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Sample records for early pulmonary inflammation

  1. Regulation of pulmonary inflammation by mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Alkhouri, Hatem; Poppinga, Wilfred Jelco; Tania, Navessa Padma; Ammit, Alaina; Schuliga, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Pulmonary inflammation and tissue remodelling are common elements of chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), and pulmonary hypertension (PH). In disease, pulmonary mesenchymal cells not only contribute to tissue remodelling, but also have an important role in pulmonary inflammation. This review will describe the immunomodulatory functions of pulmonary mesenchymal cells, such as airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells and lung fibroblasts, in chronic respiratory disease. An important theme of the review is that pulmonary mesenchymal cells not only respond to inflammatory mediators, but also produce their own mediators, whether pro-inflammatory or pro-resolving, which influence the quantity and quality of the lung immune response. The notion that defective pro-inflammatory or pro-resolving signalling in these cells potentially contributes to disease progression is also discussed. Finally, the concept of specifically targeting pulmonary mesenchymal cell immunomodulatory function to improve therapeutic control of chronic respiratory disease is considered. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Systemic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer: common driver of pulmonary cachexia?

    PubMed

    Ceelen, Judith J M; Langen, Ramon C J; Schols, Annemie M W J

    2014-12-01

    In this article, a putative role of systemic inflammation as a driver of pulmonary cachexia induced by either chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or nonsmall cell lung cancer is reviewed. Gaps in current translational research approaches are discussed and alternative strategies are proposed to provide new insights. Activation of the ubiquitin proteasome system has generally been considered a cause of pulmonary cachexia, but current animal models lack specificity and evidence is lacking in nonsmall cell lung cancer and conflicting in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. Recent studies have shown activation of the autophagy-lysosome pathway in both nonsmall cell lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Myonuclear loss, as a consequence of increased apoptotic events in myofibers, has been suggested in cancer-cachexia-associated muscle atrophy. Plasma transfer on myotube cultures can be used to detect early inflammatory signals in patients and presence of atrophy-inducing activity within the circulation. Comparative clinical research between nonsmall cell lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in different disease stages is useful to unravel disease-specific versus common denominators of pulmonary cachexia.

  3. Inflammation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and aging.

    PubMed

    Provinciali, Mauro; Cardelli, Maurizio; Marchegiani, Francesca

    2011-12-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by an abnormal persistent inflammatory response to noxious environmental stimuli, particularly cigarette smoke. The determinants of the dysregulated immune responses, which play a role both in the onset and continuation of COPD, are largely unknown. We examined several molecular mechanisms regulating the inflammatory pathway, such as cytokine polymorphisms, miRNA expression, and DNA methylation in COPD and aging, with the aim to provide evidence supporting the view that aging of the immune system may predispose to COPD. The incidence of COPD increases with age. The pathogenesis of the disease is linked to a chronic inflammation and involves the recruitment and regulation of innate and adaptive immune cells. A chronic systemic inflammation characterizes aging and has been correlated with many diseases, most of them age-related. COPD and aging are associated with significant dysregulation of the immune system that leads to a chronic inflammatory response. The similar molecular mechanisms and the common genetic signature shared by COPD and aging suggest that immunosenescence may contribute to the development of COPD.

  4. Inflammation and immunity in the pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rabinovitch, Marlene; Guignabert, Christophe; Humbert, Marc; Nicolls, Mark R

    2014-06-20

    This review summarizes an expanding body of knowledge indicating that failure to resolve inflammation and altered immune processes underlie the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension. The chemokines and cytokines implicated in pulmonary arterial hypertension that could form a biomarker platform are discussed. Pre-clinical studies that provide the basis for dysregulated immunity in animal models of the disease are reviewed. In addition, we present therapies that target inflammatory/immune mechanisms that are currently enrolling patients, and discuss others in development. We show how genetic and metabolic abnormalities are inextricably linked to dysregulated immunity and adverse remodeling in the pulmonary arteries. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Early environments and the ecology of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    McDade, Thomas W.

    2012-01-01

    Recent research has implicated inflammatory processes in the pathophysiology of a wide range of chronic degenerative diseases, although inflammation has long been recognized as a critical line of defense against infectious disease. However, current scientific understandings of the links between chronic low-grade inflammation and diseases of aging are based primarily on research in high-income nations with low levels of infectious disease and high levels of overweight/obesity. From a comparative and historical point of view, this epidemiological situation is relatively unique, and it may not capture the full range of ecological variation necessary to understand the processes that shape the development of inflammatory phenotypes. The human immune system is characterized by substantial developmental plasticity, and a comparative, developmental, ecological framework is proposed to cast light on the complex associations among early environments, regulation of inflammation, and disease. Recent studies in the Philippines and lowland Ecuador reveal low levels of chronic inflammation, despite higher burdens of infectious disease, and point to nutritional and microbial exposures in infancy as important determinants of inflammation in adulthood. By shaping the regulation of inflammation, early environments moderate responses to inflammatory stimuli later in life, with implications for the association between inflammation and chronic diseases. Attention to the eco-logics of inflammation may point to promising directions for future research, enriching our understanding of this important physiological system and informing approaches to the prevention and treatment of disease. PMID:23045646

  6. Granulomatous inflammation of pulmonary squamous cell carcinoma: a rare phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Shogo; Koda, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Some neoplasms are associated with granulomatous inflammation. Granuloma formation in tumor tissue is caused by the cytokines derived from either the main tumor or other cells surrounding the tumor. In other instances, granulomatous inflammation is observed in the lymph nodes draining a tumor. This has been recognized as a sarcoid-like reaction. Herein, we report of a 75-year-old man with pulmonary squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), where granulomatous inflammation was observed extensively at the primary site. The carcinoma seemed to partly regress. In the regressing area, tumor cell debris was surrounded by granuloma. In contrast, no granuloma was identified in the dissected regional lymph nodes. To the best of our knowledge, such a case of SCC had not been described thus far. More case studies are required to determine whether tumor-related granuloma is the main cause of regression or whether it is just a secondary phenomenon caused by the attack and destruction of the tumor by lymphocytes.

  7. Effects of exercise training on pulmonary hemodynamics, functional capacity and inflammation in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Manuel J.; Grimminger, Jan; Krüger, Britta; Ghofrani, Hossein A.; Mooren, Frank C.; Gall, Henning; Pilat, Christian; Krüger, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is characterized by severe exercise limitation mainly attributed to the impairment of right ventricular function resulting from a concomitant elevation of pulmonary vascular resistance and pressure. The unquestioned cornerstone in the management of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is specific vasoactive medical therapy to improve pulmonary hemodynamics and strengthen right ventricular function. Nevertheless, evidence for a beneficial effect of exercise training (ET) on pulmonary hemodynamics and functional capacity in patients with PH has been growing during the past decade. Beneficial effects of ET on regulating factors, inflammation, and metabolism have also been described. Small case-control studies and randomized clinical trials in larger populations of patients with PH demonstrated substantial improvements in functional capacity after ET. These findings were accompanied by several studies that suggested an effect of ET on inflammation, although a direct link between this effect and the therapeutic benefit of ET in PH has not yet been demonstrated. On this background, the aim of the present review is to describe current concepts regarding the effects of exercise on the pulmonary circulation and pathophysiological limitations, as well as the clinical and mechanistic effects of exercise in patients with PH. PMID:28680563

  8. Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 Knockout Abrogates Radiation Induced Pulmonary Inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallahan, Dennis E.; Virudachalam, Subbulakshmi

    1997-06-01

    Increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1; CD54) is induced by exposure to ionizing radiation. The lung was used as a model to study the role of ICAM-1 in the pathogenesis of the radiation-induced inflammation-like response. ICAM-1 expression increased in the pulmonary microvascular endothelium and not in the endothelium of larger pulmonary vessels following treatment of mice with thoracic irradiation. To quantify radiation-induced ICAM-1 expression, we utilized fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis of anti-ICAM-1 antibody labeling of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells from human cadaver donors (HMVEC-L cells). Fluorochrome conjugates and UV microscopy were used to quantify the fluorescence intensity of ICAM in the irradiated lung. These studies showed a dose- and time-dependent increase in ICAM-1 expression in the pulmonary microvascular endothelium. Peak expression occurred at 24 h, while threshold dose was as low as 2 Gy. To determine whether ICAM-1 is required for inflammatory cell infiltration into the irradiated lung, the anti-ICAM-1 blocking antibody was administered by tail vein injection to mice following thoracic irradiation. Inflammatory cells were quantified by immunofluorescence for leukocyte common antigen (CD45). Mice treated with the anti-ICAM-1 blocking antibody showed attenuation of inflammatory cell infiltration into the lung in response to ionizing radiation exposure. To verify the requirement of ICAM-1 in the inflammation-like radiation response, we utilized the ICAM-1 knockout mouse. ICAM-1 was not expressed in the lungs of ICAM-1-deficient mice following treatment with thoracic irradiation. ICAM-1 knockout mice had no increase in the inflammatory cell infiltration into the lung in response to thoracic irradiation. These studies demonstrate a radiation dose-dependent increase in ICAM-1 expression in the pulmonary microvascular endothelium, and show that ICAM-1 is required for inflammatory cell infiltration

  9. CFTR-regulated MAPK/NF-κB signaling in pulmonary inflammation in thermal inhalation injury.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhi Wei; Chen, Jing; Ruan, Ye Chun; Zhou, Tao; Chen, Yu; Chen, YaJie; Tsang, Lai Ling; Chan, Hsiao Chang; Peng, Yi Zhi

    2015-10-30

    The mechanism underlying pulmonary inflammation in thermal inhalation injury remains elusive. Cystic fibrosis, also hallmarked with pulmonary inflammation, is caused by mutations in CFTR, the expression of which is temperature-sensitive. We investigated whether CFTR is involved in heat-induced pulmonary inflammation. We applied heat-treatment in 16HBE14o- cells with CFTR knockdown or overexpression and heat-inhalation in rats in vivo. Heat-treatment caused significant reduction in CFTR and, reciprocally, increase in COX-2 at early stages both in vitro and in vivo. Activation of ERK/JNK, NF-κB and COX-2/PGE2 were detected in heat-treated cells, which were mimicked by knockdown, and reversed by overexpression of CFTR or VX-809, a reported CFTR mutation corrector. JNK/ERK inhibition reversed heat-/CFTR-knockdown-induced NF-κB activation, whereas NF-κB inhibitor showed no effect on JNK/ERK. IL-8 was augmented by heat-treatment or CFTR-knockdown, which was abolished by inhibition of NF-κB, JNK/ERK or COX-2. Moreover, in vitro or in vivo treatment with curcumin, a natural phenolic compound, significantly enhanced CFTR expression and reversed the heat-induced increases in COX-2/PGE2/IL-8, neutrophil infiltration and tissue damage in the airway. These results have revealed a CFTR-regulated MAPK/NF-κB pathway leading to COX-2/PGE2/IL-8 activation in thermal inhalation injury, and demonstrated therapeutic potential of curcumin for alleviating heat-induced pulmonary inflammation.

  10. Hfe Deficiency Impairs Pulmonary Neutrophil Recruitment in Response to Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Benesova, Karolina; Vujić Spasić, Maja; Schaefer, Sebastian M.; Stolte, Jens; Baehr-Ivacevic, Tomi; Waldow, Katharina; Zhou, Zhe; Klingmueller, Ursula; Benes, Vladimir; Mall, Marcus A.; Muckenthaler, Martina U.

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of iron homeostasis and the inflammatory response are tightly linked to protect the host from infection. Here we investigate how imbalanced systemic iron homeostasis in a murine disease model of hereditary hemochromatosis (Hfe−/− mice) affects the inflammatory responses of the lung. We induced acute pulmonary inflammation in Hfe−/− and wild-type mice by intratracheal instillation of 20 µg of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and analyzed local and systemic inflammatory responses and iron-related parameters. We show that in Hfe−/− mice neutrophil recruitment to the bronchoalveolar space is attenuated compared to wild-type mice although circulating neutrophil numbers in the bloodstream were elevated to similar levels in Hfe−/− and wild-type mice. The underlying molecular mechanisms are likely multifactorial and include elevated systemic iron levels, alveolar macrophage iron deficiency and/or hitherto unexplored functions of Hfe in resident pulmonary cell types. As a consequence, pulmonary cytokine expression is out of balance and neutrophils fail to be recruited efficiently to the bronchoalveolar compartment, a process required to protect the host from infections. In conclusion, our findings suggest a novel role for Hfe and/or imbalanced iron homeostasis in the regulation of the inflammatory response in the lung and hereditary hemochromatosis. PMID:22745741

  11. Cytokine–Ion Channel Interactions in Pulmonary Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hamacher, Jürg; Hadizamani, Yalda; Borgmann, Michèle; Mohaupt, Markus; Männel, Daniela Narcissa; Moehrlen, Ueli; Lucas, Rudolf; Stammberger, Uz

    2018-01-01

    The lungs conceptually represent a sponge that is interposed in series in the bodies’ systemic circulation to take up oxygen and eliminate carbon dioxide. As such, it matches the huge surface areas of the alveolar epithelium to the pulmonary blood capillaries. The lung’s constant exposure to the exterior necessitates a competent immune system, as evidenced by the association of clinical immunodeficiencies with pulmonary infections. From the in utero to the postnatal and adult situation, there is an inherent vital need to manage alveolar fluid reabsorption, be it postnatally, or in case of hydrostatic or permeability edema. Whereas a wealth of literature exists on the physiological basis of fluid and solute reabsorption by ion channels and water pores, only sparse knowledge is available so far on pathological situations, such as in microbial infection, acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome, and in the pulmonary reimplantation response in transplanted lungs. The aim of this review is to discuss alveolar liquid clearance in a selection of lung injury models, thereby especially focusing on cytokines and mediators that modulate ion channels. Inflammation is characterized by complex and probably time-dependent co-signaling, interactions between the involved cell types, as well as by cell demise and barrier dysfunction, which may not uniquely determine a clinical picture. This review, therefore, aims to give integrative thoughts and wants to foster the unraveling of unmet needs in future research. PMID:29354115

  12. Grouping nanomaterials to predict their potential to induce pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Braakhuis, Hedwig M; Oomen, Agnes G; Cassee, Flemming R

    2016-05-15

    The rapidly expanding manufacturing, production and use of nanomaterials have raised concerns for both worker and consumer safety. Various studies have been published in which induction of pulmonary inflammation after inhalation exposure to nanomaterials has been described. Nanomaterials can vary in aspects such as size, shape, charge, crystallinity, chemical composition, and dissolution rate. Currently, efforts are made to increase the knowledge on the characteristics of nanomaterials that can be used to categorise them into hazard groups according to these characteristics. Grouping helps to gather information on nanomaterials in an efficient way with the aim to aid risk assessment. Here, we discuss different ways of grouping nanomaterials for their risk assessment after inhalation. Since the relation between single intrinsic particle characteristics and the severity of pulmonary inflammation is unknown, grouping of nanomaterials by their intrinsic characteristics alone is not sufficient to predict their risk after inhalation. The biokinetics of nanomaterials should be taken into account as that affects the dose present at a target site over time. The parameters determining the kinetic behaviour are not the same as the hazard-determining parameters. Furthermore, characteristics of nanomaterials change in the life-cycle, resulting in human exposure to different forms and doses of these nanomaterials. As information on the biokinetics and in situ characteristics of nanomaterials is essential but often lacking, efforts should be made to include these in testing strategies. Grouping nanomaterials will probably be of the most value to risk assessors when information on intrinsic characteristics, life-cycle, biokinetics and effects are all combined. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Inhalation of Carbon Black Nanoparticles Aggravates Pulmonary Inflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Saputra, Devina; Yoon, Jin-ha; Park, Hyunju; Heo, Yongju; Yang, Hyoseon; Lee, Eun Ji; Lee, Sangjin; Song, Chang-Woo; Lee, Kyuhong

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of recent studies have focused on the impact of particulate matter on human health. As a model for atmospheric particulate inhalation, we investigated the effects of inhaled carbon black nanoparticles (CBNP) on mice with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The CNBPs were generated by a novel aerosolization process, and the mice were exposed to the aerosol for 4 hours. We found that CBNP inhalation exacerbated lung inflammation, as evidenced by histopathology analysis and by the expression levels of interleukin-6 protein, fibronectin, and interferon-γ mRNAs in lung tissues. Notably, fibronectin mRNA expression showed a statistically significant increase in expression after CBNP exposure. These data suggest that the concentration of CBNPs delivered (calculated to be 12.5 μg/m3) can aggravate lung inflammation in mice. Our results also suggest that the inhalation of ultrafine particles like PM 2.5 is an impactful environmental risk factor for humans, particularly in susceptible populations with predisposing lung conditions. PMID:25071917

  14. Establishment of a mouse model for pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis by intratracheal instillation of polyhexamethyleneguanidine phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Jin; Park, Jong-Hwan; Lee, Jun-Young; Jeong, Yu-Jin; Song, Jeong Ah; Lee, Kyuhong; Kim, Dong-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Although several animal models have been developed to study human pulmonary fibrosis, lack of a perfect model has raised the need for various animal models of pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, we evaluated the pulmonary effect of polyhexamethyleneguanidine phosphate instillation into the lungs of mice to determine the potential of these mice as a murine model of pulmonary fibrosis. Intratracheal instillation of polyhexamethyleneguanidine phosphate induced severe lung inflammation manifested by the infiltration of mononuclear cells and neutrophils and increased production of IL-6, TNF-α, CCL2 and CXCL1. The lung inflammation gradually increased until 28 days after polyhexamethyleneguanidine phosphate exposure, and increases of collagen deposition and TGF-β production, which are indicators of pulmonary fibrosis, were seen. Our study showed that intratracheal instillation of polyhexamethyleneguanidine phosphate induces pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis in mice. PMID:27182113

  15. Airway inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): a true paradox.

    PubMed

    Eapen, Mathew Suji; Myers, Stephen; Walters, Eugene Haydn; Sohal, Sukhwinder Singh

    2017-10-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is primarily an airway condition, which mainly affects cigarette smokers and presents with shortness of breath that is progressive and poorly reversible. In COPD research, there has been a long held belief that airway disease progression is due to inflammation. Although this may be true in the airway lumen with innate immunity activated by the effect of smoke or secondary to infection, the accurate picture of inflammatory cells in the airway wall, where the pathophysiological COPD remodeling occurs, is uncertain and debatable. Areas covered: The current review provides a comprehensive literature survey of the changes in the main inflammatory cells in human COPD patients and focuses on contrarian views that affect the prevailing dogma on inflammation. The review also delves into the role of oxidative stress and inflammasomes in modulating the immune response in COPD. Further, the effects of inflammation in affecting the epithelium, fibroblasts, and airway remodeling are discussed. Expert commentary: Inflammation as a driving force for airway wall damage and remodelling in early COPD is at the very least 'oversimplified' and is likely to be misleading. This has serious implications for rational thinking about the illness, including pathogenesis and designing therapy.

  16. Grouping nanomaterials to predict their potential to induce pulmonary inflammation

    SciT

    Braakhuis, Hedwig M., E-mail: hedwig.braakhuis@rivm.nl; Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, PO Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht; Oomen, Agnes G.

    The rapidly expanding manufacturing, production and use of nanomaterials have raised concerns for both worker and consumer safety. Various studies have been published in which induction of pulmonary inflammation after inhalation exposure to nanomaterials has been described. Nanomaterials can vary in aspects such as size, shape, charge, crystallinity, chemical composition, and dissolution rate. Currently, efforts are made to increase the knowledge on the characteristics of nanomaterials that can be used to categorise them into hazard groups according to these characteristics. Grouping helps to gather information on nanomaterials in an efficient way with the aim to aid risk assessment. Here, wemore » discuss different ways of grouping nanomaterials for their risk assessment after inhalation. Since the relation between single intrinsic particle characteristics and the severity of pulmonary inflammation is unknown, grouping of nanomaterials by their intrinsic characteristics alone is not sufficient to predict their risk after inhalation. The biokinetics of nanomaterials should be taken into account as that affects the dose present at a target site over time. The parameters determining the kinetic behaviour are not the same as the hazard-determining parameters. Furthermore, characteristics of nanomaterials change in the life-cycle, resulting in human exposure to different forms and doses of these nanomaterials. As information on the biokinetics and in situ characteristics of nanomaterials is essential but often lacking, efforts should be made to include these in testing strategies. Grouping nanomaterials will probably be of the most value to risk assessors when information on intrinsic characteristics, life-cycle, biokinetics and effects are all combined. - Highlights: • Grouping of nanomaterials helps to gather information in an efficient way with the aim to aid risk assessment. • Different ways of grouping nanomaterials for their risk assessment after inhalation

  17. Familial idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Evidence of lung inflammation in unaffected family members

    SciT

    Bitterman, P.B.; Rennard, S.I.; Keogh, B.A.

    1986-05-22

    We evaluated 17 clinically unaffected members of three families with an autosomal dominant form of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis for evidence of alveolar inflammation. Each person in the study was examined by gallium-67 scanning for a general estimate of pulmonary inflammation, and by bronchoalveolar lavage for characterization of the types of recovered cells and their state of activation. Eight of the 17 subjects had evidence of alveolar inflammation on the lavage studies. Supporting data included increased numbers of neutrophils and activated macrophages that released one or more neutrophil chemoattractants, and growth factors for lung fibroblasts--findings similar to those observed in patientsmore » with overt idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Four of these eight also had a positive gallium scan; in all the other clinically unaffected subjects the scan was normal. During a follow-up of two to four years in seven of the eight subjects who had evidence of inflammation, no clinical evidence of pulmonary fibrosis has appeared. These results indicate that alveolar inflammation occurs in approximately half the clinically unaffected family members at risk of inheriting autosomal dominant idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Whether these persons with evidence of pulmonary inflammation but no fibrosis will proceed to have clinically evident pulmonary fibrosis is not yet known.« less

  18. Protective role of interleukin-10 in Ozone-induced pulmonary inflammation**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The mechanisms underlying ozone (03)-induced pulmonary inflammation remain unclear. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is an anti-inflammatory cytokine that is known to inhibit inflammatory mediators. Objectives: We investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying interleuken-10...

  19. Ozone-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Inflammation are Modulated by Adrenal-Derived Stress Hormones

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone exposure promotes pulmonary injury and inflammation. Previously we have characterized systemic changes that occur immediately after acute ozone exposure and are mediated by neuro-hormonal stress response pathway. Both HPA axis and sympathetic tone alterations induce the rel...

  20. Pulmonary oxidative stress, inflammation and dysregulated iron homeostatis in rat models of cardiovascular disease

    EPA Science Inventory

    Underlying cardiovascular disease (CVD) is considered a risk factor for the exacerbation of air pollution health effects. Therefore, rodent models of CVD are increasingly used to examine mechanisms ofvariation in susceptibility. Pulmonary oxidative stress, inflammation and altere...

  1. Pulmonary exposure to diesel exhaust particles enhances coagulatory disturbance with endothelial damage and systemic inflammation related to lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Ken-Ichiro; Takano, Hirohisa; Sakurai, Miho; Oda, Toshio; Tamura, Hiroshi; Yanagisawa, Rie; Shimada, Akinori; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2006-11-01

    Pulmonary exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) enhances lung inflammation related to bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]) in mice. Severe lung inflammation can reportedly induce coagulatory abnormalities and systemic inflammation. This study examined the effects of components of DEP on lung inflammation, pulmonary permeability, coagulatory changes, systemic inflammatory response, and lung-to-systemic translocation of LPS in a murine model of lung inflammation. ICR mice were divided into six experimental groups that intratracheally received vehicle, LPS (2.5 mg/kg), organic chemicals in DEP (DEP-OC; 4 mg/kg) extracted with dicloromethane), residual carbonaceous nuclei of DEP (washed DEP: 4 mg/kg), DEP-OC + LPS, or washed DEP + LPS. Both DEP components exacerbated lung inflammation, vascular permeability, and the increased fibrinogen and E-selectin levels induced by LPS. With overall trends, the exacerbation was more prominent with washed DEP than with DEP-OC. Washed DEP + LPS significantly decreased activated protein C and antithrombin-III and elevated circulatory levels of interleukin (IL)-6, keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC), and LPS as compared with LPS alone, whereas DEP-OC + LPS elevated IL-6, KC, and LPS without significance. These results show that DEP components, especially washed DEP, amplify the effects if LPS on the respiratory system and suggest that they contribute to the adverse health effects of particulate air pollution on the sensitive populations with predisposing vascular and/or pulmonary diseases, including ischemic vascular diseases and respiratory infection.

  2. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator regulates epithelial cell response to Aspergillus and resultant pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Neelkamal; Datta, Kausik; Askin, Frederic B; Staab, Janet F; Marr, Kieren A

    2012-02-01

    Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) alter epithelial cell (EC) interactions with multiple microbes, such that dysregulated inflammation and injury occur with airway colonization in people with cystic fibrosis (CF). Aspergillus fumigatus frequently colonizes CF airways, but it has been assumed to be an innocent saprophyte; its potential role as a cause of lung disease is controversial. To study the interactions between Aspergillus and EC, and the role of the fungus in evoking inflammatory responses. A. fumigatus expressing green fluorescent protein was developed for in vitro and in vivo models, which used cell lines and mouse tracheal EC. Fungal spores (conidia) are rapidly ingested by ECs derived from bronchial cell lines and murine tracheas, supporting a role for EC in early airway clearance. Bronchial ECs harboring CFTR mutations (ΔF508) or deletion demonstrate impaired uptake and killing of conidia, and ECs with CFTR mutation undergo more conidial-induced apoptosis. Germinated (hyphal) forms of the fungus evoke secretion of inflammatory mediators, with CFTR mutation resulting in increased airway levels of macrophage inflammatory protein 2 and KC, and higher lung monocyte chemotactic protein-1. After A. fumigatus inhalation, CFTR(-/-) mice develop exaggerated lymphocytic inflammation, mucin accumulation, and lung injury. Data demonstrate a critical role for CFTR in mediating EC responses to A. fumigatus. Results suggest that the fungus elicits aberrant pulmonary inflammation in the setting of CFTR mutation, supporting the potential role of antifungals to halt progressive CF lung disease.

  3. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Regulates Epithelial Cell Response to Aspergillus and Resultant Pulmonary Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Neelkamal; Datta, Kausik; Askin, Frederic B.; Staab, Janet F.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) alter epithelial cell (EC) interactions with multiple microbes, such that dysregulated inflammation and injury occur with airway colonization in people with cystic fibrosis (CF). Aspergillus fumigatus frequently colonizes CF airways, but it has been assumed to be an innocent saprophyte; its potential role as a cause of lung disease is controversial. Objectives: To study the interactions between Aspergillus and EC, and the role of the fungus in evoking inflammatory responses. Methods: A. fumigatus expressing green fluorescent protein was developed for in vitro and in vivo models, which used cell lines and mouse tracheal EC. Measurements and Main Results: Fungal spores (conidia) are rapidly ingested by ECs derived from bronchial cell lines and murine tracheas, supporting a role for EC in early airway clearance. Bronchial ECs harboring CFTR mutations (ΔF508) or deletion demonstrate impaired uptake and killing of conidia, and ECs with CFTR mutation undergo more conidial-induced apoptosis. Germinated (hyphal) forms of the fungus evoke secretion of inflammatory mediators, with CFTR mutation resulting in increased airway levels of macrophage inflammatory protein 2 and KC, and higher lung monocyte chemotactic protein-1. After A. fumigatus inhalation, CFTR−/− mice develop exaggerated lymphocytic inflammation, mucin accumulation, and lung injury. Conclusions: Data demonstrate a critical role for CFTR in mediating EC responses to A. fumigatus. Results suggest that the fungus elicits aberrant pulmonary inflammation in the setting of CFTR mutation, supporting the potential role of antifungals to halt progressive CF lung disease. PMID:22135344

  4. [TLR-4 involvement in pyroptosis of mice with pulmonary inflammation infected by Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae].

    PubMed

    Hu, Peipei; Huang, Fushen; Niu, Junchao; Tang, Zhaoshan

    2015-05-04

    Pyroptosis is a caspase-1 dependent programmed cell death and involves pathogenesis of infectious diseases by releasing many pro-inflammatory cytokines to induced inflammation. TLR-4 plays an important role in mediating pathogenesis of some infectious diseases. In this study, we detected the expression of TLR-4 and some molecules (e. g caspase-1, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-18 ) related with pyroptosis to determine its involvement and mechanisms of pulmonary inflammation in mice infected by A. pleuropneumoniae. Mice were intranasally infected by A. pleuropneumoniae and killed 48 hours post infection. Pulmonary gross lesion and histological pathology by H-E were observed. Expression levels of caspase-1 , caspase-3, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-18, and TLR-4 in lung of mice were detected by RT-PCR and qPCR. Serious pulmonary hemorrhage and inflammation in infected mice were observed. Expression levels of caspase-1, caspase-3, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-18 and TLR-4 increased, and expression levels of caspase-3 were not changed in lung of infected mice. TLR-4 might be involved in pulmonary inflammation of mice infected by A. pleuropneumoniae. After induced by activated TLR-4 some cells in this lesion expressed pro-inflammatory cytokines. These cytokines would induce pulmonary inflammation. This lesion might involve pyroptosis with caspase-1 expression.

  5. Home-based pulmonary rehabilitation improves clinical features and systemic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    PubMed

    do Nascimento, Eloisa Sanches Pereira; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosá; Peixoto-Souza, Fabiana Sobral; Dias, Fernanda Dultra; Gomes, Evelim Leal Freitas Dantas; Greiffo, Flavia Regina; Ligeiro de Oliveira, Ana Paula; Stirbulov, Roberto; Vieira, Rodolfo Paula; Costa, Dirceu

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a respiratory disease characterized by chronic airflow limitation that leads beyond the pulmonary changes to important systemic effects. COPD is characterized by pulmonary and systemic inflammation. However, increases in the levels of inflammatory cytokines in plasma are found even when the disease is stable. Pulmonary rehabilitation improves physical exercise capacity and quality of life and decreases dyspnea. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a home-based pulmonary rehabilitation (HBPR) program improves exercise tolerance in COPD patients, as well as health-related quality of life and systemic inflammation. This prospective study was conducted at the Laboratory of Functional Respiratory Evaluation, Nove de Julho University, São Paulo, Brazil. After anamnesis, patients were subjected to evaluations of health-related quality of life and dyspnea, spirometry, respiratory muscle strength, upper limbs incremental test, incremental shuttle walk test, and blood test for quantification of systemic inflammatory markers (interleukin [IL]-6 and IL-8). At the end of the evaluations, patients received a booklet containing the physical exercises to be performed at home, three times per week for 8 consecutive weeks. Around 25 patients were enrolled, and 14 completed the pre- and post-HBPR ratings. There was a significant increase in the walked distance and the maximal inspiratory pressure, improvements on two components from the health-related quality-of-life questionnaire, and a decrease in plasma IL-8 levels after the intervention. The HBPR is an important and viable alternative to pulmonary rehabilitation for the treatment of patients with COPD; it improves exercise tolerance, inspiratory muscle strength, quality of life, and systemic inflammation in COPD patients.

  6. Early postoperative pulmonary complications after heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Camkiran Firat, A; Komurcu, O; Zeyneloglu, P; Turker, M; Sezgin, A; Pirat, A

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the types, incidence, and risk factors for early postoperative pulmonary complications in heart transplant recipients. We retrospectively collected data from the records of consecutive heart transplantations from January 2003 to December 2013. A total of 83 patients underwent heart transplantation. The data collected for each case were demographic features, duration of mechanical ventilation, respiratory problems that developed during the intensive care unit (ICU) stay, and early postoperative mortality (<30 d). Of the 72 patients considered, 52 (72.2%) were male. The overall mean age at the time of transplantation was 32.1 ± 16.6 years. Twenty-five patients (34.7%) developed early postoperative respiratory complications. The most frequent problem was pleural effusion (n = 19; 26.4%), followed by atelectasis (n = 6; 8.3%), acute respiratory distress syndrome (n = 5; 6.9%), pulmonary edema (n = 4; 5.6%), and pneumonia (n = 3; 4.2%). Postoperative duration of mechanical ventilation (44.2 ± 59.2 h vs 123.8 ± 190.8 h; P = .005) and the length of postoperative ICU stay (10.1 ± 5.8 h vs 19.8 ± 28.9 h; P = .03) were longer among patients who had respiratory problems. Postoperative length of stay in the hospital (22.3 ± 12.5 d vs 30.3 ± 38.3 d; P = .75) was similar in the 2 groups. The overall mortality rate was 12.5% (n = 9). The patients who had respiratory problems did not show higher mortality than those who did not have respiratory problems (16.0% vs 10.6%; P = .71). Respiratory complications were relatively common in our cohort of heart transplant recipients. However, these complications were mostly self-limiting and did not result in worse mortality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Docosahexaenoic acid inhibits monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension via attenuating endoplasmic reticulum stress and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Zhong, Wei; Shao, Chen; Liu, Peijing; Wang, Cuiping; Wang, Zhongqun; Jiang, Meiping; Lu, Yi; Yan, Jinchuan

    2018-02-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and inflammation contribute to pulmonary hypertension (PH) pathogenesis. Previously, we confirmed that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) could improve hypoxia-induced PH. However, little is known about the link between DHA and monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PH. Our aims were, therefore, to evaluate the effects and molecular mechanisms of DHA on MCT-induced PH in rats. Rat PH was induced by MCT. Rats were treated with DHA daily in the prevention group (following MCT injection) and the reversal group (after MCT injection for 2 wk) by gavage. After 4 wk, mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP), right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy index, and morphological and immunohistochemical analyses were evaluated. Rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) were used to investigate the effects of DHA on cell proliferation stimulated by platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB. DHA decreased mPAP and attenuated pulmonary vascular remodeling and RV hypertrophy, which were associated with suppressed ER stress. DHA blocked the mitogenic effect of PDGF-BB on PASMCs and arrested the cell cycle via inhibiting nuclear factor of activated T cells-1 (NFATc1) expression and activation and regulating cell cycle-related proteins. Moreover, DHA ameliorated inflammation in lung and suppressed macrophage and T lymphocyte accumulation in lung and adventitia of resistance pulmonary arteries. These findings suggest that DHA could protect against MCT-induced PH by reducing ER stress, suppressing cell proliferation and inflammation.

  8. Global analysis of gene expression in pulmonary fibrosis reveals distinct programs regulating lung inflammation and fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, Naftali; Allard, John D.; Pittet, Jean F.; Zuo, Fengrong; Griffiths, Mark J. D.; Morris, David; Huang, Xiaozhu; Sheppard, Dean; Heller, Renu A.

    2000-02-01

    The molecular mechanisms of pulmonary fibrosis are poorly understood. We have used oligonucleotide arrays to analyze the gene expression programs that underlie pulmonary fibrosis in response to bleomycin, a drug that causes lung inflammation and fibrosis, in two strains of susceptible mice (129 and C57BL/6). We then compared the gene expression patterns in these mice with 129 mice carrying a null mutation in the epithelial-restricted integrin 6 subunit (6/-), which develop inflammation but are protected from pulmonary fibrosis. Cluster analysis identified two distinct groups of genes involved in the inflammatory and fibrotic responses. Analysis of gene expression at multiple time points after bleomycin administration revealed sequential induction of subsets of genes that characterize each response. The availability of this comprehensive data set should accelerate the development of more effective strategies for intervention at the various stages in the development of fibrotic diseases of the lungs and other organs.

  9. G-CSF suppresses allergic pulmonary inflammation, downmodulating cytokine, chemokine and eosinophil production.

    PubMed

    Queto, Túlio; Vasconcelos, Zilton F M; Luz, Ricardo Alves; Anselmo, Carina; Guiné, Ana Amélia A; e Silva, Patricia Machado R; Farache, Júlia; Cunha, José Marcos T; Bonomo, Adriana C; Gaspar-Elsas, Maria Ignez C; Xavier-Elsas, Pedro

    2011-05-09

    Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (G-CSF), which mobilizes hemopoietic stem cells (HSC), is believed to protect HSC graft recipients from graft-versus-host disease by enhancing Th2 cytokine secretion. Accordingly, G-CSF should aggravate Th2-dependent allergic pulmonary inflammation and the associated eosinophilia. We evaluated the effects of G-CSF in a model of allergic pulmonary inflammation. Allergic pulmonary inflammation was induced by repeated aerosol allergen challenge in ovalbumin-sensitized C57BL/6J mice. The effects of allergen challenge and of G-CSF pretreatment were evaluated by monitoring: a) eosinophilia and cytokine/chemokine content of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, pulmonary interstitium, and blood; b) changes in airway resistance; and c) changes in bone-marrow eosinophil production. Contrary to expectations, G-CSF pretreatment neither induced nor enhanced allergic pulmonary inflammation. Instead, G-CSF: a) suppressed accumulation of infiltrating eosinophils in bronchoalveolar, peribronchial and perivascular spaces of challenged lungs; and b) prevented ovalbumin challenge-induced rises in airway resistance. G-CSF had multiple regulatory effects on cytokine and chemokine production: in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, levels of IL-1 and IL-12 (p40), eotaxin and MIP-1a were decreased; in plasma, KC, a neutrophil chemoattractant, was increased, while IL-5 was decreased and eotaxin was unaffected. In bone-marrow, G-CSF: a) prevented the increase in bone-marrow eosinophil production induced by ovalbumin challenge of sensitized mice; and b) selectively stimulated neutrophil colony formation. These observations challenge the view that G-CSF deviates cytokine production towards a Th2 profile in vivo, and suggest that this neutrophil-selective hemopoietin affects eosinophilic inflammation by a combination of effects on lung cytokine production and bone-marrow hemopoiesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The role of inflammation in hypoxic pulmonary hypertension: from cellular mechanisms to clinical phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Poth, Jens M.; Fini, Mehdi A.; Olschewski, Andrea; El Kasmi, Karim C.; Stenmark, Kurt R.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (PH) comprises a heterogeneous group of diseases sharing the common feature of chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling. The disease is usually characterized by mild to moderate pulmonary vascular remodeling that is largely thought to be reversible compared with the progressive irreversible disease seen in World Health Organization (WHO) group I disease. However, in these patients, the presence of PH significantly worsens morbidity and mortality. In addition, a small subset of patients with hypoxic PH develop “out-of-proportion” severe pulmonary hypertension characterized by pulmonary vascular remodeling that is irreversible and similar to that in WHO group I disease. In all cases of hypoxia-related vascular remodeling and PH, inflammation, particularly persistent inflammation, is thought to play a role. This review focuses on the effects of hypoxia on pulmonary vascular cells and the signaling pathways involved in the initiation and perpetuation of vascular inflammation, especially as they relate to vascular remodeling and transition to chronic irreversible PH. We hypothesize that the combination of hypoxia and local tissue factors/cytokines (“second hit”) antagonizes tissue homeostatic cellular interactions between mesenchymal cells (fibroblasts and/or smooth muscle cells) and macrophages and arrests these cells in an epigenetically locked and permanently activated proremodeling and proinflammatory phenotype. This aberrant cellular cross-talk between mesenchymal cells and macrophages promotes transition to chronic nonresolving inflammation and vascular remodeling, perpetuating PH. A better understanding of these signaling pathways may lead to the development of specific therapeutic targets, as none are currently available for WHO group III disease. PMID:25416383

  11. Pulmonary inflammation induced by bacteria-free outer membrane vesicles from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyong-Su; Lee, Jaewook; Jang, Su Chul; Kim, Sae Rom; Jang, Myoung Ho; Lötvall, Jan; Kim, Yoon-Keun; Gho, Yong Song

    2013-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is often involved in lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis. These bacteria can release outer membrane vesicles (OMVs), which are bilayered proteolipids with diameters of approximately 20 to 250 nm. In vitro, these OMVs activate macrophages and airway epithelial cells. The aim of this study was to determine whether OMVs from P. aeruginosa can induce pulmonary inflammation in vivo and to elucidate the mechanisms involved. Bacteria-free OMVs were isolated from P. aeruginosa cultures. Wild-type, Toll-like receptor (TLR)2 and TLR4 knockout mice were exposed to OMVs by the airway, and inflammation in the lung was assessed using differential counts, histology, and quantification of chemokines and cytokines. The involvement of the TLR2 and TLR4 pathways was studied in human cells using transfection. OMVs given to the mouse lung caused dose- and time-dependent pulmonary cellular inflammation. Furthermore, OMVs increased concentrations of several chemokines and cytokines in the mouse lungs and mouse alveolar macrophages. The inflammatory responses to OMVs were comparable to those of live bacteria and were only partly regulated by the TLR2 and TLR4 pathways, according to studies in knockout mice. This study shows that OMVs from P. aeruginosa cause pulmonary inflammation without live bacteria in vivo. This effect is only partly controlled by TLR2 and TLR4. The role of OMVs in clinical disease warrants further studies because targeting of OMVs in addition to live bacteria may add clinical benefit compared with treating with antibiotics alone.

  12. 4-Chloro-DL-phenylalanine protects against monocrotaline‑induced pulmonary vascular remodeling and lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yang; Wang, Han-Ming; Liu, Ming; Wang, Yun; Lian, Guo-Chao; Zhang, Xin-Hua; Kang, Jian; Wang, Huai-Liang

    2014-02-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the effects of 4-chloro-DL-phenylalanine (PCPA), a tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph) inhibitor (TphI), on pulmonary vascular remodeling and lung inflammation in monocrotaline (MCT)-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in rats. Animal models of PAH were established using Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats by a single intraperitoneal injection of MCT (60 mg/kg). PCPA (50 or 100 mg/kg/day) was administered to the rats with PAH. On day 22, hemodynamic measurements and morphological observations of the lung tissues were performed. The levels of Tph-1 and serotonin transporter (SERT) in the lungs were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. The expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 and TIMP-2 and inflammatory cytokines were assayed by western blot analysis. The activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 was evaluated by gelatin zymography (GZ). MCT markedly promoted PAH, increased the right ventricular hypertrophy index, pulmonary vascular remodeling, lung inflammation and mortality, which was associated with the increased expression of Tph-1, SERT, MMP-2/-9, TIMP-1/-2 and inflammatory cytokines. PCPA markedly attenuated MCT-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling and lung inflammation, inhibited the expression of Tph-1 and SERT and suppressed the expression of MMP-2/-9, TIMP-1/-2, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). These findings suggest that the amelioration of MCT-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling and lung inflammation by PCPA is associated with the downregulation of Tph-1, SERT, MMP/TIMP and inflammatory cytokine expression in rats.

  13. Role for phospholipid acyl chains and cholesterol in pulmonary infections and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Saame Raza; Fessler, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial and viral respiratory tract infections result in millions of deaths worldwide and are currently the leading cause of death from infection. Acute inflammation is an essential element of host defense against infection, but can be damaging to the host when left unchecked. Effective host defense requires multiple lipid mediators, which collectively have proinflammatory and/or proresolving effects on the lung. During pulmonary infections, phospholipid acyl chains and cholesterol can be chemically and enzymatically oxidized, as well as truncated and modified, producing complex mixtures of bioactive lipids. We review recent evidence that phospholipids and cholesterol and their derivatives regulate pulmonary innate and adaptive immunity during infection. We first highlight data that oxidized phospholipids generated in the lung during infection stimulate pattern recognition receptors, such as TLRs and scavenger receptors, thereby amplifying the pulmonary inflammatory response. Next, we discuss evidence that oxidation of endogenous pools of cholesterol during pulmonary infections produces oxysterols that also modify the function of both innate and adaptive immune cells. Last, we conclude with data that n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, both in the form of phospholipid acyl chains and through enzymatic processing into endogenous proresolving lipid mediators, aid in the resolution of lung inflammation through distinct mechanisms. Unraveling the complex mechanisms of induction and function of distinct classes of bioactive lipids, both native and modified, may hold promise for developing new therapeutic strategies for improving pulmonary outcomes in response to infection. PMID:27286794

  14. Pulmonary stromal cells induce the generation of regulatory DC attenuating T-cell-mediated lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Guo, Zhenhong; Xu, Xiongfei; Xia, Sheng; Cao, Xuetao

    2008-10-01

    The tissue microenvironment may affect the development and function of immune cells such as DC. Whether and how the pulmonary stromal microenvironment can affect the development and function of lung DC need to be investigated. Regulatory DC (DCreg) can regulate T-cell response. We wondered whether such regulatory DC exist in the lung and what is the effect of the pulmonary stromal microenvironment on the generation of DCreg. Here we demonstrate that murine pulmonary stromal cells can drive immature DC, which are regarded as being widely distributed in the lung, to proliferate and differentiate into a distinct subset of DCreg, which express high levels of CD11b but low levels of MHC class II (I-A), CD11c, secrete high amounts of IL-10, NO and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and suppress T-cell proliferation. The natural counterpart of DCreg in the lung with similar phenotype and regulatory function has been identified. Pulmonary stroma-derived TGF-beta is responsible for the differentiation of immature DC to DCreg, and DCreg-derived PGE2 contributes to their suppression of T-cell proliferation. Moreover, DCreg can induce the generation of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg. Importantly, infusion with DCreg attenuates T-cell-mediated eosinophilic airway inflammation in vivo. Therefore, the pulmonary microenvironment may drive the generation of DCreg, thus contributing to the maintenance of immune homoeostasis and the control of inflammation in the lung.

  15. Microbiota Promotes Chronic Pulmonary Inflammation by Enhancing IL-17A and Autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Yadava, Koshika; Pattaroni, Céline; Sichelstiel, Anke K; Trompette, Aurélien; Gollwitzer, Eva S; Salami, Olawale; von Garnier, Christophe; Nicod, Laurent P; Marsland, Benjamin J

    2016-05-01

    Changes in the pulmonary microbiota are associated with progressive respiratory diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Whether there is a causal relationship between these changes and disease progression remains unknown. To investigate the link between an altered microbiota and disease, we used a murine model of chronic lung inflammation that is characterized by key pathological features found in COPD and compared responses in specific pathogen-free (SPF) mice and mice depleted of microbiota by antibiotic treatment or devoid of a microbiota (axenic). Mice were challenged with LPS/elastase intranasally over 4 weeks, resulting in a chronically inflamed and damaged lung. The ensuing cellular infiltration, histological damage, and decline in lung function were quantified. Similar to human disease, the composition of the pulmonary microbiota was altered in diseased animals. We found that the microbiota richness and diversity were decreased in LPS/elastase-treated mice, with an increased representation of the genera Pseudomonas and Lactobacillus and a reduction in Prevotella. Moreover, the microbiota was implicated in disease development as mice depleted, or devoid, of microbiota exhibited an improvement in lung function, reduced inflammation, and lymphoid neogenesis. The absence of microbial cues markedly decreased the production of IL-17A, whereas intranasal transfer of fluid enriched with the pulmonary microbiota isolated from diseased mice enhanced IL-17A production in the lungs of antibiotic-treated or axenic recipients. Finally, in mice harboring a microbiota, neutralizing IL-17A dampened inflammation and restored lung function. Collectively, our data indicate that host-microbial cross-talk promotes inflammation and could underlie the chronicity of inflammatory lung diseases.

  16. Protection against fine particle-induced pulmonary and systemic inflammation by omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang-Yong; Hao, Lei; Liu, Ying-Hua; Chen, Chih-Yu; Pai, Victor J; Kang, Jing X

    2017-03-01

    Exposure to fine particulate matter, such as through air pollution, has been linked to the increased incidence of chronic diseases. However, few measures have been taken to reduce the health risks associated with fine particle exposure. The identification of safe and effective methods to protect against fine particle exposure-related damage is urgently needed. We used synthetic, non-toxic, fluorescent fine particles to investigate the physical distribution of inhaled fine particles and their effects on pulmonary and systemic inflammation in mice. Tissue levels of omega-3 fatty acids were elevated via dietary supplementation or the fat-1 transgenic mouse model. Markers of pulmonary and systemic inflammation were assessed. We discovered that fine particulate matter not only accumulates in the lungs but can also penetrate the pulmonary barrier and travel into other organs, including the brain, liver, spleen, kidney, and testis. These particles induced both pulmonary and systemic inflammation and increased oxidative stress. We also show that elevating tissue levels of omega-3 fatty acids was effective in reducing fine particle-induced inflammation, whether as a preventive method (prior to exposure) or as an intervention (after exposure). These results advance our understanding of how fine particles contribute to disease development and suggest that increasing tissue omega-3 levels may be a promising nutritional means for reducing the risk of diseases induced by particle exposure. Our findings demonstrate that elevating tissue omega-3 levels can prevent and treat fine particle-induced health problems and thereby present an immediate, practical solution for reducing the disease burden of air pollution. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Inhibition of chlorine-induced pulmonary inflammation and edema by mometasone and budesonide

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Mo, Yiqun; Schlueter, Connie F.; Hoyle, Gary W.

    2013-01-01

    Chlorine gas is a widely used industrial compound that is highly toxic by inhalation and is considered a chemical threat agent. Inhalation of high levels of chlorine results in acute lung injury characterized by pneumonitis, pulmonary edema, and decrements in lung function. Because inflammatory processes can promote damage in the injured lung, anti-inflammatory therapy may be of potential benefit for treating chemical-induced acute lung injury. We previously developed a chlorine inhalation model in which mice develop epithelial injury, neutrophilic inflammation, pulmonary edema, and impaired pulmonary function. This model was used to evaluate nine corticosteroids for the ability to inhibit chlorine-induced neutrophilic inflammation. Two of the most potent corticosteroids in this assay, mometasone and budesonide, were investigated further. Mometasone or budesonide administered intraperitoneally 1 h after chlorine inhalation caused a dose-dependent inhibition of neutrophil influx in lung tissue sections and in the number of neutrophils in lung lavage fluid. Budesonide, but not mometasone, reduced the levels of the neutrophil attractant CXCL1 in lavage fluid 6 h after exposure. Mometasone or budesonide also significantly inhibited pulmonary edema assessed 1 day after chlorine exposure. Chlorine inhalation resulted in airway hyperreactivity to inhaled methacholine, but neither mometasone nor budesonide significantly affected this parameter. The results suggest that mometasone and budesonide may represent potential treatments for chemical-induced lung injury. PMID:23800689

  18. Inhibition of chlorine-induced pulmonary inflammation and edema by mometasone and budesonide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Mo, Yiqun; Schlueter, Connie F; Hoyle, Gary W

    2013-10-15

    Chlorine gas is a widely used industrial compound that is highly toxic by inhalation and is considered a chemical threat agent. Inhalation of high levels of chlorine results in acute lung injury characterized by pneumonitis, pulmonary edema, and decrements in lung function. Because inflammatory processes can promote damage in the injured lung, anti-inflammatory therapy may be of potential benefit for treating chemical-induced acute lung injury. We previously developed a chlorine inhalation model in which mice develop epithelial injury, neutrophilic inflammation, pulmonary edema, and impaired pulmonary function. This model was used to evaluate nine corticosteroids for the ability to inhibit chlorine-induced neutrophilic inflammation. Two of the most potent corticosteroids in this assay, mometasone and budesonide, were investigated further. Mometasone or budesonide administered intraperitoneally 1h after chlorine inhalation caused a dose-dependent inhibition of neutrophil influx in lung tissue sections and in the number of neutrophils in lung lavage fluid. Budesonide, but not mometasone, reduced the levels of the neutrophil attractant CXCL1 in lavage fluid 6h after exposure. Mometasone or budesonide also significantly inhibited pulmonary edema assessed 1 day after chlorine exposure. Chlorine inhalation resulted in airway hyperreactivity to inhaled methacholine, but neither mometasone nor budesonide significantly affected this parameter. The results suggest that mometasone and budesonide may represent potential treatments for chemical-induced lung injury. © 2013.

  19. Prostaglandin D2 Attenuates Bleomycin-Induced Lung Inflammation and Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kida, Taiki; Ayabe, Shinya; Omori, Keisuke; Nakamura, Tatsuro; Maehara, Toko; Aritake, Kosuke; Urade, Yoshihiro; Murata, Takahisa

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive and fatal lung disease with limited therapeutic options. Although it is well known that lipid mediator prostaglandins are involved in the development of pulmonary fibrosis, the role of prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) remains unknown. Here, we investigated whether genetic disruption of hematopoietic PGD synthase (H-PGDS) affects the bleomycin-induced lung inflammation and pulmonary fibrosis in mouse. Compared with H-PGDS naïve (WT) mice, H-PGDS-deficient mice (H-PGDS-/-) represented increased collagen deposition in lungs 14 days after the bleomycin injection. The enhanced fibrotic response was accompanied by an increased mRNA expression of inflammatory mediators, including tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and cyclooxygenase-2 on day 3. H-PGDS deficiency also increased vascular permeability on day 3 and infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages in lungs on day 3 and 7. Immunostaining showed that the neutrophils and macrophages expressed H-PGDS, and its mRNA expression was increased on day 3and 7 in WT lungs. These observations suggest that H-PGDS-derived PGD2 plays a protective role in bleomycin-induced lung inflammation and pulmonary fibrosis.

  20. Implication of NADPH Oxidases in the Early Inflammation Process Generated by Cystic Fibrosis Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pongnimitprasert, Nushjira; Hurtado, Margarita; Lamari, Foudil; El Benna, Jamel; Dupuy, Corinne; Fay, Michèle; Foglietti, Marie-José; Bernard, Maguy; Gougerot-Pocidalo, Marie-Anne; Braut-Boucher, Françoise

    2012-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, pulmonary inflammation is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to further investigate whether oxidative stress could be involved in the early inflammatory process associated with CF pathogenesis. We used a model of CFTR defective epithelial cell line (IB3-1) and its reconstituted CFTR control (S9) cell line cultured in various ionic conditions. This study showed that IB3-1 and S9 cells expressed the NADPH oxidases (NOXs) DUOX1/2 and NOX2 at the same level. Nevertheless, several parameters participating in oxidative stress (increased ROS production and apoptosis, decreased total thiol content) were observed in IB3-1 cells cultured in hypertonic environment as compared to S9 cells and were inhibited by diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), a well-known inhibitor of NOXs; besides, increased production of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8 by IB3-1 cells was also inhibited by DPI as compared to S9 cells. Furthermore, calcium ionophore (A23187), which upregulates DUOX and NOX2 activities, strongly induced oxidative stress and IL-8 and IL-6 overexpression in IB3-1 cells. All these events were suppressed by DPI, supporting the involvement of NOXs in the oxidative stress, which can upregulate proinflammatory cytokine production by the airway CFTR-deficient cells and trigger early pulmonary inflammation in CF patients. PMID:24049649

  1. Impaired Respiratory Function and Heightened Pulmonary Inflammation in Episodic Binge Ethanol Intoxication and Burn Injury

    PubMed Central

    Shults, Jill A.; Curtis, Brenda J.; Chen, Michael M.; O'Halloran, Eileen B.; Ramirez, Luis; Kovacs, Elizabeth J.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical data indicate that cutaneous burn injuries covering greater than ten percent total body surface area are associated with significant morbidity and mortality, where pulmonary complications, including acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), contribute to nearly half of all patient deaths. Approximately 50% of burn patients are intoxicated at the time of hospital admission, which increases days on ventilators by three-fold, and doubles length of hospital admittance, compared to non-intoxicated burn patients. The most common drinking pattern in the United States is binge drinking, where one rapidly consumes alcoholic beverages (4 for women, 5 for men) in 2 hours and an estimated 38 million Americans binge drink, often several times per month. Experimental data demonstrate a single binge ethanol exposure prior to scald injury, impairs innate and adaptive immune responses, thereby enhancing infection susceptibility and amplifying pulmonary inflammation, neutrophil infiltration, and edema, and is associated with increased mortality. Since these characteristics are similar to those observed in ARDS burn patients, our study objective was to determine whether ethanol intoxication and burn injury and the subsequent pulmonary congestion affects physiological parameters of lung function using non-invasive and unrestrained plethysmography in a murine model system. Furthermore, to mirror young adult binge drinking patterns, and to determine the effect of multiple ethanol exposures on pulmonary inflammation, we utilized an episodic binge ethanol exposure regimen, where mice were exposed to ethanol for a total of 6 days (3 days ethanol, 4 days rest, 3 days ethanol) prior to burn injury. Our analyses demonstrate mice exposed to episodic binge ethanol and burn injury have higher mortality, increased pulmonary congestion and neutrophil infiltration, elevated neutrophil chemoattractants, and respiratory dysfunction, compared to burn or ethanol intoxication alone. Overall

  2. Ethanol intoxication prolongs post-burn pulmonary inflammation: role of alveolar macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Shults, Jill A.; Curtis, Brenda J.; Boe, Devin M.; Ramirez, Luis; Kovacs, Elizabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the role and fate of AMs were examined in pulmonary inflammation after intoxication and injury. Clinical evidence has revealed that half of all burn patients brought to the emergency department are intoxicated at the time of injury. This combined insult results in amplified neutrophil accumulation and pulmonary edema, with an increased risk of lung failure and mortality, relative to either insult alone. We believe that this excessive pulmonary inflammation, which also parallels decreased lung function, is mediated in part by AMs. Restoration of lung tissue homeostasis is dependent on the eradication of neutrophils and removal of apoptotic cells, both major functions of AMs. Thirty minutes after binge ethanol intoxication, mice were anesthetized and given a 15% total body surface area dorsal scald injury. At 24 h, we found a 50% decrease in the total number of AMs (P < 0.05) and observed a proinflammatory phenotype on the remaining lung AMs. Loss of AMs paralleled a 6-fold increase in the number of TUNEL+ lung apoptotic cells (P < 0.05) and a 3.5-fold increase in the percentage of annexin V+ apoptotic cells in BAL (P < 0.05), after intoxication and injury, relative to controls. In contrast to the reduction in the number of cells, AMs from intoxicated and injured mice had a 4-fold increase in efferocytosis (P < 0.05). In summary, these data suggest that loss of AMs may delay resolution of inflammation, resulting in the pulmonary complications and elevated mortality rates observed in intoxicated and burn-injured patients. PMID:27531926

  3. P2Y6 Receptor Activation Promotes Inflammation and Tissue Remodeling in Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Tobias; Fay, Susanne; Vieira, Rodolfo Paula; Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Cicko, Sanja; Ayata, Cemil Korcan; Zissel, Gernot; Goldmann, Torsten; Lungarella, Giuseppe; Ferrari, Davide; Di Virgilio, Francesco; Robaye, Bernard; Boeynaems, Jean-Marie; Lazarowski, Eduardo R.; Blackburn, Michael R.; Idzko, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a disease with a poor prognosis and very few available treatment options. The involvement of the purinergic receptor subtypes P2Y2 and P2X7 in fibrotic lung disease has been demonstrated recently. In this study, we investigated the role of P2Y6 receptors in the pathogenesis of IPF in humans and in the animal model of bleomycin-induced lung injury. P2Y6R expression was upregulated in lung structural cells but not in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells derived from IPF patients as well as in animals following bleomycin administration. Furthermore, BAL fluid levels of the P2Y6R agonist uridine-5′-diphosphate were elevated in animals with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Inflammation and fibrosis following bleomycin administration were reduced in P2Y6R-deficient compared to wild-type animals confirming the pathophysiological relevance of P2Y6R subtypes for fibrotic lung diseases. Experiments with bone marrow chimeras revealed the importance of P2Y6R expression on lung structural cells for pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. Similar effects were obtained when animals were treated with the P2Y6R antagonist MRS2578. In vitro studies demonstrated that proliferation and secretion of the pro-inflammatory/pro-fibrotic cytokine IL-6 by lung fibroblasts are P2Y6R-mediated processes. In summary, our results clearly demonstrate the involvement of P2Y6R subtypes in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. Thus, blocking pulmonary P2Y6 receptors might be a new target for the treatment of IPF. PMID:28878780

  4. Impact of agglomeration state of nano- and submicron sized gold particles on pulmonary inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Nanoparticle (NP) toxicity testing comes with many challenges. Characterization of the test substance is of crucial importance and in the case of NPs, agglomeration/aggregation state in physiological media needs to be considered. In this study, we have addressed the effect of agglomerated versus single particle suspensions of nano- and submicron sized gold on the inflammatory response in the lung. Rats were exposed to a single dose of 1.6 mg/kg body weight (bw) of spherical gold particles with geometric diameters of 50 nm or 250 nm diluted either by ultrapure water or by adding phosphate buffered saline (PBS). A single dose of 1.6 mg/kg bw DQ12 quartz was used as a positive control for pulmonary inflammation. Extensive characterization of the particle suspensions has been performed by determining the zetapotential, pH, gold concentration and particle size distribution. Primary particle size and particle purity has been verified using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. Pulmonary inflammation (total cell number, differential cell count and pro-inflammatory cytokines), cell damage (total protein and albumin) and cytotoxicity (alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase) were determined in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and acute systemic effects in blood (total cell number, differential cell counts, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein) 3 and 24 hours post exposure. Uptake of gold particles in alveolar macrophages has been determined by TEM. Results Particles diluted in ultrapure water are well dispersed, while agglomerates are formed when diluting in PBS. The particle size of the 50 nm particles was confirmed, while the 250 nm particles appear to be 200 nm using tracking analysis and 210 nm using TEM. No major differences in pulmonary and systemic toxicity markers were observed after instillation of agglomerated versus single gold particles of different sizes. Both agglomerated as well as single nanoparticles were taken up by

  5. Asthma causes inflammation of human pulmonary arteries and decreases vasodilatation induced by prostaglandin I2 analogs.

    PubMed

    Foudi, Nabil; Badi, Aouatef; Amrane, Mounira; Hodroj, Wassim

    2017-12-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with increased cardiovascular events. This study assesses the presence of inflammation and the vascular reactivity of pulmonary arteries in patients with acute asthma. Rings of human pulmonary arteries obtained from non-asthmatic and asthmatic patients were set up in organ bath for vascular tone monitoring. Reactivity was induced by vasoconstrictor and vasodilator agents. Protein expression of inflammatory markers was detected by western blot. Prostanoid releases and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels were quantified using specific enzymatic kits. Protein expression of cluster of differentiation 68, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and cyclooxygenase-2 was significantly increased in arteries obtained from asthmatic patients. These effects were accompanied by an alteration of vasodilatation induced by iloprost and treprostinil, a decrease in cAMP levels and an increase in prostaglandin (PG) E 2 and PGI 2 synthesis. The use of forskolin (50 µmol/L) has restored the vasodilatation and cAMP release. No difference was observed between the two groups in reactivity induced by norepinephrine, angiotensin II, PGE 2 , KCl, sodium nitroprusside, and acetylcholine. Acute asthma causes inflammation of pulmonary arteries and decreases vasodilation induced by PGI 2 analogs through the impairment of cAMP pathway.

  6. Silver Nanoparticles: A study of dissolution, kinetics, and factors affecting pulmonary inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Eric L.

    The growing use of silver (Ag) nanoparticles (NP) in consumer and industrial goods has led to an increase in interest in the health effects associated with exposure, both occupationally and environmentally. The aim of this research is to examine the contribution of size, shape, and dissolution of AgNP, with its corresponding effect on pulmonary inflammation and clearance. In addition this study looks at metallothionein (MT) and the role it plays as an inflammatory modulator. A nose only exposure method was used to expose three strains of mouse (two inbred, one knockout) to two different sizes of AgNP (˜25 nm and ˜100 nm). This research demonstrates that size, chemistry, and dissolution play key roles in NP deposition and inflammatory response, while no conclusions could be drawn about shape. Additionally, this study found that the main factors affecting the deposition of NP in mice both acutely and sub-chronically are particle size and mouse strain. The results of this study also indicate a relationship between MT2 and inflammation. It was found that the mRNA levels of MT2 were greatly up-regulated in the livers and lungs of mice exposed to AgNP, while MT protein levels were not significantly altered to correlate with the altered regulation of mRNA. Finally, this study showed that, for AgNP, the mechanisms of pulmonary clearance and dissolution happened rapidly and that they, combined, likely represent a major pathway of AgNP transport out of the lung. Taken as a whole, the data in this study show that dissolution, coupled with protein interaction, is a significant mediator of pulmonary inflammation and translocation of AgNP.

  7. Rest and exercise echocardiography for early detection of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kusunose, Kenya; Yamada, Hirotsugu

    2016-03-01

    Early detection of pulmonary hypertension (PH) is essential to ensure that patients receive timely and appropriate treatment for this progressive disease. Rest and exercise echocardiography has been used to screen patients in an attempt to identify early stage PH. However, current PH guidelines recommend against exercise tests because of the lack of evidence. We reviewed previous studies to discuss the current standpoint concerning rest and exercise echocardiography in PH. Around 20 exercise echocardiography studies were included to assess the cutoff value for exercise-induced pulmonary hypertension (EIPH). Approximately 40 exercise echocardiography studies were also included to evaluate the pulmonary artery pressure-flow relationship as assessed by the slope of the mean pulmonary artery pressure and cardiac output (ΔmPAP/ΔQ). There were several EIPH and ΔmPAP/ΔQ reference values in individuals with pulmonary vascular disease. We believed that assessing the ΔmPAP/ΔQ makes sense from a physiological standpoint, and the clinical value should be confirmed in future studies. Exercise echocardiography is an appealing alternative in PH. Further studies are needed to assess the prognostic value of the pulmonary artery pressure-flow relationship in high-risk subjects.

  8. Early-life inflammation, immune response and ageing.

    PubMed

    Khan, Imroze; Agashe, Deepa; Rolff, Jens

    2017-03-15

    Age-related diseases are often attributed to immunopathology, which results in self-damage caused by an inappropriate inflammatory response. Immunopathology associated with early-life inflammation also appears to cause faster ageing, although we lack direct experimental evidence for this association. To understand the interactions between ageing, inflammation and immunopathology, we used the mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor as a study organism. We hypothesized that phenoloxidase, an important immune effector in insect defence, may impose substantial immunopathological costs by causing tissue damage to Malpighian tubules (MTs; functionally equivalent to the human kidney), in turn accelerating ageing. In support of this hypothesis, we found that RNAi knockdown of phenoloxidase (PO) transcripts in young adults possibly reduced inflammation-induced autoreactive tissue damage to MTs, and increased adult lifespan. Our work thus suggests a causative link between immunopathological costs of early-life inflammation and faster ageing. We also reasoned that if natural selection weakens with age, older individuals should display increased immunopathological costs associated with an immune response. Indeed, we found that while old infected individuals cleared infection faster than young individuals, possibly they also displayed exacerbated immunopathological costs (larger decline in MT function) and higher post-infection mortality. RNAi-mediated knockdown of PO response partially rescued MTs function in older beetles and resulted in increased lifespan after infection. Taken together, our data are consistent with a direct role of immunopathological consequences of immune response during ageing in insects. Our work is also the first report that highlights the pervasive role of tissue damage under diverse contexts of ageing and immune response. © 2017 The Author(s).

  9. Early-life inflammation, immune response and ageing

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Age-related diseases are often attributed to immunopathology, which results in self-damage caused by an inappropriate inflammatory response. Immunopathology associated with early-life inflammation also appears to cause faster ageing, although we lack direct experimental evidence for this association. To understand the interactions between ageing, inflammation and immunopathology, we used the mealworm beetle Tenebrio molitor as a study organism. We hypothesized that phenoloxidase, an important immune effector in insect defence, may impose substantial immunopathological costs by causing tissue damage to Malpighian tubules (MTs; functionally equivalent to the human kidney), in turn accelerating ageing. In support of this hypothesis, we found that RNAi knockdown of phenoloxidase (PO) transcripts in young adults possibly reduced inflammation-induced autoreactive tissue damage to MTs, and increased adult lifespan. Our work thus suggests a causative link between immunopathological costs of early-life inflammation and faster ageing. We also reasoned that if natural selection weakens with age, older individuals should display increased immunopathological costs associated with an immune response. Indeed, we found that while old infected individuals cleared infection faster than young individuals, possibly they also displayed exacerbated immunopathological costs (larger decline in MT function) and higher post-infection mortality. RNAi-mediated knockdown of PO response partially rescued MTs function in older beetles and resulted in increased lifespan after infection. Taken together, our data are consistent with a direct role of immunopathological consequences of immune response during ageing in insects. Our work is also the first report that highlights the pervasive role of tissue damage under diverse contexts of ageing and immune response. PMID:28275145

  10. Exercise alleviates depression related systemic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Kader, Shehab M; Al-Jiffri, Osama H

    2016-12-01

    Depression is a highly prevalent co-morbidity in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) which was shown to be associated with a worse course of disease, including reduced quality of life and increased symptoms burden, healthcare use, and even mortality. It has been speculated that systemic inflammation may play a role in the presence of depression. Currently, physical activity is an important lifestyle factor that has the potential to modify inflammatory cytokines and depression, however our understanding of how to use exercise effectively in COPD patients to alleviate depression related systemic inflammation is incomplete and has prompted our interest to identify the type and intensities of effective exercise. The aim of this study was to measure the changes in depression related systemic inflammation of aerobic exercise training in COPD patients in Jeddah area. Eighty patients with moderate severity of COPD participated in this study and were divided into two groups; the first group received aerobic exercise, whereas the second group received no exercise training for 12 weeks. The mean values of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-4 (IL-4), interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scores were significantly decreased in in group (A) after treatments, but the changes in group (B) were not significant .Also, there were significant differences between mean levels of the investigated parameters in group (A) and group (B) at the end of the study. Aerobic exercise is an effective treatment policy to improve depression related to systemic inflammation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  11. Pirfenidone ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis by blocking NLRP3 inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Li, Haitao; Liu, Shuai; Pan, Pinhua; Su, Xiaoli; Tan, Hongyi; Wu, Dongdong; Zhang, Lemeng; Song, Chao; Dai, Minhui; Li, Qian; Mao, Zhi; Long, Yuan; Hu, Yongbin; Hu, Chengping

    2018-05-18

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome(ARDS)is a severe clinical disorder characterized by its acute onset, diffuse alveolar damage, intractable hypoxemia, and non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Acute lung injury(ALI) can trigger persistent lung inflammation and fibrosis through activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and subsequent secretion of mature IL-1β, suggesting that the NLRP3 inflammasome is a potential therapeutic target for ALI, for which new therapeutic approaches are needed. Our present study aims to assess whether pirfenidone,with anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory properties, can improve LPS-induced inflammation and fibrosis by inhibiting NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Male C57BL/6 J mice were intratracheally injected with LPS to induce ALI. Mice were administered pirfenidone by oral gavage throughout the entire experimental course. The mouse macrophage cell line (J774 A.1) was incubated with LPS and ATP, with or without PFD pre-treatment. We demonstrated that PFD remarkably ameliorated LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis and reduced IL-1β and TGF-β1 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid(BALF). Pirfenidone substantially reduced NLRP3 and ASC expression and inhibited caspase-1 activation and IL-1β maturation in lung tissues. In vitro, the experiments revealed that PFD significantly suppressed LPS/ATP-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decreased caspase-1 activation and the level of IL-1β in J774 A.1 cells. Taken together, the administration of PFD reduced LPS-induced lung inflammation and fibrosis by blocking NLRP3 inflammasome activation and subsequent IL-1β secretion. These findings indicated that PFD can down-regulate NLRP3 inflammasome activation and that it may offer a promising therapeutic approach for ARDS patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Pulmonary Remodeling in Equine Asthma: What Do We Know about Mediators of Inflammation in the Horse?

    PubMed Central

    Gehlen, Heidrun

    2016-01-01

    Equine inflammatory airway disease (IAD) and recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) represent a spectrum of chronic inflammatory disease of the airways in horses resembling human asthma in many aspects. Therefore, both are now described as severity grades of equine asthma. Increasing evidence in horses and humans suggests that local pulmonary inflammation is influenced by systemic inflammatory processes and the other way around. Inflammation, coagulation, and fibrinolysis as well as extracellular remodeling show close interactions. Cytology of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and tracheal wash is commonly used to evaluate the severity of local inflammation in the lung. Other mediators of inflammation, like interleukins involved in the chemotaxis of neutrophils, have been studied. Chronic obstructive pneumopathies lead to remodeling of bronchial walls and lung parenchyma, ultimately causing fibrosis. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are discussed as the most important proteolytic enzymes during remodeling in human medicine and increasing evidence exists for the horse as well. A systemic involvement has been shown for severe equine asthma by increased acute phase proteins like serum amyloid A and haptoglobin in peripheral blood during exacerbation. Studies focusing on these and further possible inflammatory markers for chronic respiratory disease in the horse are discussed in this review of the literature. PMID:28053371

  13. Aspirin reduces lipopolysaccharide-induced pulmonary inflammation in human models of ARDS.

    PubMed

    Hamid, U; Krasnodembskaya, A; Fitzgerald, M; Shyamsundar, M; Kissenpfennig, A; Scott, C; Lefrancais, E; Looney, M R; Verghis, R; Scott, J; Simpson, A J; McNamee, J; McAuley, D F; O'Kane, C M

    2017-11-01

    Platelets play an active role in the pathogenesis of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Animal and observational studies have shown aspirin's antiplatelet and immunomodulatory effects may be beneficial in ARDS. To test the hypothesis that aspirin reduces inflammation in clinically relevant human models that recapitulate pathophysiological mechanisms implicated in the development of ARDS. Healthy volunteers were randomised to receive placebo or aspirin 75  or 1200 mg (1:1:1) for seven days prior to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inhalation, in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, allocation-concealed study. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed 6 hours after inhaling 50 µg of LPS. The primary outcome measure was BAL IL-8. Secondary outcome measures included markers of alveolar inflammation (BAL neutrophils, cytokines, neutrophil proteases), alveolar epithelial cell injury, systemic inflammation (neutrophils and plasma C-reactive protein (CRP)) and platelet activation (thromboxane B2, TXB2). Human lungs, perfused and ventilated ex vivo (EVLP) were randomised to placebo or 24 mg aspirin and injured with LPS. BAL was carried out 4 hours later. Inflammation was assessed by BAL differential cell counts and histological changes. In the healthy volunteer (n=33) model, data for the aspirin groups were combined. Aspirin did not reduce BAL IL-8. However, aspirin reduced pulmonary neutrophilia and tissue damaging neutrophil proteases (Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP)-8/-9), reduced BAL concentrations of tumour necrosis factor α and reduced systemic and pulmonary TXB2. There was no difference between high-dose and low-dose aspirin. In the EVLP model, aspirin reduced BAL neutrophilia and alveolar injury as measured by histological damage. These are the first prospective human data indicating that aspirin inhibits pulmonary neutrophilic inflammation, at both low and high doses. Further clinical studies are indicated to assess the role of aspirin in the

  14. Pulmonary inflammation-induced loss and subsequent recovery of skeletal muscle mass require functional poly-ubiquitin conjugation.

    PubMed

    Ceelen, Judith J M; Schols, Annemie M W J; Thielen, Nathalie G M; Haegens, Astrid; Gray, Douglas A; Kelders, Marco C J M; de Theije, Chiel C; Langen, Ramon C J

    2018-05-02

    Pulmonary inflammation in response to respiratory infections can evoke muscle wasting. Increased activity of the ubiquitin (Ub)-proteasome system (UPS) and the autophagy lysosome pathway (ALP) have been implicated in inflammation-induced muscle atrophy. Since poly-Ub conjugation is required for UPS-mediated proteolysis and has been implicated in the ALP, we assessed the effect of impaired ubiquitin conjugation on muscle atrophy and recovery following pulmonary inflammation, and compared activation and suppression of these proteolytic systems to protein synthesis regulation. Pulmonary inflammation was induced in mice by an intratracheal instillation of LPS. Proteolysis (UPS and ALP) and synthesis signaling were examined in gastrocnemius muscle homogenates. Ub-conjugation-dependency of muscle atrophy and recovery was addressed using Ub-K48R (K48R) mice with attenuated poly-ubiquitin conjugation, and compared to UBWT control mice. Pulmonary inflammation caused a decrease in skeletal muscle mass which was accompanied by a rapid increase in expression of UPS and ALP constituents and reduction in protein synthesis signaling acutely after LPS. Muscle atrophy was attenuated in K48R mice, while ALP and protein synthesis signaling were not affected. Muscle mass recovery starting 72 h post LPS, correlated with reduced expression of UPS and ALP constituents and restoration of protein synthesis signaling. K48R mice however displayed impaired recovery of muscle mass. Pulmonary inflammation-induced muscle atrophy is in part attributable to UPS-mediated proteolysis, as activation of ALP- and suppression of protein synthesis signaling occur independently of poly-Ub conjugation during muscle atrophy. Recovery of muscle mass following pulmonary inflammation involves inverse regulation of proteolysis and protein synthesis signaling, and requires a functional poly-Ub conjugation.

  15. Genetics and Early Detection in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Putman, Rachel K.; Rosas, Ivan O.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic studies hold promise in helping to identify patients with early idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Recent studies using chest computed tomograms (CTs) in smokers and in the general population have demonstrated that imaging abnormalities suggestive of an early stage of pulmonary fibrosis are not uncommon and are associated with respiratory symptoms, physical examination abnormalities, and physiologic decrements expected, but less severe than those noted in patients with IPF. Similarly, recent genetic studies have demonstrated strong and replicable associations between a common promoter polymorphism in the mucin 5B gene (MUC5B) and both IPF and the presence of abnormal imaging findings in the general population. Despite these findings, it is important to note that the definition of early-stage IPF remains unclear, limited data exist to definitively connect abnormal imaging findings to IPF, and genetic studies assessing early-stage pulmonary fibrosis remain in their infancy. In this perspective we provide updated information on interstitial lung abnormalities and their connection to IPF. We summarize information on the genetics of pulmonary fibrosis by focusing on the recent genetic findings of MUC5B. Finally, we discuss the implications of these findings and suggest a roadmap for the use of genetics in the detection of early IPF. PMID:24547893

  16. Platelet activation independent of pulmonary inflammation contributes to diesel exhaust particulate-induced promotion of arterial thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Tabor, Caroline M; Shaw, Catherine A; Robertson, Sarah; Miller, Mark R; Duffin, Rodger; Donaldson, Ken; Newby, David E; Hadoke, Patrick W F

    2016-02-09

    Accelerated thrombus formation induced by exposure to combustion-derived air pollution has been linked to alterations in endogenous fibrinolysis and platelet activation in response to pulmonary and systemic inflammation. We hypothesised that mechanisms independent of inflammation contribute to accelerated thrombus formation following exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP). Thrombosis in rats was assessed 2, 6 and 24 h after administration of DEP, carbon black (CB; control carbon nanoparticle), DQ12 quartz microparticles (to induce pulmonary inflammation) or saline (vehicle) by either intra-tracheal instillation (0.5 mg, except Quartz; 0.125 mg) or intravenous injection (0.5 mg/kg). Thrombogenicity was assessed by carotid artery occlusion, fibrinolytic variables and platelet-monocyte aggregates. Measures of inflammation were determined in plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 were measured following direct in vitro exposure of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to DEP (10-150 μg/mL). Instillation of DEP reduced the time to thrombotic occlusion in vivo, coinciding with the peak of DEP-induced pulmonary inflammation (6 h). CB and DQ12 produced greater inflammation than DEP but did not alter time to thrombotic occlusion. Intravenous DEP produced an earlier (2 h) acceleration of thrombosis (as did CB) without pulmonary or systemic inflammation. DEP inhibited t-PA and PAI-1 release from HUVECs, and reduced the t-PA/PAI-1 ratio in vivo; similar effects in vivo were seen with CB and DQ12. DEP, but not CB or DQ12, increased platelet-monocyte aggregates. DEP accelerates arterial thrombus formation through increased platelet activation. This effect is dissociated from pulmonary and systemic inflammation and from impaired fibrinolytic function.

  17. Immune Modulatory Effects of IL-22 on Allergen-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ping; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Yuqi; Kolls, Jay K.; Zheng, Tao; Zhu, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    IL-22 is a Th17/Th22 cytokine that is increased in asthma. However, recent animal studies showed controversial findings in the effects of IL-22 in allergic asthma. To determine the role of IL-22 in ovalbumin-induced allergic inflammation we generated inducible lung-specific IL-22 transgenic mice. Transgenic IL-22 expression and signaling activity in the lung were determined. Ovalbumin (OVA)-induced pulmonary inflammation, immune responses, and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) were examined and compared between IL-22 transgenic mice and wild type controls. Following doxycycline (Dox) induction, IL-22 protein was readily detected in the large (CC10 promoter) and small (SPC promoter) airway epithelial cells. IL-22 signaling was evidenced by phosphorylated STAT3. After OVA sensitization and challenge, compared to wild type littermates, IL-22 transgenic mice showed decreased eosinophils in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and in lung tissue, decreased mucus metaplasia in the airways, and reduced AHR. Among the cytokines and chemokines examined, IL-13 levels were reduced in the BAL fluid as well as in lymphocytes from local draining lymph nodes of IL-22 transgenic mice. No effect was seen on the levels of serum total or OVA-specific IgE or IgG. These findings indicate that IL-22 has immune modulatory effects on pulmonary inflammatory responses in allergen-induced asthma. PMID:25254361

  18. Cannabidiol (CBD) Enhances Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation in C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Karmaus, Peer W. F.; Wagner, James G.; Harkema, Jack R.; Kaminski, Norbert E.; Kaplan, Barbara L.F.

    2012-01-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a plant-derived cannabinoid that has been predominantly characterized as anti-inflammatory. However, it is clear that immune effects of cannabinoids can vary with cannabinoid concentration, or type or magnitude of immune stimulus. The present studies demonstrate that oral administration of CBD enhanced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pulmonary inflammation in C57BL/6 mice. The enhanced inflammatory cell infiltrate as observed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was comprised mainly of neutrophils, with some monocytes. Concomitantly, CBD enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA production, including tumor necrosis factor-α (Tnfa), interleukins (IL) 6 and 23 (Il6, Il23), and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (Gcsf). These results demonstrate that the CBD-mediated enhancement of LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation is mediated at the level of transcription of a variety of pro-inflammatory genes. The significance of these studies is that CBD is part of a therapeutic currently in use for spasticity and pain in multiple sclerosis patients, and therefore it is important to further understand mechanisms by which CBD alters immune function. PMID:23173851

  19. Cannabidiol (CBD) enhances lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pulmonary inflammation in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Karmaus, Peer W F; Wagner, James G; Harkema, Jack R; Kaminski, Norbert E; Kaplan, Barbara L F

    2013-01-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a plant-derived cannabinoid that has been predominantly characterized as anti-inflammatory. However, it is clear that immune effects of cannabinoids can vary with cannabinoid concentration, or type or magnitude of immune stimulus. The present studies demonstrate that oral administration of CBD enhanced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pulmonary inflammation in C57BL/6 mice. The enhanced inflammatory cell infiltrate as observed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was comprised mainly of neutrophils, with some monocytes. Concomitantly, CBD enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA production, including tumor necrosis factor-α (Tnfa), interleukins (IL)-5 and -23 (Il6, Il23), and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (Gcsf). These results demonstrate that the CBD-mediated enhancement of LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation is mediated at the level of transcription of a variety of pro-inflammatory genes. The significance of these studies is that CBD is part of a therapeutic currently in use for spasticity and pain in multiple sclerosis patients, and therefore it is important to further understand mechanisms by which CBD alters immune function.

  20. Arterial Carboxyhemoglobin Measurement Is Useful for Evaluating Pulmonary Inflammation in Subjects with Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Yu; Shinkai, Masaharu; Kanoh, Soichiro; Fujikura, Yuji; K. Rubin, Bruce; Kawana, Akihiko; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Objective The arterial concentration of carboxyhemoglobin (CO-Hb) in subjects with inflammatory pulmonary disease is higher than that in healthy individuals. We retrospectively analyzed the relationship between the CO-Hb concentration and established markers of disease severity in subjects with interstitial lung disease (ILD). Methods The CO-Hb concentration was measured in subjects with newly diagnosed or untreated ILD and the relationships between the CO-Hb concentration and the serum biomarker levels, lung function, high-resolution CT (HRCT) findings, and the uptake in gallium-67 (67Ga) scintigraphy were evaluated. Results Eighty-one non-smoking subjects were studied (mean age, 67 years). Among these subjects, (A) 17 had stable idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), (B) 9 had an acute exacerbation of IPF, (C) 44 had stable non-IPF, and (D) 11 had an exacerbation of non-IPF. The CO-Hb concentrations of these subjects were (A) 1.5±0.5%, (B) 2.1±0.5%, (C) 1.2±0.4%, and (D) 1.7±0.5%. The CO-Hb concentration was positively correlated with the serum levels of surfactant protein (SP)-A (r=0.38), SP-D (r=0.39), and the inflammation index (calculated from HRCT; r=0.57) and was negatively correlated with the partial pressure of oxygen in the arterial blood (r=-0.56) and the predicted diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide (r=-0.61). The CO-Hb concentrations in subjects with a negative heart sign on 67Ga scintigraphy were higher than those in subjects without a negative heart sign (1.4±0.5% vs. 1.1±0.3%, p=0.018). Conclusion The CO-Hb levels of subjects with ILD were increased, particularly during an exacerbation, and were correlated with the parameters that reflect pulmonary inflammation. PMID:28321059

  1. Arterial Carboxyhemoglobin Measurement Is Useful for Evaluating Pulmonary Inflammation in Subjects with Interstitial Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Hara, Yu; Shinkai, Masaharu; Kanoh, Soichiro; Fujikura, Yuji; K Rubin, Bruce; Kawana, Akihiko; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Objective The arterial concentration of carboxyhemoglobin (CO-Hb) in subjects with inflammatory pulmonary disease is higher than that in healthy individuals. We retrospectively analyzed the relationship between the CO-Hb concentration and established markers of disease severity in subjects with interstitial lung disease (ILD). Methods The CO-Hb concentration was measured in subjects with newly diagnosed or untreated ILD and the relationships between the CO-Hb concentration and the serum biomarker levels, lung function, high-resolution CT (HRCT) findings, and the uptake in gallium-67 ( 67 Ga) scintigraphy were evaluated. Results Eighty-one non-smoking subjects were studied (mean age, 67 years). Among these subjects, (A) 17 had stable idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), (B) 9 had an acute exacerbation of IPF, (C) 44 had stable non-IPF, and (D) 11 had an exacerbation of non-IPF. The CO-Hb concentrations of these subjects were (A) 1.5±0.5%, (B) 2.1±0.5%, (C) 1.2±0.4%, and (D) 1.7±0.5%. The CO-Hb concentration was positively correlated with the serum levels of surfactant protein (SP)-A (r=0.38), SP-D (r=0.39), and the inflammation index (calculated from HRCT; r=0.57) and was negatively correlated with the partial pressure of oxygen in the arterial blood (r=-0.56) and the predicted diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide (r=-0.61). The CO-Hb concentrations in subjects with a negative heart sign on 67 Ga scintigraphy were higher than those in subjects without a negative heart sign (1.4±0.5% vs. 1.1±0.3%, p=0.018). Conclusion The CO-Hb levels of subjects with ILD were increased, particularly during an exacerbation, and were correlated with the parameters that reflect pulmonary inflammation.

  2. Apoptosis and Inflammation Associated Gene Expressions in Monocrotaline-Induced Pulmonary Hypertensive Rats after Bosentan Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Young Mi; Kwon, Jung Hyun; Choi, Shinkyu

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Vascular wall remodeling in pulmonary hypertension can be caused by an aberration in the normal balance between proliferation and apoptosis of endothelial cell in the pulmonary artery. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of bosentan on apoptosis in monocrotaline (MCT)-induced pulmonary hypertension. Materials and Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: control (C) group, M group (MCT 60 mg/kg) and B group (MCT 60 mg/kg plus bosentan 20 mg/day orally). Gene expressions of Bcl (B cell leukemia/lymphoma)-2, caspase-3, complement component (C)-6, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were analyzed by real time polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. Results The messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) expressions of caspase-3 and VEGF were significantly increased in the M group compared with the C group, and significantly decreased in the B group compared with the M group in week 4. mRNA expression of IL-6 was significantly decreased in weeks 1, 2, and 4 in the B group compared with the M group. mRNA expression of TNF-α was significantly decreased on day 5 and in weeks 1 and 2 in the B group compared with the M group. Conclusion Bosentan may have potential for preventing apoptosis and inflammation. PMID:24653739

  3. Milano summer particulate matter (PM10) triggers lung inflammation and extra pulmonary adverse events in mice.

    PubMed

    Farina, Francesca; Sancini, Giulio; Battaglia, Cristina; Tinaglia, Valentina; Mantecca, Paride; Camatini, Marina; Palestini, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested a link between particulate matter (PM) exposure and increased mortality and morbidity associated with pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases; accumulating evidences point to a new role for air pollution in CNS diseases. The purpose of our study is to investigate PM10sum effects on lungs and extra pulmonary tissues. Milano PM10sum has been intratracheally instilled into BALB/c mice. Broncho Alveolar Lavage fluid, lung parenchyma, heart and brain were screened for markers of inflammation (cell counts, cytokines, ET-1, HO-1, MPO, iNOS), cytotoxicity (LDH, ALP, Hsp70, Caspase8-p18, Caspase3-p17) for a putative pro-carcinogenic marker (Cyp1B1) and for TLR4 pathway activation. Brain was also investigated for CD68, TNF-α, GFAP. In blood, cell counts were performed while plasma was screened for endothelial activation (sP-selectin, ET-1) and for inflammation markers (TNF-α, MIP-2, IL-1β, MPO). Genes up-regulation (HMOX1, Cyp1B1, IL-1β, MIP-2, MPO) and miR-21 have been investigated in lungs and blood. Inflammation in the respiratory tract of PM10sum-treated mice has been confirmed in BALf and lung parenchyma by increased PMNs percentage, increased ET-1, MPO and cytokines levels. A systemic spreading of lung inflammation in PM10sum-treated mice has been related to the increased blood total cell count and neutrophils percentage, as well as to increased blood MPO. The blood-endothelium interface activation has been confirmed by significant increases of plasma ET-1 and sP-selectin. Furthermore PM10sum induced heart endothelial activation and PAHs metabolism, proved by increased ET-1 and Cyp1B1 levels. Moreover, PM10sum causes an increase in brain HO-1 and ET-1. These results state the translocation of inflammation mediators, ultrafine particles, LPS, metals associated to PM10sum, from lungs to bloodstream, thus triggering a systemic reaction, mainly involving heart and brain. Our results provided additional insight into the toxicity of PM10sum

  4. Airway epithelial SPDEF integrates goblet cell differentiation and pulmonary Th2 inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Rajavelu, Priya; Chen, Gang; Xu, Yan; Kitzmiller, Joseph A.; Korfhagen, Thomas R.; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial cells that line the conducting airways provide the initial barrier and innate immune responses to the abundant particles, microbes, and allergens that are inhaled throughout life. The transcription factors SPDEF and FOXA3 are both selectively expressed in epithelial cells lining the conducting airways, where they regulate goblet cell differentiation and mucus production. Moreover, these transcription factors are upregulated in chronic lung disorders, including asthma. Here, we show that expression of SPDEF or FOXA3 in airway epithelial cells in neonatal mice caused goblet cell differentiation, spontaneous eosinophilic inflammation, and airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. SPDEF expression promoted DC recruitment and activation in association with induction of Il33, Csf2, thymic stromal lymphopoietin (Tslp), and Ccl20 transcripts. Increased Il4, Il13, Ccl17, and Il25 expression was accompanied by recruitment of Th2 lymphocytes, group 2 innate lymphoid cells, and eosinophils to the lung. SPDEF was required for goblet cell differentiation and pulmonary Th2 inflammation in response to house dust mite (HDM) extract, as both were decreased in neonatal and adult Spdef–/– mice compared with control animals. Together, our results indicate that SPDEF causes goblet cell differentiation and Th2 inflammation during postnatal development and is required for goblet cell metaplasia and normal Th2 inflammatory responses to HDM aeroallergen. PMID:25866971

  5. Effect of Treatment of Cystic Fibrosis Pulmonary Exacerbations on Systemic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Valeria; Chmiel, James F.; Montgomery, Gregory S.; Nasr, Samya Z.; Perkett, Elizabeth; Saavedra, Milene T.; Slovis, Bonnie; Anthony, Margaret M.; Emmett, Peggy; Heltshe, Sonya L.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: In cystic fibrosis (CF), pulmonary exacerbations present an opportunity to define the effect of antibiotic therapy on systemic measures of inflammation. Objectives: Investigate whether plasma inflammatory proteins demonstrate and predict a clinical response to antibiotic therapy and determine which proteins are associated with measures of clinical improvement. Methods: In this multicenter study, a panel of 15 plasma proteins was measured at the onset and end of treatment for pulmonary exacerbation and at a clinically stable visit in patients with CF who were 10 years of age or older. Measurements and Main Results: Significant reductions in 10 plasma proteins were observed in 103 patients who had paired blood collections during antibiotic treatment for pulmonary exacerbations. Plasma C-reactive protein, serum amyloid A, calprotectin, and neutrophil elastase antiprotease complexes correlated most strongly with clinical measures at exacerbation onset. Reductions in C-reactive protein, serum amyloid A, IL-1ra, and haptoglobin were most associated with improvements in lung function with antibiotic therapy. Having higher IL-6, IL-8, and α1-antitrypsin (α1AT) levels at exacerbation onset were associated with an increased risk of being a nonresponder (i.e., failing to recover to baseline FEV1). Baseline IL-8, neutrophil elastase antiprotease complexes, and α1AT along with changes in several plasma proteins with antibiotic treatment, in combination with FEV1 at exacerbation onset, were predictive of being a treatment responder. Conclusions: Circulating inflammatory proteins demonstrate and predict a response to treatment of CF pulmonary exacerbations. A systemic biomarker panel could speed up drug discovery, leading to a quicker, more efficient drug development process for the CF community. PMID:25714657

  6. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Induces Early Nasal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Almendros, Isaac; Acerbi, Irene; Vilaseca, Isabel; Montserrat, Josep M.; Navajas, Daniel; Farré, Ramon

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: To assess whether noninvasive application of nCPAP is a mechanical stimulus inducing early nasal inflammation. Design: Prospective controlled animal study. Setting: University laboratory. Patients or Participants: 32 male Sprague-Dawley rats (250–300 g). Interventions: The rats were anesthetized and subjected to nCPAP=10 cm H2O and sham-CPAP through a mask for 3 h and 5 h (n=8 each). Measurements and Results: After nCPAP or sham, nasal scraping was carried out to detect neutrophils, and septum and dorsal nasal concha were excised to assess gene expression of inflammatory markers by real time PCR. Percentage of neutrophils in nucleated cells in the nasal scrapings was significantly (P = 0.006) higher after 5 h of nCPAP (3.51% ± 0.73%; m ± SEM) than in the sham group (1.12% ± 0.39%). When compared with sham, the mRNA of macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) in nasal tissue was significantly overexpressed after both 3 h (2.28-fold ± 0.43–fold; P = 0.034) and 5 h (5.56-fold ± 1.88–fold; P = 0.002) of nCPAP=10 cm H2O. No significant changes were found in the gene expressions of tumor necrosis factor-α, nerve growth factor and tachykinin-1 receptor. Conclusions: The compression applied by nCPAP (10 cm H2O, 5 h) on the nasal wall of healthy rats is a mechanical stimulus that triggers an early inflammatory process mediated by MIP-2, resulting in neutrophil extravasation. Citation: Almendros I; Acerbi I; Vilaseca I; Montserrat JM; Navajas D; Farré R. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) induces early nasal inflammation. SLEEP 2008;31(1):127-131. PMID:18220086

  7. Framework for 3D histologic reconstruction and fusion with in vivo MRI: Preliminary results of characterizing pulmonary inflammation in a mouse model

    SciT

    Rusu, Mirabela, E-mail: mirabela.rusu@gmail.com; Wang, Haibo; Madabhushi, Anant

    Purpose: Pulmonary inflammation is associated with a variety of diseases. Assessing pulmonary inflammation on in vivo imaging may facilitate the early detection and treatment of lung diseases. Although routinely used in thoracic imaging, computed tomography has thus far not been compellingly shown to characterize inflammation in vivo. Alternatively, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a nonionizing radiation technique to better visualize and characterize pulmonary tissue. Prior to routine adoption of MRI for early characterization of inflammation in humans, a rigorous and quantitative characterization of the utility of MRI to identify inflammation is required. Such characterization may be achieved by considering exmore » vivo histology as the ground truth, since it enables the definitive spatial assessment of inflammation. In this study, the authors introduce a novel framework to integrate 2D histology, ex vivo and in vivo imaging to enable the mapping of the extent of disease from ex vivo histology onto in vivo imaging, with the goal of facilitating computerized feature analysis and interrogation of disease appearance on in vivo imaging. The authors’ framework was evaluated in a preclinical preliminary study aimed to identify computer extracted features on in vivo MRI associated with chronic pulmonary inflammation. Methods: The authors’ image analytics framework first involves reconstructing the histologic volume in 3D from individual histology slices. Second, the authors map the disease ground truth onto in vivo MRI via coregistration with 3D histology using the ex vivo lung MRI as a conduit. Finally, computerized feature analysis of the disease extent is performed to identify candidate in vivo imaging signatures of disease presence and extent. Results: The authors evaluated the framework by assessing the quality of the 3D histology reconstruction and the histology—MRI fusion, in the context of an initial use case involving characterization of chronic

  8. Framework for 3D histologic reconstruction and fusion with in vivo MRI: Preliminary results of characterizing pulmonary inflammation in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Rusu, Mirabela; Golden, Thea; Wang, Haibo; Gow, Andrew; Madabhushi, Anant

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary inflammation is associated with a variety of diseases. Assessing pulmonary inflammation on in vivo imaging may facilitate the early detection and treatment of lung diseases. Although routinely used in thoracic imaging, computed tomography has thus far not been compellingly shown to characterize inflammation in vivo. Alternatively, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a nonionizing radiation technique to better visualize and characterize pulmonary tissue. Prior to routine adoption of MRI for early characterization of inflammation in humans, a rigorous and quantitative characterization of the utility of MRI to identify inflammation is required. Such characterization may be achieved by considering ex vivo histology as the ground truth, since it enables the definitive spatial assessment of inflammation. In this study, the authors introduce a novel framework to integrate 2D histology, ex vivo and in vivo imaging to enable the mapping of the extent of disease from ex vivo histology onto in vivo imaging, with the goal of facilitating computerized feature analysis and interrogation of disease appearance on in vivo imaging. The authors' framework was evaluated in a preclinical preliminary study aimed to identify computer extracted features on in vivo MRI associated with chronic pulmonary inflammation. The authors' image analytics framework first involves reconstructing the histologic volume in 3D from individual histology slices. Second, the authors map the disease ground truth onto in vivo MRI via coregistration with 3D histology using the ex vivo lung MRI as a conduit. Finally, computerized feature analysis of the disease extent is performed to identify candidate in vivo imaging signatures of disease presence and extent. The authors evaluated the framework by assessing the quality of the 3D histology reconstruction and the histology-MRI fusion, in the context of an initial use case involving characterization of chronic inflammation in a mouse model. The authors

  9. Early pulmonary events of nose-only water pipe (shisha) smoking exposure in mice

    PubMed Central

    Nemmar, Abderrahim; Hemeiri, Ahmed Al; Hammadi, Naser Al; Yuvaraju, Priya; Beegam, Sumaya; Yasin, Javed; Elwasila, Mohamed; Ali, Badreldin H; Adeghate, Ernest

    2015-01-01

    Water pipe smoking (WPS) is increasing in popularity and prevalence worldwide. Convincing data suggest that the toxicants in WPS are similar to that of cigarette smoke. However, the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms related to the early pulmonary events of WPS exposure are not understood. Here, we evaluated the early pulmonary events of nose-only exposure to mainstream WPS generated by commercially available honey flavored “moasel” tobacco. BALB/c mice were exposed to WPS 30 min/day for 5 days. Control mice were exposed using the same protocol to atmospheric air only. We measured airway resistance using forced oscillation technique, and pulmonary inflammation was evaluated histopathologically and by biochemical analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissue. Lung oxidative stress was evaluated biochemically by measuring the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxidation (LPO), reduced glutathione (GSH), catalase, and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Mice exposed to WPS showed a significant increase in the number of neutrophils (P < 0.05) and lymphocytes (P < 0.001). Moreover, total protein (P < 0.05), lactate dehydrogenase (P < 0.005), and endothelin (P < 0.05) levels were augmented in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Tumor necrosis factor α (P < 0.005) and interleukin 6 (P < 0.05) concentrations were significantly increased in lung following the exposure to WPS. Both ROS (P < 0.05) and LPO (P < 0.005) in lung tissue were significantly increased, whereas the level and activity of antioxidants including GSH (P < 0.0001), catalase (P < 0.005), and SOD (P < 0.0001) were significantly decreased after WPS exposure, indicating the occurrence of oxidative stress. In contrast, airway resistance was not increased in WPS exposure. We conclude that subacute, nose-only exposure to WPS causes lung inflammation and oxidative stress without affecting pulmonary function suggesting that inflammation and oxidative stress are

  10. Early pulmonary events of nose-only water pipe (shisha) smoking exposure in mice.

    PubMed

    Nemmar, Abderrahim; Al Hemeiri, Ahmed; Al Hammadi, Naser; Yuvaraju, Priya; Beegam, Sumaya; Yasin, Javed; Elwasila, Mohamed; Ali, Badreldin H; Adeghate, Ernest

    2015-03-01

    Water pipe smoking (WPS) is increasing in popularity and prevalence worldwide. Convincing data suggest that the toxicants in WPS are similar to that of cigarette smoke. However, the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms related to the early pulmonary events of WPS exposure are not understood. Here, we evaluated the early pulmonary events of nose-only exposure to mainstream WPS generated by commercially available honey flavored "moasel" tobacco. BALB/c mice were exposed to WPS 30 min/day for 5 days. Control mice were exposed using the same protocol to atmospheric air only. We measured airway resistance using forced oscillation technique, and pulmonary inflammation was evaluated histopathologically and by biochemical analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissue. Lung oxidative stress was evaluated biochemically by measuring the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxidation (LPO), reduced glutathione (GSH), catalase, and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Mice exposed to WPS showed a significant increase in the number of neutrophils (P < 0.05) and lymphocytes (P < 0.001). Moreover, total protein (P < 0.05), lactate dehydrogenase (P < 0.005), and endothelin (P < 0.05) levels were augmented in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Tumor necrosis factor α (P < 0.005) and interleukin 6 (P < 0.05) concentrations were significantly increased in lung following the exposure to WPS. Both ROS (P < 0.05) and LPO (P < 0.005) in lung tissue were significantly increased, whereas the level and activity of antioxidants including GSH (P < 0.0001), catalase (P < 0.005), and SOD (P < 0.0001) were significantly decreased after WPS exposure, indicating the occurrence of oxidative stress. In contrast, airway resistance was not increased in WPS exposure. We conclude that subacute, nose-only exposure to WPS causes lung inflammation and oxidative stress without affecting pulmonary function suggesting that inflammation and oxidative stress are early

  11. Pulmonary Sequestration: Early Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Sajad A.; Mufti, Gowher N.; Bhat, Nisar A.; Baba, Ajaz A.

    2015-01-01

    Intralobar sequestration is characterized by aberrant formation of nonfunctional lung tissue that has no communication with the bronchial tree and receives systemic arterial blood supply. Failure of earlier diagnosis can lead to recurrent pneumonia, failure to thrive, multiple hospital admissions, and more morbidity. The aim of this case report is to increase the awareness about the lung sequestration, to diagnose and treat it early, so that it is resected before repeated infection, and prevent the morbidity and mortality. PMID:26273485

  12. Early Brain Injury Associated with Systemic Inflammation After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Savarraj, Jude; Parsha, Kaushik; Hergenroeder, Georgene; Ahn, Sungho; Chang, Tiffany R; Kim, Dong H; Choi, H Alex

    2018-04-01

    Early brain injury (EBI) after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is defined as brain injury occurring within 72 h of aneurysmal rupture. Although EBI is the most significant predictor of outcomes after aSAH, its underlying pathophysiology is not well understood. We hypothesize that EBI after aSAH is associated with an increase in peripheral inflammation measured by cytokine expression levels and changes in associations between cytokines. aSAH patients were enrolled into a prospective observational study and were assessed for markers of EBI: global cerebral edema (GCE), subarachnoid hemorrhage early brain edema score (SEBES), and Hunt-Hess grade. Serum samples collected at ≤ 48 h of admission were analyzed using multiplex bead-based assays to determine levels of 13 pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Pairwise correlation coefficients between cytokines were represented as networks. Cytokine levels and differences in correlation networks were compared between EBI groups. Of the 71 patients enrolled in the study, 17 (24%) subjects had GCE, 31 (44%) subjects had SEBES ≥ 3, and 21 (29%) had HH ≥ 4. IL-6 was elevated in groups with GCE, SEBES ≥ 3, and HH ≥ 4. MIP1β was independently associated with high-grade SEBES. Correlation network analysis suggests higher systematic inflammation in subjects with SEBES ≥ 3. EBI after SAH is associated with increased levels of specific cytokines. Peripheral levels of IL-10, IL-6, and MIP1β may be important markers of EBI. Investigating systematic correlations in addition to expression levels of individual cytokines may offer deeper insight into the underlying mechanisms related to EBI.

  13. IL-23 Is Essential for the Development of Elastase-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation and Emphysema.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Utako; Miyahara, Nobuaki; Taniguchi, Akihiko; Waseda, Koichi; Morichika, Daisuke; Kurimoto, Etsuko; Koga, Hikari; Kataoka, Mikio; Gelfand, Erwin W; Cua, Daniel J; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kanehiro, Arihiko

    2016-11-01

    We recently reported that IL-17A plays a critical role in the development of porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE)-induced emphysema. The proliferation of T-helper type 17 (Th17) cells was induced by IL-23. To determine the contribution of IL-23 to the development of pulmonary emphysema, a mouse model of PPE-induced emphysema was used in which responses of IL-23p19-deficient (IL-23 -/- ) and wild-type (WT) mice were compared. Intratracheal instillation of PPE induced emphysematous changes in the lungs and was associated with increased levels of IL-23 in lung homogenates. Compared with WT mice, IL-23 -/- mice developed significantly lower static compliance values and markedly reduced emphysematous changes on histological analyses after PPE instillation. These changes were associated with lower levels of IL-17A and fewer Th17 cells in the lung. The neutrophilia seen in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of WT mice was attenuated in IL-23 -/- mice, and the reduction was associated with decreased levels of keratinocyte-derived cytokine and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Treatment with anti-IL-23p40 monoclonal antibody significantly attenuated PPE-induced emphysematous changes in the lungs of WT mice. These data identify the important contributions of IL-23 to the development of elastase-induced pulmonary inflammation and emphysema, mediated through an IL-23/IL-17 pathway. Targeting IL-23 in emphysema is a potential therapeutic strategy for delaying disease progression.

  14. Oleanolic acid acetate attenuates polyhexamethylene guanidine phosphate-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Seok; Han, Jin-Young; Kim, Sung-Hwan; Jeon, Doin; Kim, Hyeon-Young; Lee, Seung Woong; Rho, Mun-Chual; Lee, Kyuhong

    2018-06-01

    Oleanolic acid acetate (OAA), triterpenoid compound isolated from Vigna angularis (azuki bean), has been revealed anti-inflammatory in several studies. We investigated the effects of OAA against polyhexamethylene guanidine phosphate (PHMG-P)-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis in mice. OAA treatment effectively alleviated PHMG-P-induced lung injury, including the number of total and differential cell in BAL fluid, histopathological lesions and hydroxyproline content in a dose dependent manner. Moreover, OAA treatment significantly decreased the elevations of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, TGF-β1, and fibronectin, and the activation of the NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome in the lungs of PHMG-P-treated mice. Cytokines are known to be key modulators in the inflammatory responses that drive progression of fibrosis in injured tissues. The activation of NLRP3 inflammasome has been reported to be involved in induction of inflammatory cytokines. These results indicate that OAA may mitigate the inflammatory response and development of pulmonary fibrosis in the lungs of mice treated with PHMG-P. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Mesoporous carbon nanomaterials induced pulmonary surfactant inhibition, cytotoxicity, inflammation and lung fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yunan; Yang, Yi; Xu, Bolong; Wang, Shunhao; Li, Bin; Ma, Juan; Gao, Jie; Zuo, Yi Y; Liu, Sijin

    2017-12-01

    Environmental exposure and health risk upon engineered nanomaterials are increasingly concerned. The family of mesoporous carbon nanomaterials (MCNs) is a rising star in nanotechnology for multidisciplinary research with versatile applications in electronics, energy and gas storage, and biomedicine. Meanwhile, there is mounting concern on their environmental health risks due to the growing production and usage of MCNs. The lung is the primary site for particle invasion under environmental exposure to nanomaterials. Here, we studied the comprehensive toxicological profile of MCNs in the lung under the scenario of moderate environmental exposure. It was found that at a low concentration of 10μg/mL MCNs induced biophysical inhibition of natural pulmonary surfactant. Moreover, MCNs at similar concentrations reduced viability of J774A.1 macrophages and lung epithelial A549 cells. Incubating with nature pulmonary surfactant effectively reduced the cytotoxicity of MCNs. Regarding the pro-inflammatory responses, MCNs activated macrophages in vitro, and stimulated lung inflammation in mice after inhalation exposure, associated with lung fibrosis. Moreover, we found that the size of MCNs played a significant role in regulating cytotoxicity and pro-inflammatory potential of this nanomaterial. In general, larger MCNs induced more pronounced cytotoxic and pro-inflammatory effects than their smaller counterparts. Our results provided valuable information on the toxicological profile and environmental health risks of MCNs, and suggested that fine-tuning the size of MCNs could be a practical precautionary design strategy to increase safety and biocompatibility of this nanomaterial. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Reproducibility of a novel model of murine asthma-like pulmonary inflammation

    PubMed Central

    MCKINLEY, L; KIM, J; BOLGOS, G L; SIDDIQUI, J; REMICK, D G

    2004-01-01

    Sensitization to cockroach allergens (CRA) has been implicated as a major cause of asthma, especially among inner-city populations. Endotoxin from Gram-negative bacteria has also been investigated for its role in attenuating or exacerbating the asthmatic response. We have created a novel model utilizing house dust extract (HDE) containing high levels of both CRA and endotoxin to induce pulmonary inflammation (PI) and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). A potential drawback of this model is that the HDE is in limited supply and preparation of new HDE will not contain the exact components of the HDE used to define our model system. The present study involved testing HDEs collected from various homes for their ability to cause PI and AHR. Dust collected from five homes was extracted in phosphate buffered saline overnight. The levels of CRA and endotoxin in the supernatants varied from 7·1 to 49·5 mg/ml of CRA and 1·7–6 µg/ml of endotoxin in the HDEs. Following immunization and two pulmonary exposures to HDE all five HDEs induced AHR, PI and plasma IgE levels substantially higher than normal mice. This study shows that HDE containing high levels of cockroach allergens and endotoxin collected from different sources can induce an asthma-like response in our murine model. PMID:15086384

  17. Bilirubin treatment suppresses pulmonary inflammation in a rat model of smoke-induced emphysema.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jingjing; Zhao, Hui; Fan, Guoquan; Li, Jianqiang

    2015-09-18

    Cigarette smoking is a significant risk factor for emphysema, which is characterized by airway inflammation and oxidative damage. To assess the capacity of bilirubin to protect against smoke-induced emphysema. Smoking status and bilirubin levels were recorded in 58 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) and 71 non-COPD participants. The impact of smoking on serum bilirubin levels and exogenous bilirubin (20 mg/kg/day) on pulmonary injury was assessed in a rat model of smoking-induced emphysema. At sacrifice lung histology, airway leukocyte accumulation and cytokine and chemokine levels in serum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung were analyzed. Oxidative lipid damage and anti-oxidative components was assessed by measuring malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and glutathione. Total serum bilirubin levels were lower in smokers with or without COPD than non-smoking patients without COPD (P < 0.05). Indirect serum bilirubin levels were lower in COPD patients than patients without COPD (P < 0.05). In rats, cigarette smoke reduced serum total and indirect bilirubin levels. Administration of bilirubin reduced mean linear intercept and mean alveoli area, increased mean alveoli number, reduced macrophage, neutrophil and TNF-α content of BALF, and increased BALF and serum IL-10 level, but lowered local and systemic CCL2, CXCL2, CXCL8 and IL-17 levels. Bilirubin suppressed the smoke-induced systemic and regional oxidative lipid damage associated with increased SOD activity. Bilirubin attenuated smoking-induced pulmonary injury by suppressing inflammatory cell recruitment and pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion, increasing anti-inflammatory cytokine levels, and anti-oxidant SOD activity in a rat model of smoke-induced emphysema. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Skin condition and its relationship to systemic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Majewski, Sebastian; Pietrzak, Anna; Tworek, Damian; Szewczyk, Karolina; Kumor-Kisielewska, Anna; Kurmanowska, Zofia; Górski, Paweł; Zalewska-Janowska, Anna; Piotrowski, Wojciech Jerzy

    2017-01-01

    The systemic (extrapulmonary) effects and comorbidities of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) contribute substantially to its burden. The supposed link between COPD and its systemic effects on distal organs could be due to the low-grade systemic inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the systemic inflammation may influence the skin condition in COPD patients. Forty patients with confirmed diagnosis of COPD and a control group consisting of 30 healthy smokers and 20 healthy never-smokers were studied. Transepidermal water loss, stratum corneum hydration, skin sebum content, melanin index, erythema index, and skin temperature were measured with worldwide-acknowledged biophysical measuring methods at the volar forearm of all participants using a multifunctional skin physiology monitor. Biomarkers of systemic inflammation, including high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), were measured in serum using commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. There were significant differences between COPD patients and healthy never-smokers in skin temperature, melanin index, sebum content, and hydration level ( P <0.05), but not for transepidermal water loss and erythema index. No significant difference was noted between COPD patients and smokers in any of the biophysical properties of the skin measured. The mean levels of hsCRP and IL-6 in serum were significantly higher in COPD patients and healthy smokers in comparison with healthy never-smokers. There were significant correlations between skin temperature and serum hsCRP ( R =0.40; P =0.02) as well as skin temperature and serum IL-6 ( R =0.49; P =0.005) in smokers. Stratum corneum hydration correlated significantly with serum TNF-α ( R =0.37; P =0.01) in COPD patients. Differences noted in several skin biophysical properties and biomarkers of systemic inflammation between COPD patients, smokers, and healthy never

  19. Early growth response gene 1 is essential for urban particulate matter-induced inflammation and mucus hyperproduction in airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Cao, Jiaofei; Luo, Man; Che, Luanqing; Li, Wen; Ying, Songmin; Chen, Zhihua; Shen, Huahao

    2018-05-19

    Particulate matter (PM) has been implicated as a risk factor for human airway disorders. However, the biological mechanisms underlying the correlation between PM exposure and adverse airway effects have not yet been fully clarified. The objective of this study was to explore the possible role of early growth response gene 1 (Egr-1) in PM-induced toxic effects in pulmonary inflammation and mucus hyperproduction in vitro and in vivo. Particulate matter exposure induced a rapid Egr-1 expression in human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells and in mouse lungs. Genetic blockage of Egr-1 markedly reduced PM-induced inflammatory cytokines, e.g., IL6 and IL8, and MUC5AC in HBE cells, and these effects were mechanistically mediated by the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) pathways, respectively. Egr-1-knockout mice displayed significantly reduced airway inflammation and mucus hyperproduction in response to PM exposure in vivo. Moreover, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) contained in the PM also induced Egr-1 expression, and also played a role in the inflammatory responses and mucus production. Taken together, our data reveal novel Egr-1 signaling that mediates the NF-κB and AP-1 pathways to orchestrate PM-induced pulmonary inflammation and mucus hyperproduction, suggesting that Egr-1 inhibition could be an effective therapeutic approach for airway disorders or disease exacerbations induced by airborne particulate pollution. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Biomarkers for Pulmonary Inflammation and Fibrosis and Lung Ventilation Function in Chinese Occupational Refractory Ceramic Fibers-Exposed Workers.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaojun; Gu, Yishuo; Ma, Wenjun; Gao, Panjun; Liu, Mengxuan; Xiao, Pei; Wang, Hongfei; Chen, Juan; Li, Tao

    2017-12-27

    Refractory ceramic fibers (RCFs) can cause adverse health effects on workers' respiratory system, yet no proper biomarkers have been used to detect early pulmonary injury of RCFs-exposed workers. This study assessed the levels of two biomarkers that are related to respiratory injury in RCFs-exposed workers, and explored their relations with lung function. The exposure levels of total dust and respirable fibers were measured simultaneously in RCFs factories. The levels of TGF-β1 and ceruloplasmin (CP) increased with the RCFs exposure level ( p < 0.05), and significantly increased in workers with high exposure level (1.21 ± 0.49 ng/mL, 115.25 ± 32.44 U/L) when compared with the control group (0.99 ± 0.29 ng/mL, 97.90 ± 35.01 U/L) ( p < 0.05). The levels of FVC and FEV₁ were significantly decreased in RCFs exposure group ( p < 0.05). Negative relations were found between the concentrations of CP and FVC (B = -0.423, p = 0.025), or FEV₁ (B = -0.494, p = 0.014). The concentration of TGF-β1 (B = 0.103, p = 0.001) and CP (B = 8.027, p = 0.007) were associated with respirable fiber exposure level. Occupational exposure to RCFs can impair lung ventilation function and may have the potential to cause pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. TGF-β1 and CP might be used as sensitive and noninvasive biomarkers to detect lung injury in occupational RCFs-exposed workers. Respirable fiber concentration can better reflect occupational RCFs exposure and related respiratory injuries.

  1. Biomarkers for Pulmonary Inflammation and Fibrosis and Lung Ventilation Function in Chinese Occupational Refractory Ceramic Fibers-Exposed Workers

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yishuo; Ma, Wenjun; Gao, Panjun; Liu, Mengxuan; Xiao, Pei; Wang, Hongfei; Chen, Juan; Li, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Refractory ceramic fibers (RCFs) can cause adverse health effects on workers’ respiratory system, yet no proper biomarkers have been used to detect early pulmonary injury of RCFs-exposed workers. This study assessed the levels of two biomarkers that are related to respiratory injury in RCFs-exposed workers, and explored their relations with lung function. The exposure levels of total dust and respirable fibers were measured simultaneously in RCFs factories. The levels of TGF-β1 and ceruloplasmin (CP) increased with the RCFs exposure level (p < 0.05), and significantly increased in workers with high exposure level (1.21 ± 0.49 ng/mL, 115.25 ± 32.44 U/L) when compared with the control group (0.99 ± 0.29 ng/mL, 97.90 ± 35.01 U/L) (p < 0.05). The levels of FVC and FEV1 were significantly decreased in RCFs exposure group (p < 0.05). Negative relations were found between the concentrations of CP and FVC (B = −0.423, p = 0.025), or FEV1 (B = −0.494, p = 0.014). The concentration of TGF-β1 (B = 0.103, p = 0.001) and CP (B = 8.027, p = 0.007) were associated with respirable fiber exposure level. Occupational exposure to RCFs can impair lung ventilation function and may have the potential to cause pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. TGF-β1 and CP might be used as sensitive and noninvasive biomarkers to detect lung injury in occupational RCFs-exposed workers. Respirable fiber concentration can better reflect occupational RCFs exposure and related respiratory injuries. PMID:29280967

  2. Lack of Correlation Between Pulmonary and Systemic Inflammation Markers in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Simultaneous, Two-Compartmental Analysis.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Belen; Sauleda, Jaume; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Noguera, Aina; Monsó, Eduard; Gómez, Federico; Barreiro, Esther; Marín, Alicia; Antó, Josep Maria; Agusti, Alvar

    2016-07-01

    The origin of systemic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients remains to be defined, but one of the most widely accepted hypothesis is the 'spill over' of inflammatory mediators from the lung to the circulation. To evaluate the relationship between pulmonary and systemic inflammation in COPD quantifying several inflammatory markers in sputum and serum determined simultaneously. Correlations between various inflammatory variables (TNF-α, IL6, IL8) in sputum and serum were evaluated in 133 patients from the PAC-COPD cohort study. A secondary objective was the evaluation of relationships between inflammatory variables and lung function. Inflammatory markers were clearly higher in sputum than in serum. No significant correlation was found (absolute value, r=0.03-0.24) between inflammatory markers in blood and in sputum. There were no significant associations identified between those markers and lung function variables, such as FEV1, DLCO and PaO2 neither. We found no correlation between pulmonary and systemic inflammation in patients with stable COPD, suggesting different pathogenic mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Early onset primary pulmonary cryptococcosis in a renal transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Tarai, B; Kher, V; Kotru, P; Sabhikhi, A; Barman, P; Rattan, A

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of primary pulmonary cryptococcosis in a post-renal transplant patient. A 65-year-old male renal transplant patient was admitted to the hospital with a low grade fever of 1 month, radiologically mimicking tuberculosis (TB). Broncho-alveolar fluid (BAL) shows capsulated yeast, and Cryptococcus neoformans was grown on culture supported by cytology and histopathological examination. Cryptococcal antigen was positive (32-fold) in serum and was negative in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The patient was given amphotericin B and 5-flucytosine and clinical improvement was seen on a weekly follow up. The serum cryptococcal antigen test might contribute to the early detection and treatment of pulmonary cryptococcosis. The results of antifungal susceptibility were aid in selecting the drug of choice for treatment.

  4. Nanofibrillated cellulose causes acute pulmonary inflammation that subsides within a month.

    PubMed

    Ilves, Marit; Vilske, Sara; Aimonen, Kukka; Lindberg, Hanna K; Pesonen, Saila; Wedin, Irene; Nuopponen, Markus; Vanhala, Esa; Højgaard, Casper; Winther, Jakob R; Willemoës, Martin; Vogel, Ulla; Wolff, Henrik; Norppa, Hannu; Savolainen, Kai; Alenius, Harri

    2018-05-30

    Nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) is a renewable nanomaterial that has beneficial uses in various applications such as packaging materials and paper. Like carbon nanotubes (CNT), NFCs have high aspect ratio and favorable mechanical properties. The aspect ratio also rises a concern whether NFC could pose a health risk and induce pathologies, similar to those triggered by multi-walled CNT. In this study, we explored the immunomodulatory properties of four NFCs in vitro and in vivo, and compared the results with data on bulk-sized cellulose fibrils and rigid multi-walled CNT (rCNT). Two of the NFCs were non-functionalized and two were carboxymethylated or carboxylated. We investigated the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in differentiated THP-1 cells, and studied the pulmonary effects and biopersistence of the materials in mice. Our results demonstrate that one of the non-functionalized NFCs tested reduced cell viability and triggered pro-inflammatory reactions in vitro. In contrast, all cellulose materials induced innate immunity response in vivo 24 h after oropharyngeal aspiration, and the non-functionalized NFCs additionally caused features of Th2-type inflammation. Modest immune reactions were also seen after 28 days, however, the effects were markedly attenuated as compared with the ones after 24 h. Cellulose materials were not cleared within 1 month, as demonstrated by their presence in the exposed lungs. All effects of NFC were modest as compared with those induced by rCNT. NFC-induced responses were similar or exceeded those triggered by bulk-sized cellulose. These data provide new information about the biodurability and pulmonary effects of different NFCs; this knowledge can be useful in the risk assessment of cellulose materials.

  5. Hirsutella sinensis mycelium attenuates bleomycin-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tsung-Teng; Lai, Hsin-Chih; Ko, Yun-Fei; Ojcius, David M.; Lan, Ying-Wei; Martel, Jan; Young, John D.; Chong, Kowit-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Hirsutella sinensis mycelium (HSM), the anamorph of Cordyceps sinensis, is a traditional Chinese medicine that has been shown to possess various pharmacological properties. We previously reported that this fungus suppresses interleukin-1β and IL-18 secretion by inhibiting both canonical and non-canonical inflammasomes in human macrophages. However, whether HSM may be used to prevent lung fibrosis and the mechanism underlying this activity remain unclear. Our results show that pretreatment with HSM inhibits TGF-β1–induced expression of fibronectin and α-SMA in lung fibroblasts. HSM also restores superoxide dismutase expression in TGF-β1–treated lung fibroblasts and inhibits reactive oxygen species production in lung epithelial cells. Furthermore, HSM pretreatment markedly reduces bleomycin–induced lung injury and fibrosis in mice. Accordingly, HSM reduces inflammatory cell accumulation in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and proinflammatory cytokines levels in lung tissues. The HSM extract also significantly reduces TGF-β1 in lung tissues, and this effect is accompanied by decreased collagen 3α1 and α-SMA levels. Moreover, HSM reduces expression of the NLRP3 inflammasome and P2X7R in lung tissues, whereas it enhances expression of superoxide dismutase. These findings suggest that HSM may be used for the treatment of pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. PMID:26497260

  6. Involvement of the cytokine-IDO1-AhR loop in zinc oxide nanoparticle-induced acute pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chia-Chi; Lee, Hui-Ling; Chen, Chao-Yu; Luo, Yueh-Hsia; Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Tsai, Hui-Ti; Lin, Pinpin

    2017-04-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs) are widely used in our daily life, such as in sunscreens and electronic nanodevices. However, pulmonary exposure to ZnONPs causes acute pulmonary inflammation, which is considered as an initial event for various respiratory diseases. Thus, elucidation of the underlying cellular mechanisms of ZnONPs can help us in predicting their potential effects in respiratory diseases. In this study, we observed that ZnONPs increased proinflammatory cytokines, accompanied with an increased expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and its downstream target cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) in macrophages in vitro and in mouse lung epithelia in vivo. Moreover, zinc nitrate, but not silica or titanium dioxide nanoparticles (NPs), had similar effects on macrophages, indicating that the zinc element or ion released from ZnONPs is likely responsible for the activation of the AhR pathway. Cotreatment with an AhR antagonist or AhR knockout reduced ZnONPs-induced cytokine secretion in macrophages or mice, respectively. Furthermore, kynurenine (KYN), an endogenous AhR agonist and a tryptophan metabolite catalyzed by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), was increased in the serums of mice that aspirated ZnONPs. Consistently, ZnONPs increased IDO1 expression in lung cells in vitro and in vivo. Finally, AhR knockout reduced ZnONPs-induced pulmonary inflammation, cytokine secretion and KYN production in mice, suggesting that AhR activation is involved in ZnONPs-induced cytokine secretion and pulmonary inflammation. In summary, we demonstrated that the pulmonary exposure of ZnONPs stimulated the cytokine-IDO1-AhR loop in the lungs, which has been implied to play roles in immune dysfunctions.

  7. Low level laser therapy reduces acute lung inflammation in a model of pulmonary and extrapulmonary LPS-induced ARDS.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Manoel Carneiro; Greiffo, Flávia Regina; Rigonato-Oliveira, Nicole Cristine; Custódio, Ricardo Wesley Alberca; Silva, Vanessa Roza; Damaceno-Rodrigues, Nilsa Regina; Almeida, Francine Maria; Albertini, Regiane; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Álvaro B; de Oliveira, Luis Vicente Franco; de Carvalho, Paulo de Tarso Camillo; Ligeiro de Oliveira, Ana Paula; Leal, Ernesto César P; Vieira, Rodolfo P

    2014-05-05

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects low level laser therapy (LLLT) in a LPS-induced pulmonary and extrapulmonary acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in BALB/c mice. Laser (830nm laser, 9J/cm(2), 35mW, 80s per point, 3 points per application) was applied in direct contact with skin, 1h after LPS administration. Mice were distributed in control (n=6; PBS), ARDS IT (n=7; LPS orotracheally 10μg/mouse), ARDS IP (n=7; LPS intra-peritoneally 100μg/mouse), ARDS IT+Laser (n=9; LPS intra-tracheally 10μg/mouse), ARDS IP+Laser (n=9; LPS intra-peritoneally 100μg/mouse). Twenty-four hours after last LPS administration, mice were studied for pulmonary inflammation by total and differential cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), cytokines (IL-1beta, IL-6, KC and TNF-alpha) levels in BAL fluid and also by quantitative analysis of neutrophils number in the lung parenchyma. LLLT significantly reduced pulmonary and extrapulmonary inflammation in LPS-induced ARDS, as demonstrated by reduced number of total cells (p<0.001) and neutrophils (p<0.001) in BAL, reduced levels of IL-1beta, IL-6, KC and TNF-alpha in BAL fluid and in serum (p<0.001), as well as the number of neutrophils in lung parenchyma (p<0.001). LLLT is effective to reduce pulmonary inflammation in both pulmonary and extrapulmonary model of LPS-induced ARDS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A Plant Proteinase Inhibitor from Enterolobium contortisiliquum Attenuates Pulmonary Mechanics, Inflammation and Remodeling Induced by Elastase in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Theodoro-Júnior, Osmar Aparecido; Righetti, Renato Fraga; Almeida-Reis, Rafael; Martins-Oliveira, Bruno Tadeu; Oliva, Leandro Vilela; Prado, Carla Máximo; Saraiva-Romanholo, Beatriz Mangueira; Leick, Edna Aparecida; Pinheiro, Nathalia Montouro; Lobo, Yara Aparecida; Martins, Mílton de Arruda; Oliva, Maria Luiza Vilela; Tibério, Iolanda de Fátima Lopes Calvo

    2017-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitors have been associated with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities and may represent a potential therapeutic treatment for emphysema. Our aim was to evaluate the effects of a plant Kunitz proteinase inhibitor, Enterolobium contortisiliquum trypsin inhibitor (EcTI), on several aspects of experimental elastase-induced pulmonary inflammation in mice. C57/Bl6 mice were intratracheally administered elastase (ELA) or saline (SAL) and were treated intraperitoneally with EcTI (ELA-EcTI, SAL-EcTI) on days 1, 14 and 21. On day 28, pulmonary mechanics, exhaled nitric oxide (ENO) and number leucocytes in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were evaluated. Subsequently, lung immunohistochemical staining was submitted to morphometry. EcTI treatment reduced responses of the mechanical respiratory system, number of cells in the BALF, and reduced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), matrix metalloproteinase-12 (MMP-12), tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP-1), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-positive cells and volume proportion of isoprostane, collagen and elastic fibers in the airways and alveolar walls compared with the ELA group. EcTI treatment reduced elastase induced pulmonary inflammation, remodeling, oxidative stress and mechanical alterations, suggesting that this inhibitor may be a potential therapeutic tool for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) management. PMID:28216579

  9. Lycium barbarum polysaccharide protects against LPS-induced ARDS by inhibiting apoptosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation in pulmonary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lan; Li, Wen; Qi, Di; Wang, Daoxin

    2018-04-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a heterogenous syndrome characterised by diffuse alveolar damage, with an increase in lung endothelial and epithelial permeability. Lycium barbarum polysaccharide (LBP), the most biologically active fraction of wolfberry, possesses antiapoptotic and antioxidative effects in distinct situations. In the present study, the protective effects and potential molecular mechanisms of LBP against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ARDS were investigated in the mice and in the human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMECs). The data indicated that pretreatment with LBP significantly attenuated LPS-induced lung inflammation and pulmonary oedema in vivo. LBP significantly reversed LPS-induced decrease in cell viability, increase in apoptosis and oxidative stress via inhibiting caspase-3 activation and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in vitro. Moreover, the scratch assay verified that LBP restored the dysfunction of endothelial cells (ECs) migration induced by LPS stimulation. Furthermore, LBP also significantly suppressed LPS-induced NF-κB activation, and subsequently reversed the release of cytochrome c. These results showed the antiapoptosis and antioxidant LBP could partially protect against LPS-induced ARDS through promoting the ECs survival and scavenging ROS via inhibition of NF-κB signalling pathway. Thus, LBP could be potentially used for ARDS against pulmonary inflammation and pulmonary oedema.

  10. Inhibitory effects of thalidomide on bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats via regulation of thioredoxin reductase and inflammations.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaoying; Li, Xin; Li, Minghui; Chen, Ming; Fan, Qian; Wei, Wei

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the potential clinical effects of thalidomide on bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis were investigated. A Sprague-Dawley rats' model of pulmonary fibrosis induced by an intratracheal instillation of bleomycin was adopted. The rats in thalidomide treated groups were intraperitoneally injected with thalidomide (10, 20, 50 mg/kg) daily for 28 days, while the rats in control and bleomycin treated groups were injected with a saline solution. The effects of thalidomide on pulmonary injury were evaluated by the lung wet/dry weight ratios, cell counts, and histopathological examination. Inflammation of lung tissues was assessed by measuring the levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Oxidative stress was evaluated by detecting the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), superoxide dismutase (SOD), total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), and malondialdehyde (MDA) in lung tissue. The results indicated that thalidomide treatment remarkably attenuated bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, oxidative stress and inflammation in rats' lung. The anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects of thalidomide were also found in human lung fibroblasts. Thalidomide administration significantly stimulated the activity of thioredoxin reductase, while other enzymes or proteins involved in biologic oxidation-reduction equilibrium were not affected. Our findings indicate that thalidomide-mediated suppression of fibro-proliferation may contribute to the anti-fibrotic effect against bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The mechanisms are related to the inhibition of oxidative stress and inflammatory response. In summary, these results may provide a rationale to explore clinical application of thalidomide for the prevention of pulmonary fibrosis.

  11. Alterations in NO- and PGI2- dependent function in aorta in the orthotopic murine model of metastatic 4T1 breast cancer: relationship with pulmonary endothelial dysfunction and systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Buczek, E; Denslow, A; Mateuszuk, L; Proniewski, B; Wojcik, T; Sitek, B; Fedorowicz, A; Jasztal, A; Kus, E; Chmura-Skirlinska, A; Gurbiel, R; Wietrzyk, J; Chlopicki, S

    2018-05-22

    Patients with cancer develop endothelial dysfunction and subsequently display a higher risk of cardiovascular events. The aim of the present work was to examine changes in nitric oxide (NO)- and prostacyclin (PGI 2 )-dependent endothelial function in the systemic conduit artery (aorta), in relation to the formation of lung metastases and to local and systemic inflammation in a murine orthotopic model of metastatic breast cancer. BALB/c female mice were orthotopically inoculated with 4T1 breast cancer cells. Development of lung metastases, lung inflammation, changes in blood count, systemic inflammatory response (e.g. SAA, SAP and IL-6), as well as changes in NO- and PGI 2 -dependent endothelial function in the aorta, were examined 2, 4, 5 and 6 weeks following cancer cell transplantation. As early as 2 weeks following transplantation of breast cancer cells, in the early metastatic stage, lungs displayed histopathological signs of inflammation, NO production was impaired and nitrosylhemoglobin concentration in plasma was decreased. After 4 to 6 weeks, along with metastatic development, progressive leukocytosis and systemic inflammation (as seen through increased SAA, SAP, haptoglobin and IL-6 plasma concentrations) were observed. Six weeks following cancer cell inoculation, but not earlier, endothelial dysfunction in aorta was detected; this involved a decrease in basal NO production and a decrease in NO-dependent vasodilatation, that was associated with a compensatory increase in cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)- derived PGI 2 production. In 4 T1 metastatic breast cancer in mice early pulmonary metastasis was correlated with lung inflammation, with an early decrease in pulmonary as well as systemic NO availability. Late metastasis was associated with robust, cancer-related, systemic inflammation and impairment of NO-dependent endothelial function in the aorta that was associated with compensatory upregulation of the COX-2-derived PGI 2 pathway.

  12. Sarcopenic Obesity, Functional Outcomes, and Systemic Inflammation in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Joppa, Pavol; Tkacova, Ruzena; Franssen, Frits M E; Hanson, Corrine; Rennard, Stephen I; Silverman, Edwin K; McDonald, Merry-Lynn N; Calverley, Peter M A; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Spruit, Martijn A; Kenn, Klaus; Wouters, Emiel F M; Rutten, Erica P A

    2016-08-01

    Both loss of muscle mass (ie, sarcopenia) and obesity adversely impact clinically important outcomes in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Currently, there are only a few studies in patients with COPD with sarcopenia and concurrent obesity, termed sarcopenic obesity (SO). To explore the effects of SO on exercise capacity, health status, and systemic inflammation in COPD. Baseline data collected from a total of 2548 participants (2000 patients with COPD, mean age (SD), 63.5 (7.1) years; and 548 controls, 54.8 (9.0) years) from ECLIPSE (Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints) study, a multicenter longitudinal observational study, were used. All participants were divided into 4 body composition phenotypes using bioelectrical impedance analysis: (1) normal body composition, (2) obesity, (3) sarcopenia, and (4) SO. In patients with COPD, the 6-minute walking distance, disease-specific health status, and plasma inflammatory markers were compared among the respective body composition groups. Patients with COPD were 3 times more likely to present with SO compared with controls without COPD (odds ratio [OR] 3.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.0-5.4, P < .001). In patients with COPD, SO was related to reduced 6-minute walking distance (-28.0 m, 95% CI -45.6 to -10.4), P < .01) and to higher systemic inflammatory burden (an elevation of at least 2 inflammatory markers, OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1-2.5, P = .028) compared with the normal body composition group after adjustments for age, sex, smoking, body mass index, and airflow limitation. Our findings suggest that SO is associated with worse physical performance and higher systemic inflammatory burden compared with other body composition phenotypes in patients with COPD. ClinicalTrials.gov no. NCT00292552. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Divergent Effects of Neutrophils on Fas-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation, Apoptosis, and Lung Damage.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Bastian; Hönle, Theresia; Kellermann, Philipp; Ayala, Alfred; Perl, Mario

    2017-02-01

    Pulmonary Fas activation is essential in the pathogenesis of the acute respiratory distress syndrome. It remains unclear whether Fas-induced lung injury is dependent on neutrophils or mainly triggered by epithelial cell apoptosis. The contribution of lung epithelial cells (LEC) and alveolar macrophages (AM) remains elusive.Mice were neutrophil reduced prior to intratracheal instillation of Fas-activating (Jo2) or isotype antibody for 6 or 18 h. LEC and AM were incubated with Jo2 and in the presence of nuclear factor kappa B, p-38 mitogen activated protein kinase (p38MAPK), or extracellular signal regulating kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) inhibitors. Cytokines were assessed by cytometric bead array or ELISA. Apoptosis was quantified via active caspase-3 Western blotting and Terminal Deoxynucleotide Transferase dUTP Nick End Labeling (TUNEL). Lung injury was assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) protein concentration and lung histology.KC, IL-6, and MCP-1 were markedly increased in lung, plasma, and BALF 18 h after Jo2 in the presence of neutrophils; in neutrophil-reduced mice lungs, MCP-1, but not KC or IL-6, was even further enhanced. Six hours after Jo2, BALF protein was markedly increased only in the presence of neutrophils. Apoptosis remained unaffected by neutrophil reduction. AM released MCP-1 and underwent apoptosis at lower concentrations of Jo2 than LEC. Inhibition of p38MAPK significantly increased, while inhibition of ERK1/2 reduced AM and LEC apoptosis.In conclusion, neutrophils are a necessary component of Fas-induced lung damage, while not affecting lung apoptosis directly per se. LEC display higher resistance to Fas-triggered inflammation and apoptosis than AM.

  14. Mycobacterium tuberculosis manipulates pulmonary APCs subverting early immune responses.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Romo, Gina S; Pedroza-Gonzalez, Alexander; Lambrecht, Bart N; Aguilar-Leon, Diana; Estrada-Garcia, Iris; Hernandez-Pando, Rogelio; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo

    2013-03-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) and dendritic cells (DCs) are the main antigen presenting cells (APCs) in the respiratory tract. Whereas macrophages have been extensively studied in tuberculosis, in situ interactions of DC with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) are poorly explored. We aimed to characterize lung APCs during pulmonary tuberculosis in Balb/C mice infected with Mtb H37Rv. Mtb-infection via the airways induced a delayed and continuous accumulation of DCs and AM in the lungs. While lung DCs increased after day 3 post-infection, macrophages increased after 2-3 weeks. Although both populations accumulated in lungs during the infection, DCs decreased in the late stages. Infection induced differential expression of co-stimulatory molecules in these lung APCs, decreasing to basal levels in both APCs in the late stages. A remarkable segregation was found regarding bacillary burden. Many macrophages contained numerous bacilli, but DC contained scarce mycobacteria or none. Mtb-infection also induced delayed accumulation of DC in draining lymph nodes. This delayed recruitment was not associated with a lack of IL-12p40, which was detected from day 3 post-infection. Although AM and lung DCs behave differently during pulmonary tuberculosis, Mtb apparently manipulates both lung APCs subverting early protective responses resulting in disease progression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Neurodevelopment: The Impact of Nutrition and Inflammation During Early to Middle Childhood in Low Resource Settings

    PubMed Central

    John, Chandy C.; Black, Maureen M.; Nelson, Charles A.

    2017-01-01

    The early to middle childhood years are a critical period for child neurodevelopment. Nutritional deficiencies, infection and inflammation are major contributors to impaired child neurodevelopment in these years, particularly in low resource settings. This review identifies global research priorities relating to nutrition, infection, and inflammation in early to middle childhood neurodevelopment. Research priority areas identified include: 1) assessment of how nutrition, infection or inflammation in the pre-conception, prenatal and infancy periods (or interventions in these periods) affect function in early to middle childhood; 2) assessment of whether effects of nutritional interventions vary by poverty or inflammation; 3) determination of the feasibility of pre-school and school-based integrated nutritional interventions; 4) improved assessment of the epidemiology of infection- and inflammation-related neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI); 5) identification of mechanisms through which infection causes NDI; 6) identification of non-infectious causes of inflammation-related NDI and interventions for causes already identified (e.g, environmental factors); and 7) studies on the effects of interactions between nutritional, infectious and inflammatory factors on neurodevelopment in early to middle childhood. Areas of emerging importance which require further study include the effects of maternal Zika virus infection, childhood environmental enteropathy, and alterations in the child’s microbiome on neurodevelopment in early to middle childhood. Research in these key areas will be critical to the development of interventions to optimize the neurodevelopmental potential of children worldwide in the early to middle childhood years. PMID:28562249

  16. MTOR Suppresses Cigarette Smoke-Induced Epithelial Cell Death and Airway Inflammation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Liu, Juan; Zhou, Jie-Sen; Huang, Hua-Qiong; Li, Zhou-Yang; Xu, Xu-Chen; Lai, Tian-Wen; Hu, Yue; Zhou, Hong-Bin; Chen, Hai-Pin; Ying, Song-Min; Li, Wen; Shen, Hua-Hao; Chen, Zhi-Hua

    2018-04-15

    Airway epithelial cell death and inflammation are pathological features of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR) is involved in inflammation and multiple cellular processes, e.g., autophagy and apoptosis, but little is known about its function in COPD pathogenesis. In this article, we illustrate how MTOR regulates cigarette smoke (CS)-induced cell death, airway inflammation, and emphysema. Expression of MTOR was significantly decreased and its suppressive signaling protein, tuberous sclerosis 2 (TSC2), was increased in the airway epithelium of human COPD and in mouse lungs with chronic CS exposure. In human bronchial epithelial cells, CS extract (CSE) activated TSC2, inhibited MTOR, and induced autophagy. The TSC2-MTOR axis orchestrated CSE-induced autophagy, apoptosis, and necroptosis in human bronchial epithelial cells; all of which cooperatively regulated CSE-induced inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8 through the NF-κB pathway. Mice with a specific knockdown of Mtor in bronchial or alveolar epithelial cells exhibited significantly augmented airway inflammation and airspace enlargement in response to CS exposure, accompanied with enhanced levels of autophagy, apoptosis, and necroptosis in the lungs. Taken together, these data demonstrate that MTOR suppresses CS-induced inflammation and emphysema-likely through modulation of autophagy, apoptosis, and necroptosis-and thus suggest that activation of MTOR may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for COPD. Copyright © 2018 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  17. An alteration of the gut-liver axis drives pulmonary inflammation after intoxication and burn injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Michael M.; Zahs, Anita; Brown, Mary M.; Ramirez, Luis; Turner, Jerrold R.; Choudhry, Mashkoor A.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately half of all adult burn patients are intoxicated at the time of their injury and have worse clinical outcomes than those without prior alcohol exposure. This study tested the hypothesis that intoxication alters the gut-liver axis, leading to increased pulmonary inflammation mediated by burn-induced IL-6 in the liver. C57BL/6 mice were given 1.2 g/kg ethanol 30 min prior to a 15% total body surface area burn. To restore gut barrier function, the specific myosin light chain kinase inhibitor membrane-permeant inhibitor of kinase (PIK), which we have demonstrated to reduce bacterial translocation from the gut, was administered 30 min after injury. Limiting bacterial translocation with PIK attenuated hepatic damage as measured by a 47% reduction in serum alanine aminotransferase (P < 0.05), as well as a 33% reduction in hepatic IL-6 mRNA expression (P < 0.05), compared with intoxicated and burn-injured mice without PIK. This mitigation of hepatic damage was associated with a 49% decline in pulmonary neutrophil infiltration (P < 0.05) and decreased alveolar wall thickening compared with matched controls. These results were reproduced by prophylactic reduction of the bacterial load in the intestines with oral antibiotics before intoxication and burn injury. Overall, these data suggest that the gut-liver axis is deranged when intoxication precedes burn injury and that limiting bacterial translocation in this setting attenuates hepatic damage and pulmonary inflammation. PMID:25104501

  18. Oxidative stress–induced mitochondrial dysfunction drives inflammation and airway smooth muscle remodeling in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Wiegman, Coen H.; Michaeloudes, Charalambos; Haji, Gulammehdi; Narang, Priyanka; Clarke, Colin J.; Russell, Kirsty E.; Bao, Wuping; Pavlidis, Stelios; Barnes, Peter J.; Kanerva, Justin; Bittner, Anton; Rao, Navin; Murphy, Michael P.; Kirkham, Paul A.; Chung, Kian Fan; Adcock, Ian M.; Brightling, Christopher E.; Davies, Donna E.; Finch, Donna K.; Fisher, Andrew J.; Gaw, Alasdair; Knox, Alan J.; Mayer, Ruth J.; Polkey, Michael; Salmon, Michael; Singh, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Inflammation and oxidative stress play critical roles in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Mitochondrial oxidative stress might be involved in driving the oxidative stress–induced pathology. Objective We sought to determine the effects of oxidative stress on mitochondrial function in the pathophysiology of airway inflammation in ozone-exposed mice and human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. Methods Mice were exposed to ozone, and lung inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and mitochondrial function were determined. Human ASM cells were isolated from bronchial biopsy specimens from healthy subjects, smokers, and patients with COPD. Inflammation and mitochondrial function in mice and human ASM cells were measured with and without the presence of the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ. Results Mice exposed to ozone, a source of oxidative stress, had lung inflammation and AHR associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and reflected by decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), increased mitochondrial oxidative stress, and reduced mitochondrial complex I, III, and V expression. Reversal of mitochondrial dysfunction by the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ reduced inflammation and AHR. ASM cells from patients with COPD have reduced ΔΨm, adenosine triphosphate content, complex expression, basal and maximum respiration levels, and respiratory reserve capacity compared with those from healthy control subjects, whereas mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were increased. Healthy smokers were intermediate between healthy nonsmokers and patients with COPD. Hydrogen peroxide induced mitochondrial dysfunction in ASM cells from healthy subjects. MitoQ and Tiron inhibited TGF-β–induced ASM cell proliferation and CXCL8 release. Conclusions Mitochondrial dysfunction in patients with COPD is associated with excessive mitochondrial ROS levels, which contribute to enhanced inflammation and cell

  19. Radiographic Evidence of Sinonasal Inflammation in Asthma-Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Overlap Syndrome: An Underrecognized Association.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Satoshi; Tatsumi, Shuji; Kobayashi, Yoshiki; Matsumoto, Hisako; Yasuba, Hirotaka

    Sinonasal inflammation on both clinical examinations and imaging significantly impacts both asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The objective of this study was to examine the association between sinonasal inflammation and asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). A total of 112 patients with a ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s to forced vital capacity of less than 70% were enrolled. COPD, asthma, and ACOS were clinically diagnosed according to the 2014 Global Initiative for Asthma and Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease guidelines. Sinonasal inflammatory condition was evaluated using sinus computed tomography, and its severity was assessed according to the Lund-Mackay staging (LMS) system. Ethmoid sinus-dominant shadow was defined as the presence of greater LMS scores for the anterior and posterior ethmoid sinuses than for the maxillary sinus. COPD, asthma, and ACOS were diagnosed in 55 (49.1%), 39 (34.8%), and 18 patients (16.1%), respectively. The frequency of radiographic evidence of sinonasal inflammation in patients with COPD, asthma, ACOS was 60.0%, 94.9%, and 72.2%, respectively. Patients with ACOS and COPD had only mild radiographic evidence of sinonasal inflammation (LMS score, 1-7), whereas moderate (LMS score, 8-11) and severe (LMS score, ≥12) radiographic evidence of sinonasal inflammation were detected only in patients with asthma. Furthermore, the frequency of ethmoid sinus-dominant shadow was significantly higher in patients with asthma than in those with COPD and ACOS. Radiographic evidence of sinonasal inflammation was a common comorbidity in ACOS. Future studies are required to examine the role of sinonasal inflammation in ACOS. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction drives inflammation and airway smooth muscle remodeling in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Wiegman, Coen H; Michaeloudes, Charalambos; Haji, Gulammehdi; Narang, Priyanka; Clarke, Colin J; Russell, Kirsty E; Bao, Wuping; Pavlidis, Stelios; Barnes, Peter J; Kanerva, Justin; Bittner, Anton; Rao, Navin; Murphy, Michael P; Kirkham, Paul A; Chung, Kian Fan; Adcock, Ian M

    2015-09-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress play critical roles in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Mitochondrial oxidative stress might be involved in driving the oxidative stress-induced pathology. We sought to determine the effects of oxidative stress on mitochondrial function in the pathophysiology of airway inflammation in ozone-exposed mice and human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. Mice were exposed to ozone, and lung inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and mitochondrial function were determined. Human ASM cells were isolated from bronchial biopsy specimens from healthy subjects, smokers, and patients with COPD. Inflammation and mitochondrial function in mice and human ASM cells were measured with and without the presence of the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ. Mice exposed to ozone, a source of oxidative stress, had lung inflammation and AHR associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and reflected by decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), increased mitochondrial oxidative stress, and reduced mitochondrial complex I, III, and V expression. Reversal of mitochondrial dysfunction by the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ reduced inflammation and AHR. ASM cells from patients with COPD have reduced ΔΨm, adenosine triphosphate content, complex expression, basal and maximum respiration levels, and respiratory reserve capacity compared with those from healthy control subjects, whereas mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were increased. Healthy smokers were intermediate between healthy nonsmokers and patients with COPD. Hydrogen peroxide induced mitochondrial dysfunction in ASM cells from healthy subjects. MitoQ and Tiron inhibited TGF-β-induced ASM cell proliferation and CXCL8 release. Mitochondrial dysfunction in patients with COPD is associated with excessive mitochondrial ROS levels, which contribute to enhanced inflammation and cell hyperproliferation. Targeting mitochondrial ROS represents

  1. A Review of Pulmonary Toxicity of Electronic Cigarettes in the Context of Smoking: A Focus on Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Shields, Peter G; Berman, Micah; Brasky, Theodore M; Freudenheim, Jo L; Mathe, Ewy; McElroy, Joseph P; Song, Min-Ae; Wewers, Mark D

    2017-08-01

    The use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigs) is increasing rapidly, but their effects on lung toxicity are largely unknown. Smoking is a well-established cause of lung cancer and respiratory disease, in part through inflammation. It is plausible that e-cig use might affect similar inflammatory pathways. E-cigs are used by some smokers as an aid for quitting or smoking reduction, and by never smokers (e.g., adolescents and young adults). The relative effects for impacting disease risk may differ for these groups. Cell culture and experimental animal data indicate that e-cigs have the potential for inducing inflammation, albeit much less than smoking. Human studies show that e-cig use in smokers is associated with substantial reductions in blood or urinary biomarkers of tobacco toxicants when completely switching and somewhat for dual use. However, the extent to which these biomarkers are surrogates for potential lung toxicity remains unclear. The FDA now has regulatory authority over e-cigs and can regulate product and e-liquid design features, such as nicotine content and delivery, voltage, e-liquid formulations, and flavors. All of these factors may impact pulmonary toxicity. This review summarizes current data on pulmonary inflammation related to both smoking and e-cig use, with a focus on human lung biomarkers. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(8); 1175-91. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Bone marrow transplantation reveals an essential synergy between neuronal and hemopoietic cell neurokinin production in pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chavolla-Calderón, Mara; Bayer, Meggan K; Fontán, J Julio Pérez

    2003-04-01

    Neurogenic inflammation is believed to originate with the antidromic release of substance P, and of other neurokinins encoded by the preprotachykinin A (PPT-A) gene, from unmyelinated nerve fibers (C-fibers) following noxious stimuli. Consistent with this concept, we show here that selective sensory-fiber denervation with capsaicin and targeted deletion of the PPT-A gene protect murine lungs against both immune complex-mediated and stretch-mediated injuries. Reconstitution of PPT-A gene-deleted mice with WT bone marrow does not abrogate this protection, demonstrating a critical role for PPT-A gene expression by sensory neurons in pulmonary inflammation. Surprisingly, reconstitution of WT mice with PPT-A gene-deficient bone marrow also confers protection against pulmonary injury, revealing that PPT-A gene expression in hemopoietic cells has a previously unanticipated essential role in tissue injury. Taken together, these findings demonstrate a critical synergy between capsaicin-sensitive sensory fibers and hemopoietic cells in neurokinin-mediated inflammation and suggest that such synergy may be the basis for a stereotypical mechanism of response to injury in the respiratory tract.

  3. Bone marrow transplantation reveals an essential synergy between neuronal and hemopoietic cell neurokinin production in pulmonary inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chavolla-Calderón, Mara; Bayer, Meggan K.; Fontán, J. Julio Pérez

    2003-01-01

    Neurogenic inflammation is believed to originate with the antidromic release of substance P, and of other neurokinins encoded by the preprotachykinin A (PPT-A) gene, from unmyelinated nerve fibers (C-fibers) following noxious stimuli. Consistent with this concept, we show here that selective sensory-fiber denervation with capsaicin and targeted deletion of the PPT-A gene protect murine lungs against both immune complex–mediated and stretch-mediated injuries. Reconstitution of PPT-A gene–deleted mice with WT bone marrow does not abrogate this protection, demonstrating a critical role for PPT-A gene expression by sensory neurons in pulmonary inflammation. Surprisingly, reconstitution of WT mice with PPT-A gene–deficient bone marrow also confers protection against pulmonary injury, revealing that PPT-A gene expression in hemopoietic cells has a previously unanticipated essential role in tissue injury. Taken together, these findings demonstrate a critical synergy between capsaicin-sensitive sensory fibers and hemopoietic cells in neurokinin-mediated inflammation and suggest that such synergy may be the basis for a stereotypical mechanism of response to injury in the respiratory tract. PMID:12671046

  4. Inflammation responses in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in an intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiu-Yue; Han, Fen; Pan, Li-Ping; Jia, Hong-Yan; Li, Qi; Zhang, Zong-De

    2018-01-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains a global problem. Inflammatory responses are the primary characteristics of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in intensive care units (ICU). The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical importance of inflammatory cells and factors for patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in ICU. A total of 124 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in ICU were recruited for the present study. The inflammatory responses in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in ICU were examined by changes in inflammatory cells and factors in the serum. The results indicated that serum levels of lymphocytes, plasma cells, granulocytes and monocytes were increased in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in ICU compared with healthy controls. The serum levels of inflammatory factors interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, and IL-4 were upregulated in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in ICU. Lower plasma concentrations of IL-2, IL-15 and interferon-γ were detected in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis compared with healthy controls. It was demonstrated that high mobility group box-1 protein expression levels were higher in the serum of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis compared with healthy controls. Notably, an imbalance of T-helper cell (Th)1/Th2 cytokines was observed in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. Pulmonary tuberculosis caused by M. tuberculosis also upregulated expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-9 in hPMCs. In conclusion, these outcomes demonstrated that inflammatory responses and inflammatory factors are associated with the progression of pulmonary tuberculosis, suggesting that inhibition of inflammatory responses and inflammatory factors may be beneficial for the treatment of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis in ICU. PMID:29456674

  5. In obese mice, exercise training increases 11β-HSD1 expression, contributing to glucocorticoid activation and suppression of pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Du, Shu-Fang; Yu, Qing; Chuan, Kai; Ye, Chang-Lin; He, Ze-Jia; Liu, Shu-Juan; Zhu, Xiao-Yan; Liu, Yu-Jian

    2017-10-01

    Exercise training is advocated for treating chronic inflammation and obesity-related metabolic syndromes. Glucocorticoids (GCs), the anti-inflammatory hormones, are synthesized or metabolized in extra-adrenal organs. This study aims to examine whether exercise training affects obesity-associated pulmonary inflammation by regulating local GC synthesis or metabolism. We found that sedentary obese ( ob/ob ) mice exhibited increased levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-18, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1, and leukocyte infiltration in lung tissues compared with lean mice, which was alleviated by 6 wk of exercise training. Pulmonary corticosterone levels were decreased in ob/ob mice. Exercise training increased pulmonary corticosterone levels in both lean and ob/ob mice. Pulmonary corticosterone levels were negatively correlated with IL-1β, IL-18, and MCP-1. Immunohistochemical staining of the adult mouse lung sections revealed positive immunoreactivities for the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, the cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11A1), the steroid 21-hydroxylase (CYP21), 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD), and type 1 and type 2 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD) but not for 11β-hydroxylase (CYP11B1). Exercise training significantly increased pulmonary 11β-HSD1 expression in both lean and ob/ob mice. In contrast, exercise training per se had no effect on pulmonary 11β-HSD2 expression, although pulmonary 11β-HSD2 levels in ob/ob mice were significantly higher than in lean mice. RU486, a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, blocked the anti-inflammatory effects of exercise training in lung tissues of obese mice and increased inflammatory cytokines in lean exercised mice. These findings indicate that exercise training increases pulmonary expression of 11β-HSD1, thus contributing to local GC activation and suppression of pulmonary inflammation in obese mice. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Treadmill training leads to a significant increase in

  6. Early Detection of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Seiichi; Hanagama, Masakazu; Yanai, Masaru

    2017-12-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of an early detection program for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in a primary care setting in Japan. Methods Participants of ≥40 years of age who regularly visited a general practitioner's clinic due to chronic disease were asked to complete a COPD screening questionnaire (COPD Population Screener; COPD-PS) and undergo simplified spirometry using a handheld spirometric device. Patients who showed possible COPD were referred to a respiratory specialist and underwent a detailed examination that included spirometry and chest radiography. Results A total of 111 patients with possible COPD were referred for close examination. Among these patients, 27 patients were newly diagnosed with COPD. The patients with COPD were older, had lower BMI values, and had a longer smoking history in comparison to non-COPD patients. COPD patients also had more comorbid conditions. A diagnosis of COPD was significantly associated with a high COPD-PS score (p<0.001) and the detection of possible airflow limitation evaluated by the handheld spirometric device (p<0.01). An ROC curve analysis demonstrated that 5 points was the best COPD-PS cut-off value for the diagnosis of COPD. The combination of both tools showed 40.7% of sensitivity and 96.4% of specificity. Conclusion The use of the COPD-PS plus a handheld spirometric device could facilitate the early detection of undiagnosed COPD in primary care.

  7. Psoralidin, a dual inhibitor of COX-2 and 5-LOX, regulates ionizing radiation (IR)-induced pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hee Jung; Youn, HyeSook; Seong, Ki Moon; Yun, Young Ju; Kim, Wanyeon; Kim, Young Ha; Lee, Ji Young; Kim, Cha Soon; Jin, Young-Woo; Youn, BuHyun

    2011-09-01

    Radiotherapy is the most significant non-surgical cure for the elimination of tumor, however it is restricted by two major problems: radioresistance and normal tissue damage. Efficiency improvement on radiotherapy is demanded to achieve cancer treatment. We focused on radiation-induced normal cell damage, and are concerned about inflammation reported to act as a main limiting factor in the radiotherapy. Psoralidin, a coumestan derivative isolated from the seed of Psoralea corylifolia, has been studied for anti-cancer and anti-bacterial properties. However, little is known regarding its effects on IR-induced pulmonary inflammation. The aim of this study is to investigate mechanisms of IR-induced inflammation and to examine therapeutic mechanisms of psoralidin in human normal lung fibroblasts and mice. Here, we demonstrated that IR-induced ROS activated cyclooxygenases-2 (COX-2) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) pathway in HFL-1 and MRC-5 cells. Psoralidin inhibited the IR-induced COX-2 expression and PGE(2) production through regulation of PI3K/Akt and NF-κB pathway. Also, psoralidin blocked IR-induced LTB(4) production, and it was due to direct interaction of psoralidin and 5-lipoxygenase activating protein (FLAP) in 5-LOX pathway. IR-induced fibroblast migration was notably attenuated in the presence of psoralidin. Moreover, in vivo results from mouse lung indicate that psoralidin suppresses IR-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, TGF-β, IL-6 and IL-1 α/β) and ICAM-1. Taken together, our findings reveal a regulatory mechanism of IR-induced pulmonary inflammation in human normal lung fibroblast and mice, and suggest that psoralidin may be useful as a potential lead compound for development of a better radiopreventive agent against radiation-induced normal tissue injury. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. PULMONARY INJURY AND INFLAMMATION FROM REPEATED EXPOSURE TO SOLUBLE COMPONENTS AND SOLID PARTICULATE MATTER (PM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pulmonary injury from acute exposures to PM and the role of soluble versus insoluble PM have received considerable attention; however, their long-term impacts are less well understood. This study compared pulmonary injury and inflammatory responses from repeated exposure to solub...

  9. Role of intestinal inflammation as an early event in obesity and insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shengli; Lund, Pauline K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review To highlight recent evidence supporting a concept that intestinal inflammation is a mediator or contributor to development of obesity and insulin resistance. Recent findings Current views suggest that obesity-associated systemic and adipose tissue inflammation promote insulin resistance, which underlies many obesity-linked health risks. Diet-induced changes in gut microbiota also contribute to obesity. Recent findings support a concept that high fat diet and bacteria interact to promote early inflammatory changes in the small intestine that contribute to development of or susceptibility to obesity and insulin resistance. This review summarizes the evidence supporting a role of intestinal inflammation in diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance and discusses mechanisms. Summary The role of diet-induced intestinal inflammation as an early biomarker and mediator of obesity, and insulin resistance warrants further study. PMID:21587067

  10. Association of air pollution sources and aldehydes with biomarkers of blood coagulation, pulmonary inflammation, and systemic oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Altemose, Brent; Robson, Mark G; Kipen, Howard M; Ohman Strickland, Pamela; Meng, Qingyu; Gong, Jicheng; Huang, Wei; Wang, Guangfa; Rich, David Q; Zhu, Tong; Zhang, Junfeng

    2017-05-01

    Using data collected before, during, and after the 2008 Summer Olympic Games in Beijing, this study examines associations between biomarkers of blood coagulation (vWF, sCD62P and sCD40L), pulmonary inflammation (EBC pH, EBC nitrite, and eNO), and systemic oxidative stress (urinary 8-OHdG) with sources of air pollution identified utilizing principal component analysis and with concentrations of three aldehydes of health concern. Associations between the biomarkers and the air pollution source types and aldehydes were examined using a linear mixed effects model, regressing through seven lag days and controlling for ambient temperature, relative humidity, gender, and day of week for the biomarker measurements. The biomarkers for pulmonary inflammation, particularly EBC pH and eNO, were most consistently associated with vehicle and industrial combustion, oil combustion, and vegetative burning. The biomarkers for blood coagulation, particularly vWF and sCD62p, were most consistently associated with oil combustion. Systemic oxidative stress biomarker (8-OHdG) was most consistently associated with vehicle and industrial combustion. The associations of the biomarkers were generally not significant or consistent with secondary formation of pollutants and with the aldehydes. The findings support policies to control anthropogenic pollution sources rather than natural soil or road dust from a cardio-respiratory health standpoint.

  11. Adrenergic and steroid hormone modulation of ozone-induced pulmonary injury and inflammation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: We have shown that acute ozone inhalation promotes activation of the sympathetic and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis leading to release of cortisol and epinephrine from the adrenals. Adrenalectomy (ADREX) inhibits ozone-induced pulmonary vascular leakage and ...

  12. Early detection and management of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Humbert, Marc; Gerry Coghlan, J; Khanna, Dinesh

    2012-12-01

    The long-term prognosis for patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) remains poor, despite advances in treatment options that have been made in the past few decades. Recent evidence suggests that World Health Organization functional class I or II patients have significantly better long-term survival rates than patients in higher functional classes, thus providing a rationale for earlier diagnosis and treatment of PAH. However, early diagnosis is challenging and there is frequently a delay between symptom onset and diagnosis. Screening programmes play an important role in PAH detection and expert opinion favours echocardiographic screening of asymptomatic patients who may be predisposed to the development of PAH (i.e. those with systemic sclerosis or sickle cell disease), although current guidelines only recommend annual echocardiographic screening in symptomatic patients. This article reviews the currently available screening programmes, including their limitations, and describes alternative screening approaches that may identify more effectively those patients who require right heart catheterisation for a definitive PAH diagnosis.

  13. Early-life enteric infections: relation between chronic systemic inflammation and poor cognition in children

    PubMed Central

    Murray-Kolb, Laura E.; Scharf, Rebecca J.; Pendergast, Laura L.; Lang, Dennis R.; Kolling, Glynis L.; Guerrant, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota undergoes active remodeling in the first 6 to 18 months of life, during which time the characteristics of the adult microbiota are developed. This process is strongly influenced by the early diet and enteric pathogens. Enteric infections and malnutrition early in life may favor microbiota dysbiosis and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, resulting in intestinal barrier dysfunction and translocation of intestinal bacterial products, ultimately leading to low-grade, chronic, subclinical systemic inflammation. The leaky gut–derived low-grade systemic inflammation may have profound consequences on the gut–liver–brain axis, compromising normal growth, metabolism, and cognitive development. This review examines recent data suggesting that early-life enteric infections that lead to intestinal barrier disruption may shift the intestinal microbiota toward chronic systemic inflammation and subsequent impaired cognitive development. PMID:27142301

  14. Early Macrophage Recruitment and Alternative Activation Are Critical for the Later Development of Hypoxia-induced Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Vergadi, Eleni; Chang, Mun Seog; Lee, Changjin; Liang, Olin; Liu, Xianlan; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Angeles; Mitsialis, S. Alex; Kourembanas, Stella

    2011-01-01

    Background Lung inflammation precedes the development of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (HPH); however its role in the pathogenesis of HPH is poorly understood. We sought to characterize the hypoxic inflammatory response and elucidate its role in the development of HPH. We also aimed to investigate the mechanisms by which heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an anti-inflammatory enzyme, is protective in HPH. Methods and Results We generated bitransgenic mice that overexpress human HO-1 under doxycycline (dox) control in an inducible, lung-specific manner. Hypoxic exposure of mice in the absence of dox resulted in early transient accumulation of monocytes/macrophages in the bronchoalveolar lavage. Alveolar macrophages acquired an alternatively activated phenotype (M2) in response to hypoxia, characterized by the expression of Found in Inflammatory Zone-1, Arginase-1 and Chitinase-3-like-3. A brief, two-day pulse of dox delayed but did not prevent the peak of hypoxic inflammation, and could not protect from HPH. In contrast, a seven-day dox treatment sustained high HO-1 levels during the entire period of hypoxic inflammation, inhibited macrophage accumulation and activation, induced macrophage IL-10 expression, and prevented the development of HPH. Supernatants from hypoxic M2 macrophages promoted proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells while treatment with carbon monoxide, a HO-1 enzymatic product, abrogated this effect. Conclusions Early recruitment and alternative activation of macrophages in hypoxic lungs is critical for the later development of HPH. HO-1 may confer protection from HPH by effectively modifing macrophage activation state in hypoxia. PMID:21518986

  15. The novel compound Sul-121 inhibits airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in experimental models of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Han, Bing; Poppinga, Wilfred J.; Zuo, Haoxiao; Zuidhof, Annet B.; Bos, I. Sophie T.; Smit, Marieke; Vogelaar, Pieter; Krenning, Guido; Henning, Robert H.; Maarsingh, Harm; Halayko, Andrew J.; van Vliet, Bernard; Stienstra, Stef; Graaf, Adrianus Cornelis van der; Meurs, Herman; Schmidt, Martina

    2016-01-01

    COPD is characterized by persistent airflow limitation, neutrophilia and oxidative stress from endogenous and exogenous insults. Current COPD therapy involving anticholinergics, β2-adrenoceptor agonists and/or corticosteroids, do not specifically target oxidative stress, nor do they reduce chronic pulmonary inflammation and disease progression in all patients. Here, we explore the effects of Sul-121, a novel compound with anti-oxidative capacity, on hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and inflammation in experimental models of COPD. Using a guinea pig model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neutrophilia, we demonstrated that Sul-121 inhalation dose-dependently prevented LPS-induced airway neutrophilia (up to ~60%) and AHR (up to ~90%). Non-cartilaginous airways neutrophilia was inversely correlated with blood H2S, and LPS-induced attenuation of blood H2S (~60%) was prevented by Sul-121. Concomitantly, Sul-121 prevented LPS-induced production of the oxidative stress marker, malondialdehyde by ~80%. In immortalized human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, Sul-121 dose-dependently prevented cigarette smoke extract-induced IL-8 release parallel with inhibition of nuclear translocation of the NF-κB subunit, p65 (each ~90%). Sul-121 also diminished cellular reactive oxygen species production in ASM cells, and inhibited nuclear translocation of the anti-oxidative response regulator, Nrf2. Our data show that Sul-121 effectively inhibits airway inflammation and AHR in experimental COPD models, prospectively through inhibition of oxidative stress. PMID:27229886

  16. Innate Lymphoid Cells Mediate Pulmonary Eosinophilic Inflammation, Airway Mucous Cell Metaplasia, and Type 2 Immunity in Mice Exposed to Ozone.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Kazuyoshi; Lewandowski, Ryan P; Jackson-Humbles, Daven N; Buglak, Nicholas; Li, Ning; White, Kaylin; Van Dyken, Steven J; Wagner, James G; Harkema, Jack R

    2017-08-01

    Exposure to elevated levels of ambient ozone in photochemical smog is associated with eosinophilic airway inflammation and nonatopic asthma in children. In the present study, we determined the role of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) in the pathogenesis of ozone-induced nonatopic asthma by using lymphoid cell-sufficient C57BL/6 mice, ILC-sufficient Rag2 -/- mice (devoid of T and B cells), and ILC-deficient Rag2 -/- Il2rg -/- mice (depleted of all lymphoid cells including ILCs). Mice were exposed to 0 or 0.8 parts per million ozone for 1 day or 9 consecutive weekdays (4 hr/day). A single exposure to ozone caused neutrophilic inflammation, airway epithelial injury, and reparative DNA synthesis in all strains of mice, irrespective of the presence or absence of ILCs. In contrast, 9-day exposures induced eosinophilic inflammation and mucous cell metaplasia only in the lungs of ILC-sufficient mice. Repeated ozone exposures also elicited increased messenger RNA expression of transcripts associated with type 2 immunity and airway mucus production in ILC-sufficient mice. ILC-deficient mice repeatedly exposed to ozone had no pulmonary pathology or increased gene expression related to type 2 immunity. These results suggest a new paradigm for the biologic mechanisms underlying the development of a phenotype of childhood nonatopic asthma that has been linked to ambient ozone exposures.

  17. Serum amyloid A opposes lipoxin A₄ to mediate glucocorticoid refractory lung inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Bozinovski, Steven; Uddin, Mohib; Vlahos, Ross; Thompson, Michelle; McQualter, Jonathan L; Merritt, Anne-Sophie; Wark, Peter A B; Hutchinson, Anastasia; Irving, Louis B; Levy, Bruce D; Anderson, Gary P

    2012-01-17

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) will soon be the third most common cause of death globally. Despite smoking cessation, neutrophilic mucosal inflammation persistently damages the airways and fails to protect from recurrent infections. This maladaptive and excess inflammation is also refractory to glucocorticosteroids (GC). Here, we identify serum amyloid A (SAA) as a candidate mediator of GC refractory inflammation in COPD. Extrahepatic SAA was detected locally in COPD bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, which correlated with IL-8 and neutrophil elastase, consistent with neutrophil recruitment and activation. Immunohistochemistry detected SAA was in close proximity to airway epithelium, and in vitro SAA triggered release of IL-8 and other proinflammatory mediators by airway epithelial cells in an ALX/FPR2 (formyl peptide receptor 2) receptor-dependent manner. Lipoxin A(4) (LXA(4)) can also interact with ALX/FPR2 receptors and lead to allosteric inhibition of SAA-initiated epithelial responses (pA(2) 13 nM). During acute exacerbation, peripheral blood SAA levels increased dramatically and were disproportionately increased relative to LXA(4). Human lung macrophages (CD68(+)) colocalized with SAA and GCs markedly increased SAA in vitro (THP-1, pEC(50) 43 nM). To determine its direct actions, SAA was administered into murine lung, leading to induction of CXC chemokine ligand 1/2 and a neutrophilic response that was inhibited by 15-epi-LXA(4) but not dexamethasone. Taken together, these findings identify SAA as a therapeutic target for inhibition and implicate SAA as a mediator of GC-resistant lung inflammation that can overwhelm organ protective signaling by lipoxins at ALX/FPR2 receptors.

  18. Non-invasive biomarkers of pulmonary damage and inflammation: Application to children exposed to ozone and trichloramine

    SciT

    Bernard, Alfred; Carbonnelle, Sylviane; Nickmilder, Marc

    2005-08-07

    To date, airways injury or inflammation caused by air pollutants has been evaluated mainly by analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage, an invasive technique totally unsuitable to children. The assessment of respiratory risks in this particularly vulnerable population has thus for a long time relied on spirometric tests and self-reported symptoms which are relatively late and inaccurate indicators of lung damage. Research in the field of biomarkers is now opening new perspectives with the development of non-invasive tests allowing to monitor inflammation and damage in the deep lung. Blood tests measuring lung-specific proteins (pneumoproteins) such as Clara cell protein (CC16) and surfactant-associatedmore » proteins (A, B or D) are now available to evaluate the permeability and/or the cellular integrity of the pulmonary epithelium. The application of these tests to children has recently led to the discovery of a lung epithelium hyperpermeability caused by trichloramine (nitrogen trichloride), an irritant gas contaminating the air of indoor-chlorinated pools. Serum CC16 can also serve to detect increases of airway permeability during short-term exposures to ambient ozone. Indicators measurable in exhaled air such as nitric oxide (NO) appear more useful to detect airway inflammation. By applying the exhaled NO test to children attending summer camps, we recently found that ambient ozone produces an acute inflammatory response in children from levels slightly lower than current air quality guidelines. In a study exploring the links between atopy, asthma, and exposure to chlorination products in indoor pools, we also found that the exhaled NO test can serve to detect the chronic airway inflammation associated with excessive exposure to trichloramine. Lung-specific proteins measurable in serum and markers in exhaled air represent sensitive tools that can be used to assess non-invasively the effects of air pollutants on the respiratory tract of children.« less

  19. [The role of expired air moisture condensate in assessment of pulmonary inflammation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Dotsenko, E K; Goncharova, V A; Kuzubova, N A; Kamenova, M Iu; Egorova, N V

    2008-01-01

    To study biochemical composition of expired air condensate (EAC) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in relation to a phase and severity of the disease and its treatment. EAC was investigated in 18 COPD patients and 9 healthy subjects. Basic broncholytic therapy with ipratropium bromide was combined with beclomethasone and fenspiride in 11 and 7 patients, respectively. The condensate was lyophilised, the residue was solved and analysed on the biochemical analyzer Casis (Beringer Manheim, Rosch). EAC was examined for albumin, C-reactive protein, glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, urea, uric acid, alkaline phosphatase (AP), lactate dehydrogenase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, total calcium, magnesium. Compared to healthy subjects, COPD patients' EAC contains significantly higher levels of albumin, C-reactive protein, calcium, bilirubin and more active AP. Quantitative composition of EAC depends on COPD phase and severity. A negative correlation exists between FEV+AEA-1 and albumin concentration, FEV+AEA-1 and CRP concentration. The anti-inflammatory therapy decreases EAC content of both protein and lipid metabolism products, enzyme activity reflecting attenuation of oxidant and inflammatory processes, stabilization of cell membranes in the respiratory zone. EAC composition reflects metabolic processes in the lungs and can be used for assessment of airway affection, activity of the inflammatory process and COPD treatment efficacy.

  20. Variability in Ozone-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Inflammation in Healthy and Cardiovascular Compromised Rat Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    The molecular bases for variability in air pollutant-induced pulmonary injury due to underlying cardiovascular (CVD) and/or metabolic diseases are unknown. We hypothesized that healthy and genetic CVD-prone rat models will exhibit exacerbated response to acute ozone exposure depe...

  1. Protective effects of tiotropium alone or combined with budesonide against cadmium inhalation induced acute neutrophilic pulmonary inflammation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Jianming; Gustin, Pascal

    2018-01-01

    As a potent bronchodilator, the anti-inflammatory effects of tiotropium and its interaction with budesonide against cadmium-induced acute pulmonary inflammation were investigated. Compared to values obtained in rats exposed to cadmium, cytological analysis indicated a significant decrease of total cell and neutrophil counts and protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in rats pretreated with tiotropium (70μg/15ml or 350μg/15ml). Zymographic tests showed a decrease of MMP-2 activity in BALF in rats pretreated only with high concentration of tiotropium. Histological examination revealed a significant decrease of the severity and extent of inflammatory lung injuries in rats pretreated with both tested concentrations of tiotropium. Though tiotropium (70μg/15ml) or budesonide (250μg/15ml) could not reduce cadmium-induced bronchial hyper-responsiveness, their combination significantly decreased bronchial contractile response to methacholine. These two drugs separately decreased the neutrophil number and protein concentration in BALF but no significant interaction was observed when both drugs were combined. Although no inhibitory effects on MMP-2 and MMP-9 was observed in rats pretreated with budesonide alone, the combination with the ineffective dose of tiotropium induced a significant reduction on these parameters. The inhibitory effect of tiotropium on lung injuries was not influenced by budesonide which alone induced a limited action on the severity and extent of inflammatory sites. Our findings show that tiotropium exerts anti-inflammatory effects on cadmium-induced acute neutrophilic pulmonary inflammation. The combination of tiotropium with budesonide inhibits cadmium-induced inflammatory injuries with a synergistic interaction on MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity and airway hyper-responsiveness. PMID:29489916

  2. Protective effects of tiotropium alone or combined with budesonide against cadmium inhalation induced acute neutrophilic pulmonary inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shiwei; Yang, Qi; Yu, Zhixi; Lv, You; Zhi, Jianming; Gustin, Pascal; Zhang, Wenhui

    2018-01-01

    As a potent bronchodilator, the anti-inflammatory effects of tiotropium and its interaction with budesonide against cadmium-induced acute pulmonary inflammation were investigated. Compared to values obtained in rats exposed to cadmium, cytological analysis indicated a significant decrease of total cell and neutrophil counts and protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in rats pretreated with tiotropium (70μg/15ml or 350μg/15ml). Zymographic tests showed a decrease of MMP-2 activity in BALF in rats pretreated only with high concentration of tiotropium. Histological examination revealed a significant decrease of the severity and extent of inflammatory lung injuries in rats pretreated with both tested concentrations of tiotropium. Though tiotropium (70μg/15ml) or budesonide (250μg/15ml) could not reduce cadmium-induced bronchial hyper-responsiveness, their combination significantly decreased bronchial contractile response to methacholine. These two drugs separately decreased the neutrophil number and protein concentration in BALF but no significant interaction was observed when both drugs were combined. Although no inhibitory effects on MMP-2 and MMP-9 was observed in rats pretreated with budesonide alone, the combination with the ineffective dose of tiotropium induced a significant reduction on these parameters. The inhibitory effect of tiotropium on lung injuries was not influenced by budesonide which alone induced a limited action on the severity and extent of inflammatory sites. Our findings show that tiotropium exerts anti-inflammatory effects on cadmium-induced acute neutrophilic pulmonary inflammation. The combination of tiotropium with budesonide inhibits cadmium-induced inflammatory injuries with a synergistic interaction on MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity and airway hyper-responsiveness.

  3. Pulmonary inflammation induced by subacute ozone is augmented in adiponectin deficient mice: role of IL-17A

    PubMed Central

    Kasahara, David I.; Kim, Hye Y.; Williams, Alison S.; Verbout, Norah G.; Tran, Jennifer; Si, Huiqing; Wurmbrand, Allison P.; Jastrab, Jordan; Hug, Christopher; Umetsu, Dale T.; Shore, Stephanie A.

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary responses to ozone, a common air pollutant, are augmented in obese individuals. Adiponectin, an adipose derived hormone that declines in obesity, has regulatory effects on the immune system. To determine the role of adiponectin in the pulmonary inflammation induced by extended (48–72 h) low dose (0.3 ppm) exposure to ozone, adiponectin deficient (Adipo−/−) and wildtype mice were exposed to ozone or to room air. In wildtype mice, ozone exposure increased total bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) adiponectin. Ozone induced lung inflammation, including increases in BAL neutrophils, protein (an index of lung injury), IL-6, KC, LIX and G-CSF were augmented in Adipo−/− versus wildtype mice. Ozone also increased IL-17A mRNA expression to a greater extent in Adipo−/− versus wildtype mice. Moreover, compared to control antibody, anti-IL-17A antibody attenuated ozone-induced increases in BAL neutrophils and G-CSF in Adipo−/− but not in wildtype mice, suggesting that IL-17A, by promoting G-CSF release, contributed to augmented neutrophilia in Adipo−/− mice. Flow-cytometric analysis of lung cells revealed that the number of CD45+/F4/80+/IL-17A+ macrophages and γδ T cells expressing IL-17A increased after ozone exposure in wildtype mice, and further increased in Adipo−/− mice. The IL-17+ macrophages were CD11c− (interstitial macrophages), whereas CD11c+ macrophages (alveolar macrophages) did not express IL-17A. Taken together, the data are consistent with the hypothesis that adiponectin protects against neutrophil recruitment induced by extended, low dose ozone exposure by inhibiting the induction and/or recruitment of IL-17A in interstitial macrophages and/or γδ T cells. PMID:22474022

  4. Dietary long-chain omega-3 fatty acids do not diminish eosinophilic pulmonary inflammation in mice

    The effects of fish oil supplements on diminishing airway inflammation in asthma have been studied in mouse models and human intervention trials with varying results. However, the independent effects of the main omega-3 PUFAs found in fish oil, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (D...

  5. The Effects of Aging on Pulmonary Oxidative Damage, Protein Nitration and Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase Down-Regulation During Systemic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Starr, Marlene E; Ueda, Junji; Yamamoto, Shoji; Evers, B. Mark; Saito, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), a serious clinical condition characterized by whole body inflammation, is particularly threatening for elderly patients who suffer much higher mortality rates than the young. A major pathological consequence of SIRS is acute lung injury caused by neutrophil-mediated oxidative damage. Previously, we reported an increase in protein tyrosine nitration (a marker of oxidative/nitrosative damage), and a decrease in antioxidant enzyme, extra-cellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD), in the lungs of young mice during endotoxemia-induced SIRS. Here we demonstrate that during endotoxemia, down-regulation of EC-SOD is significantly more profound and prolonged, while up-regulation of iNOS is augmented in aged compared to young mice. Aged mice also showed 2.5-fold higher protein nitration levels, compared to young mice, with particularly strong nitration in the pulmonary vascular endothelium during SIRS. Additionally, by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis, Western blotting and mass spectrometry, we identified proteins which show increased tyrosine nitration in age- and SIRS-dependent manners; these proteins (profilin-1, transgelin-2, LASP 1, tropomyosin and myosin) include components of the actin cytoskeleton responsible for maintaining pulmonary vascular permeability. Reduced EC-SOD in combination with increased oxidative/nitrosative damage and altered cytoskeletal protein function due to tyrosine nitration may contribute to augmented lung injury in the aged with SIRS. PMID:21092756

  6. TRPV4 inhibition counteracts edema and inflammation and improves pulmonary function and oxygen saturation in chemically induced acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishna, Shrilatha; Song, Weifeng; Achanta, Satyanarayana; Doran, Stephen F.; Liu, Boyi; Kaelberer, Melanie M.; Yu, Zhihong; Sui, Aiwei; Cheung, Mui; Leishman, Emma; Eidam, Hilary S.; Ye, Guosen; Willette, Robert N.; Thorneloe, Kevin S.; Bradshaw, Heather B.; Matalon, Sadis

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of acute lung injury caused by exposure to reactive chemicals remains challenging because of the lack of mechanism-based therapeutic approaches. Recent studies have shown that transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), an ion channel expressed in pulmonary tissues, is a crucial mediator of pressure-induced damage associated with ventilator-induced lung injury, heart failure, and infarction. Here, we examined the effects of two novel TRPV4 inhibitors in mice exposed to hydrochloric acid, mimicking acid exposure and acid aspiration injury, and to chlorine gas, a severe chemical threat with frequent exposures in domestic and occupational environments and in transportation accidents. Postexposure treatment with a TRPV4 inhibitor suppressed acid-induced pulmonary inflammation by diminishing neutrophils, macrophages, and associated chemokines and cytokines, while improving tissue pathology. These effects were recapitulated in TRPV4-deficient mice. TRPV4 inhibitors had similar anti-inflammatory effects in chlorine-exposed mice and inhibited vascular leakage, airway hyperreactivity, and increase in elastance, while improving blood oxygen saturation. In both models of lung injury we detected increased concentrations of N-acylamides, a class of endogenous TRP channel agonists. Taken together, we demonstrate that TRPV4 inhibitors are potent and efficacious countermeasures against severe chemical exposures, acting against exaggerated inflammatory responses, and protecting tissue barriers and cardiovascular function. PMID:24838754

  7. Deletion of Ku80 causes early aging independent of chronic inflammation and Rag-1-induced DSBs.

    PubMed

    Holcomb, Valerie B; Vogel, Hannes; Hasty, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Animal models of premature aging are often defective for DNA repair. Ku80-mutant mice are disabled for nonhomologous end joining; a pathway that repairs both spontaneous DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and induced DNA DSBs generated by the action of a complex composed of Rag-1 and Rag-2 (Rag). Rag is essential for inducing DSBs important for assembling V(D)J segments of antigen receptor genes that are required for lymphocyte development. Thus, deletion of either Rag-1 or Ku80 causes severe combined immunodeficiency (scid) leading to chronic inflammation. In addition, Rag-1 induces breaks at non-B DNA structures. Previously we reported Ku80-mutant mice undergo premature aging, yet we do not know the root cause of this phenotype. Early aging may be caused by either defective repair of spontaneous DNA damage, defective repair of Rag-1-induced breaks or chronic inflammation caused by scid. To address this issue, we analyzed aging in control and Ku80-mutant mice deleted for Rag-1 such that both cohorts are scid and suffer from chronic inflammation. We make two observations: (1) chronic inflammation does not cause premature aging in these mice and (2) Ku80-mutant mice exhibit early aging independent of Rag-1. Therefore, this study supports defective repair of spontaneous DNA damage as the root cause of early aging in Ku80-mutant mice.

  8. Acute pulmonary toxicity and inflammation induced by combined exposure to didecyldimethylammonium chloride and ethylene glycol in rats.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Do Young; Kim, Hyun-Mi; Kim, Eunji; Lim, Yeon-Mi; Kim, Pilje; Choi, Kyunghee; Kwon, Jung-Taek

    2016-02-01

    Didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC), an antimicrobial agent, has been reported to induce pulmonary toxicity in animal studies. DDAC is frequently used in spray-form household products in combination with ethylene glycol (EG). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the toxic interaction between DDAC and EG in the lung. DDAC at a sub-toxic dose (100 μg/kg body weight) was mixed with a non-toxic dose of EG (100 or 200 μg/kg body weight), and was administrated to rats via intratracheal instillation. Lactate dehydrogenase activity and total protein content in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were not changed by singly treated DDAC or EG, but significantly enhanced at 1 d after treatment with the mixture, with the effect dependent on the dose of EG. Total cell count in BALF was largely increased and polymorphonuclear leukocytes were predominantly recruited to the lung in rats administrated with the mixture. Inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 also appeared to be increased by the mixture of DDAC and EG (200 μg/kg body weight) at 1 d post-exposure, which might be associated with the increase in inflammatory cells in lung. BALF protein content and inflammatory cell recruitment in the lung still remained elevated at 7 d after the administration of DDAC with the higher dose of EG. These results suggest that the combination of DDAC and EG can synergistically induce pulmonary cytotoxicity and inflammation, and EG appears to amplify the harmful effects of DDAC on the lung. Therefore pulmonary exposure to these two chemicals commonly found in commercial products can be a potential hazard to human health.

  9. Eosinophilic and Neutrophilic Airway Inflammation in the Phenotyping of Mild-to-Moderate Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Górska, Katarzyna; Paplińska-Goryca, Magdalena; Nejman-Gryz, Patrycja; Goryca, Krzysztof; Krenke, Rafał

    2017-04-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are heterogeneous diseases with different inflammatory phenotypes. Various inflammatory mediators play a role in these diseases. The aim of this study was to analyze the neutrophilic and eosinophilic airway and systemic inflammation as the phenotypic characterization of patients with asthma and COPD. Twenty-four patients with asthma and 33 patients with COPD were enrolled in the study. All the patients were in mild-to-moderate stage of disease, and none of them were treated with inhaled corticosteroids. Concentrations of IL-6, neutrophil elastase (NE), matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), and IL-33 and IL-17 in serum and induced sputum (IS) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The cellular composition of blood and IS was evaluated. Hierarchical clustering of patients was performed for the combination of selected clinical features and mediators. Asthma and COPD can be differentiated based on eosinophilic/neutrophilic systemic or airway inflammation with unsatisfactory efficiency. Hierarchical clustering of patients based on blood eosinophil percentage and clinical data revealed two asthma clusters differing in the number of positive skin prick tests and one COPD cluster with two subclusters characterized by low and high blood eosinophil concentrations. Clustering of patients according to IS measurements and clinical data showed two main clusters: pure asthma characterized by high eosinophil/atopy status and mixed asthma and COPD cluster with low eosinophil/atopy status. The neutrophilic phenotype of COPD was associated with more severe airway obstruction and hyperinflation.

  10. An Immature Myeloid/Myeloid-Suppressor Cell Response Associated with Necrotizing Inflammation Mediates Lethal Pulmonary Tularemia

    PubMed Central

    Periasamy, Sivakumar; Avram, Dorina; McCabe, Amanda; MacNamara, Katherine C.; Sellati, Timothy J.; Harton, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation of Francisella tularensis (Ft) causes acute and fatal pneumonia. The lung cytokine milieu favors exponential Ft replication, but the mechanisms underlying acute pathogenesis and death remain unknown. Evaluation of the sequential and systemic host immune response in pulmonary tularemia reveals that in contrast to overwhelming bacterial burden or cytokine production, an overt innate cellular response to Ft drives tissue pathology and host mortality. Lethal infection with Ft elicits medullary and extra-medullary myelopoiesis supporting recruitment of large numbers of immature myeloid cells and MDSC to the lungs. These cells fail to mature and die, leading to subsequent necrotic lung damage, loss of pulmonary function, and host death that is partially dependent upon immature Ly6G+ cells. Acceleration of this process may account for the rapid lethality seen with Ft SchuS4. In contrast, during sub-lethal infection with Ft LVS the pulmonary cellular response is characterized by a predominance of mature neutrophils and monocytes required for protection, suggesting a required threshold for lethal bacterial infection. Further, eliciting a mature phagocyte response provides transient, but dramatic, innate protection against Ft SchuS4. This study reveals that the nature of the myeloid cell response may be the primary determinant of host mortality versus survival following Francisella infection. PMID:27015566

  11. Impact of Major Pulmonary Resections on Right Ventricular Function: Early Postoperative Changes.

    PubMed

    Elrakhawy, Hany M; Alassal, Mohamed A; Shaalan, Ayman M; Awad, Ahmed A; Sayed, Sameh; Saffan, Mohammad M

    2018-01-15

    Right ventricular (RV) dysfunction after pulmonary resection in the early postoperative period is documented by reduced RV ejection fraction and increased RV end-diastolic volume index. Supraventricular arrhythmia, particularly atrial fibrillation, is common after pulmonary resection. RV assessment can be done by non-invasive methods and/or invasive approaches such as right cardiac catheterization. Incorporation of a rapid response thermistor to pulmonary artery catheter permits continuous measurements of cardiac output, right ventricular ejection fraction, and right ventricular end-diastolic volume. It can also be used for right atrial and right ventricular pacing, and for measuring right-sided pressures, including pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. This study included 178 patients who underwent major pulmonary resections, 36 who underwent pneumonectomy assigned as group (I) and 142 who underwent lobectomy assigned as group (II). The study was conducted at the cardiothoracic surgery department of Benha University hospital in Egypt; patients enrolled were operated on from February 2012 to February 2016. A rapid response thermistor pulmonary artery catheter was inserted via the right internal jugular vein. Preoperatively the following was recorded: central venous pressure, mean pulmonary artery pressure, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, cardiac output, right ventricular ejection fraction and volumes. The same parameters were collected in fixed time intervals after 3 hours, 6 hours, 12 hours, 24 hours, and 48 hours postoperatively. For group (I): There were no statistically significant changes between the preoperative and postoperative records in the central venous pressure and mean arterial pressure; there were no statistically significant changes in the preoperative and 12, 24, and 48 hour postoperative records for cardiac index; 3 and 6 hours postoperative showed significant changes. There were statistically significant changes between the preoperative and

  12. The Effects of Resveratrol on Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in a Rat Model of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Li; Li, Ting; Li, Ji-Hong; Miao, Shu-Ying; Xiao, Xian-Zhong

    2017-09-12

    Oxidative stress and inflammation are hypothesized to contribute to the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Resveratrol (trans-3,5,4'-trihydroxystilbene) is known for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The study aimed to investigate the effects of resveratrol in a rat model with COPD on the regulation of oxidative stress and inflammation via the activation of Sirtuin1 (SIRTl) and proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α). Thirty Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: control group, COPD group and resveratrol intervention group. The COPD model was established by instilling with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and challenging with cigarette smoke (CS). The levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) in serum were measured. The levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) were measured. The expression levels of SIRT1 and PGC-1α in the lung tissues were examined by immunohistochemistry as well as real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR) and western blotting analysis. After the treatment with resveratrol (50 mg/kg), compared with the COPD group, alleviation of inflammation and reconstruction in the small airways of the lungs were seen. Resveratrol might be correlated not only with the lower level of MDA and the higher activity of SOD, but also with the upregulation of SIRT1 and PGC-1α expression. Resveratrol treatment decreased serum levels of IL-6 and IL-8. Our findings indicate that resveratrol had a therapeutic effect in our rat COPD model, which is related to the inhibition of oxidative stress and inflammatory response. The mechanism may be related to the activation and upgrading of the SIRT1/PGC-1α signaling pathways. Thus resveratrol might be a therapeutic modality in COPD.

  13. Use of metal oxide nanoparticle band gap to develop a predictive paradigm for oxidative stress and acute pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiyuan; Ji, Zhaoxia; Xia, Tian; Meng, Huan; Low-Kam, Cecile; Liu, Rong; Pokhrel, Suman; Lin, Sijie; Wang, Xiang; Liao, Yu-Pei; Wang, Meiying; Li, Linjiang; Rallo, Robert; Damoiseaux, Robert; Telesca, Donatello; Mädler, Lutz; Cohen, Yoram; Zink, Jeffrey I; Nel, Andre E

    2012-05-22

    We demonstrate for 24 metal oxide (MOx) nanoparticles that it is possible to use conduction band energy levels to delineate their toxicological potential at cellular and whole animal levels. Among the materials, the overlap of conduction band energy (E(c)) levels with the cellular redox potential (-4.12 to -4.84 eV) was strongly correlated to the ability of Co(3)O(4), Cr(2)O(3), Ni(2)O(3), Mn(2)O(3), and CoO nanoparticles to induce oxygen radicals, oxidative stress, and inflammation. This outcome is premised on permissible electron transfers from the biological redox couples that maintain the cellular redox equilibrium to the conduction band of the semiconductor particles. Both single-parameter cytotoxic as well as multi-parameter oxidative stress assays in cells showed excellent correlation to the generation of acute neutrophilic inflammation and cytokine responses in the lungs of C57 BL/6 mice. Co(3)O(4), Ni(2)O(3), Mn(2)O(3), and CoO nanoparticles could also oxidize cytochrome c as a representative redox couple involved in redox homeostasis. While CuO and ZnO generated oxidative stress and acute pulmonary inflammation that is not predicted by E(c) levels, the adverse biological effects of these materials could be explained by their solubility, as demonstrated by ICP-MS analysis. These results demonstrate that it is possible to predict the toxicity of a large series of MOx nanoparticles in the lung premised on semiconductor properties and an integrated in vitro/in vivo hazard ranking model premised on oxidative stress. This establishes a robust platform for modeling of MOx structure-activity relationships based on band gap energy levels and particle dissolution. This predictive toxicological paradigm is also of considerable importance for regulatory decision-making about this important class of engineered nanomaterials.

  14. Use of Metal Oxide Nanoparticle Band Gap to Develop a Predictive Paradigm for Oxidative Stress and Acute Pulmonary Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiyuan; Ji, Zhaoxia; Xia, Tian; Meng, Huan; Low-Kam, Cecile; Liu, Rong; Pokhrel, Suman; Lin, Sijie; Wang, Xiang; Liao, Yu-Pei; Wang, Meiying; Li, Linjiang; Rallo, Robert; Damoiseaux, Robert; Telesca, Donatello; Mädler, Lutz; Cohen, Yoram; Zink, Jeffrey I.; Nel, Andre E.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate for 24 metal oxide (MOx) nanoparticles that it is possible to use conduction band energy levels to delineate their toxicological potential at cellular and whole animal levels. Among the materials, the overlap of conduction band energy (Ec) levels with the cellular redox potential (−4.12 to −4.84 eV) was strongly correlated to the ability of Co3O4, Cr2O3, Ni2O3, Mn2O3 and CoO nanoparticles to induce oxygen radicals, oxidative stress and inflammation. This outcome is premised on permissible electron transfers from the biological redox couples that maintain the cellular redox equilibrium to the conduction band of the semiconductor particles. Both single parameter cytotoxic as well as multi-parameter oxidative stress assays in cells showed excellent correlation to the generation of acute neutrophilic inflammation and cytokine responses in the lungs of CB57 Bl/6 mice. Co3O4, Ni2O3, Mn2O3 and CoO nanoparticles could also oxidize cytochrome c as a representative redox couple involved in redox homeostasis. While CuO and ZnO generated oxidative stress and acute pulmonary inflammation that is not predicted by Ec levels, the adverse biological effects of these materials could be explained by their solubility, as demonstrated by ICP-MS analysis. Taken together, these results demonstrate, for the first time, that it is possible to predict the toxicity of a large series of MOx nanoparticles in the lung premised on semiconductor properties and an integrated in vitro/in vivo hazard ranking model premised on oxidative stress. This establishes a robust platform for modeling of MOx structure-activity relationships based on band gap energy levels and particle dissolution. This predictive toxicological paradigm is also of considerable importance for regulatory decision-making about this important class of engineered nanomaterials. PMID:22502734

  15. Role of eosinophils in airway inflammation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Tashkin, Donald P; Wechsler, Michael E

    2018-01-01

    COPD is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. In some patients with COPD, eosinophils contribute to inflammation that promotes airway obstruction; approximately a third of stable COPD patients have evidence of eosinophilic inflammation. Although the eosinophil threshold associated with clinical relevance in patients with COPD is currently subject to debate, eosinophil counts hold potential as biomarkers to guide therapy. In particular, eosinophil counts may be useful in assessing which patients may benefit from inhaled corticosteroid therapy, particularly regarding exacerbation prevention. In addition, several therapies targeting eosinophilic inflammation are available or in development, including monoclonal antibodies targeting the IL5 ligand, the IL5 receptor, IL4, and IL13. The goal of this review was to describe the biologic characteristics of eosinophils, their role in COPD during exacerbations and stable disease, and their use as biomarkers to aid treatment decisions. We also propose an algorithm for inhaled corticosteroid use, taking into consideration eosinophil counts and pneumonia history, and emerging eosinophil-targeted therapies in COPD.

  16. Role of eosinophils in airway inflammation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Tashkin, Donald P; Wechsler, Michael E

    2018-01-01

    COPD is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. In some patients with COPD, eosinophils contribute to inflammation that promotes airway obstruction; approximately a third of stable COPD patients have evidence of eosinophilic inflammation. Although the eosinophil threshold associated with clinical relevance in patients with COPD is currently subject to debate, eosinophil counts hold potential as biomarkers to guide therapy. In particular, eosinophil counts may be useful in assessing which patients may benefit from inhaled corticosteroid therapy, particularly regarding exacerbation prevention. In addition, several therapies targeting eosinophilic inflammation are available or in development, including monoclonal antibodies targeting the IL5 ligand, the IL5 receptor, IL4, and IL13. The goal of this review was to describe the biologic characteristics of eosinophils, their role in COPD during exacerbations and stable disease, and their use as biomarkers to aid treatment decisions. We also propose an algorithm for inhaled corticosteroid use, taking into consideration eosinophil counts and pneumonia history, and emerging eosinophil-targeted therapies in COPD. PMID:29403271

  17. Upregulation of Human Endogenous Retrovirus-K Is Linked to Immunity and Inflammation in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Saito, Toshie; Miyagawa, Kazuya; Chen, Shih-Yu; Tamosiuniene, Rasa; Wang, Lingli; Sharpe, Orr; Samayoa, Erik; Harada, Daisuke; Moonen, Jan-Renier A J; Cao, Aiqin; Chen, Pin-I; Hennigs, Jan K; Gu, Mingxia; Li, Caiyun G; Leib, Ryan D; Li, Dan; Adams, Christopher M; Del Rosario, Patricia A; Bill, Matthew; Haddad, Francois; Montoya, Jose G; Robinson, William H; Fantl, Wendy J; Nolan, Garry P; Zamanian, Roham T; Nicolls, Mark R; Chiu, Charles Y; Ariza, Maria E; Rabinovitch, Marlene

    2017-11-14

    Immune dysregulation has been linked to occlusive vascular remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) that is hereditary, idiopathic, or associated with other conditions. Circulating autoantibodies, lung perivascular lymphoid tissue, and elevated cytokines have been related to PAH pathogenesis but without a clear understanding of how these abnormalities are initiated, perpetuated, and connected in the progression of disease. We therefore set out to identify specific target antigens in PAH lung immune complexes as a starting point toward resolving these issues to better inform future application of immunomodulatory therapies. Lung immune complexes were isolated and PAH target antigens were identified by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and localized by confocal microscopy. One PAH antigen linked to immunity and inflammation was pursued and a link to PAH pathophysiology was investigated by next-generation sequencing, functional studies in cultured monocytes and endothelial cells, and hemodynamic and lung studies in a rat. SAM domain and HD domain-containing protein 1 (SAMHD1), an innate immune factor that suppresses HIV replication, was identified and confirmed as highly expressed in immune complexes from 16 hereditary and idiopathic PAH versus 12 control lungs. Elevated SAMHD1 was localized to endothelial cells, perivascular dendritic cells, and macrophages, and SAMHD1 antibodies were prevalent in tertiary lymphoid tissue. An unbiased screen using metagenomic sequencing related SAMHD1 to increased expression of human endogenous retrovirus K (HERV-K) in PAH versus control lungs (n=4). HERV-K envelope and deoxyuridine triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase mRNAs were elevated in PAH versus control lungs (n=10), and proteins were localized to macrophages. HERV-K deoxyuridine triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase induced SAMHD1 and proinflammatory cytokines (eg, interleukin 6, interleukin 1β, and tumor

  18. Early age exposure to moisture damage and systemic inflammation at the age of 6 years.

    PubMed

    Karvonen, A M; Tischer, C; Kirjavainen, P V; Roponen, M; Hyvärinen, A; Illi, S; Mustonen, K; Pfefferle, P I; Renz, H; Remes, S; Schaub, B; von Mutius, E; Pekkanen, J

    2018-05-01

    Cross-sectional studies have shown that exposure to indoor moisture damage and mold may be associated with subclinical inflammation. Our aim was to determine whether early age exposure to moisture damage or mold is prospectively associated with subclinical systemic inflammation or with immune responsiveness in later childhood. Home inspections were performed in children's homes in the first year of life. At age 6 years, subclinical systemic inflammation was measured by serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and blood leukocytes and immune responsiveness by ex vivo production of interleukin 1-beta (IL-1β), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in whole blood cultures without stimulation or after 24 hours stimulation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and ionomycin (PI), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), or peptidoglycan (PPG) in 251-270 children. Moisture damage in child's main living areas in infancy was not significantly associated with elevated levels of CRP or leukocytes at 6 years. In contrast, there was some suggestion for an effect on immune responsiveness, as moisture damage with visible mold was positively associated with LPS-stimulated production of TNF-α and minor moisture damage was inversely associated with PI-stimulated IL-1β. While early life exposure to mold damage may have some influence on later immune responsiveness, it does not seem to increase subclinical systemic inflammation in later life. © 2018 National Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland Indoor Air published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Circadian clock component REV-ERBα controls homeostatic regulation of pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pariollaud, Marie; Gibbs, Julie E; Hopwood, Thomas W; Brown, Sheila; Begley, Nicola; Vonslow, Ryan; Poolman, Toryn; Guo, Baoqiang; Saer, Ben; Jones, D Heulyn; Tellam, James P; Bresciani, Stefano; Tomkinson, Nicholas Co; Wojno-Picon, Justyna; Cooper, Anthony Wj; Daniels, Dion A; Trump, Ryan P; Grant, Daniel; Zuercher, William; Willson, Timothy M; MacDonald, Andrew S; Bolognese, Brian; Podolin, Patricia L; Sanchez, Yolanda; Loudon, Andrew Si; Ray, David W

    2018-06-01

    Recent studies reveal that airway epithelial cells are critical pulmonary circadian pacemaker cells, mediating rhythmic inflammatory responses. Using mouse models, we now identify the rhythmic circadian repressor REV-ERBα as essential to the mechanism coupling the pulmonary clock to innate immunity, involving both myeloid and bronchial epithelial cells in temporal gating and determining amplitude of response to inhaled endotoxin. Dual mutation of REV-ERBα and its paralog REV-ERBβ in bronchial epithelia further augmented inflammatory responses and chemokine activation, but also initiated a basal inflammatory state, revealing a critical homeostatic role for REV-ERB proteins in the suppression of the endogenous proinflammatory mechanism in unchallenged cells. However, REV-ERBα plays the dominant role, as deletion of REV-ERBβ alone had no impact on inflammatory responses. In turn, inflammatory challenges cause striking changes in stability and degradation of REV-ERBα protein, driven by SUMOylation and ubiquitination. We developed a novel selective oxazole-based inverse agonist of REV-ERB, which protects REV-ERBα protein from degradation, and used this to reveal how proinflammatory cytokines trigger rapid degradation of REV-ERBα in the elaboration of an inflammatory response. Thus, dynamic changes in stability of REV-ERBα protein couple the core clock to innate immunity.

  20. Cannabinoid receptor 2 augments eosinophil responsiveness and aggravates allergen-induced pulmonary inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Frei, R B; Luschnig, P; Parzmair, G P; Peinhaupt, M; Schranz, S; Fauland, A; Wheelock, C E; Heinemann, A; Sturm, E M

    2016-07-01

    Accumulation of activated eosinophils in tissue is a hallmark of allergic inflammation. The endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) has been proposed to elicit eosinophil migration in a CB2 receptor/Gi/o -dependent manner. However, it has been claimed recently that this process may also involve other mechanisms such as cytokine priming and the metabolism of 2-AG into eicosanoids. Here, we explored the direct contribution of specific CB2 receptor activation to human and mouse eosinophil effector function in vitro and in vivo. In vitro studies including CB2 expression, adhesion and migratory responsiveness, respiratory burst, degranulation, and calcium mobilization were conducted in human peripheral blood eosinophils and mouse bone marrow-derived eosinophils. Allergic airway inflammation was assessed in mouse models of acute OVA-induced asthma and directed eosinophil migration. CB2 expression was significantly higher in eosinophils from symptomatic allergic donors. The selective CB2 receptor agonist JWH-133 induced a moderate migratory response in eosinophils. However, short-term exposure to JWH-133 potently enhanced chemoattractant-induced eosinophil shape change, chemotaxis, CD11b surface expression, and adhesion as well as production of reactive oxygen species. Receptor specificity of the observed effects was confirmed in eosinophils from CB2 knockout mice and by using the selective CB2 antagonist SR144528. Of note, systemic application of JWH-133 clearly primed eosinophil-directed migration in vivo and aggravated both AHR and eosinophil influx into the airways in a CB2 -specific manner. This effect was completely absent in eosinophil-deficient ∆dblGATA mice. Our data indicate that CB2 may directly contribute to the pathogenesis of eosinophil-driven diseases. Moreover, we provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the CB2 -mediated priming of eosinophils. Hence, antagonism of CB2 receptors may represent a novel pharmacological approach

  1. Histologic and biochemical alterations predict pulmonary mechanical dysfunction in aging mice with chronic lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Massa, Christopher B; Groves, Angela M; Jaggernauth, Smita U; Laskin, Debra L; Gow, Andrew J

    2017-08-01

    Both aging and chronic inflammation produce complex structural and biochemical alterations to the lung known to impact work of breathing. Mice deficient in surfactant protein D (Sftpd) develop progressive age-related lung pathology characterized by tissue destruction/remodeling, accumulation of foamy macrophages and alteration in surfactant composition. This study proposes to relate changes in tissue structure seen in normal aging and in chronic inflammation to altered lung mechanics using a computational model. Alterations in lung function in aging and Sftpd -/- mice have been inferred from fitting simple mechanical models to respiratory impedance data (Zrs), however interpretation has been confounded by the simultaneous presence of multiple coexisting pathophysiologic processes. In contrast to the inverse modeling approach, this study uses simulation from experimental measurements to recapitulate how aging and inflammation alter Zrs. Histologic and mechanical measurements were made in C57BL6/J mice and congenic Sftpd-/- mice at 8, 27 and 80 weeks of age (n = 8/group). An anatomic computational model based on published airway morphometry was developed and Zrs was simulated between 0.5 and 20 Hz. End expiratory pressure dependent changes in airway caliber and recruitment were estimated from mechanical measurements. Tissue elements were simulated using the constant phase model of viscoelasticity. Baseline elastance distribution was estimated in 8-week-old wild type mice, and stochastically varied for each condition based on experimentally measured alteration in elastic fiber composition, alveolar geometry and surfactant composition. Weighing reduction in model error against increasing model complexity allowed for identification of essential features underlying mechanical pathology and their contribution to Zrs. Using a maximum likelihood approach, alteration in lung recruitment and diminished elastic fiber density were shown predictive of mechanical alteration at

  2. Histologic and biochemical alterations predict pulmonary mechanical dysfunction in aging mice with chronic lung inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Laskin, Debra L.; Gow, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    Both aging and chronic inflammation produce complex structural and biochemical alterations to the lung known to impact work of breathing. Mice deficient in surfactant protein D (Sftpd) develop progressive age-related lung pathology characterized by tissue destruction/remodeling, accumulation of foamy macrophages and alteration in surfactant composition. This study proposes to relate changes in tissue structure seen in normal aging and in chronic inflammation to altered lung mechanics using a computational model. Alterations in lung function in aging and Sftpd -/- mice have been inferred from fitting simple mechanical models to respiratory impedance data (Zrs), however interpretation has been confounded by the simultaneous presence of multiple coexisting pathophysiologic processes. In contrast to the inverse modeling approach, this study uses simulation from experimental measurements to recapitulate how aging and inflammation alter Zrs. Histologic and mechanical measurements were made in C57BL6/J mice and congenic Sftpd-/- mice at 8, 27 and 80 weeks of age (n = 8/group). An anatomic computational model based on published airway morphometry was developed and Zrs was simulated between 0.5 and 20 Hz. End expiratory pressure dependent changes in airway caliber and recruitment were estimated from mechanical measurements. Tissue elements were simulated using the constant phase model of viscoelasticity. Baseline elastance distribution was estimated in 8-week-old wild type mice, and stochastically varied for each condition based on experimentally measured alteration in elastic fiber composition, alveolar geometry and surfactant composition. Weighing reduction in model error against increasing model complexity allowed for identification of essential features underlying mechanical pathology and their contribution to Zrs. Using a maximum likelihood approach, alteration in lung recruitment and diminished elastic fiber density were shown predictive of mechanical alteration at

  3. Effects of oral administration of tilmicosin on pulmonary inflammation in piglets experimentally infected with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Nerland, Erin M; LeBlanc, Justin M; Fedwick, Jason P; Morck, Douglas W; Merrill, John K; Dick, Paul; Paradis, Marie-Anne; Buret, Andre G

    2005-01-01

    To determine the effects of oral administration of tilmicosin in piglets experimentally infected with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. Forty 3-week-old specific-pathogen free piglets. Piglets were assigned to 1 of 4 groups as follows: 1) uninfected sham-treated control piglets; 2) infected untreated piglets that were intratracheally inoculated with 10(7) CFUs of A pleuropneumoniae; 3) infected treated piglets that were intratracheally inoculated with A pleuropneumoniae and received tilmicosin in feed (400 ppm [microg/g]) for 7 days prior to inoculation; or 4) infected treated piglets that were intratracheally inoculated with A pleuropneumoniae and received chlortetracycline (CTC) in feed (1100 ppm [microg/gl) for 7 days prior to inoculation. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissue specimens of piglets for each group were evaluated at 3 or 24 hours after inoculation. For each time point, 4 to 6 piglets/group were studied. Feeding of CTC and tilmicosin decreased bacterial load in lungs of infected piglets. Tilmicosin delivered in feed, but not CTC, enhanced apoptosis in porcine BAL fluid leukocytes. This was associated with a decrease in LTB4 concentrations in BAL fluid of tilmicosin-treated piglets, compared with untreated and CTC-treated piglets, and also with a significant decrease in the number of pulmonary lesions. Tilmicosin inhibited infection-induced increases in rectal temperatures, as measured in untreated and CTC-treated piglets. Pulmonary neutrophil infiltration and prostaglandin E2 concentrations in the BAL fluid were not significantly different among groups at any time. Oral administration of tilmicosin to infected piglets induces apoptosis in BAL fluid leukocytes and decreases BAL fluid LTB4 concentrations and inflammatory lung lesions.

  4. Early Whole Blood Transcriptional Signatures Are Associated with Severity of Lung Inflammation in Cynomolgus Macaques with Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Gideon, Hannah P; Skinner, Jason A; Baldwin, Nicole; Flynn, JoAnne L; Lin, Philana Ling

    2016-12-15

    Whole blood transcriptional profiling offers great diagnostic and prognostic potential. Although studies identified signatures for pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and transcripts that predict the risk for developing active TB in humans, the early transcriptional changes immediately following Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection have not been evaluated. We evaluated the gene expression changes in the cynomolgus macaque model of TB, which recapitulates all clinical aspects of human M. tuberculosis infection, using a human microarray and analytics platform. We performed genome-wide blood transcriptional analysis on 38 macaques at 11 postinfection time points during the first 6 mo of M. tuberculosis infection. Of 6371 differentially expressed transcripts between preinfection and postinfection, the greatest change in transcriptional activity occurred 20-56 d postinfection, during which fluctuation of innate and adaptive immune response-related transcripts was observed. Modest transcriptional differences between active TB and latent infection were observed over the time course with substantial overlap. The pattern of module activity previously published for human active TB was similar in macaques with active disease. Blood transcript activity was highly correlated with lung inflammation (lung [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose [FDG] avidity) measured by positron emission tomography and computed tomography at early time points postinfection. The differential signatures between animals with high and low lung FDG were stronger than between clinical outcomes. Analysis of preinfection signatures of macaques revealed that IFN signatures could influence eventual clinical outcomes and lung FDG avidity, even before infection. Our data support that transcriptional changes in the macaque model are translatable to human M. tuberculosis infection and offer important insights into early events of M. tuberculosis infection. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  5. Transgenic up-regulation of Claudin-6 decreases fine diesel particulate matter (DPM)-induced pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Joshua B; Bodine, Jared S; Gassman, Jason R; Muñoz, Samuel Arce; Milner, Dallin C; Dunaway, Todd M; Egbert, Kaleb M; Monson, Troy D; Broberg, Dallin S; Arroyo, Juan A; Reynolds, Paul R

    2018-04-25

    Claudin-6 (Cldn6) is a tetraspanin transmembrane protein that contributes to tight junctional complexes and has been implicated in the maintenance of lung epithelial barriers. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that genetic up-regulation of Cldn-6 influences inflammation in mice exposed to short-term environmental diesel particulate matter (DPM). Mice were subjected to ten exposures of nebulized DPM (PM2.5) over a period of 20 days via a nose-only inhalation system (Scireq, Montreal, Canada). Using real-time RT-PCR, we discovered that the Cldn6 gene was up-regulated in control mice exposed to DPM and in lung-specific transgenic mice that up-regulate Cldn-6 (Cldn-6 TG). Interestingly, DPM did not further enhance Cldn-6 expression in Cldn-6 TG mice. DPM caused increased cell diapedesis into bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from control mice; however, Cldn-6 TG mice had less total cells and PMNs in BALF following DPM exposure. Because Cldn-6 TG mice had diminished cell diapedesis, other inflammatory intermediates were screened to characterize the impact of increased Cldn-6 on inflammatory signaling. Cytokines that mediate inflammatory responses including TNF-α and IL-1β were differentially regulated in Cldn6 TG mice and controls following DPM exposure. These results demonstrate that epithelial barriers organized by Cldn-6 mediate, at least in part, diesel-induced inflammation. Further work may show that Cldn-6 is a key target in understanding pulmonary epithelial gateways exacerbated by environmental pollution.

  6. Biodiesel versus diesel exposure: Enhanced pulmonary inflammation, oxidative stress, and differential morphological changes in the mouse lung

    SciT

    Yanamala, Naveena, E-mail: wqu1@cdc.gov; Hatfield, Meghan K., E-mail: wla4@cdc.gov; Farcas, Mariana T., E-mail: woe7@cdc.gov

    2013-10-15

    The use of biodiesel (BD) or its blends with petroleum diesel (D) is considered to be a viable approach to reduce occupational and environmental exposures to particulate matter (PM). Due to its lower particulate mass emissions compared to D, use of BD is thought to alleviate adverse health effects. Considering BD fuel is mainly composed of unsaturated fatty acids, we hypothesize that BD exhaust particles could induce pronounced adverse outcomes, due to their ability to readily oxidize. The main objective of this study was to compare the effects of particles generated by engine fueled with neat BD and neat petroleum-basedmore » D. Biomarkers of tissue damage and inflammation were significantly elevated in lungs of mice exposed to BD particulates. Additionally, BD particulates caused a significant accumulation of oxidatively modified proteins and an increase in 4-hydroxynonenal. The up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines/growth factors was higher in lungs upon BD particulate exposure. Histological evaluation of lung sections indicated presence of lymphocytic infiltrate and impaired clearance with prolonged retention of BD particulate in pigment laden macrophages. Taken together, these results clearly indicate that BD exhaust particles could exert more toxic effects compared to D. - Highlights: • Exposure of mice to BDPM caused higher pulmonary toxicity compared to DPM. • Oxidative stress and inflammation were higher in BD vs to D exposed mice. • Inflammatory lymphocyte infiltrates were seen only in lungs of mice exposed to BD. • Ineffective clearance, prolonged PM retention was present only after BD exposure.« less

  7. Effects of inhaled corticosteroids on airway inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jen, Rachel; Rennard, Stephen I; Sin, Don D

    2012-01-01

    Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by chronic inflammation in the small airways. The effect of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) on lung inflammation in COPD remains uncertain. We sought to determine the effects of ICS on inflammatory indices in bronchial biopsies and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of patients with COPD. Methods: We searched Medline, Embase, Cinahl, and the Cochrane database for randomized, controlled clinical trials that used bronchial biopsies and bronchoalveolar lavage to evaluate the effects of ICS in stable COPD. For each chosen study, we calculated the mean differences in the concentrations of inflammatory cells before and after treatment in both intervention and control groups. These values were then converted into standardized mean differences (SMD) to accommodate the differences in patient selection, clinical treatment, and biochemical procedures that were employed across the original studies. If significant heterogeneity was present (P < 0.1), then a random effects model was used to pool the original data; otherwise, a fixed effects model was used. Results: We identified eight original studies that met the inclusion criteria. Four studies used bronchial biopsies (n =102 participants) and showed that ICS were effective in reducing CD4 and CD8 cell counts (SMD, −0.52 units and −0.66 units, 95% confidence interval). The five studies used bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (n =309), which together showed that ICS reduced neutrophil and lymphocyte counts (SMD, −0.64 units and −0.64 units, 95% confidence interval). ICS on the other hand significantly increased macrophage counts (SMD, 0.68 units, 95% confidence interval) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Conclusion: ICS has important immunomodulatory effects in airways with COPD that may explain its beneficial effect on exacerbations and enhanced risk of pneumonia. PMID:23055709

  8. Complement Activation and STAT4 Expression Are Associated with Early Inflammation in Diabetic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Cunnion, Kenji M.; Krishna, Neel K.; Pallera, Haree K.; Pineros-Fernandez, Angela; Rivera, Magdielis Gregory; Hair, Pamela S.; Lassiter, Brittany P.; Huyck, Ryan; Clements, Mary A.; Hood, Antoinette F.; Rodeheaver, George T.; Nadler, Jerry L.; Dobrian, Anca D.

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic non-healing wounds are a major clinical problem. The mechanisms leading to poor wound healing in diabetes are multifactorial but unresolved inflammation may be a major contributing factor. The complement system (CS) is the most potent inflammatory cascade in humans and contributes to poor wound healing in animal models. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 4 (STAT4) is a transcription factor expressed in immune and adipose cells and contributes to upregulation of some inflammatory chemokines and cytokines. Persistent CS and STAT4 expression in diabetic wounds may thus contribute to chronic inflammation and delayed healing. The purpose of this study was to characterize CS and STAT4 in early diabetic wounds using db/db mice as a diabetic skin wound model. The CS was found to be activated early in the diabetic wounds as demonstrated by increased anaphylatoxin C5a in wound fluid and C3-fragment deposition by immunostaining. These changes were associated with a 76% increase in nucleated cells in the wounds of db/db mice vs. controls. The novel classical CS inhibitor, Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 (PIC1) reduced inflammation when added directly or saturated in an acellular skin scaffold, as reflected by reduced CS components and leukocyte infiltration. A significant increase in expression of STAT4 and the downstream macrophage chemokine CCL2 and its receptor CCR2 were also found in the early wounds of db/db mice compared to non-diabetic controls. These studies provide evidence for two new promising targets to reduce unresolved inflammation and to improve healing of diabetic skin wounds. PMID:28107529

  9. Intrauterine inflammation, cerebral oxygen consumption and susceptibility to early brain injury in very preterm newborns.

    PubMed

    Stark, Michael J; Hodyl, Nicolette A; Belegar V, Kiran Kumar; Andersen, Chad C

    2016-03-01

    In utero exposure to inflammation results in elevated cerebral oxygen consumption. This increased metabolic demand may contribute to the association between chorioamnionitis and intraventricular haemorrhage (P/IVH). We hypothesised that intrauterine inflammation imposes an elevated cerebral metabolic load and increased fractional oxygen extraction (cFTOE) with cFTOE further increased in the presence of early P/IVH. Eighty-three infants ≤30 weeks gestation were recruited. Exposure to intrauterine inflammation was determined by placental histology. Total internal carotid blood flow (Doppler ultrasound) and near infrared spectroscopy were measured and cerebral oxygen delivery (mcerbDO2), consumption (mcerbVO2) and cFTOE were calculated on days 1 and 3 of life. Primary outcome was defined as death or P/IVH >grade II (cranial sonograph) by day 3. Infants exposed to intrauterine inflammation had higher total internal carotid blood flow (92 vs 63 mL/kg/min) and mcerbDO2 (13.7 vs 10.1 mL/kg/min) than those not exposed to inflammation. Newborns with P/IVH had both higher oxygen consumption and extraction compared with those without sonographic injury regardless of exposure to intrauterine inflammation. Further, in preterms exposed to inflammation, those with P/IVH had higher consumption (6.1 vs 4.8 mL/kg/min) and extraction than those without injury. These differences were observed only on day 1 of life. Although P/IVH is multifactorial in preterm newborns, it is likely that cerebral hypoxic-ischaemia plays a central pathophysiological role. These data provide a mechanistic insight into this process and suggests that the increased cerebral metabolic load imposed by the presence of inflammation results in a higher risk of critical hypoxic ischaemia in the preterm with increased susceptibility to significant P/IVH. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. Early-onset obesity dysregulates pulmonary adipocytokine/insulin signaling and induces asthma-like disease in mice

    PubMed Central

    Dinger, Katharina; Kasper, Philipp; Hucklenbruch-Rother, Eva; Vohlen, Christina; Jobst, Eva; Janoschek, Ruth; Bae-Gartz, Inga; van Koningsbruggen-Rietschel, Silke; Plank, Christian; Dötsch, Jörg; Alejandre Alcázar, Miguel Angel

    2016-01-01

    Childhood obesity is a risk factor for asthma, but the molecular mechanisms linking both remain elusive. Since obesity leads to chronic low-grade inflammation and affects metabolic signaling we hypothesized that postnatal hyperalimentation (pHA) induced by maternal high-fat-diet during lactation leads to early-onset obesity and dysregulates pulmonary adipocytokine/insulin signaling, resulting in metabolic programming of asthma-like disease in adult mice. Offspring with pHA showed at postnatal day 21 (P21): (1) early-onset obesity, greater fat-mass, increased expression of IL-1β, IL-23, and Tnf-α, greater serum leptin and reduced glucose tolerance than Control (Ctrl); (2) less STAT3/AMPKα-activation, greater SOCS3 expression and reduced AKT/GSK3β-activation in the lung, indicative of leptin resistance and insulin signaling, respectively; (3) increased lung mRNA of IL-6, IL-13, IL-17A and Tnf-α. At P70 body weight, fat-mass, and cytokine mRNA expression were similar in the pHA and Ctrl, but serum leptin and IL-6 were greater, and insulin signaling and glucose tolerance impaired. Peribronchial elastic fiber content, bronchial smooth muscle layer, and deposition of connective tissue were not different after pHA. Despite unaltered bronchial structure mice after pHA exhibited significantly increased airway reactivity. Our study does not only demonstrate that early-onset obesity transiently activates pulmonary adipocytokine/insulin signaling and induces airway hyperreactivity in mice, but also provides new insights into metabolic programming of childhood obesity-related asthma. PMID:27087690

  11. Etanercept Exacerbates Inflammation and Pathology in a Rabbit Model of Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Tsenova, Liana; O'Brien, Paul; Holloway, Jennifer; Peixoto, Blas; Soteropoulos, Patricia; Fallows, Dorothy; Subbian, Selvakumar

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) antagonists has been associated with increased risk of tuberculosis (TB). We examined the usefulness of the rabbit model of active pulmonary TB for studying the impact of the human immune modulatory reagent etanercept on the host immune response. Control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection, disease pathology, and the global transcriptional response in Mtb-infected lungs of rabbits were studied. Etanercept treatment exacerbated disease pathology and reduced bacillary control in the lungs, compared with infected untreated animals. Reduced collagen and fibrin deposition in the granulomas was associated with significant downregulation of the collagen metabolism and fibrosis network genes and upregulation of genes in the inflammatory response and cell recruitment networks in the lungs of etanercept treated, compared with untreated rabbits. Our results suggest that targeting the TNF-α signaling pathway disrupts the tissue remodeling process, which is required for the formation and maintenance of well-differentiated granulomas and for control of Mtb growth in the lungs. These results validate the use of the rabbit model for investigating the impact of selected human immune modulatory drugs, such as a TNF-α antagonist, on the host immune response and pathogenesis in TB. PMID:24831609

  12. Acute tropical pulmonary eosinophilia. Characterization of the lower respiratory tract inflammation and its response to therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Pinkston, P; Vijayan, V K; Nutman, T B; Rom, W N; O'Donnell, K M; Cornelius, M J; Kumaraswami, V; Ferrans, V J; Takemura, T; Yenokida, G

    1987-01-01

    Although acute tropical pulmonary eosinophilia (TPE) is well recognized as a manifestation of filarial infection, the processes that mediate the abnormalities of the lung in TPE are unknown. To evaluate the hypothesis that the derangements of the lower respiratory tract in this disorder are mediated by inflammatory cells in the local milieu, we utilized bronchoalveolar lavage to evaluate affected individuals before and after therapy. Inflammatory cells recovered from the lower respiratory tract of individuals with acute, untreated TPE (n = 8) revealed a striking eosinophilic alveolitis, with marked elevations in both the proportion of eosinophils (TPE 54 +/- 5%; normal 2 +/- 5%; P less than 0.001) and the concentration of eosinophils in the recovered epithelial lining fluid (ELF) (TPE 63 +/- 20 X 10(3)/microliter; normal 0.3 +/- 0.1 X 10(3)/microliter; P less than 0.01). Importantly, when individuals (n = 5) with acute TPE were treated with diethylcarbamazine (DEC), there was a marked decrease of the lung eosinophils and concomitant increase in lung function. These observations are consistent with the concept that at least some of the abnormalities found in the lung in acute TPE are mediated by an eosinophil-dominated inflammatory process in the lower respiratory tract. Images PMID:3298321

  13. Inflammation-induced microvascular insulin resistance is an early event in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lina; Fu, Zhuo; Wu, Jing; Aylor, Kevin W; Barrett, Eugene J; Cao, Wenhong; Liu, Zhenqi

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and vascular insulin resistance usually coexist and chronic inflammation engenders both. In the present study, we investigate the temporal relationship between vascular insulin resistance and metabolic insulin resistance. We assessed insulin responses in all arterial segments, including aorta, distal saphenous artery and the microvasculature, as well as the metabolic insulin responses in muscle in rats fed on a high-fat diet (HFD) for various durations ranging from 3 days to 4 weeks with or without sodium salicylate treatment. Compared with controls, HFD feeding significantly blunted insulin-mediated Akt (protein kinase B) and eNOS [endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase] phosphorylation in aorta in 1 week, blunted vasodilatory response in small resistance vessel in 4 weeks and microvascular recruitment in as early as 3 days. Insulin-stimulated whole body glucose disposal did not begin to progressively decrease until after 1 week. Salicylate treatment fully inhibited vascular inflammation, prevented microvascular insulin resistance and significantly improved muscle metabolic responses to insulin. We conclude that microvascular insulin resistance is an early event in diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance and inflammation plays an essential role in this process. Our data suggest microvascular insulin resistance contributes to the development of metabolic insulin resistance in muscle and muscle microvasculature is a potential therapeutic target in the prevention and treatment of diabetes and its related complications. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  14. Inflammation-induced microvascular insulin resistance is an early event in diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lina; Fu, Zhuo; Wu, Jing; Aylor, Kevin W.; Barrett, Eugene J.; Cao, Wenhong

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and vascular insulin resistance usually coexist and chronic inflammation engenders both. In the present study, we investigate the temporal relationship between vascular insulin resistance and metabolic insulin resistance. We assessed insulin responses in all arterial segments, including aorta, distal saphenous artery and the microvasculature, as well as the metabolic insulin responses in muscle in rats fed on a high-fat diet (HFD) for various durations ranging from 3 days to 4 weeks with or without sodium salicylate treatment. Compared with controls, HFD feeding significantly blunted insulin-mediated Akt (protein kinase B) and eNOS [endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase] phosphorylation in aorta in 1 week, blunted vasodilatory response in small resistance vessel in 4 weeks and microvascular recruitment in as early as 3 days. Insulin-stimulated whole body glucose disposal did not begin to progressively decrease until after 1 week. Salicylate treatment fully inhibited vascular inflammation, prevented microvascular insulin resistance and significantly improved muscle metabolic responses to insulin. We conclude that microvascular insulin resistance is an early event in diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance and inflammation plays an essential role in this process. Our data suggest microvascular insulin resistance contributes to the development of metabolic insulin resistance in muscle and muscle microvasculature is a potential therapeutic target in the prevention and treatment of diabetes and its related complications. PMID:26265791

  15. Pulmonary exposure to diesel exhaust particles induces airway inflammation and cytokine expression in NC/Nga mice.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Ken-ichiro; Takano, Hirohisa; Yanagisawa, Rie; Ichinose, Takamichi; Shimada, Akinori; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2005-10-01

    Although several studies have reported that diesel exhaust particles (DEP) affect cardiorespiratory health in animals and humans, the effect of DEP on animal models with spontaneous allergic disorders has been far less intensively studied. The Nc/Nga mouse is known to be a typical animal model for human atopic dermatitis (AD). In the present study, we investigated the effects of repeated pulmonary exposure to DEP on airway inflammation and cytokine expression in NC/Nga mice. The animals were randomized into two experimental groups that received vehicle or DEP by intratracheal instillation weekly for six weeks. Cellular profiles of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and expressions of cytokines and chemokines in both the BAL fluid and lung tissues were evaluated 24 h after the last instillation. The DEP challenge produced an increase in the numbers of total cells, neutrophils, and mononuclear cells in BAL fluid as compared to the vehicle challenge (P<0.01). DEP exposure significantly induced the lung expressions of interleukin (IL)-4, keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC), and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha when compared to the vehicle challenge. These results indicate that intratracheal exposure to DEP induces the recruitment of inflammatory cells, at least partially, through the local expression of IL-4 and chemokines in NC/Nga mice.

  16. Current concepts on oxidative/carbonyl stress, inflammation and epigenetics in pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    SciT

    Yao Hongwei; Rahman, Irfan, E-mail: irfan_rahman@urmc.rochester.edu

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a global health problem. The current therapies for COPD are poorly effective and the mainstays of pharmacotherapy are bronchodilators. A better understanding of the pathobiology of COPD is critical for the development of novel therapies. In the present review, we have discussed the roles of oxidative/aldehyde stress, inflammation/immunity, and chromatin remodeling in the pathogenesis of COPD. An imbalance of oxidants/antioxidants caused by cigarette smoke and other pollutants/biomass fuels plays an important role in the pathogenesis of COPD by regulating redox-sensitive transcription factors (e.g., NF-{kappa}B), autophagy and unfolded protein response leading to chronic lung inflammatorymore » response. Cigarette smoke also activates canonical/alternative NF-{kappa}B pathways and their upstream kinases leading to sustained inflammatory response in lungs. Recently, epigenetic regulation has been shown to be critical for the development of COPD because the expression/activity of enzymes that regulate these epigenetic modifications have been reported to be abnormal in airways of COPD patients. Hence, the significant advances made in understanding the pathophysiology of COPD as described herein will identify novel therapeutic targets for intervention in COPD.« less

  17. Early History of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease 1808-1980.

    PubMed

    Watson, R Ann; Pride, Neil B

    2016-01-01

    COPD has become a more popular research area in the last 3 decades, yet the first clear descriptions of acute and chronic bronchitis were in 1808. This brief history, comprehensively referenced, leads us through the early developments in respiratory physiology and their applications. It emphasises the early history of chronic bronchitis and emphysema in the 19(th) and early 20(th) centuries, long before the dominant effects of cigarette smoking emerged. This remains relevant to developing countries today.

  18. Hydrogen-rich saline inhibits tobacco smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by alleviating airway inflammation and mucus hypersecretion in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zibing; Geng, Wenye; Jiang, Chuanwei; Zhao, Shujun; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Ying; Qin, Shucun; Li, Chenxu; Zhang, Xinfang; Si, Yanhong

    2017-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease induced by tobacco smoke has been regarded as a great health problem worldwide. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the protective effect of hydrogen-rich saline, a novel antioxidant, on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and explore the underlying mechanism. Sprague-Dawley rats were made chronic obstructive pulmonary disease models via tobacco smoke exposure for 12 weeks and the rats were treated with 10 ml/kg hydrogen-rich saline intraperitoneally during the last 4 weeks. Lung function testing indicated hydrogen-rich saline decreased lung airway resistance and increased lung compliance and the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 0.1 s/forced vital capacity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease rats. Histological analysis revealed that hydrogen-rich saline alleviated morphological impairments of lung in tobacco smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease rats. ELISA assay showed hydrogen-rich saline lowered the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-8 and IL-6) and anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease rats. The content of malondialdehyde in lung tissue and serum was also determined and the data indicated hydrogen-rich saline suppressed oxidative stress reaction. The protein expressions of mucin MUC5C and aquaporin 5 involved in mucus hypersecretion were analyzed by Western blot and ELISA and the data revealed that hydrogen-rich saline down-regulated MUC5AC level in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue and up-regulated aquaporin 5 level in lung tissue of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease rats. In conclusion, these results suggest that administration of hydrogen-rich saline exhibits significant protective effect on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease through alleviating inflammation, reducing oxidative stress and lessening mucus hypersecretion in tobacco smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease rats

  19. Inflammation occurs early during the Abeta deposition process in TgCRND8 mice.

    PubMed

    Dudal, Sherri; Krzywkowski, Pascale; Paquette, Julie; Morissette, Céline; Lacombe, Diane; Tremblay, Patrick; Gervais, Francine

    2004-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by a progressive cognitive decline leading to dementia and involves the deposition of amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptides into senile plaques. Other neuropathological features that accompany progression of the disease include a decrease in synaptic density, neurofibrillary tangles, dystrophic neurites, inflammation, and neuronal cell loss. In this study, we report the early kinetics of brain amyloid deposition and its associated inflammation in an early onset transgenic mouse model of AD (TgCRND8) harboring the human amyloid precursor protein gene with the Indiana and Swedish mutations. Both diffuse and compact plaques were detected as early as 9-10 weeks of age. Abeta-immunoreactive (Abeta-IR) plaques (4G8-positive) appeared first in the neocortex and amygdala, then in the hippocampal formation, and lastly in the thalamus. Compact plaques (ThioS-positive) with an amyloid core were observed as early as diffuse plaques were detected, but in lower numbers. Amyloid deposition increased progressively with age. The formation of plaques was concurrent with the appearance of activated microglial cells and shortly followed by the clustering of activated astrocytes around plaques at 13-14 weeks of age. This TgCRND8 mouse model allows for a rapid, time-dependent study of the relationship between the fibrillogenic process and the inflammatory response during the brain amyloidogenic process.

  20. β-Glucans Are Masked but Contribute to Pulmonary Inflammation During Pneumocystis Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Kutty, Geetha; Davis, A. Sally; Ferreyra, Gabriela A.; Qiu, Ju; Huang, Da Wei; Sassi, Monica; Bishop, Lisa; Handley, Grace; Sherman, Brad; Lempicki, Richard; Kovacs, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    β-glucans, which can activate innate immune responses, are a major component in the cell wall of the cyst form of Pneumocystis. In the current study, we examined whether β-1,3-glucans are masked by surface proteins in Pneumocystis and what role β-glucans play in Pneumocystis-associated inflammation. For 3 species, including Pneumocystis jirovecii, which causes Pneumocystis pneumonia in humans, Pneumocystis carinii, and Pneumocystis murina, β-1,3-glucans were masked in most organisms, as demonstrated by increased exposure following trypsin treatment. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and microarray techniques, we demonstrated in a mouse model of Pneumocystis pneumonia that treatment with caspofungin, an inhibitor of β-1,3-glucan synthesis, for 21 days decreased expression of a broad panel of inflammatory markers, including interferon γ, tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 1β, interleukin 6, and multiple chemokines/chemokine ligands. Thus, β-glucans in Pneumocystis cysts are largely masked, which likely decreases innate immune activation; this mechanism presumably was developed for interactions with immunocompetent hosts, in whom organism loads are substantially lower. In immunosuppressed hosts with a high organism burden, organism death and release of glucans appears to be an important contributor to deleterious host inflammatory responses. PMID:27324243

  1. Measured Pulmonary and Systemic Markers of Inflammation and Oxidative Stress Following Wildland Firefighter Simulations.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Matthew D; Semmens, Erin O; Dumke, Charles; Quindry, John C; Ward, Tony J

    2016-04-01

    A controlled human exposure study was conducted to investigate the impact of inhalational exposures to wood smoke PM2.5 on measured concentrations of airway and systemic inflammatory biomarkers. Mimicking wildland firefighter activities, 10 participants were exposed to three doses of wood smoke PM2.5 (filtered-air, 250 μg/m, and 500 μg/m) while exercising on a treadmill. Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) and blood plasma samples were obtained pre-, immediately post-, and 1-hour postexposure. 8-isoprostane, pH, and myeloperoxidase were measured in EBC, while H2O2, surfactant protein D, and pentraxin-3 (PTX3) were measured in both EBC and plasma. Only pH, 8-isoprostane, and PTX3 displayed significant changes when comparing pre- and postexposures. Markers of inflammation and oxidative stress, including PTX3, pH, and 8-isoprostane in EBC and/or plasma, are sensitive to wood smoke inhalation, with further investigations warranted.

  2. Measured pulmonary and systemic markers of inflammation and oxidative stress following wildland firefighter simulations

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Matthew D.; Semmens, Erin O.; Dumke, Charles; Quindry, John C.; Ward, Tony J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective A controlled human exposure study was conducted to investigate the impact of inhalational exposures to wood smoke PM2.5 on measured concentrations of airway and systemic inflammatory biomarkers. Methods Mimicking wildland firefighter activities, 10 participants were exposed to three doses of wood smoke PM2.5 (filtered-air, 250 µg/m3, and 500 µg/m3) while exercising on a treadmill. Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) and blood plasma samples were obtained pre-, immediately post-, and 1-hour post-exposure. 8-isoprostane, pH, and myeloperoxidase were measured in EBC while H2O2, surfactant protein D, and pentraxin-3 (PTX3) were measured in both EBC and plasma. Results Only pH, 8-isoprostane, and PTX3 displayed significant changes when comparing pre- and post- exposures. Conclusions Markers of inflammation and oxidative stress, including PTX3, pH, and 8-isoprostane in EBC and/or plasma, are sensitive to wood smoke inhalation, with further investigations warranted. PMID:27058482

  3. Update on the Mechanisms of Pulmonary Inflammation and Oxidative Imbalance Induced by Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Araneda, O. F.; Carbonell, T.; Tuesta, M.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in the generation of oxidative damage and lung inflammation induced by physical exercise are described. Changes in lung function induced by exercise involve cooling of the airways, fluid evaporation of the epithelial surface, increased contact with polluting substances, and activation of the local and systemic inflammatory response. The present work includes evidence obtained from the different types of exercise in terms of duration and intensity, the effect of both acute performance and chronic performance, and the influence of special conditions such as cold weather, high altitude, and polluted environments. Levels of prooxidants, antioxidants, oxidative damage to biomolecules, and cellularity, as well as levels of soluble mediators of the inflammatory response and its effects on tissues, are described in samples of lung origin. These samples include tissue homogenates, induced sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, biopsies, and exhaled breath condensate obtained in experimental protocols conducted on animal and human models. Finally, the need to simultaneously explore the oxidative/inflammatory parameters to establish the interrelation between them is highlighted. PMID:26881028

  4. Update on the Mechanisms of Pulmonary Inflammation and Oxidative Imbalance Induced by Exercise.

    PubMed

    Araneda, O F; Carbonell, T; Tuesta, M

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in the generation of oxidative damage and lung inflammation induced by physical exercise are described. Changes in lung function induced by exercise involve cooling of the airways, fluid evaporation of the epithelial surface, increased contact with polluting substances, and activation of the local and systemic inflammatory response. The present work includes evidence obtained from the different types of exercise in terms of duration and intensity, the effect of both acute performance and chronic performance, and the influence of special conditions such as cold weather, high altitude, and polluted environments. Levels of prooxidants, antioxidants, oxidative damage to biomolecules, and cellularity, as well as levels of soluble mediators of the inflammatory response and its effects on tissues, are described in samples of lung origin. These samples include tissue homogenates, induced sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, biopsies, and exhaled breath condensate obtained in experimental protocols conducted on animal and human models. Finally, the need to simultaneously explore the oxidative/inflammatory parameters to establish the interrelation between them is highlighted.

  5. β-Glucans Are Masked but Contribute to Pulmonary Inflammation During Pneumocystis Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Kutty, Geetha; Davis, A Sally; Ferreyra, Gabriela A; Qiu, Ju; Huang, Da Wei; Sassi, Monica; Bishop, Lisa; Handley, Grace; Sherman, Brad; Lempicki, Richard; Kovacs, Joseph A

    2016-09-01

    β-glucans, which can activate innate immune responses, are a major component in the cell wall of the cyst form of Pneumocystis In the current study, we examined whether β-1,3-glucans are masked by surface proteins in Pneumocystis and what role β-glucans play in Pneumocystis-associated inflammation. For 3 species, including Pneumocystis jirovecii, which causes Pneumocystis pneumonia in humans, Pneumocystis carinii, and Pneumocystis murina, β-1,3-glucans were masked in most organisms, as demonstrated by increased exposure following trypsin treatment. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and microarray techniques, we demonstrated in a mouse model of Pneumocystis pneumonia that treatment with caspofungin, an inhibitor of β-1,3-glucan synthesis, for 21 days decreased expression of a broad panel of inflammatory markers, including interferon γ, tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 1β, interleukin 6, and multiple chemokines/chemokine ligands. Thus, β-glucans in Pneumocystis cysts are largely masked, which likely decreases innate immune activation; this mechanism presumably was developed for interactions with immunocompetent hosts, in whom organism loads are substantially lower. In immunosuppressed hosts with a high organism burden, organism death and release of glucans appears to be an important contributor to deleterious host inflammatory responses. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  6. Iron Status and Inflammation in Early Stages of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Łukaszyk, Ewelina; Łukaszyk, Mateusz; Koc-Żórawska, Ewa; Tobolczyk, Jolanta; Bodzenta-Łukaszyk, Anna; Małyszko, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    One of the most common causes of anemia of chronic disease (ACD) is chronic kidney disease. The main pathomechanism responsible for ACD is subclinical inflammation. The key element involved in iron metabolism is hepcidin, however, studies on new indices of iron status are in progress.The aim of the study was to assess the iron status in patients in early stages of chronic kidney disease, iron correlation with inflammation parameters and novel biomarkers of iron metabolism. The study included 69 patients. Standard laboratory measurements were used to measure the iron status, complete blood count, fibrinogen, prothrombin index, C-reactive protein concentration (CRP), creatinine, urea, uric acid. Commercially available kits were used to measure high-sensitivity CRP, interleukin 6 (IL-6), hepcidin-25, hemojuvelin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15) and zonulin. Absolute iron deficiency was present in 17% of the patients, functional iron deficiency was present in 12% of the patients. Functional iron deficiency was associated with significantly higher serum levels of fibrinogen, ferritin, transferrin saturation, total iron binding capacity, hepcidin and older age relative to patients with absolute iron deficiency. In comparison with patients without iron deficiency, patients with functional iron deficiency were older, with lower prothrombin index, higher fibrinogen, CRP, hsCRP, sTfR, GDF-15, urea and lower eGFR. Hepcidin was predicted by markers of inflammation:ferritin, fibrinogen and IL-6. Inflammation is correlated with iron status. Novel biomarkers of iron metabolism might be useful to distinguish iron deficiency anemia connected with inflammation and absolute iron deficiency. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Differences in inflammation and acute phase response but similar genotoxicity in mice following pulmonary exposure to graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide

    PubMed Central

    Bengtson, Stefan; Knudsen, Kristina B.; Kyjovska, Zdenka O.; Berthing, Trine; Skaug, Vidar; Levin, Marcus; Koponen, Ismo K.; Shivayogimath, Abhay; Booth, Timothy J.; Alonso, Beatriz; Pesquera, Amaia; Zurutuza, Amaia; Thomsen, Birthe L.; Troelsen, Jesper T.; Jacobsen, Nicklas R.

    2017-01-01

    We investigated toxicity of 2–3 layered >1 μm sized graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) in mice following single intratracheal exposure with respect to pulmonary inflammation, acute phase response (biomarker for risk of cardiovascular disease) and genotoxicity. In addition, we assessed exposure levels of particulate matter emitted during production of graphene in a clean room and in a normal industrial environment using chemical vapour deposition. Toxicity was evaluated at day 1, 3, 28 and 90 days (18, 54 and 162 μg/mouse), except for GO exposed mice at day 28 and 90 where only the lowest dose was evaluated. GO induced a strong acute inflammatory response together with a pulmonary (Serum-Amyloid A, Saa3) and hepatic (Saa1) acute phase response. rGO induced less acute, but a constant and prolonged inflammation up to day 90. Lung histopathology showed particle agglomerates at day 90 without signs of fibrosis. In addition, DNA damage in BAL cells was observed across time points and doses for both GO and rGO. In conclusion, pulmonary exposure to GO and rGO induced inflammation, acute phase response and genotoxicity but no fibrosis. PMID:28570647

  8. Subchronic exposures to fungal bioaerosols promotes allergic pulmonary inflammation in naïve mice.

    PubMed

    Nayak, A P; Green, B J; Lemons, A R; Marshall, N B; Goldsmith, W T; Kashon, M L; Anderson, S E; Germolec, D R; Beezhold, D H

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiological surveys indicate that occupants of mold contaminated environments are at increased risk of respiratory symptoms. The immunological mechanisms associated with these responses require further characterization. The aim of this study was to characterize the immunotoxicological outcomes following repeated inhalation of dry Aspergillus fumigatus spores aerosolized at concentrations potentially encountered in contaminated indoor environments. Aspergillus fumigatus spores were delivered to the lungs of naïve BALB/cJ mice housed in a multi-animal nose-only chamber twice a week for a period of 13 weeks. Mice were evaluated at 24 and 48 h post-exposure for histopathological changes in lung architecture, recruitment of specific immune cells to the airways, and serum antibody responses. Germinating A. fumigatus spores were observed in lungs along with persistent fungal debris in the perivascular regions of the lungs. Repeated exposures promoted pleocellular infiltration with concomitant epithelial mucus hypersecretion, goblet cell metaplasia, subepithelial fibrosis and enhanced airway hyperreactivity. Cellular infiltration in airways was predominated by CD4(+) T cells expressing the pro-allergic cytokine IL-13. Furthermore, our studies show that antifungal T cell responses (IFN-γ(+) or IL-17A(+) ) co-expressed IL-13, revealing a novel mechanism for the dysregulated immune response to inhaled fungi. Total IgE production was augmented in animals repeatedly exposed to A. fumigatus. Repeated inhalation of fungal aerosols resulted in significant pulmonary pathology mediated by dynamic shifts in specific immune populations and their cytokines. These studies provide novel insights into the immunological mechanisms and targets that govern the health outcomes that result from repeated inhalation of fungal bioaerosols in contaminated environments. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  9. Subchronic exposures to fungal bioaerosols promotes allergic pulmonary inflammation in naïve mice

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Ajay P.; Green, Brett J.; Lemons, Angela R.; Marshall, Nikki B.; Goldsmith, W. Travis; Kashon, Michael L.; Anderson, Stacey E.; Germolec, Dori R.; Beezhold, Donald H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Epidemiological surveys indicate that occupants of mold contaminated environments are at increased risk of respiratory symptoms. The immunological mechanisms associated with these responses require further characterization. Objective The aim of this study was to characterize the immunotoxicological outcomes following repeated inhalation of dry Aspergillus fumigatus spores aerosolized at concentrations potentially encountered in contaminated indoor environments. Methods A. fumigatus spores were delivered to the lungs of naïve BALB/cJ mice housed in a multi-animal nose-only chamber twice a week for a period of 13 weeks. Mice were evaluated at 24 and 48 hours post-exposure for histopathological changes in lung architecture, recruitment of specific immune cells to the airways, and serum antibody responses. Result Germinating A. fumigatus spores were observed in lungs along with persistent fungal debris in the perivascular regions of the lungs. Repeated exposures promoted pleocellular infiltration with concomitant epithelial mucus hypersecretion, goblet cell metaplasia, subepithelial fibrosis and enhanced airway hyperreactivity. Cellular infiltration in airways was predominated by CD4+ T cells expressing the pro-allergic cytokine IL-13. Furthermore, our studies show that antifungal T cell responses (IFN-γ+ or IL-17A+) co-expressed IL-13, revealing a novel mechanism for the dysregulated immune response to inhaled fungi. Total IgE production was augmented in animals repeatedly exposed to A. fumigatus. Conclusions & Clinical Relevance Repeated inhalation of fungal aerosols resulted in significant pulmonary pathology mediated by dynamic shifts in specific immune populations and their cytokines. These studies provide novel insights into the immunological mechanisms and targets that govern the health outcomes that result from repeated inhalation of fungal bioaerosols in contaminated environments. PMID:26892490

  10. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection and G and/or SH Protein Expression Contribute to Substance P, Which Mediates Inflammation and Enhanced Pulmonary Disease in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tripp, Ralph A.; Moore, Deborah; Winter, Jorn; Anderson, Larry J.

    2000-01-01

    A distinct clinical presentation of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection of humans is bronchiolitis, which has clinical features similar to those of asthma. Substance P (SP), a tachykinin neuropeptide, has been associated with neurogenic inflammation and asthma; therefore, we chose to examine SP-induced inflammation with RSV infection. In this study, we examined the production of pulmonary SP associated with RSV infection of BALB/c mice and the effect of anti-SP F(ab)2 antibodies on the pulmonary inflammatory response. The peak production of pulmonary SP occurred between days 3 and 5 following primary RSV infection and day 1 after secondary infection. Treatment of RSV-infected mice with anti-SP F(ab)2 antibodies suggested that SP may alter the natural killer cell response to primary and secondary infection. In mice challenged after formalin-inactivated RSV vaccination, SP appears to markedly enhance pulmonary eosinophilia as well as increase polymorphonuclear cell trafficking to the lung. Based on studies with a strain of RSV that lacks the G and SH genes, the SP response to RSV infection appears to be associated with G and/or SH protein expression. These data suggest that SP may be an important contributor to the inflammatory response to RSV infection and that anti-SP F(ab)2 antibodies might be used to ameliorate RSV-associated disease. PMID:10644330

  11. Neurodevelopment: The Impact of Nutrition and Inflammation During Early to Middle Childhood in Low-Resource Settings.

    PubMed

    John, Chandy C; Black, Maureen M; Nelson, Charles A

    2017-04-01

    The early to middle childhood years are a critical period for child neurodevelopment. Nutritional deficiencies, infection, and inflammation are major contributors to impaired child neurodevelopment in these years, particularly in low-resource settings. This review identifies global research priorities relating to nutrition, infection, and inflammation in early to middle childhood neurodevelopment. The research priority areas identified include: (1) assessment of how nutrition, infection, or inflammation in the preconception, prenatal, and infancy periods (or interventions in these periods) affect function in early to middle childhood; (2) assessment of whether effects of nutritional interventions vary by poverty or inflammation; (3) determination of the feasibility of preschool- and school-based integrated nutritional interventions; (4) improved assessment of the epidemiology of infection- and inflammation-related neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI); (5) identification of mechanisms through which infection causes NDI; (6) identification of noninfectious causes of inflammation-related NDI and interventions for causes already identified (eg, environmental factors); and (7) studies on the effects of interactions between nutritional, infectious, and inflammatory factors on neurodevelopment in early to middle childhood. Areas of emerging importance that require additional study include the effects of maternal Zika virus infection, childhood environmental enteropathy, and alterations in the child's microbiome on neurodevelopment in early to middle childhood. Research in these key areas will be critical to the development of interventions to optimize the neurodevelopmental potential of children worldwide in the early to middle childhood years. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  12. Surgical management of anomalous pulmonary venous connection to the superior vena cava - early results

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Dinesh; Gupta, Anubhav; Nath, Ranjit K.; kazmi, Aamir; Grover, Vijay; Gupta, Vijay K.

    2013-01-01

    Background The anatomical variability in patients with anomalous pulmonary venous connection to superior vena cava presents a surgical challenge. The problem is further compounded by the common occurrence of postoperative complications like arrhythmias and obstruction of the superior vena cava or pulmonary veins. We present our experience of managing this subset using the two patch and Warden's techniques. Patients and methods Between June 2011 and September 2012, 7 patients with APVC to the SVC were operated in our institute. After delineating the anatomy, five of them had a two patch repair and two were managed with Warden's technique. Results There was no in-hospital mortality or early mortality over a mean follow-up of 9.66 ± 3.88 months (range 6–15 months). All the patients on follow-up had unobstructed pulmonary venous and SVC drainage on echocardiography and all of them were in normal sinus rhythm. Conclusions Anomalous pulmonary venous connection to superior vena cava is a challenging subset of patients in whom the surgical management needs to be individualized. The detailed anatomy must be delineated using echocardiography with or without CT angiography before deciding the surgical plan. This entity can be repaired with excellent immediate and early results. However, these patients must be closely followed up for complications like systemic and pulmonary venous obstruction and sinus node dysfunction. PMID:24206880

  13. The use of iloprost in early pregnancy in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Elliot, C A; Stewart, P; Webster, V J; Mills, G H; Hutchinson, S P; Howarth, E S; Bu'lock, F A; Lawson, R A; Armstrong, I J; Kiely, D G

    2005-07-01

    In patients with pulmonary hypertension, pregnancy is associated with a high risk of maternal death. Such patients are counselled to avoid pregnancy, or if it occurs, are offered early interruption. Some patients, however, decide to continue with their pregnancy and others may present with symptoms for the first time whilst pregnant. Pulmonary vasodilator therapy provides a treatment option for these high-risk patients. The present study describes three patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension of various aetiologies who were treated with the prostacyclin analogue iloprost during pregnancy, and the post-partum period. Nebulised iloprost commenced as early as 8 weeks of gestation and patients were admitted to hospital between 24-36 weeks of gestation. All pregnancies were completed with a duration of between 25-36 weeks and all deliveries were by caesarean section under local anaesthetic. All patients delivered children free from congenital abnormalities, and there was no post-partum maternal or infant mortality. In conclusion, although pregnancy is strongly advised against in those with pulmonary hypertension, the current authors have achieved a successful outcome for mother and foetus with a multidisciplinary approach and targeted pulmonary vascular therapy.

  14. Cold ischemia with selective anterograde in situ pulmonary perfusion preserves gas exchange and mitochondrial homeostasis and curbs inflammation in an experimental model of donation after cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Pottecher, Julien; Santelmo, Nicola; Noll, Eric; Charles, Anne-Laure; Benahmed, Malika; Canuet, Matthieu; Frossard, Nelly; Namer, Izzie J; Geny, Bernard; Massard, Gilbert; Diemunsch, Pierre

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the functional preservation of the lung graft with anterograde lung perfusion in a model of donation after cardiac death. Thirty minutes after cardiac arrest, in situ anterograde selective pulmonary cold perfusion was started in six swine. The alveolo-capillary membrane was challenged at 3, 6, and 8 h with measurements of the mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP), the pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), the PaO2 /FiO2 ratio, the transpulmonary oxygen output (tpVO2 ), and the transpulmonary CO2 clearance (tpCO2 ). Mitochondrial homeostasis was investigated by measuring maximal oxidative capacity (Vmax ) and the coupling of phosphorylation to oxidation (ACR, acceptor control ratio) in lung biopsies. Inflammation and induction of primary immune response were assessed by measurement of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), interleukine-6 (IL-6) and receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Data were compared using repeated measures Anova. Pulmonary hemodynamics (mPAP: P = 0.69; PVR: P = 0.46), oxygenation (PaO2 /FiO2 : P = 0.56; tpVO2 : P = 0.46), CO2 diffusion (tpCO2 : P = 0.24), mitochondrial homeostasis (Vmax : P = 0.42; ACR: P = 0.8), and RAGE concentrations (P = 0.24) did not significantly change up to 8 h after cardiac arrest. TNFα and IL-6 were undetectable. Unaffected pulmonary hemodynamics, sustained oxygen and carbon dioxide diffusion, preserved mitochondrial homeostasis, and lack of inflammation suggest a long-lasting functional preservation of the graft with selective anterograde in situ pulmonary perfusion. © 2013 Steunstichting ESOT. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Pulmonary decompression sickness at altitude: early symptoms and circulating gas emboli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balldin, Ulf I.; Pilmanis, Andrew A.; Webb, James T.

    2002-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Pulmonary altitude decompression sickness (DCS) is a rare condition. 'Chokes' which are characterized by the triad of substernal pain, cough, and dyspnea, are considered to be associated with severe accumulation of gas bubbles in the pulmonary capillaries and may rapidly develop into a life-threatening medical emergency. This study was aimed at characterizing early symptomatology and the appearance of venous gas emboli (VGE). METHODS: Symptoms of simulated-altitude DCS and VGE (with echo-imaging ultrasound) were analyzed in 468 subjects who participated in 22 high altitude hypobaric chamber research protocols from 1983 to 2001 at Brooks Air Force Base, TX. RESULTS: Of 2525 subject-exposures to simulated altitude, 1030 (41%) had symptoms of DCS. Only 29 of those included DCS-related pulmonary symptoms. Of these, only 3 subjects had all three pulmonary symptoms of chokes; 9 subjects had two of the pulmonary symptoms; and 17 subjects had only one. Of the 29 subject-exposures with pulmonary symptoms, 27 had VGE and 21 had severe VGE. The mean onset times of VGE and symptoms in the 29 subject-exposures were 42 +/- 30 min and 109 +/- 61 min, respectively. In 15 subjects, the symptoms disappeared during recompression to ground level followed by 2 h of oxygen breathing. In the remaining 14 cases, the symptoms disappeared with immediate hyperbaric oxygen treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Pulmonary altitude DCS or chokes is confirmed to be a rare condition. Our data showed that when diagnosed early, recompression to ground level pressure and/or hyperbaric oxygen treatment was 100% successful in resolving the symptoms.

  16. Acute Meteorite Dust Exposure and Pulmonary Inflammation - Implications for Human Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, A. D.; McCubbin, F. M.; Kaur, J.; Smirnov, A.; Galdanes, K.; Schoonen, M. A. A.; Chen, L. C.; Tsirka, S. E.; Gordon, T.

    2017-01-01

    The previous manned missions to the Moon represent milestones of human ingenuity, perseverance, and intellectual curiosity. However, one of the major ongoing concerns is the array of hazards associated with lunar surface dust. Not only did the dust cause mechanical and structural integrity issues with the suits, the dust 'storm' generated upon reentrance into the crew cabin caused "lunar hay fever" and "almost blindness [1-3]" (Figure 1). It was further reported that the allergic response to the dust worsened with each exposure [4]. The lack of gravity exacerbated the exposure, requiring the astronauts to wear their helmet within the module in order to avoid breathing the irritating particles [1]. Due to the prevalence of these high exposures, the Human Research Roadmap developed by NASA identifies the Risk of Adverse Health and Performance Effects of Celestial Dust Exposure as an area of concern [5]. Extended human exploration will further increase the probability of inadvertent and repeated exposures to celestial dusts. Going forward, hazard assessments of celestial dusts will be determined through sample return efforts prior to astronaut deployment. Studies on the lunar highland regolith indicate that the dust is not only respirable but also reactive [2, 6-9], and previous studies concluded that it is moderately toxic; generating a greater response than titanium oxide but a lower response than quartz [6]. The presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on the surface of the dust has been implicated. However, there is actually little data related to physicochemical characteristics of particulates and pulmonary toxicity, especially as it relates to celestial dust exposure. As a direct response to this deficit, the present study evaluates the role of a particulate's innate geochemical features (e.g., bulk chemistry, internal composition, morphology, size, and reactivity) in generating adverse toxicological responses in vitro and in vivo. This highly interdisciplinary

  17. Maternal Dietary Docosahexaenoic Acid Supplementation Attenuates Fetal Growth Restriction and Enhances Pulmonary Function in a Newborn Mouse Model of Perinatal Inflammation123

    PubMed Central

    Velten, Markus; Britt, Rodney D.; Heyob, Kathryn M.; Tipple, Trent E.; Rogers, Lynette K.

    2014-01-01

    The preterm infant is often exposed to maternal and neonatal inflammatory stimuli and is born with immature lungs, resulting in a need for oxygen therapy. Nutritional intervention with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 6.3 g/kg of diet) has been shown to attenuate inflammation in various human diseases. Previous studies demonstrated that maternal DHA supplementation during late gestation and lactation attenuated hyperoxic lung injury in newborn mouse pups. In the present studies, we tested the hypothesis that DHA supplementation to the dam would reduce hyperoxic lung injury and growth deficits in a more severe model of systemic maternal inflammation, including lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and neonatal hyperoxia exposure. On embryonic day 16, dams were placed on DHA (6.3 g DHA/kg diet) or control diets and injected with saline or LPS. Diets were maintained through weaning. At birth, pups were placed in room air or hyperoxia for 14 d. Improvements in birth weight (P < 0.01), alveolarization (P ≤ 0.01), and pulmonary function (P ≤ 0.03) at 2 and 8 wk of age were observed in pups exposed to perinatal inflammation and born to DHA-supplemented dams compared with control diet–exposed pups. These improvements were associated with decreases in tissue macrophage numbers (P < 0.01), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression (P ≤ 0.05), and decreases in soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products concentrations (P < 0.01) at 2 and 8 wk. Furthermore, DHA supplementation attenuated pulmonary fibrosis, which was associated with the reduction of matrix metalloproteinases 2, 3, and 8 (P ≤ 0.03) and collagen mRNA (P ≤ 0.05), and decreased collagen (P < 0.01) and vimentin (P ≤ 0.03) protein concentrations. In a model of severe inflammation, maternal DHA supplementation lessened inflammation and improved lung growth in the offspring. Maternal supplementation with DHA may be a therapeutic strategy to reduce neonatal inflammation. PMID:24453131

  18. Early pulmonary vascular disease in preterm infants at risk for bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Mourani, Peter M; Sontag, Marci K; Younoszai, Adel; Miller, Joshua I; Kinsella, John P; Baker, Christopher D; Poindexter, Brenda B; Ingram, David A; Abman, Steven H

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is associated with poor outcomes among preterm infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), but whether early signs of pulmonary vascular disease are associated with the subsequent development of BPD or PH at 36 weeks post-menstrual age (PMA) is unknown. To prospectively evaluate the relationship of early echocardiogram signs of pulmonary vascular disease in preterm infants to the subsequent development of BPD and late PH (at 36 wk PMA). Prospectively enrolled preterm infants with birthweights 500-1,250 g underwent echocardiogram evaluations at 7 days of age (early) and 36 weeks PMA (late). Clinical and echocardiographic data were analyzed to identify early risk factors for BPD and late PH. A total of 277 preterm infants completed echocardiogram and BPD assessments at 36 weeks PMA. The median gestational age at birth and birthweight of the infants were 27 weeks and 909 g, respectively. Early PH was identified in 42% of infants, and 14% were diagnosed with late PH. Early PH was a risk factor for increased BPD severity (relative risk, 1.12; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-1.23) and late PH (relative risk, 2.85; 95% confidence interval, 1.28-6.33). Infants with late PH had greater duration of oxygen therapy and increased mortality in the first year of life (P < 0.05). Early pulmonary vascular disease is associated with the development of BPD and with late PH in preterm infants. Echocardiograms at 7 days of age may be a useful tool to identify infants at high risk for BPD and PH.

  19. B-type natriuretic peptide measurement for early diagnosis of acute pulmonary edema during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Seror, Jeremy; Lefevre, Guillaume; Berkane, Nathalie; Richard, Frederic; Bornes, Marie; Uzan, Serge; Berkane, Nadia

    2014-12-01

    Calcium-channel blockers administered to pregnant women as tocolytic agents can cause acute pulmonary edema. The first signs of this severe complication can be atypical and so delay introduction of appropriate therapy. We describe three cases in whom B-type natriuretic peptide measurements proved to be relevant in early diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women with acute pulmonary edema. B-type natriuretic peptide measurement in this setting could contribute to timely diagnosis and improve follow-up. © 2014 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  20. A Randomized, Placebo-controlled Trial of Roflumilast. Effect on Proline-Glycine-Proline and Neutrophilic Inflammation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Wells, J Michael; Jackson, Patricia L; Viera, Liliana; Bhatt, Surya P; Gautney, Joshua; Handley, Guy; King, R Wilson; Xu, Xin; Gaggar, Amit; Bailey, William C; Dransfield, Mark T; Blalock, J Edwin

    2015-10-15

    Roflumilast is a therapeutic agent in the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It has antiinflammatory effects; however, it is not known whether it can affect a biologic pathway implicated in COPD pathogenesis and progression. The self-propagating acetyl-proline-glycine-proline (AcPGP) pathway is a novel means of neutrophilic inflammation that is pathologic in the development of COPD. AcPGP is produced by extracellular matrix collagen breakdown with prolyl endopeptidase and leukotriene A4 hydrolase serving as the enzymes responsible for its production and degradation, respectively. We hypothesized that roflumilast would decrease AcPGP, halting the feed-forward cycle of inflammation. We conducted a single-center, placebo-controlled, randomized study investigating 12 weeks of roflumilast treatment added to current therapy in moderate-to-severe COPD with chronic bronchitis. Subjects underwent sputum and blood analyses, pulmonary function testing, exercise tolerance, and quality-of-life assessment at 0, 4, and 12 weeks. Twenty-seven patients were enrolled in the intention-to-treat analysis. Roflumilast treatment decreased sputum AcPGP by more than 50% (P < 0.01) and prolyl endopeptidase by 46% (P = 0.02), without significant improvement in leukotriene A4 hydrolase activity compared with placebo. Roflumilast also reduces other inflammatory markers. There were no significant changes in lung function, quality of life, or exercise tolerance between roflumilast- and placebo-treated groups. Roflumilast reduces pulmonary inflammation through decreasing prolyl endopeptidase activity and AcPGP. As expected for lower AcPGP levels, markers of neutrophilic inflammation are blunted. Inhibiting this self-propagating pathway lessens the overall inflammatory burden, which may alter the natural history of COPD, including the risk of exacerbation. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 01572948).

  1. Btk Inhibitor RN983 Delivered by Dry Powder Nose-only Aerosol Inhalation Inhibits Bronchoconstriction and Pulmonary Inflammation in the Ovalbumin Allergic Mouse Model of Asthma.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Jonathan E; Renteria, Lorena; Burns, Lisa; Harris, Paul; Peng, Ruoqi; Bauer, Carla M T; Laine, Dramane; Stevenson, Christopher S

    2016-06-01

    In allergen-induced asthma, activated mast cells start the lung inflammatory process with degranulation, cytokine synthesis, and mediator release. Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) activity is required for the mast cell activation during IgE-mediated secretion. This study characterized a novel inhaled Btk inhibitor RN983 in vitro and in ovalbumin allergic mouse models of the early (EAR) and late (LAR) asthmatic response. RN983 potently, selectively, and reversibly inhibited the Btk enzyme. RN983 displayed functional activities in human cell-based assays in multiple cell types, inhibiting IgG production in B-cells with an IC50 of 2.5 ± 0.7 nM and PGD2 production from mast cells with an IC50 of 8.3 ± 1.1 nM. RN983 displayed similar functional activities in the allergic mouse model of asthma when delivered as a dry powder aerosol by nose-only inhalation. RN983 was less potent at inhibiting bronchoconstriction (IC50(RN983) = 59 μg/kg) than the β-agonist salbutamol (IC50(salbutamol) = 15 μg/kg) in the mouse model of the EAR. RN983 was more potent at inhibiting the antigen induced increase in pulmonary inflammation (IC50(RN983) = <3 μg/kg) than the inhaled corticosteroid budesonide (IC50(budesonide) = 27 μg/kg) in the mouse model of the LAR. Inhalation of aerosolized RN983 may be effective as a stand-alone asthma therapy or used in combination with inhaled steroids and β-agonists in severe asthmatics due to its potent inhibition of mast cell activation.

  2. Btk Inhibitor RN983 Delivered by Dry Powder Nose-only Aerosol Inhalation Inhibits Bronchoconstriction and Pulmonary Inflammation in the Ovalbumin Allergic Mouse Model of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Renteria, Lorena; Burns, Lisa; Harris, Paul; Peng, Ruoqi; Bauer, Carla M.T.; Laine, Dramane; Stevenson, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: In allergen-induced asthma, activated mast cells start the lung inflammatory process with degranulation, cytokine synthesis, and mediator release. Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) activity is required for the mast cell activation during IgE-mediated secretion. Methods: This study characterized a novel inhaled Btk inhibitor RN983 in vitro and in ovalbumin allergic mouse models of the early (EAR) and late (LAR) asthmatic response. Results: RN983 potently, selectively, and reversibly inhibited the Btk enzyme. RN983 displayed functional activities in human cell-based assays in multiple cell types, inhibiting IgG production in B-cells with an IC50 of 2.5 ± 0.7 nM and PGD2 production from mast cells with an IC50 of 8.3 ± 1.1 nM. RN983 displayed similar functional activities in the allergic mouse model of asthma when delivered as a dry powder aerosol by nose-only inhalation. RN983 was less potent at inhibiting bronchoconstriction (IC50(RN983) = 59 μg/kg) than the β-agonist salbutamol (IC50(salbutamol) = 15 μg/kg) in the mouse model of the EAR. RN983 was more potent at inhibiting the antigen induced increase in pulmonary inflammation (IC50(RN983) = <3 μg/kg) than the inhaled corticosteroid budesonide (IC50(budesonide) = 27 μg/kg) in the mouse model of the LAR. Conclusions: Inhalation of aerosolized RN983 may be effective as a stand-alone asthma therapy or used in combination with inhaled steroids and β-agonists in severe asthmatics due to its potent inhibition of mast cell activation. PMID:27111445

  3. Alum Adjuvant Enhances Protection against Respiratory Syncytial Virus but Exacerbates Pulmonary Inflammation by Modulating Multiple Innate and Adaptive Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Hye; Lee, Young-Tae; Hwang, Hye Suk; Kwon, Young-Man; Jung, Yu-Jin; Lee, Youri; Lee, Jong Seok; Lee, Yu-Na; Park, Soojin; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is well-known for inducing vaccine-enhanced respiratory disease after vaccination of young children with formalin-inactivated RSV (FI-RSV) in alum formulation. Here, we investigated alum adjuvant effects on protection and disease after FI-RSV immunization with or without alum in comparison with live RSV reinfections. Despite viral clearance, live RSV reinfections caused weight loss and substantial pulmonary inflammation probably due to high levels of RSV specific IFN-γ+IL4-, IFN-γ-TNF-α+, IFN-γ+TNF-α- effector CD4 and CD8 T cells. Alum adjuvant significantly improved protection as evidenced by effective viral clearance compared to unadjuvanted FI-RSV. However, in contrast to unadjuvanted FI-RSV, alum-adjuvanted FI-RSV (FI-RSV-A) induced severe vaccine-enhanced RSV disease including weight loss, eosinophilia, and lung histopathology. Alum adjuvant in the FI-RSV-A was found to be mainly responsible for inducing high levels of RSV-specific IFN-γ-IL4+, IFN-γ-TNF-α+ CD4+ T cells, and proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-4 as well as B220+ plasmacytoid and CD4+ dendritic cells, and inhibiting the induction of IFN-γ+CD8 T cells. This study suggests that alum adjuvant in FI-RSV vaccines increases immunogenicity and viral clearance but also induces atypical T helper CD4+ T cells and multiple inflammatory dendritic cell subsets responsible for vaccine-enhanced severe RSV disease. PMID:26468884

  4. Asthma-COPD overlap. Clinical relevance of genomic signatures of type 2 inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Christenson, Stephanie A; Steiling, Katrina; van den Berge, Maarten; Hijazi, Kahkeshan; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Postma, Dirkje S; Lenburg, Marc E; Spira, Avrum; Woodruff, Prescott G

    2015-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a heterogeneous disease and likely includes a subgroup that is biologically comparable to asthma. Studying asthma-associated gene expression changes in COPD could add insight into COPD pathogenesis and reveal biomarkers that predict a favorable response to corticosteroids. To determine whether asthma-associated gene signatures are increased in COPD and associated with asthma-related features. We compared disease-associated airway epithelial gene expression alterations in an asthma cohort (n = 105) and two COPD cohorts (n = 237, 171). The T helper type 2 (Th2) signature (T2S) score, a gene expression metric induced in Th2-high asthma, was evaluated in these COPD cohorts. The T2S score was correlated with asthma-related features and response to corticosteroids in COPD in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial, the Groningen and Leiden Universities study of Corticosteroids in Obstructive Lung Disease (GLUCOLD; n = 89). The 200 genes most differentially expressed in asthma versus healthy control subjects were enriched among genes associated with more severe airflow obstruction in these COPD cohorts (P < 0.001), suggesting significant gene expression overlap. A higher T2S score was associated with decreased lung function (P < 0.001), but not asthma history, in both COPD cohorts. Higher T2S scores correlated with increased airway wall eosinophil counts (P = 0.003), blood eosinophil percentage (P = 0.03), bronchodilator reversibility (P = 0.01), and improvement in hyperinflation after corticosteroid treatment (P = 0.019) in GLUCOLD. These data identify airway gene expression alterations that can co-occur in asthma and COPD. The association of the T2S score with increased severity and "asthma-like" features (including a favorable corticosteroid response) in COPD suggests that Th2 inflammation is important in a COPD subset that cannot be identified by clinical history of asthma.

  5. A Single Aspiration of Rod-like Carbon Nanotubes Induces Asbestos-like Pulmonary Inflammation Mediated in Part by the IL-1 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Rydman, Elina M; Ilves, Marit; Vanhala, Esa; Vippola, Minnamari; Lehto, Maili; Kinaret, Pia A S; Pylkkänen, Lea; Happo, Mikko; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta; Greco, Dario; Savolainen, Kai; Wolff, Henrik; Alenius, Harri

    2015-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been eagerly studied because of their multiple applications in product development and potential risks on health. We investigated the difference of two different CNT and asbestos in inducing proinflammatory reactions in C57BL/6 mice after single pharyngeal aspiration exposure. We used long tangled and long rod-like CNT, as well as crocidolite asbestos at a dose of 10 or 40 µg/mouse. The mice were sacrificed 4 and 16 h or 7, 14, and 28 days after the exposure. To find out the importance of a major inflammatory marker IL-1β in CNT-induced pulmonary inflammation, we used etanercept and anakinra as antagonists as well as Interleukin 1 (IL-1) receptor (IL-1R-/-) mice. The results showed that rod-like CNT, and asbestos in lesser extent, induced strong pulmonary neutrophilia accompanied by the proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines 16 h after the exposure. Seven days after the exposure, neutrophilia had essentially disappeared but strong pulmonary eosinophilia peaked in rod-like CNT and asbestos-exposed groups. After 28 days, pulmonary granulomas, goblet cell hyperplasia, and Charcot-Leyden-like crystals containing acidophilic macrophages were observed especially in rod-like CNT-exposed mice. IL-1R-/- mice and antagonists-treated mice exhibited a significant decrease in neutrophilia and messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) levels of proinflammatory cytokines at 16 h. However, rod-like CNT-induced Th2-type inflammation evidenced by the expression of IL-13 and mucus production was unaffected in IL-1R-/- mice at 28 days. This study provides knowledge about the pulmonary effects induced by a single exposure to the CNT and contributes to hazard assessment of carbon nanomaterials on airway exposure. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Omentin protects against LPS-induced ARDS through suppressing pulmonary inflammation and promoting endothelial barrier via an Akt/eNOS-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Qi, Di; Tang, Xumao; He, Jing; Wang, Daoxin; Zhao, Yan; Deng, Wang; Deng, Xinyu; Zhou, Guoqi; Xia, Jing; Zhong, Xi; Pu, Shenglan

    2016-09-08

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by increased pulmonary inflammation and endothelial barrier permeability. Omentin has been shown to benefit obesity-related systemic vascular diseases; however, its effects on ARDS are unknown. In the present study, the level of circulating omentin in patients with ARDS was assessed to appraise its clinical significance in ARDS. Mice were subjected to systemic administration of adenoviral vector expressing omentin (Ad-omentin) and one-shot treatment of recombinant human omentin (rh-omentin) to examine omentin's effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ARDS. Pulmonary endothelial cells (ECs) were treated with rh-omentin to further investigate its underlying mechanism. We found that a decreased level of circulating omentin negatively correlated with white blood cells and procalcitonin in patients with ARDS. Ad-omentin protected against LPS-induced ARDS by alleviating the pulmonary inflammatory response and endothelial barrier injury in mice, accompanied by Akt/eNOS pathway activation. Treatment of pulmonary ECs with rh-omentin attenuated inflammatory response and restored adherens junctions (AJs), and cytoskeleton organization promoted endothelial barrier after LPS insult. Moreover, the omentin-mediated enhancement of EC survival and differentiation was blocked by the Akt/eNOS pathway inactivation. Therapeutic rh-omentin treatment also effectively protected against LPS-induced ARDS via the Akt/eNOS pathway. Collectively, these data indicated that omentin protects against LPS-induced ARDS by suppressing inflammation and promoting the pulmonary endothelial barrier, at least partially, through an Akt/eNOS-dependent mechanism. Therapeutic strategies aiming to restore omentin levels may be valuable for the prevention or treatment of ARDS.

  7. Early treatment of chlorine-induced airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation with corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Jonasson, Sofia; Wigenstam, Elisabeth; Koch, Bo; Bucht, Anders

    2013-09-01

    Chlorine (Cl2) is an industrial gas that is highly toxic and irritating when inhaled causing tissue damage and an acute inflammatory response in the airways followed by a long-term airway dysfunction. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether early anti-inflammatory treatment can protect against the delayed symptoms in Cl2-exposed mice. BALB/c mice were exposed by nose-only inhalation using 200ppm Cl2 during 15min. Assessment of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), inflammatory cell counts in bronchoalveolar lavage, occurrence of lung edema and lung fibrosis were analyzed 24h or 14days post-exposure. A single dose of the corticosteroid dexamethasone (10 or 100mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally 1, 3, 6, or 12h following Cl2 exposure. High-dose of dexamethasone reduced the acute inflammation if administered within 6h after exposure but treated animals still displayed a significant lung injury. The effect of dexamethasone administered within 1h was dose-dependent; high-dose significantly reduced acute airway inflammation (100mg/kg) but not treatment with the relatively low-dose (10mg/kg). Both doses reduced AHR 14days later, while lung fibrosis measured as collagen deposition was not significantly reduced. The results point out that the acute inflammation in the lungs due to Cl2 exposure only partly is associated with the long-term AHR. We hypothesize that additional pathogenic mechanisms apart from the inflammatory reactions contribute to the development of long-term airway dysfunction. By using this mouse model, we have validated early administration of corticosteroids in terms of efficacy to prevent acute lung injury and delayed symptoms induced by Cl2 exposure. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Regulation of Adult Neurogenesis and Plasticity by (Early) Stress, Glucocorticoids, and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lucassen, Paul J.; Oomen, Charlotte A.; Naninck, Eva F.G.; Fitzsimons, Carlos P.; van Dam, Anne-Marie; Czeh, Boldizsár; Korosi, Aniko

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to stress is one of the best-known negative regulators of adult neurogenesis (AN). We discuss changes in neurogenesis in relation to exposure to stress, glucocorticoid hormones, and inflammation, with a particular focus on early development and on lasting effects of stress. Although the effects of acute and mild stress on AN are generally brief and can be quickly overcome, chronic exposure or more severe forms of stress can induce longer lasting reductions in neurogenesis that can, however, in part, be overcome by subsequent exposure to exercise, drugs targeting the stress system, and some antidepressants. Exposure to stress, particularly during the sensitive period of early life, may (re)program brain plasticity, in particular, in the hippocampus. This may increase the risk to develop cognitive or anxiety symptoms, common to brain diseases like dementia and depression in which plasticity changes occur, and a normalization of neurogenesis may be required for a successful treatment response and recovery. PMID:26330520

  9. Esmolol reduces apoptosis and inflammation in early sepsis rats with abdominal infection.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yang; Yang, Yang; He, Xin; Dong, Shangwen; Wang, Wanhua; Wang, Donghao; Zhang, Peng

    2017-10-01

    Esmolol is a highly selective beta 1 receptor blocker with various effects such as slowing heart rate, lowering blood pressure and reducing myocardial oxygen consumption. However, few studies have reported the use of beta blockers in sepsis with multiple organ dysfunctions. This study aimed to investigate the effects of esmolol on reducing apoptosis and inflammation in early sepsis rats with abdominal infection. Rats were randomly divided into sham operation group, sepsis group, antibiotic group, Esmolol + antibiotic group with low, median and high dose Esmolol (L group, M group and H group). Values between two or more groups were compared by independent t-tests. In the liver and kidney, we found inflammatory infiltration in sepsis group while pathological aspects reduced in L, M and H groups. Bcl-2 mRNA and protein levels increased while Bax mRNA and protein levels decreased in the liver and kidney of L, M and H groups. Serum IL-6, HMGB-1 and TNF-α levels decreased but IL-10 level increased in L, M and H groups, compared to sepsis group. Compared to sepsis and antibiotic groups, the levels of myocardial enzymes were lower in L, M and H groups. The administration of esmolol in early sepsis may reduce inflammation, inhibit apoptosis and protect key organs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Tiotropium in Early-Stage Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yumin; Zhong, Nan-Shan; Li, Xiaochen; Chen, Shuyun; Zheng, Jinping; Zhao, Dongxing; Yao, Weimin; Zhi, Rongchang; Wei, Liping; He, Bingwen; Zhang, Xiangyan; Yang, Changli; Li, Ying; Li, Fenglei; Du, Juan; Gui, Jianping; Hu, Bin; Bai, Chunxue; Huang, Ping; Chen, Gang; Xu, Yongjian; Wang, Changzheng; Liang, Biao; Li, Yinhuan; Hu, Guoping; Tan, Hui; Ye, Xianwei; Ma, Xitao; Chen, Yan; Hu, Xiwei; Tian, Jia; Zhu, Xiaodan; Shi, Zhe; Du, Xiufang; Li, Minjing; Liu, Shengming; Yu, Ronghuan; Zhao, Jianping; Ma, Qianli; Xie, Canmao; Li, Xiongbin; Chen, Tao; Lin, Yingxiang; Zeng, Lizhen; Ye, Changxiu; Ye, Weishu; Luo, Xiangwen; Zeng, Lingshan; Yu, Shuqing; Guan, Wei-Jie; Ran, Pixin

    2017-09-07

    Patients with mild or moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) rarely receive medications, because they have few symptoms. We hypothesized that long-term use of tiotropium would improve lung function and ameliorate the decline in lung function in patients with mild or moderate COPD. In a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial that was conducted in China, we randomly assigned 841 patients with COPD of Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) stage 1 (mild) or 2 (moderate) severity to receive a once-daily inhaled dose (18 μg) of tiotropium (419 patients) or matching placebo (422) for 2 years. The primary end point was the between-group difference in the change from baseline to 24 months in the forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV 1 ) before bronchodilator use. Secondary end points included the between-group difference in the change from baseline to 24 months in the FEV 1 after bronchodilator use and the between-group difference in the annual decline in the FEV 1 before and after bronchodilator use from day 30 to month 24. Of 841 patients who underwent randomization, 388 patients in the tiotropium group and 383 in the placebo group were included in the full analysis set. The FEV 1 in patients who received tiotropium was higher than in those who received placebo throughout the trial (ranges of mean differences, 127 to 169 ml before bronchodilator use and 71 to 133 ml after bronchodilator use; P<0.001 for all comparisons). There was no significant amelioration of the mean (±SE) annual decline in the FEV 1 before bronchodilator use: the decline was 38±6 ml per year in the tiotropium group and 53±6 ml per year in the placebo group (difference, 15 ml per year; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1 to 31; P=0.06). In contrast, the annual decline in the FEV 1 after bronchodilator use was significantly less in the tiotropium group than in the placebo group (29±5 ml per year vs. 51±6 ml per year; difference, 22

  11. The effect of early-life stress on airway inflammation in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Vig, Rattanjeet; Gordon, John R; Thébaud, Bernard; Befus, A Dean; Vliagoftis, Harissios

    2010-01-01

    Neonatal stress induces permanent physiological changes that may influence the immune system. Early-life stress increases asthma disease severity in children. We investigated the effects of early-life stress on allergic airway inflammation using a murine model of asthma coupled to maternal separation as an early-life stress stimulus. Maternally separated (MS) and unseparated control (CON) mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) beginning at day 31 after birth. Challenging mice with OVA increased airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and the number of inflammatory cells recovered in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), compared to saline-challenged mice. Challenging MS mice with OVA resulted in less total inflammatory cells, eosinophils, interferon-gamma, and interleukin-4 in BAL compared to CON mice. However, MS mice challenged with OVA exhibited AHR similar to CON mice challenged with OVA. In contrast, an enhanced stress protocol (MS+) involving removal of pups from their home cages following the removal of the dam resulted in inflammatory cell accumulation and cytokine levels in the BAL similar to CON mice and higher than MS mice. These findings indicate that the effect of early-life psychological factors on the development of airway inflammatory diseases such as asthma is very complex and depends on the quality of the psychological stress stimulus.

  12. The Relationship Between Cardiac Conduction Times, Cardiovascular Risk Factors, and Inflammation in Patients with Early Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Turk, Samina A; Heslinga, Sjoerd C; Dekker, Jill; Britsemmer, Linda; van der Lugt, Véronique; Lems, Willem F; van Schaardenburg, Dirkjan; Nurmohamed, Michael T

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the prevalence of conduction disorders in patients with early arthritis and the relationship with inflammation and traditional cardiovascular (CV) risk factors. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have a 2-fold higher risk of sudden cardiac death, possibly owing to conduction disorders. This increased risk might already be present at the clinical onset of arthritis. Therefore, we assessed electrocardiography, blood pressure, 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28), lipid profile, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) level in 480 patients with early arthritis at baseline and after 1 year. The prevalence of conduction disorders was 12.5%. Conduction times at baseline were not associated with DAS28, ESR, or CRP levels and did not change during antirheumatic treatment. Baseline and the improvement in DAS28 (European League Against Rheumatism response), ESR, and CRP were significantly associated with heart rate, lipid profile, and blood pressure. Elevated total cholesterol and blood pressure were associated with an increased QRS time. The change in heart rate differed 7.3 bpm between patients with the least versus largest DAS improvement. The prevalence of conduction disorders in patients with early arthritis was 12.5%, which is similar to the general population and was not associated with changes in inflammation markers. However, a high cholesterol was associated with a prolonged QRS time. Therefore, the emphasis of CV risk management in arthritis should not be only on treatment of disease activity but also on traditional CV risk factors. The relationship between the improvement in disease activity and heart rate is remarkable because this could imply a 10-year CV mortality risk difference of 24%.

  13. Preoperative partitioning of pulmonary vascular resistance correlates with early outcome after thromboendarterectomy for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nick H S; Fesler, Pierre; Channick, Richard N; Knowlton, Kirk U; Ben-Yehuda, Ori; Lee, Stephen H; Naeije, Robert; Rubin, Lewis J

    2004-01-06

    Pulmonary thromboendarterectomy (PTE) is the preferred treatment for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH), but persistent pulmonary hypertension after PTE, as a result of either inaccessible distal thrombotic material or coexistent intrinsic small-vessel disease, remains a major determinant of poor outcome. Conventional preoperative evaluation is unreliable in identifying patients at risk for persistent pulmonary hypertension or predicting postoperative hemodynamic outcome. We postulated that pulmonary arterial occlusion pressure waveform analysis, a technique that has been used for partitioning pulmonary vascular resistance, might identify CTEPH patients with significant distal, small-vessel disease. Twenty-six patients underwent preoperative right heart catheterization before PTE. Pulmonary artery occlusion waveform recordings were performed in triplicate. Postoperative hemodynamics after PTE were compared with preoperative partitioning of pulmonary vascular resistance derived from the occlusion data. Preoperative assessment of upstream resistance (Rup) correlated with both postoperative total pulmonary resistance index (R2=0.79, P<0.001) and postoperative mean pulmonary artery pressure (R2=0.75, P<0.001). All 4 postoperative deaths occurred in patients with a preoperative Rup <60%. Pulmonary arterial occlusion pressure waveform analysis may identify CTEPH patients at risk for persistent pulmonary hypertension and poor outcome after PTE. Patients with CTEPH and Rup value <60% appear to be at highest risk.

  14. Halothane reduces the early lipopolysaccharide-induced lung inflammation in mechanically ventilated rats.

    PubMed

    Giraud, O; Seince, P F; Rolland, C; Leçon-Malas, V; Desmonts, J M; Aubier, M; Dehoux, M

    2000-12-01

    Several studies suggest that anesthetics modulate the immune response. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of halothane and thiopental on the lung inflammatory response. Rats submitted or not to intratracheal (IT) instillation of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) were anesthetized with either halothane (0. 5, 1, or 1.5%) or thiopental (60 mg. kg(-1)) and mechanically ventilated for 4 h. Control rats were treated or not by LPS without anesthesia. Lung inflammation was assessed by total and differential cell counts in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF) and by cytokine measurements (tumor necrosis factor-alpha [TNF-alpha], interleukin-6 [IL-6], macrophage inflammatory protein-2 [MIP-2], and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 [MCP-1]) in BALF and lung homogenates. In the absence of LPS treatment, neither halothane nor thiopental modified the moderate inflammatory response induced by tracheotomy or mechanical ventilation. Cell recruitment and cytokine concentrations were increased in all groups receiving IT LPS. However, in halothane-anesthetized rats (halothane > or = 1%), but not in thiopental-anesthetized rats, the LPS-induced lung inflammation was altered in a dose-dependent manner. Indeed, when using 1% halothane, polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) recruitment was decreased by 55% (p < 0.001) and TNF-alpha, IL-6, and MIP-2 concentrations in BALF and lung homogenates were decreased by more than 60% (p < 0.001) whereas total protein and MCP-1 concentrations remained unchanged. The decrease of MIP-2 (observed at the protein and messenger RNA [mRNA] level) was strongly correlated to the decrease of PMN recruitment (r = 0.73, p < 0.05). This halothane-reduced lung inflammatory response was transient and was reversed 20 h after the end of the anesthesia. Our study shows that halothane > or = 1%, delivered during 4 h by mechanical ventilation, but not mechanical ventilation per se, alters the early LPS-induced lung inflammation in the rat, suggesting a specific

  15. Early-life exposure to combustion-derived particulate matter causes pulmonary immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Saravia, Jordy; You, Dahui; Thevenot, Paul; Lee, Greg I.; Shrestha, Bishwas; Lomnicki, Slawo; Cormier, Stephania A.

    2013-01-01

    Elevated levels of combustion-derived particulate matter (CDPM) are a risk factor for the development of lung diseases such as asthma. Studies have shown that CDPM exacerbates asthma, inducing acute lung dysfunction and inflammation; however, the impact of CDPM exposure on early immunological responses to allergens remains unclear. To determine the effects of early-life CDPM exposure on allergic asthma development in infants, we exposed infant mice to CDPM and then induced a mouse model of asthma using house dust mite (HDM) allergen. Mice exposed to CDPM+HDM failed to develop a typical asthma phenotype including airway hyperresponsiveness, Th2-inflammation, Muc5ac expression, eosinophilia, and HDM-specific Ig compared to HDM-exposed mice. Although HDM-specific IgE was attenuated, total IgE was two-fold higher in CDPM+HDM mice compared to HDM-mice. We further demonstrate that CDPM exposure during early life induced an immunosuppressive environment in the lung, concurrent with increases in tolerogenic dendritic cells and Tregs, resulting in suppression of Th2 responses. Despite having early immunosuppression, these mice develop severe allergic inflammation when challenged with allergen as adults. These findings demonstrate a mechanism whereby CDPM exposure modulates adaptive immunity, inducing specific-antigen tolerance while amplifying total IgE, and leading to a predisposition to develop asthma upon rechallenge later in life. PMID:24172848

  16. Early treatment of chlorine-induced airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation with corticosteroids

    SciT

    Jonasson, Sofia, E-mail: sofia.jonasson@foi.se; Wigenstam, Elisabeth; Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Unit of Respiratory Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå

    Chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) is an industrial gas that is highly toxic and irritating when inhaled causing tissue damage and an acute inflammatory response in the airways followed by a long-term airway dysfunction. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether early anti-inflammatory treatment can protect against the delayed symptoms in Cl{sub 2}-exposed mice. BALB/c mice were exposed by nose-only inhalation using 200 ppm Cl{sub 2} during 15 min. Assessment of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), inflammatory cell counts in bronchoalveolar lavage, occurrence of lung edema and lung fibrosis were analyzed 24 h or 14 days post-exposure. A single dose of themore » corticosteroid dexamethasone (10 or 100 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally 1, 3, 6, or 12 h following Cl{sub 2} exposure. High-dose of dexamethasone reduced the acute inflammation if administered within 6 h after exposure but treated animals still displayed a significant lung injury. The effect of dexamethasone administered within 1 h was dose-dependent; high-dose significantly reduced acute airway inflammation (100 mg/kg) but not treatment with the relatively low-dose (10 mg/kg). Both doses reduced AHR 14 days later, while lung fibrosis measured as collagen deposition was not significantly reduced. The results point out that the acute inflammation in the lungs due to Cl{sub 2} exposure only partly is associated with the long-term AHR. We hypothesize that additional pathogenic mechanisms apart from the inflammatory reactions contribute to the development of long-term airway dysfunction. By using this mouse model, we have validated early administration of corticosteroids in terms of efficacy to prevent acute lung injury and delayed symptoms induced by Cl{sub 2} exposure. - Highlights: • Inhalation of Cl{sub 2} may lead to a long-standing airway hyperresponsiveness. • The symptoms in Cl{sub 2}-exposed mice are similar to those described for RADS in humans. • Corticosteroids prevent delayed symptoms such as

  17. Potentiated Interaction between Ineffective Doses of Budesonide and Formoterol to Control the Inhaled Cadmium-Induced Up-Regulation of Metalloproteinases and Acute Pulmonary Inflammation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenhui; Zhi, Jianming; Cui, Yongyao; Zhang, Fan; Habyarimana, Adélite; Cambier, Carole; Gustin, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory properties of glucocorticoids are well known but their protective effects exerted with a low potency against heavy metals-induced pulmonary inflammation remain unclear. In this study, a model of acute pulmonary inflammation induced by a single inhalation of cadmium in male Sprague-Dawley rats was used to investigate whether formoterol can improve the anti-inflammatory effects of budesonide. The cadmium-related inflammatory responses, including matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity, were evaluated. Compared to the values obtained in rats exposed to cadmium, pretreatment of inhaled budesonide (0.5 mg/15 ml) elicited a significant decrease in total cell and neutrophil counts in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) associated with a significant reduction of MMP-9 activity which was highly correlated with the number of inflammatory cells in BALF. Additionally, cadmium-induced lung injuries characterized by inflammatory cell infiltration within alveoli and the interstitium were attenuated by the pre-treatment of budesonide. Though the low concentration of budesonide (0.25 mg/15 ml) exerted a very limited inhibitory effects in the present rat model, its combination with an inefficient concentration of formoterol (0.5 mg/30 ml) showed an enhanced inhibitory effect on neutrophil and total cell counts as well as on the histological lung injuries associated with a potentiation of inhibition on the MMP-9 activity. In conclusion, high concentration of budesonide alone could partially protect the lungs against cadmium exposure induced-acute neutrophilic pulmonary inflammation via the inhibition of MMP-9 activity. The combination with formoterol could enhance the protective effects of both drugs, suggesting a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of heavy metals-induced lung diseases. PMID:25313925

  18. Osthole Alleviates Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis via Modulating Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/Angiotensin-(1-7) Axis and Decreasing Inflammation Responses in Rats.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yuewen; Liu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown that angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) plays modulating roles in lung pathophysiology, including pulmonary fibrosis (PF) and acute lung injury. Pulmonary fibrosis is a common complication in these interstitial lung diseases, and PF always has a poor prognosis and short survival. To date, there are few promising methods for treating PF, and they are invariably accompanied by severe side effects. Recent studies have showed that the traditional Chinese herbal extract, osthole, had beneficial effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced acute lung injury (ALI) via an ACE2 pathway. Here we further investigated the protective effects of osthole on bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis and attempted to determine the underlying mechanism. PF mode rats were induced by bleomycin (BLM) and then subsequently administered osthole. Histopathological analyses were employed to identify PF changes. The results showed that BLM resulted in severe PF and diffuse lung inflammation, together with significant elevation of inflammatory factors and a marked increase in expression of angiotensin II (ANG II) and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1). ACE2 and angiotensin-(1-7) [ANG-(1-7)] were both greatly reduced after BLM administration. Meanwhile, osthole treatment attenuated BLM induced PF and inflammation, decreased the expression of these inflammatory mediators, ANG II, and TGF-β1, and reversed ACE2 and ANG-(1-7) production in rat lungs. We conclude that osthole may exert beneficial effects on BLM induced PF in rats, perhaps via modulating the ACE2/ANG-(1-7) axis and inhibiting lung inflammation pathways.

  19. Evaluation of atrial electromechanical delay and its relationship to inflammation and oxidative stress in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Acar, Gurkan; Kahraman, Hasan; Akkoyun, Murat; Kilinc, Metin; Zencir, Cemil; Yusufoglu, Edagani; Dirnak, Imran; Sahin, Hatice; Olmez, Soner; Akcay, Ahmet; Ardic, Idris

    2014-05-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate atrial electromechanical delay, inflammation, and oxidative stress parameters, along with to investigate clinical and laboratory characteristics affecting atrial electromechanical delay in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Forty-three patients with COPD (60.5 ± 9.9 years) and 50 healthy controls (59.6 ± 7.1 years) were included in the study. Atrial electromechanical delay intervals were measured from lateral mitral annulus corrected PA (cPA lateral) and lateral tricuspid annulus (cPA tricuspid) using tissue Doppler imaging (TDI), and corrected for heart rate. Left and right ventricles functions were examined using conventional and TDI. Plasma levels of high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and oxidative stress parameters were also measured. Factors associated with atrial electromechanical delay were evaluated by stepwise multiple regression analysis. Corrected PA lateral and cPA tricuspid were significantly higher in patients with COPD (69.8 ± 10.4 vs. 62.2 ± 8.9 msec, P < 0.001 and 45.4 ± 10.2 vs. 33.5 ± 5.1 msec, P < 0.001, respectively). Plasma levels of hsCRP and malondialdehyde, an indicator of oxidative stress, were increased in patient's group (15.7 ± 31.7 vs. 4.8 ± 4.7 mg/L, P = 0.01 and 17.1 ± 10.3 vs. 11.6 ± 7.9 nmol/L, P = 0.005, respectively). cPA lateral is independently related to lateral Em /Am ratio (β = -0.29, P = 0.004) and forced expiratory volume in 1st second/forced vital capacity (FEV1 /FVC) ratio (β = -0.24, P = 0.02). cPA tricuspid is independently related to only FEV1 /FVC ratio (β = -0.51, P < 0.001). This study shows that atrial electromechanical delay intervals are prolonged in patients with COPD. Prolongation of atrial electromechanical delay measured from lateral tricuspid annulus was independently related with FEV1 /FVC ratio in these patients. © 2013, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Asthma–COPD Overlap. Clinical Relevance of Genomic Signatures of Type 2 Inflammation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Steiling, Katrina; van den Berge, Maarten; Hijazi, Kahkeshan; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Lenburg, Marc E.; Spira, Avrum; Woodruff, Prescott G.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a heterogeneous disease and likely includes a subgroup that is biologically comparable to asthma. Studying asthma-associated gene expression changes in COPD could add insight into COPD pathogenesis and reveal biomarkers that predict a favorable response to corticosteroids. Objectives: To determine whether asthma-associated gene signatures are increased in COPD and associated with asthma-related features. Methods: We compared disease-associated airway epithelial gene expression alterations in an asthma cohort (n = 105) and two COPD cohorts (n = 237, 171). The T helper type 2 (Th2) signature (T2S) score, a gene expression metric induced in Th2-high asthma, was evaluated in these COPD cohorts. The T2S score was correlated with asthma-related features and response to corticosteroids in COPD in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial, the Groningen and Leiden Universities study of Corticosteroids in Obstructive Lung Disease (GLUCOLD; n = 89). Measurements and Main Results: The 200 genes most differentially expressed in asthma versus healthy control subjects were enriched among genes associated with more severe airflow obstruction in these COPD cohorts (P < 0.001), suggesting significant gene expression overlap. A higher T2S score was associated with decreased lung function (P < 0.001), but not asthma history, in both COPD cohorts. Higher T2S scores correlated with increased airway wall eosinophil counts (P = 0.003), blood eosinophil percentage (P = 0.03), bronchodilator reversibility (P = 0.01), and improvement in hyperinflation after corticosteroid treatment (P = 0.019) in GLUCOLD. Conclusions: These data identify airway gene expression alterations that can co-occur in asthma and COPD. The association of the T2S score with increased severity and “asthma-like” features (including a favorable corticosteroid response) in COPD suggests that Th2 inflammation is important in a

  1. Using bacterial biomarkers to identify early indicators of cystic fibrosis pulmonary exacerbation onset

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Geraint B; Hoffman, Lucas R; Johnson, Matt W; Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Schwarze, Jürgen; Carroll, Mary P; Bruce, Kenneth D

    2011-01-01

    Acute periods of pulmonary exacerbation are the single most important cause of morbidity in cystic fibrosis patients, and may be associated with a loss of lung function. Intervening prior to the onset of a substantially increased inflammatory response may limit the associated damage to the airways. While a number of biomarker assays based on inflammatory markers have been developed, providing useful and important measures of disease during these periods, such factors are typically only elevated once the process of exacerbation has been initiated. Identifying biomarkers that can predict the onset of pulmonary exacerbation at an early stage would provide an opportunity to intervene before the establishment of a substantial immune response, with major implications for the advancement of cystic fibrosis care. The precise triggers of pulmonary exacerbation remain to be determined; however, the majority of models relate to the activity of microbes present in the patient's lower airways of cystic fibrosis. Advances in diagnostic microbiology now allow for the examination of these complex systems at a level likely to identify factors on which biomarker assays can be based. In this article, we discuss key considerations in the design and testing of assays that could predict pulmonary exacerbations. PMID:21405970

  2. Targeting Amino Acid Metabolism for Molecular Imaging of Inflammation Early After Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Thackeray, James T; Bankstahl, Jens P; Wang, Yong; Wollert, Kai C; Bengel, Frank M

    2016-01-01

    Acute tissue inflammation after myocardial infarction influences healing and remodeling and has been identified as a target for novel therapies. Molecular imaging holds promise for guidance of such therapies. The amino acid (11)C-methionine is a clinically approved agent which is thought to accumulate in macrophages, but not in healthy myocytes. We assessed the suitability of positron emission tomography (PET) with (11)C-methionine for imaging post-MI inflammation, from cell to mouse to man. Uptake assays demonstrated 7-fold higher (11)C-methionine uptake by polarized pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages over anti-inflammatory M2 subtypes (p<0.001). C57Bl/6 mice (n=27) underwent coronary artery ligation or no surgery. Serial (11)C-methionine PET was performed 3, 5 and 7d later. MI mice exhibited a perfusion defect in 32-50% of the left ventricle (LV). PET detected increased (11)C-methionine accumulation in the infarct territory at 3d (5.9±0.9%ID/g vs 4.7±0.9 in remote myocardium, and 2.6±0.5 in healthy mice; p<0.05 and <0.01 respectively), which declined by d7 post-MI (4.3±0.6 in infarct, 3.4±0.8 in remote; p=0.03 vs 3d, p=0.08 vs healthy). Increased (11)C-methionine uptake was associated with macrophage infiltration of damaged myocardium. Treatment with anti-integrin antibodies (anti-CD11a, -CD11b, -CD49d; 100µg) lowered macrophage content by 56% and (11)C-methionine uptake by 46% at 3d post-MI. A patient study at 3d after ST-elevation MI and early reperfusion confirmed elevated (11)C-methionine uptake in the hypoperfused myocardial region. Targeting of elevated amino acid metabolism in pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages enables PET imaging-derived demarcation of tissue inflammation after MI. (11)C-methionine-based molecular imaging may assist in the translation of novel image-guided, inflammation-targeted regenerative therapies.

  3. Targeting Amino Acid Metabolism for Molecular Imaging of Inflammation Early After Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Thackeray, James T.; Bankstahl, Jens P.; Wang, Yong; Wollert, Kai C.; Bengel, Frank M.

    2016-01-01

    Acute tissue inflammation after myocardial infarction influences healing and remodeling and has been identified as a target for novel therapies. Molecular imaging holds promise for guidance of such therapies. The amino acid 11C-methionine is a clinically approved agent which is thought to accumulate in macrophages, but not in healthy myocytes. We assessed the suitability of positron emission tomography (PET) with 11C-methionine for imaging post-MI inflammation, from cell to mouse to man. Uptake assays demonstrated 7-fold higher 11C-methionine uptake by polarized pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages over anti-inflammatory M2 subtypes (p<0.001). C57Bl/6 mice (n=27) underwent coronary artery ligation or no surgery. Serial 11C-methionine PET was performed 3, 5 and 7d later. MI mice exhibited a perfusion defect in 32-50% of the left ventricle (LV). PET detected increased 11C-methionine accumulation in the infarct territory at 3d (5.9±0.9%ID/g vs 4.7±0.9 in remote myocardium, and 2.6±0.5 in healthy mice; p<0.05 and <0.01 respectively), which declined by d7 post-MI (4.3±0.6 in infarct, 3.4±0.8 in remote; p=0.03 vs 3d, p=0.08 vs healthy). Increased 11C-methionine uptake was associated with macrophage infiltration of damaged myocardium. Treatment with anti-integrin antibodies (anti-CD11a, -CD11b, -CD49d; 100µg) lowered macrophage content by 56% and 11C-methionine uptake by 46% at 3d post-MI. A patient study at 3d after ST-elevation MI and early reperfusion confirmed elevated 11C-methionine uptake in the hypoperfused myocardial region. Targeting of elevated amino acid metabolism in pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages enables PET imaging-derived demarcation of tissue inflammation after MI. 11C-methionine-based molecular imaging may assist in the translation of novel image-guided, inflammation-targeted regenerative therapies. PMID:27570549

  4. An intravital microscopy model to study early pancreatic inflammation in type 1 diabetes in NOD mice

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Christian; Fisher, Nicholas B.; Tugwell, Barna; Zhou, Juan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intravital microscopy (IVM) of the pancreas has been proven to be an invaluable tool in pancreatitis, transplantation and ischemia/reperfusion research. Also in type 1 diabetes (T1D) pancreatic IVM offers unique advantages for the elucidation of the disease process. Female non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice develop T1D spontaneously by 40 weeks of age. Our goal was to establish an IVM-based method to study early pancreatic inflammation in NOD mice, which can be used to screen novel medications to prevent or delay T1D in future studies. This included evaluation of leukocyte-endothelial interactions as well as disturbances of capillary perfusion in the pancreatic microcirculation. PMID:28243521

  5. Altered serum microRNAs as biomarkers for the early diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is a highly lethal infectious disease and early diagnosis of TB is critical for the control of disease progression. The objective of this study was to profile a panel of serum microRNAs (miRNAs) as potential biomarkers for the early diagnosis of pulmonary TB infection. Methods Using TaqMan Low-Density Array (TLDA) analysis followed by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) validation, expression levels of miRNAs in serum samples from 30 patients with active tuberculosis and 60 patients with Bordetella pertussis (BP), varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and enterovirus (EV) were analyzed. Results The Low-Density Array data showed that 97 miRNAs were differentially expressed in pulmonary TB patient sera compared with healthy controls (90 up-regulated and 7 down-regulated). Following qRT-PCR confirmation and receiver operational curve (ROC) analysis, three miRNAs (miR-361-5p, miR-889 and miR-576-3p) were shown to distinguish TB infected patients from healthy controls and other microbial infections with moderate sensitivity and specificity (area under curve (AUC) value range, 0.711-0.848). Multiple logistic regression analysis of a combination of these three miRNAs showed an enhanced ability to discriminate between these two groups with an AUC value of 0.863. Conclusions Our study suggests that altered levels of serum miRNAs have great potential to serve as non-invasive biomarkers for early detection of pulmonary TB infection. PMID:23272999

  6. Differential effects of estradiol on carotid artery inflammation when administered early versus late after surgical menopause.

    PubMed

    Sophonsritsuk, Areepan; Appt, Susan E; Clarkson, Thomas B; Shively, Carol A; Espeland, Mark A; Register, Thomas C

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of estrogen therapy (ET) on carotid artery inflammation when initiated early and late relative to surgical menopause. Female cynomolgus macaques consuming atherogenic diets were ovariectomized and randomized to control or oral estradiol (E2; human equivalent dose of 1 mg/d micronized E2) initiated at 1 month (early menopause, n = 24) or 54 months (late menopause, n = 40) after ovariectomy. The treatment period was 8 months. Carotid artery expression of the markers of monocyte/macrophages (CD68 and CD163), dendritic cells (CD83), natural killer cells (neural cell adhesion molecule-1), and interferon-γ was significantly lower in E2-treated animals in the early menopause group but not in the late menopause group (P < 0.05). In contrast, carotid artery transcripts for T-cell markers (CD3, CD4, CD8, and CD25), interleukin-10, type I collagen, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and tumor necrosis factor-α were lower in E2-treated monkeys regardless of menopausal stage (P < 0.05). ET initiated soon after menopause inhibits macrophage accumulation in the carotid artery, an effect that is not observed when E2 is administered after several years of estrogen deficiency. No evidence for pro-inflammatory effects of late ET is observed. The results provide support for the timing hypothesis of postmenopausal ET with implications for the interpretation of outcomes in the Women's Health Initiative.

  7. Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles highlight early involvement of the choroid plexus in central nervous system inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Millward, Jason M.; Schnorr, Jörg; Taupitz, Matthias; Wagner, Susanne; Wuerfel, Jens T.; Infante-Duarte, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Neuroinflammation during multiple sclerosis involves immune cell infiltration and disruption of the BBB (blood–brain barrier). Both processes can be visualized by MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), in multiple sclerosis patients and in the animal model EAE (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis). We previously showed that VSOPs (very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles) reveal CNS (central nervous system) lesions in EAE which are not detectable by conventional contrast agents in MRI. We hypothesized that VSOP may help detect early, subtle inflammatory events that would otherwise remain imperceptible. To investigate the capacity of VSOP to reveal early events in CNS inflammation, we induced EAE in SJL mice using encephalitogenic T-cells, and administered VSOP prior to onset of clinical symptoms. In parallel, we administered VSOP to mice at peak disease, and to unmanipulated controls. We examined the distribution of VSOP in the CNS by MRI and histology. Prior to disease onset, in asymptomatic mice, VSOP accumulated in the choroid plexus and in spinal cord meninges in the absence of overt inflammation. However, VSOP was undetectable in the CNS of non-immunized control mice. At peak disease, VSOP was broadly distributed; we observed particles in perivascular inflammatory lesions with apparently preserved glia limitans. Moreover, at peak disease, VSOP was prominent in the choroid plexus and was seen in elongated endothelial structures, co-localized with phagocytes, and diffusely disseminated in the parenchyma, suggesting multiple entry mechanisms of VSOP into the CNS. Thus, using VSOP we were able to discriminate between inflammatory events occurring in established EAE and, importantly, we identified CNS alterations that appear to precede immune cell infiltration and clinical onset. PMID:23452162

  8. Vaspin protects against LPS‑induced ARDS by inhibiting inflammation, apoptosis and reactive oxygen species generation in pulmonary endothelial cells via the Akt/GSK‑3β pathway.

    PubMed

    Qi, Di; Wang, Daoxin; Zhang, Chunrong; Tang, Xumao; He, Jing; Zhao, Yan; Deng, Wang; Deng, Xinyu

    2017-12-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by uncontrolled extravasation of protein‑rich fluids, which is caused by disruption and dysfunction of the barrier of pulmonary endothelial cells (ECs). Visceral adipose tissue‑derived serine protease inhibitor (vaspin) is a novel adipokine with pleiotropic properties, which has been reported to exert beneficial effects against obesity‑associated systemic vascular diseases; however, its effects on ARDS remain unknown. In the present study, mice were subjected to systemic administration of adenoviral vector expressing vaspin (Ad‑vaspin) to examine its effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)‑induced ARDS in vivo. Histological analysis was then conducted, and cytokine [tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α, interleukin (IL)‑6 and IL‑10] levels, and intercellular cell adhesion molecule‑1 (ICAM‑1) and adherens junctions (AJs) expression were detected. In addition, human pulmonary microvascular ECs (HPMECs) were treated with recombinant human (rh)‑vaspin to further investigate its molecular basis and underlying mechanism. The mRNA expression levels of inflammatory cytokines (TNF‑α and IL‑6) and endothelial‑specific adhesion markers [vascular cell adhesion molecule‑1 and E‑selectin], activation of nuclear factor‑κB, and cell viability and apoptosis were then examined. Furthermore, the expression of AJs and organization of the cytoskeleton, as well as expression and activity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were determined. The results indicated that Ad‑vaspin protected against LPS‑induced ARDS by alleviating the pulmonary inflammatory response and pulmonary EC barrier dysfunction in mice, which was accompanied by activation of the protein kinase B (Akt)/glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)‑3β pathway. In addition, pretreatment of HPMECs with rh‑vaspin attenuated inflammation, apoptosis and ROS generation

  9. Vaspin protects against LPS-induced ARDS by inhibiting inflammation, apoptosis and reactive oxygen species generation in pulmonary endothelial cells via the Akt/GSK-3β pathway

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Di; Wang, Daoxin; Zhang, Chunrong; Tang, Xumao; He, Jing; Zhao, Yan; Deng, Wang; Deng, Xinyu

    2017-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by uncontrolled extravasation of protein-rich fluids, which is caused by disruption and dysfunction of the barrier of pulmonary endothelial cells (ECs). Visceral adipose tissue-derived serine protease inhibitor (vaspin) is a novel adipokine with pleiotropic properties, which has been reported to exert beneficial effects against obesity-associated systemic vascular diseases; however, its effects on ARDS remain unknown. In the present study, mice were subjected to systemic administration of adenoviral vector expressing vaspin (Ad-vaspin) to examine its effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ARDS in vivo. Histological analysis was then conducted, and cytokine [tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10] levels, and intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and adherens junctions (AJs) expression were detected. In addition, human pulmonary microvascular ECs (HPMECs) were treated with recombinant human (rh)-vaspin to further investigate its molecular basis and underlying mechanism. The mRNA expression levels of inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-6) and endothelial-specific adhesion markers [vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and E-selectin], activation of nuclear factor-κB, and cell viability and apoptosis were then examined. Furthermore, the expression of AJs and organization of the cytoskeleton, as well as expression and activity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were determined. The results indicated that Ad-vaspin protected against LPS-induced ARDS by alleviating the pulmonary inflammatory response and pulmonary EC barrier dysfunction in mice, which was accompanied by activation of the protein kinase B (Akt)/glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β pathway. In addition, pretreatment of HPMECs with rh-vaspin attenuated inflammation, apoptosis and ROS generation without alterations in AJs and cytoskeletal

  10. Hemoglobin induced lung vascular oxidation, inflammation, and remodeling contributes to the progression of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and is attenuated in rats with repeat dose haptoglobin administration

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jin Hyen; Hassell, Kathryn; Nuss, Rachelle; Eigenberger, Paul; Lisk, Christina; Loomis, Zoe; Maltzahn, Joanne; Stenmark, Kurt R; Nozik-Grayck, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Objective Haptoglobin (Hp) is an approved treatment in Japan with indications for trauma, burns and massive transfusion related hemolysis. Additional case reports suggest uses in other acute hemolytic events that lead to acute kidney injury. However, Hp's protective effects on the pulmonary vasculature have not been evaluated within the context of mitigating the consequences of chronic hemoglobin (Hb) exposure in the progression of pulmonary hypertension (PH) secondary to hemolytic diseases. This study was performed to assess the utility of chronic Hp therapy in a preclinical model of Hb and hypoxia mediated PH. Approach and results Rats were simultaneously exposed to chronic Hb-infusion (35 mg per day) and hypobaric hypoxia for five weeks in the presence or absence of Hp treatment (90 mg/kg twice a week). Hp inhibited the Hb plus hypoxia-mediated non-heme iron accumulation in lung and heart tissue, pulmonary vascular inflammation and resistance, and right ventricular hypertrophy, which suggest a positive impact on impeding the progression of PH. In addition, Hp therapy was associated with a reduction in critical mediators of PH, including lung adventitial macrophage population and endothelial ICAM-1 expression. Conclusions By preventing Hb-mediated pathology, Hp infusions: (1) demonstrate a critical role for Hb in vascular remodeling associated with hypoxia; and (2) suggest a novel therapy for chronic hemolysis associated PH. PMID:25656991

  11. Hemoglobin-induced lung vascular oxidation, inflammation, and remodeling contribute to the progression of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and is attenuated in rats with repeated-dose haptoglobin administration.

    PubMed

    Irwin, David C; Baek, Jin Hyen; Hassell, Kathryn; Nuss, Rachelle; Eigenberger, Paul; Lisk, Christina; Loomis, Zoe; Maltzahn, Joanne; Stenmark, Kurt R; Nozik-Grayck, Eva; Buehler, Paul W

    2015-05-01

    Haptoglobin (Hp) is an approved treatment in Japan for trauma, burns, and massive transfusion-related hemolysis. Additional case reports suggest uses in other acute hemolytic events that lead to acute kidney injury. However, Hp's protective effects on the pulmonary vasculature have not been evaluated within the context of mitigating the consequences of chronic hemoglobin (Hb) exposure in the progression of pulmonary hypertension (PH) secondary to hemolytic diseases. This study was performed to assess the utility of chronic Hp therapy in a preclinical model of Hb and hypoxia-mediated PH. Rats were simultaneously exposed to chronic Hb infusion (35 mg per day) and hypobaric hypoxia for 5 weeks in the presence or absence of Hp treatment (90 mg/kg twice a week). Hp inhibited the Hb plus hypoxia-mediated nonheme iron accumulation in lung and heart tissue, pulmonary vascular inflammation and resistance, and right-ventricular hypertrophy, which suggests a positive impact on impeding the progression of PH. In addition, Hp therapy was associated with a reduction in critical mediators of PH, including lung adventitial macrophage population and endothelial ICAM-1 expression. By preventing Hb-mediated pathology, Hp infusions: (1) demonstrate a critical role for Hb in vascular remodeling associated with hypoxia and (2) suggest a novel therapy for chronic hemolysis-associated PH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. CD28/B7 deficiency attenuates systolic overload-induced congestive heart failure, myocardial and pulmonary inflammation, and activated T-cell accumulation in the heart and lungs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huan; Kwak, Dongmin; Fassett, John; Hou, Lei; Xu, Xin; Burbach, Brandon J.; Thenappan, Thenappan; Xu, Yawei; Ge, Jun-bo; Shimizu, Yoji; Bache, Robert J.; Chen, Yingjie

    2017-01-01

    The inflammatory response regulates congestive heart failure (CHF) development. T-cell activation plays an important role in tissue inflammation. We postulate that CD28 or B7 deficiency inhibits T-cell activation and attenuates CHF development by reducing systemic, cardiac and pulmonary inflammation. We demonstrated that chronic pressure overload-induced end-stage CHF in mice is characterized by profound accumulation of activated effector T-cells (CD3+CD44high cells) in the lungs and a mild but significant increase of these cells in the heart. In knockout (KO) mice lacking either CD28 or B7, there was a dramatic reduction in the accumulation of activated effector T cells in both hearts and lungs of mice under control conditions and after transverse aortic constriction (TAC). CD28 or B7 KO significantly attenuated TAC-induced CHF development, as indicated by less increase of heart and lung weight, and less reduction of LV contractility. CD28 or B7 KO also significantly reduced TAC-induced CD45+ leukocyte, T-cell and macrophage infiltration in hearts and lungs, lowered pro-inflammatory cytokine expression (such as TNF-α and IL-1β) in lungs. Furthermore, CD28/B7 blockade by CTLA4-Ig treatment (250μg/mouse every 3 days) attenuated TAC-induced T cell activation, LV hypertrophy, and LV dysfunction. Our data indicate that CD28/B7 deficiency inhibits activated effector T-cell accumulation, reduces myocardial and pulmonary inflammation, and attenuates the development of CHF. Our findings suggest that strategies targeting T-cell activation may be useful in treating CHF. PMID:27432861

  13. Effect of ageing on pulmonary inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness and T and B cell responses in antigen-sensitized and -challenged mice.

    PubMed

    Busse, Paula J; Zhang, Teng Fei; Srivastava, Kamal; Schofield, Brian; Li, Xiu-Min

    2007-09-01

    The effect of ageing on several pathologic features of allergic asthma (pulmonary inflammation, eosinophilia, mucus hypersecretion), and their relationship with airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) is not well characterized. To evaluate lung inflammation, mucus metaplasia and AHR in relationship with age in murine models of allergic asthma comparing young and older mice. Young (6 weeks) and older (6, 12, 18 months) BALB/c mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA). AHR and bronchoalveolar fluid (BALF), total inflammatory cell count and differential were measured. To evaluate mucus metaplasia, quantitative PCR for the major airway mucin-associated gene, MUC-5AC, from lung tissue was measured, and lung tissue sections stained with periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) for goblet-cell enumeration. Lung tissue cytokine gene expression was determined by quantitative PCR, and systemic cytokine protein levels by ELISA from spleen-cell cultures. Antigen-specific serum IgE was determined by ELISA. AHR developed in both aged and young OVA-sensitized/challenged mice (OVA mice), and was more significantly increased in young OVA mice than in aged OVA mice. However, BALF eosinophil numbers were significantly higher, and lung histology showed greater inflammation in aged OVA mice than in young OVA mice. MUC-5AC expression and numbers of PAS+ staining bronchial epithelial cells were significantly increased in the aged OVA mice. All aged OVA mice had increased IL-5 and IFN-gamma mRNA expression in the lung and IL-5 and IFN-gamma protein levels from spleen cell cultures compared with young OVA mice. OVA-IgE was elevated to a greater extent in aged OVA mice. Although pulmonary inflammation and mucus metaplasia after antigen sensitization/challenge occurred to a greater degree in older mice, the increase in AHR was significantly less compared with younger OVA mice. Antigen treatment produced a unique cytokine profile in older mice (elevated IFN-gamma and IL-5) compared with young mice

  14. A Sickle Cell Disease Patient with Severe Tricuspid Regurgitation and Early Developed Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Gaurang; Sarwar, Muhammad; Sun, Zongxia; Wei, Tiemin; Liu, Kan

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) worsens the mortality of the patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). The exact mechanism of PH development/progression in SCD, including the role of tricuspid regurgitation (TR), remains unclear. We herein report an unusual SCD case, complicated by chronic thromboembolic disorder, who developed severe TR and an accelerated progression of PH. Tricuspid valve surgery significantly ameliorated the patient's symptoms and reduced hospital readmission. The early detection and management of the reversible disorder accelerating the PH development in SCD patients may alter the clinical course, improve the quality of life, and potentially affect the long-term outcome.

  15. Early outcomes of percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation using the Edwards SAPIEN XT transcatheter heart valve system.

    PubMed

    Haas, Nikolaus A; Carere, Ronald Giacomo; Kretschmar, Oliver; Horlick, Eric; Rodés-Cabau, Josep; de Wolf, Daniël; Gewillig, Marc; Mullen, Michael; Lehner, Anja; Deutsch, Cornelia; Bramlage, Peter; Ewert, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Patients with congenital or acquired heart defects affecting the pulmonary valve and right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) commonly require multiple surgical interventions, resulting in significant morbidity. A less invasive alternative is percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation (PPVI). Though studies have previously reported the safety and efficacy of the early generation transcatheter heart valves (THVs), data on more recent devices are severely lacking. We performed a multinational, multicentre, retrospective, observational registry analysis of patients who underwent PPVI using the Edwards SAPIEN XT THV. Of the 46 patients that were enrolled, the majority had tetralogy of Fallot as the underlying diagnosis (58.7%), and stentless xenograft as the most common RVOT anatomy (34.8%). Procedural success rate was high (93.5%), with a low frequency of periprocedural complications and adverse events (6.5% and 10.9%, respectively). At 30days post-procedure, NYHA class had improved significantly (90.6% were at NYHA I or II). The rate of moderate/severe pulmonary regurgitation had decreased from 76.1% at baseline to 5.0% at 30days, and the calculated peak systolic gradient had decreased from 45.2 (SD±21.3) mmHg to 16.4 (SD±8.0) mmHg, with these values remaining low up to 2years. The data suggest the efficacy and safety of the SAPIEN XT THV in PPVI in common anatomies in patients with conduits, as well as those with native pulmonary valves or transannular patches. Continued data collection is necessary to verify long-term findings. CLINICALTRIALS. NCT02302131. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. An association between pulmonary Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex infections and biomarkers of Th2-type inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, Paul E; Hopkins, Susan; Cropley, Ian; Lowe, David M; Lipman, Marc

    2017-05-15

    The rising incidence of pulmonary Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex (MAI) infection is unexplained but parallels the growing world-wide epidemic of allergic disease. We hypothesized an association between pulmonary MAI infection and Th2-type immune responses as seen in allergy. Biomarkers of patient Th2-type immune responses (peripheral blood eosinophil counts and serum IgE levels) were compared between patients with positive pulmonary samples for tuberculosis and non-tuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infection. A further comparison of clinical characteristics, including respiratory co-morbidities, and biomarkers, was conducted between patients culturing MAI NTM and those culturing NTM other than MAI. Patients culturing NTM from pulmonary samples had significantly higher peripheral blood eosinophil levels than those culturing Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Furthermore, patients culturing MAI compared to those culturing NTM other than MAI had higher eosinophil counts (mean 0.29x10 9 /L vs 0.15x10 9 /L, p = 0.010) and IgE levels (geometric mean 138kU/L vs 47kU/L, p = 0.021). However there was no significant difference in the frequency of asthma between the two NTM groups. There is an association between biomarkers of Th2-type immune responses and pulmonary MAI. Prospective and translational research could identify the direction of causation; and so determine whether our finding may be utilized within future management strategies for MAI.

  17. Cardioprotective effects of early and late aerobic exercise training in experimental pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Moreira-Gonçalves, Daniel; Ferreira, Rita; Fonseca, Hélder; Padrão, Ana Isabel; Moreno, Nuno; Silva, Ana Filipa; Vasques-Nóvoa, Francisco; Gonçalves, Nádia; Vieira, Sara; Santos, Mário; Amado, Francisco; Duarte, José Alberto; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F; Henriques-Coelho, Tiago

    2015-11-01

    Clinical studies suggest that aerobic exercise can exert beneficial effects in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We compared the impact of early or late aerobic exercise training on right ventricular function, remodeling and survival in experimental PAH. Male Wistar rats were submitted to normal cage activity (SED), exercise training in early (EarlyEX) and in late stage (LateEX) of PAH induced by monocrotaline (MCT, 60 mg/kg). Both exercise interventions resulted in improved cardiac function despite persistent right pressure-overload, increased exercise tolerance and survival, with greater benefits in EarlyEX+MCT. This was accompanied by improvements in the markers of cardiac remodeling (SERCA2a), neurohumoral activation (lower endothelin-1, brain natriuretic peptide and preserved vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA), metabolism and mitochondrial oxidative stress in both exercise interventions. EarlyEX+MCT provided additional improvements in fibrosis, tumor necrosis factor-alpha/interleukin-10 and brain natriuretic peptide mRNA, and beta/alpha myosin heavy chain protein expression. The present study demonstrates important cardioprotective effects of aerobic exercise in experimental PAH, with greater benefits obtained when exercise training is initiated at an early stage of the disease.

  18. Early-life inflammation with LPS delays fear extinction in adult rodents.

    PubMed

    Doenni, V M; Song, C M; Hill, M N; Pittman, Q J

    2017-07-01

    A large body of evidence has been brought forward connecting developmental immune activation to abnormal fear and anxiety levels. Anxiety disorders have extremely high lifetime prevalence, yet susceptibility factors that contribute to their emergence are poorly understood. In this research we investigated whether an inflammatory insult early in life can alter the response to fear conditioning in adulthood. Fear learning and extinction are important and adaptive behaviors, mediated largely by the amygdala and its interconnectivity with cortico-limbic circuits. Male and female rat pups were given LPS (100μg/kg i.p.) or saline at postnatal day 14; LPS activated cFos expression in the central amygdala 2.5h after exposure, but not the basal or lateral nuclei. When tested in adulthood, acquisition of an auditory cued or contextual learned fear memory was largely unaffected as was the extinction of fear to a conditioned context. However, we detected a deficit in auditory fear extinction in male and female rats that experienced early-life inflammation, such that there is a significant delay in fear extinction processes resulting in more sustained fear behaviors in response to a conditioned cue. This response was specific to extinction training and did not persist into extinction recall. The effect could not be explained by differences in pain threshold (unaltered) or in baseline anxiety, which was elevated in adolescent females only and unaltered in adolescent males and adult males and females. This research provides further evidence for the involvement of the immune system during development in the shaping of fear and anxiety related behaviors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mast cell activation and neutrophil recruitment promotes early and robust inflammation in the meninges in EAE.

    PubMed

    Christy, Alison L; Walker, Margaret E; Hessner, Martin J; Brown, Melissa A

    2013-05-01

    The meninges are often considered inert tissues that house the CSF and provide protection for the brain and spinal cord. Yet emerging data demonstrates that they are also active sites of immune responses. Furthermore, the blood-CSF barrier surrounding meningeal blood vessels, together with the blood-brain barrier (BBB), is postulated to serve as a gateway for the pathological infiltration of immune cells into the CNS in multiple sclerosis (MS). Our previous studies using mast cell-deficient (Kit(W/Wv)) mice demonstrated that mast cells resident in the dura mater and pia mater exacerbate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a rodent model of MS, by facilitating CNS inflammatory cell influx. Here we examined the underlying mechanisms that mediate these effects. We demonstrate that there are dramatic alterations in immune associated gene expression in the meninges in pre-clinical disease, including those associated with mast cell and neutrophil function. Meningeal mast cells are activated within 24 h of disease induction, but do not directly compromise CNS vascular integrity. Rather, through production of TNF, mast cells elicit an early influx of neutrophils, cells known to alter vascular permeability, into the meninges. These data add to the growing evidence that inflammation in the meninges precedes CNS immune cell infiltration and establish that mast cells are among the earliest participants in these disease-initiating events. We hypothesize that mast cell-dependent neutrophil recruitment and activation in the meninges promotes early breakdown of the local BBB and CSF-blood barrier allowing initial immune cell access to the CNS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Early pulmonary toxicity following lung stereotactic body radiation therapy delivered in consecutive daily fractions.

    PubMed

    Stauder, Michael C; Macdonald, O Kenneth; Olivier, Kenneth R; Call, Jason A; Lafata, Kyle; Mayo, Charles S; Miller, Robert C; Brown, Paul D; Bauer, Heather J; Garces, Yolanda I

    2011-05-01

    Identify the incidence of early pulmonary toxicity in a cohort of patients treated with lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) on consecutive treatment days. A total of 88 lesions in 84 patients were treated with SBRT in consecutive daily fractions (Fx) for medically inoperable non-small cell lung cancer or metastasis. The incidence of pneumonitis was evaluated and graded according to the NCI CTCAE v3.0. With a median follow-up of 15.8 months (range 2.5-28.6), the median age at SBRT was 71.8 years (range 23.8-87.8). 47 lesions were centrally located and 41 were peripheral. Most central lesions were treated with 48Gy in 4 Fx, and most peripheral lesions with 54Gy in 3 Fx. The incidence of grade ≥ 2 pneumonitis was 12.5% in all patients treated, and 14.3% among the subset of patients treated with 54Gy in 3 Fx. A total of two grade 3 toxicities were seen as one grade 5 toxicity in a patient treated for recurrence after pneumonectomy. Treating both central and peripheral lung lesions with SBRT in consecutive daily fractions in this cohort was well tolerated and did not cause excessive early pulmonary toxicity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Characterization of the early pulmonary inflammatory response associated with PTFE fume exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, C. J.; Finkelstein, J. N.; Gelein, R.; Baggs, R.; Oberdorster, G.; Clarkson, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Heating of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) has been described to release fumes containing ultrafine particles (approximately 18 nm diam). These fumes can be highly toxic in the respiratory tract inducing extensive pulmonary edema with hemorrhagic inflammation. Fischer-344 rats were exposed to PTFE fumes generated by temperatures ranging from 450 to 460 degrees C for 15 min at an exposure concentration of 5 x 10(5) particles/cm3, equivalent to approximately 50 micrograms/m3. Responses were examined 4 hr post-treatment when these rats demonstrated 60-85% neutrophils (PMNs) in their lung lavage. Increases in abundance for messages encoding the antioxidants manganese superoxide dismutase and metallothionein (MT) increased 15- and 40-fold, respectively. For messages encoding the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines: inducible nitric oxide synthase, interleukin 1 alpha, 1 beta, and 6 (IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, and IL-6), macrophage inflammatory protein-2, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) increases of 5-, 5-, 10-, 40-, 40-, and 15-fold were present. Vascular endothelial growth factor, which may play a role in the integrity of the endothelial barrier, was decreased to 20% of controls. In situ sections were hybridized with 33P cRNA probes encoding IL-6, MT, surfactant protein C, and TNF alpha. Increased mRNA abundance for MT and IL-6 was expressed around all airways and interstitial regions with MT and IL-6 demonstrating similar spatial distribution. Large numbers of activated PMNs expressed IL-6, MT, and TNF alpha. Additionally, pulmonary macrophages and epithelial cells were actively involved. These observations support the notion that PTFE fumes containing ultrafine particles initiate a severe inflammatory response at low inhaled particle mass concentrations, which is suggestive of an oxidative injury. Furthermore, PMNs may actively regulate the inflammatory process through cytokine and antioxidant expression.

  2. Systemic inflammation in early neonatal mice induces transient and lasting neurodegenerative effects.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Filipa L; Herz, Jasmin; Fernandes, Adelaide; Rocha, João; Sepodes, Bruno; Brito, Maria A; McGavern, Dorian B; Brites, Dora

    2015-04-29

    The inflammatory mediator lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been shown to induce acute gliosis in neonatal mice. However, the progressive effects on the murine neurodevelopmental program over the week that follows systemic inflammation are not known. Thus, we investigated the effects of repeated LPS administration in the first postnatal week in mice, a condition mimicking sepsis in late preterm infants, on the developing central nervous system (CNS). Systemic inflammation was induced by daily intraperitoneal administration (i.p.) of LPS (6 mg/kg) in newborn mice from postnatal day (PND) 4 to PND6. The effects on neurodevelopment were examined by staining the white matter and neurons with Luxol Fast Blue and Cresyl Violet, respectively. The inflammatory response was assessed by quantifying the expression/activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP), toll-like receptor (TLR)-4, high mobility group box (HMGB)-1, and autotaxin (ATX). In addition, B6 CX3CR1(gfp/+) mice combined with cryo-immunofluorescence were used to determine the acute, delayed, and lasting effects on myelination, microglia, and astrocytes. LPS administration led to acute body and brain weight loss as well as overt structural changes in the brain such as cerebellar hypoplasia, neuronal loss/shrinkage, and delayed myelination. The impaired myelination was associated with alterations in the proliferation and differentiation of NG2 progenitor cells early after LPS administration, rather than with excessive phagocytosis by CNS myeloid cells. In addition to disruptions in brain architecture, a robust inflammatory response to LPS was observed. Quantification of inflammatory biomarkers revealed decreased expression of ATX with concurrent increases in HMGB1, TLR-4, and MMP-9 expression levels. Acute astrogliosis (GFAP(+) cells) in the brain parenchyma and at the microvasculature interface together with parenchymal microgliosis (CX3CR1(+) cells) were also observed. These changes preceded the migration

  3. Pulmonary instillation of low doses of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in mice leads to particle retention and gene expression changes in the absence of inflammation

    SciT

    Husain, Mainul, E-mail: mainul.husain@hc-sc.gc.ca; Saber, Anne T., E-mail: ats@nrcwe.dk; Guo, Charles, E-mail: charles.guo@hc-sc.gc.ca

    2013-06-15

    We investigated gene expression, protein synthesis, and particle retention in mouse lungs following intratracheal instillation of varying doses of nano-sized titanium dioxide (nano-TiO{sub 2}). Female C57BL/6 mice were exposed to rutile nano-TiO{sub 2} via single intratracheal instillations of 18, 54, and 162 μg/mouse. Mice were sampled 1, 3, and 28 days post-exposure. The deposition of nano-TiO{sub 2} in the lungs was assessed using nanoscale hyperspectral microscopy. Biological responses in the pulmonary system were analyzed using DNA microarrays, pathway-specific real-time RT-PCR (qPCR), gene-specific qPCR arrays, and tissue protein ELISA. Hyperspectral mapping showed dose-dependent retention of nano-TiO{sub 2} in the lungs upmore » to 28 days post-instillation. DNA microarray analysis revealed approximately 3000 genes that were altered across all treatment groups (± 1.3 fold; p < 0.1). Several inflammatory mediators changed in a dose- and time-dependent manner at both the mRNA and protein level. Although no influx of neutrophils was detected at the low dose, changes in the expression of several genes and proteins associated with inflammation were observed. Resolving inflammation at the medium dose, and lack of neutrophil influx in the lung fluid at the low dose, were associated with down-regulation of genes involved in ion homeostasis and muscle regulation. Our gene expression results imply that retention of nano-TiO{sub 2} in the absence of inflammation over time may potentially perturb calcium and ion homeostasis, and affect smooth muscle activities. - Highlights: • Pulmonary effects following exposure to low doses of nano-TiO{sub 2} were examined. • Particle retention in lungs was assessed using nanoscale hyperspectral microscopy. • Particles persisted up to 28 days in lungs in all dose groups. • Inflammation was the pathway affected in the high dose group at all time points. • Ion homeostasis and muscle activity pathways were affected in the

  4. Role of Cardiovascular Disease-associated iron overload in Libby amphibole-induced acute pulmonary injury and inflammation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pulmonary toxicity induced by asbestos is thought to be mediated through redox-cycling of fiber-bound and bioavailable iron (Fe). We hypothesized that Libby amphibole (LA)-induced cute lung injury will be exacerbated in rat models of cardiovascular disease (CVD)-associated Fe-ove...

  5. DIFFERENTIAL PULMONARY INFLAMMATION AND IN VITRO CYTOTOXICITY BY SIZE-FRACTIONATED FLY ASH PARTICLES FROM PULVERIZED COAL COMBUSTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents results of research on the adverse health effects associated with exposure to airborne particulate matter. Pulmonary inflammatory responses were examined in CDI mice after intratracheal instillation of 25 or 100 micrograms of ultrafine (<0.2 micrometers), fine ...

  6. Early growth response protein-1 mediates lipotoxicity-associated placental inflammation: Role in maternal obesity

    Obesity is associated with low-grade chronic inflammation, which contributes to cellular dysfunction promoting metabolic disease. Obesity during pregnancy leads to a pro-inflammatory milieu in the placenta; however, the underlying causes for obesity-induced placental inflammation remain unclear. H...

  7. The Interplay between Inflammation, Coagulation and Endothelial Injury in the Early Phase of Acute Pancreatitis: Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Dumnicka, Paulina; Maduzia, Dawid; Ceranowicz, Piotr; Olszanecki, Rafał; Drożdż, Ryszard; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata

    2017-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an inflammatory disease with varied severity, ranging from mild local inflammation to severe systemic involvement resulting in substantial mortality. Early pathologic events in AP, both local and systemic, are associated with vascular derangements, including endothelial activation and injury, dysregulation of vasomotor tone, increased vascular permeability, increased leukocyte migration to tissues, and activation of coagulation. The purpose of the review was to summarize current evidence regarding the interplay between inflammation, coagulation and endothelial dysfunction in the early phase of AP. Practical aspects were emphasized: (1) we summarized available data on diagnostic usefulness of the markers of endothelial dysfunction and activated coagulation in early prediction of severe AP; (2) we reviewed in detail the results of experimental studies and clinical trials targeting coagulation-inflammation interactions in severe AP. Among laboratory tests, d-dimer and angiopoietin-2 measurements seem the most useful in early prediction of severe AP. Although most clinical trials evaluating anticoagulants in treatment of severe AP did not show benefits, they also did not show significantly increased bleeding risk. Promising results of human trials were published for low molecular weight heparin treatment. Several anticoagulants that proved beneficial in animal experiments are thus worth testing in patients. PMID:28208708

  8. Budesonide suppresses pulmonary antibacterial host defense by down-regulating cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide in allergic inflammation mice and in lung epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glucocorticoids are widely regarded as the most effective treatment for asthma. However, the direct impact of glucocorticoids on the innate immune system and antibacterial host defense during asthma remain unclear. Understanding the mechanisms underlying this process is critical to the clinical application of glucocorticoids for asthma therapy. After sensitization and challenge with ovalbumin (OVA), BALB/c mice were treated with inhaled budesonide and infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). The number of viable bacteria in enflamed lungs was evaluated, and levels of interleukin-4 (IL-4) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in serum were measured. A lung epithelial cell line was pretreated with budesonide. Levels of cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP) were measured by immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. Intracellular bacteria were observed in lung epithelial cells. Results Inhaled budesonide enhanced lung infection in allergic mice exposed to P. aeruginosa and increased the number of viable bacteria in lung tissue. Higher levels of IL-4 and lower levels of IFN-γ were observed in the serum. Budesonide decreased the expression of CRAMP, increased the number of internalized P. aeruginosa in OVA-challenged mice and in lung epithelial cell lines. These data indicate that inhaled budesonide can suppress pulmonary antibacterial host defense by down-regulating CRAMP in allergic inflammation mice and in cells in vitro. Conclusions Inhaled budesonide suppressed pulmonary antibacterial host defense in an asthmatic mouse model and in lung epithelium cells in vitro. This effect was dependent on the down-regulation of CRAMP. PMID:23387852

  9. Low-Level Laser Therapy Reduces Lung Inflammation in an Experimental Model of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Involving P2X7 Receptor.

    PubMed

    da Cunha Moraes, Gabriel; Vitoretti, Luana Beatriz; de Brito, Auriléia Aparecida; Alves, Cintia Estefano; de Oliveira, Nicole Cristine Rigonato; Dos Santos Dias, Alana; Matos, Yves Silva Teles; Oliveira-Junior, Manoel Carneiro; Oliveira, Luis Vicente Franco; da Palma, Renata Kelly; Candeo, Larissa Carbonera; Lino-Dos-Santos-Franco, Adriana; Horliana, Anna Carolina Ratto Tempestine; Gimenes Júnior, João Antonio; Aimbire, Flavio; Vieira, Rodolfo Paula; Ligeiro-de-Oliveira, Ana Paula

    2018-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive disease characterized by irreversible airflow limitation, airway inflammation and remodeling, and enlargement of alveolar spaces. COPD is in the top five leading causes of deaths worldwide and presents a high economic cost. However, there are some preventive measures to lower the risk of developing COPD. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a new effective therapy, with very low cost and no side effects. So, our objective was to investigate if LLLT reduces pulmonary alterations in an experimental model of COPD. C57BL/6 mice were submitted to cigarette smoke for 75 days (2x/day). After 60 days to smoke exposure, the treated group was submitted to LLLT (diode laser, 660 nm, 30 mW, and 3 J/cm 2 ) for 15 days and euthanized for morphologic and functional analysis of the lungs. Our results showed that LLLT significantly reduced the number of inflammatory cells and the proinflammatory cytokine secretion such as IL-1 β , IL-6, and TNF- α in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). We also observed that LLLT decreased collagen deposition as well as the expression of purinergic P2X7 receptor. On the other hand, LLLT increased the IL-10 release. Thus, LLLT can be pointed as a promising therapeutic approach for lung inflammatory diseases as COPD.

  10. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma-associated Proteobacteria, but not commensal Prevotella spp., promote Toll-like receptor 2-independent lung inflammation and pathology.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Jeppe M; Musavian, Hanieh S; Butt, Tariq M; Ingvorsen, Camilla; Thysen, Anna H; Brix, Susanne

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies of healthy human airways have revealed colonization by a distinct commensal bacterial microbiota containing Gram-negative Prevotella spp. However, the immunological properties of these bacteria in the respiratory system remain unknown. Here we compare the innate respiratory immune response to three Gram-negative commensal Prevotella strains (Prevotella melaninogenica, Prevotella nanceiensis and Prevotella salivae) and three Gram-negative pathogenic Proteobacteria known to colonize lungs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma (Haemophilus influenzae B, non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis). The commensal Prevotella spp. and pathogenic Proteobacteria were found to exhibit intrinsic differences in innate inflammatory capacities on murine lung cells in vitro. In vivo in mice, non-typeable H. influenzae induced severe Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-independent COPD-like inflammation characterized by predominant airway neutrophilia, expression of a neutrophilic cytokine/chemokine profile in lung tissue, and lung immunopathology. In comparison, P. nanceiensis induced a diminished neutrophilic airway inflammation and no detectable lung pathology. Interestingly, the inflammatory airway response to the Gram-negative bacteria P. nanceiensis was completely TLR2-dependent. These findings demonstrate weak inflammatory properties of Gram-negative airway commensal Prevotella spp. that may make colonization by these bacteria tolerable by the respiratory immune system. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma-associated Proteobacteria, but not commensal Prevotella spp., promote Toll-like receptor 2-independent lung inflammation and pathology

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Jeppe M; Musavian, Hanieh S; Butt, Tariq M; Ingvorsen, Camilla; Thysen, Anna H; Brix, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of healthy human airways have revealed colonization by a distinct commensal bacterial microbiota containing Gram-negative Prevotella spp. However, the immunological properties of these bacteria in the respiratory system remain unknown. Here we compare the innate respiratory immune response to three Gram-negative commensal Prevotella strains (Prevotella melaninogenica, Prevotella nanceiensis and Prevotella salivae) and three Gram-negative pathogenic Proteobacteria known to colonize lungs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma (Haemophilus influenzae B, non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis). The commensal Prevotella spp. and pathogenic Proteobacteria were found to exhibit intrinsic differences in innate inflammatory capacities on murine lung cells in vitro. In vivo in mice, non-typeable H. influenzae induced severe Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-independent COPD-like inflammation characterized by predominant airway neutrophilia, expression of a neutrophilic cytokine/chemokine profile in lung tissue, and lung immunopathology. In comparison, P. nanceiensis induced a diminished neutrophilic airway inflammation and no detectable lung pathology. Interestingly, the inflammatory airway response to the Gram-negative bacteria P. nanceiensis was completely TLR2-dependent. These findings demonstrate weak inflammatory properties of Gram-negative airway commensal Prevotella spp. that may make colonization by these bacteria tolerable by the respiratory immune system. PMID:25179236

  12. In Vivo Dark-Field Radiography for Early Diagnosis and Staging of Pulmonary Emphysema.

    PubMed

    Hellbach, Katharina; Yaroshenko, Andre; Meinel, Felix G; Yildirim, Ali Ö; Conlon, Thomas M; Bech, Martin; Mueller, Mark; Velroyen, Astrid; Notohamiprodjo, Mike; Bamberg, Fabian; Auweter, Sigrid; Reiser, Maximilian; Eickelberg, Oliver; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the suitability of in vivo x-ray dark-field radiography for early-stage diagnosis of pulmonary emphysema in mice. Furthermore, we aimed to analyze how the dark-field signal correlates with morphological changes of lung architecture at distinct stages of emphysema. Female 8- to 10-week-old C57Bl/6N mice were used throughout all experiments. Pulmonary emphysema was induced by orotracheal injection of porcine pancreatic elastase (80-U/kg body weight) (n = 30). Control mice (n = 11) received orotracheal injection of phosphate-buffered saline. To monitor the temporal patterns of emphysema development over time, the mice were imaged 7, 14, or 21 days after the application of elastase or phosphate-buffered saline. X-ray transmission and dark-field images were acquired with a prototype grating-based small-animal scanner. In vivo pulmonary function tests were performed before killing the animals. In addition, lungs were obtained for detailed histopathological analysis, including mean cord length (MCL) quantification as a parameter for the assessment of emphysema. Three blinded readers, all of them experienced radiologists and familiar with dark-field imaging, were asked to grade the severity of emphysema for both dark-field and transmission images. Histopathology and MCL quantification confirmed the introduction of different stages of emphysema, which could be clearly visualized and differentiated on the dark-field radiograms, whereas early stages were not detected on transmission images. The correlation between MCL and dark-field signal intensities (r = 0.85) was significantly higher than the correlation between MCL and transmission signal intensities (r = 0.37). The readers' visual ratings for dark-field images correlated significantly better with MCL (r = 0.85) than visual ratings for transmission images (r = 0.36). Interreader agreement and the diagnostic accuracy of both quantitative and visual assessment were significantly higher

  13. Early pulmonary response is critical for extra-pulmonary carbon nanoparticle mediated effects: comparison of inhalation versus intra-arterial infusion exposures in mice.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Koustav; Ettehadieh, Dariusch; Upadhyay, Swapna; Takenaka, Shinji; Adler, Thure; Karg, Erwin; Krombach, Fritz; Kreyling, Wolfgang G; Schulz, Holger; Schmid, Otmar; Stoeger, Tobias

    2017-06-20

    The death toll associated with inhaled ambient particulate matter (PM) is attributed mainly to cardio-vascular rather than pulmonary effects. However, it is unclear whether the key event for cardiovascular impairment is particle translocation from lung to circulation (direct effect) or indirect effects due to pulmonary particle-cell interactions. In this work, we addressed this issue by exposing healthy mice via inhalation and intra-arterial infusion (IAI) to carbon nanoparticles (CNP) as surrogate for soot, a major constituent of (ultrafine) urban PM. Equivalent surface area CNP doses in the blood (30mm 2 per animal) were applied by IAI or inhalation (lung-deposited dose 10,000mm 2 ; accounting for 0.3% of lung-to-blood CNP translocation). Mice were analyzed for changes in hematology and molecular markers of endothelial/epithelial dysfunction, pro-inflammatory reactions, oxidative stress, and coagulation in lungs and extra-pulmonary organs after CNP inhalation (4 h and 24 h) and CNP infusion (4 h). For methodological reasons, we used two different CNP types (spark-discharge and Printex90), with very similar physicochemical properties [≥98 and ≥95% elemental carbon; 10 and 14 nm primary particle diameter; and 800 and 300 m 2 /g specific surface area] for inhalation and IAI respectively. Mild pulmonary inflammatory responses and significant systemic effects were observed following 4 h and 24 h CNP inhalation. Increased retention of activated leukocytes, secondary thrombocytosis, and pro-inflammatory responses in secondary organs were detected following 4 h and 24 h of CNP inhalation only. Interestingly, among the investigated extra-pulmonary tissues (i.e. aorta, heart, and liver); aorta revealed as the most susceptible extra-pulmonary target following inhalation exposure. Bypassing the lungs by IAI however did not induce any extra-pulmonary effects at 4 h as compared to inhalation. Our findings indicate that extra-pulmonary effects due to CNP

  14. Fractalkine (CX3CL1) is involved in the early activation of hypothalamic inflammation in experimental obesity.

    PubMed

    Morari, Joseane; Anhe, Gabriel F; Nascimento, Lucas F; de Moura, Rodrigo F; Razolli, Daniela; Solon, Carina; Guadagnini, Dioze; Souza, Gabriela; Mattos, Alexandre H; Tobar, Natalia; Ramos, Celso D; Pascoal, Vinicius D; Saad, Mario J; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia; Moraes, Juliana C; Velloso, Licio A

    2014-11-01

    Hypothalamic inflammation is a common feature of experimental obesity. Dietary fats are important triggers of this process, inducing the activation of toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) signaling and endoplasmic reticulum stress. Microglia cells, which are the cellular components of the innate immune system in the brain, are expected to play a role in the early activation of diet-induced hypothalamic inflammation. Here, we use bone marrow transplants to generate mice chimeras that express a functional TLR4 in the entire body except in bone marrow-derived cells or only in bone marrow-derived cells. We show that a functional TLR4 in bone marrow-derived cells is required for the complete expression of the diet-induced obese phenotype and for the perpetuation of inflammation in the hypothalamus. In an obesity-prone mouse strain, the chemokine CX3CL1 (fractalkine) is rapidly induced in the neurons of the hypothalamus after the introduction of a high-fat diet. The inhibition of hypothalamic fractalkine reduces diet-induced hypothalamic inflammation and the recruitment of bone marrow-derived monocytic cells to the hypothalamus; in addition, this inhibition reduces obesity and protects against diet-induced glucose intolerance. Thus, fractalkine is an important player in the early induction of diet-induced hypothalamic inflammation, and its inhibition impairs the induction of the obese and glucose intolerance phenotypes. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  15. Acute respiratory changes and pulmonary inflammation involving a pathway of TGF-β1 induction in a rat model of chlorine-induced lung injury

    SciT

    Wigenstam, Elisabeth; Elfsmark, Linda; Koch, Bo

    We investigated acute and delayed respiratory changes after inhalation exposure to chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) with the aim to understand the pathogenesis of the long-term sequelae of Cl{sub 2}-induced lung-injury. In a rat model of nose-only exposure we analyzed changes in airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), inflammatory responses in airways, expression of pro-inflammatory markers and development of lung fibrosis during a time-course from 5 h up to 90 days after a single inhalation of Cl{sub 2}. A single dose of dexamethasone (10 mg/kg) was administered 1 h following Cl{sub 2}-exposure. A 15-min inhalation of 200 ppm Cl{sub 2} was non-lethal in Sprague-Dawley rats.more » At 24 h post exposure, Cl{sub 2}-exposed rats displayed elevated numbers of leukocytes with an increase of neutrophils and eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and edema was shown both in lung tissue and the heart. At 24 h, the inflammasome-associated cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 were detected in BAL. Concomitant with the acute inflammation a significant AHR was detected. At the later time-points, a delayed inflammatory response was observed together with signs of lung fibrosis as indicated by increased pulmonary macrophages, elevated TGF-β expression in BAL and collagen deposition around airways. Dexamethasone reduced the numbers of neutrophils in BAL at 24 h but did not influence the AHR. Inhalation of Cl{sub 2} in rats leads to acute respiratory and cardiac changes as well as pulmonary inflammation involving induction of TGF-β1. The acute inflammatory response was followed by sustained macrophage response and lack of tissue repair. It was also found that pathways apart from the acute inflammatory response contribute to the Cl{sub 2}-induced respiratory dysfunction. - Highlights: • Inhalation of Cl{sub 2} leads to acute lung inflammation and airway hyperreactivity. • Cl{sub 2} activates an inflammasome pathway of TGF-β induction. • Cl{sub 2} leads to a fibrotic respiratory disease.

  16. Early sepsis does not stimulate reactive oxygen species production and does not reduce cardiac function despite an increased inflammation status.

    PubMed

    Léger, Thibault; Charrier, Alice; Moreau, Clarisse; Hininger-Favier, Isabelle; Mourmoura, Evangelia; Rigaudière, Jean-Paul; Pitois, Elodie; Bouvier, Damien; Sapin, Vincent; Pereira, Bruno; Azarnoush, Kasra; Demaison, Luc

    2017-07-01

    If it is sustained for several days, sepsis can trigger severe abnormalities of cardiac function which leads to death in 50% of cases. This probably occurs through activation of toll-like receptor-9 by bacterial lipopolysaccharides and overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF- α and IL-1 β In contrast, early sepsis is characterized by the development of tachycardia. This study aimed at determining the early changes in the cardiac function during sepsis and at finding the mechanism responsible for the observed changes. Sixty male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to two groups, the first one being made septic by cecal ligation and puncture (sepsis group) and the second one being subjected to the same surgery without cecal ligation and puncture (sham-operated group). The cardiac function was assessed in vivo and ex vivo in standard conditions. Several parameters involved in the oxidative stress and inflammation were determined in the plasma and heart. As evidenced by the plasma level of TNF- α and gene expression of IL-1 β and TNF- α in the heart, inflammation was developed in the sepsis group. The cardiac function was also slightly stimulated by sepsis in the in vivo and ex vivo situations. This was associated with unchanged levels of oxidative stress, but several parameters indicated a lower cardiac production of reactive oxygen species in the septic group. In conclusion, despite the development of inflammation, early sepsis did not increase reactive oxygen species production and did not reduce myocardial function. The depressant effect of TNF- α and IL-1 β on the cardiac function is known to occur at very high concentrations. The influence of low- to moderate-grade inflammation on the myocardial mechanical behavior must thus be revisited. © 2017 French National Institute of Agronomical Research (INRA). Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  17. Associations between the degree of early lactation inflammation and performance, metabolism, and immune function in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, M M; Yasui, T; Felippe, M J B; Overton, T R

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to determine associations between the severity of systemic inflammation during the early postpartum period and performance, energy metabolism, and immune function in dairy cows. Cows were assigned to categorical quartiles (Q; Q1=0.18-0.59, Q2=0.60-1.14, Q3=1.15-2.05, and Q4=2.06-2.50 g of haptoglobin/L) based on the highest plasma haptoglobin (Hp) concentration measured during wk 1 postpartum. Although cows were assigned to different categories of inflammation during the postpartum period, we detected a quadratic relationship of inflammation on prepartum dry matter intake (DMI) and body weight (BW) such that cows in Q2 had lower prepartum DMI and cows in Q2 and Q3 had lower prepartum BW compared with cows in the other quartiles. We also detected a quadratic association of inflammation with postpartum DMI and BW such that cows in Q2 and Q3 also had generally lower postpartum DMI and BW compared with cows in Q1. There was a tendency for a Q × time interaction for milk yield and Q × time interactions for 3.5% fat-corrected milk and energy-corrected milk yields; quadratic relationships suggested decreased milk yield for Q2 and Q3 cows. We also found Q × parity and Q × time interactions for plasma glucose and insulin concentrations, suggesting alterations with differing degrees of inflammation. There was also a Q × time interaction for plasma nonesterified fatty acids concentration. In addition, alterations in liver triglyceride and glycogen contents for cows with inflammation as well as alterations in [1-(14)C]propionate oxidation in vitro were observed. Although we observed limited effects of inflammation on neutrophil and monocyte phagocytosis at d 7 postpartum, inflammation appeared to alter neutrophil and monocyte oxidative burst. Overall, cows with any degree of elevated haptoglobin in the first week after calving had alterations in both pre- and postpartum intake and postpartum metabolism. Copyright © 2016 American

  18. Gram staining of protected pulmonary specimens in the early diagnosis of ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Mimoz, O; Karim, A; Mazoit, J X; Edouard, A; Leprince, S; Nordmann, P

    2000-11-01

    We evaluated prospectively the use of Gram staining of protected pulmonary specimens to allow the early diagnosis of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), compared with the use of 60 bronchoscopic protected specimen brushes (PSB) and 126 blinded plugged telescopic catheters (PTC) obtained from 134 patients. Gram stains were from Cytospin slides; they were studied for the presence of microorganisms in 10 and 50 fields by two independent observers and classified according to their Gram stain morphology. Quantitative cultures were performed after serial dilution and plating on appropriate culture medium. A final diagnosis of VAP, based on a culture of > or = 10(3) c.f.u. ml-1, was established after 81 (44%) samplings. When 10 fields were analysed, a strong relationship was found between the presence of bacteria on Gram staining and the final diagnosis of VAP (for PSB and PTC respectively: sensitivity 74 and 81%, specificity 94 and 100%, positive predictive value 91 and 100%, negative predictive value 82 and 88%). The correlation was less when we compared the morphology of microorganisms observed on Gram staining with those of bacteria obtained from quantitative cultures (for PSB and PTC respectively: sensitivity 54 and 69%, specificity 86 and 89%, positive predictive value 72 and 78%, negative predictive value 74 and 84%). Increasing the number of fields read to 50 was associated with a slight decrease in specificity and positive predictive value of Gram staining, but with a small increase in its sensitivity and negative predictive value. The results obtained by the two observers were similar to each other for both numbers of fields analysed. Gram staining of protected pulmonary specimens performed on 10 fields predicted the presence of VAP and partially identified (using Gram stain morphology) the microorganisms growing at significant concentrations, and could help in the early choice of the treatment of VAP. Increasing the number of fields read or having the Gram

  19. C1q Deficiency Promotes Pulmonary Vascular Inflammation and Enhances the Susceptibility of the Lung Endothelium to Injury.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dilip; Romero, Freddy; Zhu, Ying; Duong, Michelle; Sun, Jianxin; Walsh, Kenneth; Summer, Ross

    2015-12-04

    The collectin proteins are innate immune molecules found in high concentrations on the epithelial and endothelial surfaces of the lung. While these proteins are known to have important anti-inflammatory actions in the airways of the lung little is known of their functional importance in the pulmonary circulation. We recently demonstrated that the circulating collectin protein adiponectin has potent anti-inflammatory effects on the lung endothelium, leading us to reason that other structurally related proteins might have similar effects. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the anti-inflammatory actions of C1q in lung endothelial homeostasis and the pulmonary vascular response to LPS or HCl injury. We show that lung endothelium from C1q-deficient (C1q(-/-)) mice expresses higher baseline levels of the vascular adhesion markers ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin when compared with wild-type mice. Further, we demonstrate that these changes are associated with enhanced susceptibility of the lung to injury as evident by increased expression of adhesion markers, enhanced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and augmented neutrophil recruitment. Additionally, we found that C1q(-/-) mice also exhibited enhanced endothelial barrier dysfunction after injury as manifested by decreased expression of junctional adherens proteins and enhanced vascular leakage. Mechanistically, C1q appears to mediate its effects by inhibiting phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and blocking nuclear translocation of the P65 subunit of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. In summary, our findings indicate a previously unrecognized role for C1q in pulmonary vascular homeostasis and provide added support for the hypothesis that circulating collectin proteins have protective effects on the lung endothelium. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. C1q Deficiency Promotes Pulmonary Vascular Inflammation and Enhances the Susceptibility of the Lung Endothelium to Injury*

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Dilip; Romero, Freddy; Zhu, Ying; Duong, Michelle; Sun, Jianxin; Walsh, Kenneth; Summer, Ross

    2015-01-01

    The collectin proteins are innate immune molecules found in high concentrations on the epithelial and endothelial surfaces of the lung. While these proteins are known to have important anti-inflammatory actions in the airways of the lung little is known of their functional importance in the pulmonary circulation. We recently demonstrated that the circulating collectin protein adiponectin has potent anti-inflammatory effects on the lung endothelium, leading us to reason that other structurally related proteins might have similar effects. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the anti-inflammatory actions of C1q in lung endothelial homeostasis and the pulmonary vascular response to LPS or HCl injury. We show that lung endothelium from C1q-deficient (C1q−/−) mice expresses higher baseline levels of the vascular adhesion markers ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin when compared with wild-type mice. Further, we demonstrate that these changes are associated with enhanced susceptibility of the lung to injury as evident by increased expression of adhesion markers, enhanced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and augmented neutrophil recruitment. Additionally, we found that C1q−/− mice also exhibited enhanced endothelial barrier dysfunction after injury as manifested by decreased expression of junctional adherens proteins and enhanced vascular leakage. Mechanistically, C1q appears to mediate its effects by inhibiting phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and blocking nuclear translocation of the P65 subunit of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. In summary, our findings indicate a previously unrecognized role for C1q in pulmonary vascular homeostasis and provide added support for the hypothesis that circulating collectin proteins have protective effects on the lung endothelium. PMID:26487714

  1. [Morphological characteristics of inflammation in HIV-associated pulmonary tuberculosis with regard to the expression of myeloperoxidase].

    PubMed

    Bykhalov, L S; Smirnov, A V

    2015-01-01

    to characterize the morphological features of inflammation and the degree of myeloperoxidase expression in the lung of patients who died from HIV-associated tuberculosis (TB). Autopsy lung tissue specimens from 229 patients with HIV-associated TB were examined. A comparison group consisted of dead TB mono-infected patients (n = 30). Dead HIV/TB co-infected patients were divided into subgroups: 1) 50 patients with Stage 4A-4B and a CD4(+)-lymphocyte count of more than 200 cells/µl; 2) 54 with Stage 4B-4C and a CD4(+)-lymphocyte count of 100 to 200 cells/µl; 3) 125 with Stage 4C-5 and a CD4(+)-lymphocyte count of less than 100 cells/µl. Histological and immunohistochemical examinations of lung slices were performed using antibodies to myeloperoxidase (MPO). The predominant types of an inflammatory response were revealed according to the level of CD4+ lymphocytes. The lungs in Subgroup 1 showed a predominant typical granulomatous response (82%). Subgroup 2 exhibited an exudative-productive inflammatory response (57.4%) while Subgroup 3 displayed an alterative necrotic type (92.8%). Subgroup 3 showed the most marked reduction in lymphocyte numbers in the areas of inflammation, which was accompanied by a significant increase in the relative density and other morphometric parameters of MPO-positive macrophages and granulocytes in the inflammatory infiltration zones and alveolar walls. The identified changes in the lungs suggest that there is a decline in the magnitude of a delayed type hypersensitivity reaction, a progression of alterative necrotic processes as CD4(+) lymphocytes decrease in the systemic blood flow, and an increase in the proportion of functionally immature macrophages in the areas of inflammation, which reflects a substantially impaired local immune response to the persistence of M. tuberculosis in HIV infection.

  2. The role of oxidative stress, inflammation and acetaminophen exposure from birth to early childhood in the induction of autism

    PubMed Central

    Hornik, Chi Dang; Bilbo, Staci; Holzknecht, Zoie E.; Gentry, Lauren; Rao, Rasika; Lin, Shu S.; Herbert, Martha R.; Nevison, Cynthia D.

    2017-01-01

    The wide range of factors associated with the induction of autism is invariably linked with either inflammation or oxidative stress, and sometimes both. The use of acetaminophen in babies and young children may be much more strongly associated with autism than its use during pregnancy, perhaps because of well-known deficiencies in the metabolic breakdown of pharmaceuticals during early development. Thus, one explanation for the increased prevalence of autism is that increased exposure to acetaminophen, exacerbated by inflammation and oxidative stress, is neurotoxic in babies and small children. This view mandates extreme urgency in probing the long-term effects of acetaminophen use in babies and the possibility that many cases of infantile autism may actually be induced by acetaminophen exposure shortly after birth. PMID:28415925

  3. The role of oxidative stress, inflammation and acetaminophen exposure from birth to early childhood in the induction of autism.

    PubMed

    Parker, William; Hornik, Chi Dang; Bilbo, Staci; Holzknecht, Zoie E; Gentry, Lauren; Rao, Rasika; Lin, Shu S; Herbert, Martha R; Nevison, Cynthia D

    2017-04-01

    The wide range of factors associated with the induction of autism is invariably linked with either inflammation or oxidative stress, and sometimes both. The use of acetaminophen in babies and young children may be much more strongly associated with autism than its use during pregnancy, perhaps because of well-known deficiencies in the metabolic breakdown of pharmaceuticals during early development. Thus, one explanation for the increased prevalence of autism is that increased exposure to acetaminophen, exacerbated by inflammation and oxidative stress, is neurotoxic in babies and small children. This view mandates extreme urgency in probing the long-term effects of acetaminophen use in babies and the possibility that many cases of infantile autism may actually be induced by acetaminophen exposure shortly after birth.

  4. Inhibition of connexin 43 hemichannel-mediated ATP release attenuates early inflammation during the foreign body response.

    PubMed

    Calder, Bennett W; Matthew Rhett, Joshua; Bainbridge, Heather; Fann, Stephen A; Gourdie, Robert G; Yost, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    In the last 50 years, the use of medical implants has increased dramatically. Failure of implanted devices and biomaterials is a significant source of morbidity and increasing healthcare expenditures. An important cause of implant failure is the host inflammatory response. Recent evidence implicates extracellular ATP as an important inflammatory signaling molecule. A major pathway for release of cytoplasmic ATP into the extracellular space is through connexin hemichannels, which are the unpaired constituents of gap junction intercellular channels. Blockade of hemichannels of the connexin 43 (Cx43) isoform has been shown to reduce inflammation and improve healing. We have developed a Cx43 mimetic peptide (JM2) that targets the microtubule-binding domain of Cx43. The following report investigates the role of the Cx43 microtubule-binding domain in extracellular ATP release by Cx43 hemichannels and how this impacts early inflammatory events of the foreign body reaction. In vitro Cx43 hemichannel-mediated ATP release by cultured human microvascular endothelial cells subjected to hypocalcemic and normocalcemic conditions was measured after application of JM2 and the known hemichannel blocker, flufenamic acid. A submuscular silicone implant model was used to investigate in vivo ATP signaling during the early foreign body response. Implants were coated with control pluronic vehicle or pluronic carrying JM2, ATP, JM2+ATP, or known hemichannel blockers and harvested at 24 h for analysis. JM2 significantly inhibited connexin hemichannel-mediated ATP release from cultured endothelial cells. Importantly, the early inflammatory response to submuscular silicone implants was inhibited by JM2. The reduction in inflammation by JM2 was reversed by the addition of exogenous ATP to the pluronic vehicle. These data indicate that ATP released through Cx43 hemichannels into the vasculature is an important signal driving the early inflammatory response to implanted devices. A vital

  5. Marijuana smoke induces severe pulmonary hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and emphysema in a predictive mouse model not via CB1 receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Helyes, Z; Kemény, Á; Csekő, K; Szőke, É; Elekes, K; Mester, M; Sándor, K; Perkecz, A; Kereskai, L; Márk, L; Bona, Á; Benkő, A; Pintér, E; Szolcsányi, J; Ledent, C; Sperlágh, B; Molnár, T F

    2017-08-01

    Sporadic clinical reports suggested that marijuana smoking induces spontaneous pneumothorax, but no animal models were available to validate these observations and to study the underlying mechanisms. Therefore, we performed a systematic study in CD1 mice as a predictive animal model and assessed the pathophysiological alterations in response to 4-mo-long whole body marijuana smoke with integrative methodologies in comparison with tobacco smoke. Bronchial responsiveness was measured with unrestrained whole body plethysmography, cell profile in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid with flow cytometry, myeloperoxidase activity with spectrophotometry, inflammatory cytokines with ELISA, and histopathological alterations with light microscopy. Daily marijuana inhalation evoked severe bronchial hyperreactivity after a week. Characteristic perivascular/peribronchial edema, atelectasis, apical emphysema, and neutrophil and macrophage infiltration developed after 1 mo of marijuana smoking; lymphocyte accumulation after 2 mo; macrophage-like giant cells, irregular or destroyed bronchial mucosa, goblet cell hyperplasia after 3 mo; and severe atelectasis, emphysema, obstructed or damaged bronchioles, and endothelial proliferation at 4 mo. Myeloperoxidase activity, inflammatory cell, and cytokine profile correlated with these changes. Airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation were not altered in mice lacking the CB1 cannabinoid receptor. In comparison, tobacco smoke induced hyperresponsiveness after 2 mo and significantly later caused inflammatory cell infiltration/activation with only mild emphysema. We provide the first systematic and comparative experimental evidence that marijuana causes severe airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, tissue destruction, and emphysema, which are not mediated by the CB1 receptor. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Riociguat in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension: results from an early access study.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Vallerie V; Jansa, Pavel; Nielsen-Kudsk, Jens E; Halank, Michael; Simonneau, Gérald; Grünig, Ekkehard; Ulrich, Silvia; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Gómez Sánchez, Miguel A; Pulido, Tomás; Pepke-Zaba, Joanna; Barberá, Joan Albert; Hoeper, Marius M; Vachiéry, Jean-Luc; Lang, Irene; Carvalho, Francine; Meier, Christian; Mueller, Katharina; Nikkho, Sylvia; D'Armini, Andrea M

    2017-12-28

    Following positive results from the Phase III CHEST-1 study in patients with inoperable or persistent/recurrent chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH), the Phase IIIb CTEPH early access study (EAS) was designed to assess the safety and tolerability of riociguat in real-world clinical practice, as well as to provide patients with early access to riociguat before launch. Riociguat is approved for the treatment of inoperable and persistent/recurrent CTEPH. We performed an open-label, uncontrolled, single-arm, early access study in which 300 adult patients with inoperable or persistent/recurrent CTEPH received riociguat adjusted from 1 mg three times daily (tid) to a maximum of 2.5 mg tid. Patients switching from unsatisfactory prior pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH)-targeted therapy (n = 84) underwent a washout period of at least 3 days before initiating riociguat. The primary aim was to assess the safety and tolerability of riociguat, with World Health Organization functional class and 6-min walking distance (6MWD) as exploratory efficacy endpoints. In total, 262 patients (87%) completed study treatment and entered the safety follow-up (median treatment duration 47 weeks). Adverse events were reported in 273 patients (91%). The most frequently reported serious adverse events were syncope (6%), right ventricular failure (3%), and pneumonia (2%). There were five deaths, none of which was considered related to study medication. The safety and tolerability of riociguat was similar in patients switched from other PAH-targeted therapies and those who were treatment naïve. In patients with data available, mean ± standard deviation 6MWD had increased by 33 ± 42 m at Week 12 with no clinically relevant differences between the switched and treatment-naïve subgroups. Riociguat was well tolerated in patients with CTEPH who were treatment naïve, and in those who were switched from other PAH-targeted therapies. No new safety signals were

  7. Kupffer Cell p38 MAPK Signaling Drives Post Burn Hepatic Damage and Pulmonary Inflammation when Alcohol Intoxication Precedes Burn Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Michael M.; O’Halloran, Eileen B.; Ippolito, Jill A.; Kovacs, Elizabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Clinical and animal studies demonstrate that alcohol intoxication at the time of injury worsens post-burn outcome. The purpose of this study was to determine the role and mechanism of Kupffer cell derangement in exacerbating post-burn end organ damage in alcohol exposed mice. Design Interventional study. Setting Research Institute. Subjects Male C57BL/6 mice. Interventions Alcohol administered 30 minutes before a 15% scald burn injury. Antecedent Kupffer cell depletion with clodronate liposomes (0.5 mg/kg). p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibition via SB203580 (10 mg/kg). Measurements and Main Results Kupffer cells were isolated 24 hours after injury and analyzed for p38 activity and IL-6 production. Intoxicated burned mice demonstrated a 2-fold (p<0.05) elevation of Kupffer cell p38 activation relative to either insult alone and this corresponded to a 43% (p<0.05) increase in IL-6 production. Depletion of Kupffer cells attenuated hepatic damage as seen by decreases of 53% (p<0.05) in serum ALT and 74% (p<0.05) in hepatic triglycerides, as well as a 77% reduction (p<0.05) in serum IL-6 levels compared to matched controls. This mitigation of hepatic damage was associated with a 54% decrease (p<0.05) in pulmonary neutrophil infiltration and reduced alveolar wall thickening by 45% (p<0.05). In vivo p38 inhibition conferred nearly identical hepatic and pulmonary protection after the combined injury as mice depleted of Kupffer cells. Conclusions Intoxication exacerbates post-burn hepatic damage through p38-dependent IL-6 production in Kupffer cells. PMID:27322363

  8. Neglected evidence in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and the importance of early diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Cottin, Vincent; Richeldi, Luca

    2014-03-01

    In idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), some facts or concepts based on substantial evidence, whilst implicit for learned subspecialists, have previously been neglected and/or not explicitly formulated or made accessible to a wider audience. IPF is strongly associated with cigarette smoking and is predominantly a disease of ageing. However, its cause(s) remain elusive and, thus, it is one of the most challenging diseases for the development of novel effective and safe therapies. With the approval of pirfenidone for patients with mild-to-moderate IPF, an earlier diagnosis of IPF is a prerequisite for earlier treatment and, potentially, improvement of the long-term clinical outcome of this progressive and ultimately fatal disease. An earlier diagnosis may be achieved in IPF by promoting thin-slice chest high-resolution computed tomography screening of interstitial lung disease as a "by-product" of large-scale lung cancer screening strategies in smokers, but other techniques, which have been neglected in the past, are now available. Lung auscultation and early identification of "velcro" crackles has been proposed as a key component of early diagnosis of IPF. An ongoing study is exploring correlations between lung sounds on auscultation obtained using electronic stethoscopes and high-resolution computed tomography patterns.

  9. Novel therapeutic strategies targeting innate immune responses and early inflammation after stroke.

    PubMed

    Shichita, Takashi; Ago, Tetsuro; Kamouchi, Masahiro; Kitazono, Takanari; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Ooboshi, Hiroaki

    2012-11-01

    Post-ischemic inflammation is an essential step in the progression of ischemic stroke. This review focuses on the function of infiltrating immune cells, macrophages, and T cells, in ischemic brain injury. The brain is a sterile organ; however, the activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4 is pivotal in the beginning of post-ischemic inflammation. Some endogenous TLR ligands are released from injured brain cells, including high mobility group box 1 and peroxiredoxin family proteins, and activate the infiltrating macrophages and induce the expression of inflammatory cytokines. Following this step, T cells also infiltrate into the ischemic brain and mediate post-ischemic inflammation in the delayed phase. Various cytokines from helper T cells and γδT cells function as neurotoxic (IL-23/IL-17, IFN-γ) or neuroprotective (IL-10, IL-4) mediators. Novel neuroprotective strategies should therefore be developed through more detailed understanding of this process and the regulation of post-ischemic inflammation. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Neurochemistry © International Society for Neurochemistry.

  10. Mechanical ventilation with lower tidal volumes and positive end-expiratory pressure prevents pulmonary inflammation in patients without preexisting lung injury.

    PubMed

    Wolthuis, Esther K; Choi, Goda; Dessing, Mark C; Bresser, Paul; Lutter, Rene; Dzoljic, Misa; van der Poll, Tom; Vroom, Margreeth B; Hollmann, Markus; Schultz, Marcus J

    2008-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation with high tidal volumes aggravates lung injury in patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome. The authors sought to determine the effects of short-term mechanical ventilation on local inflammatory responses in patients without preexisting lung injury. Patients scheduled to undergo an elective surgical procedure (lasting > or = 5 h) were randomly assigned to mechanical ventilation with either higher tidal volumes of 12 ml/kg ideal body weight and no positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) or lower tidal volumes of 6 ml/kg and 10 cm H2O PEEP. After induction of anesthesia and 5 h thereafter, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and/or blood was investigated for polymorphonuclear cell influx, changes in levels of inflammatory markers, and nucleosomes. Mechanical ventilation with lower tidal volumes and PEEP (n = 21) attenuated the increase of pulmonary levels of interleukin (IL)-8, myeloperoxidase, and elastase as seen with higher tidal volumes and no PEEP (n = 19). Only for myeloperoxidase, a difference was found between the two ventilation strategies after 5 h of mechanical ventilation (P < 0.01). Levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha, IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, macrophage inflammatory protein 1alpha, and macrophage inflammatory protein 1beta in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were not affected by mechanical ventilation. Plasma levels of IL-6 and IL-8 increased with mechanical ventilation, but there were no differences between the two ventilation groups. The use of lower tidal volumes and PEEP may limit pulmonary inflammation in mechanically ventilated patients without preexisting lung injury. The specific contribution of both lower tidal volumes and PEEP on the protective effects of the lung should be further investigated.

  11. The administration of a high refined carbohydrate diet promoted an increase in pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress in mice exposed to cigarette smoke

    PubMed Central

    Pena, Karina Braga; Ramos, Camila de Oliveira; Soares, Nícia Pedreira; da Silva, Pamela Félix; Bandeira, Ana Carla Balthar; Costa, Guilherme de Paula; Cangussú, Sílvia Dantas; Talvani, André; Bezerra, Frank Silva

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of a high refined carbohydrate diet and pulmonary inflammatory response in C57BL/6 mice exposed to cigarette smoke (CS). Twenty-four male mice were divided into four groups: control group (CG), which received a standard diet; cigarette smoke group (CSG), which was exposed to CS; a high refined carbohydrate diet group (RG), which received a high refined carbohydrate diet; and a high refined carbohydrates diet and cigarette smoke group (RCSG), which received a high refined carbohydrate diet and was exposed to CS. The animals were monitored for food intake and body weight gain for 12 weeks. After this period, the CSG and RCSG were exposed to CS for five consecutive days. At the end of the experimental protocol, all animals were euthanized for subsequent analyses. There was an increase of inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of CSG compared to CG and RCSG compared to CG, CSG, and RG. In addition, in the BALF, there was an increase of tumor necrosis factor alpha in RCSG compared to CG, CSG, and RG; interferon gamma increase in RCSG compared to the CSG; and increase in interleukin-10 in RCSG compared to CG and RG. Lipid peroxidation increased in RCSG compared to CG, CSG, and RG. Furthermore, the oxidation of proteins increased in CSG compared to CG. The analysis of oxidative stress showed an increase in superoxide dismutase in RCSG compared to CG, CSG, and RG and an increase in the catalase activity in RCSG compared with CG. In addition, there was a decrease in the glutathione reduced/glutathione total ratio of CSG, RG, and RCSG compared to CG. Therefore, the administration of a high refined carbohydrate diet promoted an increase in pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress in mice exposed to CS. PMID:28008246

  12. Pulmonary outcome of esophageal atresia patients and its potential causes in early childhood.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, René; Stock, Philippe; Rothe, Karin; Degenhardt, Petra

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to illustrate the pulmonary long term outcome of patients with repaired esophageal atresia and to further examine causes and correlations that might have led to this outcome. Twenty-seven of 62 possible patients (43%) aged 5-20years, with repaired esophageal atresia were recruited. Body plethysmography and spirometry were performed to evaluate lung function, and the Bruce protocol treadmill exercise test to assess physical fitness. Results were correlated to conditions such as interpouch distance, gastroesophageal reflux or duration of post-operative mechanical ventilation. Seventeen participants (63%) showed abnormal lung function at rest or after exercise. Restrictive ventilatory defects (solely restrictive or combined) were found in 11 participants (41%), and obstructive ventilatory defects (solely obstructive or combined) in 13 subjects (48%). Twenty-two participants (81%) performed the Bruce protocol treadmill exercise test to standard. The treadmill exercise results were expressed in z-score and revealed to be significantly below the standard population mean (z-score=-1.40). Moreover, significant correlations between restrictive ventilatory defects and the interpouch distance; duration of post-operative ventilation; gastroesophageal reflux disease; plus recurrent aspiration pneumonia during infancy; were described. It was shown that esophageal atresia and associated early complications have significant impact on pulmonary long term outcomes such as abnormal lung function and, in particular restrictive ventilatory defects. Long-running and regular follow-ups of patients with congenital esophageal atresia are necessary in order to detect and react to the development and progression of associated complications such as ventilation disorders or gastroesophageal reflux disease. Prognosis study, Level II. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Vitamin D supplementation of initially vitamin D-deficient mice diminishes lung inflammation with limited effects on pulmonary epithelial integrity.

    PubMed

    Gorman, Shelley; Buckley, Alysia G; Ling, Kak-Ming; Berry, Luke J; Fear, Vanessa S; Stick, Stephen M; Larcombe, Alexander N; Kicic, Anthony; Hart, Prue H

    2017-08-01

    In disease settings, vitamin D may be important for maintaining optimal lung epithelial integrity and suppressing inflammation, but less is known of its effects prior to disease onset. Female BALB/c dams were fed a vitamin D 3 -supplemented (2280 IU/kg, VitD + ) or nonsupplemented (0 IU/kg, VitD - ) diet from 3 weeks of age, and mated at 8 weeks of age. Male offspring were fed the same diet as their mother. Some offspring initially fed the VitD - diet were switched to a VitD + diet from 8 weeks of age (VitD -/+ ). At 12 weeks of age, signs of low-level inflammation were observed in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of VitD - mice (more macrophages and neutrophils), which were suppressed by subsequent supplementation with vitamin D 3 There was no difference in the level of expression of the tight junction proteins occludin or claudin-1 in lung epithelial cells of VitD + mice compared to VitD - mice; however, claudin-1 levels were reduced when initially vitamin D-deficient mice were fed the vitamin D 3 -containing diet (VitD -/+ ). Reduced total IgM levels were detected in BALF and serum of VitD -/+ mice compared to VitD + mice. Lung mRNA levels of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) were greatest in VitD -/+ mice. Total IgG levels in BALF were greater in mice fed the vitamin D 3 -containing diet, which may be explained by increased activation of B cells in airway-draining lymph nodes. These findings suggest that supplementation of initially vitamin D-deficient mice with vitamin D 3 suppresses signs of lung inflammation but has limited effects on the epithelial integrity of the lungs. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  14. Comparison of particle-exposure triggered pulmonary and systemic inflammation in mice fed with three different diets

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Obesity can be linked to disease risks such as diabetes and cardiovascular disorders, but recently, the adipose tissue (AT) macrophage also emerges as actively participating in inflammation and immune function, producing pro- and anti-inflammatory factors. Connections between the AT and chronic lung diseases, like emphysema and asthma and a protective role of adipocyte-derived proteins against acute lung injury were suggested. In this study we addressed the question, whether a diet challenge increases the inflammatory response in the alveolar and the blood compartment in response to carbon nanoparticles (CNP), as a surrogate for ambient/urban particulate air pollutants. Methods Mice were fed a high caloric carbohydrate-rich (CA) or a fat-rich (HF) diet for six weeks and were compared to mice kept on a purified low fat (LF) diet, respectively. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and blood samples were taken 24 h after intratracheal CNP instillation and checked for cellular and molecular markers of inflammation. Results and discussion The high caloric diets resulted in distinct effects when compared with LF mice, respectively: CA resulted in increased body and fat mass without affecting blood cellular immunity. Conversely, HF activated the blood system, increasing lymphocyte and neutrophil counts, and resulted in slightly increased body fat content. In contrast to higher pro-inflammatory BAL Leptin in CA and HF mice, on a cellular level, both diets did not lead to an increased pro-inflammatory basal status in the alveolar compartment per se, nor did result in differences in the particle-triggered response. However both diets resulted in a disturbance of the alveolar capillary barrier as indicated by enhanced BAL protein and lactate-dehydrogenase concentrations. Systemically, reduced serum Adiponectin in HF mice might be related to the observed white blood cell increase. Conclusion The increase in BAL pro-inflammatory factors in high caloric groups and reductions

  15. Comparison of particle-exposure triggered pulmonary and systemic inflammation in mice fed with three different diets.

    PubMed

    Götz, Alexander A; Rozman, Jan; Rödel, Heiko G; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Klingenspor, Martin; Stoeger, Tobias

    2011-09-27

    Obesity can be linked to disease risks such as diabetes and cardiovascular disorders, but recently, the adipose tissue (AT) macrophage also emerges as actively participating in inflammation and immune function, producing pro- and anti-inflammatory factors. Connections between the AT and chronic lung diseases, like emphysema and asthma and a protective role of adipocyte-derived proteins against acute lung injury were suggested.In this study we addressed the question, whether a diet challenge increases the inflammatory response in the alveolar and the blood compartment in response to carbon nanoparticles (CNP), as a surrogate for ambient/urban particulate air pollutants. Mice were fed a high caloric carbohydrate-rich (CA) or a fat-rich (HF) diet for six weeks and were compared to mice kept on a purified low fat (LF) diet, respectively. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and blood samples were taken 24 h after intratracheal CNP instillation and checked for cellular and molecular markers of inflammation. The high caloric diets resulted in distinct effects when compared with LF mice, respectively: CA resulted in increased body and fat mass without affecting blood cellular immunity. Conversely, HF activated the blood system, increasing lymphocyte and neutrophil counts, and resulted in slightly increased body fat content. In contrast to higher pro-inflammatory BAL Leptin in CA and HF mice, on a cellular level, both diets did not lead to an increased pro-inflammatory basal status in the alveolar compartment per se, nor did result in differences in the particle-triggered response. However both diets resulted in a disturbance of the alveolar capillary barrier as indicated by enhanced BAL protein and lactate-dehydrogenase concentrations. Systemically, reduced serum Adiponectin in HF mice might be related to the observed white blood cell increase. The increase in BAL pro-inflammatory factors in high caloric groups and reductions in serum concentrations of anti-inflammatory factors

  16. MRI evidence of persistent joint inflammation and progressive joint damage despite clinical remission during treatment of early rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Forslind, K; Svensson, B

    2016-01-01

    To determine the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of bones and joints in patients with recent-onset rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated for 2 years from diagnosis with disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and glucocorticoids. Thirteen patients with early RA were treated according to clinical practice and followed with MRI, radiographs, and Disease Activity Score calculated on 28 joints (DAS28) at inclusion (baseline) and after 1, 4, 7, 13, and 25 months. MRI of the dominant wrist and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints were assessed for synovitis, bone oedema, and erosions using the RA MRI Score (RAMRIS) and for tenosynovitis by an MRI tenosynovitis scoring method. Radiographs were assessed by the van der Heijde modified Sharp score (SHS). Clinical remission was defined by a DAS28 < 2.6. MRI at baseline detected inflammation in joints and tendons in all patients as well as erosions in 10 out of 13 patients. Over time, the erosion score increased while the synovitis and tenosynovitis scores remained almost unchanged. Bone oedema strongly correlated with synovitis. Synovitis and tenosynovitis correlated well with the erosion score at baseline but not thereafter. The MRI changes showed that joint damage started early and continued in the presence of persistent synovial and tenosynovial inflammation. The observations made in this small study suggest that the treatment goal of 'clinical remission' should be supplemented by a 'joint remission' goal. To this end, MRI is an appropriate tool. Further studies are needed to evaluate the optimal use of MRI in early RA.

  17. Microhemorrhage is an Early Event in the Pulmonary Fibrotic Disease of PECAM-1 Deficient FVB/n Mice

    PubMed Central

    Young, Lena C.; Woods, Steven J.; Groshong, Steven D.; Basaraba, Randall J.; Gilchrist, John M.; Higgins, David M.; Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes; Bass, Todd A.; Muller, William A.; Schenkel, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 (PECAM-1) deficient mice in the FVB/n strain exhibit fatal chronic pulmonary fibrotic disease. The illness occurs in the absence of a detectable pro-inflammatory event. PECAM-1 is vital to the stability of vascular permeability, leukocyte extravasation, clotting of platelets, and clearance of apoptotic cells. We show here that the spontaneous development of fibrotic disease in PECAM-1 deficient FVB/n mice is characterized by early loss of vascular integrity in pulmonary capillaries, resulting in spontaneous microbleeds. Hemosiderin-positive macrophages were found in interstitial spaces and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid in relatively healthy animals. We also observed a gradually increasing presence of hemosiderin-positive macrophages and fibrin deposition in the advanced stages of disease, corresponding to the accumulation of collagen, IL-10 expression, and myofibroblasts expressing alpha smooth muscle actin (SMA). Together with the growing evidence that pulmonary microbleeds and coagulation play an active part in human pulmonary fibrosis, this data further supports our hypothesis that PECAM-1 expression is necessary for vascular barrier function control and regulation of homeostasis specifically, in the pulmonary environment. PMID:24972347

  18. Protective effects of diketopiperazines from Moslae Herba against influenza A virus-induced pulmonary inflammation via inhibition of viral replication and platelets aggregation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huan-Huan; Yu, Wen-Ying; Li, Lan; Wu, Fang; Chen, Qin; Yang, Yang; Yu, Chen-Huan

    2018-04-06

    Moslae Herba (MH) is broadly used as an antiviral, antipyretic and anticoagulant drug which effectively treats respiratory diseases including cough, asthma, throat, cold and flu. The excessive inflammation of the lungs is the hallmark of severe influenza A virus (IAV) infection, while platelet aggregation and its subsequent microvascular thrombosis can exacerbate IAV-induced lung injury. Thus, inhibition of platelet aggregation can be a potential target for IAV treatment. Previous studies focus on the flavonoids from MH and their anti-inflammatory activities, but the anticoagulant compounds and potential molecular mechanism of MH remains unclear. This study was to isolate and characterize diketopiperazines (DKPs) from MH and to explore the underlying anticoagulant mechanism on IAV infection models. EtOAc sub-extract separated from MH ethanolic extract was subjected to fractionation through column chromatography. The chemical structures of pure compounds were characterized by the spectral analysis. Antiviral activities of DKPs were assayed in IAV-infected Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells and mice. Anticoagulant effects of DKPs were investigated on adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP)-induced acute pulmonary embolism and IAV-induced lung injury in vivo, as well as the inhibition on platelet activating factor (PAF), arachidonic acid (AA) and ADP-induced platelet aggregation in vitro. The serum levels of thromboxane B 2 (TXB 2 ) and 6-keto-PGF 1α were detected by ELISA. The expressions of key proteins in CD41-mediated PI3K/AKT pathways were determined by western blotting analysis. Six DKPs were, for the first time, isolated from MH and identified as cyclo(Tyr-Leu) (1), cyclo(Phe-Phe) (2), cyclo(Phe-Tyr) (3), cyclo(Ala-Ile) (4), cyclo(Ala-Leu) (5) and Bz-Phe-Phe-OMe (6). Among these DKPs, cyclo(Ala-Ile) and Bz-Phe-Phe-OMe possessed low cytotoxicities and significant inhibition against cytopathic effects induced by IAV (H1N1 and H3N2) replication in MDCK cells

  19. Pulmonary magnetic resonance imaging is similar to chest tomography in detecting inflammation in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Müller, Carolina de Souza; Warszawiak, Danny; Paiva, Eduardo Dos Santos; Escuissato, Dante Luiz

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are prevalent complications of systemic sclerosis (SSc) and are currently the leading causes of death related to the disease. The accurate recognition of these conditions is therefore of utmost importance for patient management. A study was carried out with 24 SSc patients being followed at the Rheumatology Department of the Hospital de Clínicas of Universidade Federal do Paraná (UFPR) and 14 healthy volunteers, with the objective of evaluating the usefulness of lung magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) when assessing ILD in SS patients. The results obtained with lung MRI were compared to those obtained by computed tomography (CT) of the chest, currently considered the examination of choice when investigating ILD in SS patients. The assessed population was predominantly composed of women with a mean age of 50 years, limited cutaneous SS, and a disease duration of approximately 7 years. In most cases, there was agreement between the findings on chest CT and lung MRI. Considering it is a radiation-free examination and capable of accurately identifying areas of lung tissue inflammatory involvement, lung MRI showed to be a useful examination, and further studies are needed to assess whether there is an advantage in using lung MRI instead of chest CT when assessing ILD activity in SS patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Attenuation of early phase inflammation by cannabidiol prevents pain and nerve damage in rat osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Philpott, Holly T.; O'Brien, Melissa; McDougall, Jason J.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Osteoarthritis (OA) is a multifactorial joint disease, which includes joint degeneration, intermittent inflammation, and peripheral neuropathy. Cannabidiol (CBD) is a noneuphoria producing constituent of cannabis that has the potential to relieve pain. The aim of this study was to determine whether CBD is anti-nociceptive in OA, and whether inhibition of inflammation by CBD could prevent the development of OA pain and joint neuropathy. Osteoarthritis was induced in male Wistar rats (150-175 g) by intra-articular injection of sodium monoiodoacetate (MIA; 3 mg). On day 14 (end-stage OA), joint afferent mechanosensitivity was assessed using in vivo electrophysiology, whereas pain behaviour was measured by von Frey hair algesiometry and dynamic incapacitance. To investigate acute joint inflammation, blood flow and leukocyte trafficking were measured on day 1 after MIA. Joint nerve myelination was calculated by G-ratio analysis. The therapeutic and prophylactic effects of peripheral CBD (100-300 μg) were assessed. In end-stage OA, CBD dose-dependently decreased joint afferent firing rate, and increased withdrawal threshold and weight bearing (P < 0.0001; n = 8). Acute, transient joint inflammation was reduced by local CBD treatment (P < 0.0001; n = 6). Prophylactic administration of CBD prevented the development of MIA-induced joint pain at later time points (P < 0.0001; n = 8), and was also found to be neuroprotective (P < 0.05; n = 6-8). The data presented here indicate that local administration of CBD blocked OA pain. Prophylactic CBD treatment prevented the later development of pain and nerve damage in these OA joints. These findings suggest that CBD may be a safe, useful therapeutic for treating OA joint neuropathic pain. PMID:28885454

  1. Attenuation of early phase inflammation by cannabidiol prevents pain and nerve damage in rat osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Philpott, Holly T; OʼBrien, Melissa; McDougall, Jason J

    2017-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a multifactorial joint disease, which includes joint degeneration, intermittent inflammation, and peripheral neuropathy. Cannabidiol (CBD) is a noneuphoria producing constituent of cannabis that has the potential to relieve pain. The aim of this study was to determine whether CBD is anti-nociceptive in OA, and whether inhibition of inflammation by CBD could prevent the development of OA pain and joint neuropathy. Osteoarthritis was induced in male Wistar rats (150-175 g) by intra-articular injection of sodium monoiodoacetate (MIA; 3 mg). On day 14 (end-stage OA), joint afferent mechanosensitivity was assessed using in vivo electrophysiology, whereas pain behaviour was measured by von Frey hair algesiometry and dynamic incapacitance. To investigate acute joint inflammation, blood flow and leukocyte trafficking were measured on day 1 after MIA. Joint nerve myelination was calculated by G-ratio analysis. The therapeutic and prophylactic effects of peripheral CBD (100-300 μg) were assessed. In end-stage OA, CBD dose-dependently decreased joint afferent firing rate, and increased withdrawal threshold and weight bearing (P < 0.0001; n = 8). Acute, transient joint inflammation was reduced by local CBD treatment (P < 0.0001; n = 6). Prophylactic administration of CBD prevented the development of MIA-induced joint pain at later time points (P < 0.0001; n = 8), and was also found to be neuroprotective (P < 0.05; n = 6-8). The data presented here indicate that local administration of CBD blocked OA pain. Prophylactic CBD treatment prevented the later development of pain and nerve damage in these OA joints. These findings suggest that CBD may be a safe, useful therapeutic for treating OA joint neuropathic pain.

  2. Transcriptome of Cultured Lung Fibroblasts in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: Meta-Analysis of Publically Available Microarray Datasets Reveals Repression of Inflammation and Immunity Pathways.

    PubMed

    Plantier, Laurent; Renaud, Hélène; Respaud, Renaud; Marchand-Adam, Sylvain; Crestani, Bruno

    2016-12-13

    Heritable profibrotic differentiation of lung fibroblasts is a key mechanism of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Its mechanisms are yet to be fully understood. In this study, individual data from four independent microarray studies comparing the transcriptome of fibroblasts cultured in vitro from normal (total n = 20) and IPF (total n = 20) human lung were compiled for meta-analysis following normalization to z-scores. One hundred and thirteen transcripts were upregulated and 115 were downregulated in IPF fibroblasts using the Significance Analysis of Microrrays algorithm with a false discovery rate of 5%. Downregulated genes were highly enriched for Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) functional classes related to inflammation and immunity such as Defense response to virus, Influenza A, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) mediated signaling pathway, interferon-inducible absent in melanoma2 (AIM2) inflammasome as well as Apoptosis. Although upregulated genes were not enriched for any functional class, select factors known to play key roles in lung fibrogenesis were overexpressed in IPF fibroblasts, most notably connective tissue growth factor ( CTGF ) and serum response factor ( SRF ), supporting their role as drivers of IPF. The full data table is available as a supplement.

  3. [Airway oxidative stress and inflammation markers in chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases(COPD) patients are linked with exposure to traffic-related air pollution: a panel study].

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Zhao, Q; Liu, B B; Wang, J; Xu, H B; Zhang, Y; Song, X M; He, B; Huang, W

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the effects of short-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution on airway oxidative stress and inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) patients. A panel of forty-five diagnosed COPD patients were recruited and followed with repeated measurements of biomarkers reflecting airway oxidative stress and inflammation in exhaled breath condensate (EBC), including nitrate and nitrite, 8-isoprostane, interleukin-8 and acidity of EBC (pH), between 5(th) September in 2014 and 26(th) May in 2015. The associations between air pollution and biomarkers were analyzed with mixed-effects models, controlling for confounding covariates. The concentration of PM2.5, black carbon, NO2 and number concentration of particles with diameter less than 100 nm (PNC100), and particles in size ranges between 100 nm to 200 nm (PNC100-200) during the first follow-up were (156.5±117.7), (10.7±0.7), (165.9±66.0)μg/m(3) and 397 521±96 712, 79 421±44 090 per cubic meter, respectively; the concentration were (67.9±29.6), (3.4±1.3), (126.1±10.9) μg/m(3) and (295 682±39 430), (24 693±12 369) per cubic meter, respectively during the second follow-up. The differences were of significance, with t value being 3.10, 4.42, 2.61, 4.02, 5.12, respectively and P value being 0.005,<0.001, 0.016, <0.001 and <0.001, respectively. In our COPD-patient panel, per interquartile range (IQR) increase in PNC100-200, we observed an increase of 65% (95% CI: 8%-152%) in nitrate and nitrite in EBC reflecting airway oxidative stress. For an IQR increase in PM2.5, black carbon and PNC100-200, respective increases of 0.17 ng/ml (95% CI: 0.02-0.33), 0.12 ng/ml (95% CI: 0.01-0.24) and 0.13 ng/ml (95% CI:0.02-0.24) in interleukin-8 in EBC reflecting airway inflammation were also observed. An IQR increase in ozone was also associated with a 0.24 (95%CI: 0.05-0.42) decrease in pH of EBC reflecting increased airway inflammation. No significant association observed between air pollution

  4. Biodiesel versus diesel exposure: Enhanced pulmonary inflammation, oxidative stress, and differential morphological changes in the mouse lung

    PubMed Central

    Yanamala, Naveena; Hatfield, Meghan K.; Farcas, Mariana T.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Hummer, Jon A.; Shurin, Michael R.; Birch, M. Eileen; Gutkin, Dmitriy W.; Kisin, Elena; Kagan, Valerian E.; Bugarski, Aleksandar D.; Shvedova, Anna A.

    2015-01-01

    The use of biodiesel (BD) or its blends with petroleum diesel (D) is considered to be a viable approach to reduce occupational and environmental exposures to particulate matter (PM). Due to its lower particulate mass emissions compared to D, use of BD is thought to alleviate adverse health effects. Considering BD fuel is mainly composed of unsaturated fatty acids, we hypothesize that BD exhaust particles could induce pronounced adverse outcomes, due to their ability to readily oxidize. The main objective of this study was to compare the effects of particles generated by engine fueled with neat BD and neat petroleum-based D. Biomarkers of tissue damage and inflammation were significantly elevated in lungs of mice exposed to BD particulates. Additionally, BD particulates caused a significant accumulation of oxidatively modified proteins and an increase in 4-hydroxynonenal. The up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines/growth factors was higher in lungs upon BD particulate exposure. Histological evaluation of lung sections indicated presence of lymphocytic infiltrate and impaired clearance with prolonged retention of BD particulate in pigment laden macrophages. Taken together, these results clearly indicate that BD exhaust particles could exert more toxic effects compared to D. PMID:23886933

  5. The Translational Repressor T-cell Intracellular Antigen-1 (TIA-1) is a Key Modulator of Th2 and Th17 Responses Driving Pulmonary Inflammation Induced by Exposure to House Dust Mite

    PubMed Central

    Simarro, Maria; Giannattasio, Giorgio; Xing, Wei; Lundequist, Emma-Maria; Stewart, Samantha; Stevens, Richard L.; Orduña, Antonio; Boyce, Joshua A.; Anderson, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    T-cell Intracellular Antigen-1 (TIA-1) is a translational repressor that dampens the production of proinflammatory cytokines and enzymes. In this study we investigated the role of TIA-1 in a mouse model of pulmonary inflammation induced by exposure to the allergenic extract (Df) of the house dust mite Dermatophagoides farinae. When intranasally challenged with a low dose of Df, mice lacking TIA-1 protein (Tia-1−/−) showed more severe airway and tissue eosinophilia, infiltration of lung bronchovascular bundles, and goblet cell metaplasia than wild-type littermates. Tia-1−/− mice also had higher levels of Df-specific IgE and IgG1 in serum and ex vivo restimulated Tia-1−/− lymph node cells and splenocytes transcribed and released more Th2/Th17 cytokines. To evaluate the site of action of TIA-1, we studied the response to Df in bone marrow chimeras. These experiments revealed that TIA-1 acts on both hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells to dampen pulmonary inflammation. Our results identify TIA-1 as a negative regulator of allergen-mediated pulmonary inflammation in vivo. Thus, TIA-1 might be an important player in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma. PMID:22525013

  6. The translational repressor T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1) is a key modulator of Th2 and Th17 responses driving pulmonary inflammation induced by exposure to house dust mite.

    PubMed

    Simarro, Maria; Giannattasio, Giorgio; Xing, Wei; Lundequist, Emma-Maria; Stewart, Samantha; Stevens, Richard L; Orduña, Antonio; Boyce, Joshua A; Anderson, Paul J

    2012-08-30

    T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1) is a translational repressor that dampens the production of proinflammatory cytokines and enzymes. In this study we investigated the role of TIA-1 in a mouse model of pulmonary inflammation induced by exposure to the allergenic extract (Df) of the house dust mite Dermatophagoides farinae. When intranasally challenged with a low dose of Df, mice lacking TIA-1 protein (Tia-1(-/-)) showed more severe airway and tissue eosinophilia, infiltration of lung bronchovascular bundles, and goblet cell metaplasia than wild-type littermates. Tia-1(-/-) mice also had higher levels of Df-specific IgE and IgG(1) in serum and ex vivo restimulated Tia-1(-/-) lymph node cells and splenocytes transcribed and released more Th2/Th17 cytokines. To evaluate the site of action of TIA-1, we studied the response to Df in bone marrow chimeras. These experiments revealed that TIA-1 acts on both hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells to dampen pulmonary inflammation. Our results identify TIA-1 as a negative regulator of allergen-mediated pulmonary inflammation in vivo. Thus, TIA-1 might be an important player in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Intestinal fibrosis is reduced by early elimination of inflammation in a mouse model of IBD: impact of a "Top-Down" approach to intestinal fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Laura A; Luke, Amy; Sauder, Kay; Moons, David S; Horowitz, Jeffrey C; Higgins, Peter D R

    2012-03-01

    The natural history of Crohn's disease follows a path of progression from an inflammatory to a fibrostenosing disease, with most patients requiring surgical resection of fibrotic strictures. Potent antiinflammatory therapies reduce inflammation but do not appear to alter the natural history of intestinal fibrosis. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between intestinal inflammation and fibrogenesis and the impact of a very early "top-down" interventional approach on fibrosis in vivo. In this study we removed the inflammatory stimulus from the Salmonella typhimurium mouse model of intestinal fibrosis by eradicating the S. typhimurium infection with levofloxacin at sequential timepoints during the infection. We evaluated the effect of this elimination of the inflammatory stimulus on the natural history of inflammation and fibrosis as determined by gross pathology, histopathology, mRNA expression, and protein expression. Fibrogenesis is preceded by inflammation. Delayed eradication of the inflammatory stimulus by antibiotic treatment represses inflammation without preventing fibrosis. Early intervention significantly ameliorates but does not completely prevent subsequent fibrosis. This study demonstrates that intestinal fibrosis develops despite removal of an inflammatory stimulus and elimination of inflammation. Early intervention ameliorates but does not abolish subsequent fibrosis, suggesting that fibrosis, once initiated, is self-propagating, suggesting that a very early top-down interventional approach may have the most impact on fibrostenosing disease. Copyright © 2011 Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America, Inc.

  8. Should chest examination be reinstated in the early diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease?

    PubMed Central

    Oshaug, Katja; Halvorsen, Peder A; Melbye, Hasse

    2013-01-01

    Background Although proven to be associated with bronchial obstruction, chest signs are not listed among cues that should prompt spirometry in the early diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in established guidelines. Aims We aimed to explore how chest findings add to respiratory symptoms and a history of smoking in the diagnosis of COPD. Methods In a cross-sectional study, patients aged 40 years or older, previously diagnosed with either asthma or COPD in primary care, answered questionnaires and underwent physical chest examination and spirometry. Results Among the 375 patients included, 39.7% had forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity <0.7. Hyperresonance to percussion was the strongest predictor of COPD, with a sensitivity of 20.8, a specificity of 97.8, and likelihood ratio of 9.5. In multivariate logistic regression, where pack-years, shortness of breath, and chest findings were among the explanatory variables, three physical chest findings were independent predictors of COPD. Hyperresonance to percussion yielded the highest odds ratio (OR = 6.7), followed by diminished breath sounds (OR = 5.0), and thirdly wheezes (OR = 2.3). These three chest signs also gave significant diagnostic information when added to shortness of breath and pack-years in receiver operating-characteristic curve analysis. Conclusion We found that chest signs may add to respiratory symptoms and a history of smoking in the diagnosis of COPD, and we conclude that chest signs should be reinstated as cues to early diagnosis of COPD in patients 40 years or older. PMID:23983462

  9. Right Pulmonary Artery Distensibility Index (RPAD Index). A field study of an echocardiographic method to detect early development of pulmonary hypertension and its severity even in the absence of regurgitant jets for Doppler evaluation in heartworm-infected dogs.

    PubMed

    Venco, Luigi; Mihaylova, Liliya; Boon, June A

    2014-11-15

    invasively and noninvasively if possible. Results of these evaluations indicated that RPAD Index is a valuable method for early detection of the presence and severity of pulmonary hypertension in heartworm-infected dogs even in the absence of regurgitant jets for Doppler evaluation and that there is a strong correlation between the RPAD Index and the level of pulmonary hypertension. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of the molecular mechanisms associated with cytotoxicity and inflammation after pulmonary exposure to different metal-rich welding particles.

    PubMed

    Shoeb, Mohammad; Kodali, Vamsi; Farris, Breanne; Bishop, Lindsey M; Meighan, Terence; Salmen, Rebecca; Eye, Tracy; Roberts, Jenny R; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti; Erdely, Aaron; Antonini, James M

    2017-08-01

    Welding generates a complex aerosol of incidental nanoparticles and cytotoxic metals, such as chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), and iron (Fe). The goal was to use both in vivo and in vitro methodologies to determine the mechanisms by which different welding fumes may damage the lungs. Sprague-Dawley rats were treated by intratracheal instillation (ITI) with 2.0 mg of gas metal arc-mild steel (GMA-MS) or manual metal arc-stainless steel (MMA-SS) fumes or saline (vehicle control). At 1, 3, and 10 days, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed to measure lung toxicity. To assess molecular mechanisms of cytotoxicity, RAW264.7 cells were exposed to both welding fumes for 24 h (0-100 μg/ml). Fume composition was different: MMA-SS (41% Fe, 29% Cr, 17% Mn, 3% Ni) versus GMA-MS (85% Fe, 14% Mn). BAL indicators of lung injury and inflammation were increased by MMA-SS at all time points and by GMA-MS at 3 and 10 days after exposure. RAW264.7 cells exposed to MMA-SS had elevated generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), protein-HNE (P-HNE) adduct formation, activation of ERK1/2, and expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) compared to GMA-MS and control. Increased generation of ROS due to MMA-SS exposure was confirmed by increased expression of Nrf2 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Results of in vitro studies provide evidence that stainless steel welding fume mediate inflammatory responses via activation of ROS/P-HNE/ERK1/2/Nrf2 signaling pathways. These findings were corroborated by elevated expression of COX-2, Nrf2, and HO-1 in homogenized lung tissue collected 1 day after in vivo exposure.

  11. Wilson disease: changes in methionine metabolism and inflammation affect global DNA methylation in early liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Medici, Valentina; Shibata, Noreene M.; Kharbanda, Kusum K.; LaSalle, Janine M.; Woods, Rima; Liu, Sarah; Engelberg, Jesse A.; Devaraj, Sridevi; Török, Natalie J.; Jiang, Joy X.; Havel, Peter J.; Lönnerdal, Bo; Kim, Kyoungmi; Halsted, Charles H.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic methionine metabolism may play an essential role in regulating methylation status and liver injury in Wilson disease (WD) through the inhibition of S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (SAHH) by copper (Cu) and the consequent accumulation of S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH). We studied the transcript levels of selected genes related to liver injury, levels of SAHH, SAH, DNA methyltransferases genes (Dnmt1, Dnmt3a, Dnmt3b) and global DNA methylation in the tx-j mouse (tx-j), an animal model of WD. Findings were compared to those in control C3H mice, and in response to Cu chelation by penicillamine (PCA) and dietary supplementation of the methyl donor betaine to modulate inflammatory and methylation status. Transcript levels of selected genes related to endoplasmic reticulum stress, lipid synthesis, and fatty acid oxidation were down-regulated at baseline in tx-j mice, further down-regulated in response to PCA, and showed little to no response to betaine. Hepatic Sahh transcript and protein levels were reduced in tx-j mice with consequent increase of SAH levels. Hepatic Cu accumulation was associated with inflammation, as indicated by histopathology and elevated serum ALT and liver tumor necrosis factor alpha (Tnf-α) levels. Dnmt3b was down-regulated in tx-j mice together with global DNA hypomethylation. PCA treatment of tx-j mice reduced Tnf-α and ALT levels, betaine treatment increased S-adenosylmethionine and up-regulated Dnmt3b levels, and both treatments restored global DNA methylation levels. Conclusion: reduced hepatic Sahh expression was associated with increased liver SAH levels in the tx-j model of WD, with consequent global DNA hypomethylation. Increased global DNA methylation was achieved by reducing inflammation by Cu chelation or by providing methyl groups. We propose that increased SAH levels and inflammation affect widespread epigenetic regulation of gene expression in WD. PMID:22945834

  12. Raw milk consumption and other early-life farm exposures and adult pulmonary function in the Agricultural Lung Health Study.

    PubMed

    Wyss, Annah B; House, John S; Hoppin, Jane A; Richards, Marie; Hankinson, John L; Long, Stuart; Henneberger, Paul K; Beane Freeman, Laura E; Sandler, Dale P; O'Connell, Elizabeth Long; Cummings, Christie Barker; Umbach, David M; London, Stephanie J

    2018-03-01

    Literature suggests that early exposure to the farming environment protects against atopy and asthma; few studies have examined pulmonary function. We evaluated associations between early-life farming exposures and pulmonary function in 3061 adults (mean age=63) from a US farming population using linear regression. Childhood raw milk consumption was associated with higher FEV 1 (β=49.5 mL, 95% CI 2.8 to 96.1 mL, p=0.04) and FVC (β=66.2 mL, 95% CI 13.2 to 119.1 mL, p=0.01). We did not find appreciable associations with other early-life farming exposures. We report a novel association between raw milk consumption and higher pulmonary function that lasts into older adulthood. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Inhibition of Connexin 43 Hemichannel-Mediated ATP Release Attenuates Early Inflammation During the Foreign Body Response

    PubMed Central

    Calder, Bennett W.; Rhett, Joshua Matthew; Bainbridge, Heather; Fann, Stephen A.; Gourdie, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In the last 50 years, the use of medical implants has increased dramatically. Failure of implanted devices and biomaterials is a significant source of morbidity and increasing healthcare expenditures. An important cause of implant failure is the host inflammatory response. Recent evidence implicates extracellular ATP as an important inflammatory signaling molecule. A major pathway for release of cytoplasmic ATP into the extracellular space is through connexin hemichannels, which are the unpaired constituents of gap junction intercellular channels. Blockade of hemichannels of the connexin 43 (Cx43) isoform has been shown to reduce inflammation and improve healing. We have developed a Cx43 mimetic peptide (JM2) that targets the microtubule-binding domain of Cx43. The following report investigates the role of the Cx43 microtubule-binding domain in extracellular ATP release by Cx43 hemichannels and how this impacts early inflammatory events of the foreign body reaction. Methods: In vitro Cx43 hemichannel-mediated ATP release by cultured human microvascular endothelial cells subjected to hypocalcemic and normocalcemic conditions was measured after application of JM2 and the known hemichannel blocker, flufenamic acid. A submuscular silicone implant model was used to investigate in vivo ATP signaling during the early foreign body response. Implants were coated with control pluronic vehicle or pluronic carrying JM2, ATP, JM2+ATP, or known hemichannel blockers and harvested at 24 h for analysis. Results: JM2 significantly inhibited connexin hemichannel-mediated ATP release from cultured endothelial cells. Importantly, the early inflammatory response to submuscular silicone implants was inhibited by JM2. The reduction in inflammation by JM2 was reversed by the addition of exogenous ATP to the pluronic vehicle. Conclusions: These data indicate that ATP released through Cx43 hemichannels into the vasculature is an important signal driving the early inflammatory

  14. Direct peritoneal resuscitation improves inflammation, liver blood flow, and pulmonary edema in a rat model of acute brain death.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jason W; Ghazi, Cameron A; Cain, Brandon C; Hurt, Ryan T; Garrison, R Neal; Matheson, Paul J

    2014-07-01

    Brain death in organ donors alters central hemodynamic performance, impairs physiology, exaggerates inflammation, and causes end-organ microcirculatory dysfunction and hypoxia. A new treatment, direct peritoneal resuscitation (DPR), might improve these derangements in acute brain death (ABD). We studied a standardized rodent model of brain death with matched controls to assess the efficacy of DPR as a resuscitation strategy after ABD. Anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized as follows: ABD (supradural balloon inflation) with minimal IV fluid (IVF; 2 mL/h, n = 12); ABD + adequate IVF (5 mL/h, n = 12); ABD with aggressive IVF (goal: mean arterial pressure [MAP] >80 mmHg, n = 15); or ABD + IVF + DPR (goal: MAP >80 mmHg, n = 12). Ventilation support, IVF, and DPR were started at loss of reflexes, and MAP, heart rate, and effective hepatic blood flow were recorded. High IVF and DPR prevented mortality (0%) compared with low IVF (81.8%) or mid IVF (16.7%). Effective hepatic blood flow was decreased in low and mid IVF (2.8 ± 0.3 mL/min/g body weight and 4.0 ± 0.5 mL/min/g body weight, respectively) vs baseline, but was stable in high IVF (6.2 ± 0.5 mL/min/g body weight; NS) or improved with DPR (8.6 ± 0.7 mL/min/g body weight). The high-IVF group had significant organ edema, which was prevented in the DPR group. The mid-IVF and low-IVF groups had higher serum markers of organ injury compared with high-IVF or DPR groups. The high-IVF group had elevated inflammatory cytokines compared with the DPR group. Direct peritoneal resuscitation improved survival and effective hepatic blood flow, required less IVF to stabilize blood pressure, prevented organ edema, and normalized fluid electrolyte balance compared with IVF-alone groups. Direct peritoneal resuscitation in animals reduced inflammatory response after ABD compared with IVF-alone controls. These data suggest a potential role for DPR in organ donors to stabilize donors and possibly increase the number

  15. Pulmonary hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension; Sporadic primary pulmonary hypertension; Familial primary pulmonary hypertension; Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension; Primary pulmonary hypertension; PPH; Secondary pulmonary ...

  16. Cerebrospinal Fluid B Cells Correlate with Early Brain Inflammation in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kuenz, Bettina; Lutterotti, Andreas; Ehling, Rainer; Gneiss, Claudia; Haemmerle, Monika; Rainer, Carolyn; Deisenhammer, Florian; Schocke, Michael; Berger, Thomas; Reindl, Markus

    2008-01-01

    Background There is accumulating evidence from immunological, pathological and therapeutic studies that B cells are key components in the pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis (MS). Methodology/Principal Findings In this prospective study we have for the first time investigated the differences in the inflammatory response between relapsing and progressive MS by comparing cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cell profiles from patients at the onset of the disease (clinically isolated syndrome, CIS), relapsing-remitting (RR) and chronic progressive (CP) MS by flow cytometry. As controls we have used patients with other neurological diseases. We have found a statistically significant accumulation of CSF mature B cells (CD19+CD138−) and plasma blasts (CD19+CD138+) in CIS and RRMS. Both B cell populations were, however, not significantly increased in CPMS. Further, this accumulation of B cells correlated with acute brain inflammation measured by magnetic resonance imaging and with inflammatory CSF parameters such as the number of CSF leukocytes, intrathecal immunoglobulin M and G synthesis and intrathecal production of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and the B cell chemokine CxCL-13. Conclusions Our data support an important role of CSF B cells in acute brain inflammation in CIS and RRMS. PMID:18596942

  17. Antileukotriene Reverts the Early Effects of Inflammatory Response of Distal Parenchyma in Experimental Chronic Allergic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Gobbato, Nathália Brandão; de Souza, Flávia Castro Ribas; Fumagalli, Stella Bruna Napolitano; Lopes, Fernanda Degobbi Tenório Quirino dos Santos; Prado, Carla Máximo; Martins, Milton Arruda; Tibério, Iolanda de Fátima Lopes Calvo; Leick, Edna Aparecida

    2013-01-01

    Aims. Compare the effects of montelukast or dexamethasone in distal lung parenchyma and airway walls of guinea pigs (GP) with chronic allergic inflammation. Methods. GP have inhaled ovalbumin (OVA group-2x/week/4weeks). After the 4th inhalation, GP were treated with montelukast or dexamethasone. After 72 hours of the 7th inhalation, GP were anesthetised, and lungs were removed and submitted to histopathological evaluation. Results. Montelukast and dexamethasone treatments reduced the number of eosinophils in airway wall and distal lung parenchyma compared to OVA group (P < 0.05). On distal parenchyma, both treatments were effective in reducing RANTES, NF-κB, and fibronectin positive cells compared to OVA group (P < 0.001). Montelukast was more effective in reducing eotaxin positive cells on distal parenchyma compared to dexamethasone treatment (P < 0.001), while there was a more expressive reduction of IGF-I positive cells in OVA-D group (P < 0.001). On airway walls, montelukast and dexamethasone were effective in reducing IGF-I, RANTES, and fibronectin positive cells compared to OVA group (P < 0.05). Dexamethasone was more effective in reducing the number of eotaxin and NF-κB positive cells than Montelukast (P < 0.05). Conclusions. In this animal model, both treatments were effective in modulating allergic inflammation and remodeling distal lung parenchyma and airway wall, contributing to a better control of the inflammatory response. PMID:24151607

  18. Fibroblast growth factor 23, iron and inflammation - are they related in early stages of chronic kidney disease?

    PubMed

    Lukaszyk, Ewelina; Lukaszyk, Mateusz; Koc-Zorawska, Ewa; Bodzenta-Lukaszyk, Anna; Malyszko, Jolanta

    2017-06-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) levels are elevated in impaired renal function. Inflammation and iron are potential regulators of FGF-23. The aim of the study was to evaluate the association between FGF-23 concentration, novel iron status biomarkers and inflammatory parameters among patients with early stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The study population included 84 patients with CKD in the early stage. Serum hemoglobin, fibrinogen, creatinine, iron, transferrin saturation and ferritin levels were measured using standard laboratory methods. Commercially available kits were used to measure: intact FGF-23, hepcidin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). In patients with CKD no differences in FGF-23 concentration according to iron status were observed. Lower iron concentration was associated with higher concentrations of hsCRP, IL-6 and fibrinogen. In univariate and multivariate analysis FGF-23 correlated with fibrinogen ( r = -0.23, p < 0.05) and eGFR ( r = -0.36, p < 0.05). FGF-23 is affected by kidney function and fibrinogen but not iron status parameters in the early stages of CKD. Our data are paving the way for further studies on the role of FGF-23 in iron metabolism, especially in early stages of CKD.

  19. Prolonged Pulmonary Exposure to Diesel Exhaust Particles Exacerbates Renal Oxidative Stress, Inflammation and DNA Damage in Mice with Adenine-Induced Chronic Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    Nemmar, Abderrahim; Karaca, Turan; Beegam, Sumaya; Yuvaraju, Priya; Yasin, Javed; Hamadi, Naserddine Kamel; Ali, Badreldin H

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicates that patients with chronic kidney diseases have increased susceptibility to adverse outcomes related to long-term exposure to particulate air pollution. However, mechanisms underlying these effects are not fully understood. Presently, we assessed the effect of prolonged exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) on chronic renal failure induced by adenine (0.25% w/w in feed for 4 weeks), which is known to involve inflammation and oxidative stress. DEP (0.5m/kg) was intratracheally (i.t.) instilled every 4th day for 4 weeks (7 i.t. instillation). Four days following the last exposure to either DEP or saline (control), various renal endpoints were measured. While body weight was decreased, kidney weight increased in DEP+adenine versus saline+adenine or DEP. Water intake, urine volume, relative kidney weight were significantly increased in adenine+DEP versus DEP and adenine+saline versus saline. Plasma creatinine and urea increased and creatinine clearance decreased in adenine+DEP versus DEP and adenine+saline versus saline. Tumor necrosis factor α, lipid peroxidation and reactive oxygen species were significantly increased in adenine+DEP compared with either DEP or adenine+saline. The antioxidant calase was significantly decreased in adenine+DEP compared with either adenine+saline or DEP. Notably, renal DNA damage was significantly potentiated in adenine+DEP compared with either adenine+saline or DEP. Similarly, systolic blood pressure was increased in adenine+DEP versus adenine+saline or DEP, and in DEP versus saline. Histological evaluation revealed more collagen deposition, higher number of necrotic cell counts and dilated tubules, cast formation and collapsing glomeruli in adenine+DEP versus adenine+saline or DEP. Prolonged pulmonary exposure to diesel exhaust particles worsen renal oxidative stress, inflammation and DNA damage in mice with adenine-induced chronic renal failure. Our data provide biological plausibility that air

  20. Neutralization of both IL-1α/IL-1β plays a major role in suppressing combined cigarette smoke/virus-induced pulmonary inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Bucher, Hannes; Mang, Samuel; Keck, Martina; Przibilla, Michèl; Lamb, David J; Schiele, Felix; Wittenbrink, Mareike; Fuchs, Klaus; Jung, Birgit; Erb, Klaus J; Peter, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    Smoking is an important risk factor for the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and viral infections are believed to be major triggers of exacerbations, which periodically lead to a worsening of symptoms. The pro-inflammatory IL-1 family members IL-1α and IL-1β are increased in COPD patients and might contribute to disease pathology. We investigated whether individual or combined inhibition of these cytokines reduced lung inflammation in cigarette smoke (CS)-exposed and H1N1-infected BALB/c mice. Animals were treated with individual or combined antibodies (Abs) directed against IL-1α, IL-1β or IL-1R1. Cells in BAL fluid and cytokines/chemokines in lung homogenate were determined. The viral load was investigated. Blocking IL-1α had significant suppressive effects on total cells, neutrophils, and macrophages. Furthermore, it reduced KC levels significantly. Blocking of IL-1β did not provide significant activity. In primary human bronchial epithelial air-liquid-interface cell cultures infected with H1N1, IL-1α Abs but not IL-1β Abs reduced levels of TNF-α and IL-6. Concomitant usage of Abs against IL-1α/IL-1β revealed strong effects in vivo and reduced total cells, neutrophils and macrophages. Additionally, levels of KC, IL-6, TNF-α, MCP-1, MIP-1α and MIP-1β were significantly reduced and ICAM-1 and MUC5 A/C mRNA expression was attenuated. The viral load decreased significantly upon combined IL-1α/IL-1β Ab treatment. Blocking the IL-1R1 provided significant effects on total cells, neutrophils and macrophages but was inferior compared to inhibiting both its soluble ligands IL-1α/IL-1β. Our results suggest that combined inhibition of IL-1α/IL-1β might be beneficial to reduce CS/H1N1-induced airway inflammation. Moreover, combined targeting of both IL-1α/IL-1β might be more efficient compared to individual neutralization IL-1α or IL-1β or inhibition of the IL-1R1. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd

  1. Pulmonary function, respiratory symptoms, and dust exposures among workers engaged in early manufacturing processes of tea: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Tzong-Shiun; Chung, Jui-Jung; Wang, Chung-Jing; Tsai, Perng-Jy; Kuo, Yau-Chang; Guo, How-Ran

    2012-02-13

    To evaluate pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms in workers engaged in the early manufacturing processes of tea and to identify the associated factors, we conducted a study in a tea production area in Taiwan. We recruited tea workers who engaged in the early manufacturing process in the Mountain Ali area in Taiwan and a comparison group of local office workers who were matched for age, gender, and smoking habits. We performed questionnaire interviews, pulmonary function tests, skin prick tests, and measurement of specific IgE for tea on the participants and assessed tea dust exposures in the tea factories. The 91 participating tea workers had higher prevalence of respiratory symptoms than the comparison group (32 participants). Among tea workers, ball-rolling workers had the highest prevalence of symptoms and the highest exposures of inhalable dusts. At baseline, tea workers had similar pulmonary functions as the comparison group, but compared to the other tea workers ball-rolling workers had a lower ratio of the 1-second forced expiratory volume to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) and a lower maximal mid-expiratory flow rate expressed as% of the predicted value--MMF (%pred). A total of 58 tea workers participated in the on-site investigation and the cross-shift lung function measurements. We found ball-rolling yielded the highest inhalable dust level, panning yielded the highest respirable dust level, and withering yielded the lowest levels of both dusts. Ball-rolling also yielded the highest coarse fraction (defined as inhalable dusts minus respirable dusts), which represented exposures from nose to tracheobronchial tract. During the shift, we observed significant declines in pulmonary function, especially in ball-rolling workers. Multiple regressions showed that age, height, work tasks, coarse fraction, and number of months working in tea manufacturing each year were independent predictors of certain pulmonary function parameters in tea workers. Tea

  2. Therapies in early development for the treatment of urinary tract inflammation.

    PubMed

    Zacchè, Martino Maria; Giarenis, Ilias

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract inflammation is a very common clinical condition. It is caused by several pathogens and antibiotic treatment is the mainstay of therapy. Increasing antimicrobial resistance and high recurrence rates represent a challenge. Consequently, there is an unmet need for new therapeutic options. The authors discuss the rationale of emerging management strategies and current experimentation. Furthermore, they focus on both acute and recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) and examine a range of therapeutics, including new antibiotics, vaccines, mannosides, hyaluronic acid, probiotics, immunomodulant agents and novel compounds derived from nanotechnology. Basic science studies have elucidated the pathogenesis of UTIs and built up the ground for the development of new therapies. Evidence is mainly derived from animal studies on murine models of bacterial cystitis. However, clinical trials are scanty and cannot provide us with robust evidence. Hetereogeneity and virulence of uropathogens pose a threat that scientists and clinicians are struggling to overcome.

  3. Early Detection of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Apparently Healthy Attendants of Tertiary Care Hospital and Assessment of its Severity.

    PubMed

    Zubair, Tahira; Abbassi, Amanullah; Khan, Osama Ahsan

    2017-05-01

    Early detection of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in apparently healthy attendants of tertiary care hospital and assessment of its severity. Cross-sectional, observational study. Study was conducted from January 2015 to July 2015 at Dow University Hospital, Ojha campus. Ascreening method was designed for apparently healthy individuals including attendants of patients, hospital staff, faculty and students, belonging to age group 18-60 years after excluding severe obesity and already diagnosed respiratory and cardiovascular diseases by means of history. Each participant performed pulmonary function tests via spirometer after filling a questionnaire based on various risk factors and symptoms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Data was entered and analysed by SPSS-20. Out of the 517 participants, 122 (23.6%) were found to have COPD diagnosed by means of spirometry. Out of these, 23 (4.4%) had COPD stage I, 42 (8.1%) had COPD II, 34 (6.6%) had COPD III, and 23 (4.4%) had COPD IV. Exposure to smoking, wooden stoves, pesticides, biomass fuel, aerosol sprays, gas grill and vehicle exhaust were found to be statistically significant factors in relation to development of COPD. Apparently healthy individuals may have underlying COPD and active screening by means of spirometry plays vital role in early detection of COPD. Smoking and exposure to certain hazardous environmental pollutants are responsible for the development and progression of COPD.

  4. Early origins of inflammation: An examination of prenatal and childhood social adversity in a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Slopen, Natalie; Loucks, Eric B; Appleton, Allison A; Kawachi, Ichiro; Kubzansky, Laura D; Non, Amy L; Buka, Stephen; Gilman, Stephen E

    2015-01-01

    Children exposed to social adversity carry a greater risk of poor physical and mental health into adulthood. This increased risk is thought to be due, in part, to inflammatory processes associated with early adversity that contribute to the etiology of many adult illnesses. The current study asks whether aspects of the prenatal social environment are associated with levels of inflammation in adulthood, and whether prenatal and childhood adversity both contribute to adult inflammation. We examined associations of prenatal and childhood adversity assessed through direct interviews of participants in the Collaborative Perinatal Project between 1959 and 1974 with blood levels of C-reactive protein in 355 offspring interviewed in adulthood (mean age=42.2 years). Linear and quantile regression models were used to estimate the effects of prenatal adversity and childhood adversity on adult inflammation, adjusting for age, sex, and race and other potential confounders. In separate linear regression models, high levels of prenatal and childhood adversity were associated with higher CRP in adulthood. When prenatal and childhood adversity were analyzed together, our results support the presence of an effect of prenatal adversity on (log) CRP level in adulthood (β=0.73, 95% CI: 0.26, 1.20) that is independent of childhood adversity and potential confounding factors including maternal health conditions reported during pregnancy. Supplemental analyses revealed similar findings using quantile regression models and logistic regression models that used a clinically-relevant CRP threshold (>3mg/L). In a fully-adjusted model that included childhood adversity, high prenatal adversity was associated with a 3-fold elevated odds (95% CI: 1.15, 8.02) of having a CRP level in adulthood that indicates high risk of cardiovascular disease. Social adversity during the prenatal period is a risk factor for elevated inflammation in adulthood independent of adversities during childhood. This

  5. Discordant inflammation and pain in early and established rheumatoid arthritis: Latent Class Analysis of Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Network and British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register data.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Daniel F; Ferguson, Eamonn; Young, Adam; Kiely, Patrick D W; Walsh, David A

    2016-12-13

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) disease activity is often measured using the 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28). We aimed to identify and independently verify subgroups of people with RA that may be discordant with respect to self-reported and objective disease state, with potentially different clinical needs. Data were derived from three cohorts: (1) the Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Network (ERAN) and the British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register (BSRBR), (2) those commencing tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitors and (3) those using non-biologic drugs. In latent class analysis, we used variables related to pain, central pain mechanisms or inflammation (pain, vitality, mental health, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, swollen joint count, tender joint count, visual analogue scale of general health). Clinically relevant outcomes were examined. Five, four and four latent classes were found in the ERAN, BSRBR TNF inhibitor and non-biologic cohorts, respectively. The proportions of people assigned with >80% probability into latent classes were 76%, 58% and 72% in the ERAN, TNF inhibitor and non-biologic cohorts, respectively. The latent classes displayed either concordance between measures indicative of mild, moderate or severe disease activity; discordantly worse patient-reported measures despite less markedly elevated inflammation; or discordantly less severe patient-reported measures despite elevated inflammation. Latent classes with discordantly worse patient-reported measures represented 12%, 40% and 21% of the ERAN, TNF inhibitor and non-biologic cohorts, respectively; contained more females; and showed worse function. In those latent classes with worse scores at baseline, DAS28 and function improved over 1 year (p < 0.001 for all comparisons), and scores differed less at follow-up than at baseline. Discordant latent classes can be identified in people with RA, and these findings are robust across three cohorts with varying disease duration and

  6. Low serum mannose-binding lectin levels are associated with inflammation and apoptosis in early surveillance allograft biopsies.

    PubMed

    Ibernon, M; Moreso, F; O'Valle, F; Grinyo, J M; Moral, R G; Seron, D

    2014-09-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a protein of the innate immune system that participates in host defense and the tissue injury/repair process, enhancing the clearance of apoptotic cells by macrophages. The aim is to characterize the relationship between pre-transplant MBL levels, histological lesions and number of apoptotic cells in early surveillance renal allograft biopsies. Consecutive renal transplant recipients were recruited and MBL levels were classified into tertiles. The first tertile was considered the low MBL group. Surveillance biopsies were done during the first 6 months and were evaluated according to Banff criteria. Renal inflammatory infiltrates were studied by immunohistochemical techniques. Apoptosis was studied using morphological methods in renal tubular cells and was expressed as the number of apoptotic cells/mm(2). MBL was determined in 126 patients and a surveillance biopsy with sufficient tissue was obtained in 41 of them. Patients with low pre-transplant MBL levels showed a higher acute Banff index (3.14 ± 1.96 vs. 1.88 ± 1.56, p = 0.044) and an increased proportion of biopsies with tubular cell apoptosis The proportion of biopsies with tubular cell apoptosis was higher in patients with low pre-transplant MBL levels in comparison with patients with high MBL levels (4.3 ± 3.6 versus 0.2 ± 0.9 p = 0.012) and increased interstitial number of inflammatory cells and significantly the macrophages/mm(2) (109 ± 118 vs. 32 ± 46; p = 0.04). Low pre-transplant serum MBL levels are associated with more severe inflammation and increased apoptosis in early surveillance renal allograft biopsies suggesting that MBL modulates renal inflammation after transplantation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The Effect Of Pixel Size On The Detection Rate Of Early Pulmonary Sarcoidosis In Digital Chest Radiographic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMahon, Heber; Vyborny, Carl; Powell, Gregory; Doi, Kunio; Metz, Charles E.

    1984-08-01

    In digital radiography the pixel size used determines the potential spatial resolution of the system. The need for spatial resolution varies depending on the subject matter imaged. In many areas, including the chest, the minimum spatial resolution requirements have not been determined. Sarcoidosis is a disease which frequently causes subtle interstitial infiltrates in the lungs. As the initial step in an investigation designed to determine the minimum pixel size required in digital chest radiographic systems, we have studied 1 mm pixel digitized images on patients with early pulmonary sarcoidosis. The results of this preliminary study suggest that neither mild interstitial pulmonary infiltrates nor other abnormalities such as pneumothoraces may be detected reliably with 1 mm pixel digital images.

  8. Early-onset pediatric atopic dermatitis is characterized by TH2/TH17/TH22-centered inflammation and lipid alterations.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Patrick M; Israel, Ariel; Zhang, Ning; Leonard, Alexandra; Wen, Huei-Chi; Huynh, Thy; Tran, Gary; Lyon, Sarah; Rodriguez, Giselle; Immaneni, Supriya; Wagner, Annette; Zheng, Xiuzhong; Estrada, Yeriel D; Xu, Hui; Krueger, James G; Paller, Amy S; Guttman-Yassky, Emma

    2018-06-01

    Although atopic dermatitis (AD) often starts in early childhood, detailed tissue profiling of early-onset AD in children is lacking, hindering therapeutic development for this patient population with a particularly high unmet need for better treatments. We sought to globally profile the skin of infants with AD compared with that of adults with AD and healthy control subjects. We performed microarray, RT-PCR, and fluorescence microscopy studies in infants and young children (<5 years old) with early-onset AD (<6 months disease duration) compared with age-matched control subjects and adults with longstanding AD. Transcriptomic analyses revealed profound differences between pediatric patients with early-onset versus adult patients with longstanding AD in not only lesional but also nonlesional tissues. Although both patient populations harbored T H 2-centered inflammation, pediatric AD also showed significant T H 17/T H 22 skewing but lacked the T H 1 upregulation that characterizes adult AD. Pediatric AD exhibited relatively normal expression of epidermal differentiation and cornification products, which is downregulated in adults with AD. Defects in the lipid barrier (eg, ELOVL fatty acid elongase 3 [ELOVL3] and diacylglycerol o-acyltransferase 2 [DGAT2]) and tight junction regulation (eg, claudins 8 and 23) were evident in both groups. However, some lipid-associated mediators (eg, fatty acyl-CoA reductase 2 and fatty acid 2-hydroxylase) showed preferential downregulation in pediatric AD, and lipid barrier genes (FA2H and DGAT2) showed inverse correlations with transepidermal water loss, a functional measure of the epidermal barrier. Skin samples from children and adult patients with AD share lipid metabolism and tight junction alterations, but epidermal differentiation complex defects are only present in adult AD, potentially resulting from chronic immune aberration that is not yet present in early-onset disease. Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Allergy

  9. Hepatic Warm Ischemia-Reperfusion-Induced Increase in Pulmonary Capillary Filtration Is Ameliorated by Administration of a Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 1 Inhibitor and Leukotriene D4 Antagonist (MK-571) Through Reducing Neutrophil Infiltration and Pulmonary Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in Rats.

    PubMed

    Yeh, D Y-W; Yang, Y-C; Wang, J-J

    2015-05-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is the major complication subsequent to liver ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury after resection or transplantation of liver. Hallmarks of HPS include increases in pulmonary leukotrienes and neutrophil recruitment and infiltrating across capillaries. We aimed to investigate the protective efficacy of MK-571, a multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 inhibitor and leukotriene D4 agonist, against hepatic I/R injury-associated change in capillary filtration. Eighteen Sprague-Dawley male rats were evenly divided into a sham-operated group, a hepatic I/R group, and an MK-571-treated I/R group. MK-571 was administered intraperitoneally 15 min before hepatic ischemia and every 12 hours during reperfusion. Ischemia was conducted by occluding the hepatic artery and portal vein for 30 min, followed by removing the clamps and closing the incision. Forty-eight hours after hepatic ischemia, we assessed the pulmonary capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc) through the use of in vitro-isolated, perfused rat lung preparation. We also measured the lung wet-to-dry weight ratio (W/D) and protein concentration in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (PCBAL). Lung inflammation and oxidative stress were evaluated by use of tissue tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and malondialdehyde levels and lavage differential macrophage and neutrophil cell count. Hepatic I/R injury markedly increased Kfc, W/D, PCBAL, tissue TNF-α level, and differential neutrophil cell count (P < .05). MK-571 treatment reduced neutrophil infiltration and lung inflammation and improved pulmonary capillary filtration, collectively suggesting lung protection. Treatment with MK-571 before and during hepatic ischemia and reperfusion protects lung against pulmonary capillary barrier function impairment through decreasing pulmonary lung inflammation and lavage neutrophils. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Improving early diagnosis of pulmonary infections in patients with febrile neutropenia using low-dose chest computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Gerritsen, M G; Willemink, M J; Pompe, E; van der Bruggen, T; van Rhenen, A; Lammers, J W J; Wessels, F; Sprengers, R W; de Jong, P A; Minnema, M C

    2017-01-01

    We performed a prospective study in patients with chemotherapy induced febrile neutropenia to investigate the diagnostic value of low-dose computed tomography compared to standard chest radiography. The aim was to compare both modalities for detection of pulmonary infections and to explore performance of low-dose computed tomography for early detection of invasive fungal disease. The low-dose computed tomography remained blinded during the study. A consensus diagnosis of the fever episode made by an expert panel was used as reference standard. We included 67 consecutive patients on the first day of febrile neutropenia. According to the consensus diagnosis 11 patients (16.4%) had pulmonary infections. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 36%, 93%, 50% and 88% for radiography, and 73%, 91%, 62% and 94% for low-dose computed tomography, respectively. An uncorrected McNemar showed no statistical difference (p = 0.197). Mean radiation dose for low-dose computed tomography was 0.24 mSv. Four out of 5 included patients diagnosed with invasive fungal disease had radiographic abnormalities suspect for invasive fungal disease on the low-dose computed tomography scan made on day 1 of fever, compared to none of the chest radiographs. We conclude that chest radiography has little value in the initial assessment of febrile neutropenia on day 1 for detection of pulmonary abnormalities. Low-dose computed tomography improves detection of pulmonary infiltrates and seems capable of detecting invasive fungal disease at a very early stage with a low radiation dose.

  11. Improving early diagnosis of pulmonary infections in patients with febrile neutropenia using low-dose chest computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Pompe, E.; van der Bruggen, T.; van Rhenen, A.; Lammers, J. W. J.; Wessels, F.; Sprengers, R. W.; de Jong, P. A.; Minnema, M. C.

    2017-01-01

    We performed a prospective study in patients with chemotherapy induced febrile neutropenia to investigate the diagnostic value of low-dose computed tomography compared to standard chest radiography. The aim was to compare both modalities for detection of pulmonary infections and to explore performance of low-dose computed tomography for early detection of invasive fungal disease. The low-dose computed tomography remained blinded during the study. A consensus diagnosis of the fever episode made by an expert panel was used as reference standard. We included 67 consecutive patients on the first day of febrile neutropenia. According to the consensus diagnosis 11 patients (16.4%) had pulmonary infections. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 36%, 93%, 50% and 88% for radiography, and 73%, 91%, 62% and 94% for low-dose computed tomography, respectively. An uncorrected McNemar showed no statistical difference (p = 0.197). Mean radiation dose for low-dose computed tomography was 0.24 mSv. Four out of 5 included patients diagnosed with invasive fungal disease had radiographic abnormalities suspect for invasive fungal disease on the low-dose computed tomography scan made on day 1 of fever, compared to none of the chest radiographs. We conclude that chest radiography has little value in the initial assessment of febrile neutropenia on day 1 for detection of pulmonary abnormalities. Low-dose computed tomography improves detection of pulmonary infiltrates and seems capable of detecting invasive fungal disease at a very early stage with a low radiation dose. PMID:28235014

  12. Early-life antibiotic treatment enhances the pathogenicity of CD4+ T cells during intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Scheer, Sebastian; Medina, Tiago S; Murison, Alex; Taves, Matthew D; Antignano, Frann; Chenery, Alistair; Soma, Kiran K; Perona-Wright, Georgia; Lupien, Mathieu; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; De Carvalho, Daniel D; Zaph, Colby

    2017-04-01

    The incidence of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) has steadily increased in recent decades-a phenomenon that cannot be explained by genetic mutations alone. Other factors, including the composition of the intestinal microbiome, are potentially important contributors to the increased occurrence of this group of diseases. Previous reports have shown a correlation between early-life antibiotic (Abx) treatment and an increased incidence of IBD. In this report, we investigated the effects of early-life Abx treatments on the pathogenicity of CD4 + T cells using an experimental T cell transfer model of IBD. Our results show that CD4 + T cells isolated from adult mice that had been treated with Abx during gestation and in early life induced a faster onset of IBD in Rag1 -deficient mice compared with CD4 + T cells of untreated mice. Ex vivo functional analyses of IBD-inducing CD4 + T cells did not show significant differences in their immunologic potential ex vivo, despite their in vivo phenotype. However, genome-wide gene-expression analysis revealed that these cells displayed dysregulated expression of genes associated with cell-cycle regulation, metabolism, and cellular stress. Analysis of Abx-treated CD4 + T cell donors showed systemically elevated levels of the stress hormone corticosterone throughout life compared with untreated donors. The cohousing of Abx-treated mice with untreated mice decreased serum corticosterone, and a consequent transfer of the cells from cohoused mice into Rag1 -deficient mice restored the onset and severity of disease to that of untreated animals. Thus, our results suggest that early-life Abx treatment results in a stress response with high levels of corticosterone that influences CD4 + T cell function. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  13. Crosstalk between intestinal microbiota, adipose tissue and skeletal muscle as an early event in systemic low-grade inflammation and the development of obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bleau, Christian; Karelis, Antony D; St-Pierre, David H; Lamontagne, Lucie

    2015-09-01

    Obesity is associated with a systemic chronic low-grade inflammation that contributes to the development of metabolic disorders such as cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes. However, the etiology of this obesity-related pro-inflammatory process remains unclear. Most studies have focused on adipose tissue dysfunctions and/or insulin resistance in skeletal muscle cells as well as changes in adipokine profile and macrophage recruitment as potential sources of inflammation. However, low-grade systemic inflammation probably involves a complex network of signals interconnecting several organs. Recent evidences have suggested that disturbances in the composition of the gut microbial flora and alterations in levels of gut peptides following the ingestion of a high-fat diet may be a cause of low-grade systemic inflammation that may even precede and predispose to obesity, metabolic disorders or type 2 diabetes. This hypothesis is appealing because the gastrointestinal system is first exposed to nutrients and may thereby represent the first link in the chain of events leading to the development of obesity-associated systemic inflammation. Therefore, the present review will summarize the latest advances interconnecting intestinal mucosal bacteria-mediated inflammation, adipose tissue and skeletal muscle in a coordinated circuitry favouring the onset of a high-fat diet-related systemic low-grade inflammation preceding obesity and predisposing to metabolic disorders and/or type 2 diabetes. A particular emphasis will be given to high-fat diet-induced alterations of gut homeostasis as an early initiator event of mucosal inflammation and adverse consequences contributing to the promotion of extended systemic inflammation, especially in adipose and muscular tissues. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Expression of Iroquois genes is up-regulated during early lung development in the nitrofen-induced pulmonary hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Doi, Takashi; Lukošiūtė, Aušra; Ruttenstock, Elke; Dingemann, Jens; Puri, Prem

    2011-01-01

    Iroquois homeobox (Irx) genes have been implicated in the early lung morphogenesis of vertebrates. Irx1-3 and Irx5 gene expression is seen in fetal lung in rodents up to day (D) 18.5 of gestation. Fetal lung in Irx knockdown mice shows loss of mesenchyme and dilated airspaces, whereas nitrofen-induced hypoplastic lung displays thickened mesenchyme and diminished airspaces. We hypothesized that the Irx genes are up-regulated during early lung morphogenesis in the nitrofen-induced hypoplastic lung. Pregnant rats were exposed either to olive oil or nitrofen on D9. Fetal lungs harvested on D15 were divided into control and nitrofen groups; and the lungs harvested on D18 were divided into control, nitrofen without congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH[-]), and nitrofen with CDH (CDH[+]). Irx gene expression levels were analyzed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Immunohistochemistry was performed to evaluate protein expression of Irx family. Pulmonary Irx1-3 and Irx5 messenger RNA expression levels were significantly up-regulated in nitrofen group compared with controls at D15. On D15, Irx immunoreactivity was increased in nitrofen-induced hypoplastic lung compared with controls. Overexpression of Irx genes in the early lung development may cause pulmonary hypoplasia in the nitrofen CDH model by inducing lung dysmorphogenesis with thickened mesenchyme and diminished airspaces. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Systemic rapamycin to prevent in-stent stenosis in peripheral pulmonary arterial disease: early clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Hallbergson, Anna; Esch, Jesse J; Tran, Trang X; Lock, James E; Marshall, Audrey C

    2016-10-01

    We have taken a novel approach using oral rapamycin - sirolimus - as a medical adjunct to percutaneous therapy in patients with in-stent stenosis and high risk of right ventricular failure. Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis can result in right ventricular hypertension, dysfunction, and death. Percutaneous pulmonary artery angioplasty and stent placement acutely relieve obstructions, but patients frequently require re-interventions due to re-stenosis. In patients with tetralogy of Fallot or arteriopathy, the problem of in-stent stenosis contributes to the rapidly recurrent disease. Rapamycin was administered to 10 patients (1.5-18 years) with peripheral pulmonary stenosis and in-stent stenosis and either right ventricular hypertension, pulmonary blood flow maldistribution, or segmental pulmonary hypertension. Treatment was initiated around the time of catheterisation and continued for 1-3 months. Potential side-effects were monitored by clinical review and blood tests. Target serum rapamycin level (6-10 ng/ml) was accomplished in all patients; eight of the nine patients who returned for clinically indicated catheterisations demonstrated reduction in in-stent stenosis, and eight of the 10 patients experienced no significant side-effects. Among all, one patient developed diarrhoea requiring drug discontinuation, and one patient experienced gastrointestinal bleeding while on therapy that was likely due to an indwelling feeding tube and this patient tolerated rapamycin well following tube removal. Our initial clinical experience supports that patients with peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis can be safely treated with rapamycin. Systemic rapamycin may provide a novel medical approach to reduce in-stent stenosis.

  16. Determinants of ventilation and pulmonary artery pressure during early acclimatization to hypoxia in humans.

    PubMed

    Fatemian, Marzieh; Herigstad, Mari; Croft, Quentin P P; Formenti, Federico; Cardenas, Rosa; Wheeler, Carly; Smith, Thomas G; Friedmannova, Maria; Dorrington, Keith L; Robbins, Peter A

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary ventilation and pulmonary arterial pressure both rise progressively during the first few hours of human acclimatization to hypoxia. These responses are highly variable between individuals, but the origin of this variability is unknown. Here, we sought to determine whether the variabilities between different measures of response to sustained hypoxia were related, which would suggest a common source of variability. Eighty volunteers individually underwent an 8-h isocapnic exposure to hypoxia (end-tidal P(O2)=55 Torr) in a purpose-built chamber. Measurements of ventilation and pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) assessed by Doppler echocardiography were made during the exposure. Before and after the exposure, measurements were made of the ventilatory sensitivities to acute isocapnic hypoxia (G(pO2)) and hyperoxic hypercapnia, the latter divided into peripheral (G(pCO2)) and central (G(cCO2)) components. Substantial acclimatization was observed in both ventilation and PASP, the latter being 40% greater in women than men. No correlation was found between the magnitudes of pulmonary ventilatory and pulmonary vascular responses. For G(pO2), G(pCO2) and G(cC O2), but not the sensitivity of PASP to acute hypoxia, the magnitude of the increase during acclimatization was proportional to the pre-acclimatization value. Additionally, the change in G(pO2) during acclimatization to hypoxia correlated well with most other measures of ventilatory acclimatization. Of the initial measurements prior to sustained hypoxia, only G(pCO2) predicted the subsequent rise in ventilation and change in G(pO2) during acclimatization. We conclude that the magnitudes of the ventilatory and pulmonary vascular responses to sustained hypoxia are predominantly determined by different factors and that the initial G(pCO2) is a modest predictor of ventilatory acclimatization. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The Physiological

  17. Exercise facilitates early recognition of cardiac and vascular remodeling in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension in swine.

    PubMed

    Stam, Kelly; van Duin, Richard W B; Uitterdijk, André; Cai, Zongye; Duncker, Dirk J; Merkus, Daphne

    2018-03-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) develops in 4% of patients after pulmonary embolism and is accompanied by an impaired exercise tolerance, which is ascribed to the increased right ventricular (RV) afterload in combination with a ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) mismatch in the lungs. The present study aimed to investigate changes in arterial Po 2 and hemodynamics in response to graded treadmill exercise during development and progression of CTEPH in a novel swine model. Swine were chronically instrumented and received multiple pulmonary embolisms by 1) microsphere infusion (Spheres) over 5 wk, 2) endothelial dysfunction by administration of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N ω -nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) for 7 wk, 3) combined pulmonary embolisms and endothelial dysfunction (L-NAME + Spheres), or 4) served as sham-operated controls (sham). After a 9 wk followup, embolization combined with endothelial dysfunction resulted in CTEPH, as evidenced by mean pulmonary artery pressures of 39.5 ± 5.1 vs. 19.1 ± 1.5 mmHg (Spheres, P < 0.001), 22.7 ± 2.0 mmHg (L-NAME, P < 0.001), and 20.1 ± 1.5 mmHg (sham, P < 0.001), and a decrease in arterial Po 2 that was exacerbated during exercise, indicating V/Q mismatch. RV dysfunction was present after 5 wk of embolization, both at rest (trend toward increased RV end-systolic lumen area, P = 0.085, and decreased stroke volume index, P = 0.042) and during exercise (decreased stroke volume index vs. control, P = 0.040). With sustained pulmonary hypertension, RV hypertrophy (Fulton index P = 0.022) improved RV function at rest and during exercise, but this improvement was insufficient in CTEPH swine to result in an exercise-induced increase in cardiac index. In conclusion, embolization in combination with endothelial dysfunction results in CTEPH in swine. Exercise increased RV afterload, exacerbated the V/Q mismatch, and unmasked RV dysfunction. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Here, we present the first

  18. Short-term exposure to high ambient air pollution increases airway inflammation and respiratory symptoms in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaowei; Ni, Yang; Li, Hongyu; Pan, Lu; Yang, Di; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Deng, Furong; Chen, Yahong; Shima, Masayuki; Guo, Xinbiao

    2016-09-01

    Few studies have investigated the short-term respiratory effects of ambient air pollution in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients in the context of high pollution levels in Asian cities. A panel of 23 stable COPD patients was repeatedly measured for biomarkers of airway inflammation including exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and exhaled hydrogen sulfide (FeH2S) (215 measurements) and recorded for daily respiratory symptoms (794person-days) in two study periods in Beijing, China in January-September 2014. Daily ambient air pollution data were obtained from nearby central air-monitoring stations. Mixed-effects models were used to estimate the associations between exposures and health measurements with adjustment for potential confounders including temperature and relative humidity. Increasing levels of air pollutants were associated with significant increases in both FeNO and FeH2S. Interquartile range (IQR) increases in PM2.5 (76.5μg/m(3), 5-day), PM10 (75.0μg/m(3), 5-day) and SO2 (45.7μg/m(3), 6-day) were associated with maximum increases in FeNO of 13.6% (95% CI: 4.8%, 23.2%), 9.2% (95% CI: 2.1%, 16.8%) and 34.2% (95% CI: 17.3%, 53.4%), respectively; and the same IQR increases in PM2.5 (6-day), PM10 (6-day) and SO2 (7-day) were associated with maximum increases in FeH2S of 11.4% (95% CI: 4.6%, 18.6%), 7.8% (95% CI: 2.3%, 13.7%) and 18.1% (95% CI: 5.5%, 32.2%), respectively. Increasing levels of air pollutants were also associated with increased odds ratios of sore throat, cough, sputum, wheeze and dyspnea. FeH2S may serve as a novel biomarker to detect adverse respiratory effects of air pollution. Our results provide potential important public health implications that ambient air pollution may pose risk to respiratory health in the context of high pollution levels in densely-populated cities in the developing world. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Effects of Antigen-Specific IgG1 Antibody for the Pulmonary-Hypertension-Phenotype and B Cells for Inflammation in Mice Exposed to Antigen and Fine Particles from Air Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung-Hyun; Chen, Wen-Chi; Durmus, Nedim; Bleck, Bertram; Reibman, Joan; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Grunig, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution is known to exacerbate chronic inflammatory conditions of the lungs including pulmonary hypertension, cardiovascular diseases and autoimmune diseases. Directly pathogenic antibodies bind pro-inflammatory cell receptors and cause or exacerbate inflammation. In contrast, anti-inflammatory antibody isotypes (e.g. mouse immunoglobulin G1, IgG1) bind inhibitory cell receptors and can inhibit inflammation. Our previous studies showed that co-exposure to antigen and urban ambient particulate matter (PM2.5) induced severe pulmonary arterial thickening and increased right ventricular systolic pressures in mice via T-cell produced cytokines, Interleukin (IL)-13 and IL-17A. The aim of the current study was to understand how B cell and antibody responses integrate into this T cell cytokine network for the pulmonary hypertension phenotype. Special focus was on antigen-specific IgG1 that is the predominant antibody in the experimental response to antigen and urban ambient PM2.5. Wild type and B cell-deficient mice were primed with antigen and then challenged with antigen and urban particulate matter and injected with antibodies as appropriate. Our data surprisingly showed that B cells were necessary for the development of increased right ventricular pressures and molecular changes in the right heart in response to sensitization and intranasal challenge with antigen and PM2.5. Further, our studies showed that both, the increase in right ventricular systolic pressure and right ventricular molecular changes were restored by reconstituting the B cell KO mice with antigen specific IgG1. In addition, our studies identified a critical, non-redundant role of B cells for the IL-17A-directed inflammation in response to exposure with antigen and PM2.5, which was not corrected with antigen-specific IgG1. In contrast, IL-13-directed inflammatory markers, as well as severe pulmonary arterial remodeling induced by challenge with antigen and PM2.5 were similar in B cell

  20. Decision Support Tool for Early Differential Diagnosis of Acute Lung Injury and Cardiogenic Pulmonary Edema in Medical Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shahjehan, Khurram; Li, Guangxi; Dhokarh, Rajanigandha; Kashyap, Rahul; Janish, Christopher; Alsara, Anas; Jaffe, Allan S.; Hubmayr, Rolf D.; Gajic, Ognjen

    2012-01-01

    Background: At the onset of acute hypoxic respiratory failure, critically ill patients with acute lung injury (ALI) may be difficult to distinguish from those with cardiogenic pulmonary edema (CPE). No single clinical parameter provides satisfying prediction. We hypothesized that a combination of those will facilitate early differential diagnosis. Methods: In a population-based retrospective development cohort, validated electronic surveillance identified critically ill adult patients with acute pulmonary edema. Recursive partitioning and logistic regression were used to develop a decision support tool based on routine clinical information to differentiate ALI from CPE. Performance of the score was validated in an independent cohort of referral patients. Blinded post hoc expert review served as gold standard. Results: Of 332 patients in a development cohort, expert reviewers (κ, 0.86) classified 156 as having ALI and 176 as having CPE. The validation cohort had 161 patients (ALI = 113, CPE = 48). The score was based on risk factors for ALI and CPE, age, alcohol abuse, chemotherapy, and peripheral oxygen saturation/Fio2 ratio. It demonstrated good discrimination (area under curve [AUC] = 0.81; 95% CI, 0.77-0.86) and calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow [HL] P = .16). Similar performance was obtained in the validation cohort (AUC = 0.80; 95% CI, 0.72-0.88; HL P = .13). Conclusions: A simple decision support tool accurately classifies acute pulmonary edema, reserving advanced testing for a subset of patients in whom satisfying prediction cannot be made. This novel tool may facilitate early inclusion of patients with ALI and CPE into research studies as well as improve and rationalize clinical management and resource use. PMID:22030803

  1. Neonatal Biomarkers of Inflammation: Correlates of Early Neurodevelopment and Gait in Very-Low-Birth-Weight Preterm Children.

    PubMed

    Rose, Jessica; Vassar, Rachel; Cahill-Rowley, Katelyn; Hintz, Susan R; Stevenson, David K

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal biomarkers of inflammation were examined in relation to early neurodevelopment and gait in very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) preterm children. We hypothesized that preterm infants exposed to higher levels of neonatal inflammation would demonstrate lower scores on Bayley Scales of Infant Toddler Development, 3rd ed. (BSID-III) and slower gait velocity at 18 to 22 months adjusted age. A total of 102 VLBW preterm infants (birthweight [BW] ≤ 1,500 g, gestational age [GA] ≤ 32 weeks) admitted to neonatal intensive care unit [NICU] were recruited. Neonatal risk factors examined were GA at birth, BW, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, necrotizing enterocolitis, retinopathy of prematurity, sepsis, and serum C-reactive protein (CRP), albumin, and total bilirubin over first 2 postnatal weeks. At 18 to 22 months, neurodevelopment was assessed with BSID-III and gait was assessed with an instrumented mat. Children with neonatal CRP ≥ 0.20 mg/dL (n = 52) versus < 0.20 mg/dL (n = 37) had significantly lower BSID-III composite cognitive (92.0 ± 13.1 vs. 100.1 ± 9.6, p = 0.002), language (83.9 ± 16.0 vs. 95.8 ± 14.2, p < 0.001), and motor scores (90.0 ± 13.2 vs. 98.8 ± 10.1, p = 0.002), and slower gait velocity (84.9 ± 19.0 vs. 98.0 ± 22.4 cm/s, p = 0.004). Higher neonatal CRP correlated with lower cognitive (rho =  - 0.327, p = 0.002), language (rho =  - 0.285, p = 0.007), and motor scores (rho =  - 0.257, p = 0.015), and slower gait (rho =  - 0.298, p = 0.008). Multivariate analysis demonstrated neonatal CRP ≥ 0.20 mg/dL significantly predicted BSID-III cognitive (adjusted R(2) = 0.104, p = 0.008), language (adjusted R(2) = 0.124, p = 0.001), and motor scores (adjusted R(2) = 0.122, p = 0.004). Associations between low-level neonatal inflammation and neurodevelopment suggest early biomarkers that may inform neuroprotective

  2. Edaravone attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome associated early pulmonary fibrosis via amelioration of oxidative stress and transforming growth factor-β1/Smad3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xida; Lai, Rongde; Su, Xiangfen; Chen, Guibin; Liang, Zijing

    2018-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is responsible for the both short-term and long-term outcomes in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). There is still no effective cure to improve prognosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether edaravone, a free radical scavenger, have anti-fibrosis effects in the rat model of ARDS associated early pulmonary fibrosis by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration. Rats were subjected to intravenous injection of LPS, and edaravone was given intraperitoneally after LPS administration daily for 7 consecutive days. LPS treatment rapidly increased lung histopathology abnormalities, coefficient of lung, hydroxyproline and collagen I levels, stimulated myofibroblast differentiation and induced expression of TGF-β1 and activation of TGF-β1/Smad3 signaling as early as day 7 after LPS injection. Moreover, LPS intoxication significantly increased the contents of malondialdehyde (MDA), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), whereas it dramatically decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) activities from day 1 after LPS treatment. On the contrary, edaravone treatment ameliorated LPS-induced myofibroblast differentiation and pulmonary fibrosis, simultaneously, and attenuated LPS-stimulated oxidative stress and activation of TGF-β1/Smad3 signaling. Collectively, edaravone may attenuate ARDS associated early pulmonary fibrosis through amelioration of oxidative stress and TGF-β1/Smad3 signaling pathway. Edaravone may be a promising drug candidate for the treatment of ARDS-related pulmonary fibrosis in early period. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The effect of antibiotics on social aversion following early life inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kentner, Amanda C; Khan, Urma; MacRae, M; Dowd, Scot E; Yan, Siyang

    2018-06-13

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that exposure to infection during early development increases the risk for neurodevelopmental disorders associated with symptoms such as a decreased desire to engage in social interactions. In animals, disruptions in social behavior can be modelled by administering bacterial mimetics such as liposaccharide (LPS). However, when evaluating social interactions in the laboratory, attention is rarely directed on the reciprocal relationship as a whole, which is important as peers may drive social withdrawal. Previously, we have shown that male adolescent rats treated neonatally (n) with LPS receive less contact from their conspecifics in a social interaction test, and that this effect is mediated through olfactory communication. In the present study, we reconfirmed this effect using a more direct social test and evaluated the hypothesis that changes in the microbiome underlie the olfactory induced social aversion. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were administered nLPS (50 μg/kg, i.p) or nSaline on postnatal days (P)3 and 5. On P40, adolescent nLPS treated males received less contact in a social preference test compared to nSaline treated controls, an effect not observed in females. To confirm that nLPS led male rats to elicit a scent cue, resulting in social aversion, a subset of neurotypical conspecifics underwent an anosmia procedure that disrupted their olfactory processing via olfactory neuroepithelium degeneration. This normalized the contact that they directed towards nLPS and nSaline male rats. Although 16 s rRNA sequencing failed to detect significant differences in bacterial phyla across either sex or neonatal treatment, treating male nLPS rats with an antibiotic cocktail, which induced clear changes in microbial communities, diminished the social rejection effect. Therefore, manipulation of the microbiome appears to affect social communication where there exists an underlying deficit. Moreover, our data reaffirm that

  4. Determinants of ventilation and pulmonary artery pressure during early acclimatization to hypoxia in humans

    PubMed Central

    Fatemian, Marzieh; Herigstad, Mari; Croft, Quentin P. P.; Formenti, Federico; Cardenas, Rosa; Wheeler, Carly; Smith, Thomas G.; Friedmannova, Maria; Dorrington, Keith L.

    2015-01-01

    Key points Lung ventilation and pulmonary artery pressure rise progressively in response to 8 h of hypoxia, changes described as ‘acclimatization to hypoxia’. Acclimatization responses differ markedly between humans for unknown reasons.We explored whether the magnitudes of the ventilatory and vascular responses were related, and whether the degree of acclimatization could be predicted by acute measurements of ventilatory and vascular sensitivities.In 80 healthy human volunteers measurements of acclimatization were made before, during, and after a sustained exposure to 8 h of isocapnic hypoxia.No correlation was found between measures of ventilatory and pulmonary vascular acclimatization.The ventilatory chemoreflex sensitivities to acute hypoxia and hypercapnia all increased in proportion to their pre‐acclimatization values following 8 h of hypoxia. The peripheral (rapid) chemoreflex sensitivity to CO2, measured before sustained hypoxia against a background of hyperoxia, was a modest predictor of ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia. This finding has relevance to predicting human acclimatization to the hypoxia of altitude. Abstract Pulmonary ventilation and pulmonary arterial pressure both rise progressively during the first few hours of human acclimatization to hypoxia. These responses are highly variable between individuals, but the origin of this variability is unknown. Here, we sought to determine whether the variabilities between different measures of response to sustained hypoxia were related, which would suggest a common source of variability. Eighty volunteers individually underwent an 8‐h isocapnic exposure to hypoxia (end‐tidal P O2=55 Torr) in a purpose‐built chamber. Measurements of ventilation and pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) assessed by Doppler echocardiography were made during the exposure. Before and after the exposure, measurements were made of the ventilatory sensitivities to acute isocapnic hypoxia (GpO2) and

  5. Development of asthmatic inflammation in mice following early-life exposure to ambient environmental particulates and chronic allergen challenge

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Cristan; Siegle, Jessica S.; Shadie, Alexander M.; Nikolaysen, Stina; Garthwaite, Linda; Hansbro, Nicole G.; Foster, Paul S.; Kumar, Rakesh K.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Childhood exposure to environmental particulates increases the risk of development of asthma. The underlying mechanisms might include oxidant injury to airway epithelial cells (AEC). We investigated the ability of ambient environmental particulates to contribute to sensitization via the airways, and thus to the pathogenesis of childhood asthma. To do so, we devised a novel model in which weanling BALB/c mice were exposed to both ambient particulate pollutants and ovalbumin for sensitization via the respiratory tract, followed by chronic inhalational challenge with a low mass concentration of the antigen. We also examined whether these particulates caused oxidant injury and activation of AEC in vitro. Furthermore, we assessed the potential benefit of minimizing oxidative stress to AEC through the period of sensitization and challenge by dietary intervention. We found that characteristic features of asthmatic inflammation developed only in animals that received particulates at the same time as respiratory sensitization, and were then chronically challenged with allergen. However, these animals did not develop airway hyper-responsiveness. Ambient particulates induced epithelial injury in vitro, with evidence of oxidative stress and production of both pro-inflammatory cytokines and Th2-promoting cytokines such as IL-33. Treatment of AEC with an antioxidant in vitro inhibited the pro-inflammatory cytokine response to these particulates. Ambient particulates also induced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression following administration to weanling mice. However, early-life dietary supplementation with antioxidants did not prevent the development of an asthmatic inflammatory response in animals that were exposed to particulates, sensitized and challenged. We conclude that injury to airway epithelium by ambient environmental particulates in early life is capable of promoting the development of an asthmatic inflammatory response in sensitized and antigen-challenged mice

  6. Endovascular management of early lung transplant-related anastomotic pulmonary artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Anaya-Ayala, Javier E; Loebe, Matthias; Davies, Mark G

    2015-06-01

    To report the safety and short-term efficacy of endovascular interventions for symptomatic lung transplant-related anastomotic pulmonary artery stenosis (PAS). From February 2008 to December 2011, 354 lung transplants were performed. Pulmonary arteriography was performed in 19 patients (63% men; age, 57 y ± 21, mean ± SD; seven double-lung transplants) because of respiratory decompensation (mean 6.7 mo after transplant). Seven arteriograms were normal, and 12 showed significant PAS. One patient (5%) underwent angioplasty alone, and 11 patients (57%) underwent stent placement. All patients underwent general anesthesia, and femoral access was used for the intervention. Technical success was 100% in the 12 patients treated. Symptoms improved in all patients who underwent intervention, with resolution in 11 of 12 (92%). There were no major or minor complications. Three patients (16%) had recurrent symptoms after discharge secondary to chronic rejection or pneumonia. Two patients died as a result of sepsis and multiorgan failure at 2 days and 14 days, respectively, after undergoing only pulmonary arteriography. In-stent stenosis occurred in 1 (9%) patient who required additional stent placement. During a mean follow-up period of 11 months, the remaining stents were patent, and the patients were asymptomatic. Endovascular stent placement provides an alternative to open repair for transplant-related anastomotic PAS. It has low mortality and morbidity rates, and it has shown excellent short-term functional and anatomic outcomes. Copyright © 2015 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. MALT1 Controls Attenuated Rabies Virus by Inducing Early Inflammation and T Cell Activation in the Brain.

    PubMed

    Kip, E; Staal, J; Verstrepen, L; Tima, H G; Terryn, S; Romano, M; Lemeire, K; Suin, V; Hamouda, A; Kalai, M; Beyaert, R; Van Gucht, S

    2018-04-15

    MALT1 is involved in the activation of immune responses, as well as in the proliferation and survival of certain cancer cells. MALT1 acts as a scaffold protein for NF-κB signaling and a cysteine protease that cleaves substrates, further promoting the expression of immunoregulatory genes. Deregulated MALT1 activity has been associated with autoimmunity and cancer, implicating MALT1 as a new therapeutic target. Although MALT1 deficiency has been shown to protect against experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, nothing is known about the impact of MALT1 on virus infection in the central nervous system. Here, we studied infection with an attenuated rabies virus, Evelyn-Rotnycki-Abelseth (ERA) virus, and observed increased susceptibility with ERA virus in MALT1 -/- mice. Indeed, after intranasal infection with ERA virus, wild-type mice developed mild transient clinical signs with recovery at 35 days postinoculation (dpi). Interestingly, MALT1 -/- mice developed severe disease requiring euthanasia at around 17 dpi. A decreased induction of inflammatory gene expression and cell infiltration and activation was observed in MALT1 -/- mice at 10 dpi compared to MALT1 +/+ infected mice. At 17 dpi, however, the level of inflammatory cell activation was comparable to that observed in MALT1 +/+ mice. Moreover, MALT1 -/- mice failed to produce virus-neutralizing antibodies. Similar results were obtained with specific inactivation of MALT1 in T cells. Finally, treatment of wild-type mice with mepazine, a MALT1 protease inhibitor, also led to mortality upon ERA virus infection. These data emphasize the importance of early inflammation and activation of T cells through MALT1 for controlling the virulence of an attenuated rabies virus in the brain. IMPORTANCE Rabies virus is a neurotropic virus which can infect any mammal. Annually, 59,000 people die from rabies. Effective therapy is lacking and hampered by gaps in the understanding of virus pathogenicity. MALT1 is an intracellular

  8. Pulmonary inflammation and cytokine dynamics of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from a mouse model of bronchial asthma during A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza infection.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Yousuke; Hasegawa, Shunji; Matsushige, Takeshi; Wakiguchi, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Tamaki; Hasegawa, Hideki; Nakajima, Noriko; Ainai, Akira; Oga, Atsunori; Itoh, Hiroshi; Shirabe, Komei; Toda, Shoichi; Atsuta, Ryo; Morishima, Tsuneo; Ohga, Shouichi

    2017-08-22

    Asthmatic patients present more rapid progression of respiratory distress after A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza infection than after seasonal infection. Here, we sought to clarify the pathophysiology of early deterioration in asthmatic patients after A(H1N1)pdm09 infection. Cytokine levels and virus titres in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from mice with and without asthma after A(H1N1)pdm09 or seasonal H1N1 infection were examined. In asthma/A(H1N1)pdm09 mice, IL-6 and TNF-α levels peaked at 3 days post-infection and were higher than those in all other groups. IFN-γ levels in asthma/A(H1N1)pdm09 mice at 3 days post-infection were higher than in all other mice at any time point, whereas at 7 days post-infection, the levels were lowest in asthma/A(H1N1)pdm09 mice. Virus titres in asthma/A(H1N1)pdm09 mice were highest at 3 days post-infection, and decreased by 7 days post-infection, although the levels at this time point were still higher than that in any other group. Histopathological examination showed more inflammatory cell infiltration and lung tissue destruction in the asthma/A(H1N1)pdm09 group than in any other group. The distinct cytokine profiles in A(H1N1)pdm09-infected asthmatic mice indicated excessive inflammation and virus replication within a few days after infection. Thus, bronchial asthma could be a more exacerbating factor for pandemic influenza infection than for seasonal influenza infection.

  9. Infection, inflammation, and lung function decline in infants with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Pillarisetti, Naveen; Williamson, Elizabeth; Linnane, Barry; Skoric, Billy; Robertson, Colin F; Robinson, Phil; Massie, John; Hall, Graham L; Sly, Peter; Stick, Stephen; Ranganathan, Sarath

    2011-07-01

    Better understanding of evolution of lung function in infants with cystic fibrosis (CF) and its association with pulmonary inflammation and infection is crucial in informing both early intervention studies aimed at limiting lung damage and the role of lung function as outcomes in such studies. To describe longitudinal change in lung function in infants with CF and its association with pulmonary infection and inflammation. Infants diagnosed after newborn screening or clinical presentation were recruited prospectively. FVC, forced expiratory volume in 0.5 seconds (FEV(0.5)), and forced expiratory flows at 75% of exhaled vital capacity (FEF(75)) were measured using the raised-volume technique, and z-scores were calculated from published reference equations. Pulmonary infection and inflammation were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage within 48 hours of lung function testing. Thirty-seven infants had at least two successful repeat lung function measurements. Mean (SD) z-scores for FVC were -0.8 (1.0), -0.9 (1.1), and -1.7 (1.2) when measured at the first visit, 1-year visit, or 2-year visit, respectively. Mean (SD) z-scores for FEV(0.5) were -1.4 (1.2), -2.4 (1.1), and -4.3 (1.6), respectively. In those infants in whom free neutrophil elastase was detected, FVC z-scores were 0.81 lower (P=0.003), and FEV(0.5) z-scores 0.96 lower (P=0.001), respectively. Significantly greater decline in FEV(0.5) z-scores occurred in those infected with Staphylococcus aureus (P=0.018) or Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P=0.021). In infants with CF, pulmonary inflammation is associated with lower lung function, whereas pulmonary infection is associated with a greater rate of decline in lung function. Strategies targeting pulmonary inflammation and infection are required to prevent early decline in lung function in infants with CF.

  10. Human Adipose-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Attenuate Early Stage of Bleomycin Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis: Comparison with Pirfenidone

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Manoj; Fonseca, Lyle; Gowda, Shashank; Chougule, Basavraj; Hari, Aarya; Totey, Satish

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive, irreversible, invariably fatal fibrotic lung disease with no lasting option for therapy. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) could be a promising modality for the treatment of IPF. Aim of the study was to investigate improvement in survivability and anti-fibrotic efficacy of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSCs) in comparison with pirfenidone in the bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis model. Methods Human AD-MSCs were administered intravenously on day 3, 6 and 9 after an intra-tracheal challenge with bleomycin, whereas, pirfenidone was given orally in drinking water at the rate of 100 mg/kg body weight three times a day daily from day 3 onward. AD-MSCs were labelled with PKH-67 before administration to detect engraftment. Disease severity and improvement was assessed and compared between sham control and vehicle control groups using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, biochemical and molecular analysis, histopathology and high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) parameters at the end of study. Results Results demonstrated that AD-MSCs significantly increase survivability; reduce organ weight and collagen deposition better than pirfenidone group. Histological analyses and HRCT of the lung revealed that AD-MSCs afforded protection against bleomycin induced fibrosis and protect architecture of the lung. Gene expression analysis revealed that AD-MSCs potently suppressed pro-fibrotic genes induced by bleomycin. More importantly, AD-MSCs were found to inhibit pro-inflammatory related transcripts. Conclusions Our results provided direct evidence that AD-MSC-mediated immunomodulation and anti-fibrotic effect in the lungs resulted in marked protection in pulmonary fibrosis, but at an early stage of disease. PMID:27871152

  11. Cardiomyopathy confers susceptibility to particulate matter-induced oxidative stress, vagal dominance, arrhythmia, pulmonary inflammation in heart failure-prone rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute exposure to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is tied to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, especially among those with prior cardiac injury. The mechanisms and pathophysiologic events precipitating these outcomes remain poorly understood but may involve inflamm...

  12. The Association Between Childhood Emotional Functioning and Adulthood Inflammation Is Modified by Early-Life Socioeconomic Status

    PubMed Central

    Appleton, Allison A.; McCormick, Marie C.; Loucks, Eric B.; Buka, Stephen L.; Koenen, Karestan C.; Kubzansky, Laura D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Identifying interrelationships among childhood social disadvantage, emotional functioning and adult health may help illustrate how health disparities may become embedded early in life, yet few have considered how these factors are associated. We examined whether the association of child emotional functioning and adult health risk was modified by child socioeconomic status (CSES), or whether child emotional functioning mediated the association of CSES and adult health risk. Method We studied 430 adult offspring (mean age 42 years) of Collaborative Perinatal Project participants, a cohort of pregnant women enrolled in 1959–1966 (Broman, Nichols, & Kennedy, 1975; Niswander & Gordon, 1972). Child emotional functioning was assessed by psychologist ratings at age 7 and included inappropriate self regulation (ISR) and distress proneness. CSES measures included parental education, household income, and parental occupation. Adult health risk was measured by the inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP). Hypotheses were tested with multiple linear regression. Effect modification was evaluated via interaction terms and stratification of fully adjusted models by CSES. Mediation by child emotional functioning was evaluated via coefficient changes. Results There was no evidence that child emotional functioning mediated the association of CSES and CRP. Significant interactions were observed for ISR and low income (b = 1.67, SE = 0.70, p < .05), and distress proneness and low (b = 3.14, SE = 1.47, p < .05) and middle (b = 3.52, SE = 1.46, p < .05) income. Stratified models indicated that associations of child emotion with CRP varied significantly by level of parental education, household income and occupation. Conclusion The highest levels of adult inflammation were observed among those with childhood emotional problems who were also exposed to low socioeconomic status as children. This study suggests adulthood disparities in CRP may have developmental origins in

  13. The association between childhood emotional functioning and adulthood inflammation is modified by early-life socioeconomic status.

    PubMed

    Appleton, Allison A; Buka, Stephen L; McCormick, Marie C; Koenen, Karestan C; Loucks, Eric B; Kubzansky, Laura D

    2012-07-01

    Identifying interrelationships among childhood social disadvantage, emotional functioning and adult health may help illustrate how health disparities may become embedded early in life, yet few have considered how these factors are associated. We examined whether the association of child emotional functioning and adult health risk was modified by child socioeconomic status (CSES), or whether child emotional functioning mediated the association of CSES and adult health risk. We studied 430 adult offspring (mean age 42 years) of Collaborative Perinatal Project participants, a cohort of pregnant women enrolled in 1959-1966 (Broman, Nichols, & Kennedy, 1975; Niswander & Gordon, 1972). Child emotional functioning was assessed by psychologist ratings at age 7 and included inappropriate self regulation (ISR) and distress proneness. CSES measures included parental education, household income, and parental occupation. Adult health risk was measured by the inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP). Hypotheses were tested with multiple linear regression. Effect modification was evaluated via interaction terms and stratification of fully adjusted models by CSES. Mediation by child emotional functioning was evaluated via coefficient changes. There was no evidence that child emotional functioning mediated the association of CSES and CRP. Significant interactions were observed for ISR and low income (b = 1.67, SE = 0.70, p < .05), and distress proneness and low (b = 3.14, SE = 1.47, p < .05) and middle (b = 3.52, SE = 1.46, p < .05) income. Stratified models indicated that associations of child emotion with CRP varied significantly by level of parental education, household income and occupation. The highest levels of adult inflammation were observed among those with childhood emotional problems who were also exposed to low socioeconomic status as children. This study suggests adulthood disparities in CRP may have developmental origins in childhood adversity.

  14. Cost-Effectiveness of Tight Control of Inflammation in Early Psoriatic Arthritis: Economic Analysis of a Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    O'Dwyer, John L; Meads, David M; Hulme, Claire T; Mcparland, Lucy; Brown, Sarah; Coates, Laura C; Moverley, Anna R; Emery, Paul; Conaghan, Philip G; Helliwell, Philip S

    2018-03-01

    Treat-to-target approaches have proved to be effective in rheumatoid arthritis, but have not been studied in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). This study was undertaken to examine the cost-effectiveness of tight control (TC) of inflammation in early PsA compared to standard care. Cost-effectiveness analyses were undertaken alongside a UK-based, open-label, multicenter, randomized controlled trial. Taking the perspective of the health care sector, effectiveness was measured using the 3-level EuroQol 5-domain, which allows for the calculation of quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) are presented, which represent the additional cost per QALY gained over a 48-week time horizon. Sensitivity analyses are presented assessing the impact of variations in the analytical approach and assumptions on the cost-effectiveness estimates. The mean cost and QALYs were higher in the TC group: £4,198 versus £2,000 and 0.602 versus 0.561. These values yielded an ICER of £53,948 per QALY. Bootstrapped uncertainty analysis suggests that the TC has a 0.07 probability of being cost-effective at a £20,000 threshold. Stratified analysis suggests that with certain costs being controlled, an ICER of £24,639 can be calculated for patients with a higher degree of disease severity. A tight control strategy to treat PsA is an effective intervention in the treatment pathway; however, this study does not find tight control to be cost-effective in most analyses. Lower drug prices, targeting polyarthritis patients, or reducing the frequency of rheumatology visits may improve value for money metrics in future studies. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  15. Three-dimensional analysis of alveolar wall destruction in the early stage of pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yukihiro; Uehara, Takeshi; Kawasaki, Kenji; Sugano, Mitsutoshi; Matsumoto, Takehisa; Matsumoto, Gou; Honda, Takayuki

    2015-03-01

    The morphological mechanism of alveolar wall destruction during pulmonary emphysema has not been clarified. The aim of this study was to elucidate this process three-dimensionally. Lung specimens from five patients with pulmonary emphysema were used, and five controls with normal alveolar structure were also examined. Sections 150 μm thick were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, elastica, and silver impregnation, and immunostained with selected antibodies. We examined these sections three-dimensionally using a laser confocal microscope and a light microscope. There were only a few Kohn's pores and no fenestrae in the normal alveoli from the controls. In the lungs of the emphysema patients a small rupture appeared in the extremely thin alveolar wall among the alveolar capillaries. This rupture enlarged to form a circle surrounded by the capillaries, which was called an alveolar fenestra. Two neighboring fenestrae fused by breakdown of the collapsed or cord-like capillary between them to form a large fenestra. The large fenestrae fused repeatedly to become larger, and these were bordered by thick elastic fibers constructing an alveolar framework. Alveolar wall destruction during emphysema could start from small ruptures of the alveolar wall that become fenestrae surrounded by capillaries, which fuse repeatedly to become larger fenestrae rimmed with elastic fibers. The alveolar capillary network could initially prevent enlargement of the fenestrae, and the thick elastic fibers constituting the alveolar framework could secondarily prevent destruction of the alveolar wall structure. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Isolated supravalvular pulmonary stenosis in a 25-day-old newborn infant: an occasional and early diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Patanè, Salvatore; Marte, Filippo; Di Bella, Gianluca; Di Tommaso, Eleonora; Pagano, Giuseppina Tindara; Coglitore, Sebastiano

    2009-04-03

    Pulmonary stenosis comprises variable pathologic features from the right ventricular outflow tract to the peripheral pulmonary arteries. Most frequently, the obstruction occurs at the level of the pulmonary valve; however, it occurs less frequently at the infindibular level. It can occur as part of more congenital cardiac malformations such as tetralogy of Fallot, complete transposition of great arteries, or atrial septal defect. Proximal pulmonary artery stenosis has also been reported as an acquired lesion in infants treated for congenital heart disease. Primary isolated supravalvular pulmonary stenosis is less common. We present a case of primary isolated pulmonary artery stenosis in an asymptomatic 25-day-old newborn infant.

  17. Ameliorative effect of dietary genistein on diabetes induced hyper-inflammation and oxidative stress during early stage of wound healing in alloxan induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Eo, Hyeyoon; Lee, Hea-Ji; Lim, Yunsook

    2016-09-23

    Among the diabetic complications, diabetic foot ulcer due to delayed wound healing is one of the most significant clinical problems. Early inflammatory stage is important for better prognosis during wound healing. Thus, regulation of inflammatory response during early stage of wound healing is main target for complete cutaneous recovery. This study investigated the role of genistein supplementation in inflammation and oxidative stress, which are related to NLRP3 inflammasome, NFκB and Nrf2 activation, during cutaneous wound healing in alloxan-induced diabetic mice. Mice with diabetes with fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels > 250 mg/dl were fed diets with AIN-93G rodent diet containing 0%, 0.025% (LG) or 0.1% (HG) genistein. After 2 weeks of genistein supplementation, excisional wounds were made by biopsy punches (4 mm). Genistein supplementation improved fasting glucose levels and wound closure rate. Moreover, genistein supplementation restored NLRP3 inflammasome (NLRP3, ASC and caspase-1) at the basal level and ameliorated both inflammation (TNFα, iNOS, COX2 and NFκB) and antioxidant defense system (Nrf2, HO-1, GPx, and catalase) during early stage of wound healing in diabetic mice. Taken together, genistein supplementation would be a potential therapeutic nutrient in prevention and treatment of delayed wound healing by modulation of inflammation and oxidative stress during inflammatory stage. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Early markers of airways inflammation and occupational asthma: Rationale, study design and follow-up rates among bakery, pastry and hairdressing apprentices

    PubMed Central

    Tossa, Paul; Bohadana, Abraham; Demange, Valérie; Wild, Pascal; Michaely, Jean-Pierre; Hannhart, Bernard; Paris, Christophe; Zmirou-Navier, Denis

    2009-01-01

    Background Occupational asthma is a common type of asthma caused by a specific agent in the workplace. The basic alteration of occupational asthma is airways inflammation. Although most patients with occupational asthma are mature adults, there is evidence that airways inflammation starts soon after inception of exposure, including during apprenticeship. Airways hyper responsiveness to methacholine is a valid surrogate marker of airways inflammation, which has proved useful in occupational epidemiology. But it is time-consuming, requires active subject's cooperation and is not readily feasible. Other non-invasive and potentially more useful tests include the forced oscillation technique, measurement of fraction exhaled nitric oxide, and eosinophils count in nasal lavage fluid. Methods and design This study aims to investigate early development of airways inflammation and asthma-like symptoms in apprentice bakers, pastry-makers and hairdressers, three populations at risk of occupational asthma whose work-related exposures involve agents of different nature. The objectives are to (i) examine the performance of the non-invasive tests cited above in detecting early airways inflammation that might eventually develop into occupational asthma; and (ii) evaluate whether, and how, constitutional (e.g. atopy) and behavioural (e.g. smoking) risk factors for occupational asthma modulate the effects of allergenic and/or irritative substances involved in these occupations. This paper presents the study rationale and detailed protocol. Discussion Among 441 volunteers included at the first visit, 354 attended the fourth one. Drop outs were investigated and showed unrelated to the study outcome. Sample size and follow-up participation rates suggest that the data collected in this study will allow it to meet its objectives. PMID:19389222

  19. Early markers of airways inflammation and occupational asthma: rationale, study design and follow-up rates among bakery, pastry and hairdressing apprentices.

    PubMed

    Tossa, Paul; Bohadana, Abraham; Demange, Valérie; Wild, Pascal; Michaely, Jean-Pierre; Hannhart, Bernard; Paris, Christophe; Zmirou-Navier, Denis

    2009-04-23

    Occupational asthma is a common type of asthma caused by a specific agent in the workplace. The basic alteration of occupational asthma is airways inflammation. Although most patients with occupational asthma are mature adults, there is evidence that airways inflammation starts soon after inception of exposure, including during apprenticeship. Airways hyper responsiveness to methacholine is a valid surrogate marker of airways inflammation, which has proved useful in occupational epidemiology. But it is time-consuming, requires active subject's cooperation and is not readily feasible. Other non-invasive and potentially more useful tests include the forced oscillation technique, measurement of fraction exhaled nitric oxide, and eosinophils count in nasal lavage fluid. This study aims to investigate early development of airways inflammation and asthma-like symptoms in apprentice bakers, pastry-makers and hairdressers, three populations at risk of occupational asthma whose work-related exposures involve agents of different nature. The objectives are to (i) examine the performance of the non-invasive tests cited above in detecting early airways inflammation that might eventually develop into occupational asthma; and (ii) evaluate whether, and how, constitutional (e.g. atopy) and behavioural (e.g. smoking) risk factors for occupational asthma modulate the effects of allergenic and/or irritative substances involved in these occupations. This paper presents the study rationale and detailed protocol. Among 441 volunteers included at the first visit, 354 attended the fourth one. Drop outs were investigated and showed unrelated to the study outcome. Sample size and follow-up participation rates suggest that the data collected in this study will allow it to meet its objectives.

  20. Portal inflammation during NAFLD is frequent and associated with the early phases of putative hepatic progenitor cell activation.

    PubMed

    Carotti, Simone; Vespasiani-Gentilucci, Umberto; Perrone, Giuseppe; Picardi, Antonio; Morini, Sergio

    2015-11-01

    We investigated whether portal tract inflammation observed in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with hepatic progenitor cell compartment activation, as thoroughly evaluated with different markers of the staminal lineage. Fifty-two patients with NAFLD were studied. NAFLD activity score, fibrosis and portal inflammation were histologically evaluated. Putative hepatic progenitor cells, intermediate hepatobiliary cells and bile ductules/interlobular bile ducts were evaluated by immunohistochemistry for cytokeratin (CK)-7, CK-19 and epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), and a hepatic progenitor cell compartment score was derived. Hepatic stellate cell and myofibroblast activity was determined by immunohistochemistry for α-smooth muscle actin. Portal inflammation was absent in a minority of patients, mild in 40% of cases and more than mild in about half of patients, showing a strong correlation with fibrosis (r=0.76, p<0.001). Portal inflammation correlated with CK-7-counted putative hepatic progenitor cells (r=0.48, p<0.001), intermediate hepatobiliary cells (r=0.6, p<0.001) and bile ductules/interlobular bile ducts (r=0.6, p<0.001), and with the activity of myofibroblasts (r=0.5, p<0.001). Correlations were confirmed when elements were counted by immunostaining for CK-19 and EpCAM. Lobular inflammation, ballooning, myofibroblast activity and hepatic progenitor cell compartment activation were associated with portal inflammation by univariate analysis. In the multivariate model, the only variable independently associated with portal inflammation was hepatic progenitor cell compartment activation (OR 3.7, 95% CI 1.1 to 12.6). Portal inflammation is frequent during NAFLD and strongly associated with activation of putative hepatic progenitor cells since the first steps of their differentiation, portal myofibroblast activity and fibrosis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a

  1. Cost-effectiveness of an autoantibody test (EarlyCDT-Lung) as an aid to early diagnosis of lung cancer in patients with incidentally detected pulmonary nodules.

    PubMed

    Edelsberg, John; Weycker, Derek; Atwood, Mark; Hamilton-Fairley, Geoffrey; Jett, James R

    2018-01-01

    Patients who have incidentally detected pulmonary nodules and an estimated intermediate risk (5-60%) of lung cancer frequently are followed via computed tomography (CT) surveillance to detect nodule growth, despite guidelines for a more aggressive diagnostic strategy. We examined the cost-effectiveness of an autoantibody test (AABT)-Early Cancer Detection Test-Lung (EarlyCDT-LungTM)-as an aid to early diagnosis of lung cancer among such patients. We developed a decision-analytic model to evaluate use of the AABT versus CT surveillance alone. In the model, patients with a positive AABT-because they are at substantially enhanced risk of lung cancer-are assumed to go directly to biopsy, resulting in diagnosis of lung cancer in earlier stages than under current guidelines (a beneficial stage shift). Patients with a negative AABT, and those scheduled for CT surveillance alone, are assumed to have periodic CT screenings to detect rapid growth and thus to have their lung cancers diagnosed-on average-at more advanced stages. Among 1,000 patients who have incidentally detected nodules 8-30 mm, have an intermediate-risk of lung cancer, and are evaluated by CT surveillance alone, 95 (9.5%) are assumed to have lung cancer (local, 73.6%; regional, 22.0%; distant, 4.4%). With use of the AABT set at a sensitivity/specificity of 41%/93% (stage shift = 10.8%), although expected costs would be higher by $949,442 ($949 per person), life years would be higher by 53 (0.05 per person), resulting in a cost per life-year gained of $18,029 and a cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained of $24,330. With use of the AABT set at a sensitivity/specificity of 28%/98% (stage shift = 7.4%), corresponding cost-effectiveness ratios would be $18,454 and $24,833. Under our base-case assumptions, and reasonable variations thereof, using AABT as an aid in the early diagnosis of lung cancer in patients with incidentally detected pulmonary nodules who are estimated to be at intermediate risk of

  2. [Study on effect of cordyceps sinensis on early-stage silicotic pulmonary fibrosis in rabbits].

    PubMed

    Liu, Qianzhong; Zhang, Wei; Cui, Hongfu; Ying, Yanhong

    2014-07-01

    To establish a rabbit model of silicotic pulmonary fibrosis and to investigate the effect of cordyceps sinensis in this model. Thirty healthy male white rabbits were randomly divided into control group, silicosis model group, and intervention group. The rabbits in silicosis model group and intervention group received endotracheal perfusion of silicon dioxide suspension (120 mg/kg), and the control group was treated with the same volume of saline. All the rabbits were sacrificed 30 days later. The lung coefficient was calculated by comparing the lung weight and body weight; the right lung tissue was stained with hematoxylin-eosin (HE). The content of hydroxyproline in lung tissue was measured by alkaline hydrolysis. The mRNA levels of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β₁) and mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 7 (Smad7) in rabbit lung sections were determined by real-time PCR. No abnormalities were observed by HE staining in the lung tissues of control group, while fibrosis and silicotic nodules were discovered in the silicosis model group and intervention group. The lung coefficient and the content of hydroxyproline in lung tissue were significantly higher in the silicosis model group than in the control group and intervention group (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). Compared with the control group, the silicosis model group and intervention group had significantly increased TGF-β₁ mRNA levels but significantly reduced Smad7 mRNA levels (P < 0.02). Compared with the silicosis model group, the intervention group had a significantly reduced TGF-β₁ mRNA level but a significantly increased Smad7 mRNA level (P < 0.05). Cordyceps sinensis is able to reduce the expression of TGF-β₁ mRNA and increase the expression of Smad7 mRNA in lung tissues of rabbits with silicotic pulmonary fibrosis, and thus postpone the progression of fibrosis.

  3. The impact of concomitant pulmonary hypertension on early and late outcomes following surgery for mitral stenosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; DeBenedictus, Christina; Watt, Tessa; Farley, Sean; Salita, Alona; Hornsby, Whitney; Wu, Xiaoting; Herbert, Morley; Likosky, Donald; Bolling, Steven F

    2016-08-01

    To provide initial evidence on the management of mitral stenosis and pulmonary hypertension (PH) based on short-term and long-term outcomes following mitral valve surgery. Consecutive patients with mitral stenosis (n = 317) who had undergone mitral valve surgery between 1992 and 2014 with recorded pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) data were reviewed. PH severity, based on systolic PAP, was categorized as mild (35 to 44 mm Hg), moderate (45 to 59 mm Hg), or severe (>60 mm Hg). Primary outcomes were 30-day mortality and long-term survival. There were no significant between-group differences in age or preoperative comorbidities. Mitral valve surgery included mitral valve replacement (78%) and repair (22%). The severe PH group had more mitral valve replacement (81%; P = .04), severe tricuspid valve regurgitation (31%; P = .003), right heart failure (17%; P = .02), and concomitant tricuspid valve procedures (46%; P < .001). For severe PH, 30-day mortality was 9%, with no significant group differences. Ten- and 12-year survival were significantly worse in the moderate-severe PH group (58% and 51%, respectively) compared with the normal PAP-mild PH group (83% and 79%, respectively) with a hazard ratio of 2.98 (95% confidence interval, 1.55-5.75; P = .001). Ten-year survival after mitral valve surgery for mitral stenosis was inversely associated with preoperative PAP. Mitral valve surgery can be performed with acceptable 30-day mortality for patients with mitral stenosis and moderate to severe PH, but long-term survival is impaired by moderate to severe PH. Patients with mitral stenosis and mild PH (systolic PAP 35-44 mm Hg) should be considered for mitral valve surgery. Copyright © 2016 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. “Sentinel” Circulating Tumor Cells Allow Early Diagnosis of Lung Cancer in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ilie, Marius; Hofman, Véronique; Long-Mira, Elodie; Selva, Eric; Vignaud, Jean-Michel; Padovani, Bernard; Mouroux, Jérôme; Marquette, Charles-Hugo; Hofman, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a risk factor for lung cancer. Migration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) into the blood stream is an early event that occurs during carcinogenesis. We aimed to examine the presence of CTCs in complement to CT-scan in COPD patients without clinically detectable lung cancer as a first step to identify a new marker for early lung cancer diagnosis. The presence of CTCs was examined by an ISET filtration-enrichment technique, for 245 subjects without cancer, including 168 (68.6%) COPD patients, and 77 subjects without COPD (31.4%), including 42 control smokers and 35 non-smoking healthy individuals. CTCs were identified by cytomorphological analysis and characterized by studying their expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers. COPD patients were monitored annually by low-dose spiral CT. CTCs were detected in 3% of COPD patients (5 out of 168 patients). The annual surveillance of the CTC-positive COPD patients by CT-scan screening detected lung nodules 1 to 4 years after CTC detection, leading to prompt surgical resection and histopathological diagnosis of early-stage lung cancer. Follow-up of the 5 patients by CT-scan and ISET 12 month after surgery showed no tumor recurrence. CTCs detected in COPD patients had a heterogeneous expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers, which was similar to the corresponding lung tumor phenotype. No CTCs were detected in control smoking and non-smoking healthy individuals. CTCs can be detected in patients with COPD without clinically detectable lung cancer. Monitoring “sentinel” CTC-positive COPD patients may allow early diagnosis of lung cancer. PMID:25360587

  5. Rationale and design of a randomized trial of home electronic symptom and lung function monitoring to detect cystic fibrosis pulmonary exacerbations: the early intervention in cystic fibrosis exacerbation (eICE) trial.

    PubMed

    Lechtzin, N; West, N; Allgood, S; Wilhelm, E; Khan, U; Mayer-Hamblett, N; Aitken, M L; Ramsey, B W; Boyle, M P; Mogayzel, P J; Goss, C H

    2013-11-01

    Acute pulmonary exacerbations are central events in the lives of individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary exacerbations lead to impaired lung function, worse quality of life, and shorter survival. We hypothesized that aggressive early treatment of acute pulmonary exacerbation may improve clinical outcomes. Describe the rationale of an ongoing trial designed to determine the efficacy of home monitoring of both lung function measurements and symptoms for early detection and subsequent early treatment of acute CF pulmonary exacerbations. A randomized, non-blinded, multi-center trial in 320 individuals with CF aged 14 years and older. The study compares usual care to a twice a week assessment of home spirometry and CF respiratory symptoms using an electronic device with data transmission to the research personnel to identify and trigger early treatment of CF pulmonary exacerbation. Participants will be enrolled in the study for 12 months. The primary endpoint is change in FEV1 (L) from baseline to 12 months determined by a linear mixed effects model incorporating all quarterly FEV1 measurements. Secondary endpoints include time to first acute protocol-defined pulmonary exacerbation, number of acute pulmonary exacerbations, number of hospitalization days for acute pulmonary exacerbation, time from the end of acute pulmonary exacerbation to onset of subsequent pulmonary exacerbation, change in health related quality of life, change in treatment burden, change in CF respiratory symptoms, and adherence to the study protocol. This study is a first step in establishing alternative approaches to the care of CF pulmonary exacerbations. We hypothesize that early treatment of pulmonary exacerbations has the potential to slow lung function decline, reduce respiratory symptoms and improve the quality of life for individuals with CF. © 2013.

  6. Regional Emphysema Score Predicting Overall Survival, Quality of Life and Pulmonary Function Recovery in Early-stage Lung Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jie; Liu, Ming; Swensen, Stephen J.; Stoddard, Shawn M.; Wampfler, Jason A.; Limper, Andrew H.; Jiang, Gening; Yang, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Pulmonary emphysema is a common comorbidity in lung cancer, but its role in tumor prognosis remains obscure. Our aim was to evaluate the impact of the regional emphysema score (RES) on patient’s overall survival, quality of life (QOL), and pulmonary function recovery in stage I–II lung cancer. Methods Between 1997 and 2009, 1,073 patients were identified and divided into two surgical groups (cancer in emphysematous [group 1, n=565] and non-emphysematous [group 2, n=435] region) and one non-surgical group (group 3, n=73). RES was derived from the emphysematous region and categorized into mild (≤5%), moderate (6–24%) and severe (25–60%). Results In group 1, patients with moderate and severe RES experienced slight decreases in postoperative FEV1, but increases in FEV1/FVC, compared to those with mild RES (p<0.01); however, this correlation was not observed in group 2. Post-treatment QOL was lower in patients with greater RES in all groups mainly due to dyspnea (p<0.05). Cox-regression analysis revealed that patients with higher RES had a significantly poorer survival in both surgical groups, with adjusted HRs of 1.41 and 1.43 for moderate RES and 1.63 and 2.04 for severe RES, respectively; however, this association was insignificant in the non-surgical group (adjusted HR of 0.99 for moderate/severe RES). Conclusions In surgically-treated patients with cancer in emphysematous region, RES is associated with postoperative changes in lung function. RES is also predictive of post-treatment QOL related to dyspnea in early-stage lung cancer. In both surgical groups, RES is an independent predictor of survival. PMID:28126539

  7. The Critical Role of Pulmonary Arterial Compliance in Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Prins, Kurt W.; Pritzker, Marc R.; Scandurra, John; Volmers, Karl; Weir, E. Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    The normal pulmonary circulation is a low-pressure, high-compliance system. Pulmonary arterial compliance decreases in the presence of pulmonary hypertension because of increased extracellular matrix/collagen deposition in the pulmonary arteries. Loss of pulmonary arterial compliance has been consistently shown to be a predictor of increased mortality in patients with pulmonary hypertension, even more so than pulmonary vascular resistance in some studies. Decreased pulmonary arterial compliance causes premature reflection of waves from the distal pulmonary vasculature, leading to increased pulsatile right ventricular afterload and eventually right ventricular failure. Evidence suggests that decreased pulmonary arterial compliance is a cause rather than a consequence of distal small vessel proliferative vasculopathy. Pulmonary arterial compliance decreases early in the disease process even when pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance are normal, potentially enabling early diagnosis of pulmonary vascular disease, especially in high-risk populations. With the recognition of the prognostic importance of pulmonary arterial compliance, its impact on right ventricular function, and its contributory role in the development and progression of distal small-vessel proliferative vasculopathy, pulmonary arterial compliance is an attractive target for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:26848601

  8. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... together all groups are called pulmonary hypertension.) Group 1 Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Group 1 PAH includes: PAH ... information, go to "Types of Pulmonary Hypertension." ) Group 1 Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Group 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension ( ...

  9. Efficacy and Pharmacology of the NLRP3 Inflammasome Inhibitor CP-456,773 (CRID3) in Murine Models of Dermal and Pulmonary Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Primiano, Michael J; Lefker, Bruce A; Bowman, Michael R; Bree, Andrea G; Hubeau, Cedric; Bonin, Paul D; Mangan, Matthew; Dower, Ken; Monks, Brian G; Cushing, Leah; Wang, Stephen; Guzova, Julia; Jiao, Aiping; Lin, Lih-Ling; Latz, Eicke; Hepworth, David; Hall, J Perry

    2016-09-15

    A critical component of innate immune response to infection and tissue damage is the NACHT, LRR, and PYD domains-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome, and this pathway and its activation products have been implicated in the pathophysiology of a variety of diseases. NLRP3 inflammasome activation leads to the cleavage of pro-IL-1β and pro-IL-18, as well as the subsequent release of biologically active IL-1β, IL-18, and other soluble mediators of inflammation. In this study, we further define the pharmacology of the previously reported NLRP3 inflammasome-selective, IL-1β processing inhibitor CP-456,773 (also known as MCC950), and we demonstrate its efficacy in two in vivo models of inflammation. Specifically, we show that in human and mouse innate immune cells CP-456,773 is an inhibitor of the cellular release of IL-1β, IL-1α, and IL-18, that CP-456,773 prevents inflammasome activation induced by disease-relevant soluble and crystalline NLRP3 stimuli, and that CP-456,773 inhibits R848- and imiquimod-induced IL-1β release. In mice, CP-456,773 demonstrates potent inhibition of the release of proinflammatory cytokines following acute i.p. challenge with LPS plus ATP in a manner that is proportional to the free/unbound concentrations of the drug, thereby establishing an in vivo pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model for CP-456,773. Furthermore, CP-456,773 reduces ear swelling in an imiquimod cream-induced mouse model of skin inflammation, and it reduces airway inflammation in mice following acute challenge with house dust mite extract. These data implicate the NLRP3 inflammasome in the pathogenesis of dermal and airway inflammation, and they highlight the utility of CP-456,773 for interrogating the contribution of the NLRP3 inflammasome and its outputs in preclinical models of inflammation and disease. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  10. G-CSF maintains controlled neutrophil mobilization during acute inflammation by negatively regulating CXCR2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bajrami, Besnik; Zhu, Haiyan; Zhang, Yu C.

    2016-01-01

    Cytokine-induced neutrophil mobilization from the bone marrow to circulation is a critical event in acute inflammation, but how it is accurately controlled remains poorly understood. In this study, we report that CXCR2 ligands are responsible for rapid neutrophil mobilization during early-stage acute inflammation. Nevertheless, although serum CXCR2 ligand concentrations increased during inflammation, neutrophil mobilization slowed after an initial acute fast phase, suggesting a suppression of neutrophil response to CXCR2 ligands after the acute phase. We demonstrate that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), usually considered a prototypical neutrophil-mobilizing cytokine, was expressed later in the acute inflammatory response and unexpectedly impeded CXCR2-induced neutrophil mobilization by negatively regulating CXCR2-mediated intracellular signaling. Blocking G-CSF in vivo paradoxically elevated peripheral blood neutrophil counts in mice injected intraperitoneally with Escherichia coli and sequestered large numbers of neutrophils in the lungs, leading to sterile pulmonary inflammation. In a lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury model, the homeostatic imbalance caused by G-CSF blockade enhanced neutrophil accumulation, edema, and inflammation in the lungs and ultimately led to significant lung damage. Thus, physiologically produced G-CSF not only acts as a neutrophil mobilizer at the relatively late stage of acute inflammation, but also prevents exaggerated neutrophil mobilization and the associated inflammation-induced tissue damage during early-phase infection and inflammation. PMID:27551153

  11. Efficacy of simple short-term in vitro assays for predicting the potential of metal oxide nanoparticles to cause pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Senlin; Duffin, Rodger; Poland, Craig; Daly, Paul; Murphy, Fiona; Drost, Ellen; Macnee, William; Stone, Vicki; Donaldson, Ken

    2009-02-01

    There has been concern regarding risks from inhalation exposure to nanoparticles (NPs). The large number of particles requiring testing means that alternative approaches to animal testing are needed. We set out to determine whether short-term in vitro assays that assess intrinsic oxidative stress potential and membrane-damaging potency of a panel of metal oxide NPs can be used to predict their inflammogenic potency. For a panel of metal oxide NPs, we investigated intrinsic free radical generation, oxidative activity in an extracellular environment, cytotoxicity to lung epithelial cells, hemolysis, and inflammation potency in rat lungs. All exposures were carried out at equal surface area doses. Only nickel oxide (NiO) and alumina 2 caused significant lung inflammation when instilled into rat lungs at equal surface area, suggesting that these two had extra surface reactivity. We observed significant free radical generation with 4 of 13 metal oxides, only one of which was inflammogenic. Only 3 of 13 were significantly hemolytic, two of which were inflammogenic. Potency in generating free radicals in vitro did not predict inflammation, whereas alumina 2 had no free radical activity but was inflammogenic. The hemolysis assay was correct in predicting the proinflammatory potential of 12 of 13 of the particles examined. Using a battery of simple in vitro tests, it is possible to predict the inflammogenicity of metal oxide NPs, although some false-positive results are likely. More research using a larger panel is needed to confirm the efficacy and generality of this approach for metal oxide NPs.

  12. Pulmonary capillary haemangiomatosis: a rare cause of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Babu, K Anand; Supraja, K; Singh, Raj B

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary capillary haemangiomatosis (PCH) is a rare disorder of unknown aetiology, characterised by proliferating capillaries that invade the pulmonary interstitium, alveolar septae and the pulmonary vasculature. It is often mis-diagnosed as primary pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. Pulmonary capillary haemangiomatosis is a locally aggressive benign vascular neoplasm of the lung. We report the case of a 19-year-old female who was referred to us in the early post-partum period with severe pulmonary artery hypertension, which was diagnosed as PCH by open lung biopsy.

  13. Minocycline Protects Against NLRP3 Inflammasome-Induced Inflammation and P53-Associated Apoptosis in Early Brain Injury After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianru; Chen, Jingsen; Mo, Hangbo; Chen, Jingyin; Qian, Cong; Yan, Feng; Gu, Chi; Hu, Qiang; Wang, Lin; Chen, Gao

    2016-05-01

    Minocycline has beneficial effects in early brain injury (EBI) following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH); however, the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects have not been clearly identified. This study was undertaken to determine the influence of minocycline on inflammation and neural apoptosis and the possible mechanisms of these effects in early brain injury following subarachnoid hemorrhage. SAH was induced by the filament perforation model of SAH in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Minocycline or vehicle was given via an intraperitoneal injection 1 h after SAH induction. Minocycline treatment markedly attenuated brain edema secondary to blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction by inhibiting NLRP3 inflammasome activation, which controls the maturation and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, especially interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Minocycline treatment also markedly reduced the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells. To further identify the potential mechanisms, we demonstrated that minocycline increased Bcl2 expression and reduced the protein expression of P53, Bax, and cleaved caspase-3. In addition, minocycline reduced the cortical levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are closely related to both NLRP3 inflammasome and P53 expression. Minocycline protects against NLRP3 inflammasome-induced inflammation and P53-associated apoptosis in early brain injury following SAH. Minocycline's anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effect may involve the reduction of ROS. Minocycline treatment may exhibit important clinical potentials in the management of SAH.

  14. Early phase evaluation of SQ109 alone and in combination with rifampicin in pulmonary TB patients.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Norbert; Dawson, Rodney; du Bois, Jeannine; Narunsky, Kim; Horwith, Gary; Phipps, Andrew J; Nacy, Carol A; Aarnoutse, Rob E; Boeree, Martin J; Gillespie, Stephen H; Venter, Amour; Henne, Sonja; Rachow, Andrea; Phillips, Patrick P J; Hoelscher, Michael; Diacon, Andreas H

    2015-05-01

    SQ109, an asymmetrical diamine, is a novel anti-TB drug candidate. This first study in patients was done to determine safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and bacteriological effect of different doses of SQ109 alone and in combination with rifampicin when administered over 14 days. Smear-positive pulmonary TB patients were randomized into six groups of 15 to receive once-daily oral treatment with 75, 150 or 300 mg of SQ109, rifampicin (10 mg/kg body weight), rifampicin plus 150 mg of SQ109, or rifampicin plus 300 mg of SQ109 for 14 days. Patients were hospitalized for supervised treatment, regular clinical, biochemical and electrocardiographic safety assessments, pharmacokinetic profiling and daily overnight sputum collection. SQ109 was safe and generally well tolerated. Mild to moderate dose-dependent gastrointestinal complaints were the most frequent adverse events. No relevant QT prolongation was noted. Maximum SQ109 plasma concentrations were lower than MICs. Exposure to SQ109 (AUC0-24) increased by drug accumulation upon repeated administration in the SQ109 monotherapy groups. Co-administration of SQ109 150 mg with rifampicin resulted in decreasing SQ109 exposures from day 1 to day 14. A higher (300 mg) dose of SQ109 largely outweighed the evolving inductive effect of rifampicin. The daily fall in log cfu/mL of sputum (95% CI) was 0.093 (0.126-0.059) with rifampicin, 0.133 (0.166-0.100) with rifampicin plus 150 mg of SQ109 and 0.089 (0.121-0.057) with rifampicin plus 300 mg of SQ109. Treatments with SQ109 alone showed no significant activity. SQ109 alone or with rifampicin was safe over 14 days. Upon co-administration with rifampicin, 300 mg of SQ109 yielded a higher exposure than the 150 mg dose. SQ109 did not appear to be active alone or to enhance the activity of rifampicin during the 14 days of treatment. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For

  15. Early rehabilitation exercise program for inpatients during an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tang, Clarice Y; Blackstock, Felicity C; Clarence, Michael; Taylor, Nicholas F

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether an early rehabilitation program was safe and feasible for patients during an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In this phase 1 randomized controlled trial, patients with an acute exacerbation of COPD admitted to the hospital were randomly allocated to a low-intensity exercise group, a moderate- to high-intensity exercise group, or a control group, who received routine physical therapy. In addition to routine physical therapy, patients in the exercise group had to participate in an exercise program. The program consisted of twice-daily aerobic and resistance exercise sessions. Primary outcomes were the number and classification of adverse events and program adherence. In 174 exercise sessions, there was 1 serious adverse event of arrhythmia in the low-intensity exercise group that resolved within 1 hour. There were 12 other minor adverse events involving 5 patients with no significant differences between groups. Patients completed an average of 80% of their scheduled sessions with no significant between-group differences. The exercise groups improved significantly in walking distance; however, no significant between-group differences were observed. There was preliminary evidence that it was safe and feasible to implement an exercise program for patients during an acute exacerbation of COPD. Additional studies with larger sample sizes are required to accurately evaluate program effectiveness.

  16. Survival significance of coexisting chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients with early lung cancer after curative surgery

    PubMed Central

    Miyazawa, Tomoyuki; Sakai, Hiroki; Kimura, Yusuke; Tsuda, Masataka; Wakiyama, Yoichi; Marushima, Hideki; Kojima, Koji; Nakamura, Haruhiko

    2017-01-01

    Background The impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) severity on survival after curative resection of early‐stage lung cancer (NSCLC) has not been sufficiently elucidated. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 250 consecutive patients who underwent lobectomy with lymph nodal dissection for pathological stage I–II NSCLC. Results Among the COPD patients, 28 were classified as Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) 1, 21 as GOLD 2, and one as GOLD 3. The cumulative overall survival (OS) of the non‐COPD, GOLD 1, and GOLD 2–3 groups at five years was 90.7%, 85.7%, and 55.3%, respectively, (P < 0.0001), while recurrence‐free survival (RFS) between the groups at five years was 84.7%, 80.7%, and 72.9%, respectively. Although RFS in the GOLD 2–3 group tended to indicate a poor prognosis, there was no statistical difference between the groups (P = 0.385). In multivariate analysis, age ≥75 years, pN1, and GOLD 2–3 COPD were independent factors for a poor prognosis (P = 0.034, P = 0.010, and P = 0.030, respectively). Conclusions Our results indicate that early stage NSCLC patients with COPD had a significantly increased risk of poorer OS and potentially an increased risk of poor RFS. PMID:28976075

  17. Pulmonary edema

    MedlinePlus

    ... congestion; Lung water; Pulmonary congestion; Heart failure - pulmonary edema ... Pulmonary edema is often caused by congestive heart failure . When the heart is not able to pump efficiently, blood ...

  18. Regional Emphysema Score Predicting Overall Survival, Quality of Life, and Pulmonary Function Recovery in Early-Stage Lung Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jie; Liu, Ming; Swensen, Stephen J; Stoddard, Shawn M; Wampfler, Jason A; Limper, Andrew H; Jiang, Gening; Yang, Ping

    2017-05-01

    Pulmonary emphysema is a frequent comorbidity in lung cancer, but its role in tumor prognosis remains obscure. Our aim was to evaluate the impact of the regional emphysema score (RES) on a patient's overall survival, quality of life (QOL), and recovery of pulmonary function in stage I to II lung cancer. Between 1997 and 2009, a total of 1073 patients were identified and divided into two surgical groups-cancer in the emphysematous (group 1 [n = 565]) and nonemphysematous (group 2 [n = 435]) regions-and one nonsurgical group (group 3 [n = 73]). RES was derived from the emphysematous region and categorized as mild (≤5%), moderate (6%-24%), or severe (25%-60%). In group 1, patients with a moderate or severe RES experienced slight decreases in postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 second, but increases in the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity compared with those with a mild RES (p < 0.01); however, this correlation was not observed in group 2. Posttreatment QOL was lower in patients with higher RESs in all groups, mainly owing to dyspnea (p < 0.05). Cox regression analysis revealed that patients with a higher RES had significantly poorer survival in both surgical groups, with adjusted hazard ratios of 1.41 and 1.43 for a moderate RES and 1.63 and 2.04 for a severe RES, respectively; however, this association was insignificant in the nonsurgical group (adjusted hazard ratio of 0.99 for a moderate or severe RES). In surgically treated patients with cancer in the emphysematous region, RES is associated with postoperative changes in lung function. RES is also predictive of posttreatment QOL related to dyspnea in early-stage lung cancer. In both surgical groups, RES is an independent predictor of survival. Copyright © 2017 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. No Clinically Significant Changes in Pulmonary Function Following Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early- Stage Peripheral Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: An Analysis of RTOG 0236

    SciT

    Stanic, Sinisa, E-mail: sinisa.stanic@carle.com; Paulus, Rebecca; Timmerman, Robert D.

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate pulmonary function test (PFT) results and arterial blood gas changes (complete PFT) following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and to see whether baseline PFT correlates with lung toxicity and overall survival in medically inoperable patients receiving SBRT for early stage, peripheral, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: During the 2-year follow-up, PFT data were collected for patients with T1-T2N0M0 peripheral NSCLC who received effectively 18 Gy × 3 in a phase 2 North American multicenter study (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group [RTOG] protocol 0236). Pulmonary toxicity was graded by using the RTOG SBRT pulmonary toxicity scale. Paired Wilcoxon signedmore » rank test, logistic regression model, and Kaplan-Meier method were used for statistical analysis. Results: At 2 years, mean percentage predicted forced expiratory volume in the first second and diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide declines were 5.8% and 6.3%, respectively, with minimal changes in arterial blood gases and no significant decline in oxygen saturation. Baseline PFT was not predictive of any pulmonary toxicity following SBRT. Whole-lung V5 (the percentage of normal lung tissue receiving 5 Gy), V10, V20, and mean dose to the whole lung were almost identical between patients who developed pneumonitis and patients who were pneumonitis-free. Poor baseline PFT did not predict decreased overall survival. Patients with poor baseline PFT as the reason for medical inoperability had higher median and overall survival rates than patients with normal baseline PFT values but with cardiac morbidity. Conclusions: Poor baseline PFT did not appear to predict pulmonary toxicity or decreased overall survival after SBRT in this medically inoperable population. Poor baseline PFT alone should not be used to exclude patients with early stage lung cancer from treatment with SBRT.« less

  20. Rapamycin Ameliorates Inflammation and Fibrosis in the Early Phase of Cirrhotic Portal Hypertension in Rats through Inhibition of mTORC1 but Not mTORC2

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weijie; Yan, Jiqi; Wang, Huakai; Shi, Minmin; Zhang, Mingjun; Yang, Weiping; Peng, Chenghong; Li, Hongwei

    2014-01-01

    Objective Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) transdifferentiation and subsequent inflammation are important pathological processes involved in the formation of cirrhotic portal hypertension. This study characterizes the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to cholestatic liver fibrosis and portal hypertension, and focuses on mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway as a potential modulator in the early phase of cirrhotic portal hypertension. Methods Early cirrhotic portal hypertension was induced by bile duct ligation (BDL) for three weeks. One week after operation, sham-operated (SHAM) and BDL rats received rapamycin (2 mg/kg/day) by intraperitoneal injection for fourteen days. Vehicle-treated SHAM and BDL rats served as controls. Fibrosis, inflammation, and portal pressure were evaluated by histology, morphometry, and hemodynamics. Expressions of pro-fibrogenic and pro-inflammatory genes in liver were measured by RT-PCR; alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and antigen Ki67 were detected by immunohistochemistry; expressions of AKT/mTOR signaling molecules, extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), p-ERK1/2, and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) were assessed by western blot. Results The AKT/mTOR signaling pathway was markedly activated in the early phase of cirrhotic portal hypertension induced by BDL in rats. mTOR blockade by rapamycin profoundly improved liver function by limiting inflammation, fibrosis and portal pressure. Rapamycin significantly inhibited the expressions of phosphorylated 70KD ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p-P70S6K) and phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 (p-S6) but not p-AKT Ser473 relative to their total proteins in BDL-Ra rats. Those results suggested that mTOR Complex 1 (mTORC1) rather than mTORC2 was inhibited by rapamycin. Interestingly, we also found that the level of p-ERK1/2 to ERK1/2 was significantly increased in BDL rats, which was little affected by rapamycin. Conclusions The AKT/mTOR signaling pathway played an important role in the

  1. Rapamycin ameliorates inflammation and fibrosis in the early phase of cirrhotic portal hypertension in rats through inhibition of mTORC1 but not mTORC2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weijie; Yan, Jiqi; Wang, Huakai; Shi, Minmin; Zhang, Mingjun; Yang, Weiping; Peng, Chenghong; Li, Hongwei

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) transdifferentiation and subsequent inflammation are important pathological processes involved in the formation of cirrhotic portal hypertension. This study characterizes the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to cholestatic liver fibrosis and portal hypertension, and focuses on mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway as a potential modulator in the early phase of cirrhotic portal hypertension. Early cirrhotic portal hypertension was induced by bile duct ligation (BDL) for three weeks. One week after operation, sham-operated (SHAM) and BDL rats received rapamycin (2 mg/kg/day) by intraperitoneal injection for fourteen days. Vehicle-treated SHAM and BDL rats served as controls. Fibrosis, inflammation, and portal pressure were evaluated by histology, morphometry, and hemodynamics. Expressions of pro-fibrogenic and pro-inflammatory genes in liver were measured by RT-PCR; alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and antigen Ki67 were detected by immunohistochemistry; expressions of AKT/mTOR signaling molecules, extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), p-ERK1/2, and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) were assessed by western blot. The AKT/mTOR signaling pathway was markedly activated in the early phase of cirrhotic portal hypertension induced by BDL in rats. mTOR blockade by rapamycin profoundly improved liver function by limiting inflammation, fibrosis and portal pressure. Rapamycin significantly inhibited the expressions of phosphorylated 70KD ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p-P70S6K) and phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 (p-S6) but not p-AKT Ser473 relative to their total proteins in BDL-Ra rats. Those results suggested that mTOR Complex 1 (mTORC1) rather than mTORC2 was inhibited by rapamycin. Interestingly, we also found that the level of p-ERK1/2 to ERK1/2 was significantly increased in BDL rats, which was little affected by rapamycin. The AKT/mTOR signaling pathway played an important role in the early phase of cirrhotic portal

  2. Markers of inflammation, oxidative stress, and endothelial dysfunction and the 20-year cumulative incidence of early age-related macular degeneration: the Beaver Dam Eye Study.

    PubMed

    Klein, Ronald; Myers, Chelsea E; Cruickshanks, Karen J; Gangnon, Ronald E; Danforth, Lorraine G; Sivakumaran, Theru A; Iyengar, Sudha K; Tsai, Michael Y; Klein, Barbara E K

    2014-04-01

    IMPORTANCE Modifying levels of factors associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) may decrease the risk for visual impairment in older persons. OBJECTIVE To examine the relationships of markers of inflammation, oxidative stress, and endothelial dysfunction to the 20-year cumulative incidence of early AMD. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS This longitudinal population-based cohort study involved a random sample of 975 persons in the Beaver Dam Eye Study without signs of AMD who participated in the baseline examination in 1988-1990 and up to 4 follow-up examinations in 1993-1995, 1998-2000, 2003-2005, and 2008-2010. EXPOSURES Serum markers of inflammation (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, tumor necrosis factor-α receptor 2, interleukin-6, and white blood cell count), oxidative stress (8-isoprostane and total carbonyl content), and endothelial dysfunction (soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1) were measured. Interactions with complement factor H (rs1061170), age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 (rs10490924), complement component 3 (rs2230199), and complement component 2/complement factor B (rs4151667) were examined using multiplicative models. Age-related macular degeneration was assessed from fundus photographs. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Early AMD defined by the presence of any size drusen and the presence of pigmentary abnormalities or by the presence of large-sized drusen (≥125-μm diameter) in the absence of late AMD. RESULTS The 20-year cumulative incidence of early AMD was 23.0%. Adjusting for age, sex, and other risk factors, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (odds ratio comparing fourth with first quartile, 2.18; P = .005), tumor necrosis factor-α receptor 2 (odds ratio, 1.78; P = .04), and interleukin-6 (odds ratio, 1.78; P = .03) were associated with the incidence of early AMD. Increased incidence of early AMD was associated with soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule

  3. Early bactericidal activity of delamanid (OPC-67683) in smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Diacon, A H; Dawson, R; Hanekom, M; Narunsky, K; Venter, A; Hittel, N; Geiter, L J; Wells, C D; Paccaly, A J; Donald, P R

    2011-07-01

    Delamanid (OPC-67683) is a novel mycolic acid biosynthesis inhibitor active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis at a low minimum inhibitory concentration. Forty-eight patients with smear-positive tuberculosis (63% male; 54.7 ± 9.9 kg; 30.7 ± 10.8 years) were randomly assigned to receive delamanid 100, 200, 300 or 400 mg daily for 14 days. Colony forming units (cfu) of M. tuberculosis were counted on agar plates from overnight sputum collections to calculate early bactericidal activity (EBA), defined as fall in log(10) cfu/ml sputum/day. The EBA of delamanid was monophasic and not significantly different between dosages; however, more patients receiving 200 mg (70%) and 300 mg (80%) experienced a response of ≥0.9 log(10) cfu/ml sputum decline over 14 days than those receiving 100 mg (45%) and 400 mg (27%). The average EBA of all dosages combined (0.040 ± 0.056 log(10) cfu/ml sputum/day) was significant from day 2 onward. Delamanid exposure was less than dosage-proportional, reaching a plateau at 300 mg, likely due to dose-limited absorption. Moderate but significant correlation was found between C(max) and EBA, indicating exposure dependence. Delamanid was well tolerated without significant toxicity. Delamanid at all dosages was safe, well tolerated and demonstrated significant exposure-dependent EBA over 14 days, supporting further investigation of its pharmacokinetics and anti-tuberculosis activity.

  4. Pretreatment advanced lung cancer inflammation index (ALI) for predicting early progression in nivolumab-treated patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Shiroyama, Takayuki; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Tamiya, Motohiro; Tamiya, Akihiro; Tanaka, Ayako; Okamoto, Norio; Nakahama, Kenji; Taniguchi, Yoshihiko; Isa, Shun-Ichi; Inoue, Takako; Imamura, Fumio; Atagi, Shinji; Hirashima, Tomonori

    2018-01-01

    Programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression status is inadequate for indicating nivolumab in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Because the baseline advanced lung cancer inflammation index (ALI) is reportedly associated with patient outcomes, we investigated whether the pretreatment ALI is prognostic in NSCLC patients treated with nivolumab. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all patients treated with nivolumab for advanced NSCLC between December 2015 and May 2016 at three Japanese institutes. Multivariate logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the impact of the pretreatment ALI (and other inflammation-related parameters) on progression-free survival (PFS) and early progression (i.e., within 8 weeks after starting nivolumab). A total of 201 patients were analyzed; their median age was 68 years (range, 27-87 years), 67% were men, and 24% had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status of 2 or higher. An ECOG performance status ≥2, serum albumin <3.7 g/dL, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio ≥4, and ALI <18 were significantly associated with poor PFS and early progression on univariate analysis. Multivariate analyses revealed that pretreatment ALI <18 was independently associated with inferior PFS (median, 1.4 vs. 3.7 months, P < 0.001) and a higher likelihood of early progression (odds ratio, 2.76; 95% confidence interval 1.44-5.34; P = 0.002). The pretreatment ALI was found to be a significant independent predictor of early progression in patients with advanced NSCLC receiving nivolumab, and may help identify patients likely to benefit from continued nivolumab treatment in routine clinical practice. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Hospital at home for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: an integrated hospital and community based generic intermediate care service for prevention and early discharge.

    PubMed

    Davison, A G; Monaghan, M; Brown, D; Eraut, C D; O'Brien, A; Paul, K; Townsend, J; Elston, C; Ward, L; Steeples, S; Cubitt, L

    2006-01-01

    Recent randomized controlled studies have reported success for hospital at home for prevention and early discharge of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients using hospital based respiratory nurse specialists. This observational study reports results using an integrated hospital and community based generic intermediate care service. The length of care, readmission within 60 days and death within 60 days in the early discharge (9.37 days, 21.1%, 7%) and the prevention of admission (five to six days, 34.1%, 3.8%) are similar to previous studies. We suggest that this generic community model of service may allow hospital at home services for COPD to be introduced in more areas.

  6. Albumin stimulates renal tubular inflammation through an HSP70-TLR4 axis in mice with early diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Jheng, Huei-Fen; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Chuang, Yi-Lun; Shen, Yi-Ting; Tai, Ting-An; Chen, Wen-Chung; Chou, Chuan-Kai; Ho, Li-Chun; Tang, Ming-Jer; Lai, Kuei-Tai A.; Sung, Junne-Ming; Tsai, Yau-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Increased urinary albumin excretion is not simply an aftermath of glomerular injury, but is also involved in the progression of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Whereas Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are incriminated in the renal inflammation of DN, whether and how albumin is involved in the TLR-related renal inflammatory response remains to be clarified. Here, we showed that both TLR2 and TLR4, one of their putative endogenous ligands [heat shock protein 70 (HSP70)] and nuclear factor-κB promoter activity were markedly elevated in the kidneys of diabetic mice. A deficiency of TLR4 but not of TLR2 alleviated albuminuria, tubulointerstitial fibrosis and inflammation induced by diabetes. The protection against renal injury in diabetic Tlr4−/− mice was associated with reduced tubular injuries and preserved cubilin levels, rather than amelioration of glomerular lesions. In vitro studies revealed that albumin, a stronger inducer than high glucose (HG), induced the release of HSP70 from proximal tubular cells. HSP70 blockade ameliorated albumin-induced inflammatory mediators. HSP70 triggered the production of inflammatory mediators in a TLR4-dependent manner. Moreover, HSP70 inhibition in vivo ameliorated diabetes-induced albuminuria, inflammatory response and tubular injury. Finally, we found that individuals with DN had higher levels of TLR4 and HSP70 in the dilated tubules than non-diabetic controls. Thus, activation of the HSP70-TLR4 axis, stimulated at least in part by albumin, in the tubular cell is a newly identified mechanism associated with induction of tubulointerstitial inflammation and aggravation of pre-existing microalbuminuria in the progression of DN. PMID:26398934

  7. The Role of Multidetector Computed Tomography in the Early Diagnosis of Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis in Patients with Febrile Neutropenia Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Çiledağ, Nazan; Arda, Kemal; Arıbaş, Bilgin Kadri; Tekgündüz, Ali Irfan Emre; Altuntaş, Fevzi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate vessel involvement and the role of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in the earlydiagnosis of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) in patients with febrile neutropenia and antibiotic-resistant feverundergoing autologous bone morrow transplantation. Material and Methods: In all, 74 pulmonary MDCT examinations in 37 consecutive hematopoietic stem celltransplantation patients with febrile neutropenia and clinically suspected IPA were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Diagnosis of IPA was based on Fungal Infections Cooperative Group, and National Institute of Allergy andInfectious Diseases Mycoses Study Consensus Group criteria. In all, 0, 14, and 11 patients were diagnosed as proven,probable, and possible IPA, respectively. Among the 25 patients accepted as probable and possible IPA, all had pulmonaryMDCT findings consistent with IPA. The remaining 12 patients were accepted as having fever of unknown origin (FUO)and had patent vessels based on MDCT findings.In the patients with probable and possible IPA, 72 focal pulmonary lesions were observed; in 41 of the 72 (57%) lesionsvascular occlusion was noted and the CT halo sign was observed in 25 of these 41 (61%) lesions. Resolution of feveroccurred following antifungal therapy in 19 (76%) of the 25 patients with probable and possible IPA. In all, 6 (25%)of the patients diagnosed as IPA died during follow-up. Transplant-related mortality 100 d post transplant in patientswith IPA and FUO was 24% and 0%, respectively. Conclusion: In conclusion, MDCT has a potential role in the early diagnosis of IPA via detection of vessel occlusion. PMID:24744620

  8. Does the usage of digital chest drainage systems reduce pleural inflammation and volume of pleural effusion following oncologic pulmonary resection?-A prospective randomized trial.

    PubMed

    De Waele, Michèle; Agzarian, John; Hanna, Waël C; Schieman, Colin; Finley, Christian J; Macri, Joseph; Schneider, Laura; Schnurr, Terri; Farrokhyar, Forough; Radford, Katherine; Nair, Parameswaran; Shargall, Yaron

    2017-06-01

    Prolonged air leak and high-volume pleural drainage are the most common causes for delays in chest tube removal following lung resection. While digital pleural drainage systems have been successfully used in the management of post-operative air leak, their effect on pleural drainage and inflammation has not been studied before. We hypothesized that digital drainage systems (as compared to traditional analog continuous suction), using intermittent balanced suction, are associated with decreased pleural inflammation and postoperative drainage volumes, thus leading to earlier chest tube removal. One hundred and three [103] patients were enrolled and randomized to either analog (n=50) or digital (n=53) drainage systems following oncologic lung resection. Chest tubes were removed according to standardized, pre-defined protocol. Inflammatory mediators [interleukin-1B (IL-1B), 6, 8, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)] in pleural fluid and serum were measured and analysed. The primary outcome of interest was the difference in total volume of postoperative fluid drainage. Secondary outcome measures included duration of chest tube in-situ, prolonged air-leak incidence, length of hospital stay and the correlation between pleural effusion formation, degree of inflammation and type of drainage system used. There was no significant difference in total amount of fluid drained or length of hospital stay between the two groups. A trend for shorter chest tube duration was found with the digital system when compared to the analog (P=0.055). Comparison of inflammatory mediator levels revealed no significant differences between digital and analog drainage systems. The incidence of prolonged post-operative air leak was significantly higher when using the analog system (9 versus 2 patients; P=0.025). Lobectomy was associated with longer chest tube duration (P=0.001) and increased fluid drainage when compared to sub-lobar resection (P<0.001), regardless of drainage system. Use of post

  9. Monitoring tissue inflammation and responses to drug treatments in early stages of mice bone fracture using 50 MHz ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yen-Chu; Lin, Yi-Hsun; Wang, Shyh-Hau; Lin, Shih-Ping; Shung, K. Kirk; Wu, Chia-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Bone fracture induces moderate inflammatory responses that are regulated by cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) or 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) for initiating tissue repair and bone formation. Only a handful of non-invasive techniques focus on monitoring acute inflammation of injured bone currently exists. In the current study, we monitored in vivo inflammation levels during the initial 2 weeks of the inflammatory stage after mouse bone fracture utilizing 50 MHz ultrasound. The acquired ultrasonic images were correlated well with histological examinations. After the bone fracture in the tibia, dynamic changes in the soft tissue at the medial-posterior compartment near the fracture site were monitored by ultrasound on the days of 0, 2, 4, 7, and 14. The corresponding echogenicity increased on the 2nd, 4th, and 7th day, and subsequently declined to basal levels after the 14th day. An increase of cell death was identified by the positive staining of deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay and was consistent with ultrasound measurements. The increases of both COX-2 and Leukotriene B4 receptor 1 (BLT1, 5- LO-relative receptor), which are regulators for tissue inflammation, in the immunohistochemistry staining revealed their involvement in bone fracture injury. Monitoring the inflammatory response to various non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) treatments was investigated by treating injured mice with a daily oral intake of aspirin (Asp), indomethacin (IND), and a selective COX-2 inhibitor (SC-236). The Asp treatment significantly reduced fracture-increased echogenicity (hyperechogenicity, p < 0.05) in ultrasound images as well as inhibited cell death, and expression of COX-2 and BLT1. In contrast, treatment with IND or SC-236 did not reduce the hyperechogenicity, as confirmed by cell death (TUNEL) and expression levels of COX-2 or BLT1. Taken together, the current study reports the feasibility of a noninvasive ultrasound method capable of monitoring

  10. Preoperative Pulmonary Function Tests (PFTs) and Outcomes from Resected Early Stage Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC).

    PubMed

    Almquist, Daniel; Khanal, Nabin; Smith, Lynette; Ganti, Apar Kishor

    2018-05-01

    Preoperative pulmonary function tests (PFTs) predict operative morbidity and mortality after resection in lung cancer. However, the impact of preoperative PFTs on overall outcomes in surgically-resected stage I and II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has not been well studied. This is a retrospective study of 149 patients who underwent surgical resection as first-line treatment for stage I and II NSCLC at a single center between 2003 and 2014. PFTs [forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1), Diffusing Capacity (DLCO)], both absolute values and percent predicted values were categorized into quartiles. The Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression analysis were used to determine whether PFTs predicted for overall survival (OS). Logistic regression was used to estimate the risk of postoperative complications and length of stay (LOS) greater than 10 days based on the results of PFTs. The median age of the cohort was 68 years. The cohort was predominantly males (98.6%), current or ex-smokers (98%), with stage I NSCLC (82.76%). The majority of patients underwent a lobectomy (n=121, 81.21%). The predominant tumor histology was adenocarcinoma (n=70, 47%) followed by squamous cell carcinoma (n=61, 41%). The median follow-up of surviving patients was 53.2 months. DLCO was found to be a significant predictor of OS (HR=0.93, 95% CI=0.87-0.99; p=0.03) on univariate analysis. Although PFTs did not predict for postoperative complications, worse PFTs were significant predictors of length of stay >10 days. Preoperative PFTs did not predict for survival from resected early-stage NSCLC, but did predict for prolonged hospital stay following surgery. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  11. Baicalein inhibits pulmonary carcinogenesis-associated inflammation and interferes with COX-2, MMP-2 and MMP-9 expressions in-vivo

    SciT

    Chandrashekar, Naveenkumar; Selvamani, Asokkumar; Subramanian, Raghunandhakumar

    2012-05-15

    The objective of the present study is to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of baicalein (BE) on inflammatory cytokines, which is in line with tumor invasion factors and antioxidant defensive system during benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P] (50 mg/kg body weight) induced pulmonary carcinogenesis in Swiss albino mice. After experimental period, increased levels of total and differential cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were observed. Accompanied by marked increase in immature mast cell by toluidine blue staining and mature mast cell by safranin–alcian blue staining in B(a)P-induced lung cancer bearing animals. Protein expression levels studied by immunohistochemistry and immunoblot analysis of cytokines such asmore » tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and inducible nitric oxide synthase were also found to be significantly increased in lung cancer bearing animals. B(a)P-exposed mice lung exhibits activated expression of nuclear transcription factor kappa-B as confirmed by immunofluorescence and immunoblot analysis. Administration of BE (12 mg/kg body weight) significantly counteracted all the above deleterious changes. Moreover, assessment of tumor invasion factors on protein levels by immunoblot and mRNA expression levels by RT-PCR revealed that BE treatment effectively negates B(a)P-induced upregulated expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and cyclo-oxygenase-2. Further analysis of lipid peroxidation markers such as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, hydro-peroxides and antioxidants such as glutathione-S-transferase and reduced glutathione in lung tissue was carried out to substantiate the antioxidant effect of BE. The chemotherapeutic effect observed in the present study is attributed to the potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant potential by BE against pulmonary carcinogenesis. -- Highlights: ► BE treatment protects from inflammatory cells and mast-cells accumulation in lungs. ► BE altered the expressions of

  12. Inflammation, coagulation, endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress in prediabetes--Biomarkers as a possible tool for early disease detection for rural screening.

    PubMed

    Maschirow, L; Khalaf, K; Al-Aubaidy, H A; Jelinek, H F

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to increase understanding of the connection between oxidative stress and inflammation in diabetes disease progression to provide a basis for investigating improved diagnostic possibilities, treatment and prevention of prediabetes. Differences in the level of biochemical markers of oxidative stress (erythrocyte GSH/GSSG and urinary 8-isoprostane), inflammation (CRP, IL-6), endothelial dysfunction (plasma homocysteine, urinary 8-hydroxy-2-deoxy-guanosine) and coagulation/fibrinolysis (C5a, D-Dimer) were determined in prediabetes and control subjects. While no difference was found in the 8-isoprostane levels between the two groups, the erythrocyte GSH/GSSG ratio was significantly reduced in the prediabetes group compared to control, indicating increased oxidative stress in the prediabetic state. Both urinary 8-OHdG and surprisingly also plasma homocysteine were significantly elevated in the prediabetes group, indicating endothelial dysfunction. The inflammation markers were slightly elevated in the prediabetic subjects and the same trend was found for the coagulation/fibrinolysis markers C5a and D-Dimer. These results were however not significant. The small elevation of blood glucose levels in the prediabetic state may have a detectable influence on endothelial function as indicated by changes to 8-OHdG, indicating an increased DNA-damage and homocysteine release from endothelial cells. Increased oxidative stress as indicated by the reduced GSH/GSSG ratio is likely to be the link between the moderate hyperglycaemia in prediabetes and pathological changes in endothelial function, which in the long-term may promote atherogenesis and result in the development of cardiovascular disease. Early detection of prediabetes is essential to avoid diabetes development and the associated complications like cardiovascular disease. The GSH/GSSG ratio and biomarkers like urinary 8-OHdG and plasma homocysteine offer a possible tool for the assessment of prediabetes in

  13. Interrelations among the adipocytokines leptin and adiponectin, oxidative stress and aseptic inflammation markers in pre- and early-pubertal normal-weight and obese boys.

    PubMed

    Paltoglou, George; Schoina, Maria; Valsamakis, George; Salakos, Nicolaos; Avloniti, Alexandra; Chatzinikolaou, Athanasios; Margeli, Alexandra; Skevaki, Chrysanthi; Papagianni, Maria; Kanaka-Gantenbein, Christina; Papassotiriou, Ioannis; Chrousos, George P; Fatouros, Ioannis G; Mastorakos, George

    2017-03-01

    Presumed interrelationships among deleterious aspects of adipose tissue metabolism, inflammation, and cellular oxidative stress could be influenced by pubertal hormonal changes. They were investigated in pre- and early pubertal normal-weight and obese boys before and after an exercise bout employed as an energy demanding stimulator. Cross-sectional study. Seventy-six healthy pre- (mean ± SD, 10.6 ± 0.2 years old, 28 normal-weight, and 11 obese) and early-(11.4 ± 0.2 years old, 25 normal-weight, and 12 obese) pubertal boys, were blood-sampled before and after a bout of exercise at 70% VO 2 max. Leptin, adiponectin, markers of inflammation (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, high sensitivity IL-6), pro- (thiobarbitouric acid reactive substances, protein carbonyls) and anti- (glutathione, oxidized glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, catalase, total antioxidant capacity) oxidation were measured. Baseline and post-exercise adiponectin was greater and leptin and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were lower in normal-weight than in obese pre- and early pubertal boys, while high sensitivity IL-6 was greater in obese than in normal-weight pre-pubertal boys. In pre-pubertal obese boys: at baseline, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein correlated negatively with catalase; high sensitivity IL-6 correlated positively with protein carbonyls; Δ (difference during exercise) adiponectin correlated positively with Δcatalase. In all boys: at baseline, high sensitivity IL-6 correlated positively with leptin and was the best negative and the second best positive predictor for post-exercise glutathione/oxidized glutathione and protein carbonyls, respectively; leptin was the best negative predictor for post-exercise glutathione; waist to height ratio was the best positive predictor for post-exercise thiobarbitouric acid reactive substances; body mass index z-score and adiponectin were, respectively, the best positive predictor for post-exercise protein carbonyls

  14. [Orbital inflammation].

    PubMed

    Mouriaux, F; Coffin-Pichonnet, S; Robert, P-Y; Abad, S; Martin-Silva, N

    2014-12-01

    Orbital inflammation is a generic term encompassing inflammatory pathologies affecting all structures within the orbit : anterior (involvement up to the posterior aspect of the globe), diffuse (involvement of intra- and/or extraconal fat), apical (involvement of the posterior orbit), myositis (involvement of only the extraocular muscles), dacryoadenitis (involvement of the lacrimal gland). We distinguish between specific inflammation and non-specific inflammation, commonly referred to as idiopathic inflammation. Specific orbital inflammation corresponds to a secondary localization of a "generalized" disease (systemic or auto-immune). Idiopathic orbital inflammation corresponds to uniquely orbital inflammation without generalized disease, and thus an unknown etiology. At the top of the differential diagnosis for specific or idiopathic orbital inflammation are malignant tumors, represented most commonly in the adult by lympho-proliferative syndromes and metastases. Treatment of specific orbital inflammation begins with treatment of the underlying disease. For idiopathic orbital inflammation, treatment (most often corticosteroids) is indicated above all in cases of visual loss due to optic neuropathy, in the presence of pain or oculomotor palsy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Lipids Derived from Virulent Francisella tularensis Broadly Inhibit Pulmonary Inflammation via Toll-Like Receptor 2 and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Deborah D.; Ireland, Robin; Alinger, Joshua B.; Small, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative facultative intracellular pathogen that causes an acute lethal respiratory disease in humans. The heightened virulence of the pathogen is linked to its unique ability to inhibit Toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated inflammatory responses. The bacterial component and mechanism of this inhibition are unknown. Here we show that lipids isolated from virulent but not attenuated strains of F. tularensis are not detected by host cells, inhibit production of proinflammatory cytokines by primary macrophages in response to known TLR ligands, and suppress neutrophil recruitment in vivo. We further show that lipid-mediated inhibition of inflammation is dependent on TLR2, MyD88, and the nuclear hormone and fatty acid receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). Pathogen lipid-mediated interference with inflammatory responses through the engagement of TLR2 and PPARα represents a novel manipulation of host signaling pathways consistent with the ability of highly virulent F. tularensis to efficiently evade host immune responses. PMID:23925884

  16. An inflammation-related nomogram for predicting the survival of patients with non-small cell lung cancer after pulmonary lobectomy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Qu, Xiao; Kam, Ngar-Woon; Wang, Kai; Shen, Hongchang; Liu, Qi; Du, Jiajun

    2018-06-26

    Emerging inflammatory response biomarkers are developed to predict the survival of patients with cancer, the aim of our study is to establish an inflammation-related nomogram based on the classical predictive biomarkers to predict the survivals of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Nine hundred and fifty-two NSCLC patients with lung cancer surgery performed were enrolled into this study. The cutoffs of inflammatory response biomarkers were determined by Receiver operating curve (ROC). Univariate and multivariate analysis were conducted to select independent prognostic factors to develop the nomogram. The median follow-up time was 40.0 months (range, 1 to 92 months). The neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (cut-off: 3.10, HR:1.648, P = 0.045) was selected to establish the nomogram which could predict the 5-year OS probability. The C-index of nomogram was 0.72 and the 5-year OS calibration curve displayed an optimal agreement between the actual observed outcomes and the predictive results. Neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio was shown to be a valuable biomarker for predicting survival of patients with NSCLC. The addition of neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio could improve the accuracy and predictability of the nomogram in order to provide reference for clinicians to assess patient outcomes.

  17. Arctigenin Protects against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Pulmonary Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in a Mouse Model via Suppression of MAPK, HO-1, and iNOS Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-zhou; Jiang, Zheng-kui; He, Bao-xia; Liu, Xian-ben

    2015-08-01

    Arctigenin, a bioactive component of Arctium lappa (Nubang), has anti-inflammatory activity. Here, we investigated the effects of arctigenin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury. Mice were divided into four groups: control, LPS, LPS + DMSO, and LPS + Arctigenin. Mice in the LPS + Arctigenin group were injected intraperitoneally with 50 mg/kg of arctigenin 1 h before an intratracheal administration of LPS (5 mg/kg). Lung tissues and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALFs) were collected. Histological changes of the lung were analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Arctigenin decreased LPS-induced acute lung inflammation, infiltration of inflammatory cells into BALF, and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Moreover, arctigenin pretreatment reduced the malondialdehyde level and increased superoxide dismutase and catalase activities and glutathione peroxidase/glutathione disulfide ratio in the lung. Mechanically, arctigenin significantly reduced the production of nitric oxygen and inducible nitric oxygen synthase (iNOS) expression, enhanced the expression of heme oxygenase-1, and decreased the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Arctigenin has anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects on LPS-induced acute lung injury, which are associated with modulation of MAPK, HO-1, and iNOS signaling.

  18. Aged red garlic extract reduces lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide production in RAW 264.7 macrophages and acute pulmonary inflammation through haeme oxygenase-1 induction.

    PubMed

    Park, H-J; Jeon, B T; Kim, H C; Roh, G S; Shin, J-H; Sung, N-J; Han, J; Kang, D

    2012-05-01

    It is known that garlic has antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. Aged red garlic (ARG), a novel aged garlic formulation, has higher antioxidant effects than fresh raw garlic. This study was performed to examine the anti-inflammatory effects of ARG extract (ARGE). The anti-inflammatory effects of ARGE were evaluated in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated Raw 264.7 macrophages and acute lung inflammatory mice. NO production was determined by the Griess method, and iNOS, HO-1 and COX-2 expressions were measured using Western blot analysis. Histology and inflammation extent of lung were analysed using haematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemistry. ARGE treatment markedly reduced LPS-induced nitrite production in RAW 264.7 macrophages and reduced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression. Treatment of cells with ARGE led to a significant increase in haeme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein expression, which was mediated by stimulating the expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Treatment with zinc protoporphyrin, a selective inhibitor of HO-1, significantly reversed the ARGE-mediated inhibition of nitrite production (P < 0.05). In LPS-induced inflammatory mice, ARGE treatment down-regulated iNOS and COX-2 expressions, while it up-regulated HO-1 expression. These results show that ARGE reduces LPS-induced nitric oxide production in RAW 264.7 macrophages through HO-1 induction and suggest that ARGE may have potential effects on prevention and treatment of acute inflammatory lung injury. © 2012 The Authors Acta Physiologica © 2012 Scandinavian Physiological Society.

  19. Moderate hypothermia suppresses jugular venous superoxide anion radical, oxidative stress, early inflammation, and endothelial injury in forebrain ischemia/reperfusion rats.

    PubMed

    Koda, Yoichi; Tsuruta, Ryosuke; Fujita, Motoki; Miyauchi, Takashi; Kaneda, Kotaro; Todani, Masaki; Aoki, Tetsuya; Shitara, Masaki; Izumi, Tomonori; Kasaoka, Shunji; Yuasa, Makoto; Maekawa, Tsuyoshi

    2010-01-22

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of moderate hypothermia (MH) on generation of jugular venous superoxide radical (O2-.), oxidative stress, early inflammation, and endothelial injury in forebrain ischemia/reperfusion (FBI/R) rats. Twenty-one Wistar rats were allocated to a control group (n=7, 37 degrees C), a pre-MH group (n=7, 32 degrees C before ischemia), and a post-MH group (n=7, 32 degrees C after reperfusion). MH was induced before induction of ischemia in the pre-MH group and just after reperfusion in the post-MH group. Forebrain ischemia was induced by occlusion of bilateral common carotid arteries with hemorrhagic hypotension for 10 min, followed by reperfusion. O(2)(-)(.) in the jugular vein was measured from the produced current using a novel O2-. sensor. The O2-. current showed a gradual increase during forebrain ischemia in the control and post-MH groups but was attenuated in the pre-MH group. Following reperfusion, the current showed a marked increase in the control group but was strongly attenuated in the pre- and post-MH groups. Concentrations of malondialdehyde, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in the brain and plasma 120 min after reperfusion in the pre- and post-MH groups were significantly lower than those in the control group, except for plasma HMGB1 in the post-MH group. In conclusion, MH suppressed O2-. measured in the jugular vein, oxidative stress, early inflammation, and endothelial injury in FBI/R rats. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Oncogenic Smad3 signaling induced by chronic inflammation is an early event in ulcerative colitis-associated carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kawamata, Seiji; Matsuzaki, Koichi; Murata, Miki; Seki, Toshihito; Matsuoka, Katsuyoshi; Iwao, Yasushi; Hibi, Toshifumi; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2011-03-01

    Both chronic inflammation and somatic mutations likely contribute to the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis (UC)-associated dysplasia and cancer. On the other hand, both tumor suppression and oncogenesis can result from transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling. TGF-β type I receptor (TβRI) and Ras-associated kinases differentially phosphorylate a mediator, Smad3, to become C-terminally phosphorylated Smad3 (pSmad3C), linker phosphorylated Smad3 (pSmad3L), and both C-terminally and linker phosphorylated Smad3 (pSmad3L/C). The pSmad3C/p21(WAF1) pathway transmits a cytostatic TGF-β signal, while pSmad3L and pSmad3L/C promote cell proliferation by upregulating c-Myc oncoprotein. The purpose of this study was to clarify the alteration of Smad3 signaling during UC-associated carcinogenesis. By immunostaining and immunofluorescence, we compared pSmad3C-, pSmad3L-, and pSmad3L/C-mediated signaling in colorectal specimens representing colitis, dysplasia, or cancer from eight UC patients with signaling in normal colonic crypts. We also investigated p53 expression and mutations of p53 and K-ras genes. We further sought functional meaning of the phosphorylated Smad3-mediated signaling in vitro. As enterocytes in normal crypts migrated upward toward the lumen, cytostatic pSmad3C/p21(WAF1) tended to increase, while pSmad3L/c-Myc shown by progenitor cells gradually decreased. Colitis specimens showed prominence of pSmad3L/C/c-Myc, mediated by TGF-β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, in all enterocyte nuclei throughout entire crypts. In proportion with increases in frequency of p53 and K-ras mutations during progression from dysplasia to cancer, the oncogenic pSmad3L/c-Myc pathway came to be dominant with suppression of the pSmad3C/p21(WAF1) pathway. Oncogenic Smad3 signaling, altered by chronic inflammation and eventually somatic mutations, promotes UC-associated neoplastic progression by upregulating growth-related protein. Copyright © 2010 Crohn's & Colitis

  1. Prenatal Inflammation Linked to Autism Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thursday, January 24, 2013 Prenatal inflammation linked to autism risk Maternal inflammation during early pregnancy may be related to an increased risk of autism in children, according to new findings supported by ...

  2. Early discharge of patients with pulmonary embolism in daily clinical practice: A prospective observational study comparing clinical gestalt and clinical rules.

    PubMed

    Vanni, Simone; Becattini, Cecilia; Nazerian, Peiman; Bova, Carlo; Stefanone, Valerio Teodoro; Cimini, Ludovica Anna; Viviani, Gabriele; Caviglioli, Cosimo; Sanna, Michela; Pepe, Giuseppe; Grifoni, Stefano

    2018-05-08

    To estimate the efficiency and safety of clinicians' gestalt in the identification of patients with pulmonary embolism (PE) candidates for early discharge and to compare the efficiency and safety of clinical gestalt with that of the Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index (PESI), the simplified PESI (sPESI) and the Hestia criteria (HC). Consecutive adult patients presenting to the emergency department of four Italian hospitals with confirmed diagnosis of PE were included. Data for PESI, sPESI and HC assessment were prospectively collected. Patients were managed according to the clinical gestalt of the attending physician, independent of the results of PESI, sPESI and HC. Efficiency was defined as the prevalence of candidates to early discharge. The primary safety measure was the incidence of a composite of venous thromboembolic recurrence, major haemorrhage or all-cause mortality within 30 days. Out of 547 included patients, 178 (32.5%) were judged to be at low risk and discharged within 48 h from presentation. HC identified a higher proportion (41.7%) whereas both PESI (24.1%) and sPESI (18.3%) identified a lower proportion of candidates for early discharge when compared to clinical gestalt (P < 0.01 for all). The incidence of the safety outcome was 2.8% in early-discharged patients according to clinical gestalt and 2.3%, 3.0% and 2.6% in candidates to early discharge according to PESI, sPESI and HC, without differences between strategies. In our cohort, clinical gestalt identified one-third of PE patients for early discharge. Among different strategies HC showed the highest efficiency sharing similar safety with the other strategies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. An adipoinductive role of inflammation in adipose tissue engineering: key factors in the early development of engineered soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Lilja, Heidi E; Morrison, Wayne A; Han, Xiao-Lian; Palmer, Jason; Taylor, Caroline; Tee, Richard; Möller, Andreas; Thompson, Erik W; Abberton, Keren M

    2013-05-15

    Tissue engineering and cell implantation therapies are gaining popularity because of their potential to repair and regenerate tissues and organs. To investigate the role of inflammatory cytokines in new tissue development in engineered tissues, we have characterized the nature and timing of cell populations forming new adipose tissue in a mouse tissue engineering chamber (TEC) and characterized the gene and protein expression of cytokines in the newly developing tissues. EGFP-labeled bone marrow transplant mice and MacGreen mice were implanted with TEC for periods ranging from 0.5 days to 6 weeks. Tissues were collected at various time points and assessed for cytokine expression through ELISA and mRNA analysis or labeled for specific cell populations in the TEC. Macrophage-derived factors, such as monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), appear to induce adipogenesis by recruiting macrophages and bone marrow-derived precursor cells to the TEC at early time points, with a second wave of nonbone marrow-derived progenitors. Gene expression analysis suggests that TNFα, LCN-2, and Interleukin 1β are important in early stages of neo-adipogenesis. Increasing platelet-derived growth factor and vascular endothelial cell growth factor expression at early time points correlates with preadipocyte proliferation and induction of angiogenesis. This study provides new information about key elements that are involved in early development of new adipose tissue.

  4. Inflammation-based scoring is a useful prognostic predictor of pulmonary resection for elderly patients with clinical stage I non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Takuro; Yamasaki, Naoya; Tsuchiya, Tomoshi; Matsumoto, Keitaro; Kunizaki, Masaki; Taniguchi, Daisuke; Nagayasu, Takeshi

    2015-04-01

    The number of elderly lung cancer patients requiring surgery has been increasing due to the ageing society and less invasive perioperative procedures. Elderly people usually have various comorbidities, but there are few simple and objective tools that can be used to determine prognostic factors for elderly patients with clinical stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the prognostic factors of surgically treated, over 80-year old patients with clinical stage I NSCLC. The preoperative data of 97 over 80-year old patients with clinical stage I NSCLC were collected at Nagasaki University Hospital from 1990 to 2012. As prognostic factors, inflammation-based scoring systems, including the Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS) determined by serum levels of C-reactive protein and albumin, the neutrophil lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and the platelet lymphocyte ratio (PLR) were evaluated, as well as other clinicopathological factors, including performance status, body mass index, carcinoembryonic antigen, Charlson comorbidity index and type of surgical procedure. The median age was 82 (range, 80-93) years. There were 62 (64.0%) clinical stage IA cases and 35 IB cases. Operations included 64 (66.0%) lobectomies, 15 segmentectomies and 18 wedge resections. The pathological stage was I in 76 (78.4%) patients, II in 12 (12.4%), III in 8 (8.2%) and IV in 1 (1.0%). Twelve (12.4%) patients underwent mediastinal lymph node dissection. Overall survival and disease-specific 5-year survival rates were 55.5 and 70.0%, respectively. The average GPS score was 0.4 (0-2). Disease-specific 5-year survival was significantly longer with GPS 0 than with GPS 1-2. (74.2%, 53.7%, respectively, P = 0.03). Overall 5-year survival was significantly longer with GPS 0 than with GPS 1-2. (59.7%, 43.1%, respectively, P = 0.005). Both the NLR (median value = 1.9) and the PLR (median value = 117) were not correlated with disease-specific and overall 5-year

  5. Tomosynthesis for the early detection of pulmonary emphysema: diagnostic performance compared with chest radiography, using multidetector computed tomography as reference.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yoshitake; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Shiomi, Eisuke; Abe, Takayuki; Kuribayashi, Sachio; Ogawa, Kenji

    2013-08-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of tomosynthesis with that of chest radiography for the detection of pulmonary emphysema, using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) as reference. Forty-eight patients with and 63 without pulmonary emphysema underwent chest MDCT, tomosynthesis and radiography on the same day. Two blinded radiologists independently evaluated the tomosynthesis images and radiographs for the presence of pulmonary emphysema. Axial and coronal MDCT images served as the reference standard and the percentage lung volume with attenuation values of -950 HU or lower (LAA-950) was evaluated to determine the extent of emphysema. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and generalised estimating equations model were used. ROC analysis revealed significantly better performance (P < 0.0001) of tomosynthesis than radiography for the detection of pulmonary emphysema. The average sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of tomosynthesis were 0.875, 0.968, 0.955 and 0.910, respectively, whereas the values for radiography were 0.479, 0.913, 0.815 and 0.697, respectively. For both tomosynthesis and radiography, the sensitivity increased with increasing LAA-950. The diagnostic performance of tomosynthesis was significantly superior to that of radiography for the detection of pulmonary emphysema. In both tomosynthesis and radiography, the sensitivity was affected by the LAA-950. • Tomosynthesis showed significantly better diagnostic performance for pulmonary emphysema than radiography. • Interobserver agreement for tomosynthesis was significantly higher than that for radiography. • Sensitivity increased with increasing LAA -950 in both tomosynthesis and radiography. • Tomosynthesis imparts a similar radiation dose to two projection chest radiography. • Radiation dose and cost of tomosynthesis are lower than those of MDCT.

  6. Effects of Aerobic Exercise Applied Early After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting on Pulmonary Function, Respiratory Muscle Strength, and Functional Capacity: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Borges, Daniel L; Silva, Mayara Gabrielle; Silva, Luan Nascimento; Fortes, João Vyctor; Costa, Erika Thalita; Assunção, Rebeca Pessoa; Lima, Carlos Magno; da Silva Nina, Vinícius José; Bernardo-Filho, Mário; Caputo, Danúbia Sá

    2016-09-01

    Physical activity is beneficial in several clinical situations and recommended for patients with ischemic heart disease, as well as for those undergoing cardiac surgery. In a randomized controlled trial, 34 patients underwent coronary artery bypass grafting. A randomized control group (n = 15) submitted to conventional physiotherapy. The intervention group (n = 19) received the same protocol plus additional aerobic exercise with cycle ergometer. Pulmonary function by spirometry, respiratory muscle strength by manovacuometry, and functional capacity through 6-minute walking test was assessed before surgery and at hospital discharge. There was significant reduction in pulmonary function in both groups. In both groups, inspiratory muscle strength was maintained while expiratory muscle strength significantly decreased. Functional capacity was maintained in the intervention group (364.5 [324.5 to 428] vs. 348 [300.7 to 413.7] meters, P = .06), but it decreased significantly in control group patients (320 [288.5 to 393.0] vs. 292 [237.0 to 336.0] meters, P = .01). A significant difference in functional capacity was also found in intergroup analyses at hospital discharge (P = .03). Aerobic exercise applied early on coronary artery bypass grafting patients may promote maintenance of functional capacity, with no impact on pulmonary function and respiratory muscle strength when compared with conventional physiotherapy.

  7. Early diagnosis of asthma in young children by using non-invasive biomarkers of airway inflammation and early lung function measurements: study protocol of a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    van de Kant, Kim DG; Klaassen, Ester MM; Jöbsis, Quirijn; Nijhuis, Annedien J; van Schayck, Onno CP; Dompeling, Edward

    2009-01-01

    Background Asthma is the most common chronic disease in childhood, characterized by chronic airway inflammation. There are problems with the diagnosis of asthma in young children since the majority of the children with recurrent asthma-like symptoms is symptom free at 6 years, and does not have asthma. With the conventional diagnostic tools it is not possible to differentiate between preschool children with transient symptoms and children with asthma. The analysis of biomarkers of airway inflammation in exhaled breath is a non-invasive and promising technique to diagnose asthma and monitor inflammation in young children. Moreover, relatively new lung function tests (airway resistance using the interrupter technique) have become available for young children. The primary objective of the ADEM study (Asthma DEtection and Monitoring study), is to develop a non-invasive instrument for an early asthma diagnosis in young children, using exhaled inflammatory markers and early lung function measurements. In addition, aetiological factors, including gene polymorphisms and gene expression profiles, in relation to the development of asthma are studied. Methods/design A prospective case-control study is started in 200 children with recurrent respiratory symptoms and 50 control subjects without respiratory symptoms. At 6 years, a definite diagnosis of asthma is made (primary outcome measure) on basis of lung function assessments and current respiratory symptoms ('golden standard'). From inclusion until the definite asthma diagnosis, repeated measurements of lung function tests and inflammatory markers in exhaled breath (condensate), blood and faeces are performed. The study is registered and ethically approved. Discussion This article describes the study protocol of the ADEM study. The new diagnostic techniques applied in this study could make an early diagnosis of asthma possible. An early and reliable asthma diagnosis at 2–3 years will have consequences for the management of

  8. Air pollution source apportionment before, during, and after the 2008 Beijing Olympics and association of sources to aldehydes and biomarkers of blood coagulation, pulmonary and systemic inflammation, and oxidative stress in healthy young adults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altemose, Brent A.

    Based on principal component analysis (PCA) of air pollution data collected during the Summer Olympic Games held in Beijing, China during 2008, the five source types of air pollution identified -- natural soil/road dust, vehicle and industrial combustion, vegetative burning, oil combustion, and secondary formation, were all distinctly lower during the Olympics. This was particularly true for vehicle and industrial combustion and oil combustion, and during the main games period between the opening and closing ceremonies. The reduction in secondary formation was reflective of a reduction in nitrogen oxides, but this also contributed to increased ozone concentrations during the Olympic period. Among three toxic aldehydes measured in Beijing during the same time period, only acetaldehyde had a reduction in mean concentration during the Olympic air pollution control period compared to the pre-Olympic period. Accordingly, acetaldehyde was significantly correlated with primary emission sources including vegetative burning and oil combustion, and with several pollutants emitted mainly from primary sources. In contrast, formaldehyde and acrolein increased during the Olympic air pollution control period; accordingly both were significantly correlated with ozone and with the secondary formation source type. These findings indicate primary sources may dominate for acetaldehyde while secondary sources may dominate for formaldehyde and acrolein. Biomarkers for pulmonary inflammation (exhaled breath condensate (EBC) pH, exhaled nitric oxide, and EBC nitrite) and hemostasis and blood coagulation (vWF and sCD62p) were most consistently associated with vehicle and industrial combustion, oil combustion, and vegetative burning. The systemic inflammation biomarker 8-OHdG was most consistently associated with vehicle and industrial combustion. In contrast, the associations between the biomarkers and the aldehydes were generally not significant or in the hypothesized direction, although

  9. Does exercise pulmonary hypertension exist?

    PubMed

    Lau, Edmund M; Chemla, Denis; Whyte, Kenneth; Kovacs, Gabor; Olschewski, Horst; Herve, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    The exercise definition of pulmonary hypertension using a mean pulmonary artery pressure threshold of greater than 30 mmHg was abandoned following the 4th World Pulmonary Hypertension Symposium in 2008, as this definition was not supported by evidence and healthy individuals frequently exceed this threshold. Meanwhile, the clinical value of exercise pulmonary hemodynamic testing has also been questioned. Recent data support the notion that an abnormal pulmonary hemodynamic response during exercise (or exercise pulmonary hypertension) is associated with symptoms and exercise limitation. Pathophysiologic mechanisms accounting for the development of exercise pulmonary hypertension include increased vascular resistance, excessive elevation in left atrial pressure and/or increased volume of trapped air during exercise, resulting in a steep rise in pulmonary artery pressure relative to cardiac output. Recent evidence suggests that exercise pulmonary hypertension may be defined by a mean pulmonary artery pressure surpassing 30 mmHg together with a simultaneous total pulmonary resistance exceeding 3 WU. Exercise pulmonary hypertension is a clinically relevant entity and an improved definition has been suggested based on new evidence. Exercise pulmonary hemodynamics may help unmask early or latent disease, particularly in populations that are at high risk for the development of pulmonary hypertension.

  10. Pulmonary tuberculosis

    MedlinePlus

    TB; Tuberculosis - pulmonary; Mycobacterium - pulmonary ... Pulmonary TB is caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M tuberculosis) . TB is contagious. This means the bacteria is easily spread from an infected person ...

  11. Pulmonary Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... as pulmonary hypertension and interstitial lung disease can benefit as well. What is Pulmonary Rehabilitation? Pulmonary rehabilitation is a program of education and exercise that helps you manage your breathing ...

  12. Astaxanthin protects against early burn-wound progression in rats by attenuating oxidative stress-induced inflammation and mitochondria-related apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Quan; Guo, Songxue; Zhou, Hanlei; Han, Rui; Wu, Pan; Han, Chunmao

    2017-01-01

    Burn-wound progression can occur in the initial or peri-burn area after a deep burn injury. The stasis zone has a higher risk of deterioration mediated by multiple factors but is also considered salvageable. Astaxanthin (ATX), which is extracted from some marine organisms, is a natural compound with a strong antioxidant effect that has been reported to attenuate organ injuries caused by traumatic injuries. Hence, we investigated the potential effects of ATX on preventing early burn-wound progression. A classic “comb” burn rat model was established in this study for histological and biological assessments, which revealed that ATX, particularly higher doses, alleviated histological deterioration in the stasis zone. Additionally, we observed dose-dependent improvements in oxidative stress and the release of inflammatory mediators after ATX treatment. Furthermore, ATX dose-dependently attenuated burn-induced apoptosis in the wound areas, and this effect was accompanied by increases in Akt and Bad phosphorylation and a downregulation of cytochrome C and caspase expression. In addition, the administration of Ly 294002 further verified the effect of ATX. In summary, we demonstrated that ATX protected against early burn-wound progression in a rat deep-burn model. This protection might be mediated by the attenuation of oxidative stress-induced inflammation and mitochondria-related apoptosis. PMID:28128352

  13. Early Life Stress, Air Pollution, Inflammation, and Disease: An Integrative Review and Immunologic Model of Social-Environmental Adversity and Lifespan Health.

    PubMed

    Olvera Alvarez, Hector A; Kubzansky, Laura D; Campen, Matthew J; Slavich, George M

    2018-06-03

    Socially disadvantaged individuals are at greater risk for simultaneously being exposed to adverse social and environmental conditions. Although the mechanisms underlying joint effects remain unclear, one hypothesis is that toxic social and environmental exposures have synergistic effects on inflammatory processes that underlie the development of chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, depression, and certain types of cancer. In the present review, we examine how exposure to two risk factors that commonly occur with social disadvantage-early life stress and air pollution-affect health. Specifically, we identify neuroimmunologic pathways that could link early life stress, inflammation, air pollution, and poor health, and use this information to propose an integrated, multi-level model that describes how these factors may interact and cause health disparity across individuals based on social disadvantage. This model highlights the importance of interdisciplinary research considering multiple exposures across domains and the potential for synergistic, cross-domain effects on health, and may help identify factors that could potentially be targeted to reduce disease risk and improve lifespan health. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Phosphorylcholine decreases early inflammation and promotes the establishment of stable biofilm communities of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae strain 86-028NP in a chinchilla model of otitis media.

    PubMed

    Hong, Wenzhou; Mason, Kevin; Jurcisek, Joseph; Novotny, Laura; Bakaletz, Lauren O; Swords, W Edward

    2007-02-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a leading causative agent of otitis media. Much of the inflammation occurring during NTHi disease is initiated by lipooligosaccharides (LOS) on the bacterial surface. Phosphorylcholine (PCho) is added to some LOS forms in a phase-variable manner, and these PCho(+) variants predominate in vivo. Thus, we asked whether this modification confers some advantage during infection. Virulence of an otitis media isolate (NTHi strain 86-028NP) was compared with that of an isogenic PCho transferase (licD) mutant using a chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera) model of otitis media. Animals infected with NTHi 86-028NP licD demonstrated increased early inflammation and a delayed increase in bacterial counts compared to animals infected with NTHi 86-028NP. LOS purified from chinchilla-passed NTHi 86-028NP had increased PCho content compared to LOS purified from the inoculum. Both strains were recovered from middle ear fluids as long as 14 days postinfection. Biofilms were macroscopically visible in the middle ears of euthanized animals infected with NTHi 86-028NP 7 days and 14 days postchallenge. Conversely, less dense biofilms were observed in animals infected with NTHi 86-028NP licD 7 days postinfection, and none of the animals infected with NTHi 86-028NP licD had a visible biofilm by 14 days. Fluorescent antibody staining revealed PCho(+) variants within biofilms, similar to our prior results with tissue culture cells in vitro (S. L. West-Barnette, A. Rockel, and W. E. Swords, Infect. Immun. 74:1828-1836, 2006). Animals coinfected with equal proportions of both strains had equal persistence of each strain and somewhat greater severity of disease. We thus conclude that PCho promotes NTHi infection and persistence by reducing the host inflammatory response and by promoting formation of stable biofilm communities.

  15. Hypoxia-induced mitogenic factor (FIZZ1/RELMα) induces endothelial cell apoptosis and subsequent interleukin-4-dependent pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Takimoto, Eiki; Zhang, Ailan; Weiner, Noah C.; Meuchel, Lucas W.; Berger, Alan E.; Cheadle, Chris; Johns, Roger A.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is characterized by elevated pulmonary artery pressure that leads to progressive right heart failure and ultimately death. Injury to endothelium and consequent wound repair cascades have been suggested to trigger pulmonary vascular remodeling, such as that observed during PH. The relationship between injury to endothelium and disease pathogenesis in this disorder remains poorly understood. We and others have shown that, in mice, hypoxia-induced mitogenic factor (HIMF, also known as FIZZ1 or RELMα) plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of lung inflammation and the development of PH. In this study, we dissected the mechanism by which HIMF and its human homolog resistin (hRETN) induce pulmonary endothelial cell (EC) apoptosis and subsequent lung inflammation-mediated PH, which exhibits many of the hallmarks of the human disease. Systemic administration of HIMF caused increases in EC apoptosis and interleukin (IL)-4-dependent vascular inflammatory marker expression in mouse lung during the early inflammation phase. In vitro, HIMF, hRETN, and IL-4 activated pulmonary microvascular ECs (PMVECs) by increasing angiopoietin-2 expression and induced PMVEC apoptosis. In addition, the conditioned medium from hRETN-treated ECs had elevated levels of endothelin-1 and caused significant increases in pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. Last, HIMF treatment caused development of PH that was characterized by pulmonary vascular remodeling and right heart failure in wild-type mice but not in IL-4 knockout mice. These data suggest that HIMF contributes to activation of vascular inflammation at least in part by inducing EC apoptosis in the lung. These events lead to subsequent PH. PMID:24793164

  16. Microbial exposure early in life regulates airway inflammation in mice after infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae with enhancement of local resistance.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Yasuki; Matsumura, Yoko; Kasahara, Kazuki; Ouji, Noriko; Sugiura, Shigeki; Mikasa, Keiichi; Kita, Eiji

    2010-01-01

    The immunological explanation for the "hygiene hypothesis" has been proposed to be induction of T helper 1 (Th1) responses by microbial products. However, the protective results of hygiene hypothesis-linked microbial exposures are currently shown to be unlikely to result from a Th1-skewed response. Until now, effect of microbial exposure early in life on airway innate resistance remained unclear. We examined the role of early life exposure to microbes in airway innate resistance to a respiratory pathogen. Specific pathogen-free weanling mice were nasally exposed to the mixture of microbial extracts or PBS (control) every other day for 28 days and intratracheally infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae 10 days after the last exposure. Exposure to microbial extracts facilitated colonization of aerobic gram-positive bacteria, anaerobic microorganisms, and Lactobacillus in the airway, compared with control exposure. In pneumococcal pneumonia, the exposure prolonged mouse survival days by suppressing bacterial growth and by retarding pneumococcal blood invasion, despite significantly low levels of leukocyte recruitment in the lung. Enhancement of airway resistance was associated with a significant decrease in production of leukocyte chemokine (KC) and TNFalpha, and suppression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9) expression/activation with enhancement of tissue inhibitor of MMP (TIMP-3) activation. The exposure increased production of IFN-gamma, IL-4, and monocyte chemoattractant-1 following infection. Furthermore, expression of Toll-like receptor 2, 4, and 9 was promoted by the exposure but no longer upregulated upon pneumococcal infection. Thus, we suggest that hygiene hypothesis is more important in regulating the PMN-dominant inflammatory response than in inducing a Th1-dominant response.

  17. Postpartum Circulating Markers of Inflammation and the Systemic Acute-Phase Response After Early-Onset Preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    van Rijn, Bas B; Bruinse, Hein W; Veerbeek, Jan H; Post Uiterweer, Emiel D; Koenen, Steven V; van der Bom, Johanna G; Rijkers, Ger T; Roest, Mark; Franx, Arie

    2016-02-01

    Preeclampsia is an inflammatory-mediated hypertensive disorder of pregnancy and seems to be an early indicator of increased cardiovascular risk, but mechanisms underlying this association are unclear. In this study, we identified levels of circulating inflammatory markers and dynamic changes in the systemic acute-phase response in 44 women with a history of severe early-onset preeclampsia, compared with 29 controls with only uneventful pregnancies at 1.5 to 3.5 years postpartum. Models used were in vivo seasonal influenza vaccination and in vitro whole-blood culture with T-cell stimulants and the toll-like receptor-4 ligand lipopolysaccharide. Outcome measures were C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-18, fibrinogen, myeloperoxidase, and a panel of 13 cytokines representative of the innate and adaptive inflammatory response, in addition to established cardiovascular markers. The in vivo acute-phase response was higher for women with previous preeclampsia than that for controls without such a history, although only significant for C-reactive protein (P=0.04). Preeclampsia was associated with higher IL-1β (P<0.05) and IL-8 (P<0.01) responses to T-cell activation. Hierarchical clustering revealed 2 distinct inflammatory clusters associated with previous preeclampsia: an adaptive response cluster associated with increased C-reactive protein and IL-6 before and after vaccination, increased weight, and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; and a toll-like receptor-4 mediated the cluster associated with increased IL-18 before and after vaccination but not associated with other cardiovascular markers. Furthermore, we found interactions between previous preeclampsia, common TLR4 gene variants, and the IL-18 response to vaccination. In conclusion, preeclampsia is associated with alterations in the inflammatory response postpartum mostly independent of other established cardiovascular risk markers. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. ChronicOnline: Implementing a mHealth solution for monitoring and early alerting in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Bitsaki, Marina; Koutras, Christos; Koutras, George; Leymann, Frank; Steimle, Frank; Wagner, Sebastian; Wieland, Matthias

    2017-09-01

    Lack of time or economic difficulties prevent chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients from communicating regularly with their physicians, thus inducing exacerbation of their chronic condition and possible hospitalization. Enhancing Chronic patients' Health Online proposes a new, sustainable and innovative business model that provides at low cost and at significant savings to the national health system, a preventive health service for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients, by combining human medical expertise with state-of-the-art online service delivery based on cloud computing, service-oriented architecture, data analytics, and mobile applications. In this article, we implement the frontend applications of the Enhancing Chronic patients' Health Online system and describe their functionality and the interfaces available to the users.

  19. Serum soluble CD30 in early arthritis: a sign of inflammation but not a predictor of outcome.

    PubMed

    Savolainen, E; Matinlauri, I; Kautiainen, H; Luosujärvi, R; Kaipiainen-Seppänen, O

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate serum soluble CD30 levels (sCD30) in an early arthritis series and assess their ability to predict the outcome in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and undifferentiated arthritis (UA) at one year follow-up. Serum sCD30 levels were measured by ELISA from 92 adult patients with RA and UA at baseline and from 60 adult controls. The patients were followed up for one year in the Kuopio 2000 Arthritis Survey. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed to determine cut off points of sCD30 in RA and UA that select the inflammatory disease from controls. Sensitivity, specificity and positive likelihood ratio, and their 95 % CIs were calculated for sCD30 levels in RA and UA. Median serum sCD30 levels were higher in RA 25.1 (IQ range 16.3-38.6) IU/ml (p<0.001) and in UA 23.4 (15.4-35.6) IU/ml (p<0.001) than in controls 15.1 (10.7-20.8) IU/ml. No differences were recorded between RA and UA (p=0.840). Serum sCD30 levels at baseline did not predict remission at one year follow-up. Serum sCD30 levels were higher in RA and UA than in controls at baseline but they did not predict remission at one year follow-up in this series.

  20. Early life adversity and inflammation in African Americans and whites in the midlife in the United States survey.

    PubMed

    Slopen, Natalie; Lewis, Tené T; Gruenewald, Tara L; Mujahid, Mahasin S; Ryff, Carol D; Albert, Michelle A; Williams, David R

    2010-09-01

    To determine whether early life adversity (ELA) was predictive of inflammatory markers and to determine the consistency of these associations across racial groups. We analyzed data from 177 African Americans and 822 whites aged 35 to 86 years from two preliminary subsamples of the Midlife in the United States biomarker study. ELA was measured via retrospective self-report. We used multivariate linear regression models to examine the associations between ELA and C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, fibrinogen, endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule-1, and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1, independent of age, gender, and medications. We extended race-stratified models to test three potential mechanisms for the observed associations. Significant interactions between ELA and race were observed for all five biomarkers. Models stratified by race revealed that ELA predicted higher levels of log interleukin-6, fibrinogen, endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule-1, and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 among African Americans (p < .05), but not among whites. Some, but not all, of these associations were attenuated after adjustment for health behaviors and body mass index, adult stressors, and depressive symptoms. ELA was predictive of high concentrations of inflammatory markers at midlife for African Americans, but not whites. This pattern may be explained by an accelerated course of age-related disease development for African Americans.

  1. Ketamine potentiates oxidative stress and influences behavior and inflammation in response to lipolysaccharide (LPS) exposure in early life.

    PubMed

    Réus, Gislaine Z; Simões, Lutiana R; Colpo, Gabriela D; Scaini, Giselli; Oses, Jean P; Generoso, Jaqueline S; Prossin, Alan R; Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima; Quevedo, João; Barichello, Tatiana

    2017-06-14

    Immune activation (IA) during the early neonatal period is a risk factor for the development of schizophrenia. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injected in neonates lead to behavioral and brain changes that persist to adult life. We investigated oxidative stress, levels of cytokines, and the locomotor activity of IA in a schizophrenia animal model in which neonatal male Wistar rats were administered with an injection of LPS (50μg/kg) on postnatal day 3 and different doses of ketamine (5, 15 and 25mg/kg) for 7days during adulthood. Rats LPS-induced did not have locomotor activity alterations. Locomotor activity was elevated in neonatally saline-injected in the higher dose ketamine-treated animals. Carbonyl protein in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus and striatum were increased in the LPS- and saline-induced in the ketamine (25mg/kg)-treated animals. Lipid damage occurred in the PFC, striatum and hippocampus in the LPS- and saline-induced in the ketamine (15 and 25mg/kg) -treated animals. In the hippocampus the superoxide dismutase (SOD) was decreased in the LPS- and saline-induced in the ketamine-treated with the dose of 25mg/kg. In the PFC SOD was reduced in the LPS-induced in the ketamine (25mg/kg)-treated animals. Catalase in the PFC and hippocampus was reduced in the LPS- and saline-induced in the ketamine (25mg/kg)-treated animals. Pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines were lower in the brains of LPS-induced in the higher dose ketamine-treated rats. IA influences the locomotor activity and cytokine levels induced by ketamine, and it has a negative effect in potentiating the oxidative stress by higher doses of ketamine in the brain. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Joint Inflammation and Early Degeneration Induced by High-Force Reaching Are Attenuated by Ibuprofen in an Animal Model of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Driban, Jeffrey B.; Barr, Ann E.; Amin, Mamta; Sitler, Michael R.; Barbe, Mary F.

    2011-01-01

    We used our voluntary rat model of reaching and grasping to study the effect of performing a high-repetition and high-force (HRHF) task for 12 weeks on wrist joints. We also studied the effectiveness of ibuprofen, administered in the last 8 weeks, in attenuating HRHF-induced changes in these joints. With HRHF task performance, ED1+ and COX2+ cells were present in subchondral radius, carpal bones and synovium; IL-1alpha and TNF-alpha increased in distal radius/ulna/carpal bones; chondrocytes stained with Terminal deoxynucleotidyl Transferase- (TDT-) mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL) increased in wrist articular cartilages; superficial structural changes (e.g., pannus) and reduced proteoglycan staining were observed in wrist articular cartilages. These changes were not present in normal controls or ibuprofen treated rats, although IL-1alpha was increased in reach limbs of trained controls. HRHF-induced increases in serum C1,2C (a biomarker of collagen I and II degradation), and the ratio of collagen degradation to synthesis (C1,2C/CPII; the latter a biomarker of collage type II synthesis) were also attenuated by ibuprofen. Thus, ibuprofen treatment was effective in attenuating HRHF-induced inflammation and early articular cartilage degeneration. PMID:21403884

  3. Cardiovascular system diseases in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome - the role of inflammation process in this pathology and possibility of early diagnosis and prevention.

    PubMed

    Marciniak, Aleksandra; Nawrocka Rutkowska, Jolanta; Brodowska, Agnieszka; Wiśniewska, Berenika; Starczewski, Andrzej

    2016-12-23

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is a disorder which affects 5-10% of women in reproductive age. PCOS is a cause of hyperandrogenism, menstrual disorders and infertility. The most common clinical symptoms are hirsutism, acne and obesity. Patients often suffer from metabolic disorders: insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, dislipidemia, leading to atherosclerosis and others irregularities of the metabolic syndrome. Patients are in the high risk group for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) development because of the metabolic abnormalities. Obesity is observed in 35-60% of women with PCOS. Lean women with PCOS are also exposed to a greater risk of glucose intolerance development and abnormalities in lipid profile than women without PCOS with comparable BMI. Adipocytes are the source of many compounds of the paracrine and endocrine activity. Some of them are also markers and mediators of inflammation. Increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines in blood can promote atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Markers: IL-18, TNF, IL-6 and hs-CRP are often elevated in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome. An increase in inflammatory markers may be an early indicator of the risk of developing insulin resistance and atherosclerosis, and may become a useful prognostic and therapeutic tool for monitoring patients with PCOS: lean and those with overweight and obesity. Assessment of the concentrations of inflammatory markers may become a very useful test in evaluating the risk of developing atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease, long before their clinical manifestation. It will also allow for the appropriate prophylaxis.

  4. PULMONARY CIRCULATION AT EXERCISE

    PubMed Central

    NAEIJE, R; CHESLER, N

    2012-01-01

    The pulmonary circulation is a high flow and low pressure circuit, with an average resistance of 1 mmHg.min.L−1 in young adults, increasing to 2.5 mmHg.min.L−1 over 4–6 decades of life. Pulmonary vascular mechanics at exercise are best described by distensible models. Exercise does not appear to affect the time constant of the pulmonary circulation or the longitudinal distribution of resistances. Very high flows are associated with high capillary pressures, up to a 20–25 mmHg threshold associated with interstitial lung edema and altered ventilation/perfusion relationships. Pulmonary artery pressures of 40–50 mmHg, which can be achieved at maximal exercise, may correspond to the extreme of tolerable right ventricular afterload. Distension of capillaries that decrease resistance may be of adaptative value during exercise, but this is limited by hypoxemia from altered diffusion/perfusion relationships. Exercise in hypoxia is associated with higher pulmonary vascular pressures and lower maximal cardiac output, with increased likelihood of right ventricular function limitation and altered gas exchange by interstitial lung edema. Pharmacological interventions aimed at the reduction of pulmonary vascular tone have little effect on pulmonary vascular pressure-flow relationships in normoxia, but may decrease resistance in hypoxia, unloading the right ventricle and thereby improving exercise capacity. Exercise in patients with pulmonary hypertension is associated with sharp increases in pulmonary artery pressure and a right ventricular limitation of aerobic capacity. Exercise stress testing to determine multipoint pulmonary vascular pressures-flow relationships may uncover early stage pulmonary vascular disease. PMID:23105961

  5. A Common Profile of Disordered Angiogenic Factor Production and the Exacerbation of Inflammation in Early Preeclampsia, Late Preeclampsia, and Intrauterine Growth Restriction.

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowski, Sebastian; Dołęgowska, Barbara; Kwiatkowska, Ewa; Rzepka, Rafał; Torbè, Andrzej; Bednarek-Jędrzejek, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction are two separate disease entities that, according to numerous reports, share the same pathogenesis. In both, angiogenesis disorders and generalized inflammation are the dominant symptoms. In this study, we hypothesized that both diseases demonstrate the same profile in early preeclampsia, late preeclampsia, and intrauterine growth restriction patients, with the only difference being the degree of exacerbation of lesions. One hundred sixty-seven patients were enrolled in the study and divided into four groups: early preeclampsia, late preeclampsia, and intrauterine growth restriction groups, and one control group. Concentrations of the angiogenesis and inflammatory markers soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase receptor 1, placental growth factor, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and interleukin-6 were determined, and the behavior of these markers and correlations among them were studied. Higher concentrations of soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase receptor 1, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and interleukin-6 and a lower concentration of placental growth factor were observed in the study groups compared with the control group. No differences in concentrations of the studied markers were found among the study groups but significant correlations were observed. The higher values for the angiogenesis and inflammatory markers both in preeclampsia patients and patients with intrauterine growth restriction of placental origin compared with the control group suggest the existence of the same underlying disorders in the development of these pathologies. The observed mutual correlations for disordered angiogenesis and inflammatory markers are suggestive of a mutual relationship between these processes in the development of pathologies evolving secondary to placental ischemia. The same lesion profile was observed for both preeclampsia and 'placental' intrauterine growth restriction patients, which could be used in developing

  6. Early PQQ supplementation has persistent long-term protective effects on developmental programming of hepatic lipotoxicity and inflammation in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Jonscher, Karen R; Stewart, Michael S; Alfonso-Garcia, Alba; DeFelice, Brian C; Wang, Xiaoxin X; Luo, Yuhuan; Levi, Moshe; Heerwagen, Margaret J R; Janssen, Rachel C; de la Houssaye, Becky A; Wiitala, Ellen; Florey, Garrett; Jonscher, Raleigh L; Potma, Eric O; Fiehn, Oliver; Friedman, Jacob E

    2017-04-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is widespread in adults and children. Early exposure to maternal obesity or Western-style diet (WD) increases steatosis and oxidative stress in fetal liver and is associated with lifetime disease risk in the offspring. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is a natural antioxidant found in soil, enriched in human breast milk, and essential for development in mammals. We investigated whether a supplemental dose of PQQ, provided prenatally in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity during pregnancy, could protect obese offspring from progression of NAFLD. PQQ treatment given pre- and postnatally in WD-fed offspring had no effect on weight gain but increased metabolic flexibility while reducing body fat and liver lipids, compared with untreated obese offspring. Indices of NAFLD, including hepatic ceramide levels, oxidative stress, and expression of proinflammatory genes ( Nos2 , Nlrp3 , Il6 , and Ptgs2 ), were decreased in WD PQQ-fed mice, concomitant with increased expression of fatty acid oxidation genes and decreased Pparg expression. Notably, these changes persisted even after PQQ withdrawal at weaning. Our results suggest that supplementation with PQQ, particularly during pregnancy and lactation, protects offspring from WD-induced developmental programming of hepatic lipotoxicity and may help slow the advancing epidemic of NAFLD in the next generation.-Jonscher, K. R., Stewart, M. S., Alfonso-Garcia, A., DeFelice, B. C., Wang, X. X., Luo, Y., Levi, M., Heerwagen, M. J. R., Janssen, R. C., de la Houssaye, B. A., Wiitala, E., Florey, G., Jonscher, R. L., Potma, E. O., Fiehn, O. Friedman, J. E. Early PQQ supplementation has persistent long-term protective effects on developmental programming of hepatic lipotoxicity and inflammation in obese mice. © FASEB.

  7. Sex differences in the diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension enrolled in the registry to evaluate early and long-term pulmonary arterial hypertension disease management.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Shelley; Traiger, Glenna L; Turner, Michelle; McGoon, Michael D; Wason, Prieya; Barst, Robyn J

    2012-02-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a life-threatening disease that affects more women than men. The reasons for the female preponderance are unclear, and there are limited data available for men with PAH. Data from the Registry to Evaluate Early and Long-term PAH Disease Management (REVEAL Registry) were analyzed to explore sex differences among patients with PAH with regard to 2-year survival from enrollment and 5-year survival from time of diagnosis. The data set included 2,318 women and 651 men. More women had PAH associated with connective tissue disease (P < .001), and more men had portopulmonary hypertension (P < .001) and HIV-associated PAH (P < .001). More women had congenital heart disease-associated PAH (P = .017), thyroid disease (P < .001), and depression reported (P ≤ .001). At diagnosis, men had higher mean pulmonary artery pressure (53 ± 14 vs 51 ± 14.3 mm Hg; P = .013) and mean right atrial pressure (10 ± 6 vs 9 ± 6 mm Hg; P = .031). Women had better survival estimates for 2 years from enrollment and for 5 years from diagnosis. Stratifying by age showed that survival from enrollment was similar between men and women aged < 60 years at enrollment, whereas men aged ≥ 60 years have lower survival rates compared with women aged ≥ 60 years. Our findings highlight similarities and differences between men and women with PAH, raising questions for future exploration regarding the role of hormones and sex in causation and survival in PAH. ClinicalTrials.gov; No.: NCT00370214; URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov.

  8. Prognostic implications of serial risk score assessments in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension: a Registry to Evaluate Early and Long-Term Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Disease Management (REVEAL) analysis.

    PubMed

    Benza, Raymond L; Miller, Dave P; Foreman, Aimee J; Frost, Adaani E; Badesch, David B; Benton, Wade W; McGoon, Michael D

    2015-03-01

    Data from the Registry to Evaluate Early and Long-Term Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Disease Management (REVEAL) were used previously to develop a risk score calculator to predict 1-year survival. We evaluated prognostic implications of changes in the risk score and individual risk-score parameters over 12 months. Patients were grouped by decreased, unchanged, or increased risk score from enrollment to 12 months. Kaplan-Meier estimates of subsequent 1-year survival were made based on change in the risk score during the initial 12 months of follow-up. Cox regression was used for multivariable analysis. Of 2,529 patients in the analysis cohort, the risk score was decreased in 800, unchanged in 959, and increased in 770 at 12 months post-enrollment. Six parameters (functional class, systolic blood pressure, heart rate, 6-minute walk distance, brain natriuretic peptide levels, and pericardial effusion) each changed sufficiently over time to improve or worsen risk scores in ≥5% of patients. One-year survival estimates in the subsequent year were 93.7%, 90.3%, and 84.6% in patients with a decreased, unchanged, and increased risk score at 12 months, respectively. Change in risk score significantly predicted future survival, adjusting for risk at enrollment. Considering follow-up risk concurrently with risk at enrollment, follow-up risk was a much stronger predictor, although risk at enrollment maintained a significant effect on future survival. Changes in REVEAL risk scores occur in most patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension over a 12-month period and are predictive of survival. Thus, serial risk score assessments can identify changes in disease trajectory that may warrant treatment modifications. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. All rights reserved.

  9. Oxidative injury of the pulmonary circulation in the perinatal period: Short- and long-term consequences for the human cardiopulmonary system

    PubMed Central

    de Wijs-Meijler, Daphne P.; Duncker, Dirk J.; Tibboel, Dick; Schermuly, Ralph T.; Weissmann, Norbert; Merkus, Daphne; Reiss, Irwin K.M.

    2017-01-01

    Development of the pulmonary circulation is a complex process with a spatial pattern that is tightly controlled. This process is vulnerable for disruption by various events in the prenatal and early postnatal periods. Disruption of normal pulmonary vascular development leads to abnormal structure and function of the lung vasculature, causing neonatal pulmonary vascular diseases. Premature babies are especially at risk of the development of these diseases, including persistent pulmonary hypertension and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Reactive oxygen species play a key role in the pathogenesis of neonatal pulmonary vascular diseases and can be caused by hyperoxia, mechanical ventilation, hypoxia, and inflammation. Besides the well-established short-term consequences, exposure of the developing lung to injurious stimuli in the perinatal period, including oxidative stress, may also contribute to the development of pulmonary vascular diseases later in life, through so-called “fetal or perinatal programming.” Because of these long-term consequences, it is important to develop a follow-up program tailored to adolescent survivors of neonatal pulmonary vascular diseases, aimed at early detection of adult pulmonary vascular diseases, and thereby opening the possibility of early intervention and interfering with disease progression. This review focuses on pathophysiologic events in the perinatal period that have been shown to disrupt human normal pulmonary vascular development, leading to neonatal pulmonary vascular diseases that can extend even into adulthood. This knowledge may be particularly important for ex-premature adults who are at risk of the long-term consequences of pulmonary vascular diseases, thereby contributing disproportionately to the burden of adult cardiovascular disease in the future. PMID:28680565

  10. Effects of altitude and exercise on pulmonary capillary integrity: evidence for subclinical high-altitude pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, Marlowe W; Braun, Ruedi K; Yoneda, Ken Y; Walby, William F

    2006-03-01

    Strenuous exercise may be a significant contributing factor for development of high-altitude pulmonary edema, particularly at low or moderate altitudes. Thus we investigated the effects of heavy cycle ergometer exercise (90% maximal effort) under hypoxic conditions in which the combined effects of a marked increase in pulmonary blood flow and nonuniform hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction could add significantly to augment the mechanical stress on the pulmonary microcirculation. We postulated that intense exercise at altitude would result in an augmented permeability edema. We recruited eight endurance athletes and examined their bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) for red blood cells (RBCs), protein, inflammatory cells, and soluble mediators at 2 and 26 h after intense exercise under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. After heavy exercise, under all conditions, the athletes developed a permeability edema with high BALF RBC and protein concentrations in the absence of inflammation. We found that exercise at altitude (3,810 m) caused significantly greater leakage of RBCs [9.2 (SD 3.1)x10(4) cells/ml] into the alveolar space than that seen with normoxic exercise [5.4 (SD 1.2)x10(4) cells/ml]. At altitude, the 26-h postexercise BALF revealed significantly higher RBC and protein concentrations, suggesting an ongoing capillary leak. Interestingly, the BALF profiles following exercise at altitude are similar to that of early high-altitude pulmonary edema. These findings suggest that pulmonary capillary disruption occurs with intense exercise in healthy humans and that hypoxia augments the mechanical stresses on the pulmonary microcirculation.

  11. Early-Onset Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Is Associated with Female Sex, Maternal Factors, and African American Race in the COPDGene Study

    PubMed Central

    Foreman, Marilyn G.; Zhang, Lening; Murphy, James; Hansel, Nadia N.; Make, Barry; Hokanson, John E.; Washko, George; Regan, Elizabeth A.; Crapo, James D.; Silverman, Edwin K.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale: The characterization of young adults who develop late-onset diseases may augment the detection of novel genes and promote new pathogenic insights. Methods: We analyzed data from 2,500 individuals of African and European ancestry in the COPDGene Study. Subjects with severe, early-onset chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (n = 70, age < 55 yr, FEV1 < 50% predicted) were compared with older subjects with COPD (n = 306, age > 64 yr, FEV1 < 50% predicted). Measurements and Main Results: Subjects with severe, early-onset COPD were predominantly females (66%), P = 0.0004. Proportionally, early-onset COPD was seen in 42% (25 of 59) of African Americans versus 14% (45 of 317) of non-Hispanic whites, P < 0.0001. Other risk factors included current smoking (56 vs. 17%, P < 0.0001) and self-report of asthma (39 vs. 25%, P = 0.008). Maternal smoking (70 vs. 44%, P = 0.0001) and maternal COPD (23 vs. 12%, P = 0.03) were reported more commonly in subjects with early-onset COPD. Multivariable regression analysis found association with African American race, odds ratio (OR), 7.5 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.3–24; P = 0.0007); maternal COPD, OR, 4.7 (95% CI, 1.3–17; P = 0.02); female sex, OR, 3.1 (95% CI, 1.1–8.7; P = 0.03); and each pack-year of smoking, OR, 0.98 (95% CI, 0.96–1.0; P = 0.03). Conclusions: These observations support the hypothesis that severe, early-onset COPD is prevalent in females and is influenced by maternal factors. Future genetic studies should evaluate (1) gene-by-sex interactions to address sex-specific genetic contributions and (2) gene-by-race interactions. PMID:21562134

  12. Pulmonary physiology during pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Elliott, C G

    1992-04-01

    Acute pulmonary thromboembolism produces a number of pathophysiologic derangements of pulmonary function. Foremost among these alterations is increased pulmonary vascular resistance. For patients without preexistent cardiopulmonary disease, increased pulmonary vascular resistance is directly related to the degree of vascular obstruction demonstrated on the pulmonary arteriogram. Vasoconstriction, either reflexly or biochemically mediated, may contribute to increased pulmonary vascular resistance. Acute pulmonary thromboembolism also disturbs matching of ventilation and blood flow. Consequently, some lung units are overventilated relative to perfusion (increased dead space), while other lung units are underventilated relative to perfusion (venous admixture). True right-to-left shunting of mixed venous blood can occur through the lungs (intrapulmonary shunt) or across the atrial septum (intracardiac shunt). In addition, abnormalities of pulmonary gas exchange (carbon monoxide transfer), pulmonary compliance and airway resistance, and ventilatory control may accompany pulmonary embolism. Thrombolytic therapy can reverse the hemodynamic derangements of acute pulmonary thromboembolism more rapidly than anticoagulant therapy. Limited data suggest a sustained benefit of thrombolytic treatment on the pathophysiologic alterations of pulmonary vascular resistance and pulmonary gas exchange produced by acute pulmonary emboli.

  13. Inflammatory Role of Macrophage Xanthine Oxidoreductase in Pulmonary Hypertension: Implications for Novel Therapeutic Approaches

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Lung Inflammation, Uric Acid, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Mononuclear Phagocyte , Monosodium Urate, XOR WT, XOR KO, Wistar Kyoto, Pulmonary...0451 Annual Report (Year 1) 4 Mononuclear Phagocyte XOR Activity and Superoxide Generation Were Reduced by

  14. Concurrent Cryptococcal and Pneumocystis Pneumonia along with Pulmonary Tuberculosis in an HIV-Positive Patient: Lessons Learned for Early Management.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Ravinder; Gautam, Hitender; Maheshwari, Megha; Goyal, Ritu; Bhalla, Preena; Dewan, Richa

    2011-01-01

    We are presenting a 50-year-old patient of pulmonary tuberculosis, on anti-tuberculosis therapy (ATT) for last 2 months who presented with fever, cough, breathlessness, anorexia, and weight loss. The case was found to be HIV reactive. His sputum sample showed Candida albicans and Pneumocystis jirovecii. Fluconazole and cotrimoxazole + sulphamethoxazole were added. The index case did not respond to the treatment and his clinical condition started to deteriorate and he developed headache, vomiting, and dysphagia. Repeat sputum sample and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) showed Cryptococcus neoformans which was found to be sensitive to Amphotericin B. Amphotericin B was added to the treatment and patient clinically responded to treatment. In conclusion, emphasis should be given to correct etiological identification, allowing appropriate treatment and decreasing the morbidity and mortality in these patients as concomitant opportunistic infections may cause diagnostic problems.

  15. Prenatal Stress, Methylation in Inflammation-Related Genes, and Adiposity Measures in Early Childhood: the Programming Research in Obesity, Growth Environment and Social Stress Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaowei; Gennings, Chris; Wright, Rosalind J; Wilson, Ander; Burris, Heather H; Just, Allan C; Braun, Joseph M; Svensson, Katherine; Zhong, Jia; Brennan, Kasey J M; Dereix, Alexandra; Cantoral, Alejandra; Schnaas, Lourdes; Téllez-Rojo, Martha Maria; Wright, Robert O; Baccarelli, Andrea A

    2018-01-01

    Maternal stress during pregnancy may influence childhood growth and adiposity, possibly through immune/inflammatory programming. We investigated whether exposure to prenatal stress and methylation in inflammation-related genes were associated with childhood adiposity in 424 mother-child pairs in Mexico City, Mexico. A stress index was created based on four prenatally administered stress-related scales (Exposure to Violence, Crisis in Family Systems, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale). We measured weight, height, body fat mass (BFM), percentage body fat (PBF), and waist circumference in early childhood (age range, 4-6 years). Body mass index (BMI) z scores were calculated according to World Health Organization standards. DNA methylation in gene promoters of tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 8, and interleukin 6 (IL6) in umbilical cord blood were determined by pyrosequencing. An interquartile range increase in stress index (27.3) was associated with decreases of 0.14 unit in BMI z score (95% confidence interval [CI] = -0.28 to -0.005), 5.6% in BFM (95% CI = -9.7 to -1.4), 3.5% in PBF (95% CI = -6.3 to -0.5), and 1.2% in waist circumference (95% CI = -2.4 to -0.04) in multivariable-adjusted models. An interquartile range increase in IL6 methylation (3.9%) was associated with increases of 0.23 unit in BMI z score (95% CI = 0.06-0.40), 8.1% (95% CI = 2.3-14.3) in BFM, 5.5% (95% CI = 1.7-9.5) in PBF, and 1.7% (95% CI = 0.2-3.3) in waist circumference. Prenatal stress was associated with decreased childhood adiposity, whereas cord blood IL6 methylation was associated with increased childhood adiposity in Mexican children.

  16. Mdivi-1 ameliorates early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage via the suppression of inflammation-related blood-brain barrier disruption and endoplasmic reticulum stress-based apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lin-Feng; He, Ping-You; Peng, Yu-Cong; Du, Qing-Hua; Ma, Yi-Jun; Jin, Jian-Xiang; Xu, Hang-Zhe; Li, Jian-Ru; Wang, Zhi-Jiang; Cao, Sheng-Long; Li, Tao; Yan, Feng; Gu, Chi; Wang, Lin; Chen, Gao

    2017-11-01

    Aberrant modulation of mitochondrial dynamic network, which shifts the balance of fusion and fission towards fission, is involved in brain damage of various neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and Alzheimer's disease. A recent research has shown that the inhibition of mitochondrial fission alleviates early brain injury after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage, however, the underlying molecular mechanisms have remained to be elucidated. This study was undertaken to characterize the effects of the inhibition of dynamin-related protein-1 (Drp1, a dominator of mitochondrial fission) on blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and neuronal apoptosis following SAH and the potential mechanisms. The endovascular perforation model of SAH was performed in adult male Sprague Dawley rats. The results indicated Mdivi-1(a selective Drp1 inhibitor) reversed the morphologic changes of mitochondria and Drp1 translocation, reduced ROS levels, ameliorated the BBB disruption and brain edema remarkably, decreased the expression of MMP-9 and prevented degradation of tight junction proteins-occludin, claudin-5 and ZO-1. Mdivi-1 administration also inhibited the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), leading to decreased expressions of TNF-ɑ, IL-6 and IL-1ß. Moreover, Mdivi-1 treatment attenuated neuronal cell death and improved neurological outcome. To investigate the underlying mechanisms further, we determined that Mdivi-1 reduced p-PERK, p-eIF2α, CHOP, cleaved caspase-3 and Bax expression as well as increased Bcl-2 expression. Rotenone (a selective inhibitor of mitochondrial complexes I) abolished both the anti-BBB disruption and anti-apoptosis effects of Mdivi-1. In conclusion, these data implied that excessive mitochondrial fission might inhibit mitochondrial complex I to become a cause of oxidative stress in SAH, and the inhibition of Drp1 by Mdivi-1 attenuated early brain injury after SAH probably via the suppression

  17. Early bronchopulmonary involvement in Crohn disease: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Valletta, Enrico; Bertini, Marina; Sette, Luciano; Braggion, Cesare; Pradal, Ugo; Zannoni, Marina

    2001-01-01

    Background Bronchopulmonary manifestations of Crohn disease have been rarely described in children, including both subclinical pulmonary involvement and severe lung disease. Case presentation A 6.5-year-old girl is described with early recurrent bronchopulmonary symptoms both at presentation and in the quiescent phase of Crohn disease. Pulmonary function tests (lung volumes and flows, bronchial reactivity and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity) were normal. Bronchoalveolar cytology showed increased (30%) lymphocyte counts and bronchial biopsy revealed thickening of basal membrane and active chronic inflammation. Conclusions Clinical and histological findings in our young patient suggest involvement of both distal and central airways in an early phase of lung disease. The pathogenesis of Crohn disease-associated lung disorders is discussed with reference to the available literature. A low threshold for pulmonary evaluation seems to be advisable in all children with CD. PMID:11734067

  18. Effect of Warfarin Treatment on Survival of Patients With Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) in the Registry to Evaluate Early and Long-Term PAH Disease Management (REVEAL)

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Ioana R.; Roberts, Kari E.; Miller, Dave P.; Sen, Ginny P.; Selej, Mona; Benton, Wade W.; Hill, Nicholas S.

    2015-01-01

    Background— Long-term anticoagulation is recommended in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH). In contrast, limited data support anticoagulation in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) associated with systemic sclerosis (SSc-PAH). We assessed the effect of warfarin anticoagulation on survival in IPAH and SSc-PAH patients enrolled in Registry to Evaluate Early and Long-term PAH Disease Management (REVEAL), a longitudinal registry of group I PAH. Methods and Results— Patients who initiated warfarin on study (n=187) were matched 1:1 with patients never on warfarin, by enrollment site, etiology, and diagnosis status. Descriptive analyses were conducted to compare warfarin users and nonusers by etiology. Survival analyses with and without risk adjustment were performed from the time of warfarin initiation or a corresponding quarterly update in matched pairs to avoid immortal time bias. Time-varying covariate models were used as sensitivity analyses. Mean warfarin treatment was 1 year; mean international normalized ratios were 1.9 (IPAH) and 2.0 (SSc-PAH). Two-thirds of patients initiating warfarin discontinued treatment before the last study assessment. There was no survival difference with warfarin in IPAH patients (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.37; P=0.21) or in SSc-PAH patients (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.60; P=0.15) in comparison with matched controls. However, SSc-PAH patients receiving warfarin within the previous year (hazard ratio, 1.57; P=0.031) or any time postbaseline (hazard ratio, 1.49; P=0.046) had increased mortality in comparison with warfarin-naïve patients. Conclusions— No significant survival advantage was observed in IPAH patients who started warfarin. In SSc-PAH patients, long-term warfarin was associated with poorer survival than in patients not receiving warfarin, even after adjusting for confounders. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00370214. PMID:26510696

  19. Effect of Warfarin Treatment on Survival of Patients With Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) in the Registry to Evaluate Early and Long-Term PAH Disease Management (REVEAL).

    PubMed

    Preston, Ioana R; Roberts, Kari E; Miller, Dave P; Sen, Ginny P; Selej, Mona; Benton, Wade W; Hill, Nicholas S; Farber, Harrison W

    2015-12-22

    Long-term anticoagulation is recommended in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH). In contrast, limited data support anticoagulation in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) associated with systemic sclerosis (SSc-PAH). We assessed the effect of warfarin anticoagulation on survival in IPAH and SSc-PAH patients enrolled in Registry to Evaluate Early and Long-term PAH Disease Management (REVEAL), a longitudinal registry of group I PAH. Patients who initiated warfarin on study (n=187) were matched 1:1 with patients never on warfarin, by enrollment site, etiology, and diagnosis status. Descriptive analyses were conducted to compare warfarin users and nonusers by etiology. Survival analyses with and without risk adjustment were performed from the time of warfarin initiation or a corresponding quarterly update in matched pairs to avoid immortal time bias. Time-varying covariate models were used as sensitivity analyses. Mean warfarin treatment was 1 year; mean international normalized ratios were 1.9 (IPAH) and 2.0 (SSc-PAH). Two-thirds of patients initiating warfarin discontinued treatment before the last study assessment. There was no survival difference with warfarin in IPAH patients (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.37; P=0.21) or in SSc-PAH patients (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.60; P=0.15) in comparison with matched controls. However, SSc-PAH patients receiving warfarin within the previous year (hazard ratio, 1.57; P=0.031) or any time postbaseline (hazard ratio, 1.49; P=0.046) had increased mortality in comparison with warfarin-naïve patients. No significant survival advantage was observed in IPAH patients who started warfarin. In SSc-PAH patients, long-term warfarin was associated with poorer survival than in patients not receiving warfarin, even after adjusting for confounders. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00370214. © 2015 The Authors.

  20. Evaluation of the role of oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis in the pulmonary and the hepatic toxicity induced by cerium oxide nanoparticles following intratracheal instillation in male Sprague-Dawley rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalabotu, Siva Krishna

    The field of nanotechnology is rapidly progressing with potential applications in the automobile, healthcare, electronics, cosmetics, textiles, information technology, and environmental sectors. Nanomaterials are engineered structures with at least one dimension of 100 nanometers or less. With increased applications of nanotechnology, there are increased chances of exposure to manufactured nanomaterials. Recent reports on the toxicity of engineered nanomaterials have given scientific and regulatory agencies concerns over the safety of nanomaterials. Specifically, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has identified fourteen high priority nanomaterials for study. Cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles are one among the high priority group. Recent data suggest that CeO2 nanoparticles may be toxic to lung cell lines in vitro and lung tissues in vivo. Other work has proposed that oxidative stress may play an important role in the toxicity; however, the exact mechanism of the toxicity, has to our knowledge, not been investigated. Similarly, it is not clear whether CeO2 nanoparticles exhibit systemic toxicity. Here, we investigate whether pulmonary exposure to CeO2 nanoparticles is associated with oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis in the lungs and liver of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Our data suggest that the intratracheal instillation of CeO2 nanoparticles can cause an increased lung weight to body weight ratio. Changes in lung weights were associated with the accumulation of cerium in the lungs, elevations in serum inflammatory markers, an increased Bax to Bcl-2 ratio, elevated caspase-3 protein levels, increased phosphorylation of p38-MAPK and diminished phosphorylation of ERK1/2-MAPK. Our findings from the study evaluating the possible translocation of CeO2 nanoparticles from the lungs to the liver suggest that CeO 2 nanoparticle exposure was associated with increased liver ceria levels, elevations in serum alanine transaminase

  1. Cardiovascular function in pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Visca, Dina; Aiello, Marina; Chetta, Alfredo