Xiaojun; Li, Ping

    The aim of this study is to investigate the incidence, related risk factors, and outcomes of postoperative delirium (POD) in severely burned patients undergoing early escharotomy. This study included 385 severely burned patients (injured <1 week; TBSA, 31-50% or 11-20%; American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status, II-IV) aged 18 to 65 years, who underwent early escharotomy between October 2014 and December 2015, and were selected by cluster sampling. The authors excluded patients with preoperative delirium or diagnosed dementia, depression, or cognitive dysfunction. Preoperative, perioperative, intraoperative, and postoperative information, such as demographic characteristics, vital signs, and health history were collected. The Confusion Assessment Method was used once daily for 5 days after surgery to identify POD. Stepwise binary logistic regression analysis was used to identify the risk factors for POD, t-tests, and χ tests were performed to compare the outcomes of patients with and without the condition. Fifty-six (14.55%) of the patients in the sample were diagnosed with POD. Stepwise binary logistic regression showed that the significant risk factors for POD in severely burned patients undergoing early escharotomy were advanced age (>50 years old), a history of alcohol consumption (>3/week), high American Society of Anesthesiologists classification (III or IV), time between injury and surgery (>2 days), number of previous escharotomies (>2), combined intravenous and inhalation anesthesia, no bispectral index applied, long duration surgery (>180 min), and intraoperative hypotension (mean arterial pressure < 55 mm Hg). On the basis of the different odds ratios, the authors established a weighted model. When the score of a patient's weighted odds ratios is more than 6, the incidence of POD increased significantly (P < .05). When the score of a patient's weighted odds ratios is more than 6, the incidence of POD increased significantly (P < .05

  17. Enzymatic debridement for the treatment of severely burned upper extremities - early single center experiences.

    PubMed

    Cordts, Tomke; Horter, Johannes; Vogelpohl, Julian; Kremer, Thomas; Kneser, Ulrich; Hernekamp, Jochen-Frederick

    2016-06-24

    Severe burns of hands and arms are complex and challenging injuries. The Standard of care (SOC) - necrosectomy with skin grafting - is often associated with poor functional or aesthetic outcome. Enzymatic debridement (ED) is considered one promising alternative but, until recently, results proved to be highly variable. Between 04/2014 and 04/2015, 16 patients with deep partial- to full-thickness burns of the upper extremities underwent enzymatic debridement (ED) in our Burn Center and were evaluated for extent of additional surgery, wound healing, pain management and functional parameters. Following ED, no further surgical intervention was required in 53.8 % of the study population. In patients who required surgical treatment, the the skin-grafted area could be reduced by 37.0 % when compared to initial assessment. Time from injury to ED was 24.4 h and patients were able to start physical therapy after 2.0 days but suffered from prolonged wound closure (28.0 days). Regionally administered anesthesia proved to be superior to pain medication alone as pain levels and consumed morphine-equivalent were lower. Post-demission follow-up showed good functional results and pain levels with low scores in two self-report questionnaires (DASH, PRWE-G) but 3 patients reported increased susceptibility to shear stress. Based on these early experiences, we developed a 3-step algorithm for consecutive patients allowing appropriate and individualized treatment selection. We see a potential benefit for ED in the treatment of severely burned hands and forearms but further investigations and proper prospective, randomized controlled trials are needed to statistically support any outlined assumptions.

  18. The influence of burn severity on postfire vegetation recovery and albedo change during early succession in North American boreal forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yufang; Randerson, James T.; Goetz, Scott J.; Beck, Pieter S. A.; Loranty, Michael M.; Goulden, Michael L.

    2012-03-01

    Severity of burning can influence multiple aspects of forest composition, carbon cycling, and climate forcing. We quantified how burn severity affected vegetation recovery and albedo change during early succession in Canadian boreal regions by combining satellite observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Canadian Large Fire Database. We used the MODIS-derived difference Normalized Burn Ratio (dNBR) and initial changes in spring albedo as measures of burn severity. We found that the most severe burns had the greatest reduction in summer MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) in the first year after fire, indicating greater loss of vegetation cover. By 5-8 years after fire, summer EVI for all severity classes had recovered to within 90%-108% of prefire levels. Spring and summer albedo progressively increased during the first 7 years after fire, with more severely burned areas showing considerably larger postfire albedo increases during spring and more rapid increases during summer as compared with moderate- and low-severity burns. After 5-7 years, increases in spring albedo above prefire levels were considerably larger in high-severity burns (0.20 ± 0.06; defined by dNBR percentiles greater than 75%) as compared to changes observed in moderate- (0.16 ± 0.06; for dNBR percentiles between 45% and 75%) or low-severity burns (0.13 ± 0.06; for dNBR percentiles between 20% and 45%). The sensitivity of spring albedo to dNBR was similar in all ecozones and for all vegetation types along gradients of burn severity. These results suggest carbon losses associated with increases in burn severity observed in some areas of boreal forests may be at least partly offset, in terms of climate impacts, by increases in negative forcing associated with changes in surface albedo.

  19. Biomass burning emissions in north Australia during the early dry season: an overview of the 2014 SAFIRED campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallet, Marc D.; Desservettaz, Maximilien J.; Miljevic, Branka; Milic, Andelija; Ristovski, Zoran D.; Alroe, Joel; Cravigan, Luke T.; Rohan Jayaratne, E.; Paton-Walsh, Clare; Griffith, David W. T.; Wilson, Stephen R.; Kettlewell, Graham; van der Schoot, Marcel V.; Selleck, Paul; Reisen, Fabienne; Lawson, Sarah J.; Ward, Jason; Harnwell, James; Cheng, Min; Gillett, Rob W.; Molloy, Suzie B.; Howard, Dean; Nelson, Peter F.; Morrison, Anthony L.; Edwards, Grant C.; Williams, Alastair G.; Chambers, Scott D.; Werczynski, Sylvester; Williams, Leah R.; Winton, V. Holly L.; Atkinson, Brad; Wang, Xianyu; Keywood, Melita D.

    2017-11-01

    The SAFIRED (Savannah Fires in the Early Dry Season) campaign took place from 29 May until 30 June 2014 at the Australian Tropical Atmospheric Research Station (ATARS) in the Northern Territory, Australia. The purpose of this campaign was to investigate emissions from fires in the early dry season in northern Australia. Measurements were made of biomass burning aerosols, volatile organic compounds, polycyclic aromatic carbons, greenhouse gases, radon, speciated atmospheric mercury and trace metals. Aspects of the biomass burning aerosol emissions investigated included; emission factors of various species, physical and chemical aerosol properties, aerosol aging, micronutrient supply to the ocean, nucleation, and aerosol water uptake. Over the course of the month-long campaign, biomass burning signals were prevalent and emissions from several large single burning events were observed at ATARS.Biomass burning emissions dominated the gas and aerosol concentrations in this region. Dry season fires are extremely frequent and widespread across the northern region of Australia, which suggests that the measured aerosol and gaseous emissions at ATARS are likely representative of signals across the entire region of north Australia. Air mass forward trajectories show that these biomass burning emissions are carried north-west over the Timor Sea and could influence the atmosphere over Indonesia and the tropical atmosphere over the Indian Ocean. Here we present characteristics of the biomass burning observed at the sampling site and provide an overview of the more specific outcomes of the SAFIRED campaign.

  20. Health-related quality of life (EQ-5D) early after injury predicts long-term pain after burn.

    PubMed

    Gauffin, Emelie; Öster, Caisa; Sjöberg, Folke; Gerdin, Bengt; Ekselius, Lisa

    2016-12-01

    Chronic pain after burn can have severe physical and psychological effects on former patients years after the initial injury. Although the issue of pain after burn has gained increased attention over the past years, prospective, longitudinal studies are scarce. Our aim was to prospectively investigate consecutive burn patients for pain severity over time and to evaluate the prevalence and characteristics of post-burn pain to 2-7 years after the burn. As an additional aim, the effects of burn and individual-related factors, especially health-related Quality of Life (HRQoL), were investigated. Sixty-seven consecutive burn patients were assessed during acute care at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months, as well as at 2-7 years post-burn. HRQoL, symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other psychiatric disorders were investigated. During the interviews that took place 2-7 years after the injury (mean 4.6±1.9 years), current chronic post-burn pain was assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form (BPI-SF). One-third of the patients still reported pain 2-7 years after the injury. Pain severity and interference with daily life were mainly mild to moderate though they were found to be associated with significantly lower HRQoL. Chronic pain after burn was associated with both burn- and individual-related factors. In logistic regression analysis HRQoL at 3 and 12 months and symptoms of PTSD at 12 months were independent factors in predicting chronic pain after burn. Pain after burn becomes a chronic burden for many former burn patients and decreases HRQoL. A novel finding in this study was that HRQoL assessed early after burn was a predictor for the development of chronic pain. This finding may help to predict future pain problems and serve as an indicator for pain preventive measures. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Recursive SVM biomarker selection for early detection of breast cancer in peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Kaufman, Howard L; Deng, Youping; Drabier, Renee

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is worldwide the second most common type of cancer after lung cancer. Traditional mammography and Tissue Microarray has been studied for early cancer detection and cancer prediction. However, there is a need for more reliable diagnostic tools for early detection of breast cancer. This can be a challenge due to a number of factors and logistics. First, obtaining tissue biopsies can be difficult. Second, mammography may not detect small tumors, and is often unsatisfactory for younger women who typically have dense breast tissue. Lastly, breast cancer is not a single homogeneous disease but consists of multiple disease states, each arising from a distinct molecular mechanism and having a distinct clinical progression path which makes the disease difficult to detect and predict in early stages. In the paper, we present a Support Vector Machine based on Recursive Feature Elimination and Cross Validation (SVM-RFE-CV) algorithm for early detection of breast cancer in peripheral blood and show how to use SVM-RFE-CV to model the classification and prediction problem of early detection of breast cancer in peripheral blood.The training set which consists of 32 health and 33 cancer samples and the testing set consisting of 31 health and 34 cancer samples were randomly separated from a dataset of peripheral blood of breast cancer that is downloaded from Gene Express Omnibus. First, we identified the 42 differentially expressed biomarkers between "normal" and "cancer". Then, with the SVM-RFE-CV we extracted 15 biomarkers that yield zero cross validation score. Lastly, we compared the classification and prediction performance of SVM-RFE-CV with that of SVM and SVM Recursive Feature Elimination (SVM-RFE). We found that 1) the SVM-RFE-CV is suitable for analyzing noisy high-throughput microarray data, 2) it outperforms SVM-RFE in the robustness to noise and in the ability to recover informative features, and 3) it can improve the prediction performance (Area Under

  2. Early dietary sodium restriction disrupts the peripheral anatomical development of the gustatory system.

    PubMed

    Krimm, R F; Hill, D L

    1999-05-01

    Dietary sodium restriction has profound effects on the development of peripheral taste function and central taste system anatomy. This study examined whether early dietary sodium restriction also affects innervation of taste buds. The number of geniculate ganglion cells that innervate single fungiform taste buds were quantified for the midregion of the tongue in two groups of rats: those fed either a low-sodium diet and those fed a sodium replete diet (control rats) from early prenatal development through adulthood. The same mean number of ganglion cells in developmentally sodium-restricted and control adult rats innervated taste buds on the midregion of the tongue. However, the characteristic relationship of the larger the taste bud, the more neurons that innervate it did not develop in sodium-restricted rats. The failure to form such a relationship in experimental rats was likely due to a substantially smaller mean taste bud volume than controls and probably not to changes in innervation. Further experiments demonstrated that the altered association between number of innervating neurons and taste bud size in restricted rats was reversible. Feeding developmentally sodium-restricted rats a sodium replete diet at adulthood resulted in an increase in taste bud size. Accordingly, the high correlation between taste bud volume and innervation was established in sodium-replete rats. Findings from the current study reveal that early dietary manipulations influence neuron-target interactions; however, the effects of dietary sodium restriction on peripheral gustatory anatomy can be completely restored, even in adult animals.

  3. Preliminary evidence of early bone resorption in a sheep model of acute burn injury: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Klein, Gordon L; Xie, Yixia; Qin, Yi-Xian; Lin, Liangjun; Hu, Minyi; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Bonewald, Lynda F

    2014-03-01

    Treatment with bisphosphonates within the first 10 days of severe burn injury completely prevents bone loss. We therefore postulated that bone resorption occurs early post burn and is the primary explanation for acute bone loss in these patients. Our objective was to assess bone for histological and biomechanical evidence of early resorption post burn. We designed a randomized controlled study utilizing a sheep model of burn injury. Three sheep received a 40 % total body surface area burn under isoflurane anesthesia, and three other sheep received cotton-smoke inhalation and served as control. Burned sheep were killed 5 days post procedure and controls were killed 2 days post procedure. Backscatter scanning electron microscopy was performed on iliac crests obtained immediately postmortem along with quantitative histomorphometry and compression testing to determine bone strength (Young's modulus). Blood ionized Ca was also determined in the first 24 h post procedure as was urinary CTx. Three of three sheep killed at 5 days had evidence of scalloping of the bone surface, an effect of bone resorption, whereas none of the three sheep killed at 2 days post procedure had scalloping. One of the three burned sheep killed at 5 days showed quantitative doubling of the eroded surface and halving of the bone volume compared to sham controls. Mean values of Young's modulus were approximately one third lower in the burned sheep killed at 5 days compared to controls, p = 0.08 by unpaired t test, suggesting weaker bone. These data suggest early post-burn bone resorption. Urine CTx normalized to creatinine did not differ between groups at 24 h post procedure because the large amounts of fluids received by the burned sheep may have diluted urine creatinine and CTx and because the urine volume produced by the burned sheep was threefold that of the controls. We calculated 24 h urinary CTx excretion, and with this calculation CTx excretion/24 h in the burned sheep was

  4. [The brothers of Jumiege--the peripheral nervous system in early French mythology].

    PubMed

    Brean, Are

    2002-03-20

    This article reviews the process of discovery of the nervous system from Pythagoras (570-500 BC) to Galen (130-201 AD). After Galen, no anatomical studies were performed before the renaissance. According to a legend, probably produced for political reasons, two brothers, sons of the French king Clovis II, revolted against their father and were sentenced to loose their physical powers by having the nerves of their arms and legs cut. They were then set adrift on the river Seine, stranding at the Jumiège monastery. The earliest written version of this legend stems from the fourteenth century; it was probably a part of the local French mythology. This indicates that the existence of the peripheral nervous system, and therefore also in part the knowledge contained in the early anatomical works, quite early may have been more or less known outside academic circles.

  5. Astaxanthin attenuates early acute kidney injury following severe burns in rats by ameliorating oxidative stress and mitochondrial-related apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Song-Xue; Zhou, Han-Lei; Huang, Chun-Lan; You, Chuan-Gang; Fang, Quan; Wu, Pan; Wang, Xin-Gang; Han, Chun-Mao

    2015-04-13

    Early acute kidney injury (AKI) is a devastating complication in critical burn patients, and it is associated with severe morbidity and mortality. The mechanism of AKI is multifactorial. Astaxanthin (ATX) is a natural compound that is widely distributed in marine organisms; it is a strong antioxidant and exhibits other biological effects that have been well studied in various traumatic injuries and diseases. Hence, we attempted to explore the potential protection of ATX against early post burn AKI and its possible mechanisms of action. The classic severe burn rat model was utilized for the histological and biochemical assessments of the therapeutic value and mechanisms of action of ATX. Upon ATX treatment, renal tubular injury and the levels of serum creatinine and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin were improved. Furthermore, relief of oxidative stress and tubular apoptosis in rat kidneys post burn was also observed. Additionally, ATX administration increased Akt and Bad phosphorylation and further down-regulated the expression of other downstream pro-apoptotic proteins (cytochrome c and caspase-3/9); these effects were reversed by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. Moreover, the protective effect of ATX presents a dose-dependent enhancement. The data above suggested that ATX protects against early AKI following severe burns in rats, which was attributed to its ability to ameliorate oxidative stress and inhibit apoptosis by modulating the mitochondrial-apoptotic pathway, regarded as the Akt/Bad/Caspases signalling cascade.

  6. Astaxanthin Attenuates Early Acute Kidney Injury Following Severe Burns in Rats by Ameliorating Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial-Related Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Song-Xue; Zhou, Han-Lei; Huang, Chun-Lan; You, Chuan-Gang; Fang, Quan; Wu, Pan; Wang, Xin-Gang; Han, Chun-Mao

    2015-01-01

    Early acute kidney injury (AKI) is a devastating complication in critical burn patients, and it is associated with severe morbidity and mortality. The mechanism of AKI is multifactorial. Astaxanthin (ATX) is a natural compound that is widely distributed in marine organisms; it is a strong antioxidant and exhibits other biological effects that have been well studied in various traumatic injuries and diseases. Hence, we attempted to explore the potential protection of ATX against early post burn AKI and its possible mechanisms of action. The classic severe burn rat model was utilized for the histological and biochemical assessments of the therapeutic value and mechanisms of action of ATX. Upon ATX treatment, renal tubular injury and the levels of serum creatinine and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin were improved. Furthermore, relief of oxidative stress and tubular apoptosis in rat kidneys post burn was also observed. Additionally, ATX administration increased Akt and Bad phosphorylation and further down-regulated the expression of other downstream pro-apoptotic proteins (cytochrome c and caspase-3/9); these effects were reversed by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. Moreover, the protective effect of ATX presents a dose-dependent enhancement. The data above suggested that ATX protects against early AKI following severe burns in rats, which was attributed to its ability to ameliorate oxidative stress and inhibit apoptosis by modulating the mitochondrial-apoptotic pathway, regarded as the Akt/Bad/Caspases signalling cascade. PMID:25871290

  7. Risk factors for early failure after peripheral endovascular intervention: application of a reliability engineering approach.

    PubMed

    Meltzer, Andrew J; Graham, Ashley; Connolly, Peter H; Karwowski, John K; Bush, Harry L; Frazier, Peter I; Schneider, Darren B

    2013-01-01

    We apply an innovative and novel analytic approach, based on reliability engineering (RE) principles frequently used to characterize the behavior of manufactured products, to examine outcomes after peripheral endovascular intervention. We hypothesized that this would allow for improved prediction of outcome after peripheral endovascular intervention, specifically with regard to identification of risk factors for early failure. Patients undergoing infrainguinal endovascular intervention for chronic lower-extremity ischemia from 2005 to 2010 were identified in a prospectively maintained database. The primary outcome of failure was defined as patency loss detected by duplex ultrasonography, with or without clinical failure. Analysis included univariate and multivariate Cox regression models, as well as RE-based analysis including product life-cycle models and Weibull failure plots. Early failures were distinguished using the RE principle of "basic rating life," and multivariate models identified independent risk factors for early failure. From 2005 to 2010, 434 primary endovascular peripheral interventions were performed for claudication (51.8%), rest pain (16.8%), or tissue loss (31.3%). Fifty-five percent of patients were aged ≥75 years; 57% were men. Failure was noted after 159 (36.6%) interventions during a mean follow-up of 18 months (range, 0-71 months). Using multivariate (Cox) regression analysis, rest pain and tissue loss were independent predictors of patency loss, with hazard ratios of 2.5 (95% confidence interval, 1.6-4.1; P < 0.001) and 3.2 (95% confidence interval, 2.0-5.2, P < 0.001), respectively. The distribution of failure times for both claudication and critical limb ischemia fit distinct Weibull plots, with different characteristics: interventions for claudication demonstrated an increasing failure rate (β = 1.22, θ = 13.46, mean time to failure = 12.603 months, index of fit = 0.99037, R(2) = 0.98084), whereas interventions for critical limb

  8. Soil nutrients and microbial activity after early and late season prescribed burns in a Sierra Nevada mixed conifer forest

    Treesearch

    Sarah T. Hamman; Ingrid C. Burke; Eric E. Knapp

    2008-01-01

    Restoring the natural fire regime to forested systems that have experienced fire exclusion throughout the past century can be a challenge due to the heavy fuel loading conditions. Fire is being re-introduced to mixed conifer forests in the Sierra Nevada through both early season and late season prescribed burns, even though most fires historically occurred in the late...

  9. Peripheral Synucleinopathy in Early Parkinson’s Disease: Submandibular Gland Needle Biopsy Findings

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Charles H.; Dugger, Brittany N.; Hentz, Joseph G.; Hinni, Michael L.; Lott, David G.; Driver-Dunckley, Erika; Mehta, Shyamal; Serrano, Geidy; Sue, Lucia I.; Duffy, Amy; Intorcia, Anthony; Filon, Jessica; Pullen, Joel; Walker, Douglas G.; Beach, Thomas G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Finding a peripheral tissue biopsy site to diagnose early Parkinson’s disease would be of value for clinical care, biomarker validation, and as research enrollment criteria. While autopsy and advanced Parkinson’s disease studies suggest submandibular gland is an important biopsy site, there are no studies in early Parkinson’s disease. Objectives Determine whether needle biopsy of the submandibular gland reveals Lewy type α-synucleinopathy in early Parkinson’s disease. Methods Twenty-five early Parkinson’s disease (duration < 5 years) and 10 controls underwent transcutaneous needle core biopsies of the submandibular gland. Tissue was stained for phosphorylated α-synuclein, reviewed blind to clinical diagnosis, and only nerve element staining was considered positive. Results Mean (Standard Deviation) age 69.5 (8.3) for Parkinson’s disease group, 64.8 (8.0) years for controls, and disease duration 2.6 (1.1) years. Six Parkinson’s disease and one control subject had inadequate glandular tissue. Positive staining was found in 14/19 (74%) Parkinson’s disease and 2/9 (22%) control subjects. Parkinson’s disease positive and negative cases did not differ clinically. Adverse events (mainly swelling and bruising) were common (77% of cases), but were minor and transient. Conclusions Submandibular gland needle biopsies identified phosphorylated α-synuclein staining in 74% of early Parkinson’s disease subjects. False positives may be true false positives or may represent prodromal Parkinson’s disease. If confirmed in larger studies with eventual autopsy confirmation, the potential value of submandibular gland biopsies for early Parkinson’s disease may be to aid in clinical trial inclusion/exclusion and eventually serve as a gold standard for biomarker studies short of autopsy confirmation. PMID:26799362

  10. Early assessment and identification of posttraumatic stress disorder, satisfaction with appearance and coping in patients with burns.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Oili; Wickman, Marie; Björnhagen, Viveca; Friberg, Mona; Wengström, Yvonne

    2016-12-01

    The first year after severe burn is a psychologically challenging period for the patient. Patients may still struggle with burn-related physical and psychological problems such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and body image dissatisfaction (BID). This study investigates the presence of PTSD, BID and coping, at three, six and twelve months after discharge for early identification of patients in need of focused support during rehabilitation. Fifty-two adult patients with different degrees of burns were followed at three, six and twelve months after discharge and 36 patients completed all assessment points. A standardized clinical protocol was used for systematic assessment of PTSD (IES-R), BID (SWAP-Swe) and Coping (CBQ). The follow-up included an intervention with a burn nurse as a complement to the existing program. Approximately half of the patients had a risk of developing PTSD three months after discharge from hospital, and body image dissatisfaction was found to potentially predict risk of PTSD during follow-up. The findings suggest that it is important to include patients with less extensive burns in follow-up as this group is at risk of development of PTSD. Using standardized questionnaires in early follow-up along with assessment of body image dissatisfaction may facilitate detection of psychological problems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  11. The Relationship of Early Pain Scores and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Burned Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    Patterson DR, Carrigan L, Questad KA, Robinson R. Post - traumatic stress disorder in hospitalized patients with burn injuries. J Burn Care Rehabil...Sieck HS. Post - traumatic stress disorder . J Burn Care Rehabil 1990;11:96. 6. Van Loey NE, Maas CJ, Faber AW, Taal LA. Predictors of chronic...20. Holbrook TL, Galarneau MR, Dye JL, Quinn K, Dougherty AL. Morphine use after combat injury in Iraq and post - traumatic stress disorder . N Engl J

  12. Development of an Animal Model for Burn-Blast Combined Injury and Cardiopulmonary System Changes in the Early Shock Stage.

    PubMed

    Hu, Quan; Chai, Jiake; Hu, Sen; Fan, Jun; Wang, Hong-Wei; Ma, Li; Duan, Hong-Jie; Liu, Lingying; Yang, Hongming; Li, Bai-Ling; Wang, Yi-He

    2015-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to establish an animal model for burn-blast combined injury research and elaborate cardiopulmonary system changes in the early shock stage. In this study, royal demolition explosive or RDX (hexagon, ring trimethylene nitramine) was used as an explosive source, and the injury conditions of the canine test subjects at various distances to the explosion (30, 50, and 70 cm) were observed by gross anatomy and pathology to determine a larger animal model of moderate blast injury. The canines were then subjected to a 35 % total body surface area (TBSA) full-thickness flame injury using napalm, which completed the development of a burn-blast combined injury model. Based on this model, the hemodynamic changes and arterial blood gas analysis after the burn-blast combined injury were measured to identify the cardiopulmonary system characteristics. In this research, RDX explosion and flame injury were used to develop a severe burn-blast injury animal model that was stable, close to reality, and easily controllable. The hemodynamic and arterial blood gas changes in the canine subjects after burn-blast injury changed distinctly from the burn and blast injuries. Blood pressure and cardiac output fluctuated, and the preload was significantly reduced, whereas the afterload significantly increased. Meanwhile, the oxygen saturation (SO2) decreased markedly with carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO2), and lactic acid (Lac) rose, and oxygen partial pressure (PO2) reduced. These changes suggested that immediate clinical treatment is important during burn-blast injury both to stabilize cardiac function and supply blood volume and to reduce the vascular permeability, thereby preventing acute pneumonedema or other complications.

  13. Effect of Poloxamer 188 on deepening of deep second-degree burn wounds in the early stage.

    PubMed

    Yuhua, Shi; Ligen, Li; Jiake, Chai; Tongzhu, Sun

    2012-02-01

    To discuss the effect of Poloxamer 188 (P188) on deepening of deep second-degree burn wounds in the early stage after burn. We divided Wistar rats with deep second-degree burn wounds on the backs thereof into two groups, then intravenously injected P188 for the treatment group and intravenously injecting physiological saline for the control group, detecting the activity of Na(+)-K(+)-adenosine triphosphatase (Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase), myeloperoxidase (MPO) and the content of malonaldehyde (MDA) and succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) in the burn wound, and showing the degree of necrosis in the wound by haematoxylin-eosin (HE) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunohistochemical staining. In the control group and treatment group, the activity of SDH and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase dropped to the lowest point 24 h after the burn took place, and then increased gradually, but was still far lower than the normal level at the furthest time point. At 24 h after burn, activity of SDH and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase in the treatment group was higher than that of the control group (P<0.05); the activity of MPO of the control group reached the highest point at 24 h while that of MPO of the treatment group reached the highest point after 48 h; later, that of MPO of both groups decreased, but was still higher than the normal level. Compared with the highest values of the activity of MPO of both groups, that of the control group was higher than that of the treatment group (p<0.05); the contents of MDA of both groups kept increasing after the burn; 72 h later, that of the control group was higher than that of the treatment group (p<0.05). HE and PCNA staining showed progressive damage of the wound in the treatment group, which was decreased with treatment, particularly at the early stages. Systemic application of P188 on deep second-degree burn wounds at the early stage may alleviate wound deepening, whose mechanism may be related to timely sealing up the damaged cell membrane and inhibiting the

  14. Terminal Maturation of Orthochromatic Erythroblasts Is Impaired in Burn Patients.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Shirin; Mosier, Michael J; Conrad, Peggie; Szilagyi, Andrea; Gamelli, Richard L; Muthumalaiappan, Kuzhali

    2018-02-20

    Mechanisms of erythropoietin (Epo)-resistant anemia in burn patients are poorly understood. We have recently found that administering a nonselective beta 1,2-adrenergic blocker propranolol (PR) was effective in reversing myelo-erythroid commitment through MafB regulation and increase megakaryocyte erythrocyte progenitors in burn patients' peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-derived ex vivo culture system. Having known that Epo-dependent proliferation of early erythroblasts is intact after burn injury, here we inquired whether or not Epo-independent maturation stage of erythropoiesis is affected by burn injury and the relative role of PR on late-stage erythropoiesis. While majority of erythropoiesis occurs in the bone marrow, maturation into reticulocytes is crucial for their release into sinusoids to occupy the peripheral circulation for which enucleation is vital. peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from burn patients were extended beyond commitment and proliferation stages to late maturation stage in ex vivo culture to understand the role of PR in burn patients. Burn impedes late maturation of orthochromatic erythroblasts into reticulocytes by restricting the enucleation step. Late-stage erythropoiesis is impaired in burn patients irrespective of PR treatment. Further, substituting the microenvironment with control plasma (homologous) in place of autologous plasma rescues the conversion of orthochromatic erythroblasts to reticulocytes. Results show promise in formulating interventions to regulate late-stage erythropoiesis, which can be used in combination with PR to reduce the number of transfusions.

  15. Early Exercise in the Burn Intensive Care Unit Decreases Hospital Stay, Improves Mental Health, and Physical Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    AD______________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-2-0160 TITLE: Early Exercise in the Burn Intensive Care Unit Decreases Hospital Stay, Improves... designated by other documentation. REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of... Care Unit Decreases Hospital Stay, Improves Mental Health, and Physical Performance 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Oscar E

  16. Indoor air pollution from biomass burning activates Akt in airway cells and peripheral blood lymphocytes: a study among premenopausal women in rural India.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Nandan K; Roy, Amrita; Mukherjee, Bidisha; Das, Debangshu; Ray, Manas R

    2010-12-01

    Biomass burning is a major source of indoor air pollution in rural India. The authors investigated in this study whether cumulative exposures to biomass smoke cause activation of the serine/threonine kinase Akt in airway cells and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). For this, the authors enrolled 87 premenopausal (median age 34 years), nonsmoking women who used to cook with biomass (wood, dung, crop wastes) and 85 age-matched control women who cooked with cleaner fuel liquefied petroleum gas. Immunocytochemical and immunoblotting assays revealed significantly higher levels of phosphorylated forms of Akt protein (p-Akt(ser473) and p-Akt(thr308)) in PBL, airway epithelial cells, alveolar macrophages, and neutrophils in sputum of biomass-using women than control. Akt activation in biomass users was associated with marked rise in generation of reactive oxygen species and concomitant depletion of superoxide dismutase. Measurement of particulate matter having a diameter of less than 10 and 2.5 µm in indoor air by real-time aerosol monitor showed 2 to 4 times more particulate pollution in biomass-using households, and Akt activation was positively associated with particulate pollution after controlling potential confounders. The findings suggest that chronic exposure to biomass smoke activates Akt, possibly via generation of oxidative stress.

  17. Impact of early developmental fluoride exposure on the peripheral pain sensitivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Liu, Fei; Liu, Peng; Dong, Ying-Ying; Chu, Zheng; Hou, Tie-Zhou; Dang, Yong-Hui

    2015-12-01

    Consumption of high concentration of fluoride in the drinking water would cause the fluorosis and chronic pain. Similar pain syndrome appeared in the patients in fluoride therapy of osteoporotic. The aim of the current study was to examine whether exposing immature mice to fluoride would modify the peripheral pain sensitivity or even cause a pain syndrome. We gave developmental fluoride exposure to mice in different concentration (0mg/L, 50mg/L and 100mg/L) and evaluated their basal pain threshold. Von Frey hair test, hot plate test and formalin test were conducted to examine the mechanical, thermal nociceptive threshold and inflammatory pain, respectively. In addition, the expression of hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was also evaluated by Western blotting. Hyperalgesia in fluoride exposure mice was exhibited in the Von Frey hair test, hot plate test and formalin test. Meanwhile, the expression of BDNF was significantly higher than that of control group. The results suggest that early developmental fluoride exposure may lower the basal pain threshold and be associated with the increasing of BDNF expression in hippocampus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Early increase of peripheral B cell levels in kidney transplant recipients with CMV infection or reactivation.

    PubMed

    Besançon-Watelet, C; De March, A K; Renoult, E; Kessler, M; Béné, M C; Faure, G C; Sarda, M N

    2000-02-15

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection or reactivation is a frequent complication of renal transplantation. Diagnosis of these conditions relies on the detection of circulating antigen, or of specific IgM and/or IgG, which develop over several weeks. Evocative clinical features may be detected earlier, but lack specificity. Rapid and early changes in the partition of lymphocyte subsets could be an additional indication of pending CMV infection. A systematic follow-up of peripheral B lymphocytes identified immunophenotypically by the determination of surface immunoglobulins (sIg), performed in 97 kidney transplant recipients, allowed to identify transient increases apparently predictive of CMV primo-infection or reactivation over the next 3 months. To better define the nature of these B cells, an extended investigation was performed for 14 prospective patients. In addition to surface Ig, membrane CD19, HLA-DR, and CD80 expression were explored. The cytoplasmic presence of mu, kappa, and lambda chains was also examined. B cell function was investigated using the ELISPOT technique, which allows an enumeration of the populations of IgG, IgA, and IgM secreting B cells. Retrospective analysis of the clinical outcome of the cohort of 97 patients evidenced that early transient increases in B cell levels were significantly (P<0.0001) associated with CMV infection. The same trend was noted in the smaller series of patients who benefited from a more extensive investigation of B cells, 10 of whom presented clinical or biological signs of CMV infection. Mature B cells, expressing surface Ig, CD19, DR, and CD80 are those presenting transient increases. No significant variation of preB (cmu+/kappalambda-) or activated (spot-forming) cells was evidenced in these patients. Individual examination of each patient's immune reconstitution profile allows to detect transient peaks of mature B cell during the initial immunosuppressive therapy, that appear to be predictive of oncoming CMV

  19. Interferon stimulated genes as peripheral diagnostic markers of early pregnancy in sheep: a critical assessment.

    PubMed

    Mauffré, V; Grimard, B; Eozenou, C; Inghels, S; Silva, L; Giraud-Delville, C; Capo, D; Sandra, O; Constant, F

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the diagnostic reliability of pregnancy detection using changes in interferon stimulated gene (ISG) messenger RNA (mRNA) levels in circulating immune cells in ewes. Two different groups of ewes (an experimental group, experiment 1 and a farm group, experiment 2) were oestrus-synchronized and blood sampled on day 14 (D0=day of insemination in control animals, experiment 1) and day 15 (experiment 2). Real-time PCR were performed to evaluate the abundance of different ISG mRNAs. In the experimental group, peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 29 ewes born and bred in experimental facilities were isolated using a Percoll gradient method. Gene expression for Chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 10 (CXCL10), Myxovirus (influenza virus) resistance 1 (MX1) and Signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) mRNA were, respectively, 8.3-fold, 6.1-fold and 2.7-fold higher (P0.10) in CXCL10, STAT1, MX1, Myxovirus (influenza virus) resistance 2 (MX2) and ISG15 ubiquitin-like modifier (ISG15) mRNA expression were found between pregnant and non-pregnant ewes. The ROC curves and the hierarchical classification generated from the real-time PCR data failed to discriminate between pregnant and non-pregnant animals. In this group of animals, our results show a strong variability in ISG expression patterns: 17% of animals identified as non-pregnant by the five tests were in fact pregnant, only 52% of pregnant animals had at least two positive results (two genes above threshold), whereas up to five positive results (five genes above threshold) were needed to avoid misclassification. In conclusion, this study illustrates the high variability in ISG expression levels in immune circulating cells during early pregnancy and, therefore, highlights the limits of using ISG expression levels in blood samples, collected on PAXgene® tubes on farms, for early pregnancy detection in sheep.

  20. [Effects of early enteral nutrition in the treatment of patients with severe burns].

    PubMed

    Wu, Y W; Liu, J; Jin, J; Liu, L J; Wu, Y F

    2018-01-20

    Objective: To investigate the effects of early enteral nutrition (EEN) in the treatment of patients with severe burns. Methods: Medical records of 52 patients with severe burns hospitalized in the three affiliations of authors from August to September in 2014 were retrospectively analyzed and divided into EEN group ( n =28) and non-early enteral nutrition (NEEN) group ( n =24) according to the initiation time of enteral nutrition. On the basis of routine treatment, enteral nutrition was given to patients in group EEN within post injury day (POD) 3, while enteral nutrition was given to patients in group NEEN after POD 3. The following items were compared between patients of the two groups, such as the ratio of enteral nutrition intake to total energy intake, the ratio of parenteral nutrition intake to total energy intake, the ratio of total energy intake to energy target on POD 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 14, 21, and 28, the levels of prealbumin, serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation Ⅱ (APACHE Ⅱ) score on POD 1, 3, 7, 14, and 28, the first operation time, the number of operations, and the frequencies of abdominal distension, diarrhea, vomiting, aspiration, catheter blockage, and low blood sugar within POD 28. Data were processed with χ (2)test, t test, Wilcoxon rank sum test, and Bonferroni correction. Results: (1) The ratio of parenteral nutrition intake to total energy intake of patients in group EEN on POD 1 was obviously lower than that in group NEEN ( Z =2.078, P <0.05). The ratio of enteral nutrition intake to total energy intake and the ratio of total energy intake to energy target of patients in group EEN on POD 2 and 3 were obviously higher than those in group NEEN ( Z =5.766, 6.404, t =4.907, 6.378, P <0.01). The ratio of total energy intake to energy target of patients in group EEN was obviously lower than that in group NEEN on POD 4, 5, 6, and 7 ( t =4.635, 2.547, 3

  1. Early ICU Standardized Rehabilitation Therapy for the Critically Injured Burn Patient

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Therapy for the Critically Injured Burn Patient PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Peter E. Morris , MD...the Critically Injured Burn Patient 5b. GRANT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Morris , James Holmes, Brad Freeman, Bruce Cairns, Michael Berry, L Doug E-Mail...and has been submitted for publication appendix). a. 6 iii. Parry SM, EI-Ansary D, Berney S, Koopman R, Cartwright MS, Morris PE, Hilton A, Sarwal A

  2. Plasma NGAL predicts early acute kidney injury no earlier than s-creatinine or cystatin C in severely burned patients.

    PubMed

    Rakkolainen, Ilmari; Vuola, Jyrki

    2016-03-01

    Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is a novel biomarker used in acute kidney injury (AKI) diagnostics. Studies on burn patients have highlighted it as a promising biomarker for early detection of AKI. This study was designed to discover whether plasma NGAL is as a biomarker superior to serum creatinine and cystatin C in detecting AKI in severely burned patients. Nineteen subjects were enrolled from March 2013 to September 2014 in the Helsinki Burn Centre. Serum creatinine, cystatin C, and plasma NGAL were collected from the patients at admission and every 12h during the first 48h and thereafter daily until seven days following admission. AKI was defined by acute kidney injury network criteria. Nine (47%) developed AKI during their intensive care unit stay and two (11%) underwent renal replacement therapy. All biomarkers were significantly higher in the AKI group but serum creatinine- and cystatin C values reacted more rapidly to changes in kidney function than did plasma NGAL. Plasma NGAL tended to rise on average 72h±29h (95% CI) later in patients with early AKI than did serum creatinine. Area-under-the-curve values calculated for each biomarker were 0.92 for serum creatinine, 0.87 for cystatin C, and 0.62 for plasma NGAL predicting AKI by the receiver-operating-characteristic method. This study demonstrated serum creatinine and cystatin C as faster and more reliable biomarkers than plasma NGAL in detecting early AKI within one week of injury in patients with severe burns. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  3. Discharge rates in electromyography distinguish early between peripheral and central paresis.

    PubMed

    Jürgens, Tim P; Puchner, Christoph; Schulte-Mattler, Wilhelm J

    2012-10-01

    Abnormally increased discharge rates (DRs) of motor unit potentials on concentric needle electromyography (CNEMG) indicate a loss of motor units in peripheral neurogenic lesions. To determine when increased DRs occur during the course of a peripheral nerve lesion, we retrospectively analyzed CNEMG recordings of 19 patients with acute weakness of peripheral origin. The initial CNEMG studies took place from 3.7 hours to 10 days after the onset of the lesion. Abnormally increased DRs (≥20/s) were found in all but 1 of the muscles in which MRC grade was <4. Peripheral neurogenic damage was confirmed in all patients thereafter. The DRs depended on neither the kind of lesion nor the time between onset and CNEMG examination. The measurement of DRs of motor unit potentials is helpful immediately after a sudden paresis of MRC grade 3 or worse to differentiate between a central and a peripheral lesion. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Influence of early childhood burns on school performance: an Australian population study.

    PubMed

    Azzam, Nadin; Oei, Ju-Lee; Adams, Susan; Bajuk, Barbara; Hilder, Lisa; Mohamed, Abdel-Latif; Wright, Ian M R; Holland, Andrew J A

    2018-05-01

    To determine the influence of burn injuries on childhood performance in national standardised curriculum-based school tests. Birth and health records of 977 children who were hospitalised with a burn injury between 2000 and 2006 in the state of New South Wales, Australia, were linked to performance scores in the National Assessment Program: Literacy and Numeracy test, a compulsory nationwide curriculum-based test (CBT) and compared with children who were not hospitalised for burns and who were matched for birth year, gender, gestation and socioeconomic status. Test scores in years 3 (ages 8-9), 5 (ages 10-11) and 7 (ages 13-14) in numeracy, writing, reading, spelling, grammar and punctuation. Mean age at first burn injury was 28 months (median: 20, range: 0-140). Children with burns were significantly more likely to have younger mothers (28.5 vs 29.6 years) (P<0.001), be indigenous (OR 2.5 (95% CI 2.1 to 3.1)) (P<0.001) and have siblings (OR 1.2 (95% CI 1.1 to 1.4)) (P<0.001). They were also less likely to meet national minimum standards in most domains of testing until year 5, even after adjustment for parental education levels, parental smoking, maternal age and indigenous status. Each 10% increase in total body surface area burnt was associated with a decrease in year 5 scores by 37.0% in numeracy and 71.9% in writing. Most childhood burn injuries occur before the start of formal schooling. Children who are hospitalised for burns perform more poorly in CBT even after accounting for family and socioeconomic disadvantage. Rehabilitation of children with burn injuries must address school performance to decrease any long-term negative societal impact of burns. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Combined ionizing radiation and thermal injury in the rat. Evaluation of early excision and closure of the burn wound

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, E.F.; Vezina, R.; Corbett, S.

    1990-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to establish an animal model of combined whole-body irradiation and thermal injury and to determine the effectiveness of early excision and closure of the burn wound in such a model. Whole-body irradiation over a range of doses resulted in a predictable mortality rate, with an LD50/30 of 783 rad with 95% confidence limits of 737 and 823 rad. A controlled 10% body surface area full-thickness thermal injury resulted in no deaths in 30 animals. When combined with a standard nonlethal 10% thermal injury, varying doses of whole-body irradiation resulted in widely differing LD50/30 values inmore » three separate cohorts of rats. Excision and closure of a 10% burn 24 hours after exposure to 200 rads did not improve survival.« less

  6. Astaxanthin protects against early burn-wound progression in rats by attenuating oxidative stress-induced inflammation and mitochondria-related apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Quan; Guo, Songxue; Zhou, Hanlei; Han, Rui; Wu, Pan; Han, Chunmao

    2017-01-01

    Burn-wound progression can occur in the initial or peri-burn area after a deep burn injury. The stasis zone has a higher risk of deterioration mediated by multiple factors but is also considered salvageable. Astaxanthin (ATX), which is extracted from some marine organisms, is a natural compound with a strong antioxidant effect that has been reported to attenuate organ injuries caused by traumatic injuries. Hence, we investigated the potential effects of ATX on preventing early burn-wound progression. A classic “comb” burn rat model was established in this study for histological and biological assessments, which revealed that ATX, particularly higher doses, alleviated histological deterioration in the stasis zone. Additionally, we observed dose-dependent improvements in oxidative stress and the release of inflammatory mediators after ATX treatment. Furthermore, ATX dose-dependently attenuated burn-induced apoptosis in the wound areas, and this effect was accompanied by increases in Akt and Bad phosphorylation and a downregulation of cytochrome C and caspase expression. In addition, the administration of Ly 294002 further verified the effect of ATX. In summary, we demonstrated that ATX protected against early burn-wound progression in a rat deep-burn model. This protection might be mediated by the attenuation of oxidative stress-induced inflammation and mitochondria-related apoptosis. PMID:28128352

  7. Analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes using flow cytometry in polymyalgia rheumatica, RS3PE and early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Shimojima, Y; Matsuda, M; Ishii, W; Gono, T; Ikeda, S

    2008-01-01

    Clinical pictures of poly-myalgia rheumatica (PMR) and remitting seronegative symmetrical synovitis with pitting edema (RS3PE) are often indistinguishable from those of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To investigate whether there is a difference in immunological aspects among these 3 disorders, we performed a phenotypic analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes. Eleven patients with early RA, 14 with PMR and 11 with RS3PE were enrolled in this study. After separation of mononuclear cells from peripheral blood using the Ficoll-Hypaque method, surface markers and intracellular cytokines of lymphocytes were analyzed by 2- or 3-color flow cytometry. Both PMR and RS3PE showed a significant decrease in CD8+CD25+ cells (p<0.05), and significant increases in CD4+IFN-gamma+IL-4- (p<0.05), CD8+IFN-gamma+IL-4- (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively) and CD4+TNF-alpha+ cells (p<0.05) compared with early RA. CD3+CD4+ cells were higher in PMR than in RS3PE (p<0.01), but there were no significant differences in any other phenotypes between these disorders. A decrease in activated cytotoxic/suppressor T cells and increases in circulating Th1 and Tc1 cells may be common characteristics of PMR and RS3PE in comparison with early RA. Both disorders are clearly different from early RA, and probably belong to the same disease entity with regard to phenotypes of peripheral blood lymphocytes.

  8. Early excision and grafting versus delayed excision and grafting of deep thermal burns up to 40% total body surface area: a comparison of outcome

    PubMed Central

    Saaiq, M.; Zaib, S.; Ahmad, S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary This is a study of 120 patients of either sex and all ages who had sustained deep burns of up to 40% of the total body surface area. Half the patients underwent early excision and skin autografting (i.e., within 4-7 days of sustaining burn injury) while the rest underwent delayed excision and skin autografting (i.e., within 1-4 weeks post-burn). Significant differences were found in favour of the early excision and grafting group with regard to the various burn management outcome parameters taken into consideration, i.e. culture positivity of wounds, graft take, duration of post-graft hospitalization, and mortality. PMID:23467391

  9. Effectiveness of an early mobilization protocol in a trauma and burns intensive care unit: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Clark, Diane E; Lowman, John D; Griffin, Russell L; Matthews, Helen M; Reiff, Donald A

    2013-02-01

    Bed rest and immobility in patients on mechanical ventilation or in an intensive care unit (ICU) have detrimental effects. Studies in medical ICUs show that early mobilization is safe, does not increase costs, and can be associated with decreased ICU and hospital lengths of stay (LOS). The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of an early mobilization protocol on complication rates, ventilator days, and ICU and hospital LOS for patients admitted to a trauma and burn ICU (TBICU). This was a retrospective cohort study of an interdisciplinary quality-improvement program. Pre- and post-early mobility program patient data from the trauma registry for 2,176 patients admitted to the TBICU between May 2008 and April 2010 were compared. No adverse events were reported related to the early mobility program. After adjusting for age and injury severity, there was a decrease in airway, pulmonary, and vascular complications (including pneumonia and deep vein thrombosis) post-early mobility program. Ventilator days and TBICU and hospital lengths of stay were not significantly decreased. Using a historical control group, there was no way to account for other changes in patient care that may have occurred between the 2 periods that could have affected patient outcomes. The dose of physical activity both before and after the early mobility program were not specifically assessed. Early mobilization of patients in a TBICU was safe and effective. Medical, nursing, and physical therapy staff, as well as hospital administrators, have embraced the new culture of early mobilization in the ICU.

  10. Burns - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - burns ... The following organizations are good resources for information on burns : Burns Recovered -- brsg.org Model Systems Knowledge Translation Center - Burn Model Systems -- www.msktc.org/burn http:// ...

  11. Early resuscitation with polymerized bovine hemoglobin reverses acidosis, but not peripheral tissue oxygenation, in a severe hamster shock model.

    PubMed

    Wettstein, Reto; Tsai, Amy G; Harder, Yves; Erni, Dominique; Intaglietta, Marcos

    2006-11-01

    Awake hamsters equipped with the dorsal window chamber preparation were subjected to hemorrhage of 50% of the estimated blood volume. Initial resuscitation (25% of estimated blood volume) with polymerized bovine hemoglobin (PBH) or 10% hydroxyethyl starch (HES) occurred in concert with an equivolumetric bleeding to simulate the early, prehospital setting (exchange transfusion). Resuscitation (25% of estimated blood volume) without bleeding was performed with PBH, HES, or autologous red blood cells (HES-RBCs). Peripheral microcirculation, tissue oxygenation, and systemic hemodynamic and blood gas parameters were assessed. After exchange transfusion, base deficit was -8.6 +/- 3.7 mmol/L (PBH) and -5.1 +/- 5.3 mmol/L (HES) (not significant). Functional capillary density was 17% +/- 6% of baseline (PBH) and 31% +/- 11% (HES) (P < 0.05) and arteriolar diameter 73% +/- 3% of baseline (PBH) and 90% + 5% (HES) (P < 0.01). At the end, hemoglobin levels were 3.7 +/- 0.3 g/dL with HES, 8.2 +/- 0.6 g/dL with PBH, and 10.4 +/- 0.8 g/dL with HES-RBCs (P < 0.01 HES vs. PBH and HES-RBCs, P < 0.05 PBH vs. HES-RBCs). Base excess was restored to baseline with PBH and HES-RBCs, but not with HES (P < 0.05). Functional capillary density was 46% +/- 5% of baseline (PBH), 62% + 20% (HES-RBCs), and 36% +/- 19% (HES) (P < 0.01 HES-RBCs vs. HES). Peripheral oxygen delivery and consumption was highest with HES-RBCs, followed by PBH (P < 0.05 HES-RBCs vs. PBH, P < 0.01 HES-RBCs and PBH vs. HES). In conclusion, the PBH led to a correction of base deficit comparable to blood transfusion. However, oxygenation of the peripheral tissue was inferior with PBH. This was attributed to its negative impact on the peripheral microcirculation caused by arteriolar vasoconstriction.

  12. Development of a long-term ovine model of cutaneous burn and smoke inhalation injury and the effects of early excision and skin autografting

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yusuke; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Sakurai, Hiroyuki; Rehberg, Sebastian; Asmussen, Sven; Ito, Hiroshi; Sousse, Linda E.; Cox, Robert A.; Deyo, Donald J.; Traber, Lillian D.; Traber, Maret G.; Herndon, David N.; Traber, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    Smoke inhalation injury frequently increases the risk of pneumonia and mortality in burn patients. The pathophysiology of acute lung injury secondary to burn and smoke inhalation is well studied, but long-term pulmonary function, especially the process of lung tissue healing following burn and smoke inhalation, has not been fully investigated. By contrast, early burn excision has become the standard of care in the management of major burn injury. While many clinical studies and small-animal experiments support the concept of early burn wound excision, and show improved survival and infectious outcomes, we have developed a new chronic ovine model of burn and smoke inhalation injury with early excision and skin grafting that can be used to investigate lung pathophysiology over a period of 3 weeks. Materials and methods Eighteen female sheep were surgically prepared for this study under isoflurane anesthesia. The animals were divided into three groups: an Early Excision group (20% TBSA, third-degree cutaneous burn and 36 breaths of cotton smoke followed by early excision and skin autografting at 24 h after injury, n = 6), a Control group (20% TBSA, third-degree cutaneous burn and 36 breaths of cotton smoke without early excision, n = 6) and a Sham group (no injury, no early excision, n = 6). After induced injury, all sheep were placed on a ventilator and fluid-resuscitated with Lactated Ringers solution (4 mL/% TBS/kg). At 24 h post-injury, early excision was carried out to fascia, and skin grafting with meshed autografts (20/1000 in., 1:4 ratio) was performed under isoflurane anesthesia. At 48 h post-injury, weaning from ventilator was begun if PaO2/FiO2 was above 250 and sheep were monitored for 3 weeks. Results At 96 h post-injury, all animals were weaned from ventilator. There are no significant differences in PaO2/FiO2 between Early Excision and Control groups at any points. All animals were survived for 3 weeks without infectious complication in Early Excision

  13. High BAALC copy numbers in peripheral blood prior to allogeneic transplantation predict early relapse in acute myeloid leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Jentzsch, Madlen; Bill, Marius; Grimm, Juliane; Schulz, Julia; Goldmann, Karoline; Beinicke, Stefanie; Häntschel, Janine; Pönisch, Wolfram; Franke, Georg-Nikolaus; Vucinic, Vladan; Behre, Gerhard; Lange, Thoralf; Niederwieser, Dietger; Schwind, Sebastian

    2017-10-20

    High BAALC expression levels at acute myeloid leukemia diagnosis have been linked to adverse outcomes. Recent data indicate that high BAALC expression levels may also be used as marker for residual disease following acute myeloid leukemia treatment. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) offers a curative treatment for acute myeloid leukemia patients. However, disease recurrence remains a major clinical challenge and identification of high-risk patients prior to HSCT is crucial to improve outcomes. We performed absolute quantification of BAALC copy numbers in peripheral blood prior (median 7 days) to HSCT in complete remission (CR) or CR with incomplete peripheral recovery in 82 acute myeloid leukemia patients using digital droplet PCR (ddPCR) technology. An optimal cut-off of 0.14 BAALC / ABL1 copy numbers was determined and applied to define patients with high or low BAALC / ABL1 copy numbers. High pre-HSCT BAALC / ABL1 copy numbers significantly associated with higher cumulative incidence of relapse and shorter overall survival in univariable and multivariable models. Patients with high pre-HSCT BAALC / ABL1 copy numbers were more likely to experience relapse within 100 days after HSCT. Evaluation of pre-HSCT BAALC / ABL1 copy numbers in peripheral blood by ddPCR represents a feasible and rapid way to identify acute myeloid leukemia patients at high risk of early relapse after HSCT. The prognostic impact was also observed independently of other known clinical, genetic, and molecular prognosticators. In the future, prospective studies should evaluate whether acute myeloid leukemia patients with high pre-HSCT BAALC / ABL1 copy numbers benefit from additional treatment before or early intervention after HSCT.

  14. High BAALC copy numbers in peripheral blood prior to allogeneic transplantation predict early relapse in acute myeloid leukemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Jentzsch, Madlen; Bill, Marius; Grimm, Juliane; Schulz, Julia; Goldmann, Karoline; Beinicke, Stefanie; Häntschel, Janine; Pönisch, Wolfram; Franke, Georg-Nikolaus; Vucinic, Vladan; Behre, Gerhard; Lange, Thoralf; Niederwieser, Dietger; Schwind, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    High BAALC expression levels at acute myeloid leukemia diagnosis have been linked to adverse outcomes. Recent data indicate that high BAALC expression levels may also be used as marker for residual disease following acute myeloid leukemia treatment. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) offers a curative treatment for acute myeloid leukemia patients. However, disease recurrence remains a major clinical challenge and identification of high-risk patients prior to HSCT is crucial to improve outcomes. We performed absolute quantification of BAALC copy numbers in peripheral blood prior (median 7 days) to HSCT in complete remission (CR) or CR with incomplete peripheral recovery in 82 acute myeloid leukemia patients using digital droplet PCR (ddPCR) technology. An optimal cut-off of 0.14 BAALC/ABL1 copy numbers was determined and applied to define patients with high or low BAALC/ABL1 copy numbers. High pre-HSCT BAALC/ABL1 copy numbers significantly associated with higher cumulative incidence of relapse and shorter overall survival in univariable and multivariable models. Patients with high pre-HSCT BAALC/ABL1 copy numbers were more likely to experience relapse within 100 days after HSCT. Evaluation of pre-HSCT BAALC/ABL1 copy numbers in peripheral blood by ddPCR represents a feasible and rapid way to identify acute myeloid leukemia patients at high risk of early relapse after HSCT. The prognostic impact was also observed independently of other known clinical, genetic, and molecular prognosticators. In the future, prospective studies should evaluate whether acute myeloid leukemia patients with high pre-HSCT BAALC/ABL1 copy numbers benefit from additional treatment before or early intervention after HSCT. PMID:29152132

  15. Symptoms, disability and handicap in unilateral peripheral vestibular disorders. Effects of early presentation and initiation of balance exercises.

    PubMed

    Bamiou, D E; Davies, R A; McKee, M; Luxon, L M

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain a profile of disability and handicap in patients with unilateral peripheral vestibular disorders presenting to a specialist tertiary care unit. Two validated questionnaires were sent to patients who had a unilateral peripheral vestibular disorder as defined by strict criteria. Some patients still suffered moderate handicap and disability 5 years after the initial symptoms related to a unilateral vestibular disorder, although the duration of symptoms (onset to questionnaire completion) did not correlate with severity of disability and handicap, as judged by questionnaire scores. However, patients presenting to the unit within 6 months of onset of vertigo commenced balance exercises significantly earlier and had significantly lower disability scores than patients presenting later. A high proportion of non-compliance with, and delay in initiation of, vestibular rehabilitation exercises was noted in the total patient sample, while compliance with, and early initiation of, Cooksey Cawthorne exercises were significantly correlated with low disability and questionnaire scores. These findings suggest that early referral to a specialist balance unit for patients with persistent dizziness is associated with better outcome.

  16. Post-coital burning pain and pain at micturition: early symptoms of partial vaginismus with or without vulvar vestibulitis?

    PubMed

    Engman, Maria; Wijma, Klaas; Wijma, Barbro

    2008-01-01

    Twenty-four women with partial vaginismus with or without vulvar vestibulitis participated in a semi-structured telephone interview concerning early signs and development of their pain symptoms during/after intercourse. At the onset of the problem, pain after intercourse was more common than pain during penetration. Pain intensity during penetration increased from the onset of the problem to when the women ceased having intercourse. Pain during penetration lasted for 1 minute, and was most often described as sharp/incisive/bursting, while pain after intercourse had a duration of 2 hours and was described as burning and/or smarting. Post-coital pain during micturition was described by 70% of the women.

  17. Systemic rapamycin to prevent in-stent stenosis in peripheral pulmonary arterial disease: early clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Hallbergson, Anna; Esch, Jesse J; Tran, Trang X; Lock, James E; Marshall, Audrey C

    2016-10-01

    We have taken a novel approach using oral rapamycin - sirolimus - as a medical adjunct to percutaneous therapy in patients with in-stent stenosis and high risk of right ventricular failure. Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis can result in right ventricular hypertension, dysfunction, and death. Percutaneous pulmonary artery angioplasty and stent placement acutely relieve obstructions, but patients frequently require re-interventions due to re-stenosis. In patients with tetralogy of Fallot or arteriopathy, the problem of in-stent stenosis contributes to the rapidly recurrent disease. Rapamycin was administered to 10 patients (1.5-18 years) with peripheral pulmonary stenosis and in-stent stenosis and either right ventricular hypertension, pulmonary blood flow maldistribution, or segmental pulmonary hypertension. Treatment was initiated around the time of catheterisation and continued for 1-3 months. Potential side-effects were monitored by clinical review and blood tests. Target serum rapamycin level (6-10 ng/ml) was accomplished in all patients; eight of the nine patients who returned for clinically indicated catheterisations demonstrated reduction in in-stent stenosis, and eight of the 10 patients experienced no significant side-effects. Among all, one patient developed diarrhoea requiring drug discontinuation, and one patient experienced gastrointestinal bleeding while on therapy that was likely due to an indwelling feeding tube and this patient tolerated rapamycin well following tube removal. Our initial clinical experience supports that patients with peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis can be safely treated with rapamycin. Systemic rapamycin may provide a novel medical approach to reduce in-stent stenosis.

  18. Correlation of Michigan neuropathy screening instrument, United Kingdom screening test and electrodiagnosis for early detection of diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Fateh, Hamid R; Madani, Seyed Pezhman; Heshmat, Ramin; Larijani, Bagher

    2015-01-01

    Almost half of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathies (DPNs) are symptom-free. Methods including questionnaires and electrodiagnosis (EDx) can be fruitful for easy reach to early diagnosis, correct treatments of diabetic neuropathy, and so decline of complications for instance diabetic foot ulcer and prevention of high costs. The goal of our study was to compare effectiveness of the Michigan neuropathy screening instrument (MNSI), United Kingdom screening test (UKST) and electrophysiological evaluation in confirming diabetic peripheral neuropathy. One hundred twenty five known diabetes mellitus male and female subjects older than 18 with or without symptoms of neuropathy comprised in this research. All of them were interviewed in terms of demographic data, lipid profile, HbA1C, duration of disease, and history of retinopathy, so examined by Michigan neuropathy screening instrument (MNSI), United Kingdom screening test (UKST), and nerve conduction studies (NCS). The collected data were analyzed by SPSS software 18. One hundred twenty five diabetic patients (70 female, 55 male) were recruited in this study with a mean age of 58.7 ± 10.2, and mean duration of diabetes was 10.17 ± 6.9 years. The mean neuropathy score of MNSI and UKST were 2.3 (1.7) and 4.16 (2.9), respectively. Each instrument detected the peripheral neuropathy in 78 (69 %) and 91 (73 %) of patients, respectively. There was a significant relationship between number of neuropathies and mean of diabetes duration and development of retinopathy in both questionnaire evaluations and NCS. By nerve conduction study, neuropathy was detected in 121 (97 %) diabetic patients were reported in order 15 (12 %) mononeuropathy (as 33 % sensory and 67 % motor neuropathy) and 106 (85 %) polyneuropathy (as 31 % motor and 69 % sensorimotor neuropathy). As regards NCS is an objective, simple, and non-invasive tool and also can determine level of damage and regeneration in peripheral nerves, this study

  19. Peripheral neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... peripheral; Neuritis - peripheral; Nerve disease; Polyneuropathy; Chronic pain - peripheral neuropathy ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 107. Shy ME. Peripheral neuropathies. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  20. [Molecular markers of Alzheimer disease early diagnostic: investigation perspectives of peripheral tissues.

    PubMed

    Paltsev, M A; Zuev, V A; Kozhevnikova, E O; Linkova, N S; Kvetnaia, T V; Polyakova, V O; Kvetnoy, I M

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder of elderly and old age people. For intravital diagnosis of the expression of signaling molecules - AD markers, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and peripheral tissues are used: lymphocytes and blood platelets, buccal and olfactory epithelium, skin fibroblasts. There are several changes in the production of hyper phosphorylated form of τ-protein, BACE1 and peptide Аβ42 in CSF in case of AD, but CSF taking may have a number of side effects. Less traumatic taking of sampling tissues for the diagnosis of AD is in use of epithelium biopsy and blood portion. An increase in the expression of the hyper phosphorylated form of τ-protein is shown in blood lymphocytes of AD patients. An increase in the content of high molecular weight forms of phosphorylated t-protein and amyloid precursor protein-APP was also revealed in blood platelets of AD patients. Changes in the amount of 2 miRNA families - miR-132 family and miR-134 family were revealed in blood cells 1-5 years before the manifestation of clinical signs of AD. An increase in the concentration of bound calcium, synthesis of peptides Aβ40 and Aβ42, τ protein was observed in AD skin fibroblasts. In the olfactory and buccal epithelium an increase in the expression of hyper phosphorylated form of τ-protein and Aβ peptide was detected in patients with AD. Verification of AD markers in peripheral tissues for biopsy have the important significant for life diagnostics, prevention and and target AD treatment.

  1. Early ICU Standardized Rehabilitation Therapy for the Critically Inijured Burn Patient

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    strength assessments) post-enrollment. Functional testing with Short Physical Performance Battery ( SPPB ) and Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL... testing will determine if standardized early rehab improves functional performance quality of life and employment status. Accomplishments Year #1

  2. Niche Marketing: Branding Your Early Child Care and Education Business without Getting Burned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wassom, Julie

    2004-01-01

    Branding in the early child care and education marketplace is very similar to branding on the farm. It refers to the specific image the company develops and promotes to make services unique, recognizable, and memorable in the minds of prospects and customers. This article discusses how to establish a niche in a business, develop a brand, and…

  3. PERIPHERAL IMMUNE SYSTEM SUPPRESSION IN EARLY ABSTINENT ALCOHOL DEPENDENT INDIVIDUALS: LINKS TO STRESS AND CUE-RELATED CRAVING

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Helen C; Milivojevic, Verica; Angarita, Gustavo A; Stowe, Raymond; Sinha, Rajita

    2017-01-01

    Background Peripheral immune system cytokines may play an integral role in underlying sensitized stress response and alcohol craving during early withdrawal. To date, the nature of these immune changes during early abstinence have not been examined. Methods Thirty-nine early abstinent, treatment-seeking alcohol dependent individuals and 46 socially drinking controls were exposed to three guided imageries: stress, alcohol cue and neutral. These were presented randomly across consecutive days. Plasma measures of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and interleukin-10 (IL-10), were collected at baseline, immediately after imagery and at various recovery time-points. Ratings of alcohol craving, negative mood and anxiety were also obtained at the same time-points. Results The alcohol group demonstrated decreased basal IL-10 compared with controls particularly following exposure to alcohol cue. They also showed a dampened TNFα and TNFR1 response to stress and cue, respectively, and a generalized suppression of IL-6. In the alcohol group, these immune system adaptations occurred alongside significant elevations in anxiety, negative mood and alcohol craving. Conclusions Findings demonstrate that broad immuno-suppression is still observed in alcohol dependent individuals after three weeks of abstinence and may be linked to motivation for alcohol. PMID:28675117

  4. Genetic Polymorphism Associated Prefrontal Glutathione and Its Coupling With Brain Glutamate and Peripheral Redox Status in Early Psychosis.

    PubMed

    Xin, Lijing; Mekle, Ralf; Fournier, Margot; Baumann, Philipp S; Ferrari, Carina; Alameda, Luis; Jenni, Raoul; Lu, Huanxiang; Schaller, Benoit; Cuenod, Michel; Conus, Philippe; Gruetter, Rolf; Do, Kim Q

    2016-09-01

    Oxidative stress and glutathione (GSH) metabolism dysregulation has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. GAG-trinucleotide repeat (TNR) polymorphisms in the glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic gene (GCLC), the rate-limiting enzyme for GSH synthesis, are associated with schizophrenia. In addition, GSH may serve as a reserve pool for neuronal glutamate (Glu) through the γ-glutamyl cycle. The aim of this study is to investigate brain [GSH] and its association with GCLC polymorphism, peripheral redox indices and brain Glu. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to measure [GSH] and [Glu] in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of 25 early-psychosis patients and 33 controls. GCLC polymorphism was genotyped, glutathione peroxidases (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities were determined in blood cells. Significantly lower [GSHmPFC] in GCLC high-risk genotype subjects were revealed as compared to low-risk genotype subjects independent of disease status. In male subjects, [GSHmPFC] and blood GPx activities correlate positively in controls (P = .021), but negatively in patients (P = .039). In GCLC low-risk genotypes, [GlumPFC] are lower in patients, while it is not the case for high-risk genotypes. GCLC high-risk genotypes are associated with low [GSHmPFC], highlighting that GCLC polymorphisms should be considered in pathology studies of cerebral GSH. Low brain GSH levels are related to low peripheral oxidation status in controls but with high oxidation status in patients, pointing to a dysregulated GSH homeostasis in early psychosis patients. GCLC polymorphisms and disease associated correlations between brain GSH and Glu levels may allow patients stratification. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. The influence of burn severity on post-fire vegetation recovery and albedo change during early succession in North American boreal forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Y.; Randerson, J. T.; Goetz, S. J.; Beck, P. S.; Loranty, M. M.; Goulden, M.

    2011-12-01

    Severity of burning can influence multiple aspects of forest composition, carbon cycling, and climate forcing. We quantified how burn severity affected vegetation recovery and albedo change during early succession in Canadian boreal regions by combining satellite observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Canadian Large Fire Data Base (LFDB). We used the difference Normalized Burn Ratio (dNBR) and changes in spring albedo derived from MODIS 500m albedo product as measures of burn severity. We found that the most severe burns had the greatest reduction in summer EVI in first year after fire, indicating greater loss of vegetation cover immediately following fire. By 5-7 years after fire, summer EVI for all severity classes had recovered to within 90-110% of pre-fire levels. Burn severity had a positive effect on the increase of post-fire spring albedo during the first 7 years after fire, and a shift from low to moderate or moderate to severe fires led to amplification of the post-fire albedo increase by approximately 30%. Fire-induced increases in both spring and summer albedo became progressively larger with stand age from years 1-7, with the trend in spring albedo likely driven by continued losses of needles and branches from trees killed by the fire (and concurrent losses of black carbon coatings on remaining debris), and the summer trend associated with increases in leaf area of short-stature herbs and shrubs. Our results suggest that increases in burn severity and carbon losses observed in some areas of boreal forests (e.g., Turetsky et al., 2011) may be at least partly offset by increases in negative forcing associated with changes in surface albedo.

  6. Early Hg mobility in cultivated tropical soils one year after slash-and-burn of the primary forest, in the Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Béliveau, Annie; Lucotte, Marc; Davidson, Robert; Lopes, Luis Otávio do Canto; Paquet, Serge

    2009-07-15

    In the Brazilian Amazon, forest conversion to agricultural lands (slash-and-burn cultivation) contributes to soil mercury (Hg) release and to aquatic ecosystem contamination. Recent studies have shown that soil Hg loss occurs rapidly after deforestation, suggesting that Hg mobility could be related to the massive cation input resulting from biomass burning. The objective of this research was to determine the effects of the first year of slash-and-burn agriculture on soil Hg levels at the regional scale of the Tapajós River, in the state of Pará, Brazilian Amazon. A total of 429 soil samples were collected in 26 farms of five riparian communities of the Tapajós basin. In September 2004, soil samples were collected from primary forest sites planned for slash-and-burn cultivation. In August 2005, one year after the initial burning, a second campaign was held and the exact same sites were re-sampled. Our results showed that total Hg levels in soils did not change significantly during the first year following slash-and-burn, suggesting no immediate release of soil Hg at that point in time. However, an early Hg mobility was detected near the surface (0-5 cm), reflected by a significant shift in Hg distribution in soil fractions. Indeed, a transfer of Hg from fine to coarser soil particles was observed, indicating that chemical bonds between Hg and fine particles could have been altered. A correspondence analysis (CA) showed that this process could be linked to a chemical competition caused by cation enrichment. The regional dimension of the study highlighted the prevailing importance of soil types in Hg dynamics, as shown by differentiated soil responses following deforestation according to soil texture. Confirming an early Hg mobility and indicating an eventual Hg release out of the soil, our results reinforce the call for the development of more sustainable agricultural practices in the Amazon.

  7. A silver coated dressing reduces the incidence of early burn wound cellulitis and associated costs of inpatient treatment: comparative patient care audits.

    PubMed

    Fong, J; Wood, F; Fowler, B

    2005-08-01

    In 2000 and 2002, the Royal Perth Hospital (RPH) Burn Unit, Western Australia, conducted two 'before and after' patient care audits comparing the effectiveness and cost of Silvazine (silver sulphadiazine and chlorhexidine digluconate cream) and Acticoat, a new dressing product for in-patient treatment of early burn wounds. The main outcome variables were: burn wound cellulitis, antibiotic use and cost of treatment. Two patient care audits and a comparative sample were used. The two regimes audited were, 'standard treatment' of twice daily showers or washes with 4% chlorhexidine soap and Silvazine cream as a topical dressing (2000, n=51), compared with the 'new treatment' of daily showers of the burn wound with 4% chlorhexidine soap and the application of an Acticoat dressing (2002, n=19). In 2002, costs were also examined using a sample of matched pairs (n=8) of current and previous patients. The main findings were: when using Acticoat the incidence of infection and antibiotic use fell from 55% (28/51) and 57% (29/51) in 2000 to 10.5% (2/19) and 5.2% (1/19) in 2002. The total costs (excluding antibiotics, staffing and surgery) for those treated with Silvazine were US$ 109,357 and those treated with Acticoat were US$ 78,907, demonstrating a saving of US$ 30,450 with the new treatment. The average length of stay (LOS) in hospital was 17.25 days for the Silvazine group and 12.5 days for the Acticoat group-a difference of 4.75 days. These audits demonstrate that Acticoat results in a reduced incidence of burn wound cellulitis, antibiotic use and overall cost compared to Silvazine in the treatment of early burn wounds.

  8. Sweet preference modified by early experience in mice and the related molecular modulations on the peripheral pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-Li; Chen, Meng-Ling; Liu, Si-Si; Li, Guo-Liang; Gu, Tian-Yuan; Liang, Pei; Qin, Yu-Mei; Zhan, Yue-Hua; Quan, Ying; Zhang, Gen-Hua

    2013-09-01

    The sweet taste is of immense interest to scientists and has been intensively studied during the last two decades. However, the sweet preference modification and the related mechanisms are still unclear. In this study, we try to establish a mice model with manipulated sweet taste preference and explore the involved possible molecular mechanisms. The animals were exposed to acesulfame-K via maternal milk during lactation and the sweet preference tests were carried out when they grew to adulthood. Our results showed that the preference thresholds for sweet taste were increased in adults by early acesulfame-K exposure and the preference ratios for sweet tastants at low or preferred concentrations were decreased. Moreover, by means of qRT-PCR and Western blot, we observed the increased expression of leptin receptor Ob-Rb and downregulation of Gα-gustducin protein in the soft palate. Thereby, the sweet taste sensitivity may be modified by early sweetener experience during lactation. Along the peripheral sweet sensory pathway, the sweet regulator receptors Ob-Rb, CB1 and components of sweet transduction signal Gα-gustducin and T1R2 in both the soft palate and tongue may be cooperatively involved in the plastic development of sweet taste.

  9. Early diagnosis of peripheral nervous system involvement in Fabry disease and treatment of neuropathic pain: the report of an expert panel

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Fabry disease is an inherited metabolic disorder characterized by progressive lysosomal accumulation of lipids in a variety of cell types, including neural cells. Small, unmyelinated nerve fibers are particularly affected and small fiber peripheral neuropathy often clinically manifests at young age. Peripheral pain can be chronic and/or occur as provoked attacks of excruciating pain. Manifestations of dysfunction of small autonomic fibers may include, among others, impaired sweating, gastrointestinal dysmotility, and abnormal pain perception. Patients with Fabry disease often remain undiagnosed until severe complications involving the kidney, heart, peripheral nerves and/or brain have arisen. Methods An international expert panel convened with the goal to provide guidance to clinicians who may encounter unrecognized patients with Fabry disease on how to diagnose these patients early using simple diagnostic tests. A further aim was to offer recommendations to control neuropathic pain. Results We describe the neuropathy in Fabry disease, focusing on peripheral small fiber dysfunction - the hallmark of early neurologic involvement in this disorder. The clinical course of peripheral pain is summarized, and the importance of medical history-taking, including family history, is highlighted. A thorough physical examination (e.g., angiokeratoma, corneal opacities) and simple non-invasive sensory perception tests could provide clues to the diagnosis of Fabry disease. Reported early clinical benefits of enzyme replacement therapy include reduction of neuropathic pain, and adequate management of residual pain to a tolerable and functional level can substantially improve the quality of life for patients. Conclusions Our recommendations can assist in diagnosing Fabry small fiber neuropathy early, and offer clinicians guidance in controlling peripheral pain. This is particularly important since management of pain in young patients with Fabry disease appears to be

  10. Gene Expression Profiling of Peripheral Blood From Kidney Transplant Recipients for the Early Detection of Digestive System Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kusaka, M; Okamoto, M; Takenaka, M; Sasaki, H; Fukami, N; Kataoka, K; Ito, T; Kenmochi, T; Hoshinaga, K; Shiroki, R

    2017-06-01

    Kidney transplant recipients are at increased risk of developing cancer in comparison with the general population. To effectively manage post-transplantation malignancies, it is essential to proactively monitor patients. A long-term intensive screening program was associated with a reduced incidence of cancer after transplantation. This study evaluated the usefulness of the gene expression profiling of peripheral blood samples obtained from kidney transplant patients and adopted a screening test for detecting cancer of the digestive system (gastric, colon, pancreas, and biliary tract). Nineteen patients were included in this study and a total of 53 gene expression screening tests were performed. The gene expression profiles of blood-delivered total RNA and whole genome human gene expression profiles were obtained. We investigated the expression levels of 2665 genes associated with digestive cancers and counted the number of genes in which expression was altered. A hierarchical clustering analysis was also performed. The final prediction of the cancer possibility was determined according to an algorithm. The number of genes in which expression was altered was significantly increased in the kidney transplant recipients in comparison with the general population (1091 ± 63 vs 823 ± 94; P = .0024). The number of genes with altered expression decreased after the induction of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor (1484 ± 227 vs 883 ± 154; P = .0439). No cases of possible digestive cancer were detected in this study period. The gene expression profiling of peripheral blood samples may be a useful and noninvasive diagnostic tool that allows for the early detection of cancer of the digestive system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Charcoal reflectance reveals early holocene boreal deciduous forests burned at high intensities.

    PubMed

    Hudspith, Victoria A; Belcher, Claire M; Kelly, Ryan; Hu, Feng Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Wildfire size, frequency, and severity are increasing in the Alaskan boreal forest in response to climate warming. One of the potential impacts of this changing fire regime is the alteration of successional trajectories, from black spruce to mixed stands dominated by aspen, a vegetation composition not experienced since the early Holocene. Such changes in vegetation composition may consequently alter the intensity of fires, influencing fire feedbacks to the ecosystem. Paleorecords document past wildfire-vegetation dynamics and as such, are imperative for our understanding of how these ecosystems will respond to future climate warming. For the first time, we have used reflectance measurements of macroscopic charcoal particles (>180μm) from an Alaskan lake-sediment record to estimate ancient charring temperatures (termed pyrolysis intensity). We demonstrate that pyrolysis intensity increased markedly from an interval of birch tundra 11 ky ago (mean 1.52%Ro; 485°C), to the expansion of trees on the landscape ~10.5 ky ago, remaining high to the present (mean 3.54%Ro; 640°C) irrespective of stand composition. Despite differing flammabilities and adaptations to fire, the highest pyrolysis intensities derive from two intervals with distinct vegetation compositions. 1) the expansion of mixed aspen and spruce woodland at 10 cal. kyr BP, and 2) the establishment of black spruce, and the modern boreal forest at 4 cal. kyr BP. Based on our analysis, we infer that predicted expansion of deciduous trees into the boreal forest in the future could lead to high intensity, but low severity fires, potentially moderating future climate-fire feedbacks.

  12. Charcoal Reflectance Reveals Early Holocene Boreal Deciduous Forests Burned at High Intensities

    PubMed Central

    Hudspith, Victoria A.; Belcher, Claire M.; Kelly, Ryan; Hu, Feng Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Wildfire size, frequency, and severity are increasing in the Alaskan boreal forest in response to climate warming. One of the potential impacts of this changing fire regime is the alteration of successional trajectories, from black spruce to mixed stands dominated by aspen, a vegetation composition not experienced since the early Holocene. Such changes in vegetation composition may consequently alter the intensity of fires, influencing fire feedbacks to the ecosystem. Paleorecords document past wildfire-vegetation dynamics and as such, are imperative for our understanding of how these ecosystems will respond to future climate warming. For the first time, we have used reflectance measurements of macroscopic charcoal particles (>180μm) from an Alaskan lake-sediment record to estimate ancient charring temperatures (termed pyrolysis intensity). We demonstrate that pyrolysis intensity increased markedly from an interval of birch tundra 11 ky ago (mean 1.52%Ro; 485°C), to the expansion of trees on the landscape ∼10.5 ky ago, remaining high to the present (mean 3.54%Ro; 640°C) irrespective of stand composition. Despite differing flammabilities and adaptations to fire, the highest pyrolysis intensities derive from two intervals with distinct vegetation compositions. 1) the expansion of mixed aspen and spruce woodland at 10 cal. kyr BP, and 2) the establishment of black spruce, and the modern boreal forest at 4 cal. kyr BP. Based on our analysis, we infer that predicted expansion of deciduous trees into the boreal forest in the future could lead to high intensity, but low severity fires, potentially moderating future climate-fire feedbacks. PMID:25853712

  13. Early snow melts and biomass burning over Eastern Eurasia and their impacts on the air quality in Northern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasunari, T. J.; daSilva, A.; Akiyama, M.; Hayasaki, M.; Murao, N.; Kim, K. M.

    2016-12-01

    We investigated monthly characteristics including a couple of large biomass burnings (BB) in Eastern Eurasia during 2003 and 2014, and the smoke impacts on Northern Japan. The new re-analyses data including the aerosol data assimilation, called MERRA-2, which was produced by the NASA's Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO), the monthly mean MODIS snow cover fraction (SCF) data (MOD10CM; further re-gridded), and the observations on PM2.5, elemental carbon (EC), and organic carbon (OC) in Sapporo city (Hokkaido, Japan), were used in our analyses. For the MERRA-2 and MODIS SCF data, we calculated 12-year climatology for each month and these anomalies from the climatology on the focused variables. Three-month means of the anomalies for the last three months until the BB months were calculated except for the SCF. For the SCF, the three-month mean anomalies until the one month before the BB months were also calculated. Here we start especially focusing on the identified fire months with the MERRA-2 data (May 2003, April 2008, and July 2014) in terms of these smoke impacts on the air qualities in Northern Japan (i.e., Hokkaido). We identified two types of biomass burning patterns within these three months. For the BBs in May 2003 and April 2008, the main BB areas were seen in the eastern part of the Lake Baikal. In July 2014, the main BB area was in the Sakha Republic and close to the Arctic region. Then, the MERRA-2 data overestimated the observations (EC, OC, and PM2.5) in Sapporo (Hokkaido, Japan) during the smoke transports, but the elevated timings were well reproduced. For all the three BB cases, abnormally reduced SCF were seen by the one month before the Eurasian BB generations (i.e., earlier than the BB generations). The positive and negative anomalies of 2-m temperature and surface soil wetness, covering the three-month until the BB months, were identified. These suggest that early snow-melting anomalies for these three years could make the following BB

  14. [Effects of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on damage of intestinal mucosa of rats with severe burn in early stage and the mechanism].

    PubMed

    Cai, C; Xia, Z G; Xu, Q L; Li, X Z

    2017-08-20

    Objective: To observe the effects of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) on damage of intestinal mucosa of rats with severe burn in early stage and to explore the mechanism. Methods: One hundred and twenty SD rats were divided into sham injury group, pure burn group, and ω-3 PUFA group according to the random number table, with 40 rats in each group. Rats in sham injury group were sham injured, while rats in pure burn group and ω-3 PUFA group were inflicted with 30% total body surface area full-thickness scald (hereinafter referred to as burn) on the back. Rats in sham injury group and pure burn group were injected with normal saline solution (1 mL/kg) by tail vein, while rats in ω-3 PUFA group were injected with ω-3 PUFA solution (1 mL/kg) by the same way at 5 minutes post injury. At post injury hour (PIH) 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48, abdominal aorta blood and intestinal mucosa were collected from 8 rats in each group, respectively. Serum content of diamine oxidase (DAO) was detected by spectrophotography. Serum content of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Protein expression of NF-κB-p65 in intestinal mucosa was determined by Western blotting. Data were processed with analysis of variance of factorial design, one-way analysis of variance, chi-square test, LSD test, and Bonferroni correction. Results: (1) At all time points post injury, serum content of DAO of rats in pure burn group and ω-3 PUFA group was significantly higher than that in sham injury group (with P values below 0.01), and serum content of DAO of rats in ω-3 PUFA group was significantly lower than that in pure burn group (with P values below 0.01). (2) At all time points post injury, serum content of TNF-α and IL-6 of rats in pure burn group and ω-3 PUFA group was significantly higher than that in sham injury group (with P values below 0.01), and serum content of TNF-α and IL-6 of rats in ω-3 PUFA group was

  15. Peripheral Nerve Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... outlet syndrome. In some cases, like complex regional pain syndrome and brachial plexus injuries, the problem begins after an injury. Some people are born with peripheral nerve disorders. Symptoms often start gradually, and then ... Burning or tingling Muscle weakness Sensitivity to touch ...

  16. Biomass Burning

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-07-27

    Projects:  Biomass Burning Definition/Description:  Biomass Burning: This data set represents the geographical and temporal distribution of total amount of biomass burned. These data may be used in general circulation models (GCMs) and ...

  17. [Effects of application of pulse contour cardiac output monitoring technology in early treatment of patients with large area burns].

    PubMed

    Wang, D Y; Xie, W G; Xi, M M; Li, Z; Wang, B

    2018-01-20

    Objective: To analyze the changes and relationship of early hemodynamic indexes of patients with large area burns monitored by pulse contour cardiac output (PiCCO) monitoring technology, so as to assess the guiding value of this technology in the treatment of patients with large area burns during shock period. Methods: Eighteen patients with large area burns, confirming to the study criteria, were admitted to our unit from May 2016 to May 2017. Pulse contour cardiac output index (PCCI), systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI), global end-diastolic volume index (GEDVI), and extravascular lung water index (EVLWI) of patients were monitored by PiCCO instrument from admission to post injury day (PID) 7, and they were calibrated and recorded once every four hours. The fluid infusion coefficients of patients at the first and second 24 hours post injury were calculated. The blood lactic acid values of patients from PID 1 to 7 were also recorded. The correlations among PCCI, SVRI, and GEDVI as well as the correlation between SVRI and blood lactic acid of these 18 patients were analyzed. Prognosis of patients were recorded. Data were processed with one-way analysis of variance, single sample t test and Bonferroni correction, Pearson correlation analysis, and Spearman rank correlation analysis. Results: (1) There was statistically significant difference in PCCI value of patients from post injury hour (PIH) 4 to 168 ( F =7.428, P <0.01). The PCCI values of patients at PIH 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24 were (2.4±0.9), (2.6±1.2), (2.2±0.6), (2.6±0.7), (2.8±0.6), and (2.7±0.7) L·min(-1)·m(-2,) respectively, and they were significantly lower than the normal value 4 L·min(-1)·m(-2)( t =-3.143, -3.251, -11.511, -8.889, -6.735, -6.976, P <0.05 or P <0.01). At PIH 76, 80, 84, 88, 92, and 96, the PCCI values of patients were (4.9±1.5), (5.7±2.0), (5.9±1.7), (5.5±1.3), (5.3±1.1), and (4.9±1.4) L·min(-1)·m(-2,) respectively, and they were significantly higher than the

  18. [Clinical randomized controlled trial on the feasibility and validity of continuous blood purification during the early stage of severe burn].

    PubMed

    Liu, F; Huang, Z G; Peng, Y Z; Wu, J; He, W F; Yuan, Z Q; Zhang, J P; Luo, Q Z; Yan, H; Peng, D Z; Dang, Y M; Luo, G X

    2016-03-01

    To observe and primarily evaluate the feasibility and validity of continuous blood purification (CBP) during the early stage of severe burn. Forty-one patients with severe burn admitted to our ward from January 2013 to July 2015, conforming to the study criteria, were divided into conventional treatment group (CT, n=21) and blood purification group (BP, n=20) according to the random number table and patient's personal consent. Patients in group CT received CT conforming to the traditional resuscitation principle for severe burn, while patients in group BP received CT and blood purification treatment in the mode of continuous venous-venous hemodiafiltration in addition up to post injury hour (PIH) 72. On post injury day (PID) 1, 2, 3, the vital signs, volume of fluid input, and volume of the urine output were observed and recorded; femoral artery blood was drawn to determine lactate, bicarbonate radical, and base excess, and oxygen index was calculated. At PIH 12, 24, 48, 72, femoral vein blood was drawn to determine white cell count, platelet count, neutrophils, creatine kinase-MB, creatine kinase, lactic dehydrogenase, aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), creatinine, urea nitrogen, and blood glucose (the ratio of AST to ALT was calculated). The incidence of infection, sepsis, and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and the mortality of patients were recorded during 2 months after injury. Data were processed with chi-square test, analysis of variance for repeated measurement, t test and Wilcoxon test, and the values of P were adjusted by Bonferroni. The observation was completed in the 41 patients without exclusion. (1) There were no statistically significant differences in vital signs, volume of fluid input, and volume of the urine output of patients between two groups on PID 1, 2, 3 (with t values from -1.64 to 1.48, P values above 0.05). (2) Compared with that in group CT, the level of lactate of patients in group BP declined

  19. Early diagnosis of an isolated primary peripheral T-cell lymphoma masquerading as massive gingival enlargement in a pediatric patient

    PubMed Central

    Ghattamaneni, Sravani; Guttikonda, Venkateswara Rao; Yeluri, Sivaranjani; Kolipara, Rajani

    2017-01-01

    Lymphomas are malignant neoplasm of the lymphocyte cell lines, classified as either Hodgkin's or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). NHL comprises a heterogeneous group of lymphoid neoplasm arising from B-cell, T-cell or natural killer cell with a spectrum of behavior ranging from relatively indolent to highly aggressive and potentially fatal. Peripheral T-cell lymphoma, a variant of NHL, is a disease characterized by the presence of diffuse lymphadenopathy, extranodal involvement, classical B symptoms such as fever (>100.4°F) for 3 consecutive days, weight loss exceeding 10% of body weight in 6 months and drenching night sweats with a tendency for recurrence. Among NHLs, extranodal presentations are relatively common. Extranodal presentation particularly in the oral cavity is very rare and may misinterpret the diagnosis. Lesions of this type should be cautiously dealt especially in pediatric patients and young adolescents. The present case report is about an atypical presentation of disease process in a 15-year-old male patient, which was diagnosed early with the help of a combination of histopathology and immunohistochemistry techniques. PMID:29391718

  20. Transcriptional response of peripheral lymphocytes to early fibrosarcoma: a model system for cancer detection based on hybridization signatures.

    PubMed

    Marques, Márcia M C; Junta, Cristina M; Zárate-Blades, Carlos R; Sakamoto-Hojo, Elza Tiemi; Donadi, Eduardo A; Passos, Geraldo A S

    2009-07-01

    Since circulating leukocytes, mainly B and T cells, continuously maintain vigilant and comprehensive immune surveillance, these cells could be used as reporters for signs of infection or other pathologies, including cancer. Activated lymphocyte clones trigger a sensitive transcriptional response, which could be identified by gene expression profiling. To assess this hypothesis, we conducted microarray analysis of the gene expression profile of lymphocytes isolated from immunocompetent BALB/c mice subcutaneously injected with different numbers of tumorigenic B61 fibrosarcoma cells. Flow cytometry demonstrated that the number of circulating T (CD3(+)CD4(+) or CD3(+)CD8(+)) or B (CD19(+)) cells did not change. However, the lymphocytes isolated from tumor cell-injected animals expressed a unique transcriptional profile that was identifiable before the development of a palpable tumor mass. This finding demonstrates that the transcriptional response appears before alterations in the main lymphocyte subsets and that the gene expression profile of peripheral lymphocytes can serve as a sensitive and accurate method for the early detection of cancer.

  1. 17β-Estradiol Promotes Schwann Cell Proliferation and Differentiation, Accelerating Early Remyelination in a Mouse Peripheral Nerve Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Guo, Wenjie; Li, Wenjuan; Cheng, Meng; Hu, Ying; Xu, Wenming

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen induces oligodendrocyte remyelination in response to demyelination in the central nervous system. Our objective was to determine the effects of 17β-estradiol (E2) on Schwann cell function and peripheral nerve remyelination after injury. Adult male C57BL/6J mice were used to prepare the sciatic nerve transection injury model and were randomly categorized into control and E2 groups. To study myelination in vitro, dorsal root ganglion (DRG) explant culture was prepared using 13.5-day-old mouse embryos. Primary Schwann cells were isolated from the sciatic nerves of 1- to 3-day-old Sprague–Dawley rats. Immunostaining for myelin basic protein (MBP) expression and toluidine blue staining for myelin sheaths demonstrated that E2 treatment accelerates early remyelination in the “nerve bridge” region between the proximal and distal stumps of the transection injury site in the mouse sciatic nerve. The 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine incorporation assay revealed that E2 promotes Schwann cell proliferation in the bridge region and in the primary culture, which is blocked using AKT inhibitor MK2206. The in vitro myelination in the DRG explant culture determined showed that the MBP expression in the E2-treated group is higher than that in the control group. These results show that E2 promotes Schwann cell proliferation and myelination depending on AKT activation. PMID:27872858

  2. Peripheral and placental immune responses in goats after primoinfection with Neospora caninum at early, mid and late gestation.

    PubMed

    Porto, Wagnner José Nascimento; Horcajo, Pilar; Kim, Pomy de Cássia Peixoto; Regidor-Cerrillo, Javier; Romão, Elton Amorim; Álvarez-García, Gema; Mesquita, Emanuela Polimeni de; Mota, Rinaldo Aparecido; Ortega-Mora, Luis Miguel

    2017-08-15

    Neospora caninum can cause reproductive failure in goats. However, the pathogenesis of neosporosis in this domestic species remains largely unknown. We recently demonstrated that the outcome of experimental infection by N. caninum in pregnant goats is highly dependent on the time of gestation, during which infection occurs. In the present study, we examined the peripheral and placental immune responses in these groups of goats infected with 10 6 tachyzoites of the Nc-Spain7 isolate at early (G1, at day 40 of gestation, dg), mid (G2, 90 dg) and late (G3, 120 dg) gestation, together with a group of non-infected goats as a control group (G4). Seroconversion was observed as early as day 10 post-infection (pi) in all goats from G1 that aborted earlier (10-11 pi). The remaining infected goats had seroconverted by day 14 pi. Similar IFN-γ kinetic profiles were found in sera from goats in G1 and G2 with a significant increase in the IFN-γ levels on days 7 and 10 pi. This increase was not observed in G3. A similar pattern of placental cytokine expression was found in all infected groups. IFN-γ and IL-4 showed the highest increase, followed by a weaker up-regulation in TNF-α and IL-10. The lowest up-regulation was observed for IL-12 expression. In summary, this study provides information regarding the dynamics of immune responses and their relationship with the outcome of N. caninum infection in goats during gestation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Assessment of global DNA methylation in peripheral blood cell subpopulations of early rheumatoid arthritis before and after methotrexate.

    PubMed

    de Andres, María C; Perez-Pampin, Eva; Calaza, Manuel; Santaclara, Francisco J; Ortea, Ignacio; Gomez-Reino, Juan J; Gonzalez, Antonio

    2015-08-29

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism regulating gene expression that has been insufficiently studied in the blood of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, as only T cells and total peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with established RA have been studied and with conflicting results. Five major blood cell subpopulations: T, B and NK cells, monocytes, and polymorphonuclear leukocytes, were isolated from 19 early RA patients and 17 healthy controls. Patient samples were taken before and 1 month after the start of treatment with methotrexate (MTX). Analysis included DNA methylation with high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry-selected reaction monitoring (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS-SRM) and expression levels of seven methylation-specific enzymes by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug (DMARD)-naïve early RA patients showed global DNA hypomethylation in T cells and monocytes, together with a lower expression of DNA methyltrasnferase 1 (DNMT1), the maintenance DNA methyltransferase, which was also decreased in B cells. Furthermore, significantly increased expression of ten-eleven translocation1 (TET1), TET2 and TET3, enzymes involved in demethylation, was found in monocytes and of TET2 in T cells. There was also modest decreased expression of DNMT3A in B cells and of growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible protein 45A (GADD45A) in T and B cells. Treatment with MTX reverted hypomethylation in T cells and monocytes, which were no longer different from controls, and increased global methylation in B cells. In addition, DNMT1 and DNMT3A showed a trend to reversion of their decreased expression. Our results confirm global DNA hypomethylation in patients with RA with specificity for some blood cell subpopulations and their reversal with methotrexate treatment. These changes are accompanied by parallel changes in the levels of enzymes involved in methylation, suggesting

  4. Cognitive impairment in metabolically-obese, normal-weight rats: identification of early biomarkers in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Cifre, Margalida; Palou, Andreu; Oliver, Paula

    2018-03-22

    Metabolically-obese, normal-weight (MONW) individuals are not obese in terms of weight and height but have a number of obesity-related features (e.g. greater visceral adiposity, insulin resistance, and increased risk of cardiovascular disease). The MONW phenotype is related to the intake of unbalanced diets, such as those rich in fat. Increasing evidence shows a relationship between high-fat diet consumption and mild cognitive impairment and dementia. Thus, MONW individuals could be at a greater risk of cognitive dysfunction. We aimed to evaluate whether MONW-like animals present gene expression alterations in the hippocampus associated with an increased risk of cognitive impairment, and to identify early biomarkers of cognitive dysfunction in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Wistar rats were chronically fed with a 60% (HF60) or a 45% (HF45) high-fat diet administered isocalorically to control animals to mimic MONW features. Expression analysis of cognitive decline-related genes was performed using RT-qPCR, and working memory was assessed using a T-maze. High-fat diet consumption altered the pattern of gene expression in the hippocampus, clearly pointing to cognitive decline, which was accompanied by a worse performance in the T-maze in HF60 animals. Remarkably, Syn1 and Sorl1 mRNA showed the same expression pattern in both the hippocampus and the PBMC obtained at different time-points in the HF60 group, even before other pathological signs were observed. Our results demonstrate that long-term intake of high-fat diets, even in the absence of obesity, leads to cognitive disruption that is reflected in PBMC transcriptome. Therefore, PBMC are revealed as a plausible, minimally-invasive source of early biomarkers of cognitive impairment associated with increased fat intake.

  5. A protocol of early aggressive acceleration of tube feeding increases ileus without perceptible benefit in severely burned patients.

    PubMed

    Kesey, Jennifer; Dissanaike, Sharmila

    2013-01-01

    Optimal nutrition is essential to the recovery of burned patients. The authors evaluated the efficacy of an aggressive nutrition delivery protocol. The following protocol was implemented: initiation of tube feeds within 4 hours, acceleration to goal rate within 8 hours, and tolerance of gastric residual volumes of 400 ml. Patients on the protocol formed the study group whereas patients admitted immediately before implementation served as controls for a study period of 7 days after admission. Outcome variables included ileus, prokinetic medication use, intensive care unit and overall length of stay, ventilator days and mortality. Variables were compared using bivariate analysis. The 42 study subjects and 34 controls were similar at baseline. Time to initiation was similar (6.8 vs 9.4 hours; P = .226), however, goal rate was achieved much sooner in the study group (11.2 vs 20.9 hours; P < .001). Number of hours spent at goal was different on days 1 and 2 (6.62 vs 2.74, P = .003 and 17.24 vs 13.18, P = .032) with no difference thereafter. Residual volumes in the study group were higher from day 2 onward, and remained increased throughout the study period (401 vs 234 ml average; P = .449). Clinical ileus was much more common in the study group (8 cases vs 1, P = .037). There was no difference in length of stay or mortality. The protocol was successfully implemented and resulted in early achievement of goal tube feed rates. However, this resulted in tube feed intolerance as manifested by more cases of clinical ileus.

  6. Burning Issue: Handling Household Burns

    MedlinePlus

    ... hot objects or liquid, fire, friction, the sun, electricity, or certain chemicals. Each year, about a half- ... infant or elderly. the burn was caused by electricity, which can lead to “invisible” burns. Links Burns ...

  7. Theoretical evaluation of burns to the human respiratory tract due to inhalation of hot gas in the early stage of fires.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yong-Gang; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Jun

    2006-06-01

    A transient two-dimensional mathematical model for heat and water vapor transport across the respiratory tract of human body was established and applied to predict the thermal impact of inhaled hot gas to the nasal tissues during the early stage of fires. Influences of individual's physiological status and environment variables were comprehensively investigated through numerical calculations. Burn evaluation was performed using the classical Henriques model to predict the time for thermal injury to occur. It was shown that decreasing the air velocity and increasing the respiratory rate is helpful to minimize the burn over the respiratory tract. The effect of relative humidity of surrounding dry hot air could be ignored in predicting burns for short duration exposures. Due to evaporation cooling on the mucousal membrane, the burn often occurs at certain positions underneath the skin of the tract near the inlet of the respiratory tract. Most of the tissues near the surface suffer injury immediately after exposure to fire, while in the deeper tissues, serious damage occurs after a relatively longer time period. The method presented in this paper may suggest a valuable approach to theoretically evaluate the injury of hot air to the human respiratory tract under various fire situations.

  8. Cpt1a gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells as an early biomarker of diet-related metabolic alterations

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Rúa, Rubén; Palou, Andreu; Oliver, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Background Research on biomarkers that provide early information about the development of future metabolic alterations is an emerging discipline. Gene expression analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) is a promising tool to identify subjects at risk of developing diet-related diseases. Objective We analysed PBMC expression of key energy homeostasis-related genes in a time-course analysis in order to find out early markers of metabolic alterations due to sustained intake of high-fat (HF) and high-protein (HP) diets. Design We administered HF and HP diets (4 months) to adult Wistar rats in isocaloric conditions to a control diet, mainly to avoid overweight associated with the intake of hyperlipidic diets and, thus, to be able to characterise markers of metabolically obese normal-weight (MONW) syndrome. PBMC samples were collected at different time points of dietary treatment and expression of relevant energy homeostatic genes analysed by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Serum parameters related with metabolic syndrome, as well as fat deposition in liver, were also analysed. Results The most outstanding results were those obtained for the expression of the lipolytic gene carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a (Cpt1a). Cpt1a expression in PBMC increased after only 1 month of exposure to both unbalanced diets, and this increased expression was maintained thereafter. Interestingly, in the case of the HF diet, Cpt1a expression was altered even in the absence of increased body weight but correlated with alterations such as higher insulin resistance, alteration of serum lipid profile and, particularly, increased fat deposition in liver, a feature characteristic of metabolic syndrome, which was even observed in animals fed with HP diet. Conclusions We propose Cpt1a gene expression analysis in PBMC as an early biomarker of metabolic alterations associated with MONW phenotype due to the intake of isocaloric HF diets, as well as a marker of

  9. Advanced detection and measurement of cells on membrane from peripheral blood by laser scanning cytometry (LSC) in early stage breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Sanislo, L; Kuliffay, P; Sedlak, J; Kausitz, J; Galbavy, S

    2010-01-01

    The aim of our study was the potential detection of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in early stage breast cancer patients. Our approach was cell microfiltration through polycarbonate membrane as a concentration method suitable for CTC selection in peripheral blood. The isolated cells on membrane were further analysed by laser scanning cytometry. Sixteen patients were enrolled in the study, of which 13 had early stage breast carcinoma and 3 patients had metastatic breast carcinoma. The analyses were performed from 9 ml of peripheral blood, in one patient blood was drawn twice. Blood samples were taken after adjuvant chemotherapy but prior to adjuvant radiotherapy. The control group consisted of 12 clinically healthy subjects. In the control group 3 subjects out of 12 had 1 CTC, the mean CTC numbers being 0.25 +/- 0.45. In the early stage breast cancer patients 0-36 CTCs were detected (mean 13.9 +/- 12.9 CTCs. 10 patients out of 13 had more than 2 CTCs (62%). The detection and measurement of cells on membrane is a simple and reproducible method of detection of CTCs in peripheral blood. Sensitivity of the method is 88.5%. Detection of CTCs seems to be a promising method for the monitoring of adjuvant therapy in early stage breast cancer patients and for the identification of high risk patients in whom elevated numbers of CTCs are persisting following the termination of adjuvant therapy (Tab. 1, Fig. 4, Ref. 35). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.

  10. [Clinical research of features of magnetic resonance imaging of high-voltage electrical burns in limbs at early stage].

    PubMed

    Li, S J; Wang, Z L; Zhu, W P; Xiang, Y; Lin, J; Yu, Y J; Li, P

    2017-12-20

    Objective: To analyze the features of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of patients with high-voltage electrical burns in limbs at early stage. Methods: Thirty-eight patients with high-voltage electrical burns, conforming to the study criteria, were hospitalized in our unit from March 2013 to August 2016. T(1) weighted imaging (T(1)WI), T(2)WI, fat-suppression T(2)WI plain scan, and fat-suppression T(1)WI enhanced scan of MRI were performed in 78 limbs, including 56 upper limbs and 22 lower limbs at post injury hour 72. The MRI signal characteristics of electrical burns in skin and subcutaneous tissue, skeletal muscle, tendon, joint ligament, and skeleton of limbs were analyzed. " Sandwich-like" necrosis and injury in skeletal muscle, injuries of tendon, joint ligament, and skeleton were observed. MRI signal characteristics of amputated upper limbs and salvaged limbs were also analyzed. All patients underwent surgery within 24 h after MRI examination, and the muscle vitality was judged during operation. Muscle tissue without reaction to electrical stimulation which was completely necrotic as shown by MRI, muscle tissue with weak reaction to electrical stimulation which was injured with blood supply as shown by MRI, and muscle tissue with edema as shown by MRI were collected, and then the pathological characteristics of muscle tissue were observed with HE staining. Results: (1) The defect area of patients at entrance of current was bigger than that at exit. The skin and subcutaneous tissue extensively unevenly thickened. T(2)WI manifested hyperintensity, and T(1)WI manifested isointensity, while fat-suppression enhanced T(1)WI manifested uneven enhancement. Zonal effusion was seen in the region of serious subcutaneous edema. (2) For complete necrosis of skeletal muscle, T(2)WI manifested hypointense, isointensity, or slight hyperintensity, and T(1)WI manifested isointensity, slight hyperintensity, or mixed signal of isointensity and slight hyperintensity, while fat

  11. Loss of CD28 on Peripheral T Cells Decreases the Risk for Early Acute Rejection after Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dedeoglu, Burç; Meijers, Ruud W. J.; Klepper, Mariska; Hesselink, Dennis A.; Baan, Carla C.; Litjens, Nicolle H. R.; Betjes, Michiel G. H.

    2016-01-01

    Background End-stage renal disease patients have a dysfunctional, prematurely aged peripheral T-cell system. Here we hypothesized that the degree of premature T-cell ageing before kidney transplantation predicts the risk for early acute allograft rejection (EAR). Methods 222 living donor kidney transplant recipients were prospectively analyzed. EAR was defined as biopsy proven acute allograft rejection within 3 months after kidney transplantation. The differentiation status of circulating T cells, the relative telomere length and the number of CD31+ naive T cells were determined as T-cell ageing parameters. Results Of the 222 patients analyzed, 30 (14%) developed an EAR. The donor age and the historical panel reactive antibody score were significantly higher (p = 0.024 and p = 0.039 respectively) and the number of related donor kidney transplantation was significantly lower (p = 0.018) in the EAR group. EAR-patients showed lower CD4+CD28null T-cell numbers (p<0.01) and the same trend was observed for CD8+CD28null T-cell numbers (p = 0.08). No differences regarding the other ageing parameters were found. A multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that higher CD4+CD28null T-cell numbers was associated with a lower risk for EAR (HR: 0.65, p = 0.028). In vitro, a significant lower percentage of alloreactive T cells was observed within CD28null T cells (p<0.001). Conclusion Immunological ageing-related expansion of highly differentiated CD28null T cells is associated with a lower risk for EAR. PMID:26950734

  12. Burn Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Church, Deirdre; Elsayed, Sameer; Reid, Owen; Winston, Brent; Lindsay, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Burns are one of the most common and devastating forms of trauma. Patients with serious thermal injury require immediate specialized care in order to minimize morbidity and mortality. Significant thermal injuries induce a state of immunosuppression that predisposes burn patients to infectious complications. A current summary of the classifications of burn wound infections, including their diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, is given. Early excision of the eschar has substantially decreased the incidence of invasive burn wound infection and secondary sepsis, but most deaths in severely burn-injured patients are still due to burn wound sepsis or complications due to inhalation injury. Burn patients are also at risk for developing sepsis secondary to pneumonia, catheter-related infections, and suppurative thrombophlebitis. The introduction of silver-impregnated devices (e.g., central lines and Foley urinary catheters) may reduce the incidence of nosocomial infections due to prolonged placement of these devices. Improved outcomes for severely burned patients have been attributed to medical advances in fluid resuscitation, nutritional support, pulmonary and burn wound care, and infection control practices. PMID:16614255

  13. Enzymatic debridement of deeply burned faces: Healing and early scarring based on tissue preservation compared to traditional surgical debridement.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Alexandra; Fuchs, Paul Christian; Rothermundt, Irene; Hoffmann, Alexandra; Rosenberg, Lior; Shoham, Yaron; Oberländer, Henrik; Schiefer, Jennifer

    2017-09-01

    Facial burns occur frequently and depending on the injured skin layers often heal with scars which may cause permanent functional and cosmetic sequelae. Preservation of the sensitive facial skin layers, especially of the dermis is essential for scarless epithelialisation. Enzymatic debridement of deep thermal burns has already been shown to assist with preserving viable dermis. However, up to date, there are no published reports on wound healing and in the long term aesthetic outcome after enzymatic debridement of facial burns. Therefore we performed a-single centre clinical trial that included 26 subjects aged 18-78 years with facial burns clinically evaluated as deep dermal or deeper. Burns were treated either with enzymatic debridement or excisional surgical debridement. Then we compared both groups regarding debridement selectivity, wound closure and scar quality after more than 12 months. Enzymatic debridement significantly reduced time to complete wound closure after admission (19.85 days versus 42.23 days, p=0.002), and after enzymatic eschar removal (18.92 days versus 35.62 days, p=0.042). The number of procedures to complete debridement were significantly lower in the enzymatic debridement group (1.00 versus 1.77, p=0.003). 77% of facial burns that had been debrided enzymatically were found to be more superficially burned than initially estimated. Wounds undergoing autografting of any size were significantly reduced by enzymatic debridement (15% versus 77%, p=0.002). Scar quality after enzymatic debridement was superior compared to surgical debridement after 12 months regarding pigmentation (p=0.016), thickness (p=0.16), relief (p=0.10), pliability (p=0.01), surface area (p=0.004), stiffness (p=0.023), thickness (0.011) and scar irregularity (p=0.011). Regarding erythema and melanin, viscoelasticity and pliability, trans-epidermal water loss or laser tissue oxygen saturation, haemoglobin level and microcirculation we found no significant differences for

  14. Heterogeneity in fire severity with early season and late season prescribed burns in a mixed conifer forest

    Treesearch

    Eric E. Knapp; Jon E. Keeley

    2006-01-01

    Structural heterogeneity in forests of the Sierra Nevada was historically produced through variation in fire regimes and local environmental factors. The amount of heterogeneity that prescription burning can achieve might now be more limited owing to high fuel loads and increased fuel continuity. Topography, woody fuel loading, and vegetative composition were...

  15. Effects of early enteral nutrition on the gastrointestinal motility and intestinal mucosal barrier of patients with burn-induced invasive fungal infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Gu, Fang; Wang, Fengxian; Zhang, Yuanda

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of early enteral nutrition on the gastrointestinal motility and intestinal mucosal barrier of patients with burn-induced invasive fungal infection. Methods: A total of 120 patients with burn-induced invasive fungal infection were randomly divided into an early enteral nutrition (EN) group and a parenteral nutrition (PN) group (n=60). The patients were given nutritional support intervention for 14 days, and the expression levels of serum transferrin, albumin, total protein, endotoxin, D-lactic acid and inflammatory cytokines were detected on the 1st, 7th and 14th days respectively. Results: As the treatment progressed, the levels of serum transferrin, albumin and total protein of the EN group were significantly higher than those of the PN group (P<0.05), while the levels of serum endotoxin and D-lactic acid of the form group were significantly lower (P<0.05). After treatment, the expression levels of IL-6 and TNF-α were decreased in the EN group, which were significantly different from those of the PN group (P<0.05). During treatment, the incidence rates of complications such as abdominal distension, diarrhea, sepsis, nausea, vomiting and gastric retention were similar. The mean healing time of wound surface was 9.34±0.78 days in the EN group and 12.46±2.19 days in the PN group, i.e. such time of the former was significantly shorter than that of the latter (P<0.05). Conclusion: Treating patients having burn-induced invasive fungal infection by early enteral nutrition support with arginine can safely alleviate malnutrition and stress reaction, strengthen cellular immune function and promote wound healing, thereby facilitating the recovery of gastrointestinal motility and the function of intestinal mucosal barrier. PMID:27375697

  16. Detection of Circulating Mucorales DNA in Critically Ill Burn Patients: Preliminary Report of a Screening Strategy for Early Diagnosis and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Legrand, Matthieu; Gits-Muselli, Maud; Boutin, Louis; Garcia-Hermoso, Dea; Maurel, Véronique; Soussi, Sabri; Benyamina, Mourad; Ferry, Axelle; Chaussard, Maïté; Hamane, Samia; Denis, Blandine; Touratier, Sophie; Guigue, Nicolas; Fréalle, Emilie; Jeanne, Mathieu; Shaal, Jean-Vivien; Soler, Charles; Mimoun, Maurice; Chaouat, Marc; Lafaurie, Matthieu; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Bretagne, Stéphane; Alanio, Alexandre

    2016-11-15

     Invasive wound mucormycosis (IWM) is associated with an extremely poor outcome among critically ill burn patients. We describe the detection of circulating Mucorales DNA (cmDNA) for the early diagnosis of IWM in those patients and report the potential value of detecting cmDNA for treatment guidance.  Severely ill burn patients admitted to our tertiary referral center between October 2013 and February 2016 were included. Retrospective plasma samples were tested for the presence of cmDNA by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Patients were then prospectively screened twice a week, and liposomal amphotericin-B therapy initiated based on a positive qPCR. The primary endpoint was the time between cmDNA detection and standard diagnosis. Secondary endpoints were the time from cmDNA detection and treatment initiation and mortality.  Seventy-seven patients (418 samples) were included. The average age was 46 (28-60) years, abbreviated burn severity index was 8 (7-10), and simplified acute physiology score was 33 (23-46). The total body surface area was 33% (22%-52%). cmDNA was detected 11 (4.5-15) days before standard diagnosis. The in-hospital mortality was 62% for patients with IWM and 24% for those without (P = .03). The mortality due to IWM was 80% during period A and 33% during period B (P = .46).  This study suggests that the detection of cmDNA allows earlier diagnosis of IWM in severely ill burn patients and earlier initiation of treatment. Further studies are needed to confirm the impact of earlier treatment initiation on patient outcome. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Burn Wise

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Burn Wise is a partnership program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency that emphasizes the importance of burning the right wood, the right way, in the right appliance to protect your home, health, and the air we breathe.

  18. Lightning burns.

    PubMed

    Russell, Katie W; Cochran, Amalia L; Mehta, Sagar T; Morris, Stephen E; McDevitt, Marion C

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a lightning-strike victim. This case illustrates the importance of in-field care, appropriate referral to a burn center, and the tendency of lightning burns to progress to full-thickness injury.

  19. Scald Burns

    MedlinePlus

    Safety Tips & Info Scald Burns Thousands of scald burns occur annually, and ALL are preventable! The two high-risk populations are children under the age ... the single most important factor in preventing scald burns. Increased awareness is the key to scald prevention! ...

  20. Early Exercise in the Burn Intensive Care Unit Decreases Hospital Stay, Improves Mental Health, and Physical Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-10-01

    Decreases Hospital Stay, Improves Mental Health , and Physical Performance 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Oscar E. Suman, PhD...Multicenter Study of the Effect of In-Patient Exercise Training on Length of Hospitalization, Mental Health , and Physical Performance in Burned...Intensive Care Unit Decreases Hospital Stay, Improves Mental Health , and Physical Performance,” Proposal Log Number 13214039, Award Number W81XWH-14

  1. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells correlates with early childhood social interaction in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Makinodan, Manabu; Iwata, Keiko; Ikawa, Daisuke; Yamashita, Yasunori; Yamamuro, Kazuhiko; Toritsuka, Michihiro; Kimoto, Sohei; Okumura, Kazuki; Yamauchi, Takahira; Yoshino, Hiroki; Tsujii, Masatsugu; Sugiyama, Toshiro; Tsuchiya, Kenji; Mori, Norio; Matsuzaki, Hideo; Kishimoto, Toshifumi

    2017-03-01

    Autism spectrum disorder is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impaired social interaction, poor communication skills, and repetitive/restrictive behaviors. Elevated blood levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines have been reported in subjects with autism spectrum disorder. On the other hand, early childhood adverse experience also increases blood levels of these cytokines. Since social experience of children with autism spectrum disorder is generally unlike to typically developing children, we hypothesized that social interaction during childhood contribute to pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in subjects with autism spectrum disorder. We compared revised Autism Diagnostic Interview scores and expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of subjects with autism spectrum disorder (n = 30). The score of domain A on the revised Autism Diagnostic Interview, indicating social interaction impairment in early childhood, was negatively correlated with tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA expression level in peripheral blood mononuclear cells but not interleukin-1β or -6. Consistently, tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA expression was markedly low in subjects with autism spectrum disorder compared to typically developing children who presumably experienced the regular levels of social interaction. These findings suggest that the low blood levels of tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA in subjects with autism spectrum disorder might be due to impaired social interaction in early childhood. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. HSP27 phosphorylation protects against endothelial barrier dysfunction under burn serum challenge.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huan-bo; Ren, Xi; Liu, Jie; Guo, Xiao-wei; Jiang, Xu-pin; Zhang, Dong-xia; Huang, Yue-sheng; Zhang, Jia-ping

    2015-07-31

    F-actin rearrangement is an early event in burn-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction. HSP27, a target of p38 MAPK/MK2 pathway, plays an important role in actin dynamics through phosphorylation. The question of whether HSP27 participates in burn-related endothelial barrier dysfunction has not been identified yet. Here, we showed that burn serum induced a temporal appearance of central F-actin stress fibers followed by a formation of irregular dense peripheral F-actin in pulmonary endothelial monolayer, concomitant with a transient increase of HSP27 phosphorylation that conflicted with the persistent activation of p38 MAPK/MK2 unexpectedly. The appearance of F-actin stress fibers and transient increase of HSP27 phosphorylation occurred prior to the burn serum-induced endothelial hyperpermeability. Overexpressing phospho-mimicking HSP27 (HSP27(Asp)) reversed the burn serum-induced peripheral F-actin rearrangement with the augmentation of central F-actin stress fibers, and more importantly, attenuated the burn serum-induced endothelial hyperpermeability; such effects were not observed by HSP27(Ala), a non-phosphorylated mutant of HSP27. HSP27(Asp) overexpression also rendered the monolayer more resistant to barrier disruption caused by Cytochalasin D, a chemical reagent that depolymerizes F-actin specifically. Further study showed that phosphatases and sumoylation-inhibited MK2 activity contributed to the blunting of HSP27 phosphorylation during the burn serum-induced endothelial hyperpermeability. Our study identifies HSP27 phosphorylation as a protective response against burn serum-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction, and suggests that targeting HSP27 wound be a promising therapeutic strategy in ameliorating burn-induced lung edema and shock development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Burning Feet

    MedlinePlus

    ... are most often a sign of nerve damage (peripheral neuropathy). Nerve damage has many different causes, including diabetes, ... if any of the various conditions that cause peripheral neuropathy are to blame. Eleftheriadou I, et al. A ...

  4. Prediction of Scar Size in Rats Six Months after Burns Based on Early Post-injury Polarization-Sensitive Optical Frequency Domain Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kravez, Eli; Villiger, Martin; Bouma, Brett; Yarmush, Martin; Yakhini, Zohar; Golberg, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars remain a major clinical problem in the rehabilitation of burn survivors and lead to physical, aesthetic, functional, psychological, and social stresses. Prediction of healing outcome and scar formation is critical for deciding on the best treatment plan. Both subjective and objective scales have been devised to assess scar severity. Whereas scales of the first type preclude cross-comparison between observers, those of the second type are based on imaging modalities that either lack the ability to image individual layers of the scar or only provide very limited fields of view. To overcome these deficiencies, this work aimed at developing a predictive model of scar formation based on polarization sensitive optical frequency domain imaging (PS-OFDI), which offers comprehensive subsurface imaging. We report on a linear regression model that predicts the size of a scar 6 months after third-degree burn injuries in rats based on early post-injury PS-OFDI and measurements of scar area. When predicting the scar area at month 6 based on the homogeneity and the degree of polarization (DOP), which are signatures derived from the PS-OFDI signal, together with the scar area measured at months 2 and 3, we achieved predictions with a Pearson coefficient of 0.57 (p < 10−4) and a Spearman coefficient of 0.66 (p < 10−5), which were significant in comparison to prediction models trained on randomly shuffled data. As the model in this study was developed on the rat burn model, the methodology can be used in larger studies that are more relevant to humans; however, the actual model inferred herein is not translatable. Nevertheless, our analysis and modeling methodology can be extended to perform larger wound healing studies in different contexts. This study opens new possibilities for quantitative and objective assessment of scar severity that could help to determine the optimal course of therapy. PMID:29249978

  5. Early changes in muscle atrophy and muscle fiber type conversion after spinal cord transection and peripheral nerve transection in rats.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Kosaku; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Suganuma, Katsuyoshi; Yukata, Kiminori; Nishisho, Toshihiko; Yasui, Natsuo

    2013-05-20

    Spinal cord transection and peripheral nerve transection cause muscle atrophy and muscle fiber type conversion. It is still unknown how spinal cord transection and peripheral nerve transection each affect the differentiation of muscle fiber type conversion mechanism and muscle atrophy. The aim of our study was to evaluate the difference of muscle weight change, muscle fiber type conversion, and Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivatior-1α (PGC-1α) expression brought about by spinal cord transection and by peripheral nerve transection. Twenty-four Wistar rats underwent surgery, the control rats underwent a laminectomy; the spinal cord injury group underwent a spinal cord transection; the denervation group underwent a sciatic nerve transection. The rats were harvested of the soleus muscle and the TA muscle at 0 week, 1 week and 2 weeks after surgery. Histological examination was assessed using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining and immunofluorescent staing. Western blot was performed with 3 groups. Both sciatic nerve transection and spinal cord transection caused muscle atrophy with the effect being more severe after sciatic nerve transection. Spinal cord transection caused a reduction in the expression of both sMHC protein and PGC-1α protein in the soleus muscle. On the other hand, sciatic nerve transection produced an increase in expression of sMHC protein and PGC-1α protein in the soleus muscle. The results of the expression of PGC-1α were expected in other words muscle atrophy after sciatic nerve transection is less than after spinal cord transection, however muscle atrophy after sciatic nerve transection was more severe than after spinal cord transection. In the conclusion, spinal cord transection diminished the expression of sMHC protein and PGC-1α protein in the soleus muscle. On the other hand, sciatic nerve transection enhanced the expression of sMHC protein and PGC-1α protein in the soleus muscle.

  6. Modulation of the Early Inflammatory Microenvironment in the Alkali-Burned Eye by Systemically Administered Interferon-γ-Treated Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Javorkova, Eliska; Trosan, Peter; Zajicova, Alena; Krulova, Magdalena; Hajkova, Michaela

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of systemically administered bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) on the early acute phase of inflammation in the alkali-burned eye. Mice with damaged eyes were either untreated or treated 24 h after the injury with an intravenous administration of fluorescent-dye-labeled MSCs that were unstimulated or pretreated with interleukin-1α (IL-1α), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), or interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Analysis of cell suspensions prepared from the eyes of treated mice on day 3 after the alkali burn revealed that MSCs specifically migrated to the damaged eye and that the number of labeled MSCs was more than 30-times higher in damaged eyes compared with control eyes. The study of the composition of the leukocyte populations within the damaged eyes showed that all types of tested MSCs slightly decreased the number of infiltrating lymphoid and myeloid cells, but only MSCs pretreated with IFN-γ significantly decreased the percentage of eye-infiltrating cells with a more profound effect on myeloid cells. Determining cytokine and NO production in the damaged eyes confirmed that the most effective immunomodulation was achieved with MSCs pretreated with IFN-γ, which significantly decreased the levels of the proinflammatory molecules IL-1α, IL-6, and NO. Taken together, the results show that systemically administered MSCs specifically migrate to the damaged eye and that IFN-γ-pretreated MSCs are superior in inhibiting the acute phase of inflammation, decreasing leukocyte infiltration, and attenuating the early inflammatory environment. PMID:24849741

  7. Early discharge after high-dose melphalan and peripheral blood stem cell reinfusion in patients with hematological and non-hematological disease.

    PubMed

    Anastasia, Antonella; Giglio, Fabio; Mazza, Rita; Sarina, Barbara; Todisco, Elisabetta; Bramanti, Stefania; Castagna, Luca

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse our experience of early discharge 2 days after high-dose melphalan (HDM) (Day-1) followed by peripheral blood stem cell re-infusion (Day-0) and re-admission on Day +5 in patients with hematological diseases or solid tumors. From 2000 to November 2005, seven patients received tandem Melphalan 200 mg/m(2) HDM with peripheral blood stem cells transplantation (PBSC-T), 130 a single HDM, for a total of 144 procedures. In 123 of them, patients were discharged on Day +1 for re-admission on Day +5 or earlier in the event of complications. Antibiotic prophylaxis was not used. Patients were hospitalised in positive-pressure reverse isolation room during the neutropenic period. Of the 123 procedures eligible for our mixed inpatient-outpatient management regimen, six (5%) required early re-admission for complications. Full engraftment was achieved in all cases. Median time to neutrophil count >0.5 x 10(9)/microL and >1 x 10(9)/microL were 12 and 14 days, respectively. Median time to platelet recovery (>20 x 10(9)/microL) was 13 days. Severe extra-hematological toxicities occurred in 78 (63%) patients: all had oral mucositis and five had associated diarrhoea. During hospitalisation, 94/123 (76%) experienced febrile neutropenia, 20/94 (21%) had documented infection and 74/94 (79%) were considered fever of unknown origin. Median fever duration was 1 day (range 0-11). Median duration of antibiotic treatment was 6 days (range 3-26). Median time to discharge (from Day 0) was 16 days (range 11-57). There was no mortality by on Day +100. Our experience of early discharge after HDM and PBSC-T with re-admission on Day +5 is safe and feasible with acceptable frequency of hematological and extra-hematological toxicities. The regimen allows reduced hospital stay and hence cost savings.

  8. Peripheral natural killer cytotoxicity and CD56(pos)CD16(pos) cells increase during early pregnancy in women with a history of recurrent spontaneous abortion.

    PubMed

    Emmer, P M; Nelen, W L; Steegers, E A; Hendriks, J C; Veerhoek, M; Joosten, I

    2000-05-01

    For diagnostic purposes we assessed peripheral natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity and NK and T cell numbers to assess their putative predictive value in recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA). A total of 43 women with subsequent pregnancy, 37 healthy controls and 39 women successfully partaking in an in-vitro fertilization (IVF) procedure, were included in the study. We show that before pregnancy, levels of NK cytotoxicity and numbers of both single CD56(pos) and double CD56(pos)CD16(pos) cells were similar between RSA women and controls. But notably, within the RSA group, NK cell numbers of <12% were strongly associated with a subsequent pregnancy carried to term. Supplementation of folic acid led to an increase of single CD56(pos) cells, but cytotoxic function appeared unaffected. The expression pattern of killer inhibitory receptors on CD56(pos) cells was not different between patients and controls. A longitudinal study revealed that, compared with controls, in RSA women higher numbers of double CD56(pos)CD16(pos) cells were present during early pregnancy, paralleled by an increase in cytotoxic NK cell reactivity. The single CD56(pos) population decreased in number. In conclusion, the analysis of peripheral NK cell characteristics appears a suitable diagnostic tool in RSA. Immunomodulation aimed at NK cell function appears a promising therapeutic measure.

  9. Direct and indirect climate controls predict heterogeneous early-mid 21st century wildfire burned area across western and boreal North America

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Donald A.; Westerling, Anthony L.; Swetnam, Thomas W.

    2017-01-01

    Predicting wildfire under future conditions is complicated by complex interrelated drivers operating across large spatial scales. Annual area burned (AAB) is a useful index of global wildfire activity. Current and antecedent seasonal climatic conditions, and the timing of snowpack melt, have been suggested as important drivers of AAB. As climate warms, seasonal climate and snowpack co-vary in intricate ways, influencing fire at continental and sub-continental scales. We used independent records of seasonal climate and snow cover duration (last date of permanent snowpack, LDPS) and cell-based Structural Equation Models (SEM) to separate direct (climatic) and indirect (snow cover) effects on relative changes in AAB under future climatic scenarios across western and boreal North America. To isolate seasonal climate variables with the greatest effect on AAB, we ran multiple regression models of log-transformed AAB on seasonal climate variables and LDPS. We used the results of multiple regressions to project future AAB using GCM ensemble climate variables and LDPS, and validated model predictions with recent AAB trends. Direct influences of spring and winter temperatures on AAB are larger and more widespread than the indirect effect mediated by changes in LDPS in most areas. Despite significant warming trends and reductions in snow cover duration, projected responses of AAB to early-mid 21st century are heterogeneous across the continent. Changes in AAB range from strongly increasing (one order of magnitude increases in AAB) to moderately decreasing (more than halving of baseline AAB). Annual wildfire area burned in coming decades is likely to be highly geographically heterogeneous, reflecting interacting regional and seasonal climate drivers of fire occurrence and spread. PMID:29244839

  10. Direct and indirect climate controls predict heterogeneous early-mid 21st century wildfire burned area across western and boreal North America.

    PubMed

    Kitzberger, Thomas; Falk, Donald A; Westerling, Anthony L; Swetnam, Thomas W

    2017-01-01

    Predicting wildfire under future conditions is complicated by complex interrelated drivers operating across large spatial scales. Annual area burned (AAB) is a useful index of global wildfire activity. Current and antecedent seasonal climatic conditions, and the timing of snowpack melt, have been suggested as important drivers of AAB. As climate warms, seasonal climate and snowpack co-vary in intricate ways, influencing fire at continental and sub-continental scales. We used independent records of seasonal climate and snow cover duration (last date of permanent snowpack, LDPS) and cell-based Structural Equation Models (SEM) to separate direct (climatic) and indirect (snow cover) effects on relative changes in AAB under future climatic scenarios across western and boreal North America. To isolate seasonal climate variables with the greatest effect on AAB, we ran multiple regression models of log-transformed AAB on seasonal climate variables and LDPS. We used the results of multiple regressions to project future AAB using GCM ensemble climate variables and LDPS, and validated model predictions with recent AAB trends. Direct influences of spring and winter temperatures on AAB are larger and more widespread than the indirect effect mediated by changes in LDPS in most areas. Despite significant warming trends and reductions in snow cover duration, projected responses of AAB to early-mid 21st century are heterogeneous across the continent. Changes in AAB range from strongly increasing (one order of magnitude increases in AAB) to moderately decreasing (more than halving of baseline AAB). Annual wildfire area burned in coming decades is likely to be highly geographically heterogeneous, reflecting interacting regional and seasonal climate drivers of fire occurrence and spread.

  11. No Clinically Significant Changes in Pulmonary Function Following Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early- Stage Peripheral Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: An Analysis of RTOG 0236

    SciTech Connect

    Stanic, Sinisa, E-mail: sinisa.stanic@carle.com; Paulus, Rebecca; Timmerman, Robert D.

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate pulmonary function test (PFT) results and arterial blood gas changes (complete PFT) following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and to see whether baseline PFT correlates with lung toxicity and overall survival in medically inoperable patients receiving SBRT for early stage, peripheral, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: During the 2-year follow-up, PFT data were collected for patients with T1-T2N0M0 peripheral NSCLC who received effectively 18 Gy × 3 in a phase 2 North American multicenter study (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group [RTOG] protocol 0236). Pulmonary toxicity was graded by using the RTOG SBRT pulmonary toxicity scale. Paired Wilcoxon signedmore » rank test, logistic regression model, and Kaplan-Meier method were used for statistical analysis. Results: At 2 years, mean percentage predicted forced expiratory volume in the first second and diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide declines were 5.8% and 6.3%, respectively, with minimal changes in arterial blood gases and no significant decline in oxygen saturation. Baseline PFT was not predictive of any pulmonary toxicity following SBRT. Whole-lung V5 (the percentage of normal lung tissue receiving 5 Gy), V10, V20, and mean dose to the whole lung were almost identical between patients who developed pneumonitis and patients who were pneumonitis-free. Poor baseline PFT did not predict decreased overall survival. Patients with poor baseline PFT as the reason for medical inoperability had higher median and overall survival rates than patients with normal baseline PFT values but with cardiac morbidity. Conclusions: Poor baseline PFT did not appear to predict pulmonary toxicity or decreased overall survival after SBRT in this medically inoperable population. Poor baseline PFT alone should not be used to exclude patients with early stage lung cancer from treatment with SBRT.« less

  12. An early warning system to forecast the close of the spring burning window from satellite-observed greenness.

    PubMed

    Pickell, Paul D; Coops, Nicholas C; Ferster, Colin J; Bater, Christopher W; Blouin, Karen D; Flannigan, Mike D; Zhang, Jinkai

    2017-10-27

    Spring represents the peak of human-caused wildfire events in populated boreal forests, resulting in catastrophic loss of property and human life. Human-caused wildfire risk is anticipated to increase in northern forests as fuels become drier, on average, under warming climate scenarios and as population density increases within formerly remote regions. We investigated springtime human-caused wildfire risk derived from satellite-observed vegetation greenness in the early part of the growing season, a period of increased ignition and wildfire spread potential from snow melt to vegetation green-up with the aim of developing an early warning wildfire risk system. The initial system was developed for 392,856 km 2 of forested lands with satellite observations available prior to the start of the official wildfire season and predicted peak human-caused wildfire activity with 10-day accuracy for 76% of wildfire-protected lands by March 22. The early warning system could have significant utility as a cost-effective solution for wildfire managers to prioritize the deployment of wildfire protection resources in wildfire-prone landscapes across boreal-dominated ecosystems of North America, Europe, and Russia using open access Earth observations.

  13. Plasma vemurafenib exposure and pre-treatment hepatocyte growth factor level are two factors contributing to the early peripheral lymphocytes depletion in BRAF-mutated melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Puszkiel, Alicja; White-Koning, Mélanie; Dupin, Nicolas; Kramkimel, Nora; Thomas-Schoemann, Audrey; Noé, Gaëlle; Chapuis, Nicolas; Vidal, Michel; Goldwasser, François; Chatelut, Etienne; Blanchet, Benoit

    2016-11-01

    The therapeutic response to vemurafenib, a BRAF serine-threonine kinase inhibitor, exhibits large variations between patients. Evaluation of factors predicting the clinical efficacy of vemurafenib may help to identify patients at high risk of non-response in the early phase of treatment. The aim of this study was to analyze the pharmacokinetics of vemurafenib by a population approach and to evaluate the relationship between plasma drug exposure and pre-treatment plasma hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) levels with clinical effects (progression-free survival (PFS), peripheral lymphocytes depletion) in patients with metastatic BRAF V600 mutated melanoma treated with single agent vemurafenib. Concentration-time data (n=332) obtained in 44 patients were analyzed using the NONMEM program. Pre-treatment plasma levels of HGF (n=36) were assayed by ELISA method. A Cox model was used to identify prognostic factors associated with progression-free survival (PFS), and a linear regression to identify factors contributing to the depletion of peripheral lymphocytes at day 15. Steady-state pharmacokinetics of vemurafenib was described by a one compartment model with first order absorption and first order elimination. None of the tested covariates explained the inter-patient variability in CL/F. A significant decrease in total lymphocytes count was observed within the first 15days (median ratio Day15/Day0=0.66, p<0.0001). Patients with Day15/Day0 ratio below 0.66 had longer PFS (14 vs 4 months, HR=0.41, CI95%=[0.15-0.77], p=0.0095). In the multivariate Cox model analysis, ECOG PS was the only parameter independently associated with PFS (grade 1 vs 0, HR=3.26, CI95%=[1.29-8.22], p=0.01 and grade ≥2 vs 0, HR=4.77, CI95%=[1.52-14.95], p=0.007). Plasma vemurafenib exposure (p=0.046) and pre-treatment HGF levels (p=0.003) were independently associated with the total lymphocyte ratio Day15/Day0. These findings show that plasma vemurafenib exposure and pre-treatment HGF levels are two

  14. Retinal Laser Burn Disrupts Immune Privilege in the Eye

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Hong; Lucas, Kenyatta; Stein-Streilein, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Immune privilege allows for the immune protection of the eye in the absence of inflammation. Very few events are capable of overcoming the immune-privileged mechanisms in the eye. In this study, we report that retinal laser burn (RLB) abrogates immune privilege in both the burned and nonburned eye. As early as 6 hours after RLB, and as late as 56 days after RLB, antigen inoculation into the anterior chamber of the burned eye failed to induce peripheral tolerance. After RLB, aqueous humor samples harvested from nontreated eyes but not from either the burned or the contralateral eye, down-regulated the expression of CD40 and up-regulated interleukin-10 mRNA in peritoneal exudate cells, and converted peritoneal exudate cells into tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Unlike F4/80+ APCs from nontreated mice, F4/80+ APCs from RLB mice were unable to transfer tolerance after anterior chamber inoculation of antigen into naïve mice. The increased use of lasers in both the industrial and medical fields raises the risk of RLB-associated loss of immune regulation and an increased risk of immune inflammation in the eye. PMID:19147817

  15. Cyclic variations of fuel-droplet distribution during the early intake stroke of a lean-burn stratified-charge spark-ignition engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleiferis, P. G.; Hardalupas, Y.; Taylor, A. M. K. P.; Ishii, K.; Urata, Y.

    2005-11-01

    Lean-burn spark-ignition engines exhibit higher efficiency and lower specific emissions in comparison with stoichiometrically charged engines. However, as the air-to-fuel (A/F) ratio of the mixture is made leaner than stoichiometric, cycle-by-cycle variations in the early stages of in-cylinder combustion, and subsequent indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP), become more pronounced and limit the range of lean-burn operation. Viable lean-burn engines promote charge stratification, the mixture near the spark plug being richer than the cylinder volume averaged value. Recent work has shown that cycle-by-cycle variations in the early stages of combustion in a stratified-charge engine can be associated with variations in both the local value of A/F ratio near the spark plug around ignition timing, as well as in the volume averaged value of the A/F ratio. The objective of the current work was to identify possible sources of such variability in A/F ratio by studying the in-cylinder field of fuel-droplet distribution during the early intake stroke. This field was visualised in an optical single-cylinder 4-valve pentroof-type spark-ignition engine by means of laser-sheet illumination in planes parallel to the cylinder head gasket 6 and 10 mm below the spark plug. The engine was run with port-injected isooctane at 1500 rpm with 30% volumetric efficiency and air-to-fuel ratio corresponding to both stoichiometric firing (A/F=15, Φ =1.0) and mixture strength close to the lean limit of stable operation (A/F=22, Φ =0.68). Images of Mie intensity scattered by the cloud of fuel droplets were acquired on a cycle-by-cycle basis. These were studied in order to establish possible correlations between the cyclic variations in size, location and scattered-light intensity of the cloud of droplets with the respective variations in IMEP. Because of the low level of Mie intensity scattered by the droplets and because of problems related to elastic scattering on the walls of the combustion

  16. Early effects of low dose 12C6+ ion or X-ray irradiation on human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yingtai; Li, Yumin; Zhang, Hong; Xie, Yi; Chen, Xuezhong; Ren, Jinyu; Zhang, Xiaowei; Zhu, Zijiang; Liu, Hongliang; Zhang, Yawei

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the acute effects of low dose 12C6+ ions or X-ray radiation on human immune function. The human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBL) of seven healthy donors were exposed to 0.05 Gy 12C6+ ions or X-ray radiation and cell responses were measured at 24 h after exposure. The cytotoxic activities of HPBL were determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT); the percentages of T and NK cells subsets were detected by flow cytometry; mRNA expression of interleukin (IL)-2, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-γ were examined by real time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR); and these cytokines protein levels in supernatant of cultured cells were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). The results showed that the cytotoxic activity of HPBL, mRNA expression of IL-2, IFN-γ and TNF-α in HPBL and their protein levels in supernatant were significantly increased at 24 h after exposure to 0.05 Gy 12C6+ ions radiation and the effects were stronger than observed for X-ray exposure. However, there was no significant change in the percentage of T and NK cells subsets of HPBL. These results suggested that 0.05 Gy high linear energy transfer (LET) 12C6+ radiation was a more effective approach to host immune enhancement than that of low LET X-ray. We conclude that cytokines production might be used as sensitive indicators of acute response to LDI.

  17. Quantitative power Doppler ultrasound measures of peripheral joint synovitis in poor prognosis early rheumatoid arthritis predict radiographic progression.

    PubMed

    Sreerangaiah, Dee; Grayer, Michael; Fisher, Benjamin A; Ho, Meilien; Abraham, Sonya; Taylor, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    To assess the value of quantitative vascular imaging by power Doppler US (PDUS) as a tool that can be used to stratify patient risk of joint damage in early seropositive RA while still biologic naive but on synthetic DMARD treatment. Eighty-five patients with seropositive RA of <3 years duration had clinical, laboratory and imaging assessments at 0 and 12 months. Imaging assessments consisted of radiographs of the hands and feet, two-dimensional (2D) high-frequency and PDUS imaging of 10 MCP joints that were scored for erosions and vascularity and three-dimensional (3D) PDUS of MCP joints and wrists that were scored for vascularity. Severe deterioration on radiographs and ultrasonography was seen in 45 and 28% of patients, respectively. The 3D power Doppler volume and 2D vascularity scores were the most useful US predictors of deterioration. These variables were modelled in two equations that estimate structural damage over 12 months. The equations had a sensitivity of 63.2% and specificity of 80.9% for predicting radiographic structural damage and a sensitivity of 54.2% and specificity of 96.7% for predicting structural damage on ultrasonography. In seropositive early RA, quantitative vascular imaging by PDUS has clinical utility in predicting which patients will derive benefit from early use of biologic therapy. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Cardiac and peripheral adjustments induced by early exercise training intervention were associated with autonomic improvement in infarcted rats: role in functional capacity and mortality.

    PubMed

    Jorge, Luciana; Rodrigues, Bruno; Rosa, Kaleizu Teodoro; Malfitano, Christiane; Loureiro, Tatiana Carolina Alba; Medeiros, Alessandra; Curi, Rui; Brum, Patricia Chakur; Lacchini, Silvia; Montano, Nicola; De Angelis, Kátia; Irigoyen, Maria-Cláudia

    2011-04-01

    To test the effects of early exercise training (ET) on left ventricular (LV) and autonomic functions, haemodynamics, tissues blood flows (BFs), maximal oxygen consumption (VO(2) max), and mortality after myocardial infarction (MI) in rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into: control (C), sedentary-infarcted (SI), and trained-infarcted (TI). One week after MI, TI group underwent an ET protocol (90 days, 50-70% VO(2) max). Left ventricular function was evaluated non-invasively and invasively. Baroreflex sensitivity, heart rate variability, and pulse interval were measured. Cardiac output (CO) and regional BFs were determined using coloured microspheres. Infarcted area was reduced in TI (19 ± 6%) compared with SI (34 ± 5%) after ET. Exercise training improved the LV and autonomic functions, the CO and regional BF changes induced by MI, as well as increased SERCA2 expression and mRNA vascular endothelial growth factor levels. These changes brought about by ET resulted in mortality rate reduction in the TI (13%) group compared with the SI (54%) group. Early aerobic ET reduced cardiac and peripheral dysfunctions and preserved cardiovascular autonomic control after MI in trained rats. Consequently, these ET-induced changes resulted in improved functional capacity and survival after MI.

  19. Evaluation of peripheral blood T lymphocyte surface activation markers and transcription factors in patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Jacek; Cyman, Marta; Ślebioda, Tomasz; Bemben, Kamila; Rutkowska, Aleksandra; Gruchała, Marcin; Kmieć, Zbigniew; Pliszka, Agnieszka; Zaucha, Renata

    2017-12-01

    Lung cancer cells harboring multiple mutations as a consequence of long-term damage by different etiologic factors are responsible for high immunogenicity. Immune checkpoint inhibitors significantly improve treatment results in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Unfortunately, the role of T-lymphocytes in early NSCLC has not been sufficiently elucidated. The aim of this study was to characterize peripheral blood T cells expressing several selected surface antigens (CD4, CD8, CD25, CD28, PD-1, CTLA-4) and transcription factors (T-bet, ROR-yt, Fox-P3, GATA-3) in this patient population. The study group (LC) consisted of 80 treatment-naïve patients with T1/2aN0M0 NSCLC and was compared with 40 cancer-free patients matched for non-oncological diseases and demographic parameters (CG). Significantly higher counts of CTLA-4+cells (in both CD4+and CD8+subtypes), a lower proportion of PD-1 expressing cells and a significantly higher percentage of Fox-P3+CD4+cells were found in the LC group. The high proportion of CD4+PD-1+cells significantly correlated with poor outcomes in LC group, while low CD4/CD8 ratio predicted a better prognosis. Based on our results it seems that NSCLC even at early stages of development initiate changes in the proportions of T cells that may have a significant impact on the clinical outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Early indicators of exposure to biological threat agents using host gene profiles in peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Das, Rina; Hammamieh, Rasha; Neill, Roger; Ludwig, George V; Eker, Steven; Lincoln, Patrick; Ramamoorthy, Preveen; Dhokalia, Apsara; Mani, Sachin; Mendis, Chanaka; Cummings, Christiano; Kearney, Brian; Royaee, Atabak; Huang, Xiao-Zhe; Paranavitana, Chrysanthi; Smith, Leonard; Peel, Sheila; Kanesa-Thasan, Niranjan; Hoover, David; Lindler, Luther E; Yang, David; Henchal, Erik; Jett, Marti

    2008-01-01

    Background Effective prophylaxis and treatment for infections caused by biological threat agents (BTA) rely upon early diagnosis and rapid initiation of therapy. Most methods for identifying pathogens in body fluids and tissues require that the pathogen proliferate to detectable and dangerous levels, thereby delaying diagnosis and treatment, especially during the prelatent stages when symptoms for most BTA are indistinguishable flu-like signs. Methods To detect exposures to the various pathogens more rapidly, especially during these early stages, we evaluated a suite of host responses to biological threat agents using global gene expression profiling on complementary DNA arrays. Results We found that certain gene expression patterns were unique to each pathogen and that other gene changes occurred in response to multiple agents, perhaps relating to the eventual course of illness. Nonhuman primates were exposed to some pathogens and the in vitro and in vivo findings were compared. We found major gene expression changes at the earliest times tested post exposure to aerosolized B. anthracis spores and 30 min post exposure to a bacterial toxin. Conclusion Host gene expression patterns have the potential to serve as diagnostic markers or predict the course of impending illness and may lead to new stage-appropriate therapeutic strategies to ameliorate the devastating effects of exposure to biothreat agents. PMID:18667072

  1. The Calcium-binding Proteins S100A8 and S100A9 Initiate the Early Inflammatory Program in Injured Peripheral Nerves*

    PubMed Central

    Chernov, Andrei V.; Dolkas, Jennifer; Hoang, Khang; Angert, Mila; Srikrishna, Geetha; Vogl, Thomas; Baranovskaya, Svetlana; Strongin, Alex Y.; Shubayev, Veronica I.

    2015-01-01

    To shed light on the early immune response processes in severed peripheral nerves, we performed genome-wide transcriptional profiling and bioinformatics analyses of the proximal (P, regenerating) and distal (D, degenerating) nerve stumps on day 1 in the sciatic nerve axotomy model in rats. Multiple cell death-related pathways were activated in the degenerating D stump, whereas activation of the cytoskeletal motility and gluconeogenesis/glycolysis pathways was most prominent in the P stump of the axotomized nerve. Our bioinformatics analyses also identified the specific immunomodulatory genes of the chemokine, IL, TNF, MHC, immunoglobulin-binding Fc receptor, calcium-binding S100, matrix metalloproteinase, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase, and ion channel families affected in both the P and D segments. S100a8 and S100a9 were the top up-regulated genes in both the P and D segments. Stimulation of cultured Schwann cells using the purified S100A8/A9 heterodimer recapitulated activation of the myeloid cell and phagocyte chemotactic genes and pathways, which we initially observed in injured nerves. S100A8/A9 heterodimer injection into the intact nerve stimulated macrophage infiltration. We conclude that, following peripheral nerve injury, an immediate acute immune response occurs both distal and proximal to the lesion site and that the rapid transcriptional activation of the S100a8 and S100a9 genes results in S100A8/A9 hetero- and homodimers, which stimulate the release of chemokines and cytokines by activated Schwann cells and generate the initial chemotactic gradient that guides the transmigration of hematogenous immune cells into the injured nerve. PMID:25792748

  2. Early sensory re-education of the hand after peripheral nerve repair based on mirror therapy: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Paula, Mayara H; Barbosa, Rafael I; Marcolino, Alexandre M; Elui, Valéria M C; Rosén, Birgitta; Fonseca, Marisa C R

    2016-01-01

    Mirror therapy has been used as an alternative stimulus to feed the somatosensory cortex in an attempt to preserve hand cortical representation with better functional results. To analyze the short-term functional outcome of an early re-education program using mirror therapy compared to a late classic sensory program for hand nerve repair. This is a randomized controlled trial. We assessed 20 patients with median and ulnar nerve and flexor tendon repair using the Rosen Score combined with the DASH questionnaire. The early phase group using mirror therapy began on the first postoperative week and lasted 5 months. The control group received classic sensory re-education when the protective sensation threshold was restored. All participants received a patient education booklet and were submitted to the modified Duran protocol for flexor tendon repair. The assessments were performed by the same investigator blinded to the allocated treatment. Mann-Whitney Test and Effect Size using Cohen's d score were used for inter-group comparisons at 3 and 6 months after intervention. The primary outcome (Rosen score) values for the Mirror Therapy group and classic therapy control group after 3 and 6 months were 1.68 (SD=0.5); 1.96 (SD=0.56) and 1.65 (SD=0.52); 1.51 (SD=0.62), respectively. No between-group differences were observed. Although some clinical improvement was observed, mirror therapy was not shown to be more effective than late sensory re-education in an intermediate phase of nerve repair in the hand. Replication is needed to confirm these findings.

  3. Early sensory re-education of the hand after peripheral nerve repair based on mirror therapy: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Paula, Mayara H.; Barbosa, Rafael I.; Marcolino, Alexandre M.; Elui, Valéria M. C.; Rosén, Birgitta; Fonseca, Marisa C. R.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mirror therapy has been used as an alternative stimulus to feed the somatosensory cortex in an attempt to preserve hand cortical representation with better functional results. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the short-term functional outcome of an early re-education program using mirror therapy compared to a late classic sensory program for hand nerve repair. METHOD: This is a randomized controlled trial. We assessed 20 patients with median and ulnar nerve and flexor tendon repair using the Rosen Score combined with the DASH questionnaire. The early phase group using mirror therapy began on the first postoperative week and lasted 5 months. The control group received classic sensory re-education when the protective sensation threshold was restored. All participants received a patient education booklet and were submitted to the modified Duran protocol for flexor tendon repair. The assessments were performed by the same investigator blinded to the allocated treatment. Mann-Whitney Test and Effect Size using Cohen's d score were used for inter-group comparisons at 3 and 6 months after intervention. RESULTS: The primary outcome (Rosen score) values for the Mirror Therapy group and classic therapy control group after 3 and 6 months were 1.68 (SD=0.5); 1.96 (SD=0.56) and 1.65 (SD=0.52); 1.51 (SD=0.62), respectively. No between-group differences were observed. CONCLUSION: Although some clinical improvement was observed, mirror therapy was not shown to be more effective than late sensory re-education in an intermediate phase of nerve repair in the hand. Replication is needed to confirm these findings. PMID:26786080

  4. Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    Cancer.gov

    The pain and discomfort caused by peripheral neuropathy is one of the most common reasons that cancer patients stop their treatment early. Researchers are working to improve new screening, treatment, and prevention options for patients.

  5. [Burn scars].

    PubMed

    Roques, Claude

    2013-01-01

    Burns often result in extensive scars which can change the body aesthetically and/ or functionally. Rapid scarring is a sign of a good prognosis. Preventative actions such as hydration, compression, massage, posture and splints help to prevent or contain the negative evolution of pathological scars.

  6. Prescribed burning

    Treesearch

    James D. Haywood; Finis Harris

    2002-01-01

    This presentation on prescribed burning is a cooperative effort of the USDA Forest Service, Southern Research Station and Kisatchie National Forest; Louisiana State University Agricultural Center; and the Joint Fire Science Program. The CD includes three methods of delivery: slides, Power Point presentation, and script only.

  7. EOARC - Burns |

    Science.gov Websites

    Skip to Main Content Area Oregon State University USDA Agricultural Research Service | Donate | College of Agricultural Sciences EOARC - Burns banner image Resources Extn Agr Sci and NR Program Ag Agricultural Research Center! Front entrance located on Hwy 205 Front entrance located on Hwy 205 Main office

  8. Burning Man

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cech, Scott J.

    2006-01-01

    Former Baltimore cop and teacher Ed Burns isn't a masochist. The writer-producer for "The Wire," a critically applauded HBO series about life and death on the streets of Baltimore, is just feverishly trying to save public schools. He thinks American education is hopelessly screwed up, but that it's also the country's only hope. So it…

  9. [Clinical study on application of intermittent hemofiltration combined with hemoperfusion in the early stage of severe burn in the prevention and treatment of sepsis].

    PubMed

    Guo, Wanli; Lei, Jin; Duan, Peng; Ma, Xiaoming

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the effects of application of intermittent hemofiltration combined with hemoperfusion (HP) in the early stage of severe burn in the prevention and treatment of sepsis. Forty severely burned patients, admitted to our burn ward from June 2011 to March 2013, conforming to the study criteria, were divided into conventional treatment group (CT, n=20) and blood purification group (BP, n=20) according to the random number table. Patients in group CT received CT according to the accepted principles of treatment for a severe burn. Patients in group BP received CT and intermittent hemofiltration combined with HP once respectively on post injury day (PID) 3, 5, and 7, spanning 6 to 8 hours for each treatment. On PID 3, 5, 7, 10, and 14, body temperature, heart rate, and respiratory rate were recorded; white blood cell count (WBC), neutrophil granulocytes, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and creatinine were determined; levels of IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α, and high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) in serum were determined by ELISA; level of LPS in serum was determined with the chromogenic substrate limulus amebocyte lysate method; level of procalcitonin (PCT) in serum was determined by double antibody sandwich immune chemiluminescence method. The symptoms and signs of sepsis were observed during the treatment. Data were processed with Fisher's exact test, chi-square test, analysis of variance for repeated measurement, and LSD-t test. (1) Except for that on PID 5, the mean body temperature of patients in group BP was significantly lower than that of group CT at each of the rest time points (with t values from 1.87 to 2.97, P values below 0.05). The heart rate was significantly slower in patients of group BP than in group CT from PID 3 to 14 (with t values from 1.78 to 3.59, P values below 0.05). Except for that on PID 3, the respiratory rate of patients in group BP was significantly slower than that of group CT at each of the rest time points (with t values from 1.93 to 2.85, P

  10. Educational Materials - Burn Wise

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Burn Wise outreach material. Burn Wise is a partnership program of that emphasizes the importance of burning the right wood, the right way, in the right wood-burning appliance to protect your home, health, and the air we breathe.

  11. American Burn Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Quality Care Resources Prevention Prevention Resources Burn Prevention Poster Contest Burn Awareness Week Advocacy Education Annual Meeting ... Quality Care Resources Prevention Prevention Resources Burn Prevention Poster Contest Burn Awareness Week Advocacy Education Annual Meeting ...

  12. Insulin and the Burned Patient

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    until recently due to the belief that this was a beneficial “fight or flight” response and should not be dis- turbed, as the risks ( hypoglycemia ) out... hypoglycemia was lessened (7). From this, it was postulated that an insulin resistance probably exists following se- vere injury. The early 1980s saw...the burned limb, again suggesting insulin re- sistance that in this instance was local- ized (8). Severe burn was also shown to cause an increase in

  13. Reactivation of Latent Tuberculosis in Cynomolgus Macaques Infected with SIV Is Associated with Early Peripheral T Cell Depletion and Not Virus Load

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Edwin; Janssen, Chris; Phuah, Jiayao; Sturgeon, Timothy J.; Montelaro, Ronald C.; Lin, Philana Ling; Flynn, JoAnne L.

    2010-01-01

    HIV-infected individuals with latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection are at significantly greater risk of reactivation tuberculosis (TB) than HIV-negative individuals with latent TB, even while CD4 T cell numbers are well preserved. Factors underlying high rates of reactivation are poorly understood and investigative tools are limited. We used cynomolgus macaques with latent TB co-infected with SIVmac251 to develop the first animal model of reactivated TB in HIV-infected humans to better explore these factors. All latent animals developed reactivated TB following SIV infection, with a variable time to reactivation (up to 11 months post-SIV). Reactivation was independent of virus load but correlated with depletion of peripheral T cells during acute SIV infection. Animals experiencing reactivation early after SIV infection (<17 weeks) had fewer CD4 T cells in the periphery and airways than animals reactivating in later phases of SIV infection. Co-infected animals had fewer T cells in involved lungs than SIV-negative animals with active TB despite similar T cell numbers in draining lymph nodes. Granulomas from these animals demonstrated histopathologic characteristics consistent with a chronically active disease process. These results suggest initial T cell depletion may strongly influence outcomes of HIV-Mtb co-infection. PMID:20224771

  14. Cerebral oxygen saturation and peripheral perfusion in the extremely premature infant with intraventricular and/or pulmonary haemorrhage early in life.

    PubMed

    Beausoleil, Thierry P; Janaillac, Marie; Barrington, Keith J; Lapointe, Anie; Dehaes, Mathieu

    2018-04-25

    Extremely preterm infants are at higher risk of pulmonary (PH) and intraventricular (IVH) haemorrhage during the transitioning physiology due to immature cardiovascular system. Monitoring of haemodynamics can detect early abnormal circulation that may lead to these complications. We described time-frequency relationships between near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) cerebral regional haemoglobin oxygen saturation (CrSO 2 ) and preductal peripheral perfusion index (PI), capillary oxygen saturation (SpO 2 ) and heart rate (HR) in extremely preterm infants in the first 72 h of life. Patients were sub-grouped in infants with PH and/or IVH (N H  = 8) and healthy controls (N C  = 11). Data were decomposed in wavelets allowing the analysis of localized variations of power. This approach allowed to quantify the percentage of time of significant cross-correlation, semblance, gain (transfer function) and coherence between signals. Ultra-low frequencies (<0.28 mHz) were analyzed as slow and prolonged periods of impaired circulation are considered more detrimental than transient fluctuations. Cross-correlation between CrSO 2 and oximetry (PI, SpO 2 and HR) as well as in-phase semblance and gain between CrSO 2 and HR were significantly lower while anti-phase semblance between CrSO 2 and HR was significantly higher in PH-IVH infants compared to controls. These differences may reflect haemodynamic instability associated with cerebrovascular autoregulation and hemorrhagic complications observed during the transitioning physiology.

  15. Burn Resuscitation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    The modified Brooke formula may not be effective in preventing all complications of fluid loading in all patients. The important concept is that if...addition to complicated mathematical computations [39]. They used their knowledge of expected fluid loss rates to devise a formula, based on trials of...burn resuscitations in order to prevent such a complication . This has proven to be a difficult task. The use of colloid has been examined in

  16. Work-related burns.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, Valerie M

    2006-01-01

    Work-related upper extremity burns often occur. The cause directs the course of action. Thermal burns should be assessed for system alterations, and depth of burn should be determined. Deep partial-thickness burns and more severe burns require a specialist evaluation. Chemical burns must be irrigated and the agent identified. Some chemical burns, such as those that involve phenols and metal fragments, require specific topical applications before water lavage. Hydrofluoric acid burns can cause life-threatening electrolyte abnormalities with a small, highly concentrated acid burn. The goal with any extremity burn is to provide the patient with a multidisciplinary team approach to achieve a functional, usable extremity.

  17. Growth of Douglas-fir seedlings after slash burning.

    Treesearch

    Robert F. Tarrant; Ernest. Wright

    1955-01-01

    An understanding of the ways slash burning may affect seedling growth is important in evaluating present slash-disposal practices. Some observations of early seedling development after slash burning are now available from a recent exploratory study.

  18. Impact of a Newly Implemented Burn Protocol on Surgically Managed Partial Thickness Burns at a Specialized Burns Center in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Tay, Khwee-Soon Vincent; Chong, Si-Jack; Tan, Bien-Keem

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluated the impact of a newly implemented protocol for superficial to mid-dermal partial thickness burns which involves early surgery and rapid coverage with biosynthetic dressing in a specialized national burns center in Singapore. Consecutive patients with 5% or greater total body surface area (TBSA) superficial to mid-dermal partial thickness burns injury admitted to the Burns Centre at the Singapore General Hospital between August and December 2014 for surgery within 48 hours of injury were prospectively recruited into the study to form the protocol group. Comparable historical cases from the year 2013 retrieved from the burns center audit database were used to form the historical control group. Demographics (age, sex), type and depth of burns, %TBSA burnt, number of operative sessions, and length of stay were recorded for each patient of both cohorts. Thirty-nine burns patients managed under the new protocol were compared with historical control (n = 39) comparable in age and extensiveness of burns. A significantly shorter length of stay (P < 0.05) per TBSA burns was observed in the new protocol group (0.74 day/%TBSA) versus historical control (1.55 day/%TBSA). Fewer operative sessions were needed under the new protocol for burns 10% or greater TBSA burns (P < 0.05). The authors report their promising experience with a newly implemented protocol for surgically managed burns patients which involves early surgery and appropriate use of biosynthetic dressing on superficial to mid-dermal partial thickness burns. Clinically, shorter lengths of stay, fewer operative sessions, and decreased need for skin grafting of burns patient were observed.

  19. Burn severity mapping in Australia 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKinley, Randy; Clark, J.; Lecker, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, the Victoria Department of Sustainability and Environment estimated approximately 430,000 hectares of Victoria Australia were burned by numerous bushfires. Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) teams from the United States were deployed to Victoria to assist local fire managers. The U.S. Geological Survey Earth Resources Observation and Science Center (USGS/EROS) and U.S. Forest Service Remote Sensing Applications Center (USFS/RSAC) aided the support effort by providing satellite-derived "soil burn severity " maps for over 280,000 burned hectares. In the United States, BAER teams are assembled to make rapid assessments of burned lands to identify potential hazards to public health and property. An early step in the assessment process is the creation of a soil burn severity map used to identify hazard areas and prioritize treatment locations. These maps are developed primarily using Landsat satellite imagery and the differenced Normalized Burn Ratio (dNBR) algorithm.

  20. Burning mouth syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gurvits, Grigoriy E; Tan, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is a debilitating medical condition affecting nearly 1.3 million of Americans. Its common features include a burning painful sensation in the mouth, often associated with dysgeusia and xerostomia, despite normal salivation. Classically, symptoms are better in the morning, worsen during the day and typically subside at night. Its etiology is largely multifactorial, and associated medical conditions may include gastrointestinal, urogenital, psychiatric, neurologic and metabolic disorders, as well as drug reactions. BMS has clear predisposition to peri-/post menopausal females. Its pathophysiology has not been fully elucidated and involves peripheral and central neuropathic pathways. Clinical diagnosis relies on careful history taking, physical examination and laboratory analysis. Treatment is often tedious and is aimed at correction of underlying medical conditions, supportive therapy, and behavioral feedback. Drug therapy with alpha lipoic acid, clonazepam, capsaicin, and antidepressants may provide symptom relief. Psychotherapy may be helpful. Short term follow up data is promising, however, long term prognosis with treatment is lacking. BMS remains an important medical condition which often places a recognizable burden on the patient and health care system and requires appropriate recognition and treatment. PMID:23429751

  1. Burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gurvits, Grigoriy E; Tan, Amy

    2013-02-07

    Burning mouth syndrome is a debilitating medical condition affecting nearly 1.3 million of Americans. Its common features include a burning painful sensation in the mouth, often associated with dysgeusia and xerostomia, despite normal salivation. Classically, symptoms are better in the morning, worsen during the day and typically subside at night. Its etiology is largely multifactorial, and associated medical conditions may include gastrointestinal, urogenital, psychiatric, neurologic and metabolic disorders, as well as drug reactions. BMS has clear predisposition to peri-/post menopausal females. Its pathophysiology has not been fully elucidated and involves peripheral and central neuropathic pathways. Clinical diagnosis relies on careful history taking, physical examination and laboratory analysis. Treatment is often tedious and is aimed at correction of underlying medical conditions, supportive therapy, and behavioral feedback. Drug therapy with alpha lipoic acid, clonazepam, capsaicin, and antidepressants may provide symptom relief. Psychotherapy may be helpful. Short term follow up data is promising, however, long term prognosis with treatment is lacking. BMS remains an important medical condition which often places a recognizable burden on the patient and health care system and requires appropriate recognition and treatment.

  2. Identification of conserved microRNAs in peripheral blood from giant panda: expression of mammary gland-related microRNAs during late pregnancy and early lactation.

    PubMed

    Wang, C D; Long, K; Jin, L; Huang, S; Li, D H; Ma, X P; Wei, M; Gu, Y; Ma, J D; Zhang, H

    2015-11-13

    The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is one of the world's most endangered mammals, and it has evolved several unusual biological and behavioral traits. During puberty, pregnancy, lactation, and involution, the mammary gland undergoes profound morphological and functional changes. A large number of microRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified to be involved in mammary gland development and lactation. In this study, we identified 202 conserved mature miRNAs, corresponding to 147 pre-miRNAs, in giant panda peripheral blood using a small RNA-sequencing approach. In addition, 27 miRNA families and 29 miRNA clusters were identified. We analyzed the arm selection preference of pre-miRNAs and found that: 1) most giant panda pre-miRNAs generated one-strand miRNAs, and the 5p-arm only miRNAs have a higher expression level than 3p-arm only miRNAs; 2) there were more 5p-arm dominant miRNAs than 3p-arm dominant miRNAs; and 3) 5p-arm dominant miRNAs have a larger fold change within miRNA pairs than 3p-arm dominant miRNAs. Expression of 12 lactation-related miRNAs was detected across late pregnancy and early lactation stages by qPCR, and seven miRNAs were identified as clustered in one significant model. Most of these clustered miRNAs exhibited inhibitory roles in proliferation and differentiation of mammary epithelial cells. Functional analysis highlighted important roles of the seven as signed miRNAs in mammary development and metabolic changes, including blood vessel morphogenesis, macromolecule biosynthesis, cell cycle regulation, and protein transport.

  3. Burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jääskeläinen, Satu K; Woda, Alain

    2017-06-01

    Objective To review the clinical entity of primary burning mouth syndrome (BMS), its pathophysiological mechanisms, accurate new diagnostic methods and evidence-based treatment options, and to describe novel lines for future research regarding aetiology, pathophysiology, and new therapeutic strategies. Description Primary BMS is a chronic neuropathic intraoral pain condition that despite typical symptoms lacks clear clinical signs of neuropathic involvement. With advanced diagnostic methods, such as quantitative sensory testing of small somatosensory and taste afferents, neurophysiological recordings of the trigeminal system, and peripheral nerve blocks, most BMS patients can be classified into the peripheral or central type of neuropathic pain. These two types differ regarding pathophysiological mechanisms, efficacy of available treatments, and psychiatric comorbidity. The two types may overlap in individual patients. BMS is most frequent in postmenopausal women, with general population prevalence of around 1%. Treatment of BMS is difficult; best evidence exists for efficacy of topical and systemic clonazepam. Hormonal substitution, dopaminergic medications, and therapeutic non-invasive neuromodulation may provide efficient mechanism-based treatments for BMS in the future. Conclusion We present a novel comprehensive hypothesis of primary BMS, gathering the hormonal, neuropathic, and genetic factors presumably required in the genesis of the condition. This will aid in future research on pathophysiology and risk factors of BMS, and boost treatment trials taking into account individual mechanism profiles and subgroup-clusters.

  4. Elevated Ratio of Th17 Cell-Derived Th1 Cells (CD161(+)Th1 Cells) to CD161(+)Th17 Cells in Peripheral Blood of Early-Onset Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients.

    PubMed

    Kotake, Shigeru; Nanke, Yuki; Yago, Toru; Kawamoto, Manabu; Kobashigawa, Tsuyoshi; Yamanaka, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the destruction of articular cartilage and bone with elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines. It has been reported that IL-17 and Th17 cells play important roles in the pathogenesis of RA. Recently, plasticity in helper T cells has been demonstrated; Th17 cells can convert to Th1 cells. It remains to be elucidated whether this conversion occurs in the early phase of RA. Here, we tried to identify Th17 cells, Th1 cells, and Th17 cell-derived Th1 cells (CD161(+)Th1 cells) in the peripheral blood of early-onset RA patients. We also evaluated the effect of methotrexate on the ratio of Th17 cells in early-onset RA patients. The ratio of Th17 cell-derived Th1 cells to CD161(+)Th17 cells was elevated in the peripheral blood of early-onset RA patients. In addition, MTX reduced the ratio of Th17 cells but not Th1 cells. These findings suggest that IL-17 and Th17 play important roles in the early phase of RA; thus, anti-IL-17 antibodies should be administered to patients with RA in the early phase.

  5. Elevated Ratio of Th17 Cell-Derived Th1 Cells (CD161+Th1 Cells) to CD161+Th17 Cells in Peripheral Blood of Early-Onset Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kotake, Shigeru; Nanke, Yuki; Yago, Toru; Kawamoto, Manabu; Kobashigawa, Tsuyoshi; Yamanaka, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the destruction of articular cartilage and bone with elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines. It has been reported that IL-17 and Th17 cells play important roles in the pathogenesis of RA. Recently, plasticity in helper T cells has been demonstrated; Th17 cells can convert to Th1 cells. It remains to be elucidated whether this conversion occurs in the early phase of RA. Here, we tried to identify Th17 cells, Th1 cells, and Th17 cell-derived Th1 cells (CD161+Th1 cells) in the peripheral blood of early-onset RA patients. We also evaluated the effect of methotrexate on the ratio of Th17 cells in early-onset RA patients. The ratio of Th17 cell-derived Th1 cells to CD161+Th17 cells was elevated in the peripheral blood of early-onset RA patients. In addition, MTX reduced the ratio of Th17 cells but not Th1 cells. These findings suggest that IL-17 and Th17 play important roles in the early phase of RA; thus, anti-IL-17 antibodies should be administered to patients with RA in the early phase. PMID:27123445

  6. Early sexual maturity in local boars of Northeastern India: age-related changes in testicular growth, epididymal sperm characteristics and peripheral testosterone levels.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, A; Bujarbaruah, K M; Kadirvel, G; Khargharia, G; Sarma, Rumi G; Goswami, J; Basumatary, Rantu; Palaniappan, Kavitha; Bardoloi, R K

    2011-03-01

    The present study reports the age related changes in the peripheral testosterone levels, testicular and epididymal growth and development and cauda epididymal spermiogram in local pigs of Northeastern India, which attain sexual maturity around 3 months of age. Local boars (n = 20) were castrated at monthly intervals from 2 to 6 months of age (4 boars per month) to study the testicular growth and development and the epididymal spermiogram. Blood samples, collected from local boars (n = 6) at monthly intervals from 2 to 6 months of age, were analyzed for testosterone levels by radioimmunoassay. Compared to Hampshire boars, significantly (P < 0.05) high testosterone levels were observed in the local boars as early as 2 months of age. The mean (± SEM) level of testosterone in the local boars at 2, 3 and 4 months of age was 11.89 ± 1.52, 20.45 ± 1.33 and 20.38 ± 2.0 ngml(-1), respectively. Though there was consistently significant (P < 0.05) difference in the body weight between Hampshire and local pigs, the same was not observed in case of testicular weight except at 3 and 6 months of age. In line with the above observation, the testis:body weight ratio (gram testis per kg body weight) was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in the local boars compared to the Hampshire boars at any time of observation, which ranged from 0.8 to 1.0 in case of Hampshire and from 2.3 to 3.0 in local boars. The sperm concentration in the cauda epididymal fluid of local boars at 2, 3 and 6 months of age was 2255 ± 186.6, 3685 ± 103.8 and 4325 ± 146.2 million/ml, respectively and the sperm motility, viability and total abnormality was 73.3, 75.2 and 6.2%, respectively at 3 months of age. Taken together, the testosterone level, testicular growth and development and epididymal spermiogram indicate the trait of early sexual maturity in the local pigs as compared to Hampshire. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Early stages of development of Trypanosoma rotatorium (Mayer, 1843) from peripheral blood and internal organs of Anurans Bufo bufo (Linnaeus) and Rana sp. (Anura)].

    PubMed

    Malysheva, M N

    2014-01-01

    The data on the fauna of trypanosomes of Anura of the Leningrad Province are given. The initial development stages of Trypanosoma rotatorium in peripheral blood and internal organs of the frog are described for the first time.

  8. Lipopolysaccharide-induced early response genes in bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells implicate GLG1/E-selectin as a key ligand–receptor interaction

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study uses a systems biology approach, integrating global gene expression information and knowledge of the regulatory events in cells to identify transcription networks controlling peripheral blood mononuclear cells’ (PBMCs) immune response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and to identify the molecu...

  9. Early Reconstruction of Distal Leg and Foot in Acute High-Voltage Electrical Burn: Does Location of Pedicle in the Zone of Injury Affect the Outcome of Distally Based Sural Flap?

    PubMed

    Asʼadi, Kamran; Salehi, Seyed Hamid; Shoar, Saeed

    2017-01-01

    Distally based fasciocutaneous sural flap is popular in the reconstruction of distal leg and foot burns. However, utilization of this technique in high-voltage electrical injury has been challenging. The present study aimed to compare the outcome of early aggressive debridement and coverage of contact point of acute high-voltage electrical injury using distally based fasciocutaneous sural flap between high-risk and low-risk patients defined by the anatomic proximity of the flap pedicle to the zone of injury. A total of 51 patients with contact point of high-voltage electrical burn (HVEB) in distal leg and foot undergoing distally based fasciocutaneous sural flap were included in this prospective clinical study. In 28 patients, the flap pedicle was not involved in the contact point of high-voltage electrical injury (low risk/control group), whereas in 21 patients, it was located inside the zone of injury (high-risk/case group). Patients were followed up for a median of 21 months (range, 12-44 months). Wound dimensions to be covered were relatively similar between the 2 groups. Complications of flap survival (primary outcome) and other minor early and late complications (secondary outcome) did not significantly differ between the 2 groups (P > 0.05). Provided that early and completed debridements of contact points of HVEB were achieved, distally based sural flap is feasible and there is reliable coverage in HVEB even in patients with flap pedicle located in vicinity of the zone of injury.

  10. Soil alkalinity on recent burns

    Treesearch

    Robert Marshall; Clarence Averill

    1928-01-01

    During late July and early August, 1926, the Kaniksu National Forest in northern Idaho experienced its most severe fire damage since the advent of the white man in that region. About 125,000 acres were burned as a result of the conflagrations. The destroyed forests consisted largely of western white pine (Pinus mionticola), western larch (Larix occidentalis), Douglas...

  11. Burning Mouth Syndrome and "Burning Mouth Syndrome".

    PubMed

    Rifkind, Jacob Bernard

    2016-03-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is distressing to both the patient and practitioner unable to determine the cause of the patient's symptoms. Burning mouth syndrome is a diagnosis of exclusion, which is used only after nutritional deficiencies, mucosal disease, fungal infections, hormonal disturbances and contact stomatitis have been ruled out. This article will explore the many causes and treatment of patients who present with a chief complaint of "my mouth burns," including symptomatic treatment for those with burning mouth syndrome.

  12. Pattern of burn injury in hang-glider pilots.

    PubMed

    Campbell, D C; Nano, T; Pegg, S P

    1996-06-01

    High-voltage electrical injury has been well documented in a number of situations, such as the occupational hazard of linesmen and construction workers, and in the context of overhead railway power lines. Two cases of hang-glider pilots contacting 11,000-volt power lines have recently been treated in the Royal Brisbane Hospital Burns Unit. They demonstrate an interesting pattern of injury, not described in current burns literature, involving both hand and lower abdominal burns. Both patients sustained full-thickness patches of burn injury, with underlying muscle damage and peripheral neurological injury. This distribution of injury seems to be closely related to the design of the hang glider.

  13. A comparison of the effect of early insertion of standard latex and silver-impregnated latex foley catheters on urinary tract infections in burn patients.

    PubMed

    Newton, Terry; Still, Joseph M; Law, Edward

    2002-04-01

    A retrospective study was designed to compare the incidence of urinary tract infections during two different time periods in burn patients treated with two different types of Foley catheters. In time period 1, latex catheters present on admission were not changed. In time period 2, catheters were replaced on admission with silver alloy-impregnated catheters. In time period 1, the rate of symptomatic urinary tract infections was 7.2 per 1,000 catheter-days. In time period 2, the rate was 4.4 per 1,000 catheter-days. Results, compared using Fisher's exact test, revealed a statistically significant P value of .029. The use of silver-impregnated catheters significantly lowered the rate of urinary tract infection at our burn center.

  14. Injuries to children caused by burning rice husk.

    PubMed

    Raveendran, Sherine Subodhini

    2002-02-01

    A case study of injury to the feet of children from Sri Lanka due to burning husk is discussed. The hot husk causes deep burns on the dorsum of the feet and spares the plantar surface. The contractures caused by the burns lead to severe deformity, and are very resistant to treatment. These burn injuries need to be treated early, in specialized centers, to avoid long term complications. Health education of the public plays an important role in the prevention of these injuries.

  15. Burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crow, Heidi C; Gonzalez, Yoly

    2013-02-01

    Pain in the tongue or oral tissues described as "burning" has been referred to by many terms including burning mouth syndrome. When a burning sensation in the mouth is caused by local or systemic factors, it is called secondary burning mouth syndrome and when these factors are treated the pain will resolve. When burning mouth syndrome occurs in the absence of identified risk indicators, the term primary burning mouth syndrome is utilized. This article focuses on descriptions, etiologic theories, and management of primary burning mouth syndrome, a condition for which underlying causative agents have been ruled out. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Burn hazards of the deployed environment in wartime: epidemiology of noncombat burns from ongoing United States military operations.

    PubMed

    Kauvar, David S; Wade, Charles E; Baer, David G

    2009-10-01

    Service in the deployed military environment carries risks for accidental (noncombat-related) burns. Examining these risks can assist in the development of military burn prevention measures. This study endeavored to examine noncombat burn epidemiology in the context of similar civilian data. We performed a retrospective cohort study of consecutive casualties evacuated from operational military theaters in Iraq and Afghanistan to the sole tertiary military burn center in the US. Military data were compared with database samples of the US population from the American Burn Association and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The main causes of the 180 noncombat burns seen from March 2003 to June 2008 were waste burning, fuel mishaps, and unintentional ordinance detonations. Overall prevalence of noncombat burns was 19.5 burns/100,000 person-years lived. If causes specific to military operations are removed, military prevalence was 13.0/100,000. More than one-third of noncombat burns occurred in the first year of the study; a period of stability followed. A similar US population had an accidental burn prevalence of 7.1/100,000 from 2003 to 2007. Burn size, presence of inhalation injury, and burn center mortality were not different from those in a similar civilian cohort. Deployed service members have a greater risk of unintentional burns than a similar civilian cohort does. This is in part because of the specific dangers of military activities. More attention to deployed military burn prevention is needed, especially early in combat support operations.

  17. Management of acid burns: experience from Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Das, Kishore Kumar; Olga, Loren; Peck, Michael; Morselli, Paolo G; Salek, A J M

    2015-05-01

    Acid burn injuries in Bangladesh primarily occur as a result of intentional attacks although there are incidences of accidental acid burns in industry, on the street, and at home. A total of 126 patients with acid burns, 95 from attacks and 31 from accidents, were studied from July 2004 to December 2012. A diagnosis of acid burn was made from history, physical examination and in some cases from chemical analysis of the patients' clothing. Alkali burns were excluded from the study. In the burn unit of Dhaka Medical College Hospital, we applied a slightly different protocol for management of acid burns, beginning with plain water irrigation of the wound, which effectively reduced burn depth and the requirement of surgical treatment. Application of hydrocolloid dressing for 48-72 h helped with the assessment of depth and the course of treatment. Early excision and grafting gives good results but resultant acid trickling creates a marble cake-like appearance of the wound separated by the vital skin. Excision with a scalpel and direct stitching of the wounds are often a good option. Observation of patients on follow-up revealed that wounds showed a tendency for hypertrophy. Application of pressure garments and other scar treatments were given in all cases unless the burn was highly superficial. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  18. The Burn Wound Exudate – an under-utilized resource

    PubMed Central

    Widgerow, Alan D; King, Kassandra; Tussardi, Ilaria Tocco; Banyard, Derek A.; Chiang, Ryan; Awad, Antony; Afzel, Hassan; Bhatnager, Shweta; Melkumyan, Satenik; Wirth, Garrett; Evans, Gregory R.D

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The burn wound exudate represents the burn tissue microenvironment. Extracting information from the exudate relating to cellular components, signaling mediators and protein content can provide much needed data relating to the local tissue damage, depth of the wound and probable systemic complications. This review examines the scientific data extracted from burn wound exudates over the years and proposes new investigations that will provide useful information from this underutilized resource. Method A literature review was conducted using the electronic database PubMed to search for literature pertaining to burn wound or blister fluid analysis. Key words included burn exudate, blister fluid, wound exudate, cytokine burn fluid, subeschar fluid, cytokine burns, serum cytokines. 32 relevant article were examined and 29 selected as relevant to the review. 3 papers were discarded due to questionable methodology or conclusions. The reports were assessed for their affect on management decisions and diagnostics. Furthermore, traditional blood level analysis of these mediators was made to compare the accuracy of blood versus exudate in burn wound management. Extrapolations are made for new possibilities of burn wound exudate analysis. Results Studies pertaining to burn wound exudate, subeschar fluid and blister fluid analyses may have contributed to burn wound management decisions particularly related to escharectomies and early burn wound excision. In addition, information from these studies have the potential to impact on areas such as healing, scarring, burn wound conversion and burn wound depth analysis. Conclusion Burn wound exudate analysis has proven useful in burn wound management decisions. It appears to offer a far more accurate reflection of the burn wound pathophysiology than the traditional blood/serum investigations undertaken in the past. New approaches to diagnostics and treatment efficacy assessment are possible utilizing data from this fluid

  19. THE INFLUENCE OF RADIOPHOSPHORUS THERAPEUTICS ON THE PERIPHERAL BLOOD IN THE CASE OF POLYCYTHEMIA AND EARLY IDENTIFICATON OF BLOOD-PICTURE ALTERATIONS (in German)

    SciTech Connect

    Graul, E.H.; Damminger, K.

    1961-10-01

    The alterations of the peripheral blood picture of 17 patients, who were treated with radiophosphorus (P/sup 32/) for polycythemia are described. Within the first 24 hours after the intravenous injection of 5 mc of P/sup 32/ the cell- numbers in the capillary-blood diminish. The effect is most obvious for the thrombocyte-number. By electronic counting and measuring, this radiation effect on the blood cells can be represented by a curve, which is obtained in the short time of 10 sec with a precision better than 1%. Striking is the alteration of the distribution curve of the erythrocytes, which seems to speakmore » for an elimination of microcytous forms out of the peripheral blood and, by that, for a normalization. The importance of the method, with regard to its use in times of a catastrophe which allows to detect a radiation exposition of less than 10 r, is pointed out. (auth)« less

  20. Accuracy of burn size estimation in patients transferred to adult Burn Units in Sydney, Australia: an audit of 698 patients.

    PubMed

    Harish, Varun; Raymond, Andrew P; Issler, Andrea C; Lajevardi, Sepehr S; Chang, Ling-Yun; Maitz, Peter K M; Kennedy, Peter

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare burn size estimation between referring centres and Burn Units in adult patients transferred to Burn Units in Sydney, Australia. A review of all adults transferred to Burn Units in Sydney, Australia between January 2009 and August 2013 was performed. The TBSA estimated by the referring institution was compared with the TBSA measured at the Burns Unit. There were 698 adults transferred to a Burns Unit. Equivalent TBSA estimation between the referring hospital and Burns Unit occurred in 30% of patients. Overestimation occurred at a ratio exceeding 3:1 with respect to underestimation, with the difference between the referring institutions and Burns Unit estimation being statistically significant (P<0.001). Significant overestimation occurs in the early transfer of burn-injured patients as well as in patients transferred more than 48h after the burn (P<0.005). Underestimation occurs with less frequency but rises with increasing time after the burn (P<0.005) and with increasing TBSA. Throughout the temporal spectrum of transferred patients, severe burns (≥20% TBSA) were found to have more satisfactory burn size estimations compared with less severe injuries (<20% TBSA; P<0.005). There are significant inaccuracies in burn size assessment by referring centres. The systemic tendency for overestimation occurs throughout the entire TBSA spectrum, and persists with increasing time after the burn. Underestimation occurs less frequently but rises with increasing time after the burn and with increasing TBSA. Severe burns (≥20% TBSA) are more accurately estimated by the referring hospital. The inaccuracies in burn size assessment have the potential to result in suboptimal treatment and inappropriate referral to specialised Burn Units. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  1. Responses of Understory Vegetation on Highly Erosive Louisiana Soils to Prescribed Burning in May

    Treesearch

    James D. Haywood; Alton Martin; John C. Novosad

    1995-01-01

    Prescribed burning is necessary to restore the herbaceous plant community normally associated with the fire-dependent longleaf pine, Pinus palustris Mill., ecosystem. Usually these burns are done in the winter months. However, burning during the early growing season may allow herbaceous plants to recover better than when burning is conducted during...

  2. Fungal infections in burns: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Struck, M.F.; Gille, J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Burn wound infections remain the most important factor limiting survival in burn intensive care units. Large wound surface, impaired immune systems, and broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy contribute to the growth of opportunistic fungal species. Faced with challenging fluid resuscitation, wound excision and cardiopulmonary stabilization, mycosis in burns are likely to be underestimated. Diagnostic performance can sometimes be delayed because clinical signs are unspecific and differentiation between colonization and infection is difficult. Therapeutic measures range from infection prophylaxis over treatment with antifungal agents towards radical amputation of infected limbs. New methods of early and reliable detection of fungal organisms, as well as the use of novel antifungal substances, are promising but require wider establishment to confirm the beneficial effects in burn patients. This review aims to highlight the main important aspects of fungal infections in burns including incidence, infection control, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, prognosis and outcomes. PMID:24563641

  3. Acute and Perioperative Care of the Burn-Injured Patient

    PubMed Central

    Bittner, Edward A.; Shank, Erik; Woodson, Lee; Martyn, J.A. Jeevendra

    2016-01-01

    Care of burn-injured patients requires knowledge of the pathophysiologic changes affecting virtually all organs from the onset of injury until wounds are healed. Massive airway and/or lung edema can occur rapidly and unpredictably after burn and/or inhalation injury. Hemodynamics in the early phase of severe burn injury are characterized by a reduction in cardiac output, increased systemic and pulmonary vascular resistance. Approximately 2–5 days after major burn injury, a hyperdynamic and hypermetabolic state develops. Electrical burns result in morbidity much higher than expected based on burn size alone. Formulae for fluid resuscitation should serve only as guideline; fluids should be titrated to physiologic end points. Burn injury is associated basal and procedural pain requiring higher than normal opioid and sedative doses. Operating room concerns for the burn-injured patient include airway abnormalities, impaired lung function, vascular access, deceptively large and rapid blood loss, hypothermia and altered pharmacology. PMID:25485468

  4. Discrete β-adrenergic mechanisms regulate early and late erythropoiesis in erythropoietin-resistant anemia.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Shirin; Mosier, Michael J; Szilagyi, Andrea; Gamelli, Richard L; Muthumalaiappan, Kuzhali

    2017-10-01

    Anemia of critical illness is resistant to exogenous erythropoietin. Packed red blood cells transfusions is the only treatment option, and despite related cost and morbidity, there is a need for alternate strategies. Erythrocyte development can be divided into erythropoietin-dependent and erythropoietin-independent stages. We have shown previously that erythropoietin-dependent development is intact in burn patients and the erythropoietin-independent early commitment stage, which is regulated by β1/β2-adrenergic mechanisms, is compromised. Utilizing the scald burn injury model, we studied erythropoietin-independent late maturation stages and the effect of β1/β2, β-2, or β-3 blockade in burn mediated erythropoietin-resistant anemia. Burn mice were randomized to receive daily injections of propranolol (nonselective β1/β2 antagonist), nadolol (long-acting β1/β2 antagonist), butoxamine (selective β2 antagonist), or SR59230A (selective β3 antagonist) for 6 days after burn. Total bone marrow cells were characterized as nonerythroid cells, early and late erythroblasts, nucleated orthochromatic erythroblasts and enucleated reticulocyte subsets using CD71, Ter119, and Syto-16 by flow cytometry. Multipotential progenitors were probed for MafB expressing cells. Although propranolol improved early and late erythroblasts, only butoxamine and selective β3-antagonist administrations were positively reflected in the peripheral blood hemoglobin and red blood cells count. While burn impeded early commitment and late maturation stages, β1/β2 antagonism increased the early erythroblasts through commitment stages via β2 specific MafB regulation. β3 antagonism was more effective in improving overall red blood cells through late maturation stages. The study unfolds novel β2 and β3 adrenergic mechanisms orchestrating erythropoietin resistant anemia after burn, which impedes both the early commitment stage and the late maturation stages, respectively. Copyright © 2017

  5. First Aid: Burns

    MedlinePlus

    ... for: Parents Kids Teens Kitchen: Household Safety Checklist Fireworks Safety First Aid: Sunburn Firesetting Fire Safety Burns ... Being Safe in the Kitchen Finding Out About Fireworks Safety Playing With Fire? Dealing With Burns Fireworks ...

  6. Burn Wise Funding

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is working with federal, state, tribal and local agencies to find and promote viable funding options to replace wood-burning appliances with cleaner home heating. Includes Guide to Financing Options for Wood-burning Appliance Changeouts.

  7. Burn Wise - Partners

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Within this site you will find information for consumers to make informed decisions about what it means to burn wise. And partners will learn about how they can work with EPA to bring cleaner-burning appliances to market.

  8. Myocardial Autophagy after Severe Burn in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiong; Shi, Xiao-hua; Huang, Yue-sheng

    2012-01-01

    Background Autophagy plays a major role in myocardial ischemia and hypoxia injury. The present study investigated the effects of autophagy on cardiac dysfunction in rats after severe burn. Methods Protein expression of the autophagy markers LC3 and Beclin 1 were determined at 0, 1, 3, 6, and 12 h post-burn in Sprague Dawley rats subjected to 30% total body surface area 3rd degree burns. Autophagic, apoptotic, and oncotic cell death were evaluated in the myocardium at each time point by immunofluorescence. Changes of cardiac function were measured in a Langendorff model of isolated heart at 6 h post-burn, and the autophagic response was measured following activation by Rapamycin and inhibition by 3-methyladenine (3-MA). The angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor enalaprilat, the angiotensin receptor I blocker losartan, and the reactive oxygen species inhibitor diphenylene iodonium (DPI) were also applied to the ex vivo heart model to examine the roles of these factors in post-burn cardiac function. Results Autophagic cell death was first observed in the myocardium at 3 h post-burn, occurring in 0.008 ± 0.001% of total cardiomyocytes, and continued to increase to a level of 0.022 ± 0.005% by 12 h post-burn. No autophagic cell death was observed in control hearts. Compared with apoptosis, autophagic cell death occurred earlier and in larger quantities. Rapamycin enhanced autophagy and decreased cardiac function in isolated hearts 6 h post-burn, while 3-MA exerted the opposite response. Enalaprilat, losartan, and DPI all inhibited autophagy and enhanced heart function. Conclusion Myocardial autophagy is enhanced in severe burns and autophagic cell death occurred early at 3 h post-burn, which may contribute to post-burn cardiac dysfunction. Angiotensin II and reactive oxygen species may play important roles in this process by regulating cell signaling transduction. PMID:22768082

  9. Topical Antimicrobials for Burn Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Tianhong; Huang, Ying-Ying; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Hashmi, Javad T.; Kurup, Divya B.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Throughout most of history, serious burns occupying a large percentage of body surface area were an almost certain death sentence because of subsequent infection. A number of factors such as disruption of the skin barrier, ready availability of bacterial nutrients in the burn milieu, destruction of the vascular supply to the burned skin, and systemic disturbances lead to immunosuppression combined together to make burns particularly susceptible to infection. In the 20th century the introduction of antibiotic and antifungal drugs, the use of topical antimicrobials that could be applied to burns, and widespread adoption of early excision and grafting all helped to dramatically increase survival. However the relentless increase in microbial resistance to antibiotics and other antimicrobials has led to a renewed search for alternative approaches to prevent and combat burn infections. This review will cover patented strategies that have been issued or filed with regard to new topical agents, preparations, and methods of combating burn infections. Animal models that are used in preclinical studies are discussed. Various silver preparations (nanocrystalline and slow release) are the mainstay of many approaches but antimicrobial peptides, topical photodynamic therapy, chitosan preparations, new iodine delivery formulations, phage therapy and natural products such as honey and essential oils have all been tested. This active area of research will continue to provide new topical antimicrobials for burns that will battle against growing multi-drug resistance. PMID:20429870

  10. Burning mouth syndrome: a review and update.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, Francisco J; Silvestre-Rangil, Javier; López-Jornet, Pía

    2015-05-16

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is mainly found in middle aged or elderly women and is characterized by intense burning or itching sensation of the tongue or other regions of the oral mucosa. It can be accompanied by xerostomia and dysgeusia. The syndrome generally manifests spontaneously, and the discomfort is typically of a continuous nature but increases in intensity during the evening and at night. Although BMS classically has been attributed to a range of factors, in recent years evidence has been obtained relating it peripheral (sensory C and/or trigeminal nerve fibers) or central neuropathic disturbances (involving the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system). The differential diagnosis requires the exclusion of oral mucosal lesions or blood test alterations that can produce burning mouth sensation. Patient management is based on the avoidance of causes of oral irritation and the provision of psychological support. Drug treatment for burning sensation in primary BMS of peripheral origin can consist of topical clonazepam, while central type BMS appears to improve with the use of antidepressants such as duloxetine, antiseizure drugs such as gabapentin, or amisulpride.

  11. Burns - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Burn Care - العربية (Arabic) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect) (简体中文) Expand Section Burn ... Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese, Traditional (Cantonese dialect) (繁體中文) Expand Section Burn ...

  12. Learn Not To Burn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Nancy; Hendricks, Charlotte M.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the "Learn Not to Burn Preschool Program," a low-cost fire safety awareness and burn prevention curriculum for young children. The program promotes eight burn prevention methods--including practicing an escape plan--using developmentally appropriate learning objectives to increase children's fire safety knowledge, skill, and…

  13. Minor burns - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... Larger than 2 inches (5 cm) On the hand, foot, face, groin, buttocks, hip, knee, ankle, shoulder, elbow, or wrist First aid for Minor Burns First, calm and reassure the person who is burned. If clothing is not stuck to the burn, remove it. ...

  14. Economics of pediatric burns.

    PubMed

    Bass, Michael J; Phillips, Linda G

    2008-07-01

    Sustaining a burn injury sets in motion a cycle of pain, disfigurement, and a search for survival. In pediatric burns, the injury extends to the parents where fear, ignorance, and helplessness forever change their lives. Pediatric burn injuries are caused by fire, hot liquids, clothing irons, hair curlers, caustic substances like drain cleaner, the grounding of an electrical source, and exposure to radiation. Efficiency in the delivery of pediatric burn care is critical. Maximizing resource utilization means continual self-evaluation and economic analysis of therapeutic modalities. Griffiths et al found that most childhood burns are due to scalds, which can be treated for $1061 per percent burn. Paddock et al reduced the cost of treating superficial pediatric burns and reduced the length of stay in hospital using silver-impregnated gauze over traditional methods. Barrett et al found improved cosmesis of skin grafts using cultured epithelial autografts but at a substantially increased cost. Corpron et al showed that pediatric burn units that treat burns >10% total body surface area and operative treatment of pediatric burns regardless of size generate positive revenue. There is a paucity of evidentiary pediatric burn economic data. More research is needed to address areas of pediatric burn care inefficiency. Improving knowledge of cost in all health care endeavors will create competition and drive down expenditures.

  15. Burns and Fire Safety

    MedlinePlus

    Number of Deaths Death Rate Burns and Fire Safety Fact Sheet (2015) Fatalities • 334 children ages 19 and under died from fires or burns ... burns were ages 4 and under. 1 The death rate for children this age (0.73 per 100, ...

  16. Trout Creek 1999 Burn

    Treesearch

    Sherel Goodrich

    2008-01-01

    A small prescribed fire near the mouth of Trout Creek in Strawberry Valley, Wasatch County, Utah, on the Uinta National Forest provided an opportunity to compare production and vascular plant composition in unburned and burned areas. At four years post burn, production of herbaceous plants was about four times greater in the burned area than in the unburned area. Most...

  17. California Burn Scars

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Burn Scars Across Southern California     ... California between October 21 and November 18, 2003. Burn scars and vegetation changes wrought by the fires are illustrated in these ... and Nov 18, 2003 Images:  California Burn Scars location:  United States region:  ...

  18. Luciferase-tagged wild-type and tropism-deficient mouse cytomegaloviruses reveal early dynamics of host colonization following peripheral challenge.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Helen; Oliveira, Martha; Macdonald, Kate; Yunis, Joseph; Mach, Michael; Bruce, Kimberley; Stevenson, Philip; Cardin, Rhonda; Davis-Poynter, Nicholas

    2016-12-01

    Cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) establish persistent, systemic infections and cause disease by maternal-foetal transfer, suggesting that their dissemination is a key target for antiviral intervention. Late clinical presentation has meant that human CMV (HCMV) dissemination is not well understood. Murine CMV (MCMV) provides a tractable model. Whole mouse imaging of virus-expressed luciferase has proved a useful way to track systemic infections. MCMV, in which the abundant lytic gene M78 was luciferase-tagged via a self-cleaving peptide (M78-LUC), allowed serial, unbiased imaging of systemic and peripheral infection without significant virus attenuation. Ex vivo luciferase imaging showed greater sensitivity than plaque assay, and revealed both well-known infection sites (the lungs, lymph nodes, salivary glands, liver, spleen and pancreas) and less explored sites (the bone marrow and upper respiratory tract). We applied luciferase imaging to tracking MCMV lacking M33, a chemokine receptor conserved in HCMV and a proposed anti-viral drug target. M33-deficient M78-LUC colonized normally in peripheral sites and local draining lymph nodes but spread poorly to the salivary gland, suggesting a defect in vascular transport consistent with properties of a chemokine receptor.

  19. [Enteral nutrition in burn patients].

    PubMed

    Pereira, J L; Garrido, M; Gómez-Cía, T; Serrera, J L; Franco, A; Pumar, A; Relimpio, F; Astorga, R; García-Luna, P P

    1992-01-01

    diet was very good, and only mild complications such as diarrhoea developed in two patients. Enteral nutrition is a suitable nutritional support method for patients with burns, which maintains the nitrogenous balance positive and improves the visceral protein parameters in these patients at an early stage, with very few complications.

  20. Timing of slash burning with the seed crop—a case history.

    Treesearch

    Roy R. Silen

    1952-01-01

    Studies by Isaac indicate that regeneration to Douglas-fir following logging often fails because a good seed crop is destroyed in the slash fire. To prevent this loss during a good seed year, early burning before seed fall starts has been recommended. If early burning is too hazardous, only the concentrations of slash should be burned later in the fall. In contrast,...

  1. Flow cytometric minimal residual disease assessment of peripheral blood in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia patients has potential for early detection of relapsed extramedullary disease.

    PubMed

    Keegan, Alissa; Charest, Karry; Schmidt, Ryan; Briggs, Debra; Deangelo, Daniel J; Li, Betty; Morgan, Elizabeth A; Pozdnyakova, Olga

    2018-03-27

    To evaluate peripheral blood (PB) for minimal residual disease (MRD) assessment in adults with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). We analysed 76 matched bone marrow (BM) aspirate and PB specimens independently for the presence of ALL MRD by six-colour flow cytometry (FC). The overall rate of BM MRD-positivity was 24% (18/76) and PB was also MRD-positive in 22% (4/18) of BM-positive cases. We identified two cases with evidence of leukaemic cells in PB at the time of the extramedullary relapse that were interpreted as MRD-negative in BM. The use of PB MRD as a non-invasive method for monitoring of systemic relapse may have added clinical and diagnostic value in patients with high risk of extramedullary disease. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. Spatial frequency domain imaging of burn wounds in a preclinical model of graded burn severity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, John Quan; Crouzet, Christian; Mai, Tuan; Riola, Kathleen; Uchitel, Daniel; Liaw, Lih-Huei; Bernal, Nicole; Ponticorvo, Adrien; Choi, Bernard; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2013-06-01

    Frequent monitoring of early-stage burns is necessary for deciding optimal treatment and management. Both superficial and full thickness burns are relatively easy to diagnose based on clinical observation. In between these two extremes are superficial-partial thickness and deep-partial thickness burns. These burns, while visually similar, differ dramatically in terms of clinical treatment and are known to progress in severity over time. The objective of this study was to determine the potential of spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) for noninvasively mapping quantitative changes in chromophore and optical properties that may be an indicative of burn wound severity. A controlled protocol of graded burn severity was developed and applied to 17 rats. SFDI data was acquired at multiple near-infrared wavelengths over a course of 3 h. Burn severity was verified using hematoxylin and eosin histology. From this study, we found that changes in water concentration (edema), deoxygenated hemoglobin concentration, and optical scattering (tissue denaturation) to be statistically significant at differentiating superficial partial-thickness burns from deep-partial thickness burns.

  3. Infections in critically ill burn patients.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, F; Mas, D; Rubio, M; Garcia-Hierro, P

    2016-04-01

    Severe burn patients are one subset of critically patients in which the burn injury increases the risk of infection, systemic inflammatory response and sepsis. The infections are usually related to devices and to the burn wound. Most infections, as in other critically ill patients, are preceded by colonization of the digestive tract and the preventative measures include selective digestive decontamination and hygienic measures. Early excision of deep burn wound and appropriate use of topical antimicrobials and dressings are considered of paramount importance in the treatment of burns. Severe burn patients usually have some level of systemic inflammation. The difficulty to differentiate inflammation from sepsis is relevant since therapy differs between patients with and those without sepsis. The delay in prescribing antimicrobials increases morbidity and mortality. Moreover, the widespread use of antibiotics for all such patients is likely to increase antibiotic resistance, and costs. Unfortunately the clinical usefulness of biomarkers for differential diagnosis between inflammation and sepsis has not been yet properly evaluated. Severe burn injury induces physiological response that significantly alters drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. These alterations impact antimicrobials distribution and excretion. Nevertheless the current available literature shows that there is a paucity of information to support routine dose recommendations. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  4. [The Nutrition Care of Severe Burn Patients].

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yu-Hsiu

    2016-02-01

    In addition to recent advances in burn patient care techniques such as maintaining warm circumambient temperature, the early excision of wounds, and the use of closed dressing, providing nutrition support through early feeding has proven instrumental in greatly increasing the survival rate of burn patients. Severe burns complicated by many factors initiate tremendous physiological stress that leads to postburn hypermetabolism that includes enhanced tissue catabolism, the loss of muscle mass, and decreases in the body's reservoirs of protein and energy. These problems have become the focus of burn therapy. Treating severe burns aims not only to enhance survival rates but also to restore normal bodily functions as completely as possible. Recent research evaluating the application of anabolic agents and immune-enhance formula for severe burns therapy has generated significant controversy. Inadequate caloric intake is one of the main differences among the related studies, with the effect of many special nutrients such as bran acid amides not taken into consideration. Therefore, considering the sufficiency of caloric and protein intake is critical in assessing effectiveness. Only after patients receive adequate calories and protein may the effect of special nutrients such as glutamine and supplements be evaluated effectively.

  5. Retrospective analysis of patients with burn injury treated in a burn center in Turkey during the Syrian civil war

    PubMed Central

    Yuce, Yucel; Acar, Hakan A.; Erkal, Kutlu H.; Arditi, Nur B.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To report the management of burn injuries that occured in the Syria civil war, which were referred to our burn center. Methods: Forty-three patients with burns, injured in the civil war in Syria and whom were referred to Dr. Lütfi Kırdar Kartal Educating and Training Hospital Burn Centre of İstanbul, Turkey between 2011-2015 were analyzed in a retrospective study. Results: Most of our patients were in major burn classification (93%; 40/43) and most of them had burns >15% total on body surface area. Most of them were admitted to our center late after first management at centers with improper conditions and in cultures of these patients unusual and resistant strains specific to the battlefield were produced. Conclusion: Immediate transfer of the patients from the scene of incidence to burn centers ensures early treatment, this factor may be effective on the outcome of these patients. PMID:28042637

  6. Adult survivors' lived experience of burns and post-burn health: A qualitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Thereasa E; Ogletree, Roberta J; Ratnapradipa, Dhitinut; Neumeister, Michael W

    2016-02-01

    The individual implications of major burns are likely to affect the full spectrum of patients' physical, emotional, psychological, social, environmental, spiritual and vocational health. Yet, not all of the post-burn health implications are inevitably negative. Utilizing a qualitative approach, this heuristic phenomenological study explores the experiences and perceptions early (ages 18-35) and midlife (ages 36-64) adults providing insight for how participants perceived their burns in relationship to their post-burn health. Participants were interviewed using semi-structured interview questions framed around seven domains of health. Interview recordings were transcribed verbatim then coded line by line, identifying dominant categories related to health. Categories were analyzed identifying shared themes among the study sample. Participants were Caucasian, seven males and one female. Mean age at time of interviews was 54.38 and 42.38 at time of burns. Mean time since burns occurred was 9.38 years with a minimum of (20%) total body surface area (TBSA) burns. Qualitative content analysis rendered three emergent health-related categories and associated themes that represented shared meanings within the participant sample. The category of "Physical Health" reflected the theme physical limitations, pain and sensitivity to temperature. Within the category of "Intellectual Health" were themes of insight, goal setting and self-efficacy, optimism and humor and within "Emotional Health" were the themes empathy and gratitude. By exploring subjective experiences and perceptions of health shared through dialog with experienced burned persons, there are opportunities to develop a more complete picture of how holistic health may be affected by major burns that in turn could support future long-term rehabilitative trajectories of early and midlife adult burn patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  7. Diagnosis of cutaneous thermal burn injuries by multispectral imaging analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anselmo, V. J.; Zawacki, B. E.

    1978-01-01

    Special photographic or television image analysis is shown to be a potentially useful technique to assist the physician in the early diagnosis of thermal burn injury. A background on the medical and physiological problems of burns is presented. The proposed methodology for burns diagnosis from both the theoretical and clinical points of view is discussed. The television/computer system constructed to accomplish this analysis is described, and the clinical results are discussed.

  8. Autonomic dysfunction and osteoporosis after electrical burn.

    PubMed

    Roshanzamir, Sharareh; Dabbaghmanesh, Mohammad Hossein; Dabbaghmanesh, Alireza; Nejati, Solmaz

    2016-05-01

    Several studies have shown the importance of the sympathetic nervous system in bone metabolism. There is an evidence of sympathetic skin response (SSR) impairment in electrical burn patients up to 2 years after their injuries. The acute phase of burn is accompanied by increased bone resorption. Whether the prolonged dysfunction of sympathetic nervous system may result in bone metabolism derangement even after the acute phase of electrical burn is the inspiring question for this study. And we tried to find correlation between SSR abnormality and areal bone mineral density (BMD) in electrical burn patients 6 months or more after the incidents. 42 electrical burn patients (≥6 months prior to study) who did not have a known joint or bone disease, history of neuropathy (central or peripheral), diabetes mellitus or consumption of any drug affecting the autonomic nervous system or evidence of neuropathy in nerve conduction study were recruited. We also gathered a control group of 50 healthy subjects (without electrical burn or the exclusion criteria). They went under dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and SSR study. Data were analyzed statistically with SPSS 16.0 making use of independent t-test and Pearson correlation coefficient. P<0.05 was considered significant statistically. Areal BMD was significantly lower in electrical burn patients than control group (P<0.001). SSR latency was significantly prolonged and its amplitude was significantly reduced in burn patients compared to control group (P<0.001). In burn patients there was an inverse correlation of areal BMD of lumbar vertebrae, left femur neck and total femur with SSR latency and a direct correlation of areal BMD with SSR amplitude. In control group there was just direct correlation of areal BMD of lumbar vertebrae and left femur neck with SSR amplitude. Electrical burn patients are at risk of reduced areal BMD long after their injuries. Sympathetic derangement and impaired SSR are correlated with reduction in

  9. Choosing Wood Burning Appliances

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information to assist consumers in choosing a wood burning appliance, including types of appliances, the differences between certified and non-certified appliances, and alternative wood heating options.

  10. Resuscitation burn card--a useful tool for burn injury assessment.

    PubMed

    Malic, C C; Karoo, R O S; Austin, O; Phipps, A

    2007-03-01

    It is well recognised that the initial assessment of body surface area affected by a burn is often over estimated in Accident and Emergency Departments. A useful aide-memoir in the acute setting is Wallace's "rule of nines" or using the patients' palmar surface of the hand, which approximates 1% of the total body surface area, as a method of assessment. Unfortunately, as with every system, limitations apply. Factors such as patient size and the interpretation of what is exactly the 'palmar surface' may significantly influence burn size estimations and subsequently fluid resuscitation. Our aim is to develop a simple, quick and easy reproducible method of calculating burn injuries for medical professionals in the acute setting. Worldwide, the dimensions of a credit card are standardized (8.5 cm x 5.3 cm), thus producing a surface area of 45 cm2. We created a resuscitation burn card (RBC) using these exact same proportions, upon which a modified body surface area (BSA) nomogram was printed. Knowing the patient height and weight, we calculated the surface area of the card as percentage of total body surface area (TBSA). On the opposite site of the RBC, a Lund and Browder chart was printed, as well as the Parkland formula and a formula to calculate paediatric burn fluid requirements. The plastic, flexible RBC conformed well to the body contour and was designed for single use. We used the resuscitation burn card in the initial assessment of simulated burns in a Regional Burn Centre and in an Accident and Emergency Department. The information present on the card was found to be clear and straightforward to use. The evaluation of burn extent was found to be more accurately measured than the estimation obtained without the RBC. The resuscitation burn card can be a valuable tool in the hands of less experienced medical professionals for the early assessment and fluid resuscitation of a burn.

  11. Burn-associated bloodstream infections in pediatric burn patients: Time distribution of etiologic agents.

    PubMed

    Devrim, İlker; Kara, Ahu; Düzgöl, Mine; Karkıner, Aytaç; Bayram, Nuri; Temir, Günyüz; Şencan, Arzu; Sorguç, Yelda; Gülfidan, Gamze; Hoşgör, Münevver

    2017-02-01

    Infections are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with burns in burn units. Bloodstream infections (BSIs) in patients with burns may result from burn wound infection, use of invasive devices such as central venous catheters, and translocation of the gastrointestinal flora. In this study, we investigated the distribution and antimicrobial drug resistance of causative pathogens in children with burns and the durational changes of microorganisms in the distribution of BSIs in children. This study was conducted at the Pediatric Burn Unit (PBU) of Dr. Behçet Uz Children Research and Training Hospital during the period of November 2008-April 2015. The study subjects were all the patients admitted to the PBU, in whom microorganisms were isolated at least from one of the cultures, including blood and catheter cultures. Gram-positive bacteria were the most common causative agents of BSI in patients with burns (66.4%), followed by gram-negative bacteria (22.1%) and fungi (11.5%). The median duration of development of BSIs caused by gram-positive bacteria from the time of burn was 5 days (ranging from 2 to 54 days of burn), which was significantly shorter than that of BSIs caused by gram-negative bacteria (12 days) and fungal pathogens (13 days). The etiologic agents of BSIs in children may differ from those in adults. Gram-negative drug-resistant bacteria such as multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii were important agents of BSI in patients with burns, especially in the long term; however, gram-positive bacteria should also be considered while deciding the antimicrobial therapy, especially in the early periods of burn. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  12. Randomized sham-controlled pilot trial of weekly electro-acupuncture for the prevention of taxane-induced peripheral neuropathy in women with early stage breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Greenlee, Heather; Crew, Katherine D; Capodice, Jillian; Awad, Danielle; Buono, Donna; Shi, Zaixing; Jeffres, Anne; Wyse, Sharon; Whitman, Wendy; Trivedi, Meghna S; Kalinsky, Kevin; Hershman, Dawn L

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the effect of electro-acupuncture (EA) as a non-pharmacological intervention to prevent or reduce chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) in breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy of taxane. Women with stage I-III breast cancer scheduled to receive taxane therapy were randomized to receive a standardized protocol of 12 true or sham EA (SEA) weekly treatments concurrent with taxane treatment. Subjects completed the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form (BPI-SF), Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Taxane neurotoxicity subscale (FACT-NTX), and other assessments at baseline and weeks 6, 12, and 16. A total of 180 subjects were screened, 63 enrolled and 48 completed week 16 assessments. Mean age was 50 with 25 % white, 25 % black, and 43 % Hispanic; 52 % had no prior chemotherapy. At week 12, both groups reported an increase in mean BPI-SF worst pain score, but no mean differences were found between groups (SEA 2.8 vs. EA 2.6, P = .86). By week 16, the SEA group returned to baseline, while the EA group continued to worsen (SEA 1.7 vs. EA 3.4, P = .03). The increase in BPI-SF worst pain score was 1.62 points higher in the EA group than in the SEA group at week 16 (P = .04). In a randomized, sham-controlled trial of EA for prevention of taxane-induced CIPN, there were no differences in pain or neuropathy between groups at week 12. Of concern, subjects on EA had a slower recovery than SEA subjects. Future studies should focus on EA for treatment as opposed to prevention of CIPN.

  13. Neospora caninum infection during early pregnancy in cattle: how the isolate influences infection dynamics, clinical outcome and peripheral and local immune responses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This work studies the influence of Neospora caninum intra-species diversity on abortion outcome, infection dynamics in terms of parasite dissemination and peripheral-local immune responses in pregnant cattle. Animals were intravenously inoculated at day 70 of pregnancy with 107 tachyzoites of two isolates showing marked differences in virulence in vitro and in pregnant mouse models: Nc-Spain7, a high virulence isolate, and Nc-Spain8, a low-to-moderate virulence isolate. After inoculation, pregnancy was monitored, and dams were culled when foetal death was detected. Foetal mortality occurred in all infected heifers between days 24 and 49 post-infection (pi), however, it was detected sooner in Nc-Spain7-infected animals (median day = 34) than those inoculated with Nc-Spain8 (median day = 41) with a trend towards significance (P < 0.11). Similar histological lesions were observed in placentomes and in most of the foetuses from the two infected groups. However, parasites were more frequently detected in the placenta and foetuses by PCR and in the foetal brain by immunohistochemistry in Nc-Spain7-infected animals. Specific antibodies were detected starting at day 13 post-infection in all infected cattle, with higher IgG levels in Nc-Spain7-infected group. IFN-γ and IL-4 profiles also varied between infected groups in PBMC stimulation assays. Infected animals showed significant increases in their cytokine mRNA levels (IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12p40 and TNF-α) in the caruncle at time of foetal death. Differences between the infected groups were also observed for cytokine profiles. These results demonstrate the influence of the N. caninum isolate on foetal death outcome, infection dynamics and immune responses in cattle. PMID:24479988

  14. Randomized sham controlled pilot trial of weekly electro-acupuncture for the prevention of taxane-induced peripheral neuropathy in women with early stage breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Greenlee, Heather; Crew, Katherine D.; Capodice, Jillian; Awad, Danielle; Buono, Donna; Shi, Zaixing; Jeffres, Anne; Wyse, Sharon; Whitman, Wendy; Trivedi, Meghna S.; Kalinsky, Kevin; Hershman, Dawn L.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To investigate the effect of electro-acupuncture (EA) as a non-pharmacological intervention to prevent or reduce chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) in breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy of taxane. METHODS Women with stage I-III breast cancer scheduled to receive taxane therapy were randomized to receive a standardized protocol of 12 true or sham EA (SEA) weekly treatments concurrent with taxane treatment. Subjects completed the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form (BPI-SF), Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Taxane neurotoxicity subscale (FACT-NTX), and other assessments at baseline and weeks 6, 12, and 16. RESULTS A total of 180 subjects were screened, 63 enrolled and 48 completed week 16 assessments. Mean age was 50 with 25% white, 25% black, and 43% Hispanic; 52% had no prior chemotherapy. At week 12, both groups reported an increase in mean BPI-SF worst pain score, but no mean differences were found between groups (SEA 2.8 vs. EA 2.6, p=.86). By week 16, the SEA group returned to baseline, while the EA group continued to worsen (mean=1.7 in SEA vs. 3.40 in EA, p=.03). The increase in BPI-SF worst pain score was 1.62 points higher in the EA group than in the SEA group at week 16 (p=.04). CONCLUSIONS In a randomized, sham-controlled trial of EA for prevention of taxane-induced CIPN, there were no differences in pain or neuropathy between groups at week 12. Of concern, subjects on EA had a slower recovery than SEA subjects. Future studies should focus on EA for treatment as opposed to prevention of CIPN. PMID:27013473

  15. Burns and military clothing.

    PubMed

    McLean, A D

    2001-02-01

    Burn injury is a ubiquitous threat in the military environment. The risks during combat are well recognised, but the handling of fuel, oil, munitions and other hot or flammable materials during peacetime deployment and training also imposes an inherent risk of accidental burn injury. Over the last hundred years, the burn threat in combat has ranged from nuclear weapons to small shoulder-launched missiles. Materials such as napalm and white phosphorus plainly present a risk of burn, but the threat extends to encompass personnel in vehicles attacked by anti-armour weapons, large missiles, fuel-air explosives and detonations/conflagrations on weapons platforms such as ships. Large numbers of burn casualties were caused at Pearl Harbor, in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Vietnam, during the Arab/Israeli Wars and in the Falkland Islands conflict. The threat from burns is unlikely to diminish, indeed new developments in weapons seek to exploit the vulnerability of the serviceman and servicewoman to burns. Clothing can be a barrier to some types of burn--both inherently in the properties of the material, but also by trapping air between clothing layers. Conversely, ignition of the clothing may exacerbate a burn. There is hearsay that burnt clothing products within a wound may complicate the clinical management, or that materials that melt (thermoplastic materials) should not be worn if there is a burn threat. This paper explores the incidence of burn injury, the mechanisms of heat transfer to bare skin and skin covered by materials, and the published evidence for the complication of wound management by materials. Even light-weight combat clothing can offer significant protection to skin from short duration flash burns; the most vulnerable areas are the parts of the body not covered--face and hands. Multilayered combat clothing can offer significant protection for short periods from engulfment by flames; lightweight tropical wear with few layers offers little protection. Under

  16. [REVIEW OF 30 YEARS OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF AN ENZYMATIC DEBRIDEMENT AGENT FOR BURNS].

    PubMed

    Krieger, Yuval; Shoham, Yaron; Bogdanov-Berezovsky, Alexander; Silberstein, Eldad; Sagi, Amiram; Levy, Avraham; Rosenberg, Nir; Rubin, Guy; Egozi, Dana; Ullman, Yehuda; Haik, Josef; Rosenberg, Lior

    2016-05-01

    Early removal of burn eschar is a cornerstone of burn care. The most commonly practiced eschar removal technique for deep burns in modern burn care is surgical debridement but this technique is associated with surgical burden and leads to unnecessary excision of viable tissue. To review 30 years of research and development of an enzymatic debridement agent for burns. Studies performed during the last 30 years are reviewed in this manuscript. Patients who underwent enzymatic debridement had a significantly shorter time to complete debridement, the surgical burden was significantly lower, hand burns did not necessitate escharotomy, and the long term results were favorable. Early enzymatic debridement leads to an efficient debridement, preservation of viable tissue, a reduction in surgical burden and favorable long term results. We believe early enzymatic debridement will lead to better care for burn victims and perhaps, even to a paradigm shift in the treatment of burns.

  17. Evaluation of burned aspen communities in Jackson Hole, Wyoming

    Treesearch

    Charles E. Kay

    2001-01-01

    Aspen has been declining in Jackson Hole for many years, a condition generally attributed to the fact that lightning fires have been aggressively suppressed since the early 1900s. It is also believed that burning will successfully regenerate aspen stands despite high elk numbers. To test this hypothesis, I evaluated 467 burned and 495 adjacent, unburned aspen stands at...

  18. Initial evaluation and management of the critical burn patient.

    PubMed

    Vivó, C; Galeiras, R; del Caz, Ma D P

    2016-01-01

    The major improvement in burn therapy is likely to focus on the early management of hemodynamic and respiratory failures in combination with an aggressive and early surgical excision and skin grafting for full-thickness burns. Immediate burn care by first care providers is important and can vastly alter outcomes, and it can significantly limit burn progression and depth. The goal of prehospital care should be to cease the burning process as well as prevent future complications and secondary injuries for burn shock. Identifying burn patients appropriate for immediate or subacute transfer is an important step in reducing morbidity and mortality. Delays in transport to Burn Unit should be minimized. The emergency management follows the principles of the Advanced Trauma Life Support Guidelines for assessment and stabilization of airway, breathing, circulation, disability, exposure and environment control. All patients with suspected inhalation injury must be removed from the enclosure as soon as possible, and immediately administer high-flow oxygen. Any patient with stridor, shortness of breath, facial burns, singed nasal hairs, cough, soot in the oral cavity, and history of being in a fire in an enclosed space should be strongly considered for early intubation. Fibroscopy may also be useful if airway damage is suspected and to assess known lung damage. Secondary evaluation following admission to the Burn Unit of a burned patient suffering a severe thermal injury includes continuation of respiratory support and management and treatment of inhalation injury, fluid resuscitation and cardiovascular stabilization, pain control and management of burn wound. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  19. Burn and Scald Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... ĵ ĵ Remove all clothing, diapers, jewelry and metal from the burned area. These can hide underlying burns and retain heat, which can increase skin damage. For more information and free fire-safety resources, visit www.usfa.fema.gov. Click ...

  20. Critical issues in burn care.

    PubMed

    Holmes, James H

    2008-01-01

    Burn care, especially for serious burn injuries, represents a considerable challenge for the healthcare system. The American Burn Association has established a number of strategies for the management of burn patients and dedicates its efforts and resources to promoting and supporting burn-related research, education, care, rehabilitation, and prevention, often in collaboration with other organizations. The American Burn Association has recommended that patients with serious burns be referred to a designated burn center, ie, a hospital outfitted with specialized personnel and equipment dedicated to burn care. Burn centers have been operational for over 50 years, but the complexity and costs of providing specialized burn care have given rise to a number of critical administrative and political issues. These include logistical limitations imposed by the uneven national distribution of burn centers and a potential shortage of burn beds, both during everyday conditions and in the event of a mass disaster. Burn surgeon shortages have also been identified, stemming, in part, from a lack of specialized burn care training opportunities. There is currently a lack of quality outcome data to support evidence-based recommendations for burn care, and burn care centers are compromised by problems obtaining reimbursement for the care of uninsured and publicly insured out-of-state burn patients. Initiatives are underway to maintain efficient burn care facilities that are fully funded, easily accessible, and most importantly, provide optimal, evidence-based care on a daily basis, and are well-equipped to handle a surge of patients during a disaster situation.

  1. Short-term effects of burn season on flowering phenology of savanna plants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pavlovic, N.B.; Leicht-Young, S. A.; Grundel, R.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the effect of season of burn on flowering phenology of groundlayer species, in the year following burns, in a mesic-sand Midwestern oak savanna. Burn treatments were fall, early-season, growing-season, late-season, and 1 or 5 years after a prior early-season wildfire. For these treatments, we compared the number of flowering stems and of flowers for species overall, for the 20 most prolifically flowering species, as well as for species grouped by flowering phenoperiods, and by growth form. Growing-season burn had a significant negative effect on number of flowering stems and total number of flowers. This effect occurred when either the burn occurred during the flowering season or during the season prior to the flowering phenoperiod. Tradescantia ohiensis showed expedited flowering and Phlox pilosa showed delayed flowering in response to early-season burning. Flowering of early shrubs was reduced by the previous fall and early-spring fires, while flowering of mid-season blooming shrubs was reduced by the early- and growing-season burns. Vaccinium and Gaylussacia, early-flowering shrubs, produced fewer flowers 1 year after than 5 years after an early-season burn. Arabis lyrata showed reduced flowering from the early-season burn. We also found four instances where the early-spring burn effect on flowering was more severe than the fall burn effect, suggesting that many frequent early-season burns may be deleterious to flowering and reproduction of some species. Burns occurring too frequently in the same season could negatively affect future flowering and reproduction of these plant species.

  2. Burning Mouth Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kamala, K A; Sankethguddad, S; Sujith, S G; Tantradi, Praveena

    2016-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is multifactorial in origin which is typically characterized by burning and painful sensation in an oral cavity demonstrating clinically normal mucosa. Although the cause of BMS is not known, a complex association of biological and psychological factors has been identified, suggesting the existence of a multifactorial etiology. As the symptom of oral burning is seen in various pathological conditions, it is essential for a clinician to be aware of how to differentiate between symptom of oral burning and BMS. An interdisciplinary and systematic approach is required for better patient management. The purpose of this study was to provide the practitioner with an understanding of the local, systemic, and psychosocial factors which may be responsible for oral burning associated with BMS, and review of treatment modalities, therefore providing a foundation for diagnosis and treatment of BMS.

  3. Burning Mouth Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kamala, KA; Sankethguddad, S; Sujith, SG; Tantradi, Praveena

    2016-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is multifactorial in origin which is typically characterized by burning and painful sensation in an oral cavity demonstrating clinically normal mucosa. Although the cause of BMS is not known, a complex association of biological and psychological factors has been identified, suggesting the existence of a multifactorial etiology. As the symptom of oral burning is seen in various pathological conditions, it is essential for a clinician to be aware of how to differentiate between symptom of oral burning and BMS. An interdisciplinary and systematic approach is required for better patient management. The purpose of this study was to provide the practitioner with an understanding of the local, systemic, and psychosocial factors which may be responsible for oral burning associated with BMS, and review of treatment modalities, therefore providing a foundation for diagnosis and treatment of BMS. PMID:26962284

  4. Peripheral thyroid hormone levels and hepatic thyroid hormone deiodinase gene expression in dairy heifers on the day of ovulation and during the early peri-implantation period.

    PubMed

    Meyerholz, Marie Margarete; Mense, Kirsten; Linden, Matthias; Raliou, Mariam; Sandra, Olivier; Schuberth, Hans-Joachim; Hoedemaker, Martina; Schmicke, Marion

    2016-09-08

    Before the onset of fetal thyroid hormone production, the transplacental delivery of maternal thyroid hormones is necessary for embryonic and fetal development. Therefore, the adaptation of maternal thyroid hormone metabolism may be important for pregnancy success and embryo survival. The aims of this study were to determine the thyroid hormone levels during the early peri-implantation period until day 18 and on the day of ovulation, to determine whether pregnancy success is dependent on a "normothyroid status" and to determine whether physiological adaptations in maternal thyroid hormone metabolism occur, which may be necessary to provide sufficient amounts of biologically active T3 to support early pregnancy. Therefore, blood samples obtained on the day of ovulation (day 0) and days 14 and 18 of the Holstein-Friesian heifers (n = 10) during the respective pregnant, non-pregnant and negative control cycles were analyzed for thyroid-stimulating-hormone (TSH), thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). Liver biopsies (day 18) from pregnant and respective non-pregnant heifers were analyzed for mRNA expression of the most abundant hepatic thyroid hormone deiodinase (DIO1) by real time qPCR. Although liver DIO1 mRNA expression did not differ between the pregnant and non-pregnant heifers on day 18, the serum concentrations of TSH and T3 on day 18 were higher in non-pregnant heifers compared to pregnant heifers (P < 0.05). Moreover, T3 decreased between day 0 and 18 in pregnant heifers (P < 0.001). In conclusion, no associations between thyroid hormone patterns on day 18 and pregnancy success were detected. During the early peri-implantation period, TSH and T3 may be affected by the pregnancy status because both TSH and T3 were lower on day 18 in pregnant heifers compared to non-pregnant dairy heifers. In further studies, the thyroid hormone axis should be evaluated throughout the entire gestation to confirm these data and identify other possible effects of

  5. [Myocardial depression in the burn patient].

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Esper, Raúl; Sánchez-Zúñiga, Martín de Jesús

    2006-01-01

    Myocardial depression and heart failure are frequent complications in critically ill burn patients. The physiopathology is complex and involves the activation of inflammatory pathways, ischemia-reperfusion, oxidative stress and endothelial lesion. Diagnosis should be made early by means of hemodynamic monitoring. Treatment is accomplished by inotropics that act on different pathways of the contractile function and immune response associated with antioxidants and allopurinol.

  6. Ecological Consequences of Shifting the Timing of Burning Tallgrass Prairie

    PubMed Central

    Towne, E. Gene; Craine, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    In the Kansas Flint Hills, grassland burning is conducted during a relatively narrow window because management recommendations for the past 40 years have been to burn only in late spring. Widespread prescribed burning within this restricted time frame frequently creates smoke management issues downwind. A potential remedy for the concentrated smoke production in late spring is to expand burning to times earlier in the year. Yet, previous research suggested that burning in winter or early spring reduces plant productivity and cattle weight gain while increasing the proportion of undesirable plant species. In order to better understand the ecological consequences of burning at different times of the year, plant production and species abundance were measured for 20 years on ungrazed watersheds burned annually in autumn, winter, or spring. We found that there were no significant differences in total grass production among the burns on either upland or lowland topographic positions, although spring burned watersheds had higher grass culm production and lower forb biomass than autumn and winter burned watersheds. Burning in autumn or winter broadened the window of grass productivity response to precipitation, which reduces susceptibility to mid-season drought. Burning in autumn or winter also increased the phenological range of species by promoting cool-season graminoids without a concomitant decrease in warm-season grasses, potentially widening the seasonal window of high-quality forage. Incorporating autumn and winter burns into the overall portfolio of tallgrass prairie management should increase the flexibility in managing grasslands, promote biodiversity, and minimize air quality issues caused by en masse late-spring burning with little negative consequences for cattle production. PMID:25077487

  7. Ecological consequences of shifting the timing of burning tallgrass prairie.

    PubMed

    Towne, E Gene; Craine, Joseph M

    2014-01-01

    In the Kansas Flint Hills, grassland burning is conducted during a relatively narrow window because management recommendations for the past 40 years have been to burn only in late spring. Widespread prescribed burning within this restricted time frame frequently creates smoke management issues downwind. A potential remedy for the concentrated smoke production in late spring is to expand burning to times earlier in the year. Yet, previous research suggested that burning in winter or early spring reduces plant productivity and cattle weight gain while increasing the proportion of undesirable plant species. In order to better understand the ecological consequences of burning at different times of the year, plant production and species abundance were measured for 20 years on ungrazed watersheds burned annually in autumn, winter, or spring. We found that there were no significant differences in total grass production among the burns on either upland or lowland topographic positions, although spring burned watersheds had higher grass culm production and lower forb biomass than autumn and winter burned watersheds. Burning in autumn or winter broadened the window of grass productivity response to precipitation, which reduces susceptibility to mid-season drought. Burning in autumn or winter also increased the phenological range of species by promoting cool-season graminoids without a concomitant decrease in warm-season grasses, potentially widening the seasonal window of high-quality forage. Incorporating autumn and winter burns into the overall portfolio of tallgrass prairie management should increase the flexibility in managing grasslands, promote biodiversity, and minimize air quality issues caused by en masse late-spring burning with little negative consequences for cattle production.

  8. [Transfusional requirements for escharectomy in burned children].

    PubMed

    Julia, Analía R; Basílico, Hugo; Magaldi, Gustavo; Demirdjian, Graciela

    2010-02-01

    Early excision has considerably improved outcome in extensive burns, but massive resections usually mean copious bleeding that must be conveniently corrected. The purpose of this study was to measure blood component use during escharectomies in children. All pediatric patients with acute burns excised at the Burn Unit of the Hospital Garrahan during one year were included. Volume of blood component used during and immediately after surgery was analyzed and related to percent excised, time post-burn, and the coexistence of infection and autograft at the time of excision. Ninety-four surgeries in 51 children aged 0-14 years with total burned body surface areas of 5-80% who underwent resections of 3-70% were studied. Total blood use (intra + post-operatively) was 2.07 ml/kg/%excised for red blood cells (60% during surgery) and 0.7 ml/kg/% excised for plasma. Only 12% of patients required platelet transfusion. There was no significant requirement variation with the existence of infection, grafting or time post-burn. Approximately 2 ml/kg/% excised of red blood cells (2/3 for surgery) and 1 ml/kg/% excised of plasma are needed for escharectomies in children. The need for platelets must be judged considering the individual patient.

  9. One-stop microvascular screening service: an effective model for the early detection of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and the high-risk foot.

    PubMed

    Binns-Hall, O; Selvarajah, D; Sanger, D; Walker, J; Scott, A; Tesfaye, S

    2018-04-02

    To evaluate the feasibility of a one-stop microvascular screening service for the early diagnosis of diabetic distal symmetrical polyneuropathy, painful distal symmetrical polyneuropathy and the at-risk diabetic foot. People with diabetes attending retinal screening in hospital and community settings had their feet examined by a podiatrist. Assessment included: Toronto Clinical Neuropathy Score evaluation; a 10-g monofilament test; and two validated, objective and quick measures of neuropathy obtained using the point-of-care devices 'DPN-Check', a hand-held device that measures sural nerve conduction velocity and amplitude, and 'Sudoscan', a device that measures sudomotor function. The diagnostic utility of these devices was assessed against the Toronto Clinical Neuropathy Score as the 'gold standard'. A total of 236 consecutive people attending the retinal screening service, 18.9% of whom had never previously had their feet examined, were evaluated. The prevalence of distal symmetrical polyneuropathy, assessed using the Toronto Clinical Neuropathy Score, was 30.9%, and was underestimated by 10-g monofilament test (14.4%). The prevalence of distal symmetrical polyneuropathy using DPN-check was 51.5% (84.3% sensitivity, 68.3% specificity), 38.2% using Sudoscan foot electrochemical skin conductance (77.4% sensitivity, 68.3% specificity), and 61.9% using abnormality in either of the results (93.2% sensitivity, 52.8% specificity). The results of both devices correlated with Toronto Clinical Neuropathy Score (P<0.001). A new diagnosis of painful distal symmetrical polyneuropathy was made in 59 participants (25%), and 56.6% had moderate- or high-risk foot. Participants rated the service very highly. Combined, eye, foot and renal screening is feasible, has a high uptake, reduces clinic visits, and identifies painful distal symmetrical polyneuropathy and the at-risk foot. Combined large- and small-nerve-fibre assessment using non-invasive, quantitative and quick point

  10. Customized laboratory TLR4 and TLR2 detection method from peripheral human blood for early detection of doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Pop-Moldovan, A L; Trofenciuc, N-M; Dărăbanţiu, D A; Precup, C; Branea, H; Christodorescu, R; Puşchiţă, M

    2017-05-01

    Cancer treatments can have significant cardiovascular adverse effects that can cause cardiomyopathy and heart failure with reduced survival benefit and considerable decrease in the use of antineoplastic therapy. The purpose of this study is to assess the role of TLR2 and TLR4 gene expression as an early marker for the risk of doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy in correlation with early diastolic dysfunction in patients treated with doxorubicin. Our study included 25 consecutive patients who received treatment with doxorubicin for hematological malignancies (leukemia, lymphomas or multiple myeloma), aged 18-65 years, with a survival probability>6 months and with left ventricular ejection fraction>50%. Exclusion criteria consisted of the following: previous anthracycline therapy, previous radiotherapy, history of heart failure or chronic renal failure, atrial fibrillation, and pregnancy. In all patients, in fasting state, a blood sample was drawn for the assessment of TLR2 and TLR4 gene expression. Gene expression was assessed by quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) using blood collection, RNA isolation, cDNA reverse transcription, qRT-PCR and quantification of the relative expression. At enrollment, all patients were evaluated clinically; an ECG and an echocardiography were performed. The average amount of gene expression units was 0.113 for TLR4 (range 0.059-0.753) and 0.218 for TLR2 (range 0.046-0.269). The mean mRNA extracted quantity was 113 571 ng/μl. As for the diastolic function parameters, criteria for diastolic dysfunction were present after 6 months in 16 patients (64%). In these patients, the mean values for TLR4 were 0.1198625 and for TLR2 were 0.16454 gene expression units. As for the diastolic function parameters, criteria for diastolic dysfunction were present after 6 months in 16 patients (64%). In these patients, the mean value for TLR2 was 0.30±0.19 and for TLR4 was 0.15±0.04. The corresponding values for the patients who did not

  11. Increasing the utility of the Functional Assessment for Burns Score: Not just for major burns.

    PubMed

    Smailes, Sarah T; Engelsman, Kayleen; Rodgers, Louise; Upson, Clara

    2016-02-01

    The Functional Assessment for Burns (FAB) score is established as an objective measure of physical function that predicts discharge outcome in adult patients with major burn. However, its validity in patients with minor and moderate burn is unknown. This is a multi-centre evaluation of the predictive validity of the FAB score for discharge outcome in adult inpatients with minor and moderate burns. FAB assessments were undertaken within 48 h of admission to (FAB 1), and within 48 h of discharge (FAB 2) from burn wards in 115 patients. Median age was 45 years and median burn size 4%. There were significant improvements in the patients' FAB scores (p<0.0001), 98 patients were discharged home (no social care) and 17 patients discharged to further inpatient rehabilitation or home with social care. FAB 1 score (≤ 14) is strongly associated with discharge to inpatient rehabilitation or home with social care (p=0.0001) and as such can be used to facilitate early discharge planning. FAB 2 (≤ 30) independently predicts discharge outcome to inpatient rehabilitation or home with social care (p<0.0001), increasing its utility to patients with minor and moderate burns. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  12. [Cement burns: a 10-year retrospective study in our burn unit. About 55 cases].

    PubMed

    Besset, M; Quignon, R; Dhennin, C; Yassine, A; Penaud, A

    2014-06-01

    Although cement burns represents only a small percentage of admissions to burn centers, their diagnosis and treatment are specific. Our retrospective study concerns all patients treated for cement burns in our unit between 1999 and 2009. This is the largest series described. Fifty-five patients, aged from 23 to 63, were treated in our burn unit from 1999 to 2009. A review of medical and socioeconomic data was made from computer data files. This population is predominantly male, young and active. These burns occurred mainly in a domestic accident situation (78.2%). Burns were limited but deep and concerned especially lower limbs. The average duration of treatment was 39days. Forty-four patients were treated medically. The mean duration of sick live for these patients was 63 days. It was only of 21 days for those treated surgically. Aesthetic and functional sequelae were present in 88% of medically treated patients and in 18% of patients treated surgically. This study demonstrates that early surgical diagnosis and the coverage (care) of these burns allows to limit the socioeconomic echo and to reduce the risk of after-effects for this population of patients mainly young and active. The necessity of strengthening the precautionary measures with these users who are informed enough about the risks incurred during the misuse of the cement is also a reality. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. A 10-year experience with major burns from a non-burn intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Ibarra Estrada, Miguel Ángel; Chávez Peña, Quetzalcóatl; García Guardado, Dante Ismael; López Pulgarín, José Arnulfo; Aguirre Avalos, Guadalupe; Corona Jiménez, Federico

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to review clinical data and outcomes of patients with burns in a Mexican non-burn intensive care unit (ICU). We did a retrospective analysis of our single-centre database of burn patients admitted to the ICU in the Hospital Civil Fray Antonio Alcalde (University Hospital). The sample was divided for analysis into two groups according to the outcome 'death' or 'discharge' from ICU. Overall mortality was 58.2%, without a decreasing trend in mortality rates through the years. We identified the presence of third-degree burns (odds ratio (OR) 1.5, p=0.003), and >49% total burned surface area (TBSA; OR 3.3, p≤0.001) was associated with mortality. Mean age was higher in deceased patients (38.2 years vs. 31.3 years, p=0.003) as was the TBSA (62.8% vs. 36.4%, p≤0.001). At multivariate analysis, inhalation injury was not associated with increased mortality, but it was with more mechanical ventilation days. Early surgical debridement/cleansing was performed in most patients; however, the mean of the procedures was 1.7 per patient in both groups. We identified significant factors associated with mortality. These variables and prognosis from non-burn ICUs differ broadly compared with burn intensive care units (BICUs); thus, more structured, multidisciplinary and specialised treatment strategies are still needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  14. Early intraocular pressure change after peripheral iridotomy with ultralow fluence pattern scanning laser and Nd:YAG laser in primary angle-closure suspect: Kowloon East Pattern Scanning Laser Study Report No. 3.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jeffrey Chi Wang; Choy, Bonnie Nga Kwan; Chan, Orlando Chia Chieh; Li, Kenneth Kai Wang

    2018-02-01

    Our purpose was to assess the early intraocular pressure (IOP) changes of ultralow fluence laser iridotomy using pattern scanning laser followed by neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-gamet (Nd:YAG) laser. This is a prospective interventional study. Thirty-three eyes of 33 adult Chinese primary angle-closure suspect subjects were recruited for prophylactic laser peripheral iridotomy. Sequential laser peripheral iridotomy was performed using pattern scanning laser followed by Nd:YAG laser. Visual acuity (VA) and IOP were measured before treatment, at 1 h, 1 day, 1 week, 1 month, 3 months and 6 months after laser. Laser energy used and complications were documented. Corneal endothelial cell count was examined at baseline and 6 months. Patency of the iridotomy was assessed at each follow-up visit. All subjects achieved patent iridotomy in a single session. The mean energy used was 0.335+/-0.088 J for the pattern scanning laser, and 4.767+/-5.780 mJ for the Nd:YAG laser. The total mean energy was 0.339+/-0.089 J. None of the eyes developed a clinically significant IOP spike (≥ 8 mmHg) at 1 h and 1 day after laser use. Only four eyes developed higher IOP at 1 h and all were ≤3 mmHg compared to baseline. The mean IOP was 13.8+/-2.5 mmHg at 1 h and 11.5+/-2.2 mmHg at 1 day, both were significantly lower than baseline (15.8+/-2.1 mmHg) (P < 0.001). Mean VA (logMAR) was similar at 1 h post laser compared to baseline (0.23 vs 0.26). There was also no statistically significant difference in mean VA at other follow-up visits compared to baseline. Peripheral iridotomy closure was encountered in two (6.1%) eyes, one at 1 month and another at 6 months follow-up. There were no complications including hyphema, peripheral anterior synechia formation nor prolonged inflammation throughout the follow-up period. There was no significant loss in corneal endothelial cell counts at 6 months (2255+/-490) compared to baseline (2303+/-386) (P = 0.347). Sequential

  15. Delayed prescribed burning in a seedling and sapling Longleaf Pine plantation in Louisiana

    Treesearch

    James D. Haywood

    2002-01-01

    To examine the effects of delaying prescribed burning for several years, I initiated five treatments in a 5- to 6-year-old longleaf pine stand: a check of no control; biennial hardwood control by directed chemical application; and biennial burning in either early March, May, or July. After the initial burns, longleaf pine survival decreased from 82 percent in February...

  16. Improving burn care and preventing burns by establishing a burn database in Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Fuzaylov, Gennadiy; Murthy, Sushila; Dunaev, Alexander; Savchyn, Vasyl; Knittel, Justin; Zabolotina, Olga; Dylewski, Maggie L; Driscoll, Daniel N

    2014-08-01

    Burns are a challenge for trauma care and a contribution to the surgical burden. The former Soviet republic of Ukraine has a foundation for burn care; however data concerning burns in Ukraine has historically been scant. The objective of this paper was to compare a new burn database to identify problems and implement improvements in burn care and prevention in this country. Retrospective analyses of demographic and clinical data of burn patients including Tukey's post hoc test, analysis of variance, and chi square analyses, and Fisher's exact test were used. Data were compared to the American Burn Association (ABA) burn repository. This study included 1752 thermally injured patients treated in 20 hospitals including Specialized Burn Unit in Municipal Hospital #8 Lviv, Lviv province in Ukraine. Scald burns were the primary etiology of burns injuries (70%) and burns were more common among children less than five years of age (34%). Length of stay, mechanical ventilation use, infection rates, and morbidity increased with greater burn size. Mortality was significantly related to burn size, inhalation injury, age, and length of stay. Wound infections were associated with burn size and older age. Compared to ABA data, Ukrainian patients had double the length of stay and a higher rate of wound infections (16% vs. 2.4%). We created one of the first burn databases from a region of the former Soviet Union in an effort to bring attention to burn injury and improve burn care. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  17. Transfer time to a specialist burn service and influence on burn mortality in Australia and New Zealand: A multi-centre, hospital based retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, T John; Edgar, Dale W; Phillips, Michael; Cameron, Peter; Cleland, Heather; Wood, Fiona M

    2015-06-01

    In Australia and New Zealand (ANZ), health care is provided for ∼26 million people dispersed across the eight million square kilometres of the two countries. Providing optimal care prior to and during transfer across such vast distances is challenging. Lengthening the time taken to definitive burn care has a negative impact on burn outcome. The aims of this study were to determine if transfer time and admission pathway influenced burn mortality and to identify the factors predicting burn mortality in ANZ. The study included all adult burn patient admission data from 15 of 17 burn services submitted to the Australian and New Zealand Burn Association bi-national registry (2010-2012). Multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to address the study aims. Of the 2892 patients, 69 (2.4%) died following burn. Time to admission and direct admission to a burn centre did not independently influence burn mortality except when patients with inhalation injury took >16 h to transfer to definitive care. The risk of death was increased 5.7 times in the presence of inhalation injury. Burn size and age amplified the risk of death while gender did not. In ANZ, pre-hospital transport systems and peripheral hospital stabilisation were not associated with an increased risk of death due to burn except when inhalation injury was present. The results of this study indicate that burn patients with inhalation injury should be stabilised and transferred to a burn service within 16 h of burn. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  18. Treating and Preventing Burns

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat at home. Safeguard Your Family from Fires, Scalding & Burns Install smoke detectors in hallways outside ... than alarms with loud beeping tones. Practice home fire drills . Make sure every family member and others ...

  19. Burn Wise Awareness Kit

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Health and safety outreach materials in the form of an awareness kit. Designed specifically for state, local, and tribal air agencies working to reduce wood smoke pollution, it includes best burn tips, social media m

  20. Burns Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Over Navigation Links National Institute of General Medical Sciences Site Map Staff Search My Order Search the ... NIGMS Website Research Funding Research Training News & Meetings Science Education About NIGMS NIGMS Home > Science Education > Burns ...

  1. New Fashioned Book Burning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Robert

    1997-01-01

    Reports on results of a teacher's experiment in book burning as a lesson accompanying the teaching of Ray Bradbury's "Fahrenheit 451." Discusses student reactions and the purpose of or justification for the experimental lesson. (TB)

  2. Burns at KCMC: epidemiology, presentation, management and treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Ringo, Y; Chilonga, K

    2014-08-01

    About 90% of the global burden of burns occurs in the low and middle income countries. In Africa it is estimated that between 17,000 and 30,000 children under five die each year due to burns. In Tanzania there are no specialized burn centers. Burn patients are often managed in the general surgical wards in most hospitals. Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre is one of the four tertiary referral hospitals in Tanzania. This study aimed to review the epidemiology presentation management and outcome of burn patients in this challenging environment. A cross-sectional prospective study involving 41 patients was undertaken from October 2011 to April 2012. 65.9% were males. The largest age group was below 5 years (36.6%). 19.5% were epileptic. More than half of the burns were due to open flame. 80.5% had second degree burns. 56.1% had a BSA of 15% or less and 56.1% had an APACHE score of 10 or less. It was found that 73.2% of burns occurred at home. The commonest prehospital first aid applied was honey. Only 41.5% arrived in hospital within the first 24h after burn. Among the 14.6% who had skin grafting, none had early excision of burn wound. 53.7% developed wound sepsis while 24.4% developed contractures. The mortality rate was 26.8%. Children under five are the worst affected by burns. Most patients had second degree burn wounds. Inappropriate management of the burn wound started just after injury and continued even in hospital. Mortality and complication rates are high. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  3. Epidemiology and financial implications of self-inflicted burns.

    PubMed

    George, S; Javed, M; Hemington-Gorse, S; Wilson-Jones, N

    2016-02-01

    The cost of the treatment of burns is high especially in self-inflicted burns with prolonged treatment. We performed a retrospective review of the self-inflicted burns at our regional burns centre to determine the costs incurred in their management and to identify factors which could reduce the financial burden in the future. The data was collected retrospectively of all the inpatient and outpatient self-inflicted burns presenting to our regional burns centre in the year 2011. Twenty one patients (out of a total of 870 patients) presented with self-inflicted burns to our centre in 2011. Five (23.8%) were major burns with an average of 53.2% Total Body Surface Area (TBSA) and 16 (76.2%) were minor burns with an average of 0.5% TBSA. 11 (52.4%) patients had flame burns including 4 self-immolation burns. The mortality rate was 4.8% (n=1). Five (23.8%) patients underwent surgical treatment. Seven (33.3%) patients were treated in intensive care and with average stay of 46.85 days. Critical care and theatre attendances made up most of the costs with average ICU stay per patient calculated at £313,131/day. The total cost of all 21 patients was £1,581,856. Burns are preventable injuries, early detection and intervention in patients with propensity to self-inflict burns can possibly reduce the costs of treatment in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  4. [Advances in the research of pressure therapy for pediatric burn patients with facial scar].

    PubMed

    Wei, Y T; Fu, J F; Li-Tsang, Z H P

    2017-05-20

    Facial scar and deformation caused by burn injury severely affect physical and psychological well-being of pediatric burn patients, which needs medical workers and pediatric burn patients' family members to pay much attention to and to perform early rehabilitation treatment. Pressure therapy is an important rehabilitative strategy for pediatric burn patients with facial scar, mainly including wearing headgears and transparent pressure facemasks, which have their own features. To achieve better treatment results, pressure therapy should be chosen according to specific condition of pediatric burn patients and combined with other assistant therapies. Successful rehabilitation for pediatric burn patients relies on cooperation of both family members of pediatric burn patients and society. Rehabilitation knowledge should be provided to parents of pediatric burn patients to acquire their full support and cooperation in order to achieve best therapeutic effects and ultimately to rebuild physical and psychological well-being of pediatric burn patients.

  5. CD3+/CD19+-depleted grafts in HLA-matched allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation lead to early NK cell cytolytic responses and reduced inhibitory activity of NKG2A.

    PubMed

    Eissens, D N; Schaap, N P M; Preijers, F W M B; Dolstra, H; van Cranenbroek, B; Schattenberg, A V M; Joosten, I; van der Meer, A

    2010-03-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have an important function in the anti-tumor response early after stem cell transplantation (SCT). As part of a prospective randomized phase III study, directly comparing the use of CD3(+)/CD19(+)-depleted peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) harvests with CD34(+)-selected PBSC harvests in allogeneic human leukocyte antigen-matched SCT, we here show that the use of CD3(+)/CD19(+)-depleted PBSC grafts leads to early NK cell repopulation and reconstitution of the CD56(dim) and CD56(bright) NK cell subsets, with concomitant high cytolytic capacity. In the CD34 group, this process took significantly longer. Moreover, in the CD3/19 group after reconstitution, a higher percentage of killer immunoglobulin-like receptor-positive NK cells was found. Although similar percentages of CD94-positive NK cells were found in both groups, in the CD34 group, almost all expressed the inhibitory CD94:NKG2A complex, whereas in the CD3/19 group, the inhibitory CD94:NKG2A and the activating CD94:NKG2C complex were equally distributed. This preferential development of NKG2C-expressing NK cells in the CD3/19 group was paralleled by a loss of NKG2A-mediated inhibition of NK cell degranulation. These results show that the use of CD3(+)/CD19(+)-depleted grafts facilitates strong NK cell cytolytic responses directly after SCT, and the rapid emergence of an NK cell receptor phenotype that is more prone to activation.

  6. Smartphone applications in burns.

    PubMed

    Wurzer, Paul; Parvizi, Daryousch; Lumenta, David B; Giretzlehner, Michael; Branski, Ludwik K; Finnerty, Celeste C; Herndon, David N; Tuca, Alexandru; Rappl, Thomas; Smolle, Christian; Kamolz, Lars P

    2015-08-01

    Since the introduction of applications (apps) for smartphones, the popularity of medical apps has been rising. The aim of this review was to demonstrate the current availability of apps related to burns on Google's Android and Apple's iOS store as well as to include a review of their developers, features, and costs. A systematic online review of Google Play Store and Apple's App Store was performed by using the following search terms: "burn," "burns," "thermal," and the German word "Verbrennung." All apps that were programmed for use as medical apps for burns were included. The review was performed from 25 February until 1 March 2014. A closer look at the free and paid calculation apps including a standardized patient was performed. Four types of apps were identified: calculators, information apps, book/journal apps, and games. In Google Play Store, 31 apps were related to burns, of which 20 were calculation apps (eight for estimating the total body surface area (TBSA) and nine for total fluid requirement (TFR)). In Apple's App Store, under the category of medicine, 39 apps were related to burns, of which 21 were calculation apps (19 for estimating the TBSA and 17 for calculating the TFR). In 19 out of 32 available calculation apps, our study showed a correlation of the calculated TFR compared to our standardized patient. The review demonstrated that many apps for medical burns are available in both common app stores. Even free available calculation apps may provide a more objective and reproducible procedure compared to manual/subjective estimations, although there is still a lack of data security especially in personal data entered in calculation apps. Further clinical studies including smartphone apps for burns should be performed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  7. Burning by prescription in chaparral

    Treesearch

    Lisle R. Green

    1981-01-01

    Prescribed burning is frequently suggested for reducing conflagration costs in chaparral. Preparation for a prescribed burn includes environmental impact reports, approval by higher levels of authority, and a burn plan. After objectives are stated, the prescription can be written. Elements of the burn prescription reflect fuel, weather, and other factors that determine...

  8. Prescribed Burning and Direct-Seeding Old Clearcuts in the Piedmont

    Treesearch

    W. Henry McNab

    1976-01-01

    Logging slash 14 to 26 months old was burned at different seasons of the year in the Georgia Piedmont.The following winter, loblolly pine seeds were broadcast 1 to 13 months after burning. Burning 1 -year-old slash during early- or mid-growing season resulted in better stocking, greater height growth, and more effective hardwood control than burning during the dorm ant...

  9. Harborview Burns – 1974 to 2009

    PubMed Central

    Engrav, Loren H.; Heimbach, David M.; Rivara, Frederick P.; Kerr, Kathleen F.; Osler, Turner; Pham, Tam N.; Sharar, Sam R.; Esselman, Peter C.; Bulger, Eileen M.; Carrougher, Gretchen J.; Honari, Shari; Gibran, Nicole S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Burn demographics, prevention and care have changed considerably since the 1970s. The objectives were to 1) identify new and confirm previously described changes, 2) make comparisons to the American Burn Association National Burn Repository, 3) determine when the administration of fluids in excess of the Baxter formula began and to identify potential causes, and 4) model mortality over time, during a 36-year period (1974–2009) at the Harborview Burn Center in Seattle, WA, USA. Methods and Findings 14,266 consecutive admissions were analyzed in five-year periods and many parameters compared to the National Burn Repository. Fluid resuscitation was compared in five-year periods from 1974 to 2009. Mortality was modeled with the rBaux model. Many changes are highlighted at the end of the manuscript including 1) the large increase in numbers of total and short-stay admissions, 2) the decline in numbers of large burn injuries, 3) that unadjusted case fatality declined to the mid-1980s but has changed little during the past two decades, 4) that race/ethnicity and payer status disparity exists, and 5) that the trajectory to death changed with fewer deaths occurring after seven days post-injury. Administration of fluids in excess of the Baxter formula during resuscitation of uncomplicated injuries was evident at least by the early 1990s and has continued to the present; the cause is likely multifactorial but pre-hospital fluids, prophylactic tracheal intubation and opioids may be involved. Conclusions 1) The dramatic changes include the rise in short-stay admissions; as a result, the model of burn care practiced since the 1970s is still required but is no longer sufficient. 2) Fluid administration in excess of the Baxter formula with uncomplicated injuries began at least two decades ago. 3) Unadjusted case fatality declined to ∼6% in the mid-1980s and changed little since then. The rBaux mortality model is quite accurate. PMID:22792216

  10. [Burn injuries in children].

    PubMed

    Brudvik, Christina; Hoem, Eli Leirdal; Luggenes, Brita; Vindenes, Hallvard

    2011-01-07

    Burn injuries in children may cause permanent harm. This study reports data on incidence, injury mechanisms and products that cause burn injuries (in the period 01.01.07-31.12.07) and compares findings with those from previous studies (in 1989 and 1998). Semi-structured questionnaires were filled in by patients or next-of-kin and health workers at Bergen Accident and Emergency Department, casualty centres in three municipalities in western Norway (Fana, Åsane and Loddefjord) and at the National Burns Centre, Haukeland University Hospital. Missing data were retrieved retrospectively from medical records. We recorded 142 children with burn injuries; 35% were boys under two years of age. The annual incidence was the same as earlier; 6.6 per 1,000 under five years and 3.1 per 1,000 children under 15 years living in the community of Bergen. Contact injuries and scalds were most common and were caused by contact with ovens, stoves and hot food or liquids. Most children (93%) had less severe burns; 6% (9) were hospitalized (four of them had a non-western background). Almost 95% were given first aid by cooling. Children under two years, especially boys, are most at risk of burn injuries. Ovens were the cause more often now than before. The incidence has been the same the last 20 years and is the same as that in Trondheim ten years ago. The fact that the small city, Harstad, (northern Norway) attained substantially less injuries after the introduction of preventive actions indicates that such actions are needed to reduce the number of burn injuries among children.

  11. Differential regulation of innate immune cytokine production through pharmacological activation of Nuclear Factor-Erythroid-2-Related Factor 2 (NRF2) in burn patient immune cells and monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Stepp, Wesley; Sjeklocha, Lucas; Long, Clayton; Riley, Caitlin; Callahan, James; Sanchez, Yolanda; Gough, Peter; Knowlin, Laquanda; van Duin, David; Ortiz-Pujols, Shiara; Jones, Samuel; Maile, Robert; Hong, Zhi; Berger, Scott; Cairns, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Burn patients suffer from immunological dysfunction for which there are currently no successful interventions. Similar to previous observations, we find that burn shock patients (≥15% Total Burn Surface Area (TBSA) injury) have elevated levels of the innate immune cytokines Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1)/CC-motif Chemokine Ligand 2(CCL2) early after hospital admission (0–48 Hours Post-hospital Admission (HPA). Functional immune assays with patient Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) revealed that burn shock patients (≥15% TBSA) produced elevated levels of MCP-1/CCL2 after innate immune stimulation ex vivo relative to mild burn patients. Interestingly, treatment of patient PBMCs with the Nuclear Factor-Erythroid-2-Related Factor 2 (NRF2) agonist, CDDO-Me(bardoxolone methyl), reduced MCP-1 production but not IL-6 or Interleukin-10 (IL-10) secretion. In enriched monocytes from healthy donors, CDDO-Me(bardoxolone methyl) also reduced LPS-induced MCP1/CCL2 production but did not alter IL-6 or IL-10 secretion. Similar immunomodulatory effects were observed with Compound 7, which activates the NRF2 pathway through a different and non-covalent Mechanism Of Action (MOA). Hence, our findings with CDDO-Me(bardoxolone methyl) and Compound 7 are likely to reflect a generalizable aspect of NRF2 activation. These observed effects were not specific to LPS-induced immune responses, as NRF2 activation also reduced MCP-1/CCL2 production after stimulation with IL-6. Pharmacological NRF2 activation reduced Mcp-1/Ccl2 transcript accumulation without inhibiting either Il-6 or Il-10 transcript levels. Hence, we describe a novel aspect of NRF2 activation that may contribute to the beneficial effects of NRF2 agonists during disease. Our work also demonstrates that the NRF2 pathway is retained and can be modulated to regulate important immunomodulatory functions in burn patient immune cells. PMID:28886135

  12. Differential regulation of innate immune cytokine production through pharmacological activation of Nuclear Factor-Erythroid-2-Related Factor 2 (NRF2) in burn patient immune cells and monocytes.

    PubMed

    Eitas, Timothy K; Stepp, Wesley H; Sjeklocha, Lucas; Long, Clayton V; Riley, Caitlin; Callahan, James; Sanchez, Yolanda; Gough, Peter; Knowlin, Laquanda; van Duin, David; Ortiz-Pujols, Shiara; Jones, Samuel W; Maile, Robert; Hong, Zhi; Berger, Scott; Cairns, Bruce A

    2017-01-01

    Burn patients suffer from immunological dysfunction for which there are currently no successful interventions. Similar to previous observations, we find that burn shock patients (≥15% Total Burn Surface Area (TBSA) injury) have elevated levels of the innate immune cytokines Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1)/CC-motif Chemokine Ligand 2(CCL2) early after hospital admission (0-48 Hours Post-hospital Admission (HPA). Functional immune assays with patient Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) revealed that burn shock patients (≥15% TBSA) produced elevated levels of MCP-1/CCL2 after innate immune stimulation ex vivo relative to mild burn patients. Interestingly, treatment of patient PBMCs with the Nuclear Factor-Erythroid-2-Related Factor 2 (NRF2) agonist, CDDO-Me(bardoxolone methyl), reduced MCP-1 production but not IL-6 or Interleukin-10 (IL-10) secretion. In enriched monocytes from healthy donors, CDDO-Me(bardoxolone methyl) also reduced LPS-induced MCP1/CCL2 production but did not alter IL-6 or IL-10 secretion. Similar immunomodulatory effects were observed with Compound 7, which activates the NRF2 pathway through a different and non-covalent Mechanism Of Action (MOA). Hence, our findings with CDDO-Me(bardoxolone methyl) and Compound 7 are likely to reflect a generalizable aspect of NRF2 activation. These observed effects were not specific to LPS-induced immune responses, as NRF2 activation also reduced MCP-1/CCL2 production after stimulation with IL-6. Pharmacological NRF2 activation reduced Mcp-1/Ccl2 transcript accumulation without inhibiting either Il-6 or Il-10 transcript levels. Hence, we describe a novel aspect of NRF2 activation that may contribute to the beneficial effects of NRF2 agonists during disease. Our work also demonstrates that the NRF2 pathway is retained and can be modulated to regulate important immunomodulatory functions in burn patient immune cells.

  13. [Fluid management and cause of death during shock period in patients with severe burns or burns complicated by inhalation injury].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming-liang; Li, Chi; Ma, Chun-xu

    2003-11-01

    To explore fluid management and cause of death during shock period in severe burns or burns with inhalation injury. One hundred and twelve patients with severe burns or burn complicated by inhalation injury admitted to our hospital from 1991 to 2000 were analyzed. The fluid management and death conditions during shock period were discussed. The fluid volume for resuscitation could be described as follows: the total fluid volume was 2.2 ml/(%TBSA.kg) including colloid fluid 0.5 ml/(%TBSA.kg), crystalloid fluid 1 ml/(%TBSA.kg)and water 0.7 ml/(%TBSA.kg) during first 24 hours. The total fluid volume was 1.8 ml/(%TBSA.kg) including colloid fluid 0.4 ml/(%TBSA.kg), crystalloid fluid 0.7 ml/(%TBSA.kg) and water 0.7 ml/(%TBSA.kg) during second 24 hours. There were no difference in fluid management between burns and burns with inhalation injury. Seven patients died due to respiratory failure during shock period. Many fluid formula can provide guidance for resuscitation and it is very important that early fluid therapy should accord with concrete clinical conditions of patients in order to pass smoothly through shock period. Early fluid management is not different between burns and burns with inhalation injury.

  14. Comparison of four measures in reducing length of stay in burns: An Asian centre's evolved multimodal burns protocol.

    PubMed

    Chong, Si Jack; Kok, Yee Onn; Choke, Abby; Tan, Esther W X; Tan, Kok Chai; Tan, Bien-Keem

    2017-09-01

    Multidisciplinary burns care is constantly evolving to improve outcomes given the numerous modalities available. We examine the use of Biobrane, micrografting, early renal replacement therapy and a strict target time of surgery within 24h of burns on improving outcomes of length of stay, duration of surgery, mean number of surgeries and number of positive tissue cultures in a tertiary burns centre. A post-implementation prospective cohort of inpatient burns patients from 2014 to 2015 (n=137) was compared against a similar pre-implementation cohort from 2013 to 2014 (n=93) using REDCAP, an electronic database. There was no statistically significant difference for comorbidities, age and percentage (%) TBSA between the new protocol and control groups. The protocol group had shorter mean time to surgery (23.5-38.5h) (p<0.002), 0.63 fewer operative sessions, shorter mean length of stay (11.8-16.8 days) (p<0.04), less positive tissue cultures (0.59-1.28) (p<0.03). The 4 measures of the new burns protocol improved burns care and validated the collective effort of a multi-disciplinary, multipronged burns management supported by surgeons, anesthetists, renal physicians, emergency physicians, nurses, and allied healthcare providers. Biobrane, single stage onlay micrograft/allograft, early CRRT and surgery within 24h were successfully introduced. These are useful adjuncts in the armamentarium to be considered for any burns centre. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Peripheral Neuropathy: Symptoms and Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Utah Research News Make a Difference Symptoms of Peripheral Neuropathy Print This Page Peripheral Neuropathy symptoms usually start ... more slowly over many years. The symptoms of peripheral neuropathy often include: A sensation of wearing an invisible “ ...

  16. Burning trees and bridges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joel S.

    1990-01-01

    Most burning of biomass is the result of human activity, and on a global scale it is increasing. Tropospheric concentrations of CO2, CO, CH4, non-methane hydrocarbons, and ozone are all increasing with time; global biomass burning may make an important contribution to this increase and thus to potential global climate change. The nitrogen cycle also can have important climatic effects. Nitrous oxide put into the atmosphere by biomass burning is a greenhouse gas 250 times more powerful (molecule for molecule) than carbon dioxide. Nitric oxide, as well as being a photochemical precursor of ozone, a major pollutant in the troposphere, produces nitric acid, the fastest-growing component of acid rain. Hence, the new bridge in the nitrogen cycle is of more than mere technical interest.

  17. Burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thoppay, Jaisri R; De Rossi, Scott S; Ciarrocca, Katharine N

    2013-07-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic condition that is characterized by burning symptoms of the oral mucosa without obvious clinical examination findings. This syndrome has complex characteristics, but its cause remains largely enigmatic, making treatment and management of patients with BMS difficult. Despite not being accompanied by evident organic changes, BMS can significantly reduce the quality of life for such patients. Therefore, it is incumbent on dental professionals to diagnose and manage patients with BMS as a part of comprehensive care. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Burning mouth syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jimson, Sudha; Rajesh, E.; Krupaa, R. Jayasri; Kasthuri, M.

    2015-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a complex disorder that is characterized by warm or burning sensation in the oral mucosa without changes on physical examination. It occurs more commonly in middle-aged and elderly women and often affects the tip of the tongue, lateral borders, lips, hard and soft palate. This condition is probably of multi-factorial origin, often idiopathic, and its etiopathogensis is unknown. BMS can be classified into two clinical forms namely primary and secondary BMS. As a result, a multidisciplinary approach is required for better control of the symptoms. In addition, psychotherapy and behavioral feedback may also help eliminate the BMS symptoms. PMID:26015707

  19. Burn Safety Awareness on Playgrounds: Thermal Burns from Playground Equipment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety Awareness on Playgrounds Thermal Burns from Playground Equipment The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission CPSC wants ... of the risk of thermal burns from playground equipment. You may remember the metal slides of your ...

  20. The Ocular Surface Chemical Burns

    PubMed Central

    Baradaran-Rafii, Alireza; Djalilian, Ali R.

    2014-01-01

    Ocular chemical burns are common and serious ocular emergencies that require immediate and intensive evaluation and care. The victims of such incidents are usually young, and therefore loss of vision and disfigurement could dramatically affect their lives. The clinical course can be divided into immediate, acute, early, and late reparative phases. The degree of limbal, corneal, and conjunctival involvement at the time of injury is critically associated with prognosis. The treatment starts with simple but vision saving steps and is continued with complicated surgical procedures later in the course of the disease. The goal of treatment is to restore the normal ocular surface anatomy and function. Limbal stem cell transplantation, amniotic membrane transplantation, and ultimately keratoprosthesis may be indicated depending on the patients' needs. PMID:25105018

  1. Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) happens when there is a narrowing of the blood vessels outside of your heart. The cause of ... smoking. Other risk factors include older age and diseases like diabetes, high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, ...

  2. Transient Diabetes Insipidus Following Thermal Burn; A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Dash, Suvashis; Ghosh, Shibajyoti

    2017-10-01

    Diabetes insipidus is a disease charaterised by increased urine production and thrist. Neurogenic diabetes insipidus following head trauma,autoimmune disease and infection is quite common but diabetes insipidus following thermal burn injury is a rare complication.We should know about this complication as its management need a comprehensive approach for satisfactory outcome. Thermal burn can cause different complications in early post burn period like electrolyte imbalance, dehydration, acute renal failure, but diabetes insipidus is a very rare and unusual complication that may come across in thermal burn. We should be aware about this condition to prevent and treat mortality and morbidity in burn patients. We have reported a case of transient diabetes insipidus in a patient of thermal burn in early post burn period. Patient was treated accordingly, leading to complete recovery.

  3. [Surgical treatment of burns : Special aspects of pediatric burns].

    PubMed

    Bührer, G; Beier, J P; Horch, R E; Arkudas, A

    2017-05-01

    Treatment of pediatric burn patients is very important because of the sheer frequency of burn wounds and the possible long-term ramifications. Extensive burns need special care and are treated in specialized burn centers. The goal of this work is to present current standards in burn therapy and important innovations in the treatment of burns in children so that the common and small area burn wounds and scalds in pediatric patients in day-to-day dermatological practice can be adequately treated. Analysis of current literature, discussion of reviews, incorporation of current guidelines. Burns in pediatric patients are common. Improvement of survival can be achieved by treatment in burn centers. The assessment of burn depth and area is an important factor for proper treatment. We give an overview for outpatient treatment of partial thickness burns. New methods may result in better long-term outcome. Adequate treatment of burn injuries considering current literature and guidelines improves patient outcome. Rational implementation of new methods is recommended.

  4. Minor burn - first aid - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100213.htm Minor burn - first aid - series—Procedure, part 1 To use ... out of 2 Overview To treat a minor burn, run cool water over the area of the ...

  5. Phoenix Society for Burn Survivors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Our Blog Taking Care of Yourself at Phoenix World Burn Congress 3 Oct 2017 Imagine this: a ... Menu Get Support Find Resources Our Programs Phoenix World Burn Congress Get Involved Ways to Give Who ...

  6. One Burn, One Standard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Johannes Kepler University Linz Software GmbH Research Department Medical Informatics Hagenberg, Austria Herbert L. Haller, MD Trauma Hospital Linz of...0000000000000004 Address correspondence to M. Giretzlehner, PhD, Johannes Kepler University Linz, RISC Software GmbH, Research Department Medical Informatics, Softwarepark 35, 4232 Hagenberg, Austria. One Burn, One Standard LETTER TO THE EDITOR

  7. The Burn Wound Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Lloyd F.; Chan, Rodney K.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: While the survival rate of the severely burned patient has improved significantly, relatively little progress has been made in treatment or prevention of burn-induced long-term sequelae, such as contraction and fibrosis. Recent Advances: Our knowledge of the molecular pathways involved in burn wounds has increased dramatically, and technological advances now allow large-scale genomic studies, providing a global view of wound healing processes. Critical Issues: Translating findings from a large number of in vitro and preclinical animal studies into clinical practice represents a gap in our understanding, and the failures of a number of clinical trials suggest that targeting single pathways or cytokines may not be the best approach. Significant opportunities for improvement exist. Future Directions: Study of the underlying molecular influences of burn wound healing progression will undoubtedly continue as an active research focus. Increasing our knowledge of these processes will identify additional therapeutic targets, supporting informed clinical studies that translate into clinical relevance and practice. PMID:26989577

  8. [Burns in adolescents].

    PubMed

    Ortiz Rodríguez, R; Domínguez Amillo, E; Soto Beauregard, C; Díaz González, M; López Gutiérrez, J C; Ros Mar, Z; Tovar Larrucea, J A

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to know the epidemiology of burns in teenagers. Burn patients over 11 years old admitted in our Institution in the last 10 years were included. Etiology, burn size, hospital stay, quirurgical interventions and long term sequelae were registered. One thousand and eight patients were admitted, 89 were over 11 years (8.8%), 70.7% were boys and 29.3% girls. Fire was the principal agent in 58 cases (65.1%), due to fireworks in 13 (22.4%), alcohol in 7 (12%), explosion of flammable containers (spray) in 4 (6.8%) and gasoline in 3 (5.2%). Fireworks injuries and spray explosions affected face and hand in 88% cases. The median hospital stay was 8 days after admission (1 to 90). 83.1% required surgical treatment with mean of 1.8 +/- 1.4 interventions and 21.3% had long-term sequelaes that required at least one surgical intervention. Fire is the main cause of burns in adolescents. Fireworks injuries represented a quarter of that lesions, and highlights paint spray explosions as new causative agents. Considering the high morbidity in this age group, with permanent functional and aesthetic sequelae, prevention campaigns are needed to reduce such accidents.

  9. TIRES, OPEN BURNING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chapter describes available information on the health effects from open burning of rubber tires. It concentrates on the three known sources of detailed measurements: (1) a small-scale emissions characterization study performed by the U.S. EPA in a facility designed to simulat...

  10. The Earth Could Burn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yarrow, Ruth

    1982-01-01

    Environmental educators are worried about the ultimate ecological threat--nuclear war, which could burn thousands of square miles, sterilize the soil, destroy 70 percent of the ozone layer letting in lethal ultraviolet rays, and cause severe radiation sickness. Educators must inform themselves, teach others, contact government representatives, and…

  11. Predicting the proportion of full-thickness involvement for any given burn size based on burn resuscitation volumes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nehemiah T; Salinas, José; Fenrich, Craig A; Serio-Melvin, Maria L; Kramer, George C; Driscoll, Ian R; Schreiber, Martin A; Cancio, Leopoldo C; Chung, Kevin K

    2016-11-01

    The depth of burn has been an important factor often overlooked when estimating the total resuscitation fluid needed for early burn care. The goal of this study was to determine the degree to which full-thickness (FT) involvement affected overall 24-hour burn resuscitation volumes. We performed a retrospective review of patients admitted to our burn intensive care unit from December 2007 to April 2013, with significant burns that required resuscitation using our computerized decision support system for burn fluid resuscitation. We defined the degree of FT involvement as FT Index (FTI; percentage of FT injury/percentage of total body surface area (TBSA) burned [%FT / %TBSA]) and compared variables on actual 24-hour fluid resuscitation volumes overall as well as for any given burn size. A total of 203 patients admitted to our burn center during the study period were included in the analysis. Mean age and weight were 47 ± 19 years and 87 ± 18 kg, respectively. Mean %TBSA was 41 ± 20 with a mean %FT of 18 ± 24. As %TBSA, %FT, and FTI increased, so did actual 24-hour fluid resuscitation volumes (mL/kg). However, increase in FTI did not result in increased volume indexed to burn size (mL/kg per %TBSA). This was true even when patients with inhalation injury were excluded. Further investigation revealed that as %TBSA increased, %FT increased nonlinearly (quadratic polynomial) (R = 0.994). Total burn size and FT burn size were both highly correlated with increased 24-hour fluid resuscitation volumes. However, FTI did not correlate with a corresponding increase in resuscitation volumes for any given burn size, even when patients with inhalation injury were excluded. Thus, there are insufficient data to presume that those who receive more volume at any given burn size are likely to be mostly full thickness or vice versa. This was influenced by a relatively low sample size at each 10%TBSA increment and larger burn sizes disproportionately having more FT burns. A more

  12. Alcohol Modulation of the Post Burn Hepatic Response

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Michael M; Carter, Stewart R; Curtis, Brenda J; O’Halloran, Eileen B; Gamelli, Richard L; Kovacs, Elizabeth J

    2015-01-01

    The widespread and rapidly increasing trend of binge drinking is accompanied by a concomitant rise in the prevalence of trauma patients under the influence of alcohol at the time of their injury. Epidemiologic evidence suggests up to half of all adult burn patients are intoxicated at the time of admission and the presence of alcohol is an independent risk factor for death in the early stages post burn. As the major site of alcohol metabolism and toxicity, the liver is a critical determinant of post burn outcome and experimental evidence implies an injury threshold exists beyond which burn-induced hepatic derangement is observed. Alcohol may lower this threshold for post burn hepatic damage through a variety of mechanisms including modulation of extrahepatic events, alteration of the gut-liver axis, and changes in signaling pathways. The direct and indirect effects of alcohol may prime the liver for the second-hit of many overlapping physiologic responses to burn injury. In an effort to gain a deeper understanding of how alcohol potentiates post burn hepatic damage, we summarize possible mechanisms by which alcohol modulates the post burn hepatic response. PMID:26284631

  13. [Experimental determination of the time-dependent extent of after-burning with reference to possibilities of the plastic surgery reconstruction of 3d degree burns].

    PubMed

    Bäumer, F; Henrich, H A; Ussmüller, J

    1986-02-01

    The present experiments try to answer the question as to the time-dependent extent of the after-burning process after full-thickness burn (third degree). For an early plastic surgical treatment it was of interest to determine the most early time of escharotomy. The time-dependent spreading of the after-burning area reached its maximum five days after the burn injury. The after-burning area was marked by intravenous injections of Patentblau which caused distinct intravital colouring. Subsequently no further progress could be observed. In the present experiments we suggest this time as the earliest time for plastic covering in case it would be dependent upon the end of the after-burning process.

  14. Burn Wise Educational Materials for Businesses

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Burn Wise outreach material. Burn Wise is a partnership program of that emphasizes the importance of burning the right wood, the right way, in the right wood-burning appliance to protect your home, health, and the air we breathe.

  15. Repeated Prescribed Burning in Aspen

    Treesearch

    Donald A. Perala

    1974-01-01

    Infrequent burning weather, low flammability of the aspen-hardwood association, and prolific sprouting and seeding of shrubs and hardwoods made repeated dormant season burning a poor tool to convert good site aspen to conifers. Repeat fall burns for wildlife habitat maintenance is workable if species composition changes are not important.

  16. Biomass Burning Data and Information

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-04-21

    Biomass Burning Data and Information This data set represents ... geographical and temporal distribution of total amount of biomass burned. These data may be used in general circulation models (GCMs) and ... models of the atmosphere. Project Title:  Biomass Burning Discipline:  Tropospheric Composition ...

  17. The overall patterns of burns

    PubMed Central

    Almoghrabi, A.; Abu Shaban, N.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Burn patterns differ across the whole world and not only in relation to lack of education, overcrowding, and poverty. Cultures, habits, traditions, psychiatric illness, and epilepsy are strongly correlated to burn patterns. However, burns may also occur because of specific religious beliefs and activities, social events and festivals, traditional medical practices, occupational activities, and war. PMID:22639565

  18. 40 CFR 49.10411 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.10411 Section 49.10411 Protection of... for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. (a) Beginning...

  19. Locating the cortical bottleneck for slow reading in peripheral vision

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Deyue; Jiang, Yi; Legge, Gordon E.; He, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Yu, Legge, Park, Gage, and Chung (2010) suggested that the neural bottleneck for slow peripheral reading is located in nonretinotopic areas. We investigated the potential rate-limiting neural site for peripheral reading using fMRI, and contrasted peripheral reading with recognition of peripherally presented line drawings of common objects. We measured the BOLD responses to both text (three-letter words/nonwords) and line-drawing objects presented either in foveal or peripheral vision (10° lower right visual field) at three presentation rates (2, 4, and 8/second). The statistically significant interaction effect of visual field × presentation rate on the BOLD response for text but not for line drawings provides evidence for distinctive processing of peripheral text. This pattern of results was obtained in all five regions of interest (ROIs). At the early retinotopic cortical areas, the BOLD signal slightly increased with increasing presentation rate for foveal text, and remained fairly constant for peripheral text. In the Occipital Word-Responsive Area (OWRA), Visual Word Form Area (VWFA), and object sensitive areas (LO and PHA), the BOLD responses to text decreased with increasing presentation rate for peripheral but not foveal presentation. In contrast, there was no rate-dependent reduction in BOLD response for line-drawing objects in all the ROIs for either foveal or peripheral presentation. Only peripherally presented text showed a distinctive rate-dependence pattern. Although it is possible that the differentiation starts to emerge at the early retinotopic cortical representation, the neural bottleneck for slower reading of peripherally presented text may be a special property of peripheral text processing in object category selective cortex. PMID:26237299

  20. Physical functional outcome assessment of patients with major burns admitted to a UK Burn Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Smailes, Sarah T; Engelsman, Kayleen; Dziewulski, Peter

    2013-02-01

    Determining the discharge outcome of burn patients can be challenging and therefore a validated objective measure of functional independence would assist with this process. We developed the Functional Assessment for Burns (FAB) score to measure burn patients' functional independence. FAB scores were taken on discharge from ICU (FAB 1) and on discharge from inpatient burn care (FAB 2) in 56 patients meeting the American Burn Association criteria for major burn. We retrospectively analysed prospectively collected data to measure the progress of patients' physical functional outcomes and to evaluate the predictive validity of the FAB score for discharge outcome. Mean age was 38.6 years and median burn size 35%. Significant improvements were made in the physical functional outcomes between FAB 1 and FAB 2 scores (p<0.0001). 48 patients were discharged home, 8 of these with social care. 8 patients were transferred to another hospital for further inpatient rehabilitation. FAB 1 score (≤ 9) is strongly associated with discharge outcome (p<0.006) and as such can be used to facilitate early discharge planning. FAB 2 score (≤ 26) independently predicts discharge outcome (p<0.0001) and therefore is a valid outcome measure to determine discharge outcome of burn patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  1. Economic burden of burn injuries in the Netherlands: A 3 months follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Hop, M Jenda; Wijnen, Ben F M; Nieuwenhuis, Marianne K; Dokter, Jan; Middelkoop, Esther; Polinder, Suzanne; van Baar, Margriet E

    2016-01-01

    Burn care has rapidly improved in the past decades. However, healthcare innovations can be expensive, demanding careful choices on their implementation. Obtaining knowledge on the extent of the costs of burn injuries is an essential first step for economic evaluations within burn care. The objective of this study was to determine the economic burden of patients with burns admitted to a burn centre and to identify important cost categories until 3 months post-burn. A prospective cohort study was conducted in the burn centre of Maasstad Hospital Rotterdam, the Netherlands, including all patients with acute burn related injuries from August 2011 until July 2012. Total costs were calculated from a societal perspective, until 3 months post injury. Subgroup analyses were performed to examine whether the mean total costs per patient differed by age, aetiology or percentage total body surface area (TBSA) burned. In our population, with a mean burn size of 8%, mean total costs were €26,540 per patient varying from €742 to €235,557. Most important cost categories were burn centre days (62%), surgical interventions (5%) and work absence (20%). Flame burns were significantly more costly than other types of burns, adult patients were significantly more costly than children and adolescents and a higher percentage TBSA burned also corresponded to significantly higher costs. Mean total costs of burn care in the first 3 months post injury were estimated at €26,540 and depended on age, aetiology and TBSA. Mean total costs in our population probably apply to other high-income countries as well, although we should realise that patients with burn injuries are diverse and represent a broad range of total costs. To reduce costs of burn care, future intervention studies should focus on a timely wound healing, reducing length of stay and enabling an early return to work. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Chemical Debridement of Burns

    PubMed Central

    Levenson, Stanley M.; Kan, Dorinne; Gruber, Charles; Crowley, Leo V.; Lent, Richard; Watford, Alvin; Seifter, Eli

    1974-01-01

    The development of effective, non-toxic (local and systemic) methods for the rapid chemical (enzymatic and non-enzymatic) debridement of third degree burns would dramatically reduce the morbidity and mortality of severely burned patients. Sepsis is still the major cause of death of patients with extensive deep burns. The removal of the devitalized tissue, without damage to unburned skin or skin only partially injured by burning, and in ways which would permit immediate (or very prompt) skin grafting, would lessen substantially the problems of sepsis, speed convalescence and the return of these individuals to society as effective human beings, and would decrease deaths. The usefulness and limitations of surgical excision for patients with extensive third degree burns are discussed. Chemical debridement lends itself to complementary use with surgical excision and has the potential advantage over surgical excision in not requiring anesthesia or a formal surgical operation. The authors' work with the chemical debridement of burns, in particular the use of Bromelain, indicates that this approach will likely achieve clinical usefulness. The experimental studies indicate that rapid controlled debridement, with minimal local and systemic toxicity, is possible, and that effective chemotherapeutic agents may be combined with the Bromelain without either interfering with the actions of the other. The authors believe that rapid (hours) debridement accomplished by the combined use of chemical debriding and chemotherapeutic agents will obviate the possibility of any increase in infection, caused by the use of chemical agents for debridement, as reported for Paraenzyme21 and Travase.39,48 It is possible that the short term use of systemic antibiotics begun just before and continued during, and for a short time after, the rapid chemical debridement may prove useful for the prevention of infection, as appears to be the case for abdominal operations of the clean-contaminated and

  3. Wildfire impacts on stream sedimentation: re-visiting the Boulder Creek Burn in Little Granite Creek, Wyoming, USA

    Treesearch

    Sandra Ryan; Kathleen Dwire

    2012-01-01

    In this study of a burned watershed in northwestern Wyoming, USA, sedimentation impacts following a moderately-sized fire (Boulder Creek burn, 2000) were evaluated against sediment loads estimated for the period prior to burning. Early observations of suspended sediment yield showed substantially elevated loads (5x) the first year post-fire (2001), followed by less...

  4. Current methods of burn reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Orgill, Dennis P; Ogawa, Rei

    2013-05-01

    After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Explain the present challenges in reconstructive burn surgery. 2. Describe the most appropriate treatment methods and techniques for specific burn injury types, including skin grafts, dermal substitutes, and a variety of flap options. 3. Identify the appropriate use, advantages, and disadvantages of specific flaps in the treatment of burn injuries, including local, regional, superthin, prefabricated, prelaminated, and free flaps. Victims of thermal burns often form heavy scars and develop contractures around joints, inhibiting movement. As burns can occur in all cutaneous areas of the body, a wide range of reconstructive options have been utilized. Each method has advantages and disadvantages that must be considered by both patients and surgeons. The authors reviewed the literature for burn reconstruction and focused their discussion on areas that have been recently developed. They reviewed the mechanism of burn injury and discussed how this relates to the pathophysiology of the burn injury. Surgeons now have a wide array of plastic surgical techniques that can be used to treat burn victims. These range from skin grafts and local flaps to free flaps, prefabricated flaps, superthin flaps, and dermal scaffolds. Recent advances in burn reconstruction provide methods to decrease scar tissue and joint contractures. In the future, the authors hope that further developments in burn treatment will foster the development of new technologies that will allow site-specific reconstruction with minimal donor-site morbidity.

  5. Fungal Burn Wound Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    Aspergillus), Blasto- T he use of effective topical chemotherapeutic agents to myces (Candida), and Zygomycetes ( Mucor , Rhizopus).6 reduce...species, 18%; Mucor species and Rhizopus species, acetate in the morning and silver sulfadiazine in the evening. Prophy- 9.1%; and Microspora species and...sensitivity reports, and the patient’s sue, including one patient who required a hip disarticulation response. to control an invasive Mucor burn wound

  6. Prescribed burning symposium

    Treesearch

    USDA Forest Service Southeastern Forest Experiment Station

    1971-01-01

    The custom of annual burning of the woods from Colonial times onward is a subject of more interest, perhaps, to ecologists and social scientists than it is to foresters. The important point to us is that it had become a well-settled folkway by the time large-scale lumbering began in the southern pineries about 1890. Before this lumbering began, the light annual fires...

  7. Role of burning season on initial understory vegetation response to prescribed fire in a mixed conifer forest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knapp, E.E.; Schwilk, D.W.; Kane, J.M.; Keeley, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    Although the majority of fires in the western United States historically occurred during the late summer or early fall when fuels were dry and plants were dormant or nearly so, early-season prescribed burns are often ignited when fuels are still moist and plants are actively growing. The purpose of this study was to determine if burn season influences postfire vegetation recovery. Replicated early-season burn, late-season burn, and unburned control units were established in a mixed conifer forest, and understory vegetation was evaluated before and after treatment. Vegetation generally recovered rapidly after prescribed burning. However, late-season burns resulted in a temporary but significant drop in cover and a decline in species richness at the 1 m 2 scale in the following year. For two of the several taxa that were negatively affected by burning, the reduction in frequency was greater after late-season than early-season burns. Early-season burns may have moderated the effect of fire by consuming less fuel and lessening the amount of soil heating. Our results suggest that, when burned under high fuel loading conditions, many plant species respond more strongly to differences in fire intensity and severity than to timing of the burn relative to stage of plant growth. ?? 2007 NRC.

  8. Antiseptics for burns.

    PubMed

    Norman, Gill; Christie, Janice; Liu, Zhenmi; Westby, Maggie J; Jefferies, Jayne M; Hudson, Thomas; Edwards, Jacky; Mohapatra, Devi Prasad; Hassan, Ibrahim A; Dumville, Jo C

    2017-07-12

    Burn wounds cause high levels of morbidity and mortality worldwide. People with burns are particularly vulnerable to infections; over 75% of all burn deaths (after initial resuscitation) result from infection. Antiseptics are topical agents that act to prevent growth of micro-organisms. A wide range are used with the intention of preventing infection and promoting healing of burn wounds. To assess the effects and safety of antiseptics for the treatment of burns in any care setting. In September 2016 we searched the Cochrane Wounds Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations), Ovid Embase, and EBSCO CINAHL. We also searched three clinical trials registries and references of included studies and relevant systematic reviews. There were no restrictions based on language, date of publication or study setting. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that enrolled people with any burn wound and assessed the use of a topical treatment with antiseptic properties. Two review authors independently performed study selection, risk of bias assessment and data extraction. We included 56 RCTs with 5807 randomised participants. Almost all trials had poorly reported methodology, meaning that it is unclear whether they were at high risk of bias. In many cases the primary review outcomes, wound healing and infection, were not reported, or were reported incompletely.Most trials enrolled people with recent burns, described as second-degree and less than 40% of total body surface area; most participants were adults. Antiseptic agents assessed were: silver-based, honey, Aloe Vera, iodine-based, chlorhexidine or polyhexanide (biguanides), sodium hypochlorite, merbromin, ethacridine lactate, cerium nitrate and Arnebia euchroma. Most studies compared antiseptic with a topical antibiotic, primarily silver sulfadiazine (SSD); others compared antiseptic with a non

  9. Treatment of peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed Central

    Hallett, M; Tandon, D; Berardelli, A

    1985-01-01

    There are three general approaches to treatment of peripheral neuropathy. First, an attempt should be made to reverse the pathophysiological process if its nature can be elucidated. Second, nerve metabolism can be stimulated and regeneration encouraged. Third, even if the neuropathy itself cannot be improved, symptomatic therapy can be employed. This review outlines the options available for each approach. PMID:3003254

  10. Peripheral Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... narrow or block the arteries and limit the flow of oxygen-rich blood to your body. Risk Factors Peripheral artery disease (P.A.D.) affects millions of people in the United States. The disease is more common in blacks than ...

  11. Foot burns: epidemiology and management.

    PubMed

    Hemington-Gorse, S; Pellard, S; Wilson-Jones, N; Potokar, T

    2007-12-01

    This is a retrospective study of the epidemiology and management of isolated foot burns presenting to the Welsh Centre for Burns from January 1998 to December 2002. A total of 289 were treated of which 233 were included in this study. Approximately 40% were in the paediatric age group and the gender distribution varied dramatically for adults and children. In the adult group the male:female ratio was 3.5:1, however in the paediatric group the male:female ratio was more equal (1.6:1). Scald burns (65%) formed the largest group in children and scald (35%) and chemical burns (32%) in adults. Foot burns have a complication rate of 18% and prolonged hospital stay. Complications include hypertrophic scarring, graft loss/delayed healing and wound infection. Although isolated foot burns represent a small body surface area, over half require treatment as in patients to allow for initial aggressive conservative management of elevation and regular wound cleansing to avoid complications. This study suggests a protocol for the initial acute management of foot burns. This protocol states immediate referral of all foot burns to a burn centre, admission of these burns for 24-48 h for elevation, regular wound cleansing with change of dressings and prophylactic antibiotics.

  12. Smoke inhalation increases intensive care requirements and morbidity in paediatric burns.

    PubMed

    Tan, Alethea; Smailes, Sarah; Friebel, Thessa; Magdum, Ashish; Frew, Quentin; El-Muttardi, Naguib; Dziewulski, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Burn survival has improved with advancements in fluid resuscitation, surgical wound management, wound dressings, access to antibiotics and nutritional support for burn patients. Despite these advancements, the presence of smoke inhalation injury in addition to a cutaneous burn still significantly increases morbidity and mortality. The pathophysiology of smoke inhalation has been well studied in animal models. Translation of this knowledge into effectiveness of clinical management and correlation with patient outcomes including the paediatric population, is still limited. We retrospectively reviewed our experience of 13 years of paediatric burns admitted to a regional burn's intensive care unit. We compared critical care requirements and patient outcomes between those with cutaneous burns only and those with concurrent smoke inhalation injury. Smoke inhalation increases critical care requirements and mortality in the paediatric burn population. Therefore, early critical care input in the management of these patients is advised. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  13. American Burn Association Practice Guidelines: Burn Shock Resuscitation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    Ann Surg 1979;189: 546–52. 39. Jelenko C III, Williams JB, Wheeler ML, et al. Studies in shock and resuscitation, I: use of a hypertonic, albumin...SUMMARY ARTICLE American Burn Association Practice Guidelines Burn Shock Resuscitation Tam N. Pham, MD,* Leopoldo C . Cancio, MD,† Nicole S. Gibran...practice guidelines burn shock resuscitation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Pham T. N., Cancio L. C

  14. Reacting Chemistry Based Burn Model for Explosive Hydrocodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwaab, Matthew; Greendyke, Robert; Steward, Bryan

    2017-06-01

    Currently, in hydrocodes designed to simulate explosive material undergoing shock-induced ignition, the state of the art is to use one of numerous reaction burn rate models. These burn models are designed to estimate the bulk chemical reaction rate. Unfortunately, these models are largely based on empirical data and must be recalibrated for every new material being simulated. We propose that the use of an equilibrium Arrhenius rate reacting chemistry model in place of these empirically derived burn models will improve the accuracy for these computational codes. Such models have been successfully used in codes simulating the flow physics around hypersonic vehicles. A reacting chemistry model of this form was developed for the cyclic nitramine RDX by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). Initial implementation of this chemistry based burn model has been conducted on the Air Force Research Laboratory's MPEXS multi-phase continuum hydrocode. In its present form, the burn rate is based on the destruction rate of RDX from NRL's chemistry model. Early results using the chemistry based burn model show promise in capturing deflagration to detonation features more accurately in continuum hydrocodes than previously achieved using empirically derived burn models.

  15. Acoustic emission strand burning technique for motor burning rate prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, W. N.

    1978-01-01

    An acoustic emission (AE) method is being used to measure the burning rate of solid propellant strands. This method has a precision of 0.5% and excellent burning rate correlation with both subscale and large rocket motors. The AE procedure burns the sample under water and measures the burning rate from the acoustic output. The acoustic signal provides a continuous readout during testing, which allows complete data analysis rather than the start-stop clockwires used by the conventional method. The AE method helps eliminate such problems as inhibiting the sample, pressure increase and temperature rise, during testing.

  16. Clothing burns in Canadian children

    PubMed Central

    Stanwick, Richard S.

    1985-01-01

    A Canadian survey of 11 tertiary care pediatric centres with specialized burn facilities revealed that an estimated 37 children up to 9 years of age are admitted annually to such hospitals because of clothing burns. Sleepwear accounts for an estimated 21 such burns per year. Girls were found to suffer the most severe burns and represented eight of the nine children in the series who died. Loose and flowing garments dominated the girls' styles. The results of multiple-regression analysis confirmed that style of clothing (loose and flowing as opposed to snug) was the most significant predictor of burn severity, length of hospital stay, the need for skin grafting and survival. The ignition situation (avoidance of parental supervision at the time of injury) was the only other important predictor. The success of regulatory actions in other countries in reducing the incidence of severe clothing burns is reviewed, and preventive strategies for Canada are explored. ImagesFig. 2 PMID:3995433

  17. Community integration after burn injuries.

    PubMed

    Esselman, P C; Ptacek, J T; Kowalske, K; Cromes, G F; deLateur, B J; Engrav, L H

    2001-01-01

    Evaluation of community integration is a meaningful outcome criterion after major burn injury. The Community Integration Questionnaire (CIQ) was administered to 463 individuals with major burn injuries. The CIQ results in Total, Home Integration, Social Integration, and Productivity scores. The purposes of this study were to determine change in CIQ scores over time and what burn injury and demographic factors predict CIQ scores. The CIQ scores did not change significantly from 6 to 12 to 24 months postburn injury. Home integration scores were best predicted by sex and living situation; Social Integration scores by marital status; and Productivity scores by functional outcome, burn severity, age, and preburn work factors. The data demonstrate that individuals with burn injuries have significant difficulties with community integration due to burn and nonburn related factors. CIQ scores did not improve over time but improvement may have occurred before the initial 6-month postburn injury follow-up in this study.

  18. Physical rehabilitation of pediatric burns.

    PubMed

    Atiyeh, B; Janom, H H

    2014-03-31

    Significant improvements have been made in the acute treatment of pediatric burn injuries over the past 3 decades which have significantly decreased mortality. Each year, more burned children are necessitating serious medical attention during their convalescence. For children with serious consequences resulting from burns that can persist from childhood through adolescence into adulthood, the value of long-term rehabilitation cannot be over stated. Burn injury management should not focus only on the immediate treatment. Long-term functional outcome and the required rehabilitation that burn victims must go through should be given equal if not more attention. The present is a review of the available modalities utilized for the physical rehabilitation of convalescent pediatric burns in order to overcome the catabolic state, improve muscle power and fitness, reduce disfiguring scars and prevent contractures.

  19. A rare approach? Microsurgical breast reconstruction after severe burns

    PubMed Central

    Weitgasser, Laurenz; Bahsoun, Ali; Amr, Amro; Brandstetter, Michael; Knam, Friedrich; Schoeller, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Breast deformity, in post-burn patients, is a common problem leading to lower self-esteem and reclusive behavior that impairs quality of life. The authors present the course of treatment of an 18-year-old immigrant girl who suffered second- to third-degree burns over approximately 20% of her total body surface area in her early childhood. The second- to third-degree burns were located on her right trunk and abdomen, as well as her right shoulder, neck, and right groin area. Since it was not offered in her home country, reconstructive surgery, including microsurgical breast reconstruction, was sought abroad. Due to the lack of available skin and soft tissue, a bilateral breast reconstruction with free transverse myocutaneous gracilis flaps was offered. This case illustrates one method of using microsurgery to address post-burn breast deformities in order to alleviate psychological suffering and improve quality of life. PMID:29506333

  20. Retrospective analysis of patients with burn injury treated in a burn center in Turkey during the Syrian civil war.

    PubMed

    Yuce, Yucel; Acar, Hakan A; Erkal, Kutlu H; Arditi, Nur B

    2017-01-01

    To report the management of burn injuries that occured in the Syria civil war, which were referred to our burn center. Methods: Forty-three patients with burns, injured in the civil war in Syria and whom were referred to Dr. Lütfi Kırdar Kartal Educating and Training Hospital Burn Centre of İstanbul, Turkey between 2011-2015 were analyzed in a retrospective study. Results: Most of our patients were in major burn classification (93%; 40/43) and most of them had burns greater than 15% total on body surface area. Most of them were admitted to our center late after first management at centers with improper conditions and in cultures of these patients unusual and resistant strains specific to the battlefield were produced. Conclusion: Immediate transfer of the patients from the scene of incidence to burn centers ensures early treatment, this factor may be effective on the outcome of these patients.

  1. [Application of a hydrosurgery system in debridement of various types of burn wounds].

    PubMed

    Li, M Y; Mao, Y G; Guo, G H; Liu, D W

    2016-09-20

    Burn wound healing is closely associated with the depth of wound and early debridement. The traditional ways of debridement have certain limitations and often result in poor appearance and function of repaired area. At present, the hydrosurgery system has been applied clinically in burn field. This paper summarizes advantages and disadvantages of application of the hydrosurgery system in debridement of burn wound with different depths, different periods, extraordinary region, and uncommon agent.

  2. Burning Mouth Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Klasser, Gary D; Grushka, Miriam; Su, Nan

    2016-08-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is an enigmatic, misunderstood, and under-recognized painful condition. Symptoms associated with BMS can be varied, thereby providing a challenge for practitioners and having a negative impact on oral health-related quality of life for patients. Management also remains a challenge for practitioners because it is currently only targeted for symptom relief without a definitive cure. There is an urgent need for further investigations to determine the efficacy of different therapies because this is the only way viable therapeutic options can be established for patients with this chronic and painful syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. 40 CFR 49.11021 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.11021 Section 49.11021 Protection of... Reservation, Oregon § 49.11021 Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and...

  4. 40 CFR 49.10411 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.10411 Section 49.10411 Protection of... Tribe of Idaho § 49.10411 Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and...

  5. 40 CFR 49.10411 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.10411 Section 49.10411 Protection of... Tribe of Idaho § 49.10411 Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and...

  6. 40 CFR 49.10411 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.10411 Section 49.10411 Protection of... Tribe of Idaho § 49.10411 Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and...

  7. 40 CFR 49.10411 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.10411 Section 49.10411 Protection of... Tribe of Idaho § 49.10411 Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and...

  8. Effectiveness of Aloe Vera gel compared with 1% silver sulphadiazine cream as burn wound dressing in second degree burns.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Muhammad Naveed; Ahmed, Naheed

    2013-02-01

    To assess the efficacy of Aloe Vera gel compared with 1% silver sulfadiazine cream as a burn dressing for the treatment of superficial and partial thickness burns. This Interventional Comparative study was carried out at the Burn unit and Plastic surgery department, Nishtar Hospital Multan, Pakistan from July 2008 to December 2010. A total of 50 patients with superficial and partial thickness burns were divided into two equal groups randomly by consecutive sampling method, one group was dressed with Aloe Vera gel while the other was treated with 1% silversulphadiazine cream, and the results regarding duration of wound epithelialization, pain relief and cost of treatment were compared. In patients treated with Aloe Vera gel, healing of burn wounds were remarkably early than those patients treated with 1% silver sulfadiazine. All the patients of Aloe Vera group were relieved of pain earlier than those patients who were treated with SSD. Thermal burns patients dressed with Aloe Vera gel showed advantage compared to those dressed with SSD regarding early wound epithelialization, earlier pain relief and cost-effectiveness.

  9. Rehabilitation after a burn injury.

    PubMed

    Serghiou, Michael; Cowan, April; Whitehead, Christopher

    2009-10-01

    Burn rehabilitation is a serious undertaking, and to produce the best outcomes, it demands the special attention of the entire medical team. A significant burn injury may lead to functional and aesthetic limitations along with psychosocial issues affecting the quality of life for the person who has the injury. Burn rehabilitation professionals specialize in assisting patients to achieve optimal functional outcomes at the completion of the rehabilitative process.

  10. Burn epidemiology and cost of medication in paediatric burn patients.

    PubMed

    Koç, Zeliha; Sağlam, Zeynep

    2012-09-01

    Burns are common injuries that cause problems to societies throughout the world. In order to reduce the cost of burn treatment in children, it is extremely important to determine the burn epidemiology and the cost of medicines used in burn treatment. The present study used a retrospective design, with data collected from medical records of 140 paediatric patients admitted to a burn centre between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2009. Medical records were examined to determine burn epidemiology, medication administered, dosage, and duration of use. Descriptive statistical analysis was completed for all variables; chi-square was used to examine the relationship between certain variables. It was found that 62.7% of paediatric burns occur in the kitchen, with 70.7% involving boiling water; 55.7% of cases resulted in third-degree burns, 19.3% required grafting, and mean duration of hospital stay was 27.5 ± 1.2 days. Medication costs varied between $1.38 US dollars (USD) and $14,159.09, total drug cost was $46,148.03 and average cost per patient was $329.63. In this study, the medication cost for burn patients was found to be relatively high, with antibiotics comprising the vast majority of medication expenditure. Most paediatric burns are preventable, so it is vital to educate families about potential household hazards that can be addressed to reduce the risk of a burn. Programmes are also recommended to reduce costs and the inappropriate prescribing of medication. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  11. Management of the Acute Partial-thickness Burned Hand; Moist Exposed Burn Ointment or Silver Sulphadiazine Cream both Combined with a Polyethylene Bag.

    PubMed

    Allam, A M; Mostafa, W; Zayed, E; El-Gamaly, J

    2007-09-30

    Hand burns predominantly affect young adults, and therefore have serious social and financial implications. In the present work, 106 patients with less than 25% body surface area burns and acute partial-thickness burned hands were managed using polyethylene bags and 1% local silver sulphadiazine (SSD) cream or moist exposed burn ointment (MEBO). Females made up 61.3% of the cases and flame burn was the majority cause (54.7%). There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding either the analgesic effect after local ointment application or hand movement inside the polyethylene bag. Local agent crustation over the wound was very evident in the hands managed by local 1% SSD cream (69.81%). On follow-up, the burned hands healed faster using local MEBO (10.48 versus 14.53 days), with fewer post-burn hand deformities and better active hand movements; however, the total cost until complete hand burn wound healing was higher with MEBO than with 1% SSD, although the final results were superior, with early return to work, when MEBO was used. We concluded that the use of MEBO as a topical agent and of polyethylene bags for the dressing of the acute partial-thickness burned hand accelerated healing; daily wound evaluation was easy as there was no crustation over it of the agent. It was more expensive than 1% SSD cream but presented fewer post-burn complications and more rapid healing, with shorter hospital stay.

  12. Management of the Acute Partial-thickness Burned Hand; Moist Exposed Burn Ointment or Silver Sulphadiazine Cream both Combined with a Polyethylene Bag

    PubMed Central

    Allam, A.M.; Mostafa, W.; Zayed, E.; El-Gamaly, J.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Hand burns predominantly affect young adults, and therefore have serious social and financial implications. In the present work, 106 patients with less than 25% body surface area burns and acute partial-thickness burned hands were managed using polyethylene bags and 1% local silver sulphadiazine (SSD) cream or moist exposed burn ointment (MEBO). Females made up 61.3% of the cases and flame burn was the majority cause (54.7%). There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding either the analgesic effect after local ointment application or hand movement inside the polyethylene bag. Local agent crustation over the wound was very evident in the hands managed by local 1% SSD cream (69.81%). On follow-up, the burned hands healed faster using local MEBO (10.48 versus 14.53 days), with fewer post-burn hand deformities and better active hand movements; however, the total cost until complete hand burn wound healing was higher with MEBO than with 1% SSD, although the final results were superior, with early return to work, when MEBO was used. We concluded that the use of MEBO as a topical agent and of polyethylene bags for the dressing of the acute partial-thickness burned hand accelerated healing; daily wound evaluation was easy as there was no crustation over it of the agent. It was more expensive than 1% SSD cream but presented fewer post-burn complications and more rapid healing, with shorter hospital stay. PMID:21991086

  13. Novel burn device for rapid, reproducible burn wound generation.

    PubMed

    Kim, J Y; Dunham, D M; Supp, D M; Sen, C K; Powell, H M

    2016-03-01

    Scarring following full thickness burns leads to significant reductions in range of motion and quality of life for burn patients. To effectively study scar development and the efficacy of anti-scarring treatments in a large animal model (female red Duroc pigs), reproducible, uniform, full-thickness, burn wounds are needed to reduce variability in observed results that occur with burn depth. Prior studies have proposed that initial temperature of the burner, contact time with skin, thermal capacity of burner material, and the amount of pressure applied to the skin need to be strictly controlled to ensure reproducibility. The purpose of this study was to develop a new burner that enables temperature and pressure to be digitally controlled and monitored in real-time throughout burn wound creation and compare it to a standard burn device. A custom burn device was manufactured with an electrically heated burn stylus and a temperature control feedback loop via an electronic microstat. Pressure monitoring was controlled by incorporation of a digital scale into the device, which measured downward force. The standard device was comprised of a heat resistant handle with a long rod connected to the burn stylus, which was heated using a hot plate. To quantify skin surface temperature and internal stylus temperature as a function of contact time, the burners were heated to the target temperature (200±5°C) and pressed into the skin for 40s to create the thermal injuries. Time to reach target temperature and elapsed time between burns were recorded. In addition, each unit was evaluated for reproducibility within and across three independent users by generating burn wounds at contact times spanning from 5 to 40s at a constant pressure and at pressures of 1 or 3lbs with a constant contact time of 40s. Biopsies were collected for histological analysis and burn depth quantification using digital image analysis (ImageJ). The custom burn device maintained both its internal

  14. Novel burn device for rapid, reproducible burn wound generation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J.Y.; Dunham, D.M.; Supp, D.M.; Sen, C.K.; Powell, H.M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Scarring following full thickness burns leads to significant reductions in range of motion and quality of life for burn patients. To effectively study scar development and the efficacy of anti-scarring treatments in a large animal model (female red Duroc pigs), reproducible, uniform, full-thickness, burn wounds are needed to reduce variability in observed results that occur with burn depth. Prior studies have proposed that initial temperature of the burner, contact time with skin, thermal capacity of burner material, and the amount of pressure applied to the skin need to be strictly controlled to ensure reproducibility. The purpose of this study was to develop a new burner that enables temperature and pressure to be digitally controlled and monitored in real-time throughout burn wound creation and compare it to a standard burn device. Methods A custom burn device was manufactured with an electrically heated burn stylus and a temperature control feedback loop via an electronic microstat. Pressure monitoring was controlled by incorporation of a digital scale into the device, which measured downward force. The standard device was comprised of a heat resistant handle with a long rod connected to the burn stylus, which was heated using a hot plate. To quantify skin surface temperature and internal stylus temperature as a function of contact time, the burners were heated to the target temperature (200 ± 5 °C) and pressed into the skin for 40 s to create the thermal injuries. Time to reach target temperature and elapsed time between burns were recorded. In addition, each unit was evaluated for reproducibility within and across three independent users by generating burn wounds at contact times spanning from 5 to 40 s at a constant pressure and at pressures of 1 or 3 lbs with a constant contact time of 40 s. Biopsies were collected for histological analysis and burn depth quantification using digital image analysis (ImageJ). Results The custom burn device

  15. Peripheral neuromodulation: a review.

    PubMed

    Goroszeniuk, Teodor; Pang, David

    2014-05-01

    Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) is likely the most diverse and rapidly expanding area of neuromodulation. Its expansion has become possible due to both technological and clinical advances in pain medicine. The first implantable systems were surgically placed. However, it is currently commonplace to use percutaneous leads, as this approach has become instrumental in its expansion. The first percutaneous peripheral nerve stimulators were reported in 1999. Cylindrical leads were implanted to stimulate the greater occipital nerve to manage intractable headache. It has been expanded into other individual nerves or nerve plexuses to treat neuropathic, visceral, cardiac, abdominal, low back and facial pain. The use of PNS in modulating organ function in treatment of syndromes such as epilepsy, incontinence and obesity with vagal, tibial and gastric stimulation is under extensive investigation. New technologies that allow easier and safer electrode placement are expected to further expand the uses of PNS. A noninvasive stimulation will open this treatment modality to more clinicians of varying backgrounds.

  16. Burning Fuel Droplet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Fuel ignites and burns in the Droplet Combustion Experiment (DCE) on STS-94 on July 4 1997, MET:2/05:40 (approximate). The DCE was designed to investigate the fundamental combustion aspects of single, isolated droplets under different pressures and ambient oxygen concentrations for a range of droplet sizes varying between 2 and 5 mm. DCE used various fuels -- in drops ranging from 1 mm (0.04 inches) to 5 mm (0.2 inches) -- and mixtures of oxidizers and inert gases to learn more about the physics of combustion in the simplest burning configuration, a sphere. The experiment elapsed time is shown at the bottom of the composite image. The DCE principal investigator was Forman Williams, University of California, San Diego. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (121KB JPEG, 654 x 977 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) The MPG from which this composite was made is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300169.html.

  17. Burning mouth syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Burning mouth syndrome mainly affects women, particularly after the menopause, when its prevalence may be 18-33%. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for burning mouth syndrome? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to February 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 12 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: anaesthetics (local), antidepressants, benzodiazepines (topical clonazepam), benzydamine hydrochloride, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), dietary supplements, and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in postmenopausal women. PMID:19450321

  18. Burning mouth syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Burning mouth syndrome mainly affects women, particularly after the menopause, when its prevalence may be 18% to 33%. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic overview, aiming to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of selected treatments for burning mouth syndrome? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to January 2015 (BMJ Clinical Evidence overviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this overview). Results At this update, searching of electronic databases retrieved 70 studies. After deduplication and removal of conference abstracts, 45 records were screened for inclusion in the overview. Appraisal of titles and abstracts led to the exclusion of 25 studies and the further review of 20 full publications. Of the 20 full articles evaluated, one systematic review and nine RCTs were added at this update. We performed a GRADE evaluation for five PICO combinations. Conclusions In this systematic overview, we categorised the efficacy for six interventions based on information about the effectiveness and safety of alphalipoic acid, benzodiazepines, benzydamine hydrochloride, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs), and tricyclic antidepressants. PMID:26745781

  19. Burns: Treatment and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Burd, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Burns can cause extensive and devastating injuries of the head and neck. Prevention of the initial injury must always be a priority, but once an injury has occurred, then prevention of progression of the damage together with survival of the patient must be the immediate goals. The acute care will have a major influence on the subsequent scarring, reconstructive need, and long-term outcome. In the majority of cases, the reconstruction will involve restoration of form and function to the soft tissues, and the methods used will depend very much on the extent of scarring locally and elsewhere in the body. In nearly all cases, a significant improvement in functional and aesthetic outcomes can be achieved, which, in conjunction with intensive psychosocial rehabilitation, can lead to high-quality patient outcomes. With the prospect of facial transplantation being a clinical reality, the reconstructive spectrum has opened up even further, and, with appropriate reconstruction and support, no patient should be left economically deprived or socially isolated after a burn injury. PMID:22550448

  20. Oral Rehydration Therapy in Burn Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-24

    Burn Any Degree Involving 20-29 Percent of Body Surface; Burn Any Degree Involving 30-39 Percent of Body Surface; Burn Any Degree Involving 40-49 Percent of Body Surface; Burn Any Degree Involving 50-59 Percent of Body Surface; Burn Any Degree Involving 60-65 Percent of Body Surface

  1. Paraesthesia and peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Beran, Roy

    2015-03-01

    Paraesthesia reflects an abnormality affecting the sensory pathways anywhere between the peripheral sensory nervous system and the sensory cortex. As with all neurology, the fundamental diagnostic tool is a concise history, devoid of potentially ambiguous jargon, which properly reflects the true nature of what the patient is experiencing, provocateurs, precipitating and relieving factors, concomitant illnesses, such as diabetes, and any treatments that could evoke neuropathies. Some localised neuropathies, such as carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) or ulnar neuropathy, produce classical features, such as weakness of the 'LOAF' (lateral two lumbricals, opponens pollicis, abductor pollicis brevis and flexor pollicis brevis) median innervated muscles, thereby obviating need for further neurophysiology. Nerve conduction studies may be necessary to diagnose peripheral neuropathy, but they may also be normal with small fibre neuropathy. Even with a diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy, definition of the underlying cause may remain elusive in a significant proportion of cases, despite involvement of consultants. Treatment is based on the relevant diagnosis and mechanism to address the cause. This includes better glycaemic control for diabetes, night splint for CTS or elbow padding for ulnar neuropathy, modifying lifestyle with reduced alcohol consumption or replacing dietary deficiencies or changing medications where appropriate and practical. Should such intervention fail to relieve symptoms, consideration of intervention to relieve symptoms of neuropathic pain may be required.

  2. Global Burned Area and Biomass Burning Emissions from Small Fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randerson, J. T.; Chen, Y.; vanderWerf, G. R.; Rogers, B. M.; Morton, D. C.

    2012-01-01

    In several biomes, including croplands, wooded savannas, and tropical forests, many small fires occur each year that are well below the detection limit of the current generation of global burned area products derived from moderate resolution surface reflectance imagery. Although these fires often generate thermal anomalies that can be detected by satellites, their contributions to burned area and carbon fluxes have not been systematically quantified across different regions and continents. Here we developed a preliminary method for combining 1-km thermal anomalies (active fires) and 500 m burned area observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to estimate the influence of these fires. In our approach, we calculated the number of active fires inside and outside of 500 m burn scars derived from reflectance data. We estimated small fire burned area by computing the difference normalized burn ratio (dNBR) for these two sets of active fires and then combining these observations with other information. In a final step, we used the Global Fire Emissions Database version 3 (GFED3) biogeochemical model to estimate the impact of these fires on biomass burning emissions. We found that the spatial distribution of active fires and 500 m burned areas were in close agreement in ecosystems that experience large fires, including savannas across southern Africa and Australia and boreal forests in North America and Eurasia. In other areas, however, we observed many active fires outside of burned area perimeters. Fire radiative power was lower for this class of active fires. Small fires substantially increased burned area in several continental-scale regions, including Equatorial Asia (157%), Central America (143%), and Southeast Asia (90%) during 2001-2010. Globally, accounting for small fires increased total burned area by approximately by 35%, from 345 Mha/yr to 464 Mha/yr. A formal quantification of uncertainties was not possible, but sensitivity

  3. [Chemical and Thermal Eye Burns].

    PubMed

    Struck, H-G

    2016-11-01

    Background: This review gives a therapeutic approach for the early treatment of chemical and thermal burns of the ocular surface (CTOS). Method: Based on a review of international literature, the experiences of University Hospital Aachen and Halle/Saale, Eye Clinic Cologne as well as experimental data of the research institute (An-Institut) at RWTH Aachen University are considered and discussed. Results: As the risk depends on the stage of CTOS, recommendations are given for acute treatment for different stages. Pathophysiological considerations will be discussed. Special treatment options for exceptional situations and for late phase CTOS are demonstrated. Conclusion: According to the latest data, the most important clinical recommendation for the acute phase of CTOS is the application of a suitable rinsing solution. Furthermore, anti-inflammatory treatment is of central importance. For the therapy of severe CTOS, approved and advanced surgical methods need to be applied. In this way, anti-inflammatory and tissue-protecting mechanisms are activated simultaneously. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Fire behavior, weather, and burn severity of the 2007 Anaktuvuk River tundra fire, North Slope, Alaska

    Treesearch

    Benjamin M. Jones; Crystal A. Kolden; Randi Jandt; John T. Abatzoglu; Frank Urban; Christopher D. Arp

    2009-01-01

    In 2007, the Anaktuvuk River Fire (ARF) became the largest recorded tundra fire on the North Slope of Alaska. The ARF burned for nearly three months, consuming more than 100,000 ha. At its peak in early September, the ARF burned at a rate of 7000 ha d-1. The conditions potentially responsible for this large tundra fire include modeled record high...

  5. Scar Management of the Burned Hand

    PubMed Central

    Sorkin, Michael; Cholok, David; Levi, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Unimpaired hand function is critical in almost all activities of daily living. Burn injury can result in hypertrophic scar formation that can lead to debilitating functional deficits and poor aesthetic outcomes. Initial algorithms of acute burn management involve early debridement and skin grafting and early mobilization to prevent formation of hypertrophic scarring and ultimately digit contractures. While non-operative modalities in the early phase of scar maturation are critical to minimize hypertrophic scar formation, surgical management is often indicated in order to restore hand function. The essential tenant of operative scar management is release of tension, which can often be achieved through local tissue rearrangement. Laser therapy has emerged as a central pillar of subsequent scar rehabilitation with several modalities that address scar texture, color, pruritis and thickness. These can be utilized in conjunction with local corticosteroid treatment and other emerging modalities to modulate the scar and achieve optimal hand function. These treatment tools provide an effective resource for the reconstructive surgeon to treat hypertrophic hand scars. PMID:28363297

  6. Role of burning season on initial understory vegetation response to prescribed fire in a mixed conifer forest

    Treesearch

    Eric E. Knapp; Dylan W. Schwilk; Jeffrey M. Kane; Jon E. Keeley

    2007-01-01

    Although the majority of fires in the western United States historically occurred during the late summer or early fall when fuels were dry and plants were dormant or nearly so, early-season prescribed burns are often ignited when fuels are still moist and plants are actively growing. The purpose of this study was to determine if burn season influences postfire...

  7. A systematic review of quantitative burn wound microbiology in the management of burns patients.

    PubMed

    Halstead, Fenella D; Lee, Kwang Chear; Kwei, Johnny; Dretzke, Janine; Oppenheim, Beryl A; Moiemen, Naiem S

    2018-02-01

    The early diagnosis of infection or sepsis in burns are important for patient care. Globally, a large number of burn centres advocate quantitative cultures of wound biopsies for patient management, since there is assumed to be a direct link between the bioburden of a burn wound and the risk of microbial invasion. Given the conflicting study findings in this area, a systematic review was warranted. Bibliographic databases were searched with no language restrictions to August 2015. Study selection, data extraction and risk of bias assessment were performed in duplicate using pre-defined criteria. Substantial heterogeneity precluded quantitative synthesis, and findings were described narratively, sub-grouped by clinical question. Twenty six laboratory and/or clinical studies were included. Substantial heterogeneity hampered comparisons across studies and interpretation of findings. Limited evidence suggests that (i) more than one quantitative microbiology sample is required to obtain reliable estimates of bacterial load; (ii) biopsies are more sensitive than swabs in diagnosing or predicting sepsis; (iii) high bacterial loads may predict worse clinical outcomes, and (iv) both quantitative and semi-quantitative culture reports need to be interpreted with caution and in the context of other clinical risk factors. The evidence base for the utility and reliability of quantitative microbiology for diagnosing or predicting clinical outcomes in burns patients is limited and often poorly reported. Consequently future research is warranted. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. 30 CFR 816.87 - Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste...-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.87 Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization. (a) Coal mine... extinguishing operations. (b) No burning or burned coal mine waste shall be removed from a permitted disposal...

  9. 30 CFR 816.87 - Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste...-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.87 Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization. (a) Coal mine... extinguishing operations. (b) No burning or burned coal mine waste shall be removed from a permitted disposal...

  10. 30 CFR 816.87 - Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste...-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.87 Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization. (a) Coal mine... extinguishing operations. (b) No burning or burned coal mine waste shall be removed from a permitted disposal...

  11. 30 CFR 816.87 - Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste...-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.87 Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization. (a) Coal mine... extinguishing operations. (b) No burning or burned coal mine waste shall be removed from a permitted disposal...

  12. 30 CFR 816.87 - Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste...-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.87 Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization. (a) Coal mine... extinguishing operations. (b) No burning or burned coal mine waste shall be removed from a permitted disposal...

  13. Animal models in burn research.

    PubMed

    Abdullahi, A; Amini-Nik, S; Jeschke, M G

    2014-09-01

    Burn injury is a severe form of trauma affecting more than 2 million people in North America each year. Burn trauma is not a single pathophysiological event but a devastating injury that causes structural and functional deficits in numerous organ systems. Due to its complexity and the involvement of multiple organs, in vitro experiments cannot capture this complexity nor address the pathophysiology. In the past two decades, a number of burn animal models have been developed to replicate the various aspects of burn injury, to elucidate the pathophysiology, and to explore potential treatment interventions. Understanding the advantages and limitations of these animal models is essential for the design and development of treatments that are clinically relevant to humans. This review aims to highlight the common animal models of burn injury in order to provide investigators with a better understanding of the benefits and limitations of these models for translational applications. While many animal models of burn exist, we limit our discussion to the skin healing of mouse, rat, and pig. Additionally, we briefly explain hypermetabolic characteristics of burn injury and the animal model utilized to study this phenomena. Finally, we discuss the economic costs associated with each of these models in order to guide decisions of choosing the appropriate animal model for burn research.

  14. Ammonia emissions from biomass burning

    Treesearch

    Dean A. Hegg; Lawrence F. Radke; Peter V. Hobbs; Philip J. Riggan

    1988-01-01

    Measurements in the plumes from seven forest fires show that the concentrations of NH3 were considerably in excess of ambient values. Calculation of NH3 emissions from the fires, based on the ratio of NH3/CO in the plumes and emissions of CO from biomass burning, suggest that biomass burning may be a...

  15. Animal Models in Burn Research

    PubMed Central

    Abdullahi, A.; Amini-Nik, S.; Jeschke, M.G

    2014-01-01

    Burn injury is a severe form of trauma affecting more than two million people in North America each year. Burn trauma is not a single pathophysiological event but a devastating injury that causes structural and functional deficits in numerous organ systems. Due to its complexity and the involvement of multiple organs, in vitro experiments cannot capture this complexity nor address the pathophysiology. In the past two decades, a number of burn animal models have been developed to replicate the various aspects of burn injury; to elucidate the pathophysiology and explore potential treatment interventions. Understanding the advantages and limitations of these animal models is essential for the design and development of treatments that are clinically relevant to humans. This review paper aims to highlight the common animal models of burn injury in order to provide investigators with a better understanding of the benefits and limitations of these models for translational applications. While many animal models of burn exist, we limit our discussion to the skin healing of mouse, rat, and pig. Additionally, we briefly explain hypermetabolic characteristics of burn injury and the animal model utilized to study this phenomena. Finally, we discuss the economic costs associated with each of these models in order to guide decisions of choosing the appropriate animal model for burn research. PMID:24714880

  16. Burning crude oil without pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, J.

    1979-01-01

    Crude oil can be burned at drilling sites by two-stage combustion process without producing pollution. Process allows easier conformance to strict federal or state clean air standards without installation of costly pollution removal equipment. Secondary oil recovery can be accomplished with injection of steam heating by burning oil.

  17. Comparison of combat and non-combat burns from ongoing U.S. military operations.

    PubMed

    Kauvar, David S; Cancio, Leopoldo C; Wolf, Steven E; Wade, Charles E; Holcomb, John B

    2006-05-15

    Military burns result from either combat or non-combat causes. We compared these etiologies from patients involved in ongoing conflicts to evaluate their impact and provide prevention recommendations. All military patients with significant burns treated at the United States Army Institute of Surgical Research from April 2003 to May 2005 were reviewed. Injuries were categorized as having resulted from combat or non-combat causes. Demographics, burn severity and pattern, mortality, and early outcomes were compared. There were 273 burn patients seen with 63% injured in combat. A high early rate of non-combat injuries was noted. Feedback on non-combat burn prevention was provided to the combat theater, and the incidence of non-combat burns decreased. Mean age and time from injury to admission did not differ. The majority of combat injuries resulted from explosive device detonation. Waste burning, ammunition handling, and gasoline caused most non-combat injuries. Combat casualties had more associated and inhalation injuries and greater full-thickness burn size; total body surface area burned was equivalent. The hands and the face were the most frequently burned body areas. Mortality was 5% in combat and 2% in non-combat patients. The majority of survivors in both groups returned to military duty. The disparity in full-thickness burn size and incidence of inhalation and associated injuries resulted from differing mechanisms of injury, with explosions and penetrating trauma more common in combat wounds. Despite the severity of combat burns, mortality was low and outcomes generally good. Non-combat burns are preventable and have decreased in incidence.

  18. Forward-looking infrared imaging predicts ultimate burn depth in a porcine vertical injury progression model.

    PubMed

    Miccio, Joseph; Parikh, Shruti; Marinaro, Xavier; Prasad, Atulya; McClain, Steven; Singer, Adam J; Clark, Richard A F

    2016-03-01

    Current methods of assessing burn depth are limited and are primarily based on visual assessments by burn surgeons. This technique has been shown to have only 60% accuracy and a more accurate, simple, noninvasive method is needed to determine burn wound depth. Forward-looking infrared (FLIR) thermography is both noninvasive and user-friendly with the potential to rapidly assess burn depth. The purpose of this paper is to determine if early changes in burn temperature (first 3 days) can be a predictor of burn depth as assessed by vertical scarring 28 days after injury. While under general anesthesia, 20 burns were created on the backs of two female Yorkshire swine using a 2.5cm×2.5cm×7.5cm, 150g aluminum bar, for a total of 40 burns. FLIR imaging was performed at both early (1, 2 and 3 days) and late (7, 10, 14, 17, 21, 24 and 28 days) time points. Burns were imaged from a height of 12 inches from the skin surface. FLIR ExaminIR(©) software was used to examine the infrared thermographs. One hundred temperature points from burn edge to edge across the center of the burn were collected for each burn at all time points and were exported as a comma-separated values (CSV) file. The CSV file was processed and analyzed using a MATLAB program. The temperature profiles through the center of the burns generated parabola-like curves. The lowest temperature (temperature minimum) and a line midway between the temperature minimum and ambient skin temperature at the burn edges was defined and the area of the curve calculated (the "temperature half-area"). Half-area values 2 days after burn had higher correlations with scar depth than did the minimum temperatures. However, burns that became warmer from 1 day to 2 days after injury had a lower scar depth then burns that became cooler and this trend was best predicted by temperature minima. When data were analyzed as a diagnostic test for sensitivity and specificity using >3mm scarring, i.e. a full-thickness burn, as a clinically

  19. A review of community management of paediatric burns.

    PubMed

    Cox, S G; Martinez, R; Glick, A; Numanoglu, A; Rode, H

    2015-12-01

    This study was a component of a broader review to evaluate burn care in South Africa. A prospective audit of 353 children with thermal injuries admitted to the Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital in Cape Town was performed during 2012/2013. The audit was based to assess the adherence of initial burn management to the provincial policy guidelines on the clinical management of the burn wound. The community management of each patient prior to admission to a burns centre was assessed for the following: basic demographics, emergency home management, wound cover, analgesia and transport to medical facilities. Their ages ranged from 1 month to 14 years. The average total body surface area [TBSA] was 15% [1-86%]. Most of the injuries were due to hot water accidents [78.5%] followed by flame burns (9%), direct contact and electricity burns. Two hundred and twenty five children [63%] received first aid measures at home, including cooling with water [166] ice [30] and a cooling agent. No cooling was instituted in 130 and 65% of the patient's wounds were cooled for 10 min or less. Eighty percent proceeded to the referral centre or burns unit without their wounds being covered; with only 19 patients having any medical type of dressing available at home. Two hundred and ninety five children [83.6%] received pain medication prior to admission at the burns unit. Of the 316 patients not directly attending the burns unit, 137 received i.v. fluids of which 95 had burns greater than 10% TBSA. None of the patients were in shock on admission and all i.v. lines were functioning. Forty-four children with burns greater than 10% did not receive i.v. fluids. The audit identified six factors that were inadequately addressed during the pre-admission period: first aid, cooling of the wound, early covering of the wound, resuscitation, pain management and transfer. If these could be readdressed, basic burn care would be substantially improved in the study area. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier

  20. The year in burns 2013.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Steven E; Phelan, Herbert A; Arnoldo, Brett D

    2014-12-01

    Approximately 3415 research articles were published with burns in the title, abstract, and/or keyword in 2013. We have continued to see an increase in this number; the following reviews articles selected from these by the Editor of one of the major journals (Burns) and colleagues that in their opinion are most likely to have effects on burn care treatment and understanding. As we have done before, articles were found and divided into the following topic areas: epidemiology of injury and burn prevention, wound and scar characterization, acute care and critical care, inhalation injury, infection, psychological considerations, pain and itching management, rehabilitation and long-term outcomes, and burn reconstruction. The articles are mentioned briefly with notes from the authors; readers are referred to the full papers for details. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  1. Minor burn management: potions and lotions

    PubMed Central

    Hyland, Ela J; Connolly, Siobhan M; Fox, Jade A; Harvey, John G

    2015-01-01

    Summary The first aid for burns is to run cold water over the burn for 20 minutes. This is effective for up to three hours after the injury. Assess the affected body surface area using the rule of nines. Consult a burn unit if more than 5% of the total body surface area is burnt in a child or if more than 10% in an adult. Extensive or deep burns and burns to special areas, such as the hands, should be referred. Chemical or electrical burns should also be assessed by a burn unit. For minor burns, antimicrobial dressings are recommended, but oral antibiotics should be avoided unless there are signs of infection. As burns are tetanus prone, check the patient’s immunisation status. Burns that become infected or are slow to heal should be discussed with a burn unit. The burn unit can also provide advice if there are uncertainties about how to manage a patient. PMID:26648640

  2. Fires and Burns Involving Home Medical Oxygen

    MedlinePlus

    ... nfpa.org Fires and Burns Involving Home Medical Oxygen The air is normally 21% oxygen. Oxygen is not flammable, but fire needs it to burn. ¾ When more oxygen is present, any fire that starts will burn ...

  3. Bastrop County Complex Fire Burn Scar

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    NASA image acquired September 12, 2011 To view more images from this event go to: earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/event.php?id=52029 The Bastrop County Complex Fire in southern Texas started on September 4, 2011. By September 13, 2011, the fire was 70 percent contained, but had scorched 34,068 acres (13,787 hectares). The Advanced Land Imager (ALI) on NASA’s Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) satellite captured this image of the affected region on September 12, 2011. This false-color image shows a wide-area view of the fire. Vegetation is bright green, and sparsely vegetated or bare land is green-yellow. The burn scar appears in shades of red and orange. The burn scar is far from uniform; burned areas are separated by unburned expanses. As of September 13, a re-entry plan had been established for residents of the region, the Incident Information System reported. Residents were warned, however, that they might see vegetation still smoldering or burning. Ongoing drought set the stage for severe fires in Texas in the slate summer of 2011. In early September, Tropical Storm Lee, which drenched other parts of the United States, brought strong winds to Texas, worsening the fires. NASA Earth Observatory image created by Jesse Allen and Robert Simmon, using EO-1 ALI data provided courtesy of the NASA EO-1 team. Caption by Michon Scott. Instrument: EO-1 - ALI Credit: NASA Earth Observatory NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  4. Pediatric burns: Kids' Inpatient Database vs the National Burn Repository.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, Tahereh; Evans, Tyler A; Sood, Rajiv; Hartman, Brett C; Hadad, Ivan; Tholpady, Sunil S

    2016-04-01

    Burn injuries are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in young children. The Kids' Inpatient Database (KID) and National Burn Repository (NBR) are two large national databases that can be used to evaluate outcomes and help quality improvement in burn care. Differences in the design of the KID and NBR could lead to differing results affecting resultant conclusions and quality improvement programs. This study was designed to validate the use of KID for burn epidemiologic studies, as an adjunct to the NBR. Using the KID (2003, 2006, and 2009), a total of 17,300 nonelective burn patients younger than 20 y old were identified. Data from 13,828 similar patients were collected from the NBR. Outcome variables were compared between the two databases. Comparisons revealed similar patient distribution by gender, race, and burn size. Inhalation injury was more common among the NBR patients and was associated with increased mortality. The rates of respiratory failure, wound infection, cellulitis, sepsis, and urinary tract infection were higher in the KID. Multiple regression analysis adjusting for potential confounders demonstrated similar mortality rate but significantly longer length of stay for patients in the NBR. Despite differences in the design and sampling of the KID and NBR, the overall demographic and mortality results are similar. The differences in complication rate and length of stay should be explored by further studies to clarify underlying causes. Investigations into these differences should also better inform strategies to improve burn prevention and treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cologne burn centre experience with assault burn injuries.

    PubMed

    Theodorou, P; Spanholtz, T A; Amini, P; Maurer, C A; Phan, T Q V; Perbix, W; Lefering, R; Spilker, G

    2009-12-01

    To evaluate demographic and socioeconomic factors associated with assault burn injuries. Assault by burning demonstrates a rare but severe public health issue and accounts for unique injury characteristics in the burn intensive care unit (BICU). We conducted a retrospective cohort study involving patients with thermal injuries admitted to the BICU of a university hospital. The patient cohort was divided into two groups (ABI group: patients with assault burns, n=41; population of all other burned patients admitted to the BICU, n=1202). Bivariate and multivariate analyses including demographic and socioeconomic data were used to identify factors associated with assault burns. Forty-one assault-related burn victims were identified in the study period. This represents 3.3% of all significant burns admitted. Comparing battery victims with the control population, assault patients were more likely to be young (mean age 36.2 years vs. 42.2 years) and immigrants (41.5% vs. 15.1%). Furthermore, marital status (65.9% vs. 40.8% singles), employment status (36.6% vs. 9.7% unemployed) and insurance status (41.5% vs. 12.3% social insurance) were significantly different in the bivariate analysis. Logistic regression evaluation identified three variables that were independently associated with assault burns: younger age (< or =25 years) (odds ratio, 2.54 [95% confidence interval, 1.29-5.02]; p=0.007), ethnic minority (odds ratio, 3.71 [95% confidence interval, 1.91-7.20]; p<0.001) and unemployment (odds ratio, 4.02 [95% confidence interval, 2.03-7.97]; p<0.001). The high incidence of youngsters, unemployment and the great proportion of immigrants in victims of assault might provide several opportunities for community-based psychosocial and occupational programs. A multidisciplinary approach targeting issues specific to the violent nature of the injury and the socioeconomic background of the victims may be of benefit to improve their perspectives for rehabilitation.

  6. Bone markers during acute burn care: Relevance to clinical practice?

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Anne-Françoise; Damas, Pierre; Delanaye, Pierre; Cavalier, Etienne

    2017-02-01

    Bone changes are increasingly described after burn. How bone markers could help to detect early bone changes or to screen burn patients at higher risk of demineralization is still not made clear. We performed an observational study assessing the changes in serum bone markers after moderate burn. Adults admitted in the first 24h following burn extended on >10% body surface area were included. Serum levels of collagen type 1 cross-linked C-telopeptide (CTX), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRAP), type 1 procollagen N-terminal (P1NP) and bone alkaline phosphatase (b-ALP) were measured at admission and every week during the first month. Data are expressed as median [min-max]. Bone markers were measured in 20 patients: 18 men, 2 women (including one post-menopausal). Age was 46 [19-86] years old, burn surface area reached 15 [7-85] %. Twelve patients completed the study. All biomarkers mainly remained into normal ranges during evolution. A huge variability was observed regarding biomarkers evolution. Patient's evolution was not linear and could fluctuate from a decrease to an increase of blood concentrations. There was not necessarily a consistency between the two formation or the two resorption markers. Variations observed between two consecutive measurements were lesser than the accepted critical difference in almost one third of the cases. Considering available data, role and interest of bone markers in management of burn related bone disease remain unclear. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  7. Burning mouth syndrome: A diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Panat, Sunil R.

    2012-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) has been considered an enigmatic condition because the intensity of pain rarely corresponds to the clinical signs of the disease. Various local, systemic and psychological factors are associated with BMS, but its etiology is not fully understood. Also there is no consensus on the diagnosis and classification of BMS. A substantial volume of research has been focused on BMS during the last two decades. Progress has been made but the condition remains a fascinating, yet poorly understood area, in the field of oral medicine. Recently, there has been a resurgence of interest in this disorder with the discovery that the pain of BMS may be neuropathic in origin and originate both centrally and peripherally. The aim of this paper is to explore the condition of BMS with the specific outcome of increasing awareness of the condition. Key words:Burning mouth syndrome, stomatodynia, oral dysesthesia, pain management. PMID:24558551

  8. Burning Mouth Syndrome: Aetiopathogenesis and Principles of Management

    PubMed Central

    Fourie, J.; Bouckaert, M.; Ballyram, R.; Lemmer, J.

    2017-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic debilitating oral condition characterised by a burning sensation of the oral mucosa in an otherwise apparently normal person. Its aetiology and pathogenesis are obscure, but both psychogenic factors and peripheral and central neuropathies appear to be implicated. There is no cure for BMS, and treatment with either local or systemic medications focuses on the relief of symptoms and on improving quality of life. In recalcitrant cases, psychological/psychiatric intervention may be helpful. In order to improve treatment outcomes, a better understanding of the pathogenesis of this syndrome might provide a basis for the development of more effective management strategies. In this short review, we discuss current knowledge of the diagnosis, aetiopathogenesis, and management of BMS. PMID:29180911

  9. Burning Mouth Syndrome: Aetiopathogenesis and Principles of Management.

    PubMed

    Feller, L; Fourie, J; Bouckaert, M; Khammissa, R A G; Ballyram, R; Lemmer, J

    2017-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic debilitating oral condition characterised by a burning sensation of the oral mucosa in an otherwise apparently normal person. Its aetiology and pathogenesis are obscure, but both psychogenic factors and peripheral and central neuropathies appear to be implicated. There is no cure for BMS, and treatment with either local or systemic medications focuses on the relief of symptoms and on improving quality of life. In recalcitrant cases, psychological/psychiatric intervention may be helpful. In order to improve treatment outcomes, a better understanding of the pathogenesis of this syndrome might provide a basis for the development of more effective management strategies. In this short review, we discuss current knowledge of the diagnosis, aetiopathogenesis, and management of BMS.

  10. Free radicals and lipid peroxidation mediated injury in burn trauma: the role of antioxidant therapy.

    PubMed

    Horton, Jureta W

    2003-07-15

    Burn trauma produces significant fluid shifts that, in turn, reduce cardiac output and tissue perfusion. Treatment approaches to major burn injury include administration of crystalloid solutions to correct hypovolemia and to restore peripheral perfusion. While this aggressive postburn volume replacement increases oxygen delivery to previously ischemic tissue, this restoration of oxygen delivery is thought to initiate a series of deleterious events that exacerbate ischemia-related tissue injury. While persistent hypoperfusion after burn trauma would produce cell death, volume resuscitation may exacerbate the tissue injury that occurred during low flow state. It is clear that after burn trauma, tissue adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels gradually fall, and increased adenosine monophosphate (AMP) is converted to hypoxanthine, providing substrate for xanthine oxidase. These complicated reactions produce hydrogen peroxide and superoxide, clearly recognized deleterious free radicals. In addition to xanthine oxidase related free radical generation in burn trauma, adherent-activated neutrophils produce additional free radicals. Enhanced free radical production is paralleled by impaired antioxidant mechanisms; as indicated by burn-related decreases in superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione, alpha tocopherol, and ascorbic acid levels. Burn related upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) may produce peripheral vasodilatation, upregulate the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB), and promote transcription and translation of numerous inflammatory cytokines. NO may also interact with the superoxide radical to yield peroxynitrite, a highly reactive mediator of tissue injury. Free radical mediated cell injury has been supported by postburn increases in systemic and tissue levels of lipid peroxidation products such as conjugated dienes, thiobarbituric acid reaction products, or malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. Antioxidant therapy in burn therapy

  11. Peripherally induced oromandibular dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Sankhla, C.; Lai, E.; Jankovic, J.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Oromandibular dystonia (OMD) is a focal dystonia manifested by involuntary muscle contractions producing repetitive, patterned mouth, jaw, and tongue movements. Dystonia is usually idiopathic (primary), but in some cases it follows peripheral injury. Peripherally induced cervical and limb dystonia is well recognised, and the aim of this study was to characterise peripherally induced OMD.
METHODS—The following inclusion criteria were used for peripherally induced OMD: (1) the onset of the dystonia was within a few days or months (up to 1 year) after the injury; (2) the trauma was well documented by the patient's history or a review of their medical and dental records; and (3) the onset of dystonia was anatomically related to the site of injury (facial and oral).
RESULTS—Twenty seven patients were identified in the database with OMD, temporally and anatomically related to prior injury or surgery. No additional precipitant other than trauma could be detected. None of the patients had any litigation pending. The mean age at onset was 50.11 (SD 14.15) (range 23-74) years and there was a 2:1 female preponderance. Mean latency between the initial trauma and the onset of OMD was 65 days (range 1 day-1 year). Ten (37%) patients had some evidence of predisposing factors such as family history of movement disorders, prior exposure to neuroleptic drugs, and associated dystonia affecting other regions or essential tremor. When compared with 21 patients with primary OMD, there was no difference for age at onset, female preponderance, and phenomenology. The frequency of dystonic writer's cramp, spasmodic dysphonia, bruxism, essential tremor, and family history of movement disorder, however, was lower in the post-traumatic group (p<0.05). In both groups the response to botulinum toxin treatment was superior to medical therapy (p<0.005). Surgical intervention for temporomandibular disorders was more frequent in the post-traumatic group and was associated with

  12. A rare case of failed healing in previously burned skin after a secondary burns.

    PubMed

    Goldie, Stephen J; Parsons, Shaun; Menezes, Hana; Ives, Andrew; Cleland, Heather

    2017-01-01

    Patients presenting with large surface area burns are common in our practice; however, patients with a secondary large burn on pre-existing burn scars and grafts are rare and not reported. We report on an unusual case of a patient sustaining a secondary large burn to areas previously injured by a burn from a different mechanism. We discuss the potential implications when managing a case like this and suggest potential biological reasons why the skin may behave differently. Our patient was a 33-year-old man who presented with a 5% TBSA burn on skin scarred by a previous 40% total body surface area (TBSA) burn and skin grafts. Initially assessed as superficial partial thickness in depth, the wounds were treated conservatively with dressings; however, they failed to heal and became infected requiring surgical management. Burns sustained in areas of previous burn scars and grafts may behave differently to normal patterns of healing, requiring more aggressive management and surgical intervention at an early stage.

  13. Assault by burning in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Haddadin, W

    2012-12-31

    Criminal attacks by burns on women in Jordan are highlighted in this retrospective study carried out of all proved cases of criminal burns in female patients treated at the burn unit of the Royal Rehabilitation Center in Jordan between January 2005 and June 2012. Thirteen patients were included in our study, out of a total of 550 patients admitted, all in the age range of 16-45 yr. Of these 13 women, six were burned by acid throwing, five by hot water, and two by direct flames from fuel thrown over them. Burn percentage ranged from 15 to 75% of the total body surface area, with involvement in most cases of the face and upper trunk. The mean hospital stay was 33 days and the mortality rate was 3/13, i.e. 23%. Violence against women exists in Jordanian society, yet burning assaults are rare. Of these, burning by throwing acid is the most common and most disfiguring act, with a higher mortality rate in domestic environments.

  14. Assault by burning in Jordan

    PubMed Central

    Haddadin, W.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Criminal attacks by burns on women in Jordan are highlighted in this retrospective study carried out of all proved cases of criminal burns in female patients treated at the burn unit of the Royal Rehabilitation Center in Jordan between January 2005 and June 2012. Thirteen patients were included in our study, out of a total of 550 patients admitted, all in the age range of 16-45 yr. Of these 13 women, six were burned by acid throwing, five by hot water, and two by direct flames from fuel thrown over them. Burn percentage ranged from 15 to 75% of the total body surface area, with involvement in most cases of the face and upper trunk. The mean hospital stay was 33 days and the mortality rate was 3/13, i.e. 23%. Violence against women exists in Jordanian society, yet burning assaults are rare. Of these, burning by throwing acid is the most common and most disfiguring act, with a higher mortality rate in domestic environments. PMID:23766757

  15. Infection in burn patients in a referral center in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Blanco, Carlos Enrique; Ramirez-Rivero, Carlos Enrique; Diaz-Martinez, Luis Alfonso; Sosa-Avila, Luis Miguel

    2017-05-01

    Worldwide, burns are responsible for more than 300,000 deaths annually; infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in these patients. Early identification and treatment of infection improves outcome. Toward this end it's necessary to identify the institutions flora and organisms that most frequently produces infection. To characterize infections developed by burn patients hospitalized at the University Hospital of Santander (HUS). Burn patients hospitalized in the HUS from January 1 to December 2014 were followed. Medical information regarding infections, laboratory and pathology reports were obtained. Statistical analysis with measures of central tendency, proportions, global and specific incidence density plus overall and specific incidence was obtained. For the microbiological profile proportions were established. 402 burn patients were included, 234 (58.2%) men and 168 (41.8%) women, aged between 6 days and 83 years, median 12.5 years. The burn agents include scald (52.5%), fire (10.0%), gasoline (9.2%), electricity (7.5%), among others. Burn area ranged from 1% to 80% TBS. Cumulative mortality was 1.5%. 27.8% of burned patients had one or more infections. Identified infections include folliculitis (27.0%), urinary tract infection (19.0%), infection of the burn wound (10.4%), pneumonia (8.6%), Central venous catheter (7.4%), bloodstream infection (7.4%) and skin grafts infection (4.3%) among others. Bacteria were responsible for 88.5% of the cases and fungi 11.5%. The most frequently isolated germs were P. aeruginosa, A. baumannii, E. coli, S. aureus and K. pneumoniae. Most gram-negative bacteria were sensitive to Amikacin, gram positive bacteria were sensitive to multiple antibiotics. Burns is a severe trauma that occurs in adult and pediatric patients, has several causative agents and can compromise the patient's life. The burned patient is at risk for a variety of infections. According to the type of infection it is possible to infer the most

  16. Efficacy of moist exposed burn ointment on burns.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Qi; Yip, Tsui-Pik; Hui, Irene; Lai, Vincy; Wong, Ann

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we sought to test the medical efficacy of a Chinese medical herb product, moist exposed burn ointment (MEBO), on wound healing rate and infection control in burn injury. Standardized deep burn wounds were created on the back skin of rats by applying a hot brass bar for 12 to 18 seconds. MEBO was applied four times per day and compared with petroleum jelly, silver sulfadiazine, and dry exposure therapy. Under such a controlled setting, although MEBO had a better wound healing rate than the dry exposure treatment, it did not show the medical advantage statistically, as has been claimed, over the other two treatments (P > .05), either in terms of wound healing rate or bacterial control. We conclude that the MEBO is not suitable for deep burn wound treatment, particularly when infection is a concern.

  17. The effects of epidermal debridement of partial-thickness burns on infection and reepithelialization in swine.

    PubMed

    Singer, A J; Thode, H C; McClain, S A

    2000-02-01

    Early postburn debridement of burn blisters is controversial. This study was conducted to compare rates of infection and reepithelialization in debrided vs nondebrided second-degree burns in swine. This was a prospective, blinded, controlled, experimental trial using isoflurane-anesthetized swine. Standardized partial-thickness burns were inflicted by applying an aluminum bar preheated to 80 degrees C to the backs and flanks of two young pigs for 20 seconds. In half of the burns the necrotic epidermis was manually debrided. All burns were randomly treated with octylcyanoacrylate spray (OCA) or dry gauze (C). Full-thickness biopsies were taken at 7, 10, and 14 days for blinded histopathologic evaluation. The primary outcomes were the proportions of infected burns at days 7 and 10 and the proportion of completely reepithelialized burns at day 14. Burns were considered infected in the presence of intradermal neutrophils containing bacteria (intraobserver agreement, K = 1.00). A secondary outcome was the proportion of burns with the presence of scar tissue (abnormal collagen under polarized light; intraobserver correlation, K = 0.93). Chi-square tests were used for group comparisons. This study had 90% power to detect a 40-percentage-point difference in infection rates (alpha = 0.05). A total of 126 biopsies from 42 burns were available for review. Infection rates were higher in the debrided burns both at day 7 (55% vs 4.5%, p < 0.001) and at day 10 (65% vs 9%, p < 0.001) after injury. The proportion of nondebrided burns that were completely reepithelialized was higher at days 10 (68% vs 0%, p < 0.001) and 14 (100% vs 65%, p = 0.003). The presence of scar tissue was more common in debrided burns (75% vs 4.5%, p < 0.001). Burns treated with OCA had fewer infections than controls (4% vs 55%, p < 0.001). Fewer OCA-treated debrided burns were reepithelialized at 14 days than those that were not debrided (30% vs 100%, p = 0.001). Under the current study conditions, early

  18. 40 CFR 49.11021 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.11021 Section 49.11021 Protection of... Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, Oregon § 49.11021 Permits for general open burning, agricultural...

  19. 40 CFR 49.11021 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.11021 Section 49.11021 Protection of... Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, Oregon § 49.11021 Permits for general open burning, agricultural...

  20. 40 CFR 49.11021 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.11021 Section 49.11021 Protection of... Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, Oregon § 49.11021 Permits for general open burning, agricultural...

  1. 40 CFR 49.11021 - Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Permits for general open burning, agricultural burning, and forestry and silvicultural burning. 49.11021 Section 49.11021 Protection of... Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, Oregon § 49.11021 Permits for general open burning, agricultural...

  2. Several Flame Balls Burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Structure of Flameballs at Low Lewis Numbers (SOFBALL) experiments aboard the space shuttle in 1997 a series of sturningly successful burns. This sequence was taken during STS-94, July 12, 1997, MET:10/08:18 (approximate). It was thought these extremely dim flameballs (1/20 the power of a kitchen match) could last up to 200 seconds -- in fact, they can last for at least 500 seconds. This has ramifications in fuel-spray design in combustion engines, as well as fire safety in space. The SOFBALL principal investigator was Paul Ronney, University of Southern California, Los Angeles. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced combustion experiments will be a part of investigations planned for the International Space Station. (925KB, 9-second MPEG spanning 10 minutes, screen 320 x 240 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300186.html.

  3. Burn Incidence and Treatment in the U.S.

    MedlinePlus

    ... state health data systems, and the National Burn Repository (NBR) of the American Burn Association (ABA). ABA ... Burn Admissions to Burn Centers (ABA National Burn Repository 2015) Survival Rate: 96.8% Gender: 68% Male, ...

  4. Prescribed burning weather in Minnesota.

    Treesearch

    Rodney W. Sando

    1969-01-01

    Describes the weather patterns in northern Minnesota as related to prescribed burning. The prevailing wind direction, average wind speed, most persistent wind direction, and average Buildup Index are considered in making recommendations.

  5. Eye burning - itching and discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... as chlorine in a swimming pool or makeup) Dry eyes Irritants in the air (cigarette smoke or smog) ... almost all causes of burning and irritation, especially dry eyes. If you have allergies, try to avoid the ...

  6. Alkalosis in Burns in Children

    PubMed Central

    Black, J. A.; Harris, F.; Lenton, E. A.; Miller, R. W. S.; Child, V. J.

    1971-01-01

    The acid-base changes in 14 children with severe burns were studied for varying periods after resuscitation. A long-continued metabolic alkalosis was found, which may be due to increased adrenocortical activity. PMID:5124436

  7. Burn Scars Across Southern California

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-26

    Brush fires consumed nearly 750,000 acres across Southern California between October 21 and November 18, 2003. Burn scars and vegetation changes wrought by the fires are illustrated in these false-color images from NASA Terra spacecraft.

  8. Lawn mower-related burns.

    PubMed

    Still, J; Orlet, H; Law, E; Gertler, C

    2000-01-01

    Lawn mower-related injuries are fairly common and are usually caused by the mower blades. Burns may also be associated with the use of power lawn mowers. We describe 27 lawn mower-related burn injuries of 24 male patients and 3 female patients. Three of the patients with burn injuries were children. Burn sizes ranged from 1% to 99% of the total body surface area (mean, 18.1%). Two of the patients died. The hospital stay ranged from 1 day to 45 days. Twenty-six injuries involved gasoline, which is frequently associated with refueling accidents. Safety measures should involve keeping children away from lawn mowers that are being used. The proper use and storage of gasoline is stressed.

  9. A modified surgical technique in the management of eyelid burns: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Contractures, ectropion and scarring, the most common sequelae of skin grafts after eyelid burn injuries, can result in corneal exposure, corneal ulceration and even blindness. Split-thickness or full-thickness skin grafts are commonly used for the treatment of acute eyelid burns. Plasma exudation and infection are common early complications of eyelid burns, which decrease the success rate of grafts. Case presentation We present the cases of eight patients, two Chinese women and six Chinese men. The first Chinese woman was 36 years old, with 70% body surface area second or third degree flame burn injuries involving her eyelids on both sides. The other Chinese woman was 28 years old, with sulfuric acid burns on her face and third degree burn on her eyelids. The six Chinese men were aged 21, 31, 38, 42, 44, and 55 years, respectively. The 38-year-old patient was transferred from the ER with 80% body surface area second or third degree flame burn injuries and third degree burn injuries to his eyelids. The other five men were all patients with flame burn injuries, with 7% to 10% body surface area third degree burns and eyelids involved. All patients were treated with a modified surgical procedure consisting of separation and loosening of the musculus orbicularis oculi between tarsal plate and septum orbital, followed by grafting a large full-thickness skin graft in three days after burn injury. The use of our modified surgical procedure resulted in 100% successful eyelid grafting on first attempt, and all our patients were in good condition at six-month follow-up. Conclusions This new surgical technique is highly successful in treating eyelid burn injuries, especially flame burn injuries of the eyelid. PMID:21843322

  10. Aging impairs the mobilization and homing of bone marrow-derived angiogenic cells to burn wounds

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xianjie; Sarkar, Kakali; Rey, Sergio; Sebastian, Raul; Andrikopoulou, Efstathia; Marti, Guy P.; Fox-Talbot, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Impaired wound healing in the elderly represents a major clinical problem. Delineating the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which aging impairs wound healing may lead to the development of improved treatment strategies for elderly patients with non-healing wounds. Neovascularization is an essential step in wound healing, and bone marrow-derived angiogenic cells (BMDACs) play an important role in vascularization. Using a mouse full-thickness burn wound model, we demonstrate that perfusion and vascularization of burn wounds were impaired by aging and were associated with dramatically reduced mobilization of BMDACs bearing the cell surface molecules CXCR4 and Sca1. Expression of stromal-derived factor 1 (SDF-1), the cytokine ligand for CXCR4, was significantly decreased in peripheral blood and burn wounds of old mice. Expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α was detected in burn wounds from young (2-month-old), but not old (2-year-old), mice. When BMDACs from young donor mice were injected intravenously, homing to burn wound tissue was impaired in old recipient mice, whereas the age of the BMDAC donor mice had no effect on homing. Our results indicate that aging impairs burn wound vascularization by impairing the mobilization of BMDACs and their homing to burn wound tissue as a result of impaired HIF-1 induction and SDF-1 signaling. PMID:21499736

  11. Neutrino-Induced Hydrogen Burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, Chad T.; Fuller, George M.

    2006-07-01

    The principal hydrogen burning mechanisms that take place in stars have been elucidated and explored for many decades. However, the introduction of a prodigious flux of electron anti-neutrinos would significantly accelerate these mechanisms and change the path toward the production of an α particle. We discuss the nature of such changes in the hydrogen burning mechanisms, and the side effects spawned from such alterations.

  12. Burns Caused by Medical Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-05-01

    Insensate skin and chronic medical illness such as diabetes mellitus were common risk factors. The scald potential from hydrotherapy in patients with...anesthetized, unconscious, or immobilized patients by the use of hydrotherapy , heating blankets, hot water bonlcs, or other warm- 272 Bnrillo cr a/ ing de...Hwang JC, Himel HN, Edlich RF. Bilateral amputations foUowing hydrotherapy t:lnk burns in a. paraplegic patient. Burns 1995;21:70-L 53. Simonsen K

  13. Prescribed burning in the North Central States.

    Treesearch

    Linda R. Donoghue; Von J. Johnson

    1975-01-01

    Describes 5 years of prescribed burning in the North Central States from 1968 through 1972. Provides information concerning participating agencies, burned-acreage, purpose-of-burn, fuels, and weather. Also examines other aspects such as ignition and burning techniques, hours-to-complete, time of fire start, and cost-per-acre.

  14. Lenticular burns following argon panretinal photocoagulation.

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, S. M.; Mahl, C. F.; Schiller, S. B.

    1992-01-01

    Photocoagulation burns of the crystalline lens are a rare complication of posterior segment laser surgery. These burns occur more commonly in eyes with cataracts and with small, high-power, long-duration argon blue-green burns. We describe the first occurrence of lenticular burns caused by a fractured laser fibre optic cord. Images PMID:1340772

  15. Nitramine propellants. [gun propellant burning rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, N. S.; Strand, L. D. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Nitramine propellants without a pressure exponent shift in the burning rate curves are prepared by matching the burning rate of a selected nitramine or combination of nitramines within 10% of burning rate of a plasticized active binder so as to smooth out the break point appearance in the burning rate curve.

  16. Effect of crib dimensions on burning rate

    Treesearch

    S. McAllister; M. Finney

    2013-01-01

    The burning rate of unconfined cribs has long been identified to occur in two regimes: the densely-packed regime where the burning rate is proportional to the crib porosity and the loosely-packed regime where the burning rate is independent of porosity. Though the cribs used to define these burning regimes were primarily cubic in dimension, there are seemingly endless...

  17. 50 CFR 35.10 - Controlled burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Controlled burning. 35.10 Section 35.10 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE... burning. Controlled burning will be permitted on wilderness units when such burning will contribute to the...

  18. 50 CFR 35.10 - Controlled burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Controlled burning. 35.10 Section 35.10 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE... burning. Controlled burning will be permitted on wilderness units when such burning will contribute to the...

  19. 21 CFR 880.5180 - Burn sheet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Burn sheet. 880.5180 Section 880.5180 Food and... Burn sheet. (a) Identification. A burn sheet is a device made of a porous material that is wrapped aroung a burn victim to retain body heat, to absorb wound exudate, and to serve as a barrier against...

  20. 50 CFR 35.10 - Controlled burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Controlled burning. 35.10 Section 35.10 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE... burning. Controlled burning will be permitted on wilderness units when such burning will contribute to the...

  1. 50 CFR 35.10 - Controlled burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Controlled burning. 35.10 Section 35.10 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE... burning. Controlled burning will be permitted on wilderness units when such burning will contribute to the...

  2. 21 CFR 880.5180 - Burn sheet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Burn sheet. 880.5180 Section 880.5180 Food and... Burn sheet. (a) Identification. A burn sheet is a device made of a porous material that is wrapped aroung a burn victim to retain body heat, to absorb wound exudate, and to serve as a barrier against...

  3. 50 CFR 35.10 - Controlled burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Controlled burning. 35.10 Section 35.10 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE... burning. Controlled burning will be permitted on wilderness units when such burning will contribute to the...

  4. 21 CFR 880.5180 - Burn sheet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Burn sheet. 880.5180 Section 880.5180 Food and... Burn sheet. (a) Identification. A burn sheet is a device made of a porous material that is wrapped aroung a burn victim to retain body heat, to absorb wound exudate, and to serve as a barrier against...

  5. 21 CFR 880.5180 - Burn sheet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Burn sheet. 880.5180 Section 880.5180 Food and... Burn sheet. (a) Identification. A burn sheet is a device made of a porous material that is wrapped aroung a burn victim to retain body heat, to absorb wound exudate, and to serve as a barrier against...

  6. 21 CFR 880.5180 - Burn sheet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Burn sheet. 880.5180 Section 880.5180 Food and... Burn sheet. (a) Identification. A burn sheet is a device made of a porous material that is wrapped aroung a burn victim to retain body heat, to absorb wound exudate, and to serve as a barrier against...

  7. Peripheral Refraction, Peripheral Eye Length, and Retinal Shape in Myopia.

    PubMed

    Verkicharla, Pavan K; Suheimat, Marwan; Schmid, Katrina L; Atchison, David A

    2016-09-01

    To investigate how peripheral refraction and peripheral eye length are related to retinal shape. Relative peripheral refraction (RPR) and relative peripheral eye length (RPEL) were determined in 36 young adults (M +0.75D to -5.25D) along horizontal and vertical visual field meridians out to ±35° and ±30°, respectively. Retinal shape was determined in terms of vertex radius of curvature Rv, asphericity Q, and equivalent radius of curvature REq using a partial coherence interferometry method involving peripheral eye lengths and model eye raytracing. Second-order polynomial fits were applied to RPR and RPEL as functions of visual field position. Linear regressions were determined for the fits' second order coefficients and for retinal shape estimates as functions of central spherical refraction. Linear regressions investigated relationships of RPR and RPEL with retinal shape estimates. Peripheral refraction, peripheral eye lengths, and retinal shapes were significantly affected by meridian and refraction. More positive (hyperopic) relative peripheral refraction, more negative RPELs, and steeper retinas were found along the horizontal than along the vertical meridian and in myopes than in emmetropes. RPR and RPEL, as represented by their second-order fit coefficients, correlated significantly with retinal shape represented by REq. Effects of meridian and refraction on RPR and RPEL patterns are consistent with effects on retinal shape. Patterns derived from one of these predict the others: more positive (hyperopic) RPR predicts more negative RPEL and steeper retinas, more negative RPEL predicts more positive relative peripheral refraction and steeper retinas, and steeper retinas derived from peripheral eye lengths predict more positive RPR.

  8. Chemical and Common Burns in Children.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shan

    2017-05-01

    Burns are a common cause of preventable morbidity and mortality in children. Thermal and chemical burns are the most common types of burns. Their clinical appearance can be similar and the treatment is largely similar. Thermal burns in children occur primarily after exposure to a hot surface or liquid, or contact with fire. Burns are typically classified based on the depth and total body surface area, and the severity and onset of the burn can also depend on the temperature and duration of contact. Chemical burns are caused by chemicals-most commonly acids and alkalis-that can damage the skin on contact. In children, the most common cause of chemical burns is from household products such as toilet bowl cleaners, drain cleaners, detergents, and bleaches. Mild chemical burns generally cause redness and pain and can look similar to other common rashes or skin infections, whereas severe chemical burns are more extreme and may cause redness, blistering, skin peeling, and swelling.

  9. 30 CFR 817.87 - Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste...-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES § 817.87 Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization. (a) Coal mine... extinguishing operations. (b) No burning or unburned coal mine waste shall be removed from a permitted disposal...

  10. 30 CFR 817.87 - Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste...-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES § 817.87 Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization. (a) Coal mine... extinguishing operations. (b) No burning or unburned coal mine waste shall be removed from a permitted disposal...

  11. 30 CFR 817.87 - Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste...-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES § 817.87 Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization. (a) Coal mine... extinguishing operations. (b) No burning or unburned coal mine waste shall be removed from a permitted disposal...

  12. 30 CFR 817.87 - Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste...-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES § 817.87 Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization. (a) Coal mine... extinguishing operations. (b) No burning or unburned coal mine waste shall be removed from a permitted disposal...

  13. 30 CFR 817.87 - Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste...-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES § 817.87 Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization. (a) Coal mine... extinguishing operations. (b) No burning or unburned coal mine waste shall be removed from a permitted disposal...

  14. Recurrent peripheral cemento-ossifying fibroma.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Treville; Shetty, Subraj; Shetty, Arvind; Pereira, Svylvy

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral cement-ossifying fibroma (PCOF) is a rare osteogenic neoplasm that ordinarily presents as an epulis-like growth. It frequently occurs in maxillary anterior region in teenagers and young adults. We report a case of PCOF in a 42-year-old male, which was previously surgically excised and recurred after a period of 2 years. PCOF should be considered in the differential diagnosis of reactive hyperplastic lesions originating from gingiva. Hence, early diagnosis with proper surgical excision and aggressive curettage of the adjacent tissues is essential for prevention of recurrence.

  15. Odontogenic keratocyst: a peripheral variant.

    PubMed

    Vij, H; Vij, R; Gupta, V; Sengupta, S

    2011-01-01

    Odontogenic keratocyst, which is developmental in nature, is an intraosseous lesion though on rare occasions it may occur in an extraosseous location. The extraosseous variant is referred to as peripheral odontogenic keratocyst. Though, clinically, peripheral odontogenic keratocyst resembles the gingival cyst of adults, it has histologic features that are pathognomonic of odontogenic keratocyst. This article presents a case of this uncommon entity.

  16. Effects of burn location and investigator on burn depth in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Singer, Adam J; Toussaint, Jimmy; Chung, Won Taek; Thode, Henry C; McClain, Steve; Raut, Vivek

    2016-02-01

    In order to be useful, animal models should be reproducible and consistent regardless of sampling bias, investigator creating burn, and burn location. We determined the variability in burn depth based on biopsy location, burn location and investigator in a porcine model of partial thickness burns. 24 partial thickness burns (2.5 cm by 2.5 cm each) were created on the backs of 2 anesthetized pigs by 2 investigators (one experienced, one inexperienced) using a previously validated model. In one of the pigs, the necrotic epidermis covering each burn was removed. Five full thickness 4mm punch biopsies were obtained 1h after injury from the four corners and center of the burns and stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin and Masson's trichrome for determination of burn depth by a board certified dermatopathologist blinded to burn location and investigator. Comparisons of burn depth by biopsy location, burn location and investigator were performed with t-tests and ANOVA as appropriate. The mean (SD) depth of injury to blood vessels (the main determinant of burn progression) in debrided and non-debrided pigs pooled together was 1.8 (0.3)mm, which included 75% of the dermal depth. Non-debrided burns were 0.24 mm deeper than debrided burns (P<0.001). Burn depth increased marginally from cephalic to caudal in non-debrided burns, but showed no statistical differences for these locations, in debrided burns. Additionally, there were also no statistical differences in burn depths from midline to lateral in either of these burn types. Burn depth was similar for both investigators and among biopsy locations. Burn depth was greater for caudal locations in non-debrided burns and overall non-debrided burns were deeper than debrided burns. However, burn depth did not differ based on investigator, biopsy site, and medial-lateral location. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  17. How to manage burns in primary care.

    PubMed Central

    Waitzman, A. A.; Neligan, P. C.

    1993-01-01

    Burns are common injuries; more than 200,000 occur in Canada annually. Nearly all burn injuries can be managed on on outpatient basis. Appropriate treatment depends on burn depth, extent, and location. Special types of burns, such as chemical, tar, and electrical injuries, need specific management strategies. Prevention through education is important to reduce the incidence of burns. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8268745

  18. Computer aided diagnosis of diabetic peripheral neuropathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekh, Viktor; Soliz, Peter; McGrew, Elizabeth; Barriga, Simon; Burge, Mark; Luan, Shuang

    2014-03-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) refers to the nerve damage that can occur in diabetes patients. It most often affects the extremities, such as the feet, and can lead to peripheral vascular disease, deformity, infection, ulceration, and even amputation. The key to managing diabetic foot is prevention and early detection. Unfortunately, current existing diagnostic techniques are mostly based on patient sensations and exhibit significant inter- and intra-observer differences. We have developed a computer aided diagnostic (CAD) system for diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The thermal response of the feet of diabetic patients following cold stimulus is captured using an infrared camera. The plantar foot in the images from a thermal video are segmented and registered for tracking points or specific regions. The temperature recovery of each point on the plantar foot is extracted using our bio-thermal model and analyzed. The regions that exhibit abnormal ability to recover are automatically identified to aid the physicians to recognize problematic areas. The key to our CAD system is the segmentation of infrared video. The main challenges for segmenting infrared video compared to normal digital video are (1) as the foot warms up, it also warms up the surrounding, creating an ever changing contrast; and (2) there may be significant motion during imaging. To overcome this, a hybrid segmentation algorithm was developed based on a number of techniques such as continuous max-flow, model based segmentation, shape preservation, convex hull, and temperature normalization. Verifications of the automatic segmentation and registration using manual segmentation and markers show good agreement.

  19. [Clinical and biological monitoring of nutritional status in severe burns].

    PubMed

    Bargues, L; Cottez-Gacia, S; Jault, P; Renard, C; Vest, P

    2009-01-01

    Burn patients are subject to hypermetabolism and catabolic states. Aim was to evaluate our current practice in nutrition. Twenty-one severely burned patients were prospectively included during three months period. Body weight was measured at least two times in a week during all stay in burn ICU. Biological markers of inflammation (C-reactive protein, CRP) and nutrition (prealbumin) were performed weekly. Protocol included early nasogastric feeding, tolerated gastric stasis less than 250 mL at four hours nasogastric aspirations, caloric target value of 40 Kcal/kg per day and measurement of total daily calorie intakes. Patient demographics showed a mean percent total body surface burn of 51.1+/-27 % (range 20-90), age of 38.7+/-13.1 years (range 18-67) and 57.3 % of smoke inhalation. All patients were ventilated and 19 patients survived. Length of stay was 75.7+/-47 days (range 22-184). Patients received only 58.9+/-10 % of calorie intakes recommended by French burn society. Loss of body mass was 15.2+/-9 kg (range 3-31) or 19.1+/-10 % of admission weight (range 5-37). Erosion of body mass was not correlated with burned surface (p=0.08), calorie intakes (p=0.26), smoke inhalation (p=0.46), lengths of stay (p=0.53), lengths of ventilation (p=0.08) or nutrition (p=0.12), days of antibiotic (p=0.72), number of dressing changes (p=0.6) or surgery (p=0.64). Biological parameters showed CRP decreasing and prealbumin improving values. New strategies of nutrition are necessary to improve outcome and reduce body mass loss in burns.

  20. Tweens feel the burn: "salt and ice challenge" burns.

    PubMed

    Roussel, Lauren O; Bell, Derek E

    2016-05-01

    To review our institution's experience with frostbite injury secondary to "salt and ice challenge" (SIC) participation. We conducted a retrospective analysis of intentional freezing burns from 2012 to 2014. Demographics, depth and location of burn, total body surface area of burn, treatment, time to wound healing, length of stay, complications, and motives behind participation were analyzed. Five patients were seen in the emergency department for intentional freezing burns that resulted from SIC (all females; mean age: 12.3 years; range age: 10.0-13.2 years). Mean total body surface area was 0.408%. Salt and ice was in contact with skin for >10 min for two patients, >20 min for two patients, and an unknown duration for one patient. Complications included pain and burn scar dyschromia. Four patients cited peer pressure and desire to replicate SIC as seen on the Internet as their motivation in attempting the challenge. SIC has become a popular, self-harming behavior among youths. Increased public education, and provider and parent awareness of SIC are essential to address this public health concern.

  1. From traditional biochemical signals to molecular markers for detection of sepsis after burn injuries.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Balam; Suárez-Sánchez, Rocío; Hernández-Hernández, Oscar; Franco-Cendejas, Rafael; Cortés, Hernán; Magaña, Jonathan J

    2018-05-22

    Sepsis is a life-threatening organ-dysfunction condition caused by a dysregulated response to an infectious condition that can cause complications in patients with major trauma. Burns are one of the most destructive forms of trauma; despite the improvements in medical care, infections remain an important cause of burn injury-related mortality and morbidity, and complicated sepsis predisposes patients to diverse complications such as organ failure, lengthening of hospital stays, and increased costs. Accurate diagnosis and early treatment of sepsis may have a beneficial impact on clinical outcome of burn-injured patients. In this review, we offer a comprehensive description of the current and traditional markers used as indicative of sepsis in burned patients. However, although these are markers of the inflammatory post-burn response, they usually fail to predict sepsis in severely burned patients due to that they do not reflect the severity of the infection. Identification and measurement of biomarkers in early stages of infection is important in order to provide timely response and effective treatment of burned patients. Therefore, we compiled important experimental evidence, demonstrating novel biomarkers, including molecular markers such as genomic DNA variations, alterations of transcriptome profiling (mRNA, miRNAs, lncRNAs and circRNAs), epigenetic markers, and advances in proteomics and metabolomics. Finally, this review summarizes next-generation technologies for the identification of markers for detection of sepsis after burn injuries. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  2. LA50 in burn injuries.

    PubMed

    Seyed-Forootan, K; Karimi, H; Motevalian, S A; Momeni, M; Safari, R; Ghadarjani, M

    2016-03-31

    Burn injuries put a huge financial burden on patients and healthcare systems. They are the 8th leading cause of mortality and the 13th most common cause of morbidity in our country. We used data from our Burn Registry Program to evaluate risk factors for mortality and lethal area fifty percent (LA50) in all burn patients admitted over two years. We used multiple logistic regressions to identify risk factors for mortality. LA50 is a reliable aggregate index for hospital care quality and a good measure for comparing results, also with those of other countries. 28,690 burn patients sought medical attention in the Emergency Department, and 1721 of them were admitted. Male to female ratio was 1,75:1. 514 patients were under 15 years old. Median age was 25 (range: 3 months - 93 years). Overall, probability of death was 8.4%. LA50 was 62.31% (CI 95%: 56.57-70.02) for patients aged 15 and over and 72.52% (CI 95%: 61.01-100) for those under 15. In the final model, we found that Adjusted OR was significant for age, female sex, TBSA and inhalation injury (P < 0.05). LA50 values showed that children tolerate more extensive burns. Female sex, burn size, age and inhalation injury were the main risk factors for death. Authorities should pay special attention to these variables, especially in prevention programs, to reduce mortality and improve patient outcome. Children have better outcome than adults given equal burn size. Suicide rates are higher for women than men in our country.

  3. The treatment of sulphur mustard burns with laser debridement.

    PubMed

    Evison, D; Brown, R F R; Rice, P

    2006-01-01

    The chemical warfare agent, sulphur mustard (SM), is a potent blistering agent in man. Skin exposure can produce partial-thickness burns which take up to three months to heal. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of early laser ablation as a means of accelerating this exceptionally slow rate of healing. Four circular partial-thickness SM burns were induced on the dorsum of nine large white pigs (under general anaesthesia). At 72 h post-exposure, three burns per animal were ablated with a single pass of an UltraPulse 5000C CO(2) laser, at a fluence of 5-6 J cm(-2). All the burns were dressed with silver sulphadiazine and a semi-occlusive dressing. At one, two and three weeks post-surgery three animals were culled and all lesions excised for histological analysis. Burn depth was confirmed and measurements of the radii of regenerative epithelium were performed allowing the area of the zone of re-epithelialisation in each lesion to be calculated. Laser-treated lesions showed a significant increase (350%) in healing rates compared to controls (p<0.005). At two weeks, the laser-treated sites were 95% healed in comparison with control sites (28% healed). These data suggest that laser ablation may be effective in the treatment of partial-thickness SM-induced skin injury.

  4. Life expectancy in elderly patients following burns injury.

    PubMed

    Sepehripour, Sarvnaz; Duggineni, Sirisha; Shahsavari, Somaya; Dheansa, Baljit

    2018-05-18

    Burn injuries commonly occur in vulnerable age and social groups. Previous research has shown that frailty may represent a more important marker of adverse outcome in healthcare rather than chronological age (Roberts et al., 2012). In this paper we determined the relationship between burn injury, frailty, co-morbidities and long-term survival. Retrospective data collection from patients aged 75 with burns injuries, treated and discharged at Queen Victoria Hospital. The Clinical Frailty Scale (Rockwood et al., 2005) was used to calculate frailty at the time of admission. The expected mortality age (life expectancy) of deceased patients was obtained from two survival predictors. The data shows a statistically significant correlation between frailty score and complications and a statistically significant correlation between total body surface area percentage and complications. No significant difference was found between expected and observed age of death or life expectancy amongst the deceased (p value of 0.109). Based on the data from our unit, sustaining a burn as an elderly person does not reduce life expectancy. Medical and surgical complications, immediate, early and late, although higher with greater frailty and TBSA of burn, but do not adversely affect survival in this population. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Barriers to return to work after burn injuries.

    PubMed

    Esselman, Peter C; Askay, Shelley Wiechman; Carrougher, Gretchen J; Lezotte, Dennis C; Holavanahalli, Radha K; Magyar-Russell, Gina; Fauerbach, James A; Engrav, Loren H

    2007-12-01

    To identify barriers to return to work after burn injury as identified by the patient. A cohort study with telephone interview up to 1 year. Hospital-based burn centers at 3 national sites. Hospitalized patients (N=154) meeting the American Burn Association criteria for major burn injury, employed at least 20 hours a week at the time of injury, and with access to a telephone after discharge. Patients were contacted via telephone every 2 weeks up to 4 months, then monthly up to 1 year after discharge. A return to work survey was used to identify barriers that prevented patients from returning to work. A graphic rating scale determined the impact of each barrier. By 1 year, 79.7% of patients returned to work. Physical and wound issues were barriers early after discharge. Although physical abilities continued to be a significant barrier up to 1 year, working conditions (temperature, humidity, safety) and psychosocial factors (nightmares, flashbacks, appearance concerns) became important issues in those with long-term disability. The majority of patients return to work after a burn injury. Although physical and work conditions are important barriers, psychosocial issues need to be evaluated and treated to optimize return to work.

  6. Examining the Correlation between Objective Injury Parameters, Personality Traits, and Adjustment Measures among Burn Victims

    PubMed Central

    Weissman, Oren; Domniz, Noam; Petashnick, Yoel R.; Gilboa, Dalia; Raviv, Tal; Barzilai, Liran; Farber, Nimrod; Harats, Moti; Winkler, Eyal; Haik, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Background: Burn victims experience immense physical and mental hardship during their process of rehabilitation and regaining functionality. We examined different objective burn-related factors as well as psychological ones, in the form of personality traits that may affect the rehabilitation process and its outcome. Objective: To assess the influence and correlation of specific personality traits and objective injury-related parameters on the adjustment of burn victims post-injury. Methods: Sixty-two male patients admitted to our burn unit due to burn injuries were compared with 36 healthy male individuals by use of questionnaires to assess each group’s psychological adjustment parameters. Multivariate and hierarchical regression analysis was conducted to identify differences between the groups. Results: A significant negative correlation was found between the objective burn injury severity (e.g., total body surface area and burn depth) and the adjustment of burn victims (p < 0.05, p < 0.001, Table 3). Moreover, patients more severely injured tend to be more neurotic (p < 0.001), and less extroverted and agreeable (p < 0.01, Table 4). Conclusion: Extroverted burn victims tend to adjust better to their post-injury life while the neurotic patients tend to have difficulties adjusting. This finding may suggest new tools for early identification of maladjustment-prone patients and therefore provide them with better psychological support in a more dedicated manner. PMID:25874193

  7. Comparing the reported burn conditions for different severity burns in porcine models: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Christine J; Cuttle, Leila

    2017-12-01

    There are many porcine burn models that create burns using different materials (e.g. metal, water) and different burn conditions (e.g. temperature and duration of exposure). This review aims to determine whether a pooled analysis of these studies can provide insight into the burn materials and conditions required to create burns of a specific severity. A systematic review of 42 porcine burn studies describing the depth of burn injury with histological evaluation is presented. Inclusion criteria included thermal burns, burns created with a novel method or material, histological evaluation within 7 days post-burn and method for depth of injury assessment specified. Conditions causing deep dermal scald burns compared to contact burns of equivalent severity were disparate, with lower temperatures and shorter durations reported for scald burns (83°C for 14 seconds) compared to contact burns (111°C for 23 seconds). A valuable archive of the different mechanisms and materials used for porcine burn models is presented to aid design and optimisation of future models. Significantly, this review demonstrates the effect of the mechanism of injury on burn severity and that caution is recommended when burn conditions established by porcine contact burn models are used by regulators to guide scald burn prevention strategies. © 2017 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Burning mouth syndrome: Current concepts.

    PubMed

    Nasri-Heir, Cibele; Zagury, Julyana Gomes; Thomas, Davis; Ananthan, Sowmya

    2015-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic pain condition. It has been described by the International Headache Society as "an intra-oral burning or dysesthetic sensation, recurring daily for more than 2 h/day for more than 3 months, without clinically evident causative lesions." BMS is frequently seen in women in the peri-menopausal and menopausal age group in an average female/male ratio of 7:1. The site most commonly affected is the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. The patient may also report taste alterations and oral dryness along with the burning. The etiopathogenesis is complex and is not well-comprehended. The more accepted theories point toward a neuropathic etiology, but the gustatory system has also been implicated in this condition. BMS is frequently mismanaged, partly because it is not well-known among healthcare providers. Diagnosis of BMS is made after other local and systemic causes of burning have been ruled out as then; the oral burning is the disease itself. The management of BMS still remains a challenge. Benzodiazepines have been used in clinical practice as the first-line medication in the pharmacological management of BMS. Nonpharmacological management includes cognitive behavioral therapy and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The aim of this review is to familiarize healthcare providers with the diagnosis, pathogenesis, and general characteristics of primary BMS while updating them with the current treatment options to better manage this group of patients.

  9. Burning mouth syndrome: Current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Nasri-Heir, Cibele; Zagury, Julyana Gomes; Thomas, Davis; Ananthan, Sowmya

    2015-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic pain condition. It has been described by the International Headache Society as “an intra-oral burning or dysesthetic sensation, recurring daily for more than 2 h/day for more than 3 months, without clinically evident causative lesions.” BMS is frequently seen in women in the peri-menopausal and menopausal age group in an average female/male ratio of 7:1. The site most commonly affected is the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. The patient may also report taste alterations and oral dryness along with the burning. The etiopathogenesis is complex and is not well-comprehended. The more accepted theories point toward a neuropathic etiology, but the gustatory system has also been implicated in this condition. BMS is frequently mismanaged, partly because it is not well-known among healthcare providers. Diagnosis of BMS is made after other local and systemic causes of burning have been ruled out as then; the oral burning is the disease itself. The management of BMS still remains a challenge. Benzodiazepines have been used in clinical practice as the first-line medication in the pharmacological management of BMS. Nonpharmacological management includes cognitive behavioral therapy and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The aim of this review is to familiarize healthcare providers with the diagnosis, pathogenesis, and general characteristics of primary BMS while updating them with the current treatment options to better manage this group of patients. PMID:26929531

  10. 40 CFR 49.133 - Rule for agricultural burning permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... (v) A description of the burning method(s) to be used (pile or stack burn, open field or broadcast burn, windrow burn, mobile field sanitizer, etc.) and the amount of material to be burned with each... person must comply with § 49.131 General rule for open burning or the EPA-approved Tribal open burning...

  11. Cutaneous manifestations of diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Dogiparthi, S N; Muralidhar, K; Seshadri, K G; Rangarajan, S

    2017-01-01

    There is a rise in number of people diagnosed with Diabetes Mellitus. The incidence is rising in modern Indian society because of Industrial development and drastically changing lifestyles. Diabetic neuropathies are microvascular disorders that are usually associated with the duration of Diabetes. Among the various forms, the most common is Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy. The disease if neglected leads to chronic ulcer formation leading to amputations frequently. Hence the aim of this study is to document the early cutaneous changes and create an early awareness in the importance of controlling Diabetes. The study consisted of 205 patients with Type 2 DM. Participant's neuropathy status was determined based on Neuropathy Disability Score and Diabetic Neuropathy Symptom Score. Among the Skin changes documented, the common changes seen were: Peripheral hair loss in 185 (90.2%), Xerosis in 168 (82%), Anhydrosis in 162 (79%), Plantar Fissures in 136 (66.3%), Plantar Ulcer in 80 (39%), common nail changes documented were Onychomycosis in 165 (80.5%) and Onychauxis in 53 (25.8%) patients in relation to the occupation and duration of Diabetes mellitus. In conclusion, it is important to control glycemic levels in the all stages of Diabetes and institute foot care measures to prevent the complications of neuropathy.

  12. Droplet burning at zero G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, F. A.

    1978-01-01

    Questions of the importance and feasibility of performing experiments on droplet burning at zero gravity in Spacelab were studied. Information on the physics and chemistry of droplet combustion, with attention directed specifically to the chemical kinetics, heat and mass transfer, and fluid mechanics of the phenomena involved, are presented. The work was divided into three phases, the justification, the feasibility, and the conceptual development of a preliminary design. Results from the experiments performed revealed a few new facts concerning droplet burning, notably burning rates in excess of theoretical prediction and a phenomenon of flash extinction, both likely traceable to accumulation of carbon produced by gas-phase pyrolysis in the fuel-rich zone enclosed by the reaction surface. These experiments also showed that they were primarily due to timing difficulties.

  13. Burn Control Mechanisms in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, M. A.; Stacey, W. M.

    2015-11-01

    Burn control and passive safety in accident scenarios will be an important design consideration in future tokamak reactors, in particular fusion-fission hybrid reactors, e.g. the Subcritical Advanced Burner Reactor. We are developing a burning plasma dynamics code to explore various aspects of burn control, with the intent to identify feedback mechanisms that would prevent power excursions. This code solves the coupled set of global density and temperature equations, using scaling relations from experimental fits. Predictions of densities and temperatures have been benchmarked against DIII-D data. We are examining several potential feedback mechanisms to limit power excursions: i) ion-orbit loss, ii) thermal instability density limits, iii) MHD instability limits, iv) the degradation of alpha-particle confinement, v) modifications to the radial current profile, vi) ``divertor choking'' and vii) Type 1 ELMs. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-FG02-00ER54538, DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  14. Wallet Neuritis - An Example of Peripheral Sensitization.

    PubMed

    Siddiq, Md Abu Bakar; Jahan, Israt; Masihuzzaman, Sam

    2017-03-09

    Wallet neuritis is an example of extra-spinal tunnel neuropathy concerning sciatic nerve. Its clinical appearance often gets confused with sciatica of lumbar spine origin. Wallet-induced chronic sciatic nerve constriction produces gluteal and ipsilateral lower extremity pain, tingling, and burning sensation. It was Lutz, first describing credit-card wallet sciatica in an Attorney, surfaced on Journal of American Medical Association (JAMA), 1978; however, the condition has not been well-studied in various other occupations. In this write-up, I take the privilege of demonstrating wallet neuritis as an example of peripheral sensitization in three different professionals namely specialist doctor, driver, and banker first time in Bangladesh. All the three patients demonstrated about aggravated gluteal pain with radiation on the ipsilateral lower extremity while remained seated on heavy wallet for a while, fortunately improved discontinuing such stuff with. Alongside, radical wallectomy, piriformis stretching exercise on the affected side had also been recommended and found worthy in terms of pain relief. long-standing use of rear pocket wallet may compress and sensitize ipsilateral sciatic nerve, generating features resembling lumbago sciatica; thereby, remains a source of patients' misery and diagnostic illusion for pain physicians as well. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. A lateral tarsorrhaphy with forehead hitch to pre-empt and treat burns ectropion with a contextual review of burns ectropion management.

    PubMed

    Lymperopoulos, Nikolaos S; Jordan, Daniel J; Jeevan, Ranjeet; Shokrollahi, Kayvan

    2016-01-01

    Facial burns around the eyes and eyelid ectropion can lead to corneal exposure, irritation, dryness, epiphora, infection or visual loss. We undertook a review of the published articles describing management of eyelid burns as well as methods to treat or prevent ectropion. We describe early experience of a surgical technique that we have found to mitigate ectropion in facial burns with peri-ocular involvement. Two illustrative cases with our surgical technique is described from our experience of three cases. We reviewed the literature using the PubMed and EMBASE databases using the search terms 'burn' and 'ectropion'. The literature review produced a total of 17 relevant papers. Treatment options for eyelid burns were varied and were invariably level 4 or 5 evidence. Various techniques were used to treat eyelid burns including the use of a full thickness skin graft with or without concurrent scar contracture release but also use of a local flap reconstruction with or without a tissue expander or release of the underlying muscle. Other techniques included canthoplasty, Z-plasty, forehead flaps, fat transfer, and tarsorrhaphy with full thickness skin grafting. In general, the focus of articles was therapeutic and reconstructive rather than pre-emptive/preventative management. We describe our early experience of a novel technique for temporary lateral tarsorrhaphy with forehead hitch which protexts the globe and counters the scar- and gravity-related ectropic effects on the lower eyelids. Facial burns pose a difficult problem to the burn surgeon, especially when the eyelids are affected, both directly or indirectly. The optimal surgical management of eyelid burns remains unclear and the literature base lies mainly in the domain of case series. We review the literature on this subject and tabulate our findings and also describe our contribution to this area with a method of lateral and lower lid elevator that we have found valuable.

  16. Burn-induced Myxedema Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Ann S.; Zane, Laura L.; Smith, Lane M.

    2017-01-01

    Myxedema crisis (MC) is a rare but life-threatening illness characterized by multi-system organ impairment from thyroid hormone deficiency that is often brought on by an eliciting event. We present the case of MC with a rapid progression of hypothermia, altered mental status, and respiratory failure that was instigated by a flash burn to the face. The patient’s condition was refractory to rewarming and supportive efforts until thyroid hormone was replaced. This case illustrates the need for a high index of suspicion for patients with a rapid onset of metabolic encephalopathy immediately after an injury or burn. PMID:29849399

  17. Principles of Burn Pain Management.

    PubMed

    James, Dominika Lipowska; Jowza, Maryam

    2017-10-01

    This article describes pathophysiology of burn injury-related pain and the basic principles of burn pain management. The focus is on concepts of perioperative and periprocedural pain management with extensive discussion of opioid-based analgesia, including patient-controlled analgesia, challenges of effective opioid therapy in opioid-tolerant patients, and opioid-induced hyperalgesia. The principles of multimodal pain management are discussed, including the importance of psychological counseling, perioperative interventional pain procedures, and alternative pain management options. A brief synopsis of the principles of outpatient pain management is provided. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Advance on human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells for treatment of ALI in severe burns].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Hu, Xiaohong

    2017-01-01

    Severe burn is often accompanied by multiple organ damage. Acute lung injury (ALI) is one of the most common complications, and often occurs in the early stage of severe burns. If it is not treated in time, it will progress to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which will be a serious threat to the lives of patients. At present, the treatment of ALI in patients with severe burn is still remained in some common ways, such as the liquid resuscitation, the primary wound treatment, ventilation support, and anti-infection. In recently, human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) have been found having some good effects on ALI caused by various causes, but few reports on the efficacy of ALI caused by severe burns were reported. By reviewing the mechanism of stem cell therapy for ALI, therapeutic potential of hUCMSCs in the treatment of severe burns with ALI and a new approach for clinical treatment was provided.

  19. [Anesthetic management in a patient with head and neck burn by asphalt].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Nao; Niiyama, Yukitoshi; Tokinaga, Yasuyuki; Yamakage, Michiaki

    2013-10-01

    In cases of facial burns caused by molten asphalt, examination for possible airway burns and early removal of the asphalt should be carried out to prevent chemical-induced tissue damage and infection. However, asphalt that has adhered to tissues is difficult to remove. A 35-year-old male with burns caused by molten asphalt was scheduled for emergency debridement. He had 6% body surface area burns on his face and neck. He was not able to open his eyes due to the adherence of asphalt. His respiratory condition was stable and a perioperative fiberoptic view revealed no airway burns. After awake intubation, orange peel oil was used to remove the asphalt from his face and eyes. Since orange peel oil does not contain any harmful substances, it is effective for removing asphalt without causing tissue damage.

  20. Is proportion burned severely related to daily area burned?

    Treesearch

    Donovan S. Birch; Penelope Morgan; Crystal A. Kolden; Andrew T. Hudak; Alistair M. S. Smith

    2014-01-01

    The ecological effects of forest fires burning with high severity are long-lived and have the greatest impact on vegetation successional trajectories, as compared to low-to-moderate severity fires. The primary drivers of high severity fire are unclear, but it has been hypothesized that wind-driven, large fire-growth days play a significant role, particularly on large...

  1. Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disclosures Acknowledgments Footnotes Figures & Tables Info & Metrics eLetters Article Tools Print Citation Tools Screening for Peripheral Artery ... Remember my user name & password. Submit Share this Article Email Thank you for your interest in spreading ...

  2. Peripheral metabolic actions of leptin.

    PubMed

    Muoio, Deborah M; Lynis Dohm, G

    2002-12-01

    The adipocyte-derived hormone, leptin, regulates food intake and systemic fuel metabolism; ob /ob mice, which lack functional leptin, exhibit an obesity syndrome that is similar to morbid obesity in humans. Leptin receptors are expressed most abundantly in the brain but are also present in several peripheral tissues. The role of leptin in controlling energy homeostasis has thus far focused on brain receptors and neuroendocrine pathways that regulate feeding behaviour and sympathetic nervous system activity. This chapter focuses on mounting evidence that leptin's effects on energy balance are also mediated by direct peripheral actions on key metabolic organs such as skeletal muscle, liver, pancreas and adipose tissue. Strong evidence indicates that peripheral leptin receptors regulate cellular lipid balance, favouring beta-oxidation over triacylglycerol storage. There are data to indicate that peripheral leptin also modulates glucose metabolism and insulin action; however, its precise role in controlling gluco-regulatory pathways remains uncertain and requires further investigation.

  3. Utilization of open pit burned household waste ash--a feasibility study in Dhaka.

    PubMed

    Haque, Md Obaidul; Sharif, Ahmed

    2014-05-01

    Informal incineration or open pit burning of waste materials is a common practice in the peripheral area of Dhaka, one of the fastest growing mega-cities in the world. This study deals with the effect of open pit burned (i.e. open burned) household waste bottom ash on fired clay bricks. Between 0 to 50% (by weight) of open pit burned household waste bottom ash was mixed with clay to make bricks. The molded specimens were air-dried at room temperature for 24 h and then oven dried at 100 °C for another 24 h to remove the water. The raw bricks were fired in a muffle furnace to a designated temperature (800, 900 and 1000 °C, respectively). The firing behaviour (mechanical strength, water absorption and shrinkage) was determined. The microstructures, phase compositions and leachates were evaluated for bricks manufactured at different firing temperatures. These results demonstrate that open pit burned ash can be recycled in clay bricks. This study also presents physical observations of the incinerated ash particles and determination of the chemical compositions of the raw materials by wet analysis. Open pit burned ash can be introduced easily into bricks up to 20% wt. The concentrations of hazardous components in the leachates were below the standard threshold for inert waste category landfill and their environmental risk during their use-life step can be considered negligible.

  4. Non-CD34+ cells, especially CD8+ cytotoxic T cells and CD56+ natural killer cells, rather than CD34 cells, predict early engraftment and better transplantation outcomes in patients with hematologic malignancies after allogeneic peripheral stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Hwan; Won, Dong Il; Lee, Nan Young; Sohn, Sang Kyun; Suh, Jang Soo; Lee, Kyu Bo

    2006-07-01

    The effect of the transplant dose of each cell subset on engraftment kinetics and transplantation outcomes was evaluated in HLA-identical allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT). Sixty-nine patients were included in this retrospective study. Engraftment kinetics, transplantation outcomes, and immune reconstitution up to 1 year after transplantation were analyzed according to the transplant dose of CD34+ and non-CD34+ cells, including natural killer (NK) cells and CD8+ cytotoxic T (Tc) cells. An accelerated neutrophil engraftment was strongly associated with a higher transplant dose of NK cells (12 versus 16 days, P < .001) and Tc cells (13 versus 16 days, P < .001) but not CD34+ cells (P = .442). Survival analyses revealed a favorable prognosis for patients who received a higher dose of non-CD34+ cell subsets, rather than CD34+ cells, in terms of overall survival (OS; P = .024 for NK cells and .050 for Tc cells) and nonrelapse mortality (NRM; P = .005 for NK cells, .060 for Tc cells). In addition, a higher transplant dose of NK and Tc cells was correlated with a faster lymphoid reconstitution. In multivariate analyses, rapid neutrophil engraftment was correlated with a higher transplant dose of NK cells (P = .001) and Tc cells (P = .004). Moreover, an increased OS was associated with the NK cell dose (P = .007) and chronic graft-versus-host disease (P = .009), whereas a decreased NRM was associated with the NK dose (P = .024). In conclusion, in a PBSCT setting, a higher transplant dose of NK and Tc cells accelerated neutrophil engraftment, improved the immune reconstitution, and decreased NRM, thereby increasing OS after allogeneic PBSCT.

  5. Response of southern Appalachian table mountain pine (Pinus pungens) and pitch pine (P. rigida) stands to prescribed burning

    Treesearch

    N.T. Welch; Thomas A. Waldrop; E.R. Buckner

    2000-01-01

    Southern Appalachian table mountain pine (Pinus pungens) and pitch pine (P. rigida) forests require disturbance for regeneration. Lightning-ignited fires and cultural burning practices provided the disturbance that prehistorically and historically maintained these forests. Burning essentially ceased on public lands in the early...

  6. Myelo-erythroid commitment after burn injury is under β-adrenergic control via MafB regulation.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Shirin; Johnson, Nicholas B; Mosier, Michael J; Shankar, Ravi; Conrad, Peggie; Szilagyi, Andrea; Gamelli, Richard L; Muthumalaiappan, Kuzhali

    2017-03-01

    Severely injured burn patients receive multiple blood transfusions for anemia of critical illness despite the adverse consequences. One limiting factor to consider alternate treatment strategies is the lack of a reliable test platform to study molecular mechanisms of impaired erythropoiesis. This study illustrates how conditions resulting in a high catecholamine microenvironment such as burns can instigate myelo-erythroid reprioritization influenced by β-adrenergic stimulation leading to anemia. In a mouse model of scald burn injury, we observed, along with a threefold increase in bone marrow LSK cells (lin neg Sca1 + cKit + ), that the myeloid shift is accompanied with a significant reduction in megakaryocyte erythrocyte progenitors (MEPs). β-Blocker administration (propranolol) for 6 days after burn, not only reduced the number of LSKs and MafB + cells in multipotent progenitors, but also influenced myelo-erythroid bifurcation by increasing the MEPs and reducing the granulocyte monocyte progenitors in the bone marrow of burn mice. Furthermore, similar results were observed in burn patients' peripheral blood mononuclear cell-derived ex vivo culture system, demonstrating that commitment stage of erythropoiesis is impaired in burn patients and intervention with propranolol (nonselective β1,2-adrenergic blocker) increases MEPs. Also, MafB + cells that were significantly increased following standard burn care could be mitigated when propranolol was administered to burn patients, establishing the mechanistic regulation of erythroid commitment by myeloid regulatory transcription factor MafB. Overall, results demonstrate that β-adrenergic blockers following burn injury can redirect the hematopoietic commitment toward erythroid lineage by lowering MafB expression in multipotent progenitors and be of potential therapeutic value to increase erythropoietin responsiveness in burn patients. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Myelo-erythroid commitment after burn injury is under β-adrenergic control via MafB regulation

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Shirin; Johnson, Nicholas B.; Mosier, Michael J.; Shankar, Ravi; Conrad, Peggie; Szilagyi, Andrea; Gamelli, Richard L.

    2017-01-01

    Severely injured burn patients receive multiple blood transfusions for anemia of critical illness despite the adverse consequences. One limiting factor to consider alternate treatment strategies is the lack of a reliable test platform to study molecular mechanisms of impaired erythropoiesis. This study illustrates how conditions resulting in a high catecholamine microenvironment such as burns can instigate myelo-erythroid reprioritization influenced by β-adrenergic stimulation leading to anemia. In a mouse model of scald burn injury, we observed, along with a threefold increase in bone marrow LSK cells (linneg Sca1+cKit+), that the myeloid shift is accompanied with a significant reduction in megakaryocyte erythrocyte progenitors (MEPs). β-Blocker administration (propranolol) for 6 days after burn, not only reduced the number of LSKs and MafB+ cells in multipotent progenitors, but also influenced myelo-erythroid bifurcation by increasing the MEPs and reducing the granulocyte monocyte progenitors in the bone marrow of burn mice. Furthermore, similar results were observed in burn patients’ peripheral blood mononuclear cell-derived ex vivo culture system, demonstrating that commitment stage of erythropoiesis is impaired in burn patients and intervention with propranolol (nonselective β1,2-adrenergic blocker) increases MEPs. Also, MafB+ cells that were significantly increased following standard burn care could be mitigated when propranolol was administered to burn patients, establishing the mechanistic regulation of erythroid commitment by myeloid regulatory transcription factor MafB. Overall, results demonstrate that β-adrenergic blockers following burn injury can redirect the hematopoietic commitment toward erythroid lineage by lowering MafB expression in multipotent progenitors and be of potential therapeutic value to increase erythropoietin responsiveness in burn patients. PMID:28031160

  8. Factors influencing occupancy of nest cavities in recently burned forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saab, V.A.; Dudley, J.; Thompson, W.L.

    2004-01-01

    Recently burned forests in western North America provide nesting habitat for many species of cavity-nesting birds. However, little is understood about the time frame and the variables affecting occupancy of postfire habitats by these birds. We studied factors influencing the occupancy and reuse of nest cavities from 1-7 years after fire in two burned sites of western Idaho during 1994-1999. Tree cavities were used for nesting by 12 species of cavity nesters that were classified by the original occupant (strong excavator, weak excavator, or nonexcavator) of 385 nest cavities. We used logistic regression to model cavity occupancy by strong excavators (n = 575 trials) and weak excavators (n = 206 trials). Year after fire had the greatest influence on occupancy of nest cavities for both groups, while site of the burn was secondarily important in predicting occupancy by strong excavators and less important for weak excavators. Predicted probability of cavity occupancy was highest during the early years (1-4) after fire, declined over time (5-7 years after fire), and varied by site, with a faster decline in the smaller burned site with a greater mosaic of unburned forest. Closer proximity and greater interspersion of unburned forest (15% unburned) may have allowed a quicker recolonization by nest predators into the smaller burn compared to the larger burn with few patches of unburned forest (4% unburned). In combination with time and space effects, the predicted probability of cavity occupancy was positively affected by tree and nest heights for strong and weak excavators, respectively.

  9. Reliability enhancement through optimal burn-in

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, W.

    1984-06-01

    A numerical reliability and cost model is defined for production line burn-in tests of electronic components. The necessity of burn-in is governed by upper and lower bounds: burn-in is mandatory for operation-critical or nonreparable component; no burn-in is needed when failure effects are insignificant or easily repairable. The model considers electronic systems in terms of a series of components connected by a single black box. The infant mortality rate is described with a Weibull distribution. Performance reaches a steady state after burn-in, and the cost of burn-in is a linear function for each component. A minimum cost is calculated among the costs and total time of burn-in, shop repair, and field repair, with attention given to possible losses in future sales from inadequate burn-in testing.

  10. Aging and the Pathogenic Response to Burn

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Meenakshi; Schwacha, Martin G.

    2012-01-01

    Aging is an important and critical factor that contributes to the clinical outcome of burn patients. The very young and the elderly are more likely to succumb after major burn as compared to their adult counterparts. With the aging population, improved understanding of the mechanisms underlying age-associated complications after burns becomes even more demanding. It is widely accepted that elderly burn patients have significantly increased morbidity and mortality. Irrespective of the type of burn injury, the aged population shows slower recoveries and suffers more complications. Age-associated immune dysfunction, immunosenescence, may predispose the elderly burn patients to more infections, slower healing and/or to other complications. Furthermore, pre-existing, age-related medical conditions such as, pulmonary/cardiovascular dysfunctions and diabetes in the elderly are other important factors that contribute to their poorer outcomes after major burn. The present review describes the impact of aging on burn patients outcomes. PMID:22724078

  11. Protect the Ones You Love: Burns Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit Search The CDC Protect the Ones You Love: Child Injuries are Preventable Note: Javascript is disabled ... ways you can help protect the children you love from burns. Key Prevention Tips To prevent burns ...

  12. Burns from buried electric cables.

    PubMed

    Gault, D T; Eve, M D

    1987-04-01

    Twenty-six patients who sustained significant burn injuries as a result of striking underground electric cables are reviewed. This study sets out to highlight why such injuries occur and to recommend preventive measures to those digging in the London area. There were three deaths in this series.

  13. Infection and the Burn Patient,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    Leading articles -T[--- Sr. J. Surg. 1990, Vol. 77, October, 1081- 1082 Ii’ ftELECTE f Infection and the burn patient 0U11901 Can ... the leopard...Distribution/ Availability Codes. Avail and/or Dlst Special 1082 Br. J. Surg., Vol. 77, No. 10, October 1990

  14. The Burn-Out Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Ruth Christ

    1979-01-01

    An article is presented on the "burn-out" of parents, particularly those of autistic children (i.e., the exhaustion of their psychological and/or physical resources as a result of long and intense caring for their children), along with the comments and responses of five parents and professionals. (DLS)

  15. Burning Mouth Syndrome and Menopause

    PubMed Central

    Dahiya, Parveen; Kamal, Reet; Kumar, Mukesh; Niti; Gupta, Rajan; Chaudhary, Karun

    2013-01-01

    Menopause is a physiological process typically occurring in the fifth decade of life. One of the most annoying oral symptoms in this age group is the burning mouth syndrome (BMS), which may be defined as an intraoral burning sensation occurring in the absence of identifiable oral lesion or laboratory findings. Pain in burning mouth syndrome may be described as burning, tender, tingling, hot, scalding, and numb sensation in the oral mucosa. Multiple oral sites may be involved, but the anterior two-third part and the tip of tongue are most commonly affected site. There is no definite etiology for BMS other than the precipitating causative factors, and it is still considered idiopathic. Various treatment options like use of benzodiazepine, anti-depressants, analgesics, capsaicin, alpha lipoic acids, and cognitive behavioral therapy are found to be effective, but definite treatment is still unknown. The present article discusses some of the recent concepts of etiopathogenesis of BMS as well as the role of pharmacotherapeutic management in this disorder. PMID:23411996

  16. Burns, metabolism and nutritional requirements.

    PubMed

    Mendonça Machado, N; Gragnani, A; Masako Ferreira, L

    2011-01-01

    To review the nutritional evaluation in burned patient, considering the literature descriptions of nutritional evaluation and energy requirements of these patients. Thermal injury is the traumatic event with the highest metabolic response in critically ill patients. Various mathematical formulas have been developed to estimate nutritional requirements in burned patient. Indirect Calorimetry is the only method considered gold standard for measuring caloric expenditure. A survey of the literature and data was collected based on official data bases, LILACS, EMBASE and PubMed. The metabolic changes involved in hypermetabolism are designed to supply energy to support immune function, brain activity, wound healing, and preservation of body tissues. Body weight is considered the easiest indicator and perhaps the best to assess the nutritional status. The most common formulas utilized in these patients are the Curreri, Pennisi, Schofield, Ireton-Jones, Harris-Benedict and the ASPEN recommendations. For children is the Mayes and World Health Organization formula. The majority of mathematical formulas overestimate the nutritional needs. The regular use of Indirect Calorimetry supplies adequate nutritional support to the burn patient. The traditional nutritional evaluation considers anthropometry, biochemical markers and estimation of nutritional requirements. The weight provides a basis for decisions that are established in the clinical context. Classic parameters can be adapted to intensive care environment. The use of Indirect Calorimetry is crucial to ensure the safety of the nutritional support of burn patients and this should be widely encouraged.

  17. "First aid" for burned watersheds

    Treesearch

    J. S. Krammes; L. W. Hill

    1963-01-01

    Most of the vegetative cover on the San Dimas Experimental Forest was destroyed by a wildfire in 1960. Following the fire an emergency research program was initiated to test several "first -aid" treatments aimed at reducing flood and erosion damage from burned watersheds. This paper summarizes first - and second-year results of the research program.

  18. Burns Cliff in Color Stereo

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-07-10

    NASA Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity captured a sweeping stereo image of Burns Cliff after driving right to the base of this southeastern portion of the inner wall of Endurance Crater in November 2004. 3D glasses are necessary to view this image.

  19. American Burn Association Consensus Statements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    stream infections, catheter-associated urinary tract infections, and ventilator-associated pneumonias in spite of many fewer catheters per 1000...multiple attempts the burn community has never been able to link ABA verification with enhanced reimbursement. It is clear that to accomplish this...goal, we must be able to link verification with improved outcomes, decreased mortality, shorter hospital stay, reduced hospital- acquired

  20. Methoxyflurane analgesia for burns dressings

    PubMed Central

    Packer, Kathleen J.

    1972-01-01

    The requirements for analgesia for burns dressings are discussed. Methoxyflurane has proved satisfactory in a clinical trial, and can be administered by one of two types of vaporizer. The possibility of nephrotoxicity due to methoxyflurane has not been eliminated. PMID:5024149

  1. Prescribed burning for understory restoration

    Treesearch

    Kenneth W. Outcalt

    2006-01-01

    Because the longleaf ecosystem evolved with and is adapted to frequent fire, every 2 to 8 years, prescribed burning is often useful for restoring understory communities to a diverse ground layer of grasses, herbs, and small shrubs. This restoration provides habitat for a number of plant and animal species that are restricted to or found mostly in longleaf pine...

  2. Burn Wound Infections and Antibiotic Susceptibility Patterns at Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Saaiq, Muhammad; Ahmad, Shehzad; Zaib, Muhammad Salman

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROND Burn wound infections carry considerable mortality and morbidity amongst burn injury victims who have been successfully rescued through the initial resuscitation. This study assessed the prevalent microrganisms causing burn wound infections among hospitalized patients; their susceptibility pattern to commonly used antibiotics; and the frequency of infections with respect to the duration of the burn wounds. METHODS This study was carried out at Burn Care Centre, Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences (PIMS), Islamabad, Pakistan over a period of two years (i.e. from June 2010 to May 2012). The study included all wound-culture-positive patients of either gender and all ages, who had sustained deep burns and underwent definitive management with wound excisions and skin auto-grafting. Patients with negative cultures of the wounds were excluded. Tissue specimens for culture and sensitivity were collected from burn wounds using standard collection techniques and analyzed at microbiological laboratory. RESULTS Out of a total of 95 positive microbial growths, 36 were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (35.29%) as the most frequent isolate found, followed by 21 Klebsiella pneumoniae (20.58%), 19 Staphylococcus aureaus (18.62%), 10 Proteus (9.80%), 7 E. coli (6.86%), 7 Acinetobacter (6.86%), and 4 Candida (3.92%). A variable antibiotic susceptibility pattern was observed among the grown microbes. Positive cultures were significantly more frequent among patients with over two weeks duration of burn wounds. CONCLUSION P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae and S. aureus constituted the most common bacterial microbes of burn wounds in our in-patients cases. Positive cultures were more frequent among patients with over two weeks duration of burn wounds. Early excision and skin grafting of deep burns and adherence to infection control measures can help to effectively reduce the burden of these infections. PMID:25606471

  3. Third-degree burn leading to partial foot amputation--why a notebook is no laptop.

    PubMed

    Paprottka, Felix Julian; Machens, Hans-Günther; Lohmeyer, Jörn Andreas

    2012-08-01

    So far a few case reports about laptops causing burns have been published. Now for the first time, we report on a case, in which notebook-induced thermal injuries placed in a patient's lap resulted in severe second- and third-degree burns. As a consequence, a partial amputation of the left foot had to be performed. Furthermore, we measured maximum temperatures of 12 popular laptops, which were running full load for 3 h. For this experiment air circulation underneath the device was blocked in order to simulate surrounding conditions, which were present when the patient got injured. Although this setting may be the reason for most of all notebook burns, this kind of test has not been part of any scientific publication until now. Patients with lower extremity sensation, altered consciousness or decreased peripheral sensitivity have a higher risk for thermal injuries. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Burn injury pain: the continuing challenge.

    PubMed

    Summer, Gretchen J; Puntillo, Kathleen A; Miaskowski, Christine; Green, Paul G; Levine, Jon D

    2007-07-01

    The development of more effective methods of relieving pain associated with burn injury is a major unmet medical need. Not only is acute burn injury pain a source of immense suffering, but it has been linked to debilitating chronic pain and stress-related disorders. Although pain management guidelines and protocols have been developed and implemented, unrelieved moderate-to-severe pain continues to be reported after burn injury. One reason for this is that the intensity of pain associated with wound care and rehabilitation therapy, the major source of severe pain in this patient population, varies widely over the 3 phases of burn recovery, making it difficult to estimate analgesic requirements. The effects of opioids, the most commonly administered analgesics for burn injury procedural pain, are difficult to gauge over the course of burn recovery because the need for an opioid may change rapidly, resulting in the overmedication or undermedication of burn-injured patients. Understanding the mechanisms that contribute to the intensity and variability of burn injury pain over time is crucial to its proper management. We provide an overview of the types of pain associated with a burn injury, describe how these different types of pain interfere with the phases of burn recovery, and summarize pharmacologic pain management strategies across the continuum of burn care. We conclude with a discussion and suggestions for improvement. Rational management, based on the underlying mechanisms that contribute to the intensity and variability of burn injury pain, is in its infancy. The paucity of information highlights the need for research that explores and advances the identification of mechanisms of acute and chronic burn injury pain. Researchers continue to report that burn pain is undertreated. This review examines burn injury pain management across the phases of burn recovery, emphasizing 3 types of pain that require separate assessment and management. It provides insights

  5. Inorganic markers, carbonaceous components and stable carbon isotope from biomass burning aerosols in northeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, F.; Zhang, Y.; Kawamura, K.

    2015-12-01

    To better characterize the sources of fine particulate matter (i.e. PM2.5) in Sanjiang Plain, Northeast China, aerosol chemical composition such total carbon (TC), organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), and inorganic ions were studied as well as stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of TC. Intensively open biomass burning episodes were identified from late September to early October by satellite fire and aerosol optical depth maps. During the biomass burning episodes, concentrations of PM2.5, OC, EC, and WSOC increased by a factor of 4-12 compared to non-biomass-burning periods. Non-sea-salt potassium is strongly correlated with PM2.5, OC, EC and WSOC, suggesting an important contribution of biomass burning emission. The enrichment in both the non-sea-salt potassium and chlorine is significantly larger than other inorganic species, indicating that biomass burning aerosols in Sanjiang Plain is mostly fresh and less aged. In addition, WSOC to OC ratio is relatively lower compared to that reported in biomass burning aerosols in tropical regions, supporting that biomass burning aerosols in Sanjiang Plain is mostly primary and secondary organic aerosols is not significant. A lower average δ13C value (-26.2‰) is found for the biomass-burning aerosols, suggesting a dominant contribution from combustion of C3 plants in the studied region.

  6. Identification and Validation of Established and Novel Biomarkers for Infections in Burns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-10-01

    in burn patients have been proposed, but not validated. In our four site study , we are enrolling severely burned adults and children , and...identify the early stages of infection prior to clinical detection. This multicenter study will enable us to identify novel biomarkers, validate whether...a multicenter study 3. Develop a model of prediction of infection using clinical data and proteomic information. Relevance: 5% of combat-sustained

  7. Hardwood control using pelleted herbicides and burning

    Treesearch

    James H. Miller

    1982-01-01

    Treatments using combinations of pelletized herbicides with prescribe burning were tested for planting site preparation on steep terrain (>35% slopes) in the Alabama Piedmont. Mixed forests of southern pines, oaks, and hickories occupied areas before logging. Three burning treatments (no-burn, pre- and post-harvest) were applied randomly among three 4-acre major...

  8. Ice nuclei emissions from biomass burning

    Treesearch

    Markus D. Petters; Matthew T. Parsons; Anthony J. Prenni; Paul J. DeMott; Sonia M. Kreidenweis; Christian M. Carrico; Amy P. Sullivan; Gavin R. McMeeking; Ezra Levin; Cyle E. Wold; Jeffrey L. Collett; Hans Moosmuller

    2009-01-01

    Biomass burning is a significant source of carbonaceous aerosol in many regions of the world. When present, biomass burning particles may affect the microphysical properties of clouds through their ability to function as cloud condensation nuclei or ice nuclei. We report on measurements of the ice nucleation ability of biomass burning particles performed on laboratory-...

  9. 40 CFR 52.273 - Open burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Open burning. 52.273 Section 52.273... PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS California § 52.273 Open burning. (a) The following rules or portions of rules are disapproved because they contain exemptions to open burning (including open agricultural...

  10. 40 CFR 52.273 - Open burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Open burning. 52.273 Section 52.273... PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS California § 52.273 Open burning. (a) The following rules or portions of rules are disapproved because they contain exemptions to open burning (including open agricultural...

  11. 40 CFR 52.273 - Open burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Open burning. 52.273 Section 52.273... PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS California § 52.273 Open burning. (a) The following rules or portions of rules are disapproved because they contain exemptions to open burning (including open agricultural...

  12. 40 CFR 52.273 - Open burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Open burning. 52.273 Section 52.273... PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS California § 52.273 Open burning. (a) The following rules or portions of rules are disapproved because they contain exemptions to open burning (including open agricultural...

  13. 40 CFR 52.273 - Open burning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Open burning. 52.273 Section 52.273... PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS California § 52.273 Open burning. (a) The following rules or portions of rules are disapproved because they contain exemptions to open burning (including open agricultural...

  14. Legionnaire's pneumonia complicating a thermal burn.

    PubMed

    Signorini, M; Grappolini, S; Lo Cicero, S; Candiani, P; Klinger, M; Donati, L

    1989-12-01

    The report describes a patient with 45 per cent BSA burns who developed Legionnaire's disease 3 days after the acute injury. The diagnosis of this life-threatening complication was late because most of its signs and symptoms can be encountered in the burned patient. This delay could have been fatal to the patient and required the evacuation of the burn centre for disinfection.

  15. Car radiator burns: a prevention issue.

    PubMed

    Rabbitts, Angela; Alden, Nicole E; Conlin, Tara; Yurt, Roger W

    2004-01-01

    Scald burns continue to be the major cause of injury to patients admitted to the burn center. Scald burns occurring from car radiator fluid comprise a significant subgroup. Although manufacturer warning labels have been placed on car radiators, these burns continue to occur. This retrospective review looks at all patients admitted to our burn center who suffered scald burns from car radiator fluid to assess the extent of this problem. During the study period, 86 patients were identified as having suffered scald burns as a result of contact with car radiator fluid. Seventy-one percent of the burn injuries occurred in the summer months. The areas most commonly burned were the head and upper extremities. Burn prevention efforts have improved greatly over the years; however, this study demonstrates that scald burns from car radiator fluid continue to cause physical, emotional, and financial devastation. The current radiator warning labels alone are not effective. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has proposed a new federal motor vehicle safety standard to aid in decreasing the number of scald burns from car radiators. The results of this study were submitted to the United States Department of Transportation for inclusion in a docket for federal legislation supporting these safety measures.

  16. A Rare Case of Anal and Perianal Chemical Burn in a Child due to Potassium Permanganate Crystals.

    PubMed

    Dash, Suvashis; Bhojani, Jatin; Sharma, Sharadendu

    2018-02-09

    Many chemicals used as medical treatments can cause chemical burns as an untoward side effect. One of such chemicals is potassium permanganate. It is a caustic chemical used as a disinfectant. The most common sites of burn by potassium permanganate are exposed sites like the face and hands. Chemical burns in the perianal and anal region are rare in clinical practice and even sparser in the pediatric age group. In this article, we report a case of perianal and anal chemical burn in an 18-month-old, male child, caused by potassium permanganate crystal applied wrongly for the treatment of pinworm infestation. As a chemical burn in this region can have serious complications, it is necessary to be vigilant when using such chemicals in these cases. Early and timely management in such cases leads to good outcomes. This is the first of such cases of chemical burn caused by potassium permanganate in the anal and perianal region.

  17. Adaptive optics for peripheral vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosén, R.; Lundström, L.; Unsbo, P.

    2012-07-01

    Understanding peripheral optical errors and their impact on vision is important for various applications, e.g. research on myopia development and optical correction of patients with central visual field loss. In this study, we investigated whether correction of higher order aberrations with adaptive optics (AO) improve resolution beyond what is achieved with best peripheral refractive correction. A laboratory AO system was constructed for correcting peripheral aberrations. The peripheral low contrast grating resolution acuity in the 20° nasal visual field of the right eye was evaluated for 12 subjects using three types of correction: refractive correction of sphere and cylinder, static closed loop AO correction and continuous closed loop AO correction. Running AO in continuous closed loop improved acuity compared to refractive correction for most subjects (maximum benefit 0.15 logMAR). The visual improvement from aberration correction was highly correlated with the subject's initial amount of higher order aberrations (p = 0.001, R 2 = 0.72). There was, however, no acuity improvement from static AO correction. In conclusion, correction of peripheral higher order aberrations can improve low contrast resolution, provided refractive errors are corrected and the system runs in continuous closed loop.

  18. Incidence and characteristics of chemical burns.

    PubMed

    Koh, Dong-Hee; Lee, Sang-Gil; Kim, Hwan-Cheol

    2017-05-01

    Chemical burns can lead to serious health outcomes. Previous studies about chemical burns have been performed based on burn center data so these studies have provided limited information about the incidence of chemical burns at the national level. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence and characteristics of chemical burns using nationwide databases. A cohort representing the Korean population, which was established using a national health insurance database, and a nationwide workers' compensation database were used to evaluate the incidence and characteristics of chemical burns. Characteristics of the affected body region, depth of burns, industry, task, and causative agents were analyzed from two databases. The incidence of chemical burns was calculated according to employment status. The most common regions involving chemical burns with hospital visits were the skin followed by the eyes. For skin lesions, the hands and wrists were the most commonly affected regions. Second degree burns were the most common in terms of depth of skin lesions. The hospital visit incidence was 1.96 per 10,000 person-year in the general population. The compensated chemical burns incidence was 0.17 per 10,000 person-year. Employees and the self-employed showed a significantly increased risk of chemical burns undergoing hospital visits compared to their dependents. Chemical burns on the skin and eyes are almost equally prevalent. The working environment was associated with increased risk of chemical burns. Our results may aid in estimating the size of the problem and prioritizing prevention of chemical burns. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  19. [Advances in the research of scar stricture after esophageal burn].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shi-lei; Gu, Chun-dong

    2013-10-01

    Caustic esophageal burn is a common ailment in clinical practice. In some patients, scar stricture was formed in the late stage of injury, and it seriously undermined quality of life of the patients. We adopted various clinical interventions at an early stage in order to relieve and alleviate the formation and development of corrosive esophageal stricture as a result of chemical injury as well as to avoid invasive operations to make it more acceptable for the patients. This article summarized the progress in etiology, pathological changes, identification, early prevention, and surgical management of corrosive esophageal stricture.

  20. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    has also been shown to produce human-beta-3-defensin. These antimicrobial peptides are implicated in the resistance of epithelial surfaces to...gonadotrophin receptors that regulate prostaglandin production and activity. Epithelial cells manufacture multiple vasoactive peptides , growth factors...200734 P-RCT (n Z 102) PT burns Processed Amnion vs topical antimicrobials . Significantly less dressing changes with amnion. Time to healing, length

  1. A lateral tarsorrhaphy with forehead hitch to pre-empt and treat burns ectropion with a contextual review of burns ectropion management

    PubMed Central

    Lymperopoulos, Nikolaos S; Jordan, Daniel J; Jeevan, Ranjeet; Shokrollahi, Kayvan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Facial burns around the eyes and eyelid ectropion can lead to corneal exposure, irritation, dryness, epiphora, infection or visual loss. We undertook a review of the published articles describing management of eyelid burns as well as methods to treat or prevent ectropion. We describe early experience of a surgical technique that we have found to mitigate ectropion in facial burns with peri-ocular involvement. Materials and methods: Two illustrative cases with our surgical technique is described from our experience of three cases. We reviewed the literature using the PubMed and EMBASE databases using the search terms ‘burn’ and ‘ectropion’. Results: The literature review produced a total of 17 relevant papers. Treatment options for eyelid burns were varied and were invariably level 4 or 5 evidence. Various techniques were used to treat eyelid burns including the use of a full thickness skin graft with or without concurrent scar contracture release but also use of a local flap reconstruction with or without a tissue expander or release of the underlying muscle. Other techniques included canthoplasty, Z-plasty, forehead flaps, fat transfer, and tarsorrhaphy with full thickness skin grafting. In general, the focus of articles was therapeutic and reconstructive rather than pre-emptive/preventative management. Procedure: We describe our early experience of a novel technique for temporary lateral tarsorrhaphy with forehead hitch which protexts the globe and counters the scar- and gravity-related ectropic effects on the lower eyelids. Discussion: Facial burns pose a difficult problem to the burn surgeon, especially when the eyelids are affected, both directly or indirectly. The optimal surgical management of eyelid burns remains unclear and the literature base lies mainly in the domain of case series. We review the literature on this subject and tabulate our findings and also describe our contribution to this area with a method of lateral and lower

  2. [Electrical burns in children. 3 years of case histories].

    PubMed

    Caneira, E; Serafim, Z; Duarte, R; Leal, M J

    1996-01-01

    The Burn Unit of Dona Estefânia Hospital admitted a total of 454 patients from January 1992 to January 1995, 24 of these patients suffered from electric shock. Of these 24 patients 3 suffered burns in the mouth, 15 in one or both hands and 6 multiple burns. In 19 patients the burns were up to 1%. A description is made of 5 cases, male children between the ages of 9 and 13 years, which were deemed severe. The incidents occurred outdoors with different voltages and in activities considered of ludic or experimental nature: two on the roof of a house, two with railway cables and one with an electrical cable in a port zone. The burnt areas vary between 4% and 70%, all of them 2nd and 3rd degree, with hospitalization lasting from 36 to 116 days. In addition to early and coordinated medical and rehabilitative treatment, according to individual needs, a description is also made of the cutaneous sequelae (deforming cicatrices, bridles), neurologic and psychologic sequelae, with emphasis on a patient who underwent amputation of the lower left leg and 4th and 5th ranges of the right foot. It was concluded that measures should be taken in education and legislation to prevent these accidents. Relevance is given to the need for a multidisciplinary team and specialized center for the treatment of these patients.

  3. Fluid resuscitation for major burn patients with the TMMU protocol.

    PubMed

    Luo, Gaoxing; Peng, Yizhi; Yuan, Zhiqiang; Cheng, Wenguang; Wu, Jun; Tang, Jin; Huang, Yuesheng; Fitzgerald, Mark

    2009-12-01

    Fluid resuscitation is one of the critical treatments for the major burn patient in the early phases after injury. We evaluated the practice of fluid resuscitation for severely burned patients with the Third Military Medical University (TMMU) protocol, which is most widely used in many regions of China. Patients with major burns (>30% total body surface area (TBSA)) presenting to Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, between January 2005 and October 2007, were included in this study. Fluid resuscitation was initiated by the TMMU protocol. A total of 71 patients were (46 adults and 25 children) included in this study. All patients survived the first 48 h after injury smoothly and none developed abdominal compartment syndrome or other recognised complications associated with fluid resuscitation. The average quantity of fluid infused was 3.3-61.33% more than that calculated based on the TMMU protocol in both adult and paediatric groups. The average urine output during the first 24h after injury was about 1.2 ml per kg body weight per hour in the two groups, but reached 1.2 ml and 1.7 ml during the second 24h in adult and pediatric groups, respectively. This study indicates that the TMMU protocol for fluid resuscitation is a feasible option for burn patients. Individualised resuscitation - guided by the physiological response to fluid administration - is still important as in other protocols.

  4. Ultrasonic technique for characterizing skin burns

    DOEpatents

    Goans, Ronald E.; Cantrell, Jr., John H.; Meyers, F. Bradford; Stambaugh, Harry D.

    1978-01-01

    This invention, a method for ultrasonically determining the depth of a skin burn, is based on the finding that the acoustical impedance of burned tissue differs sufficiently from that of live tissue to permit ultrasonic detection of the interface between the burn and the underlying unburned tissue. The method is simple, rapid, and accurate. As compared with conventional practice, it provides the important advantage of permitting much earlier determination of whether a burn is of the first, second, or third degree. In the case of severe burns, the usual two - to three-week delay before surgery may be reduced to about 3 days or less.

  5. Management of post burn hand deformities

    PubMed Central

    Sabapathy, S. Raja; Bajantri, Babu; Bharathi, R. Ravindra

    2010-01-01

    The hand is ranked among the three most frequent sites of burns scar contracture deformity. One of the major determinants of the quality of life in burns survivors is the functionality of the hands. Burns deformities, although largely preventable, nevertheless do occur when appropriate treatment is not provided in the acute situation or when they are part of a major burns. Reconstructive procedures can greatly improve the function of the hands. Appropriate choice of procedures and timing of surgery followed by supervised physiotherapy can be a boon for a burns survivor. PMID:21321661

  6. Preparation of Partial-Thickness Burn Wounds in Rodents Using a New Experimental Burning Device.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Michiharu; Morimoto, Naoki; Ogino, Shuichi; Jinno, Chizuru; Kawaguchi, Atsushi; Kawai, Katsuya; Suzuki, Shigehiko

    2016-06-01

    The manual application of hot water or hot metal to an animal's skin surface is often used to prepare burn wound models. However, manual burn creation is subject to human variability. We developed a new device that can control the temperature, time, and pressure of contact to produce precise and reproducible animal burn wounds and investigated the conditions required to prepare various burn wounds using our new device. We prepared burn wounds on F344 rats using 3 contact times 2, 4, and 10 seconds using a stamp heated to 80°C. We observed the wound-healing process macroscopically and histologically and evaluated the burn depth using a laser speckle contrast-imaging device, which evaluated the blood flow of the wound. The changes in the burned area over time, tissue perfusion of the burn wounds, histological evaluation of the burn depth by hematoxylin-eosin and azocarmine and aniline blue staining, and the epithelialization rate (the ratio of the epithelialized area to the wound length) were evaluated on histological sections. Results indicated that the burn wounds prepared with contact times of 2, 4, and 10 seconds corresponded to superficial dermal burns, deep dermal burns, and full-thickness burns, respectively. We demonstrated that partial- and full-thickness burn wounds can be precisely and reproducibly created with our new automated burning device.

  7. Peripheral nerve conduits: technology update

    PubMed Central

    Arslantunali, D; Dursun, T; Yucel, D; Hasirci, N; Hasirci, V

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a worldwide clinical problem which could lead to loss of neuronal communication along sensory and motor nerves between the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral organs and impairs the quality of life of a patient. The primary requirement for the treatment of complete lesions is a tension-free, end-to-end repair. When end-to-end repair is not possible, peripheral nerve grafts or nerve conduits are used. The limited availability of autografts, and drawbacks of the allografts and xenografts like immunological reactions, forced the researchers to investigate and develop alternative approaches, mainly nerve conduits. In this review, recent information on the various types of conduit materials (made of biological and synthetic polymers) and designs (tubular, fibrous, and matrix type) are being presented. PMID:25489251

  8. Methylated spirit burns: an ongoing problem.

    PubMed

    Jansbeken, J R H; Vloemans, A F P M; Tempelman, F R H; Breederveld, R S

    2012-09-01

    Despite many educational campaigns we still see burns caused by methylated spirit every year. We undertook a retrospective study to analyse the impact of this problem. We retrospectively collected data of all patients with burns caused by methylated spirit over twelve years from 1996 to 2008. Our main endpoints were: incidence, age, mechanism of injury, total body surface area (TBSA) burned, burn depth, need for surgery and length of hospital stay. Ninety-seven patients with methylated spirit burns were included. During the study period there was no decrease in the number of patients annually admitted to the burn unit with methylated spirit burns. 28% of the patients (n=27) were younger than eighteen years old, 15% (n=15) were ten years old or younger. The most common cause of burns was carelessness in activities involving barbecues, campfires and fondues. Mean TBSA burned was 16% (SD 12.4). 70% (n=68) had full thickness burns. 66% (n=64) needed grafting. Mean length of hospital stay was 23 days (SD 24.7). The use of methylated spirit is an ongoing problem, which continues to cause severe burns in adults and children. Therefore methylated spirit should be banned in households. We suggest sale only in specialised shops, clear labelling and mandatory warnings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  9. Pre-hospital care in burn injury

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Prabhat; Goel, Arun

    2010-01-01

    The care provided to the victims of burn injury immediately after sustaining burns can largely affect the extent and depth of the wound. Although standard guidelines have been formulated by various burn associations, they are still not well known to public at large in our country. In burn injuries, most often, the bystanders are the first care providers. The swift implementation of the measures described in this article for first aid in thermal, chemical, electrical and inhalational injuries in the practical setting, within minutes of sustaining the burn, plays a vital role and can effectively reduce the morbidity and mortality to a great extent. In case of burn disasters, triage needs to be carried out promptly as per the defined protocols. Proper communication and transport from the scene of the accident to the primary care centre and onto the burn care facility greatly influences the execution of the management plans PMID:21321651

  10. Burned forests impact water supplies.

    PubMed

    Hallema, Dennis W; Sun, Ge; Caldwell, Peter V; Norman, Steven P; Cohen, Erika C; Liu, Yongqiang; Bladon, Kevin D; McNulty, Steven G

    2018-04-10

    Wildland fire impacts on surface freshwater resources have not previously been measured, nor factored into regional water management strategies. But, large wildland fires are increasing and raise concerns about fire impacts on potable water. Here we synthesize long-term records of wildland fire, climate, and river flow for 168 locations across the United States. We show that annual river flow changed in 32 locations, where more than 19% of the basin area was burned. Wildland fires enhanced annual river flow in the western regions with a warm temperate or humid continental climate. Wildland fires increased annual river flow most in the semi-arid Lower Colorado region, in spite of frequent droughts in this region. In contrast, prescribed burns in the subtropical Southeast did not significantly alter river flow. These extremely variable outcomes offer new insights into the potential role of wildfire and prescribed fire in regional water resource management, under a changing climate.

  11. [Atherectomy for peripheral arterial disease].

    PubMed

    Londero, Louise Skovgaard; Høgh, Annette Langager; Lindholt, Jes Sanddal

    2015-04-13

    Symptomatic peripheral arterial disease is managed according to national and international guidelines and the number of vascular reconstructions performed each year has increased over the past decade mainly due to an increasing frequency of endovascular procedures. Atherectomy as an alternative to the established treatment of symptomatic peripheral arterial disease has recently been analysed in a Cochrane review. In Denmark, atherectomy is not performed and so far the evidence is poor as the method is not an alternative to the established treatment in this country.

  12. Peripheral Atherectomy: Applications and Techniques.

    PubMed

    Mittleider, Derek; Russell, Erich

    2016-06-01

    Peripheral atherectomy is a class of procedures that is rapidly increasing in volume. Multiple classes of devices exist, and newer variants are added to the market annually. The devices see wide application for de novo lesions, in-stent restenosis, and adjunctive therapy for drug-coated balloons. The body of evidence supporting atherectomy is less robust than for many other peripheral therapies. The frequency and severity of complications from atherectomy can be significant compared with angioplasty and stenting, and familiarity with preventative and bailout techniques is essential for the interventionalist. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Imaging of the peripheral retina

    PubMed Central

    Kernt, Marcus; Kampik, Anselm

    2013-01-01

    The technical progress of the recent years has revolutionized imaging in ophthalmology. Scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO), digital angiography, optical coherence tomography (OCT), and detection of fundus autofluorescence (FAF) have fundamentally changed our understanding of numerous retinal and choroidal diseases. Besides the tremendous advances in macular diagnostics, there is more and more evidence that central pathologies are often directly linked to changes in the peripheral retina. This review provides a brief overview on current posterior segment imaging techniques with a special focus on the peripheral retina. PMID:24391370

  14. Treatment of Peripheral Talus Fractures.

    PubMed

    Shank, John R; Benirschke, Stephen K; Swords, Michael P

    2017-03-01

    Peripheral talus fractures include injuries to the lateral process, posteromedial talar body, and talar head. These injuries are rare and are often missed. Nonunion with conservative treatment is high and excision can lead to joint instability, rapid arthrosis, and earlier need for arthrodesis. Open reduction internal fixation of most peripheral talus fractures is critical to achieving a good outcome. Open reduction leads to more rapid union and ability to mobilize the ankle and subtalar joints, quicker revascularization of the talus, and lower rates of arthrosis. Surgical treatment can lead to substantial functional improvement and a slowing of the degenerative process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Atmospheric Effects of Biomass Burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Anne M.

    2000-01-01

    Biomass fires are both natural and anthropogenic in origin. The natural trigger is lightning, which leads to mid- and high-latitude fires and episodes of smoke and pollution associated with them. Lightning is also prominent in tropical regions when the dry season gives way to the wet season and lightning in convective systems ignites dry vegetation. Atmospheric consequences of biomass fires are complex. When considering the impacts of fires for a given ecosystem, inputs of fires must be compared to other process that emit trace gases and particles into the atmosphere. Other processes include industrial activity, fires for household purposes and biogenic sources which may themselves interact with fires. That is, fires may promote or restrict biogenic processes. Several books have presented various aspects of fire interactions with atmospheric chemistry and a cross-disciplinary review of a 1992 fire-oriented experiment appears in SAFARI: The Role of southern African Fires in Atmospheric and Ecological Environments. The IGAC/BIBEX core activity (see acronyms at end of Chapter) has sponsored field campaigns that integrate multiple aspects of fires ground-based measurements with an ecological perspective, atmospheric measurements with chemical and meteorological components, and remote sensing. This Chapter presents two aspects of biomass fires and the environment. Namely, the relationship between biomass burning and ozone is described, starting with a brief description of the chemical reactions involved and illustrative measurements and interpretation. Second, because of the need to observe biomass burning and its consequences globally, a summary of remote sensing approaches to the study of fires and trace gases is given. Examples in this Chapter are restricted to tropical burning for matters of brevity and because most burning activity globally is within this zone.

  16. Burning Phosphorus under Water Safely

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Larry C.

    1997-09-01

    A safer method for demonstrating the burning of white phosphorous under water is described. This demonstration uses 3% hydrogen peroxide solution and manganese dioxide as the oxygen source, eliminating the use of potentially explosive potassium chlorate. The oxygen generation is manually controlled by means of a stopcock on the dropping funnel. The apparatus has been designed to provide a most spectacular display, especially in the dark, lasting an hour or longer if desired, and eliminates the noxious phosphorous odor.

  17. Civilian blast-related burn injuries

    PubMed Central

    Patel, J.N.; Tan, A.; Dziewulski, P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary There is limited English literature describing the experience of a civilian hospital managing blast-related burn injuries. As the largest regional burn unit, we reviewed our cases with the aim of identifying means to improve current management. A 6-year retrospective analysis of all patients coded as sustaining blast-related burns was conducted through the unit’s burns database. Medical case notes were reviewed for information on burn demographics, management and outcomes. 42 patients were identified. Male to female ratio was 37:5. Age range was 12-84 years, (mean=33 years). Total body surface area (%TBSA) burn ranged from 0.25% to 60%, (median=1%). The most common burn injury was flame (31/42, 73.8%). Gas explosions were the most common mechanism of injury (19 cases; 45.2%). 7/42 cases (16.7%) had full ATLS management pre-transfer to the burns unit. The Injury Severity Score (ISS) ranged from 0-43 (median=2). 17/42 (40.4%) patients required admission. 37/36 (88.1%) patients were managed conservatively of which 1 patient later required surgery due to deeper burns. 5/42 (11.9%) patients required surgical management at presentation and these were noted to be burns with >15% TBSA requiring resuscitation. One case required emergency escharotomies and finger amputations. All patients survived their burn injuries. Blast-related burn injuries are generally uncommon in the civilian setting. Following proper assessment, most of these cases can be deemed as minor injuries and managed conservatively. Improvement in burns management education and training at local emergency departments would provide efficient patient care and avoid unnecessary referrals to a burns unit. PMID:27857651

  18. Bilateral foveal retinoschisis accompanying unilateral peripheral retinoschisis.

    PubMed

    Kocak, Nilufer; Ozturk, Taylan A; Kaynak, Suleyman

    2014-04-01

    X-linked juvenile retinoschisis is a rare hereditary retinal disease characterized by a tangential splitting of the neurosensory retina which may cause early-onset visual impairment. Existence of the retinal neurosensory layer splitting on cross-sectional images of optical coherance tomography (OCT) and the absence of leakage on fluorescein angiography (FA) help confirming the diagnosis. Such diagnostic tests are also helpful in determining the management of the disease. However, most of the retinoschisis cavities remain stable and rarely extend to the posterior pole, many authors suggest laser prophylaxis to avoid the potential risk of retinal detachment due to holes in the outer retinal layer. Herein, we report a case with bilateral foveal retinoschisis accompanying unilateral peripheral retinoschisis who was evaluated with detailed ophthalmologic examination. Visual acuity, fundoscopy, OCT, and FA remained stable in the second year of follow-up after prophylactic argon laser treatment.

  19. Bilateral foveal retinoschisis accompanying unilateral peripheral retinoschisis

    PubMed Central

    Kocak, Nilufer; Ozturk, Taylan A; Kaynak, Suleyman

    2014-01-01

    X-linked juvenile retinoschisis is a rare hereditary retinal disease characterized by a tangential splitting of the neurosensory retina which may cause early-onset visual impairment. Existence of the retinal neurosensory layer splitting on cross-sectional images of optical coherance tomography (OCT) and the absence of leakage on fluorescein angiography (FA) help confirming the diagnosis. Such diagnostic tests are also helpful in determining the management of the disease. However, most of the retinoschisis cavities remain stable and rarely extend to the posterior pole, many authors suggest laser prophylaxis to avoid the potential risk of retinal detachment due to holes in the outer retinal layer. Herein, we report a case with bilateral foveal retinoschisis accompanying unilateral peripheral retinoschisis who was evaluated with detailed ophthalmologic examination. Visual acuity, fundoscopy, OCT, and FA remained stable in the second year of follow-up after prophylactic argon laser treatment. PMID:23571248

  20. Skin graft fixation in severe burns: use of topical negative pressure.

    PubMed

    Kamolz, L P; Lumenta, D B; Parvizi, D; Wiedner, M; Justich, I; Keck, M; Pfurtscheller, K; Schintler, M

    2014-09-30

    Over the last 50 years, the evolution of burn care has led to a significant decrease in mortality. The biggest impact on survival has been the change in the approach to burn surgery. Early excision and grafting has become a standard of care for the majority of patients with deep burns; the survival of a given patient suffering from major burns is invariably linked to the take rate and survival of skin grafts. The application of topical negative pressure (TNP) therapy devices has demonstrated improved graft take in comparison to conventional dressing methods alone. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of TNP therapy on skin graft fixation in large burns. In all patients, we applied TNP dressings covering a %TBSA of >25. The following parameters were recorded and documented using BurnCase 3D: age, gender, %TBSA, burn depth, hospital length-of-stay, Baux score, survival, as well as duration and incidence of TNP dressings. After a burn depth adapted wound debridement, coverage was simultaneously performed using split-thickness skin grafts, which were fixed with staples and covered with fatty gauzes and TNP foam. The TNP foam was again fixed with staples to prevent displacement and finally covered with the supplied transparent adhesive film. A continuous subatmospheric pressure between 75-120 mm Hg was applied (VAC®, KCI, Vienna, Austria). The first dressing change was performed on day 4. Thirty-six out of 37 patients, suffering from full thickness burns, were discharged with complete wound closure; only one patient succumbed to their injuries. The overall skin graft take rate was over 95%. In conclusion, we consider that split thickness skin graft fixation by TNP is an efficient method in major burns, notably in areas with irregular wound surfaces or subject to movement (e.g. joint proximity), and is worth considering for the treatment of aged patients.

  1. Periorbital burns – a 6 year review of management and outcome.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald O'Connor, Edmund; Frew, Q; Din, A; Pleat, J; Ashraff, S; Ghazi-Nouri, S; El-Muttardi, N; Philp, B; Dziewulski, P

    2015-05-01

    Periorbital burns are an infrequent but potentially devastating injury. This study aimed to elucidate the spectrum of such injuries presenting to a UK burns centre and the outcome achieved in the cases requiring periorbital reconstruction for the restoration of function and form. Patients admitted to a UK regional burns centre between January 2005 and January 2011 with periorbital burns were identified from the Patient Administration System (PAS), theatre logs and the International Burns Injury database (IBID). Multiple parameters were assessed using patient notes, ITU and hospital image databases. Over 6 years, 167 patients with facial burns requiring surgery were treated, including 103 patients with eyelid burns. The mean burn size was 33% total body surface area. The eyelid burn depth varied; 67% superficial partial thickness, 17% deep dermal and 16% full thickness. Two patients lost complete vision in one eye, one patient underwent amniotic membrane grafting. In total 16 patients required periorbital reconstruction to maintain eye closure, with 1.8 operations on average per patient. Acute surgery was required in 11 patients, whilst late intervention (>3 months) was needed in 5, 2 patients had both acute and delayed surgery. Of the 5 late intervention patients 4 were treated with full thickness skin grafts and 1 with a Z plasty. Average time for final reconstruction with delayed surgery was 4.5 months. The goal in management of periorbital burns is preservation of vision, prevention of future complications and restoration of an acceptable aesthetic outcome. Total visual loss is thankfully rare, but early ophthalmology intervention is vital given the evidence of corneal damage as a brief therapeutic window exists. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessment Tools for Peripheral Neuropathy in Pediatric Oncology: A Systematic Review From the Children's Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Smolik, Suzanne; Arland, Lesley; Hensley, Mary Ann; Schissel, Debra; Shepperd, Barbara; Thomas, Kristin; Rodgers, Cheryl

    Peripheral neuropathy is a known side effect of several chemotherapy agents, including vinca alkaloids and platinum-based chemotherapy. Early recognition and monitoring of this side effect is an important role of the pediatric oncology nurse. There are a variety of peripheral neuropathy assessment tools currently in use, but the usefulness of these tools in identifying and grading neuropathy in children varies, and there is currently no standardized tool in place to evaluate peripheral neuropathy in pediatric oncology. A systematic review was performed to identify the peripheral neuropathy assessment tools that best evaluate the early onset and progression of peripheral neuropathy in pediatric patients receiving vincristine. Because of the limited information available in pediatric oncology, this review was extended to any pediatric patient with neuropathy. A total of 8 studies were included in the evidence synthesis. Based on available evidence, the pediatric-modified Total Neuropathy Scale (ped-m TNS) and the Total Neuropathy Score-pediatric version (TNS-PV) are recommended for the assessment of vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy in children 6 years of age and older. In addition, several studies demonstrated that subjective symptoms alone are not adequate to assess for vincristine-induced peripheral neuropathy. Nursing assessment of peripheral neuropathy should be an integral and regular part of patient care throughout the course of chemotherapy treatment.

  3. Estimates of biomass burning emissions in tropical Asia based on satellite-derived data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, D.; Song, Y.

    2009-09-01

    , India, Myanmar, and Cambodia. Furthermore, the peak in burned area was generally found in the early fire season, while the maximum fire emissions often occurred in the late fire season.

  4. Disaster planning: the basics of creating a burn mass casualty disaster plan for a burn center.

    PubMed

    Kearns, Randy D; Conlon, Kathe M; Valenta, Andrea L; Lord, Graydon C; Cairns, Charles B; Holmes, James H; Johnson, Daryhl D; Matherly, Annette F; Sawyer, Dalton; Skarote, Mary Beth; Siler, Sean M; Helminiak, Radm Clare; Cairns, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    In 2005, the American Burn Association published burn disaster guidelines. This work recognized that local and state assets are the most important resources in the initial 24- to 48-hour management of a burn disaster. Historical experiences suggest there is ample opportunity to improve local and state preparedness for a major burn disaster. This review will focus on the basics of developing a burn surge disaster plan for a mass casualty event. In the event of a disaster, burn centers must recognize their place in the context of local and state disaster plan activation. Planning for a burn center takes on three forms; institutional/intrafacility, interfacility/intrastate, and interstate/regional. Priorities for a burn disaster plan include: coordination, communication, triage, plan activation (trigger point), surge, and regional capacity. Capacity and capability of the plan should be modeled and exercised to determine limitations and identify breaking points. When there is more than one burn center in a given state or jurisdiction, close coordination and communication between the burn centers are essential for a successful response. Burn surge mass casualty planning at the facility and specialty planning levels, including a state burn surge disaster plan, must have interface points with governmental plans. Local, state, and federal governmental agencies have key roles and responsibilities in a burn mass casualty disaster. This work will include a framework and critical concepts any burn disaster planning effort should consider when developing future plans.

  5. Combining glyphosate with burning or mowing improves control of Yellow Bluestem (Bothriochloa ischaemum)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, S.; Hickman, Karen R.; Harmoney, Keith R.; Leslie,, David M.

    2013-01-01

    The invasive yellow bluestem (Bothriochloa ischaemum [L.] Keng) threatens native biodiversity, and its control is of interest to land managers involved in restoration of invaded grasslands. We used single, double, and triple applications of glyphosate (2.125 kg ai.ha-1.application-1) over the course of one growing season in combinations at different timings (early, middle, late season) with and without a mechanical treatment of mowing or burning to determine the most effective control method. One year after treatment, burning and mowing prior to a mid-season single or double early, middle, and/or late season herbicide application resulted in a similar level of control of yellow bluestem relative to a triple herbicide application, all of which had greater control relative to herbicide treatment alone. Reproductive tiller density and visual obstruction increased 2 yr after treatment with two herbicide treatments applied either early and middle season or early and late season, but it was prevented with burning and mowing prior to herbicide application. With the exception of three herbicide applications, combining burning or mowing with herbicide applications provided more effective control of yellow bluestem than any individual herbicide applications. Burning or mowing likely improves glyphosate effectiveness by altering the invasive grass structure so that plants are clear of standing dead and have shorter, active regrowth to enhance herbicide effectiveness. During restoration projects requiring control of invasive yellow bluestem, an effective management option is a combination of mechanical and chemical control.

  6. The Significance of Brain Transcranial Sonography in Burning Mouth Syndrome: a Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Zavoreo, Iris; Vučićević, Vanja; Boras; Zadravec, Dijana; Bašić, Vanja; Kes; Ciliga, Dubravka; Gabrić, Dragana

    2017-03-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic disorder which is affecting mostly postmenopausal women and is characterized by burning symptoms in the oral cavity on the clinically healthy oral mucosa. Also, the results of previous studies suggested a possible role of peripheral and/or central neurological disturbances in these patients. The aim of this study was to analyze patients with burning mouth syndrome using transcranial sonography. By use of transcranial sonography of the brain parenchyma, substantia nigra , midbrain raphe and brain nucleus were evaluated in 20 patients with BMS (64.7±12.3 years) and 20 controls with chronic pain in the lumbosacral region (61.5±15). Statistical analysis was performed by use of Student t test with significance set at p<0.05. The results of this study have shown hypoechogenicity of the substantia nigra and midbrain raphe as well as hyperechogenicity of the brain nucleus in BMS patients (p<0,05) as compared to controls. Altered transcranial sonography findings of the brain parenchyma , midbrain raphe and brain nucl eus in patients with burning mouth syndrome might reflect central disturbances within this syndrome. Burning Mouth Syndrome; Transcranial Sonography; substantia nigra; Midbrain Raphe Nuclei; Red Nucleus.

  7. The Significance of Brain Transcranial Sonography in Burning Mouth Syndrome: a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Zavoreo, Iris; Vučićević, Vanja; Zadravec, Dijana; Bašić, Vanja; Kes; Ciliga, Dubravka; Gabrić, Dragana

    2017-01-01

    Objective Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic disorder which is affecting mostly postmenopausal women and is characterized by burning symptoms in the oral cavity on the clinically healthy oral mucosa. Also, the results of previous studies suggested a possible role of peripheral and/or central neurological disturbances in these patients. The aim of this study was to analyze patients with burning mouth syndrome using transcranial sonography. Methods By use of transcranial sonography of the brain parenchyma, substantia nigra, midbrain raphe and brain nucleus were evaluated in 20 patients with BMS (64.7±12.3 years) and 20 controls with chronic pain in the lumbosacral region (61.5±15). Statistical analysis was performed by use of Student t test with significance set at p<0.05. Results The results of this study have shown hypoechogenicity of the substantia nigra and midbrain raphe as well as hyperechogenicity of the brain nucleus in BMS patients (p<0,05) as compared to controls. Conclusions Altered transcranial sonography findings of the brain parenchyma, midbrain raphe and brain nucleus in patients with burning mouth syndrome might reflect central disturbances within this syndrome. Key words Burning Mouth Syndrome; Transcranial Sonography; substantia nigra; Midbrain Raphe Nuclei; Red Nucleus PMID:28740270

  8. Biotechnological Management of Skin Burn Injuries: Challenges and Perspectives in Wound Healing and Sensory Recovery.

    PubMed

    Girard, Dorothée; Laverdet, Betty; Buhé, Virginie; Trouillas, Marina; Ghazi, Kamélia; Alexaline, Maïa M; Egles, Christophe; Misery, Laurent; Coulomb, Bernard; Lataillade, Jean-Jacques; Berthod, François; Desmoulière, Alexis

    2017-02-01

    Many wound management protocols have been developed to improve wound healing after burn with the primordial aim to restore the barrier function of the skin and also provide a better esthetic outcome. Autologous skin grafts remain the gold standard in the treatment of skin burn, but this treatment has its limitation especially for patients presenting limited donor sites due to extensive burn areas. Deep burn injuries also alter the integrity of skin-sensitive innervation and have an impact on patient's quality of life by compromising perceptions of touch, temperature, and pain. Thus, patients can suffer from long-term disabilities ranging from cutaneous sensibility loss to chronic pain. The cellular mechanisms involved in skin reinnervation following injury are not elucidated yet. Depending on the depth of the burn, nerve sprouting can occur from the wound bed or the surrounding healthy tissue, but somehow this process fails to provide correct reinnervation of the wound during scarring. In addition, several clinical observations indicate that damage to the peripheral nervous system influences wound healing, resulting in delayed wound healing or chronic wounds, underlining the role of innervation and neuromediators for normal cutaneous tissue repair development. Promising tissue engineering strategies, including the use of biomaterials, skin substitutes, and stem cells, could provide novel alternative treatments in wound healing and help in improving patient's sensory recovery.

  9. [Ultrasound-guided peripheral catheterization].

    PubMed

    Salleras-Duran, Laia; Fuentes-Pumarola, Concepció

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral catheterization is a technique that can be difficult in some patients. Some studies have recently described the use of ultrasound to guide the venous catheterization. To describe the success rate, time required, complications of ultrasound-guided peripheral venous catheterization. and patients and professionals satisfaction The search was performed in databases (Medline-PubMed, Cochrane Library, CINAHL and Cuiden Plus) for studies published about ultrasound-guided peripheral venous catheterization performed on patients that provided results on the success of the technique, complications, time used, patient satisfaction and the type of professional who performed the technique. A total of 21 studies were included. Most of them get a higher success rate 80% in the catheterization ecoguide and time it is not higher than the traditional technique. The Technical complications analyzed were arterial puncture rates and lower nerve 10%. In all studies measuring and comparing patient satisfaction in the art ecoguide is greater. Various professional groups perform the technique. The use of ultrasound for peripheral pipes has a high success rate, complications are rare and the time used is similar to that of the traditional technique. The technique of inserting catheters through ultrasound may be learned by any professional group performing venipuncture. Finally, it gets underscores the high patient satisfaction with the use of this technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Peripheral facial weakness (Bell's palsy).

    PubMed

    Basić-Kes, Vanja; Dobrota, Vesna Dermanović; Cesarik, Marijan; Matovina, Lucija Zadro; Madzar, Zrinko; Zavoreo, Iris; Demarin, Vida

    2013-06-01

    Peripheral facial weakness is a facial nerve damage that results in muscle weakness on one side of the face. It may be idiopathic (Bell's palsy) or may have a detectable cause. Almost 80% of peripheral facial weakness cases are primary and the rest of them are secondary. The most frequent causes of secondary peripheral facial weakness are systemic viral infections, trauma, surgery, diabetes, local infections, tumor, immune disorders, drugs, degenerative diseases of the central nervous system, etc. The diagnosis relies upon the presence of typical signs and symptoms, blood chemistry tests, cerebrospinal fluid investigations, nerve conduction studies and neuroimaging methods (cerebral MRI, x-ray of the skull and mastoid). Treatment of secondary peripheral facial weakness is based on therapy for the underlying disorder, unlike the treatment of Bell's palsy that is controversial due to the lack of large, randomized, controlled, prospective studies. There are some indications that steroids or antiviral agents are beneficial but there are also studies that show no beneficial effect. Additional treatments include eye protection, physiotherapy, acupuncture, botulinum toxin, or surgery. Bell's palsy has a benign prognosis with complete recovery in about 80% of patients, 15% experience some mode of permanent nerve damage and severe consequences remain in 5% of patients.

  11. MEGACARYOCYTES IN THE PERIPHERAL CIRCULATION

    PubMed Central

    Minot, George R.

    1922-01-01

    A megacaryocyte is seen commonly as an occasional cell in the peripheral blood of patients with myelogenous leucemia. Less commonly they appear in relatively large numbers. These giant cells also may occur in the blood under other conditions. Their presence is indicative of a bone marrow under intense strain. PMID:19868650

  12. Does nurses'perceived burn prevention knowledge and ability to teach burn prevention correlate with their actual burn prevention knowledge?

    PubMed

    Lehna, Carlee; Myers, John

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship among nurses'perceived burn prevention knowledge, their perceived ability to teach about burn prevention, and their actual burn prevention knowledge and to test if their actual burn knowledge could be predicted by these perceived measures. A two-page, anonymous survey that included a 10-item burn prevention knowledge test and an assessment of nurses'perceived knowledge of burn prevention and their perceived ability to teach burn prevention was administered to 313 nurses. Actual burn prevention knowledge was determined and the correlation among actual burn prevention knowledge, perceived knowledge, and perceived ability to teach was determined. Differences in these outcome variables based on specialty area were tested using analysis of variance techniques. Generalized linear modeling techniques were used to investigate which variables significantly predict a nurse's actual burn prevention knowledge. Test for interaction effects were performed, and significance was set at .05. Responding nurses (N = 265) described practicing in a variety of settings, such as pediatric settings (40.2%, n = 105), emergency departments (25.4%, n = 86), medical/surgical settings (8.4%, n = 22), and one pediatric burn setting (4.1%, n = 14), with all specialty areas as having similar actual burn prevention knowledge (P = .052). Seventy-seven percent of the nurses said they never taught about burn prevention (n = 177). Perceived knowledge and actual knowledge (r = .124, P = .046) as well as perceived knowledge and perceived ability were correlated (r = .799, P < .001). Significant predictors of actual knowledge were years in practice (beta = -0.063, P = .034), years in current area (beta = 0.072, P = .003), perceived knowledge (beta = 0.109, P = .042), and perceived ability (beta = 0.137, P = .019). All nurses, regardless of specialty area, have poor burn prevention knowledge, which is correlated with their perceived lack of

  13. Evaluating the role of alternative therapy in burn wound management: randomized trial comparing moist exposed burn ointment with conventional methods in the management of patients with second-degree burns.

    PubMed

    Ang, E S; Lee, S T; Gan, C S; See, P G; Chan, Y H; Ng, L H; Machin, D

    2001-03-06

    Moist exposed burn ointment (MEBO), from China, has been said to revolutionize burn management. Our study was conducted to compare MEBO with conventional management (C) with respect to the rate of wound healing, antibacterial and analgesic effect, and hospital costs. This is a prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trial conducted between 1 March 1997 and 24 October 1998. The trial was conducted in a specialized burn facility located in a tertiary referral hospital in a developed and industrialized island-state in Southeast Asia. We randomly assigned 115 consecutive patients between the ages of 12 and 80 who had partial-thickness thermal burns covering less than 40% of body surface area (BSA) to receive either MEBO or C. Fifty-seven patients were assigned to MEBO and 58 patients to C. The latter group received twice-daily dressing changes; MEBO patients received MEBO every 4 hours. Patients were hospitalized until 75% BSA had healed. BSA was determined by visual inspection and charted on Lund and Browder charts regularly. Wound healing rate, bacterial infection rate, pain score, and hospitalization costs were recorded. The median time to 75% healing was 17.0 and 20.0 days with MEBO and C, respectively (HR = 0.67, 95% CI = 0.41-1.11, P =.11), suggesting similar efficacy between the 2 modalities. Bacterial infection rates were similar between the 2 groups (HR = 1.10, 95% CI = 0.59-2.03, P =.76). MEBO imparted a greater analgesic effect in the first 5 days of therapy and reduced hospital costs by 8%. MEBO is as effective as conventional management but is not the panacea for all burn wounds. The use of MEBO eases the management of face and neck burns and facilitates early institution of occupational therapy in hand burns. It confers better pain relief such that fewer opiates are used during the first 5 days after burn injury.

  14. Body Composition Changes in Severely Burned Children During ICU Hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Cambiaso-Daniel, Janos; Malagaris, Ioannis; Rivas, Eric; Hundeshagen, Gabriel; Voigt, Charles D; Blears, Elizabeth; Mlcak, Ron P; Herndon, David N; Finnerty, Celeste C; Suman, Oscar E

    2017-12-01

    Prolonged hospitalization due to burn injury results in physical inactivity and muscle weakness. However, how these changes are distributed among body parts is unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the degree of body composition changes in different anatomical regions during ICU hospitalization. Retrospective chart review. Children's burn hospital. Twenty-four severely burned children admitted to our institution between 2000 and 2015. All patients underwent a dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry within 2 weeks after injury and 2 weeks before discharge to determine body composition changes. No subject underwent anabolic intervention. We analyzed changes of bone mineral content, bone mineral density, total fat mass, total mass, and total lean mass of the entire body and specifically analyzed the changes between the upper and lower limbs. In the 24 patients, age was 10 ± 5 years, total body surface area burned was 59% ± 17%, time between dual-energy x-ray absorptiometries was 34 ± 21 days, and length of stay was 39 ± 24 days. We found a significant (p < 0.001) average loss of 3% of lean mass in the whole body; this loss was significantly greater (p < 0.001) in the upper extremities (17%) than in the lower extremities (7%). We also observed a remodeling of the fat compartments, with a significant whole-body increase in fat mass (p < 0.001) that was greater in the truncal region (p < 0.0001) and in the lower limbs (p < 0.05). ICU hospitalization is associated with greater lean mass loss in the upper limbs of burned children. Mobilization programs should include early mobilization of upper limbs to restore upper extremity function.

  15. Compliance with nutrition support guidelines in acutely burned patients.

    PubMed

    Holt, Brennen; Graves, Caran; Faraklas, Iris; Cochran, Amalia

    2012-08-01

    Adequate and timely provision of nutritional support is a crucial component of care of the critically ill burn patient. The goal of this study was to assess a single center's consistency with Society of Critical Care Medicine/American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SCCM/ASPEN) guidelines for nutritional support in critically ill patients. Acutely burned patients >45kg in weight admitted to a regional burn center during a two-year period and who required 5 or more days of full enteral nutritional support were eligible for inclusion in this retrospective review. Specific outcomes evaluated include time from admission to feeding tube placement and enteral feeding initiation and percent of nutritional goal received within the first week of hospital stay. Descriptive statistics were used for all analyses. IRB approval was obtained. Thirty-seven patients were included in this retrospective review. Median age of patients was 44.9 years (IQR: 24.2-55.1), and median burn injury size was 30% (IQR: 19-47). Median time to feeding tube placement was 31.1h post admission (IQR: 23.6-50.2h), while median time to initiation of EN was 47.9h post admission (IQR: 32.4-59.9h). The median time required for patients to reach 60% of caloric goal was 3 days post-admission (IQR: 3-4.5). The median time for initiation of enteral nutrition was within the SCCM/ASPEN guidelines for initial nutrition in the critically ill patient. This project identified a 16h time lag between placement of enteral access and initiation of enteral nutrition. Development of a protocol for feeding tube placement and enteral nutrition management may optimize early nutritional support in the acutely injured burn patient. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  16. Pavement temperature and burns: streets of fire.

    PubMed

    Harrington, W Z; Strohschein, B L; Reedy, D; Harrington, J E; Schiller, W R

    1995-11-01

    To measure pavement temperatures over a 24-hour period to determine when patients are at risk for burns and to report cases of pavement burns with predisposing factors. Descriptive study of pavement temperatures and retrospective case series of 23 patients with pavement burns admitted to the Maricopa Medical Center during the years 1986 to 1992. Twenty-three patients with pavement burns serious enough for them to be admitted to the burn center. We measured the temperatures of asphalt, cement, and other outdoor materials hourly for one 24-hour period using a thermocouple thermometer. Asphalt pavement was hot enough to cause burns from 9 AM to 7 PM during the summer months. It was hot enough to cause a second-degree burn within 35 seconds from 10 AM to 5 PM. The group of burned patients could be divided into three categories: incapacitated, restrained, and sensory deficient. All burns involved less than 13% of the total body surface area. During summer days in the desert, pavement is often hot enough to cause burns and does so with regularity in the southwestern United States. No one should be allowed to remain in contact with hot pavement, even transiently.

  17. Automobile carburetor- and radiator-related burns.

    PubMed

    Renz, B M; Sherman, R

    1992-01-01

    Seventy-nine persons who had sustained automobile engine carburetor- and radiator-related burns were admitted to Grady Memorial Hospital Burn Unit between June 1, 1984 and September 30, 1990. Forty patients with carburetor-priming flame burns had a mean age of 31.5 years, a mean burn size of 13.4% total body surface area, and a mean length of stay of 13.8 days. There were 37 male patients. Four patients had an inhalation injury. Twenty-two surgical procedures were performed on 13 patients. One patient was an innocent bystander, and one patient died. The clothing of 16 patients had ignited, which resulted in larger, deeper burns and in one death. Burns predominantly involved the right sides of the face, head, and torso; the right upper extremity; and the right hand. Thirty-nine patients had scald burns that were associated with uncapping a radiator. These patients had a mean age of 29.6 years, a mean burn size of 8.9% total body surface area, and a mean length of stay of 6.4 days. There were 36 male patients and three innocent bystanders. One autografting procedure was performed, and there were no deaths in this group of patients. The burn-prone person is the young adult male. The circumstances that result in such dangerous behavior are predictable, and resultant burn injuries are preventable.

  18. Muscle Contractile Properties in Severely Burned Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaowu; Wolf, Steven E.; Walters, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Burn induces a sustained catabolic response which causes massive loss of muscle mass after injury. A better understanding of the dynamics of muscle wasting and its impact on muscle function is necessary for the development of effective treatments. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent either a 40% total body surface area (TBSA) scald burn or sham burn, and were further assigned to subgroups at four time points after injury (days 3, 7, 14 and 21). In situ isometric contractile properties were measured including twitch tension (Pt), tetanic tension (Po) and fatigue properties. Body weight decreased in burn and sham groups through day 3, however, body weight in the sham groups recovered and increased over time compared to burned groups, which progressively decreased until day 21 after injury. Significant differences in muscle wet weight and protein weight were found between sham and burn. Significant differences in muscle contractile properties were found at day 14 with lower absolute Po as well as specific Po in burned rats compared to sham. After burn, the muscle twitch tension was significantly higher than the sham at day 21. No significant difference in fatigue properties was found between the groups. This study demonstrates dynamics of muscle atrophy and muscle contractile properties after severe burn; this understanding will aid in the development of approaches designed to reduce the rate and extent of burn induced muscle loss and function. PMID:20381255

  19. Peripheral neuropathy in liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Kharbanda, Parampreet S; Prabhakar, Sudesh; Chawla, Yogesh K; Das, Chandi P; Syal, Puneet

    2003-08-01

    Neuropathy in association with chronic liver disease, including cirrhosis, is recognized; however, there are differences in the incidence and type of neuropathy reported. The causal relationship of liver disease to neuropathy has been questioned. This study was designed to evaluate the incidence and character of peripheral neuropathy in patients with liver cirrhosis. The effect of alcohol consumption, severity of liver disease and encephalopathy on the incidence and severity of neuropathy were also studied. Patients having an identifiable cause of peripheral neuropathy, except alcohol, were excluded from the study. Patients with evidence of vitamin B12 deficiency or diabetes were also excluded from the study. In this study, 33 patients with liver cirrhosis were evaluated clinically and electrophysiologically to detect any evidence of peripheral neuropathy. Nerve conduction studies were performed in the upper and lower limbs using surface electrodes. These patients also underwent a detailed clinical examination. Clinical signs of peripheral neuropathy were found in seven (21%) patients. Nerve conduction studies were abnormal in 24 (73%) patients. The pattern of involvement was predominantly of an axonal sensory motor polyneuropathy. Neuropathy was found both in patients with alcohol-related and non-alcohol-related cirrhosis. The presence of encephalopathy did not have a significant bearing on the incidence and severity of neuropathy. The neuropathy was also not significantly related to the severity of liver disease. The present study reveals that a significant number of patients with liver cirrhosis show evidence of peripheral neuropathy, which is present regardless of the etiology of cirrhosis, and is subclinical in a majority of these patients. The cause of neuropathy was probably the liver disease itself, as the incidence and severity of neuropathy in the alcohol-related cirrhosis, although higher, was not significantly different from the neuropathy in patients

  20. Cardowan coal mine explosion: experience of a mass burns incident.

    PubMed Central

    Allister, C; Hamilton, G M

    1983-01-01

    A coal mine explosion 1700 feet (516 m) underground and two miles (3.2 km) from the pit head resulted in 40 casualties. Two hours elapsed between the explosion and the arrival of patients at hospital. Six patients suffered mechanical injuries, only one of which was life threatening. Thirty six suffered burns; in 18 over 15% of the total body surface area was affected. Nineteen patients had a mild respiratory upset requiring oxygen treatment. The average length of inpatient stay in those admitted was 24 days. Early assessment and treatment in the accident and emergency department was relatively simple because of the large proportion of burn injuries. Lack of communication between site and hospital made administration of the disaster difficult. PMID:6409324